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Sample records for 14-gauge core biopsy

  1. Core needle biopsies and surgical excision biopsies in the diagnosis of lymphoma-experience at the Lymph Node Registry Kiel.

    PubMed

    Johl, Alice; Lengfelder, Eva; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Klapper, Wolfram

    2016-08-01

    Current guidelines of the European Society of Medical Oncology recommend surgical excision biopsies of lymph nodes for the diagnosis of lymphoma whenever possible. However, core needle biopsies are increasingly used. We aimed to understand the common practice to choose the method of biopsy in Germany. Furthermore, we wanted to understand performance of surgical excision and core needle biopsies of lymph nodes in the diagnosis of lymphoma. The files of 1510 unselected, consecutive lymph node specimens from a consultation center for lymphoma diagnosis were analyzed. Core needle biopsies were obtained frequently from lymph nodes localized in mediastinal, abdominal, retroperitoneal, or thoracic regions. Patients undergoing core needle biopsies were significantly older and suffered significantly more often from lymphoma than patients undergoing surgical excision biopsies. Although more immunohistochemical tests were ordered by the pathologist for core needle biopsies specimens than for surgical excision biopsies specimens, core needle biopsies did not yield a definite diagnosis in 8.3 % of cases, compared to 2.8 % for SEB (p = 0.0003). Restricting the analysis to cases with a final diagnosis of follicular lymphoma or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, core needle biopsies identified a simultaneous low- and high-grade lymphoma (transformation) in 3.3 % of cases, compared to 7.6 % for surgical excision biopsies (p = 0.2317). In Germany, core needle biopsies are preferentially used in elderly patients with a high likelihood of suffering from lymphoma. Core needle appeared inferior to surgical excision biopsies at providing a definite diagnosis and at identifying multiple lymphoma differentiations and transformation.

  2. Biopsies

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Biopsies - Overview A biopsy is the removal of tissue ... What are the limitations of biopsies? What are biopsies? A biopsy is the removal of tissue in ...

  3. Combination of needle aspiration and core needle biopsy: A new technique of stereotactic biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Abrar Ahad; Wani, M. Afzal; Ramzan, Altaf U.; Nizami, Furqan A.; Malik, Nayil K.; Shafiq, S.; Ahmad, Rais; Kumar, Ashish; Lone, Iqbal; Makhdoomi, Rumana

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study aims at describing the results of using a new technique to acquire the tissue sample in stereotactic biopsy of brain lesions. Materials and Methods: The study was performed in 19 patients over a period of 5 years in which we used the new technique, i.e., Abrar and Afzal technique (AT) of obtaining tissue biopsy. It is a combination of core tissue biopsy and needle aspiration techniques. The technique was devised to acquire greater amount of tissue for pathologic study. Results: While we could give pathologic diagnosis in 18 patients out of 19 (94.7%), in one patient, the tissue sample revealed only inflammatory cells and definitive diagnosis could not be reached. There was no significant morbidity or any mortality in the series. Conclusion: Abrar and Afzal technique is a reasonably accurate technique of acquiring larger tissue sample in stereotactic brain biopsy without any additional risks. It can be done with little modification of the conventional equipment available with the stereotactic system. PMID:27057212

  4. Use of core biopsy in diagnosing cervical lymphadenopathy: a viable alternative to surgical excisional biopsy of lymph nodes?

    PubMed

    Allin, D; David, S; Jacob, A; Mir, N; Giles, A; Gibbins, N

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVES Lymphoma often presents with a neck mass and while fine-needle aspiration cytology may be suggestive, tissue biopsy is required for reliable diagnosis and classification of a lymphoma that is sufficient to deliver the correct treatment for the patient. Traditionally, excisional biopsy of a lymph node has been the standard method of tissue sampling, providing ample tissue for assessment. However, this requires theatre time, and preceding fine-needle aspiration cytology, which may incur a delay. With careful use of tissue, coupled with advances in immunohistochemical and molecular investigative techniques, core biopsy provides a possible alternative to traditional fine-needle aspiration and excisional biopsy. In this study, we aimed to determine the efficacy of diagnosing neck masses. METHOD A retrospective analysis was performed of patients being investigated for a neck mass who were undergoing ultrasound-guided core biopsies of cervical lymph nodes over a 17-month period. The final histology report was scrutinised to assess whether adequate tissue was obtained to allow for full tissue diagnosis. RESULTS Over the 17-month period analysed, 70 patients with cervical lymphadenopathy underwent core biopsy. Of these, 63 (90%) were diagnostic for either lymphoma or other pathology and did not require further tissue sampling. Overall, 19 patients were diagnosed with lymphoma, of which only 1 required further biopsy due to inconclusive initial core biopsy. CONCLUSIONS Current guidelines for investigating lymphomas require that excisional biopsy be performed to obtain ample tissue to allow full nodal architecture assessment and ancillary investigation to reach an accurate histological classification. Within our head and neck multidisciplinary team, however, it is considered that results from core biopsies can be obtained in a more timely fashion and with histological accuracy equal to those of open biopsy. The results obtained demonstrate that core biopsy is an

  5. Core needle biopsy guidance based on EMOCT imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Park, Jesung; Maguluri, Gopi

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel method, based on encoder mapping OCT imaging, for real-time guidance of core biopsy procedures. This method provides real-time feedback to the interventional radiologist, such that he/she can reorient the needle during the biopsy and sample the most representative area of the suspicious mass that is being investigated. This aspect is very important for tailoring therapy to the specific cancer based on biomarker analysis, which will become one of the next big advances in our search for the optimal cancer therapy. To enable individualized treatment, the genetic constitution and the DNA repair status in the affected areas is needed for each patient. Thus, representative sampling of the tumor is needed for analyzing various biomarkers, which are used as a tool to personalize cancer therapy. The encoder-based OCT enables samping of large size masses and provides full control on the imaging probe, which is passed through the bore of the biopsy guidance needle. The OCT image is built gradually, based on the feedback of an optical encoder which senses the incremental movement of the needle with a few microns resolution. Tissue mapping is independent of the needle speed, while it is advanced through the tissue. The OCT frame is analyzed in real-time and tissue cellularity is reported in a very simple manner (pie chart). Our preliminary study on a rabbit model of cancer has demonstrated the capability of this technology for accurately differentiating between viable cancer and heterogeneous or necrotic tissue.

  6. Does length of prostate biopsy cores have an impact on diagnosis of prostate cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Ergün, Müslüm; İslamoğlu, Ekrem; Yalçınkaya, Soner; Tokgöz, Hüsnü; Savaş, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether core length is a significant biopsy parameter in the detection of prostate cancer. Material and methods We retrospectively analyzed pathology reports of the specimens of 188 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer who had undergone initial transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy, and compared biopsy core lengths of the patients with, and without prostate cancer. The biopsy specimens of prostate cancer patients were divided into 3 groups according to core length, and the data obtained were compared (Group 1; total core length <10 mm, Group 2; total core length 10 mm–19 mm, and Group 3; total core length >20 mm). Biopsy core lengths of the patients diagnosed as prostate cancer, and benign prostatic hyperplasia were compared, and a certain cut-off value for core length with optimal diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for prostate cancer was calculated. Results Mean age, PSA and total length of cores were 65.08±7.41 years, 9.82±6.34 ng/mL and 11.2±0.2 mm, respectively. Assessment of biopsy core lengths showed that cores with cancer (n=993, median length 12.5 mm) were significantly longer than benign cores (n=1185, median length=11.3 mm) (p<0.001). Core length analysis yielded 12 mm cores have an optimal sensitivity (41.9%) and specificity (62%) for detection of cancer (odds ratio: 1.08). Conclusion Biopsy core length is one of the most important parameter that determines the quality of biopsy and detection of prostate cancer. A median sample length of 12 mm is ideal lower limit for cancer detection, and biopsy procedures which yield shorter biopsy cores should be repeated. PMID:27635285

  7. 49 CFR 178.338-14 - Gauging devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-14 Gauging devices. (a) Liquid...

  8. 49 CFR 178.337-14 - Gauging devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.337-14 Gauging devices. (a) Liquid...

  9. Are We Overtreating Papillomas Diagnosed on Core Needle Biopsy?

    PubMed Central

    Cyr, Amy E.; Novack, Deborah; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy J.; Ritter, Jon; Aft, Rebecca L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast papillomas often are diagnosed with core needle biopsy (CNB). Most studies support excision for atypical papillomas, because as many as one half will be upgraded to malignancy on final pathology. The literature is less clear on the management of papillomas without atypia on CNB. Our goal was to determine factors associated with pathology upgrade on excision. Methods Our pathology database was searched for breast papillomas diagnosed by CNB during the past 10 years. We identified 277 charts and excluded lesions associated with atypia or malignancy on CNB. Two groups were identified: papillomas that were surgically excised (group 1) and those that were not (group 2). Charts were reviewed for the subsequent diagnosis of cancer or high-risk lesions. Appropriate statistical tests were used to analyze the data. Results A total of 193 papillomas were identified. Eighty-two lesions were excised (42%). Caucasian women were more likely to undergo excision (p = 0.03). Twelve percent of excised lesions were upgraded to malignancy. Increasing age was a predictor of upgrading, but this was not significant. Clinical presentation, lesion location, biopsy technique, and breast cancer history were not associated with pathology upgrade. Two lesions in group 2 ultimately required excision due to enlargement, and both were upgraded to malignancy. Conclusions Twenty-four percent of papillomas diagnosed on CNB have upgraded pathology on excision—half to malignancy. All of the cancers diagnosed were stage 0 or I. For patients in whom excision was not performed, 2 of 111 papillomas were later excised and upgraded to malignancy. PMID:21046266

  10. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous splenic biopsy using an 18-G core biopsy needle: our experience with 52 cases

    PubMed Central

    Dawe, Gemma; Tung, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The spleen is more commonly affected in multiorgan disease, but alternative sites are selected for biopsy owing to perceived haemorrhage risk. If these sites are inaccessible or, less commonly, the spleen is the only disease site, then splenic biopsy is considered, with most studies using a 20- to 22-G needle. The primary aim of biopsy is to exclude underlying malignancy or to obtain histological analysis in known malignancy, usually lymphoma, when reclassification is required for therapy. We present, to our knowledge, the largest series of 18-G ultrasound-guided splenic core needle biopsy assessing diagnostic and complication rates. Methods: All ultrasound-guided splenic biopsy cases from May 1990 to May 2015 were identified on the radiology information system. Histological diagnosis and complications were identified from laboratory reports, case notes and discharge summaries to assess diagnostic positive and complication rates. Haemorrhages requiring transfusion, embolization or splenectomy, pneumothorax, other significant intra-abdominal injury or death are classified as major complications, whilst conservative haemorrhage management is considered a minor complication. Results: A total of 52 splenic biopsies were performed in 47 patients. A positive diagnostic yield for all biopsies was 90.4%. The major and minor complication rates were 0% and 1.9% (1/52), respectively. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided 18-G splenic biopsy is a safe and accurate procedure with no added risk of complications when compared with smaller needles or biopsy of other abdominal organs. Advances in knowledge: This is the largest case series of ultrasound-guided splenic biopsy with an 18-G needle, and our experience confirms a high diagnostic yield and a complication rate which compares favourably with the biopsy of other abdominal organs. PMID:26337505

  11. Fluorescence and Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy for Breast Cancer Diagnosis During Core Needle Biopsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    for breast biopsy. A first generation probe has been designed for use in a 9-gauge vacuum assisted biopsy needle ( Suros ATEC, Suros Surgical Systems...tissue composition in vivo. 2. Methods 2.1 Probe design A fiber optic probe has been designed for use in a vacuum-assisted core biopsy needle ( Suros ...ATEC, Suros Surgical Systems, IN), which is currently employed for image guided breast biopsy at the University of Wisconsin Health and Clinics

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guided Vacuum Assisted and Core Needle Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Kılıç, Fahrettin; Eren, Abdulkadir; Tunç, Necmettin; Velidedeoğlu, Mehmet; Bakan, Selim; Aydoğan, Fatih; Çelik, Varol; Gazioğlu, Ertuğrul; Yılmaz, Mehmet Halit

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study to present the results of Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided cutting needle biopsy procedures of suspicious breast lesions that can be solely detected on Magnetic resonance (MR) examination. Materials and Methods The study included 48 patients with 48 lesions which were solely be observed in breast MRI, indistinguishable in ultrasonography and mammography, for MR guided vacuum-assisted cutting needle biopsy and 42 patients with 42 lesions for MR guided cutting needle biopsy for the lesions of the same nature. MR imaging was performed using a 1.5-Tesla MRI device. Acquired MR images were determined and biopsy protocol was performed using computer-aided diagnosis system on the workstation. Vacuum biopsies were performed using 10 G or 12 G automatic biopsy systems, cutting needle biopsy procedures were performed using fully automated 12 G biopsy needle. Results All biopsy procedures were finalized successfully without major complications. The lesions were 54 mass (60%), 28 were non-mass contrast enhancement (31%) and 8 were foci (9%) in the MR examination. Histopathological evaluation revealed 18 malignant (invasive, in-situ ductal carcinoma and lobular carcinoma), 66 benign (apocrine metaplasia, fibrosis, fibroadenomatoid lesion, sclerosing adenosis, fibrocystic disease and mild-to-severe epithelial proliferation) and 6 high-risk (atypical ductal hyperplasia, intraductal papilloma, radial scar) lesions. Conclusion Magnetic resonance guided vacuum and cutting needle biopsy methods are successful methods fort he evaluation of solely MRI detected suspicious breast lesions. There are several advantages relative to each other in both methods.

  13. Neck schwannoma diagnosed by core needle biopsy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nasrollah, N; Trimboli, P; Bianchi, D; Taccogna, S

    2015-12-01

    Here we present a case of a 58 year old man referred to our hospital to undergo neck and thyroid ultrasonography (US) following palpable neck mass. US revealed a solid hypoechoic nodule in right thyroid lobe, and a solid lesion on the right laterocervical neck region with ultrasound suspicious features of neoplastic lymph node. In order to achieve a diagnosis of the neck mass and to get a proper evaluation of the thyroid nodule, we decided to perform a fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of both lesions. At cytopathologic examination the thyroid nodule appeared as benign, while cytologic sampling of the neck lesion was inadequate for a proper evaluation. Thus, we performed core needle biopsy (CNB) of the neck lesion like recently proposed for thyroid lesions; also, to definitively exclude malignancy of thyroid nodule, this also underwent CNB. Histologic report of CNB confirmed benign thyroid nodule, while the neck lesion revealed a proliferation of neuronal type consistent with schwannoma. The patient has been addressed to clinical and ultrasonographic follow-up. CNB appears as a safe and minimally-invasive approach to diagnose indeterminate neck masses and avoid unnecessary diagnostic surgery.

  14. Efficacy of Core Needle Biopsy Technique for Jawbone Diseases.

    PubMed

    Stolbizer, Federico; Cabrini, Romulo L; Keszler, Alicia

    2015-12-01

    Core needle biopsy (CNB) has been proven useful for diagnosing bone lesions, although it is not often used for jawbone lesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the CNB method in a series of cases of intramaxillary lesions. CNB was performed on 85 patients with intraosseous lesions which were grouped according to radiographic appearance as: radiopaque lesions (RO, n=13), radiolucent lesions (RL, n=39) and mixed lesions with both radiolucent and radiopaque areas (RL-RO, n=33). The technique enabled us to obtain several tissue cylinders from each lesion (average 2.5 cylinders), which were processed following routine histopathological technique and H&E stain, plus special techniques when necessary. The histopathological analysis together with clinical data enabled accurate diagnosis (AD) in 81% of the cases and descriptive diagnosis (DD) in 14%. The material obtained in 5% of the cases was not appropriate for study (ND). The difference between successful (AD) and unsuccessful (DD+ND) CNB cases is statistically significant. The highest percentage of successful CBNs was for RO and RLRO lesions (85% and 100% respectively). RL lesions were more difficult because most of them were cystic lesions with fluid content.

  15. Transvenous Transjugular Renal Core Biopsy with a Redesigned Biopsy Set Including a Blunt-Tipped Needle

    SciTech Connect

    Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Bahramipour, Philip; Mele, Christopher; Hinrichs, Clay R.; Barone, Alison; Abujudeh, Hani

    2002-03-15

    A novel 19-gauge, blunt-tipped, side cutting single throw, 70-cm long transjugular needle, specifically designed for transvenous kidney biopsy, was used in seven patients with high risk for bleeding. A mean of 4 device-passes (3-6) per patient resulted in a satisfactory specimen for pathological diagnosis. Immediate post-biopsy non enhanced CT was performed to evaluate for bleeding at the biopsy site. All patients were observed for 2 hr after the procedure. No clinically significant immediate or late complication was noted.

  16. The value of forceps biopsy and core needle biopsy in prediction of pathologic complete remission in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing-Hua; An, Xin; Lin, Xi; Gao, Yuan-Hong; Liu, Guo-Chen; Kong, Ling-Heng; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Ding, Pei-Rong

    2015-10-20

    Patients with pathological complete remission (pCR) after treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) have better long-term outcome and may receive conservative treatments in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). The study aimed to evaluate the value of forceps biopsy and core needle biopsy in prediction of pCR in LARC treated with nCRT. In total, 120 patients entered this study. Sixty-one consecutive patients received preoperative forceps biopsy during endoscopic examination. Ex vivo core needle biopsy was performed in resected specimens of another 43 consecutive patients. The accuracy for ex vivo core needle biopsy was significantly higher than forceps biopsy (76.7% vs. 36.1%; p < 0.001). The sensitivity for ex vivo core needle biopsy was significantly lower in good responder (TRG 3) than poor responder (TRG ≤ 2) (52.9% vs. 94.1%; p = 0.017). In vivo core needle biopsy was further performed in 16 patients with good response. Eleven patients had residual cancer cells in final resected specimens, among whom 4 (36.4%) patients were biopsy positive. In conclusion, routine forceps biopsy was of limited value in identifying pCR after nCRT. Although core needle biopsy might further identify a subset of patients with residual cancer cells, the accuracy was not substantially increased in good responders.

  17. Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nemcek AA. Percutaneous biopsy. In: Mauro MA, Murphy KPJ, Thomson KR, Venbrux AC, Morgan RA, eds. Image- ... by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is ...

  18. 49 CFR 178.338-14 - Gauging devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gauging devices. 178.338-14 Section 178.338-14 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-14 Gauging devices. (a) Liquid level gauging...

  19. 49 CFR 178.338-14 - Gauging devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gauging devices. 178.338-14 Section 178.338-14 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-14 Gauging devices. (a) Liquid level gauging...

  20. 49 CFR 178.338-14 - Gauging devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gauging devices. 178.338-14 Section 178.338-14 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-14 Gauging devices. (a) Liquid level gauging...

  1. 49 CFR 178.337-14 - Gauging devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gauging devices. 178.337-14 Section 178.337-14 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.337-14 Gauging devices. (a) Liquid level gauging...

  2. 49 CFR 178.337-14 - Gauging devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gauging devices. 178.337-14 Section 178.337-14 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.337-14 Gauging devices. (a) Liquid level gauging...

  3. 49 CFR 178.337-14 - Gauging devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gauging devices. 178.337-14 Section 178.337-14 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.337-14 Gauging devices. (a) Liquid level gauging...

  4. 49 CFR 178.337-14 - Gauging devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gauging devices. 178.337-14 Section 178.337-14 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.337-14 Gauging devices. (a) Liquid level gauging...

  5. 49 CFR 178.338-14 - Gauging devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gauging devices. 178.338-14 Section 178.338-14 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-14 Gauging devices. (a) Liquid level gauging...

  6. Accessible or Inaccessible? Diagnostic Efficacy of CT-Guided Core Biopsies of Head and Neck Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Jane D. McCusker, Mark W.; Power, Sarah; PearlyTi, Joanna; Thornton, John; Brennan, Paul; Lee, Michael J.; O’Hare, Alan; Looby, Seamus

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTissue sampling of lesions in the head and neck is challenging due to complex regional anatomy and sometimes necessitates open surgical biopsy. However, many patients are poor surgical candidates due to comorbidity. Thus, we evaluated the use of CT guidance for establishing histopathological diagnosis of head and neck masses.MethodsAll consecutive patients (n = 22) who underwent CT-guided core biopsy of head or neck masses between April 2009 and August 2012 were retrospectively reviewed using the departmental CT interventional procedures database. The indication for each biopsy performed was to establish or exclude a diagnosis of neoplasia in patients with suspicious head or neck lesions found on clinical examination or imaging studies. Patients received conscious sedation and 18 G, semiautomated core needle biopsies were performed by experienced neuroradiologists using 16-slice multidetector row CT imaging guidance (Somatom Definition Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany). Histopathology results of each biopsy were analysed.ResultsSixteen of 22 biopsies that were performed (73 %) yielded a pathological diagnosis. Anatomic locations biopsied included: masticator (n = 7), parapharyngeal (n = 3), parotid (n = 3), carotid (n = 3), perivertebral (n = 3), pharyngeal (n = 2), and retropharyngeal (n = 1) spaces. Six biopsies (27 %) were nondiagnostic due to inadequate tissue sampling, particularly small biopsy sample size and failure to biopsy the true sampling site due to extensive necrosis. No major complications were encountered.ConclusionsThe use of CT guidance to perform core biopsies of head and neck masses is an effective means of establishing histopathological diagnosis and reduces the need for diagnostic open surgical biopsy and general anaesthesia.

  7. Surgical follow-up results for apocrine adenosis and atypical apocrine adenosis diagnosed on breast core biopsy.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanjun; Chaudhary, Shweta; Gao, Faye F; Li, Zaibo

    2016-10-01

    Apocrine adenosis (AA) and atypical apocrine adenosis (AAA) are uncommon findings in breast biopsies that may be misinterpreted as carcinoma. The clinical significance and risk implications of AAA diagnosed on core biopsy are not well established. This study aimed to determine the frequency of carcinoma on follow-up excision in patients with a diagnosis of AA or AAA on core biopsy. Forty-one breast core biopsies of AA (n=29) and AAA (n=12) were identified during a study period of 12 years. Of the 41 core biopsies with AA or AAA, 10 biopsies showed coexisting/concurrent atypical hyperplasia or carcinoma. In the absence of coexisting/concurrent atypical hyperplasia or carcinoma in core biopsy, none of the follow-up excision specimens after a diagnosis of AA or AAA showed ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive carcinoma. In conclusion, AA or AAA by itself is an uncommon core biopsy diagnosis that may not require surgical excision.

  8. Video-Assisted Needle Core Biopsy in Children Affected by Neuroblastoma: A Novel Combined Technique.

    PubMed

    Avanzini, Stefano; Faticato, Maria Grazia; Sementa, Angela Rita; Granata, Claudio; Martucciello, Giuseppe; Pio, Luca; Prato, Alessio Pini; Garaventa, Alberto; Bisio, Giovanni; Montobbio, Giovanni; Buffa, Piero; Mattioli, Girolamo

    2017-04-01

    Aim This study aims to evaluate the experience gained with video-assisted needle-core biopsy in patients affected by neuroblastoma (NB). Patient and Methods We retrospectively reviewed all the patients presenting at our center with a thoracic, abdominal, and/or pelvic NB who underwent biopsy between 2007 and 2014. Data on demographics, localization, and size of the tumor, image-defined risk factors involved in each case, technical details about biopsies performed, qualitative and quantitative adequacy of tumor sampling and histological diagnosis, postoperative details, and complications were recorded and analyzed. Results During the 7 years of our study 51 patients affected by NB underwent 55 biopsies. Our results focus on the 29 patients undergoing 32 video-assisted needle-core biopsies. The median age was 4 years with a median weight of 13.5 kg. Out of 29, 28 tumors were localized in the abdomen/pelvis compartment, whereas 1 patient presented with a thoracic mass. The median size of the tumors was 57 mm. A total of 28 patients had an adequate tissue sampling for complete tumor characterization. Biopsies were repeated twice in a patient. Three complications occurred in three patients. Conclusions The video-assisted needle-core biopsy combines minimally invasive surgery several advantages with the possibility to obtain multiple samples in different regions with minimal tumor exposition and low complication rate.

  9. Transjugular Core Liver Biopsy with a 19-Gauge Spring-Loaded Cutting Needle

    SciTech Connect

    Choh, Jeffery; Dolmatch, Bart; Safadi, Rami; Long, Phil; Geisinger, Michael; Lammert, Gary; Dempsey, James

    1998-01-15

    One hundred and five sequential transjugular core liver biopsies (TJLBx) were performed in 101 patients with coagulopathy and/or ascites using the 19-gauge Quick-Core Biopsy (QCB) needle. Two-hundred and seventy-three cores were obtained in 295 passes (92.5%). One-hundred and two of the 105 procedures (97.1%) led to a histopathologic diagnosis. One of the three nondiagnostic biopsies was done because of severe autolysis of the liver. There was one subcapsular hematoma, one hepatic arteriovenous fistula, and one liver capsular puncture. Two minor neck hematomas occurred. One death was reported (unrelated to the procedure). QCB needle TJLBx is an effective and relatively safe way to obtain core liver samples.

  10. Lobular neoplasia diagnosed on breast Core biopsy: frequency of carcinoma on excision and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, Benjamin C; Collie, Angela M B; Lott-Limbach, Abberly A; Udoji, Esther N; Sieck, Leah R; Booth, Christine N; Downs-Kelly, Erinn

    2016-12-01

    The appropriate follow-up and treatment for patients with a core biopsy diagnosis of lobular neoplasia (atypical lobular hyperplasia or lobular carcinoma in situ) remains controversial. Several studies have attempted to address this issue, with recommendations ranging from close clinical follow-up or surveillance to mandatory surgical excision in all cases. We report the findings at our institution, where virtually every core needle biopsy diagnosis of lobular neoplasia results in follow-up excision. The goal of the study was to identify potential predictors of upgrade to a more significant lesion. We identified 76 patients over a 15-year period with a core biopsy diagnosis of pure lobular neoplasia and no other high-risk lesions. Subsequent surgical excision identified 10 cases (13%) that were upgraded to carcinoma. Upgrade diagnoses included invasive ductal carcinoma (n=1), invasive lobular carcinoma (n=4), ductal carcinoma in situ (n=3), and pleomorphic lobular carcinoma in situ (n=2). All 10 upgraded cases had imaging findings suspicious for malignancy including irregular masses, asymmetric densities, or pleomorphic calcifications. Of the 10 upgraded cases, 7 were diagnosed as lobular carcinoma in situ on core biopsy. The data support a role for radiologic-pathologic correlation in the evaluation of suspicious breast lesions and suggest that the extent of lobular neoplasia in core biopsy specimens may be an indicator of the likelihood of upgrade to carcinoma.

  11. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Core Needle Biopsy of Abdominal Viscera: Tips to Ensure Safe and Effective Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Woong

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy (USPCB) is used extensively in daily clinical practice for the pathologic confirmation of both focal and diffuse diseases of the abdominal viscera. As a guidance tool, US has a number of clear advantages over computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging: fewer false-negative biopsies, lack of ionizing radiation, portability, relatively short procedure time, real-time intra-procedural visualization of the biopsy needle, ability to guide the procedure in almost any anatomic plane, and relatively lower cost. Notably, USPCB is widely used to retrieve tissue specimens in cases of hepatic lesions. However, general radiologists, particularly beginners, find USPCB difficult to perform in abdominal organs other than the liver; indeed, a full understanding of the entire USPCB process and specific considerations for specific abdominal organs is necessary to safely obtain adequate specimens. In this review, we discuss some points and techniques that need to be borne in mind to increase the chances of successful USPCB. We believe that the tips and considerations presented in this review will help radiologists perform USPCB to successfully retrieve target tissue from different organs with minimal complications. PMID:28246511

  12. Squamous cell carcinoma of the breast diagnosis by vacuum-assisted core biopsy.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Gabriella; Zagami, Maria Giovanna; Montesano, Marilena; Primavera, Angelo; Carino, Rita; Battista, Cleonice; Rabitti, Carla; Altomare, Vittorio

    2005-01-01

    Squamous cell breast carcinoma is a rare occurrence. Often the tumor is metastatic from an extramammary primary tumor. In order to determine the nature of the lesion, extensive sampling is necessary. We report a case of primary squamous cell carcinoma of the breast diagnosed by vacuum-assisted core biopsy.

  13. Fluorescence and Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy for Breast Cancer Diagnosis During Core Needle Biopsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    The goal of this project is to explore the potential of using tissue fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for breast cancer detection...sensor based on tissue fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy as an adjunct diagnostic tool, which has the potential to provide guidance for core needle breast biopsy.

  14. Safety of 12 core transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy in patients on aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Vasudeva, Pawan; Kumar, Niraj; Kumar, Anup; Singh, Harbinder; Kumar, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To prospectively assess safety outcome of TRUS guided prostate biopsy in patients taking low dose aspirin. Materials and methods: Consecutive patients, who were planned for 12 core TRUS guided prostate biopsy and satisfied eligibility criteria, were included in the study and divided into two Groups: Group A: patients on aspirin during biopsy, Group B: patients not on aspirin during biopsy, including patients in whom aspirin was stopped prior to the biopsy. Parameters included for statistical analysis were: age, serum prostate specific antigen (PSA), prostate volume, hemoglobin (Hb %), number of hematuria episodes, number of patient reporting hematuria, hematuria requiring intervention, number of patient reporting hematospermia and number of patient reporting rectal bleeding. Results: Of 681 eligible patients, Group A and B had 191 and 490 patients respectively. The mean age, prostate volume, serum PSA and pre-biopsy hemoglobin were similar in both Groups with no significant differences noted between them. None of the post-biopsy complications, including number of hematuria episodes (p=0.83), number of patients reporting hematuria (p=0.55), number of patients reporting hematospermia (p=0.36) and number of patients reporting rectal bleeding (p=0.65), were significantly different between Groups A and B respectively. None of the hemorrhagic complication in either group required intervention and were self limiting. Conclusion: Continuing low dose aspirin during TRUS guided prostate biopsy neither alters the minor bleeding episodes nor causes major bleeding complication. So, discontinuation of low dose aspirin prior to TRUS guided prostate biopsy is not required. PMID:26742966

  15. 78 FR 66932 - Scientific Information Request on Core Needle and Open Surgical Biopsy for Diagnosis of Breast...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ...? Question 2 In women with a palpable or nonpalpable breast abnormality, what are the harms associated with... associated with the patient and her breast abnormality influence the harms of core-needle breast biopsy when... associated with the procedure itself influence the harms of core-needle breast biopsy when ] compared...

  16. Feasibility Study: Comparison of Frontal Cortex Needle Core Versus Open Biopsy For Detection of Characteristic Proteinopathies of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Geidy E.; Intorcia, Anthony; Carew, Jeremiah; Chiarolanza, Glenn; Hidalgo, Jose A.; Sue, Lucia. I.; Dugger, Brittany N.; Saxon-LaBelle, Megan; Filon, Jessica; Scroggins, Alex; Pullen, Joel; Fornwalt, Brandon E.; Scott, Sarah; Sabbagh, Marwan M.; Adler, Charles H.; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Beach, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis and classification of neurodegenerative diseases based on clinical examination or available biomarkers are currently insufficiently accurate. Although histological examination is considered the gold standard for diagnosis, brain biopsies have been avoided because of the high risk-benefit ratio. However, brain biopsies have previously been performed with a craniotomy and excision of approximately 1 cc of cerebral cortex tissue, and it is possible that needle core brain biopsies would have a lower morbidity and mortality risk. Here, we compared the ability of simulated needle core biopsy versus simulated open biopsy to detect the frontal cortex histopathology associated with common neurodegenerative diseases in the elderly using 144 autopsy-proven cases. Simulated needle core biopsy, as compared to simulated open biopsy, gave close to 90% sensitivity and specificity for identifying graded densities of β-amyloid and neuritic plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, phosphorylated α-synuclein, and phosphorylated TDP-43 pathology. This study shows that the presence and densities of the most common molecular pathologies may be histopathologically assessed in simulated frontal cortex needle biopsies with accuracy very close to that obtained by open cortical biopsy. An accurate estimation of the morbidity and mortality risk associated with cortical needle core biopsy will require specifically designed clinical trials in appropriate subjects. PMID:26230581

  17. Inflammation and focal atrophy in prostate needle biopsy cores and association to prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Ines; Bettin, Alfonso; Reyes, Niradiz

    2016-10-01

    The possible origin of proliferative inflammatory atrophy in the regenerative proliferation of prostate epithelial cells in response to injury caused by inflammation, and their relation to prostate adenocarcinoma have not been defined. Inflammation and focal atrophy are common pathological findings in prostate biopsies, currently not routinely included in surgical pathology reports. The objective of the study was to determine the correlation between inflammation and focal atrophy with prostate adenocarcinoma. Prostate needle biopsies from 203 patients with clinical parameters suspicious for malignancy were evaluated for the presence and extent of chronic inflammation, type and grade of focal atrophy, high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, and adenocarcinoma. Relations among them and with age were also analyzed. χ(2) tests and binary logistic regression were used to estimate associations. Chronic inflammation was observed in 77.3% of the biopsies, significantly associated to adenocarcinoma (P = .031). Moderate/severe inflammation in at least 1 biopsy core increased the risk of prostate adenocarcinoma (odds ratio, 2.94; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-6.8), whereas glandular localization of inflammation decreased the risk. Focal atrophy was present in 72.9% of the biopsies, proliferative inflammatory atrophy was the most common type, and its grade was significantly associated to inflammation (P < .0001) and inflammation intensity (P = .003). An association between prostate adenocarcinoma and inflammation was found, with higher odds in presence of moderate/severe inflammation in at least 1 biopsy core. Increasing grades of proliferative inflammatory atrophy were associated to high levels of inflammation, supporting its previously proposed inflammatory nature.

  18. Surgical biopsy is still necessary for BI-RADS 4 calcifications found on digital mammography that are technically too faint for stereotactic core biopsy.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Deborah O; Neal, Colleen H; Noroozian, Mitra; Joe, Annette I; Pinsky, Renee W; Goodsitt, Mitchell M; Helvie, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of faint BI-RADS 4 calcifications detected with digital mammography that were not amenable to stereotactic core biopsy due to suboptimal visualization. Following Institutional Review Board approval, a HIPAA compliant retrospective search identified 665 wire-localized surgical excisions of calcifications in 606 patients between 2007 and 2010. We included all patients that had surgical excision for initial diagnostic biopsy due to poor calcification visualization, whose current imaging was entirely digital and performed at our institution and who did not have a diagnosis of breast cancer within the prior 2 years. The final study population consisted of 20 wire-localized surgical biopsies in 19 patients performed instead of stereotactic core biopsy due to poor visibility of faint calcifications. Of the 20 biopsies, 4 (20% confidence intervals 2, 38%) were malignant, 5 (25%) showed atypia and 11 (55%) were benign. Of the malignant cases, two were invasive ductal carcinoma (2 and 1.5 mm), one was intermediate grade DCIS and one was low-grade DCIS. Malignant calcifications ranged from 3 to 12 mm. The breast density was scattered in 6/19 (32%), heterogeneously dense in 11/19 (58%) and extremely dense in 2/19 (10%). Digital mammography-detected faint calcifications that were not amenable to stereotactic biopsy due to suboptimal visualization had a risk of malignancy of 20%. While infrequent, these calcifications should continue to be considered suspicious and surgical biopsy recommended.

  19. Simulation of Autonomous Robotic Multiple-Core Biopsy by 3D Ultrasound Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Kaicheng; Rogers, Albert J.; Light, Edward D.; von Allmen, Daniel; Smith, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    An autonomous multiple-core biopsy system guided by real-time 3D ultrasound and operated by a robotic arm with 6+1 degrees of freedom has been developed. Using a specimen of turkey breast as a tissue phantom, our system was able to first autonomously locate the phantom in the image volume and then perform needle sticks in each of eight sectors in the phantom in a single session, with no human intervention required. Based on the fraction of eight sectors successfully sampled in an experiment of five trials, a success rate of 93% was recorded. This system could have relevance in clinical procedures that involve multiple needle-core sampling such as prostate or breast biopsy. PMID:20687279

  20. Confocal Microscopy of Unfixed Breast Needle Core Biopsies: A Comparison to Fixed and Stained Sections

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Needle core biopsy, often in conjunction with ultrasonic or stereotactic guided techniques, is frequently used to diagnose breast carcinoma in women. Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) is a technology that provides real-time digital images of tissues with cellular resolution. This paper reports the progress in developing techniques to rapidly screen needle core breast biopsy and surgical specimens at the point of care. CSLM requires minimal tissue processing and has the potential to reduce the time from excision to diagnosis. Following imaging, specimens can still be submitted for standard histopathological preparation. Methods Needle core breast specimens from 49 patients were imaged at the time of biopsy. These lesions had been characterized under the Breast Imaging Reporting And Data System (BI-RADS) as category 3, 4 or 5. The core biopsies were imaged with the CSLM before fixation. Samples were treated with 5% citric acid and glycerin USP to enhance nuclear visibility in the reflectance confocal images. Immediately following imaging, the specimens were fixed in buffered formalin and submitted for histological processing and pathological diagnosis. CSLM images were then compared to the standard histology. Results The pathologic diagnoses by standard histology were 7 invasive ductal carcinomas, 2 invasive lobular carcinomas, 3 ductal carcinomas in-situ (CIS), 21 fibrocystic changes/proliferative conditions, 9 fibroadenomas, and 5 other/benign; two were excluded due to imaging difficulties. Morphologic and cellular features of benign and cancerous lesions were identified in the confocal images and were comparable to standard histologic sections of the same tissue. Conclusion CSLM is a technique with the potential to screen needle core biopsy specimens in real-time. The confocal images contained sufficient information to identify stromal reactions such as fibrosis and cellular proliferations such as intra-ductal and infiltrating carcinoma, and

  1. Ultrasound Guided Core Biopsy versus Fine Needle Aspiration for Evaluation of Axillary Lymphadenopathy in Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ganott, Marie A.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Abrams, Gordon S.; Lu, Amy H.; Kelly, Amy E.; Chivukula, Mamatha; Carter, Gloria; Austin, R. Marshall; Bandos, Andriy I.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives. To compare the sensitivities of ultrasound guided core biopsy and fine needle aspiration (FNA) for detection of axillary lymph node metastases in patients with a current diagnosis of ipsilateral breast cancer. Materials and Methods. From December 2008 to December 2010, 105 patients with breast cancer and abnormal appearing lymph nodes in the ipsilateral axilla consented to undergo FNA of an axillary node immediately followed by core biopsy of the same node, both with ultrasound guidance. Experienced pathologists evaluated the aspirate cytology without knowledge of the core histology. Cytology and core biopsy results were compared to sentinel node excision or axillary dissection pathology. Sensitivities were compared using McNemar's test. Results. Of 70 patients with axillary node metastases, FNA was positive in 55/70 (78.6%) and core was positive in 61/70 (87.1%) (P = 0.18). The FNA and core results were discordant in 14/70 (20%) patients. Ten cases were FNA negative/core positive. Four cases were FNA positive/core negative. Conclusion. Core biopsy detected six (8.6%) more cases of metastatic lymphadenopathy than FNA but the difference in sensitivities was not statistically significant. Core biopsy should be considered if the node is clearly imaged and readily accessible. FNA is a good alternative when a smaller needle is desired due to node location or other patient factors. This trial is registered with NCT01920139. PMID:24649373

  2. Feasibility of near-infrared diffuse optical spectroscopy on patients undergoing image-guided core-needle biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bing; Burnside, Elizabeth S.; Sisney, Gale A.; Harter, Josephine M.; Zhu, Changfang; Dhalla, Al-Hafeez; Ramanujam, Nirmala

    2009-01-01

    We describe a side-firing fiber optic sensor based on near-infrared spectroscopy for guiding core needle biopsy diagnosis of breast cancer. The sensor is composed of three side firing optical fibers (two source fibers and one detection fiber), providing two source-detector separations. The entire assembly is inserted into a core biopsy needle, allowing for sampling to occur at the biopsy site. A multi-wavelength frequency-domain near-infrared instrument is used to collect diffuse reflectance in the breast tissue through an aperture on the biopsy needle before the tissue is removed for histology. Preliminary in vivo measurements performed on 10 normal or benign breast tissues from 5 women undergoing stereo- or ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy show the ability of the system to determine tissue optical properties and constituent concentrations, which are correlated with breast tissue composition derived from histopathology. PMID:19547057

  3. Greater Biopsy Core Number Is Associated With Improved Biochemical Control in Patients Treated With Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bittner, Nathan; Wallner, Kent E.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Standard prostate biopsy schemes underestimate Gleason score in a significant percentage of cases. Extended biopsy improves diagnostic accuracy and provides more reliable prognostic information. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that greater biopsy core number should result in improved treatment outcome through better tailoring of therapy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to May 2006, 1,613 prostate cancer patients were treated with permanent brachytherapy. Patients were divided into five groups stratified by the number of prostate biopsy cores ({<=}6, 7-9, 10-12, 13-20, and >20 cores). Biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated as a function of core number. Results: The median patient age was 66 years, and the median preimplant prostate-specific antigen was 6.5 ng/mL. The overall 10-year bPFS, CSS, and OS were 95.6%, 98.3%, and 78.6%, respectively. When bPFS was analyzed as a function of core number, the 10-year bPFS for patients with >20, 13-20, 10-12, 7-9 and {<=}6 cores was 100%, 100%, 98.3%, 95.8%, and 93.0% (p < 0.001), respectively. When evaluated by treatment era (1995-2000 vs. 2001-2006), the number of biopsy cores remained a statistically significant predictor of bPFS. On multivariate analysis, the number of biopsy cores was predictive of bPFS but did not predict for CSS or OS. Conclusion: Greater biopsy core number was associated with a statistically significant improvement in bPFS. Comprehensive regional sampling of the prostate may enhance diagnostic accuracy compared to a standard biopsy scheme, resulting in better tailoring of therapy.

  4. Intraductal papillomas on core biopsy can be upgraded to malignancy on subsequent excisional biopsy regardless of the presence of atypical features.

    PubMed

    Shiino, Sho; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Masayuki; Jimbo, Kenjiro; Asaga, Sota; Hojo, Takashi; Kinoshita, Takayuki

    2015-06-01

    Intraductal papillary lesions of the breast constitute a heterogeneous entity, including benign intraductal papilloma (IDP) with or without atypia and malignant papillary carcinoma. Differentiating between these diagnoses can be challenging. We re-evaluated core biopsy specimens that were diagnosed as IDP and the corresponding surgical excision specimens, and assessed the potential risk for the diagnosis to be modified to malignancy based on excision. By sorting the pathology database of the National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, we identified 146 core biopsy cases that were histologically diagnosed as IDP between 1997 and 2013. The re-evaluated diagnosis was IDP without atypia in 79 (54%) patients, IDP with atypia in 66 (45%), and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in 1 (1%). Among the 34 patients (23%) who underwent surgical excision subsequent to core biopsy, histological diagnosis was upgraded to carcinoma, excluding lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS), in 14 (41%) cases, including 4 (33%) of 12 IDPs without atypia and 10 (45%) of 22 IDPs with atypia. Complete surgical excision should be kept in mind for all IDPs diagnosed on core biopsy, not only IDPs with atypia but IDPs without atypia, especially when clinical or imaging diagnosis findings cannot rule out the possibility of malignancy, because papillary lesions comprise a variety of morphological appearances.

  5. Chronic Inflammation in Prostate Biopsy Cores is an Independent Factor that Lowers the Risk of Prostate Cancer Detection and is Inversely Associated with the Number of Positive Cores in Patients Elected to a First Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Porcaro, Antonio B.; Novella, Giovanni; Mattevi, Daniele; Bizzotto, Leonardo; Cacciamani, Giovanni; Luyk, Nicolò De; Tamanini, Irene; Cerruto, Maria A.; Brunelli, Matteo; Artibani, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate associations of chronic inflammatory infiltrate (CII) with prostate cancer (PCa) risk and the number of positive cores in patients elected to a first set of biopsies. Materials and Methods Excluding criteria were as follows: active surveillance, prostate specific antigen (PSA) ≥ 30 ng/l, re-biopsies, incidental PCa, less than 14 cores, metastases, or 5-alpha reductase inhibitors. The cohort study was classified as negative (control group) and positive cores between 1 and 2 or > 2. Results The cohort included 421 cases who did not meet the exclusion criteria. PCa was detected in 192 cases (45.6%) of which the number of positive cores was between 1 and 2 in 77 (40.1%) cases. The median PSA was 6.05 ng/ml (range 0.3-29 ng/ml). Linear regression models showed that CII was an independent predictor inversely associated with the risk of PCa. Multinomial logistic regression models showed that CII was an independent factor that was inversely associated with PCa risk in cases with positive cores between 1 and 2 (OR = 0.338; p = 0.004) or more than 2 (OR = 0.076; p < 0.0001) when compared to the control group. Conclusion In a cohort of men undergoing the first biopsy set after prostate assessment, the presence of CII in the biopsy core was an independent factor inversely associated with PCa risk as well as with the number of positive biopsy cores (tumor extension). Clinically, the detection of CII in negative biopsy cores might reduce the risk of PCa in repeat biopsies as well as the probability of detecting multiple positive cores. PMID:27390581

  6. Real-time three-dimensional optical coherence tomography image-guided core-needle biopsy system

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Wei-Cheng; Kim, Jongsik; Shemonski, Nathan D.; Chaney, Eric J.; Spillman, Darold R.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in optical imaging modalities, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), enable us to observe tissue microstructure at high resolution and in real time. Currently, core-needle biopsies are guided by external imaging modalities such as ultrasound imaging and x-ray computed tomography (CT) for breast and lung masses, respectively. These image-guided procedures are frequently limited by spatial resolution when using ultrasound imaging, or by temporal resolution (rapid real-time feedback capabilities) when using x-ray CT. One feasible approach is to perform OCT within small gauge needles to optically image tissue microstructure. However, to date, no system or core-needle device has been developed that incorporates both three-dimensional OCT imaging and tissue biopsy within the same needle for true OCT-guided core-needle biopsy. We have developed and demonstrate an integrated core-needle biopsy system that utilizes catheter-based 3-D OCT for real-time image-guidance for target tissue localization, imaging of tissue immediately prior to physical biopsy, and subsequent OCT imaging of the biopsied specimen for immediate assessment at the point-of-care. OCT images of biopsied ex vivo tumor specimens acquired during core-needle placement are correlated with corresponding histology, and computational visualization of arbitrary planes within the 3-D OCT volumes enables feedback on specimen tissue type and biopsy quality. These results demonstrate the potential for using real-time 3-D OCT for needle biopsy guidance by imaging within the needle and tissue during biopsy procedures. PMID:22741064

  7. New Radiofrequency Device to Reduce Bleeding after Core Needle Biopsy: Experimental Study in a Porcine Liver Model

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sanghyeok; Lee, Min Woo; Song, Kyoung Doo; Kang, Tae Wook; Kim, Young-sun; Lim, Hyo Keun

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the in vivo efficiency of the biopsy tract radiofrequency ablation for hemostasis after core biopsy of the liver in a porcine liver model, including situations with bleeding tendency and a larger (16-gauge) core needle. Materials and Methods A preliminary study was performed using one pig to determine optimal ablation parameters. For the main experiment, four pigs were assigned to different groups according to heparinization use and biopsy needle caliber. In each pig, 14 control (without tract ablation) and 14 experimental (tract ablation) ultrasound-guided core biopsies were performed using either an 18- or 16-gauge needle. Post-biopsy bleeding amounts were measured by soaking up the blood for five minutes. The results were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results The optimal parameters for biopsy tract ablation were determined as a 2-cm active tip electrode set at 40-watt with a tip temperature of 70–80℃. The bleeding amounts in all experimental groups were smaller than those in the controls; however they were significant in the non-heparinized pig biopsied with an 18-gauge needle and in two heparinized pigs (p < 0.001). In the heparinized pigs, the mean blood loss in the experimental group was 3.5% and 13.5% of the controls biopsied with an 18- and 16-gauge needle, respectively. Conclusion Radiofrequency ablation of hepatic core biopsy tract ablation may reduce post-biopsy bleeding even under bleeding tendency and using a larger core needle, according to the result from in vivo porcine model experiments. PMID:28096727

  8. Analysis of repeated 24-core saturation prostate biopsy: Inverse association between asymptomatic histological inflammation and prostate cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Tomonori; Komiya, Akira; Morii, Akihiro; Iida, Hiroaki; Ito, Takatoshi; Fuse, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Saturation prostate biopsy protocols have been developed to improve the prostate cancer (PCa) detection rate, particularly in the setting of repeat biopsies. The present study attempted to clarify the association between PCa detection and various risk factors in repeat saturation biopsies. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 78 Japanese patients for whom findings had caused suspicion of PCa despite previous negative prostate biopsies, and who consecutively underwent a 24-core transperineal repeat biopsy at Toyama University Hospital (Toyama, Japan). PCa was confirmed histologically in 16 of the 78 patients (20.5%). A univariate analysis revealed that the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level at repeat biopsy was higher (P<0.01), the fPSA/tPSA ratio was lower (P=0.04), the total prostate volume was smaller (P=0.01) and the PSA density was higher (P<0.01) in PCa patients than in patients with benign prostatic disease (BPD). Histological inflammation was more frequently observed in BPD patients than in PCa patients (P<0.01). A multivariate analysis revealed that histological inflammation was the only independent predictor of the presence of a malignant lesion on repeat biopsy (odds ratio, 0.027; P=0.01). It must be considered that inflammation may cause a PSA increase in some patients with a negative initial biopsy, leading to unnecessary repeat biopsy. PMID:27446407

  9. Analysis of repeated 24-core saturation prostate biopsy: Inverse association between asymptomatic histological inflammation and prostate cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tomonori; Komiya, Akira; Morii, Akihiro; Iida, Hiroaki; Ito, Takatoshi; Fuse, Hideki

    Saturation prostate biopsy protocols have been developed to improve the prostate cancer (PCa) detection rate, particularly in the setting of repeat biopsies. The present study attempted to clarify the association between PCa detection and various risk factors in repeat saturation biopsies. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 78 Japanese patients for whom findings had caused suspicion of PCa despite previous negative prostate biopsies, and who consecutively underwent a 24-core transperineal repeat biopsy at Toyama University Hospital (Toyama, Japan). PCa was confirmed histologically in 16 of the 78 patients (20.5%). A univariate analysis revealed that the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level at repeat biopsy was higher (P<0.01), the fPSA/tPSA ratio was lower (P=0.04), the total prostate volume was smaller (P=0.01) and the PSA density was higher (P<0.01) in PCa patients than in patients with benign prostatic disease (BPD). Histological inflammation was more frequently observed in BPD patients than in PCa patients (P<0.01). A multivariate analysis revealed that histological inflammation was the only independent predictor of the presence of a malignant lesion on repeat biopsy (odds ratio, 0.027; P=0.01). It must be considered that inflammation may cause a PSA increase in some patients with a negative initial biopsy, leading to unnecessary repeat biopsy.

  10. Percutaneous CT-Guided Core Needle Biopsy Versus Fine Needle Aspiration in Diagnosing Pneumonia and Mimics of Pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, Loukas; Galani, Panagiota Mylona, Sophia; Pomoni, Maria; Mpatakis, Nikolaos

    2004-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of percutaneous core needle biopsy (CNB) relative to fine needle aspiration (FNA) in patients with pneumonia and pneumonia mimics. In this prospective study we present our experience with 48 thoracic FNAs and CNBs carried out on 48 patients with pneumonia and pneumonia mimics. Samples were obtained from all patients using both CNB (with an automated 18-G core biopsy needle and a gun) and FNA (with a 22-G needle). A specific diagnosis was made in 10/48 cases (20.83%) by FNA and in 42/48 (87.5%) by CNB. The main complications encountered were pneumothorax (n = 4) and hemoptysis (n = 2), yielding a total complication rate of 12.5%. We concluded that CNB using an automated biopsy gun results in a higher diagnostic accuracy for pneumonia and pneumonia mimic biopsies than FNA. Complications should be considered and proper patient observation should follow the procedure.

  11. Percentage of Positive Biopsy Cores: A Better Risk Stratification Model for Prostate Cancer?

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jiayi; Vicini, Frank A.; Williams, Scott G.; Ye Hong; McGrath, Samuel; Ghilezan, Mihai; Krauss, Daniel; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Kestin, Larry L.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the prognostic value of the percentage of positive biopsy cores (PPC) and perineural invasion in predicting the clinical outcomes after radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer and to explore the possibilities to improve on existing risk-stratification models. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2004, 1,056 patients with clinical Stage T1c-T3N0M0 prostate cancer, who had four or more biopsy cores sampled and complete biopsy core data available, were treated with external beam RT, with or without a high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost at William Beaumont Hospital. The median follow-up was 7.6 years. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed with PPC, Gleason score, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen, T stage, PNI, radiation dose, androgen deprivation, age, prostate-specific antigen frequency, and follow-up duration. A new risk stratification (PPC classification) was empirically devised to incorporate PPC and replace the T stage. Results: On multivariate Cox regression analysis, the PPC was an independent predictor of distant metastasis, cause-specific survival, and overall survival (all p < .05). A PPC >50% was associated with significantly greater distant metastasis (hazard ratio, 4.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.86-8.61), and its independent predictive value remained significant with or without androgen deprivation therapy (all p < .05). In contrast, PNI and T stage were only predictive for locoregional recurrence. Combining the PPC ({<=}50% vs. >50%) with National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk stratification demonstrated added prognostic value of distant metastasis for the intermediate-risk (hazard ratio, 5.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.78-16.6) and high-risk (hazard ratio, 4.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.70-11.3) groups, regardless of the use of androgen deprivation and high-dose RT (all p < .05). The proposed PPC classification appears to provide improved stratification of the clinical outcomes relative to the National

  12. Fluorescence Spectroscopy: An Adjunct Diagnostic Tool to Image-Guided Core Needle Biopsy of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changfang; Burnside, Elizabeth S.; Sisney, Gale A.; Salkowski, Lonie R.; Harter, Josephine M.; Yu, Bing

    2009-01-01

    We explored the use of a fiber-optic probe for in vivo fluorescence spectroscopy of breast tissues during percutaneous image-guided breast biopsy. A total of 121 biopsy samples with accompanying histological diagnosis were obtained clinically and investigated in this study. The tissue spectra were analyzed using partial least-squares analysis and represented using a set of principal components (PCs) with dramatically reduced data dimension. For nonmalignant tissue samples, a set of PCs that account for the largest amount of variance in the spectra displayed correlation with the percent tissue composition. For all tissue samples, a set of PCs was identified using a Wilcoxon rank-sum test as showing statistically significant differences between: 1) malignant and fibrous/benign; 2) malignant and adipose; and 3) malignant and nonmalignant breast samples. These PCs were used to distinguish malignant from other nonmalignant tissue types using a binary classification scheme based on both linear and nonlinear support vector machine (SVM) and logistic regression (LR). For the sample set investigated in this study, the SVM classifier provided a cross-validated sensitivity and specificity of up to 81% and 87%, respectively, for discrimination between malignant and fibrous/benign samples, and up to 81% and 81%, respectively, for discriminating between malignant and adipose samples. Classification based on LR was used to generate receiver operator curves with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.87 for discriminating malignant versus fibrous/benign tissues, and an AUC of 0.84 for discriminating malignant from adipose tissue samples. This study demonstrates the feasibility of performing fluorescence spectroscopy during clinical core needle breast biopsy, and the potential of this technique for identifying breast malignancy in vivo. PMID:19272976

  13. Recommendations for excision following core needle biopsy of the breast: a contemporary evaluation of the literature.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, Benjamin C; Collins, Laura C

    2016-01-01

    Pathologists frequently encounter non-malignant histological findings in percutaneous core needle biopsies (CNBs). Standards for the management of patients with lesions such as atypical ductal hyperplasia, atypical lobular hyperplasia, and lobular carcinoma in situ, as well as other benign lesions, are not well defined, and recommendations for surgical biopsy or continued clinical and radiological follow-up are inconsistent. The frequency with which these lesions are 'upgraded' to carcinoma in excision specimens is widely variable in the literature. Many CNB studies lack careful radiological-pathological correlation, clear criteria for excision, and clinical follow-up for patients on whom excision was not performed. This review of the recent literature emphasizes studies with radiological-pathological correlation, with the goal of developing a contemporary, evidence-based approach to the management of non-malignant lesions of the breast diagnosed on CNB. The data supporting an emerging consensus on which lesions may not require excision are highlighted. The management of non-malignant lesions diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging-guided CNB is also discussed.

  14. Discontinuous unilateral involvement of 12 part core biopsies by adenocarcinoma predicts bilateral involvement of subsequent radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Lowenthal, Brett Matthew; Liao, Xiaoyan; Wen, Fang; Bagherzadeh, Nader; Mahooti, Sepi

    2016-08-01

    At our institution, percent tumor burden in prostate core biopsies is quantified using variations of one of two methods. Measurement by the Aggregate method reports only adenocarcinoma and omits intervening stroma and benign prostatic glands while the Discontinuous method includes the intervening stroma and benign glands between distinct foci of adenocarcinoma. In this study, we selected cases with 12-part core biopsies that were followed by a radical prostatectomy within two years. Interestingly, we found that when adenocarcinoma involved prostate 12-part core biopsies and subsequent resection unilaterally, there is no significant difference in absolute percentage of tumor using either measuring method (P = 0.4). In contrast, when adenocarcinoma involved the biopsies unilaterally and subsequent prostatectomy bilaterally, the two measurement methods had a statistically significant difference in percentage scores (P = 0.002). In the study cohort, other factors including Gleason score (P = 0.88) and total number of adenocarcinoma-involved cores (P = 0.27) did not introduce any significant correlation with bilateral involvement. In this study, we found that biopsies that discontinuously and unilaterally involve half of a prostate are much more likely to involve both lobes than those that are unilateral and present in nodular aggregates.

  15. Initial experience with a novel EUS-guided core biopsy needle (SharkCore): results of a large North American multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    DiMaio, Christopher J.; Kolb, Jennifer M.; Benias, Petros C.; Shah, Hiral; Shah, Shashin; Haluszka, Oleh; Maranki, Jennifer; Sharzehi, Kaveh; Lam, Eric; Gordon, Stuart R.; Hyder, Sarah M.; Kaimakliotis, Pavlos Z.; Allaparthi, Satya B.; Gress, Frank G.; Sethi, Amrita; Shah, Ashish R.; Nieto, Jose; Kaul, Vivek; Kothari, Shivangi; Kothari, Truptesh H.; Ho, Sammy; Izzy, Manhal J.; Sharma, Neil R.; Watson, Rabindra R.; Muthusamy, V. Raman; Pleskow, Douglas K.; Berzin, Tyler M.; Sawhney, Mandeep; Aljahdi, Emad; Ryou, Marvin; Wong, Clarence K.; Gupta, Parantap; Yang, Dennis; Gonzalez, Susana; Adler, Douglas G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: The ability to safely and effectively obtain sufficient tissue for pathologic evaluation by using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guidance remains a challenge. Novel designs in EUS needles may provide for improved ability to obtain such core biopsies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic yield of core biopsy specimens obtained using a novel EUS needle specifically designed to obtain core biopsies. Patients and methods: Multicenter retrospective review of all EUS-guided fine-needle biopsies obtained using a novel biopsy needle (SharkCore FNB needle, Medtronic, Dublin, Ireland). Data regarding patient demographics, lesion type/location, technical parameters, and diagnostic yield was obtained. Results: A total of 250 lesions were biopsied in 226 patients (Median age 66 years; 113 (50 %) male). Median size of all lesions (mm): 26 (2 – 150). Overall, a cytologic diagnosis was rendered in 81 % specimens with a median number of 3 passes. When rapid onsite cytologic evaluation (ROSE) was used, cytologic diagnostic yield was 126/149 (85 %) with a median number of 3 passes; without ROSE, cytologic diagnostic yield was 31/45 (69 %, P = 0.03) with a median number of 3 passes. Overall, a pathologic diagnosis was rendered in 130/147 (88 %) specimens with a median number of 2 passes. Pathologic diagnostic yield for specific lesion types: pancreas 70/81 (86 %), subepithelial lesion 13/15 (87 %), lymph node 26/28 (93 %). Ten patients (10/226, 4 %) experienced adverse events: 4 acute pancreatitis, 5 pain, 1 fever/cholangitis. Conclusions: Initial experience with a novel EUS core biopsy needle demonstrates excellent pathologic diagnostic yield with a minimum number of passes. PMID:27652304

  16. Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy of the breast: does frozen section give an accurate diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Mueller-Holzner, Elisabeth; Frede, Thomas; Daniaux, Martin; Ban, Michael; Taucher, Susanne; Schneitter, Alois; Zeimet, Alain G; Marth, Christian

    2007-12-01

    Reducing the period of uncertainty between the discovery of a breast tumor and histological diagnosis alleviates the psychological impact of breast cancer to an important degree. We aimed to verify whether histological results obtained with frozen sections of core needle biopsies (CNBs) offer an accurate and reliable tool for minimising this period. In 2619 cases we compared histological diagnosis on frozen sections with those on paraffin sections of CNB and finally with the results of open biopsies. Of the cases 49% were proved malignant and 51% benign. In 99.3% of the malignant lesions preceding CNB was correctly classified as B5 (n = 1185, 92.9%) or at least B4 (n = 82, 6.4%) in frozen and in paraffin sections. There were seven false-negative cases in frozen (false-negative rate = 0.5%) and five false-negative cases (false-negative rate = 0.4%) in paraffin sections of CNB. On frozen sections complete sensitivity was 99.5% and the positive predictive value of B5 was 99.9%. There was one false-positive case in frozen sections and one in paraffin sections. False-positive rate = 0.08%, negative predictive value for B2 = 99.4% for frozen and 99.6% for paraffin sections; full specificity was 85.9 for frozen and 85.8 for paraffin sections of CNBs. Immediate investigation of CNB in frozen sections is an accurate diagnostic method and an important step in reducing psychological strain on patients with breast tumors and may be offered by specialised Breast Assessment Units.

  17. Pre-operative axillary staging: should core biopsy be preferred to fine needle aspiration cytology?

    PubMed Central

    Vidya, Raghavan; Iqbal, Fahad Mujtaba; Bickley, Bernadette

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology and core needle biopsy (CNB) of axillary lymph nodes pre-operatively in newly diagnosed operable primary breast cancer. Methods An observational study for all patients who underwent pre-operative FNA cytology or CNB during September 2013–August 2014 was conducted at our institution (County Hospital, Stafford, UK). The accuracy of pre-operative axillary staging was compared to the post-operative histology. For this sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were calculated. Results A total of 81 consecutive patients were evaluated by axillary ultrasound. Patients identified with potentially abnormal axillary lymph nodes underwent definitive surgery. Seven patients had positive cytology/histology who did not undergo definitive surgery and were excluded (N = 74) from the study. CNB had a sensitivity of 100% versus 72% (p = 0.006) for FNA cytology. Both had 100% specificity and PPV. The NPV of CNB was 100% versus 72% for FNA cytology. Among 35% of patients that underwent FNA cytology required repeat procedure versus 2.6% of patients who underwent CNB. 0/38 patients that had CNB required a second operation while 7/43 patients with negative FNA cytology had positive lymph nodes identified at sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) requiring surgical re-intervention with axillary node clearance. Conclusion CNB was superior to FNA cytology when interrogating the axilla. We recommend CNB to be adopted routinely in pre-operative axillary staging to reduce surgical re-intervention. PMID:28386294

  18. Concurrent fine needle aspirations and core needle biopsies: a comparative study of substrates for next-generation sequencing in solid organ malignancies.

