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Sample records for 14-year-old school children

  1. [Sexuality in children 9-14 years old].

    PubMed

    Ballester Arnal, Rafael; Gil Llario, María Dolores

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze sexual behaviors and attitudes of children 9-14 years old in Spain. In this article we present data from 470 children of which 52% are boys and 48% girls. In order to evaluate the sample, Information, Attitudes and Behaviors related to Health Questionnaire (CIACS-II) was used. Results evidence that boys 9 years old already show behaviors that evidence their interest towards sexuality. 8% have sometimes masturbated and 9% have used pornography for becoming excited. 14% of children 11-12 years old have already had sexual relations and 38% state to have sexual fantasies. Girls start to masturbate and to have sexual relations later than boys and show a prevalence of sexual fantasies and use of pornography very lower. It is necessary sexual education programs to be implanted since early ages in schools.

  2. Individual and familial factors associated with fruit and vegetable intake among 11- to 14-year-old Romanian school children.

    PubMed

    Lotrean, Lucia Maria; Tutui, Iulia

    2015-09-01

    The healthy nutrition guidelines proposed by international research institutes and the World Health Organization recommend a daily intake of fruit and vegetables of at least 400 g, representing five servings a day (each serving contains around 80 g). Moreover, the recommendations stress the importance of consuming both fruit and vegetables daily, preferably at least two portions of fruit and three portions of vegetables per day. To efficiently develop interventions for promoting fruit and vegetable consumption among children, it is essential to identify and understand the factors that influence these behaviours. The present study aims at identifying the individual and familial factors which influence fruit and vegetable consumption among Romanian children. A cross-sectional survey by means of anonymous questionnaires was conducted among 361 school children, aged 11-14, from Cluj-Napoca, Romania (April-May 2011). Multiple linear regression analyses were used to assess the correlates of fruit and vegetable intake. The results show that 44.6% of the children met the recommendations regarding fruit intake, while 9.1% of the children declared eating the daily recommended portions of vegetables. Knowledge regarding the recommended number of daily servings and higher self-efficacy concerning the intake of fruit and vegetables every day were positively associated with higher consumption of fruit and vegetables. Fruit preference also influenced positively the consumption of fruit. The familial factor associated with vegetable intake was the perceived behaviour of the mother, while fruit intake was higher among children who declared higher fruit availability at home. Hence, it is necessary to develop in Romania nutrition interventions addressing the determinants of fruit and vegetable intake as identified by this study; these interventions should target both children and parents.

  3. Drug Ingestions in Children 10-14 Years Old: An Old Problem Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pomerantz, Wendy; Gittelman, Michael; Farris, Sarah; Frey, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    To determine changes in rates of drug ingestions in 10-14 year old children in our country, a retrospective chart review of 10-14 year olds hospitalized for drug ingestion between 1993-1995 and 2000-2004 was performed. Odds ratios and Chi-square were used for analyses. From 1993-1995 there were 92.8 ingestions/100,000 children/year; from 2000-2004…

  4. School achievement in 14-year-old youths prenatally exposed to marijuana.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Lidush; Richardson, Gale A; Willford, Jennifer A; Severtson, Stevan G; Day, Nancy L

    2012-01-01

    The relation between prenatal marijuana exposure (PME) and school achievement was evaluated in a sample of 524 14-year-olds. Women were recruited during pregnancy and assessed, along with their offspring, at multiple phases from infancy to early adulthood. The sample represents a low-income population. Half of the adolescents are male and 55% are African American. School achievement was assessed with the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test (WIAT) Screener (Psychological Corporation, 1992). A significant negative relation was found between PME and 14-year WIAT composite and reading scores. The deficit in school achievement was mediated by the effects of PME on intelligence test performance at age 6, attention problems and depression symptoms at age 10, and early initiation of marijuana use. These findings suggest that the effects of PME on adolescent achievement are mediated by the earlier negative effects of PME on child characteristics. The negative impact of these characteristics on adolescent achievement may presage later problems in early adulthood.

  5. [Food consumption patterns of children 4 to 14 years old in Valencia, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    del Real, Sara Irene; Fajardo, Zuleida; Solano, Liseti; Concepción Páez, María; Sánchez, Armando

    2005-09-01

    Results from a nutritional assessment are presented to establish the usual food consumption pattern of 438 children between 4-14 years of age, from a low income urban community in Valencia, Venezuela. Food intake data were collected through multiple 24 hours recalls and converted to individual food item weight in grams. Amounts of energy, macronutrients, iron, calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin C were estimated to compare them to national references. The food pattern was established according to intake frequency per food item and per food groups. Arepa was the most commonly consumed food item, and a main source of kilocalories, protein, carbohydrates, iron, and vitamin A. Unlike coffee, fruits were not among the most commonly consumed foods. Black beans were the main source of protein. Cookies and sodas were among the major sources of energy. Energy and nutrient intake were adequate, except for calcium (67% in preschoolers y 43% in school-aged children). Preschoolers' diet showed a better adequacy for all nutrients (p < 0.005), except for iron which was significantly higher in school-aged children. Since children below 15 years old are still forming food behaviors and habits, they are an ideal group to develop nutritional education strategies to modify harmful patterns such as high intake of sodas, and low intakes of calcium rich foods.

  6. School and Work in Prospect: 14-Year-Olds in Australia. ACER Research Monograph No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Trevor; And Others

    A study examined the educational and occupational plans of Australian fourteen-year-olds as part of program of research on the transition to adulthood. A twenty-item questionnaire was administered to 969 students in 243 schools across Australia. The questionnaire contained items pertaining to respondents' State of residence, school system…

  7. An Assessment of Oral Hygiene in 7-14-Year-Old Children undergoing Orthodontic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Krupińska-Nanys, Magdalena; Zarzecka, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Backround: The study is focused on increased risk of dental plaque accumulation among the children undergoing orthodontic treatment in consideration of individual hygiene and dietary habits. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted among 91 children aged 7-14 including 47 girls and 44 boys. The main objectives of the study were: API index, plaque pH, DMF index, proper hygiene and dietary habits. Statistical analysis was provided in Microsoft Office Exel spreadsheet and STATISTICA statistical software. Results: The average API index among the children wearing removable appliance was 9 (SD = 13), and among children without appliances was 16 (SD = 21). DMF index for patients using appliances was 5 (SD = 3) and for those without appliances was 4 (SD = 2). The average plaque pH was 6 for children with appliances (SD = 0.9) and 6.2 without ones (SD = 0.3). Conclusion: In patients in whom there is a higher risk of dental plaque accumulating, correct oral hygiene supported with regular visits to the dentist is one of the best ways to control dental caries. In the fight against caries the most effective and only approach is to promote awareness of the problem, foster proper hygiene and nutritional habits, as well as educate children from a very young age in how to maintain proper oral hygiene. PMID:25709359

  8. Potential weekly intake of artificial food colours by 3-14-year-old children in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Toledo, M C; Guerchon, M S; Ragazzi, S

    1992-01-01

    The Potential Weekly Intake (PWI) of artificial food colours by 3-14-year-old children living in the District of Barão Geraldo, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil, was estimated on the basis of average consumption data of artificially coloured food and analytically determined colour concentration in foodstuffs ingested. Coloured food consumption data were obtained through dietary recall interviews and collection of the packages and/or labels of the coloured foods consumed during a two-week period. Colours found in the individual types of foods detected through the consumption survey were identified and determined by methods that included wool dyeing and polyamide column extractions, ascending paper chromatography and spectrophotometry. The results showed that all artificial colours used in the composition of 83 commercial food products, including jellies, juices, soft drinks, syrups and 57 different candies, were permitted for use in food in Brazil the year the survey was conducted (1986), in amounts below those prescribed by law. Statistical analysis performed to compare the PWI for different population groups demonstrated that young male children, especially from lower social classes, were most exposed to artificial colours. Comparison of the estimated potential intakes with the toxicologically Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) showed that consumption of Amaranth, Sunset Yellow, Indigotine and Tartrazine by all children in the study represented approximately 24%, 3%, 0.05% and 0.4%, of the actual ADI values, respectively.

  9. Investigating the Effect of Educating Philosophy in the Children on the Spiritual Development of Female Students with 12-14 Years Old in the City of Isfahan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abaspour, Nafiseh; Nowrozi, Reza Ali; Latifi, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of educating philosophy curriculum in the children on the spiritual development of female students with 12-14 years old in the city of Isfahan. The present study is a semi-experiment research. The research design is pretest-posttest research with experiment and control group. In order to select…

  10. Prevalence of asthma symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment in 12-14 year old children across Great Britain (international study of asthma and allergies in childhood, ISAAC UK)

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, B.; Anderson, H. R.; Austin, J.; Burr, M.; Harkins, L. S.; Strachan, D. P.; Warner, J. O.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate variations in the prevalence of self reported symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of asthma in 12-14 year old children. DESIGN: Self completion questionnaire. SETTING: Great Britain. SUBJECTS: All pupils aged 12-14 years in a stratified cluster sample of 93 large mixed secondary schools in 1995. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self reported prevalence of symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of asthma at four geographical levels. RESULTS: 27,507 questionnaires were completed (85.9% response rate). The national 12 month prevalence of any wheezing, speech limiting wheeze, four or more attacks of wheeze, and frequent night waking with wheeze was 33.3% (n = 9155), 8.8% (2427), 9.6% (2634), and 3.7% (1023) respectively. The prevalence of ever having had a diagnosis of asthma was 20.9% (5736). In total, 19.8% (5438/27,507) of pupils reported treatment with anti-asthma drugs in the past year, but, of pupils reporting frequent nocturnal wheeze in the past year, 33.8% (342/1012) had no diagnosis of asthma and 38.6% (395/1023) denied receiving inhaler therapy. The 12 month prevalence of wheeze was highest in Scotland (36.7%, 1633/4444), but in England and Wales there was no discernible north-south or east-west gradient. Wheeze prevalence was slightly higher in non-metropolitan areas (35.0%, 6155/17,605) than in metropolitan areas (30.3%, 3000/9902). The prevalence of self reported asthma diagnosis and inhaler use showed no discernible national, regional, north-south, or east-west geographical pattern but was higher in non-metropolitan areas. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of self reported symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of asthma was high among 12-14 year olds throughout Great Britain with little geographical or urban-rural variation. Underdiagnosis and undertreatment were substantial. PMID:9462318

  11. [Intake of trace elements and heavy metals with the diet of 2-14 years old children. Zinc, manganese, copper, fluoride, iodine, selen; lead, cadmium, mercury (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Stolley, H; Kersting, M; Droese, W

    1981-04-01

    For 2-14 year old children the intake of the trace elements zinc, manganese, copper, fluoride, iodine, selen, and of the heavy metals, lead, cadmium and mercury is calculated from their food intake. The results give a representative statement of the average supply of trace elements and of the average intake of heavy metals with the diet of children in the Federal Republic of Germany. It is shown that the choice of foodstuffs for the diet has an important influence on the supply of trace elements.

  12. Malocclusion and occlusal traits in an urban Iranian population. An epidemiological study of 11- to 14-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Borzabadi-Farahani, Anahid; Eslamipour, Faezeh

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of malocclusions, occlusal traits, and their gender distribution in urban Iranian school children. Five hundred and two subjects (253 females and 249 males, aged 11-14 years) were examined. Molar relationship, overjet (OJ), overbite, midline deviation, crossbite, and crowding/spacing were recorded. Gender dimorphism was evaluated by the chi-square test. According to the classification of Angle, the prevalence of Class I, Class II division 1, Class II division 2, and Class III malocclusions was 41.8, 24.1, 3.4, and 7.8 per cent, respectively. Symmetric molar relationship was present in 69.5 per cent. An OJ of at least 3.5 mm or more was present in 28.1 per cent; an OJ of more than 6 mm in 3.6 per cent, and 4.2 per cent had a reverse OJ. A normal overbite was observed in 60.4 per cent, while 34.5 per cent had an increased and 2.2 per cent a very deep overbite. An anterior open bite (AOB) was present in 1.6 per cent and a scissor bite or anterior crossbite in 2 and 8.4 per cent, respectively. A posterior crossbite was observed in 12.4 per cent (8.4 per cent unilateral, 2 per cent bilateral, and 2 per cent in association with an anterior crossbite). Midline deviation was present in 23.7 per cent. Severe crowding (>or=5.1 mm) was observed in 16.7 and 10.8 per cent and spacing in 18.9 and 20.7 per cent of the maxillary and mandibular arches, respectively. Significant gender differences were found for overbite (P < 0.001), midline deviation (P < 0.05), and maxillary and mandibular arch crowding/spacing (P < 0.05). The prevalence of Class II malocclusions was comparable with Caucasians; however, the most severe forms of Class II malocclusions were rare in this Iranian population. The relative prevalence of Class III malocclusions in the present study was greater than in Caucasians. Crowding was the most common dental anomaly in both arches.

  13. Prevalence and Predictors of Drooling in 7- to 14-Year-Old Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Population Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Susan M.; McCutcheon, Jennifer; Reddihough, Dinah S.; Johnson, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To establish a prevalence estimate for drooling and explore factors associated with drooling in a population sample of children with cerebral palsy (CP) aged 7 to 14 years living in Victoria, Australia. Method: A self-report questionnaire was used to collect data on drooling from parents of children born between 1996 and 2001, and registered…

  14. Self-Esteem of 8-14-Year-Old Children with Psychiatric Disorders: Disorder- and Gender-Specific Effects.

    PubMed

    Stadelmann, Stephanie; Grunewald, Madlen; Gibbels, Charlotte; Jaeger, Sonia; Matuschek, Tina; Weis, Steffi; Klein, Annette Maria; Hiemisch, Andreas; von Klitzing, Kai; Döhnert, Mirko

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the relation between global and domain-specific self-esteem and psychiatric disorders. A sample of 577 children aged 8-14 years was recruited via psychiatric hospitals and from the general population. Parents were given a diagnostic interview to assess children's psychiatric diagnoses (current/past). Parents and children completed questionnaires on child symptoms. Children completed a questionnaire on global and domain-specific self-esteem (scales: scholastic competence, social acceptance, athletic performance and physical appearance, global self-esteem). Self-esteem of children with current psychiatric disorders was lower than that of healthy controls (η p(2) between 0.01 and 0.08). Concerning scholastic competence, social acceptance and global self-esteem, children with past psychiatric disorders scored also lower than healthy controls. Different current psychiatric disorders showed specific but small effects on dimensions of self-esteem (β between -0.08 and 0.19). Moreover, we found a gender × group interaction, indicating that girls with depressive and adjustment disorders were specifically impaired in their global self-esteem and perception of their physical appearance. Findings might help clinicians to focus on particular domains of self-esteem during the diagnostic process and to define adequate treatment goals.

  15. Models of Micro-Organisms: Children's Knowledge and Understanding of Micro-Organisms from 7 to 14 Years Old

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the expressed models that children aged 7, 11, and 14 years have about micro-organisms and microbial activity. These were elicited using a variety of data collection techniques that complemented each other, resulting in a rich dataset, and provided information about the level of knowledge and progression of ideas across the…

  16. The effect of hydroxyzine on treating bruxism of 2- to 14-year-old children admitted to the clinic of Bandar Abbas Children Hospital in 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Rahmati, M; Moayedi, A; Zakery Shahvari, S; Golmirzaei, J; Zahirinea, M; Abbasi, B

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Bruxism is to press or grind teeth against each other in non-physiologic cases, when an individual does not swallow or chew. If not treated, teeth problems, stress, mental disorders, frequent night waking, and headache is expected. This research aimed to study the effect of hydroxyzine on treating bruxism of 2- to 14-year-old children admitted to the clinic of Bandar Abbas Children Hospital. Methodology. In this clinical trial, 143 children with the ages between 4-12 years were admitted to the Children Hospital and were divided randomly into test and control groups. The test group consisted of 88 hydroxyzine-treated children and the control group consisted of 55 children who used hot towels. Both groups were examined in some stages including the pre-test stages or the stage before starting treatments at two, four, and six weeks and four months after stopping the treatment. The effects of each treatment on reducing bruxism symptoms were assessed by a questionnaire. The data were analyzed by using SPSS in descriptive statistics, t-test, and ANOVA. Results. As far as bruxism severity was concerned, the results showed a significant difference between the test group members who received hydroxyzine and the control group members who received no medication. T-test results showed a statistically significant difference between the test and the control groups in the second post-test (four weeks later) (p. value ≤ 0.05). Mean of the scores of bruxism severity in the test group has changed significantly in the post-test (at two weeks, four weeks, and six weeks later) as compared to the pre-test. Whereas, as far as the response to the treatment, no significant difference was recorded between the control group and the test group 4 weeks after the treatment. Discussion. The results showed that prescribing hydroxyzine for 4 weeks had a considerable effect in diminishing bruxism severity between the test groups.

  17. The effect of hydroxyzine on treating bruxism of 2- to 14-year-old children admitted to the clinic of Bandar Abbas Children Hospital in 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Rahmati, M; Moayedi, A; Zakery Shahvari, S; Golmirzaei, J; Zahirinea, M; Abbasi, B

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Bruxism is to press or grind teeth against each other in non-physiologic cases, when an individual does not swallow or chew. If not treated, teeth problems, stress, mental disorders, frequent night waking, and headache is expected. This research aimed to study the effect of hydroxyzine on treating bruxism of 2- to 14-year-old children admitted to the clinic of Bandar Abbas Children Hospital. Methodology. In this clinical trial, 143 children with the ages between 4-12 years were admitted to the Children Hospital and were divided randomly into test and control groups. The test group consisted of 88 hydroxyzine-treated children and the control group consisted of 55 children who used hot towels. Both groups were examined in some stages including the pre-test stages or the stage before starting treatments at two, four, and six weeks and four months after stopping the treatment. The effects of each treatment on reducing bruxism symptoms were assessed by a questionnaire. The data were analyzed by using SPSS in descriptive statistics, t-test, and ANOVA. Results. As far as bruxism severity was concerned, the results showed a significant difference between the test group members who received hydroxyzine and the control group members who received no medication. T-test results showed a statistically significant difference between the test and the control groups in the second post-test (four weeks later) (p. value ≤ 0.05). Mean of the scores of bruxism severity in the test group has changed significantly in the post-test (at two weeks, four weeks, and six weeks later) as compared to the pre-test. Whereas, as far as the response to the treatment, no significant difference was recorded between the control group and the test group 4 weeks after the treatment. Discussion. The results showed that prescribing hydroxyzine for 4 weeks had a considerable effect in diminishing bruxism severity between the test groups.

  18. Spatial patterns of the congenital heart disease prevalence among 0- to 14-year-old children in Sichuan Basin, P. R China, from 2004 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of major birth defects in Sichuan, the most populous province in China. The detailed etiology of CHD is unknown but some environmental factors are suspected as the cause of this disease. However, the geographical variations in CHD prevalence would be highly valuable in providing a clue on the role of the environment in CHD etiology. Here, we investigate the spatial patterns and geographic differences in CHD prevalence among 0- to 14-year-old children, discuss the possible environmental risk factors that might be associated with CHD prevalence in Sichuan Basin from 2004 to 2009. Methods The hierarchical Bayesian model was used to estimate CHD prevalence at the township level. Spatial autocorrelation statistics were performed, and a hot-spot analysis with different distance thresholds was used to identify the spatial pattern of CHD prevalence. Distribution and clustering maps were drawn using geographic information system tools. Results CHD prevalence was significantly clustered in Sichuan Basin in different spatial scale. Typical hot/cold clusters were identified, and possible CHD causes were discussed. The association between selected hypothetical environmental factors of maternal exposure and CHD prevalence was evaluated. Conclusions The largest hot-spot clustering phenomena and the CHD prevalence clustering trend among 0- to 14-year-old children in the study area showed a plausibly close similarity with those observed in the Tuojiang River Basin. The high ecological risk of heavy metal(Cd, As, and Pb)sediments in the middle and lower streams of the Tuojiang River watershed and ammonia–nitrogen pollution may have contribution to the high prevalence of CHD in this area. PMID:24924350

  19. Dental age assessment in 7-14-year-old Chinese children: comparison of Demirjian and Willems methods.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiuxia; Jiang, Fan; Sheng, Xiaoyang; Huang, Hong; Shen, Xiaoming

    2014-11-01

    Several approaches have proven be valuable in estimating dental age in children. The Demirjian method, based on crown and root calcification, is the most frequently used tool. The Willems method is a modification of the Demirjian method. There are few studies regarding to compare the application of the two methods in China. This study aims to apply the two methods in a Han population as well as identify if there are some differences between two methods in estimating dental age versus chronological age. Nine hundred forty-one orthopantomograms of 410 boys and 531 girls between seven and 14 years of age were selected from our patient records database with defined standard, and the Demirjian and Willems methods of dental age estimation were applied. The seven left mandibular teeth were scored and calculated in order to obtain the Demirjian and Willems estimated dental ages. It is suggested that the Demirjian method overestimated chronological age by 1.68 years for boys and 1.28 years for girls. The discrepancy between the Demirjian estimate and the chronological age was most frequently observed between 1 and 3.5 years for boys and between 1 and 2 years for girls. While it is indicted that the Willems method overestimated chronological age by 0.35 years for boys and underestimated the age by 0.02 years for girls. The discrepancy between chronological age and Willems estimated age was most frequently observed between -0.5 and 0.5 years for boys and between -1 and 0.5 years for girls. It is demonstrated that the Willems method was more accurate in estimating dental age than the Demirjian method, with a mean absolute error of 0.98 years for boys and 0.93 years for girls. As a result, it is highly recommended that the Willems method should be applied when estimating dental age in Chinese Han population, further modifications to the method are suggested.

  20. Associations between prolonged sedentary time and breaks in sedentary time with cardiometabolic risk in 10-14-year-old children: The HAPPY study.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Daniel P; Charman, Sarah J; Ploetz, Thomas; Savory, Louise A; Kerr, Catherine J

    2016-11-28

    This study examines the association between prolonged sedentary time and breaks in sedentary time with cardiometabolic risk in 10-14-year-old children. This cross-sectional design study analysed accelerometry-determined sedentary behaviour and physical activity collected over 7 days from 111 (66 girls) UK schoolchildren. Objective outcome measures included waist circumference, fasting lipids, fasting glucose, blood pressure, and cardiorespiratory fitness. Logistic regression was used for the main data analysis. After adjustment for confounders, the odds of having hypertriglyceridaemia (P = 0.03) and an increased clustered cardiometabolic risk score (P = 0.05) were significantly higher in children who engaged in more prolonged sedentary bouts per day. The number of breaks in sedentary time per day was not associated with any cardiometabolic risk factor, but longer mean duration of daily breaks in sedentary time were associated with a lower odds of having abdominal adiposity (P = 0.04) and elevated diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.01). These associations may be mediated by engagement in light activity. This study provides evidence that avoiding periods of prolonged uninterrupted sedentary time may be important for reducing cardiometabolic disease risk in children.

  1. Predictors of Dental caries among children 7–14 years old in Northwest Ethiopia: a community based cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dental caries in children remains a significant public health problem. It is a disease with multifactorial causes. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence and associated factors of dental caries among children between 7 to 14 years old. Methods A community based cross-sectional study was conducted in Gondar town from June 2011 to September 2011. A total of 842 children were involved in the study. Multi-stage sampling technique was used to select the children. Pretested and structured questionnaires were used to collect data from mothers. Clinical examination of children was done using dental caries criteria set by world health organization. Data were entered, cleaned and edited using EPI Info version 3.5.1 and exported to SPSS version 16.0 for analysis. Binary multiple logistic regression analyses was applied to test the association. Results Four hundred sixty three (55%) children were females. The prevalence of dental caries was 306(36.3%).The educational status of children’s father (AOR=0.3, 95%CI, 0.17, 0.80), monthly household income (AOR=0.59, 95%CI, 0.01, 0.45), regular teeth brushing (AOR=0.08, 95% CI, 0.03, 0.20) and using mouth rinsing (AOR=0.40, 95% CI, 0.2, 0.80) were found statistically significantly associated with dental caries. Conclusions Dental caries were high among children in Gondar town. Low socioeconomic status and poor oral hygiene practices were the influencing factors for dental caries. Oral hygiene, dietary habits and access to dental care services are supreme important for the prevention of the problem. PMID:23331467

  2. Conceptualization of the Unknown by 6-, 9-, and 14-Year-Old Children in a Story-Telling Context: In Search of a "Heffalump."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pramling, Niklas; Norlander, Torsten; Archer, Trevor

    2003-01-01

    Examined 6-, 9-, and 14-year-olds' imagination of the unknown within a storytelling context. Performed phenomenological analysis of the two youngest groups' drawings and the oldest group's story on the "heffalump" theme. Derived eight categories providing an image-analysis of the concept of the "unknown" structured as "something-otherwise," that…

  3. Causes of Death among Children Aged 5 to 14 Years Old from 2008 to 2013 in Kersa Health and Demographic Surveillance System (Kersa HDSS), Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Zelalem, Desalew; Eskinder, Biniyam; Assefa, Nega; Ashenafi, Wondimye; Baraki, Negga; Damena Tesfatsion, Melake; Oljira, Lemessa; Haile, Ashenafi

    2016-01-01

    Background The global burden of mortality among children is still very huge though its trend has started declining following the improvements in the living standard. It presents serious challenges to the well-being of children in many African countries. Today, Sub-Saharan Africa alone accounts for about 50% of global child mortality. The overall objective of this study was to determine the magnitude and distribution of causes of death among children aged 5 to 14 year olds in the population of Kersa HDSS using verbal autopsy method for the period 2008 to 2013. Methods Kersa Health and Demographic Surveillance System(Kersa HDSS) was established in September 2007. The center consists of 10 rural and 2 urban kebeles which were selected randomly from 38 kebeles in the district. Thus this study was conducted in Kersa HDSS and data was taken from Kersa HDSS database. The study population included all children aged 5 to 14 years registered during the period of 2008 to 2013 in Kersa HDSS using age specific VA questionnaires. Data were extracted from SPSS database and analyzed using STATA. Results A total of 229 deaths were recorded over the period of six years with a crude death rate of 219.6 per 100,000 population of this age group over the study period. This death rate was 217.5 and 221.5 per 100,000 populations for females and males, respectively. 75% of deaths took place at home. The study identified severe malnutrition(33.9%), intestinal infectious diseases(13.8%) and acute lower respiratory infections(9.2%) to be the three most leading causes of death. In broad causes of death classification, injuries have been found to be the second most cause of death next to communicable diseases(56.3%) attributing to 13.1% of the total deaths. Conclusion and Recommendation In specific causes of death classification severe malnutrition, intestinal infectious diseases and acute lower respiratory infections were the three leading causes of death where, in broad causes of death

  4. Assessment of schistosomiasis prevalence among children 5 to 14 years old after several years of mass drug administration in the Senegal River basin

    PubMed

    Abdellahi, Moussa; Ndir, Oumar; Niang, Saidou

    2016-10-19

    Introduction: The advent of Diama and Manantali dams in the eighties has altered the schistosomiasis profile in the Senegal River Basin, with the appearance of an intestinal form in the Delta and a high prevalence of the urinary form in all ecological areas of the basin. Methods: The present study was mainly designed to re-evaluate the prevalence of schistosomiasis after many years of mass drug administration with praziquantel 600 mg allowing analysis of the pertinence of World Health Organisation guidelines in terms of dosing frequency, particularly in the Senegal River Basin. Stools and urine from 1,215 public school children from 24 villagesidentified in three ecological areas of the Senegal River Basin (Delta, valley, upper basin), were examined. Results: The results of thisstudy show the endemic prevalences of urinary schistosomiasisin all ecological areas ofthe Senegal River Basin: 57.4% in the Delta, 32.5% in the Valley and 25.1% in the upper basin. The prevalence of the intestinalschistosomiasisform was 21.8 % in the Delta, and this form has also entered the valley. Conclusion: The results ofthisstudy confirm that schistosomiasis is still a public health problem in the Senegal River Basin despite several series of mass praziquantel 600 mg administration. This situation requires detailed reflection concerning dosing frequencies of this drug in the Senegal River basin and the need to take social behaviours and sociological realities into account in order to eradicate schistosomiasis.

  5. Heart Health...Your Choice. 11-14 Year Olds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    The purpose of this illustrated booklet is to teach 11-14 year old students that all healthy Americans, 2 years of age or older, should eat in a way that is low in saturated fat and cholesterol to help reduce the risk of heart disease. The guide is designed to promote changes in eating patterns, to show children how to switch to good eating…

  6. Factors Affecting Female Attitude Formation toward Science. Specific Reference to 12-14 Year Old Female Adolescents and Their Affective Orientation toward Middle School Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber, Deborah A.

    This paper: (1) briefly reviews the existing literature which supports that female adolescents possess significantly more negative attitudes toward middle school science than do males; (2) examines the process of gender socialization in the United States to establish the socio-cultural and social psychological framework within which an attitudinal…

  7. A Psychometric Evaluation of the Danish Version of the Theory of Mind Storybook for 8–14 Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Clemmensen, Lars; Bartels-Velthuis, Agna A.; Jespersen, Rókur av F.; van Os, Jim; Blijd-Hoogewys, Els M. A.; Ankerstrøm, Lise; Væver, Mette; Daniel, Peter F.; Drukker, Marjan; Jeppesen, Pia; Jepsen, Jens R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Theory-of-Mind (ToM) keeps on developing in late childhood and early adolescence, and the study of ToM development later in childhood had to await the development of sufficiently sensitive tests challenging more mature children. The current study aimed to investigate the psychometric properties of the Danish version of the Theory-of-Mind Storybook Frederik (ToM-Frederik). Methods: We assessed whether ToM-Frederik scores differed between a group of 41 typically developing (TD) children and a group of 33 children with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder (HFASD). A lower mean ToM-Frederik score was expected in the HFASD group. To determine the convergent validity of ToM-Frederik, potential associations with Strange Stories and Animated Triangles (AT) were analyzed. Furthermore, potential associations between ToM-Frederik and the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) and between ToM-Frederik and the Social Emotional Evaluation (SEE) Total score were analyzed. Results: A significantly higher ToM-Frederik score was observed in the TD group compared to the HFASD group. Furthermore, the convergent validity of ToM-Frederik as a measure of ToM was supported by significant and positive associations with the Strange Stories and the AT scores in the HFASD group, whereas ToM-Frederik was significantly correlated with Strange Stories, but not with AT in the TD group. ToM-Frederik was not significantly associated with SRS in neither the HFASD nor the TD group. Conclusion: The findings are supportive of ToM-Frederik as a valid indicator of deficits at the group level in children with HFASD between 7 and 14 years of age. Furthermore, the convergent validity is supported. PMID:27014139

  8. Impact of malocclusion on oral health-related quality of life in 10–14-year-old children of Mumbai, India

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Rupinder; Winnier, J. Jasmin; Mehta, Nirali

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The aim and objective of this study was to establish the relationship of oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) as assessed by the Child Perception Questionnaire (CPQ 11–14) with the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) and the child's apprehension with his/her dental appearance and how upset the child would feel if he/she is unable to obtain orthodontic treatment. Materials and Methods: An observational cross-sectional study was conducted among 604 children between the age group of 10–14 years to analyze the effect of malocclusion on the quality of life of children on the basis of impact on oral symptoms, functional limitation, emotional well-being, and social well-being. Malocclusion was evaluated using the IOTN, and the CPQ 11–14 was used to study the OHRQoL in children. The collected data were then subjected to statistical analysis. Statistical Analysis: Spearman's correlation coefficient was used to analyze the data statistically. Results: Out of the 604 children examined, boys showed effect on emotional well-being, whereas girls showed a significant correlation on both emotional and social well-being. There was a statistically significant correlation between IOTN and all the four domains of CPQ scores with respect to the two questions that were added to the CPQ questionnaire. Conclusion: A questionnaire when developed specifically for determining the effect of malocclusion on OHRQoL focusing more on emotional and psychological impact and less on oral symptoms and functional limitation will provide advantages of having limited questions, being less time-consuming, and providing better understanding of the patients’ concern. PMID:27994409

  9. Association between genetic taste sensitivity, 2D:4D ratio, dental caries prevalence, and salivary flow rate in 6-14-year-old children: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Chintamaneni Raja; Radhika, Doppalapudi; Prabhat, Mpv; Bhavana, Sujana mulk; Sai Madhavi, Nallamilli

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between genetic taste sensitivity, dietary preferences and salivary flow rate in 6‒14-year-old children for identification of individuals at higher risk of developing dental caries. Methods. A total of 500 children 6‒14 years of age, of both genders, who reported to the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, were included. Propylthiouracil (PROP) sensitivity test was carried out and the subjects whose perception was bitter were grouped as tasters, whereas those who were unable to perceive any taste were grouped as non-tasters. The 2D:4D ratio was obtained by measuring the length ratio of index finger to ring finger with the help of a digital Vernier caliper. Evaluation of dietary preferences was carried out using a 24-hour dietary recall and accordingly they were categorized as sweet likers and dislikers. The salivary flow rate was estimated by collecting unstimulated saliva by spitting method. Data were analyzed with Student’s t-test and chi-squared test. Results. The results suggested a positive relation between low digit ratio (2D:4D), non-tasters, sweet likers and high caries index among the participants with a highly significant statistical difference (P ≤ 0.000). Tasters had high mean of USSR (0.48) than non-tasters (0.29), which was statistically significant. Conclusion. The present research revealed a positive correlation between all the parameters evaluated. Therefore an individual considered as non-taster by PROP was a sweet liker with low 2D:4D ratio, reduced salivary flow rate and high caries index. PMID:27651879

  10. Association between genetic taste sensitivity, 2D:4D ratio, dental caries prevalence, and salivary flow rate in 6-14-year-old children: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Chintamaneni Raja; Radhika, Doppalapudi; Prabhat, Mpv; Bhavana, Sujana Mulk; Sai Madhavi, Nallamilli

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between genetic taste sensitivity, dietary preferences and salivary flow rate in 6‒14-year-old children for identification of individuals at higher risk of developing dental caries. Methods. A total of 500 children 6‒14 years of age, of both genders, who reported to the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, were included. Propylthiouracil (PROP) sensitivity test was carried out and the subjects whose perception was bitter were grouped as tasters, whereas those who were unable to perceive any taste were grouped as non-tasters. The 2D:4D ratio was obtained by measuring the length ratio of index finger to ring finger with the help of a digital Vernier caliper. Evaluation of dietary preferences was carried out using a 24-hour dietary recall and accordingly they were categorized as sweet likers and dislikers. The salivary flow rate was estimated by collecting unstimulated saliva by spitting method. Data were analyzed with Student's t-test and chi-squared test. Results. The results suggested a positive relation between low digit ratio (2D:4D), non-tasters, sweet likers and high caries index among the participants with a highly significant statistical difference (P ≤ 0.000). Tasters had high mean of USSR (0.48) than non-tasters (0.29), which was statistically significant. Conclusion. The present research revealed a positive correlation between all the parameters evaluated. Therefore an individual considered as non-taster by PROP was a sweet liker with low 2D:4D ratio, reduced salivary flow rate and high caries index.

  11. Enterobius vermicularis in a 14-year-old girl's eye.

    PubMed

    Babady, N Esther; Awender, Erich; Geller, Robert; Miller, Terry; Scheetz, Gayle; Arguello, Heather; Weisenberg, Scott A; Pritt, Bobbi

    2011-12-01

    We report an unusual case of extraintestinal infection with adult Enterobius vermicularis worms in the nares and ocular orbit of a 14-year-old girl in Illinois. Only one other similar case has been reported in the English-language literature.

  12. [Myocardial infarction after butane inhalation in a 14-year-old boy].

    PubMed

    Godlewski, Krzysztof; Werner, Bozena; Sterliński, Maciej; Pytkowski, Mariusz; Szwed, Hanna; Domagała, Marek; Koc, Lucyna

    2006-03-01

    Myocardial infarction is a rare disease in children. Among many reasons the toxic damage of myocardium should be taken into consideration. The authors present the case of a 14-year-old boy with sudden cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation and myocardial infarction as a result of butane gas inhalation. Coronary angiography revealed normal coronary arteries. Cardioverter-defibrillator was implanted as a secondary prophylaxis of sudden cardiac death.

  13. Children's Beliefs about the Human Circulatory System: An Aid for Teachers Regarding the Role Intuitive Beliefs Play in the Development of Formal Concepts in 7-14-Year Olds. Report No. 82:16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catherall, Robin W.

    This exploratory study was aimed at uncovering children's beliefs and ideas about the human circulatory system. Thirty-two subjects, aged 7 to 14 years, were interviewed using a modification of Piaget's clinical method. The data were analyzed by developing a conceptual inventory of beliefs for each of five research questions. It was found that the…

  14. Pseudoaneurysm rupture after liver injury in a 14-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Hacker, H W; Schwöbel, M G; Allgayer, B

    2008-04-01

    Today, haemodynamically stable children with blunt liver trauma are treated conservatively and can be discharged from hospital within one week. We report on a 14-year-old boy with a blunt hepatic trauma grade III, who showed a pseudoaneurysm with active bleeding into the abdominal cavity after mobilisation on day 9. Supraselective angiography of the right hepatic artery was performed and 2 titanium coils and gelatine sponge particles were placed for embolisation. In view of this complication, we suggest carrying out colour Doppler sonographic imaging to rule out pseudoaneurysm in children with blunt hepatic trauma before they are discharged from hospital.

