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Sample records for 14c urea breath

  1. 14C-urea breath test in C pylori gastritis.

    PubMed Central

    Rauws, E A; Royen, E A; Langenberg, W; Woensel, J V; Vrij, A A; Tytgat, G N

    1989-01-01

    14C-urea breath test was used to detect Campylobacter pylori colonisation in 129 consecutive non-ulcer dyspepsia patients. Fasting patients were given 3 microCi (110 kBq) of 14C-labelled urea after a test meal. Breath samples were collected at 10 minute intervals for 90 minutes and the C-14 activity was counted on a liquid scintillation analyser. Urea derived 14CO2 appears in the exhaled breath of Campylobacter pylori culture positive individuals within 20-30 minutes. Likelihood analysis revealed a most favourable cut off level of [0.07% dose 14C-urea/mmol CO2] multiplied by body weight at t = 40 minutes, to separate culture positive from culture negative subjects. Using this upper limit of normal, a positive likelihood ratio of 50 and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.05 was calculated. Sensitivity of the test was 95% and specificity 98%. The 14C-urea breath test is a simple, sensitive and non-invasive test, that detects viable C pylori microorganism and semiquantitatively assesses the bacterial load of C pylori colonisation. Administration of a single dose of colloidal bismuth subcitrate resulted in a rapid decrease in 14CO2 excretion, so this test can be used to confirm eradication of the bacterium in therapeutic trials without endoscopy, or need for culture. PMID:2753404

  2. ( sup 14 C)urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Ormand, J.E.; Talley, N.J.; Carpenter, H.A.; Shorter, R.G.; Conley, C.R.; Wilson, W.R.; DiMagno, E.P.; Zinsmeister, A.R.; Phillips, S.F. )

    1990-07-01

    H. pylori is a potent urease producer, a characteristic that has been exploited in the development of the (14C)- and (13C)urea breath tests. The prevalence of H. pylori infection also is known to increase with advancing age; however, the individual patient's age has not routinely been considered when interpreting urea breath test results. The aim of this study was to validate a short, age-adjusted (14C)urea breath test for use in diagnosing H. pylori infections. Forty-one subjects (28 volunteers, 13 patients) underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsies. Subjects were defined as being H. pylori-positive if histology or culture was positive. In addition, all subjects completed a 120-min (14C)urea breath test. A logistic regression analysis adjusting for age was used to estimate the probability of H. pylori positivity as a function of the 14C values generated. Sixteen subjects were H. pylori-positive, and 25 were H. pylori-negative. The 14C values generated between 15 and 80 min were found to be equally predictive in identifying H. pylori-positive subjects. Advancing age was associated with a higher probability of H. pylori-positivity. By taking advantage of the statistical probabilities, older patients could be accurately diagnosed with H. pylori at lower 14C values. We found that (14C)urea breath test to be both a sensitive and specific test that can be abbreviated to a 30-min examination (total test time). Moreover, our mathematical model indicates that a patient's age should be considered in order to optimize interpretation of the (14C)urea breath test, although further observations are needed to confirm this model.

  3. sup 14 C-urea breath test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Veldhuyzen van Zanten, S.J.; Tytgat, K.M.; Hollingsworth, J.; Jalali, S.; Rshid, F.A.; Bowen, B.M.; Goldie, J.; Goodacre, R.L.; Riddell, R.H.; Hunt, R.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The high urease activity of Helicobacter pylori can be used to detect this bacterium by noninvasive breath tests. We have developed a {sup 14}C-urea breath test which uses 5 microCi {sup 14}C with 50 mg nonradioactive urea. Breath samples are collected at baseline and every 30 min for 2 h. Our study compared the outcome of the breath test to the results of histology and culture of endoscopically obtained gastric biopsies in 84 patients. The breath test discriminated well between the 50 positive patients and the 34 patients negative for Helicobacter pylori: the calculated sensitivity was 100%, specificity 88%, positive predictive value 93%, and negative predictive value 100%. Treatment with bismuth subsalicylate and/or ampicillin resulted in lower counts of exhaled {sup 14}CO{sub 2} which correlated with histological improvement in gastritis. The {sup 14}C-urea breath test is a better gold standard for the detection of Helicobacter pylori than histology and/or culture.

  4. Estimation of prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in an asymptomatic elderly population comparing [14C] urea breath test and serology.

    PubMed Central

    Newell, D G; Hawtin, P R; Stacey, A R; MacDougall, M H; Ruddle, A C

    1991-01-01

    A non-invasive serological assay devised in this laboratory had a sensitivity and specificity of 100% as determined by culture and confirmed by histology in a group of 47 patients who had undergone endoscopy. The correlation between serology and the non-invasive [14C] breath test was very good. Only one of 24 culture positive patients was, while all 23 culture negative patients were, breath test negative. In a group of 46 healthy elderly persons, however, significant anomalies between serology and breath test were observed. Only 83% of the breath test negative persons were seronegative, while only 68% of the breath test positive persons were seropositive. These results can be explained in terms of age related atrophic gastritis and immune incompetence, causing reduced colonisation and decreased antibody production, respectively. These investigations suggest that non-invasive tests for H pylori infection may not be reliable in the elderly. PMID:2045496

  5. Urea recycling from the renal pelvis in sheep: A study with ( sup 14 C)urea

    SciTech Connect

    Cirio, A.; Boivin, R. )

    1990-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that urea can be recycled from the renal pelvis, (14C)urea diluted in native urine (1 microCi/ml) was perfused (0.5 ml/min) into one of the pelvises of sheep fed either normal (NP) or low (LP)-protein diets. Blood samples were obtained from the ipsilateral renal vein and from the carotid artery throughout the perfusions. 14C activity determinations in urine and plasma demonstrated a flux of (14C)urea from the pelvis to renal vein blood (40,000 in NP and 130,000 disintegrations/min in LP sheep, P less than 0.01). The corresponding flux of native urea was only 1.5 times higher in NP than in LP sheep (6.8 +/- 1.1 vs. 4.7 +/- 2.9 mumol/min, not significant) despite their 8 times higher urinary concentration of urea. The fraction of filtered urea that was reabsorbed in the pelvis was larger in LP sheep (7.5 +/- 3.7 vs. 1.9 +/- 0.7% in NP sheep, P less than 0.05). A fraction of urea is thus actually recycled from the renal pelvis in sheep, and this pelvic retention is enhanced in LP animals. The importance of this phenomenon in the nitrogen economy is discussed.

  6. Assessment of the 14C-Glycocholic Acid Breath Test

    PubMed Central

    James, O. F. W.; Agnew, J. E.; Bouchier, I. A. D.

    1973-01-01

    The 1-(14C)-glycine-glycocholic-acid breath test has been performed on 104 subjects and a normal range established. Abnormal results due to bacterial deconjugation of bile salts were found not only in patients with the “contaminated bowel” syndrome and in those with ileal resection but also in a third group, patients with cholangitis. Abnormal results were also found in patients with gastrocolic fistula and staphylococcal enterocolitis, while mildly abnormal results were also found in some patients with liver disease. PMID:4718834

  7. Metabolism of 14C-urea by T-strain mycoplasma.

    PubMed

    Ford, D K; McCandlish, K L; Gronlund, A F

    1970-05-01

    When (14)C-labeled urea was metabolized by T-strain mycoplasma, 94 to 95% of the radioactivity was recovered as (14)CO(2), and significant radioactivity was not incorporated into cellular material. PMID:5419267

  8. Carbon-14 urea breath test for the diagnosis of Campylobacter pylori associated gastritis

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.J.; Surveyor, I.

    1988-01-01

    Urease in the human gastric mucosa is a marker for infection with Campylobacter pylori (CP), an organism suspected of causing chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. To detect gastric urease, we examined 32 patients who were being evaluated for possible peptic ulcer disease. Fasting patients were given 10 microCi (370 kBq) of /sup 14/C-labeled urea. Breath samples were collected in hyamine at intervals between 1 and 30 min. The amount of /sup 14/C collected at these times was expressed as: body weight X (% of administered dose of /sup 14/C in sample)/(mmol of CO/sub 2/ collected). The presence of C. pylori colonization was also determined by examination of multiple endoscopic gastric biopsy specimens. On average, patients who were proven to have C. pylori infection exhaled 20 times more labeled CO/sub 2/ than patients who were not infected. The difference between infected patients and C. pylori negative control patients was highly significant at all time points between 2 and 30 min after ingestion of the radionuclide (p less than 0.0001). The noninvasive urea breath is less expensive than endoscopic biopsy of the stomach and more accurate than serology as a means of detecting Campylobacter pylori infection. Because the test detects actual viable CP organisms, it can be used to confirm eradication of the bacterium after antibacterial therapy.

  9. Validation of a simplified carbon-14-urea breath test for routine use for detecting Helicobacter pylori noninvasively

    SciTech Connect

    Henze, E.; Malfertheiner, P.; Clausen, M.; Burkhardt, H.; Adam, W.E. )

    1990-12-01

    A carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) urea breath test for detecting Helicobacter pylori with multiple breath sampling was developed. Carbon-14-urea (110 kBq) administered orally to 18 normal subjects and to 82 patients with Helicobacter infection. The exhaled {sup 14}C-labeled CO{sub 2} was trapped at 10-min intervals for 90 min. The total {sup 14}C activity exhaled over 90 min was integrated and expressed in %activity of the total dose given. In normals, a mean of 0.59% +/- 0.24% was measured, resulting in an upper limit of normal of 1.07%. In 82 patients, a sensitivity of 90.2%, a specificity of 83.8%, and a positive predictive value of 90.2% was found. The single probes at intervals of 40-60 min correlated best with the integrated result, with r ranging from 0.986 to 0.990. The test's diagnostic accuracy did not change at all when reevaluated with the 40-, 50-, or 60-min sample data alone. Thus, the {sup 14}C-urea breath test can be applied routinely as a noninvasive, low-cost and one-sample test with high diagnostic accuracy in detecting Helicobacter pylori colonization.

  10. (14C)Aminopyrine breath test in chronic liver disease: preliminary diagnostic implications

    SciTech Connect

    Burnstein, A.V.; Galambos, J.T.

    1981-12-01

    The (14C)aminopyrine breath test (APBT) score, an estimate of hepatic mixed-oxidase function, was evaluated in 21 consecutive patients wih active nonalcoholic chronic liver diseases. Ten had primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and 11 had chronic active hepatitis (CAH). The APBT score was normal or elevated in patients with PBC (P less than 0.001), and lower than normal in CAH patients (P less than 0.01); 10.5 +/- 1.6 and 3.5 +/- 1.86, respectively, vs control 7.65 +/- 1.15 (mean +/- SD). The 11 patients with CAH included two middle-aged women who displayed ambiguous severe intrahepatic cholestasis. There was no overlap between the APBT scores of the 10 PBC and 11 CAH patients. These initial data suggest that the APBT may be helpful in the differentiation of PBC and CAH, including misleading cholestatic forms of CAH.

  11. Validity and cost comparison of 14carbon urea breath test for diagnosis of H Pylori in dyspeptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Rasool, Shahid; Abid, Shahab; Jafri, Wasim

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To validate and compare the cost of microdose 14C urea breath test (UBT) with histology and rapid urease test for the diagnosis of H Pylori. METHODS: Ninety-four consecutive patients with dyspeptic symptoms undergoing gastroscopy were enrolled. Gastric biopsies were taken for histology and rapid urease test. UBT was performed after gastroscopy by microdose 14C urea capsules. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of UBT were calculated and compared with histology and rapid urease test. Cost comparison of these tests was also performed. RESULTS: H pylori was diagnosed by histology and rapid urease test in 66 (70%) and 61 (65%) patients, while 14C UBT detected infection in 63 (67%). Accuracy of UBT was 93% in comparison with histology while its positive and negative predictive values were 97% and 84%, respectively. Comparison of 14C UBT with rapid urease test gives an accuracy of 96%, with positive and negative predictive values of 95% and 97%, respectively. These results were highly reproducible with a Kappa test (P value < 0.001). Cost of histology or rapid urease test with gastroscopy was 110 USD or 95 USD respectively while the cost of UBT was 15 USD. CONCLUSION: Microdose 14C UBT was comparable to histology and rapid urease test. 14C UBT is an economical, self sufficient and suitable test to diagnose active H pylori infection in less developed countries. PMID:17352025

  12. The urea breath test: a non-invasive clinical tool for detecting Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Perri, F; Ghoos, Y; Hiele, M; Andriulli, A; Rutgeerts, P

    1995-03-01

    The urea breath test exploits the urease enzyme of Helicobacter pylori. The hydrolysis of labelled urea releases labelled carbon dioxide that is excreted in the breath. Distribution of urea throughout the stomach prevents sampling errors and allows for semiquantitative assessment of the extent of Helicobacter pylori infection. The urea breath test is very specific and sensitive and can be proposed as the method of choice for detecting Helicobacter pylori infection in ulcer patients before and after eradicating treatment as well as in epidemiological studies. PMID:7579592

  13. Breath /sup 14/CO2 after intravenous administration of (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine in liver diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Pauwels, S.; Geubel, A.P.; Dive, C.; Beckers, C.

    1982-01-01

    The determination of of /sup 14/CO2 in breath after oral administration of (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine has been proposed as a quantitative liver function test. In order to shorten the procedure and avoid misinterpretations related to variable rates of intestinal absorption, the (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine breath test (ABT) was performed after intravenous administration of (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine in 21 controls and 89 patients with biopsy-proven liver disease. The specific activity of the first hour sample corrected for body weight (SA1) was the most discriminant expression of breath data. The SA1 value, expressed as the percentage of the administered dose, was 0.86 +/- 0.1% (mean +/- SD) in controls and significantly less in patients (0.46 +/- 0.31%). Low values were observed in patients with untreated chronic active hepatitis (0.16 +/- 0.13%), alcoholic cirrhosis (0.2 +/ 0.15%0, and untreated postnecrotic cirrhosis (0.47 +/- 0.17%). In contrast, normal values were obtained in chronic persistent hepatitis (0.86 +/- 0.13%) and 58% of noncirrhotic alcoholic liver diseases (0.83 +/- 0.27%). The results of duplicate studies were reproducible and SA1 correlated with other conventional liver function tests, including 45-min BSP retention. Among these, ABT was the most sensitive screening test for the presence of cirrhosis, especially in alcoholic patients, where it allowed a sharp distinction between cirrhotic and noncirrhotic cases. The results obtained in chronic hepatitis suggested that ABT may provide a reliable index of the activity of the disease. In our hands, intravenous ABT, performed over a 1-hr period, was a fast, sensitive, and discriminant liver function test.

  14. Accuracy of urea breath test in Helicobacter pylori infection: Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ferwana, Mazen; Abdulmajeed, Imad; Alhajiahmed, Ali; Madani, Wedad; Firwana, Belal; Hasan, Rim; Altayar, Osama; Limburg, Paul J; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Knawy, Bandar

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To quantitatively summarize and appraise the available evidence of urea breath test (UBT) use to diagnose Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in patients with dyspepsia and provide pooled diagnostic accuracy measures. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane library and other databases for studies addressing the value of UBT in the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. We included cross-sectional studies that evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of UBT in adult patients with dyspeptic symptoms. Risk of bias was assessed using QUADAS (Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies)-2 tool. Diagnostic accuracy measures were pooled using the random-effects model. Subgroup analysis was conducted by UBT type (13C vs 14C) and by measurement technique (Infrared spectrometry vs Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry). RESULTS: Out of 1380 studies identified, only 23 met the eligibility criteria. Fourteen studies (61%) evaluated 13C UBT and 9 studies (39%) evaluated 14C UBT. There was significant variation in the type of reference standard tests used across studies.Pooled sensitivity was 0.96 (95%CI: 0.95-0.97) andpooled specificity was 0.93 (95%CI: 0.91-0.94). Likelihood ratio for a positive test was 12 and for a negative test was 0.05 with an area under thecurve of 0.985. Meta-analyses were associated with a significant statistical heterogeneity that remained unexplained after subgroup analysis. The included studies had a moderate risk of bias. CONCLUSION: UBT has high diagnostic accuracy for detecting H. pylori infection in patients with dyspepsia. The reliability of diagnostic meta-analytic estimates however is limited by significant heterogeneity. PMID:25632206

  15. 13C urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori: Evaluation of 10-minute breath collection

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Marina; Radovic, Vladimir; Wolfe, Melanie; Kamath, Markad; Bercik, Premsyl; Armstrong, David

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether a shortened 13C urea breath test (13C UBT) (breath collection time of 10 min) is as reliable as the standard assay (30 min). METHODS: Two hundred ninety-seven patients (mean ± SD: 53±16 years, 57% female) completed a 13C UBT. Breath samples were obtained at baseline and at 5 min intervals up to 30 min. Sixty-seven patients also underwent endoscopic biopsy. Cluster analysis was performed on the 13C UBT data to determine the optimal cut-off point at each time interval. Sensitivity and specificity of the 13C UBT at all intervals compared with histology and culture and against the standard 30 min interval were determined. RESULTS: The calculated optimal cut-off points for each time interval (T), expressed as delta over baseline (δ‰), were 3.29 δ‰ at T5, 3.15 δ‰ at T10, 3.42 δ‰ at T15, 3.17 δ‰ at T20, 2.99 δ‰ at T25 and 2.82 δ ‰ at T30. Except at T5, the risk of false-positive and false-negative test results at each time interval was lower than 2.3% using these cut-off points. When replacing the cut-off points with 3.0 δ‰, the risk of error was still lower than 2.3%. The test at T10 showed 98.6% sensitivity and 98.6% specificity compared with T30. T10 and T30 showed 100% sensitivity and 96% specificity compared with histology and culture. CONCLUSIONS: The 13C UBT is an accurate, noninvasive test, even when the breath sample interval is reduced to 10 min. The present study confirms the validity of a cut-off point of 3.0 δ‰ for the 10 min and 30 min 13C UBT. PMID:17171196

  16. Efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the 13C-urea breath test as the primary diagnostic investigation for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection compared to invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tests

    PubMed Central

    Nocon, Marc; Kuhlmann, Alexander; Leodolter, Andreas; Roll, Stephanie; Vauth, Christoph; Willich, Stefan N.; Greiner, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    sensitivity of the 13C-urea breath test is higher in one study and lower in two studies. The specificity is higher in two studies and lower in one study. One study each compares the 13C-urea breath test to the 14C-urea breath test and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, respectively, and reports no difference in sensitivity and specificity with the 14C-urea breath test, and lower sensitivity and higher specificity compared to PCR. The statistical significance of these differences is described for six of the 30 studies. Nine health economic evaluations are included in the Health Technology Assessment (HTA) report. Among these studies, the test-and-treat strategy using the 13C-urea breath test is compared to test-and-treat using serology in six analyses and to test and treat using the stool antigen test in three analyses. Thereby, test-and-treat using the breath test is shown to be cost-effective over the serology based strategy in three models and is dominated by a test-and-treat strategy using the stool antigen test in one model. A cost-effectiveness comparison between the urea breath test approach and the empirical antisecretory therapy is carried out in four studies. Of these, two studies report that the strategy using the urea breath test is cost-effective over the empirical antisecretory therapy. In two studies, test-and-treat using the 13C-urea breath test is compared to the empirical eradication therapy and in five studies to endoscopy-based strategies. The breath test approach dominates endoscopy in two studies and is dominated by this strategy in one study. Discussion All included medical and economic studies are limited to a greater or lesser extent. Additionally, the results of the studies are heterogeneous regarding medical and economic outcomes respectively. Thus, the majority of the medical studies do not report the statistical significance of the differences in sensitivity and specificity. In direct comparisons the 13C- urea breath test shows higher

  17. Dosimetry and reproducibility of a capsule-based C-14 urea breath test

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, M.J.; Stubbs, J.B.; Buck, D.A. |

    1995-05-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to determine the excretion of the C-14 and associated radiation dose and (2) to examine the reproducibility of a commercial C-14 urea breath test for H.pylori diagnosis. Tests were performed on twenty consenting volunteers (13M, 7F, 24-48 yr). Breath samples containing 1 mmol CO{sub 2} were obtained at 0,5,10,15,20,25,30 min. and 1,2,3,4,5,6,12, 24 hrs following administration of the 37kBq C-14 urea test capsule. A 24 hr urine collection was performed with each voiding collected separately. A repeat breath test was performed 24 hr after the first. H. pylori positive (HP+) was defined as a 15 minute breath sample >=50 dpm. Total urine excretion was obtained directly. Breath excretion was modeled by estimating the area under the excretion curve and using a constant factor of 884 mmol CO{sub 2}/ hr. Urine and breath excretion data in HP+ and H. pylori-negative (HP-) volunteers were pooled and fit to a monoexponential function thus estimating the cumulative urinary excretion of unmetabolized urea. Previously reported biokinetic models of C-14 urea and bicarbonate were used to estimate radiation doses form each compound. Weighted sums were calculated for each dose estimate using each group`s excretion fraction distribution. Both HP+ and HP- volunteers excreted an average of 73% of the C-14 over the first 24 hr. HP+ excretion was evenly divided between breath (34%) and urine (38%). HP-excretion is almost solely by the urinary pathway. The maximum dose for HP= was to the red marrow (0.0033 mGy) and a maximum of 0.0054 mGy to the urinary bladder wall for HP-. There was no difference between 15 inch breath samples on the two days (t-test, p>0.6). The minimum HP+ result at 15 inch was 270 dpm and the maximum HP- result at 15 inch was 18 dpm, indicating great separation between HP+ and HP- results. This study verifies previous dose estimates using C-14 excretion data. The test is sensitive and reproducible with a low radiation dose.

  18. Limitations in the use of /sup 14/C-glycocholate breath and stool bile acid determinations in patients with chronic diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.; Walker, K.; Thomson, A.B.

    1986-06-01

    Analysis of a modified /sup 14/C-glycocholate breath test on 165 consecutive in-patients being investigated for chronic diarrhea showed that the measurement of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ between 3 and 6 h after oral dosing of 5 microCi of /sup 14/C-glycocholic acid was of only limited use to distinguish between patients with Crohn's disease (CD), idiopathic bile salt wastage (IBW), or ileal resection (IR) from those with the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Continuing /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ collections for up to 24 h was of little more help in establishing the presence of bacterial overgrowth syndrome (BOS) and in distinguishing between BOS and CD. Stool bile acid measurements were of use in differentiating between IBW and IBS, but did not distinguish between CD and BOS or between CD and IR. Since the range of normal values was defined by measurements in the IBS group, a positive test was specific for an organic cause of chronic diarrhea. Even so, the sensitivity of the test was relatively low: CD, 53%; IR, 23%; IBW, /sup 14/%; and BOS, 10%. We believe that the 24-h /sup 14/C-glycocholic breath test combined with the measurement of stool bile acids represents a screening test of only limited use for the identification of organic causes of chronic diarrhea.

  19. Posttreatment 13C-Urea Breath Test Is Predictive of Antimicrobial Resistance to H. pylori After Failed Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Ai-Wen; Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Sheu, Bor-Shyang; Lin, Ching-Yih; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We tested whether a 13C-urea breath test can predict antimicrobial resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). METHODS Seventy patients who had failed triple eradication therapy and 108 untreated H. pylori-infected patients were given a 13C-urea breath test, endoscopy for culture of H. pylori, and assessment of clarithromycin resistance. The patients who had failed triple therapy then received 1 week of quadruple therapy to eradicate residual H. pylori. RESULTS The posttreatment value of the 13C-urea breath test expressed as excessive δ13CO2 per ml (ECR) was higher in patients with residual H. pylori with clarithromycin resistance than in those without (23.8 vs 10.6; P <.0001). With a cutoff of ECR >or≤15, the 13C-urea breath test was 88.6% sensitive and 88.9% specific in predicting clarithromycin resistance of residual H. pylori. The H. pylori eradication rate of the rescue regimen was higher for patients with a posttreatment ECR of the 13C-urea breath test ≤ 15 than for those with a value >15 (93.8% vs 73.3%; P <.05). In contrast, in treatment-naive H. pylori-infected patients, the pretreatment value of the 13C-urea breath test did not differ between patients infected with clarithromycin-resistant or-sensitive isolates (P >.05). CONCLUSION The posttreatment value of the 13C-urea breath test is predictive of clarithromycin resistance in residual H. pylori after failed triple therapy and predicts efficacy of the rescue regimen. The value of the noninvasive test is promising for primary care physicians who need to select a rescue regimen without invasive H. pylori culture. PMID:15836546

  20. Determining Urea Levels in Exhaled Breath Condensate with Minimal Preparation Steps and Classic LC–MS

    PubMed Central

    Pitiranggon, Masha; Perzanowski, Matthew S.; Kinney, Patrick L.; Xu, Dongqun; Chillrud, Steven N.; Yan, Beizhan

    2014-01-01

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) provides a relatively easy, non-invasive method for measuring biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in the airways. However, the levels of these biomarkers in EBC are influenced, not only by their levels in lung lining fluid but also by the volume of water vapor that also condenses during EBC collection. For this reason, the use of a biomarker of dilution has been recommended. Urea has been proposed and utilized as a promising dilution biomarker due to its even distribution throughout the body and relatively low volatility. Current EBC urea analytical methods either are not sensitive enough, necessitating large volumes of EBC, or are labor intensive, requiring a derivatization step or other pretreatment. We report here a straightforward and reliable LC–MS approach that we developed that does not require derivatization or large sample volume (∼36 µL). An Acclaim mixed-mode hydrophilic interaction chromatography column was selected because it can produce good peak symmetry and efficiently separate urea from other polar and nonpolar compounds. To achieve a high recovery rate, a slow and incomplete evaporation method was used followed by a solvent-phase exchange. Among EBC samples collected from 28 children, urea levels were found to be highly variable, with a relative standard deviation of 234%, suggesting high variability in dilution of the lung lining fluid component of EBC. The limit of detection was found to be 0.036 µg/mL. PMID:24190872

  1. Determining urea levels in exhaled breath condensate with minimal preparation steps and classic LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Pitiranggon, Masha; Perzanowski, Matthew S; Kinney, Patrick L; Xu, Dongqun; Chillrud, Steven N; Yan, Beizhan

    2014-10-01

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) provides a relatively easy, non-invasive method for measuring biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in the airways. However, the levels of these biomarkers in EBC are influenced, not only by their levels in lung lining fluid but also by the volume of water vapor that also condenses during EBC collection. For this reason, the use of a biomarker of dilution has been recommended. Urea has been proposed and utilized as a promising dilution biomarker due to its even distribution throughout the body and relatively low volatility. Current EBC urea analytical methods either are not sensitive enough, necessitating large volumes of EBC, or are labor intensive, requiring a derivatization step or other pretreatment. We report here a straightforward and reliable LC-MS approach that we developed that does not require derivatization or large sample volume (∼36 µL). An Acclaim mixed-mode hydrophilic interaction chromatography column was selected because it can produce good peak symmetry and efficiently separate urea from other polar and nonpolar compounds. To achieve a high recovery rate, a slow and incomplete evaporation method was used followed by a solvent-phase exchange. Among EBC samples collected from 28 children, urea levels were found to be highly variable, with a relative standard deviation of 234%, suggesting high variability in dilution of the lung lining fluid component of EBC. The limit of detection was found to be 0.036 µg/mL. PMID:24190872

  2. Simple 13C-urea breath test with infra-red spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Y; Kimura, K; Sohara, H; Shirasaki, A; Kawada, H; Satoh, K; Kihira, K; Wang, X M; Takimoto, T; Goto, Y; Takatori, K; Iida, K; Kajiwara, M

    1996-11-01

    When mass spectrophotometric analysis is used for the 13C-urea breath test to assess H. pylori infection, it is costly, complicated, and time-consuming. To overcome these disadvantages, we utilized an infra-red spectrophotometer as a substitute for the mass spectrophotometer. A total of 153 patients (181 tests) analyzed with peptic ulcers or non-ulcer dyspepsia were investigated. Breath samples were collected 15 min after ingestion of 13C-urea (100 mg in 30 ml water). An infra-red spectrophotometer was used to determine the concentration of 13CO2 in the expirate. The 13CO2/12CO2 ratio was also measured by mass spectrophotometry to compare results with those of infra-red spectrophotometric analysis. Direct detection of H. pylori was qualified in biopsy specimens. Of the 181 biopsies, 138 were positive for H. pylori infection and 43 were negative. With the urea breath test, the mean value in the positive group was significantly higher than that in the negative group (0.062 +/- 0.044 vs 0.011 +/- 0.014, respectively). The cut-off level, 0.01, was determined as delta 13C atom %. The sensitivity of infra-red spectrophotometry was 97.8% (135/138) and specificity was 74.4% (32/43). There was an extremely high coefficient of correlation (r = 0.996) between mass and infra-red photometric analysis. Infra-red spectrometry appears to have great potential not only for diagnosing H. pylori infection but also for assessing treatment results. Its advantages include technical simplicity, cost-effectiveness, and high accuracy. PMID:8959516

  3. Comparison of the 1-gram (/sup 14/C)xylose, 10-gram lactulose-H/sub 2/, and 80-gram glucose-H/sub 2/ breath tests in patients with small intestine bacterial overgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    King, C.E.; Toskes, P.P.

    1986-12-01

    The sensitivity of three breath tests (1-g (/sup 14/C)xylose, 10-g lactulose-H/sub 2/, and 80-g glucose-H/sub 2/) was studied in 20 subjects with culture-documented small intestine bacterial overgrowth. Elevated breath /sup 14/CO2 levels were seen within 30 min of (/sup 14/C)xylose administration in 19 of 20 subjects with bacterial overgrowth and 0 of 10 controls. In contrast, H/sub 2/ breath tests demonstrated uninterpretable tests (absence of H/sub 2/-generating bacteria) in 2 of 20 subjects with bacterial overgrowth and 1 of 10 controls and nondiagnostic increases in H/sub 2/ production in 3 of 18 glucose-H/sub 2/ and 7 of 18 lactulose-H/sub 2/ breath tests in subjects with bacterial overgrowth. These findings demonstrate continued excellent reliability of the 1-g (/sup 14/C)xylose breath test as a diagnostic test for bacterial overgrowth, indicate inadequate sensitivity of H/sub 2/ breath tests in detecting bacterial overgrowth, and suggest the need for evaluation of a /sup 13/CO/sub 2/ breath test having the same characteristics as the (/sup 14/C)xylose test (avidly absorbed substrate having minimal contact with the colonic flora) for nonradioactive breath detection of bacterial overgrowth in children and reproductive-age women.