    PubMed

    Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Chen, Hui; Singh, Rajesh R; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Patel, Keyur P; Routbort, Mark J; Manekia, Jawad; Barkoh, Bedia A; Yao, Hui; Sabir, Sharjeel; Broaddus, Russell R; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Staerkel, Gregg; Stewart, John; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi

    2017-01-13

    Minimally invasive procedures, such as fine needle aspiration and core needle biopsy, are commonly used for the diagnosis in solid organ malignancies. In the era of targeted therapy, it is crucial for molecular testing to be performed on these limited volume specimens. Although several recent studies have demonstrated the utility of small biopsy specimens for molecular testing, there remains debate as to whether core needle biopsy specimens are more reliable than fine needle aspiration for molecular studies. In this study, we reviewed concurrently acquired fine needle aspiration and core needle biopsy samples (n=24), and compared overall cellularity, tumor fraction, and the results of next-generation sequencing. All somatic mutations detected in core needle biopsy samples were also detected in fine needle aspiration samples. The estimated tumor fraction was significantly higher in fine needle aspiration smears than core needle biopsy samples (P=0.003), whereas the overall DNA yield from smears was significantly lower than that obtained from the core needle biopsy specimens (P=0.01). The normalized average amplicon coverage for the genes analyzed was significantly higher in cytology smears than paired core needle biopsy samples, with lower numbers of failed amplicons and higher overall mutation allelic frequencies seen in the former. We further evaluated 100 malignant fine needle aspiration and core needle biopsy samples, acquired concurrently, for overall cellularity and tumor fraction. Overall cellularity and tumor fraction of fine needle aspiration samples was significantly higher than concurrently acquired core needle biopsy samples (P<0.001). In conclusion, we show that fine needle aspiration samples frequently provide better cellularity, higher tumor fraction, and superior sequencing metrics than concurrently acquired core needle biopsy samples. Cytologic specimens, therefore, should be better integrated into routine molecular diagnostics workflow to maximize

  19. Automated tru-cut imaging-guided core needle biopsy of canine orbital neoplasia. A prospective feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cirla, A.; Rondena, M.; Bertolini, G.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of imaging-guided core needle biopsy for canine orbital mass diagnosis. A second excisional biopsy obtained during surgery or necropsy was used as the reference standard. A prospective feasibility study was conducted in 23 canine orbital masses at a single centre. A complete ophthalmic examination was always followed by orbital ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) examination of the head. All masses were sampled with the patient still on the CT table using ultrasound (US) guided automatic tru-cut device. The most suitable sampling approach to the orbit was chosen each time based on the CT image analysis. One of the following different approaches was used: trans-orbital, trans-conjunctival or trans-masseteric. In all cases, the imaging-guided biopsy provided a sufficient amount of tissue for the histopathological diagnosis, which concurred with the biopsies obtained using the excisional technique. CT examination was essential for morphological diagnosis and provided detailed topographic information that allowed us to choose the safest orbital approach for the biopsy. US guided automatic tru-cut biopsy based on CT images, performed with patient still on the CT table, resulted in a minimally invasive, relatively easy, and accurate diagnostic procedure in dogs with orbital masses. PMID:27540512

  20. Accuracy of Estrogen and Progesterone Receptor Assessment in Core Needle Biopsy Specimens of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Omranipour, Ramesh; Alipour, Sadaf; Hadji, Maryam; Fereidooni, Forouzandeh; Jahanzad, Issa; Bagheri, Khojasteh

    2013-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of breast cancer is completed through core needle biopsy (CNB) of the tumors but there is controversy on the accuracy of hormone receptor results on CNB specimens. Objectives We undertook this study to compare the results of hormone receptor assessment in CNB and surgical samples on our patients. Patients and Methods Hormone receptor status was determined in CNB and surgical samples in breast cancer patients whose CNB and operation had been performed in this institute from 2009 to 2011 and had not undergone neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Results About 350 patients, 60 cases met all the criteria for entering the study. The mean age was 49.8 years. Considering a confidence interval (CI) of 95%, the sensitivity of ER and PR assessment in CNB was 92.9% and 81%, respectively and the specificity of both was 100%. The Accuracy of CNB was 98% for ER and 93% for PR. Conclusions Our results confirm the acceptable accuracy of ER assessment on CNB. The subject needs further investigation in developing countries where omission of the test in surgical samples can be cost and time-saving. PMID:24349751

  1. Malignant-looking thyroid nodules with size reduction: core needle biopsy results

    PubMed Central

    Shong, Young Kee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate whether malignant-looking thyroid nodules with size reduction were malignant or not. Methods From November 2010 to July 2011, we retrospectively enrolled 16 patients with 16 nodules (11 females and five males; mean age, 55 years) who underwent core needle biopsy (CNB), and whose thyroid nodules had malignant ultrasonographic (US) features, although they showed size reduction (>20% decrease in maximum diameter) during the follow-up period (mean, 37±27 months). The histologic findings of the CNB specimen were reviewed and correlated with the US findings. US studies were analyzed for their internal content, shape, margin, echogenicity, the presence of microcalcification and macrocalcification, inner isoechoic rim, and low-echoic halo. Results All nodules were confirmed as benign by CNB. Pathologic analysis was available for 12 CNB specimens. US imaging showed central hypoechogenicity or marked hypoechogenicity in all cases and a peripheral isoechoic rim in 15 nodules. US-pathologic correlation showed that the central hypoechoic area was primarily composed of fibrosis (12/12) and hemorrhage (8/12) and that the isoechoic rim was composed of follicular cells. Conclusion In our study, the CNB results of all of the malignant-looking thyroid nodules with size reduction were benign and were primarily composed of internal fibrosis and hemorrhage. Understanding these US and pathologic features could prevent repeated fine-needle aspiration or unnecessary diagnostic surgery. PMID:27184652

  2. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy in the diagnosis of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bulakci, Mesut; Ilhan, Mehmet; Bademler, Suleyman; Yilmaz, Erdem; Gulluoglu, Mine; Bayraktar, Adem; Asik, Murat; Guloglu, Recep

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study retrospectively analyzed the clinical data, laboratory results, imaging findings, and histopathological features of 28 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy from a hepatic lesion and were diagnosed with alveolar echinococcosis. Results: Among 28 patients included in the study, 16 were females and 12 were males. The mean age of the studied population was 53 ± 16 years, and the age range was 18–79 years. The most common presenting symptom was abdominal pain, which was observed in 14 patients. A total of 36 lesions were detected in the patients’ livers, out of which 7 had a cystic appearance. Hepatic vascular involvement, bile duct involvement, and other organ involvement were depicted in 14, 5, and 7 patients, respectively. The average number of cores taken from the lesions was 2.7, ranging between 2 and 5. In histopathological evaluation, PAS+ parasitic membrane structures were visualized on a necrotic background in all cases. Regarding seven patients, who were operated, the pathological findings of preoperative percutaneous biopsies were in perfect agreement with the pathological examinations after surgical resections. None of the patients developed major complications after biopsy. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy is a minimally invasive, reliable, and effective diagnostic tool for the definitive diagnosis of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis. PMID:27101838

  3. Complications of transrectal ultrasound-guided 12-core prostate biopsy: a single center experience with 2049 patients

    PubMed Central

    Efesoy, Ozan; Bozlu, Murat; Çayan, Selahittin; Akbay, Erdem

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Currently, transrectal ultrasound-guided (TRUS) systematic prostate biopsy is the standard procedure in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Although TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is a safe method, it is an invasive procedure that is not free from complications. In this prospective study we evaluated the complications of a TRUS-guided 12-core prostate biopsy. Material and methods: The study included 2049 patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided 12-core prostate biopsy used in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. The indications for the prostate biopsy were abnormal digital rectal examination findings and/or an elevated serum total prostate specific antigen (PSA) level (greater than 4 ng/mL). The participants received prophylactic oral ciprofloxacin (500 mg) the night before and the morning of the biopsy, followed by 500 mg orally twice daily for 2 days. To prevent development of voiding disorders, the patients also received oral alpha blockers for 30 days starting the day before the procedure. A Fleet enema was self-administered the night before the procedure for rectal cleansing. The complications were assessed both 10 days and 1 month after the biopsy. Results: The mean age, serum total PSA level and prostate volume of the patients were 65.4±9.6 years, 18.6±22.4 ng/mL and 51.3±22.4 cc, respectively. From these 2.042 biopsies, 596 cases (29.1%) were histopathologically diagnosed as prostate adenocarcinoma. Minor complications, such as hematuria (66.3%), hematospermia (38.8%), rectal bleeding (28.4%), mild to moderate degrees of vasovagal episodes (7.7%), and genitourinary tract infection (6.1%) were noted frequently. Major complications were rare and included urosepsis (0.5%), rectal bleeding requiring intervention (0.3%), acute urinary retention (0.3%), hematuria necessitating transfusion (0.05%), Fournier’s gangrene (0.05%), and myocardial infarction (0.05%). Conclusion: TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is safe for diagnosing prostate cancer with few

  4. Touch Imprint Cytology and Stereotactically-Guided Core Needle Biopsy of Suspicious Breast Lesions: 15-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Schulz-Wendtland, R.; Fasching, P. A.; Bani, M. R.; Lux, M. P.; Jud, S.; Rauh, C.; Bayer, C.; Wachter, D. L.; Hartmann, A.; Beckmann, M. W.; Uder, M.; Loehberg, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Stereotactically-guided core needle biopsies (CNB) of breast tumours allow histological examination of the tumour without surgery. Touch imprint cytology (TIC) of CNB promises to be useful in providing same-day diagnosis for counselling purposes and for planning future surgery. Having addressed the issue of accuracy of immediate microscopic evaluation of TIC, we wanted to re-examine the usefulness of this procedure in light of the present health care climate of cost containment by incorporating the surgical 15-year follow-up data and outcome. Patients and Methods: From January until December 1996 we performed TIC in core needle biopsies of 173 breast tumours in 169 patients, consisting of 122 malignant and 51 benign tumours. Histology of core needle biopsies was proven by surgical histology in all malignant and in 5 benign tumours. Surgical breast biopsy was not performed in 46 patients with 46 benign lesions, as the histological result from the core needle biopsy and the result of the TIC were in agreement with the suspected diagnosis from the complementary breast diagnostics. A 15-year follow-up of these patients followed in 2013 and follow-up data was collected from 40 women. Results: In the 15-year follow-up of the 40 benign lesions primarily confirmed using CNB and TIC, a diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value and accuracy of 100 % was found. Conclusion: TIC and stereotactically guided CNB showed excellent long-term follow-up in patients with benign breast lesions. The use of TIC to complement CNB can therefore provide immediate cytological diagnosis of breast lesions. PMID:26855442

  5. Ki67 proliferation in core biopsies versus surgical samples - a model for neo-adjuvant breast cancer studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An increasing number of neo-adjuvant breast cancer studies are being conducted and a novel model for tumor biological studies, the "window-of-opportunity" model, has revealed several advantages. Change in tumor cell proliferation, estimated by Ki67-expression in pre-therapeutic core biopsies versus post-therapeutic surgical samples is often the primary end-point. The aim of the present study was to investigate potential differences in proliferation scores between core biopsies and surgical samples when patients have not received any intervening anti-cancer treatment. Also, a lack of consensus concerning Ki67 assessment may raise problems in the comparison of neo-adjuvant studies. Thus, the secondary aim was to present a novel model for Ki67 assessment. Methods Fifty consecutive breast cancer cases with both a core biopsy and a surgical sample available, without intervening neo-adjuvant therapy, were collected and tumor proliferation (Ki67, MIB1 antibody) was assessed immunohistochemically. A theoretical model for the assessment of Ki67 was constructed based on sequential testing of the null hypothesis 20% Ki67-positive cells versus the two-sided alternative more or less than 20% positive cells.. Results Assessment of Ki67 in 200 tumor cells showed an absolute average proliferation difference of 3.9% between core biopsies and surgical samples (p = 0.046, paired t-test) with the core biopsies being the more proliferative sample type. A corresponding analysis on the log-scale showed the average relative decrease from the biopsy to the surgical specimen to be 19% (p = 0.063, paired t-test on the log-scale). The difference was significant when using the more robust Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test (p = 0.029). After dichotomization at 20%, 12 of the 50 sample pairs had discrepant proliferation status, 10 showed high Ki67 in the core biopsy compared to two in the surgical specimen (p = 0.039, McNemar's test). None of the corresponding results for 1000

  6. Assessment of Independent Risk Factors of Developing Pneumothorax During Percutaneous Core Needle Lung Biopsy: Focus on Lesion Depth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ha-Yeon; Lee, In Jae

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies identifying risk factors for pneumothorax in percutaneous core needle lung biopsies reported inconsistent and contradictory results. Objectives We aimed to identify independent risk factors for pneumothorax associated with computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous core needle lung biopsy (PCNB). Patients and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 591 biopsy procedures for focal lung lesions. Risk factors for pneumothorax as a complication after lung biopsy were determined by univariate and multivariate analyses of variables including the patient’s age, gender, lesion depth from the pleural surface, lesion size, lesion location, presence or absence of fissure crossing by the needle, emphysema in the same lobe where the biopsy was performed, and the final diagnosis of the biopsy lesion. Results Pneumothorax occurred in 100 (16.9%) of 591 procedures. Based on univariate analyses, significant risk factors affecting the incidence of pneumothorax were patient gender (P = 0.039), lesion depth from the pleural surface (P < 0.001), fissure crossing by the needle (P = 0.002), and the presence of emphysema (P = 0.009). From the multivariate analysis, an increased rate of pneumothorax was strongly correlated with lesion depth from the pleural surface (odds ratio [OR], 1.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.50 - 1.96; P < 0.001) and the presence of emphysema (OR, 2.95; 95% CI, 1.73 - 5.04; P < 0.001). Conclusion Lesion depth from the pleural surface and the presence of emphysema were strongly correlated with the increasing incidence of pneumothorax after CT-guided PCNB. Our results may be applicable for the risk management of PCNBs to reduce pneumothorax as a complication. PMID:27895865

  7. CT-Guided Transthoracic Core Biopsy for Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Diagnostic Value of the Histopathological Findings in the Specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Hozumi Ibukuro, Kenji; Tsukiyama, Toshitaka; Ishii, Rei

    2004-09-15

    We evaluated the value of CT-guided transthoracic core biopsy for the diagnosis of mycobacterial pulmonary nodules. The 30 subjects in this study had pulmonary nodules that had been either diagnosed histopathologically as tuberculosis or were suspected as tuberculosis based on a specimen obtained by CT-guided transthoracic core biopsy. The histopathological findings, the existence of acid-fast bacilli in the biopsy specimens, and the clinical course of the patients after the biopsy were reviewed retrospectively. Two of the three histological findings for tuberculosis that included epithelioid cells, multinucleated giant cells and caseous necrosis were observed in 21 of the nodules which were therefore diagnosed as histological tuberculosis. Six of these 21 nodules were positive for acid-fast bacilli, confirming the diagnosis of tuberculosis. Thirteen of the 21 nodules did not contain acid-fast bacilli but decreased in size in response to antituberculous treatment and were therefore diagnosed as clinical tuberculosis. Seven nodules with only caseous necrosis were diagnosed as suspected tuberculosis, with a final diagnosis of tuberculosis being made in 4 of the nodules and a diagnosis of old tuberculosis in 2 nodules. Two nodules with only multinucleated giant cells were diagnosed as suspected tuberculosis with 1 of these nodules being diagnosed finally as tuberculosis and the other nodule as a nonspecific granuloma. When any two of the three following histopathological findings - epithelioid cells, multinucleated giant cells or caseous necrosis - are observed in a specimen obtained by CT-guided transthoracic core biopsy, the diagnosis of tuberculosis can be established without the detection of acid-fast bacilli or Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  8. Diagnostic performance of core needle biopsy in identifying breast phyllodes tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhi-Rui; Wang, Chen-Chen; Sun, Xiang-Jie; Yang, Zhao-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Background A retrospective analysis of diagnoses was performed in patients with phyllodes tumors of the breast (PTB) who received preoperative core needle biopsy (CNB) and had breast surgery at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center from January 1, 2002 to April 1, 2013. The resulting data allowed us to compare the accordance between CNB and excision diagnoses of PTB patients and evaluate the accuracy of CNB in preoperative diagnosis. Methods Data from 128 patients with PTB who had undergone preoperative CNB and breast surgery were retrospectively analyzed. We reviewed the medical history, clinical follow-up data, and CNB diagnostic data. A diagnostic test was used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of CNB in diagnosing benign, borderline, and malignant phyllodes tumors. Results The accuracy of CNB for diagnosing PTB was 13.3% (17/128). Of the remaining patients, 98 (75.5% of the PTB patients) were diagnosed with fibroadenoma or fibroepithelial lesions. The sensitivity of CNB at diagnosing benign, borderline, and malignant phyllodes tumors were 4.9% (2/41), 4.2% (3/71), and 25.0% (4/16), respectively, whereas the corresponding specificity were 92.0%, 98.2%, and 100%, respectively. Some clinical features, such as large tumor size, rapid growth, or surgical history of fibroadenomas, were indicative of an increased possibility of PTB. Conclusions CNB provides a pathological basis for the preoperative diagnosis of PTB, but it has a poor accuracy and offers limited guidance for surgical decisions. Considering CNB along with multiple histologic features may improve the ability to accurately diagnose PTB. An integrated assessment using CNBs in combination with clinical data and imaging features is suggested as a reliable strategy to assist PTB diagnosis. PMID:28066593

  9. Galectin-3 and HBME-1 improve the accuracy of core biopsy in indeterminate thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Trimboli, Pierpaolo; Guidobaldi, Leo; Amendola, Stefano; Nasrollah, Naim; Romanelli, Francesco; Attanasio, Daniela; Ramacciato, Giovanni; Saggiorato, Enrico; Valabrega, Stefano; Crescenzi, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Core needle biopsy (CNB) has been recently described as an accurate second-line test in thyroid inconclusive cytology (FNA). Here we retrospectively investigated the potential improvement given by Galectin-3, Cytokeratin-19, and HBME-1 on the accuracy of CNB in thyroid nodules with prior indeterminate FNA report. The study included 74 nodules. At CNB diagnosis, 15 were cancers, 40 were benign, and 19 had uncertain/non-diagnostic CNB report. The above immunohistochemical (IHC) panel was analyzed in all cases. After surgery, 19 malignant and 55 benign lesions were found. All 15 cancers and all 40 benign nodules diagnosed at CNB were confirmed at final histology. Regarding the uncertain CNB group, 4 (21 %) were malignant and 15 (79 %) benign. When we considered all the series, the most accurate IHC combination was Galectin-3 plus HBME-1, while HBME-1 was the most sensitive marker in those nodules with uncertain CNB report. The combination of CNB plus IHC could indentify 19/19 cancers and 53/55 benign lesions. Sensitivity and specificity of CNB increased from 79 to 100 % and from 73 to 96 %, respectively, by adding IHC. CNB can diagnose the majority of thyroid nodules with previous indeterminate FNA cytology, while the accuracy of CNB is increased by adding Galectin-3, Cytokeratin-19, and HBME-1 panel. We suggest to adopt CNB as a second-line approach to indeterminate thyroid FNA, and apply IHC in those lesions with uncertain/non-diagnostic CNB report. This approach should improve the pre-surgical diagnosis of patients. These results should be confirmed in larger prospective series.

  10. Predictive Factors for Upgrading Patients with Benign Breast Papillary Lesions Using a Core Needle Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Young Ran; Song, Byung Joo; Jung, Sang Seol; Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Sung Hun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intraductal papilloma (IDP) is a benign breast disease with malignant potential, for which complete surgical excision is usually recommended. The aim of the present study was to investigate predictive factors for upgrading patients with a benign papillary lesion (BPL). Methods This study was an observational study using a prospectively collected cohort. In total, 13,049 patients who underwent a core needle biopsy (CNB) for a breast lesion between January 2009 and May 2015 were enrolled. We reviewed all patients with pathologically confirmed BPL from a CNB. Results Surgical treatment was performed for 363 out of a total of 592 lesions. According to the pathological differences, the lowest upgrade rate was shown in IDP without atypia (without atypia, 6.0%; with atypia, 26.8%; papillary neoplasm, 31.5%; p<0.001). The univariate analysis showed that, in IDP without atypia, the age at diagnosis, size of BPL on ultrasonography, and density on mammography were associated with upgrading. The multivariate analysis revealed that age >54 years and lesion size >1 cm were significantly associated with upgrade to malignancy (odds ratio [OR]=4.351, p=0.005 and OR=4.236, p=0.001, respectively). Conclusion The indications for surgical treatment can be defined as age >54 years and mass size >1 cm, even in IDP without atypia in the CNB results; this also includes cases of IDP with atypia or papillary neoplasm. Therefore, we suggest that close observation without surgery is sufficient for younger women with a small IDP without atypia. PMID:28053629

  11. Vacuum-assisted core-needle biopsy as a diagnostic and therapeutic method in lesions radiologically suspicious of breast fibroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Połom, Karol; Murawa, Dawid; Nowaczyk, Piotr; Adamczyk, Beata; Giles, Elizabeth; Fertsch, Sonia; Michalak, Michal; Murawa, Paweł

    2010-01-01

    Background Treatment of breast fibroadenoma remains a subject of clinical discussion. Recommended methods include clinical observation or surgical excision of the lesion. The procedure involves hospitalisation and anaesthesia, leaving a scar on the breast. Aim The aim of this study was to present the Centre's experience in removing lesions radiologically suspicious of fibroadenoma by means of an ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted core-needle biopsy as an alternative to a classical surgery. Materials and methods Between March 2007 and April 2010, 196 ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted biopsies were performed in the Mammotome Biopsy Laboratory of the 1st Surgical Oncology and General Surgery Department at the Greater Poland Cancer Centre in Poznań. The procedure was delivered to female patients aged 17–91 years (mean 40.8, median 39). Qualified for removal were ultrasound identified lesions described as fibroadenomas. Results The average size of excised lesions according to pre-biopsy ultrasound image was 13.53 ± 8.92 mm (median 11 mm, range 4–60 mm). In 184 cases (93.9%), benign lesions were found in the final histopathologic examination. Pre-cancer lesions were found in 10 cases, and invasive lesions in two cases. Overall, after follow-up ultrasound examination, four patients were qualified for subsequent surgical resection of lesions that had been left behind. Conclusion Vacuum core-needle biopsy is an effective tool enabling removal of breast fibroadenomas. It combines features of a lesion resection and histopathologic material collection providing an access with minimum invasiveness. PMID:24376952

  12. Importance of assessing CK19 immunostaining in core biopsies in patients subjected to sentinel node study by OSNA.

    PubMed

    Vilardell, Felip; Novell, Anna; Martin, Javier; Santacana, Maria; Velasco, Ana; Díez-Castro, M J; Cuevas, Dolors; Panadés, M Jose; González, Serafin; Llombart, Antonio; Iglesias, Edelmiro; Matias-Guiu, Xavier

    2012-06-01

    Analysis of sentinel lymph node (SLN) by means of One-Step Nucleic Acid Amplification (OSNA) is being used increasingly as a very sensitive and quick method for intraoperative axillary staging in patients with breast cancer. This molecular diagnostic assay detects the expression level of cytokeratin 19 (CK19), a luminal epithelial cell marker broadly expressed in most breast carcinomas and not normally found in lymph nodes. Almost all breast cancers express this cytoskeleton protein, but some breast tumors have been found to lose the expression of CK19. CK19 immunostaining in core biopsies has been recommended in selecting patients eligible for OSNA analysis because SLNs with metastatic involvement by CK19-negative breast cancers may result in a false negative result by OSNA. However, the real frequency of CK19-negative breast cancer has to be elucidated. In this study, we have assessed the frequency and molecular profile of CK19-negative breast carcinomas in three series of cases. The first is a prospective series of 197 breast carcinomas, 111 of which were subjected to SLN evaluation by OSNA. The second is a retrospective series of 41 triple-negative (TN) breast carcinomas, and the third is a retrospective series of 68 breast cancer patients (matched core biopsies and metastatic lymph nodes) that had been evaluated by conventional procedures before the OSNA methodology was adopted in our institution. Our results not only demonstrate that lack of expression of CK19 is infrequent in breast cancers but also that performing CK19 immunohistochemical staining is important on diagnostic core biopsies in taking the decision of using OSNA methodology in the evaluation of sentinel nodes in breast cancer patients.

  13. Core Needle Biopsy of the Thyroid: 2016 Consensus Statement and Recommendations from Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Na, Dong Gyu; Jung, So Lyung; Kim, Ji-hoon; Sung, Jin Yong; Kim, Kyu Sun; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Shin, Jung Hee; Choi, Yoon Jung; Ha, Eun Ju; Lim, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Soo Jin; Hahn, Soo Yeon; Lee, Kwang Hwi; Choi, Young Jun; Youn, Inyoung; Kim, Young Joong; Ahn, Hye Shin; Ryu, Ji Hwa; Baek, Seon Mi; Sim, Jung Suk; Jung, Chan Kwon; Lee, Joon Hyung

    2017-01-01

    Core needle biopsy (CNB) has been suggested as a complementary diagnostic method to fine-needle aspiration in patients with thyroid nodules. Many recent CNB studies have suggested a more advanced role for CNB, but there are still no guidelines on its use. Therefore, the Task Force Committee of the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology has developed the present consensus statement and recommendations for the role of CNB in the diagnosis of thyroid nodules. These recommendations are based on evidence from the current literature and expert consensus. PMID:28096731

  14. Practical Guidelines for Ultrasound-Guided Core Needle Biopsy of Soft-Tissue Lesions: Transformation from Beginner to Specialist

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Yoon; Oh, Tack Sun; Lee, Jong-Seok

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (US-CNB) is an important step in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal soft-tissue lesions. To maximize efficacy and minimize the complications of US-CNB, it is critical to collaborate with a multidisciplinary team and to understand the particular considerations of US-CNB for these lesions. The purpose of this article is to provide a systematic review and step-by-step tips for using US-CNB to diagnose musculoskeletal soft-tissue lesions. PMID:28246516

  15. Radial scar lesions of the breast diagnosed by needle core biopsy: analysis of cases containing occult malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Douglas‐Jones, Anthony G; Denson, Jemimah L; Cox, Adam C; Harries, Iwan B; Stevens, Guy

    2007-01-01

    Aim To identify and review cases of false negative needle core biopsy (NCB) in the preoperative investigation of radial scar/complex sclerosing lesion (RS/CSL) lesions—that is, benign NCB from RS/CSL which contained malignancy on excision. Methods and results A total of 11 false negative NCB in RS/CSL lesions from 281 (3.9%) were identified (6 cases: B1, 2 cases: B2 and 3 cases: B3). In 6 of 11 cases a radial scar or stromal sclerosis was seen in NCB. Localisation biopsy showed duct carcinoma in situ in six cases, duct carcinoma in situ with invasive carcinoma in three and invasive carcinoma in two. In all 11 cases, needle tracks were identified as missing the malignant epithelium by a mean of 5 mm (median:4 mm; range:1–20 mm). In 9 of 11 cases, the malignancy was missed by <6 mm. Conclusions Despite evidence of accurate targeting of lesions, the use of NCB instead of fine needle aspiration cytology has not eliminated the problem of false negative biopsy in RS/CSL, and excision is recommended. PMID:16731590

  16. High-grade Prostatic Adenocarcinoma Present in a Single Biopsy Core is Associated With Increased Extraprostatic Extension, Seminal Vesicle Invasion, and Positive Surgical Margins at Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chaux, Alcides; Fajardo, Daniel A.; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Partin, Alan W.; Eisenberger, Mario; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Netto, George J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the pathologic outcome of prostate-specific antigen-screened patients with high-grade (Gleason score ≥ 8) prostate cancer limited to 1 biopsy core, without clinical evidence of disease. METHODS Ninety-two patients with only 1 biopsy core with cancer and treated by radical prostatectomy were divided into 4 groups according to the biopsy Gleason score: 3 + 3 = 6 (23 cases), 3 + 4 = 7 (25 cases), 4 + 3 = 7 (20 cases), and ≥8 (24 cases). RESULTS Cases with Gleason score ≥8 showed a significantly higher proportion of extraprostatic extension (50%), positive surgical margins (21%), and seminal vesicle invasion (12%) when compared with the other groups. Patients with Gleason score ≥8 in the biopsy had a 25-fold increased in the odds ratio for extraprostatic extension in the prostatectomy. The incidence of extraprostatic extension was higher in those with prostatic cancer involving ≥50% of one core (88%) compared with cases involving <50% (32%). CONCLUSION In patients with prostate cancer limited to 1 biopsy core, the presence of Gleason score ≥8 significantly increased the incidence of extraprostatic extension, positive surgical margins, and seminal vesicle invasion. The odds ratio was substantially higher in patients with ≥50% of Gleason ≥8 in the biopsy core. These data might be taken into account for proper clinical management of this set of patients. PMID:22173174

  17. Changing attitudes toward needle biopsies of breast cancer in Shanghai: experience and current status over the past 8 years

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Shuang; Liu, Zhe-Bin; Ling, Hong; Chen, Jia-Jian; Shen, Ju-Ping; Yang, Wen-Tao; Shao, Zhi-Min

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic patterns in breast cancer have greatly changed over the past few decades, and core needle biopsy (CNB) has become a reliable procedure for detecting breast cancer without invasive surgery. To estimate the changing diagnostic patterns of breast cancer in urban Shanghai, 11,947 women with breast lesions detected by preoperative needle biopsy between January 1995 and December 2012 were selected from the Shanghai Cancer Data base, which integrates information from approximately 50% of breast cancer patients in Shanghai. The CNB procedure uses an automated prone unit, biopsy gun, and 14-gauge needles under freehand or ultrasound guidance and was performed by experienced radiologists and surgeons specializing in needle biopsies. Diagnosis and classification for each patient were independently evaluated by pathologists. Over the indicated 8-year period, biopsy type consisted of 11,947 ultrasound-guided core needle biopsies (UCNBs), 2,015 ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted biopsies (UVABs), and 654 stereotactic X-ray-guided vacuum-assisted biopsies (XVABs). For all the 11,947 women included in this study, image-guided needle biopsy was the initial diagnostic procedure. Approximately 81.0% of biopsied samples were histopathologically determined to be malignant lesions, 5.5% were determined to be high-risk lesions, and 13.5% were determined to be benign lesions. The number of patients choosing UCNB increased at the greatest rate, and UCNB has become a standard procedure for histodiagnosis because it is inexpensive, convenient, and accurate. The overall false-negative rate of CNB was 1.7%, and the specific false-negative rates for UCNB, UVAB, and XVAB, were 1.7%, 0%, and 0%, respectively. This study suggests that the use of preoperative needle biopsy as the initial breast cancer diagnostic procedure is acceptable in urban Shanghai. Preoperative needle biopsy is now a standard procedure in the Shanghai Cancer Center because it may reduce the number of surgeries

  18. Randomized controlled trial of stereotactic 11-G vacuum-assisted core biopsy for the diagnosis and management of mammographic microcalcification

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Anthony J; Morris, Julie; Lim, Yit Y; Harake, MD Janick; Whiteside, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of 11-G vacuum-assisted biopsy (VAB) with 14-G core needle biopsy (CNB) to diagnose mammographic microcalcification (MM) and effect on surgical outcomes. Methods: Following ethical approval, VAB and CNB (control) were compared in a randomized prospective study for first-line diagnosis of MM and subsequent surgical outcomes in two breast-screening units. Participants gave written informed consent. Exclusions included comorbidity precluding surgery, prior ipsilateral breast cancer and lesions >40 mm requiring mastectomy as first surgical procedure. The final pathological diagnosis was compared with the initial biopsy result. Quality-of-life (QOL) questionnaires were administered at baseline, 2, 6 and 12 months. 110 participants were required to show a 25% improvement in diagnosis with VAB compared with CNB (90% power). Results: Eligibility was assessed for 787 cases; 129 females recalled from the National Health Service breast screening programme were randomized. Diagnostic accuracy of VAB was 86% and that of CNB was 84%. Using VAB, 2/14 (14.3%) cases upgraded from ductal carcinoma in situ to invasion at surgery and 3/19 (15.8%) using CNB. Following VAB 7/16 (44%) cases required repeat surgery vs 7/24 (29%) after CNB. Both groups recorded significant worsening of functional QOL measures and increased breast pain at follow-up. Conclusion: VAB and CNB were equally accurate at diagnosing MM, and no significant differences in surgical outcomes were observed. Advances in knowledge: The first randomized controlled study of VAB for diagnosis of microcalcification using digital mammography showed no difference in diagnostic accuracy of VAB and CNB, or in the proportion of participants needing repeat non-operative biopsy or second therapeutic operation to treat malignancy. PMID:26654214

  19. Collagen, type XI, alpha 1: an accurate marker for differential diagnosis of breast carcinoma invasiveness in core needle biopsies.

    PubMed

    Freire, Javier; Domínguez-Hormaetxe, Saioa; Pereda, Saray; De Juan, Ana; Vega, Alfonso; Simón, Laureano; Gómez-Román, Javier

    2014-12-01

    Accurate diagnosis of invasive breast lesions, when analyzed by Core Needle Biopsy, may suppose a major challenge for the pathologist. Various markers of invasiveness such as laminin, S-100 protein, P63 or calponin have been described; however, none of them is completely reliable. The use of a specific marker of the infiltrating tumor microenvironment seems vital to support the diagnosis of invasive against in situ lesions. At this point, Collagen, type XI, alpha 1 (COL11A1), might be helpful since it has been described to be associated to cancer associated fibroblasts in other tumors such as lung, pancreas or colorectal. This paper aims to analyze the role of COL11A1 as a marker of invasiveness in breast tumor lesions. Two hundred and one breast Core Needle Biopsy samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry against pro-COL11A1. The results show a significant difference (p < 0.0001) when comparing the expression in infiltrative tumors (93%) versus immunostaining of non-invasive lesions (4%). Forty cases of underestimated DCIS were also stained for COL11A1, presenting a sensitivity of 90% when compared with p63 and calponin which not tagged invasion. In conclusion, pro-COL11A1 expression is a promising marker of invasive breast lesions, and may be included in immunohistochemical panels aiming at identifying infiltration in problematic breast lesions.

  20. Optically clearing tissue as an initial step for 3D imaging of core biopsies to diagnose pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ronnie; Agrawal, Aishwarya; Upton, Melissa P.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-02-01

    The pancreas is a deeply seated organ requiring endoscopically, or radiologically guided biopsies for tissue diagnosis. Current approaches include either fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNA) for cytologic evaluation, or core needle biopsies (CBs), which comprise of tissue cores (L = 1-2 cm, D = 0.4-2.0 mm) for examination by brightfield microscopy. Between procurement and visualization, biospecimens must be processed, sectioned and mounted on glass slides for 2D visualization. Optical information about the native tissue state can be lost with each procedural step and a pathologist cannot appreciate 3D organization from 2D observations of tissue sections 1-8 μm in thickness. Therefore, how might histological disease assessment improve if entire, intact CBs could be imaged in both brightfield and 3D? CBs are mechanically delicate; therefore, a simple device was made to cut intact, simulated CBs (L = 1-2 cm, D = 0.2-0.8 mm) from porcine pancreas. After CBs were laid flat in a chamber, z-stack images at 20x and 40x were acquired through the sample with and without the application of an optical clearing agent (FocusClear®). Intensity of transmitted light increased by 5-15x and islet structures unique to pancreas were clearly visualized 250-300 μm beneath the tissue surface. CBs were then placed in index matching square capillary tubes filled with FocusClear® and a standard optical clearing agent. Brightfield z-stack images were then acquired to present 3D visualization of the CB to the pathologist.

  1. Autoimmune Pancreatitis Diagnosed with Core Biopsy Obtained from a Novel Fork-Tip EUS Needle

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Sameer D.; Chamberlain, Priscilla R.; Prabhu, Anoop

    2017-01-01

    The endoscopic diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis from histologic criteria remains challenging as it requires adequate architectural details rather than cytology alone. A 67-year-old man presented with progressive abdominal pain and weight loss. Cross-sectional imaging showed inflammatory changes of the pancreatic body and tail and periaortitis on abdominal computed tomography, but normal serum immunoglobulin G4. A mass-like lesion of the pancreatic body and tail was identified on endoscopic ultrasonography. A histologic diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis was accomplished through needle biopsy using a novel fork-tip needle. PMID:28144612

  2. Diagnostic Yield of Computed Tomography-Guided Coaxial Core Biopsy of Undetermined Masses in the Free Retroperitoneal Space: Single-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Stattaus, Joerg Kalkmann, Janine Kuehl, Hilmar; Metz, Klaus A.; Nowrousian, Mohammad R.; Forsting, Michael Ladd, Susanne C.

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic yield of core biopsy in coaxial technique under guidance of computed tomography (CT) for retroperitoneal masses. We performed a retrospective analysis of CT-guided coaxial core biopsies of undetermined masses in the non-organ-bound retroperitoneal space in 49 patients. In 37 cases a 15-G guidance needle with a 16-G semiautomated core biopsy system, and in 12 cases a 16-G guidance needle with an 18-G biopsy system, was used. All biopsies were technically successful. A small hematoma was seen in one case, but no relevant complication occurred. With the coaxial technique, up to 4 specimens were obtained from each lesion (mean, 2.8). Diagnostic accuracy in differentiation between malignant and benign diseases was 95.9%. A specific histological diagnosis could be established in 39 of 42 malignant lesions (92.9%). Correct subtyping of malignant lymphoma according to the WHO classification was possible in 87.0%. Benign lesions were correctly identified in seven cases, although a specific diagnosis could only be made in conjunction with clinical and radiological information. In conclusion, CT-guided coaxial core biopsy provides safe and accurate diagnosis of retroperitoneal masses. A specific histological diagnosis, which is essential for choosing the appropriate therapy, could be established in most cases of malignancy.

  3. For Women Facing a Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... thinner than the one used for blood tests. Core needle biopsy A core biopsy uses a larger needle to sample breast ... or CT scan. Another way to do a core biopsy is known as vacuum-assisted. Surgical (open) ...

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided tissue sampling of small subepithelial tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle

    PubMed Central

    Schlag, Christoph; Menzel, Christoph; Götzberger, Manuela; Nennstiel, Simon; Klare, Peter; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Schmid, Roland M.; Weirich, Gregor; von Delius, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims The optimal approach to small subepithelial tumors (SETs) of the upper gastrointestinal tract remains inconclusive. The aim of this study was to evaluate endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) for less invasive tissue sampling of small SETs of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Patients and methods In this prospective observational study patients with small ( ≤ 3 cm) SETs of the upper gastrointestinal tract were eligible and underwent EUS-FNB with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle. The main outcome measure was the diagnostic yield. The number of obtained core biopsies was also assessed. Results Twenty patients were included. The mean SET size was 16 mm (range 10 – 27 mm). EUS-FNB was technically feasible in all cases and no complications were observed. The diagnostic yield was 75 %. Core biopsy specimens were obtained in only 25 % of cases. Conclusion EUS-FNB with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle of small SETs can achieve a definite diagnosis in the majority of cases. However, because core samples cannot regularly be obtained, EUS-FNB seems not to be convincingly superior to standard EUS-FNA in this setting PMID:28299351

  5. Prospective Study for Comparison of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Tissue Acquisition Using 25- and 22-Gauge Core Biopsy Needles in Solid Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hee Seung; Lee, Hyun Jik; Park, Jeong Yup; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Kim, Hoguen; Chung, Jae Bock; Bang, Seungmin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Although thicker needles theoretically allow more tissue to be collected, their decreased flexibility can cause mechanical damage to the endoscope, technical failure, and sample blood contamination. The effects of needle gauge on diagnostic outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) of pancreatic mass lesions remain unknown. This study compared procurement rates of histologic cores obtained from EUS-FNB of pancreatic masses using 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Patients and Methods From March 2014 to July 2014, 66 patients with solid pancreatic mass underwent EUS-FNB with both 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Among them, 10 patients were excluded and thus 56 patients were eligible for the analyses. Needle sequences were randomly assigned, and two passes were made with each needle, consisting of 10 uniform to-and-fro movements on each pass with 10 mL syringe suction. A pathologist blinded to needle sequence evaluated specimens for the presence of histologic core. Results The mean patient age was 65.8 ± 9.5 years (range, 44–89 years); 35 patients (62.5%) were men. The mean pancreatic mass size was 35.3 ± 17.1 mm (range 14–122.3 mm). Twenty-eight patients (50%) had tumors at the pancreas head or uncinate process. There were no significant differences in procurement rates of histologic cores between 25-gauge (49/56, 87.5%) and 22-gauge (46/56, 82.1%, P = 0.581) needles or diagnostic accuracy using only histologic cores (98% and 95%). There were no technical failures or procedure-related adverse events. Conclusions The 25-gauge core biopsy needle could offer acceptable and comparable outcomes regarding diagnostic performance including histologic core procurement rates compared to the 22-gauge core biopsy needle, although the differences were not statistically significant. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01795066 PMID:27149404

  6. Real-Time 3D Fluoroscopy-Guided Large Core Needle Biopsy of Renal Masses: A Critical Early Evaluation According to the IDEAL Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeze, Stephanie G. C.; Huisman, Merel; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Diest, Paul J. van; Ruud Bosch, J. L. H.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den

    2012-06-15

    Introduction: Three-dimensional (3D) real-time fluoroscopy cone beam CT is a promising new technique for image-guided biopsy of solid tumors. We evaluated the technical feasibility, diagnostic accuracy, and complications of this technique for guidance of large-core needle biopsy in patients with suspicious renal masses. Methods: Thirteen patients with 13 suspicious renal masses underwent large-core needle biopsy under 3D real-time fluoroscopy cone beam CT guidance. Imaging acquisition and subsequent 3D reconstruction was done by a mobile flat-panel detector (FD) C-arm system to plan the needle path. Large-core needle biopsies were taken by the interventional radiologist. Technical success, accuracy, and safety were evaluated according to the Innovation, Development, Exploration, Assessment, Long-term study (IDEAL) recommendations. Results: Median tumor size was 2.6 (range, 1.0-14.0) cm. In ten (77%) patients, the histological diagnosis corresponded to the imaging findings: five were malignancies, five benign lesions. Technical feasibility was 77% (10/13); in three patients biopsy results were inconclusive. The lesion size of these three patients was <2.5 cm. One patient developed a minor complication. Median follow-up was 16.0 (range, 6.4-19.8) months. Conclusions: 3D real-time fluoroscopy cone beam CT-guided biopsy of renal masses is feasible and safe. However, these first results suggest that diagnostic accuracy may be limited in patients with renal masses <2.5 cm.

  7. Diagnosis of primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas using endoscopic ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy.

    PubMed

    Kashani, Amir; Kahn, Melissa; Jamil, Laith H

    2015-05-16

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the pancreas is a particularly rare entity. Diagnosis of this tumor is tentatively made after ruling out metastatic SCC from another primary site and adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC) of the pancreas. Here we discuss the case of a 76-year-old woman who was found to have a solitary pancreatic lesion and multiple hepatic lesions. Results of computed tomography-guided biopsy of the liver lesions were consistent with a metastatic carcinoma displaying squamous differentiation; therefore, an endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided core-needle biopsy (CNB) of the pancreatic mass was performed. Meticulous histopathological examination of the pancreatic specimen at multiple levels revealed moderately well-differentiated SCC with no glandular component. An extensive metastatic work-up did not reveal an extra-pancreatic origin for this SCC; hence, a diagnosis of primary SCC of the pancreas was established. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the diagnosis of a primary SCC of the pancreas using EUS-guided CNB. We believe that CNB has a diagnostic yield equivalent to that of fine-needle aspiration for recognizing pancreatic adenocarcinoma; however, when cytological examinations reveal atypical squamous epithelial cells suggestive of malignancy, CNB may provide a better tissue specimen, from which to determine the presence of a glandular component. Such an assessment will differentiate pancreatic SCC from ASC.

  8. Fine-needle aspiration and core biopsy in the diagnosis of breast lesions: A comparison and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Suvradeep; Dey, Pranab

    2016-01-01

    In recent times, the diagnosis of breast lesions has mostly become dependent on core needle biopsies (CNBs) with a gradual reduction in the rate of performing fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). Both the procedures have their pros and cons and outsmart each other taking into account different parameters. Both the methods are found to be fraught with loopholes, taking into account different performance indices, diagnostic accuracy and concordance, patient benefit, and cost-effectiveness. Unlike the popular belief of an absolute superiority of CNB over FNAC, the literature review does not reveal a very distinct demarcation in many aspects. We recommend judicious use of these diagnostic modalities in resource-limited settings and screening programs taking into account parameters such as palpability and availability of an experienced cytopathologist. PMID:27651820

  9. Ductal carcinoma in situ in core needle biopsies and its association with extensive in situ component in the surgical specimen

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We evaluated the presence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in core needle biopsies (CNB) from invasive ductal lesions. Methods Retrospective study, which analyzed 90 cases of invasive ductal carcinoma lesions. The percentage of DCIS was quantified in each specimens obtained from CNB, which were compared to the surgical specimens. CNB and surgical specimens were evaluated by the same pathologist, and the percentage of DCIS in CNB was evaluated (percentage) and divided into categories. We considered the following parameters regarding the amount of DCIS: 1 = 0; 2 = 1 for 5%; 3 = 6 for 24%; 4 = 25 for 50%; 5 = 51 for 75% and 6 = 76 for 99%. The number of fragments and the histological pattern of DCIS was found. Results We found the following results regarding the distribution of the percentage of DCIS in the CNB: 1 = 63.3%; 2 = 12.2%; 3 = 12.2%; 4 = 5.6%; 5 = 1.1% and 6 = 5.6%. The logistic regression analysis showed that CNB percentages above 45% reflected the presence of DCIS in the surgical specimen in 100% of the cases (p < 0.001), with a specificity of 100%, accuracy of 83.3% and false positive rate of 0% (p <0.001). Conclusion There is direct relationship between extensive intraductal component in the surgical specimen when the core biopsy shows 45% or more of the DCI or microinvasive in the material examined. PMID:22715888

  10. Benign Papillomas Without Atypia Diagnosed on Core Needle Biopsy: Experience From a Single Institution and Proposed Criteria for Excision

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Anupma; Carkaci, Selin; Gilcrease, Michael Z.; Liu, Ping; Middleton, Lavinia P.; Bassett, Roland L.; Zhang, Jinxia; Zhang, Hong; Coyne, Robin L.; Bevers, Therese B.; Sneige, Nour; Huo, Lei

    2015-01-01

    The management of benign papilloma (BP) without atypia identified on breast core needle biopsy (CNB) is controversial. We describe the clinicopathologic features of 80 patients with such lesions in our institution, with an upgrade rate to malignancy of 3.8%. A multidisciplinary approach to select patients for surgical excision is recommended. Background The management of benign papilloma (BP) without atypia identified on breast core needle biopsy (CNB) is controversial. In this study, we determined the upgrade rate to malignancy for BPs without atypia diagnosed on CNB and whether there are factors associated with upgrade. Methods Through our pathology database search, we studied 80 BPs without atypia identified on CNB from 80 patients from 1997 to 2010, including 30 lesions that had undergone excision and 50 lesions that had undergone ≥ 2 years of radiologic follow-up. Associations between surgery or upgrade to malignancy and clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features were analyzed. Results Mass lesions, lesions sampled by ultrasound-guided CNB, and palpable lesions were associated with surgical excision. All 3 upgraded cases were mass lesions sampled by ultrasound-guided CNB. None of the lesions with radiologic follow-up only were upgraded to malignancy. The overall upgrade rate was 3.8%. None of the clinical, radiologic, or histologic features were predictive of upgrade. Conclusion Because the majority of patients can be safely managed with radiologic surveillance, a selective approach for surgical excision is recommended. Our proposed criteria for excision include pathologic/radiologic discordance or sampling by ultrasound-guided CNB without vacuum assistance when the patient is symptomatic or lesion size is ≥ 1.5 cm. PMID:24119786

  11. Detection of anti-HLA antibodies with flow cytometry in needle core biopsies of renal transplants recipients with chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Martin, Laurent; Guignier, Fredy; Bocrie, Olivier; D'Athis, Philippe; Rageot, David; Rifle, Gérard; Justrabo, Eve; Mousson, Christiane

    2005-05-27

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of detecting anti-HLA antibodies in eluates from needle core biopsies of renal transplants with chronic allograft nephropathy. Two methods of screening, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and flow cytometry (FlowPRA) were compared. Twenty renal transplants with CAN were removed after irreversible graft failure. To assess the feasibility of detecting anti-HLA antibodies in small samples, needle core biopsies were sampled at the same place as surgical samples and at a second cortical area. Antibodies were eluted with an acid elution kit and anti-class I and class II IgG HLA antibodies detected using ELISA and flow cytometry. Flow cytometry was found to be more sensitive than ELISA for detecting anti-HLA antibodies in eluates from renal transplants with CAN (95% vs. 75% of positive cases). Detection of anti-HLA antibodies showed good agreement between surgical samples and needle core biopsies performed at the same place for anti-class I (80% vs. 65%, r=0.724 P<0.01) and anti-class II HLA antibodies (70% vs. 55%, r=0.827 P<0.01). In addition, differences in the detection of anti-class I HLA antibodies in needle core biopsies sampled at different sites suggests that immunization to class I donor antigen could be underestimated in needle core biopsy samples. These data indicate that anti-HLA antibodies can be detected in needle core biopsies from renal transplants. Provided further evaluation is done, elution might be a complementary method to detect anti-HLA antibodies when they are bound to the transplant.

  12. CT-guided transthoracic core needle biopsy for small pulmonary lesions: diagnostic performance and adequacy for molecular testing

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Panwen; Wang, Ye; Li, Lei; Zhou, Yongzhao; Luo, Wenxin

    2017-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT)-guided transthoracic needle biopsy is a well-established, minimally invasive diagnostic tool for pulmonary lesions. Few large studies have been conducted on the diagnostic performance and adequacy for molecular testing of transthoracic core needle biopsy (TCNB) for small pulmonary lesions. Methods This study included CT-guided TCNB with 18-gauge cutting needles in 560 consecutive patients with small (≤3 cm) pulmonary lesions from January 2012 to January 2015. There were 323 males and 237 females, aged 51.8±12.7 years. The size of the pulmonary lesions was 1.8±0.6 cm. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and complications of the biopsies were investigated. The risk factors of diagnostic failure were assessed using univariate and multivariate analyses. The sample’s adequacy for molecular testing of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was analyzed. Results The overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for diagnosis of malignancy were 92.0% (311/338), 98.6% (219/222), and 94.6% (530/560), respectively. The incidence of bleeding complications was 22.9% (128/560), and the incidence of pneumothorax was 10.4% (58/560). Logistic multivariate regression analysis showed that the independent risk factors for diagnostic failure were a lesion size ≤1 cm [odds ratio (OR), 3.95; P=0.007], lower lobe lesions (OR, 2.83; P=0.001), and pneumothorax (OR, 1.98; P=0.004). Genetic analysis was successfully performed on 95.45% (168/176) of specimens diagnosed as NSCLC. At least 96.8% of samples with two or more passes from a lesion were sufficient for molecular testing. Conclusions The diagnostic yield of small pulmonary lesions by CT-guided TCNB is high, and the procedure is relatively safe. A lesion size ≤1 cm, lower lobe lesions, and pneumothorax are independent risk factors for biopsy diagnostic failure. TCNB specimens could provide adequate tissues for molecular testing. PMID:28275482

  13. Lobular neoplasia detected in MRI-guided core biopsy carries a high risk for upgrade: a study of 63 cases from four different institutions.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Thaer; Kumar, Prasanna R; Li, Zaibo; Karabakhtsian, Rouzan G; Sanati, Souzan; Chen, Xiwei; Wang, Dan; Liu, Song; Reig, Beatriu

    2016-01-01

    There are certain criteria to recommend surgical excision for lobular neoplasia diagnosed in mammographically detected core biopsy. The aims of this study are to explore the rate of upgrade of lobular neoplasia detected in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided biopsy and to investigate the clinicopathological and radiological features that could predict upgrade. We reviewed 1655 MRI-guided core biopsies yielding 63 (4%) cases of lobular neoplasia. Key clinical features were recorded. MRI findings including mass vs non-mass enhancement and the reason for biopsy were also recorded. An upgrade was defined as the presence of invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ in subsequent surgical excision. The overall rate of lobular neoplasia in MRI-guided core biopsy ranged from 2 to 7%, with an average of 4%. A total of 15 (24%) cases had an upgrade, including 5 cases of invasive carcinoma and 10 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ. Pure lobular neoplasia was identified in 34 cases, 11 (32%) of which had upgrade. In this group, an ipsilateral concurrent or past history of breast cancer was found to be associated with a higher risk of upgrade (6/11, 55%) than contralateral breast cancer (1 of 12, 8%; P=0.03). To our knowledge, this is the largest series of lobular neoplasia diagnosed in MRI-guided core biopsy. The incidence of lobular neoplasia is relatively low. Lobular neoplasia detected in MRI-guided biopsy carries a high risk for upgrade warranting surgical excision. However, more cases from different types of institutions are needed to verify our results.

  14. Recurrence of breast carcinoma as Paget disease of the skin at a prior core needle biopsy site: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Calvillo, Katherina Zabicki; Guo, Lifei; Brostrom, Valerie; Schnitt, Stuart J.; Hong, Xuefei; Raza, Sughra; Lester, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Core needle biopsy has become the preferred method of diagnosing breast carcinomas prior to definitive surgery. The possibility of displacing tumor cells into the needle track is a concern. Presentation of case A 38 year old woman was diagnosed with right breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) with microinvasion by core needle biopsy. Bilateral skin sparing mastectomies with immediate autologous reconstruction were performed. One and a half years later the patient noted erythema and a scaling crust on the skin of the right breast that progressed over several months. Punch biopsy revealed Paget disease restricted to the epidermis. Subsequent comparison to initial clinical photographs confirmed the cancer was associated with the skin puncture site of the needle biopsy. The patient underwent complete excision with skin grafting and remains free of disease three years later. Discussion Only 13 cases of needle track recurrences have been reported. The majority presented as invasive carcinoma forming a subcutaneous mass. In the current case, detection was delayed due to not initially noting that a skin lesion was at the puncture site of the original needle biopsy. This is the only case of recurrence as tumor limited to the epidermis. Conclusion Although recurrence in a needle track occurs very infrequently, clinicians should be aware of this phenomenon and investigate any changes, particularly when occurring at a needle biopsy site. Recording the skin puncture site can aid in early detection of recurrences. Recognition of a recurrence is important for prompt treatment and optimal prognosis. PMID:26395914

  15. Computed tomography-guided fine-needle aspirate and tissue-core biopsy of intrathoracic lesions in thirty dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Zekas, Lisa J; Crawford, Jason T; O'Brien, Robert T

    2005-01-01

    Medical records and computed tomography (CT) images were reviewed retrospectively for 30 animals (27 dogs, two cats, one cougar) in which CT-guided intrathoracic fine-needle aspirates (FNA) (12), core biopsies (10) or both (8) were performed. Sample interpretation was listed as diagnostic or nondiagnostic and nonneoplasia or neoplasia. Diagnostic results were inconclusive in 35% FNA and 17% biopsies. FNA and biopsy interpretations were in agreement in seven patients, one nonneoplasia, and six neoplasia. A clinical diagnosis was made in 65% FNA and 83% biopsies. When 18 patients with confirmed diagnoses were used, overall accuracy for diagnosis was 92% for FNA and biopsy and the sensitivity for neoplasia was 91% using fine needle aspirate and 80% using biopsy. Complications seen on CT images were noted in 43% of patients, four pneumothorax, five pulmonary hemorrhage, and four with both. No clinical manifestations were noted and treatment was not necessary. Significant correlation was noted between complications and penetration of aerated lung, but not with lesion location, type of disease, method of sampling, width of mass and depth of aerated lung penetrated. CT-guided sampling is relatively safe and useful in the diagnosis of intra-thoracic lesions, especially neoplasia. FNA samples are nondiagnostic more often than biopsy samples. Sub-clinical pneumothorax and hemorrhage are common when aerated lung is penetrated.

  16. Rapid diagnostic imaging and pathologic evaluation of whole core biopsies at the point-of-care using structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mei; Sholl, Andrew B.; Kimbrell, Hillary; Tulman, David B.; Elfer, Katherine N.; Brown, J. Quincy

    2015-07-01

    Video-rate structured illumination microscopy (VR-SIM) of fluorescently stained prostate biopsies is demonstrated as a potential tool for rapid diagnosis of prostate biopsies at the point of care. Images of entire biopsies at 1.3 micron lateral resolution are rendered in seconds, and pathologist review of the resulting images achieves 90% accuracy as compared to gold standard histopathology.

  17. Percutaneous Biopsy of Osteoid Osteomas Prior to Percutaneous Treatment Using Two Different Biopsy Needles

    SciTech Connect

    Laredo, Jean-Denis Hamze, Bassam; Jeribi, Riadh

    2009-09-15

    Biopsy is usually performed as the first step in percutaneous treatment of osteoid osteomas prior to laser photocoagulation. At our institution, 117 patients with a presumed diagnosis of osteoid osteoma had a trephine biopsy before a percutaneous laser photocoagulation. Biopsies were made using two different types of needles. A Bonopty biopsy needle (14-gauge cannula, 16-gauge trephine needle; Radi Medical Systems, Uppsala, Sweden) was used in 65 patients, and a Laurane biopsy needle (11-gauge cannula, 12.5-gauge trephine needle; Laurane Medical, Saint-Arnoult, France) in 43 patients. Overall biopsy results were positive for osteoid osteoma in 83 (70.9%) of the 117 cases. The Laurane needle provided a significantly higher positive rate (81.4%) than the Bonopty needle (66.1%; p < 0.05). This difference was not due to the size of the nidus, which was similar in the two groups (p < 0.05) and may be an effect of differences in needle caliber (12.5 vs. 14 gauge) as well as differences in needle design. The rate of positive biopsy results obtained in the present series with the Laurane biopsy needle is, to our knowledge, the highest rate reported in series dealing with percutaneous radiofrequency ablation and laser photocoagulation of osteoid osteomas.

  18. Bone Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Bone Biopsy Bone biopsy uses a needle and imaging guidance ... limitations of Bone Biopsy? What is a Bone Biopsy? A bone biopsy is an image-guided procedure ...

  19. Diagnostic underestimation of atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ at percutaneous core needle and vacuum-assisted biopsies of the breast in a Brazilian reference institution*

    PubMed Central

    Badan, Gustavo Machado; Roveda Júnior, Decio; Piato, Sebastião; Fleury, Eduardo de Faria Castro; Campos, Mário Sérgio Dantas; Pecci, Carlos Alberto Ferreira; Ferreira, Felipe Augusto Trocoli; D'Ávila, Camila

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the rates of diagnostic underestimation at stereotactic percutaneous core needle biopsies (CNB) and vacuum-assisted biopsies (VABB) of nonpalpable breast lesions, with histopathological results of atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) subsequently submitted to surgical excision. As a secondary objective, the frequency of ADH and DCIS was determined for the cases submitted to biopsy. Materials and Methods Retrospective review of 40 cases with diagnosis of ADH or DCIS on the basis of biopsies performed between February 2011 and July 2013, subsequently submitted to surgery, whose histopathological reports were available in the internal information system. Biopsy results were compared with those observed at surgery and the underestimation rate was calculated by means of specific mathematical equations. Results The underestimation rate at CNB was 50% for ADH and 28.57% for DCIS, and at VABB it was 25% for ADH and 14.28% for DCIS. ADH represented 10.25% of all cases undergoing biopsy, whereas DCIS accounted for 23.91%. Conclusion The diagnostic underestimation rate at CNB is two times the rate at VABB. Certainty that the target has been achieved is not the sole determining factor for a reliable diagnosis. Removal of more than 50% of the target lesion should further reduce the risk of underestimation. PMID:26929454

  20. Small Field of View Scintimammography Gamma Camera Integrated to a Stereotactic Core Biopsy Digital X-ray System

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Weisenberger; Fernando Barbosa; T. D. Green; R. Hoefer; Cynthia Keppel; Brian Kross; Stanislaw Majewski; Vladimir Popov; Randolph Wojcik

    2002-10-01

    A small field of view gamma camera has been developed for integration with a commercial stereotactic core biopsy system. The goal is to develop and implement a dual-modality imaging system utilizing scintimammography and digital radiography to evaluate the reliability of scintimammography in predicting the malignancy of suspected breast lesions from conventional X-ray mammography. The scintimammography gamma camera is a custom-built mini gamma camera with an active area of 5.3 cm /spl times/ 5.3 cm and is based on a 2 /spl times/ 2 array of Hamamatsu R7600-C8 position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. The spatial resolution of the gamma camera at the collimator surface is < 4 mm full-width at half-maximum and a sensitivity of /spl sim/ 4000 Hz/mCi. The system is also capable of acquiring dynamic scintimammographic data to allow for dynamic uptake studies. Sample images of preliminary clinical results are presented to demonstrate the performance of the system.

  1. Prognostic Importance of Gleason 7 Disease Among Patients Treated With External Beam Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Results of a Detailed Biopsy Core Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Spratt, Daniel E.; Zumsteg, Zach; Ghadjar, Pirus; Pangasa, Misha; Pei, Xin; Fine, Samson W.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Kollmeier, Marisa; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of primary Gleason (pG) grade among a large cohort of Gleason 7 prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: From May 1989 to January 2011, 1190 Gleason 7 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT at a single institution. Of these patients, 613 had a Gleason 7 with a minimum of a sextant biopsy with nonfragmented cores and full biopsy core details available, including number of cores of cancer involved, percentage individual core involvement, location of disease, bilaterality, and presence of perineural invasion. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 1-16 years). The prognostic implication for the following outcomes was analyzed: biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Results: The 8-year bRFS rate for pG3 versus pG4 was 77.6% versus 61.3% (P<.0001), DMFS was 96.8% versus 84.3% (P<.0001), and PCSM was 3.7% versus 8.1% (P=.002). On multivariate analysis, pG4 predicted for significantly worse outcome in all parameters. Location of disease (apex, base, mid-gland), perineural involvement, maximum individual core involvement, and the number of Gleason 3+3, 3+4, or 4+3 cores did not predict for distant metastases. Conclusions: Primary Gleason grade 4 independently predicts for worse bRFS, DMFS, and PCSM among Gleason 7 patients. Using complete core information can allow clinicians to utilize pG grade as a prognostic factor, despite not having the full pathologic details from a prostatectomy specimen. Future staging and risk grouping should investigate the incorporation of primary Gleason grade when complete biopsy core information is used.

  2. C-Arm Cone-Beam CT-Guided Transthoracic Lung Core Needle Biopsy as a Standard Diagnostic Tool

    PubMed Central

    Jaconi, Marta; Pagni, Fabio; Vacirca, Francesco; Leni, Davide; Corso, Rocco; Cortinovis, Diego; Bidoli, Paolo; Bono, Francesca; Cuttin, Maria S.; Valente, Maria G.; Pesci, Alberto; Bedini, Vittorio A.; Leone, Biagio E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CT)-guided transthoracic lung core needle biopsy (CNB) is a safe and accurate procedure for the evaluation of patients with pulmonary nodules. This article will focus on the clinical features related to CNB in terms of diagnostic performance and complication rate. Moreover, the concept of categorizing pathological diagnosis into 4 categories, which could be used for clinical management, follow-up, and quality assurance is also introduced. We retrospectively collected data regarding 375 C-arm cone-beam CT-guided CNBs from January 2010 and June 2014. Clinical and radiological variables were evaluated in terms of success or failure rate. Pathological reports were inserted in 4 homogenous groups (nondiagnostic-L1, benign-L2, malignant not otherwise specified-L3, and malignant with specific histotype-L4), defining for each category a hierarchy of suggested actions. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value and accuracy for patients subjected to CNBs were of 96.8%, 100%, 100%, 100%, and 97.2%, respectively. Roughly 75% of our samples were diagnosed as malignant, with 60% lung adenocarcinoma diagnoses. Molecular analyses were performed on 85 malignant samples to verify applicability of targeted therapy. The rate of “nondiagnostic” samples was 12%. C-arm cone-beam CT-guided transthoracic lung CNB can represent the gold standard for the diagnostic evaluation of pulmonary nodules. A clinical and pathological multidisciplinary evaluation of CNBs was needed in terms of integration of radiological, histological, and oncological data. This approach provided exceptional performances in terms of specificity, positive and negative predictive values; sensitivity in our series was lower compared with other large studies, probably due to the application of strong criteria of adequacy for CNBs (L1 class rate). The satisfactory rate of collected material was evaluated not only in terms of merely diagnostic

  3. Adjunctive self-hypnotic relaxation for outpatient medical procedures: a prospective randomized trial with women undergoing large core breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Lang, Elvira V; Berbaum, Kevin S; Faintuch, Salomao; Hatsiopoulou, Olga; Halsey, Noami; Li, Xinyu; Berbaum, Michael L; Laser, Eleanor; Baum, Janet

    2006-12-15

    Medical procedures in outpatient settings have limited options of managing pain and anxiety pharmacologically. We therefore assessed whether this can be achieved by adjunct self-hypnotic relaxation in a common and particularly anxiety provoking procedure. Two hundred and thirty-six women referred for large core needle breast biopsy to an urban tertiary university-affiliated medical center were prospectively randomized to receive standard care (n=76), structured empathic attention (n=82), or self-hypnotic relaxation (n=78) during their procedures. Patients' self-ratings at 1 min-intervals of pain and anxiety on 0-10 verbal analog scales with 0=no pain/anxiety at all, 10=worst pain/anxiety possible, were compared in an ordinal logistic regression model. Women's anxiety increased significantly in the standard group (logit slope=0.18, p<0.001), did not change in the empathy group (slope=-0.04, p=0.45), and decreased significantly in the hypnosis group (slope=-0.27, p<0.001). Pain increased significantly in all three groups (logit slopes: standard care=0.53, empathy=0.37, hypnosis=0.34; all p<0.001) though less steeply with hypnosis and empathy than standard care (p=0.024 and p=0.018, respectively). Room time and cost were not significantly different in an univariate ANOVA despite hypnosis and empathy requiring an additional professional: 46 min/161 dollars for standard care, 43 min/163 dollars for empathy, and 39 min/152 dollars for hypnosis. We conclude that, while both structured empathy and hypnosis decrease procedural pain and anxiety, hypnosis provides more powerful anxiety relief without undue cost and thus appears attractive for outpatient pain management.

  4. Kidney biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Renal biopsy; Biopsy - kidney ... Barisoni L, Arend LJ, Thomas DB. Introduction to renal biopsy. In: Zhou M, Mari-Galluzzi C, eds. ... Saunders; 2015:chap 7. Topham PS, Chen Y. Renal biopsy. In: Johnson RJ, Feehally J, Floege J, ...

  5. Short-term imaging follow-up of patients with concordant benign breast core needle biopsies: is it really worth it?

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michelle C.; Falcon, Shannon; Mooney, Blaise P.; Laronga, Christine; Chau, Alec; Drukteinis, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Women with histologically proven concordant benign breast disease are often followed closely after biopsy for a period of two years, and they are considered to be at high-risk for cancer development. Our goal was to evaluate the utility of short-term (six-month) imaging follow-up and determine the incidence of breast cancer development in this population. METHODS Retrospective review of concordant benign breast pathology was performed in 558 patients who underwent multi-modality breast core biopsy. A total of 339 patients (60.7%) with 393 biopsies qualified for the study. The six-, 12-, and 24-month incidence rates of breast cancer development were estimated with 95% confidence intervals (CI), using the exact method binomial proportions. RESULTS No cancer was detected in 285 of 339 patients (84.1%) returning for the six-month follow-up. No cancer was detected in 271 of 339 patients (79.9%) returning for the 12-month follow-up. Among 207 follow-up exams (61.1%) performed at 24 months, three patients were detected to have cancer in the ipsilateral breast (1.45% [95% CI, 0.30%–4.18%]) and two patients were detected to have cancer in the contralateral breast (0.97% [95% CI, 0.12%–3.45%]). Subsequent patient biopsy rate was 30 of 339 (8.85%, [95% CI, 6.05%–12.39%]). Three ipsilateral biopsies occurred as a sole result of the six-month follow-up of 285 patients (1.05%, [95% CI, 0.22%–3.05%]). CONCLUSION Short-term imaging follow-up did not contribute to improved breast cancer detection, as all subsequent cancers were detected on annual mammography. Annual diagnostic mammography after benign breast biopsy may be sufficient. PMID:25205024

  6. Percentage of Biopsy Cores Positive for Malignancy and Biochemical Failure Following Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy in 3,264 Men: Statistical Significance Without Predictive Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Scott G. Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Pickles, Tom; Kestin, Larry; Martinez, Alvaro; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Duchesne, Gillian M.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To define and incorporate the impact of the percentage of positive biopsy cores (PPC) into a predictive model of prostate cancer radiotherapy biochemical outcome. Methods and Materials: The data of 3264 men with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy at four institutions were retrospectively analyzed. Standard prognostic and treatment factors plus the number of biopsy cores collected and the number positive for malignancy by transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy were available. The primary endpoint was biochemical failure (bF, Phoenix definition). Multivariate proportional hazards analyses were performed and expressed as a nomogram and the model's predictive ability assessed using the concordance index (c-index). Results: The cohort consisted of 21% low-, 51% intermediate-, and 28% high-risk cancer patients, and 30% had androgen deprivation with radiotherapy. The median PPC was 50% (interquartile range [IQR] 29-67%), and median follow-up was 51 months (IQR 29-71 months). Percentage of positive biopsy cores displayed an independent association with the risk of bF (p = 0.01), as did age, prostate-specific antigen value, Gleason score, clinical stage, androgen deprivation duration, and radiotherapy dose (p < 0.001 for all). Including PPC increased the c-index from 0.72 to 0.73 in the overall model. The influence of PPC varied significantly with radiotherapy dose and clinical stage (p = 0.02 for both interactions), with doses <66 Gy and palpable tumors showing the strongest relationship between PPC and bF. Intermediate-risk patients were poorly discriminated regardless of PPC inclusion (c-index 0.65 for both models). Conclusions: Outcome models incorporating PPC show only minor additional ability to predict biochemical failure beyond those containing standard prognostic factors.

  7. Biopsy - polyps

    MedlinePlus

    Polyp biopsy ... are treated is the colon. How a polyp biopsy is done depends on the location: Colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy explores the large bowel Colposcopy-directed biopsy examines the vagina and cervix Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) or ...

  8. Liver biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - liver; Percutaneous biopsy ... the biopsy needle to be inserted into the liver. This is often done by using ultrasound. The ... the chance of damage to the lung or liver. The needle is removed quickly. Pressure will be ...

  9. Liver Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Series Urinary Tract Imaging Urodynamic Testing Virtual Colonoscopy Liver Biopsy What is a liver biopsy? A liver biopsy is a procedure that ... remove the liver tissue sample. What is the liver and what does it do? The liver is ...

  10. Consecutive CT-guided core needle tissue biopsy of lung lesions in the same dog at different phases of radiation-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhongyuan; Deng, Sisi; Liang, Zhiwen; Wang, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    This project aimed to set up a Beagle dog model of radiation-induced lung injury in order to supply fresh lung tissue samples in the different injury phases for gene and protein research. Three dogs received 18 Gy X-ray irradiation in one fraction, another three dogs received 8 Gy in each of three fractions at weekly intervals, and one control dog was not irradiated. Acute pneumonitis was observed during the first 3 months after radiation, and chronic lung fibrosis was found during the next 4–12 months in all the dogs exposed to radiation. CT-guided core needle lung lesion biopsies were extracted from each dog five times over the course of 1 year. The dogs remained healthy after each biopsy, and 50–100 mg fresh lung lesion tissues were collected in each operation. The incidence of pneumothorax and hemoptysis was 20% and 2.8%, respectively, in the 35 tissue biopsies. A successful and stable radiation-induced lung injury dog model was established. Lung lesion tissue samples from dogs in acute stage, recovery stage and fibrosis stage were found to be sufficient to support cytology, genomics and proteomics research. This model safely supplied fresh tissue samples that would allow future researchers to more easily explore and develop treatments for radiation-induced lung injury. PMID:27422930

  11. Why is carcinoma of the breast more frequent in the upper outer quadrant? A case series based on needle core biopsy diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew H S

    2005-04-01

    The relatively high proportion of carcinomas arising in the upper outer quadrant of the breasts is argued to support the hypothesis that underarm cosmetics cause breast cancer. This study aimed to test the alternative hypothesis that the high proportion of carcinomas arising in the upper outer quadrant of the breasts is a reflection of the greater amount of breast tissue in this quadrant. The quadrant from which 746 consecutive breast core biopsies reported as normal, benign or malignant was recorded. The distribution in the breast of normal, benign and malignant results were comparable. In particular, the proportion of core biopsies from the upper outer quadrant reported as normal (67%, 95% confidence interval 59-74%), benign (57%, 95% confidence interval 51-63%) or malignant (62%, 95% confidence interval 57-67%) were similar. This result supports the hypothesis that the high proportion of upper outer quadrant carcinomas of the breasts is a reflection of the greater amount of breast tissue in this quadrant.

  12. Prospective evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of hepatic copper content, as determined using the entire core of a liver biopsy sample

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiao‐peng; Zhang, Yong‐hong; Luo, Kai‐zhong; Jiang, Yong‐fang; Luo, Hong‐yu; Lei, Jian‐hua; Wang, Wen‐long; Li, Ming‐ming; Chen, Han‐chun; Deng, Shi‐lin; Lai, Li‐ying; Liang, Jun; Zhang, Min; Tian, Yi; Xu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic copper determination is an important test for the diagnosis of Wilson's disease (WD). However, the method has not been standardized, the diagnostic accuracy has not been evaluated prospectively, and the optimal cut‐off value remains controversial. Accordingly, we aimed to prospectively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of hepatic copper content, as determined using the entire core of a liver biopsy sample. Patients for whom a liver biopsy was indicated were consecutively enrolled. Hepatic copper content was determined with atomic absorption spectroscopy. All assays were performed using careful quality control by a single technician. WD diagnosis was based on WD score or its combination with clinical follow‐up results. A total of 3,350 consecutive patients underwent liver biopsy. Six hundred ninety‐one patients, including 178 with WD, underwent two passes of liver biopsy with hepatic copper determination. Mean hepatic content in WD patients was 770.6 ± 393.2 μg/g dry weight (wt). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of hepatic copper content for WD diagnosis in the absence of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) or primary sclerosing cholangitis at the cut‐off value of 250 μg/g dry wt. were 94.4%, 96.8%, 91.8%, and 97.8%, respectively. The most useful cut‐off value was 209 μg/g dry wt, with a sensitivity and specificity of 99.4% and 96.1%, respectively. A total of 23.3% of patients without WD and PBC had hepatic copper content >75 μg/g dry wt. Conclusion: A liver biopsy sample of more than 1 mg dry wt may reliably reflect hepatic copper content and should be used for hepatic copper determination. Hepatic copper determination is a very valid procedure for the diagnosis of WD, and the most useful cut‐off value is 209 μg/g dry wt.(Hepatology 2015;62:1731–1741) PMID:26095812

  13. Kidney Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the right diagnosis. What should a person do days before a kidney biopsy? Days before the procedure, ... procedure. What can a person expect on the day of the kidney biopsy? A person should arrive ...