  15. Oral submucous fibrosis: a premalignant condition in a 14-year-old Indian girl

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Anshula; Kiran, Shital; Dhillon, Steffi; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-01-01

    A 14-year-old Indian girl presented with difficulty in mouth opening and burning sensation while eating. On examination, blanching of the oral mucosa with diffuse white pigmented lesion of size 3.5 to 2 cm along with melanotic pigmentation was seen on the left buccal mucosa posteriorly. The patient was diagnosed with oral submucous fibrosis. A comprehensive treatment plan was made based on conservative management that included motivation and intense counselling of the patient and her parents so that she quits the habit of chewing areca nut and tobacco, along with systemic treatment of vitamin B complex supplements, antioxidants, multivitamins and oral physiotherapy. We present this case to highlight the difficulties faced by the clinical practitioners in providing treatment because of the taboos and myths associated with surgical treatment modality in rural population as well as to emphasise the menace of increasing consumption and availability of tobacco and areca nut to children. PMID:24334472

  16. Sexual initiation among adolescents (10 to 14 years old) and health behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Helen; Machado, Eduardo Coelho; Soares, Ana Luiza Gonçalves; Camargo-Figuera, Fabio Alberto; Seering, Lenise Menezes; Mesenburg, Marília Arndt; Guttier, Marília Cruz; Barcelos, Raquel Siqueira; Buffarini, Romina; Assunção, Maria Cecília Formoso; Hallal, Pedro Curi; Menezes, Ana Maria Baptista

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence of sexual initiation until the age of 14 years old, as well as sociodemographic and behavioral factors. Methods In 2008, 4,325 from the 5,249 adolescents of the 1993 birth cohort in Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, were interviewed. Sexual initiation was defined as the first intercourse up to the age of 14 years old. The information was obtained by interviewing adolescents in their houses, during the 2008 follow-up. The analyzed variables were: skin color, asset index, maternal and adolescents’ schooling, experimental use of tobacco and alcohol, drunkenness episode, use of any illicit drug, illegal drug use by friends and involvement in fights during the past year. Use of condoms and contraceptive methods, number of partners and the age of sexual initiation were also analyzed. Results The prevalence of sexual initiation by the age of 14 was of 18.6%. Lower schooling, asset index and maternal education were related to higher prevalence of sexual initiation until the age of 14, as well as being male or being born to adolescent mothers. Sexual intercourse was also related to the behavioral variables analyzed. Among adolescent girls who had intercourse up to the age of 14, 30% did not use contraception and 18% did not use condoms in the last sexual intercourse. Boys reported a higher number of sexual partners than girls. Conclusion The results suggest a relationship between sexual intercourse (≤ 14 years) and some health-risk behaviors. The non-use of condoms and contraceptives may make them vulnerable to experiencing unwanted situations. Education and sociocultural strategies for health should be implemented from the beginning of adolescence. PMID:25651009

  17. Schwannoma Localized Retroperitoneally in a 14-Year-Old Boy

    PubMed Central

    Cayirli, Hasan; Ozguven, Ali Aykan; Gunsar, Cuneyt; Ersoy, Betul; Kandiloglu, Ali Riza

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas usually occur in adults being between the second and fifth decades, and such neoplasms are extremely rare in a pediatric population. In addition, they are not normally found in the retroperitoneal region. Here, we present a pediatric case of a retroperitoneal schwannoma in an adrenal location where the tumor was not able to be preoperatively differentiated from other benign or malign adrenal gland tumors. In our opinion, this tumor can be included in the differential diagnosis of a nonfunctioning retroperitoneal adrenal mass in children. PMID:28078159

  18. Lead toxicity in a 14-year-old female with retained bullet fragments.

    PubMed

    Coon, Troy; Miller, Michael; Shirazi, Farshad; Sullivan, John

    2006-01-01

    In the past 3 decades, lead levels in North American children have been declining. Despite the decline in lead exposure, lead toxicity remains a significant childhood environmental health hazard. The usual route of lead exposure is through ingestion, but lead toxicity secondary to retained bullet fragments has been well documented in the adult literature. The diagnosis of lead toxicity is often difficult and delayed secondary to vague and transient symptoms. Recognizing high-risk characteristics of bullet fragments can improve clinician awareness to the possibility of lead toxicity. The primary management of patients with continued lead exposure is to remove the source of exposure. However, in the case of retained bullet fragments, initiation of chelation therapy before surgical removal may be essential in preventing systemic toxicity. We present the case of a 14-year-old female with lead toxicity who presented with an 18-month course of chronic abdominal pain, vomiting, and anorexia 2 years after sustaining a gunshot wound to the right leg. The patient was treated with oral succimer and operative removal of bullet fragments.

  19. [Neurologic appearence of Behçet disease in 14-year old boy treated with adalimumab with good result].

    PubMed

    Iwańczak, Barbara; Reich, Adam; Kofla-Dłubacz, Anna; Kazanowska, Bernarda; Ruczka, Małgorzata

    2016-02-01

    Behçet disease is a multiorgan inflammatory vessel disorder of unknown etiology which only occasionally occurs in children. Here, we demonstrate a 14-year-old boy with Behçet disease diagnosed based on recurrent aphthous stomatitis, acneiform facial lesions, subpreputial erosions and extensive thrombosis involving sigmoid sinus, transverse sinus and right internal cervical vein. Treatment with low molecular weight heparins, systemic corticosteroids, and azathioprine only resulted in partial remission of clinical symptoms. Addition of adalimumab led to complete resolution of clinical and biochemical abnormalities and disappearance of thrombosis in central nervous system.

  20. Dental Management of a 14-Year-Old with Cockayne Syndrome under General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Gaddam, Divya; Thakur, Mukesh Singh; Krothapalli, Niranjani; Kaniti, Saujanya

    2014-01-01

    Cockayne's syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized clinically by cachectic dwarfism, cutaneous photosensitivity, loss of adipose tissue, mental retardation, skeletal and neurological abnormalities, and pigmentary degeneration of the retina. Dental caries is a common finding. Dental rehabilitation of a 14-year-old male with Cockayne's syndrome is presented. PMID:25574402

  1. Transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder in a 14-year-old dog.

    PubMed

    Caswell, Melissa

    2011-06-01

    A 14-year-old spayed female poodle-pekinese dog with a history of hematuria was tentatively diagnosed with non-radiopaque uroliths or urinary bladder neoplasia following temporary resolution of clinical signs after several rounds of antibiotic treatments, normal abdominal radiographs and no growth on urine culture. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a mass in the trigone area of the urinary bladder which was confirmed to be an invasive transitional cell carcinoma by histopathology following euthanasia.

  2. Transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder in a 14-year-old dog

    PubMed Central

    Caswell, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    A 14-year-old spayed female poodle-pekinese dog with a history of hematuria was tentatively diagnosed with non-radiopaque uroliths or urinary bladder neoplasia following temporary resolution of clinical signs after several rounds of antibiotic treatments, normal abdominal radiographs and no growth on urine culture. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a mass in the trigone area of the urinary bladder which was confirmed to be an invasive transitional cell carcinoma by histopathology following euthanasia. PMID:22131588

  3. Kleine-Levin syndrome in a 14-year-old girl: CSF hypocretin-1 measurements.

    PubMed

    Podestá, Claudio; Ferreras, Mónica; Mozzi, Marcela; Bassetti, Claudio; Dauvilliers, Yves; Billiard, Michel

    2006-12-01

    CSF hypocretin-1 measurements were performed during a period of hypersomnia and during an asymptomatic interval in a 14-year-old girl affected with severe Kleine-Levin syndrome. A twofold decrease in hypocretin-1 was evidenced during the period of hypersomnia in comparison with the asymptomatic interval. Together with previous data, this result is in favour of recurrent dysfunction at the hypothalamic level in Kleine-Levin syndrome.

  4. Severe hyponatremia due to ACTH insufficiency in a 14 year-old girl with growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Lo-Lin; Lue, Hung-Chi; Huang, Cheng-Hung; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2010-01-01

    SIADH-like hyponatremia as the presenting manifestation of ACTH deficiency is rare in childhood. Here we report a 14 year-old girl who, after 8 years of GH replacement and subsequent treatment for subclinical secondary hypothyroidism, presented with confusion and disorientation due to severe hyponatremia. When her pituitary axis was re-assessed, she was diagnosed as having ACTH deficiency associated with multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD) (including GH, FSH, LH, and subclinical TSH deficiencies). She responded poorly to treatment with only hypertonic fluid, but improved after addition of hydrocortisone replacement. The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the importance of suspecting ACTH insufficiency in children with GH deficiency if hyponatremia develops.

  5. Symptomatic Floor-of-Mouth Swelling with Neck Extension in a 14-Year-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Dayton, Kristin; Ryan, Matthew F.

    2014-01-01

    A plunging ranula is a soft-tissue mass stemming from a mucous extravasation cyst of the sublingual gland which can herniate through the mylohyoid muscle. We describe a case in which a 14-year-old girl presented with a rapidly expanding mass on the floor of her mouth affecting her ability to swallow and speak and causing tracheal compression. The patient was initially managed conservatively with antibiotics and steroids; however, the mass continued to expand necessitating emergent bedside incision and drainage and subsequent surgical intervention. The pathophysiology and management options for ranulas are also discussed herein. PMID:25548707

  6. Endovascular stenting of tracheoinnominate fistula after tracheostomy in a 14-year-old boy

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Mi-Hye; Lee, Yun-Jin; Nam, Sang Ook; Kim, Hye-Young; Kim, Chang Won

    2016-01-01

    Tracheoinnominate artery fistula is a rare, fatal complication of tracheostomy, and prompt diagnosis and management are imperative. We report the case of tracheoinnominate artery fistula after tracheostomy in a 14-year-old boy with a history of severe periventricular leukomalacia, hydrocephalus, cerebral palsy, and epilepsy. The tracheoinnominate artery fistula was successfully treated with a stent graft insertion via the right common femoral artery. Endovascular repair of the tracheoinnominate artery fistula via stent grafting is a safe, effective, and minimally invasive treatment for patients in poor clinical conditions and is an alternative to traditional open surgical treatment. PMID:28018452

  7. A Case-Control Study of Emotion Regulation and School Refusal in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Elizabeth K.; Gullone, Eleonora; Dudley, Amanda; Tonge, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate emotion regulation (ER) strategy use in a sample of 21 clinic-referred children and adolescents (10-14 years old) presenting with school refusal, all of whom were diagnosed with at least one anxiety disorder. Being the first known study to examine ER and school refusal, hypotheses were guided by previous…

  8. Severe growing-up phobia, a condition explained in a 14-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Perales-Blum, Laurencia; Juárez-Treviño, Myrthala; Escobedo-Belloc, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    We present the clinical case of a 14-year-old boy with gerascophobia or an excessive fear of aging, who felt his body development as a threat, to the point where he took extreme measures to stop or otherwise hide growth. He had a history of separation anxiety, sexual abuse, and suffering bullying. He presented with anxious and depressive symptoms and food restriction, criticized his body image, had negative feelings towards the maturation process, suffered at the thought of being rejected, and was preoccupied with certain physical characteristics. We conducted an analysis of biological, psychological, and environmental factors and their possible interactions and established treatment with psychotherapy and fluoxetine. Because of the favorable results, this approach could be considered a good option in such cases.

  9. A solitary mastocytoma presenting with urticaria and angioedema in a 14-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Karthik R; Ownby, Dennis R

    2010-01-01

    Urticaria with angioedema is a common clinical presentation that often poses a challenge for allergists. The differential diagnosis for urticaria is broad, making the evaluation and pinpointing the underlying cause difficult and frustrating for both families and physicians. Certain causes of urticaria such as infections or medications are more common and easier to identify whereas less frequently seen conditions are often overlooked because of their rarity. One such condition is mastocytosis. Mastocytosis is a rare disease that very seldom presents with urticaria but may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality if not recognized in a timely manner. We are presenting a case of a 14-year-old boy who presented with urticaria and angioedema possibly caused by a solitary mastocytoma. The learning points from this case are that mastocytosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of urticaria and solitary mastocytomas may remain active into adolescence, raising concern for systemic progression.

  10. Isolated Spontaneous Midbrain Hemorrhage in a 14-Year-Old Boy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kim-Long R.; Kim, Hyunyoung; Nagy, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    Isolated spontaneous midbrain hemorrhages are rare because they are usually secondary to hemorrhages from inferior structures such as the pons and cerebellum, or superior structures such as the thalamus and putamen. While the etiologies are largely unidentified, the most common ones are vascular malformations and bleeding diathesis with hypertension being relatively uncommon. We report midbrain hemorrhage in a 14-year-old boy with a long-standing history of frequent migraine headaches and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Neurologic examinations, noncontrast computed tomography (CT) scans, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggested that the lesion likely affected the dorsal part of the midbrain. The neurologic symptoms improved following endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) with the placement of external ventricular drains (EVDs). In this report, anatomical correlations to the case are discussed and previous reports of midbrain hemorrhages are reviewed. PMID:28180053

  11. Smoking among adults in Syria: proxy reporting by 13-14 year olds.

    PubMed

    Maziak, W; Tabbah, K

    2005-07-01

    Despite active epidemiological research related to smoking in Syria in the past few years, there is currently no population-based prevalence data for adult smoking in this country. This study presents the first such figures based on information about the smoking habits of 3066 couples in Aleppo, Syria collected during a survey on respiratory morbidity among 13-14-year-old youths. Reports from the young people indicated levels of parental smoking to be 54% for men and 18% for women. This figure for women is twice that reported previously. The mean number of smokers within the studied households was one smoker per household. Smoking among women was found to be strongly associated with their educational status and their spouse's smoking status. This information is of major importance for public health efforts to deal with the smoking epidemic in Syria, as it indicates a hidden epidemic of smoking among women, most likely due to under-reporting.

  12. Severe Growing-Up Phobia, a Condition Explained in a 14-Year-Old Boy

    PubMed Central

    Juárez-Treviño, Myrthala

    2014-01-01

    We present the clinical case of a 14-year-old boy with gerascophobia or an excessive fear of aging, who felt his body development as a threat, to the point where he took extreme measures to stop or otherwise hide growth. He had a history of separation anxiety, sexual abuse, and suffering bullying. He presented with anxious and depressive symptoms and food restriction, criticized his body image, had negative feelings towards the maturation process, suffered at the thought of being rejected, and was preoccupied with certain physical characteristics. We conducted an analysis of biological, psychological, and environmental factors and their possible interactions and established treatment with psychotherapy and fluoxetine. Because of the favorable results, this approach could be considered a good option in such cases. PMID:25610691

  13. A Case of Tuberculous Meningitis with Paradoxical Response in a 14-Year-Old Boy

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Ali Bülent; Emiralioğlu, Nagehan; Doğru, Deniz; Oğuz, Kader Karlı; Akça, Onur; Özkayar, Özgür

    2016-01-01

    A clinical or radiological worsening of already existing lesions or an emergence of new lesions after beginning treatment in patients with tuberculosis (TB) is referred to as the paradoxical response. This has aroused suspicion regarding the accuracy of diagnosis, the possibilities of treatment failure, or the presence of another underlying disease, and thus it is an important topic for clinicians to understand. In this article, the development of a paradox reaction in a 14-year-old male patient diagnosed with and treated for tuberculosis meningitis is reported. This pediatric patient with a healthy immune system is treated with steroids successfully and reported to elucidate the importance of managing the paradox of TB progression in spite of the appropriate anti-TB medications. PMID:27807490

  14. Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of ovary with metastasis in 14-year-old girl

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Prerna; Khurana, Nita; Tempe, Anjali

    2017-01-01

    Ovarian mucinous tumors in <15 years old are rare with <50 cases reported till date in the literature. Majority of them are benign or borderline epithelial ovarian tumors with only 12 cases of cystadenocarcinomas reported at a young age. We report a case of mucinous cystadenocarcinoma in 14-year-old girl with metastasis to omentum at the time of presentation. Management of such cases is tricky as conservative approach sparing fertility of the patient is adopted. This case is presented for its rarity and unique presentation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the thirteenth case of ovarian cystadenocarcinoma being reported at a very young age and the first case being reported from Indian subcontinent. Extensive review of the previously published cases in the literature has been done in this study. PMID:28344967

  15. Erdheim-Chester disease with rare radiological features in a 14-year old girl with pre-B Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia and Diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Varanasi Venkata Rama; James, Teo Eu Leong Harvey; Chang, Kenneth Tou En; Yen, Soh Shui

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 14 year-old girl with Diabetes Mellitus who was in remission with pre-B cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and subsequently diagnosed with Erdheim-Chester disease. Erdheim-Chester disease is a non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis and is very rare in children. In addition, the radiological features of the lesions are atypical and have not been reported in children. There is no known association between the three conditions and this is the first reported case in the literature. A literature review of Erdheim-Chester disease will be performed. PMID:25426240

  16. An extramedullary plasmacytoma in the kidney of a 14-year-old girl

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Yan-hui; Yu, Jian-peng; Li, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP) a rare plasma cell disorder and is frequently associated with plasma cell bone marrow infiltration. Most EMPs involve mucosal lymphoid tissue, especially in the nasopharyngeal area, respiratory tract, and head and neck region. Primary involvement of the kidney is exceedingly rare. Patient Concerns: A 14-year-old girl was admitted in our hospital with intermittent right upper quadrant pain for 1 month and recent (1 day) progressive deterioration. There was a mass found by ultrasonography in the right kidney and subsequent abdominal computed tomography scan revealed a 3 cm mass within the right kidney. Diagnoses: Pathology revealed typical histology of plasmacytoma and immunohistochemistry revealed the expression of CD138, CD45, vimentin, and Kappa light chain. Interventions: The patient successfully underwent radical nephrectomy with an uneventful recovery. She received no chemotherapy or radiotherapy after surgery. Outcomes: There was no recurrence or metastasis during a 22-month follow-up. Lessons: Our case study demonstrated that renal EMP with a relatively indolent clinical course, if detected at an early stage, can be treated by radical nephrectomy without adjuvant therapy. Generally, the clinical outcome and prognosis of EMP are favorable PMID:28178171

  17. Genetic and environmental influences on cortical thickness among 14-year-old twins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaling; Joshi, Anand A.; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Baker, Laura A.; Narr, Katherine L.; Raine, Adrian; Thompson, Paul M.; Damasio, Hanna

    2013-01-01

    The overall volume of the brain has been found to be under relatively strong genetic control, but the relative strength of genetic and environmental factors on between-person variations in regional cortical thickness in adolescence is still not well understood. Here, we analyzed structural MRI data from 108 14-year-old healthy twins (54 females/54 males) to determine the relative contributions of genes and the environment toward regional variations in gray matter thickness across the cortex. After extracting cortical thickness values at a high spatial resolution, an A/C/E structural equation model that divides the variations into additive genetic (A), shared (C), and unique (E) environmental components was fitted. There was considerable regional variability in the magnitude of genetic influences on cortical thickness after controlling for sex. Regions with genetic contributions of greater than 80% were observed in the prefrontal cortex, predominantly in the bilateral dorsolateral and mesial superior frontal regions. No region showed prominent shared environmental influences, but unique environmental influences of over 80% were found in parietal association regions. The genetic variance for cortical thickness in adolescents in prefrontal regions overlapped with previous findings in adults. However, the unique environmental effects observed in multimodal parietal association cortices with converging inputs from visual, auditory, somatosensory regions, and neighboring secondary association cortices suggest that these regional variations are more shaped by experience and could form targets for early interventions in youth with behavioral disorders. PMID:22713927

  18. A cross-curricular physical activity intervention to combat cardiovascular disease risk factors in 11-14 year olds: 'Activity Knowledge Circuit'

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease have been shown to track from childhood through to adulthood. Previous school-based physical activity interventions have demonstrated modest improvements to cardiovascular disease risk factors by implementing extra-curricular activities or improving current physical education curriculum. Few have attempted to increase physical activity in class-room taught curriculum subjects. This study will outline a school-based cross-curricular physical activity intervention to combat cardiovascular disease risk factors in 11-14 year old children. Method/Design A South Wales Valley school of low socio-economic status has been selected to take part. Participants from year eight (12-13 years) are to be assigned to an intervention group, with maturation-matched participants from years seven (11-12 years) and nine (13-14 years) assigned to a control group. A cross-curricular physical activity intervention will be implemented to increase activity by two hours a week for 18 weeks. Participants will briskly walk 3200 m twice weekly during curriculum lessons (60 minutes duration). With the exception of physical education, all curriculum subjects will participate, with each subject delivering four intervention lessons. The intervention will be performed outdoors and on school premises. An indoor course of equal distance will be used during adverse weather conditions. Cardiovascular disease risk factors will be measured pre- and post-intervention for intervention and control groups. These will take place during physical education lessons and will include measures of stature, mass, waist, hip, and neck circumferences, together with skinfold measure's taken at four sites. Blood pressure will be measured, and fitness status assessed via the 20 m multi-stage fitness test. Questionnaires will be used to determine activity behaviour (physical activity questionnaire

  19. A School in Siberia: 14-Year-Olds Take University Math Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogdanovsky, Georgy

    1978-01-01

    Ordinary students (n=40) are participating in a Soviet experiment wherein they are taught by well-known scientists and specialists in a math-intensive course comparable to that taught at the Kiev University. (JC)

  20. Prevalence of malocclusion and its relationship with socio-demographic factors, dental caries, and oral hygiene in 12- to 14-year-old Tanzanian schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Mtaya, Matilda; Brudvik, Pongsri; Astrøm, Anne Nordrehaug

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of malocclusion and its association with socio-demographic characteristics, caries experience, and level of oral hygiene in 12- to 14-year-old schoolchildren residing in two socio-economically different districts of Tanzania. A total of 1601 children (mean age 13 years, 60.5 per cent girls) attending 16 primary schools in Kinondoni and Temeke districts participated in a clinical examination and were interviewed in school settings. Chi-square and multiple logistic regression models were used to test for statistically significant differences between different groups. The results showed that 63.8 per cent (62.6 per cent in Kinondoni and 66.0 per cent in Temeke) of the subjects had at least one type of anomaly, with a midline shift (22.5 per cent), spacing of at least 2 mm (21.9 per cent), and an open bite (16.1 per cent) being the most frequently recorded. The majority (93.6 per cent) of the children showed a Class I molar relationship. Class II and Class III malocclusions were registered in 4.4 and 2.0 per cent, respectively. Multiple logistic regression analyses, controlling for socio-demographic factors, showed that the odds ratio for having an open bite was 1.8 if residing in a less socio-economically privileged district. Subjects with decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DNFT) (>0) were 1.7, 2.1, 2.4, and 1.7, respectively, more likely to be diagnosed with a malocclusion, a midline shift, Angle Class II and III, and an open bite. Schoolchildren with fair/poor oral hygiene were less likely than their counterparts with good oral hygiene to be diagnosed with a midline shift. Malocclusions were prevalent in the Tanzanian children investigated and were associated with environmental factors in terms of caries experience and residing in a less affluent district. Preventive programmes to combat the prevalence of malocclusion are recommended.

  1. Neurotropic T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma in a 14-year-old Morgan gelding

    PubMed Central

    Westerman, Trina L.; Poulsen, Keith P.; Schlipf, John W.; Valentine, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    A 14-year-old Morgan gelding was presented for progressive weakness and muscle atrophy. The horse was initially diagnosed with equine protozoal myelitis based on history, physical examination, and laboratory diagnostics. Despite therapy, the horse declined clinically and was euthanized. Necropsy revealed a rare form of neurotropic lymphoma, described in this report. PMID:24688140

  2. Acute hepatotoxicity after ingestion of Morinda citrifolia (Noni Berry) juice in a 14-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Elizabeth L; Sivagnanam, Mamata; Ellis, Linda; Huang, Jeannie S

    2011-02-01

    We present a case of a 14-year-old previously healthy boy with acute hepatotoxicity after noni berry juice consumption. As the popularity of noni berry consumption continues to increase, heightened awareness of the relation between noni berry consumption and acute hepatotoxicity is important.

  3. [Abdominal CSF pseudocyst recurrence in a 14-year-old patient with ventricular-peritoneal shunt].

    PubMed

    Laurent, P; Hennecker, J-L; Schillaci, A; Scordidis, V

    2014-08-01

    Abdominal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pseudocyst is a rare complication of ventricular-peritoneal shunt (VPS) but needs to be considered in every patient with abdominal complaints or signs of intracranial hypertension (IH). The pathogenesis of pseudocysts remains unclear. Diverse predisposing factors have been proposed such as previous abdominal surgeries, multiple VPS revisions, infections, history of necrotizing enterocolitis, and nonspecific inflammatory processes. We report the case of a 14-year-old patient, known to have a VPS as intraventricular hemorrhage treatment, presenting cephalalgia, vomiting, apathy, and an indurate abdominal mass without fever. The first abdominal CSF pseudocyst diagnosis had been established 3 months earlier. Abdominal ultrasounds confirmed a large homogeneous cyst with the shunt tip within the pseudocyst. Cerebral CT revealed an increased ventricular size. An exploratory laparotomy with cyst aspiration, lysis of adhesions, excision of cystic walls, and repositioning of the peritoneal catheter was performed. No antibiotics were initiated given that the cultures were negative. Ultrasonography proved to be the method of choice in the diagnosis of VPS abdominal complications, especially CSF pseudocyst. CT can also reliably confirm the pseudocyst. In case of IH signs, a cerebral CT scan can be performed to evaluate the ventricular distension and to check the shunt position. Various methods to process the cyst have been described in the medical literature, but the recurrence rate remains elevated (25-100%). Then the probability of an infection without any clinical sign has to be considered. In case of suspected infection, the VPS is removed and replaced by an external ventricular drain. Antibiotics are started and adjusted to the results of the CSF culture. If there is no direct sign of infection, only the distal catheter is externalized and antibiotics are introduced until infection is treated. Depending on the peritoneal absorption state

  4. Long-term survival of full trisomy 13 in a 14 year old male: a case report.

    PubMed

    Imataka, G; Hagisawa, S; Nitta, A; Hirabayashi, H; Suzumura, H; Arisaka, O

    2016-03-01

    Long term survival for the cases of trisomy 13 into over a first decade is very rare. We reported here the case of a 14-year-old male karyotype with full type of trisomy 13. In this clinical phenomenon, the case had typical facial, finger and limb anomalies for trisomy 13. Arterial septal defect and patent ductus arteriosus were recognized using ultrasonography after birth. Major cerebral malformation such as holoprosencephaly or cerebellar hypoplasia were also not revealed. After 5 months of his age, artificial ventilation therapy for dyspnea associated with laryngomalacia was required. A tracheotomy was performed at 6 months of his age. After 12 years old, intractable partial epilepsy was recognized. For his partial seizures, a treatment with a combination of two anti-epileptic drugs, valproic acid and levetiracetam, were advised. Now he is alive for 14-years-old and he is the 4th longest surviving patient with full karyotype of trisomy 13.

  5. A case of catatonia in a 14-year-old girl with schizophrenia treated with electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Häßler, Frank; Reis, Olaf; Weirich, Steffen; Höppner, Jacqueline; Pohl, Birgit; Buchmann, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a case of a 14-year-old female twin with schizophrenia who developed severe catatonia following treatment with olanzapine. Under a combined treatment with amantadine, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and (currently) ziprasidone alone she improved markedly. Severity and course of catatonia including treatment response were evaluated with the Bush-Francis Catatonia Rating Scale (BFCRS). This case report emphasizes the benefit of ECT in the treatment of catatonic symptoms in an adolescent patient with schizophrenic illness.

  6. Event Narratives in 11-14 Year Olds with Autistic Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Diane; Dockrell, Julie E.; Stuart, Morag

    2013-01-01

    Background: Children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) are known to have difficulties in narrative language and especially with use of evaluative enrichment devices. However, little is known about their production of event narratives. Aims: To establish if children with ASD differ from typically developing peers in their production of general…

  7. Comparison of Internalizing Disorders in 8-14-Year-Old Offspring of Opium and Heroin Dependent Parents: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Eslami Shahrbabaki, Mahin; Ziaaddini, Hassan; Saieedi Gargari, Hamdollah; Nakhaee, Nouzar; Eslami Shahrbabaki, Parvin; Eslami Sharbabaki, Nasrin

    2010-01-01

    Background: In general, parental substance abuse is associated with children's emotional and behavioral problems. This study only investigated the internalizing problems (depression, anxiety and physical complains) in children of opioid or heroin-dependent parents in comparison with non-opioid dependent parents in order to determine the effects of drug dependency after excluding the confounding factors. Methods: This case-control study compared the internalizing problems of one hundred twenty eight 8 to 14-year-old students in two offspring groups of opioid or heroin-dependent parents (n=64) and non opioid dependent parents (n=64). Then we used the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Parents in both groups had no major psychiatric disorders (e.g., personality disorders, mood and anxiety disorders or psychosis), no history of major medical diseases, and no history of divorce. Analysis was performed using chi square or Fisher's exact test. Findings: The anxiety/depression subscales in children of non opioid dependent parents were significantly higher in comparison with children of opioid or heroin-dependent parents. Conclusion: Substance dependence in addition to reducing parental supervision on children may cause lack of knowledge and unawareness of their children's anxiety and mood problems. Considering study limitations, study repetition in larger statistical population is necessary for generalizing the study findings. In order to assess internalizing problems in further studies, usage of behavioral checklists for self-report of children and youth is recommended. PMID:24494100

  8. Developmental and sex differences in somatosensory perception--a systematic comparison of 7- versus 14-year-olds using quantitative sensory testing.

    PubMed

    Blankenburg, M; Meyer, D; Hirschfeld, G; Kraemer, N; Hechler, T; Aksu, F; Krumova, E K; Magerl, W; Maier, C; Zernikow, B

    2011-11-01

    There are controversial discussions regarding developmental- and sex-related differences in somatosensory perception, which were found, eg, when comparing younger children (6-8 years), older children (9-12 years), and adolescents (13-16 years) using quantitative sensory testing (QST). The aim of our current study was to systematically assess the impact of age and sex using the QST protocol of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS). QST, including thermal and mechanical detection and pain thresholds, was assessed in 86 healthy 7-year-old children (42 girls and 44 boys) and 87 healthy 14-year-old adolescents (43 girls and 44 boys). The sample size was calculated a priori to detect medium-sized effects as found in the previous studies with adequate power. Developmental and sex differences were tested using univariate analysis of variance. Children were more sensitive to most pain stimuli, except cold pain stimuli, compared with adolescents, but did not differ in mechanical and thermal detection thresholds except in regard to cold stimuli. Sex had an impact only on warm detection, with girls being more sensitive. There were no interactions between age and sex. In conclusion, developmental changes during the puberty appear to influence pain perception, whereas sex effects in childhood are negligible. At present, it is not clear what brings about the differences between adult men and women that are apparent in epidemiological studies. Our results contradict the hypothesis that differences in peripheral nerve-fiber functioning underlie sex effects.

  9. Salter-Harris type II fracture of the femoral bone in a 14-year-old boy – case report

    PubMed Central

    Kuleta-Bosak, Elżbieta; Bożek, Paweł; Kluczewska, Ewa; Tomaszewski, Ryszard; Machnik-Broncel, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background: Distal femoral physis fractures with displacement are rare injuries seen in adolescents related with high incidence of complication. They may lead to premature physeal closure consequently, to growth arrest and bone deformity. Case Report: The case of a 14-year-old boy with Salter-Harris type II displaced fracture underwent surgery with open reduction has been described. CT examination with multiplanar reconstruction was used in pre-operative assessment of distal femur growth plate fracture. Conclusions: Knowledge of classification, prognosis and methods of treatment is necessary in accurate pre- and postoperative assessment of physial fractures in adolescents. CT and multiplanar reconstruction improve the understanding of patterns of injury, relative prevalence and accuracy of pre-operative planning. PMID:22802768

  10. Depression risk and electrocortical reactivity during self-referential emotional processing in 8 to 14 year-old girls.

    PubMed

    Speed, Brittany C; Nelson, Brady D; Auerbach, Randy P; Klein, Daniel N; Hajcak, Greg

    2016-07-01

    Cognitive vulnerabilities, such as a negative self-referential processing bias, have been theorized to play a causal role in the development of depression. Indeed, depression is associated with the endorsement and recall of more negative and fewer positive emotional words (i.e., recall biases) in the self-referential encoding task (SRET). In addition, currently depressed adults and adolescents, compared to healthy controls, show an enhanced late positive potential (LPP), an event-related potential (ERP) component that reflects sustained attentional engagement, during the processing of negative relative to positive words in the SRET. However, it is unclear whether these behavioral and neural measures in the SRET are indicators of risk for depression, or are concomitants of the disorder. The present study included 121 8 to 14 year-old girls with no lifetime history of depression, and examined the association between maternal history of depression (i.e., risk) and both behavioral and ERP measures while viewing positive and negative adjectives during the SRET. Lifetime history of major depressive disorder and/or dysthymia in the biological mother was assessed via a semistructured diagnostic interview. Results indicated that participants with maternal history of depression, compared with those with no maternal history of depression, demonstrated an enhanced LPP to negative words. There were no group differences in the LPP to positive words. Maternal history of depression was also related to faster response time when rejecting negative words. Participant's current depression symptoms were associated with increased negative recall bias and decreased positive recall bias. The present study provides novel evidence that abnormal electrocortical reactivity to negative self-referential words indexes vulnerability for depression in 8 to 14 year-old girls. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. Autoimmune polyglandular endocrinopathy and anterior hypophysitis in a 14 year-old girl presenting with delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Cemeroglu, A P; Böber, E; Dündar, B; Büyükgebiz, A

    2001-01-01

    We report a 14 year-old peripubertal girl who presented at our clinic with the primary complaint of delayed puberty. She was asymptomatic except for vague complaints of fatigue. Physical examination was significant for mucosal hyperpigmentation and lack of secondary sexual characteristics. Laboratory evaluation revealed a morning cortisol concentration of <0.1 microg/dl (normal range [n.r.]: 4.3-22.4 microg/dl) and a simultaneous ACTH concentration of 2 pg/ml (n.r. 25-62 pg/ml); FSH 66.8 IU/l (n.r. for age: 1-12.8 IU/l); LH 41.1 IU/l (n.r. for age: 1-12 IU/l); E2 38 pg/ml (n.r. for age: 7-60 pg/ml). She had a flat cortisol response to an ACTH stimulation test. MRI of the pituitary gland failed to reveal a lesion. Plasma renin activity, thyroid function tests, parathyroid hormone, prolactin, IGF-I, IGFBP-3 concentrations and serum electrolytes were normal. However, her urinary sodium concentration was high. She was diagnosed with autoimmune polyglandular endocrinopathy including ovarian failure, adrenal failure and autoimmune anterior hypophysitis presenting as isolated ACTH deficiency. We emphasize that autoimmune etiology should be considered in the differential diagnosis of delayed puberty and ovarian failure and that the presence of other endocrinopathies should be searched for even in asymptomatic patients.

  12. Hip Replacement Surgery in 14-Year-Old Girl with Factor V Deficiency: Haemostatic Treatment and Thromboprophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Núñez, Josefina; Baeza-Montañez, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Factor V (FV) is a pivotal coagulation factor present in plasma and platelets. It plays an essential role in secondary haemostasis acting as a cofactor in the prothrombinase complex, catalysing the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin. There is little evidence on the management of mayor orthopaedic surgery in paediatric or adolescents subjects with this coagulopathy and almost no information about thromboprophylaxis in these situations. We report a case of a hip replacement in a 14-year-old girl with moderate FV deficiency (0.07 IU mL−1). As haemostatic replacement, inactivated fresh frozen plasma (FFP) was transfused at doses of 600 mL (15 mL kg−1, 45 kg weight) 2 hours before surgery and then sequential FFP infusions of 250 mL (7 mL kg−1) every 12 hours for 7 days. Plasma factor VIII, von Willebrand factor antigen, and von Willebrand ristocetin cofactor were monitored to avoid supranormal levels. Since the patient was sexually mature (Marshall and Tanner stage 5) with the hormone replacement therapy, she was immobilized and the surgery was considered as a high thrombotic risk. Thus, low molecular weight heparin was administered at doses of intermediate risk (Enoxaparin 20 mg daily, by weight) after finishing the daily infusion of plasma: 24 hours and during the 7 days after intervention. No tranexamic acid was used. No haemorrhagic or thrombotic adverse event was described. PMID:27872768

  13. Ovarian carcinoma in a 14-year-old with classical salt-wasting congenital adrenal hyperplasia and bilateral adrenalectomy.

    PubMed

    Pina, Christian; Khattab, Ahmed; Katzman, Philip; Bruckner, Lauren; Andolina, Jeffrey; New, Maria; Yau, Mabel

    2015-05-01

    A 14-year-old female with classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia because of 21-hydroxylase deficiency underwent bilateral adrenalectomy at 6 years of age as a result of poor hormonal control. Because the patient was adrenalectomized, extra adrenal androgen production was suspected. Imaging studies including pelvic ultrasound and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were obtained to evaluate for adrenal rest tumors of the ovaries. Abdominal MRI was obtained to evaluate for residual adrenal tissue. A cystic lesion arising from her right ovary suspicious for ovarian neoplasm was noted on pelvic MRI. Right salpingo-oophorectomy was performed and histopathological examination revealed ovarian serous adenocarcinoma, low-grade, and well-differentiated. Tumor marker CA-125 was elevated and additional ovarian cancer staging workup confirmed stage IIIC due to one lymph node positive for carcinoma. The patient then developed a large left ovarian cyst, which led to a complete total abdominal hysterectomy and removal of the left ovary and fallopian tube. Pathology confirmed ovarian serous adenocarcinoma with microscopic focus of carcinoma in the left ovary. After numerous complications, the patient responded well to chemotherapy, CA-125 levels fell and no evidence of carcinoma was observed on subsequent imaging. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an ovarian serous adenocarcinoma in a patient with CAH. Although rare, we propose that the ovaries were the origin of androgen production and not residual adrenal tissue. The relationship between CAH and ovarian carcinomas has yet to be established, but further evaluation is needed given the poor survival rate of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma.

