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Sample records for 14-mev neutrons produced

  1. LOW VOLTAGE 14 Mev NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Little, R.N. Jr.; Graves, E.R.

    1959-09-29

    An apparatus yielding high-energy neutrons at the rate of 10/sup 8/ or more per second by the D,T or D,D reactions is described. The deuterium gas filling is ionized by electrons emitted from a filament, and the resulting ions are focused into a beam and accelerated against a fixed target. The apparatus is built in accordance with the relationship V/sub s/ = A--B log pd, where V/sub s/ is the sparking voltage, p the gas pressure, and d the gap length between the high voltage electrodes. Typical parameters to obtain the high neutron yields are 55 to 80 kv, 0.5 to 7.0 ma beam current, 5 to 12 microns D/sub 2/, and a gap length of 1 centimeter.

  2. Material Classification by Analysis of Prompt Photon Spectra Induced by 14-Mev Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzilov, Alexander; Novikov, Ivan

    Neutron based technologies are widely used in the field of bulk material analysis. These methods employ characteristic prompt gamma rays induced by a neutron probe for classification of the interrogated object using the elemental parameters extracted from the spectral data. Automatic data analysis and material classification algorithms are required for applications where access to nuclear spectroscopy expertise is limited and/or the autonomous robotic operation is necessary. Data obtained with neutron based systems differ from elemental composition evaluations based on chemical formulae due to statistical nature of nuclear reactions, presence of shielding and cladding, and other environmental conditions. Experimental data that are produced by the spectral decomposition can be expressed graphically as sets of overlapping classes in a multidimensional space of measured elemental intensities. To discriminate between classes of various materials, decision-tree and pattern recognition algorithms were studied. Results of application of these methods to data sets obtained for a pulsed 14-MeV neutron generator based active interrogation system are discussed.

  3. FEASIBILITY OF MEASURING IRON IN VIVO USING FAST 14 MEV NEUTRONS.

    SciTech Connect

    WIELOPOLSKI, L.

    2005-05-01

    In this short report, I reassess the feasibility of measuring iron in vivo in the liver and heart of thalassemia patients undergoing chelation therapy. Despite the multiplicity of analytical methods for analyzing iron, only two, magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic susceptibility, are suitable for in vivo applications, and these are limited to the liver because of the heart's beat. Previously, a nuclear method, gamma-resonance scattering, offered a quantitative measure of iron in these organs; however, it was abandoned because it necessitated a nuclear reactor to produce the radioactive source. I reviewed and reassessed the status of two alternative nuclear methods, based on iron spectroscopy of gamma rays induced by fast neutron inelastic scattering and delayed activation in iron. Both are quantitative methods with high specificity for iron and adequate penetrating power to measure it in organs sited deep within the human body. My experiments demonstrated that both modalities met the stated qualitative objectives to measure iron. However, neutron dosimetry revealed that the intensity of the neutron radiation field was too weak to reliably assess the minimum detection limits, and to allow quantitative extrapolations to measurements in people. A review of the literature, included in this report, showed that these findings agree qualitatively with the published results, although the doses reported were about three orders-of-magnitude higher than those I used. Reviewing the limitations of the present work, steps were outlined for overcoming some of the shortcomings. Due to a dearth of valid quantitative alternatives for determining iron in vivo, I conclude that nuclear methods remain the only viable option. However, from the lessons learned, further systematic work is required before embarking on clinical studies.

  4. METHOD OF PRODUCING NEUTRONS

    DOEpatents

    Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

    1964-01-14

    This patent relates to a method of producing neutrons in which there is produced a heated plasma containing heavy hydrogen isotope ions wherein heated ions are injected and confined in an elongated axially symmetric magnetic field having at least one magnetic field gradient region. In accordance with the method herein, the amplitude of the field and gradients are varied at an oscillatory periodic frequency to effect confinement by providing proper ratios of rotational to axial velocity components in the motion of said particles. The energetic neutrons may then be used as in a blanket zone containing a moderator and a source fissionable material to produce heat and thermal neutron fissionable materials. (AEC)

  5. METHOD OF PRODUCING NEUTRONS

    DOEpatents

    Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

    1964-02-01

    A method for producing neutrons is described in which there is employed a confinement zone defined between longitudinally spaced localized gradient regions of an elongated magnetic field. Changed particles and neutralizing electrons, more specifically deuterons and tritons and neutralizng electrons, are injected into the confinement field from ion sources located outside the field. The rotational energy of the parrticles is increased at the gradients by imposing an oscillating transverse electrical field thereacross. The imposition of such oscillating transverse electrical fields improves the reflection capability of such gradient fielda so that the reactive particles are retained more effectively within the zone. With the attainment of appropriate densities of plasma particles and provided that such particles are at a sufficiently high temperature, neutron-producing reactions ensue and large quantities of neutrons emerge from the containment zone. (AEC)

  6. Neutron filters for producing monoenergetic neutron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Harvey, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Neutron transmission measurements have been made on high-purity, highly-enriched samples of /sup 58/Ni (99.9%), /sup 60/Ni (99.7%), /sup 64/Zn (97.9%) and /sup 184/W (94.5%) to measure their neutron windows and to assess their potential usefulness for producing monoenergetic beams of intermediate energies from a reactor. Transmission measurements on the Los Alamos Sc filter (44.26 cm Sc and 1.0 cm Ti) have been made to determine the characteristics of the transmitted neutron beam and to measure the total cross section of Sc at the 2.0 keV minimum. When corrected for the Ti and impurities, a value of 0.35 +- 0.03 b was obtained for this minimum.

  7. Producing Mono-energetic Neutrons for Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepeal, Steven

    2014-09-01

    Free neutrons are seldom produced in nature and are unstable, decaying back to protons with a mean life of 881s. The only natural sources are spontaneous fission of actinides and cosmic ray interactions, both of which are rare processes. The detection of neutrons indicates unusual nuclear activity, allowing neutron detection the roll of the ``smoking gun'' for seeking potential nuclear terrorism. Recently, there has been a push for the development of new neutron detectors, ideally sufficiently inexpensive that a detector can be carried by all first responders such as police and fire fighters. One promising new material is the inorganic scintillator CLYC, a crystal of chlorine, lithium, yttrium and cesium. CLYC has a high energy resolution not only for gamma rays, but also for fast neutrons. At the University of Massachusetts, Lowell, CLYC is being developed in collaboration with local industrial companies. To evaluate its response to neutrons, in to 500 keV to 4 MeV energy range, the CN Van de Graaff generator is used to produce neutrons, via the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. However, the important energy regime of 4--10 MeV is currently inaccessible. This current project is to build a gas-cell target to enable the D(d,n)3He reaction and produce neutrons of energy up to 9 MeV, an approach that has been used successfully at the University of Kentucky. The project involves some mechanical engineering management, then chamber construction, vacuum testing, developing thin window technology, and finally commissioning of the gas cell using accelerated beams. The commissioning will be physics rich in quantifying the flux and energy resolution of the neutron beam produced. Free neutrons are seldom produced in nature and are unstable, decaying back to protons with a mean life of 881s. The only natural sources are spontaneous fission of actinides and cosmic ray interactions, both of which are rare processes. The detection of neutrons indicates unusual nuclear activity, allowing

  8. Neutron producing reactions in PuBe neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagi, János; Lakosi, László; Nguyen, Cong Tam

    2016-01-01

    There are a plenty of out-of-use plutonium-beryllium neutron sources in Eastern Europe presenting both nuclear safeguards and security issues. Typically, their actual Pu content is not known. In the last couple of years different non-destructive methods were developed for their characterization. For such methods detailed knowledge of the nuclear reactions taking place within the source is necessary. In this paper we investigate the role of the neutron producing reactions, their contribution to the neutron yield and their dependence on the properties of the source.

  9. Radioisotopes produced by neutron irradiation of food.

    PubMed

    Albright, S; Seviour, R

    2016-04-01

    The use of neutrons for cargo interrogation has the potential to drastically improve threat detection. Previous research has focussed on the production of (24)Na, based on the isotopes produced in pharmaceuticals and medical devices. For both the total activity and the ingestion dose we show that a variety of isotopes contribute and that (24)Na is only dominant under certain conditions. The composition of the foods has a strong influence on the resulting activity and ingestion dose suggesting that the pharmaceuticals and medical devices considered initially are not a viable analogue for foodstuffs. There is an energy dependence to the isotopes produced due to the cross-sections of different reactions varying with neutron energy. We show that this results in different isotopes dominating the ingestion dose at different energies, which has not been considered in the previous literature. PMID:26749562

  10. Spacecraft-produced neutron fluxes on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quist, T. C.; Furst, M.; Burnett, D. S.; Baum, J. H.; Peacock, C. L., Jr.; Perry, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    Estimates of neutron fluxes in different energy ranges are reported for the Skylab spacecraft. Detectors composed of uranium, thorium, and bismuth foils with mica as a fission track recorder, as well as boron foils with cellulose acetate as an alpha-particle recorder, were deployed at different positions in the Orbital Workshop. It was found that the Skylab neutron flux was dominated by high energy (greater than 1 MeV) contributions and that there was no significant time variation in the fluxes. Firm upper limits of 7-15 neutrons/sq cm-sec, depending on the detector location in the spacecraft, were established for fluxes above 1 MeV. Below 1 MeV, the neutron fluxes were about an order of magnitude lower. The neutrons are interpreted as originating from the interactions of leakage protons from the radiation belt with the spacecraft.

  11. Cosmogenic neutron-capture-produced nuclides in stony meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spergel, M. S.; Reedy, R. C.; Lazareth, O. W.; Levy, P. W.; Slatest, L. A.

    1986-01-01

    The complete neutron-flux results and production rates for Cl-36, Ni-59, and Co-60 in stony meteorites of various radii and composition are presented. The relative neutron source strengths and neutron production-versus-depth profiles were determined by using calculated H-3 production rates. The absolute source strengths were normalized to that determined for the moon by Woolum et al. (1975). The energy spectrum of the source neutrons and the neutron transport calculations, which employed the ANISN computer code, were similar to those used for the moon by Lingenfelter et al. (1972). The production rates of the three radionuclides were determined as a function of depth in various spherical meteoroids from the calculated equilibrium neutron-flux distributions and from energy-dependent neutron-capture cross sections. Rates for producing these radionuclides by spallation reactions were also calculated.

  12. Maximizing the Efficacy of Accelerator-Produced Neutrons for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Jay F. Kunze; J. Frank Harmon; Rajat Kudchadker; Chad L. Lee

    2000-06-04

    Production of neutrons for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatment of malignant brain tumors will best be served if the neutrons can be produced by accelerators rather than nuclear reactors. The neutron production reaction that has been most thoroughly examined using accelerators is {sup 7}Li(n, p){sup 7}Be, generally on a thick lithium target. The threshold for this reactor is 1.88 MeV, and the yield curve for neutron production rises quite rapidly up to 2.3 MeV, where the positive slope is reduced significantly. In considering the design of a neutron production device, it has been traditional to use proton energies in the 2.4- to 2.5-MeV range. Over the last several years, our group has been working with lower-energy protons, just above the threshold for neutron production. The advantage is that the neutrons produced would have much lower energy and hence need much less moderator. The principal disadvantage of operating at these near-threshold energies is that the yield from the target is substantially reduced from that at or near 2.5-MeV proton energy. Table I shows the results of calculations to find an optimum energy for 3-mA proton beam on target. In general, we have concluded that 1.96 to 1.98 MeV is probably optimum for a tumor 5 cm below the skull.

  13. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING NEUTRONS AND OTHER RADIATIONS

    DOEpatents

    Tuck, J.L.

    1962-06-01

    A neutron source is designed which comprises a toroidal chamber contained deuterium or tritium gas, means for ionizing said gas, primary coils located around said chamber for inducing an electrical current in said gas having a value high enough to produce a pinch effect, and electrical coil nmeans for preventing the outward radial drift of the pinched discharge current. (AEC)

  14. A neutron producing target for BINP accelerator-based neutron source.

    PubMed

    Bayanov, B; Kashaeva, E; Makarov, A; Malyshkin, G; Samarin, S; Taskaev, S

    2009-07-01

    An innovative accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT has just started operation at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk. One of the main elements of the facility is a lithium target producing neutrons via the threshold (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction at 25 kW proton beam with energies of 1.915 MeV or 2.5 MeV. The design of an optimal target and results of the investigation of radiation blistering of the lithium layer were presented at previous NCT Congresses. During the last two years the neutron target has been manufactured, assembled and placed in the facility. Optimization of the target is carried out with the Monte Carlo simulation code MCNP. In this article, the design of the target is discussed, results of all previous investigations are summarized, results of target testing and neutron generation are described, and results of simulation of neutron spectra are presented. PMID:19376729

  15. METHOD OF PRODUCING ENERGETIC PLASMA FOR NEUTRON PRODUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Simon, A.; Mackin, R.J. Jr.

    1961-01-24

    A method is given for producing an energetic plasma for neutron production. An energetic plasma is produced in a small magnetically confined subvolume of the device by providing a selected current of energetic molecular ions at least greater than that required for producing a current of atomic ions sufficient to achieve "burnout" of neutral particles in the subvolume. The atomic ions are provided by dissociation of the molecular ions by an energetic arc discharge within the subvolume. After burnout, the arc discharge is terminated, the magnetic fields increased, and cold fuel feed is substituted for the molecular ions. After the subvolume is filled with an energetic plasma, the size of the magnetically confined subvolume is gradually increased until the entire device is filled with an energetic neutron producing plasma. The reactions which take place in the device to produce neutrons will generate a certain amount of heat energy which may be converted by the use of a conventional heat cycle to produce electrical energy.

  16. Measurement of Ultracold Neutrons Produced by Using Doppler-shifted Bragg Reflection at a Pulsed-neutron Source

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Brun, T. O.; Carpenter, J. M.; Krohn, V. E.; Ringo, G. R.; Cronin, J. W.; Dombeck, T. W.; Lynn, J. W.; Werner, S. A.

    1979-01-01

    Ultracold neutrons (UCN) have been produced at the Argonne pulsed-neutron source by the Doppler shift of 400-m/s neutrons Bragg reflected from a moving crystal. The peak density of UCN produced at the crystal exceeds 0.1 n/cm{sup 3}.

  17. Multileaf shielding design against neutrons produced by medical linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Rebello, W F; Silva, A X; Facure, A

    2008-01-01

    This work aims at presenting a study using Monte Carlo simulation of a Multileaf Shielding (MLS) System designed to be used for the protection of patients who undergo radiotherapy treatment, against undesired exposure to neutrons produced in the components of the medical linear accelerator heads. The choice of radiotherapy equipment as the subject of study fell on the Varian Clinac 2,100/2,300 with MLC-120 operating at 18 MeV. The general purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP5, was used in the computer simulation in order to determine the ambient dose equivalent, H (10), on several points on the patient's plane, with the equipment operation with and without the MLS. The results of the simulations showed a significant neutron dose reduction after the inclusion of the proposed shielding. PMID:17569690

  18. Strong flux of low-energy neutrons produced by thunderstorms.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, A V; Antonova, V P; Chubenko, A P; Karashtin, A N; Mitko, G G; Ptitsyn, M O; Ryabov, V A; Shepetov, A L; Shlyugaev, Yu V; Vildanova, L I; Zybin, K P

    2012-03-23

    We report here for the first time about the registration of an extraordinary high flux of low-energy neutrons generated during thunderstorms. The measured neutron count rate enhancements are directly connected with thunderstorm discharges. The low-energy neutron flux value obtained in our work is a challenge for the photonuclear channel of neutron generation in thunderstorm: the estimated value of the needed high-energy γ-ray flux is about 3 orders of magnitude higher than that one observed. PMID:22540588

  19. Tables for simplifying calculations of activities produced by thermal neutrons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Champion, W.R.

    1954-01-01

    The method of calculation described is useful for the types of work of which examples are given. It is also useful in making rapid comparison of the activities that might be expected from several different elements. For instance, suppose it is desired to know which of the three elements, cobalt, nickel, or vanadium is, under similar conditions, activated to the greatest extent by thermal neutrons. If reference is made to a cross-section table only, the values may be misleading unless properly interpreted by a suitable comparison of half-lives and abundances. In this table all the variables have been combined and the desired information can be obtained directly from the values of A 3??, the activity produced per gram per second of irradiation, under the stated conditions. Hence, it is easily seen that, under similar circumstances of irradiation, vanadium is most easily activated even though the cross section of one of the cobalt isotopes is nearly five times that of vanadium and the cross section of one of the nickel isotopes is three times that of vanadium. ?? 1954 Societa?? Italiana di Fisica.

  20. Characteristics of neutrons produced by muons in a standard rock

    SciTech Connect

    Malgin, A. S.

    2015-10-15

    Characteristics of cosmogenic neutrons, such as the yield, production rate, and flux, were determined for a standard rock. The dependences of these quantities on the standard-rock depth and on the average muon energy were obtained. These properties and dependences make it possible to estimate easy the muon-induced neutron background in underground laboratories for various chemical compositions of rock.

  1. How to Produce a Reactor Neutron Spectrum Using a Proton Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, K.; Wootan, D.; Gates, R.; Schmitt, B.; Asner, D. M.

    A method for reproducing the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor using an engineered target in an accelerator proton beam is proposed. The protons interact with a target to create neutrons through various (p,n) type reactions. Spectral tailoring of the emitted neutrons can be used to modify the energy of the generated neutron spectrum to represent various reactor spectra. Through the use of moderators and reflectors, the neutron spectrum can be modified to reproduce many different spectra of interest including spectra in small thermal test reactors, large pressurized water reactors, and fast reactors. The particular application of this methodology is the design of an experimental approach for using an accelerator to measure the betas produced during fission to be used to reduce uncertainties in the interpretation of reactor antineutrino measurements. This approach involves using a proton accelerator to produce a neutron field representative of a power reactor, and using this neutron field to irradiate fission foils of the primary isotopes contributing to fission in the reactor, creating unstable, neutron rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. A major advantage of an accelerator neutron source over a neutron beam from a thermal reactor is that the fast neutrons can be slowed down or tailored to approximate various power reactor spectra. An accelerator based neutron source that can be tailored to match various reactor neutron spectra provides an advantage for control in studying how changes in the neutron spectra affect parameters such as the resulting fission product beta spectrum.

  2. How to produce a reactor neutron spectrum using a proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Kimberly A.; Wootan, David W.; Gates, Robert O.; Schmitt, Bruce E.; Asner, David M.

    2015-01-01

    A method for reproducing the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor using an engineered target in an accelerator proton beam is proposed. The protons interact with a target to create neutrons through various (p,n) type reactions. Spectral tailoring of the emitted neutrons can be used to modify the energy of the generated neutron spectrum to represent various reactor spectra. Through the use of moderators and reflectors, the neutron spectrum can be modified to reproduce many different spectra of interest including spectra in small thermal test reactors, large pressurized water reactors, and fast reactors. The particular application of this methodology is the design of an experimental approach for using an accelerator to measure the betas produced during fission to be used to reduce uncertainties in the interpretation of reactor antineutrino measurements. This approach involves using a proton accelerator to produce a neutron field representative of a power reactor, and using this neutron field to irradiate fission foils of the primary isotopes contributing to fission in the reactor, creating unstable, neutron rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. A major advantage of an accelerator neutron source over a neutron beam from a thermal reactor is that the fast neutrons can be slowed down or tailored to approximate various power reactor spectra. An accelerator based neutron source that can be tailored to match various reactor neutron spectra provides an advantage for control in studying how changes in the neutron spectra affect parameters such as the resulting fission product beta spectrum.

  3. Level Density of COBALT-57 in the Energy Region 1 Mev to 14 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Vivek

    The level density of ^{57 }Co is studied in the energy region of 1-14 MeV using three experimental techniques. Levels are counted in the resolved region, evaporation spectra are measured in the resolved to continuum region, and the coherence width is measured in the region of level overlap. Use of Hauser-Feshbach fits to the evaporation cross sections requires level densities of the residual nucleus. A two -parameter based Fermi gas form is used for the calculation of level density as a function of the nuclear excitation energy. This procedure enables level density calculation beyond the energy region in which the two fixed parameters provide the best fits to the data. A comparison is made between the level density obtained from the above described methods and the predictions of the microscopic model in an energy range of 1-20 MeV. This model utilizes a BCS pairing Hamiltonian and specific sets of single particle states and calculates numerical values of the level density. Comparisons are also made with level density of ^{57 }Co obtained in various other studies. Both the resolved level studies and the fits to the evaporation spectra were conducted using the ^{56}Fe(d,n)^{57 }Co and ^{57}Fe(p,n) ^{57}Co reactions. Standard neutron time-of-flight techniques including pulse shape discrimination for elimination of gamma -rays were employed. An energy resolution as good as 6 keV at 1-1.5 MeV neutron energy was obtained for high resolution measurements. For Ericson fluctuation measurements, the excitation functions corresponding to the ground state and the first two excited states of the residual nucleus in the ^{56}Fe(p,n) ^{56}Co reaction were obtained for lab angles between 0^circ and 150^circ. The ^{56}Fe(d,n) ^{57}Co reaction proves to be very selective in populating resolved states and includes substantial contributions from mechanisms other than the compound nuclear. The ^{57 }Fe(p,n)^{57}Co reaction populated 14 previously unknown levels. The fits to the

  4. Potential for improvement of a neutron producing target for time-of-flight measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaska, M.; Lathouwers, D.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Mondelaers, W.; van der Hagen, T. H. J. J.; van Dam, H.

    2005-12-01

    The Geel electron linear accelerator (GELINA) white neutron source is designed for time-of-flight (TOF) measurements with a high neutron energy resolution. A project has been launched in order to improve the accuracy of the high-resolution neutron cross-section measurements. The experimental accuracy is highly dependent on the neutron intensity and the time spread of the neutrons leaving the target. The main project objective is not only to design a new neutron producing target that reduces the time spread of the neutrons of a given energy, but also to maintain or possibly enhance the neutron production. The present GELINA target has been simulated recently with coupled electron-photon-neutron MCNP4C3 calculations and, subsequently, compared with experimental results. Based on the very good benchmarking results, this code is now used to design and optimise the new target and to assess all relevant parameters influencing the neutron flux and resolution functions. In this paper, the reader will find an explanation of the methodology on which the research of a new target is based. We compared the neutron fluxes of the compact geometries of various materials for different angles with the fluxes of the existing target. Further, we also made a comparison of the resolution functions for the present design versus a compact design. Finally, a dedicated figure of merit was used to make a qualitative comparison of various designs. The results presented in this paper reveal that there is a possibility to design a new target with superior characteristics so that all project objectives will be fulfilled.

  5. Dosimetry and fast neutron energies characterization of photoneutrons produced in some medical linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaled, N. E.; Attalla, E. M.; Ammar, H.; Khalil, W.

    2011-12-01

    This work focusses on the estimation of induced photoneutrons energy, fluence, and strength using nuclear track detector (NTD) (CR-39). Photoneutron energy was estimated for three different linear accelerators, LINACs as an example for the commonly used accelerators. For high-energy linear accelerators, neutrons are produced as a consequence of photonuclear reactions in the target nuclei, accelerator head, field-flattening filters and beam collimators, and other irradiated objects. NTD (CR-39) is used to evaluate energy and fluence of the fast neutron. Track length is used to estimate fast photoneutrons energy for linear accelerators (Elekta 10 MV, Elekta 15 MV, and Varian 15 MV). Results show that the estimated neutron energies for the three chosen examples of LINACs reveals neutron energies in the range of 1-2 MeV for 10 and 15 MV X-ray beams. The fluence of neutrons at the isocenter (Φtotal) is found to be (4×106 n cm2 Gy-1) for Elekta machine 10 MV. The neutron source strengths Q are calculated. It was found to be 0.2×1012 n Gy-1 X-ray at the isocenter. This work represents simple, low cost, and accurate methods of measuring fast neutrons dose and energies.

  6. A Novel Approach to Study of Neutron Producing Reactions for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febbraro, Michael; Becchetti, Frederick; Pierson, Bruce; Lawrence, Chris; Torres-Isea, Ramon; Robertson, Dan; Stech, Ed; Kolata, James; Peters, William

    2014-03-01

    Neutron producing reactions such as 13C(α,n)16O which serve as dominate neutron sources for the s-process, incur experimental challenges due to the difficulties in detection of neutrons. Measurements of such reactions at low energies usually involve the use of 3He counters or n/γ-convertors but these methods do not provide neutron spectroscopy. Neutron Time-of-Flight (n-ToF) provides spectroscopy but requires ether beam pulsing or a fast recoil trigger. The University of Michigan Deuterated Scintillator Array appears to be well suited for such measurements either above or below ground. The array has been shown to provide n/ γ discrimination, low background, and can yield neutron spectroscopic information without the use of n-ToF relying instead on matrix inversion techniques for spectrum unfolding. Methods such as MLEM, CGRN, and Artificial Neural Networks permit extraction of discrete neutron energy groups imposed on a continuous background. Preliminary measurements of the 13C(α,n)16Oreaction conducted at the 10 MV FN tandem and the new 5U high intensity accelerator at the University of Notre Dame will be shown. This work is supported by NSF grants PHY 0969456.

  7. Shielding implications for secondary neutrons and photons produced within the patient during IMPT

    SciTech Connect

    DeMarco, J.; Kupelian, P.; Santhanam, A.; Low, D.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) uses a combination of computer controlled spot scanning and spot-weight optimized planning to irradiate the tumor volume uniformly. In contrast to passive scattering systems, secondary neutrons and photons produced from inelastic proton interactions within the patient represent the major source of emitted radiation during IMPT delivery. Various published studies evaluated the shielding considerations for passive scattering systems but did not directly address secondary neutron production from IMPT and the ambient dose equivalent on surrounding occupational and nonoccupational work areas. Thus, the purpose of this study was to utilize Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the energy and angular distributions of secondary neutrons and photons following inelastic proton interactions within a tissue-equivalent phantom for incident proton spot energies between 70 and 250 MeV.Methods: Monte Carlo simulation methods were used to calculate the ambient dose equivalent of secondary neutrons and photons produced from inelastic proton interactions in a tissue-equivalent phantom. The angular distribution of emitted neutrons and photons were scored as a function of incident proton energy throughout a spherical annulus at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 m from the phantom center. Appropriate dose equivalent conversion factors were applied to estimate the total ambient dose equivalent from secondary neutrons and photons.Results: A reference distance of 1 m from the center of the patient was used to evaluate the mean energy distribution of secondary neutrons and photons and the resulting ambient dose equivalent. For an incident proton spot energy of 250 MeV, the total ambient dose equivalent (3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mSv per proton Gy) was greatest along the direction of the incident proton spot (0 Degree-Sign -10 Degree-Sign ) with a mean secondary neutron energy of 71.3 MeV. The dose equivalent decreased by a factor of 5 in the

  8. Segmented Ge detector rejection of internal beta activity produced by neutron irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnell, L. S.; Callas, J. L.; Mahoney, W. A.; Pehl, R. H.; Landis, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Future Ge spectrometers flown in space to observe cosmic gamma-ray sources will incorporate segmented detectors to reduce the background from radioactivity produced by energetic particle reactions. To demonstrate the effectiveness of a segmented Ge detector in rejecting background events due to the beta decay of internal radioactivity, a laboratory experiment has been carried out in which radioactivity was produced in the detector by neutron irradiation. A Cf-252 source of neutrons was used to produce, by neutron capture on Ge-74 (36.5 percent of natural Ge) in the detector itself, Ge-75 (t sub 1/2 = 82.78 min), which decays by beta emission with a maximum electron kinetic energy of 1188 keV. By requiring that an ionizing event deposit energy in two or more of the five segments of the detector, each about 1-cm thick, the beta particles, which have a range of about 1-mm, are rejected, while most external gamma rays incident on the detector are counted. Analysis of this experiment indicates that over 85 percent of the beta events from the decay of Ge-75 are rejected, which is in good agreement with Monte Carlo calculations.

  9. Dose Measurements of Bremsstrahlung-Produced Neutrons at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Job, P.K.; Pisharody, M.; Semones, E.

    1998-08-01

    Bremsstrahlung is generated in the storage rings of the synchrotron radiation facilities by the radiative interaction of the circulating particle beam with both the residual gas molecules and storage ring components. These bremsstrahlung photons, having an energy range of zero to the maximum energy of the particle beam, interact with beamline components like beam stops and collimators generating photoneutrons of varying energies. There are three main processes by which photoneutrons may be produced by the high energy bremsstrahlung photons: giant nuclear dipole resonance and decay (10 MeV < E{sub {gamma}} < 30 MeV), quasi-deuteron production and decay (50 MeV < E{sub {gamma}} < 300 MeV), and intranuclear cascade and evaporation (E{sub {gamma}} > 140 MeV). The giant resonance neutrons are emitted almost isotropically and have an average energy of about 2 MeV. High energy neutrons (E > 10 MeV) emitted from the quasi-deuteron decay and intranuclear cascade are peaked in the forward direction. At the Advanced Photon Source (APS), where bremsstrahlung energy can be as high as 7 GeV, production of photoneutrons in varying yields is possible from all of the above three processes. The bremsstrahlung produced along a typical 15.38-m straight path of the insertion device (ID) beamline of the APS has been measured and analyzed in previous studies. High-Z materials constituting the beamline components, such as collimators and beam stops, can produce photoneutrons upon interaction with these bremsstrahlung photons. The 1/E nature of the bremsstrahlung spectrum and the fact that the photoneutron production cross section is comparatively larger in the energy region 10 MeV < E{sub {gamma}} < 30 MeV, results in the giant resonance interaction being the dominant mechanism that generates photoneutrons at the APS. Such neutron flux in the vicinities of the first optics enclosures (FOEs) of ID beamlines is important, from the point of view of radiation protection of the personnel. Only

  10. Radioactive ion beams produced by neutron-induced fission at ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isolde Collaboration; Catherall, R.; Lettry, J.; Gilardoni, S.; Köster, U.

    2003-05-01

    The production rates of neutron-rich fission products for the next-generation radioactive beam facility EURISOL [EU-RTD Project EURISOL (HPRI-CT-1999-50001)] are mainly limited by the maximum amount of power deposited by protons in the target. An alternative approach is to use neutron beams to induce fission in actinide targets. This has the advantage of reducing: the energy deposited by the proton beam in the target; contamination from neutron-deficient isobars that would be produced by spallation; and mechanical stress on the target. At ISOLDE CERN [E. Kugler, Hyperfine Interact. 129 (2000) 23], tests have been made on standard ISOLDE actinide targets using fast-neutron bunches produced by bombarding thick, high-/Z metal converters with 1 and 1.4 GeV proton pulses. This paper reviews the first applications of converters used at ISOLDE. It highlights the different geometries and the techniques used to compare fission yields produced by the proton beam directly on the target with neutron-induced fission. Results from the six targets already tested, namely UC2/graphite and ThO2 targets with tungsten and tantalum converters, are presented. To gain further knowledge for the design of a dedicated target as required by the TARGISOL project [EU-RTD Project TARGISOL (HPRI-CT-2001-50033)], the results are compared to simulations, using the MARS [N.V. Mokhov, S.I. Striganov, A. Van Ginneken, S.G. Mashnik, A.J. Sierk, J. Ranft, MARS code developments, in: 4th Workshop on Simulating Accelerator Radiation Environments, SARE-4, Knoxville, USA, 14-15.9.1998, FERMILAB-PUB-98-379, nucl-th/9812038; N.V. Mokhov, The Mars Code System User's Guide, Fermilab-FN-628, 1995; N.V. Mokhov, MARS Code Developments, Benchmarking and Applications, Fermilab-Conf-00-066, 2000; O.E. Krivosheev, N.V. Mokhov, A New MARS and its Applications, Fermilab-Conf-98/43, 1998] code interfaced with MCNP [J.S. Hendrics, MCNP4C LANL Memo X-5; JSH-2000-3; J.F. Briemesteir (Ed.), MCNP - A General Montecarlo N

  11. THE METHODS OF PRODUCING AND ANALYZING POLARIZED NEUTRON BEAMS FOR HYSPEC AT THE SNS.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAPIRO, S.M.; PASSELL, L.; ZALIZNYAK, A.; GHOSH, V.J.; LEONHARDT, W.L.; HAGEN, M.E.

    2005-04-25

    The Hybrid Spectrometer (HYSPEC), under construction at the SNS on beam line 14B, is the only inelastic scattering instrument designed to enable polarization of the incident and the scattered neutron beams. A Heusler monochromator will replace the graphite crystal for producing polarized neutrons. In the scattered beam it is planned to use a collimator--multi-channel supermirror bender array to analyze the polarization of the scattered beam over the final energy range from 5-20 meV. Other methods of polarization analysis under consideration such as transmission filters using He{sup 3}, Sm, and polarized protons are considered. Their performance is estimated and a comparison of the various methods of polarization is made.

  12. Computational Assessment of Naturally Occurring Neutron and Photon Background Radiation Produced by Extraterrestrial Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Thomas Martin; de Wet, Wouter C.; Patton, Bruce W.

    2015-10-28

    In this study, a computational assessment of the variation in terrestrial neutron and photon background from extraterrestrial sources is presented. The motivation of this assessment is to evaluate the practicality of developing a tool or database to estimate background in real time (or near–real time) during an experimental measurement or to even predict the background for future measurements. The extraterrestrial source focused on during this assessment is naturally occurring galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). The MCNP6 transport code was used to perform the computational assessment. However, the GCR source available in MCNP6 was not used. Rather, models developed and maintained by NASA were used to generate the GCR sources. The largest variation in both neutron and photon background spectra was found to be caused by changes in elevation on Earth's surface, which can be as large as an order of magnitude. All other perturbations produced background variations on the order of a factor of 3 or less. The most interesting finding was that ~80% and 50% of terrestrial background neutrons and photons, respectively, are generated by interactions in Earth's surface and other naturally occurring and man-made objects near a detector of particles from extraterrestrial sources and their progeny created in Earth's atmosphere. In conclusion, this assessment shows that it will be difficult to estimate the terrestrial background from extraterrestrial sources without a good understanding of a detector's surroundings. Therefore, estimating or predicting background during a measurement environment like a mobile random search will be difficult.

  13. Microdosimetric study for secondary neutrons in phantom produced by a 290 MeV/nucleon carbon beam

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, Satoru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Takada, Masashi; Onizuka, Yoshihiko; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Ishikawa, Masayori; Maeda, Naoko; Hayabuchi, Naofumi; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2007-09-15

    Absorbed doses from main charged-particle beams and charged-particle fragments have been measured with high accuracy for particle therapy, but there are few reports for doses from neutron components produced as fragments. This study describes the measurements on neutron doses produced by carbon beams; microdosimetric distributions of secondary neutrons produced by 290 MeV/nucleon carbon beams have been measured by using a tissue equivalent proportional counter at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The microdosimetric distributions of the secondary neutron were measured on the distal and lateral faces of a body-simulated acrylic phantom (300 mm heightx300 mm widthx253 mm thickness). To confirm the dose measurements, the neutron energy spectra produced by incident carbon beams in the acrylic phantom were simulated by the particle and heavy ion transport code system. The absorbed doses obtained by multiplying the simulated neutron energy spectra with the kerma factor calculated by MCNPX agree with the corresponding experimental data fairly well. Downstream of the Bragg peak, the ratio of the neutron dose to the carbon dose at the Bragg peak was found to be a maximum of 1.4x10{sup -4} and the ratio of neutron dose was a maximum of 3.0x10{sup -7} at a lateral face of the acrylic phantom. The ratios of neutrons to charged particle fragments were 11% to 89% in the absorbed doses at the lateral and the distal faces of the acrylic phantom. We can conclude that the treatment dose will not induce serious secondary neutron effects at distances greater than 90 mm from the Bragg peak in carbon particle therapy.

  14. Heavy-element abundances from a neutron burst that produces Xe-H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. M.; Meyer, Bradley S.; Clayton, Donald D.

    1992-01-01

    We examine quantitatively the suggestion that the heavy anomalous isotopes of Xe-HL found in meteoritic diamonds were produced by a short intense neutron burst and then implanted into the diamonds. Using a large nuclear reaction network we establish one (out of many) neutron irradiation hostories that successfully reproduces the heavy isotopes of Xe-HL, and then evaluate what that same history would produce in every heavy element. This has become more relevant following recent measurement of anomalous Ba and Sr in those same diamond samples. Therefore we offer these calculations as a guide to the anomalies to be expected in all elements if this scenario is correct. We also discuss several other aspects of the problem, especially the established contradictions for Ba, the observed Kr pattern, the near normalcy of Xe-129 and some related astrophysical ideas. In particular we argue from p-process theory that the observed deficit of Kr-78 in correlation with Xe-(124-126) excess implicates Type II supernovae as the diamond sources.

  15. LICORNE: A new and unique facility for producing intense, kinematically focused neutron beams at the IPN Orsay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. N.; Lebois, M.; Halipre, P.; Leniau, B.; Matea, I.; Verney, D.; Oberstedt, S.; Billnert, R.; Oberstedt, A.; Georgiev, G.; Ljungvall, J.

    2013-12-01

    LICORNE is a new neutron source recently installed at the tandem accelerator of the Institut de Physique Nucléaire d'Orsay, where a Li7-beam is used to bombard a hydrogen-containing target to produce an intense forward-directed neutron beam. The directionality of the beam, which is the unique characteristic of LICORNE, will permit the installation of γ-ray detectors dedicated to the investigation of fission fragment de-excitation which are unimpeded by neutrons from the source. A first experimental program will focus on the measurement of prompt γ-ray emission in the neutron-induced fission of fertile and fissile isotopes at incident neutron energies relevant for the core design of Generation-IV nuclear reactors. Other potential uses of the LICORNE facility for both fundamental and applied physics research are also presented.

  16. On the idea of low-energy nuclear reactions in metallic lattices by producing neutrons from protons capturing "heavy" electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennfors, Einar

    2013-02-01

    The present article is a critical comment on Widom and Larsens speculations concerning low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR) based on spontaneous collective motion of protons in a room temperature metallic hydride lattice producing oscillating electric fields that renormalize the electron self-energy, adding significantly to the effective electron mass and enabling production of low-energy neutrons. The frequency and mean proton displacement estimated on the basis of neutron scattering from protons in palladium and applied to the Widom and Larsens model of the proton oscillations yield an electron mass enhancement less than one percent, far below the threshold for the proposed neutron production and even farther below the mass enhancement obtained by Widom and Larsen assuming a high charge density. Neutrons are not stopped by the Coulomb barrier, but the energy required for the neutron production is not low.

  17. Computational Assessment of Naturally Occurring Neutron and Photon Background Radiation Produced by Extraterrestrial Sources

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miller, Thomas Martin; de Wet, Wouter C.; Patton, Bruce W.

    2015-10-28

    In this study, a computational assessment of the variation in terrestrial neutron and photon background from extraterrestrial sources is presented. The motivation of this assessment is to evaluate the practicality of developing a tool or database to estimate background in real time (or near–real time) during an experimental measurement or to even predict the background for future measurements. The extraterrestrial source focused on during this assessment is naturally occurring galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). The MCNP6 transport code was used to perform the computational assessment. However, the GCR source available in MCNP6 was not used. Rather, models developed and maintained bymore » NASA were used to generate the GCR sources. The largest variation in both neutron and photon background spectra was found to be caused by changes in elevation on Earth's surface, which can be as large as an order of magnitude. All other perturbations produced background variations on the order of a factor of 3 or less. The most interesting finding was that ~80% and 50% of terrestrial background neutrons and photons, respectively, are generated by interactions in Earth's surface and other naturally occurring and man-made objects near a detector of particles from extraterrestrial sources and their progeny created in Earth's atmosphere. In conclusion, this assessment shows that it will be difficult to estimate the terrestrial background from extraterrestrial sources without a good understanding of a detector's surroundings. Therefore, estimating or predicting background during a measurement environment like a mobile random search will be difficult.« less

  18. Gamma-Ray Measurement of 152Eu Produced by Neutrons from the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb and Evaluation of Neutron Fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kazuo; Habara, Minoru; Aoyama, Tetsuhisa; Sakata, Hidefumi; Yoshizawa, Yasukazu

    1990-08-01

    The 152Eu/Eu ratios were measured in a tombstone exposed to neutrons of the Hiroshima atomic bomb near the hypocenter. Measurements of 152Eu gamma rays were performed for europium samples chemically isolated from numerous rock specimens taken from the tombstone. A reliable attenuation curve of the 152Eu/Eu ratios was obtained. The curve suggests that the thermal neutron component was relatively small and the average incident angle of neutrons to the tombstone was roughly 45° from the perpendicular downward direction. It revealed to us several important pieces of information concerning the energy and angular distributions near the Hiroshima bomb hypocenter.

  19. Neutron measurements of stresses in a test artifact produced by laser-based additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Gnäupel-Herold, Thomas; Slotwinski, John; Moylan, Shawn

    2014-02-18

    A stainless steel test artifact produced by Direct Metal Laser Sintering and similar to a proposed standardized test artifact was examined using neutron diffraction. The artifact contained a number of structures with different aspect ratios pertaining to wall thickness, height above base plate, and side length. Through spatial resolutions of the order of one millimeter the volumetric distribution of stresses in several was measured. It was found that the stresses peak in the tensile region around 500 MPa near the top surface, with balancing compressive stresses in the interior. The presence of a support structure (a one millimeter high, thin walled, hence weaker, lattice structure deposited on the base plate, followed by a fully dense AM structure) has only minor effects on the stresses.

  20. The observation of damage regions produced by neutron irradiation in lithium-doped silicon solar cells.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, S.; Sargent, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Study regions of lattice disorder produced in lithium-doped float-zone melted n/p-type silicon solar cells by irradiation with monoenergetic neutrons at doses between 10 to the 10th and 10 to the 13th per cu cm. The defect regions were revealed by chemically etching the surface of the solar cells and by observing carbon replicas in an electron microscope. It was found that the defect density increased with increasing irradiation dose and increased lithium content, whereas the average defect diameter was found to decrease. From thermal annealing experiments it was found that in the lithium-doped material the defect structure was stable at temperatures between 300 and 1200 K. This was found to be in contrast to the undoped material where at the lowest doses considerable annealing was observed to occur. These results are discussed in terms of the theoretical predictions and models of defect clusters proposed by Gossick (1959) and Crawford and Cleland (1959).

  1. Neutron techniques. [for study of high-energy particles produced in large solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, Glenn M., Jr.; Dunphy, Philip P.; Chupp, Edward L.; Evenson, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Three experimental methods are described which hold the most promise for improved energy resolution, time resolution and sensitivity in the detection of solar neutrons on satellites and/or long duration balloon flights: the neutron calorimeter, the solar neutron track chamber, and the solar neutron decay proton detector. The characteristics of the three methods as to energy range, energy resolution, time resolution, detection efficiency, and physical properties are delineated. Earlier techniques to measure the intensity of high-energy cosmic-ray neutrons at the top of the atmosphere and to search for solar neutrons are described. The past three decades of detector development has now reached the point where it is possible to make comprehensive and detailed measurements of solar neutrons on future space missions.

  2. Neutron-Star-Black-Hole Binaries Produced by Binary-Driven Hypernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryer, Chris L.; Oliveira, F. G.; Rueda, J. A.; Ruffini, R.

    2015-12-01

    Binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (Eiso≳1052 erg ), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed "ultrastripped" binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compact binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs.

  3. Neutron-Star-Black-Hole Binaries Produced by Binary-Driven Hypernovae.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Chris L; Oliveira, F G; Rueda, J A; Ruffini, R

    2015-12-01

    Binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (E_{iso}≳10^{52}  erg), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed "ultrastripped" binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compact binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs. PMID:26684106

  4. Neutron-produced component of radiation background on orbit, surface and subsurface of Mars: data from HEND/Odyssey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, I.; Kozyrev, A.; Litvak, M.; Sanin, A.; Tret'yakov, V.

    The fluxes of neutrons and gamma-rays from Mars are produced by the bombardment of the surface layer by galactic cosmic rays. Subsurface layer of 1-2 meters emits the leakage flux of neutrons, which energy spectrum depends on the composition of subsurface material, mainly on the content of hydrogen in the soil. Gamma rays are produced by nuclei of the main soil elements, which are exited either by inelastic collisions or by capture reactions with neutrons. Therefore, Mars has much enhanced radiation background in comparison with the Earth both on the surface and in the surrounding space up to several thousands kilometers away. Data of neutrons measurements from HEND/Odyssey will be presented both for interplanetary flight to Mars and on the orbit around mars. These data will be transformed into the neutron-produced component of radiation dose at these conditions. The map of neutron-produced doses will be presented for orbital altitude of 400 km above Mars. Model-dependent deconvolution of orbital data will be described, which allows to estimate the leakage flux of neutrons on the surface of Mars. It will be shown that content of ground water is the main factor, which determines the local radiation background on the surface. Using the values of leakage flux of neutrons at the surface, neutron-produced doses will be estimated for different regions of Mars with different content of ground water. Neutron-produced doses will be also estimated in the shallow subsurface of different regions of Mars down to 3 meters. The data for neutron-produced doses over the Mars will be useful for creation of comprehensive engineering model of radiation environment on the planet. rom A soil with larger content of hydrogen moderates much better original neutrons from the energy range about 10-20 MeV down to the thermal energy. On Mars hydrogen is associated with water. Therefore, regions with larger and smaller content of water in the soil emit lower and higher fluxes of epithermal

  5. Using a Tandem Pelletron accelerator to produce a thermal neutron beam for detector testing purposes.

    PubMed

    Irazola, L; Praena, J; Fernández, B; Macías, M; Bedogni, R; Terrón, J A; Sánchez-Nieto, B; Arias de Saavedra, F; Porras, I; Sánchez-Doblado, F

    2016-01-01

    Active thermal neutron detectors are used in a wide range of measuring devices in medicine, industry and research. For many applications, the long-term stability of these devices is crucial, so that very well controlled neutron fields are needed to perform calibrations and repeatability tests. A way to achieve such reference neutron fields, relying on a 3 MV Tandem Pelletron accelerator available at the CNA (Seville, Spain), is reported here. This paper shows thermal neutron field production and reproducibility characteristics over few days. PMID:26595777

  6. Spectral measurements of neutrons produced by 52 MeV protons with activation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Kazuo; Saito, Takatsugu; Fujii, Masahiko; Nakamura, Takashi

    The accuracy of the neutron spectral measurement of energy up to ˜40 MeV with activation detectors was examined using high energy neutrons from thick targets bombarded by 52 MeV protons. The measured activation rates were unfolded with the modified SAND-II code and compared with the neutron spectra measured by the NE-213 scintillator. Quite good agreement in absolute values was obtained between the spectra recorded by these two different detectors. The activation detector was shown to be useful for neutron spectroscopy at energies higher than ˜ 10 MeV.

  7. Using FLUKA to Study Concrete Square Shield Performance in Attenuation of Neutron Radiation Produced by APF Plasma Focus Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemati, M. J.; Habibi, M.; Amrollahi, R.

    2013-04-01

    In 2010, representatives from the Nuclear Engineering and physics Department of Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT) requested development of a project with the objective of determining the performance of a concrete shield for their Plasma Focus as neutron source. The project team in Laboratory of Nuclear Engineering and physics department of Amirkabir University of Technology choose some shape of shield to study on their performance with Monte Carlo code. In the present work, the capability of Monte Carlo code FLUKA will be explored to model the APF Plasma Focus, and investigating the neutron fluence on the square concrete shield in each region of problem. The physical models embedded in FLUKA are mentioned, as well as examples of benchmarking against future experimental data. As a result of this study suitable thickness of concrete for shielding APF will be considered.

  8. Code System for Producing Pointwise and Multigroup Neutron and Photon Cross Sections from ENDF/B Data.

    1996-12-19

    Version 03 The NJOY nuclear data processing system is a comprehensive computer code system for producing pointwise and multigroup cross sections and related quantities from ENDF/B evaluated nuclear data in the ENDF format, including the latest US library, ENDF/B-VI. The NJOY code works with neutrons, photons, and charged particles and produces libraries for a wide variety of particle transport and reactor analysis codes.

  9. A novel laser-collider used to produce monoenergetic 13.3 MeV 7Li (d, n) neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. R.; Zhang, X. P.; Yuan, D. W.; Li, Y. T.; Li, D. Z.; Rhee, Y. J.; Zhang, Z.; Li, F.; Zhu, B. J.; Li, Yan F.; Han, B.; Liu, C.; Ma, Y.; Li, Yi F.; Tao, M. Z.; Li, M. H.; Guo, X.; Huang, X. G.; Fu, S. Z.; Zhu, J. Q.; Zhao, G.; Chen, L. M.; Fu, C. B.; Zhang, J.

    2016-06-01

    Neutron energy is directly correlated with the energy of the incident ions in experiments involving laser-driven nuclear reactions. Using high-energy incident ions reduces the energy concentration of the generated neutrons. A novel “laser-collider” method was used at the Shenguang II laser facility to produce monoenergetic neutrons via 7Li (d, n) nuclear reactions. The specially designed K-shaped target significantly increased the numbers of incident d and Li ions at the keV level. Ultimately, 13.3 MeV neutrons were obtained. Considering the time resolution of the neutron detector, we demonstrated that the produced neutrons were monoenergetic. Interferometry and a Multi hydro-dynamics simulation confirmed the monoenergetic nature of these neutrons.

  10. A novel laser-collider used to produce monoenergetic 13.3 MeV 7Li (d, n) neutrons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, J. R.; Zhang, X. P.; Yuan, D. W.; Li, Y. T.; Li, D. Z.; Rhee, Y. J.; Zhang, Z.; Li, F.; Zhu, B. J.; Li, Yan F.; Han, B.; Liu, C.; Ma, Y.; Li, Yi F.; Tao, M. Z.; Li, M. H.; Guo, X.; Huang, X. G.; Fu, S. Z.; Zhu, J. Q.; Zhao, G.; Chen, L. M.; Fu, C. B.; Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron energy is directly correlated with the energy of the incident ions in experiments involving laser-driven nuclear reactions. Using high-energy incident ions reduces the energy concentration of the generated neutrons. A novel “laser-collider” method was used at the Shenguang II laser facility to produce monoenergetic neutrons via 7Li (d, n) nuclear reactions. The specially designed K-shaped target significantly increased the numbers of incident d and Li ions at the keV level. Ultimately, 13.3 MeV neutrons were obtained. Considering the time resolution of the neutron detector, we demonstrated that the produced neutrons were monoenergetic. Interferometry and a Multi hydro-dynamics simulation confirmed the monoenergetic nature of these neutrons. PMID:27250660

  11. A novel laser-collider used to produce monoenergetic 13.3 MeV (7)Li (d, n) neutrons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J R; Zhang, X P; Yuan, D W; Li, Y T; Li, D Z; Rhee, Y J; Zhang, Z; Li, F; Zhu, B J; Li, Yan F; Han, B; Liu, C; Ma, Y; Li, Yi F; Tao, M Z; Li, M H; Guo, X; Huang, X G; Fu, S Z; Zhu, J Q; Zhao, G; Chen, L M; Fu, C B; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    Neutron energy is directly correlated with the energy of the incident ions in experiments involving laser-driven nuclear reactions. Using high-energy incident ions reduces the energy concentration of the generated neutrons. A novel "laser-collider" method was used at the Shenguang II laser facility to produce monoenergetic neutrons via (7)Li (d, n) nuclear reactions. The specially designed K-shaped target significantly increased the numbers of incident d and Li ions at the keV level. Ultimately, 13.3 MeV neutrons were obtained. Considering the time resolution of the neutron detector, we demonstrated that the produced neutrons were monoenergetic. Interferometry and a Multi hydro-dynamics simulation confirmed the monoenergetic nature of these neutrons. PMID:27250660

  12. FIGARO: a New Facility for Studying Neutron-Induced Reactions that Produce Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanini, L.; Haight, R. C.; Devlin, M.; Aprahamian, A.

    2000-04-01

    FIGARO (Fast neutron-Induced GAmma-Ray Observer) was established in 1999 at LANSCE/WNR. This new capability is intended to extend our research into nuclear reactions and nuclear structure using gamma rays as the principal probe. The detector will consist of an array of germanium and NE-213 neutron detectors, operating in coincidence, placed at a distance of about 20 m from the neutron source. The scientific goals of FIGARO include: investigation of nuclear level densities using gamma-ray transitions as an indicator of angular momentum populated in the reaction; investigations of pre-equilibrium reactions; and study of cross sections and neutron emission spectra in (n,n') excitations. A first measurement, with the detection of only gamma-rays, has been performed with a ^59Co sample. By comparison with existing data(T. E. Slusarchyk, ORNL/TM-11404(1989)) we can assess the performance of the detector. Results will be discussed.

  13. Charged particles produced in neutron reactions on nuclei from beryllium to gold

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, R.C.

    1997-08-01

    Charged-particle production in reactions of neutrons with nuclei has been studied over the past several years with the spallation source of neutrons from 1 to 50 MeV at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Target nuclides include 9Be, C, 27Al, Si, 56Fe, 59Co, 58,60Ni, 93Nb and 197Au. Proton, deuteron, triton, 3He and 4He emission spectra, angular distributions and production cross sections have been measured. Transitions from the compound nuclear reaction mechanism to precompound reactions are clearly seen in the data. The data are compared with data from the literature where available, with evaluated nuclear data libraries, and with calculations where the selection of the nuclear level density prescription is of great importance. Calculations normalized at En = 14 MeV can differ from the present data by a factor of 2 for neutron energies between 5 and 10 MeV.