  14. Outcome Analysis of 9-Gauge Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Vacuum-Assisted Core Needle Breast Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Rauch, Gaiane M.; Dogan, Basak E.; Smith, Taletha B.; Liu, Ping; Yang, Wei T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To correlate 9-gauge Magnetic Resonance imaging-guided Vacuum-Assisted breast Biopsy (MRVAB) with surgical histology to determine the upgrade rate and to correlate the frequency of MRVAB cancer diagnosis with breast MRI indications and enhancement characteristics of targeted lesions. Materials and Methods The HIPAA compliant study was approved by the institutional review board. A database search was performed of all MRVABs performed from January 1, 2005 to September 31, 2010. The breast MRI indications, history, age, risk factors, lesion size, enhancement characteristics, pathology at MRVAB and at surgery were documented. Fisher's exact test and Analysis of Variance were used for statistical analysis. Results A total of 218 lesions underwent MRVAB in 197 women (mean age 52 years, range 28 - 76 years), of which 85 (39%) had surgical correlation. (R1, #3) There were 48/218 (22%) malignant, 133/218 (61%) benign, and 37/218 (17%) high-risk lesions at MRVAB. Ten (12%) of 85 lesions were upgraded to malignancy at surgery, with a final malignancy rate of 25%. The frequency of malignancy was significantly higher in patients presenting for diagnostic (50/177, 28%) versus screening (4/41, 10%, P<0.05) evaluation, patients with ipsilateral cancer (22/49, 45%, P<0.001), lesions with washout kinetics (34/103, 33%, P < 0.05); and relatively higher in lesions with non-mass-like enhancement (26/76, 34%, P=0.07), which represented ductal carcinoma in situ in the majority (17/26, 65%, P<0.005). Conclusion Patients with ipsilateral cancer who have additional suspicious lesions identified on MRI require careful evaluation and biopsy to exclude additional sites of cancer that may impact surgical management. PMID:22268171

  15. Borderline breast lesions diagnosed at core needle biopsy: can magnetic resonance mammography rule out associated malignancy? Preliminary results based on 79 surgically excised lesions.

    PubMed

    Linda, Anna; Zuiani, Chiara; Bazzocchi, Massimo; Furlan, Alessandro; Londero, Viviana

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess whether magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) can exclude associated malignancy in case of diagnosis of borderline breast lesions (B3) at core needle biopsy (CNB). Retrospective analysis of MRM findings of 79 borderline breast lesions (26 benign papillomas, 29 radial sclerosing lesions, 6 atypical ductal hyperplasias, 18 lobular neoplasias) diagnosed at CNB was performed. Lesions were classified as "non-suspicious" or "suspicious" according to Fischer score. These findings were compared to the results of histological analysis of the excisional specimens. Sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values of MRM in predicting the presence of malignancy were calculated. Out of 24 (30.4%) lesions classified as "suspicious", 8 (33.3%) proved to be malignant and 16 (66.7%) benign. Among the 55 (69.6%) "non-suspicious" lesions, only 1 (1.8%) was malignant (low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ), while the remaining 54 (98.2%) proved to be benign. MRM sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 88.9%, 77.1%, 33.3%, and 98.2%, respectively. When a borderline lesion is diagnosed on CNB, in case of mild or no enhancement at MRM, follow-up rather than excisional biopsy might be prompted.

  16. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... biopsy; Pap smear - cone biopsy; HPV - cone biopsy; Human papilloma virus - cone biopsy; Cervix - cone biopsy; Colposcopy - cone biopsy Images Female reproductive anatomy Cold cone biopsy Cold cone removal References American ...

  17. The Percent of Positive Biopsy Cores Improves Prediction of Prostate Cancer-Specific Death in Patients Treated With Dose-Escalated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Yushen; Feng, Felix Y.; Halverson, Schuyler; Blas, Kevin; Sandler, Howard M.; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To examine the prognostic utility of the percentage of positive cores (PPC) at the time of prostate biopsy for patients treated with dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients treated at University of Michigan Medical Center to at least 75 Gy. Patients were stratified according to PPC by quartile, and freedom from biochemical failure (nadir + 2 ng/mL), freedom from metastasis (FFM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were assessed by log-rank test. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to determine the optimal cut point for PPC stratification. Finally, Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression was used to assess the impact of PPC on clinical outcome when adjusting for National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk group and androgen deprivation therapy. Results: PPC information was available for 651 patients. Increasing-risk features including T stage, prostate-specific antigen, Gleason score, and NCCN risk group were all directly correlated with increasing PPC. On log-rank evaluation, all clinical endpoints, except for OS, were associated with PPC by quartile, with worse clinical outcomes as PPC increased, with the greatest impact seen in the highest quartile (>66.7% of cores positive). ROC curve analysis confirmed that a cut point using two-thirds positive cores was most closely associated with CSS (p = 0.002; area under ROC curve, 0.71). On univariate analysis, stratifying patients according to PPC less than or equal to 66.7% vs. PPC greater than 66.7% was prognostic for freedom from biochemical failure (p = 0.0001), FFM (p = 0.0002), and CSS (p = 0.0003) and marginally prognostic for OS (p = 0.055). On multivariate analysis, after adjustment for NCCN risk group and androgen deprivation therapy use, PPC greater than 66.7% increased the risk for biochemical failure (p = 0.0001; hazard ratio [HR], 2.1 [95% confidence

  18. Evaluation of a Marker Clip System in Sonographically Guided Core Needle Biopsy for Breast Cancer Localization Before and After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schulz-Wendtland, R.; Dankerl, P.; Bani, M. R.; Fasching, P. A.; Heusinger, K.; Lux, M. P.; Jud, S. M.; Rauh, C.; Bayer, C. M.; Schrauder, M. G.; Beckmann, M. W.; Uder, M.; Brehm, B.; Loehberg, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The placement of intramammary marker clips has proven to be helpful for tumor localization in patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy and breast-conserving surgery. The purpose of our study was to investigate the feasibility of using a clip marker system for breast cancer localization and its influence on the imaging assessment of treatment responses after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and Methods Between March and June 2015, a total of 25 patients (n = 25), with a suspicion of invasive breast cancer with diameters of at least 2 cm (cT2), underwent preoperative sonographically guided core needle biopsy using a single-use breast biopsy system (HistoCore™) and intramammary clip marking using a directly adapted clip system based on the established O-Twist Marker™, before their scheduled preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Localization of the intramammary marker clip was controlled by sonography and digital breast tomosynthesis. Results Sonography detected no dislocation of intrammammary marker clips in 20 of 25 patients (80 %), while digital breast tomosynthesis showed accurate placement without dislocation in 24 patients (96 %) (p < 0.05). There was no evidence of significant clip migration during preoperative follow-up imaging after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. No complication related to the clip marking was noted and there was no difficulty in evaluating the treatment response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Among the breast-conserving surgeries performed, no cases were identified in which intraoperative loss of the marker clip had occurred. Conclusion Our study underscores the importance of intramammary marking clip systems before neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Placement of marker clips is advised to facilitate accurate tumor bed localization. With regard to digital breast tomosynthesis, its development continues to improve the quality of diagnostics and the therapy of breast cancer particularly for small breast cancer tumors or in

  19. Liver Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a liver biopsy by talking with a health care provider having blood tests arranging for a ride home fasting before the ... for a liver biopsy by talking with a health care provider having blood tests arranging for a ride home fasting before the ...

  20. Stereotactic core-needle biopsy of the breast: a report of the Joint Task Force of the American College of Radiology, American College of Surgeons, and College of American Pathologists.

    PubMed

    Bassett, L; Winchester, D P; Caplan, R B; Dershaw, D D; Dowlatshahi, K; Evans, W P; Fajardo, L L; Fitzgibbons, P L; Henson, D E; Hutter, R V; Morrow, M; Paquelet, J R; Singletary, S E; Curry, J; Wilcox-Buchalla, P; Zinninger, M

    1997-01-01

    A national task force consisting of members from the American College of Radiology, the American College of Surgeons, and the College of American Pathologists examined the issues surrounding stereotactic core-needle biopsy for occult breast lesions. Their report includes indications and contraindications, informed consent, specimen handling, and management of indeterminate, atypical, or discordant lesions.

  1. Discontinuous foci of cancer in a single core of prostatic biopsy: when it occurs and performance of quantification methods in a private-practice setting.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Luciana; Maluf, Carlos E; da Silva, Rogério C; Falashi, Rodrigo de H; da Costa, Matheus V; Schultz, Maria Ines O

    2013-12-01

    In addition to clinical data, prostatic biopsy (Bx) reports orient urologists in outlining the patient's treatment options. Discontinuous involvement of a core by multiple foci of cancer is not infrequent; however, there is currently no consensus as to which method of quantification should be the standard. We applied 2 distinct approaches to quantify the length of cancer foci in the Bx and compared the results to prostatectomy (RP) parameters. All patients with matched Bx and RP treated by the same medical team between 2006 and 2010 were consecutively included in the study. Tumor extent in the Bx was estimated by multiple approaches, and the length was measured in millimeters. The subset of cases with discontinuous foci of cancer in a single core was initially reported by adding each foci and ignoring the benign intervening prostatic tissue, which was designated as additive quantification (AQ). Upon slide review, these foci were reassessed as a single focus and measured by linear quantification (LQ). RPs were partially embedded according to the International Society of Urological Pathology recommendations, and the percentage of tumor was evaluated with graphic precision. Mean percentage of the tumor in RP (%RP) and in the Bx were arbitrarily classified as limited (<6%) and nonlimited (≥6%). Bx parameters were then correlated with %RP and margin status. All methods of quantification of the tumor in the Bx obtained excellent correlation with %RP. LQ and AQ diverged in 14/38 patients, with a mean total length of cancer of 5.8 mm more than the length obtained by LQ in the same population, accurately upgrading 6/14 cases to nonlimited. This subset (LQ>AQ) was more often seen in Bx with significantly more positive cores (P=0.003) of predominantly Gleason score 7 and associated with positive surgical margins in RP (P=0.034) independent of %RP (21% vs. 19% in the margin-negative cases). However, in the subset of Bx in which the tumor infiltration was continuous (AQ

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle core biopsy for the diagnosis of pancreatic malignant lesions: a systematic review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongtao; Li, Lianyong; Qu, Changmin; Liang, Shuwen; Zeng, Bolun; Luo, Zhiwen

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle core biopsy (EUS-FNB) has been used as an effective method of diagnosing pancreatic malignant lesions. It has the advantage of providing well preserved tissue for histologic grading and subsequent molecular biological analysis. In order to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNB for pancreatic malignant lesions, studies assessing EUS-FNB to diagnose solid pancreatic masses were selected via Medline. Sixteen articles published between 2005 and 2015, covering 828 patients, met the inclusion criteria. The summary estimates for EUS-FNB differentiating malignant from benign solid pancreatic masses were: sensitivity 0.84 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.82–0.87); specificity 0.98 (95% CI, 0.93–1.00); positive likelihood ratio 8.0 (95% CI 4.5–14.4); negative likelihood ratio 0.17 (95% CI 0.10–0.26); and DOR 64 (95% CI 30.4–134.8). The area under the sROC curve was 0.96. Subgroup analysis did not identify other factors that could substantially affect the diagnostic accuracy, such as the study design, location of study, number of centers, location of lesion, whether or not a cytopathologist was present, and so on. EUS-FNB is a reliable diagnostic tool for solid pancreatic masses and should be especially considered for pathology where histologic morphology is preferred for diagnosis. PMID:26960914

  3. [Optimized standards for prostate biopsy].

    PubMed

    Wullich, B; Füssel, S; Grobholz, R

    2007-06-01

    As individual risk assessment mainly depends on the correct prediction of the tumor's biological behavior, primary diagnosis plays a key role in the clinical management of prostate cancer patients. Prostate core needle biopsy, as a primary diagnostic tool, should not only confirm clinical suspicion but also supply the urologist with information which is necessary for risk-adapted therapy. The experience and competence of both the urologist and the pathologist are crucial for the quality of prostate core needle biopsy diagnosis. Optimized handling and submission of prostate core needle biopsy specimens by the urologist to the pathologist are of outstanding importance for improving the number of cancer cases detected. Increasing availability of molecular markers leads to the necessity of developing new tissue sampling procedures which allow prostate core needle biopsy specimens to be simultaneously studied histologically and by molecular approaches.

  4. Gum biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - gingiva (gums) ... the mouth in the area of the abnormal gum tissue. You may also have an injection of numbing medicine. A small piece of gum tissue is removed and checked for problems in ...

  5. Concordance between core needle biopsy and surgical specimen for oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asogan, Aravind Barathi; Hong, Ga Sze; Prabhakaran, Subash Kumar Arni

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to analyse the concordance rate, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value of core needle biopsy (CNB) and subsequent surgical specimen (SS) in assessing levels of oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu). It also evaluated the revised American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists (ASCO/CAP) guidelines for ER/PgR positivity. METHODS We analysed the breast cancer database of KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore, from 1 June 2005 to 30 December 2012. Invasive breast cancer patients who had CNB and subsequent SS were included. RESULTS A total of 560 patients were included. The concordance of ER, PgR and HER2/neu positivity between CNB and SS was 96.1%, 89.1% and 96.8%, respectively. When the ‘ER ≥ 10% positive’ group was compared with the ‘ER ≥ 1% positive’ group, specificity increased from 79.7% to 92.5% and PPV increased from 93.9% to 97.5%. When the ‘PgR ≥ 10% positive’ group was compared with the ‘PgR ≥ 1% positive’ group, specificity increased from 84.2% to 89.3% and PPV improved from 89.7% to 92.9%. The revised ASCO/CAP guidelines decreased discordant results by > 50% for ER and by 18.2% for PgR. CONCLUSION CNB has high concordance with SS in the evaluation of the molecular profile of invasive breast cancer. Thus, molecular evaluation does not need to be repeated with SS except for ER-, PgR- and HER2/neu-negative CNB results. The revised ASCO/CAP guidelines resulted in more precise ER and PgR status on CNB. PMID:27029805

  6. Pathology in a tube: Step 1. Fixing, staining, and transporting pancreatic core biopsies in a microfluidic device for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ronnie; Burfeind, Chris W.; Kramer, Greg M.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-03-01

    A minimally-invasive diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is accomplished by obtaining a fine needle aspirate and observing the cell preparations under conventional optical microscopy. As an unavoidable artifact, native tissue architecture is lost, making definite diagnosis of malignancy, or invasive neoplasm, impossible. One solution is the preparation of core biopsies (CBs) within a microfluidic device that are subsequently imaged in 3D. In this paper, porcine pancreas CBs (L = 1-2 cm, D = 0.4-2.0 mm) were formalin-fixed, stained and optically cleared (FocusClear®). In brightfield at 40x, light transmission through the ordinarily opaque CBs was increased 5-15x, and internal islet structures were easily identified 250-300 μm beneath the tissue surface. Typically, specimen preparation is time intensive and requires precise handling since CBs are delicate; thus, fixative, absorptive stain and FocusClear® diffusion were done slowly and manually. To significantly speed up tissue processing, we developed a microfluidic device consisting of both a main channel (L = 12.5 cm, D = 1.415 mm) with a circular cross section used for fixing and transporting the CB and an intersecting U-channel employed for staining. Space between the CB and channel wall provided a key feature not traditionally employed in microfluidic devices, such that at low flow rates (5-10 mL/min) CBs were fixed and stained while the specimen remained stationary. By switching quickly to higher flow rates (15-20 mL/min), we could precisely overcome adhesion and transport the specimen within the channel towards the imaging platform for 3D pathology.

  7. C-arm cone-beam CT-guided transthoracic lung core needle biopsy as a standard diagnostic tool: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Jaconi, Marta; Pagni, Fabio; Vacirca, Francesco; Leni, Davide; Corso, Rocco; Cortinovis, Diego; Bidoli, Paolo; Bono, Francesca; Cuttin, Maria S; Valente, Maria G; Pesci, Alberto; Bedini, Vittorio A; Leone, Biagio E

    2015-03-01

    C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CT)-guided transthoracic lung core needle biopsy (CNB) is a safe and accurate procedure for the evaluation of patients with pulmonary nodules. This article will focus on the clinical features related to CNB in terms of diagnostic performance and complication rate. Moreover, the concept of categorizing pathological diagnosis into 4 categories, which could be used for clinical management, follow-up, and quality assurance is also introduced. We retrospectively collected data regarding 375 C-arm cone-beam CT-guided CNBs from January 2010 and June 2014. Clinical and radiological variables were evaluated in terms of success or failure rate. Pathological reports were inserted in 4 homogenous groups (nondiagnostic--L1, benign--L2, malignant not otherwise specified--L3, and malignant with specific histotype--L4), defining for each category a hierarchy of suggested actions. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value and accuracy for patients subjected to CNBs were of 96.8%, 100%, 100%, 100%, and 97.2%, respectively. Roughly 75% of our samples were diagnosed as malignant, with 60% lung adenocarcinoma diagnoses. Molecular analyses were performed on 85 malignant samples to verify applicability of targeted therapy. The rate of "nondiagnostic" samples was 12%. C-arm cone-beam CT-guided transthoracic lung CNB can represent the gold standard for the diagnostic evaluation of pulmonary nodules. A clinical and pathological multidisciplinary evaluation of CNBs was needed in terms of integration of radiological, histological, and oncological data. This approach provided exceptional performances in terms of specificity, positive and negative predictive values; sensitivity in our series was lower compared with other large studies, probably due to the application of strong criteria of adequacy for CNBs (L1 class rate). The satisfactory rate of collected material was evaluated not only in terms of merely diagnostic

  8. Implementation of a microwave-assisted tissue-processing system and an automated embedding system for breast needle core biopsy samples: morphology, immunohistochemistry, and FISH evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pegolo, Enrico; Pandolfi, Maura; Di Loreto, Carla

    2013-07-01

    A platform composed of a microwave (MW)-assisted tissue-processing system and an automated embedding system has been recently introduced in pathology laboratories. Needle core biopsy (NCB) is an established, highly accurate method for diagnosing breast lesions and for providing important pathologic, predictive, and prognostic information such as biomarker expression in case of breast carcinoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether breast NCBs processed with the MW-assisted tissue-processing system and automatically embedded show good-quality histology preparations and whether they are suitable for the assessment of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), Ki-67, and HER2 in breast carcinoma. A series of 233 consecutive breast NCBs processed by both conventional and MW-assisted tissue-processing systems was included in this study. The histomorphologic and immunohistochemical quality, as well as the results of the evaluation of the biomarkers, were compared-the conventional processing method being the gold standard for comparison. The quality of hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemical tissue sections provided by the new system is comparable to that obtained after the conventional processing method. Moreover, in breast carcinomas, a perfect agreement between the paired tissues when evaluating ER and PR status (Cohen κ = 1) and a very good agreement when evaluating Ki-67 (κ = 0.91) and HER2 (κ = 0.93) have been found. In conclusion, applying strict criteria in tissue-handling steps, breast NCB can be processed and automatically embedded with these platforms. The diagnosability and the evaluation of the main prognostic and predictive biomarkers have been proved to be reliable.

  9. Prostate biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... NSAIDs), such as aspirin and ibuprofen Herbal supplements Vitamins Continue to take any prescription medicines unless your provider tells you not to take them. Your provider may ask you to: Eat only light meals the day before the biopsy. Do an ...

  10. Morphological parameters of flat epithelial atypia (FEA) in stereotactic vacuum-assisted needle core biopsies do not predict the presence of malignancy on subsequent surgical excision.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Simonetta; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Castellano, Isabella; Piubello, Quirino; Renne, Giuseppe; Cattani, Maria Grazia; Di Stefano, Domenica; Carrillo, Giovanna; Laurino, Licia; Bersiga, Alessandra; Giardina, Carmela; Dante, Stefania; Di Loreto, Carla; Quero, Carmela; Antonacci, Concetta Maria; Palli, Domenico

    2012-10-01

    Flat epithelial atypia (FEA) may represent the earliest precursor of low-grade breast cancer and often coexists with more advanced atypical proliferative breast lesions such as atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) and lobular intraepithelial neoplasia (LIN). The present study aims to investigate the association between morphological parameters of FEA and presence of malignancy at surgical excision (SE) and the clinical significance of the association of FEA with ADH and/or LIN. This study included 589 cases of stereotactic 11-gauge vacuum-assisted needle core biopsy (VANCB), reporting a diagnosis of FEA, ADH or LIN with subsequent SE from 14 pathology departments in Italy. Available slides were reviewed, with 114 (19.4 %) showing a malignant outcome at SE. Among the 190 cases of pure FEA, no statistically significant association emerged between clinical-pathological parameters of FEA and risk of malignancy. Logistic regression analyses showed an increased risk of malignancy according to the extension of ADH among the 275 cases of FEA associated with ADH (p = 0.004) and among the 34 cases of FEA associated with ADH and LIN (p = 0.02). In the whole series, a statistically significant increased malignancy risk emerged according to mammographic R1-R3/R4-R5 categories (OR = 1.56; p = 0.04), extension (OR = 1.24; p = 0.04) and grade (OR = 1.94; p = 0.004) of cytological atypia of FEA. The presence of ADH was associated with an increased malignancy risk (OR = 2.85; p < 0.0001). Our data confirm the frequent association of FEA with ADH and/or LIN. A diagnosis of pure FEA on VANCB carries a 9.5 % risk of concurrent malignancy and thus warrants follow-up excision because none of the clinical-pathological parameters predicts which cases will present carcinoma on SE.

  11. Simulated prostate biopsy: prostate cancer distribution and clinical correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Dean, Robert; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    2000-04-01

    Our group has recently obtained data based upon whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens using a 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator that suggests an increased detection rate is possible using laterally placed biopsies. A new 10-core biopsy pattern was demonstrated to be superior to the traditional sextant biopsy. This patter includes the traditional sextant biopsy cores and four laterally placed biopsies in the right and left apex and mid portion of the prostate gland. The objective of this study is to confirm the higher prostate cancer defection rate obtained using our simulated 10-core biopsy pattern in a small clinical trial. We retrospectively reviewed 35 consecutive patients with a pathologic diagnosis of prostate cancer biopsied by a single urologist using the 10-core prostate biopsy patterns were compared with respect to prostate cancer detection rate. Of the 35 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, 54.3 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent of patients were diagnosed solely with the laterally placed biopsies. Our results suggest that biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon a five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern.

  12. The Impact of Prostate Volume, Number of Biopsy Cores and American Urological Association Symptom Score on the Sensitivity of Cancer Detection Using the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial Risk Calculator

    PubMed Central

    Ankerst, Donna P.; Till, Cathee; Boeck, Andreas; Goodman, Phyllis; Tangen, Catherine M.; Feng, Ziding; Partin, Alan W.; Chan, Daniel W.; Sokoll, Lori; Kagan, Jacob; Wei, John T.; Thompson, Ian M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the independent predictive value of prostate volume, number of biopsy cores and AUASS (American Urological Association symptom score) compared to risk factors included in the PCPTRC (Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial risk calculator for prostate cancer) and PCPTHG (Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial risk calculator for high grade cancer [Gleason grade 7 or greater]). Materials and Methods Of 5,519 PCPT (Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial) participants the 4,958 used to construct the PCPTRC with AUASS and prostate specific antigen 10 ng/ml or less were included on logistic regression analysis. Risk algorithms were evaluated in 571 EDRN (Early Detection Research Network) participants using the ROC AUC. Results A total of 1,094 participants (22.1%) had prostate cancer, of whom 232 (21.2%) had high grade disease. For prostate cancer prediction higher prostate specific antigen, abnormal digital rectal examination, family history of prostate cancer and number of cores were associated with increased risk, while volume was associated with decreased risk. Excluding prostate volume and number of cores, a history of negative biopsy and increased AUASS were also associated with lower risk. For high grade cancer higher prostate specific antigen, abnormal digital rectal examination, black race and number of cores were associated with increased risk and volume, while AUASS was associated with decreased risk. The AUC of the PCPTRC adjusted for volume and number of cores was 72.7% using EDRN data and 68.2% when adjusted for AUASS alone vs 67.6% for the PCPTRC. For high grade disease the AUC was 74.8% and 74.0%, respectively, vs 73.5% for the PCPTHG. Conclusions Adjusted PCPT risk calculators for volume, number of cores and AUASS improve cancer detection. PMID:23313212

  13. Lateral biopsies added to the traditional sextant prostate biopsy pattern increases the detection rate of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bauer, J J; Zeng, J; Zhang, W; McLeod, D G; Sesterhenn, I A; Connelly, R R; Mun, S K; Moul, J W

    2000-07-01

    Urologists routinely use the systematic sextant needle biopsy technique to detect prostate cancer. However, recent evidence suggests that this technique has a significant sampling error and data based upon whole-mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens using a three-dimensional computer-assisted prostate biopsy simulator suggests that an increased detection rate is possible using laterally placed biopsies. The simulated 10-core biopsy pattern (traditional sextant biopsy cores and four laterally placed biopsies in the right and left apex and mid portion of the prostate gland) was shown to be superior to the traditional sextant biopsy. The objective of this pilot study was to confirm the higher prostate cancer detection rate obtained using the 10-core biopsy pattern in patients. We reviewed data on 35 consecutive patients with a pathologic diagnosis of prostate cancer biopsied by a single urologist using the 10-core biopsy pattern. The frequency of positive biopsy was determined for each core. Additionally, the sextant and 10-core prostate biopsy patterns were compared with respect to prostate cancer detection rate. Of the 35 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, 54.3%(19/35) were diagnosed by the sextant biopsy only. The 10-core pattern resulted in an additional 45.7%(16/35) of patients being diagnosed solely with the laterally placed biopsies. The laterally placed biopsies had the highest frequency of positive biopsies when compared to the sextant cores. In conclusion, biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon a five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern. Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases (2000) 3, 43-46

  14. Bone lesion biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Bone biopsy; Biopsy - bone ... the cut, then pushed and twisted into the bone. Once the sample is obtained, the needle is ... sample is sent to a lab for examination. Bone biopsy may also be done under general anesthesia ...

  15. Muscle biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle biopsy involves removal of a plug of tissue usually by a needle to be later used for examination. Sometimes ... there is a patchy condition expected an open biopsy may be used. Open biopsy involves a small ...

  16. Bone biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A bone biopsy is performed by making a small incision into the skin. A biopsy needle retrieves a sample of bone and it ... examination. The most common reasons for bone lesion biopsy are to distinguish between benign and malignant bone ...

  17. Concordance between HER-2 status determined by qPCR in Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) samples compared with IHC and FISH in Core Needle Biopsy (CNB) or surgical specimens in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Claudia; Suciu, Voichita; Poterie, Audrey; Lacroix, Ludovic; Miran, Isabelle; Boichard, Amélie; Delaloge, Suzette; Deneuve, Jacqueline; Azoulay, Sandy; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Valent, Alexander; Michiels, Stefan; Arnedos, Monica; Vielh, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    Determining the status of HER2-neu amplification and overexpression in breast cancer is crucial for prognosis but mostly for treatment purposes. Standard techniques include the determination of IHC in combination with in situ hybridization techniques to confirm a HER2-neu amplification in case of IHC2+ using either a core-needle biopsy or a surgical specimen. qPCR has been also demonstrated to be able to determine HER2 status, mostly in core biopsies or in surgical specimens. Fine-needle aspiration is a reliable, quicker and less invasive technique that is widely used for diagnosis of invasive breast cancer. In this study, we assessed the performance of qPCR in invasive breast carcinomas to determine HER2-neu status by using fine-needle aspiration samples and comparing to standard IHC and FISH. From a total of 154 samples from patients who had nodular breast lesions and attended the 1-day-stop clinic at the Gustave Roussy from March 2013 to October 2014, qPCR was able to determine the HER2 status in a mean of 3.7 days (SD 3.1). The overall concordance with standard HER2-testing was very high: 97% (95% CI 0.94 to 0.99); sensitivity was 96% (0.87-1), specificity 98% (0.95-1) and positive and negative predictive values 88% (0.75-1) and 99% (0.98-1), respectively. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that qPCR performed using fine-needle aspiration samples from a primary tumour is a reliable and fast method to determine HER2/neu status in patients with early breast cancer.

  18. Optimization of prostate biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Weir, James; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Connelly, Roger R.; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    1999-05-01

    Urologists routinely use the systematic sextant needle biopsy technique to detect prostate cancer. However, recent evidence suggests that this technique has a significant sampling error. We have developed a novel 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator based upon 201 whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various prostate needle biopsy protocols. Computerized prostate models have been developed to accurately depict the anatomy of the prostate and all individual tumor foci. We obtained 18-biopsies of each prostate model to determine the detection rates of various biopsy protocols. As a result, the 10- and 12- pattern biopsy protocols had a 99.0 percent detection rate, while the traditional sextant biopsy protocol rate was only 72.6 percent. The 5-region biopsy protocol had a 90.5 percent detection rate. the lateral sextant pattern revealed a detection rate of 95.5 percent, whereas the 4-pattern lateral biopsy protocol had a 93.5 percent detection rate. Our results suggest that all the biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon the five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern. Lateral biopsies in the mid and apical zones of the gland are the most important.

  19. Nerve biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  20. Sentinel node biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sentinel node biopsy is a technique which helps determine if a cancer has spread (metastasized), or is contained locally. When a ... is closest to the cancer site. Sentinel node biopsy is used to stage many kinds of cancer, ...

  1. Transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy of the prostate: random sextant versus biopsies of sono-morphologically suspicious lesions.

    PubMed

    Loch, Tillmann; Eppelmann, Ursula; Lehmann, Jan; Wullich, Bernd; Loch, Annemie; Stöckle, Michael

    2004-11-01

    Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided multiple systematic random biopsies are presently the method of choice for determining the presence or absence of prostate cancer. TRUS image information is only used to guide the biopsy needle into the prostate, but not to localize and target cancerous lesions. Our aim in this study was to evaluated the possible predictive value of tumor suspicious endosonographic lesions of the prostate for prostate biopsies. We prospectively compared six systematic biopsies with lesion guided biopsies in a consecutive series of 217 patients. All patients had a prostate specific antigen (PSA) level of >4 ng/ml without a history of prostate disease. In a subgroup of 145 men with sonomorphologic lesions suggestive for prostate cancer (hypoechoic areas or asymmetries predominantly in the peripheral zone), lesion-guided biopsies were taken in addition to the systematic biopsies. We evaluated the number of tumors which were diagnosed or missed by both of the biopsy strategies. Of the 217 evaluated patients, 64 (29%) had histology confirmed cancer. Four patients with negative sextant biopsies had a positive TRUS guided biopsy. Out of 145 patients with a normal TRUS, three were cancer positive by sextant biopsy. A total of 1,387 individual biopsy cores were evaluated. Of the 1,304 systematic biopsy cores, 182 (14%) were positive and 1,122 (86%) negative. Of the 329 TRUS lesion guided biopsy cores 139 (42%) were positive and 190 (58%) negative. Patients with tumor suggestive TRUS lesions have a considerably higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer compared to patients without such lesions. Both systematic sextant and TRUS lesion guided biopsies missed detectable prostate cancer in a minority of patients. Taking the endosonographic morphology of the prostate gland into consideration for biopsy strategies may improve the quality of the biopsy and avoid unnecessary invasive procedures in selected cases.

  2. Complications of prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Zapała, Lukasz; Cordeiro, Ernesto; Antoniewicz, Artur; Dimitriadis, Georgios; De Reijke, Theo

    2013-07-01

    Biopsy of the prostate is a common procedure with minor complications that are usually self-limited. However, if one considers that millions of men undergo biopsy worldwide, one realizes that although complication rate is low, the number of patients suffering from biopsy complications should not be underestimated and can be a clinically relevant problem for healthcare professionals. In this review, the authors present diagnosis and management of postbiopsy of prostate complications. Bleeding is the most common complication observed after prostate biopsy, but the use of aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is not an absolute contraindication to prostate biopsy. Emerging resistance to ciprofloxacin is the most probable cause of the increasing risk of infectious complications after prostate biopsy. Even though extremely rare, fatal complications are possible and were described in case reports.

  3. Analysis of bone biopsies.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, J A; Difiore, R J; Tippens, J K

    1983-11-01

    The orthopedic surgeon is frequently confronted with the decision of when to perform a bone biopsy and whether to do a needle biopsy or an open biopsy. Frequently consultations are received from other services requesting bone biopsies with questionable indications. The indications and contraindications for performing bone biopsies are discussed as well as advantages and disadvantages of either closed or open technique. Four selective cases are discussed with illustrations. The challenge of undiagnosed osseous lesions is best met by rational evaluation of each individual case and coordinated with the team effort of the primary care physician, surgeon, pathologist, and radiologist. The decision for either an open or closed biopsy technique must be based on the experience and skills of the surgeon and pathologist.

  4. Biopsies in oncology.

    PubMed

    de Bazelaire, C; Coffin, A; Cohen, S; Scemama, A; de Kerviler, E

    2014-01-01

    Imaging-guided percutaneous biopsies in patients in oncology provide an accurate diagnosis of malignant tumors. Percutaneous biopsy results are improved by correct use of sampling procedures. The risks of percutaneous biopsy are low and its complications are generally moderate. These risks can be reduced using aids such as blund tip introducers, hydrodissection and correct patient positioning. The multidisciplinary team meetings dialogue between oncologist, surgeon and radiologist correctly defines the indications in order to improve the treatment strategies.

  5. Utility of synovial biopsy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Synovial biopsies, gained either by blind needle biopsy or minimally invasive arthroscopy, offer additional information in certain clinical situations where routine assessment has not permitted a certain diagnosis. In research settings, synovial histology and modern applications of molecular biology increase our insight into pathogenesis and enable responses to treatment with new therapeutic agents to be assessed directly at the pathophysiological level. This review focuses on the diagnostic usefulness of synovial biopsies in the light of actual developments. PMID:19951395

  6. Colposcopy - directed biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... squamous cells - colposcopy; Pap smear - colposcopy; HPV - colposcopy; Human papilloma virus - colposcopy; Cervix - colposcopy; Colposcopy Images Female reproductive anatomy Colposcopy-directed biopsy Uterus References American College of ...

  7. The meaning of sampling density in multiple repeat prostate biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Čapoun, Otakar; Minárik, Ivo; Kýr, Michal; Hanuš, Tomáš; Babjuk, Marek; Sobotka, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Extended transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy is a state-of-the-art tool for prostate cancer detection. Nevertheless, approximately 1/3 of cancers are missed when using this method and repeat biopsy sessions are often required. The aim of this study was to investigate how sampling density (a compound variable reflecting the number of biopsy cores and prostate volume) impacts on detection rate in multiple repeat TRUS-biopsies. Material and methods A total of 1007 consecutive patients undergoing their 1st, 2nd, 3rd and any further repeat prostate biopsies were included. The relationship between sampling density and other clinical variables (age, prostate-specific antigen level, free/total PSA ratio, digital rectal examination, number of previous biopsies) and cancer detection rate were assessed by interaction analysis. Results There were 562 primary re-biopsies, 267 second re-biopsies and 178 third and further re-biopsies included in the study. Detection rate was 25.4%, 25.8% and 25.3%, respectively. Interaction of sampling density with age was demonstrated in patients undergoing their first repeat biopsy (but not further re-biopsies). No interaction was observed with other variables investigated. Conclusions A more extensive prostate sampling leads to a higher cancer detection rate on repeat prostate biopsies, as shown previously. However, this effect seems to be particularly pronounced in men younger than 65 years undergoing their first repeat prostate biopsy. PMID:28127449

  8. Geometric Evaluation of Systematic Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Misop; Chang, Doyoung; Kim, Chunwoo; Lee, Brian J.; Zuo, Yihe; Kim, Hyung-Joo; Petrisor, Doru; Trock, Bruce; Partin, Alan W.; Rodriguez, Ronald; Carter, H. Ballentine; Allaf, Mohamad; Kim, Jongwon; Stoianovici, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy results rely on physician ability to target the gland according to the biopsy schema. However, to our knowledge it is unknown how accurately the freehand, transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy cores are placed in the prostate and how the geometric distribution of biopsy cores may affect the prostate cancer detection rate. Materials and Methods To determine the geometric distribution of cores, we developed a biopsy simulation system with pelvic mock-ups and an optical tracking system. Mock-ups were biopsied in a freehand manner by 5 urologists and by our transrectal ultrasound robot, which can support and move the transrectal ultrasound probe. We compared 1) targeting errors, 2) the accuracy and precision of repeat biopsies, and 3) the estimated significant prostate cancer (0.5 cm3 or greater) detection rate using a probability based model. Results Urologists biopsied cores in clustered patterns and under sampled a significant portion of the prostate. The robot closely followed the predefined biopsy schema. The mean targeting error of the urologists and the robot was 9.0 and 1.0 mm, respectively. Robotic assistance significantly decreased repeat biopsy errors with improved accuracy and precision. The mean significant prostate cancer detection rate of the urologists and the robot was 36% and 43%, respectively (p <0.0001). Conclusions Systematic biopsy with freehand transrectal ultrasound guidance does not closely follow the sextant schema and may result in suboptimal sampling and cancer detection. Repeat freehand biopsy of the same target is challenging. Robotic assistance with optimized biopsy schemas can potentially improve targeting, precision and accuracy. A clinical trial is needed to confirm the additional benefits of robotic assistance. PMID:23088974

  9. A new apparatus for standardized rat kidney biopsy.

    PubMed

    Schirutschke, Holger; Gladrow, Lars; Norkus, Christian; Parmentier, Simon Paul; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian P M

    2014-01-01

    Survival biopsies are frequently applied in rat kidney disease models, but several drawbacks such as surgical kidney trauma, bleeding risk and variable loss of kidney tissue are still unsolved. Therefore, we developed an easy-to-use core biopsy instrument and evaluated whether two consecutive kidney biopsies within the same kidney can be carried out in a standardized manner. On day 0, 18 Lewis rats underwent a right nephrectomy and 9 of these rats a subsequent first biopsy of the left kidney (Bx group). 9 control rats had a sham biopsy of the left kidney (Ctrl group). On day 7, a second kidney biopsy/sham biopsy was performed. On day 42, all animals were sacrificed and their kidneys were removed for histology. Biopsy cylinders contained 57±28 glomeruli per transversal section, representing an adequate sample size. PAS staining showed that the biopsy depth was limited to the renal cortex whereas surgical tissue damage was limited to the area immediately adjacent to the taken biopsy cylinder. On day 42, the reduction of functional renal mass after two biopsies was only 5.2% and no differences of body weight, blood pressure, proteinuria, serum creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis or number of ED-1 positive macrophages were found between both groups. In summary, our apparatus offers a safe method to perform repetitive kidney biopsies with minimal trauma and sufficient sample size and quality even in experimental disease models restricted to one single kidney.

  10. Salivary gland biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - salivary gland ... You have several pairs of salivary glands that drain into your mouth: A major pair in front of the ears (parotid glands) Another major pair beneath your jaw (submandibular ...

  11. Lymph node biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Performed The test is used to diagnose cancer, sarcoidosis, or an infection (such as tuberculosis): When you ... of lymph nodes and other organs and tissues ( sarcoidosis ) Risks Lymph node biopsy may result in any ...

  12. Open lung biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of different conditions, such as: Rheumatoid lung disease Sarcoidosis Wegener granulomatosis Risks There is a possibility of ... biopsy Malignant mesothelioma Pulmonary tuberculosis Rheumatoid lung disease Sarcoidosis Simple pulmonary eosinophilia Solitary fibrous tumor Viral pneumonia ...

  13. Pleural needle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the pleural membrane. Pleural biopsy can diagnose tuberculosis , cancer, and other diseases. If this type of ... lung cancer , malignant mesothelioma , and metastatic pleural tumor ), tuberculosis, other infections, or collagen vascular disease. Risks There ...

  14. Open pleural biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... due to a virus, fungus, or parasite Mesothelioma Tuberculosis Risks There is a slight chance of: Air ... More Metastatic pleural tumor Pleural needle biopsy Pulmonary tuberculosis Tumor Review Date 11/4/2014 Updated by: ...

  15. Mediastinoscopy with biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... This procedure is also done for certain infections (tuberculosis, sarcoidosis) and autoimmune disorders . Normal Results Biopsies of ... of disease from one body part to another Tuberculosis Risks There is a risk of puncturing the ...

  16. Ultrasound-guided serial transabdominal cardiac biopsies in cats.

    PubMed

    van Essen, Vivian J; Uilenreef, Joost J; Szatmári, Viktor; Veldhuis Kroeze, Edwin J B; Kuiper, Raoul V; Rothuizen, Jan; de Bruin, Alain

    2012-03-01

    A percutaneous/transdiaphragmatic core needle biopsy technique was developed in cats to obtain serial biopsies from different locations of the left ventricle, through which morphological and molecular changes within the same individual can be studied to unravel the mechanisms of feline cardiomyopathies. Transmural left ventricular myocardial samples were obtained from 29 anesthetized, healthy, adult cats with ultrasound guidance. An 18G automatic biopsy needle was inserted between the last left rib and the sternum through the diaphragm into the thorax. Biopsies were obtained from the left ventricular wall. In five cats, three single biopsies were taken with 4-week intervals. Autopsy was performed on six cats, of which three cats had serial biopsies. In total, 87 biopsies were obtained without long-term effects on cardiac function or structure. The biopsies caused transient single ventricular premature complexes and mild pericardial effusion without tamponade. Necropsy revealed a minimal amount of fibrous connective tissue in the diaphragm and the heart without any significant microscopic lesions in the adjacent muscle tissue. The high quality biopsy material was suitable for morphological and molecular studies. This minimally invasive, ultrasound-guided cardiac biopsy technique thus allows for the safe collection of serial biopsies to study feline cardiomyopathies in an experimental setting.

  17. Prostate biopsy strategies: current state of the art.

    PubMed

    Mian, Badar M

    2004-05-01

    Prostate-specific antigen testing and prostate biopsy have revolutionized our ability to detect prostate cancer at an early stage. The transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy procedure has undergone a number of modifications over the past 10 years to meet our goal of early detection of cancer at a curable stage. Biopsy schemes have evolved from lesion-directed biopsies to systematic mapping of the peripheral zone of the prostate, which harbors almost all of the significant tumor foci. An increase in the number of biopsy cores from 6 to 10 (or 12) has resulted in a significant improvement in the detection of clinically localized cancer, without any appreciable increase in the number of indolent cancers. Current biopsy schemes also have enhanced our ability to determine the true prognostic value of pathologic lesions such as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and atypical small acinar proliferation which have been associated with cancer detection in repeat biopsies. I discuss the rationale behind, and the outcomes of, various biopsy strategies. More than 15 years after PSA testing was popularized for early detection, a number of men are presenting for evaluation regarding repeat prostate biopsy for various clinical indications. The indications, biopsy scheme, and cancer detection rates for repeat prostate biopsy are discussed in detail.

  18. Percutaneous CT-guided biopsy of the spine: results of 430 biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Rimondi, Eugenio; Errani, Costantino; Bianchi, Giuseppe; Casadei, Roberto; Alberghini, Marco; Malaguti, Maria Cristina; Rossi, Giuseppe; Durante, Stefano; Mercuri, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Biopsies of lesions in the spine are often challenging procedures with significant risk of complications. CT-guided needle biopsies could lower these risks but uncertainties still exist about the diagnostic accuracy. Aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided needle biopsies for bone lesions of the spine. We retrieved the results of 430 core needle biopsies carried out over the past fifteen years at the authors’ institute and examined the results obtained. Of the 430 biopsies performed, in 401 cases the right diagnosis was made with the first CT-guided needle biopsy (93.3% accuracy rate). Highest accuracy rates were obtained in primary and secondary malignant lesions. Most false negative results were found in cervical lesions and in benign, pseudotumoral, inflammatory, and systemic pathologies. There were only 9 complications (5 transient paresis, 4 haematomas that resolved spontaneously) that had no influence on the treatment strategy, nor on the patient’s outcome. In conclusion we can assert that this technique is reliable and safe and should be considered the gold standard in biopsies of the spine. PMID:18463900

  19. Breast Biopsy System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) are high technology silicon chips that connect light directly into electronic or digital images, which can be manipulated or enhanced by computers. When Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) scientists realized that existing CCD technology could not meet scientific requirements for the Hubble Space Telescope Imagining Spectrograph, GSFC contracted with Scientific Imaging Technologies, Inc. (SITe) to develop an advanced CCD. SITe then applied many of the NASA-driven enhancements to the manufacture of CCDs for digital mammography. The resulting device images breast tissue more clearly and efficiently. The LORAD Stereo Guide Breast Biopsy system incorporates SITe's CCD as part of a digital camera system that is replacing surgical biopsy in many cases. Known as stereotactic needle biopsy, it is performed under local anesthesia with a needle and saves women time, pain, scarring, radiation exposure and money.

  20. Thyroid gland biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The thyroid is a gland located in the neck. It is a part of the endocrine (hormone) system, and plays a major role in regulating ... sample of cells is needed from the thyroid gland a fine needle biopsy can be performed. During ...

  1. Comparison of prostate MRI-3D transrectal ultrasound fusion biopsy for first-time and repeat biopsy patients with previous atypical small acinar proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Izawa, Jonathan I.; Chin, Joseph; Gardi, Lori; Tessier, David; Mercado, Ashley; Mandel, Jonathan; Ward, Aaron D.; Fenster, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study evaluates the clinical benefit of magnetic resonance-transrectal ultrasound (MR-TRUS) fusion biopsy over systematic biopsy between first-time and repeat prostate biopsy patients with prior atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP). Materials: 100 patients were enrolled in a single-centre prospective cohort study: 50 for first biopsy, 50 for repeat biopsy with prior ASAP. Multiparameteric magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI) and standard 12-core ultrasound biopsy (Std-Bx) were performed on all patients. Targeted biopsy using MRI-TRUS fusion (Fn-Bx) was performed f suspicious lesions were identified on the pre-biopsy MP-MRI. Classification of clinically significant disease was assessed independently for the Std-Bx vs. Fn-Bx cores to compare the two approaches. Results: Adenocarcinoma was detected in 49/100 patients (26 first biopsy, 23 ASAP biopsy), with 25 having significant disease (17 first, 8 ASAP). Fn-Bx demonstrated significantly higher per-core cancer detection rates, cancer involvement, and Gleason scores for first-time and ASAP patients. However, Fn-Bx was significantly more likely to detect significant cancer missed on Std-Bx for ASAP patients than first-time biopsy patients. The addition of Fn-Bx to Std-Bx for ASAP patients had a 166.7% relative risk reduction for missing Gleason ≥ 3 + 4 disease (number needed to image with MP-MRI=10 patients) compared to 6.3% for first biopsy (number to image=50 patients). Negative predictive value of MP-MRI for negative biopsy was 79% for first-time and 100% for ASAP patients, with median followup of 32.1 ± 15.5 months. Conclusions: MR-TRUS Fn-Bx has a greater clinical impact for repeat biopsy patients with prior ASAP than biopsy-naïve patients by detecting more significant cancers that are missed on Std-Bx. PMID:27800057

  2. Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Biopsy An ultrasound-guided breast biopsy uses sound waves to help locate a lump or abnormality ... exam. The transducer sends out inaudible, high—frequency sound waves into the body and then listens for ...

  3. Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow KidsHealth > For Parents > Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow A A A What's in this ... ósea What It Is Bone marrow aspirations and biopsies are performed to examine bone marrow, the spongy ...

  4. Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow KidsHealth > For Teens > Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow A A A What's in this ... Questions What It Is Bone marrow aspirations and biopsies are performed to examine bone marrow, the spongy ...

  5. High-frequency ultrasound imaging for breast cancer biopsy guidance

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Thomas; Yoon, Changhan; Choi, Hojong; Eliahoo, Payam; Kim, Hyung Ham; Yamashita, Mary W.; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda J.; Lang, Julie E.; Sener, Stephen F.; Vallone, John; Martin, Sue E.; Kirk Shung, K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Image-guided core needle biopsy is the current gold standard for breast cancer diagnosis. Microcalcifications, an important radiographic finding on mammography suggestive of early breast cancer such as ductal carcinoma in situ, are usually biopsied under stereotactic guidance. This procedure, however, is uncomfortable for patients and requires the use of ionizing radiation. It would be preferable to biopsy microcalcifications under ultrasound guidance since it is a faster procedure, more comfortable for the patient, and requires no radiation. However, microcalcifications cannot reliably be detected with the current standard ultrasound imaging systems. This study is motivated by the clinical need for real-time high-resolution ultrasound imaging of microcalcifications, so that biopsies can be accurately performed under ultrasound guidance. We have investigated how high-frequency ultrasound imaging can enable visualization of microstructures in ex vivo breast tissue biopsy samples. We generated B-mode images of breast tissue and applied the Nakagami filtering technique to help refine image output so that microcalcifications could be better assessed during ultrasound-guided core biopsies. We describe the preliminary clinical results of high-frequency ultrasound imaging of ex vivo breast biopsy tissue with microcalcifications and without Nakagami filtering and the correlation of these images with the pathology examination by hematoxylin and eosin stain and whole slide digital scanning. PMID:26693167

  6. Telepathology and Optical Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer-Roca, Olga

    2009-01-01

    The ability to obtain information about the structure of tissue without taking a sample for pathology has opened the way for new diagnostic techniques. The present paper reviews all currently available techniques capable of producing an optical biopsy, with or without morphological images. Most of these techniques are carried out by physicians who are not specialized in pathology and therefore not trained to interpret the results as a pathologist would. In these cases, the use of telepathology or distant consultation techniques is essential. PMID:20339507

  7. Evaluation of biopsy methods in the diagnosis of submandibular space pathology.

    PubMed

    Olubaniyi, B O; Chow, V; Mandalia, U; Haldar, S; Gok, G; Michl, P; Ramesar, K; Sellon, E; Williams, M; Howlett, D C

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (USCNB), punch biopsy, and surgical excision biopsy in neoplasms presenting within the submandibular space. A retrospective analysis of all patients with a pathological diagnosis of a submandibular space neoplasm within a 12-year period (February 1999 to June 2011) was performed. Biopsy results were compared to histopathological diagnosis obtained from surgical excision biopsy. Eighty-one specimens from 44 patients met the search criteria (15 FNAC, 24 USCNB, 7 punch biopsy, and 35 surgical excision biopsy). The final diagnosis was established by USCNB, punch biopsy, or surgical excision biopsy and not by FNAC alone. Surgical excision biopsy was performed as a primary diagnostic (n = 8), secondary diagnostic (n = 15), or as a post-diagnostic therapeutic procedure (n = 12). Non-diagnostic results were: FNAC 11/15, USCNB 2/24, and punch biopsy 1/7. Diagnostic results were: FNAC 2/15, USCNB 20/24, and punch biopsy 5/7. No complications were reported. Although punch biopsy demonstrated good yield and accuracy, its use is restricted to a small cohort of patients. USCNB is a safe and accurate technique in the submandibular space, with a low non-diagnostic rate.

  8. Strategies for prevention of ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy infections

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Diane D; Raman, Jay D

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in male patients and the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in males. To confirm the diagnosis of prostate cancer, an ultrasound-guided needle biopsy is necessary to obtain prostate tissue sufficient for histologic analysis by pathologists. Ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy can be accomplished via a transperineal or transrectal approach. The latter biopsy technique involves placing an ultrasound probe into the rectum, visualizing the prostate located just anterior to it, and then obtaining 12–14 biopsies. Each biopsy core requires piercing of the rectal mucosa which can inherently contribute to infection. The increasing infectious risk of prostate needle biopsy requires refinement and re-evaluation of the process in which the technique is performed. Such processes include (but are not limited to) prebiopsy risk stratification, antibiotic prophylaxis, use of rectal preparations, and equipment processing. In the subsequent review, we highlight the current available information on different strategies to reduce the risk of infection following prostate needle biopsy. PMID:27468242

  9. Ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sitt, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of synovium is an increasingly performed procedure with a high diagnostic yield. In this review, we discuss the normal synovium, as well as the indications, technique, tissue handling and clinical applications of ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy. PMID:26581578

  10. Oral biopsy in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Mota-Ramírez, Amparo; Silvestre, Francisco Javier; Simó, Juan Manuel

    2007-11-01

    The conclusions drawn from the study of an oral biopsy are considered essential for the definitive diagnosis of diseases of the oral mucosa, and for the subsequent planning of appropriate treatment. Although the obtainment of biopsies is widely used in all medical fields, the practice is not so widespread in dental practice--fundamentally because of a lack of awareness of the procedure among dental professionals. In this context, it must be taken into account that the early diagnosis of invasive oral malignancy may be critical for improving the patient prognosis. However, in some cases the results are adversely affected by incorrect manipulation of the biopsy material. The present study provides an update on the different biopsy sampling techniques and their application. Such familiarization in turn will contribute to knowledge of the material and instruments required for correct biopsy performance in dentistry, as well as of the material required for correct sample storage and transport.

  11. Biopsy: Types of Biopsy Procedures Used to Diagnose Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... A biopsy also helps your doctor determine how aggressive your cancer is — the cancer's grade. The grade ... grade (grade 1) cancers are generally the least aggressive and high-grade (grade 4) cancers are generally ...

  12. [Pulmonary needle biopsy in children].

    PubMed

    Gerbeaux, J

    1975-01-01

    Pulmonary biopsy done with a needle of circular bore, can be performed on very young children. A sample of tissue, big enough to establish a precise diagnosis in 2/3 of cases, can be obtained. The main complication is pneumothorax occuring about once in five. Hemoptysia or hemorrhage has never been observed. A proposed indication of premortem biopsy accelerated the death of a child with congenital pulmonary fibrosis. The search of a diagnosis in diffuse pulmonary diseases is the major indication for pulmonary biopsy in the child.

  13. How does prostate biopsy guidance error impact pathologic cancer risk assessment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter R.; Gaed, Mena; Gómez, José A.; Moussa, Madeleine; Gibson, Eli; Cool, Derek W.; Chin, Joseph L.; Pautler, Stephen; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided "fusion" prostate biopsy aims to reduce the 21-47% false negative rate of clinical 2D TRUS-guided sextant biopsy, but still has a substantial false negative rate. This could be improved via biopsy needle target optimization, accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system errors, image registration errors, and irregular tumor shapes. As an initial step toward the broader goal of optimized prostate biopsy targeting, in this study we elucidated the impact of biopsy needle delivery error on the probability of obtaining a tumor sample, and on the core involvement. These are both important parameters to patient risk stratification and the decision for active surveillance vs. definitive therapy. We addressed these questions for cancer of all grades, and separately for high grade (>= Gleason 4+3) cancer. We used expert-contoured gold-standard prostatectomy histology to simulate targeted biopsies using an isotropic Gaussian needle delivery error from 1 to 6 mm, and investigated the amount of cancer obtained in each biopsy core as determined by histology. Needle delivery error resulted in variability in core involvement that could influence treatment decisions; the presence or absence of cancer in 1/3 or more of each needle core can be attributed to a needle delivery error of 4 mm. However, our data showed that by making multiple biopsy attempts at selected tumor foci, we may increase the probability of correctly characterizing the extent and grade of the cancer.

  14. Gram stain of tissue biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... an excellent technique for making a general, basic identification of the type of bacteria in the sample. ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Bacterial Infections Biopsy Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  15. Gastric tissue biopsy and culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mean Abnormal results may be due to: Stomach (gastric) cancer Gastritis , when the lining of the stomach becomes ... team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Biopsy Peptic Ulcer Stomach Cancer Stomach Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  16. How to Interpret Thyroid Biopsy Results: A Three-Year Retrospective Interventional Radiology Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, Jason D. Kasuganti, Deepa; Nayar, Ritu; Chrisman, Howard B.; Lewandowski, Robert J.; Nemcek, Albert A.; Ryu, Robert K.

    2010-08-15

    Results of thyroid biopsy determine whether thyroid nodule resection is appropriate and the extent of thyroid surgery. At our institution we use 20/22-gauge core biopsy (CBx) in conjunction with fine-needle aspiration (FNA) to decrease the number of passes and improve adequacy. Occasionally, both ultrasound (US)-guided FNA and CBx yield unsatisfactory specimens. To justify clinical recommendations for these unsatisfactory thyroid biopsies, we compare rates of malignancy at surgical resection for unsatisfactory biopsy results against definitive biopsy results. We retrospectively reviewed a database of 1979 patients who had a total of 2677 FNA and 663 CBx performed by experienced interventional radiologists under US guidance from 2003 to 2006 at a tertiary-care academic center. In 451 patients who had surgery following biopsy, Fisher's exact test was used to compare surgical malignancy rates between unsatisfactory and malignant biopsy cohorts as well as between unsatisfactory and benign biopsy cohorts. We defined statistical significance at P = 0.05. We reported an overall unsatisfactory thyroid biopsy rate of 3.7% (100/2677). A statistically significant higher rate of surgically proven malignancies was found in malignant biopsy patients compared to unsatisfactory biopsy patients (P = 0.0001). The incidence of surgically proven malignancy in unsatisfactory biopsy patients was not significantly different from that in benign biopsy patients (P = 0.8625). In conclusion, an extremely low incidence of malignancy was associated with both benign and unsatisfactory thyroid biopsy results. The difference in incidence between these two groups was not statistically significant. Therefore, patients with unsatisfactory biopsy specimens can be reassured and counseled accordingly.

  17. Accuracy Evaluation of a 3D Ultrasound-guided Biopsy System.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Walter J; Nye, Jonathan A; Schuster, David M; Nieh, Peter T; Master, Viraj A; Votaw, John R; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-14

    Early detection of prostate cancer is critical in maximizing the probability of successful treatment. Current systematic biopsy approach takes 12 or more randomly distributed core tissue samples within the prostate and can have a high potential, especially with early disease, for a false negative diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system. Testing was conducted on prostate phantoms created from an agar mixture which had embedded markers. The phantoms were scanned and the 3D ultrasound system was used to direct the biopsy. Each phantom was analyzed with a CT scan to obtain needle deflection measurements. The deflection experienced throughout the biopsy process was dependent on the depth of the biopsy target. The results for markers at a depth of less than 20 mm, 20-30 mm, and greater than 30 mm were 3.3 mm, 4.7 mm, and 6.2 mm, respectively. This measurement encapsulates the entire biopsy process, from the scanning of the phantom to the firing of the biopsy needle. Increased depth of the biopsy target caused a greater deflection from the intended path in most cases which was due to an angular incidence of the biopsy needle. Although some deflection was present, this system exhibits a clear advantage in the targeted biopsy of prostate cancer and has the potential to reduce the number of false negative biopsies for large lesions.

  18. Accuracy evaluation of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Walter J.; Nye, Jonathan A.; Schuster, David M.; Nieh, Peter T.; Master, Viraj A.; Votaw, John R.; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-01

    Early detection of prostate cancer is critical in maximizing the probability of successful treatment. Current systematic biopsy approach takes 12 or more randomly distributed core tissue samples within the prostate and can have a high potential, especially with early disease, for a false negative diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system. Testing was conducted on prostate phantoms created from an agar mixture which had embedded markers. The phantoms were scanned and the 3D ultrasound system was used to direct the biopsy. Each phantom was analyzed with a CT scan to obtain needle deflection measurements. The deflection experienced throughout the biopsy process was dependent on the depth of the biopsy target. The results for markers at a depth of less than 20 mm, 20-30 mm, and greater than 30 mm were 3.3 mm, 4.7 mm, and 6.2 mm, respectively. This measurement encapsulates the entire biopsy process, from the scanning of the phantom to the firing of the biopsy needle. Increased depth of the biopsy target caused a greater deflection from the intended path in most cases which was due to an angular incidence of the biopsy needle. Although some deflection was present, this system exhibits a clear advantage in the targeted biopsy of prostate cancer and has the potential to reduce the number of false negative biopsies for large lesions.

  19. Optimizing prostate needle biopsy through 3D simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jianchao; Kaplan, Charles; Xuan, Jian Hua; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Lynch, John H.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    1998-06-01

    Prostate needle biopsy is used for the detection of prostate cancer. The protocol of needle biopsy that is currently routinely used in the clinical environment is the systematic sextant technique, which defines six symmetric locations on the prostate surface for needle insertion. However, this protocol has been developed based on the long-term observation and experience of urologists. Little quantitative or scientific evidence supports the use of this biopsy technique. In this research, we aim at developing a statistically optimized new prostate needle biopsy protocol to improve the quality of diagnosis of prostate cancer. This new protocol will be developed by using a three-dimensional (3-D) computer- based probability map of prostate cancer. For this purpose, we have developed a computer-based 3-D visualization and simulation system with prostate models constructed from the digitized prostate specimens, in which the process of prostate needle biopsy can be simulated automatically by the computer. In this paper, we first develop an interactive biopsy simulation mode in the system, and evaluate the performance of the automatic biopsy simulation with the sextant biopsy protocol by comparing the results by the urologist using the interactive simulation mode with respect to 53 prostate models. This is required to confirm that the automatic simulation is accurate and reliable enough for the simulation with respect to a large number of prostate models. Then we compare the performance of the existing protocols using the automatic biopsy simulation system with respect to 107 prostate models, which will statistically identify if one protocol is better than another. Since the estimation of tumor volume is extremely important in determining the significance of a tumor and in deciding appropriate treatment methods, we further investigate correlation between the tumor volume and the positive core volume with 89 prostate models. This is done in order to develop a method to

  20. [Liquid Biopsy and Laboratory Medicine].

    PubMed

    Furuta, Koh

    2015-09-01

    Recent progress in cancer biology has revealed the fact that molecular profiles of primary and metastatic cancer are not necessarily the same. Furthermore, evidence of intra-tumor heterogeneity has been disclosed repeatedly. In addition to these, acquiring resistances to chemoradiation therapy is far more rapid than typical predictions. Under these circumstances, physicians are realizing that one biopsy is not enough to predict the direction of cancer progression or extension. Repeated biopsy was proposed in this context. For "re-biopsy", acquiring blood is much easier compared to regular biopsies of acquiring body tissues. Therefore, CTC or Cell-free DNA is one of the hot topics in clinical and molecular diagnostic fields. The term "liquid biopsy" is used to include these two materials. We utilized a CTC isolation device based on microfluidic principles. Procedures for the extraction of DNA from plasma (Cell-free DNA) is also available. Based on this background, we performed a feasibility study of NGS (Next Generation Sequencing) by analyzing materials from advanced gastrointestinal cancer patients. We have successfully acquired NGS results using these liquid biopsies. We have also investigated the possibility of storing CTCs by evaluating procedures after cytospin using H1975 cells with various fixation conditions under a DIC microscope examination. Because of the paucity of the number of isolated CTCs, H1975 cells were used for this purpose. After cytospin, 95% ETOH and then -80 degrees C storage provided the best results. Attempts at not only NGS but also storage in this sequence of studies have opened new fields of liquid biopsy in clinical laboratories.

  1. Toward 3D-guided prostate biopsy target optimization: an estimation of tumor sampling probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter R.; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided "fusion" prostate biopsy aims to reduce the ~23% false negative rate of clinical 2D TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsy still yields false negatives. Therefore, we propose optimization of biopsy targeting to meet the clinician's desired tumor sampling probability, optimizing needle targets within each tumor and accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system errors, image registration errors, and irregular tumor shapes. We obtained multiparametric MRI and 3D TRUS images from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D surfaces that were registered to 3D TRUS. We estimated the probability, P, of obtaining a tumor sample with a single biopsy. Given an RMS needle delivery error of 3.5 mm for a contemporary fusion biopsy system, P >= 95% for 21 out of 81 tumors when the point of optimal sampling probability was targeted. Therefore, more than one biopsy core must be taken from 74% of the tumors to achieve P >= 95% for a biopsy system with an error of 3.5 mm. Our experiments indicated that the effect of error along the needle axis on the percentage of core involvement (and thus the measured tumor burden) was mitigated by the 18 mm core length.

  2. Confirmatory biopsy for the assessment of prostate cancer in men considering active surveillance: reference centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Bosco, Cecilia; Cozzi, Gabriele; Kinsella, Janette; Bianchi, Roberto; Acher, Peter; Challacombe, Benjamin; Popert, Rick; Brown, Christian; George, Gincy; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Cahill, Declan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate how accurate a 12-core transrectal biopsy derived low-risk prostate cancer diagnosis is for an active surveillance programme by comparing the histological outcome with that from confirmatory transperineal sector biopsy. Subjects and methods The cohort included 166 men diagnosed with low volume Gleason score 3+3 prostate cancer on initial transrectal biopsy who also underwent a confirmatory biopsy. Both biopsy techniques were performed according to standard protocols and samples were taken for histopathology analysis. Subgroup analysis was performed according to disease severity at baseline to determine possible disease parameters of upgrading at confirmatory biopsy. Results After confirmatory biopsy, 34% demonstrated Gleason score upgrade, out of which 25% were Gleason score 3+4 and 8.5% primary Gleason pattern 4. Results remained consistent for the subgroup analysis and a weak positive association, but not statistically significant, between prostate specific antigen (PSA), age, and percentage of positive cores, and PCa upgrading at confirmatory biopsy was found. Conclusion In our single centre study, we found that one-third of patients had higher Gleason score at confirmatory biopsy. Furthermore 8.5% of these upgraders had a primary Gleason pattern 4. Our results together with previously published evidence highlight the need for the revision of current guidelines in prostate cancer diagnosis for the selection of men for active surveillance. PMID:27170833

  3. Development of a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cool, Derek; Sherebrin, Shi; Izawa, Jonathan; Fenster, Aaron

    2007-03-01

    Biopsy of the prostate using ultrasound guidance is the clinical gold standard for diagnosis of prostate adenocarinoma. However, because early stage tumors are rarely visible under US, the procedure carries high false-negative rates and often patients require multiple biopsies before cancer is detected. To improve cancer detection, it is imperative that throughout the biopsy procedure, physicians know where they are within the prostate and where they have sampled during prior biopsies. The current biopsy procedure is limited to using only 2D ultrasound images to find and record target biopsy core sample sites. This information leaves ambiguity as the physician tries to interpret the 2D information and apply it to their 3D workspace. We have developed a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system that provides 3D intra-biopsy information to physicians for needle guidance and biopsy location recording. The system is designed to conform to the workflow of the current prostate biopsy procedure, making it easier for clinical integration. In this paper, we describe the system design and validate its accuracy by performing an in vitro biopsy procedure on US/CT multi-modal patient-specific prostate phantoms. A clinical sextant biopsy was performed by a urologist on the phantoms and the 3D models of the prostates were generated with volume errors less than 4% and mean boundary errors of less than 1 mm. Using the 3D biopsy system, needles were guided to within 1.36 +/- 0.83 mm of 3D targets and the position of the biopsy sites were accurately localized to 1.06 +/- 0.89 mm for the two prostates.

  4. Update on Renal Mass Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Haifler, Miki; Kutikov, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Renal masses are diagnosed with an increasing frequency. However, a significant proportion of these masses are benign, and the majority of malignant tumors are biologically indolent. Furthermore, renal tumors are often harbored by the elderly and comorbid patients. As such, matching of renal tumor biology to appropriate treatment intensity is an urgent clinical need. Renal mass biopsy is currently a very useful clinical tool that can assist with critical clinical decision-making in patients with renal mass. Yet, renal mass biopsy is associated with limitations and, as such, may not be appropriate for all patients.

  5. Vacuum Enhanced Cutaneous Biopsy Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Joseph

    1999-06-25

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  6. Biopsy techniques for intraocular tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rishi, Pukhraj; Dhami, Abhinav; Biswas, Jyotirmay

    2016-01-01

    Biopsy involves the surgical removal of a tissue specimen for histopathologic evaluation. Most intraocular tumors are reliably diagnosed based on the clinical evaluation or with noninvasive diagnostic techniques. However, accurately diagnosing a small percentage of tumors can be challenging. A tissue biopsy is thus needed to establish a definitive diagnosis and plan the requisite treatment. From fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) to surgical excision, all tissue collection techniques have been studied in the literature. Each technique has its indications and limitations. FNAB has been reported to provide for 88–95% reliable and safe ophthalmic tumor diagnosis and has gained popularity for prognostic purposes and providing eye conserving treatment surgeries. The technique and instrumentation for biopsy vary depending upon the tissue involved (retina, choroid, subretinal space, vitreous, and aqueous), suspected diagnosis, size, location, associated retinal detachment, and clarity of the media. The cytopathologist confers a very important role in diagnosis and their assistance plays a key role in managing and planning the treatment for malignancies. PMID:27488148

  7. Vacuum enhanced cutaneous biopsy instrument

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  8. [The Diagnostic Value of Pre-Biopsy Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Detecting Prostate Cancer].