  14. To What Extent Do Pupils Perceive Science to Be Inconsistent with Religious Faith? An Exploratory Survey of 13-14 Year-Old English Pupils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Keith S.; Billingsley, Berry; Riga, Fran; Newdick, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Scientists hold a wide range of beliefs on matters of religion, although popular media coverage in the UK commonly suggests that atheism is a core commitment for scientists. Considering the relationship between religion and science is a recommended topic in the English National Curriculum for lower secondary pupils (11-14 year-olds), and it is…

  15. [Tobacco consumption in pre-adolescent and adolescent school children in Spain: gender differences].

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Ramón; López Pérez, Pilar

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to describe the prevalence of tobacco consumption among pre-adolescent and adolescent school children in Spain at the start of the 21st century. The data were collected within the framework of the "Estilos de Vida de los Adolescentes Escolarizados" (EVAE) project, a nationwide cross-sectional study on the lifestyles of adolescent school children. In this study, a random sample of 8429 students aged from 10 to 18 years old (49.9% boys and 50.1% girls) was selected. The school children filled in an anonymous questionnaire in their classrooms. Among the 12-year-old age group, there are a significantly higher number of boys than girls who have ever smoked tobacco. Figures are higher for girls in the 14-year-old or older age groups. Between the 12 and the 14-year-old age groups, there is an increase of 40 percentage points for girls who have ever smoked tobacco. The prevalence of daily smoking exceeds 10% among the 14-year-old or older age groups, with significantly higher rates for girls than for boys among the 15-year-old group and older students. Among the 17-year-old group, 25% of boys and 35% of girls report that they smoke daily. The recent experience of Spain and other countries shows that it is possible to significantly reduce the prevalence of tobacco consumption among school children within a few years. The primary prevention of tobacco consumption among adolescents can be highly effective and should constitute a priority for the health system, the education system and other sectors involved.

  16. Intestinal parasitic infections among school children in Tripoli, Libya.

    PubMed

    Ben Musa, Najla; Sehari, Aisha; Hawas, Ali

    2007-12-01

    An epidemiological survey was carried out in Tripoli district to collect baseline data on the prevalence of intestinal parasites. A sample of 486 school children aged from 5 to 14 years old provided morning stool samples as part of a pilot study of a larger national project. Questionnaires were distributed and general information on each child was recorded. Posters and leaflets were used extensively to increase the public health information and awareness about parasitosis. The results revealed that 14.6% of children were infected with at least one intestinal parasite. Double infections were in 2% of them. Giardia lamblia was the common parasite, followed by Enterobius vermicularis and then Ascqris lumbricoides. This was a preliminary approach to clarify the status on intestinal parasites since reliable reportable data being still comparatively lacking, which might be a guide for a feasible national control program.

  17. Distinct discrimination learning strategies and their relation with spatial memory and attentional control in 4- to 14-year-olds.

    PubMed

    Schmittmann, Verena D; van der Maas, Han L J; Raijmakers, Maartje E J

    2012-04-01

    Behavioral, psychophysiological, and neuropsychological studies have revealed large developmental differences in various learning paradigms where learning from positive and negative feedback is essential. The differences are possibly due to the use of distinct strategies that may be related to spatial working memory and attentional control. In this study, strategies in performing a discrimination learning task were distinguished in a cross-sectional sample of 302 children from 4 to 14 years of age. The trial-by-trial accuracy data were analyzed with mathematical learning models. The best-fitting model revealed three learning strategies: hypothesis testing, slow abrupt learning, and nonlearning. The proportion of hypothesis-testing children increased with age. Nonlearners were present only in the youngest age group. Feature preferences for the irrelevant dimension had a detrimental effect on performance in the youngest age group. The executive functions spatial working memory and attentional control significantly predicted posterior learning strategy probabilities after controlling for age.

  18. Children's Understanding of Television Advertising: A Revisit in the Chinese Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Kara; McNeal, James U.

    2004-01-01

    The authors conducted a survey of 1,758 elementary school children (6-14 years old) from December 2001, to March 2002, in 3 Chinese cities with different levels of television advertising. The authors used D. R. John's (1999) model of consumer socialization as the theoretical framework for their study. More than half of the children whom the…

  19. Implicit alcohol-aggression scripts and alcohol-related aggression on a laboratory task in 11- to 14-year-old adolescents.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen L; Lipka, Sigrid; Coyne, Sarah M; Qualter, Pamela; Barlow, Alexandra; Taylor, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Social scripts are commonly shared representations of behavior in social contexts, which are seen to be partly transmitted through social and cultural media. Research suggests that people hold scripts associated with alcohol-related aggression, but, unlike general aggression scripts, there is little evidence of social transmission. To demonstrate social transmission of alcohol-related aggression scripts, learning mechanisms based on personal experience should be minimized. We used a lexical decision task to examine implicit links between alcohol and aggression in alcohol-naïve adolescents who have limited personal or vicarious experience of alcohol-related aggression. One hundred and four 11-14 year old adolescents made lexical decisions on aggressive or nonaggressive words preceded by 40-ms alcohol or nonalcohol word primes. Repeated measures analyses of group data showed that alcohol word primes did not lead to faster responses to aggressive words than to nonaggressive words, nor were responses to aggressive words faster when they were preceded by alcohol word primes than by nonalcohol word primes. However, at an individual level, faster recognition times to the alcohol prime/aggression target word combination predicted aggression on a competitive laboratory task in 14 year olds only. This occurred only when the competitive aggression task was preceded by a visual presentation of alcoholic, but not nonalcoholic beverage, images. We concluded that alcohol-related aggression scripts are not strongly developed in this age group, but individual differences in script strength are linked to alcohol-related laboratory aggression.

  20. [Relation of the physical-sport activity practice and alcohol consumption of citizens older than 14 years old].

    PubMed

    Valero Valenzuela, Alfonso; Ruiz Juan, Francisco; García Montes, Ma Elena; Granero Gallegos, Antonio; Martínez Rodríguez, Ana María

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the current research is to ascertain any possible relationship that could exist between the alcohol consumption of the population and several sociodemographic variables, in addition to the influence of physical exercise/sports on the creation of healthy lifestyle habits. The sample comprised 1102 subjects from Almeria Spain, over 14 years of age, to whom we administered the "physical exercise/sporting habits and life styles" questionnaire, selecting the sections on physical exercise/sporting habits in leisure, fitness and state of health perception and alcohol consumption habits, related to attitudes, behavioural and sociodemographic variables. We used an innovative tool for data analysis in the sphere of physical exercise, known as the Bayesian networks, emphasizing a positive relationship between alcohol consumption and physical exercise/sporting activities, it being the active people, with an interest in physical exercise/sports, who have a good perception of their health and physical fitness who are the ones who make habitual and occasional use of this substance. The profile of the individual who does not drink alcohol is female, over 44 years of age, with no studies, housewives who have a poor perception of their health, and who do not do any physical exercise or plays sports, whereas the populations with health risks, are men between 15 and 44 years of age who have secondary school studies or a degree and who work in the public or private sector.

  1. Thirty Years on--A Large Anti-Flynn Effect? (II): 13- and 14-Year-Olds. Piagetian Tests of Formal Operations Norms 1976-2006/7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shayer, Michael; Ginsburg, Denise

    2009-01-01

    Background: Shayer, Ginsburg, and Coe (2007) showed that children leaving primary school in Y6 entered secondary school with much lower levels of understanding of the physical conservations than in 1976. It seemed desirable to investigate cognitive development in the first three years of secondary education. Aims: By using two Piagetian tests of…

  2. The changing phenotype in diploid/triploid mosaicism may mimic genetic syndromes with aberrant genomic imprinting: follow up in a 14-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Rittinger, Olaf; Kronberger, Gabriela; Pfeifenberger, Andrea; Kotzot, Dieter; Fauth, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Diploid/triploid mosaicism is a rare chromosome aberration characterized by growth and mental retardation, muscular hypotonia, clinodactyly, syndactyly of fingers and toes, asymmetry of the body and the face, truncal obesity, and pigmentary anomalies of the skin. Many patients initially present with severe growth retardation and develop truncal obesity later in life. Variable phenotype expression during development and restriction of triploid cells to certain tissues explain why the diagnosis of diploid/triploid mosaicism is often delayed. Here, we report on a moderately retarded 14-year-old girl with diploid/triploid mosaicism due to inclusion of the second polar body, whose changing phenotype overlaps considerably with different genetic disorders associated with aberrant genomic imprinting. The observation that triploid cells, which in our patient show remarkably variable distribution in different tissues, may also be present in easily accessible tissues such as urinary sediment or buccal smear may contribute to an earlier diagnosis of this rare syndrome.

  3. Splenorenal Collaterals as Hallmark for a Twisted Wandering Spleen in a 14-Year-Old Girl with Abdominal Pain: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rellum, Rashidi; Risseeuw, Gerard; Blaauw, Ivo de; Lequin, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Wandering spleen is a rare cause of acute or chronic recurrent abdominal pain with a risk of splenic torsion and infarction. We describe a case of a 14-year-old girl with chronic recurrent abdominal pain with a palpable spleen in normal position on the initial physical examination. Laboratory findings were normal. A normal blood flow was seen on the initial (color Doppler) sonography. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an enlarged spleen in the pelvic region with torsion of hilar pedicle and splenorenal collaterals. Semielective, a laparoscopic splenopexy was performed without complications. A twisted wandering spleen should be included in the differential diagnosis of recurrent abdominal pain despite possible normal positioning of the spleen. The presence of splenorenal collaterals on imaging techniques can be used as a diagnostic hallmark. PMID:25755964

  4. Splenorenal collaterals as hallmark for a twisted wandering spleen in a 14-year-old girl with abdominal pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rellum, Rashidi; Risseeuw, Gerard; Blaauw, Ivo de; Lequin, Maarten

    2014-06-01

    Wandering spleen is a rare cause of acute or chronic recurrent abdominal pain with a risk of splenic torsion and infarction. We describe a case of a 14-year-old girl with chronic recurrent abdominal pain with a palpable spleen in normal position on the initial physical examination. Laboratory findings were normal. A normal blood flow was seen on the initial (color Doppler) sonography. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an enlarged spleen in the pelvic region with torsion of hilar pedicle and splenorenal collaterals. Semielective, a laparoscopic splenopexy was performed without complications. A twisted wandering spleen should be included in the differential diagnosis of recurrent abdominal pain despite possible normal positioning of the spleen. The presence of splenorenal collaterals on imaging techniques can be used as a diagnostic hallmark.

  5. DIETARY HABITS OF SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN IN TBILISI.

    PubMed

    Mebonia, N; Trapaidze, D; Kvanchakhadze, R; Zhizhilashvili, S; Kasradze, N

    2015-11-01

    Study Goal was to determine dietary habits in school-aged children. Sampling of children was conducted in two stages. In the first stage, five schools in Nadzaladevi district of city Tbilisi were randomly selected. On the second stage the study groups from the appropriate school-aged students (10-14 years old children) were also randomly selected. All student participants filled out standardized and adopted questionnaires suggested by the American Academy of family physicians. Data were analyzed by using EpiInfo 7th version. Statistical analyses looked at correlations between criteria of unhealthy diet (such as morning without breakfast, frequent consumption of non-alcoholic beverages and fast food products) and overweight/obesity. A Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated by using CDC tool. 175 children with ages of 10-14 years (47% boys) were included and interviewed. Half of the children noted that they love or like fast food products. 10% - visits fast food places 2-3 times a week together with a family. 11% - visits fast food places 5 times a week and even more. 34% - do not start morning with breakfast; 15% - eat only twice a day; 26% - add salt to their dishes; 58% - drink non-alcoholic beverages every day or many times during a week; 24% - are overweight; 29% suffer from obesity; 25% noted that fast food places are located near schools. Very weak correlation was found between unhealthy diet (morning without breakfast, frequent consumption of non-alcoholic beverages and fast food products) and overweight/obesity. According to study results, dietary habits of school-age children in Tbilisi is unhealthy; to improve nutritional habits is essential: (1) promote consumer (students, parents and teachers) awareness on a healthy diet, (2) educate children, adolescents and adults about nutrition and healthy dietary practices, (3) encourage to raise awareness about the salt consumption in recommended doses in children.

  6. Education Participation in Sri Lanka--Why All Are Not in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arunatilake, Nisha

    2006-01-01

    Despite Sri Lanka's 1990 commitment to provide 10-11 years of free education to all, only 93% of children in the 5-14-year-old age group were in school by the year 2000. Moreover, the education participation rates are not equitable across the country, varying by socio-economic groups. This paper examines the determinants of school…

  7. Helping Your Child through Early Adolescence: For Parents of Children from 10 through 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC. Office of Intergovernmental and Interagency Affairs.

    Recognizing that parents and families can greatly influence the development of their 10- through 14-year-olds, this booklet is part of a national effort to provide parents with the latest research and practical information to help them support their children both at home and in school. The booklet is organized into 13 sections around the following…

  8. Influence of Mandarin tone exposure on the processing of intonation by 14-year-old American adolescents: An fMRI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jo-Fu Lotus; Imada, Toshiaki; Kuhl, Patricia; Wang, Yue

    2004-05-01

    This study investigated, for American adolescents, whether the learning of non-native speech contrasts in one prosodic domain (Mandarin Chinese tones) would influence the processing of non-native contrasts in another prosodic domain (Mandarin Chinese intonation). Two groups of 14-year-old American teenagers were tested using the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique, including eight who had received a two-week Mandarin tone training program and eight with no exposure to Mandarin. Subjects were scanned during identification tasks. Despite their similar behavioral performance on identification of Mandarin intonation, preliminary results showed different cortical activation patterns for the two groups. Teenagers exposed to Mandarin showed similar activation patterns for the Mandarin intonation and Mandarin tone task, with more right-hemisphere activation for intonation, which differed from activation for English intonation. Teenagers without exposure activated similar areas for Mandarin and English intonation. Familiarity with Mandarin tonal contrasts affects brain activation, not only for Mandarin tones but also for Mandarin intonation, suggesting that training effects may transcend levels. [Work supported by NIH (HD 37954) and the Talaris Research Institute.

  9. Unrecognized citrullinemia mimicking encephalitis in a 14-year-old boy: unexpected result through the use of a standardized lumbar puncture protocol.

    PubMed

    Karall, Daniela; Haberlandt, Edda; Albrecht, Ursula; Rostasy, Kevin; Häberle, Johannes; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine

    2012-04-01

    Citrullinemia is a urea cycle disorder caused by deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase. Late onset forms can remain undiscovered until a decompensation that can resemble encephalitis. Herein, we report a 14-year old patient with suspected encephalitis with fluctuating episodes of confusion. EEG mainly showed bilateral slowing with some spikes plus spike waves; and was interpreted as suspicious for encephalitis. Brain MRI was normal. Leukocytes in CSF were slightly elevated. Treatment for a CNS infectious disease was begun. Symptoms did not resolve and there were several episodes of confusion, so a repeat lumbar puncture was performed according to a standardized protocol including an amino acid profile. An elevation of citrulline in CSF was found, which ultimately led to the diagnosis of a late onset citrullinemia. The establishment of this diagnosis will protect the patient from the sequelae of unrecognized and thus untreated episodes of hyperammonemia. Thus, following a standardized lumbar puncture protocol can be essential to detect patients with otherwise unrecognized underlying metabolic disorders that are not suspected because of clinical symptoms. In addition, it is important to stress that an ammonia concentration should be determined in any patient with neurological signs like confusion.

  10. Association of parents' nutritional status, and sociodemographic and dietary factors with overweight/obesity in schoolchildren 7 to 14 years old.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Carla de Oliveira; Vasconcelos, Francisco de Assis Guedes de

    2012-02-01

    To assess the association of parents' nutritional status, and dietary and sociodemographic factors with overweight/obesity in schoolchildren in Florianópolis Island, Santa Catarina State, Brazil, this cross-sectional epidemiological study examined 2,826 schoolchildren 7 to 14 years old, classified according to body mass index curves for age and sex recommended by the International Obesity Task Force. Data were analyzed using Poisson regression. The final model showed overweight/obesity in boys associated directly with father's educational level, mother's age, and parents' nutritional status, and inversely with mother's educational level, and number of daily meals. Among girls, it associated directly with parents' nutritional status and the schoolchildren's age, and inversely with consumption of risk foods. The variables that associated with overweight/obesity differed between the sexes, except parents' nutritional status. Boys and girls with both parents overweight or obese were, respectively, 80% and 150% more likely to exhibit the same diagnosis, indicating the need for interventions that include the family environment.

  11. Bowel perforation presenting with acute abdominal pain and subcutaneous emphysema in a 14-year-old girl with an abandoned distal peritoneal shunt catheter: case report.

    PubMed

    Riccardello, Gerald J; Barr, Luke K; Bassani, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    The authors report the case of 14-year-old girl with a history of myelomeningocele and previously shunt-treated hydrocephalus who presented with right-sided abdominal pain and subcutaneous emphysema that developed over a 1-week period. A CT scan of the patient's abdomen revealed a retained distal ventriculoperitoneal (VP) catheter with air tracking from the catheter to the upper chest wall. Given the high suspicion of the catheter being intraluminal, an exploratory laparotomy was performed and revealed multiple jejunal perforations. The patient required a partial small-bowel resection and reanastomosis for complete removal of the retained catheter. Six other similar cases of bowel perforation occurring in patients with abandoned VP and subdural-peritoneal shunts have been reported. The authors analyzed these cases with regard to age of presentation, symptomatic presentation, management, morbidity, and mortality. While there was 0% mortality associated with bowel perforation secondary to a retained distal VP catheter, the morbidity was significantly high and included peritonitis and small bowel resection.

  12. A 14-year-old girl who regained normal vision after bilateral visual impairment following hot water injury to the eyes

    PubMed Central

    Monsudi, Kehinde F.; Ayanniyi, Abdulkabir A.

    2010-01-01

    A 14-year-old girl presented with bilateral visual impairment following hot water injury to the eyes. The patient was admitted for a week and managed with guttae tropicamide 0.5% 8 h, diclofenac sodium 0.1% 4 h, and fluoroquinolone 0.3% 6 h and ointment chloramphenicol 8 h. Also, the patient was managed with capsule doxycycline 100 mg 12 h for 10 days, tablet cataflam 50 mg 12 h for 7 days and intramuscular tetanus toxoid 0.5 mg stat and dermacine cream for facial scald. The visual acuities improved from 3/60 (right eye) and 6/24 (left eye) to 6/6 in both eyes. There were resolutions of facial/eye pain, tearing, photophobia, lid edema, blepharospasm, and conjunctival hyperemia. There was complete healing of facial wounds and corneal ulcers. She was discharged from hospital on the 7th day of admission. Prompt presentation, degree of scald sustained, and appropriate medical intervention enhanced visual recovery and wound healing in the patient. PMID:23960925

  13. Complicated sea urchin-induced wound infection caused by Vibrio alginolyticus and Staphylococcus lugdunensis in a 14-year-old boy

    PubMed Central

    Steiß, Jens-Oliver; Langner, Cornelia; Benkert, Birgit; Havener, Magdalena; Küsters, Uta; Hühn-Lindenbein, Stephan Georg; Mack, Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Wound infections with Vibrio alginolyticus, a Gram-negative bacterium found in all temperate oceans, are rarely reported. However, a rising incidence of wound infections caused by V. alginolyticus requires better knowledge about this infectious agent. Case presentation: We report the case of a 14-year-old boy suffering from a wound infection caused by V. alginolyticus and Staphylococcus lugdunensis after stepping on a sea urchin. Despite wound debridement and antibiotic therapy with cefaclor, the lesion did not heal over several weeks. After identification of the pathogens and antibiotic-susceptibility testing, antibiotic therapy was switched to ciprofloxacin, followed by trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Two months after the accident the wound was re-epithelialized. Follow up after 6 months revealed a painful scar. Conclusion: Non-cholera vibrios like V. alginolyticus should be considered as possible causative agents in seawater-contaminated wounds. S. lugdunensis is a relevant pathogen in mixed wound infections. Early microbiological diagnosis and antibiotic-susceptibility testing is crucial to prevent therapeutic failure. PMID:28348795

  14. Severe transfuse related acute lung injury (TRALI) syndrome in a 14 years old girl with a history of type I von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Arghir, Oana C; Ionescu, Florin C; Apostol, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Von Willebrand disease (vWD) is the most common inherited bleeding disorder based on an autosomal abnormality of von Willebrand factor. Transfusion is a lifesaving medical intervention among patients with bleeding disorders. Patients with vWD are exposed to Transfuse Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI) when they become recipients of multiple blood products and repeated transfusions. TRALI is a non-hemolytic transfusion reaction induced by infusions of intravenous immunoglobulin, platelets (suspended in plasma), whole blood, cryoprecipitates, and fresh frozen plasma (FFP). We report a 14 years old white girl, with a history of type 1 von Willebrand disease (vWd), recipient of 2 units' fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) and 1 unit whole blood transfusion who developed an acute respiratory distress with severe hypoxemia and bilateral pulmonary infiltrate on chest X-ray within 3 hours of the whole blood transfusion, completely reversible after mechanical ventilation. Concluding, patients with vWd who received recurrent transfusions have an increased risk of TRALI. Physicians must be familiar with it as a cause of white lung X-ray pattern.

  15. The biological age of 14-year-old boys and success in adult soccer: do early maturers predominate in the top-level game?

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Sergej M; Castagna, Carlo; Calleja-González, Julio; Jukic, Igor; Idrizovic, Kemal; Stojanovic, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Talent identification and development in soccer is often biased by maturation-related differences of young athletes. However, there is no information available about success rates for youth maturing at different tempos to achieve success in elite adult soccer. The purposes of this study were to determine the prevalence of different maturational groups among boys playing soccer, and to track them for competence in adult performance. A prospective cohort study design was used to follow 55, 14-year-old boys playing in Serbian youth soccer Division I over eight years. At the age of 14, biological age using skeletal age rates was determined, and participants were categorized as early maturers (EaM), normal maturers (NoM), and late maturers (LaM). Game competence for adult soccer at age 22 was described as elite if an individual played for clubs competing in top-five international soccer leagues (La Liga, Premier League, Bundesliga, Serie A, and Ligue 1), and/or has become a member of an adult National team. Among boys in our study group, 43.8% were categorized as EaM, 35.4% as NoM, and 20.8% as LaM (P = 0.11). A significant difference in biological age was found among maturational groups at age 14, with EaM > NoM > LaM (P > 0.0001). When assessed for adult soccer competence, 33.3% of participants (16 out of 48 players) succeed in achieving elite level. Elite soccer competence acquired 60.1% players from the group of LaM, 38.1% from NoM, and 11.8% from EaM (P > 0.0001). Our comparative analysis suggests that soccer excludes early maturing boys and favors late maturing boys as level of performance increases.

  16. Muslim Children's Other School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Leslie C.

    2012-01-01

    Millions of Muslim children around the world participate in Qur'anic schooling. For some, this is their only formal schooling experience; others attend both Qur'anic school and secular school. Qur'anic schooling emphasizes memorization and reproduction (recitation, reading, and transcription) of Qur'anic texts without comprehension of their…

  17. Como ayudar a su hijo durante los primeros anos de la adolescencia: Para los padres con ninos entre las edades de 10 a 14 anos (Helping Your Child through Early Adolescence: For Parents of Children from 10 through 14).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulu, Nancy

    Recognizing that parents and families can greatly influence the development of their 10- through 14-year-olds, this Spanish-language booklet is part of a national effort to provide parents with the latest research and practical information to help them support their children both at home and in school. The booklet is organized in 13 sections…

  18. School-Phobic Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gittelman, Rachel

    1976-01-01

    Separation anxiety is the major difficulty (and anticipatory anxiety a secondary difficulty) in treating school phobic children, and must be dealt with in a coordinated effort by school therapists, teachers, and parents. (MB)

  19. Traffic Safety Facts, 2001: Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This document provides statistical information on the incidence of U.S. motor vehicle-related accidents and fatalities involving children. Data include: (1) total traffic fatalities among children 0-14 years old, by age group, 1991-2001; (2) total pedestrian fatalities among children 0-14 years old, by age group, 1991-2001; (3) total pedalcyclist…

  20. Children. Traffic Safety Facts, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This document provides statistical information on the incidence of U.S. motor vehicle-related accidents and fatalities involving children. Data include: (1) total traffic fatalities among children 0-14 years old, by age group, 1990-2000; (2) total pedestrian fatalities among children 0-14 years old, by age group, 1990-2000; (3) total pedalcyclist…

  1. What Does Democracy Mean to 14-Year-Old Turkish Children? A Comparison with Results of the 1999 IEA Civic Education Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doganay, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    The scores of Turkish students on the international tests such as TIMMS and PISA, which assess basic science concepts, reading and problem-solving abilities, are among the lowest. Although understanding the concept of democracy has been studied across the countries, it has not been clearly researched in Turkey. For this reason, the focus of this…

  2. [NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND BIOCHEMICAL MARKERS OF DEFICIENCY OR EXCESS OF MICRONUTRIENTS IN 4 TO 14 YEAR-OLD CHILEAN CHILDREN: A CRITICAL REVIEW].

    PubMed

    Rozowski Narkunska, Jaime; Castillo Valenzuela, Oscar; Figari Jullian, Nicole; García-Díaz, Diego F; Cruchet Muñoz, Sylvia; Weisstaub Nuta, Gerardo; Pérez-Bravo, Francisco; Gotteland Russel, Martín

    2015-12-01

    La prevalencia de obesidad en niños chilenos ha aumentado consistentemente en las últimas dos décadas. El primer estudio que determinó el estado nutricional y la ingesta de alimentos efectuado en una muestra representativa de la población fue llevado a cabo en 1960. Recientemente el Ministerio de Salud publicó la Encuesta Nacional de Consumo Alimentario (ENCA), efectuada en el año 2012. Sin embargo, este estudio no incluyó mediciones bioquímicas de nutrientes que permitan un diagnóstico integral y representativo de la condición nutricional del niño en Chile. Objetivos: revisar la literatura disponible entre los años 2004 y 2014 sobre ingesta de alimentos y estado nutricional en niños chilenos de 4 a 14 años de edad. Método: un total de 362 referencias publicadas en ese período se obtuvieron de las bases de datos PubMed, Lilacs, Embase y Scielo. De estos, 40 artículos fueron seleccionados para una revisión completa. Resultados: la ingesta de alimentos se caracteriza por una ingesta calórica alta; un bajo consumo de frutas, verduras y productos lácteos y un alto consumo de pan. La ENCA concluyó que un 95% de los chilenos presenta una dieta deficiente. Se observa una alta prevalencia de obesidad desde edades tempranas. Desde 1960 no ha habido un estudio representativo de la población que incluya niveles plasmáticos de micronutrientes, que proveerían información más confiable sobre el estado nutricional de los niños, además de encuestas de consumo de alimentos. Conclusión: los niños chilenos presentan un estado nutricional y una alimentación deficientes; sin embargo, no hay evidencia representativa de los niveles plasmáticos de nutrientes, por lo que es imperativo desarrollar un estudio representativo que incluya indicadores bioquímicos de micronutrientes con objeto de desarrollar estrategias para mejorar el estado nutricional de los niños.

  3. Long term formalin preserved stool specimens for detection of intestinal parasites from school aged children in Tripoli, Libya.

    PubMed

    Ben Musa, Najla A; Ibrahim, R

    2007-12-01

    A total of 949 single stool samples were collected from school aged children (5-14 years old) in the city of Tripoli. The samples were preserved in 10% formalin and examined by routine microscopy using normal saline and Lugol's iodine preparations as well as the formol ethyl concentration method after a storage period of twelve months at room temperature. Of 949 samples examined 4.5% were positive. Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba coli were the only protozoan parasites identified with an infection rate of 3.2% & 1.3% respecttively. No helminthes were detected in any of the samples. About 14% of the children had intestinal yeast infection Candida albicans in their stool of which 0.63% was infected with intestinal parasites. No distortion or alteration of morphology was observed particularly in G. lamblia. Preservation in 10% formalin is a very productive means for the accurate identification of protozoan parasites.

  4. Preschool Children's School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pekdogan, Serpil; Akgül, Esra

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine preschool teachers' perspectives about children's school readiness. Qualitative and quantitative research methods were used in the study as a mixed method research. Data, in the quantitative aspects of the research, were collected through the use of "School Readiness Form" developed by Boz (2004)…

  5. Disruptive Behavior Disorders in 8 to 14 Years Old Offspring's of Opium and Heroin Dependent Parents: a Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Eslami Shahrbabaki, Mahin; Ziaaddini, Hassan; Saieedi, Hamdollah; Nakhaiee, Nouzar

    2009-01-01

    Background: Drug abuse is usually associated with behavioral disorders in children especially conduct disorder. This study investigated the behavioral disorders of children whose parents were opium or heroin dependent in compare with children whose parents were non-addicts to find the effects of drug abuse on offspring's behavior disorders by adjusting intervening factors. Methods: This case-control study, compared the behavioral disorders of 128 students (aged 8 to 14 years) in two groups of opium or heroin dependent parents and non–dependent parents (n = 64 in both groups) using Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) questionnaire. Parents of both groups were checked not to have any significant psychiatric disorder (such as personality disorder or mood disorder), major health problem, and history of divorce. To compare percentages of the two groups, chi square and if required exact test were used. Findings: There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in subscales of oppositional behavior problems and problems disorders. Conclusion: According to the results, in case there is no psychiatric co-morbidity associated with opium and heroin abuse, drug dependency does not seem to have any effect on disruptive bahavior disorder of children. Due to study limitations, the results cannot be generalized without conducting the study on a bigger population. PMID:24494088

  6. Concept Formation in Environmental Education: 14-Year Olds' Work on the Intensified Greenhouse Effect and the Depletion of the Ozone Layer. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterlind, Karolina

    2005-01-01

    A case study is presented describing the work of three pupils in the upper level of compulsory school. The pupils were learning about the intensified greenhouse effect and the depletion of the ozone layer. In their work, the need for certain domain-specific knowledge becomes apparent; for example, understanding such concepts as photosynthesis,…

  7. [Physique and motor ability of school children in Republic of Honduras].

    PubMed

    Sekiya, T

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of the physique and motor ability of elementary school children in the Republic of Honduras in comparison with those of Japanese children. Honduran children of 6 to 15 years old, and a total of 29,602, were examined on the following 10 items: body height, body weight, chest girth, 50 m dash, standing long jump, softball throwing. Burpee test, sitting trunk flexion, zigzag running with holding softball, and foot-balance with closed-eye. The physique of Honduran children was smaller than that of Japanese, but the value of chest girth/body height was not smaller. Among Honduran children of 10 to 15 years old, the girls were heavier and thicker in the chest girth than the boys. The adolescent growth spurt of the physique was observed in boys of 13-14 years old and in girls of 9-10. Furthermore, in almost all the items of motor ability, Honduran children were inferior to Japanese. One of the presumable reasons is the imbalance of nutrition (low level protein and high level fat), which may cause the delay of physical matureness in boys and increase obesity in girls. Another is a lack of proper exercise opportunity to develop their motor ability.

  8. Syntactic and Semantic Characteristics in the Written Language of Hearing Impaired and Normally Hearing School-Aged Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshinaga, Christine

    To investigate semantic and syntactic variables in the written language of normally hearing and hearing impaired children, 49 hearing impaired and 49 normally hearing children (10-14 years old) were asked to write compositions based on the Accident/Emergency Picture in the Peabody Language Development Kit. In addition, syntactic characteristics…

  9. School Meals and Nutrition of School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Judith; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The stated purpose of the study discussed here was to assess the contribution of school meals to the nutrition of 778 primary and secondary school children attending schools in Kent using information collected during a survey made in 1968-1970 which included a weighed diet record, a socio-economic questionnaire, and a medical examination.…

  10. The numbers, educational status and health of enrolled and non-enrolled school-age children in the Allai Valley, Northwest Frontier Province, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hall, Andrew; Kirby, Helen

    2010-04-01

    A cluster survey of the age, sex and enrolment status of all school-age children 5-14 years old was undertaken in 2006 in a remote rural sub-district of the Northwest Frontier Province, Pakistan about a year after a devastating earthquake. Information was collected on the characteristics of children, their households and parents, and on reasons for non-enrolment. The health and nutritional status of a randomly selected child in each household was assessed and enrolled and non-enrolled children were compared by sex. A total of 2032 children were recorded in 925 households, 845 girls and 1187 boys, a sex ratio of 71 girls/100 boys. Half of all girls were not enrolled in school compared with a fifth of all boys. There was no common reason for non-enrolment and they differed between the sexes. The randomly selected children (n = 897) were moderately malnourished: 43% were stunted, 12% were thin and 46% were anaemic. 66% of a sub-sample of children (n = 269) had a low urinary iodine concentration, which could contribute to a low IQ and impaired hearing. There were no statistically significant differences in the nutritional status or health of non-enrolled and enrolled girls. These data contribute towards an understanding of how to improve the education and health of school-age children in a conservative, rural province of Pakistan.

  11. Distributed neural representations of logical arguments in school-age children

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Romain; Booth, James R.; Prado, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Children’s understanding of linear-order (e.g., Dan is taller than Lisa, Lisa is taller than Jess) and set-inclusion (i.e., All tulips are flowers, All flowers are plants) relationships is critical for the acquisition of deductive reasoning, i.e., the ability to reach logically valid conclusions from given premises. Behavioral and neuroimaging studies in adults suggest processing differences between these relations: While arguments that involve linear-orders may be preferentially associated with spatial processing, arguments that involve set-inclusions may be preferentially associated with verbal processing. In the present study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate whether these processing differences appear during the period of elementary school in development. Consistent with previous studies in adults, we found that arguments that involve linear-order and set-inclusion relationships preferentially involve spatial and verbal brain mechanisms (respectively) in school-age children (9 to 14 year olds). Because this neural sensitivity was not related to age, it likely emerges before the period of elementary education. However, the period of elementary education might play an important role in shaping the neural processing of logical reasoning, as indicated by developmental changes in frontal and parietal regions that were dependent upon the type of relation. PMID:25355487

  12. School Adaptation of Roma Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerganov, Encho; Varbanova, Silvia; Kyuchukov, Hristo

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the degree of school adaptation among Roma children who were included in a program for the desegregation of Roma schools in Bulgaria. More specifically, the program requires Roma children to attend mixed classes with Bulgarian students and Roma teacher assistants to work with them. The Bulgarian version of the Questionnaire on…

  13. Children, Computers, and School Furniture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lorraine E.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the rise of posture-related discomfort and injury in children using computers in their classrooms and explores the research in the area. Recommends greater effort in encouraging school furniture manufacturers to create ergonomically appropriate computer workstations. Advice on what children can do to lessen musculoskeletal discomfort…

  14. Children of Alcoholics: School Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAndrew, Judith A.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the influences of parental alcoholism on children's daily lives, generally, and learning problems, absenteeism, and adjustment problems, specifically. Suggests that schools are one of the most promising settings for identifying and intervening with children of alcoholics as a target group. (DST)

  15. Guiding School-Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roden, Jean

    1994-01-01

    Explores challenges faced by caregivers working with school-age children. Suggests guidance techniques based on understanding of children's emotional, social, physical, and intellectual characteristics. Focuses on appropriate use of environment, group management and problem solving, and development of self-discipline. (BAC)

  16. School Desegregation: Outcome for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Nancy H.

    This book focuses on the question: What is the effect of racial mixing in school on the children involved? Unless the context indicates a more specific meaning, "desegregation" is used here to refer broadly to racial mixing in schools. The term "integration" is reserved for that biracial situation in which the minority group is accepted on a…

  17. Home Schooling Children with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffey, Jane G.

    2002-01-01

    A survey of 121 families who were home schooling children with special needs found family profiles were similar to the general home schooling population and, unlike the general home schooling population, children often spent as much time in a school setting as in a home school environment. Four case studies identified themes as needs-based…

  18. Enuresis in School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stehbens, James A.

    1970-01-01

    Studies relating to the more popular explanations of enuresis, are discussed and research relating to each is presented. Evidence supporting, or failing to support, treatment methods is also presented. Research possibilities for the school psychologist are suggested. (Author)

  19. Autistic Children in Public School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schopler, Eric; Bristol, Marie

    Intended for public school administrators and regular classroom teachers, the report discusses the nature of autistic children and examines aspects of successful educational programs for them. The historical background is traced down from Itard's wild boy through theories of faulty parental conditioning, to current thought on the causes of autism.…

  20. Children out of School. Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for International Development, London (England).

    This paper aims to provide a clear understanding of the circumstances of children who are not in school, as a background for a step-change in national and international efforts to make progress toward the Millennium Development Goals of achieving Universal Primary Education (UPE) by 2015 and the elimination of gender disparities in primary and…

  1. Children's Perceptions of School Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Colette; Beggs, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Reports on the results of a study investigating when the erosion of children's interest in science starts. Focuses on elementary education and suggests clear differences between boys and girls in their attitudes toward school science. (Contains 14 references.) (Author/YDS)

  2. MIXTECAN CHILDREN AT SCHOOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SWADESH, EVANGELINA ARANA

    SINCE ONLY ONE FOURTH OF THE POPULATION SPOKE SPANISH, THE LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION, EDUCATION BEFORE 1955 WAS ESSENTIALLY PRECLUDED FOR 150,000 MIXTECAN INDIANS LIVING IN SOUTHERN OAXACA, MEXICO. IN 1955, 7 ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS WERE ESTABLISHED BY THE NATIONAL INDIAN INSTITUTE, WITH TEACHERS FROM THE LOCAL POPULATION AND INSTRUCTION IN MIXTECO, THE…

  3. School Psychologists' Role Concerning Children with Chronic Illnesses in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barraclough, Camille; Machek, Greg

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the role of school psychologists in working with children with chronic illnesses in the schools. A total of 300 practicing school psychologists in public schools, drawn from the National Association of School Psychologists membership directory, completed a standard mail survey. The survey solicited information on (a) graduate…

  4. Prevalence of symptoms of asthma, rhinitis and eczema in 13- to 14-year-old children in Africa: the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase III.