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry of 36Cl produced by neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Habara, M; Yoshizawa, Y; Biebel, U; Haberstock, G; Heinzl, J; Korschinek, G; Morinaga, H; Nolte, E

    1990-10-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry was performed at the Munich tandem laboratory to determine 36Cl/Cl ratios of samples from a tombstone exposed to neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb. The ratios were determined from the surface to deeper positions. The depth profile of 36Cl/Cl can be used for estimating the neutron energy distribution and intensity near the hypocentre in Hiroshima. PMID:1976726

  15. Measurement of Neutrons Produced by Beam-Target Interactions via a Coaxial Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauble, Scott; Poehlmann, Flavio; Rieker, Gregory; Cappelli, Mark

    2011-10-01

    This poster presents a method to measure neutron yield from a coaxial plasma accelerator. Stored electrical energies between 1 and 19 kJ are discharged within a few microseconds across the electrodes of the coaxial gun, accelerating deuterium gas samples to plasma beam energies well beyond the keV energy range. The focus of this study is to examine the interaction of the plasma beam with a deuterated target by designing and fabricating a detector to measure neutron yield. Given the strong electromagnetic pulse associated with our accelerator, indirect measurement of neutrons via threshold-dependent nuclear activation serves as both a reliable and definitive indicator of high-energy particles for our application. Upon bombardment with neutrons, discs or stacks of metal foils placed near the deuterated target undergo nuclear activation reactions, yielding gamma-emitting isotopes whose decay is measured by a scintillation detector system. By collecting gamma ray spectra over time and considering nuclear cross sections, the magnitude of the original neutron pulse is inferred.

  16. Neutron spectra produced by 30, 35 and 40 MeV proton beams at KIRAMS MC-50 cyclotron with a thick beryllium target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae Won; Bak, Sang-In; Ham, Cheolmin; In, Eun Jin; Kim, Do Yoon; Min, Kyung Joo; Zhou, Yujie; Park, Tae-Sun; Hong, Seung-Woo; Bhoraskar, V. N.

    2015-10-01

    Neutrons over a wide range of energies are produced by bombarding a 1.05 cm thick beryllium target with protons of different energies delivered by the MC-50 Cyclotron of the Korea Institute of Radiological Medical Sciences (KIRAMS). The neutron flux Φ(En) versus neutron energy En, produced by protons of 30, 35, and 40 MeV energies, was obtained by using the GEANT4 code with a data-based hadronic model. For the experimental validation of the simulated neutron spectra, a number of pure aluminum and iron oxide samples were irradiated with the neutrons produced by 30, 35, and 40 MeV protons at 20 μA beam current. The gamma-ray activities of 24Na and 56Mn produced, respectively, through 27Al(n,α)24Na and 56Fe(n,p)56Mn reactions were measured by a HPGe detector. The neutron flux Φ(En) at each neutron energy from the simulation was multiplied with the evaluated cross-sections σ(En) of the respective nuclear reaction, and the summation ∑ Φ(En) σ(En) was calculated over the neutron spectrum for each proton energy of 30, 35, and 40 MeV. The measured gamma-ray activities of 24Na and 56Mn were found in good agreement with the activities estimated by using the summed values of ∑ Φ(En) σ(En) along with other parameters in a neutron activation method.

  17. Measurements of Accelerator-Produced Leakage Neutron and Photon Transmission through Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Walter R

    2002-07-04

    Optimum shielding of the radiation from particle accelerators requires knowledge of the attenuation characteristics of the shielding material. The most common material for shielding this radiation is concrete, which can be made using various materials of different densities as aggregates. These different concrete mixes can have very different attenuation characteristics. Information about the attenuation of leakage photons and neutrons in ordinary and heavy concrete is, however, very limited. To increase our knowledge and understanding of the radiation attenuation in concrete of various compositions, we have performed measurements of the transmission of leakage radiation, photons and neutrons, from a Varian Clinac 2100C medical linear accelerator operating at maximum electron energies of 6 and 18 MeV. We also calculated, using Monte Carlo techniques, the leakage neutron spectra and its transmission through concrete. The results of these measurements and calculations extend the information currently available for designing shielding for medical electron accelerators. Photon transmission characteristics depend more on the manufacturer of the concrete than on the atomic composition. A possible cause for this effect is a non-uniform distribution of the high density aggregate, typically iron, in the concrete matrix. Errors in estimated transmission of photons can exceed a factor of three, depending on barrier thickness, if attenuation in high-density concrete is simply scaled from that of normal density concrete. We found that neutron transmission through the high-density concretes can be estimated most reasonably and conservatively by using the linear tenth-value layer of normal concrete if specific values of the tenth-value layer of the high-density concrete are not known. The reason for this is that the neutron transmission depends primarily on the hydrogen content of the concrete, which does not significantly depend on concrete density. Errors of factors of two to

  18. Investigation of X-ray spectral response of D-T fusion produced neutron irradiated PIPS detectors for plasma X-ray diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneshwara Raja, P.; Narasimha Murty, N. V. L.; Rao, C. V. S.; Abhangi, Mitul

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the fusion-produced neutron irradiation induced changes in the X-ray spectral response of commercially available Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon (PIPS) detectors using the accelerator based D-T generator. After 14.1 MeV neutron irradiation up to a fluence of 3.6× 1010 n/cm2, the energy resolution (i.e. FWHM) of the detectors at room temperature is found to degrade by about 3.8 times that of the pre-irradiated value. From the X-ray spectral characteristics, it has been observed that the room temperature spectral response of PIPS detectors is too poor even at low neutron fluences. Irradiation is also carried out with Am-Be neutron source for studying the effect of scattered neutrons from the reactor walls on the detector performance. Comparative studies of the damage caused by 14.1 MeV neutrons and Am-Be source produced neutrons at the same neutron fluence are carried out by analyzing the irradiated detector characteristics. The degradation in the energy resolution of the detectors is attributed to the radiation induced changes in the detector leakage current. No considerable changes in the full depletion voltage and the effective doping concentration up to the neutron fluence of 3.6× 1010 n/cm2, are observed from the measured C-V characteristics. Partial recovery of the neutron irradiated detector characteristics is discussed.

  19. Neutron yields and effective doses produced by Galactic Cosmic Ray interactions in shielded environments in space.

    PubMed

    Heilbronn, Lawrence H; Borak, Thomas B; Townsend, Lawrence W; Tsai, Pi-En; Burnham, Chelsea A; McBeth, Rafe A

    2015-11-01

    In order to define the ranges of relevant neutron energies for the purposes of measurement and dosimetry in space, we have performed a series of Monte Carlo transport model calculations that predict the neutron field created by Galactic Cosmic Ray interactions inside a variety of simple shielding configurations. These predictions indicate that a significant fraction of the neutron fluence and neutron effective dose lies in the region above 20 MeV up to several hundred MeV. These results are consistent over thicknesses of shielding that range from very thin (2.7 g/cm(2)) to thick (54 g/cm(2)), and over both shielding materials considered (aluminum and water). In addition to these results, we have also investigated whether simplified Galactic Cosmic Ray source terms can yield predictions that are equivalent to simulations run with a full GCR source term. We found that a source using a GCR proton and helium spectrum together with a scaled oxygen spectrum yielded nearly identical results to a full GCR spectrum, and that the scaling factor used for the oxygen spectrum was independent of shielding material and thickness. Good results were also obtained using a GCR proton spectrum together with a scaled helium spectrum, with the helium scaling factor also independent of shielding material and thickness. Using a proton spectrum alone was unable to reproduce the full GCR results. PMID:26553642

  20. A 14 MeV neutron generator as a source of various charged particles produced in fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdowicz, Krzysztof; Dankowski, Jan; Gabańska, Barbara; Igielski, Andrzej; Janik, Władysław; Kurowski, Arkadiusz; Woźnicka, Urszula

    2014-05-01

    Measuring the energy of ions from the thermonuclear reaction in future energetic tokamaks (like ITER) is important in order to obtain information on the energetic balance in a plasma toroidal column. Detectors made of synthetic diamond can be used for the spectrometry of ions which accompany burning plasma. A fast neutron (14 MeV) generator, which is a linear accelerator of deuterons, is based on the nuclear reaction T(d,n)α in a tritium target. The energy of alpha particles produced in the D-T reaction in the neutron generator is the same (maximum 3.5 MeV) as the energy of alpha particles present in the hot D-T plasma in tokamaks. Other reactions in the target also occur and the energy spectra of various created ions can be also measured. The experiments have been performed with an ion spectrometry made possible with the use of scCVD diamond detectors at the fast neutron generator (IGN-14) at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Kraków, Poland.

  1. Nuclear Structure Studies of Some Neutron Rich Nuclei Produced in 252Cf Spontaneous Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramayya, A. V.; Hamilton, J. H.; Hwang, J. K.

    2015-02-01

    High spin states of neutron-rich nuclei such as 133,134Te, 93Sr, 105Nb have been studied by measuring γ- γ- γ coincidences (cube), γ- γ- γ- γ coincidences (hypercube) and angular correlations from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf with the LBNL Gammasphere detector array. Four types of particle-hole bands built on the known 334.3 keV isomer in 133Te were identified. The level structure of 93Sr is interpreted, in part, as arising from the weak coupling of the 1d5/2 neutron hole to the yrast states of the 94Sr core. The g-factor of the 4+ state in 134Te was measured, for the first time, by using a new technique developed for measuring angular correlations with Gammasphere. A new level scheme of 105Nb was established. Three new collective bands were identified with a total of 14 new levels and 36 new γ transitions. In 117-122Cd, a shift to more slightly deformed structures was found where the excited levels do not fit the long held picture of one, two and three phonon bands.

  2. Shock wave produced by hadron-quark phase transition in neutron star

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavo de Almeida, Luis; Duarte, Sérgio José Barbosa; Rodrigues, Hilário

    2015-12-17

    In this work we present a schematic description of the detonation wave in hadronic matter inside a neutron star core. We have used a simplified two shells model where the inner shell medium is initially composed of a small lump of strange quark matter surrounded by a large outer shell composed of hadronic matter. We have utilized an equation of state (EOS) based on Relativistic Mean Field Theory with the parameter set NL3 to describe the nuclear and subnuclear phases. We use the MIT bag model to describe the strange quark matter. The hadron-quark phase transition actually induces highly non equilibrium modes, which may become a detonation process (faster) or a burning process (slower). The main purpose of the work is to study the formation of a remnant quark star and the possibility of mass ejection caused by the hadron-quark phase transition. We have found that the total amount of ejected mass is dependant of the bag constant utilized in the strange matter description.

  3. Calculated shielding characteristics of eight materials for neutrons and secondary photons produced by monoenergetic source neutrons with energies less than 400 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Noriyoshi; Shikata, Takashi; Fujita, Shin; Kosako, Toshiso

    1995-10-01

    Shielding characteristics of iron, lead, ordinary concrete, heavy concrete, graphite, marble, water, and paraffin were calculated for monoenergetic source neutrons with energies < 400 MeV. The depth dependence of neutron and secondary photon transmitted dose equivalents at the exit surfaces of shields of varying thickness is exhibited for some monoenergetic source neutrons and for each material. Their shielding characteristics are compared and discussed in terms of the degradation process of neutron energy and the change of neutron spectrum in typical shielding materials. Calculations were carried out by using the one-dimensional discrete ordinates code ANISN-JR and the cross-section library DLC-87/HILO. Systematic knowledge concerning the shielding of neutrons with energies < 400 MeV was successfully obtained.

  4. Identification of 63Ni and 60Co produced in a steel sample by thermal neutrons from the Hiroshima atomic bomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizuma, K.; Iwatani, K.; Hasai, H.; Oka, T.; Hoshi, M.; Shibata, S.; Imamura, M.; Shibata, T.

    1997-02-01

    Long-lived residual radioactivity 63Ni produced by the (n, γ) reaction was detected for the first time from a steel plate sampled at near the hypocenter of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Nickel and cobalt were chemically separated and enriched from the steel sample. Low energy beta rays of 63Ni were measured with a low-background liquid scintillation counter and gamma-rays of 60Co were measured with a low background Ge detector. Specific activities were determined as 0.0063±0.0004 Bq mg -1 for {63Ni}/{Ni} and 8.70±0.46 Bq mg -1 for {60Co}/{Co} at the time of the bomb explosion. Comparisons with the calculated yield based on the current dosimetry system DS86 neutrons were also given.

  5. Code System for Producing Pointwise and Multigroup Neutron and Photon Cross Sections from ENDF/B Data.

    1995-06-01

    Version 04 The NJOY nuclear data processing system is a comprehensive computer code package for producing pointwise and multigroup neutron and photon cross sections from ENDF/B evaluated nuclear data. This is the last NJOY-91 series. It uses the same module structure as the earlier versions and its graphics options depend on DISSPLA. This new release, designated NJOY91.119, includes bug fixes, improvements in several modules, and some new capabilities. Information on the changes is included inmore » the README file. A new test problem was added to test some ENDF-6 features, including Reich-Moore resonance reconstruction, energy-angle matrices in GROUPR, and energy-angle distributions in ACER. The 91.119 release is basically configured for UNIX.« less

  6. Characterization of the secondary neutron field produced during treatment of an anthropomorphic phantom with x-rays, protons and carbon ions.

    PubMed

    Tessa, C La; Berger, T; Kaderka, R; Schardt, D; Burmeister, S; Labrenz, J; Reitz, G; Durante, M

    2014-04-21

    Short- and long-term side effects following the treatment of cancer with radiation are strongly related to the amount of dose deposited to the healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. The characterization of the radiation field outside the planned target volume is the first step for estimating health risks, such as developing a secondary radioinduced malignancy. In ion and high-energy photon treatments, the major contribution to the dose deposited in the far-out-of-field region is given by neutrons, which are produced by nuclear interaction of the primary radiation with the beam line components and the patient's body. Measurements of the secondary neutron field and its contribution to the absorbed dose and equivalent dose for different radiotherapy technologies are presented in this work. An anthropomorphic RANDO phantom was irradiated with a treatment plan designed for a simulated 5 × 2 × 5 cm³ cancer volume located in the center of the head. The experiment was repeated with 25 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) photons and charged particles (protons and carbon ions) delivered with both passive modulation and spot scanning in different facilities. The measurements were performed with active (silicon-scintillation) and passive (bubble, thermoluminescence ⁶LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-600) and ⁷LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-700)) detectors to investigate the production of neutral particles both inside and outside the phantom. These techniques provided the whole energy spectrum (E ≤ 20 MeV) and corresponding absorbed dose and dose equivalent of photo neutrons produced by x-rays, the fluence of thermal neutrons for all irradiation types and the absorbed dose deposited by neutrons with 0.8 < E < 10 MeV during the treatment with scanned carbon ions. The highest yield of thermal neutrons is observed for photons and, among ions, for passively modulated beams. For the treatment with high-energy x-rays, the contribution of secondary neutrons to the dose equivalent is of the same

  7. Characterization of the secondary neutron field produced during treatment of an anthropomorphic phantom with x-rays, protons and carbon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Tessa, C.; Berger, T.; Kaderka, R.; Schardt, D.; Burmeister, S.; Labrenz, J.; Reitz, G.; Durante, M.

    2014-04-01

    Short- and long-term side effects following the treatment of cancer with radiation are strongly related to the amount of dose deposited to the healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. The characterization of the radiation field outside the planned target volume is the first step for estimating health risks, such as developing a secondary radioinduced malignancy. In ion and high-energy photon treatments, the major contribution to the dose deposited in the far-out-of-field region is given by neutrons, which are produced by nuclear interaction of the primary radiation with the beam line components and the patient’s body. Measurements of the secondary neutron field and its contribution to the absorbed dose and equivalent dose for different radiotherapy technologies are presented in this work. An anthropomorphic RANDO phantom was irradiated with a treatment plan designed for a simulated 5 × 2 × 5 cm3 cancer volume located in the center of the head. The experiment was repeated with 25 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) photons and charged particles (protons and carbon ions) delivered with both passive modulation and spot scanning in different facilities. The measurements were performed with active (silicon-scintillation) and passive (bubble, thermoluminescence 6LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-600) and 7LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-700)) detectors to investigate the production of neutral particles both inside and outside the phantom. These techniques provided the whole energy spectrum (E ⩽ 20 MeV) and corresponding absorbed dose and dose equivalent of photo neutrons produced by x-rays, the fluence of thermal neutrons for all irradiation types and the absorbed dose deposited by neutrons with 0.8 < E < 10 MeV during the treatment with scanned carbon ions. The highest yield of thermal neutrons is observed for photons and, among ions, for passively modulated beams. For the treatment with high-energy x-rays, the contribution of secondary neutrons to the dose equivalent is of the same order

  8. Angular distribution of 4.43-MeV γ-rays produced in inelastic scattering of 14.1-MeV neutrons by 12C nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystritsky, V. M.; Grozdanov, D. N.; Zontikov, A. O.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Rogov, Yu. N.; Ruskov, I. N.; Sadovsky, A. B.; Skoy, V. R.; Barmakov, Yu. N.; Bogolyubov, E. P.; Ryzhkov, V. I.; Yurkov, D. I.

    2016-07-01

    The work is devoted to measuring the angular distribution of 4.43-MeV γ-rays produced in inelastic scattering of 14.1-MeV neutrons by 12C nuclei. A portable ING-27 neutron generator (designed and fabricated at VNIIA, Moscow) with a built-in 64-pixel silicon α-detector was used as a source of tagged neutrons. The γ-rays of characteristic nuclear radiation from 12C were detected with a spectrometric system that consisted of 22 γ-detectors based on NaI(Tl) crystals arranged around the carbon target. The measured angular distribution of 4.43-MeV γ-rays is analyzed and compared with the results of other published experimental works.

  9. Deuterium Gas-Puff Z-pinch as a Source of Fast Ions Producing Intensive Pulse of Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezac, K.; Cikhardt, J.; Cikhardtova, B.; Klir, D.; Kravarik, J.; Kubes, P.; Sila, O.; Shishlov, A.; Cherdizov, R.; Fursov, F.; Kokshenev, V.; Kovalchuk, B.; Kurmaev, N.; Labetsky, A.; Ratakhin, N.; Turek, K.

    2015-11-01

    A deuterium gas-puff with outer plasma shell has been examined on GIT-12 generator (on the current level of 3 MA) since 2013. Such a configuration caused more stable implosion at final stage of z-pinch. The consequence of this was a production of intensive pulses of fast ions. During last 4 campaigns in 2013-2015, fast ions were examined by several in-chamber diagnostics such as: stack detector (ion energy), pinhole camera (location of ion source), multi-pinhole camera (asymmetry and anisotropy of ion emission), and ion beam detector (dynamics of ion pulses). A CR-39 track detectors and also GAFCHROMIC HD-V2 films from these diagnostics will be presented. On the basis of obtained results, the solid sample for increasing of neutron yield up to 1e13 could be placed below the cathode mesh. Except of neutron yield, other properties such as: neutron energies (up to 33 MeV), neutron emission time (about 20 ns), and emission anisotropy of neutrons were measured. Such a short and intensive neutron pulse provides various applications. This work was supported by the MSMT project LH13283.

  10. High energy neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of the experimental pulse height spectra produced in diamond detectors by quasi-mono-energetic neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milocco, A.; Pillon, M.; Angelone, M.; Plompen, A.; Krása, A.; Trkov, A.

    2013-08-01

    This work was carried out in view of the possible use of diamond detectors as high resolution neutron spectrometers for the ITER project. An MCNP5(X) based computational tool has been developed to simulate the fast neutron response of diamond detectors. The source neutrons are generated by a source routine, developed earlier, that includes deuteron beam energy loss, angular straggling, and two-body relativistic kinematics. The diamond detector routine calculates a pulse height spectrum that is built up by elastic and inelastic scattering, (n,a), (n,p), and (n,d) reaction channels. A combination of nuclear data from ENDF/B-VII.0, TENDL-2010, and ENSDF is used. The simulated spectra are compared with measured spectra. It is shown that the simulation tool allows an interpretation of most of the characteristic features in the spectrum. This is an important step towards the use of diamond detectors for spectral analysis and fluence measurements. © 2001 Elsevier Science.

  12. Research on anisotropy of fusion-produced protons and neutrons emission from high-current plasma-focus discharges.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, K; Skladnik-Sadowska, E; Sadowski, M J; Szydlowski, A; Czaus, K; Kwiatkowski, R; Zaloga, D; Paduch, M; Zielinska, E

    2015-01-01

    The paper concerns fast protons and neutrons from D-D fusion reactions in a Plasma-Focus-1000U facility. Measurements were performed with nuclear-track detectors arranged in "sandwiches" of an Al-foil and two PM-355 detectors separated by a polyethylene-plate. The Al-foil eliminated all primary deuterons, but was penetrable for fast fusion protons. The foil and first PM-355 detector were penetrable for fast neutrons, which were converted into recoil-protons in the polyethylene and recorded in the second PM-355 detector. The "sandwiches" were irradiated by discharges of comparable neutron-yields. Analyses of etched tracks and computer simulations of the fusion-products behavior in the detectors were performed. PMID:25638081

  13. Research on anisotropy of fusion-produced protons and neutrons emission from high-current plasma-focus discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowski, K. Sadowski, M. J.; Szydlowski, A.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Czaus, K.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Zaloga, D.; Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E.

    2015-01-15

    The paper concerns fast protons and neutrons from D-D fusion reactions in a Plasma-Focus-1000U facility. Measurements were performed with nuclear-track detectors arranged in “sandwiches” of an Al-foil and two PM-355 detectors separated by a polyethylene-plate. The Al-foil eliminated all primary deuterons, but was penetrable for fast fusion protons. The foil and first PM-355 detector were penetrable for fast neutrons, which were converted into recoil-protons in the polyethylene and recorded in the second PM-355 detector. The “sandwiches” were irradiated by discharges of comparable neutron-yields. Analyses of etched tracks and computer simulations of the fusion-products behavior in the detectors were performed.

  14. Relative biological effectiveness of fission neutrons for producing micronuclei in the root-tip cells of onion seedlings after irradiation as dry seeds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenyi; Endo, Satoru; Ishikawa, Masayori; Ikeda, Hideo; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2002-12-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of mixed neutron and gamma-ray radiation emitted at a 252Cf source at the Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, compared with 60Co gamma-ray radiation was determined. The tissue-absorbed dose contribution of the accompanying gamma radiation was about 35.7% to the total tissue-absorbed dose from the 252Cf mixed radiation. The 252Cf mixed radiation and 60Co gamma rays produced approximate linear changes in the frequency of micronuclei induced in root-tip cells of Allium cepa L. onion seedlings after irradiation as dry dormant seeds with varying absorbed doses in onion seeds. Therefore, the RBE for radiation-induced micronuclei was calculated as the ratio of the slopes for the 252Cf mixed radiation and the 60Co gamma rays. The deduced RBE value of 252Cf mixed radiation to 60Co gamma rays to induce micronuclei in dry dormant onion seed cells was about 90.5 +/- 3.6 (+/- 1sigma); the RBE of neutrons from the 252Cf mixed radiation was about 150 +/- 6 (+/- 1sigma). Furthermore, the sensitivity ratio of the induction rate of micronuclei in dry dormant seeds to that in seedlings by neutrons from 252Cf mixed radiation was significantly different from that by 60Co gamma rays. From these results, we concluded that the repair efficiency of DNA damage induced by neutrons may be different from that by gamma rays. PMID:12674204

  15. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Guillen, Donna P.; Longhurst, Glen R.; Porter, Douglas L.; Parry, James R.

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  16. Producing persistent, high-current, high-duty-factor H{sup -} beams for routine 1 MW operation of Spallation Neutron Source (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Han, B. X.; Hardek, T. W.; Kang, Y. W.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Welton, R.

    2012-02-15

    Since 2009, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been producing neutrons with ion beam powers near 1 MW, which requires the extraction of {approx}50 mA H{sup -} ions from the ion source with a {approx}5% duty factor. The 50 mA are achieved after an initial dose of {approx}3 mg of Cs and heating the Cs collar to {approx}170 deg. C. The 50 mA normally persist for the entire 4-week source service cycles. Fundamental processes are reviewed to elucidate the persistence of the SNS H{sup -} beams without a steady feed of Cs and why the Cs collar temperature may have to be kept near 170 deg. C.

  17. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bernander, N.K. et al.

    1960-10-18

    An apparatus is described for producing neutrons through target bombardment with deuterons. Deuterium gas is ionized by electron bombardment and the deuteron ions are accelerated through a magnetic field to collimate them into a continuous high intensity beam. The ion beam is directed against a deuteron pervious metal target of substantially the same nnaterial throughout to embed the deuterous therein and react them to produce neutrons. A large quantity of neutrons is produced in this manner due to the increased energy and quantity of ions bombarding the target.

  18. Measurement of the neutron fields produced by a 62 MeV proton beam on a PMMA phantom using extended range Bonner sphere spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amgarou, K.; Bedogni, R.; Domingo, C.; Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Carinci, G.; Russo, S.

    2011-10-01

    The experimental characterization of the neutron fields produced as parasitic effect in medical accelerators is assuming an increased importance for either the patient protection or the facility design aspects. Medical accelerators are diverse in terms of particle type (electrons or hadrons) and energy, but the radiation fields around them have in common (provided that a given threshold energy is reached) the presence of neutrons with energy span over several orders of magnitude. Due to the large variability of neutron energy, field or dosimetry measurements in these workplaces are very complex, and in general, cannot be performed with ready-to-use commercial instruments. In spite of its poor energy resolution, the Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS) is the only instrument able to simultaneously determine all spectral components in such workplaces. The energy range of this instrument is limited to E<20 MeV if only polyethylene spheres are used, but can be extended to hundreds of MeV by including metal-loaded spheres (extended range BSS, indicated with ERBSS). With the aim of providing useful data to the scientific community involved in neutron measurements at hadron therapy facilities, an ERBSS experiment was carried out at the Centro di AdroTerapia e Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate (CATANA) of INFN—LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud), where a proton beam routinely used for ophthalmic cancer treatments is available. The 62 MeV beam was directed towards a PMMA phantom, simulating the patient, and two neutron measurement points were established at 0° and 90° with respect to the beam-line. Here the ERBSS of UAB (Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona— Grup de Física de les Radiacions) and INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati) were exposed to characterize the "forward" and "sideward" proton-induced neutron fields. The use of two ERBSS characterized by different set of spheres, central detectors, and independently established and

  19. Code System for Producing Pointwise and Multigroup Neutron and Photon Cross Sections from ENDF/B Data.

    1998-05-13

    Version 00 The NJOY nuclear data processing system is a modular computer code used for converting evaluated nuclear data in the ENDF format into libraries useful for applications calculations. Because the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) format is used all around the world (e.g., ENDF/B-VI in the US, JEF-2.2 in Europe, JENDL-3.2 in Japan, BROND-2.2 in Russia), NJOY gives its users access to a wide variety of the most up-to-date nuclear data. NJOY provides comprehensivemore » capabilities for processing evaluated data, and it can serve applications ranging from continuous-energy Monte Carlo (MCNP), through deterministic transport codes (DANT, ANISN, DORT), to reactor lattice codes (WIMS, EPRI). NJOY handles a wide variety of nuclear effects, including resonances, Doppler broadening, heating (KERMA), radiation damage, thermal scattering (even cold moderators), gas production, neutrons and charged particles, photoatomic interactions, self shielding, probability tables, photon production, and high-energy interactions (to 150 MeV). Output can include printed listings, special library files for applications, and Postscript graphics (plus color). More information on NJOY is available from the developer's home page at http://t2.lanl.gov. Follow the Tourbus section of the Tour area to find notes from the ICTP lectures held at Trieste in March 1998 on the ENDF format and on the NJOY code.« less

  20. Code System for Producing Pointwise and Multigroup Neutron and Photon Cross Sections from ENDF/B Data.

    2000-03-28

    Version 00 The NJOY nuclear data processing system is a modular computer code used for converting evaluated nuclear data in the ENDF format into libraries useful for applications calculations. Because the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) format is used all around the world (e.g., ENDF/B‑VI in the US, JEF‑2.2 in Europe, JENDL‑3.2 in Japan, BROND‑2.2 in Russia), NJOY gives its users access to a wide variety of the most up‑to‑date nuclear data. NJOY provides comprehensivemore » capabilities for processing evaluated data, and it can serve applications ranging from continuous‑energy Monte Carlo (MCNP), through deterministic transport codes (DANT, ANISN, DORT), to reactor lattice codes (WIMS, EPRI). NJOY handles a wide variety of nuclear effects, including resonances, Doppler broadening, heating (KERMA), radiation damage, thermal scattering (even cold moderators), gas production, neutrons and charged particles, photoatomic interactions, self shielding, probability tables, photon production, and high‑energy interactions (to 150 MeV). Output can include printed listings, special library files for applications, and Postscript graphics (plus color).« less

  1. The structure of Sindbis virus produced from vertebrate and invertabrate hosts determined by small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    He, Lilin; Piper, Amanda; Meilleur, Flora; Myles, Dean A A; Hernandez, Raquel; Brown, Dennis; Heller, William T

    2010-01-01

    The complex natural cycle of vectored viruses that transition between host species, such as between insects and mammals, makes understanding the full life cycle of the virus an incredibly complex problem. Sindbis virus, an arbovirus and prototypic alphavirus having an inner protein shell and an outer glycoprotein coat separated by a lipid membrane, is one example of a vectored virus that transitions between vertebrate and insect hosts. While evidence of host-specific differences in Sindbis virus has been observed, no work has been performed to characterize the impact of the host species on the structure of the virus. Here, we report the first study of the structural differences between Sindbis viruses grown in mammalian and insect cells, which were determined by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), a nondestructive technique that did not decrease the infectivity of the Sindbis virus particles studied. The scattering data and modeling showed that, while the radial position of the lipid bilayer did not change significantly, it was possible to conclude that it did have significantly more cholesterol when the virus was grown in mammalian cells. Additionally, the outer protein coat was found to be more extended in the mammalian Sindbis virus. The SANS data also demonstrated that the RNA and nucleocapsid protein share a closer interaction in the mammalian-cell-grown virus than in the virus from insect cells.

  2. Small angle neutron scattering analyses and high temperature mechanical properties of nano-structured oxide dispersion strengthened steels produced via cryomilling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeoung Han; Byun, Thak Sang; Shin, Eunjoo; Seol, Jae-Bok; Young, Sung; Reddy, N. S.

    2015-08-17

    Three oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels are produced in order to investigate the effect of the mechanical alloying (MA) temperature on the microstructural evolution and high temperature mechanical properties. The microstructural evolution with different MA conditions is examined using small angle neutron scattering. As the MA temperature decreases, the density of the nanoclusters below 10 nm increases and their mean diameter decreases. A low temperature during MA leads to a high strength in the compression tests performed at 500 *C; however, this effect disappears in testing at 900 *C. The milling process at *70 *C exhibits excellent high fracture toughness, which is better than the benchmark material 14YWT-SM10. However, the *150 *C milling process results in significantly worse fracture toughness properties. The reasons for this strong temperature dependency are discussed.

  3. Neutron metrology laboratory facility simulation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Mariana; Salgado, Ana P; Filho, Aidano S; Pereira, Walsan W; Patrão, Karla C S; Fonseca, Evaldo S

    2014-10-01

    The Neutron Low Scattering Laboratory in Brazil has been completely rebuilt. Evaluation of air attenuation parameters and neutron component scattering in the room was done using Monte Carlo simulation code. Neutron fields produced by referenced neutron source were used to calculate neutron scattering and air attenuation. PMID:24864318

  4. Tungsten thermal neutron dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, L. L.; Richardson, P. J.; Sheibley, D. W.

    1969-01-01

    Tungsten-185 activity, which is produced by neutron activation of tungsten-184, determines thermal neutron flux. Radiochemical separation methods and counting techniques for irradiated tungsten provide accurate determination of the radiation exposure.

  5. Ultrafast neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1985-06-19

    A neutron detector of very high temporal resolution is described. It may be used to measure distributions of neutrons produced by fusion reactions that persist for times as short as about 50 picoseconds.

  6. Neutron-deficient N{approx_equal}126 nuclei produced in 238U fragmentation: population of high-spin states

    SciTech Connect

    Podolyak, Zs.; Regan, P. H.; Walker, P. M.; Pearson, C. J.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Gerl, J.; Hellstroem, M.; Becker, F.; Gorska, M.; Kelic, A.; Kopatch, Y.; Mandal, S.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Banu, A.; Geissel, H.; Grawe, H.; Kojouharov, I.; Lozeva, R.; Portillo, M.

    2006-04-26

    The population of metastable states produced in relativistic-energy fragmentation of a 238U beam has been measured. For states with high angular momentum, I=17({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) and I=21.5({Dirac_h}/2{pi}), a higher population than expected has been observed, with the discrepancy increasing with angular momentum. By considering two sources for the angular momentum, related to single-particle and collective motions, a much improved description of the experimental results can be obtained. In addition, new results on the structure of 208Fr, 211Ra and 216Ac are reported.

  7. Novel technologies and theoretical models in radiation therapy of cancer patients using 6.3 MeV fast neutrons produced by U-120 cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musabaeva, L. I.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Gribova, O. V.; Velikaya, V. V.; Lisin, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    The analysis of clinical use of neutron therapy with 6 MeV fast neutrons compared to conventional radiation therapy was carried out. The experience of using neutron and mixed neutron and photon therapy in patients with different radio-resistant malignant tumors shows the necessity of further studies and development of the novel approaches to densely-ionizing radiation. The results of dosimetry and radiobiological studies have been the basis for planning clinical programs for neutron therapy. Clinical trials over the past 30 years have shown that neutron therapy successfully destroys radio-resistant cancers, including salivary gland tumors, adenoidcystic carcinoma, inoperable sarcomas, locally advanced head and neck tumors, and locally advanced prostate cancer. Radiation therapy with 6.3 MeV fast neutrons used alone and in combination with photon therapy resulted in improved long-term treatment outcomes in patients with radio-resistant malignant tumors.

  8. Dose equivalent neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, Richard V.; Hankins, Dale E.; Tomasino, Luigi; Gomaa, Mohamed A. M.

    1983-01-01

    A neutron dosimeter is disclosed which provides a single measurements indicating the amount of potential biological damage resulting from the neutron exposure of the wearer, for a wide range of neutron energies. The dosimeter includes a detecting sheet of track etch detecting material such as a carbonate plastic, for detecting higher energy neutrons, and a radiator layer containing conversion material such as .sup.6 Li and .sup.10 B lying adjacent to the detecting sheet for converting moderate energy neutrons to alpha particles that produce tracks in the adjacent detecting sheet. The density of conversion material in the radiator layer is of an amount which is chosen so that the density of tracks produced in the detecting sheet is proportional to the biological damage done by neutrons, regardless of whether the tracks are produced as the result of moderate energy neutrons striking the radiator layer or as the result of higher energy neutrons striking the sheet of track etch material.

  9. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  10. SU-E-T-554: Monte Carlo Calculation of Source Terms and Attenuation Lengths for Neutrons Produced by 50–200 MeV Protons On Brass

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos-Mendez, J; Faddegon, B; Paganetti, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We used TOPAS (TOPAS wraps and extends Geant4 for medical physicists) to compare Geant4 physics models with published data for neutron shielding calculations. Subsequently, we calculated the source terms and attenuation lengths (shielding data) of the total ambient dose equivalent (TADE) in concrete for neutrons produced by protons in brass. Methods: Stage1: The Bertini and Binary nuclear models available in Geant4 were compared with published attenuation at depth of the TADE in concrete and iron. Stage2: Shielding data of the TADE in concrete was calculated for 50– 200 MeV proton beams on brass. Stage3: Shielding data from Stage2 was extrapolated for 235 MeV proton beams. This data was used in a point-line-source analytical model to calculate the ambient dose per unit therapeutic dose at two locations inside one treatment room at the Francis H Burr Proton Therapy Center. Finally, we compared these results with experimental data and full TOPAS simulations. Results: At larger angles (∼130o) the TADE in concrete calculated with the Bertini model was about 9 times larger than that calculated with the Binary model. The attenuation length in concrete calculated with the Binary model agreed with published data within 7%±0.4% (statistical uncertainty) for the deepest regions and 5%±0.1% for shallower regions. For iron the agreement was within 3%±0.1%. The ambient dose per therapeutic dose calculated with the Binary model, relative to the experimental data, was a ratio of 0.93±0.16 and 1.23±0.24 for two locations. The analytical model overestimated the dose by four orders of magnitude. These differences are attributed to the complexity of the geometry. Conclusion: The Binary and Bertini models gave comparable results, with the Binary model giving the best agreement with published data at large angle. Shielding data we calculated using the Binary model is useful for fast shielding calculations with other analytical models. This work was supported by

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1958-04-22

    A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

  12. Intense fusion neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  13. Observation of new K isomers among neutron-rich rare earth nuclei produced by in-flight fission of 345 MeV/nucleon 238U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Daisuke; Kubo, Toshiyuki; BigRIPS new isotope Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    We have performed search for new K isomers for a wide range of neutron-rich rare earth nuclei using the BigRIPS separator at RIKEN RIBF. The rare earth nuclei were produced by in-flight fission of a 238U beam at 345 MeV/nucleon, and isomeric gamma rays were detected using four clover-type germanium detectors. As a result, we have observed a total of 25 new microsecond isomers: 158 m , 159 m , 160 mNd, 158 m , 159 m , 161 mPm, 160 m , 161 m , 162 mSm, 163 m , 164 mEu, 162 m , 164 m , 165 m , 166 mGd, 164 m , 165 m , 166 m , 167 m , 168 mTb, 167 m , 168 m , 169 m , 170 mDy, and 171mHo, and obtained a wealth of spectroscopic information on these nuclei. The nuclei in this region are predicted to be well deformed with a prolate shape, and Kisomers are expected to appear due to the K hindrance. In the present measurement, as anticipated, many of the observed new isomers have been interpreted as a K isomer, because we could identify some gamma rays which belong to the grand-state rotational band being fed by isomeric transitions. The systematics of known K isomers, such as those in neighboring higher- Zisotones, also help and support the interpretation of isomerism. Here we will report on the details of the experimental results and discuss the possible configurations of deformed orbits for the observed new K isomers.

  14. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Foster, J.S. Jr.

    1960-04-19

    A compact electronic device capable of providing short time high density outputs of neutrons is described. The device of the invention includes an evacuated vacuum housing adapted to be supplied with a deuterium, tritium, or other atmosphere and means for establishing an electrical discharge along a path through the gas. An energized solenoid is arranged to constrain the ionized gas (plasma) along the path. An anode bearing adsorbed or adherent target material is arranged to enclose the constrained plasma. To produce neutrons a high voltage is applied from appropriate supply means between the plasma and anode to accelerate ions from the plasma to impinge upcn the target material, e.g., comprising deuterium.

  15. Frascati neutron generator (FNG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martone, M.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, Mario

    1995-03-01

    The 14 MeV neutron generator (FNG), in operation at the ENEA Energy Center of Frascati, Italy, is described. It produces up to 1 X 1011 neutrons per second and consists essentially of a deuterium-ion accelerator, a beam transport system, and a target of titanium tritide, where neutrons are produced by the T(d,n)4He fusion reactions. An application of FNG in the context of research activity on controlled thermonuclear fusion research is also briefly described.

  16. Use of D-T-produced fast neutrons for in vivo body composition analysis: a reference method for nutritional assessment in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kehayias, J J

    2004-05-01

    Body composition has become the main outcome of many nutritional intervention studies including osteoporosis, malnutrition, obesity, AIDS, and aging. Traditional indirect body composition methods developed with healthy young adults do not apply to the elderly or diseased. Fast neutron activation (for N and P) and neutron inelastic scattering (for C and O) are used to assess in vivo elements characteristic of specific body compartments. Non-bone phosphorus for muscle is measured by the (31)P(n, alpha)(28)Al reaction, and nitrogen for protein via the (14)N(n,2n)(13)N fast neutron reaction. Inelastic neutron scattering is used to measure total body carbon and oxygen. Body fat is derived from carbon after correcting for contributions from protein, bone, and glycogen. Carbon-to-oxygen ratio (C/O) is used to measure the distribution of fat and lean tissue in the body and to monitor small changes of lean mass. A sealed, D-T neutron generator is used for the production of fast neutrons. Carbon and oxygen mass and their ratio are measured in vivo at a radiation exposure of less than 0.06 mSv. Gamma-ray spectra are collected using large BGO detectors and analyzed for the 4.43 MeV state of carbon and 6.13 MeV state of oxygen, simultaneously with the irradiation. P and N analysis by delayed fast neutron activation is performed by transferring the patient to a shielded room equipped with an array of NaI(Tl) detectors. A combination of measurements makes possible the assessment of the "quality" of fat-free mass. The neutron generator system is used to evaluate the efficacy of new treatments, to study mechanisms of lean tissue depletion with aging, and to investigate methods for preserving function and quality of life in the elderly. It is also used as a reference method for the validation of portable instruments of nutritional assessment. PMID:14747891

  17. Neutron field characteristics of Ciemat's Neutron Standards Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Garcia, Karen A; Mendez-Villafañe, Roberto; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2015-06-01

    Monte Carlo calculations were carried out to characterize the neutron field produced by the calibration neutron sources of the Neutron Standards Laboratory at the Research Center for Energy, Environment, and Technology (CIEMAT) in Spain. For (241)AmBe and (252)Cf neutron sources, the neutron spectra, the ambient dose equivalent rates and the total neutron fluence rates were estimated. In the calibration hall, there are several items that modify the neutron field. To evaluate their effects different cases were used, from point-like source in vacuum up to the full model. Additionally, using the full model, the neutron spectra were estimated to different distances along the bench; with these spectra, the total neutron fluence and the ambient dose equivalent rates were calculated. The hall walls induce the largest changes in the neutron spectra and the respective integral quantities. The free-field neutron spectrum is modified due the room return effect. PMID:25468287

  18. Organic metal neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Michael A.; Ginley, David S.

    1987-01-01

    A device for detecting neutrons comprises a layer of conductive polymer sandwiched between electrodes, which may be covered on each face with a neutron transmissive insulating material layer. Conventional electrodes are used for a non-imaging integrating total neutron fluence-measuring embodiment, while wire grids are used in an imaging version of the device. The change in conductivity of the polymer after exposure to a neutron flux is determined in either case to provide the desired data. Alternatively, the exposed conductive polymer layer may be treated with a chemical reagent which selectively binds to the sites altered by neutrons to produce an image of the flux detected.

  19. Switchable radioactive neutron source device

    DOEpatents

    Stanford, G.S.; Rhodes, E.A.; Devolpi, A.; Boyar, R.E.

    1987-11-06

    This invention is a switchable neutron generating apparatus comprised of a pair of plates, the first plate having an alpha emitter section on it and the second plate having a target material portion on it which generates neutrons when its nuclei absorb an alpha particle. In operation, the alpha portion of the first plate is aligned with the neutron portion of the second plate to produce neutrons and brought out of alignment to cease production of neutrons. 3 figs.

  20. Switchable radioactive neutron source device

    DOEpatents

    Boyar, Robert E.; DeVolpi, Alexander; Stanford, George S.; Rhodes, Edgar A.

    1989-01-01

    This invention is a switchable neutron generating apparatus comprised of a pair of plates, the first plate having an alpha emitter section on it and the second plate having a target material portion on it which generates neutrons when its nuclei absorb an alpha particle. In operation, the alpha portion of the first plate is aligned with the neutron portion of the second plate to produce neutrons and brought out of alignment to cease production of neutrons.

  1. Cross sections for neutron-producing reactions induced by 14. 1 MeV neutrons incident on /sup 6/Li, /sup 7/Li, /sup 10/B, /sup 11/B, and carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Drosg, M.; Lisowski, P.W.; Drake, D.M.; Hardekopf, R.A.; Muellner, M.

    1988-10-01

    Using the time-of-flight technique, we have measured neutron emission spectra for /sup 6/Li, /sup 7/Li, /sup 10/B, /sup 11/B and carbon at an incident neutron energy of 14.1 MeV and at 10 angles between 30/degree/ and 143/degree/. Double differential cross sections and their integrated values have been extracted and are presented in tables and graphs. The nonelastic portion of the neutron emission spectra is noticeably higher than expected which may be due to uncertainties in the input library (ENDF/B-IV) used in the Monte Carlo correction for multiple scattering. In particular, the library for /sup 11/B appears to be very unrealistic with an integrated elastic cross section which should be higher by 50%. 20 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

  2. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Seagraves, David T.

    2003-01-01

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  3. Deformation of the very neutron-deficient rare-earth nuclei produced with the SPIRAL 76Kr radioactive beam and studied with EXOGAM + DIAMANT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redon, N.; Prévost, A.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph.; Meyer, M.; Rossé, B.; Stézowski, O.; Nolan, P. J.; Andreoiu, C.; Boston, A. J.; Descovich, M.; Evans, A. O.; Gros, S.; Norman, J.; Page, R. D.; Paul, E. S.; Rainovski, G.; Sampson, J.; de France, G.; Casandjian, J. M.; Theisen, Ch.; Scheurer, J. N.; Nyakó, B. M.; Gál, J.; Kalinka, G.; Molnár, J.; Dombrádi, Zs.; Timár, J.; Zolnai, L.; Juhász, K.; Astier, A.; Deloncle, I.; Porquet, M. G.; Wadsworth, R.; Raddon, P.; Lee, Y.; Wilkinson, A.; Joshi, P.; Simpson, J.; Appelbe, D.; Joss, D.; Lemmon, R.; Smith, J.; Cullen, D.; Brondi, A.; La Rana, G.; Moro, R.; Vardacci, E.; Girod, M.

    2004-02-01

    The structure of the very neutron-deficient rare-earth nuclei has been investigated in the first experiment with the EXOGAM gamma array coupled to the DIAMANT light charged particle detector using radioactive beam of 76Kr delivered by the SPIRAL facility. Very neutron-deficient Pr, Nd and Pm isotopes have been populated at rather high spin by the reaction 76Kr + 58Ni at a beam energy of 328 MeV. We report here the first results of this experiment.

  4. Deformation of the very neutron-deficient rare-earth nuclei produced with the SPIRAL 76Kr radioactive beam and studied with EXOGAM + DIAMANT

    SciTech Connect

    Redon, N.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph.; Meyer, M.; Rosse, B.; Stezowski, O.; France, G. de; Casandjian, J. M.

    2004-02-27

    The structure of the very neutron-deficient rare-earth nuclei has been investigated in the first experiment with the EXOGAM gamma array coupled to the DIAMANT light charged particle detector using radioactive beam of 76Kr delivered by the SPIRAL facility. Very neutron-deficient Pr, Nd and Pm isotopes have been populated at rather high spin by the reaction 76Kr + 58Ni at a beam energy of 328 MeV. We report here the first results of this experiment.

  5. PRODUCING ENERGY AND RADIOACTIVE FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Segre, E.; Kennedy, J.W.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1959-10-13

    This patent broadly discloses the production of plutonium by the neutron bombardment of uranium to produce neptunium which decays to plutonium, and the fissionability of plutonium by neutrons, both fast and thermal, to produce energy and fission products.

  6. High intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1973-12-11

    This invention relates to a high intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source comprising a neutron-producing source which emits pulses of fast neutrons, a moderator block adjacent to the last neutron source, a reflector block which encases the fast neutron source and the moderator block and has a thermal neutron exit port extending therethrough from the moderator block, and a neutron energy- dependent decoupling reflector liner covering the interior surfaces of the thermal neutron exit port and surrounding all surfaces of the moderator block except the surface viewed by the thermal neutron exit port. (Official Gazette)

  7. THERMAL NEUTRON INTENSITIES IN SOILS IRRADIATED BY FAST NEUTRONS FROM POINT SOURCES. (R825549C054)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal-neutron fluences in soil are reported for selected fast-neutron sources, selected soil types, and selected irradiation geometries. Sources include 14 MeV neutrons from accelerators, neutrons from spontaneously fissioning 252Cf, and neutrons produced from alp...

  8. Determination of the Neutron Lifetime Using Magnetically Trapped Neutrons

    PubMed Central

    Dzhosyuk, S. N.; Copete, A.; Doyle, J. M.; Yang, L.; Coakley, K. J.; Golub, R.; Korobkina, E.; Kreft, T.; Lamoreaux, S. K.; Thompson, A. K.; Yang, G. L.; Huffman, P. R.

    2005-01-01

    We report progress on an experiment to measure the neutron lifetime using magnetically trapped neutrons. Neutrons are loaded into a 1.1 T deep superconducting Ioffe-type trap by scattering 0.89 nm neutrons in isotopically pure superfluid 4He. Neutron decays are detected in real time using the scintillation light produced in the helium by the beta-decay electrons. The measured trap lifetime at a helium temperature of 300 mK and with no ameliorative magnetic ramping is substantially shorter than the free neutron lifetime. This is attributed to the presence of neutrons with energies higher than the magnetic potential of the trap. Magnetic field ramping is implemented to eliminate these neutrons, resulting in an 833−63+74s trap lifetime, consistent with the currently accepted value of the free neutron lifetime. PMID:27308147

  9. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.; Babcock, Dale F.; Menegus, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

  10. DNA damage produced by exposure of supercoiled plasmid DNA to high- and low-LET ionizing radiation: Effects of hydroxyl radical quenchers. DNA breakage, neutrons, OH radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Peak, J.G.; Ito, T.; Peak, M.J.; Robb, F.T.

    1994-08-01

    A supercoiled plasmid of 7300 base pairs was isolated and exposed in an aqueous environment to {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays and JANUS 0.85 MeV fission-spectrum neutrons. Dose responses for the production of single-strand breaks (SSBs), double-strand breaks (DSBs) and alkali-labile sites (ALSs) were compared with computations made from the conversion of the supercoil to its relaxed and linear forms. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for production of SSBs and DSBs was similar to that previously measured in the cellular environment. The RBE for destruction of genetic transforming activity of M13 viral DNA followed that for DNA damage. This is in contrast to the situation for biological effects such as lethality, mutagenesis, and cellular transformation measured in mammalian cells, where the RBE values are reversed. The role of hydroxyl (OH) radical in DNA damage induction by neutrons was investigated by exposure of plasmid in the presence of known quenchers of this species. Of four quenchers tested, all were able to reduce the yields of both SSBs and DSBs. These findings are consistent with a model for SSB and DSB induction by high linear energy transfer that involves OH radical mediation.

  11. Method of producing molybdenum-99

    DOEpatents

    Pitcher, Eric John

    2013-05-28

    Method of producing molybdenum-99, comprising accelerating ions by means of an accelerator; directing the ions onto a metal target so as to generate neutrons having an energy of greater than 10 MeV; directing the neutrons through a converter material comprising techentium-99 to produce a mixture comprising molybdenum-99; and, chemically extracting the molybdenum-99 from the mixture.

  12. Boron nitride solid state neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2004-04-27

    The present invention describes an apparatus useful for detecting neutrons, and particularly for detecting thermal neutrons, while remaining insensitive to gamma radiation. Neutrons are detected by direct measurement of current pulses produced by an interaction of the neutrons with hexagonal pyrolytic boron nitride.

  13. Calculation of dose coefficients for radionuclides produced in a spallation neutron source utilizing NUBASE and the evaluated nuclear structure data file databases.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, J; Eckerman, K; Arndt, A; Gold, C; Patton, P; Rudin, M; Brey, R; Gesell, T; Rusetski, V; Pagava, S

    2006-01-01

    Based on a mercury spallation neutron source target, the UNLV Transmutation Research Program has identified 72 radionuclides with a half-life greater than or equal to a minute as lacking an appropriate reference for a published dose coefficient according to existing radiation safety dose coefficient databases. A method was developed to compare the nuclear data presented in the ENSDF and NUBASE databases for these 72 radionuclides. Due to conflicting or lacking nuclear data in one or more of the databases, internal and external dose coefficient values have been calculated for only 14 radionuclides, which are not currently presented in Federal Guidance Reports Nos. 11, 12, and 13 or Publications 68 and 72 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Internal dose coefficient values are reported for inhalation and ingestion of 1 microm and 5 microm AMAD particulates along with the f1 values and absorption types for the adult worker. Internal dose coefficient values are also reported for inhalation and ingestion of 1 microm AMAD particulates as well as the f1 values and absorption types for members of the public. Additionally, external dose coefficient values for air submersion, exposure to contaminated ground surface, and exposure to soil contaminated to an infinite depth are also presented. PMID:16340608

  14. Simulated workplace neutron fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, V.; Taylor, G.; Röttger, S.

    2011-12-01

    The use of simulated workplace neutron fields, which aim at replicating radiation fields at practical workplaces, is an alternative solution for the calibration of neutron dosemeters. They offer more appropriate calibration coefficients when the mean fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficients of the simulated and practical fields are comparable. Intensive Monte Carlo modelling work has become quite indispensable for the design and/or the characterization of the produced mixed neutron/photon fields, and the use of Bonner sphere systems and proton recoil spectrometers is also mandatory for a reliable experimental determination of the neutron fluence energy distribution over the whole energy range. The establishment of a calibration capability with a simulated workplace neutron field is not an easy task; to date only few facilities are available as standard calibration fields.

  15. Pulsed neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, deceased, J. Craig; Rowland, Mark S.

    1989-03-21

    A pulsed neutron detector and system for detecting low intensity fast neutron pulses has a body of beryllium adjacent a body of hydrogenous material the latter of which acts as a beta particle detector, scintillator, and moderator. The fast neutrons (defined as having En>1.5 MeV) react in the beryllium and the hydrogenous material to produce larger numbers of slow neutrons than would be generated in the beryllium itself and which in the beryllium generate hellium-6 which decays and yields beta particles. The beta particles reach the hydrogenous material which scintillates to yield light of intensity related to the number of fast neutrons. A photomultiplier adjacent the hydrogenous material (scintillator) senses the light emission from the scintillator. Utilization means, such as a summing device, sums the pulses from the photo-multiplier for monitoring or other purposes.

  16. Dose-equivalent neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, R.V.; Hankins, D.E.; Tomasino, L.; Gomaa, M.A.M.