  4. An optimized 13C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of H pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Campuzano-Maya, Germán

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To validate an optimized 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT) protocol for the diagnosis of H pylori infection that is cost-efficient and maintains excellent diagnostic accuracy. METHODS: 70 healthy volunteers were tested with two simplified 13C-UBT protocols, with test meal (Protocol 2) and without test meal (Protocol 1). Breath samples were collected at 10, 20 and 30 min after ingestion of 50 mg 13C-urea dissolved in 10 mL of water, taken as a single swallow, followed by 200 mL of water (pH 6.0) and a circular motion around the waistline to homogenize the urea solution. Performance of both protocols was analyzed at various cut-off values. Results were validated against the European protocol. RESULTS: According to the reference protocol, 65.7% individuals were positive for H pylori infection and 34.3% were negative. There were no significant differences in the ability of both protocols to correctly identify positive and negative H pylori individuals. However, only Protocol 1 with no test meal achieved accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 100%. The highest values achieved by Protocol 2 were 98.57%, 97.83%, 100%, 100% and 100%, respectively. CONCLUSION: A 10 min, 50 mg 13C-UBT with no test meal using a cut-off value of 2-2.5 is a highly accurate test for the diagnosis of H pylori infection at a reduced cost. PMID:17907288

  5. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori by carbon-13 urea breath test using a portable mass spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Sreekumar, J; France, N; Taylor, S; Matthews, T; Turner, P; Bliss, P; Watson, AJM

    2015-01-01

    Context: In the non-invasive detection of markers of disease, mass spectrometry is able to detect small quantities of volatile markers in exhaled air. However, the problem of size, expense and immobility of conventional mass spectrometry equipment has restricted its use. Now, a smaller, less expensive, portable quadrupole mass spectrometer system has been developed. Helicobacter pylori has been implicated in the development of chronic gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer. Objectives: To compare the results obtained from the presence of H. pylori by a carbon-13 urea test using a portable quadrupole mass spectrometer system with those from a fixed mass spectrometer in a hospital-based clinical trial. Methods: Following ethical approval, 45 patients attending a gastroenterology clinic at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital exhaled a breath sample into a Tedlar gas sampling bag. They then drank an orange juice containing urea radiolabelled with carbon and 30 min later gave a second breath sample. The carbon-13 content of both samples was measured using both quadrupole mass spectrometer systems. If the post-drink level exceeded the pre-drink level by 3% or more, a positive diagnosis for the presence of H. pylori was made. Results: The findings were compared to the results using conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry using a laboratory-based magnetic sector instrument off-site. The results showed agreement in 39 of the 45 patients. Conclusions: This study suggests that a portable quadrupole mass spectrometer is a potential alternative to the conventional centralised testing equipment. Future development of the portable quadrupole mass spectrometer to reduce further its size and cost is indicated, together with further work to validate this new equipment and to enhance its use in mass spectrometry diagnosis of other medical conditions. PMID:26770764

  6. [BREATH TEST WITH LOCALLY PRODUCED 13С-UREA (TBILISI, GEORGIA) IN DIAGNOSTICS OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION].

    PubMed

    Girdaladze, A; Mosidze, B; Elisabedashvili, G; Kordzaia, D

    2016-04-01

    Comparative assessment of results of detection of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection by breath tests with standard and locally produced 13С urea was done in 213 patients with gastric and duodenal pathology, including those who already were undergone the surgery. Invasive endoscopic biopsy test including rapid urease test (RUT), smear cytology and histology were also performed (tissue samples were obtained after endoscopy or surgery). RUT was carried out with the help of URE-HP test kit. Serological test for Hp antibodies was performed by IFA using kit ELISA. 13С urea breath test (UBT) was conducted for the determination of 13/12CO2 in breath samples by using of infrared spectroscope. In I group (125 patients) UBT was performed with standard 13С urea, in II group (88 patients) with locally produced 13С urea. Based on 5 different methods of Hp infection testing Hp positivity in 172 (80,8%) and Hp negativity in 41 (19,2%) patients were revealed. 13С-UBT showed the highest diagnostic value (accuracy-97,5%, sensibility-97,0%, specificity-100%) in Hp infection diagnosis. The (accuracy, sensibility and specificity of breath test with locally issued 13С urea (98,7%, 98,5% and 100% respectively) are the same as those for BT with standard 13С urea (96,7%, 96,2% and 100% respectively). These parameters are also highly credible in control of treatment efficiency (96,7%, 90,0% and 100% respectively). The correlation of index DOB‰ of breath test with results of RUT was revealed In Hp positive patients. This can serve as a marker of Hp infection rate. Preliminarily, in pre-clinical experimental study, harmless of locally issued 13С-urea from point of view of acute/sub-acute toxicity and allergy development was confirmed. The advantages (noninvasiveness, simplicity, rapidity, safety) and high diagnostic value of UBT (with both standard as well as locally produced 13С-urea) provide the opportunity to offer 13С-UBT as screening method of Hp infection diagnosis. It also

  7. Disposition of exogenous urea and effects of diet in rats.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Naruaki; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Nishimura, Yuka; Terauchi, Yoshiaki; Fujii, Toshihiko

    2006-01-01

    Although breath test using 13C-labeled urea (CAS 57-13-6, UBT) is becoming popular for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, disposition of exogenously given urea is not fully understood. The purpose of the present study is to elucidate the disposition of exogenous urea and to consider its relation with the UBT safety and biobehavior of endogenous urea. With 14C-labeled urea ([14C]urea), the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion including that into breathed air after its administration in trace to large doses in rats were investigated. [14C]Urea was given to fasted and non-fasted rats through intravenous and oral routes. It was found that the disposition of exogenous [14C]urea behaves in a similar way as endogenous urea, and a sufficiently large capacity for disposing urea in rats was suggested from the linear pharmacokinetics within the wide dose range of [14C]urea (2-1000 mg/kg). The safety of urea in UBT was also revealed by consideration of its dose and human urea body pool. It was also suggested that diet stimulates both systemic (as observed after the intravenous dose) and pre-systemic (as with the oral route) decompositions of urea into carbon dioxide and ammonia, but does not affect the renal elimination and distribution pattern in rat tissues. The findings in this study provide us with the quantitative information concerning not only the safety and disposition of urea as a diagnostic agent, but also the biobehavior of endogenous urea in ureotelism. PMID:16618019

  8. 13C-urea breath test for diagnosis of experimental Helicobacter pylori infection in barrier born pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Rosberg, K; Gustavsson, S

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies with Helicobacter pylori infected barrier born pigs indicate that the infection has a patchy distribution, resulting in false negative culture results on endoscopic biopsy specimens. This study aimed to adapt the 13C-urea breath test as used in humans to diagnose H pylori infection in barrier born pigs. The breath test was also performed after bismuth as a single treatment and after triple therapy (bismuth, ampicillin, metronidazole). In control pigs the median excess of 13CO2 in expired air was 2.2 (range 0-12 n = 22) ppm. The infected pigs (n = 4) showed consistently high values (median 23 range 14-43) when examined on four occasions (n = 16) four to 10 weeks after inoculation. Biopsy specimens for culture had lower sensitivity than the breath test. No reduction in excess 13CO2 was seen after three days' single bismuth treatment, but after two weeks' triple therapy the breath test results had returned to normal. This suppression was temporary only, however, as the breath test was positive again four weeks after stopping treatment. In conclusion, the 13C-urea breath test is a simple and reliable test for determining H pylori infection and monitoring treatment effects in barrier born pigs. Because the test can be performed in awake pigs anaesthesia and gastroscopy are unnecessary. Images Figure 1 PMID:8504957

  9. Comparison of an enzyme immunoassay for the detection of Helicobacter pylori antigens in the faeces with the urea breath test

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, A.; Williams, C.; Doherty, C.; Hossack, M.; Preston, T.; McColl, K.; Weaver, L.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Current diagnostic tests for Helicobacter pylori are invasive (endoscopy) or indirect (urea breath test, serology).
AIMS—To evaluate a new enzyme immunoassay (EIA) which detects H pylori antigens in faeces, by comparing its sensitivity and specificity in children with the 13C urea breath test (UBT).
METHODS—A total of 119 children underwent a UBT and provided a faecal sample for antigen testing within seven days. After an overnight fast each child provided a pretest breath sample, and samples at 30 and 40 minutes after ingestion of 100 mg 13C labelled urea. 13C enrichment of breath was measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Faeces were stored at −70°C until antigen testing, using the EIA. Samples were read spectrophotometrically at 450 nm and results were interpreted using recommended cut offs of optical density <0.14 as negative, ⩾0.16 as positive, with ⩾0.14 and <0.16 representing equivocal results. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated using the manufacturer's cut off compared with UBT.
RESULTS—Sensitivity and specificity were 88% and 82%, respectively. Negative and positive predictive values were 97% and 58%.
CONCLUSIONS—The EIA is an alternative, non-invasive, and easy to use method for the detection of H pylori in children. Its high negative predictive value suggests a role in screening out uninfected children.

 PMID:10952653

  10. Effect of posture on 13C-urea breath test in partial gastrectomy patients

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shu-Ming; Zhang, Fan; Shi, Dong-Mei; Xiang, Ping; Xiao, Li; Huang, Yi-Qin; Zhang, Gan-Sheng; Bao, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether posture affects the accuracy of 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT) for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) detection in partial gastrectomy patients. METHODS: We studied 156 consecutive residual stomach patients, including 76 with H. pylori infection (infection group) and 80 without H. pylori infection (control group). H. pylori infection was confirmed if both the rapid urease test and histology were positive during gastroscopy. The two groups were divided into four subgroups according to patients’ posture during the 13C-UBT: subgroup A, sitting position; subgroup B, supine position; subgroup C, right lateral recumbent position; and subgroup D, left lateral recumbent position. Each subject underwent the following modified 13C-UBT: 75 mg of 13C-urea (powder) in 100 mL of citric acid solution was administered, and a mouth wash was performed immediately; breath samples were then collected at baseline and at 5-min intervals up to 30 min while the position was maintained. Seven breath samples were collected for each subject. The cutoff value was 2.0‰. RESULTS: The mean delta over baseline (DOB) values in the subgroups of the infection group were similar at 5 min (P > 0.05) and significantly higher than those in the corresponding control subgroups at all time points (P < 0.01). In the infection group, the mean DOB values in subgroup A were higher than those in other subgroups within 10 min and peaked at the 10-min point (12.4‰ ± 2.4‰). The values in subgroups B and C both reached their peaks at 15 min (B, 13.9‰ ± 1.5‰; C, 12.2‰ ± 1.7‰) and then decreased gradually until the 30-min point. In subgroup D, the value peaked at 20 min (14.7‰ ± 1.7‰). Significant differences were found between the values in subgroups D and B at both 25 min (t = 2.093, P = 0.043) and 30 min (t = 2.141, P = 0.039). At 30 min, the value in subgroup D was also significantly different from those in subgroups A and C (D vs C: t = 6.325, P = 0.000; D vs A: t

  11. [COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF MASS-SPECTROMETRY AND INFRARED SPECRTROMETRY USED IN 13C-UREA BREATH TEST FOR HELICOBACTER PYLORI].

    PubMed

    Plavnik, R G; Nevmerzhitsky, V I; Butorova, L I; Plavnik, T E

    2015-01-01

    At present, mass-spectrometry is the most accurate and efficient method for measuring carbon isotope ratio in 13C-urea breath test for H. pylori infection but its wide application is restricted by the high cost of equipment and operational complexity. IR spectrometry is one of the less expensive techniques recently proposedfor the purpose. To compare the effectiveness of the two methods, we undertook a study including 20 volunteers (6 men and 14 women) aged 18-60 years with parallel measurements by IR and mass-spectrometry. IR spectrometry was shown to be highly accurate (94-96%), sensitive (up to 100%), and specific (87.5%) which makes it a promising alternative to mass-spectrometry to be used in urea breath test for mass examination especially in outpatient facilities. PMID:27008742

  12. Cost-effectiveness of the Carbon-13 Urea Breath Test for the Detection of Helicobacter Pylori

    PubMed Central

    Masucci, L; Blackhouse, G; Goeree, R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This analysis aimed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of various testing strategies for Helicobacter pylori in patients with uninvestigated dyspepsia and to calculate the budgetary impact of these tests for the province of Ontario. Data Sources Data on the sensitivity and specificity were obtained from the clinical evidence-based analysis. Resource items were obtained from expert opinion, and costs were applied on the basis of published sources as well as expert opinion. Review Methods A decision analytic model was constructed to compare the costs and outcomes (false-positive results, false-negative results, and misdiagnoses avoided) of the carbon-13 (13C) urea breath test (UBT), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) serology test, and a 2-step strategy of an ELISA serology test and a confirmatory 13C UBT based on the sensitivity and specificity of the tests and prevalence estimates. Results The 2-step strategy is more costly and more effective than the ELISA serology test and results in $210 per misdiagnosis case avoided. The 13C UBT is dominated by the 2-step strategy, i.e., it is more costly and less effective. The budget impact analysis indicates that it will cost $7.9 million more to test a volume of 129,307 patients with the 13C UBT than with ELISA serology, and $4.7 million more to test these patients with the 2-step strategy. Limitations The clinical studies that were pooled varied in the technique used to perform the breath test and in reference standards used to make comparisons with the breath test. However, these parameters were varied in a sensitivity analysis. The economic model was designed to consider intermediate outcomes only (i.e., misdiagnosed cases) and was not a complete model with final patient outcomes (e.g., quality-adjusted life years). Conclusions Results indicate that the 2-step strategy could be economically attractive for the testing of H. pylori. However, testing with the 2-step strategy will cost the Ministry of

  13. Effect of a test meal on the intragastric distribution of urea in the 13C-urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, J C; Washington, N; Blackshaw, P E; Greaves, J L; Perkins, A C; Hawkey, C J; Spiller, R C

    1995-01-01

    Test meals are invariably used in the 13C-urea breath test (UBT) but their effect on the intragastric distribution and gastric residence time of urea given in the test is unknown. The site of Helicobacter pylori urease measured in the test is unknown and whether the test measures total or regional gastric urease is uncertain. This study reports the results of paired UBTs with simultaneous gastric distribution studies, one with and one without a fatty test meal, two weeks apart on seven H pylori infected subjects. The test meal did not affect UBT results at 10 minutes, but increased values at 30 minutes and thereafter. The amount of scintigraphic label in the antrum at 10 minutes was also unaffected by the meal but increased at 30 minutes and thereafter, whereas the amount in the body/fundus was greatly increased both at 10 minutes and throughout the test. There was considerable variation in intragastric distribution of urea between subjects, both with and without the test meal. This study shows that a test meal profoundly affects intragastric distribution of urea solution in the UBT, and increases UBT values at 30 minutes and later. Variability between subjects, however, means that accurate measurement of total or regional gastric urease is probably unrealistic. Images Figure 1 PMID:7698688

  14. Capsule 13C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Nan-Jing; Lai, Kwok-Hung; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Lee, Shui-Cheng; Tsay, Daw-Guey; Lo, Ching-Chu; Tseng, Huei-Hwa; Huang, Wen-Keui; Lo, Gin-Ho; Hsu, Ping-I

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To compare the accuracy of capsule 13C-urea breath test (UBT) with conventional invasive methods for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. METHODS: One hundred patients received CLO test, histological examination, culture and 100- or 50-mg capsule UBT for the diagnosis of H pylori infection. H pylori infection was defined as those with positive culture or positive results from both histology and CLO test. RESULTS: Both the sensitivity and specificity of the 100-mg capsule UBT (n = 50) were 100%. The sensitivity and specificity of the 50-mg capsule UBT (n = 50) were 96.4 and 100%, respectively. Taken together, the accuracy of capsule UBT (n = 100) was higher than that of CLO test, histology and culture (100% vs 92%, 91% and 89%, respectively; P = 0.035, 0.018 and 0.005, respectively). Our data showed that the optimal timing of sampling for 100- and 50-mg capsule UBT was 15-30 and 6-15 min, respectively. CONCLUSION: Capsule UBT has a higher accuracy compared with biopsy-based tests. It is an ideal method for the diagnosis of H pylori infection. PMID:15761976

  15. Gender-associated differences in urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori infection referrals and results among dyspeptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Moshkowitz, Menachem; Horowitz, Noya; Beit-Or, Anat; Halpern, Zamir; Santo, Erwin

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To verify whether there is a gender difference in the 13C-urea breath test results in a large cohort. METHODS: The test results of dyspeptic patients referred for 13C-urea breath testing between January and December, 2007 were evaluated. Testing was carried out at the health insurance organization branches and evaluated at a central laboratory in Israel. RESULTS: Of a total of 28 746 test results, 18 122 (63.04%) were from females and 10 624 (36.95%) from males. Overall, 10 188 (35.4%) results [expressed as delta over baseline (DOB)] were positive (DOB 13C > 5), 18,326 (63.7%) were negative (DOB 13C < 3.5) and 232 (0.8%) were borderline (DOB 13C 3.5-5). There was a significant difference between the total positive rate among females and males (34.8% vs 37.2%, respectively, P = 0.0003). The mean test value was increased by approximately 10 units for females compared to males (P < 0.01) and this difference was consistent for all age groups (i.e., between 10-80 years of age, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: More females were referred to 13C-urea breath testing. More males had positive results. The mean test values were significantly higher among females of all age groups, possibly representing an increased bacterial load among females and suggesting gender-associated differences in Helicobacter pylori host interactions. PMID:22737592

  16. Urea

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Urea ; CASRN : 57 - 13 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects ) a

  17. Dual therapy for third-line Helicobacter pylori eradication and urea breath test prediction

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Maekawa, Takama; Harada, Naohiko; Toyokawa, Tatsuya; Kuwai, Toshio; Ohara, Masanori; Suzuki, Takahiro; Kawanishi, Masahiro; Noguchi, Kenji; Yoshio, Toshiyuki; Katsushima, Shinji; Tsuruta, Hideo; Masuda, Eiji; Tanaka, Munehiro; Katayama, Shunsuke; Kawamura, Norio; Nishizawa, Yuko; Hibi, Toshifumi; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of a dual therapy with rabeprazole and amoxicillin (AMX) as an empiric third-line rescue therapy. In patients with failure of first-line treatment with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-AMX-clarithromycin regimen and second-line treatment with the PPI-AMX-metronidazole regimen, a third-line eradication regimen with rabeprazole (10 mg q.i.d.) and AMX (500 mg q.i.d.) was prescribed for 2 wk. Eradication was confirmed by the results of the 13C-urea breath test (UBT) at 12 wk after the therapy. A total of 46 patients were included; however, two were lost to follow-up. The eradication rates as determined by per-protocol and intention-to-treat analyses were 65.9% and 63.0%, respectively. The pretreatment UBT results in the subjects showing eradication failure; those patients showing successful eradication comprised 32.9 ± 28.8 permil and 14.8 ± 12.8 permil, respectively. The pretreatment UBT results in the subjects with eradication failure were significantly higher than those in the patients with successful eradication (P = 0.019). A low pretreatment UBT result (≤ 28.5 permil) predicted the success of the eradication therapy with a positive predictive value of 81.3% and a sensitivity of 89.7%. Adverse effects were reported in 18.2% of the patients, mainly diarrhea and stomatitis. Dual therapy with rabeprazole and AMX appears to serve as a potential empirical third-line strategy for patients with low values on pretreatment UBT. PMID:22690086

  18. Applicability of a short/rapid 13C-urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori: retrospective multicenter chart review study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Carbon labeled urea breath tests usually entail a two point sampling with a 20 to 30-minute gap. Our aim was to evaluate the duration of time needed for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori by the BreathID® System. Methods This is a retrospective multicenter chart review study. Test location, date, delta over baseline, and duration of the entire test were recorded. Consecutively 13C urea breath tests results were extracted from the files over a nine year period. Results Of the 12,791 tests results, 35.1% were positively diagnosed and only 0.1% were inconclusive. A statistically significant difference in prevalence among the countries was found: Germany showing the lowest, 13.3%, and Israel the highest, 44.1%. Significant differences were found in time to diagnosis: a positive diagnosis had the shortest and an inconclusive result had the longest. Overall test duration averaged 15.1 minutes in Germany versus approximately 13 minutes in other countries. Diagnosis was achieved after approximately 9 minutes in Israel, Italy and Switzerland, but after 10 on average in the others. The mean delta over baseline value for a negative diagnosis was 1.03 ± 0.86, (range, 0.9 - 5), versus 20.2 ± 18.9, (range, 5.1 - 159.4) for a positive one. Conclusions The BreathID® System used in diagnosing Helicobacter pylori can safely shorten test duration on average of 10-13 minutes without any loss of sensitivity or specificity and with no test lasting more than 21 minutes. PMID:22260296

  19. Evaluation of three commercial enzyme immunoassays compared with the 13C urea breath test for detection of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed Central

    Marchildon, P A; Ciota, L M; Zamaniyan, F Z; Peacock, J S; Graham, D Y

    1996-01-01

    The diagnostic significance of the serological detection of antibodies to Helicobacter pylori has been established by numerous investigators. Reports of the clinical reliabilities of commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kits available for this purpose vary as a result of the different H. pylori antigen sources and reference methods used. The 13C urea breath test (UBT) has been shown to be an extremely accurate and reliable method of detecting H. pylori infection. We used the 13C urea breath test as the confirmatory method for H. pylori status to evaluate three commercially available EIA kits designed to detect immunoglobulin G antibodies to H. pylori. These kits were the HM-CAP EIA kit (Enteric Products, Inc.), the PYLORI STAT EIA kit (BioWhittaker, Inc.), and the G.A.P. kit (Bio-Rad Laboratories/Biomerica, Inc.). The evaluations were performed in a double-blind manner with samples from 473 clinically characterized patients. This group included patients with symptomatic gastrointestinal disorders as well as nonsymptomatic volunteers. The sensitivities of the kits were as follows: HM-CAP, 98.4%; PYLORI STAT, 99.2%; and G.A.P., 100%. The specificities were as follows: HM-CAP, 96.4%; PYLORI STAT, 90.1%; and G.A.P., 26.0%. Although the HM-CAP and PYLORI STAT kits performed comparably, the G.A.P. test yielded significantly more false-positive results and an unacceptably high number of indeterminate results. PMID:8727892

  20. Evaluation of 13C-urea breath test in the detection of Helicobacter pylori and in monitoring the effect of tripotassium dicitratobismuthate in non-ulcer dyspepsia.

    PubMed Central

    Dill, S; Payne-James, J J; Misiewicz, J J; Grimble, G K; McSwiggan, D; Pathak, K; Wood, A J; Scrimgeour, C M; Rennie, M J

    1990-01-01

    Sixty nine patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia have been studied with endoscopy, biopsy, quick urease (CLO) test, Helicobacter pylori culture, and the 13C-urea breath test before and after treatment with tripotassium dicitratobismuthane (DeNol) two tablets twice daily for four weeks. Symptoms of non-ulcer dyspepsia were recorded using a standard questionnaire. Using H pylori culture as the gold standard, the sensitivity of the 13C-urea breath test was 90%, the specificity 98.6%, and the accuracy 94.8% with a positive predictive value of 98.2% and a negative predictive value of 92.5%. Conversion rate from H pylori positive to negative status after treatment with tripotassium dicitratobismuthate was 17.9%. Symptoms of non-ulcer dyspepsia improved appreciably after treatment irrespective of H pylori status. The 13C-urea breath test is an accurate research tool suitable for serial testing and population surveys. PMID:2253905

  1. Simplified single sample 13Carbon urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori: comparison with histology, culture, and ELISA serology.

    PubMed Central

    Logan, R P; Polson, R J; Misiewicz, J J; Rao, G; Karim, N Q; Newell, D; Johnson, P; Wadsworth, J; Walker, M M; Baron, J H

    1991-01-01

    There is no ideal method for detecting Helicobacter pylori. The 'standard' 13Carbon urea breath test (13C-UBT), which involves collecting eight to 15 breath samples and subsequent costly analysis, was modified by pooling 21 samples of expired breath taken at five minute intervals for 40 minutes into a collecting bag, from which a single 20 ml aliquot was taken and analysed by mass spectrometry. This test was evaluated on 50 patients after routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, and results were compared with those from the standard 13C-UBT, bacteriology, ELISA serology, and histology--the latter being taken as the gold standard. H pylori were seen in 34 of 50 (68%) patients (in three it was detected in biopsy specimens from the corpus alone). The modified 13C-UBT was positive (pooled excretion delta 13CO2 greater than 5 per mil) in 31 patients and negative in 19 (three false negative results), specificity was 100% (standard 13C-UBT 94%) and sensitivity 92% (standard 13C-UBT 93%). The modified 13C-UBT had a coefficient of variation within subjects of 3.7%. For the ELISA serology and culture the specificities were both 100%, but the sensitivities were 82% and 68% respectively. The 13C-UBT results correlated with the grade of histological gastritis. The modified 13C-UBT is simpler, cheaper, more reproducible, and provides an easy non-invasive method for the detection of H pylori. PMID:1773948

  2. Carbon-13 Urea Breath Test for Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Patients with Uninvestigated Ulcer-Like Dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Ling, D

    2013-01-01

    Background Dyspepsia is a condition defined by chronic pain or discomfort in the upper gastrointestinal tract that can be caused by Helicobacter pylori. The carbon-13 urea breath test (13C UBT) is a non-invasive test to detect H. pylori. Objectives We aimed to determine the diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility of the 13C UBT in adult patients with ulcer-like dyspepsia who have no alarm features. Data Sources A literature search was performed using Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid Embase, the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database, for studies published between 2003 and 2012. Review Methods We abstracted the sensitivity and specificity, which were calculated against a composite reference standard. Summary estimates were obtained using bivariate random effects regression analysis. Results From 19 diagnostic studies, the 13C UBT summary estimates were 98.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 96.3–99.0) for sensitivity and 95.1% (95% CI, 90.3–97.6) for specificity. In 6 studies that compared the 13C UBT with serology, the 113C UBT sensitivity was 95.0% (95% CI, 90.1–97.5) and specificity was 91.6 % (95% CI, 81.3–96.4). The sensitivity and specificity for serology were 92.9% (95% CI, 82.6–97.3) and 71.1% (95% CI, 63.8–77.5), respectively. In 1 RCT, symptom resolution, medication use, and physician visits were similar among the 13C UBT, serology, gastroscopy, or empirical treatment arms. However, patients tested with 13C UBT reported higher dyspepsia-specific quality of life scores. Limitations Processing of the 13C UBT results can vary according to many factors. Further, the studies showed significant heterogeneity and used different composite reference standards. Conclusions The 13C UBT is an accurate test with high sensitivity and specificity. Compared with serology, it has higher specificity. There is a paucity of data on the 13C UBT beyond test accuracy. Plain Language

  3. Quantification of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastritis and ulcer disease using a simple and rapid carbon-14-urea breath test

    SciTech Connect

    Debongnie, J.C.; Pauwels, S.; Raat, A.; de Meeus, Y.; Haot, J.; Mainguet, P. )

    1991-06-01

    Gastric urease was studied isotopically in 230 patients with biopsy-proven normal mucosa or chronic gastritis, including 59 patients with ulcer disease. Carbon-14-urea was given in 25 ml of water without substrate carrier or nutrient-dense meal, and breath samples were collected over a 60-min period. The amount of 14CO2 excreted at 10 min was independent of the rate of gastric emptying and was not quantitatively influenced by the buccal urease activity. The 10-min 14CO2 values discriminated well between Helicobacter pylori positive and negative patients (94% sensitivity, 89% specificity) and correlated with the number of organisms assessed by histology. The test was a good predictor of chronic gastritis (95% sensitivity and 96% specificity), and a quantitative relationship was observed between 14CO2 values and the severity and activity of the gastritis. In H. pylori positive patients, breath 14CO2 was found to be similar in patients with and without ulcer disease, suggesting that the number of bacteria is not a determining factor for the onset of ulceration.