    PubMed

    Ait-Khaled, N; Odhiambo, J; Pearce, N; Adjoh, K S; Maesano, I A; Benhabyles, B; Bouhayad, Z; Bahati, E; Camara, L; Catteau, C; El Sony, A; Esamai, F O; Hypolite, I E; Melaku, K; Musa, O A; Ng'ang'a, L; Onadeko, B O; Saad, O; Jerray, M; Kayembe, J M; Koffi, N B; Khaldi, F; Kuaban, C; Voyi, K; M'Boussa, J; Sow, O; Tidjani, O; Zar, H J

    2007-03-01

    Phase I of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood has provided valuable information regarding international prevalence patterns and potential risk factors in the development of asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema. However, in Phase I, only six African countries were involved (Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco, Kenya, South Africa and Ethiopia). Phase III, conducted 5-6 years later, enrolled 22 centres in 16 countries including the majority of the centres involved in Phase I and new centres in Morocco, Tunisia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Togo, Sudan, Cameroon, Gabon, Reunion Island and South Africa. There were considerable variations between the various centres of Africa in the prevalence of the main symptoms of the three conditions: wheeze (4.0-21.5%), allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (7.2-27.3%) and eczema (4.7-23.0%). There was a large variation both between countries and between centres in the same country. Several centres, including Cape Town (20.3%), Polokwane (18.0%), Reunion Island (21.5%), Brazzaville (19.9%), Nairobi (18.0%), Urban Ivory Coast (19.3%) and Conakry (18.6%) showed relatively high asthma symptom prevalences, similar to those in western Europe. There were also a number of centres showing high symptom prevalences for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (Cape Town, Reunion Island, Brazzaville, Eldoret, Urban Ivory Coast, Conakry, Casablanca, Wilays of Algiers, Sousse and Eldoret) and eczema (Brazzaville, Eldoret, Addis Ababa, Urban Ivory Coast, Conakry, Marrakech and Casablanca).

  5. Governor's Schools: An Alternative for Gifted Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkler, Daniel L.; Stephenson, Scott; Jolly, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss Governor's Schools as an alternative for gifted students. When the word school is used, people typically think about traditional schooling. But Governor's Schools are different in the type of schooling provided and the type of students served--they educate predominantly gifted children, teach a wide array of…

  6. Counseling Children and Adolescents in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Robyn S.; Magnuson, Sandy; Beeler, Linda

    2011-01-01

    "Counseling Children and Adolescents in Schools" is a text and workbook designed to help aspiring school psychologists and counselors gain the necessary theoretical background and skill set to work effectively with youth in schools. The dual focus on school counselors and school psychologists provides students with a broader view of the different…

  7. Stimulant Treatment of Elementary School Children: Implications for School Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramlett, Ronald K.; Nelson, Patricia; Reeves, Betty

    1997-01-01

    Determines the percentage of elementary children in the United States who are currently receiving stimulant medication at school. Forty-six states and 246,707 children were represented in the survey. Approximately 3% of children were receiving stimulant medication at school with Ritalin the stimulant most widely used. Explores assessment issues…

  8. Social Influences on Children's Engagement in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herald-Brown, Sarah L.; Kochel, Karen P.; Ladd, Gary W.

    2008-01-01

    Children's social relationships have been linked with various indicators of their school engagement. This overview of the current literature examines evidence concerning the processes through which children's relationships with teachers, parents, and peers positively or negatively contribute to children's engagement in school. In this paper, we…

  9. Implementing Children's Human Rights Education in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covell, Katherine; Howe, R. Brian; McNeil, Justin K.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluations of a children's rights education initiative in schools in Hampshire, England--consistent with previous research findings--demonstrate the effectiveness of a framework of rights for school policy, practice, and teaching, for promoting rights-respecting attitudes and behaviors among children, and for improving the school ethos. The value…

  10. Seizure Management for School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frueh, Eileen

    2008-01-01

    As many as 325,000 school-age children, ages 5-14, have epilepsy in the U.S. Thankfully, with medication, surgery, a special diet or vagus nerve stimulation, most go to school and fully participate in school activities. Children who continue to have seizures, however, may run into problems. Many of these problems can be overcome or prevented…

  11. Children's conceptions of conventional and nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    The general objective of this study was to investigate the development of the conceptions of conventional and nuclear war in the preadolescent and adolescent child. Subjects consisted of children in three age groups: 5-6, 9-10, and 13-14 year olds (N = 63) drawn from public and private schools in the metropolitan Los Angeles area. Children were administered an interview and supplementary measures. Parents were administered questionnaires examining related areas. The principal findings were as follows: (1) The development of the war concepts. Regarding the concept of conventional war, by the age of five or six, the child usually can recognize the word war and indicate that the word has to do with fighting between two or more parties. However, the notion of nationality is evidently not solidly grasped until around the ages of 8-11 years old. In this study, 45% of the 5 and 6 year olds were minimally aware of the concept of nuclear war. By the time the child reaches the age of 9 or 10, the proportion of those with minimal awareness rises to about 80%. By 13 and 14 years old, 100% are familiar with the concept. (2) Levels of Worry. Of the children aware of the subject of nuclear war, 76% indicated that they were very worried by its possibility.

  12. Common Concerns of School Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malkus, Amy J.; Musser, Lynn M.

    This study assessed common concerns of school-age children. Participating were 138 children in grades 1, 3, and 5. Concerns were spontaneously generated by children during Phase 1 of the study, and common stressors most frequently mentioned were ranked on a 10-item rank-order task during Phase 2. In Phase 3, children completed questionnaires…

  13. Few CT Scan Abnormalities Found Even in Neurologically Impaired Learning Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denckla, Martha Bridge; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Most of 32 learning disabled children (seven to 14 years old) with neurological lateralization characteristics marked by right and left hemispheres had a normal CT (computerized tomography) scan. (CL)

  14. School characteristics among children of alcoholic parents.

    PubMed

    Casas-Gil, Maria J; Navarro-Guzman, Jose I

    2002-02-01

    Studies show that children of alcoholics constitute a population at-risk commonly for poor performance, skipping school days, and school drop out. The focus of the present study was to examine a variety of direct outcome variables measuring academic performance among a sample of 226 children, 108 of them from parents who misused alcohol in Cadiz. Parents were outpatients of a Health Service and received treatment for the drinking problem; 118 students were children of nonalcoholic parents attending the same schools as the children of alcoholic parents. Both groups were compared on age, sex, school grade, and social environment. The study identified five variables on which performance by children of alcoholic parents was poorer: intelligence, repeating a grade, low academic performance, skipping school days, and dropping out of school.

  15. Taking Sides: To School or Not to School Squatters' Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutercq, Yves; Lafaye, Claudette

    2007-01-01

    Families of squatters who had settled in a quiet neighborhood of Paris wished to send their children to the local school. Our ethnohistorical inquiry explores how the mobilization in favor of schooling the children was embedded in other controversies and mobilizations that arose from the squatters' presence in the occupied building. Many…

  16. [Prevalence of pre-hypertension and arterial hypertension and evaluation of associated factors in children and adolescents in public schools in Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Pinto, Sônia Lopes; Silva, Rita de Cássia Ribeiro; Priore, Silvia Eloíza; Assis, Ana Marlúcia Oliveira; Pinto, Elizabete de Jesus

    2011-06-01

    This study aimed to assess pre-hypertension and hypertension-related factors in 1,125 seven- to-14-year-old subjects enrolled in the public school system in Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil. Exposure variables, namely body mass index, waist circumference, gender, age, physical activity, environmental and housing status, family income, diet, schooling, and maternal age were analyzed by polytomous logistic regression, and the outcome variable was categorized as normal, pre-hypertensive, and hypertensive. Prevalence of high blood pressure was 14.1%, including the prevalence of both hypertension (4.8%) and pre-hypertension (9.3%). An association was shown between pre-hypertension and overweight (OR: 3.13; 95%CI: 1.75-5.57). Hypertension was associated with overweight (OR: 3.02; 95%CI: 1.45-6.28), female gender (OR: 2.49; 95%CI: 1.24-4.98), and high-risk eating patterns (OR: 1.93; 95%CI: 1.04-3.56). In short, prevalence of pre-hypertension and hypertension in children and adolescents was higher among girls and individuals with overweight and inadequate diet.

  17. Families with School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Kathleen; Schneider, Barbara; Butler, Donnell

    2011-01-01

    Most working parents face a common dilemma--how to care for their children when they are not in school but the parents are at work. In this article Kathleen Christensen, Barbara Schneider, and Donnell Butler describe the predictable and unpredictable scheduling demands school-age children place on working couples and single working parents. The…

  18. Day Care for School-Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diffendal, Elizabeth

    This booklet examines four aspects of day care services for school-age children: (1) national availability and trends, (2) parents' views, (3) program planning, and (4) recommended program models. A nationwide survey of 58 day care programs enrolling school-age children was conducted, and the general findings are presented. Information on parents'…

  19. International School Children's Health Needs: School Nurses' Views in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansson, Annika; Clausson, Eva; Janlov, Ann-Christin

    2012-01-01

    Rapid globalization and the integration of national economies have contributed to the sharp rise in enrollment in international schools. How does this global nomadism affect international school children and their individual health needs? This study attempts to find an answer by interviewing 10 school nurses, with varying degrees of experience in…

  20. SCHOOL AND FAMILY BACKGROUND CORRELATES OF CHILDREN'S SCHOOL ANXIETY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DUNN, JAMES A.

    A STUDY WAS MADE OF THE RELATIONSHIP OF CHILDREN'S SCHOOL MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS TO (1) THEIR INTELLECTUAL, ACADEMIC, AND SOCIAL PERFORMANCE AND (2) CERTAIN FAMILY, SCHOOL, AND COMMUNITY BACKGROUND VARIABLES. LITERATURE PERTINENT TO THE PROBLEM IS REVIEWED. THE SAMPLE CONSISTED OF 400 ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS. GROUP INTELLIGENCE TESTS, AN…

  1. Serum LH and FSH Responses to Synthetic LH-RH in Normal Infants, Children and Patients With Turner's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suwa, Seizo; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) on LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) release were studied in 26 normal children and six patients (from 1-to 14-years-old) with Turner's syndrome. (Author)

  2. Dietary Habits of Greek Primary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piperakis, S. M.; Papadimitriou, V.; Zafiropoulou, M.; Piperakis, A. S.; Zisis, P.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess Greek primary (1st to 6th grade) school children's dietary habits and the factors influencing them. Our results show that children know the value of different foods. The socio-economic status of father has no effect on the attitude of children towards choosing their diet, however, mothers' educational status…

  3. School Integration of Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haiduc, Lavinia

    2009-01-01

    We consider that children with autism are invisible in contemporary Romanian society; there is even a lack of statistical data regarding children with autism in Romania. In this paper we emphasize how important it is for the education of children with autism to integrate in the school community. First we present the characteristics of children…

  4. Who Dispenses Pharmaceuticals to Children at School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Elaine Esielionis; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This study examined how pharmaceuticals were dispensed in one Florida county's public elementary, middle, and high schools and in six private schools. Surveys indicated that of 28,134 children surveyed, 1,016 received 5,411 doses of medication from school personnel, who were not necessarily health care personnel. Methylphenidate was the most…

  5. Supporting Children's Transition to School Age Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockett, Sue; Perry, Bob

    2016-01-01

    While a great deal of research has focused on children's experiences as they start school, less attention has been directed to their experiences--and those of their families and educators--as they start school age care. This paper draws from a recent research project investigating practices that promote positive transitions to school and school…

  6. School Social Work with Grieving Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn-Lee, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the research reported in this article was to advance understanding of the work of school social workers with grieving students. This research was aimed at answering the following question: What are school social workers' experiences working with grieving children? There were two steps in this study. Fifty-nine school social workers…

  7. Teach the Children: Louise's Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Robert W.

    1996-01-01

    A school counselor recounts the case of a gifted 14-year-old with rheumatoid arthritis and a destructive home situation, to remind teachers that in-school problems have out-of-school roots and that the teacher is not the only professional available to, and concerned with, the well-being of the student. (DB)

  8. Insights into the future generation of veterinarians: perspectives gained from the 13- and 14-year-olds who attended Michigan State University's veterinary camp, and conclusions about our obligations.

    PubMed

    Sprecher, David J

    2004-01-01

    Veterinary medicine is at a crossroads: the future of the profession will be determined by those who join it and by those who select who will join it. Veterinary schools are the gatekeepers of the profession, and the entire veterinary profession is responsible for ensuring that the image it presents to those who will join it matches the social needs that it must serve. The application process for a Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine (MSUCVM) academic summer camp provided an opportunity to discern attributes of the 314 eighth-grade students who attended in 2000-2002. A re-reading of their application essays allowed clustering of similar descriptions and comments about motivations to attend the camp, interests in science, interactions with animals, and exposure to veterinarians and veterinary medicine. Many veterinary camp attendees will be undergraduate students by 2005/2006 and will be applying to colleges of veterinary medicine between 2008 and 2010. There-fore, an understanding of their attributes is germane to discussions about desirable characteristics of veterinary college applicants. Although the camp was designed to attract eighth graders interested in science and curious about veterinary medicine, attendees frequently described veterinary medicine as their career goal. These students (89.5% female, 95.6% residents of Michigan) enjoyed science, but their interest in veterinary medicine related to emotions such as a love of animals and sympathy for sick or injured animals (96.1%). They discussed having pets in their homes (75.5%), involvement with horseback riding (20.7%), experiences with animal-related projects and activities in 4-H (17.2%), and husbandry experience at farms or stables (16.2%). Although 22.6% had already shadowed a veterinarian and 12.8% described receiving other forms of veterinary mentoring, 22.9% commented on their inability to gain shadowing exposures prior to age 16. Based on the results of this survey and years

  9. Voices of out of School Children with Disabilities in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzoor, Afaf; Hameed, Abdul; Nabeel, Tanzila

    2016-01-01

    In Pakistan, 96% children with disabilities are out of school and are unreached for any educational services. According to UNESCO (2010), the unreached are those children and youth who are of school age but not attending school for some reasons. Some of these children may have never been to school; others may have attended school but eventually…

  10. School Phobic Children and Adolescents: A Challenge to Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Sandra R.

    1980-01-01

    Although fearful avoidance of school is a complex and serious problem among school-age children, there are techniques available to professionals for assisting children to overcome school-related anxiety. It is important for school personnel to identify school-phobic children and to assist in planning the earliest possible intervention. (Author)

  11. Children's rights and school psychology: children's right to participation.

    PubMed

    Lansdown, Gerison; Jimerson, Shane R; Shahroozi, Reza

    2014-02-01

    The Convention on the Rights of the Child detailed an international imperative to fulfilling, protecting, and respecting the rights of every child. In particular, the Convention set out a clear mandate for guaranteeing opportunities for children to be heard on all matters of concern to them. The attainment of these goals involves respecting and valuing children as active participants in the educational process. If fully implemented, the right of children to express views and have them taken seriously, throughout the school environment, would represent one of the most profound transformations in moving towards a culture of respect for children's rights, for their dignity and citizenship, and for their capacities to contribute significantly towards their own well-being. These values and principles are consistent with those of the school psychology profession, thus, school psychologists are encouraged to be at the Center of the process advocating and actualizing the Convention in schools throughout the world.

  12. School Health Screening of Indochinese Refugee Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickwell, Sheila M.

    1981-01-01

    Indochinese children registering for the first time in American schools are appearing with multiple health problems. These frequently include lice and scabies, intestinal parasites, vision and hearing defects, and severe dental decay. (JN)

  13. How Schools Train Children for Political Impotence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozol, Jonathan

    1972-01-01

    The contrast between the real power and the experience of impotence that millions of bright, earnest school children attest to prompts one to enquire into preplanned impotence and self-defeat. (Author)

  14. Social Support and School Adjustment in Japanese Elementary School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kojima, Hideo; Miyakawa, Juji

    This poster presentation examined the structure of Japanese elementary school children's social support systems to demonstrate how they are related to: (1) academic achievement; (2) teacher evaluations; and (3) the children's own sense of self-esteem. A total of 91 fifth and sixth graders, along with their teachers, were interviewed and surveyed.…

  15. School Mobility and School-Age Children's Social Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupere, Veronique; Archambault, Isabelle; Leventhal, Tama; Dion, Eric; Anderson, Sara

    2015-01-01

    This study explored how nonpromotional school changes, a potentially major event for children, were associated with 3 forms of social maladjustment: isolation/withdrawal, affiliation with maladjusted peers, and aggression toward peers. Given that school mobility frequently co-occurs with family transitions, the moderating role of these transitions…

  16. Dietary Habits of Greek Primary School Children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piperakis, S. M.; Papadimitriou, V.; Zafiropoulou, M.; Piperakis, A. S.; Zisis, P.

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess Greek primary (1st to 6th grade) school children's dietary habits and the factors influencing them. Our results show that children know the value of different foods. The socio-economic status of father has no effect on the attitude of children towards choosing their diet, however, mothers' educational status appears to have an effect on their children's behaviour. Place of residence (urban or semi-rural areas) and gender does not influence their knowledge about different diets. It was, finally, shown that as children grow older they tend to eat less healthy foods.

  17. Christmas Program for Elementary School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taggart, Doris

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: In 1974 Doris Taggart, Public Relations Vice President of Zions First National Bank in Salt Lake City, was serving on the Free Enterprise Committee of the Salt Lake Chamber of Commerce. She developed a plan to involve elementary school children with a large bank by asking the children to make…

  18. Counseling Immigrant Children in the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esquivel, Giselle B.; Keitel, Merle A.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses development of a culturally relevant school counseling program for immigrant children which includes needs assessment, inservice training, training school counselors in cross-cultural counseling, incorporation of interpreters and consultants, appropriate diagnostic procedures, preventive and intervention programs, an advocacy role for…

  19. Children, Schools, & Inequality. Social Inequality Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Entwisle, Doris R.; And Others

    Findings from the Beginning School Study, conducted in Baltimore (Maryland) are used to show how differences in family circumstances translate into beliefs and activities that help or hinder children's development. The Beginning School Study started in 1982 and has followed 790 randomly selected Baltimore students from first-grade in 1982 through…

  20. Ritalin for School Children: The Teachers' Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robin, Stanley S.; Bosco, James J.

    Research in an urban public school system (Grand Rapids, Michigan) was conducted to determine teachers' view of Ritalin for school children. Three questions were addressed: what contact with and information about Ritalin do teachers have; what attitude do teachers express toward Ritalin; and what professional behaviors do teachers report in regard…

  1. Rural School Children Picturing Family Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Lange, Naydene; Olivier, Tilla; Geldenhuys, Johanna; Mitchell, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Rurality is an active agent and central to the lived experiences of children growing up on a farm and attending a farm school. It is a key to their everyday experiences, and influences family life, schooling and their future. Previous studies elsewhere in the world have explored the notion of childhood in rural contexts, but there is a dearth of…

  2. School Children At-Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Virginia; And Others

    The study described in this book examined at close range the experiences of 12 elementary school students (enrolled in two schools) who were considered at-risk within the context of their specific classroom and school. The meaning of at-risk status to the teachers and other school personnel is determined, and the interaction between the context…

  3. [Somatotype-dependent cardiorespiratory system adaption in children and adolsescents in the north-east of Russia].

    PubMed

    Bartosh, O P; Sokolov, A Ia

    2006-01-01

    The authors have revealed the tension of cardiovascular performance in 11-14-year-old children and adolescents with the macrosomatotype (MaS) and a lower bronchial patency in 13-14-year-old adolescents in the winter-spring period. This points to the decreased reserves of the cardiorespiratory system in the teenagers with MaS during their adaptation the environment of the north-east of Russia.

  4. Upstart Startup: Creating and Sustaining a Public Charter School. The Series on School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nehring, James

    The Francis W. Parker Charter Essential School was formed in response to the Massachusetts Education Reform Act of 1993, which established 25 charter schools that were fully public in both funding and access. Its goals are influenced by Theodore Sizer's Coalition of Essential Schools. Initially, 120 students, 12 to 14 years old, attended. Five…

  5. School-age children development

    MedlinePlus

    ... on this page, please enable JavaScript. School-age child development describes the expected physical, emotional, and mental abilities ... to 2 hours a day. Images School age child development References Feigelman S. Middle childhood. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman ...

  6. Factors Influencing Whether Children Walk to School

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jason G.; Jerrett, Michael; Mcconnell, Rob; Berhane, Kiros; Dunton, Genevieve; Shankardass, Ketan; Reynolds, Kim; Chang, Roger; Wolch, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated multiple levels of influence simultaneously on whether children walk to school. A large cohort of 4,338 subjects from ten communities was used to identify the determinants of walking through (1) a one-level logistic regression model for individual-level variables and (2) a two-level mixed regression model for individual and school-level variables. Walking rates were positively associated with home-to-school proximity, greater age, and living in neighborhoods characterized by lower traffic density. Greater land use mix around the home was, however, associated with lower rates of walking. Rates of walking to school were also higher amongst recipients of the Free and Reduced Price Meals Program and attendees of schools with higher percentage of English language learners. Designing schools in the same neighborhood as residential districts should be an essential urban planning strategy to reduce walking distance to school. Policy interventions are needed to encourage children from higher socioeconomic status families to participate in active travel to school and to develop walking infrastructures and other measures that protect disadvantaged children. PMID:23707968

  7. Self-Concepts of Head Start and Nursery School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derrick, Sara M.; Halsted, Georgia

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether self-concepts of Head Start children differed from self-concepts of nursery school children. A total of 90 children attending Head Start programs and 70 children attending proprietary nursery schools participated in the study. The preschool form of the Children's Self-Social Constructs Test, a…

  8. School Administrators' Perceptions of Factors that Influence Children's Active Travel to School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Anna E.; Pluto, Delores M.; Ogoussan, Olga; Banda, Jorge A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Increasing children's active travel to school may be 1 strategy for addressing the growing prevalence of obesity among school age children. Using the School Travel Survey, we examined South Carolina school district leaders' perceptions of factors that influence elementary and middle school students walking to school. Methods: Frequency…

  9. Anemia among school children in eastern Nepal.

    PubMed

    Khatiwada, Saroj; Gelal, Basanta; Gautam, Sharad; Tamang, Man Kumar; Shakya, Prem Raj; Lamsal, Madhab; Baral, Nirmal

    2015-06-01

    Anemia is one of the most common public health problems in developing countries like Nepal. This study was done to find the prevalence of anemia among the children aged 4-13 years in eastern Nepal. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 in four districts (Morang, Udayapur, Bhojpur and Ilam) of eastern Nepal to find the prevalence of anemia among the school children of eastern Nepal. Children aged 4-13 years were selected randomly from different schools of above districts and 618 venous blood samples were collected. Hemoglobin level was estimated by using cyanmethemoglobin method. The mean hemoglobin level was 12.2 ± 1.82 gm/dl. About 37.9% (n = 234) children were found anemic. Anemia prevalence was 42.4% (n = 78), 31.6% (n = 60), 45.3% (n = 48) and 34.8% (n = 48) among school children of Morang, Udayapur, Bhojpur and Ilam district, respectively. The study finds anemia as a significant health problem among the school children of eastern Nepal.

  10. [Stress in school-age children].

    PubMed

    Plourde, R G

    1994-10-01

    In April 1988, following preliminary research, Notre Dame Elementary School in Edmunston, N.B. initiated a pilot project entitled Management of Children's Stress. Using a three-dimensional process, parents, teachers and students collaborated to empower all students enrolled at the school to effectively manage their day-to-day stress. To prepare, the children, parents and teachers participated in nine- and 15-hour education sessions, respectively. Various techniques, including deep breathing exercises, stretching, relaxation techniques and listening to music, were considered. Visualization, maximizing the mind's potential to envision relaxing images, became the preferred technique. In addition to complementing other relaxation techniques used by the children, visualization facilitated their learning; developed and improved their concentration, motivation and self-confidence; gave them a positive self-image; and reduced health problems. The project has surpassed all expectations. In March 1993, it became part of a Quality of Life Education Project at the school.

  11. Sleep problems in primary school children: comparison between mainstream and special school children.

    PubMed

    Quine, L

    2001-05-01

    This paper reports on a study of the prevalence and social correlates of dyssomnias, features associated with obstructive sleep apnoea, and parasomnias in primary school children aged 4-12. Head teachers of schools selected randomly from lists of local primary and special schools were contacted by telephone and asked to distribute a questionnaire package to the parents of all pupils aged 4-12 years. In all, 890 parents of children from mainstream schools and 300 from special schools were approached. The response rates were 64.7% and 60%, respectively. The results showed that significantly higher proportions of children in special schools than in mainstream schools presented four of the five dyssomnias investigated and all of the features associated with obstructive sleep apnoea. In contrast, only two of the seven parasomnias were presented by higher proportions of the children in special schools. Age and gender differences for the two groups of children are presented. Finally, multiple correlations were computed between a range of child, family, and environmental characteristics and the three problems most frequently reported: frequency of settling problems; sleeping in the parents' bed; and night waking. The findings are discussed with reference to other studies of children's sleep problems, and the implications for treatment are considered.

  12. School functioning of US children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Fowler, M G; Davenport, M G; Garg, R

    1992-12-01

    Data from the 1988 US National Health Interview Survey on Child Health, a nationally representative cross-sectional survey, were used to determine national estimates of school outcomes (grade failure, learning disabilities, and suspension/expulsion) and mean number of absences for children with asthma (CWA) compared to well children without current health conditions. Families indicated that 536 (4.9%) of the 10,362 survey children in grades 1 through 12 had had asthma in the previous 12 months. Families reported 18% of CWA vs 15% of well children had grade failure, 9% of CWA vs 5% of well children had learning disabilities, and 5% of CWA vs 6% of well children had been expelled or suspended. Children with asthma averaged 7.6 school days absent compared with 2.5 days for the well group. Multiple logistic regression was used to compare the odds of grade failure, learning disabilities, and suspension/expulsion among CWA and well children, overall and stratified by income. Similar methods were used to assess the role of health status among asthmatic children. After adjustment for demographic factors, CWA had similar risks of grade failure and suspension/expulsion, but 1.7 times the risk of learning disability compared with well children. Also, among families with incomes below $20,000, CWA had twice the odds of grade failure compared with well children. For asthmatic children, reported health status was an important predictor of learning disability. Ten percent of CWA were reported to be in fair-poor health. After adjustment for demographic factors, those in fair-poor health were twice as likely to have a reported learning disability compared with those in good-excellent health.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Is Child Labor a Barrier to School Enrollment in Low- and Middle-Income Countries?

    PubMed Central

    Putnick, Diane L.; Bornstein, Marc H.

    2015-01-01

    Achieving universal primary education is one of the Millennium Development Goals. In low- and middle-income developing countries (LMIC), child labor may be a barrier. Few multi-country, controlled studies of the relations between different kinds of child labor and schooling are available. This study employs 186,795 families with 7- to 14-year-old children in 30 LMIC to explore relations of children’s work outside the home, family work, and household chores with school enrollment. Significant negative relations emerged between each form of child labor and school enrollment, but relations were more consistent for family work and household chores than work outside the home. All relations were moderated by country and sometimes by gender. These differentiated findings have nuanced policy implications. PMID:26034342

  14. Auditory Sensitivity in School-Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trehub, Sandra E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Obtained thresholds for octave-band noises with center frequencies of 0.4, 1, 2, 4, and 10 kHz and 1/3-octave band noises centered at 10 and 20 kHz from children aged 6 to 16 years. Compared results with findings for infants, preschool children, and adults. Continuing sensitivity improvements were evident from infancy well into the school years.…

  15. Children's need for favorable acoustics in schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Peggy B.

    2003-10-01

    Children continue to improve their understanding of speech in noise and reverberation throughout childhood and adolescence. They do not typically achieve adult performance levels until their late teenage years. As a result, schools that are designed to be acoustically adequate for adult understanding may be insufficient for full understanding by young children. In addition, children with hearing loss, those with attention problems, and those learning in a non-native language require even more favorable signal-to-noise ratios. This tutorial will review the literature gathered by the ANSl/ASA working group on classroom acoustics that shaped the recommendations of the working group. Special topics will include speech perception data from typically developing infants and children, from children with hearing loss, and from adults and children listening in a non-native language. In addition, the tutorial will overview recommendations contained within ANSI standard 12.60-2002: Acoustical Performance Criteria, Design Requirements, and Guidelines for Schools. The discussion will also include issues related to designing quiet classrooms and working with local schools and professionals.

  16. Children's understanding of television advertising: a revisit in the Chinese context.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kara; McNeal, James U

    2004-03-01

    The authors conducted a survey of 1,758 elementary school children (6-14 years old) from December 2001, to March 2002, in 3 Chinese cities with different levels of television advertising. The authors used D. R. John's (1999) model of consumer socialization as the theoretical framework for their study. More than half of the children whom the authors interviewed were able to understand that television stations broadcast commercials to earn money. Their understanding of the purposes of television commercials and the persuasive intention of television commercials developed with age. The authors examined the influence of gender, level of advertising, and level of television viewing on children's understanding of television advertising by using 3-way factorial models.

  17. Estimates of dietary exposure of children to artificial food colours in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Husain, A; Sawaya, W; Al-Omair, A; Al-Zenki, S; Al-Amiri, H; Ahmed, N; Al-Sinan, M

    2006-03-01

    To assess the intake of artificial food colour additives by 5-14-year-old children in the State of Kuwait, a 24-h dietary recall was conducted twice on 3141 male and female Kuwaiti and non-Kuwaiti children from 58 schools. The determination of colour additives in 344 foods items consumed was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector. A comparison with the Food and Agriculture Organization and World Health Organization acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) was undertaken to evaluate the potential risk associated with the consumption of artificial colour additives by children in Kuwait. The results indicated that out of nine permitted colours, four exceeded their ADIs by factors of 2-8: tartrazine, sunset yellow, carmoisine and allura red. Further, follow-up studies to provide insight into potential adverse health effects associated with the high intakes of these artificial colour additives on the test population are warranted.

  18. ["Sex-daring games": sexuality and gender socialization in the working-class children's universe].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jucélia Santos Bispo

    2003-01-01

    This article focuses on the socialization of children and youth with respect to gender and sexuality, from a socio-anthropological perspective. The work is based on ethnographic research in a group of 5-14-year-old boys and girls in a community in Baia de Todos os Santos, Bahia, Brazil. Despite the strong influence of family and school in primary socialization, the children reproduced and re-elaborated norms and practices on appropriate gender and sexual conduct, especially among their peers, and primarily in the context of play. The research analyzes the children s representations and practices in this socializing process, showing how gender and sexuality are socially constructed according to the contexts in which the different social interactions take place.

  19. Getting Ready for High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Karra

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author describes her anxiety concerning her 14-year-old son being able to sit for five consecutive hours and take the entrance exam required for him to attend a private high school, should he decide that's what he wants to do next year. What she discovered about herself through this process is never to underestimate her son…

  20. Metacognitive Knowledge in Children at Early Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberkorn, Kerstin; Lockl, Kathrin; Pohl, Steffi; Ebert, Susanne; Weinert, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    In metacognition research, many studies focused on metacognitive knowledge of preschoolers or children at the end of elementary school or secondary school, but investigations of children starting elementary school are quite limited. The present study, thus, took a closer look at children's knowledge about mental processes and strategies in…

  1. Communicating Astronomy to School Children Through Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Gil, A.; Collado, M. G.

    2011-06-01

    Artistic activities permeate our culture and our education, mainly because they speak of our most precious and intimate feelings, hopes, fears and sensations. Art constitutes, therefore, a universal language that can communicate and inspire through time and space, addressed to anybody with any kind of background. The power of inspiration of art is a wonderful way to excite children's imagination while communicating astronomical concepts. We present an example of communicating astronomy through different kinds of art pieces to school children. Also, children artworks are very useful to understand many of their conceptions and misconceptions about astronomical concepts.

  2. Peer Victimization in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Judith; Mak, Meghan

    2009-01-01

    This study explored peer victimization in 9- to 14-year-old children with and without Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The sample comprised 104 children, 52 of whom had a previous ADHD diagnosis. Children with ADHD had higher overall rates of self-reported victimization by peers and parent- and teacher-reported bullying behavior…

  3. Responding to Undocumented Children in the Schools. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Susan C.; Ludovina, Frank S.

    This digest discusses public schooling for undocumented immigrant children--children born outside the United States who live here without permission of the federal government. Most are children of agricultural workers. Whatever their circumstances, undocumented immigrant children are entitled to attend school. Anti-immigrant fears are stoked by…

  4. Perceptions of Elementary School Children's Parents Regarding Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Christine M.; Telljohann, Susan K.; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph A.; Glassman, Tavis

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the preferences of parents of elementary school-aged children regarding when sexuality topics should be discussed in school and at home. The survey was mailed to a national random sample of parents of elementary school age children. Overall, 92% of parents believed that sexuality education should be taught in schools.…

  5. Children's Sleep and School Psychology Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckhalt, Joseph A.; Wolfson, Amy R.; El-Sheikh, Mona

    2009-01-01

    Much contemporary research has demonstrated the multiple ways that sleep is important for child and adolescent development. This article reviews that research with an emphasis on how sleep parameters are related to school adjustment and achievement. Five areas of sleep research are reviewed to discern implications for practice with children using…

  6. Moroccan Children and Arabic in Spanish Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Bernabe Lopez; Molina, Laura Mijares

    This paper discusses classical Arabic as a minority language for Moroccan children in Spanish schools. It highlights programs of "education des langues et cultures d'origine" (ELCO), which specifically target these students. ELCO is the only public program in Spain recognizing Arabic as an immigrant minority language. Intercultural…

  7. Is Your School Hazardous to Children's Health?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Norma L.

    1993-01-01

    Children are at high risk of exposure to dangerous chemicals because of their low weight, incompletely developed body defenses, rapidly growing body tissues, and small passages susceptible to inflammations and spasms. Five areas of concern involving school maintenance include art supplies, lead-based compounds, hazardous cleaning substances,…

  8. Scientific Investigations of Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valanides, Nicos; Papageorgiou, Maria; Angeli, Charoula

    2014-01-01

    The study provides evidence concerning elementary school children's ability to conduct a scientific investigation. Two hundred and fifty sixth-grade students and 248 fourth-grade students were administered a test, and based on their performance, they were classified into high-ability and low-ability students. The sample of this study was…

  9. Children's Need to Know: Curiosity in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Susan

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, Susan Engel argues that curiosity is both intrinsic to children's development and unfolds through social interactions. Thus, it should be cultivated in schools, even though it is often almost completely absent from classrooms. Calling on well-established research and more recent studies, Engel argues that interactions between…

  10. Ritalin For School Children: The Teachers' Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robin, Stanley S.; Bosco, James J.

    1973-01-01

    The authors report on a study designed to assess teachers' attitudes toward the use of Ritalin in the treatment of hyperkinesis in school children. Overall, the attitudes of teachers are cautiously favorable. Although teachers commonly have experience with a pupil using Ritalin, specific and accurate information about the drug is uncommon. (RP)

  11. Promotion of School Children's Invention in Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakamoto, Takashi

    1989-01-01

    In the late 1980s an American newspaper reported that by one measure--the number of patents cited by successive inventors--Japan overtook the United States in the number of inventions produced during the 1970s. The reasons for this are not clear, but educational efforts promoting creative behaviors in school children are probably essential and…

  12. Exemplary School Programs for Disadvantaged Minority Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut Univ., Storrs. National Leadership Inst. - Teacher Education/Early Childhood.

    This compilation includes descriptions and data for some 298,000 children and youth in 230 school systems. National Leadership Institute/Teacher Education (NLITE) staff estimates that this represents less than one-fifth of the number of effective programs in operation and compilation is therefore an on-going operation with expanded reports issued…

  13. THE LANGUAGE OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LOBAN, WALTER

    THIS 7-YEAR LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF THE LANGUAGE SKILLS OF 338 OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA, SCHOOL CHILDREN UTILIZES A SCIENTIFIC APPROACH TO THE STUDY OF BOTH THE SEMANTIC AND STRUCTURAL ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE. A SPECIFIC METHOD OF LANGUAGE ANALYSIS HAS BEEN SHAPED. THE "SEGMENTATION" METHOD OF ANALYSIS USES SEVERAL TYPES OF SENTENCE SEGMENTS. A…

  14. Families with school-age children.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Kathleen; Schneider, Barbara; Butler, Donnell

    2011-01-01

    Most working parents face a common dilemma--how to care for their children when they are not in school but the parents are at work. In this article Kathleen Christensen, Barbara Schneider, and Donnell Butler describe the predictable and unpredictable scheduling demands school-age children place on working couples and single working parents. The authors assess the potential capacity of schools to help meet the needs of working families through changes in school schedules and after-school programs and conclude that the flexibility parents need to balance family-work responsibilities probably cannot be found in the school setting. They argue that workplaces are better able than schools to offer the flexibility that working parents need to attend to basic needs of their children, as well as to engage in activities that enhance their children's academic performance and emotional and social well-being. Two types of flexible work practices seem especially well suited to parents who work: flextime arrangements that allow parents to coordinate their work schedules with their children's school schedules, and policies that allow workers to take short periods of time off--a few hours or a day or two-to attend a parent-teacher conference, for example, or care for a child who has suddenly fallen ill. Many companies that have instituted such policies have benefited through employees' greater job satisfaction and employee retention. Yet despite these measured benefits to employers, workplaces often fall short of being family friendly. Many employers do not offer such policies or offer them only to employees at certain levels or in certain types of jobs. Flexible work practices are almost nonexistent for low-income workers, who are least able to afford alternative child care and may need flexibility the most. Moreover the authors find that even employees in firms with flexible practices such as telecommuting may be reluctant to take advantage of them, because the workplace culture

  15. Children's Experiences and Meaning Construction on Parental Divorce: A Focus Group Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maes, Sofie D. J.; De Mol, Jan; Buysse, Ann

    2012-01-01

    The global aim of this study was to explore children's narratives of parental divorce. A convenience sample, composed of 11- and 14-year-old children, was recruited. A total of 22 children (12 male, 10 female) participated in this focus group study. The findings show that two components seem to be really important for children during the divorce…

  16. MIGRANT CHILDREN IN CALIFORNIA SCHOOLS, A 1961 SURVEY OF SCHOOLS SERVING CHILDREN OF SEASONAL FARM WORKERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NANCE, AFTON D.