    1981-01-07

    A neutron dosimeter is disclosed which provides a single measurement indicating the amount of potential biological damage resulting from the neutron exposure of the wearer, for a wide range of neutron energies. The dosimeter includes a detecting sheet of track etch detecting material such as a carbonate plastic, for detecting higher energy neutrons, and a radiator layer contaning conversion material such as /sup 6/Li and /sup 10/B lying adjacent to the detecting sheet for converting moderate energy neutrons to alpha particles that produce tracks in the adjacent detecting sheet.

  17. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskaev, S. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    We review the current status of the development of accelerator sources of epithermal neutrons for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a promising method of malignant tumor treatment. Particular attention is given to the source of epithermal neutrons on the basis of a new type of charged particle accelerator: tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation and lithium neutron-producing target. It is also shown that the accelerator with specialized targets makes it possible to generate fast and monoenergetic neutrons, resonance and monoenergetic gamma-rays, alpha-particles, and positrons.

  18. Neutron capture therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, J.C.; Shefer, R.E.; Klinkowstein, R.E.

    1999-11-02

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  19. Neutron capture therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.; Shefer, Ruth E.; Klinkowstein, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the .sup.10 B(n,.alpha.).sup.7 Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  20. Compact neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  1. Production of Epithermal Neutron Beams for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Colangelo, P.; Colonna, N.; Santorelli, P.; Variale, V.; Paticchio, V.; Maggipinto, G.

    1999-12-31

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, a promising modality for the treatment of malignant tumors, relies on the use of neutron beams of suitable energy and intensity. For deep-seated tumors, simulations indicate that the optimal neutron energy is in the epithermal region, and in particular between 1 and 10 keV. Therapeutic neutron beams of high spectral purity could be produced with low-energy accelerators, through a suitable neutron producing reaction. In this talk we present an overview of some recently investigated reactions for the production of intense epithermal neutron beams for BNCT, and their potential use towards the setup of an hospital-based BNCT facility.

  2. Materials and neutronic research at the Low Energy Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, David V.

    2016-04-01

    In the decade since the Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM) produced its first neutrons, the facility has made important contributions to the international neutron scattering community. LENS employs a 13MeV proton beam at up to 4kW beam power onto one of two Be targets to produce neutrons for research in fields ranging from radiation effects in electronics to studies of the structure of fluids confined in nanoporous materials. The neutron source design at the heart of LENS facilitates relatively rapid hands-on access to most of its components which provides a foundation for a research program in experimental neutronics and affords numerous opportunities for novel educational experiences. We describe in some detail a number of the unique capabilities of this facility.

  3. SELF-REACTIVATING NEUTRON SOURCE FOR A NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Newson, H.W.

    1959-02-01

    Reactors of the type employing beryllium in a reflector region around the active portion and to a neutron source for use therewith are discussed. The neutron source is comprised or a quantity of antimony permanently incorporated in, and as an integral part of, the reactor in or near the beryllium reflector region. During operation of the reactor the natural occurring antimony isotope of atomic weight 123 absorbs neutrons and is thereby transformed to the antimony isotope of atomic weight 124, which is radioactive and emits gamma rays. The gamma rays react with the beryllium to produce neutrons. The beryllium and antimony thus cooperate to produce a built in neutron source which is automatically reactivated by the operation of the reactor itself and which is of sufficient strength to maintain the slow neutron flux at a sufficiently high level to be reliably measured during periods when the reactor is shut down.

  4. First neutron generation in the BINP accelerator based neutron source.

    PubMed

    Bayanov, B; Burdakov, A; Chudaev, V; Ivanov, A; Konstantinov, S; Kuznetsov, A; Makarov, A; Malyshkin, G; Mekler, K; Sorokin, I; Sulyaev, Yu; Taskaev, S

    2009-07-01

    Pilot innovative facility for neutron capture therapy was built at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk. This facility is based on a compact vacuum insulation tandem accelerator designed to produce proton current up to 10 mA. Epithermal neutrons are proposed to be generated by 1.915 MeV protons bombarding a lithium target using (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be threshold reaction. The results of the first experiments on neutron generation are reported and discussed. PMID:19375928

  5. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korff, S. A.; Mendell, R. B.; Merker, M.; Light, E. S.; Verschell, H. J.; Sandie, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Contributions to fast neutron measurements in the atmosphere are outlined. The results of a calculation to determine the production, distribution and final disappearance of atmospheric neutrons over the entire spectrum are presented. An attempt is made to answer questions that relate to processes such as neutron escape from the atmosphere and C-14 production. In addition, since variations of secondary neutrons can be related to variations in the primary radiation, comment on the modulation of both radiation components is made.

  6. Reactor-Produced Medical Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Mausner, Leonard; Garland, Marc A

    2011-01-01

    The therapeutic use of radionuclides in nuclear medicine, oncology and cardiology is the most rapidly growing use of medical radionuclides. Since most therapeutic radionuclides are neutron rich and decay by beta emission, they are reactor-produced. This chapter deals mainly with production approaches with neutrons. Neutron interactions with matter, neutron transmission and activation rates, and neutron spectra of nuclear reactors are discussed in some detail. Further, a short discussion of the neutron-energy dependence of cross sections, reaction rates in thermal reactors, cross section measurements and flux monitoring, and general equations governing the reactor production of radionuclides are presented. Finally, the chapter is concluded by providing a number of examples encompassing the various possible reaction routes for production of a number of medical radionuclides in a reactor.

  7. Neutron guide

    DOEpatents

    Greene, Geoffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  8. Neutron dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1976-07-27

    A method of measuring neutron radiation within a nuclear reactor is provided. A sintered oxide wire is disposed within the reactor and exposed to neutron radiation. The induced radioactivity is measured to provide an indication of the neutron energy and flux within the reactor.

  9. Neutron Laue macromolecular crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Meilleur, Flora; Myles, Dean A A; Blakeley, M. P.

    2006-01-01

    Recent progress in neutron protein crystallography such as the use of the Laue technique and improved neutron optics and detector technologies have dramatically improved the speed and precision with which neutron protein structures can now be determined. These studies are providing unique and complementary insights on hydrogen and hydration in protein crystal structures that are not available from X-ray structures alone. Parallel improvements in modern molecular biology now allow fully (per)deuterated protein samples to be produced for neutron scattering that essentially eradicate the large--and ultimately limiting--hydrogen incoherent scattering background that has hampered such studies in the past. High quality neutron data can now be collected to near atomic resolution ({approx}2.0 Angstroms) for proteins of up to {approx}50 kDa molecular weight using crystals of volume {approx}0.1 mm3 on the Laue diffractometer at ILL. The ability to flash-cool and collect high resolution neutron data from protein crystals at cryogenic temperature (15 K) has opened the way for kinetic crystallography on freeze trapped systems. Current instrument developments now promise to reduce crystal volume requirements by a further order of magnitude, making neutron protein crystallography a more accessible and routine technique.

  10. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2009-12-29

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  11. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-04-22

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  12. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-06-14

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  13. Personnel neutron monitoring in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    A brief review is presented of available information on the galactic neutron spectrum. An examination is made of the difficulties encountered in the determination of the dose equivalent of neutron recoil protons in the presence of a substantially larger background of trapped and star-produced protons as well as other ionizing particles in space.

  14. Ultrafast neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1987-01-01

    The invention comprises a neutron detector (50) of very high temporal resolution that is particularly well suited for measuring the fusion reaction neutrons produced by laser-driven inertial confinement fusion targets. The detector comprises a biased two-conductor traveling-wave transmission line (54, 56, 58, 68) having a uranium cathode (60) and a phosphor anode (62) as respective parts of the two conductors. A charge line and Auston switch assembly (70, 72, 74) launch an electric field pulse along the transmission line. Neutrons striking the uranium cathode at a location where the field pulse is passing, are enabled to strike the phosphor anode and produce light that is recorded on photographic film (64). The transmission line may be variously configured to achieve specific experimental goals.

  15. Spherical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2006-11-21

    A spherical neutron generator is formed with a small spherical target and a spherical shell RF-driven plasma ion source surrounding the target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) ion plasma is produced by RF excitation in the plasma ion source using an RF antenna. The plasma generation region is a spherical shell between an outer chamber and an inner extraction electrode. A spherical neutron generating target is at the center of the chamber and is biased negatively with respect to the extraction electrode which contains many holes. Ions passing through the holes in the extraction electrode are focused onto the target which produces neutrons by D-D or D-T reactions.

  16. Chandra Captures Neutron Star Action

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows a fast moving jet of particles produced by a rapidly rotating neutron star, and may provide new insight into the nature of some of the densest...

  17. Shaping micron-sized cold neutron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Frédéric; Kozhevnikov, Sergey; Thiaville, André; Torrejón, Jacob; Vázquez, Manuel

    2015-07-01

    In the field of neutron scattering, the need for micro-sized (1-50 μm) thermal or cold neutron beams has recently appeared, typically in the field of neutron imaging to probe samples with a high spatial resolution. We discuss various possibilities of producing such micro-sized neutron beams. The advantages and drawbacks of the different techniques are discussed. We show that reflective optics offers the most flexible way of producing tiny neutron beams together with an enhanced signal to background ratio. The use of such micro beams is illustrated by the study of micrometric diameter magnetic wires.

  18. Direct Fast-Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect

    DC Stromswold; AJ Peurrung; RR Hansen; PL Reeder

    2000-01-18

    Direct fast-neutron detection is the detection of fast neutrons before they are moderated to thermal energy. We have investigated two approaches for using proton-recoil in plastic scintillators to detect fast neutrons and distinguish them from gamma-ray interactions. Both approaches use the difference in travel speed between neutrons and gamma rays as the basis for separating the types of events. In the first method, we examined the pulses generated during scattering in a plastic scintillator to see if they provide a means for distinguishing fast-neutron events from gamma-ray events. The slower speed of neutrons compared to gamma rays results in the production of broader pulses when neutrons scatter several times within a plastic scintillator. In contrast, gamma-ray interactions should produce narrow pulses, even if multiple scattering takes place, because the time between successive scattering is small. Experiments using a fast scintillator confirmed the presence of broader pulses from neutrons than from gamma rays. However, the difference in pulse widths between neutrons and gamma rays using the best commercially available scintillators was not sufficiently large to provide a practical means for distinguishing fast neutrons and gamma rays on a pulse-by-pulse basis. A faster scintillator is needed, and that scintillator might become available in the literature. Results of the pulse-width studies were presented in a previous report (peurrung et al. 1998), and they are only summarized here.

  19. Neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  20. Prompt Fission Neutron Energy Spectra Induced by Fast Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staples, Parrish Alan

    Prompt fission neutron energy spectra for ^{235}U and ^{239 }Pu have been measured for fission neutron energies greater than the energy of the incident neutrons inducing fission. The measurements were undertaken to investigate the shape dependence of the fission neutron spectra upon both the incident neutron energy and the mass of the nucleus undergoing fission. Measurements were made for both nuclides at the following incident neutron energies; 0.50 MeV, 1.50 MeV, 2.50 MeV and 3.50 MeV. The data are presented either as relative yields or as ratios of a measured spectrum to the ^{235}U spectrum at 0.50 MeV. Incident neutrons were produced by the ^7Li(p,n)^7Be reaction using a pulsed, bunched proton beam from the 5.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at the University of Massachusetts Lowell Pinanski Energy Center. The neutrons were detected by a thin liquid scintillator with good time resolution capabilities; time-of-flight techniques were used for neutron energy determination; in addition pulse-shape-discrimination was used to reduce gamma-ray background levels. The measurements are compared to calculations based on the Los Alamos Model of Madland and Nix to test its predictive capabilities. The data are fit by the Watt equation to determine the mean energy of the spectra, and to facilitate comparison of the results to previous measurements. The data are also compared directly to previous measurements.

  1. Micromegas neutron beam monitor neutronics.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Andrew C; Miller, Laurence F

    2005-01-01

    The Micromegas is a type of ionising radiation detector that consists of a gas chamber sandwiched between two parallel plate electrodes, with the gas chamber divided by a Frisch grid into drift and amplification gaps. Investigators have applied it to a number of different applications, such as charged particle, X-ray and neutron detection. A Micromegas device has been tested as a neutron beam monitor at CERN and is expected to be used for that purpose at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) under construction in Oak Ridge, TN. For the Micromegas to function effectively as neutron beam monitor, it should cause minimal disruption to the neutron beam in question. Specifically, it should scatter as few neutrons as possible and avoid neutron absorption when it does not contribute to generating useful information concerning the neutron beam. Here, we present the results of Monte Carlo calculations of the effect of different types of wall materials and detector gases on neutron beams and suggest methods for minimising disruption to the beam. PMID:16381746

  2. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-08-17

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.; Anderson, H.L.

    1958-09-16

    Means are presenied for increasing the reproduction ratio of a gaphite- moderated neutronic reactor by diminishing the neutron loss due to absorption or capture by gaseous impurities within the reactor. This means comprised of a fluid-tight casing or envelope completely enclosing the reactor and provided with a valve through which the casing, and thereby the reactor, may be evacuated of atmospheric air.

  4. Neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-10-21

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

  5. Neutron tubes

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  6. FAST NEUTRON SPECTROMETER USING SPACED SEMICONDUCTORS FOR MEASURING TOTAL ENERGY OF NEUTRONS CAPTURED

    DOEpatents

    Love, T.A.; Murray, R.B.

    1964-04-14

    A fast neutron spectrometer was designed, which utilizes a pair of opposed detectors having a layer of /sup 6/LiF between to produce alpha and T pair for each neutron captured to provide signals, which, when combined, constitute a measure of neutron energy. (AEC)

  7. Research on fusion neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryaznevich, M. P.

    2012-06-01

    The use of fusion devices as powerful neutron sources has been discussed for decades. Whereas the successful route to a commercial fusion power reactor demands steady state stable operation combined with the high efficiency required to make electricity production economic, the alternative approach to advancing the use of fusion is free of many of complications connected with the requirements for economic power generation and uses the already achieved knowledge of Fusion physics and developed Fusion technologies. "Fusion for Neutrons" (F4N), has now been re-visited, inspired by recent progress achieved on comparably compact fusion devices, based on the Spherical Tokamak (ST) concept. Freed from the requirement to produce much more electricity than used to drive it, a fusion neutron source could be efficiently used for many commercial applications, and also to support the goal of producing energy by nuclear power. The possibility to use a small or medium size ST as a powerful or intense steady-state fusion neutron source (FNS) is discussed in this paper in comparison with the use of traditional high aspect ratio tokamaks. An overview of various conceptual designs of compact fusion neutron sources based on the ST concept is given and they are compared with a recently proposed Super Compact Fusion Neutron Source (SCFNS), with major radius as low as 0.5 metres but still able to produce several MW of neutrons in a steady-state regime.

  8. Towards a laser neutron driver.

    PubMed

    Keskilidou, E; Moustaizis, S D; Mikheev, L; Auvray, P; Rouiller, C

    2005-01-01

    During the last few years, important experimental investigations have been made concerning the possibility of induced nuclear fission of high-Z elements by electromagnetic interaction (photofission, electron fission, neutron fission). Fast ions, neutrons and fission fragments from such interactions can be used to pump a laser medium, to produce energy from the (232)Th-(233)U nuclear fission cycle. The main aim of the present work is to study a three-step process, in a relatively new experimental scheme, in order to improve the number of both neutrons and fast ions. In the proposed scheme, high-energy particles and photons are produced by high-intensity laser beam interaction with a solid or gas target, which are utilized later on to trigger the nuclear reactions for the production of (photo) neutrons. These neutrons can give rise to fission of (232)Th that leads through a cascade of decays to (233)U --a highly fissionable material. Such a process will enhance, by an important factor, the final neutron flux and the energetic fission fragments. The use of a high intensity pulsed laser beam will control the turn-on and turn-off of the nuclear reactions and allow one to ensure the security of the whole operation. Finally, the produced neutrons are used to accomplish a major population inversion in an appropriate gas medium for the last stage of amplification of a high-contrast ultra-short laser seed pulse. PMID:15990323

  9. PRODUCTION AND APPLICATIONS OF NEUTRONS USING PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester

    2009-11-01

    Advances in neutron science have gone hand in hand with the development and of particle accelerators from the beginning of both fields of study. Early accelerator systems were developed simply to produce neutrons, allowing scientists to study their properties and how neutrons interact in matter, but people quickly realized that more tangible uses existed too. Today the diversity of applications for industrial accelerator-based neutron sources is high and so to is the actual number of instruments in daily use is high, and they serve important roles in the fields where they're used. This chapter presents a technical introduction to the different ways particle accelerators are used to produce neutrons, an historical overview of the early development of neutron-producing particle accelerators, a description of some current industrial accelerator systems, narratives of the fields where neutron-producing particle accelerators are used today, and comments on future trends in the industrial uses of neutron producing particle accelerators.

  10. Neutron sources: Present practice and future potential

    SciTech Connect

    Cierjacks, S.; Smith, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    The present capability and future potential of accelerator-based monoenergetic and white neutron sources are outlined in the context of fundamental and applied neutron-nuclear research. The neutron energy range extends from thermal to 500 MeV, and the time domain from steady-state to pico-second pulsed sources. Accelerator technology is summarized, including the production of intense light-ion, heavy-ion and electron beams. Target capabilities are discussed with attention to neutron-producing efficiency and power-handling capabilities. The status of underlying neutron-producing reactions is summarized. The present and future use of neutron sources in: fundamental neutron-nuclear research, nuclear data acquisition, materials damage studies, engineering tests, and biomedical applications are discussed. Emphasis is given to current status, near-term advances well within current technology, and to long-range projections. 90 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Personnel electronic neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Falk, Roger B.; Tyree, William H.

    1984-12-18

    A personnel electronic dosimeter includes a neutron-proton and neutron-alpha converter for providing an electrical signal having a magnitude proportional to the energy of a detected proton or alpha particle produced from the converter, a pulse generator circuit for generating a pulse having a duration controlled by the weighed effect of the amplitude of the electrical signal, an oscillator enabled by the pulse for generating a train of clock pulses for a time dependent upon the pulse length, a counter for counting the clock pulses, and an indicator for providing a direct reading and aural alarm when the count indicates that the wearer has been exposed to a selected level of neutron dose equivalent.

  12. Personnel electronic neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Falk, R.B.; Tyree, W.H.

    1982-03-03

    A personnel electronic dosimeter includes a neutron-proton and neutron-alpha converter for providing an electrical signal having a magnitude proportional to the energy of a detected proton or alpha particle produced from the converter, a pulse generator circuit for generating a pulse having a duration controlled by the weighed effect of the amplitude of the electrical signal, an oscillator enabled by the pulse for generating a train of clock pulses for a time dependent upon the pulse length, a counter for counting the clock pulses, and an indicator for providing a direct reading and aural alarm when the count indicates that the wearer has been exposed to a selected level of neutron dose equivalent.

  13. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.; Kunze, J.

    1991-05-01

    Several investigators have suggested that a charged particle accelerator with light element reactions might be able to produce enough epithermal neutrons to be useful in Neutron Capture Therapy. The reaction choice so far has been the Li(p,n) reaction with protons up to 2.5 MeV. A moderator around the target would reduce the faster neutrons down to the epithermal energy region. The goals of the present research are: identify better reactions; improve the moderators; and find better combinations of 1 and 2. The target is to achieve, at the patient location, an epithermal neutron current of greater than 10{sup 9}n/cm{sup 2}sec, with a dose to tissue from the neutrons alone of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n and a dose from the gamma rays in the beam of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n.

  14. Origin of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, K.

    1999-12-01

    The origin of the concept of neutron stars can be traced to two brief, incredibly insightful publications. Work on the earlier paper by Lev Landau (Phys. Z. Sowjetunion, 1, 285, 1932) actually predated the discovery of neutrons. Nonetheless, Landau arrived at the notion of a collapsed star with the density of a nucleus (really a "nucleus star") and demonstrated (at about the same time as, and independent of, Chandrasekhar) that there is an upper mass limit for dense stellar objects of about 1.5 solar masses. Perhaps even more remarkable is the abstract of a talk presented at the December 1933 meeting of the American Physical Society published by Walter Baade and Fritz Zwicky in 1934 (Phys. Rev. 45, 138). It followed the discovery of the neutron by just over a year. Their report, which was about the same length as the present abstract: (1) invented the concept and word supernova; (2) suggested that cosmic rays are produced by supernovae; and (3) in the authors own words, proposed "with all reserve ... the view that supernovae represent the transitions from ordinary stars to neutron stars (italics), which in their final stages consist of extremely closely packed neutrons." The abstract by Baade and Zwicky probably contains the highest density of new, important (and correct) ideas in high energy astrophysics ever published in a single paper. In this talk, we will discuss some of the facts and myths surrounding these two publications.

  15. Scintillating-glass-fiber neutron sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, K. H.; Arthur, R. J.; Bliss, M.; Brite, D. W.; Brodzinski, R. L.; Craig, R. A.; Geelhood, B. D.; Goldman, D. S.; Griffin, J. W.; Perkins, R. W.; Reeder, P. L.; Richey, W. R.; Stahl, K. A.; Sunberg, D. S.; Warner, R. A.; Wogman, N. A.; Weber, M. J.

    1994-12-01

    Cerium-doped lithium-silicate glass fibers have been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for use as thermal neutron detectors. By using highly-enriched 6Li, these fibers efficiently capture thermal neutrons and produce scintillation light that can be detected at the ends of the fibers. Advantages of scintillating fibers over 3He or BF 3 proportional tubes include flexibility in geometric configuration, ruggedness in high-vibration environments, and less detector weight for the same neutron sensitivity. This paper describes the performance of these scintillating fibers with regard to count rates, pulse height spectra, absolute efficiencies, and neutron/gamma discrimination. Fibers with light transmission lengths ( {1}/{e}) of greater than 2 m have been produced at PNL. Neutron sensors in fiber form allow development of a variety of neutron detectors packaged in previously unavailable configurations. Brief descriptions of some of the devices already produced are included to illustrate these possibilities.

  16. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, Anthony J.; Stromswold, David C.

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  17. Neutron fan beam source for neutron radiography purpose

    SciTech Connect

    Le Tourneur, P.; Bach, P.; Dance, W. E.

    1999-06-10

    The development of the DIANE neutron radiography system included a sealed-tube neutron generator for this purpose and the optimization of the system's neutron beam quality in terms of divergence and useful thermal neutron yield for each 14-MeV neutron produced. Following this development, the concept of a DIANE fan beam source is herewith introduced. The goal which drives this design is one of economy: by simply increasing the aperture dimension of a conventional DIANE beam in one plane of its collimator axis to a small-angle, fan-shaped output, the useful beam area for neutron radiography would be substantially increased. Thus with the same source, the throughput, or number of objects under examination at any given time, would be augmented significantly. Presented here are the design of this thermal neutron source and the initial Monte Carlo calculations. Taking into account the experience with the conventional DIANE neutron radiography system, these result are discussed and the potential of and interest in such a fan-beam source are explored.

  18. Surface Mounted Neutron Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.

    2012-10-01

    A deuterium-tritium (DT) base reaction pulsed neutron generator packaged in a flat computer chip shape of 1.54 cm (0.600 in) wide by 3.175 cm (1.25 in) length and 0.3 cm (0.120 in) thick has been successfully demonstrated to produce 14 MeV neutrons at a rate of 10^9 neutrons per second. The neutron generator is based on a deuterium ion beam accelerated to impact a tritium loaded target. The accelerating voltage is in the 15 to 20 kV in a 3 mm (0.120 in) gap, the ion beam is shaped by using a lens design to produce a flat ion beam that conforms to the flat rectangular target. The ion source is a simple surface mounted deuterium filled titanium film with a fused gap that operates at a current-voltage design to release the deuterium during a pulse length of about 1 μs. We present the general description of the working prototypes, which we have labeled the ``NEUTRISTOR.''[4pt] Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. Work funded by the LDRD office.

  19. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to a reflector means for a neutronic reactor. A reflector comprised of a plurality of vertically movable beryllium control members is provided surrounding the sides of the reactor core. An absorber of fast neutrons comprised of natural uramum surrounds the reflector. An absorber of slow neutrons surrounds the absorber of fast neutrons and is formed of a plurality of beryllium blocks having natural uranium members distributcd therethrough. in addition, a movable body is positioned directly below the core and is comprised of a beryllium reflector and an absorbing member attached to the botiom thereof, the absorbing member containing a substance selected from the goup consisting of natural urantum and Th/sup 232/.

  20. Neutronic moderator design for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, L.A.; Barnes, J.M.; Johnson, J.O.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1998-11-01

    Neutronics analyses are now in progress to support the initial selection of moderator design parameters for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The results of the initial optimization studies involving moderator poison plate location, moderator position, and premoderator performance for the target system are presented in this paper. Also presented is an initial study of the use of a composite moderator to produce a liquid methane like spectrum.

  1. General Cavity Theories for Photon and Neutron Dosimetry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearsley, Eric Edward

    1982-03-01

    The aim of a general cavity theory is to predict the energy deposition from a source of ionizing radiation in a cavity of arbitrary size and composition. This thesis proposes two new general cavity theories. The first is intended for cavities in photon fields. The second is for spherical cavities in fast neutron fields. Both models can be written in the familiar form of the Burlin cavity theory. The proposed photon model takes into account the effect of secondary electron scattering at the cavity boundaries. The model can be used to calculate the average cavity dose, the dose distribution inside the cavity, as well as the relative contributions of the wall and the cavity to the cavity response. A comparison is made between the proposed model, the well known Burlin model, and experimental data. The second model discussed is a calculation of the response of a sphere of arbitrary size in a fast neutron field. The dose deposited in the cavity is calculated taking into account the energy dependence of the stopping power, the secondary starting energy distribution, and the cavity volume. An analytical solution is derived. From this a simple three parameter power function is fitted which accurately predicts cavity doses to within 0.1% of the values predicted by the analytical model. Results of the calculation are given in a table for TE/TE, TE/air, and C/CO2 wall-gas combinations for neutron energies between 0.76 Mev and 14 Mev and cavity sizes between 0.01 cm('3) and 10 cm('3). These results are compared with a more detailed calculation. There is good agreement between the two methods under 5 MeV in all cases and up to 14 MeV in the hydrogenous cases. That is, the model works well when elastic scattering interactions dominate the cavity response.

  2. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

    1961-11-21

    A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

  3. NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOEpatents

    Richmond, J.L.; Wells, C.E.

    1963-01-15

    A neutron source is obtained without employing any separate beryllia receptacle, as was formerly required. The new method is safer and faster, and affords a source with both improved yield and symmetry of neutron emission. A Be container is used to hold and react with Pu. This container has a thin isolating layer that does not obstruct the desired Pu--Be reaction and obviates procedures previously employed to disassemble and remove a beryllia receptacle. (AEC)

  4. Accelerators and Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlon, A. A.; Kreiner, A. J.; Valda, A.

    2002-08-01

    Within the frame of Accelerator Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT), the 7Li (p,n) 7Be reaction, relatively near its energy threshold is one of the most promising, due to its high yield and low neutron energy. In this work a thick LiF target irradiated with a proton beam was studied as a neutron source. The 1.88-2.0 MeV proton beam was produced by the tandem accelerator TANDAR at CNEA's facilities in Buenos Aires. A water-filled phantom, containing a boron sample was irradiated with the resulting neutron flux. The 10B(n,αγ)7Li boron neutron capture reaction produces a 0.478 MeV gamma ray in 94% of the cases. The neutron yield was measured through the detection of this gamma ray using a hyperpure germanium detector with an anti-Compton shield. In addition, the thermal neutron flux was evaluated at different depths inside the phantom using bare and Cd-covered gold foils. A maximum neutron thermal flux of 1.4×108 cm-2s-1mA-1 was obtained at 4.2 cm from the phantom surface. In order to optimize the design of the neutron production target and the beam shaping assembly extensive Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon (MCNP) simulations have been performed. Neutron fields from a thick LiF and a Li metal target (with both a D2O-graphite and a Al/AlF3-graphite moderator/reflector assembly) were evaluated along the centerline of a head and a whole body phantom. Simulations were carried out for 1.89, 2.0 and 2.3 MeV proton beams. The results show that it is more advantageous to irradiate the target with 2.3 MeV near-resonance protons, instead of very near threshold, because of the higher neutron yield at this energy. On the other hand, the Al/AlF3-graphite exhibits a more efficient performance than D2O in terms of tumor to maximum healthy tissue dose ratio. Treatment times of less than 15 min and tumor control probabilities larger than 98% are obtained for a 50 mA, 2.3 MeV proton beam. The alternative neutron-producing reaction 13C(d,n) is also briefly reviewed. A

  5. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Manglos, S.H.

    1988-03-10

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

  6. Monoenergetic Neutrons for Stellar Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosconi, M.; Heil, M.; Käppeler, F.; Plag, R.; Mengoni, A.; Nolte, R.

    2009-09-01

    With modern techniques, neutron-capture cross sections can be determined with uncertainties of a few percent. However, Maxwellian averaged cross sections calculated from such data require a correction (because low-lying excited states are thermally populated in the hot stellar photon bath) which has to be determined by theoretical calculations. These calculations can be improved with information from indirect measurements, in particular by the inelastic scattering cross section. For low-lying levels, the inelastically scattered neutrons are difficult to separate from the dominant elastic channel. This problem is best solved by means of pulsed, monoenergetic neutron beams. For this reason, a pulsed beam of 30 keV neutrons with an energy spread of 7 to 9 keV FWHM and a width from 10 to 15 ns has been produced at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe using the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction directly at the reaction threshold. With this neutron beam the inelastic scattering cross section of the first excited level at 9.75 keV in 187Os was determined with a relative uncertainty of 6%. The use of monoenergetic neutron beams has been further pursued at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig, including the 3H(p, n)3He reaction for producing neutrons with an energy of 64 keV.

  7. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    The International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) has consultative committees covering various areas of metrology. The Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI) differs from the others in having three sections: Section (I) deals with radiation dosimetry, Section (II) with radionuclide metrology and Section (III) with neutron metrology. In 2003 a proposal was made to publish special issues of Metrologia covering the work of the three Sections. Section (II) was the first to complete their task, and their special issue was published in 2007, volume 44(4). This was followed in 2009 by the special issue on radiation dosimetry, volume 46(2). The present issue, volume 48(6), completes the trilogy and attempts to explain neutron metrology, the youngest of the three disciplines, the neutron only having been discovered in 1932, to a wider audience and to highlight the relevance and importance of this field. When originally approached with the idea of this special issue, Section (III) immediately saw the value of a publication specifically on neutron metrology. It is a topic area where papers tend to be scattered throughout the literature in journals covering, for example, nuclear instrumentation, radiation protection or radiation measurements in general. Review articles tend to be few. People new to the field often ask for an introduction to the various topics. There are some excellent older textbooks, but these are now becoming obsolete. More experienced workers in specific areas of neutron metrology can find it difficult to know the latest position in related areas. The papers in this issue attempt, without presenting a purely historical outline, to describe the field in a sufficiently logical way to provide the novice with a clear introduction, while being sufficiently up-to-date to provide the more experienced reader with the latest scientific developments in the different topic areas. Neutron radiation fields obviously occur throughout the nuclear

  8. Neutron Technologies for Bioenergy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Langan, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Neutron scattering is a powerful technique that can be used to probe the structures and dynamics of complex systems. It can provide a fundamental understanding of the processes involved in the production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. A variety of neutron scattering technologies are available to elucidate both the organization and deconstruction of this complex composite material and the associations and morphology of the component polymers and the enzymes acting on them, across multiple length scales ranging from Angstroms to micrometers and time scales from microseconds to picoseconds. Unlike most other experimental techniques, neutron scattering is uniquely sensitive to hydrogen (and its isotope deuterium), an atom abundantly present throughout biomass and a key effector in many biological, chemical, and industrial processes for producing biofuels. Sensitivity to hydrogen, the ability to replace hydrogen with deuterium to alter scattering levels, the fact that neutrons cause little or no direct radiation damage, and the ability of neutrons to exchange thermal energies with materials, provide neutron scattering technologies with unique capabilities for bioenergy research. Further, neutrons are highly penetrating, making it possible to employ sample environments that are not suitable for other techniques. The true power of neutron scattering is realized when it is combined with computer simulation and modeling and contrast variation techniques enabled through selective deuterium labeling.

  9. Experimental investigation of new neutron moderator materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal; Daemen, Luke L; Hartl, Monika; Huegle, Thomas; Muhrer, Guenter

    2010-01-01

    In this study we present experimental investigation of thermal neutron energy spectra produced by lead and bismuth hydroxides (Pb(OH){sub 2}, and Bi(OH){sub 3}). The experimental energy spectra are compared with a thermal neutron energy spectrum of water measured in the same geometry. We present an MCNPX geometry model used to help with the experimental data interpretation. We demonstrate a very good reproduction of the experimental thermal neutron energy spectrum produced by the water moderator. We show a sensitivity study with the Pb(OH){sub 2}, and Bi(OH){sub 3} materials on different combinations of thermal neutron scattering kernels.

  10. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    The International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) has consultative committees covering various areas of metrology. The Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI) differs from the others in having three sections: Section (I) deals with radiation dosimetry, Section (II) with radionuclide metrology and Section (III) with neutron metrology. In 2003 a proposal was made to publish special issues of Metrologia covering the work of the three Sections. Section (II) was the first to complete their task, and their special issue was published in 2007, volume 44(4). This was followed in 2009 by the special issue on radiation dosimetry, volume 46(2). The present issue, volume 48(6), completes the trilogy and attempts to explain neutron metrology, the youngest of the three disciplines, the neutron only having been discovered in 1932, to a wider audience and to highlight the relevance and importance of this field. When originally approached with the idea of this special issue, Section (III) immediately saw the value of a publication specifically on neutron metrology. It is a topic area where papers tend to be scattered throughout the literature in journals covering, for example, nuclear instrumentation, radiation protection or radiation measurements in general. Review articles tend to be few. People new to the field often ask for an introduction to the various topics. There are some excellent older textbooks, but these are now becoming obsolete. More experienced workers in specific areas of neutron metrology can find it difficult to know the latest position in related areas. The papers in this issue attempt, without presenting a purely historical outline, to describe the field in a sufficiently logical way to provide the novice with a clear introduction, while being sufficiently up-to-date to provide the more experienced reader with the latest scientific developments in the different topic areas. Neutron radiation fields obviously occur throughout the nuclear

  11. Neutron Imaging of Archaeological Bronzes

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzewski, Krysta; Herringer, Susan; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Walker, Lakeisha MH; Sheldon, Brian; Voisin, Sophie; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe; Finocchiaro, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the initial results of 2-D and 3-D neutron imaging of bronze artifacts using the CG-1D prototype beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Neutron imaging is a non-destructive technique capable of producing unprecedented three-dimensional information on archaeomaterials, including qualitative, quantitative, and visual data on impurities, composition change, voids, and c

  12. Aerial Neutron Detection: Neutron Signatures for Nonproliferation and Emergency Response Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, Richard J.; Stampahar, Thomas G.; Smith, Ethan X.; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wolff, Ronald S.; Rourke, Timothy J.; LeDonne, Jeffrey P.; Avaro, Emanuele; Butler, D. Andre; Borders, Kevin L.; Stampahar, Jezabel; Schuck, William H.; Selfridge, Thomas L.; McKissack, Thomas M.; Duncan, William W.; Hendricks, Thane J.

    2012-10-17

    From 2007 to the present, the Remote Sensing Laboratory has been conducting a series of studies designed to expand our fundamental understanding of aerial neutron detection with the goal of designing an enhanced sensitivity detection system for long range neutron detection. Over 35 hours of aerial measurements in a helicopter were conducted for a variety of neutron emitters such as neutron point sources, a commercial nuclear power reactor, nuclear reactor spent fuel in dry cask storage, depleted uranium hexafluoride and depleted uranium metal. The goals of the project were to increase the detection sensitivity of our instruments such that a 5.4 × 104 neutron/second source could be detected at 100 feet above ground level at a speed of 70 knots and to enhance the long-range detection sensitivity for larger neutron sources, i.e., detection ranges above 1000 feet. In order to increase the sensitivity of aerial neutron detection instruments, it is important to understand the dynamics of the neutron background as a function of altitude. For aerial neutron detection, studies have shown that the neutron background primarily originates from above the aircraft, being produced in the upper atmosphere by galactic cosmic-ray interactions with air molecules. These interactions produce energetic neutrons and charged particles that cascade to the earth’s surface, producing additional neutrons in secondary collisions. Hence, the neutron background increases as a function of altitude which is an impediment to long-range neutron detection. In order to increase the sensitivity for long range detection, it is necessary to maintain a low neutron background as a function of altitude. Initial investigations show the variation in the neutron background can be decreased with the application of a cosmic-ray shield. The results of the studies along with a representative data set are presented.

  13. Compact neutron generator developement and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Gicquel, Frederic; Hahto, Sami; Lou, Tak-Pui

    2004-01-18

    The Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been engaging in the development of high yield compact neutron generators for the last ten years. Because neutrons in these generators are formed by using either D-D, T-T or D-T fusion reaction, one can produce either mono-energetic (2.4 MeV or 14 MeV) or white neutrons. All the neutron generators being developed by our group utilize 13.5 MHz RF induction discharge to produce a pure deuterium or a mixture of deuterium-tritium plasma. As a result, ion beams with high current density and almost pure atomic ions can be extracted from the plasma source. The ion beams are accelerated to {approx}100 keV and neutrons are produced when the beams impinge on a titanium target. Neutron generators with different configurations and sizes have been designed and tested at LBNL. Their applications include neutron activation analysis, oil-well logging, boron neutron capture therapy, brachytherapy, cargo and luggage screening. A novel small point neutron source has recently been developed for radiography application. The source size can be 2 mm or less, making it possible to examine objects with sharper images. The performance of these neutron generators will be described in this paper.

  14. POLARIZED NEUTRONS IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    COURANT,E.D.

    1998-04-27

    There does not appear to be any obvious way to accelerate neutrons, polarized or otherwise, to high energies by themselves. To investigate the behavior of polarized neutrons the authors therefore have to obtain them by accelerating them as components of heavier nuclei, and then sorting out the contribution of the neutrons in the analysis of the reactions produced by the heavy ion beams. The best neutron carriers for this purpose are probably {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons. A polarized deuteron is primarily a combination of a proton and a neutron with their spins pointing in the same direction; in the {sup 3}He nucleus the spins of the two protons are opposite and the net spin (and magnetic moment) is almost the same as that of a free neutron. Polarized ions other than protons may be accelerated, stored and collided in a ring such as RHIC provided the techniques proposed for polarized proton operation can be adapted (or replaced by other strategies) for these ions. To accelerate polarized particles in a ring, one must make provisions for overcoming the depolarizing resonances that occur at certain energies. These resonances arise when the spin tune (ratio of spin precession frequency to orbit frequency) resonates with a component present in the horizontal field. The horizontal field oscillates with the vertical motion of the particles (due to vertical focusing); its frequency spectrum is dominated by the vertical oscillation frequency and its modulation by the periodic structure of the accelerator ring. In addition, the magnet imperfections that distort the closed orbit vertically contain all integral Fourier harmonics of the orbit frequency.

  15. Neutron Multiplicity Measurements With 3He Alternative: Straw Neutron Detectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wolff, Ronald S.; Meade, John A.; Detweiler, Ryan; Maurer, Richard J.; Mitchell, Stephen E.; Guss, Paul P.; Lacy, Jeffrey L.; Sun, Liang; Athanasiades, Athanasios

    2015-01-27

    neutron multiplicity information from spontaneous fission sources using a single panel consisting of 60 straws equally distributed over three rows in high-density polyethylene moderator. In the following year, we developed the field-programmable gate array and associated DAQ software. Finally, this SDRD effort successfully produced a prototype NMC with ~33% detection efficiency compared to a commercial fission meter.« less

  16. Neutron multiplicity ,easurements With 3He alternative: Straw neutron detectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wolff, Ronald S.; Meade, John A.; Detweiler, Ryan; Maurer, Richard J.; Mitchell, Stephen E.; Guss, Paul P.; Lacy, Jeffrey L.; Sun, Liang; Athanasiades, Athanasios

    2015-01-27

    neutron multiplicity information from spontaneous fission sources using a single panel consisting of 60 straws equally distributed over three rows in high-density polyethylene moderator. In the following year, we developed the field-programmable gate array and associated DAQ software. Finally, this SDRD effort successfully produced a prototype NMC with ~33% detection efficiency compared to a commercial fission meter.« less

  17. Study of 232Th(n, γ) and 232Th(n,f) reaction rates in a graphite moderated spallation neutron field produced by 1.6 GeV deuterons on lead target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asquith, N. L.; Hashemi-Nezhad, S. R.; Westmeier, W.; Zhuk, I.; Tyutyunnikov, S.; Adam, J.

    2015-02-01

    The Gamma-3 assembly of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna, Russia is designed to emulate the neutron spectrum of a thermal Accelerator Driven System (ADS). It consists of a lead spallation target surrounded by reactor grade graphite. The target was irradiated with 1.6 GeV deuterons from the Nuclotron accelerator and the neutron capture and fission rate of 232Th in several locations within the assembly were experimentally measured. 232Th is a proposed fuel for envisaged Accelerator Driven Systems and these two reactions are fundamental to the performance and feasibility of 232Th in an ADS. The irradiation of the Gamma-3 assembly was also simulated using MCNPX 2.7 with the INCL4 intra-nuclear cascade and ABLA fission/evaporation models. Good agreement between the experimentally measured and calculated reaction rates was found. This serves as a good validation for the computational models and cross section data used to simulate neutron production and transport of spallation neutrons within a thermal ADS.

  18. Nested Focusing Optics for Compact Neutron Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH) have developed novel neutron grazing incidence optics for use with small-scale portable neutron generators. The technology was developed to enable the use of commercially available neutron generators for applications requiring high flux densities, including high performance imaging and analysis. Nested grazing incidence mirror optics, with high collection efficiency, are used to produce divergent, parallel, or convergent neutron beams. Ray tracing simulations of the system (with source-object separation of 10m for 5 meV neutrons) show nearly an order of magnitude neutron flux increase on a 1-mm diameter object. The technology is a result of joint development efforts between NASA and MIT researchers seeking to maximize neutron flux from diffuse sources for imaging and testing applications.

  19. Neutron sources: present practice and future potential

    SciTech Connect

    Cierjacks, S.; Smith, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    The present capability and future potential of accelerator-based monoenergetic and white neutron sources are outlined in the context of fundamental and applied neutron-nuclear research. The neutron energy range extends from thermal to 500+ MeV, and the time domain from steady-state to pico-second pulsed sources. Accelerator technology is summarized, including the production of intense light-ion, heavy-ion and electron beams. Target capabilities are discussed with attention to neutron-production efficiency and power-handling capabilities. The status of underlying neutron-producing reactions is summarized. The present and future use of neutron sources in: (i) fundamental neutron-nuclear research, (ii) nuclear-data acquisition, (iii) materials-damage studies, (iv) engineering test, and (v) biomedical applications are discussed. Emphasis is given to current status, near-term advances well within current technology, and to long-range projections.

  20. Development of fast neutron radiography system based on portable neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Chia Jia; Nilsuwankosit, Sunchai

    2016-01-01

    Due to the high installation cost, the safety concern and the immobility of the research reactors, the neutron radiography system based on portable neutron generator is proposed. Since the neutrons generated from a portable neutron generator are mostly the fast neutrons, the system is emphasized on using the fast neutrons for the purpose of conducting the radiography. In order to suppress the influence of X-ray produced by the neutron generator, a combination of a shielding material sandwiched between two identical imaging plates is used. A binary XOR operation is then applied for combining the information from the imaging plates. The raw images obtained confirm that the X-ray really has a large effect and that XOR operation can help enhance the effect of the neutrons.

  1. Thermal neutron analysis (TNA) explosive detection based on electronic neutron generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. C.; Mahood, D. B.; Ryge, P.; Shea, P.; Gozani, T.

    1995-05-01

    Thermal neutron analysis explosive detection systems have been developed and demonstrated for inspection of checked airline baggage and for detection of buried land mines. Thermal neutrons from a moderated neutron source impinge on the inspected object, and the resulting capture gamma ray signatures provide detection information. Isotopic neutron sources, e.g. 252Cf, are compact, economical and reliable, but they are subject to the licensing requirements, safety concerns and public perception problems associated with radioactive material. These are mitigated by use of an electronic neutron generator — an ion accelerator with a target producing neutrons by a nuclear reaction such as D(d, n) 3He or 9Be(d, n) 10B. With suitable moderator designs based on neutron transport codes, operational explosive detection systems can be built and would provide effective alternatives to radioactive neutron sources. Calculations as well as laboratory and field experience with three generator types will be presented.

  2. The decompression of cold neutron star matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattimer, J. M.; Mackie, F.; Ravenhall, D. G.; Schramm, D. N.

    1977-01-01

    The ejection of cold neutron-star matter is examined, and an attempt is made to determine whether the final composition of this matter may be similar to that normally associated with the hot high-neutron-flux r-process. A semiempirical liquid-drop model is used for the nucleus, and the equilibrium composition of the matter is determined by assuming it to be in its absolute ground state at a given density. Physical mechanisms operating during the expansion are analyzed, and the composition of the ejected matter is found as a function of its density during expansion. The results indicate that it is virtually impossible for deuterium to form, that neutrons can be captured only after beta decay increases the atomic numbers of nuclei, and that no free neutrons can escape. It is concluded that neutron-star ejecta can produce heavy neutron-rich nuclei and may produce somewhat heavier nuclei than a standard r-process.

  3. Neutron dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Miola, U.J.; Ettinger, K.V.

    1981-01-01

    The recent development of various borated compounds and the utilization of one of these (Na/sub 2/B/sub 12/H/sub 11/SH) to treat brain tumors in clinical studies in Japan has renewed interest in neutron capture therapy. In these procedures thermal neutrons interact with /sup 10/B in boron containing cells through the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction producing charged particles with a maximum range of approx. 10..mu..m in tissue. Borated analogs of chlorpromazine, porphyrin, thiouracil and deoxyuridine promise improved tumor uptake and blood clearance. The therapy beam from the Medical Research Reactor in Brookhaven contains neutrons from a modified and filtered fission spectrum and dosimetric consequences of the use of the above mentioned compounds in conjunction with thermal and epithermal fluxes are discussed in the paper. One of the important problems of radiation dosimetry in capture therapy is determination of the flux profile and, hence, the dose profile in the brain. This has been achieved by constructing a brain phantom made of TE plastic. The lyoluminescence technique provides a convenient way of monitoring the neutron flux distributions; the detectors for this purpose utilize /sup 6/Li and /sup 10/B compounds. Such compounds have been synthesized specially for the purpose of dosimetry of thermal and epithermal beams. In addition, standard lyoluminescent phosphors, like glutamine, could be used to determine the collisional component of the dose as well as the contribution of the /sup 14/N(n,p)/sup 14/C reaction. Measurements of thermal flux were compared with calculations and with measurements done with activation foils.

  4. Neutron tube design study for boron neutron capture therapy application

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1999-05-06

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  5. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hurwitz, H. Jr.; Brooks, H.; Mannal, C.; Payne, J.H.; Luebke, E.A.

    1959-03-24

    A reactor of the heterogeneous, liquid cooled type is described. This reactor is comprised of a central region of a plurality of vertically disposed elongated tubes surrounded by a region of moderator material. The central region is comprised of a central core surrounded by a reflector region which is surrounded by a fast neutron absorber region, which in turn is surrounded by a slow neutron absorber region. Liquid sodium is used as the primary coolant and circulates through the core which contains the fuel elements. Control of the reactor is accomplished by varying the ability of the reflector region to reflect neutrons back into the core of the reactor. For this purpose the reflector is comprised of moderator and control elements having varying effects on reactivity, the control elements being arranged and actuated by groups to give regulation, shim, and safety control.

  6. Neutron therapy of cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frigerio, N. A.; Nellans, H. N.; Shaw, M. J.

    1969-01-01

    Reports relate applications of neutrons to the problem of cancer therapy. The biochemical and biophysical aspects of fast-neutron therapy, neutron-capture and neutron-conversion therapy with intermediate-range neutrons are presented. Also included is a computer program for neutron-gamma radiobiology.

  7. Optical neutron polarizers

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    A neutron wave will be refracted by an appropriately varying potential. Optical neutron polarizers use spatially varying, spin- dependent potentials to refract neutrons of opposite spin states into different directions, so that an unpolarized beam will be split into two beams of complementary polarization by such a device. This paper will concentrate on two methods of producing spin-dependent potentials which are particularly well-suited to polarizing cold neutron beams, namely thin-film structures and field-gradient techniques. Thin-film optical devices, such as supermirror multilayer structures, are usually designed to deviate only one spin-state, so that they offer the possibility of making insertion (transmission) polarizers. Very good supermirrors may now be designed and fabricated, but it is not always straightforward to design mirror-based devices which are useful in real (divergent beam) applications, and some practical configurations will be discussed. Field-gradient devices, which are usually based on multipolar magnets, have tended to be too expensive for general use, but this may change with new developments in superconductivity. Dipolar and hexapolar configurations will be considered, with emphasis on the focusing characteristics of the latter. 21 refs., 7 figs.

  8. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

    1958-04-15

    A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

  9. Neutron generator yield measurements using a phoswich detector with the digital pulse shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzilov, Alexander; Novikov, Ivan; Womble, Phillip; Heinze, Julian

    2012-03-01

    The phoswich detector designed as a combination of two scintillators with dissimilar pulse shape characteristics that are optically coupled to each other and to a common photomultiplier is used for the simultaneous detection of fast and thermal neutrons. The digital signal processing of detector signals is used. The pulse shape analysis distinguishes the scintillation signals produced by photons, fast neutrons, and thermal neutrons. The phoswich was tested using the photon and neutron sources. We discuss neutron yield measurements for a pulse DT neutron generator. The spatial distribution of fast neutron flux and thermal neutron flux was evaluated for the generator in presence of neutron moderating materials.

  10. Characterization of pulsed (plasma focus) neutron source with image plate and application to neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Andola, Sanjay; Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, S. C.; Shaikh, A. M.

    2013-02-05

    Plasma focus device of Mather type developed in house has been used first time for neutron radiography of different objects. The device gives (1.2{+-}0.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} neutrons per pulse produced by D-D fusion reaction with a pulse width of 50{+-}5 ns. The method involves exposing sample to be radiographed to thermalized D-D neutrons and recording the image on Fuji-film BAS-ND image plates. The thermal neutron component of the moderated beam was estimated using two image plates: a conventional IP for X-rays and gamma rays, and an IP doped with Gd for detecting neutrons.

  11. Gravitational Waves from Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkotas, Konstantinos

    2016-03-01

    Neutron stars are the densest objects in the present Universe, attaining physical conditions of matter that cannot be replicated on Earth. These unique and irreproducible laboratories allow us to study physics in some of its most extreme regimes. More importantly, however, neutron stars allow us to formulate a number of fundamental questions that explore, in an intricate manner, the boundaries of our understanding of physics and of the Universe. The multifaceted nature of neutron stars involves a delicate interplay among astrophysics, gravitational physics, and nuclear physics. The research in the physics and astrophysics of neutron stars is expected to flourish and thrive in the next decade. The imminent direct detection of gravitational waves will turn gravitational physics into an observational science, and will provide us with a unique opportunity to make major breakthroughs in gravitational physics, in particle and high-energy astrophysics. These waves, which represent a basic prediction of Einstein's theory of general relativity but have yet to be detected directly, are produced in copious amounts, for instance, by tight binary neutron star and black hole systems, supernovae explosions, non-axisymmetric or unstable spinning neutron stars. The focus of the talk will be on the neutron star instabilities induced by rotation and the magnetic field. The conditions for the onset of these instabilities and their efficiency in gravitational waves will be presented. Finally, the dependence of the results and their impact on astrophysics and especially nuclear physics will be discussed.

  12. a Portable Pulsed Neutron Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoulakis, A.; Androulakis, G. C.; Clark, E. L.; Hassan, S. M.; Lee, P.; Chatzakis, J.; Bakarezos, M.; Dimitriou, V.; Petridis, C.; Papadogiannis, N. A.; Tatarakis, M.

    2014-02-01

    The design and construction of a pulsed plasma focus device to be used as a portable neutron source for material analysis such as explosive detection using gamma spectroscopy is presented. The device is capable of operating at a repetitive rate of a few Hz. When deuterium gas is used, up to 105 neutrons per shot are expected to be produced with a temporal pulse width of a few tens of nanoseconds. The pulsed operation of the device and its portable size are its main advantage in comparison with the existing continuous neutron sources. Parts of the device include the electrical charging unit, the capacitor bank, the spark switch (spark gap), the trigger unit and the vacuum-fuel chamber / anode-cathode. Numerical simulations are used for the simulation of the electrical characteristics of the device including the scaling of the capacitor bank energies with total current, the pinch current, and the scaling of neutron yields with energies and currents. The MCNPX code is used to simulate the moderation of the produced neutrons in a simplified geometry and subsequently, the interaction of thermal neutrons with a test target and the corresponding prompt γ-ray generation.

  13. New sources and instrumentation for neutron science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Alina

    2011-04-01

    Neutron-scattering research has a lot to do with our everyday lives. Things like medicine, food, electronics, cars and airplanes have all been improved by neutron-scattering research. Neutron research also helps scientists improve materials used in a multitude of different products, such as high-temperature superconductors, powerful lightweight magnets, stronger, lighter plastic products etc. Neutron scattering is one of the most effective ways to obtain information on both, the structure and the dynamics of condensed matter. Most of the world's neutron sources were built decades ago, and although the uses and demand for neutrons have increased throughout the years, few new sources have been built. The new construction, accelerator-based neutron source, the spallation source will provide the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world for scientific research and industrial development. In this paper it will be described what neutrons are and what unique properties make them useful for science, how spallation source is designed to produce neutron beams and the experimental instruments that will use those beams. Finally, it will be described how past neutron research has affected our everyday lives and what we might expect from the most exciting future applications.

