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Sample records for 14-ton thin-wall depleted

  1. Methods and results for stress analyses on 14-ton, thin-wall depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Chung, C.K.; Frazier, J.L.; Kelley, D.K.

    1996-10-01

    Uranium enrichment operations at the three US gaseous diffusion plants produce depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) as a residential product. At the present time, the inventory of DUF{sub 6} in this country is more than half a million tons. The inventory of DUF{sub 6} is contained in metal storage cylinders, most of which are located at the gaseous diffusion plants. The principal objective of the project is to ensure the integrity of the cylinders to prevent causing an environmental hazard by releasing the contents of the cylinders into the atmosphere. Another objective is to maintain the cylinders in such a manner that the DUF{sub 6} may eventually be converted to a less hazardous material for final disposition. An important task in the DUF{sub 6} cylinders management project is determining how much corrosion of the walls can be tolerated before the cylinders are in danger of being damaged during routine handling and shipping operations. Another task is determining how to handle cylinders that have already been damaged in a manner that will minimize the chance that a breach will occur or that the size of an existing breach will be significantly increased. A number of finite element stress analysis (FESA) calculations have been done to analyze the stresses for three conditions: (1) while the cylinder is being lifted, (2) when a cylinder is resting on two cylinders under it in the customary two-tier stacking array, and (3) when a cylinder is resting on tis chocks on the ground. Various documents describe some of the results and discuss some of the methods whereby they have been obtained. The objective of the present report is to document as many of the FESA cases done at Oak Ridge for 14-ton thin-wall cylinders as possible, giving results and a description of the calculations in some detail.

  2. Review of corrosion in 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Lykins, M.L.

    1995-08-01

    A literature review was conducted to determine the type, extent and severity of corrosion found in the 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders. Also discussed in this review is corrosion found in the valves and plugs used in the cylinders. Corrosion of the cylinders is a gradual process which occurs slowly over time. Understanding corrosion of the cylinders is an important concern for long term storage of the UF{sub 6} in the cylinder yards, as well as the final disposition of the depleted UF{sub 6} tails inventory in the future. The following conclusions are made from the literature review: (1) The general external corrosion rate of the cylinders is about 1 to 2 mils per year (1 mil = 0.001{double_prime}). The highest general external corrosion rate was over 5 mpy on the 48G type cylinders. (2) General internal corrosion from the depleted UF{sub 6} is negligible under normal storage conditions. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/saddle interface from the retention of water in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/skirt interface on the older skirted cylinders due to the lack of water drainage in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur on cylinders that have been in ground contact. Crevice corrosion and galvanic corrosion can occur where the stainless steel I.D. nameplates are attached to the cylinder. The packing nuts on the bronze one-inch valves used in the cylinders are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Mechanical damage from routine handling can lead to a breach in a cylinder with subsequent accelerated corrosion of the mild steel due to attack from HF and other UF{sub 6} hydrolysis by-products.

  3. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  4. The Performance of a Small 14 Ton Tracked Amphibian in Calm and Rough Water.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    OF A SMALL 14 TON TRACKED AMPHIBIAN IN CALM AND ROUGH WATER by 0. FRIDSMA AND W.E. KLOSINSKI APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE: DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED _ DT’O...TYPE OF REPORT It PERIOD COVERED THE PERFORMANCE OF A SMALL 14 TON TRACKED Final August 1981-January 1982 AMPHIBIAN IN CALM AND ROUGH WATER 6...Block 20, II dill and from Report) I. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on favee side i1 necessary and Identify by block number) Amphibious

  5. Thin Wall Cast Iron: Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Doru M. Stefanescu

    2005-07-21

    The development of thin-wall technology allows the designers of energy consuming equipment to select the most appropriate material based on cost/material properties considerations, and not solely on density. The technology developed in this research project will permit the designers working for the automotive industry to make a better informed choice between competing materials and thin wall cast iron, thus decreasing the overall cost of the automobile.

  6. Fillability of Thin-Wall Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Voigt; Joseph Bertoletti; Andrew Kaley; Sandi Ricotta; Travis Sunday

    2002-07-30

    The use of steel components is being challenged by lighter nonferrous or cast iron components. The development of techniques for enhancing and ensuring the filability of thin-wall mold cavities is most critical for thinner wall cast steel production. The purpose of this research was to develop thin-wall casting techniques that can be used to reliably produce thin-wall castings from traditional gravity poured sand casting processes. The focus of the research was to enhance the filling behavior to prevent misrunds. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various foundry variables on the filling of thin section steel castings. These variables include casting design, heat transfer, gating design, and metal fluidity. Wall thickness and pouring temperature have the greatest effect on casting fill. As wall thickness increases the volume to surface area of the casting increases, which increases the solidification time, allowing the metal to flow further in thicker sect ions. Pouring time is another significant variable affecting casting fill. Increases or decreases of 20% in the pouring time were found to have a significant effect on the filling of thin-wall production castings. Gating variables, including venting, pouring head height, and mold tilting also significantly affected thin-wall casting fill. Filters offer less turbulent, steadier flow, which is appropriate for thicker castings, but they do not enhance thin-wall casting fill.

  7. Criticality safety review of 2 1/2 -, 10-, and 14-ton UF sub 6 cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1991-10-01

    Currently, UF{sub 6} cylinders designed to contain 2{1/2} tons of UF{sub 6} are classified as Fissile Class 2 packages with a transport index (TI) of 5 for the purpose of transportation. The 10-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders are classified as Fissile Class 1 with no TI assigned for transportation. The 14-ton cylinders, although not certified for transport with enrichments greater than 1 wt % because they have no approved overpack, can be used in on-site operations for enrichments greater than 1 wt %. The maximum {sup 235}U enrichments for these cylinders are 5.0 wt % for the 2{1/2}-ton cylinder and 4.5 wt % for the 10- and 14-ton cylinders. This work reviews the suitability for reclassification of the 2{1/2}-ton UF{sub 6} packages as Fissile Class 1 with a maximum {sup 235}U enrichment of 5 wt %. Additionally, the 10- and 14-ton cylinders are reviewed to address a change in maximum {sup 235}U enrichment from 4.5 to 5 wt %. Based on this evaluation, the 2{1/2}-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders meet the 10 CFR.71 criteria for Fissile Class 1 packages, and no TI is needed for criticality safety purposes; however, a TI may be required based on radiation from the packages. Similarly, the 10- and 14-ton UF{sub 6} packages appear acceptable for a maximum enrichment rating change to 5 wt % {sup 235}U. 11 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Criticality safety review of 2 1/2 -, 10-, and 14-ton UF sub 6 cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    The US regulations governing the packaging and transportation of UF{sub 6} cylinders are contained in the publication 10CFR71. Under the current 10CFR71 regulations, packages are classified according to Fissile Class I, II, or III and a corresponding transport index (TI). UF{sub 6} cylinders designed to contain 2{1/2}-tons of UF{sub 6} are classified as Fissile Class II packages with a TI of 5 for the purpose of transportation. The 10-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders are classified as Fissile Class I with no TI assigned for transportation. The 14-ton cylinders are not certified for transport with enrichments greater than 1 wt % since they have no approved overpack. This work reviews the suitability of 2{1/2}-ton UF{sub 6} packages for reclassification as Fissile Class I with a maximum {sup 235}U enrichment of 5 wt %. Additionally, the 10- and 14-ton cylinders are reviewed to address a change in maximum {sup 235}U enrichment from 4.5 to 5 wt %. Based on this evaluation, the 2{1/2}-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders meet the 10CFR71 criteria for Fissile Class I packages, and no TI is needed for criticality safety purposes. Similarly, the 10- and 14-ton UF{sub 6} packages appear suitable for a maximum enrichment rating change to 5 wt % {sup 235}U. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Corrections to the thin wall approximation in general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garfinkle, David; Gregory, Ruth

    1989-01-01

    The question is considered whether the thin wall formalism of Israel applies to the gravitating domain walls of a lambda phi(exp 4) theory. The coupled Einstein-scalar equations that describe the thick gravitating wall are expanded in powers of the thickness of the wall. The solutions of the zeroth order equations reproduce the results of the usual Israel thin wall approximation for domain walls. The solutions of the first order equations provide corrections to the expressions for the stress-energy of the wall and to the Israel thin wall equations. The modified thin wall equations are then used to treat the motion of spherical and planar domain walls.

  10. Theory of thin-walled rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldenveizer, A L

    1951-01-01

    Starting with the Love equations for bending of extensible shells, "principal stress states" are sought for a thin-walled rod of arbitrary but open cross section. Principal stress states exclude those local states arising from end conditions which damp out with distance from the ends. It is found that for rods of intermediate length, long enough to avoid local bending at a support, and short enough that elementary torsion and bending are not the most significant stress states, four principal states exist. Three of these states are associated with the planar distribution of axial stress and are equivalent to the engineering theory of extension and bending of solid sections. The fourth state resembles that which has been called in the literature "bending stress due to torsional", except that cross sections are permitted to bend and the shear along the center line of the cross section is permitted to differ from zero.

  11. Thermophysical Properties of Thin Walled Compacted Graphite Iron Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górny, Marcin; Lelito, Janusz; Kawalec, Magdalena

    The thermal conductivity, diffusivity and specific heat were investigated in thin walled compacted graphite iron castings. The research was conducted for thin-walled iron castings with a 3-mm wall thickness. This study addresses the effect of cooling rate and of titanium additions on the exhibited microstructure and thermophysical parameters of thin-walled compacted graphite iron (TWCI) castings as determined by changing the molding media (silica sand and insulating sand LDASC), and Ferro Titanium. The tested material represents the occurrence of graphite in the shape of nodules, flakes (C and D types) and compacted graphite with a different shape factor and percent nodularity. Thermophysical parameters have been evaluated by the laser flash technique in a temperature range of 22-600°C. The results show that the cooling rates together with the titanium content largely influence the microstructure, graphite morphology and finally thermophysical properties of thin walled castings.

  12. Plastic shoe facilitates ultrasonic inspection of thin wall metal tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambermeyer, D. J.; Peterson, R. M.

    1967-01-01

    Plastic shoe aids inspection of thin walled stainless steel welded tubing to locate voids or other material defects in critical component equipment. Incorporated in available ultrasonic inspection equipment, it couples the transducer to the tube at desired incident angles.

  13. Strength Tests of Thin-Walled Duralumin Cylinders in Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Eugene E

    1934-01-01

    This report is the second of a series presenting the results of strength tests of thin-walled duralumin cylinders and truncated cones of circular and elliptic section. It contains the results obtained from compression tests on 45 thin-walled duralumin cylinders of circular section with ends clamped to rigid bulkheads. In addition to the tests on duralumin cylinders, there are included the results of numerous tests on rubber, celluloid, steel, and brass cylinders obtained from various sources.

  14. Computer analysis of thin-walled structural members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papangelis, J. P.; Hancock, G. J.

    1995-07-01

    The calculation of the stresses and failure modes in thin-walled structural members is a complex procedure. Structural designers will often need help in analysing these types of structures. A vehicle for providing this help is the computer program developed for the microcomputer. In this paper, a computer procedure is described for the cross-section analysis and elastic buckling analysis of thin-walled structural members. The cross-section analysis calculates the section properties, warping displacements, and the longitudinal and shear stresses for thin-walled open and closed cross-sections of any shape. The longitudinal stresses are used to perform an elastic finite strip buckling analysis of thin-walled structural members. The analysis can be done for a number of different buckle half-wavelengths of the member and the load factor and buckled shape are output for each length. The analysis is performed by the user-friendly computer program THIN-WALL, which is also described in the paper.

  15. Criticality Safety Review of 2 1/2-, 10-, and 14-Ton UF(Sub 6) Cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    Currently, UF{sub 6} cylinders designed to contain 2 1/2 tons of UF{sub 6} are classified as Fissile Class II packages with a transport index (TI) of 5 for the purpose of transportation. The 10-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders are classified as Fissile Class I with no TI assigned for transportation. The 14-ton cylinders, although not certified for transport with enrichments greater than 1 wt % because they have no approved overpack, can be used in on-site operations for enrichments greater than 1 wt %. The maximum 235U enrichments for these cylinders are 5.0 wt % for the 2 1/2-ton cylinder and 4.5 wt % for the 10- and 14-ton cylinders. This work reviews the suitability for reclassification of the 2 1/2-ton UF{sub 6} packages as Fissile Class I with a maximum {sup 235}U enrichment of 5 wt %. Additionally, the 10- and 14-ton cylinders are reviewed to address a change in maximum {sup 235}U enrichment from 4.5 to 5 wt %. Based on this evaluation, the 2 1/2-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders meet the 10 CFR.71 criteria for Fissile Class I packages, and no TI is needed for criticality safety purposes; however, a TI may be required based on radiation from the packages. Similarly, the 10- and 14-ton UF{sub 6} packages appear acceptable for a maximum enrichment rating change to 5 wt % {sup 235}U.

  16. Evaluation of dynamic collapse in thin-walled composite members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, N.; Murase, K.; Onda, T.; Watanabe, T.

    2013-07-01

    Many of steel thin wall closed section members are used by automobile industry. The local buckling of these elements that occur under compressive stress remains the main technological problem. To improve the performance of the members, the filling the inside of closed section with the low-density foaming material are usually used. In this study, we present the usefulness of axial compression and 3-point bending tests for the composite members filled with two kinds of epoxy resin. The difference between composite member and thin-walled member was investigated concerning their elastic and plastic collapse characteristics while tested with various deformation velocities. The adherent strength between thin-walled member and foaming material, and filling effect of the foaming material in the energy absorption characteristics was clarified.

  17. On the mechanics of thin-walled laminated composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Ever J.; Lopez-Anido, Roberto; Davalos, Julio F.

    1993-01-01

    A formal engineering approach of the mechanics of thin-walled laminated beams based on kinematic assumptions consistent with Timoshenko beam theory is presented. Thin-walled composite beams with open or closed cross section subjected to bending and axial load are considered. A variational formulation is employed to obtain a comprehensive description of the structural response. Beam stiffness coefficients, which account for the cross section geometry and for the material anisotropy, are obtained. An explicit expression for the static shear correction factor of thin-walled composite beams is derived from energy equivalence. A numerical example involving a laminated I-beam is used to used to demonstrate the capability of the model for predicting displacements and ply stresses.

  18. Nonlinear fracture mechanics-based analysis of thin wall cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brust, Frederick W.; Leis, Brian N.; Forte, Thomas P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a simple analysis technique to predict the crack initiation, growth, and rupture of large-radius, R, to thickness, t, ratio (thin wall) cylinders. The method is formulated to deal both with stable tearing as well as fatigue mechanisms in applications to both surface and through-wall axial cracks, including interacting surface cracks. The method can also account for time-dependent effects. Validation of the model is provided by comparisons of predictions to more than forty full scale experiments of thin wall cylinders pressurized to failure.

  19. Transverse Vibrations of Hollow Thin-Walled Cylindrical Beams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1953-01-01

    REPORT 1129 TRANSVERSE VIBRATIONS OF HOLLOW THIN-WALLED CYLINDRICAL BEAMS By BERNARD 3UDIANSKY and EDWIN T. KRUSZEWSKI Lankly Aetenudea Labsntory...iangey Flew, Va. acea n 4. j ’tifitl Distribution AvailabilitYC04eS I /or fteci0 National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Hmd piarters, 1714 F Sweet ...fundmenta pr*oWxe ffJlight •[0 REPORT 1129 TRANSVERSE VIBRATIONS OF HOLLOW THIN-WALLED CYLINDRICAL BEAMS’ By BERNARD BuDIANSKY and EDWIN T. Ktuszowiat

  20. Silver plating technique seals leaks in thin wall tubing joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blenderman, W. H.

    1966-01-01

    Leaks in thin wall tubing joints are sealed by cleaning and silver plating the hot gas side of the joint in the leakage area. The pressure differential across the silver during hydrostatic test and subsequent use forces the ductile silver into the leak area and seals it.

  1. Stability analysis of thin-walled fiber reinforced members

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, P.K.; Dey, A.

    1997-07-01

    Finite element and theoretical stability analyses of thin-walled glass fiber reinforced structural members are undertaken to predict the critical load in various modes of buckling and to study the buckling behavior of such members as compared to those made of isotropic materials. The applicability of component plate analysis is evaluated with respect to full three-dimensional analysis.

  2. Method for preparing thin-walled ceramic articles of configuration

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Powell, G.L.

    1975-11-01

    A method for preparing a hollow thin-walled ceramic product is described. Ceramic powder is plasma-sprayed onto a concave surface of a substrate having a coefficient of thermal expansion less than that of the ceramic. The coated substrate is heated to sinter the ceramic and then cooled to effect a separation of the ceramic product from the substrate. (auth)

  3. Welded repairs of punctured thin-walled aluminum pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. J.

    1969-01-01

    Punctures in thin-walled aluminum pressure vessels are repaired by plugging the hole with an interference-fit disc and welding the unit. The repaired vessels withstood test pressures in excess of vessel ultimate design values for 2-, 4-, and 6-inch holes in 0.202-inch-thick aluminum alloy parent material.

  4. Extrusion of small-diameter, thin-wall tungsten tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, C. P.; Gyorgak, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    Small-diameter, thin-wall seamless tubing of tungsten has been fabricated in lengths of up to 10 feet by hot extrusion over a floating mandrel. Extrusion of 0.50-inch-diameter tubing over 0.4-inch-diameter mandrels was accomplished at temperatures ranging from 3000 degrees to 4000 degrees F.

  5. Twisting of thin walled columns perfectly restrained at one end

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazzarino, Lucio

    1938-01-01

    Proceeding from the basic assumptions of the Batho-Bredt theory on twisting failure of thin-walled columns, the discrepancies most frequently encountered are analyzed. A generalized approximate method is suggested for the determination of the disturbances in the stress condition of the column, induced by the constrained warping in one of the end sections.

  6. Standard surface grinder for precision machining of thin-wall tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, A.; Kotora, J., Jr.; Rein, J.; Smith, S. V.; Strack, D.; Stuckey, D.

    1967-01-01

    Standard surface grinder performs precision machining of thin-wall stainless steel tubing by electrical discharge grinding. A related adaptation, a traveling wire electrode fixture, is used for machining slots in thin-walled tubing.

  7. Dynamic behavior of braced thin-walled beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokić, A.; Lukić, D.

    2007-11-01

    The present paper considers the dynamic behavior of beams with open thin-walled cross-sections along their length with bracings (connecting beams and truss). The effect of the constrained torsion warping, rotary inertia, and flexural-torsion coupling due to nonsymmetric cross-sections is included. In the case of simply supported beams, closed-form solutions for determining coupled natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes are newly derived. The frequency equation, given in a determinantal form, is expanded in an explicit analytical form and then solved using the Mathcad 2001 Professional symbolic computing package. Some illustrative examples on the application of the present theory are given for coupled bending-torsion vibrations of braced thin-walled beams. As compared with FEM, numerical results demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed method

  8. Stability of Thin-Walled Tubes Under Torsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnell, L H

    1935-01-01

    In this report a theoretical solution is developed for the torsion on a round thin-walled tube for which the walls become unstable. The results of this theory are given by a few simple formulas and curves which cover all cases. The differential equations of equilibrium are derived in a simpler form than previously found, it being shown that many items can be neglected.

  9. On milling of thin-wall conical and tubular workpieces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Mu-Ping; Tsai, Nan-Chyuan; Yeh, Cheng-Wei

    2016-05-01

    Thin-wall tubular-geometry workpieces have been widely applied in aircraft and medical industries. However, due to the special geometry of this kind of workpieces and induced poor machinability, the desired accuracy of machining tends to be greatly degraded, no matter what type of metal-cutting task such as milling, drilling or turning is undertaken. Though numerous research reports are available that the tool path can be planned on the basis of preset surface profile before actual milling operation is performed, it is still difficult to predict the real-time surface profile errors for peripheral milling of thin-wall tubular workpieces. Instead of relying on tool path planning, this research is focused on how to real-time formulate the appropriate applied cutting torque via feedback of spindle motor current. On the other hand, a few suitable cutting conditions which are able to prevent potential break/crack of thin-wall workpieces and enhance productivity but almost retain the same cutting quality is proposed in this research. To achieve this goal, estimated surface profile error on machined parts due to deflections caused by both tool and workpiece is studied at first. Traditionally, by adjusting cutting parameters such as feed rate or cut depth, the deflection of tool or workpiece can be expected not to exceed the specified limit. Instead, an effective feedback control loop is proposed by this work for applying real-time appropriate applied cutting torque to prevent potential break/crack of the thin-wall conical workpieces. The torque estimation approach by spindle motor current feedback and the corresponding fuzzy logic controller are employed. Compared with constant cutting torque during milling operation in tradition manner, it is observed that the time consumption of milling cycle by aid of the aforesaid fuzzy logic controller is greatly shortened while the resulted cutting accuracy upon finish of workpiece can be almost retained.

  10. Thin-walled reinforcement lattice structure for hollow CMC buckets

    DOEpatents

    de Diego, Peter

    2017-06-27

    A hollow ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine bucket with an internal reinforcement lattice structure has improved vibration properties and stiffness. The lattice structure is formed of thin-walled plies made of CMC. The wall structures are arranged and located according to high stress areas within the hollow bucket. After the melt infiltration process, the mandrels melt away, leaving the wall structure to become the internal lattice reinforcement structure of the bucket.

  11. The Twisting of Thin-walled, Stiffened Circular Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schapitz, E

    1938-01-01

    On the basis of the present investigation of the twisting of thin-walled, stiffened cylinders the following conclusions can be reached: 1) there is as yet no generally applicable formula for the buckling moment of the skin; 2) the mathematical treatment of the condition of the shell after buckling of the skin is based on the tension-field theory, wherein the strain condition is considered homogenous.

  12. Critical stress of thin-walled cylinders in axial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batdorf, S B; Schildcrout, Murry; Stein, Manuel

    1947-01-01

    Empirical design curves are presented for the critical stress of thin-wall cylinders loaded in axial compression. These curves are plotted in terms of the nondimensional parameters of small-deflection theory and are compared with theoretical curves derived for the buckling of cylinders with simply supported and clamped edges. An empirical equation is given for the buckling of cylinders having a length-radius ratio greater than about 0.75.

  13. Inflated Sporopollenin Exine Capsules Obtained from Thin-Walled Pollen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Hyeon; Seo, Jeongeun; Jackman, Joshua A.; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-06-01

    Sporopollenin is a physically robust and chemically resilient biopolymer that comprises the outermost layer of pollen walls and is the first line of defense against harsh environmental conditions. The unique physicochemical properties of sporopollenin increasingly motivate the extraction of sporopollenin exine capsules (SECs) from pollen walls as a renewable source of organic microcapsules for encapsulation applications. Despite the wide range of different pollen species with varying sizes and wall thicknesses, faithful extraction of pollen-mimetic SECs has been limited to thick-walled pollen capsules with rigid mechanical properties. There is an unmet need to develop methods for producing SECs from thin-walled pollen capsules which constitute a large fraction of all pollen species and have attractive materials properties such as greater aerosol dispersion. Herein, we report the first successful extraction of inflated SEC microcapsules from a thin-walled pollen species (Zea mays), thereby overcoming traditional challenges with mechanical stability and loss of microstructure. Morphological and compositional characterization of the SECs obtained by the newly developed extraction protocol confirms successful protein removal along with preservation of nanoscale architectural features. Looking forward, there is excellent potential to apply similar strategies across a wide range of unexplored thin-walled pollen species.

  14. Inflated Sporopollenin Exine Capsules Obtained from Thin-Walled Pollen

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hyeon; Seo, Jeongeun; Jackman, Joshua A.; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Sporopollenin is a physically robust and chemically resilient biopolymer that comprises the outermost layer of pollen walls and is the first line of defense against harsh environmental conditions. The unique physicochemical properties of sporopollenin increasingly motivate the extraction of sporopollenin exine capsules (SECs) from pollen walls as a renewable source of organic microcapsules for encapsulation applications. Despite the wide range of different pollen species with varying sizes and wall thicknesses, faithful extraction of pollen-mimetic SECs has been limited to thick-walled pollen capsules with rigid mechanical properties. There is an unmet need to develop methods for producing SECs from thin-walled pollen capsules which constitute a large fraction of all pollen species and have attractive materials properties such as greater aerosol dispersion. Herein, we report the first successful extraction of inflated SEC microcapsules from a thin-walled pollen species (Zea mays), thereby overcoming traditional challenges with mechanical stability and loss of microstructure. Morphological and compositional characterization of the SECs obtained by the newly developed extraction protocol confirms successful protein removal along with preservation of nanoscale architectural features. Looking forward, there is excellent potential to apply similar strategies across a wide range of unexplored thin-walled pollen species. PMID:27302853

  15. Buckling and crumpling of a compressed thin-walled box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallinen, Tuomas; Åström, Jan; Timonen, Jussi

    2010-03-01

    Vertical compression of an elastic thin-walled box is explored. Such a compression displays three successive regimes: linear, buckled and collapsed. Analogy of the buckled regime to thin-film blisters is demonstrated. The compression force is shown to reach its maximum at the end of that regime, after which the box collapses displaying features (e.g. ridges) typical of crumpling of thin sheets. These qualitative findings are confirmed by numerical simulations based on a discrete element method, and implications are drawn on the box compression strength.

  16. Linear motion feed through with thin wall rubber sealing element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, V. P.; Deulin, E. A.

    2017-07-01

    The patented linear motion feedthrough is based on elastic thin rubber walls usage being reinforced with analeptic string fixed in the middle part of the walls. The pneumatic or hydro actuators create linear movement of stock. The length of this movement is two times more the rubber wall length. This flexible wall is a sealing element of feedthrough. The main advantage of device is negligible resistance force that is less then mentioned one in sealing bellows that leads to positioning error decreasing. Nevertheless, the thin wall rubber sealing element (TRE) of the feedthrough is the main unreliable element that was the reason of this element longevity research. The theory and experimental results help to create equation for TRE longevity calculation under vacuum or extra high pressure difference action. The equation was used for TRE longevity determination for hydraulic or vacuum equipment realization also as it helps for gas flow being leaking through the cracks in thin walls of rubber sealing element of linear motion feedthrough calculation.

  17. A Nonlinear Thin-Wall Model for Vein Buckling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Avione Y; Han, Hai-Chao

    2010-12-01

    Tortuous or twisted veins are often seen in the retina, cerebrum, and legs (varicose veins) of one-third of the aged population, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. While the collapse of veins under external pressure has been well documented, the bent buckling of long vein segments has not been studied. The objectives of this study were to develop a biomechanical model of vein buckling under internal pressure and to predict the critical pressure. Veins were modeled as thin-walled nonlinear elastic tubes with the Fung exponential strain energy function. Our results demonstrated that veins buckle due to high blood pressure or low axial tension. High axial tension stabilized veins under internal pressure. Our buckling model estimated the critical pressure accurately compared to the experimental measurements. The buckling equation provides a useful tool for studying the development of tortuous veins.

  18. Analysis of deformations of thin wall parts in machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ślusarczyk, Ł.

    2015-09-01

    The article presents a study on deformation of thin-walled components during milling. In the practical part, the test position consisting of conventional milling machines, high-speed camera and piezoelectric dynamometer was prepared. Milling operations performed on samples prepared of ST3S steel. Cutting parameters for each sample were the same, the way of mounting the samples in a holder constituted the difference. The tests were made for conventional and climbing milling. During the tests, deformation of samples was recorded with the high-speed camera. Moreover, the cutting forces were also recorded. In the second part of the article, the work in NX application was described. Geometric models of samples and material model were built, and simulation of deformation of the samples was performed. A comparison of the deformation results obtained from the laboratory tests and simulations constitutes a summary of the article.

  19. Mechanism of Filling and Feeding of Thin-Walled Structures during Gravity Casting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Faguo; Zhang, Jiao; Bian, Fenggang; Fu, Yanan; Xue, Yanling; Yin, Fucheng; Xie, Yu; Xu, Yi; Sun, Baode

    2015-01-01

    The filling and feeding of thin-walled structures in metal castings pose significant difficulties in manufacturing aerospace structural materials. Samples containing 2 mm and 5 mm thin-walled structures were designed to study the kinetics of filling. The microstructural evolution of the solidification of thin-walled structures was studied with synchrotron X-radiation imaging. The formation of dendritic networks and the isotherm profiles of samples of different thickness were examined. The experimental results showed solidification microstructures of 2 mm and 5 mm thin-walled parts containing elongated equiaxed grains and normal equiaxed grains, respectively. The filling and feeding abilities of thin-walled parts were found to depend more on the wall thickness than on the pouring temperature.

  20. Mechanical testing of thin-walled zirconia abutments

    PubMed Central

    CANULLO, Luigi; COELHO, Paulo G.; BONFANTE, Estevam A.

    2013-01-01

    Although the use of zirconia abutments for implant-supported restorations has gained momentum with the increasing demand for esthetics, little informed design rationale has been developed to characterize their fatigue behavior under different clinical scenarios. However, to prevent the zirconia from fracturing, the use of a titanium connection in bicomponent aesthetic abutments has been suggested. Objective: Mechanical testing of customized thin-walled titanium-zirconia abutments at the connection with the implant was performed in order to characterize the fatigue behavior and the failure modes for straight and angled abutments. Material and Methods: Twenty custom-made bi-component abutments were tested according to ISO 14801:2007 either at a straight or a 25º angle inclination (n=10 each group). Fatigue was conducted at 15 Hz for 5 million cycles in dry conditions at 20ºC±5ºC. Mean values and standard deviations were calculated for each group. All comparisons were performed by t-tests assuming unequal variances. The level of statistical significance was set at p≤0.05. Failed samples were inspected in a polarized-light and then in a scanning electron microscope. Results: Straight and angled abutments mean maximum load was 296.7 N and 1,145 N, the dynamic loading mean Fmax was 237.4 N and 240.7 N, respectively. No significant differences resulted between the straight and angled bi-component abutments in both static (p=0.253) and dynamic testing (p=0.135). A significant difference in the bending moment required for fracture was detected between the groups (p=0.01). Fractures in the angled group occurred mainly at the point of load application, whereas in the straight abutments, fractures were located coronally and close to the thinly designed areas at the cervical region. Conclusion: Angled or straight thin-walled zirconia abutments presented similar Fmax under fatigue testing despite the different bending moments required for fracture. The main implication is

  1. Mechanical testing of thin-walled zirconia abutments.

    PubMed

    Canullo, Luigi; Coelho, Paulo G; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2013-01-01

    Although the use of zirconia abutments for implant-supported restorations has gained momentum with the increasing demand for esthetics, little informed design rationale has been developed to characterize their fatigue behavior under different clinical scenarios. However, to prevent the zirconia from fracturing, the use of a titanium connection in bi-component aesthetic abutments has been suggested. Mechanical testing of customized thin-walled titanium-zirconia abutments at the connection with the implant was performed in order to characterize the fatigue behavior and the failure modes for straight and angled abutments. Twenty custom-made bi-component abutments were tested according to ISO 14801:2007 either at a straight or a 25° angle inclination (n=10 each group). Fatigue was conducted at 15 Hz for 5 million cycles in dry conditions at 20°C±5°C. Mean values and standard deviations were calculated for each group. All comparisons were performed by t-tests assuming unequal variances. The level of statistical significance was set at p≤0.05. Failed samples were inspected in a polarized-light and then in a scanning electron microscope. Straight and angled abutments mean maximum load was 296.7 N and 1,145 N, the dynamic loading mean Fmax was 237.4 N and 240.7 N, respectively. No significant differences resulted between the straight and angled bi-component abutments in both static (p=0.253) and dynamic testing (p=0.135). A significant difference in the bending moment required for fracture was detected between the groups (p=0.01). Fractures in the angled group occurred mainly at the point of load application, whereas in the straight abutments, fractures were located coronally and close to the thinly designed areas at the cervical region. Angled or straight thin-walled zirconia abutments presented similar Fmax under fatigue testing despite the different bending moments required for fracture. The main implication is that although zirconia angled or straight abutments

  2. Frontal horn thin walled cysts in preterm neonates are benign

    PubMed Central

    Pal, B; Preston, P; Morgan, M; Rushton, D; Durbin, G

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Screening cranial ultrasound led to the discovery of isolated frontal horn cysts quite distinct from periventricular leucomalacia cysts.
AIM—To clarify their significance, incidence, characteristics, causal factors or aetiology, and effect on long term outcome.
DESIGN—A retrospective observational study of all first cranial ultrasound scans (total of 2914) performed during the period 1984-1994 inclusive found 21 neonates with smooth thin walled frontal horn cysts: 18 of 2629 scanned were of birth weight < 1500 g or gestation < 33 weeks, and three of 285 were > 33 weeks gestation. Sequential ultrasound, maternal records, and neonatal events were retrospectively assessed. In survivors, routine neurodevelopmental evaluations were obtained. Postmortem studies of one cyst were performed to determine the nature and origin of these lesions.
RESULTS—Of the 21 subjects, 15 had isolated frontal horn cysts and six had additional ultrasound scan abnormalities, including four with subependymal haemorrhage. The sonographic features of frontal horn cysts were of distinctive morphology (elliptical, smooth, thin walled, ranging in size from 3 to 20 mm) and position (adjacent to the tip of the anterior horns). The cysts enlarged and then regressed by a median corrected age of 2 months. Subjects of < 33 weeks gestation (n = 18) had a median birth weight of 1465g (range 720-1990) and median gestation of 30 weeks (range 24-32). There was no consistent perinatal course. The neurodevelopmental outcome in 10 of the 11 survivors with isolated frontal horn cysts was normal. Five subjects died from causes unrelated to brain pathology in the neonatal period, and one subject died after infancy. Histological examination of a cyst at autopsy in one additional subject subsequent to the period of study confirmed the cyst to be lined by neuroblasts and ependymal cells.
CONCLUSIONS—The incidence of frontal horn cysts in this low birthweight population was 7 per 1000 (0

  3. Active stabilization of thin-wall structures under compressive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welham, Jared; Calius, Emilio P.; Chase, J. Geoffrey

    2003-08-01

    The active suppression of elastic buckling instability has the potential to significantly increase the effective strength of thin-wall structures. Despite all the interest in smart structures, the active suppression of buckling has received comparatively little attention. This paper addresses the effects of embedded actuation on the compression buckling strength of laminated composite plates through analysis and simulation. Numerical models are formulated that include the influence of essential features such as sensor uncertainty and noise, actuator saturation and control architecture on the buckling process. Silicon-based strain sensors and diffuse laser distance sensors are both considered for use in the detection of incipient buckling behavior due to their increased sensitivity. Actuation is provided by paired distributions of piezo-electric material incorporated into both sides of the laminate. Optimal controllers are designed to command the structure to deform in ways that interfere with the development of buckling mode shapes. Commercial software packages are used to solve the resulting non-linear equations, and some of the tradeoffs are enumerated. Overall, the results show that active buckling control can considerably enhance resistance to instability under compressive loads. These buckling load predictions demonstrate the viability of optimal control and piezo-electric actuation for implementing active buckling control. Due to the importance of early detection, the relative effectiveness of active buckling control is shown to be strongly dependent on the performance of the sensing scheme, as well as on the characteristics of the structure.

  4. Menu driven heat treatment control of thin walled bodies

    DOEpatents

    Kothmann, Richard E.; Booth, Jr., Russell R.; Grimm, Noel P.; Batenburg, Abram; Thomas, Vaughn M.

    1992-01-01

    A process for controlling the heating of a thin-walled body according to a predetermined temperature program by means of electrically controllable heaters, comprising: disposing the heaters adjacent one surface of the body such that each heater is in facing relation with a respective zone of the surface; supplying heat-generating power to each heater and monitoring the temperature at each surface zone; and for each zone: deriving (16,18,20), on the basis of the temperature values obtained in the monitoring step, estimated temperature values of the surface at successive time intervals each having a first selected duration; generating (28), on the basis of the estimated temperature values derived in each time interval, representations of the temperature, THSIFUT, which each surface zone will have, based on the level of power presently supplied to each heater, at a future time which is separated from the present time interval by a second selected duration; determining (30) the difference between THSIFUT and the desired temperature, FUTREFTVZL, at the future time which is separated from the present time interval by the second selected duration; providing (52) a representation indicating the power level which sould be supplied to each heater in order to reduce the difference obtained in the determining step; and adjusting the power level supplied to each heater by the supplying step in response to the value of the representation provided in the providing step.

  5. Optimum design of the carbon fiber thin-walled baffle for the space-based camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yong; Song, Gu; Yuan, An; Jin, Guang

    2011-08-01

    The thin-walled baffle design of the space-based camera is an important job in the lightweight space camera research task for its stringent quality requirement and harsh mechanical environment especially for the thin-walled baffle of the carbon fiber design. In the paper, an especially thin-walled baffle of the carbon fiber design process was described and it is sound significant during the other thin-walled baffle design of the space camera. The designer obtained the design margin of the thin-walled baffle that structural stiffness and strength can tolerated belong to its development requirements through the appropriate use of the finite element analysis of the walled parameters influence sensitivity to its structural stiffness and strength. And the designer can determine the better optimization criterion of thin-walled baffle during the geometric parameter optimization process in such guiding principle. It sounds significant during the optimum design of the thin-walled baffle of the space camera. For structural stiffness and strength of the carbon fibers structure which can been designed, the effect of the optimization will be more remarkable though the optional design of the parameters chose. Combination of manufacture process and design requirements the paper completed the thin-walled baffle structure scheme selection and optimized the specific carbon fiber fabrication technology though the FEM optimization, and the processing cost and process cycle are retrenchment/saved effectively in the method. Meanwhile, the weight of the thin-walled baffle reduced significantly in meet the design requirements under the premise of the structure. The engineering prediction had been adopted, and the related result shows that the thin-walled baffle satisfied the space-based camera engineering practical needs very well, its quality reduced about 20%, the final assessment index of the thin-walled baffle were superior to the overall design requirements significantly. The design

  6. Thin-walled compliant plastic structures for meso-scale fluidic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, R R; Schumann, D L

    1998-12-29

    Thin-walled, compliant plastic structures for meso-scale fluidic systems were fabricated, tested and used to demonstrate valving, pumping, metering and mixing. These structures permit the isolation of actuators and sensors from the working fluid, thereby reducing chemical compatibility issues. The thin-walled, compliant plastic structures can be used in either a permanent, reusable system or as an inexpensive disposable for single-use assay systems. The implementation of valving, pumping, mixing and metering operations involve only an elastic change in the mechanical shape of various portions of the structure. Advantages provided by the thin-walled plastic structures include reduced dead volume and rapid mixing. Five different methods for fabricating the thin-walled plastic structures discussed including laser welding, molding, vacuum forming, thermal heat staking and photolithographic patterning techniques.

  7. Fabrication of thin-wall hollow nickel spheres and low density syntactic foams

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, R.B.; Sanders, T.H. Jr.; Cochran, J.K.

    1991-12-31

    A process has been developed to fabricate thin-wall hollow spheres from conventional oxide powders at room temperature. The polymer- bonded powder shells are fired in air to sinter the walls, leaving the shells either impervious or porous. Alternatively, the oxide shells can be preferentially reduced to produce thin-wall hollow metal spheres which can be bonded together to produce an ultra light weight closed-cell foam. Processing and properties of this class of low density structures will be discussed.

  8. A study of thin-walled Taylor column under the influence of rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Kuan-Ruei; Chu, Chin-Chou; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2016-11-01

    An extended study of thin-walled Taylor column under the influence of rotating cylinder is presented with very consistent results in numerical simulations and laboratory experiments. In the previous set-up, the Taylor column effect is produced under the influence of protruded cylinder from the top lid, and the thin-walled Taylor column is formed by draining of the fluid at the bottom. The primary interest of this study is to investigate the influence to thin-walled Taylor column when the cylinder is exerted with a relative rotation rate under very small Rossby number (Ro = U / fR) and Ekman number (Ek = ν / fR2) . The flow patterns are performed with different cylinder height ratios (h/ H) along with varying relative rotation ratio of cylinder to the background α = ω / Ω . Steady-state solutions being solved numerically in the rotating frame are shown to have good agreements with experimental flow visualizations on the resulting appearance of deformed thin-walled Taylor columns. As a result, the thin-walled Taylor column is observed to strengthen up with increasing α, and weakens with decreasing α. In addition, the weakening thin-walled Taylor column is observed to experience a break through transition near the bottom, which penetration diverged the recirculating region into two portions. Supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology, TAIWAN ROC, Contract No's 103-2221-E002-099-MY3; 105-2221-E002-097-MY3.

  9. Novel Adaptive Fixturing for Thin Walled Aerospace Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, Angelo; Ricciardi, Donato; Salvi, Edoardo; Fantinati, Dario; Iorio, Ernesto

    2011-12-01

    In the aerospace industry the monolithic structures have been introduced to reduce the costs of assembling large numbers of components. The expected benefit of using thin walled monolithic parts is given by a large reduction in the overall manufacturing costs, nevertheless this kind of component encounters a critical phase in fixturing. Fixtures are used to locate and hold workpieces during manufacturing. Because workpiece surface errors and fixture set-up errors (called source errors) always exist, the fixtured workpiece will consequently have position and/or orientation errors (called resultant errors) that will definitely affect the final machining accuracy. Most often the current clamping procedure is not straightforward, it implies several steps and the success of the operation hardly depends by the skill of the human operator. It is estimated that fixturing could constitute 10-20% of the total manufacturing costs, assuming that the fixtures are amortized over relatively small batches. Fixturing devices must satisfy two requisites, which, in some terms, are opposite: to provide relatively high forces in order to guarantee that the workpiece will be maintained in position under the maximum cutting forces to reduce as much as possible strains induced in the workpiece. Limiting the strains induced in the workpiece is crucial because of elastic strain recovery: releasing the clamped workpiece would result in an unwanted final deformation. In this paper a novel adaptive fixturing based on active clamping forces (supplied by piezoelectric actuators) is presented: a real aerospace part case study, - a Nozzle Guide Vane (NGV) -, is introduced, the related problems are identified, and the adopted solutions shown. The proposed adaptive fixturing device can lead to the following advantages: to perform an automatic errors-free workpiece clamping and then drastically reduce the overall fixturing set up time; to recover unwanted strains induced to the workpiece, in order to

  10. Fem and Experimental Analysis of Thin-Walled Composite Elements Under Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Różyło, P.; Wysmulski, P.; Falkowicz, K.

    2017-05-01

    Thin-walled steel elements in the form of openwork columns with variable geometrical parameters of holes were studied. The samples of thin-walled composite columns were modelled numerically. They were subjected to axial compression to examine their behavior in the critical and post-critical state. The numerical models were articulately supported on the upper and lower edges of the cross-section of the profiles. The numerical analysis was conducted only with respect to the non-linear stability of the structure. The FEM analysis was performed until the material achieved its yield stress. This was done to force the loss of stability by the structures. The numerical analysis was performed using the ABAQUS® software. The numerical analysis was performed only for the elastic range to ensure the operating stability of the tested thin-walled structures.

  11. Strength Tests of Thin-walled Duralumin Cylinders in Pure Bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Eugene E

    1933-01-01

    This report is the third of a series presenting the results of strengths tests on thin-walled cylinders and truncated cones of circular and elliptic section; it includes the results obtained from pure bending tests on 58 thin-walled duralumin cylinders of circular section with ends clamped to rigid bulkheads. The tests show that the stress on the extreme fiber at failure as calculated by the ordinary theory of bending is from 30 to 80 percent greater than the compressive stress at failure for thin-walled cylinders in compression. The tests also show that length/radius ratio has no consistent effect upon the bending strength and that the size of the wrinkles that form on the compression half of a cylinder in bending is approximately equal to the size of the wrinkles that form in the complete circumference of a cylinder of the same dimensions in compression.

  12. Instantaneous response of elastic thin-walled structures with arbitrary open cross section to rapid heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Xiaoqin; Mohan, Ram V.; Tamma, Kumar K.

    1992-01-01

    A generalized modeling and analysis approach of thermally-induced coupled vibrations of elastic thin-walled configurations with arbitrary open cross sections are presented in conjunction with a unified implicit transient methodology. Limited research appears in literature which takes into account the influence of rapid thermal heating effects on structures involving various forms of coupling. As a consequence, the dynamic response of such thin-walled structures of arbitrary open cross section due to rapid heating are described here. Effects involving triple, double, and no coupling between bending and torsional vibrations caused by sudden heating on these structures are examined. Numerical test cases are presented which describe the influence of sudden heating on elastic thin-walled structures of arbitrary open cross sections.

  13. Free vibrations of thin-walled semicircular graphite-epoxy composite frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, Huey D.; Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed study is made of the effects of variations in lamination and material parameters of thin walled composite frames on their vibrational characteristics. The structures considered are semicircular thin walled frames with I and J sections. The flanges and webs of the frames are modeled by using 2-D shell and plate finite elements. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of both the generalized displacements and stress resultants in the frame. The frequencies and modes predicted by the 2-D finite element model are compared with those obtained from experiments, as well as with the predictions of a non-dimensional thin walled beam finite element model. A detailed study is made of the sensitivity of the vibrational response to variations in the fiber orientation, material properties of the individual layers, and boundary conditions.

  14. Computed tomography for the diagnosis of solitary thin-walled cavity lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xin-Ying; Liu, Yu-Xia; Wang, Kai-Fei; Zang, Xue-Feng; Sun, Jun-Ping; Zhang, Ming-Yue; Yang, Bing; Ao, Ting; Wang, Jian-Xin

    2015-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed neoplasm and the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Despite the high incidence of lung cancer, the diagnosis of solitary thin-walled cavity lung cancer is rare. The aim of this review is to explore the potentials of computed tomography (CT) as diagnostic tool for solitary thin-walled cavity lung cancer. The literature search was made in electronic databases including PudMed, Ovid SP, Embase, Web of Sciences, EBSCO and Wiley online by using relevant key terms. Because of the rarity of the subject, no precise exclusion or inclusion criteria were used for article selection and the outcome dissemination was decided to be more descriptive rather than quantitative. The detection of cavitation in lungs is frequently done utilizing chest radiographs CT scans. However, the diagnostic challenge remains the accurate detection of solitary thin-walled cavity lung cancer among the prevalence of cavitary lung lesions in multiple thoracic disorders including benign disorders, infectious disease and malignant tumors. Moreover, an accurate diagnosis of solitary thin-walled cavity lung cancer is further complicated by its subjective classification within the literature. In order to facilitate early diagnosis of this disease and circumvent the need for more invasive tests that may not be warranted, the overarching goal is to establish definitive radiological features of lung cavities that are indicative of malignancy. Herein, we describe the benefits of using CT to identify and diagnose solitary thin-walled cavity lung cancer, as well as explore the underlying mechanisms that contribute to thin-walled cavity formation in oncology patients. CT is the best modality for the noninvasive differentiation between malignant and nonmalignant cavities as it provides reliable information regarding the morphology and density of lesions. Besides, CT densitometry can efficiently detect the calcifications in lesions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons

  15. Method of fabricating thin-walled articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Northcutt, Jr., Walter G.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for fabricating thin-walled high-density structures oftungsten-nickel-iron alloys. A powdered blend of the selected alloy constituents is plasma sprayed onto a mandrel having the desired article configuration. The sprayed deposit is removed from the mandrel and subjected to liquid phase sintering to provide the alloyed structure. The formation of the thin-walled structure by plasma spraying significantly reduces shrinkage, and cracking while increasing physical properties of the structure over that obtainable by employing previously known powder metallurgical procedures.

  16. Method of fabricating thin-walled articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Northcutt, W.G. Jr.

    The present invention relates to a method for fabricating thin-walled high-density structures of tungsten-nickel-iron alloys. A powdered blend of the selected alloy constituents is plasma sprayed onto a mandrel having the desired article configuration. The sprayed deposit is removed from the mandrel and subjected to liquid phase sintering to provide the alloyed structure. The formation of the thin-walled structure by plasma spraying significantly reduces shrinkage, and cracking while increasing physical properties of the structure over that obtainable by employing previously known powder metallurgical procedures.

  17. Analysis of thin-walled structural elements via 3D standard BEM with generic substructuring

    SciTech Connect

    De Araujo, Francisco Celio; Gray, Leonard J

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the application of standard 3D Boundary Element Methods to solve thin-walled structural elements (needle-like/shell-like solids). A subregion-by-subregion data structure, incorporating iterative solvers and discontinuous boundary elements, is presented. To efficiently and accurately evaluate the quasi-singular integrals, special quadrature methods are applied. In addition, structured matrix-vector products, designed to avoid the excessive number of conditional tests during solver iterations, are proposed. Numerical results for complex thin-walled BE models are validated by comparison with FEM calculations and previously published BEM analyses.

  18. Prediction of Microporosity in Complex Thin-Wall Castings with the Dimensionless Niyama Criterion

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Maodong; Gao, Haiyan; Wang, Jun; Ling, Lishibao; Sun, Baode

    2013-01-01

    The dimensionless Niyama criterion was used to predict the formation of microporosity in nickel-based superalloy casting, which extended the model application from a simple plate casting to complex thin-wall superalloy casting. The physical characteristics of the superalloy were calculated by JMatPro software. The relation between the volume percentage of microporosity and the dimensionless Niyama values were constructed. Quantitative metallographic measurements of the microporosity of the practical thin-wall casting were carried out. The prediction agreed well with the experiment in general, except for some thick-wall sites in the casting. PMID:28809243

  19. Vibrational behavior of adaptive aircraft wing structures modelled as composite thin-walled beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, O.; Librescu, L.; Rogers, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    The vibrational behavior of cantilevered aircraft wings modeled as thin-walled beams and incorporating piezoelectric effects is studied. Based on the converse piezoelectric effect, the system of piezoelectric actuators conveniently located on the wing yield the control of its associated vertical and lateral bending eigenfrequencies. The possibility revealed by this study enabling one to increase adaptively the eigenfrequencies of thin-walled cantilevered beams could play a significant role in the control of the dynamic response and flutter of wing and rotor blade structures.

  20. Dynamic response of thin-walled structures by variable kinematic one-dimensional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, E.; Varello, A.

    2012-11-01

    This paper investigates the accuracy capabilities of using variable kinematic modeling in compact and thin-walled beam-like structures with dynamic loadings. Carrera Unified Formulation (CUF) is employed to introduce refined one-dimensional (1D) models with a variable order of expansion for the displacement unknowns over the beam cross-section. Classical Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam theories are obtained as particular cases of these variable kinematic models while a higher order expansion permits the detection of in-plane cross-section deformation, since it leads to shell-like solutions. Finite element (FE) method is used to provide numerical results and the Newmark method is implemented as a time integration scheme. Some assessments with closed form solutions are discussed and comparisons with shell-type results obtained with commercial FE software are made. Further analyses address both compact and thin-walled cross-sections. In particular, the case of a deformable thin-walled cylinder loaded by time-dependent internal forces is discussed. The results clearly show that finite elements which are formulated in the CUF framework do not introduce additional numerical problems with respect to classical beam theories. Comparisons with elasticity solutions prove that the present 1D CUF model offers an accuracy in analyzing thin-walled structures which is typical of shell or three-dimensional models with a remarkable reduction in the computational cost required.

  1. Fabrication techniques developed for small- diameter, thin-wall tungsten and tungsten alloy tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brillhart, D. C.; Burt, W. R.; Karasek, F. J.; Mayfield, R. M.

    1968-01-01

    Report describes methods for the fabrication of tungsten and tungsten alloys into small-diameter, thin-wall tubing of nuclear quality. The tungsten, or tungsten alloy tube blanks are produced by double extrusion. Plug-drawing has emerged as an excellent secondary fabrication technique for the reduction of the overall tube dimensions.

  2. Development of processes, means, and theoretical principles of thin-walled detail plastic forming at Kazan Aviation Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakirov, I. M.

    1993-05-01

    The scientific school of thin-walled detail plastic forming was established at Kazan Aviation Institute in the transition period from wood to metal aircraft construction. High precision requirements to thin walled detail plastic forming drove the development of new processes to secure high productivity and a work culture under conditions of low volume production.

  3. Dynamics of thin-walled aerospace structures for fixture design in multi-axis milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshreki, Mouhab

    Milling of thin-walled aerospace structures is a critical process due to the high flexibility of the workpiece. Available models for the prediction of the effect of the fixture on the dynamic response of the workpiece are computationally demanding and fail to represent practical cases for milling of thin-walled structures. Based on the analysis of typical structural components encountered in the aerospace industry, a generalized unit-element, with the shape of an asymmetric pocket, was identified to represent the dynamic response of these components. Accordingly, two computationally efficient dynamic models were developed to predict the dynamic response of typical thin-walled aerospace structures. These models were formulated using Rayleigh's energy and the Rayleigh-Ritz methods. In the first model, the dynamics of multi-pocket thin-walled structures is represented by a plate with torsional and translational springs. A methodology was proposed and implemented for an off-line calibration of the stiffness of the springs using Genetic Algorithms. In the second model, the dynamics of a 3D pocket is represented by an equivalent 2D multi-span plate. Through a careful examination of the milling of thin-walled structures, a new formulation was developed to represent the continuous change of thickness of the workpiece due to the material removal action. Two formulations, based on holonomic constraints and springs with finite stiffness, were also developed and implemented to take into account the effect of perfectly rigid and deformable fixture supports. All the developed models and formulations were validated numerically and experimentally for different workpiece geometries and various types of loading. These models resulted in one to two orders of magnitude reduction in computation time when compared with FE models, with prediction errors of less than 10%. The experimental validation of the models was performed through the machining of thin-walled components. The

  4. An analytical method for prediction of stability lobes diagram of milling of large-size thin-walled workpiece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jiming; Lin, Bin; Guo, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Different from common thin-walled workpiece, in the process of milling of large-size thin-walled workpiece chatter in the axial direction along the spindle is also likely to happen because of the low stiffness of the workpiece in this direction. An analytical method for prediction of stability lobes of milling of large-size thin-walled workpiece is presented in this paper. In the method, not only frequency response function of the tool point but also frequency response function of the workpiece is considered.

  5. Mixed finite element models for free vibrations of thin-walled beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.; Min, Byung-Jin

    1989-01-01

    Simple, mixed finite element models are developed for the free vibration analysis of curved thin-walled beams with arbitrary open cross section. The analytical formulation is based on a Vlasov's type thin-walled beam theory with the effects of flexural-torsional coupling, transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia included. The fundamental unknowns consist of seven internal forces and seven generalized displacements of the beam. The element characteristic arrays are obtained by using a perturbed Lagrangian-mixed variational principle. Only C(sup o) continuity is required for the generalized displacements. The internal forces and the Lagrange multiplier are allowed to be discontinuous at interelement boundaries. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the high accuracy and effectiveness of the elements developed. The standard of comparison is taken to be the solutions obtained by using 2-D plate/shell models for the beams.

  6. Development of a Thin-Wall Magnesium side door Inner Panel for Automobiles

    SciTech Connect

    Jekl, J.; Auld, J.; Sweet, C.; Carter, Jon; Resch, Steve; Klarner, A.; Brevick, J.; Luo, A.

    2015-05-17

    Cast magnesium side door inner panels can provide a good combination of weight, functional, manufacturing and economical requirements. However, several challenges exist including casting technology for thin-wall part design, multi-material incompatibility and relatively low strength vs steel. A project has been initiated, supported by the US Department of Energy, to design and develop a lightweight frame-under-glass door having a thin-wall, full die-cast, magnesium inner panel. This development project is the first of its kind within North America. Phase I of the project is now complete and the 2.0mm magnesium design, through casting process enablers, has met or exceeded all stiffness requirements, with significant mass reduction and part consolidation. In addition, a corrosion mitigation strategy has been established using industry-accepted galvanic isolation methods and coating technologies.

  7. Scaling Behavior in Non-Hookean Compression of Thin-Walled Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallinen, T.; Ojajärvi, J.; Åström, J. A.; Timonen, J.

    2010-08-01

    The mechanics and stability of thin-walled structures is a challenging and important branch in structural mechanics. Under vertical compression the deformation of a thin-walled box differs from that of, e.g., a cylindrical shell. It is demonstrated here that compression of a box can be described by a set of generic scaling laws representing three successive regimes: a linear, wrinkled, and collapsed regime. The linear Hookean regime represents the normal behavior before any instability sets in, while the following wrinkled regime is shown to be analogous to compression of thin-film blisters. The compression force reaches its maximum at the onset of the final collapsed regime that has all the characteristics of membrane crumpling. The theoretical scaling laws were confirmed by numerical simulations.

  8. Electroless-plating technique for fabricating thin-wall convective heat-transfer models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, D. E.; Ballard, G. K.; Wilson, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for fabricating uniform thin-wall metallic heat-transfer models and which simulates a Shuttle thermal protection system tile is described. Two 6- by 6- by 2.5-in. tiles were fabricated to obtain local heat transfer rates. The fabrication process is not limited to any particular geometry and results in a seamless thin-wall heat-transfer model which uses a one-wire thermocouple to obtain local cold-wall heat-transfer rates. The tile is relatively fragile because of the brittle nature of the material and the structural weakness of the flat-sided configuration; however, a method was developed and used for repairing a cracked tile.

  9. High Resolution X-Ray Micro-CT of Ultra-Thin Wall Space Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Rauser, R. W.; Bowman, Randy R.; Bonacuse, Peter; Martin, Richard E.; Locci, I. E.; Kelley, M.

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution micro-CT system has been assembled and is being used to provide optimal characterization for ultra-thin wall space components. The Glenn Research Center NDE Sciences Team, using this CT system, has assumed the role of inspection vendor for the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) project at NASA. This article will discuss many aspects of the development of the CT scanning for this type of component, including CT system overview; inspection requirements; process development, software utilized and developed to visualize, process, and analyze results; calibration sample development; results on actual samples; correlation with optical/SEM characterization; CT modeling; and development of automatic flaw recognition software. Keywords: Nondestructive Evaluation, NDE, Computed Tomography, Imaging, X-ray, Metallic Components, Thin Wall Inspection

  10. Evaluation of stresses in large diameter, thin walled piping at support locations

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, B.J.; Flanders, H.E. Jr.; Rawls, G.B. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The highest stresses in many thin walled piping systems are the local stresses at the pipe supports. These secondary stresses are caused by saddles or other structural discontinuities that restrain pipe ovalization. A static analysis of a thin walled pipe supported on structural steel saddle under dead weight loading is presented. The finite element analysis is performed using a shell model with distributed gravity and hydrostatic pressure loading. Parametric studies on global and local stress are performed to determine the effect of the pipe diameter to thickness ratio. Two aspects of the saddle design are also investigated: the effect of saddle width, and the effect of saddle wrap angle. Additionally, the computed stresses are compared to closed form solutions.

  11. Evaluation of stresses in large diameter, thin walled piping at support locations

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, B.J.; Flanders, H.E. Jr.; Rawls, G.B. Jr.

    1992-12-31

    The highest stresses in many thin walled piping systems are the local stresses at the pipe supports. These secondary stresses are caused by saddles or other structural discontinuities that restrain pipe ovalization. A static analysis of a thin walled pipe supported on structural steel saddle under dead weight loading is presented. The finite element analysis is performed using a shell model with distributed gravity and hydrostatic pressure loading. Parametric studies on global and local stress are performed to determine the effect of the pipe diameter to thickness ratio. Two aspects of the saddle design are also investigated: the effect of saddle width, and the effect of saddle wrap angle. Additionally, the computed stresses are compared to closed form solutions.