    PubMed

    Mori, Kohei; Miyoshi, Yasuhide; Yoneyama, Shuko; Ishida, Hiroaki; Hattori, Yusuke; Teranishi, Jun-ichi; Kondo, Keiichi; Noguchi, Kazumi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the value of pre-biopsy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting prostate cancer. We analyzed 267 men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels of 3-10 ng/ml who underwent systematic prostate needle biopsy. From April 2009 to March 2011, a total of 98 male patients underwent 16-core prostatic biopsies without pre-biopsy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (nonenforcement group). From April 2011 to March 2013, 169 men underwent pre-biopsy MRI [T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)] (enforcement group). When MRI findings indicated cancer in the latter group, in addition to the systematic 16-core biopsy one or two targeted biopsies were performed. Patients without suspicious MRI findings underwent only systematic 16-core biopsy. Cancer detection rates in the nonenforcement and enforcement groups were 42.9% (48/92) and 46. 2% (78/169), respectively. The difference did not reach significance (p=0.612). Although the cancer detection rates were 39.4% (41/104) in the MRI-negative group and 56. 9% (37/65) in the MRI-positive group (p=0.039), the sensitivity and specificity for cancer detection by MRI were relatively low: 47.4% and 69.2%, respectively. By receiver-operating curve analysis, the area under the curve for cancer detection by MRI was only 0.583. There were two study limitations. First, the patient sample size was small. Second, it is unclear whether an adequate sample of the suspicious lesion was obtained by biopsy. We thus demonstrated that it might be improper to base a diagnosis solely on pre-biopsy MRI (T2WI and DWI) findings in men with serum PSA levels of 3-10 ng/ml.

  9. Near Infrared Spectroscopy for Improving Breast Core Needle Biopsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    and a from agar, Intralipid , and ink were constructed with numerical aperture of 0.22, an optical quartz cap with cylindrical heterogeneities that were...cm-1 were constructed with Intralipid (scatterer) and India ink (absorber).7 IF Figure 3 shows the measured Ma as a function of the Heterogeneity

  10. Near Infrared Spectroscopy for Improving Breast Core Needle Biopsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    and water measurements to calibrate data. Completing the Monte Carlo inversions with two channels will help us to determine what difficulties we will...reflectance, Monte Carlo , signal-to-noise ratio 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF...be analyzed by an inverse Monte Carlo model developed by our group to extract optical absorption and scattering properties from the spectral data

  11. Transjugular Renal Biopsy: Our Experience and Technical Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    See, Teik Choon; Thompson, Barbara C.; Howie, Alexander J.; Karamshi, M.; Papadopoulou, Anthie M.; Davies, Neil; Tibballs, Jonathan

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to describe the indications for and technique of transjugular renal biopsy (TJRB) and evaluate the efficacy and complications of this method. We performed a retrospective review of 59 patients who underwent TJRB using the Quick-core needle biopsy system (Cook, Letchworth, UK) over a 4-year period. The indications for obtaining renal biopsy included acute renal failure, chronic renal failure, nephrotic syndrome, and proteinuria with or without other associated disease. Indications for the transjugular approach included coagulopathy, biopsy of a solitary kidney or essentially single functioning kidney, simultaneous renal and hepatic biopsy, morbid obesity, and failed percutaneous biopsy. All but four cases were performed via the right internal jugular vein. The right, left, or both renal veins were cannulated in 41, 14, and 4 cases, respectively. Combined liver and renal biopsies were obtained in seven cases. Diagnostic biopsy specimens were obtained in 56 of 59 patients (95%). The number and size of tissue cores ranged from 1 to 9 mm and from 1 to 20 mm, respectively. The mean numbers of glomeruli per procedure on light microscopy and electron microscopy were 10.3 and 2.6, respectively. Specimens for immunohistology were acquired in 49 cases, of which 40 were adequate. Of the 56 successful TJRB procedures, 34 (61%) were associated with isolated capsular perforation (19), contained subcapsular leak (10), isolated collecting system puncture (1), and concurrent collecting system and capsular perforation (4). There was a significant increase in capsular perforation with six or more needle passes, although no significant correlation was seen between number of needle passes and complication. Six patients had minor complications defined as hematuria or loin pain. Seven patients developed major complications, of whom five received blood transfusion alone. Two required intervention: in one an arteriocalyceal fistula was embolized and the patient

  12. Diagnostic Accuracy of Robot-Guided, Software Based Transperineal MRI/TRUS Fusion Biopsy of the Prostate in a High Risk Population of Previously Biopsy Negative Men

    PubMed Central

    Schaal, Kathrin; Benndorf, Matthias; Soschynski, Martin; Lenz, Philipp; Krauss, Tobias; Drendel, Vanessa; Kurz, Philipp; Werner, Martin; Wetterauer, Ulrich; Schultze-Seemann, Wolfgang; Langer, Mathias; Jilg, Cordula A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. In this study, we compared prostate cancer detection rates between MRI-TRUS fusion targeted and systematic biopsies using a robot-guided, software based transperineal approach. Methods and Patients. 52 patients received a MRIT/TRUS fusion followed by a systematic volume adapted biopsy using the same robot-guided transperineal approach. The primary outcome was the detection rate of clinically significant disease (Gleason grade ≥ 4). Secondary outcomes were detection rate of all cancers, sampling efficiency and utility, and serious adverse event rate. Patients received no antibiotic prophylaxis. Results. From 52 patients, 519 targeted biopsies from 135 lesions and 1561 random biopsies were generated (total n = 2080). Overall detection rate of clinically significant PCa was 44.2% (23/52) and 50.0% (26/52) for target and random biopsy, respectively. Sampling efficiency as the median number of cores needed to detect clinically significant prostate cancer was 9 for target (IQR: 6–14.0) and 32 (IQR: 24–32) for random biopsy. The utility as the number of additionally detected clinically significant PCa cases by either strategy was 0% (0/52) for target and 3.9% (2/52) for random biopsy. Conclusions. MRI/TRUS fusion based target biopsy did not show an advantage in the overall detection rate of clinically significant prostate cancer. PMID:27990424

  13. Biopsy Findings After Breast Conservation Therapy for Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vapiwala, Neha Starzyk, Jill; Harris, Eleanor E.; Tchou, Julia C.; Boraas, Marcia C.; Czerniecki, Brian J.; Rosato, Ernest F.; Orel, Susan G.; Solin, Lawrence J.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the patterns and factors predictive of positive ipsilateral breast biopsy after conservation therapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of Stage I-II breast cancer patients initially treated with lumpectomy and radiotherapy between 1977 and 1996, who later underwent post-treatment ipsilateral breast biopsies. Results: A total of 223 biopsies were performed in 193 treated breasts: 171 single and 22 multiple biopsies. Of the 223 biopsies, 56% were positive and 44% were negative for recurrence. The positive biopsy rate (PBR) was 59% for the first and 32% for subsequent biopsies. The median time to the first post-treatment biopsy was 49 months. Of the patients with negative initial biopsy findings, 11% later developed local recurrence. The PBR was 40% among patients with physical examination findings only, 65% with mammographic abnormalities only, and 79% with both findings (p = 0.001). Analysis of the procedure type revealed a PBR of 86% for core and 58% for excisional biopsies compared with 28% for aspiration cytology alone (p = 0.025). The PBR varied inversely with age at the original diagnosis: 49% if {>=}51 years, 57% if 36-50 years, and 83% if {<=}35 years (p = 0.05). The PBR correlated directly with the interval after radiotherapy: 49% if {<=}60 months, 59% if 60.1-120 months, 77% if 120.1-180 months, and 100% if >180 months after completing postlumpectomy radiotherapy (p = 0.01). The PBR was not linked with recurrence location, initial pathologic T or N stage, estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor status, or final pathologic margins (all p {>=} 0.15). Conclusion: After definitive radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer, a greater PBR was associated with the presence of both mammographic and clinical abnormalities, excisional or core biopsies, younger age at the initial diagnosis, and longer intervals after radiotherapy completion.

  14. Fluoroscopy-Guided Percutaneous Vertebral Body Biopsy Using a Novel Drill-Powered Device: Technical Case Series

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Adam N. Pacheco, Rafael A. Tomasian, Anderanik; Hsi, Andy C.; Long, Jeremiah; Chang, Randy O.; Jennings, Jack W.

    2016-02-15

    BackgroundA novel coaxial biopsy system powered by a handheld drill has recently been introduced for percutaneous bone biopsy. This technical note describes our initial experience performing fluoroscopy-guided vertebral body biopsies with this system, compares the yield of drill-assisted biopsy specimens with those obtained using a manual technique, and assesses the histologic adequacy of specimens obtained with drill assistance.MethodsMedical records of all single-level, fluoroscopy-guided vertebral body biopsies were reviewed. Procedural complications were documented according to the Society of Interventional Radiology classification. The total length of bone core obtained from drill-assisted biopsies was compared with that of matched manual biopsies. Pathology reports were reviewed to determine the histologic adequacy of specimens obtained with drill assistance.ResultsTwenty eight drill-assisted percutaneous vertebral body biopsies met study inclusion criteria. No acute complications were reported. Of the 86 % (24/28) of patients with clinical follow-up, no delayed complications were reported (median follow-up, 28 weeks; range 5–115 weeks). The median total length of bone core obtained from drill-assisted biopsies was 28 mm (range 8–120 mm). This was longer than that obtained from manual biopsies (median, 20 mm; range 5–45 mm; P = 0.03). Crush artifact was present in 11 % (3/28) of drill-assisted biopsy specimens, which in one case (3.6 %; 1/28) precluded definitive diagnosis.ConclusionsA drill-assisted, coaxial biopsy system can be used to safely obtain vertebral body core specimens under fluoroscopic guidance. The higher bone core yield obtained with drill assistance may be offset by the presence of crush artifact.

  15. Biopsies

    MedlinePlus

    ... taking, including blood thinners such as aspirin and herbal supplements, and whether you have any allergies – especially to ... doctor all medications that you are taking, including herbal supplements, and if you have any allergies, especially to ...

  16. Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foundation for Osteopathic Dermatology What is the FOD? Governance By-Laws Committees Committee Service Conflict of Interest ... quality of the sections is not nearly as good as those of the regular ('permanent') slides. PATHOLOGIC ...

  17. Liquid biopsy in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Labgaa, Ismail; Villanueva, Augusto

    2015-04-01

    Liver cancer has become the second cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Most patients are still diagnosed at intermediate or advanced stage, where potentially curative treatment options are not recommended. Unlike other solid tumors, there are no validated oncogenic addiction loops and the only systemic agent to improve survival in advanced disease is sorafenib. All phase 3 clinical trials testing molecular therapies after sorafenib have been negative, none of which selected patients based on predictive biomarkers of response. Theoretically, analysis of circulating cancer byproducts (e.g., circulating tumor cells, cell-free nucleic acids), namely "liquid biopsy," could provide easy access to molecular tumor information, improve patients' stratification and allow to assess tumor dynamics over time. Recent technical developments and preliminary data from other malignancies indicate that liquid biopsy might have a role in the future management of cancer patients.

  18. Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Exams and Tests for Cancer Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer Waiting to hear a possible ... best decisions about your treatment. Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer How is cancer diagnosed? Types ...

  19. Trans-rectal interventional MRI: initial prostate biopsy experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Bernadette M.; Behluli, Meliha R.; Feller, John F.; May, Stuart T.; Princenthal, Robert; Winkel, Alex; Kaminsky, David B.

    2010-02-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate gland when evaluated along with T2-weighted images, diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and their corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps can yield valuable information in patients with rising or elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels1. In some cases, patients present with multiple negative trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsies, often placing the patient into a cycle of active surveillance. Recently, more patients are undergoing TRIM for targeted biopsy of suspicious findings with a cancer yield of ~59% compared to 15% for second TRUS biopsy2 to solve this diagnostic dilemma and plan treatment. Patients were imaged in two separate sessions on a 1.5T magnet using a cardiac phased array parallel imaging coil. Automated CAD software was used to identify areas of wash-out. If a suspicious finding was identified on all sequences it was followed by a second imaging session. Under MRI-guidance, cores were acquired from each target region3. In one case the microscopic diagnosis was prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), in the other it was invasive adenocarcinoma. Patient 1 had two negative TRUS biopsies and a PSA level of 9ng/mL. Patient 2 had a PSA of 7.2ng/mL. He underwent TRUS biopsy which was negative for malignancy. He was able to go on to treatment for his prostate carcinoma (PCa)4. MRI may have an important role in a subset of patients with multiple negative TRUS biopsies and elevated or rising PSA.

  20. Post-radiotherapy prostate biopsies reveal heightened apex positivity relative to other prostate regions sampled

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kris T.; Stoyanova, Radka; Walker, Gail; Sandler, Kiri; Studenski, Matthew T.; Dogan, Nesrin; Al-Saleem, Tahseen; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Pollack, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Prostate biopsy positivity after radiotherapy (RT) is a significant determinant of eventual biochemical failure. We mapped pre- and post-treatment tumor locations to determine if residual disease is location-dependent. Materials and methods There were 303 patients treated on a randomized hypofractionation trial. Of these, 125 underwent prostate biopsy 2-years post-RT. Biopsy cores were mapped to a sextant template, and 86 patients with both pre-/post-treatment systematic sextant biopsies were analyzed. Results The pretreatment distribution of positive biopsy cores was not significantly related to prostate region (base, mid, apex; p = 0.723). Whereas all regions post-RT had reduced positive biopsies, the base was reduced to the greatest degree and the apex the least (p = 0.045). In 38 patients who had a positive post-treatment biopsy, there was change in the rate of apical positivity before and after treatment (76 vs. 71%; p = 0.774), while significant reductions were seen in the mid and base. Conclusion In our experience, persistence of prostate tumor cells after RT increases going from the base to apex. MRI was used in planning and image guidance was performed daily during treatment, so geographic miss of the apex is unlikely. Nonetheless, the pattern observed suggests that attention to apex dosimetry is a priority. PMID:25963053

  1. Methylation analyses in liquid biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Lissa, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Recent implementation of low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening is predicted to lead to diagnosis of lung cancer at an earlier stage, with survival benefit. However, there is still a pressing need for biomarkers that will identify individuals eligible for screening, as well as improve the diagnostic accuracy of LDCT. In addition, biomarkers for prognostic stratification of patients with early stage disease, and those that can be used as surrogates to monitor tumor evolution, will greatly improve clinical management. Molecular alterations found in the DNA of tumor cells, such as mutations, translocations and methylation, are reflected in DNA that is released from the tumor into the bloodstream. Thus, in recent years, circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) has gained increasing attention as a noninvasive alternative to tissue biopsies and potential surrogate for the entire tumor genome. Activating gene mutations found in ctDNA have been proven effective in predicting response to targeted therapy. Analysis of ctDNA is also a valuable tool for longitudinal follow-up of cancer patients that does not require serial biopsies and may anticipate the acquisition of resistance. DNA methylation has also emerged as a promising marker for early detection, prognosis and real-time follow-up of tumor dynamics that is independent of the genomic composition of the primary tumor. This review summarizes the various investigational applications of methylated ctDNA in lung cancer reported to date. It also provides a brief overview of the technologies for analysis of DNA methylation in liquid biopsies, and the challenges that befall the implementation of methylated ctDNA into routine clinical practice. PMID:27826530

  2. Upgrading the Gleason Score in Extended Prostate Biopsy: Implications for Treatment Choice

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira Leite, Katia Ramos Camara-Lopes, Luiz H.A.; Dall'Oglio, Marcos F.; Cury, Jose; Antunes, Alberto A.; Sanudo, Adriana; Srougi, Miguel

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of overestimation of Gleason score (GS) in extended prostate biopsy, and consequently circumventing unnecessary aggressive treatment. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective study of 464 patients who underwent prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy between January 2001 and November 2007. The GS from biopsy and radical prostatectomy were compared. The incidence of overestimation of GS in biopsies and tumor volume were studied. Multivariate analysis was applied to find parameters that predict upgrading the GS in prostate biopsy. Results: The exact agreement of GS between prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy occurred in 56.9% of cases. In 29.1% cases it was underestimated, and it was overestimated in 14%. One hundred and six (22.8%) patients received a diagnosis of high GS (8, 9, or 10) in a prostate biopsy. In 29.2% of cases, the definitive Gleason Score was 7 or lower. In cases in which GS was overestimated in the biopsy, tumors were significantly smaller. In multivariate analysis, the total percentage of tumor was the only independent factor in overestimation of GS. Tumors occupying less than 33% of cores had a 5.6-fold greater chance of being overestimated. Conclusion: In the extended biopsy era and after the International Society of Urological Pathology consensus on GS, almost one third of tumors considered to have high GS at the biopsy may be intermediate-risk cancers. In that condition, tumors are smaller in biopsy. This should be remembered by professionals involved with prostate cancer to avoid overtreatment and undesirable side effects.

  3. CT-Guided Biopsy of Small Liver Lesions: Visibility, Artifacts, and Corresponding Diagnostic Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Stattaus, Joerg Kuehl, Hilmar; Ladd, Susanne; Schroeder, Tobias; Antoch, Gerald; Baba, Hideo A.; Barkhausen, Joerg; Forsting, Michael

    2007-09-15

    Purpose. Our study aimed to determine the visibility of small liver lesions during CT-guided biopsy and to assess the influence of lesion visibility on biopsy results. Material and Methods. Fifty patients underwent CT-guided core biopsy of small focal liver lesions (maximum diameter, 3 cm); 38 biopsies were performed using noncontrast CT, and the remaining 12 were contrast-enhanced. Visibility of all lesions was graded on a 4-point-scale (0 = not visible, 1 = poorly visible, 2 = sufficiently visible, 3 = excellently visible) before and during biopsy (with the needle placed adjacent to and within the target lesion). Results. Forty-three biopsies (86%) yielded diagnostic results, and seven biopsies were false-negative. In noncontrast biopsies, the rate of insufficiently visualized lesions (grades 0-1) increased significantly during the procedure, from 10.5% to 44.7%, due to needle artifacts. This resulted in more (17.6%) false-negative biopsy results compared to lesions with good visualization (4.8%), although this difference lacks statistical significance. Visualization impairment appeared more often with an intercostal or subcostal vs. an epigastric access and with a subcapsular vs. a central lesion location, respectively. With contrast-enhanced biopsy the visibility of hepatic lesions was only temporarily improved, with a risk of complete obscuration in the late phase. Conclusion. In conclusion, visibility of small liver lesions diminished significantly during CT-guided biopsy due to needle artifacts, with a fourfold increased rate of insufficiently visualized lesions and of false-negative histological results. Contrast enhancement did not reveal better results.

  4. PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF SPIROTOME® DEVICE FOR LIVER BIOPSY IN GREEN IGUANAS (IGUANA IGUANA): A PILOT STUDY.

    PubMed

    Nardini, Giordano; Origgi, Francesco C; Leopardi, Stefania; Zaghini, Anna; Saunders, Jimmy H; Vignoli, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a large-core manual biopsy device (Spirotome(®), Medinvents, 3500 Hasselt, Belgium) for liver sampling and histologic diagnosis in green iguanas (Iguana iguana). The study included eight green iguanas, and two ultrasound-guided biopsies were collected for each lizard, for 16 biopsies in total. The procedure was carried out under general anesthesia induced by intravenous injection of propofol (10 mg/kg) maintained with a mixture of 2.0% isoflurane and 0.8-1.2 L/min oxygen after tracheal intubation. Fourteen (87.5%) of the 16 biopsies were considered diagnostic. Liver biopsy quality was assessed according to sample size and tissue preservation. In particular, mean length (16.2 ± 4.5 mm), width (2.2 ± 0.5 mm), area (34.8 ± 6.9 mm(2)), and number of portal areas (9.4 ± 3.9) of each biopsy were recorded for all green iguanas. The total available surface of the sections obtained from the biopsies and their grade of preservation enabled a satisfactory evaluation of the parenchymal architecture. One of the green iguanas in the study died the day after the procedure due to severe hemocoeloma. Risk assessment evaluation suggested that small green iguanas may not be suitable for this biopsy procedure.

  5. Single-Pass Percutaneous Liver Biopsy for Diffuse Liver Disease Using an Automated Device: Experience in 154 Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Sanfeliz, Gerant Kinney, Thomas B.; Rose, Steven C.; Agha, Ayad K.M.; Valji, Karim; Miller, Franklin J.; Roberts, Anne C.

    2005-06-15

    Purpose: To describe our experience with ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous liver biopsies using the INRAD 18G Express core needle biopsy system.Methods: One hundred and fifty-four consecutive percutaneous core liver biopsy procedures were performed in 153 men in a single institution over 37 months. The medical charts, pathology reports, and radiology files were retrospectively reviewed. The number of needle passes, type of guidance, change in hematocrit level, and adequacy of specimens for histologic analysis were evaluated.Results: All biopsies were performed for histologic staging of chronic liver diseases. The majority of patients had hepatitis C (134/153, 90.2%). All patients were discharged to home after 4 hr of postprocedural observation. In 145 of 154 (94%) biopsies, a single needle pass was sufficient for diagnosis. US guidance was utilized in all but one of the procedures (153/154, 99.4%). The mean hematocrit decrease was 1.2% (44.1-42.9%). Pain requiring narcotic analgesia, the most frequent complication, occurred in 28 of 154 procedures (18.2%). No major complications occurred. The specimens were diagnostic in 152 of 154 procedures (98.7%).Conclusions: Single-pass percutaneous US-guided liver biopsy with the INRAD 18G Express core needle biopsy system is safe and provides definitive pathologic diagnosis of chronic liver disease. It can be performed on an outpatient basis. Routine post-biopsy monitoring of hematocrit level in stable, asymptomatic patients is probably not warranted.

  6. Diagnosis: to biopsy or not to biopsy: assessing the role of surgical lung biopsy in the diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Michael C

    2005-11-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic disorder that is associated with a poorer prognosis than subacute idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs). IPF can be differentiated from other IIPs on the basis of its histologic pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). Although a surgical lung biopsy specimen showing a UIP pattern is required for the definitive diagnosis of IPF, clinical criteria can be used in the absence of a lung biopsy specimen to make a likely diagnosis of IPF. The predictive value of these criteria largely depends on the expertise of the clinician and radiologist, but considerable interobserver variability exists even when evaluations are performed by experts in the field. Moreover, these criteria lead to misdiagnosis in about 25 to 35% of cases. Interobserver variability is reduced and diagnostic accuracy is improved in cases in which a diagnosis is made with a high degree of confidence. Diagnostic accuracy is also higher when the diagnosis is made by a core group of experts rather than by a referring center. The decision on whether or not to perform a surgical lung biopsy is difficult. It is clearly indicated in cases in which clinical or radiologic findings are atypical or when the diagnosis is made with a low degree of certainty.

  7. Basics of kidney biopsy: A nephrologist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, S. K.; Sethi, S.; Dinda, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of the kidney biopsy is one of the major events in the history of nephrology. Primary indications of kidney biopsy are glomerular hematuria/proteinuria with or without renal dysfunction and unexplained renal failure. Kidney biopsy is usually performed in prone position but in certain situations, supine and lateral positions may be required. Biopsy needles have changed with times from Vim–Silverman needle to Tru-cut needle to spring-loaded automatic gun. The procedure has also changed from blind bedside kidney biopsy to ultrasound marking to real-time ultrasound guidance to rarely computerized tomography guidance and laparoscopic and open biopsy. In very specific situations, transjugular kidney biopsy may be required. Most of the centers do kidney biopsy on short 1-day admission, whereas some take it as an outdoor procedure. For critical interpretation of kidney biopsy, adequate sample and clinical information are mandatory. Tissue needs to be stained with multiple stains for delineation of various components of kidney tissue. Many consider that electron microscopy (EM) is a must for all kidney biopsies, but facilities for EM are limited even in big centers. Sophisticated tests such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization are useful adjuncts for definitive diagnosis in certain situations. PMID:23960337

  8. Outcome of MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy – initial experience at Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Zebic-Sinkovec, Marta; Hertl, Kristijana; Kadivec, Maksimiljan; Cavlek, Mihael; Podobnik, Gasper; Snoj, Marko

    2012-01-01

    Background Like all breast imaging modalities MRI has limited specificity and the positive predictive value for lesions detected by MRI alone ranges between 15 and 50%. MRI guided procedures (needle biopsy, presurgical localisation) are mandatory for suspicious findings visible only at MRI, with potential influence on therapeutic decision. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate our initial clinical experience with MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy as an alternative to surgical excision and to investigate the outcome of MRI-guided breast biopsy as a function of the MRI features of the lesions. Patients and methods. In 14 women (median age 51 years) with 14 MRI-detected lesions, MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy was performed. We evaluated the MRI findings that led to biopsy and we investigated the core and postoperative histology results and follow-up data. Results The biopsy was technically successful in 14 (93%) of 15 women. Of 14 biopsies in 14 women, core histology revealed 6 malignant (6/14, 43%), 6 benign (6/14, 43%) and 2 high-risk (2/14, 14%) lesions. Among the 6 cancer 3 were invasive and 3 were ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The probability of malignancy in our experience was higher for non-mass lesion type and for washout and plateau kinetics. Conclusions Our initial experience confirms that MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy is fast, safe and accurate alternative to surgical biopsy for breast lesions detected at MRI only. PMID:23077445

  9. Evaluation of GSTP1 and APC methylation as indicators for repeat biopsy in a high-risk cohort of men with negative initial prostate biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Trock, Bruce J.; Brotzman, Michelle J.; Mangold, Leslie A.; Bigley, Joseph W.; Epstein, Jonathan I.; McLeod, David; Klein, Eric A.; Jones, J. Stephen; Wang, Songbai; McAskill, Theresa; Mehrotra, Jyoti; Raghavan, Bhargavi; Partin, Alan W.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the performance of DNA methylation biomarkers in the setting of repeat biopsy in men with an initially negative prostate biopsy but a high index of suspicion for missed prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS We prospectively evaluated 86 men with an initial histologically negative prostate biopsy and high-risk features. All men underwent repeat 12-core ultrasonography-guided biopsy. DNA methylation of glutathione-S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) was determined using tissue from the initially negative biopsy and compared with histology of the repeat biopsy. The primary outcome was the relative negative predictive value (NPV) of APC compared with GSTP1, and its 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULTS On repeat biopsy, 21/86 (24%) men had prostate cancer. APC and GSTP1 methylation ratios below the threshold (predicting no cancer) produced a NPV of 0.96 and 0.80, respectively. The relative NPV was 1.2 (95% CI: 1.06–1.36), indicating APC has significantly higher NPV. Methylation ratios above the threshold yielded a sensitivity of 0.95 for APC and 0.43 for GSTP1. Combining both methylation markers produced a performance similar to that of APC alone. APC methylation patterns were consistent with a possible field effect or occurrence early in carcinogenesis. CONCLUSION APC methylation provided a very high NPV with a low percentage of false-negatives, in the first prospective study to evaluate performance of DNA methylation markers in a clinical cohort of men undergoing repeat biopsy. The potential of APC methylation to reduce unnecessary repeat biopsies warrants validation in a larger prospective cohort. PMID:22077694

  10. Image-Guided Adrenal and Renal Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Karun V.; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Swerdlow, Daniel; DaSilva, Daniel; Beck, Avi; Jain, Nidhi; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided biopsy is a safe and well-established technique that is familiar to most interventional radiologists (IRs). Improvements in image-guidance, biopsy tools and biopsy techniques now routinely allow for safe biopsy of renal and adrenal lesions which traditionally were considered difficult to reach or technically challenging. Image-guided biopsy is used to establish the definitive tissue diagnosis in adrenal mass lesions that can not be fully characterized with imaging or laboratory tests alone. It is also used to establish definitive diagnosis in some cases of renal parenchymal disease and has an expanding role in diagnosis and characterization of renal masses prior to treatment. Although basic principles and techniques for image-guided needle biopsy are similar regardless of organ, this paper will highlight some technical considerations, indications and complications which are unique to the adrenal gland and kidney because of their anatomic location and physiologic features. PMID:20540919

  11. Photoacoustic biopsy: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Tomlins, Scott A.; Siddiqui, Javed; Davis, Mandy A.; Kunju, Lakshmi P.; Wei, John T.; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) measurements encode the information associated with both physical microstructures and chemical contents in biological tissues. A two-dimensional physio-chemical spectrogram (PCS) can be formulated by combining the power spectra of PA signals acquired at a series of optical wavelengths. The analysis of PCS, or namely PA physio-chemical analysis (PAPCA), enables the quantification of the concentrations and the spatial distributions of a variety of chemical components in the tissue. The chemical components and their distribution are the two major features observed in the biopsy procedures which have been regarded as the gold standard of the diagnosis of many diseases. Taking non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and prostate cancer for example, this study investigates the feasibility of PAPCA in characterizing the histopathological changes in the diseased conditions in biological tissue. A catheter based setup facilitating measurement in deep tissues was also proposed and tested.

  12. Papillary lesions of the breast: outcomes of 156 patients managed without excisional biopsy.

    PubMed

    Wyss, Paloma; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Rössle, Matthias; Rageth, Christoph J

    2014-01-01

    Papillomas of the breast are benign epithelial neoplasms. Because of the low, but continued potential for malignancy, the treatment options after initial diagnosis remain controversial. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical course of patients with papilloma who were managed by active surveillance following initial diagnosis by core needle biopsy or vacuum-assisted biopsy. This retrospective study analyzed 174 patients with 180 papillomas that were diagnosed by core needle biopsy (113 cases) or vacuum-assisted biopsy (67 cases) at the Breast Center Seefeld Zurich between February 2002 and May 2011. We excluded 24 cases that underwent excisional biopsy for removal of the lesion. Over a mean follow-up of 3.5 years, 13 further events occurred in 156 cases (8%). These events included two cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (one after 4 and one after 6 years), one case of atypical ductal hyperplasia, one radial scar, eight cases of papilloma, and one case of flat epithelial atypia. No invasive carcinomas occurred during the follow-up period. Conservative management of 156 papillary lesions with removal by vacuum-assisted biopsy and surveillance was not associated with invasive cancer over a median follow-up of 3.5 years. Therefore, this approach seems to be a safe option for the clinical management of papillary lesions.

  13. Repeat Targeted Prostate Biopsy under Guidance of Multiparametric MRI-Correlated Real-Time Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound for Patients with Previous Negative Biopsy and Elevated Prostate-Specific Antigen: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dong Ryul; Jung, Dae Chul; Oh, Young Taik; Noh, Songmi; Han, Kyunghwa; Kim, Kiwook; Rha, Koon-Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Joon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To prospectively determine whether multi-parametric MRI (mpMRI) - contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) correlated, imaging-guided target biopsy (TB) method could improve the detection of prostate cancer in re-biopsy setting of patients with prior negative biopsy. Methods From 2012 to 2014, a total of 42 Korean men with a negative result from previous systematic biopsy (SB) and elevated prostate-specific antigen underwent 3T mpMRI and real-time CEUS guided TB. Target lesions were determined by fusion of mpMRI and CEUS. Subsequently, 12-core SB was performed by a different radiologist. We compared core-based cancer detection rates (CaDR) using the generalized linear mixed model (GLIMMIX) for each biopsy method. Results Core-based CaDR was higher in TB (17.92%, 38 of 212 cores) than in SB (6.15%, 31 of 504 cores) (p < 0.0001; GLIMMIX). In the cancer-positive TB cores, CaDR with suspicious lesions by mpMRI was higher than that by CEUS (86.8% vs. 60.5%, p= 0.02; paired t-test) and concordant rate between mpMRI and CEUS was significantly different with discordant rate (48% vs. 52%, p=0.04; McNemar’s test). Conclusion The mpMRI-CEUS correlated TB technique for the repeat prostate biopsy of patients with prior negative biopsy can improve CaDR based on the number of cores taken. PMID:26083348

  14. Patients with Persistently Elevated PSA and Negative Results of TRUS-Biopsy: Does 6-Month Treatment with Dutasteride can Indicate Candidates for Re-Biopsy. What is the Best of Saturation Schemes: Transrectal or Transperineal Approach?

    PubMed

    Kravchick, Sergey; Lobik, Leonid; Cytron, Shmuel; Kravchenko, Yakov; Dor, David Ben; Peled, Ronit

    2015-09-01

    To identify patients who actually need a re - biopsy, based on alterations in PSA readings after 6-month treatment with Dutasteride. We also sought to bring out the most beneficial re-biopsy scheme. We have reviewed the records of patients with persistently elevated PSA and at least one set of TRUS biopsies. Patients who were treated with alpha -blockers/Dutasteride combination were considered as the study group, while patients in control received alpha-blockers alone. Patients in both groups underwent re-biopsy 6 months later. The two protocols of re-biopsies were used at that time: 20-24 cores saturation transrectal (ST)) and ≥ 40 cores saturation transperineal template-guided (STT) biopsies. One hundred thirty-three patients were included in this study. In 86.7 % of the patients in the study group mean PSA decreased from 7.4 ± 2.69 to 4.037 ± 1.53 (p-0.001). The overall cancer detection rate was 29 % (n-39: 19 v/s 20, control and study groups, respectively). In the study group PSA decreased to 26.73 ± 11.26 % in patients with cancer, compared with 40.54 ± 13.3 % in patients without. It must be emphasized that STT-biopsies detected significantly more cancers (38.46 v/s 20.59 %, p- 0.005). Mean cores number got to 21 ± 2.45 and 45 ± 5.65 in ST and STT biopsies, respectively. Six-month treatment with Dutasteride decreases PSA readings in 86.7 % of the patients. A PSA decline of less than 40% (cutoff) should be considered as an indicator for re-biopsy. Transperineal template-guided biopsies had a higher cancer detection rate.

  15. Rectourethral fistula after repeat transrectal prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Loran, Oleg B; Veliev, Evgeny I; Sokolov, Egor A; Dadashev, Elmar O; Guspanov, Renat I

    2013-09-01

    Transrectal prostate biopsy is considered a relatively safe procedure, with a quite small number of complications. We report a patient with a rectourethral fistula after a repeat transrectal prostate biopsy. To our knowledge, this is the first incident in the published literature.

  16. Three different anesthesia techniques for a comfortable prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Şahin, Adnan; Ceylan, Cavit; Gazel, Eymen; Odabaş, Öner

    2015-01-01

    Aim: In this paper, we aimed to compare the efficacy of three different anesthesia techniques applied in 90 cases of which transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) -guided prostate biopsies were taken. Materials and Methods: Between February 2012 and July 2012, TRUS-guided 16 core biopsies were taken from 90 patients who comply the study criteria. Patients were randomly divided into three groups each of which consists of 30 individuals. Group 1: Was applied periprostatic block anesthesia; Group 2: Was administered intrarectal lidocaine gel; Group 3: Was applied pudendal block. Visual analog scale (VAS) of patients in groups was evaluated. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the mean ages, prostate-specific antigen values of three groups. Although pain ratings of Groups 2 and 3 were high, no significant difference was present between each other (P > 0.05). In Groups 1 and 2, the difference between VASs was significant. In the group where periprostatic block was applied, pain ratings were significantly low compared with the other two groups (P = 0.0001). Discussion: Enabling pain and discomfort control in patients is very important during TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. In our study, we observed that the periprostatic block enables more comfortable compared with patient groups with intrarectal lidocaine gel and pudendal block and better reduction in pain scores. PMID:26229322

  17. Image Registration for Targeted MRI-guided Transperineal Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Fedorov, Andriy; Tuncali, Kemal; Fennessy, Fiona M.; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Wells, William M.; Kikinis, Ron; Tempany, Clare M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate image registration methodology for automated re-identification of tumor-suspicious foci from pre-procedural MR exams during MR-guided transperineal prostate core biopsy. Materials and Methods A hierarchical approach for automated registration between planning and intra-procedural T2-weighted prostate MRI was developed and evaluated on the images acquired during 10 consecutive MR-guided biopsies. Registration accuracy was quantified at image-based landmarks and by evaluating spatial overlap for the manually segmented prostate and sub-structures. Registration reliability was evaluated by simulating initial mis-registration and analyzing the convergence behavior. Registration precision was characterized at the planned biopsy targets. Results The total computation time was compatible with a clinical setting, being at most 2 minutes. Deformable registration led to a significant improvement in spatial overlap of the prostate and peripheral zone contours compared to both rigid and affine registration. Average in-slice landmark registration error was 1.3±0.5 mm. Experiments simulating initial mis-registration resulted in an estimated average capture range of 6 mm and an average in-slice registration precision of ±0.3 mm. Conclusion Our registration approach requires minimum user interaction and is compatible with the time constraints of our interventional clinical workflow. The initial evaluation shows acceptable accuracy, reliability and consistency of the method. PMID:22645031

  18. Optimizing MRI-targeted fusion prostate biopsy: the effect of systematic error and anisotropy on tumor sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter R.; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided "fusion" prostate biopsy aims to reduce the 21-47% false negative rate of clinical 2D TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsy still has a substantial false negative rate. Therefore, we propose optimization of biopsy targeting to meet the clinician's desired tumor sampling probability, optimizing needle targets within each tumor and accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system errors, image registration errors, and irregular tumor shapes. As a step toward this optimization, we obtained multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) and 3D TRUS images from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D surfaces that were registered to 3D TRUS. We estimated the probability, P, of obtaining a tumor sample with a single biopsy, and investigated the effects of systematic errors and anisotropy on P. Our experiments indicated that a biopsy system's lateral and elevational errors have a much greater effect on sampling probabilities, relative to its axial error. We have also determined that for a system with RMS error of 3.5 mm, tumors of volume 1.9 cm3 and smaller may require more than one biopsy core to ensure 95% probability of a sample with 50% core involvement, and tumors 1.0 cm3 and smaller may require more than two cores.

  19. The liquid biopsy in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Junaid; Yun, Jungmi W; Kompelli, Anvesh R; Moufarrej, Youmna E; Alexander, Jonathan S; Herrera, Guillermo A; Shackelford, Rodney E

    2016-11-01

    The incidence of lung cancer has significantly increased over the last century, largely due to smoking, and remains the most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. This is often due to lung cancer first presenting at late stages and a lack of curative therapeutic options at these later stages. Delayed diagnoses, inadequate tumor sampling, and lung cancer misdiagnoses are also not uncommon due to the limitations of the tissue biopsy. Our better understanding of the tumor microenvironment and the systemic actions of tumors, combined with the recent advent of the liquid biopsy, may allow molecular diagnostics to be done on circulating tumor markers, particularly circulating tumor DNA. Multiple liquid biopsy molecular methods are presently being examined to determine their efficacy as surrogates to the tumor tissue biopsy. This review will focus on new liquid biopsy technologies and how they may assist in lung cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment.

  20. The liquid biopsy in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Junaid; Yun, Jungmi W.; Kompelli, Anvesh R.; Moufarrej, Youmna E.; Alexander, Jonathan S.; Herrera, Guillermo A.; Shackelford, Rodney E.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of lung cancer has significantly increased over the last century, largely due to smoking, and remains the most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. This is often due to lung cancer first presenting at late stages and a lack of curative therapeutic options at these later stages. Delayed diagnoses, inadequate tumor sampling, and lung cancer misdiagnoses are also not uncommon due to the limitations of the tissue biopsy. Our better understanding of the tumor microenvironment and the systemic actions of tumors, combined with the recent advent of the liquid biopsy, may allow molecular diagnostics to be done on circulating tumor markers, particularly circulating tumor DNA. Multiple liquid biopsy molecular methods are presently being examined to determine their efficacy as surrogates to the tumor tissue biopsy. This review will focus on new liquid biopsy technologies and how they may assist in lung cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:28191282

  1. [Experimental quality control of biopsy cannulas].

    PubMed

    Schild, H H; Michel, S G

    1993-09-01

    To examine the quality and comparability of biopsy needles. 310 biopsy needles of 40 types were examined microscopically and their suitability for penetrating tissues were studied. For this purpose the pressure required to penetrate a phantom was evaluated. The results were correlated with the diameter, design and construction. 50 of the 310 needles (16%) showed faults on microscopic examination. Measurements of identical needle types within a single production run showed variations in penetration pressures up to 330% (measured as force required for penetration), the average variation was 88%. The results show that the quality of biopsy needles is not constant and leaves something to be desired. To what extent variations in quality affect the biopsy material cannot be estimated. Nevertheless, the present results indicate that stricter quality control of biopsy needles is desirable.

  2. Association of [-2]proPSA with Biopsy Reclassification During Active Surveillance for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tosoian, Jeffrey J.; Loeb, Stacy; Feng, Zhaoyong; Isharwal, Sumit; Landis, Patricia; Elliot, Debra J.; Veltri, Robert; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Partin, Alan W.; Carter, H. Ballentine; Trock, Bruce; Sokoll, Lori J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have suggested an association between [-2]proPSA expression and prostate cancer detection. Less is known about the utility of this marker in following prostate cancer patients on active surveillance. Thus, our objective was to examine the relationship between [-2]proPSA and biopsy results in men enrolled in an active surveillance program. Materials and Methods In 167 men from our institutional active surveillance program, we used Cox proportional hazards models to examine the relationship between [-2]proPSA and annual surveillance biopsy results. The outcome of interest was biopsy reclassification (Gleason score ≥7, or >2 positive biopsy cores, or >50% involvement of any core with cancer). We also examined the association of biopsy results with total PSA, %fPSA, [-2]proPSA/%fPSA, and the Beckman Coulter Prostate Health Index [phi=([-2]proPSA/fPSA) x (tPSA)½]. Results While on active surveillance (median time from diagnosis 4.3 years), 63 (37.7%) men demonstrated biopsy reclassification based on the above criteria, including 28 (16.7%) of whom had reclassification based on Gleason score upgrading (Gleason score≥7). Baseline and longitudinal %fPSA, %[-2]proPSA, [-2]proPSA/%fPSA, and phi measurements were significantly associated with biopsy reclassification, and %[-2]proPSA and phi provided the greatest predictive accuracy for high-grade cancer. Conclusions In men on active surveillance, measures based on [-2]proPSA such as phi, appear to provide improved prediction of biopsy reclassification during follow-up. Additional validation is warranted to determine whether clinically useful thresholds can be defined, and to better characterize the role of %[-2]proPSA and phi in conjunction with other markers in monitoring patients enrolled in active surveillance. PMID:22901577

  3. Transplant biopsy beyond light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Adam, Benjamin; Mengel, Michael

    2015-08-07

    Despite its long-standing status as the diagnostic "gold standard", the renal transplant biopsy is limited by a fundamental dependence on descriptive, empirically-derived consensus classification. The recent shift towards personalized medicine has resulted in an increased demand for precise, mechanism-based diagnoses, which is not fully met by the contemporary transplantation pathology standard of care. The expectation is that molecular techniques will provide novel pathogenetic insights that will allow for the identification of more accurate diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic targets. Here we review the current state of molecular renal transplantation pathology. Despite significant research activity and progress within the field, routine adoption of clinical molecular testing has not yet been achieved. The recent development of novel molecular platforms suitable for use with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue will offer potential solution for the major barriers to implementation. The recent incorporation of molecular diagnostic criteria into the 2013 Banff classification is a reflection of progress made and future directions in the area of molecular transplantation pathology. Transcripts related to endothelial injury and NK cell activation have consistently been shown to be associated with antibody-mediated rejection. Prospective multicenter validation and implementation of molecular diagnostics for major entities remains an unmet clinical need in transplantation. It is expected that an integrated system of transplantation pathology diagnosis comprising molecular, morphological, serological, and clinical variables will ultimately provide the greatest diagnostic precision.

  4. Features of Occult Invasion in Biopsy-Proven DCIS at Breast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wisner, Dorota Jakubowski; Hwang, E. Shelley; Chang, C. Belinda; Tso, Hilda H.; Joe, Bonnie N.; Lessing, Juan N.; Lu, Ying; Hylton, Nola M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine if MRI BI-RADS criteria or radiologist perception correlate with presence of invasive cancer after initial core biopsy of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Materials and Methods Retrospective search spanning 2000-2007 identified all core-biopsy diagnoses of pure DCIS that coincided with preoperative MRI. Two radiologists fellowship-trained in breast imaging categorized lesions according to ACR MRI-BIRADS lexicon and estimated likelihood of occult invasion. Semi-quantitative signal enhancement ratio (SER) kinetic analysis was also performed. Results were compared to histopathology. Results 51 consecutive patients with primary core biopsy-proven DCIS and concurrent MRI were identified. Of these, 13 patients (25%) had invasion at excision. Invasion correlated significantly with presence of a mass for both readers (p=0.012, 0.001), rapid initial enhancement for Reader 1 (p=0.001), and washout kinetics for Reader 2 (p=0.012). Significant correlation between washout and invasion was confirmed by SER (p=0.006) when threshold percent enhancement was sufficiently high (130%), corresponding to rapidly enhancing portions of the lesion. Radiologist perception of occult invasion was strongly correlated to true presence of invasion. Conclusion These results provide evidence that certain BI-RADS MRI criteria, as well as radiologist perception, correlate with occult invasion after an initial core biopsy of DCIS. PMID:24165314

  5. Features of occult invasion in biopsy-proven DCIS at breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Wisner, Dorota Jakubowski; Hwang, E Shelley; Chang, C Belinda; Tso, Hilda H; Joe, Bonnie N; Lessing, Juan N; Lu, Ying; Hylton, Nola M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if MRI BI-RADS criteria or radiologist perception correlate with presence of invasive cancer after initial core biopsy of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Retrospective search spanning 2000-2007 identified all core-biopsy diagnoses of pure DCIS that coincided with preoperative MRI. Two radiologists fellowship-trained in breast imaging categorized lesions according to ACR MRI BI-RADS lexicon and estimated likelihood of occult invasion. Semiquantitative signal enhancement ratio (SER) kinetic analysis was also performed. Results were compared with histopathology. 51 consecutive patients with primary core biopsy-proven DCIS and concurrent MRI were identified. Of these, 13 patients (25%) had invasion at excision. Invasion correlated significantly with presence of a mass for both readers (p = 0.012 and 0.001), rapid initial enhancement for Reader 1 (p = 0.001), and washout kinetics for Reader 2 (p = 0.012). Significant correlation between washout and invasion was confirmed by SER (p = 0.006) when threshold percent enhancement was sufficiently high (130%), corresponding to rapidly enhancing portions of the lesion. Radiologist perception of occult invasion was strongly correlated with true presence of invasion. These results provide evidence that certain BI-RADS MRI criteria, as well as radiologist perception, correlate with occult invasion after an initial core biopsy of DCIS.

  6. 21 CFR 876.1075 - Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument. 876... Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument. (a) Identification. A gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument is a... generic type of device includes the biopsy punch, gastrointestinal mechanical biopsy instrument,...

  7. Clinical Validation of an Epigenetic Assay to Predict Negative Histopathological Results in Repeat Prostate Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Partin, Alan W.; Van Neste, Leander; Klein, Eric A.; Marks, Leonard S.; Gee, Jason R.; Troyer, Dean A.; Rieger-Christ, Kimberly; Jones, J. Stephen; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Mangold, Leslie A.; Trock, Bruce J.; Lance, Raymond S.; Bigley, Joseph W.; Van Criekinge, Wim; Epstein, Jonathan I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The DOCUMENT multicenter trial in the United States validated the performance of an epigenetic test as an independent predictor of prostate cancer risk to guide decision making for repeat biopsy. Confirming an increased negative predictive value could help avoid unnecessary repeat biopsies. Materials and Methods We evaluated the archived, cancer negative prostate biopsy core tissue samples of 350 subjects from a total of 5 urological centers in the United States. All subjects underwent repeat biopsy within 24 months with a negative (controls) or positive (cases) histopathological result. Centralized blinded pathology evaluation of the 2 biopsy series was performed in all available subjects from each site. Biopsies were epigenetically profiled for GSTP1, APC and RASSF1 relative to the ACTB reference gene using quantitative methylation specific polymerase chain reaction. Predetermined analytical marker cutoffs were used to determine assay performance. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate all risk factors. Results The epigenetic assay resulted in a negative predictive value of 88% (95% CI 85–91). In multivariate models correcting for age, prostate specific antigen, digital rectal examination, first biopsy histopathological characteristics and race the test proved to be the most significant independent predictor of patient outcome (OR 2.69, 95% CI 1.60–4.51). Conclusions The DOCUMENT study validated that the epigenetic assay was a significant, independent predictor of prostate cancer detection in a repeat biopsy collected an average of 13 months after an initial negative result. Due to its 88% negative predictive value adding this epigenetic assay to other known risk factors may help decrease unnecessary repeat prostate biopsies. PMID:24747657

  8. Predicting Low-Risk Prostate Cancer from Transperineal Saturation Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Pim J.; Siriwardana, Amila; Roobol, Monique; Ting, Francis; Nieboer, Daan; Thompson, James; Delprado, Warick; Haynes, Anne-Marie; Brenner, Phillip; Stricker, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To assess the performance of five previously described clinicopathological definitions of low-risk prostate cancer (PC). Materials and Methods. Men who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) for clinical stage ≤T2, PSA <10 ng/mL, Gleason score <8 PC, diagnosed by transperineal template-guided saturation biopsy were included. The performance of five previously described criteria (i.e., criteria 1–5, criterion 1 stringent (Gleason score 6 + ≤5 mm total max core length PC + ≤3 mm max per core length PC) up to criterion 5 less stringent (Gleason score 6-7 with ≤5% Gleason grade 4) was analysed to assess ability of each to predict insignificant disease in RP specimens (defined as Gleason score ≤6 and total tumour volume <2.5 mL, or Gleason score 7 with ≤5% grade 4 and total tumour volume <0.7 mL). Results. 994 men who underwent RP were included. Criterion 4 (Gleason score 6) performed best with area under the curve of receiver operating characteristics 0.792. At decision curve analysis, criterion 4 was deemed clinically the best performing transperineal saturation biopsy-based definition for low-risk PC. Conclusions. Gleason score 6 disease demonstrated a superior trade-off between sensitivity and specificity for clarifying low-risk PC that can guide treatment and be used as reference test in diagnostic studies. PMID:27148459

  9. Liver biopsy histopathology for diagnosis of Johne's disease in sheep.

    PubMed

    Smith, S L; Wilson, P R; Collett, M G; Heuer, C; West, D M; Stevenson, M; Chambers, J P

    2014-09-01

    Sheep with Johne's disease develop epithelioid macrophage microgranulomas, specific to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) infection, in the terminal ileum, mesenteric lymph nodes, and organs distant to the alimentary tract such as the liver. The objectives of this study were to determine whether liver pathology was present in ewes affected by Map and whether liver cores provide adequate tissue for this potential diagnostic marker. One hundred and twenty-six adult, low body condition ewes were euthanized, necropsied, and underwent simulated liver biopsy. Ileal lesions typical of Map were found in 60 ewes. Hepatic epithelioid microgranulomas were observed in all ewes with Type 3b (n = 40) and 82% (n = 11) with Type 3c ileal lesions. None were found in ewes unaffected by Map or with Type 1, 2, or 3a ileal lesions. Liver biopsy core samples provided adequate tissue for histopathology with a sensitivity and specificity of 96% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.87-0.99) and 100% (95% CI, 0.95-1), respectively for detection of types 3b and 3c ileal lesions.

  10. Prevention of sepsis prior to prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Toner, Liam; Bolton, Damien M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Urosepsis is the most feared complication of transrectal prostate biopsy. The incidence may be increasing from <1% to 2%–3% in contemporary series. Historically, fluoroquinolones have been effective antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent infective complications but antibiotic resistance is increasing. The increase in antibiotic resistance may contribute to reported increases in urosepsis and hospitalization after transrectal biopsy. This article will review other methods clinicians may employ to reduce the incidence of infective complications after prostate biopsy. Materials and Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted using literature databases PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE in August 2015 in accordance with the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses) criteria. Results Effective strategies to reduce infective complications after transrectal prostate biopsy include augmented prophylaxis with other antibiotics, rectal swab culture directed antibiotic prophylaxis or a transperineal biopsy approach. Needle disinfection, minimizing the number of biopsy needles and rectal disinfectants may also be of use. These methods may be of particular utility in patients with risk factors for developing urosepsis such as recent antibiotic use and overseas travel. Conclusions The scientific literature describes various techniques designed to reduce infective complications caused by prostate biopsy. Clinicians should consider incorporating these novel techniques into their contemporary practice. PMID:26981590

  11. Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid An ultrasound-guided thyroid biopsy ... Thyroid? What is Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid? During a fine needle aspiration ...

  12. Multiparametric-MRI and Targeted Biopsies in the Management of Prostate Cancer Patients on Active Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Kiri; Patel, Mausam; Lynne, Charles; Parekh, Dipen J.; Punnen, Sanoj; Jorda, Merce; Casillas, Javier; Pollack, Alan; Stoyanova, Radka

    2015-01-01

    An important key to clinical management of prostate cancer patients is to determine early those who will benefit from primary treatment and are not good candidates for active surveillance (AS). We describe a 67-year-old gentleman with a long history of stable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and a negative biopsy. After slight PSA rise and low volume Gleason score 6 biopsy, the patient was considered for primary treatment or AS. A multiparametric (MP)-MRI exam revealed a suspicious lesion in the anterior apex of the prostate. Biopsies were carried out on a 3D-ultrasound prostate biopsy system with MRI-fusion. The location of the target area was challenging and could have been missed using standard 12-core biopsy template. The pathology determined Gleason 3 + 4 disease in 30% of the core from this region. Consequently, the patient underwent radiotherapy (RT). MP-MRI was also used to follow the changes from pre- to post-RT. PMID:25674540

  13. Brain biopsy in benign neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Gilkes, C E; Love, S; Hardie, R J; Edwards, R J; Scolding, N J; Rice, C M

    2012-05-01

    Brain biopsy is well established in clinical practice when there is suspicion of CNS malignancy. However, there is little consensus regarding the indications for brain biopsy in non-malignant neurological disease. This is due in no small part to limitations in the available literature pertaining to diagnostic brain biopsies. The published evidence largely comprises small, retrospective, single-centre analyses performed over long time periods, including non-homogeneous patient groups with considerable variation in reported outcomes. Here we present pragmatic guidance for those clinicians considering diagnostic brain biopsy in a patient with non-neoplastic neurological disease and highlight practice points with the aim of maximising the probability of gaining clinically useful information from the procedure.

  14. [Cartilage biopsy for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI)].

    PubMed

    Pestka, J M; Salzmann, G M; Südkamp, N P; Niemeyer, P

    2013-06-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is an established two-step procedure for the treatment of full-thickness cartilage defects of the knee. Cartilage harvest from the affected knee joint represents the first step of this procedure and is essential for further in vitro expansion of autologous chondrocytes. Nevertheless, the cartilage biopsy process itself is underrepresented in the scientific literature and currently there is only a limited amount of data available addressing this process. Biopsy location as well as the technique itself and instruments used for cartilage collection are not well defined and only little standardisation can be found. The article describes the relevant aspects of the biopsy in the context of ACI with regard to the literature available. Follow-up studies to better define and standardise the cartilage biopsy process are thus required.

  15. 20 CFR 718.106 - Autopsy; biopsy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... miner who died prior to March 31, 1980, an autopsy or biopsy report shall be considered even when the... concerning a miner who died prior to March 31, 1980, shall be accorded the appropriate weight in light of...

  16. Magnetic Resonance (MR)-Guided Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Breast . top of page What does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a ... is used for a surgical biopsy. Other sterile equipment involved in this procedure includes syringes, sponges, forceps, ...

  17. Predicting the Risk of Non–organ-confined Prostate Cancer When Perineural Invasion Is Found on Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Gorin, Michael A.; Chalfin, Heather J.; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Feng, Zhaoyong; Partin, Alan W.; Trock, Bruce J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To more precisely define the risk of non–organ-confined (non-OC) prostate cancer among men with perineural invasion (PNI) identified on prostate biopsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS The Johns Hopkins radical prostatectomy database was queried for men with PNI reported on prostate biopsy. Patients with and without non-OC disease were compared for differences in preoperative clinical and pathologic characteristics, including three biopsy-based measures of tumor volume (number of cores with cancer, percentage of cores with cancer, and maximum percent core involvement with cancer). After evaluating the different preoperative variables in univariate analyses, a multivariable logistic regression model was generated, and bootstrap estimates of the risk of non-OC disease were calculated. RESULTS In total, 556 patients with PNI were analyzed, 279 (50.2%) of whom were found to have non-OC prostate cancer. In univariate analyses, preoperative prostate-specific antigen, clinical T stage, biopsy Gleason sum, and the three biopsy-based measures of tumor volume were significantly associated with non-OC disease. Of the three measures of tumor volume, the best fit to the data and highest degree of model discrimination were obtained using maximum percent core involvement with cancer. Incorporating this variable, preoperative prostate-specific antigen, clinical T stage, and biopsy Gleason sum into a multivariable model, the estimated risk of non-OC disease was found to range from 13.8% to 94.4% (bootstrap corrected c-index = 0.735). CONCLUSION Men with PNI on prostate biopsy are at a wide range of risk for non-OC disease. Preoperative estimation of this risk is improved by considering readily available biopsy estimates of tumor volume. PMID:24655556

  18. Giardia lamblia trophozoites in gastric biopsies.

    PubMed

    Misra, Vatsala; Misra, S P; Dwivedi, Manisha; Singh, P A

    2006-10-01

    To assess the prevalence of gastric giardiasis in gastric biopsies of patients with carcinoma stomach and in patients taking treatment for duodenal ulcer. Gastric biopsy specimens from 54 patients of carcinoma stomach and 100 antral biopsies from patients taking treatment for duodenal ulcer were included in the study. Sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin, methylene blue and May Grunwald-Giemsa stains and examined for presence of Giardia lamblia trophozoites. Eight out of 54 (14.9%) biopsies of gastric carcinoma patients harboured trophozoites of Giardia lamblia. Associated H. pylori infection was present in all biopsies (8/8; 100%). Atrophy and intestinal metaplasia was present in 62.5% (5/8) and 25% (2/8) cases respectively. Sections from seven out of 35 patients (20%) taking treatment for duodenal ulcer showed presence of G. lamblia. H. pylori infection, gastritis and atrophy were found in 85.7% (6/7), 71.4% (5/7) and 28.6% (2/7) cases respectively. First gastric biopsy in these patients was negative for G. lamblia but 2nd and 3rd biopsies were positive. A careful search for G. lamblia trophozoites should be made while examining the gastric biopsies, especially in patients with carcinoma stomach, intestinal metaplasia, atrophic gastritis and those taking treatment for duodenal ulcer. This may help in indirect diagnosis of clinically unsuspected cases of intestinal giardiasis and may explain persistence of vague upper gastrointestinal tract (UGIT) symptoms despite clearance of H. pylori in patients on anti-ulcer therapy.

  19. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Guided Biopsy of Undetermined Abdominal Lesions: A Multidisciplinary Decision-Making Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Feng; Dong, Yi; Ji, Zhengbiao; Cao, Jiaying

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) guided biopsy of undetermined abdominal lesions in multidisciplinary treatment (MDT) decision-making approach. Methods. Between Jan 2012 and Dec 2015, 60 consecutive patients (male, 37; female, 23; mean age, 51.3 years ± 14.6) who presented with undetermined abdominal lesions were included. CEUS and core needle percutaneous biopsy was performed under real-time CEUS guidance in all lesions. Data were recorded and compared with conventional ultrasound (US) guidance group (n = 75). All CEUS findings and clinical data were evaluated in MDT. Results. CEUS enabled the delimitation of more (88.3% versus 41.3%) and larger (14.1 ± 10.7 mm versus 32.3 ± 18.5 mm) nonenhanced necrotic areas. More inner (20.0% versus 6.7%) and surrounding (18.3% versus 2.7%) major vessels were visualized and avoided during biopsies. CEUS-guided biopsy increased the diagnostic accuracy from 93.3% to 98.3%, with correct diagnosis in 57 of 60 lesions (95.0%). The therapeutic plan was influenced by CEUS guided biopsies findings in the majority of patients (98.3%). Conclusion. The combination of CEUS guided biopsy and MDT decision-making approach is useful in the diagnostic work-up and therapeutic management. PMID:28133613

  20. From testicular biopsy to human embryo.

    PubMed

    Jezek, D; Knezević, N; Kalanj-Bognar, S; Vukelić, Z; Krhen, I

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the role of a testicular biopsy in the diagnosis and therapy of infertile men with a non-obstructive azoospermia. Overall, 70 testicular biopsies from infertile men were analysed. Samples were obtained by the "open testicular biopsy" method. After dissection, several pieces of the tissue were immediately immersed into the Sperm Prep Medium (Medi-Cult) and fixative (5.5% buffered glutaraldehyde). Tissue samples transported in Sperm Prep Medium were plunged into Sperm Freezing Medium (Medi-Cult) and were stored in liquid nitrogen for potential in vitro fertilization procedures. The tissue was also processed for semithin sections and transmission electron microscopy. Semithin sections from 8 infertile patients demonstrated regular testis structure and fully preserved spermatogenesis (control biopsies). In the remaining 62 cases, spermatogenesis was impaired and a variety of pathological changes could be seen: disorganization and desquamation of spermatogenic cells, spermatid or spermatocyte "stop", spermatogonia only, "Sertoli cells only" or tubular fibrosis. However, in 65% of cases (despite the above mentioned changes of seminiferous epithelium) foci of preserved spermatogenesis could be detected. These cases were classified as "mixed atrophy" of seminiferous tubules. In 63% of infertile patients, a successful extraction of sperm from the biopsy could be performed. In azoospermic patients, histological analysis of testicular biopsy proved to be very useful in terms of diagnosis as well as therapy, i.e. for further in vitro fertilization procedures.

  1. Single Dose of Levofloxacin versus Three Dosages for Prophylaxis in Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Linden-Castro, Edgar; Pelayo-Nieto, Marcela; Alias-Melgar, Alejandro; Carreño-de la Rosa, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Transrectal ultrasound-guided core prostate biopsy is a key event in the diagnosis of prostate cancer, transient side events such as local pain, haematuria, haematospermia, dysuria, and rectal bleeding are reported in a large number of patients. Antimicrobial agents lower the incidence of postbiopsy infectious complications. The timing and duration of the regimen and the route of administration remain controversial. We developed a standard prophylactic regimen, in which safety and efficiency were maximized, while costs and variability were minimized. Accordingly we prospectively evaluated 425 consecutive patients, who underwent outpatient transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy after a single dose versus three doses of levofloxacin. PMID:27437497

  2. Hematoma in Retzius' space following US-guided prostate biopsy: evidence of the diagnostic accuracy using transrectal end-fire probe in the anterior prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Dell'atti, Lucio

    2014-03-01

    We report a rare case of hematoma in Retzius' space in a 62-year-old man who underwent transrectal prostate biopsy using an endocavitary, end-fire, convex probe. Clinical symptoms resolved spontaneously after catheter placement and appropriate antibiotic therapy. Transrectal ultrasound 1 month later showed partial resolution of the hematoma. Based on the analysis of this unusual complication, we demonstrate the effectiveness of transrectal biopsy as compared to transperineal biopsy in detecting cancer of the anterior prostate. We have also analyzed the various factors that may be the reason why core biopsy harvested in this "hidden" area may be inadequate.

  3. MO-G-17A-09: Quantitative Autoradiography of Biopsy Specimens Extracted Under PET/CT Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Fanchon, L; Carlin, S; Schmidtlein, C; Humm, J; Yorke, E; Solomon, S; Deasy, J; Kirov, A; Burger, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a procedure for accurate determination of PET tracer concentration with high spatial accuracy in situ by performing Quantitative Autoradiography of Biopsy Specimens (QABS) extracted under PET/CT guidance. Methods: Autoradiography (ARG) standards were produced from a gel loaded with a known concentration of FDG biopsied with 18G and 20G biopsy needles. Specimens obtained with these needles are generally cylindrical: up to 18 mm in length and about 0.8 and 0.6 mm in diameter respectively. These standards, with similar shape and density as biopsy specimens were used to generate ARG calibration curves.Quantitative ARG was performed to measure the activity concentration in biopsy specimens extracted from ten patients. The biopsy sites were determined according to PET/CT's obtained in the operating room. Additional CT scans were acquired with the needles in place to confirm correct needle placements. The ARG images were aligned with the needle tip in the PET/CT images using the open source CERR software. The mean SUV calculated from the specimen activities (SUVarg) were compared to that from PET (SUVpet) at the needle locations. Results: Calibration curves show that the relation between ARG signal and activity concentration in those standards is linear for the investigated range (up to 150 kBq/ml). The correlation coefficient of SUVarg with SUVpet is 0.74. Discrepancies between SUVarg and SUVpet can be attributed to the small size of the biopsy specimens compared to PET resolution. Conclusion: The calibration procedure using surrogate biopsy specimens provided a method for quantifying the activity within the biopsy cores obtained under FDG-PET guidance. QABS allows mapping the activity concentration in such biopsy specimens with a resolution of about 1mm. QABS is a promising tool for verification of biopsy adequacy by comparing specimen activity to that expected from the PET image. A portion of this research was funded by a research grant from

  4. Assessment of histopathological features of needle biopsy in recurrent prostate cancer following salvage high-intensity focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Billia, Michele; Siddiqui, Khurram M.; Chan, Susanne; Li, Fan; Al-Zahrani, Ali; Gomez, Jose A.; Chin, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Local recurrence of prostate cancer (PCa) following radiotherapy may be treated with curative intent using salvage high-intensity focused ultrasound (s-HIFU). The interpretation of needle core biopsy specimens following s-HIFU is a daunting task, even for experienced pathologists. We describe various histopathological features encountered in biopsy specimens following whole-gland s-HIFU in one of the largest descriptive studies to date. Methods Fifty-five patients with biopsy-proven localized radio-recurrent PCa underwent s-HIFU and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostatic needle biopsies at 180 days post-treatment. All biopsies were reviewed by two genitourinary pathologists. Results PCa was detected in 11 (24%) biopsies. Radiation therapy-associated changes were identified in all cases. Additional findings included extensive coagulative stromal necrosis (100%), smudgy chromatin of cancer nuclei (82%), and markedly enlarged bizarre nuclei in the residual cancer (55%). Gleason grade assignment was possible in 10 (91%) of these biopsies and concordance of Gleason grading between pre- and post-therapy specimens was observed in six (60%) cases. Conclusions The histological interpretation of needle biopsies following salvage HIFU is challenging and requires an understanding of the histopathological changes associated with this procedure in both tumoural and non-tumoural prostatic tissue. Accurate interpretation of the morphological changes following s-HIFU is instrumental for optimization of clinical decision-making and treatment planning in recurrent PCa. PMID:28096917

  5. 3T MR Guided in bore transperineal prostate biopsy: A Comparison of robotic and manual needle-guidance templates

    PubMed Central

    Tilak, Gaurie; Tuncali, Kemal; Song, Sang-Eun; Tokuda, Junichi; Olubiyi, Olutayo; Fennessy, Fiona; Fedorov, Andriy; Penzkofer, Tobias; Tempany, Clare; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the utility of a robotic needle-guidance template device as compared to a manual template for in-bore 3T transperineal MR-guided prostate biopsy. Materials and Methods This two-arm mixed retrospective-prospective study included 99 cases of targeted transperineal prostate biopsies. The biopsy needles were aimed at suspicious foci noted on multiparametric 3T MRI using manual template (historical control) as compared with a robotic template. The following data was obtained: the accuracy of average and closest needle placement to the focus, histologic yield, percentage of cancer volume in positive core samples, complication rate, and time to complete the procedure. Results 56 cases were performed using the manual template, and 43 cases were performed using the robotic template. The mean accuracy of the best needle placement attempt was higher in the robotic group (2.39 mm) than the manual group (3.71 mm, p<0.027). The mean core procedure time was shorter in the robotic (90.82min) than the manual group (100.63min, p<0.030). Percentage of cancer volume in positive core samples was higher in robotic group (p<0.001). Cancer yields and complication rates were not statistically different between the two sub-groups (p = 0.557 and p=0.172 respectively). Conclusion The robotic needle-guidance template helps accurate placement of biopsy needles in MRI-guided core biopsy of prostate cancer. PMID:25263213

  6. Does Leaving the Biopsy Needle in Povidone-Iodine Solution Reduce Infective Complications after Biopsy?

    PubMed Central

    Cirakoglu, Abdullah; Ogreden, Ercan; Cetinkol, Yeliz; Calgin, Mustafa Kerem; Ayyildiz, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether leaving the biopsy needle used during prostate needle biopsy in 10% povidone-iodine (betadine) solution affects the infectious complications forming after biopsy. Material and Method. This study retrospectively evaluated the data of 176 patients with prostate biopsy performed between December 2012 and April 2014. Patients in Group 1 (n = 89) were given ofloxacin as a prophylactic antibiotic before biopsy. Patients in Group 2 (n = 87) had the biopsy needle left in povidone-iodine solution for 1 minute before each use, in addition to antibiotic prophylaxis. The two groups were compared in terms of infective complications developing after biopsy. Results were analyzed using the Mann–Whitney U test and Fisher's exact test. Results. The distribution of infective complications after biopsy according to group was as follows. Group 1, not using betadine, had 15.7% fever, 13.5% hospital stay, 12.4% urinary retention, 10.1% prostatitis, and 5.6% sepsis. The distribution of the same complications in Group 2 using betadine was identified as 5.7% fever, 4.6% hospital stay, 3.4% urinary retention, 2.3% prostatitis, and 0% sepsis. The use of betadine was found to significantly reduce the infectious complications after biopsy compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Conclusion. At the end of this study leaving the prostate needle in povidone-iodine solution before each use during prostate biopsy was found to reduce the infective complications and hospital stay after biopsy. PMID:28096812

  7. Risk score predicts high‐grade prostate cancer in DNA‐methylation positive, histopathologically negative biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Van Neste, Leander; Partin, Alan W.; Stewart, Grant D.; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Harrison, David J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis is challenging because efforts for effective, timely treatment of men with significant cancer typically result in over‐diagnosis and repeat biopsies. The presence or absence of epigenetic aberrations, more specifically DNA‐methylation of GSTP1, RASSF1, and APC in histopathologically negative prostate core biopsies has resulted in an increased negative predictive value (NPV) of ∼90% and thus could lead to a reduction of unnecessary repeat biopsies. Here, it is investigated whether, in methylation‐positive men, DNA‐methylation intensities could help to identify those men harboring high‐grade (Gleason score ≥7) PCa, resulting in an improved positive predictive value. METHODS Two cohorts, consisting of men with histopathologically negative index biopsies, followed by a positive or negative repeat biopsy, were combined. EpiScore, a methylation intensity algorithm was developed in methylation‐positive men, using area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic as metric for performance. Next, a risk score was developed combining EpiScore with traditional clinical risk factors to further improve the identification of high‐grade (Gleason Score ≥7) cancer. RESULTS Compared to other risk factors, detection of DNA‐methylation in histopathologically negative biopsies was the most significant and important predictor of high‐grade cancer, resulting in a NPV of 96%. In methylation‐positive men, EpiScore was significantly higher for those with high‐grade cancer detected upon repeat biopsy, compared to those with either no or low‐grade cancer. The risk score resulted in further improvement of patient risk stratification and was a significantly better predictor compared to currently used metrics as PSA and the prostate cancer prevention trial (PCPT) risk calculator (RC). A decision curve analysis indicated strong clinical utility for the risk score as decision‐making tool for repeat biopsy

  8. Open rib biopsy guided by radionuclide technique

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, W.J.; DeLand, F.H.; Domstad, P.A.; Magoun, S.; Dillon, M.L.