  14. Pulsed neutron interrogation for detection of concealed special nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddy, Frank; Seidel, John; Flammang, Robert; Petrović, Bojan; Dulloo, Abdul; Congedo, Thomas

    2006-05-01

    A new neutron interrogation technique for detection of concealed Special Nuclear Material (SNM) is described. This technique is a combination of timing techniques from pulsed prompt gamma neutron activation analysis with silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor fast neutron detector technology. SiC detectors are a new class of radiation detectors that are ultra-fast and capable of processing high count rates. SiC detectors can operate during and within nanoseconds of the end of an intense neutron pulse, providing the ability to detect the prompt neutron emissions from fission events produced by the neutrons in concealed SNM on a much faster pulsing time scale than has been achieved by other techniques. Neutron-induced fission neutrons in 235U have been observed in the time intervals between pulses of 14-MeV neutrons from a deuterium-tritium electronic neutron generator. Initial measurements have emphasized the detection of SNM using thermal-neutron induced fission. Neutron pulsing and time-sequenced neutron counts were carried out on a hundreds of microseconds time scale, enabling the observation of prompt fission neutrons induced by the die-away of thermal neutrons following the 14-MeV pulse. A discussion of pulsed prompt-neutron measurements and of SiC detectors as well as initial measurement results will be presented.

  15. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J. C.

    2006-11-01

    Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120 mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions.

  16. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1960-09-27

    A unit assembly is described for a neutronic reactor comprising a tube and plurality of spaced parallel sandwiches in the tube extending lengthwise thereof, each sandwich including a middle plate having a central opening for plutonium and other openings for fertile material at opposite ends of the plate.

  17. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Carleton, John T.

    1977-01-25

    A graphite-moderated nuclear reactor includes channels between blocks of graphite and also includes spacer blocks between adjacent channeled blocks with an axis of extension normal to that of the axis of elongation of the channeled blocks to minimize changes in the physical properties of the graphite as a result of prolonged neutron bombardment.

  18. Prompt fission neutron spectra of actinides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Capote, R.; Chen, Y. -J.; Hambsch, F. -J.; Kornilov, N. V.; Lestone, J. P.; Litaize, O.; Morillon, B.; Neudecker, D.; Oberstedt, S.; Ohsawa, T.; et al

    2016-01-06

    Here, the energy spectrum of prompt neutrons emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) "Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides" was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei.

  19. Neutron Scattering Stiudies

    SciTech Connect

    Kegel, Gunter H.R.; Egan, James J

    2007-04-18

    This project covers four principal areas of research: Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering studies in odd-A terbium, thulium and other highly deformed nuclei near A=160 with special regard to interband transitions and to the investigation of the direct-interaction versus the compound-nucleus excitation process in these nuclei. Examination of new, fast photomultiplier tubes suitable for use in a miniaturized neutron-time-of-flight spectrometer. Measurement of certain inelastic cross sections of 238U. Determination of the multiplicity of prompt fission gamma rays in even-A fissile actinides. Energies and mean lives of fission isomers produced by fast fission of even-Z, even-A actinides. Study of the mean life of 7Be in different host matrices and its possible astro-physical significance.

  20. The possible use of a spallation neutron source for neutron capture therapy with epithermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Grusell, E.; Conde, H.; Larsson, B.; Roennqvist, T.; Sornsuntisook, O.; Crawford, J.; Reist, H.; Dahl, B.; Sjoestrand, N.G.; Russel, G. . Dept. of Radiation Sciences; Paul Scherrer Inst. , Villigen; Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Goeteborg . Dept. of Reactor Physics; Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1989-01-01

    Spallation is induced in a heavy material by 72 MeV protons. The hereby produced neutrons with essentially an evaporation spectrum with a peak energy of less than 2 MeV are moderated in two steps, first in iron, and then in carbon. Results from neutron fluence measurements in a perspex phantom placed close to the moderator are presented. Monte Carlo calculations of neutron fluence in a water phantom are also presented under some chosen configurations of spallation source and moderator. The calculations and measurements show a good agreement and also show that useful thermal neutron fluences are attainable in the depth of the brain, at proton currents of less than 0.5 mA. 3 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Neutron multiplicity analysis tool

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Scott L

    2010-01-01

    I describe the capabilities of the EXCOM (EXcel based COincidence and Multiplicity) calculation tool which is used to analyze experimental data or simulated neutron multiplicity data. The input to the program is the count-rate data (including the multiplicity distribution) for a measurement, the isotopic composition of the sample and relevant dates. The program carries out deadtime correction and background subtraction and then performs a number of analyses. These are: passive calibration curve, known alpha and multiplicity analysis. The latter is done with both the point model and with the weighted point model. In the current application EXCOM carries out the rapid analysis of Monte Carlo calculated quantities and allows the user to determine the magnitude of sample perturbations that lead to systematic errors. Neutron multiplicity counting is an assay method used in the analysis of plutonium for safeguards applications. It is widely used in nuclear material accountancy by international (IAEA) and national inspectors. The method uses the measurement of the correlations in a pulse train to extract information on the spontaneous fission rate in the presence of neutrons from ({alpha},n) reactions and induced fission. The measurement is relatively simple to perform and gives results very quickly ({le} 1 hour). By contrast, destructive analysis techniques are extremely costly and time consuming (several days). By improving the achievable accuracy of neutron multiplicity counting, a nondestructive analysis technique, it could be possible to reduce the use of destructive analysis measurements required in safeguards applications. The accuracy of a neutron multiplicity measurement can be affected by a number of variables such as density, isotopic composition, chemical composition and moisture in the material. In order to determine the magnitude of these effects on the measured plutonium mass a calculational tool, EXCOM, has been produced using VBA within Excel. This

  2. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, James L.

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

  3. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, J.L.

    1992-12-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

  4. Recent Advances in Neutron Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Herman; Sheldon, Eric

    1977-01-01

    Discusses new studies in neutron physics within the last decade, such as ultracold neutrons, neutron bottles, resonance behavior, subthreshold fission, doubly radiative capture, and neutron stars. (MLH)

  5. Martian Neutron Energy Spectrometer (MANES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. H.; Roth, D. R.; Kinnison, J. D.; Goldsten, J. O.; Fainchtein, R.; Badhwar, G.

    2000-01-01

    High energy charged particles of extragalactic, galactic, and solar origin collide with spacecraft structures and planetary atmospheres. These primaries create a number of secondary particles inside the structures or on the surfaces of planets to produce a significant radiation environment. This radiation is a threat to long term inhabitants and travelers for interplanetary missions and produces an increased risk of carcinogenesis, central nervous system (CNS) and DNA damage. Charged particles are readily detected; but, neutrons, being electrically neutral, are much more difficult to monitor. These secondary neutrons are reported to contribute 30-60% of the dose equivalent in the Shuttle and MIR station. The Martian atmosphere has an areal density of 37 g/sq cm primarily of carbon dioxide molecules. This shallow atmosphere presents fewer mean free paths to the bombarding cosmic rays and solar particles. The secondary neutrons present at the surface of Mars will have undergone fewer generations of collisions and have higher energies than at sea level on Earth. Albedo neutrons produced by collisions with the Martian surface material will also contribute to the radiation environment. The increased threat of radiation damage to humans on Mars occurs when neutrons of higher mean energy traverse the thin, dry Martian atmosphere and encounter water in the astronaut's body. Water, being hydrogeneous, efficiently moderates the high energy neutrons thereby slowing them as they penetrate deeply into the body. Consequently, greater radiation doses can be deposited in or near critical organs such as the liver or spleen than is the case on Earth. A second significant threat is the possibility of a high energy heavy ion or neutron causing a DNA double strand break in a single strike.

  6. CR-39 detector based thermal neutron flux measurements, in the photo neutron project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mameli, A.; Greco, F.; Fidanzio, A.; Fusco, V.; Cilla, S.; D'Onofrio, G.; Grimaldi, L.; Augelli, B. G.; Giannini, G.; Bevilacqua, R.; Totaro, P.; Tommasino, L.; Azario, L.; Piermattei, A.

    2008-08-01

    PhoNeS (photo neutron source) is a project aimed at the production and moderation of neutrons by exploiting high energy linear accelerators, currently used in radiotherapy. A feasibility study has been carried out with the scope in mind to use the high energy photon beams from these accelerators for the production of neutrons suitable for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Within these investigations, it was necessary to carry out preliminary measurements of the thermal neutron component of neutron spectra, produced by the photo-conversion of X-ray radiotherapy beams supplied by three LinAcs: 15 MV, 18 MV and 23 MV. To this end, a simple passive thermal neutron detector has been used which consists of a CR-39 track detector facing a new type of boron-loaded radiator. Once calibrated, this passive detector has been used for the measurement of both the thermal neutron component and the cadmium ratio of different neutron spectra. In addition, bubble detectors with a response highly sensitive to thermal neutrons have also been used. Both thermal neutron detectors are simple to use, very compact and totally insensitive to low-ionizing radiation such as electrons and X-rays. The resultant thermal neutron flux was above 10 6 n/cm 2s and the cadmium ratio was no greater than 15 for the first attempt of photo-conversion of X-ray radiotherapy beams.

  7. Illuminating the Past: The Neutron as a Tool in Archaeology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kockelmann, W.; Kirfel, A.; Siano, S.; Frost, C. D.

    2004-01-01

    Neutrons can be produced in nuclear reactions and used as very versatile probes for condensed matter research. Since their introduction in the 1950s neutron scattering techniques have evolved to be very powerful tools for investigating the properties of condensed matter. Here we present the concept of neutron diffraction and how this technique can…

  8. BINP accelerator based epithermal neutron source.

    PubMed

    Aleynik, V; Burdakov, A; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Kanygin, V; Kuznetsov, A; Makarov, A; Sorokin, I; Taskaev, S

    2011-12-01

    Innovative facility for neutron capture therapy has been built at BINP. This facility is based on compact vacuum insulation tandem accelerator designed to produce proton current up to 10 mA. Epithermal neutrons are proposed to be generated by 1.915-2.5 MeV protons bombarding a lithium target using (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be threshold reaction. In the article, diagnostic techniques for proton beam and neutrons developed are described, results of experiments on proton beam transport and neutron generation are shown, discussed, and plans are presented. PMID:21439836

  9. Construction of the WSU Epithermal Neutron Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, James Robert; Nigg, David Waler; Tripard, G.

    2002-09-01

    Moderating material has been installed in the original thermal-neutron filter region of the Washington State University (WSU) TRIGA™ type reactor to produce an epithermal-neutron beam. Attention has been focused upon the development of a convenient, local, epithermal-neutron beam facility at WSU for collaborative Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL)/WSU boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) preclinical research and boronated pharmaceutical screening in cell and animal models. The design of the new facility was performed in a collaborative effort1,2 of WSU and INEEL scientists. This paper summarizes the physical assembly of this filter.

  10. Dose measurements around spallation neutron sources.

    PubMed

    Fragopoulou, M; Stoulos, S; Manolopoulou, M; Krivopustov, M; Zamani, M

    2008-01-01

    Neutron dose measurements and calculations around spallation sources appear to be of great importance in shielding research. Two spallation sources were irradiated by high-energy proton beams delivered by the Nuclotron accelerator (JINR), Dubna. Neutrons produced by the spallation sources were measured by using solid-state nuclear track detectors. In addition, neutron dose was calculated after polyethylene and concrete, using a phenomenological model based on empirical relations applied in high-energy physics. The study provides an analytical and experimental neutron benchmark analysis using the transmission factor and a comparison between the experimental results and calculations. PMID:18957519

  11. Neutron Spectra and H*(10) in a 15 MV Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Benites, J.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Hernandez-Davila, V. M.; Rivera, T.; Carrillo, A.; Mondragon, R.

    2010-12-07

    Neutron spectra and the ambient dose equivalent were calculated inside the bunker of a 15 MV Varian linac model CLINAC iX. Calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. Neutron spectra in the vicinity of isocentre show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons produced by the source term, while epithermal and thermal neutron remain constant regardless the distance respect to isocentre, due to room return. Along the maze neutron spectra becomes softer as the detector moves along the maze. The ambient dose equivalent is decreased but do not follow the 1/r{sup 2} rule due to changes in the neutron spectra.

  12. A neutron detector to monitor the intensity of transmitted neutrons for small-angle neutron scattering instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lurgio, Patrick M.; Klann, Raymond T.; Fink, Charles L.; McGregor, Douglas S.; Thiyagarajan, Pappannan; Naday, Istvan

    2003-06-01

    A semiconductor-based neutron detector was developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for use as a neutron beam monitor for small-angle neutron scattering instruments. The detector is constructed using a coating of 10B on a gallium-arsenide semiconductor detector and is mounted directly within a cylindrical (2.2 cm dia. and 4.4 cm long) enriched 10B 4C beam stop in the time-of-flight Small Angle Neutron Diffractometer (SAND) instrument at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) facility at ANL. The neutron beam viewed by the SAND is from a pulsed spallation source moderated by a solid methane moderator that produces useful neutrons in the wavelength range of 0.5-14 Å. The SAND instrument uses all detected neutrons in the above wavelength range sorted by time-of-flight into 68 constant Δ T/ T=0.05 channels. This new detector continuously monitors the transmitted neutron beam through the sample during scattering measurements and takes data concurrently with the other detectors in the instrument. The 10B coating on the GaAs detector allows the detection of the cold neutron spectrum with reasonable efficiency. This paper describes the details of the detector fabrication, the beam stop monitor design, and includes a discussion of results from preliminary tests using the detector during several run cycles at the IPNS.

  13. Interpreting inertial fusion neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, David H.

    2016-03-01

    A burning laser fusion plasma produces a neutron spectrum first described by Brysk (1973 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 15 611). This and more recent work deals with the spectrum produced by a single fluid element. The distribution of temperatures and velocities in multiple fluid elements combine in any real spectrum; we derive formulas for how the neutron spectrum averages these contributions. The single element momentum spectrum is accurately Gaussian, but the multi-element spectrum exhibits higher moments. In particular, the skew and kurtosis are likely to be large enough to measure. Even the single fluid element spectrum may exhibit measurable directional anisotropy, so that instruments with different lines of sight should see different yields, mean velocities, mean temperatures, and higher moments. Finally, we briefly discuss how scattering in the imploded core modifies the neutron spectrum by changing the relative weighting of fuel regions with different temperatures and velocities.

  14. Compound Refractive Lenses for Thermal Neutron Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, Charles K.

    2013-11-12

    This project designed and built compound refractive lenses (CRLs) that are able to focus, collimate and image using thermal neutrons. Neutrons are difficult to manipulate compared to visible light or even x rays; however, CRLs can provide a powerful tool for focusing, collimating and imaging neutrons. Previous neutron CRLs were limited to long focal lengths, small fields of view and poor resolution due to the materials available and manufacturing techniques. By demonstrating a fabrication method that can produce accurate, small features, we have already dramatically improved the focal length of thermal neutron CRLs, and the manufacture of Fresnel lens CRLs that greatly increases the collection area, and thus efficiency, of neutron CRLs. Unlike a single lens, a compound lens is a row of N lenslets that combine to produce an N-fold increase in the refraction of neutrons. While CRLs can be made from a variety of materials, we have chosen to mold Teflon lenses. Teflon has excellent neutron refraction, yet can be molded into nearly arbitrary shapes. We designed, fabricated and tested Teflon CRLs for neutrons. We demonstrated imaging at wavelengths as short as 1.26 ? with large fields of view and achieved resolution finer than 250 μm which is better than has been previously shown. We have also determined designs for Fresnel CRLs that will greatly improve performance.

  15. Measuring the Neutron Lifetime using Magnetically Trapped Ultracold Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumm, H. P.; Coakley, K. J.; Dewey, M. S.; Huber, M. G.; Hughes, P. P.; Thompson, A. K.; Golub, R.; Huffer, C. R.; Huffman, P. R.; O'Shaughnessy, C. M.; Schelhammer, K. W.

    2010-11-01

    The neutron beta-decay lifetime is important in both theoretical predictions of the primordial abundance of ^4He and providing a strong unitarity test of the CKM mixing matrix. We have previously demonstrated trapping of Ultracold Neutrons (UCN) in a magnetic trap, and, though statistically limited, measured a lifetime consistent with the world average. A major upgrade of the apparatus has now been completed at NIST. In our unique approach, a 0.89 nm neutron beam is incident on a superfluid ^4He target within the minimum field region of an Ioffe-type magnetic trap. Neutrons are downscattered by single phonon scattering in liquid helium to near rest and trapped; at sufficiently low temperatures, the low phonon density in the helium suppresses upscatter. The electron accompanying neutron decay produces scintillation in the superfluid helium and can be detected in real time. Previous statistical limitations as well as systematics related to neutron material bottling will be reduced by significant increases in field strength and trap volume. Details of analyses of the systematics as well as the initial performance benchmarks of the new apparatus will be presented.

  16. A NEW SINGLE-CRYSTAL FILTERED THERMAL NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Brockman; David W. Nigg; M. Frederick Hawthorne

    2008-09-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and initial neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline to be used for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The calculated and measured thermal neutron flux produced at the irradiation location is on the order of 9.5x108 neutrons/cm2-s, with a measured cadmium ratio (Au foils) of 105, indicating a well-thermalized spectrum.

  17. Neutron Emission Spectra from Inelastic Scattering on 58,60Ni with a White Neutron Source at FIGARO

    SciTech Connect

    Rochman, D.; Haight, R.C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Devlin, M.; Ethvignot, T.; Granier, T.; Grimes, S.M.; Talou, P.

    2005-05-24

    Neutron emission spectra from inelastic neutron scattering on natural nickel at the FIGARO facility have been measured by a double time-of-flight technique. The incident neutrons are produced from the spallation source of the Weapons Neutron Research facility, and their energies are determined by time of flight. The emitted neutrons and gamma rays are detected by 16 liquid scintillators and one high-resolution germanium or one barium-fluoride detector, respectively. The results for incident neutron energies from 2 to 10 MeV are compared with predictions of nuclear model calculations performed with the code EMPIRE-II. Finally, the level density parameters 'a' and ''{delta}'' are extracted.

  18. High Intensity, Pulsed, D-D Neutron Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. L.; Vainionpaa, J. H.; Jones, G.; Piestrup, M. A.; Gary, C. K.; Harris, J. L.; Fuller, M. J.; Cremer, J. T.; Ludewigt, B. A.; Kwan, J. W.; Reijonen, J.; Leung, K.-N.; Gough, R. A.

    2009-03-01

    Single ion-beam RF-plasma neutron generators are presented as a laboratory source of intense neutrons. The continuous and pulsed operations of such a neutron generator using the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction are reported. The neutron beam can be pulsed by switching the RF plasma and/or a gate electrode. These generators are actively vacuum pumped so that a continuous supply of deuterium gas is present for the production of ions and neutrons. This contributes to the generator's long life. These single-beam generators are capable of producing up to 1010 n/s. Previously, Adelphi and LBNL have demonstrated these generators' applications in fast neutron radiography, Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). Together with an inexpensive compact moderator, these high-output neutron generators extend useful applications to home laboratory operations.

  19. Developments for neutron-induced fission at IGISOL-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelov, D.; Penttilä, H.; Al-Adili, A.; Eronen, T.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Koponen, J.; Lantz, M.; Mattera, A.; Moore, I. D.; Pohjalainen, I.; Pomp, S.; Rakopoulos, V.; Reinikainen, J.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Simutkin, V.; Solders, A.; Voss, A.; Äystö, J.

    2016-06-01

    At the IGISOL-4 facility, neutron-rich, medium mass nuclei have usually been produced via charged particle-induced fission of natural uranium and thorium. Neutron-induced fission is expected to have a higher production cross section of the most neutron-rich species. Development of a neutron source along with a new ion guide continues to be one of the major goals since the commissioning of IGISOL-4. Neutron intensities at different angles from a beryllium neutron source have been measured in an on-line experiment with a 30 MeV proton beam. Recently, the new ion guide coupled to the neutron source has been tested as well. Details of the neutron source and ion guide design together with preliminary results from the first neutron-induced fission experiment at IGISOL-4 are presented in this report.

  20. High Intensity, Pulsed, D-D Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D. L.; Vainionpaa, J. H.; Jones, G.; Piestrup, M. A.; Gary, C. K.; Harris, J. L.; Fuller, M. J.; Cremer, J. T.; Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Kwan, J. W.; Reijonen, J.; Leung, K.-N.; Gough, R. A.

    2008-08-01

    Single ion-beam RF-plasma neutron generators are presented as a laboratory source of intense neutrons. The continuous and pulsed operations of such a neutron generator using the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction are reported. The neutron beam can be pulsed by switching the RF plasma and/or a gate electrode. These generators are actively vacuum pumped so that a continuous supply of deuterium gas is present for the production of ions and neutrons. This contributes to the generator's long life. These single-beam generators are capable of producing up to 1E10 n/s. Previously, Adelphi and LBNL have demonstrated these generators' applications in fast neutron radiography, Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). Together with an inexpensive compact moderator, these high-output neutron generators extend useful applications to home laboratory operations.

  1. Pair correlations in neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Esbensen, H.

    1995-08-01

    We started a program to study the ground-state properties of heavy, neutron-rich nuclei using the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) approximation. This appears at present to be the most realistic approach for heavy nuclei that contain many loosely bound valence neutrons. The two-neutron density obtained in this approach can be decomposed into two components, one associated with the mean field and one associated with the pairing field. The latter has a structure that is quite similar to the pair-density obtained by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian for a two-neutron halo, which was studied earlier. This allows comparison of the HFB solutions against numerically exact solutions for two-neutron halos. This work is in progress. We intend to apply the HFB method to predict the ground-state properties of heavier, more neutron-rich nuclei that may be produced at future radioactive beam facilities.

  2. A system for fast neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R.T.

    1996-05-01

    A system has been designed and a neutron generator installed to perform fast neutron radiography. With this sytem, objects as small as a coin or as large as a waste drum can be radiographed. The neutron source is an MF Physics A-711 neutron generator which produces 3x10{sup 10} neutrons/second with an average energy of 14.5 MeV. The radiography system uses x-ray scintillation screens and film in commercially available cassettes. The cassettes have been modified to include a thin sheet of plastic to convert neutrons to protons through elastic scattering from hydrogen and other low Z materials in the plastic. For film densities from 1.8 to 3.0, exposures range from 1.9x10{sup 7} to 3.8x10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2} depending on the type of screen and film.

  3. HFIR cold neutron source moderator vessel design analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.J.

    1998-04-01

    A cold neutron source capsule made of aluminum alloy is to be installed and located at the tip of one of the neutron beam tubes of the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Cold hydrogen liquid of temperature approximately 20 degree Kelvin and 15 bars pressure is designed to flow through the aluminum capsule that serves to chill and to moderate the incoming neutrons produced from the reactor core. The cold and low energy neutrons thus produced will be used as cold neutron sources for the diffraction experiments. The structural design calculation for the aluminum capsule is reported in this paper.

  4. Narcotics detection using fast-neutron interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    Fast-neutron interrogation techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in luggage and cargo containers. This paper discusses two different fast-neutron techniques. The first uses a pulsed accelerator or sealed-tube source to produce monoenergetic fast neutrons. Gamma rays characteristic of carbon and oxygen are detected and the elemental densities determined. Spatial localization is accomplished by either time of flight or collimators. This technique is suitable for examination of large containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the high-energy gamma rays. The second technique uses an accelerator to produce nanosecond pulsed beams of deuterons that strike a target to produce a pulsed beam of neutrons with a continuum of energies. Elemental distributions are obtained by measuring the neutron spectrum after the source neutrons pass through the items being interrogated. Spatial variation of elemental densities is obtained by tomographic reconstruction of projection data obtained for three to five angles and relatively low (2 cm) resolution. This technique is best suited for examination of luggage or small containers with average neutron transmissions greater than about 0.01. Analytic and Monte-Carlo models are being used to investigate the operational characteristics and limitations of both techniques.

  5. Determination of neutron absorbed doses in lithium aluminates.

    PubMed

    Delfín Loya, A; Carrera, L M; Ureña-Núñez, F; Palacios, O; Bosch, P

    2003-04-01

    Lithium-based ceramics have been proposed as tritium breeders for fusion reactors. The lithium aluminate (gamma phase) seems to be thermally and structurally stable, the damages produced by neutron irradiation depend on the absorbed dose. A method based on the measurement of neutron activation of foils through neutron capture has been developed to obtain the neutron absorbed dose in lithium aluminates irradiated in the thermal column facility and in the fixed irradiation system of a Triga Mark III Nuclear Reactor. PMID:12672632

  6. High flux compact neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Reijonen, J.; Lou, T.-P.; Tolmachoff, B.; Leung, K.-N.; Verbeke, J.; Vujic, J.

    2001-06-15

    Compact high flux neutron generators are developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The neutron production is based on D-D or D-T reaction. The deuterium or tritium ions are produced from plasma using either a 2 MHz or 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) discharge. RF-discharge yields high fraction of atomic species in the beam which enables higher neutron output. In the first tube design, the ion beam is formed using a multiple hole accelerator column. The beam is accelerated to energy of 80 keV by means of a three-electrode extraction system. The ion beam then impinges on a titanium target where either the 2.4 MeV D-D or 14 MeV D-T neutrons are generated. The MCNP computation code has predicted a neutron flux of {approximately}10{sup 11} n/s for the D-D reaction at beam intensity of 1.5 A at 150 kV. The neutron flux measurements of this tube design will be presented. Recently new compact high flux tubes are being developed which can be used for various applications. These tubes also utilize RF-discharge for plasma generation. The design of these tubes and the first measurements will be discussed in this presentation.

  7. Forming images with thermal neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanier, Peter E.; Forman, Leon

    2003-01-01

    Thermal neutrons passing through air have scattering lengths of about 20 meters. At further distances, the majority of neutrons emanating from a moderated source will scatter multiple times in the air before being detected, and will not retain information about the location of the source, except that their density will fall off somewhat faster than 1/r2. However, there remains a significant fraction of the neutrons that will travel 20 meters or more without scattering and can be used to create an image of the source. A few years ago, a proof-of-principle "camera" was demonstrated that could produce images of a scene containing sources of thermalized neutrons and could locate a source comparable in strength with an improvised nuclear device at ranges over 60 meters. The instrument makes use of a coded aperture with a uniformly redundant array of openings, analogous to those used in x-ray and gamma cameras. The detector is a position-sensitive He-3 proportional chamber, originally used for neutron diffraction. A neutron camera has many features in common with those designed for non-focusable photons, as well as some important differences. Potential applications include detecting nuclear smuggling, locating non-metallic land mines, assaying nuclear waste, and surveying for health physics purposes.

  8. Hybrid scintillators for neutron discrimination

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Patrick L; Cordaro, Joseph G; Anstey, Mitchell R; Morales, Alfredo M

    2015-05-12

    A composition capable of producing a unique scintillation response to neutrons and gamma rays, comprising (i) at least one surfactant; (ii) a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent; and (iii) at least one luminophore. A method including combining at least one surfactant, a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent and at least one luminophore in a scintillation cell under vacuum or an inert atmosphere.

  9. Method and apparatus for determination of temperature, neutron absorption cross section and neutron moderating power

    DOEpatents

    Vagelatos, Nicholas; Steinman, Donald K.; John, Joseph; Young, Jack C.

    1981-01-01

    A nuclear method and apparatus determines the temperature of a medium by injecting fast neutrons into the medium and detecting returning slow neutrons in three first energy ranges by producing three respective detection signals. The detection signals are combined to produce three derived indicia each systematically related to the population of slow neutrons returning from the medium in a respective one of three second energy ranges, specifically exclusively epithermal neutrons, exclusively substantially all thermal neutrons and exclusively a portion of the thermal neutron spectrum. The derived indicia are compared with calibration indicia similarly systematically related to the population of slow neutrons in the same three second energy ranges returning from similarly irradiated calibration media for which the relationships temperature, neutron absorption cross section and neutron moderating power to such calibration indicia are known. The comparison indicates the temperature at which the calibration indicia correspond to the derived indicia and consequently the temperature of the medium. The neutron absorption cross section and moderating power of the medium can be identified at the same time.

  10. Production of ultra cold neutrons by a doppler shifter with pulsed neutrons at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishima, K.; Imajo, S.; Hino, M.; Ino, T.; Iwashita, Y.; Katayama, R.; Kitaguchi, M.; Oda, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Utsuro, M.; Yamashita, S.; Yoshioka, T.

    2014-07-01

    Ultracold neutrons (UCNs) are neutrons whose kinetic energy is around a few hundred nanoelectronvolts. Neutrons with such small kinetic energy can be trapped in a material vessel or magnetic fields. Because of these unique characteristics, UCNs are used for some important experiments of fundamental physics. The Doppler shifter is a device to produce UCN by slowing them down by the reflection on a mirror moving with half of the velocity of incoming neutrons. A Doppler shifter using a quadruple-stack of monochromatic supermirrors that reflects neutrons with a velocity around 68m/s [1, Hino et al.(2010)] was fabricated, and operated with a pulsed neutron source of J-PARC. An important feature of the Doppler shifter is the use of a pulsed neutron beam. Unlike in continuous neutron beams, the neutron velocity can be selected by choosing a time slice in a pulsed neutron bunch. Thus the UCN production improves by ~80 times in the case of J-PARC. We successfully produced the UCNs by the Doppler shifter: the measured UCN production rate is consistent with the simulations.

  11. Neutron logging tool

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.A.; Taylor, K.G.

    1987-02-03

    A method is described of logging earth formations traversed by a well bore and utilizing a logging tool having a neutron source and a short spaced and a long spaced thermal neutron detector which produce an independent response as a function of depth of the logging tool in a well bore. The method comprises: moving the logging tool through a well bore to locate a section of the earth formations which has minimum porosity and obtaining measurement responses from each of the long and short spaced detectors; normalizing the responses of the long and short spaced detectors by matching the sensitivity of response of the long spaced detector to the sensitivity of response of the short spaced detector for an earth formation which has minimum porosity so that the normalized responses track one another in an earth formation which has minimum porosity; and moving the tool over the length of the well bore to be surveyed while recording the normalized responses of the long and short spaced neutron detectors as a function of depth.

  12. Position annihilation radiation from neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Borner, G. A.; Cohen, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Matter accreted on the surfaces of neutron stars consists of energetic particles of a few tens to a couple hundred MeV/nucleon, depending on the neutron star mass. In addition to heat, such particles produce nuclear reactions with the surface material. It is proposed that the recently observed 473 + or - 30 keV spectral feature from the galactic center is gravitationally red-shifted positron annihilation radiation produced at the surfaces of old neutron stars. The principal observational tests of the model would be the detection of nuclear gamma ray lines from the galactic center and red-shifted positron annihilation radiation from the galactic disk.

  13. Study of neutron focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wehring, B.W.; Uenlue, K.

    1996-12-19

    The goals of this three-year study were: (1) design a neutron focusing system for use with the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) to produce an intense beam of cold neutrons appropriate for prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA); (2) orchestrate the construction of the focusing system, integrate it into the TCNS neutron guide complex, and measure its performance; and (3) design, setup, and test a cold-neutron PGAA system which utilizes the guided focused cold neutron beam. During the first year of the DOE grant, a new procedure was developed and used to design a focusing converging guide consisting of truncated rectangular cone sections. Detailed calculations were performed using a 3-D Monte Carlo code which the authors wrote to trace neutrons through the curved guide of the TCNS into the proposed converging guide. Using realistic reflectivities for Ni-Ti supermirrors, the authors obtained gains of 3 to 5 for 4 different converging guide geometries. During the second year of the DOE grant, the subject of this final report, Ovonic Synthetic Materials Company was contracted to build a converging neutron guide focusing system to the specifications. Considerable time and effort were spent working with Ovonics on selecting the materials for the converging neutron guide system. The major portion of the research on the design of a cold-neutron PGAA system was also completed during the second year. At the beginning of the third year of the grant, a converging neutron guide focusing system had been ordered, and a cold-neutron PGAA system had been designed. Since DOE did not fund the third year, there was no money to purchase the required equipment for the cold-neutron PGAA system and no money to perform tests of either the converging neutron guide or the cold-neutron PGAA system. The research already accomplished would have little value without testing the systems which had been designed. Thus the project was continued at a pace that could be sustained with internal funding.

  14. Advanced Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, Mark; Dobson, Chris; Norwood, Joseph; Kayatin, Matthew; Apple, Jeff; Gibson, Brian; Dietz, Kurt; Benson, Carl; Smith, Dennis; Howard, David; Rodriquez, Miguel; Watts, John; Sabra, Mohammed; Kuznetsov, Evgeny

    2013-01-01

    Energetic neutron measurements remain a challenge for space science investigations and radiation monitoring for human exploration beyond LEO. We are investigating a new composite scintillator design that uses Li6 glass scintillator embedded in a PVT block. A comparison between Li6 and Boron 10 loaded scintillators are being studied to assess the advantages and shortcomings of these two techniques. We present the details of the new Li6 design and results from the comparison of the B10 and Li6 techniques during exposures in a mixed radiation field produced by high energy protons interacting in a target material.

  15. Beam characterization at the Neutron Radiography Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah W. Morgan; Jeffrey C. King; Chad L. Pope

    2013-12-01

    The quality of a neutron-imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, potential image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This paper provides a characterization of the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio and potential image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. The NRAD has an effective collimation ratio greater than 125, a beam divergence of 0.3 +_ 0.1 degrees, and a gold foil cadmium ratio of 2.7. The flux profile has been quantified and the facility is an ASTM Category 1 radiographic facility. Based on bare and cadmium covered foil activation results, the neutron energy spectrum used in the current MCNP model of the radiography beamline over-samples the thermal region of the neutron energy spectrum.

  16. Therapeutic potential of atmospheric neutrons

    PubMed Central

    Voyant, Cyril; Roustit, Rudy; Tatje, Jennifer; Biffi, Katia; Leschi, Delphine; Briançon, Jérome; Marcovici, Céline Lantieri

    2010-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive type of primary brain tumour in humans. It has a very poor prognosis despite multi-modality treatments consisting of open craniotomy with surgical resection, followed by chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Recently, a new treatment has been proposed – Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) – which exploits the interaction between Boron-10 atoms (introduced by vector molecules) and low energy neutrons produced by giant accelerators or nuclear reactors. Methods The objective of the present study is to compute the deposited dose using a natural source of neutrons (atmospheric neutrons). For this purpose, Monte Carlo computer simulations were carried out to estimate the dosimetric effects of a natural source of neutrons in the matter, to establish if atmospheric neutrons interact with vector molecules containing Boron-10. Results The doses produced (an average of 1 μGy in a 1 g tumour) are not sufficient for therapeutic treatment of in situ tumours. However, the non-localised yet specific dosimetric properties of 10B vector molecules could prove interesting for the treatment of micro-metastases or as (neo)adjuvant treatment. On a cellular scale, the deposited dose is approximately 0.5 Gy/neutron impact. Conclusion It has been shown that BNCT may be used with a natural source of neutrons, and may potentially be useful for the treatment of micro-metastases. The atmospheric neutron flux is much lower than that utilized during standard NBCT. However the purpose of the proposed study is not to replace the ordinary NBCT but to test if naturally occurring atmospheric neutrons, considered to be an ionizing pollution at the Earth's surface, can be used in the treatment of a disease such as cancer. To finalize this study, it is necessary to quantify the biological effects of the physically deposited dose, taking into account the characteristics of the incident particles (alpha particle and Lithium

  17. Methods of producing cesium-131

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David H; Snyder, John R

    2012-09-18

    Methods of producing cesium-131. The method comprises dissolving at least one non-irradiated barium source in water or a nitric acid solution to produce a barium target solution. The barium target solution is irradiated with neutron radiation to produce cesium-131, which is removed from the barium target solution. The cesium-131 is complexed with a calixarene compound to separate the cesium-131 from the barium target solution. A liquid:liquid extraction device or extraction column is used to separate the cesium-131 from the barium target solution.

  18. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Reardon, W.A.; Lennox, D.H.; Nobles, R.G.

    1959-01-13

    A neutron source of the antimony--beryllium type is presented. The source is comprised of a solid mass of beryllium having a cylindrical recess extending therein and a cylinder containing antimony-124 slidably disposed within the cylindrical recess. The antimony cylinder is encased in aluminum. A berylliunn plug is removably inserted in the open end of the cylindrical recess to completely enclose the antimony cylinder in bsryllium. The plug and antimony cylinder are each provided with a stud on their upper ends to facilitate handling remotely.

  19. Calculations of neutron spectra after neutron neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, B. E.; Stephenson, S. L.; Howell, C. R.; Mitchell, G. E.; Tornow, W.; Furman, W. I.; Lychagin, E. V.; Muzichka, A. Yu; Nekhaev, G. V.; Strelkov, A. V.; Sharapov, E. I.; Shvetsov, V. N.

    2004-09-01

    A direct neutron-neutron scattering length, ann, measurement with the goal of 3% accuracy (0.5 fm) is under preparation at the aperiodic pulsed reactor YAGUAR. A direct measurement of ann will not only help resolve conflicting results of ann by indirect means, but also in comparison to the proton-proton scattering length, app, shed light on the charge-symmetry of the nuclear force. We discuss in detail the analysis of the nn-scattering data in terms of a simple analytical expression. We also discuss calibration measurements using the time-of-flight spectra of neutrons scattered on He and Ar gases and the neutron activation technique. In particular, we calculate the neutron velocity and time-of-flight spectra after scattering neutrons on neutrons and after scattering neutrons on He and Ar atoms for the proposed experimental geometry, using a realistic neutron flux spectrum—Maxwellian plus epithermal tail. The shape of the neutron spectrum after scattering is appreciably different from the initial spectrum, due to collisions between thermal-thermal and thermal-epithermal neutrons. At the same time, the integral over the Maxwellian part of the realistic scattering spectrum differs by only about 6 per cent from that of a pure Maxwellian nn-scattering spectrum.

  20. CONTROL SYSTEM FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Crever, F.E.

    1962-05-01

    BS>A slow-acting shim rod for control of major variations in reactor neutron flux and a fast-acting control rod to correct minor flux variations are employed to provide a sensitive, accurate control system. The fast-acting rod is responsive to an error signal which is produced by changes in the neutron flux from a predetermined optimum level. When the fast rod is thus actuated in a given direction, means is provided to actuate the slow-moving rod in that direction to return the fast rod to a position near the midpoint of its control range. (AEC)

  1. Compact ion source neutron generator

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, Thomas; Persaud, Arun; Kapadia, Rehan; Javey, Ali; Chang-Hasnain, Constance; Rangelow, Ivo; Kwan, Joe

    2015-10-13

    A neutron generator includes a conductive substrate comprising a plurality of conductive nanostructures with free-standing tips and a source of an atomic species to introduce the atomic species in proximity to the free-standing tips. A target placed apart from the substrate is voltage biased relative to the substrate to ionize and accelerate the ionized atomic species toward the target. The target includes an element capable of a nuclear fusion reaction with the ionized atomic species to produce a one or more neutrons as a reaction by-product.

  2. Development of high flux thermal neutron generator for neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainionpaa, Jaakko H.; Chen, Allan X.; Piestrup, Melvin A.; Gary, Charles K.; Jones, Glenn; Pantell, Richard H.

    2015-05-01

    The new model DD110MB neutron generator from Adelphi Technology produces thermal (<0.5 eV) neutron flux that is normally achieved in a nuclear reactor or larger accelerator based systems. Thermal neutron fluxes of 3-5 · 107 n/cm2/s are measured. This flux is achieved using four ion beams arranged concentrically around a target chamber containing a compact moderator with a central sample cylinder. Fast neutron yield of ∼2 · 1010 n/s is created at the titanium surface of the target chamber. The thickness and material of the moderator is selected to maximize the thermal neutron flux at the center. The 2.5 MeV neutrons are quickly thermalized to energies below 0.5 eV and concentrated at the sample cylinder. The maximum flux of thermal neutrons at the target is achieved when approximately half of the neutrons at the sample area are thermalized. In this paper we present simulation results used to characterize performance of the neutron generator. The neutron flux can be used for neutron activation analysis (NAA) prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) for determining the concentrations of elements in many materials. Another envisioned use of the generator is production of radioactive isotopes. DD110MB is small enough for modest-sized laboratories and universities. Compared to nuclear reactors the DD110MB produces comparable thermal flux but provides reduced administrative and safety requirements and it can be run in pulsed mode, which is beneficial in many neutron activation techniques.

  3. Neutronic effects on tungsten-186 double neutron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Marc Alan

    Rhenium-188, a daughter product of tungsten-188, is an isotope of great interest in therapeutic nuclear medicine, being used in dozens of laboratory and clinical investigations worldwide. Applications include various cancer therapy strategies, treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, prevention of restenosis following coronary artery angioplasty, and palliation of bone pain associated with cancer metastases. With its half-life of 17 hours, 2.12 MeV (maximum) beta-particle emission, chemical similarity to technetium-99m (the most widely used diagnostic radioisotope), and its availability in a convenient tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator system, rhenium-188 is a superb candidate for a broad range of applications. Production of 188W is typically via double neutron capture by 186W in a high flux nuclear reactor, predominantly the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. Experience at HFIR has shown that production yields (measured in Ci of 188W produced per g of 186W target) decrease considerably as target size increases. While the phenomenon of neutron resonance self-shielding would be expected to produce such an effect, temperature effects on neutron flux distribution and neutron capture rates may also be involved. Experimental investigations of these phenomena have not been previously performed. The work presented in this thesis evaluates the factors that contribute to the decrease in 188W yield from both theoretical and experimental standpoints. Neutron self-shielding and temperature effects were characterized to develop a strategy for target design that would optimize production yield, an important factor in minimizing health care costs. It was determined that decrease in yield due to neutron self-shielding can be attributed to depletion of epithermal neutrons at resonant energies, most significantly within the initial 0.4 mm depth of the target. The results from these studies further show that 188W yield in the interior of the

  4. - and -delayed neutron- decay of neutron-rich copper isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Korgul, A.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Winger, J. A.; Ilyushkin, S.; Gross, Carl J; Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Borzov, Ivan N; Goodin, C.; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Hamilton, Joseph H; Krolas, W.; Liddick, S. N.; Mazzocchi, C.; Nelson, C.; Nowacki, F.; Padgett, Stephen; Piechaczek, A.; Rajabali, M. M.; Shapira, Dan; Sieja, K.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2012-01-01

    The {beta}-decay properties of neutron-rich Cu isotopes produced in proton-induced fission of {sup 238}U were studied at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The data were collected using high-resolution online mass separation, reacceleration, and digital {beta}-{gamma} spectroscopy methods. An improved decay scheme of N = 49 {sup 78}Cu and the first observation of N = 50 {sup 79}Cu {beta}-delayed neutron decay followed by a gamma transition are reported. Spin and parity (5{sup -}) are deduced for {sup 78gs}Cu. The {beta}-delayed neutron branching ratios (P{sub {beta}n}) for the {sup 77}Cu and {sup 79}Cu precursors are analyzed with the help of nuclear structure models.

  5. Time of flight fast neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveman, R.; Bendahan, J.; Gozani, T.; Stevenson, J.

    1995-05-01

    Neutron radiography with fast or thermal neutrons is a standard technique for non-destructive testing (NDT). Here we report results for fast neutron radiography both as an adjunct to pulsed fast neutron analysis (PFNA) and as a stand-alone method for NDT. PFNA is a new technique for utilizing a collimated pulsed neutron beam to interrogate items and determine their elemental composition. By determining the time of flight for gamma-rays produced by (n,n' gamma X) reactions, a three dimensional image can be produced. Neutron radiography data taken with the same beam provides an important constraint for image reconstruction, and in particular is important in inferring the amount of hydrogen within the interrogated item. As a stand-alone device, the radiography measurement can be used to image items as large as cargo containers as long as their density is not too high. The use of a pulsed beam gives the further advantage of a time of flight measurement on the transmitted neutrons. By gating the radiography signal on the time of flight appropriate to the energy of the primary neutrons, most build-up from scattered neutrons can be eliminated. The pulsed beam also greatly improves the signal to background and extends the range of the neutron radiography. Simulation results will be presented which display the advantage of this constraint in particular for statistically limited data. Experimental results will be presented which show some of the limitations likely in a PFNA system utilizing neutron radiography data. Experimental and simulation results will demonstrate possible uses for this type of radiographic data in identifying contraband substances such as drugs.

  6. Production of 14 MeV neutrons by heavy ions

    DOEpatents

    Brugger, Robert M.; Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a neutron generator and a method for the production of 14 MeV neutrons. Heavy ions are accelerated to impinge upon a target mixture of deuterium and tritium to produce recoil atoms of deuterium and tritium. These recoil atoms have a sufficient energy such that they interact with other atoms of tritium or deuterium in the target mixture to produce approximately 14 MeV neutrons.

  7. Project Produce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfinger, Donna M.

    2005-01-01

    The grocery store produce section used to be a familiar but rather dull place. There were bananas next to the oranges next to the limes. Broccoli was next to corn and lettuce. Apples and pears, radishes and onions, eggplants and zucchinis all lay in their appropriate bins. Those days are over. Now, broccoli may be next to bok choy, potatoes beside…

  8. Variation in lunar neutron dose estimates.

    PubMed

    Slaba, Tony C; Blattnig, Steve R; Clowdsley, Martha S

    2011-12-01

    The radiation environment on the Moon includes albedo neutrons produced by primary particles interacting with the lunar surface. In this work, HZETRN2010 is used to calculate the albedo neutron contribution to effective dose as a function of shielding thickness for four different space radiation environments and to determine to what extent various factors affect such estimates. First, albedo neutron spectra computed with HZETRN2010 are compared to Monte Carlo results in various radiation environments. Next, the impact of lunar regolith composition on the albedo neutron spectrum is examined, and the variation on effective dose caused by neutron fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients is studied. A methodology for computing effective dose in detailed human phantoms using HZETRN2010 is also discussed and compared. Finally, the combined variation caused by environmental models, shielding materials, shielding thickness, regolith composition and conversion coefficients on the albedo neutron contribution to effective dose is determined. It is shown that a single percentage number for characterizing the albedo neutron contribution to effective dose can be misleading. In general, the albedo neutron contribution to effective dose is found to vary between 1-32%, with the environmental model, shielding material and shielding thickness being the driving factors that determine the exact contribution. It is also shown that polyethylene or other hydrogen-rich materials may be used to mitigate the albedo neutron exposure. PMID:21859325

  9. Plutonium Detection with Straw Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Guss, Paul

    2014-03-27

    A kilogram of weapons grade plutonium gives off about 56,000 neutrons per second of which 55,000 neutrons come from spontaneous fission of 240Pu (~6% by weight of the total plutonium). Actually, all even numbered isotopes (238Pu, 240Pu, and 242Pu) produce copious spontaneous fission neutrons. These neutrons induce fission in the surrounding fissile 239Pu with an approximate multiplication of a factor of ~1.9. This multiplication depends on the shape of the fissile materials and the surrounding material. These neutrons (typically of energy 2 MeV and air scattering mean free path >100 meters) can be detected 100 meters away from the source by vehicle-portable neutron detectors. [1] In our current studies on neutron detection techniques, without using 3He gas proportional counters, we designed and developed a portable high-efficiency neutron multiplicity counter using 10B-coated thin tubes called straws. The detector was designed to perform like commercially available fission meters (manufactured by Ortec Corp.) except instead of using 3He gas as a neutron conversion material, we used a thin coating of 10B.

  10. Neutron measurements in ITER using the Radial Neutron Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marocco, D.; Esposito, B.; Moro, F.

    2012-03-01

    The Radial Neutron Camera (RNC) is one of the key diagnostic systems of the ITER international fusion experiment. It is designed to measure the uncollided 14 MeV and 2.5 MeV neutrons from deuterium-tritium (DT) and deuterium-deuterium (DD) fusion reactions taking place in the ITER plasma through an array of 45 detectors positioned along collimated lines of sight. Scintillators and diamonds coupled to fast digital acquisition electronics are among the detectors presently considered for the RNC. The RNC will provide spatially resolved measurements of several plasma parameters needed for fusion power estimation, plasma control and plasma physics studies. The line-integrated RNC neutron fluxes are used to evaluate the local profile of the neutron emission (neutron emissivity, s-1m-3) and therefore the total neutron yield and the birth profile of the alpha particles. The temperature profile of the bulk ions can be derived from the Doppler broadened widths of the RNC line-integrated spectra, that also provide insight on the supra-thermal ions produced by the injection in the plasma of electromagnetic waves and neutral particles. The RNC emissivity and temperature measurements can be employed to estimate the composition of the ITER fuel, namely the ratio between the tritium and deuterium densities. Data processing techniques involving spatial inversion and spectra unfolding are necessary to deduce the profile quantities from the line-integrated RNC measurements. The expected performances of the RNC as a diagnostic for the neutron emissivity/ion temperature/fuel ratio profile (measurement range, time resolution, accuracy, precision) have been estimated by means of synthetic data simulating actual RNC measurements. The results of the simulations, together with an overall description of the diagnostic and of the measurement techniques, are presented.

  11. Neutron Generators for Spent Fuel Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A

    2010-12-30

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. DOE has initiated a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in, and detect the diversion of pins from, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies with non-destructive assay (NDA). The 14 NDA techniques being studied include several that require an external neutron source: Delayed Neutrons (DN), Differential Die-Away (DDA), Delayed Gammas (DG), and Lead Slowing-Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This report provides a survey of currently available neutron sources and their underlying technology that may be suitable for NDA of SNF assemblies. The neutron sources considered here fall into two broad categories. The term 'neutron generator' is commonly used for sealed devices that operate at relatively low acceleration voltages of less than 150 kV. Systems that employ an acceleration structure to produce ion beam energies from hundreds of keV to several MeV, and that are pumped down to vacuum during operation, rather than being sealed units, are usually referred to as 'accelerator-driven neutron sources.' Currently available neutron sources and future options are evaluated within the parameter space of the neutron generator/source requirements as currently understood and summarized in section 2. Applicable neutron source technologies are described in section 3. Commercially available neutron generators and other source options that could be made available in the near future with some further development and customization are discussed in sections 4 and 5, respectively. The pros and cons of the various options and possible ways forward are discussed in section 6. Selection of the best approach must take a number of parameters into account including cost, size, lifetime, and power consumption, as well as neutron flux, neutron energy spectrum, and pulse structure that satisfy the requirements of the NDA instrument to be built.

  12. Neutrons in extensive air showers

    SciTech Connect

    Stenkin, Yu. V.; Djappuev, D. D.; Valdes-Galicia, J. F.

    2007-06-15

    The main properties of the so-called neutron bursts produced by the passage of extensive air showers (EASs) through a detector array and the properties of these EASs are considered using the experiments that are being or have been carried out previously with the Carpet-2 array at Baksan Neutrino Observatory of the Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, and at Cosmic-Ray Station of UNAM in Mexico as examples. We show that no exotic processes are required to explain the nature of neutron bursts. Based on a working prototype of the previously proposed MULTICOM array, we also show that this phenomenon can be successfully used in studying the EAS hadronic component and that adding special thermal neutron detectors can improve significantly the capabilities of the array for EAS study.

  13. Quantum crystals in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Chitre, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    Using the many-body techniques appropriate for quantum crystals it is shown that the deep interior of a neutron star is most likely an orderly arrangement of neutrons, protons and hyperons forming a solid. It is shown that a liquid or gas arrangement would produce higher energy. If so, a neutron star can be viewed as two solids (crust and core) permeated by a layer of ordinary or (perhaps) superfluid liquid. Astronomical evidence is in favor of such a structure: the sudden jumps in the periods of the Crab and Vela pulsars that differ by a factor of about 100 can be easily explained by the star-quake model. If the Crab is less massive than Vela (i.e., if it is not dense enough to have a solid core), the star-quakes take place in the crust whereas for Vela they occur in the core.

  14. Earth formation porosity determination with dual epithermal neutron detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Mongne, M. L.

    1985-03-19

    A method of determining the porosity of earth formations surrounding a wellbore despite shielding of that formation by well casing, cement or mud cake. The method includes producing fast neutrons in a wellbore and detecting a first epithermal neutron population resulting from passage of neutrons from the source through a designated first region and a second epithermal neutron population resulting from passage of neutrons through a designated second region. The relationship of the logarithms of a first and a second epithermal neutron population resulting from passage of neutrons through a plurality of known porosity homogenous mediums is determined and plotted as a first curve with each point representing a unique value of porosity. A second curve of the logarithms of the first and second epithermal neutron populations in the actual wellbore is plotted. Individual points on the second curve are then corrected to the first curve utilizing known attenuating factors to determine the porosity of the earth formation.

  15. Conceptual design of an RFQ accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron-capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Stovall, J.E.; Bhatia, T.S.; Wang, C.K.; Blue, T.E.; Gahbauer, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    We present a conceptual design of a low-energy neutron generator for treatment of brain tumors by boron neutron capture theory (BNCT). The concept is based on a 2.5-MeV proton beam from a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, and the neutrons are produced by the /sup 7/Li(p,n)/sup 7/Be reaction. A liquid lithium target and modulator assembly are designed to provide a high flux of epithermal neutrons. The patient is administered a tumor-specific /sup 10/Be-enriched compound and is irradiated by the neutrons to create a highly localized dose from the reaction /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li. An RFQ accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT is compact, which makes it practical to site the facility within a hospital. 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Dependence of Delayed-Neutron Energy Spectra on the Energy of Neutrons which Induce Fission of Uranium -235

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharfuddin, Quazi

    Delayed neutron energy spectra following both fast and thermal neutron induced fission of U-235 are measured by the time-of-flight technique using beta-neutron correlations. Fast neutrons are produced via the (p,n) reaction in Li-7 using the University of Lowell 5.5 MV Van de Graaff Accelerator, whereas thermal neutrons are produced by surrounding the fission chamber and target assembly with paraffin. Fission fragments stopped in the helium atmosphere of the fission chamber are transferred by a helium jet system to a low background counting room where the composite delayed neutron energy spectra are measured as a function of time after fission. The delayed neutron energy spectra following fast fission of U-235 are compared to those resulting from thermal fission of U-235. Two mathematical methods are developed to deduce the equilibrium delayed neutron spectrum from the composite delayed neutron spectra measured as a function of delay time after fission. These methods are then applied to obtain the equilibrium delayed neutron spectrum from thermal fission of U-235. Finally, the six-group delayed neutron spectra resulting from thermal fission of U-235 are deduced from the measured composite delayed neutron spectra as a function of delay time after fission using a matrix inversion method.