    ENROLLMENT, ATTENDANCE, CLASS SIZE, NUMBER OF TEACHERS EMPLOYED, ADEQUACY OF FACILITIES, AND PROBLEMS RELATED TO THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN OF MIGRANT WORKERS WERE THE CONCERNS OF A 1961 SURVEY OF SCHOOLS SERVING CHILDREN OF SEASONAL FARM WORKERS. QUESTIONNAIRES WERE SENT TO THE SUPERINTENDENTS OF 105 CALIFORNIA DISTRICTS ENROLLING THE MOST MIGRANT…

  17. Global Initiative on Out-of-School Children: All Children in School by 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UNICEF, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics (UIS) launched the joint Global Initiative on Out-of-School Children in 2010 to accelerate efforts towards the goal of universal primary education by 2015. The goal of the…

  18. Behavioral Clustering of School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberty, Carl J.; DiStefano, Christine; Kamphaus, Randy W.

    1997-01-01

    How a cluster analysis is conducted, validated, and interpreted is illustrated using a 14-scale behavioral assessment instrument and a national sample of 1,228 elementary school students. Method, cluster typology, validity, cluster structure, and prediction of cluster membership are discussed. (Author/SLD)

  19. Learning disability in rural primary school children.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, K N; Agarwal, D K; Upadhyay, S K; Singh, M

    1991-04-01

    In rural primary school children observed for two years, 12.97 per cent of those having IQ greater than or equal to 90 were found to have poor achievement in arithmetic test and teacher's assessment. These learning disabled children had impaired perceptual maturity and conceptual grasp as observed on MISIC (Indian modification of WISC), Bender Gestalt test and Piaget's test. On WISC Bannatyne categories learning disabled children scored highest in verbal conceptualization (similarities, vocabulary, comprehension), followed by spatial (picture completion, object assembly, block design) and sequencing (arithmetic, digit span, coding) abilities. These children on Bender Gestalt test made more errors particularly distortions (distortion of parts, incorrect number of dots, shape of design lost etc). They also showed delayed development on Piagetian tasks class inclusion, conservation (for length, substance, liquid and number) ordinal relation and one to one correspondence. These observations indicate impaired perceptual maturity, conception and information processing deficit.

  20. The School Playground Experience: Opportunities and Challenges for Children and School Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulryan-Kyne, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The school playground experience is an inevitable part of school life for primary school children. For most children, the experience is a positive and enjoyable one that contributes to their physical and social well-being and has been associated with enhanced attention and learning in the classroom. For some children, however, the playground can…

  1. Determinants of After-School Programming for School-Age Immigrant Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Joy P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the child and family characteristics that predict enrollment in after-school programming for school-age children of immigrant and nonimmigrant families. Although much is known about the beneficial effects of after-school programming for children and youths, the literature focused on immigrant children--the…

  2. Maternal Parenting Styles, School Involvement, and Children's School Achievement and Conduct in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stright, Anne Dopkins; Yeo, Kim Lian

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the roles of children's perceptions of maternal parenting styles (warmth, psychological control, and behavioral control) and maternal involvement in school-focused parenting practices (home-based involvement, home-school conferencing, and school-based involvement) predicting children's school achievement and conduct in…

  3. School-Related Stress: Children with and without Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Barbara J.

    This study examined school-related stress in children with and without disabilities, specifically the sources and manifestations of such stress and whether children with disabilities experience greater degrees of school-related stress than children without disabilities. The nondisabled group comprised 7,200 grade 4-12 students from urban and…

  4. Birth Order and Maladaptive Behavior in School-Aged Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmichael, Karla D.

    Drawing on Alfred Adler's theories on the effect of birth order on maladaptive behavior in children, this study focused on the relationship between birth order and the referral to counseling of school-aged children with maladaptive disorder. School-aged children (N=217) with academic or behavioral problems, ages 5 to 18, were referred to the staff…

  5. School Readiness and Children's Developmental Status. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zill, Nicholas; And Others

    In order to provide data to help schools respond to the diversity in the backgrounds and educational needs of children entering school, a U.S. Department of Education study asked parents of 3- to 5-year-old children who had not yet started kindergarten about their children's accomplishments that indicated emerging literacy and numeracy skills and…

  6. Children's Economic Activities and Primary School Attendance in Rural Guatemala.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Carol A. M.

    To investigate whether low school attendance rates in Guatemala (about 35% of primary school aged children do not attend) are due primarily to the need for children in low income families to contribute to family income or child care and other housekeeping tasks, time use data were collected in 4 rural villages from mothers of 369 children, aged…

  7. Helping Mixed Heritage Children Develop "Character and Resilience" in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Kirstin

    2016-01-01

    Recent UK government policy suggests that all schools have a key role to play in building "character and resilience" in children. This article draws on data from a wider research project, exploring the school experiences of mixed White/Black Caribbean and mixed White/Black African children in two London secondary schools. Because data…

  8. The School Adjustment of Post-Meningitic Children. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, John E.

    To study the school adjustment of children known to have had prolonged high fevers, 25 elementary school students who had had acute bacterial meningitis were matched by age, sex, and socioeconomic levels with peers from their same classroom. The nature and extent of school problems and educational handicaps of the post-meningitic children examined…

  9. REPORT ON SCHOOLS FOR MIGRANT CHILDREN, SUMMER 1960.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MANN, FRANK A.; AND OTHERS

    A SCHOOL FOR CHILDREN OF MIGRATORY AGRICULTURAL WORKERS, CONDUCTED DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS IN FIVE PENNSYLVANIA COUNTIES IN 1960, PROVIDED TRANSPORTATION, BREAKFAST, LUNCH, SNACKS, AND AN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PROGRAM. THE PROGRAM WAS ORGANIZED TO HELP MIGRANT CHILDREN OVERCOME ACADEMIC RETARDATION BECAUSE OF IRREGULAR SCHOOL ATTENDANCE AND TO HELP…

  10. How Can Schools Support Children with a Parent in Prison?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Julia; Leeson, Caroline; Carter Dillon, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Children who experience the imprisonment of a parent or close relative are more likely to have poorer outcomes including lower school attainment and an increased risk of truancy, school exclusion and socio-emotional difficulties. This paper reports on a research project, undertaken in 2011, into support provision in schools for children who…

  11. Health Shocks and Children's School Attainments in Rural China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Ang; Yao, Yang

    2010-01-01

    Using a long panel dataset of Chinese farm households covering the period of 1987-2002, this paper studies how major health shocks happening to household adults affect children's school attainments. We find that primary school-age children are the most vulnerable to health shocks, with their chances to enter middle school dropping by 9.9…

  12. School Readiness for Gifted Children: Considering the Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porath, Marion

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses issues relevant to gifted children's readiness for school. It raises a number of questions that challenge thinking about what is meant by school readiness. Gifted children can often be ready for school entrance before the age traditionally considered appropriate. Their complex developmental profiles challenge accepted notions…

  13. Children's Strategies for Making Friends when Starting School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danby, Susan; Thompson, Catherine; Theobald, Maryanne; Thorpe, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Starting school is a critical and potentially stressful time for many young children, and having supportive relationships with parents, teachers and peers and friends offer better outcomes for school adjustment and social relationships. This paper explores matters of friendship when young children are starting school, and how they initiate…

  14. An Inner Face Advantage in Children's Recognition of Familiar Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ge, Liezhong; Anzures, Gizelle; Wang, Zhe; Kelly, David J.; Pascalis, Olivier; Quinn, Paul C.; Slater, Alan M.; Yang, Zhiliang; Lee, Kang

    2008-01-01

    Children's recognition of familiar own-age peers was investigated. Chinese children (4-, 8-, and 14-year-olds) were asked to identify their classmates from photographs showing the entire face, the internal facial features only, the external facial features only, or the eyes, nose, or mouth only. Participants from all age groups were familiar with…

  15. Assessment of Self-Esteem and Satisfaction in Amputee Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, C. D.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The study involving six single and multiple amputee children (10 to 14 years old) was conducted to provide information on how situations affect the self esteem of amputee children, how situations affect satisfaction with their prostheses, and the relationship between amputee self esteem and their satisfaction with their prosthetic device.…

  16. Special Educational Needs of Children with Chronic Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodabaugh, Barbara; McNabb, Wylie

    A 4 year study is being conducted with 150 children (9 to 14 years old) to develop and evaluate a self management system for children with asthma. Ss receive a variety of educational "treatments" for their asthma, including information giving sessions, peer and family support groups, and relaxation training. Critical Incident Interviews, as well…

  17. Parasitic infections in Pemba Island school children.

    PubMed

    Albonico, M; Chwaya, H M; Montresor, A; Stolfzfus, R J; Tielsch, J M; Alawi, K S; Savioli, L

    1997-05-01

    Intestinal helminths, schistosomiasis and malaria have been recognised for decades to be major public health problems in Zanzibar, Tanzania. During the evaluation of the impact of the Zanzibar Helminth Control Programme, baseline parasitological data on 3,605 school children were collected in Pemba Island. Prevalence of intestinal helminth infections was 72%, 94% and 96% for Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworm, respectively. Thirty one percent of children tested positive for haematuria, a reliable indicator of urinary schistosomiasis in the study area. Malaria parasites were found in 61% of children. Hookworm infections and haematuria were more prevalent in boys. Sixty seven percent of the children were infected with all the three helminths, and 28% harboured double infection. No association was found between intestinal helminths and schistosomiasis or malaria. Children living in rural areas were more heavily infected with hookworms, schistosomiasis and malaria compared to children in towns. Results from this study provided relevant information for designing a "plan of action" for the integrated control of filariasis, intestinal helminths, malaria and schistosomiasis in Zanzibar.

  18. Nutritional assessment in children with cystic fibrosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimal nutrition, including consuming 35–40% of calories (kcal) as fat, is a vital part of the management of cystic fibrosis (CF), and involves accurate assessment of dietary intake. We compared 3 methods of nutritional assessment in 8– to 14-year-old children (n=20) with CF: 1) a 24-h Dietary Reca...

  19. How Children from Disadvantaged Areas Keep Safe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Katrina M.; Hill, Malcolm; Stafford, Anne; Walker, Moira

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The paper sets out to describe how children from disadvantaged areas perceive their communities and actively negotiate threats in their lives. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 60 interviews and 16 discussions groups were held with 8 to 14-year-olds sampled from four deprived communities located in the West of Scotland. Participants…

  20. The Role of School Principals in Shaping Children's Values.

    PubMed

    Berson, Yair; Oreg, Shaul

    2016-12-01

    Instilling values in children is among the cornerstones of every society. There is wide agreement that beyond academic teaching, schools play an important role in shaping schoolchildren's character, imparting in them values such as curiosity, achievement, benevolence, and citizenship. Despite the importance of this topic, we know very little about whether and how schools affect children's values. In this large-scale longitudinal study, we examined school principals' roles in the development of children's values. We hypothesized that relationships exist between principals' values and changes in children's values through the mediating effect of the school climate. To test our predictions, we collected data from 252 school principals, 3,658 teachers, and 49,401 schoolchildren. A multilevel structural-equation-modeling analysis yielded overall support for our hypotheses. These findings contribute to understanding the development of children's values and the far-reaching impact of leaders' values. They also demonstrate effects of schools on children beyond those on academic achievement.

  1. School performance and school behavior of children affected by AIDS in China.

    PubMed

    Tu, Xiaoming; Lv, Yunfei; Li, Xiaoming; Fang, Xiaoyi; Zhao, Guoxiang; Lin, Xiuyun; Hong, Yan; Zhang, Liying; Stanton, Bonita

    2009-09-01

    It is generally recognized that the AIDS epidemic will have a negative effect on the orphans' school education. However, few studies have been carried out to examine the school performance and school behavior of AIDS orphans and vulnerable children (children living with HIV-infected parents). Using both self-report and teacher evaluation data of 1625 children from rural central China, we examined the impact of parental HIV/AIDS on children's school performances (academic marks, educational expectation, and student leadership) and school behaviors (e.g., aggression, shy/anxious and assertive social skills). Results indicate that AIDS orphans and vulnerable children had disadvantages in school performances in comparison to their peers from the same community who did not experience AIDS-related death and illness in their family (comparison children). AIDS orphans had the lowest academic marks based on the reports of both children and teachers. Educational expectation was significantly lower among AIDS orphans and vulnerable children than comparison children from teacher's perspective. AIDS orphans were significantly more likely to demonstrate aggressive, impulsive and anxious behaviors than non-orphans. Moreover, orphans have more learning difficulties. Vulnerable children were also at a disadvantage on most measures. The data suggest that a greater attention is needed to the school performance and behavior of children affected by AIDS. The findings also indicate that AIDS relief and assistance program for children should go beyond the school attendance and make efforts to improve their school performance and education aspiration.

  2. REPORT ON TALENT PRESERVATION OF THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS OF HOUSTON INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOCK, JOZIE M.

    SPECIAL ATTENTION WAS GIVEN TO SLOW LEARNERS WITH UNSTABLE AND CULTURALLY DEPRIVED BACKGROUNDS TO KEEP THEM INTERESTED AND IN SCHOOL. PARTICIPANTS WERE 14 YEARS OLD, WITH AN IQ OF 76-90 AND 2 YEARS' RETARDATION IN LANGUAGE, READING, AND MATHEMATICS. PROJECT TEACHERS WERE SPECIALLY SELECTED FOR THEIR UNDERSTANDING AND ABILITY TO TEACH EMOTIONALLY…

  3. History of Peer Victimization and Children's Response to School Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elledge, L. Christian; Cavell, Timothy A.; Ogle, Nick T.; Malcolm, Kenya T.; Newgent, Rebecca A.; Faith, Melissa A.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the degree to which children with and without a history of stable peer victimization differentially endorse strategies for dealing with school bullies. Participants were 323 children, 58 of whom met criteria for chronic peer victimization. Children with a history of stable peer victimization differed from comparison children in how…

  4. The Admission and Induction of Refugee Children into School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spafford, Tim; Bolloten, Bill

    1995-01-01

    Examines induction and admission practice for refugee school children into Britain's public schools, highlights the educational issues and concerns of newly-arrived refugee families, and discusses what schools can do to make their entry into the school system less problematic. The author explains how good admission and induction practices can…

  5. "Entre Familia": Immigrant Parents' Strategies for Involvement in Children's Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poza, Luis; Brooks, Maneka Deanna; Valdés, Guadalupe

    2014-01-01

    Teachers and administrators in schools with large, working-class Latino populations often complain of parents' indifference or lack of involvement in children's schooling because of their low visibility at school events and relatively little face-to-face communication with teachers and school administration. In a series of semi-structured…

  6. AN ANALYSIS OF CAUSES OF ANXIETY AMONG CHILDREN IN SCHOOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PHILLIPS, BEEMAN N.

    THE BASIC PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY WAS TO ATTEMPT TO FIND OUT WHETHER ANXIETY IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHILDREN WAS TO A SIGNIFICANT DEGREE THE RESULT OF SCHOOL EXPERIENCES AND CONDITIONS. THE ANTECEDENTS AND CONSEQUENCES OF SCHOOL ANXIETY WERE ALSO TO BE ANALYZED. THE METHOD OF STUDY INVOLVED OBTAINING MEASURES OF SCHOOL ANXIETY AT THE BEGINNING AND END…

  7. School Personnel Responses to Children Exposed to Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenemore, Thomas; Lynch, John; Mann, Kimberly; Steinhaus, Patricia; Thompson, Theodore

    2010-01-01

    Authors explored the experiences of school personnel in their responses to children's exposure to violence. Thirty-one school personnel, including administrators, teachers, counselors, school social workers, and psychologists, were interviewed to obtain data on their experiences related to violence exposure in their schools and the surrounding…

  8. Elementary school children's science learning from school field trips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Marilyn Petty

    This research examines the impact of classroom anchoring activities on elementary school students' science learning from a school field trip. Although there is prior research demonstrating that students can learn science from school field trips, most of this research is descriptive in nature and does not examine the conditions that enhance or facilitate such learning. The current study draws upon research in psychology and education to create an intervention that is designed to enhance what students learn from school science field trips. The intervention comprises of a set of "anchoring" activities that include: (1) Orientation to context, (2) Discussion to activate prior knowledge and generate questions, (3) Use of field notebooks during the field trip to record observations and answer questions generated prior to field trip, (4) Post-visit discussion of what was learned. The effects of the intervention are examined by comparing two groups of students: an intervention group which receives anchoring classroom activities related to their field trip and an equivalent control group which visits the same field trip site for the same duration but does not receive any anchoring classroom activities. Learning of target concepts in both groups was compared using objective pre and posttests. Additionally, a subset of students in each group were interviewed to obtain more detailed descriptive data on what children learned through their field trip.

  9. Do You See What I See? School Perspectives of Deaf Children, Hearing Children and Their Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marschark, Marc; Bull, Rebecca; Sapere, Patricia; Nordmann, Emily; Skene, Wendy; Lukomski, Jennifer; Lumsden, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Perspectives on academic and social aspects of children's school experiences were obtained from deaf and hearing children and their (deaf or hearing) parents. Possible differences between (1) the views of children and their parents and (2) those of hearing children and their parents compared to deaf children and their parents were of particular…

  10. School lunch program for health promotion among children in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nobuko; Miyoshi, Miki

    2012-01-01

    In Japan, the present school lunch program has been implemented under the "School Lunch Act" enacted in 1954. The main purpose of the school lunch program is to promote healthy development of the minds and bodies of school children. Later, "The School Lunch Act" was revised in 2008 and its aim was changed to "promoting Shokuiku". As of May 2009, approximately 10 million school children participate in the school lunch program. This program itself is an educational activity. School children are responsible for serving lunch and clearing the dishes. They could also learn proper manners, by having meals together with classmates. Furthermore, understanding of balanced diet and food culture can be enhanced through learning the menu of each meal. Recently, as eating disorders and obesity increase among adults and school children, there is rising concern on development of lifestyle-related diseases. Under this circumstance, the Basic Law on Shokuiku was enacted in 2005. Besides, in order to enhance Shokuiku to school children, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology established the Diet and Nutrition Teacher System in April 2007. It is reported that, in those schools with Diet and Nutrition Teachers, a positive impact has been observed in terms of awareness and interest in diet among teachers and guardians. It is also reported that proportion of children skipping breakfast has decreased, and quality of life has been improved. In this way, the Japanese school lunch program system is essential for fostering healthy mind and bodies for the next generation.

  11. Primary School Attendance and Completion among Lower Secondary School Age Children in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyi, Peter

    2013-01-01

    At the World Education Forum in Dakar in 2000, governments pledged to achieve education for all by 2015. However, if current enrollment trends continue, the number of out-of-school children could increase from current levels. Greater focus is needed on lower secondary school age (13-16 years) children. These children are not included estimates of…

  12. Active and Passive Commuting to School: Influences on Affect in Primary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulley, Angela; Bentley, Nick; Clough, Catherine; Fishlock, Adelle; Morrell, Frances; O'Brien, James; Radmore, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Active commuting among school children is being encouraged for physical and environmental reasons, but little is known about its influence on affect. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that children who walk further to school experience increased arousal and affective valence compared with children who walk a short distance. This was…

  13. Starting School at a Disadvantage: The School Readiness of Poor Children. The Social Genome Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacs, Julia B.

    2012-01-01

    Poor children in the United States start school at a disadvantage in terms of their early skills, behaviors, and health. Fewer than half (48 percent) of poor children are ready for school at age five, compared to 75 percent of children from families with moderate and high income, a 27 percentage point gap. This paper examines the reasons why poor…

  14. Effect of School System and Gender on Moral Values and Forgiveness in Pakistani School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Javed, Anam; Kausar, Rukhsana; Khan, Nashi

    2014-01-01

    The present research was conducted to compare children studying in private and public schools in Pakistan on forgiveness and moral values. It was hypothesized that the type of school and gender of the child are likely to affect forgiveness and moral values in children. A sample of 100 children with equal number of girls and boys was recruited from…

  15. School Readiness Profiles Pilot Study: Helping Children in Ventura County Succeed in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvinder, Sareen; Thompson, Lisa; Franke, Todd; Halfon, Neal

    2005-01-01

    School Readiness profiles measured countywide at kindergarten entry provide important, population-based information about the developmental capacities of children as well as the capacity of families, pre-schools, and communities to support children's school readiness. These profiles enable key stakeholders to plan, evaluate, and improve programs,…

  16. Bullying among school children: a case report.

    PubMed

    Benčić, Miro

    2014-12-01

    The case study shows an example of peer violence, a physical attack on a high school student. The attacker was a child his own age attending the same school. Immediately after the attack the victim visited his chosen family doctor accompanying by mother. After interviewing in calm and safe environment and physical examination he was referred to the hospital emergency, because of evident trauma. During the follow up, it was obvious that the patient is interested in talking about the event but is uncomfortable to do so in front of his mother. Having obtained the mother's permission the conversation was carried out alone and the patient revealed all the details regarding the assault as well as his own feelings. The case study contains a description of the incident, the basic information regarding types of abuse amongst children, information on how to approach a victim as well as the obligation to report every type of abuse.

  17. Assessing attachment in school-age children.

    PubMed

    Crittenden, Patricia; Kozlowska, Kasia; Landini, Andrea

    2010-04-01

    The School-age Assessment of Attachment (SAA) is a newly developed clinical tool to identify pattern of attachment using the Dynamic-Maturational Model of attachment and adaptation (DMM). Seven picture cards were used to elicit fantasy stories and recalled episodes. The transcribed discourse was analyzed to yield one of 13 DMM attachment classifications, together with possible unresolved traumas and losses, and modifiers (depression and intrusions). In this article, we outline the steps necessary to validate an assessment tool, describe the development of the SAA, and report data from a preliminary clinical study testing the SAA's reliability, validity, and utility. Concurrent construct, familial, and discriminant validity were evaluated in terms of mental health status and exposure to danger on a sample of 5-12-year-old children, drawn from clinical ( n = 51) and normative (n = 40) populations. The SAA (a) differentiated children referred for psychiatric diagnosis from those in the normative population; (b) accounted for 31% of the variance (46% when family variables were added); (c) identified risk children in the normative sample; and (d) suggested risk factors associated with children's psychiatric disorder.

  18. Does ergonomic mismatch at school impact pain in school children?

    PubMed

    Brewer, J M; Davis, K G; Dunning, K K; Succop, P A

    2009-01-01

    Musculoskeletal pain in school-aged children is highly prevalent. While there are many potential factors relating to this discomfort, one unexplored factor is the ergonomic mismatch. The objective of this study was to determine whether the degree of mismatch between the body dimensions and the classroom furniture was associated with body discomfort. One hundred and thirty-nine children in a Midwestern U.S. school district participated in the study where demographic information, anthropometric measurements, self-reported regional body discomfort, and furniture measurements were collected. The results indicate an extremely high prevalence of ergonomic mismatch. Contrary to what was hypothesized, the ergonomic mismatch was not associated with body discomfort. The lack of association may have been a result of the extremely high prevalence of ergonomic mismatch as well as potential adaptations by the students. Although almost every student was found to not fit their desk and chairs, ergonomic mismatch had limited impact on the body discomfort. It appears that other factors such as backpack weight and time carrying may contribute more to the discomfort of students. However, caution is stress with regard to dismissing ergonomic mismatch factor as a potential risk factor since the extremely high prevalence may have washed out any effect.

  19. Voices of Children, Parents and Teachers: How Children Cope with Stress during School Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Mun

    2015-01-01

    This study explores how children's perceptions of stress factors and coping strategies are constructed over time. Children were interviewed before and after they made the transition from preschool to primary school. This study also explores teachers' and parental strategies in helping children to cope with stress at school. The sample included 53…

  20. Inadequacy of in-school support for diabetic children.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Dalila W; Powers, Patricia A; Goodenough, Mary F; Poth, Merrily A

    2003-01-01

    The level of blood glucose control needed to minimize complications in children with diabetes requires frequent blood sugar monitoring and appropriate responses to the information obtained. It is our impression that optimal support for good control is not available in all of the schools our patients attend. The objective of this study was to identify and quantify barriers to good control of diabetes in the school setting, and then use this information to target interventions to improve in-school support for children with diabetes. Two questionnaires were designed based on recommendations of the American Diabetes Association for appropriate in-school support for children with diabetes. Parental perception of in-school resources was addressed in one questionnaire. Forty-seven parents of children with diabetes in our clinic were surveyed. The second questionnaire was mailed to 222 randomly selected schools in our area inquiring about the in-school support available to children with diabetes and the types of educational materials that would be useful for school personnel. Thirty percent of the parents of children with diabetes indicated that the in-school support of their child was insufficient. Sixty-five of the 222 schools surveyed responded. The responses were variable and demonstrated inconsistency and, in some cases, inadequacy of support. A major deficiency noted in 13% of schools was lack of on-site personnel trained in diabetes management skills. From the schools' perspective, however, 50% of schools reported lack of parental communication. The care available for the child with diabetes is highly variable among schools. Targeted educational materials for both school personnel and parents would be useful to improve support for these children.

  1. Diversity between and within: Approaches to Teaching about Distant Place in the Secondary School Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Liz

    2014-01-01

    This study outlines some challenges of teaching about distant place and demonstrates how different strategies can influence school students' framings of diversity. The analysis is based on an interpretive case study of 13-14?year-old students learning about Japan in a UK school. Their changing representations of Japan were tracked in detail over a…

  2. Senior Secondary School Children's Understanding of Plant Nutrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosothwane, Modise

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess children's understanding of plant nutrition. The research was done on a sample of secondary school pupils in the age range of 16 to 19 years in two senior secondary schools in Botswana. The sample contained 137 senior secondary pupils all in their final year of study. These children were above average…

  3. Recurrent Respiratory Infections and Psychological Problems in Junior School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelmanson, Igor A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recurrent respiratory infections (RRI) are among most common diseases in school-aged children. Little is known about possible associations between RRI and children psychological well-being. Aim: To study possible associations between RRI in junior school pupils and their emotional/behavioural characteristics. Methods: The RRI group…

  4. Children's Access to Pre-School Education in Bangladesh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nath, Samir Ranjan; Sylva, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    Using the "Education Watch" household survey database, this paper explores children's access to pre-school education in Bangladesh. Participation in pre-school education has been increasing in Bangladesh at the rate of 0.6% per year and the net enrolment rate was found to be 13.4% in 2005. Enrolment of over-aged children in pre-school…

  5. The Effect of Preschool on Children's School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marjanovic Umek, Ljubica; Kranjc, Simona; Fekonja, Urska; Bajc, Katja

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of preschool on children's school readiness in connection with their intellectual abilities, language competence and parents' education. The sample included 219 children from 68 to 83 months old attending the first year of primary school, differentiated by whether or not they had attended…

  6. Creativity, Emotional Intelligence, and School Performance in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansenne, Michel; Legrand, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that both creativity and emotional intelligence (EI) were related to children school performance. In this study, we investigated the incremental validity of EI over creativity in an elementary school setting. Seventy-three children aged from 9 to 12 years old were recruited to participate in the study. Verbal and…

  7. Relations between School Performance and Depressive Symptoms in Spanish Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orgiles, Mireia; Gomez, Marta; Piqueras, Jose A.; Espada, Jose P.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Despite data showing the relationship between depression and decreased school performance, there is a lack of studies with Spanish children. The objective of this research is to examine school performance as a function of depression and gender. Method: Participants were 658 Spanish children aged between 8 and 12 years, 49.6% male,…

  8. [Vulnerable children detected by the school health service: the forgotten?].

    PubMed

    Noirhomme-Renard, F; Bullens, Q; Malchair, A; Gosset, C

    2014-12-01

    The current health needs of children largely exceeds the biomedical model. The school doctor occupies a special position where he can take into account the social determinants of health and identify vulneirable children. After the detection by the school health service, the harmonious development of, the child requires that health professionals cooperate in a "preventive network".

  9. Level of Depression in Intellectually Gifted Secondary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahzad, Salman; Begume, Nasreen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present research was to investigate the difference in depression between intellectually gifted and non-gifted secondary school children. After a detailed review of literature the following hypothesis was formulated; there would be a significant difference between intellectually gifted and non-gifted secondary school children on…

  10. Latent Structure of Motor Abilities in Pre-School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vatroslav, Horvat

    2011-01-01

    The theoretical and practical knowledge which have so far been acquired through work with pre-school children pointed to the conclusion that the structures of the latent dimensions of the motor abilities differ greatly from such a structure, in pre-school children and adults alike. Establishing the latent structure of the motor abilities in…

  11. Canadian Indian Children Who Had Never Attended School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Lolita

    1973-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the performance on selected intelligence tests of a group of Canadian Indian children who had never been to school with the performance of a similar group of children who were attending school regularly. (Author/RK)

  12. The School Achievement of Minority Children. New Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neisser, Ulric, Ed.

    Most of the chapters in this book grew out of the Conference on the Academic Performance of Minority Children held at Cornell University in 1982. Six hypotheses about minority school achievement are presented. After a general introduction by Ulric Neisser, John Ogbu describes the effects of caste and argues that black school children are preparing…

  13. Exposure to Conflict and Violence across Contexts: Relations to Adjustment among Palestinian Children

    PubMed Central

    Dubow, Eric F.; Boxer, Paul; Huesmann, L. Rowell; Shikaki, Khalil; Landau, Simha; Gvirsman, Shira Dvir; Ginges, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    Despite extensive literatures on the impact on children of exposure to violence in families, neighborhoods, and peer groups, there has been relatively little effort evaluating their cumulative impact. There also has been less attention to the effects of exposure to political conflict and violence. We collected data from a representative sample of 600 Palestinian youths (three age cohorts: 8, 11, and 14 years old) to evaluate the relation of exposure to political conflict and violence, and violence in the family, community, and school, to post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTS) and aggressive behavior. Results highlight the additive effects of exposure to political conflict and violence, suggesting that interventionists should consider the full spectrum of sources of environmental risk for PTS symptoms and aggressive behavior. PMID:20390802

  14. The Effects of Echolalia on Acquisition and Generalization of Receptive Labeling in Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlop, Marjorie H.

    1983-01-01

    Two experiments, with about five autistic children (two to 14 years old) in each experiment, assessed the effects of autistic immediate echolalia on acquisition and generalization of receptive labeling tasks. These results indicated that echolalia faciliated generalization for echolalic autistic children but not for functionally mute autistic…

  15. A Multisite, Randomized Controlled Trial for Children with Sexual Abuse-Related PTSD Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Deblinger, Esther; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Steer, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the differential efficacy of trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) and child-centered therapy for treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and related emotional and behavioral problems in children who have suffered sexual abuse. Method: Two hundred twenty-nine 8- to 14-year-old children and their primary…

  16. Developmental, Familial and Educational Characteristics of a Sample of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stampoltzis, Aglaia; Papatrecha, Virginia; Polychronopoulou, Stavroula; Mavronas, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the developmental, familial and educational characteristics of 91 children with a clinical diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), from one educational district of Athens, Greece. Records of the 91 children, aged 4-14 years old, were examined with respect to sex, age of diagnosis, type of ASDs, school…

  17. Deficient Orthographic and Phonological Representations in Children with Dyslexia Revealed by Brain Activation Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Fan; Bitan, Tali; Chou, Tai-Li; Burman, Douglas D.; Booth, James R.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The current study examined the neuro-cognitive network of visual word rhyming judgment in 14 children with dyslexia and 14 age-matched control children (8- to 14-year-olds) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Methods: In order to manipulate the difficulty of mapping orthography to phonology, we used conflicting and…

  18. Measuring Children's Proportional Reasoning, The "Tendency" for an Additive Strategy and The Effect of Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misailadou, Christina; Williams, Julian

    2003-01-01

    We report a study of 10-14 year old children's use of additive strategies while solving ratio and proportion tasks. Rasch methodology was used to develop a diagnostic instrument that reveals children's misconceptions. Two versions of this instrument, one with "models" thought to facilitate proportional reasoning and one without were…

  19. Does Gaze Direction Modulate Facial Expression Processing in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akechi, Hironori; Senju, Atsushi; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Tojo, Yoshikuni; Osanai, Hiroo; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments investigated whether children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) integrate relevant communicative signals, such as gaze direction, when decoding a facial expression. In Experiment 1, typically developing children (9-14 years old; n = 14) were faster at detecting a facial expression accompanying a gaze direction with a congruent…

  20. Diverse Family Types and Out-of-School Learning Time of Young School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ono, Hiromi; Sanders, James

    2010-01-01

    Sources of differentials in out-of-school learning time between children in first marriage biological parent families and children in six nontraditional family types are identified. Analyses of time diaries reveal that children in four of the six nontraditional family types spend fewer minutes learning than do children in first marriage biological…

  1. Perceptions of School Nurses regarding Obesity in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyers, Pamela; Bugle, Linda; Jackson, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    Obesity is epidemic in the nation's school-age population with African American and Hispanic children and adolescents specifically at risk. School nurses at elementary and middle public schools in the Missouri 8th Congressional District were surveyed regarding their perceptions of childhood obesity. School nurses supported preventive interventions…

  2. Exploring Primary Children's Views and Experiences of the School Ground: The Case of a Greek School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christidou, Vasilia; Tsevreni, Irida; Epitropou, Maria; Kittas, Constantinos

    2013-01-01

    The present study explores the use of a conventional school ground of a primary school and its potential as a space for creative play and environmental learning. Children's play behavior and views of the school ground are explored, as well as their vision for its improvement. The research constitutes part of a wider school ground project and was…

  3. Our Children, Our Schools: Seeking Solutions for Improving the Climate in Urban Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Ronald A.; Harrington, Sonja Y.

    2015-01-01

    Using a quantitative study the researchers examined perceptions regarding school climate of parents with children who attend urban schools, based on several dimensions: quality of the instructional program, support for learning, school climate/environment for learning, parent/school relationships, and resource management. Of the 150 administered…

  4. Grade Retention and School Dropout: Policy Debate and Research Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roderick, Melissa

    1995-01-01

    Educational policy trends have contributed to rising rates of student grade retention over the past two decades. This research bulletin looks at the evidence about whether and how grade retention may influence the chances that a student would drop out of school. In 1992, evidence indicates that about 20% of 14-year-olds may have experienced a…

  5. Model Programs for Middle School Teacher Preparation. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harnett, Anne Marie

    This digest describes three teacher education program models designed to concentrate on: (1) a philosophy of middle school education; (2) an understanding of the unique psychological, social, and intellectual needs peculiar to the 10- to 14-year-old student; (3) an ability to increase student motivation; and (4) a command of subject area. The…

  6. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among School Age Palestinian Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khamis, Vivian

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This study was designed to assess the prevalence of PTSD among Palestinian school-age children. Variables that distinguish PTSD and non-PTSD children were examined, including child characteristics, socioeconomic status, family environment, and parental style of influence. Method: Participants were 1,000 children aged 12 to 16 years.…

  7. Executive Dysfunction in School-Age Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambek, Rikke; Tannock, Rosemary; Dalsgaard, Soeren; Trillingsgaard, Anegen; Damm, Dorte; Thomsen, Per Hove

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The study examined executive function deficits (EFD) in school-age children (7 to 14 years) with ADHD. Method: A clinical sample of children diagnosed with ADHD (n = 49) was compared to a population sample (n = 196) on eight executive function (EF) measures. Then, the prevalence of EFD in clinical and non-clinical children was examined…

  8. Personality and Locus of Control among School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandya, Archana A.; Jogsan, Yogesh A.

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this investigation is to find out the sex differences in personality traits and locus of control among school children. A total 60 children (30 boys and 30 girls) were taken as a sample. The research tool for personality, children personality questionnaire was used, which was made by Cattell and Porter. Locus of control was…

  9. A Children's Place? The School Playground Debate in Postwar Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsson, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Starting from theoretical issues concerning places for children and from historical studies of childhood and education, the present article deals with the history of the school playground in a Swedish context. The focus is on a school playground debate in the 1970s, in which school playgrounds were the subject of lively discussion and the object…

  10. Sick Schools 2009: America's Continuing Environmental Health Crisis for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2010

    2010-01-01

    Everybody knows that healthy school buildings contribute to student learning, reduce health and operating costs, and ultimately, increase school quality and competitiveness. However, 55 million of the nation's children attend public and private K-12 schools where poor air quality, hazardous chemicals and other unhealthy conditions make students…

  11. Children Facing School: Sally Brown and Peppermint Patty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crain, William

    1999-01-01

    Analyzes the comic strip "Peanuts" characters Sally Brown and Peppermint Patty as they illustrate children's difficulties in school and their emotional responses to school. Explores how Sally illustrates the conflict between the creative impulses of childhood with school demands, while Patty illustrates the extent to which many children…

  12. Free Time Motivation and Physical Activity in Middle School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozub, Francis M.; Farmer, James

    2011-01-01

    This study examined free time motivation and physical activity in 68 middle school children from a rural public school system (N = 24) and a private school located in the same area of the Midwest (N = 44). Results indicated that free time motivation did not explain variability in physical activity behavior during free time or while students were…

  13. The University of Tulsa School for Gifted Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Patricia L.

    The University of Tulsa (Oklahoma) School for Gifted Children is a full school program for able learners ages 3-12. The school is the only one in the nation to use a curriculum based on Enaction Theory which postulates that thinking is a matter of running a simulation in one's head and involves three steps: (1) creating a mental model, (2)…

  14. Early Intervention and Prevention for Children Excluded from Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panayiotopoulos, Christos; Kerfoot, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In the last 10 years, the problem of school exclusion in England has reached a crisis point. Figures on permanent exclusions from primary, secondary and special schools in England show that for 1996/97, 12 700 children were excluded. Among these, 12% were pupils permanently excluded from primary schools. When the present Labour Government came to…

  15. School-Based Health Promotion Initiative Increases Children's Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cluss, Patricia; Lorigan, Devin; Kinsky, Suzanne; Nikolajski, Cara; McDermott, Anne; Bhat, Kiran B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Childhood obesity increases health risk, and modest physical activity can impact that risk. Schools have an opportunity to help children become more active. Purpose: This study implemented a program offering extra school-day activity opportunities in a rural school district where 37% of students were obese or overweight in 2005 and…

  16. Effective Schools: Critical Issues in the Education of Black Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Percy, Ed.; Wilson, Ted, Ed.