  4. 13C-Urea breath test threshold calculation and evaluation for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    PubMed Central

    Herold, Ralf; Becker, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Background The 13C-urea breath test (UBT) is performed in adults and children with epigastric pain for non-invasively diagnosing a suspected H. pylori infection. Criteria for UBT interpretation have not been generally agreed on and test reliability has not been established in children of different ages. This study aimed at identifying reliable UBT thresholds in children by using 251 UBTs in conjunction with reference histology and by analyzing 1232 UBTs. Methods At baseline and 30 and 60 minutes after the administration of 75 mg 13C-urea to children and adolescents (0.25 to 18 years of age), the differences (Δ) of 13CO2/12CO2 ratio in exhaled air (δ) were determined by mass spectrometry. UBT Δδ value thresholds were calculated in random subgroups and evaluated in complementary subgroups using logistic regressions on reference histology or bimodal distribution analyses of Δδ values from UBTs alone. Results Δδ values were higher (median, 15.4‰) in positive (133/251, 53 %) than in negative histology (2.4‰). At 30 minutes, the calculated cut-off was 5.3‰ (mean regression determination R2 = 0.91), and sensitivity (0.95), specificity (0.97), positive (0.97) and negative predictive values (0.95) were higher than at 60 minutes (threshold 6.8‰, R2 = 0.85). Similar thresholds resulted from UBTs analysis (5.8‰ and 6.2‰) when sensitivity and specificity were maximized (concordance probabilities, 0.99 and 0.99). There was no systematic age effect. Conclusions In children, 13C UBT cut-offs were obtained and specially validated, entailing high accuracy of non-invasively testing for gastric H. pylori infection. PMID:12014996

  5. Occult H. pylori infection partially explains ‘false-positive’ results of 13C-urea breath test

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Lázaro, María J; Lario, Sergio; Sánchez-Delgado, Jordi; Montserrat, Antònia; Quílez, Elisa M; Casalots, Alex; Suarez, David; Campo, Rafel; Brullet, Enric; Junquera, Félix; Sanfeliu, Isabel; Segura, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    Background In a previous study, UBiT-100 mg, (Otsuka, Spain), a commercial 13C-urea breath test omitting citric acid pre-treatment, had a high rate of false-positive results; however, it is possible that UBiT detected low-density ‘occult’ infection missed by other routine reference tests. We aimed to validate previous results in a new cohort and to rule out the possibility that false-positive UBiT were due to an ‘occult’ infection missed by reference tests. Methods Dyspeptic patients (n = 272) were prospectively enrolled and UBiT was performed, according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Helicobacter pylori infection was determined by combining culture, histology and rapid urease test results. We calculated UBiT sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (with 95% CI). In addition, we evaluated ‘occult’ H. pylori infection using two previously-validated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for urease A (UreA) and 16 S sequences in gastric biopsies. We included 44 patients with a false-positive UBiT, and two control groups of 25 patients each, that were positive and negative for all H. pylori tests. Results UBiT showed a false-positive rate of 17%, with a specificity of 83%. All the positive controls and 12 of 44 patients (27%) with false-positive UBiT were positive for all two PCR tests; by contrast, none of our negative controls had two positive PCR tests. Conclusions UBiT suffers from a high rate of false-positive results and sub-optimal specificity, and the protocol skipping citric acid pre-treatment should be revised; however, low-density ‘occult’ H. pylori infection that was undetectable by conventional tests accounted for around 25% of the ‘false-positive’ results. PMID:26535122

  6. Impact of long-term ranitidine and pantoprazole on accuracy of [13C]urea breath test.

    PubMed

    Dulbecco, Pietro; Gambaro, Camilla; Bilardi, Claudio; Zentilin, Patrizia; Mele, Maria Raffaella; Mansi, Carlo; Biagini, Riccardo; Tessieri, Laura; Iiritano, Elena; Usai, Paolo; Vigneri, Sergio; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2003-02-01

    No previous study has analyzed the impact of long-term antisecretory drugs on the precision of [13C]urea breath test (UBT). We assessed the rate of UBT conversion from positive to negative results during 60-day therapy with standard doses of ranitidine and pantoprazole. For this purpose, we recruited 60 dyspeptic patients with H. pylori infection ascertained on the basis of the concomitant results of CLO-test, histology, and UBT. Our patients were randomly assigned to receive ranitidine 300 mg at night or pantoprazole 40 mg in the morning for 60 days. UBT was performed at baseline and on days 14, 30, and 60, while patients were still taking antisecretory drugs. Patients with false-negative UBT on day 60 repeated the test every 3 days until conversion. After overnight fasting, duplicate breath test samples were taken from each patient before and 30 min after ingestion of 75 mg [13C]urea dissolved in 150 ml of 0.033 mol/liter citric acid. Four patients dropped out of the study. Both drugs induced similar false-negative UBTs on day 14 of dosing (P = 0.5). Afterwards, the three false-negative UBTs in the ranitidine group again became positive during therapy and particularly on day 30 of dosing. Of the four false-negative UBTs in the pantoprazole group at day 60, one became positive after 3 and three after 9 days of therapy cessation. Our findings show that the long-term use of ranitidine and pantoprazole at standard doses has different effects on the results of UBT. In the pantoprazole group patients again became positive within 3-9 days after stopping 60-day therapy, whereas in the ranitidine group patients reverted to positive on day 30 of dosing while they were still on treatment and this was likely due to development of tolerance. Therefore, patients taking pantoprazole need at least a 10-day withdrawal before UBT testing, while those taking ranitidine for at least 30 days can undergo UBT without the necessity of a wash-out period. PMID:12643609

  7. Diagnostic values of Helicobacter pylori diagnostic tests: stool antigen test, urea breath test, rapid urease test, serology and histology*

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Shadi; Tavakkoli, Hamid; Habizadeh, Mohamad Reza; Emami, Mohammad Hasan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study is to compare validity of 5 diagnostic tests of helicobacter pylori with each other: stool antigen test, urea breath test (UBT), rapid urease test (RUT), serology and histology. METHODS: A total of 94 patients who had indication of endoscopy entered the study. All of the 5 tests were performed for each patient. When the results of at least 2 tests were positive (except serology), Helicobacter pylori infection was considered to be positive. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, accuracy and area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of these 5 tests were determined. RESULTS: The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, accuracy and area under ROC curve of these 5 tests are as below, respectively. Histology: 89%, 78%, 93%, 91%, 85% and 0.881; RUT: 93%, 75%, 95%, 94%, 86% and 0.831; serology: 50%, 54%, 46%, 61%, 52% and 0.563; stool antigen test: 96%, 83%, 98%, 96%, 91% and 0.897; UBT: 89%, 73%, 92%, 90%, 82% and 0.892. CONCLUSIONS: Stool antigen test is the most accurate test for Helicobacter pylori diagnosis before eradication of these bacteria. PMID:22973378

  8. Rapid 13C Urea Breath Test to Identify Helicobacter pylori Infection in Emergency Department Patients with Upper Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, Andrew C.; Pierce, Rebecca; Cummings, Derek A.T.; Pines, Jesse M.; May, Larissa; Smith, Meaghan A.; Marcotte, Joseph; McCarthy, Melissa L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In emergency department (ED) patients with upper abdominal pain, management includes ruling out serious diseases and providing symptomatic relief. One of the major causes of upper abdominal pain is an ulcer caused by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which can be treated and cured with antibiotics. We sought to estimate the prevalence of H. pylori infection in symptomatic patients using a convenience sample at a single urban academic ED and demonstrate the feasibility of ED-based testing. Methods: We prospectively enrolled patients with a chief complaint of pain or discomfort in the upper abdomen for 1 year from February 2011 until February 2012 at a single academic urban ED. Enrolled subjects were tested for H. pylori using a rapid point of care 13C Urea Breath Test (UBT) [Exalenz Bioscience]. We compared patient characteristics between those who tested positive versus negative for the disease. Results: A total of 205 patients with upper abdominal pain were tested over 12 months, and 24% (95% confidence interval: 19% to 30%) tested positive for H. pylori. Black subjects were more likely to test positive than white subjects (28% v. 6%, P < 0.001). Other factors, such as age and sex, were not different between the 2 groups. Conclusion: In our ED, H. pylori infection was present in 1 in 4 patients with epigastric pain, and testing with a UBT was feasible. Further study is needed to determine the risk factors associated with infection, the prevalence of H. pylori in other EDs, the effect of the test on ED length of stay and the costeffectiveness of an ED-based test-and-treat strategy. PMID:23687549

  9. Evaluation of [13C]Urea Breath Test and Helicobacter pylori Stool Antigen Test for Diagnosis of H. pylori Infection in Children from a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Cardinali, Luciana de Carvalho Costa; Rocha, Gifone Aguiar; Rocha, Andreia Maria Camargos; de Moura, Sílvia Beleza; de Figueiredo Soares, Taciana; Esteves, Ana Maria Braz; Nogueira, Ana Margarida Miguel Ferreira; Cabral, Mônica Maria Demas Álvares; de Carvalho, Anfrisina Sales Teles; Bitencourt, Paulo; Ferreira, Alexandre; Queiroz, Dulciene Maria Magalhães

    2003-01-01

    The [13C]urea breath test (13C-UBT) and Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test (HpSA) for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection in children were validated. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 93.8, 99.1, 97.8, and 98.0%, respectively, for the 13C-UBT and 96.9, 100, 100, and 98.0%, respectively, for HpSA. Both tests are appropriate for diagnosing H. pylori infection in children. PMID:12843086

  10. Measurement of fecal /sup 14/C excretion

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaran, K.A.; Wiener, N.S.; Katz, J.B.

    1982-11-01

    Simultaneous measurements of fecal /sup 14/C and expired /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ in the breath are necessary to evaluate patients with various ileal abnormalities and bile salt malabsorption. Following the oral ingestion of the labeled bile acid, glycine-(I-/sup 14/C)cholic acid, detection of increased fecal /sup 14/C without abnormal expiration of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ identifies patients with ileal resection. This contrasts with the normal fecal /sup 14/C content and abnormal expired /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ found in patients with bacterial overgrowth. Fecal /sup 14/C content was determined by utilizing Van Slyke combustion of the specimen and trapping the liberated /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ with Scintisorb C. The method is simple, rapid, and accurate, and expands the diagnostic usefulness of the bile salt absorption test.

  11. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children: Comparison of a Salivary Immunoglobulin G Antibody Test with the [13C]Urea Breath Test

    PubMed Central

    Bode, G.; Marchildon, P.; Peacock, J.; Brenner, H.; Rothenbacher, D.

    2002-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in a population-based sample of 477 children (mean age ± standard deviation, 5.8 ± 0.5 years) determined by the [13C]urea breath test ([13C]UBT) was 10.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.1 to 13.8%), and that determined by salivary enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was 11.9% (95% CI, 9.2 to 15.2%). Compared to the [13C]UBT, the sensitivity and specificity of the salivary ELISA were 80.9% (95% CI, 66.3 to 90.4%) and 95.3% (95% CI, 92.7 to 97.1%), respectively. PMID:11874901

  12. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in School and Pre-School Aged Children with C-14 Urea Breath Test and the Association with Familial and Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Çınar, Alev; Sadıç, Murat; İkbal Atılgan, Hasan; Baskın, Aylin; Koca, Gökhan; Demirel, Koray; Korkmaz, Meliha

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection in pre-school and school age children with C-14 urea breath test, and to explore its association with age and socioeconomic factors in Turkey. Methods: Hp infection status was determined by using Urea Breath Test (UBT). Patients who had previous gastric surgery, Hp eradication treatment or equivocal UBT results were excluded. A questionnaire was administered to elicit information on gender, age, ABO/Rh blood group type, presence of gastric disease in the family, domestic animal in the household, and treatment for idiopathic Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA). Results: This retrospective study included 500 pediatric patients (179 boys, 321 girls, mean age 10.7±4.3 years) of whom 62 (12.4%) were aged ≤6 years and 438 (87.6%) were aged 7 to 16 years. Helicobacter pylori (Hp) was positive in 245 (49%) cases. In the pre-school age group, 21/62 cases (34%) had positive UBT while in the school age group 224/438 children (51%) had positive UBT. A family history of dyspepsia and pet ownership were not associated with Hp positivity. Hp positive 76 (29.8%) children were on IDA treatment but this was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The Hp infection positivity rate was 49% in the pediatric age study group. The positivity rate was significantly lower at preschool age than school age, and it increased with age. There was no association with gender, ABO/Rh blood groups, presence of domestic pets, IDA, or history of gastric disease in the family. PMID:26316471

  13. Urease-positive bacteria in the stomach induce a false-positive reaction in a urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Takako; Mabe, Katsuhiro; Hanawa, Tomoko; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2008-07-01

    This study investigated the influence of urease-positive non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria on the results of a urea breath test (UBT) to evaluate the diagnostic utility of a UBT using film-coated [(13)C]urea tablets. The UBT was performed in 102 patients treated with a proton pump inhibitor and antibiotics for the eradication of H. pylori. Urease-producing bacteria other than H. pylori were isolated and identified from the oral cavity and stomach. In 4/102 patients, the UBT gave false-positive results. These false-positive results were found to be caused by the presence of urease-positive bacteria in the oral cavity and stomach. Five bacterial species with urease activity (Proteus mirabilis, Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae and Staphylococcus aureus) were subsequently isolated from the oral cavity and/or stomach. As there was no correlation between the in vitro urease activity of urease-positive non-H. pylori bacteria and the UBT value, and all of the patients with a false-positive UBT result were suffering from atrophic gastritis, it is possible that the false-positive results in the UBT were a result of colonization of urease-positive bacteria and gastric hypochlorhydric conditions. Thus, for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection using a UBT, the influence of stomach bacteria must be considered when interpreting the results. PMID:18566138

  14. A citric acid solution is an optimal test drink in the 13C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J E; Leodolter, A; Sauerbruch, T; Malfertheiner, P

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT) is a simple, non-invasive and reliable test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. The duration of the test, the timing of breath sampling, and the accuracy of the method vary according to the test meal used. AIM: To identify the optimal test meal or drink for rapid and accurate performance of the 13C-UBT for the detection of H pylori infection. PATIENTS: Eighty patients with dyspeptic symptoms were included. Of these, 48 patients had a positive H pylori status and 32 a negative one according to the results of the rapid urease test, histological examination, and culture. METHODS: A 13C-UBT was performed after an overnight fast, on three consecutive days. On each study day a different test meal or drink was given (0.1 N citric acid solution, a standard semiliquid meal, or a semiliquid fatty meal) 10 minutes before giving 75 mg 13C-urea. Breath samples were collected at 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes, and analysed by isotype ratio mass spectrometry. Results were expressed as delta (delta) and considered as positive for H pylori if the highest delta (peak) was greater than 4.0. RESULTS: The delta peak obtained with the citric acid drink in H pylori positive subjects (24.1 (SEM 1.5)) was significantly higher than that obtained with any of the semiliquid meals (13.3 (SEM 1.1) and 17.1 (SEM 1.0) respectively, p < 0.001). Furthermore, this delta peak was obtained earlier with the citric acid drink (30 (SEM 2) minutes) than with the other two meals tests (53 (SEM 2) min and 45 (SEM 2) min, p < 0.001). The sensitivity of the 13C-UBT for the diagnosis of H pylori infection was 96-100% with all three test meals. This high sensitivity was, however, obtained from 15 minutes by giving citric acid as the test drink, from 45 minutes by giving a semiliquid fatty meal, and at 60 minutes by giving the semiliquid standard meal. The specificity was 100% for all test meals. Citric acid is inexpensive and palatable to patients

  15. Defense against environmental ammonia toxicity in the African lungfish, Protopterus aethiopicus: Bimodal breathing, skin ammonia permeability and urea synthesis.

    PubMed

    Loong, A M; Tan, J Y L; Wong, W P; Chew, S F; Ip, Y K

    2007-11-15

    This study aimed to determine how the African lungfish Protopterus aethiopicus defended against ammonia toxicity when confronted with high concentrations (30 or 100 mmoll(-1)) of environmental ammonia. Exposure to 100 mmoll(-1) of NH(4)Cl for 1 or 6 days had no significant effect on the rate of O(2) uptake from water or from air, and the rate of total O(2) consumption. Using an Ussing-like apparatus, we report for the first time that the skin of P. aethiopicus had low permeability (1.26 x 10(-4) micromol min(-1)cm(-1)) to NH(3)in vitro. Indeed, the influx of exogenous ammonia into fish exposed to 30 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl was low (0.117 micromol min(-1) 100g(-1) fish). As a result, P. aethiopicus could afford to maintain relatively low ammonia contents in plasma, muscle, liver and brain even after 6 days of exposure to 100 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl. Surprisingly, fish exposed to 30 or 100 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl had comparable ammonia contents in the muscle and the brain in spite of the big difference (70 mmoll(-1)) in environmental ammonia concentrations. Significant increases in urea contents occurred in various tissues of fish exposed to 30 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl for 6 days, but there were no significant differences in tissue urea contents between fish exposed to 30 mmoll(-1) and 100 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl. Between days 3 and 6, the rate of urea excretion in fish exposed to 30 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl was significantly greater than that of the control. By contrast, there was no significant difference in urea excretion rates between fish exposed to 100 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl and control fish throughout the 6-day period, and such a phenomenon has not been reported before for other lungfish species. Thus, our results suggest that P. aethiopicus was capable of decreasing the NH(3) permeability of its body surface when exposed to high concentrations of environmental ammonia. Indeed, after 6 days of exposure to 100 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl, the NH(3) permeability constant of the skin (0.55 x 10(-4) micromol min(-1

  16. Comparison of the 13C-urea breath test and the endoscopic phenol red mucosal pH test in the quantification of Helicobacter pylori infection loading

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Seok; Jang, Se Na; Kim, Jin-Soo; Son, Hye Suk; Kim, Hyung-Keun; Kim, Byung-Wook; Han, Sok-Won; Choi, Kyu-Yong; Lee, Hae Kyung; Chang, Eun Deok

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aims The 13C-urea breath test (UBT) is a semiquantitative test for measuring Helicobacter pylori infection loading. H. pylori produces ammonia, which elevates the pH of the gastric mucosa and is detectable via endoscopy using a phenol red indicator. We evaluated whether this test could be used to diagnose H. pylori infection and whether phenol red staining was correlated with 13C-UBT results. Methods One hundred and twenty-three patients participated. The UBT was performed after ingestion of a capsule containing urea. A change in 13C-UBT >2‰ was selected as the cutoff value for diagnosing infection. After spraying evenly with a 0.1% phenol red solution, the pH of the gastric mucosal surface was measured using an antimony electrode through the biopsy channel. Results The pH of stained mucosa (6.9±0.4) was significantly higher than that of unstained mucosa (1.9±0.8; p<0.001), and the H. pylori detection rate confirmed via histology was higher in stained versus unstained mucosa (p<0.01). Extensive mucosal staining resulted in a higher detection rate (p<0.001). The UBT produced results were very similar to those obtained via histological detection in stained mucosa (p<0.001). The extent of staining, expressed as a staining score, was positively correlated with the change in 13C-UBT (r=0.426, p<0.001). A significant correlation was also observed between the histologically determined H. pylori density and 13C-UBT results (r=0.674, p<0.001). Conclusions H. pylori infection elevates gastric mucosal surface pH, and endoscopic phenol red staining may be an alternative method for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. PMID:18787366

  17. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Infants and Toddlers in South America: Concordance between [13C]Urea Breath Test and Monoclonal H. pylori Stool Antigen Test

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Mayuko; Rocha, Gifone Aguiar; Rocha, Andreia Maria Camargos; Melo, Fabrício Freire; Checkley, William; Braga, Lúcia Libanez Bessa C.; Silva, Igor Simões; Gilman, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate noninvasive tests for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection in very young children are strongly required. We investigated the agreement between the [13C]urea breath test ([13C]UBT) and a monoclonal ELISA (HpSA) for detection of H. pylori antigen in stool. From October 2007 to July 2011, we enrolled 414 infants (123 from Brazil and 291 from Peru) of ages 6 to 30 months. Breath and stool samples were obtained at intervals of at least 3 months from Brazilian (n = 415) and Peruvian (n = 908) infants. [13C]UBT and stool test results concurred with each other in 1,255 (94.86%) cases (kappa coefficient = 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.87 to 0.92). In the H. pylori-positive group, delta-over-baseline (DOB) and optical density (OD) values were positively correlated (r = 0.62; P < 0.001). The positivity of the tests was higher (P < 0.001; odds ratio [OR] = 6.01; 95% CI = 4.50 to 8.04) in Peru (546/878; 62.2%) than in Brazil (81/377; 21.5%) and increased with increasing age in Brazil (P = 0.02), whereas in Peru it decreased with increasing age (P < 0.001). The disagreement between the test results was associated with birth in Brazil and female gender but not with age and diarrhea. Our results suggest that both [13C]UBT and the stool monoclonal test are reliable for diagnosing H. pylori infection in very young children, which will facilitate robust epidemiological studies in infants and toddlers. PMID:24006009

  18. 13C urea breath test (UBT) in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori: why does it work better with acid test meals?

    PubMed Central

    Pantoflickova, D; Scott, D R; Sachs, G; Dorta, G; Blum, A L

    2003-01-01

    Background: Acid test meals may improve the accuracy of the 13C urea breath test (UBT). This has been attributed to changes in gastric emptying rather than to the effects of gastric pH on Helicobacter pylori urease. Aims: To determine whether enhancement of 13CO2 excretion in the UBT in H pylori infected volunteers by acidification of a test meal is due to a delay in gastric emptying. Methods: Urease activity in vitro was measured in intact bacteria and in bacterial homogenates. Urease activity in vivo was assessed by means of the UBT. Eleven H pylori infected subjects underwent UBTs with neutral Ensure (pH 7.0), acidified Ensure (pH 3.0), and apple juice (pH 3.0). Gastric emptying was assessed by 13C sodium acetate breath test. Results: From pH 7 to pH 3, the in vitro urease activity of intact bacteria increased sixfold. In contrast, urease activity of bacterial homogenates was inactivated by low pH. In vivo, urease activity, as measured by the UBT 20 minutes after meal ingestion, was higher with apple juice (δ 13CO2=21.1; p=0.03) and acidified Ensure (δ 13CO2=25.5; p=0.01) than with neutral Ensure (δ 13CO2=12.5). Gastric emptying was faster with apple juice (Tmax=36.7 (8) minutes) but not with acidified Ensure (Tmax=63.3 (5) minutes; p=0.06) than with neutral Ensure (Tmax=65.0 (3) minutes; p=0.04). Conclusions: The higher UBT found with acidified compared with neutral test meals was independent of the emptying rates of the test meals but may have been due to medium acidity dependent activation of intra-bacterial urease in intact H pylori. PMID:12801946

  19. Cost effectiveness analysis of population-based serology screening and 13C-Urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori to prevent gastric cancer: A markov model

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Feng; Luo, Nan; Lee, Hin-Peng

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To compare the costs and effectiveness of no screening and no eradication therapy, the population-based Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) serology screening with eradication therapy and 13C-Urea breath test (UBT) with eradication therapy. METHODS: A Markov model simulation was carried out in all 237 900 Chinese males with age between 35 and 44 from the perspective of the public healthcare provider in Singapore. The main outcome measures were the costs, number of gastric cancer cases prevented, life years saved, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained from screening age to death. The uncertainty surrounding the cost-effectiveness ratio was addressed by one-way sensitivity analyses. RESULTS: Compared to no screening, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was $16 166 per life year saved or $13 571 per QALY gained for the serology screening, and $38 792 per life year saved and $32 525 per QALY gained for the UBT. The ICER was $477 079 per life year saved or $390 337 per QALY gained for the UBT compared to the serology screening. The cost-effectiveness of serology screening over the UBT was robust to most parameters in the model. CONCLUSION: The population-based serology screening for H pylori was more cost-effective than the UBT in prevention of gastric cancer in Singapore Chinese males. PMID:18494053

  20. Pre-treatment urea breath test results predict the efficacy of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy in patients with active duodenal ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yung-Chih; Yang, Jyh-Chin; Huang, Shih-Hung

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the association of pre-treatment 13C-urea breath test (UBT) results with H pylori density and efficacy of eradication therapy in patients with active duodenal ulcers. METHODS: One hundred and seventeen consecutive outpatients with active duodenal ulcer and H pylori infection were recruited. H pylori density was histologically graded according to the Sydney system. Each patient received lansoprazole (30 mg b.i.d.), clarithromycin (500 mg b.i.d.) and amoxicillin (1 g b.i.d.) for 1 week. According to pre-treatment UBT values, patients were allocated into low ( < 16‰), intermediate (16‰-35‰), and high ( > 35‰) UBT groups. RESULTS: A significant correlation was found between pre-treatment UBT results and H pylori density (P < 0.001). H pylori eradication rates were 94.9%, 94.4% and 81.6% in the low, intermediate and high UBT groups, respectively (per protocol analysis, P = 0.11). When patients were assigned into two groups (UBT results ≤ 35‰ and > 35‰), the eradication rates were 94.7% and 81.6%, respectively (P = 0.04). CONCLUSION: The intragastric bacterial load of H pylori can be evaluated by UBT, and high pre-treatment UBT results can predict an adverse outcome of eradication therapy. PMID:15052680

  1. Comparison of a monoclonal antigen stool test (Hp StAR) with the 13C-urea breath test (UBT) in monitoring Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy

    PubMed Central

    Perri, Francesco; Quitadamo, Michele; Ricciardi, Rosalba; Piepoli, Ada; Cotugno, Rosa; Gentile, Annamaria; Pilotto, Alberto; Andriulli, Angelo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the agreement between a mAb-based stool test (HP StAR) and the urea breath test (UBT) in monitoring (H pylori) infection after eradication therapy. METHODS: Patients with discordant results on UBT and Hp StAR underwent endoscopy with biopsies for rapid urease test, culture, and histology to confirm H pylori status. RESULTS: Among 250 patients (50±14 years), 240 (96.0%) had concordant UBT and Hp StAR tests with a significant correlation between DOB and A values (R = 0.87; P<0.0001). The remaining 10 (4.0%) patients had discordant tests (positive Hp StAR and negative UBT) with the Hp StAR inaccurate in five cases (false positive) and UBT inaccurate in the other five cases (false negative). The “maximal expected” sensitivity, specificity, +PV, -PV, +LR, and -LR were 91%, 100%, 100%, 97.4%, , and 8.2 respectively, for the UBT, and 100%, 97.4%, 91%, 100%, 38.8, and 0, respectively, for the Hp StAR. Overall accuracy for both tests was 98%. CONCLUSION: Both the UBT and the Hp StAR are equally accurate in monitoring H pylori infection. Nowadays, the choice of the “best” non-invasive H pylori test in the post-treatment setting should be done not only in terms of diagnostic accuracy but also in view of cost and local facilities. PMID:16270402

  2. Validation of the String Test for the Recovery of Helicobacter pylori from Gastric Secretions and Correlation of Its Results with Urea Breath Test Results, Serology, and Gastric pH Levels

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Javier; Camorlinga, Margarita; Pérez-Peréz, Guillermo; Gonzalez, Gerardo; Muñoz, Onofre

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of the string culture test to isolate Helicobacter pylori from gastric secretions of 28 volunteers was studied. With the urea breath test (UBT) as the “gold standard,” the string culture test showed a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 100%. The results of string culture did not correlate with the UBT results, with serum antibody levels, or with the pH levels of gastric secretions. PMID:11283108

  3. 13C urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori: Determination of the optimal cut-off point in a Canadian community population

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Marina; Radovic, Vladimir; Zhou, Pengfei; Wolfe, Melanie; Kamath, Markad; Bercik, Premsyl; Croitoru, Ken; Armstrong, David

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the test characteristics and the optimal cut-off point for the 13C urea breath test (13C UBT) in a Canadian community laboratory setting. METHODS: Of 2232 patients (mean age ± SD: 51±21 years, 56% female) who completed a 13C UBT, 1209 were tested to evaluate the primary diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection and 1023 were tested for confirmation of eradication following treatment. Cluster analysis was performed on the 13C UBT data to determine the optimal cut-off point and the risk of false-positive and false-negative results. Additionally, 176 patients underwent endoscopic biopsy to allow validation of the sensitivity and specificity of the 13C UBT against histology and microbiology using the calculated cut-off point. RESULTS: The calculated cut-off points were 3.09 δ‰ for the whole study population (n=2232), 3.09 δ‰ for the diagnosis group (n=1209) and 2.88 δ‰ for the post-treatment group (n=1023). When replacing the calculated cut-off points by a practical cut-off point of 3.0 δ‰, the risk of false-positive and false-negative results was lower than 2.3%. The 13C UBT showed 100% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity compared with histology and microbiology (n=176) for the diagnosis of active H pylori infection. CONCLUSIONS: The 13C UBT is an accurate, noninvasive test for the diagnosis of H pylori infection and for confirmation of cure after eradication therapy. The present study confirms the validity of a cutoff point of 3.0 δ‰ for the 13C UBT when used in a large Canadian community population according to a standard protocol. PMID:17171195

  4. Prevalence and risk factors of helicobacter pylori in Turkey: a nationally-representative, cross-sectional, screening with the 13C-Urea breath test

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is an important global pathogen infecting approximately 50% of the world’s population. This study was undertaken in order to estimate the prevalence rate of Helicobacter pylori infections among adults living in Turkey and to investigate the associated risk factors. Method This study was a nationally representative cross sectional survey, using weighted multistage stratified cluster sampling. All individuals aged ≥18 years in the selected households were invited to participate in the survey. Ninety two percent (n = 2382) of the households in 55 cities participated; 4622 individuals from these households were tested with the 13C-Urea breath test. Helicobacter pylori prevalence and associated factors were analysed by the t test, chi square and multiple logistic regression with SPSS11.0. Results The weighted overall prevalence was 82.5% (95% CI: 81.0-84.2) and was higher in men. It was lowest in the South which has the major fruit growing areas of the country. The factors included in the final model were sex, age, education, marital status, type of insurance (social security), residential region, alcohol use, smoking, drinking water source. While education was the only significant factor for women, residential region, housing tenure, smoking and alcohol use were significant for men in models by sex. Conclusion In Turkey, Helicobacter pylori prevalence was found to be very high. Individuals who were women, elderly adults, single, had a high educational level, were living in the fruit growing region, had social security from Emekli Sandigi, were drinking bottled water, non smokers and regular alcohol consumers, were under less risk of Helicobacter pylori infection than others. PMID:24359515

  5. Medical Diagnostic Breath Analysis by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guss, Joseph S.; Metsälä, Markus; Halonen, Lauri

    2009-06-01

    Certain medical conditions give rise to the presence of chemicals in the bloodstream. These chemicals - known as biomarkers - may also be present in low concentrations in human breath. Cavity ring down spectroscopy possesses the requisite selectivity and sensitivity to detect such biomarkers in the congested spectrum of a breath sample. The ulcer-causing bacterium, Helicobacter pylori, is a prolific producer of the enzyme urease, which catalyses the breakdown of urea ((NH_2)_2CO) in the stomach as follows: (NH_2)_2CO + H_2O ⟶ CO_2 + 2NH_3 Currently, breath tests seeking altered carbon-isotope ratios in exhaled CO_2 after the ingestion of ^{13}C- or ^{14}C-labeled urea are used to diagnose H. pylori infection. We present recent results from an ongoing collaboration with Tampere Area University Hospital. The study involves 100 patients (both infected and uninfected) and concerns the possible correlation between the bacterial infection and breath ammonia. D. Y. Graham, P. D. Klein, D. J. Evans, Jr, D. G. Evans, L. C. Alpert, A. R. Opekun, T. W. Boutton, Lancet 1(8543), 1174-7 March 1987.

  6. A 20-minute breath test for helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.J.; Plankey, M.W.; Hoffman, S.R.; Boyd, C.L.; Dye, K.R.; Frierson, H.F. Jr.; Guerrant, R.L.; McCallum, R.W. )

    1991-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated a simplified rapid {sup 14}C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori. Fasting patients undergoing initial assessment for H. pylori drank 5 microCi of {sup 14}C-urea in 20 ml of water. Breath was collected at intervals for 30 min. Samples were counted in a beta-counter, and the results were expressed as counts per minute (cpm). In the same week, patients underwent endoscopy, and a blinded investigator examined biopsy samples of gastric mucosa by culture and histology for H. pylori. There were 49 H. pylori-negative (HP-) and 104 H. pylori-positive (HP+) patients in the study. HP+ patients expired a mean of 4398 cpm (SD 2468) per mmol CO{sub 2} in a sample taken 20 min after ingestion of the isotope. In contrast, HP--patients expired only 340 cpm (SD 196). If the mean +3 SD of HP- patients was used as a cutoff value, the 20-minute sample gave a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 100% for detecting H. pylori. The radiation exposure from this test is less than 1% of that received from an upper gastrointestinal series, and the short collection time makes it both convenient and cost effective.