  17. Neutron standard data

    SciTech Connect

    Peelle, R.; Conde, H.

    1988-01-01

    The neutron standards are reviewed with emphasis on the evaluation for ENDFB-VI. Also discussed are the neutron spectrum of /sup 252/Cf spontaneous fission, activation cross sections for neutron flux measurement, and standards for neutron energies greater than 20 MeV. Recommendations are made for future work. 21 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Borner Ball Neutron Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector measures neutron radiation. Neutrons are uncharged atomic particles that have the ability to penetrate living tissues, harming human beings in space. The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector is one of three radiation experiments during Expedition Two. The others are the Phantom Torso and Dosimetric Mapping.

  19. Neutron Scattering Simulations at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thienan; Jackson, Daniel; Hicks, S. F.; Rice, Ben; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2015-10-01

    The Monte-Carlo N-Particle Transport code (MCNP) has many applications ranging from radiography to reactor design. It has particle interaction capabilities, making it useful for simulating neutron collisions on surfaces of varying compositions. The neutron flux within the accelerator complex at the University of Kentucky was simulated using MCNP. With it, the complex's capabilities to contain and thermalize 7 MeV neutrons produced via 2H(d,n)3He source reaction to an acceptable level inside the neutron hall and adjoining rooms were analyzed. This will aid in confirming the safety of researchers who are working in the adjacent control room. Additionally, the neutron transport simulation was used to analyze the impact of the collimator copper shielding on various detectors located around the neutron scattering hall. The purpose of this was to attempt to explain any background neutrons that are observed at these detectors. The simulation shows that the complex performs very well with regards to neutron containment and thermalization. Also, the tracking information for the paths taken by the neutrons show that most of the neutrons' lives are spent inside the neutron hall. Finally, the neutron counts were analyzed at the positions of the neutron monitor detectors located at 90 and 45 degrees relative to the incident beam direction. This project was supported in part by the DOE NEUP Grant NU-12-KY-UK-0201-05 and the Donald A. Cowan Physics Institute at the University of Dallas.

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Stewart, H.B.

    1958-12-23

    A nuclear reactor of the type speclfically designed for the irradiation of materials is discussed. In this design a central cyllndrical core of moderating material ls surrounded by an active portlon comprlsed of an annular tank contalning fissionable material immersed ln a liquid moderator. The active portion ls ln turn surrounded by a reflector, and a well ls provided in the center of the core to accommodate the materlals to be irradiated. The over-all dimensions of the core ln at least one plane are equal to or greater than twice the effective slowing down length and equal to or less than twlce the effective diffuslon length for neutrons in the core materials.

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-10-14

    A method is presented for loading and unloading rod type fuel elements of a neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, solld moderator, liquid cooled type. In the embodiment illustrated, the fuel rods are disposed in vertical coolant channels in the reactor core. The fuel rods are loaded and unloaded through the upper openings of the channels which are immersed in the coolant liquid, such as water. Unloading is accomplished by means of a coffer dam assembly having an outer sleeve which is placed in sealing relation around the upper opening. A radiation shield sleeve is disposed in and reciprocable through the coffer dam sleeve. A fuel rod engaging member operates through the axial bore in the radiation shield sleeve to withdraw the fuel rod from its position in the reactor coolant channel into the shield, the shield snd rod then being removed. Loading is accomplished in the reverse procedure.

  2. Direct Measurement of Neutron-Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sharapov, E.I.; Furman, W.I.; Lychagin, W.I.; Muzichka, G.V.; Nekhaev, G.V.; Safronov, Yu.V.; Shvetsov, V.N.; Strelkov, A.V.; Bowman, C.D.; Crawford, B.E.; Stephenson, S.L.; Howell, C.R.; Tornow, W.; Levakov, B.G.; Litvin, V.I.; Lyzhin, A.E.; Magda, E.P.; Mitchell, G.E.

    2003-08-26

    In order to resolve long-standing discrepancies in indirect measurements of the neutron-neutron scattering length ann and contribute to solving the problem of the charge symmetry of the nuclear force, the collaboration DIANNA (Direct Investigation of ann Association) plans to measure the neutron-neutron scattering cross section {sigma}nn. The key issue of our approach is the use of the through-channel in the Russia reactor YAGUAR with a peak neutron flux of 10{sup 18} /cm2/s. The proposed experimental setup is described. Results of calculations are presented to connect {sigma}nn with the nn-collision detector count rate and the neutron flux density in the reactor channel. Measurements of the thermal neutron fields inside polyethylene converters show excellent prospects for the realization of the direct nn-experiment.

  3. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, James L.

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

  4. Search for Neutrons Associated with Lightning Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, J. E.; Johnson, W. N.; Phlips, B. F.; Wulf, E. A.; Hutcheson, A. L.; Mitchell, L. J.; Woolf, R. S.; Schaal, M.; Uman, M. A.; Jordan, D. M.; Dwyer, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    We report on a search for neutrons produced by natural and triggered lightning discharges in Summer 2013 and Summer 2014 at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing, Camp Blanding, Florida. Neutrons may be expected, e.g., from photonuclear interactions of gamma rays above 2.2 MeV with natural deuterium in humid air or, for higher energy gamma rays, with isotopes of N and O. The instrument includes large arrays of thermal neutron and fast neutron detectors. Gamma ray detectors co-located with the neutron-sensitive arrays measure energetic emission associated with lightning events. The array of electric field, magnetic field, and optical sensors that comprise the ICLRT measurement network provide lightning discharge diagnostics for context. This work was sponsored by DARPA and the Office of Naval Research.

  5. Future of Semiconductor Based Thermal Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, R J; Cheung, C L; Reinhardt, C E; Wang, T F

    2006-02-22

    Thermal neutron detectors have seen only incremental improvements over the last decades. In this paper we overview the current technology of choice for thermal neutron detection--{sup 3}He tubes, which suffer from, moderate to poor fieldability, and low absolute efficiency. The need for improved neutron detection is evident due to this technology gap and the fact that neutrons are a highly specific indicator of fissile material. Recognizing this need, we propose to exploit recent advances in microfabrication technology for building the next generation of semiconductor thermal neutron detectors for national security requirements, for applications requiring excellent fieldability of small devices. We have developed an innovative pathway taking advantage of advanced processing and fabrication technology to produce the proposed device. The crucial advantage of our Pillar Detector is that it can simultaneously meet the requirements of high efficiency and fieldability in the optimized configuration, the detector efficiency could be higher than 70%.

  6. Neutron production in several americium compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Shores, E. F.

    2004-01-01

    Americium, like other alpha emitting actinides, may indirectly produce neutrons when combined with light target materials. These (alpha,n) reaction neutrons, along with well known photon lines, have been an advantage of the {sup 241}Am isotope for diverse applications such as radiography, thickness gauges, neutron sources, and even common household smoke detectors. To characterize these sources, the SOURCES code was used to calculate neutron yields and spectra from {sup 241}Am metal, americium oxide, and americium aluminum alloys. Such information may be used as source terms for future transport problems (e.g. shielding calculations). Table 1 contains neutron yields for six americium configurations. The metal, oxides, and alloys were run as homogeneous problems while the interface case was run in both two- and three-region interface modes.

  7. Cement analysis using d + D neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womble, Phillip C.; Paschal, Jon; Moore, Ryan

    2005-12-01

    In the cement industry, the primary concern is quality control. The earlier the cement industry can institute quality control upon their product, the more significant their savings in labor, energy and material. We are developing a prototype cement analyzer using pulsed neutrons from a d-D electronic neutron generator with the goal of ensuring quality control of cement in an on-line manner. By utilizing a low intensity d-D neutron source and a specially-designed moderator assembly, we are able to produce one of the safest neutron-based systems in the market. Also, this design includes some exciting new methods of data acquisition which may substantially reduce the final installation costs. In our proof-of-principle measurements, we were able to measure the primary components of cement (Al, Si, Ca and Fe) to limits required for the raw materials, the derived mixes and the clinkers utilizing this neutron generator.

  8. Polarized Cold Neutron Capture in ^27Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balascuta, Septimiu

    2013-04-01

    The NPDGamma Experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL is measuring the parity-odd correlation between the neutron spin and the direction of the emitted photon in the capture of cold neutrons on a 16-liter liquid parahydrogen target. The goal is to determine the strength of the weak nucleon-nucleon interaction. One of the main background contributions comes from the gamma rays produced by neutrons captured in the Al walls of the target vessel. To quantify this effect a commissioning experiment measured the parity-odd and parity-even asymmetries in the angular distribution of the gamma rays from the capture of polarized cold neutrons in a solid Al target. A status of the analysis of this experiment will be presented.

  9. Neutrons in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Barry J.

    1995-03-01

    The role of neutrons in the management of cancer has a long history. However, it is only in recent years that neutrons are beginning to find an accepted place as an efficacious radiation modality. Fast neutron therapy is already well established for the treatment of certain cancers, and clinical trials are ongoing. Californium neutron sources are being used in brachytherapy. Boron neutron capture therapy has been well tested with thermal neutrons and epithermal neutron dose escalation studies are about to commence in the USA and Europe. Possibilities of neutron induced auger electron therapy are also discussed. With respect to chemotherapy, prompt neutron capture analysis is being used to study the dose optimization of chemotherapy in the management of breast cancer. The rationales behind these applications of neutrons in the management of cancer are examined.

  10. Negative ion-driven associated particle neutron generator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K. N.; Morse, D. H.; Donovan, D. C.; Chames, J. M.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Chen, A. X.; Hausladen, P. A.; Liang, F.

    2015-10-09

    We describe an associated particle neutron generator that employs a negative ion source to produce high neutron flux from a small source size. Furthermore, negative ions produced in an rf-driven plasma source are extracted through a small aperture to form a beam which bombards a positively biased, high voltage target electrode. Electrons co-extracted with the negative ions are removed by a permanent magnet electron filter. The use of negative ions enables high neutron output (100% atomic ion beam), high quality imaging (small neutron source size), and reliable operation (no high voltage breakdowns). Finally, the neutron generator can operate in eithermore » pulsed or continuous-wave (cw) mode and has been demonstrated to produce 106 D-D n/s (equivalent to similar to 108 D-T n/s) from a 1 mm-diameter neutron source size to facilitate high fidelity associated particle imaging.« less

  11. Negative ion-driven associated particle neutron generator

    SciTech Connect

    Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K. N.; Morse, D. H.; Donovan, D. C.; Chames, J. M.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Chen, A. X.; Hausladen, P. A.; Liang, F.

    2015-10-09

    We describe an associated particle neutron generator that employs a negative ion source to produce high neutron flux from a small source size. Furthermore, negative ions produced in an rf-driven plasma source are extracted through a small aperture to form a beam which bombards a positively biased, high voltage target electrode. Electrons co-extracted with the negative ions are removed by a permanent magnet electron filter. The use of negative ions enables high neutron output (100% atomic ion beam), high quality imaging (small neutron source size), and reliable operation (no high voltage breakdowns). Finally, the neutron generator can operate in either pulsed or continuous-wave (cw) mode and has been demonstrated to produce 106 D-D n/s (equivalent to similar to 108 D-T n/s) from a 1 mm-diameter neutron source size to facilitate high fidelity associated particle imaging.

  12. Negative ion-driven associated particle neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K. N.; Morse, D. H.; Donovan, D. C.; Chames, J. M.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Chen, A. X.; Hausladen, P. A.; Liang, F.

    2016-01-01

    An associated particle neutron generator is described that employs a negative ion source to produce high neutron flux from a small source size. Negative ions produced in an rf-driven plasma source are extracted through a small aperture to form a beam which bombards a positively biased, high voltage target electrode. Electrons co-extracted with the negative ions are removed by a permanent magnet electron filter. The use of negative ions enables high neutron output (100% atomic ion beam), high quality imaging (small neutron source size), and reliable operation (no high voltage breakdowns). The neutron generator can operate in either pulsed or continuous-wave (cw) mode and has been demonstrated to produce 106 D-D n/s (equivalent to ~108 D-T n/s) from a 1 mm-diameter neutron source size to facilitate high fidelity associated particle imaging.

  13. The Neutron Imaging System Fielded at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fittinghoff, D N; Atkinson, D P; Bower, D E; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Felker, B; Frank, M; Liddick, S N; Moran, M J; Roberson, G P; Weiss, P B; Grim, G P; Aragonez, R J; Archuleta, T N; Batha, S H; Clark, D D; Clark, D J; Danly, C R; Day, R D; Fatherley, V E; Finch, J P; Garcia, F P; Gallegos, R A; Guler, N; Hsu, A H; Jaramillo, S A; Loomis, E N; Mares, D; Martinson, D D; Merrill, F E; Morgan, G L; Munson, C; Murphy, T J; Oertel, J A; Polk, P J; Schmidt, D W; Tregillis, I L; Valdez, A C; Volegov, P L; Wang, T F; Wilde, C H; Wilke, M D; Wilson, D C; Buckles, R A; Cradick, J R; Kaufman, M I; Lutz, S S; Malone, R M; Traille, A

    2011-10-24

    We have fielded a neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility to collect images of fusion neutrons produced in the implosion of inertial confinement fusion experiments and scattered neutrons from (n, n') reactions of the source neutrons in the surrounding dense material. A description of the neutron imaging system will be presented, including the pinhole array aperture, the line-of-sight collimation, the scintillator-based detection system and the alignment systems and methods. Discussion of the alignment and resolution of the system will be presented. We will also discuss future improvements to the system hardware.

  14. A sensitive neutron spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, R. G.; Chrien, R. E.; Klare, K. A.; Murphy, T. J.; Wilson, D. C.; Haan, S.

    2001-01-01

    We are developing a sensitive neutron spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility laser at Livermore. The spectrometer will consist of a 1020 channel single-neutron-interaction time-of-flight detector array fielded 23 m from the neutron-producing target. It will use an existing detector array together with upgraded electronics for improved time resolution. Measurements of neutron yield, ion and electron temperatures, and density-radius product are all possible under certain conditions using one-, two-, or three-step reaction processes. The locations of the most important potential sources of scattered neutron backgrounds are determined as the first step in designing collimation to reduce these backgrounds.

  15. The neutron imaging system fielded at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fittinghoff, D. N.; Atkinson, D. P.; Bower, D. E.; Drury, O. B.; Dzenitis, J. M.; Frank, M.; Liddick, S. N.; Moran, M. J.; Roberson, G. P.; Weiss, P. B.; Grim, G. P.; Aragonez, R. J.; Archuleta, T. N.; Batha, S. H.; Clark, D. D.; Clark, D. J.; Danly, C. R.; Day, R. D.; Fatherley, V. E.; Finch, J. P.; Garcia, F. P.; Gallegos, R. A.; Guler, N.; Hsu, A. H.; Jaramillo, S. A.; Loomis, E. N.; Mares, D.; Martinson, D. D.; Merrill, F. E.; Morgan, G. L.; Munson, C.; Murphy, T. J.; Oertel, J. A.; Polk, P. J.; Schmidt, D. W.; Tregillis, I. L.; Valdez, A. C.; Volegov, P. L.; Wang, T. F.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilke, M. D.; Wilson, D. C.; Buckles, R. A.; Cradick, J. R.; Kaufman, M. I.; Lutz, S. S.; Malone, R. M.; Traille, A.

    2013-11-01

    We have fielded a neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility to collect images of fusion neutrons produced in the implosion of inertial confinement fusion experiments and scattered neutrons from (n, n') reactions of the source neutrons in the surrounding dense material. A description of the neutron imaging system is presented, including the pinhole array aperture, the line-of-sight collimation, the scintillator-based detection system and the alignment systems and methods. Discussion of the alignment and resolution of the system is presented. We also discuss future improvements to the system hardware.

  16. LENS: A New Pulsed Neutron Source for Research and Education

    PubMed Central

    Leuschner, M.; Baxter, D. V.; Cameron, J. M.; Derenchuk, V.; Lavelle, C.; Lone, A.; Nann, H.; Rinckel, T.; Snow, W. M.

    2005-01-01

    A new pulsed neutron source is under construction at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF). Neutrons are produced via (p,n) reactions by a low-energy proton beam incident on a thin beryllium target. The source is tightly coupled to a cold methane moderator held at a temperature of 20 K or below. The resulting time-averaged cold neutron flux is expected to be comparable to that of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The initial experimental suite will include instrumentation for small angle neutron scattering (SANS), moderator studies, radiography, and zero-field spin-echo SANS. PMID:27308113

  17. Illuminating the past: the neutron as a tool in archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kockelmann, W.; Kirfel, A.; Siano, S.; Frost, C. D.

    2004-03-01

    Neutrons can be produced in nuclear reactions and used as very versatile probes for condensed matter research. Since their introduction in the 1950s neutron scattering techniques have evolved to be very powerful tools for investigating the properties of condensed matter. Here we present the concept of neutron diffraction and how this technique can be used to address problems in archaeology facilitated by accelerator-based neutron sources like ISIS at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Oxfordshire. The great beauty of neutrons for the archaeologist is that they allow non-destructive testing of intact and original archaeological artifacts and museum objects.

  18. Detection of special nuclear material by observation of delayed neutrons with a novel fast neutron composite detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Michael; Nattress, Jason; Barhoumi Meddeb, Amira; Foster, Albert; Trivelpiece, Cory; Rose, Paul; Erickson, Anna; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-10-01

    Detection of shielded special nuclear material is crucial to countering nuclear terrorism and proliferation, but its detection is challenging. By observing the emission of delayed neutrons, which is a unique signature of nuclear fission, the presence of nuclear material can be inferred. We report on the observation of delayed neutrons from natural uranium by using monoenergetic photons and neutrons to induce fission. An interrogating beam of 4.4 MeV and 15.1 MeV gamma-rays and neutrons was produced using the 11B(d,n-γ)12C reaction and used to probe different targets. Neutron detectors with complementary Cherenkov detectors then discriminate material undergoing fission. A Li-doped glass-polymer composite neutron detector was used, which displays excellent n/ γ discrimination even at low energies, to observe delayed neutrons from uranium fission. Delayed neutrons have relatively low energies (~0.5 MeV) compared to prompt neutrons, which makes them difficult to detect using recoil-based detectors. Neutrons were counted and timed after the beam was turned off to observe the characteristic decaying time profile of delayed neutrons. The expected decay of neutron emission rate is in agreement with the common parametrization into six delayed neutron groups.

  19. On the Rutherford-Santilli neutron model

    SciTech Connect

    Burande, Chandrakant S.

    2015-03-10

    In 1920 H. Rutherford conjectured that the first particle synthesized in stars is neutron from a proton and an electron after which all known matter is progressively synthesized. However, Pauli objected Rutherford’s version of neutron synthesis because inability to represent spin 1/2 of the neutron. Using this objection E. Fermi proposed emission of massless particle, called “neutrino”. However, Santilli has dismissed the neutrino hypothesis following certain ambiguities such as positive binding energy required in synthesis of neutron. He found that celebrated Schrödinger’s equation of quantum physics is not suitable for obtaining positive binding energy for bound state at the dimension of 10{sup −13}cm. In order to remove these shortcomings, Santilli has developed isomathematics and then hadronic mechanics, which allowed the time invariant representation of Hamiltonian and non-Hamiltonian interactions as needed for the neutron synthesis (see for example: References cited at [1]).Thus the anomalies pertaining to the binding energy, the spin and the magnetic moment got resolved. He successfully calculated missing positive binding energy via isonormalization of the mass for electron when totally immersed within the hyper-dense medium inside the proton. Considering Rutherford’s compression of the isoelectron within the proton in the singlet coupling, he also identified the spin 1/2 for neutron and calculated the magnetic moment of the neutron. In order to verify his logical concept, he repeated the Don Carlo Borghi experiment of synthesis of the neutron from proton and electrons and verified that the said setup indeed produces neutron-type particles called “neutroids” which latter is absorbed by the activated detector substances that produces known nuclear reactions. He dismissed the neutrino hypothesis and replaced it with a longitudinal impulse originating from the ether as a universal substratum, named, “etherino”. He pointed out that all the

  20. A study of non-elastic reaction rates for the ADS materials in the environment of spallation neutrons produced by 1.6 GeV d-beam.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Chitra; Adam, J; Kumar, V; Katovsky, K; Majerle, M; Solnyshkin, A A; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V M

    2012-07-01

    For the design and modeling of Accelerator Driven sub-critical System (ADS) a detailed study of response of ADS materials to the spallation neutrons is required. For this purpose reaction rates of different reactions like (n, xn) and (n, xnyp) in 209Bi, natMo, 56Fe, natNi, 55Mn, natTi and natCo materials are determined in an experiment conducted at Nuclotron of JINR, Dubna, using 1.6 GeV d-beam in the 'Energy+Transmutation' set-up. Reaction rates of various (n, xn) and (n, xnyp) reactions are studied in these samples. Results of reaction rates deduced from all the gamma peaks observed in case of 209Bi (n, xn) reactions with x=3-9, natMo (n, γ), (n, 3n), (n, 6n), 56Fe (n, p), (n, p2n), (n, p4n), natNi (n, 2n), (n, 3n), (n, p), (n, d), (n, t), 55Mn (n, γ), (n, 2n), (n, 4n), natTi (n, p), (n, d), (n, t) and natCo (n, γ), (n, xn) reactions with x=2-5 along with (n, p), (n, 2p2n), (n, 2p4n) and (n, 2p6n) are presented. The measured reaction rates for all the elements show good consistency for all the reaction channels and all observed Eγ's of the product nucleus. For all the above mentioned reactions, both experimental as well as theoretical spectrum average cross-sections (σsp.av.cs) are deduced and compared. A close agreement is found between the experimental σsp.av.cs and theoretical σsp.av.cs values. PMID:22204785

  1. The neutron long counter NERO for studies of β-delayed neutron emission in the r-process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, J.; Hosmer, P.; Lorusso, G.; Santi, P.; Couture, A.; Daly, J.; Del Santo, M.; Elliot, T.; Görres, J.; Herlitzius, C.; Kratz, K.-L.; Lamm, L. O.; Lee, H. Y.; Montes, F.; Ouellette, M.; Pellegrini, E.; Reeder, P.; Schatz, H.; Schertz, F.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Smith, K.; Stech, E.; Strandberg, E.; Ugalde, C.; Wiescher, M.; Wöhr, A.

    2010-06-01

    The neutron long counter NERO was built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University, for measuring β-delayed neutron-emission probabilities. The detector was designed to work in conjunction with a β-delay implantation station, so that β decays and β-delayed neutrons emitted from implanted nuclei can be measured simultaneously. The high efficiency of about 40%, for the range of energies of interest, along with the small background, are crucial for measuring β-delayed neutron emission branchings for neutron-rich r-process nuclei produced as low intensity fragmentation beams in in-flight separator facilities.

  2. A Monte Carlo comparison of PGNAA system performance using 252Cf neutrons, 2.8-MeV neutrons and 14-MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, A. A.

    2003-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to compare performance of a 252Cf neutron and a 14-MeV neutron-based prompt γ-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) system with that of the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM), Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. Since the energy of neutron beam used in the KFUPM PGNAA system is very close to that produced by a DD neutron generator, performance comparison between a DD and a DT neutron generator-based PGNAA system is highly desired. For the sake of comparison, the calculations were carried out for the PGNAA system with geometry similar to the KFUPM PGNAA system. These calculations were required to determine improvement in performance of the KFUPM PGNAA system if its 2.8-MeV neutron source is replaced by a 252Cf neutron source or a 14-MeV neutron source. Results of the calculations revealed that the geometry of the 252Cf neutron and the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system are not significantly different but the geometry of the 14-MeV neutron-based system is significantly different from that of the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system. Accordingly, the prompt γ-ray yields from the 252Cf neutron and the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system is comparable but prompt γ-ray yields from 14-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system are about three times smaller than that from the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system. This study has shown that performance of the 252Cf neutron-based PGNAA system is comparable with that of the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system but the performance of the 14-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system is poorer than that of the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system.

  3. a Study of Prompt Neutron Emission in Thermal Neutron-Induced Fission of URANIUM-235.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklyn, Christopher Barry

    An original experiment was performed to measure the angular correlation of fission neutrons from thermal -neutron-induced fission of ('235)U, with respect to the light fission fragment direction, as a function of fragment mass division and neutron energy. A Monte Carlo model, with a realistic description of the fission fragment de -excitation process, was developed to simulate the observed neutron-fragment angular correlation data. The model was capable of investigating various possible forms of neutron emission which were classified into emission before, during and after full fragment acceleration, and correspondingly named scission acceleration and prompt neutron emission. Simulated neutron-fragment angular correlations displaying similar distributions with respect to the light fragment direction for different forms of neutron emission are shown to exhibit differing distributions when examined as a function of fragment mass division or neutron energy, thus illustrating the sensitivity of the experiment to the forms of neutron emission occurring in fission. A primary conclusion of the investigation was that neutron emission solely from fully accelerated fragments, whether isotropically or anisotropically emitted in the fragment centre of mass system, was unable to adequately describe the observed neutron-fragment angular correlations. Simulation of the fission process with some neutron emission before or during fragment acceleration exhibited a closer correspondence with observed phenomena. Within the scope of this work the form of neutron emission that produced the closest overall correspondence with experimental data was a simulation in which 20% of the emitted neutrons were isotropically emitted scission neutrons with a Maxwellian energy distribution of temperature 1.0 MeV. The remaining neutrons were emitted from fully accelerated fragments, being isotropic in the fragment centre of mass frame, except for the n-th(n > 1) neutrons from the light fragment, which

  4. Intermediate energy neutron beams from the MURR

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.M.; Herleth, W.H. )

    1990-01-01

    Several reactors in the United States are potential candidates to deli1ver beams of intermediate energy neutrons for NCT. At this time, moderators, as compared to filters, appear to be the more effective means of tailoring the flux of these reactors. The objective is to sufficiently reduce the flux of fast neutrons while producing enough intermediate energy neutrons for treatments. At the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), the code MCNP has recently been used to calculate doses in a phantom. First, ideal beams of 1, 35, and 1000 eV neutrons were analyzed to determine doses and advantage depths in the phantom. Second, a high quality beam that had been designed to fit in the thermal column of the MURR, was reanalyzed. MCNP calculations of the dose in phantom in this beam confirmed previous calculations and showed that this beam would be a nearly ideal one with neutrons of the desired energy and also a high neutron current. However, installation of this beam will require a significant modification of the thermal column of the MURR. Therefore, a second beam that is less difficult to build and install, but of lower neutron current, has been designed to fit in MURR port F. This beam is designed using inexpensive A1, S, and Pb. The doses calculated in the phantom placed in this beam show that it will be satisfactory for sample tests, animal tests, and possible initial patient trials. Producing this beam will require only modest modifications of the existing tube.

  5. Radio Detection of Neutron Star Binary Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bear, Brandon; Cardena, Brett; Dispoto, Dana; Papadopoulos, Joanna; Kavic, Michael; Simonetti, John

    2011-10-01

    Neutron star binary systems lose energy through gravitational radiation, and eventually merge. The gravitational radiation from the merger can be detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). It is expected that a transient radio pulse will also be produced during the merger event. Detection of such radio transients would allow for LIGO to search for signals within constrained time periods. We calculate the LWA-1 detection rate of transient events from neutron star binary mergers. We calculate the detection rate of transient events from neutron star binary mergers for the Long Wavelength Array and the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array.

  6. Total body calcium analysis. [neutron irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewellen, T. K.; Nelp, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    A technique to quantitate total body calcium in humans is developed. Total body neutron irradiation is utilized to produce argon 37. The radio argon, which diffuses into the blood stream and is excreted through the lungs, is recovered from the exhaled breath and counted inside a proportional detector. Emphasis is placed on: (1) measurement of the rate of excretion of radio argon following total body neutron irradiation; (2) the development of the radio argon collection, purification, and counting systems; and (3) development of a patient irradiation facility using a 14 MeV neutron generator. Results and applications are discussed in detail.

  7. Relativistically correct DD and DT neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbe, B.; Chittenden, J.

    2014-06-01

    We use relativistic kinematics to derive an expression for the energy spectrum of neutrons produced by fusion reactions in deuterium and deuterium-tritium thermal plasmas. The derivation does not require approximations and the obtained expression gives the exact shape of the spectrum. It is shown that the high-energy tail of the neutron spectrum is highly sensitive to the plasma temperature. Simple expressions for the plasma temperature as a function of the neutron spectrum full width at half maximum (FWHM) are given.

  8. One-Dimensional Neutron Imager for the Sandia Z Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fittinghoff, D N; Bower, D E; Hollaway, J R; Jacoby, B A; Weiss, P B; Buckles, R; Sammons, T; McPherson, L A; Ruiz, C; Chandler, G; Torres, J; Leeper, R; Cooper, G; Nelson, A

    2008-06-17

    A multi-institution collaboration is developing a neutron imaging system for the Sandia Z Facility. The initial system design is for slit-aperture imaging system capable of obtaining a 1-D image of a 2.45-MeV source producing 5 x 10{sup 12} neutrons with a resolution of 320 {micro}m along the axial dimension of the plasma, but the design being developed can be modified for 2-D imaging and imaging of DT neutrons with other resolutions. This system will allow us to understand the spatial production of neutrons in the plasmas produced at the Z Facility.

  9. Pulsed neutron sources for condensed-matter research

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    The efforts around the world to provide higher neutron intensities are now focussed on accelerator-driven spallation sources in which neutrons are produced by bombardment of heavy metal targets with high energy protons. Spallation sources can be pulsed or quasi-continuous depending on the nature of the proton accelerator. Pulsed spallation sources, based on rapid cycling synchrotrons or storage rings, are especially attractive since a moderate average proton current (10/sup -5/ - 10/sup -3/A) can produce high instantaneous neutron intensities which can be used with time-of-flight methods to provide powerful neutron spectrometers.

  10. A new active thermal neutron detector.

    PubMed

    Bedogni, R; Bortot, D; Pola, A; Introini, M V; Gentile, A; Esposito, A; Gómez-Ros, J M; Palomba, M; Grossi, A

    2014-10-01

    This communication presents the main results about the design and in-house fabrication of a new solid-state neutron detector, which produces a DC output signal proportional to the thermal neutron fluence rate. The detector has been developed within the framework of the 3-y project NESCOFI@BTF of INFN (CSN V). Due to its sensitivity, photon rejection, low cost and minimum size, this device is suited to be used in moderator-based spectrometers. PMID:24345462

  11. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Manglos, Stephen H.

    1989-06-06

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

  12. Neutronics design

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.

    1984-10-01

    Initial scoping calculations were done by Lee at LLNL with the TART code and ENDL data to determine the tritium breeding potential of this blanket type. A radially zoned cylindrical nucleonics model was used and is described. Results, local (100% blanket coverage) T and M vs Be zone thickness, are shown. The tritium breeding ratio, T, is seen to vary between 0.5 with no Be to 1.7 with a 60-cm Be zone. Correspondingly, energy multiplication, M, varies between 1.1 and 1.4. The effects of less than 100% blanket coverage on T is shown. For example, if the effective coverage is only 80, a 15-cm Be zone is needed for T = 1.01 compared to 10 cm at full coverage. Higher T can be achieved, of course, by increasing the Be zone thickness. Another possibly attractive use of the excess neutrons generated in Be is for higher M. While this was not the objective here it is clearly possible to include material in the blanket with significantly higher Q's than 4.8 MeV for the Li6(n,t) reaction. Also enriching the Li in Li6 can increase T.

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, L.A.; Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.M.; Young, G.J.

    1958-09-01

    This patent relates to neutronic reactors of the heterogeneous water cooled type, and in particular to a fuel element charging and discharging means therefor. In the embodiment illustrated the reactor contains horizontal, parallel coolant tubes in which the fuel elements are disposed. A loading cart containing a magnzine for holding a plurality of fuel elements operates along the face of the reactor at the inlet ends of the coolant tubes. The loading cart is equipped with a ram device for feeding fuel elements from the magazine through the inlot ends of the coolant tubes. Operating along the face adjacent the discharge ends of the tubes there is provided another cart means adapted to receive irradiated fuel elements as they are forced out of the discharge ends of the coolant tubes by the incoming new fuel elements. This cart is equipped with a tank coataining a coolant, such as water, into which the fuel elements fall, and a hydraulically operated plunger to hold the end of the fuel element being discharged. This inveation provides an apparatus whereby the fuel elements may be loaded into the reactor, irradiated therein, and unloaded from the reactor without stopping the fiow of the coolant and without danger to the operating personnel.

  14. Production and Applications of Neutrons Using Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichester, David L.

    2012-06-01

    Advances in neutron science have gone hand in hand with the development of particle accelerators from the beginning of both fields. Early accelerator systems were developed simply to produce neutrons, allowing scientists to study their properties and interactions with matter, but people quickly realized that more tangible uses existed for them. Today, these systems are in use in such diverse applications as mineral assaying, oil well logging, radiography, and explosive detection to name a few. This chapter presents a technical introduction to the different ways particle accelerators are used to produce neutrons, an historical overview of the development of neutron-producing particle accelerators, a description of current industrial accelerator systems, narratives of the industrial fields where neutron-producing particle accelerators are used today, and comments on future trends.

  15. On the measurement the neutron lifetime using ultra-cold neutrons in a vacuum quadrupole trap

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J. D.; Penttila, S. I.

    2004-01-01

    We present a conceptual design for an experiment to measure the neutron lifetime ({approx}882 s) with an accuracy of 10{sup -4}. The lifetime will be measured by observing the decay rate of a sample of UCNs confined in vacuum in a magnetic trap. The UCN collaboration at LANL has developed a prototype ultra-cold neutron UCN source that is expected to produce a bottled UCN density of more than 100 UCN/cm{sup 3}. The availability of such an intense source makes it possible to approach the measurement of the neutron lifetime in a new way. We argue below that it is possible to measure the neutron lifetime to 10{sup -4} in a vacuum magnetic trap. The measurement involves no new technology beyond the expected UCN density. If even higher densities are available, the experiment can be made better and/or less expensive. We present the design and methodology for the measurement. The slow loss of neutrons that have stable orbits, but are not energetically trapped would produce a systematic error in the measurement. We discuss a new approach, chaotic cleaning, to the elimination of quasi-neutrons from the trap by breaking the rotational symmetry of the quadrupole trap. The neutron orbits take on a chaotic character and mode mixing causes the neutrons on the quasi-bound orbits to leave the trap.

  16. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, Woo Y.; Jones, James L.; Nigg, David W.; Harker, Yale D.

    1999-01-01

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0.times.10.sup.9 neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use.

  17. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, W.Y.; Jones, J.L.; Nigg, D.W.; Harker, Y.D.

    1999-05-11

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0{times}10{sup 9} neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use. 3 figs.

  18. On the Measurement of the Neutron Lifetime Using Ultracold Neutrons in a Vacuum Quadrupole Trap

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, J. David; Penttila, S. I.

    2005-01-01

    We present a conceptual design for an experiment to measure the neutron lifetime (~886 s) with an accuracy of 10−4. The lifetime will be measured by observing the decay rate of a sample of ultracold neutrons (UCN) confined in vacuum in a magnetic trap. The UCN collaboration at Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a prototype UCN source that is expected to produce a bottled UCN density of more than 100/cm3 [1]. The availability of such an intense source makes it possible to approach the measurement of the neutron lifetime in a new way. We argue below that it is possible to measure the neutron lifetime to 10−4 in a vacuum magnetic trap. The measurement involves no new technology beyond the expected UCN density. If even higher densities are available, the experiment can be made better and/or less expensive. We present the design and methodology for the measurement. The slow loss of neutrons that have stable orbits, but are not energetically trapped would produce a systematic uncertainty in the measurement. We discuss a new approach, chaotic cleaning, to the elimination of quasi-neutrons from the trap by breaking the rotational symmetry of the quadrupole trap. The neutron orbits take on a chaotic character and mode mixing causes the neutrons on the quasi-bound orbits to leave the trap. PMID:27308151

  19. Probable detection of solar neutrons by ground-level neutron monitors during STIP interval 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, M. A.; Smart, D. F.; Flueckiger, E. O.

    1987-01-01

    The third solar neutron event detected by Earth-orbiting spacecraft was observed during STIP Interval XVI. The solar flare beginning at 2356 UT on 24 April l984 produced a variety of emissions including gamma rays and solar neutrons. The neutrons were observed by the SMM satellite and the neutron-decay protons were observed on the ISEE-3 spacecraft. Between 0000 and 0010 UT on 25 April an increase of 0.7 and 1.7 percent was recorded by neutron monitors at Tokyo (Itabashi) and Morioka, Japan. These stations were located about 42 degrees from the sub-solar point, and consequently, these is approximately 1400 grams of atmosphere between the incident neutrons at the top of the atmosphere and their detection on the Earth's surface. Nevertheless, the time coincidence of a small increase in the total counting rate of two independent neutron monitors indicates the presence of solar neutrons with energies greater than 400 MeV at the top of the Earth's atmosphere. The small increases in the counting rate emphasize the difficulty in identifying similar events using historical neutron monitor data.

  20. Organic metal neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Ginley, D.S.

    1984-11-21

    A device for detection of neutrons comprises: as an active neutron sensing element, a conductive organic polymer having an electrical conductivity and a cross-section for said neutrons whereby a detectable change in said conductivity is caused by impingement of said neutrons on the conductive organic polymer which is responsive to a property of said polymer which is altered by impingement of said neutrons on the polymer; and means for associating a change in said alterable property with the presence of neutrons at the location of said device.

  1. Neutron streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1981-05-14

    Apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon.

  2. Neutron streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1983-09-13

    Disclosed is an apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon. 4 figs.

  3. Neutron streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1983-09-13

    Apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon.

  4. Neutronic Reactor Design to Reduce Neutron Loss

    DOEpatents

    Miles, F. T.

    1961-05-01

    A nuclear reactor construction is described in which an unmoderated layer of the fissionable material is inserted between the moderated portion of the reactor core and the core container steel wall. The wall is surrounded by successive layers of pure fertile material and moderator containing fertile material. The unmoderated layer of the fissionable material will insure that a greater portion of fast neutrons will pass through the steel wall than would thermal neutrons. Since the steel has a smaller capture cross section for the fast neutrons, greater nunnbers of neutrons will pass into the blanket, thereby increasing the over-all efficiency of the reactor. (AEC)

  5. NEUTRONIC REACTOR DESIGN TO REDUCE NEUTRON LOSS

    DOEpatents

    Mills, F.T.

    1961-05-01

    A nuclear reactor construction is described in which an unmoderated layer of the fissionable material is inserted between the moderated portion of the reactor core and the core container steel wall which is surrounded by successive layers of pure fertile material and fertile material having moderator. The unmoderated layer of the fissionable material will insure that a greater portion of fast neutrons will pass through the steel wall than would thermal neutrons. As the steel has a smaller capture cross-section for the fast neutrons, then greater numbers of the neutrons will pass into the blanket thereby increasing the over-all efficiency of the reactor.

  6. Application of Wavelet Unfolding Technique in Neutron Spectroscopic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Jessica; Barzilov, Alexander

    Nonproliferation of nuclear materials is important in nuclear power industry and fuel cycle facilities. It requires technologies capable of measuring and assessing the radiation signatures of fission events. Neutrons produced in spontaneous or induced fission reactions are mainly fast. The neutron energy information allows characterization of nuclear materials and neutron sources. It can also be applied in remote sensing and source search tasks. The plastic scintillator EJ-299-33A was studied as a fast neutron detector. The detector response to a polyenergetic flux was unfolded usingthe multiple linear regression method. It yields the intensities of neutron flux of particular energy, hence, enabling the spectroscopic analysis. The wavelet technique was evaluated for the unfolding of neutron spectrum using the scintillator's response functions between 1 MeV and 14 MeV computed with the MCNPX code. This paperpresents the computational results of the wavelet-based spectrum unfolding applied to a scintillator detector with neutron / photon pulse shape discrimination properties.

  7. Monoenergetic fast neutron reference fields: II. Field characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, Ralf; Thomas, David J.

    2011-12-01

    Monoenergetic neutron reference fields are required for the calibration of neutron detectors and dosemeters for various applications ranging from nuclear physics and nuclear data measurements to radiation protection. In a series of two separate publications the metrological aspects of the production and measurement of fast neutrons are reviewed. In the first part, requirements for the nuclear reactions used to produce neutron fields as well as methods for target characterization and the general layout of reference facilities were discussed. This second part focuses on the most important techniques for field characterization and includes the determination of the neutron fluence as well as the spectral neutron distribution and the determination of the fluence of contaminating photons. The measurements are usually carried out relative to reference cross sections which are reviewed in a separate contribution, but for certain conditions 'absolute' methods for neutron measurements can be used which are directly traceable to the international system of units (SI).

  8. Neutron anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, G.E.

    1994-12-31

    The familiar extremes of crystalline material are single-crystals and random powders. In between these two extremes are polycrystalline aggregates, not randomly arranged but possessing some preferred orientation and this is the form taken by constructional materials, be they steel girders or the bones of a human or animal skeleton. The details of the preferred orientation determine the ability of the material to withstand stress in any direction. In the case of bone the crucial factor is the orientation of the c-axes of the mineral content - the crystals of the hexagonal hydroxyapatite - and this can readily be determined by neutron diffraction. In particular it can be measured over the volume of a piece of bone, utilizing distances ranging from 1mm to 10mm. The major practical problem is to avoid the intense incoherent scattering from the hydrogen in the accompanying collagen; this can best be achieved by heat-treatment and it is demonstrated that this does not affect the underlying apatite. These studies of bone give leading anatomical information on the life and activities of humans and animals - including, for example, the life history of the human femur, the locomotion of sheep, the fracture of the legs of racehorses and the life-styles of Neolithic tribes. We conclude that the material is placed economically in the bone to withstand the expected stresses of life and the environment. The experimental results are presented in terms of the magnitude of the 0002 apatite reflection. It so happens that for a random powder the 0002, 1121 reflections, which are neighboring lines in the powder pattern, are approximately equal in intensity. The latter reflection, being of manifold multiplicity, is scarcely affected by preferred orientation so that the numerical value of the 0002/1121 ratio serves quite accurately as a quantitative measure of the degree of orientation of the c-axes in any chosen direction for a sample of bone.

  9. Training Reactor VR-1 Neutron Spectrum Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vins, M.; Kolros, A.; Katovsky, K.

    2009-08-01

    The main objective of the investigations presented in the paper is to determine the neutron energy spectrum at the specified position in the reactor core used for neutron activation analysis. The methodology is based on irradiation of certified activation foils, measurements of their reaction rates, and consecutive deconvolution of the spectrum using various adjustments/unfolding computer codes. The activation detectors consist of foils of high purity elements (i.e. gold, nickel, indium, tungsten, scandium, manganese, vanadium, and copper were used). Some foils were irradiated also in cadmium cover for suppressing of thermal neutrons. All gamma measurements were performed on a HPGe detector. The measured reaction rates served as an input for computer deconvolution codes as SAND-II, STAY-SL, MAXED (from the UMG package) and GRAVEL (from the UMG package). Libraries of response functions (cross sections of observed reactions) for the all used codes were adopted from the IRDF-2002 library or generated from the ENDF/B-VII.0 using NJOY99. Monte Carlo calculation code MCNP5 was used for calculation of the first approximation of the neutron spectrum. The used codes solve the adjustment issue with a different mathematical approach and a comparison of different neutron adjustment/unfolding methods is a part of the result. Neutron capture and (n,p) reactions were produced during irradiation. The high ratio of thermal and epithermal neutrons in the spectra and low contribution of fast neutrons was expected and was also observed. The results will be used for evaluation of neutron activation analysis exercises on reactor VR-1 and for further innovation of experimental methods. The neutron fluence rates in thermal, epithermal and fast energy regions were also obtained and represent the important part of results.

  10. High Brightness Neutron Source for Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, J. T.; Piestrup, Melvin, A.; Gary, Charles, K.; Harris, Jack, L. Williams, David, J.; Jones, Glenn, E.; Vainionpaa, J. , H.; Fuller, Michael, J.; Rothbart, George, H.; Kwan, J., W.; Ludewigt, B., A.; Gough, R.., A..; Reijonen, Jani; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-12-08

    This research and development program was designed to improve nondestructive evaluation of large mechanical objects by providing both fast and thermal neutron sources for radiography. Neutron radiography permits inspection inside objects that x-rays cannot penetrate and permits imaging of corrosion and cracks in low-density materials. Discovering of fatigue cracks and corrosion in piping without the necessity of insulation removal is possible. Neutron radiography sources can provide for the nondestructive testing interests of commercial and military aircraft, public utilities and petrochemical organizations. Three neutron prototype neutron generators were designed and fabricated based on original research done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The research and development of these generators was successfully continued by LBNL and Adelphi Technology Inc. under this STTR. The original design goals of high neutron yield and generator robustness have been achieved, using new technology developed under this grant. In one prototype generator, the fast neutron yield and brightness was roughly 10 times larger than previously marketed neutron generators using the same deuterium-deuterium reaction. In another generator, we integrate a moderator with a fast neutron source, resulting in a high brightness thermal neutron generator. The moderator acts as both conventional moderator and mechanical and electrical support structure for the generator and effectively mimics a nuclear reactor. In addition to the new prototype generators, an entirely new plasma ion source for neutron production was developed. First developed by LBNL, this source uses a spiral antenna to more efficiently couple the RF radiation into the plasma, reducing the required gas pressure so that the generator head can be completely sealed, permitting the possible use of tritium gas. This also permits the generator to use the deuterium-tritium reaction to produce 14-MeV neutrons with increases

  11. ULTRASONIC NEUTRON DOSIMETER

    DOEpatents

    Truell, R.; de Klerk, J.; Levy, P.W.

    1960-02-23

    A neutron dosimeter is described which utilizes ultrasonic waves in the megacycle region for determination of the extent of neutron damage in a borosilicate glass through ultrasonic wave velocity and attenuation measurements before and after damage.

  12. On neutron surface waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatovich, V. K.

    2009-01-15

    It is shown that neutron surface waves do not exist. The difference between the neutron wave mechanics and the wave physics of electromagnetic and acoustic processes, which allows the existence of surface waves, is analyzed.

  13. Neutron dose equivalent meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Hsu, Hsiao-Hua; Casson, William H.; Vasilik, Dennis G.; Kleck, Jeffrey H.; Beverding, Anthony

    1996-01-01

    A neutron dose equivalent detector for measuring neutron dose capable of accurately responding to neutron energies according to published fluence to dose curves. The neutron dose equivalent meter has an inner sphere of polyethylene, with a middle shell overlying the inner sphere, the middle shell comprising RTV.RTM. silicone (organosiloxane) loaded with boron. An outer shell overlies the middle shell and comprises polyethylene loaded with tungsten. The neutron dose equivalent meter defines a channel through the outer shell, the middle shell, and the inner sphere for accepting a neutron counter tube. The outer shell is loaded with tungsten to provide neutron generation, increasing the neutron dose equivalent meter's response sensitivity above 8 MeV.

  14. Pulsed-neutron monochromator

    DOEpatents

    Mook, H.A. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention is an improved pulsed-neutron monochromator of the vibrated-crystal type. The monochromator is designed to provide neutron pulses which are characterized both by short duration and high density. A row of neutron-reflecting crystals is disposed in a neutron beam to reflect neutrons onto a common target. The crystals in the row define progressively larger neutron-scattering angles and are vibrated sequentially in descending order with respect to the size of their scattering angles, thus generating neutron pulses which arrive simultaneously at the target. Transducers are coupled to one end of the crystals to vibrate them in an essentially non-resonant mode. The transducers propagate transverse waves in the crystal which progress longitudinally therein. The waves are absorbed at the undriven ends of the crystals by damping material mounted thereon. In another aspect, the invention is a method for generating neutron pulses characterized by high intensity and short duration.

  15. Pulsed-neutron monochromator

    DOEpatents

    Mook, Jr., Herbert A.

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention is an improved pulsed-neutron monochromator of the vibrated-crystal type. The monochromator is designed to provide neutron pulses which are characterized both by short duration and high density. A row of neutron-reflecting crystals is disposed in a neutron beam to reflect neutrons onto a common target. The crystals in the row define progressively larger neutron-scattering angles and are vibrated sequentially in descending order with respect to the size of their scattering angles, thus generating neutron pulses which arrive simultaneously at the target. Transducers are coupled to one end of the crystals to vibrate them in an essentially non-resonant mode. The transducers propagate transverse waves in the crystal which progress longitudinally therein. The wave are absorbed at the undriven ends of the crystals by damping material mounted thereon. In another aspect, the invention is a method for generating neutron pulses characterized by high intensity and short duration.

  16. Accelerator-driven boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgecock, Rob

    2014-05-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is a binary treatment for certain types of cancer. It works by loading the cancerous cells with a boron-10 carrying compound. This isotope has a large cross-section for thermal neutrons, the reaction producing a lithium nucleus and alpha particle that kill the cell in which they are produced. Recent studies of the boron carrier compound indicate that the uptake process works best in particularly aggressive cancers. Most studied is glioblastoma multiforme and a trial using a combination of BNCT and X-ray radiotherapy has shown an increase of nearly a factor of two in mean survival over the state of the art. However, the main technical problem with BNCT remains producing a sufficient flux of neutrons for a reasonable treatment duration in a hospital environment. This paper discusses this issue.

  17. Beam Characterization at the Neutron Radiography Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah Morgan; Jeffrey King

    2013-01-01

    The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This project characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the model’s energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

  18. Beam characterization at the neutron radiography reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Sarah

    The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This thesis characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the model's energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

  19. The spectrum of neutrons at 60 hg m(-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The rate of neutron interactions was measured for the energy range 7.5 to 60 MeV, using a 3.85 kg cell of liquid scintillator. The neutrons are selected by pulse shape discrimination, with anticoincidence counters used to reduce interference from muons transversing the scintillator. The observed flux is interpreted in terms of neutrons produced from environmental uranium and thorium, those resulting from the capture of negative muons in nuclei and those from fast muon interactions.

  20. Dibaryons in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, Angela V.; Haensel, Pawel; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects are studied of H-dibaryons on the structure of neutron stars. It was found that H particles could be present in neutron stars for a wide range of dibaryon masses. The appearance of dibaryons softens the equations of state, lowers the maximum neutron star mass, and affects the transport properties of dense matter. The parameter space is constrained for dibaryons by requiring that a 1.44 solar mass neutron star be gravitationally stable.

  1. 500 MHz neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Yi-Fen; Bowman, J.D.; Matsuda, Y.

    1993-12-01

    A {sup 10}B-loaded scintillation detector was built for neutron transmission measurements at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center. The efficiency of the detector is nearly 100% for neutron energies from 0 to 1 keV. The neutron moderation time in the scintillator is about 250 ns and is energy independent. The detector and data processing system are designed to handle an instantaneous rate as high as 500 MHz. The active area of the detector is 40 cm in diameter.

  2. Gamma-ray and neutron radiography as part of a pulsed fast neutron analysis inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rynes, J.; Bendahan, J.; Gozani, T.; Loveman, R.; Stevenson, J.; Bell, C.

    1999-02-01

    A gamma-ray and neutron radiography system has been developed to provide useful supplemental information for a Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA) cargo inspection system. PFNA uses a collimated beam of pulsed neutrons to interrogate cargoes using (n, γx) reactions. The PFNA source produces both gamma rays as well as neutrons. The transmission of both species through the cargo is measured with an array of plastic scintillators. Since the neutron and gamma-ray signals are easily separated by arrival time a separate image can be made for both species. The radiography measurement is taken simultaneously with the PFNA measurement turning PFNA into an emission and transmission imaging system, thus enhancing the PFNA radiography system.

  3. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy. Annual report, [October 1990--April 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.; Kunze, J.

    1991-05-01

    Several investigators have suggested that a charged particle accelerator with light element reactions might be able to produce enough epithermal neutrons to be useful in Neutron Capture Therapy. The reaction choice so far has been the Li(p,n) reaction with protons up to 2.5 MeV. A moderator around the target would reduce the faster neutrons down to the epithermal energy region. The goals of the present research are: identify better reactions; improve the moderators; and find better combinations of 1 and 2. The target is to achieve, at the patient location, an epithermal neutron current of greater than 10{sup 9}n/cm{sup 2}sec, with a dose to tissue from the neutrons alone of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n and a dose from the gamma rays in the beam of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n.

  4. Biomedical neutron research at the Californium User Facility for neutron science

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Byrne, T.E.; Miller, L.F.

    1997-04-01

    The Californium User Facility for Neutron Science has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Californium User Facility (CUF) is a part of the larger Californium Facility, which fabricates and stores compact {sup 252}Cf neutron sources for worldwide distribution. The CUF can provide a cost-effective option for research with {sup 252}Cf sources. Three projects at the CUF that demonstrate the versatility of {sup 252}Cf for biological and biomedical neutron-based research are described: future establishment of a {sup 252}Cf-based neutron activation analysis system, ongoing work to produce miniature high-intensity, remotely afterloaded {sup 252}Cf sources for tumor therapy, and a recent experiment that irradiated living human lung cancer cells impregnated with experimental boron compounds to test their effectiveness for boron neutron capture therapy.

  5. Multi-axis neutron imaging at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fittinghoff, D. N.; Bettencourt, R.; Christensen, K.; Grim, G. P.; Hibbard, R. L.; Jedlovec, D. R.; Shingleton, N.; Merrill, F. E.; Fatherley, V. E.; Simpson, R.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.