  12. Embedded Acoustic Black Holes for semi-passive broadband vibration attenuation in thin-walled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liuxian; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2017-02-01

    We explore the use of structure-embedded Acoustic Black Holes (ABH) to design thin-walled structural components exhibiting broadband vibration attenuation characteristics. The ABH is a geometric taper with a power-law profile fully integrated into the structural component and able to induce a smooth and progressive decrease of both the velocity and the wavelength of flexural waves. Previous studies have shown these characteristics to be critical to enable highly efficient vibration attenuation systems. The performance of ABH thin-walled structures is numerically and experimentally evaluated under both transient and steady state excitation conditions. Both numerical and experimental results suggest that the proposed approach enables highly efficient and broadband vibration attenuation performance.

  13. Interfacial double layer mediated electrochemical growth of thin-walled platinum nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liqiu; Kim, Sang Min; Cho, Sanghyun; Jang, Hee-Jeong; Liu, Lichun; Park, Sungho

    2017-01-01

    This work demonstrates that thin-walled platinum nanotubes can be readily synthesized by controlling the interfacial double layer in alumina nanochannels. The gradient distribution of ions in nanochannels enables the creation of Pt nanotubes with walls as thin as 5 nm at the top end when using a solution containing polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) under the influence of an electric potential in nanochannels. The highly efficient formation of thin-walled Pt nanotubes is a result of the concentration gradient of {{{{PtCl}}}6}2- and a thick double layer, which was caused by the low concentration of Pt precursors and the enhanced surface charge density induced by protonated PVP steric adsorption. This well-controlled synthesis reveals that the interfacial double layer is a useful tool to tailor the structure of nanomaterials in a nanoscale space, and holds promise in the construction of more complex functional nanostructures.

  14. Buckling of thin-walled cylinder under axial compression and internal pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Hsu; Crate, Harold; Schwartz, Edward B

    1951-01-01

    An investigation was made of a thin-walled cylinder under axial compression and various internal pressures to study the effect of the internal pressure on the compressive buckling stress of the cylinder. A theoretical analysis based on a large-deflection theory was also made. The theoretically predicted increase of compressive buckling stress due to internal pressure agrees fairly well with the experimental results. (author)

  15. The FEM simulation of the thin walled aircraft engine corpus deformation during milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matras, A.; Plaza, M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper discusses the results of the experimental research performed with the support of finite element method. The deformation of the thin walled aircraft engine corpus was analyzed based on a geometric model. Then, the boundary of the outer side of the part was loaded by the components of a cutting force during milling. The material model of the part was also defined in the simulation software. The analysis allowed to optimize feed rate in order to decrease the deformation of the part.

  16. Numerical study on injection parameters optimization of thin wall and biodegradable polymers parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, C.; Mendes, A.; Carreira, P.; Mateus, A.; Malça, C.

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays, the molds industry searches new markets, with diversified and added value products. The concept associated to the production of thin walled and biodegradable parts mostly manufactured by injection process has assumed a relevant importance due to environmental and economic factors. The growth of a global consciousness about the harmful effects of the conventional polymers in our life quality associated with the legislation imposed, become key factors for the choice of a particular product by the consumer. The target of this work is to provide an integrated solution for the injection of parts with thin walls and manufactured using biodegradable materials. This integrated solution includes the design and manufacture processes of the mold as well as to find the optimum values for the injection parameters in order to become the process effective and competitive. For this, the Moldflow software was used. It was demonstrated that this computational tool provides an effective responsiveness and it can constitute an important tool in supporting the injection molding of thin-walled and biodegradable parts.

  17. Optimization of an asymmetric thin-walled tube in rotary draw bending process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xin; Liao, Juan; Vincze, Gabriela; Gracio, Jose J.

    2013-12-01

    The rotary draw bending is one of the advanced thin-walled tube forming processes with high efficiency, low consumption and good flexibility in several industries such as automotive, aerospace and shipping. However it may cause undesirable deformations such as over-thinning and ovalization, which bring the weakening of the strength and difficulties in the assembly process respectively. Accurate modeling and effective optimization design to eliminate or reduce undesirable deformations in tube bending process have been a challenging topic. In this paper, in order to study the deformation behaviors of an asymmetric thin-walled tube in rotary draw bending process, a 3D elastic-plastic finite element model has been built under the ABAQUS environment, and the reliability of the model is validated by comparison with experiment. Then, the deformation mechanism of thin-walled tube in bending process was briefly analysis and the effects of wall thickness ratio, section height width ratio and mandrel extension on wall thinning and ovalization in bending process were investigated by using Response Surface Methodology. Finally, multi-objective optimization method was used to obtain an optimum solution of design variables based on simulation results.

  18. Reflection and transmission of regular waves from/through single and double perforated thin walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chioukh, Nadji; Çevik, Esin; Yüksel, Yalçin

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, reflection and transmission coefficients of regular waves from/through perforated thin walls are investigated. Small scale laboratory tests have been performed in a wave flume firstly with single perforated thin Plexiglas plates of various porosities. The plate is placed perpendicular to the flume with the height from the flume bottom to the position above water surface. With this thin wall in the flume wave overtopping is prohibited and incident waves are able to transmit. The porosities of the walls are achieved by perforating the plates with circular holes. Model settings with double perforated walls parallel to each other forming so called chamber system, have been also examined. Several parameters have been used for correlating the laboratory tests' results. Experimental data are also compared with results from the numerical model by applying the multi-domain boundary element method (MDBEM) with linear wave theory. Wave energy dissipation due to the perforations of the thin wall has been represented by a simple yet effective porosity parameter in the model. The numerical model with the MDBEM has been further validated against the previously published data.

  19. Calculation of Centrally Loaded Thin-Walled Columns Above the Buckling Limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinitzhuber, F.

    1945-01-01

    When thin-walled columns formed from flanged sheet, such as used in airplane construction, are subjected to axial load, their behavior at failure varies according to the slenderness ratio. On long columns the axis deflects laterally while the cross section form is maintained; buckling results. The respective breaking load in the elastic range is computed by Euler's formula and for the plastic range by the Engesser- Karman formula. Its magnitude is essentially dependent upon the length. On intermediate length columns, especially where open sections are concerned, the cross section is distorted while the cross section form is preserved; twisting failure results. The buckling load in twisting is calculated according to Wagner and Kappus. On short columns the straight walls of low-bending resistance that form the column are deflected at the same time that the cross section form changes - buckling occurs without immediate failure. Then the buckling load of the total section computable from the buckling loads of the section walls is not the ultimate load; quite often, especially on thin-walled sections, it lies considerably higher and is secured by tests. Both loads, the buckling and the ultimate load are only in a small measure dependent upon length. The present report is an attempt to theoretically investigate the behavior of such short, thin-walled columns above the buckling load with the conventional calculating methods.

  20. Structure and machinability of thin-walled parts made of titanium alloy powder using electron beam melting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, A.; Grechishnikov, V.; Kozochkin, M.; Volosova, M.; Petuhov, Yu; Peretyagin, P.

    2016-04-01

    The present study aims at study of structure and properties of raw and thermal treated titanium-based powder material used to produce the thin-walled components by electron beam melting technology. Producing the end product means also studying the finishing cutting process. Examining the quality of end product in terms of geometric tolerance and thin walls thickness stability consists of control the surface roughness is also included in this study.

  1. Theory of anisotropic thin-walled closed-section beams with hygrothermal effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badir, Ashraf M.

    1992-01-01

    A variationally consistent theory is developed in order to derive the governing equations of anisotropic thin-walled beams with closed sections subjected to axial load, torsion, bending and hygrothermal loads. The theory is based on an asymptotical analysis of two-dimensional shell theory. Closed-form expressions for the beam stiffness coefficients, equivalent hygrothermal loads, stress and displacement fields are provided. The influence of material anisotropy and hygrothermal coefficients on the displacement field is identified. The analysis is applied to predict the response of composite beams under thermomechanical loading.

  2. Theory of anisotropic thin-walled closed-cross-section beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdichevsky, Victor; Armanios, Erian; Badir, Ashraf

    1992-01-01

    A variationally and asymptotically consistent theory is developed in order to derive the governing equations of anisotropic thin-walled beams with closed sections. The theory is based on an asymptotic analysis of two-dimensional shell theory. Closed-form expressions for the beam-stiffness coefficients, stress and displacement fields are provided. The influence of material anisotropy on the displacement field is identified. A comparison with the displacement fields obtained by other analytical developments is performed. The stiffness coefficients and static response are also compared with finite element predictions, closed-form solutions and test data.

  3. Some considerations on instability of combined loaded thin-walled tubes with a crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariati, M.; Akbarpour, A.

    2016-05-01

    Instability of a thin-walled stainless steel tube with a crack-shaped defect under combined loading is studied in this paper. Furthermore, the effects of the tube length, crack orientation, and crack length on the buckling behavior of tubes are investigated. The behavior of tubes subjected to combined is analyzed by using the finite element method (by Abaqus software). For cracked tubes with a fixed thickness, the buckling load decreases as the tube length and the ratio of the tube length to its diameter increase. Moreover, the buckling load of cracked tubes under combined loading also decreases with increasing crack length.

  4. Extensional and Flexural Waves in a Thin-Walled Graphite/Epoxy Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Gorman, Michael R.; Dorighi, John

    1992-01-01

    Simulated acoustic emission signals were induced in a thin-walled graphite/epoxy tube by means of lead breaks (Hsu-Neilsen source). The tube is of similar material and layup to be used by NASA in fabricating the struts of Space Station Freedom. The resulting waveforms were detected by broad band ultrasonic transducers and digitized. Measurements of the velocities of the extensional and flexural modes were made for propagation directions along the tube axis (0 degrees), around the tube circumference (90 degrees) and at an angle of 45 degrees. These velocities were found to be in agreement with classical plate theory.

  5. Extensional and flexural waves in a thin-walled graphite/epoxy tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Dorighi, John; Gorman, Michael R.

    1992-01-01

    Simulated acoustic emission signals were induced in a thin-walled graphite/epoxy tube by means of lead breaks (Hsu-Nielsen source). The tube is of similar material and layup to be used by NASA in fabricating the struts of Space Station Freedom. The resulting waveforms were detected by broad band ultrasonic transducers and digitized. Measurements of the velocities of the extensional and flexural modes were made for propagation directions along the tube axis (0 degrees), around the tube circumference (90 degrees) and at an angle of 45 degrees. These velocities were found to be in agreement with classical plate theory.

  6. Reinforcement of thin-walled root canal structures for placement of esthetic dowels: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Ayad, Mohamed F; Bahannan, Salma A; Rosenstiel, Stephen F

    2011-01-01

    Thin-walled root canals always present a challenge to dentists to select a restorative treatment that does not further weaken the thin tooth structure. The prognosis of dowel and core restorations can be unpredictable. This clinical report describes the treatment of a patient with extensive caries extending into the root canal of an endodontically treated maxillary central incisor. The use of a flowable composite resin in combination with a quartz fiber reinforced post is described, resulting in the rehabilitation of a structurally compromised root canal with satisfactory esthetic and functional outcomes.

  7. Interactive buckling of thin-walled structural components under static and dynamic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, S.; Benito, R.

    1984-01-01

    Recent advances in the study of interactive buckling of thin walled structural components achieved with the aid of finite strip technique used in conjunction with the theory of mode interaction are summarized. The interaction of the primary local mode with Euler buckling (in columns) and flexural torsional buckling (in columns and beams) is of primary interest. The interaction of two companion local modes with the overall mode is also considered briefly for the columns with doubly symmetric cross sections. The effect of dynamic loads in the form of suddenly applied and compression is also investigated.

  8. Analysis of a thin-walled pressurized torus in contact with a plane. [aircraft tires study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, M. J., Jr.; Gassman, P. M.; Baumgarten, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Finite element analysis is applied to study the large deflection of a standing torus loaded by a plane. The internally pressurized thin-walled structure is found to have an elliptical footprint area. Considerable bulge occurs in the sidewall in the region of the load plane. Stress distributions throughout the torus are shown for various load levels and for various modeling strategies at a given load level. In large load ranges finite element calculations show compressive circumferential stress and negative curvature in the footprint region. Results are compared with inelastic wall analysis.

  9. Large structural, thin-wall castings made of metals subject to hot tearing, and their fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smashey, Russell W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An article, such as a gas turbine engine mixer, is made by providing a mold structure defining a thin-walled, hollow article, and a base metal that is subject to hot tear cracking when cast in a generally equiaxed polycrystalline form, such as Rene' 108 and Mar-M247. The article is fabricated by introducing the molten base metal into the mold structure, and directionally solidifying the base metal in the mold structure to form a directionally oriented structure. The directionally oriented structure may be formed of a single grain or oriented multiple grains.

  10. Partial Surface Damper to Suppress Vibration for Thin Walled Plate Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SHI, Jiahao; SONG, Qinghua; LIU, Zhanqiang; AI, Xing

    2017-05-01

    The material removal rate and required workpiece surface quality of thin-walled structure milling are greatly limited due to its severe vibration, which is directly associated with the dynamic characteristics of the system. Therefore, the suppression of vibration is an unavoidable problem during milling. A novel partial surface damping method is proposed to modify the mode of the thin walled cantilever plate and to suppress vibration during milling. Based on classical plate theory, the design criterion is analyzed and configuration of the partial surface damper is introduced, in which viscoelastic plate and constraining plate are attached to the surface of the plate to increase the system's natural frequency and loss factor. In order to obtain the energy expression of the cutting system, the Ritz method is used to describe the unknown displacements. Then, with Lagrange's equation, the natural frequency and loss factor are calculated. In addition, the plate is divided into a finite number of square elements, and the regulation of treated position is studied based on theoretic and experimental analysis. The milling tests are conducted to verify its damping performance and the experimental results show that with treatment of partial surface damper, the deformation of the bare plate is reduced from 0.27 mm to 0.1 mm, while the vibration amplitude of the bare plate is reduced from 0.08 mm to 0.01 mm. The proposed research provides the instruction to design partial surface damper.

  11. Partial Surface Damper to Suppress Vibration for Thin Walled Plate Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SHI, Jiahao; SONG, Qinghua; LIU, Zhanqiang; AI, Xing

    2017-03-01

    The material removal rate and required workpiece surface quality of thin-walled structure milling are greatly limited due to its severe vibration, which is directly associated with the dynamic characteristics of the system. Therefore, the suppression of vibration is an unavoidable problem during milling. A novel partial surface damping method is proposed to modify the mode of the thin walled cantilever plate and to suppress vibration during milling. Based on classical plate theory, the design criterion is analyzed and configuration of the partial surface damper is introduced, in which viscoelastic plate and constraining plate are attached to the surface of the plate to increase the system's natural frequency and loss factor. In order to obtain the energy expression of the cutting system, the Ritz method is used to describe the unknown displacements. Then, with Lagrange's equation, the natural frequency and loss factor are calculated. In addition, the plate is divided into a finite number of square elements, and the regulation of treated position is studied based on theoretic and experimental analysis. The milling tests are conducted to verify its damping performance and the experimental results show that with treatment of partial surface damper, the deformation of the bare plate is reduced from 0.27 mm to 0.1 mm, while the vibration amplitude of the bare plate is reduced from 0.08 mm to 0.01 mm. The proposed research provides the instruction to design partial surface damper.

  12. Thin-Wall GaN/InAlN Multiple Quantum Well Tubes.

    PubMed

    Durand, Christophe; Carlin, Jean-François; Bougerol, Catherine; Gayral, Bruno; Salomon, Damien; Barnes, Jean-Paul; Eymery, Joël; Butté, Raphaël; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2017-06-14

    Thin-wall tubes composed of nitride semiconductors (III-N compounds) based on GaN/InAlN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) are fabricated by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy in a simple and full III-N approach. The synthesis of such MQW-tubes is based on the growth of N-polar c-axis vertical GaN wires surrounded by a core-shell MQW heterostructure followed by in situ selective etching using controlled H2/NH3 annealing at 1010 °C to remove the inner GaN wire part. After this process, well-defined MQW-based tubes having nonpolar m-plane orientation exhibit UV light near 330 nm up to room temperature, consistent with the emission of GaN/InAlN MQWs. Partially etched tubes reveal a quantum-dotlike signature originating from nanosized GaN residuals present inside the tubes. The possibility to fabricate in a simple way thin-wall III-N tubes composed of an embedded MQW-based active region offering controllable optical emission properties constitutes an important step forward to develop new nitride devices such as emitters, detectors or sensors based on tubelike nanostructures.

  13. Hybrid Analytical Technique for Nonlinear Vibration Analysis of Thin-Walled Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Hadian, Jafar M.; Andersen, Carl M.

    1993-01-01

    A two-step hybrid analytical technique is presented for the nonlinear vibration analysis of thin-walled beams. The first step involves the generation of various-order perturbation functions using the Linstedt-Poincare perturbation technique. The second step consists of using the perturbation functions as coordinate (or approximation) functions and then computing both the amplitudes of these functions and the nonlinear frequency of vibration via a direct variational procedure. The analytical formulation is based on a form of the geometrically nonlinear beam theory with the effects of in-plane inertia, rotatory inertia, and transverse shear deformation included. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is demonstrated by means of a numerical example of thin-walled beam with a doubly symmetric I-section. The solutions obtained using a single-spatial mode were compared with those obtained using multiple-spatial modes. The standard of comparison was taken to be the frequencies obtained by the direct integration/fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique. The nonlinear frequencies obtained by the hybrid technique were shown to converge to the corresponding ones obtained by the direct integration/fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique well beyond the range of applicability of the perturbation technique. The frequencies and total strain energy of the beam were overestimated by using a single-spatial mode.

  14. Material Behavior Based Hybrid Process for Sheet Draw-Forging Thin Walled Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Z.Q.; Shivpuri, R.

    2005-08-05

    Magnesium alloys are conventionally formed at the elevated temperatures. The thermally improved formability is sensitive to the temperature and strain rate. Due to limitations in forming speeds, tooling strength and narrow processing windows, complex thin walled parts cannot be made by traditional warm drawing or hot forging processes. A hybrid process, which is based on the deformation mechanism of magnesium alloys at the elevated temperature, is proposed that combines warm drawing and hot forging modes to produce an aggressive geometry at acceptable forming speed. The process parameters, such as temperatures, forming speeds etc. are determined by the FEM modeling and simulation. Sensitivity analysis under the constraint of forming limits of Mg alloy sheet material and strength of tooling material is carried out. The proposed approach is demonstrated on a conical geometry with thin walls and with bottom features. Results show that designed geometry can be formed in about 8 seconds, this cannot be formed by conventional forging while around 1000s is required for warm drawing. This process is being further investigated through controlled experiments.

  15. Laser bending of pre-stressed thin-walled nickel micro-tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Jamil, M. S.; Imam Fauzi, E. R.; Juinn, C. S.; Sheikh, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Laser forming is an innovative technique of producing bending, spatial forming and alignment of both metallic and non-metallic parts by introducing thermal stresses into a work piece with a laser beam. It involves a complex interaction of process parameters to mechanical and thermal characteristics of materials. This paper presents a comprehensive experimental and numerical study of laser bending process of thin-walled micro-tubes. The effect of input parameters, namely laser power, pulse length and pre-stress constraint, on the process and the final product characteristics are investigated. Results of the analysis show that the bending angle of the tube increases considerably when a constraint is imposed at the tube's free end during the heating period. The introduction of compressive pre-stresses (from mechanical bending) in the irradiated region increases the final deformation which varies almost linearly with the amount of pre-stress. Due to high thermal conductivity and thin-walled structure of the tube, the heat dissipates quickly from the irradiated region to its surrounding material. Therefore, a combination of short pulse duration and high power is preferable to generate a higher thermal gradient and induce plastic strain. Design of experiment and regression analysis are implemented to develop an empirical model based on simulation results. Sensitivity analysis is also performed to determine the influence of independent variables on output response. It is evident that initial displacement and pulse length have a stronger positive effect on the output response as compared to laser power.

  16. PRODUCTION OF HIGHER STRENGTH THIN WALLED GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER SHELLS FOR CRYOGENIC EXPERIMENTS AT OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    NIKROO,A; CZECHOWICZ,DG; CASTILLO,ER; PONTELANDOLFO,JM

    2002-04-01

    OAK A271 PRODUCTION OF HIGHER STRENGTH THIN WALLED GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER SHELLS FOR CRYOGENIC EXPERIMENTS AT OMEGA. Thin walled polymer shells are needed for OMEGA cryogenic laser experiments. These capsules need to be about 900 {micro}m in diameter and as thin as possible (approx 1-2 {micro}m), while having enough strength to be filled with DT as fast as possible to about 1000 atm. The authors have found that by optimizing the coating parameters in the glow discharge polymer (GDP) deposition system, traditionally used for making ICF targets, they can routinely make robust, {approx} 1.5 {micro}m thick, 900 {micro}m diameter GDP shells with buckle strengths of over 0.3 atm. This is twice the strength of shells made prior to the optimization and is comparable to values quoted for polyimide shells. In addition, these shells were found to be approximately three times more permeable and over 20% denser than previously made GDP shells. The combination of higher strength and permeability is ideal for direct drive cryogenic targets at OMEGA. Shells as thin as 0.5 {micro}m have been made. In this paper, the authors discuss the shell fabrication process, effects of modifying various GDP deposition parameters on shell properties and chemical composition.

  17. Effect of Different Molding Materials on the Thin-Walled Compacted Graphite Iron Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górny, Marcin; Dańko, Rafał; Lelito, Janusz; Kawalec, Magdalena; Sikora, Gabriela

    2016-10-01

    This article addresses the effects of six mold materials used for obtaining thin-walled compacted graphite iron castings with a wall thickness of 3 mm. During this research, the following materials were analyzed: fine silica sand, coarse silica sand, cerabeads, molohite and also insulated materials in the shape of microspheres, including low-density alumina/silica ceramic sand. Granulometric and SEM observations indicate that the sand matrix used in these studies differs in terms of size, homogeneity and shape. This study shows that molds made with insulating sands (microspheres) possess both: thermal conductivity and material mold ability to absorb heat, on average to be more than five times lower compared to those of silica sand. In addition to that, the resultant peak of heat transfer coefficient at the mold/metal interface for microspheres is more than four times lower in comparison with fine silica sand. This is accompanied by a significant decrease in the cooling rate of metal in the mold cavity which promotes the development of compacted graphite in thin-walled castings as well as ferrite fractions in their microstructure.

  18. Thin-walled boron nitride microtubes exhibiting intense band-edge UV emission at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yang; Bando, Yoshio; Tang, Chengchun; Zhi, Chunyi; Terao, Takeshi; Dierre, Benjamin; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Golberg, Dmitri

    2009-02-01

    Boron nitride (BN) microtubes were synthesized in a vertical induction furnace using Li2CO3 and B reactants. Their structures and morphologies were investigated using x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The microtubes have diameters of 1-3 µm, lengths of up to hundreds of micrometers, and well-structured ultrathin walls only ~50 nm thick. A mechanism combining the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) and template self-sacrificing processes is proposed to explain the formation of these novel one-dimensional microstructures, in which the Li2O-B2O3 eutectic reaction plays an important role. Cathodoluminescence studies show that even at room temperature the thin-walled BN microtubes can possess an intense band-edge emission at ~216.5 nm, which is distinct compared with other BN nanostructures. The study suggests that the thin-walled BN microtubes should be promising for constructing compact deep UV devices and find potential applications in microreactors and microfluidic and drug delivery systems.

  19. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Based Numerical Simulation of Machining of Thin-Wall Components with Varying Wall Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Shrikrishna Nandkishor; Bolar, Gururaj

    2017-06-01

    Control of part deflection and deformation during machining of low rigidity thin-wall components is an important aspect in the manufacture of desired quality products. This paper presents a comparative study on the effect of geometry constraints on the product quality during machining of thin-wall components made of an aerospace alloy aluminum 2024-T351. Three-dimensional nonlinear finite element (FE) based simulations of machining of thin-wall parts were carried out by considering three variations in the wall constraint viz. free wall, wall constrained at one end, and wall with constraints at both the ends. Lagrangian formulation based transient FE model has been developed to simulate the interaction between the workpiece and helical milling cutter. Johnson-Cook material and damage model were adopted to account for material behavior during machining process; damage initiation and chip separation. A modified Coulomb friction model was employed to define the contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece. The numerical model was validated with experimental results and found to be in good agreement. Based on the simulation results it was noted that deflection and deformation were maximum in the thin-wall constrained at one end in comparison with those obtained in other cases. It was noted that three dimensional finite element simulations help in a better way to predict the product quality during precision manufacturing of thin-wall components.

  20. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Based Numerical Simulation of Machining of Thin-Wall Components with Varying Wall Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Shrikrishna Nandkishor; Bolar, Gururaj

    2016-06-01

    Control of part deflection and deformation during machining of low rigidity thin-wall components is an important aspect in the manufacture of desired quality products. This paper presents a comparative study on the effect of geometry constraints on the product quality during machining of thin-wall components made of an aerospace alloy aluminum 2024-T351. Three-dimensional nonlinear finite element (FE) based simulations of machining of thin-wall parts were carried out by considering three variations in the wall constraint viz. free wall, wall constrained at one end, and wall with constraints at both the ends. Lagrangian formulation based transient FE model has been developed to simulate the interaction between the workpiece and helical milling cutter. Johnson-Cook material and damage model were adopted to account for material behavior during machining process; damage initiation and chip separation. A modified Coulomb friction model was employed to define the contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece. The numerical model was validated with experimental results and found to be in good agreement. Based on the simulation results it was noted that deflection and deformation were maximum in the thin-wall constrained at one end in comparison with those obtained in other cases. It was noted that three dimensional finite element simulations help in a better way to predict the product quality during precision manufacturing of thin-wall components.

  1. Local buckling of thin-walled channel member flange made of aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, Czesław; Kujawa, Marcin

    2017-03-01

    The paper deals with local stability of the thin-walled compressed flange of channel columns and beams made of aluminum alloy. The aim of paper is to find critical stress of local buckling of the flange member taking into account the web-flange interaction in linear and nonlinear elastic range of the member material. The governing differential equation of the problem is derived with aid of the principle of stationary total potential energy. The equation solution leads to the critical buckling stress and assessment of the number of half-waves in linear elastic range of the member material. Taking into account these results the analytical formula of the critical buckling stress in nonlinear elastic range is established using the tangent modulus theory and the Ramberg-Osgood stress-strain relationship. Finally the analytical results for simply supported members are compared with the FEM solutions and good agreement is observed.

  2. Optimal Shakedown of the Thin-Wall Metal Structures Under Strength and Stiffness Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alawdin, Piotr; Liepa, Liudas

    2017-06-01

    Classical optimization problems of metal structures confined mainly with 1st class cross-sections. But in practice it is common to use the cross-sections of higher classes. In this paper, a new mathematical model for described shakedown optimization problem for metal structures, which elements are designed from 1st to 4th class cross-sections, under variable quasi-static loads is presented. The features of limited plastic redistribution of forces in the structure with thin-walled elements there are taken into account. Authors assume the elastic-plastic flexural buckling in one plane without lateral torsional buckling behavior of members. Design formulae for Methods 1 and 2 for members are analyzed. Structures stiffness constrains are also incorporated in order to satisfy the limit serviceability state requirements. With the help of mathematical programming theory and extreme principles the structure optimization algorithm is developed and justified with the numerical experiment for the metal plane frames.

  3. Modeling of Macro-deformation Behavior of Thin-Walled Aluminum Foam by Gas Injection Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Chen; Ningzhen, Wang; Jianyu, Yuan; Yanxiang, Li; Huawei, Zhang; Yuan, Liu

    2017-07-01

    The favorable energy absorption characteristics of foam structures originate from their layer-by-layer deformation behavior. In this paper, the effects of cell morphology on the compressive performance of thin-walled aluminum foams were studied by a finite element method using a three-dimensional, thin-shell Kelvin tetrakaidecahedron model. Models with varying cell structure parameters were established so that the effects of relative density, cell size, cell wall thickness, and cell anisotropy on the plateau stress and energy absorption capacity of the foams could be investigated. Both the numerical deformation behavior and stress-strain curves of aluminum foams are found to have good agreement with the experimental results under quasi-static compressive loading. Moreover, the deformation behaviors of those foams with a certain anisotropy ratio are compared for different loading directions. The cell shape is a key factor affecting the plateau stress as well as the relative density.

  4. Large rotation FE transient analysis of piezolaminated thin-walled smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. Q.; Schmidt, R.

    2013-10-01

    A geometrically nonlinear large rotation shell theory is proposed for dynamic finite element (FE) analysis of piezoelectric integrated thin-walled smart structures. The large rotation theory, which has six independent kinematic parameters but expressed by five nodal degrees of freedom (DOFs), is based on first-order shear deformation (FOSD) hypothesis. The two-dimensional (2D) FE model is constructed using eight-node quadrilateral shell elements with five mechanical DOFs per node and one electrical DOF per piezoelectric material layer with linear constitutive equations. The linear and nonlinear dynamic responses are determined by the central difference algorithm (CDA) and the Newmark method. The results are compared with those obtained by simplified nonlinear theories, as well as those reported in the literature. It is shown that the present large rotation theory yields considerable improvement if the structures undergo large displacements and rotations.

  5. Strength Tests of Thin-walled Duralumin Cylinders of Elliptic Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Eugene E; Burke, Walter F

    1935-01-01

    This report is the fifth of a series presenting the results of strength tests of thin-walled cylinders and truncated cones of circular and elliptic section; it includes the results obtained from torsion tests on 30 cylinders, pure bending tests on 30 cylinders, and combined transverse shear and bending tests on 60 cylinders. All the cylinders tested were elliptic section with the ends clamped to rigid bulkheads. In the pure bending and combined transverse shear and bending tests the loads were applied in the plane of the major axis. The results of the tests on elliptic cylinders are correlated with the results of corresponding tests on circular cylinders and are presented in charts suitable for use in design.

  6. Computation of macro-fiber composite integrated thin-walled smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, S. Y.; Chen, M.; Bai, J.; Li, J.

    2016-07-01

    Due to high flexibility, reliability, and strong actuation forces, piezo fiber based composite smart material, macro-fiber composite (MFC), is increasingly applied in various fields for vibration suppression, shape control, and health monitoring. The complexity arrangement of MFC materials makes them difficult in numerical simulations. This paper develops a linear electro-mechanically coupled finite element (FE) model for composite laminated thin-walled smart structures bonded with MFC patches considering arbitrary piezo fiber orientation. Two types of MFCs are considered, namely, MFC-d31 in which the d 31 effect dominates the actuation forces, and MFC-d33 which mainly uses the d 33 effect. The proposed FE model is validated by static analysis of an MFC bonded smart plate.

  7. Aeroelastic instability of aircraft wings modelled as anisotropic composite thin-walled beams in incompressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Z.; Librescu, L.

    2003-08-01

    An encompassing aeroelastic model developed toward investigating the influence of directionality property of advanced composite materials and non-classical effects such as transverse shear and warping restraint on the aeroelastic instability of composite aircraft wings is presented. Within the model developed herein, both divergence and flutter instabilities are simultaneously addressed. The aircraft wing is modelled as an anisotropic composite thin-walled beam featuring circumferentially asymmetric stiffness lay-up that generates, for the problem at hand, elastic coupling among plunging, pitching and transverse shear motions. The unsteady incompressible aerodynamics used here is based on the concept of indicial functions. Issues related to aeroelastic instability are discussed, the influence of warping restraint and transverse shear on the critical speed are evaluated, and pertinent conclusions are outlined.

  8. Vibration control of pre-twisted rotating composite thin-walled beams with piezoelectric fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seung-Chan; Park, Jae-Sang; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2007-02-01

    Rotating composite beam structures like blades are applied in many fields of aerospace and mechanical engineering. In this research, bending vibration control of the pre-twisted rotating composite thin-walled beam is studied. The formulation is based on single cell composite beam including a warping function, centrifugal force, Coriolis acceleration, pre-twist angle and piezoelectric effect. A negative velocity feedback control algorithm is applied to realize the adaptive capability of the beam. Using a finite-element method, numerical simulations show that macro-fiber composite (MFC) actuators which are piezoelectric fiber composites and PVDF sensors can generate active vibration control effect. Relations between active vibration control effect and design parameters of beams such as rotating speeds, pre-twist angles and fiber orientations in a host structure are investigated in detail. Besides, a case study conformed that the effective damping performance can be obtained by suitable arrangement and distribution of the sensor and actuator pairs.

  9. Free-surface roughness of thin-walled tubes in reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, S. E.; Lyamina, E. A.; Manabe, K.

    2017-03-01

    The problem of the stress-strain state of thin-walled tubes in axisymmetric steady-state deformation is solved using the membrane theory of shells and the model of an ideal rigid-plastic material satisfying the Mises yield condition and the associated flow law. The obtained solution is used together with the empirical relation between the strain state at an arbitrary point of the free surface and the surface roughness parameters at the same point to determine the influence of some tube reduction parameters on the surface roughness parameters in the product. The employed empirical relation is derived assuming that the free surface roughness parameters depend on two independent kinematic variables.

  10. Stress distribution in and equivalent width of flanges of wide, thin-wall steel beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, George

    1940-01-01

    The use of different forms of wide-flange, thin-wall steel beams is becoming increasingly widespread. Part of the information necessary for a national design of such members is the knowledge of the stress distribution in and the equivalent width of the flanges of such beams. This problem is analyzed in this paper on the basis of the theory of plane stress. As a result, tables and curves are given from which the equivalent width of any given beam can be read directly for use in practical design. An investigation is given of the limitations of this analysis due to the fact that extremely wide and thin flanges tend to curve out of their plane toward the neutral axis. A summary of test data confirms very satisfactorily the analytical results.

  11. Towards observable signatures of other bubble universes. II. Exact solutions for thin-wall bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, Anthony; Johnson, Matthew C.

    2008-06-15

    We assess the effects of a collision between two vacuum bubbles in the thin-wall limit. After describing the outcome of a generic collision possessing the expected hyperbolic symmetry, we focus on collisions experienced by a bubble containing positive vacuum energy, which could in principle contain our observable universe. We provide criteria governing whether the post-collision domain wall accelerates towards or away from this observation bubble, and discuss the implications for observers located at various positions inside of the bubble. Then, we identify the class of solutions which have minimal impact on the interior of the observation bubble, and derive a simple formula for the energy density of a shell of radiation emitted from such a collision. In the context of a universe undergoing false-vacuum eternal inflation, these solutions are perhaps the most promising candidates for collisions that could exist within our past light cone, and therefore in principle be observable.

  12. Deformability of molybdenum during the production of thin-wall pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, S. V.; Nesterenko, A. V.; Shveikin, V. P.

    2008-10-01

    The deformation properties of commercial-purity MChVP molybdenum are studied. Plasticity diagrams that relate the limiting strain to failure to the state-of-stress indices are constructed. The plasticity of the material is found to depend substantially on the type of state of stress, which is characterized by the Lode parameter. The plasticity of the material is analyzed under alternating deformation conditions. A damage theory is used to study the healing of the deformation-induced damage during annealing and to determine the conditions under which irreversible damage, which cannot be healed by heat treatment, appears. The simulation results are used to analyze the damage accumulation during the production of thin-wall pipes. The plasticity margin is found to decrease most strongly during the multipass pressing of a pipe workpiece in a punch. As follows from the damage calculation results, intermediate annealing between pressing passes should be introduced at a size of 18 × 3.1 mm.

  13. Thermomechanics of Inelastic Thin-Walled Structural Members with Piezoelectric Sensors and Actuators Under Harmonic Loading (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnaukhov, V. G.; Kirichok, I. F.; Kozlov, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    Models, combined numerical-analytical methods, and results related to study of the forced resonance vibrations and self-heating of thin-walled inelastic structural members with piezoelectric sensors and actuators under monoharmonic mechanical and electric loading are presented. The thermomechanical behavior of passive and piezoactive materials is described using the concept of complex characteristics that are assumed to depend on temperature and invariants of the strain tensor. The classical and refined thermomechanical theories are used to model the vibrations and self-heating of thin-walled structural members with sensors and actuators. Nonlinear coupled thermoelastic problems for thin-walled structural members are solved by iteration and numerical methods. The thermal failure of structural members is considered. Methods for determining the critical electrical and mechanical monoharmonic loads and methods of postcritical analysis are described. The effect of various factors on the effectiveness of active damping of the resonance vibrations of inelastic thin-walled structural members by piezoelectric sensors and actuators is studied

  14. Vibration and aeroelasticity of advanced aircraft wings modeled as thin-walled beams: Dynamics, stability and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhanming

    Based on a refined analytical anisotropic thin-walled beam model, aeroelastic instability, dynamic aeroelastic response, active/passive aeroelastic control of advanced aircraft wings modeled as thin-walled beams are systematically addressed. The refined thin-walled beam model is based on an existing framework of the thin-walled beam model and a couple of non-classical effects that are usually also important are incorporated and the model herein developed is validated against the available experimental, Finite Element Analysis (FEA), Dynamic Finite Element (DFE), and other analytical predictions. The concept of indicial functions is used to develop unsteady aerodynamic model, which broadly encompasses the cases of incompressible, compressible subsonic, compressible supersonic and hypersonic flows. State-space conversion of the indicial function based unsteady aerodynamic model is also developed. Based on the piezoelectric material technology, a worst case control strategy based on the minimax theory towards the control of aeroelastic systems is further developed. Shunt damping within the aeroelastic tailoring environment is also investigated. The major part of this dissertation is organized in the form of self-contained chapters, each of which corresponds to a paper that has been or will be submitted to a journal for publication. In order to fullfil the requirement of having a continuous presentation of the topics, each chapter starts with the purely structural models and is gradually integrated with the involved interactive field disciplines.

  15. Torsional stiffness of thin-walled shells having reinforcing cores and rectangular, triangular, or diamond cross section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomb, Harvey G , R

    1956-01-01

    A theoretical investigation is presented of the torsional stiffness of thin-walled aerodynamic surfaces filled with cores which stabilize the skins. Rectangular, slender triangular, and slender diamond cross sections are considered. Results for the torsional stiffness constants are shown graphically.

  16. Modeling and free vibration behavior of rotating composite thin-walled closed-section beams with SMA fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yongsheng; Yang, Shulian; Du, Xianghong

    2012-09-01

    Smart structure with active materials embedded in a rotating composite thin-walled beam is a class of typical structure which is using in study of vibration control of helicopter blades and wind turbine blades. The dynamic behavior investigation of these structures has significance in theory and practice. However, so far dynamic study on the above-mentioned structures is limited only the rotating composite beams with piezoelectric actuation. The free vibration of the rotating composite thin-walled beams with shape memory alloy(SMA) fiber actuation is studied. SMA fiber actuators are embedded into the walls of the composite beam. The equations of motion are derived based on Hamilton's principle and the asymptotically correct constitutive relation of single-cell cross-section accounting for SMA fiber actuation. The partial differential equations of motion are reduced to the ordinary differential equations of motion by using the Galerkin's method. The formulation for free vibration analysis includes anisotropy, pitch and precone angle, centrifugal force and SMA actuation effect. Numerical results of natural frequency are obtained for two configuration composite beams. It is shown that natural frequencies of the composite thin-walled beam decrease as SMA fiber volume and initial strain increase and the decrease in natural frequency becomes more significant as SMA fiber volume increases. The actuation performance of SMA fibers is found to be closely related to the rotational speeds and ply-angle. In addition, the effect of the pitch angle appears to be more significant for the lower-bending mode ones. Finally, in all cases, the precone angle appears to have marginal effect on free vibration frequencies. The developed model can be capable of describing natural vibration behaviors of rotating composite thin-walled beam with active SMA fiber actuation. The present work extends the previous analysis done for modeling passive rotating composite thin-walled beam.

  17. Eikonal-based initiation of fibrillatory activity in thin-walled cardiac propagation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlin, Antoine; Jacquemet, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    Reentrant arrhythmias can be simulated in electrophysiological models of electrical impulse propagation governed by a reaction-diffusion system. To facilitate the initiation of a large number of independent episodes of simulated arrhythmias with controllable level of complexity, a new approach is proposed for thin-walled geometries in which depolarization wave dynamics is essentially two-dimensional. Points representing phase singularities are first randomly distributed over the epicardial surface and are assigned a topological charge (direction of rotation). A qualitatively-correct phase map is then reconstructed on the whole surface by interpolation. The eikonal-diffusion equation is used to iteratively regularize the phase map based on a priori information on wavefront propagation. An initial condition for the reaction-diffusion model is created from the resulting phase map with multiple functional/anatomical reentries. Results in an atrial model demonstrate the ability to generate statistical realizations of the same dynamics and to vary the level of complexity measured by the number of phase singularities. A library of 100 simulations with an average number of phase singularities ranging from 1 to 10 is created. An extension to volumetric patient-specific atrial models including fiber orientation and a fast conducting system is presented to illustrate possible applications.

  18. Space-deployed, thin-walled enclosure for a cryogenically-cooled high temperature superconducting coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Allison K.

    The interaction of magnetic fields generated by large superconducting coils has multiple applications in space, including actuation of spacecraft or spacecraft components, wireless power transfer, and shielding of spacecraft from radiation and high energy particles. These applications require coils with major diameters as large as 20 meters and a thermal management system to maintain the superconducting material of the coil below its critical temperature. Since a rigid thermal management system, such as a heat pipe, is unsuitable for compact stowage inside a 5 meter payload fairing, a thin-walled thermal enclosure is proposed. A 1.85 meter diameter test article consisting of a bladder layer for containing chilled nitrogen vapor, a restraint layer, and multilayer insulation was tested in a custom toroidal vacuum chamber. The material properties found during laboratory testing are used to predict the performance of the test article in low Earth orbit. Deployment motion of the same test article was measured using a motion capture system and the results are used to predict the deployment in space. A 20 meter major diameter and coil current of 6.7 MA is selected as a point design case. This design point represents a single coil in a high energy particle shielding system. Sizing of the thermal and structural components of the enclosure is completed. The thermal and deployment performance is predicted.

  19. Experiments on self-excited oscillation in a thin-walled collapsible tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hai-Jun; Jia, Lai-Bing; Yin, Xie-Zhen

    2015-12-01

    Self-excited oscillation in a collapsible tube is an important phenomenon in physiology. An experimental approach on self-excited oscillation in a thin-walled collapsible tube is developed by using a high transmittance and low Young's modulus silicone rubber tube. The elastic tube is manufactured by the method of centrifugal casting in our laboratory. An optical method for recording the evolution of the cross-sectional areas at a certain position along the longitudinal direction of the tube is developed based on the technology of refractive index matching. With the transparent tube, the tube law is measured under the static no-flow condition. The cross section at the middle position of the tube transfers from a quasi-circular configuration to an ellipse, and then to a dumbell-shape as the chamber pressure is increased. During the self-excited oscillation, two periodic self-excited oscillating states and one transitional oscillating state are identified. They all belong to the LU mode. These different oscillating states are related to the initial cross-sectional shape of the tube caused by the difference of the downstream transmural pressure.

  20. Tensile Response of Hoop Reinforced Multiaxially Braided Thin Wall Composite Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sree Shankhachur; Potluri, Prasad; Soutis, Constantinos

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents the tensile response of thin-walled composite tubes with multi-axial fibre architecture. A hybrid braid-wound layup has the potential to optimise the composite tube properties, however, stacking sequence plays a role in the failure mechanism. A braid-winding method has been used to produce stacked overwound braid layup [(±45°/0°)5/90°4]T. Influence of stacking sequence on premature failure of hoop layers has been reported. Under tensile loading, a cross-ply composite tube with the alternate stacking of hoop and axial fibre show hoop plies splitting similar to the overwound braided composite tube. However, splitting has been restricted by the surrounding axial plies and contained between the adjacent axial fibre tows. This observation suggests hoop layers sandwiched between braid layers will improve structural integrity. A near net shape architecture with three fibre orientation in a triaxial braid will provide additional support to prevent extensive damage for plies loaded in off-axis. Several notable observations for relatively open braid structures such as tow scissoring, high Poisson's ratio and influence of axial tow crimp on the strain to failure have been reported. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) in conjunction with surface strain gauging has been employed to capture the strain pattern.

  1. Active vibration control of a thin walled beam by neural networks and piezo-actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Lecce, L.; Sorrentino, A.; Concilio, A.

    1994-12-31

    In turboprop aircraft, vibration of the fuselage frame (typically a thin-walled beam) has been identified as the main cause of interior noise. Passive methods, based essentially on the use of DVA (Dynamic Vibration Absorbers) have been shown to be not entirely satisfactory, due to the significant weight increase. The use of active control systems based on piezoceramic sensors and actuators integrated into the frame seems to be a valid alternative to attenuate interior noise. In this paper, the use of a MIMO feedforward active control system with piezoceramic actuators is proposed, in order to reduce the vertical vibration levels of a rectified, typical fuselage frame. A numerical FEM model of the rectified frame has been experimentally validated and has been used in order to evaluate the dynamic response of the beam, both with regard to piezoceramic actuators and to a point force, representing the primary disturbance. A neural network (NN) controller has been used to simultaneously compute amplitudes and phases of the control force for the 6 piezo actuators, so as to minimize the accelerometric responses acquired in 30 points of the beam (6 at each of 5 different transversal sections).

  2. The influence of triggers geometry upon the stiffness of cylindrical thin walled tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soica, Adrian; Radu, Gheorghe

    2014-06-01

    Today's automobile manufacturers are increasingly using lightweight materials to reduce weight; these include plastics, composites, aluminium, magnesium alloys, and also new types of high strength steels. Many of these materials have limited strength or ductility, therefore in many cases the rupture being serious consequences during crashes, underscore Picketta et al. in their studies. Automotive structures must deform plastically in a short period of time, a few milliseconds, to absorb the crash energy in a controllable manner. It must be light and enable economically mass-production [1]. FE models rapidly gained acceptance among engineers. Many other factors facilitated the development of vehicle models by shell finite elements since most of the geometry of the structural surfaces was already on computer graphic files. Kee Poong Kim and Hoon Huh emphasize that the crashworthiness of each vehicle part needs to be evaluated at the initial stage of design for good performance of an assembled vehicle. As the dynamic behaviour of structural members is different from the static one, the crashworthiness of the vehicle structures has to be assessed by impact analysis. The paper analyzes the influence of trigger geometry upon the compression of thin-walled cylindrical tubes. Simulations performed on a simple model showed the dependence between triggers area and deformation times as well as the maximum deformations obtained for various speeds at which the simulations ware carried out. Likewise, the geometry of trigger leads to different results.

  3. Viability of thin wall tube forming of ATF FeCrAl

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew; Aydogan, Eda; Anderoglu, Osman; Lavender, Curt; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2016-09-16

    Fabrication of thin walled tubing of FeCrAl alloys is critical to its success as a candidate enhanced accident-tolerant fuel cladding material. Alloys that are being investigated are Generation I and Generation II FeCrAl alloys produced at ORNL and an ODS FeCrAl alloy, MA-956 produced by Special Metals. Gen I and Gen II FeCrAl alloys were provided by ORNL and MA-956 was provided by LANL (initially produced by Special Metals). Three tube development efforts were undertaken. ORNL led the FeCrAl Gen I and Gen II alloy development and tube processing studies through drawing tubes at Rhenium Corporation. LANL received alloys from ORNL and led tube processing studies through drawing tubes at Century Tubing. PNNL led the development of tube processing studies on MA-956 through pilger processing working with Sandvik Corporation. A summary of the recent progress on tube development is provided in the following report and a separate ORNL report: ORNL/TM-2015/478, “Development and Quality Assessments of Commercial Heat Production of ATF FeCrAl Tubes”.

  4. Braided thin-walled biodegradable ureteral stent: preliminary evaluation in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming Qing; Zou, Ting; Huang, Yi Chen; Shang, Ya Feng; Yang, Gang Gang; Wang, Wen Zu; Zhou, Jun Mei; Wang, Lu; Chen, Fang; Xie, Hua

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate a novel designed degradable ureteral stent. A total of 24 male Beagles, each with bilateral stents implanted (a biodegradable ureteral 4.5-Fr stent and a standard 4-Fr biostable stent) were divided into four groups. Intravenous pyelography, B-mode ultrasonography, and blood and urine tests were carried out before the procedure (0 weeks), and at 1-, 2-, 3- and 4-week intervals. Meanwhile, the mechanical characteristics of stents were tested, and scanning electron microscopy images of the biodegradable braided stents were obtained at different time-points postoperatively. In addition, histopathological changes were compared between the two different stents. All biodegradable braided stents began degrading at 1 week, and had completely degraded by 4 weeks. Hydronephrosis was equivalent during the first 2 weeks, but less with the biodegradable stents than with the control biostable stents at 3 and 4 weeks. Preoperative and postoperative blood and urine results were similar. The mechanical properties of the biodegradable stents were better than conventional biostable stents. Scanning electron microscopy images obtained at different weekly intervals showed that stents degraded in a predictable fashion. Histological testing of the urinary tract showed that the stent-related tissue reactivity of the two different stents were similar. Our novel braided thin-walled biodegradable stents provide temporary renal drainage as good as commercially available biostable stents. They also have good biocompatibility and physical characteristics. Therefore, they might have clinical application. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  5. Modeling of Fillets in Thin-Walled Structures for Dynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seugling, Richard M.; Brown, Andrew M.; Rodrigue, Pete (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Relatively new developments in manufacturing methods have made it possible to produce machined parts with a wall thickness of less than 0.010". While the parts are being machined. Fillets of relatively large radius to thickness ratios are created by the milling tool. This paper discusses an accurate new technique for finite-element modeling of fillets for dynamic and stiffness analysis using efficient plate elements rather than more computationally intensive, high density solid meshes, A simple filleted cantilever beam of 0.040" thickness, 1.6" length, 1" depth, and 0.250" radius in the corner was modeled using both solid elements and several different plate element geometries. The finite element results were then compared with static and modal testing of a machined sample. The highest-scoring plate element technique uses a bridge of elements that is constructed through the tangent point of the Fillet radius such that the thickness of the element matches tile volume of the fillet. This model produces errors of less than 4.6 percent for static loading and less than 7.4 percent for modal analysis. This simple plate element technique will prove critical for efficient, timely, and accurate dynamic analysis of complex thin-walled structures.

  6. Defect Characterization in a Thin Walled Composite RP-1 Tank: A Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langsing, Matthew D.; Walker, James L., II; Russell, Samual S.

    2000-01-01

    A full scale thin walled composite tank, designed and fabricated for the storage of pressurized RP- I rocket fuel, was fully inspected with digital infrared thermography (IR) during assembly and prior to proof testing. The tank featured a "pill capsule" design with the equatorial bondline being overwrapped on both the inner and outer surfaces. A composite skirt was bonded to the aft dome of the tank to serve as a structural support when the tank was stood on end in service. Numerous anomalies were detected and mapped prior to proof testing, some along bondlines and some scattered throughout the acreage. After the tank was intentionally burst, coupons were cut from the regions including thermographic anomalies. These coupons were again inspected thermographically to document the growth of any indications due to proof testing. Ultrasonic inspections (UT) were also performed on the coupons for comparison to thermography. Several coupons were dissected and micrographed. Relationships between IR and UT indications and the physical nature of the dissected material are presented.

  7. Effect of Mould Coating on Skin Formation and Nodule Characteristics of Thin Wall Ductile Iron Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaneswara, D.; Suharno, B.; Aprilio, A.; Ariobimo, R. D. S.; Sofyan, N.

    2017-05-01

    Thin wall ductile iron (TWDI) has the potential alternative for lightweight aluminium use in automotive parts. The main problem in TWDI, however, is the formation of skin during the casting, which may reduce its mechanical properties. This casting skin is formed by the decomposition of nodular graphite at the mould interface during the casting process. One of the ways to work around this problem is by using mould coating to control the cooling process. In this work, three variables of mould coatings were used, i.e. graphite, MgO, and MgO/graphite double layers. The results showed that the average casting skin thickness in double layer coating was the lowest (30.41 μm), 57% lower than that of in MgO (71.46 μm) and 60% lower than that of graphite (74.44 μm). The reduction of casting skin thickness increased the mechanical properties of TWDI (346 MPa), 69% higher than that of MgO (223 MPa) and 26% higher than that of graphite (297 MPa). The same is true for ductility (2.7%), which was higher than that of MgO (1.43%) and that of graphite (1.43%).

  8. The shear-lag effect of thin-walled box girder under vertical earthquake excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Zhipeng; Li, Yaozhuang; Guo, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The variation method based on the energy variation principle is proved to be accurate and valid for analyzing the shear lag effect of box girder under static and dynamic load. Meanwhile, dynamic problems gradually become the key factors in engineering practice. Therefore, a method for calculating the shear lag effect in thin-walled box girder under vertical seismic excitation is proposed by applying Hamilton Principle in this paper. The Timoshenko shear deformation is taken into account. And a new definition of shear lag ratio for box girder is given. What's more, some conclusions are drawn by analysis of numerical example. The results show that small amplitude of earthquake ground motion can generate high stress and obvious shear lag, especially in the region of resonance. And the influence of rotary inertia cannot be ignored for analyzing the shear lag effect. With the increase of span to width ratio, shear lag effect becomes smaller and smaller. These research conclusions will be useful for the engineering practice and enrich the theoretical studies of box girders.

  9. The influence of triggers geometry upon the stiffness of cylindrical thin walled tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soica, Adrian; Radu, Gheorghe N.

    2014-06-01

    Today's automobile manufacturers are increasingly using lightweight materials to reduce weight; these include plastics, composites, aluminium, magnesium alloys, and also new types of high strength steels. Many of these materials have limited strength or ductility, therefore in many cases the rupture being serious consequences during crashes, underscore Picketta et al. in their studies. Automotive structures must deform plastically in a short period of time, a few milliseconds, to absorb the crash energy in a controllable manner. It must be light and enable economically mass-production [1]. FE models rapidly gained acceptance among engineers. Many other factors facilitated the development of vehicle models by shell finite elements since most of the geometry of the structural surfaces was already on computer graphic files. Kee Poong Kim and Hoon Huh emphasize that the crashworthiness of each vehicle part needs to be evaluated at the initial stage of design for good performance of an assembled vehicle. As the dynamic behaviour of structural members is different from the static one, the crashworthiness of the vehicle structures has to be assessed by impact analysis. The paper analyzes the influence of trigger geometry upon the compression of thin-walled cylindrical tubes. Simulations performed on a simple model showed the dependence between triggers area and deformation times as well as the maximum deformations obtained for various speeds at which the simulations ware carried out. Likewise, the geometry of trigger leads to different results.

  10. dc and ac magnetic properties of thin-walled superconducting niobium cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsindlekht, M. I.; Genkin, V. M.; Felner, I.; Zeides, F.; Katz, N.; Gazi, Š.; Chromik, Š.

    2014-07-01

    We report the results of an experimental study of the dc and ac magnetic properties of superconducting Nb thin-walled cylinders in parallel to the axis magnetic fields. The magnetization curves at various temperatures are measured. Surprisingly, at 4.5 K, for magnetic fields much lower than Hc1, avalanchelike jumps of the magnetization are observed. The position of the jumps is not reproducible and changes from one experiment to another, resembling vortex lattice instabilities usually observed for magnetic fields larger than Hc1. At temperatures larger than 6.5 K, the measured magnetization curves become smooth. ac response is measured in constant and swept dc magnetic fields. A phenomenological model that describes the ac response of the surface superconducting states is proposed. This model assumes that the observed ac response in dc fields larger than Hc2 is due to the relaxation of surface superconducting states with nonzero current in the walls to the state with zero current, and the existence of a critical current below which this relaxation is absent.

  11. Magnetic moment jumps in flat and nanopatterned Nb thin-walled cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsindlekht, M. I.; Genkin, V. M.; Felner, I.; Zeides, F.; Katz, N.; Gazi, Š.; Chromik, Š.; Dobrovolskiy, O. V.; Sachser, R.; Huth, M.

    2017-02-01

    Penetration of magnetic flux into hollow superconducting cylinders is investigated by magnetic moment measurements. The magnetization curves of a flat and a nanopatterned thin-walled superconducting Nb cylinders with a rectangular cross section are reported for the axial field geometry. In the nanopatterned sample, a row of micron-sized antidots (holes) was milled in the film along the cylinder axis. Magnetic moment jumps are observed for both samples at low temperatures for magnetic fields not only above Hc1, but also in fields lower than Hc1, i. e., in the vortex-free regime. The positions of the jumps are not reproducible and they change from one experiment to another, resembling vortex lattice instabilities usually observed for magnetic fields larger than Hc1. At temperatures above 0.66Tc and 0.78Tc the magnetization curves become smooth for the patterned and the as-prepared sample, respectively. The magnetization curve of a reference flat Nb film in the parallel field geometry does not exhibit jumps in the entire range of accessible temperatures.

  12. Identification of cracks in thin-walled structures by means of wavenumber filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudela, Paweł; Radzieński, Maciej; Ostachowicz, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    This research is related to a signal processing of full wavefield data as an effective tool for detection, localization and visualization of a crack growth in thin-walled structures. Full wavefield data of propagating Lamb waves in structures such as plates and shells made out of metallic alloys and composite laminates contain a wealth of information about wave pattern anomalies due to occurrence of a damage. The aim is to demonstrate a method for enhancing damage visualization in structures such that estimation of the length and orientation of the crack can be easily obtained. The proposed signal processing involves application of discrete fast Fourier transform, wavenumber domain filtering and inverse discrete Fourier transform. The method is further enhanced by a technique for compensation of the wave attenuation so that the effects of structural damage have the same influence regardless of the location. The concept is first illustrated on numerically simulated data, and then tested on experimental results. In the experiments, full wavefield measurements are obtained using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer, which allows the measurement of displacements and/or velocities along three axes over a user-defined grid. In the proposed method only out-of-plane velocities are used. Tests performed on simple aluminum and composite plates with artificially introduced longitudinal cracks confirm the effectiveness of the method and its potential for application to the inspection of a variety of structural components.

  13. Disturbance rejection control for vibration suppression of piezoelectric laminated thin-walled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. Q.; Li, H. N.; Schmidt, R.; Müller, P. C.

    2014-02-01

    Thin-walled piezoelectric integrated smart structures are easily excited to vibrate by unknown disturbances. In order to design and simulate a control strategy, firstly, an electro-mechanically coupled dynamic finite element (FE) model of smart structures is developed based on first-order shear deformation (FOSD) hypothesis. Linear piezoelectric constitutive equations and the assumption of constant electric field through the thickness are considered. Based on the dynamic FE model, a disturbance rejection (DR) control with proportional-integral (PI) observer using step functions as the fictitious model of disturbances is developed for vibration suppression of smart structures. In order to achieve a better dynamic behavior of the fictitious model of disturbances, the PI observer is extended to generalized proportional-integral (GPI) observer, in which sine or polynomial functions can be used to represent disturbances resulting in better dynamics. Therefore the disturbances can be estimated either by PI or GPI observer, and then the estimated signals are fed back to the controller. The DR control is validated by various kinds of unknown disturbances, and compared with linear-quadratic regulator (LQR) control. The results illustrate that the vibrations are better suppressed by the proposed DR control.