    This collection of essays focuses on how Ronald Edmond's work on effective schools and school improvement can affect the education of black children. The book represents a cooperative effort of the Charles D. Moody Research Institute, established as a vehicle for the program services of the National Alliance of Black School Educators (NABSE), and…

  17. Group Counseling With Emotionally Disturbed School Children in Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Peter

    The application of group counseling to emotionally disturbed school children in Chinese culture was examined. Two junior high schools located in Tao-Yuan Province were randomly selected with two eighth-grade classes randomly selected from each school. Ten emotionally disturbed students were chosen from each class and randomly assigned to two…

  18. Determinants of Children's Schooling: The Case of Tigray Region, Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abafita, Jemal; Kim, Chang-Soo

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the determinants of educational outcomes of primary school children in Tigray region of Ethiopia using a survey data gathered from four villages in 2013. Four different measures of schooling were used to examine the impact of household and child-specific factors. First, we examine the determinants of school attendance (ever-attendance,…

  19. School-Age Children with Disabilities: Technology Implications for Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parette, Howard P., Jr.; VanBievliet, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Focuses on the provision of technology to children with disabilities and examines school-subsidized provision of assistive devices and related services. Reviews federal technology legislation and grants to states, school technology teams, role of the elementary school counselor, various ethical considerations, and selection of appropriate…

  20. For Professors' Children, the Case for Home Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannapacker, W. A.

    2005-01-01

    The number of families who home school their children is growing between five and 15% per year and it is believed that home schoolers outperform their public-educated peers, though critics believe that home schooling is a form of religious fanaticism and a means of avoiding diversity. A professor explains how he and his wife, home school their…

  1. Can Schools Promote the Health of Children with Asthma?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhirter, Jenny; McCann, Donna; Coleman, Helen; Calvert, Marguerite; Warner, John

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the evaluation of a whole-school intervention to improve morbidity and psychosocial well-being in pupils with asthma. In all, 193 children with asthma (7-9 years) from 23 primary/junior schools in the south of England participated. Schools (n = 12) randomly assigned to the intervention group (IV) received a staff asthma…

  2. Family Background, School Characteristics, and Children's Cognitive Achievement in Madagascar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Peter; Randrianarisoa, Jean Claude; Sahn, David E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses linked household, school, and test score data from Madagascar to investigate the relation of household characteristics and school factors to the cognitive skills of children ages 8-10 and 14-16. In contrast to most achievement test studies in developing countries, the study uses representative rather than school-based samples of…

  3. Neurologic Damage and Behavior Disorder in Rubella Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chess, Stella; Fernandez, Paulina

    1980-01-01

    A longitudinal study of 214 rubella deaf children (13 to 14 years old) revealed a low incidence (10%) of neurologica damage among those with normal intelligence, but a high incidence (51% to 70%) among those who were mentally retarded or blind. (Author)

  4. Analysis of Functions of Delayed Echolalia in Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prizant, Barry M.; Rydell, Patrick J.

    1984-01-01

    Fourteen functional categories of delayed echolalia in three autistic children (4-14 years old) were derived from videotape analyses. Individual differences in functional usage were apparent across Ss. Delayed echolalia varied along the dimensions of interactiveness, comprehension of the utterance produced, and relevance to linguistic or…

  5. Prevalence of Bruxism among Mexican Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Perez, Ruben; Lopez-Morales, Patricia; Borges-Yanez, S. Aida; Maupome, Gerardo; Pares-Vidrio, Gustavo

    2007-01-01

    This study sought to determine the prevalence of bruxism in a Mexican community of children with Down syndrome, and to evaluate bruxism's relationship with age, sex, intellectual disability level, and type of chromosomal abnormality of trisomy 21. Using a cross-sectional design, 57 boys and girls (3 to 14 years old) were examined. Three approaches…

  6. Health status and school achievement of children from Head Start and Free School Lunch Programs.

    PubMed

    Gietzen, D; Vermeersch, J A

    1980-01-01

    School health records of 332 children through the eighth grade were examined in a retrospective comparative analysis of physical health status and school achievement of children from Head Start and Free School Lunch Programs. The objective was to determine if nutrition early in the lives of children as a part of a comprehensive health and education program such as Head Start produces greater or different benefits for disadvantaged children than nutrition intervention later through free lunches when the child enters school. Cross-sectional longitudinal, and case-study approaches were used in the analysis. A group of no-food-program disadvantaged children and a group of advantaged children served as comparisons. Results showed that advantaged children performed better on all parameters of school achievement and health status compared with the disadvantaged children, regardless of the form of intervention. Measures of school achievement of Head Start and Free Lunch children did not differ from those of the disadvantaged comparison group, but there were significant differences in measures of health status between the disadvantaged groups. Fewer boys from Project Head Start fell below the 25th percentile for height compared with boys in the Free Lunch Program. Head Start children also scored higher in physical fitness and had fewer reported absences from school due to illness.

  7. Turkish children's Bender-Gestalt test performance: differences in public and private school children.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Serap

    2011-02-01

    The present study was undertaken to provide data on the Bender-Gestalt test for children aged 5 to 11 in Turkey. Although it is well documented that sociocultural factors are important in cognitive evaluations, the effects of type of school and differing educational opportunities provided by these schools on the Bender-Gestalt test have not been previously investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of age, sex, and school type on Bender-Gestalt performance. The test was individually administered to 484 children between the ages of 5 and 11 years. The children were enrolled in either public or private schools. Koppitz's Developmental Scoring System was utilized. The results indicated that older children performed with fewer errors. Girls performed with fewer errors than boys. Finally, as expected, private school children outperformed their public school peers. The results are discussed with respect to the importance of taking into account various educational factors in utilizing commonly used tests.

  8. Demographic, Environmental, Access, and Attitude Factors that Influence Walking to School by Elementary School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Ariel; Vogt, Christine A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Walking to school has been identified as an activity that contributes to children's daily exercise requirements. The purpose of this study was to better understand factors that influence walking to school by elementary school-aged children. Methods: A sample of 1,897 elementary school-aged children (84% response rate; 3rd-5th graders)…

  9. Discourses on bad children and bad schools.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gary; Loxley, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    First, discourse is discussed as concerning the subtler lineaments of knowledge production in notions about difference and difficulty. The unhelpful influences that these notions have had on the development of special education research and practice are discussed. The importance of the scholar-practitioner in undoing some of these understandings is further developed. Second, the point is stressed that politics and political questions are intertwined with empirical questions and that a discourse of objectivity propagates and fosters a belief that the supposed paraphernalia of science (measurement, experiment, prediction) can be employed without cost. Third, the point is made that the individual discourse is rooted in the theoretical context of special education--with unhelpful consequences for the way that difficulty continues to be construed as rooted in individuals, whether those individuals be children or schools.

  10. Ocular screening tests of elementary school children

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, J.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents an analysis of 507 abnormal retinal reflex images taken of Huntsville kindergarten and first grade students. The retinal reflex images were obtained by using an MSFC-developed Generated Retinal Reflex Image System (GRRIS) photorefractor. The system uses a 35 mm camera with a telephoto lens with an electronic flash attachment. Slide images of the eyes were examined for abnormalities. Of a total of 1835 students screened for ocular abnormalities, 507 were found to have abnormal retinal reflexes. The types of ocular abnormalities detected were hyperopia, myopia, astigmatism, esotropia, exotropia, strabismus, and lens obstuctions. The report shows that the use of the photorefractor screening system is an effective low-cost means of screening school children for abnormalities.

  11. Advances in children's rights and children's well-being measurement: implications for school psychologists.

    PubMed

    Kosher, Hanita; Jiang, Xu; Ben-Arieh, Asher; Huebner, E Scott

    2014-03-01

    Recent years have brought important changes to the profession of school psychology, influenced by larger social, scientific, and political trends. These trends include the emergence of children's rights agenda and advances in children's well-being measurement. During these years, a growing public attention and commitment to the notion of children's rights has developed, which is best expressed in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. The Convention outlines the conditions necessary to ensure and promote children's well-being and calls for the ongoing monitoring of children's well-being for accountability purposes. We articulate advances in children's rights and children's well-being measurement in the context of children's schooling experiences in general and for school psychology in particular. We highlight implications for the assessment roles of school psychologists, who occupy a unique position at the intersection of multiple subsystems of children's overall ecosystems. We argue that the synergy between a rights-based agenda and advances in children's well-being assessment methodology can provide valuable opportunities for school psychology. This synergy can help school communities establish perspective and goals for children's well-being in rights respecting ways, using the most promising well-being assessment strategies.

  12. Characteristics of American Children and Youth: 1980. Current Population Reports, Special Studies Series P-23, No. 114.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Jerry T.

    This report presents a statistical portrait of the demographic, social, and economic characteristics of American children and youth. The source of the data in U.S. government sources includes surveys, censuses, and vital statistics. In general, children are defined as persons under 14 years old, and youth as persons 14 to 24 years old. Exceptions…

  13. Scientific Investigations of Elementary School Children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valanides, Nicos; Papageorgiou, Maria; Angeli, Charoula

    2013-04-01

    The study provides evidence concerning elementary school children's ability to conduct a scientific investigation. Two hundred and fifty sixth-grade students and 248 fourth-grade students were administered a test, and based on their performance, they were classified into high-ability and low-ability students. The sample of this study was randomly selected and included 80 students, 40 fourth-grade and 40 sixth-grade students of low and high abilities. Students were specifically instructed to investigate the functioning of a device, to think aloud prior and after any experiment with the device, and to keep a record of their experimental results. The results showed that students were inclined to mainly collect evidence from the experimental space and failed to control variables during their investigation. The majority of the students had difficulties with effectively organizing collected data and failed to coordinate hypotheses with evidence. The significant interaction effect that was found between grade level and ability in terms of students' investigation ability indicates that the existing gap between high- and low-ability students becomes bigger as students become older. Undoubtedly, ongoing research efforts for identifying patterns of children's cognitive development will be most valuable as they can have important implications for the design of teaching scenarios and inquiry-based science activities conducive to accelerating students' cognitive growth and scientific investigation abilities.

  14. Do You See What I See? School Perspectives of Deaf Children, Hearing Children, and Their Parents

    PubMed Central

    Marschark, Marc; Bull, Rebecca; Sapere, Patricia; Nordmann, Emily; Skene, Wendy; Lukomski, Jennifer; Lumsden, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Perspectives on academic and social aspects of children's school experiences were obtained from deaf and hearing children and their (deaf or hearing) parents. Possible differences between (1) the views of children and their parents and (2) those of hearing children and their parents compared to deaf children and their parents were of particular interest. Overall, parents gave their children higher school friendship ratings than the children gave themselves, and hearing children and their parents were more positive about children's friendships than were deaf children and their parents. Both children and parents also saw deaf children as less successful in reading than hearing children. However, deaf children’s having deaf parents, attending a school for the deaf, and using sign language at home all were associated with more positive perceptions of social success. Use of cochlear implants was not associated with perceptions of greater academic or social success. These and related findings are discussed in the context of parent and child perspectives on social and academic functioning and particular challenges confronted by deaf children in regular school settings. PMID:23543959

  15. Reducing Children's Exposure to School Bus Diesel Exhaust in One School District in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazer, Mary E.; Jacobson Vann, Julie C.; Lamanna, Beth F.; Davison, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Children who are exposed to diesel exhaust from idling school buses are at increased risk of asthma exacerbation, decreased lung function, immunologic reactions, leukemia, and increased susceptibility to infections. Policies and initiatives that aim to protect school children from the harmful effects of exposure to diesel exhaust range from…

  16. Individual and School-Level Socioeconomic Gradients in Physical Activity in Australian School children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Lucy; Maher, Carol; Katzmarzyk, Peter; Olds, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Background: We attempted to determine whether there was a socioeconomic gradient in 9- to 11-year-old Australian children's moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and whether school facilities or policies supporting physical activity were associated with school-level socioeconomic status (SES) and MVPA. Methods: Children (N = 528) from 26…

  17. Learning To Learn: Children's Progress through the First 3 Years of School. Junior School Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wylie, Cathy; Smith, Lesley

    This study organized in 2 sections examined the progress of 32 New Zealand children during their first 3 years at school. Their achievement levels in reading, mathematics, and writing were examined based on interviews with the children, their teachers, and their parents; school records; notes; and video recordings. Section 1 deals with perceptions…

  18. School Absences and School Achievements in Children with Congenital Coagulation Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kvist, S. Beatrice M.

    1988-01-01

    Ten Finnish children (aged 7-15 years) suffering from hemophilia or von Willebrand's disease were compared with 20 healthy schoolmates with reference to scholastic achievement and school absences. It appears that despite a greater number of absences, the children affected by the disease were doing relatively well in school. (TJH)

  19. Frequent Visitors: Somatization in School-Age Children and Implications for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Robin Adair; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Matthews, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    There is a gap in the nursing literature regarding children who frequently visit school nurses' offices with recurrent unexplained physical symptoms. A review of the scientific health literature was undertaken to examine the clinical presentation, associated variables, and implications for school nurses regarding children who are frequent school…

  20. School Reintegration for Children and Adolescents with Cancer: The Role of School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Mekel S.

    2009-01-01

    As a result of advancements in medical expertise and technology, children and adolescents diagnosed with cancer now have opportunities to participate in many typical activities, including school. To some extent, school reintegration reflects positive adjustment to their illness. Nevertheless, children and adolescents with cancer may experience…

  1. The Effects of School Lunch Participation, Socioeconomic and Psychological Variables on Food Consumption of School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, David W.; Price, Dorothy Z.

    Estimates were made of the effects of school lunch participation and various socioeconomic, anthropometric, and psychological variables on the consumption of 20 food items by 8- to 12-year-old children. The study sample consisted of 845 school children in the State of Washington, stratified by ethnic group and by poverty level so that it contained…

  2. A Study of Pre-School Children's School Readiness Related to Scientific Thinking Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unutkan, Ozgul Polat

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare school readiness of children who had pre-school experiences and children without such experiences on the basis of scientific thinking skills. This comparison is held in terms of variables of age, gender, and socio economic status. The questions of the study in relation to the purpose of the study are as…

  3. How To Choose a Public School: A Guide for Parents of Young NYC School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukess, Laura F.

    This pamphlet guides New York City parents through the basic steps in choosing a public school for their children. Every child 6 years of age or older in New York City must attend school, and children may be enrolled in kindergarten the year they turn 5. A limited number of preschool spaces are available. Legal residency is not a requirement for…

  4. Hypothesis: Impregnated school uniforms reduce the incidence of dengue infections in school children.

    PubMed

    Wilder-Smith, A; Lover, A; Kittayapong, P; Burnham, G

    2011-06-01

    Dengue infection causes a significant economic, social and medical burden in affected populations in over 100 countries in the tropics and sub-tropics. Current dengue control efforts have generally focused on vector control but have not shown major impact. School-aged children are especially vulnerable to infection, due to sustained human-vector-human transmission in the close proximity environments of schools. Infection in children has a higher rate of complications, including dengue hemorrhagic fever and shock syndromes, than infections in adults. There is an urgent need for integrated and complementary population-based strategies to protect vulnerable children. We hypothesize that insecticide-treated school uniforms will reduce the incidence of dengue in school-aged children. The hypothesis would need to be tested in a community based randomized trial. If proven to be true, insecticide-treated school uniforms would be a cost-effective and scalable community based strategy to reduce the burden of dengue in children.

  5. CHILDREN'S ATTITUDES TOWARD SCHOOL AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS WITH SCHOOL ANXIETY, STUDY I. SCHOOL ANXIETY AND CONGITIVE FUNCTIONING--EXPLORATORY STUDIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DUNN, JAMES A.; SHANKS, PATRICIA F.

    GROUP DIFFERENCES (AGE, SEX, AND SOCIAL CLASS) IN CHILDREN'S SCHOOL ANXIETY AND IN THEIR ATTITUDES TOWARD VARIOUS ASPECTS OF SCHOOL, AND THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ANXIETY AND CHILDREN'S ATTITUDE PATTERNS WERE EXPLORED. SEVERAL THEORIES AND EARLIER STUDIES IN THIS AREA ARE DISCUSSED. THE SAMPLE CONSISTED OF 480 STUDENTS IN GRADES FIVE, SEVEN, AND…

  6. Predisposing, Reinforcing and Enabling Predictors of Middle School Children's After-School Physical Activity Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kristi M.; Ogletree, Roberta J.; Fetro, Joyce V.; Brown, Stephen L.; Partridge, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Children's participation in after-school physical activity can attenuate the overweight and obesity rates among rural, low socioeconomic status (SES) children. Children's individual determination, as well as social and environmental factors, can influence their behaviors. Purpose: The purposes of this study were to determine if a difference…

  7. No More Bullying: An Analysis of Primary School Children's Drawings of School Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slee, Phillip T.; Skrzypiec, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Bullying in schools is an international problem impacting negatively on children's well-being. Children's drawings can provide an insight into their emotional states. There is little published literature that uses children's drawings to gain better understandings of the nature and impact of bullying. We report two studies using indicators of…

  8. Families, Schools, and Children's School Achievement: A Study Based on Rural Regions in China Gansu Province

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhijun, Sun; Zeyun, Liu; Baicai, Sun

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the impact of school factors on student achievement due to differences in family backgrounds. Based on the principle of diminishing effects of school investment in children's achievement, this study built a model that includes individual characteristics, family characteristics, and school characteristics. Family and school…

  9. School-Based Primary School Sexuality Education for Migrant Children in Beijing, China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Wenli; Su, Yufen

    2014-01-01

    In May 2007, Beijing Normal University launched a programme of school-based sexuality education for migrant children in Xingzhi Primary School in Beijing. Over the past seven years, the project team has developed a school-based sexuality education curriculum using the "International Technical Guidance on Sexuality Education" published by…

  10. School Bus Safety: What Can Our Schools Do to Protect Our Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dargan, Thomas J.; Silverstone, Adam H.

    2014-01-01

    School districts and school bus contractors are entrusted with the most important of all road users--our nation's children. In the wake of recent newsworthy accidents and attention grabbing headlines regarding unfit bus drivers, claims premised upon school bus accidents have become increasingly tangential and, in turn, personal injury attorneys…

  11. Meeting the Needs of Texas School Children: The Texas Minimum Foundation School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morowski, Deborah L.

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the 1920s and early 1930s, the quality of education for school children in Texas was inconsistent and control of public schools resided with local communities. As a result, teachers' salaries across the state were inequitable among the races, as well as among different divisions within a single district. School district spending was…

  12. Working with Homeless School-Aged Children: Barriers to School Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groton, Danielle; Teasley, Martell L.; Canfield, James P.

    2013-01-01

    With the needs and challenges of adolescent homelessness on the rise, the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (MVA) was crafted as a public policy initiative aimed at facilitating access to schools for this population. While school social workers are the designated personnel for practice with homeless school-aged children, we know little about…

  13. Perceived School and Neighborhood Safety, Neighborhood Violence and Academic Achievement in Urban School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milam, A. J.; Furr-Holden, C. D. M.; Leaf, P. J.

    2010-01-01

    Community and school violence continue to be a major public health problem, especially among urban children and adolescents. Little research has focused on the effect of school safety and neighborhood violence on academic performance. This study examines the effect of the school and neighborhood climate on academic achievement among a population…

  14. School Counselors' Perceptions of Their Training Regarding School-Age Children's Mental Health Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primiano, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    A scarcity of research exists concerning professional school counselors' perceptions of their training regarding recognizing and addressing the mental health issues of children and adolescents in the elementary, middle, and high school setting. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of professional school counselors regarding…

  15. Health Assessment of School Children II -- Screening Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisner, Victor; Oglesby, Allan

    1971-01-01

    The article concludes that adequate screening, and the use of expensive diagnostic procedures (such as medical referral) only for children who have failed a screening test, will result in the most effective use of school health time and funds. (Author)

  16. Impedance and Otoscopy Screening of Multiply Handicapped Children in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruns, Janet M.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    In order to examine the effectiveness of impedance and otoscopic screening in the determination of middle ear abnormalities, 79 physically handicapped, mentally retarded school children (mean age 8 years) were examined. (Author/PHR)

  17. Chronic Respiratory Diseases of School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGovern, John P.

    1976-01-01

    The author examines the problems of chronic respiratory disease in school-age children from a medical viewpoint, including recognition and diagnosis, commonly encountered diseases, their effect on participation in physical exercise, emotional factors, medication, and emergency care. (MB)

  18. Helping Children of Alcoholic Parents: An Elementary School Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Ruth B.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes a program in the Somerville, Massachusetts, elementary schools, designed to help children cope with the emotional distress of family alcoholism and to prevent them from abusing alcohol in adolescence or adulthood. Program structure and results are discussed. (JAC)

  19. The Neurological Examination of Children with School Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard D.; McNamara, John J.

    1984-01-01

    The use of neurological examinations as a method of evaluating learning and behavior problems in students is a controversial issue in the medical field. Various aspects of the examination and its relevance to children with school problems are explored. (DF)

  20. Provisional Regulations on Schooling for Migrant Children and Juveniles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinese Education and Society, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses 19 articles under the Provisional Regulations on Schooling for Migrant Children and Juveniles which were issued by the State Education Commission and the Ministry of Public Security of the People's Republic of China on March 2, 1988.

  1. Making a Difference for Overweight Children: The School Nurse Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosca, Nancy W.

    2005-01-01

    This manual discusses the school nurse's role in prevention and management of overweight children from an individual student perspective and, perhaps more important, from a system perspective. Manual includes the BMI (Body Mass Index) Wheel.

  2. Who's in charge of children's environmental health at school?

    PubMed

    Paulson, Jerome; Barnett, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Children spend many hours each week in and around school buildings. Their short- and long-term health outcomes and ability to learn are affected by numerous environmental factors related to the school buildings, the school grounds, the school transportation system, and the use of various products and materials in and around the school. Many school buildings are old, and they-and even newer buildings-can contain multiple environmental health hazards. While some districts self-report they have environmental health policies in place, no independent verification of these policies or their quality exists. Teachers and other staff, but not children who are more vulnerable to hazards than adults, are afforded some protections from hazards by Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations, by their employment contracts, or through adult occupational health services. Major environmental problems include: indoor air quality, lighting, pests and pesticides, heavy metals and chemical management issues, renovation of occupied buildings, noise, and cleaning processes and products. No agency at the federal or state levels is charged with ensuring children's health and safety in and around school buildings. No systematic means exists for collecting data about exposures which occur in the school setting. Recommendations are made for dealing with issues of data collection, federal actions, state and local actions, and for building the capacity of the Environmental Protection Agency and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-designated and funded Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units (PEHSU) in responding to and evaluating risks to children's environmental health in schools.

  3. [School inclusion of autistic children in adapted classes].

    PubMed

    Nacéra, Hubert; Sarot, Adeline

    2015-01-01

    A study was carried out into the subjective experience of the main people concerned by the schooling of autistic children in an inclusion classroom: the children, the parents and the teaching professionals. It highlights the need to take into account the transferential dimension of the pedagogical relationships. It also offers interesting perspectives with regard to clinical applications concerning the role of the school psychologist in supporting the professionals as well as the families.

  4. Teaching All of God's Children: Attitudes of Catholic School Principals towards Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huppe, Maureen A.

    2010-01-01

    Nationally, a significant number of children with disabilities attend Catholic schools across the country. The National Center for Educational Statistics shows that during the 2001-2002 school year, 2.2% of students attending parochial, private and diocesan schools were placed into special education programs (U.S., 2001). Although Catholic schools…

  5. Caregivers' moral narratives of their African American children's out-of-school suspensions: implications for effective family-school collaborations.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Priscilla A; Haight, Wendy

    2013-07-01

    In this qualitative study, the authors examined the culturally nuanced meanings of out-of-school suspensions for 30 lower income caregivers of African American children suspended from school. Caregivers were invited to describe their experiences of their children's suspensions during in-depth, individual, audiotaped interviews. Caregivers generally valued their children's school success, recognized when their children had misbehaved, and supported educators' imposition of appropriate consequences. Out-of-school suspensions, however, were rarely viewed as appropriate consequences. On the contrary, caregivers produced emotionally laden moral narratives that generally characterized their children's suspensions as unjust; harmful to children; negligent in helping children with underlying problems such as bullying; undermining parents' racial socialization; and, in general, racially problematic. Suspensions also contributed to some families' withdrawal from participation in their schools. Understanding how caregivers experience children's out-of-school suspensions provides important clues to how families and schools can work together to effectively reduce racial disparities in out-of-school suspensions.

  6. Sleep clinical record: what differences in school and preschool children?

    PubMed Central

    Shafiek, Hanaa; Evangelisti, Melania; Rabasco, Jole; Cecili, Manuela; Montesano, Marilisa; Barreto, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The sleep clinical record (SCR) may be a valid method for detecting children with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). This study aimed to evaluate whether there were differences in SCR depending on age and to identify the possible risk factors for OSA development. We enrolled children with sleep disordered breathing between 2013 and 2015, and divided them according to age into preschool- and school-age groups. All patients underwent SCR and polysomnography. OSA was detected in 81.1% and 83.6% of preschool- and school-age groups, respectively. Obesity, malocclusions, nasal septal deviation and inferior turbinate hypertrophy were significantly more prevalent in school-age children (p<0.05); however, only tonsillar hypertrophy had significant hazard ratio (2.3) for OSA development. Saddle nose, nasal hypotonia, oral breathing and tonsillar hypertrophy were significantly more prevalent for development of OSA in preschoolers (p<0.03). The SCR score was significantly higher among preschool children than in school-age children (8.4±2.22 versus 7.9±2.6; p=0.044). Further, SCR score >6.5 had a sensitivity of 74% in predicting OSA in preschool children with positive predictive value of 86% (p=0.0001). Our study confirms the validity of the SCR as a screening tool for patient candidates for a PSG study for suspected OSA, in both school and preschool children. PMID:27730168

  7. Overweight and school performance among primary school children: the PIAMA birth cohort study.

    PubMed

    Veldwijk, Jorien; Fries, Marieke C E; Bemelmans, Wanda J E; Haveman-Nies, Annemien; Smit, Henriëtte A; Koppelman, Gerard H; Wijga, Alet H

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association between overweight and school performance among primary school children prospectively and including a broad range of potential confounding factors. In addition it was investigated what factors mediate this association. For this purpose, data of 2,159 12-year-old children who participated in the Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy (PIAMA) birth cohort study were used. Two indicators of school performance were parental reported when children were 12 years of age and included (i): the score on a standardized achievement test that Dutch children have to complete at the end of their primary education (Cito)-test and (ii): the teacher's advice regarding a child's potential performance level in secondary education. Children's height and weight were measured by a trained research assistant at the age of 8 and by their parents at the age of 12. Overweight was defined using age and gender specific cut-off points. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to assess the association between overweight and school performance. Besides, both confounder and mediation analyses were conducted. Results showed lower Cito-test scores and lower teacher's school-level advice among overweight children. These associations were no longer significant when adjusting for parental educational level, skipping breakfast, and screen time. This study found no independent association between overweight and school performance among primary school children. Results showed strong confounding by parental educational level.

  8. "Not Girly, Not Sexy, Not Glamorous": Primary School Girls' and Parents' Constructions of Science Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Louise; DeWitt, Jennifer; Osborne, Jonathan; Dillon, Justin; Willis, Beatrice; Wong, Billy

    2013-01-01

    Internationally, there is widespread concern about the need to increase participation in the sciences (particularly the physical sciences), especially among girls/women. This paper draws on data from a five-year, longitudinal study of 10-14-year-old children's science aspirations and career choice to explore the reasons why, even from a young age,…

  9. Student Civic Participation in School: What Makes a Difference in Ireland?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilleece, Lorraine; Cosgrove, Jude

    2012-01-01

    Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child provides for the views of the child to be given due weight in accordance with the child's age and maturity. Legislation in Ireland recognizes the rights of children to have a voice in educational matters. Based on a sample of 2838 14-year-olds in Ireland and using questionnaire…

  10. The Effect of Early Childhood Developmental Program Attendance on Future School Enrollment in Rural North India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazarika, Gautam; Viren, Vejoya

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of prior participation in early childhood developmental programs, considered endogenous, upon 7-18 years olds' school enrollment in rural North India. Analyses by age group of data from the World Bank's 1997-98 Survey of Living Conditions in Uttar Pradesh and Bihar reveal that 7-10 year olds, 11-14 year olds, and…

  11. Kicking the Habitus: Power, Culture and Pedagogy in the Secondary School Music Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Within a theoretical framework drawn from sociologists of education Bourdieu and Bernstein, this paper will examine some of the findings of an ethnographic case study conducted with a secondary school music teacher and one class of her pupils in Wales. This teacher attracted 25% of Year 10 (14-year-old) pupils to study music as an optional subject…

  12. Subclinical Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms, Cognitive Processes, School Achievement, and Intelligence-Achievement Relationship in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malakar, Partha; Basu, Jayanti

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether the general intelligence, cognitive processes, school achievement, and intelligence-achievement relationship of adolescents with subclinical levels of obsessive-compulsive symptoms differed from those of their normal counterparts. From an initial large pool of 14-year-old Bengali students in eighth…

  13. Kendall Demonstration Elementary School: The Special Opportunities Programs. Who It Serves and Why.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owner, Susan Zylstra

    1982-01-01

    The Special Opportunities Program (SOP) at the Kendall Demonstration Elementary School in Washington, DC, serves hearing impaired students (two to 14 years old) who have special learning problems on additional handicaps, including developmental disabilities. The SOP is also integrated with the regular program, which eases mainstreaming. (SEW)

  14. Young Ladies' Institutions: The Development of Secondary Schools for Girls in Scotland, 1833--c. 1870.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Lindy

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the development of middle class, public secondary Scottish schools for girls over 14 years old in the latter 1800s. States these institutions opened the door for the Scottish women's movement, allowing women to pursue public positions. Clarifies that the movement was still in its early stages by the late 1800s. (KDR)

  15. Developing Children's Language Learner Strategies at Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirsch, Claudine

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the strategy repertoires and strategy development of six English children who learned foreign languages at primary school. My study differs from mainstream research, in that it focuses on young children and on the development of their strategies, draws on sociocultural theory and uses ethnographic methods. My findings show…

  16. Children's Tendency to Defend Victims of School Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, James R.; Smith-Adcock, Sondra

    2016-01-01

    Defenders, or children who help victims, are studied less often than children who bully or are victims of bullying. In this study, the authors examined middle schools students' perceived normative pressure from significant others to help victims. Findings suggest that normative pressure from best friends mediated gender and defending, and the…

  17. An Investigation of School Violence through Turkish Children's Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurtal, Filiz; Artut, Kazim

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates Turkish children's perception of violence in school as represented through drawings and narratives. In all, 66 students (12 to 13 years old) from the middle socioeconomic class participated. To elicit children's perception of violence, they were asked to draw a picture of a violent incident they had heard, experienced, or…

  18. Who Chooses Non-Public Schools for Their Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Philip Q.; Kayaardi, Nihan

    2004-01-01

    Using the pooled 1998-2000 GSS data, this study examines what kinds of parents tend to select non-public schools for their children, a question that is fundamental but lacks direct, adequate answers in the literature. The results of logistic regression analysis show that religion, socio-economic status, age, nativity, number of children and region…

  19. Exploratory Talk, Argumentation and Reasoning in Mexican Primary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojas-Drummond, Sylvia; Zapata, Margarita Peon

    2004-01-01

    The study analyses the effects of training primary school children in the use of a linguistic tool called "Exploratory Talk" (ET) on their capacity for argumentation. ET allows for reasoned confrontation and negotiation of points of view, making the reasoning visible in the talk. Eighty-eight Mexican children from the 5th and 6th grades…

  20. Pre-School Children's Agency in Learning for Sustainable Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caiman, Cecilia; Lundegård, Iann

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in pre-school children's meaning-making and learning in education for sustainability. Young children should be recognized as "agents for change" and active participants in their own day-to-day practices. Such issues are thoroughly discussed in the early childhood education for…

  1. School Experiences of the Children of Lesbian and Gay Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Vivien; Gregory, Robin

    2001-01-01

    Drew on parent questionnaires, child interviews, and focus groups to investigate school incidents experienced by children of lesbian and gay parents and determine children's feelings of discrimination. Found that youngest students were frustrated by peers' lack of understanding about their families. Teasing/bullying experiences were common between…

  2. African American Father Involvement and Preschool Children's School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downer, Jason T.; Mendez, Julia L.

    2005-01-01

    A developmental ecological model was used to identify child attributes, father characteristics, and familial factors associated with multidimensional father involvement with preschool children enrolled in Head Start. The relations between father involvement and children's school readiness were also investigated. Eighty-five African American…

  3. School Ecology and the Learning of Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lui, Ping

    2002-01-01

    One Chinese preschool uses the school ecology to address students' culture, prior knowledge, and social experience, thus enhancing learning. The ecology focuses on a theme of love and reflects children's life experiences and the local culture. The program develops all children's potential. It coordinates drawing, speaking, and thinking, prepares…

  4. Using a Single Topic Film with Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Ralph

    1975-01-01

    Studied whether or not viewing different versions of a silent, single concept film would affect the responses of elementary school children to tests related to the film. No significant correlations were found between pretest and posttest scores and 19 independent variables related to the children. (MLH)

  5. Mexican Immigrant Children in American Schools: A Brief Sketch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saragoza, Alex M.

    This essay outlines Mexican immigration to the United States, with particular reference to Mexican children and the implications for schooling. The ability of Mexican immigrants to obtain jobs and the nature of the work itself has changed drastically for the worse in recent years. Children of Mexican origin differ in numerous ways in part because…

  6. School & Library Service to Children: Crisis in the Southeast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Diana, Comp.

    This report presents papers, transcripts of speeches and group discussions, and other documents from a June 1982 conference on school and library services to children in the southeastern United States. The major presentations include: (1) a keynote address by Sara W. Hodgkins entitled "Our Children, Our Future"; (2) the transcript of an…

  7. Expository Language Skills of Young School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerveld, Marleen F.; Moran, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This research investigated the expository language skills of young school-age children with the ultimate aim of obtaining normative data for clinical practice. Specifically, this study examined (a) the level of expository language performance of 6- and 7-year-old children with typical development and (b) age-related differences between…

  8. Primary School Children's Self-Efficacy for Music Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Laura; Williamon, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    The Self-Efficacy for Musical Learning questionnaire was adapted and tested with 404 primary school children, producing a robust Cronbach alpha (0.87) and confirming a single underlying factor through exploratory factor analysis. Test-retest scores showed the measure's stability over a 9-month period. Data were collected on children's prior music…

  9. Active Play: Exploring the Influences on Children's School Playground Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyndman, Brendon; Benson, Amanda; Telford, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Because children spend so much of their time in schools, their playgrounds offer a good setting for promoting active play in young lives. Teachers, instead of considering active play a taxing demand on their busy day, have begun to develop an informal curriculum for it. The authors review the research on children's active play and explores its…

  10. ELEMENTARY SUMMER SCHOOLING OF MIGRANT CHILDREN. SOCIAL STRUCTURE AND IGNORANCE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FASICK, FRANK; MARCSON, SIMON

    TWO BASIC PROGRAMS TO PROVIDE UNDERPRIVILEGED CHILDREN GENERALLY, AND MIGRANT CHILDREN IN PARTICULAR, WITH THE EDUCATION THEY NEED TO IMPROVE THEIR SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC POSITION ARE PRESENTED. THE FIRST PROGRAM IS BASED UPON THE FRAMEWORK OF THE EXISTING SYSTEM, AND WOULD EXPAND THE USE OF KINDERGARTEN AND NURSERY SCHOOLS, IMPROVE PRIMARY AND…

  11. Say the Word Islam: School Counselors and Muslim Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleem, Daa'iyah; Rasheed, Sakinah

    2010-01-01

    Two Muslim women who hold Ph.D.'s, a clinical and developmental psychologist and a teacher educator speak personally and professionally about important information school counselors need to know about Islam and providing services to Muslim children. First, the authors draw from personal experiences in parenting Muslim children who have come of age…

  12. Emergent Technological Literacy: What Do Children Bring to School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawson, W. B.