    2015-08-01

    Inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) rely on a neutron imager to measure the 2D size and shape of the neutron-producing region in the burning deuterium-tritium plasma. Since the existing neutron imager is located on the equator of the NIF chamber, it provides only one view of the plasma, which complicates understanding the inherently three-dimensional nature of the implosion. Attempts to use x-ray images combined with the neutron image to improve our understanding of the 3D neutron-burn volume have proved to be inconsistent with the fuel mass. This result is understandable since neutrons and x-rays are not produced or propagated in the same manner. Thus, it is desirable to use multiple neutron imagers, and we are designing two neutron imagers on lines of sight that are nearly orthogonal to the current imager, one near the pole of the chamber and one near the equator, for fielding on the NIF in the next five years. In this paper, we will discuss the current designs, including the resolution, field of view and placement in the facility that will be required to use the three orthogonal neutron imagers to measure the neutron burn volume of plasmas at NIF. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Neutron removal cross section as a measure of neutron skin

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, D. Q.; Ma, Y. G.; Cai, X. Z.; Tian, W. D.; Wang, H. W.

    2010-04-15

    We study the relation between neutron removal cross section (sigma{sub -N}) and neutron skin thickness for finite neutron-rich nuclei using the statistical abrasion ablation model. Different sizes of neutron skin are obtained by adjusting the diffuseness parameter of neutrons in the Fermi distribution. It is demonstrated that there is a good linear correlation between sigma{sub -N} and the neutron skin thickness for neutron-rich nuclei. Further analysis suggests that the relative increase of neutron removal cross section could be used as a quantitative measure for neutron skin thickness in neutron-rich nuclei.

  7. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Eddy L.

    1981-01-01

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5 Mev neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  8. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  9. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  10. Prototype Neutron Energy Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Mitchell, Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Richard Maurer, Ronald Wolff

    2010-06-16

    The project goals are: (1) Use three to five pressurized helium tubes with varying polyethylene moderators to build a neutron energy spectrometer that is most sensitive to the incident neutron energy of interest. Neutron energies that are of particular interest are those from the fission neutrons (typically around 1-2 MeV); (2) Neutron Source Identification - Use the neutron energy 'selectivity' property as a tool to discriminate against other competing processes by which neutrons are generated (viz. Cosmic ray induced neutron production [ship effect], [a, n] reactions); (3) Determine the efficiency as a function of neutron energy (response function) of each of the detectors, and thereby obtain the composite neutron energy spectrum from the detector count rates; and (4) Far-field data characterization and effectively discerning shielded fission source. Summary of the presentation is: (1) A light weight simple form factor compact neutron energy spectrometer ready to be used in maritime missions has been built; (2) Under laboratory conditions, individual Single Neutron Source Identification is possible within 30 minutes. (3) Sources belonging to the same type of origin viz., (a, n), fission, cosmic cluster in the same place in the 2-D plot shown; and (4) Isotopes belonging to the same source origin like Cm-Be, Am-Be (a, n) or Pu-239, U-235 (fission) do have some overlap in the 2-D plot.

  11. Accelerator-based neutron source for the neutron-capture and fast neutron therapy at hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayanov, B. F.; Belov, V. P.; Bender, E. D.; Bokhovko, M. V.; Dimov, G. I.; Kononov, V. N.; Kononov, O. E.; Kuksanov, N. K.; Palchikov, V. E.; Pivovarov, V. A.; Salimov, R. A.; Silvestrov, G. I.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Soloviov, N. A.; Taskaev, S. Yu.

    The proton accelerator complex for neutron production in lithium target discussed, which can operate in two modes. The first provides a neutron beam kinematically collimated with good forward direction in 25° and average energy of 30 keV, directly applicable for neutron-capture therapy with high efficiency of proton beam use. The proton energy in this mode is 1.883-1.890 MeV that is near the threshold of the 7Li( p, n) 7Be reaction. In the second mode, at proton energy of 2.5 MeV, the complex-produced neutron beam with maximum energy board of 790 keV which can be used directly for fast neutron therapy and for neutron-capture therapy after moderation. The project of such a neutron source is based on the 2.5 MeV original electrostatic accelerator tandem with vacuum insulation developed at BINP which is supplied with a high-voltage rectifier. The rectifier is produced in BINP as a part of ELV-type industrial accelerator. Design features of the tandem determining its high reliability in operation with a high-current (up to 40 mA) H - ion beam are discussed. They are: the absence of ceramic accelerator columns around the beam passage region, good conditions for pumping out of charge-exchange gaseous target region, strong focusing optics and high acceleration rate minimizing the space charge effects. The possibility of stabilization of protons energy with an accuracy level of 0.1% necessary for operation in the near threshold region is considered. The design description of H - continuous ion source with a current of 40 mA is also performed. To operate with a 100 kW proton beam it is proposed to use liquid-lithium targets. A thin lithium layer on the surface of a tungsten disk cooled intensively by a liquid metal heat carrier is proposed for use in case of the vertical beam, and a flat liquid lithium jet flowing through the narrow nozzle - for the horizontal beam.

  12. Polarized neutron reflectometry in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzsche, H.

    2005-11-15

    A simple method is described to maintain the polarization of a neutron beam on its way through the large magnetic stray fields produced by a vertical field of a cryomagnet with a split-coil geometry. The two key issues are the proper shielding of the neutron spin flippers and an additional radial field component in order to guide the neutron spin through the region of the null point (i.e., point of reversal for the vertical field component). Calculations of the neutron's spin rotation as well as polarized neutron reflectometry experiments on an ErFe{sub 2}/DyFe{sub 2} multilayer show the perfect performance of the used setup. The recently commissioned cryomagnet M5 with a maximum vertical field of up to 7.2 T in asymmetric mode for polarized neutrons and 9 T in symmetric mode for unpolarized neutrons was used on the C5 spectrometer in reflectometry mode, at the NRU reactor in Chalk River, Canada.

  13. A system for fast neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R.T.

    1997-04-01

    A system has been designed and a neutron generator installed to perform fast neutron radiography. With this system, objects as small as a coin and as large as a 19 liter container have been radiographed. The neutron source is an MF Physics A-711 neutron generator which produces 3 x 10[sup 10] neutrons/second with an average energy of 14. 5 MeV. The radiography system uses x-ray scintillation screens and film in commercially available light-tight cassettes. The cassettes have been modified to include a thin sheet of plastic to produce protons from the neutron beam through elastic scattering from hydrogen and other low Z materials in the plastic. For film densities from 1.8 to 3.0, exposures range from 1.9 x 10[sup 7] n/cm[sup 2] to 3.8 x 10[sup 8] n/cm[sup 2] depending on the type of screen and film. The optimum source-to-film distance was found to be 150 cm. At this distance, the geometric unsharpness was determined to be approximately 2.2-2.3 mm and the smallest hole that could be resolved in a 1.25 cm thick sample had a diameter of 0.079 cm.

  14. Advancing Materials Science using Neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    Carpenter, John

    2014-06-03

    Jack Carpenter, pioneer of accelerator-based pulsed spallation neutron sources, talks about neutron science at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and a need for a second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). ORNL is the Department of Energy's largest multiprogram science and energy laboratory, and is home to two scientific user facilities serving the neutron science research community: the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and SNS. HFIR and SNS provide researchers with unmatched capabilities for understanding the structure and properties of materials, macromolecular and biological systems, and the fundamental physics of the neutron. Neutrons provide a window through which to view materials at a microscopic level that allow researchers to develop better materials and better products. Neutrons enable us to understand materials we use in everyday life. Carpenter explains the need for another station to produce long wavelength neutrons, or cold neutrons, to answer questions that are addressed only with cold neutrons. The second target station is optimized for that purpose. Modern technology depends more and more upon intimate atomic knowledge of materials, and neutrons are an ideal probe.

  15. Advancing Materials Science using Neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, John

    2014-04-24

    Jack Carpenter, pioneer of accelerator-based pulsed spallation neutron sources, talks about neutron science at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and a need for a second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). ORNL is the Department of Energy's largest multiprogram science and energy laboratory, and is home to two scientific user facilities serving the neutron science research community: the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and SNS. HFIR and SNS provide researchers with unmatched capabilities for understanding the structure and properties of materials, macromolecular and biological systems, and the fundamental physics of the neutron. Neutrons provide a window through which to view materials at a microscopic level that allow researchers to develop better materials and better products. Neutrons enable us to understand materials we use in everyday life. Carpenter explains the need for another station to produce long wavelength neutrons, or cold neutrons, to answer questions that are addressed only with cold neutrons. The second target station is optimized for that purpose. Modern technology depends more and more upon intimate atomic knowledge of materials, and neutrons are an ideal probe.

  16. Enhanced reaction rates in NDP analysis with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, R. Gregory

    2014-04-15

    Neutron depth profiling (NDP) makes accessible quantitative information on a few isotopic concentration profiles ranging from the surface into the sample a few micrometers. Because the candidate analytes for NDP are few, there is little interference encountered. Furthermore, neutrons have no charge so mixed chemical states in the sample are of no direct concern. There are a few nuclides that exhibit large probabilities for neutron scattering. The effect of neutron scattering on NDP measurements has not previously been evaluated as a basis for either enhancing the reaction rates or as a source of measurement error. Hydrogen is a common element exhibiting large neutron scattering probability found in or around sample volumes being analyzed by NDP. A systematic study was conducted to determine the degree of signal change when neutron scattering occurs during analysis. The relative signal perturbation was evaluated for materials of varied neutron scattering probability, concentration, total mass, and geometry. Signal enhancements up to 50% are observed when the hydrogen density is high and in close proximity to the region of analysis with neutron beams of sub thermal energies. Greater signal enhancements for the same neutron number density are reported for thermal neutron beams. Even adhesive tape used to position the sample produces a measureable signal enhancement. Because of the shallow volume, negligible distortion of the NDP measured profile shape is encountered from neutron scattering.

  17. Development of a sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator

    PubMed

    Verbeke; Leung; Vujic

    2000-10-01

    Sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generators are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for applications ranging from neutron radiography to boron neutron capture therapy and neutron activation analysis. The new generation of high-output neutron generators is based on the D-T fusion reaction, producing 14.1-MeV neutrons. The main components of the neutron tube--the ion source, the accelerator and the target--are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Thick-target neutron yield computations are performed in this paper to estimate the neutron yield of titanium and scandium targets. With an average deuteron beam current of 1 A and an energy of 120 keV, a time-averaged neutron production of approximately 10(14) n/s can be estimated for a tritiated target, for both pulsed and cw operations. In mixed deuteron/triton beam operation, a beam current of 2 A at 150 keV is required for the same neutron output. Recent experimental results on ion sources and accelerator columns are presented and discussed. PMID:11003523

  18. Ultra-short ion and neutron pulse production

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Barletta, William A.; Kwan, Joe W.

    2006-01-10

    An ion source has an extraction system configured to produce ultra-short ion pulses, i.e. pulses with pulse width of about 1 .mu.s or less, and a neutron source based on the ion source produces correspondingly ultra-short neutron pulses. To form a neutron source, a neutron generating target is positioned to receive an accelerated extracted ion beam from the ion source. To produce the ultra-short ion or neutron pulses, the apertures in the extraction system of the ion source are suitably sized to prevent ion leakage, the electrodes are suitably spaced, and the extraction voltage is controlled. The ion beam current leaving the source is regulated by applying ultra-short voltage pulses of a suitable voltage on the extraction electrode.

  19. Jets from Merging Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    With the recent discovery of gravitational waves from the merger of two black holes, its especially important to understand the electromagnetic signals resulting from mergers of compact objects. New simulations successfully follow a merger of two neutron stars that produces a short burst of energy via a jet consistent with short gamma-ray burst (sGRB) detections.Still from the authors simulation showing the two neutron stars, and their magnetic fields, before merger. [Adapted from Ruiz et al. 2016]Challenging SystemWe have long suspected that sGRBs are produced by the mergers of compact objects, but this model has been difficult to prove. One major hitch is that modeling the process of merger and sGRB launch is very difficult, due to the fact that these extreme systems involve magnetic fields, fluids and full general relativity.Traditionally, simulations are only able to track such mergers over short periods of time. But in a recent study, Milton Ruiz (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Industrial University of Santander, Colombia) and coauthors Ryan Lang, Vasileios Paschalidis and Stuart Shapiro have modeled a binary neutron star system all the way through the process of inspiral, merger, and the launch of a jet.A Merger TimelineHow does this happen? Lets walk through one of the teams simulations, in which dipole magnetic field lines thread through the interior of each neutron star and extend beyond its surface(like magnetic fields found in pulsars). In this example, the two neutron stars each have a mass of 1.625 solar masses.Simulation start (0 ms)Loss of energy via gravitational waves cause the neutron stars to inspiral.Merger (3.5 ms)The neutron stars are stretched by tidal effects and make contact. Their merger produces a hypermassive neutron star that is supported against collapse by its differential (nonuniform) rotation.Delayed collapse into a black hole (21.5 ms)Once the differential rotation is redistributed by magnetic fields and partially

  20. Jets from Merging Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    With the recent discovery of gravitational waves from the merger of two black holes, its especially important to understand the electromagnetic signals resulting from mergers of compact objects. New simulations successfully follow a merger of two neutron stars that produces a short burst of energy via a jet consistent with short gamma-ray burst (sGRB) detections.Still from the authors simulation showing the two neutron stars, and their magnetic fields, before merger. [Adapted from Ruiz et al. 2016]Challenging SystemWe have long suspected that sGRBs are produced by the mergers of compact objects, but this model has been difficult to prove. One major hitch is that modeling the process of merger and sGRB launch is very difficult, due to the fact that these extreme systems involve magnetic fields, fluids and full general relativity.Traditionally, simulations are only able to track such mergers over short periods of time. But in a recent study, Milton Ruiz (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Industrial University of Santander, Colombia) and coauthors Ryan Lang, Vasileios Paschalidis and Stuart Shapiro have modeled a binary neutron star system all the way through the process of inspiral, merger, and the launch of a jet.A Merger TimelineHow does this happen? Lets walk through one of the teams simulations, in which dipole magnetic field lines thread through the interior of each neutron star and extend beyond its surface(like magnetic fields found in pulsars). In this example, the two neutron stars each have a mass of 1.625 solar masses.Simulation start (0 ms)Loss of energy via gravitational waves cause the neutron stars to inspiral.Merger (3.5 ms)The neutron stars are stretched by tidal effects and make contact. Their merger produces a hypermassive neutron star that is supported against collapse by its differential (nonuniform) rotation.Delayed collapse into a black hole (21.5 ms)Once the differential rotation is redistributed by magnetic fields and partially

  1. Neutron and high speed photogrammetric arcjet diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, P. A. E.; Rogers, J. D.; Fowler, P. H.; Deininger, W. D.; Taylor, A. D.

    1989-01-01

    Two methods for real time internal diagnostics of arcjet engines are described. One method uses cold, thermal, or epithermal neutrons. Cold neutrons are used to detect the presence and location of hydrogenous propellants. Thermal neutrons are used to delineate the edge contours of anode and cathode surfaces and to measure stress/strain. Epithermal neutrons are used to measure temperatures on arcjet surfaces, bulk material temperatures, and point temperatures in bulk materials. It is found that this method, with an exposure time of 10 min, produces at temperature accuracy for W or Re of + or - 2.5 C. The other method uses visible-light high-speed photogrammetry to obtain images of the transient behavior of the arc during start-up and to relate this behavior to electrial supply characteristics such as voltage, current, and ripple.

  2. Magnetic Fields in Superconducting Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lander, S. K.

    2013-02-01

    The interior of a neutron star is likely to be predominantly a mixture of superfluid neutrons and superconducting protons. This results in the quantization of the star’s magnetic field into an array of thin flux tubes, producing a macroscopic force very different from the Lorentz force of normal matter. We show that in an axisymmetric superconducting equilibrium the behavior of a magnetic field is governed by a single differential equation. Solving this, we present the first self-consistent superconducting neutron star equilibria with poloidal and mixed poloidal-toroidal fields and also give the first quantitative results for the corresponding magnetically induced distortions to the star. The poloidal component is dominant in all our configurations. We suggest that the transition from normal to superconducting matter in a young neutron star may cause a large-scale field rearrangement.

  3. Neutron beam characterization at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, E. B.

    1998-05-18

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source dedicated to materials research. Its three cryogenic methane moderators provide twelve neutron beams to fourteen neutron scattering instruments and test facilities. The moderators at IPNS are of cryogenic methane (CH{sub 4}); one of liquid methane at 100 K, and two of solid methane at 30 K. These moderators produce intense beams of both cold and thermal neutrons. The moderators are each of a different physical configuration in order to tailor their performance for the instruments and facilities that operate on the neutron beams. As part of the ongoing operation of IPNS, as well as new enhancements to the target, moderator, and reflector systems, we have performed experiments characterizing the energy and time distribution of neutrons in the various beams. These measurements provide absolutely normalized energy spectra using foil activation techniques joined with time-of-flight measurements, and energy-dependent time distributions using a time-focused crystal analyzer. The IPNS accelerator system delivers 14 {micro}A of 450 MeV protons, in 100 ns pulses at 30 Hz, to a target composed of water-cooled depleted uranium disks. The solid methane ''H'' moderator is 100 by 100 by 45 mm in size, centerline poisoned with 0.25 mg/mm{sup 2} gadolinium, and decoupled from the graphite reflector with 0.5 mm of cadmium. The liquid methane ''F'' moderator, which is viewed from both faces, is also 100 by 100 by 45 mm in size, gadolinium poisoned 16 mm below each of the two viewed surfaces, and decoupled from the graphite reflector with cadmium. The solid methane ''C'' moderator has a re-entrant ''grooved'' geometry. The moderator is 100 by 100 by 80 mm overall, with 40 mm deep 12 mm wide horizontal grooves in the viewed surface. These grooves cover 50% of the viewed surface area. The ''C'' moderator is unpoisoned, but is decoupled from the graphite reflector with 0.5 mm of cadmium.

  4. PERSONNEL NEUTRON DOSIMETER

    DOEpatents

    Fitzgerald, J.J.; Detwiler, C.G. Jr.

    1960-05-24

    A description is given of a personnel neutron dosimeter capable of indicating the complete spectrum of the neutron dose received as well as the dose for each neutron energy range therein. The device consists of three sets of indium foils supported in an aluminum case. The first set consists of three foils of indium, the second set consists of a similar set of indium foils sandwiched between layers of cadmium, whereas the third set is similar to the second set but is sandwiched between layers of polyethylene. By analysis of all the foils the neutron spectrum and the total dose from neutrons of all energy levels can be ascertained.

  5. Neutron activation analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, M.C.; Rhodes, J.R.

    1973-12-25

    A neutron activation analysis system for monitoring a generally fluid media, such as slurries, solutions, and fluidized powders, including two separate conduit loops for circulating fluid samples within the range of radiation sources and detectors is described. Associated with the first loop is a neutron source that emits s high flux of slow and thermal neutrons. The second loop employs a fast neutron source, the flux from which is substantially free of thermal neutrons. Adjacent to both loops are gamma counters for spectrographic determination of the fluid constituents. Other gsmma sources and detectors are arranged across a portion of each loop for deterMining the fluid density. (Official Gazette)

  6. Grazing incidence neutron optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V. (Inventor); Ramsey, Brian D. (Inventor); Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Neutron optics based on the two-reflection geometries are capable of controlling beams of long wavelength neutrons with low angular divergence. The preferred mirror fabrication technique is a replication process with electroform nickel replication process being preferable. In the preliminary demonstration test an electroform nickel optics gave the neutron current density gain at the focal spot of the mirror at least 8 for neutron wavelengths in the range from 6 to 20 .ANG.. The replication techniques can be also be used to fabricate neutron beam controlling guides.

  7. Grazing Incidence Neutron Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V. (Inventor); Ramsey, Brian D. (Inventor); Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Neutron optics based on the two-reflection geometries are capable of controlling beams of long wavelength neutrons with low angular divergence. The preferred mirror fabrication technique is a replication process with electroform nickel replication process being preferable. In the preliminary demonstration test an electroform nickel optics gave the neutron current density gain at the focal spot of the mirror at least 8 for neutron wavelengths in the range from 6 to 20.ANG.. The replication techniques can be also be used to fabricate neutron beam controlling guides.

  8. High energy neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Rai, K.S.F.

    1994-01-11

    A device for measuring dose equivalents in neutron radiation fields is described. The device includes nested symmetrical hemispheres (forming spheres) of different neutron moderating materials that allow the measurement of dose equivalents from 0.025 eV to past 1 GeV. The layers of moderating material surround a spherical neutron counter. The neutron counter is connected by an electrical cable to an electrical sensing means which interprets the signal from the neutron counter in the center of the moderating spheres. The spherical shape of the device allows for accurate measurement of dose equivalents regardless of its positioning. 2 figures.

  9. High energy neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Rai Ko S.F.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring dose equivalents in neutron radiation fields. The device includes nested symmetrical hemispheres (forming spheres) of different neutron moderating materials that allow the measurement of dose equivalents from 0.025 eV to past 1 GeV. The layers of moderating material surround a spherical neutron counter. The neutron counter is connected by an electrical cable to an electrical sensing means which interprets the signal from the neutron counter in the center of the moderating spheres. The spherical shape of the device allows for accurate measurement of dose equivalents regardless of its positioning.

  10. Neutron scatter camera

    DOEpatents

    Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Krenz, Kevin D.

    2010-06-22

    An instrument that will directly image the fast fission neutrons from a special nuclear material source has been described. This instrument can improve the signal to background compared to non imaging neutron detection techniques by a factor given by ratio of the angular resolution window to 4.pi.. In addition to being a neutron imager, this instrument will also be an excellent neutron spectrometer, and will be able to differentiate between different types of neutron sources (e.g. fission, alpha-n, cosmic ray, and D-D or D-T fusion). Moreover, the instrument is able to pinpoint the source location.

  11. Thermal neutron image intensifier tube provides brightly visible radiographic pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, H.; Kraska, I.; Niklas, W.; Schmidt, A.

    1967-01-01

    Vacuum-type neutron image intensifier tube improves image detection in thermal neutron radiographic inspection. This system converts images to an electron image, and with electron acceleration and demagnification between the input target and output screen, produces a bright image viewed through a closed circuit television system.

  12. Precision Neutron Polarimetry for Neutron Beta Decay

    PubMed Central

    Penttila, S. I.; Bowman, J. D.

    2005-01-01

    The abBA collaboration is developing a new type of field-expansion spectrometer for a measurement of the three correlation coefficients a, A, and B and the shape parameter b. The measurement of A and B requires precision neutron polarimetry. We will polarize a pulsed cold neutron beam from the SNS using a 3He neutron spin filter. The well-known polarizing cross section for n-3He has a 1/v dependence, where v is the neutron velocity, which is used to determine the absolute beam polarization through a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. We show that by measuring the TOF dependence of A and B, the coefficients and the neutron polarization can be determined with a small loss of the statistical precision and with negligible systematic error. We conclude that it is possible to determine the neutron polarization averaged over a long run in the neutron beta decay experiment with a statistical error less than 10−4. We discuss various sources of systematic uncertainty in the measurement of A and B and conclude that the fractional systematic errors are less than 2 × 10−4. PMID:27308142

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, F.

    1962-12-18

    A power plant is described comprising a turbine and employing round cylindrical fuel rods formed of BeO and UO/sub 2/ and stacks of hexagonal moderator blocks of BeO provided with passages that loosely receive the fuel rods so that coolant may flow through the passages over the fuels to remove heat. The coolant may be helium or steam and fiows through at least one more heat exchanger for producing vapor from a body of fluid separate from the coolant, which fluid is to drive the turbine for generating electricity. By this arrangement the turbine and directly associated parts are free of particles and radiations emanating from the reactor. (AEC)

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1957-09-17

    A reactor of the type having coolant liquid circulated through clad fuel elements geometrically arranged in a solid moderator, such as graphite, is described. The core is enclosed in a pressure vessel and suitable shielding, wherein means is provided for circulating vapor through the core to superheat the same. This is accomplished by drawing off the liquid which has been heated in the core due to the fission of the fuel, passing it to a nozzle within a chamber where it flashes into a vapor, and then passing the vapor through separate tubes extending through the moderator to pick up more heat developed in the core due to the fission of the fuel, thereby producing superheated vapor.

  15. Spin distribution in neutron induced preequilibrium reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D; Kawano, T; Chadwick, M; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Nelson, R O; Mitchell, G E; Garrett, P E; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Macri, R; Younes, W

    2005-10-04

    The preequilibrium reaction mechanism makes an important contribution to neutron-induced reactions above E{sub n} {approx} 10 MeV. The preequilibrium process has been studied exclusively via the characteristic high energy neutrons produced at bombarding energies greater than 10 MeV. They are expanding the study of the preequilibrium reaction mechanism through {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. Cross-section measurements were made of prompt {gamma}-ray production as a function of incident neutron energy (E{sub n} = 1 to 250 MeV) on a {sup 48}Ti sample. Energetic neutrons were delivered by the Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation neutron source located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were detected with the large-scale Compton-suppressed Germanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE). Neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. The {gamma}-ray excitation functions were converted to partial {gamma}-ray cross sections taking into account the dead-time correction, target thickness, detector efficiency and neutron flux (monitored with an in-line fission chamber). Residual state population was predicted using the GNASH reaction code, enhanced for preequilibrium. The preequilibrium reaction spin distribution was calculated using the quantum mechanical theory of Feshback, Kerman, and Koonin (FKK). The multistep direct part of the FKK theory was calculated for a one-step process. The FKK preequilibrium spin distribution was incorporated into the GNASH calculations and the {gamma}-ray production cross sections were calculated and compared with experimental data. The difference in the partial {gamma}-ray cross sections using spin distributions with and without preequilibrium effects is significant.

  16. STRATIFIED COMPOSITION EFFECTS ON PLANETARY NEUTRON FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    O. GASNAULT; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    All the bodies of the solar system that are directly irradiated by the galactic cosmic rays, emit enough neutrons to allow a measurement from space. These leakage neutron fluxes are indexes of the surface composition, depending on the energy of the neutrons [1]. Recent work propose geochemical interpretations of these fluxes: the thermal energy range is sensitive to iron, titanium, rare earth elements and thorium [2, 3], the epithermal energy range is sensitive to hydrogen, samarium and gadolinium [2] and the fast energy range is representative of the average soil atomic mass [4]. Nevertheless these studies make the hypothesis of a composition uniform within the footprint of the spectrometer and independent of depth. We show in this abstract that a stratified composition could change significantly the flux intensity and complicate the interpretation of the measurements. The neutron leakage flux is a competition between production effects (sensitive at high energy) and diffusion-capture effects (mostly sensitive at low energy). On one hand, it happens to be that the elements which produce the higher number of neutrons in typical lunar compositions are iron and titanium, which have also large cross section of absorption with the neutrons. On the other hand, the maximum of neutron intensity does not occur at the surface but at about 180 g cm{sup {minus}2} in depth. Therefore, if we have an iron- and/or titanium-rich soil (important production of neutrons) with a top layer having less iron and/or titanium (i.e. more transparent to the neutrons), we can expect an enhancement of the flux compared to a uniform composition.

  17. Tandem mirrors for neutron production

    SciTech Connect

    Doggett, J.N.

    1983-03-31

    Two mirror machine concepts are being studied as early-time, low-cost, neutron-producing devices for testing and demonstrating reactor-relevant fusion technology. The first of these concepts is for a new, small, driven, steady-state, D-T reactor, called the Technology Demonstration Facility (TDF). The second concept is for upgrades to the MFTF-B machine that burn tritium and run for pulse lengths of some hours. Both devices operate in the Kelley mode in order to provide high-wall loadings of 14-MeV neutrons, thereby providing a valuable test bed for reactor-relevant hardware and subsystems. Either one of these devices could be running in the early 1990's with first wall fluxes between 1.4 and 2.0 MW m/sup -2/.

  18. NEUTRON DENSITY CONTROL IN A NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Young, G.J.

    1959-06-30

    The method and means for controlling the neutron density in a nuclear reactor is described. It describes the method and means for flattening the neutron density distribution curve across the reactor by spacing the absorbing control members to varying depths in the central region closer to the center than to the periphery of the active portion of the reactor to provide a smaller neutron reproduction ratio in the region wherein the members are inserted, than in the remainder of the reactor thereby increasing the over-all potential power output.

  19. Performance characteristics of a compact D-T neutron generator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfutzner, H. G.; Groves, J. L.; Mahdavi, M.

    1995-05-01

    A new pulsed neutron generator system has been introduced which uses the deuterium-tritium fusion reaction to produce 14 MeV neutrons. The new system incorporates the latest technology in its electronics, sealed tube neutron head and computer control. The system is extremely flexible and adaptable to a wide range of applications in the field of materials non-destructive analysis.

  20. A detector system for neutron resonance capture imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelli Cippo, E.; Borella, A.; Gorini, G.; Kockelmann, W.; Pietropaolo, A.; Postma, H.; Rhodes, N. J.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Tardocchi, M.; Wynants, R.; Ancient Charm Collaboration

    2010-11-01

    Neutron resonance capture analysis (NRCA) is used in the Ancient Charm project to determine element concentrations in cultural heritage objects. NRCA employs gamma-ray detectors to determine time-of-flight spectra that reveal the resonance structure in neutron induced reaction cross sections. One of the objectives is to produce a high-detection efficient NRCA system capable of mapping element distributions. The detection system is described together with the results of neutron beam tests at the time-of-flight facility GELINA and at the pulsed neutron spallation source ISIS (UK).

  1. Determination of spallation neutron flux through spectral adjustment techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, M. A.; Engle, J. W.; Jackman, K. R.; Nortier, F. M.; Birnbaum, E. R.

    2016-08-01

    The Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility (IPF) creates medical isotopes using a proton beam impinged on a target stack. Spallation neutrons are created in the interaction of the beam with target. The use of these spallation neutrons to produce additional radionuclides has been proposed. However, the energy distribution and magnitude of the flux is not well understood. A modified SAND-II spectral adjustment routine has been used with radioactivation foils to determine the differential neutron fluence for these spallation neutrons during a standard IPF production run.

  2. Measurement of the lunar neutron density profile. [Apollo 17 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolum, D. S.; Burnett, D. S.; Furst, M.; Weiss, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    An in situ measurement of the lunar neutron density from 20 to 400 g/sq cm depth between the lunar surface was made by the Apollo 17 Lunar Neutron Probe Experiment using particle tracks produced by the B10(n, alpha)Li7 reaction. Both the absolute magnitude and depth profile of the neutron density are in good agreement with past theoretical calculations. The effect of cadmium absorption on the neutron density and in the relative Sm149 to Gd157 capture rates obtained experimentally implies that the true lunar Gd157 capture rate is about one half of that calculated theoretically.

  3. Burst Oscillations: A New Spin on Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2007-01-01

    Observations with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) have shown that the X-ray flux during thermonuclear X-ray bursts fr-om accreting neutron stars is often strongly pulsed at frequencies as high as 620 Hz. We now know that these oscillations are produced by spin modulation of the thermonuclear flux from the neutron star surface. In addition to revealing the spin frequency, they provide new ways to probe the properties and physics of accreting neutron stars. I will briefly review our current observational and theoretical understanding of these oscillations and discuss what they are telling us about neutron stars.

  4. Background neutron spectrum at 2420 m above sea level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene; Manzanares-Acuña, Eduardo

    2004-05-01

    The ambient neutron spectrum was measured in-doors at ground level in Zacatecas Mexico at 2420 m above sea level. A Bonner sphere spectrometer with a 6LiI(Eu) scintillator was used to obtain the neutron spectrum. With the spectrum the ambient dose equivalent was calculated using the ICRP 74 neutron fluence-to-dose conversion factors. The neutron fluence rate was 65±3 cm -2 h -1, producing 13.7±0.6 nSv h -1 due to ambient dose equivalent.

  5. Review of current neutron detection systems for emergency response

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Guss, Paul; Kruschwitz, Craig

    2014-09-05

    Neutron detectors are utilized in a myriad of applications—from safeguarding special nuclear materials (SNM) to determining lattice spacing in soft materials. The transformational changes taking place in neutron detection and imaging techniques in the last few years are largely being driven by the global shortage of helium-3 (3He). This article reviews the status of neutron sensors used specifically for SNM detection in radiological emergency response. These neutron detectors must be highly efficient, be rugged, have fast electronics to measure neutron multiplicity, and be capable of measuring direction of the neutron sources and possibly image them with high spatial resolution. Neutron detection is an indirect physical process: neutrons react with nuclei in materials to initiate the release of one or more charged particles that produce electric signals that can be processed by the detection system. Therefore, neutron detection requires conversion materials as active elements of the detection system; these materials may include boron-10 (10B), lithium-6 (6Li), and gadollinium-157 (157Gd), to name a few, but the number of materials available for neutron detection is limited. However, in recent years, pulse-shape-discriminating plastic scintillators, scintillators made of helium-4 (4He) under high pressure, pillar and trench semiconductor diodes, and exotic semiconductor neutron detectors made from uranium oxide and other materials have widely expanded the parameter space in neutron detection methodology. In this article we will pay special attention to semiconductor-based neutron sensors. Finally, modern microfabricated nanotubes covered inside with neutron converter materials and with very high aspect ratios for better charge transport will be discussed.

  6. Shielding Ddsign and analyses of KIPT neutron source facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of a neutron source facility. An electron accelerator drives a sub-critical facility (ADS) is used for generating the neutron source. The facility will be utilized for performing basic and applied nuclear researches, producing medical isotopes, and training young nuclear specialists. Monte Carlo code MCNPX has been utilized as the major design tool for the design, due to its capability to transport electrons, photons, and neutrons at high energies. However the ADS shielding calculations with MCNPX need enormous computational resources and the small neutron yield per electron makes sampling difficulty for the Monte Carlo calculations. The high energy electrons (E > 100 MeV) generate very high energy neutrons and these neutrons dominant the total radiation dose outside the shield. The radiation dose caused by high energy neutrons is {approx}3-4 orders of magnitude higher than that of the photons. However, the high energy neutron fraction within the total generated neutrons is very small, which increases the sampling difficulty and the required computational time. To solve these difficulties, the user subroutines of MCNPX are utilized to generate a neutron source file, which record the generated neutrons from the photonuclear reactions caused by electrons. This neutron source file is utilized many times in the following MCNPX calculations for weight windows (importance function) generation and radiation dose calculations. In addition, the neutron source file can be sampled multiple times to improve the statistics of the calculated results. In this way the expensive electron transport calculations can be performed once with good statistics for the different ADS shielding problems. This paper presents the method of generating and utilizing the neutron source file by MCNPX for the ADS shielding calculation

  7. Neutron beam design, development, and performance for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A. ); Zamenhof, R.G. )

    1990-01-01

    The report presents topics presented at a workshop on neutron beams and neutron capture therapy. Topics include: neutron beam design; reactor-based neutron beams; accelerator-based neutron beams; and dosimetry and treatment planning. Individual projects are processed separately for the databases. (CBS)

  8. Neutron and gamma-ray spectra of 239PuBe and 241AmBe.

    PubMed

    Vega-Carrillo, Héctor René; Manzanares-Acuña, Eduardo; Becerra-Ferreiro, Ana María; Carrillo-Nuñez, Aureliano

    2002-08-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray spectra of 239PuBe and 241AmBe were measured and their dosimetric features were calculated. Neutron spectra were measured using a multisphere neutron spectrometer with a 6LiI(Eu) scintillator. The 239PuBe neutron spectrum was measured in an open environment, while the 241AmBe neutron spectrum was measured in a closed environment. Gamma-ray spectra were measured using a NaI(Tl) scintillator using the same experimental conditions for both sources. The effect of measuring conditions for the 241AmBe neutron spectrum indicates the presence of epithermal and thermal neutrons. The low-resolution neutron spectra obtained with the multisphere spectrometer allows one to calculate the dosimetric features of neutron sources. At 100 cm both sources produce approximately the same count rate as that of the 4.4 MeV gamma-ray per unit of alpha emitter activity. PMID:12150274

  9. Microtron MT 25 as a source of neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kralik, M.; Solc, J.; Chvatil, D.; Krist, P.; Turek, K.; Granja, C.

    2012-08-15

    The objective was to describe Microtron MT25 as a source of neutrons generated by bremsstrahlung induced photonuclear reactions in U and Pb targets. Bremsstrahlung photons were produced by electrons accelerated at energy 21.6 MeV. Spectral fluence of the generated neutrons was calculated with MCNPX code and then experimentally determined at two positions by means of a Bonner spheres spectrometer in which the detector of thermal neutrons was replaced by activation Mn tablets or track detectors CR-39 with a {sup 10}B radiator. The measured neutron spectral fluence and the calculated anisotropy served for the estimation of neutron yield from the targets and for the determination of ambient dose equivalent rate at the place of measurement. Microtron MT25 is intended as one of the sources for testing neutron sensitive devices which will be sent into the space.

  10. Microtron MT 25 as a source of neutrons.

    PubMed

    Králík, M; Šolc, J; Chvátil, D; Krist, P; Turek, K; Granja, C

    2012-08-01

    The objective was to describe Microtron MT25 as a source of neutrons generated by bremsstrahlung induced photonuclear reactions in U and Pb targets. Bremsstrahlung photons were produced by electrons accelerated at energy 21.6 MeV. Spectral fluence of the generated neutrons was calculated with MCNPX code and then experimentally determined at two positions by means of a Bonner spheres spectrometer in which the detector of thermal neutrons was replaced by activation Mn tablets or track detectors CR-39 with a (10)B radiator. The measured neutron spectral fluence and the calculated anisotropy served for the estimation of neutron yield from the targets and for the determination of ambient dose equivalent rate at the place of measurement. Microtron MT25 is intended as one of the sources for testing neutron sensitive devices which will be sent into the space. PMID:22938289

  11. Characterization of short-pulse laser driven neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Katerina; Jung, Daniel; Guler, Nevzat; Deppert, Oliver; Devlin, Matthew; Fernandez, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R. C.; Hegelich, B. M.; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, R. P.; Merrill, F. E.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Tybo, J. L.; Wagner, F.; Wender, S. A.; Wurden, G. A.; Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2014-10-01

    We present a full spectral characterization of a novel laser driven neutron source, which employed the Break Out Afterburner ion acceleration mechanism. Neutrons were produced by nuclear reactions of the ions deposited on Be or Cu converters. We observed neutrons at energies up to 150 MeV. The neutron spectra were measured by five neutron time-of-flight detectors at various positions and distances from the source. The nTOF detectors observed that emission of neutrons is a superposition of an isotropic component peaking at 3.5--5 MeV resulting from nuclear reactions in the converter and a directional component at 25--70 MeV, which was a product of break-up reaction of the forward moving deuterons. Energy shifts due to geometrical effects in BOA were also observed.

  12. Simulation of neutron production using MCNPX+MCUNED.

    PubMed

    Erhard, M; Sauvan, P; Nolte, R

    2014-10-01

    In standard MCNPX, the production of neutrons by ions cannot be modelled efficiently. The MCUNED patch applied to MCNPX 2.7.0 allows to model the production of neutrons by light ions down to energies of a few kiloelectron volts. This is crucial for the simulation of neutron reference fields. The influence of target properties, such as the diffusion of reactive isotopes into the target backing or the effect of energy and angular straggling, can be studied efficiently. In this work, MCNPX/MCUNED calculations are compared with results obtained with the TARGET code for simulating neutron production. Furthermore, MCUNED incorporates more effective variance reduction techniques and a coincidence counting tally. This allows the simulation of a TCAP experiment being developed at PTB. In this experiment, 14.7-MeV neutrons will be produced by the reaction T(d,n)(4)He. The neutron fluence is determined by counting alpha particles, independently of the reaction cross section. PMID:24132389

  13. Evaluation of neutron radiation field in carbon ion therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun-Kui; Su, You-Wu; Li, Wu-Yuan; Yan, Wei-Wei; Chen, Xi-Meng; Mao, Wang; Pang, Cheng-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ions have significant advantages in tumor therapy because of their physical and biological properties. In view of the radiation protection, the safety of patients is the most important issue in therapy processes. Therefore, the effects of the secondary particles produced by the carbon ions in the tumor therapy should be carefully considered, especially for the neutrons. In the present work, the neutron radiation field induced by carbon ions was evaluated by using the FLUKA code. The simulated results of neutron energy spectra and neutron dose was found to be in good agreement with the experiment data. In addition, energy deposition of carbon ions and neutrons in tissue-like media was studied, it is found that the secondary neutron energy deposition is not expected to exceed 1% of the carbon ion energy deposition in a typical treatment.

  14. An approach of reducing the background induced by neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, C.; Gu, Y.; Sun, Y.; Ma, Y.; Dai, C.; Fan, Z.

    1985-01-01

    The background induced by interactions of neutrons with detector material (and shield material) is difficult to be rejected. It is one of the most important factors to affect the sensitivity of a balloon-borne gamma-ray astronomical telescope. The main component of neutron flux at the major detector of the telescope is incident neutrons, that consists of atmospheric neutrons and neutrons locally produced in the balloon platform. Therefore, shielding the detector from incident neutrons is a possible way to reduce the background. NaI (T1) crystal is very widely used in gamma-ray astronomical telescopes. Through balloon-borne experiment it is shown that up 6 LiF shield is effective to reduce the background in NaI crystal.

  15. A Highly Efficient Neutron Veto Using Boron-Loaded Liquid Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.; Mosteiro, P.; Loer, B.; Calaprice, F.

    2011-04-27

    By surrounding a dark matter detector with a layer of boron-loaded liquid scintillator, a highly efficient neutron veto can be produced. In Monte Carlo studies, a one meter thick layer of scintillator has a veto efficiency greater than 99.5% for nuclear recoil events induced by radiogenic neutrons, and a veto efficiency of more than 95% for nuclear recoil events produced by cosmogenic neutrons. The use of boron-loaded scintillator both reduces the veto-induced dead time by decreasing the neutron capture time and allows high neutron detection efficiency to be achieved in a relatively compact geometry.

  16. Neutron radiography using neutron imaging plate.

    PubMed

    Chankow, Nares; Punnachaiya, Suvit; Wonglee, Sarinrat

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this research are to study properties of a neutron imaging plate (NIP) and to test it for use in nondestructive testing (NDT) of materials. The experiments were carried out by using a BAS-ND 2040 Fuji NIP and a neutron beam from the Thai Research Reactor TRR-1/M1. The neutron intensity and Cd ratio at the specimen position were approximately 9x10(5) ns/cm(2) s and 100 respectively. It was found that the photostimulated luminescence (PSL) readout of the imaging plate was directly proportional to the exposure time and approximately 40 times faster than the conventional NR using Gd converter screen/X-ray film technique. The sensitivities of the imaging plate to slow neutron and to Ir-192 gamma-rays were found to be approximately 4.2x10(-3) PSL/mm(2) per neutron and 6.7x10(-5) PSL/mm(2) per gamma-ray photon respectively. Finally, some specimens containing light elements were selected to be radiographed with neutrons using the NIP and the Gd converter screen/X-ray film technique. The image quality obtained from the two recording media was found to be comparable. PMID:19828321

  17. Precision neutron polarimetry for neutron beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Penttila, S. I.; Bowman, J. D.

    2004-01-01

    The abBA collaboration is developing a new type of field-expansion spectrometer for measurement of the three correlation coefficients a, A, and B and shape parameter b. The measurement of A and B requires precision neutron polarimetry. We will polarize a pulsed cold neutron beam from SNS using a {sup 3}He neutron spin filter. The well-known polarizing cross section for n-{sup 3}He has 1/v dependence, which is used to determine the absolute beam polarization through a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. We show that measuring the TOF dependence of A and B, the coefficients and the neutron polarization can be determined with small loss of statistical precision and negligible systematic error. We conclude that it is possible to determine the neutron polarization averaged over a run in the neutron beta decay experiment to better than 10{sup -3}. We discuss various sources of systematic uncertainties in the measurement of A and B and conclude that they are less than 10{sup -4}.

  18. Method and apparatus for epithermal neutron porosity well logging

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzog, R.C.; Loomis, W.A.; Wraight, P.

    1991-09-24

    This patent describes a method for investigating the porosity of a subsurface earth formation surrounding a borehole. It comprises repetitively irradiating the borehole and earth formation with discrete bursts of high energy neutrons from a neutron source, which neutrons interact with nuclei of the materials in the borehole and the formation to produce therein populations of epithermal neutrons; detecting the populations of epithermal neutrons at near and far locations in the borehole spaced apart longitudinally by different distances from the neutron source; generating count signals indicative of the magnitudes of the detected epithermal neutron populations at the respective near and far locations; detecting the decay of the epithermal neutron populations following the neutron bursts at least at one location in the borehole and generating signals representative thereof; deriving from the decay signals a signal indicative of the slowing down time of epithermal neutrons in the formation of the at least one location; and deriving from the near and far count signals and the slowing down time signal a measurement signal representative of the porosity of the formation surrounding the borehole inherently compensated for the effects of tool standoff on the responses of the logging tool.

  19. Neutron angular distribution in plutonium-240 spontaneous fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcath, Matthew J.; Shin, Tony H.; Clarke, Shaun D.; Peerani, Paolo; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear safeguards applications require accurate fission models that exhibit prompt neutron anisotropy. In the laboratory reference frame, an anisotropic neutron angular distribution is observed because prompt fission neutrons carry momentum from fully accelerated fission fragments. A liquid organic scintillation detector array was used with pulse shape discrimination techniques to produce neutron-neutron cross-correlation time distributions and angular distributions from spontaneous fission in a 252Cf, a 0.84 g 240Pueff metal, and a 1.63 g 240Pueff metal sample. The effect of cross-talk, estimated with MCNPX-PoliMi simulations, is removed from neutron-neutron coincidences as a function of the angle between detector pairs. Fewer coincidences were observed at detector angles near 90°, relative to higher and lower detector angles. As light output threshold increases, the observed anisotropy increases due to spectral effects arising from fission fragment momentum transfer to emitted neutrons. Stronger anisotropy was observed in Cf-252 spontaneous fission prompt neutrons than in Pu-240 neutrons.

  20. Mineral exploration and soil analysis using in situ neutron activation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Hoyte, A.F.

    1966-01-01

    A feasibility study has been made to operate by remote control an unshielded portable positive-ion accelerator type neutron source to induce activities in the ground or rock by "in situ" neutron irradiation. Selective activation techniques make it possible to detect some thirty or more elements by irradiating the ground for periods of a few minutes with either 3-MeV or 14-MeV neutrons. The depth of penetration of neutrons, the effect of water content of the soil on neutron moderation, gamma ray attenuation in the soil and other problems are considered. The analysis shows that, when exploring for most elements of economic interest, the reaction 2H(d,n)3He yielding ??? 3-MeV neutrons is most practical to produce a relatively uniform flux of neutrons of less than 1 keV to a depth of 19???-20???. Irradiation with high energy neutrons (??? 14 MeV) can also be used and may be better suited for certain problems. However, due to higher background and lower sensitivity for the heavy minerals, it is not a recommended neutron source for general exploration use. Preliminary experiments have been made which indicate that neutron activation in situ is feasible for a mineral exploration or qualititative soil analysis. ?? 1976.

  1. D-D neutron generator development at LBNL.

    PubMed

    Reijonen, J; Gicquel, F; Hahto, S K; King, M; Lou, T-P; Leung, K-N

    2005-01-01

    The plasma and ion source technology group in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is developing advanced, next generation D-D neutron generators. There are three distinctive developments, which are discussed in this presentation, namely, multi-stage, accelerator-based axial neutron generator, high-output co-axial neutron generator and point source neutron generator. These generators employ RF-induction discharge to produce deuterium ions. The distinctive feature of RF-discharge is its capability to generate high atomic hydrogen species, high current densities and stable and long-life operation. The axial neutron generator is designed for applications that require fast pulsing together with medium to high D-D neutron output. The co-axial neutron generator is aimed for high neutron output with cw or pulsed operation, using either the D-D or D-T fusion reaction. The point source neutron generator is a new concept, utilizing a toroidal-shaped plasma generator. The beam is extracted from multiple apertures and focus to the target tube, which is located at the middle of the generator. This will generate a point source of D-D, T-T or D-T neutrons with high output flux. The latest development together with measured data will be discussed in this article. PMID:15975804

  2. A dosimetry study of deuterium-deuterium neutron generator-based in vivo neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowers, Daniel A.

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo Neutron Activation Analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator which produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 x 108 +/-30% s-1. A moderator/reflector/shielding (5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite & 5.7 cm borated HDPE) assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeter (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and photon dose by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10 min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 +/- 0.8 mSv for neutron and 4.2 +/- 0.2 mSv for photon for 10 mins; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  3. A Dosimetry Study of Deuterium-Deuterium Neutron Generator-based In Vivo Neutron Activation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sowers, Daniel; Liu, Yingzi; Mostafaei, Farshad; Blake, Scott; Nie, Linda H

    2015-12-01

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator that produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 × 10(8) ± 30% s(-1). A moderator/reflector/shielding [5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite and 5.7 cm borated (HDPE)] assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeters (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and the photon dose was measured by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10-min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 ± 0.8 mSv for neutrons and 4.2 ± 0.2 mSv for photons for 10 min; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population. PMID:26509624

  4. Neutron chopper development at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Nutter, M.; Lewis, L.; Tepper, S.; Silver, R.N.; Heffner, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Progress is reported on neutron chopper systems for the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center pulsed spallation neutron source. This includes the development of 600+ Hz active magnetic bearing neutron chopper and a high speed control system designed to operate with the Proton Storage Ring to phase the chopper to the neutron source. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Validation of computational methods for treatment planning of fast-neutron therapy using activation foil techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D.W.; Wemple, C.A.; Hartwell, J.K.; Harker, Y.D.; Venhuizen, J.R.; Risler, R.

    1997-12-01

    A closed-form direct method for unfolding neutron spectra from foil activation data is presented. The method is applied to measurements of the free-field neutron spectrum produced by the proton-cyclotron-based fast-neutron radiotherapy facility at the University of Washington (UW) School of Medicine. The results compare favorably with theoretical expectations based on an a-priori calculational model of the target and neutron beamline configuration of the UW facility.

  6. Neutron multiplicity measurements with 3He alternative: Straw neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wolff, Ronald; Detwiler, Ryan; Maurer, Richard; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul; Lacy, Jeffrey L.; Sun, Liang; Athanasiades, Athanasios

    2015-01-27

    developed a data acquisition (DAQ) system to collect neutron multiplicity information from spontaneous fission sources using a single panel consisting of 60 straws equally distributed over three rows in high-density polyethylenemoderator. In the following year, we developed the field-programmable gate array and associated DAQ software. This SDRD effort successfully produced a prototype NMC with*33% detection efficiency compared to a commercial fission meter.

  7. Neutron multiplicity ,easurements With 3He alternative: Straw neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wolff, Ronald S.; Meade, John A.; Detweiler, Ryan; Maurer, Richard J.; Mitchell, Stephen E.; Guss, Paul P.; Lacy, Jeffrey L.; Sun, Liang; Athanasiades, Athanasios

    2015-01-27

    , and developed a data acquisition (DAQ) system to collect neutron multiplicity information from spontaneous fission sources using a single panel consisting of 60 straws equally distributed over three rows in high-density polyethylene moderator. In the following year, we developed the field-programmable gate array and associated DAQ software. Finally, this SDRD effort successfully produced a prototype NMC with ~33% detection efficiency compared to a commercial fission meter.

  8. Neutron sources and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.L.; Rush, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

  9. Neutron Imaging and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Ian S; McGreevy, Robert L; Bilheux, Hassina Z

    2009-04-01

    Neutron Imaging and Applications offers an introduction to the basics of neutron beam production and instrumentation in addition to the wide scope of techniques that provide unique imaging capabilities over a broad and diverse range of applications. An instructional overview of neutron sources, optics and detectors, allows readers to delve more deeply into the discussions of radiography, tomography, phase contrast imaging and prospective applications using advanced neutron holography techniques and polarized beams. A section devoted to overviews in a growing range of applications describes imaging of fuel cells and hydrogen storage devices for a robust hydrogen economy; new directions in material science and engineering; the investigation of precious artifacts of cultural heritage importance; determination of plant physiology and growth processes; imaging of biological tissues and macromolecules, and the practical elements of neutron imaging for homeland security and contraband detection. Written by key experts in the field, researchers and engineers involved with imaging technologies will find Neutron Imaging and Applications a valuable reference.

  10. Neutron Emission Spectra from Inelastic Scattering on 58,60Ni with a White Neutron Source at FIGARO.

    SciTech Connect

    Rochman, D.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Devlin, M. J.; Ethvignot, T.; Granier, T.; Grimes, S. M.

    2005-01-01

    Neutron emission spectra from inelastic neutron scattering on natural nickel at the FIGARO facility have been measured by a double time-of-flight technique. The incident neutrons are produced from the spallation source of the Weapons Neutron Research facility, and their energies are determined by time of flight. The emitted neutrons and gamma rays are detected by 16 liquid scintillators and one high-resolution germanium or one barium-fluoride detector, respectively. The results for incident neutron energies from 2 to 10 MeV are compared with predictions of nuclear model calculations performed with the code EMPIRE-II. Finally, the level density parameters 'a' and '{Delta}E' are extracted.

  11. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Nuclear Science Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald Owen; Wender, Steve

    2015-06-19

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facilities for Nuclear Science consist of a high-energy "white" neutron source (Target 4) with 6 flight paths, three low-energy nuclear science flight paths at the Lujan Center, and a proton reaction area. The neutron beams produced at the Target 4 complement those produced at the Lujan Center because they are of much higher energy and have shorter pulse widths. The neutron sources are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam of the LANSCE linear accelerator. With these facilities, LANSCE is able to deliver neutrons with energies ranging from a milli-electron volt to several hundreds of MeV, as well as proton beams with a wide range of energy, time and intensity characteristics. The facilities, instruments and research programs are described briefly.