  14. Tensile Response of Hoop Reinforced Multiaxially Braided Thin Wall Composite Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sree Shankhachur; Potluri, Prasad; Soutis, Constantinos

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the tensile response of thin-walled composite tubes with multi-axial fibre architecture. A hybrid braid-wound layup has the potential to optimise the composite tube properties, however, stacking sequence plays a role in the failure mechanism. A braid-winding method has been used to produce stacked overwound braid layup [(±45°/0°)5/90°4]T. Influence of stacking sequence on premature failure of hoop layers has been reported. Under tensile loading, a cross-ply composite tube with the alternate stacking of hoop and axial fibre show hoop plies splitting similar to the overwound braided composite tube. However, splitting has been restricted by the surrounding axial plies and contained between the adjacent axial fibre tows. This observation suggests hoop layers sandwiched between braid layers will improve structural integrity. A near net shape architecture with three fibre orientation in a triaxial braid will provide additional support to prevent extensive damage for plies loaded in off-axis. Several notable observations for relatively open braid structures such as tow scissoring, high Poisson's ratio and influence of axial tow crimp on the strain to failure have been reported. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) in conjunction with surface strain gauging has been employed to capture the strain pattern.

  15. Effects of substrate preheating on the thin-wall part built by laser metal deposition shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Shijie; Liu, Weijun; Long, Risheng

    2014-10-01

    Laser metal deposition shaping (LMDS) is a state-of-the-art technology that combines rapid prototyping and laser processing. There are many factors affecting the quality, precision, microstructure and performance of the LMDS-deposited parts. Among these factors, substrate preheating is a significant one because it can change the heat history of the LMDS process. Preheating is generally adopted to reduce the residual stresses and the risk of thermal distortion and cracking. However, it changes the heat transfer conditions and affects the final microstructure and properties. In this work a numerical simulation model was established to analyze the heat transfer characteristics between deposited material and substrate, the influence rules of substrate preheating on the thermal behavior during LMDS, and the distribution characters of temperature and stress field. And then, the experimental methods were used to evaluate the effects of substrate preheating on the surface quality, microstructure, composition, hardness distribution, and mechanical properties of as-built thin-wall parts. The experimental results primarily agree with the theoretical analysis and numerical model, which indicates that in terms of the varied thermo-mechanical coupled field, the investigated microstructure and properties of formed components depend considerably on the initial temperature of the substrate, so the LMDS process can be effectively adjusted and controlled by means of substrate preheating.

  16. Gating geometry studies of thin-walled 17-4PH investment castings

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, M.C.; Zanner, F.J.

    1992-11-01

    The ability to design gating systems that reliably feed and support investment castings is often the result of ``cut-and-try`` methodology. Factors such as hot tearing, porosity, cold shuts, misruns, and shrink are defects often corrected by several empirical gating design iterations. Sandia National Laboratories is developing rules that aid in removing the uncertainty involved in the design of gating systems for investment castings. In this work, gating geometries used for filling of thin walled investment cast 17-4PH stainless steel flat plates were investigated. A full factorial experiment evaluating the influence of metal pour temperature, mold preheat temperature, and mold channel thickness were conducted for orientations that filled a horizontal flat plate from the edge. A single wedge gate geometry was used for the edge-gated configuration. Thermocouples placed along the top of the mold recorded metal front temperatures, and a real-time x-ray imaging system tracked the fluid flow behavior during filling of the casting. Data from these experiments were used to determine the terminal fill volumes and terminal fill times for each gate design.

  17. Gating geometry studies of thin-walled 17-4PH investment castings

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, M.C.; Zanner, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    The ability to design gating systems that reliably feed and support investment castings is often the result of cut-and-try'' methodology. Factors such as hot tearing, porosity, cold shuts, misruns, and shrink are defects often corrected by several empirical gating design iterations. Sandia National Laboratories is developing rules that aid in removing the uncertainty involved in the design of gating systems for investment castings. In this work, gating geometries used for filling of thin walled investment cast 17-4PH stainless steel flat plates were investigated. A full factorial experiment evaluating the influence of metal pour temperature, mold preheat temperature, and mold channel thickness were conducted for orientations that filled a horizontal flat plate from the edge. A single wedge gate geometry was used for the edge-gated configuration. Thermocouples placed along the top of the mold recorded metal front temperatures, and a real-time x-ray imaging system tracked the fluid flow behavior during filling of the casting. Data from these experiments were used to determine the terminal fill volumes and terminal fill times for each gate design.

  18. Effects of Pore Distributions on Ductility of Thin-Walled High Pressure Die-Cast Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Li, Mei; Allison, John

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a microstructure-based three-dimensional (3D) finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die-cast (HPDC) Magnesium alloys on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope and X-ray tomography to obtain the general information on the pore distribution features. The experimentally observed pore distribution features are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element models with different pore volume fractions and pore distribution features. Shear and ductile damage models are adopted in the finite element analyses to induce the fracture by element removal, leading to the prediction of ductility. The results in this study show that the ductility monotonically decreases as the pore volume fraction increases and that the effect of ‘skin region’ on the ductility is noticeable under the condition of same local pore volume fraction in the center region of the sample and its existence can be beneficial for the improvement of ductility. The further synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element analyses are planned to investigate the effects of pore size and pore size distribution.

  19. Neutral-Axis Springs for Thin-Wall Integral Boom Hinges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James M.

    2003-01-01

    A document proposes the use of neutral- axis springs to augment the unfolding torques of hinges that are integral parts of thin-wall composite-material booms used to deploy scientific instruments from spacecraft. A spring according to the proposal would most likely be made of metal and could be either flat or curved in the manner of a measuring tape. Under the unfolded, straightboom condition, each spring would lie along the neutral axis of a boom. The spring would be connected to the boom by two supports at fixed locations on the boom. The spring would be fixed to one of the supports and would be free to slide through the other support. The width, thickness, and material of the spring would be chosen to tailor the spring stiffness to provide the desired torque margin to assist in deployment of the boom. The spring would also contribute to the stiffness of the boom against bending and torsion, and could contribute some damping that would help suppress unwanted vibrations caused by the deployment process or by external disturbances.

  20. The Pack Method for Compressive Tests of Thin Specimens of Materials Used in Thin-Wall Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aitchison, C S; Tuckerman, L B

    1939-01-01

    The strength of modern lightweight thin-wall structures is generally limited by the strength of the compression members. An adequate design of these members requires a knowledge of the compressive stress-strain graph of the thin-wall material. The "pack" method was developed at the National Bureau of Standards with the support of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to make possible a determination of compressive stress-strain graphs for such material. In the pack test an odd number of specimens are assembled into a relatively stable pack, like a "pack of cards." Additional lateral stability is obtained from lateral supports between the external sheet faces of the pack and outside reactions. The tests seems adequate for many problems in structural research.

  1. High trapped field performances in thin-wall YBa2Cu3O7-δ bulk cryomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenfaui, Driss; Sibeud, Pierre-Frédéric; Louradour, Eric; Noudem, Jacques G.; Chaud, Xavier

    2013-05-01

    Thin-wall YBa2Cu3O7-δ bulk single domains were grown from drilled preforms with a holes network in the aim of increasing the specific areas and diminishing the oxygen diffusion paths. By applying a progressive annealing at high temperature under oxygen pressure (10 MPa), crack-free superconductors were obtained in a very short time (less than 3 days). A crack-free microstructure fostered large size persistent current loops, which boosted the trapped field performances. A trapped field Bmax = 5.2 T at 17 K was achieved on a 16 mm-diameter thin-wall pellet (disk surface s = 1.987 cm2), which led to a striking trapped field density Bmax/S=2.617 T cm-2.

  2. One-dimensional analysis of thin-walled beams with diaphragms and its application to optimization for stiffness reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Joon Hee; Jang, Gang-Won; Shin, Dongil; Kim, Yoon Young

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a method to analyze thin-walled beams with quadrilateral cross sections reinforced with diaphragms using a one-dimensional higher-order beam theory. The effect of a diaphragm is reflected focusing on the increase of static stiffness. The deformations on the beam-interfacing boundary of a thin diaphragm are described by using deformation modes of the beam cross section while the deformations inside the diaphragm are approximated in the form of complete cubic polynomials. By using the principle of minimum potential energy, its stiffness that significantly affects distortional deformation of a thin-walled beam can be considered in the one-dimensional beam analysis. It is shown that the accuracy of the resulting one-dimensional analysis is comparable with that by a shell element based analysis. As a means to demonstrate the usefulness of the present approach for design, position optimization problems of diaphragms for stiffness reinforcement of an automotive side frame are solved.

  3. Using fluctuations of Entropy as a starting point for obtaining behavior of scalar fields permitting collapse of thin wall approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, Andrew

    2005-04-01

    We have shown that a scalar field can be used, employing Scherrer's k essence cosmological sound calculation, to model how we evolve from a dark matter-dark energy mix to a cosmological constant. Here, we are exploring what initiates the decay of the near perfect thin wall approximation on that scalar field to circumstances permitting a k essence speed-of-sound argument in favor of traditional models of Einstein's cosmological constant as a driving force for inflationary expansion.

  4. Analysis of active closed cross-section slender beams based on asymptotically correct thin-wall beam theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouli, F.; Langlois, R. G.; Afagh, F. F.

    2007-02-01

    An asymptotically correct theory for multi-cell thin-wall anisotropic slender beams that includes the shell bending strain measures is extended to include embedded active fibre composites (AFCs). A closed-form solution of the asymptotically correct cross-sectional actuation force and moments is obtained. Active thin-wall beam theories found in the literature neglect the shell bending strains, which lead to incorrect predictions for certain cross-sections, while the theory presented is shown to overcome this shortcoming. The theory is implemented and verified against single-cell examples that were solved using the University of Michigan/Variational Beam Sectional Analysis (UM/VABS) software. The stiffness constants and the actuation vector are obtained for two-cell and three-cell active cross-sections. The theory is argued to be reliable for efficient initial design analysis and interdisciplinary parametric or optimization studies of thin-wall closed cross-section slender beams with no initial twist or obliqueness.

  5. Static and free-vibrational response of semi-circular graphite-epoxy frames with thin-walled open sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. Scott; Johnson, Eric R.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure the three-dimensional static and free vibrational response of two graphite-epoxy, thin-walled, open section frames. The frames are semi-circular with a radius of three feet, and one specimen has an I cross section and the other has a channel cross section. The flexibility influence coefficients were measured in static tests for loads applied at midspan with the ends of the specimens clamped. Natural frequencies and modes were determined from vibrational tests for free and clamped end conditions. The experimental data is used to evaluate a new finite element which was developed specifically for the analysis of curved, thin-walled structures. The formulation of the element is based on a Vlasov-type, thin-walled, curved beam theory. The predictions from the finite element program generally correlated well with the experimental data for the symmetric I-specimen. Discrepancies in some of the data were found to be due to flexibility in the clamped end conditions. With respect to the data for the channel specimen, the correlation was less satisfactory. The finite element analysis predicted the out-of-plane response of the channel specimen reasonably well, but large discrepancies occurred between the predicted in-plane response and the experimental data. The analysis predicted a much more compliant in-plane response than was observed in the experiments.

  6. Evaluation of advanced automatic PET segmentation methods using nonspherical thin-wall inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Berthon, B. Marshall, C.; Evans, M.; Spezi, E.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The use of positron emission tomography (PET) within radiotherapy treatment planning requires the availability of reliable and accurate segmentation tools. PET automatic segmentation (PET-AS) methods have been recommended for the delineation of tumors, but there is still a lack of thorough validation and cross-comparison of such methods using clinically relevant data. In particular, studies validating PET segmentation tools mainly use phantoms with thick plastic walls inserts of simple spherical geometry and have not specifically investigated the effect of the target object geometry on the delineation accuracy. Our work therefore aimed at generating clinically realistic data using nonspherical thin-wall plastic inserts, for the evaluation and comparison of a set of eight promising PET-AS approaches. Methods: Sixteen nonspherical inserts were manufactured with a plastic wall of 0.18 mm and scanned within a custom plastic phantom. These included ellipsoids and toroids derived with different volumes, as well as tubes, pear- and drop-shaped inserts with different aspect ratios. A set of six spheres of volumes ranging from 0.5 to 102 ml was used for a baseline study. A selection of eight PET-AS methods, written in house, was applied to the images obtained. The methods represented promising segmentation approaches such as adaptive iterative thresholding, region-growing, clustering and gradient-based schemes. The delineation accuracy was measured in terms of overlap with the computed tomography reference contour, using the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), and error in dimensions. Results: The delineation accuracy was lower for nonspherical inserts than for spheres of the same volume in 88% cases. Slice-by-slice gradient-based methods, showed particularly lower DSC for tori (DSC < 0.5), caused by a failure to recover the object geometry. The region-growing method reached high levels of accuracy for most inserts (DSC > 0.76 except for tori) but showed the largest

  7. Status of Joining Thin Sheet and Thin Wall Tubes of 14YWT

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzer, David T.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Tang, Wei; Feng, Zhili

    2015-09-18

    Beginning this fiscal year, the FCRD research project initiated an investigation on joining thin sections of the advanced ODS 14YWT ferritic alloy. Friction stir welding (FSW) was investigated as a method to join thin plate and tubing of 14YWT since it is a solid state joining method that has been shown in past studies to be a promising method for joining plates of ODS alloys, such as 14YWT. However, this study will attempt to be the first to demonstrate if FSW can successfully join thin plates and thin wall tubing of 14YWT. In the first FSW attempt, a 1.06 cm thick plate of 14YWT (SM13 heat) was successfully rolled at 1000ºC to the target thickness of 0.1 cm with no edge cracking. This achievement is a highlight since previous attempts to roll 14YWT plates have resulted in extensive cracking. For the FSW run, a pin tool being developed by the ORNL FSW Process Development effort was used. The first FSW run successfully produced a bead-on-plate weld in the 0.1 cm thick plate. The quality of the weld zone appears very good with no evidence of large defects such as cavities. The microstructural characterization study of the bead-on-plate weld zone has been initiated to compare the results of the microstructure analysis with those obtained in the reference microstructural analysis of the 14YWT (SM13 heat) that showed ultra-fine grain size of 0.43 μm and a high number density of ~2-5 nm sizes oxygen-enriched nanoclusters.

  8. Isogeometric Analysis of Deformation, Inelasticity and Fracture In Thin-Walled Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Borst, René

    2016-08-01

    The basic idea of isogeometric analysis (IGA) is to use splines, which are the functions commonly used in computer-aided design (CAD) to describe the geometry, as the basis function for the analysis as well. A main advantage is that a sometimes elaborate meshing process is by-passed. Another benefit is that spline basis-functions possess a higher-order degree of continuity, which enables a more accurate representation of the stress. Further, the order of continuity of the basis-functions can be reduced locally by knot insertion. This feature can be used to model interfaces and cracks as discontinuities in the displacement field. In order to study failure-mechanisms in thin-walled composite materials, an accurate representation of the full three-dimensional stress field is mandatory. A continuum shell formulation is an obvious choice. Continuum shell elements can be developed based on the isogeometric concept. They exploit NURBS basis functions to construct the mid-surface of the shell. In combination with a higher-order B-spline basis function in the thickness direction a complete three-dimensional representation of the shell is obtained. This isogeometric shell formulation can be implemented in a standard finite element code using Bézier extraction. Weak and strong discontinuities can be introduced in the B-spline function using knot-insertion to model material interfaces and delaminations rigorously as discontinuities in the displacement field. The exact representation of material interfaces vastly improves the accuracy of the through-the- thickness stress field. The ability to provide a double knot insertion enables a straightforward analysis of delamination growth in layered composite shells. Illustrative examples will be given.

  9. Analysis and Parametric Investigation of Active Open Cross Section Thin Wall Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, James

    The static behaviour of active Open Cross Section Thin Wall Beams (OCSTWB) with embedded Active/Macro Fibre Composites (AFCs/MFCs) has been investigated for the purpose of advancing the fundamental theory needed in the development of advanced smart structures. An efficient code that can analyze active OCSTWB using analytical equations has been studied. Various beam examples have been investigated in order to verify this recently developed analytical active OCSTWB analysis tool. The cross sectional stiffness constants and induced force, moments and bimoment predicted by this analytical code have been compared with those predicted by the 2-D finite element beam cross section analysis codes called the Variational Asymptotic Beam Sectional (VABS) analysis and the University of Michigan VABS (UM/VABS). Good agreement was observed between the results obtained from the analytical tool and VABS. The calculated cross sectional stiffness constants and induced force/moments, the constitutive relation and the six intrinstic static equilibrium equations for OCSTWB were all used together in a first-order accurate forward difference scheme in order to determine the average twist and deflections along the beam span. In order to further verify the analytical code, the static behaviour of a number of beam examples was investigated using 3-D Finite Element Analysis (FEA). For a particular cross section, the rigid body twist and displacements were minimized with the displacements of all the nodes in the 3-D FEA model that compose the cross section. This was done for a number of cross sections along the beam span in order to recover the global beam twist and displacement profiles from the 3-D FEA results. The global twist and deflections predicted by the analytical code agreed closely with those predicted by UM/VABS and 3-D FEA. The study was completed by a parametric investigation to determine the boundary conditions and the composite ply lay-ups of the active and passive plies that

  10. Influence of irrigant, dowel type, and root-reinforcing material on fracture resistance of thin-walled endodontically treated teeth.

    PubMed

    Ayad, Mohamed F; Bahannan, Salma A; Rosenstiel, Stephen F

    2011-04-01

    Unresolved controversy exists concerning the optimum restorative material to reinforce the thin-walled roots of endodontically treated teeth to improve their fracture resistance under occlusal load. This study evaluated the effectiveness of irrigant, dowel type, and root-reinforcing material on the fracture resistance of thin-walled endodontically treated teeth. The root canals of 140 maxillary central incisors were enlarged and equally divided into seven groups according to the canal irrigant: no irrigant (control), 5% hydrogen peroxide, 5% sodium hypochlorite, a combination of 5% hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite, 15% ethylenediaminotetraacetic acid (EDTA), 10% lactic acid, or 20% lactic acid. Within each group, root canals were lined with composite resin (PermaFlo) or glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC). A light-transmitting plastic dowel (Luminex) was used to create space for a quartz fiber-reinforced dowel (Aestheti Post) or a titanium alloy dowel (ParaPost XH) and to cure the restorative materials. Following dowel cementation and restoration of the roots with composite core, the teeth were submitted to fracture resistance testing, and data were analyzed with 3-way ANOVA followed by Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch Multiple Range Test (α= 0.05). Fracture resistance values were significantly different among irrigants, restorative materials, and their interaction (p < 0.001); however, the dowel type was not significantly different (p= 0.51). Thin-walled roots that had the smear layer removed with lactic acid and that were then lined with composite resin had a higher fracture resistance. © 2011 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  11. Mount Protects Thin-Walled Glass or Ceramic Tubes from Large Thermal and Vibration Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amato, Michael; Schmidt, Stephen; Marsh. James; Dahya, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The design allows for the low-stress mounting of fragile objects, like thin walled glass, by using particular ways of compensating, isolating, or releasing the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) differences between the mounted object and the mount itself. This mount profile is lower than true full kinematic mounting. Also, this approach enables accurate positioning of the component for electrical and optical interfaces. It avoids the higher and unpredictable stress issues that often result from potting the object. The mount has been built and tested to space-flight specifications, and has been used for fiber-optic, optical, and electrical interfaces for a spaceflight mission. This mount design is often metal and is slightly larger than the object to be mounted. The objects are optical or optical/electrical, and optical and/or electrical interfaces are required from the top and bottom. This requires the mount to be open at both ends, and for the object s position to be controlled. Thin inside inserts at the top and bottom contact the housing at defined lips, or edges, and hold the fragile object in the mount. The inserts can be customized to mimic the outer surface of the object, which further reduces stress. The inserts have the opposite CTE of the housing material, partially compensating for the CTE difference that causes thermal stress. A spring washer is inserted at one end to compensate for more CTE difference and to hold the object against the location edge of the mount for any optical position requirements. The spring also ensures that any fiber-optic or optic interface, which often requires some pressure to ensure a good interface, does not overstress the fragile object. The insert thickness, material, and spring washer size can be traded against each other to optimize the mount and stresses for various thermal and vibration load ranges and other mounting requirements. The alternate design uses two separate, unique features to reduce stress and hold the

  12. Complete Status Report Documenting Weld Development for Thin Wall Tubing of ODS Ferritic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzer, David T.; Edmondson, Philip D.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Tang, Wei; Feng, Zhili

    2016-09-16

    Beginning in 2015, research in the FCRD program began the development of FSW for joining thin sections of 14YWT in the form of thin (0.5 mm) plate and ultimately thin wall tubing. In the previous fiscal year, a ~1 mm thick plate, or sheet, of 14YWT was produced by hot rolling with no edge cracking. The initial FSW experiment was performed on the 1 mm thick plate and involved a bead-on-plate weld in which the spinning pin tool is plunged into the plate surface, but does not penetrate the thickness of the plate, and then travels the length of the plate. The FSW run successfully produced a bead-on-plate stir zone on the 1 mm thick plate of 14YWT, but no characterization studies of the stir zone were performed by the end of FY15. Therefore, the results presented in this report cover the microstructural analysis of the bead-on-plate stir zone and the initial research task on obtaining tensile properties of the stir zone using the digital image correlation (DIC) approach during testing of miniature tensile specimens to assess the quality of the FSW parameters used in the initial experiment. The results of the microstructural characterization study using optical, scanning electron and scanning transmission electron microscopies showed the grain structure in the SZ to have isotropic and irregular shape but very similar size compared to the highly elongated grains oriented horizontally with the plane of the plate that were observed in the unaffected zone of 14YWT. Several cracks oriented horizontally were observed mostly on the retreating side of the SZ in both the SZ and TMAZ. These cracks may have formed due to insufficient pressure being exerted on the top surface of the plate by the shoulder and pin tool during the FSW run. High resolution STEM-EDS analysis showed the presence of the Y-Ti-O particles in the SZ, but that some particles exhibited coarsening. Overall, the FSW parameters used to produce the bead-on-plate SZ in the 0.1 cm thick plate of 14YWT were nearly

  13. Thin-walled nanoscrolls by multi-step intercalation from tubular halloysite-10 Å and its rearrangement upon peroxide treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsirka, Balázs; Horváth, Erzsébet; Szabó, Péter; Juzsakova, Tatjána; Szilágyi, Róbert K.; Fertig, Dávid; Makó, Éva; Varga, Tamás; Kónya, Zoltán; Kukovecz, Ákos; Kristóf, János

    2017-03-01

    Surface modification of the halloysite-10 Å mineral with tubular morphology can be achieved by slightly modified procedures developed for the delamination of kaolinite minerals. The resulting delaminated halloysite nanoparticles have unexpected surface/morphological properties that display, new potentials in catalyst development. In this work, a four-step intercalation/delamination procedure is described for the preparation of thin-walled nanoscrolls from the multi-layered hydrated halloysite mineral that consists of (1) intercalation of halloysite with potassium acetate, (2) replacement intercalation with ethylene glycol, (3) replacement intercalation with hexylamine, and (4) delamination with toluene. The intercalation steps were followed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption, thermogravimetry, and infrared spectroscopy. Delamination eliminated the crystalline order and the crystallite size along the 'c'-axis, increased the specific surface area, greatly decreased the thickness of the mineral tubes to a monolayer, and shifted the pore diameter toward the micropore region. Unexpectedly, the removal of residual organics from intercalation steps adsorbed at the nanoscroll surface with a peroxide treatment resulted in partial recovery of crystallinity and increase of crystallite size along the 'c'-crystal direction. The d(001) value showed a diffuse pattern at 7.4-7.7 Å due to the rearrangement of the thin-walled nanoscrolls toward the initial tubular morphology of the dehydrated halloysite-7 Å mineral.

  14. Tunneling from a Minkowski vacuum to an AdS vacuum: A new thin-wall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Ali; Paban, Sonia; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2016-07-01

    Using numerical and analytic methods, we study quantum tunneling from a Minkowski false vacuum to an anti-de Sitter true vacuum. Scanning the parameter space of theories with quartic and nonpolynomial potentials, we find that for any given potential tunneling is completely quenched if gravitational effects are made sufficiently strong. For potentials where ɛ , the energy density difference between the vacua, is small compared to the barrier height, this occurs in the thin-wall regime studied by Coleman and De Luccia. However, we find that other potentials, possibly with ɛ much greater than the barrier height, produce a new type of thin-wall bounce when gravitational effects become strong. We show that the critical curve that bounds the region in parameter space where the false vacuum is stable can be found by a computationally simple overshoot/undershoot argument. We discuss the treatment of boundary terms in the bounce calculation and show that, with proper regularization, one obtains an identical finite result for the tunneling exponent regardless of whether or not these are included. Finally, we briefly discuss the extension of our results to transitions between anti-de Sitter vacua.

  15. Numerical Estimation of the Elastic Properties of Thin-Walled Structures Manufactured from Short-Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenbach, H.; Naumenko, K.; L'vov, G. I.; Pilipenko, S. N.

    2003-05-01

    A model which allows us to estimate the elastic properties of thin-walled structures manufactured by injection molding is presented. The starting step is the numerical prediction of the microstructure of a short-fiber-reinforced composite developed during the filling stage of the manufacturing process. For this purpose, the Moldflow Plastic Insight® commercial program is used. As a result of simulating the filling process, a second-rank orientation tensor characterizing the microstructure of the material is obtained. The elastic properties of the prepared material locally depend on the orientational distribution of fibers. The constitutive equation is formulated by means of orientational averaging for a given orientation tensor. The tensor of elastic material properties is computed and translated into the format for a stress-strain analysis based on the ANSYSÒ finite-element code. The numerical procedure and the convergence of results are discussed for a thin strip, a rectangular plate, and a shell of revolution. The influence of manufacturing conditions on the stress-strain state of statically loaded thin-walled elements is illustrated.

  16. Bridging multi-scale approach to consider the effects of local deformations in the analysis of thin-walled members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkmen, R. Emre

    2013-07-01

    Thin-walled members that have one dimension relatively large in comparison to the cross-sectional dimensions are usually modelled by using beam-type one-dimensional finite elements. Beam-type elements, however, are based on the assumption of rigid cross-section, thus they only allow considerations associated with the beam axis behaviour such as flexural-, torsional- or lateral-buckling and cannot consider the effects of local deformations such as flange local buckling or distortional buckling. In order to capture the local effects of this type shell-type finite element models can be used. Based on the Bridging multi-scale approach, this study proposes a numerical technique that is able to split the global analysis, which is performed by using simple beam-type elements, from the local analysis which is based on more sophisticated shell-type elements. As a result, the proposed multi-scale method allows the usage of shell elements in a local region to incorporate the local deformation effects on the overall behaviour of thin-walled members without necessitating a shell-type model for the whole member. Comparisons with full shell-type analysis are provided in order to illustrate the efficiency of the method developed herein.

  17. Influences of deposition strategies and oblique angle on properties of AISI316L stainless steel oblique thin-walled part by direct laser fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinlin; Deng, Dewei; Qi, Meng; Zhang, Hongchao

    2016-06-01

    Direct laser fabrication (DLF) developed from laser cladding and rapid prototyping technique has been widely used to fabricate thin-walled parts exhibiting more functions without expending weight and size. Oblique thin-walled parts accompanied with inhomogeneous mechanical properties are common in application. In the present study, a series of AISI316L stainless steel oblique thin-walled parts are successfully produced by DLF, in addition, deposition strategies, microstructure, and mechanical property of the oblique thin-walled parts are investigated. The results show that parallel deposition way is more valuable to fabricate oblique thin-walled part than oblique deposition way, because of the more remarkable properties. The hardness of high side initially increases until the distance to the substrate reaches about 25 mm, and then decreases with the increase of the deposition height. Oblique angle has a positive effect on the tensile property but a negative effect on microstructure, hardness and elongation due to the more tempering time. The maximum average ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation are presented 744.3 MPa and 13.5% when the angle between tensile loading direction and horizontal direction is 45° and 90°, respectively.

  18. GBT pre-buckling and buckling analyses of thin-walled members under axial and transverse loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taig, Gerard; Ranzi, Gianluca; Luongo, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an analytical approach for pre-buckling and buckling analyses of thin-walled members implemented within the framework of the Generalised Beam Theory (GBT). With the proposed GBT cross-sectional analysis, the set of deformation modes used in the analysis is represented by the dynamic modes obtained for an unrestrained frame representing the cross-section. In this manner, it is possible to account for the deformability of the cross-section in both pre-buckling and buckling analyses. Different loading conditions, including both axial and transverse arrangements, are considered in the applications to highlight under which circumstances the use of the GBT deformation modes is required for an adequate representation of the pre-buckling and buckling response. The numerical results have been validated against those determined using a shell element model developed in the finite element software ABAQUS.

  19. Lamb-Wave Embedded NDE with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Thin-Wall Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2004-02-01

    Piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) are inexpensive, non-intrusive, unobtrusive devices that can be surface-mounted on existing structures or inserted between the layers of new composite structures. The PWAS can be used in both active and passive modes. PWAS generate and detect Lamb waves and enable the development of embedded NDE concepts. This paper will present two embedded NDE concepts based on the PWAS technology and Lamb waves approach. The first concept utilizes traveling Lamb waves and could be described as embedded ultrasonics. It is shown that embedded PWAS are able to reproduce most of the conventional ultrasonic techniques, such as pitch-catch, pulse-echo, and phased array. Several experiments using Lamb waves traveling in thin-wall structures are presented.

  20. Proof test criteria for thin-walled 2219 aluminum pressure vessels. Volume 1: Program summary and data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    This experimental program was undertaken to investigate the crack growth behavior of deep surface flaws in 2219 aluminum. The program included tests of uniaxially loaded surface flaw and center crack panels at temperatures ranging from 20K (-423 F) to ambient. The tests were conducted on both the base metal and as-welded weld metal material. The program was designed to provide data on the mechanisms of failure by ligament penetration, and the residual cyclic life, after proof-testing, of a vessel which has been subjected to incipient penetration by the proof test. The results were compared and analyzed with previously developed data to develop guidelines for the proof testing of thin walled 2219 pressure vessels.

  1. Ball tonometry: a rapid, nondestructive method for measuring cell turgor pressure in thin-walled plant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lintilhac, P. M.; Wei, C.; Tanguay, J. J.; Outwater, J. O.

    2000-01-01

    In this article we describe a new method for the determination of turgor pressures in living plant cells. Based on the treatment of growing plant cells as thin-walled pressure vessels, we find that pressures can be accurately determined by observing and measuring the area of the contact patch formed when a spherical glass probe is lowered onto the cell surface with a known force. Within the limits we have described, we can show that the load (determined by precalibration of the device) divided by the projected area of the contact patch (determined by video microscopy) provides a direct, rapid, and accurate measure of the internal turgor pressure of the cell. We demonstrate, by parallel measurements with the pressure probe, that our method yields pressure data that are consistent with those from the pressure probe. Also, by incubating target tissues in stepped concentrations of mannitol to incrementally reduce the turgor pressure, we show that the pressures measured by tonometry accurately reflect the predicted changes from the osmotic potential of the bathing medium. The advantages of this new method over the pressure probe are considerable, however, in that we can move rapidly from cell to cell, taking measurements every 20 s. In addition, the nondestructive nature of the method means that we can return to the same cell repeatedly for periodic pressure measurements. The limitations of the method lie in the fact that it is suitable only for superficial cells that are directly accessible to the probe and to cells that are relatively thin walled and not heavily decorated with surface features. It is also not suitable for measuring pressures in flaccid cells.

  2. Influence of measuring algorithm on shape accuracy in the compensating turning of high gradient thin-wall parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Guilin; Zhu, Dengchao; Li, Shengyi

    2015-02-01

    In order to meet the requirement of aerodynamics, the infrared domes or windows with conformal and thin-wall structure becomes the development trend of high-speed aircrafts in the future. But these parts usually have low stiffness, the cutting force will change along with the axial position, and it is very difficult to meet the requirement of shape accuracy by single machining. Therefore, on-machine measurement and compensating turning are used to control the shape errors caused by the fluctuation of cutting force and the change of stiffness. In this paper, on the basis of ultra precision diamond lathe, a contact measuring system with five DOFs is developed to achieve on-machine measurement of conformal thin-wall parts with high accuracy. According to high gradient surface, the optimizing algorithm is designed on the distribution of measuring points by using the data screening method. The influence rule of sampling frequency is analyzed on measuring errors, the best sampling frequency is found out based on planning algorithm, the effect of environmental factors and the fitting errors are controlled within lower range, and the measuring accuracy of conformal dome is greatly improved in the process of on-machine measurement. According to MgF2 conformal dome with high gradient, the compensating turning is implemented by using the designed on-machine measuring algorithm. The shape error is less than PV 0.8μm, greatly superior compared with PV 3μm before compensating turning, which verifies the correctness of measuring algorithm.

  3. Ball tonometry: a rapid, nondestructive method for measuring cell turgor pressure in thin-walled plant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lintilhac, P. M.; Wei, C.; Tanguay, J. J.; Outwater, J. O.

    2000-01-01

    In this article we describe a new method for the determination of turgor pressures in living plant cells. Based on the treatment of growing plant cells as thin-walled pressure vessels, we find that pressures can be accurately determined by observing and measuring the area of the contact patch formed when a spherical glass probe is lowered onto the cell surface with a known force. Within the limits we have described, we can show that the load (determined by precalibration of the device) divided by the projected area of the contact patch (determined by video microscopy) provides a direct, rapid, and accurate measure of the internal turgor pressure of the cell. We demonstrate, by parallel measurements with the pressure probe, that our method yields pressure data that are consistent with those from the pressure probe. Also, by incubating target tissues in stepped concentrations of mannitol to incrementally reduce the turgor pressure, we show that the pressures measured by tonometry accurately reflect the predicted changes from the osmotic potential of the bathing medium. The advantages of this new method over the pressure probe are considerable, however, in that we can move rapidly from cell to cell, taking measurements every 20 s. In addition, the nondestructive nature of the method means that we can return to the same cell repeatedly for periodic pressure measurements. The limitations of the method lie in the fact that it is suitable only for superficial cells that are directly accessible to the probe and to cells that are relatively thin walled and not heavily decorated with surface features. It is also not suitable for measuring pressures in flaccid cells.

  4. Optimizing the qusai-static folding and deploying of thin-walled tube flexure hinges with double slots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Deng, Zongquan; Liu, Rongqiang; Wang, Yan; Guo, Hongwei

    2014-03-01

    The thin-walled tube flexure(TWTF) hinges have important potential application value in the deployment mechanisms of satellite and solar array, but the optimal design of the TWTF hinges haven't been completely solved, which restricts their applications. An optimal design method for the qusai-static folding and deploying of TWTF hinges with double slots is presented based on the response surface theory. Firstly, the full factorial method is employed to design of the experiments. Then, the finite element models of the TWTF hinges with double slots are constructed to simulate the qusai-static folding and deploying non-linear analysis. What's more, the mathematical model of the TWTF flexure hinge quasi-static folding and deploying properties are derived by the response surface method. Considering of small mass and high stability, the peak moment of quasi-static folding and deploying as well as the lightless are set as the objectives to get the optimal performances. The relative errors of the objectives between the optimal design results and the FE analysis results are less than 7%, which demonstrates the precision of the surrogate models. Lastly, the parameter study shows that both the slots length and the slots width both have significant effects to the peak moment of quasi-static folding and deploying of TWTF hinges with double slots. However, the maximum Mises stress of quasi-static folding is more sensitive to the slots length than the slots width. The proposed research can be applied to optimize other thin-walled flexure hinges under quasi-static folding and deploying, which is of great importance to design of flexure hinges with high stability and low stress.

  5. Deformation mechanisms and impact attenuation characteristics of thin-walled collapsible air chambers used in head protection.

    PubMed

    Lamb, L; Hoshizaki, T B

    2009-11-01

    Head injuries are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, many resulting from sporting activities. There is a constant need in the head protection industry for improved methods to manage impacts and to reduce the risk of mild and severe head injuries. Contemporary head protection primarily consists of foam with several inherent disadvantages, including a limited ability to provide effective energy absorption under both low and high impact velocities. Recently, thin-walled collapsible chambers were engineered to address this problem and have been implemented into sport helmets. The chambers consist of four engineering elements which define their dynamic performance: geometry, air volume, material, and venting system. This research analysed the contribution of air flow through an orifice to the chamber's management of impact energy. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of the chamber's vent diameter and material stiffness on peak force and venting rate during an impact. Two material stiffnesses (thermoplastic polyurethane 45D and thermoplastic polyurethane 90A) and five vent diameters (1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, and 5 mm) were tested at three inbound velocities (1.3 m/s, 2.3 m/s, and 3.0 m/s). Each chamber was impacted ten times using a monorail drop system. Analysis of the results revealed that the material stiffness, vent diameter, and inbound velocity all had a significant effect on peak force and venting rate (p < 0.001). Under low inbound velocities the largest vent diameters transmitted a lower force than the smallest vent, while this relationship reversed at high inbound velocities. Under low velocities the air flowrate was negatively correlated and the flow duration was positively correlated to the peak force. Under high velocities, the air flowrate was positively correlated and the duration was negatively correlated to the peak force. This suggested that, under low velocities, chambers performed optimally when air was dissipated

  6. Adhesion phenomena between particles according to the content of organic binder in core for thin-wall casting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Cho, Geon-Ho; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Kim, In-Soo; Jo, Chang-Young; Lee, Jin-Seok

    2014-10-01

    The content of organic binder in a core for thin-wall casting has been controlled to investigate the adhesion phenomena of inorganic binder between starting particles, as directly related to the mechanical and thermal properties of the core. The inorganic binder precursor was composed of tetraethyl orthosilicate and sodium methoxide as the silicon dioxide and sodium oxide precursors, respectively. Poly(vinyl alcohol), a hydrophilic polymer, was used as an organic binder. The particles coated with the inorganic precursor were sculpted with the organic binder and then the prepared core samples were heated at 1000 degrees C for 1 h. The core samples prepared with the optimum content of organic binder show the highest fracture strength. This may be due to the enhancement of adhesion by the glass phase formed between starting particles. However, when too much or too little organic binder is employed, the strength values of the core samples are significantly decreased. This is because the network structure of the glass phase is not inadequately created or the glass phase is not uniformly developed between starting particles, resulting in the insufficient contact between starting particles during the convert process.

  7. Long-Term Creep of a Thin-Walled Inconel 718 Stirling Power-Convertor Heater Head Assessed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Randy R.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy and NASA have identified Stirling power convertors as candidate power supply systems for long-duration, deep-space science missions. A key element for qualifying the flight hardware is a long-term durability assessment for critical hot section components of the power convertor. One such critical component is the power convertor heater head. The heater head is a high-temperature pressure vessel that transfers heat to the working gas medium of the convertor, which is typically helium. An efficient heater head design is the result of balancing the divergent requirements of thin walls for increased heat transfer versus thick walls to lower the wall stresses and thus improve creep resistance and durability. In the current design, the heater head is fabricated from the Ni-base superalloy Inconel 718 (IN 718, Inco Alloys International, Inc., Huntington, WV). Although IN 718 is a mature alloy system (patented in 1962), there is little long-term (>50,000-hr) creep data available for thin-specimen geometries. Since thin-section properties tend to be inferior to thicker samples, it is necessary to generate creep data using specimens with the same geometry as the actual flight hardware. Therefore, one facet of the overall durability assessment program involves generating relatively short-term creep data using thin specimens at the design temperature of 649 C (1200 F).

  8. Development of an extremely thin-wall straw tracker operational in vacuum - The COMET straw tracker system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiguchi, H.; Evtoukhovitch, P.; Fujii, Y.; Hamada, E.; Mihara, S.; Moiseenko, A.; Noguchi, K.; Oishi, K.; Tanaka, S.; Tojo, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Tsverava, N.; Ueno, K.; Volkov, A.

    2017-02-01

    The COMET experiment at J-PARC aims to search for a lepton-flavour violating process of muon to electron conversion in a muonic atom, μ-e conversion, with a branching-ratio sensitivity of better than 10-16, 4 orders of magnitude better than the present limit, in order to explore the parameter region predicted by most of well-motivated theoretical models beyond the Standard Model. The need for this sensitivity places several stringent requirements on the detector development. The experiment requires to detect the monochromatic electron of 105 MeV, the momentum resolution is primarily limited by the multiple scattering effect for this momentum region. Thus we need the very light material detector in order to achieve an excellent momentum resolution, better than 2%, for 100 MeV region. In order to fulfil such a requirement, the thin-wall straw-tube planar tracker has been developed by an extremely light material which is operational in vacuum. The COMET straw tracker consists of 9.8 mm diameter straw tube, longer than 1 m length, with 20-μm-thick Mylar foil and 70-nm-thick aluminium deposition. Currently even thinner and smaller, 12 μm thick and 5 mm diameter, straw is under development by the ultrasonic welding technique.

  9. Elastic Critical Axial Force for the Torsional-Flexural Buckling of Thin-Walled Metal Members: An Approximate Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kováč, Michal

    2015-03-01

    Thin-walled centrically compressed members with non-symmetrical or mono-symmetrical cross-sections can buckle in a torsional-flexural buckling mode. Vlasov developed a system of governing differential equations of the stability of such member cases. Solving these coupled equations in an analytic way is only possible in simple cases. Therefore, Goľdenvejzer introduced an approximate method for the solution of this system to calculate the critical axial force of torsional-flexural buckling. Moreover, this can also be used in cases of members with various boundary conditions in bending and torsion. This approximate method for the calculation of critical force has been adopted into norms. Nowadays, we can also solve governing differential equations by numerical methods, such as the finite element method (FEM). Therefore, in this paper, the results of the approximate method and the FEM were compared to each other, while considering the FEM as a reference method. This comparison shows any discrepancies of the approximate method. Attention was also paid to when and why discrepancies occur. The approximate method can be used in practice by considering some simplifications, which ensure safe results.

  10. Fabrication of Aluminum Foam-Filled Thin-Wall Steel Tube by Friction Welding and Its Compression Properties

    PubMed Central

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Saito, Masaki; Utsunomiya, Takao; Kitahara, Soichiro; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum foam has received considerable attention in various fields and is expected to be used as an engineering material owing to its high energy absorption properties and light weight. To improve the mechanical properties of aluminum foam, combining it with dense tubes, such as aluminum foam-filled tubes, was considered necessary. In this study, an aluminum foam-filled steel tube, which consisted of ADC12 aluminum foam and a thin-wall steel tube, was successfully fabricated by friction welding. It was shown that a diffusion bonding layer with a thickness of approximately 10 μm was formed, indicating that strong bonding between the aluminum foam and the steel tube was realized. By the X-ray computed tomography observation of pore structures, the fabrication of an aluminum foam-filled tube with almost uniform pore structures over the entire specimen was confirmed. In addition, it was confirmed that the aluminum foam-filled steel tube exhibited mechanical properties superior to those of the ADC12 aluminum foam and steel tube. This is considered to be attributed to the combination of the aluminum foam and steel tube, which particularly prevents the brittle fracture and collapse of the ADC12 foam by the steel tube, along with the strong metal bonding between the aluminum foam and the steel tube. PMID:28788213

  11. Experimental Study of the Biaxial Cyclic Behavior of Thin-Wall Tubes of NiTi Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. M.; Zhou, Q. T.; Liu, H.; Deng, C. H.; Yue, Z. F.

    2012-11-01

    Combined torsion-tension cycling experiments were performed on thin-wall tubes (with thickness/radius ratio of 1:20, similar to that found for stents) of nearly equiatomic NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs). Experiments were controlled by axial displacement and torsional angle with step loading involving torsional loading to a maximum strain, followed by tensile loading, and reverse-order unloading. The superelasticity of the material is confirmed by pure torsion and tension experiments at the test temperature. The evolution of equivalent stress-strain curves as well as the separated tensile and torsional stress-strain curves during cycling is analyzed. Results show that the equivalent stress increases greatly with a small amount of applied axial strain, and the equivalent stress-strain curves have negative slopes in the phase transformation region. The shear stress drops when the torsional strain is maintained at its maximum value and the tensile strain is increased. The shear stress increases with decreasing tensile strain, but it cannot recover to the original value after the complete unloading of the tensile strain. Attention is also paid to dissipated energy density and characteristic stress evolutions during cycling.

  12. Bubbles effect on sound dispersion in thin-walled tube with polymeric liquid and elastic central rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitsky, S. P.; Bergman, R. M.; Haddad, J.

    2011-06-01

    The present study is devoted to the investigation of fine air bubbles effect on sound propagation in thin-walled elastic tube with compressible polymeric liquid and cylindrical elastic rod in the central part of the tube. The problem formulation and solution method follow the previous paper of the authors (S.P. Levitsky, R.M. Bergman, J. Haddad, Sound dispersion in deformable tube with polymeric liquid and elastic central rod, Journal of Sound and Vibration 275 (1-2) (2004) 267-281). In order to account for the bubbles' influence on sound dispersion and attenuation, dynamic equation of state of the mixture, formulated within homogeneous approximation, is used. It is assumed that the volume gas concentration is small. The resulting dispersion equation for the waveguide with viscoelastic liquid-gas mixture is studied in a long-wave range. Results of simulations illustrate the influence of free gas concentration, bubble radius and rheological properties of the liquid on sound dispersion and attenuation in the system.

  13. Fabrication of Aluminum Foam-Filled Thin-Wall Steel Tube by Friction Welding and Its Compression Properties.

    PubMed

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Saito, Masaki; Utsunomiya, Takao; Kitahara, Soichiro; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2014-09-19

    Aluminum foam has received considerable attention in various fields and is expected to be used as an engineering material owing to its high energy absorption properties and light weight. To improve the mechanical properties of aluminum foam, combining it with dense tubes, such as aluminum foam-filled tubes, was considered necessary. In this study, an aluminum foam-filled steel tube, which consisted of ADC12 aluminum foam and a thin-wall steel tube, was successfully fabricated by friction welding. It was shown that a diffusion bonding layer with a thickness of approximately 10 μm was formed, indicating that strong bonding between the aluminum foam and the steel tube was realized. By the X-ray computed tomography observation of pore structures, the fabrication of an aluminum foam-filled tube with almost uniform pore structures over the entire specimen was confirmed. In addition, it was confirmed that the aluminum foam-filled steel tube exhibited mechanical properties superior to those of the ADC12 aluminum foam and steel tube. This is considered to be attributed to the combination of the aluminum foam and steel tube, which particularly prevents the brittle fracture and collapse of the ADC12 foam by the steel tube, along with the strong metal bonding between the aluminum foam and the steel tube.

  14. Design and validation of the mounting structure for BETTII balloon-based telescope with thin-walled optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furst, Stephen; Dow, Tom; Garrard, Ken; Sohn, Alex; Fixsen, Dale; Rinehart, Stephen; Mentzell, Eric; Veach, Todd; Rizzo, Maxime; Dhabal, Arnab

    2016-04-01

    The NASA Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII) system is designed to study the infrared emissions from star formation and active galactic nuclei through a double-Fourier Michelson interferometer located on a balloon at an altitude of 37 km. The BETTII external optics include a pair of identical beam-reducing, four-mirror telescopes, each with a 522-mm aperture, nonrotationally symmetric primary mirror. These telescopes were designed and assembled at the North Carolina State University Precision Engineering Consortium and are composed entirely of thin-walled aluminum components. The mounting structure is designed to be light weight and stiff to reduce thermal equilibration time in the rarified air at the edge of space and to maintain robust alignment of the optical elements. The mounts also prevent deformation of the large optical elements via custom-built kinematic Kelvin couplings and fixed-load clamps; the maximum form error of the optical surfaces are 300 nm RMS. This work details the design of the thin mirrors and mounting structure as well as validation of the mount assembly process, mount stiffness, and the kinematic couplings.

  15. Thin-walled NiO tubes functionalized with catalytic Pt for highly selective C2H5OH sensors using electrospun fibers as a sacrificial template.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Gyu; Woo, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Jong-Heun; Kim, Il-Doo

    2011-10-28

    Hollow thin walled NiO tubes functionalized by catalytic Pt were synthesized via nanofiber templating and multilayered sputter-coating of Pt and NiO thin overlayers followed by heat-treatment at 600 °C. Sandwich Pt-NiO-Pt tube networks exhibited superior C(2)H(5)OH sensing response and remarkable selectivity against CO and H(2) gases.

  16. Synthesis and enhanced field-emission of thin-walled, open-ended, and well-aligned N-doped carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Tongxiang; Lv, Ruitao; Kang, Feiyu; Hu, Qiang; Gu, Jialin; Wang, Kunlin; Wu, Dehai

    2010-03-31

    Thin-walled, open-ended, and well-aligned N-doped carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the quartz slides were synthesized by using acetonitrile as carbon sources. As-obtained products possess large thin-walled index (TWI, defined as the ratio of inner diameter and wall thickness of a CNT). The effect of temperature on the growth of CNTs using acetonitrile as the carbon source was also investigated. It is found that the diameter, the TWI of CNTs increase and the Fe encapsulation in CNTs decreases as the growth temperature rises in the range of 780-860°C. When the growth temperature is kept at 860°C, CNTs with TWI = 6.2 can be obtained. It was found that the filed-emission properties became better as CNT growth temperatures increased from 780 to 860°C. The lowest turn-on and threshold field was 0.27 and 0.49 V/μm, respectively. And the best field-enhancement factors reached 1.09 × 105, which is significantly improved about an order of magnitude compared with previous reports. In this study, about 30 × 50 mm2 free-standing film of thin-walled open-ended well-aligned N-doped carbon nanotubes was also prepared. The free-standing film can be transferred easily to other substrates, which would promote their applications in different fields.

  17. Guided waves in pre-stressed hyperelastic plates and tubes: Application to the ultrasound elastography of thin-walled soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo-Yang; He, Qiong; Mangan, Robert; Xu, Guoqiang; Mo, Chi; Luo, Jianwen; Destrade, Michel; Cao, Yanping

    2017-05-01

    In vivo measurement of the mechanical properties of thin-walled soft tissues (e.g., mitral valve, artery and bladder) and in situ mechanical characterization of thin-walled artificial soft biomaterials in service are of great challenge and difficult to address via commonly used testing methods. Here we investigate the properties of guided waves generated by focused acoustic radiation force in immersed pre-stressed plates and tubes, and show that they can address this challenge. To this end, we carry out both (i) a theoretical analysis based on incremental wave motion in finite deformation theory and (ii) finite element simulations. Our analysis leads to a novel method based on the ultrasound elastography to image the elastic properties of pre-stressed thin-walled soft tissues and artificial soft materials in a non-destructive and non-invasive manner. To validate the theoretical and numerical solutions and demonstrate the usefulness of the corresponding method in practical measurements, we perform (iii) experiments on polyvinyl alcohol cryogel phantoms immersed in water, using the Verasonics V1 System equipped with a L10-5 transducer. Finally, potential clinical applications of the method have been discussed.

  18. Synthesis and Enhanced Field-Emission of Thin-Walled, Open-Ended, and Well-Aligned N-Doped Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Thin-walled, open-ended, and well-aligned N-doped carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the quartz slides were synthesized by using acetonitrile as carbon sources. As-obtained products possess large thin-walled index (TWI, defined as the ratio of inner diameter and wall thickness of a CNT). The effect of temperature on the growth of CNTs using acetonitrile as the carbon source was also investigated. It is found that the diameter, the TWI of CNTs increase and the Fe encapsulation in CNTs decreases as the growth temperature rises in the range of 780–860°C. When the growth temperature is kept at 860°C, CNTs with TWI = 6.2 can be obtained. It was found that the filed-emission properties became better as CNT growth temperatures increased from 780 to 860°C. The lowest turn-on and threshold field was 0.27 and 0.49 V/μm, respectively. And the best field-enhancement factors reached 1.09 × 105, which is significantly improved about an order of magnitude compared with previous reports. In this study, about 30 × 50 mm2 free-standing film of thin-walled open-ended well-aligned N-doped carbon nanotubes was also prepared. The free-standing film can be transferred easily to other substrates, which would promote their applications in different fields. PMID:20672122

  19. Correcting and coating thin walled X-ray Optics via a combination of controlled film deposition and magnetic smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, Melville

    The project goal is to demonstrate that thin walled (<400 micron thick) X-ray optics can be controllably shaped to produce high quality (~1" or better) X-ray optics at an affordable price. Since the desired surface area for the next generation X-ray telescope is >10x that of Chandra, the >10x requirement is then for >200 m^2 of surface area with a surface finish of better than 0.5 nm. Therefore, replication of some sort is called for. Because no replication technology has been shown to achieve ≤1" angular resolution, post fabrication figure corrections are likely going to be necessary. Some have proposed to do this in orbit and others prelaunch including us. Our prelaunch approach is to apply in-plane stresses to the thin walled mirror shells via a magnetic field. The field will be held in by some magnetically hard material such as NiCo. By use of a so called magnetic smart material (MSM) such as Terfenol-D, we already shown that strong enough stresses can be generated. Preliminary work has also shown that the magnetic field can be held in well enough to apply the figure correcting stresses pre-launch. What we call "set-it and forget-it." However, what is unique about our approach is that at the cost of complexity and some areal coverage, our concept will also accommodate in-orbit adjustments. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge ours is one of two known stress modification processes that are bi-axial. Our plan is first to validate set-it and forget-it first on cantilevers and then to expand this to working on 5 cm x 5 cm pieces. We will work both with NiCo and glass or Si coated with Terfenol-D. Except for the NiCo, substrates we will also coat the samples with NiCo in order to have a film that will hold in the magnetic field. As part of the coating process, we will control the stress of the film by varying the voltage bias while coating. The bias stress control can be used to apply films with minimal stress such as Terfenol-D and X-ray reflecting coatings

  20. Characteristic of skin formation using zircon- and graphite-coated mold in thin wall ductile iron fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaneswara, Donanta; Suharno, Bambang; Nugroho, Janu Ageng; Ariobimo, Rianti Dewi S.; Sofyan, Nofrijon

    2017-03-01

    One of the problems in thin wall ductile iron (TWDI) fabrication is skin formation during the casting. The presence of this skin will decrease strength and strain of the TWDI. One of the ways to control this skin formation is to change the cooling rate during the process through a mold coating. In testing the effectiveness of skin prevention, the following variables were used for the mold coating i.e. (i) graphite: (ii) zirconium; and (iii) double layer of graphite-zirconium. After the process, the plates were characterized by non-etching, etching, tensile test, and SEM observation. The results showed that the average skin formation using graphite: 65 µm; zirconium: 13.04 µm; and double layer of graphite-zirconium: 33.25 µm. It seems that zirconium has the most effect on the skin prevention due to sulfur binding and magnesium locked, which then prevented rapid cooling resulting in less skin formation. The results also showed the number of nodules obtained in specimen with graphite: 703 nodules/mm2 with average diameter of 12.57 µm, zirconium: 798 nodules/mm2 with average diameter of 12.15 µm, and double layer of graphite-zirconium: 697 nodules/mm2 with average diameter of 11.9 µm and nodularity percentage of 82.58%, 84.53%, and 84.22%, respectively. Tensile test showed that the strength of the specimen with graphite is 301.1 MPa, with zirconium is 388.8 MPa, and with double layer of graphite-zirconium is 304 MPa. In overall, zirconium give the best performance on the skin formation prevention in TWDI fabrication.

  1. Predicting the Influence of Pore Characteristics on Ductility of Thin-Walled High Pressure Die Casting Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Li, Dongsheng

    2013-06-10

    In this paper, a two-dimensional microstructure-based finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die casting Mg materials on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM50 and AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope to obtain the overall information on the pore characteristics. The experimentally quantified pore characteristics are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructures with different pore sizes, pore volume fractions and pore size distributions. Pores are explicitly represented in the synthetic microstructures and meshed out for the subsequent finite element analysis. In the finite element analysis, an intrinsic critical strain value is used for the Mg matrix material, beyond which work-hardening is no longer permissible. With no artificial failure criterion prescribed, ductility levels are predicted for the various microstructures in the form of strain localization. Mesh size effect study is also conducted, from which a mesh size dependent critical strain curve is determined. A concept of scalability of pore size effects is then presented and examined with the use of the mesh size dependent critical strain curve. The results in this study show that, for the regions with lower pore size and lower volume fraction, the ductility generally decreases as the pore size and pore volume fraction increase whereas, for the regions with larger pore size and larger pore volume fraction, other factors such as the mean distance between the pores begin to have some substantial influence on the ductility. The results also indicate that the pore size effects may be scalable for the models with good-representative pore shape and distribution with the use of the mesh size dependent critical strain curve.

  2. Characterisation of a complex thin walled structure fabricated by selective laser melting using a ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened steel

    SciTech Connect

    Boegelein, Thomas Louvis, Eleftherios; Dawson, Karl; Tatlock, Gordon J.; Jones, Andy R.

    2016-02-15

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys exhibit superior mechanical and physical properties due to the presence of nanoscopic Y(Al, Ti) oxide precipitates, but their manufacturing process is complex. The present study is aimed at further investigation of the application of an alternative, Additive Manufacturing (AM) technique, Selective Laser Melting (SLM), to the production of consolidated ODS alloy components. Mechanically alloyed PM2000 (ODS-FeCrAl) powders have been consolidated and a fine dispersion of Y-containing precipitates were observed in an as built thin-walled component, but these particles were typically poly-crystalline and contained a variety of elements including O, Al, Ti, Cr and Fe. Application of post-build heat treatments resulted in the modification of particle structures and compositions; in the annealed condition most precipitates were transformed to single crystal yttrium aluminium oxides. During the annealing treatment, precipitate distributions homogenised and localised variations in number density were diminished. The resulting volume fractions of those precipitates were 25–40% lower than have been reported in conventionally processed PM2000, which was attributed to Y-rich slag-like surface features and inclusions formed during SLM. - Highlights: • A wall structure was grown from ODS steel powder using selective laser melting. • A fine dispersion of nano-precipitates was apparent in as-build material. • Precipitates were multi-phased containing several elements, e.g. O, Ti, Al, Fe, Cr, Y. • Post-build annealing changed those into typically single-crystalline Y–Al–O. • The anneal also reduced and stabilised the volume fraction of precipitates to ~ 0.006.

  3. Effects of Ceramic Fibre Insulation Thickness on Skin Formation and Nodule Characteristics of Thin Wall Ductile Iron Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaneswara, D.; Suharno, B.; Nugraha, N. D.; Ariobimo, R. D. S.; Sofyan, N.

    2017-02-01

    Skin formation has become one of the problems in the thin wall ductile iron casting because it will reduce the mechanical properties of the materials. One of the solutions to reduce this skin formation is by using heat insulator to control the cooling rate. One of the insulators used for this purpose is ceramic fibre. In this research, the thickness of the ceramic fibre heat insulator used in the mould was varied, i.e. 50 mm on one side and 37.5 mm on the other side (A), no heat insulator (B), and 37.5 mm on both sides (C). After the casting process, the results were characterized in terms of metallography by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and tensile test for mechanical properties. The results showed that the skin thickness formed in A is 34.21 μm, 23.38 μm in B, and 27.78 μm in C. The nodule count in A is 541.98 nodule/mm2 (84.7%) with an average diameter of 15.14 μm, 590 nodule/mm2 (86.7%) with an average diameter of 13.18 μm in B, and 549.73 nodule/mm2 (87.2%) with an average diameter of 13.95 μm in C. The average ultimate tensile strength for A was 399 MPa, B was 314 MPa, and C was 415 MPa. Microstructural examination under SEM showed that the materials have a ductile fracture with matrix full of ferrite.