  7. Synthesis of [(14) C]omarigliptin.

    PubMed

    Ren, Sumei; Gauthier, Donald; Marques, Rosemary; Helmy, Roy; Hesk, David

    2016-08-01

    An efficient synthesis for [(14) C]Omarigliptin (MK-3102) is described. The initial synthesis of a key (14) C-pyrazole moiety did not work due to the lack of stability of (14) C-DMF-DMA reagent. Thus, a new radiolabeled synthon, (14) C-biphenylmethylformate, was synthesized from (14) C-sodium formate in one step in 92% yield and successfully used in construction of the key (14) C-pyrazole moiety. Regioselective N-sulfonation of the pyrazole moiety was achieved through a dehydration-sulfonation-isomerization sequence. [(14) C]MK 3102 was synthesized in five steps from (14) C-biphenylmethylformate with 25% overall yield. PMID:27334864

  8. One-year follow-up study of Helicobacter pylori eradication rate with 13C-urea breath test after 3-d and 7-d rabeprazole-based triple therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hwang-Huei; Chou, Jen-Wei; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lin, Zong-Yi; Lai, Hsueh-Chou; Hsu, Chang-Hu; Chen, Chih-Bin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the long-term role of a 3-d rabeprazole-based triple therapy in patients with Helicobacter pylori(H pylori)-infected active peptic ulcers. METHODS: We prospectively studied 115 consecutive patients with H pylori-infected active peptic ulcers. H pylori infection was confirmed if any two of H pylori DNA, histology, and rapid urease test were positive. Patients were assigned to either an open-labeled 3-d course of oral amoxicillin 1000 mg b.i.d., clarithromycin 500 mg b.i.d., and rabeprazole 20 mg b.i.d., or 7-d course of oral amoxicillin 1000 mg b.i.d., clarithromycin 500 mg b.i.d., and rabeprazole 20 mg b.i.d. Subsequently, all patients received oral rabeprazole 20 mg once daily until the 8th wk. Three months after therapy, all patients were followed-up endoscopically for the peptic ulcer, H pylori DNA, histology, and rapid urease test. One year after therapy, H pylori infection was tested using the 13C-urea breath test. RESULTS: The ulcer healing rates 3 mo after therapy were 81.0% vs 75.4% for the 3-d and 7-d groups [intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis, P = 0.47] respectively, and 90.4% vs 89.6% for the 3-d and 7-d groups [per-protocol (PP) analysis, P = 0.89] respectively. The eradication rates 3 mo after therapy were 75.9% vs 73.7% for the 3-d and 7-d groups (ITT, P = 0.79) respectively, and 84.6% vs 87.5% for the 3-d and 7-d groups (PP, P = 0.68) respectively. One year after therapy, seventy-five patients returned to receive the 13C-urea breath test, and the eradication rates were 78.4% vs 81.6% in 3-d and 7-d groups (PP, P = 0.73) respectively. CONCLUSION: Our study showed the eradication rates against H pylori infection 3 and 12 mo after triple therapy were not different between the 3-d and 7-d rabeprazole-based groups. Therefore, the 3-d rabeprazole-based triple therapy may be an alternative treatment for peptic ulcers with H pylori infection. PMID:15786549

  9. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on intragastric urea and ammonium concentrations in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Neithercut, W D; Rowe, P A; el Nujumi, A M; Dahill, S; McColl, K E

    1993-01-01

    AIM--To assess the value of measuring the gastric juice urea:ammonium ratio in detecting Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with chronic renal failure. METHODS--Twenty three (12 men) patients with established chronic renal failure and dyspepsia were studied. Gastric juice (2 ml) was aspirated during endoscopy to measure urea and ammonium. The upper gastrointestinal tract was routinely inspected and two antral biopsy specimens obtained. The 14C-urea breath test was conducted within 14 days of endoscopic examination to determine H pylori antibody response. RESULTS--The median (range) serum urea concentration in 11 patients with renal failure and H pylori infection was similar to that in 12 without H pylori infection. The median gastric juice urea concentration in subjects with infection was lower than that in the subjects without infection (p < 0.01). The median gastric juice ammonium concentration in subjects with the infection was higher compared with subjects without infection (p < 0.01). There was an overlap of the urea and ammonium concentrations in gastric juice from both H pylori positive and negative subjects. The urea:ammonium ratio was 0.16 (0.01-1.11) for subjects with H pylori compared with 1.63 (1.0-18.9) in subjects without infection (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION--The urea:ammonium ratio differentiated both groups, with the exception of one false negative result. The urea:ammonium ratio proved almost as effective in identifying the presence of H pylori infection in subjects with chronic renal failure as it had in subjects with normal renal function. PMID:8331178

  10. Biokinetic and dosimetric investigations of 14C-labeled substances in man using AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Sören; Gunnarsson, Mikael; Svegborn, Sigrid Leide; Nosslin, Bertil; Nilsson, Lars-Erik; Thorsson, Ola; Valind, Sven; Åberg, Magnus; Östberg, Henrik; Hellborg, Ragnar; Stenström, Kristina; Erlandsson, Bengt; Faarinen, Mikko; Kiisk, Madis; Magnusson, Carl-Erik; Persson, Per; Skog, Göran

    2001-07-01

    Up to now, radiation dose estimates from radiopharmaceuticals, labeled with pure β-emitting radionuclides, e.g., 14C or 3H have been very uncertain. Using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) we have derived new and improved data for 14C-triolein and 14C-urea and are currently running a program related to the biokinetics and dosimetry of 14C-glycocholic acid and 14C-xylose. The results of our investigations have made it possible to widen the indications for the clinical use of the 14C-urea test for Helicobacter pylori infection in children. The use of ultra-low activities, which is possible with AMS (down to 1/1000 of that used for liquid scintillation counting), has opened the possibility for metabolic investigations on children as well as on other sensitive patient groups like new-borns, and pregnant or breast-feeding women. Using the full potential of AMS, new 14C-labeled drugs could be tested on humans at a much earlier stage than today, avoiding uncertain extrapolations from animal models.

  11. Stool microbiome reveals diverse bacterial ureases as confounders of oral urea breath testing for Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Bamako, Mali.

    PubMed

    Maiga, Mamoudou; Cohen, Keira; Baya, Bocar; Srikrishna, Geetha; Siddiqui, Sophia; Sanogo, Moumine; Somboro, Anou M; Diarra, Bassirou; Diallo, Mariam H; Mazumdar, Varun; Yoder, Christian; Orsega, Susan; Belson, Michael; Kassambara, Hamadoun; Goita, Drissa; Murphy, Robert L; Dao, Sounkalo; Polis, Michael; Diallo, Souleymane; Timmins, Graham S; Dodd, Lori; Earl, Ashlee M; Bishai, William R

    2016-01-01

    Detection of bacterial urease activity has been utilized successfully to diagnose Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). While Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) also possesses an active urease, it is unknown whether detection of mycobacterial urease activity by oral urease breath test (UBT) can be exploited as a rapid point of care biomarker for tuberculosis (TB) in humans. We enrolled 34 individuals newly diagnosed with pulmonary TB and 46 healthy subjects in Bamako, Mali and performed oral UBT, mycobacterial sputum culture and H. pylori testing. Oral UBT had a sensitivity and specificity (95% CI) of 70% (46-88%) and 11% (3-26%), respectively, to diagnose culture-confirmed M. tuberculosis disease among patients without H. pylori, and 100% sensitivity (69-100%) and 11% specificity (3-26%) to diagnose H. pylori among patients without pulmonary TB. Stool microbiome analysis of controls without TB or H. pylori but with positive oral UBT detected high levels of non-H. pylori urease producing organisms, which likely explains the low specificity of oral UBT in this setting and in other reports of oral UBT studies in Africa. PMID:27532494

  12. Bioproduction of [14C]ochratoxin A in submerged culture.

    PubMed Central

    Lillehoj, E B; Aalund, O; Hald, B

    1978-01-01

    A number of Aspergillus and Penicillium species were tested for production of ochratoxin A (OA) in several media. After 8 days of static incubations of submerged cultures at 28 degrees C, toxin yields of 25 and 30 micrograms/ml were obtained with Aspergillus alliaceus NRRL 4181 in Ferreirás and 2% yeast extract-4% sucrose media, respectively. However, the largest production observed in the preliminary screening was 54 micrograms/ml; this highest level was produced by A. sulphureus NRRL 4077 in a modified Czapek solution. The medium contained the basal salts and sucrose of Czapek plus urea (3%) and corn steep liquor (0.5% solids). A time study of toxin production demonstrated maximum yield of 350 micrograms/ml by the A. sulphureus isolate in the modified Czapek medium after 11 days of static incubation at 28 degrees C. The optimal production conditions were employed in additional tests designed to measure the efficiency of 14C incorporation from sodium [1-14C]-acetate into OA. Samples (20 microCi) of sodium acetate were added to separate culture flasks at 24-h intervals during the initial 9 days of the fermentation. Addition of [14C]acetate on day 4 of incubation provided the maximum yield of labeled OA. The highest specific activity of labeled toxin obtained was 0.07 microCi/mg of OA and the maximum incorporation rate of labeled acetate was 5.3%. PMID:727787

  13. 14C-carbaryl residues in hazelnut.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Ulkü; Ilim, Murat; Aslan, Nazife

    2006-01-01

    A hazelnut ocak (shrub growing form) in the field in Black Sea region of Turkey was treated with commercial carbaryl insecticide spiked with 14C-carbaryl. Three months later, the harvested hazelnuts were separated into husk, shell, and kernel components, then homogenized and analyzed. The total and unextractable (bound) 14C-residues were determined by combustion and the extractable 14C-residues were obtained by extracting the samples with methanol. Concentrated extracts were first analyzed by thin layer chromatography (TLC). The extracts were also subjected to a series of liquid-liquid extraction procedures for clean-up and the final extracts were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Crude hazelnut oil was also extracted with hexane and analyzed for total 14C-residue. A total of 1.3% of applied radioactivity was recovered from the total nut harvested, with 0.04%, 0.06%, and 1.2% present in shell, kernel, and husk, respectively. The results show that the inedible husk and shell contained 95.7% 14C, whereas the edible kernel contained 4.3% of the total 14C recovered. The terminal 14C-residue in hazelnut kernel and oil did not contain carbaryl and/or its metabolite naphthol. PMID:16785168

  14. Metabolism of urea by Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Hodson, R C; Thompson, J F

    1969-05-01

    Urea metabolism was studied with nitrogen-starved cells of Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck var. viridis (Chodat), a green alga which apparently lacks urease. Incorporation of radioactivity from urea-(14)C into the alcohol-soluble fraction was virtually eliminated in cell suspensions flushed with 10% CO(2) in air. This same result was obtained when expected acceptors of urea carbon were replenished by adding ornithine and glucose with the urea. Several carbamyl compounds, which might be early products of urea metabolism and a source of the (14)CO(2), were not appreciably labeled. If cells were treated with cyanide at a concentration which inhibited ammonia uptake completely and urea uptake only slightly, more than half of the urea nitrogen taken up was found in the medium as ammonia. Cells under nitrogen gas in the dark were unable to take up urea or ammonia, but the normal rate of uptake was resumed in light. Since 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea did not selectively inhibit this uptake, an active respiration supported by light-dependent oxygen evolution in these cells was ruled out. A tentative scheme for urea metabolism is proposed to consist of an initial energy-dependent splitting of urea into carbon dioxide and ammonia. This reaction in Chlorella is thought to differ from a typical urease-catalyzed reaction by the apparent requirement of a high energy compound, possibly adenosine triphosphate. PMID:5783973

  15. Uptake and distribution of 14C during and following exposure to [14C]methyl isocyanate.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, J S; Kennedy, A L; Stock, M F; Brown, W E; Alarie, Y

    1988-06-15

    Guinea pigs were exposed to [14C]methyl isocyanate (14CH3-NCO, 14C MIC) for periods of 1 to 6 hr at concentrations of 0.5 to 15 ppm. Arterial blood samples taken during exposure revealed immediate and rapid uptake of 14C. Clearance of 14C was then gradual over a period of 3 days. Similarly 14C was present in urine and bile immediately following exposure, and clearance paralleled that observed in blood. Guinea pigs fitted with a tracheal cannula and exposed while under anesthesia showed a reduced 14C uptake in blood indicating that most of the 14C MIC uptake in normal guinea pigs occurred from retention of this agent in the upper respiratory tract passages. In exposed guinea pigs 14C was distributed to all examined tissues. In pregnant female mice similarly exposed to 14C MIC, 14C was observed in all tissues examined following exposure including the uterus, placenta, and fetus. While the form of 14C distributed in blood and tissues has not yet been identified, these findings may help to explain the toxicity of MIC or MIC reaction products on organs other than the respiratory tract, as noted by several investigators. PMID:3376108

  16. 14C Analysis via Intracavity Optogalvanic Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Murnick, Daniel; Dogru, Ozgur; Ilkmen, Erhan

    2010-01-01

    A new ultra sensitive laser-based analytical technique, intracavity optogalvanic spectroscopy (ICOGS), allowing extremely high sensitivity for detection of 14C-labeled carbon dioxide has recently been demonstrated. Capable of replacing accelerator mass spectrometers (AMS) for many applications, the technique quantifies zeptomoles of 14C in sub micromole CO2 samples. Based on the specificity of narrow laser resonances coupled with the sensitivity provided by standing waves in an optical cavity, and detection via impedance variations, limits of detection near 10−15 14C/12C ratios have been obtained with theoretical limits much lower. Using a 15 W 14CO2 laser, a linear calibration with samples from 5 × 10−15 to >1.5 × 10−12 in 14C/12C ratios, as determined by AMS, was demonstrated. Calibration becomes non linear over larger concentration ranges due to interactions between CO2 and buffer gas, laser saturation effects and changes in equilibration time constants. The instrument is small (table top), low maintenance and can be coupled to GC or LC input. The method can also be applied to detection of other trace entities. Possible applications include microdosing studies in drug development, individualized sub therapeutic tests of drug metabolism, carbon dating and real time monitoring of atmospheric radiocarbon. PMID:20448803

  17. Metabolism of L-(guanidinooxy-/sup 14/C)canavanine in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.A.; Rosenthal, G.A.

    1987-12-01

    The metabolism of L-canavanine, a nonprotein amino acid with significant antitumor effects, was investigated. L-Canavanine, provided at 2.0 g/kg, was supplemented with 5 microCi of L-(guanidinooxy-/sup 14/C)canavanine (58 microCi/mumol) and administered iv, sc, or orally to female Sprague-Dawley rats weighing approximately 200 g. /sup 14/C recovery in the urine at 24 hr was 83, 68, or 61%, respectively, of the administered dose. Another 5-8% of the /sup 14/C was expired as /sup 14/CO/sub 2/. The gastrointestinal tract contained 21% of orally administered /sup 14/C. Serum, feces, tissues, and de novo synthesized proteins only accounted for a few percent of the original dose by any administrative route. Analysis of the /sup 14/C-containing urinary metabolites revealed that (/sup 14/C) urea accounted for 88% of the urinary radioactivity for an iv injection, 75% for sc administration, and 50% following an oral dose. By all routes of administration, (/sup 14/C)guanidine represented 5% of the radioactivity in the urine and (/sup 14/C)guanidinoacetic acid accounted for 2%. Serum and urine amino acid analysis showed a markedly elevated ornithine level. Basic amino acids such as histidine, lysine, and arginine were also higher in the urine. Plasma ammonia levels were determined following oral canavanine doses of 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 g/kg. A rapid but transient elevation in plasma ammonia was observed only at the 4.0 g/kg dose. This indicates that elevated plasma ammonia is not a likely cause of canavanine toxicity at the drug concentrations used in this study.

  18. Breath odor

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube) in place. The breath may have an ammonia-like odor (also described as urine-like or " ... kidney failure (can cause breath to smell like ammonia ) Diabetes (fruity or sweet chemical smell associated with ...

  19. Breathing Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... re not getting enough air. Sometimes mild breathing problems are from a stuffy nose or hard exercise. ... emphysema or pneumonia cause breathing difficulties. So can problems with your trachea or bronchi, which are part ...

  20. Breathing difficulty

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary disease (COPD), such as chronic bronchitis or emphysema Other lung disease Pneumonia Pulmonary hypertension Problems with ... of breath; Breathlessness; Difficulty breathing; Dyspnea Images Lungs Emphysema References Kraft M. Approach to the patient with ...

  1. Breath odor

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a potentially life-threatening condition. Breath that smells like feces can occur with prolonged vomiting , especially ... renal failure Bowel obstruction (can cause breath to smell like feces) Bronchiectasis Chronic kidney failure (can cause ...

  2. Deglacial 14C plateau suites recalibrated by Suigetsu atmospheric 14C record - Revised 14C reservoir ages from three ocean basins corroborate extreme surface water variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnthein, M.; Balmer, S.; Grootes, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) reservoir/ventilation ages (Δ14C) provide unique insights into the dynamics of ocean water masses over LGM and deglacial times. The 14C plateau-tuning technique enables us to derive both an absolute chronology for marine sediment records and a high-resolution record of changing Δ14C values for deglacial surface and deep waters (Sarnthein et al., 2007; AGU Monogr. 173, 175). We designate as 14C plateau a sediment section in the age-depth profile with several almost constant planktic 14C ages - variation less than ×100 to ×300 yr - which form a plateau-shaped scatter band that extends over ~5 to 50 and up to 200 cm in sediment cores with sedimentation rates of >10 cm/ky. Previously, a suite of >15 plateau boundary ages were calibrated to a joint reference record of U/Th-dated 14C time series measured on coral samples, the Cariaco sediment record, and speleothems (Fairbanks et al., 2005, QSR 24; Hughen et al., 2006, QSR 25; Beck et al., 2001, Science 292). We now used the varve-counted atmospheric 14C record of Lake Suigetsu (Ramsey et al., 2012, Science 338, 370) to recalibrate the boundary ages and average ages of 14C plateaus and apply the amended plateau-tuning technique to a dozen Δ14C records from the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific. Main results are: (1) The Suigetsu atmospheric 14C record reflects all 14C plateaus, their internal structures and relative length previously identified, but implies a rise in the average plateau age by <200 14C yr during the LGM, >700 yr at its end, and <200 yr in the Bølling-Allerød. (2) Based on different 14C ages of coeval atmospheric and planktic 14C plateaus surface water Δ14C may have temporarily dropped to an equivalent of 200 yr in low-latitude stratified waters, such as off northwestern South America, and in turn reached values corresponding to an age difference of >2500 14C yr in stratified subpolar regions and upwelled waters such as in the South China Sea, values that differ significantly from a

  3. 17 CFR 240.14c-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Definitions. 240.14c-1 Section 240.14c-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL... Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) §...

  4. 17 CFR 240.14c-5 - Filing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Filing requirements. 240.14c-5 Section 240.14c-5 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED... Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) §...

  5. 17 CFR 240.14c-5 - Filing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Filing requirements. 240.14c-5 Section 240.14c-5 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED... Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) §...

  6. 17 CFR 240.14c-5 - Filing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Filing requirements. 240.14c-5 Section 240.14c-5 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED... Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) §...

  7. 17 CFR 240.14c-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Definitions. 240.14c-1 Section 240.14c-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL... Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) §...

  8. 17 CFR 240.14c-5 - Filing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Filing requirements. 240.14c-5 Section 240.14c-5 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED... Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) §...

  9. 17 CFR 240.14c-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Definitions. 240.14c-1 Section 240.14c-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL... Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) §...

  10. 17 CFR 240.14c-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions. 240.14c-1 Section 240.14c-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL... Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) §...

  11. 17 CFR 240.14c-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Definitions. 240.14c-1 Section 240.14c-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL... Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) §...

  12. Bioconversion of alpha-[14C]zearalenol and beta-[14C]zearalenol into [14C]zearalenone by Fusarium roseum 'Gibbosum'.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, K E; Hagler, W M; Hamilton, P B

    1984-01-01

    Cultures of Fusarium roseium 'Gibbosum' on rice were treated with [14C]zearalenone, alpha[14C]zearalenol, or beta-[14C]zearalenol to determine whether a precursor-product relationship exists among these closely related fungal metabolites. Culture extracts were purified by silica gel column chromatography and fractionated by high-pressure liquid chromatography, and the level of radioactivity was determined. Within 7 days, the beta-[14C]zearalenol was converted to zearalenone, and no residual beta-[14C]zearalenol was detectable. Most of the alpha-[14C]zearalenol added was also converted into zearalenone with 14 days. In cultures treated with [14C]zearalenone, no radioactivity was noted in any other components. PMID:6742839

  13. Dirhythmic breathing.

    PubMed

    Flemister, G; Goldberg, N B; Sharp, J T

    1981-01-01

    Four patients with severe chronic obstructive lung disease and recent respiratory failure are described in whom two distinct simultaneous respiratory rhythms were identified, one at 8 to 13 breaths per minute and the other at 39 to 65 per minute. Magnetometer measurements of thoracoabdominal motion together with simultaneous electromyograms of multiple inspiratory muscles suggested that both rhythms were the result of coordinated action of several inspiratory muscles. We suggest that this phenomenon, which we have called dirhythmic breathing, results from the conflicting influence upon respiratory centers and motoneurons of two or more stimuli, some favoring rapid shallow breaths and others slow deep breaths. PMID:7449504

  14. Synthesis of. beta. -sitosterol-/sup 14/C

    SciTech Connect

    Askinazi, B.Z.; Kivokurtseva, L.N.; Bobrova, N.S.; Kozarinskaya, N.Ya.

    1986-08-01

    The method of synthesis of ..beta..-sitosterol-4-/sup 14/C starting with the enolactone 4-oxa-5-sitosten-3-one is discussed. Methyl-/sup 14/C magnesium iodide is utilized for the introduction of the label. The authors selected this method for the isolation of ..beta..-sitosterol-/sup 14/C, introducing a series of changes into the original method. The authors discuss obtaining sitostenone, the ketoacid of sitostenone, the enol-lactone of the ketoacid of sitostenone, sitostenone-4-/sup 14/C (by different methods), the enol-acetate of sitostenone-/sup 14/C, and ..beta.. sitosterol-4-/sup 14/C.

  15. Biochemical pathways of breath ammonia (NH3) generation in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Laiho, S; Vaittinen, O; Halonen, L; Ortiz, F; Forsblom, C; Groop, P-H; Lehto, M; Metsälä, M

    2016-01-01

    Breath ammonia (NH3) has been proposed as a potential biomarker in monitoring hemodialysis (HD) adequacy, since a strong correlation between blood urea and mouth-exhaled breath NH3 has been observed in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing HD. However, the biochemical pathways for breath NH3 generation from blood urea have not been demonstrated. In this study, we show a strong correlation (r s  =  0.77, p  <  0.001) between blood and salivary urea, indicating that salivary urea levels reflect blood urea levels. Salivary urea is in turn strongly correlated to salivary ammonia ([Formula: see text] + NH3) in most of the patients. This confirms that the hydrolysis of urea by urease generates ammonia in the oral cavity. A further strong correlation between salivary ammonia and breath NH3 indicates that salivary ammonia evaporates into gas phase and turns to breath NH3. Therefore, blood urea is a major biochemical source of breath NH3. Since breath NH3 is generated predominantly in the oral cavity, the levels of breath NH3 are influenced significantly by the patient's oral condition including urease activity and salivary pH. Our results agree with previous studies that have shown a connection between salivary urea and breath NH3. PMID:27516572

  16. Forensic applications of 14C at CIRCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzaioli, F.; Fiumano, V.; Capano, M.; Passariello, I.; Cesare, N. De.; Terrasi, F.

    2011-12-01

    The decreasing trend of the radiocarbon pulse produced during the atmospheric tests of nuclear weapons (bomb-carbon) coupled with high sensitivity accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements, drastically increased the precision of radiocarbon age determinations since the second part of the sixties, allowing the application of radiocarbon AMS to a wide range of studies previously not directly involving conventional radiocarbon dating (i.e. food authenticity, forensic, biochemistry). In the framework of authenticity evaluation of artworks, high precision radiocarbon ( 14C) AMS measurements (Δ R/ R < 0.3%) reduce the conventional uncertainty of the dating to few decades, allowing precise age estimation of materials containing carbon (C). The Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) during its activity on AMS 14C dating achieved high precision measurements opening the opportunity to these kinds of applications. This paper presents the main results obtained from radiocarbon measurements on a set of bone samples analyzed for the determination of the post-mortem interval in the framework of an unsolved case investigated by the Rome prosecutor office. The chronological characterization of the wooden support of the "Acerenza portrait" is also presented with the aim to evaluate its age and to further investigate the possibility to attribute this artwork to Leonardo da Vinci. Bomb- 14C dating on the lipid and collagen fractions of bones allows the evaluation of the year of the death of the individuals by means of ad hoc calibration data sheet with the typical few years precision and difference between collagen apparent age and the year of death appeared in agreement with the age of one individual estimated by dating of tooth collagen. Conventional radiocarbon dating on both wood and wood extracted cellulose leads to an estimation of the portrait wood board age (2σ) of 1459-1524 AD (57% relative probability), 1571-1631 AD interval (42

  17. Urea metabolism in plants.

    PubMed

    Witte, Claus-Peter

    2011-03-01

    Urea is a plant metabolite derived either from root uptake or from catabolism of arginine by arginase. In agriculture, urea is intensively used as a nitrogen fertilizer. Urea nitrogen enters the plant either directly, or in the form of ammonium or nitrate after urea degradation by soil microbes. In recent years various molecular players of plant urea metabolism have been investigated: active and passive urea transporters, the nickel metalloenzyme urease catalyzing the hydrolysis of urea, and three urease accessory proteins involved in the complex activation of urease. The degradation of ureides derived from purine breakdown has long been discussed as a possible additional metabolic source for urea, but an enzymatic route for the complete hydrolysis of ureides without a urea intermediate has recently been described for Arabidopsis thaliana. This review focuses on the proteins involved in plant urea metabolism and the metabolic sources of urea but also addresses open questions regarding plant urea metabolism in a physiological and agricultural context. The contribution of plant urea uptake and metabolism to fertilizer urea usage in crop production is still not investigated although globally more than half of all nitrogen fertilizer is applied to crops in the form of urea. Nitrogen use efficiency in crop production is generally well below 50% resulting in economical losses and creating ecological problems like groundwater pollution and emission of nitric oxides that can damage the ozone layer and function as greenhouse gasses. Biotechnological approaches to improve fertilizer urea usage bear the potential to increase crop nitrogen use efficiency. PMID:21421389

  18. Breathing Problems

    MedlinePlus

    When you're short of breath, it's hard or uncomfortable for you to take in the oxygen your body needs. You may feel as if you're ... stuffy nose or hard exercise. But shortness of breath can also be a sign of a serious ...

  19. Simplified analytical methods for the measurement of the synthesis rate of plasma proteins in vivo by the [14C]carbonate method.

    PubMed

    Caine, S; Fleck, A

    1984-09-01

    We describe a method for obtaining the specific activity of 14C in urea, essential in the measurement of the synthesis rate of a plasma protein in vivo, which is simpler than the original procedure. The principle is the measurement of 14CO2 and NH4+ separately, after incubation with urease. A simple alteration gives samples of 13CO2 for mass spectrometry. The 'recoveries' of 14C and 13C in urea were invariably between 90 and 96% and the CV was 3%. PMID:6439102

  20. 17 CFR 240.14c-101 - Schedule 14C. Information required in information statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-101. Item 1. Information required by Items of Schedule 14A (17 CFR 240.14a-101). Furnish the information called for by all of the items of Schedule 14A of Regulation 14A (17 CFR 240.14a-101) (other than... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Schedule 14C....

  1. Estimation of whole body protein synthesis from oxidation of infused [1-14C]leucine.

    PubMed

    Yagi, M; Walser, M

    1990-01-01

    In rats infused with NaH14CO3, 14CO2 exhalation approached an asymptotic rate equal to 96.0 +/- 1.3 (SD) % of the infusion rate of 14C in a monoexponential manner with a half-time of 20 min. In rats infused with [1-14C]leucine, 14CO2 exhalation (/0.96) approached an asymptotic value, (1-F), of 16-25% of 14C infusion rate (mean 20.4%) in a monoexponential manner with a half-time of approximately 31 min. Whole body protein synthesis (S) was calculated from 1-F and urea N plus ammonia N excretion (C) as S = CF/(1-F). S was a uniform function of body weight in these rats, in six additional rats in which S was measured 6 h after single intravenous injection of [1-14C]leucine and also in previously reported rats given single injections. The relationship was S (mg.100 g-1.h-1) = 11-0.143 body wt (g) +/- 8.3. In six of these rats, S was also estimated from the plateau specific activity of plasma leucine or plasma 2-ketoisocaproate (KIC); the former estimate of S was significantly lower (by an average of 17%), but S was the same when specific activity of KIC was employed. These results support the validity of the expired 14CO2 technique for measuring S. PMID:2154116

  2. Bad Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... mouth and between your teeth produce the bad odor. Other problems in your mouth, such as gum ... and medicines are associated with a specific breath odor. Having good dental habits, like brushing and flossing ...

  3. Bad Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... hygiene leads to bad breath because when food particles are left in your mouth, they can rot ... Flossing once a day helps get rid of particles wedged between your teeth. Also, visit your dentist ...

  4. Breath sounds

    MedlinePlus

    The lung sounds are best heard with a stethoscope. This is called auscultation. Normal lung sounds occur ... the bottom of the rib cage. Using a stethoscope, the doctor may hear normal breathing sounds, decreased ...

  5. 17 CFR 240.14c-101 - Schedule 14C. Information required in information statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... required by Items of Schedule 14A (17 CFR 240.14a-101). Furnish the information called for by all of the items of Schedule 14A of Regulation 14A (17 CFR 240.14a-101) (other than Items 1(c). 2, 4 and 5 thereof... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Schedule 14C....

  6. 17 CFR 240.14c-101 - Schedule 14C. Information required in information statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... required by Items of Schedule 14A (17 CFR 240.14a-101). Furnish the information called for by all of the items of Schedule 14A of Regulation 14A (17 CFR 240.14a-101) (other than Items 1(c). 2, 4 and 5 thereof... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Schedule 14C....

  7. 17 CFR 240.14c-101 - Schedule 14C. Information required in information statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... required by Items of Schedule 14A (17 CFR 240.14a-101). Furnish the information called for by all of the items of Schedule 14A of Regulation 14A (17 CFR 240.14a-101) (other than Items 1(c). 2, 4 and 5 thereof... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Schedule 14C....

  8. Reassessment of sup 14 CO sub 2 compartmentation and of ( sup 14 C)formate oxidation in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Marsolais, C.; Lafreniere, F.; David, F.; Dodgson, S.J.; Brunengraber, H. )

    1989-11-25

    Our previous report had concluded that a fraction of ({sup 14}C)formate oxidation in liver occurs in the mitochondrion. This conclusion was based on the labeling patterns of urea and acetoacetate labeled via {sup 14}CO{sub 2} generated from ({sup 14}C)formate and other ({sup 14}C)substrates. We reassessed our interpretation in experiments conducted in (i) perifused mitochondria and (ii) isolated livers perfused with buffer containing ({sup 14}C)formate, ({sup 14}C)gluconolactone, {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, or NaH{sup 13}CO{sub 3}, in the absence and presence of acetazolamide, an inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase. Our data show that the cytosolic pools of bicarbonate and CO{sub 2} are not in isotopic equilibrium when {sup 14}CO{sub 2} is generated in the cytosol or is supplied as NaH{sup 14}CO3. We retract our earlier suggestion of a mitochondrial site of ({sup 14}C)formate oxidation.