  12. Broad energy range neutron spectroscopy using a liquid scintillator and a proportional counter: Application to a neutron spectrum similar to that from an improvised nuclear device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A.; Garty, Guy; Harken, Andrew; Brenner, David J.

    2015-09-01

    A novel neutron irradiation facility at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been developed to mimic the neutron radiation from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) at relevant distances (e.g. 1.5 km) from the epicenter. The neutron spectrum of this IND-like neutron irradiator was designed according to estimations of the Hiroshima neutron spectrum at 1.5 km. It is significantly different from a standard reactor fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and it is dominated by neutron energies from 100 keV up to 9 MeV. To verify such wide energy range neutron spectrum, detailed here is the development of a combined spectroscopy system. Both a liquid scintillator detector and a gas proportional counter were used for the recoil spectra measurements, with the individual response functions estimated from a series of Monte Carlo simulations. These normalized individual response functions were formed into a single response matrix for the unfolding process. Several accelerator-based quasi-monoenergetic neutron source spectra were measured and unfolded to test this spectroscopy system. These reference neutrons were produced from two reactions: T(p,n)3He and D(d,n)3He, generating neutron energies in the range between 0.2 and 8 MeV. The unfolded quasi-monoenergetic neutron spectra indicated that the detection system can provide good neutron spectroscopy results in this energy range. A broad-energy neutron spectrum from the 9Be(d,n) reaction using a 5 MeV deuteron beam, measured at 60 degrees to the incident beam was measured and unfolded with the evaluated response matrix. The unfolded broad neutron spectrum is comparable with published time-of-flight results. Finally, the pair of detectors were used to measure the neutron spectrum generated at the RARAF IND-like neutron facility and a comparison is made to the neutron spectrum of Hiroshima.

  13. Plasma physics of accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Pranab; Lamb, Frederick K.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma concepts and phenomena that are needed to understand X- and gamma-ray sources are discussed. The capture of material from the wind or from the atmosphere or envelope of a binary companion star is described and the resulting types of accretion flows discussed. The reasons for the formation of a magnetosphere around the neutron star are explained. The qualitative features of the magnetospheres of accreting neutron stars are then described and compared with the qualitative features of the geomagnetosphere. The conditions for stable flow and for angular and linear momentum conservation are explained in the context of accretion by magnetic neutron stars and applied to obtain rough estimates of the scale of the magnetosphere. Accretion from Keplerian disks is then considered in some detail. The radial structure of geometrically thin disk flows, the interaction of disk flows with the neutron star magnetosphere, and models of steady accretion from Keplerian disks are described. Accretion torques and the resulting changes in the spin frequencies of rotating neutron stars are considered. The predicted behavior is then compared with observations of accretion-powered pulsars. Magnetospheric processes that may accelerate particles to very high energies, producing GeV and, perhaps, TeV gamma-rays are discussed. Finally, the mechanisms that decelerate and eventually stop accreting plasma at the surfaces of strongly magnetic neutron stars are described.

  14. Used Fuel Cask Identification through Neutron Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Eric Benton

    2015-11-20

    Currently, most spent fuel is stored near reactors. An interim consolidated fuel storage facility would receive fuel from multiple sites and store it in casks on site for decades. For successful operation of such a facility there is need for a way to restore continuity of knowledge if lost as well as a method that will indicate state of fuel inside the cask. Used nuclear fuel is identifiable by its radiation emission, both gamma and neutron. Neutron emission from fission products, multiplication from remaining fissile material, and the unique distribution of both in each cask produce a unique neutron signature. If two signatures taken at different times do not match, either changes within the fuel content or misidentification of a cask occurred. It was found that identification of cask loadings works well through the profile of emitted neutrons in simulated real casks. Even casks with similar overall neutron emission or average counts around the circumference can be distinguished from each other by analyzing the profile. In conclusion, (1) identification of unaltered casks through neutron signature profile is viable; (2) collecting the profile provides insight to the condition and intactness of the fuel stored inside the cask; and (3) the signature profile is stable over time.

  15. Formation sigma measurement from thermal neutron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Albats, P.; Hertzog, R.C.; Mahdavi, M.

    1993-08-10

    In a logging system including a sonde for traversing a borehole at a controlled speed between spaced apart elevations in an earth formation, means carried by the sonde for irradiating the formation and generating detector signals indicative of the response of the borehole environment in and around the sonde to the radiation, and data processing means for computing at least one characteristic of the borehole environment from the detector signals, said at least one characteristic including the macroscopic thermal absorption cross section of the formation (formation sigma), the logging method is described using said sonde comprising the steps of: (a) irradiating the formation with a pulsed source of high energy neutrons as the sonde traverses the borehole, whereby the neutrons generated at each pulse interact with the borehole environment to produce a neutron population having a space, time and energy distribution including epithermal and thermal energies; (b) with a detector that has an azimuthally limited angle of receptivity, detecting the time-dependent population of thermal neutrons at an eccentric position in the borehole during a period of time between successive source pulses and generating a thermal neutron detector signal commensurate with said time-dependent population; and (c) from the thermal neutron detector signal, computing the value of formation sigma at the elevation of said eccentric position.

  16. A Comparison of Neutron Beams for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, Thomas E.; Woollard, Jeffrey E.

    2001-06-17

    The potential of the Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR) with a fission converter plate (FCP) for clinical boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is evaluated. The evaluation used design methods that were developed for the analysis of the OSU design of an accelerator-based neutron source (ABNS) for BNCT. The paper compares an FCP epithermal neutron beam, which is based on the OSURR, with the ABNS. Neutron and gamma-ray absorbed dose rates and the boron-10 specific absorbed dose rate were calculated. A major goal of the analysis was to determine if a 500-kW reactor with an FCP can produce a neutron field with sufficient intensity to allow a patient to be treated in an acceptable treatment time with adequate beam quality. The answer obtained was positive, provided that the patient is treated with at least four fractions. Although the quality of the neutron field for the FCP is slightly inferior to that of the ABNS, it was judged to be acceptable.

  17. Neutron radiation measurements on several international flights.

    PubMed

    Poje, Marina; Vuković, Branko; Radolić, Vanja; Miklavčić, Igor; Planinić, Josip

    2015-03-01

    The earth is continually exposed to cosmic radiation of both solar and galactic origin. High-energy particles interact with the constituents in the atmosphere producing secondary particles that create radiation fields at aircraft altitudes. These secondary particles consist mainly of photons, protons, neutrons, charged and uncharged pions, and muons. The neutron component dominates the hadron cascade at lower altitudes as a result of its longer mean free path. Since air transportation has become more available to a greater number of people, this has led to an increase in the number of persons exposed to ionizing radiation of cosmic origin. This concerns pilots and cabin crews as well as frequent flyers. A neutron component of cosmic radiation was measured using an LR 115/CR-39 track detector associated with a 10B converter foil. The measurement of the neutron dose is a good approximation of the total dose since neutrons carry about 50% of the total ambient dose equivalent at aircraft altitudes. Also, the results of the measurements were compared with the data obtained by EPCARD software simulation. The measured neutron dose rate had a span from 0.36 to 8.83 μSv h(-1) (dose enhancement due to high solar activity in the flight period). PMID:25627946

  18. Neutron measurements onboard the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Keith, J. E.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    2001-01-01

    The radiation environment inside a shielded volume is highly complex, consisting of both charged and neutral particles. Since the inception of human space flights, the charged particle component has received virtually all of the attention. There is however, a significant production of secondary neutrons, particularly from the aluminum structure in low earth orbiting spacecrafts. The interactions of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), and solar energetic particles with the earth's atmosphere produce a non-isotropic distribution of albedo neutrons. Inside any reasonable habitable module, the average radiation quality factor of neutrons is about 4-5 times larger than the corresponding average quality factor of charged particles. The measurement of neutrons and their energy spectra is a difficult problem due the intense sources of charged particles. This paper reviews the results of Shuttle flight experiments (made during both solar maximum and solar minimum) to measure the contribution of neutrons to the dose equivalent, as well as theoretical calculations to estimate the appropriate range of neutron energies that contribute most to the dose equivalent. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  19. Neutron measurements onboard the space shuttle.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Keith, J E; Cleghorn, T F

    2001-06-01

    The radiation environment inside a shielded volume is highly complex, consisting of both charged and neutral particles. Since the inception of human space flights, the charged particle component has received virtually all of the attention. There is however, a significant production of secondary neutrons, particularly from the aluminum structure in low earth orbiting spacecrafts. The interactions of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), and solar energetic particles with the earth's atmosphere produce a non-isotropic distribution of albedo neutrons. Inside any reasonable habitable module, the average radiation quality factor of neutrons is about 4-5 times larger than the corresponding average quality factor of charged particles. The measurement of neutrons and their energy spectra is a difficult problem due the intense sources of charged particles. This paper reviews the results of Shuttle flight experiments (made during both solar maximum and solar minimum) to measure the contribution of neutrons to the dose equivalent, as well as theoretical calculations to estimate the appropriate range of neutron energies that contribute most to the dose equivalent. PMID:11852943

  20. Neutron environments on the Martian surface.

    PubMed

    Clowdsley, M S; Wilson, J W; Kim, M H; Singleterry, R C; Tripathi, R K; Heinbockel, J H; Badavi, F F; Shinn, J L

    2001-01-01

    Radiation is a primary concern in the planning of a manned mission to Mars. Recent studies using NASA Langley Research Center's HZETRN space radiation transport code show that the low energy neutron fluence on the Martian surface is larger than previously expected. The upper atmosphere of Mars is exposed to a background radiation field made up of a large number of protons during a solar particle event and mixture of light and heavy ions caused by galactic cosmic rays at other times. In either case, these charged ions interact with the carbon and oxygen atoms of the Martian atmosphere through ionization and nuclear collisions producing secondary ions and neutrons which then interact with the atmospheric atoms in a similar manner. In the past, only these downward moving particles have been counted in evaluating the neutron energy spectrum on the surface. Recent enhancements in the HZETRN code allow for the additional evaluation of those neutrons created within the Martian regolith through the same types of nuclear reactions, which rise to the surface. New calculations using this improved HZETRN code show that these upward moving neutrons contribute significantly to the overall neutron spectrum for energies less than 10 MeV. PMID:11770546

  1. Fast Neutron Irradiation of the Highly Radioresistant Bacterium Deinococcus Radiodurans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Diane Louise

    Fast neutron dose survival curves were generated for the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, which is renowned for its unusually high resistance to gamma, x-ray, and ultraviolet radiation, but for which fast neutron response was unknown. The fast neutrons were produced by the University of Massachusetts Lowell 5.5-MV, type CN Van de Graaff accelerator through the ^7Li(p,n)^7 Be reaction by bombarding a thick metallic lithium target with a 4-MeV proton beam. The bacteria were uniformly distributed on 150-mm agar plates and were exposed to the fast neutron beam under conditions of charged particle equilibrium. The plates were subdivided into concentric rings of increasing diameter from the center to the periphery of the plate, within which the average neutron dose was calculated as the product of the precisely known neutron fluence at the average radius of the ring and the neutron energy dependent kerma factor. The neutron fluence and dose ranged from approximately 3 times 1013 n cm^ {-2} to 1 times 1012 n cm^ {-2}, and 200 kilorad to 5 kilorad, respectively, from the center to the periphery of the plate. Percent survival for Deinococcus radiodurans as a function of fast neutron dose was derived from the ability of the irradiated cells to produce visible colonies within each ring compared to that of a nonirradiated control population. The bacterium Escherichia coli B/r (CSH) was irradiated under identical conditions for comparative purposes. The survival response of Deinococcus radiodurans as a result of cumulative fast neutron exposures was also investigated. The quantification of the ability of Deinococcus radiodurans to survive cellular insult from secondary charged particles, which are produced by fast neutron interactions in biological materials, will provide valuable information about damage and repair mechanisms under extreme cellular stress, and may provide new insight into the origin of this bacterium's unprecedented radiation resistance.

  2. Development of a new deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutron generator for prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergaoui, K; Reguigui, N; Gary, C K; Brown, C; Cremer, J T; Vainionpaa, J H; Piestrup, M A

    2014-12-01

    A new deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutron generator has been developed by Adelphi Technology for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), neutron activation analysis (NAA), and fast neutron radiography. The generator makes an excellent fast, intermediate, and thermal neutron source for laboratories and industrial applications that require the safe production of neutrons, a small footprint, low cost, and small regulatory burden. The generator has three major components: a Radio Frequency Induction Ion Source, a Secondary Electron Shroud, and a Diode Accelerator Structure and Target. Monoenergetic neutrons (2.5MeV) are produced with a yield of 10(10)n/s using 25-50mA of deuterium ion beam current and 125kV of acceleration voltage. The present study characterizes the performance of the neutron generator with respect to neutron yield, neutron production efficiency, and the ionic current as a function of the acceleration voltage at various RF powers. In addition the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport (MCNP) simulation code was used to optimize the setup with respect to thermal flux and radiation protection. PMID:25305524

  3. ATR neutron spectral characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W.; Anderl, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INEL provides intense neutron fields for irradiation-effects testing of reactor material samples, for production of radionuclides used in industrial and medical applications, and for scientific research. Characterization of the neutron environments in the irradiation locations of the ATR has been done by means of neutronics calculations and by means of neutron dosimetry based on the use of neutron activation monitors that are placed in the various irradiation locations. The primary purpose of this report is to present the results of an extensive characterization of several ATR irradiation locations based on neutron dosimetry measurements and on least-squares-adjustment analyses that utilize both neutron dosimetry measurements and neutronics calculations. This report builds upon the previous publications, especially the reference 4 paper. Section 2 provides a brief description of the ATR and it tabulates neutron spectral information for typical irradiation locations, as derived from the more historical neutron dosimetry measurements. Relevant details that pertain to the multigroup neutron spectral characterization are covered in section 3. This discussion includes a presentation on the dosimeter irradiation and analyses and a development of the least-squares adjustment methodology, along with a summary of the results of these analyses. Spectrum-averaged cross sections for neutron monitoring and for displacement-damage prediction in Fe, Cr, and Ni are given in section 4. In addition, section4 includes estimates of damage generation rates for these materials in selected ATR irradiation locations. In section 5, the authors present a brief discussion of the most significant conclusions of this work and comment on its relevance to the present ATR core configuration. Finally, detailed numerical and graphical results for the spectrum-characterization analyses in each irradiation location are provided in the Appendix.

  4. The Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new user experimental facility planned to be operational at Oak Ridge in the late 1990's. The centerpiece of the ANS will be a steady-state research reactor of unprecedented thermal neutron flux ({phi}{sub th} {approx} 9{center dot}10{sup 19} m{sup -2}{center dot}s{sup -1}) accompanied by extensive and comprehensive equipment and facilities for neutron-based research. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Neutron irradiation of Am-241 effectively produces curium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. W.; Milstead, J.; Stewart, D. C.

    1967-01-01

    Computer study was made on the production of multicurie amounts of highly alpha-active curium 242 from americium 241 irradiation. The information available includes curium 242 yields, curium composition, irradiation data, and production techniques and safeguards.

  6. Introduction to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.

    2015-02-24

    Neutron stars contain the densest form of matter in the present universe. General relativity and causality set important constraints to their compactness. In addition, analytic GR solutions are useful in understanding the relationships that exist among the maximum mass, radii, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers of neutron stars, all of which are accessible to observation. Some of these relations are independent of the underlying dense matter equation of state, while others are very sensitive to the equation of state. Recent observations of neutron stars from pulsar timing, quiescent X-ray emission from binaries, and Type I X-ray bursts can set important constraints on the structure of neutron stars and the underlying equation of state. In addition, measurements of thermal radiation from neutron stars has uncovered the possible existence of neutron and proton superfluidity/superconductivity in the core of a neutron star, as well as offering powerful evidence that typical neutron stars have significant crusts. These observations impose constraints on the existence of strange quark matter stars, and limit the possibility that abundant deconfined quark matter or hyperons exist in the cores of neutron stars.

  7. Neutron detection technique

    SciTech Connect

    Oblath, N.S.; Poon, A.W.P.

    2000-09-14

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has the ability to measure the total flux of all active flavors of neutrinos using the neutral current reaction, whose signature is a neutron. By comparing the rates of the neutral current reaction to the charged current reaction, which only detects electron neutrinos, one can test the neutrino oscillation hypothesis independent of solar models. It is necessary to understand the neutron detection efficiency of the detector to make use of the neutral current reaction. This report demonstrates a coincidence technique to identify neutrons emitted from the {sup 252}Cf neutron calibration source. The source releases on average four neutrons when a {sup 252}Cf nucleus spontaneously fissions. Each neutron is detected as a separate event when the neutron is captured by a deuteron, releasing a gamma ray of approximately 6.25 MeV. This gamma ray is in turn detected by the photomultiplier tube (PMT) array. By investigating the time and spatial separation between neutron-like events, it is possible to obtain a pure sample of neutrons for calibration study. Preliminary results of the technique applied to two calibration runs are presented.

  8. Neutron capture measurements for nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifarth, Rene

    2005-04-01

    Almost all of the heavy elements are produced via neutron capture reactions in a multitude of stellar production sites. The predictive power of the underlying stellar models is currently limited because they contain poorly constrained physics components such as convection, rotation or magnetic fields. Neutron captures measurements on heavy radioactive isotopes provide a unique opportunity to largely improve these physics components, and thereby address important questions of nuclear astrophysics. Such species are branch-points in the otherwise uniquely defined path of subsequent n-captures along the s-process path in the valley of stability. These branch points reveal themselves through unmistakable signatures recovered from pre-solar meteoritic grains that originate in individual element producing stars. Measurements on radioactive isotopes for neutron energies in the keV region represent a stringent challenge for further improvements of experimental techniques. This holds true for the neutron sources, the detection systems and the technology to handle radioactive material. Though the activation method or accelerator mass spectroscopy of the reaction products could be applied in a limited number of cases, Experimental facilities like DANCE at LANL, USA and n-TOF at CERN, Switzerland are addressing the need for such measurements on the basis of the more universal method of detecting the prompt capture gamma-rays, which is required for the application of neutron time-of-flight (TOF) techniques. With a strongly optimized neutron facility at the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) isotopes with half-lives down to tens of days could be investigated, while present facilities require half-lives of a few hundred days. Recent neutron capture experiments on radioactive isotopes with relevance for nuclear astrophysics and possibilities for future experimental setups will be discussed during the talk.

  9. Pillar Structured Thermal Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, R; Conway, A; Reinhardt, C; Graff, R; Wang, T; Deo, N; Cheung, C

    2008-06-10

    This work describes an innovative solid state device structure that leverages advanced semiconductor fabrication technology to produce an efficient device for thermal neutron detection which we have coined the 'Pillar Detector'. State-of-the-art thermal neutron detectors have shortcomings in simultaneously achieving high efficiency, low operating voltage while maintaining adequate fieldability performance. By using a three dimensional silicon PIN diode pillar array filled with isotopic {sup 10}boron ({sup 10}B), a high efficiency device is theoretically possible. Here we review the design considerations for going from a 2-D to 3-D device and discuss the materials trade-offs. The relationship between the geometrical features and efficiency within our 3-D device is investigated by Monte Carlo radiation transport method coupled with finite element drift-diffusion carrier transport simulations. To benchmark our simulations and validate the predicted efficiency scaling, experimental results of a prototype device are illustrated. The fabricated pillar structures reported in this work are composed of 2 {micro}m diameter silicon pillars with a 2 {micro}m spacing and pillar height of 12 {micro}m. The pillar detector with a 12 {micro}m height achieved a thermal neutron detection efficiency of 7.3% at a reverse bias of -2 V.

  10. Review of current neutron detection systems for emergency response

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Guss, Paul; Kruschwitz, Craig

    2014-09-05

    Neutron detectors are utilized in a myriad of applications—from safeguarding special nuclear materials (SNM) to determining lattice spacing in soft materials. The transformational changes taking place in neutron detection and imaging techniques in the last few years are largely being driven by the global shortage of helium-3 (3He). This article reviews the status of neutron sensors used specifically for SNM detection in radiological emergency response. These neutron detectors must be highly efficient, be rugged, have fast electronics to measure neutron multiplicity, and be capable of measuring direction of the neutron sources and possibly image them with high spatial resolution. Neutronmore » detection is an indirect physical process: neutrons react with nuclei in materials to initiate the release of one or more charged particles that produce electric signals that can be processed by the detection system. Therefore, neutron detection requires conversion materials as active elements of the detection system; these materials may include boron-10 (10B), lithium-6 (6Li), and gadollinium-157 (157Gd), to name a few, but the number of materials available for neutron detection is limited. However, in recent years, pulse-shape-discriminating plastic scintillators, scintillators made of helium-4 (4He) under high pressure, pillar and trench semiconductor diodes, and exotic semiconductor neutron detectors made from uranium oxide and other materials have widely expanded the parameter space in neutron detection methodology. In this article we will pay special attention to semiconductor-based neutron sensors. Finally, modern microfabricated nanotubes covered inside with neutron converter materials and with very high aspect ratios for better charge transport will be discussed.« less

  11. Neutron Tube Design Study for Boron Neutron Capture TherapyApplication

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1998-01-04

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  12. Study of neutron focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wehring, B.W.; Uenlue, K.

    1995-03-06

    Funds were received for the first year of a three year DOE Nuclear Engineering Research Grant, ``Study of Neutron Focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source`` (FGO2-92ER75711). The purpose of this three year study was to develop a neutron focusing system to be used with the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) to produce an intense beam of neutrons. A prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) facility was also to be designed, setup, and tested under the three year project. During the first year of the DOE grant, a new procedure was developed and used to design a focusing converging guide consisting of truncated rectangular cone sections. Detailed calculations were performed using a 3-D Monte Carlo code which we wrote to trace neutrons through the curved guide of the TCNS into the proposed converging guide. Using realistic reflectivities for Ni-Ti supermirrors, we obtained gains of 3 to 5 for the neutron flux averaged over an area of 1 {times} 1 cm.

  13. The Frankfurt neutron source FRANZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzubaidi, Suha; Bartz, Ulrich; Basten, Markus; Bechtold, Alexander; Chau, Long Phi; Claessens, Christine; Dinter, Hannes; Droba, Martin; Fix, Christopher; Hähnel, Hendrik; Heilmann, Manuel; Hinrichs, Ole; Huneck, Simon; Klump, Batu; Lotz, Marcel; Mäder, Dominik; Meusel, Oliver; Noll, Daniel; Nowottnick, Tobias; Obermayer, Marcus; Payir, Onur; Petry, Nils; Podlech, Holger; Ratzinger, Ulrich; Schempp, Alwin; Schmidt, Stefan; Schneider, Philipp; Seibel, Anja; Schwarz, Malte; Schweizer, Waldemar; Volk, Klaus; Wagner, Christopher; Wiesner, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    A 2MeV proton beam will produce a quasi-Maxwellian neutron spectrum of around 30 keV by the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction. The experiments are mainly focused on the measurement of differential neutron capture cross sections relevant for the astrophysical s-process in nuclear synthesis. Moreover, proton capture cross sections for the astrophysical p-process can be measured directly with the proton beam. For an efficient time of flight measurement of the neutron energies along the 0.7 m long drift from the Li-target to the sample, 1ns short, intense proton pulses are needed at the target. Additionally, to reach 107 n/cm2/s at the sample, a pulse repetition rate of 250 kHz is intended. After completion and successful running in, FRANZ will become a user facility with internal and external users. The 120 kV injector terminal and the 200mA proton source as well as the low-energy beam transport section and the FRANZ cave have been realized successfully. The 1.9 MV RF accelerator consists of a combined 4-Rod-RFQ/IH-DTL-resonator and is in the RF tuning and power testing phase. The 2 MeV transport and rebuncher section is ready for installation. In a first step FRANZ will offer experimental areas for neutron activation experiments and for proton beam experiments, as mentioned above. From the accelerator physics point of view, FRANZ will be an excellent facility for high current beam investigations and for beam wall interaction studies.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of a fast neutron counter for use in neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkian, Mohsen

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation is employed to evaluate the response of a neutron detection sheet composed of a layer of plexiglas as neutron-to-proton converter and a layer of silver-activated zinc sulphide (ZnS(Ag)) as phosphor. ZnS(Ag) scintillators have the largest light output among the scintillators for fast-neutron spectroscopy. The simulations are performed for 252Cf neutrons which after impinging the converter layer of the detector produce recoil protons. Recoil protons that interact with the scintillator deposit energy which is converted to scintillation light. In this report, different aspects of the ZnS(Ag)-detector, such as the effective converter and scintillator thickness, as well as the detector response are investigated.

  15. Neutron Reactions in Accreting Neutron Stars: A New Pathway to Efficient Crust Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sanjib S.; Kawano, Toshihiko; Moeller, Peter

    2008-12-05

    In our calculation of neutron star crust heating we include several key new model features. In earlier work electron capture (EC) only allowed neutron emission from the daughter ground state; here we calculate, in a deformed quasi-random-phase approximation (QRPA) model, EC decay rates to all states in the daughter that are allowed by Gamow-Teller selection rules and energetics. The subsequent branching ratios between the 1n,...,xn channels and the competing {gamma} decay are calculated in a Hauser-Feshbach model. In our multicomponent plasma model a single (EC, xn) reaction step can produce several neutron-deficient nuclei, each of which can further decay by (EC, xn). Hence, the neutron emission occurs more continuously with increasing depth as compared to that in a one-component plasma model.

  16. Neutron energy spectrum characterization on TMR-1 at the Indiana University neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halstead, Matthew R.; Lee, Sangjin; Petrosky, James; Bickley, Abigail; Sokol, Paul

    The energy spectrum of the Neutron Radiation Effects Program (NREP) beam line, Target-Moderator-Reflector-1 (TMR-1), at Indiana University has not been previously characterized. The facility has a unique proton source with variable pulse length (15-600 ms) and energy (13 MeV). Thus, it can produce a unique and tailored neutron beam when incident on a beryllium target. Through a combination of MCNP-X particle simulations, neutron activation experiments, and application of a spectrum unfolding code (SAND-II), the neutron source is characterized. Eight activation foils and wires were irradiated in the target area and the gamma activity measured. This information was used in an unfolding code, SAND-II, to deconvolve the spectrum, using the MCNP simulations as a basis for the spectral fitting.

  17. Simulation of response functions of fast neutron sensors and development of thin neutron silicon sensor.

    PubMed

    Takada, Masashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsuda, Mikihiko; Nunomiya, Tomoya

    2014-10-01

    On radiation detection using silicon sensor, signals are produced from collected charges in a depletion layer; however, for high-energy particles, this depletion layer is extended due to funnelling phenomenon. The lengths of charge collection were experimentally obtained from proton peak energies in measured pulse-heights. The length is extended with increasing proton energy of up to 6 MeV, and then, is constant over 6 MeV. The response functions of fast neutron sensors were simulated for 5- and 15-MeV monoenergetic and (252)Cf neutron sources using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code. The simulation results agree well with the experimental ones, including the effect of funnelling phenomenon. In addition, a thin silicon sensor was developed for a new real-time personal neutron dosemeter. Photon sensitivity is vanishingly smaller than neutron one by a factor of 5×10(-4). PMID:24516186

  18. Neutron sources and neutron-capture paths in asymptotic giant branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maria, Lugaro

    2016-04-01

    Roughly half of the abundances of the elements heavier than iron in the cosmos are produced by slow neutron captures (the s process) in hydrostatic conditions when the neutron density is below roughly 1013 n/cm-3. While it is observationally well confirmed that asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are the main site of the s process, we are still facing many problems in the theoretical models and nuclear inputs. Major current issues are the effect of stellar rotation and magnetic fields and the determination of the rate of the neutron source reactions. I will present these problems and discuss the observational constraints that can help us to solve them, including spectroscopically derived abundances, meteoritic stardust, and stellar seismology. Further, I will present evidence that the s process is not the only neutron-capture process to occur in AGB stars: an intermediate process is also required to explain recent observations of post-AGB stars.

  19. Neutron dosimetric measurements in shuttle and MIR.

    PubMed

    Reitz, G

    2001-06-01

    Detector packages consisting of thermoluminescence detectors (TLD), nuclear emulsions and plastic track detectors were exposed at identical positions inside MIR space station and on shuttle flights inside Spacelab and Spacehab during different phases of the solar cycle. The objectives of the investigations are to provide data on charge and energy spectra of heavy ions, and the contribution of events with low-energy deposit (protons, electrons, gamma, etc.) to the dose, as well as the contribution of secondaries, such as nuclear disintegration stars and neutrons. For neutron dosimetry 6LiF (TLD600) and 7LiF (TLD700) chips were used both of which have almost the same response to gamma rays but different response to neutrons. Neutrons in space are produced mainly in evaporation and knock-on processes with energies mainly of 1-10 MeV and up to several 100 MeV, respectively. The energy spectrum undergoes continuous changes toward greater depth in the attenuating material until an equilibrium is reached. In equilibrium, the spectrum is a wide continuum extending down to thermal energies to which the 6LiF is sensitive. Based on the difference of absorbed doses in the 6LiF and 7LiF chips, thermal neutron fluxes from 1 to 2.3 cm-2 s-1 are calculated using the assumption that the maximum induced dose in TLD600 for 1 neutron cm-2 is 1.6 x 10(-10) Gy (Horowitz and Freeman, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 157 (1978) 393). It is assumed that the flux of high-energy neutrons is at least of that quantity. Tissue doses were calculated taking as a mean ambient absorbed dose per neutron 6 x10(-12) Gy cm2 (for a10 MeV neutron). The neutron equivalent doses for the above-mentioned fluxes are 52 micro Gy d-1 and 120 micro Gy d-1. In recent experiments, a personal neutron dosimeter was integrated into the dosimeter packages. First results of this dosimeter which is based on nuclear track detectors with converter foils are reported. For future measurements, a scintillator counter with

  20. APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING AND MANIPULATING PLASMAS

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.; Ferguson, J.P.; Furth, H.P.; Wright, R.E.

    1960-07-26

    An electrical pinch discharge apparatus is described for producing and manipulating high-temperature plasmas. The apparatus may be of either the linear or toroidal pinch discharge type. Arrangements are provided whereby stabilizing fields may be trapped in the plasma external to the main pinch discharge path and the boundary condition of the stabilizing field programed so as to stabilize the discharge or to promote instabilities in the discharge as desired. The produced plasmas may be employed for various purposes, and fusion neutrons have been produced with the apparatus.

  1. Development of beryllium-based neutron target system with three-layer structure for accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Hiroaki; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yoshioka, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugano, Tomei; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The iBNCT project team with University of Tsukuba is developing an accelerator-based neutron source. Regarding neutron target material, our project has applied beryllium. To deal with large heat load and blistering of the target system, we developed a three-layer structure for the target system that includes a blistering mitigation material between the beryllium used as the neutron generator and the copper heat sink. The three materials were bonded through diffusion bonding using a hot isostatic pressing method. Based on several verifications, our project chose palladium as the intermediate layer. A prototype of the neutron target system was produced. We will verify that sufficient neutrons for BNCT treatment are generated by the device in the near future. PMID:26260448

  2. Neutron radiographic viewing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leysath, W.; Brown, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Neutron radiographic viewing system consisting of camera head and control processor is developed for use in nondestructive testing applications. Camera head consists of neutron-sensitive image intensifier system, power supply, and SEC vidicon camera head. Both systems, with their optics, are housed on test mount.

  3. Neutron star models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Bowers, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The current state of neutron star structure calculations is reviewed. Uncertainties in the equation of state for matter at and above nuclear density remain. The role of the delta resonance, pion condensates, and quark matter is reviewed. It is found that recent models yield stable neutron star masses which are consistent with observational estimates.

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Untermyer, S.; Hutter, E.

    1959-08-01

    This patent relates to "shadow" control of a nuclear reactor. The control means comprises a plurality ot elongated rods disposed adjacent and parallel to each other, The morphology and effects of gases generated within sections of neutron absorbing materials and equal length sections of neutron permeable materials together with means for longitudinally pcsitioning the rcds relative to each other.

  5. Neutron-neutron quasifree scattering in nd breakup at 10 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, R. C.; Crowe, B.; Crowell, A. S.; Cumberbatch, L. C.; Esterline, J. H.; Fallin, B. A.; Friesen, F. Q. L.; Han, Z.; Howell, C. R.; Markoff, D.; Ticehurst, D.; Tornow, W.; Witała, H.

    2016-03-01

    The neutron-deuteron (nd) breakup reaction provides a rich environment for testing theoretical models of the neutron-neutron (nn) interaction. Current theoretical predictions based on rigorous ab-initio calculations agree well with most experimental data for this system, but there remain a few notable discrepancies. The cross section for nn quasifree (QFS) scattering is one such anomaly. Two recent experiments reported cross sections for this particular nd breakup configuration that exceed theoretical calculations by almost 20% at incident neutron energies of 26 and 25 MeV [1, 2]. The theoretical values can be brought into agreement with these results by increasing the strength of the 1S0 nn potential matrix element by roughly 10%. However, this modification of the nn effective range parameter and/or the 1S0 scattering length causes substantial charge-symmetry breaking in the nucleon-nucleon force and suggests the possibility of a weakly bound di-neutron state [3]. We are conducting new measurements of the cross section for nn QFS in nd breakup. The measurements are performed at incident neutron beam energies below 20 MeV. The neutron beam is produced via the 2H(d, n)3He reaction. The target is a deuterated plastic cylinder. Our measurements utilize time-of-flight techniques with a pulsed neutron beam and detection of the two emitted neutrons in coincidence. A description of our initial measurements at 10 MeV for a single scattering angle will be presented along with preliminary results. Also, plans for measurements at other energies with broad angular coverage will be discussed.

  6. Neutron scattering effects on fusion ion temperature measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Lee; Starner, Jason R.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Franklin, James Kenneth; Casey, Daniel T.

    2006-06-01

    To support the nuclear fusion program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), a consistent and verifiable method to determine fusion ion temperatures needs to be developed. Since the fusion temperature directly affects the width in the spread of neutron energies produced, a measurement of the neutron energy width can yield the fusion temperature. Traditionally, the spread in neutron energies is measured by using time-of-flight to convert a spread in neutron energies at the source to a spread in time at detector. One potential obstacle to using this technique at the Z facility at SNL is the need to shield the neutron detectors from the intense bremsstrahlung produced. The shielding consists of eight inches of lead and the concern is that neutrons will scatter in the lead, artificially broaden the neutron pulse width and lead to an erroneous measurement. To address this issue, experiments were performed at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics, which demonstrated that a reliable ion temperature measurement can be achieved behind eight inches of lead shielding. To further expand upon this finding, Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) was used to simulate the experimental geometric conditions and perform the neutron transport. MCNPX was able to confidently estimate results observed at the University of Rochester.

  7. Neutrons against cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovbnya, A. N.; Kuplennikov, E. L.; Kandybey, S. S.; Krasiljnikov, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    The review is devoted to the analysis and generalization of the research carried out during recent years in industrially advanced countries on the use of fast, epithermal, and thermal neutrons for therapy of malignant tumors. Basic facilities for neutron production used for cancer treatment are presented. Optimal parameters of therapeutic beams are described. Techniques using neutrons of different energy regions are discussed. Results and medical treatment efficiency are given. Comparison of the current state of neutron therapy of tumors and alternative treatments with beams of protons and carbon ions has been conducted. Main attention is given to the possibility of the practical use of accumulated experience of application of neutron beams for cancer therapy.

  8. NEUTRON SHIELDING STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Mattingly, J.T.

    1962-09-25

    A lightweight neutron shielding structure comprises a honeycomb core which is filled with a neutron absorbing powder. The honeycomb core is faced with parallel planar facing sheets to form a lightweight rigid unit. Suitable absorber powders are selected from among the following: B, B/sub 4/C, B/sub 2/O/ sub 3/, CaB/sub 6/, Li/sub 2/CO3, LiOH, LiBO/sub 2/, Li/s ub 2/O. The facing sheets are constructed of a neutron moderating material, so that fast neutrons will be moderated while traversing the facing sheets, and ultimately be absorbed by the absorber powder in the honeycomb. Beryllium is a preferred moderator material for use in the facing sheets. The advantage of the structure is that it combines the rigidity and light weight of a honeycomb construction with the neutron absorption properties of boron and lithium. (AEC)

  9. Precision Neutron Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Monisha; Barron-Palos, L.; Bowman, J. D.; Chupp, T. E.; Crawford, C.; Danagoulian, A.; Klein, A.; Penttila, S. I.; Salas-Bacci, A. F.; Wilburn, W. S.

    2008-04-01

    Proposed PANDA and abBA experiments aim to measure the correlation coefficients in the polarized neutron beta decay at the SNS. The goal of these experiments is 0.1% measurement which will require neutron polarimetry at 0.1% level. The FnPB neutron beam will be polarized either using a ^3He spin filter or a supermirror polarizer and the neutron polarization will be measured using a ^3He spin filter. Experiment to establish the accuracy to which neutron polarization can be determined using ^3He spin fliters was performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in Summer 2007 and the analysis is in progress. The details of the experiment and the results will be presented.

  10. Pocked surface neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas; Klann, Raymond

    2003-04-08

    The detection efficiency, or sensitivity, of a neutron detector material such as of Si, SiC, amorphous Si, GaAs, or diamond is substantially increased by forming one or more cavities, or holes, in its surface. A neutron reactive material such as of elemental, or any compound of, .sup.10 B, .sup.6 Li, .sup.6 LiF, U, or Gd is deposited on the surface of the detector material so as to be disposed within the cavities therein. The portions of the neutron reactive material extending into the detector material substantially increase the probability of an energetic neutron reaction product in the form of a charged particle being directed into and detected by the neutron detector material.

  11. Neutron stars - General review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.; Canuto, V.

    1974-01-01

    A review is presented of those properties of neutron stars upon which there is general agreement and of those areas which currently remain in doubt. Developments in theoretical physics of neutron star interiors are summarized with particular attention devoted to hyperon interactions and the structure of interior layers. Determination of energy states and the composition of matter is described for successive layers, beginning with the surface and proceeding through the central region into the core. Problems encountered in determining the behavior of matter in the ultra-high density regime are discussed, and the effects of the magnetic field of a neutron star are evaluated along with the behavior of atomic structures in the field. The evolution of a neutron star is outlined with discussion centering on carbon detonation, cooling, vibrational damping, rotation, and pulsar glitches. The role of neutron stars in cosmic-ray propagation is considered.

  12. The Neutron Structure Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Roy

    2013-10-01

    Knowledge of the neutron structure function is important for testing models of the nucleon, for a complete understanding of deep inelastic scattering (DIS) from nuclei, and for high energy experiments. As there exist no free neutron targets, neutron structure functions have been determined from deep inelastic scattering from the deuteron. Unfortunately, the short-range part of the deuteron wave function becomes important in extracting the neutron structure function at very high Bjorken x. New methods have been devised for Jefferson Lab experiments to mitigate this problem. The BONUS experiment involves tagging spectator neutrons in the deuteron, while the MARATHON experiment minimizes nuclear structure effects by a comparison of DIS from 3H and 3He. A summary of the status and future plans will be presented. This work supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  13. The fission track detector revisited: application to individual neutron dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Prêtre, S; Aroua, A; Boschung, M; Grecescu, M; Valley, J F; Wernli, C

    1996-08-01

    A system based on fission fragment tracks had previously been developed for individual neutron dosimetry. The dosimeter detects both fast neutrons by means of the 232Th(n,f) reaction, and thermal and albedo neutrons by means of the 235U(n,f) reaction. The fission tracks produced in a plastic foil are chemically etched and counted by spark discharges. The response of the dosimeter has recently been re-investigated in 36 different neutron fields: monoenergetic beams, reference fields near isotopic sources, and radiation fields encountered in a variety of situations inside nuclear power plants. The results obtained have been compared to those computed by convolution of the neutron spectra with the energy response functions of the dosimeters. In practical situations, it is essential to know the shape of the neutron spectrum, approximately at least, in order to perform an acceptably accurate dose evaluation. For that purpose, the neutron fields encountered inside nuclear power plants have been grouped into four categories, for which algorithms for dose evaluation have been developed. Concerning the neutron equivalent dose, the error associated with this approach does not exceed a factor of 2, a performance which is comparable to other detection systems used in the field of individual neutron dosimetry. PMID:8690594

  14. High-Energy Neutron Spectra and Flux Measurements Below Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, Caleb; Bernstein, Adam; Marleau, Peter; Vetter, Kai

    2016-03-01

    High-energy neutrons are a ubiquitous and often poorly measured background. Below ground, these neutrons could potentially interfere with antineutrino based reactor monitoring experiments as well as other rare-event neutral particle detectors. We have designed and constructed a transportable fast neutron detection system for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The spectrometer uses a multiplicity technique in order to have a higher effective area than traditional transportable high-energy neutron spectrometers. Transportability ensures a common detector-related systematic bias for future measurements. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. A high-energy neutron may interact in the lead producing many secondary neutrons. The detector records the correlated secondary neutron multiplicity. Over many events, the response can be used to infer the incident neutron energy spectrum and flux. As a validation of the detector response, surface measurements have been performed; results confirm agreement with previous experiments. Below ground measurements have been performed at 3 depths (380, 600, and 1450 m.w.e.); results from these measurements will be presented.

  15. Fusion of time-dependent gamma production spectra from thermal neutron capture and fast neutron inelastic scattering to improve material detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, T.; Elsalim, M.; Strellis, D.; Brown, D.

    2003-06-01

    Neutron-based inspection techniques are unique in their ability to provide material specific signatures, thus offering very high performance and automatic detection of explosives and other contraband. Thermal neutron capture gamma spectroscopy provides excellent sensitivities to hydrogen, nitrogen, chlorine, and other elements, which are characteristic to most explosives, drugs and other contraband that may be smuggled into the country. Fast neutron gamma production (mostly through inelastic scattering) provides good sensitivity to carbon and oxygen. When necessary, these two types of complementary interactions can be combined to yield a more accurate material determination inside small to medium size containers. Standard pulsed 14 MeV electronic neutron generators offer an efficient way to obtain these two types of interactions. Fast (14 MeV) neutrons are produced during the pulse. After the pulse, only the decaying thermal neutron population exists, and thus pure neutron capture gamma-rays are produced. Unfortunately, during the pulse (which is normally much longer than the neutron thermalization time) the fast neutron interactions are highly "contaminated" by the interactions of thermal neutrons within the object and the nearby gamma-ray detectors. This creates high background and spectral interferences in the common medium resolution detectors, such as NaI, BGO, etc. The use of an appropriate shielding, neutron spectrum tailoring, full spectral feature analysis as well as temporal information ("die-away" time) resulted in significant performance enhancements in detection of explosives, drugs and other contraband in difficult geometries.

  16. Designing a new type of neutron detector for neutron and gamma-ray discrimination via GEANT4.

    PubMed

    Shan, Qing; Chu, Shengnan; Ling, Yongsheng; Cai, Pingkun; Jia, Wenbao

    2016-04-01

    Design of a new type of neutron detector, consisting of a fast neutron converter, plastic scintillator, and Cherenkov detector, to discriminate 14-MeV fast neutrons and gamma rays in a pulsed n-γ mixed field and monitor their neutron fluxes is reported in this study. Both neutrons and gamma rays can produce fluorescence in the scintillator when they are incident on the detector. However, only the secondary charged particles of the gamma rays can produce Cherenkov light in the Cherenkov detector. The neutron and gamma-ray fluxes can be calculated by measuring the fluorescence and Cherenkov light. The GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit is used to simulate the whole process occurring in the detector, whose optimum parameters are known. Analysis of the simulation results leads to a calculation method of neutron flux. This method is verified by calculating the neutron fluxes using pulsed n-γ mixed fields with different n/γ ratios, and the results show that the relative errors of all calculations are <5%. PMID:26844541

  17. Thermal Neutron Imaging in an Active Interrogation Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier, Peter E.; Forman, Leon; Norman, Daren R.

    2009-03-10

    We have developed a thermal-neutron coded-aperture imager that reveals the locations of hydrogenous materials from which thermal neutrons are being emitted. This imaging detector can be combined with an accelerator to form an active interrogation system in which fast neutrons are produced in a heavy metal target by means of excitation by high energy photons. The photo-induced neutrons can be either prompt or delayed, depending on whether neutron-emitting fission products are generated. Provided that there are hydrogenous materials close to the target, some of the photo-induced neutrons slow down and emerge from the surface at thermal energies. These neutrons can be used to create images that show the location and shape of the thermalizing materials. Analysis of the temporal response of the neutron flux provides information about delayed neutrons from induced fission if there are fissionable materials in the target. The combination of imaging and time-of-flight discrimination helps to improve the signal-to-background ratio. It is also possible to interrogate the target with neutrons, for example using a D-T generator. In this case, an image can be obtained from hydrogenous material in a target without the presence of heavy metal. In addition, if fissionable material is present in the target, probing with fast neutrons can stimulate delayed neutrons from fission, and the imager can detect and locate the object of interest, using appropriate time gating. Operation of this sensitive detection equipment in the vicinity of an accelerator presents a number of challenges, because the accelerator emits electromagnetic interference as well as stray ionizing radiation, which can mask the signals of interest.

  18. Novel Materials and Devices for Solid-State Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Pfeifer, Kent B.

    2015-11-01

    There is a need in many fields, such as nuclear medicine, non-proliferation, energy exploration, national security, homeland security, nuclear energy, etc, for miniature, thermal neutron detectors. Until recently, thermal neutron detection has required physically large devices to provide sufficient neutron interaction and transduction signal. Miniaturization would allow broader use in the fields just mentioned and open up other applications potentially. Recent research shows promise in creating smaller neutron detectors through the combination of high-neutron-cross-section converter materials and solid-state devices. Yet, till recently it is difficult to measure low neutron fluxes by solidstate means given the need for optimized converter materials (purity, chemical composition and thickness) and a lack of designs capable of efficient transduction of the neutron conversion products (x-rays, electrons, gamma rays). Gadolinium-based semiconductor heterojunctions have detected electrons produced by Gd-neutron reactions but only at high neutron fluxes. One of the main limitations to this type of approach is the use of thin converter layers and the inability to utilize all the conversion products. In this LDRD we have optimized the converter material thickness and chemical composition to improve capture of conversion electrons and have detected thermal neutrons with high fidelity at low flux. We are also examining different semiconductor materials and converter materials to attempt to capture a greater percentage of the conversion electrons, both low and higher energy varieties. We have studied detector size and bias scaling, and cross-sensitivity to xrays and shown that we can detect low fluxes of thermal neutrons in less than 30 minutes with high selectivity by our approach. We are currently studying improvements in performance with direct placement of the Gd converter on the detector. The advancement of sensitive, miniature neutron detectors will have benefits in

  19. Optical polarizing neutron devices designed for pulsed neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, M.; Kurahashi, K.; Endoh, Y.; Itoh, S.

    1997-09-01

    We have designed two polarizing neutron devices for pulsed cold neutrons. The devices have been tested at the pulsed neutron source at the Booster Synchrotron Utilization Facility of the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. These two devices proved to have a practical use for experiments to investigate condensed matter physics using pulsed cold polarized neutrons.

  20. Neutron Decay Array for beta-delayed neutron Decay Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorusso, Giuseppe; Pereira, J.; Hosmer, P.; Kern, L.; Kratz, K.; Montes, F.; Reeder, P.; Santi, P.; Schatz, H.; Schertz, F.; Wör, A.

    The Neutron Emission Ratio Observer (NERO), has been constructed for use at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory to work in conjunction with the NSCL Beta Counting System BCS [1] in order to detect β-delayed neutrons. The design of the detector provides high and flat efficiency for a wide range of neutron energies, as well as a low neutron background.

  1. Current Status and Future Works of Neutron Scattering Laboratory at BATAN in Serpong

    SciTech Connect

    Ikram, A.

    2008-03-17

    Current status of neutron beam instruments using neutrons produced by the Multi Purpose Research Reactor--30MWth (MPR 30, RSG GA Siwabessy) located in Serpong is presented. Description of the reactor as the neutron source is mentioned briefly. There are six neutron beam tubes coming from the beryllium reflector surrounding half of the reactor core providing neutrons in the experimental hall of the reactor (XHR). Four of them are dedicated to R and D in materials science using neutron scattering techniques. Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF), Triple Axis Spectrometer (TAS) and Residual Stress Measurement (RSM) Diffractometer are installed respectively at beam tubes S2, S4 and S6. The largest neutron beam tube (S5) is exploited to accommodate two neutron guide tubes that transfer the neutrons to a neighbouring building called neutron guide hall (NGH). There are three other neutron beam instruments installed in this building, namely Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) Spectrometer (SMARTer), High Resolution SANS (HRSANS) Spectrometer and High Resolution Powder Diffractometer (HRPD). In the XHR, a Four Circle and Texture Diffractometer (FCD/TD) is attached to one of the neutron guide tubes. These seven instruments were installed to utilize the neutrons for materials science research, and recently the RSM diffractometer has shown its capabilities in identifying different amount of stress left due to different treatments of welding in fuel cladding, while the SANS spectrometer is now gaining capabilities in identifying different sizes and shapes of macromolecules in polymers as well as investigations of magnetic samples. In the mean time, non-destructive tests using the NRF is gathering more confidence from some latest real time measurements eventhough there are still some shortcomings in the components and their alignments. Future works including improvement of each facility and its components, even replacement of some parts are necessary and have to be carried out

  2. Current Status and Future Works of Neutron Scattering Laboratory at BATAN in Serpong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikram, A.

    2008-03-01

    Current status of neutron beam instruments using neutrons produced by the Multi Purpose Research Reactor—30MWth (MPR 30, RSG GA Siwabessy) located in Serpong is presented. Description of the reactor as the neutron source is mentioned briefly. There are six neutron beam tubes coming from the beryllium reflector surrounding half of the reactor core providing neutrons in the experimental hall of the reactor (XHR). Four of them are dedicated to R&D in materials science using neutron scattering techniques. Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF), Triple Axis Spectrometer (TAS) and Residual Stress Measurement (RSM) Diffractometer are installed respectively at beam tubes S2, S4 and S6. The largest neutron beam tube (S5) is exploited to accommodate two neutron guide tubes that transfer the neutrons to a neighbouring building called neutron guide hall (NGH). There are three other neutron beam instruments installed in this building, namely Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) Spectrometer (SMARTer), High Resolution SANS (HRSANS) Spectrometer and High Resolution Powder Diffractometer (HRPD). In the XHR, a Four Circle and Texture Diffractometer (FCD/TD) is attached to one of the neutron guide tubes. These seven instruments were installed to utilize the neutrons for materials science research, and recently the RSM diffractometer has shown its capabilities in identifying different amount of stress left due to different treatments of welding in fuel cladding, while the SANS spectrometer is now gaining capabilities in identifying different sizes and shapes of macromolecules in polymers as well as investigations of magnetic samples. In the mean time, non-destructive tests using the NRF is gathering more confidence from some latest real time measurements eventhough there are still some shortcomings in the components and their alignments. Future works including improvement of each facility and its components, even replacement of some parts are necessary and have to be carried out

  3. Thermal neutron scattering in graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qasir, Iyad Ibrahim

    Generation IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concepts, are graphite moderated and gas cooled thermal spectrum reactors. The characteristics of the low energy (E < 1 eV) neutron spectrum in these reactors will be dictated by the process of neutron slowing-down and thermalization in the graphite moderator. The ability to accurately predict this process in these reactors can have significant neutronic and safety implications. In reactor design calculations, thermal neutron scattering cross section libraries are needed for the prediction of the thermal neutron environment in the core. Currently used libraries (ENDF/B-VII) are a product of the 1960s and remain based on many physical approximations. In addition, these libraries show noticeable discrepancies with experimental data. In this work, investigation of thermal neutron scattering in graphite as a function of temperature was performed. The fundamental input for the calculation of thermal neutron scattering cross sections, i.e., the phonon frequency distribution and/or the dispersion relations, was generated using a modern approach that is based on quantum mechanical electronic structure (ab initio) simulations combined with a lattice dynamics direct method supercell approach. The calculations were performed using the VASP and PHONON codes. The VASP calculations used the local density approximation, and the projector augmented-wave pseudopotential. A supercell of 144 atoms was used; and the integration over the Brillouin zone was confined to a 3x3x4 k-mesh generated by the Monkhorst-Pack scheme. A plane-wave basis set with an energy cutoff of 500 eV was applied. The corresponding dispersion relations, heat capacity, and phonon frequency distribution show excellent agreement with experimental data. Despite the use of the above techniques to produce more accurate input data, the examination of the results indicated persistence of the inconsistencies between calculations and measurements at neutron energies

  4. A time-of-flight detector for thermal neutrons from radiotherapy Linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, V.; Bartesaghi, G.; Bolognini, D.; Mascagna, V.; Perboni, C.; Prest, M.; Scazzi, S.; Mozzanica, A.; Cappelletti, P.; Frigerio, M.; Gelosa, S.; Monti, A.; Ostinelli, A.; Giannini, G.; Vallazza, E.

    2007-10-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a therapeutic technique exploiting the release of dose inside the tumour cell after a fission of a 10B nucleus following the capture of a thermal neutron. BNCT could be the treatment for extended tumors (liver, stomach, lung), radio-resistant ones (melanoma) or tumours surrounded by vital organs (brain). The application of BNCT requires a high thermal neutron flux (>5×108 n cm-2 s-1) with the correct energy spectrum (neutron energy <10 keV), two requirements that for the moment are fulfilled only by nuclear reactors. The INFN PhoNeS (Photo Neutron Source) project is trying to produce such a neutron beam with standard radiotherapy Linacs, maximizing with a dedicated photo-neutron converter the neutrons produced by Giant Dipole Resonance by a high energy ( >8 MeV) photon beam. In this framework, we have developed a real-time detector to measure the thermal neutron time-of -flight to compute the flux and the energy spectrum. Given the pulsed nature of Linac beams, the detector is a single neutron counting system made of a scintillator detecting the photon emitted after the neutron capture by the hydrogen nuclei. The scintillator signal is sampled by a dedicated FPGA clock thus obtaining the exact arrival time of the neutron itself. The paper will present the detector and its electronics, the feasibility measurements with a Varian Clinac 1800/2100CD and comparison with a Monte Carlo simulation.