    2013-01-01

    There has been very little research into children's technological practice in early childhood settings. This article describes four typical examples of the technological activity that occurs on a daily basis in New Zealand early childhood settings. It is suggested that children come to compulsory schooling with well-developed technological…

  13. Developing Primary School Children's Understanding of Energy Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruger, Colin; Summers, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Studies 34 elementary school children's understanding of five aspects of energy waste and the ways in which these conceptions develop following teaching. Concludes that the children had good prior awareness of some behaviors that save energy, but their reasons for thinking this were based largely on everyday intuitive ideas that involved…

  14. Self-Control in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duckworth, Angela L.; Gendler, Tamar Szabó; Gross, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Conflicts between immediately rewarding activities and more enduringly valued goals abound in the lives of school-age children. Such conflicts call upon children to exercise self-control, a competence that depends in part on the mastery of metacognitive, prospective strategies. The "process model of self-control" organizes these…

  15. Education, Schooling, and Children's Rights: The Complexity of Homeschooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunzman, Robert

    2012-01-01

    By blurring the distinction between formal school and education writ large, homeschooling both highlights and complicates the tensions among the interests of parents, children, and the state. In this essay, Robert Kunzman argues for a modest version of children's educational rights, at least in a legal sense that the state has the duty and…

  16. Too Cool for School?: Gifted Children and Homeschooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winstanley, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Homeschooling can be a last resort for frustrated families where gifted children are not having their complex needs met through mainstream schooling. Unlike many other groups of homeschoolers, parents of highly able children take this option for pragmatic reasons rather than as a kind of moral stance. This article explores some of the ways that…

  17. Parental Involvement and Children's School Achievement: Evidence for Mediating Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Maria A.; Theule, Jennifer; Ryan, Bruce A.; Adams, Gerald R.; Keating, Leo

    2009-01-01

    This study used path analytic techniques and an ecological framework to examine the association between children's perceptions of their parents' educational involvement, children's personal characteristics, and their school achievement. Fathers' academic pressure was predictive of lower achievement, whereas mothers' encouragement and support…

  18. Assessment of School-Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paynter, Jessica M.

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of school children are diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). These children may be referred for assessments for a variety of reasons, including to assess for intellectual impairments, eligibility for support, or to monitor progress. Characteristics of ASD, such as social communication difficulties, as well as common…

  19. Children's Diurnal Cortisol Activity during the First Year of School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Pei-Jung; Lamb, Michael E.; Kappler, Gregor; Ahnert, Lieselotte

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined 4- to 5-year-old British children's diurnal cortisol activity during their first year of school. The children's cortisol was measured before enrollment (baseline), upon enrollment, and both 3 and 6 months after enrollment. On each day, cortisol was sampled four times, providing information about the diurnal amount of…

  20. School-Age Children in CCDBG: 2012 Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Hannah; Reeves, Rhiannon

    2014-01-01

    The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) is the primary funding source for federal child care subsidies to low-income working families, as well as improving child care quality. CCDBG provides child care assistance to children from birth to age 13. This fact sheet highlights key information about school-age children and CCDBG. This…

  1. Teaching Humility in First-Grade Christian School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yonker, Julie E.; Wielard, Cassie J.; Vos, Carolyn L.; Tudder, Ashley M.

    2017-01-01

    Four classes of first-grade children at a Christian school took pre- and post-tests measuring humility. Two intervention classes had devotional lessons on humility and two comparison classes did not. For one week, devotional lessons featured humility-related children's literature, cognitively appropriate discussions, writing about humility, and…

  2. I Compagni: Understanding Children's Transition from Preschool to Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsaro, William A.; Molinari, Luisa

    2006-01-01

    What happens when children in creative, Reggio-like preschools go to a more traditional elementary school? In this book, William Corsaro and his Italian coauthor, Luisa Molinari, tell a complete and important story about the lives of children as they grow from young preschoolers to preadolescents in Modena, Italy. The authors both explore and…

  3. Executive Function in Very Preterm Children at Early School Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aarnoudse-Moens, Cornelieke S. H.; Smidts, Diana P.; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; Weisglas-Kuperus, Nynke

    2009-01-01

    We examined whether very preterm ([less than or equal to] 30 weeks gestation) children at early school age have impairments in executive function (EF) independent of IQ and processing speed, and whether demographic and neonatal risk factors were associated with EF impairments. A consecutive sample of 50 children (27 boys and 23 girls) born very…

  4. Kinematic Measures of Imitation Fidelity in Primary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Justin H. G.; Casey, Jackie M.; Braadbaart, Lieke; Culmer, Peter R.; Mon-Williams, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We sought to develop a method for measuring imitation accuracy objectively in primary school children. Children imitated a model drawing shapes on the same computer-tablet interface they saw used in video clips, allowing kinematics of model and observers' actions to be directly compared. Imitation accuracy was reported as a correlation reflecting…

  5. Epidemiological Study of Mental Health Problems among Handicapped School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahadur Singh, Tej

    1988-01-01

    Indian teachers rating the prevalence of psychiatric problems in 79 school children with visual handicaps, 91 with hearing handicaps, and 105 nonhandicapped identified a higher prevalence than did psychiatrists. Although similar percentages of children in the 3 groups were diagnosed as having psychiatric problems, the types of problems experienced…

  6. Prioritising Student Voice: "Tween" Children's Perspectives on School Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargeant, Jonathon

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study of the perspectives of Australian, English and New Zealand "tweens" in response to one question, "what makes people muck up at school?" Arguing for the increased prioritisation of children's voices in educational planning and provision, this paper provides, in children's own words,…

  7. Head Injuries in School-Age Children Who Play Golf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Krebs, Madelyn; Eads, Julia K.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. We conducted a prospective study, which examined injury characteristics and outcomes of school-age children of 5.0-15.0 years (N = 10) who were admitted to hospital for a TBI. This study evaluated the role of age, gender, the Glasgow Coma Scale, mechanisms and…

  8. Children with Asthma: Assessment and Treatment in School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Melissa A.; Kehle, Thomas J.; Grigerick, Sarah E.; Loftus, Susan; Nicholson, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease of the airways. It affects approximately 12% of American children, and it appears that that incidence is increasing. Asthma in children negatively influences school-based outcomes such as absenteeism and friendship formation. Potential triggers of asthma include environmental allergens, exercise, weather, and emotional…

  9. Anti-Social Behaviour: Children, Schools and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Dan

    2007-01-01

    Under Prime Minister Tony Blair's New Labour government, increased criminalisation of previously non-criminal behaviour, anti-social behaviour and greater accountability of children and parents for their behaviour were evident. The article provides an overview of anti-social behaviour legislation and the implications for children, schools and…

  10. A SCHOOL TRANSFER RECORD SYSTEM FOR FARM MIGRANT CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HANEY, GEORGE E.

    THE LACK OF SCHOOL TRANSFER RECORDS FOR THE CHILDREN OF MIGRANT FARMWORKERS IS A MAJOR PROBLEM IN PROVIDING CONTINUITY IN THE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM OF THESE YOUNGSTERS. IN AN ATTEMPT TO COORDINATE THE TRANSFER OF MIGRANT FARM CHILDREN, THIS BULLETIN OF PRACTICAL SUGGESTIONS AND SAMPLE FORMS HAS BEEN PREPARED. THE SUGGESTED FORMS FOR USE WITH MIGRANT…

  11. Civic and Patriotic Education of Pre-School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokeyeva, Ekaterina V.; Andreeva, Irina N.

    2016-01-01

    The urgency of the current research devoted to civic and patriotic education of pre-school children is determined by the contradiction between the necessity of civic-patriotic education of children in the current context, their readiness to defend their Motherland and the lack of the development of this issue both in pedagogical theory and…

  12. New York City's Children First: Lessons in School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelleher, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    Under Mayor Michael Bloomberg, New York City's education system embarked on a massive change effort, known as Children First, that produced significant results: new and better school options for families, more college-ready graduates, and renewed public confidence in New York City's schools. New York City's reform effort has also produced…

  13. Management of Chronic Infectious Diseases in School Children. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    This manual contains current guidelines for Illinois school personnel to follow when working with children who have infectious diseases. The first chapter focuses on school district development of policies and procedures and program implementation. The next chapter provides information on characteristics, mode of transmission, prevention, and…

  14. Making Children's Voices Visible: The School Setting Interview (SSI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmingsson, Helena; Penman, Merrolee

    2010-01-01

    Children and young people with disabilities educated in their local school may need services to get equal access to the curriculum. To ensure that any educationally-relevant services achieve the best outcomes, the students' own voices and perspectives should also be included. This paper introduces the School Setting Interview (SSI), an…

  15. School Psychologists Working with Children Affected by Abuse and Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dezen, Kristin A.; Gurl, Aaron; Ping, Jenn

    2010-01-01

    School psychologists encounter children regularly who have been affected by abuse and neglect. Maltreatment adversely affects the mental health status and academic achievement of youth, thereby making the topic an area of concern for school psychologists. More recently, child protection laws have been expanded to include mandatory child abuse…

  16. THE EFFECT OF WINDOWLESS CLASSROOMS ON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LARSON, C. THEODORE; AND OTHERS

    THIS CASE STUDY WAS MADE TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTS OF NONFENESTRATED CLASSROOMS ON CHILDREN'S LEARNING ACHIEVEMENT. USING GRADES K-3, OBSERVATIONS WERE MADE IN TWO SCHOOLS OF SIMILAR CONSTRUCTION AND DEMOGRAPHY. THE STUDY WAS MADE IN THREE SETTINGS--A YEAR IN EXISTING FENESTRATED CLASSROOMS, A YEAR WITH ALL WINDOWS REMOVED IN THE TEST SCHOOL AND…

  17. Change and Adaptation: Children and Curriculum in International Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akram, Christine

    1995-01-01

    An international school teacher describes the stresses besetting children who move frequently from country to country. She suggests ways for teachers to combat relocation's ill effects, while helping kids enjoy international school life. Social-studies curricula can feature "community" themes or timelines highlighting important events in…

  18. Obesity status trajectory groups among elementary school children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about patterns in the transition from healthy weight to overweight or obesity during the elementary school years. This study examined whether there were distinct body mass index (BMI) trajectory groups among elementary school children, and predictors of trajectory group membership. T...

  19. Developing School Provision for Children with Dyspraxia. A Practical Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Nichola, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    With a much greater awareness in schools of conditions like dyslexia, dyspraxia and autism, and the effects they have in the context of the educational curriculum, schools are becoming better placed to help children access a curriculum that takes account of the diverse needs of its learners. It has been predicted that as people move through the…

  20. Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children and the School Nurse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Lisa Goldblatt; Starck, Maureen; Potenza, Jane; Kenney, Patricia A.; Sheetz, Anne H.

    2012-01-01

    As trusted health professionals in the school setting, school nurses are well positioned to identify students who may be victims of commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC). However, until recently this issue has been clouded by lack of awareness, stigma, and/or denial. Since nationally the average age of entry for girls into the…

  1. Promoting Smooth School Transitions for Children in Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laviolette, Ghyslyn T.

    2011-01-01

    Children in foster care move two times per year on average. School records are not always transferred in a timely manner, which leads to a lack of services. Schools often are not aware of the legal issues surrounding foster care, such as who has legal rights to sign field trip permission slips or consent for educational evaluations. This study led…

  2. A Study of Identities of Asian Origin Primary School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghuman, Paul A. S.

    1997-01-01

    Used qualitative approach to examine attitudes of British-born Asian primary school children regarding their cultural and personal identities. Found that the majority could not read or write in their mother-tongue, had no knowledge of their religion, and experienced racism at school and in the neighborhood. Although they described themselves as…

  3. Sleep Disorders in Children: Collaboration for School-Based Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everhart, D. Erik

    2011-01-01

    The effects of sleep disturbance on children are wide ranging and include alterations in behavior, mood, cognition, and academic performance. Screening and intervention for pediatric sleep disorders within the schools are not widely implemented, and the concept of integrating school personnel into the multidisciplinary sleep team has yet to be…

  4. Identity and Culture Shock: Aboriginal Children and Schooling in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Gisela; Eckermann, Anne-Katrin

    1996-01-01

    Observes the activities and characteristics of Aboriginal children in an Aboriginal school and compares these to the culture shock and alienation experienced when they transfer to a mainstream school. Identifies five major stressors of culture shock as mechanical differences, communication, attitudes and beliefs, customs, and isolation. (MJP)

  5. The Realities of Middle School for Mexican Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollin, Gail G.

    2003-01-01

    Presents information about the middle school educational system in Mexico. Considers the implications for better meeting the needs of Mexican children in U.S. schools. Describes experiences and knowledge gained while the author taught a graduate workshop to American teachers in Guanajuato, Mexico. Places the information gained in the context of…

  6. The Relational Judgments of Pre-School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Selma; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Report summarizes the activities of a team of researchers in seven pre-school centers on Long Island, between October 1967 and April 1968. Aim of the project was to find a normative base for the construction of a new curriculum for pre-school children, in particular for those labeled disadvantaged.'' (Authors/CB)

  7. Pediatric-Based Assessment: Children with School Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, Paul H.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Results of a study concerning 21 children undergoing pediatric-based assessment indicate that the majority of recommendations evolving from the combined, interdisciplinary assessment are implemented and approved by parents and school personnel. Study results support pediatric-based assessments for school problems and demonstrate the advantages of…

  8. School Bus Safety: Safe Passage for America's Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This document outlines measures to enhance the safe transportation of children to and from school. It reports that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is dedicated to the highest standards of safety in school buses, and it outlines some of the NHTSA guidelines, such as rollover protection, body-joint strength, seat belts,…

  9. Handicapped Children in Schools: Administrators and the Courts. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Robert C.; Sayler, Mary R.

    School principals perform a crucial role in discharging a school system's legal obligations toward the handicapped. Since principals are unable to supply money damages, they are rarely primary targets of lawsuits involving handicapped children, but their role in representing Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) to parents is critical. Thus,…

  10. Children's Rights, School Exclusion and Alternative Educational Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCluskey, Gillean; Riddell, Sheila; Weedon, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines findings from a recent study in Wales of school exclusion and alternative educational provision. Many, but not all, children in alternative provision have been excluded from school. The most recent statistics reveal that nearly 90% of pupils in alternative provision have special educational needs, nearly 70% are entitled to…

  11. Children's Homes and School Exclusion: Redefining the Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Isabelle

    Focusing on the way marginalization or "exclusion" from school is experienced by children in English foster/residential care and the professionals working with them, this book shows how a reflective understanding of the complex school exclusion process can be applied to both child welfare practice and policy. By drawing on the personal…

  12. Obesity and Other Predictors of Absenteeism in Philadelphia School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rappaport, Elizabeth B.; Daskalakis, Constantine; Andrel, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    Background: Limited data indicate that obese children are absent from school more than their normal-weight peers. We analyzed administrative data from a large urban school district to investigate the association of obesity and student sociodemographic characteristics with absenteeism. Methods: We analyzed 291,040 records, representing 165,056…

  13. The Mismatch between Children's Health Needs and School Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knauer, Heather; Baker, Dian L.; Hebbeler, Kathleen; Davis-Alldritt, Linda

    2015-01-01

    There are increasing numbers of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) who require various levels of care each school day. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of public schools in supporting CSHCN through in-depth key informant interviews. For this qualitative study, the authors interviewed 17 key informants to identify key…

  14. Background Factors Predicting Teacher Ratings of Children's School Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, M. Kaye

    This study examined background factors in children that influence teachers' ratings on the Classroom Adjustment Rating Scale (CARS). Sixteen classrooms in five schools were selected to include a range of socio-economic and cultural groupings from Inner London, England Primary Schools. Teachers used the CARS and an additional short scale of overall…

  15. Excess weight gain in elementary school-aged Hispanic children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current data was collected as part of a 6-year longitudinal study in which elementary schools from a southeast Texas school district were provided with resources to encourage children to make healthier choices. The objective of the current study was to evaluate children’s change in body mass ind...

  16. Schooling Children Living in Poverty: Perspectives on Social Justice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynes, Bill; Sarbit, Gayl

    2000-01-01

    A case study of the efforts at Mount Pleasant School in Vancouver to create a more equitable educational experience for children of poverty, illustrates the potential of schooling to contribute positively to social justice. Successful conditions included: availability of funding, clarity of focus, facilitation of leadership, and openness to…

  17. Diverse Family Types and Out-Of-School Learning Time of Young School Age Children

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Hiromi

    2010-01-01

    =Sources of differentials in out-of-school learning time between children in first marriage biological parent families and children in six nontraditional family types are identified. Analyses of time diaries reveal that children in four of the six nontraditional family types spend fewer minutes learning than do children in first marriage biological parent families. In all four cases, however, the differentials are explained by the presence of siblings age 18+, lower levels of family income, or younger maternal age. PMID:21532970

  18. Women’s decision-making autonomy and children’s schooling in rural Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Luciana; Agadjanian, Victor

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Women’s decision-making autonomy in developing settings has been shown to improve child survival and health outcomes. However, little research has addressed possible connections between women’s autonomy and children’s schooling. OBJECTIVE To examine the relationship between rural women’s decision-making autonomy and enrollment status of primary school-age children living in their households and how this relationship differs by child’s gender. METHODS The analysis uses data from a 2009 survey of rural households in four districts of Gaza province in southern Mozambique. Multilevel logistic models predict the probability of being in school for children between 6 and 14 years old. RESULTS The results show a positive association of women’s decision-making autonomy with the probability of being enrolled in primary school for daughters, but not for sons. The effect of women’s autonomy is net of other women’s characteristics typically associated with enrollment and does not mediate the effects of those characteristics. CONCLUSIONS Based on the results, we argue that women with higher levels of decision-making autonomy may have a stronger preference for daughters’ schooling and may have a greater say in making and implementing decisions regarding daughters’ education, compared to women with lower autonomy levels. Results also illustrate a need for considering a broader set of autonomy-related characteristics when examining the effects of women’s status on children’s educational outcomes. PMID:26491400

  19. The Mismatch Between Children's Health Needs and School Resources.

    PubMed

    Knauer, Heather; Baker, Dian L; Hebbeler, Kathleen; Davis-Alldritt, Linda

    2015-10-01

    There are increasing numbers of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) who require various levels of care each school day. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of public schools in supporting CSHCN through in-depth key informant interviews. For this qualitative study, the authors interviewed 17 key informants to identify key themes, provide recommendations, and generate hypotheses for further statewide survey of school nurse services. Key informants identified successful strategies and challenges that public schools face in meeting the needs of all CSHCN. Although schools are well intentioned, there is wide variation in the ability of schools to meet the needs of CSHCN. Increased funding, monitoring of school health services, integration of services, and interagency collaboration are strategies that could improve the delivery of health services to CSHCN in schools.

  20. The Reliability and Validity of Scores from the Children's Version of the Perception of Success Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liukkonen, Jarmo; Leskinen, Esko

    1999-01-01

    Analyzed the reliability and validity of scores of 557 14-year-old Finnish male soccer players on the children's version of the Perception of Success Questionnaire (G. Roberts and others, 1998). Internal consistency coefficients for the two subscales' scores were high, and scores on both scales had strong construct validity. (LSD)

  1. Language Training for Trainable Mentally Retarded Children: ITPA, Peabody, and Distar Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiss, Robert H.; Proger, Barton B.

    To determine the most effective language training activities for trainable mentally retarded (TMR) children, the variables of degree of previous language training, IQ, Peabody language treatment program versus Distar language treatment program, pretest versus posttest, and sex were examined with 122 TMR Ss (7 to 14 years old). Results of the…

  2. Teaching the Holocaust: The Relevance of Children's Perceptions of Jewish Culture and Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Geoffrey

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that the Jewish Holocaust is now part of the history curriculum for 11- to 14-year-old students in England and Wales. Argues that teachers need to know how children in this age group perceive culture and identity. Reports on a study of 72 students and discusses the policy implications of the findings. (CFR)

  3. School-related adjustment in children and adolescents with CHD.

    PubMed

    Im, Yu-Mi; Lee, Sunhee; Yun, Tae-Jin; Choi, Jae Young

    2017-03-20

    Advancements in medical and surgical treatment have increased the life expectancy of patients with CHD. Many patients with CHD, however, struggle with the medical, psychosocial, and behavioural challenges as they transition from childhood to adulthood. Specifically, the environmental and lifestyle challenges in school are very important factors that affect children and adolescents with CHD. This study aimed to evaluate school-related adjustments depending on school level and disclosure of disease in children and adolescents with CHD. This was a descriptive and exploratory study with 205 children and adolescents, aged 7-18 years, who were recruited from two congenital heart clinics from 5 January to 27 February, 2015. Data were analysed using the Student's t-test, analysis of variance, and a univariate general linear model. School-related adjustment scores were significantly different according to school level and disclosure of disease (p<0.001) when age, religion, experience being bullied, and parents' educational levels were assigned as covariates. The school-related adjustment score of patients who did not disclose their disease dropped significantly in high school. This indicated that it is important for healthcare providers to plan developmentally appropriate educational transition programmes for middle-school students with CHD in order for students to prepare themselves before entering high school.

  4. Anthropometric data peculiarities in early school children population.

    PubMed

    Jorjoliani, L; Karseladze, R; Vekua, M; Chkhartishvili, E; Bigvava, T

    2011-01-01

    The anthropometric data were studied in early school aged (6-7 years old) children and the degree of harmonization during physical development was evaluated. Representative population of 400 otherwise healthy early school aged children was included in study group. Study period covered the end of school year. In the selected under observation focused population the level of individual anthropometric data was determined in percentile intervals according its position. Anthropometric data assessments by using percentile method it was revealed in early school aged (6-7 years of old children) excess in body height and weight in comparison with normal values. This phenomenon indicates the prevalence of acceleration and weight gain. Anthropometric data in boys were increased while comparing with physical development data in girls. This result difference has the tendency to statistically insignificant. Physical development harmonization values were studied in 200 children. Harmonized physical development revealed in 50 children (25%); disharmonized physical development I 50 children (15%), among them with I degree weight gain were 48 (24%), and with I degree weight deficit were 2 (1%). Markedly disharmonized development had 100 children (50%), among them with II degree weight gain were 98 (49%), and with II degree weight deficit were 2 (1%). According to the children's anthropometric data and assessment by physical development harmonization percentiles tables three groups of children were organized: main, risk group and the group with deviation in physical development. On the basis of resulted data the study of early school age children's physical development gives possibility for risk groups stratification, which in turn itself makes a strong basis for reasonable preventive measurements and stepwise monitoring implementation.

  5. How Children Adjust to School. With Sensitivity and Support, You Can Help Soothe Young Children's Transition from Home to School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Carla

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses how to transition young children from home to school. The author states that while it's not easy for working parents to place their infant or toddler in childcare, it is a healthy experience for children and their parents. Hopefully, as a parent brings the baby for a little longer stay each day, feelings of mutual trust and…

  6. The Right of Public School Employees to Send Their Children to Private Schools: The Demise of "Cook v. Hudson."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, T. Page

    1991-01-01

    The demise of "Cook v. Hudson" stems from its failure to accord proper value to public school employees' constitutional right to select private schooling for children. Unjustified school board attempts to terminate the employment of staff enrolling their children in private schools will not survive the "Pickering"…

  7. Head Injuries in School-Age Children Who Play Golf.

    PubMed

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Krebs, Madelyn; Eads, Julia K

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. We conducted a prospective study, which examined injury characteristics and outcomes of school-age children of 5.0-15.0 years (N = 10) who were admitted to hospital for a TBI. This study evaluated the role of age, gender, the Glasgow Coma Scale, mechanisms and severity of injury, and functional outcomes. Seventy percent of the children sustained a TBI from a fall. We also found that playing golf was associated with 40% of the TBIs, with three (30%) children being unrestrained passengers in a moving golf cart and another one (10%) was struck by a golf club. Injury awareness could have benefited or prevented most injuries, and school nurses are in the best position to provide preventative practice education. In golf-centric communities, prevention of golf-related injuries should include education within the schools.

  8. Accelerometry-Derived Physical Activity of First through Third Grade Children during the Segmented School Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Crimarco, Anthony; Brusseau, Timothy A.; Webster, Collin A.; Burns, Ryan D.; Hannon, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Schools should provide children 30 minutes/day of moderate-to-vigorous-physical-activity (MVPA). Determining school day segments that contribute to children's MVPA can inform school-based activity promotion. The purpose of this paper was to identify the proportion of children accumulating 30 minutes/day of school-based MVPA, and to…

  9. Towards Healthy Schools 2015: Progress on America's Environmental Health Crisis for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2013

    2013-01-01

    States compel children to attend school; in fact, 98% of all school-age children attend schools--irrespective of conditions. Yet the environmental conditions of decayed facilities or facilities close to hazards can damage children's health and ability to learn. At the same time, it is well documented that healthy school facilities can help…

  10. School Readiness among Low-Income, Latino Children Attending Family Childcare versus Centre-Based Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansari, Arya; Winsler, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Latino children often struggle in school. Early childhood education programmes are seen as critical for fostering children's school readiness. Latino families often choose family childcare (FCC) over centre-based childcare (CBC), yet little is known about the school readiness of Latino children attending FCC. We compared school readiness over the…

  11. REPORT OF THE 1964 SUMMER SCHOOL PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN OF MIGRANT WORKERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    REUF, WERNER H.; AND OTHERS

    AIMS OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN OF MIGRANT WORKERS WERE TO TEACH THE CHILDREN BASIC ACADEMIC SKILLS AND TO OFFER THEM HEALTH SERVICES WHICH THEY WOULD NOT OTHERWISE OBTAIN. DURING 1964, THE 9TH YEAR OF THE PROGRAM, 13 SCHOOLS ENROLLED 400 CHILDREN FROM 5 TO 14 YEARS OF AGE. CHILD CARE UNITS WERE LOCATED IN 10 SCHOOLS. SCHOOLS WERE…

  12. Chinese Children's Perceived School Satisfaction: The Role of Contextual and Intrapersonal Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hui, Eadaoin K. P.; Sun, Rachel C. F.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the contribution of school contextual factors and intrapersonal factors to school satisfaction among a sample of Hong Kong Chinese primary school children. A total of 760 children completed the School Satisfaction Subscale of the Multidimensional Life Satisfaction Scale for Children along with self-report measures of…

  13. Mothers' School-Related Identities and Possible Selves for Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Kyle; Dilworth-Bart, Janean

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we explored how mothers' school-related identities influence their current expectations of school identities for their children using a possible selves framework. Forty-seven mothers of preschool-aged children participated in semi-structured interviews about their school-related histories and children's school preparation.…

  14. Barriers to Participation and Retention: Engaging and Returning "Out of School" Children in the Gambia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Angela; Mbenga, Basiru; Camara, Alpha

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the phenomenon of out-of-school children in the Gambia through the perspectives of children and families. Using mixed methods, the study reports the extent of school participation. Interviews with urban and rural out-of-school children reveal their experiences and reasons for non-enrolment or leaving school. The study…

  15. Managing unwanted behaviour in pre-school children.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Theresa

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes a behaviour group, set up as a pilot project to empower parents and to promote their self-confidence in managing pre-school children's undesirable behaviour. Led by community nursery nurses (CNNs), the programme has already worked with six groups, each of six parents or carers and their children. Families are guided through coping strategies and learn management skills in changing undesirable behaviour problems in their pre-school children. Children between the ages of two to five years have been referred along with their parents to the group. Types of behaviours referred include: sleep problems, feeding/eating difficulties, sibling rivalry, temper tantrums, defiant anti-social behaviour and toilet/potty training. All these behaviours are prevalent among pre-school children, but are sometimes difficult for parents to manage. The evaluation of this pilot programme was based on pre-post-programme questionnaires and direct observation of parent-child interaction. Success of the behaviour group has indicated the need for such early preventative work to continue with parents and children. The children's services team, which includes health visitors and school health advisors, refers targeted families for immediate intervention, without families being on a long waiting list. Parents and carers who have difficulties coping with their child's undesirable behaviour can now access a service in their local clinic. Feedback from parents has been positive. Such a group is also beneficial in reducing the problem of less severe behavioural difficulties being referred to hard pressed and understaffed CAMHS teams.

  16. A survey of learning problems in black primary school children.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, J D; Jukes, C; Wilson, A; Xaba, D

    1981-03-28

    A survey of the prevalence and types of learning disorders among Black primary school children was undertaken on the East Rand. Class teachers were given a questionnaire and asked to identify the number of children in their class with learning problems and the number of those with specific disabilities such as poor eyesight or hearing, epilepsy, physical handicaps or mental retardation. There were 7516 children in the classes surveyed; 1692 (22,4%) of them were identified by their teachers as having learning problems, while 666 (8,7%) had a physical or mental handicap. The prevalence and present status of children with learning disability need to be defined before plans to improve their education can be established. Our data show that at present classes are large and the prevalence of children with learning problems is high. Improving teachers' skills and reducing the number of children per class might improve the education of children with learning problems.

  17. Preschool Age Children's Views about Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocyigit, Sezai

    2014-01-01

    Starting primary education is one of the most important changes that children encounter in early childhood. Moreover, especially within the last twenty years, as an outcome of the idea that children are active learners, listening to children's ideas about their learning, lives, and experiences has gained importance. In this sense, this study is…

  18. Family, Schools and Taiwanese Children's Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Chih-Lun

    2007-01-01

    Background: Educational reform is a major challenge facing schools in Taiwan. The new educational reform requires that every primary school must have parental involvement programmes in their school schedules, and to support these new programmes, there is a need for research to examine the extent and nature of parental involvement in primary…

  19. Foods in schools: Children with diabetes can make wise meal choices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Students, parents, and school staff often believe there are no healthful foods available in schools for children with diabetes. This paper explains modern school food environments and how children with diabetes can eat school foods. National School Lunch Program meals usually consist of an entree, t...

  20. Barriers to Care of Inner-City Children with Asthma: School Nurse Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbis, Shalini; Rammel, Jennifer; Huffman, Belinda; Taylor, Roberta

    2006-01-01

    School nurses spend considerable time caring for the needs of children with asthma and thus can offer valuable insights into barriers to asthma care within the school setting. Investigators conducted focus groups with school nurses in Dayton Public Schools to evaluate barriers to asthma care for children in an urban school system. The school…

  1. Leukemia in children: getting back to school-part 1.

    PubMed

    Wessler, Jacob M

    2015-03-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death by disease past infancy. In 2014, nearly 16,000 children and adolescents 0 to 19 years of age will be diagnosed with cancer in the United States. More than 80% of those children will survive at least 5 years after their diagnosis. Much of the increase in survival has been seen in children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Once cancer treatment ends, the real battle begins. Getting back to school helps cancer patients return to normal. Part 1 is a brief review of the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of ALL in children and adolescents with an introduction to Philadelphia chromosome positive ALL and is written in language that makes it ideal for use in teaching school personnel and other parents about ALL. Part 2 is a reflection of Abby Furco's transition to school after being diagnosed with this type of leukemia at 4 1/2 years of age. The accommodations and strategies employed for this student are likely to be useful and adaptable to assist other families and school communities as they work with children entering school with physical challenges.

  2. Hair and scalp mycobiota in school children in Nablus area.

    PubMed

    Ali-Shtayeh, M S; Salameh, A A; Abu-Ghdeib, S I; Jamous, R M

    2001-01-01

    Hair and scalp mycobiota of 1389 clinically normal children aged 6-12 years attending 12 schools in the Nablus District, Palestinian Authority, was assessed on three occasions over 8-month period (October 1998-May 1999) using the hair brush technique. One hundred and one fungal species belonging to 33 genera were recovered: 6 dermatophytes, 16 dermatophyte-like keratinophilic fungi, and 79 other keratinophilic fungal species. Species varied considerably in their frequency of occurrence and abundance based on their relative importance values (RIVs). The most frequent and abundant species were: Cladosporium cladosporioides, Cl. herbarum, Penicillium chrysogenum and Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Aphanoascus fulvescence and Chrysosporum sulfureum were the most frequent and abundant species of all dermatophytes and dermatophyte-like keratinophilic fungi recovered. The most frequent and abundant dermatophytes in different communities were M. canis in rural (RIV 0.87) and urban children (0.45), and Trichophyton violaceum (1.41) in refugee camp children. Chrysosporium species were the most frequent and abundant dermatophyte-like keratinophilic fungus in children from all localities followed by Aphanoascus fulvescence. Comparable results on the frequency and abundance of human hair and scalp mycobiota component fungi were obtained based on age group and sex of children. Higher number of species was recovered in spring months (73 species) than in autumn (57) and winter (44) months. Similar occurrence pattern was also noted for dermatophyte-like keratinophilic species and dermatophytes. Higher percentages of children with moderate (11-50) and heavy (< or = 50) spore loads (7.54 and 0.73, respectively) were found in urban school children community than in rural and refugee camp school children (4.7 and 0.1, respectively). Also significantly higher light (1-10) spore load percentages were found in rural (63.67) and refugee camp (62.9) than in urban children (52.6). Of

  3. Perceiving and Acting on Complex Affordances: How Children and Adults Bicycle across Two Lanes of Opposing Traffic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grechkin, Timofey Y.; Chihak, Benjamin J.; Cremer, James F.; Kearney, Joseph K.; Plumert, Jodie M.

    2013-01-01

    This investigation examined how children and adults negotiate a challenging perceptual-motor problem with significant real-world implications--bicycling across two lanes of opposing traffic. Twelve- and 14-year-olds and adults rode a bicycling simulator through an immersive virtual environment. Participants crossed intersections with continuous…

  4. Reduced Recognition of Dynamic Facial Emotional Expressions and Emotion-Specific Response Bias in Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evers, Kris; Steyaert, Jean; Noens, Ilse; Wagemans, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Emotion labelling was evaluated in two matched samples of 6-14-year old children with and without an autism spectrum disorder (ASD; N = 45 and N = 50, resp.), using six dynamic facial expressions. The Emotion Recognition Task proved to be valuable demonstrating subtle emotion recognition difficulties in ASD, as we showed a general poorer emotion…

  5. Improving the Representational Strategies of Children in a Music-Listening and Playing Task: An Intervention-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gil, Vicent; Reybrouck, Mark; Tejada, Jesús; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2015-01-01

    This intervention-based study focuses on the relation between music and its graphic representation from a meta-representational point of view. It aims to determine whether middle school students show an increase in meta-representational competence (MRC) after an educational intervention. Three classes of 11 to 14-year-old students participated in…

  6. How Home Gets to School: Parental Control Strategies Predict Children's School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Aimee Kleisner; MacPhee, David

    2011-01-01

    At-risk families' control style (autonomy support and coercive control) was examined in relation to children's school readiness; children's social skills and mastery motivation were hypothesized mediating variables. In two different, low-income samples from diverse ethnic backgrounds, one preschool sample recruited from Head Start (N = 199) and a…

  7. Physical Activity Pattern of Prepubescent Filipino School Children during School Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Suarez, Consuelo B.; Grimmer-Somers, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Background: Little is known about pre-pubescent Filipino children's involvement in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). There are international guidelines regarding required levels of MVPA for healthy children. Methods: This study describes participation of 11- to 12-year-olds in randomly selected public and private schools in San Juan,…

  8. School Nurse Interventions in Managing Functional Urinary Incontinence in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivers, Charisse L.

    2010-01-01

    Uncomplicated urinary incontinence (UI) in school-age children is a prevalent yet underrecognized problem that has remained in the shadow of other concerns commonly perceived as more prominent or urgent. There is good evidence that functional UI in children can be treated and managed effectively. When there is no structural or neurologic…

  9. Work of School Children during Out-of-School Hours. Bulletin, 1917, No. 20

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, C. D.

    1917-01-01

    The investigation reported in this bulletin was undertaken for the purpose of making available a volume of evidence on questions concerning the early elimination of children during out-of-school hours. The inquiry was confined to the children of sixth, seventh, and eighth grades. Information concerning the following points has been presented: (1)…

  10. Schooling the Different: Ethnographic Case Studies of Hispanic Deaf Children's Initiation into Formal Schooling. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Adrian T.

    An ethnographic study of the intake process involving the formal assessment, placement, and educational programming of 12 Hispanic deaf/hearing impaired children, aged 3-8, in both a private school for the deaf and the New York City public schools, was conducted over a 2-year period (1984-1986). Participant observation, interviewing, and…

  11. Family School Connectedness: An Examination of Participation for Foster Care Families with Children in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baehr, Katherine Bradley

    2009-01-01

    Research (Henderson & Mapp, 2002) suggests the participation of teachers and families as partners in the education of students builds stronger foundations for the future development of children. This dissertation examined the participation of foster care families in schools and factors that contribute to their participation in the school setting…

  12. A Controlled Evaluation of a School-Based Obesity Prevention in Turkish School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toruner, Ebru Kilicarslan; Savaser, Sevim

    2010-01-01

    This research was conducted to assess the effect of a weight management program in Turkish school children with overweight and obesity. Forty one students formed the intervention group while 40 students formed the control group in two elementary schools. Students in intervention group were given seven training sessions in a period of 2.5 months.…

  13. Children Entering School Ready to Learn: 2010-2011 Maryland Model for School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The report shares what everyone has learned from the 2010-2011 Maryland Model for School Readiness (MMSR) data about the school readiness of Maryland's children: statewide, by subgroups, and for each of Maryland's 24 local jurisdictions. Some of the highlights are: (1) The percentage of Maryland kindergarteners fully ready to start school…

  14. Children of Alcoholics in Schools: A Call to Compassion. CRIS Perspectives on the School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitman, Ralph

    The issue of children of alcoholics (COAs) is discussed in this document, focusing on COAs in school. The topics of authority in the family and family relationships are discussed. The roles (hero, lost child, mascot) COAs adopt and how these roles are manifested in school are discussed. It is noted that COAs are seeking to have fundamental needs…

  15. Food Group Preferences of Elementary School Children Participating in the National School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashman, Linda; Tripurana, Madhuri; Englund, Tim; Bergman, Ethan A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of the study was to assess the food group preferences of second through fifth grade children based on ethnic background, gender, and grade. Food group preferences were determined by the amount of various food groups consumed in meals served as part of the National School Lunch Program at selected schools. Research…

  16. Racial Bullying and Victimization in Canadian School-Aged Children: Individual and School Level Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larochette, Anne-Claire; Murphy, Ashley Nicole; Craig, Wendy M.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous individual factors, including race, have been identified to date that may place children at risk for bullying involvement. The importance of the school's environment on bullying behaviours has also been highlighted, as the majority of bullying occurs at school. The variables associated with racial bullying and victimization, however, have…

  17. The Contribution Made by School Milk to the Nutrition of Primary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Judith; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Study discusses the assessment of the contribution of school milk to the nutrition of 396 Kent primary school children aged eight to eleven years, using information collected in a survey which included a weighed diet record, a socio-economic questionnaire, and a medical examination. [Available from Cambridge University Press, 32 East 57th Street,…

  18. Association between serum ferritin and goitre in Iranian school children.

    PubMed

    Hashemipour, Mahin; Soheilipour, Fahimeh; Keshteli, Ammar Hassanzadeh; Siavash, Mansour; Amini, Masoud; Kelishadi, Roya

    2010-04-01

    Despite long-standing supplementation of iodine in Iran, the prevalence of goitre among general people remains high in some regions. The study investigated the role of iron status in the aetiology of goitre in school children in Isfahan, Iran. Two thousand three hundred and thirty-one school children were selected by multi-stage random sampling. Thyroid size was estimated by inspection and palpation. Urinary iodine concentration (UIC) and serum ferritin (SF) were measured. Overall, 32.9% of the children had goitre. The median UIC was 195.5 microg/L. The mean +/- SD of SF in the goitrous and non-goitrous children was 47.65 +/- 42.51 and 44.55 +/- 37.07 microg/L respectively (p=0.52). The prevalence of iron deficiency in goitrous and non-goitrous children was 9.6% and 3.1% respectively (p=0.007). Goitre is still prevalent in school children of Isfahan. However, their median UIC was well in the accepted range. Iron deficiency is associated with goitre in a small group of goitrous children. The role of goitrogens should also be investigated in this region.