  9. Uptake and distribution of /sup 14/C during and following exposure to (/sup 14/C)methyl isocyanate

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.S.; Kennedy, A.L.; Stock, M.F.; Brown, W.E.; Alarie, Y.

    1988-06-15

    Guinea pigs were exposed to (/sup 14/C)methyl isocyanate (/sup 14/CH/sub 3/-NCO, /sup 14/C MIC) for periods of 1 to 6 hr at concentrations of 0.5 to 15 ppm. Arterial blood samples taken during exposure revealed immediate and rapid uptake of /sup 14/C. Clearance of /sup 14/C was then gradual over a period of 3 days. Similarly /sup 14/C was present in urine and bile immediately following exposure, and clearance paralleled that observed in blood. Guinea pigs fitted with a tracheal cannula and exposed while under anesthesia showed a reduced /sup 14/C uptake in blood indicating that most of the /sup 14/C MIC uptake in normal guinea pigs occurred from retention of this agent in the upper respiratory tract passages. In exposed guinea pigs /sup 14/C was distributed to all examined tissues. In pregnant female mice similarly exposed to /sup 14/C MIC, /sup 14/C was observed in all tissues examined following exposure including the uterus, placenta, and fetus. While the form of /sup 14/C distributed in blood and tissues has not yet been identified, these findings may help to explain the toxicity of MIC or MIC reaction products on organs other than the respiratory tract, as noted by several investigators.

  10. The metabolism of [14C]nicotine in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Turner, D. M.

    1969-01-01

    The metabolism of [2′-14C]nicotine given as an intravenous injection in small doses to anaesthetized and unanaesthetized cats has been studied. A method is described for the quantitative determination of [14C]nicotine and [14C]cotinine in tissues and body fluids. Nanogram amounts of these compounds have been detected. After a single dose of 40μg. of [14C]nicotine/kg., 55% of the injected radioactivity was excreted in the urine within 24hr., but only 1% of this radioactivity was unchanged nicotine. [14C]Nicotine is metabolized extremely rapidly, [14C]cotinine appearing in the blood within 2·5min. of intravenous injection. [14C]Nicotine accumulates rapidly in the brain and 15min. after injection 90% of the radioactivity still represents [14C]nicotine. Metabolites of [14C]nicotine have been identified in liver and urine extracts. [14C]Nicotine-1′-oxide has been detected in both liver and urine. PMID:5360723

  11. How to breathe when you are short of breath

    MedlinePlus

    Pursed lip breathing; COPD - pursed lip breathing; Emphysema - pursed lip breathing; Chronic bronchitis - pursed lip breathing; Pulmonary fibrosis - pursed lip breathing; Interstitial lung disease - pursed lip breathing; Hypoxia - pursed lip breathing; ...

  12. Breathing difficulty - lying down

    MedlinePlus

    ... breath; Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea; PND; Difficulty breathing while lying down; Orthopnea ... Obesity (does not directly cause difficulty breathing while lying down but often worsens other conditions that lead ...

  13. Effects of insulin on the utilization of 14C-glycerol and 14C-glucose in hepatectomized nephrectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Mampel, T; Herrera, E

    1985-04-01

    Insulin (i.v.) administration to functionally hepatectomized-nephrectomized rats did not alter circulating levels of glycerol and only slightly affected plasma radioactivity when animals received (U-14C)-glycerol, whereas after (U-14C)-glucose administration insulin enhanced hypoglycemia and greatly accelerated the rate of radioactivity loss from plasma. At 15 min after i.v. injection of (U-14C)-glycerol, radioactivity in total lipids was reduced in heart and lungs by insulin administration and enhanced in carcass and brown adipose tissue. These effects involved the 14C-glyceride glycerol fraction in the case of heart and 14C-fatty acids in carcass and adipose tissue. When (U-14C)-glucose was administered, insulin enhanced the appearance of 14C-water-soluble material in heart and carcass and 14C-total lipids in heart, carcass, and both brown and white adipose tissue. The effect in heart corresponded mainly to the 14C-glyceride glycerol fraction whereas it corresponded to the 14C-fatty acids in the other tissues. Therefore, insulin effects on glycerol metabolism substantially differ from those on glucose. Opposite effects on heart and lung glycerol utilization as compared to those in carcass and brown adipose tissue may account for the difficulties in observing changes in plasma glycerol levels after insulin treatment. PMID:3891443

  14. Behaviour of (14)C-sulfadiazine and (14)C-difloxacin during manure storage.

    PubMed

    Lamshöft, Marc; Sukul, Premasis; Zühlke, Sebastian; Spiteller, Michael

    2010-03-01

    The persistence of sulfadiazine, difloxacin, and their metabolites has been investigated in stored manure. The manure collected from sulfadiazine ((14)C-SDZ) and difloxacin ((14)C-DIF) treated pigs contained N-acetylsulfadiazine (Ac-SDZ), 4-hydroxy-SDZ (4-OH-SDZ), and sarafloxacin (SARA) as the main metabolites, respectively along with their parent compounds. Manures were stored separately at 10 degrees C and 20 degrees C at various moisture levels. About 96-99% of the radioactivity remained in extractable parent compounds and their metabolites after 150d of storage. The formation of non-extractable residue and the rate of mineralization were both negligible in manure containing SDZ and DIF. During storage SDZ concentration increased as a result of the deacetylation of Ac-SDZ, whose concentration decreased proportionally. Hence the environmental effects may be underestimated if the parent compound alone is considered for environmental risk assessment. About 11% and 14% of 4-OH-SDZ were lost after 20 and 40d of storage; thereafter its concentration increased relatively, highlighting hydroxylation of SDZ. DIF degraded very slowly (7% loss after 150d) during the storage of manure; in contrast the concentration of SARA decreased rapidly (72-90% loss after 150d). Dilution of manure and storage at higher temperatures for a reasonable period of time enhanced the rate of reactions of SDZ, DIF and their related metabolites. PMID:20022355

  15. Enzymatic method for the synthesis of (/sup 14/C)pyridoxal 5-phosphate from (/sup 14/C)pyridoxine

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, T.; Takasugi, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Nozaki, M.

    1986-10-01

    A new enzymatic method for the synthesis of (/sup 14/C)pyridoxal 5-phosphate is presented. (/sup 14/C)Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate was synthesized from (/sup 14/C)pyriodoxine through the successive actions of pyridoxal kinase and pyrdoxamine 5'-phosphate oxidase in a reaction mixture containing ATP, (/sup 14/C)pyridoxine, and both enzymes. (/sup 14/C)Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate was isolated by omega-aminohexyl-Sepharose 6B column chromatography. The overall yield of the product was more than 60%, starting from 550 nmol of (/sup 14/C)pyridoxine. The radiochemical purity of the products, as determined by thin-layer and ion-exchange chromatography, was greater than 98%.

  16. Traveling with breathing problems

    MedlinePlus

    If you have breathing problems and you: Are short of breath most of the time Get short of breath when you walk 150 ... or less Have been in the hospital for breathing problems recently Use oxygen at home, even if ...

  17. Bound sup 14 C residues in stored wheat treated with ( sup 14 C)deltamethrin and their bioavailability in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, S.U.; Kacew, S. ); Akhtar, M.H. )

    1990-04-01

    Wheat grains treated with radiolabeled deltamethrin ((S)-{alpha}-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl (1R,3R)-cis-3-(2,2-dibromovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate) and stored in the laboratory for 168 days formed bound (nonextractable) {sup 14}C residues. The amount of bound {sup 14}C residues formed was about 11% of the total {sup 14}C in stored grain. Br{sub 2}CA (3-(2,2-dibromovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylic acid) and 3-PBacid (3-phenoxybenzoic acid) were present in the form of bound {sup 14}C residues in addition to some radiolabeled product of unknown composition. The stored wheat containing bound {sup 14}C was fed to rats. The {sup 14}C residues were excreted in urine and feces in nearly equal proportion. The {sup 14}C residues identified in urine were Br{sub 2}CA, 3-PBacid, and conjugated compounds of 4{prime}-OH-3-PBacid (3-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)benzoic acid). Most of the {sup 14}C residues excreted in feces were extractable with methanol. Trace amounts of {sup 14}C residues were also present in lungs, kidney, and liver. The results suggest that bound residues in stored wheat treated with deltamethrin when fed to rats are highly bioavailable.

  18. 14C-age tracers in global ocean circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeve, W.; Wagner, H.; Kähler, P.; Oschlies, A.

    2015-07-01

    The natural abundance of 14C in total CO2 dissolved in seawater (DIC) is a property applied to evaluate the water age structure and circulation in the ocean and in ocean models. In this study we use three different representations of the global ocean circulation augmented with a suite of idealised tracers to study the potential and limitations of using natural 14C to determine water age, which is the time elapsed since a body of water has been in contact with the atmosphere. We find that, globally, bulk 14C-age is dominated by two equally important components, one associated with ageing, i.e. the time component of circulation, and one associated with a "preformed 14C-age". The latter quantity exists because of the slow and incomplete atmosphere-ocean equilibration of 14C particularly in high latitudes where many water masses form. In the ocean's interior, preformed 14C-age behaves like a passive tracer. The relative contribution of the preformed component to bulk 14C-age varies regionally within a given model, but also between models. Regional variability in the Atlantic Ocean is associated with the mixing of waters with very different end members of preformed 14C-age. Here, variations in the preformed component over space and time mask the circulation component to an extent that its patterns are not detectable from bulk 14C-age. Between models, the variability of preformed 14C-age can also be considerable (factor of 2), related to the combination of physical model parameters, which influence circulation dynamics or gas exchange. The preformed component was found to be very sensitive to gas exchange and moderately sensitive to ice cover. In our model evaluation, the choice of the gas-exchange constant from within the currently accepted range of uncertainty had such a strong influence on preformed and bulk 14C-age that if model evaluation would be based on bulk 14C-age, it could easily impair the evaluation and tuning of a model's circulation on global and regional

  19. Transport of sup 14 C-IAA and sup 14 C-ACC within floral organs of Ipomoea nil

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, H.G. ); Maurice, H.R. ); Koning, R.E. ); Daie, J. )

    1989-04-01

    The transport of {sup 14}C-IAA {sup 14}C-ACC from agarose donor blocks applied to I. nil filaments their recovery as {sup 14}C-accumulation into floral organs was examined. The accumulation of the isotopes in the corolla tissue was greater when {sup 14}C-ACC was applied than {sup 14}C-IAA in intact isolated flower buds. Greater levels of the isotopes accumulated in the pistil, with minimal levels in receptacle and calyx tissues from isolated buds. With intact buds, greater levels of the isotopes were recovered in pistil, calyx receptacle tissues. This study provides further evidence for the role of the filaments as transport vectors for IAA ACC for the production of ethylene.

  20. Respiratory strategy is a major determinant of [3H]water and [14C]chlorpyrifos uptake in aquatic insects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchwalter, D.B.; Jenkins, J.J.; Curtis, L.R.

    2002-01-01

    Despite the extensive use of aquatic insects to evaluate freshwater ecosystem health, little is known about the underlying factors that result in sensitivity differences between taxa. Organismal characteristics (respiratory strategy and body size) were used to explore the rates of [3H]H2O and [14)C]chlorpyrifos accumulation in aquatic insects. Ten aquatic insect taxa, including ephemeropteran, trichopteran, dipteran, hemipteran, and coleopteran species, were exposed to [14C]chlorpyrifos (240 ng??L-1) and [3H]H2O for up to 12 h. Because exchange epithelial surfaces on the)integument are permeable to water, [3H]H2O was used as a quantitative surrogate for exposed cellular surface area.) [14C]Chlorpyrifos uptake rates were highly correlated with water permeability in all 10 taxa tested and largely covaried with body size and respiratory strategy. Rates were highest among smaller organisms on a per-weight basis and in taxa with relatively large external cellular surfaces such as gills. Air-breathing taxa were significantly less permeable to both [3)HH20 and [14C)C]chlorpyrifos. A method for labeling exposed epithelial surfaces with a fluorescent dye was developed. This technique allowed discrimination between exchange epithelium and barrier tissue on the integument. Fluorescent dye distributions on the body surface provided a rapid method for estimating exposed epithelium consistent with [3H]H2O and [14)C]chlorpyrifos accumulation.

  1. Effects of ruminally degradable nitrogen intake and in vitro addition of ammonia and propionate on the metabolic fate of L-[1-14C]alanine and L-[15N]alanine in isolated sheep hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mutsvangwa, T; Buchanan-Smith, J G; McBride, B W

    1997-04-01

    Isolated hepatocytes prepared from sheep fed a basal diet (bromegrass hay-corn, 50:50 wt/ wt, as-fed basis) with or without urea were used to determine the effects of added ammonia (as NH4Cl) and propionate on the partitioning of C from 1.25 mM L-[1-14C]alanine between oxidation and gluconeogenesis, and the flux of 15N from 1.25 mM L-[15N]alanine to [14N15N]urea and [15N15N]urea. Hepatocyte suspensions were incubated with NH4Cl (0, .31, .63, and 1.25 mM) and (or) propionate (0, .31, .63, and 1.25 mM) in the presence of either 1.25 mM L-[15N]alanine or 1.25 mM L-alanine plus 18.5 kBq of L-[1-14C]alanine. Feeding dietary urea did not affect [1-14C]alanine oxidation to 14CO2 (P = .601), or its conversion to [14C]glucose (P = .576) by isolated hepatocytes. Increasing in vitro concentrations of NH4Cl and propionate between 0 and 1.25 mM reduced [1-14C]alanine oxidation to 14CO2 (P < .001). Increasing NH4Cl concentration between 0 and 1.25 mM reduced [1-14C]alanine conversion to [14C]glucose in isolated hepatocytes (P < .001), whereas addition of propionate between 0 and 1.25 mM stimulated production of [14C]glucose from [1-14C]alanine (P < .001). Feeding urea did not affect in vitro rates of total urea production (P = .655) but increased the production of [14N15N]urea and [15N15N]urea (P < .05). Addition of NH4Cl increased total urea, [14N15N]urea, and [15N15N]urea production (P < .001), but reduced 15N isotopic enrichments of [14N15N]urea and [15N15N]urea (P < .001). Increasing propionate concentration between 0 and 1.25 mM reduced total urea production (P < .001), but [14N15N]urea and [15N15N]urea production was reduced only at 1.25 mM propionate (P < .001). We conclude that NH3 detoxification by isolated sheep hepatocytes increases amino acid deamination and this might have implications for nitrogen retention in ruminants consuming diets that promote considerable NH3 absorption from the digestive tract. PMID:9110231

  2. Determination of 14C residue in eggs of laying hens administered orally with [14C] sulfaquinoxaline.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, B; Rummel, N; Smith, D

    2004-06-01

    Ten layer hens were dosed for 5 consecutive days with 6.2 mg kg(-1) [14C] sulfaquinoxaline (SQX). Eggs were collected from the hens during the 5-day dosing period and during a 10-day post-dose withdrawal period. Egg yolk and albumen were separated and assayed for total radioactive residues (TRR) using a combustion oxidizer and liquid scintillation counting techniques. Significant amounts of radioactivity were detected on the second day of dosing (greater than 24h after the initial dose) in both egg yolk and albumen. First eggs were collected about 8 h after dosing; the second-day eggs were collected during 8-h period after the second dose. Radioactive residues reached a maximum on the fifth day of dosing in albumen, whereas on the second day of withdrawal in egg yolk, the peak TRR levels in albumen were about threefold higher than in yolk. Thereafter, the TRR levels declined rapidly in albumen and were detectable up to withdrawal day 6, whereas the TRR levels in egg yolk declined more slowly and were detectable up to withdrawal day 10. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis indicated that the parent drug sulfaquinoxaline was the major component in both the egg albumen and yolk. Additionally, this work suggests that egg yolk is the appropriate matrix for monitoring SQX residues PMID:15204532

  3. Forensic applications of 14C bomb-pulse dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoppi, U.; Skopec, Z.; Skopec, J.; Jones, G.; Fink, D.; Hua, Q.; Jacobsen, G.; Tuniz, C.; Williams, A.

    2004-08-01

    After a brief review of the basics of 14C bomb-pulse dating, this paper presents two unique forensic applications. Particular attention is dedicated to the use of the 14C bomb-pulse to establish the time of harvest of illicit drugs such as heroin and opium. Preliminary measurements of 14C concentrations in milligram samples taken from seized drugs are presented. 14C bomb-pulse dating can determine whether drug distribution originates from stockpiles or recent manufacture, and support the action of law enforcement authorities against criminal organisations involved in drug trafficking. In addition, we describe the dating of wine vintages for a number of authenticated single label vintage red wines from the Barossa Valley - South Australia. Our results show that radiocarbon dating can be used to accurately determine wine vintages and therefore reveal the addition of unrelated materials of natural and synthetic origin.

  4. 14C-age tracers in global ocean circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeve, W.; Wagner, H.; Kähler, P.; Oschlies, A.

    2014-10-01

    The natural abundance of 14C in total CO2 dissolved in seawater is a property applied to evaluate the water age structure and circulation in the ocean and in ocean models. In this study we use three different representations of the global ocean circulation augmented with a suite of idealised tracers to study the potential and limitations of using natural 14C to determine water age, the time elapsed since a body of water had contact with the atmosphere. We find that, globally, bulk 14C-age is dominated by two equally important components, one associated with aging, i.e. the time component of circulation and one associated with a "preformed 14C-age". This latter quantity exists because of the slow and incomplete atmosphere/ocean equilibration of 14C in particular in high latitudes where many water masses form. The relative contribution of the preformed component to bulk 14C-age varies regionally within a given model, but also between models. Regional variability, e.g. in the Atlantic Ocean is associated with the mixing of waters with very different end members of preformed 14C-age. In the Atlantic, variations in the preformed component over space and time mask the circulation component to an extent that its patterns are not detectable from bulk 14C-age alone. Between models the variability of age can also be considerable (factor of 2), related to the combinations of physical model parameters, which influence circulation dynamics, and gas exchange in the models. The preformed component was found to be very sensitive to gas exchange and moderately sensitive to ice cover. In our model evaluation exercise, the choice of the gas exchange constant from within the current range of uncertainty had such a strong influence on preformed and bulk 14C-age that if model evaluation would be based on bulk 14C-age it could easily impair the evaluation and tuning of a models circulation on global and regional scales. Based on the results of this study, we propose that considering

  5. 14-C-NAPHTHYL, 14-C-METHYL AND 14-C-CARBONYL CARBARYL DISTRIBUTION IN THE PREGNANT MOUSE AND RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The distribution of carbaryl labeled with 14C in the ring, methyl or carbonyl groups was determined in pregnant mice and rats. Three identical concurrent experiments were performed using each of the three radiolabeled compounds in each of the species so that the different moietie...

  6. Decay width measurements of excited states in 14C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haigh, P.; Ashwood, N.; Bloxham, T.; Curtis, N.; Freer, M.; Price, D.; Ziman, V.; Bohlen, H.; Kokalova, T.; Schulz, C.; von Oertzen, W.; Weldon, C.; Catford, W.; Harlin, C.

    2008-05-01

    Various excited states in 14C, above the α-decay threshold, are believed to possess a geometric arrangement of three α-particles covalently bound by the two delocalised valence neutrons. The 12C(16O, 14O)14C* reaction was studied at a beam energy of 234 MeV, at the ISL facility at the Hahn-Meitner-Institut (HMI), Berlin. The 14O ejectile was detected by a Q3D spectrometer at forward angles. The energies and angles of the excited 14C recoil break-up fragments were measured in coincidence using a double sided silicon strip detector array comprised of four detectors at backwards angles. A complete kinematic reconstruction of the reaction was performed to reconstruct the 14C* → 10Be + α and 14C* → 13C + n decay channels and the branching ratios of these decays were calculated. Neutron emission was found to be favoured for the 12.96, 14.87, 16.72 and 18.6 MeV states. Evidence for α-decay was found for the 14.87, 18.6 and 21.4 MeV states; which are candidates for the three bodied molecular cluster structure of 14C.

  7. Shortness of Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body & lifestyle changes > Shortness of breath Shortness of breath E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... oxygen your baby gets. Causes of shortness of breath during pregnancy Early pregnancy In the first few ...

  8. What Controls Your Breathing?

    MedlinePlus

    ... To a limited degree, you can change your breathing rate, such as by breathing faster or holding your ... oxygen levels in your blood and change your breathing rate as needed. Sensors in the airways detect lung ...

  9. Breath alcohol test

    MedlinePlus

    Alcohol test - breath ... There are various brands of breath alcohol tests. Each one uses a different method to test the level of alcohol in the breath. The machine may be electronic or manual. One ...

  10. Breath-Holding Spells

    MedlinePlus

    ... less than a minute before a child regains consciousness and resumes breathing normally. Breath-holding spells can ... spells cause kids to stop breathing and lose consciousness for up to a minute. In the most ...

  11. Rapid shallow breathing

    MedlinePlus

    Tachypnea; Breathing - rapid and shallow; Fast shallow breathing; Respiratory rate - rapid and shallow ... Shallow, rapid breathing has many possible medical causes, including: Asthma Blood clot in an artery in the lung Choking Chronic obstructive ...

  12. 14C Analysis of protein extracts from Bacillus spores.

    PubMed

    Cappuccio, Jenny A; Falso, Miranda J Sarachine; Kashgarian, Michaele; Buchholz, Bruce A

    2014-07-01

    Investigators of bioagent incidents or interdicted materials need validated, independent analytical methods that will allow them to distinguish between recently made bioagent samples versus material drawn from the archives of a historical program. Heterotrophic bacteria convert the carbon in their food sources, growth substrate or culture media, into the biomolecules they need. The F(14)C (fraction modern radiocarbon) of a variety of media, Bacillus spores, and separated proteins from Bacillus spores was measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). AMS precisely measures F(14)C values of biological materials and has been used to date the synthesis of biomaterials over the bomb pulse era (1955 to present). The F(14)C of Bacillus spores reflects the radiocarbon content of the media in which they were grown. In a survey of commercial media we found that the F(14)C value indicated that carbon sources for the media were alive within about a year of the date of manufacture and generally of terrestrial origin. Hence, bacteria and their products can be dated using their (14)C signature. Bacillus spore samples were generated onsite with defined media and carbon free purification and also obtained from archived material. Using mechanical lysis and a variety of washes with carbon free acids and bases, contaminant carbon was removed from soluble proteins to enable accurate (14)C bomb-pulse dating. Since media is contemporary, (14)C bomb-pulse dating of isolated soluble proteins can be used to distinguish between historical archives of bioagents and those produced from recent media. PMID:24814329

  13. 14C Analysis of Protein Extracts from Bacillus Spores

    PubMed Central

    Cappucio, Jenny A.; Sarachine Falso, Miranda J.; Kashgarian, Michaele; Buchholz, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Investigators of bioagent incidents or interdicted materials need validated, independent analytical methods that will allow them to distinguish between recently made bioagent samples versus material drawn from the archives of a historical program. Heterotrophic bacteria convert the carbon in their food sources, growth substrate or culture media, into the biomolecules they need. The F14C (fraction modern radiocarbon) of a variety of media, Bacillus spores, and separated proteins from Bacillus spores was measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). AMS precisely measures F14C values of biological materials and has been used to date the synthesis of biomaterials over the bomb pulse era (1955 to present). The F14C of Bacillus spores reflects the radiocarbon content of the media in which they were grown. In a survey of commercial media we found that the F14C value indicated that carbon sources for the media were alive within about a year of the date of manufacture and generally of terrestrial origin. Hence, bacteria and their products can be dated using their 14C signature. Bacillus spore samples were generated onsite with defined media and carbon free purification and also obtained from archived material. Using mechanical lysis and a variety of washes with carbon free acids and bases, contaminant carbon was removed from soluble proteins to enable accurate 14C bomb-pulse dating. Since media is contemporary, 14C bomb-pulse dating of isolated soluble proteins can be used to distinguish between historical archives of bioagents and those produced from recent media. PMID:24814329

  14. Characterization of 14C in Swedish light water reactors.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Asa; Aronsson, Per-Olof; Lundgren, Klas; Stenström, Kristina

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents the results of a 4-y investigation of 14C in different waste streams of both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Due to the potential impact of 14C on human health, minimizing waste and releases from the nuclear power industry is of considerable interest. The experimental data and conclusions may be implemented to select appropriate waste management strategies and practices at reactor units and disposal facilities. Organic and inorganic 14C in spent ion exchange resins, process water systems, ejector off-gas and replaced steam generator tubes were analyzed using a recently developed extraction method. Separate analysis of the chemical species is of importance in order to model and predict the fate of 14C within process systems as well as in dose calculations for disposal facilities. By combining the results of this investigation with newly calculated production rates, mass balance assessments were made of the 14C originating from production in the coolant. Of the 14C formed in the coolant of BWRs, 0.6-0.8% was found to be accumulated in the ion exchange resins (core-specific production rate in the coolant of a 2,500 MWth BWR calculated to be 580 GBq GW(e)(-1) y(-1)). The corresponding value for PWRs was 6-10% (production rate in a 2,775 MWth PWR calculated to be 350 GBq GW(e)(-1) y(-1)). The 14C released with liquid discharges was found to be insignificant, constituting less than 0.5% of the production in the coolant. The stack releases, routinely measured at the power plants, were found to correspond to 60-155% of the calculated coolant production, with large variations between the BWR units. PMID:18617793

  15. Pyrolysis-combustion 14C dating of soil organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Hongfang; Hackley, Keith C.; Panno, S.V.; Coleman, D.D.; Liu, J.C.-L.; Brown, J.

    2003-01-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) dating of total soil organic matter (SOM) often yields results inconsistent with the stratigraphic sequence. The onerous chemical extractions for SOM fractions do not always produce satisfactory 14C dates. In an effort to develop an alternative method, the pyrolysis-combustion technique was investigated to partition SOM into pyrolysis volatile (Py-V) and pyrolysis residue (Py-R) fractions. The Py-V fractions obtained from a thick glacigenic loess succession in Illinois yielded 14C dates much younger but more reasonable than the counterpart Py-R fractions for the soil residence time. Carbon isotopic composition (??13C) was heavier in the Py-V fractions, suggesting a greater abundance of carbohydrate- and protein-related constituents, and ??13C was lighter in the Py-R fractions, suggesting more lignin- and lipid-related constituents. The combination of 14C dates and ??13C values indicates that the Py-V fractions are less biodegradation resistant and the Py-R fractions are more biodegradation resistant. The pyrolysis-combustion method provides a less cumbersome approach for 14C dating of SOM fractions. With further study, this method may become a useful tool for analyzing unlithified terrestrial sediments when macrofossils are absent. ?? 2003 University of Washington. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Calculation of the compounded uncertainty of 14C AMS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Marie-Josée; Grootes, Pieter M.

    2013-01-01

    The correct method to calculate conventional 14C ages from the carbon isotopic ratios was summarised 35 years ago by Stuiver and Polach (1977) and is now accepted as the only method to calculate 14C ages. There is, however, no consensus regarding the treatment of AMS data, mainly of the uncertainty of the final result. The estimation and treatment of machine background, process blank, and/or in situ contamination is not uniform between laboratories, leading to differences in 14C results, mainly for older ages. As Donahue (1987) and Currie (1994), among others, mentioned, some laboratories find it important to use the scatter of several measurements as uncertainty while others prefer to use Poisson statistics. The contribution of the scatter of the standards, machine background, process blank, and in situ contamination to the uncertainty of the final 14C result is also treated in different ways. In the early years of AMS, several laboratories found it important to describe their calculation process in details. In recent years, this practise has declined. We present an overview of the calculation process for 14C AMS measurements looking at calculation practises published from the beginning of AMS until present.

  17. Measuring the 14C content in liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enqvist, T.; Barabanov, I. R.; Bezrukov, L. B.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gavrilyuk, Y. M.; Grishina, V. Yu; Gurentsov, V. I.; Hissa, J.; Joutsenvaara, J.; Kazalov, V. V.; Krokhaleva, S.; Kutuniva, J.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Kurlovich, A. S.; Loo, K.; Lubsandorzhiev, B. K.; Lubsandorzhiev, S.; Morgalyuk, V. P.; Novikova, G. Y.; Pshukov, A. M.; Sinev, V. V.; Słupecki, M.; Trzaska, W. H.; Umerov, Sh I.; Veresnikova, A. V.; Virkajärvi, A.; Yanovich, Y. A.; Zavarzina, V. P.

    2016-05-01

    We are going to perform a series of measurements where the 14C/12 C ratio will be measured from several liquid scintillator samples with a dedicated setup. The setup is designed with the aim of measuring ratios smaller than 10-18. Measurements take place in two underground laboratories: in the Baksan Neutrino Observatory, Russia and in the Pyhäsalmi mine, Finland. In Baksan the measurements started in 2015 and in Pyhäsalmi they start in the beginning of 2015. In order to fully understand the operation of the setup and its background contributions a development of simulation packages has also been started. Low-energy neutrino detection with a liquid scintillator requires that the intrinsic 14C content in the liquid is extremely low. In the Borexino CTF detector at Gran Sasso, Italy the 14C/12C ratio of 2 × 10-18 has been achieved being the lowest 14C concentration ever measured. In principle, the older the oil or gas source that the liquid scintillator is derived of and the deeper it situates, the smaller the 14C/12C ratio is supposed to be. This, however, is not generally the case, and the ratio is probably determined by the U and Th content of the local environment.

  18. Pyrolysis-combustion 14C dating of soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Hackley, Keith C.; Panno, Samuel V.; Coleman, Dennis D.; Liu, Jack Chao-li; Brown, Johnie

    2003-11-01

    Radiocarbon ( 14C) dating of total soil organic matter (SOM) often yields results inconsistent with the stratigraphic sequence. The onerous chemical extractions for SOM fractions do not always produce satisfactory 14C dates. In an effort to develop an alternative method, the pyrolysis-combustion technique was investigated to partition SOM into pyrolysis volatile (Py-V) and pyrolysis residue (Py-R) fractions. The Py-V fractions obtained from a thick glacigenic loess succession in Illinois yielded 14C dates much younger but more reasonable than the counterpart Py-R fractions for the soil residence time. Carbon isotopic composition (δ 13C) was heavier in the Py-V fractions, suggesting a greater abundance of carbohydrate- and protein-related constituents, and δ 13C was lighter in the Py-R fractions, suggesting more lignin- and lipid-related constituents. The combination of 14C dates and δ 13C values indicates that the Py-V fractions are less biodegradation resistant and the Py-R fractions are more biodegradation resistant. The pyrolysis-combustion method provides a less cumbersome approach for 14C dating of SOM fractions. With further study, this method may become a useful tool for analyzing unlithified terrestrial sediments when macrofossils are absent.

  19. Urea Utilization by Leptospira

    PubMed Central

    Kadis, Solomon; Pugh, William L.