  4. Investigation of breached depleted UF sub 6 cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, E.J.; Butler, T.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Googin, J.M.; Taylor, M.S.; Dyer, R.H.; Russell, J.R.

    1991-09-01

    In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton steel cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. Both holes, concealed by UF{sub 4} reaction products identical in color to the cylinder coating, were similarly located near the front stiffening ring. The UF{sub 4} appeared to have self-sealed the holes, thus containing nearly all of the uranium contents. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Vice President K.W. Sommerfeld immediately formed an investigation team to: (1) identify the most likely cause of failure for the two breached cylinders, (2) determine the impact of these incidents on the three-site inventory, and (3) provide recommendations and preventive measures. This document discusses the results of this investigation.

  5. Investigation of breached depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, E.J.; Butler, T.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Googin, J.M.; Taylor, M.S.; Dyer, R.H.; Russell, J.R.

    1991-09-01

    In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton steel cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. Both holes, concealed by UF{sub 4} reaction products identical in color to the cylinder coating, were similarly located near the front stiffening ring. The UF{sub 4} appeared to have self-sealed the holes, thus containing nearly all of the uranium contents. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Vice President K.W. Sommerfeld immediately formed an investigation team to: (1) identify the most likely cause of failure for the two breached cylinders, (2) determine the impact of these incidents on the three-site inventory, and (3) provide recommendations and preventive measures. This document discusses the results of this investigation.

  6. Influence of Mn contents in 0Cr18Ni10Ti thin wall stainless steel tube on TIG girth weld quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo

    2017-03-01

    Three kinds of cold worked 0Cr18Ni10Ti thin wall stainless steel tubes with the manganese contents of 1.27%, 1.35% and 1.44% and the cold worked 0Cr18Ni10Ti stainless steel end plug with manganese content of 1.35% were used for TIG girth welding in the present investigation. The effect of different manganese contents in stainless steel tube on weld quality was studied. The results showed that under the same welding conditions, the metallographic performance of the girth weld for the thin wall stainless steel tube with the manganese element content 1.44% welded with end plug was the best. Under the appropriate welding conditions, the quality of the girth weld increased with the increase of the manganese content till 1.44%. It was found that in the case of the Mn content of 1.44%, and under the proper welding condition the welding defects, such as welding cracks were effectively avoided, and the qualified weld penetration can be obtained.. It is concluded that the appropriate increase of the manganese content can significantly improve the TIG girth weld quality of the cold worked 0Cr18Ni10Ti stainless steel tube.

  7. Real-Time Deflection Monitoring for Milling of a Thin-Walled Workpiece by Using PVDF Thin-Film Sensors with a Cantilevered Beam as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming; Liu, Dongsheng; Luo, Huan

    2016-01-01

    Thin-walled workpieces, such as aero-engine blisks and casings, are usually made of hard-to-cut materials. The wall thickness is very small and it is easy to deflect during milling process under dynamic cutting forces, leading to inaccurate workpiece dimensions and poor surface integrity. To understand the workpiece deflection behavior in a machining process, a new real-time nonintrusive method for deflection monitoring is presented, and a detailed analysis of workpiece deflection for different machining stages of the whole machining process is discussed. The thin-film polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensor is attached to the non-machining surface of the workpiece to copy the deflection excited by the dynamic cutting force. The relationship between the input deflection and the output voltage of the monitoring system is calibrated by testing. Monitored workpiece deflection results show that the workpiece experiences obvious vibration during the cutter entering the workpiece stage, and vibration during the machining process can be easily tracked by monitoring the deflection of the workpiece. During the cutter exiting the workpiece stage, the workpiece experiences forced vibration firstly, and free vibration exists until the amplitude reduces to zero after the cutter exits the workpiece. Machining results confirmed the suitability of the deflection monitoring system for machining thin-walled workpieces with the application of PVDF sensors. PMID:27626424

  8. Problems And Their Solutions When Thin-Walled Turned Parts Of High Precision With Quasi-Optical Surfaces Are Manufactured On A CNC Automatic Lathe Under Workshop Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Valentin E.

    1989-04-01

    The geometrical accuracy and surface roughness of diamond-turned workpieces is influenced by several parameters: the properties of the machine tool, the cutting process and the environmental conditions. A thin-walled electrode made from an aluminium alloy (wall thickness: 1 mm, length: 169 mm, outer diameter: 126 mm) and intended for an electrostatic measuring instrument, serves as an example to show how quasi-optical surfaces with a surface roughness Rα < 10 nm and deviations from roundness of <= 5 μm can be achieved when some of these influence quantities are optimized. The cylindrical part of the electrode was turned by means of a rounded mirror-finish diamond tool, the width of the cutting edge being 2 mm, the rake angle -6° and the clearance angle 2°. Compliance with the tolerances of geometrical accuracy was particularly difficult. As age-hardened wrought aluminium alloys cannot be stress-relieved by annealing, or only insufficiently, the geometrical accuracy - in particular the roundness - of thin-walled, rotationally symmetric bodies decisively depends on the state of stress of the workpiece material, on the clamping fixture and on the balanced condition of this clamping fixture.

  9. Real-Time Deflection Monitoring for Milling of a Thin-Walled Workpiece by Using PVDF Thin-Film Sensors with a Cantilevered Beam as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming; Liu, Dongsheng; Luo, Huan

    2016-09-10

    Thin-walled workpieces, such as aero-engine blisks and casings, are usually made of hard-to-cut materials. The wall thickness is very small and it is easy to deflect during milling process under dynamic cutting forces, leading to inaccurate workpiece dimensions and poor surface integrity. To understand the workpiece deflection behavior in a machining process, a new real-time nonintrusive method for deflection monitoring is presented, and a detailed analysis of workpiece deflection for different machining stages of the whole machining process is discussed. The thin-film polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensor is attached to the non-machining surface of the workpiece to copy the deflection excited by the dynamic cutting force. The relationship between the input deflection and the output voltage of the monitoring system is calibrated by testing. Monitored workpiece deflection results show that the workpiece experiences obvious vibration during the cutter entering the workpiece stage, and vibration during the machining process can be easily tracked by monitoring the deflection of the workpiece. During the cutter exiting the workpiece stage, the workpiece experiences forced vibration firstly, and free vibration exists until the amplitude reduces to zero after the cutter exits the workpiece. Machining results confirmed the suitability of the deflection monitoring system for machining thin-walled workpieces with the application of PVDF sensors.

  10. Research of the process of axisymmetric forming of thin-walled flat blanks into the conical parts with minimal thickness variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demyanenko, E. G.; Popov, I. P.; Menshikov, V. S.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the method based on the process of forming a flat blank into the thin-walled conical part is proposed. The forming method is based on two stages. At the first stage, forming of the free portion of the blank is carried out until it fully contacts the conical surface of the punch. During this stage, thickness unevenness is created, which can be compensated during the second stage by the action of active friction forces. The shaping of the workpiece during the forming of the conical part is performed by thinning. The thinning increases with the increase of the penetration depth of the punch, i.e. the final part will be thinner, but its thickness variation will be reduced. This method allows achieving minimal thickness variation in the walls of the part.

  11. Drop Weight Impact Behavior of Al-Si-Cu Alloy Foam-Filled Thin-Walled Steel Pipe Fabricated by Friction Stir Back Extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Nakano, Yukiko; Utsunomiya, Takao; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2017-02-01

    In this study, Al-Si-Cu alloy ADC12 foam-filled thin-walled stainless steel pipes, which exhibit metal bonding between the ADC12 foam and steel pipe, were fabricated by friction stir back extrusion. Drop weight impact tests were conducted to investigate the deformation behavior and mechanical properties of the foam-filled pipes during dynamic compression tests, which were compared with the results of static compression tests. From x-ray computed tomography observation, it was confirmed that the fabricated foam-filled pipes had almost uniform porosity and pore size distributions. It was found that no scattering of the fragments of collapsed ADC12 foam occurred for the foam-filled pipes owing to the existence of the pipe surrounding the ADC12 foam. Preventing the scattering of the ADC12 foam decreases the drop in stress during dynamic compression tests and therefore improves the energy absorption properties of the foam.

  12. Full-scale experimental and numerical study about structural behaviour of a thin-walled cold-formed steel building affected by ground settlements due to land subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, J. A.; Hernández, L. A.; Hernández, M.; Pacheco, J.; Zermeño, M. E.; Salinas, R.

    2015-11-01

    Land subsidence due to ground water withdrawal is a problem in many places around the world (Poland, 1984). This causes differential ground settlements that affect masonry structures, because these structural materials do not exhibit an adequate performance beyond a certain level of angular distortion. This work presents the experimental and numerical results about a study regarding the performance of a full-scale thin-walled cold-formed steel building affected by ground differential settlements due to land subsidence. The experimental stage consisted in the construction of a test-building to be subjected to differential settlements in laboratory. The numerical stage consisted in performing a numerical non-linear static pull-down analysis simulating the differential ground settlements of the test-building. The results show that the structural performance of the tested building was very suitable in terms of ductility.

  13. Experimental studies of effects of tilt and structural asymmetry on vibration characteristics of thin-wall circular cylinders partly filled with liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of tilt and structural asymmetry on the vibration characteristics of partly liquid-filled thin-wall cylinders were experimentally studied. It was found that tilting the longitudinal axis of a partly filled axisymmetric cylinder from the vertical could markedly reduce its resonant frequencies and change significantly the shape of the circumferential modes. For the minimum frequency modes, vibratory motion occurred only on that side of the cylinder where the liquid was deepest. An empirical equation was derived that gives the equivalent liquid depth of an untilted cylinder having the same minimum resonant frequency as a tilted, partly filled cylinder. Circumferential mode shapes of an untilted asymmetric cylinder were similar to those of the tilted, partly filled axisymmetric cylinder. Vibratory motion in the minimum frequency modes occurred in most instances only on the side of minimum thickness. Correlation between test data and results from a reformulated NASTRAN hydroelastic analysis was excellent.

  14. Determining the Presence of Thin-Walled Regions at High-Pressure Areas in Unruptured Cerebral Aneurysms by Using Computational Fluid Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomoaki; Takao, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Takashi; Kambayashi, Yukinao; Watanabe, Mitsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Kan, Issei; Nishimura, Kengo; Kaku, Shogo; Ishibashi, Toshihiro; Ikeuchi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Makoto; Fujii, Yukihiko; Murayama, Yuichi

    2016-10-01

    Thin-walled regions (TWRs) of cerebral aneurysms are at high risk of rupture, and careful attention should be paid during surgical procedures. Despite this, an optimal imaging technique to estimate TWRs has not been established. Previously, pressure elevation at TWRs was reported with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) but not fully evaluated. To investigate the possibility of predicting aneurysmal TWRs at high-pressure areas with CFD. Fifty unruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysms were analyzed. Spatial and temporal maximum pressure (Pmax) areas were determined with a fluid-flow formula under pulsatile blood flow conditions. Intraoperatively, TWRs of aneurysm domes were identified as reddish areas relative to the healthy normal middle cerebral arteries; 5 neurosurgeons evaluated and divided these regions according to Pmax area and TWR correspondence. Pressure difference (PD) was defined as the degree of pressure elevation on the aneurysmal wall at Pmax and was calculated by subtracting the average pressure from the Pmax and dividing by the dynamic pressure at the aneurysm inlet side for normalization. In 41 of the 50 cases (82.0%), the Pmax areas and TWRs corresponded. PD values were significantly higher in the correspondence group than in the noncorrespondence group (P = .008). A receiver-operating characteristic curve demonstrated that PD accurately predicted TWRs at Pmax areas (area under the curve, 0.764; 95% confidence interval, 0.574-0.955; cutoff value, 0.607; sensitivity, 66.7%; specificity, 82.9%). A high PD may be a key parameter for predicting TWRs in unruptured cerebral aneurysms. CFD, computational fluid dynamicsMCA, middle cerebral arteryPave, average pressurePD, pressure differencePmax, maximum pressureTWR, thin-walled regionWSS, wall shear stress.

  15. Bone regeneration in 3D printing bioactive ceramic scaffolds with improved tissue/material interface pore architecture in thin-wall bone defect.

    PubMed

    Shao, Huifeng; Ke, Xiurong; Liu, An; Sun, Miao; He, Yong; Yang, Xianyan; Fu, Jianzhong; Liu, Yanming; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Guojing; Xu, Sanzhong; Gou, Zhongru

    2017-04-12

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing bioactive ceramics have demonstrated alternative approaches to bone tissue repair, but an optimized materials system for improving the recruitment of host osteogenic cells into the bone defect and enhancing targeted repair of the thin-wall craniomaxillofacial defects remains elusive. Herein we systematically evaluated the role of side-wall pore architecture in the direct-ink-writing bioceramic scaffolds on mechanical properties and osteogenic capacity in rabbit calvarial defects. The pure calcium silicate (CSi) and dilute Mg-doped CSi (CSi-Mg6) scaffolds with different layer thickness and macropore sizes were prepared by varying the layer deposition mode from single-layer printing (SLP) to double-layer printing (DLP) and then by undergoing one-, or two-step sintering. It was found that the dilute Mg doping and/or two-step sintering schedule was especially beneficial for improving the compressive strength (∼25-104 MPa) and flexural strength (∼6-18 MPa) of the Ca-silicate scaffolds. The histological analysis for the calvarial bone specimens in vivo revealed that the SLP scaffolds had a high osteoconduction at the early stage (4 weeks) but the DLP scaffolds displayed a higher osteogenic capacity for a long time stage (8-12 weeks). Although the DLP CSi scaffolds displayed somewhat higher osteogenic capacity at 8 and 12 weeks, the DLP CSi-Mg6 scaffolds with excellent fracture resistance also showed appreciable new bone tissue ingrowth. These findings demonstrate that the side-wall pore architecture in 3D printed bioceramic scaffolds is required to optimize for bone repair in calvarial bone defects, and especially the Mg doping wollastontie is promising for 3D printing thin-wall porous scaffolds for craniomaxillofacial bone defect treatment.

  16. Predicting oxidation-limited lifetime of thin-walled components of NiCrW alloy 230

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, R.; Jalowicka, Aleksandra; Unocic, Kinga A.; Pint, Bruce A.; Huczkowski, P.; Chyrkin, Anton; Gruner, D.; Pillai, R.; Quadakkers, Willem Joseph

    2016-10-18

    Using alloy 230 as an example, a generalized oxidation lifetime model for chromia-forming Ni-base wrought alloys is proposed, which captures the most important damaging oxidation effects relevant for component design: wall thickness loss, scale spallation, and the occurrence of breakaway oxidation. For deriving input parameters and for verification of the model approach, alloy 230 specimens with different thicknesses were exposed for different times at temperatures in the range 950–1050 °C in static air. The studies focused on thin specimens (0.2–0.5 mm) to obtain data for critical subscale depletion processes resulting in breakaway oxidation within reasonably achievable test times up to 3000 h. The oxidation kinetics and oxidation-induced subscale microstructural changes were determined by combining gravimetric data with results from scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The modeling of the scale spallation and re-formation was based on the NASA cyclic oxidation spallation program, while a new model was developed to describe accelerated oxidation occurring after longer exposure times in the thinnest specimens. The calculated oxidation data were combined with the reservoir model equation, by means of which the relation between the consumption and the remaining concentration of Cr in the alloy was established as a function of temperature and specimen thickness. Based on this approach, a generalized lifetime diagram is proposed, in which wall thickness loss is plotted as a function of time, initial specimen thickness, and temperature. As a result, the time to reach a critical Cr level at the scale/alloy interface of 10 wt% is also indicated in the diagrams.

  17. Predicting oxidation-limited lifetime of thin-walled components of NiCrW alloy 230

    DOE PAGES

    Duan, R.; Jalowicka, Aleksandra; Unocic, Kinga A.; ...

    2016-10-18

    Using alloy 230 as an example, a generalized oxidation lifetime model for chromia-forming Ni-base wrought alloys is proposed, which captures the most important damaging oxidation effects relevant for component design: wall thickness loss, scale spallation, and the occurrence of breakaway oxidation. For deriving input parameters and for verification of the model approach, alloy 230 specimens with different thicknesses were exposed for different times at temperatures in the range 950–1050 °C in static air. The studies focused on thin specimens (0.2–0.5 mm) to obtain data for critical subscale depletion processes resulting in breakaway oxidation within reasonably achievable test times up tomore » 3000 h. The oxidation kinetics and oxidation-induced subscale microstructural changes were determined by combining gravimetric data with results from scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The modeling of the scale spallation and re-formation was based on the NASA cyclic oxidation spallation program, while a new model was developed to describe accelerated oxidation occurring after longer exposure times in the thinnest specimens. The calculated oxidation data were combined with the reservoir model equation, by means of which the relation between the consumption and the remaining concentration of Cr in the alloy was established as a function of temperature and specimen thickness. Based on this approach, a generalized lifetime diagram is proposed, in which wall thickness loss is plotted as a function of time, initial specimen thickness, and temperature. As a result, the time to reach a critical Cr level at the scale/alloy interface of 10 wt% is also indicated in the diagrams.« less

  18. Analysis of thin-walled cylindrical composite shell structures subject to axial and bending loads: Concept development, analytical modeling and experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadev, Sthanu

    Continued research and development efforts devoted in recent years have generated novel avenues towards the advancement of efficient and effective, slender laminated fiber-reinforced composite members. Numerous studies have focused on the modeling and response characterization of composite structures with particular relevance to thin-walled cylindrical composite shells. This class of shell configurations is being actively explored to fully determine their mechanical efficacy as primary aerospace structural members. The proposed research is targeted towards formulating a composite shell theory based prognosis methodology that entails an elaborate analysis and investigation of thin-walled cylindrical shell type laminated composite configurations that are highly desirable in increasing number of mechanical and aerospace applications. The prime motivation to adopt this theory arises from its superior ability to generate simple yet viable closed-form analytical solution procedure to numerous geometrically intense, inherent curvature possessing composite structures. This analytical evaluative routine offers to acquire a first-hand insight on the primary mechanical characteristics that essentially govern the behavior of slender composite shells under typical static loading conditions. Current work exposes the robustness of this mathematical framework via demonstrating its potential towards the prediction of structural properties such as axial stiffness and bending stiffness respectively. Longitudinal ply-stress computations are investigated upon deriving the global stiffness matrix model for composite cylindrical tubes with circular cross-sections. Additionally, this work employs a finite element based numerical technique to substantiate the analytical results reported for cylindrically shaped circular composite tubes. Furthermore, this concept development is extended to the study of thin-walled, open cross-sectioned, curved laminated shells that are geometrically

  19. Data indicating temperature response of Ti–6Al–4V thin-walled structure during its additive manufacture via Laser Engineered Net Shaping

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Garrett J.; Thompson, Scott M.; Shamsaei, Nima

    2016-01-01

    An OPTOMEC Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™) 750 system was retrofitted with a melt pool pyrometer and in-chamber infrared (IR) camera for nondestructive thermal inspection of the blown-powder, direct laser deposition (DLD) process. Data indicative of temperature and heat transfer within the melt pool and heat affected zone atop a thin-walled structure of Ti–6Al–4V during its additive manufacture are provided. Melt pool temperature data were collected via the dual-wavelength pyrometer while the dynamic, bulk part temperature distribution was collected using the IR camera. Such data are provided in Comma Separated Values (CSV) file format, containing a 752×480 matrix and a 320×240 matrix of temperatures corresponding to individual pixels of the pyrometer and IR camera, respectively. The IR camera and pyrometer temperature data are provided in blackbody-calibrated, raw forms. Provided thermal data can aid in generating and refining process-property-performance relationships between laser manufacturing and its fabricated materials. PMID:27054180

  20. A Study On Critical Thinning In Thin-walled Tube Bending Of Al-Alloy 5052O Via Coupled Ductile Fracture Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Li Heng; Yang He; Zhan Mei

    2010-06-15

    Thin-walled tube bending(TWTB) method of Al-alloy tube has attracted wide applications in aerospace, aviation and automobile,etc. While, under in-plane double tensile stress states at the extrados of bending tube, the over-thinning induced ductile fracture is one dominant defect in Al-alloy tube bending. The main objective of this study is to predict the critical wall-thinning of Al-alloy tube bending by coupling two ductile fracture criteria(DFCs) into FE simulation. The DFCs include Continuum Damage Mechanics(CDM)-based model and GTN porous model. Through the uniaxial tensile test of the curved specimen, the basic material properties of the Al-alloy 5052O tube is obtained; via the inverse problem solution, the damage parameters of both the two fracture criteria are interatively determined. Thus the application study of the above DFCs in the TWTB is performed, and the more reasonable one is selected to obtain the critical thinning of Al-alloy tube in bending. The virtual damage initiation and evolution (when and where the ductile fracture occurs) in TWTB are investigated, and the fracture mechanisms of the voided Al-alloy tube in tube bending are consequently discussed.

  1. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Lost Foam Thin Wall - Feasibility of Producing Lost Foam Castings in Aluminum and Magnesium Based Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fasoyinu, Yemi; Griffin, John A.

    2014-03-31

    With the increased emphasis on vehicle weight reduction, production of near-net shape components by lost foam casting will make significant inroad into the next-generation of engineering component designs. The lost foam casting process is a cost effective method for producing complex castings using an expandable polystyrene pattern and un-bonded sand. The use of un-bonded molding media in the lost foam process will impose less constraint on the solidifying casting, making hot tearing less prevalent. This is especially true in Al-Mg and Al-Cu alloy systems that are prone to hot tearing when poured in rigid molds partially due to their long freezing range. Some of the unique advantages of using the lost foam casting process are closer dimensional tolerance, higher casting yield, and the elimination of sand cores and binders. Most of the aluminum alloys poured using the lost foam process are based on the Al-Si system. Very limited research work has been performed with Al-Mg and Al-Cu type alloys. With the increased emphasis on vehicle weight reduction, and given the high-strength-to-weight-ratio of magnesium, significant weight savings can be achieved by casting thin-wall (≤ 3 mm) engineering components from both aluminum- and magnesium-base alloys.

  2. Numerical modeling of the exterior-to-interior transmission of impulsive sound through three-dimensional, thin-walled elastic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remillieux, Marcel C.; Pasareanu, Stephanie M.; Svensson, U. Peter

    2013-12-01

    Exterior propagation of impulsive sound and its transmission through three-dimensional, thin-walled elastic structures, into enclosed cavities, are investigated numerically in the framework of linear dynamics. A model was developed in the time domain by combining two numerical tools: (i) exterior sound propagation and induced structural loading are computed using the image-source method for the reflected field (specular reflections) combined with an extension of the Biot-Tolstoy-Medwin method for the diffracted field, (ii) the fully coupled vibro-acoustic response of the interior fluid-structure system is computed using a truncated modal-decomposition approach. In the model for exterior sound propagation, it is assumed that all surfaces are acoustically rigid. Since coupling between the structure and the exterior fluid is not enforced, the model is applicable to the case of a light exterior fluid and arbitrary interior fluid(s). The structural modes are computed with the finite-element method using shell elements. Acoustic modes are computed analytically assuming acoustically rigid boundaries and rectangular geometries of the enclosed cavities. This model is verified against finite-element solutions for the cases of rectangular structures containing one and two cavities, respectively.

  3. Dilated Thin-Walled Blood and Lymphatic Vessels in Human Endometrium: A Potential Role for VEGF-D in Progestin-Induced Break-Through Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, Jacqueline F.; McGavigan, C. Jay; Lederman, Fiona L.; Cann, Leonie M.; Fu, Lulu; Dimitriadis, Eva; Girling, Jane E.; Rogers, Peter A. W.

    2012-01-01

    Progestins provide safe, effective and cheap options for contraception as well as the treatment of a variety of gynaecological disorders. Episodes of irregular endometrial bleeding or breakthrough bleeding (BTB) are a major unwanted side effect of progestin treatment, such that BTB is the leading cause for discontinued use of an otherwise effective and popular medication. The cellular mechanisms leading to BTB are poorly understood. In this study, we make the novel finding that the large, dilated, thin walled vessels characteristic of human progestin-treated endometrium include both blood and lymphatic vessels. Increased blood and lymphatic vessel diameter are features of VEGF-D action in other tissues and we show by immunolocalisation and Western blotting that stromal cell decidualisation results in a significant increase in VEGF-D protein production, particularly of the proteolytically processed 21 kD form. Using a NOD/scid mouse model with xenografted human endometrium we were able to show that progestin treatment causes decidualisation, VEGF-D production and endometrial vessel dilation. Our results lead to a novel hypothesis to explain BTB, with stromal cell decidualisation rather than progestin treatment per se being the proposed causative event, and VEGF-D being the proposed effector agent. PMID:22383980

  4. Data indicating temperature response of Ti-6Al-4V thin-walled structure during its additive manufacture via Laser Engineered Net Shaping.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Garrett J; Thompson, Scott M; Shamsaei, Nima

    2016-06-01

    An OPTOMEC Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS(™)) 750 system was retrofitted with a melt pool pyrometer and in-chamber infrared (IR) camera for nondestructive thermal inspection of the blown-powder, direct laser deposition (DLD) process. Data indicative of temperature and heat transfer within the melt pool and heat affected zone atop a thin-walled structure of Ti-6Al-4V during its additive manufacture are provided. Melt pool temperature data were collected via the dual-wavelength pyrometer while the dynamic, bulk part temperature distribution was collected using the IR camera. Such data are provided in Comma Separated Values (CSV) file format, containing a 752×480 matrix and a 320×240 matrix of temperatures corresponding to individual pixels of the pyrometer and IR camera, respectively. The IR camera and pyrometer temperature data are provided in blackbody-calibrated, raw forms. Provided thermal data can aid in generating and refining process-property-performance relationships between laser manufacturing and its fabricated materials.

  5. Investigation of breached depleted UF sub 6 cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    DeVan, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. An investigation team was immediately formed to determine the cause of the failures and their impact on future storage procedures and to recommend corrective actions. Subsequent investigation showed that the failures most probably resulted from mechanical damage that occurred at the time that the cylinders had been placed in the storage yard. In both cylinders evidence pointed to the impact of a lifting lug of an adjacent cylinder near the front stiffening ring, where deflection of cylinder could occur only by tearing the cylinder. The impacts appear to have punctured the cylinders and thereby set up corrosion processes that greatly extended the openings in the wall and obliterated the original crack. Fortunately, the reaction products formed by this process were relatively protective and prevented any large-scale loss of uranium. The main factors that precipitated the failures were inadequate spacing between cylinders and deviations in the orientations of lifting lugs from their intended horizontal position. After reviewing the causes and effects of the failures, the team's principal recommendation for remedial action concerned improved cylinder handling and inspection procedures. Design modifications and supplementary mechanical tests were also recommended to improve the cylinder containment integrity during the stacking operation. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Investigation of breached depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    DeVan, J.H.

    1991-12-31

    In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. An investigation team was immediately formed to determine the cause of the failures and their impact on future storage procedures and to recommend corrective actions. Subsequent investigation showed that the failures most probably resulted from mechanical damage that occurred at the time that the cylinders had been placed in the storage yard. In both cylinders evidence pointed to the impact of a lifting lug of an adjacent cylinder near the front stiffening ring, where deflection of the cylinder could occur only by tearing the cylinder. The impacts appear to have punctured the cylinders and thereby set up corrosion processes that greatly extended the openings in the wall and obliterated the original crack. Fortunately, the reaction products formed by this process were relatively protective and prevented any large-scale loss of uranium. The main factors that precipitated the failures were inadequate spacing between cylinders and deviations in the orientations of lifting lugs from their intended horizontal position. After reviewing the causes and effects of the failures, the team`s principal recommendation for remedial action concerned improved cylinder handling and inspection procedures. Design modifications and supplementary mechanical tests were also recommended to improve the cylinder containment integrity during the stacking operation.

  7. A prospective randomised trial comparing insertion success rate and incidence of catheterisation-related complications for subclavian venous catheterisation using a thin-walled introducer needle or a catheter-over-needle technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, E; Kim, B G; Lim, Y J; Jeon, Y T; Hwang, J W; Kim, H C; Choi, Y H; Park, H P

    2016-09-01

    In clinical practice, both a thin-walled introducer needle and catheter-over-needle technique can be used to allow insertion of a guidewire during central venous catheterisation using the Seldinger technique. We compared the incidence of catheterisation-related complications (arterial puncture, haemothorax, pneumothorax, haematoma and catheter tip malposition) and insertion success rate for these two techniques in patients requiring right-sided subclavian central venous catheterisation. A total of 414 patients requiring infraclavicular subclavian venous catheterisation were randomly allocated to either a thin-walled introducer needle (needle group, n = 208) or catheter-over-needle technique (catheter group, n = 206). The catheterisation-related complication rate was lower in the needle group compared with the catheter group (5.8% vs. 15.5%; p = 0.001). Overall insertion success rates were similar (97.1% and 92.7% in the needle and catheter groups respectively; p = 0.046), although the first-pass success rate was higher in the needle group (62.0% vs. 35.4%; p < 0.001). We recommend the use of a thin-walled introducer needle technique for right-sided infraclavicular subclavian venous catheterisation.

  8. Morphological characteristics of the interface between resin composite and glass-ionomer cement to thin-walled roots: a microscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Ayad, Mohamed F; Bahannan, Salma A; Rosenstiel, Stephen F

    2010-04-01

    To identify how different treatments of the root dentin surface affect the microscopic appearance of the resin composite/glass-ionomer cement-to-dentin interface. The root canals of 70 extracted human single-rooted teeth were enlarged to reduce dentin wall thicknesses to 0.5 mm. The roots were randomly divided into seven test groups (n=10) according to the canal irrigant used: no irrigant (control), 5% hydrogen peroxide, 5% sodium hypochlorite, a combination of 5% hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite, 15% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), 10% lactic acid, or 20% lactic acid. To simulate thin-walled roots, within each group, crowns were sectioned and the entire surface of each root canal space was enlarged with Profile instrument. Half of treated root canals (n=5) were filled with resin composite (PermaFlo) and the other half were filled with glass-ionomer cement (Fuji II LC). A light-transmitting plastic post (Luminex) was used to create space for a fiber-reinforced post and to ensure polymerization of the restorative material. Specimens were critical-point dried and freeze fractured for scanning electron microscope analysis. Three sites along the root were evaluated (cervical, middle, and apical). Scanning electron micrographs showed no differences in the morphology of the resin tags at the cervical, middle or apical levels with any of the irrigants or the restorative materials used. Also, no difference in surface topography was found within individual groups. A resin-dentin interdiffusion zone and resin tags developed after application of resin composite with lactic acid solutions and EDTA but not with the glass-ionomer cement.

  9. Water Depletion Threatens Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauman, K. A.; Richter, B. D.; Postel, S.; Floerke, M.; Malsy, M.

    2014-12-01

    Irrigated agriculture is the human activity that has by far the largest impact on water, constituting 85% of global water consumption and 67% of global water withdrawals. Much of this water use occurs in places where water depletion, the ratio of water consumption to water availability, exceeds 75% for at least one month of the year. Although only 17% of global watershed area experiences depletion at this level or more, nearly 30% of total cropland and 60% of irrigated cropland are found in these depleted watersheds. Staple crops are particularly at risk, with 75% of global irrigated wheat production and 65% of irrigated maize production found in watersheds that are at least seasonally depleted. Of importance to textile production, 75% of cotton production occurs in the same watersheds. For crop production in depleted watersheds, we find that one half to two-thirds of production occurs in watersheds that have not just seasonal but annual water shortages, suggesting that re-distributing water supply over the course of the year cannot be an effective solution to shortage. We explore the degree to which irrigated production in depleted watersheds reflects limitations in supply, a byproduct of the need for irrigation in perennially or seasonally dry landscapes, and identify heavy irrigation consumption that leads to watershed depletion in more humid climates. For watersheds that are not depleted, we evaluate the potential impact of an increase in irrigated production. Finally, we evaluate the benefits of irrigated agriculture in depleted and non-depleted watersheds, quantifying the fraction of irrigated production going to food production, animal feed, and biofuels.

  10. Influences of pulse laser parameters on properties of AISI316L stainless steel thin-walled part by laser material deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinlin; Deng, Dewei; Yi, Hongli; Xu, Haiyan; Yang, Shuhua; Zhang, Hongchao

    2017-07-01

    Laser material deposition (LMD) which combines laser cladding and rapid prototyping technique has been widely used to build full density metal parts directly without using modules or tools. There are many parameters affecting the quality and properties of the LMD parts through changing the energy distribution. Pulse laser provides the user an added degree of controlling over the energy distribution which seriously affects the solidification of molten pool and eventual part formation. In the present study, a series of AISI316L stainless steel thin-walled parts are successfully produced by LMD with different pulse laser parameters to investigate the effects of energy distribution on characteristics (microstructure, hardness, residual stress and tensile properties). The results show that the characteristics of LMD parts are obviously influenced by laser mode (pulse or continuous wave laser) and pulse laser parameters (T_pulse and T_pause). The microstructure of parts presents various grain sizes with the different pulse laser parameters. The different value (D-value) between the hardness of edge and central region varies considerably with the pulse laser parameters. The maximum D-value of hardness is presented in the part deposited by continuous wave laser. The maximum hardness is presented in item 4 (T_pulse=10 ms, T_pause=10 ms) and the minimum hardness is presented in part fabricated by continuous wave laser where the residual stress on Z-component presents tensile stress at the edge region and compress stress at the central region but opposite trend happens to the residual stress on Y-component. Tensile stress on Z-component at the edge region increases even presents compress tensile with the decrease of T_pulse. The stress on Y-component presents a periodic variation between tensile stress and compress stress in the Y-direction of the part fabricated by pulse laser. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the part fabricated using pulse laser is higher than the

  11. Halo Star Lithium Depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsonneault, M. H.; Walker, T. P.; Steigman, G.; Narayanan, Vijay K.

    1999-12-10

    The depletion of lithium during the pre-main-sequence and main-sequence phases of stellar evolution plays a crucial role in the comparison of the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis with the abundances observed in halo stars. Previous work has indicated a wide range of possible depletion factors, ranging from minimal in standard (nonrotating) stellar models to as much as an order of magnitude in models that include rotational mixing. Recent progress in the study of the angular momentum evolution of low-mass stars permits the construction of theoretical models capable of reproducing the angular momentum evolution of low-mass open cluster stars. The distribution of initial angular momenta can be inferred from stellar rotation data in young open clusters. In this paper we report on the application of these models to the study of lithium depletion in main-sequence halo stars. A range of initial angular momenta produces a range of lithium depletion factors on the main sequence. Using the distribution of initial conditions inferred from young open clusters leads to a well-defined halo lithium plateau with modest scatter and a small population of outliers. The mass-dependent angular momentum loss law inferred from open cluster studies produces a nearly flat plateau, unlike previous models that exhibited a downward curvature for hotter temperatures in the 7Li-Teff plane. The overall depletion factor for the plateau stars is sensitive primarily to the solar initial angular momentum used in the calibration for the mixing diffusion coefficients. Uncertainties remain in the treatment of the internal angular momentum transport in the models, and the potential impact of these uncertainties on our results is discussed. The 6Li/7Li depletion ratio is also examined. We find that the dispersion in the plateau and the 6Li/7Li depletion ratio scale with the absolute 7Li depletion in the plateau, and we use observational data to set bounds on the 7Li depletion in main-sequence halo

  12. Depleted Uranium: Technical Brief

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This technical brief provides accepted data and references to additional sources for radiological and chemical characteristics, health risks and references for both the monitoring and measurement, and applicable treatment techniques for depleted uranium.

  13. Battery depletion monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.S.

    1982-01-26

    A cmos inverter is used to compare pacemaker battery voltage to a referenced voltage. When the reference voltage exceeds the measured battery voltage, the inverter changes state to indicate battery depletion.

  14. Addressing Ozone Layer Depletion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Access information on EPA's efforts to address ozone layer depletion through regulations, collaborations with stakeholders, international treaties, partnerships with the private sector, and enforcement actions under Title VI of the Clean Air Act.

  15. An Investigation on Axial Deformation Behavior of Thin-Wall Unfilled and Filled Tube with Aluminum Alloy (Al-Si7Mg) Foam Reinforced with SiC Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaraswamidhas, L. A.; Rajak, Dipen Kumar; Das, S.

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this research is to produce superior quality aluminum alloy foam with low relative density and higher resistance against compression deformation. This investigation has studied crash energy capacities of unfilled and filled aluminum alloy foams in mild steel tubes. The foam has been prepared by the melt route process with an addition of 5wt.% silicon carbide particles. The fabricated aluminum alloy foams were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Material Pro analyzer. It was observed that the foam-filled tubes could absorb more energy as compared to the unfilled tubes before reaching the complete densification point. Also, the aluminum alloy foams had better energy absorption capacity during the crash or impact loading. This article demonstrates the excellent ability of aluminum alloy foam application in the field where there is a need to absorb crash energy. It is to be noted that the amount of energy absorption will be greater for low-density foam filled in thin-wall rectangular section tubes. We have seen an increasing trend in the application of aluminum foams inside the thin-wall mild steel tubes for maximum energy absorption.

  16. Cholesterol depletion induces autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jinglei; Ohsaki, Yuki; Tauchi-Sato, Kumi; Fujita, Akikazu; Fujimoto, Toyoshi . E-mail: tfujimot@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Autophagy is a mechanism to digest cells' own components, and its importance in many physiological and pathological processes is being recognized. But the molecular mechanism that regulates autophagy is not understood in detail. In the present study, we found that cholesterol depletion induces macroautophagy. The cellular cholesterol in human fibroblasts was depleted either acutely using 5 mM methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin or 10-20 {mu}g/ml nystatin for 1 h, or metabolically by 20 {mu}M mevastatin and 200 {mu}M mevalonolactone along with 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 2-3 days. By any of these protocols, marked increase of LC3-II was detected by immunoblotting and by immunofluorescence microscopy, and the increase was more extensive than that caused by amino acid starvation, i.e., incubation in Hanks' solution for several hours. The induction of autophagic vacuoles by cholesterol depletion was also observed in other cell types, and the LC3-positive membranes were often seen as long tubules, >50 {mu}m in length. The increase of LC3-II by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin was suppressed by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors and was accompanied by dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin. By electron microscopy, autophagic vacuoles induced by cholesterol depletion were indistinguishable from those seen after amino acid starvation. These results demonstrate that a decrease in cholesterol activates autophagy by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  17. Depletion of Intense Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seipt, D.; Heinzl, T.; Marklund, M.; Bulanov, S. S.

    2017-04-01

    The interaction of charged particles and photons with intense electromagnetic fields gives rise to multiphoton Compton and Breit-Wheeler processes. These are usually described in the framework of the external field approximation, where the electromagnetic field is assumed to have infinite energy. However, the multiphoton nature of these processes implies the absorption of a significant number of photons, which scales as the external field amplitude cubed. As a result, the interaction of a highly charged electron bunch with an intense laser pulse can lead to significant depletion of the laser pulse energy, thus rendering the external field approximation invalid. We provide relevant estimates for this depletion and find it to become important in the interaction between fields of amplitude a0˜1 03 and electron bunches with charges of the order of 10 nC.

  18. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

  19. Tank depletion flow controller

    DOEpatents

    Georgeson, Melvin A.

    1976-10-26

    A flow control system includes two bubbler tubes installed at different levels within a tank containing such as radioactive liquid. As the tank is depleted, a differential pressure transmitter monitors pressure differences imparted by the two bubbler tubes at a remote, shielded location during uniform time intervals. At the end of each uniform interval, balance pots containing a dense liquid are valved together to equalize the pressures. The resulting sawtooth-shaped signal generated by the differential pressure transmitter is compared with a second sawtooth signal representing the desired flow rate during each time interval. Variations in the two signals are employed by a control instrument to regulate flow rate.

  20. Depletion of intense fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Seipt, D.; Heinzl, T.; Marklund, M.

    2017-03-01

    The problem of backreaction of quantum processes on the properties of the background field still remains on the list of outstanding questions of high intensity particle physics. Usually, photon emission by an electron or positron, photon decay into electron-positron pairs in strong electromagnetic fields, or electron-positron pair production by such fields are described in the framework of the external field approximation. It is assumed that the external field has infinite energy and is not affected by these processes. However, the above-mentioned processes have a multi-photon nature, i.e., they occur with the absorption of a significant number of field photons. As a result, the interaction of an intense electromagnetic field with either a highly charged electron bunch or a fast growing population of electrons, positrons, and gamma photons (as in the case of an electromagnetic cascade) may lead to a depletion of the field energy, thus making the external field approximation invalid. Taking the multi-photon Compton process as an example, we estimate the threshold of depletion and find it to become significant at field strengths (a0˜103) and electron bunch charge of about tens of nC.

  1. Stimulated Emission Depletion Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Blom, Hans; Widengren, Jerker

    2017-06-14

    Despite its short history, diffraction-unlimited fluorescence microscopy techniques have already made a substantial imprint in the biological sciences. In this review, we describe how stimulated emission depletion (STED) imaging originally evolved, how it compares to other optical super-resolution imaging techniques, and what advantages it provides compared to previous golden-standards for biological microscopy, such as diffraction-limited optical microscopy and electron microscopy. We outline the prerequisites for successful STED imaging experiments, emphasizing the equally critical roles of instrumentation, sample preparation, and photophysics, and describe major evolving strategies for how to push the borders of STED imaging even further in life science. Finally, we provide examples of how STED nanoscopy can be applied, within three different fields with particular potential for STED imaging experiments: neuroscience, plasma membrane biophysics, and subcellular clinical diagnostics. In these areas, and in many more, STED imaging can be expected to play an increasingly important role in the future.

  2. Ozone Depletion by Hydrofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, M.; Fleming, E. L.; Newman, P. A.; Li, F.; Mlawer, E. J.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Bailey, R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are second-generation replacements for the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halons and other substances that caused the 'ozone hole'. Atmospheric concentrations of HFCs are projected to increase dramatically in the coming decades. Coupled chemistry-climate simulations forced by these projections show that HFCs will impact the global atmosphere in 2050. As strong radiative forcers, HFCs modulate atmospheric temperature, thereby changing ozone-destroying catalytic cycles and enhancing the stratospheric circulation. These changes lead to a weak depletion of stratospheric ozone. Sensitivity simulations with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2D model show that HFC-125 is the most important contributor to atmospheric change in 2050, as compared with HFC-23, HFC-32, HFC-134a and HFC-143a. Incorporating the interactions between chemistry, radiation and dynamics, for a likely 2050 climate, ozone depletion potentials (ODPs) for HFCs range from 4.3x10-4 to 3.5x10-2; previously HFCs were assumed to have negligible ODPs since these species lack chlorine or bromine atoms. The ozone impacts of HFCs are further investigated with the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOSCCM). The GEOSCCM is a three-dimensional, fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model with interactive stratospheric chemistry. Sensitivity simulations in which CO2, CFC-11 and HCFC-22 are enhanced individually are used as proxies for the atmospheric response to the HFC concentrations expected by the mid-21st century. Sensitivity simulations provide quantitative estimates of the impacts of these greenhouse gases on global total ozone, and can be used to assess their effects on the recovery of Antarctic ozone.

  3. 12. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLDS. DEPLETED URANIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLDS. DEPLETED URANIUM CASTING OPERATIONS CEASED IN 1988. (11/14/57) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  4. Depleted Uranium in Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, M.J.; Croff, A.G.

    1997-12-31

    For uranium to be useful in most fission nuclear reactors, it must be enriched (i.e. the concentration of the fissile isotope 235U must be increased). Therefore, depleted uranium (DU)-uranium which has less than naturally occurring concentrations of 235U-is a co-product of the enrichment process. Four to six tons of DU exist for every ton of fresh light water reactor fuel. There were 407,006 MgU 407,000 metric tons (t) of DU stored on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites as of July 1993. If this DU were to be declared surplus, converted to a stable oxide form, and emplaced in a near surface disposal facility, the costs are estimated to be several billion dollars. However, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has stated that near surface disposal of large quantities of DU tails is not appropriate. Thus, there is the possibility that disposition via disposal will be in a deep geological repository. One alternative that may significantly reduce the cost of DU disposition is to use it beneficially. In fact, DOE has begun the Beneficial Uses of DU Project to identify large scale uses of DU and to encourage its reuse. Several beneficial uses, many of which involve applications in the repository per se or in managing the wastes to go into the repository, are discussed in this report.

  5. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    PubMed Central

    Briner, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a clear and defined set of symptoms. Chronic low-dose, or subacute, exposure to depleted uranium alters the appearance of milestones in developing organisms. Adult animals that were exposed to depleted uranium during development display persistent alterations in behavior, even after cessation of depleted uranium exposure. Adult animals exposed to depleted uranium demonstrate altered behaviors and a variety of alterations to brain chemistry. Despite its reduced level of radioactivity evidence continues to accumulate that depleted uranium, if ingested, may pose a radiologic hazard. The current state of knowledge concerning DU is discussed. PMID:20195447

  6. Ego depletion impairs implicit learning.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kelsey R; Sanchez, Daniel J; Wesley, Abigail H; Reber, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Implicit skill learning occurs incidentally and without conscious awareness of what is learned. However, the rate and effectiveness of learning may still be affected by decreased availability of central processing resources. Dual-task experiments have generally found impairments in implicit learning, however, these studies have also shown that certain characteristics of the secondary task (e.g., timing) can complicate the interpretation of these results. To avoid this problem, the current experiments used a novel method to impose resource constraints prior to engaging in skill learning. Ego depletion theory states that humans possess a limited store of cognitive resources that, when depleted, results in deficits in self-regulation and cognitive control. In a first experiment, we used a standard ego depletion manipulation prior to performance of the Serial Interception Sequence Learning (SISL) task. Depleted participants exhibited poorer test performance than did non-depleted controls, indicating that reducing available executive resources may adversely affect implicit sequence learning, expression of sequence knowledge, or both. In a second experiment, depletion was administered either prior to or after training. Participants who reported higher levels of depletion before or after training again showed less sequence-specific knowledge on the post-training assessment. However, the results did not allow for clear separation of ego depletion effects on learning versus subsequent sequence-specific performance. These results indicate that performance on an implicitly learned sequence can be impaired by a reduction in executive resources, in spite of learning taking place outside of awareness and without conscious intent.

  7. Stratospheric ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Rowland, F Sherwood

    2006-05-29

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290-320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime-the 'Antarctic ozone hole'. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules.

  8. Stratospheric ozone depletion

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, F. Sherwood

    2006-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290–320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime—the ‘Antarctic ozone hole’. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  9. Testing fully depleted CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Ricard; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Castander, Francisco J.; Jiménez, Jorge; de Vicente, Juan

    2014-08-01

    The focal plane of the PAU camera is composed of eighteen 2K x 4K CCDs. These devices, plus four spares, were provided by the Japanese company Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. with type no. S10892-04(X). These detectors are 200 μm thick fully depleted and back illuminated with an n-type silicon base. They have been built with a specific coating to be sensitive in the range from 300 to 1,100 nm. Their square pixel size is 15 μm. The read-out system consists of a Monsoon controller (NOAO) and the panVIEW software package. The deafualt CCD read-out speed is 133 kpixel/s. This is the value used in the calibration process. Before installing these devices in the camera focal plane, they were characterized using the facilities of the ICE (CSIC- IEEC) and IFAE in the UAB Campus in Bellaterra (Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain). The basic tests performed for all CCDs were to obtain the photon transfer curve (PTC), the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) using X-rays and the EPER method, linearity, read-out noise, dark current, persistence, cosmetics and quantum efficiency. The X-rays images were also used for the analysis of the charge diffusion for different substrate voltages (VSUB). Regarding the cosmetics, and in addition to white and dark pixels, some patterns were also found. The first one, which appears in all devices, is the presence of half circles in the external edges. The origin of this pattern can be related to the assembly process. A second one appears in the dark images, and shows bright arcs connecting corners along the vertical axis of the CCD. This feature appears in all CCDs exactly in the same position so our guess is that the pattern is due to electrical fields. Finally, and just in two devices, there is a spot with wavelength dependence whose origin could be the result of a defectous coating process.

  10. Transequatorial Propagation and Depletion Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, E. S.; Bust, G. S.; Kaeppler, S. R.; Frissell, N. A.; Paxton, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    The bottomside equatorial ionosphere in the afternoon and evening sector frequently evolves rapidly from smoothly stratified to violently unstable with large wedges of depleted plasma growing through to the topside on timescales of a few tens of minutes. These depletions have numerous practical impacts on radio propagation, including amplitude scintillation, field-aligned irregularity scatter, HF blackouts, and long-distance transequatorial propagation at frequencies above the MUF. Practical impacts notwithstanding, the pathways and conditions under which depletions form remain a topic of vigorous inquiry some 80 years after their first report. Structuring of the pre-sunset ionosphere---morphology of the equatorial anomalies and long-wavelength undulations of the isodensity contours on the bottomside---are likely to hold some clues to conditions that are conducive to depletion formation. The Conjugate Depletion Experiment is an upcoming transequatorial forward-scatter HF/VHF experiment to investigate pre-sunset undulations and their connection with depletion formation. We will present initial results from the Conjugate Depletion Experiment, as well as a companion analysis of a massive HF propagation data set.

  11. Ego Depletion Impairs Implicit Learning

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kelsey R.; Sanchez, Daniel J.; Wesley, Abigail H.; Reber, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Implicit skill learning occurs incidentally and without conscious awareness of what is learned. However, the rate and effectiveness of learning may still be affected by decreased availability of central processing resources. Dual-task experiments have generally found impairments in implicit learning, however, these studies have also shown that certain characteristics of the secondary task (e.g., timing) can complicate the interpretation of these results. To avoid this problem, the current experiments used a novel method to impose resource constraints prior to engaging in skill learning. Ego depletion theory states that humans possess a limited store of cognitive resources that, when depleted, results in deficits in self-regulation and cognitive control. In a first experiment, we used a standard ego depletion manipulation prior to performance of the Serial Interception Sequence Learning (SISL) task. Depleted participants exhibited poorer test performance than did non-depleted controls, indicating that reducing available executive resources may adversely affect implicit sequence learning, expression of sequence knowledge, or both. In a second experiment, depletion was administered either prior to or after training. Participants who reported higher levels of depletion before or after training again showed less sequence-specific knowledge on the post-training assessment. However, the results did not allow for clear separation of ego depletion effects on learning versus subsequent sequence-specific performance. These results indicate that performance on an implicitly learned sequence can be impaired by a reduction in executive resources, in spite of learning taking place outside of awareness and without conscious intent. PMID:25275517

  12. "When the going gets tough, who keeps going?" Depletion sensitivity moderates the ego-depletion effect.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Stefanie J; Adriaanse, Marieke A; De Vet, Emely; Fennis, Bob M; De Ridder, Denise T D

    2014-01-01

    Self-control relies on a limited resource that can get depleted, a phenomenon that has been labeled ego-depletion. We argue that individuals may differ in their sensitivity to depleting tasks, and that consequently some people deplete their self-control resource at a faster rate than others. In three studies, we assessed individual differences in depletion sensitivity, and demonstrate that depletion sensitivity moderates ego-depletion effects. The Depletion Sensitivity Scale (DSS) was employed to assess depletion sensitivity. Study 1 employs the DSS to demonstrate that individual differences in sensitivity to ego-depletion exist. Study 2 shows moderate correlations of depletion sensitivity with related self-control concepts, indicating that these scales measure conceptually distinct constructs. Study 3 demonstrates that depletion sensitivity moderates the ego-depletion effect. Specifically, participants who are sensitive to depletion performed worse on a second self-control task, indicating a stronger ego-depletion effect, compared to participants less sensitive to depletion.

  13. Depleting depletion: Polymer swelling in poor solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherji, Debashish; Marques, Carlos; Stuehn, Torsten; Kremer, Kurt

    A polymer collapses in a solvent when the solvent particles dislike monomers more than the repulsion between monomers. This leads to an effective attraction between monomers, also referred to as depletion induced attraction. This attraction is the key factor behind standard polymer collapse in poor solvents. Strikingly, even if a polymer exhibits poor solvent condition in two different solvents, it can also swell in mixtures of these two poor solvents. This collapse-swelling-collapse scenario is displayed by poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in aqueous alcohol. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a thermodynamically consistent generic model and theoretical arguments, we unveil the microscopic origin of this phenomenon. Our analysis suggests that a subtle interplay of the bulk solution properties and the local depletion forces reduces depletion effects, thus dictating polymer swelling in poor solvent mixtures.

  14. Machining Thin-Walled Cylindrical Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimbak, Joe; Spagnolo, Jim; Kraus, Dan

    1988-01-01

    Cylindrical walls only few thousandths of inch thick machined accurately and without tears or punctures with aid of beryllium copper mandrel. Chilled so it contracts, then inserted in cylinder. As comes to room temperature, mandrel expands and fits snugly inside cylinder. Will not allow part to slide and provides solid backup to prevent deflection when part machined by grinding wheel. When machining finished, cylinder-and-mandrel assembly inserted in dry ice, mandrel contracts and removed from part.

  15. Computation of Thin-Walled Prismatic Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlasov, V. Z.

    1949-01-01

    We consider a prismatic shell consisting of a finite number of narrow rectangular plates and having in the cross-section a finite number of closed contours (fig. 1(a)). We shall assume that the rectangular plates composing the shell are rigidly joined so that there is no motion of any kind of one plate relative to the others meeting at a given connecting line. The position of a point on the middle prismatic surface is considered to be defined by the coordinate z, the distance to a certain initial cross-section z = O, end the coordinate s determining its position on the contour of the cross-section.

  16. Machining Thin-Walled Cylindrical Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimbak, Joe; Spagnolo, Jim; Kraus, Dan

    1988-01-01

    Cylindrical walls only few thousandths of inch thick machined accurately and without tears or punctures with aid of beryllium copper mandrel. Chilled so it contracts, then inserted in cylinder. As comes to room temperature, mandrel expands and fits snugly inside cylinder. Will not allow part to slide and provides solid backup to prevent deflection when part machined by grinding wheel. When machining finished, cylinder-and-mandrel assembly inserted in dry ice, mandrel contracts and removed from part.

  17. Fully depleted back illuminated CCD

    DOEpatents

    Holland, Stephen Edward

    2001-01-01

    A backside illuminated charge coupled device (CCD) is formed of a relatively thick high resistivity photon sensitive silicon substrate, with frontside electronic circuitry, and an optically transparent backside ohmic contact for applying a backside voltage which is at least sufficient to substantially fully deplete the substrate. A greater bias voltage which overdepletes the substrate may also be applied. One way of applying the bias voltage to the substrate is by physically connecting the voltage source to the ohmic contact. An alternate way of applying the bias voltage to the substrate is to physically connect the voltage source to the frontside of the substrate, at a point outside the depletion region. Thus both frontside and backside contacts can be used for backside biasing to fully deplete the substrate. Also, high resistivity gaps around the CCD channels and electrically floating channel stop regions can be provided in the CCD array around the CCD channels. The CCD array forms an imaging sensor useful in astronomy.

  18. Charge depletion in organic heterojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, T. W.; Lo, M. F.; Lee, S. T.; Lee, C. S.

    2012-03-01

    Until now two types of organic-organic heterojunction (OHJ) have been observed in P-N junctions formed between undoped-organic semiconductors. Charge-transfers across OHJs are either negligible or showing electron transfer from P-type to N-type materials, leading to charges accumulation near the interface. Here, we observed that junction of 4,4',4''-tris(2-methylphenyl-phenylamino)triphenylamine (m-MTDATA)/bathocuproine (BCP) show the third-behavior. Electrons in BCP (N-type) transfer to m-MTDATA (P-type), leading to depletion of mobile majority carriers near the junction. While "depletion junctions" are typical in inorganic semiconductors, there are no reports in undoped-OHJ. Formation mechanism of depletion OHJs and fundamental differences between inorganic and organic HJs are discussed.

  19. In vitro fatigue-crack growth and fracture toughness behavior of thin-walled superelastic Nitinol tube for endovascular stents: A basis for defining the effect of crack-like defects.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Scott W; Ritchie, Robert O

    2007-02-01

    Endovascular stents made of the superelastic nickel-titanium alloy Nitinol are subjected in service to tens of millions of loading cycles and even "single-event" overloads, both of which can potentially result in fracture and/or complete failure of the device. A fracture-mechanics-based methodology can provide a means to quantify relevant material parameters critical to the design against such failures. However, there is a dearth of relevant experimental data in the literature on such fracture-mechanics-based approaches to fatigue in Nitinol; furthermore, that which does exist invariably pertains to product forms that are not appropriate for stent manufacture, e.g., bulk Nitinol bar and strip. Consequently, the current work is focused on characterizing in vitro both subcritical and critical crack growth (fatigue-crack growth and R-curve fracture toughness) behavior in thin-walled ( approximately 400microm thick) Nitinol tubing similar to that used for medical device manufacture (following shape-setting procedures to flatten the material), with a resultant austenite finish temperature of A(f) approximately 25-30 degrees C, identical to self-expanding Nitinol stents. Fatigue-crack growth behavior, measured in Hanks' Balanced Saline Solution over a wide spectrum of growth rates (down to 10(-10)m/cycle) and at a range of positive load ratios (R=0.1-0.7), revealed significantly higher fatigue thresholds than had been previously reported for bulk Nitinol material. In addition, we examine the critical effect of test frequency, as most fatigue experiments on Nitinol have been performed at 30Hz or above, despite the fact that this is far in excess of the frequency of physiological loading. Finally, the fracture toughness properties are characterized in thin-section Nitinol and show marked crack-resistance (R-curve) behavior with a dependence on crack-growth angle (with respect to the tube drawing axis); additionally, measured toughnesses are found to be lower than has been

  20. Two-Speed Epicyclic Final Drives for 14-Ton Amphibious Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-18

    after the FMC pro- posal was submitted several parts had to be made from steel instead of aluminum due to stress levels. This, combined with the...1768 1768 2124 2072 Pump Speed (rpm) 2238 2241 2245 2244 2240 Pump P Pressure(pst) 4075 4041 4028 4292 4421 Pump S P-essure(osi) 370 366 376 373 364...1530 1525 Pump Speed (rpm) 2021 2023 2024 2030 202S Pump P PressureCpsi) 453 454 455 452 450 Pump S Pressure~psi) 3046 3243 3220 3!31 3185 Pump Control

  1. Intensive production of hybrid catfish-14 tons per acre in earthen

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In spite of record high feed prices (averaging over $400/ton during the past five years) and a flood of cheap imports being dumped on the country, the U.S. farm-raised catfish industry has remained viable by increasing production intensity while decreasing FCRs (food conversion ratios). Two technica...

  2. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made also in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion from these effects roughly to double the 'biologically active' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova must occur at approximately or less than 8 parsecs.

  3. Ozone depletion, paradigms, and politics

    SciTech Connect

    Iman, R.L.

    1993-10-01

    The destruction of the Earth`s protective ozone layer is a prime environmental concern. Industry has responded to this environmental problem by: implementing conservation techniques to reduce the emission of ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs); using alternative cleaning solvents that have lower ozone depletion potentials (ODPs); developing new, non-ozone-depleting solvents, such as terpenes; and developing low-residue soldering processes. This paper presents an overview of a joint testing program at Sandia and Motorola to evaluate a low-residue (no-clean) soldering process for printed wiring boards (PWBs). Such processes are in widespread use in commercial applications because they eliminate the cleaning operation. The goal of this testing program was to develop a data base that could be used to support changes in the mil-specs. In addition, a joint task force involving industry and the military has been formed to conduct a follow-up evaluation of low-residue processes that encompass the concerns of the tri-services. The goal of the task force is to gain final approval of the low-residue technology for use in military applications.