  5. Neutron capture therapy for melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Glass, J.D.; Micca, P.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    The development of boron-containing compounds which localize selectively in tumor may require a tumor-by-tumor type of approach that exploits any metabolic pathways unique to the particular type of tumor. Melanin-producing melanomas actively transport and metabolize aromatic amino acids for use as precursors in the synthesis of the pigment melanin. It has been shown that the boron-containing amino acid analog p-borono-phenylalanine (BPA) is selectively accumulated in melanoma tissue, producing boron concentrations in tumor that are within the range estimated to be necessary for successful boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). We report here the results of therapy experiments carried out at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Approach to magnetic neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Anatoly A. . E-mail: spod@sky.chph.ras.ru; Podoynitsyn, Sergey N.; Filippov, Victor I.; Komissarova, Lubov Kh.; Kuznetsov, Oleg A.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: The method of magnetic neutron capture therapy can be described as a combination of two methods: magnetic localization of drugs using magnetically targeted carriers and neutron capture therapy itself. Methods and Materials: In this work, we produced and tested two types of particles for such therapy. Composite ultradispersed ferro-carbon (Fe-C) and iron-boron (Fe-B) particles were formed from vapors of respective materials. Results: Two-component ultradispersed particles, containing Fe and C, were tested as magnetic adsorbent of L-boronophenylalanine and borax and were shown that borax sorption could be effective for creation of high concentration of boron atoms in the area of tumor. Kinetics of boron release into the physiologic solution demonstrate that ultradispersed Fe-B (10%) could be applied for an effective magnetic neutron capture therapy. Conclusion: Both types of the particles have high magnetization and magnetic homogeneity, allow to form stable magnetic suspensions, and have low toxicity.

  7. An Improved Neutron Transport Algorithm for HZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Walker, Steven A.; Badavi, Francis F.

    2010-01-01

    Long term human presence in space requires the inclusion of radiation constraints in mission planning and the design of shielding materials, structures, and vehicles. In this paper, the numerical error associated with energy discretization in HZETRN is addressed. An inadequate numerical integration scheme in the transport algorithm is shown to produce large errors in the low energy portion of the neutron and light ion fluence spectra. It is further shown that the errors result from the narrow energy domain of the neutron elastic cross section spectral distributions, and that an extremely fine energy grid is required to resolve the problem under the current formulation. Two numerical methods are developed to provide adequate resolution in the energy domain and more accurately resolve the neutron elastic interactions. Convergence testing is completed by running the code for various environments and shielding materials with various energy grids to ensure stability of the newly implemented method.

  8. Neutron Yield Measurements via Aluminum Activation

    SciTech Connect

    1999-12-08

    Neutron activation of aluminum may occur by several neutron capture reactions. Four such reactions are described here: {sup 27}Al + n = {sup 28}Al, {sup 27}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 24}Na, {sup 27}Al(n, 2n){sup 26}Al and {sup 27}Al(n,p){sup 27}Mg. The radioactive nuclei {sup 28}Al, {sup 24}Na, and {sup 27}Mg, which are produced via the {sup 27}Al + n = {sup 28}Al, {sup 27}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 24}Na and {sup 27}Al(n,p){sup 27}Mg neutron reactions, beta decay to excited states of {sup 28}Si, {sup 24}Mg and {sup 27}Al respectively. These excited states then emit gamma rays as the nuclei de-excite to their respective ground states.

  9. Non-Destructive Spent Fuel Characterization with Semi-Conducting Gallium Arsinde Neutron Imaging Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas S. McGregor; Holly K. Gersch; Jeffrey D. Sanders; John C. Lee; Mark D. Hammig; Michael R. Hartman; Yong Hong Yang; Raymond T. Klann; Brian Van Der Elzen; John T. Lindsay; Philip A. Simpson

    2002-01-30

    High resistivity bulk grown GaAs has been used to produce thermal neutron imaging devices for use in neutron radiography and characterizing burnup in spent fuel. The basic scheme utilizes a portable Sb/Be source for monoenergetic (24 keV) neutron radiation source coupled to an Fe filter with a radiation hard B-coated pixellated GaAs detector array as the primary neutron detector. The coated neutron detectors have been tested for efficiency and radiation hardness in order to determine their fitness for the harsh environments imposed by spent fuel. Theoretical and experimental results are presented, showing detector radiation hardness, expected detection efficiency and the spatial resolution from such a scheme. A variety of advanced neutron detector designs have been explored, with experimental results achieving 13% thermal neutron detection efficiency while projecting the possibility of over 30% thermal neutron detection efficiency.

  10. Directional Detection of Fast Neutrons Using a Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, N; Heffner, M; Carosi, G; Carter, D; Foxe, M; Jovanovic, I

    2009-06-03

    maintained. Directional detection of neutrons has been previously considered for applications such as controlled fusion neutron imaging [2], nuclear fuel safety research [3], imaging of solar neutrons and SNM [4], and in nuclear science [5]. The use of scintillating crystals and fibers has been proposed for directional neutron detection [6]. Recently, a neutron scatter camera has been designed, constructed, and tested for imaging of fast neutrons, characteristic for SNM material fission [7]. The neutron scatter camera relies on the measurement of the proton recoil angle and proton energy by time of flight between two segmented solid-state detectors. A single-measurement result from the neutron scatter camera is a ring containing the possible incident neutron direction. Here we describe the development and commissioning of a directional neutron detection system based on a time projection chamber (TPC) detector. The TPC, which has been widely used in particle and nuclear physics research for several decades, provides a convenient means of measuring the full 3D trajectory, specific ionization (i.e particle type) and energy of charged particles. For this application, we observe recoil protons produced by fast neutron scatters on protons in hydrogen or methane gas. Gas pressures of a few ATM provide reasonable neutron interaction/scattering rates.

  11. A theoretical model for the production of Ac-225 for cancer therapy by neutron capture transmutation of Ra-226.

    PubMed

    Melville, G; Melville, P

    2013-02-01

    Radium needles that were once implanted into tumours as a cancer treatment are now obsolete and constitute a radioactive waste problem, as their half-life is 1600 years. We are investigating the reduction of radium by transmutation by bombarding Ra-226 with high-energy neutrons from a neutron source to produce Ra-225 and hence Ac-225, which can be used as a generator to produce Bi-213 for use in 'Targeted Alpha Therapy' for cancer. This paper examines the possibility of producing Ac-225 by neutron capture using a theoretical model in which neutron energy is convoluted with the corresponding neutron cross sections of Ra-226. The total integrated yield can then be obtained. This study shows that an intense beam of high-energy neutrons could initiate neutron capture on Ra-226 to produce Ra-225 and hence practical amounts of Ac-225 and a useful reduction of Ra-226. PMID:23220026

  12. 2010 Neutron Review: ORNL Neutron Sciences Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bardoel, Agatha A; Counce, Deborah M; Ekkebus, Allen E; Horak, Charlie M; Nagler, Stephen E; Kszos, Lynn A

    2011-06-01

    During 2010, the Neutron Sciences Directorate focused on producing world-class science, while supporting the needs of the scientific community. As the instrument, sample environment, and data analysis tools at High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR ) and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have grown over the last year, so has promising neutron scattering research. This was an exciting year in science, technology, and operations. Some topics discussed are: (1) HFIR and SNS Experiments Take Gordon Battelle Awards for Scientific Discovery - Battelle Memorial Institute presented the inaugural Gordon Battelle Prizes for scientific discovery and technology impact in 2010. Battelle awards the prizes to recognize the most significant advancements at national laboratories that it manages or co-manages. (2) Discovery of Element 117 - As part of an international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, HFIR staff played a pivotal role in the discovery by generating the berkelium used to produce the new element. A total of six atoms of ''ununseptium'' were detected in a two-year campaign employing HFIR and the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the heavy-ion accelerator capabilities at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia. The discovery of the new element expands the understanding of the properties of nuclei at extreme numbers of protons and neutrons. The production of a new element and observation of 11 new heaviest isotopes demonstrate the increased stability of super-heavy elements with increasing neutron numbers and provide the strongest evidence to date for the existence of an island of enhanced stability for super-heavy elements. (3) Studies of Iron-Based High-Temperature Superconductors - ORNL applied its distinctive capabilities in neutron scattering, chemistry, physics, and computation to detailed studies of the magnetic excitations of iron-based superconductors (iron pnictides and

  13. Dose spectra from energetic particles and neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, Nathan; Bancroft, Chris; Bloser, Peter; Legere, Jason; Ryan, James; Smith, Sonya; Spence, Harlan; Mazur, Joe; Zeitlin, Cary

    2013-10-01

    spectra from energetic particles and neutrons (DoSEN) are an early-stage space technology research project that combines two advanced complementary radiation detection concepts with fundamental advantages over traditional dosimetry. DoSEN measures not only the energy but also the charge distribution (including neutrons) of energetic particles that affect human (and robotic) health in a way not presently possible with current dosimeters. For heavy ions and protons, DoSEN provides a direct measurement of the lineal energy transfer (LET) spectra behind shielding material. For LET measurements, DoSEN contains stacks of thin-thick Si detectors similar in design to those used for the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation. With LET spectra, we can now directly break down the observed spectrum of radiation into its constituent heavy-ion components and through biologically based quality factors that provide not only doses and dose rates but also dose equivalents, associated rates, and even organ doses. DoSEN also measures neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV, which requires enough sensitive mass to fully absorb recoil particles that the neutrons produce. DoSEN develops the new concept of combining these independent measurements and using the coincidence of LET measurements and neutron detection to significantly reduce backgrounds in each measurement. The background suppression through the use of coincidence allows for significant reductions in size, mass, and power needed to provide measurements of dose, neutron dose, dose equivalents, LET spectra, and organ doses. Thus, we introduce the DoSEN concept: a promising low-mass instrument that detects the full spectrum of energetic particles, heavy ions, and neutrons to determine biological impact of radiation in space.

  14. Time-Correlated Particles Produced by Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, George F.; Glenn, Andrew M.; Nakae, Les F.; Pawelczak, Iwona; Snyderman, Neal J.; Sheets, Steven A.; Wurtz, Ron E.

    2015-05-06

    This report describes the NA-22 supported cosmic ray experimental and analysis activities carried out at LLNL since the last report, dated October 1, 2013. In particular we report on an analysis of the origin of the plastic scintillator signals resembling the signals produced by minimum ionizing particles (MIPs). Our most notable result is that when measured in coincidence with a liquid scintillator neutron signal the MIP-like signals in the plastic scintillators are mainly due to high energy tertiary neutrons.

  15. Design of neutron beams for neutron capture therapy using a 300-kW slab TRIGA reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.B.

    1995-03-01

    A design for a slab reactor to produce an epithermal neutron beam and a thermal neutron beam for use in neutron capture therapy (NCT) is described. A thin reactor with two large-area faces, a ``slab`` reactor, was planned using eighty-six 20% enriched TRIGA fuel elements and four B{sub 4}C control rods. Two neutron beams were designed: an epithermal neutron beam from one face and a thermal neutron beam from the other. The planned facility, based on this slab-reactor core with a maximum operating power of 300 kW, will provide an epithermal neutron beam of 1.8 {times} 10{sup 9} n{sub epi}/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s intensity with low contamination by fast neutrons and gamma rays and a thermal neutron beam of 9.0 {times} 10{sup 9}n{sub th}/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s intensity with low fast-neutron dose and gamma dose. Both neutron beams will be forward directed. Each beam can be turned on and off independently through its individual shutter. A complete NCT treatment using the designed epithermal or thermal neutron beam would take 30 or 20 min, respectively, under the condition of assuming 10{mu}g {sup 10}B/g in the blood. Such exposure times should be sufficiently short to maintain near-optimal target (e.g., {sup 10}B, {sup 157}Gd, and {sup 235}U) distribution in tumor versus normal tissues throughout the irradiation. With a low operating power of 300 kW, the heat generated in the core can be removed by natural convection through a pool of light water. The proposed design in this study could be constructed for a dedicated clinical NCT facility that would operate very safely.

  16. Neutronic analysis of a fusion hybrid reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kammash, T.

    2012-07-01

    In a PHYSOR 2010 paper(1) we introduced a fusion hybrid reactor whose fusion component is the gasdynamic mirror (GDM), and whose blanket was made of thorium - 232. The thrust of that study was to demonstrate the performance of such a reactor by establishing the breeding of uranium - 233 in the blanket, and the burning thereof to produce power. In that analysis, we utilized the diffusion equation for one-energy neutron group, namely, those produced by the fusion reactions, to establish the power distribution and density in the system. Those results should be viewed as a first approximation since the high energy neutrons are not effective in inducing fission, but contribute primarily to the production of actinides. In the presence of a coolant, however, such as water, these neutrons tend to thermalize rather quickly, hence a better assessment of the reactor performance would require at least a two group analysis, namely the fast and thermal groups. We follow that approach and write an approximate set of equations for the fluxes of these groups. From these relations we deduce the all-important quantity, k{sub eff}, which we utilize to compute the multiplication factor, and subsequently, the power density in the reactor. We show that k{sub eff} can be made to have a value of 0.99, thus indicating that 100 thermal neutrons are generated per fusion neutron, while allowing the system to function as 'subcritical.' Moreover, we show that such a hybrid reactor can generate hundreds of megawatts of thermal power per cm of length depending on the flux of the fusion neutrons impinging on the blanket. (authors)

  17. Colloquium: The neutron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Geoffrey L; Wietfeldt, F

    2011-01-01

    The decay of the free neutron into a proton, electron, and antineutrino is the prototype semileptonic weak decay and is the simplest example of nuclear beta decay. It played a key role in the early Universe as it determined the ratio of neutrons to protons during the era of primordial light element nucleosynthesis. Neutron decay is physically related to important processes in solar physics and neutrino detection. The mean neutron lifetime has been the subject of more than 20 major experiments done, using a variety of methods, between 1950 and the present. The most precise recent measurements have stated accuracies approaching 0.1%, but are not in good agreement as they differ by as much as 5 sigma using quoted uncertainties. The history of neutron lifetime measurements is reviewed and the different methods used are described, giving important examples of each. The discrepancies and some systematic issues in the experiments that may be responsible are discussed, and it is shown by means of global averages that the neutron lifetime is likely to lie in the range of 880 884 s. Plans and prospects for future experiments are considered that will address these systematic issues and improve our knowledge of the neutron lifetime.

  18. General Electric PETtrace cyclotron as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosko, Andrey

    This research investigates the use of a PETtrace cyclotron produced by General Electric (GE) as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The GE PETtrace was chosen for this investigation because this type of cyclotron is popular among nuclear pharmacies and clinics in many countries; it is compact and reliable; it produces protons with energies high enough to produce neutrons with appropriate energy and fluence rate for BNCT and it does not require significant changes in design to provide neutrons. In particular, the standard PETtrace 18O target is considered. The cyclotron efficiency may be significantly increased if unused neutrons produced during radioisotopes production could be utilized for other medical modalities such as BNCT at the same time. The resulting dose from the radiation emitted from the target is evaluated using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP at several depths in a brain phantom for different scattering geometries. Four different moderating materials of various thicknesses were considered: light water, carbon, heavy water, arid Fluental(TM). The fluence rate tally was used to calculate photon and neutron dose, by applying fluence rate-to-dose conversion factors. Fifteen different geometries were considered and a 30-cm thick heavy water moderator was chosen as the most suitable for BNCT with the GE PETtrace cyclotron. According to the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) protocol, the maximum dose to the normal brain is set to 12.5 RBEGy, which for the conditions of using a heavy water moderator, assuming a 60 muA beam current, would be reached with a treatment time of 258 min. Results showed that using a PETtrace cyclotron in this configuration provides a therapeutic ratio of about 2.4 for depths up to 4 cm inside a brain phantom. Further increase of beam current proposed by GE should significantly improve the beam quality or the treatment time and allow treating tumors at greater depths.

  19. The neutron channeling phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Khanouchi, A; Sabir, A; Boulkheir, M; Ichaoui, R; Ghassoun, J; Jehouani, A

    1997-01-01

    Shields, used for protection against radiation, are often pierced with vacuum channels for passing cables and other instruments for measurements. The neutron transmission through these shields is an unavoidable phenomenon. In this work we study and discuss the effect of channels on neutron transmission through shields. We consider an infinite homogeneous slab, with a fixed thickness (20 lambda, with lambda the mean free path of the neutron in the slab), which contains a vacuum channel. This slab is irradiated with an infinite source of neutrons on the left side and on the other side (right side) many detectors with windows equal to 2 lambda are placed in order to evaluate the neutron transmission probabilities (Khanouchi, A., Aboubekr, A., Ghassoun, J. and Jehouani, A. (1994) Rencontre Nationale des Jeunes Chercheurs en Physique. Casa Blanca Maroc; Khanouchi, A., Sabir, A., Ghassoun, J. and Jehouani, A. (1995) Premier Congré International des Intéractions Rayonnements Matière. Eljadida Maroc). The neutron history within the slab is simulated by the Monte Carlo method (Booth, T. E. and Hendricks, J. S. (1994) Nuclear Technology 5) and using the exponential biasing technique in order to improve the Monte Carlo calculation (Levitt, L. B. (1968) Nuclear Science and Engineering 31, 500-504; Jehouani, A., Ghassoun, J. and Aboubker, A. (1994) In Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Radiation Physics, Rabat, Morocco). Then different geometries of the vacuum channel have been studied. For each geometry we have determined the detector response and calculated the neutron transmission probability for different detector positions. This neutron transmission probability presents a peak for the detectors placed in front of the vacuum channel. This study allowed us to clearly identify the neutron channeling phenomenon. One application of our study is to detect vacuum defects in materials. PMID:9463884

  20. β-delayed neutron emission studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Rissanen, J.; Taín, J. L.; Algora, A.; Kratz, K. L.; Lhersonneau, G.; Pfeiffer, B.; Agramunt, J.; Cano-Ott, D.; Gorlychev, V.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Martínez, T.; Achouri, L.; Calvino, F.; Cortés, G.; Eronen, T.; García, A.; Parlog, M.; Podolyak, Z.; Pretel, C.; Valencia, E.

    2014-01-01

    The study of β-delayed neutron emission plays a major role in different fields such as nuclear technology, nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure. However the quality of the existing experimental data nowadays is not sufficient for the various technical and scientific applications and new high precision measurements are necessary to improve the data bases. One key aspect to the success of these high precission measurements is the use of a very pure ion beam that ensures that only the ion of interest is produced. The combination of the IGISOL mass separator with the JYFLTRAP Penning trap is an excellent tool for this type of measurement because of the ability to deliver isobarically and even isomerically clean beams. Another key feature of the installation is the non-chemical selectivity of the IGISOL ion source which allows measurements in the important region of refractory elements. This paper summarises the β-delayed neutron emission studies that have been carried out at the IGISOL facility with two different neutron detectors based on 3He counters in a polyethylene moderator: the Mainz neutron detector and the BEta deLayEd Neutron detector.

  1. Compact neutron source development at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Reijonen, Jani; Lou, Tak Pui; Tolmachoff, Bryan; Leung, K.N.

    2001-07-25

    A compact neutron generator based on D-D or D-T fusion reactions is being developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The deuterium or tritium ions are produced in a radio-frequency (RF) driven multicusp plasma source. Seven beamlets are extracted and are accelerated to energy of 100 keV by means of a three-electrode electrostatic accelerator column. The ion beam then impinges on a titanium coated copper target where either the 2.4 MeV D-D or 14 MeV D-T neutrons are generated by fusion reaction. The development of the neutron tube is divided into three phases. First, the accelerator column is operated at hydrogen beam intensity of 15 mA. Second phase consists of deuterium beam runs at pulsed, low duty cycle 150 mA operation. The third phase consists of deuterium or tritium operation at 1.5 A beam current. Phase one is completed and the results of hydrogen beam testing are discussed. Low duty cycle 150 mA deuterium operation is being investigated. Neutron flux will be measured. Finally the phase three operation and the advance neutron generator designs are described.

  2. Compact neutron source development at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijonen, Jani; Lou, Tak P.; Tolmachoff, Bryan; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2001-12-01

    A compact neutron generator based on D-D or D-T fusion reactions is being developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National laboratory. The deuterium or tritium ions are produced in a radio-frequency (RF) driven multicusp plasma source. Seven beamlets are extracted and are accelerated to energy of 100 keV by means of a three-electrode electrostatic accelerator column. The ion beam then impinges on a titanium coated copper target where either the 2.4 MeV D-D or 13 MeV D-T neutrons are generated by fusion reaction. The development of the neutron tube is divided into three phases. First, the accelerator column is operated at hydrogen beam intensity of 15 mA. Second phase consists of deuterium beam runs at pulsed, low duty cycle 150 mA operation. The third phase consists of deuterium or tritium operation at 1.5 A beam current. Phase one is completed and the results of hydrogen beam testing are discussed. Low duty cycle 150 mA deuterium operation is being investigated. Neutron flux will be measured. Finally the phase three operation and the advance neutron generator designs are described.

  3. Semiconductor neutron detectors using depleted uranium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruschwitz, Craig A.; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Schwellenbach, David; Meek, Thomas; Shaver, Brandon; Cunningham, Taylor; Auxier, Jerrad Philip

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports on recent attempts to develop and test a new type of solid-state neutron detector fabricated from uranium compounds. It has been known for many years that uranium oxide (UO2), triuranium octoxide (U3O8) and other uranium compounds exhibit semiconducting characteristics with a broad range of electrical properties. We seek to exploit these characteristics to make a direct-conversion semiconductor neutron detector. In such a device a neutron interacts with a uranium nucleus, inducing fission. The fission products deposit energy-producing, detectable electron-hole pairs. The high energy released in the fission reaction indicates that noise discrimination in such a device has the potential to be excellent. Schottky devices were fabricated using a chemical deposition coating technique to deposit UO2 layers a few microns thick on a sapphire substrate. Schottky devices have also been made using a single crystal from UO2 samples approximately 500 microns thick. Neutron sensitivity simulations have been performed using GEANT4. Neutron sensitivity for the Schottky devices was tested experimentally using a 252Cf source.

  4. Predicted ICF Neutron Spectrum Corrections from Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, John; Munro, Dave; Spears, Brian; Peterson, Luc; Brandon, Scott; Gaffney, Jim; Hammer, Jim; Kritcher, Andrea; Nora, Ryan; Springer, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Produced neutron spectra have long been used as a diagnostic of ICF implosions. The neutron spectrum width is characteristic of the burn temperature as well as the variance of the burning region's fluid motion. Corrections to higher moments of the spectrum are thought to be diagnostic as well. Because of the large neutron fluxes at the NIF, we expect to have the opportunity to measure these corrections and compare with simulation. We will discuss a post-process platform that we have built for extracting these moment corrections as well as many other extensive quantities from the hydrodynamic simulations, and report on the predicted neutron spectrum corrections recently calculated for a large suite of implosion simulations in one, two, and three dimensions with varying drive symmetry and overall convergence ratio. We are particularly interested in the observable effects on the neutron spectrum along different lines of sight from the dimensional symmetry constraint in the simulated hydrodynamics. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Modeling gated neutron images of THD capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Douglas Carl; Grim, Gary P; Tregillis, Ian L; Wilke, Mark D; Morgan, George L; Loomis, Eric N; Wilde, Carl H; Oertel, John A; Fatherley, Valerie E; Clark, David D; Schmitt, Mark J; Merrill, Frank E; Wang, Tai - Sen F; Danly, Christopher R; Batha, Steven H; Patel, M; Sepke, S; Hatarik, R; Fittinghoff, D; Bower, D; Marinak, M; Munro, D; Moran, M; Hilko, R; Frank, M; Buckles, R

    2010-01-01

    Time gating a neutron detector 28m from a NIF implosion can produce images at different energies. The brighter image near 14 MeV reflects the size and symmetry of the capsule 'hot spot'. Scattered neutrons, {approx}9.5-13 MeV, reflect the size and symmetry of colder, denser fuel, but with only {approx}1-7% of the neutrons. The gated detector records both the scattered neutron image, and, to a good approximation, an attenuated copy of the primary image left by scintillator decay. By modeling the imaging system the energy band for the scattered neutron image (10-12 MeV) can be chosen, trading off the decayed primary image and the decrease of scattered image brightness with energy. Modeling light decay from EJ399, BC422, BCF99-55, Xylene, DPAC-30, and Liquid A leads to a preference from BCF99-55 for the first NIF detector, but DPAC 30 and Liquid A would be preferred if incorporated into a system. Measurement of the delayed light from the NIF scintillator using implosions at the Omega laser shows BCF99-55 to be a good choice for down-scattered imaging at 28m.

  6. High resolution neutron imaging capabilities at BOA beamline at Paul Scherrer Institut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Morgano, M.; Panzner, T.; Lehmann, E.; Filgers, U.; Vallerga, J. V.; McPhate, J. B.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Feller, W. B.

    2015-06-01

    The cold neutron spectrum of the Beamline for neutron Optics and other Applications (BOA) at Paul Scherrer Institut enables high contrast neutron imaging because neutron cross sections for many materials increase with neutron wavelength. However, for many neutron imaging applications, spatial resolution can be as important as contrast. In this paper the neutron transmission imaging capabilities of an MCP/Timepix detector installed at the BOA beamline are presented, demonstrating the possibilities for studying sub-20 μm features in various samples. In addition to conventional neutron radiography and microtomography, the high degree of neutron polarization at the BOA beamline can be very attractive for imaging of magnetic fields, as demonstrated by our measurements. We also show that a collimated cold neutron beamline combined with a high resolution detector can produce image artifacts, (e.g. edge enhancements) due to neutron refraction and scattering. The results of our experiments indicate that the BOA beamline is a valuable addition to neutron imaging facilities, providing improved and sometimes unique capabilities for non-destructive studies with cold neutrons.

  7. Ultrashort pulsed neutron source.

    PubMed

    Pomerantz, I; McCary, E; Meadows, A R; Arefiev, A; Bernstein, A C; Chester, C; Cortez, J; Donovan, M E; Dyer, G; Gaul, E W; Hamilton, D; Kuk, D; Lestrade, A C; Wang, C; Ditmire, T; Hegelich, B M

    2014-10-31

    We report on a novel compact laser-driven neutron source with an unprecedented short pulse duration (<50  ps) and high peak flux (>10(18)  n/cm(2)/s), an order of magnitude higher than any existing source. In our experiments, high-energy electron jets are generated from thin (<3  μm) plastic targets irradiated by a petawatt laser. These intense electron beams are employed to generate neutrons from a metal converter. Our method opens venues for enhancing neutron radiography contrast and for creating astrophysical conditions of heavy element synthesis in the laboratory. PMID:25396373

  8. Ultrashort Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantz, I.; McCary, E.; Meadows, A. R.; Arefiev, A.; Bernstein, A. C.; Chester, C.; Cortez, J.; Donovan, M. E.; Dyer, G.; Gaul, E. W.; Hamilton, D.; Kuk, D.; Lestrade, A. C.; Wang, C.; Ditmire, T.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2014-10-01

    We report on a novel compact laser-driven neutron source with an unprecedented short pulse duration (<50 ps ) and high peak flux (>1018 n /cm2/s ), an order of magnitude higher than any existing source. In our experiments, high-energy electron jets are generated from thin (<3 μ m ) plastic targets irradiated by a petawatt laser. These intense electron beams are employed to generate neutrons from a metal converter. Our method opens venues for enhancing neutron radiography contrast and for creating astrophysical conditions of heavy element synthesis in the laboratory.

  9. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Metcalf, H.E.

    1958-10-14

    Methods of controlling reactors are presented. Specifically, a plurality of neutron absorber members are adjustably disposed in the reactor core at different distances from the center thereof. The absorber members extend into the core from opposite faces thereof and are operated by motive means coupled in a manner to simultaneously withdraw at least one of the absorber members while inserting one of the other absorber members. This feature effects fine control of the neutron reproduction ratio by varying the total volume of the reactor effective in developing the neutronic reaction.

  10. FABRICATION OF NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOEpatents

    Birden, J.H.

    1959-04-21

    A method is presented for preparing a neutron source from polonium-210 and substances, such as beryllium and boron, characterized by emission of neutrons upon exposure to alpha particles from the polonium. According to the invention, a source is prepared by placing powdered beryllium and a platinum foil electroplated with polonium-2;.0 in a beryllium container. The container is sealed and then heated by induction to a temperature of 450 to 1100 deg C to volatilize the polonium off the foil into the powder. The heating step is terminated upon detection of a maximum in the neutron flux level.

  11. Coupled moderator neutronics

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; Pitcher, E.J.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1995-12-01

    Optimizing the neutronic performance of a coupled-moderator system for a Long-Pulse Spallation Source is a new and challenging area for the spallation target-system designer. For optimal performance of a neutron source, it is essential to have good communication with instrument scientists to obtain proper design criteria and continued interaction with mechanical, thermal-hydraulic, and materials engineers to attain a practical design. A good comprehension of the basics of coupled-moderator neutronics will aid in the proper design of a target system for a Long-Pulse Spallation Source.

  12. Rotational and magnetic field instabilities in neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2014-01-14

    In this short review we present recent results on the dynamics of neutron stars and their magnetic fields. We discuss the progress that has been made, during the last 5 years, in understanding the rotational instabilities with emphasis to the one due to the f-mode, the possibility of using gravitational wave detection in constraining the parameters of neutron stars and revealing the equation of state as well as the detectability of gravitational waves produced during the unstable phase of a neutron star’s life. In addition we discuss the dynamics of extremely strong magnetic fields observed in a class of neutron stars (magnetars). Magnetic fields of that strength are responsible for highly energetic phenomena (giant flares) and we demonstrate that the analysis of the emitted electromagnetic radiation can lead in constraining the parameters of neutron stars. Furthermore, we present our results from the study of such violent phenomena in association with the emission of gravitational radiation.

  13. Development of a thermal neutron sensor for Humanitarian Demining.

    PubMed

    Cinausero, M; Lunardon, M; Nebbia, G; Pesente, S; Viesti, G; Filippini, V

    2004-07-01

    A thermal neutron sensor prototype for Humanitarian Demining has been developed, trying to minimize cost and complexity of the system as required in such application. A (252)Cf source or a sealed-tube neutron generator is employed to produce primary fast neutrons that are thermalized in a moderator designed to optimize the neutron capture reaction yield in buried samples. A description of the sensor, including the performances of the acquisition system based on a Flash ADC card and final tests with explosive simulants are reported. A comparison of the sensor performance when using a radioactive source to that when employing a sealed-tube neutron generator is presented. Limitations and possible applications of this technique are discussed. PMID:15145439

  14. Development of the EURITRACK tagged neutron inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perot, B.; Carasco, C.; Bernard, S.; Mariani, A.; Szabo, J.-L.; Mercier, E.; Sannie, G.; Viesti, G.; Nebbia, G.; Pesente, S.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Fabris, D.; Zenoni, A.; Bonomi, G.; Donzella, A.; Fontana, A.; Boghen, G.; Valkovic, V.; Sudac, D.; Moszynski, M.; Batsch, T.; Gierlik, M.; Woski, D.; Klamra, W.; Isaksson, P.; Le Tourneur, P.; Lhuissier, M.; Colonna, A.; Tintori, C.; Peerani, P.; Sequeira, V.; Salvato, M.

    2007-08-01

    The EURopean Illicit TRAfficing Countermeasures Kit (EURITRACK) project is part of the 6th European Union Framework Program. It aims at developing a Tagged Neutron Inspection System (TNIS) to detect illicit materials, such as explosives and narcotics, in cargo containers. Fast neutron induced reactions produce specific gamma-rays used to determine the chemical composition of the inspected material. The associated particle technique is employed to precisely locate the interaction points of the neutrons. A new deuterium-tritium neutron generator has been developed, including a pixelized alpha particle detector. The TNIS also comprises high-efficiency fast neutron and gamma-ray detectors, a dedicated front-end electronics and an integrated software to entirely drive the system and automatically process the data. Most components have been integrated during last months at Institute Ruder Boskovic, in Zagreb, Croatia. An overview of the TNIS and of its preliminary performances is presented.

  15. Gamma-Free Neutron Detector Based upon Lithium Phosphate Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Wallace

    2007-08-28

    A gamma-free neutron-sensitive scintillator is needed to enhance radiaition sensing and detection for nonproliferation applications. Such a scintillator would allow very large detectors to be placed at the perimeter of spent-fuel storage facilities at commercial nuclear power plants, so that any movement of spontaneously emitted neutrons from spent nuclear fuel or weapons grade plutonium would be noted in real-time. This task is to demonstrate that the technology for manufacturing large panels of fluor-doped plastic containing lithium-6 phosphate nanoparticles can be achieved. In order to detect neutrons, the nanoparticles must be sufficiently small so that the plastic remains transparent. In this way, the triton and alpha particles generated by the capture of the neutron will result in a photon burst that can be coupled to a wavelength shifting fiber (WLS) producing an optical signal of about ten nanoseconds duration signaling the presence of a neutron emitting source.

  16. Proton and neutron irradiation effect of Ti: Sapphires

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Zhang, J.; Yang, J.

    1999-07-01

    Various effects of proton and neutron irradiated Ti: sapphires were studied. Proton irradiation induced F, F{sup +} and V center in Ti: sapphires and 3310 cm{sup -1} infrared absorption, and made ultraviolet absorption edge shift to short wave. Neutron irradiation produced a number of F, F{sup +} and F{sub 2} centers and larger defects in Ti: sapphires, and changed Ti{sup 4+}into Ti{sup 3+} ions. Such valence state variation enhanced characteristic luminescence of Ti: sapphires, and no singular variances of intrinsic fluorescence spectra of Ti: sapphires took place with neutron flux of 1 x 10{sup 17}n/cm{sup 2}, but the fluorescence vanished with neutron flux of 1 x 10{sup 18}n/cm{sup 2} which means the threshold for the concentration of improving Ti{sup 3+} ions by neutron irradiation.

  17. Neutron capture therapy with sup 235 U seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.B.; Brugger, R.M.; Shih, J.A. )

    1992-05-01

    A combination of brachytherapy and neutron capture therapy has been evaluated using {sup 235}U metal seeds and external neutron beam irradiation. When thermal neutrons are absorbed by {sup 235}U, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays are produced and some of these deposit energy in surrounding tissue. A Monte Carlo program, using the code MCNP, has been used to evaluate two sizes of {sup 235}U seeds in a water phantom. The results of flux suppression around the seeds and dose distributions are illustrated and discussed. The results show that high doses can be delivered in a relatively short time by using {sup 235}U seeds with neutron capture therapy. This therapy with multiple needles or seeds can be envisioned as a substitute for traditional brachytherapy to give an effective killing dose.

  18. Radioactive waste reality as revealed by neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, F.J.

    1995-12-31

    To comprehend certain aspects of the contents of a radioactive waste container is not a trivial matter, especially if one is not allowed to open the container and peer inside. One of the suite of tools available to a practioner in the art of nondestructive assay is based upon neutron measurements. Neutrons, both naturally occuring and induced, are penertrating radiations that can be detected external to the waste container. The practioner should be skilled in applying the proper technique(s) to selected waste types. Available techniques include active and passive neutron measurements, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. The waste material itself can compromise the assay results by occluding a portion of the mass of fissile material present, or by multiplying the number of neutrons produced by a spontaneously fissioning mass. This paper will discuss the difficult, but albeit necessary marriage, between radiioactive waste types and alternative neutron measurement techniques.

  19. Development of an optical fiber type detector using a Eu:LiCaAlF6 scintillator for neutron monitoring in boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kenichi; Kawabata, Yuya; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Uritani, Akira; Iguchi, Tetsuo; Fukuda, Kentaro; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a small neutron detector probe as a thermal neutron flux monitor for boron neutron capture therapy. The detector consists of an optical fiber and a small Eu:LiCaAlF6 scintillator. In order to improve neutron-gamma ray discrimination capability, we use the small-size scintillator, whose size is controlled to be smaller than fast electron range produced by gamma-rays and larger than the range of charged particles induced by 6Li(n,t) reactions. We confirmed the improved neutron-gamma ray discrimination capability by comparing the detector responses between a small-size scintillator and a slab one. We also evaluated the neutron sensitivity of the fabricated optical fiber type neutron detector to be 2×10-4 cm2.

  20. Carbon Atmosphere Discovered On Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-11-01

    Evidence for a thin veil of carbon has been found on the neutron star in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant. This discovery, made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, resolves a ten-year mystery surrounding this object. "The compact star at the center of this famous supernova remnant has been an enigma since its discovery," said Wynn Ho of the University of Southampton and lead author of a paper that appears in the latest issue of Nature. "Now we finally understand that it can be produced by a hot neutron star with a carbon atmosphere." By analyzing Chandra's X-ray spectrum - akin to a fingerprint of energy - and applying it to theoretical models, Ho and his colleague Craig Heinke, from the University of Alberta, determined that the neutron star in Cassiopeia A, or Cas A for short, has an ultra-thin coating of carbon. This is the first time the composition of an atmosphere of an isolated neutron star has been confirmed. The Chandra "First Light" image of Cas A in 1999 revealed a previously undetected point-like source of X-rays at the center. This object was presumed to be a neutron star, the typical remnant of an exploded star, but researchers were unable to understand its properties. Defying astronomers' expectations, this object did not show any X-ray or radio pulsations or any signs of radio pulsar activity. By applying a model of a neutron star with a carbon atmosphere to this object, Ho and Heinke found that the region emitting X-rays would uniformly cover a typical neutron star. This would explain the lack of X-ray pulsations because -- like a lightbulb that shines consistently in all directions -- this neutron star would be unlikely to display any changes in its intensity as it rotates. Scientists previously have used a neutron star model with a hydrogen atmosphere giving a much smaller emission area, corresponding to a hot spot on a typical neutron star, which should produce X-ray pulsations as it rotates. Interpreting the hydrogen atmosphere model

  1. Outline of a proposal for a new neutron source: The pulsed neutron research facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Kustom, R.L.

    1992-04-01

    Accelerator-based, pulsed spallation neutron sources have been performing neutron scattering research for about fifteen years. During this time beam intensities have increased by a factor of 100 and more than 50 spectrometers are now operating on four major sources worldwide. The pulsed sources have proven to be highly effective and complementary to reactor-based sources in that there are important scientific areas for which each type of source has unique capabilities. We describe a proposal for a new pulsed neutron facility based on a Fixed Field Alternating Gradient synchrotron. The specifications for this new machine, which are now only being formulated, are for an accelerator that will produce (100 {divided_by} 200) {mu}A of time-averaged proton current at (500 {divided_by} 1000) MeV, in short pulses at 30 Hz. Appropriate target and moderator systems and an array of scattering instruments will be provided to make the facility a full-blown research installation. The neutron source, named the Pulsed Neutron Research Facility (PNRF), will be as powerful as any pulsed source now operating in the world and will also act as a test bed for the Fixed Field Alternating Gradient Synchrotron concept as a basis for more powerful sources in the future. The peak thermal neutron flux in PNRF will be about 5{center_dot}10{sup 15}n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s.

  2. Outline of a proposal for a new neutron source: The pulsed neutron research facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Kustom, R.L.

    1992-04-01

    Accelerator-based, pulsed spallation neutron sources have been performing neutron scattering research for about fifteen years. During this time beam intensities have increased by a factor of 100 and more than 50 spectrometers are now operating on four major sources worldwide. The pulsed sources have proven to be highly effective and complementary to reactor-based sources in that there are important scientific areas for which each type of source has unique capabilities. We describe a proposal for a new pulsed neutron facility based on a Fixed Field Alternating Gradient synchrotron. The specifications for this new machine, which are now only being formulated, are for an accelerator that will produce (100 {divided by} 200) {mu}A of time-averaged proton current at (500 {divided by} 1000) MeV, in short pulses at 30 Hz. Appropriate target and moderator systems and an array of scattering instruments will be provided to make the facility a full-blown research installation. The neutron source, named the Pulsed Neutron Research Facility (PNRF), will be as powerful as any pulsed source now operating in the world and will also act as a test bed for the Fixed Field Alternating Gradient Synchrotron concept as a basis for more powerful sources in the future. The peak thermal neutron flux in PNRF will be about 5{center dot}10{sup 15}n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s.

  3. Epithermal neutron formation for boron neutron capture therapy by adiabatic resonance crossing concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorshidi, A.; Ghafoori-Fard, H.; Sadeghi, M.

    2014-05-01

    Low-energy protons from the cyclotron in the range of 15-30 MeV and low current have been simulated on beryllium (Be) target with a lead moderator around the target. This research was accomplished to design an epithermal neutron beam for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) using the moderated neutron on the average produced from 9Be target via (p, xn) reaction in Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) concept. Generation of neutron to proton ratio, energy distribution, flux and dose components in head phantom have been simulated by MCNP5 code. The reflector and collimator were designed in prevention and collimation of derivation neutrons from proton bombarding. The scalp-skull-brain phantom consisting of bone and brain equivalent material has been simulated in order to evaluate the dosimetric effect on the brain. Results of this analysis demonstrated while the proton energy decreased, the dose factor altered according to filters thickness. The maximum epithermal flux revealed using fluental, Fe and bismuth (Bi) filters with thicknesses of 9.4, 3 and 2 cm, respectively and also the epithermal to thermal neutron flux ratio was 103.85. The potential of the ARC method to replace or complement the current reactor-based supply sources of BNCT purposes.

  4. Kinetic simulation of neutron production in a deuterium z-pinch.

    SciTech Connect

    Mostrom, C.; Stygar, William A.; Thoma, Carsten; Welch, Dale Robert; Clark, R. E.; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Rose, David V.

    2010-11-01

    We have found computationally that, at sufficiently high currents, half of the neutrons produced by a deuterium z pinch are thermonuclear in origin. Early experiments below 1-MA current found that essentially all of the neutrons produced by a deuterium pinch are not thermonuclear, but are initiated by an instability that creates beam-target neutrons. Many subsequent authors have supported this result while others have claimed that pinch neutrons are thermonuclear. To resolve this issue, we have conducted fully kinetic, collisional, and electromagnetic simulations of the complete time evolution of a deuterium pinch. We find that at 1-MA pinch currents, most of the neutrons are, indeed, beam-target in origin. At much higher current, half of the neutrons are thermonuclear and half are beam-target driven by instabilities that produce a power law fall off in the ion energy distribution function at large energy. The implications for fusion energy production with such pinches are discussed.

  5. Upper limit to the 1-20 MeV solar neutron flux.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, J. A.; Ifedili, S. O.; Jenkins, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The upper limit on the quiet time solar neutron flux from 1 to 20 MeV has been measured to be less than .002 neutrons at the 95% confidence level. This result is deduced from the OGO-6 neutron detector measurements of the 'day-night' effect near the equator at low altitudes for the period from June 7 to Dec. 23, 1969. The OGO-6 detector had very low (less than 4%) counting rate contributions from locally produced neutrons in the detecting system and the spacecraft and from charged-particle interactions in the neutron sensor.

  6. Calculation of the neutron diffusion equation by using Homotopy Perturbation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koklu, H.; Ersoy, A.; Gulecyuz, M. C.; Ozer, O.

    2016-03-01

    The distribution of the neutrons in a nuclear fuel element in the nuclear reactor core can be calculated by the neutron diffusion theory. It is the basic and the simplest approximation for the neutron flux function in the reactor core. In this study, the neutron flux function is obtained by the Homotopy Perturbation Method (HPM) that is a new and convenient method in recent years. One-group time-independent neutron diffusion equation is examined for the most solved geometrical reactor core of spherical, cubic and cylindrical shapes, in the frame of the HPM. It is observed that the HPM produces excellent results consistent with the existing literature.

  7. Isotope-Identifying neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitenko, Yu. V. Petrenko, A. V.; Gundorin, N. A.; Gledenov, Yu. M.; Aksenov, V. L.

    2015-07-15

    The possibilities of an isotope-indentifying study of layered structures in different regimes of a neutron wave field are considered. The detection of specularly reflected neutrons and secondary radiation (caused by neutron capture) in the form of charged particles, γ quanta, and nuclear fission fragments, as well as neutrons spin-flipped in a noncollinear magnetic field and on nuclei of elements with spin, makes it possible to implement isotope-indentifying neutron reflectometry.

  8. Wavelength-selected Neutron Pulses Formed by a Spatial Magnetic Neutron Spin Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gösselsberger, C.; Bacak, M.; Gerstmayr, T.; Gumpenberger, S.; Hawlik, A.; Hinterleitner, B.; Jericha, E.; Nowak, S.; Welzl, A.; Badurek, G.

    We present a novel type of spatial magnetic neutron spin resonator whose time and wavelength resolution can be de- coupled from each other by means of a travelling wave mode of operation. Combined with a pair of highly efficient polarisers such a device could act simultaneously as monochromator and chopper, able to produce short neutron pulses, whose wavelength, spectral width and duration could be varied almost instantaneously by purely electronic means with- out any mechanical modification of the experimental setup. To demonstrate the practical feasibility of this technique we have designed and built a first prototype resonator consisting of ten individually switchable modules which allows to produce neutron pulses in the microsecond regime. It was installed at a polarised 2.6 Å neutron beamline at the 250 kW TRIGA research reactor of the Vienna University of Technology where it could deliver pulses of 55 μs duration, which is about three times less than the passage time of the neutrons through the resonator itself. In order to further improve the achievable wavelength resolution to about 3% a second prototype resonator, consisting of 48 individual modules with optimised field homogeneity and enlarged beam cross-section of 6 × 6 cm2 was developed. We present the results of first measurements which demonstrate the successful operation of this device.

  9. Multigroup neutron dose calculations for proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey Iv, Charles T; Prinja, Anil K

    2009-01-01

    We have developed tools for the preparation of coupled multigroup proton/neutron cross section libraries. Our method is to use NJOY to process evaluated nuclear data files for incident particles below 150 MeV and MCNPX to produce data for higher energies. We modified the XSEX3 program of the MCNPX code system to produce Legendre expansions of scattering matrices generated by sampling the physics models that are comparable to the output of the GROUPR routine of NJOY. Our code combines the low and high energy scattering data with user input stopping powers and energy deposition cross sections that we also calculated using MCNPX. Our code also calculates momentum transfer coefficients for the library and optionally applies an energy straggling model to the scattering cross sections and stopping powers. The motivation was initially for deterministic solution of space radiation shielding calculations using Attila, but noting that proton therapy treatment planning may neglect secondary neutron dose assessments because of difficulty and expense, we have also investigated the feasibility of multi group methods for this application. We have shown that multigroup MCNPX solutions for secondary neutron dose compare well with continuous energy solutions and are obtainable with less than half computational cost. This efficiency comparison neglects the cost of preparing the library data, but this becomes negligible when distributed over many multi group calculations. Our deterministic calculations illustrate recognized obstacles that may have to be overcome before discrete ordinates methods can be efficient alternatives for proton therapy neutron dose calculations.

  10. Neutron source in the MCNPX shielding calculating for electron accelerator driven facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.

    2012-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the design development of an experimental neutron source facility. It is an accelerator driven system (ADS) utilizing a subcritical assembly driven by electron accelerator. The facility will be utilized for performing basic and applied nuclear researches, producing medical isotopes, and training young nuclear specialists. Monte Carlo code MCNPX has been utilized as a design tool due to its capability to transport electrons, photons, and neutrons at high energies. However the facility shielding calculations with MCNPX need enormous computational resources and the small neutron yield per electron makes sampling difficulty for the Monte Carlo calculations. A method, based on generating and utilizing neutron source file, was proposed and tested. This method reduces significantly the required computer resources and improves the statistics of the calculated neutron dose outside the shield boundary. However the statistical errors introduced by generating the neutron source were not directly represented in the results, questioning the validity of this methodology, because an insufficiently sampled neutron source can cause error on the calculated neutron dose. This paper presents a procedure for the validation of the generated neutron source file. The impact of neutron source statistic on the neutron dose is examined by calculating the neutron dose as a function of the number of electron particles used for generating the neutron source files. When the value of the calculated neutron dose converges, it means the neutron source has scored sufficient records and statistic does not have apparent impact on the calculated neutron dose. In this way, the validity of neutron source and the shield analyses could be verified. (authors)

  11. Encounters between binaries and neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. B.; Benz, W.; Hills, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    We simulated encounters between a neutron star and primordial and tidal-capture binaries. In the case of encounters involving a tidal-capture binary, comprising a white dwarf and a main-sequence star, we find that most exchange encounters will produce a single merged object with the white dwarf and neutron star engulfed in a common envelope of gas donated by the main-sequence primary of the original binary. A small fraction of exchanges induce a merger of the white dwarf and main-sequence star, with this object being unbound to the neutron star, and the two objects having a large relative speed at infinity. For encounters involving a primordial binary, fewer encounters require the inclusion of hydrodynamical effects. Those involving collisions or close encounters tend to produce a binary comprised of the two merged stars (now forming one star) and the third star. The binaries produced typically have large enough separations to prevent the formation of a single merged object until subsequent stellar evolution of one of the components causes it to fill its Roche lobe. Clean exchanges produce binaries with large eccentricities; they are typically sufficiently wide to avoid circularization.

  12. Magnetized Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebling, Steven; Anderson, Matthew; Hirschmann, Eric; Lehner, Luis; Motl, Patrick; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos; Tohline, Joel

    2008-04-01

    Magnetized neutron stars, whether considered individually or within compact binary systems, demonstrate a number of interesting dynamical effects. Using a distributed adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code, we evolve such stars and study their dynamics.

  13. Precision Polarization of Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Elise; Barron-Palos, Libertad; Couture, Aaron; Crawford, Christopher; Chupp, Tim; Danagoulian, Areg; Estes, Mary; Hona, Binita; Jones, Gordon; Klein, Andi; Penttila, Seppo; Sharma, Monisha; Wilburn, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Determining polarization of a cold neutron beam to high precision is required for the next generation neutron decay correlation experiments at the SNS, such as the proposed abBA and PANDA experiments. Precision polarimetry measurements were conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the goal of determining the beam polarization to the level of 10-3 or better. The cold neutrons from FP12 were polarized using optically polarized ^3He gas as a spin filter, which has a highly spin-dependent absorption cross section. A second ^ 3He spin filter was used to analyze the neutron polarization after passing through a resonant RF spin rotator. A discussion of the experiment and results will be given.

  14. Neutron Detector Waveform Digitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toebbe, Jonathan; Gray, Fred; Grafil, Elliot; Greife, Uwe

    2010-11-01

    In the frame of a DoE Office of Nuclear Energy funded collaboration to design a next generation neutron elastic and inelastic scattering experiment, the Colorado School of Mines/Regis University group is responsible for developing and testing neutron detectors, pulse shape discrimination and read-out methods. This contribution will describe the test setup based on an n-ToF neutron selection using a ^244Cm-^13C source and the Regis Digitizer. Results on pulse shape discrimination from waveform digitization will be compared to other commercially available discrimination methods. We will also present our efforts to explore different types of algorithm for extraction of neutron assignment probabilities from the collected waveforms.

  15. Neutron personnel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, R.V.

    1981-06-16

    The current state-of-the-art in neutron personnel dosimetry is reviewed. Topics covered include dosimetry needs and alternatives, current dosimetry approaches, personnel monitoring devices, calibration strategies, and future developments. (ACR)

  16. Directionally positionable neutron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Bumgardner, H.M.; Dance, W.E.

    1981-11-10

    Disclosed is apparatus for forming and directionally positioning a neutron beam. The apparatus includes an enclosed housing rotatable about a first axis with a neutron source axially positionable on the axis of rotation of the enclosed housing but rotationally fixed with respect to the housing. The rotatable housing is carried by a vertically positionable arm carried on a mobile transport. A collimator is supported by the rotatable housing and projects into the housing to orientationally position its inlet window at an adjustably fixed axial and radial spacing from the neutron source so that rotation of the enclosed housing causes the inlet window to rotate about a circle which is a fixed axial distance from the neutron source and has the axis of rotation of the housing as its center.

  17. Shifting scintillator neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Jr., Morris Lowell; Hannah, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A

    2014-03-04

    Provided are sensors and methods for detecting thermal neutrons. Provided is an apparatus having a scintillator for absorbing a neutron, the scintillator having a back side for discharging a scintillation light of a first wavelength in response to the absorbed neutron, an array of wavelength-shifting fibers proximate to the back side of the scintillator for shifting the scintillation light of the first wavelength to light of a second wavelength, the wavelength-shifting fibers being disposed in a two-dimensional pattern and defining a plurality of scattering plane pixels where the wavelength-shifting fibers overlap, a plurality of photomultiplier tubes, in coded optical communication with the wavelength-shifting fibers, for converting the light of the second wavelength to an electronic signal, and a processor for processing the electronic signal to identify one of the plurality of scattering plane pixels as indicative of a position within the scintillator where the neutron was absorbed.

  18. Personnel neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, D.

    1982-04-01

    This edited transcript of a presentation on personnel neutron discusses the accuracy of present dosimetry practices, requirements, calibration, dosemeter types, quality factors, operational problems, and dosimetry for a criticality accident. 32 figs. (ACR)

  19. Neutron resonance averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs.

  20. Cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is at present impossible to predict the interior constitution of neutron stars based on theory and results from laboratory studies. It has been proposed that it is possible to obtain information on neutron star interiors by studying thermal radiation from their surfaces, because neutrino emission rates, and hence the temperature of the central part of a neutron star, depend on the properties of dense matter. The theory predicts that neutron stars cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and cool faster if the matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been questioned by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.