    1984-07-01

    When abnormally increased radioactivity is seen in a rib or ribs by bone imaging in a patient with suspected or known malignancy, it frequently is difficult to differentiate fracture from metastatic disease. Histological examination of the lesion is crucial for diagnosis, staging, and planning of therapy. To assess the value of external localization of the site or sites of abnormal uptake in a rib as a guide for open rib biopsy, 10 patients (7 men, 3 women; age range, 34 to 68 years) with known or suspected malignancy were studied. With reference to the oscilloscope image, a cobalt 57 marker was placed on the skin overlying the focus of increased uptake, and the area of increased activity was marked on the skin as a guide to surgical resection. Of ten resected ribs, four showed metastatic disease and five had fractures. (One patient underwent two external marking procedures and two surgical procedures.) Rib biopsy was not performed in 1 patient because prior to the surgical procedure, a small subcutaneous nodule adjacent to the skin marker was excised and confirmed to be carcinoma. Appropriate courses of management (operation, irradiation, chemotherapy) were taken after the biopsies. The surgeon responsible for the biopsy should be present during the skin-marking procedure, and the area beneath the scapula and the region adjacent to the spine should be avoided. Our results indicate that the technique is a very useful aid for approaching open rib biopsies more precisely.

  9. Midazolam sedation for percutaneous liver biopsy.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J A; Smith, B J

    1993-12-01

    Control of patient respiration is needed to safely perform percutaneous liver biopsy (PLB) and may be adversely affected by sedation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of PLB with intravenous midazolam and to evaluate patient acceptance of PLB with and without sedation. Two hundred seventeen consecutive patients underwent 301 percutaneous liver biopsies. One hundred fifty-one of the biopsies were done after the patients were sedated with intravenous midazolam immediately before the biopsy. The last 61 patients were questioned after the biopsy to evaluate the discomfort of the procedure, their memory of the procedure, and their willingness to undergo another PLB. The major complication rate was similar in the midazolam-treated (0.7%) and untreated (0.7%) groups. The midazolam-treated patients had a numerically lower mean pain score (1.5 +/- 0.4 vs 4.0 +/- 0.7) (mean +/- SEM) (P = 0.07) and significantly lower mean memory score (4.8 +/- 0.7 vs 9.9 +/- 0.1) (P < 0.01) than the untreated patients. The treated and untreated groups had similar mean willingness for repeat PLB scores (9.3 +/- 0.3 vs 9.1 +/- 0.6). We conclude that: (1) there is no increased risk of PLB with midazolam and (2) patients have less memory of the procedure with midazolam.

  10. Trephine biopsy of the lung and pleura

    PubMed Central

    Steel, S. J.; Winstanley, D. P.

    1969-01-01

    During the last five years 140 biopsies of the lung or pleura have been performed with a high-speed air-drill. A specially designed trephine, 2·1 mm. in bore, proved effective in obtaining adequate specimens from patients with diffuse lung lesions. With this method 111 out of 119 (93%) consecutive lung biopsies were successful in producing specimens of lung tissue for histological examination and 101 (85%) of these biopsies were diagnostically significant. Conditions such as sarcoidosis, berylliosis, alveolar proteinosis, polyarteritis nodosa, asbestosis, and diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis were conclusively diagnosed. Complications were not serious and the commonest, pneumothorax, which occurred in 26% of the lung biopsies, was usually asymptomatic. The procedure is rapid and painless and breath-holding is unnecessary. It is performed under local anaesthesia and can be repeated, if required, thus having many advantages over biopsy by open thoracotomy. However, full thoracic surgical cover should be available. Indications include diffuse and localized lesions of the lung or pleura where a definitive diagnosis is required for the purpose of treatment, prognosis, or a claim for industrial compensation. Images PMID:5348325

  11. Raman spectroscopic sensing of carbonate intercalation in breast microcalcifications at stereotactic biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyavathi, R.; Saha, Anushree; Soares, Jaqueline S.; Spegazzini, Nicolas; McGee, Sasha; Rao Dasari, Ramachandra; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Barman, Ishan

    2015-04-01

    Microcalcifications are an early mammographic sign of breast cancer and frequent target for stereotactic biopsy. Despite their indisputable value, microcalcifications, particularly of the type II variety that are comprised of calcium hydroxyapatite deposits, remain one of the least understood disease markers. Here we employed Raman spectroscopy to elucidate the relationship between pathogenicity of breast lesions in fresh biopsy cores and composition of type II microcalcifications. Using a chemometric model of chemical-morphological constituents, acquired Raman spectra were translated to characterize chemical makeup of the lesions. We find that increase in carbonate intercalation in the hydroxyapatite lattice can be reliably employed to differentiate benign from malignant lesions, with algorithms based only on carbonate and cytoplasmic protein content exhibiting excellent negative predictive value (93-98%). Our findings highlight the importance of calcium carbonate, an underrated constituent of microcalcifications, as a spectroscopic marker in breast pathology evaluation and pave the way for improved biopsy guidance.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Ultrasound Fusion-Guided Prostate Biopsy: Review of Technology, Techniques, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kongnyuy, Michael; George, Arvin K.; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided (12–14 core) systematic biopsy of the prostate is the recommended standard for patients with suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa). Advances in imaging have led to the application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of PCa with subsequent development of software-based co-registration allowing for the integration of MRI with real-time TRUS during prostate biopsy. A number of fusion-guided methods and platforms are now commercially available with common elements in image and analysis and planning. Implementation of fusion-guided prostate biopsy has now been proven to improve the detection of clinically significant PCa in appropriately selected patients. PMID:26902626

  13. Sentinel lymph node biopsy indications and controversies in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wiatrek, Rebecca; Kruper, Laura

    2011-05-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) has become the standard of care for early breast cancer. Its use in breast cancer has been evaluated in several randomized controlled trials and validated in multiple prospective studies. Additionally, it has been verified that SLNB has decreased morbidity when compared to axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). The technique used to perform sentinel lymph node mapping was also evaluated in multiple studies and the accuracy rate increases when radiocolloid and blue dye are used in combination. As SLNB became more accepted, contraindications were delineated and are still debated. Patients who have clinically positive lymph nodes or core biopsy-proven positive lymph nodes should not have SLNB, but should have an ALND as their staging procedure. The safety of SLNB in pregnant patients is not fully established. However, patients with multifocal or multicentric breast cancer and patients having neoadjuvant chemotherapy are considered candidates for SLNB. However, the details of which specific neoadjuvant patients should have SLNB are currently being evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. Patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) benefit from SLNB when mastectomy is planned and when there is a high clinical suspicion of invasion. With the advent of SLNB, pathologic review of breast cancer lymph nodes has evolved. The significance of occult metastasis in SLNB patients is currently being debated. Additionally, the most controversial subject with regards to SLNB is determining which patients with positive SLNs benefit from further axillary dissection.

  14. Muscle biopsy findings in inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2002-11-01

    The inflammatory myopathies encompass a heterogeneous group of acquired muscle diseases characterized clinically, by muscle weakness, and histologically, by inflammatory infiltrates within the skeletal muscles. The group of these myopathies comprise three major and discrete subsets: polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), and inclusion body myositis (IBM). Each subset retains its characteristic clinical, immunopathologic, and morphologic features regardless of whether it occurs separately or in connection with other systemic diseases. Although the diagnosis of these disorders is based on the combination of clinical examination, electromyographic data, serum muscle enzyme levels, various autoantibodies, and the muscle biopsy findings, the muscle biopsy offers the most definitive diagnostic information in the majority of the cases. This article summarizes the main histologic features that characterize PM, DM, or IBM and emphasizes the main pitfalls associated with interpretation of the biopsies.

  15. Complications of the percutaneous kidney biopsy.

    PubMed

    Whittier, William L

    2012-05-01

    Percutaneous kidney biopsy is an integral part of a nephrologist's practice. It has helped to define nephrology as a subspecialty. When indicated, it is a necessary procedure to help patients, as it allows for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic information. Although very safe, this procedure can give rise to complications, mainly related to bleeding. Since its development in the 1950s, modifications have been made to the approach and the technique, which have improved the diagnostic yield while keeping it a safe procedure. Alterations to the standard approach may be necessary if risk factors for bleeding are present. In addition, obesity, pregnancy, and solitary kidney biopsy are all special circumstances that change the procedure itself or the risk of the procedure. Today, kidney biopsy is a vital procedure for the nephrologist: clinically relevant, safe, and effective.

  16. Surgery and sentinel lymph node biopsy.

    PubMed

    Faries, Mark B; Morton, Donald L

    2007-12-01

    In patients with melanoma, surgery is pivotal not only for the primary tumor but also for regional and often distant metastases. The minimally invasive technique of sentinel node (SN) biopsy has become standard for detection of occult regional node metastasis in patients with intermediate-thickness primary melanoma; in these patients it has a central role in determining prognosis and a significant impact on survival when biopsy results are positive. Its role in thin melanoma remains under evaluation. The regional tumor-draining SN also is a useful model for studies of melanoma-induced immunosuppression. Although completion lymphadenectomy remains the standard of care for patients with SN metastasis, results of ongoing phase III trials will indicate whether SN biopsy without further lymph node surgery is adequate therapy for certain patients with minimal regional node disease.

  17. Multimodal optical biopsy probe to improve the safety and diagnostic yield of brain needle biopsies (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desroches, Joannie; Pichette, Julien; Goyette, Andréanne; Tremblay, Marie-Andrée.; Jermyn, Michael; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frédéric

    2016-03-01

    Brain needle biopsy (BNB) is performed to collect tissue when precise neuropathological diagnosis is required to provide information about tumor type, grade, and growth patterns. The principal risks associated with this procedure are intracranial hemorrhage (due to clipping blood vessels during tissue extraction), incorrect tumor typing/grading due to non-representative or non-diagnostic samples (e.g. necrotic tissue), and missing the lesion. We present an innovative device using sub-diffuse optical tomography to detect blood vessels and Raman spectroscopy to detect molecular differences between tissue types, in order to reduce the risks of misdiagnosis, incorrect tumour grading, and non-diagnostic samples. The needle probe integrates optical fibers directly onto the external cannula of a commercial BNB needle, and can perform measurements for both optical techniques through the same fibers. This integrated optical spectroscopy system uses diffuse reflectance signals to perform a 360-degree reconstruction of the tissue adjacent to the biopsy needle, based on the optical contrast associated with hemoglobin light absorption, thereby localizing blood vessels. Raman spectra measurements are also performed interstitially for tissue characterization. A detailed sensitivity of the system is presented to demonstrate that it can detect absorbers with diameters <300 µm located up to ˜2 mm from the biopsy needle core, for bulk optical properties consistent with brain tissue. Results from animal experiments are presented to validate blood vessel detection and Raman spectrum measurement without disruption of the surgical workflow. We also present phantom measurements of Raman spectra with the needle probe and a comparison with a clinically validated Raman spectroscopy probe.

  18. Chest Wall Dissemination of Nocardiosis after Percutaneous Transthoracic Needle Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Shimamoto, Hiroshi Inaba, Yoshitaka; Yamaura, Hidekazu; Sato, Yozo; Kamiya, Mika; Miyazaki, Masaya; Arai, Yasuaki; Horio, Yoshitsugu

    2007-07-15

    We described a case of chest wall dissemination after percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy. A 65-year-old man had a lung nodule which was suspected to be lung carcinoma. He underwent percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy using an 18G semiautomated biopsy needle and pathologic diagnosis showed organizing pneumonia. Two months after the biopsy, chest wall dissemination occurred. Implantation of carcinoma along the biopsy route was suspected, but the mass was actually due to pulmonary nocardiosis.

  19. Transjugular Liver Biopsy: A Review of 77 Biopsies Using a Spring-Propelled Cutting Needle (Biopsy Gun)

    SciTech Connect

    Gorriz, Elias; Reyes, Ricardo; Lobrano, Mary Beth; Pulido-Duque, Juan M.; San Roman, Jose L.; Lonjedo, Elena; Ferral, Hector; Maynar, Manuel

    1996-11-15

    Seventy-seven transjugular liver biopsies were performed with a coaxial, spring-loaded, 18-gauge cutting needle, the Biopty gun (Bard Biopsy System, Covington, GA, USA) on consecutive patients between July 1993 and February 1995. Fifty men and 27 women were included in the study; the mean age was 45 years (range 15-69 years). The average number of punctures per patient was 5.2, with a range of 2-9, yielding an average of 4.8 samples per patient (range 1-7). The length of the samples varied from 10 to 22 mm with a constant diameter of 1 mm. The mean time required to complete the procedure was 48 min (43-52 min). Histological diagnoses were obtained in 74 of 77 patients (96%), with non-diagnostic specimens attributed to excessive fragmentation (3 cases). Complications occurred in 10 patients (puncture site hematoma, carotid artery puncture, abdominal pain, vasovagal reaction, hepatic capsule perforation, and hemobilia). The latter two complications were self-limited. In our experience this transjugular hepatic biopsy method is promising for performing biopsies in patients with chronic liver disease, due to its high success rate and low morbidity rate.

  20. Bone scan appearances following bone and bone marrow biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; Maharaj, D.; Boyce, B.F.; Fogelman, I.

    1984-01-01

    Bone marrow and bone biopsies are performed not infrequently in patients referred for bone scans and represent a potential cause of a ''false positive'' focal abnormality on the bone scan. The authors have therefore examined the scan appearances in a series of patients who had undergone either sternal marrow biopsy, (Salah needle, diameter 1.2 mm) trephine iliac crest marrow biopsy (Jamshidi 11 gauge needle, diameter 3.5 mm) or a transiliac bone biopsy (needle diameter 8 mm). Of 18 patients studied 1 to 45 days after sternal marrow 17 had normal scan appearances at the biopsy site and 1 had a possible abnormality. None of 9 patients studied 4 to 19 days after trephine iliac crest marrow biopsy had a hot spot at the biopsy site. A focal scan abnormality was present at the biopsy site in 9/11 patients studied 5 to 59 days after a trans iliac bone biopsy. No resultant scan abnormality was seen in 4 patients imaged within 3 days of the bone biopsy or in 3 patients imaged 79 to 138 days after the procedure. Bone marrow biopsy of the sternum or iliac crest does not usually cause bone scan abnormalities. A focal abnormality at the biopsy site is common in patients imaged 5 days to 2 months after bone biopsy. The gauge of the needle employed in the biopsy and thus the degree of bone trauma inflicted, is likely to be main factor determining the appearance of bone scan abnormalities at the biopsy site.

  1. Renal biopsy research in the former soviet union: prevention of a negligent custom.

    PubMed

    Jargin, Sergei V

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient international coordination of medical research and partial isolation from the international scientific community can result in repetition of research already performed in other countries. Renal biopsy was broadly used for research in the former Soviet Union. It was performed, sometimes without sufficient clinical indications, in patients with amyloidosis, renovascular hypertension (from both kidneys: on the side of the renal artery stenosis and the contralateral one), chronic alcoholism, and acute and chronic pyelonephritis (intraoperative wedge and core biopsies). In chronic alcoholism, biopsies were taken from kidneys, pancreas, salivary glands, stomach, lung, skin, and liver, sometimes repeatedly. The classification of glomerulonephritis was different from those used internationally, for example, it did not include IgA nephropathy as a separate entity. Several examples of studies based on renal biopsies are discussed in this paper. A conclusion is however optimistic: the upturn in economy enables today to modernize equipment and introduce new methods, while broadening international cooperation facilitates the flow of foreign experience into the country. The purpose of this paper was to prevent inadequate use of renal biopsy in future.

  2. Biopsy needle localization using magnetic induction imaging principles: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Yusupov, B; Zlochiver, S

    2012-08-01

    The accurate navigation and location of a biopsy needle is of main clinical interest in cases of image-guided biopsies for patients with suspected cancerous lesions. Magnetic induction (MI) imaging is a relatively new simple and low-cost noninvasive imaging modality that can be used for measuring the changes of electrical conductivity distribution inside a biological tissue. The feasibility of using MI principles for measuring and imaging the location of a biopsy needle in a tissue with suspected lesion was studied in simulations and with an experimental system. A contactless excitation/sensing unit was designed, and raster scan was performed on a thin tissue slab with an inserted standard 22 gauge stainless steel biopsy needle. A 30-mA, 50-kHz excitation field was employed, and the secondary-induced electromotive force (emf(s)) was measured and plotted on a 2-D plane in order to yield an image of the needle location. The simulations demonstrated the significance of utilizing a ferrimagnetic core for the excitation coil in order to increase induced currents magnitude and scanning resolution. The experimental reconstructed images of the emf(s) spatial distribution revealed the needle position and orientation, with an accuracy of 0.1 mm and a signal-to-background ratio of ~30 dB. High correlation (R(2) = 0.89) between the experimental and simulation results was observed. We conclude that MI principles exhibit a potential alternative to existing imaging modalities for needle biopsy procedures.

  3. A biomedical engineering approach to mitigate the errors of prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hashim Uddin; Emberton, Mark; Kepner, Gordon; Kepner, Jeremy

    2012-02-07

    The current protocol for detecting and ruling out prostate cancer involves serum PSA testing followed by sampling of the prostate using a transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided biopsy. Many specialists have discussed how PSA screening has contributed to underdetection of clinically significant prostate cancer, overdiagnosis of clinically insignificant disease and poor risk stratification; however, little consideration has been given to the role of TRUS-guided biopsy in these errors. The performance of TRUS-guided biopsy is constrained by the biomechanical attributes of the sampling strategy, resulting in suboptimal detection efficiency of each core. By using a biomedical engineering approach, a uniform grid sampling strategy could be used to improve the detection efficiency of prostate biopsy. Moreover, the calibration of the sampling can be adjusted by altering the distance between needle deployments. Our model shows that for any given number of needle trajectories, a uniform grid approach will be superior to a divergent, nonuniform strategy for the detection of clinically important disease. This is an important message that should result in a move away from divergent sampling to a uniform grid approach for prostate biopsy.

  4. Sentinel lymph node biopsy and neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Benson, John R; Jatoi, Ismail

    2014-03-01

    Patient selection and timing of sentinel lymph node (SLN) in the context of primary chemotherapy continues to evolve; there is some evidence that primary chemotherapy may modify lymphatic drainage patterns and cause differential downstaging between SLNs and non-SLNs. SLN biopsy undertaken prior to chemotherapy will minimize the risk of a false-negative result, may allow more accurate initial staging and provides important information on prognostication which can guide decisions about adjuvant radiotherapy. However, quantification of regional metastatic load is incomplete and some advocate SLN biopsy after primary chemotherapy to take advantage of nodal downstaging and avoidance of axillary dissection in up to 40% of patients. Initial reports on false-negative rates for SLN biopsy after primary chemotherapy in patients who had proven axillary node metastases at presentation based on needle core biopsy were relatively high and a cause for clinical concern. However, more recent data suggest that SLN biopsy is as accurate when performed post- as pre-neochemotherapy and current practice incorporates both approaches.

  5. Percutaneous computed tomography-guided aspiration and biopsy of intrathoracic lesions: Results of 265 procedures

    PubMed Central

    Neyaz, Zafar; Lal, Hira; Thakral, Anuj; Nath, Alok; Rao, Ram Naval; Verma, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    Context: Percutaneous computed tomography (CT)-guided needle aspiration and biopsy technique have developed over time as a method for obtaining tissue specimen. Although this is a minimally invasive procedure, complications do occasionally occur. Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic yield and complications of 265 percutaneous CT-guided aspiration and biopsy procedures performed on various intrathoracic lesions. Settings and Design: Data of percutaneous CT-guided aspiration and biopsy procedures of intrathoracic lesions performed over a 4 year period were retrospectively analyzed. Subjects and Methods: Procedure details, radiological images, and pathological and microbiological reports were retrieved from radiology records and hospital information system. Technical success, diagnostic yield, and complication rates were calculated. Results: Total 265 procedures were performed for lung (n = 179), mediastinum (n = 73), and pleural lesions (n = 13). Diagnostic yield for lung, mediastinal, and pleural lesions was 80.7%, 74.2, and 75%, respectively, for core biopsy specimens. Major complication was noted in only one procedure (0.4%). Minor complications were noted in 13.6% procedures which could be managed conservatively. Conclusions: Percutaneous CT-guided aspiration and biopsy procedures for intrathoracic lesions are reasonably safe with good diagnostic yield. Complications are infrequent and conservatively managed in most of the cases. PMID:27890990

  6. Reducing infection rates after prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Pilatz, Adrian; Waliszewski, Przemyslaw; Weidner, Wolfgang; Johansen, Truls E Bjerklund

    2014-02-01

    Over the years, prostate biopsy has become the gold-standard technique for diagnosing prostate carcinoma. Worldwide, several million prostate biopsies are performed every year, most commonly using the transrectal approach. Preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis with fluoroquinolones has been shown to be effective for reducing infection rates. However, in recent years, an increase in febrile infection rates after transrectal prostate biopsy (from 1% to 4%) has been reported in retrospective and prospective studies. The predominant risk factor for infection seems to be the presence of fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria in faeces. Patients at risk of fluoroquinolone resistance should receive carefully selected antibiotics at sufficient concentrations to be effective. Targeted prophylaxis after rectal flora swabbing has been shown to be efficacious compared with empirical antibiotic prophylaxis. Several forms of bowel preparations are under investigation, although none have yet been shown to significantly reduce infection rates. Perineal prostate biopsy is currently being evaluated as a strategy for preventing the inoculation of rectal flora, but limited data support this approach at present.

  7. Semi-invasive and invasive procedures for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. I. Percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy.

    PubMed

    Shaham, D

    2000-05-01

    PTNB is a well-established technique for the diagnosis of lung cancer. In recent years, CT guidance has become the primary imaging modality, replacing fluoroscopy guided biopsies in many institutions. CT fluoroscopy, which is currently not universally available, offers promising advantages and may permit accurate and rapid procedures. A recent innovation in biopsy needles has been the introduction of automatic core biopsy needle devices that yield large specimens and improve the diagnostic accuracy of needle biopsy, particularly in benign lesions. PTNB is one of several methods available for tissue diagnosis of suspected lung cancer. The decision as to which method to use should be tailored to each patient, and is preferably reached by a team consisting of pulmonary physicians, chest surgeons, oncologists, cytologists, and radiologists.

  8. Bone scan appearances following biopsy of bone and bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; Maharaj, D.; Boyce, B.F.; Fogelman, I.

    1984-10-01

    The influence of sternal marrow aspiration, iliac crest marrow aspiration, and iliac crest bone biopsy on bone scan appearances was examined. Eighteen patients were scanned a mean of 9.9 days after sternal marrow aspiration with a Salah needle. Bone scans obtained in 9 patients a mean of 10 days aftr iliac crest trephine marrow biopsy with a Jamshidi needle showed no abnormality at the biopsy site. In 18 patients with metabolic bone disease who had undergone iliac crest bone biopsy with an 8 mm needle, a scan abnormality due to the biopsy was usually present when the interval between the biopsy and the scan was 5 days to 2 months. Patients who were scanned within 3 days of iliac crest bone biopsy or more than 2 months after biopsy had normal scan appearance at the biopsy site.

  9. Comparative Effectiveness of Targeted Prostate Biopsy Using MRI-US Fusion Software and Visual Targeting: a Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel J.; Recabal, Pedro; Sjoberg, Daniel D.; Thong, Alan; Lee, Justin K.; Eastham, James A.; Scardino, Peter T.; Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Coleman, Jonathan; Ehdaie, Behfar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare diagnostic outcomes between 2 different techniques for targeting regions-of-interest on prostate multiparametric Magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI); MRI-ultrasound fusion (MR-F) and visually targeted (VT) biopsy. Materials and Methods Patients presenting for prostate biopsy with regions-of-interest on mpMRI underwent MRI-targeted biopsy. For each region-of-interest two VT cores were obtained, followed by 2 cores using an MR-F device. Our primary endpoint was the difference in the detection of high-grade (Gleason ≥7) and any-grade cancer between VT and MR-F, investigated using McNemar’s method. Secondary endpoints were the difference in detection rate by biopsy location using a logistic regression model, and difference in median cancer length using Wilcoxon sign-rank test. Results We identified 396 regions-of-interest in 286 men. The difference in high-grade cancer detection between MR-F biopsy and VT biopsy was −1.4% (95% CI −6.4% to 3.6%; p=0.6); for any-grade cancer the difference was 3.5% (95% CI −1.9% to 8.9%; p=0.2). Median cancer length detected by MR-F and VT were 5.5mm vs. 5.8mm, respectively (p=0.8). MR-F biopsy detected 15% more cancers in the transition zone (p=0.046), and VT biopsy detected 11% more high-grade cancer at the prostate base (p=0.005). Only 52% of all high-grade cancers were detected by both techniques. Conclusions We found no evidence of a significant difference in the detection of high-grade or any-grade cancer between VT and MR-F biopsy. However, the performance of each technique varied in specific biopsy locations, and the outcomes of both techniques were complementary. Combining VT biopsy and MR-F biopsy may optimize prostate cancer detection. PMID:27038768

  10. Feasibility of fine-needle aspiration biopsy and its applications in superficial cervical lesion biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dong; Xu, Hai-Miao; Li, Ming-Kui; Chen, Li-Yu; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the feasibility and value of clinical application of fine-needle aspiration histological biopsy via ultrasound-guided thyroid nodule and enlarged cervical lymph node fine-needle aspiration histological biopsy. Fine-needle aspiration cytological and histological biopsies and surgical treatments were performed on 982 patients with thyroid nodule and 1435 patients with enlarged cervical lymph nodes. A comparative study of the histological and cytological examination results and post-surgical etiology results was subsequently conducted. Among the 982 thyroid nodule patients, the acquisition rates were 89.8% (882/982) for fine-needle aspiration histological biopsy and 96.2% (945/982) for cytological biopsy, while among the 1435 patients with enlarged cervical lymph nodes, the acquisition rate for fine-needle aspiration cytological biopsy was slightly higher than that for histological biopsy, with values of 95.7% (1374/1435) and 91.4% (1312/1435), respectively. For the thyroid nodule patients, when the acquired histological and cytological biopsy results were compared with the post-surgical etiology results, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the histological results were 98.5%, 100%, and 98.9%, respectively, whereas those of the cytological results were 86.8%, 82.9%, and 85.6%, respectively; the differences between the 2 biopsy methods were statistically significant (P < 0.05). For the patients with enlarged cervical lymph nodes, when the acquired histological and cytological biopsy results were compared with the post-surgical etiology results, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the histological results were 96.3%, 99.8%, and 97.6%, respectively, whereas the those of the cytological results were 76.8%, 92.1%, and 82.2%, respectively; again, the differences between the 2 methods were statistically significant (P < 0.05). In conclusion, Fine-needle aspiration histological biopsy is a reliable and highly

  11. Molecular image-directed biopsies: improving clinical biopsy selection in patients with multiple tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Stephanie A.; Tuite, Michael J.; Jeraj, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Site selection for image-guided biopsies in patients with multiple lesions is typically based on clinical feasibility and physician preference. This study outlines the development of a selection algorithm that, in addition to clinical requirements, incorporates quantitative imaging data for automatic identification of candidate lesions for biopsy. The algorithm is designed to rank potential targets by maximizing a lesion-specific score, incorporating various criteria separated into two categories: (1) physician-feasibility category including physician-preferred lesion location and absolute volume scores, and (2) imaging-based category including various modality and application-specific metrics. This platform was benchmarked in two clinical scenarios, a pre-treatment setting and response-based setting using imaging from metastatic prostate cancer patients with high disease burden (multiple lesions) undergoing conventional treatment and receiving whole-body [18F]NaF PET/CT scans pre- and mid-treatment. Targeting of metastatic lesions was robust to different weighting ratios and candidacy for biopsy was physician confirmed. Lesion ranked as top targets for biopsy remained so for all patients in pre-treatment and post-treatment biopsy selection after sensitivity testing was completed for physician-biased or imaging-biased scenarios. After identifying candidates, biopsy feasibility was evaluated by a physician and confirmed for 90% (32/36) of high-ranking lesions, of which all top choices were confirmed. The remaining cases represented lesions with high anatomical difficulty for targeting, such as proximity to sciatic nerve. This newly developed selection method was successfully used to quantitatively identify candidate lesions for biopsies in patients with multiple lesions. In a prospective study, we were able to successfully plan, develop, and implement this technique for the selection of a pre-treatment biopsy location.

  12. Molecular image-directed biopsies: improving clinical biopsy selection in patients with multiple tumors.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Stephanie A; Tuite, Michael J; Jeraj, Robert

    2016-10-21

    Site selection for image-guided biopsies in patients with multiple lesions is typically based on clinical feasibility and physician preference. This study outlines the development of a selection algorithm that, in addition to clinical requirements, incorporates quantitative imaging data for automatic identification of candidate lesions for biopsy. The algorithm is designed to rank potential targets by maximizing a lesion-specific score, incorporating various criteria separated into two categories: (1) physician-feasibility category including physician-preferred lesion location and absolute volume scores, and (2) imaging-based category including various modality and application-specific metrics. This platform was benchmarked in two clinical scenarios, a pre-treatment setting and response-based setting using imaging from metastatic prostate cancer patients with high disease burden (multiple lesions) undergoing conventional treatment and receiving whole-body [(18)F]NaF PET/CT scans pre- and mid-treatment. Targeting of metastatic lesions was robust to different weighting ratios and candidacy for biopsy was physician confirmed. Lesion ranked as top targets for biopsy remained so for all patients in pre-treatment and post-treatment biopsy selection after sensitivity testing was completed for physician-biased or imaging-biased scenarios. After identifying candidates, biopsy feasibility was evaluated by a physician and confirmed for 90% (32/36) of high-ranking lesions, of which all top choices were confirmed. The remaining cases represented lesions with high anatomical difficulty for targeting, such as proximity to sciatic nerve. This newly developed selection method was successfully used to quantitatively identify candidate lesions for biopsies in patients with multiple lesions. In a prospective study, we were able to successfully plan, develop, and implement this technique for the selection of a pre-treatment biopsy location.

  13. Multiple Biopsies and Detection of Cervical Cancer Precursors at Colposcopy

    PubMed Central

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Walker, Joan L.; Gold, Michael A.; Smith, Katie M.; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Mathews, Cara; Dunn, S. Terence; Zhang, Roy; Moxley, Katherine; Bishop, Erin; Tenney, Meaghan; Nugent, Elizabeth; Graubard, Barry I.; Wacholder, Sholom; Schiffman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Women with abnormal cervical cancer screening results are referred to colposcopy and biopsy for diagnosis of cervical cancer precursors (high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions [HSILs]). Colposcopy with a single biopsy can miss identification of HSILs. No systematic study has quantified the improved detection of HSIL by taking multiple lesion-directed biopsies. Methods The Biopsy Study was an observational study of 690 women referred to colposcopy after abnormal cervical cancer screening results. Up to four directed biopsies were taken from distinct acetowhite lesions and ranked by colposcopic impression. A nondirected biopsy of a normal-appearing area was added if fewer than four directed biopsies were taken. HSIL identified by any biopsy was the reference standard of disease used to evaluate the incremental yield and sensitivity of multiple biopsies. Results In the overall population, sensitivities for detecting HSIL increased from 60.6% (95% CI, 54.8% to 66.6%) from a single biopsy to 85.6% (95% CI, 80.3% to 90.2%) after two biopsies and to 95.6% (95% CI, 91.3% to 99.2%) after three biopsies. A significant increase in sensitivity of multiple biopsies was observed in all subgroups. The highest increase in yield of HSIL was observed for women with a high-grade colposcopic impression, HSIL cytology, and human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 positivity. Only 2% of all HSILs diagnosed in the participants were detected by biopsies of normal-appearing transformation zone. Conclusion Collection of additional lesion-directed biopsies during colposcopy increased detection of histologic HSIL, regardless of patient characteristics. Taking additional biopsies when multiple lesions are present should become the standard practice of colposcopic biopsy. PMID:25422481

  14. Accessing Genetic Information with Liquid Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xuyu; Janku, Filip; Zhan, Qimin; Fan, Jian-Bing

    2015-10-01

    Recent scientific advances in understanding circulating tumor cells, cell-free DNA/RNA, and exosomes in blood have laid a solid foundation for the development of routine molecular 'liquid biopsies'. This approach provides non-invasive access to genetic information--somatic mutations, epigenetic changes, and differential expression--about the physiological conditions of our body and diseases. It opens a valuable avenue for future genetic studies and human disease diagnosis, including prenatal and neurodegenerative disease diagnosis, as well as for cancer screening and monitoring. With the rapid development of highly sensitive and accurate technologies such as next-generation sequencing, molecular 'liquid biopsies' will quickly become a central piece in the future of precision medicine.

  15. [Optimizing biopsies of the oral mucosa].

    PubMed

    Raybaud, H; Voha, C; Cardot-Leccia, N; Monteil, R A

    2012-11-01

    We had for aim to describe and illustrate the artefacts observed in biopsies of the oral mucosa, as well as the impact of sending non-representative histological material to a laboratory. This article was based on an international literature review, as well as on our experience. We analysed the problems raised, for the pathologists and the histology lab-technicians, by these artefacts as well as their impact on the pathology report patient management. We suggest simple solutions.

  16. Granulomatous cryptococcal prostatitis diagnosed by transrectal biopsy.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ill Young; Jeong, Hee Jong; Yun, Ki Jung; Rim, Joung Sik

    2006-05-01

    Cryptococcal infection primarily involves the lung and is hematogenously spread to other organs. Sometimes it might affect the genitourinary tract, and rare cases have been reported involving the prostate without systemic infection. We report a case of granulomatous prostatitis as a result of Cryptococcus neoformans yeast in an immunocompromised patient with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, which was diagnosed by transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy and treated with antifungal medication.

  17. Conjunctival biopsy in adult form galactosialidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Usui, T; Sawaguchi, S; Abe, H; Iwata, K; Oyanagi, K

    1993-01-01

    Conjunctival biopsy was performed in two siblings with adult-form galactosialidosis. Electron microscopically, several types of intracytoplasmic inclusion were observed in the fibroblasts in conjunctival stroma, lymphatic capillary endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and epithelial cells. Membrane-bound vesicles with fibrillogranular content were frequently observed, and occasional lamellar structures were noted in these inclusions. Dense granular inclusions and oil droplets were also seen. Dense granular inclusions have not been reported in this disease previously. Images PMID:8384473

  18. A Prospective Randomized Trial of Two Different Prostate Biopsy Schemes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-03

    Prostate Cancer; Local Anesthesia; Prostate-Specific Antigen/Blood; Biopsy/Methods; Image-guided Biopsy/Methods; Prostatic Neoplasms/Diagnosis; Prostate/Pathology; Prospective Studies; Humans; Male; Ultrasonography, Interventional/Methods

  19. Conchotome and needle percutaneous biopsy of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Dietrichson, P; Coakley, J; Smith, P E; Griffiths, R D; Helliwell, T R; Edwards, R H

    1987-01-01

    Percutaneous muscle biopsy is an important and acceptable technique in the study of conditions involving human skeletal muscle. A review of 436 conchotome and needle muscle biopsies obtained over 18 months in this centre is presented. Images PMID:3694206

  20. Testicular Biopsy in Evaluation of Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Meinhard, Elizabeth; McRae, C. U.; Chisholm, G. D.

    1973-01-01

    Testicular biopsy findings in 100 infertile men were correlated with the clinical findings. Mild or moderately severe tubular lesions were seen in 57 cases and severe changes in 43. Clinical examination and semen analysis were no guide to the severity of the testicular lesion. Though patients with normal sized testes more commonly had mild tubular lesions, many were severe. Patients with small testes more often had severe lesions but some had only mild tubular changes. Biopsy findings in both aspermic and oligospermic patients ranged from normal to a complete loss of germinal tissue. Testicular biopsy is advocated in infertile men for the complete assessment of the case and for identifying those which are potentially treatable. Patients with a severe lesion can be spared further investigations. The choice and results of treatment are discussed, particularly the surgical treatment of varicocele or obstruction. Only patients with a mild or moderate testicular tubular lesion should participate in future trials with drugs for male infertility. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8FIG. 9FIG. 10 PMID:4726930

  1. [Neuromuscular biopsy and diagnosis of vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Vital, Anne; Vital, Claude

    2006-09-01

    One characteristic histological lesion on biopsy specimens is mandatory to establish the diagnosis of vasculitis. Combined nerve and muscle biopsies, by the same cutaneous incision, improve significantly the percentage of positive results. Nerve fragments should be taken in every patient presenting sensory manifestations. Such vasculitic lesions are present in medium-sized arterioles and/or small vessels, and correspond mainly to 4 necrotizing vasculitis: panarteritis nodosa (PAN), microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), Churg and Strauss syndrome and Wegener granulomatosis. Microvasculitis should be added to these classical entities, because it corresponds to small vessel wall infiltration by inflammatory cells, as observed in PAN and MPA, but without any necrosis. Microvasculitis has to be differentiated from the inflammatory cell infiltrates surrounding small vessels. However, such perivascular inflammatory cell infiltrates enable the diagnosis of probable vasculitis when associated with clusters of neo-vessels, hemosiderin deposits, or a focal damage of nerve fibers. Grossly, one third of vasculitis diagnosis is confirmed on muscle fragments, a second third on nerve fragments, and the last third on both nerve and muscle fragments. Moreover, in the search for vasculitis, an unpredicted diagnosis of lymphoma or amyloidosis is occasionally established on the neuro-muscular biopsy.

  2. Survival after stereotactic biopsy of malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, R.J.; Lunsford, L.D.; Taylor, F.H.

    1988-03-01

    For many patients with malignant gliomas in inaccessible or functionally important locations, stereotactic biopsy followed by radiation therapy (RT) may be a more appropriate initial treatment than craniotomy and tumor resection. We studied the long term survival in 91 consecutive patients with malignant gliomas diagnosed by stereotactic biopsy: 64 had glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and 27 had anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). Sixty-four per cent of the GBMs and 33% of the AAs involved deep or midline cerebral structures. The treatment prescribed after biopsy, the tumor location, the histological findings, and the patient's age at presentation (for AAs) were statistically important factors determining patient survival. If adequate RT (tumor dose of 5000 to 6000 cGy) was not prescribed, the median survival was less than or equal to 11 weeks regardless of tumor histology or location. The median survival for patients with deep or midline tumors who completed RT was similar in AA (19.4 weeks) and GBM (27 weeks) cases. Histology was an important predictor of survival only for patients with adequately treated lobar tumors. The median survival in lobar GBM patients who completed RT was 46.9 weeks, and that in lobar AA patients who completed RT was 129 weeks. Cytoreductive surgery had no statistically significant effect on survival. Among the clinical factors examined, age of less than 40 years at presentation was associated with prolonged survival only in AA patients. Constellations of clinical features, tumor location, histological diagnosis, and treatment prescribed were related to survival time.

  3. Vacuum-assisted stereotactic breast biopsy in the diagnosis and management of suspicious microcalcifications

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Gül; Tutar, Burçin; Uras, Cihan; Calay, Zerrin; İnce, Ümit; Tutar, Onur

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to present our biopsy method and retrospectively evaluate the results, upgrade rate, and follow-up findings of stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) procedures performed in our clinic. METHODS Two hundred thirty-four patients with mammographically detected nonpalpable breast lesions underwent VABB using a 9 gauge biopsy probe and prone biopsy table. A total of 195 patients (median age 53 years, range 32–80 years) with 198 microcalcification-only lesions with a follow-up of at least one year were included in the study. The location of the lesion relative to the needle was determined from the postfire images, and unlike the conventional technique, tissue retrieval was predominantly performed from that location, followed by a complete 360° rotation, if needed. RESULTS The median core number was 8.5. Biopsy results revealed 135 benign, 24 atypical, and 39 malignant lesions. The total upgrade rate at surgery was 7.7% (6.1% for ductal carcinomas in situ and 10.5% for atypical lesions). Patients with benign lesions were followed up for a median period of 27.5 months, with no interval change. At the follow-up, scar formation was seen in 23 patients (17%); three of the scars were remarkable for resembling a malignancy. CONCLUSION Our biposy method is fast and practical, and it is easily tolerated by patients without compromising accuracy. Patients with a diagnosis of atypia still need to undergo a diagnostic surgical procedure and those with a malignancy need to undergo curative surgery, even if the lesion is totally excised at biopsy. VABB may leave a scar in the breast tissue, which may resemble a malignancy, albeit rarely. PMID:27306660

  4. Role of Transpedicular Percutaneous Vertebral Biopsy for Diagnosis of Pathology in Vertebral Compression Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Sunil; Hardikar, Sharad Moreshwar; Hardikar, Madan Sharad

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective observational study. Purpose To identify the role of percutaneous vertebral biopsy in histopathological diagnosis of vertebral compression fractures and to identify the frequency of unexpected malignancy in vertebral compression fractures. Overview of Literature Vertebral compression fractures are common in the Indian population. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear imaging have some limitations in the diagnosis of definitive pathology of vertebral compression fractures. Therefore, histological confirmation is necessary for definitive diagnosis and to plan appropriate management for patient. Methods A retrospective observational study was conducted involving 84 patients who underwent percutaneous vertebral biopsy between 2010 and 2014. We performed C-arm guided percutaneous transpedicular core vertebral biopsy of vertebral compression fractures under combination of local anesthesia and intravenous conscious sedation. Results Sufficient biopsy material was obtained in 79 of the 84 cases. In the other five cases, biopsy material was not sufficient for reporting. Out of the 79 cases, osteoporotic pathology was detected in 69 patients, malignancy was detected in 8 patients and no pathology was found in 2 patients. Two patients with distant metastases to vertebra were identified. Primary spinal malignancy was detected in 6 patients (1 unsuspected plasmacytoma, 5 diagnosed malignancy preoperatively). So, the frequency of unsuspected malignancy of this study was 1.19% (1/84). None of the patients had any complications. Conclusions C-arm guided percutaneous transpedicular vertebral biopsy is useful in obtaining definitive histopathological diagnosis of vertebral compression fractures, especially in differentiating malignant and non-malignant vertebral compression fractures and helping plan appropriate management of patients. The rate of unexpected malignancy in vertebral compression fracture was 1.19%. PMID:27790322

  5. Peripheral Synucleinopathy in Early Parkinson’s Disease: Submandibular Gland Needle Biopsy Findings

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Charles H.; Dugger, Brittany N.; Hentz, Joseph G.; Hinni, Michael L.; Lott, David G.; Driver-Dunckley, Erika; Mehta, Shyamal; Serrano, Geidy; Sue, Lucia I.; Duffy, Amy; Intorcia, Anthony; Filon, Jessica; Pullen, Joel; Walker, Douglas G.; Beach, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Finding a peripheral tissue biopsy site to diagnose early Parkinson’s disease would be of value for clinical care, biomarker validation, and as research enrollment criteria. While autopsy and advanced Parkinson’s disease studies suggest submandibular gland is an important biopsy site, there are no studies in early Parkinson’s disease. Objectives Determine whether needle biopsy of the submandibular gland reveals Lewy type α-synucleinopathy in early Parkinson’s disease. Methods Twenty-five early Parkinson’s disease (duration < 5 years) and 10 controls underwent transcutaneous needle core biopsies of the submandibular gland. Tissue was stained for phosphorylated α-synuclein, reviewed blind to clinical diagnosis, and only nerve element staining was considered positive. Results Mean (Standard Deviation) age 69.5 (8.3) for Parkinson’s disease group, 64.8 (8.0) years for controls, and disease duration 2.6 (1.1) years. Six Parkinson’s disease and one control subject had inadequate glandular tissue. Positive staining was found in 14/19 (74%) Parkinson’s disease and 2/9 (22%) control subjects. Parkinson’s disease positive and negative cases did not differ clinically. Adverse events (mainly swelling and bruising) were common (77% of cases), but were minor and transient. Conclusions Submandibular gland needle biopsies identified phosphorylated α-synuclein staining in 74% of early Parkinson’s disease subjects. False positives may be true false positives or may represent prodromal Parkinson’s disease. If confirmed in larger studies with eventual autopsy confirmation, the potential value of submandibular gland biopsies for early Parkinson’s disease may be to aid in clinical trial inclusion/exclusion and eventually serve as a gold standard for biomarker studies short of autopsy confirmation. PMID:26799362

  6. [Liquid Biopsy in Multimodal Treatment of Esophageal Carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hideaki; Yajima, Satoshi; Oshima, Yoko; Nanami, Tatsuki; Suzuki, Takashi; Otsuka, Seiko

    2015-11-01

    Predicting and monitoring the treatment response of patients with esophageal carcinoma are important. Molecular analyses of biopsy specimens are useful; however, the characteristics of the biopsy specimen are not similar to those of whole tumors, including metastatic tumors. Therefore, liquid biopsy using blood samples has been applied for the prediction of the tumor stage, sensitivity to radiotherapy, sensitivity to chemotherapy, and recurrent disease. Liquid biopsy is advantageous for monitoring the treatment response and as an objective diagnostic tool; it is cost effective.

  7. 21 CFR 878.4755 - Absorbable lung biopsy plug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Absorbable lung biopsy plug. 878.4755 Section 878...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4755 Absorbable lung biopsy plug. (a) Identification. A preformed (polymerized) absorbable lung biopsy plug is intended to...

  8. Post-mortem computed tomography coaxial cutting needle biopsy to facilitate the detection of bacterioplankton using PCR probes as a diagnostic indicator for drowning.

    PubMed

    Rutty, Guy N; Johnson, Christopher; Amoroso, Jasmin; Robinson, Claire; Bradley, Carina J; Morgan, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    We report for the first time the use of coaxial cutting needle biopsy, guided by post-mortem computed tomography (PMCT), to sample internal body tissues for bacterioplankton PCR analysis to investigate drowning. This technical report describes the biopsy technique, the comparison of the needle biopsy and the invasive autopsy sampling results, as well as the PMCT and autopsy findings. By using this new biopsy sampling approach for bacterioplankton PCR, we have developed on previous papers describing the minimally invasive PMCT approach for the diagnosis of drowning. When such a system is used, the operator must take all precautions to avoid contamination of the core biopsy samples due to the sensitivity of PCR-based analytic systems.

  9. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  10. The Native Kidney Biopsy: Update and Evidence for Best Practice.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Jonathan J; Mocanu, Michaela; Berns, Jeffrey S

    2016-02-05

    The kidney biopsy is the gold standard in the diagnosis and management of many diseases. Since its introduction in the 1950s, advancements have been made in biopsy technique to improve diagnostic yield while minimizing complications. Here, we review kidney biopsy indications, techniques, and complications in the modern era. We also discuss patient populations in whom special consideration must be given when considering a kidney biopsy and the important role that the kidney biopsy plays in nephrology training. These data are presented to develop best practice strategies for this essential procedure.

  11. Celiac disease. "To biopsy or not to biopsy. That is the question!".

    PubMed

    Mones, R L

    2012-12-01

    Great progress has been made in the field of celiac disease (CD). During the past 50 years we have come to understand a great deal about the pathogenesis, clinical spectrum, and treatment. Great advances have been made in the technology of diagnosing CD. Heretofore, the gold standard used for diagnosis of CD is the small intestinal biopsy. The European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition has recently issued guidelines that state that some patients do not require a biopsy for diagnosis. This review traces the history of CD with a particular attention to the evolution of the technology involved in the field. The question of the need for biopsy or not is discussed.

  12. [Is bone biopsy necessary for the diagnosis of metabolic bone diseases? Necessity of bone biopsy].

    PubMed

    Ito, Akemi; Yajima, Aiji

    2011-09-01

    Histological analysis of undecalcified bone biopsy specimens is a valuable clinical and research tool for studying the etiology, pathogenesis and treatment of metabolic bone diseases. In case of osteoporosis, bone biopsy is not usually required for the diagnosis ; however, bone histomorphometry may be useful in rare cases with unusual skeletal fragility. Bone histomorphometry also provides valuable information on the mechanism of action, safety and efficacy of new anti-osteoporosis drugs. Bone histomorphometry is useful for the diagnosis and the assessment of treatment response in rickets/osteomalacia and in CKD-MBD (chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorders) . In Japan, bone biopsy is often performed to establish the diagnosis of Paget's disease of bone, especially to differentiate it from metastatic bone disease.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound-guided fusion biopsy for prostate cancer: Quantifying the impact of needle delivery error on diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter R.; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided “fusion” prostate biopsy intends to reduce the ∼23% false negative rate of clinical two-dimensional TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsies continue to yield false negatives. Therefore, the authors propose to investigate how biopsy system needle delivery error affects the probability of sampling each tumor, by accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system error, image registration error, and irregular tumor shapes. Methods: T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, and diffusion-weighted prostate MRI and 3D TRUS images were obtained from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D tumor surfaces that were registered to the 3D TRUS images using an iterative closest point prostate surface-based method to yield 3D binary images of the suspicious regions in the TRUS context. The probabilityP of obtaining a sample of tumor tissue in one biopsy core was calculated by integrating a 3D Gaussian distribution over each suspicious region domain. Next, the authors performed an exhaustive search to determine the maximum root mean squared error (RMSE, in mm) of a biopsy system that gives P ≥ 95% for each tumor sample, and then repeated this procedure for equal-volume spheres corresponding to each tumor sample. Finally, the authors investigated the effect of probe-axis-direction error on measured tumor burden by studying the relationship between the error and estimated percentage of core involvement. Results: Given a 3.5 mm RMSE for contemporary fusion biopsy systems,P ≥ 95% for 21 out of 81 tumors. The authors determined that for a biopsy system with 3.5 mm RMSE, one cannot expect to sample tumors of approximately 1 cm{sup 3} or smaller with 95% probability with only one biopsy core. The predicted maximum RMSE giving P ≥ 95% for each

  14. High-yield biopsy technique for subepidermal blisters.

    PubMed

    Braswell, Mark A; McCowan, Nancye K; Schulmeier, Jennifer S; Brodell, Robert T

    2015-04-01

    Dermatologists often perform 2 biopsies in patients with widespread tense blisters: one for light microscopy and another for direct immunofluorescence (DIF). Biopsy techniques recommended for blistering diseases with tense blisters are discussed, and illustrations demonstrate an alternative approach utilizing a single punch biopsy. A single punch biopsy is more cost effective and provides the same diagnostic information as the standard 2-biopsy approach for subepidermal blisters plus additional salt-split skin-like diagnostic information. A limitation for bisecting the single punch biopsy specimen is a potential complete separation of the epidermis from the dermis. The single punch biopsy technique is a simple cost-effective method for obtaining necessary diagnostic information when sampling tense blisters in patients with blistering diseases.

  15. Percutaneous image-guided biopsy of the musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Welch, Brian T; Welch, Timothy J

    2011-09-01

    Percutaneous image-guided biopsy plays an important role in the management of multiple pathologic conditions involving the musculoskeletal system. The vast majority of these conditions require histologic diagnosis to guide decision making concerning treatment. Percutaneous image-guided biopsy has supplanted open surgical biopsy as the primary modality for tissue diagnosis in this patient cohort. The safety, efficacy, and clinical outcome of percutaneous image-guided biopsy for a multitude of musculoskeletal conditions are well documented. Improvements in needle design and image guidance have continued to further the efficacy and safety of this diagnostic technique. Complications associated with percutaneous biopsy are minimal compared with those seen in open surgical biopsy, whereas diagnostic accuracy is comparable to that of surgical biopsy.

  16. Biopsy proven and biopsy negative temporal arteritis: differences in clinical spectrum at the onset of the disease

    PubMed Central

    Duhaut, P.; Pinede, L.; Bornet, H.; Demolombe-Rague, S.; Dumontet, C.; Ninet, J.; Loire, R.; Pasquier, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess the clinical features of biopsy proven and negative biopsy temporal arteritis at the time of diagnosis and during a three year follow up.
METHODS—Newly diagnosed cases of giant cell arteritis were included in a prospective, multicentre study. Initial clinical and biological features, season of diagnosis, and cardiovascular events occurring during the follow up were recorded. Biopsy proven and negative biopsy cases were compared. 
RESULTS—Two hundred and seven biopsy proven, and 85 negative biopsy cases were included from 1991 to 1997. Fifty eight per cent of the biopsy proven cases, compared with 39.29% of the negative biopsy cases, were diagnosed during the autumn or winter (p = 0.003). Visual problems (31.5%, v 19.1%, p = 0.031), blindness (9.7% v 2.38%, p = 0.033), jaw claudication (40.8%, v 28.243%, p = 0.044), and temporal artery palpation abnormalities (61.3% v 29.5%, p = 7.10-7) were more frequent in the biopsy proven than in the negative biopsy group. Less specific symptoms, such as headache (82.5% v 92.9%, p = 0.021), or associated polymyalgia rheumatica (40.1% v 65.9%, p = 9 × 10-5) were more prevalent in the negative biopsy cases. Biological markers of inflammation were significantly more increased in the biopsy proven group. All cases of blindness occurring after treatment belonged to the biopsy proven group.
CONCLUSION—Biopsy proven cases seem to be more severe than biopsy negative cases at the time of diagnosis and during follow up. Seasonal difference at diagnosis may suggest a different aetiological pattern.

 PMID:10340957

  17. Cangrelor Bridge Therapy for Gastroduodenal Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Cahoon, William D; Oswalt, Allison K; Francis, Kerry E; Magee, Lauren C; Lowe, Denise K

    2017-04-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is the key for secondary prevention of acute coronary syndromes and percutaneous coronary intervention with stent placement. Premature discontinuation of DAPT can result in an increase in cardiac ischemic events and death. If early interruption of DAPT for urgent procedures or surgery is necessary, then ischemic and bleed risks must be balanced with bridging therapy. To date, no medications have a Food and Drug Administration indication for antiplatelet bridge therapy. We present a case of a woman with a history of gastrointestinal bleeding on DAPT for a drug-eluting stent who received cangrelor as bridge therapy prior to gastroduodenal biopsy.

  18. Design of a small animal biopsy robot.

    PubMed

    Bebek, Ozkan; Hwang, Myun Joong; Fei, Baowei; Cavusoglu, M

    2008-01-01

    Small animals are widely used in biomedical research studies. They have compact anatomy and small organs. Therefore it is difficult to perceive tumors or cells and perform biopsies manually. Robotics technology offers a convenient and reliable solution for accurate needle insertion. In this paper, a novel 5 degrees of freedom (DOF) robot design for inserting needles into small animal subjects is proposed. The design has a compact size, is light weight, and has high resolution. Parallel mechanisms are used in the design for stable and reliable operation. The proposed robot has two gimbal joints that carry the needle mechanism. The robot can realize dexterous alignment of the needle before insertion.

  19. Glomangiosarcoma Arising from a Prior Biopsy Site

    PubMed Central

    Maselli, Amy M.; Jambhekar, Amani V.

    2017-01-01

    Summary: Glomangiosarcoma represents a rare malignant variant of the benign glomus tumor that typically presents as a tender, slowly growing nodule with a predilection for the lower extremities. Unlike their benign counterparts, glomangiosarcomas may display aggressive characteristics such as large size, local invasion, and a tendency to recur after excision. Although wide local excision remains the treatment of choice, rare cases of systemic metastasis have been previously reported. We present a case of glomangiosarcoma arising at a prior biopsy site after excision of an unknown soft tissue lesion. PMID:28203514

  20. The importance of active surveillance, and immediate re-biopsy in low-risk prostate cancer: The largest series from Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Bayar, Göksel; Horasanlı, Kaya; Acinikli, Hüseyin; Tanrıverdi, Orhan; Dalkılıç, Ayhan; Arısan, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate long-term outcomes of active surveillance (AS) applied in low-risk prostate cancer patients, and the impact of re-biopsy results on the prediction of progression. Material and methods In our clinic, patients who had undergone AS for low-risk localized prostate cancer between the years 2005–2013 were included in the study. Our AS criteria are Gleason score ≤6, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level <10 ng/mL, number of positive cores <3, maximum cancer involvement ratio <50% each core. Immediate re-biopsy (within 3 months) was performed to 65 patients who accepted AS. Finally, 43 patients who met re-biopsy criteria were included in the study. Prostate biopsy specimens were harvested from 12 cores under the guidance of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS). Re-biopsy was performed within 3 months (1–12 weeks). In re-biopsy, a total of 20 core biopsies were performed including the far lateral (6 cores) and transition zone (2 cores) in addition to standard 12 core biopsy. Our follow-up protocol is PSA measurement and digital rectal examination (DRE) every 3 months within the first 2 years, than every 6 months. Control biopsies was performed one year later and once upon every 3 years to patients whose PSA levels and DREs were normal at follow-up visits. More than 2 tumor invaded cores or 50% tumor in one core, and Gleason score exceeding 6 points were accepted as indications for definitive treatment. Patients were divided into two groups by re-biopsy results and compared according to the time to progression. We have done multivariate regression analysis to predict prognosis by using data on age, PSA level, and detection of tumor in re-biopsy specimens. Results Patients’ median age was 61 years and PSA level was 5 (2.7–9) ng/mL. Tumor was detected in 22 (34%) patients at re-biopsy and they underwent definitive treatment. Additionally tumor was detected in 9 patients, but active surveillance was maintained because their pathologic results met active

  1. [Prostate biopsy: Diagnostic responsibility and recent changes].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ballesteros, Claudio; Martínez-Salamanca, Juan Ignacio; Carballido Rodríguez, Joaquín Alberto

    2011-10-01

    In this bibliographic review we reexamine the different features in relation to indication, performance and interpretation of prostatic biopsy (PB). The main objective is to place methodological features involving PB in the current scientific scenario, establishing the correlation between the most relevant and analyzing the historic evolution this procedure has followed, particularly over the last two decades. Prostate biopsy has evolved to be a regular element in urologists` daily practice and its learning process has been simplified to the point it can be approached with adequacy during the first years of residency in Urology. This privileged position PB enjoys in daily practice and the performance obtained from it would have not been a reality without optimization of transrectal ultrasound or local anesthesia techniques, yet reviled in some forums, the real responsible of such success. The consensus reached in the various scientific associations, the clinical guidelines of which are widely consulted worldwide, is the best to support the current state of the art, being the starting point for the addition of new improvements to PB.

  2. Optical tomography of pigmented human skin biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Iris; Fischer, Peter; Kaatz, Martin; Fischer, Tobias W.; Elsner, Peter; Dimitrov, Enrico; Reif, Annette; Konig, Karsten

    2004-07-01

    The novel femtosecond NIR (near infrared) laser based high resolution imaging system DermaInspect was used for non-invasive diagnostics of pigmented skin. The system provides fluorescence and SHG images of high spatial submicron resolution (3D) and 250 ps temporal resolution (4D) based on time resolved single photon counting (TCSPC). Pigmented tissue biopsies from patients with nevi and melanoma have been investigated using the tunable 80 MHz femtosecond laser MaiTai with laser wavelengths in the range of 750 - 850 nm. The autofluorescence patterns of different intratissue cell types and structures were determined. The non-linear induced autofluorescence originates from naturally endogenous fluorophores and protein structures like NAD(P)H, flavins, elastin, collagen, phorphyrins and melanin. In addition to autofluorescence, SHG (second harmonic generation) was used to detect dermal collagen structures. Interestingly, pigmented cells showed intense luminescence signals. Further characterization of tissue components was performed via 4D measurements of the fluorescence lifetime (x, y, z, τ). The novel multiphoton technique offers the possibility of a painless high resolution non invasive diagnostic method (optical biopsy), in particular for the early detection of skin cancer.

  3. Additional Targeted Biopsy in Clinically Suspected Prostate Cancer: Prospective Randomized Comparison between Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound and Sonoelastography Guidance.

    PubMed

    Koh, Jieun; Jung, Dae Chul; Oh, Young Taik; Yoo, Moon Gyu; Noh, Songmi; Han, Kyung Hwa; Rha, Koon-Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Joon

    2015-11-01

    Our aim was to improve the detection of prostate cancer by evaluating whether contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) or sonoelastography (SE) is more helpful in guiding targeted biopsy (TB) performed before systematic biopsy (SB). A total of 52 patients suspected of having prostate cancer were prospectively included and randomly assigned to either the CEUS or SE group. Different, independent radiologists performed TB and twelve-core SB. Within each group, cancer detection rates based on core number were compared between SB and TB. We evaluated the effect of TB on core-based cancer detection rates between the CEUS and SE groups. Cancer detection was higher in overall TB cores 16.4% (28/171) than SB cores 11.4% (71/624) in both groups. In the SE group, TB cores revealed higher cancer detection than did SB cores from 4.49% (14/312) to 12.86% (9/70) (p = 0.01). Compared with CEUS, SE may improve detection rates when considering additional TB guidance methods.

  4. Contemporary update on pathology-related issues on routine workup of prostate biopsy: sectioning, tumor extent measurement, specimen orientation, and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Montironi, Rodolfo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Scarpelli, Marina; Galosi, Andrea B; Cheng, Liang

    2014-04-01

    While the prime goal of the needle biopsy is to diagnose prostatic adenocarcinoma (PCa), once PCa is detected further descriptive information regarding the type of cancer, amount of tumor, and grade in prostate needle cores forms the cornerstone for contemporary management of the patient and to assess the potential for local cure and the risk for distant metastasis. This review gives an update on selected pathology-related issues on routine workup of prostate biopsy with special references to adequate histologic sectioning necessary to maximize cancer yield, tumor extent measurements and methodologies, specimen orientation, and the role of immunohistochemistry in the evaluation of the prostate. Multiple factors influence the diagnostic yield of prostate biopsies. Many of these factors are fixed and uncontrollable. Other factors are controlled by the urologist, including number of cores obtained, method and location of biopsy, and amount of tissue obtained. The yield of cancer is also controlled by the pathologist and histotechnologist. It is necessary to report the number of cores submitted and the number of positive cores, thereby giving the fraction of positive cores. The percentage involvement by carcinoma with or without the linear extent of carcinoma of the single core with the greatest amount of tumor should also be provided. Using the marking technique, we can add a new pathological parameter: pathological orientation. Cancer or atypical lesions can be accurately located within the biopsy specimen and integrated to biopsy approach. Probably the most common use of immunohistochemistry in the evaluation of the prostate is for the identification of basal cells, which are absent with rare exception in adenocarcinoma of the prostate and in general positive in mimickers of prostate cancer. If a case is still considered atypical by a uropathology expert after negative basal cell staining, positive staining for alpha-methylacyl-CoA-racemase can help establish in 50

  5. Blood based cell biopsy for early detection of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Cha-Mei; Adams, Daniel; Adams, Diane; Alpaugh, R. Katherine; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Martin, Stuart; Chumsri, Saranya; Marks, Jeffrey

    Early detection (ED) of cancer holds the promise for less aggressive treatments and better outcome. However, there are few accepted methods for ED. We report on a previously unknown blood cell found specifically in the peripheral blood of many solid tumors. They are defined as Cancer Associated Macrophage-Like cells (CAMLs) and are characterized by large size (25-300 μm) and expression of cancer markers. CAMLs were isolated on precision filters during blood filtration. We conducted prospective studies in breast cancer (BC) to ascertain CAML prevalence, specificity and sensitivity in relation to disease status at clinical presentation. We report on two related but separate studies: 1) the isolation of CAMLs from patients with known invasive BC, compared to healthy volunteers and, 2) a double blind study conducted on women undergoing core needle biopsy to evaluate suspicious breast masses. The studies show that CAMLs are found in all stages of BC and suggest that detection of CAMLs can differentiate patients with BC from those with benign breast conditions and healthy individuals. This non-invasive blood test can be potentially used for ED of BC and other malignancies after validation studies with the advantage of a minimally invasive procedure and longitudinal monitoring. This work was supported by Grants from Maryland TEDCO MTTCF, R01-CA154624 from NIH, KG100240 from Susan G. Komen Foundation, Era of Hope Scholar award from DoD (BC100675), and U01-CA084955 from NCI EDRN.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Osseous Biopsy in Children With Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Jan; Tzaribachev, Nikolay; Thomas, Christoph; Wehrmann, Manfred; Horger, Marius S.; Carrino, John A.; Koenig, Claudius W.; Pereira, Philippe L.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To report the safety and diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MRI)-guided core biopsy of osseous lesions in children with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) that were visible on MRI but were occult on radiography and computed tomography (CT). Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of MRI-guided osseous biopsy performed in seven children (four girls and three boys; mean age 13 years (range 11 to 14) with CRMO was performed. Indication for using MRI guidance was visibility of lesions by MRI only. MRI-guided procedures were performed with 0.2-Tesla (Magnetom Concerto; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany; n = 5) or 1.5-T (Magnetom Espree; Siemens; n = 2) open MRI systems. Core needle biopsy was obtained using an MRI-compatible 4-mm drill system. Conscious sedation or general anesthesia was used. Parameters evaluated were lesion visibility, technical success, procedure time, complications and microbiology, cytology, and histopathology findings. Results: Seven of seven (100%) targeted lesions were successfully visualized and sampled. All obtained specimens were sufficient for histopathological analysis. Length of time of the procedures was 77 min (range 64 to 107). No complications occurred. Histopathology showed no evidence of malignancy, which was confirmed at mean follow-up of 50 months (range 28 to 78). Chronic nonspecific inflammation characteristic for CRMO was present in four of seven (58%) patients, and edema with no inflammatory cells was found in three of seven (42%) patients. There was no evidence of infection in any patient. Conclusion: MRI-guided osseous biopsy is a safe and accurate technique for the diagnosis of pediatric CRMO lesions that are visible on MRI only.

  7. Optical biopsy of the prostate: can we TRUST (trans-rectal ultrasound-coupled spectral tomography)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Daqing; Jiang, Zhen; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Holyoak, G. Reed; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Rock, Kendra; Ownby, Charlotte L.; Bunting, Charles F.; Slobodov, Gennady

    2011-03-01

    Needle-based core-biopsy to locate prostate cancer relies heavily upon trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging guidance. Ultrasonographic findings of classic hypoechoic peripheral zone lesions have a low specificity of ~28%, a low positive predictive value of ~29%, and an overall accuracy of ~43%, in prostate cancer diagnosis. The prevalence of isoechoic or nearly invisible prostate cancers on ultrasonography ranges from 25 to 42%. As a result, TRUS is useful and convenient to direct the needle trajectory following a systematic biopsy sampling template rather than to target only the potentially malignant lesion for focal-biopsy. To address this deficiency in the first-line of prostate cancer imaging, a trans-rectal ultrasound-coupled spectral tomography (TRUST) approach is being developed to non-invasively resolve the likely optical signatures of prostate malignancy. The approach has evolved from using one NIR wavelength to two NIR bands, and recently to three bands of NIR spectrum information. The concept has been evaluated on one normal canine prostate and three dogs with implanted prostate tumor developed as a model. The initial results implementing TRUST on the canine prostate tumor model includes: (1) quantifying substantially increased total hemoglobin concentration over the time-course of imaging in a rapidly growing prostate tumor; (2) confirming hypoxia in a prostatic cystic lesion; and (3) imaging hypoxic changes of a necrotic prostate tumor. Despite these interesting results, intensive technologic development is necessary for translating the approach to benefiting clinical practice, wherein the ultimate utility is not possibly to eliminate needle-biopsy but to perform focal-biopsy that is only necessary to confirm the cancer, as well as to monitor and predict treatment responses.