  4. Issues in Stratospheric Ozone Depletion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Steven Andrew

    Following the announcement of the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985 there have arisen a multitude of questions pertaining to the nature and consequences of polar ozone depletion. This thesis addresses several of these specific questions, using both computer models of chemical kinetics and the Earth's radiation field as well as laboratory kinetic experiments. A coupled chemical kinetic-radiative numerical model was developed to assist in the analysis of in situ field measurements of several radical and neutral species in the polar and mid-latitude lower stratosphere. Modeling was used in the analysis of enhanced polar ClO, mid-latitude diurnal variation of ClO, and simultaneous measurements of OH, HO_2, H_2 O and O_3. Most importantly, such modeling was instrumental in establishing the link between the observed ClO and BrO concentrations in the Antarctic polar vortex and the observed rate of ozone depletion. The principal medical concern of stratospheric ozone depletion is that ozone loss will lead to the enhancement of ground-level UV-B radiation. Global ozone climatology (40^circS to 50^ circN latitude) was incorporated into a radiation field model to calculate the biologically accumulated dosage (BAD) of UV-B radiation, integrated over days, months, and years. The slope of the annual BAD as a function of latitude was found to correspond to epidemiological data for non-melanoma skin cancers for 30^circ -50^circN. Various ozone loss scenarios were investigated. It was found that a small ozone loss in the tropics can provide as much additional biologically effective UV-B as a much larger ozone loss at higher latitudes. Also, for ozone depletions of > 5%, the BAD of UV-B increases exponentially with decreasing ozone levels. An important key player in determining whether polar ozone depletion can propagate into the populated mid-latitudes is chlorine nitrate, ClONO_2 . As yet this molecule is only indirectly accounted for in computer models and field

  5. Physiological implications of anthropogenic environmental calcium depletion

    Treesearch

    Catherine H. Borer; Paul G. Schaberg; Donald H. DeHayes; Gary J. Hawley

    2001-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that numerous anthropogenic factors can deplete calcium (Ca) from forested ecosystems. Although it is difficult to quantify the extent of this depletion, some reports indicate that the magnitude of Ca losses may be substantial. The potential for Ca depletion raises important questions about tree health. Only a fraction of foliar Ca is...

  6. Exposure to nature counteracts aggression after depletion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; She, Yihan; Colarelli, Stephen M; Fang, Yuan; Meng, Hui; Chen, Qiuju; Zhang, Xin; Zhu, Hongwei

    2017-08-31

    Acts of self-control are more likely to fail after previous exertion of self-control, known as the ego depletion effect. Research has shown that depleted participants behave more aggressively than non-depleted participants, especially after being provoked. Although exposure to nature (e.g., a walk in the park) has been predicted to replenish resources common to executive functioning and self-control, the extent to which exposure to nature may counteract the depletion effect on aggression has yet to be determined. The present study investigated the effects of exposure to nature on aggression following depletion. Aggression was measured by the intensity of noise blasts participants delivered to an ostensible opponent in a competition reaction-time task. As predicted, an interaction occurred between depletion and environmental manipulations for provoked aggression. Specifically, depleted participants behaved more aggressively in response to provocation than non-depleted participants in the urban condition. However, provoked aggression did not differ between depleted and non-depleted participants in the natural condition. Moreover, within the depletion condition, participants in the natural condition had lower levels of provoked aggression than participants in the urban condition. This study suggests that a brief period of nature exposure may restore self-control and help depleted people regain control over aggressive urges. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The Case of Ozone Depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambright, W. Henry

    2005-01-01

    While the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is widely perceived as a space agency, since its inception NASA has had a mission dedicated to the home planet. Initially, this mission involved using space to better observe and predict weather and to enable worldwide communication. Meteorological and communication satellites showed the value of space for earthly endeavors in the 1960s. In 1972, NASA launched Landsat, and the era of earth-resource monitoring began. At the same time, in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the environmental movement swept throughout the United States and most industrialized countries. The first Earth Day event took place in 1970, and the government generally began to pay much more attention to issues of environmental quality. Mitigating pollution became an overriding objective for many agencies. NASA's existing mission to observe planet Earth was augmented in these years and directed more toward environmental quality. In the 1980s, NASA sought to plan and establish a new environmental effort that eventuated in the 1990s with the Earth Observing System (EOS). The Agency was able to make its initial mark via atmospheric monitoring, specifically ozone depletion. An important policy stimulus in many respects, ozone depletion spawned the Montreal Protocol of 1987 (the most significant international environmental treaty then in existence). It also was an issue critical to NASA's history that served as a bridge linking NASA's weather and land-resource satellites to NASA s concern for the global changes affecting the home planet. Significantly, as a global environmental problem, ozone depletion underscored the importance of NASA's ability to observe Earth from space. Moreover, the NASA management team's ability to apply large-scale research efforts and mobilize the talents of other agencies and the private sector illuminated its role as a lead agency capable of crossing organizational boundaries as well as the science-policy divide.

  8. Biomedical consequences of ozone depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coohill, Thomas P.

    1994-07-01

    It is widely agreed that a portion of the earth's protective stratospheric ozone layer is being depleted. The major effect of this ozone loss will be an increase in the amount of ultraviolet radiation (UV reaching the biosphere. This increase will be completely contained within the UVB (290nm - 320nm). It is imperative that assessments be made of the effects of this additional UVB on living organisms. This requires a detailed knowledge of the UVB photobiology of these life forms. One analytical technique to aid in the approximations is the construction of UV action spectra for such important biological end-points as human skin cancer, cataracts, immune suppression; plant photosynthesis and crop yields; and aquatic organism responses to UVB, especially the phytoplankton. Combining these action spectra with the known solar spectrum (and estimates for various ozone depletion scenarios) can give rise to a series of effectiveness spectra for these parameters. This manuscript gives a first approximation, rough estimate, for the effectiveness spectra for some of these bioresponses, and a series of crude temporary values for how a 10% ozone loss would affect the above end-points. These are not intended to masquerade as final answers, but rather, to serve as beginning attempts for a process which should be continually refined. It is hoped that these estimates will be of some limited use to agencies, such as government and industry, that have to plan now for changes in human activities that might alter future atmospheric chemistry in a beneficial manner.

  9. Depleted Argon from Underground Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H. O.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A.; Rogers, H.; Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S.

    2011-04-27

    Argon is a strong scintillator and an ideal target for Dark Matter detection; however {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon from cosmic ray interactions limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar due to the cosmic ray shielding of the earth. In Cortez, Colorado, a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 600 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. We first concentrate the argon locally to 3% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation, and then the N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous distillation to purify the argon. We have collected 26 kg of argon from the CO{sub 2} facility and a cryogenic distillation column is under construction at Fermilab to further purify the argon.

  10. Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.; Otis, M.D.

    1994-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ``waste,`` but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity.

  11. High-voltage-compatible, fully depleted CCDs

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Stephen E.; Bebek, Chris J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Emes, JohnE.; Fabricius, Max H.; Fairfield, Jessaym A.; Groom, Don E.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, William F.; Palaio, Nick P.; Roe, Natalie A.; Wang, Guobin

    2006-05-15

    We describe charge-coupled device (CCD) developmentactivities at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).Back-illuminated CCDs fabricated on 200-300 mu m thick, fully depleted,high-resistivity silicon substrates are produced in partnership with acommercial CCD foundry.The CCDs are fully depleted by the application ofa substrate bias voltage. Spatial resolution considerations requireoperation of thick, fully depleted CCDs at high substrate bias voltages.We have developed CCDs that are compatible with substrate bias voltagesof at least 200V. This improves spatial resolution for a given thickness,and allows for full depletion of thicker CCDs than previously considered.We have demonstrated full depletion of 650-675 mu m thick CCDs, withpotential applications in direct x-ray detection. In this work we discussthe issues related to high-voltage operation of fully depleted CCDs, aswell as experimental results on high-voltage-compatible CCDs.

  12. CO depletion in the Gould Belt clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, H.; Viti, S.; Yates, J.; Hatchell, J.; Fuller, G. A.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Sadavoy, S.; Buckle, J. V.; Graves, S.; Roberts, J.; Nutter, D.; Davis, C.; White, G. J.; Hogerheijde, M.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Butner, H.; Richer, J.; Di Francesco, J.

    2012-05-01

    We present a statistical comparison of CO depletion in a set of local molecular clouds within the Gould Belt using Sub-millimetre Common User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) and Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme (HARP) data. This is the most wide-ranging study of depletion thus far within the Gould Belt. We estimate CO column densities assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium and, for a selection of sources, using the radiative transfer code RADEX in order to compare the two column density estimation methods. High levels of depletion are seen in the centres of several dust cores in all the clouds. We find that in the gas surrounding protostars, levels of depletion are somewhat lower than for starless cores with the exception of a few highly depleted protostellar cores in Serpens and NGC 2024. There is a tentative correlation between core mass and core depletion, particularly in Taurus and Serpens. Taurus has, on average, the highest levels of depletion. Ophiuchus has low average levels of depletion which could perhaps be related to the anomalous dust grain size distribution observed in this cloud. High levels of depletion are often seen around the edges of regions of optical emission (Orion) or in more evolved or less dynamic regions such as the bowl of L1495 in Taurus and the north-western region of Serpens.

  13. Ego depletion increases risk-taking.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter; Kastenmüller, Andreas; Asal, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    We investigated how the availability of self-control resources affects risk-taking inclinations and behaviors. We proposed that risk-taking often occurs from suboptimal decision processes and heuristic information processing (e.g., when a smoker suppresses or neglects information about the health risks of smoking). Research revealed that depleted self-regulation resources are associated with reduced intellectual performance and reduced abilities to regulate spontaneous and automatic responses (e.g., control aggressive responses in the face of frustration). The present studies transferred these ideas to the area of risk-taking. We propose that risk-taking is increased when individuals find themselves in a state of reduced cognitive self-control resources (ego-depletion). Four studies supported these ideas. In Study 1, ego-depleted participants reported higher levels of sensation seeking than non-depleted participants. In Study 2, ego-depleted participants showed higher levels of risk-tolerance in critical road traffic situations than non-depleted participants. In Study 3, we ruled out two alternative explanations for these results: neither cognitive load nor feelings of anger mediated the effect of ego-depletion on risk-taking. Finally, Study 4 clarified the underlying psychological process: ego-depleted participants feel more cognitively exhausted than non-depleted participants and thus are more willing to take risks. Discussion focuses on the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.

  14. Beneficial Uses of Depleted Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.; Croff, A.G.; Haire, M. J.

    1997-08-01

    Naturally occurring uranium contains 0.71 wt% {sup 235}U. In order for the uranium to be useful in most fission reactors, it must be enriched the concentration of the fissile isotope {sup 235}U must be increased. Depleted uranium (DU) is a co-product of the processing of natural uranium to produce enriched uranium, and DU has a {sup 235}U concentration of less than 0.71 wt%. In the United States, essentially all of the DU inventory is in the chemical form of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) and is stored in large cylinders above ground. If this co-product material were to be declared surplus, converted to a stable oxide form, and disposed, the costs are estimated to be several billion dollars. Only small amounts of DU have at this time been beneficially reused. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has begun the Beneficial Uses of DU Project to identify large-scale uses of DU and encourage its reuse for the primary purpose of potentially reducing the cost and expediting the disposition of the DU inventory. This paper discusses the inventory of DU and its rate of increase; DU disposition options; beneficial use options; a preliminary cost analysis; and major technical, institutional, and regulatory issues to be resolved.

  15. Depleted argon from underground sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H.O.; Alton, A.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Kendziora, C.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 500ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation. The N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

  16. Depleted uranium--the growing concern.

    PubMed

    Abu-Qare, Aqel W; Abou-Donia, Mohamed B

    2002-01-01

    Recently, several studies have reported on the health and environmental consequences of the use of depleted uranium. Depleted uranium is a heavy metal that is also radioactive. It is commonly used in missiles as a counterweight because of its very high density (1.6 times more than lead). Immediate health risks associated with exposure to depleted uranium include kidney and respiratory problems, with conditions such as kidney stones, chronic cough and severe dermatitis. Long-term risks include lung and bone cancer. Several published reports implicated exposure to depleted uranium in kidney damage, mutagenicity, cancer, inhibition of bone, neurological deficits, significant decrease in the pregnancy rate in mice and adverse effects on the reproductive and central nervous systems. Acute poisoning with depleted uranium elicited renal failure that could lead to death. The environmental consequences of its residue will be felt for thousands of years. It is inhaled and passed through the skin and eyes, transferred through the placenta into the fetus, distributed into tissues and eliminated in urine. The use of depleted uranium during the Gulf and Kosovo Wars and the crash of a Boeing airplane carrying depleted uranium in Amsterdam in 1992 were implicated in a health concern related to exposure to depleted uranium.

  17. High homocysteine induces betaine depletion.

    PubMed

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Esse, Ruben; Gupta, Sapna; Lebon, Sophie; de Vriese, An S; de Baulny, Helene Ogier; Kruger, Warren; Schiff, Manuel; Blom, Henk J

    2015-04-28

    Betaine is the substrate of the liver- and kidney-specific betaine-homocysteine (Hcy) methyltransferase (BHMT), an alternate pathway for Hcy remethylation. We hypothesized that BHMT is a major pathway for homocysteine removal in cases of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy). Therefore, we measured betaine in plasma and tissues from patients and animal models of HHcy of genetic and acquired cause. Plasma was collected from patients presenting HHcy without any Hcy interfering treatment. Plasma and tissues were collected from rat models of HHcy induced by diet and from a mouse model of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency. S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet), S-adenosyl-homocysteine (AdoHcy), methionine, betaine and dimethylglycine (DMG) were quantified by ESI-LC-MS/MS. mRNA expression was quantified using quantitative real-time (QRT)-PCR. For all patients with diverse causes of HHcy, plasma betaine concentrations were below the normal values of our laboratory. In the diet-induced HHcy rat model, betaine was decreased in all tissues analysed (liver, brain, heart). In the mouse CBS deficiency model, betaine was decreased in plasma, liver, heart and brain, but was conserved in kidney. Surprisingly, BHMT expression and activity was decreased in liver. However, in kidney, BHMT and SLC6A12 expression was increased in CBS-deficient mice. Chronic HHcy, irrespective of its cause, induces betaine depletion in plasma and tissues (liver, brain and heart), indicating a global decrease in the body betaine pool. In kidney, betaine concentrations were not affected, possibly due to overexpression of the betaine transporter SLC6A12 where betaine may be conserved because of its crucial role as an osmolyte.

  18. High homocysteine induces betaine depletion

    PubMed Central

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Esse, Ruben; Gupta, Sapna; Lebon, Sophie; de Vriese, An S; de Baulny, Helene Ogier; Kruger, Warren; Schiff, Manuel; Blom, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Betaine is the substrate of the liver- and kidney-specific betaine-homocysteine (Hcy) methyltransferase (BHMT), an alternate pathway for Hcy remethylation. We hypothesized that BHMT is a major pathway for homocysteine removal in cases of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy). Therefore, we measured betaine in plasma and tissues from patients and animal models of HHcy of genetic and acquired cause. Plasma was collected from patients presenting HHcy without any Hcy interfering treatment. Plasma and tissues were collected from rat models of HHcy induced by diet and from a mouse model of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency. S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet), S-adenosyl-homocysteine (AdoHcy), methionine, betaine and dimethylglycine (DMG) were quantified by ESI—LC–MS/MS. mRNA expression was quantified using quantitative real-time (QRT)-PCR. For all patients with diverse causes of HHcy, plasma betaine concentrations were below the normal values of our laboratory. In the diet-induced HHcy rat model, betaine was decreased in all tissues analysed (liver, brain, heart). In the mouse CBS deficiency model, betaine was decreased in plasma, liver, heart and brain, but was conserved in kidney. Surprisingly, BHMT expression and activity was decreased in liver. However, in kidney, BHMT and SLC6A12 expression was increased in CBS-deficient mice. Chronic HHcy, irrespective of its cause, induces betaine depletion in plasma and tissues (liver, brain and heart), indicating a global decrease in the body betaine pool. In kidney, betaine concentrations were not affected, possibly due to overexpression of the betaine transporter SLC6A12 where betaine may be conserved because of its crucial role as an osmolyte. PMID:26182429

  19. Gulf war depleted uranium risks.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Albert C

    2008-01-01

    US and British forces used depleted uranium (DU) in armor-piercing rounds to disable enemy tanks during the Gulf and Balkan Wars. Uranium particulate is generated by DU shell impact and particulate entrained in air may be inhaled or ingested by troops and nearby civilian populations. As uranium is slightly radioactive and chemically toxic, a number of critics have asserted that DU exposure has resulted in a variety of adverse health effects for exposed veterans and nearby civilian populations. The study described in this paper used mathematical modeling to estimate health risks from exposure to DU during the 1991 Gulf War for both US troops and nearby Iraqi civilians. The analysis found that the risks of DU-induced leukemia or birth defects are far too small to result in an observable increase in these health effects among exposed veterans or Iraqi civilians. The analysis indicated that only a few ( approximately 5) US veterans in vehicles accidentally targeted by US tanks received significant exposure levels, resulting in about a 1.4% lifetime risk of DU radiation-induced fatal cancer (compared with about a 24% risk of a fatal cancer from all other causes). These veterans may have also experienced temporary kidney damage. Iraqi children playing for 500 h in DU-destroyed vehicles are predicted to incur a cancer risk of about 0.4%. In vitro and animal tests suggest the possibility of chemically induced health effects from DU internalization, such as immune system impairment. Further study is needed to determine the applicability of these findings for Gulf War exposure to DU. Veterans and civilians who did not occupy DU-contaminated vehicles are unlikely to have internalized quantities of DU significantly in excess of normal internalization of natural uranium from the environment.

  20. Specification for the VERA Depletion Benchmark Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kang Seog

    2015-12-17

    CASL-X-2015-1014-000 iii Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The CASL neutronics simulator MPACT is under development for the neutronics and T-H coupled simulation for the pressurized water reactor. MPACT includes the ORIGEN-API and internal depletion module to perform depletion calculations based upon neutron-material reaction and radioactive decay. It is a challenge to validate the depletion capability because of the insufficient measured data. One of the detoured methods to validate it is to perform a code-to-code comparison for benchmark problems. In this study a depletion benchmark suite has been developed and a detailed guideline has been provided to obtain meaningful computational outcomes which can be used in the validation of the MPACT depletion capability.

  1. Action orientation overcomes the ego depletion effect.

    PubMed

    Dang, Junhua; Xiao, Shanshan; Shi, Yucai; Mao, Lihua

    2015-04-01

    It has been consistently demonstrated that initial exertion of self-control had negative influence on people's performance on subsequent self-control tasks. This phenomenon is referred to as the ego depletion effect. Based on action control theory, the current research investigated whether the ego depletion effect could be moderated by individuals' action versus state orientation. Our results showed that only state-oriented individuals exhibited ego depletion. For individuals with action orientation, however, their performance was not influenced by initial exertion of self-control. The beneficial effect of action orientation against ego depletion in our experiment results from its facilitation for adapting to the depleting task. © 2014 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Possible ozone depletions following nuclear explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C.; Borucki, W. J.; Turco, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    The degree of depletion of the ozone layer ensuing after delivery of strategic nuclear warheads (5000 and 10,000 Mton) due to production of nitrogen oxides is theoretically assessed. Strong depletions are calculated for 16-km and 26-km altitudes, peaking 1-2 months after detonation and lasting for three years, while a significant depletion at 36 km would peak after one year. Assuming the explosions occur between 30 and 70 deg N, these effects should be much more pronounced in this region than over the Northern Hemisphere as a whole. It is concluded that Hampson's concern on this matter (1974) is well-founded.-

  3. Fully Depleted Charge-Coupled Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Stephen E.

    2006-05-15

    We have developed fully depleted, back-illuminated CCDs thatbuild upon earlier research and development efforts directed towardstechnology development of silicon-strip detectors used inhigh-energy-physics experiments. The CCDs are fabricated on the same typeof high-resistivity, float-zone-refined silicon that is used for stripdetectors. The use of high-resistivity substrates allows for thickdepletion regions, on the order of 200-300 um, with corresponding highdetection efficiency for near-infrared andsoft x-ray photons. We comparethe fully depleted CCD to thep-i-n diode upon which it is based, anddescribe the use of fully depleted CCDs in astronomical and x-ray imagingapplications.

  4. Possible ozone depletions following nuclear explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C.; Borucki, W. J.; Turco, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    The degree of depletion of the ozone layer ensuing after delivery of strategic nuclear warheads (5000 and 10,000 Mton) due to production of nitrogen oxides is theoretically assessed. Strong depletions are calculated for 16-km and 26-km altitudes, peaking 1-2 months after detonation and lasting for three years, while a significant depletion at 36 km would peak after one year. Assuming the explosions occur between 30 and 70 deg N, these effects should be much more pronounced in this region than over the Northern Hemisphere as a whole. It is concluded that Hampson's concern on this matter (1974) is well-founded.-

  5. A definition of depletion of fish stocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Oosten, John

    1949-01-01

    Attention was focused on the need of a common and better understanding of the term depletion as applied to the fisheries in order to eliminate if possible the existing inexactness of thought on the subject. Depletion has been confused at various times with at least ten different ideas associated with it but which, as has has heen pointed out, are not synonymous at all. In defining depletion we must recognize that the term represents a condition and must not he confounded with the cause (overfishing) that leads to this condition or with the symptoms that identify it. Depletion was defined as a reduction, through overfishing, in the level of abundance of the exploitable segment of a stock that prevents the realization of the maximum productive capacity.

  6. [Hepatomioneuropathy secondary to mitochondrial DNA depletion].

    PubMed

    Blanco-Barca, M O; Gómez-Lado, C; Campos-González, Y; Castro-Gago, M

    2007-04-01

    Mitochondrial DNA depletion (mtDNA) is an highly heterogeneous condition characterized by a decreased number of mtDNA copies. The patient is a 22-month-old girl with generalized hypotonia, marked weakness, respiratory failure, arterial hypertension, hyperlactacidemia, hepatosplenomegaly and mild hypertransaminasemia without hepatic failure neither hypoketotic hypoglycemia. Electromyographic findings were consistent with neuromyopathy and muscle biopsy suggested a neurogenic atrophy. Electron microscopy revealed lipid droplets, subsarcolemmal accumulation of mitochondrias and glycogen granules. Respiratory chain enzime activities were normal. Genetic study in muscle showed mtDNA depletion, and the diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy caused by survival motoneuron gene deletion was excluded. This case might be a novel phenotype of mtDNA depletion which could be named hepatomioneuropatyc form. A normal result of respiratory chain enzimes in muscle doesn't excluded mtDNA depletion.

  7. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of investigations into the correlation between the depletion of ozone and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Satellite measurements from Nimbus 7 showed that over the years the depletion from austral spring to austral spring has generally worsened. Approximately 70 percent of the ozone above Antarctica, which equals about 3 percent of the earth's ozone, is lost during September and October. Various hypotheses for ozone depletion are discussed including the theory suggesting that chlorine compounds might be responsible for the ozone hole, whereby chlorine enters the atmosphere as a component of chlorofluorocarbons produced by humans. The three types of PSCs, nitric acid trihydrate, slowly cooling water-ice, and rapidly cooling water-ice clouds act as important components of the Antarctic ozone depletion. It is indicated that destruction of the ozone will be more severe each year for the next few decades, leading to a doubling in area of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  8. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of investigations into the correlation between the depletion of ozone and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Satellite measurements from Nimbus 7 showed that over the years the depletion from austral spring to austral spring has generally worsened. Approximately 70 percent of the ozone above Antarctica, which equals about 3 percent of the earth's ozone, is lost during September and October. Various hypotheses for ozone depletion are discussed including the theory suggesting that chlorine compounds might be responsible for the ozone hole, whereby chlorine enters the atmosphere as a component of chlorofluorocarbons produced by humans. The three types of PSCs, nitric acid trihydrate, slowly cooling water-ice, and rapidly cooling water-ice clouds act as important components of the Antarctic ozone depletion. It is indicated that destruction of the ozone will be more severe each year for the next few decades, leading to a doubling in area of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  9. Effects of Riverbed Conductance on Stream Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackey, G.; Neupauer, R. M.; Pitlick, J.

    2012-12-01

    In the western United States and other regions of the world where growing population and changing climates are threatening water supplies, accurate modeling of potential human impacts on water resources is becoming more important. Stream depletion, the reduction of surface water flow due to the extraction of groundwater from a hydraulically connected aquifer, is one of the more direct ways that development can alter water availability, degrade water quality and endanger aquatic habitats. These factors have made the accurate modeling of stream depletion an important step in the process of installing groundwater wells in regions that are susceptible to this phenomenon. Proper estimation of stream depletion requires appropriate parameterization of aquifer and streambed hydraulic properties. Although many studies have conducted numerical investigations to determine stream depletion at specific sites, they typically do not measure streambed hydraulic conductivity (Kr), but rather assume a representative value. In this work, we establish a hypothetical model aquifer that is 2000 m by 1600 m and has a meandering stream running through its center. The Kr of the model stream is varied from 1.0x10-9 m s-1 to 1.0x10-2 m s-1 in order to determine the sensitivity of the stream depletion calculations to this parameter. It was found that when Kr is in the lower part of this range, slight changes in K¬r lead to significant impacts on the calculated stream depletion values. We vary Kr along the stream channel according to naturally occurring patterns and demonstrate that alterations of the parameter over a few orders of magnitude can affect the estimated stream depletion caused by a well at a specified location. The numerical simulations show that the mean value of Kr and its spatial variability along the channel should be realistic to develop an accurate model of stream depletion.

  10. Depleted uranium: A DOE management guide

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a management challenge and financial liability in the form of 50,000 cylinders containing 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) that are stored at the gaseous diffusion plants. The annual storage and maintenance cost is approximately $10 million. This report summarizes several studies undertaken by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) to evaluate options for long-term depleted uranium management. Based on studies conducted to date, the most likely use of the depleted uranium is for shielding of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or vitrified high-level waste (HLW) containers. The alternative to finding a use for the depleted uranium is disposal as a radioactive waste. Estimated disposal costs, utilizing existing technologies, range between $3.8 and $11.3 billion, depending on factors such as applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the location of the disposal site. The cost of recycling the depleted uranium in a concrete based shielding in SNF/HLW containers, although substantial, is comparable to or less than the cost of disposal. Consequently, the case can be made that if DOE invests in developing depleted uranium shielded containers instead of disposal, a long-term solution to the UF{sub 6} problem is attained at comparable or lower cost than disposal as a waste. Two concepts for depleted uranium storage casks were considered in these studies. The first is based on standard fabrication concepts previously developed for depleted uranium metal. The second converts the UF{sub 6} to an oxide aggregate that is used in concrete to make dry storage casks.

  11. Anatomy of Depleted Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocher, M.; Lepri, S. T.; Landi, E.; Zhao, L.; Manchester, W. B., IV

    2017-01-01

    We report a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) containing distinct periods of anomalous heavy-ion charge state composition and peculiar ion thermal properties measured by ACE/SWICS from 1998 to 2011. We label them “depleted ICMEs,” identified by the presence of intervals where C6+/C5+ and O7+/O6+ depart from the direct correlation expected after their freeze-in heights. These anomalous intervals within the depleted ICMEs are referred to as “Depletion Regions.” We find that a depleted ICME would be indistinguishable from all other ICMEs in the absence of the Depletion Region, which has the defining property of significantly low abundances of fully charged species of helium, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen. Similar anomalies in the slow solar wind were discussed by Zhao et al. We explore two possibilities for the source of the Depletion Region associated with magnetic reconnection in the tail of a CME, using CME simulations of the evolution of two Earth-bound CMEs described by Manchester et al.

  12. A new definition of maternal depletion syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Winkvist, A; Rasmussen, K M; Habicht, J P

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Although the term "maternal depletion syndrome" has been commonly used to explain poor maternal and infant health, whether such a syndrome actually exists remains unclear. This uncertainty may be due to the lack of a clear definition of the syndrome and the absence of theoretical frameworks that account for the many factors related to reproductive nutrition. METHODS. We propose a new definition of maternal depletion syndrome within a framework that accounts for potential confounding factors. RESULTS. Our conceptual framework distinguishes between childbearing pattern and inadequate diet as causes of poor maternal health; hence, our definition of maternal depletion syndrome has both biological and practical meaning. The new definition is based on overall change in maternal nutritional status over one reproductive cycle in relation to possible depletion and repletion phases and in relation to initial nutritional status. CONCLUSIONS. The empirical application of this approach should permit the testing of the existence of maternal depletion syndrome in the developing world, and the distinction between populations where family planning will alleviate maternal depletion and those in which an improved diet is also necessary. PMID:1566948

  13. New Approach For Prediction Groundwater Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    Current approaches to quantify groundwater depletion involve water balance and satellite gravity. However, the water balance technique includes uncertain estimation of parameters such as evapotranspiration and runoff. The satellite method consumes time and effort. The work reported in this paper proposes using failure theory in a novel way to predict groundwater saturated thickness depletion. An important issue in the failure theory proposed is to determine the failure point (depletion case). The proposed technique uses depth of water as the net result of recharge/discharge processes in the aquifer to calculate remaining saturated thickness resulting from the applied pumping rates in an area to evaluate the groundwater depletion. Two parameters, the Weibull function and Bayes analysis were used to model and analyze collected data from 1962 to 2009. The proposed methodology was tested in a nonrenewable aquifer, with no recharge. Consequently, the continuous decline in water depth has been the main criterion used to estimate the depletion. The value of the proposed approach is to predict the probable effect of the current applied pumping rates on the saturated thickness based on the remaining saturated thickness data. The limitation of the suggested approach is that it assumes the applied management practices are constant during the prediction period. The study predicted that after 300 years there would be an 80% probability of the saturated aquifer which would be expected to be depleted. Lifetime or failure theory can give a simple alternative way to predict the remaining saturated thickness depletion with no time-consuming processes such as the sophisticated software required.

  14. Groundwater depletion embedded in international food trade.

    PubMed

    Dalin, Carole; Wada, Yoshihide; Kastner, Thomas; Puma, Michael J

    2017-03-29

    Recent hydrological modelling and Earth observations have located and quantified alarming rates of groundwater depletion worldwide. This depletion is primarily due to water withdrawals for irrigation, but its connection with the main driver of irrigation, global food consumption, has not yet been explored. Here we show that approximately eleven per cent of non-renewable groundwater use for irrigation is embedded in international food trade, of which two-thirds are exported by Pakistan, the USA and India alone. Our quantification of groundwater depletion embedded in the world's food trade is based on a combination of global, crop-specific estimates of non-renewable groundwater abstraction and international food trade data. A vast majority of the world's population lives in countries sourcing nearly all their staple crop imports from partners who deplete groundwater to produce these crops, highlighting risks for global food and water security. Some countries, such as the USA, Mexico, Iran and China, are particularly exposed to these risks because they both produce and import food irrigated from rapidly depleting aquifers. Our results could help to improve the sustainability of global food production and groundwater resource management by identifying priority regions and agricultural products at risk as well as the end consumers of these products.

  15. The New MCNP6 Depletion Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael Lorne; James, Michael R.; Hendricks, John S.; Goorley, John T.

    2012-06-19

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology.

  16. Depletion sensitivity predicts unhealthy snack purchases.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Stefanie J; Adriaanse, Marieke A; Fennis, Bob M; De Vet, Emely; De Ridder, Denise T D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to examine the relation between depletion sensitivity - a novel construct referring to the speed or ease by which one's self-control resources are drained - and snack purchase behavior. In addition, interactions between depletion sensitivity and the goal to lose weight on snack purchase behavior were explored. Participants included in the study were instructed to report every snack they bought over the course of one week. The dependent variables were the number of healthy and unhealthy snacks purchased. The results of the present study demonstrate that depletion sensitivity predicts the amount of unhealthy (but not healthy) snacks bought. The more sensitive people are to depletion, the more unhealthy snacks they buy. Moreover, there was some tentative evidence that this relation is more pronounced for people with a weak as opposed to a strong goal to lose weight, suggesting that a strong goal to lose weight may function as a motivational buffer against self-control failures. All in all, these findings provide evidence for the external validity of depletion sensitivity and the relevance of this construct in the domain of eating behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Groundwater depletion embedded in international food trade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalin, Carole; Wada, Yoshihide; Kastner, Thomas; Puma, Michael J.

    2017-03-01

    Recent hydrological modelling and Earth observations have located and quantified alarming rates of groundwater depletion worldwide. This depletion is primarily due to water withdrawals for irrigation, but its connection with the main driver of irrigation, global food consumption, has not yet been explored. Here we show that approximately eleven per cent of non-renewable groundwater use for irrigation is embedded in international food trade, of which two-thirds are exported by Pakistan, the USA and India alone. Our quantification of groundwater depletion embedded in the world’s food trade is based on a combination of global, crop-specific estimates of non-renewable groundwater abstraction and international food trade data. A vast majority of the world’s population lives in countries sourcing nearly all their staple crop imports from partners who deplete groundwater to produce these crops, highlighting risks for global food and water security. Some countries, such as the USA, Mexico, Iran and China, are particularly exposed to these risks because they both produce and import food irrigated from rapidly depleting aquifers. Our results could help to improve the sustainability of global food production and groundwater resource management by identifying priority regions and agricultural products at risk as well as the end consumers of these products.

  18. The new MCNP6 depletion capability

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, M. L.; James, M. R.; Hendricks, J. S.; Goorley, J. T.

    2012-07-01

    The first MCNP based in-line Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology. (authors)

  19. Ego depletion in visual perception: Ego-depleted viewers experience less ambiguous figure reversal.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Marina C; Stirk, Steven; Hancock, Peter J B

    2017-02-22

    This study examined the effects of ego depletion on ambiguous figure perception. Adults (N = 315) received an ego depletion task and were subsequently tested on their inhibitory control abilities that were indexed by the Stroop task (Experiment 1) and their ability to perceive both interpretations of ambiguous figures that was indexed by reversal (Experiment 2). Ego depletion had a very small effect on reducing inhibitory control (Cohen's d = .15) (Experiment 1). Ego-depleted participants had a tendency to take longer to respond in Stroop trials. In Experiment 2, ego depletion had small to medium effects on the experience of reversal. Ego-depleted viewers tended to take longer to reverse ambiguous figures (duration to first reversal) when naïve of the ambiguity and experienced less reversal both when naïve and informed of the ambiguity. Together, findings suggest that ego depletion has small effects on inhibitory control and small to medium effects on bottom-up and top-down perceptual processes. The depletion of cognitive resources can reduce our visual perceptual experience.

  20. The modality effect of ego depletion: Auditory task modality reduces ego depletion.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiong; Wang, Zhenhong

    2016-08-01

    An initial act of self-control that impairs subsequent acts of self-control is called ego depletion. The ego depletion phenomenon has been observed consistently. The modality effect refers to the effect of the presentation modality on the processing of stimuli. The modality effect was also robustly found in a large body of research. However, no study to date has examined the modality effects of ego depletion. This issue was addressed in the current study. In Experiment 1, after all participants completed a handgrip task, one group's participants completed a visual attention regulation task and the other group's participants completed an auditory attention regulation task, and then all participants again completed a handgrip task. The ego depletion phenomenon was observed in both the visual and the auditory attention regulation task. Moreover, participants who completed the visual task performed worse on the handgrip task than participants who completed the auditory task, which indicated that there was high ego depletion in the visual task condition. In Experiment 2, participants completed an initial task that either did or did not deplete self-control resources, and then they completed a second visual or auditory attention control task. The results indicated that depleted participants performed better on the auditory attention control task than the visual attention control task. These findings suggest that altering task modality may reduce ego depletion. © 2016 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Ozone depletion and chlorine loading potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pyle, John A.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Solomon, Susan; Zvenigorodsky, Sergei; Connell, Peter; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Fisher, Donald A.; Stordal, Frode; Weisenstein, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The recognition of the roles of chlorine and bromine compounds in ozone depletion has led to the regulation or their source gases. Some source gases are expected to be more damaging to the ozone layer than others, so that scientific guidance regarding their relative impacts is needed for regulatory purposes. Parameters used for this purpose include the steady-state and time-dependent chlorine loading potential (CLP) and the ozone depletion potential (ODP). Chlorine loading potentials depend upon the estimated value and accuracy of atmospheric lifetimes and are subject to significant (approximately 20-50 percent) uncertainties for many gases. Ozone depletion potentials depend on the same factors, as well as the evaluation of the release of reactive chlorine and bromine from each source gas and corresponding ozone destruction within the stratosphere.

  2. Depletion performance of layered reservoirs without crossflow

    SciTech Connect

    Fetkovich, M.J.; Works, A.M.; Thrasher, T.S. ); Bradley, M.D. )

    1990-09-01

    This paper presents a study of the rate/time and pressure/cumulative-production depletion performance of a two-layered gas reservoir producing without crossflow. The gas reservoir has produced for more than 20 years at an effectively constant wellbore pressure, thus giving continuously declining rate/time and pressure/cumulative-production data for analysis. The field data demonstrates that Arps depletion-decline exponents between 0.5 and 1 can be obtained with a no-crossflow, layered reservoir description. Rate-vs.-time and pressure-vs.-cumulative-production predictions were developed from both 2D numerical and simplified tank models of a two layered, no-crossflow system. These results demonstrate the effects of changes in reservoir layer volumes, permeability, and skin on the depletion performance.

  3. Neutral depletion and the helicon density limit

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; Carr, J. Jr.; Lusk, G.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E.

    2013-12-15

    It is straightforward to create fully ionized plasmas with modest rf power in a helicon. It is difficult, however, to create plasmas with density >10{sup 20} m{sup −3}, because neutral depletion leads to a lack of fuel. In order to address this density limit, we present fast (1 MHz), time-resolved measurements of the neutral density at and downstream from the rf antenna in krypton helicon plasmas. At the start of the discharge, the neutral density underneath the antenna is reduced to 1% of its initial value in 15 μs. The ionization rate inferred from these data implies that the electron temperature near the antenna is much higher than the electron temperature measured downstream. Neutral density measurements made downstream from the antenna show much slower depletion, requiring 14 ms to decrease by a factor of 1/e. Furthermore, the downstream depletion appears to be due to neutral pumping rather than ionization.

  4. Global Warming: Lessons from Ozone Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Art

    2010-11-01

    My teaching and textbook have always covered many physics-related social issues, including stratospheric ozone depletion and global warming. The ozone saga is an inspiring good-news story that's instructive for solving the similar but bigger problem of global warming. Thus, as soon as students in my physics literacy course at the University of Arkansas have developed a conceptual understanding of energy and of electromagnetism, including the electromagnetic spectrum, I devote a lecture (and a textbook section) to ozone depletion and another lecture (and section) to global warming. Humankind came together in 1986 and quickly solved, to the extent that humans can solve it, ozone depletion. We could do the same with global warming, but we haven't and as yet there's no sign that we will. The parallel between the ozone and global warming cases, and the difference in outcomes, are striking and instructive.

  5. Self-regulation, ego depletion, and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Baumeister, Roy F

    2014-12-01

    Inhibition is a major form of self-regulation. As such, it depends on self-awareness and comparing oneself to standards and is also susceptible to fluctuations in willpower resources. Ego depletion is the state of reduced willpower caused by prior exertion of self-control. Ego depletion undermines inhibition both because restraints are weaker and because urges are felt more intensely than usual. Conscious inhibition of desires is a pervasive feature of everyday life and may be a requirement of life in civilized, cultural society, and in that sense it goes to the evolved core of human nature. Intentional inhibition not only restrains antisocial impulses but can also facilitate optimal performance, such as during test taking. Self-regulation and ego depletion- may also affect less intentional forms of inhibition, even chronic tendencies to inhibit. Broadly stated, inhibition is necessary for human social life and nearly all societies encourage and enforce it. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Prediction of battery depletion in implanted pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Geoffrey; Siddons, Harold

    1973-01-01

    By the use of a measuring oscilloscope and the standard electrocardiogram limb leads the degree of battery depletion in an implanted pacemaker can be estimated. A formula based on readings obtained by this means has been used to determine when Devices fixed rate pacemakers should be removed. Laboratory tests show that 90% of their useful life is obtained by this means and it proved possible to extend the period of implantation from an arbitrary 24 months to 25 to 34 months without failure from battery depletion. PMID:4731110

  7. Seasonal oxygen depletion in Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Taft, J.L.; Hartwig, E.O.; Loftus, R.

    1980-12-01

    The spring freshet increases density stratification in Chesapeake Bay and minimizes oxygen transfer from the surface to the deep layer so that waters below 10 m depth experience oxygen depletion which may lead to anoxia during June to September. Respiration in the water of the deep layer is the major factor contributing to oxygen depletion. Benthic respiration seems secondary. Organic matter from the previous year which has settled into the deep layer during winter provides most of the oxygen demand but some new production in the surface layer may sink and thus supplement the organic matter accumulated in the deep layer.

  8. Low Sulfur Depletion in Photodissociation Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicoechea, J. R.; Pety, J.; Gerin, M.; Teyssier, D.; Roueff, E.; Hily-Blant, P.

    2006-06-01

    Sulfur is an abundant element which remains undepleted in diffuse interstellar gas but it is historically assumed to deplete (by factors of ˜1000) on grains at higher densities. Photodissociation regions (PDRs) are an interesting intermediate medium between translucent and dark clouds where the energetics and dynamics are dominated by an illuminating FUV radiation field, and thus they can provide some new insights about the sulfur depletion problem. In this work we present our latest studies on CS and HCS^+ photochemistry, excitation and radiative transfer in the Horsehead PDR, allowing us to infer the sulfur abundance.

  9. 48 CFR 52.223-11 - Ozone-Depleting Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ozone-Depleting Substances....223-11 Ozone-Depleting Substances. As prescribed in 23.804(a), insert the following clause: Ozone-Depleting Substances (MAY 2001) (a) Definition. Ozone-depleting substance, as used in this clause, means...

  10. 48 CFR 52.223-11 - Ozone-Depleting Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ozone-Depleting Substances....223-11 Ozone-Depleting Substances. As prescribed in 23.804(a), insert the following clause: Ozone-Depleting Substances (MAY 2001) (a) Definition. Ozone-depleting substance, as used in this clause, means...

  11. 48 CFR 52.223-11 - Ozone-Depleting Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ozone-Depleting Substances....223-11 Ozone-Depleting Substances. As prescribed in 23.804(a), insert the following clause: Ozone-Depleting Substances (MAY 2001) (a) Definition. Ozone-depleting substance, as used in this clause, means...

  12. 48 CFR 52.223-11 - Ozone-Depleting Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ozone-Depleting Substances....223-11 Ozone-Depleting Substances. As prescribed in 23.804(a), insert the following clause: Ozone-Depleting Substances (MAY 2001) (a) Definition. Ozone-depleting substance, as used in this clause, means...

  13. 48 CFR 52.223-11 - Ozone-Depleting Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ozone-Depleting Substances....223-11 Ozone-Depleting Substances. As prescribed in 23.804(a), insert the following clause: Ozone-Depleting Substances (MAY 2001) (a) Definition. Ozone-depleting substance, as used in this clause, means...

  14. Direct Visualization of an Impurity Depletion Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alex A.; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan Ma; Thomas, Bill R.

    2000-01-01

    When a crystal incorporates more impurity per unit of its volume than the impurity concentration in solution, the solution in vicinity of the growing crystal is depleted with respect to the impurity I,2. With a stagnant solution, e. g. in microgravity or gels, an impurity depletion zone expands as the crystal grows and results in greater purity in most of the outer portion of the crystal than in the core. Crystallization in gel provides an opportunity to mimic microgravity conditions and visualize the impurity depletion zone. Colorless, transparent apoferritin (M congruent to 450 KDa) crystals were grown in the presence of red holoferritin dimer as a microheterogeneous impurity (M congruent to 900 KDa) within agarose gel by counterdiffusion with Cd(2+) precipitant. Preferential trapping of dimers, (distribution coefficient K = 4 (exp 1,2)) results in weaker red color around the crystals grown in the left tube in the figure as compared to the control middle tube without crystals. The left and the middle tubes contain colored ferritin dimers, the right tube contains colored trimers. The meniscus in the left tube separate gel (below) and liquid solution containing Cd(2+) (above). Similar solutions, though without precipitants, were present on top of the middle and right tube allowing diffusion of dimers and trimers. The area of weaker color intensity around crystals directly demonstrates overlapped impurity depletion zones.

  15. Global Warming: Lessons from Ozone Depletion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    2010-01-01

    My teaching and textbook have always covered many physics-related social issues, including stratospheric ozone depletion and global warming. The ozone saga is an inspiring good-news story that's instructive for solving the similar but bigger problem of global warming. Thus, as soon as students in my physics literacy course at the University of…

  16. Global Warming: Lessons from Ozone Depletion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    2010-01-01

    My teaching and textbook have always covered many physics-related social issues, including stratospheric ozone depletion and global warming. The ozone saga is an inspiring good-news story that's instructive for solving the similar but bigger problem of global warming. Thus, as soon as students in my physics literacy course at the University of…

  17. Kinetics of the depletion of trichloroethene

    SciTech Connect

    Barrio-Lage, G.; Parson, F.Z.; Nassar, R.S.

    1987-04-01

    The depletion of trichloroethene (TCE) was studied in microcosms containing water and three types of natural sediment ranging in composition from highly organic to a calcareous sedimentary rock. The depletion rates varied slightly in the different sediments. The first-order rate constant k/sub 1/ for the depletion of TCE ranged from 8.7 x 10/sup -4/ and 4.9 x 10/sup -4/ h/sup -1/ in soils contaminated with TCE prior to microcosm preparation to 3.4 x 10/sup -4/ and 4.6 x 10/sup -4/ h/sup -1/ for soils with a large organic content to 3.2 x 10/sup -4/ h/sup -1/ for crushed rock microcosms. Depletion was found to follow nonlinear forms of Michaelis-Menten kinetics in the organic sediments; however, microcosms containing crushed rock and water followed a linear form of the equation. K/sub m/ values were found to be dependent on the percent of total organic carbon in the sediment. 16 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  18. Neutral depletion versus repletion due to ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchtman, A.; Makrinich, G.; Raimbault, J.-L.; Liard, L.; Rax, J.-M.; Chabert, P.

    2008-05-15

    Recent theoretical analyses which predicted unexpected effects of neutral depletion in both collisional and collisionless plasmas are reviewed. We focus on the depletion of collisionless neutrals induced by strong ionization of a collisionless plasma and contrast this depletion with the effect of strong ionization on thermalized neutrals. The collisionless plasma is analyzed employing a kinetic description. The collisionless neutrals and the plasma are coupled through volume ionization and wall recombination only. The profiles of density and pressure both of the plasma and of the neutral-gas and the profile of the ionization rate are calculated. It is shown that for collisionless neutrals the ionization results in neutral depletion, while when neutrals are thermalized the ionization induces a maximal neutral-density at the discharge center, which we call neutral repletion. The difference between the two cases stems from the relation between the neutral density and pressure. The pressure of the collisionless neutral-gas turns out to be maximal where its density is minimal, in contrast to the case of a thermalized neutral gas.

  19. Soil moisture depletion patterns around scattered trees

    Treesearch

    Robert R. Ziemer

    1968-01-01

    Soil moisture was measured around an isolated mature sugar pine tree (Pinus lambertiana Dougl.) in the mixed conifer forest type of the north central Sierra Nevada, California, from November 1965 to October 1966. From a sequence of measurements, horizontal and vertical soil moisture profiles were developed. Estimated soil moisture depletion from the 61-foot radius plot...

  20. Demonstration of jackhammer incorporating depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, L E; Hoard, R W; Carter, D L; Saculla, M D; Wilson, G V

    2000-04-01

    The United States Government currently has an abundance of depleted uranium (DU). This surplus of about 1 billion pounds is the result of an enrichment process using gaseous diffusion to produce enriched and depleted uranium. The enriched uranium has been used primarily for either nuclear weapons for the military or nuclear fuel for the commercial power industry. Most of the depleted uranium remains at the enrichment process plants in the form of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}). The Department of Energy (DOE) recently began a study to identify possible commercial applications for the surplus material. One of these potential applications is to use the DU in high-density strikers/hammers in pneumatically driven tools, such as jack hammers and piledrivers to improve their impulse performance. The use of DU could potentially increase tunneling velocity and excavation into target materials with improved efficiency. This report describes the efforts undertaken to analyze the particulars of using DU in two specific striking applications: the jackhammer and chipper tool.

  1. Dissolution Treatment of Depleted Uranium Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gates-Anderson, D D; Laue, C A; Fitch, T E

    2004-02-09

    Researchers at LLNL have developed a 3-stage process that converts pyrophoric depleted uranium metal turnings to a solidified final product that can be transported to and buried at a permitted land disposal site. The three process stages are: (1) pretreatment; (2) dissolution; and (3) solidification. Each stage was developed following extensive experimentation. This report presents the results of their experimental studies.

  2. Contrasts between Antarctic and Arctic ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Susan; Portmann, Robert W; Thompson, David W J

    2007-01-09

    This work surveys the depth and character of ozone depletion in the Antarctic and Arctic using available long balloon-borne and ground-based records that cover multiple decades from ground-based sites. Such data reveal changes in the range of ozone values including the extremes observed as polar air passes over the stations. Antarctic ozone observations reveal widespread and massive local depletion in the heart of the ozone "hole" region near 18 km, frequently exceeding 90%. Although some ozone losses are apparent in the Arctic during particular years, the depth of the ozone losses in the Arctic are considerably smaller, and their occurrence is far less frequent. Many Antarctic total integrated column ozone observations in spring since approximately the 1980s show values considerably below those ever observed in earlier decades. For the Arctic, there is evidence of some spring season depletion of total ozone at particular stations, but the changes are much less pronounced compared with the range of past data. Thus, the observations demonstrate that the widespread and deep ozone depletion that characterizes the Antarctic ozone hole is a unique feature on the planet.

  3. “When the going gets tough, who keeps going?” Depletion sensitivity moderates the ego-depletion effect

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Stefanie J.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; De Vet, Emely; Fennis, Bob M.; De Ridder, Denise T. D.

    2014-01-01

    Self-control relies on a limited resource that can get depleted, a phenomenon that has been labeled ego-depletion. We argue that individuals may differ in their sensitivity to depleting tasks, and that consequently some people deplete their self-control resource at a faster rate than others. In three studies, we assessed individual differences in depletion sensitivity, and demonstrate that depletion sensitivity moderates ego-depletion effects. The Depletion Sensitivity Scale (DSS) was employed to assess depletion sensitivity. Study 1 employs the DSS to demonstrate that individual differences in sensitivity to ego-depletion exist. Study 2 shows moderate correlations of depletion sensitivity with related self-control concepts, indicating that these scales measure conceptually distinct constructs. Study 3 demonstrates that depletion sensitivity moderates the ego-depletion effect. Specifically, participants who are sensitive to depletion performed worse on a second self-control task, indicating a stronger ego-depletion effect, compared to participants less sensitive to depletion. PMID:25009523

  4. How Depleted is the MORB mantle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, A. W.; Hart, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the degree of mantle depletion of highly incompatible elements is critically important for assessing Earth's internal heat production and Urey number. Current views of the degree of MORB source depletion are dominated by Salters and Stracke (2004), and Workman and Hart (2005). The first is based on an assessment of average MORB compositions, whereas the second considers trace element data of oceanic peridotites. Both require an independent determination of one absolute concentration, Lu (Salters & Stracke), or Nd (Workman & Hart). Both use parent-daughter ratios Lu/Hf, Sm/Nd, and Rb/Sr calculated from MORB isotopes combined with continental-crust extraction models, as well as "canonical" trace element ratios, to boot-strap the full range of trace element abundances. We show that the single most important factor in determining the ultimate degree of incompatible element depletion in the MORB source lies in the assumptions about the timing of continent extraction, exemplified by continuous extraction versus simple two-stage models. Continued crust extraction generates additional, recent mantle depletion, without affecting the isotopic composition of the residual mantle significantly. Previous emphasis on chemical compositions of MORB and/or peridotites has tended to obscure this. We will explore the effect of different continent extraction models on the degree of U, Th, and K depletion in the MORB source. Given the uncertainties of the two most popular models, the uncertainties of U and Th in DMM are at least ±50%, and this impacts the constraints on the terrestrial Urey ratio. Salters, F.J.M. and Stracke, A., 2004, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 5, Q05004. Workman, R.K. and Hart, S.R., 2005, EPSL 231, 53-72.

  5. A worldwide view of groundwater depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beek, L. P.; Wada, Y.; van Kempen, C.; Reckman, J. W.; Vasak, S.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2010-12-01

    During the last decades, global water demand has increased two-fold due to increasing population, expanding irrigated area and economic development. Globally such demand can be met by surface water availability (i.e., water in rivers, lakes and reservoirs) but regional variations are large and the absence of sufficient rainfall and run-off increasingly encourages the use of groundwater resources, particularly in the (semi-)arid regions of the world. Excessive abstraction for irrigation frequently leads to overexploitation, i.e. if groundwater abstraction exceeds the natural groundwater recharge over extensive areas and prolonged times, persistent groundwater depletion may occur. Observations and various regional studies have revealed that groundwater depletion is a substantial issue in regions such as Northwest India, Northeast Pakistan, Central USA, Northeast China and Iran. Here we provide a global overview of groundwater depletion from the year 1960 to 2000 at a spatial resolution of 0.5 degree by assessing groundwater recharge with the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB and subtracting estimates of groundwater abstraction obtained from IGRAC-GGIS database. PCR-GLOBWB was forced by the CRU climate dataset downscaled to daily time steps using ERA40 re-analysis data. PCR-GLOBWB simulates daily global groundwater recharge (0.5 degree) while considering sub-grid variability of each grid cell (e.g., short and tall vegetation, different soil types, fraction of saturated soil). Country statistics of groundwater abstraction were downscaled to 0.5 degree by using water demand (i.e., agriculture, industry and domestic) as a proxy. To limit problems related to increased capture of discharge and increased recharge due to groundwater pumping, we restricted our analysis to sub-humid to arid areas. The uncertainty in the resulting estimates was assessed by a Monte Carlo analysis of 100 realizations of groundwater recharge and 100 realizations of groundwater abstraction

  6. Vehicle Useful Life Study for Truck, 1/4 Ton, 4x4, M151A1/A2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    cocncxjcjicoLnoi— cri«xiLncoOi— .— r^o.— CM KO 00 LO in <C •^j-CMLnooLni— uD«^-cn cocricococ\\ JUDO ^t£)^r^c\\jr-^c\\j<^|-<Njcoo"=rLnco«^-Ln Oi ’* 0 CO ^0 1— r-.’^t

  7. Iron isotope composition of depleted MORB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labidi, J.; Sio, C. K. I.; Shahar, A.

    2015-12-01

    In terrestrial basalts, iron isotope ratios are observed to weakly fractionate as a function of olivine and pyroxene crystallization. However, a ~0.1‰ difference between chondrites and MORB had been reported (Dauphas et al. 2009, Teng et al. 2013 and ref. therein). This observation could illustrate an isotope fractionation occurring during partial melting, as a function of the Fe valence in melt versus crystals. Here, we present high-precision Fe isotopic data measured by MC-ICP-MS on well-characterized samples from the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge (PAR, n=9) and from the Garrett Transform Fault (n=8). These samples allow exploring the Fe isotope fractionation between melt and magnetite, and the role of partial melting on Fe isotope fractionation. Our average δ56Fe value is +0.095±0.013‰ (95% confidence, n=17), indistinguishable from a previous estimate of +0.105±0.006‰ (95% confidence, n=43, see ref. 2). Our δ56Fe values correlate weakly with MgO contents, and correlate positively with K/Ti ratios. PAC1 DR10 shows the largest Ti and Fe depletion after titanomagnetite fractionation, with a δ56Fe value of +0.076±0.036‰. This is ~0.05‰ below other samples at a given MgO. This may illustrate a significant Fe isotope fractionation between the melt and titanomagnetite, in agreement with experimental determination (Shahar et al. 2008). GN09-02, the most incompatible-element depleted sample, has a δ56Fe value of 0.037±0.020‰. This is the lowest high-precision δ56Fe value recorded for a MORB worldwide. This basalt displays an incompatible-element depletion consistent with re-melting beneath the transform fault of mantle source that was depleted during a first melting event, beneath the ridge axis (Wendt et al. 1999). The Fe isotope observation could indicate that its mantle source underwent 56Fe depletion after a first melting event. It could alternatively indicate a lower Fe isotope fractionation during re-melting, if the source was depleted of its Fe3

  8. Copenhagen delegates advance phaseout of ozone depleters

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, E.

    1992-12-09

    As expected, delegates at the United Nations Ozone Layer Conference in Copenhagen sped up ozone depleter phaseouts from the 1987 Montreal Protocol and the 1990 London amendments. The changes bring the worldwide production phaseout of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other ozone depleters in developed countries in line with U.S. and European plans announced earlier this year. Adjustments to the protocol, which are binding on the signatories, change the phaseout for CFC, carbon tetrachloride, and methyl chloroform production and consumption to January 1, 1996 from 2000. The 75% reduction of 1986 levels from CFCs by January 1, 1994 is a compromise between European pressure for an 85% cut and the US goal of 70%. Halon production is to end January 1, 1994, as anticipated. Developing countries continue to have a 10-year grace period. Friends of the Earth ozone campaign director Liz Cook counters that the phaseout dates were scheduled with concern for the chemical industry, not for the ozone layer.

  9. Replacements For Ozone-Depleting Foaming Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, Elana; Sharpe, Jon B.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorinated ethers used in place of chlorofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons. Replacement necessary because CFC's and HCFC's found to contribute to depletion of ozone from upper atmosphere, and manufacture and use of them by law phased out in near future. Two fluorinated ethers do not have ozone-depletion potential and used in existing foam-producing equipment, designed to handle liquid blowing agents soluble in chemical ingredients that mixed to make foam. Any polyurethane-based foams and several cellular plastics blown with these fluorinated ethers used in processes as diverse as small batch pours, large sprays, or double-band lamination to make insulation for private homes, commercial buildings, shipping containers, and storage tanks. Fluorinated ethers proved useful as replacements for CFC refrigerants and solvents.

  10. Replacements For Ozone-Depleting Foaming Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, Elana; Sharpe, Jon B.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorinated ethers used in place of chlorofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons. Replacement necessary because CFC's and HCFC's found to contribute to depletion of ozone from upper atmosphere, and manufacture and use of them by law phased out in near future. Two fluorinated ethers do not have ozone-depletion potential and used in existing foam-producing equipment, designed to handle liquid blowing agents soluble in chemical ingredients that mixed to make foam. Any polyurethane-based foams and several cellular plastics blown with these fluorinated ethers used in processes as diverse as small batch pours, large sprays, or double-band lamination to make insulation for private homes, commercial buildings, shipping containers, and storage tanks. Fluorinated ethers proved useful as replacements for CFC refrigerants and solvents.