    1974-01-01

    One representative of each of five different pathogenic serotypes of Leptospira as well as one saprophytic strain were capable of growing on medium containing urea in place of an ammonium salt as a nitrogen source. Growth of all of the organisms tested on 1% urea was substantial, but only those that exhibited strong urease activity could grow to any appreciable extent on urea at a concentration as high as 2%. Intact urea-grown cells of the pathogenic serotypes tested (grippotyphosa and icterohaemorrhagiae) exhibited urease activity, with the level of activity of the former being considerably greater. No urease could be detected in cells of the saprophytic strain. When the pathogenic leptospires were sonicated or treated with toluene, the urease activity was greatly enhanced. When cultivated on NH4Cl, neither intact nor disrupted cells of any of the strains tested exhibited any urease activity. Cells of the grippotyphosa and icterohaemorrhagiae strains exhibited diauxic growth when cultivated in the presence of both NH4Cl and urea, whereas only monophasic growth could be detected for the saprophytic test strain. The experimental data on urea utilization and urease activity, when considered in the light of previously reported findings on leptospiral pathology, renal physiology, and the role of urease in other bacterial infections, suggests a significant role for leptospiral urease (in addition to other factors) in determining localization of the organism in the kidney and contributing to the resultant kidney pathology. PMID:4426709

  20. Rapid, high-resolution 14C chronology of ooids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaupré, Steven R.; Roberts, Mark L.; Burton, Joshua R.; Summons, Roger E.

    2015-06-01

    Ooids are small, spherical to ellipsoidal grains composed of concentric layers of CaCO3 that could potentially serve as biogeochemical records of the environments in which they grew. Such records, however, must be placed in the proper temporal context. Therefore, we developed a novel acidification system and employed an accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) with a gas accepting ion source to obtain radiocarbon (14C) chronologies extending radially through ooids within one 8-h workday. The method was applied to ooids from Highborne Cay, Bahamas and Shark Bay, Australia, yielding reproducible 14C chronologies, as well as constraints on the rates and durations of ooid growth and independent estimates of local 14C reservoir ages.

  1. Low-level 14C measurements and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Litherland, A.E.; Beukens, R.P.; Zhao, X.-L.; Kieser, W.E.; Gove, H.E.

    2005-09-08

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and isotope enrichment were used in 1991 to estimate that the 14C content of methane in natural gas was {<=}1.6x10-18 of the total carbon. The low content of 14C in underground hydrocarbons was verified later in the remarkable results from the Borexino test scintillation counter for solar neutrino studies. Since then studies of the 14C background problem have demonstrated that much of the background originally observed in the AMS measurements can, in principle, be eliminated. However, many difficulties and other backgrounds are to be faced as the limit for AMS is pushed still further towards possibly a ratio of < 10-21. These will be discussed.

  2. Optoacoustic 13C-breath test analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, Hermann; Helmrich, Günther; Wolff, Marcus

    2010-02-01

    The composition and concentration of exhaled volatile gases reflects the physical ability of a patient. Therefore, a breath analysis allows to recognize an infectious disease in an organ or even to identify a tumor. One of the most prominent breath tests is the 13C-urea-breath test, applied to ascertain the presence of the bacterium helicobacter pylori in the stomach wall as an indication of a gastric ulcer. In this contribution we present a new optical analyzer that employs a compact and simple set-up based on photoacoustic spectroscopy. It consists of two identical photoacoustic cells containing two breath samples, one taken before and one after capturing an isotope-marked substrate, where the most common isotope 12C is replaced to a large extent by 13C. The analyzer measures simultaneously the relative CO2 isotopologue concentrations in both samples by exciting the molecules on specially selected absorption lines with a semiconductor laser operating at a wavelength of 2.744 μm. For a reliable diagnosis changes of the 13CO2 concentration of 1% in the exhaled breath have to be detected at a concentration level of this isotope in the breath of about 500 ppm.

  3. Study of Rainbow Scattering in 16O + 14C System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demyanova, A. S.; Glukhov, Yu. A.; Ogloblin, A. A.; Trzaska, W.; Bohlen, H. G.; Oertzen, W. Von; Goncharov, S. A.; Izadpanakh, A.; Maslov, V. A.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Khlebnikov, S. V.; Tyurin, G. P.

    2005-09-01

    We carried out new measurements of the 16O+14C differential cross-sections at the 16O energy 281 MeV in the large angles interval at the Jyvaskyla University cyclotron and at the smallest angles at the cyclotron of Hahn-Meitner institute. The results of the experiment showed that clear rainbow structure in 16O + 14C scattering really takes place. The observed position of the main Airy minimum predicted but not observed in previous measurements fits well to the empirical systematization "angle - inverse energy", obtained for the system 16O + 12C.

  4. A simplified In Situ cosmogenic 14C extraction system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, J.S.; Lifton, N.A.; Timothy, Jull A.J.; Quade, Jay

    2010-01-01

    We describe the design, construction, and testing of a new, simplified in situ radiocarbon extraction system at the University of Arizona. Blank levels for the new system are low ((234 ?? 11) ?? 103 atoms (1 ??; n = 7)) and stable. The precision of a given measurement depends on the concentration of 14C, but is typically <5% for concentrations of 100 ?? 103 atoms g-1 or more. The new system is relatively small and easy to construct, costs significantly less than the original in situ 14C extraction system at Arizona, and lends itself to future automation. ?? 2010 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona.

  5. Search for exotic cluster configurations in 14C nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkova, L. Yu; Chernyshev, B. A.; Gurov, Yu B.; Karpuhin, V. S.; Lapushkin, S. V.; Pritula, R. V.; Schurenkova, T. D.

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of 2-dimentional Dalitz’ diagram, measured in 14C(π-, pd)X reaction, allowed to distinguish the pion absorption by p intranuclear cluster and to obtain an indication on the existence of 3p + 11Li configuration in 14C nucleus. Highly excited states of 12,13Be isotopes were found with the energy of Ex ≈ 30 MeV for the first time. It was shown that these states decay as follows 12Be*→p + 11Li and 13Be*→d + 11Li.

  6. Origin of the Anomalous Long Lifetime of 14C

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, David Jarvis; Nam, Hai Ah; Maris, Pieter; Vary, J. P.; Navratil, Petr; Ormand, W. Erich

    2011-01-01

    We report the microscopic origins of the anomalously suppressed beta decay of 14C to 14N using the ab initio no-core shell model with the Hamiltonian from the chiral effective field theory including three-nucleon force terms. The three-nucleon force induces unexpectedly large cancellations within the p shell between contributions to beta decay, which reduce the traditionally large contributions from the nucleon-nucleon interactions by an order of magnitude, leading to the long lifetime of 14C.

  7. A procedure for batch separation of sup 14 C-hexose from sup 14 C-sucrose

    SciTech Connect

    Tarpley, L.; Vietor, D.M. )

    1991-05-01

    This presentation describes a method for separating {sup 14}C-hexose from {sup 14}C-sucrose in extracts of plant tissue. Portions of ethanol extracts are treated with activated charcoal in microcentrifuge tubes. Aliquots are removed, ethanol evaporated and replaced with reaction mixture that phosphorylates hexose (HEPPS, K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}, Mg(C{sub 2}H{sub 3}O{sub 2}){sub 2}, ovalbumen, Na{sub 2}ATP, yeast hexokinase). After a time course, the hexokinase reaction is stopped (slowed considerably) to minimize effects of contamination enzyme activities. The stopping agent used is lyxose, a nonphosphorylable analogue of glucose. The strong anionic charge of phosphate introduced through the hexokinase action results in binding (> 95%) of hexose-phosphate to anion-exchange resin. Sucrose remains unbound (> 95%) in solution. This batch ion-exchange is performed in microcentrifuge tubes to allow many samples to be processed simultaneously. Recovery of radiolabel in extracts is complete (99%), and determinations are repeatable (cv = 23%). This method for routinely separating and quantifying {sup 14}C-hexose and {sup 14}C-sucrose in plant tissue extracts can contribute to the economy and feasibility of studies of {sup 14}C-photoassimilate partitioning to soluble sugars within and among plant tissues.

  8. 17 CFR 240.14c-3 - Annual report to be furnished security holders.

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    ... information statement. 240.14c-4 Section 240.14c-4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE... Under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) § 240.14c-4 Presentation of information in information statement. (a) The...

  2. 17 CFR 240.14c-3 - Annual report to be furnished security holders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... security holders. 240.14c-3 Section 240.14c-3 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE... Under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) § 240.14c-3 Annual report to be furnished security holders. (a) If the information...

  3. 17 CFR 240.14c-6 - False or misleading statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... 240.14c-6 Section 240.14c-6 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) § 240.14c-6 False or misleading statements. (a) No information statement shall contain any statement...

  4. Detection of Interstellar Urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Hsin-Lun; Remijan, Anthony J.; Snyder, Lewis E.; Looney, Leslie W.; Friedel, Douglas N.; Lovas, Francis J.; McCall, Benjamin J.; Hollis, Jan M.

    2010-11-01

    Urea, a molecule discovered in human urine by H. M. Rouelle in 1773, has a significant role in prebiotic chemistry. Previous BIMA observations have suggested that interstellar urea [(NH2)2CO] is a compact hot core molecule such as other large molecules (e.g. methyl formate and acetic acid). We have conducted an extensive search for urea toward the high mass hot molecular core Sgr B2(N-LMH) using BIMA, CARMA and the IRAM 30 m. Because the spectral lines of heavy molecules like urea tend to be weak and hot cores display lines from a wide range of molecules, it is necessary to detect a number of urea lines and apply sophisticated statistical tests before having confidence in an identification. The 1 mm resolution of CARMA enables favorable coupling of the source size and synthesized beam size, which was found to be essential for the detection of weak signals. We have detected a total of 65 spectral lines (32 molecular transitions and 33 unidentified transitions), most of which are narrower than the SEST survey (Nummelin et al. 1998) due to the small synthesized beam (2.5" x 2") of CARMA. It significantly resolves out the contamination by extended emission and reveals the eight weak urea lines that were previously blended with nearby transitions. Our analysis indicates that these lines are likely to be urea since the resulting observed line frequencies are coincident with a set of overlapping connecting urea lines, and the observed line intensities are consistent with the expected line strengths of urea. In addition, we have developed a new statistical approach to examine the spatial correlation between the observed lines by applying the Student's t test to the high resolution channel maps obtained from CARMA. The t test shows consistent spatial distributions from all eight candidate lines, suggesting a common molecular origin, urea. Our t test method could have a broad impact on the next generation of arrays, such as ALMA, because the new arrays will require a method

  5. Applications of AMS {sup 14}C on Climate and Archaeology

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, P. R. S.

    2007-10-26

    We describe the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique and two distinct applications of its use with {sup 14}C to study environmental problems in Brazil, such as forest fires and climate changes in the Amazon region and archaeological studies on the early settlements in the Southeast Brazilian coast.

  6. Excretion of radioactivity following the intraperitoneal administration of /sup 14/C-DDT, /sup 14/C-DDD, /sup 14/C-DDE and /sup 14/C-DDMU to the rat and Japanese Quail

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, S.C.; Bunyan, P.J.; Huson, L.W.; King, L.J.; Stanley, P.I.

    1981-09-01

    A study in progress to examine the metabolic fate of DDT in birds and mammals is discussed. The first phase of the study, which is reported in this article, has been to establish the rate of excretion of ratioactivity following the intraperitoneal administrations of /sup 14/C-DDT, /sup 14/C-DDE, /sup 14/C-DDD, and /sup 14/C-DDMU to male rats and male Japanese quail. The mean values from the three animals in each experimental group for the amount of radioactivity excreted daily are given, and it was found that the rats excreted the radioactivity administered as DDT, DDD, and DDE substantially faster than did the quail. DDMU was excreted relatively rapidly and at similar rates. This finding suggests that apparent differences in the rates of excretion of DDT by birds and mammals probably arise from differences in the conversion of DDT to DDD or DDE or in the degradation of these metabolites to DDMU. The Japanese quail differ from the rats in excreting substantial amounts of unchanged DDT, DDE, and DDD, which probably reflects the inability of the Japanese quail to readily metabolise these compounds.

  7. DEVELOPMENT & APPLICATION OF RADIOCARBON (14C)/ORGANIC DENUDER METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The radiocarbon (14C) content of a sample measures the fraction of the sample's carbon originating from non-fossil-fuel (biogenic) sources. The most important of these sources are biomass burning (mostly winter, but wildfires can contribute in other seasons as well) and secondar...

  8. Extraction of in situ cosmogenic 14C from olivine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, J.S.; Lifton, N.A.; Timothy, Jull A.J.; Quade, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Chemical pretreatment and extraction techniques have been developed previously to extract in situ cosmogenic radiocarbon (in situ 14C) from quartz and carbonate. These minerals can be found in most environments on Earth, but are usually absent from mafic terrains. To fill this gap, we conducted numerous experiments aimed at extracting in situ 14C from olivine ((Fe,Mg)2SiO4). We were able to extract a stable and reproducible in situ 14C component from olivine using stepped heating and a lithium metaborate (LiBO2) flux, following treatment with dilute HNO3 over a variety of experimental conditions. However, measured concentrations for samples from the Tabernacle Hill basalt flow (17.3 ?? 0.3 ka4) in central Utah and the McCarty's basalt flow (3.0 ?? 0.2 ka) in western New Mexico were significantly lower than expected based on exposure of olivine in our samples to cosmic rays at each site. The source of the discrepancy is not clear. We speculate that in situ 14C atoms may not have been released from Mg-rich crystal lattices (the olivine composition at both sites was ~Fo65Fa35). Alternatively, a portion of the 14C atoms released from the olivine grains may have become trapped in synthetic spinel-like minerals that were created in the olivine-flux mixture during the extraction process, or were simply retained in the mixture itself. Regardless, the magnitude of the discrepancy appears to be inversely proportional to the Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratio of the olivine separates. If we apply a simple correction factor based on the chemical composition of the separates, then corrected in situ 14C concentrations are similar to theoretical values at both sites. At this time, we do not know if this agreement is fortuitous or real. Future research should include measurement of in situ 14C concentrations in olivine from known-age basalt flows with different chemical compositions (i.e. more Fe-rich) to determine if this correction is robust for all olivine-bearing rocks. ?? 2010 by the Arizona

  9. Reconstructing Ocean Circulation using Coral (triangle)14C Time Series

    SciTech Connect

    Kashgarian, M; Guilderson, T P

    2001-02-23

    We utilize monthly {sup 14}C data derived from coral archives in conjunction with ocean circulation models to address two questions: (1) how does the shallow circulation of the tropical Pacific vary on seasonal to decadal time scales and (2) which dynamic processes determine the mean vertical structure of the equatorial Pacific thermocline. Our results directly impact the understanding of global climate events such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). To study changes in ocean circulation and water mass distribution involved in the genesis and evolution of ENSO and decadal climate variability, it is necessary to have records of climate variables several decades in length. Continuous instrumental records are limited because technology for continuous monitoring of ocean currents (e.g. satellites and moored arrays) has only recently been available, and ships of opportunity archives such as COADS contain large spatial and temporal biases. In addition, temperature and salinity in surface waters are not conservative and thus can not be independently relied upon to trace water masses, reducing the utility of historical observations. Radiocarbon in sea water is a quasi-conservative water mass tracer and is incorporated into coral skeletal material, thus coral {sup 14}C records can be used to reconstruct changes in shallow circulation that would be difficult to characterize using instrumental data. High resolution {Delta}{sup 14}C timeseries such as ours, provide a powerful constraint on the rate of surface ocean mixing and hold great promise to augment one time oceanographic surveys. {Delta}{sup 14}C timeseries such as these, not only provide fundamental information about the shallow circulation of the Pacific, but can also be directly used as a benchmark for the next generation of high resolution ocean models used in prognosticating climate. The measurement of {Delta}{sup 14}C in biological archives such as tree rings and coral growth bands is a direct record of

  10. Urinary metabolites of 14C-labeled thyroxine in man

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Constance S.; Buck, Melvin W.; Chambers, Joseph B.

    1972-01-01

    Studies were carried out to determine the chemical structures of thyroxine metabolites after total deiodination. Normal subjects were given thyroxine labeled with 14C on the nonphenolic ring and the alanine side chain, 8-11 μg/day for 10 days. By paper chromatography of fresh urine, six or more 14C-labeled compounds were separated. The 14C-labeled metabolites were concentrated by passing the urine through a nonionic polymeric adsorbent. Two major thyroxine metabolites were identified. The identification was made by three different methods: (a) chromatography, (b) synthesis of derivatives, and (c) recrystallization to constant specific activity. One 14C-labeled metabolite was identified as thyroacetic acid or 4-phenoxy-(4′-hydroxy) phenyl-acetic acid. Another one was identified as thyronine. Of the total urinary 14C radioactivity, 43.7% was recovered as thyroacetic acid and 19.8% was recovered as thyronine. Approximately one-fifth of each of these metabolites was present in the urine in bound form which released the free metabolites during acid hydrolysis. The average daily excretion of thyroacetic acid was 13.7% of the renal disposal rate of thyroxine, or approximately 7.5 μg/day. The average daily excretion of thyronine was 6.5% of the renal disposal rate of thyroxine or approximately 3.9 μg/day while the urinary iodide made up 64.7% of the renal disposal rate of thyroxine. Our findings provide the needed proof that the major metabolic pathways of thyroxine remove the iodine atoms by substituting hydrogen for iodine and leave the diphenyl ether nucleus intact. PMID:5032524

  11. Chemiresistor urea sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.

    1997-01-01

    A sensor to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects.

  12. Evaluation of Exalenz Bioscience's BreathID for Helicobacter pylori detection.

    PubMed

    Broide, Efrat; Shirin, Haim

    2015-03-01

    Carbon-labeled urea breath tests, which have high sensitivity and specificity, are the preferred method used in epidemiological studies, screening dyspeptic patients and assessing eradication or recurrence of Helicobacter pylori infection. The principle of the (13)C-urea breath test relies upon the ability of the H. pylori urease to hydrolyze the orally administered (13)C-urea. The BreathID (Exalenz Bioscience Inc., Union, NJ, USA) provides a competitive solution for breath testing, including unique features such as automatic continuous breath collection and analysis. This is an unattended convenient test, with no human error as the correct part of the breath is collected and patients' assistance is not required. The test results are available in real time at the point of care and enable shortened breath testing procedures. Additionally, several studies showing expanded utility of the BreathID in pediatrics, after therapy and during proton pump inhibitors intake, further support the safety and performance of the BreathID in the diagnosis of H. pylori. PMID:25634297

  13. Urea Cycle Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kleppe, Soledad; Mian, Asad; Lee, Brendan

    2003-07-01

    Urea cycle disorders comprise a group of inborn errors of metabolism that represent unique gene-nutrient interactions whose significant morbidity arises from acute and chronic neurotoxicity associated with often massive hyperammonemia. Current paradigms of treatment are focused on controlling the flux of nitrogen transfer through the hepatic urea cycle by a combination of dietary and pharmacologic approaches. Evolving paradigms include the development of cell and gene therapies. Current research is focused on understanding the pathophysiology of ammonia-mediated toxicity and prevention of neural injury. PMID:12791198

  14. The metabolism of [14C]-debrisoquine in man.

    PubMed Central

    Idle, J R; Mahgoub, A; Angelo, M M; Dring, L G; Lancaster, R; Smith, R L

    1979-01-01

    1 The synthesis of [14C]-debrisoquine hydrochloride and 4-hydroxy-debrisoquine sulphate is described. 2 The metabolic fate and excretion profile in both urine and faeces of 14C-labelled debrisoquine was studied in five healthy human subjects. 3 Investigations showed that the drug is well-absorbed after a single oral dose of 32 mg and quantitatively eliminated from the body within three days. 4 4-Hydroxy-debrisoquine is the major metabolite of debrisoquine, although significant amounts of 5-,6-, 7- and 8-hydroxy-debrisoquine are also formed. 5 Electron-capture gas chromatography is a useful method for measuring debrisoquine and its five hydroxylated metabolites in urine at the pg level. PMID:371651

  15. The urea cycle disorders.

    PubMed

    Helman, Guy; Pacheco-Colón, Ileana; Gropman, Andrea L

    2014-07-01

    The urea cycle is the primary nitrogen-disposal pathway in humans. It requires the coordinated function of six enzymes and two mitochondrial transporters to catalyze the conversion of a molecule of ammonia, the α-nitrogen of aspartate, and bicarbonate into urea. Whereas ammonia is toxic, urea is relatively inert, soluble in water, and readily excreted by the kidney in the urine. Accumulation of ammonia and other toxic intermediates of the cycle lead to predominantly neurologic sequelae. The disorders may present at any age from the neonatal period to adulthood, with the more severely affected patients presenting earlier in life. Patients are at risk for metabolic decompensation throughout life, often triggered by illness, fasting, surgery and postoperative states, peripartum, stress, and increased exogenous protein load. Here the authors address neurologic presentations of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency in detail, the most common of the urea cycle disorders, neuropathology, neurophysiology, and our studies in neuroimaging. Special attention to late-onset presentations is given. PMID:25192511

  16. May 14C be used to date contemporary art?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedi, M. E.; Caforio, L.; Mandò, P. A.; Petrucci, F.; Taccetti, F.

    2013-01-01

    The use of radiocarbon in forensics is by now widespread, thanks to the so-called bomb peak, which makes it possible to perform high-precision dating. Since 1955, 14C concentration in the atmosphere had strongly increased due to nuclear explosions, reaching its maximum value in 1963-1965. After the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, 14C started to decrease as a consequence of the exchanges between atmosphere and the other natural carbon reservoirs. Nowadays, it is still slightly above the pre-bomb value. The work presented in this paper is based on the idea of exploiting the bomb peak to “precisely” date works of contemporary art, with the aim at identifying possible fakes. We analysed two kinds of materials from the 20th century: newspapers and painting canvases. Newspaper samples were taken because they might in principle be considered to represent dated samples (considering the date on the issues). Our data (28 samples) show a trend similar to atmospheric data in the literature, although with some differences; the paper peak is flatter and shifted towards more recent years (about five years) with respect to the atmospheric data. This can be explained by taking paper manufacturing processes into account. As to the canvas samples, the measured 14C concentrations were generally reasonably consistent with the expected concentrations (based on the year on the paintings). However, this does not indicate that the interpretation of the results is simpler and more straightforward. Obviously, we only measure the 14C concentration of the fibre used for the canvas, which does not necessarily measure the date the painting was manufactured. In this paper, sample preparation and experimental results will be discussed, in order to show the potential as well as the limitations of radiocarbon to date contemporary art.

  17. Pediatric microdose and microtracer studies using 14C in Europe.

    PubMed

    Turner, M A; Mooij, M G; Vaes, W H J; Windhorst, A D; Hendrikse, N H; Knibbe, C A J; Kõrgvee, L T; Maruszak, W; Grynkiewicz, G; Garner, R C; Tibboel, D; Park, B K; de Wildt, S N

    2015-09-01

    Important information gaps remain on the efficacy and safety of drugs in children. Pediatric drug development encounters several ethical, practical, and scientific challenges. One barrier to the evaluation of medicines for children is a lack of innovative methodologies that have been adapted to the needs of children. This article presents our successful experience of pediatric microdose and microtracer studies using (14) C-labeled probes in Europe to illustrate the strengths and limitations of these approaches. PMID:26095095

  18. 14C content in aerosols in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, V.; Solís, C.; Chávez, E.; Andrade, E.; Ortiz, M. E.; Huerta, A.; Aragón, J.; Rodríguez-Ceja, M.; Martínez, M. A.; Ortiz, E.

    2016-03-01

    14C-AMS of total carbon was determined in aerosols (PM10 fraction), collected in Mexico City during two weeks from 21 November to 3 December 2012. Other tracers such as total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and trace element contents were also determined. F14C values varied from 0.39 to 0.48 with an average of 0.43. These values are slightly lower than those previously obtained for PM2.5 in 2003 and 2006 and reflect a high contribution of fossil CO2 to the carbonaceous matter in aerosols from Mexico City. In contrast, from 2006 to 2012 PM10 increased; EC, Ca, Ti and Fe concentrations remained constant, while OC, TC and K concentrations decreased. The use of potassium as an indicator of biomass burning showed that this source was negligible during this campaign. Combined analytical approaches allowed us to distinguish temporal variations of anthropogenic and natural inputs to the F14C.

  19. Airy structure in 16O+14C nuclear rainbow scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.

    2015-08-01

    The Airy structure in 16 O +14 C rainbow scattering is studied with an extended double-folding (EDF) model that describes all the diagonal and off-diagonal coupling potentials derived from the microscopic realistic wave functions for 16 O by using a density-dependent nucleon-nucleon force. The experimental angular distributions at EL=132 , 281, and 382.2 MeV are well reproduced by the calculations. By studying the energy evolution of the Airy structure, the Airy minimum around θ =76∘ in the angular distribution at EL=132 MeV is assigned as the second-order Airy minimum A 2 in contrast to the recent literature which assigns it as the third order A 3 . The Airy minima in the 90∘ excitation function is investigated in comparison with well-known 16 O +16 O and 12 C +12 C systems. Evolution of the Airy structure into the molecular resonances with the 16 O +14 C cluster structure in the low-energy region around Ec .m .=30 MeV is discussed. It is predicted theoretically for the first time for a non-4 N 16O +14 C system that Airy elephants in the 90∘ excitation function are present.

  20. Temporal variation in the interhemispheric 14C offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormac, F. G.; Hogg, A. G.; Higham, T. F. G.; Lynch-Stieglitz, J.; Broecker, W. S.; Baillie, M. G. L.; Palmer, J.; Xiong, L.; Pilcher, J. R.; Brown, D.; Hoper, S. T.

    Contemporaneous tree-ring dated wood, from trees in the northern and southern hemispheres, gives different 14C dates. Previous studies [Vogel et al., 1986; 1993] using wood from South Africa and The Netherlands have shown depletion's of -4.56 ± 0.85‰ and -5.12±0.62‰ respectively. This translates to age differences of 36±7 and 41±5 years (yrs) with the southern hemisphere giving the older dates. More recently, Stuiver and Braziunas [1998] have shown that an offset of 23±4 yrs exists between combined 19th century wood measurements from Tasmania and Chile in the southern hemisphere and the west coast of the U.S. (Washington) in the northern hemisphere. In this study measurements on contemporaneous decadal samples of oak from the British Isles and cedar from New Zealand over the period 1725 to 1885 AD show a depletion of -3.4±0.58‰ (27.2±4.7 yrs). However, data after 1895 AD has a mean offset of 0.66±1.06‰ (-5.3±8.5 yrs) with increased variance compared to 19th century data. This, we believe, is attributable to anthropogenic fossil fuel, which, due to its long residence time in the earth, has long since lost any 14C component and when burned preferentially depletes the northern hemisphere atmosphere of 14C.

  1. Breath holding spell

    MedlinePlus

    ... confronted Breath holding spells are more common in children with: Genetic conditions, such as Riley-Day syndrome or Rett syndrome Iron deficiency anemia A family history of breath holding spells (parents ...

  2. Minimizing Shortness of Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top Doctors in the Nation Departments & Divisions Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Minimizing Shortness of Breath ... Management Assess Your Stress Coping Strategies Identifying ... & Programs Health Insights Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Make ...

  3. Breathing and Relaxation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top Doctors in the Nation Departments & Divisions Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Make ... Management Assess Your Stress Coping Strategies Identifying ... & Programs Health Insights Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Make ...

  4. Autoradiographic disposition of (1-methyl-/sup 14/C)- and (2-/sup 14/C)caffeine in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lachance, M.P.; Marlowe, C.; Waddell, W.J.

    1983-11-01

    Male, C57B1/6J mice received either (1-methyl-14C)caffeine or (2-14C)caffeine via the tail vein at a dose of 0.7 or 11 mg/kg, respectively. At 0.1, 0.33, 1, 3, 9, and 24 hr after treatment, the mice were anesthetized with ether and frozen by immersion in dry ice/hexane. The mice were processed for whole-body autoradiography by the Ullberg technique; this procedure does not allow thawing or contact with solvents. All autoradiographs revealed some retention of radioactivity at early time intervals in the lacrimal glands, seminal vesicle fluid, nasal and olfactory epithelium, and retinal melanocytes. The remaining portion of the animal was densitometrically uniform except for the lower levels noted in the CNS and adipose tissues. Excretion of radioactivity by the liver and kidneys seems to be the major routes of elimination. Localization in the liver at late time intervals was confined principally to the centrilobular region. Late sites of retention, observed only after (1-methyl-14C)caffeine administration, included the pancreas, minor and major salivary glands, splenic red pulp, thymal cortex, bone marrow, and gastrointestinal epithelium. Sites of localization present in both studies included the olfactory epithelium, lacrimal glands, hair follicles, and retinal melanocytes. Further studies are needed to determine whether the localization at these various sites is due to metabolic degradation, active transport, or possibly a specific receptor interaction.

  5. Fundamentals of breath malodour.

    PubMed

    Sanz, M; Roldán, S; Herrera, D

    2001-11-15

    Breath malodour is a condition that has health and social implications. The origin of breath malodour problems are related to both systemic and oral conditions. The advice of dental professionals for treatment of this condition occurs with regularity since 90% of breath odor problems emanate from the oral cavity. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the etiology of breath odor, its prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment strategies for the condition. PMID:12167916

  6. What Causes Bad Breath?

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? What Causes Bad Breath? KidsHealth > For Teens > What Causes Bad Breath? Print A A A Text Size en ... Qué es lo que provoca el mal aliento? Bad breath, or halitosis , can be a major problem, ...

  7. Urea distribution in renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Blackmore, D. J.; Elder, W. J.; Bowden, C. H.