  8. An "imaging-biopsy" strategy for colorectal tumor reconfirmation by multipurpose paramagnetic quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiaohong; Zhang, Bingbo; Wang, Xiaohui; Liu, Fengjun; Shi, Donglu; Cheng, Yingsheng

    2015-04-01

    Glucose transporter1 (Glut1) plays important roles in treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) involving early-stage diagnosis, subtype, TNM stage, and therapeutic schedule. Currently, in situ marking and tracking of the tumor biomarkers via clinical imaging remains great challenges in early stage CRC diagnosis. In this study, we have developed a unique cell-targeted, paramagnetic-fluorescent double-signal molecular nanoprobe for CRC in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis and subsequent biopsy. The unique molecular nanoprobe is composed of a fluorescent quantum dot (QD) core; a coating layer of paramagnetic DTPA-Gd coupled BSA ((Gd)DTPA∙BSA), and a surface targeting moiety of anti-Glut1 polyclonal antibody. The engineered (Gd)DTPA∙BSA@QDs-PcAb is 35 nm in diameter and colloidally stable under both basic and acidic conditions. It exhibits strong fluorescent intensities and high relaxivity (r1 and r2: 16.561 and 27.702 s(-1) per mM of Gd(3+)). Distribution and expression of Glut1 of CRC cells are investigated by in vitro cellular confocal fluorescent imaging and MR scanning upon treating with the (Gd)DTPA∙BSA@QDs-PcAb nanoprobes. In vivo MRI shows real-time imaging of CRC tumor on nude mice after intravenously injection of the (Gd)DTPA∙BSA@QDs-PcAb nanoprobes. Ex vivo biopsy is subsequently conducted for expression of Glut1 on tumor tissues. These nanoprobes are found biocompatible in vitro and in vivo. (Gd)DTPA∙BSA@QDs-PcAb targeted nanoprobe is shown to be a promising agent for CRC cancer in vivo MRI diagnosis and ex vivo biopsy analysis. The "imaging-biopsy" is a viable strategy for tumor reconfirmation with improved diagnostic accuracy and biopsy in personalized treatment.

  9. Extrapleural locating method in computed tomography-guided needle biopsies of 1,106 lung lesions

    PubMed Central

    WEI, YUE-HUA; ZHOU, FU-XIANG; LI, YAN; ZHOU, YUN-FENG; ANISH, KRISHNA; XU, LI-YING; LIAO, MEI-YAN

    2015-01-01

    Transthoracic needle biopsy is considered to be safe and effective for the diagnosis of focal lung lesions. The aim of the present study was to evaluate factors affecting the accuracy and safety of automated cutting needle lung biopsy (ACNB) using a new extrapleural locating (EPL) method. Computed tomography (CT)-guided needle biopsies were performed on 1,065 patients between March 2005 and May 2012 using the EPL method. The locating needle remained in the chest following extrapleural positioning, while the radiologist confirmed the puncture angle and distance between the locating needle and lesion. The biopsy instrument was advanced into the lung, and the core needle was subsequently fired into the lesion based on the direction indicated by the locating needle. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and safety of the procedure. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the extrapleural method were 91.9, 100, 100 and 82.9%, respectively, and the overall diagnostic accuracy was 94.2%. Significant risk factors affecting accuracy were younger age, atelectasis, hemoptysis and lesion depth (P<0.03). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the risk of malignant lesions receiving a false-negative diagnosis decreased for each additional year of subject age [odds ratio (OR), 0.97; P=0.027] and increased with each millimeter increase in lesion depth (OR, 1.03; P=0.008). Among the 1,106 lesions biopsied, 207 were associated with pneumothorax, 251 with hemorrhage and 58 with hemoptysis. Multivariate analysis revealed that lesion size and emphysema affected pneumothorax incidence, while age, lesion location and depth and emphysema significantly affected hemorrhage incidence (P<0.05). In conclusion, low-dose, CT-guided ACNB with the EPL method provides a safe and accurate diagnosis. PMID:26640541

  10. Core layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, S. A.; Rubie, D. C.; Hernlund, J. W.; Morbidelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    We have created a planetary accretion and differentiation model that self-consistently builds and evolves Earth's core. From this model, we show that the core grows stably stratified as the result of rising metal-silicate equilibration temperatures and pressures, which increases the concentrations of light element impurities into each newer core addition. This stable stratification would naturally resist convection and frustrate the onset of a geodynamo, however, late giant impacts could mechanically mix the distinct accreted core layers creating large homogenous regions. Within these regions, a geodynamo may operate. From this model, we interpret the difference between the planetary magnetic fields of Earth and Venus as a difference in giant impact histories. Our planetary accretion model is a numerical N-body integration of the Grand Tack scenario [1]—the most successful terrestrial planet formation model to date [2,3]. Then, we take the accretion histories of Earth-like and Venus-like planets from this model and post-process the growth of each terrestrial planet according to a well-tested planetary differentiation model [4,5]. This model fits Earth's mantle by modifying the oxygen content of the pre-cursor planetesimals and embryos as well as the conditions of metal-silicate equilibration. Other non-volatile major, minor and trace elements included in the model are assumed to be in CI chondrite proportions. The results from this model across many simulated terrestrial planet growth histories are robust. If the kinetic energy delivered by larger impacts is neglected, the core of each planet grows with a strong stable stratification that would significantly impede convection. However, if giant impact mixing is very efficient or if the impact history delivers large impacts late, than the stable stratification can be removed. [1] Walsh et al. Nature 475 (2011) [2] O'Brien et al. Icarus 223 (2014) [3] Jacobson & Morbidelli PTRSA 372 (2014) [4] Rubie et al. EPSL 301

  11. Can Contemporary Patients with Biopsy Gleason Score 3+4 Be Eligible for Active Surveillance?

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ohseong; Kim, Tae Jin; Lee, In Jae; Byun, Seok-Soo; Lee, Sang Eun; Hong, Sung Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We analyzed whether expansion of existing active surveillance (AS) protocols to include men with biopsy Gleason score (GS) 3+4 prostate cancer (PCa) would significantly alter pathologic and biochemical outcomes of potential candidates of AS. Methods Among patients who underwent radical prostatectomy at our center between 2006 and 2013, we identified 577 patients (group A) who preoperatively fulfilled at least one of 6 different AS criteria. Also, we identified 217 patients (group B) with biopsy GS 3+4 but fulfilled non-GS criteria from at least one of 6 AS criteria. Designating group C as expanded group incorporating all patients in group A and B, we compared risk of unfavorable disease (pathologic GS ≥4+3 and/or pathologic T stage ≥pT3a) and biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free survival between groups. Results Rates of unfavorable disease were not significantly different between patients of group A and C who met AS criteria from 5 institutions (all p>0.05), not including University of Toronto (p<0.001). Also BCR-free survivals were not significantly different between patients in group A and C meeting each of 6 AS criteria (all p>0.05). Among group B, PSAD>0.15 ng/mL/cm3 (p = 0.011) and tumor length of biopsy GS 3+4 core>4 mm (p = 0.007) were significant predictors of unfavorable disease. When these two criteria were newly applied in defining group B, rates of unfavorable disease in group A and B was 15.6% and 14.7%, respectively (p = 0.886). Conclusion Overall rate of pathologically aggressive PCa harbored by potential candidates for AS may not be increased significantly with expansion of criteria to biopsy GS 3+4 under most contemporary AS protocols. PSAD and tumor length of biopsy GS 3+4 core may be useful predictors of more aggressive disease among potential candidates for AS with biopsy GS 3+4. PMID:25268898

  12. Ultrasound: a new tool for precisely locating posterior iliac crests to obtain adequate bone marrow trephine biopsy specimen.

    PubMed

    Islam, Anwarul

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasound imaging has evolved as a very useful tool in medical science. However, the technique of ultrasound-guided bone marrow trephine biopsy (BMTB) has not been routinely used by haematologists and oncologists to help locate the posterior iliac crest during the BMTB procedure. We have used the technique of ultrasound-guided BMTB in 20 patients diagnosed with various haematological and non-haematological malignant conditions. We found the technique simple and useful in precisely locating the posterior iliac crest. As a result, it facilitates the extraction of a satisfactory core sample or aspiration biopsy and is more surgically precise than when access to the target bone is based only on external landmarks and blind biopsy.

  13. Sixteen Gauge biopsy needles are better and safer than 18 Gauge in native and transplant kidney biopsies.

    PubMed

    Peters, Björn; Mölne, Johan; Hadimeri, Henrik; Hadimeri, Ursula; Stegmayr, Bernd

    2017-02-01

    Background Kidney biopsies are essential for optimal diagnosis and treatment. Purpose To examine if quality and safety aspects differ between types and sizes of biopsy needles in native and transplant kidneys. Material and Methods A total of 1299 consecutive biopsies (1039 native and 260 transplant kidneys) were included. Diagnostic quality, needle size and type, clinical data and complications were registered. Eight-three percent of the data were prospective. Results In native kidney biopsies, 16 Gauge (G) needles compared to 18 G showed more glomeruli per pass (11 vs. 8, P <  0.001) with less complications. Sub-analysis in native kidney biopsies revealed that 18 G 19-mm side-notch needles resulted in more major (11.3% vs. 3%; odds ratio [OR], 4.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-12.3) and overall complications (12.4% vs. 4.8%; OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1-7.1) in women than in men. If the physician had performed less compared to more than four native kidney biopsies per year, minor (3.5% vs. 1.4%; OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.1-6.2) and overall complications (11.5% vs. 7.4%; OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.5) were more common. In transplant kidney biopsies, 16 G needles compared to 18 G resulted in more glomeruli per pass (12 vs. 8, P <  0.001). No differences existed in frequency of biopsy complications. The localization of performing biopsies was not a risk factor to develop complications. Conclusion Kidney biopsies taken by 16 G needles result in better histological quality and lower frequency of complications compared to 18 G. For native kidney biopsies the performer of the biopsy should do at least four biopsies per year.

  14. Unusual presentation; seeding of tumor after biopsy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Asude; Karabulut, Koray; Artas, Hakan; Kilicarslan, Ahmet; Usta, Sertac; Bahcecioglu, Ibrahim Halil

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular cancer is one of the most common and fatal cancer tumor worldwide. However, the obtained results are questionable in terms of medical treatment of hepatocellular cancer. The muscle, soft tissue and cutaneous metastases of hepatocellular cancer, for instance, are rare and may result from interventional procedures. Seeding of tumor along the biopsy needle upon percutaneous biopsy is a very rare phenomenon. We report a very rare case of a 79 -year- old man, known to be hepatitis C virus carrier with a metastatic tumor in abdominal wall caused by seeding of tumor after three years following a percutaneous biopsy procedure. Even years later, after a biopsy procedure for diagnostic purposes and may be soft tissue metastases. This complication is a very rare condition that should not be ignored but can be observed. The biopsy requirement should be questioned closely and avoided unnecessary biopsy procedures. PMID:28083068

  15. Atopic dermatitis. Findings of skin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Piloto Valdés, L; Gómez Echevarría, A H; Valdés Sánchez, A F; Ochoa Ochoa, C; Chong López, A; Mier Naranjo, G

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-eight adult patients with a clinical diagnosis of atopic dermatitis (according to the criteria of Hanifin and Lobitz) were studied at the Allergy Outpatient Service, the Dermatology Service and the Pathological Anatomy Service of the Hermanos Ameijeiras Clinical Surgical Hospital, from January to September 1986. The patients were submitted to a quantification of total serum IgE by means of the ELISA enzymatic ultramicromethod, developed at the Radioimmunoassay National Center, and skin biopsies were carried out by means of the paraffin and direct immunofluorescence methods. The most frequent histopathological findings were acanthosis, espongiosis, parakeratosis and exocitosis, as a chronic inflammatory infiltrate, mainly composed of lymphocytes, mast cells and eosinophils. In the skin direct immunofluorescence method we found depots of IgE in all the patients, having no relation in intensity to total serum IgE values.

  16. Automated quantitative muscle biopsy analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, Kenneth R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An automated system to aid the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases by producing fiber size histograms utilizing histochemically stained muscle biopsy tissue. Televised images of the microscopic fibers are processed electronically by a multi-microprocessor computer, which isolates, measures, and classifies the fibers and displays the fiber size distribution. The architecture of the multi-microprocessor computer, which is iterated to any required degree of complexity, features a series of individual microprocessors P.sub.n each receiving data from a shared memory M.sub.n-1 and outputing processed data to a separate shared memory M.sub.n+1 under control of a program stored in dedicated memory M.sub.n.

  17. Targeted Cryotherapy Using Disposable Biopsy Punches

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Avitus John Raakesh

    2014-01-01

    Cryotherapy is a commonly used office procedure that causes destruction of tissue by cryonecrosis due to rapid freezing and thawing of cells. The limitation in treating plantar warts and deeper dermal lesions is that the freeze time should be longer to penetrate deeper, which results in collateral damage to normal skin surrounding the lesion. This results in unwanted side effects of prolonged pain, blistering and haemorrhage and increased healing time. The cone spray technique was used to reduce collateral damage, but deeper penetration is difficult to achieve. An innovative technique using disposable biopsy punches is described that ensures deeper freezing as compared to the plastic cone. The metal cutting edge of the punch enters deeper into the lesions as the liquid nitrogen is passed, sparing damage to surrounding skin. PMID:25136216

  18. [Surgical renal biopsies: technique, effectiveness and complications].

    PubMed

    Pinsach Elías, L; Blasco Casares, F J; Ibarz Servió, L; Valero Milián, J; Areal Calama, J; Bucar Terrades, S; Saladié Roig, J M

    1991-01-01

    Retrospective study made on 140 renal surgical biopsies (RSB) performed throughout the past 4 years in our Unit. The technique's effectiveness and morbidity are emphasized and the surgical technique and type of anaesthesia described. The sample obtained was enough to perform an essay in 100% cases, and a diagnosis was reached in 98.5%. Thirty-nine patients (27.8%) presented complications, 13 (9.2%) of which were directly related to the surgical technique. No case required blood transfusion and no deaths were reported. The type of anaesthesia used was: local plus sedation in 104 (74.2%) cases, rachianaesthesia in 10 (7.1%) and general in 26 (18.5%). The same approach was used in all patients: minimal subcostal lumbotomy, using Wilde's forceps to obtain the samples. It is believed that RSB is a highly effective, low mortality procedure, easy and quick to perform, and suitable for selected patients.

  19. Microfabricated instrument for tissue biopsy and analysis

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Benett, William J.

    2001-01-01

    A microfabricated biopsy/histology instrument which has several advantages over the conventional procedures, including minimal specimen handling, smooth cutting edges with atomic sharpness capable of slicing very thin specimens (approximately 2 .mu.m or greater), micro-liter volumes of chemicals for treating the specimens, low cost, disposable, fabrication process which renders sterile parts, and ease of use. The cutter is a "cheese-grater" style design comprising a block or substrate of silicon and which uses anisotropic etching of the silicon to form extremely sharp and precise cutting edges. As a specimen is cut, it passes through the silicon cutter and lies flat on a piece of glass which is bonded to the cutter. Microchannels are etched into the glass or silicon substrates for delivering small volumes of chemicals for treating the specimen. After treatment, the specimens can be examined through the glass substrate.

  20. Patient Outcomes in Canceled MRI-Guided Breast Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Niell, Bethany L.; Lee, Janie M.; Johansen, Christopher; Halpern, Elkan F.; Rafferty, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The reported frequency of aborted MRI-guided breast biopsies ranges from 8% to 17%, usually secondary to nonvisualization at attempted biopsy. Our study examines the frequency of MRI-guided breast biopsies aborted because of lesion nonvisualization and the subsequent risk of malignancy. MATERIALS AND METHODS. We identified 350 patients and 445 lesions scheduled for MRI-guided biopsy between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2009. Medical records and imaging studies were reviewed to ascertain patient demographics, lesion and imaging characteristics, and subsequent pathology results. Chi-square statistics were calculated for patient level analyses. RESULTS. MRI-guided biopsies were aborted in 13% (56/445) of lesions and 15% (53/350; 95% CI, 11.6–19.3%) of patients because of nonvisualization of the biopsy target at the time of attempted biopsy. Of these 53 patients, 50 patients had follow-up data available. Malignancy was subsequently diagnosed in five of those 50 patients (10%; 95% CI, 3.3–21.8%) patients, three with invasive ductal carcinomas and two with ductal carcinoma in situ. The mean time to malignant diagnosis from the date of aborted biopsy was 2.6 months (range, 1.1–6.9 months). CONCLUSION. Informed consent for MRI-guided breast biopsies should include discussion of biopsy cancellation because of nonvisualization of the target lesion. The low yet significant risk of malignancy in patients subsequent to an aborted MRI-guided breast biopsy warrants short-term follow-up MRI after a canceled biopsy. PMID:24370148

  1. Increased rate of positive biopsies using a combination of MR-Tomography, spectroscopy and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging prior to prostate biopsies in patients with persistent elevated prostate-specific antigen values: A retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lunacek, A.; Simon, J.; Bernt, R.; Huber, M.; Plas, E.; Mrstik, C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Persistently elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values following negative biopsies result in a diagnostic dilemma. In order to improve detection rates in patients with former negative biopsies and persistently elevated PSA values, magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) were performed prior to prostate rebiopsies. Materials and Methods: Over a 14-month period, 67 patients (mean age of 66 years) with a history of 1-5 negative biopsies underwent endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using T2-weighted MRT MRS and DW-MRI before an additional prostate biopsy was performed. Subsequently, 5 contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies were performed according to a 10-core systematic scheme. Out of the 67 men, 25 patients had positive biopsies and opted for radical prostatectomy. Histological evaluation of cancer localization, PSA, diameters of primary tumors, numbers and diameters of satellite tumors, prostate volume, and staging pathology was performed. These findings were compared with MRI and MRS results. Results: Serum PSA levels ranged from 3.1 to 19.5 g/ml (median level of 7.96 ng/ml). After the 25 patients underwent radical prostatectomy, analysis of 20 whole-mount sections of 25 radical retropubic prostatectomy (RPE) specimens presented results agreeing with the tumor location from MRI and MRS data. Conclusions: The aim of image-guided diagnostics should be to provide more critical information prior to biopsy. Furthermore, the acquisition of such data is important for better risk stratification in therapeutic decisions. PMID:23798861

  2. Percutaneous Liver Biopsies Guided with Ultrasonography: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Cakmakci, Emin; Caliskan, Kosti Can; Tabakci, Omer Naci; Tahtabasi, Mehmet; Karpat, Zeki

    2013-01-01

    Background Although liver biopsy is an easy procedure for hospitalized patients and outpatients, some complications may occur. Objectives To evaluate the efficiency, complications, safety and clinicopathological utility of ultrasonographic-guided percutaneous liver biopsy in diffuse liver disease. Patients and Methods In our retrospective study, we evaluated ultrasound-assisted needle biopsies that were performed in outpatients from October 2006 to July 2010. The liver biopsies were performed following one-night fasting using the tru-cut biopsy gun (18-20 gauge) after marking the best seen and hypovascular part of the liver, distant enough from the adjacent organs. Results A total of 1018 patients were referred to our radiology department. Most of the patients had hepatitis B (60.6%). The biopsy specimens were recorded and sent to our pathology department for histopathological examination. Conclusion According to the results of our series, percutaneous liver biopsy using the tru-cut biopsy gun guided by ultrasonography can be performed safely. We resolve that routine ultrasound of the puncture site is a quick, effective and safe procedure. The complication rate is very low. The US-assisted percutaneous liver biopsy should be used for all cases. PMID:24348609

  3. Cryo-preserved porcine kidneys are feasible for teaching and training renal biopsy: “the bento kidney”

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of patients as the primary teaching modality for learning procedures is being questioned. While there have been advancements in the technology used for performing needle biopsies in both native and transplanted kidneys, there has been little advancement in teaching and training tools. We have developed a portable ex-vivo kidney, the Bento Kidney, using cryo-preserved porcine kidneys for teaching this procedure. Methods The kidney is thawed, perfused by a pump, covered with skin for realistic haptic feedback, and then used with existing biopsy technology to teach the technique. Results Thirty porcine kidneys were used in this pilot research, and nine were shipped to physicians at a distant facility. Renal biopsy was then performed using a core biopsy needle and ultrasound guidance. There was some leakage of fluid from all kidneys noted. All trainees felt that the model was realistic, and judged at a mean score of 8.7 (SD 0.8) on a scale of 1 (not useful) to 10 (very useful). Conclusions This feasibility study demonstrates that cryo-preserved porcine kidneys can be successfully used to teach and train renal biopsy techniques, and provides haptic feedback as well as realistic real-time ultrasound images. Further large scale studies are needed to demonstrate value from the educational point of view for nephrology and transplantation. PMID:23369318

  4. Evaluation of the Success Rate of Ultrasound-guided Transjugular Liver Biopsy (TJLB) and the Associated Complications

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Masoud Pezeshki; Sima, Hamidreza; Khazaeeian, Reza; Mohammadifard, Mahyar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transjugular liver biopsy (TJLB) is a diagnostic radiological intervention, applied to patients with contraindications to percutaneous or laparoscopic liver biopsy. The aim of this study was to determine the safety, effectiveness, complications, and pathological impact of TJLB. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 24 consecutive patients, undergoing TJLB at Imam Reza Hospital, affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, from April 2010 to March 2011. The inclusion criteria were coagulopathy, thrombocytopenia, and ascites. TJLB was performed by a radiologist, and a guide wire was inserted in the right jugular vein. Right atrium and middle hepatic vein were catheterized, and then, Cook Quick-Core Biopsy Needle was used by ultrasound guidance. Data analysis was performed by SPSS version 16. Results The sample size included 24 subjects (54% males and 46% females). Success rate of TJLB was reported as 87.5% and the intervention duration was 23.89±9.34 min. No complications were reported in 37.5% of the patients; however, pain in the right upper quadrant (33.3%), leakage of contrast substance into the liver capsule (4.2%), and diffuse abdominal pain (4.2%). In 83% of biopsies, suitable samples were obtained for histopathological diagnosis, and 13% of patients were excluded from the study. According to the results, the mean central port track (CPT) was 6.75 ± 2.95. Conclusion TJLB is a relatively effective and safe procedure for patients with contraindications to percutaneous liver biopsy. PMID:28163865

  5. Deliveries from trophectoderm biopsied, fresh and vitrified blastocysts derived from polar body biopsied, vitrified oocytes.

    PubMed

    Grifo, Jamie; Adler, Alexis; Lee, Hsiao Ling; Morin, Scott J; Smith, Meghan; Lu, Lucy; Hodes-Wertz, Brooke; McCaffrey, Caroline; Berkeley, Alan; Munné, Santiago

    2015-08-01

    This longitudinal study reports preliminary findings of six patients who underwent first polar body biopsy followed by oocyte vitrification. All oocytes were warmed, inseminated by intracytoplasmic sperm injection and cultured to blastocyst. All suitable blastocysts underwent trophectoderm biopsy for aneuploidy screening, and supernumerary blastocysts were vitrified. Euploid blastocysts were transferred either fresh or in a subsequent programmed cycle. Of the 91 metaphase II oocytes, 30 had euploid first polar bodies. Development to blastocyst was more likely in oocytes with a euploid first polar body (66.7% versus 24.6%; P < 0.001). Nineteen euploid blastocysts were produced: 10 from oocytes with a euploid first polar body and nine from oocytes with an aneuploid first polar body. Five out of six patients (83%) had a live birth or ongoing pregnancy at the time of analysis. Eleven euploid blastocysts have been transferred and seven implanted (64%). Although the chromosomal status of the first polar body was poorly predictive of embryonic ploidy, an association was found between chromosomal status of the first polar body and development to blastocyst. Further study is required to characterize these relationships, but proof of concept is provided that twice biopsied, twice cryopreserved oocytes and embryos can lead to viable pregnancies.

  6. A case of severe necrotising pancreatitis following ampullary biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, J; French, J

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of necrotising pancreatitis following ampullary biopsy in a patient with Barrett’s oesophagus. The patient needed multiple necrosectomies and several admissions to the intensive care unit. This report is only the third and most severe case of pancreatitis following ampullary biopsy, highlighting its importance as a complication. PMID:26263955

  7. A case of severe necrotising pancreatitis following ampullary biopsy.

    PubMed

    Skelton, D; Barnes, J; French, J

    2015-05-01

    We present a case of necrotising pancreatitis following ampullary biopsy in a patient with Barrett's oesophagus. The patient needed multiple necrosectomies and several admissions to the intensive care unit. This report is only the third and most severe case of pancreatitis following ampullary biopsy, highlighting its importance as a complication.

  8. Biopsy of the right adrenal gland by the transhepatic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.B.; Bernardino, M.E.; Berkman, W.A.; Sones, P.J. Jr.; Torres, W.E.

    1983-08-01

    A transhepatic computed-tomographic-guided biopsy of a right adrenal mass is described. This method is simpler to perform than the usual posterior biopsy carried out with the patient prone and is less likely to cause a complicating pneumothorax. In seven of eight patients with right adrenal masses, adrenal tissue was obtained and an accurate diagnosis was possible. No complications resulted.

  9. Pulmonary Parenchymal Lymphoma Diagnosed by Bronchoscopic Cryoprobe Lung Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Schiavo, Dante; Batzlaff, Cassandra; Maldonado, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    A 51-year-old man presented with progressively worsening lung infiltrates and respiratory failure. Extensive investigations including bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage and conventional transbronchial forceps biopsies failed to establish the diagnosis. After transfer to our institution, he underwent repeat bronchoscopy with transbronchial cryobiopsy, which provided large, high-quality biopsy specimens establishing the diagnosis of parenchymal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

  10. Diffuse reflectance imaging: a tool for guided biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayanthi, Jayaraj L.; Subhash, Narayanan; Manju, Stephen; Nisha, Unni G.; Beena, Valappil T.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of premalignant or malignant oral lesions depends on the quality of the biopsy, adequate clinical information and correct interpretation of the biopsy results. The major clinical challenge is to precisely locate the biopsy site in a clinically suspicious lesion. Dips due to oxygenated hemoglobin absorption have been noticed at 545 and 575 nm in the diffusely reflected white light spectra of oral mucosa and the intensity ratio R545/R575 has been found suited for early detection of oral pre-cancers. A multi-spectral diffuse reflectance (DR) imaging system has been developed consisting of an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera and a liquid crystal tunable filter for guiding the clinician to an optimal biopsy site. Towards this DR images were recorded from 27 patients with potentially malignant lesions on their tongue (dorsal, lateral and ventral sides) and from 44 healthy controls at 545 and 575 nm with the DR imaging system. False colored ratio image R545/R575 of the lesion provides a visual discerning capability that helps in locating the most malignant site for biopsy. Histopathological report of guided biopsy showed that out of the 27 patients 16 were cancers, 9 pre-cancers and 2 lichen planus. In this clinical trial DR imaging has correctly guided 25 biopsy sites, yielding a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 98%, thereby establishing the potential of DR imaging as a tool for guided biopsy.

  11. Pre-cannulation lung biopsy shortens ECMO course.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Pablo; Lee, Timothy C; Kearney, Debra L; Fernandes, Caraciolo J

    2016-07-01

    We describe the clinical course of an infant with respiratory failure who underwent lung biopsy prior to cannulation for undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Pathology revealed alveolar capillary dysplasia, and ECMO was discontinued. Rapid diagnosis allowed for closure and saved resources. We recommend considering early biopsy in infants with atypical pulmonary hypertension.

  12. Aspiration biopsy of testis: another method for histologic examination

    SciTech Connect

    Nseyo, U.O.; Englander, L.S.; Huben, R.P.; Pontes, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    The most important method for evaluating the pathogenesis of male infertility is open testicular biopsy. Herein the authors describe a method of aspiration biopsy of testis for histologic examination. Sexually mature dogs and rats treated with chemotherapeutic agents and ionizing radiation were followed with periodic testicular aspiration biopsy during and after treatment. The histologic findings from the aspiration biopsy compare with the results of routine histologic examination in assessing spermatogenetic activity and delineating pathologic changes. The puncture in the experimental animals was performed under general anesthesia. In human patients testicular biopsy could be done under local anesthesia in an outpatient clinic. The procedure would be less painful, minimally invasive, and more cost-effective.

  13. CT-directed robotic biopsy testbed: motivation and concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Kevin R.; Stoianovici, Dan S.; Glossop, Neil D.; Gary, Kevin A.; Onda, Sumiyo; Cody, Richard; Lindisch, David; Stanimir, Alexandru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Patriciu, Alexandru; Watson, Vance; Levy, Elliot

    2001-05-01

    As a demonstration platform, we are developing a robotic biopsy testbed incorporating a mobile CT scanner, a small needle driver robot, and an optical localizer. This testbed will be used to compare robotically assisted biopsy to the current manual technique, and allow us to investigate software architectures for integrating multiple medical devices. This is a collaboration between engineers and physicians from three universities and a commercial vendor. In this paper we describe the CT-directed biopsy technique, review some other biopsy systems including passive and semi- autonomous devices, describe our testbed components, and present our software architecture. This testbed is a first step in developing the image-guided, robotically assisted, physician directed, biopsy systems of the future.

  14. CT-guided Native Medical Renal Biopsy: Cortical Tangential versus Non-Tangential Approaches-A Comparison of Efficacy and Safety.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; O'Dell, Matthew; Flores, Miguel; Limback, Joseph; Kendall, Melissa; Pepe, Julie; Burt, Jeremy R; Contreras, Francisco; Lewis, Andrew R; Ward, Thomas J

    2017-04-01

    Purpose To review a single-center experience with the cortical tangential approach during computed tomography (CT)-guided native medical renal biopsy and to evaluate its efficacy and safety compared with those of a non-cortical tangential approach. Materials and Methods This retrospective study received institutional review board approval, with a waiver of the HIPAA requirement for informed consent. The number of cores, glomeruli, and complications were reviewed in 431 CT-guided medical renal biopsies performed between July 2007 and September 2015. A biopsy followed a cortical tangential approach if the needle path was parallel to the renal cortical surface, at a depth closer to the renal capsule than the renal pelvic fat. A sample was considered adequate if the biopsy yielded at least 10 glomeruli at light microscopy, one glomerulus at immunofluorescence microscopy, and one glomerulus at electron microscopy. The χ(2) test, the t test, the Mann-Whitney test, and logistic regression modeling of sample adequacy were performed. Results One hundred fifty-six (36%) of 431 biopsies were performed with the cortical tangential approach. More cores were obtained for the cortical tangential group (2.6 vs 2.4, P = .001); biopsy needle gauge was not significantly different (P = .076). More adequate samples were obtained in the cortical tangential group (66.7% vs 49.8%, P = .001), with more glomeruli (23 vs 16, P = .014). Results were significant after controlling for needle gauge and number of cores (P = .008). The cortical tangential group had fewer complications (1.9% vs 7.3%, P = .018). Conclusion The cortical tangential approach, when applied to CT-guided native medical renal biopsies, results in higher rates of sample adequacy and lower rates of postprocedural complications. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  15. Sentinel Node Biopsy in Early Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Basso, Stefano M M; Chiara, Giordano B; Lumachi, Franco

    2016-01-01

    The approach to the axilla is an evolving paradigm, and recognition of the complexity of breast cancer (BC) biology is changing treatment options. The sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) technique is based on the excision and histological examination of the axillary lymph nodes(s), which is assumed to be the first one draining from the primary tumor. SLNB can accurately stage the axilla, and several trials have shown that there are no significant differences in local recurrence and overall survival between patients treated with or without axillary node dissection (ALND) after a negative SLNB. Surgical morbidity was significantly reduced in terms of rates of lymphedema and neuropathy, with reduced hospital stay and better quality of life after the SLNB procedure. ALND can safely be omitted in patients with ≥2 positive nodes who received conservative surgery and radiotherapy, while ALND is still recommended in clinically N1 BCs, in case of ≥3 positive nodes, and when the number of positive nodes would be crucial for the choice of chemotherapy. Micrometastatic disease can be safely managed with SLNB alone, and additional identification of micrometastases with immunohistochemistry does not affect disease-free survival or overall survival. An appropriate management of the axilla is crucial for the outcome of patients with early BC, and SLNB introduction into the clinical practice dramatically changed the surgical treatment, reducing morbidity without decreasing survival. A tailored approach should be suggested in each patient with BC, considering the biology of the tumor rather than nodal involvement.

  16. Microfabricated instrument for tissue biopsy and analysis

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Benett, William J.

    1999-01-01

    A microfabricated biopsy/histology instrument which has several advantages over the conventional procedures, including minimal specimen handling, smooth cutting edges with atomic sharpness capable of slicing very thin specimens (approximately 2 .mu.m or greater), micro-liter volumes of chemicals for treating the specimens, low cost, disposable, fabrication process which renders sterile parts, and ease of use. The cutter is a "cheese-grater" style design comprising a block or substrate of silicon and which uses anisotropic etching of the silicon to form extremely sharp and precise cutting edges. As a specimen is cut, it passes through the silicon cutter and lies flat on a piece of glass which is bonded to the cutter. Microchannels are etched into the glass or silicon substrates for delivering small volumes of chemicals for treating the specimen. After treatment, the specimens can be examined through the glass substrate. For automation purposes, microvalves and micropumps may be incorporated. Also, specimens in parallel may be cut and treated with identical or varied chemicals. The instrument is disposable due to its low cost and thus could replace current expensive microtome and histology equipment.

  17. Uncompacted myelin lamellae in peripheral nerve biopsy.

    PubMed

    Vital, Claude; Vital, Anne; Bouillot, Sandrine; Favereaux, Alexandre; Lagueny, Alain; Ferrer, Xavier; Brechenmacher, Christiane; Petry, Klaus G

    2003-01-01

    Since 1979, the authors have studied 49 peripheral nerve biopsies presenting uncompacted myelin lamellae (UML). Based on the ultrastructural pattern of UML they propose a 3-category classification. The first category includes cases displaying regular UML, which was observed in 43 cases; it was more frequent in 9 cases with polyneuropathy organomegaly endocrinopathy m-protein skin changes (POEMS) syndrome as well as in 1 case of Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1B with a novel point mutation in the P0 gene. The second category consists of cases showing irregular UML, observed in 4 cases with IgM monoclonal gammopathy and anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) activity. This group included 1 benign case and 3 B-cell malignant lymphomas. The third category is complex UML, which was present in 2 unrelated patients with an Arg 98 His missense mutation in the P0 protein gene. Irregular and complex UML are respectively related to MAG and P0, which play a crucial role in myelin lamellae compaction and adhesion.

  18. Hybrid tracers for sentinel node biopsy.

    PubMed

    Van Den Berg, N S; Buckle, T; Kleinjan, G I; Klop, W M; Horenblas, S; Van Der Poel, H G; Valdés-Olmos, R A; Van Leeuwen, F I

    2014-06-01

    Conventional sentinel node (SN) mapping is performed by injection of a radiocolloid followed by lymphoscintigraphy to identify the number and location of the primary tumor draining lymph node(s), the so-called SN(s). Over the last decade research has focused on the introduction of new imaging agents that can further aid (surgical) SN identification. Different tracers for SN mapping, with varying sizes and isotopes have been reported, most of which have proven their value in a clinical setting. A major challenge lies in transferring this diagnostic information obtained at the nuclear medicine department to the operating theatre thereby providing the surgeon with (image) guidance. Conventionally, an intraoperative injection of vital blue dye or a fluorescence dye is given to allow intraoperative optical SN identification. However, for some indications, the radiotracer-based approach remains crucial. More recently, hybrid tracers, that contain both a radioactive and fluorescent label, were introduced to allow for direct integration of pre- and intraoperative guidance technologies. Their potential is especially high when they are used in combination with new surgical imaging modalities and navigation tools. Next to a description of the known tracers for SN mapping, this review discusses the application of hybrid tracers during SN biopsy and how the introduction of these new techniques can further aid in translation of nuclear medicine information into the operating theatre.

  19. NOTE: Adaptation of a 3D prostate cancer atlas for transrectal ultrasound guided target-specific biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, R.; Werahera, P. N.; Barqawi, A.; Crawford, E. D.; Shinohara, K.; Simoneau, A. R.; Suri, J. S.

    2008-10-01

    Due to lack of imaging modalities to identify prostate cancer in vivo, current TRUS guided prostate biopsies are taken randomly. Consequently, many important cancers are missed during initial biopsies. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential clinical utility of a high-speed registration algorithm for a 3D prostate cancer atlas. This 3D prostate cancer atlas provides voxel-level likelihood of cancer and optimized biopsy locations on a template space (Zhan et al 2007). The atlas was constructed from 158 expert annotated, 3D reconstructed radical prostatectomy specimens outlined for cancers (Shen et al 2004). For successful clinical implementation, the prostate atlas needs to be registered to each patient's TRUS image with high registration accuracy in a time-efficient manner. This is implemented in a two-step procedure, the segmentation of the prostate gland from a patient's TRUS image followed by the registration of the prostate atlas. We have developed a fast registration algorithm suitable for clinical applications of this prostate cancer atlas. The registration algorithm was implemented on a graphical processing unit (GPU) to meet the critical processing speed requirements for atlas guided biopsy. A color overlay of the atlas superposed on the TRUS image was presented to help pick statistically likely regions known to harbor cancer. We validated our fast registration algorithm using computer simulations of two optimized 7- and 12-core biopsy protocols to maximize the overall detection rate. Using a GPU, patient's TRUS image segmentation and atlas registration took less than 12 s. The prostate cancer atlas guided 7- and 12-core biopsy protocols had cancer detection rates of 84.81% and 89.87% respectively when validated on the same set of data. Whereas the sextant biopsy approach without the utility of 3D cancer atlas detected only 70.5% of the cancers using the same histology data. We estimate 10-20% increase in prostate cancer detection rates

  20. The value of needle renal allograft biopsy. I. A retrospective study of biopsies performed during putative rejection episodes.

    PubMed Central

    Matas, A J; Sibley, R; Mauer, M; Sutherland, D E; Simmons, R L; Najarian, J S

    1983-01-01

    Following renal transplantation, immunosuppression is usually increased to treat presumed rejection episodes. However, a) many conditions mimic rejection in the post-transplant period, and b) many rejection episodes are irreversible. As increased immunosuppressive therapy is associated with an increased risk of infection, it would be ideal to limit antirejection therapy to only the rejection episodes that are reversible. The role of percutaneous allograft biopsy was studied as an aid to decide which patients to treat for rejection, to limit unnecessary immunosuppression and to predict allograft survival. One hundred thirty-five patients with suspected rejection underwent 206 allograft biopsies without complication. Two hundred four biopsies were available for study. Biopsies were coded on a 1-4 scale (minimal, mild, moderate, severe) for acute and chronic tubulointerstitial infiltrate and vascular rejection, as well as no rejection (e.g., recurrence of original disease). Treatment decisions were made on the basis of the biopsy combined with clinical data. All patients have been followed two years and outcome correlated with biopsy findings (death, nephrectomy, and return to dialysis defined as kidney loss). The results were the following: 1) biopsies represented changes within the kidney. Of 16 kidneys removed within one month of biopsy, no nephrectomy specimen showed less rejection than that seen on biopsy. 2) Eighty-one biopsies (39.7%) led to tapering or not increasing immunosuppression (either no rejection, minimal rejection, or irreversible changes). 3) Kidneys having either severe acute or chronic vascular rejection (less than 30% function at three months) had significantly (p less than 0.05) decreased survival three to 24 months postbiopsy than those with minimal or mild vascular rejection or tubulointerstitial infiltrate (83% function at three months). 4) Kidneys with moderate chronic vascular rejection and those with severe acute tubulointerstitial

  1. [The repeated biopsy in patients with lupus nephritis].

    PubMed

    Subils, Gisella; Alba, Paula; Gobbi, Carla; Astesana, Pablo; Babini, Alejandra; Albiero, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively studied patients with SLE according to ACR criteria, with NL who underwent a repeat renal biopsy from 2005 to 2012. We analyzed the main indications of renal biopsies, the histopathological Class and activity and chronicity changes. RESULTS The total number of patients with NL was 120, of which 18 (15%) patients underwent repeat renal biopsy, 18 had 2 renal biopsies and 6 had 3 biopsies. 3 (16.7%) patients were smokers; 1 (5.6%) had a history of previous DBT, 2 (11.1%) had a history of hypertension; and 3 (16.7%) patients had previous obesity. The duration of SLE was 15 ± 96 months; the time between the 1st and the 2nd biopsy was 45 ± 11 months and the time between the 2nd and 3rd biopsy was 56 ± 12 months. Indications for repeat biopsy were proteinuria in 10 biopsies (41.6%); proteinuria with impaired renal function in 2 biopsies (8.3%); proteinuria with pathological urine sediment in 8 (33.3%); . and pathological proteinuria with pathological urine sediment and impaired renal function in 4 biopsies (16.6%) The most frequent histological changes found between first and repeat biopsies were class IV to class III: 2 (8.2%) ; Class IV to Class IV: 8 (33.3%), class IV to class III + V: 2 (8.2%); class IV to class IV + V 3 (12.5%); class IV to class V: 2 (8.2%). Changes in NL biopsies with proliferative activity and chronicity indices (A / C) were: A to A / C: 7 (29.1%), A / C to A / C: 7 (29.1%). The immunosuppressive therapy was increased in 79.1% and 16.6% remained without changes. 20% patients received cyclophosphamide 1 g every 30 days, 26% Cyclophosphamide 500 mg every 15 days, 23% induction therapy with mycophenolate mofetil; 23% with Rituximab; 8% Cyclosporin A. Maintenance therapy with mycophenolate mofetil was performed in 87.5%; azathioprine in 1 case. Hydroxychloroquine was used in all cases.

  2. Towards the mid-infrared optical biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddon, Angela B.; Benson, Trevor M.; Sujecki, Slawomir; Abdel-Moneim, Nabil; Tang, Zhuoqi; Furniss, David; Sojka, Lukasz; Stone, Nick; Jayakrupakar, Nallala; Lloyd, Gavin R.; Lindsay, Ian; Ward, Jon; Farries, Mark; Moselund, Peter M.; Napier, Bruce; Lamrini, Samir; Møller, Uffe; Kubat, Irnis; Petersen, Christian R.; Bang, Ole

    2016-03-01

    We are establishing a new paradigm in mid-infrared molecular sensing, mapping and imaging to open up the midinfrared spectral region for in vivo (i.e. in person) medical diagnostics and surgery. Thus, we are working towards the mid-infrared optical biopsy (`opsy' look at, bio the biology) in situ in the body for real-time diagnosis. This new paradigm will be enabled through focused development of devices and systems which are robust, functionally designed, safe, compact and cost effective and are based on active and passive mid-infrared optical fibers. In particular, this will enable early diagnosis of external cancers, mid-infrared detection of cancer-margins during external surgery for precise removal of diseased tissue, in one go during the surgery, and mid-infrared endoscopy for early diagnosis of internal cancers and their precision removal. The mid-infrared spectral region has previously lacked portable, bright sources. We set a record in demonstrating extreme broad-band supercontinuum generated light 1.4 to 13.3 microns in a specially engineered, high numerical aperture mid-infrared optical fiber. The active mid-infrared fiber broadband supercontinuum for the first time offers the possibility of a bright mid-infrared wideband source in a portable package as a first step for medical fiber-based systems operating in the mid-infrared. Moreover, mid-infrared molecular mapping and imaging is potentially a disruptive technology to give improved monitoring of the environment, energy efficiency, security, agriculture and in manufacturing and chemical processing. This work is in part supported by the European Commission: Framework Seven (FP7) Large-Scale Integrated Project MINERVA: MId-to-NEaR- infrared spectroscopy for improVed medical diAgnostics (317803; www.minerva-project.eu).

  3. Neuropathological alterations in diabetic truncal neuropathy: evaluation by skin biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Lauria, G.; McArthur, J.; Hauer, P.; Griffin, J.; Cornblath, D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To describe the neuropathological features in skin biopsies from patients with diabetic truncal neuropathy.
METHODS—Three patients with diabetic truncal neuropathy underwent skin biopsies from both symptomatic and asymptomatic regions of the chest and trunk. After local anaesthesia, biopsies were performed using a 3 mm diameter punch device (Acupunch). Intraepidermal nerve fibres (IENFs), the most distal processes of small myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibres, were identified after staining with PGP 9.5 as previously described.
RESULTS—Diabetes was diagnosed at the time of the neurological presentation in two, and one was a known diabetic patient. All three had associated sensory-motor polyneuropathy. In all, skin biopsies showed a marked reduction of both epidermal and dermal nerve fibres in the symptomatic dermatomes, compared with skin from asymptomatic truncal areas. In one patient, a follow up skin biopsy when symptoms had improved showed a return of IENFs.
CONCLUSIONS—In diabetic truncal neuropathy, skin biopsies from symptomatic regions show a loss of IENFs. After clinical recovery, there is a return of the IENF population, suggesting that improvement occurs by nerve regeneration. These findings suggest that sensory nerve fibre injury in diabetic truncal neuropathy is distal to or within the sensory ganglia. Skin biopsy provides a possible tool for understanding the pathophysiology of the disease.

 PMID:9810952

  4. Does Prebiopsy, Nonsterile Ultrasonography Gel Affect Biopsy-Site Asepsis?

    SciTech Connect

    Gurel, Kamil Karabay, Oguz; Gurel, Safiye; Hildebolt, Charles

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which the use of nonsterile gel, prior to antiseptic procedures in ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous biopsies, results in contamination of the biopsy site. Materials and Methods. Patients referred for US-guided percutaneous biopsies were included in this study. Transmission material used for US evaluation before biopsy-site antiseptic procedures were performed was either nonsterile gel or sterile saline. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups: nonsterile gel (n = 30) and sterile saline (n = 30). Before the transmission material was used and after antiseptic procedures were performed, microbial swabs of a 10-cm{sup 2}-diameter area were obtained at the biopsy site. Swabs were also obtained from the gel, saline, and povidine-iodine. Inoculated specimen plates were incubated at 37{sup o}C under aerobic conditions, and the numbers of colony-forming units recorded. Nominal logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the odds of postantisepsis bacterial growth (after antiseptic procedures were performed) based on group, gender, coincidental disease (diabetes, chronic renal failure, and malignancy), biopsy-site location (head and neck or breast and abdomen), and local factors (skin fold, skin tag, and hair). Results. The following odds ratios (adjusted for the other variables) and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated: (1) group (2.9 [0.8-11.1]; p = 0.10); (2) gender (1.2 [0.3-5.2]; p = 0.78); (3) coincidental disease (7.6 [0.9-166.7]; p = 0.09); (4) biopsy site location (6.2 [1.4-31.3]; p = 0.02); and (5) local factors (7.0 [1.6-36.0]; p = 0.01). No bacterial growth occurred with swabs obtained from gel, povidine-iodine, or saline. Conclusion. We conclude that nonsterile gel used prior to percutaneous biopsy does not affect biopsy-site asepsis.

  5. [Pilot study on predictive value of plasmatic levels of 9 angiogenetic biomarkers in selection of patients candidate to prostate biopsy].

    PubMed

    Serretta, Vincenzo; Scurria, Salvatore; Dispensa, Nino; Chiapparrone, Gaetano; Provenzano, Sandro; Caruso, Stefano; Bronte, Giuseppe; Cicero, Giuseppe; Russo, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    To reduce the number of negative prostate biopsies in patients with elevated PSA serum levels represents a major challenge in urological oncology. Angiogenetic factors might be involved in initial stages of prostate cancer and might represent useful tools in patients' selection for prostate biopsy. The plasmatic levels of Angiopoietin-2, Follistatin, G-CSF, HGF, IL-8, Leptin, PDGF-BB, PECAM-1 and VEGF were measured by BioPlex immunoassay in patients undergoing prostate biopsy for palpable prostate nodule and/or elevated PSA levels (≥4 ng/mL). They were related with biopsy results. ROC curve analysis was exploited to test the diagnostic accuracy of each biomarker by AUC calculation. A potential cut-off level was computed. Fifty patients were entered. Median PSA was 6.8 ng/mL. A prostate nodule was palpable in 18 (36%) patients. The median number of biopsy cores was 12. Prostate cancer was detected in 25 (50%) and ASAP and PIN in 2 more patients (4%) respectively. Among the 9 considered biomarkers, only leptin showed an interesting diagnostic performance with an AUC of 0.781, at a cut-off value of 2.11 ng/mL, demonstrating a sensitivity of 78%, a specificity of 77% and a positive predictive value of 85%. Main limitations of our study are the exploratory design and the criteria adopted for patients' selection determining a detection rate for prostate cancer above the usual range. Leptin only, in our preliminary study, shows promising diagnostic accuracy for the selection of patients candidate to prostate biopsy. Further studies are required to confirm its diagnostic value and its relation with BMI.

  6. Magnetic-resonance-guided biopsy of focal liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ethan A; Grove, Jason J; Van Der Spek, Abraham F L; Jarboe, Marcus D

    2017-03-03

    Image-guided biopsy techniques are widely used in clinical practice. Commonly used methods employ either ultrasound (US) or computed tomography (CT) for image guidance. In certain patients, US or CT guidance may be suboptimal, or even impossible, because of artifacts, suboptimal lesion visualization, or both. We recently began performing magnetic resonance (MR)-guided biopsy of focal liver lesions in select pediatric patients with lesions that are not well visualized by US or CT. This report describes our experience performing MR-guided biopsy of focal liver lesions, with case examples to illustrate innovative techniques and novel aspects of these procedures.

  7. Third-harmonic generation imaging of breast tissue biopsies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woowon; Kabir, Mohammad M; Emmadi, Rajyasree; Toussaint, Kimani C

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate for the first time the imaging of unstained breast tissue biopsies using third-harmonic generation (THG) microscopy. As a label-free imaging technique, THG microscopy is compared to phase contrast and polarized light microscopy which are standard imaging methods for breast tissues. A simple feature detection algorithm is applied to detect tumour-associated lymphocyte rich regions in unstained breast biopsy tissue and compared with corresponding regions identified by a pathologist from bright-field images of hematoxylin and eosin stained breast tissue. Our results suggest that THG imaging holds potential as a complementary technique for analysing breast tissue biopsies.

  8. Automated Analysis of PIN-4 Stained Prostate Needle Biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabata, Bikash; Babenko, Boris; Monroe, Robert; Srinivas, Chukka

    Prostate Needle biopsies are stained with the PIN-4 marker cocktail to help the pathologist distinguish between HGPIN and adenocarcinoma. The correct interpretation of multiple IHC markers can be challenging. Therefore we propose the use of computer aided diagnosis algorithms for the identification and classification of glands in a whole slide image of prostate needle biopsy. The paper presents the different issues related to the automated analysis of prostate needle biopsies and the approach taken by BioImagene in its first generation algorithms.

  9. Cancer Liquid Biopsy: Is It Ready for Clinic?

    PubMed

    Pan, Ying; Ji, John S; Jin, Jason Gang; Kuo, Winston Patrick; Kang, Hongjun

    2017-01-01

    The management of cancer relies on a combination of imaging and tissue biopsy for diagnosis, monitoring, and molecular classification-based patient stratification to ensure appropriate treatment. Conventional tissue biopsy harvests tumor samples with invasive procedures, which are often difficult for patients with advanced disease. Given the well-recognized intratumor genetic heterogeneity [1], the biopsy of small tumor fragments does not necessarily represent all the genetic aberrations in the tumor, but sampling the entire tumor in each patient is not realistic. Moreover, tumors evolve all the time from local to advanced disease and by adapting to selective pressure from treatment.

  10. Characterization of prostate cancer missed by sextant biopsy.

    PubMed

    Bak, John B; Landas, Steve K; Haas, Gabriel P

    2003-09-01

    There is a trend to increase the number of prostate biopsies taken to increase the detection rate of prostate cancer. We examined radical prostatectomy specimens and correlated the findings to those of preoperative sextant biopsy in an effort to identify the characteristics of tumors that went undetected by our biopsy regimen. Seventy-one patients diagnosed with prostate cancer based on sextant biopsy who underwent radical prostatectomy at our institution from June 1995 to November 2001 had prostatectomy specimens and biopsy slides reviewed. These specimens were step-sectioned and whole-mounted. The location, size, and grade of individual cancer foci in the prostatectomy specimens were correlated with results of the original sextant biopsies. Clinically significant tumors were defined as those with volume > 0.5 mL or Gleason score > or= 7 and extracapsular extension. In 33 patients (46%), there was concordance of biopsy and prostatectomy findings. In 38 patients (54%), additional lesions were demonstrated in the prostatectomy specimens that were not detected by our sextant biopsies. These included 13 cases (34%) with tumors > 0.5 mL and 25 cases in which the lesions were < 0.5 mL in size. However, 7 of these cases contained tumors with Gleason score > or =7. Tumors were located in the transition zone in 8 of these 38 cases (21%), and the remaining tumors were located in the peripheral zone (79%). No tumors with extracapsular extension were missed. Thus, 20 of the 71 cases (28%) had clinically significant cancers that went undetected by the traditional sextant biopsy method. Greater than 50% of patients who underwent sextant biopsy of the prostate had additional tumors that were missed when compared to the pathologic specimen. As many as 28% of these patients had clinically significant cancer based on size and grade criteria. A strategy of increased numbers of biopsies would improve the detection rate of these clinically important tumors. However, the ideal strategy

  11. Liquid Biopsy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Vila, Miguel A.; Mayo-de-las-Casas, Clara; Giménez-Capitán, Ana; Jordana-Ariza, Núria; Garzón, Mónica; Balada, Ariadna; Villatoro, Sergi; Teixidó, Cristina; García-Peláez, Beatriz; Aguado, Cristina; Catalán, María José; Campos, Raquel; Pérez-Rosado, Ana; Bertran-Alamillo, Jordi; Martínez-Bueno, Alejandro; Gil, María-de-los-Llanos; González-Cao, María; González, Xavier; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Viteri, Santiago; Karachaliou, Niki; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Liquid biopsy analyses are already incorporated in the routine clinical practice in many hospitals and oncology departments worldwide, improving the selection of treatments and monitoring of lung cancer patients. Although they have not yet reached its full potential, liquid biopsy-based tests will soon be as widespread as “standard” biopsies and imaging techniques, offering invaluable diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive information. This review summarizes the techniques available for the isolation and analysis of circulating free DNA and RNA, exosomes, tumor-educated platelets, and circulating tumor cells from the blood of cancer patients, presents the methodological challenges associated with each of these materials, and discusses the clinical applications of liquid biopsy testing in lung cancer. PMID:28066769

  12. Liquid Biopsy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Molina-Vila, Miguel A; Mayo-de-Las-Casas, Clara; Giménez-Capitán, Ana; Jordana-Ariza, Núria; Garzón, Mónica; Balada, Ariadna; Villatoro, Sergi; Teixidó, Cristina; García-Peláez, Beatriz; Aguado, Cristina; Catalán, María José; Campos, Raquel; Pérez-Rosado, Ana; Bertran-Alamillo, Jordi; Martínez-Bueno, Alejandro; Gil, María-de-Los-Llanos; González-Cao, María; González, Xavier; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Viteri, Santiago; Karachaliou, Niki; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Liquid biopsy analyses are already incorporated in the routine clinical practice in many hospitals and oncology departments worldwide, improving the selection of treatments and monitoring of lung cancer patients. Although they have not yet reached its full potential, liquid biopsy-based tests will soon be as widespread as "standard" biopsies and imaging techniques, offering invaluable diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive information. This review summarizes the techniques available for the isolation and analysis of circulating free DNA and RNA, exosomes, tumor-educated platelets, and circulating tumor cells from the blood of cancer patients, presents the methodological challenges associated with each of these materials, and discusses the clinical applications of liquid biopsy testing in lung cancer.

  13. Pulmonary sarcoidosis: An important differential diagnosis in transbronchial lung biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, Qury S.; Sahai, Kavita; Rathi, K. R.; Singh, Sarvinder; Sharma, Shruti

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. Lungs and lymphatics are the principal sites affected by this disease. The disorder is often not suspected by physicians. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study done on 140 transbronchial lung biopsies received for histopathological examination in the Department of Pathology for 1 year in a multispeciality tertiary care hospital, in Delhi. Results: Out of 140 transbronchial lung biopsies studied, 13 cases of sarcoidosis were diagnosed histopathologically. In these patients a clinical, pathological, and radiological corelation was done. And a final diagnosis of sarcoidosis was given after excluding other granulomatous lesions. Conclusion: Transbronchial lung biopsies have become an important tool in the diagnosis of sarcoidosis in present time. Hence sarcoidosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis when dealing with granulomatous lesions in lung biopsies. PMID:24778476

  14. CT guided percutaneous needle biopsy of the chest: initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Lazguet, Younes; Maarouf, Rachid; Karrou, Marouan; Skiker, Imane; Alloubi, Ihsan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article is to report our first experience of CT guided percutaneous thoracic biopsy and to demonstrate the accuracy and safety of this procedure. This was a retrospective study of 28 CT-Guided Percutaneous Needle Biopsies of the Chest performed on 24 patients between November 2014 and April 2015. Diagnosis was achieved in 18 patients (75%), negative results were found in 3 patients (12,5%). Biopsy was repeated in these cases with two positive results. Complications were seen in 7 patients (29%), Hemoptysis in 5 patients (20%), Pneumothorax in 1 patient (4,1%) and vaso-vagal shock in 1 patient (4,1%). CT Guided Percutaneous Needle Biopsy of the Chest is a safe, minimally invasive procedure with high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosis of lung lesions. PMID:27347300

  15. Breast Biopsy: The Effects of Hypnosis and Music.

    PubMed

    Téllez, Arnoldo; Sánchez-Jáuregui, Teresa; Juárez-García, Dehisy M; García-Solís, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The authors evaluated the efficacies of audio-recorded hypnosis with background music and music without hypnosis in the reduction of emotional and physical disturbances in patients scheduled for breast biopsy in comparison with a control group. A total of 75 patients were randomly assigned to 3 different groups and evaluated at baseline and before and after breast biopsy using visual analog scales of stress, pain, depression, anxiety, fatigue, optimism, and general well-being. The results showed that, before breast biopsy, the music group presented less stress and anxiety, whereas the hypnosis with music group presented reduced stress, anxiety, and depression and increased optimism and general well-being. After the biopsy, the music group presented less anxiety and pain, whereas the hypnosis group showed less anxiety and increased optimism.

  16. [Biopsy of lung tissue in the diagnosis of disseminated transformations].

    PubMed

    Lewaschow, J N; Orsheschkowskij, O W

    1988-01-01

    The results of complex studies in 440 patients with disseminated processes are presented. In 135 of them the diagnosis was confirmed by clinical, roentgenologic and laboratory data and by biopsies of skin, muscles and subcutaneous lymph nodes. Transbronchial lung biopsy was performed in 218 patients. It gave positive results in 65% of the cases. Open biopsy of lung was performed in 134 cases. Hemodynamic and gas exchange studies during the operation indicated its insignificant traumatism. Complications (limited hemothorax, partial pneumothorax, subcutaneous emphysema, wound suppuration) were noted in 10 (7.5%) cases in the postoperative period. Pulmonary tests performed three weeks after the operation did not reveal significant changes in the subjects, even those with considerable initial disorders. Open biopsy permitted to verify the diagnosis in 131 (98%) patients. In 52% of these cases the diagnosis did not correspond to the presumed one and considerably influenced the subsequent treatment.

  17. The disappearing clip: an unusual complication in MRI biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, Anita Geraldine; Peter, Prasant; Jose, Chaitra Lesli

    2014-01-01

    MRI-guided biopsies are being increasingly used for otherwise occult breast lesions. Clip migration has been reported however, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no documented cases of entire disappearance of a marker clip. Absence of the postbiopsy marker clip was noted when our patient returned for preoperative hook-wire localisation even though accurate clip placement had been confirmed on the post-MRI biopsy mammogram. PMID:25139917

  18. Thoracoscopic localization of nonpalpable rib tumors for excisional biopsy.

    PubMed

    McDonald, J M; Freeman, R K

    2000-07-01

    Nonpalpable tumors of the rib can be difficult to localize accurately at the time of excisional biopsy. Furthermore, the ability of current imaging techniques to assess pleural or pulmonary involvement is not reliable. An intraoperative localization method using single port thoracoscopy is discussed which allows optimal placement of a biopsy incision and provides an accurate assessment of any tumor invasion into the adjacent pleura or lung.

  19. Surgical sentinel lymph node biopsy in early breast cancer. Could it be avoided by performing a preoperative staging procedure? A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Testori, Alberto; Meroni, Stefano; Moscovici, Oana Codrina; Magnoni, Paola; Malerba, Paolo; Chiti, Arturo; Rahal, Daoud; Travaglini, Roberto; Cariboni, Umberto; Alloisio, Marco; Orefice, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The aim of this pilot trial was to study the feasibility of sentinel node percutaneous preoperative gamma probe-guided biopsy as a valid preoperative method of assessment of nodal status compared to surgical sentinel lymph node biopsy. Material/Methods This prospective study enrolled 10 consecutive patients without evidence of axillary lymph node metastases at preoperative imaging. All patients underwent sentinel node occult lesion localization (SNOLL) using radiotracer intradermic injection that detected a “hot spot” corresponding to the sentinel node in all cases. Gamma probe over the skin detection with subsequent ultrasonographically guided needle biopsy of the sentinel node were performed. The percutaneous needle core histopathological diagnosis was compared to the results of the surgical biopsy. Results Preoperative sentinel node identification was successful in all patients. Conclusions The combination of preoperative gamma probe sentinel node detection and ultrasound-guided biopsy could represent a valid alternative to intraoperative sentinel node biopsy in clinically and ultrasonographically negative axillary nodes, resulting in shorter duration of surgery and lower intraoperative risks. PMID:22936189

  20. A Comparison of Four- Versus Three-Pass Transjugular Biopsy Using a 19-G Tru-Cut Needle and a Randomized Study Using a Cassette to Prevent Biopsy Fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Vibhakorn, Shusang; Cholongitas, Evangelos; Kalambokis, George; Manousou, Pinelopi; Quaglia, Alberto; Marelli, Laura; Senzolo, Marco; Patch, David; Dhillon, Amar; Burroughs, Andrew K.

    2009-05-15

    Recently, it has been shown that transjugular liver biopsy (TJLB) with three passes gives comparable specimens to percutaneous liver biopsy (PLB). The aim of this study was to evaluate the adequacy of TJLB using four passes in a consecutive series of patients, and whether using a supportive cassette can prevent fragmentation. One hundred consecutive TJLBs in 92 patients (48 transplanted), always using four passes (19-G Tru-Cut), were compared to three-pass TJLBs. The four-pass TJLB specimens were randomized at a 1:1 ratio of liver cores placed in a cassette versus not. The four-pass TJLBs, compared to three-pass TJLBs, resulted in better specimens for length ({>=}25 mm: 50% vs. 35%; p = 0.026) and number of complete portal tracts (CPTs) ({>=}11: 40% vs. 26%; p = 0.027), without a higher complication rate. The four-pass TJLB with {>=}11 CPTs had a median length of 27 mm, and 57% of them longer than 28 mm contained {>=}11 CPTs. Putting the liver biopsy cores into a cassette did not improve the fragmentation rate or adequacy of the specimen (length and number of CPTs) of TJLB. We conclude that at least four passes with TJLB should be performed when liver specimens are needed for grading and staging. Using a supportive cassette did not reduce fragmentation.

  1. Barbed micro-spikes for micro-scale biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Sangwon; Lim, Jung-Min; Paik, Seung-Joon; Lee, Ahra; Koo, Kyo-in; Park, Sunkil; Park, Jaehong; Choi, Byoung-Doo; Seo, Jong Mo; Kim, Kyung-ah; Chung, Hum; Song, Si Young; Jeon, Doyoung; Cho, Dongil

    2005-06-01

    Single-crystal silicon planar micro-spikes with protruding barbs are developed for micro-scale biopsy and the feasibility of using the micro-spike as a micro-scale biopsy tool is evaluated for the first time. The fabrication process utilizes a deep silicon etch to define the micro-spike outline, resulting in protruding barbs of various shapes. Shanks of the fabricated micro-spikes are 3 mm long, 100 µm thick and 250 µm wide. Barbs protruding from micro-spike shanks facilitate the biopsy procedure by tearing off and retaining samples from target tissues. Micro-spikes with barbs successfully extracted tissue samples from the small intestines of the anesthetized pig, whereas micro-spikes without barbs failed to obtain a biopsy sample. Parylene coating can be applied to improve the biocompatibility of the micro-spike without deteriorating the biopsy function of the micro-spike. In addition, to show that the biopsy with the micro-spike can be applied to tissue analysis, samples obtained by micro-spikes were examined using immunofluorescent staining. Nuclei and F-actin of cells which are extracted by the micro-spike from a transwell were clearly visualized by immunofluorescent staining.

  2. CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Lung Biopsy with Novel Steerable Biopsy Canula: Ex-Vivo Evaluation in Ventilated Porcine Lung Explants

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Philipp J. Fabel, Michael; Bolte, Hendrik; Schaefer, Fritz K. W.; Jahnke, Thomas; Heller, Martin; Lammer, Johannes; Biederer, Juergen

    2010-08-15

    The purpose was to evaluate ex-vivo a prototype of a novel biopsy canula under CT fluoroscopy-guidance in ventilated porcine lung explants in respiratory motion simulations. Using an established chest phantom for porcine lung explants, n = 24 artificial lesions consisting of a fat-wax-Lipiodol mixture (approx. 70HU) were placed adjacent to sensible structures such as aorta, pericardium, diaphragm, bronchus and pulmonary artery. A piston pump connected to a reservoir beneath a flexible silicone reconstruction of a diaphragm simulated respiratory motion by rhythmic inflation and deflation of 1.5 L water. As biopsy device an 18-gauge prototype biopsy canula with a lancet-like, helically bended cutting edge was used. The artificial lesions were punctured under CT fluoroscopy-guidance (SOMATOM Sensation 64, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany; 30mAs/120 kV/5 mm slice thickness) implementing a dedicated protocol for CT fluoroscopy-guided lung biopsy. The mean-diameter of the artificial lesions was 8.3 {+-} 2.6 mm, and the mean-distance of the phantom wall to the lesions was 54.1 {+-} 13.5 mm. The mean-displacement of the lesions by respiratory motion was 14.1 {+-} 4.0 mm. The mean-duration of CT fluoroscopy was 9.6 {+-} 5.1 s. On a 4-point scale (1 = central; 2 = peripheral; 3 = marginal; 4 = off target), the mean-targeted precision was 1.9 {+-} 0.9. No misplacement of the biopsy canula affecting adjacent structures could be detected. The novel steerable biopsy canula proved to be efficient in the ex-vivo set-up. The chest phantom enabling respiratory motion and the steerable biopsy canula offer a feasible ex-vivo system for evaluating and training CT fluoroscopy-guided lung biopsy adapted to respiratory motion.

  3. Multicenter study for the evaluation of a dedicated biopsy device for MR-guided vacuum biopsy of the breast.

    PubMed

    Perlet, C; Heinig, A; Prat, X; Casselman, J; Baath, L; Sittek, H; Stets, C; Lamarque, J; Anderson, I; Schneider, P; Taourel, P; Reiser, M; Heywang-Köbrunner, S H

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this multicenter study was to determine the accuracy and clinical value of a dedicated breast biopsy system which allows for MR-guided vacuum biopsy (VB) of contrast-enhancing lesions. In five European centers, MR-guided 11-gauge VB was performed on 341 lesions. In 7 cases VB was unsuccessful. This was immediately realized on postinterventional images or direct follow-up combined with histopathology-imaging correlation; thus, a false-negative diagnosis was avoided. Histology of 334 successful biopsies yielded 84 (25%) malignancies, 17 (5%) atypical ductal hyperplasias, and 233 (70%) benign entities. Verification of malignant or borderline lesions included reexcision of the biopsy cavity. Benign histologic biopsy results were verified by retrospective correlation with the pre- and postinterventional MRI and by subsequent follow-up. Our results indicate that MR-guided VB, in combination with the dedicated biopsy coil, offers the possibility to accurately diagnose even very small lesions that can only be visualized or localized by MRI.

  4. Wall or machine suction rectal biopsy for Hirschsprung's disease: a simple modified technique can improve the adequacy of biopsy.

    PubMed

    Ali, A E; Morecroft, J A; Bowen, J C; Bruce, J; Morabito, A

    2006-08-01

    Suction rectal biopsy (SRB) may not include sufficient submucosa for histological diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease (HD) and a repeat biopsy is required. Substitution of the conventional syringe for sustained suction from a machine or wall suction unit could provide a more consistently adequate tissue biopsy. This study was conducted to compare the adequacy of SRB specimens using a conventional method of syringe suction (SSRB) with those taken by wall or machine suction (WSRB). Hospital records of patients who had a SRB between 2002 and 2004 were studied retrospectively. The biopsy was considered inadequate if there was insufficient submucosa and a repeat specimen was requested. SSRB were taken using the conventional SSRB technique. WSRB were taken with the same Noblett forceps but with suction from wall suction or from a portable suction machine. Ninety-five infants had 103 SRB, 24 had WSRB and all (100%) were adequate for histopathological diagnosis or exclusion of HD. Seventy nine conventional SSRB were undertaken in 71 infants of which 64 (81.02%) were adequate. The difference in adequacy between WSRB and SSRB was statistically significant (P = 0.02). There were no instances of haemorrhage or bowel perforation in either subgroup. WSRB with the Noblett biopsy forceps is more likely to produce an adequate specimen and to reduce the incidence of repeat biopsies.