  11. Ozone depletion in tropospheric volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, Alan; McGonigle, Andrew J. S.; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Stith, Jeffrey L.; Turnbull, Kate; von Glasow, Roland

    2010-11-01

    We measured ozone (O3) concentrations in the atmospheric plumes of the volcanoes St. Augustine (1976), Mt. Etna (2004, 2009) and Eyjafjallajökull (2010) and found O3 to be strongly depleted compared to the background at each volcano. At Mt. Etna O3 was depleted within tens of seconds from the crater, the age of the St. Augustine plumes was on the order of hours, whereas the O3 destruction in the plume of Eyjafjallajökull was maintained in 1-9 day old plumes. The most likely cause for this O3 destruction are catalytic bromine reactions as suggested by a model that manages to reproduce the very early destruction of O3 but also shows that O3 destruction is ongoing for several days. Given the observed rapid and sustained destruction of O3, heterogeneous loss of O3 on ash is unlikely to be important.

  12. Endoplasmic-Reticulum Calcium Depletion and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mekahli, Djalila; Bultynck, Geert; Parys, Jan B.; De Smedt, Humbert; Missiaen, Ludwig

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as an intracellular Ca2+ store not only sets up cytosolic Ca2+ signals, but, among other functions, also assembles and folds newly synthesized proteins. Alterations in ER homeostasis, including severe Ca2+ depletion, are an upstream event in the pathophysiology of many diseases. On the one hand, insufficient release of activator Ca2+ may no longer sustain essential cell functions. On the other hand, loss of luminal Ca2+ causes ER stress and activates an unfolded protein response, which, depending on the duration and severity of the stress, can reestablish normal ER function or lead to cell death. We will review these various diseases by mainly focusing on the mechanisms that cause ER Ca2+ depletion. PMID:21441595

  13. Assessment of Preferred Depleted Uranium Disposal Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Croff, A.G.; Hightower, J.R.; Lee, D.W.; Michaels, G.E.; Ranek, N.L.; Trabalka, J.R.

    2000-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of converting about 700,000 metric tons (MT) of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) containing 475,000 MT of depleted uranium (DU) to a stable form more suitable for long-term storage or disposal. Potential conversion forms include the tetrafluoride (DUF4), oxide (DUO2 or DU3O8), or metal. If worthwhile beneficial uses cannot be found for the DU product form, it will be sent to an appropriate site for disposal. The DU products are considered to be low-level waste (LLW) under both DOE orders and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The objective of this study was to assess the acceptability of the potential DU conversion products at potential LLW disposal sites to provide a basis for DOE decisions on the preferred DU product form and a path forward that will ensure reliable and efficient disposal.

  14. Depleted uranium plasma reduction system study

    SciTech Connect

    Rekemeyer, P.; Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.; Brown, B.W.

    1994-12-01

    A system life-cycle cost study was conducted of a preliminary design concept for a plasma reduction process for converting depleted uranium to uranium metal and anhydrous HF. The plasma-based process is expected to offer significant economic and environmental advantages over present technology. Depleted Uranium is currently stored in the form of solid UF{sub 6}, of which approximately 575,000 metric tons is stored at three locations in the U.S. The proposed system is preconceptual in nature, but includes all necessary processing equipment and facilities to perform the process. The study has identified total processing cost of approximately $3.00/kg of UF{sub 6} processed. Based on the results of this study, the development of a laboratory-scale system (1 kg/h throughput of UF6) is warranted. Further scaling of the process to pilot scale will be determined after laboratory testing is complete.

  15. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    Significant amounts of the depleted uranium (DU) created by past uranium enrichment activities have been sold, disposed of commercially, or utilized by defense programs. In recent years, however, the demand for DU has become quite small compared to quantities available, and within the US Department of Energy (DOE) there is concern for any risks and/or cost liabilities that might be associated with the ever-growing inventory of this material. As a result, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), was asked to review options and to develop a comprehensive plan for inventory management and the ultimate disposition of DU accumulated at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs). An Energy Systems task team, under the chairmanship of T. R. Lemons, was formed in late 1989 to provide advice and guidance for this task. This report reviews options and recommends actions and objectives in the management of working inventories of partially depleted feed (PDF) materials and for the ultimate disposition of fully depleted uranium (FDU). Actions that should be considered are as follows. (1) Inspect UF{sub 6} cylinders on a semiannual basis. (2) Upgrade cylinder maintenance and storage yards. (3) Convert FDU to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for long-term storage or disposal. This will include provisions for partial recovery of costs to offset those associated with DU inventory management and the ultimate disposal of FDU. Another recommendation is to drop the term tails'' in favor of depleted uranium'' or DU'' because the tails'' label implies that it is waste.'' 13 refs.

  16. Health Effects of Embedded Depleted Uranium Fragments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-24

    Canada Feasibility Studies of a Method for Determining Depleted Uranium Deposited in Human Limbs .................. 39 Gary S . Kramer and Erin S . Niven...International Defense Review, 27:39-46 4 Introduction to the Problem 11. Filszar RL, Wilsey EF, Bloore EW (1989) Ra- and bulk storage conditions. Richland, WA...MD, Report BRL-TR- 3068 19. Limits for intakes of radionuclides by workers (1981) Pergamon Press, N.Y., ICRP Publication 12. Wilsey EF, Bloore EW (1989

  17. Carbon sequestration in depleted oil shale deposits

    DOEpatents

    Burnham, Alan K; Carroll, Susan A

    2014-12-02

    A method and apparatus are described for sequestering carbon dioxide underground by mineralizing the carbon dioxide with coinjected fluids and minerals remaining from the extraction shale oil. In one embodiment, the oil shale of an illite-rich oil shale is heated to pyrolyze the shale underground, and carbon dioxide is provided to the remaining depleted oil shale while at an elevated temperature. Conditions are sufficient to mineralize the carbon dioxide.

  18. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, T.R.

    1991-12-31

    Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

  19. Depletion modeling of liquid dominated geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, G.

    1984-06-01

    Depletion models for liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs are derived and presented. The depletion models are divided into two categories: confined and unconfined. For both cases depletion models with no recharge (or influx), and depletion models including recharge, are used to match field data from the Svartsengi high temperature geothermal field in Iceland. The influx models included with the mass and energy balances are adopted from the petroleum engineering literature. The match to production data from Svartsengi is improved when influx was included. The Schilthuis steady-state influx gives a satisfactory match. The finite aquifer method of Fetkovitch, and the unsteady state method of Hurst gave reasonable answers, but not as good. The best match is obtained using Hurst simplified solution when lambda = 1.3 x 10{sup -4} m{sup -1}. From the match the cross-sectional area of the aquifer was calculated as 3.6 km{sup 2}. The drawdown was predicted using the Hurst simplified method, and compared with predicted drawdown from a boiling model and an empirical log-log model. A large difference between the models was obtained. The predicted drawdown using the Hurst simplified method falls between the other two. Injection has been considered by defining the net rate as being the production rate minus the injection rate. No thermal of transient effects were taken into account. Prediction using three different net rates shows that the pressure can be maintained using the Hurst simplified method if there is significant fluid reinjection. 32 refs., 44 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Capece, Angela M.; Katz, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al2O3 source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  1. Renal cortical pyruvate depletion during AKI.

    PubMed

    Zager, Richard A; Johnson, Ali C M; Becker, Kirsten

    2014-05-01

    Pyruvate is a key intermediary in energy metabolism and can exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the fate of pyruvate during AKI remains unknown. Here, we assessed renal cortical pyruvate and its major determinants (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, pyruvate dehydrogenase [PDH], and H2O2 levels) in mice subjected to unilateral ischemia (15-60 minutes; 0-18 hours of vascular reflow) or glycerol-induced ARF. The fate of postischemic lactate, which can be converted back to pyruvate by lactate dehydrogenase, was also addressed. Ischemia and glycerol each induced persistent pyruvate depletion. During ischemia, decreasing pyruvate levels correlated with increasing lactate levels. During early reperfusion, pyruvate levels remained depressed, but lactate levels fell below control levels, likely as a result of rapid renal lactate efflux. During late reperfusion and glycerol-induced AKI, pyruvate depletion corresponded with increased gluconeogenesis (pyruvate consumption). This finding was underscored by observations that pyruvate injection increased renal cortical glucose content in AKI but not normal kidneys. AKI decreased PDH levels, potentially limiting pyruvate to acetyl CoA conversion. Notably, pyruvate therapy mitigated the severity of AKI. This renoprotection corresponded with increases in cytoprotective heme oxygenase 1 and IL-10 mRNAs, selective reductions in proinflammatory mRNAs (e.g., MCP-1 and TNF-α), and improved tissue ATP levels. Paradoxically, pyruvate increased cortical H2O2 levels. We conclude that AKI induces a profound and persistent depletion of renal cortical pyruvate, which may induce additional injury.

  2. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Polk, James E. Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2016-01-14

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  3. Pumping test evaluation of stream depletion parameters.

    PubMed

    Lough, Hilary K; Hunt, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions are given of a pumping test and a corresponding analysis that permit calculation of all five hydrogeological parameters appearing in the Hunt (2003) solution for stream depletion caused by ground water abstraction from a well beside a stream. This solution assumes that flow in the pumped aquifer is horizontal, flow in the overlying aquitard or system of aquitards is vertical, and the free surface in the top aquitard is allowed to draw down. The definition of an aquitard in this paper is any layer with a vertical hydraulic conductivity much lower than the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the pumped aquifer. These "aquitards" may be reasonably permeable layers but are distinguished from the pumped aquifer by their hydraulic conductivity contrast. The pumping test requires a complete set of drawdown measurements from at least one observation well. This well must be deep enough to penetrate the pumped aquifer, and pumping must continue for a sufficient time to ensure that depleted streamflow becomes a significant portion of the well abstraction rate. Furthermore, two of the five parameters characterize an aquitard that overlies the pumped aquifer, and values for these parameters are seen to be dependent upon the initial water table elevation in the aquitard. The field test analyzed herein used a total of eight observation wells screened in the pumped aquifer, and measurements from these wells gave eight sets of parameters that are used in a sensitivity analysis to determine the relative importance of each parameter in the stream depletion calculations.

  4. Understanding the haling power depletion (HPD) method

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, S.; Blyth, T.; Ivanov, K.

    2012-07-01

    The Pennsylvania State Univ. (PSU) is using the university version of the Studsvik Scandpower Code System (CMS) for research and education purposes. Preparations have been made to incorporate the CMS into the PSU Nuclear Engineering graduate class 'Nuclear Fuel Management' course. The information presented in this paper was developed during the preparation of the material for the course. The Haling Power Depletion (HPD) was presented in the course for the first time. The HPD method has been criticized as not valid by many in the field even though it has been successfully applied at PSU for the past 20 years. It was noticed that the radial power distribution (RPD) for low leakage cores during depletion remained similar to that of the HPD during most of the cycle. Thus, the Haling Power Depletion (HPD) may be used conveniently mainly for low leakage cores. Studies were then made to better understand the HPD and the results are presented in this paper. Many different core configurations can be computed quickly with the HPD without using Burnable Poisons (BP) to produce several excellent low leakage core configurations that are viable for power production. Once the HPD core configuration is chosen for further analysis, techniques are available for establishing the BP design to prevent violating any of the safety constraints in such HPD calculated cores. In summary, in this paper it has been shown that the HPD method can be used for guiding the design for the low leakage core. (authors)

  5. 26 CFR 1.642(e)-1 - Depreciation and depletion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Depreciation and depletion. 1.642(e)-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.642(e)-1 Depreciation and depletion. An estate or trust is allowed the deductions for depreciation and depletion, but only to the extent...

  6. 26 CFR 52.4682-1 - Ozone-depleting chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ozone-depleting chemicals. 52.4682-1 Section 52... EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL TAXES § 52.4682-1 Ozone-depleting chemicals. (a) Overview. This section provides rules relating to the tax imposed on ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs) under section...

  7. 26 CFR 52.4682-1 - Ozone-depleting chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ozone-depleting chemicals. 52.4682-1 Section 52... EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL TAXES § 52.4682-1 Ozone-depleting chemicals. (a) Overview. This section provides rules relating to the tax imposed on ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs) under section...

  8. 26 CFR 52.4682-1 - Ozone-depleting chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ozone-depleting chemicals. 52.4682-1 Section 52... EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL TAXES § 52.4682-1 Ozone-depleting chemicals. (a) Overview. This section provides rules relating to the tax imposed on ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs) under section...

  9. 26 CFR 52.4682-1 - Ozone-depleting chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ozone-depleting chemicals. 52.4682-1 Section 52... EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL TAXES § 52.4682-1 Ozone-depleting chemicals. (a) Overview. This section provides rules relating to the tax imposed on ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs) under section...

  10. Children's Models of the Ozone Layer and Ozone Depletion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christidou, Vasilia; Koulaidis, Vasilis

    1996-01-01

    The views of 40 primary students on ozone and its depletion were recorded through individual, semi-structured interviews. The data analysis resulted in the formation of a limited number of models concerning the distribution and role of ozone in the atmosphere, the depletion process, and the consequences of ozone depletion. Identifies five target…

  11. Children's Models of the Ozone Layer and Ozone Depletion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christidou, Vasilia; Koulaidis, Vasilis

    1996-01-01

    The views of 40 primary students on ozone and its depletion were recorded through individual, semi-structured interviews. The data analysis resulted in the formation of a limited number of models concerning the distribution and role of ozone in the atmosphere, the depletion process, and the consequences of ozone depletion. Identifies five target…

  12. Potential For Stratospheric Ozone Depletion During Carboniferous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, M.; Goldstein, A. H.

    Methyl bromide (CH3Br) constitutes the largest source of bromine atoms to the strato- sphere whereas methyl chloride (CH3Cl) is the most abundant halocarbon in the tro- posphere. Both gases play an important role in stratospheric ozone depletion. For in- stance, Br coupled reactions are responsible for 30 to 50 % of total ozone loss in the polar vortex. Currently, the largest natural sources of CH3Br and CH3Cl appear to be biological production in the oceans, inorganic production during biomass burning and plant production in salt marsh ecosystems. Variations of paleofluxes of CH3Br and CH3Cl can be estimated by analyses of oceanic paleoproductivity, stratigraphic analyses of frequency and distribution of fossil charcoal indicating the occurrence of wildfires, and/or by paleoreconstruction indicating the extent of salt marshes. Dur- ing the lower Carboniferous time (Tournaisian-Visean), the southern margin of the Laurasian continent was characterized by charcoal deposits. Estimation on frequency of charcoal layers indicates that wildfires occur in a range of 3-35 years (Falcon-Lang 2000). This suggests that biomass burning could be an important source of CH3Br and CH3Cl during Tournaisian-Viesan time. During Tounaisian and until Merame- cian carbon and oxygen isotope records have short term oscillations (Bruckschen et al. 1999, Mii et al. 1999). Chesterian time (mid- Carboniferous) is marked by an in- crease in delta18O values ( ~ 2 permil) and an increase of glacial deposit frequency suggesting lower temperatures. The occurrence of glacial deposits over the paleopole suggests polar conditions and the associated special features of polar mete- orology such as strong circumpolar wind in the stratosphere (polar vortex) and polar stratospheric clouds. Thus, conditions leading to polar statospheric ozone depletion can be found. Simultaneously an increase in delta13C values is documented. We interpret the positive shift in delta13C as a result of higher bioproductivity

  13. Evolution of the Depleted Mantle--Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervoort, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    One of the basic tenets of radiogenic isotope geochemistry is that the Earth's crust has been extracted from the mantle leaving the mantle depleted in incompatible elements. Two tracers that have been used to constrain depleted mantle (DM) evolution are the long-lived radiogenic isotope systems Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf. It has long been assumed that Nd evolution of the depleted mantle follows a ~ linear path from chondritic composition (ɛNd = 0) at ~4.5 Ga to depleted MORB mantle (DMM) today (ɛNd = +10) [e.g., 1]. The Hf isotope system, before the revision of the 176Lu decay constant [2,3], appeared follow a similar evolution: chondritic at ~4.5 Ga to DMM today [4]. This relationship, however, changed radically with the revision of the 176Lu decay constant. Now, for the Lu-Hf isotope system, there is no evidence of a widespread depleted mantle prior to 3.5 Ga. Using the new decay constant and CHUR values [5], Hf data for juvenile, mantle-derived rocks through time define a trend that does not diverge from chondritic compositions until after 3.5 Ga. This new Hf DM evolution is defined by average DMM today (176Hf/177Hf = 0.28321, ɛHf =~ +15) and using 176Lu/177Hf = 0.0399 to calculate compositions back in time to CHUR at 3.5 Ga. The Hf-Nd isotope records, therefore, appear to indicate different evolutionary histories: Nd isotopes show evidence for widespread depleted mantle from the earliest preserved rocks [6] and; Hf isotopes show only chondritic to enriched sources for the oldest preserved rocks [7]. This "Hf-Nd paradox", if the reference frames are correct, would imply that differentiation of the early Earth affected the Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf systems in fundamentally differently ways-a premise that seems difficult to explain. A further complication in the Hf and Nd evolution of the Earth comes from the short-lived isotope system 146Sm-142Nd. An unavoidable consequence of the 142Nd data is that the silicate Earth sampled thus far has a super chondritic Sm/Nd composition [e

  14. A modern depleted uranium manufacturing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zagula, T.A.

    1995-07-01

    The Specific Manufacturing Capabilities (SMC) Project located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and operated by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co. (LMIT) for the Department of Energy (DOE) manufactures depleted uranium for use in the U.S. Army MIA2 Abrams Heavy Tank Armor Program. Since 1986, SMC has fabricated more than 12 million pounds of depleted uranium (DU) products in a multitude of shapes and sizes with varying metallurgical properties while maintaining security, environmental, health and safety requirements. During initial facility design in the early 1980`s, emphasis on employee safety, radiation control and environmental consciousness was gaining momentum throughout the DOE complex. This fact coupled with security and production requirements forced design efforts to focus on incorporating automation, local containment and computerized material accountability at all work stations. The result was a fully automated production facility engineered to manufacture DU armor packages with virtually no human contact while maintaining security, traceability and quality requirements. This hands off approach to handling depleted uranium resulted in minimal radiation exposures and employee injuries. Construction of the manufacturing facility was complete in early 1986 with the first armor package certified in October 1986. Rolling facility construction was completed in 1987 with the first certified plate produced in the fall of 1988. Since 1988 the rolling and manufacturing facilities have delivered more than 2600 armor packages on schedule with 100% final product quality acceptance. During this period there was an annual average of only 2.2 lost time incidents and a single individual maximum radiation exposure of 150 mrem. SMC is an example of designing and operating a facility that meets regulatory requirements with respect to national security, radiation control and personnel safety while achieving production schedules and product quality.

  15. Pumping induced depletion from two streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dongmin; Zhan, Hongbin

    2007-04-01

    We have proved that the Hantush's model [Hantush MS. Wells near streams with semipervious beds. J Geophys Res 1965;70:2829-38] in a half-domain can be extended to a whole-domain and becomes identical to that of Hunt [Hunt B. Unsteady stream depletion from ground water pumping. Ground Water 1999;37(1):98-102] for a shallow and infinitely narrow stream, provided that the Dupuit assumption is adopted. This proof helps correct a false concept that regards the Hantush's model as less useful because of its fully penetrating stream assumption. This study deals with interaction of an aquifer with two parallel streams based on the Hantush's model. Semi-analytical solutions are obtained based on rigorous mass conservation requirement by maintaining continuity of flux and head along the aquifer-streambed boundaries. This study shows that the hydraulic conductivity ratio of the two streambeds appears to be the most important factor controlling the stream-aquifer interaction, followed by a less important role played by the thickness ratio of the two streambeds. When the low-permeability streambeds do not exist, the steady-state stream depletion from one stream is linearly proportional to the ratio of the shortest distance from the pumping well to the other stream over the shortest distance between the two streams. When the low-permeability streambeds are presented, similar conclusion can be drawn except that the stream depletion now also strongly depends on the hydraulic conductivity ratio of the two streambeds. When the values of the hydraulic conductivity of the two streambeds are different by an order of magnitude, the location of the pumping well that receives equal flux from two streams can be off the middle-line between the two streams by nearly 90%.

  16. Zn2+ depletion blocks endosome fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Aballay, A; Sarrouf, M N; Colombo, M I; Stahl, P D; Mayorga, L S

    1995-01-01

    Fusion among endosomes is an important step for transport and sorting of internalized macromolecules. Working in a cell-free system, we previously reported that endosome fusion requires cytosol and ATP, and is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide. Fusion is regulated by monomeric and heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins. We now report that fusion can proceed at very low Ca2+ concentrations, i.e. < 30 nM. Moreover, fusion is not affected when intravesicular Ca2+ is depleted by preincubation of vesicles with calcium ionophores (5 microM ionomycin or A23187) in the presence of calcium chelators (5 mM EGTA or 60 mM EDTA). The results indicate that fusion can proceed at extremely low concentrations of intravesicular and extravesicular Ca2+. However, BAPTA [1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid], a relatively specific Ca2+ chelator, inhibits fusion. BAPTA binds other metals besides Ca2+. We present evidence that BAPTA inhibition is due not to Ca2+ chelation but to Zn2+ depletion. TPEN [N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine], another metal-ion chelator with low affinity for Ca2+, also inhibited fusion. TPEN- and BAPTA-inhibited fusions were restored by addition of Zn2+. Zn(2+)-dependent fusion presents the same characteristics as control fusion. In intact cells, TPEN inhibited transport along the endocytic pathway. The results indicate that Zn2+ depletion blocks endosome fusion, suggesting that this ion is necessary for the function of one or more factors involved in the fusion process. Images Figure 1 PMID:8554539

  17. Rhenium Disulfide Depletion-Load Inverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClellan, Connor; Corbet, Chris; Rai, Amritesh; Movva, Hema C. P.; Tutuc, Emanuel; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2015-03-01

    Many semiconducting Transition Metal Dichalcogenide (TMD) materials have been effectively used to create Field-Effect Transistor (FET) devices but have yet to be used in logic designs. We constructed a depletion-load voltage inverter using ultrathin layers of Rhenium Disulfide (ReS2) as the semiconducting channel. This ReS2 inverter was fabricated on a single micromechanically-exfoliated flake of ReS2. Electron beam lithography and physical vapor deposition were used to construct Cr/Au electrical contacts, an Alumina top-gate dielectric, and metal top-gate electrodes. By using both low (Aluminum) and high (Palladium) work-function metals as two separate top-gates on a single ReS2 flake, we create a dual-gated depletion mode (D-mode) and enhancement mode (E-mode) FETs in series. Both FETs displayed current saturation in the output characteristics as a result of the FET ``pinch-off'' mechanism and On/Off current ratios of 105. Field-effect mobilities of 23 and 17 cm2V-1s-1 and subthreshold swings of 97 and 551 mV/decade were calculated for the E-mode and D-mode FETs, respectively. With a supply voltage of 1V, at low/negative input voltages the inverter output was at a high logic state of 900 mV. Conversely with high/positive input voltages, the inverter output was at a low logic state of 500 mV. The inversion of the input signal demonstrates the potential for using ReS2 in future integrated circuit designs and the versatility of depletion-load logic devices for TMD research. NRI SWAN Center and ARL STTR Program.

  18. Scientific assessment of ozone depletion: 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Over the past few years, there have been highly significant advances in the understanding of the impact of human activities on the Earth's stratospheric ozone layer and the influence of changes in chemical composition of the radiative balance of the climate system. Specifically, since the last international scientific review (1989), there have been five major advances: (1) global ozone decreases; (2) polar ozone; (3) ozone and industrial halocarbons; (4) ozone and climate relations; and (5) ozone depletion potentials (ODP's) and global warming potentials (GWP's). These topics and others are discussed.

  19. Ozone Depletion and Biologically Relevant Ultraviolet Radiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jun

    1995-01-01

    An atmospheric radiative transfer model is used to calculate surface spectral ultraviolet irradiance under cloud-free conditions, and compared with measurements made at Lauder, New Zealand (45^circ{S }, 170^circ{E}) before and after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, and including a snow-covered surface. The ratios of diffuse to direct irradiance depend critically on solar elevation, surface albedo, and aerosol extinction. Ozone changes have pronounced effects on the global UVB irradiance, but have only a minor effect on these ratios. The comparison suggests that the ultraviolet radiation exposure can be computed with confidence for clear sky conditions, if the appropriate atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles, ozonesonde data, surface albedo, and aerosol optical properties are available. The total ozone abundances are derived by using ground-based UV irradiance measurements and compared with TOMS in Antarctica and the Arctic from 1990 to 1994. The comparisons show that they are generally in good agreement. Possible reasons for the discrepancies between the two methods are discussed. The equivalent cloud optical depths are also inferred from these data. Ozone depletion can also increase the penetration of ultraviolet radiation into the aquatic system. A coupled atmosphere-ocean radiative transfer model is used to investigate the effect of ozone depletion on UV penetration through the atmosphere and into the underlying water column. Comparisons between model computations and in situ measurements of irradiances made in Antarctic water show good agreement in the UV spectral range between 300 and 350 nm. The ratio of UVB (280-320 nm) to total (280-700 nm) irradiance also compared well. For a given ozone reduction the largest relative increase of UVB radiation arriving at the surface and penetrating to various depths in the ocean occurs at large solar zenith angles. At high latitudes the most pronounced increase in UVB exposure due to an ozone depletion occurs in the

  20. Depletion of the Outer Asteroid Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Malhotra, Renu

    1997-01-01

    During the early history of the solar system, it is likely that the outer planets changed their distance from the sun, and hence, their influence on the asteroid belt evolved with time. The gravitational influence of Jupiter and Saturn on the orbital evolution of asteroids in the outer asteroid belt was calculated. The results show that the sweeping of mean motion resonances associated with planetary migration efficiently destabilizes orbits in the outer asteroid belt on a time scale of 10 million years. This mechanism provides an explanation for the observed depletion of asteroids in that region.

  1. Ozone depletion: implications for the veterinarian.

    PubMed

    Kopecky, K E

    1978-09-15

    Man has inadvertently modified the stratosphere. There is a good possibility that the ozone layer is being depleted by the use of jet aircraft (SST), chlorofluoromethane propellants, and nitrogen fertilizers. Under unpolluted conditions, the production of ozone equals its destruction. By man's intervention, however, the destruction may exceed the production. The potential outcome is increased intensity of solar ultraviolet (280-400 nm) radiation and penetration to the earth's surface of previously absorbed wavelengths below about 280 nm. The increased ultraviolet radiation would increase the likelihood of skin cancer in man and ocular squamous cell carcinoma in cattle. The climate also might be modified, possibly in an undesirable way.

  2. Depletion of the Outer Asteroid Belt

    PubMed

    Liou; Malhotra

    1997-01-17

    During the early history of the solar system, it is likely that the outer planets changed their distance from the sun, and hence, their influence on the asteroid belt evolved with time. The gravitational influence of Jupiter and Saturn on the orbital evolution of asteroids in the outer asteroid belt was calculated. The results show that the sweeping of mean motion resonances associated with planetary migration efficiently destabilizes orbits in the outer asteroid belt on a time scale of 10 million years. This mechanism provides an explanation for the observed depletion of asteroids in that region.

  3. Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

    2004-10-19

    In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

  4. Correlation between cosmic rays and ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Lu, Q-B

    2009-03-20

    This Letter reports reliable satellite data in the period of 1980-2007 covering two full 11-yr cosmic ray (CR) cycles, clearly showing the correlation between CRs and ozone depletion, especially the polar ozone loss (hole) over Antarctica. The results provide strong evidence of the physical mechanism that the CR-driven electron-induced reaction of halogenated molecules plays the dominant role in causing the ozone hole. Moreover, this mechanism predicts one of the severest ozone losses in 2008-2009 and probably another large hole around 2019-2020, according to the 11-yr CR cycle.

  5. Commercialisation of full depletion scientific CCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorden, Paul; Ball, Kevin; Bell, Ray; Burt, David; Guyatt, Neil; Hadfield, Kevin; Jerram, Paul; Pool, Peter; Pike, Andrew; Holland, Andrew; Murray, Neil

    2006-06-01

    Following successful manufacture of small-format trial devices we have now designed and manufactured large-format scientific CCDs in high resistivity silicon ('high-rho'). These devices are intended for 'full depletion' operation as backside illuminated sensors for very high red wavelength sensitivity and X-ray imaging spectroscopy at extended energies. Devices of 2k*512 and 2k*4k format, with both single and dual stage output circuits have been manufactured and tested. Design considerations, test results, and commercial manufacturing considerations will be addressed.

  6. Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Thacker, Louis H.; Fine, H. Alan

    1993-01-01

    An instrument for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets 12, the packets 12 having a wall 14 sufficiently thin that it can be deformed by the application of an external vacuum to small area thereof. The instrument has a detector head 18 for placement against the deformable wall 14 of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall 14, with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe 20. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector 26. An abrupt change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the vacuum applied through the head 18 to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum Within the packet 12. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum reference plate 44 is placed beneath the packet 12 to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface 16 of the packet. A packet production line model is also described.

  7. Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, T.G.; Thacker, L.H.; Fine, H.A.

    1993-10-05

    An instrument is described for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets, the packets having a wall sufficiently thin that it can be deformed by the application of an external vacuum to small area thereof. The instrument has a detector head for placement against the deformable wall of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall, with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector. An abrupt change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the vacuum applied through the head to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum within the packet. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum reference plate is placed beneath the packet to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface of the packet. A packet production line model is also described. 3 figures.

  8. Friction Stir Welded Thin Wall Cryogenic Tank Skins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, David M.; Takeshita, Jennifer A.; Holguin, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    A cryogenic propellant tank is the common element of trans-planetary transportation systems, in-space storage depots, lunar landers, in-space habitats/laboratories, ascent/descent, and launch vehicles. Lockheed Martin's (LM) cryogenic tank approach integrates Friction Stir Welding (FSW) with thin-gage aluminum monocoque structural design, common spin formed FSW domes and variable tank lengths to tailor the cryogenic tank from smaller stages, such as landers or ascent/descent stages, to very large on-orbit or In Space Resource Utilization (ISRU) storage systems. Thin gage corrosion resistant steel (CRES) construction combined with normal fusion welding as used on LM's Centaur has already been demonstrated to provide the highest cryogenic tank mass fraction (~.90) for large scale, cryogenic propellant storage. However, current fusion welding technology is limited by the alloys that are considered weldable and typically achieves only 50% of the parent material ultimate strength at the weld joint. Preliminary LM technology development indicates that in certain aluminum alloys, the FSW joint retains up to 100% of the parent material ultimate strength at LH2 temperatures. Combining FSW and aluminum monocoque tank design would create a large scale cryogenic tank with a mass fraction in excess of the current industry standard and therefore is ideal for affordable, reliable, high capacity propellant storage required for all facets of space exploration.

  9. Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Thacker, Louis H.; Fine, H. Alan

    1995-01-01

    An instrument for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets 12, the packets 12 having a wall 14 that it can be deformed by the application of an external dynamic vacuum to an area thereof. The instrument has a detector head 18 for placement against the deformable wall 14 of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall 14, with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe 20. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector 26. A change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the dynamic vacuum applied through the head be to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum within the packet 12. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum plate 44 is placed beneath the packet 12 to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface 16 of the packet. A vacuum can be applied to a recess in this vacuum plate, the value of which can be used to calibrate the vacuum transducer in the detector head.

  10. Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, T.G.; Thacker, L.H.; Fine, H.A.

    1995-04-18

    An instrument is disclosed for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets, the packets having a wall that it can be deformed by the application of an external dynamic vacuum to an area thereof. The instrument has a detector head for placement against the deformable wall of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector. A change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the dynamic vacuum applied through the head be to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum within the packet. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum plate is placed beneath the packet to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface of the packet. A vacuum can be applied to a recess in this vacuum plate, the value of which can be used to calibrate the vacuum transducer in the detector head. 4 figs.

  11. Production of Thin Walled Mo Tubing using FBCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Usov, Igor Olegovich

    2015-06-02

    The goal of this report is to demonstrate our progress towards producing free standing Mo tubing with length up to 12” and wall thickness of 250 µm. Fabrication conditions corresponding to growth of fine grain and high purity Mo material were chosen based on previous work. We focused our effort on execution of prolonged deposition processes and optimization of the FBCVD set up. Our results demonstrated that 12” long Mo tubing can be fabricated by our process. At this point the 12” tube fractured in the middle and resulted in two pieces. Further improvement in one of the fabrication steps will eliminate this drawback. We were not able to produce a tube with 250 µm wall thickness so far. The deposition rate was intentionally kept low (5-6 µm/hr) to form material with fine grain microstructure. Therefore a ~50 hour long deposition run is required to achieve such a wall thickness value, which is quite challenging for the current manually operated FBCVD apparatus. Automation of the set-up is now underway to overcome this problem.

  12. Thermal postbuckling of thin-walled composite stiffeners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    A study is made of the thermal postbuckling response of composite stiffeners subjected to prescribed edge displacement and a temperature rise. The flanges and web of the stiffeners are modeled by using two-dimensional plate finite elements. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the generalized displacements and the stress resultants of the plate. A reduction method is used in conjunction with mixed finite element models for determining the postbuckling response of the stiffeners. Sensitivity derivatives are evaluated and used to study the effects of variations in the different lamination and material parameters of the stiffeners on their postbuckling response characteristics. Numerical studies are presented for anisotropic stiffeners with Zee and channel sections.

  13. Characterization of Thin Walled Mo Tubing produced by FBCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Beaux, Miles Frank; Usov, Igor Olegovich

    2016-01-21

    The goal of this report is to delineate the results of material characterization performed on Mo tubing produced via the fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition (FBCVD) method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging reveals that small randomly oriented grains are achieved in the Mo deposition, but do not persist throughout the entire thickness of the material. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) reveals the Mo tubes contain residual chlorine and oxygen. EDS measurements on the tube surfaces separated from glass and quartz substrates reveal substrate material adhered to this surface. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed the presence of carbon contaminant in the form of Mo2C and oxygen in the form of MoO2. Combustion infrared detection (CID) and inert gas fusion (IGF) performed at Luvak Inc. was used to quantify weight percentages of oxygen and carbon in the tubes produced. Hardness value of the FBCVD Mo was found to be comparable to low carbon arc cast molybdenum.

  14. Disturbance amplification in boundary layers over thin wall films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sandeep; Page, Jacob; Zaki, Tamer A.

    2016-02-01

    In single-fluid boundary layers, streaks can amplify at sub-critical Reynolds numbers and initiate early transition to turbulence. Introducing a wall film of different viscosities can appreciably alter the stability of the base flow and, in particular, the transient growth of the perturbation streaks. The formalism of seminorms is used to identify optimal disturbances which maximize the kinetic energy in the two-fluid flow. An examination of optimal growth over a range of viscosity ratios of the film relative to the outer flow reveals three distinct regimes of amplification, each associated with a particular combination of the eigenfunctions. In order to elucidate the underlying amplification mechanisms, a model problem is formulated: An initial value problem is solved using an eigenfunction expansion and is used to compute the evolution of pairs of eigenfunctions. By appropriately selecting the pair, the initial value problem qualitatively reproduces the temporal evolution of the optimal disturbance, and provides an unambiguous explanation of the dynamics. Two regimes of transient growth are attributed to the evolution of the interface mode along with free-stream vortical modes; the third regime is due to the evolution of the interface and a discrete mode. The results demonstrate that a lower-viscosity film can effectively reduce the efficacy of the lift-up mechanism and, as a result, transient growth of disturbances. However, another mechanism of amplification of wall-normal vorticity arises due to the deformation of the two-fluid interface and becomes dominant below a critical viscosity ratio.

  15. 30MM GAU-8 Thin-Wall Steel Cartridge Case

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-04-01

    t o u t U r o - - Q.~( (A4-C SEL i 4- J - 0-c CD C o C 4 - o)C E rlr- Lo IC - M" a) O k o to to to it k C O t L I La 0 a) aa LO aI...u - - C’-)C’ c4 r41 C - 4J - 4) 4- - %0JL 0)) Ln LA c’-) CL.0-0) CL 0L0) C’-) c’) C’.4 OJ 4+) 4-’ 43 CV) CV) 410 e% j CJ C~i C% j ( 0 (A e.j 0 00 a, t ...1 Lz. 4 ca + j * -- ~ ~ ~ 0 ~ a x- 0- E CD C> r UL U.- a Q** =: t LLJ ) L.).u LL. L U.. a4. 0 ~ a LIi r- 4C-),: 4-

  16. 30 MM GAU-8 Thin-Wall Steel Cartridge Case

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    transverse rupture. Examina- tion for internal stretch marks showed the 0.51-pound design with Mader finish the preferred design with no stretch marks in...normal type tests, and stretch marks less severe than for aluminum cases in "wet" tests, with high pressure cartridges preceded by cold frosted... stretch marks were more evident with the alternate DeBeers, 30 percent Teflon4 type of finish. This report covers design analysis of the various cases

  17. Leakproof Swaged Joints in Thin-Wall Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuckenberg, F. H.; Crockett, L. K.; Snyder, W. E.

    1986-01-01

    Tubular inserts reinforce joints, reducing incidence of leaks. In new swaging technique, tubular inserts placed inside ends of both tubes to be joined. Made from thicker-wall tubing with outside diameter that matches inside diameter of thin tubing swaged, inserts support tube ends at joint. They ensure more uniform contact between swage fitting and tubing. New swaging technique developed for Al/Ti/V-alloy hydraulic supply lines.

  18. Laser Welding Of Contoured Thin-Wall Housings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegel, Lyle B.; Oleksiak, Carl E.

    1991-01-01

    Superalloy parts joined with less distortion. Carbon dioxide laser beam directed by optics in numerically controlled robot arm welds shell-type turbopump housings having complicated shapes. 5-kW laser, following single programmed three-dimensional pass, produces high-quality, full-penetration weld pass in age-hardenable nickel superalloy. Operator easily programs robot by using teaching pendant to track weld joint and keeps laser focused on workpiece while following contour of shell. Shells welded in rapid succession, with minimal change in setup for each.

  19. Laser Welding Of Contoured Thin-Wall Housings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegel, Lyle B.; Oleksiak, Carl E.

    1991-01-01

    Superalloy parts joined with less distortion. Carbon dioxide laser beam directed by optics in numerically controlled robot arm welds shell-type turbopump housings having complicated shapes. 5-kW laser, following single programmed three-dimensional pass, produces high-quality, full-penetration weld pass in age-hardenable nickel superalloy. Operator easily programs robot by using teaching pendant to track weld joint and keeps laser focused on workpiece while following contour of shell. Shells welded in rapid succession, with minimal change in setup for each.

  20. Formation of thin walled ceramic solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Claar, Terry D.; Busch, Donald E.; Picciolo, John J.

    1989-01-01

    To reduce thermal stress and improve bonding in a high temperature monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), intermediate layers are provided between the SOFC's electrodes and electrolyte which are of different compositions. The intermediate layers are comprised of a blend of some of the materials used in the electrode and electrolyte compositions. Particle size is controlled to reduce problems involving differential shrinkage rates of the various layers when the entire structure is fired at a single temperature, while pore formers are provided in the electrolyte layers to be removed during firing for the formation of desired pores in the electrode layers. Each layer includes a binder in the form of a thermosetting acrylic which during initial processing is cured to provide a self-supporting structure with the ceramic components in the green state. A self-supporting corrugated structure is thus formed prior to firing, which the organic components of the binder and plasticizer removed during firing to provide a high strength, high temperature resistant ceramic structure of low weight and density.

  1. Simulations and observations of plasma depletion, ion composition, and airglow emissions in two auroral ionospheric depletion experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yau, A. W.; Whalen, B. A.; Harris, F. R.; Gattinger, R. L.; Pongratz, M. B.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of plasma depletion, ion composition modification, and airglow emissions in the Waterhole experiments are presented. The detailed ion chemistry and airglow emission processes related to the ionospheric hole formation in the experiment are examined, and observations are compared with computer simulation results. The latter indicate that the overall depletion rates in different parts of the depletion region are governed by different parameters.

  2. Decline and depletion rates of oil production: a comprehensive investigation.

    PubMed

    Höök, Mikael; Davidsson, Simon; Johansson, Sheshti; Tang, Xu

    2014-01-13

    Two of the most fundamental concepts in the current debate about future oil supply are oilfield decline rates and depletion rates. These concepts are related, but not identical. This paper clarifies the definitions of these concepts, summarizes the underlying theory and empirically estimates decline and depletion rates for different categories of oilfield. A database of 880 post-peak fields is analysed to determine typical depletion levels, depletion rates and decline rates. This demonstrates that the size of oilfields has a significant influence on decline and depletion rates, with generally high values for small fields and comparatively low values for larger fields. These empirical findings have important implications for oil supply forecasting.

  3. Ego depletion results in an increase in spontaneous false memories.

    PubMed

    Otgaar, Henry; Alberts, Hugo; Cuppens, Lesly

    2012-12-01

    The primary aim of the current study was to examine whether depleted cognitive resources might have ramifications for the formation of neutral and negative spontaneous false memories. To examine this, participants received neutral and negative Deese/Roediger-McDermott false memory wordlists. Also, for half of the participants, cognitive resources were depleted by use of an ego depletion manipulation (solving difficult calculations while being interfered with auditory noise). Our chief finding was that depleted cognitive resources made participants more vulnerable for the production of false memories. Our results shed light on how depleted cognitive resources affect neutral and negative correct and errant memories.

  4. Halocarbon ozone depletion and global warming potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Richard A.; Wuebbles, D.; Atkinson, R.; Connell, Peter S.; Dorn, H. P.; Derudder, A.; Derwent, Richard G.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Fisher, D.; Isaksen, Ivar S. A.

    1990-01-01

    Concern over the global environmental consequences of fully halogenated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) has created a need to determine the potential impacts of other halogenated organic compounds on stratospheric ozone and climate. The CFCs, which do not contain an H atom, are not oxidized or photolyzed in the troposphere. These compounds are transported into the stratosphere where they decompose and can lead to chlorine catalyzed ozone depletion. The hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs or HFCs), in particular those proposed as substitutes for CFCs, contain at least one hydrogen atom in the molecule, which confers on these compounds a much greater sensitivity toward oxidation by hydroxyl radicals in the troposphere, resulting in much shorter atmospheric lifetimes than CFCs, and consequently lower potential for depleting ozone. The available information is reviewed which relates to the lifetime of these compounds (HCFCs and HFCs) in the troposphere, and up-to-date assessments are reported of the potential relative effects of CFCs, HCFCs, HFCs, and halons on stratospheric ozone and global climate (through 'greenhouse' global warming).

  5. Convective Polymer Depletion on Pair Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Tai-Hsi; Taniguchi, Takashi; Tuinier, Remco

    2011-11-01

    Understanding transport, reaction, aggregation, and viscoelastic properties of colloid-polymer mixture is of great importance in food, biomedical, and pharmaceutical sciences. In non-adsorbing polymer solutions, colloidal particles tend to aggregate due to the depletion-induced osmotic or entropic force. Our early development for the relative mobility of pair particles assumed that polymer reorganization around the particles is much faster than particle's diffusive time, so that the coupling of diffusive and convective effects can be neglected. Here we present a nonequilibrium two-fluid (polymer and solvent) model to resolve the convective depletion effect. The theoretical framework is based on ground state approximation and accounts for the coupling of fluid flow and polymer transport to better describe pair particle interactions. The momentum and polymer transport, chemical potential, and local viscosity and osmotic pressure are simultaneously solved by numerical approximation. This investigation is essential for predicting the demixing kinetics in the pairwise regime for colloid-polymer mixtures. This work is supported by NSF CMMI 0952646.

  6. Imaging neurotransmitter uptake and depletion in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, W. |; Haydon, P.G.; Yeung, E.S.

    1997-08-01

    An ultraviolet (UV) laser-based optical microscope and charge-coupled device (CCD) detection system was used to obtain chemical images of biological cells. Subcellular structures can be easily seen in both optical and fluorescence images. Laser-induced native fluorescence detection provides high sensitivity and low limits of detection, and it does not require coupling to fluorescent dyes. We were able to quantitatively monitor serotonin that has been taken up into and released from individual astrocytes on the basis of its native fluorescence. Different regions of the cells took up different amounts of serotonin with a variety of uptake kinetics. Similarly, we observed different serotonin depletion dynamics in different astrocyte regions. There were also some astrocyte areas where no serotonin uptake or depletion was observed. Potential applications include the mapping of other biogenic species in cells as well as the ability to image their release from specific regions of cells in response to external stimuli. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  7. Stratospheric ozone depletion and animal health.

    PubMed

    Mayer, S J

    1992-08-08

    There is an increasing concern over ozone depletion and its effects on the environment and human health. However, the increase in ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) that would result from significant losses of ozone is also potentially harmful to animals. Any increase in disease in domestic species would not only have serious animal welfare implications but may also be economically important. The diseases which are likely to increase if ozone depletion continues include the squamous cell carcinomas of the exposed, non-pigmented areas of cats, cattle, sheep and horses. Uberreiter's syndrome in dogs is also associated with exposure to UV-B and may be expected to increase, as may the severity of conditions such as infectious keratoconjunctivitis (New Forest eye) in cattle. Aquaculture systems in which fish often have little or no protection by shading may also be at risk. Cataracts and skin lesions have been associated with the exposure of farmed fish to ultraviolet radiation and have resulted in significant losses.

  8. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy with optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lu

    Imaging at the nanoscale and/or at remote locations holds great promise for studies in fields as disparate as the life sciences and materials sciences. One such microscopy technique, stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, is one of several fluorescence based imaging techniques that offers resolution beyond the diffraction-limit. All current implementations of STED microscopy, however, involve the use of free-space beam shaping devices to achieve the Gaussian- and donut-shaped Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) carrying beams at the desired colors -- a challenging prospect from the standpoint of device assembly and mechanical stability during operation. A fiber-based solution could address these engineering challenges, and perhaps more interestingly, it may facilitate endoscopic implementation of in vivo STED imaging, a prospect that has thus far not been realized because optical fibers were previously considered to be incapable of transmitting the OAM beams that are necessary for STED. In this thesis, we investigate fiber-based STED systems to enable endoscopic nanoscale imaging. We discuss the design and characteristics of a novel class of fibers supporting and stably propagating Gaussian and OAM modes. Optimization of the design parameters leads to stable excitation and depletion beams propagating in the same fiber in the visible spectral range, for the first time, with high efficiency (>99%) and mode purity (>98%). Using the fabricated vortex fiber, we demonstrate an all-fiber STED system with modes that are tolerant to perturbations, and we obtain naturally self-aligned PSFs for the excitation and depletion beams. Initial experiments of STED imaging using our device yields a 4-fold improvement in lateral resolution compared to confocal imaging. In an experiment in parallel, we show the means of using q-plates as free-space mode converters that yield alignment tolerant STED microscopy systems at wavelengths covering the entire visible spectrum, and hence

  9. Seasonal iron depletion in temperate shelf seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birchill, Antony J.; Milne, Angela; Woodward, E. Malcolm S.; Harris, Carolyn; Annett, Amber; Rusiecka, Dagmara; Achterberg, Eric P.; Gledhill, Martha; Ussher, Simon J.; Worsfold, Paul J.; Geibert, Walter; Lohan, Maeve C.

    2017-09-01

    Our study followed the seasonal cycling of soluble (SFe), colloidal (CFe), dissolved (DFe), total dissolvable (TDFe), labile particulate (LPFe), and total particulate (TPFe) iron in the Celtic Sea (NE Atlantic Ocean). Preferential uptake of SFe occurred during the spring bloom, preceding the removal of CFe. Uptake and export of Fe during the spring bloom, coupled with a reduction in vertical exchange, led to Fe deplete surface waters (<0.2 nM DFe; 0.11 nM LPFe, 0.45 nM TDFe, and 1.84 nM TPFe) during summer stratification. Below the seasonal thermocline, DFe concentrations increased from spring to autumn, mirroring NO3- and consistent with supply from remineralized sinking organic material, and cycled independently of particulate Fe over seasonal timescales. These results demonstrate that summer Fe availability is comparable to the seasonally Fe limited Ross Sea shelf and therefore is likely low enough to affect phytoplankton growth and species composition.

  10. Chemical and radiological toxicity of depleted uranium.

    PubMed

    Sztajnkrycer, Matthew D; Otten, Edward J

    2004-03-01

    A by-product of the uranium enrichment process, depleted uranium (DU) contains approximately 40% of the radioactivity of natural uranium yet retains all of its chemical properties. After its use in the 1991 Gulf War, public concern increased regarding its potential radiotoxicant properties. Whereas in vitro and rodent data have suggested the potential for uranium-induced carcinogenesis, human cohort studies assessing the health effects of natural and DU have failed to validate these findings. Heavy-metal nephrotoxicity has not been noted in either animal studies or Gulf War veteran cohort studies despite markedly elevated urinary uranium excretion. No significant residual environmental contamination has been found in geographical areas exposed to DU. As such, although continued surveillance of exposed cohorts and environments (particularly water sources) are recommended, current data would support the position that DU poses neither a radiological nor chemical threat.

  11. Ozone depletion following future volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eric Klobas, J.; Wilmouth, David M.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Anderson, James G.; Salawitch, Ross J.

    2017-07-01

    While explosive volcanic eruptions cause ozone loss in the current atmosphere due to an enhancement in the availability of reactive chlorine following the stratospheric injection of sulfur, future eruptions are expected to increase total column ozone as halogen loading approaches preindustrial levels. The timing of this shift in the impact of major volcanic eruptions on the thickness of the ozone layer is poorly known. Modeling four possible climate futures, we show that scenarios with the smallest increase in greenhouse gas concentrations lead to the greatest risk to ozone from heterogeneous chemical processing following future eruptions. We also show that the presence in the stratosphere of bromine from natural, very short-lived biogenic compounds is critically important for determining whether future eruptions will lead to ozone depletion. If volcanic eruptions inject hydrogen halides into the stratosphere, an effect not considered in current ozone assessments, potentially profound reductions in column ozone would result.

  12. Magnesium depletion enhances cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lajer, H; Kristensen, M; Hansen, H H; Nielsen, S; Frøkiaer, J; Ostergaard, L F; Christensen, S; Daugaard, G; Jonassen, T E N

    2005-11-01

    Nephrotoxicity and magnesium (Mg)-depletion are well-known side effects to cisplatin (CP) treatment. The purpose of this present study was to investigate the role of Mg on CP induced changes in renal function. CP induced renal dysfunction was achieved by treatment with CP or vehicle (2.5 mg/kg) once weekly for 3 weeks. Since the CP-induced renal damage, including tubular reabsorption defects, is most prominent within the outer medulla (OM), changes in the expression pattern of OM aquaporins and sodium transporters including the Na,K-ATPase (alpha-subunit), type III Na,H-exchanger (NHE3), aquaporin 1 (AQP1) and 2 (AQP2) and the Na,K,2Cl-cotransporter (NKCC2) were investigated by semi-quantitative Western blotting. Rats had access to either a diet with standard Mg or to a Mg-depleted diet. Cisplatin was administered to female Wistar rats once a week for 3 weeks according to four regimens: (1) Cisplatin 2.5 mg/kg body weight i.p., to rats on a diet with standard Mg, (2) Cisplatin 2.5 mg/kg body weight i.p., to rats on a diet with low Mg, (3) Isotonic NaCl 2.5 ml/kg body weight i.p., to rats on a diet with standard Mg, (4) Isotonic NaCl 2.5 ml/kg body weight i.p., to rats on a diet with low Mg. CP had no effect on plasma creatinine or urea in rats with standard Mg intake, but the expression of all five transporters was significantly reduced when compared to vehicle treated rats on standard Mg-intake. Vehicle treated rats on low Mg-intake had a significant reduction in the expression of Na,K-ATPase, NHE3 and NKCC2, but unchanged expression levels of AQP1 or AQP2 when compared to standard treated controls. Forty percent of the CP-treated rats on low Mg-intake died during the experiment and the remaining animals had marked increased plasma creatinine and urea. Furthermore, the Western blot analysis revealed an almost complete disappearance of all four transporters, suggesting a dramatic synergistic effect of CP and Mg-depletion on renal function including the expression

  13. Processing depleted uranium quad alloy penetrator rods

    SciTech Connect

    Bokan, S.L.

    1987-02-19

    Two depleted uranium (DU) quad alloys were cast, extruded and rolled to produce penetrator rods. The two alloy combinations were (1) 1 wt % molybdenum (Mo), 1 wt % niobium (Nb), and 0.75 wt % titanium (Ti); and (2) 1 wt % tantalum (Ta), 1 wt % Nb, and 0.75 wt % Ti. This report covers the processing and results with limited metallographic information available. The two alloys were each vacuum induction melted (VIM) into an 8-in. log, extruded into a 3-in. log, then cut into 4 logs and extruded at 4 different temperatures into 0.8-in. bars. From the 8 conditions (2 alloys, 4 extrusion temperatures each), 10 to 13 16-in. rods were cut for rolling and swaging. Due to cracking problems, the final processing changed from rolling and swaging to limited rolling and heat treating. The contracted work was completed with the delivery of 88 rods to Dr. Zabielski. 28 figs.

  14. Tylosin depletion from edible pig tissues.

    PubMed

    Prats, C; El Korchi, G; Francesch, R; Arboix, M; Pérez, B

    2002-12-01

    The depletion of tylosin from edible pig tissues was studied following 5 days of intramuscular (i.m.) administration of 10 mg/kg of tylosin to 16 crossbreed pigs. Animals were slaughtered at intervals after treatment and samples of muscle, kidney, liver, skin+fat, and injection site were collected and analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Seven days after the completion of treatment, the concentration of tylosin in kidney, skin+fat, and at the injection site was higher than the European Union maximal residue limit (MRL) of 100 microg/kg. Tylosin residues in all tissues were below the quantification limit (50 microg/kg) at 10 and 14 days post-treatment.

  15. Anxiety, ego depletion, and sports performance.

    PubMed

    Englert, Chris; Bertrams, Alex

    2012-10-01

    In the present article, we analyzed the role of self-control strength and state anxiety in sports performance. We tested the hypothesis that self-control strength and state anxiety interact in predicting sports performance on the basis of two studies, each using a different sports task (Study 1: performance in a basketball free throw task, N = 64; Study 2: performance in a dart task, N = 79). The patterns of results were as expected in both studies: Participants with depleted self-control strength performed worse in the specific tasks as their anxiety increased, whereas there was no significant relation for participants with fully available self-control strength. Furthermore, different degrees of available self-control strength did not predict performance in participants who were low in state anxiety, but did in participants who were high in state anxiety. Thus increasing self-control strength could reduce the negative anxiety effects in sports and improve athletes' performance under pressure.

  16. Arctic Ozone Depletion from UARS MLS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements of ozone during four Arctic winters are compared. The evolution of ozone in the lower stratosphere is related to temperature, chlorine monoxide (also measured by MLS), and the evolution of the polar vortex. Lagrangian transport calculations using winds from the United Kingdom Meteorological Office's Stratosphere-Troposphere Data Assimilation system are used to estimate to what extent the evolution of lower stratospheric ozone is controlled by dynamics. Observations, along with calculations of the expected dynamical behavior, show evidence for chemical ozone depletion throughout most of the Arctic lower stratospheric vortex during the 1992-93 middle and late winter, and during all of the 1994-95 winter that was observed by MLS. Both of these winters were unusually cold and had unusually cold and had unusually strong Arctic polar vortices compared to meteorological data over the past 17 years.

  17. Policies on global warming and ozone depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Green, B.

    1987-04-01

    The recent discovery of a dramatic seasonal drop in the amount of ozone over Antarctica has catalyzed concern for protection of stratospheric ozone, the layer of gas that shields the entire planet from excess ultraviolet radiation. Conservative scientific models predict about a 5% reduction in the amount of global ozone by the middle of the next century, with large local variations. The predicted global warming from increased emissions of greenhouse gases will also have differing effects on local climate and weather conditions and consequently on agriculture. Although numerous uncertainties are associated with both ozone depletion and a global warming, there is a consensus that world leaders need to address the problems. The US Congress is now beginning to take note of the task. In this article, one representative outlines some perceptions of the problems and the policy options available to Congress.

  18. Human podocyte depletion in association with older age and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Puelles, Victor G; Cullen-McEwen, Luise A; Taylor, Georgina E; Li, Jinhua; Hughson, Michael D; Kerr, Peter G; Hoy, Wendy E; Bertram, John F

    2016-04-01

    Podocyte depletion plays a major role in the development and progression of glomerulosclerosis. Many kidney diseases are more common in older age and often coexist with hypertension. We hypothesized that podocyte depletion develops in association with older age and is exacerbated by hypertension. Kidneys from 19 adult Caucasian American males without overt renal disease were collected at autopsy in Mississippi. Demographic data were obtained from medical and autopsy records. Subjects were categorized by age and hypertension as potential independent and additive contributors to podocyte depletion. Design-based stereology was used to estimate individual glomerular volume and total podocyte number per glomerulus, which allowed the calculation of podocyte density (number per volume). Podocyte depletion was defined as a reduction in podocyte number (absolute depletion) or podocyte density (relative depletion). The cortical location of glomeruli (outer or inner cortex) and presence of parietal podocytes were also recorded. Older age was an independent contributor to both absolute and relative podocyte depletion, featuring glomerular hypertrophy, podocyte loss, and thus reduced podocyte density. Hypertension was an independent contributor to relative podocyte depletion by exacerbating glomerular hypertrophy, mostly in glomeruli from the inner cortex. However, hypertension was not associated with podocyte loss. Absolute and relative podocyte depletion were exacerbated by the combination of older age and hypertension. The proportion of glomeruli with parietal podocytes increased with age but not with hypertension alone. These findings demonstrate that older age and hypertension are independent and additive contributors to podocyte depletion in white American men without kidney disease.

  19. Modelling chemical depletion profiles in regolith

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brantley, S.L.; Bandstra, J.; Moore, J.; White, A.F.

    2008-01-01

    Chemical or mineralogical profiles in regolith display reaction fronts that document depletion of leachable elements or minerals. A generalized equation employing lumped parameters was derived to model such ubiquitously observed patterns:C = frac(C0, frac(C0 - Cx = 0, Cx = 0) exp (??ini ?? over(k, ??) ?? x) + 1)Here C, Cx = 0, and Co are the concentrations of an element at a given depth x, at the top of the reaction front, or in parent respectively. ??ini is the roughness of the dissolving mineral in the parent and k???? is a lumped kinetic parameter. This kinetic parameter is an inverse function of the porefluid advective velocity and a direct function of the dissolution rate constant times mineral surface area per unit volume regolith. This model equation fits profiles of concentration versus depth for albite in seven weathering systems and is consistent with the interpretation that the surface area (m2 mineral m- 3 bulk regolith) varies linearly with the concentration of the dissolving mineral across the front. Dissolution rate constants can be calculated from the lumped fit parameters for these profiles using observed values of weathering advance rate, the proton driving force, the geometric surface area per unit volume regolith and parent concentration of albite. These calculated values of the dissolution rate constant compare favorably to literature values. The model equation, useful for reaction fronts in both steady-state erosional and quasi-stationary non-erosional systems, incorporates the variation of reaction affinity using pH as a master variable. Use of this model equation to fit depletion fronts for soils highlights the importance of buffering of pH in the soil system. Furthermore, the equation should allow better understanding of the effects of important environmental variables on weathering rates. ?? 2008.