    1963-01-01

    An assessment of intracellular urea removed during haemodialysis has been made from urea extraction and plasma urea estimations. An apparent wide variation in the movement of intracellular urea in patients with acute renal failure from obstetric and traumatic causes and with chronic renal failure is reported. A method for the estimation of red cell water urea is presented. In two patients with chronic renal failure the red cell urea level was much higher than would have been expected from the plasma urea level before dialysis. In two obstetric patients there was no such discrepancy. The conclusion is drawn that research should be directed to variations of intracellular metabolism in renal failure before a more rational approach can be made to its management. PMID:16811009

  8. Towards optoelectronic urea biosensors.

    PubMed

    Pokrzywnicka, Marta; Koncki, Robert; Tymecki, Łukasz

    2015-03-01

    Integration of immobilized enzymes with light-emitting diodes (LEDs) leads to the development of optoelectronic enzyme-based biosensors. In this work, urease, used as a model enzyme, immobilized in the form of an open-tubular microbioreactor or biosensing membrane that has been integrated with two red LEDs. It forms complete, fiberless, miniaturized, and extremely economic biooptoelectronic devices useful for nonstationary measurements under flow analysis conditions. Both enzyme-based biodevices, operating according to the paired emitter detector diode (PEDD) principle, allow relatively fast, highly sensitive, and well-reproducible urea detection in the millimolar range of concentrations. Potential analytical applications of the developed urea bioPEDDs have been announced. Both presented constructions will be easily adapted for the development of other optoelectronic biosensors exploring various enzyme-based schemes of biodetection. PMID:25619983

  9. A high resolution method for 14C analysis of a coral from South China Sea: Implication for "AD 775" 14C event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ping; Shen, Chengde; Yi, Weixi; Wang, Ning; Ding, Xingfang; Liu, Kexin; Fu, Dongpo; Liu, Weiguo; Liu, Yi

    2015-10-01

    A pre-heating method that improves the background and precision of 14C dating significantly was applied for fossil coral dating with high resolution in our lab in Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (GIGCAS). The reaction tube is heated under 300 °C in a vacuum line before it is used for graphitization. The method can reduce the contamination absorbed in TiH2, Zn and Fe power placed in the graphitization tube. With the pre-heating and average drilling method, bi-weekly resolution 14C dating in a fossil coral is carried out to investigate the "AD 775 14C spike event". Different from the tree ring 14C archives with the 14C spike of ∼15‰ (Δ14C), the 14C spike in the coral shows an abrupt peak of 45‰ and two smaller spikes of Δ14C > 20‰ in half a year in AD 776. And then, the 14C content in coral decreases gradually in AD 777. The peak time of the 14C spike event likely occurs in the summer of AD 776 according to the δ18O variation in coral. High-resolution dating of 14C in coral provides not only a more detail process of the event than that from tree rings, but also the first report of the event from sea ecosystem. Both of them suggest an extraterrestrial origin of the event cause.

  10. Human folate metabolism using 14C-accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, A. J.; Arjomand, A.; Duecker, S. R.; Johnson, H.; Schneider, P. D.; Zulim, R. A.; Bucholz, B. A.; Vogel, J. S.

    1999-03-25

    Folate is a water soluble vitamin required for optimal health, growth and development. It occurs naturally in various states of oxidation of the pteridine ring and with varying lengths to its glutamate chain. Folates function as one-carbon donors through methyl transferase catalyzed reactions. Low-folate diets, especially by those with suboptimal methyltransferase activity, are associated with increased risk of neural tube birth defects in children, hyperhomocysteinemic heart disease, and cancer in adults. Rapidly dividing (neoplastic) cells have a high folate need for DNA synthesis. Chemical analogs of folate (antifolates) that interfere with folate metabolism are used as therapeutic agents in cancer treatment. Although much is known about folate chemistry, metabolism of this vitamin in vivo in humans is not well understood. Since folate levels in blood and tissues are very low and methods to measure them are inadequate, the few previous studies that have examined folate metabolism used large doses of radiolabeled folic acid in patients with Hodgkin's disease and cancer (Butterworth et al. 1969, Krumdieck et al. 1978). A subsequent protocol using deuterated folic acid was also insufficiently sensitive to trace a physiologic folate dose (Stites et al. 1997). Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an emerging bioanalytical tool that overcomes the limitations of traditional mass spectrometry and of decay counting of long lived radioisotopes (Vogel et al. 1995). AMS can detect attomolar concentrations of 14 C in milligram-sized samples enabling in vivo radiotracer studies in healthy humans. We used AMS to study the metabolism of a physiologic 80 nmol oral dose of 14 C-folic acid (1/6 US RDA) by measuring the 14 C-folate levels in serial plasma, urine and feces samples taken over a 150-day period after dosing a healthy adult volunteer.

  11. Low-level (submicromole) environmental 14C metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, L. A.; Kessler, J. D.; Marolf, J. V.; McNichol, A. P.; Stuart, D. R.; Donoghue, J. C.; Donahue, D. J.; Burr, G. S.; Biddulph, D.

    2000-10-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements of environmental 14C have been employed during the past decade at the several micromole level (tens of μg carbon), but advanced research in the atmospheric and marine sciences demands still higher (μg) sensitivity, an extreme example being the determination of 14C in elemental or "black" carbon (BC) at levels of 2-10 μg per kg of Greenland snow and ice (Currie et al., 1998). A fundamental limitation for 14C AMS is Poisson counting statistics, which sets in at about 1 μg modern-C. Using the small sample (25 μg) AMS target preparation facility at NOSAMS (Pearson et al., 1998), and the microsample combustion-dilution facility at NIST, we have demonstrated an intrinsic modern-C quantification limit ( mQ) of ca. 0.9 μg, based on a 1-parameter fit to the empirical AMS variance function. (For environmental 14C, the modern carbon quantification limit is defined as that mass ( mQ) corresponding to 10% relative standard deviation (rsd) for the fraction of modern carbon, σ( fM)/ fM.) Stringent control, required for quantitative dilution factors (DL), is achieved with the NIST on-line manometric/mass spectrometry facility that compensates also for unsuspected trace impurities from vigorous chemical processing (e.g., acid digestion). Our current combustion blank is trivial (mean: 0.16 ± 0.02 μg C, n=13) but lognormally distributed (dispersion [σ]: 0.07 ± 0.01 μg). An iterative numerical expression is introduced to assess the quantitative impacts of fossil and modern carbon blank components on mQ; and a new "clean chemistry" BC processing system is described for the minimization of such blanks. For the assay of soot carbon in Greenland snow/ice, the overall processing blank has been reduced from nearly 7 μg total carbon to less than 1 μg, and is undetectable for BC.

  12. Chemiresistor urea sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.

    1997-12-16

    A sensor is disclosed to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects. 16 figs.

  13. Disposition of [14C]ruboxistaurin in humans.

    PubMed

    Burkey, Jennifer L; Campanale, Kristina M; Barbuch, Robert; O'Bannon, Douglas; Rash, James; Benson, Charles; Small, David

    2006-11-01

    Ruboxistaurin is a potent and specific inhibitor of the beta isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC) that is being developed for the treatment of diabetic microvascular complications. The disposition of [(14)C]ruboxistaurin was determined in six healthy male subjects who received a single oral dose of 64 mg of [(14)C]ruboxistaurin in solution. There were no clinically significant adverse events during the study. Whole blood, urine, and feces were collected at frequent intervals after dosing. Metabolites were profiled by high performance liquid chromatography with radiometric detection. The total mean recovery of the radioactive dose was approximately 87%, with the majority of the radioactivity (82.6 +/- 1.1%) recovered in the feces. Urine was a minor pathway of elimination (4.1 +/- 0.3%). The major route of ruboxistaurin metabolism was to the N-desmethyl ruboxistaurin metabolite (LY338522), which has been shown to be active and equipotent to ruboxistaurin in the inhibition of PKC(beta). In addition, multiple hydroxylated metabolites were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in all matrices. Pharmacokinetics were conducted for both ruboxistaurin and LY338522 (N-desmethyl ruboxistaurin, 1). These moieties together accounted for approximately 52% of the radiocarbon measured in the plasma. The excreted radioactivity was profiled using radiochromatography, and approximately 31% was structurally characterized as ruboxistaurin or N-desmethyl ruboxistaurin. These data demonstrate that ruboxistaurin is metabolized primarily to N-desmethyl ruboxistaurin (1) and multiple other oxidation products, and is excreted primarily in the feces. PMID:16896067

  14. 14C Concentrations in the Northern Atlantic and Nordic Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, M.-J.; Grootes, P. M.; Erlenkeuser, H.

    2003-04-01

    We report here more than 450 new Δ14C results from water samples from the North Atlantic and the Nordic Seas measured at the Leibniz-Labor, Christian-Albrechts Universität, Kiel, using accelerator mass spectrometry. The water samples were collected during three cruises of the RV Meteor: M36 in 1996 (65 measurements, 6 stations), M39 in 1997 (217 measurements, 11 stations) and M50 in 2001 (189 measurements, 10 stations). These results are compared to those of previous sampling campaigns: GEOSECS (1972) and TTO (1981) and of samples obtained from previous cruises of the RV Meteor (M18 in 1991 and M30 in 1994) measured by decay counting at the Institut für Umweltphysik in Heidelberg. Several stations from the cruise M50 are located along the WOCE A02 line from the western entrance of the English Channel to the tip of Newfoundland/Grand Banks. This transect also analysed during the M30 (1994) campaign provides the evolution of the penetration of atmospheric bomb 14C into these waters over a seven year period. Other samples were taken in the Labrador Sea, and North and South of Iceland. Comparison with CFC measurements, for some of the stations, also provides an insight in the penetration of both tracers into the ocean.

  15. Use of polyurea from urea for coating of urea granules.

    PubMed

    Lu, Panfang; Zhang, Yanfei; Jia, Cong; Li, Yufeng; Mao, Zhiquan

    2016-01-01

    A new type of controlled release fertilizers coated with polyurea was prepared. The granulated urea was firstly changed into a liquid urea by heating as the coating liquid. By spraying uniformly the urea was coated with the polyurea synthesized by the reaction of isocyanates with a liquid urea. The effects of different modifiers on N release characteristics of polyurea-coated urea (PCU) were studied. The morphology and chemical structure of PCU coating materials was investigated by SEM and FTIR. We studied the nitrogen release characteristics of the PCU applied in both water and soil, and the biodegradability of PCU coating after buried in soil. The results showed that PCU reduced nitrogen release rate and exhibited excellent controlled release property. The PCU coating materials could biodegrade in soil. This indicated that the low cost PCU products from urea are expected to use in agricultural and horticultural applications. PMID:27119061

  16. Excretion of 14C-labeled cyanide in rats exposed to chronic intake of potassium cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Okoh, P.N.

    1983-09-15

    The excretion of an acute dose of 14C-labeled cyanide in urine, feces, and expired air was studied in rats exposed to daily intake of unlabeled KCN in the diet for 6 weeks. Urinary excretion was the main route of elimination of cyanide carbon in these rats, accounting for 83% of the total excreted radioactivity in 12 hr and 89% of the total excreted radioactivity in 24 hr. The major excretion metabolite of cyanide in urine was thiocyanate, and this metabolite accounted for 71 and 79% of the total urinary activity in 12 hr and 24 hr, respectively. The mean total activity excreted in expired air after 12 hr was only 4%, and this value did not change after 24 hr. Of the total activity in expired air in 24 hr, 90% was present as carbon dioxide and 9% as cyanide. When these results were compared with those observed for control rats, it was clear that the mode of elimination of cyanide carbon in both urine and breath was not altered by the chronic intake of cyanide.

  17. Accelerator mass spectrometry analysis of 14C-oxaliplatin concentrations in biological samples and 14C contents in biological samples and antineoplastic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoguchi, Teiko; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Konno, Noboru; Shiraishi, Tadashi; Kato, Kazuhiro; Tokanai, Fuyuki

    2015-10-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is expected to play an important role in microdose trials. In this study, we measured the 14C concentration in 14C-oxaliplatin-spiked serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate samples in our Yamagata University (YU) - AMS system. The calibration curves of 14C concentration in serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate were linear (the correlation coefficients were ⩾0.9893), and the precision and accuracy was within the acceptance criteria. To examine a 14C content of water in three vacuum blood collection tubes and a syringe were measured. 14C was not detected from water in these devices. The mean 14C content in urine samples of 6 healthy Japanese volunteers was 0.144 dpm/mL, and the intra-day fluctuation of 14C content in urine from a volunteer was little. The antineoplastic agents are administered to the patients in combination. Then, 14C contents of the antineoplastic agents were quantitated. 14C contents were different among 10 antineoplastic agents; 14C contents of paclitaxel injection and docetaxel hydrate injection were higher than those of the other injections. These results indicate that our quantitation method using YU-AMS system is suited for microdosing studies and that measurement of baseline and co-administered drugs might be necessary for the studies in low concentrations.

  18. Cholestyramine-enhanced fecal elimination of carbon-14 in rats after administration of ammonium (/sup 14/C)perfluorooctanoate or potassium (/sup 14/C)perfluorooctanesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.D.; Gibson, S.J.; Ober, R.E.

    1984-12-01

    After a single intravenous dose of ammonium (/sup 14/C)perfluorooctanoate (( /sup 14/C)PFO, 13.3 mg/kg) or of potassium (/sup 14/C)perfluorooctanesulfonate (( /sup 14/C)PFOS, 3.4 mg/kg) to rats, cholestyramine fed daily as a 4% mixture in feed was shown to increase the total carbon-14 eliminated via feces and to decrease liver concentration of carbon-14. Rats were fed cholestyramine in feed for 14 days after administration of (/sup 14/C)PFO and for 21 days after administration of (/sup 14/C)PFOS. Control rats were administered radiolabeled fluorochemical but were not treated with cholestyramine. Cholestyramine treatment increased mean cumulative carbon-14 elimination in feces by 9.8-fold for rats administered (/sup 14/C)PFO and by 9.5-fold for rats administered (/sup 14/C)PFOS. After (/sup 14/C)PFO, a mean of 4% of the dose of carbon-14 was in liver of cholestyramine-treated rats at 14 days versus 7.6% in control rats; after (/sup 14/C)PFOS, 11.3% of the dose was in liver at 21 days versus 40.3% in control rats. After administration of either radiolabeled compound, plasma and red blood cell carbon-14 concentrations, which were relatively lower than liver concentrations, were also significantly reduced by cholestyramine treatment.

  19. Electrospray ionization of volatiles in breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Lozano, P.; de La Mora, J. Fernández

    2007-08-01

    Recent work by Zenobi and colleagues [H. Chen, A. Wortmann, W. Zhang, R. Zenobi, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 46 (2007) 580] reports that human breath charged by contact with an electrospray (ES) cloud yields many mass peaks of species such as urea, glucose, and other ions, some with molecular weights above 1000 Da. All these species are presumed to be involatile, and to originate from breath aerosols by so-called extractive electrospray ionization EESI [H. Chen, A. Venter, R.G. Cooks, Chem. Commun. (2006) 2042]. However, prior work by Fenn and colleagues [C.M. Whitehouse, F. Levin, C.K. Meng, J.B. Fenn, Proceedings of the 34th ASMS Conference on Mass Spectrometry and Allied Topics, Denver, 1986 p. 507; S. Fuerstenau, P. Kiselev, J.B. Fenn, Proceedings of the 47th ASMS Conference on Mass Spectrometry, 1999, Dallas, TX, 1999] and by Hill and colleagues [C. Wu, W.F. Siems, H.H. Hill Jr., Anal. Chem. 72 (2000) 396] have reported the ability of electrospray drops to ionize a variety of low vapor pressure substances directly from the gas phase, without an apparent need for the vapor to be brought into the charging ES in aerosol form. The Ph.D. Thesis of Martínez-Lozano [P. Martínez-Lozano Sinués, Ph.D. Thesis, Department of Thermal and Fluid Engineering, University Carlos III of Madrid; April 5, 2006 (in Spanish); http://hdl.handle.net/10016/655] had also previously argued that the numerous human breath species observed via a similar ES ionization approach were in fact ionized directly from the vapor. Here, we observe that passage of the breath stream through a submicron filter does not eliminate the majority of the breath vapors seen in the absence of the filter. We conclude that direct vapor charging is the leading mechanism in breath ionization by electrospray drops, though aerosol ionization may also play a role.

  20. The use of urea by Evernia prunastri thalli.

    PubMed

    Blanco, M J; Suárez, C; Vicente, C

    1984-10-01

    Thalli of Evernia prunastri floated on 40 mM urea synthesize urease (EC3.5.1.5) which is, in part, retained in the cells as well as secreted into the external medium. By using [(14)C]urea, it has been shown that the (14)CO2 evolved by the action of urease is mainly incorporated into phenolic compounds. Evernic acid has the highest radioactivity when incubations are carried out in the light. The orsellinate moiety of this molecule contains ten times more radioactivity than the everninic acid moiety. This could be explained by the assumption that orsellinic acid is the first product of cyclisation of the polyketide chain in the biosynthetic pathway. PMID:24253163

  1. The distribution of 14c from [U-14c]glucose in mice using whole-body autoradiography.

    PubMed

    Shimada, M; Kihara, T; Watanabe, M; Kurimoto, K

    1976-04-01

    Tissue distribution of radioactive carbon from [U-14C]glucose in the mouse in vivo was studied by whole-body autoradiography. The mice were frozen with Dry-Ice-acetone at 0.5, 1, 5 and 30 min, 1 and 24 hr and 1 and 3 weeks after intraperitoneal injection of [U-14C]glucose. Whole-sagittal sections of the frozen mouse, obtained by using a microtome in a cryostat, were dried in a cryostat and autoradiographed. The resulting dry autoradiographs are called untreated autoradiographs in the present work. The sections were then fixed in cold 6% (w/v) HClO4, dried at room temperature and again autoradiographed. Autoradiographs that have undergone this process are referred to as treated autoradiographs. In both untreated and treated autoradiographs, within 1 min following injection of the labeled glucose, the abdominal cavity had the highest autoradiographic density. At 1 hr, density became highest in Harder's, sublingual and duodenal glands, large intestinal mucosa and tongue, and after 3 weeks, no autoradiographic denisty was present. PMID:1270794

  2. Effect of perfusate hematocrit on urea permeability-surface area in isolated dog lung

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, R.E.; Roselli, R.J.; Haselton, F.R.; Harris, T.R.

    1986-10-01

    Seven dog lower left lung lobes were statically inflated and perfused at a constant rate for each lobe with a perfusate in which the hematocrit was altered over a wide range. The permeability-surface area of urea was calculated from multiple indicator dilution curves using two separate injectates for each hematocrit level. One injectate contained only /sup 125/I-albumin as the vascular reference tracer and the other contained both /sup 51/Cr-erythrocytes and /sup 125/I-albumin as the vascular reference tracers; both contained (/sup 14/C)urea as the permeating tracer. The results strongly indicate that the phenomenon of erythrocyte trapping of urea does not affect the calculation of urea permeability-surface area product provided the appropriate albumin-erythrocyte composite reference tracer is utilized in its calculation.

  3. Metabolism and excretion of [14C] verruculogen in a sheep.

    PubMed

    Perera, K P; Mantle, P G; Penny, R H

    1982-05-01

    [14C] Verruculogen (75 micrograms/kg) was given intravenously to a sheep under barbiturate anaesthesia to prevent the severe tremor and convulsions which would otherwise have occurred. Two hours later 28 per cent of the tremorgenic mycotoxin was detected in the liver, bile and small intestine. Approximately 0.5 per cent was excreted in the urine. Trace amounts of radiolabel were detected in the cortex and corpus striatum of the brain. Verruculogen was metabolised by the liver and converted completely to four more polar products, including two isomeric forms of desoxy-verruculogen and the weakly tremorgenic mycotoxin TR-2. The principal and most polar metabolite excreted is probably an isomer of TR-2. PMID:7100651

  4. Structure of 19O from 9Be + 14C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungan, R.; Tabor, S. L.; Vonmoss, J.; Morrow, S.; Abromeit, B.; Kravvaris, K.; Parker, J. J., IV; Tai, P. L.; Tripathi, Vandana; Volya, A.

    2015-10-01

    The 9Be(14C, α γ) reaction at ELab = 30 and 35 MeV was used to study excited states of 19O. The Florida State University (FSU) γ detector array was used to detect γ radiation in coincidence with charged particles detected and identified with a silicon ΔE-E particle telescope. From α- γ- γ coincidences five new states of 19O have been identified and an additional three new γ transitions among known states have been observed. An additional previously unobserved state has been marked tentative from α- γ coincidences. These results are compared to shell model calculations using the USDA, WBP, and PSDU interactions. This work was supported in part by U.S. National Science Foundation Grant NSF-14-01574.

  5. Breathing metabolic simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a breathing metabolic simulator (BMS) is reported. This BMS simulates all of the breathing and metabolic parameters required for complete evaluation and test of life support and resuscitation equipment. It is also useful for calibrating and validating mechanical and gaseous pulmonary function test procedures. Breathing rate, breathing depth, breath velocity contour, oxygen uptake, and carbon dioxide release are all variable over wide ranges simulating conditions from sleep to hard work with respiratory exchange ratios covering the range from hypoventilation. In addition, all of these parameters are remotely controllable to facilitate use of the device in hostile or remote environments. The exhaled breath is also maintained at body temperature and a high humidity. The simulation is accurate to the extent of having a variable functional residual capacity independent of other parameters.

  6. Effect of endomycorrhizae on the bioavailability of bound sup 14 C residues to onion plants from an organic soil treated with ( sup 14 C)fonofos

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.D.; Khan, S.U. )

    1990-03-01

    Uptake of bound {sup 14}C residues from an organic soil treated with radiolabeled fonofos (O-ethyl S-phenyl ethylphosphonodithioate) by selected Glomus endomycorrhiza and onion roots was studied. The hyphae of endomycorrhizal associations were capable of removing {sup 14}C residues from the soil and transporting them to onion plants. Bioavailability of soil-bound {sup 14}C residues, as measured by {sup 14}C residue content in onion, was increased 32 and 40% over that of nonmycorrhizal plants by hyphae of Glomus intraradices and Glomus vesiculiferium, respectively. The data suggest that under field conditions endomycorrhizal infection may greatly increase the bioavailability of soil-bound pesticide residues to plants.

  7. Defective (U-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J.E.; Norris, B.J.; Brooke, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with normal skeletal muscle, muscle from patients with Duchenne dystrophy had decreased (U-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation. (1-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation was normal. These results may indicate a defect in intramitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

  8. Effect of diflubenzuron and its major degradation products on the growth of Euglena gracilis Z. and incorporation of glycine-U-/sub 14/C in protein

    SciTech Connect

    Gattavecchia, E.; Di Pietra, A.M.; Tonelli, D.; Borgatti, A.

    1981-01-01

    Diflubenzuron (I) and its major degradation products 4-chlorophenyl urea (II), 2,6-difluorobenzoic acid (III) and 4-chloroaniline (IV) were tested for their activity on Euglena gracilis Z. The inhibition on the growth and on the incorporation of glycine-U-/sub 14/C in the protein of Euglena was measured in the presence of I-IV ranging 10 to 200 ppm. 4-chloroaniline caused a considerable inhibition at every tested level whereas I-III slightly affected only the incorporation. Therefore, it must be inferred that diflubenzuron shows no effect on growth and protein biosynthesis for this nontarget organism.

  9. Percutaneous absorption of ( sup 14 C)DDT and ( sup 14 C)benzo(a)pyrene from soil

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, R.C.; Maibach, H.I.; Bucks, D.A.; Sedik, L.; Melendres, J.; Liao, C.; DiZio, S. )

    1990-10-01

    The objective was to determine percutaneous absorption of DDT and benzo(a)pyrene in vitro and in vivo from soil into and through skin. Soil (Yolo County 65-California-57-8; 26% sand, 26% clay, 48% silt) was passed through 10-, 20-, and 48-mesh sieves. Soil then retained by 80-mesh was mixed with (14C)-labeled chemical at 10 ppm. Acetone solutions at 10 ppm were prepared for comparative analysis. Human cadaver skin was dermatomed to 500 microns and used in glass diffusion cells with human plasma as the receptor fluid (3 ml/hr flow rate) for a 24-hr skin application time. With acetone vehicle, DDT (18.1 +/- 13.4%) readily penetrated into human skin. Significantly less DDT (1.0 +/- 0.7%) penetrated into human skin from soil. DDT would not partition from human skin into human plasma in the receptor phase (less than 0.1%). With acetone vehicle, benzo(a)pyrene (23.7 +/- 9.7%) readily penetrated into human skin. Significantly less benzo(a)pyrene (1.4 +/- 0.9%) penetrated into human skin from soil. Benzo(a)pyrene would not partition from human skin into human plasma in the receptor phase (less than 0.1%). Substantivity (skin retention) was investigated by applying 14C-labeled chemical to human skin in vitro for only 25 min. After soap and water wash, 16.7 +/- 13.2% of DDT applied in acetone remained absorbed to skin. With soil only 0.25 +/- 0.11% of DDT remained absorbed to skin. After soap and water wash 5.1 +/- 2.1% of benzo(a)pyrene applied in acetone remained absorbed to skin. With soil only 0.14 +/- 0.13% of benzo(a)pyrene remained absorbed to skin.

  10. DISTRIBUTION OF 14C-ATRAZINE FOLLOWING AN ACUTE LACTATIONAL EXPOSURE IN THE WISTAR RAT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the distribution of atrazine in the lactating dam and suckling neonate following an acute exposure to either 2 or 4 mg/kg 14C-atrazine (14C-ATR) by gavage. 14C-ATR was administered to the nursing dam on postnatal day 3 by oral gavag...

  11. Urea and urea nitrate decomposition pathways: a quantum chemistry study.

    PubMed

    Tokmakov, Igor V; Alavi, Saman; Thompson, Donald L

    2006-03-01

    Electronic structure calculations have been performed to investigate the initial steps in the gas-phase decomposition of urea and urea nitrate. The most favorable decomposition pathway for an isolated urea molecule leads to HNCO and NH3. Gaseous urea nitrate formed by the association of urea and HNO3 has two isomeric forms, both of which are acid-base complexes stabilized by the hydrogen-bonding interactions involving the acidic proton of HNO3 and either the O or N atoms of urea, with binding energies (D0(o), calculated at the G2M level with BSSE correction) of 13.7 and 8.3 kcal/mol, respectively, and with estimated standard enthalpies of formation (delta(f)H298(o) of -102.3 and -97.1 kcal/mol, respectively. Both isomers can undergo relatively facile double proton transfer within cyclic hydrogen-bonded structures. In both cases, HNO3 plays a catalytic role for the (1,3) H-shifts in urea by acting as a donor of the first and an acceptor of the second protons transferred in a relay fashion. The double proton transfer in the carbonyl/hydrogen bond complex mediates the keto-enol tautomerization of urea, and in the other complex the result is the breakdown of the urea part to the HNCO and NH3 fragments. The enolic form of urea is not expected to accumulate in significant quantities due to its very fast conversion back to H2NC(O)NH2 which is barrierless in the presence of HNO3. The HNO3-catalyzed breakdown of urea to HNCO and NH3 is predicted to be the most favorable decomposition pathway for gaseous urea nitrate. Thus, HNCO + NH3 + HNO3 and their association products (e.g., ammonium nitrate and isocyanate) are expected to be the major initial products of the urea nitrate decomposition. This prediction is consistent with the experimental T-jump/FTIR data [Hiyoshi et al. 12th Int. Detonation Symp., Aug 11-16, San Diego, CA, 2002]. PMID:16494387

  12. Carbonates in leaching reactions in context of 14C dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, Danuta; Czernik, Justyna

    2015-10-01

    Lime mortars as a mixture of binder and aggregate may contain carbon of various origins. If the mortars are made of totally burnt lime, radiocarbon dating of binder yields the real age of building construction. The presence of carbonaceous aggregate has a significant influence on the 14C measurements results and depending on the type of aggregate and fraction they may cause overaging. Another problem, especially in case of hydraulic mortars that continue to be chemically active for a very long time, is the recrystallization usually connected with rejuvenation of the results but also, depending on local geological structures, with so called reservoir effect yielding apparent ages. An attempt in separating the binder from other carbonaceous components successfully was made for samples from Israel by Nawrocka-Michalska et al. (2007). The same preparation procedure, after taking into account the petrographic composition, was used for samples coming from Poland, Nawrocka et al. (2009). To verify the procedure used previously for non-hydraulic samples determination an experimental tests on carbonaceous mortars with crushed bricks from Novae in Bulgaria were made. Additionally, to identify different carbonaceous structures and their morphology, a cathodoluminescence and scanning electron microscope with electron dispersive spectrometer were applied. The crushed bricks and brick dust used in mortars production process have been interpreted as an alternative use to other pozzolanic materials. The reaction between lime and pozzolanic additives take place easily and affects the rate and course of carbonates decomposition in orthophosphric acid, during the samples pretreatment for dating. The composition of the Bulgarian samples together with influence of climate conditions on mortar carbonates do not allow for making straightforward conclusions in chronology context, but gives some new guidelines in terms of hydraulic mortars application for dating. This work has mainly

  13. Breathing-metabolic simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Breathing-metabolic simulator was developed to be used for evaluation of life support equipment. Apparatus simulates human breathing rate and controls temperature and humidity of exhaled air as well as its chemical composition. All functions are designed to correspond to various degrees of human response.

  14. Simulated breath waveform control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Subsystem was developed which provides twelve waveform controls to breath drive mechanism. Twelve position, magnetically actuated rotary switch is connected to one end of crankshaft drive, such that it makes one complete revolution for each simulated breath. Connections with common wired point are included in modifications made to standard motor speed controller.

  15. Breath holding spell

    MedlinePlus

    ... children with: Genetic conditions, such as Riley-Day syndrome or Rett syndrome Iron deficiency anemia A family history of breath ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Breathing Problems Rett Syndrome Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  16. Characterization of hemoglobin adduct formation in mice and rats after administration of ( sup 14 C)butadiene or ( sup 14 C)isoprene

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.D.; Dahl, A.R.; Bond, J.A.; Birnbaum, L.S.; Henderson, R.F. )

    1989-08-01

    Occupational exposures to 1,3-butadiene or isoprene occur through their use in the manufacture of rubber and other related polymer products. The purpose of this study was to determine if butadiene or isoprene administration would result in the formation of adducts with blood hemoglobin (Hb), and if such adducts can be used as a measure of previous exposure(s). Male B6C3F1 mice and male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intraperitoneally with 1, 10, 100, or 1000 mumol (14C)butadiene or 0.3, 3.0, 300, 1000, or 3000 mumol (14C)isoprene per kilogram body weight. Animals were killed 24 hr later. Globin was isolated from blood samples and was analyzed for 14C by liquid scintillation spectroscopy. Hb adduct formation was linearly related to administered doses up to 100 mumol (14C)butadiene or 500 mumol (14C)isoprene per kilogram body weight for mice and rats, respectively. For (14C)butadiene, the efficiency of Hb adduct formation in mice and rats within the linear response range was 0.177 +/- 0.003 and 0.407 +/- 0.019 (pmol of 14C-adducts/mg globin)/(mumol of retained (14C)butadiene/kg body wt), respectively (mean +/- SE; n = 18). For (14C)isoprene, these values for mice and rats were 0.158 +/- 0.035 and 0.079 +/- 0.016 (pmol of 14C-adducts/mg globin)/(mumol of retained (14C)isoprene/kg body wt), respectively (mean +/- SE; n = 12). Hb adducts also accumulated linearly after repeated daily administration of 100 mumol (14C)butadiene or 500 mumol (14C)isoprene per kilogram body wt to mice and rats, respectively, for 3 days. (14C)Butadiene-derived Hb adducts in blood showed lifetimes of approximately 24 and approximately 65 days for mice and rats, respectively, which correlate with the reported lifetimes for red blood cells in these rodent species. Thus, levels of butadiene- or isoprene-derived adducts on Hb in circulating blood may be a useful measure of prior repeated exposures to these compounds.