  19. Obesity in Nursery School Children in Corum, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Akca, Selen Ozakar; Uysal, Gulzade; Aysegul Buyukgonenc, Lale

    2016-01-01

    Background Regular body mass index (BMI) screenings in schools is important to ensure that 3- to 6-year-old children are not negatively affected by obesity in terms of their current and future health. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the overweight and obesity results of 3- to 6-year-old children and to guide children and their family in making healthier dietary choices by informing them. Methods This analytical-descriptive study was conducted in Corum, Turkey, in the year 2011. The study’s sample consisted of all available 3- to 6-year-old children entering nursery school (specifically, the Buharaevler, Karsıyaka, Nasrettin Hoca, Ulukavak, Mimar Sinan, and Sevgi nursery schools). Findings from the study were statistically analyzed using the SPSS 15.0 program. The Chi-square test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) program were used in the comparison of study data. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results It was determined that 9.5% of the participating female children and 5.2% of the male children were underweight and that the boys were more obese than the girls in general. The correlation between the child’s gender and their BMI was not found to be statistically significant (P-value > 0.05). The overweight frequency of the children was 12.1%, and the obesity frequency was 14.3%. Furthermore, it was determined that the obesity rates of the children increased with their age. Accordingly, the correlation between the child’s age and BMI was found to be statistically significant (P-value < 0.05). Conclusions An approach to preventing obesity must not be enacted only in health centers. Schools should also offer information and resources for families in order to prevent obesity in children. PMID:28180017

  20. [Social stratification and nutritional anthropometry in children under 15 years old La Escalera, Lara State, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Torres-Villanueva, Mario; Dellán-Rodríguez, Graciela; Papale-Centofanti, Jham; Rodríguez, Dioslibeth; Mendoza, Norelis; Berné, Yelitza

    2007-09-01

    Malnutrition is a public health problem for underdeveloped countries. From the 852 million of undernourished estimated by FAO between 2000 and 2002, 815 million belonged to underdeveloped countries, 28 million to countries in transition and 9 million to developed countries. Malnutrition in Venezuela had a 6% raise between 2000 and 2002, when it went from 11% to 17%. This work was done with children under 15 years old from La Escalera, using classic indicators and their combination, relating them with socioeconomic conditions, through the NBI and Graffar Méndez Castellano methods, as to consider the population nutritional profile. The higher prevalence corresponded to normal nutritional values, which oscillated between 55,7% and 80,7% in the 7-14 years old group and the 2-6 years old group, respectively. Malnutrition was found in the under 2 years old group and 7-14 years old group, with values ranging between 12,5 and 41,0% respectively. The least prevalence was found for excess malnutrition. 100% of the families in this study are poor, according to NBI; although the Graffar Mendez Castellano method established that poverty was about 60%, while 40% belonged to a medium-low status. Relating nutritional diagnosis with social stratification and the mother's educational level, three patterns were observed: III, IV and V, prevailing normal diagnosis, followed by malnutrition by deficit and malnutrition by excess, respectively. The predominating mother's educational level corresponded to incomplete high school, followed by analphabetism and the least prevalent has complete basic elementary education. It should be noted that the nutrition deficit was inversely related to the socioeconomic stratification and the mother's educational level.

  1. Associations between School Meals Offered through the National School Lunch Program and the School Breakfast Program and Fruit and Vegetable Intake among Ethnically Diverse, Low-Income Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson-O'Brien, Ramona; Burgess-Champoux, Teri; Haines, Jess; Hannan, Peter J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2010-01-01

    Background: Despite evidence in support of the health benefits associated with fruit and vegetable (FV) intake, national data indicate that FV consumption among school-aged children is below recommended levels, particularly among low-income children. School meals offered through the School Breakfast Program and National School Lunch Program can…

  2. Does school mobility place elementary school children at risk for lower math achievement? The mediating role of cognitive dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Friedman-Krauss, Allison H; Raver, C Cybele

    2015-12-01

    Children growing up in poverty have a higher likelihood of exposure to multiple forms of adversity that jeopardize their chances of academic success. The current paper identifies school mobility, or changing schools, as 1 such poverty-related risk. Using a sample of low-income, predominantly ethnic-minority children (n = 381) in Chicago, this study tests the hypothesis that repeatedly changing schools during the 5-year period between Head Start (preschool) and third grade is a potent predictor of children's math achievement in fourth grade and that children's cognitive dysregulation serves as a mechanism through which school mobility may negatively affect children's math achievement. Hierarchical linear models controlling for baseline child and family characteristics (including children's early math and dysregulation measured during Head Start) revealed an inverse relation between the number of times low-income children changed schools between preschool and third grade and children's math achievement on state standardized tests in fourth grade. Furthermore, frequently changing schools (3 or 4 school changes over the same time period) was positively associated with teacher-reported cognitive dysregulation in third grade and negatively associated with children's math achievement in fourth grade. Evidence for the role of children's cognitive dysregulation as a partial statistical mediator was found for the relation between frequently changing schools and math achievement, even after accounting for baseline risk. Results are discussed in terms of school policies, practices, and intervention strategies to prevent the disruptive and potentially stressful experiences of school mobility for young, low-income children.

  3. Children exposure to PM levels in a typical school morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, J.; Amorim, J. H.; Cascão, P.; Rodrigues, V.; Borrego, C.

    2012-10-01

    One of the major challenges to urban sustainability is the threat posed by air pollution, being exposure to ambient air pollutants associated with a high rate of premature deaths. Therefore, the study of the exposure of people, and in particular of vulnerable population groups such as children, to air pollution is a subject of paramount importance. In this paper a CFD model is used to simulate the particulate matter personal exposure of students in their school routine (both daily walk to and permanence in school). Under the concept of COST TU0801, the usability of a 3D city model is evaluated. The analysis was carried out for 4 children, with 4 alternative walking routes to school and using 4 different classrooms. Results indicate that the individual exposure of children is extremely spatially dependent, as a consequence of the wind flow and air pollutant dispersion patterns.

  4. Children's Voice or Children's Voices? How Educational Research Can Be at the Heart of Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Julian

    2015-01-01

    There are problems with considering children and young people in schools as quite separate individuals, and with considering them as members of a single collectivity. The tension is represented in the use of "voice" and "voices" in educational debates. Voices in dialogue, in contrast to "children's voice", are…

  5. Advances in Children's Rights and Children's Well-Being Measurement: Implications for School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosher, Hanita; Jiang, Xu; Ben-Arieh, Asher; Huebner, E. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have brought important changes to the profession of school psychology, influenced by larger social, scientific, and political trends. These trends include the emergence of children's rights agenda and advances in children's well-being measurement. During these years, a growing public attention and commitment to the notion of…

  6. Preschool Children's Transition to Formal Schooling: The Importance of Collaboration between Teachers, Parents and Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skouteris, Helen; Watson, Brittany; Lum, Jarrad

    2012-01-01

    To our knowledge, no previous literature review has focused specifically on the effectiveness of transition programs that target collaboration between primary school and pre-school teachers, parents and children. Hence, in this paper we sought to review the literature on this topic. The findings of published studies to date reveal that,…

  7. Neurobehaviour of school age children born to diabetic mothers

    PubMed Central

    Ornoy, A; Ratzon, N; Greenbaum, C; Peretz, E; Soriano, D; Dulitzky, M

    1998-01-01

    AIM—To study the neurobehavioural effects that diabetes during pregnancy might have on children by school age.
METHODS—The neurobehavioural function of 57 school age children born to 48, well controlled diabetic mothers was compared with 57control children matched for age, birth order, and parental socioeconomic status, using several cognitive, behavioural, sensory and motor neurological tests.
RESULTS—The IQ scores of the index group children were similar to those of control children (117.7±13.4 vs 118.5±10.1). There were no differences between the groups in various sensory motor functions. However, the index group children performed less well than the controls on indices of fine and gross motor functions, as observed on the Bruininks-Oseretzky test of motor proficiency. The scores of children born to diabetic mothers were higher than controls on the Touwen and Prechtl neurological examination. They also performed worse in the Pollack tapper test which is designed to detect minor neurological deficits, inattention, and hyperactivity. The index children had higher scores on the Conners abbreviated parent-teacher questionnaire which measures hyperactivity and inattention. There was a negative correlation between the performance of the index group children on various neurodevelopmental and behavioural tests and the severity of hyperglycaemia, as assessed by blood glycosylated haemoglobin and acetonuria.
CONCLUSIONS—Diabetes during pregnancy adversely affects some fine neurological functions in children at school age, but not their cognitive scores. These effects are not correlated with the degree of glycaemic control.

 PMID:9828733

  8. Predicting Handwriting Legibility in Taiwanese Elementary School Children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzu-I; Howe, Tsu-Hsin; Chen, Hao-Ling; Wang, Tien-Ni

    This study investigates handwriting characteristics and potential predictors of handwriting legibility among typically developing elementary school children in Taiwan. Predictors of handwriting legibility included visual-motor integration (VMI), visual perception (VP), eye-hand coordination (EHC), and biomechanical characteristics of handwriting. A total of 118 children were recruited from an elementary school in Taipei, Taiwan. A computerized program then assessed their handwriting legibility. The biomechanics of handwriting were assessed using a digitizing writing tablet. The children's VMI, VP, and EHC were assessed using the Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration. Results indicated that predictive factors of handwriting legibility varied in different age groups. VMI predicted handwriting legibility for first-grade students, and EHC and stroke force predicted handwriting legibility for second-grade students. Kinematic factors such as stroke velocity were the only predictor for children in fifth and sixth grades.

  9. Children of Separation and Divorce: A Review of School Programs and Implications for the Psychologist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Ellen A.; Shellenberger, Sylvia

    1981-01-01

    Divorce and separation affect how children behave and learn in school. School psychologists can help children and parents cope with the feelings and the effects of divorce. Relevant issues in developing and implementing programs are considered. (Author/RL)

  10. Human intestinal parasites in primary school children in Kampala, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kabatereine, N B; Kemijumbi, J; Kazibwe, F; Onapa, A W

    1997-05-01

    A cross sectional survey on intestinal parasite infections was carried out in 5,313 pupils between the ages of ten and fifteen years in 98 primary schools in Kampala. The aim was to identify the types and distribution of intestinal parasites and to estimate the prevalence in school children. Trichuris trichiura (28%), Ascaris lumbricoides (17%) and hookworms (12.9%) were common infections among the children. Other less commonly found parasites were S.mansoni, Strongyloides stercolaris, Taenia sp, Enterobius vermicularis, Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba coli and E. histolytica. Refuse dumps are probably a significant source of transmission of intestinal helminthic infections in Kampala.

  11. Cognitive Impairment of School Children at High Altitude: The Case for Oxygen Conditioning in Schools.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2016-09-01

    West, John B. Cognitive impairment of school children at high altitude: the case for oxygen conditioning in schools. High Alt Med Biol. 17:203-207, 2016.-The hypoxia of high altitude frequently affects cognitive function. Recent work has shown that high altitude impairs the neuropsychological function of children of school age when compared with a similar control group of children at low altitude. This implies that the learning process is compromised at high altitude. One option is to bus children down to a lower altitude for schooling, but this is generally impracticable. Recently the new technique of oxygen conditioning has been introduced. The procedure is similar to air conditioning except that instead of altering the temperature of the air, the oxygen concentration is increased, thus raising the PO2 in the inspired air of classrooms. The result is that the children are physiologically at a lower altitude. Just as in very hot or cold climates, it is now unacceptable to have schools that are not air conditioned; in the future the same may apply to schools at high altitude that are not oxygen conditioned.

  12. School readiness among children with varying histories of language difficulties.

    PubMed

    Justice, Laura M; Bowles, Ryan P; Pence Turnbull, Khara L; Skibbe, Lori E

    2009-03-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that (a) persistent language difficulties during childhood would predict lower school readiness and (b) language difficulties present just prior to school entry would predict lower school readiness beyond any effects of persistence. The study involved examining indicators of school readiness collected at kindergarten for children exhibiting various histories of language ability based on language measures collected at 15, 24, 36, and 54 months by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Early Child Care Research Network. Children (N = 1,064) were classified according to whether they exhibited expressive or receptive language difficulties at each time point measured. The relation between persistence and timing of these difficulties to each kindergarten outcome was studied through a common factor approach for categorical outcomes. Persistence of language difficulties was not generally related to kindergarten outcomes. However, a robust effect was found for timing of language difficulties: Children who exhibited language difficulties at 54 months exhibited significantly depressed performance on measures of school readiness. Findings are discussed in terms of current policy and research concerning kindergarten readiness for children exhibiting risk.

  13. School Is Where the Children Are.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller-Pasquale, Sherry; Lee, Kami Amestoy

    1997-01-01

    Sponsored by Guatemala City's innovative Childhope/Pennat program, 30 teachers coach working children under trees in the park, in the streets next to their stalls, and in small, makeshift "mercado classrooms." Children learn how to do simple math, read official documents, understand their country's history, and manage a small business.…

  14. Bullied Children: Parent and School Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling; Zdunowski-Sjoblom, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Family interviews were conducted with 28 7-12-year-old children who had experienced various forms of bullying and relational aggression by their peers, as well as with their parent and with an older sibling. Interviews explored possible supportive strategies of older siblings, parents, and teachers. All bullied children reported negative feelings…

  15. Portland Public School Children Move with Propane

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-04-01

    This 2-page Clean Cities fact sheet describes the use of propane as a fuel source for Portland Public Schools' fleet of buses. It includes information on the history of the program, along with contact information for the local Clean Cities Coordinator and Portland Public Schools.

  16. Children's Physical Activity during Recess and Outside of School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beighle, Aaron; Morgan, Charles F.; Le Masurier, Guy; Pangrazi, Robert P.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine children's physical activity during recess and outside of school. Third-, fourth-, and fifth-grade students (N = 270; 121 boys, age = 9.5 plus or minus 0.9 years; 150 girls, age = 9.6 plus or minus 0.9 years) wore sealed pedometers during a 15-minute recess period and outside of school for 4 consecutive…

  17. Does gaze direction modulate facial expression processing in children with autism spectrum disorder?

    PubMed

    Akechi, Hironori; Senju, Atsushi; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Tojo, Yoshikuni; Osanai, Hiroo; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments investigated whether children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) integrate relevant communicative signals, such as gaze direction, when decoding a facial expression. In Experiment 1, typically developing children (9-14 years old; n = 14) were faster at detecting a facial expression accompanying a gaze direction with a congruent motivational tendency (i.e., an avoidant facial expression with averted eye gaze) than those with an incongruent motivational tendency. Children with ASD (9-14 years old; n = 14) were not affected by the gaze direction of facial stimuli. This finding was replicated in Experiment 2, which presented only the eye region of the face to typically developing children (n = 10) and children with ASD (n = 10). These results demonstrated that children with ASD do not encode and/or integrate multiple communicative signals based on their affective or motivational tendency.

  18. Language and Memory Development in Children with Down Syndrome at Mainstream Schools and Special Schools: A Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laws, Glynis; Byrne, Angela; Buckley, Sue

    2000-01-01

    Presents a study that compared 22 children with Down syndrome in mainstream school placements matched for chronological age with 22 children attending special schools in a different Local Education Authority where mainstream placements were rare. Reports that children in mainstream placements achieved higher scores for vocabulary, grammar, and…

  19. Supporting Language in Schools: Evaluating an Intervention for Children with Delayed Language in the Early School Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Wendy; Pring, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Extensive evidence exists that many children who experience early socio-economic disadvantage have delayed language development. These delays have been shown to exist when children start school and appear to persist through their education. Interventions that can help these children are desirable to ease the difficulties they have in school and to…

  20. Visiting Again? Subjective Well-Being of Children in Elementary School and Repeated Visits to School Health Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaver, Cynthia A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Children with vague complaints are without chronic illness, and who repeatedly visit the school nurse may be at risk for limited academic success. This study compares student reports of subjective well-being between children who do and do not repeatedly visit the school nurse with vague complaints. Methods: Children in grades 4 through…

  1. Research Note: Rating the Home Environment of School-Age Children; A Comparison with General Cognitive Index and School Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkinson, Christine E.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes a newly developed method of rating the home environment of primary school children. The method was used in a study to assess the cognitive abilities and school progress of 20 children. Results indicate environmental factors significantly correlate with children's cognitive abilities and demonstrate that not all such factors are related…

  2. Providing Guidance for School Personnel Making Decisions in the Service of School Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jillian; MacMath, Sheryl

    2006-01-01

    Due to improved medical procedures, more and more children with congenital heart disease are entering the school system. In order to help both school and health professionals involved in the education of children, we provide a brief review of the literature, review real-life dilemmas that school personnel face on a daily basis, and interpret the…

  3. 49 CFR 372.103 - Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... school children and teachers to or from school. 372.103 Section 372.103 Transportation Other Regulations... Exemptions § 372.103 Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from... motor vehicles being used at the time of operation in the transportation of schoolchildren and...

  4. 49 CFR 372.103 - Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... school children and teachers to or from school. 372.103 Section 372.103 Transportation Other Regulations... Exemptions § 372.103 Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from... motor vehicles being used at the time of operation in the transportation of schoolchildren and...

  5. 49 CFR 372.103 - Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... school children and teachers to or from school. 372.103 Section 372.103 Transportation Other Regulations... Exemptions § 372.103 Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from... motor vehicles being used at the time of operation in the transportation of schoolchildren and...

  6. 49 CFR 372.103 - Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... school children and teachers to or from school. 372.103 Section 372.103 Transportation Other Regulations... Exemptions § 372.103 Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from... motor vehicles being used at the time of operation in the transportation of schoolchildren and...

  7. 49 CFR 372.103 - Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... school children and teachers to or from school. 372.103 Section 372.103 Transportation Other Regulations... Exemptions § 372.103 Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from... motor vehicles being used at the time of operation in the transportation of schoolchildren and...

  8. Korean Immigrant Mothers' Perspectives: The Meanings of a Korean Heritage Language School for Their Children's American Early Schooling Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jinhee

    2011-01-01

    This study examines what a Korean heritage language school means to Korean immigrant families and their children, considering Korean immigrant mothers' perspectives on American early schooling. As part of an ethnographic research project on Korean-American children's peer culture in a heritage school, seven mothers, two guardians (grandmothers),…

  9. [Schooling and care of mild intellectual disability children].

    PubMed

    David, M; Billette de Villemeur, A; Devillard, F; Dieterich, K; Jouk, P-S; Prado, C; Descotes, A; Guillon, J-L; Counillon, J; Bloch, J; Cans, C

    2015-03-01

    Studies on mild intellectual disability (MID) are scarce. The aim of this study was to describe the educational and medical care trajectories and their determinants in children with MID. The study population concerned children born in 1997 and resident in a French county (Isère) in 2008. MID was defined as an overall IQ score between 50 and 69. For the present study, this definition was adjusted by integrating the IQ confidence intervals so that the risk of IQ measurement relativity and possible score discrepancy could be taken into account. Of the 267 children included, 180 (67%) were identified through an institute that decides upon special education and allowances (MDPH) and 87 (33%) through the educational system. The parents of 181 children (68%) accepted to answer a telephone questionnaire, describing their child's educational and medical history. Children with MID frequently presented clinical signs and comorbidities. Educational trajectories were quite varied: a majority of the children (52.9%) were oriented toward sections with adapted general and professional education (SEGPA) after finishing primary school, a minority (41.3%) were oriented towards specialized schools, such as medical-educational institutions, and a small proportion of children (5.8%) stayed in ordinary school. Children followed the SEGPA orientation more frequently when a relative written language disorder was present, and autism-spectrum disorders or other clinical signs were absent. Concerning follow-up care and rehabilitation, children mostly took part in speech therapy (76.2%) and psychotherapy (55.8%). The French law dating from 2005, ensuring equal opportunity for people with disabilities, has borne fruit in the diversification of educational trajectories.

  10. Effects of a Physical Education-Based Programme on Health-Related Physical Fitness and Its Maintenance in High School Students: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayorga-Vega, Daniel; Montoro-Escaño, Jorge; Merino-Marban, Rafael; Viciana, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a physical education-based development and maintenance programme on objective and perceived health-related physical fitness in high school students. A sample of 111 students aged 12-14 years old from six classes were cluster-randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 54) or a control…

  11. A Multilevel View of Predictors of Children's Perceptions of School Interpersonal Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Juliette K.; Aber, J. Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Increasing attention is being given to the role of a positive school interpersonal climate in children's school functioning and social-emotional development. Children's perceptions are commonly used to measure the interpersonal school climate, but the individual and contextual characteristics that contribute to variation in children's perceptions…

  12. Differences in Physical Activity Levels between Urban and Rural School Children in Cyprus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loucaides, Constantinos A.; Chedzoy, Sue M.; Bennett, Neville

    2004-01-01

    This study attempted to examine differences in physical activity levels between urban and rural primary school children. The sample consisted of 256 Greek-Cypriot children and their parents from two schools representing urban areas and three schools representing rural areas. Children's activity levels were assessed for 4 weekdays in the winter and…

  13. Attention and Memory in School-Age Children Surviving the Terrorist Attack in Beslan, Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scrimin, Sara; Moscardino, Ughetta; Capello, Fabia; Axia, Giovanna

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the impact of terrorism on children's cognitive functioning and school learning. The primary purpose of this study was to report on cognitive functioning among school-age children 20 months after a terrorist attack against their school. Participants included 203 directly and indirectly exposed children from Beslan and 100…

  14. Building a Method for Researching Attribution of Meaning by Children Aged 5 to 6 in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tertoolen, Anja; van Oers, Bert; Geldens, Jeannette; Popeijus, Herman

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the first phase of a research project in which we looked for the voices of young children, aged 5 to 6, in school. What do children experience in school? What do they see as the meaning of school? What is their motivation? Children have the right to be listened to. The question is which settings, under which circumstances,…

  15. Cultural Relay in Early Childhood Education: Methods of Teaching School Behavior to Low-Income Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Stephanie C.

    2012-01-01

    There is a distinct class difference in the way that children are taught school behavior. Teachers in affluent schools use more implicit teaching techniques while teachers of low-income children are more explicit in their teaching of behavior. This stems largely from the alignment of the home culture of middle class children to school behavior and…

  16. "Building Identity and Understanding Diversity"--Children's Literature and Traditional Literature Potential in the School Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pires, Maria da Natividade

    2011-01-01

    This paper revolves around the great potential that children's literature and traditional literature may display in social transformation, when associated with the school curriculum. Displaying a role as an important element in children's education and establishing a connection between school and out of school contexts, children's literature can…

  17. 34 CFR 200.64 - Factors for determining equitable participation of private school children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... promise of the private school children achieving the high levels called for by the State's student... private school children. 200.64 Section 200.64 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... Participation of Eligible Children in Private Schools § 200.64 Factors for determining equitable...

  18. 34 CFR 200.64 - Factors for determining equitable participation of private school children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... promise of the private school children achieving the high levels called for by the State's student... private school children. 200.64 Section 200.64 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... Participation of Eligible Children in Private Schools § 200.64 Factors for determining equitable...

  19. School-based interventions for overweight and obesity in minority school children.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Teresa; Weed, L Diane; Touger-Decker, Riva

    2012-04-01

    The prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity in the United States has resulted in a number of school-based health interventions. This article provides a review of research that addressed childhood overweight and obesity in minority, U.S. elementary schools. All studies reported some benefits in health behaviors and/or anthropometric measures. Effectiveness was greater when program objectives were specific, implemented across the school environments, extended into the community, and were culturally relevant. Because minority school children are disproportionately affected by overweight and obesity and poor health behaviors, and since schools may be the primary setting to address childhood overweight and obesity in communities, school nurses can be an advocate for school-based programs and facilitate success.

  20. Evaluation of Obesity in School-Age Children.

    PubMed

    Dobashi, Kazushige

    2016-01-01

    To prevent obesity in middle age, early precautions and interventions are required during childhood. Therefore, it is very important to accurately evaluate the degree of overweight in children. Body mass index (BMI) is widely used worldwide in adults, but not in children. Because standard BMI, which is calculated using the average height and weight for age, changes widely during growth, a constant cut-off point cannot be set for children. An international unified method defining childhood obesity has not been established. In many countries, BMI-for-age percentile (BMI%) value or Z (standard deviation) score is used, whereas in Japan, the percentage of overweight (POW), which is the modified weight-for-height method, is used. We compared BMI% values with POW values obtained using the anthropometric data of elementary and junior high school students based on the Japanese school survey conducted in 2000 and found that the values for the degree of overweight were significantly different between the two methods. It became clear that tall students were easily defined as being overweight, whereas short students tended to be evaluated as being underweight when using BMI%. POW method seemed to be more appropriate than BMI% for school-age children. Abdominal obesity, excess visceral adipose tissue (VAT), is highly associated with obesity-related complications. Waist circumference (WC) is now accepted as an appropriate guide to VAT accumulation. The cut-off value of WC defining excess VAT is 80 cm at the umbilical level in Japanese school-age children. It is not easy to decide the obesity criteria and optimum WC in school-age children. Childhood obesity should be discussed more internationally.

  1. Urban/Rural Disparity and Migrant Children's Education: An Investigation into Schools for Children of Transient Workers in Beijing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaoqing, Lu; Shouli, Zhang

    2004-01-01

    In the study of compulsory education for transient children, Beijing Xingzhi School for the Children of Transient Workers is a good example. There is no question that this is the most well-known school to date for transient children in China, and it has to a certain extent become a symbol of this social issue. The initial reports regarding this…

  2. Reading Development in Typically Developing Children and Children with Prenatal or Perinatal Brain Lesions: Differential School Year and Summer Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demir-Lira, Özlem Ece; Levine, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Summer slide, uneven growth of academic skills during the calendar year, captures the fact that the learning gains children make during the school year do not continue at the same pace over the summer, when children are typically not in school. We compared growth of reading skills during the school year and during the summer months in children…

  3. Time Concepts for Elementary School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Sharon Pray

    1990-01-01

    Points out that children have difficulty learning time concepts. Presents instructional activities for concepts associated with clocks, calendars, and chronology. Outlines Jerome Bruner's three different stages of representation for each concept: enactive, iconic, and symbolic. (DB)

  4. Where are the schools? Children, families and food practices.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, Hannah; Curtis, Penny; Goyder, Elizabeth

    2016-07-01

    Reducing childhood obesity is an international priority and children's diets, food knowledge and practices have come under intense scrutiny in both policy and popular discourse. Notwithstanding evidence that health interventions which resonate with children's own views are the most effective, there is still relatively little research which mobilises children's everyday perspectives on food to inform public health policy. We report key findings from a qualitative study with 53 children aged 9-10, attending two socio-economically contrasting schools in the UK. The study explored children's understandings of food in everyday life and their ideas about the relationship between food and health. Throughout the study, despite recent attempts to position schools as key sites for public health interventions, children consistently emphasised families as the locus for enduring food practices. The research highlights the value of listening to children and applying our understanding of their perspectives to ensure that public health initiatives work with the important influences on their diet and health that they themselves identify.

  5. Drugs, Hyperactivity, and Black School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, William

    1976-01-01

    Notes that a school system that is short of funds and long on active and aggressive black youngsters might bypass the necessary neurological and psychological examinations to determine hyperkinesis. (Author/AM)

  6. Children Diagnosed with Cancer: Returning to School

    MedlinePlus

    ... 789-2300 Website: www.caringbridge.org Offers free, personal websites that help you stay connected to family ... dealing with “weird body issues,” school concerns, and personal relationships. *Inclusion on this list does not imply ...

  7. Back pain in school children--where to from here?

    PubMed

    Trevelyan, F C; Legg, S J

    2006-01-01

    Back pain is now recognised to occur early in childhood and is associated with high prevalence rates when estimated by survey. This review paper considers the risk factors associated with back pain in children aged 11-14 years, and particularly those present in a school setting. The risk factors most significantly associated with back pain are primarily characteristics of the individual with less strong associations with factors present in the school environment. The majority of intervention studies undertaken in a school setting have focussed on the effect of school furniture on posture and comfort and were of short-term duration. There is a need for further research in order to achieve a better understanding of the risk factors present in a school environment and to address ways to reduce the currently recognised perceived problem of back pain among school children. A strategy for an evidence-based longitudinal intervention study is proposed, with the content outlined under the headings: policy, school equipment and furniture, individual and family.

  8. The Effects of Verbal Disgust- and Threat-Related Information about Novel Animals on Disgust and Fear Beliefs and Avoidance in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muris, Peter; Huijding, Jorg; Mayer, Birgit; Leemreis, Willem; Passchier, Stefanie; Bouwmeester, Samantha

    2009-01-01

    Disgust is a basic emotion that is thought to play a role in the etiology of certain types of specific phobias, like animal phobias. Two experiments were conducted in which 9- to 14-year-old children were exposed to disgust-related, cleanliness-related, and threat-related information about unknown animals. It was investigated to what extent these…

  9. Verbal victimization and changes in hopelessness among elementary school children.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Andrea J; Gibb, Brandon E

    2011-01-01

    Hopelessness is a known risk factor for a number of negative outcomes including suicide attempts and deaths. However, little is known about how hopelessness may develop. The goal of this study was to examine the impact of verbal victimization on changes in children's levels of hopelessness. Participants were 448 fourth- and fifth-grade children who were assessed twice, 6 months apart. As hypothesized, reports of verbal victimization occurring during the follow-up period predicted residual change in children's levels of hopelessness. This relation was maintained even after statistically controlling for children's depressive symptoms. Together, these findings suggest that verbal victimization is associated with a greater risk for developing hopelessness in elementary school children, an effect that appears at least partially independent of concurrent depressive symptoms.

  10. Protecting the Rights of School Children with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wood, James M.

    2013-01-01

    School children with diabetes are facing increasing difficulties in receiving care during the school day. Despite theexistence of federal statutes ensuring their rights to a free, appropriate public education, many school districts throughout the country do little, if anything, to ensure that their condition is treated throughout the school day. The chronic shortage of school nurses has resulted in hardships on families, relatives, and friends to ensure that care, including insulin, is timely and appropriately provided. While many states have taken measures to provide care by unlicensed trained volunteers, efforts to accomplish this in California have resulted in prolonged litigation. A variety of nursing organizations oppose all efforts to train unlicensed volunteers, arguing that such is not permitted by California law. The issue is unresolved and currently pending in the California Supreme Court. PMID:23566990

  11. Protecting the rights of school children with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wood, James M

    2013-03-01

    School children with diabetes are facing increasing difficulties in receiving care during the school day. Despite theexistence of federal statutes ensuring their rights to a free, appropriate public education, many school districts throughout the country do little, if anything, to ensure that their condition is treated throughout the school day. The chronic shortage of school nurses has resulted in hardships on families, relatives, and friends to ensure that care, including insulin, is timely and appropriately provided. While many states have taken measures to provide care by unlicensed trained volunteers, efforts to accomplish this in California have resulted in prolonged litigation. A variety of nursing organizations oppose all efforts to train unlicensed volunteers, arguing that such is not permitted by California law. The issue is unresolved and currently pending in the California Supreme Court.

  12. Mental health of indigenous school children in Northern Chile

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anxiety and depressive disorders occur in all stages of life and are the most common childhood disorders. However, only recently has attention been paid to mental health problems in indigenous children and studies of anxiety and depressive disorders in these children are still scarce. This study compares the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms in Aymara and non-Aymara children. Among the Aymara children, the study examines the relations between these symptoms and the degree of involvement with Aymara culture. Methods We recruited 748 children aged 9 to 15 years from nine schools serving low socioeconomic classes in the city of Arica, in northern Chile. The children were equally divided between boys and girls and 37% of the children were Aymara. To evaluate anxiety and depressive symptoms we used the Stress in Children (SiC) instrument and the Children Depression Inventory-Short version (CDI-S), and used an instrument we developed to assess level of involvement in the Aymara culture. Results There was no significant difference between Aymara and non-Aymara children on any of the instrument scales. Dividing the Aymara children into high-involvement (n = 89) and low-involvement (n = 186) groups, the low-involvement group had significantly higher scores on the Hopelessness subscale of the CDI-S (p = 0.02) and scores of marginally higher significance in overall Anxiety on the SiC (p = 0.06). Conclusions Although Aymara children have migrated from the high Andean plateau to the city, this migration has not resulted in a greater presence of anxiety and depressive symptoms. Greater involvement with the Aymara culture may be a protective factor against anxiety and depressive symptoms in Aymara children. This point to an additional benefit of maintaining cultural traditions within this population. PMID:24438210

  13. A Hidden Minority Becomes Visible: Romani Refugee Children in the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamas, Judit

    2001-01-01

    Discusses educational concerns of Roma, or Gypsy, children in Canada. Provides background information on this minority group and discusses Roma attitudes toward education and Romani children's experiences in Eastern European schools. Provides suggestions for welcoming Romani children into new schools, including developing children's first and…

  14. Effects of Divorce on Children, Traits of Resiliency and School Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Betty J.

    Gaining an awareness of the needs of children of divorce and how children achieve resilience should help students become well-adjusted and productive. This paper explores ways in which school systems and school counselors can meet the needs of these children. It portrays the effects of divorce on children by drawing on the literature, observations…

  15. Factors Affecting Children's Judgement of Culturally Deviant Acts: Findings from an International School in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutsuki, Aya; Tanaka, Yumi

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between perceptions of culturally deviant acts and multicultural experiences of elementary-school children attending an international school in Japan. Findings indicated that children judged a Japanese harsher than a foreigner, irrespective of the children's age. It was also found that younger children were…

  16. Psychiatric Disorder or Impairing Psychology in Children Who Have Been Excluded from School: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whear, Rebecca; Marlow, Ruth; Boddy, Kate; Ukoumunne, Obioha C.; Parker, Claire; Ford, Tamsin; Thompson-Coon, Jo; Stein, Ken

    2014-01-01

    When children with special educational needs are excluded from school, it should raise the concern that these children are not receiving adequate help and support. This systematic review aims to identify the prevalence of psychiatric disorder or impairing psychopathology among children who are excluded from school compared to children who are not…

  17. School Needs of Single-Parent Children in the Middle Grades: A Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanat, Carolyn L.

    The research goals of this study were to determine the special school needs of single-parent children; the effectiveness of schools in addressing those needs; and school policies, programs, and practices that would better address the needs of these children. Subjects were principals of Iowa schools with seventh and eighth grades; single parents of…

  18. Multilevel Analyses of School and Children's Characteristics Associated with Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomes, Thayse Natacha; dos Santos, Fernanda K.; Zhu, Weimo; Eisenmann, Joey; Maia, José A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Children spend most of their awake time at school, and it is important to identify individual and school-level correlates of their physical activity (PA) levels. This study aimed to identify the between-school variability in Portuguese children PA and to investigate student and school PA correlates using multilevel modeling. Methods:…

  19. Partners in School Asthma Management: Evaluation of a Self-Management Program for Children with Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholomew, L. Kay; Sockrider, Marianna M.; Abramson, Stuart L.; Swank, Paul R.; Czyzewski, Danita I.; Tortolero, Susan R.; Markham, Christine M.; Fernandez, Maria E.; Shegog, Ross; Tyrrell, Shellie

    2006-01-01

    The "Partners in School Asthma Management" program for inner-city elementary school children comprises (1) case finding; (2) linkage of school nurses, parents, and clinicians; (3) a computer-based tailored educational program; and (4) school environmental assessment and intervention. Case finding identified 1730 children in 60 elementary schools…

  20. Family and neighborhood disadvantage, home environment, and children's school readiness.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Lieny; Buettner, Cynthia K; Hur, Eunhye

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine associations between family socioeconomic risk, neighborhood disadvantage, and children's school readiness. A sample of 420 children from 48 early childcare programs yielded multi-informant data. The average age was 55.3 months (SD = 6.4), with 38% of children being Black, non-Hispanic, Hispanic, or other minority race (American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander). One third (32.4%) of the parents had annual incomes less than $30,000. We used multilevel structural equation modeling to test direct and indirect associations among family socioeconomic risk and neighborhood disadvantage and children's cognitive and social-emotional development through home learning environment and parental depression. Children with a greater number of family socioeconomic risks and a higher level of neighborhood disadvantage demonstrated lower scores on cognitive skills. The degree of family socioeconomic risk was indirectly associated with children's cognitive ability through parents' cognitive stimulation at home. Parents who had more family socioeconomic risks and neighborhood disadvantage reported more depressive symptoms, which, in turn, suggested children's greater probability of having social-emotional problems. In other words, home learning environments explained associations between family socioeconomic disadvantage and children's cognitive skills, while parental depression explained associations between family/neighborhood disadvantages and children's social-emotional problems. Results suggest the importance of intervention or prevention strategies for parents to improve cognitive stimulation at home and to reduce depressive symptoms.