  20. Brief mindfulness induction could reduce aggression after depletion.

    PubMed

    Yusainy, Cleoputri; Lawrence, Claire

    2015-05-01

    Many experiments have shown that one's ability to refrain from acting on aggressive impulses is likely to decrease following a prior act of self-control. This temporary state of self-control failure is known as ego-depletion. Although mindfulness is increasingly used to treat and manage aggressive behaviour, the extent to which mindfulness may counteract the depletion effect on aggression is yet to be determined. This study (N=110) investigated the effect of a laboratory induced one-time mindfulness meditation session on aggression following depletion. Aggression was assessed by the intensity of aversive noise blast participants delivered to an opponent on a computerised task. Depleted participants who received mindfulness induction behaved less aggressively than depleted participants with no mindfulness induction. Mindfulness also improved performance on a second measure of self-control (i.e., handgrip perseverance); however, this effect was independent of depletion condition. Motivational factors may help explain the dynamics of mindfulness, self-control, and aggression.

  1. ELEMENTAL DEPLETIONS IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS AND THE EVOLUTION OF DEPLETIONS WITH METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Tchernyshyov, Kirill; Meixner, Margaret; Seale, Jonathan; Fox, Andrew; Friedman, Scott D.; Dwek, Eli; Galliano, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    We present a study of the composition of gas and dust in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) using UV absorption spectroscopy. We measure P ii and Fe ii along 84 spatially distributed sightlines toward the MCs using archival Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer observations. For 16 of those sightlines, we also measure Si ii, Cr ii, and Zn ii from new Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph observations. We analyze these spectra using a new spectral line analysis technique based on a semi-parametric Voigt profile model. We have combined these measurements with H i and H{sub 2} column densities and reference stellar abundances from the literature to derive gas-phase abundances, depletions, and gas-to-dust ratios (GDRs). Of our 84 P and 16 Zn measurements, 80 and 13, respectively, are depleted by more than 0.1 dex, suggesting that P and Zn abundances are not accurate metallicity indicators at and above the metallicity of the SMC. Si, Cr, and Fe are systematically less depleted in the SMC than in the Milky Way (MW) or LMC. The minimum Si depletion in the SMC is consistent with zero. We find GDR ranges of 190–565 in the LMC and 480–2100 in the SMC, which is broadly consistent with GDRs from the literature. These ranges represent actual location to location variation and are evidence of dust destruction and/or growth in the diffuse neutral phase of the interstellar medium. Where they overlap in metallicity, the gas-phase abundances of the MW, LMC, and SMC and damped Lyα systems evolve similarly with metallicity.

  2. Producing, Importing, and Exporting Ozone-Depleting Substances

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Overview page provides links to information on producing, importing, and exporting ozone-depleting substances, including information about the HCFC allowance system, importing, labeling, recordkeeping and reporting.

  3. Gas generation matrix depletion quality assurance project plan

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is to provide the necessary expertise, experience, equipment and instrumentation, and management structure to: Conduct the matrix depletion experiments using simulated waste for quantifying matrix depletion effects; and Conduct experiments on 60 cylinders containing simulated TRU waste to determine the effects of matrix depletion on gas generation for transportation. All work for the Gas Generation Matrix Depletion (GGMD) experiment is performed according to the quality objectives established in the test plan and under this Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP).

  4. Glutathione depletion in tissues after administration of buthionine sulphoximine

    SciTech Connect

    Minchinton, A.I.; Rojas, A.; Smith, A.; Soranson, J.A.; Shrieve, D.C.; Jones, N.R.; Bremner, J.C.

    1984-08-01

    Buthionine sulphoximine (BSO) an inhibitor of glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis, was administered to mice in single and repeated doses. The resultant pattern of GSH depletion was studied in liver, kidney, skeletal muscle and three types of murine tumor. Liver and kidney exhibited a rapid depletion of GSH. Muscle was depleted to a similar level, but at a slower rate after a single dose. All three tumors required repeated administration of BSO over several days to obtain a similar degree of depletion to that shown in the other tissues.

  5. Regret causes ego-depletion and finding benefits in the regrettable events alleviates ego-depletion.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongmei; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Fang; Xu, Yan; Hong, Ying-Yi; Jiang, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that experiencing regret would result in ego-depletion, while finding benefits (i.e., "silver linings") in the regret-eliciting events counteracted the ego-depletion effect. Using a modified gambling paradigm (Experiments 1, 2, and 4) and a retrospective method (Experiments 3 and 5), five experiments were conducted to induce regret. Results revealed that experiencing regret undermined performance on subsequent tasks, including a paper-and-pencil calculation task (Experiment 1), a Stroop task (Experiment 2), and a mental arithmetic task (Experiment 3). Furthermore, finding benefits in the regret-eliciting events improved subsequent performance (Experiments 4 and 5), and this improvement was mediated by participants' perceived vitality (Experiment 4). This study extended the depletion model of self-regulation by considering emotions with self-conscious components (in our case, regret). Moreover, it provided a comprehensive understanding of how people felt and performed after experiencing regret and after finding benefits in the events that caused the regret.

  6. If ego depletion cannot be studied using identical tasks, it is not ego depletion.

    PubMed

    Lange, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis that human self-control capacities are fueled by glucose has been challenged on multiple grounds. A recent study by Lange and Eggert adds to this criticism by presenting two powerful but unsuccessful attempts to replicate the effect of sugar drinks on ego depletion. The dual-task paradigms employed in these experiments have been criticized for involving identical self-control tasks, a methodology that has been argued to reduce participants' willingness to exert self-control. The present article addresses this criticism by demonstrating that there is no indication to believe that the study of glucose effects on ego depletion should be restricted to paradigms using dissimilar acts of self-control. Failures to observe such effects in paradigms involving identical tasks pose a serious problem to the proposal that self-control exhaustion might be reversed by rinsing or ingesting glucose. In combination with analyses of statistical credibility, the experiments by Lange and Eggert suggest that the influence of sugar on ego depletion has been systematically overestimated.

  7. How Ego Depletion Affects Sexual Self-Regulation: Is It More Than Resource Depletion?

    PubMed

    Nolet, Kevin; Rouleau, Joanne-Lucine; Benbouriche, Massil; Carrier Emond, Fannie; Renaud, Patrice

    2015-12-21

    Rational thinking and decision making are impacted when in a state of sexual arousal. The inability to self-regulate arousal can be linked to numerous problems, like sexual risk taking, infidelity, and sexual coercion. Studies have shown that most men are able to exert voluntary control over their sexual excitation with various levels of success. Both situational and dispositional factors can influence self-regulation achievement. The goal of this research was to investigate how ego depletion, a state of low self-control capacity, interacts with personality traits-propensities for sexual excitation and inhibition-and cognitive absorption, to cause sexual self-regulation failure. The sexual responses of 36 heterosexual males were assessed using penile plethysmography. They were asked to control their sexual arousal in two conditions, with and without ego depletion. Results suggest that ego depletion has opposite effects based on the trait sexual inhibition, as individuals moderately inhibited showed an increase in performance while highly inhibited ones showed a decrease. These results challenge the limited resource model of self-regulation and point to the importance of considering how people adapt to acute and high challenging conditions.

  8. Thermal stress depletes energy reserves in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Klepsatel, Peter; Gáliková, Martina; Xu, Yanjun; Kühnlein, Ronald P.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how environmental temperature affects metabolic and physiological functions is of crucial importance to assess the impacts of climate change on organisms. Here, we used different laboratory strains and a wild-caught population of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to examine the effect of temperature on the body energy reserves of an ectothermic organism. We found that permanent ambient temperature elevation or transient thermal stress causes significant depletion of body fat stores. Surprisingly, transient thermal stress induces a lasting “memory effect” on body fat storage, which also reduces survivorship of the flies upon food deprivation later after stress exposure. Functional analyses revealed that an intact heat-shock response is essential to protect flies from temperature-dependent body fat decline. Moreover, we found that the temperature-dependent body fat reduction is caused at least in part by apoptosis of fat body cells, which might irreversibly compromise the fat storage capacity of the flies. Altogether, our results provide evidence that thermal stress has a significant negative impact on organismal energy reserves, which in turn might affect individual fitness. PMID:27641694

  9. Ozone depletion: 20 Years after the alarm

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-15

    Scientific curiosity in 1973 led to the challenge of determining the ultimate atmospheric fate of the chlorofluoromethanes, CFC-11 (CCl[sub 3]F) and CFC-12 (CCl[sub 2]F[sub 2]), whose presence at measurable levels in surface air had been detected only two years earlier. In retrospect, the decision to pursue the chemistry of CFC molecules to their final destruction and beyond foreordained an unusual outcome because CFCs are chemically inert and easily survive under almost all natural conditions. By midsummer 1994, the world is well on its way in transition to a CFC-free economy, although not yet to a CFC-free atmosphere. The rates of increase in atmospheric concentration for the three major CFCs (CFC-11, -12, and -113) have all slowed markedly in response to the restrictions of the revised Montreal protocol. Because of their long lifetimes, however, significant but gradually diminishing quantities of CFCs will remain in the atmosphere throughout the 21st century. Atomic chlorine will continue to be released into the stratosphere as long as CFCs persist, and ozone depletion will follow. The existence of the Montreal protocol and the agreement among industrial, governmental, and university scientists on its wisdom offers considerable promise for the handling of future global environmental problems.

  10. Recovery of Depleted Uranium Fragments from Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, C.P.; Alecksen, T.J.; Heronimus, R.S.; Simonds, M.H.; Farrar, D.R.; Baker, K.R.; Miller, M.L.

    2008-07-01

    A cost-effective method was demonstrated for recovering depleted uranium (DU) fragments from soil. A compacted clean soil pad was prepared adjacent to a pile of soil containing DU fragments. Soil from the contaminated pile was placed on the pad in three-inch lifts using conventional construction equipment. Each lift was scanned with an automatic scanning system consisting of an array of radiation detectors coupled to a detector positioning system. The data were downloaded into ArcGIS for data presentation. Areas of the pad exhibiting scaler counts above the decision level were identified as likely locations of DU fragments. The coordinates of these locations were downloaded into a PDA that was wirelessly connected to the positioning system. The PDA guided technicians to the locations where hand-held trowels and shovels were used to remove the fragments. After DU removal, the affected areas were re-scanned and the new data patched into the data base to replace the original data. This new data set along with soil sample results served as final status survey data. (authors)

  11. Levels of depleted uranium in Kosovo soils.

    PubMed

    Sansone, U; Stellato, L; Jia, G; Rosamilia, S; Gaudino, S; Barbizzi, S; Belli, M

    2001-01-01

    The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has performed a field survey at 11 sites located in Kosovo, where depleted uranium (DU) ammunitions were used by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) during the last Balkans conflict (1999). Soil sampling was performed to assess the spread of DU ground contamination around and within the NATO target sites and the migration of DU along the soil profile. The 234U/238U and 235U/238U activity concentration ratios have been used as an indicator of natural against anthropogenic sources of uranium. The results show that levels of 238U activity concentrations in soils above 100 Bq x kg(-1) can be considered a 'tracer' of the presence of DU in soils. The results also indicate that detectable ground surface contamination by DU is limited to areas within a few metres from localised points of concentrated contamination caused by penetrator impacts. Vertical distribution of DU along the soil profile is measurable up to a depth of 10-20 cm. This latter aspect is of particular relevance for the potential risk of future contamination of groundwater.

  12. Preventing NAD+ Depletion Protects Neurons against Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Pitta, Michael; Mattson, Mark P.

    2008-01-01

    Neurons are excitable cells that require large amounts of energy to support their survival and functions and are therefore prone to excitotoxicity, which involves energy depletion. By examining bioenergetic changes induced by glutamate, we found that the cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) level is a critical determinant of neuronal survival. The bioenergetic effects of mitochondrial uncoupling and caloric restriction were also examined in cultured neurons and rodent brain. 2, 4-dinitrophenol (DNP) is a chemical mitochondrial uncoupler that stimulates glucose uptake and oxygen consumption on cultured neurons, which accelerates oxidation of NAD(P)H to NAD+ in mitochondria. The NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase sirtulin 1 (SIRT1) and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) mRNA are upregulated mouse brain under caloric restriction. To examine whether NAD+ mediates neuroprotective effects, nicotinamide, a precursor of NAD+ and inhibitor of SIRT1 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) (two NAD+-dependent enzymes), was employed. Nicotinamide attenuated excitotoxic death and preserved cellular NAD+ levels to support SIRT1 and PARP 1 activities. Our findings suggest that mild mitochondrial uncoupling and caloric restriction exert hormetic effects by stimulating bioenergetics in neurons thereby increasing tolerance of neurons to metabolic stress. PMID:19076449

  13. Sulfachlorpyrazine residues depletion in turkey edible tissues.

    PubMed

    Łebkowska-Wieruszewska, B I; Kowalski, C J

    2010-08-01

    Sulfachlorpyrazine (SCP) is currently used to treat coccidian infections in turkeys; however, there is no information available about the withdrawal period necessary for the turkey to be safe for human consumption. A high performance liquid chromatography method with ultraviolet-visible light detection was adapted and validated for the determination of SCP in turkey tissues. The procedure is based on isolation of the (SCP sodium) compound from edible turkey tissues (muscles, liver, kidneys, and fat with skin) with satisfactory recovery (72.80 +/- 1.40) and specificity. The residue depletion of SCP in turkeys was conducted after a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight/day had been administrated orally for 3 days. After treatment has been discontinued residue concentrations were detected in tissues on the 7th day. The highest SCP concentrations were measured in muscles. Based on the results presented in this study, it could be assumed that a withdrawal period of 21 days, before medicated turkeys could be slaughtered, would be sufficient to ensure consumer safety.

  14. Diallyl disulphide depletes glutathione in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Lemar, Katey M.; Aon, Miguel A.; Cortassa, Sonia; O’Rourke, Brian; T. Müller, Carsten; Lloyd, David

    2008-01-01

    Using two-photon scanning laser microscopy, we investigated the effect of an Allium sativum (garlic) constituent, diallyl disulphide (DADS), on key physiological functions of the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans. A short 30 min exposure to 0.5 mm DADS followed by removal induced 70% cell death (50% necrotic, 20% apoptotic) within 2 h, increasing to 75% after 4 h. The early intracellular events associated with DADS-induced cell death were monitored with two-photon fluorescence microscopy to track mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NADH or reduced glutathione (GSH) under aerobic conditions. DADS treatment decreased intracellular GSH and elevated intracellular ROS levels. Additionally, DADS induced a marked decrease of ΔΨm and lowered respiration in cell suspensions and isolated mitochondria. In vitro kinetic experiments in cell-free extracts suggest that glutathione-S-transferase (GST) is one of the intracellular targets of DADS. Additional targets were also identified, including inhibition of a site or sites between complexes II-IV in the electron transport chain, as well as the mitochondrial ATP-synthase. The results indicate that DADS is an effective antifungal agent able to trigger cell death in Candida, most probably by eliciting oxidative stress as a consequence of thiol depletion and impaired mitochondrial function. PMID:17534841

  15. Ichnologic signature of oxygen-depleted deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdale, A.A.; Mason, T.R.

    1987-05-01

    The sedimentologic record of oxygen-poor depositional environments commonly includes trace fossils, especially those produced by deposit-feeding organisms that must have had broad oxygen tolerances. Endostratal fodinichnial and pascichnial traces indicate lack of oxygen within the substrate. Complex fodinichnia, such as Chondrites and Zoophycos, may form in anoxic sediment some distance below the water-sediment interface. The deposit-feeding animals can circulate oxygenated bottom water from the sea floor down through semipermanent shafts to permit respiration while they feed on unoxidized organic matter in the subsurface. Endostratal pascichnia, such as Helminthoida and Spirophycus, typically lack a continuous connection with the water-sediment interface, so interstitial water cannot be totally devoid of oxygen or else the animals cannot respire. However, endostratal pascichnia normally do not occur in oxidized sediment where digestible organic detritus has decomposed completely. In totally oxidized substrates, which typify higher energy depositional environments, permanent dwellings (domichnia) of filter-feeding organisms predominate. The ichnologic signature of oxygen-depleted deposits is a very high-density, very low-diversity association of deposit-feeding trace fossils. They suggest an oxygen-controlled trace fossil model in which increasing oxygen concentration of the interstitial water parallels a transition from fodinichnia-dominated through pascichnia-dominated to domichnia-dominated trace fossil associations. This model provides an alternative to the more traditional depth-controlled trace fossil distribution model in certain situations.

  16. Supercontinuum Stimulated Emission Depletion Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lesoine, Michael; Bose, Sayantan; Petrich, Jacob; Smith, Emily

    2012-06-13

    Supercontinuum (SC) stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence lifetime imaging is demonstrated by using time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) detection. The spatial resolution of the developed STED instrument was measured by imaging monodispersed 40-nm fluorescent beads and then determining their fwhm, and was 36 ± 9 and 40 ± 10 nm in the X and Y coordinates, respectively. The same beads measured by confocal microscopy were 450 ± 50 and 430 ± 30 nm, which is larger than the diffraction limit of light due to underfilling the microscope objective. Underfilling the objective and time gating the signal were necessary to achieve the stated STED spatial resolution. The same fluorescence lifetime (2.0 ± 0.1 ns) was measured for the fluorescent beads by using confocal or STED lifetime imaging. The instrument has been applied to study Alexa Fluor 594-phalloidin labeled F-actin-rich projections with dimensions smaller than the diffraction limit of light in cultured cells. Fluorescence lifetimes of the actin-rich projections range from 2.2 to 2.9 ns as measured by STED lifetime imaging.

  17. Thermal stress depletes energy reserves in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Klepsatel, Peter; Gáliková, Martina; Xu, Yanjun; Kühnlein, Ronald P

    2016-09-19

    Understanding how environmental temperature affects metabolic and physiological functions is of crucial importance to assess the impacts of climate change on organisms. Here, we used different laboratory strains and a wild-caught population of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to examine the effect of temperature on the body energy reserves of an ectothermic organism. We found that permanent ambient temperature elevation or transient thermal stress causes significant depletion of body fat stores. Surprisingly, transient thermal stress induces a lasting "memory effect" on body fat storage, which also reduces survivorship of the flies upon food deprivation later after stress exposure. Functional analyses revealed that an intact heat-shock response is essential to protect flies from temperature-dependent body fat decline. Moreover, we found that the temperature-dependent body fat reduction is caused at least in part by apoptosis of fat body cells, which might irreversibly compromise the fat storage capacity of the flies. Altogether, our results provide evidence that thermal stress has a significant negative impact on organismal energy reserves, which in turn might affect individual fitness.

  18. Too Depleted to Try? Testing the Process Model of Ego Depletion in the Context of Unhealthy Snack Consumption.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Ashleigh; Kemps, Eva; Moffitt, Robyn

    2016-11-01

    The process model proposes that the ego depletion effect is due to (a) an increase in motivation toward indulgence, and (b) a decrease in motivation to control behaviour following an initial act of self-control. In contrast, the reflective-impulsive model predicts that ego depletion results in behaviour that is more consistent with desires, and less consistent with motivations, rather than influencing the strength of desires and motivations. The current study sought to test these alternative accounts of the relationships between ego depletion, motivation, desire, and self-control. One hundred and fifty-six undergraduate women were randomised to complete a depleting e-crossing task or a non-depleting task, followed by a lab-based measure of snack intake, and self-report measures of motivation and desire strength. In partial support of the process model, ego depletion was related to higher intake, but only indirectly via the influence of lowered motivation. Motivation was more strongly predictive of intake for those in the non-depletion condition, providing partial support for the reflective-impulsive model. Ego depletion did not affect desire, nor did depletion moderate the effect of desire on intake, indicating that desire may be an appropriate target for reducing unhealthy behaviour across situations where self-control resources vary. © 2016 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  19. Transient Treg depletion enhances therapeutic anti‐cancer vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Aston, Wayne J.; Chee, Jonathan; Khong, Andrea; Cleaver, Amanda L.; Solin, Jessica N.; Ma, Shaokang; Lesterhuis, W. Joost; Dick, Ian; Holt, Robert A.; Creaney, Jenette; Boon, Louis; Robinson, Bruce; Lake, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Regulatory T cells (Treg) play an important role in suppressing anti‐ immunity and their depletion has been linked to improved outcomes. To better understand the role of Treg in limiting the efficacy of anti‐cancer immunity, we used a Diphtheria toxin (DTX) transgenic mouse model to specifically target and deplete Treg. Methods Tumor bearing BALB/c FoxP3.dtr transgenic mice were subjected to different treatment protocols, with or without Treg depletion and tumor growth and survival monitored. Results DTX specifically depleted Treg in a transient, dose‐dependent manner. Treg depletion correlated with delayed tumor growth, increased effector T cell (Teff) activation, and enhanced survival in a range of solid tumors. Tumor regression was dependent on Teffs as depletion of both CD4 and CD8 T cells completely abrogated any survival benefit. Severe morbidity following Treg depletion was only observed, when consecutive doses of DTX were given during peak CD8 T cell activation, demonstrating that Treg can be depleted on multiple occasions, but only when CD8 T cell activation has returned to base line levels. Finally, we show that even minimal Treg depletion is sufficient to significantly improve the efficacy of tumor‐peptide vaccination. Conclusions BALB/c.FoxP3.dtr mice are an ideal model to investigate the full therapeutic potential of Treg depletion to boost anti‐tumor immunity. DTX‐mediated Treg depletion is transient, dose‐dependent, and leads to strong anti‐tumor immunity and complete tumor regression at high doses, while enhancing the efficacy of tumor‐specific vaccination at low doses. Together this data highlight the importance of Treg manipulation as a useful strategy for enhancing current and future cancer immunotherapies. PMID:28250921

  20. Podocyte Depletion in Thin GBM and Alport Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Su Q.; Afshinnia, Farsad; Kershaw, David; Wiggins, Roger C.

    2016-01-01

    The proximate genetic cause of both Thin GBM and Alport Syndrome (AS) is abnormal α3, 4 and 5 collagen IV chains resulting in abnormal glomerular basement membrane (GBM) structure/function. We previously reported that podocyte detachment rate measured in urine is increased in AS, suggesting that podocyte depletion could play a role in causing progressive loss of kidney function. To test this hypothesis podometric parameters were measured in 26 kidney biopsies from 21 patients aged 2–17 years with a clinic-pathologic diagnosis including both classic Alport Syndrome with thin and thick GBM segments and lamellated lamina densa [n = 15] and Thin GBM cases [n = 6]. Protocol biopsies from deceased donor kidneys were used as age-matched controls. Podocyte depletion was present in AS biopsies prior to detectable histologic abnormalities. No abnormality was detected by light microscopy at <30% podocyte depletion, minor pathologic changes (mesangial expansion and adhesions to Bowman’s capsule) were present at 30–50% podocyte depletion, and FSGS was progressively present above 50% podocyte depletion. eGFR did not change measurably until >70% podocyte depletion. Low level proteinuria was an early event at about 25% podocyte depletion and increased in proportion to podocyte depletion. These quantitative data parallel those from model systems where podocyte depletion is the causative event. This result supports a hypothesis that in AS podocyte adherence to the GBM is defective resulting in accelerated podocyte detachment causing progressive podocyte depletion leading to FSGS-like pathologic changes and eventual End Stage Kidney Disease. Early intervention to reduce podocyte depletion is projected to prolong kidney survival in AS. PMID:27192434

  1. Podocyte Depletion in Thin GBM and Alport Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wickman, Larysa; Hodgin, Jeffrey B; Wang, Su Q; Afshinnia, Farsad; Kershaw, David; Wiggins, Roger C

    2016-01-01

    The proximate genetic cause of both Thin GBM and Alport Syndrome (AS) is abnormal α3, 4 and 5 collagen IV chains resulting in abnormal glomerular basement membrane (GBM) structure/function. We previously reported that podocyte detachment rate measured in urine is increased in AS, suggesting that podocyte depletion could play a role in causing progressive loss of kidney function. To test this hypothesis podometric parameters were measured in 26 kidney biopsies from 21 patients aged 2-17 years with a clinic-pathologic diagnosis including both classic Alport Syndrome with thin and thick GBM segments and lamellated lamina densa [n = 15] and Thin GBM cases [n = 6]. Protocol biopsies from deceased donor kidneys were used as age-matched controls. Podocyte depletion was present in AS biopsies prior to detectable histologic abnormalities. No abnormality was detected by light microscopy at <30% podocyte depletion, minor pathologic changes (mesangial expansion and adhesions to Bowman's capsule) were present at 30-50% podocyte depletion, and FSGS was progressively present above 50% podocyte depletion. eGFR did not change measurably until >70% podocyte depletion. Low level proteinuria was an early event at about 25% podocyte depletion and increased in proportion to podocyte depletion. These quantitative data parallel those from model systems where podocyte depletion is the causative event. This result supports a hypothesis that in AS podocyte adherence to the GBM is defective resulting in accelerated podocyte detachment causing progressive podocyte depletion leading to FSGS-like pathologic changes and eventual End Stage Kidney Disease. Early intervention to reduce podocyte depletion is projected to prolong kidney survival in AS.

  2. Optimal Allocation of Sampling Effort in Depletion Surveys

    EPA Science Inventory

    We consider the problem of designing a depletion or removal survey as part of estimating animal abundance for populations with imperfect capture or detection rates. In a depletion survey, animals are captured from a given area, counted, and withheld from the population. This proc...

  3. Whistler waves guided by density depletion ducts in a magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bakharev, P. V.; Zaboronkova, T. M.; Kudrin, A. V.; Krafft, C.

    2010-11-15

    The guided propagation of whistler waves along cylindrical density depletion ducts in a magneto-plasma is studied. It is shown that, under certain conditions, such ducts can support volume and surface eigenmodes. The dispersion properties and field structure of whistler modes guided by density depletion ducts are analyzed. The effect of collisional losses in the plasma on the properties of modes is discussed.

  4. Optimal Allocation of Sampling Effort in Depletion Surveys

    EPA Science Inventory

    We consider the problem of designing a depletion or removal survey as part of estimating animal abundance for populations with imperfect capture or detection rates. In a depletion survey, animals are captured from a given area, counted, and withheld from the population. This proc...

  5. Auto-aligning stimulated emission depletion microscope using adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Gould, Travis J; Kromann, Emil B; Burke, Daniel; Booth, Martin J; Bewersdorf, Joerg

    2013-06-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy provides diffraction-unlimited resolution in fluorescence microscopy. Imaging at the nanoscale, however, requires precise alignment of the depletion and excitation laser foci of the STED microscope. We demonstrate here that adaptive optics can be implemented to automatically align STED and confocal images with a precision of 4.3 ± 2.3 nm.

  6. [Internal contamination with depleted uranium and health disorders].

    PubMed

    Pranjić, Nurka; Karamehić, Jasenko; Ljuca, Farid; Zigić, Zlata; Ascerić, Mensura

    2002-01-01

    In this review we used the published data on depleted uranium (experimental and epidemiological) from the current literature. Depleted uranium is a toxic heavy metal that in high dose may cause poisoning and health effects as those caused by lead, mercury, and chromium. It is slightly radioactive. The aim of this review was to select, to arrange, to present references of scientific papers, and to summarise the data in order to give a comprehensive image of the results of toxicological studies on depleted uranium that have been done on animals (including carcinogenic activity). We have also used epidemiological posted study results related to occupational and environmental exposure to depleted uranium. The toxicity of uranium has been studied extensively. The results of the studies indicated primarily its chemical toxicity, particularly renal effects, but depleted uranium is not radiological hazard. Uranium is not metal determined to be carcinogenic (the International Agency of Research on Cancer). The military use of depleted uranium will give additional insight into the toxicology of depleted uranium. The present controversy over the radiological and chemical toxicity of depleted uranium used in the Gulf War requests further experimental and clinical investigations of its effects on the biosphere and human beings.

  7. 26 CFR 1.613-1 - Percentage depletion; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Percentage depletion; general rule. 1.613-1 Section 1.613-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.613-1 Percentage depletion;...

  8. Depletion of Appalachian coal reserves - how soon?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milici, R.C.

    2000-01-01

    Much of the coal consumed in the US since the end of the last century has been produced from the Pennsylvanian strata of the Appalachian basin. Even though quantities mined in the past are less than they are today, this basin yielded from 70% to 80% of the nation's annual coal production from the end of the last century until the early 1970s. During the last 25 years, the proportion of the nation's coal that was produced annually from the Appalachian basin has declined markedly, and today it is only about 40% of the total. The amount of coal produced annually in the Appalachian basin, however, has been rising slowly over the last several decades, and has ranged generally from 400 to 500 million tons (Mt) per year. A large proportion of Appalachian historical production has come from relatively few counties in southwestern Pennsylvania, northern and southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, Virginia and Alabama. Many of these counties are decades past their years of peak production and several are almost depleted of economic deposits of coal. Because the current major consumer of Appalachian coal is the electric power industry, coal quality, especially sulfur content, has a great impact on its marketability. High-sulfur coal deposits in western Pennsylvania and Ohio are in low demand when compared with the lower sulfur coals of Virginia and southern West Virginia. Only five counties in the basin that have produced 500 Mt or more exhibit increasing rates of production at relatively high levels. Of these, six are in the central part of the basin and only one, Greene County, Pennsylvania, is in the northern part of the basin. Decline rate models, based on production decline rates and the decline rate of the estimated, 'potential' reserve, indicate that Appalachian basin annual coal production will be 200 Mt or less by the middle of the next century. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.Much of the coal consumed in the US since the end of the last century has been produced

  9. Removal of depleted uranium from contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Choy, Christine Chin; Korfiatis, George P; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2006-08-10

    Contamination of soil and water with depleted uranium (DU) has increased public health concerns due to the chemical toxicity of DU at elevated dosages. For this reason, there is great interest in developing methods for DU removal from contaminated sources. Two DU laden soils, taken from U.S. Army sites, were characterized for particle size distribution, total uranium concentration and removable uranium. Soil A was found to be a well graded sand containing a total of 3210 mg/kg DU (3.99 x 10(4) Bq/kg, where a Becquerel (Bq) is a unit of radiation). About 83% of the DU in the fines fraction (particle diameter <0.075 mm, total DU 7732 mg/kg (9.61 x 10(4) Bq/kg)) was associated with the carbonate, iron and manganese oxide and organic matter fractions of the material. Soil B was classified as a sandy silt with total DU of 1560 mg/kg (1.94 x 10(4) Bq/kg). The DU content in the fines fraction was 5171 mg/kg (6.43 x 10(4) Bq/kg). Sequential extraction of the Soil B fines fraction indicated that 64% of the DU was present either as soluble U(VI) minerals or as insoluble U(IV). Citric acid, sodium bicarbonate and hydrogen peroxide were used in batch experiments to extract DU from the fines fraction of both soils. Citric acid and sodium bicarbonate were relatively successful for Soil A (50-60% DU removal), but not for Soil B (20-35% DU removal). Hydrogen peroxide was found to significantly increase DU extraction from both soils, attaining removals up to 60-80%.

  10. Impact of ozone depletion on immune function

    SciTech Connect

    Jeevan, A.; Kripke, M.L. . Dept. of Immunology)

    1993-06-01

    Depletion of stratospheric ozone is expected to lead to an increase in the amount of UV-B radiation present in sunlight. In addition to its well known ability to cause skin cancer, UV-B radiation has been shown to alter the immune system. The immune system is the body's primary defense mechanism against infectious diseases and protects against the development of certain types of cancer. Any impairment of immune function may jeopardize health by increasing susceptibility to infectious diseases, increasing the severity of infections, or delaying recovery for infections. In addition, impaired immune function can increase the incidence of certain cancers, particularly cancers of the skin. Research carried out with laboratory animals over the past 15 years has demonstrated that exposure of the skin to UV-B radiation can suppress certain types of immune responses. These include rejection of UV-induced skin cancers and melanomas, contact allergy reactions to chemicals, delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to microbial and other antigens, and phagocytosis and elimination of certain bacteria from lymphoid tissues. Recent studies with mycobacterial infection of mice demonstrated that exposure to UV-B radiation decreased the delayed hypersensitivity response to mycobacterial antigens and increased the severity of infection. In humans, UV-B radiation has also been shown to impair the contact allergy response. These studies demonstrate that UV radiation can decrease immune responses in humans and laboratory and raise the possibility that increased exposure to UV-B radiation could adversely affect human health by increasing the incidence or severity of certain infectious diseases.

  11. Recovery of depleted uranium fragments from soil.

    PubMed

    Farr, C P; Alecksen, T J; Heronimus, R S; Simonds, M H; Farrar, D R; Miller, M L; Baker, K R

    2010-02-01

    A "proof of concept" was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a survey method for cost-effective recovery of depleted uranium (DU) fragments from contaminated soil piles at Sandia National Laboratories. First, DU fragments ranging from less than a gram up to 48 g were covered by various thicknesses of soil and used for detector efficiency measurements. The efficiencies were measured for three different sodium iodide detectors: a 5.1-cm by 5.1-cm (2-inch by 2-inch) detector, a 7.6-cm by 7.6-cm (3-inch by 3-inch) detector, and a Field Instrument for the Detection of Low Energy Radiation (FIDLER) detector. The FIDLER detector was found to be superior to the other detectors in each measurement. Next, multiple 7.6-cm (3-inch) layers of soil, taken from the contaminated piles, were applied to a clean pad of soil. Each layer was scanned by an array of eight FIDLER detectors pulled by a tractor. The array, moving 10.2 to 12.7 cm s(-1) (4 to 5 inches per second), automatically recorded radiation count data along with associated detector coordinates at 3-s intervals. The DU fragments were located and identified with a handheld system consisting of a FIDLER detector and a positioning system and then removed. After DU removal, the affected areas were re-scanned and a new lift of contaminated soil was applied. The detection capability of the system as a function of DU fragment mass and burial depth was modeled and determined to be sufficient to ensure that the dose-based site concentration goals would be met. Finally, confirmation soil samples were taken from random locations and from decontaminated soil areas. All samples had concentrations of U that met the goal of 400-500 pCi g(-1).

  12. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  13. Ozone Depletion Potential of CH3Br

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, Stanley P.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Sze, Nien Dak; Scott, Courtney; Rodriquez, Jose M.; Weisenstein, Debra K.

    1998-01-01

    The ozone depletion potential (ODP) of methyl bromide (CH3Br) can be determined by combining the model-calculated bromine efficiency factor (BEF) for CH3Br and its atmospheric lifetime. This paper examines how changes in several key kinetic data affect BEF. The key reactions highlighted in this study include the reaction of BrO + H02, the absorption cross section of HOBr, the absorption cross section and the photolysis products of BrON02, and the heterogeneous conversion of BrON02 to HOBR and HN03 on aerosol particles. By combining the calculated BEF with the latest estimate of 0.7 year for the atmospheric lifetime of CH3Br, the likely value of ODP for CH3Br is 0.39. The model-calculated concentration of HBr (approximately 0.3 pptv) in the lower stratosphere is substantially smaller than the reported measured value of about I pptv. Recent publications suggested models can reproduce the measured value if one assumes a yield for HBr from the reaction of BrO + OH or from the reaction of BrO + H02. Although the DeAlore et al. evaluation concluded any substantial yield of HBr from BrO + HO2 is unlikely, for completeness, we calculate the effects of these assumed yields on BEF for CH3Br. Our calculations show that the effects are minimal: practically no impact for an assumed 1.3% yield of HBr from BrO + OH and 10% smaller for an assumed 0.6% yield from BrO + H02.

  14. Residue depletion of ampicillin in eggs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, M; Xie, K-Z; Guo, H-S; Li, A-H; Xie, X; Zhang, G-X; Dai, G-J; Wang, J-Y

    2015-10-01

    A residue depletion study of ampicillin (AMP) was performed after oral dosing (60.0 mg/kg and 120.0 mg/kg body weight once a day for 5 days) to laying hens, through the use of reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (RP-HPLC-FLD) to achieve detection of ampicillin residue in eggs. Limit of detection was 0.5 ng/g, and limit of quantitation was 1.2 ng/g for ampicillin. Extraction recoveries of ampicillin from samples fortified at 5.0-125.0 ng/g levels ranged from 77.5% to 84.6% in albumen, 77.9% to 87.5% in yolk, and 77.9% to 88.6% in whole egg, with coefficients of variation ≤ 9.3%. The maximum concentrations of ampicillin in albumen, yolk, and whole egg were detected at 1, 2, and 1 day after the last administration of ampicillin, respectively. Ampicillin was not detectable in albumen at day 9 of withdrawal time, at day 10 and 11 in yolk, and day 9 and 11 in whole egg at each of those 2 dose levels. The theoretical withdrawal time of AMP in whole egg was 6.730 and 7.296 days for 60 and 120 mg/kg oral dosage, respectively. This method also proved to be suitable as a rapid and reliable method for the determination of ampicillin in other poultry eggs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Ozone Depletion Potential of CH3Br

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, Stanley P.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Sze, Nien Dak; Scott, Courtney; Rodriquez, Jose M.; Weisenstein, Debra K.

    1998-01-01

    The ozone depletion potential (ODP) of methyl bromide (CH3Br) can be determined by combining the model-calculated bromine efficiency factor (BEF) for CH3Br and its atmospheric lifetime. This paper examines how changes in several key kinetic data affect BEF. The key reactions highlighted in this study include the reaction of BrO + H02, the absorption cross section of HOBr, the absorption cross section and the photolysis products of BrON02, and the heterogeneous conversion of BrON02 to HOBR and HN03 on aerosol particles. By combining the calculated BEF with the latest estimate of 0.7 year for the atmospheric lifetime of CH3Br, the likely value of ODP for CH3Br is 0.39. The model-calculated concentration of HBr (approximately 0.3 pptv) in the lower stratosphere is substantially smaller than the reported measured value of about I pptv. Recent publications suggested models can reproduce the measured value if one assumes a yield for HBr from the reaction of BrO + OH or from the reaction of BrO + H02. Although the DeAlore et al. evaluation concluded any substantial yield of HBr from BrO + HO2 is unlikely, for completeness, we calculate the effects of these assumed yields on BEF for CH3Br. Our calculations show that the effects are minimal: practically no impact for an assumed 1.3% yield of HBr from BrO + OH and 10% smaller for an assumed 0.6% yield from BrO + H02.

  16. The timing and mechanism of depletion in Lewisian granulites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, A. S.; Onions, R. K.; Ohara, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    Large Ion Lithophile (LIL) depletion in Lewisian granulites is discussed. Severe depletions in U, Th, and other LIL have been well documented in Lewisan mafic and felsic gneisses, but new Pb isotopic analyses show little or no depletion in lithologies with high solidus temperatures, such as peridotite. This suggests that LIL transport in this terrane took place by removal of partial melts rather than by pervasive flooding with externally derived CO2. The Pb and Nd isotopic data gathered on these rocks show that the depletion and granulite metamorphism are distinct events about 250 Ma apart. Both fluid inclusions and cation exchange geothermometers date from the later metamorphic event and therefore have little bearing on the depletion event, suggesting a note of caution for interpretations of other granulite terranes.

  17. Caffeine expectancies but not caffeine reduce depletion-induced aggression.

    PubMed

    Denson, Thomas F; Jacobson, Mandi; von Hippel, William; Kemp, Richard I; Mak, Tinnie

    2012-03-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed central nervous system stimulant in the world, yet little is known about its effects on aggressive behavior. Individuals often consume caffeine to increase energy and ward off mental depletion. Because mental depletion increases aggression when people are provoked, caffeine might reduce aggression by ameliorating the negative effects of depletion. In 2 experiments, participants consumed a 200-mg caffeine tablet or a placebo, were mentally depleted or not, and then provoked and given the opportunity to retaliate with a blast of white noise. Results showed that consuming a placebo reduced aggression relative to both caffeine (Experiments 1 and 2) and a no-pill control condition (Experiment 2). These data suggest that expectancies about the effects of caffeine in the absence of the pharmacological effects of the drug can reduce aggression when mentally depleted.

  18. Extreme Vulnerability of IDH1 Mutant Cancers to NAD+ Depletion.

    PubMed

    Tateishi, Kensuke; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Iafrate, A John; Tanaka, Shota; Loebel, Franziska; Lelic, Nina; Wiederschain, Dmitri; Bedel, Olivier; Deng, Gejing; Zhang, Bailin; He, Timothy; Shi, Xu; Gerszten, Robert E; Zhang, Yiyun; Yeh, Jing-Ruey J; Curry, William T; Zhao, Dan; Sundaram, Sudhandra; Nigim, Fares; Koerner, Mara V A; Ho, Quan; Fisher, David E; Roider, Elisabeth M; Kemeny, Lajos V; Samuels, Yardena; Flaherty, Keith T; Batchelor, Tracy T; Chi, Andrew S; Cahill, Daniel P

    2015-12-14

    Heterozygous mutation of IDH1 in cancers modifies IDH1 enzymatic activity, reprogramming metabolite flux and markedly elevating 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). Here, we found that 2-HG depletion did not inhibit growth of several IDH1 mutant solid cancer types. To identify other metabolic therapeutic targets, we systematically profiled metabolites in endogenous IDH1 mutant cancer cells after mutant IDH1 inhibition and discovered a profound vulnerability to depletion of the coenzyme NAD+. Mutant IDH1 lowered NAD+ levels by downregulating the NAD+ salvage pathway enzyme nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (Naprt1), sensitizing to NAD+ depletion via concomitant nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) inhibition. NAD+ depletion activated the intracellular energy sensor AMPK, triggered autophagy, and resulted in cytotoxicity. Thus, we identify NAD+ depletion as a metabolic susceptibility of IDH1 mutant cancers.

  19. The effect of ego depletion on sprint start reaction time.

    PubMed

    Englert, Chris; Bertrams, Alex

    2014-10-01

    In the current study, we consider that optimal sprint start performance requires the self-control of responses. Therefore, start performance should depend on athletes' self-control strength. We assumed that momentary depletion of self-control strength (ego depletion) would either speed up or slow down the initiation of a sprint start, where an initiation that was sped up would carry the increased risk of a false start. Applying a mixed between- (depletion vs. nondepletion) and within- (before vs. after manipulation of depletion) subjects design, we tested the start reaction times of 37 sport students. We found that participants' start reaction times decelerated after finishing a depleting task, whereas it remained constant in the nondepletion condition. These results indicate that sprint start performance can be impaired by unrelated preceding actions that lower momentary self-control strength. We discuss practical implications in terms of optimizing sprint starts and related overall sprint performance.

  20. Cost estimate report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride : storage of depleted uranium metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Folga, S.M.; Kier, P.H.; Thimmapuram, P.R.

    2001-01-24

    This report contains a cost analysis of the long-term storage of depleted uranium in the form of uranium metal. Three options are considered for storage of the depleted uranium. These options are aboveground buildings, partly underground vaults, and mined cavities. Three cases are presented. In the first case, all the depleted uranium metal that would be produced from the conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) generated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) prior to July 1993 would be stored at the storage facility (100% Case). In the second case, half the depleted uranium metal would be stored at this storage facility (50% Case). In the third case, one-quarter of the depleted uranium metal would be stored at the storage facility (25% Case). The technical basis for the cost analysis presented in this report is principally found in the companion report, ANL/EAD/TM-100, ''Engineering Analysis Report for the Long-Term Management of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride: Storage of Depleted Uranium Metal'', prepared by Argonne National Laboratory.

  1. Serotonin and social norms: tryptophan depletion impairs social comparison and leads to resource depletion in a multiplayer harvesting game.

    PubMed

    Bilderbeck, Amy C; Brown, Gordon D A; Read, Judi; Woolrich, Mark; Cowen, Phillip J; Behrens, Tim E J; Rogers, Robert D

    2014-07-01

    How do people sustain resources for the benefit of individuals and communities and avoid the tragedy of the commons, in which shared resources become exhausted? In the present study, we examined the role of serotonin activity and social norms in the management of depletable resources. Healthy adults, alongside social partners, completed a multiplayer resource-dilemma game in which they repeatedly harvested from a partially replenishable monetary resource. Dietary tryptophan depletion, leading to reduced serotonin activity, was associated with aggressive harvesting strategies and disrupted use of the social norms given by distributions of other players' harvests. Tryptophan-depleted participants more frequently exhausted the resource completely and also accumulated fewer rewards than participants who were not tryptophan depleted. Our findings show that rank-based social comparisons are crucial to the management of depletable resources, and that serotonin mediates responses to social norms.

  2. Associative Interactions in Crowded Solutions of Biopolymers Counteract Depletion Effects.

    PubMed

    Groen, Joost; Foschepoth, David; te Brinke, Esra; Boersma, Arnold J; Imamura, Hiromi; Rivas, Germán; Heus, Hans A; Huck, Wilhelm T S

    2015-10-14

    The cytosol of Escherichia coli is an extremely crowded environment, containing high concentrations of biopolymers which occupy 20-30% of the available volume. Such conditions are expected to yield depletion forces, which strongly promote macromolecular complexation. However, crowded macromolecule solutions, like the cytosol, are very prone to nonspecific associative interactions that can potentially counteract depletion. It remains unclear how the cytosol balances these opposing interactions. We used a FRET-based probe to systematically study depletion in vitro in different crowded environments, including a cytosolic mimic, E. coli lysate. We also studied bundle formation of FtsZ protofilaments under identical crowded conditions as a probe for depletion interactions at much larger overlap volumes of the probe molecule. The FRET probe showed a more compact conformation in synthetic crowding agents, suggesting strong depletion interactions. However, depletion was completely negated in cell lysate and other protein crowding agents, where the FRET probe even occupied slightly more volume. In contrast, bundle formation of FtsZ protofilaments proceeded as readily in E. coli lysate and other protein solutions as in synthetic crowding agents. Our experimental results and model suggest that, in crowded biopolymer solutions, associative interactions counterbalance depletion forces for small macromolecules. Furthermore, the net effects of macromolecular crowding will be dependent on both the size of the macromolecule and its associative interactions with the crowded background.

  3. Adjoint simulation of stream depletion due to aquifer pumping.

    PubMed

    Neupauer, Roseanna M; Griebling, Scott A

    2012-01-01

    If an aquifer is hydraulically connected to an adjacent stream, a pumping well operating in the aquifer will draw some water from aquifer storage and some water from the stream, causing stream depletion. Several analytical, semi-analytical, and numerical approaches have been developed to estimate stream depletion due to pumping. These approaches are effective if the well location is known. If a new well is to be installed, it may be desirable to install the well at a location where stream depletion is minimal. If several possible locations are considered for the location of a new well, stream depletion would have to be estimated for all possible well locations, which can be computationally inefficient. The adjoint approach for estimating stream depletion is a more efficient alternative because with one simulation of the adjoint model, stream depletion can be estimated for pumping at a well at any location. We derive the adjoint equations for a coupled system with a confined aquifer, an overlying unconfined aquifer, and a river that is hydraulically connected to the unconfined aquifer. We assume that the stage in the river is known, and is independent of the stream depletion, consistent with the assumptions of the MODFLOW river package. We describe how the adjoint equations can be solved using MODFLOW. In an illustrative example, we show that for this scenario, the adjoint approach is as accurate as standard forward numerical simulation methods, and requires substantially less computational effort.

  4. Long-term groundwater depletion in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, Leonard F.

    2015-01-01

    The volume of groundwater stored in the subsurface in the United States decreased by almost 1000 km3 during 1900–2008. The aquifer systems with the three largest volumes of storage depletion include the High Plains aquifer, the Mississippi Embayment section of the Gulf Coastal Plain aquifer system, and the Central Valley of California. Depletion rates accelerated during 1945–1960, averaging 13.6 km3/year during the last half of the century, and after 2000 increased again to about 24 km3/year. Depletion intensity is a new parameter, introduced here, to provide a more consistent basis for comparing storage depletion problems among various aquifers by factoring in time and areal extent of the aquifer. During 2001–2008, the Central Valley of California had the largest depletion intensity. Groundwater depletion in the United States can explain 1.4% of observed sea-level rise during the 108-year study period and 2.1% during 2001–2008. Groundwater depletion must be confronted on local and regional scales to help reduce demand (primarily in irrigated agriculture) and/or increase supply.

  5. Long-term groundwater depletion in the United States.

    PubMed

    Konikow, Leonard F

    2015-01-01

    The volume of groundwater stored in the subsurface in the United States decreased by almost 1000 km3 during 1900-2008. The aquifer systems with the three largest volumes of storage depletion include the High Plains aquifer, the Mississippi Embayment section of the Gulf Coastal Plain aquifer system, and the Central Valley of California. Depletion rates accelerated during 1945-1960, averaging 13.6 km3/year during the last half of the century, and after 2000 increased again to about 24 km3/year. Depletion intensity is a new parameter, introduced here, to provide a more consistent basis for comparing storage depletion problems among various aquifers by factoring in time and areal extent of the aquifer. During 2001-2008, the Central Valley of California had the largest depletion intensity. Groundwater depletion in the United States can explain 1.4% of observed sea-level rise during the 108-year study period and 2.1% during 2001-2008. Groundwater depletion must be confronted on local and regional scales to help reduce demand (primarily in irrigated agriculture) and/or increase supply.

  6. Unified transport scaling laws for plasma blobs and depletions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesenberger, M.; Held, M.; Kube, R.; Garcia, O. E.

    2017-06-01

    We study the dynamics of seeded plasma blobs and depletions in an (effective) gravitational field. For incompressible flows, the radial center of mass velocity of blobs and depletions is proportional to the square root of their initial cross-field size and amplitude. If the flows are compressible, this scaling holds only for ratios of amplitude to size larger than a critical value. Otherwise, the maximum blob and depletion velocity depends linearly on the initial amplitude and is independent of size. In both cases, the acceleration of blobs and depletions depends on their initial amplitude relative to the background plasma density and is proportional to gravity and independent of their cross-field size. Due to their reduced inertia plasma, depletions accelerate more quickly than the corresponding blobs. These scaling laws are derived from the invariants of the governing drift-fluid equations for blobs and agree excellently with numerical simulations over five orders of magnitude for both blobs and depletions. We suggest an empirical model that unifies and correctly captures the radial acceleration and maximum velocities of both blobs and depletions.

  7. Depletion of mesospheric sodium during extended period of pulsating aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, T.; Hosokawa, K.; Nozawa, S.; Tsuda, T. T.; Ogawa, Y.; Tsutsumi, M.; Hiraki, Y.; Fujiwara, H.; Kawahara, T. D.; Saito, N.; Wada, S.; Kawabata, T.; Hall, C.

    2017-01-01

    We quantitatively evaluated the Na density depletion due to charge transfer reactions between Na atoms and molecular ions produced by high-energy electron precipitation during a pulsating aurora (PsA). An extended period of PsA was captured by an all-sky camera at the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) radar Tromsø site (69.6°N, 19.2°E) during a 2 h interval from 00:00 to 02:00 UT on 25 January 2012. During this period, using the EISCAT very high frequency (VHF) radar, we detected three intervals of intense ionization below 100 km that were probably caused by precipitation of high-energy electrons during the PsA. In these intervals, the sodium lidar at Tromsø observed characteristic depletion of Na density at altitudes between 97 and 100 km. These Na density depletions lasted for 8 min and represented 5-8% of the background Na layer. To examine the cause of this depletion, we modeled the depletion rate based on charge transfer reactions with NO+ and O2+ while changing the R value which is defined as the ratio of NO+ to O2+ densities, from 1 to 10. The correlation coefficients between observed and modeled Na density depletion calculated with typical value R = 3 for time intervals T1, T2, and T3 were 0.66, 0.80, and 0.67, respectively. The observed Na density depletion rates fall within the range of modeled depletion rate calculated with R from 1 to 10. This suggests that the charge transfer reactions triggered by the auroral impact ionization at low altitudes are the predominant process responsible for Na density depletion during PsA intervals.

  8. A Multilab Preregistered Replication of the Ego-Depletion Effect.

    PubMed

    Hagger, Martin S; Chatzisarantis, Nikos L D; Alberts, Hugo; Anggono, Calvin Octavianus; Batailler, Cédric; Birt, Angela R; Brand, Ralf; Brandt, Mark J; Brewer, Gene; Bruyneel, Sabrina; Calvillo, Dustin P; Campbell, W Keith; Cannon, Peter R; Carlucci, Marianna; Carruth, Nicholas P; Cheung, Tracy; Crowell, Adrienne; De Ridder, Denise T D; Dewitte, Siegfried; Elson, Malte; Evans, Jacqueline R; Fay, Benjamin A; Fennis, Bob M; Finley, Anna; Francis, Zoë; Heise, Elke; Hoemann, Henrik; Inzlicht, Michael; Koole, Sander L; Koppel, Lina; Kroese, Floor; Lange, Florian; Lau, Kevin; Lynch, Bridget P; Martijn, Carolien; Merckelbach, Harald; Mills, Nicole V; Michirev, Alexej; Miyake, Akira; Mosser, Alexandra E; Muise, Megan; Muller, Dominique; Muzi, Milena; Nalis, Dario; Nurwanti, Ratri; Otgaar, Henry; Philipp, Michael C; Primoceri, Pierpaolo; Rentzsch, Katrin; Ringos, Lara; Schlinkert, Caroline; Schmeichel, Brandon J; Schoch, Sarah F; Schrama, Michel; Schütz, Astrid; Stamos, Angelos; Tinghög, Gustav; Ullrich, Johannes; vanDellen, Michelle; Wimbarti, Supra; Wolff, Wanja; Yusainy, Cleoputri; Zerhouni, Oulmann; Zwienenberg, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Good self-control has been linked to adaptive outcomes such as better health, cohesive personal relationships, success in the workplace and at school, and less susceptibility to crime and addictions. In contrast, self-control failure is linked to maladaptive outcomes. Understanding the mechanisms by which self-control predicts behavior may assist in promoting better regulation and outcomes. A popular approach to understanding self-control is the strength or resource depletion model. Self-control is conceptualized as a limited resource that becomes depleted after a period of exertion resulting in self-control failure. The model has typically been tested using a sequential-task experimental paradigm, in which people completing an initial self-control task have reduced self-control capacity and poorer performance on a subsequent task, a state known as ego depletion Although a meta-analysis of ego-depletion experiments found a medium-sized effect, subsequent meta-analyses have questioned the size and existence of the effect and identified instances of possible bias. The analyses served as a catalyst for the current Registered Replication Report of the ego-depletion effect. Multiple laboratories (k = 23, total N = 2,141) conducted replications of a standardized ego-depletion protocol based on a sequential-task paradigm by Sripada et al. Meta-analysis of the studies revealed that the size of the ego-depletion effect was small with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) that encompassed zero (d = 0.04, 95% CI [-0.07, 0.15]. We discuss implications of the findings for the ego-depletion effect and the resource depletion model of self-control. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. The 'depletion layer' of amorphous p-n junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that within reasonable approximations for the density of state distribution within the mobility gap of a:Si, a one-to-one correspondence exists between the electric field distribution in the transition region of an amorphous p-n junction and that in the depletion layer of a crystalline p-n junction. Thus it is inferred that the depletion layer approximation which leads to a parabolic potential distribution within the depletion layer of crystalline junctions also constitutes a fair approximation in the case of amorphous junctions. This fact greatly simplifies an analysis of solid-state electronic devices based on amorphous material (i.e., solar cells).

  10. Challenges dealing with depleted uranium in Germany - Reuse or disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, Kai D.

    2007-07-01

    During enrichment large amounts of depleted Uranium are produced. In Germany every year 2.800 tons of depleted uranium are generated. In Germany depleted uranium is not classified as radioactive waste but a resource for further enrichment. Therefore since 1996 depleted Uranium is sent to ROSATOM in Russia. However it still has to be dealt with the second generation of depleted Uranium. To evaluate the alternative actions in case a solution has to be found in Germany, several studies have been initiated by the Federal Ministry of the Environment. The work that has been carried out evaluated various possibilities to deal with depleted uranium. The international studies on this field and the situation in Germany have been analyzed. In case no further enrichment is planned the depleted uranium has to be stored. In the enrichment process UF{sub 6} is generated. It is an international consensus that for storage it should be converted to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The necessary technique is well established. If the depleted Uranium would have to be characterized as radioactive waste, a final disposal would become necessary. For the planned Konrad repository - a repository for non heat generating radioactive waste - the amount of Uranium is limited by the licensing authority. The existing license would not allow the final disposal of large amounts of depleted Uranium in the Konrad repository. The potential effect on the safety case has not been roughly analyzed. As a result it may be necessary to think about alternatives. Several possibilities for the use of depleted uranium in the industry have been identified. Studies indicate that the properties of Uranium would make it useful in some industrial fields. Nevertheless many practical and legal questions are open. One further option may be the use as shielding e.g. in casks for transport or disposal. Possible techniques for using depleted Uranium as shielding are the use of the metallic Uranium as well as the inclusion in concrete

  11. It Is Chloride Depletion Alkalosis, Not Contraction Alkalosis

    PubMed Central

    Galla, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance of metabolic alkalosis generated by chloride depletion is often attributed to volume contraction. In balance and clearance studies in rats and humans, we showed that chloride repletion in the face of persisting alkali loading, volume contraction, and potassium and sodium depletion completely corrects alkalosis by a renal mechanism. Nephron segment studies strongly suggest the corrective response is orchestrated in the collecting duct, which has several transporters integral to acid-base regulation, the most important of which is pendrin, a luminal Cl/HCO3− exchanger. Chloride depletion alkalosis should replace the notion of contraction alkalosis. PMID:22223876

  12. STRATOSPHERIC OZONE DEPLETION: A FOCUS ON EPA'S RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    In September of 1987 the United States, along with 26 other countries, signed a landmark treaty to limit and subsequently, through revisions, phase out the production of all significant ozone depleting substances. Many researchers suspected that these chemicals, especially chl...

  13. Depletion in Antarctic Ozone and Associated Climatic Change,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ANTARCTIC REGIONS, *CLIMATE, *DEPLETION, *OZONE, AGREEMENTS, ATMOSPHERES, ATMOSPHERICS, CARBON, CARBON DIOXIDE, COMPUTATIONS, DIOXIDES, GREENHOUSE ... EFFECT , GREENHOUSES, HIGH LATITUDES, LATITUDE, LOSSES, MEAN, METHANE, MODELS, NETS, NITROUS OXIDE, OBSERVATION, OXIDES, PERTURBATIONS, REGIONS, STEADY

  14. STRATOSPHERIC OZONE DEPLETION: A FOCUS ON EPA'S RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    In September of 1987 the United States, along with 26 other countries, signed a landmark treaty to limit and subsequently, through revisions, phase out the production of all significant ozone depleting substances. Many researchers suspected that these chemicals, especially chl...