  5. Use of a hemostasis introducer sheath to guide clip delivery during stereotactic directional vacuum-assisted breast biopsy when the biopsy system malfunctions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jane; Chang, Chun-Ju

    2010-01-01

    Stereotactic directional vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (ST DVAB) is an accurate biopsy method. Marking the biopsy site with a clip is mandatory after ST DVAB, in case excision is required. With the ST DVAB system we use, clip was delivered through the biopsy probe. We report a case with malfunctioning of the ST DVAB system during the procedure, and thus the clip could not be placed through the biopsy probe. To salvage the procedure, we placed the clip to the biopsy site via a hemostasis introducer sheath.

  6. MORPHOLOGICAL PATTERN OF ENDOMETRIAL BIOPSIES IN SOUTHWESTERN NIGERIA

    PubMed Central

    Abdullahi, YM; Ajani, MA; Iyapo, O; Aramide, KO; Okolo, CA; Akang, EEU

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endometrium remains the most sensitive indicator of ovarian function and endometrial biopsy is one of the diagnostic procedures in endometrial pathology. The current study was carried out to examine the morphological pattern of endometrial biopsies in Ibadan, South-western Nigeria and compare the results with similar studies. Method: A retrospective study was undertaken to review all cases of endometrial biopsies received in the Department of Pathology, University College Hospital, Ibadan between January 1999 and December 2008. The patients' data were retrieved from the surgical pathology daybooks and Histology Request forms. The neoplastic lesions were classified according to 2003 World Health Organization classification for endometrial neoplasms. Results: A total of 2,444 cases of endometrial biopsies were received during the 10-year study period. The functional endometrial changes were the most common histopathological diagnostic category, accounting for 53.8% (1035) of cases. Other pathological diagnoses included endometritis (7.8%), simple endometrial hyperplasia (5.8%), partial hydatidiform mole (2.3%), complete hydatidiform mole (2.1%) and malignant neoplastic lesions (3.9%). Infertility was the most common (57%) indication for endometrial biopsies followed by uterine bleeding (33%) while the least common clinical indication were the menstrual disorders (10%). Conclusion: The functional endometrial changes account for the highest morphological patterns while malignant lesions account for the least pattern of the endometrial biopsies evaluated for etiological basis of infertility, uterine bleeding and menstrual disorders in Ibadan. Infertility was the commonest indication for endometrial biopsies while the least common clinical indication was menstrual disorders. PMID:28337096

  7. Surveillance biopsies after paediatric kidney transplantation: A review.

    PubMed

    Rose, Edward M; Kennedy, Sean E; Mackie, Fiona E

    2016-09-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most effective means of treating children with end-stage kidney disease, and yet, there continues to be a limited "life span" of transplanted kidneys in paediatric recipients. Early graft monitoring, using the surveillance biopsy, has the potential to extend renal allograft survival in paediatric recipients. The surveillance biopsy provides important and timely information about acute and chronic graft pathology, particularly SCR and calcineurin inhibitor-induced nephrotoxicity, which can subsequently guide management decisions and improve long-term graft survival. The ostensible value of the surveillance biopsy is furthered by the limitations of conventional renal functional studies. However, there is still much debate surrounding the surveillance biopsy in paediatric recipients, particularly in regard to its overall utility, safety and timing. This review discusses the current literature regarding the utility, safety, and potential predictive value of surveillance biopsies for guiding post-transplant management in paediatric renal allograft recipients, as well as the viability of other potentially newer non-invasive strategies for renal allograft monitoring.

  8. Remote biopsy darting and marking of polar bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pagano, Anthony M.; Peacock, Elizabeth; McKinney, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Remote biopsy darting of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) is less invasive and time intensive than physical capture and is therefore useful when capture is challenging or unsafe. We worked with two manufacturers to develop a combination biopsy and marking dart for use on polar bears. We had an 80% success rate of collecting a tissue sample with a single biopsy dart and collected tissue samples from 143 polar bears on land, in water, and on sea ice. Dye marks ensured that 96% of the bears were not resampled during the same sampling period, and we recovered 96% of the darts fired. Biopsy heads with 5 mm diameters collected an average of 0.12 g of fur, tissue, and subcutaneous adipose tissue, while biopsy heads with 7 mm diameters collected an average of 0.32 g. Tissue samples were 99.3% successful (142 of 143 samples) in providing a genetic and sex identification of individuals. We had a 64% success rate collecting adipose tissue and we successfully examined fatty acid signatures in all adipose samples. Adipose lipid content values were lower compared to values from immobilized or harvested polar bears, indicating that our method was not suitable for quantifying adipose lipid content.

  9. Repeat Prostate-Specific Antigen Tests Before Prostate Biopsy Decisions.

    PubMed

    Nordström, Tobias; Adolfsson, Jan; Grönberg, Henrik; Eklund, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Despite limited scientific support, a repeat prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test before prostate biopsy decisions is common. We analyzed biopsy outcomes in 1686 men from the STHLM3 study with PSA 3-10 ng/mL and two PSA tests taken within eight weeks and before prostate biopsy using percentages and multinomial logistic regression. We found that omitting prostate biopsy for men with PSA values decreasing to PSAs of 3 ng/mL or less would save 16.8% of biopsy procedures, while missing 5.4% of the cancers with Gleason scores (GSs) of 7 or higher. The proportion of cancers with GSs of 6 or lower was independent of the first PSA value, as well as of PSA change. Also, the risk of tumors with GSs of 7 or higher decreased with both decreasing and increasing PSA levels: It was 18.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 16.3% to 20.9%) for men with PSA changes of less than 20%, 12.1% (95% CI = 8.0% to 16.2%) for men with PSA levels increasing at least 20%, and 6.6% (95% CI = 3.8% to 9.3%) for men with PSA levels decreasing at least 20%.

  10. Skin biopsies in the assessment of the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ningshan; Gibbons, Christopher H

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous punch biopsies are widely used to evaluate nociceptive C fibers in patients with suspected small-fiber neuropathy. Recent advances in immunohistochemical techniques and interest in cutaneous autonomic innervation has expanded the role of skin biopsy in the evaluation of the peripheral nervous system. The dermal layers of the skin provide a unique window into the structural evaluation of the autonomic nervous system. Peripheral adrenergic and cholinergic fibers innervate a number of cutaneous structures, such as sweat glands and arrector pili muscles, and can easily be seen with punch skin biopsies. Skin biopsies allow for both regional sampling, in diseases with patchy distribution, and the opportunity for repeated sampling in progressive disorders. The structural evaluation of cutaneous autonomic innervation is still in its scientific infancy, with a number of different methodologies and techniques that will require standardization and widespread acceptance before becoming a standard of care. Future studies of autonomic innervation in acquired, hereditary, neurodegenerative, or autoimmune disorders will be necessary to determine the clinical utility of skin biopsy in these disease states.

  11. Grading of shoulder ulcerations in sows by biopsies.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Henrik E; Dahl-Pedersen, Kirstin; Barington, Kristiane; Kaiser, Marianne; Bonde, Marianne K; Herskin, Mette S; Jensen, Karin H

    2014-03-01

    Shoulder ulcerations can be graded postmortem from 0 to 4 on a pathoanatomical scale. However, veterinarians and farmers express difficulties evaluating the grade of the lesions antemortem. Accurate grading is needed in order to comply with veterinary instruction in relation to the Danish legislation, stating that sows with shoulder ulcers grade 3 or 4 must be kept loose and have access to soft bedding. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate if biopsies from the center of a shoulder ulcer can be used to point out animals for which an intervention must be initiated. Postmortem, a punch biopsy was sampled from the center of the ulceration or from the tissue overlaying the tuber spina scapula. Afterward, the shoulders were cross-sectioned and evaluated grossly and histologically ("gold standard"). In total, 121 shoulders were included in the study, and the diagnostic value of a punch biopsy in grading shoulder ulcerations was evaluated. The results showed a sensitivity of 0.78, a specificity of 0.98, a positive likelihood ratio of 38.36, and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.22. The agreement between the cross-section evaluation and the punch biopsy was found to be 0.90 by calculating the Cohen kappa value. In conclusion, a single punch biopsy from the center of an ulcer is useful for determining the grade of a shoulder ulcer and can be used to facilitate the identification of sows with ulcers requiring an intervention.

  12. Update on Myocarditis and Inflammatory Cardiomyopathy: Reemergence of Endomyocardial Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Fernando; Kühl, Uwe; Pieske, Burkert; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo; Tschöpe, Carsten

    2016-02-01

    Myocarditis is defined as an inflammatory disease of the heart muscle and is an important cause of acute heart failure, sudden death, and dilated cardiomyopathy. Viruses account for most cases of myocarditis or inflammatory cardiomyopathy, which could induce an immune response causing inflammation even when the pathogen has been cleared. Other etiologic agents responsible for myocarditis include drugs, toxic substances, or autoimmune conditions. In the last few years, advances in noninvasive techniques such as cardiac magnetic resonance have been very useful in supporting diagnosis of myocarditis, but toxic, infectious-inflammatory, infiltrative, or autoimmune processes occur at a cellular level and only endomyocardial biopsy can establish the nature of the etiological agent. Furthermore, after the generalization of immunohistochemical and viral genome detection techniques, endomyocardial biopsy provides a definitive etiological diagnosis that can lead to specific treatments such as antiviral or immunosuppressive therapy. Endomyocardial biopsy is not commonly performed for the diagnosis of myocarditis due to safety reasons, but both right- and left endomyocardial biopsies have very low complication rates when performed by experienced operators. This document provides a state-of-the-art review of myocarditis and inflammatory cardiomyopathy, with special focus on the role of endomyocardial biopsy to establish specific treatments.

  13. Renal biopsy: Still a landmark for the nephrologist

    PubMed Central

    Visconti, Luca; Cernaro, Valeria; Ricciardi, Carlo Alberto; Lacava, Viviana; Pellicanò, Vincenzo; Lacquaniti, Antonio; Buemi, Michele; Santoro, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Renal biopsy was performed for the first time more than one century ago, but its clinical use was routinely introduced in the 1950s. It is still an essential tool for diagnosis and choice of treatment of several primary or secondary kidney diseases. Moreover, it may help to know the expected time of end stage renal disease. The indications are represented by nephritic and/or nephrotic syndrome and rapidly progressive acute renal failure of unknown origin. Nowadays, it is performed mainly by nephrologists and radiologists using a 14-18 gauges needle with automated spring-loaded biopsy device, under real-time ultrasound guidance. Bleeding is the major primary complication that in rare cases may lead to retroperitoneal haemorrhage and need for surgical intervention and/or death. For this reason, careful evaluation of risks and benefits must be taken into account, and all procedures to minimize the risk of complications must be observed. After biopsy, an observation time of 12-24 h is necessary, whilst a prolonged observation may be needed rarely. In some cases it could be safer to use different techniques to reduce the risk of complications, such as laparoscopic or transjugular renal biopsy in patients with coagulopathy or alternative approaches in obese patients. Despite progress in medicine over the years with the introduction of more advanced molecular biology techniques, renal biopsy is still an irreplaceable tool for nephrologists. PMID:27458561

  14. Liquid Biopsy of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Circulating Tumor-Derived Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chang-Qing; Yuan, Chun-Hui; Qu, Zhen; Guan, Qing; Chen, Hao; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide due to latent liver disease, late diagnosis, and nonresponse to systemic treatments. Till now, surgical and/or biopsy specimens are still generally used as a gold standard by the clinicians for clinical decision-making. However, apart from their invasive characteristics, tumor biopsy only mirrors a single spot of the tumor, failing to reflect current cancer dynamics and progression. Therefore, it is imperative to develop new diagnostic strategies with significant effectiveness and reliability to monitor high-risk populations and detect HCC at an early stage. In the past decade, the potent utilities of "liquid biopsy" have attracted intense concern and were developed to evaluate cancer progression in several clinical trials. "Liquid biopsies" represent a series of noninvasive tests that detect cancer byproducts easily accessible in peripheral blood, mainly including circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and cell-free nucleic acids (cfNAs) that are shed into the blood from the tumor sites. In this review, we focus on the recent developments in the field of "liquid biopsy" as well as the diagnostic and prognostic significance of CTCs and cfNAs in HCC patients.

  15. [Celebrating fifty years of percutaneous renal biopsies in Spain].

    PubMed

    García Nieto, V; Luis Yanes, M I; Ruiz Pons, M

    2009-01-01

    The first renal biopsies, made as much in adults as in children, were surgical. They were made to patients who were under renal decapsulation with the intention to reduce the kidney pressure, especially in cases of nephrotic syndrome. In 1944, Nils Alwall initiated the accomplishment of percutaneous kidney biopsies by means of a needle and aspiration at the University of Lund (Sweden), although his experience was published in 1952. The first article that had by subject the practice of a percutaneous renal biopsy was written in 1950 by a Cuban doctor, Antonino Pérez Ara, and published in a local journal with little diffusion. The first work that appeared in a Spanish journal (1953) about the practice of the percutaneus renal biopsies was not signed by any Spanish group but by members of the Hospital "Calixto García" of the University of The Havana, Cuba. The first article published in Spain regarding to this subject, saw the light in 1958, now 50 years ago, in the Revista Clínica Española. The two first signers were Alfonso de la Peña Pineda and Vicente Gilsanz García, professors of the Medicine Faculty of Madrid. Later, the practice of the percutaneous renal biopsy became general in other Spanish hospitals.

  16. Liquid Biopsies for Cancer: Coming to a Patient near You

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Nithya; Spencer, Emily; Torkamani, Ali; Nicholson, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The use of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) as a novel and non-invasive test for the diagnosis and surveillance of cancer is a rapidly growing area of interest, with sequencing of ctDNA acting as a potential surrogate for tissue biopsy. Circulating tumor DNA has been detected incidentally during noninvasive prenatal testing and additionally in more than 75% of known cancer patients participating in ctDNA studies evaluating its sensitivity. In the setting of mutation-based targeted tumor therapy, it shows a concordance rate >80% when compared with gold-standard tissue biopsies. Through ctDNA detection and sequencing, a simple blood test becomes a liquid biopsy for cancer, surveying a patient’s entire circulation with the goal of early detection, prognostic information, personalized therapy options, and tracking for recurrence or resistance, all with fewer or no tissue biopsies. Given the recent first-ever FDA approval of a liquid biopsy, it is important for clinicians to be aware of the rapid advancements likely to bring these tests into our practices soon. Here we review the biology, clinical implications, and recent advances in circulating tumor DNA analysis. PMID:28054963

  17. CT Guided Bone Biopsy Using a Battery Powered Intraosseous Device

    SciTech Connect

    Schnapauff, Dirk Marnitz, Tim Freyhardt, Patrick Collettini, Federico; Hartwig, Kerstin; Joehrens, Korinna; Hamm, Bernd Kroencke, Thomas Gebauer, Bernhard

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of a battery powered intraosseous device to perform CT-fluoroscopy guided bone biopsy. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 12 patients in whom bone specimen were acquired from different locations under CT-fluoroscopy guidance using the OnControl bone marrow biopsy system (OBM, Vidacare, Shavano Park, TX, USA). Data of the 12 were compared to a historic cohort in whom the specimen were acquired using the classic Jamshidi Needle, as reference needle using manual force for biopsy. Results: Technical success was reached in 11 of 12 cases, indicated by central localisation of the needle within the target lesion. All specimen sampled were sufficient for histopathological workup. Compared to the historical cohort the time needed for biopsy decreased significantly from 13 {+-} 6 to 6 {+-} 4 min (P = 0.0001). Due to the shortened intervention time the radiation dose (CTDI) during CT-fluoroscopy was lowered significantly from 169 {+-} 87 to 111 {+-} 54 mGy Multiplication-Sign cm (P = 0.0001). Interventional radiologists were confident with the performance of the needle especially when using in sclerotic or osteoblastic lesions. Conclusion: The OBM is an attractive support for CT-fluoroscopy guided bone biopsy which is safe tool and compared to the classical approach using the Jamshidi needle leading to significantly reduced intervention time and radiation exposure.

  18. Stereotactic breast biopsy with an 8-gauge, directional, vacuum-assisted probe: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Lifrange, Eric; Dondelinger, Robert F; Quatresooz, Pascale; Vandevorst, Geraldine; Colin, Claude

    2002-09-01

    This study was prospectively conducted to assess the feasibility, safety and accuracy of an 8-G directional vacuum-assisted biopsy (DVAB) probe in the diagnostic management of nonpalpable breast lesions (NPBL). Of 170 planned procedures which were indicated for investigation of BI-RADS category-3 to category-5 lesions, 153 were performed in 138 consecutive patients. The probe was targeted by the stereotactic unit of a prone table (United States Surgical Corporation, Norwalk, Conn.; and Lorad, Danbury, Conn.). Four to 18 (mean 8) core specimens were obtained for each lesion. In case of complete removal of the lesion, a localizing clip was deployed at the biopsy site. Adequate material for histopathologic examination was obtained in all cases (100%). Four of 138 (3%) patients experienced mild hematomas. We observed 15 of 39 failures (38%) to place the localizing clips. Thirteen of 153 (8%) procedures were inconclusive and required reintervention. Following DVAB, 42 of 138 (30%) patients underwent surgery. Subject to incomplete follow-up of the entire cohort, we observed no false-positive and one false-negative diagnosis. These preliminary results suggest that DVAB using an 8-G probe are feasible, safe and accurate. In our experience, clip placement was problematic. It is probable that increasing the dimensions of DVAB will only be relevant in a limited number of clinical situations, primarily the desire to obtain complete radiologic resections of the target abnormality.

  19. Sensitivity analysis aimed at blood vessels detection using interstitial optical tomography during brain needle biopsy procedures.

    PubMed

    Pichette, Julien; Goyette, Andréanne; Picot, Fabien; Tremblay, Marie-Andrée; Soulez, Gilles; Wilson, Brian C; Leblond, Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    A brain needle biopsy procedure is performed for suspected brain lesions in order to sample tissue that is subsequently analysed using standard histopathology techniques. A common complication resulting from this procedure is brain hemorrhaging from blood vessels clipped off during tissue extraction. Interstitial optical tomography (iOT) has recently been introduced by our group as a mean to assess the presence of blood vessels in the vicinity of the needle. The clinical need to improve safety requires the detection of blood vessels within 2 mm from the outer surface of the needle, since this distance is representative of the volume of tissue that is aspirated durirng tissue extraction. Here, a sensitivity analysis is presented to establish the intrinsic detection limits of iOT based on simulations and experiments using brain tissue phantoms. It is demonstrated that absorbers can be detected with diameters >300 μm located up to >2 mm from the biopsy needle core for bulk optical properties consistent with brain tissue.

  20. Sensitivity analysis aimed at blood vessels detection using interstitial optical tomography during brain needle biopsy procedures

    PubMed Central

    Pichette, Julien; Goyette, Andréanne; Picot, Fabien; Tremblay, Marie-Andrée; Soulez, Gilles; Wilson, Brian C.; Leblond, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    A brain needle biopsy procedure is performed for suspected brain lesions in order to sample tissue that is subsequently analysed using standard histopathology techniques. A common complication resulting from this procedure is brain hemorrhaging from blood vessels clipped off during tissue extraction. Interstitial optical tomography (iOT) has recently been introduced by our group as a mean to assess the presence of blood vessels in the vicinity of the needle. The clinical need to improve safety requires the detection of blood vessels within 2 mm from the outer surface of the needle, since this distance is representative of the volume of tissue that is aspirated durirng tissue extraction. Here, a sensitivity analysis is presented to establish the intrinsic detection limits of iOT based on simulations and experiments using brain tissue phantoms. It is demonstrated that absorbers can be detected with diameters >300 μm located up to >2 mm from the biopsy needle core for bulk optical properties consistent with brain tissue. PMID:26600990

  1. Design of a predictive targeting error simulator for MRI-guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Avni, Shachar; Vikal, Siddharth; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2010-02-23

    Multi-parametric MRI is a new imaging modality superior in quality to Ultrasound (US) which is currently used in standard prostate biopsy procedures. Surface-based registration of the pre-operative and intra-operative prostate volumes is a simple alternative to side-step the challenges involved with deformable registration. However, segmentation errors inevitably introduced during prostate contouring spoil the registration and biopsy targeting accuracies. For the crucial purpose of validating this procedure, we introduce a fully interactive and customizable simulator which determines the resulting targeting errors of simulated registrations between prostate volumes given user-provided parameters for organ deformation, segmentation, and targeting. We present the workflow executed by the simulator in detail and discuss the parameters involved. We also present a segmentation error introduction algorithm, based on polar curves and natural cubic spline interpolation, which introduces statistically realistic contouring errors. One simulation, including all I/O and preparation for rendering, takes approximately 1 minute and 40 seconds to complete on a system with 3 GB of RAM and four Intel Core 2 Quad CPUs each with a speed of 2.40 GHz. Preliminary results of our simulation suggest the maximum tolerable segmentation error given the presence of a 5.0 mm wide small tumor is between 4-5 mm. We intend to validate these results via clinical trials as part of our ongoing work.

  2. Design of a predictive targeting error simulator for MRI-guided prostate biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avni, Shachar; Vikal, Siddharth; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2010-02-01

    Multi-parametric MRI is a new imaging modality superior in quality to Ultrasound (US) which is currently used in standard prostate biopsy procedures. Surface-based registration of the pre-operative and intra-operative prostate volumes is a simple alternative to side-step the challenges involved with deformable registration. However, segmentation errors inevitably introduced during prostate contouring spoil the registration and biopsy targeting accuracies. For the crucial purpose of validating this procedure, we introduce a fully interactive and customizable simulator which determines the resulting targeting errors of simulated registrations between prostate volumes given user-provided parameters for organ deformation, segmentation, and targeting. We present the workflow executed by the simulator in detail and discuss the parameters involved. We also present a segmentation error introduction algorithm, based on polar curves and natural cubic spline interpolation, which introduces statistically realistic contouring errors. One simulation, including all I/O and preparation for rendering, takes approximately 1 minute and 40 seconds to complete on a system with 3 GB of RAM and four Intel Core 2 Quad CPUs each with a speed of 2.40 GHz. Preliminary results of our simulation suggest the maximum tolerable segmentation error given the presence of a 5.0 mm wide small tumor is between 4-5 mm. We intend to validate these results via clinical trials as part of our ongoing work.

  3. [Role of lung biopsy in diagnosis of pulmonary pathology at the prehospital level].

    PubMed

    Filippov, V P; Evgushchenko, G V; Gedymin, L E; Sidirova, N F

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the work was to assess the value of biopsy techniques for fibrobronchoscopy under local anesthesia in patients with pulmonary pathology at the prehospital level. It included 706 subjects with lobular, segmental or diffuse lesions in the lungs of specific (tuberculosis), non-specific (pneumonia, exogenous alveolitis), and other origin. All known methods of endobronchial biopsy were employed (bronchoalveolar lavage or liquid lung biopsy, tissue biopsy, transbronchial biopsy, brush biopsy, puncture and aspiration biopsy) with subsequent cytomorphological and bacteriological studies of bioptates. Diagnostic efficiency of direct biopsy was estimated at 97%, transbronchial biopsy at 5-90% depending on nosological form of lung disease, brush and puncture biopsy 20-50 and 6% respectively. Reversible complications occurred in 1.4% and were resolved by therapeutic methods. Cost effectiveness of prehospital instrumental examination of patients with pulmonary pathology is 10 times the intrahospital one.

  4. Sequential muscle biopsy changes in a case of congenital myopathy.

    SciTech Connect

    Danon, M. J.; Giometti, C. S.; Manaligod, J. R.; Swisher, C.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; New York Medical Coll.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Children's Memorial Hospital

    1997-05-01

    Muscle biopsies at age 7 months in a set of dizygotic male twins born floppy showed typical features of congenital fiber-type disproportion (CFTD). One of the twins died at age 1 year due to respiratory complications. The second one subsequently developed facial diplegia and external ophthalmoplegia. He never walked, remained wheelchair bound, and required continuous ventilatory support. He underwent repeat biopsies at ages 2 and 4, which showed many atrophic type 1 muscle fibers containing central nuclei and severe type 2 fiber deficiency compatible with centronuclear myopathy (CNM). Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of muscle showed decreases of type II myosin light chains 2 and 3, suggestive of histochemical type I fiber deficiency. The progressive nature of morphological changes in one of our patients cannot be explained by maturational arrest. Repeat biopsies in cases of CFTD with rapid clinical deterioration may very well show CNM.

  5. Pericardial Tamponade: a Rare Complication of Sternal Bone Marrow Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Santavy, Petr; Troubil, Martin; Lonsky, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Injury of the heart with concomitant pericardial tamponade as a result of sternal bone marrow biopsy is rare. An 80-year-old man was admitted with dehydration and non-specified abdominal pain to the regional hospital. Sternal aspiration biopsy was performed because of anemia and thrombocytopenia. Later on, because of the back pain, general weakness and blood pressure drop, an echocardiography examination was indicated. Pericardial fluid collection was found. Anticipated ascending aortic dissection was excluded on computed tomography scan, but pericardial fluid collection was confirmed. Transfer to our cardiac surgical facility ensued. Limited heart tamponade was affirmed on echocardiography and surgery was immediately indicated. Blood effusion was found in upper mediastinal fat tissue and 300 mL of blood were evacuated from opened pericardial space. Stab wound by sternal biopsy needle at the upper part of ascending aorta was repaired by pledgeted suture. Postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:24179668

  6. Liver biopsy and prognosis in acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Scotto, J.; Opolon, P.; Étévé, J.; Vergoz, D.; Thomas, M.; Caroli, J.

    1973-01-01

    Liver biopsy was performed in 38 patients with fulminant hepatitis and coma and repeated in 22. Stereological estimation of hepatocyte volume was correlated with levels of clotting factors. Early liver biopsy allowed prognosis in 55% of the cases. All patients with a hepatocyte volume of <35% and thromboplastin time ≤10% died; all patients but two with hepatocyte volume ≥35% and thromboplastin time >10% recovered consciousness (n = 9) or at least showed evidence of marked liver regeneration (n = 2). On serial liver biopsy a significant increase in hepatocyte volume and clotting factors was only observed in patients who recovered consciousness. The estimated liver cell mass after regeneration in patients who recovered consciousness was ≥45% and <45% in the patients who did not. ImagesFig 2Fig 3Fig 4 PMID:4785282

  7. Evaluating dermal myelinated nerve fibers in skin biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Myers, M. Iliza; Peltier, Amanda C.; Li, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Although there has been extensive research on small, unmyelinated fibers in the skin, little research has investigated dermal myelinated fibers in comparison. Glabrous, non-hairy skin contains mechanoreceptors that afford a vantage point for observation of myelinated fibers that have previously been seen only with invasively obtained nerve biopsies. This review discusses current morphometric and molecular expression data of normative and pathogenic glabrous skin obtained by various processing and analysis methods for cutaneous myelinated fibers. Recent publications have shed light on the role of glabrous skin biopsy in identifying signs of peripheral neuropathy and as a potential biomarker of distal myelin and mechanoreceptor integrity. The clinical relevance of a better understanding of the role of dermal myelinated nerve terminations in peripheral neuropathy will be addressed in light of recent publications in the growing field of skin biopsy. PMID:23192899

  8. Liquid biopsy genotyping in lung cancer: ready for clinical utility?

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Lun; Chen, Yi-Lin; Yang, Szu-Chun; Ho, Chung-Liang; Wei, Fang; Wong, David T; Su, Wu-Chou; Lin, Chien-Chung

    2017-01-12

    Liquid biopsy is a blood test that detects evidence of cancer cells or tumor DNA in the circulation. Despite complicated collection methods and the requirement for technique-dependent platforms, it has generated substantial interest due, in part, to its potential to detect driver oncogenes such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutants in lung cancer. This technology is advancing rapidly and is being incorporated into numerous EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) development programs. It appears ready for integration into clinical care. Recent studies have demonstrated that biological fluids such as saliva and urine can also be used for detecting EGFR mutant DNA through application other user-friendly techniques. This review focuses on the clinical application of liquid biopsies to lung cancer genotyping, including EGFR and other targets of genotype-directed therapy and compares multiple platforms used for liquid biopsy.

  9. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of (1s) core correlation on properties and energy separations was analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be 1 S - 1 P, the C 3 P - 5 S and CH+ 1 Sigma + or - 1 Pi separations, and CH+ spectroscopic constants, dipole moment and 1 Sigma + - 1 Pi transition dipole moment were studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods. In addition, the generation of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as a method for contracting a primitive basis set for both valence and core correlation, is discussed. When both core-core and core-valence correlation are included in the calculation, no suitable truncated CI approach consistently reproduces the FCI, and contraction of the basis set is very difficult. If the (nearly constant) core-core correlation is eliminated, and only the core-valence correlation is included, CASSCF/MRCI approached reproduce the FCI results and basis set contraction is significantly easier.

  10. Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration is positively associated with rate of disease reclassification on subsequent active surveillance prostate biopsy in men with low PSA density

    PubMed Central

    Umbehr, Martin H.; Platz, Elizabeth A.; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Bhavsar, Nrupen A.; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Landis, Patricia; Partin, Alan W.; Carter, H. Ballentine

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration at active surveillance (AS) entry and disease reclassification on subsequent AS biopsy (‘biopsy reclassification’) in men with low PSA density (PSAD). To investigate whether a clinically meaningful PSA threshold for AS eligibility/ineligibility for men with low PSAD can be identified based on risk of subsequent biopsy reclassification. Patients and Methods We included men enrolled in the Johns Hopkins AS Study (JHAS) who had a PSAD of <0.15 ng/mL/g (640 men). We estimated the incidence rates (IRs; per 100 person years) and hazard ratios (HR) of biopsy reclassification (Gleason score ≥ 7, any Gleason pattern 4 or 5, ≥3 positive cores, or ≥50% cancer involvement/biopsy core) for categories of serum PSA concentration at the time of entry into AS. We generated predicted IRs using Poisson regression to adjust for age and prostate volume, mean percentage free PSA (ratio of free to total PSA) and maximum percentage biopsy core involvement with cancer. Results The unadjusted IRs (per 100 person years) of biopsy reclassification across serum PSA concentration at entry into JHAS showed, in general, an increase; however, the pattern was not linear with higher IRs in the group ≥ 4 to <6 ng/mL (14.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 11.8–17.2%) when compared with ≥ 6 to <8 ng/mL (8.4, 95% CI 5.7–12.3%) but almost similar IRs when compared with the group ≥ 8 to <10 ng/mL (14.8, 95% CI 8.4–26.1%). The adjusted predicted IRs of reclassification showed a similar non-linear increase in IRs, whereby the rates around 4 ng/mL were similar to the rates around 10 ng/mL. Conclusion Risk for biopsy reclassification increased non-linearly across PSA concentration in men with low PSAD, whereby no obvious clinically meaningful threshold could be identified. This information could be incorporated into decision-making for AS. However, longer follow-up times are needed to

  11. Pathologists and liquid biopsies: to be or not to be?

    PubMed

    Hofman, Paul; Popper, Helmut H

    2016-12-01

    Recently, the advent of therapies targeting genomic alterations has improved the care of patients with certain types of cancer. While molecular targets were initially detected in nucleic acid samples extracted from tumor tissue, detection of nucleic acids in circulating blood has allowed the development of what has become known as liquid biopsies, which provide a complementary and alternative sample source allowing identification of genomic alterations that might be addressed by targeted therapy. Consequently, liquid biopsies might rapidly revolutionize oncology practice in allowing administration of more effective treatments. Liquid biopsies also provide an approach towards short-term monitoring of metastatic cancer patients to evaluate efficacy of treatment and/or early detection of secondary mutations responsible for resistance to treatment. In this context, pathologists, who have already been required in recent years to take interest in the domain of molecular pathology of cancer, now face new challenges. The attitude of pathologists to and level of involvement in the practice of liquid biopsies, including mastering the methods employed in molecular analysis of blood samples, need close attention. Regardless of the level of involvement of pathologists in this new field, it is mandatory that oncologists, biologists, geneticists, and pathologists work together to coordinate the pre-analytical, analytical, and post-analytical phases of molecular assessment of tissue and liquid samples of individual cancer patients. The challenges include (1) implementation of effective and efficient procedures for reception and analysis of liquid and tissue samples for histopathological and molecular evaluation and (2) assuring short turn-around times to facilitate rapid optimization of individual patient treatment. In this paper, we will review the following: (1) recent data concerning the concept of liquid biopsies in oncology and its development for patient care, (2) advantages

  12. Do we still need renal biopsy in lupus nephritis?

    PubMed

    Haładyj, Ewa; Cervera, Ricard

    2016-01-01

    The natural course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by periods of disease activity and remissions. Prolonged disease activity results in cumulative organ damage. Lupus nephritis is one of the most common and devastating manifestations of SLE. In the era of changing therapy to less toxic regimens, some authors have stated that if mycophenolate mofetil can be used for the induction and maintenance treatment in all histological classes of lupus nephritis, renal biopsy can be omitted. This article aims to answer the question of what brings the bigger risk: renal biopsy or its abandonment.

  13. Outcomes of trophectoderm biopsy on cryopreserved blastocysts: a case series.

    PubMed

    Lathi, Ruth B; Massie, Jamie A M; Gilani, Morgan; Milki, Amin A; Westphal, Lynn M; Baker, Valerie L; Behr, Barry

    2012-11-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is an increasingly common adjunct to IVF. The information gained from PGD may be used to reduce the incidence of chromosomally abnormal pregnancies and augment the current selection process of embryos. As such, patients may choose to utilize PGD in either fresh or cryopreserved IVF cycles. It is a common practice to cryopreserve excess embryos at the blastocyst stage. In these cases, trophectoderm biopsy is the only technique available for PGD. This articles reports this study centre's experience with trophectoderm biopsies of cryopreserved blastocysts in 12 patients who underwent 13 cycles of PGD. The implantation rate per embryo transferred was 46% and the ongoing pregnancy rate per embryo transfer was 63%. The results from this case series demonstrate that trophectoderm biopsy on cryopreserved blastocysts to perform PGD is logistically feasible. In addition, the rate of implantation and ongoing pregnancy were maintained within a reasonable range to justify the procedure. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is an increasingly common adjunct to IVF and is used to evaluate the genetic makeup of the embryo prior to transfer of the embryo into the uterus. The information gained from PGD may be used to identify single-gene disorders that result in genetic disease, reduce the incidence of chromosomally abnormal pregnancies and/or augment the selection process of embryos to be transferred. In order to perform PGD, a biopsy of the embryo is the performed and cells are removed for testing. PGD may be performed in either fresh or frozen (cryopreserved) IVF cycles. Patients who have cryopreserved embryos remaining in storage from a previous fresh cycle may wish to have these embryos tested with PGD. Many embryos are frozen on day 5 of development, referred to as the blastocyst stage. At this stage of development, embryo biopsy is performed via a technique known as 'trophectoderm biopsy', in which 1-3 of the cells destined to

  14. Sentinel node biopsy in the management of malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Russell-Jones, R; Acland, K

    2001-09-01

    The technique of sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy has been in use for almost a decade, but its effect on survival has not yet been established. It is however the most accurate method for staging patients with primary cutaneous melanoma who lack clinical evidence of metastatic disease. This article discusses the rationale and logistics of SLN biopsy, and the management strategies that can be employed in those patients who are SLN positive. Future therapeutic trial in patients with primary cutaneous melanoma will only be meaningful if the SLN status of the subjects is established.

  15. The pros and cons of outpatient breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Lou, M A; Mandal, A K; Alexander, J L

    1976-06-01

    A review of the 130 breast biopsies performed on women during the past three years at the Martin Luther King, Jr, General Hospital showed that 90 were performed on outpatients and 40 on inpatients. Of the 90 outpatient procedures, 61 were under local anesthesia and 29 under general. Only three outpatient biopsy specimens were malignant and required subsequent patient admission to the hospital for mastectomy at an interval of 9 to 14 days. In all three, the axillary nodes were uninvolved. In two, no residual tumor was found in the mastectomy specimen.

  16. MR guided breast interventions: role in biopsy targeting and lumpectomies

    PubMed Central

    Jagadeesan, Jayender; Richman, Danielle M; Kacher, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Contrast enhanced breast MRI is increasingly being used to diagnose breast cancer and to perform biopsy procedures. The American Cancer Society has advised women at high risk for breast cancer to have breast MRI screening as an adjunct to screening mammography. This article places special emphasis on biopsy and operative planning involving MRI and reviews utility of breast MRI in monitoring response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We describe peer-reviewed data on currently accepted MR-guided therapeutic methods for addressing benign and malignant breast diseases, including intraoperative imaging. PMID:26499274

  17. Steerable real-time sonographically guided needle biopsy.

    PubMed

    Buonocore, E; Skipper, G J

    1981-02-01

    A method for dynamic real-time ultrasonic guidance for percutaneous needle biopsy has been successful in obtaining cytologic and histologic specimens from abdominal masses. The system depends on a real-time ultrasonic transducer that has been rigidly attached to a laterally placed steerable needle holder. Using simple trigonometric functions, a chart has been derived that gives the exact angulation and needle length to produce quick, reliable, guided needle placements. Examples of successful renal, hepatobiliary, and retroperitoneal biopsies are presented. Advantages of this technique include speed, accuracy, low cost, three-dimensional format, and the omission of contrast media and radiation.

  18. Endometrial biopsy interpretation. Shortcomings and problems in current gynecologic practice.

    PubMed

    Van Bogaert, L J; Maldague, P; Staquet, J P

    1978-01-01

    The analysis of 345 endometrial biopsies was carried out with special regard to the relation between pathologic findings and presenting symptoms or complaints. Only 52.4% of the biopsies showed microscopic features possibly related to the complaints. Endometrial polyps and chronic endometritis were diagnosed in 21.1 and 9.8%, respectively, of the entire study group. The currently accepted definitions of dysfunctional uterine bleeding raise the question whether endometrial polyps and atypical secretory changes may or may not be included in the syndrome.

  19. TRUS Biopsy Yield in Indian Population: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Prakash Wamanrao; Sawant, Ajit Somaji; Patil, Akshay Vijay; Narwade, Sayalee Suryabhan; Mundhe, Shankar Tanaji; Savalia, Abhishek Jaysukhbhai; Tamhankar, Ashwin Sunil

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The reported cancer detection rate of Trans-Rectal Ultrasonography (TRUS) biopsies (TRUS biopsy yield) has been around 30 percent in western countries. However it is much lower in Asian countries, including India. Hence a larger proportion of patients in India undergo unnecessary biopsies. Aims To find out the cancer detection rate of TRUS biopsy (TRUS biopsy yield) in contemporary Indian population. Also, to study the positive predictive values at different serum Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA)/PSA Density (PSAD) cut off levels and suspicious Digital Rectal Examination (DRE) findings. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was carried out in a tertiary care institute. All symptomatic patients who underwent TRUS guided biopsy for indication of raised serum PSA level (>4 ng/ml) or suspicious DRE findings (nodule, irregularity, hard consistency, immobile rectal mucosa) from January 2012 to December 2014 were included. For serum PSA range (4-10) ng/ml, TRUS guided biopsy was done in patients with percent free/total PSA < 25. Statistical analysis used were Chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman’s rank correlation analysis and Receiver-Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve. Results Out of the 235 patients included, 60 patients had malignancy (overall cancer detection rate= 25.53%). The cancer detection rate for PSA ranges of (4-10) and (10-20) ng/ml was as low as 5.95% and 13.16% respectively. Patients with malignant disease had significantly smaller prostate gland size than patients with benign disease (53.89 vs 63.06; p-value <0.05). On the other hand, cancer detection rate was 100% for PSA greater than 50ng/ml. The cancer detection rates were only upto 10% for PSA density ranges upto 0.25 ng/ml/cm3. The Area Under the Curve (AUC) for PSA and PSAD was 0.876 and 0.884 respectively. Only one patient (0.43%) had post-biopsy complication (acute bacterial prostatitis) requiring hospital admission. Conclusion The current serum PSA and PSAD cut

  20. Expression of viral polymerase and phosphorylation of core protein determine core and capsid localization of the human hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Deroubaix, Aurélie; Osseman, Quentin; Cassany, Aurélia; Bégu, Dominique; Ragues, Jessica; Kassab, Somar; Lainé, Sébastien; Kann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Biopsies from patients show that hepadnaviral core proteins and capsids - collectively called core - are found in the nucleus and cytoplasm of infected hepatocytes. In the majority of studies, cytoplasmic core localization is related to low viraemia while nuclear core localization is associated with high viral loads. In order to better understand the molecular interactions leading to core localization, we analysed transfected hepatoma cells using immune fluorescence microscopy. We observed that expression of core protein in the absence of other viral proteins led to nuclear localization of core protein and capsids, while expression of core in the context of the other viral proteins resulted in a predominantly cytoplasmic localization. Analysis of which viral partner was responsible for cytoplasmic retention indicated that the HBx, surface proteins and HBeAg had no impact but that the viral polymerase was the major determinant. Further analysis revealed that ϵ, an RNA structure to which the viral polymerase binds, was essential for cytoplasmic retention. Furthermore, we showed that core protein phosphorylation at Ser 164 was essential for the cytoplasmic core localization phenotype, which is likely to explain differences observed between individual cells.

  1. Visually Estimated MRI Targeted Prostate Biopsy Could Improve the Detection of Significant Prostate Cancer in Patients with a PSA Level <10 ng/mL

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Nam, Jong Kil; Park, Sung Woo; Lee, Seung Soo; Han, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Sang Don; Lee, Joon Woo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare prostate cancer detection rates between 12 cores transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUS-Bx) and visually estimated multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI)-targeted prostate biopsy (MRI-visual-Bx) for patients with prostate specific antigen (PSA) level less than 10 ng/mL. Materials and Methods In total, 76 patients with PSA levels below 10 ng/mL underwent 3.0 Tesla mp-MRI and TRUS-Bx prospectively in 2014. In patients with abnormal lesions on mp-MRI, we performed additional MRI-visual-Bx. We compared pathologic results, including the rate of clinically significant prostate cancer cores (cancer length greater than 5 mm and/or any Gleason grade greater than 3 in the biopsy core). Results The mean PSA was 6.43 ng/mL. In total, 48 of 76 (63.2%) patients had abnormal lesions on mp-MRI, and 116 targeted biopsy cores, an average of 2.42 per patient, were taken. The overall detection rates of prostate cancer using TRUS-Bx and MRI-visual-Bx were 26/76 (34.2%) and 23/48 (47.9%), respectively. In comparing the pathologic results of TRUS-Bx and MRI-visual-Bx cores, the positive rates were 8.4% (77 of 912 cores) and 46.6% (54 of 116 cores), respectively (p<0.001). Mean cancer core lengths and mean cancer core percentages were 3.2 mm and 24.5%, respectively, in TRUS-Bx and 6.3 mm and 45.4% in MRI-visual-Bx (p<0.001). In addition, Gleason score ≥7 was noted more frequently using MRI-visual-Bx (p=0.028). The detection rate of clinically significant prostate cancer was 27/77 (35.1%) and 40/54 (74.1%) for TRUS-Bx and MRI-visual-Bx, respectively (p<0.001). Conclusion MRI-visual-Bx showed better performance in the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer, compared to TRUS-Bx among patients with a PSA level less than 10 ng/mL. PMID:26996553

  2. [The role of percutaneous renal biopsy in kidney transplant].

    PubMed

    Manfro, R C; Lee, J Y; Lewgoy, J; Edelweiss, M I; Gonçalves, L F; Prompt, C A

    1994-01-01

    Percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) is an useful tool for diagnostic and therapeutic orientation in renal transplantation. PURPOSE--To evaluate the current role of PRB in post-transplant acute renal dysfunction (ARD) of renal allografts. METHODS--Sixty-five renal transplant patients were submitted to 95 valid renal biopsies with no major complications. RESULTS--There was disagreement between the clinical and the pathological diagnosis in 28 occasions (29.5%). In 36 cases (37.9%) the results of the pathological examination led to a modification in patient's management. These modifications were most commonly the avoidance or witholding of a steroid pulse (8 cases); nephrectomy of the renal allograft (8 cases); witholding or decrease of cyclosporine dosage (6 cases); giving a steroid pulse (5 cases) and giving antibiotics to treat acute pyelonephritis in 4 cases. The use of kidneys from cadaveric donors was significantly associated with an increased number of biopsies (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION--These results demonstrate that even though several less invasive procedures are currently employed, renal biopsy is still an indispensable method to the management of ARD in renal transplant patients.

  3. Role of liver biopsy in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Nalbantoglu, ILKe; Brunt, Elizabeth M

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), defined as abnormal accumulation (> 5%) of hepatic triglyceride without excess alcohol intake, is the most common form of chronic liver disease in adults and children in the United States. NAFLD encompasses a spectrum of histologic findings including uncomplicated steatosis, steatosis with inflammation and steatohepatitis [nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)]; the latter can advance to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. NASH is currently accepted as the hepatic manifestation of the set of cardiovascular risk factors collectively known as metabolic syndrome. In 1999 a system for histologic grading and staging for NASH was proposed; this was revised by the NASH Clinical Research Network in 2005 for the entire spectrum of lesions in NAFLD, including the lesions and patterns of pediatric NAFLD, and for application in clinical research trials. Diagnosis remains distinct from grade and stage. A recent European proposal separates steatosis from activity to derive a numeric diagnosis of NASH. Even though there have been promising advancements in non-invasive testing, these tests are not yet detailed enough to replace the full range of findings provided by liver biopsy evaluation. Limitations of biopsy are acknowledged, but liver biopsy remains the “gold standard” for diagnosis and determination of amounts of necroinflammatory activity, and location of fibrosis, as well as remodeling of the parenchyma in NASH. This review focuses on the specific histologic lesions of NAFLD and NASH, grading and staging, differential diagnoses to be considered, and the continuing role of the liver biopsy in this important liver disease. PMID:25083076

  4. Liquid biopsy in gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Nannini, Margherita; Astolfi, Annalisa; Urbini, Milena; Biasco, Guido; Pantaleo, Maria A

    2014-08-14

    The role of molecular analysis in the management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) remains indisputable. To date, tumor tissue extracted from specimens obtained by surgical or biopsy procedures has been the only source of the tumor DNA required for the molecular and genomic assessment of cancer. However, tumor tissue sampling has several clinical limitations: for example, the invasiveness of these procedures precludes repeated sampling. Thus, it is possible to obtain only a static molecular picture of the disease, a picture that lacks the inter- and intra-metastatic molecular heterogeneity that characterizes most GIST. In contrast, circulating tumor DNA obtained from a patient's bloodstream, known as liquid biopsy, can theoretically overcome the limitations of tissue biopsies and provide the same molecular and genomic information. GIST are recognized as a paradigm of molecular biology among solid tumors. Although few but promising data on liquid biopsy in GIST have been accumulated to date, these tumors may provide the optimal field for application of this challenging approach.

  5. 21 CFR 870.4075 - Endomyocardial biopsy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Endomyocardial biopsy device. 870.4075 Section 870.4075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... procedure to remove samples of tissue from the inner wall of the heart. (b) Classification. Class...

  6. 21 CFR 870.4075 - Endomyocardial biopsy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Endomyocardial biopsy device. 870.4075 Section 870.4075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... procedure to remove samples of tissue from the inner wall of the heart. (b) Classification. Class...

  7. 21 CFR 870.4075 - Endomyocardial biopsy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Endomyocardial biopsy device. 870.4075 Section 870.4075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... procedure to remove samples of tissue from the inner wall of the heart. (b) Classification. Class...

  8. 21 CFR 870.4075 - Endomyocardial biopsy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Endomyocardial biopsy device. 870.4075 Section 870.4075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... procedure to remove samples of tissue from the inner wall of the heart. (b) Classification. Class...

  9. 21 CFR 870.4075 - Endomyocardial biopsy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endomyocardial biopsy device. 870.4075 Section 870.4075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... procedure to remove samples of tissue from the inner wall of the heart. (b) Classification. Class...

  10. [Critical haematuria after prostate biopsies with RIVAROXABAN. Case report].

    PubMed

    Olivier, J; Yakoubi, R; Gras, S; Van Agt, G; Delepaul, B

    2013-10-01

    Managing patients with new oral anticoagulants in perioperative period is not yet well protocolized. We report a clinical case of a critical haematuria after prostate biopsies to a patient treated with RIVAROXABAN. Monitoring and treatment of the haematuria have been difficult due to the lack of biological control and antidote for this treatment.

  11. A comparison of transjugular and plugged-percutaneous liver biopsy in patients with contraindications to ordinary percutaneous liver biopsy and an "in-house" protocol for selecting the procedure of choice.

    PubMed

    Atar, Eli; Ben Ari, Ziv; Bachar, Gil N; Amlinski, Yelena; Neyman, Chaim; Knizhnik, Michael; Litvin, Sergey; Schmilovitz-Weiss, Hemda; Shapiro, Riki; Bruckhaimer, Elchanan; Tur-Kaspa, Ran; Belenky, Alexander

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of transjugular liver biopsy (TJLB) and plugged-percutaneous liver biopsy (PB) in consecutive patients with severe liver disease associated with impaired coagulation, ascites, or both and to verify the in-house protocol used to select the appropriate procedure. In 2000-2006, 329 patients (208 male [62.8%] and 121 female [37.2%]), aged 1 month to 81 years (mean, 46.8 years), underwent 150 TJLBs (39.1%) or 233 PBs (60.9%) procedures at a major tertiary center, as determined by an in-house protocol. The groups were compared for specimen characteristics, technical success, and complications. Technical success rates were 97.4% for TJLB (146/150) and 99.1% for PB (231/233). TJLB was associated with a lower average core length (1.29 vs. 1.43 cm) and lower average number of specimens obtained (2.44 vs. 2.8), but both methods yielded sufficient tissue for a definitive diagnosis. There were no major complications in either group. TJLB and PB can be safely and effectively performed for the diagnosis of hepatic disease in patients with contraindications for standard percutaneous liver biopsy. When both are technically available, we suggest PB as the procedure of choice, especially in transplanted livers.

  12. A Comparison of Transjugular and Plugged-Percutaneous Liver Biopsy in Patients with Contraindications to Ordinary Percutaneous Liver Biopsy and an 'In-House' Protocol for Selecting the Procedure of Choice

    SciTech Connect

    Atar, Eli; Ben Ari, Ziv; Bachar, Gil N.; Amlinski, Yelena; Neyman, Chaim; Knizhnik, Michael; Litvin, Sergey; Schmilovitz-Weiss, Hemda; Shapiro, Riki; Bruckhaimer, Elchanan; Tur-Kaspa, Ran; Belenky, Alexander

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of transjugular liver biopsy (TJLB) and plugged-percutaneous liver biopsy (PB) in consecutive patients with severe liver disease associated with impaired coagulation, ascites, or both and to verify the in-house protocol used to select the appropriate procedure. In 2000-2006, 329 patients (208 male [62.8%] and 121 female [37.2%]), aged 1 month to 81 years (mean, 46.8 years), underwent 150 TJLBs (39.1%) or 233 PBs (60.9%) procedures at a major tertiary center, as determined by an in-house protocol. The groups were compared for specimen characteristics, technical success, and complications. Technical success rates were 97.4% for TJLB (146/150) and 99.1% for PB (231/233). TJLB was associated with a lower average core length (1.29 vs. 1.43 cm) and lower average number of specimens obtained (2.44 vs. 2.8), but both methods yielded sufficient tissue for a definitive diagnosis. There were no major complications in either group. TJLB and PB can be safely and effectively performed for the diagnosis of hepatic disease in patients with contraindications for standard percutaneous liver biopsy. When both are technically available, we suggest PB as the procedure of choice, especially in transplanted livers.

  13. Adverse perinatal outcome and later kidney biopsy in the mother.

    PubMed

    Vikse, Bjørn Egil; Irgens, Lorentz M; Bostad, Leif; Iversen, Bjarne M

    2006-03-01

    Strong associations of adverse perinatal outcomes have been identified with later cardiovascular disease in the mother. Few studies have addressed associations with kidney disease. This study investigated whether perinatal outcomes are associated with later clinical kidney disease as diagnosed by kidney biopsy. The Medical Birth Registry of Norway contains data on all childbirths in Norway since 1967. The Norwegian Kidney Biopsy Registry contains data on all kidney biopsies in Norway since 1988. All women with a first singleton delivery from 1967 to 1998 were included. Pregnancy-related predictors of later kidney biopsy were analyzed by Cox regression analyses. A total of 756,420 women were included, and after a mean period of 15.9+/-9.4 yr, 588 had a kidney biopsy. Compared with women without preeclampsia and with offspring with birth weight of >or=2.5 kg, women with no preeclampsia and with offspring with birth weight of 1.5 to 2.5 kg had a relative risk (RR) for a later kidney biopsy of 1.7, women with no preeclampsia and with offspring with birth weight of <1.5 kg had an RR of 2.9, women with preeclampsia and with offspring with a birth weight of >or=2.5 kg had an RR of 2.5, women with preeclampsia and with offspring with a birth weight of 1.5 to 2.5 kg had an RR of 4.5, and women with preeclampsia and with offspring with a birth weight of <1.5 kg had an RR of 17. Similar results were found in adjusted analyses and after exclusion of women with diabetes, kidney disease, or rheumatic disease before pregnancy. The same risk patterns applied to any of the specific categories of kidney disease as well as specific kidney diseases investigated. Women who have preeclampsia and give birth to offspring with low birth weight and short gestation have a substantially increased risk for having a later kidney biopsy.

  14. Academic Rigor: The Core of the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Some educators see the Common Core State Standards as reason for stress, most recognize the positive possibilities associated with them and are willing to make the professional commitment to implementing them so that academic rigor for all students will increase. But business leaders, parents, and the authors of the Common Core are not the only…

  15. Single-Institution Results of Image-Guided Nonplugged Percutaneous Versus Transjugular Liver Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Hardman, Rulon L.; Perrich, Kiley D.; Silas, Anne M.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively review patients who underwent transjugular and image-guided percutaneous biopsy and compare the relative risk of ascites, thrombocytopenia, and coagulopathy. Materials and Methods: From August 2001 through February 2006, a total of 238 liver biopsies were performed. The radiologist reviewed all patient referrals for transjugular biopsy. These patients either underwent transjugular biopsy or were reassigned to percutaneous biopsy (crossover group). Patients referred to percutaneous image-guided liver biopsy underwent this same procedure. Biopsies were considered successful if a tissue diagnosis could be made from the samples obtained. Results: A total of 36 transjugular biopsies were performed with 3 total (8.3%) and 1 major (2.8%) complications. A total of 171 percutaneous biopsies were performed with 10 (5.8%) total and 3 (1.8%) major complications. The crossover group showed a total of 4 (12.9%) complications with 1 (3.2%) major complication. Sample adequacy was 91.9% for transjugular and 99.5% for percutaneous biopsy. Conclusion: Both transjugular and percutaneous liver biopsy techniques are efficacious and safe. Contraindications such as thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, and ascites are indicators of greater complications but are not necessarily prevented by transjugular biopsy. Percutaneous biopsy more frequently yields a diagnostic specimen than transjugular biopsy.

  16. Novel CT-guided biopsy of isolated perineural spread of adenoid cystic carcinoma along the trigeminal nerve masquerading as chronic trigeminal neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yong, Xian Zhang Eric; Dillon, Jonathan; Smith, Paul; Salinas-La Rosa, Cesar; Jhamb, Ashu

    2017-02-01

    The differential diagnoses for chronic peripheral neuropathy are broad and diagnosing a cause can be challenging. We present a case of isolated perineural spread of adenoid cystic carcinoma to the trigeminal nerve involving skull base foramina and Meckel's cave in the setting of chronic trigeminal neuropathy and no known prior malignancy. Computed tomography-guided core (CT) needle biopsy was needed to arrive at a diagnosis and a novel approach was required to obtain tissue from the trigeminal nerve lesion at foramen ovale.

  17. Effect on biopsy technique of the breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) for nonpalpable mammographic abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Chad G.; Butchart, Michael; MacFarlane, John K.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine if the breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) defines a group of patients with mammographic abnormalities in whom stereotactic core needle biopsy (SCNB) is appropriate. Design A blinded retrospective validation sample. Setting A university-affiliated hospital. Patients One hundred and nine consecutive patients who underwent fine-wire localization breast biopsy (FWLB) between Jan. 1, 1994, and June 1, 1999, with a known final pathological diagnosis. Intervention Blinded mammographic review and classification using the BI-RADS; review of corresponding pathological findings from FWLBs. Outcome measures Correlation of pathological findings with each BI-RADS category and analysis of the predictive value of clinical and radiologic features. Results BI-RADS findings were as follows: 0 malignant lesions in 10 category 3 cases, 18 malignant lesions (3 in situ, 15 invasive) in 68 category 4 cases and 24 malignant lesions (8 in situ and 16 invasive) in 31 category 5 cases. There was 1 malignant lesion in 22 category 4 cases in women younger than 50 years. Conclusions SCNB should be applied to BI-RADS categories 3 and 4 (< 50 yr of age). FWLB should be reserved for category 4 (> 50 yr of age) and category 5 cases. This algorithm will reduce the morbidity and cost of breast biopsies in patients with nonpalpable mammographic abnormalities. PMID:12174979

  18. Evaluation of distal symmetric polyneuropathy: the role of autonomic testing, nerve biopsy, and skin biopsy (an evidence-based review).

    PubMed

    England, J D; Gronseth, G S; Franklin, G; Carter, G T; Kinsella, L J; Cohen, J A; Asbury, A K; Szigeti, K; Lupski, J R; Latov, N; Lewis, R A; Low, P A; Fisher, M A; Herrmann, D; Howard, J F; Lauria, G; Miller, R G; Polydefkis, M; Sumner, A J

    2009-01-01

    Distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP) is the most common variety of neuropathy. Since the evaluation of this disorder is not standardized, the available literature was reviewed to provide evidence-based guidelines regarding the role of autonomic testing, nerve biopsy, and skin biopsy for the assessment of polyneuropathy. A literature review using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, and Current Contents was performed to identify the best evidence regarding the evaluation of polyneuropathy published between 1980 and March 2007. Articles were classified according to a four-tiered level of evidence scheme and recommendations were based on the level of evidence. (1) Autonomic testing may be considered in the evaluation of patients with polyneuropathy to document autonomic nervous system dysfunction (Level B). Such testing should be considered especially for the evaluation of suspected autonomic neuropathy (Level B) and distal small fiber sensory polyneuropathy (SFSN) (Level C). A battery of validated tests is recommended to achieve the highest diagnostic accuracy (Level B). (2) Nerve biopsy is generally accepted as useful in the evaluation of certain neuropathies as in patients with suspected amyloid neuropathy, mononeuropathy multiplex due to vasculitis, or with atypical forms of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). However, the literature is insufficient to provide a recommendation regarding when a nerve biopsy may be useful in the evaluation of DSP (Level U). (3) Skin biopsy is a validated technique for determining intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) density and may be considered for the diagnosis of DSP, particularly SFSN (Level C). There is a need for additional prospective studies to define more exact guidelines for the evaluation of polyneuropathy.

  19. Serum testosterone as a biomarker for second prostatic biopsy in men with negative first biopsy for prostatic cancer and PSA>4ng/mL, or with PIN biopsy result

    PubMed Central

    Fiamegos, Alexandros; Varkarakis, John; Kontraros, Michael; Karagiannis, Andreas; Chrisofos, Michael; Barbalias, Dimitrios; Deliveliotis, Charalampos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Data from animal, clinical and prevention studies support the role of androgens in prostate cancer growth, proliferation and progression. Results of serum based epidemiologic studies in humans, however, have been inconclusive. The present study aims to define whether serum testosterone can be used as a predictor of a positive second biopsy in males considered for re-biopsy. Material and Methods: The study included 320 men who underwent a prostatic biopsy in our department from October 2011 until June 2012. Total testosterone, free testosterone, bioavailable testosterone and prostate pathology were evaluated in all cases. Patients undergoing a second biopsy were identified and biopsy results were statistically analyzed. Results: Forty men (12.5%) were assessed with a second biopsy. The diagnosis of the second biopsy was High Grade Intraepithelial Neoplasia in 14 patients (35%) and Prostate Cancer in 12 patients (30%). The comparison of prostatic volume, total testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin, free testosterone, bioavailable testosterone and albumin showed that patients with cancer of the prostate had significantly greater levels of free testosterone (p=0.043) and bioavailable T (p=0.049). Conclusion: In our study, higher free testosterone and bioavailable testosterone levels were associated with a cancer diagnosis at re-biopsy. Our results indicate a possible role for free and bioavailable testosterone in predicting the presence of prostate cancer in patients considered for re-biopsy. PMID:27532110

  20. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  1. Effect of coring conditions on temperature rise in bone.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Monirul; Wang, Xiaodu

    2017-01-01

    Coring is a surgical procedure in bone biopsy retrieval and dental/orthopaedic procedures, which may cause thermal damage to bone tissues adjacent to the coring zone. This study was performed to determine the temperature rise in bone by coring using a semi-empirical thermocouple approach. Concurrently, a custom-made dynamometer was used to measure the cutting and thrust forces during coring bovine cortical bone samples. The experimental results indicated that the cutting force, cutting speed, and depth of cut significantly affect the temperature rise in the cutting zone during coring process. In addition, acute temperature rises in the cutting zone occurred when the cutting speed exceeded threshold levels. The limited capacity of heat dissipation during coring is most likely responsible for such a sharp temperature rise with increasing cutting speed. Moreover, it was observed that the maximum size of potential thermal damage zone could reach to 3.0 mm in depth from the surface of the coring hole, assuming that thermal damage would occur when the temperature is greater than 47°C. Thus, proper cutting conditions need to be selected to avoid the potential thermal damage to bone during the coring procedures.

  2. Confocal reflectance imaging of excised malignant human bladder biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniltchenko, Dmitri I.; Kastein, Albrecht; Koenig, Frank; Sachs, Markus; Schnorr, Dietmar; Al-Shukri, Salman; Loening, Stefan A.

    2004-08-01

    To evaluate the potential of reflectance confocal scanning laser microscopy (CM) for rapid imaging of non-processed freshly excised human bladder biopsies and cystectomy specimens. Freshly excised bladder tumors from three cystectomy specimens and random biopsies from twenty patients with a history of superficial bladder tumors were imaged with CM. Additional acetic acid washing prior to CM imaging was performed in some of the samples. Confocal images were compared to corresponding routine histologic sections. CM allows imaging of unprocessed bladder tissue at a subcellular resolution. Urothelial cell layers, collagen, vessels and muscle fibers can be rapidly visualized, in native state. In this regard, umbrella cells, basement membrane elucidated. Besides obvious limitations partly due to non-use of exogenous dyes, CM imaging offers several advantages: rapid imaging of the tissue in its native state like the basement membrane, normally seen only by using immunohistopathology. Reflectance CM opens a new avenue for imaging bladder cancer.

  3. Texture analysis for colorectal tumour biopsies using multispectral imagery.

    PubMed

    Peyret, Remy; Bouridane, Ahmed; Al-Maadeed, Somaya Ali; Kunhoth, Suchithra; Khelifi, Fouad

    2015-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. As part of its diagnosis, a histological analysis is often run on biopsy samples. Multispecral imagery taken from cancer tissues can be useful to capture more meaningful features. However, the resulting data is usually very large having a large number of varying feature types. This papers aims to investigate and compare the performances of multispectral imagery taken from colorectal biopsies using different techniques for texture feature extraction inclduing local binary patterns, Haraclick features and local intensity order patterns. Various classifiers such as Support Vector Machine and Random Forest are also investigated. The results show the superiority of multispectral imaging over the classical panchromatic approach. In the multispectral imagery's analysis, the local binary patterns combined with Support Vector Machine classifier gives very good results achieving an accuracy of 91.3%.

  4. Motion and deformation compensation for freehand prostate biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khallaghi, Siavash; Nouranian, Saman; Sojoudi, Samira; Ashab, Hussam A.; Machan, Lindsay; Chang, Silvia; Black, Peter; Gleave, Martin; Goldenberg, Larry; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present a registration pipeline to compensate for prostate motion and deformation during targeted freehand prostate biopsies. We perform 2D-3D registration by reconstructing a thin-volume around the real-time 2D ultrasound imaging plane. Constrained Sum of Squared Differences (SSD) and gradient descent optimization are used to rigidly align the moving volume to the fixed thin-volume. Subsequently, B-spline de- formable registration is performed to compensate for remaining non-linear deformations. SSD and zero-bounded Limited memory Broyden Fletcher Goldfarb Shannon (LBFGS) optimizer are used to find the optimum B-spline parameters. Registration results are validated on five prostate biopsy patients. Initial experiments suggest thin- volume-to-volume registration to be more effective than slice-to-volume registration. Also, a minimum consistent 2 mm improvement of Target Registration Error (TRE) is achieved following the deformable registration.

  5. Skin Biopsy for the diagnosis of Alport Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lagona, E; Tsartsali, L; Kostaridou, S; Skiathitou, A; Georgaki, E; Sotsiou, F

    2008-01-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is the most common hereditary nephritis often associated with extrarenal manifestations. It was first described by Alport on 1927. There is a primary disorder in collagen type IV which is the main component of the basement membranes. Alport syndrome is more frequently inherited as an X-linked and less commonly as an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive trait. We describe the case of a 3-year-old boy with the X-linked variant of AS. The diagnosis was at first speculated from the child's detailed family history and was finally confirmed by a skin biopsy. Skin biopsy is an efficient and less invasive method for the X-linked variant of the AS diagnosis. PMID:18923659

  6. Microfluidic Exosome Analysis toward Liquid Biopsy for Cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Mei; Zeng, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Assessment of a tumor's molecular makeup using biofluid samples, known as liquid biopsy, is a prominent research topic in precision medicine for cancer, due to its noninvasive property allowing repeat sampling for monitoring molecular changes of tumors over time. Circulating exosomes recently have been recognized as promising tumor surrogates because they deliver enriched biomarkers, such as proteins, RNAs, and DNA. However, purification and characterization of these exosomes are technically challenging. Microfluidic lab-on-a-chip technology effectively addresses these challenges owing to its inherent advantages in integration and automation of multiple functional modules, enhancing sensing performance, and expediting analysis processes. In this article, we review the state-of-the-art development of microfluidic technologies for exosome isolation and molecular characterization with emphasis on their applications toward liquid biopsy-based analysis of cancer. Finally, we share our perspectives on current challenges and future directions of microfluidic exosome analysis.

  7. Robotically assisted small animal MRI-guided mouse biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Emmanuel; Chiodo, Chris; Wong, Kenneth H.; Fricke, Stanley; Jung, Mira; Cleary, Kevin

    2010-02-01

    Small mammals, namely mice and rats, play an important role in biomedical research. Imaging, in conjunction with accurate therapeutic agent delivery, has tremendous value in small animal research since it enables serial, non-destructive testing of animals and facilitates the study of biomarkers of disease progression. The small size of organs in mice lends some difficulty to accurate biopsies and therapeutic agent delivery. Image guidance with the use of robotic devices should enable more accurate and repeatable targeting for biopsies and delivery of therapeutic agents, as well as the ability to acquire tissue from a pre-specified location based on image anatomy. This paper presents our work in integrating a robotic needle guide device, specialized stereotaxic mouse holder, and magnetic resonance imaging, with a long-term goal of performing accurate and repeatable targeting in anesthetized mice studies.

  8. Cardiac iron overload in thalassemic patients: an endomyocardial biopsy study.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, T; Tamburino, C; Bartoloni, G; Morrone, M L; Frontini, V; Italia, F; Cordaro, S; Privitera, A; Calvi, V

    1995-09-01

    Secondary heart failure induced by organ siderosis is the main cause of death in patients affected by thalassemia major. At present it cannot be predicted whether heart siderosis is correlated with iron overload and little is known about the real cardiac histological pattern of post transfusional hemochromatosis in patients with thalassemia major and intermedia. The study aim was to evaluate cardiac iron overload by non invasive and invasive techniques. Fifteen thalassemic patients were investigated and endomyocardial biopsy performed in ten revealed different grades of endomyocardial iron overload with histochemical positivity. Non invasive techniques are not able to furnish an exact picture of the cardiac hemochromatosis. There was a significant correlation between serum ferritin and myocardial iron grade. Patients with elevated ferritin levels and poor compliance to chelating therapy are at high risk of severe heart hemochromatosis. It was seen that endomyocardial biopsy is a useful tool in studying myocardial iron.