  15. Stimulated Emission Depletion Lithography with Mercapto-Functional Polymers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Surface reactive nanostructures were fabricated using stimulated emission depletion (STED) lithography. The functionalization of the nanostructures was realized by copolymerization of a bifunctional metal oxo cluster in the presence of a triacrylate monomer. Ligands of the cluster surface cross-link to the monomer during the lithographic process, whereas unreacted mercapto functionalized ligands are transferred to the polymer and remain reactive after polymer formation of the surface of the nanostructure. The depletion efficiency in dependence of the cluster loading was investigated and full depletion of the STED effect was observed with a cluster loading exceeding 4 wt %. A feature size by λ/11 was achieved by using a donut-shaped depletion beam. The reactivity of the mercapto groups on the surface of the nanostructure was tested by incubation with mercapto-reactive fluorophores. PMID:26816204

  16. Individual differences in dopamine level modulate the ego depletion effect.

    PubMed

    Dang, Junhua; Xiao, Shanshan; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Yumeng; Mao, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Initial exertion of self-control impairs subsequent self-regulatory performance, which is referred to as the ego depletion effect. The current study examined how individual differences in dopamine level, as indexed by eye blink rate (EBR), would moderate ego depletion. An inverted-U-shaped relationship between EBR and subsequent self-regulatory performance was found when participants initially engaged in self-control but such relationship was absent in the control condition where there was no initial exertion, suggesting individuals with a medium dopamine level may be protected from the typical ego depletion effect. These findings are consistent with a cognitive explanation which considers ego depletion as a phenomenon similar to "switch costs" that would be neutralized by factors promoting flexible switching. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. 10. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLD IN FOUNDRY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLD IN FOUNDRY. (11/11/56) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  18. Background suppression in fluorescence nanoscopy with stimulated emission double depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Prunsche, Benedikt; Zhou, Lu; Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence nanoscopy is a powerful super-resolution imaging technique based on the confinement of fluorescence emission to the central subregion of an observation volume through de-excitation of fluorophores in the periphery via stimulated emission. Here, we introduce stimulated emission double depletion (STEDD) as a method to selectively remove artificial background intensity. In this approach, a first, conventional STED pulse is followed by a second, delayed Gaussian STED pulse that specifically depletes the central region, thus leaving only background. Thanks to time-resolved detection we can remove this background intensity voxel by voxel by taking the weighted difference of photons collected before and after the second STED pulse. STEDD thus yields background-suppressed super-resolved images as well as STED-based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy data. Furthermore, the proposed method is also beneficial when considering lower-power, less redshifted depletion pulses.

  19. Hyperspectral stimulated emission depletion microscopy and methods of use thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Timlin, Jerilyn A; Aaron, Jesse S

    2014-04-01

    A hyperspectral stimulated emission depletion ("STED") microscope system for high-resolution imaging of samples labeled with multiple fluorophores (e.g., two to ten fluorophores). The hyperspectral STED microscope includes a light source, optical systems configured for generating an excitation light beam and a depletion light beam, optical systems configured for focusing the excitation and depletion light beams on a sample, and systems for collecting and processing data generated by interaction of the excitation and depletion light beams with the sample. Hyperspectral STED data may be analyzed using multivariate curve resolution analysis techniques to deconvolute emission from the multiple fluorophores. The hyperspectral STED microscope described herein can be used for multi-color, subdiffraction imaging of samples (e.g., materials and biological materials) and for analyzing a tissue by Forster Resonance Energy Transfer ("FRET").

  20. Retrieval of buried depleted uranium from the T-1 trench

    SciTech Connect

    Burmeister, M.; Castaneda, N.; Greengard, T. |; Hull, C.; Barbour, D.; Quapp, W.J.

    1998-07-01

    The Trench 1 remediation project will be conducted this year to retrieve depleted uranium and other associated materials from a trench at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. The excavated materials will be segregated and stabilized for shipment. The depleted uranium will be treated at an offsite facility which utilizes a novel approach for waste minimization and disposal through utilization of a combination of uranium recycling and volume efficient uranium stabilization.

  1. Selective Dissolution and Recovery of Depleted Uranium from Armor Plate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-05

    targets used in testing high density armor-piercing ammunition containing depleted uranium (DU) are subject to disposal as low level radioactive waste...radioactive material. Decontamination testing on targets characterized as containing residual entrained penetrator fragments is necessary to...depleted uranium from the ac4.d solvent. A conceptual flow I sheet, based on preliminar:" test data, suggested that uranium could be I extracted from

  2. Observed and Simulated Depletion Layers with Southward IMF

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    characteristics of an event on 12 March 2001, in ionosphere , follow magnetic field lines to near the mag- which a depletion layer was observed just...depletion layers 2153 region. The second type inhibits dayside merging and is a ionosphere /thermosphere. The simulations discussed here possible...mechanism for understanding the saturation of the contain specifically selected parameters and simplifying ap- ionospheric potential under strongly driven

  3. Lithium Depletion in the Beta Pictoris Moving Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Jennifer C.; Jensen, E. L.; Reaser, B. E.

    2006-12-01

    We present a study of lithium depletion in twelve late-type pre-main-sequence stars in the coeval Beta Pictoris Moving Group (BPMG). The age of this group ( 12 Myr) is well constrained because all of the stars in the sample have Hipparcos distances. We have determined Li abundances for these K and M stars using equivalent width measurements of the 6707.8 Angstrom Li I line from new high-resolution, high-S/N echelle spectra, and we compare these abundances to models of pre-main-sequence Li depletion by Baraffe et al. (1998), D'Antona & Mazzitelli (1997, 1998), and Siess, Dufour, & Forestini (2000). Significantly more lithium depletion is observed in the sample than is predicted for a group of this age. In particular, the discrepancy between the predicted and the observed lithium abundances increases with decreasing effective temperature, suggesting a problem with theories describing pre-main-sequence lithium depletion. Our data indicate that M stars deplete lithium more rapidly than predicted, which could make M-type post-T-Tauri stars difficult to identify. In addition, we compare our results to the work of Song, Bessell, & Zuckerman (2002) on HIP 112312. In contrast to that work, we did not observe the lithium depletion boundary of the BPMG; none of the three M4.5 stars in the sample showed evidence of lithium (log N(Li) < -0.5), indicating a lithium depletion boundary later than M4.5, further underscoring the gap between age estimates from lithium depletion and those from theoretical evolutionary tracks. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation through grant AST-0307830.

  4. Mechanism of actin polymerization in cellular ATP depletion.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Simon J; Hosford, Melanie A; Molitoris, Bruce A

    2004-02-13

    Cellular ATP depletion in diverse cell types results in the net conversion of monomeric G-actin to polymeric F-actin and is an important aspect of cellular injury in tissue ischemia. We propose that this conversion results from altering the ratio of ATP-G-actin and ADP-G-actin, causing a net decrease in the concentration of thymosinactin complexes as a consequence of the differential affinity of thymosin beta4 for ATP- and ADP-G-actin. To test this hypothesis we examined the effect of ATP depletion induced by antimycin A and substrate depletion on actin polymerization, the nucleotide state of the monomer pool, and the association of actin monomers with thymosin and profilin in the kidney epithelial cell line LLC-PK1. ATP depletion for 30 min increased F-actin content to 145% of the levels under physiological conditions, accompanied by a corresponding decrease in G-actin content. Cytochalasin D treatment did not reduce F-actin formation during ATP depletion, indicating that it was predominantly not because of barbed end monomer addition. ATP-G-actin levels decreased rapidly during depletion, but there was no change in the concentration of ADP-G-actin monomers. The decrease in ATP-G-actin levels could be accounted for by dissociation of the thymosin-G-actin binary complex, resulting in a rise in the concentration of free thymosin beta4 from 4 to 11 microm. Increased detection of profilin-actin complexes during depletion indicated that profilin may participate in catalyzing nucleotide exchange during depletion. This mechanism provides a biochemical basis for the accumulation of F-actin aggregates in ischemic cells.

  5. Competition, traits and resource depletion in plant communities.

    PubMed

    Violle, Cyrille; Garnier, Eric; Lecoeur, Jérémie; Roumet, Catherine; Podeur, Cécile; Blanchard, Alain; Navas, Marie-Laure

    2009-07-01

    Although of primary importance to explain plant community structure, general relationships between plant traits, resource depletion and competitive outcomes remain to be quantified across species. Here, we used a comparative approach to test whether instantaneous measurements of plant traits can capture both the amount of resources depleted under plant cover over time (competitive effect) and the way competitors perceived this resource depletion (competitive response). We performed a large competition experiment in which phytometers from a single grass species were transplanted within 18 different monocultures grown in a common-garden experiment, with a time-integrative quantification of light and water depletion over the phytometers' growing season. Resource-capturing traits were measured on both phytometers (competitive response traits) and monocultures (competitive effect traits). The total amounts of depleted light and water availabilities over the season strongly differed among monocultures; they were best estimated by instantaneous measurements of height and rooting depth, respectively, performed when either light or water became limiting. Specific leaf area and leaf water potential, two competitive response traits measured at the leaf level, were good predictors of changes in phytometer performance under competition, and reflected the amount of light and water, respectively, perceived by plants throughout their lifespan. Our results demonstrated the relevance of instantaneous measures of plant traits as indicators of resource depletion over time, validating the trait-based approach for competition ecology.

  6. Depletion optimization of lumped burnable poisons in pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kodah, Z.H.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques were developed to construct a set of basic poison depletion curves which deplete in a monotonical manner. These curves were combined to match a required optimized depletion profile by utilizing either linear or non-linear programming methods. Three computer codes, LEOPARD, XSDRN, and EXTERMINATOR-2 were used in the analyses. A depletion routine was developed and incorporated into the XSDRN code to allow the depletion of fuel, fission products, and burnable poisons. The Three Mile Island Unit-1 reactor core was used in this work as a typical PWR core. Two fundamental burnable poison rod designs were studied. They are a solid cylindrical poison rod and an annular cylindrical poison rod with water filling the central region.These two designs have either a uniform mixture of burnable poisons or lumped spheroids of burnable poisons in the poison region. Boron and gadolinium are the two burnable poisons which were investigated in this project. Thermal self-shielding factor calculations for solid and annular poison rods were conducted. Also expressions for overall thermal self-shielding factors for one or more than one size group of poison spheroids inside solid and annular poison rods were derived and studied. Poison spheroids deplete at a slower rate than the poison mixture because each spheroid exhibits some self-shielding effects of its own. The larger the spheroid, the higher the self-shielding effects due to the increase in poison concentration.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: MPV17-related hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome MPV17-related hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... All Close All Description MPV17 -related hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome is an inherited disorder that can ...

  8. Engineering analysis report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride : storage of depleted uranium metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Folga, S.M.; Kier, P.H.; Thimmapuram, P.R.

    2001-01-24

    This report contains an engineering analysis of long-term storage of uranium metal in boxes as an option for long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Three storage facilities are considered: buildings, vaults, and mined cavities. Three cases are considered: either all, half, or a quarter of the depleted uranium metal that would be produced from the conversion of depleted UF{sub 6} is stored at the facility. The analysis of these alternatives is based on a box design used in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride, report DOE/EIS-0269, published in 1999 by the US Department of Energy. This box design does not appear to effectively use space within the box. Hence, an alternative box design that allows for a reduced storage area is addressed in the appendices for long-term storage in buildings.

  9. A robust TEC depletion detector algorithm for satellite based navigation in Indian zone and depletion analysis for GAGAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashora, Nirvikar

    2012-07-01

    Equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) and associated plasma irregularities are known to cause severe scintillation for the satellite signals and produce range errors, which eventually result either in loss of lock of the signal or in random fluctuation in TEC, respectively, affecting precise positioning and navigation solutions. The EPBs manifest as sudden reduction in line of sight TEC, which are more often called TEC depletions, and are spread over thousands of km in meridional direction and a few hundred km in zonal direction. They change shape and size while drifting from one longitude to another in nighttime ionosphere. For a satellite based navigation system, like GAGAN in India that depends upon (i) multiple satellites (i.e. GPS) (ii) multiple ground reference stations and (iii) a near real time data processing, such EPBs are of grave concern. A TEC model generally provides a near real-time grid based ionospheric vertical errors (GIVEs) over hypothetically spread 5x5 degree latitude-longitude grid points. But, on night when a TEC depletion occurs in a given longitude sector, it is almost impossible for any system to give a forecast of GIVEs. If loss-of-lock events occur due to scintillation, there is no way to improve the situation. But, when large and random depletions in TEC occur with scintillations and without loss-of-lock, it affects low latitude TEC in two ways. (a) Multiple satellites show depleted TEC which may be very different from model-TEC values and hence the GIVE would be incorrect over various grid points (ii) the user may be affected by depletions which are not sampled by reference stations and hence interpolated GIVE within one square would be grossly erroneous. The most general solution (and the far most difficult as well) is having advance knowledge of spatio-temporal occurrence and precise magnitude of such depletions. While forecasting TEC depletions in spatio-temporal domain are a scientific challenge (as we show below), operational systems

  10. Ego depletion decreases trust in economic decision making

    PubMed Central

    Ainsworth, Sarah E.; Baumeister, Roy F.; Vohs, Kathleen D.; Ariely, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Three experiments tested the effects of ego depletion on economic decision making. Participants completed a task either requiring self-control or not. Then participants learned about the trust game, in which senders are given an initial allocation of $10 to split between themselves and another person, the receiver. The receiver receives triple the amount given and can send any, all, or none of the tripled money back to the sender. Participants were assigned the role of the sender and decided how to split the initial allocation. Giving less money, and therefore not trusting the receiver, is the safe, less risky response. Participants who had exerted self-control and were depleted gave the receiver less money than those in the non-depletion condition (Experiment 1). This effect was replicated and moderated in two additional experiments. Depletion again led to lower amounts given (less trust), but primarily among participants who were told they would never meet the receiver (Experiment 2) or who were given no information about how similar they were to the receiver (Experiment 3). Amounts given did not differ for depleted and non-depleted participants who either expected to meet the receiver (Experiment 2) or were led to believe that they were very similar to the receiver (Experiment 3). Decreased trust among depleted participants was strongest among neurotics. These results imply that self-control facilitates behavioral trust, especially when no other cues signal decreased social risk in trusting, such as if an actual or possible relationship with the receiver were suggested. PMID:25013237

  11. Global storm time depletion of the outer electron belt.

    PubMed

    Ukhorskiy, A Y; Sitnov, M I; Millan, R M; Kress, B T; Fennell, J F; Claudepierre, S G; Barnes, R J

    2015-04-01

    The outer radiation belt consists of relativistic (>0.5 MeV) electrons trapped on closed trajectories around Earth where the magnetic field is nearly dipolar. During increased geomagnetic activity, electron intensities in the belt can vary by orders of magnitude at different spatial and temporal scales. The main phase of geomagnetic storms often produces deep depletions of electron intensities over broad regions of the outer belt. Previous studies identified three possible processes that can contribute to the main-phase depletions: adiabatic inflation of electron drift orbits caused by the ring current growth, electron loss into the atmosphere, and electron escape through the magnetopause boundary. In this paper we investigate the relative importance of the adiabatic effect and magnetopause loss to the rapid depletion of the outer belt observed at the Van Allen Probes spacecraft during the main phase of 17 March 2013 storm. The intensities of >1 MeV electrons were depleted by more than an order of magnitude over the entire radial extent of the belt in less than 6 h after the sudden storm commencement. For the analysis we used three-dimensional test particle simulations of global evolution of the outer belt in the Tsyganenko-Sitnov (TS07D) magnetic field model with an inductive electric field. Comparison of the simulation results with electron measurements from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer experiment shows that magnetopause loss accounts for most of the observed depletion at L>5, while at lower L shells the depletion is adiabatic. Both magnetopause loss and the adiabatic effect are controlled by the change in global configuration of the magnetic field due to storm time development of the ring current; a simulation of electron evolution without a ring current produces a much weaker depletion.

  12. Depletion models can predict shorebird distribution at different spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Gill, J A; Sutherland, W J; Norris, K

    2001-02-22

    Predicting the impact of habitat change on populations requires an understanding of the number of animals that a given area can support. Depletion models enable predictions of the numbers of individuals an area can support from prey density and predator searching efficiency and handling time. Depletion models have been successfully employed to predict patterns of abundance over small spatial scales, but most environmental change occurs over large spatial scales. We test the ability of depletion models to predict abundance at a range of scales with black-tailed godwits, Limosa limosa islandica. From the type II functional response of godwits to their prey, we calculated the handling time and searching efficiency associated with these prey. These were incorporated in a depletion model, together with the density of available prey determined from surveys, in order to predict godwit abundance. Tests of these predictions with Wetland Bird Survey data from the British Trust for Ornithology showed significant correlations between predicted and observed densities at three scales: within mudflats, within estuaries and between estuaries. Depletion models can thus be powerful tools for predicting the population size that can be supported on sites at a range of scales. This greatly enhances our confidence in predictions of the consequences of environmental change.

  13. The association between controlled interpersonal affect regulation and resource depletion.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Íñigo, David; Poerio, Giulia Lara; Totterdell, Peter

    2013-07-01

    This investigation focuses on what occurs to individuals' self-regulatory resource during controlled Interpersonal Affect Regulation (IAR) which is the process of deliberately influencing the internal feeling states of others. Combining the strength model of self-regulation and the resources conservation model, the investigation tested whether: (1) IAR behaviors are positively related to ego-depletion because goal-directed behaviors demand self-regulatory processes, and (2) the use of affect-improving strategies benefits from a source of resource-recovery because it initiates positive feedback from targets, as proposed from a resource-conservation perspective. To test this, a lab study based on an experimental dual-task paradigm using a sample of pairs of friends in the UK and a longitudinal field study of a sample of healthcare workers in Spain were conducted. The experimental study showed a depleting effect of interpersonal affect-improving IAR on a subsequent self-regulation task. The field study showed that while interpersonal affect-worsening was positively associated with depletion, as indicated by the level of emotional exhaustion, interpersonal affect-improving was only associated with depletion after controlling for the effect of positive feedback from clients. The findings indicate that IAR does have implications for resource depletion, but that social reactions play a role in the outcome. © 2013 The Authors. Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being © 2013 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  14. Self-regulatory depletion increases emotional reactivity in the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Dylan D; Heatherton, Todd F

    2013-04-01

    The ability to self-regulate can become impaired when people are required to engage in successive acts of effortful self-control, even when self-control occurs in different domains. Here, we used functional neuroimaging to test whether engaging in effortful inhibition in the cognitive domain would lead to putative dysfunction in the emotional domain. Forty-eight participants viewed images of emotional scenes during functional magnetic resonance imaging in two sessions that were separated by a challenging attention control task that required effortful inhibition (depletion group) or not (control group). Compared to the control group, depleted participants showed increased activity in the left amygdala to negative but not to positive or neutral scenes. Moreover, whereas the control group showed reduced amygdala activity to all scene types (i.e. habituation), the depletion group showed increased amygdala activity relative to their pre-depletion baseline; however this was only significant for negative scenes. Finally, depleted participants showed reduced functional connectivity between the left amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex during negative scene processing. These findings demonstrate that consuming self-regulatory resources leads to an exaggerated neural response to emotional material that appears specific to negatively valenced stimuli and further suggests a failure to recruit top-down prefrontal regions involved in emotion regulation.

  15. Self-regulatory depletion increases emotional reactivity in the amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Heatherton, Todd F.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to self-regulate can become impaired when people are required to engage in successive acts of effortful self-control, even when self-control occurs in different domains. Here, we used functional neuroimaging to test whether engaging in effortful inhibition in the cognitive domain would lead to putative dysfunction in the emotional domain. Forty-eight participants viewed images of emotional scenes during functional magnetic resonance imaging in two sessions that were separated by a challenging attention control task that required effortful inhibition (depletion group) or not (control group). Compared to the control group, depleted participants showed increased activity in the left amygdala to negative but not to positive or neutral scenes. Moreover, whereas the control group showed reduced amygdala activity to all scene types (i.e. habituation), the depletion group showed increased amygdala activity relative to their pre-depletion baseline; however this was only significant for negative scenes. Finally, depleted participants showed reduced functional connectivity between the left amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex during negative scene processing. These findings demonstrate that consuming self-regulatory resources leads to an exaggerated neural response to emotional material that appears specific to negatively valenced stimuli and further suggests a failure to recruit top–down prefrontal regions involved in emotion regulation. PMID:22842815

  16. Antarctic winter mercury and ozone depletion events over sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerentorp Mastromonaco, M.; Gårdfeldt, K.; Jourdain, B.; Abrahamsson, K.; Granfors, A.; Ahnoff, M.; Dommergue, A.; Méjean, G.; Jacobi, H.-W.

    2016-03-01

    During atmospheric mercury and ozone depletion events in the springtime in polar regions gaseous elemental mercury and ozone undergo rapid declines. Mercury is quickly transformed into oxidation products, which are subsequently removed by deposition. Here we show that such events also occur during Antarctic winter over sea ice areas, leading to additional deposition of mercury. Over four months in the Weddell Sea we measured gaseous elemental, oxidized, and particulate-bound mercury, as well as ozone in the troposphere and total and elemental mercury concentrations in snow, demonstrating a series of depletion and deposition events between July and September. The winter depletions in July were characterized by stronger correlations between mercury and ozone and larger formation of particulate-bound mercury in air compared to later spring events. It appears that light at large solar zenith angles is sufficient to initiate the photolytic formation of halogen radicals. We also propose a dark mechanism that could explain observed events in air masses coming from dark regions. Br2 that could be the main actor in dark conditions was possibly formed in high concentrations in the marine boundary layer in the dark. These high concentrations may also have caused the formation of high concentrations of CHBr3 and CH2I2 in the top layers of the Antarctic sea ice observed during winter. These new findings show that the extent of depletion events is larger than previously believed and that winter depletions result in additional deposition of mercury that could be transferred to marine and terrestrial ecosystems.

  17. ALEPH2 - A general purpose Monte Carlo depletion code

    SciTech Connect

    Stankovskiy, A.; Van Den Eynde, G.; Baeten, P.; Trakas, C.; Demy, P. M.; Villatte, L.

    2012-07-01

    The Monte-Carlo burn-up code ALEPH is being developed at SCK-CEN since 2004. A previous version of the code implemented the coupling between the Monte Carlo transport (any version of MCNP or MCNPX) and the ' deterministic' depletion code ORIGEN-2.2 but had important deficiencies in nuclear data treatment and limitations inherent to ORIGEN-2.2. A new version of the code, ALEPH2, has several unique features making it outstanding among other depletion codes. The most important feature is full data consistency between steady-state Monte Carlo and time-dependent depletion calculations. The last generation general-purpose nuclear data libraries (JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII and JENDL-4) are fully implemented, including special purpose activation, spontaneous fission, fission product yield and radioactive decay data. The built-in depletion algorithm allows to eliminate the uncertainties associated with obtaining the time-dependent nuclide concentrations. A predictor-corrector mechanism, calculation of nuclear heating, calculation of decay heat, decay neutron sources are available as well. The validation of the code on the results of REBUS experimental program has been performed. The ALEPH2 has shown better agreement with measured data than other depletion codes. (authors)

  18. Cholesterol depletion impairs contractile machinery in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hissa, Barbara; Oakes, Patrick W.; Pontes, Bruno; Ramírez-San Juan, Guillermina; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol regulates numerous cellular processes. Depleting its synthesis in skeletal myofibers induces vacuolization and contraction impairment. However, little is known about how cholesterol reduction affects cardiomyocyte behavior. Here, we deplete cholesterol by incubating neonatal cardiomyocytes with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. Traction force microscopy shows that lowering cholesterol increases the rate of cell contraction and generates defects in cell relaxation. Cholesterol depletion also increases membrane tension, Ca2+ spikes frequency and intracellular Ca2+ concentration. These changes can be correlated with modifications in caveolin-3 and L-Type Ca2+ channel distributions across the sarcolemma. Channel regulation is also compromised since cAMP-dependent PKA activity is enhanced, increasing the probability of L-Type Ca2+ channel opening events. Immunofluorescence reveals that cholesterol depletion abrogates sarcomeric organization, changing spacing and alignment of α-actinin bands due to increase in proteolytic activity of calpain. We propose a mechanism in which cholesterol depletion triggers a signaling cascade, culminating with contraction impairment and myofibril disruption in cardiomyocytes. PMID:28256617

  19. Global Depletion of Groundwater Resources: Past and Future Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierkens, M. F.; de Graaf, I. E. M.; Van Beek, L. P.; Wada, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Globally, about 17% of the crops are irrigated, yet irrigation accounts for 40% of the global food production. As more than 40% of irrigation water comes from groundwater, groundwater abstraction rates are large and exceed natural recharge rates in many regions of the world, thus leading to groundwater depletion. In this paper we provide an overview of recent research on global groundwater depletion. We start with presenting various estimates of global groundwater depletion, both from flux based as well as volume based methods. We also present estimates of the contribution of non-renewable groundwater to irrigation water consumption and how this contribution developed during the last 50 years. Next, using a flux based method, we provide projections of groundwater depletion for the coming century under various socio-economic and climate scenarios. As groundwater depletion contributes to sea-level rise, we also provide estimates of this contribution from the past as well as for future scenarios. Finally, we show recent results of groundwater level changes and change in river flow as a result of global groundwater abstractions as obtained from a global groundwater flow model.

  20. Recovery of the Ozone Layer: The Ozone Depleting Gas Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, David J.; Montzka, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    The stratospheric ozone layer, through absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation, protects all biological systems on Earth. In response to concerns over the depletion of the global ozone layer, the U.S. Clean Air Act as amended in 1990 mandates that NASA and NOAA monitor stratospheric ozone and ozone-depleting substances. This information is critical for assessing whether the Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer, an international treaty that entered into force in 1989 to protect the ozone layer, is having its intended effect of mitigating increases in harmful ultraviolet radiation. To provide the information necessary to satisfy this congressional mandate, both NASA and NOAA have instituted and maintained global monitoring programs to keep track of ozone-depleting gases as well as ozone itself. While data collected for the past 30 years have been used extensively in international assessments of ozone layer depletion science, the language of scientists often eludes the average citizen who has a considerable interest in the health of Earth's protective ultraviolet radiation shield. Are the ozone-destroying chemicals declining in the atmosphere? When will these chemicals decline to pre-ozone hole levels so that the Antarctic ozone hole might disappear? Will this timing be different in the stratosphere above midlatitudes?

  1. Wall depletion length of a channel-confined polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Guo Kang; Li, Xiaolan; Dorfman, Kevin D.

    2017-02-01

    Numerous experiments have taken advantage of DNA as a model system to test theories for a channel-confined polymer. A tacit assumption in analyzing these data is the existence of a well-defined depletion length characterizing DNA-wall interactions such that the experimental system (a polyelectrolyte in a channel with charged walls) can be mapped to the theoretical model (a neutral polymer with hard walls). We test this assumption using pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method (PERM) simulations of a DNA-like semiflexible polymer confined in a tube. The polymer-wall interactions are modeled by augmenting a hard wall interaction with an exponentially decaying, repulsive soft potential. The free energy, mean span, and variance in the mean span obtained in the presence of a soft wall potential are compared to equivalent simulations in the absence of the soft wall potential to determine the depletion length. We find that the mean span and variance about the mean span have the same depletion length for all soft potentials we tested. In contrast, the depletion length for the confinement free energy approaches that for the mean span only when depletion length no longer depends on channel size. The results have implications for the interpretation of DNA confinement experiments under low ionic strengths.

  2. Bond rupture between colloidal particles with a depletion interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, Kathryn A.; Furst, Eric M.

    2016-05-15

    The force required to break the bonds of a depletion gel is measured by dynamically loading pairs of colloidal particles suspended in a solution of a nonadsorbing polymer. Sterically stabilized poly(methyl methacrylate) colloids that are 2.7 μm diameter are brought into contact in a solvent mixture of cyclohexane-cyclohexyl bromide and polystyrene polymer depletant. The particle pairs are subject to a tensile load at a constant loading rate over many approach-retraction cycles. The stochastic nature of the thermal rupture events results in a distribution of bond rupture forces with an average magnitude and variance that increases with increasing depletant concentration. The measured force distribution is described by the flux of particle pairs sampling the energy barrier of the bond interaction potential based on the Asakura–Oosawa depletion model. A transition state model demonstrates the significance of lubrication hydrodynamic interactions and the effect of the applied loading rate on the rupture force of bonds in a depletion gel.

  3. A TEST OF PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE LITHIUM DEPLETION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Jennifer C.; Jensen, Eric L. N.

    2010-03-01

    Despite the extensive study of lithium depletion during pre-main-sequence (PMS) contraction, studies of individual stars show discrepancies between ages determined from the Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram and ages determined from lithium depletion, indicating open questions in the PMS evolutionary models. To further test these models, we present high-resolution spectra for members of the beta Pictoris Moving Group (BPMG), which is young and nearby. We measure equivalent widths of the 6707.8 A Li I line in these stars and use them to determine lithium abundances. We combine the lithium abundance with the predictions of PMS evolutionary models in order to calculate a lithium depletion age for each star. We compare this age to the age predicted by the H-R diagram of the same model. We find that the evolutionary models underpredict the amount of lithium depletion for the BPMG given its nominal H-R diagram age of {approx}12 Myr, particularly for the mid-M stars, which have no observable Li I line. This results in systematically older ages calculated from lithium depletion isochrones than from the H-R diagram. We suggest that this discrepancy may be related to the discrepancy between measured M-dwarf radii and the smaller radii predicted by evolutionary models.

  4. Examining depletion theories under conditions of within-task transfer.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Gene A; Lau, Kevin K H; Wingert, Kimberly M; Ball, B Hunter; Blais, Chris

    2017-07-01

    In everyday life, mental fatigue can be detrimental across many domains including driving, learning, and working. Given the importance of understanding and accounting for the deleterious effects of mental fatigue on behavior, a growing body of literature has studied the role of motivational and executive control processes in mental fatigue. In typical laboratory paradigms, participants complete a task that places demand on these self-control processes and are later given a subsequent task. Generally speaking, decrements to subsequent task performance are taken as evidence that the initial task created mental fatigue through the continued engagement of motivational and executive functions. Several models have been developed to account for negative transfer resulting from this "ego depletion." In the current study, we provide a brief literature review, specify current theoretical approaches to ego-depletion, and report an empirical test of current models of depletion. Across 4 experiments we found minimal evidence for executive control depletion along with strong evidence for motivation mediated ego depletion. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. About ozone depletion in stratosphere over Brazil in last decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Inácio M.; Imai, Takeshi; Seguchi, Tomio

    The depletion of stratospheric ozone, resulting from the emission of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), has become a major issue since 1980. The decrease in stratospheric ozone over the polar regions has been pronounced at the South Pole than at the North Pole. In mid-latitude and equatorial regions, ozone depletion becomes less important; it depends on seasonal effects and on the characteristics of a particular region. The detailed mechanism by which the polar ozone holes form is different from that for the mid-latitude thinning, but the most important process in both trends is the catalytic destruction of ozone by atomic chlorine and bromine. The main source of these halogen atoms in the stratosphere is photodissociation of CFC compounds, commonly called freons, and of bromofluorocarbon compounds known as halons. These compounds are transported into the stratosphere after being emitted at the surface. Both ozone depletion mechanisms strengthened as emissions of CFCs and halons increased [1]. Measurements of stratospheric ozone carried out on several locations in Brazil and on the South Pole in the last decade (1996-2005), using detectors placed on ground, stratospheric balloons and Earth Probe TOMS satellites, are presented here. Detailed series analysis from 1980 up to the present describes a mean ozone depletion of 4[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ozone/depletion.

  6. Surface depletion induced quantum confinement in CdS nanobelts.

    PubMed

    Li, Dehui; Zhang, Jun; Xiong, Qihua

    2012-06-26

    We investigate the surface depletion induced quantum confinement in CdS nanobelts beyond the quantum confinement regime, where the thickness is much larger than the bulk exciton Bohr radius. From room temperature to 77 K, the emission energy of free exciton A scales linearly versus 1/L(2) when the thickness L is less than 100 nm, while a deviation occurs for those belts thicker than 100 nm due to the reabsorption effect. The 1/L(2) dependence can be explained by the surface depletion induced quantum confinement, which modifies the confinement potential leading to a quasi-square potential well smaller than the geometric thickness of nanobelts, giving rise to the confinement effect to exciton emission beyond the quantum confinement regime. The surface depletion is sensitive to carrier concentration and surface states. As the temperature decreases, the decrease of the electrostatic potential drop in the surface depletion region leads to a weaker confinement due to the decrease of carrier concentration. With a layer of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) passivation, PL spectra exhibit pronounced red shifts due to the decrease of the surface states at room temperature. No shift is found at 10 K both with or without PMMA passivation, suggesting a much weaker depletion field due to the freezing-out of donors.

  7. Magnetic flux pileup and plasma depletion in Mercury's subsolar magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Daniel J.; Slavin, James A.; Raines, Jim M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Baker, Daniel N.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2013-11-01

    from the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) and Magnetometer (MAG) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging spacecraft during 40 orbits about Mercury are used to characterize the plasma depletion layer just exterior to the planet's dayside magnetopause. A plasma depletion layer forms at Mercury as a result of piled-up magnetic flux that is draped around the magnetosphere. The low average upstream Alfvénic Mach number (MA ~3-5) in the solar wind at Mercury often results in large-scale plasma depletion in the magnetosheath between the subsolar magnetopause and the bow shock. Flux pileup is observed to occur downstream under both quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shock geometries for all orientations of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Furthermore, little to no plasma depletion is seen during some periods with stable northward IMF. The consistently low value of plasma β, the ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic pressure, at the magnetopause associated with the low average upstream MA is believed to be the cause for the high average reconnection rate at Mercury, reported to be nearly 3 times that observed at Earth. Finally, a characteristic depletion length outward from the subsolar magnetopause of ~300 km is found for Mercury. This value scales among planetary bodies as the average standoff distance of the magnetopause.

  8. Calculating Time-Integral Quantities in Depletion Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Isotalo, Aarno

    2016-06-02

    A method referred to as tally nuclides is presented for accurately and efficiently calculating the time-step averages and integrals of any quantities that are weighted sums of atomic densities with constant weights during the step. The method allows all such quantities to be calculated simultaneously as a part of a single depletion solution with existing depletion algorithms. Some examples of the results that can be extracted include step-average atomic densities and macroscopic reaction rates, the total number of fissions during the step, and the amount of energy released during the step. Furthermore, the method should be applicable with several depletion algorithms, and the integrals or averages should be calculated with an accuracy comparable to that reached by the selected algorithm for end-of-step atomic densities. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated in depletion calculations using the Chebyshev rational approximation method. Here, we demonstrate how the ability to calculate energy release in depletion calculations can be used to determine the accuracy of the normalization in a constant-power burnup calculation during the calculation without a need for a reference solution.

  9. Neutron irradiation test of depleted CMOS pixel detector prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandić, I.; Cindro, V.; Gorišek, A.; Hiti, B.; Kramberger, G.; Mikuž, M.; Zavrtanik, M.; Hemperek, T.; Daas, M.; Hügging, F.; Krüger, H.; Pohl, D.-L.; Wermes, N.; Gonella, L.

    2017-02-01

    Charge collection properties of depleted CMOS pixel detector prototypes produced on p-type substrate of 2 kΩ cm initial resistivity (by LFoundry 150 nm process) were studied using Edge-TCT method before and after neutron irradiation. The test structures were produced for investigation of CMOS technology in tracking detectors for experiments at HL-LHC upgrade. Measurements were made with passive detector structures in which current pulses induced on charge collecting electrodes could be directly observed. Thickness of depleted layer was estimated and studied as function of neutron irradiation fluence. An increase of depletion thickness was observed after first two irradiation steps to 1 · 1013 n/cm2 and 5 · 1013 n/cm2 and attributed to initial acceptor removal. At higher fluences the depletion thickness at given voltage decreases with increasing fluence because of radiation induced defects contributing to the effective space charge concentration. The behaviour is consistent with that of high resistivity silicon used for standard particle detectors. The measured thickness of the depleted layer after irradiation with 1 · 1015 n/cm2 is more than 50 μm at 100 V bias. This is sufficient to guarantee satisfactory signal/noise performance on outer layers of pixel trackers in HL-LHC experiments.

  10. Depletion induced clustering of red blood cells in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Brust, Mathias; Podgorski, Thomas; Coupier, Gwennou

    2012-11-01

    The flow properties of blood are determined by the physical properties of its main constituents, the red blood cells (RBC's). At low shear rates RBC's form aggregates, so called rouleaux. Higher shear rates can break them up and the viscosity of blood shows a shear thinning behavior. The physical origin of the rouleaux formation is not yet fully resolved and there are two competing models available. One predicts that the adhesion is induced by bridging of the plasma (macromolecular) proteins in-between two RBC's. The other is based on the depletion effect and thus predicts the absence of macromolecules in-between the cells of a rouleaux. Recent single cell force measurements by use of an AFM support strongly the depletion model. By varying the concentration of Dextran at different molecular weights we can control the adhesions strength. Measurements at low hematocrit in a microfluidic channel show that the number of size of clusters is determined by the depletion induced adhesion strength.

  11. Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1998-11-03

    A method is described for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotopically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package. 6 figs.

  12. Processable high internal phase Pickering emulsions using depletion attraction.

    PubMed

    Kim, KyuHan; Kim, Subeen; Ryu, Jiheun; Jeon, Jiyoon; Jang, Se Gyu; Kim, Hyunjun; Gweon, Dae-Gab; Im, Won Bin; Han, Yosep; Kim, Hyunjung; Choi, Siyoung Q

    2017-02-01

    High internal phase emulsions have been widely used as templates for various porous materials, but special strategies are required to form, in particular, particle-covered ones that have been more difficult to obtain. Here, we report a versatile strategy to produce a stable high internal phase Pickering emulsion by exploiting a depletion interaction between an emulsion droplet and a particle using water-soluble polymers as a depletant. This attractive interaction facilitating the adsorption of particles onto the droplet interface and simultaneously suppressing desorption once adsorbed. This technique can be universally applied to nearly any kind of particle to stabilize an interface with the help of various non- or weakly adsorbing polymers as a depletant, which can be solidified to provide porous materials for many applications.

  13. Depletion potential in colloidal mixtures of hard spheres and platelets.

    PubMed

    Harnau, L; Dietrich, S

    2004-05-01

    The depletion potential between two hard spheres in a solvent of thin hard disclike platelets is investigated by using either the Derjaguin approximation or density functional theory. Particular attention is paid to the density dependence of the depletion potential. A second-order virial approximation is applied, which yields nearly exact results for the bulk properties of the hard-platelet fluid at densities two times smaller than the density of the isotropic fluid at isotropic-nematic phase coexistence. As the platelet density increases, the attractive primary minimum of the depletion potential deepens and an additional small repulsive barrier at larger sphere separations develops. Upon decreasing the ratio of the radius of the spheres and the platelets, the primary minimum diminishes and the position of the small repulsive barrier shifts to smaller values of the sphere separation.

  14. Processable high internal phase Pickering emulsions using depletion attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyuhan; Kim, Subeen; Ryu, Jiheun; Jeon, Jiyoon; Jang, Se Gyu; Kim, Hyunjun; Gweon, Dae-Gab; Im, Won Bin; Han, Yosep; Kim, Hyunjung; Choi, Siyoung Q.

    2017-02-01

    High internal phase emulsions have been widely used as templates for various porous materials, but special strategies are required to form, in particular, particle-covered ones that have been more difficult to obtain. Here, we report a versatile strategy to produce a stable high internal phase Pickering emulsion by exploiting a depletion interaction between an emulsion droplet and a particle using water-soluble polymers as a depletant. This attractive interaction facilitating the adsorption of particles onto the droplet interface and simultaneously suppressing desorption once adsorbed. This technique can be universally applied to nearly any kind of particle to stabilize an interface with the help of various non- or weakly adsorbing polymers as a depletant, which can be solidified to provide porous materials for many applications.

  15. Effect of Shim Arm Depletion in the NBSR

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson A. H.; Brown N.; Diamond, D.J.

    2013-02-22

    The cadmium shim arms in the NBSR undergo burnup during reactor operation and hence, require periodic replacement. Presently, the shim arms are replaced after every 25 cycles to guarantee they can maintain sufficient shutdown margin. Two prior reports document the expected change in the 113Cd distribution because of the shim arm depletion. One set of calculations was for the present high-enriched uranium fuel and the other for the low-enriched uranium fuel when it was in the COMP7 configuration (7 inch fuel length vs. the present 11 inch length). The depleted 113Cd distributions calculated for these cores were applied to the current design for an equilibrium low-enriched uranium core. This report details the predicted effects, if any, of shim arm depletion on the shim arm worth, the shutdown margin, power distributions and kinetics parameters.

  16. Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1997-12-01

    A method is described for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotonically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package.

  17. Coherent quantum depletion of an interacting atom condensate.

    PubMed

    Kira, M

    2015-03-13

    Sufficiently strong interactions promote coherent quantum transitions in spite of thermalization and losses, which are the adversaries of delicate effects such as reversibility and correlations. In atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), strong atom-atom interactions can eject atoms from the BEC to the normal component, yielding quantum depletion instead of temperature depletion. A recent experiment has already been verified to overcome losses. Here I show that it also achieves coherent quantum-depletion dynamics in a BEC swept fast enough from weak to strong atom-atom interactions. The elementary coherent process first excites the normal component into a liquid state that evolves into a spherical shell state, where the atom occupation peaks at a finite momentum to shield 50% of the BEC atoms from annihilation. The identified coherent processes resemble ultrafast semiconductor excitations expanding the scope of BEC explorations to many-body non-equilibrium studies.

  18. Coherent quantum depletion of an interacting atom condensate

    PubMed Central

    Kira, M.

    2015-01-01

    Sufficiently strong interactions promote coherent quantum transitions in spite of thermalization and losses, which are the adversaries of delicate effects such as reversibility and correlations. In atomic Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs), strong atom–atom interactions can eject atoms from the BEC to the normal component, yielding quantum depletion instead of temperature depletion. A recent experiment has already been verified to overcome losses. Here I show that it also achieves coherent quantum-depletion dynamics in a BEC swept fast enough from weak to strong atom–atom interactions. The elementary coherent process first excites the normal component into a liquid state that evolves into a spherical shell state, where the atom occupation peaks at a finite momentum to shield 50% of the BEC atoms from annihilation. The identified coherent processes resemble ultrafast semiconductor excitations expanding the scope of BEC explorations to many-body non-equilibrium studies. PMID:25767044

  19. Processable high internal phase Pickering emulsions using depletion attraction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, KyuHan; Kim, Subeen; Ryu, Jiheun; Jeon, Jiyoon; Jang, Se Gyu; Kim, Hyunjun; Gweon, Dae-Gab; Im, Won Bin; Han, Yosep; Kim, Hyunjung; Choi, Siyoung Q.

    2017-01-01

    High internal phase emulsions have been widely used as templates for various porous materials, but special strategies are required to form, in particular, particle-covered ones that have been more difficult to obtain. Here, we report a versatile strategy to produce a stable high internal phase Pickering emulsion by exploiting a depletion interaction between an emulsion droplet and a particle using water-soluble polymers as a depletant. This attractive interaction facilitating the adsorption of particles onto the droplet interface and simultaneously suppressing desorption once adsorbed. This technique can be universally applied to nearly any kind of particle to stabilize an interface with the help of various non- or weakly adsorbing polymers as a depletant, which can be solidified to provide porous materials for many applications. PMID:28145435

  20. Tuning of depletion interaction in nanoparticle-surfactant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, D. Aswal, V. K.

    2014-04-24

    The interaction of anionic silica nanoparticles (Ludox LS30) and non-ionic surfactants decaethylene glycol monododecylether (C12E10) without and with anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in aqueous electrolyte solution has been studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements have been carried out for fixed concentrations of nanoparticle (1 wt%), surfactants (1 wt%) and electrolyte (0.1 M NaCl). Each of these nanoparticlesurfactant systems has been examined for different contrast conditions where individual components (nanoparticle or surfactant) are made visible. It is observed that the nanoparticle-C12E10 system leads to the depletion-induced aggregation of nanoparticles. The system however behaves very differently on addition of SDS where depletion interaction gets suppressed and aggregation of nanoparticles can be prevented. We show that C12E10 and SDS form mixed micelles and the charge on these micelles plays important role in tuning the depletion interaction.

  1. Transient Effects And Pump Depletion In Stimulated Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsten, J. L.; Wenzel, R. G...; Druhl, K.

    1983-11-01

    Stimulated rotational Raman scattering in a 300-K multipass cell filled with para-H2 with a single-mode CO2-pumped laser is studied using a frequency-narrowed optical parametric oscillator (OPO) as a probe laser at the Stokes frequency for the So(0) transition. Amplification and pump depletion are examined as a function of incident pump energy. The pump depletion shows clear evidence of transient behavior. A theoretical treatment of transient stimulated Raman scattering, including effects of both pump depletion and medium saturation is presented. In a first approximation, diffraction effects are neglected, and only plane-wave interactions are considered. The theoretical results are compared to the experimental pulse shapes.

  2. Programmable nanometer-scale electrolytic metal deposition and depletion

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James Weifu [Oak Ridge, TN; Greenbaum, Elias [Oak Ridge, TN

    2002-09-10

    A method of nanometer-scale deposition of a metal onto a nanostructure includes the steps of: providing a substrate having thereon at least two electrically conductive nanostructures spaced no more than about 50 .mu.m apart; and depositing metal on at least one of the nanostructures by electric field-directed, programmable, pulsed electrolytic metal deposition. Moreover, a method of nanometer-scale depletion of a metal from a nanostructure includes the steps of providing a substrate having thereon at least two electrically conductive nanostructures spaced no more than about 50 .mu.m apart, at least one of the nanostructures having a metal disposed thereon; and depleting at least a portion of the metal from the nanostructure by electric field-directed, programmable, pulsed electrolytic metal depletion. A bypass circuit enables ultra-finely controlled deposition.

  3. Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1998-01-01

    A method for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotopically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package.

  4. International aspects of restrictions of ozone-depleting substances

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, S.C.

    1989-10-01

    This report summarizes international efforts to protect stratospheric ozone. Also included in this report is a discussion of activities in other countries to meet restrictions in the production and use of ozone-depleting substances. Finally, there is a brief presentation of trade and international competitiveness issues relating to the transition to alternatives for the regulated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons. The stratosphere knows no international borders. Just as the impact of reduced stratospheric ozone will be felt internationally, so protection of the ozone layer is properly an international effort. Unilateral action, even by a country that produces and used large quantities of ozone-depleting substances, will not remedy the problem of ozone depletion if other countries do not follow suit. 32 refs., 7 tabs.

  5. Prevalence of vitamin B(12) depletion and deficiency in Liechtenstein.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Victoria; Stanga, Zeno; Zerlauth, Manfred; Bernasconi, Luca; Risch, Martin; Huber, Andreas; Risch, Lorenz

    2014-02-01

    Data about vitamin B(12) (B(12)) deficiency in the general population are scarce. The present study was performed to determine the prevalence of B(12) deficiency in the general population of the Principality of Liechtenstein, as well as to identify sub-populations potentially at high risk. Retrospective study. Ambulatory setting, population of the Principality of Liechtenstein. Seven thousand four hundred and twenty-four patients seeking medical attention whose serum samples were referred for routine work-up in an ambulatory setting were consecutively enrolled. Serum total B(12) was determined in all patients in this cohort. In addition, for a subgroup of 1328 patients, serum holotranscobalamin was also measured. Prevalence of B(12) deficiency was calculated. Further, multivariate logistical regression models were applied to identify covariates independently associated with B(12) deficiency and depletion. Nearly 8% of the general population was suffering from either B(12) depletion or deficiency. The ratio between B(12) depletion and deficiency was 2:1 for all age ranges. Pathological changes were detected predominantly in older people. Female gender was a significant predictor of B(12) depletion. In the cohort, nearly 40% exhibited either depletion or deficiency of B(12). B(12) depletion and deficiency are common in Liechtenstein, a Central European country. The measurement of biochemical markers represents a cost-efficient and valid assessment of the B(12) state. When a deficiency of B(12) is diagnosed at an early stage, many cases can be treated or prevented, with beneficial effects on individual outcomes and subsequent potential reductions in health-care costs.

  6. Auxin-inducible protein depletion system in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Kanke, Mai; Nishimura, Kohei; Kanemaki, Masato; Kakimoto, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Tatsuro S; Nakagawa, Takuro; Masukata, Hisao

    2011-02-11

    Inducible inactivation of a protein is a powerful approach for analysis of its function within cells. Fission yeast is a useful model for studying the fundamental mechanisms such as chromosome maintenance and cell cycle. However, previously published strategies for protein-depletion are successful only for some proteins in some specific conditions and still do not achieve efficient depletion to cause acute phenotypes such as immediate cell cycle arrest. The aim of this work was to construct a useful and powerful protein-depletion system in Shizosaccaromyces pombe. We constructed an auxin-inducible degron (AID) system, which utilizes auxin-dependent poly-ubiquitination of Aux/IAA proteins by SCFTIR1 in plants, in fission yeast. Although expression of a plant F-box protein, TIR1, decreased Mcm4-aid, a component of the MCM complex essential for DNA replication tagged with Aux/IAA peptide, depletion did not result in an evident growth defect. We successfully improved degradation efficiency of Mcm4-aid by fusion of TIR1 with fission yeast Skp1, a conserved F-box-interacting component of SCF (improved-AID system; i-AID), and the cells showed severe defect in growth. The i-AID system induced degradation of Mcm4-aid in the chromatin-bound MCM complex as well as those in soluble fractions. The i-AID system in conjunction with transcription repression (off-AID system), we achieved more efficient depletion of other proteins including Pol1 and Cdc45, causing early S phase arrest. Improvement of the AID system allowed us to construct conditional null mutants of S. pombe. We propose that the off-AID system is the powerful method for in vivo protein-depletion in fission yeast.

  7. Erythrocyte depletion from bone marrow: performance evaluation after 50 clinical-scale depletions with Spectra Optia BMC.

    PubMed

    Kim-Wanner, Soo-Zin; Bug, Gesine; Steinmann, Juliane; Ajib, Salem; Sorg, Nadine; Poppe, Carolin; Bunos, Milica; Wingenfeld, Eva; Hümmer, Christiane; Luxembourg, Beate; Seifried, Erhard; Bonig, Halvard

    2017-08-11

    Red blood cell (RBC) depletion is a standard graft manipulation technique for ABO-incompatible bone marrow (BM) transplants. The BM processing module for Spectra Optia, "BMC", was previously introduced. We here report the largest series to date of routine quality data after performing 50 clinical-scale RBC-depletions. Fifty successive RBC-depletions from autologous (n = 5) and allogeneic (n = 45) BM transplants were performed with the Spectra Optia BMC apheresis suite. Product quality was assessed before and after processing for volume, RBC and leukocyte content; RBC-depletion and stem cell (CD34+ cells) recovery was calculated there from. Clinical engraftment data were collected from 26/45 allogeneic recipients. Median RBC removal was 98.2% (range 90.8-99.1%), median CD34+ cell recovery was 93.6%, minimum recovery being 72%, total product volume was reduced to 7.5% (range 4.7-23.0%). Products engrafted with expected probability and kinetics. Performance indicators were stable over time. Spectra Optia BMC is a robust and efficient technology for RBC-depletion and volume reduction of BM, providing near-complete RBC removal and excellent CD34+ cell recovery.

  8. Ozone depletion. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning studies of atmospheric chemistry and modeling of ozone depletion in Antarctica, and the consequences of the depletion on ultraviolet radiation levels. The studies involve chemical reactions in the atmosphere, including temperature dynamics, possible changes in solar insolation, and effects of pollution from nitrogen, chloroflourocarbons, carbon dioxide, and methane. The studies involve references to observations of the ozonosphere and modeling of interactions worldwide, together with data on the sources of the natural and man-made pollutants. (Contains a minimum of 173 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. ROLE OF NUCLEONIC FERMI SURFACE DEPLETION IN NEUTRON STAR COOLING

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, J. M.; Zuo, W.; Lombardo, U.; Zhang, H. F.

    2016-01-20

    The Fermi surface depletion of beta-stable nuclear matter is calculated to study its effects on several physical properties that determine the neutron star (NS) thermal evolution. The neutron and proton Z factors measuring the corresponding Fermi surface depletions are calculated within the Brueckner–Hartree–Fock approach, employing the AV18 two-body force supplemented by a microscopic three-body force. Neutrino emissivity, heat capacity, and in particular neutron {sup 3}PF{sub 2} superfluidity, turn out to be reduced, especially at high baryonic density, to such an extent that the cooling rates of young NSs are significantly slowed.

  10. Summer time Fe depletion in the Antarctic mesopause region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viehl, T. P.; Höffner, J.; Lübken, F.-J.; Plane, J. M. C.; Kaifler, B.; Morris, R. J.

    2015-05-01

    We report common volume measurements of Fe densities, temperatures and ice particle occurrence in the mesopause region at Davis Station, Antarctica (69°S) in the years 2011-2012. Our observations show a strong correlation of the Fe-layer summer time depletion with temperature, but no clear causal relation with the onset or occurrence of ice particles measured as noctilucent clouds (NLC) or polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). The combination of these measurements indicates that the strong summer depletion can be explained by gas-phase chemistry alone and does not require heterogeneous removal of Fe and its compounds on ice particles.

  11. Digestion and depletion of abundant proteins improves proteomic coverage

    PubMed Central

    Fonslow, Bryan R.; Stein, Benjamin D.; Webb, Kristofor J.; Xu, Tao; Choi, Jeong; Park, Sung Kyu; Yates, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Two major challenges in proteomics are the large number of proteins and their broad dynamic range within the cell. We exploited the abundance-dependent Michaelis-Menten kinetics of trypsin digestion to selectively digest and deplete abundant proteins with a method we call DigDeAPr. We validated the depletion mechanism with known yeast protein abundances and observed greater than 3-fold improvement in low abundance human protein identification and quantitation metrics. This methodology should be broadly applicable to many organisms, proteases, and proteomic pipelines. PMID:23160281

  12. Ozone depletion over the polar caps caused by solar protons

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, J.A.E.; Scourfield, M.W.J. )

    1992-12-24

    Energetic solar protons are a natural source of ozone depletion due to nitric oxides they produce in the earth's atmosphere. In March 1989, following a period of intense solar activity, the TOMS instrument aboard the Nimbus 7 satellite recorded very similar ozone losses over both polar caps for areas extending from 90[degrees] to 70[degrees]. Ozone depletions of 7.4 [times] 10[sup 9] kg for the south polar cap and 8.0 [times] 10[sup 9] kg for the north polar cap indicate the degree of symmetry over the polar caps. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Choice and ego-depletion: the moderating role of autonomy.

    PubMed

    Moller, Arlen C; Deci, Edward L; Ryan, Richard M

    2006-08-01

    The self-regulatory strength model maintains that all acts of self-regulation, self-control, and choice result in a state of fatigue called ego-depletion. Self-determination theory differentiates between autonomous regulation and controlled regulation. Because making decisions represents one instance of self-regulation, the authors also differentiate between autonomous choice and controlled choice. Three experiments support the hypothesis that whereas conditions representing controlled choice would be egodepleting, conditions that represented autonomous choice would not. In Experiment 3, the authors found significant mediation by perceived self-determination of the relation between the choice condition (autonomous vs. controlled) and ego-depletion as measured by performance.

  14. Plasma Electron Depletion via Cathode Spot Injection of Dielectric Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillman, Eric; Foster, John

    2012-10-01

    A method for addressing communication blackout associated with the formation of a dense plasma around reentry vehicles is reported upon. Quenchant particles launched into a background plasma via cathode spots is investigated as a means for free electron depletion. Time resolved measurement of electron density evolution during cathode spot ``on times'' is inferred by monitoring variations in the electron saturation current. Corrections for magnetic effects are also taken into account in the interpretation of temporal variations in the electron saturation current. Measurements indicated depletion levels of over 95% for model plasmas investigated.

  15. Geodynamic evidence for a chemically depleted continental tectosphere.

    PubMed

    Forte, A M; Perry, H K

    2000-12-08

    The tectosphere, namely the portions of Earth's mantle lying below cratons, has a thermochemical structure that differs from average suboceanic mantle. The tectosphere is thought to be depleted in its basaltic components and to have an intrinsic buoyancy that balances the mass increase associated with its colder temperature relative to suboceanic mantle. Inversions of a large set of geodynamic data related to mantle convection, using tomography-based mantle flow models, indicate that the tectosphere is chemically depleted and relatively cold to 250 kilometers depth below Earth's surface. The approximate equilibrium between thermal and chemical buoyancy contributes to cratonic stability over geological time.

  16. 26 CFR 1.1502-44 - Percentage depletion for independent producers and royalty owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... depletion deduction among oil and gas properties. Thus, if, after the initial allocation, cost depletion exceeds the percentage depletion that would be allowable for a particular oil or gas property, cost... percentage depletion deductions for the taxable year for all oil or gas property owned by all members, plus...

  17. DURABILITY OF DEPLETED URANIUM AGGREGATES (DUAGG) IN DUCRETE SHIELDING APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mattus, Catherine H.; Dole, Leslie R.

    2003-02-27

    The depleted uranium (DU) inventory in the United States exceeds 500,000 metric tonnes. To evaluate the possibilities for reuse of this stockpile of DU, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has created a research and development program to address the disposition of its DU(1). One potential use for this stockpile material is in the fabrication of nuclear shielding casks for the storage, transport, and disposal of spent nuclear fuels. The use of the DU-based shielding would reduce the size and weight of the casks while allowing a level of protection from neutrons and gamma rays comparable to that afforded by steel and concrete. DUAGG (depleted uranium aggregate) is formed of depleted uranium dioxide (DUO2) sintered with a synthetic-basalt-based binder. This study was designed to investigate possible deleterious reactions that could occur between the cement paste and the DUAGG. After 13 months of exposure to a cement pore solution, no deleterious expansive mineral phases were observed to form either with the DUO2 or with the simulated-basalt sintering phases. In the early stages of these exposure tests, Oak Ridge National Laboratory preliminary results confirm that the surface reactions of this aggregate proceed more slowly than expected. This finding may indicate that DUAGG/DUCRETE (depleted uranium concrete) casks could have service lives sufficient to meet the projected needs of DOE and the commercial nuclear power industry.

  18. Depletion of penicillin G residues in sows after intramuscular injection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A penicillin G procaine residue depletion study was conducted in heavy sows to estimate the pre-slaughter withdrawal periods necessary to clear penicillin from kidney and muscle. Heavy sows (n = 126) were treated with penicillin G procaine at a 5x dose (33,000 IU/kg) for 3 consecutive days by intra...

  19. Depletion of heterogeneous source species pools predicts future invasion rates

    Treesearch

    Andrew M. Liebhold; Eckehard G. Brockerhoff; Mark Kimberley; Jacqueline Beggs

    2017-01-01

    Predicting how increasing rates of global trade will result in new establishments of potentially damaging invasive species is a question of critical importance to the development of national and international policies aimed at minimizing future invasions. Centuries of historical movement and establishment of invading species may have depleted the supply of species...

  20. Spearfishing to depletion: evidence from temperate reef fishes in Chile.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Natalio; Gelcich, L Stefan; Vásquez, Julio A; Castilla, Juan Carlos

    2010-09-01

    Unreliable and data-poor marine fishery landings can lead to a lack of regulatory action in fisheries management. Here we use official Chilean landing reports and non-conventional indicators, such as fishers' perceptions and spearfishing competition results, to provide evidence of reef fishes depletions caused by unregulated spearfishing. Results show that the three largest and most emblematic reef fishes targeted mainly by spearfishers (> 98% of landings) [Graus nigra (vieja negra), Semicossyphus darwini (sheephead or pejeperro), and Medialuna ancietae (acha)] show signs of depletion in terms of abundance and size and that overall the catches of reef fishes have shifted from large carnivore species toward smaller-sized omnivore and herbivore species. Information from two snorkeling speargun world championships (1971 and 2004, Iquique, Chile) and from fishers' perceptions shows the mean size of reef fish to be declining. Although the ecological consequences of reef fish depletion are not fully understood in Chile, evidence of spearfishing depleting temperate reef fishes must be explicitly included in policy debates. This would involve bans or strong restrictions on the use of SCUBA and hookah diving gear for spearfishing, and minimum size limits. It may also involve academic and policy discussions regarding conservation and fisheries management synergies within networks of no-take and territorial user-rights fisheries areas, as a strategy for the sustainable management of temperate and tropical reef fisheries.