  9. Clinical applications of liquid biopsies in gastrointestinal oncology

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jason

    2016-01-01

    “Liquid biopsies” are blood based assays used to detect and analyze circulating tumor products, including circulating tumor cells (CTCs), circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), circulating messenger RNA (mRNA), circulating microRNA (miRNA), circulating exosomes, and tumor educated platelets (TEP). For patients with gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies, blood based biopsies may offer several advantages. First, tumor tissue samples are often challenging to procure, and when obtainable, are often insufficient for genomic profiling. Second, blood based assays offer a real-time overview of the entire tumor burden, and allow anatomically unbiased genomic profiling. Third, given the convenience and relative safety of liquid biopsies, this technology may facilitate identification of genomic alterations that confer sensitivity and resistance to targeted therapeutics. This review will assess the clinical applications of circulating tumor products for patients with GI tumors. PMID:27747082

  10. Gastric ulcer penetrating to liver diagnosed by endoscopic biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kayacetin, Ertugrul; Kayacetin, Serra

    2004-01-01

    Liver penetration is a rare but serious complication of peptic ulcer disease. Usually the diagnosis is made by operation or autopsy. Clinical and laboratory data were no specific. A 64-year-old man was admitted with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hepatic penetration was diagnosed as the cause of bleeding. Endoscopy showed a large gastric ulcer with a pseudotumoral mass protruding from the ulcer bed. Definitive diagnosis was established by endoscopic biopsies of the ulcer base. PMID:15188520

  11. Primary cerebellopontine progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy diagnosed premortem by cerebellar biopsy.

    PubMed

    Jones, H R; Hedley-Whyte, E T; Freidberg, S R; Kelleher, J E; Krolikowski, J

    1982-02-01

    A subacute progressive cerebellar brainstem syndrome developed in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus in remission. Cerebellar biopsy documented the diagnosis of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Data from this patient and 10 others in the literature emphasize the need to consider this diagnosis when ataxia develops in any patient with underlying malignancy, chronic infection, or other disease that involves immunological incompetence. Although the ataxic form of PML is not of nosological relevance, early diagnosis may eventually have therapeutic importance.

  12. Repeated nondiagnostic result of thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kopczyński, Janusz; Kowalska, Aldona

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the study Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is the most accurate and cost-effective method to evaluate the risk of malignancy of thyroid nodules, but approximately 1–24% of FNABs generate a nondiagnostic result (ND-FNAB). The aim of this study was to determine the predictive factors of a repeated nondiagnostic result of FNAB. Material and methods A total of 4018 FNABs performed in a territorial referral centre were analysed, of which 288 (7.17%) were nondiagnostic. Medical records were available for 245 biopsies performed in 228 patients. The retrospective analysis of factors that may influence a repeat ND-FNAB, including demographic, clinical and ultrasound characteristics, was performed. Results A repeat FNAB was performed in 159 nodules giving a diagnostic result in 79.2% of cases. The time between the biopsies ranged from 1 to 611 days (mean 154.4, median 119). The timing of a repeat FNAB did not significantly alter the diagnostic output (p = 0.29). In the univariate analysis, significant predictors of a repeat ND-FNAB were older patient age (p = 0.02), L-thyroxine supplementation (p = 0.05), and a history of 131I therapy (p < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, only a history of 131I therapy was a statistically significant risk factor for a repeat ND-FNAB (p = 0.002). Conclusions Patients with a history of 131I therapy and ND-FNAB should undergo periodic ultrasonographic assessment rather than a repeat biopsy. The interval between repeated FNABs recommended by guidelines does not affect the diagnostic output. PMID:28239289

  13. Muscle biopsy as a tool in the study of aging.

    PubMed

    Coggan, A R

    1995-11-01

    The needle biopsy procedure provides a minimally invasive means of obtaining small samples of skeletal muscle from human volunteers. Such samples can be used to examine a variety of structural and functional characteristics of muscle, including fiber type and size, capillarization, enzymatic capacities, energy substrate or protein/mRNA concentrations, metabolic responses, and contractile properties. In conjunction with other methods, biopsy sampling can also be used to estimate total muscle mass and fiber number, and to determine rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Optimal handling and storage conditions vary widely, but in general, most of the above measurements can be made using frozen tissue, so that samples can be stored almost indefinitely. The procedure is also safe and generally well-tolerated, making it possible to perform longitudinal studies of the same person. The biopsy technique is therefore well suited for examining the underlying physiological mechanisms responsible for muscle wasting in the elderly, as well as for assessing the effects of nutritional, hormonal, and/or lifestyle (e.g., exercise) interventions intended to combat this problem. Although sample size limitations have been largely overcome by the development of microtechniques, more information is needed on how to minimize the variability introduced by studying only a small fraction of the whole muscle. Studies are also required to determine whether it is sufficient to biopsy only one muscle (and if so, which is optimal), or whether there are differential effects of aging in various muscle groups that would preclude extrapolating from one muscle to all muscles in the body.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Cardiac toxoplasmosis after heart transplantation diagnosed by endomyocardial biopsy.

    PubMed

    Petty, L A; Qamar, S; Ananthanarayanan, V; Husain, A N; Murks, C; Potter, L; Kim, G; Pursell, K; Fedson, S

    2015-10-01

    We describe a case of cardiac toxoplasmosis diagnosed by routine endomyocardial biopsy in a patient with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) intolerance on atovaquone prophylaxis. Data are not available on the efficacy of atovaquone as Toxoplasma gondii prophylaxis after heart transplantation. In heart transplant patients in whom TMP-SMX is not an option, other strategies may be considered, including the addition of pyrimethamine to atovaquone.

  15. The future prospect: ductoscopy-directed brushing and biopsy.

    PubMed

    Dooley, William Chesnut

    2005-12-01

    The intraductal approach to breast cancer and premalignant lesions has now developed to yield substantial cytologic samples of exfoliated cells. Standard cytology is still inadequate in sensitivity and specificity to accurately interpret the majority of samples. As techniques evolve using ductoscopic biopsy and molecular marker panels to increase accuracy of cytologic interpretation, these tools will be able to unravel the breast carcinogenesis pathways. They will also offer considerable benefit in screening for premalignant changes and developing effective chemoprevention strategies.

  16. Prognostic Value of Allelic Imbalance in Prostate Biopsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    cancer . J. Journal of Urology ...162: 1788-92, 1999. C.A. Fordyce, C.M. Heaphy, N.E. Joste, A.Y. Smith, W.C. Hunt and J.K. Griffith Association Between Cancer -free Survival and Telomere DNA Content in Prostate Tumors. J. Urology , 173: 610-614, 2005. ...prostate cancer . Scope: The two Aims of the project are to(i)determine whether the number of sites of AI in biopsy predicts pathological staging

  17. Inadequate fine needle aspiration biopsy samples: Pathologists versus other specialists

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Macías, GS; Garza-Guajardo, R; Segura-Luna, J

    2009-01-01

    Background: Fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is a simple, sensitive, quick and inexpensive method in which operator experience is essential for obtaining the best results. Methods: A descriptive study in which the aspiration biopsy cases of the Pathology and Cytopathology Service of the University Hospital of the UANL (2003–2005) were analyzed. These were divided into three study groups: Group 1, FNAB performed by a pathologist; Group 2, FNAB performed by specialists who are not pathologists, Group 3, FNAB guided by an imaging study with immediate evaluation by a pathologist. The samples were classified as adequate and inadequate for diagnosis, the organ, the size and characteristics of the lesions were taken into consideration. Results: A total of 1905 FNAB were included. In Group 1: 1347 were performed of which 1242 (92.2%) were adequate and 105 (7.7%) were inadequate. Of the 237 from Group 2, 178 were adequate (75.1%) and 59 inadequate (24.8%); in Group 3 there were 321 of which 283 (88.1%) were adequate and 38 (11.8%) inadequate. A statistically significant difference was found between FNAB performed by Group 1 (p< 0.001) and the other groups. A multivariate analysis was done where the organ punctured, the study groups, the size and characteristics of the lesion by study group were compared, finding that the most important variable was the person who performed the procedure. Conclusion: The experience and training of the person performing the aspiration biopsy, as well as immediate evaluation of the material when it is guided, substantially reduces the number of inadequate samples, improving the sensitivity of the method as well as reducing the need for open biopsies to reach a diagnosis. PMID:19621092

  18. Major Bleeding after Percutaneous Image-Guided Biopsies: Frequency, Predictors, and Periprocedural Management

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sean A.; Milovanovic, Lazar; Midia, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Major bleeding remains an uncommon yet potentially devastating complication following percutaneous image-guided biopsy. This article reviews two cases of major bleeding after percutaneous biopsy and discusses the frequency, predictors, and periprocedural management of major postprocedural bleeding. PMID:25762845

  19. Banded transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  20. Right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy in chronic Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Pereira Barretto, A C; Mady, C; Arteaga-Fernandez, E; Stolf, N; Lopes, E A; Higuchi, M L; Bellotti, G; Pileggi, F

    1986-02-01

    Right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy was used to study myocardial involvement in 42 patients with chronic Chagas' disease. Patients were divided into three groups: group A included 16 patients with normal ECGs, normal chest x-rays, and no symptoms; group B included 15 patients with abnormal ECGs and no cardiomegaly; and group C included 11 patients with abnormal ECGs and cardiomegaly. Biopsy fragments were analyzed for hypertrophy, degeneration of myocardial fibers, and interstitial changes such as edema, fibrosis, and inflammatory infiltrate. In group A, 5 of 16 biopsies exhibited none of the previously mentioned alterations. The frequencies pathologic alterations in groups A, B, and C, respectively, were: hypertrophy 31%, 66%, and 100%; degeneration 50%, 86%, and 81%; edema 43%, 46%, and 36%; fibrosis 12%, 33%, and 54%; and inflammatory infiltrate 37%, 66%, and 65%. These data suggest that myocardial lesions of Chagas' disease represent a continuous progression from fiber destruction to substitution by fibrosis, with compensatory hypertrophy; these data also suggest that cardiac dilatation occurs when the extent of fibrosis no longer allows for efficient compensatory hypertrophy.

  1. Immunocytochemical localization of peroxisomal enzymes in human liver biopsies.

    PubMed Central

    Litwin, J. A.; Völkl, A.; Müller-Höcker, J.; Hashimoto, T.; Fahimi, H. D.

    1987-01-01

    The immunocytochemical localization of catalase and three enzymes of the peroxisomal lipid beta-oxidation system--acyl-CoA oxidase, the bifunctional protein enoyl-CoA hydratase, 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase--in human liver biopsies was investigated by means of light and electron microscopy. The antisera raised against all four enzymes from rat liver cross-reacted with the corresponding proteins in homogenates of human liver as revealed by immunoblotting. For light-microscopic localization in glutaraldehyde-fixed Epon-embedded material, the removal of resin and controlled digestion with trypsin was necessary. At the ultrastructural level specific labeling for all four antigens was found by the protein A-gold technique in peroxisomes of liver parenchymal cells fixed with formaldehyde-low glutaraldehyde concentrations and embedded in Lowicryl K4M. In biopsies fixed with glutaraldehyde and embedded in Epon, treatment with metaperiodate or etching with sodium ethoxide improved the immunolabeling. After such treatment catalase showed the most intense labeling and acyl-CoA oxidase the weakest, the two other proteins exhibiting an intermediate immunoreaction. In material postfixed with osmium only catalase could be visualized in peroxisomes. The immunocytochemical investigation of peroxisomal proteins in human liver biopsies provides a simple and highly promising approach for further elucidation of the pathophysiology of peroxisomal disorders. Images Figures 2 and 3 Figure 4-7 Figures 9-12 Figure 1 Figure 8 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 PMID:2886050

  2. The promise of liquid biopsy in cancer: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Cortesi, Enrico; Palleschi, Michela; Magri, Valentina; Naso, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    The clinical utility of liquid biopsy in cancer treatment will increase as circulating tumor cells (CTCs) analysis move from the enumeration to the real-time measurement of tumor characteristics. Intratumor heterogeneity is becoming increasingly recognized as a major drawback to the shift to personalized medicine. Spatial and temporal heterogeneity might be reflected by the serial assessment of CTCs. Indeed, the developing technologies for CTCs analysis now allow digital genomic and next-generation sequencing approaches, able to differentiate molecular subtypes of the disease and to monitor genetic variation over time. The liquid biopsy of cancer might offer a real-time assessment of tumor biology, providing the opportunity to serially evaluate patients most likely to benefit from targeted drugs based on a dynamic characterization of the disease at the molecular level. Although hurdles remain before liquid biopsy is seen in routine clinical practice, the information derived from CTCs may facilitate the real-time identification of actionable mutations in cancer leading the way toward personalized medicine.

  3. Cardiac Sarcoidosis Diagnosed by Incidental Lymph Node Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Jun; Fujiu, Katsuhito; Roh, Solji; Tajima, Miyu; Maki, Hisataka; Kojima, Toshiya; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Nawata, Kan; Takeda, Norihiko; Watanabe, Masafumi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei

    2017-02-07

    Cardiac involvement in systemic sarcoidosis sometimes provokes life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmia. Steroid administration is one of the fundamental anti-arrhythmia therapies. For an indication of steroid therapy, a definitive diagnosis of sarcoidosis is required.(1)) However, cases that are clearly suspected of cardiac sarcoidosis based on their clinical courses sometimes do not meet the current diagnostic criteria and result in the loss of an appropriate opportunity to perform steroid therapy.Here we report a case that was diagnosed as sarcoidosis by incidental biopsy of an inguinal lymph node during cardiac resuscitation for cardiac tamponade.(2)) While the inguinal lymph node was not swollen on computed tomography, a specimen obtained from an incidental biopsy during the exposure of a femoral vessel for the establishment of extracorporeal cardio-pulmonary resuscitation showed a non-caseating granuloma.This findings suggest a non-swelling lymph node biopsy might be an alternative strategy for the diagnosis for sarcoidosis if other standard strategies do not result in a diagnosis of sarcoidosis.

  4. Outpatient renal needle biopsy of the transplanted kidney: safety profile.

    PubMed

    Petrone, H; Frapiccini, M G; Skare, R; Baran, M

    2011-11-01

    Since May 2005, we began performing renal graft biopsies as outpatient procedures when the patient's condition did not require hospitalization. To evaluate the safety profile of the 137 procedures performed in 111 patients, we performed a retrospective analysis of complications after all biopsies between 4 May 2005 and 6 January 6, 2011. The analysis focused on types of complications as well as needs for hospitalization with length of stay, for blood transfusion or for a further intervention. There were complications in 10.9% of procedures (n = 15) with 8% requiring hospitalization (n = 11). The complications were: gross hematuria (n = 10) including blockage of urinary flow (n = 2) with one subject requiring urologic intervention, and one patient experienced severe pain at the puncture site. Neither renal graft nor patient survival was threatened; there was no hemodynamic decompensation needing blood transfusions. The average hospital stay was 2.27 days (range = 1-8). Outpatient renal biopsies in 111 patients (137 procedures) had an 8% incidence of complications requiring admission and an average length of hospitalization of 2.27 days. Gross hematuria the most frequent problem, in no way compromised patient or graft survival showing it to be a safe outpatient procedure.

  5. Sentinel lymph node biopsy for conjunctival malignant melanoma: surgical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Wainstein, Alberto JA; Drummond-Lage, Ana P; Kansaon, Milhem JM; Bretas, Gustavo O; Almeida, Rodrigo F; Gloria, Ana LF; Figueiredo, Ana RP

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this report is to examine the viability and safety of preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and radio guided sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy for conjunctival melanoma, and to identify the best technique to perform this procedure. Methods Three patients diagnosed with malignant melanoma of the conjunctiva underwent lymphoscintigraphy and SLN biopsy using a dual technique comprising isosulfan blue dye and technetium Tc 99m sulfur colloid. Each patient was anesthetized and the conjunctival melanoma was excised. SLNs were localized by a gamma probe, identified according to radioactivity and sentinel blue printing, and dissected, along with drainage of the associated lymphatic basins. The SLNs were evaluated by a pathologist using hematoxylin-eosin staining following serial sectioning and immunohistochemistry using a triple melanoma cocktail (S-100, Melan-A, and HMB-45 antigens). Results Two SLNs were stained in the jugular chain during preoperative lymphoscintigraphy in the first patient, two SLNs were identified in the preauricular and submandibular areas in the second patient, and two SLNs were identified in the submandibular and parotid areas in the third patient. All lymph nodes identified by lymphoscintigraphy were dissected and identified at surgery with 100% accuracy in all three patients. All SLNs were histologically and immunohistochemically negative. Patients had good cosmetic and functional results, and maintained their visual acuity and ocular motility. Conclusion Patients with conjunctival melanoma can undergo preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and SLN biopsy safely using radioactive technetium and isosulfan blue dye. PMID:25565762

  6. MRI/TRUS fusion software-based targeted biopsy: the new standard of care?

    PubMed

    Manfredi, M; Costa Moretti, T B; Emberton, M; Villers, A; Valerio, M

    2015-09-01

    The advent of multiparametric MRI has made it possible to change the way in which prostate biopsy is done, allowing to direct biopsies to suspicious lesions rather than randomly. The subject of this review relates to a computer-assisted strategy, the MRI/US fusion software-based targeted biopsy, and to its performance compared to the other sampling methods. Different devices with different methods to register MR images to live TRUS are currently in use to allow software-based targeted biopsy. Main clinical indications of MRI/US fusion software-based targeted biopsy are re-biopsy in men with persistent suspicious of prostate cancer after first negative standard biopsy and the follow-up of patients under active surveillance. Some studies have compared MRI/US fusion software-based targeted versus standard biopsy. In men at risk with MRI-suspicious lesion, targeted biopsy consistently detects more men with clinically significant disease as compared to standard biopsy; some studies have also shown decreased detection of insignificant disease. Only two studies directly compared MRI/US fusion software-based targeted biopsy with MRI/US fusion visual targeted biopsy, and the diagnostic ability seems to be in favor of the software approach. To date, no study comparing software-based targeted biopsy against in-bore MRI biopsy is available. The new software-based targeted approach seems to have the characteristics to be added in the standard pathway for achieving accurate risk stratification. Once reproducibility and cost-effectiveness will be verified, the actual issue will be to determine whether MRI/TRUS fusion software-based targeted biopsy represents anadd-on test or a replacement to standard TRUS biopsy.

  7. Contribution of Transjugular Liver Biopsy in Patients with the Clinical Presentation of Acute Liver Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, Roberto Luca, Angelo; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Minervini, Marta Ida; Vizzini, Giovanni; Arcadipane, Antonio; Gridelli, Bruno

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. Acute liver failure (ALF) treated with conservative therapy has a poor prognosis, although individual survival varies greatly. In these patients, the eligibility for liver transplantation must be quickly decided. The aim of this study was to assess the role of transjugular liver biopsy (TJLB) in the management of patients with the clinical presentation of ALF. Methods. Seventeen patients with the clinical presentation of ALF were referred to our institution during a 52 month period. A TJLB was performed using the Cook Quick-Core needle biopsy. Clinical data, procedural complications, and histologic findings were evaluated. Results. Causes of ALF were virus hepatitis B infection in 7 patients, drug toxicity in 4, mushroom in 1, Wilson's disease in 1, and unknown origin in 4. TJLB was technically successful in all patients without procedure-related complications. Tissue specimens were satisfactory for diagnosis in all cases. In 14 of 17 patients the initial clinical diagnosis was confirmed by TJLB; in 3 patients the initial diagnosis was altered by the presence of unknown cirrhosis. Seven patients with necrosis <60% were successfully treated with medical therapy; 6 patients with submassive or massive necrosis ({>=}85%) were treated with liver transplantation. Four patients died, 3 had cirrhosis, and 1 had submassive necrosis. There was a strict statistical correlation (r = 0.972, p < 0.0001) between the amount of necrosis at the frozen section examination and the necrosis found at routine histologic examination. The average time for TJLB and frozen section examination was 80 min. Conclusion. In patients with the clinical presentation of ALF, submassive or massive liver necrosis and cirrhosis are predictors of poor prognosis. TLJB using an automated device and frozen section examination can be a quick and effective tool in clinical decision-making, especially in deciding patient selection and the best timing for liver transplantation.

  8. A Miniaturized Chemical Proteomic Approach for Target Profiling of Clinical Kinase Inhibitors in Tumor Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Chamrád, Ivo; Rix, Uwe; Stukalov, Alexey; Gridling, Manuela; Parapatics, Katja; Müller, André C.; Altiok, Soner; Colinge, Jacques; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Haura, Eric B.; Bennett, Keiryn L.

    2014-01-01

    While targeted therapy based on the idea of attenuating the activity of a preselected, therapeutically relevant protein has become one of the major trends in modern cancer therapy, no truly specific targeted drug has been developed and most clinical agents have displayed a degree of polypharmacology. Therefore, the specificity of anticancer therapeutics has emerged as a highly important but severely underestimated issue. Chemical proteomics is a powerful technique combining postgenomic drug-affinity chromatography with high-end mass spectrometry analysis and bioinformatic data processing to assemble a target profile of a desired therapeutic molecule. Due to high demands on the starting material, however, chemical proteomic studies have been mostly limited to cancer cell lines. Herein, we report a down-scaling of the technique to enable the analysis of very low abundance samples, as those obtained from needle biopsies. By a systematic investigation of several important parameters in pull-downs with the multikinase inhibitor bosutinib, the standard experimental protocol was optimized to 100 µg protein input. At this level, more than 30 well-known targets were detected per single pull-down replicate with high reproducibility. Moreover, as presented by the comprehensive target profile obtained from miniaturized pull-downs with another clinical drug, dasatinib, the optimized protocol seems to be extendable to other drugs of interest. Sixty distinct human and murine targets were finally identified for bosutinib and dasatinib in chemical proteomic experiments utilizing core needle biopsy samples from xenotransplants derived from patient tumor tissue. Altogether, the developed methodology proves robust and generic and holds many promises for the field of personalized health care. PMID:23901793

  9. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large

  10. Understanding the diagnostic yield of current endoscopic biopsy for gastric neoplasm: A prospective single-center analysis based on tumor characteristics stratified by biopsy number and site.

    PubMed

    Kwack, Won G; Ho, Won J; Kim, Jae H; Lee, Jin H; Kim, Eo J; Kang, Hyoun W; Lee, Jun K

    2016-07-01

    Although there are general guidelines on endoscopic biopsy for diagnosing gastric neoplasms, they are predominantly based on outdated literature obtained with fiberscopes without analyses specific to tumor characteristics.This study aims to comprehensively characterize the contemporary endoscopic biopsy by determining the diagnostic yield across different lesion morphologies and histological stages, especially exploring how the number and site of biopsy may influence the overall yield.Biopsy samples from suspected gastric neoplasms were collected prospectively from May 2011 to August 2014 in a tertiary care medical center. A standardized methodology was used to obtain a total of 6 specimens from 2 defined sites per lesion. Rate of positive diagnosis based on the biopsy number and site was assessed for specific gastric lesion morphologies and histological stages.A total of 1080 biopsies from 180 pathologically diagnosed neoplastic lesions in 176 patients were obtained during the study. For depressed/ulcerative and polypoid lesions, the yield was already >99% by the fourth biopsy without further gain from additional biopsies. Lower overall yield was observed for infiltrative lesions (57.1% from 4 biopsies). The site of biopsy did not influence the diagnostic yield except for with infiltrative lesions in which biopsies from thickened mucosal folds were of higher yield than erosive regions.Obtaining 4 specimens may be sufficient for accurate diagnosis of a depressed/ulcerative or polypoid gastric lesion regardless of its histological stage. For infiltrative lesions, at least 5 to 6 biopsies per lesion with more representative sampling from thickened mucosal folds may be preferable.

  11. Electromyography (EMG) accuracy compared to muscle biopsy in childhood.

    PubMed

    Rabie, Malcolm; Jossiphov, Joseph; Nevo, Yoram

    2007-07-01

    Reports show wide variability of electromyography (EMG) in detecting pediatric neuromuscular disorders. The study's aim was to determine EMG/nerve conduction study accuracy compared to muscle biopsy and final clinical diagnosis, and sensitivity for myopathic motor unit potential detection in childhood. Of 550 EMG/nerve conduction studies performed by the same examiner from a pediatric neuromuscular service, 27 children (ages 6 days to 16 years [10 boys; M:F, 1:1.7]) with muscle biopsies and final clinical diagnoses were compared retrospectively. Final clinical diagnoses were congenital myopathies (5 of 27,18%), nonspecific myopathies (biopsy myopathic, final diagnosis uncertain; 6 of 27, 22%), congenital myasthenic syndrome (3 of 27, 11%), juvenile myasthenia gravis (1 of 27, 4%), arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (2 of 27, 7%), hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (1 of 27, 4%), bilateral peroneal neuropathies (1 of 27, 4%), and normal (8 of 27, 30%). There were no muscular dystrophy or spinal muscular atrophy patients. EMG/nerve conduction studies had a 74% agreement with final clinical diagnoses and 100% agreement in neurogenic, neuromuscular junction, and normal categories. Muscle biopsies concurred with final diagnoses in 87%, and 100% in myopathic and normal categories. In congenital myasthenic syndrome, muscle biopsies showed mild variation in fiber size in 2 of 3 children and were normal in 1 of 3. EMG sensitivity for detecting myopathic motor unit potentials in myopathies was 4 of 11 (36%), greater over 2 years of age (3 of 4, 75%), compared to infants less than 2 years (1 of 7, 14%), not statistically significant (P = .0879). EMGs false-negative for myopathy in infants < 2 years of age were frequently neurogenic (3 of 6, 50%). In congenital myopathies EMG detected myopathic motor unit potentials in 40%, with false-negative results neurogenic (20%) or normal (40%). Because our study has no additional tests for active myopathies, for example Duchenne

  12. Electromagnetic-Tracked Biopsy under Ultrasound Guidance: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Hakime, Antoine Deschamps, Frederic; Marques De Carvalho, Enio Garcia; Barah, Ali; Auperin, Anne; Baere, Thierry De

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy and safety of electromagnetic needle tracking for sonographically guided percutaneous liver biopsies. Methods: We performed 23 consecutive ultrasound-guided liver biopsies for liver nodules with an electromagnetic tracking of the needle. A sensor placed at the tip of a sterile stylet (18G) inserted in a coaxial guiding trocar (16G) used for biopsy was localized in real time relative to the ultrasound imaging plane, thanks to an electromagnetic transmitter and two sensors on the ultrasound probe. This allows for electronic display of the needle tip location and the future needle path overlaid on the real-time ultrasound image. Distance between needle tip position and its electronic display, number of needle punctures, number of needle pull backs for redirection, technical success (needle positioned in the target), diagnostic success (correct histopathology result), procedure time, and complication were evaluated according to lesion sizes, depth and location, operator experience, and 'in-plane' or 'out-of-plane' needle approach. Results: Electronic display was always within 2 mm from the real position of the needle tip. The technical success rate was 100%. A single needle puncture without repuncture was used in all patients. Pull backs were necessary in six patients (26%) to obtain correct needle placement. The overall diagnostic success rate was 91%. The overall true-positive, true-negative, false-negative, and failure rates of the biopsy were 100% (19/19) 100% (2/2), 0% (0/23), and 9% (2/23). The median total procedure time from the skin puncture to the needle in the target was 30 sec (from 5-60 s). Lesion depth and localizations, operator experience, in-plane or out-of-plane approach did not affect significantly the technical, diagnostic success, or procedure time. Even when the tumor size decreased, the procedure time did not increase. Conclusions: Electromagnetic-tracked biopsy is accurate to determine

  13. [Evaluation of testicular biopsy as an aspect of Chlamydia trachomatis infection (introductory report)].

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, Z; Swierczyński, W; Dziecielski, H; Semmler, G

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the study was demonstration of the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis in biopsy testicular specimens. The indication to testicular biopsy was azoospermia or cryptozoospermia. The studied group comprised 12 patients in whose semen C. trachomatis was found. For the identification of the organism culture in chick embryo was used. In 2 preparations C. trachomatis was demonstrated in testicular biopsy.

  14. 23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A COREBLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A CORE-BLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE BOXES WITH RESIGN IMPREGNATED SAND AND CREATED A CORE THAT THEN REQUIRED BAKING, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  15. The benefits of open lung biopsy in patients with previous non-diagnostic transbronchial lung biopsy. A guide to appropriate therapy.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, L H; DeMeester, T R; Kinealey, A; MacMahon, H; Churg, A; Golomb, H

    1980-05-01

    In a 17-month period, 20 immunosuppressed patients underwent transbronchial biopsy of the lung for diagnostic evaluation of a pulmonary infiltrate of unknown etiology. In 19 patients, the transbronchial biopsy was nondiagnostic. Thirteen of the 19 patients were critically ill and were referred for an open lung biopsy. Eleven (85 percent) of these 13 patients left the hospital after open lung biopsy and appropriate medical treatment. Two patients who were receiving mechanical ventilation at the time of open biopsy succumbed to the combination of their underlying disease and respiratory failure. There were no deaths directly attributed to the open lung biopsy. Of the six patients whose condition appeared stable and who did not undergo open lung biopsy, two died from unrecognized progress of their underlying malignant disease. The remainder recovered. We conclude that open lung biopsy is safe in and beneficial to the diagnosis and subsequent treatment of unknown pulmonary infiltrates in immunosuppressed patients who previously had a nondiagnostic fiberoptic transbronchial biopsy of the lung.

  16. Core-Cutoff Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gheen, Darrell

    2007-01-01

    A tool makes a cut perpendicular to the cylindrical axis of a core hole at a predetermined depth to free the core at that depth. The tool does not damage the surrounding material from which the core was cut, and it operates within the core-hole kerf. Coring usually begins with use of a hole saw or a hollow cylindrical abrasive cutting tool to make an annular hole that leaves the core (sometimes called the plug ) in place. In this approach to coring as practiced heretofore, the core is removed forcibly in a manner chosen to shear the core, preferably at or near the greatest depth of the core hole. Unfortunately, such forcible removal often damages both the core and the surrounding material (see Figure 1). In an alternative prior approach, especially applicable to toxic or fragile material, a core is formed and freed by means of milling operations that generate much material waste. In contrast, the present tool eliminates the damage associated with the hole-saw approach and reduces the extent of milling operations (and, hence, reduces the waste) associated with the milling approach. The present tool (see Figure 2) includes an inner sleeve and an outer sleeve and resembles the hollow cylindrical tool used to cut the core hole. The sleeves are thin enough that this tool fits within the kerf of the core hole. The inner sleeve is attached to a shaft that, in turn, can be attached to a drill motor or handle for turning the tool. This tool also includes a cutting wire attached to the distal ends of both sleeves. The cutting wire is long enough that with sufficient relative rotation of the inner and outer sleeves, the wire can cut all the way to the center of the core. The tool is inserted in the kerf until its distal end is seated at the full depth. The inner sleeve is then turned. During turning, frictional drag on the outer core pulls the cutting wire into contact with the core. The cutting force of the wire against the core increases with the tension in the wire and

  17. Core sample extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, James; Cobb, Billy; Hart, Steve; Leaptrotte, Jeff; Milhollin, James; Pernik, Mark

    1989-01-01

    The problem of retrieving and storing core samples from a hole drilled on the lunar surface is addressed. The total depth of the hole in question is 50 meters with a maximum diameter of 100 millimeters. The core sample itself has a diameter of 60 millimeters and will be two meters in length. It is therefore necessary to retrieve and store 25 core samples per hole. The design utilizes a control system that will stop the mechanism at a certain depth, a cam-linkage system that will fracture the core, and a storage system that will save and catalogue the cores to be extracted. The Rod Changer and Storage Design Group will provide the necessary tooling to get into the hole as well as to the core. The mechanical design for the cam-linkage system as well as the conceptual design of the storage device are described.

  18. Future of the Renal Biopsy: Time to Change the Conventional Modality Using Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Khosroshahi, Hamid Tayebi; Sarbaz, Yashar; Shakeri Bavil, Abolhassan

    2017-01-01

    At the present time, imaging guided renal biopsy is used to provide diagnoses in most types of primary and secondary renal diseases. It has been claimed that renal biopsy can provide a link between diagnosis of renal disease and its pathological conditions. However, sometimes there is a considerable mismatch between patient renal outcome and pathological findings in renal biopsy. This is the time to address some new diagnostic methods to resolve the insufficiency of conventional percutaneous guided renal biopsy. Nanotechnology is still in its infancy in renal imaging; however, it seems that it is the next step in renal biopsy, providing solutions to the limitations of conventional modalities. PMID:28316612

  19. The core paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  20. Core Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Joshua; Adrian, Betty

    2009-01-01

    The Core Research Center (CRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), located at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., currently houses rock core from more than 8,500 boreholes representing about 1.7 million feet of rock core from 35 States and cuttings from 54,000 boreholes representing 238 million feet of drilling in 28 States. Although most of the boreholes are located in the Rocky Mountain region, the geologic and geographic diversity of samples have helped the CRC become one of the largest and most heavily used public core repositories in the United States. Many of the boreholes represented in the collection were drilled for energy and mineral exploration, and many of the cores and cuttings were donated to the CRC by private companies in these industries. Some cores and cuttings were collected by the USGS along with other government agencies. Approximately one-half of the cores are slabbed and photographed. More than 18,000 thin sections and a large volume of analytical data from the cores and cuttings are also accessible. A growing collection of digital images of the cores are also becoming available on the CRC Web site Internet http://geology.cr.usgs.gov/crc/.

  1. Initial Experience with a Cone-beam Breast Computed Tomography-guided Biopsy System

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Posy J; Morgan, Renee C; Conover, David L; Arieno, Andrea L

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate our initial experience with a cone-beam breast computed tomography (BCT)-guided breast biopsy system for lesion retrieval in phantom studies for use with a cone-beam BCT imaging system. Materials and Methods: Under the Institutional Review Board approval, a phantom biopsy study was performed using a dedicated BCT-guided biopsy system. Fifteen biopsies were performed on each of the small, medium, and large anthropomorphic breast phantoms with both BCT and stereotactic guidance for comparison. Each set of the 45 phantoms contained masses and calcification clusters of varying sizes. Data included mass/calcium retrieval rate and dose and length of procedure time for phantom studies. Results: Phantom mass and calcium retrieval rate were 100% for BCT and stereotactic biopsy. BCT dose for small and medium breast phantoms was found to be equivalent to or less than the corresponding stereotactic approach. Stereotactic-guided biopsy dose was 34.2 and 62.5 mGy for small and medium breast phantoms, respectively. BCT-guided biopsy dose was 15.4 and 30.0 mGy for small and medium breast phantoms, respectively. Both computed tomography biopsy and stereotactic biopsy study time ranged from 10 to 20 min. Conclusion: Initial experience with a BCT-guided biopsy system has shown to be comparable to stereotactic biopsy in phantom studies with equivalent or decreased dose. PMID:28217404

  2. Increased promoter methylation in exfoliated breast epithelial cells in women with a previous breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Browne, Eva P; Punska, Elizabeth C; Lenington, Sarah; Otis, Christopher N; Anderton, Douglas L; Arcaro, Kathleen F

    2011-12-01

    Accurately identifying women at increased risk of developing breast cancer will provide greater opportunity for early detection and prevention. DNA promoter methylation is a promising biomarker for assessing breast cancer risk. Breast milk contains large numbers of exfoliated epithelial cells that are ideal for methylation analyses. Exfoliated epithelial cells were isolated from the milk obtained from each breast of 134 women with a history of a non-proliferative benign breast biopsy (Biopsy Group). Promoter methylation of three tumor suppressor genes, RASSF1, SFRP1 and GSTP1, was assessed by pyrosequencing of bisulfite-modified DNA. Methylation scores from the milk of the 134 women in the Biopsy Group were compared to scores from 102 women for whom a breast biopsy was not a recruitment requirement (Reference Group). Mean methylation scores for RASSF1 and GSTP1 were significantly higher in the Biopsy than in the Reference Group. For all three genes the percentage of outlier scores was greater in the Biopsy than in the Reference Group but reached statistical significance only for GSTP1. A comparison between the biopsied and non-biopsied breasts of the Biopsy Group revealed higher mean methylation and a greater number of outlier scores in the biopsied breast for both SFRP1 and RASSF1, but not for GSTP1. This is the first evidence of CpG island methylation in tumor suppressor genes of women who may be at increased risk of developing breast cancer based on having had a prior breast biopsy.

  3. A 10-year review of outpatient skin biopsy results and skin cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, Sebastian S; Vos, Paul; Green, Harris; Defazio, Jennifer; Davis, Natalie; Fiz, Lindsey; Phillips, Charles

    2016-01-15

    The results of skin biopsies over a 10 year period were reviewed from the outpatient dermatology clinic at the Brody School of Medicine in Greenville, North Carolina. This research was conducted because there are very few studies that characterize this information over a long-term horizon. The biopsy rate per patient encounter, the clinical reason for the biopsy, the biopsy outcomes, the distribution of cutaneous malignancies per encounter, and the distribution of the subtypes of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma were analyzed. Biopsy logs from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2010 were reviewed. Our investigation found that 20% of patient encounters resulted in a biopsy. Of these biopsies, 87.9% were performed to rule out malignancy and 12.1% were completed on patients suspected of having inflammatory skin conditions. The basal cell carcinomas diagnosed in Greenville, NC have more aggressive histologic subtypes compared to other studies, whereas the squamous cell carcinomas and melanomas were less aggressive.

  4. Minimalist video-assisted thoracic surgery biopsy of mediastinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tacconi, Federico; Rogliani, Paola; Cristino, Benedetto; Gilardi, Francesco; Palombi, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Mediastinal tumors often require surgical biopsy to achieve a precise and rapid diagnosis. However, subjects with mediastinal tumors may be unfit for general anesthesia, particularly when compression of major vessels or airways does occur. We tested the applicability in this setting of a minimalist (M) uniportal, video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) strategy carried out under locoregional anesthesia in awake patients (MVATS). Methods We analyzed in a comparative fashion including propensity score matching, data from a prospectively collected database of patients who were offered surgical biopsy for mediastinal tumors through either MVATS or standard VATS. Tested outcome measures included feasibility, diagnostic yield, and morbidity. Results A total of 24 procedures were performed through MVATS. Diagnostic yield was 100%. Median hospital stay and time interval to oncologic treatment were 2 days (IQR, 2–3 days) and 7 days (IQR, 5.5–11.5 days), respectively. At overall comparison (MVATS, N=24 vs. VATS, N=23), there was a significant difference in both frequency and severity of postoperative complication as measured by Clavien-Dindo classification (P<0.006). In a propensity score matched comparison (8 patients per group), grade 3 or 4 complications requiring aggressive management were found only in the general anesthesia group. Global time spent in the operating room was shorter in the MVATS group (P=0.05). Time interval to oncological treatment was the same between groups. Other differences were also found in SIRS score (P=0.05) and PaO2/FiO2 (P=0.04) thus suggesting better adaption to perioperative stress. Conclusions MVATS biopsy appears to be a reliable tool to optimize diagnostic assessment in patients with mediastinal tumors. It can offer high diagnostic accuracy due to large tissue samples, while reducing morbidity rate compared to the same operation under general anesthesia. More robust evaluation is needed to define the appropriateness of

  5. Diagnosis of breast cancer biopsies using quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Hassaan; Kandel, Mikhail E.; Han, Kevin; Luo, Zelun; Macias, Virgilia; Tangella, Krishnarao; Balla, Andre; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    The standard practice in the histopathology of breast cancers is to examine a hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue biopsy under a microscope. The pathologist looks at certain morphological features, visible under the stain, to diagnose whether a tumor is benign or malignant. This determination is made based on qualitative inspection making it subject to investigator bias. Furthermore, since this method requires a microscopic examination by the pathologist it suffers from low throughput. A quantitative, label-free and high throughput method for detection of these morphological features from images of tissue biopsies is, hence, highly desirable as it would assist the pathologist in making a quicker and more accurate diagnosis of cancers. We present here preliminary results showing the potential of using quantitative phase imaging for breast cancer screening and help with differential diagnosis. We generated optical path length maps of unstained breast tissue biopsies using Spatial Light Interference Microscopy (SLIM). As a first step towards diagnosis based on quantitative phase imaging, we carried out a qualitative evaluation of the imaging resolution and contrast of our label-free phase images. These images were shown to two pathologists who marked the tumors present in tissue as either benign or malignant. This diagnosis was then compared against the diagnosis of the two pathologists on H&E stained tissue images and the number of agreements were counted. In our experiment, the agreement between SLIM and H&E based diagnosis was measured to be 88%. Our preliminary results demonstrate the potential and promise of SLIM for a push in the future towards quantitative, label-free and high throughput diagnosis.

  6. Novel pathogenic mutations and skin biopsy analysis in Knobloch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Oscar; Kague, Erika; Bagatini, Kelly; Tu, Hongmin; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Carvalhaes, Lorenza; Gava, Elisandra; de Oliveira, Gisele; Godoi, Paulo; Oliva, Glaucius; Kitten, Gregory; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Passos-Bueno, Maria-Rita

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To facilitate future diagnosis of Knobloch syndrome (KS) and better understand its etiology, we sought to identify not yet described COL18A1 mutations in KS patients. In addition, we tested whether mutations in this gene lead to absence of the COL18A1 gene product and attempted to better characterize the functional effect of a previously reported missense mutation. Methods Direct sequencing of COL18A1 exons was performed in KS patients from four unrelated pedigrees. We used immunofluorescent histochemistry in skin biopsies to evaluate the presence of type XVIII collagen in four KS patients carrying two already described mutations: c.3277C>T, a nonsense mutation, and c.3601G>A, a missense mutation. Furthermore, we determined the binding properties of the mutated endostatin domain p.A1381T (c.3601G>A) to extracellular matrix proteins using ELISA and surface plasmon resonance assays. Results We identified four novel mutations in COL18A1, including a large deletion involving exon 41. Skin biopsies from KS patients revealed lack of type XVIII collagen in epithelial basement membranes and blood vessels. We also found a reduced affinity of p.A1381T endostatin to some extracellular matrix components. Conclusions COL18A1 mutations involved in Knobloch syndrome have a distribution bias toward the coding exons of the C-terminal end. Large deletions must also be considered when point mutations are not identified in patients with characteristic KS phenotype. We report, for the first time, lack of type XVIII collagen in KS patients by immunofluorescent histochemistry in skin biopsy samples. As a final point, we suggest the employment of this technique as a preliminary and complementary test for diagnosis of KS in cases when mutation screening either does not detect mutations or reveals mutations of uncertain effect, such as the p.A1381T change. PMID:19390655

  7. Efficacy of needle biopsy in postradiation thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, I.B.; Palmer, J.A.; Bain, J.; Strawbridge, H.; Walfish, P.G.

    1983-12-01

    Retrospective review was carried out of 124 patients with nodular disease of the thyroid gland and a history of radiation exposure who had undergone needle aspiration biopsy. Latency period from time of radiation varied from 2 to 50 years; but in 92 patients it exceeded 2 decades. Our patient group included those with occupational exposure and a past history of radiation for cancer. Incidence of cancer in the entire group was 49% but, for solitary lesions, this was increased to 56%, while only a 30% incidence of cancer was found in cases of multinodular goiters. Accuracy of needle aspiration biopsy overall was 74%: for the group with cancer--90%, for the group with adenomas--65%, and for the group with ''benign'' tumors--83%. Further assessment of needle technique indicated a sensitivity of 70%, specificity of 90%, positive predictive value of 90%, and negative predictive value of 83% to 65%. The accuracy could be increased to 84% if all adenomas were considered as possible malignancies. Eighteen percent of our patients had second tumors in the head and neck or breast area. Near-total thyroidectomy was considered to be the preferred procedure without accidental nerve injury and was done in one case of hypoparathyroidism after excision of an extensive tracheal invasive cancer. No evidence of death, recurrence, or metastasis as a result of thyroid cancer has been noted. While needle biopsy is indispensable to intelligent management, the history of radiation to the head and neck area must be preeminent in the selection of patients for surgical treatment. Conservative management appears to be reasonable in those patients with ''benign'' cytology, a less than 1 cm nodule, multinodularity, a functioning thyroid scan result, but persistence in the face of a lack of response to conservative management does not appear to be warranted.

  8. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy: a historical overview.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Marilin

    2008-11-01

    Fine needle aspiration biopsy is a safe, inexpensive and accurate technique for the diagnosis of benign and malignant conditions. Its increase in popularity in the present days has made it a technique used on daily basis in the majority of medical centers in United States and around the world. However, the situation was not always like this. In its beginnings the procedure suffered from all kinds of criticism and attacks. The purpose of this manuscript is to provide an overview about the development of this technique from its birth to our days.

  9. Gene expression changes in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy skin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Puttini, Stefania; Panaite, Petrica-Adrian; Mermod, Nicolas; Renaud, Susanne; Steck, Andreas J; Kuntzer, Thierry

    2014-05-15

    Chronic-inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune-mediated disease with no known biomarkers for diagnosing the disease or assessing its prognosis. We performed transcriptional profiling microarray analysis on skin punch biopsies from 20 CIDP patients and 17 healthy controls to identify disease-associated gene expression changes. We demonstrate changes in expression of genes involved in immune and chemokine regulation, growth and repair. We also found a combination of two upregulated genes that can be proposed as a novel biomarker of the disorder.

  10. Advanced characterization of microscopic kidney biopsies utilizing image analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Goudas, Theodosios; Doukas, Charalampos; Chatziioannou, Aristotle; Maglogiannis, Ilias

    2012-01-01

    Correct annotation and identification of salient regions in Kidney biopsy images can provide an estimation of pathogenesis in obstructive nephropathy. This paper presents a tool for the automatic or manual segmentation of such regions along with methodology for their characterization in terms of the exhibited pathology. The proposed implementation is based on custom code written in Java and the utilization of open source tools (i.e. RapidMiner, ImageJ). The corresponding implementation details along with the initial evaluation of the proposed integrated system are also presented in the paper.

  11. Mycobacterium abscessus complex bacteremia due to prostatitis after prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chung-Hua; Lin, Jesun; Lin, Jen-Shiou; Chen, Yu-Min

    2016-10-01

    We present the case of a 49-year-old man, who developed Mycobacterium abscessus complex (M. abscessus complex) bacteremia and prostatitis after prostate biopsy. The patient was successfully treated with amikacin with imipenem-cilastatin with clarithromycin. Infections caused by M. abscessus complex have been increasingly described as a complication associated with many invasive procedures. Invasive procedures might have contributed to the occurrence of the M. abscessus complex. Although M. abscessus complex infection is difficult to diagnose and treat, we should pay more attention to this kind of infection, and the correct treatment strategy will be achieved by physicians.

  12. Renal diagnosis without renal biopsy. Nephritis and sensorineural deafness.

    PubMed

    Richardson, D; Shires, M; Davison, A M

    2001-06-01

    Two examples of hereditary nephropathy within the context of clinical syndromes are described. Emphasis is put on the ability to make a renal diagnosis without renal biopsy and the benefits of screening relatives once a diagnosis is achieved. A variant of Alport's syndrome with associated macrothrombocytic thrombocytopenia, known as Epstein's syndrome, is reported. In addition siblings with Alström's syndrome characterized by pigmentary retinal degeneration (causing blindness in early childhood), progressive sensorineural hearing loss, and progressive renal failure are reported. Both cases had previously presented for non-renal pathology in advance of the onset of symptomatic renal failure and may have benefited from appropriate screening.

  13. Prognostic Value of Allelic Imbalance in Prostate Biopsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    between outcome and telomere DNA content in prostate cancer . J. Journal of Urology , 162: 1788-92, 1999. C.A. Fordyce, C.M. Heaphy, N.E. Joste, A.Y...Smith, W.C. Hunt and J.K. Griffith Association Between Cancer -free Survival and Telomere DNA Content in Prostate Tumors. J. Urology , 173: 610-614, 2005. ...obtained at prostate biopsy can serve as a sensitive and independent marker for staging and predicting disease recurrence in prostate cancer . Scope: The

  14. Can Psychiatric Rehabilitation Be Core to CORE?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olney, Marjorie F.; Gill, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, we seek to determine whether psychiatric rehabilitation principles and practices have been more fully incorporated into the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards, the extent to which they are covered in four rehabilitation counseling "foundations" textbooks, and how they are reflected in the…

  15. Making an Ice Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  16. Core Concepts of Kinesiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Jackie L.

    1995-01-01

    Core concepts of kinesiology are the basis of communication about movement that facilitate progression of skill levels. The article defines and exemplifies each of 10 core concepts: range of motion, speed of motion, number of segments, nature of segments, balance, coordination, compactness, extension at release/contact, path of projection, and…

  17. CORE - Performance Feedback System

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-02

    CORE is an architecture to bridge the gaps between disparate data integration and delivery of disparate information visualization. The CORE Technology Program includes a suite of tools and user-centered staff that can facilitate rapid delivery of a deployable integrated information to users.

  18. Iowa Core Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    One central component of a great school system is a clear set of expectations, or standards, that educators help all students reach. In Iowa, that effort is known as the Iowa Core. The Iowa Core represents the statewide academic standards, which describe what students should know and be able to do in math, science, English language arts, and…

  19. Ice Core Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  20. Modular core holder

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.; Cole, C.W.; Hamid, S.; Lucas, J.K.

    1991-03-05

    This patent describes a modular core holder. It comprises: a sleeve, forming an internal cavity for receiving a core. The sleeve including segments; support means, overlying the sleeve, for supporting the sleeve; and access means, positioned between at least two of the segments of the sleeve, for allowing measurement of conditions within the internal cavity.

  1. More on the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Monnica

    2013-01-01

    From a higher education perspective, new "Common Core" standards could improve student college-readiness levels, reduce institutional remediation rates, and close education gaps in and between states. As a national initiative to create common educational standards for students across multiple states, the Common Core State Standards…

  2. Mercury's core evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deproost, Marie-Hélène; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing data of Mercury's surface by MESSENGER indicate that Mercury formed under reducing conditions. As a consequence, silicon is likely the main light element in the core together with a possible small fraction of sulfur. Compared to sulfur, which does almost not partition into solid iron at Mercury's core conditions and strongly decreases the melting temperature, silicon partitions almost equally well between solid and liquid iron and is not very effective at reducing the melting temperature of iron. Silicon as the major light element constituent instead of sulfur therefore implies a significantly higher core liquidus temperature and a decrease in the vigor of compositional convection generated by the release of light elements upon inner core formation.Due to the immiscibility in liquid Fe-Si-S at low pressure (below 15 GPa), the core might also not be homogeneous and consist of an inner S-poor Fe-Si core below a thinner Si-poor Fe-S layer. Here, we study the consequences of a silicon-rich core and the effect of the blanketing Fe-S layer on the thermal evolution of Mercury's core and on the generation of a magnetic field.

  3. NFE Core Bibliographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Inst. for International Studies in Education.

    This collection of core bibliographies, which expands on an initial bibliography published in 1979 of the core resources housed in the Non-Formal Education Information Center at Michigan State University, comprises a basic stock of materials on nonformal education and women in development that have been contributed by development planners,…

  4. Importance of liver biopsy findings in immunosuppression management: biopsy monitoring and working criteria for patients with operational tolerance.

    PubMed

    2012-10-01

    Obstacles to morbidity-free long-term survival after liver transplantation (LT) include complications of immunosuppression (IS), recurrence of the original disease and malignancies, and unexplained chronic hepatitis and graft fibrosis. Many programs attempt to minimize chronic exposure to IS by reducing dosages and stopping steroids. A few programs have successfully weaned a highly select group of recipients from all IS without apparent adverse consequences, but long-term follow-up is limited. Patients subjected to adjustments in IS are usually followed by serial liver chemistry tests, which are relatively insensitive methods for detecting allograft damage. Protocol biopsy has largely been abandoned for hepatitis C virus-negative recipients, at least in part because of the inability to integrate routine histopathological findings into a rational clinical management algorithm. Recognizing a need to more precisely categorize and determine the clinical significance of findings in long-term biopsy samples, the Banff Working Group on Liver Allograft Pathology has reviewed the literature, pooled the experience of its members, and proposed working definitions for biopsy changes that (1) are conducive to lowering IS and are compatible with operational tolerance (OT) and (2) raise concern for closer follow-up and perhaps increased IS during or after IS weaning. The establishment of guidelines should help us to standardize analyses of the effects of various treatments and/or weaning protocols and more rigorously categorize patients who are assumed to show OT. Long-term follow-up using standardized criteria will help us to determine the consequences of lowering IS and to define and determine the incidence and robustness of OT in liver allografts.

  5. Internal core tightener

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, Glen V.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1976-06-22

    An internal core tightener which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a "fixed" outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change.

  6. Lunar Core and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  7. Postobstructive pulmonary edema after biopsy of a nasopharyngeal mass

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Keyur Kamlesh; Ahmad, Sabina Qureshi; Shah, Vikas; Lee, Haesoon

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of 17 year-old male with a nasopharyngeal rhabdomyosarcoma who developed postobstructive pulmonary edema (POPE) after removing the endotracheal tube following biopsy. He developed muffled voice, rhinorrhea, dysphagia, odynophagia, and difficulty breathing through nose and weight loss of 20 pounds in the preceding 2 months. A nasopharyngoscopy revealed a fleshy nasopharyngeal mass compressing the soft and hard palate. Head and neck MRI revealed a large mass in the nasopharynx extending into the bilateral choana and oropharynx. Biopsy of the mass was taken under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Immediately after extubation he developed oxygen desaturation, which did not improve with bag mask ventilation with 100% of oxygen, but improved after a dose of succinylcholine. He was re-intubated and pink, frothy fluid was suctioned from the endotracheal tube. Chest radiograph (CXR) was suggestive of an acute pulmonary edema. He improved with mechanical ventilation and intravenous furosemide. His pulmonary edema resolved over the next 24 h. POPE is a rare but serious complication associated with upper airway obstruction. The pathophysiology of POPE involves hemodynamic changes occurring in the lung and the heart during forceful inspiration against a closed airway due to an acute or chronic airway obstruction. This case illustrates the importance of considering the development of POPE with general anesthesia, laryngospasm and removal of endotracheal tube to make prompt diagnosis and to initiate appropriate management. PMID:26744691

  8. Biopsy proven acute interstitial nephritis after treatment with moxifloxacin

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is an important cause of reversible acute kidney injury. At least 70% of AIN is caused by various drugs, mainly penicillines and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Quinolones are only rarely known to cause AIN and so far cases have been mainly described with older fluoroquinolones. Case Presentation Here we describe a case of biopsy proven interstitial nephritis after moxifloxacin treatment. The patient presented with fever, rigors and dialysis dependent acute kidney injury, just a few days after treatment of a respiratory tract infection with moxifloxacin. The renal biopsy revealed dense infiltrates mainly composed of eosinophils and severe interstitial edema. A course of oral prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day) was commenced and rapidly tapered to zero within three weeks. The renal function improved, and the patient was discharged with a creatinine of 107 μmol/l. Conclusion This case illustrates that pharmacovigilance is important to early detect rare side effects, such as AIN, even in drugs with a favourable risk/benefit ratio such as moxifloxacin. PMID:20731847

  9. Preimplantation diagnosis or chorionic villus biopsy? Women's attitudes and preferences.

    PubMed

    Miedzybrodzka, Z; Templeton, A; Dean, J; Haites, N; Mollison, J; Smith, N

    1993-12-01

    The objective of this work was to assess women's attitudes and preferences to two methods of prenatal diagnosis for genetic disease: embryo and chorionic villus biopsy (CVS). The design involved a structured postal questionnaire sent to women in the Grampian region with different reproductive experiences. The population sample included 46 women who had had genetic counselling because of a family history of a single gene disorder, 18 women who had had CVS for a single gene disorder, 158 women who had had CVS for other reasons, 200 women who had recently delivered a normal baby and 50 women who had experience of in-vitro fertilization (IVF). The main outcome measures were attitudes to family limitation, prenatal diagnosis, termination for fetal abnormality, embryo biopsy and CVS. Of the women surveyed, 38% preferred embryo diagnosis, whereas 42% favoured CVS and termination. Women with previous experience of CVS preferred this option whereas those with experience of IVF as infertility treatment were more likely to favour embryo diagnosis, as were women who had had genetic counselling for a single gene disorder. It was concluded that a substantial number of women find embryo diagnosis more acceptable than CVS when the pregnancy is at high risk. This is especially true amongst those with experience of IVF or who are at risk themselves. A demand for embryo diagnosis has been demonstrated.

  10. Laser-induced differential fluorescence for cancer diagnosis without biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Panjehpour, M.; Overholt, B.F.; Buckley III, P.

    1997-01-01

    An optical diagnostic procedure based on laser-induced fluorescence was developed for direct {ital in vivo} cancer diagnosis without requiring biopsy. The methodology was applied in a clinical study involving over 100 patients in order to differentiate normal tissue from malignant tumors of the esophagus. Endogenous fluorescence of normal and malignant tissues was measured directly with the use of a fiber-optic probe inserted through an endoscope. The measurements were performed {ital in vivo} during routine endoscopy. Detection of the fluorescence signal from the tissue was performed with the use of laser excitation. This report describes the differential normalized fluorescence (DNF) procedure using the amplified spectral differences between the normalized fluorescence of malignant tissue and normal mucosa. The results of this DNF approach were compared with histopathology results of the biopsy samples and indicated excellent agreement in the classification of normal tissue and malignant tumors for the samples investigated. Data related to various grades of Barrett{close_quote}s esophagus are discussed. The DNF procedure could lead to the development of a rapid and cost-effective technique for cancer diagnosis. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  11. Liquid Biopsy of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Circulating Tumor-Derived Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chun-Hui; Qu, Zhen; Guan, Qing; Chen, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide due to latent liver disease, late diagnosis, and nonresponse to systemic treatments. Till now, surgical and/or biopsy specimens are still generally used as a gold standard by the clinicians for clinical decision-making. However, apart from their invasive characteristics, tumor biopsy only mirrors a single spot of the tumor, failing to reflect current cancer dynamics and progression. Therefore, it is imperative to develop new diagnostic strategies with significant effectiveness and reliability to monitor high-risk populations and detect HCC at an early stage. In the past decade, the potent utilities of “liquid biopsy” have attracted intense concern and were developed to evaluate cancer progression in several clinical trials. “Liquid biopsies” represent a series of noninvasive tests that detect cancer byproducts easily accessible in peripheral blood, mainly including circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and cell-free nucleic acids (cfNAs) that are shed into the blood from the tumor sites. In this review, we focus on the recent developments in the field of “liquid biopsy” as well as the diagnostic and prognostic significance of CTCs and cfNAs in HCC patients. PMID:27403030

  12. Muscle Pathology Grade for Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Statland, Jeffrey M; Shah, Bharati; Henderson, Don; van der Maarel, Silvere; Tapscott, Stephen J; Tawil, Rabi

    2015-01-01

    Background As we move towards planning for clinical trials in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD), a better understanding of the clinical relationship with morphological changes in FSHD muscle biopsies will be important for stratifying patients and understanding post-therapeutic changes in muscle. Methods We performed a prospective cross-sectional study of quadriceps muscle biopsies in 74 genetically confirmed FSHD participants (64 FSHD1, 10 FSHD2). We compared a 12-point muscle pathology grade to genetic mutation, disease severity score, and quantitative myometry. Results Pathology grade had moderate correlations with genetic mutation (rho=−0.45, P<0.001), clinical severity score (rho=0.53, P<0.001), disease duration (rho=0.31, P=0.03), and quantitative myometry (rho=−0.47, P<0.001). We found no difference in the frequency of inflammation between FSHD types 1 and 2. Conclusions The pathology grade of quadriceps muscle may be a useful marker of disease activity in FSHD, and it may have a role in stratification for future clinical trials. PMID:25704033

  13. Liquid biopsy of atherosclerosis using protoporphyrin IX as a biomarker.

    PubMed

    Nascimento da Silva, Monica; Sicchieri, Letícia Bonfante; de Oliveira Silva, Flávia Rodrigues; Andrade, Maira Franco; Courrol, Lilia Coronato

    2014-03-21

    Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), a derivative of hematoporphyrin, can accumulate in rapidly growing tissues, including tumors and atherosclerotic plaques. The objective of this study is to employ PPIX fluorescence to detect the changes in blood caused by the formation of atheromatous plaques in arteries; this measurement can function as a liquid biopsy. For this purpose twenty four rabbits were randomly divided into groups: control group (CG)--fed with a normal diet, and an experimental group (EG)--fed with a hypercholesterolemic diet (1% cholesterol). Blood samples were collected before (0 time) and after 22, 43, 64 days to measure biochemical factors. The aortas were removed after 22, 43 and 64 days to assess the atherosclerotic plaques. PPIX was extracted from the blood and fluorescence was measured in the 550-750 nm range from samples that were excited at 405 nm. Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) was administered intravenously to increase the PPIX fluorescence intensity in the arteries and consequently in the liquid biopsy of the atherosclerotic plaques. The results have shown that the PPIX fluorescence increased as the atheromatous plaques grew. The aorta fluorescence and the PPIX fluorescence increased in the animals in the experimental group that received ALA. PPIX that accumulates in atheromatous plaques transfers to the blood and can be analyzed by extracting porphyrin from total blood. Therefore, this method can aid in the early diagnosis of atherosclerosis with high sensitivity.

  14. Pancreatic cancer: Are "liquid biopsies" ready for prime-time?

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Alexandra R; Valle, Juan W; McNamara, Mairead G

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease that carries a poor prognosis. Accurate tissue diagnosis is required. Tumours contain a high content of stromal tissue and therefore biopsies may be inconclusive. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) have been investigated as a potential “liquid biopsy” in several malignancies and have proven to be of prognostic value in breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. They have been detected in patients with localised and metastatic pancreatic cancer with sensitivities ranging from 38%-100% using a variety of platforms. Circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) has also been detected in pancreas cancer with a sensitivity ranging from 26%-100% in studies across different platforms and using different genetic markers. However, there is no clear consensus on which platform is the most effective for detection, nor which genetic markers are the most useful to use. Potential roles of liquid biopsies include diagnosis, screening, guiding therapies and prognosis. The presence of CTCs or ctDNA has been shown to be of prognostic value both at diagnosis and after treatment in patients with pancreatic cancer. However, more prospective studies are required before this promising technology is ready for adoption into routine clinical practice. PMID:27621566

  15. Bronchoscopic procedures and lung biopsies in pediatric lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jackson Y; Westall, Glen P; Snell, Gregory I

    2015-12-01

    Bronchoscopy remains a pivotal diagnostic and therapeutic intervention in pediatric patients undergoing lung transplantation (LTx). Whether performed as part of a surveillance protocol or if clinically indicated, fibre-optic bronchoscopy allows direct visualization of the transplanted allograft, and in particular, an assessment of the patency of the bronchial anastomosis (or tracheal anastomosis following heart-lung transplantation). Additionally, bronchoscopy facilitates differentiation of infective processes from rejection episodes through collection and subsequent assessment of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and transbronchial biopsy (TBBx) samples. Indeed, the diagnostic criteria for the grading of acute cellular rejection is dependent upon the histopathological assessment of biopsy samples collected at the time of bronchoscopy. Typically, performed in an out-patient setting, bronchoscopy is generally a safe procedure, although complications related to hemorrhage and pneumothorax are occasionally seen. Airway complications, including stenosis, malacia, and dehiscence are diagnosed at bronchoscopy, and subsequent management including balloon dilatation, laser therapy and stent insertion can also be performed bronchoscopically. Finally, bronchoscopy has been and continues to be an important research tool allowing a better understanding of the immuno-biology of the lung allograft through the collection and analysis of collected BAL and TBBx samples. Whilst new investigational tools continue to evolve, the simple visualization and collection of samples within the lung allograft by bronchoscopy remains the gold standard in the evaluation of the lung allograft. This review describes the use and experience of bronchoscopy following lung transplantation in the pediatric setting.

  16. MRI-Safe Robot for Endorectal Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Sebrecht, Peter; Petrisor, Doru; Coleman, Jonathan; Solomon, Stephen B.; Hricak, Hedvig

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the development of an MRI-Safe robot for direct (interventional) MRI-guided endorectal prostate biopsy. The robot is constructed of nonmagnetic and electrically nonconductive materials, and is electricity free, using pneumatic actuation and optical sensors. Targeting biopsy lesions of MRI abnormality presents substantial clinical potential for the management of prostate cancer. The paper describes MRI-Safe requirements, presents the kinematic architecture, design and construction of the robot, and a comprehensive set of preclinical tests for MRI compatibility and needle targeting accuracy. The robot has a compact and simple 3 degree-of-freedom (DoF) structure, two for orienting a needle-guide and one to preset the depth of needle insertion. The actual insertion is performed manually through the guide and up to the preset depth. To reduce the complexity and size of the robot next to the patient, the depth setting DoF is remote. Experimental results show that the robot is safe to use in any MRI environment (MRI-Safe). Comprehensive MRI tests show that the presence and motion of the robot in the MRI scanner cause virtually no image deterioration or signal to noise ratio (SNR) change. Robot’s accuracy in bench test, CT-guided in-vitro, MRI-guided in-vitro and animal tests are 0.37mm, 1.10mm, 2.09mm, and 2.58mm respectively. These values are acceptable for clinical use. PMID:25378897

  17. Diagnosis of occult hepatitis C without the need for a liver biopsy.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Inmaculada; Bartolomé, Javier; Quiroga, Juan Antonio; Barril, Guillermina; Carreño, Vicente

    2010-09-01

    The diagnosis of occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is based on the presence of HCV-RNA in the liver. This study aimed to evaluate the use of combining non-invasive assays to diagnose occult HCV. A total of 122 patients with occult HCV (HCV-RNA in the liver without detectable anti-HCV and serum HCV-RNA) and 45 patients with cryptogenic chronic hepatitis (without HCV-RNA in the liver and negative for anti-HCV and serum HCV-RNA) were included. HCV-RNA was tested in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and in 2 ml of ultracentrifuged serum. Anti-core HCV was examined by a non-commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All controls were negative for the three HCV markers studied. Among patients with occult HCV, 36% were anti-core HCV positive, 57% had serum HCV-RNA after ultracentrifugation, and 61% had HCV-RNA in PBMCs. Combining the results of the assays, 91% of the patients were positive for at least one marker. Intrahepatic HCV-RNA load was significantly higher in patients who were positive simultaneously for the three HCV markers than in patients who were negative for all markers (P = 0.006) and than in those with one or two HCV markers (P = 0.039). Replication of HCV in liver was detected more frequently in patients with three (93%, P = 0.002), two (82%, P = 0.001), and one HCV marker (73%, P = 0.011) than in those without markers (27%). In conclusion, testing for all these markers allows diagnosis of occult HCV without the need for a liver biopsy and these assays may help to elucidate the clinical significance of occult HCV infection.

  18. Percutaneous needle biopsy for indeterminate renal masses: a national survey of UK consultant urologists

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Azhar A; Shergill, Iqbal S; Quereshi, Sheila; Arya, Manit; Vandal, Mohammed T; Gujral, Sandeep S

    2007-01-01

    Background The use of percutaneous needle biopsy in the evaluation of indeterminate renal masses is controversial and its role in management remains largely unclear. We set to establish current practice on this issue in UK urology departments. Methods We conducted a national questionnaire survey of all consultant urologists in the UK, to establish current practice and attitudes towards percutaneous needle biopsy in the management of indeterminate renal masses. Results 139 (43%) consultant urologists never use biopsy, whereas 111 (34%) always employ it for the diagnosis of indeterminate renal masses. 75 (23%) urologists use biopsy only for a selected patient group. Mass in a solitary kidney, bilateral renal masses and a past history of non-renal cancer were the main indications for use of percutaneous biopsy. The risk of false negative results and biopsy not changing the eventual management of their patients were the commonest reasons not to perform biopsy. Conclusion There is a wide and varied practice amongst UK Consultant Urologists in the use of percutaneous biopsy as part of the management of indeterminate renal masses. The majority of urologists believe biopsy confers no benefit. However there is a need to clarify this issue in the wake of recent published evidence as biopsy results may provide critical information for patients with renal masses in a significant majority. It not only differentiates benign from malignant tissue but can also help in deciding the management option for patients undergoing minimally invasive treatments. PMID:17610739

  19. 34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES CORES THAT ARE NOT MADE ON HEATED OR COLD BOX CORE MACHINES, TO SET BINDING AGENTS MIXED WITH THE SAND CREATING CORES HARD ENOUGH TO WITHSTAND THE FLOW OF MOLTEN IRON INSIDE A MOLD. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  20. Analysis of airway epithelial regeneration and repair following endobronchial brush biopsy in sheep.

    PubMed

    Yahaya, B; Baker, A; Tennant, P; Smith, S H; Shaw, D J; McLachlan, G; Collie, D D S

    2011-11-01

    Understanding the fundamental processes involved in repairing the airway wall following injury is fundamental to understanding the way in which these processes are perturbed during disease pathology. Indeed complex diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have at their core evidence of airway wall remodeling processes that play a crucial functional role in these diseases. The authors sought to understand the dynamic cellular events that occur during bronchial airway epithelial repair in sheep. The injury was induced by endobronchial brush biopsy (BBr), a process that causes epithelial débridement and induces a consequential repair process. In addition, the current experimental protocol allowed for the time-dependent changes in airway wall morphology to be studied both within and between animals. The initial débridement was followed by evidence of dedifferentiation in the intact epithelium at the wound margins, followed by proliferation of cells both within the epithelium and in the deeper wall structures, notably in association with the submucosal glands and smooth muscle bundles. Seven days after injury, although the airway wall was thickened at the site of damage, the epithelial layer was intact, with evidence of redifferentiation. These studies, in demonstrating broad agreement with previous studies in small animals, indicate the wider relevance of this system as a comparative model and should provide a solid basis upon which to further characterize the critical cellular and molecular interactions that underlie both effective restitution and pathological repair.