  17. Effects of Pseudomonas species on the release of bound sup 14 C residues from soil treated with ( sup 14 C)atrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, S.U.; Behki, R.M. )

    1990-11-01

    The release of bound (nonextractable) {sup 14}C residues from soil previously treated with ({sup 14}C)atrazine was investigated by incubation of the solvent-extracted soil with two species of Pseudomonas capable of metabolizing atrazine. The two species, 192 and 194, released bound {sup 14}C residues from the soil. Addition of glucose, known to increase microbiological activities, to the incubated soil appeared to enhance the release of soil-bound {sup 14}C residues, in particular in the presence of Pseudomonas species 192. The {sup 14}C bound residues in soil, mainly present as the parent compound and its hydroxy and monodealkylated analogues, were released into the incubation mixture and were subsequently metabolized by the two species involving dechlorination and dealkylation.

  18. Photolysis of 14C-sulfadiazine in water and manure.

    PubMed

    Sukul, Premasis; Lamshöft, Marc; Zühlke, Sebastian; Spiteller, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Photolysis of 14C-sulfadiazine in aqueous solution under simulated sunlight followed first-order kinetics. The impact of H2O2, humic acid, fulvic acid and acetone to enhance the photodegradation of sulfadiazine (SDZ) was studied. Six photoproducts, 4-OH-SDZ, 5-OH-SDZ, N-formyl-SDZ, 4-[2-iminopyrimidine-1(2H)-yl] aniline, 2-aminopyrimidine, and aniline were identified. Extrusion of SO2 was found to be the main degradation process during irradiation. These photoproducts can occur in water and soil upon sunlight exposure, when soil is treated with SDZ contained in manure. Due to photodegradation the experimental half-life of the SDZ in water was 32h and in the presence of photosensitizers the half-life values were 19.3-31.4h, 17.2-31.4h, 12.6-29.8h, and 3.8-30.7h for H2O2, humic acid, fulvic acid, and acetone, respectively depending on the concentration of the photosensitizers. The presence of photosensitizers markedly reduced SDZ persistence, indicating that indirect photolytic processes are important factors governing the photodegradation of SDZ in aqueous environments. Investigation revealed further persistence behavior of SDZ in manure. The half-life value of SDZ in manure was 158h. PMID:18076971

  19. 14C determination in different bio-based products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos Arévalo, Francisco-Javier; Gómez Martínez, Isabel; Agulló García, Lidia; Reina Maldonado, María-Teresa; García León, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    Radiocarbon determination can be used as a tool to investigate the presence of biological elements in different bio-based products, such as biodiesel blends. These products may also be produced from fossil materials obtaining the same final molecules, so that composition is chemically indistinguishable. The amount of radiocarbon in these products can reveal how much of these biological elements have been used, usually mixed with petrol derived components, free of 14C. Some of these products are liquid and thus the handling at the laboratory is not as straightforward as with solid samples. At Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA) we have tested the viability of these samples using a graphitization system coupled to an elemental analyzer used for combustion of the samples, thus avoiding any vacuum process. Samples do not follow any chemical pre-treatment procedure and are directly graphitized. Specific equipment for liquid samples related to the elemental analyzer was tested. Measurement of samples was performed by low-energy AMS at the 1 MV HVEE facility at CNA, paying special attention to background limits and reproducibility during sample preparation.

  20. Comparison of 14C ages of hydrothermal petroleums

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoneit, B.R.T.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1994-01-01

    In order to set limits on the time frame of formation of hydrothermal petroleum, we have obtained 14C ages on samples from three diverse regions; Gulf of California (Guaymas Basin), Northeast Pacific Ocean (Escanaba Trough and Middle Valley), and the East African Rift (Tanganyika Trough). The results date the source of carbon and therefore provide maximum ages for the formation and emplacement of the hydrothermal petroleums. The youngest petroleum occurs iin the Souther Trough of Guaymas Basin (3200-6600 yr, mean 4692 yr); in the Northern Trough the petroleum is slightly older (7400 yr). Significantly older hydrothermal petroleum occurs in Escanaba Trough (17,000 yr) and Middle Valley (29,000 yr). A continental example from the East African Rift has an age of 25,000 yr, comparable to the ages observed in the oceanic samples from the Northeast Pacific Ocean. These ages affirm that hydrothermal petroleum formation is a very rapid process and took place some time between the latest Pleistocene and the present in these active hydrothermal systems. ?? 1994.

  1. Degredation of [{sup 14}C]-propargite in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Comezoglu, S.N.; Ly, V.T.; Wu, J.

    1996-10-01

    The degradation of {sup 14}C-labeled propargite in soil was investigated in three different test conditions, namely, aerobic soil, anaerobic soil, aerobic aquatic, and anaerobic aquatic. All studies were conducted at {approximately}25{degrees}C in the dark with treatment rates of either 5 ppm or 6 ppm and were conducted for a period of one year except the anaerobic soil and aerobic aquatic study which were conducted for two months and one month, respectively. The apparent T{sub 1/2} values observed were {approximately}38 days, {approximately}47 days, {approximately}67 days and {approximately}64 days for aerobic aquatic, anaerobic aquatic, aerobic soil and anaerobic soil studies, respectively. The soil and test systems were extracted with organic solvent followed by radiocounting and chromatographic analysis. Major metabolites were isolated and identified by co-chromatography as well as mass spectrometry (GC/MS and/or LC/MS). A number of products were detected which included p-tertiary butylphenoxy cyclohexanol (TBPC), 2-[4-(2-hydroxycyclohexoxy) phenyl]-2,2-dimethyl acetic acid (TBPC-acid), p-tertiarybutyl phenol (PTBP), and 2-(p-tertiarybutyl phenoxy) cyclohexanol sulfuric acid as the identified major products. The averaged overall recoveries for the test substance in all studies were excellent (>90%). Data indicated that the propargite degraded at a moderate rate in hydrosoils either aerobically or anaerobically while in terrestrial soil, the degradation was slowed down after several months of incubation.

  2. Distribution of 14C cylindrospermopsin in vivo in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Norris, R L; Seawright, A A; Shaw, G R; Smith, M J; Chiswell, R K; Moore, M R

    2001-01-01

    Radiolabelled 14C cylindrospermopsin (CYN) has been prepared and used to investigate the distribution and excretion of CYN in vivo in male Quackenbush mice. At a dose of 0.2 mg/kg (i.e., approx. median lethal dose) the following mean (SD) urinary and faecal recoveries (cumulative) were obtained, respectively: (0-6 hours, n = 4) 48.2 (29.3)%, 11.9 (21.4)%; (0-12 hours, n = 12) 66.0 (27.1)%, 5.7 (5.6)%; (0-24 hours, n = 12) 68.4 (26.7)%, 8.5 (8.1)%. Mean (SD) recoveries from livers at 6 hours were 20.6 (6.4)% (n = 4), at 48 hours 13.1 (7.7)% (n = 8), and 5-7 days were 2.1 (2.1)% (n = 8). A substantial amount (up to 23%) can be retained in the liver for up to 48 hours with a lesser amount retained in the kidneys. The excretion patterns show substantial interindividual variability between predominantly faecal or urinary excretion, but these patterns are not related in any simple manner to the outcome in terms of toxicity. There is at least one methanol-extractable metabolite as well as a nonmethanol-extractable metabolite in the liver. The methanol-extractable metabolite was not found in the kidney and is more hydrophilic than CYN itself on reverse phase. PMID:11769247

  3. Understanding the production and retention of in situ cosmogenic 14C in polar firn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hmiel, B.; Petrenko, V. V.; Smith, A.; Buizert, C.; Harth, C. M.; Beaudette, R.; Place, P., Jr.; Hua, Q.; Yang, B.; Vimont, I.; Weiss, R. F.; Severinghaus, J. P.; Brook, E.; White, J. W. C.

    2014-12-01

    Radiocarbon in CO2, CO and CH4 trapped in polar ice is of interest for dating of ice cores, studies of past solar activity and cosmic ray flux, as well as studies of the paleoatmospheric CH4 budget. The major difficulty with interpreting 14C measurements in ice cores stems from the fact that the measured 14C represents a combination of trapped paleoatmospheric 14C and 14C that is cosmogenically produced within the ice matrix. This in situ cosmogenic 14C component in ice is at present poorly understood. Prior ice core 14C studies show conflicting results with regard to the retention of cosmogenic 14C in polar firn and partitioning of this 14C among CO2, CO and CH4. Our new study aims to comprehensively characterize the 14C of CO2, CO, and CH4 in both the air and the ice matrix throughout the firn column at Summit, Greenland. We will present new measurements of 14C in Summit firn air (the first phase of this study) and discuss the implications for in situ cosmogenic 14C production and retention.

  4. 14C-labeled substrate catabolism by human diploid fibroblasts derived from infants and adults

    SciTech Connect

    Rhead, W.J.; Moon, A.; Roettger, V.; Henkle, K.

    1985-10-01

    Untransformed diploid skin fibroblasts from eight normal adults, aged 24 to 74 years, catabolized several 14C-labeled substrates less effectively than cells from ten normal male infants. 14C-labeled substrate metabolism was quantitated either by measuring the evolution of 14CO2 from the 14C-labeled compounds or the incorporation of 14C into cellular protein via transamination of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates derived from the 14C-labeled substrates. With these methods, adult cells catabolized (1-14C)butyrate, (1-14C)octanoate, and 1-(2-14C)leucine at rates 44 to 64% of those found in infant cells. The oxidation of (1,4-14C)succinate and (U-14C)malate was identical in both infant and adult cells, while (2,3-14C)succinate catabolism was mildly decreased in adult cells (65-80% of control). These observations parallel those made in rat tissues and confirm that the same phenomenon occurs in cultured human fibroblasts.

  5. Breathing metabolic simulator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1971-01-01

    Description of a device for simulation of the human breathing and metabolic parameters required for the evaluation of respiratory diagnostic, monitoring, support and resuscitation equipment. The remotely controlled device allows wide variations in breathing rate and depth, breath velocity contour, oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide release to simulate conditions from sleep to hard work, with respiration exchange ratios ranging from hypoventilation to hyperventilation. It also reduces the cost of prolonged testing when simulation chambers with human subjects require three shifts of crews and standby physicians. Several block diagrams of the device and subsystems are given.

  6. A new 14C calibration data set for the last deglaciation based on marine varves

    SciTech Connect

    Hughen, K A; Kashgarian, M; Lehman, S J; Overpeck, J T; Peterson, L C; Southon, J R

    1999-02-22

    Varved sediments of the tropical Cariaco basin provide a new {sup 14}C calibration data set for the period of deglaciation (10,000 to 14,500 years before present: 10-14.5 cal ka BP). Independent evaluations of the Cariasco Basin calendar and {sup 14}C chronologies were based on the agreement of varve ages with the GISP2 ice core layer chronology for similar high-resolution paleoclimate records, in addition to {sup 14}C age agreement with terrestrial {sup 14}C dates, even during large climatic changes. These assessments indicate that the Cariaco Basin {sup 14}C reservoir age remained stable throughout the Younger Dryas and late Alleroed climatic events and that the varve and {sup 14}C chronologies provide an accurate alternative to existing calibrations based on coral U/Th dates. The Cariaco Basin calibration generally agrees with coral-derived calibrations but is more continuous and resolves century-scale details of {sup 14}C change not seen in the coral records. {sup 14}C plateaus can be identified at 9.6, 11.4, and 11.7 {sup 14}C ka BP, in addition to a large, sloping plateau during the Younger Dryas ({approximately}10 to 11 {sup 14}C ka BP). Accounting for features such as these is crucial to determining the relative timing and rates of change during abrupt global climate changes of the last deglaciation.

  7. Urea Transport by Nitrogen-Regulated Tonoplast Intrinsic Proteins in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lai-Hua; Ludewig, Uwe; Gassert, Brigitte; Frommer, Wolf B.; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2003-01-01

    Urea is the major nitrogen (N) form supplied as fertilizer in agricultural plant production and also an important N metabolite in plants. Because urea transport in plants is not well understood, the aim of the present study was to isolate urea transporter genes from the model plant Arabidopsis. Using heterologous complementation of a urea uptake-defective yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mutant allowed to isolate AtTIP1;1, AtTIP1;2, AtTIP2;1, and AtTIP4;1 from a cDNA library of Arabidopsis. These cDNAs encode channel-like tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) that belong to the superfamily of major intrinsic proteins (or aquaporins). All four genes conferred growth of a urea uptake-defective yeast mutant on 2 mm urea in a phloretin-sensitive and pH-independent manner. Uptake studies using 14C-labeled urea into AtTIP2;1-expressing Xenopus laevis oocytes demonstrated that AtTIP2;1 facilitated urea transport also in a pH-independent manner and with linear concentration dependency. Expression studies showed that AtTIP1;2, AtTIP2;1, and AtTIP4;1 genes were up-regulated during early germination and under N deficiency in roots but constitutively expressed in shoots. Subcellular localization of green fluorescent protein-fused AtTIPs indicated that AtTIP1;2, AtTIP2;1, and AtTIP4;1 were targeted mainly to the tonoplast and other endomembranes. Thus, in addition to their role as water channels, TIP transporters may play a role in equilibrating urea concentrations between different cellular compartments. PMID:14576283

  8. Alternative channels for urea in the inner medulla of the rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Nawata, C Michele; Dantzler, William H; Pannabecker, Thomas L

    2015-12-01

    The ascending thin limbs (ATLs) and lower descending thin limbs (DTLs) of Henle's loop in the inner medulla of the rat are highly permeable to urea, and yet no urea transporters have been identified in these sections. We hypothesized that novel, yet-unidentified transporters in these tubule segments could explain the high urea permeability. cDNAs encoding for Na(+)-glucose transporter 1a (SGLT1a), Na(+)-glucose transporter 1 (NaGLT1), urea transporter (UT)-A2c, and UT-A2d were isolated and cloned from the Munich-Wistar rat inner medulla. SGLT1a is a novel NH2-terminal truncated variant of SGLT1. NaGLT1 is a Na(+)-dependent glucose transporter primarily located in the proximal tubules and not previously described in the thin limbs. UT-A2c and UT-A2d are novel variants of UT-A2. UT-A2c is truncated at the COOH terminus, and UT-A2d has one exon skipped. When rats underwent water restriction for 72 h, mRNA levels of SGLT1a increased in ATLs, NaGLT1 levels increased in both ATLs and DTLs, and UT-A2c increased in ATLs. [(14)C]urea uptake assays performed on Xenopus oocytes heterologously expressing these proteins revealed that despite having structural differences from their full-length versions, SGLT1a, UT-A2c, and UT-A2d enhanced urea uptake. NaGLT1 also facilitated urea uptake. Uptakes were Na(+) independent and inhibitable by phloretin and/or phloridzin. Our data indicate that there are several alternative channels for urea in the rat inner medulla that could potentially contribute to the high urea permeabilities in thin limb segments. PMID:26423860

  9. National Urea Cycle Disorders Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... urea cycle in regulating nitric oxide in the human body, the study is being conducted by Dr. ... a major discovery in ASA deficiency that transforms human science. The research has been published in Nature ...

  10. Urea phosphate as granular or fluid fertilizers

    SciTech Connect

    Blouin, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Studies are being conducted of the production and agronomic characteristics of the phosphoric acid-urea adduct, urea phosphate, and of the various granular and fluid fertilizers that can be produced from it. Flowsheets are given for the production of urea phosphate. Characteristics of unpurified and purified urea phosphate are also given. (DLC)

  11. Breathing difficulties - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... a high altitude Blood clot in the lung Collapsed lung (pneumothorax) Heart attack Injury to the neck, chest wall, ... cavity with each breath. This can cause a collapsed lung . Bandage the wound with plastic wrap, a plastic ...

  12. Breathing - slowed or stopped

    MedlinePlus

    ... can occur with obstructive sleep apnea, for example. Prolonged apnea means a person has stopped breathing. If ... that requires immediate medical attention and first aid. Prolonged apnea with no heart activity in a person ...

  13. Shortness-of-Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... can lead to shortness of breath include anxiety, panic attacks, anemia and even constipation. The experience of shortness ... are used to treat patients with anxiety or panic attacks. Other commonly used drugs include bronchodilators to widen ...

  14. Shortness of Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... deep breath, which usually results in retention of carbon dioxide and not enough oxygen in blood (obesity hypoventilation ... for anemia), and oximetry or blood oxygen or carbon dioxide levels. Your doctor also may obtain a chest ...

  15. 14C content in vegetation in the vicinities of Brazilian nuclear power reactors.

    PubMed

    Dias, Cíntia Melazo; Santos, Roberto Ventura; Stenström, Kristina; Nícoli, Iêda Gomes; Skog, Göran; da Silveira Corrêa, Rosangela

    2008-07-01

    (14)C specific activities were measured in grass samples collected around Brazilian nuclear power reactors. The specific activity values varied between 227 and 299 Bq/kg C. Except for two samples which showed (14)C specific activities 22% above background values, half of the samples showed background specific activities, and the other half had a (14)C excess of 1-18%. The highest specific activities were found close to the nuclear power plants and along the main wind directions (NE and NNE). The activity values were found to decrease with increasing distance from the reactors. The unexpectedly high (14)C excess values found in two samples were related to the local topography, which favors (14)C accumulation and limits the dispersion of the plume. The results indicate a clear (14)C anthropogenic signal within 5 km around the nuclear power plants which is most prominent along northeastwards, the prevailing wind direction. PMID:18308434

  16. The fate of 14C in glucose 6-phosphate synthesized from [1-14C]Ribose 5-phosphate by enzymes of rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J F; Clark, M G; Blackmore, P F

    1978-01-01

    1. Glucose 5-phosphate was synthesized from ribose 5-phosphate by an enzyme extract prepared from an acetone-dried powder of rat liver. Three rates of ribose 5-phosphate utilization were observed during incubation for 17 h. An analysis of intermediates and products formed throughout the incubation revealed that as much as 20% of the substrate carbon could not be accounted for. 2. With [1-14C]ribose 5-phosphate as substrate, the specific radioactivity of [14C]glucose 6-phosphate formed was determined at 1, 2, 5 and 30 min and 3, 8 and 17 h. It increased rapidly to 1.9-fold the initial specific radioactivity of [1-14C]ribose 5-phosphate at 3 h and then decreased to a value approximately equal to that of the substrate at 6 h, and finally at 17 h reached a value 0.8-fold that of the initial substrate [1-14C]ribose 5-phosphate. 3. The specific radioactivity of [14C]ribose 5-phosphate decreased to approx. 50% of its inital value during the first 3 h of the incubation and thereafter remained unchanged. 4. The distribution of 14C in the six carbon atoms of [14C]glucose 6-phosphate formed from [1-14C]ribose 5-phosphate at 1, 2, 5 and 30 min and 3, 8 and 17 h was determined. The early time intervals (1--30 min) were characterized by large amounts of 14C in C-2 and in C-6 and with C-1 and C-3 being unlabelled. In contrast, the later time intervals (3--17 h) were characterized by the appearance of 14C in C-1 and C-3 and decreasing amounts of 14C in C-2 and C-6. 5. It is concluded that neither the currently accepted reaction sequence for the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway nor the 'defined' pentose phosphate-cycle mechanism can be reconciled with the labelling patterns observed in glucose 6-phosphate formed during the inital 3 h of the incubation. PMID:728109

  17. 14C AMS measurements of the bomb pulse in N- and S-hemisphere tropical trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, J. O.; Lawson, E. M.; Fink, D.; Hotchkis, M. A. C.; Hua, Q.; Jacobsen, G. E.; Smith, A. M.; Tuniz, C.

    1997-03-01

    The 14C bomb-pulse signature has been measured by AMS on cross-dateable teak samples from N- and S-hemisphere locations in the tropics. Excellent agreement is found with the atmospheric 14C content in the period 1955 to 1980 for the respective hemispheres. These results demonstrate that 14C measurements can be used to facilitate growth rate determinations in tropical trees.

  18. Absorption, distribution and excretion of 14C-pilocarpine following oral administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Omori, Yasuhiro; Endo, Takuro; Hara, Yoshiki; Nishiyama, Masahiko; Midgley, Ian; Smart, Clair I; John, Alexandra J; Chasseaud, Leslie F; McBurney, Alan; John, Brian A

    2004-01-01

    The absorption, distribution and excretion of pilocarpine (CAS 92-13-7) were studied after single oral doses of 14C-pilocarpine hydrochloride (CAS 54-71-7) to the Sprague-Dawley rat, administered in aqueous solution mainly at a dose level of 0.3 mg/kg. Rats also received single intravenous doses at 0.3 mg/kg so as to compare 14C pharmacokinetics and excretion. The oral 14C-dose was rapidly and almost completely absorbed from the duodenum and small intestine within 30 min in the male rat and 14C concentrations in plasma declined biexponentially with a terminal half-life of about 9 h. Over the oral dosage range studied, i.e. 0.1-1.0 mg/kg, there was no evidence of significant non-proportionality for Cmax of 14C, whereas there was some such evidence for AUG24. Tissue 14C concentrations in male and pregnant female (Day 18) rats peaked at 0.5 h and mostly declined in parallel with those in the plasma. Excluding tissues concerned with drug absorption and elimination, 14C concentrations in most tissues were similar to, or lower than, those in the plasma. The extent of placental transfer of 14C was small and less than 0.09% of a maternal dose reached a foetus. 14C diffused into maternal milk at concentrations similar to those in the plasma. The 14C-dose was rapidly excreted in male rats, mostly in the urine (about 80%) during 6 h post dose. Recoveries of 14C in mass balance (excretion) studies were in the range 96-100%. There were no apparent gender differences in the disposition of 14C-pilocarpine in the rat. PMID:15112864

  19. Atmospheric 14C variations derived from tree rings during the early Younger Dryas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Quan; Barbetti, Mike; Fink, David; Kaiser, Klaus Felix; Friedrich, Michael; Kromer, Bernd; Levchenko, Vladimir A.; Zoppi, Ugo; Smith, Andrew M.; Bertuch, Fiona

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric radiocarbon variations over the Younger Dryas interval, from ˜13,000 to 11,600 cal yr BP, are of immense scientific interest because they reveal crucial information about the linkages between climate, ocean circulation and the carbon cycle. However, no direct and reliable atmospheric 14C records based on tree rings for the entire Younger Dryas have been available. In this paper, we present (1) high-precision 14C measurements on the extension of absolute tree-ring chronology from 12,400 to 12,560 cal yr BP and (2) high-precision, high-resolution atmospheric 14C record derived from a 617-yr-long tree-ring chronology of Huon pine from Tasmania, Australia, spanning the early Younger Dryas. The new tree-ring 14C records bridge the current gap in European tree-ring radiocarbon chronologies during the early Younger Dryas, linking the floating Lateglacial Pine record to the absolute tree-ring timescale. A continuous and reliable atmospheric 14C record for the past 14,000 cal yr BP including the Younger Dryas is now available. The new records indicate that the abrupt rise in atmospheric Δ 14C associated with the Younger Dryas onset occurs at ˜12,760 cal yr BP, ˜240 yrs later than that recorded in Cariaco varves, with a smaller magnitude of ˜40‰ followed by several centennial Δ 14C variations of 20-25‰. Comparing the tree-ring Δ 14C to marine-derived Δ 14C and modelled Δ 14C based on ice-core 10Be fluxes, we conclude that changes in ocean circulation were mainly responsible for the Younger Dryas onset, while a combination of changes in ocean circulation and 14C production rate were responsible for atmospheric Δ 14C variations for the remainder of the Younger Dryas.

  20. (/sup 14/C)chloroacetylcholine as an advantageous affinity label of the acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, D.M.; Sin-Ren, A.C.; Waser, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    The alkylating agent (/sup 14/C)chloroacetylcholine perchlorate ((/sup 14/C) ClACh) was synthesized and used for affinity labelling of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo marmorata. Solubilized and affinity-purified receptor proteins were reduced and alkylated according to the bromoacetylcholine-method. Covalent binding of (/sup 14/C) ClACh to the cholinergic receptor proved to be specific and saturable, and occurred exclusively to the alpha-subunit. Halogen substitution of acetylcholine by chlorine and insertion of a /sup 14/C-isotope instead of the widely used /sup 3/H resulted in favorable properties of the affinity label.

  1. (14C)acetate assimilation by a type I obligate methylotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, R N; Hoare, S L; Hoare, D S; Taylor, B F

    1977-01-01

    Methanol and formate oxidation supported the assimilation of [14C]acetate by cell suspensions of Methylococcus capsulatus; oxidation of other primary alcohols, except ethanol, did not. The extent of [1-14C]acetate assimilation supported by methanol oxidation was decreased in the presence of primary alcohols, except ethanol. Potassium cyanide (0.33 mM) completely inhibited the oxidation of formate and its stimulation of [1-14C]acetate assimilation. The amount of [1-14C]acetate assimilation supported by methanol oxidation was significantly inhibited by cyanide. PMID:412469

  2. Transport of sodium and urea in outer medullary descending vasa recta.

    PubMed Central

    Pallone, T L; Work, J; Myers, R L; Jamison, R L

    1994-01-01

    We dissected and perfused outer medullary vasa recta (OMVR) from vascular bundles in the rat. Permeabilities of sodium (PNa) and urea (Pu) were simultaneously determined from the lumen-to-bath efflux of 22Na and [14C]urea. PNa and Pu were also measured by in vivo microperfusion of descending (DVR) and ascending vasa recta (AVR) at the papillary tip of Munich-Wistar rats. In some OMVR PNa was indistinguishable from zero. The mean +/- SE of PNa (x 10(-5), cm/s) in OMVR was 76 +/- 9. Pu in OMVR was always very high (x 10(-5), cm/s), 360 +/- 14. There was no correlation between OMVR PNa and Pu. Inner medullary AVR and DVR had PNa of 115 +/- 10 and 75 +/- 10, respectively, and Pu of 121 +/- 10 and 76 +/- 11, respectively. PNa and Pu in papillary vasa recta were always nearly identical and highly correlated. Transport of [14C] urea in OMVR was reversibly inhibited by addition of unlabeled urea or phloretin to the bath and lumen, providing evidence for carrier-mediated transport. These data suggest that sodium and urea might traverse the wall of inner medullary vasa recta by a paracellular pathway while urea also crosses by a transcellular route in OMVR. Electron microscopic examination of seven in vitro perfused OMVR revealed no fenestrations and exposure of these vessels to 10 microM calcium ionophore A23187 or 1 nM angiotensin II resulted in reversible contraction, suggesting that in vitro perfused OMVR are DVR only. Images PMID:8282790

  3. No evidence for a deglacial intermediate water Δ 14C anomaly in the SW Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sortor, Rachel N.; Lund, David C.

    2011-10-01

    The last deglaciation was characterized by an increase in atmospheric pCO 2 and decrease in atmospheric radiocarbon activity. One hypothesis is that these changes were due to out-gassing of 14C-depleted carbon from the abyssal ocean. Reconstructions of foraminiferal Δ 14C from the eastern tropical Pacific, Arabian Sea, and high latitude North Atlantic show that severe depletions in 14C occurred at intermediate water depths during the last deglaciation. It has been suggested that 14C-depleted water from the abyss upwelled in the Southern Ocean and was then carried by Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) to these sites. However, locations in the South Pacific in the direct path of modern-day AAIW do not exhibit the Δ 14C excursion and therefore cast doubt upon the AAIW mechanism ( De Pol-Holz et al., 2010; Rose et al., 2010). Here we evaluate whether or not a deglacial 14C anomaly occurred at intermediate depths in the Southwest Atlantic. We find that the deglacial benthic Δ 14C trend at our site is similar to the atmospheric Δ 14C trend. Our results are also largely consistent with results from U/Th-dated corals at shallower water depths on the Brazil Margin (Mangini et al., 2010). We find no evidence in the southwestern Atlantic of a ~ 300‰ decrease in intermediate water Δ 14C from 18 to 14 kyr BP like that observed in the eastern tropical Pacific ( Marchitto et al., 2007). When our results are paired with those from the South Pacific, it appears AAIW did not carry a highly 14C-depleted signal during the deglaciation. Another source of carbon is apparently required to explain the intermediate-depth Δ 14C anomalies in the North Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans.

  4. A high-resolution record of atmospheric 14C based on Hulu Cave speleothem H82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southon, John; Noronha, Alexandra L.; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Wang, Yongjin

    2012-02-01

    The development of a calibration of atmospheric radiocarbon (∆14C) is a significant scientific goal because it provides the means to link the numerous 14C dated paleoclimate records to a common timescale with absolutely dated records, and thereby improve our understanding the relationships between the carbon cycle and climate change. Currently, few calibration datasets that directly sample the atmospheric 14C reservoir are available beyond the end of the dendro-dated Holocene tree ring record at 12.6 kyr BP (Before 1950 AD). In the absence of suitable true atmospheric records, 14C calibrations beyond this age limit are based largely on marine data, that are complicated by the marine reservoir effect, which may have varied over the glacial cycle. In this paper, we present a high-resolution record of U-Th series and 14C measurements from Hulu Cave speleothem H82, spanning 10.6-26.8 kyr BP. Corrections for detrital 230Th are negligible, and the contribution of 14C-free geologic carbon to the speleothem calcite is small (5-6%) and is stable across major climate shifts. The time series provides a 16 kyr record of atmospheric ∆14C as well as an updated age model for the existing Hulu Cave δ18O record. The 14C data are in good overall agreement with existing marine and terrestrial 14C records, but comparisons with the Cariaco Basin marine ∆14C record through the deglacial interval reveal that the Cariaco reservoir age appears to have varied during parts of the Younger Dryas and Heinrich Stadial 1 cold events. This highlights the importance of developing extended high-resolution marine and terrestrial 14C records as a means of detecting changes in ocean circulation over the glacial cycle.

  5. New optical analyzer for 13C-breath test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, Hermann; Dressler, Matthias; Helmrich, Günther; Wolff, Marcus; Groninga, Hinrich

    2008-04-01

    Medical breath tests are well established diagnostic tools, predominantly for gastroenterological inspections, but also for many other examinations. Since the composition and concentration of exhaled volatile gases reflect the physical condition of a patient, a breath analysis allows one to recognize an infectious disease in an organ or even to identify a tumor. One of the most prominent breath tests is the 13C-urea-breath test, applied to ascertain the presence of the bacterium helicobacter pylori in the stomach wall as an indication of a gastric ulcer. In this contribution we present a new optical analyzer that is based on photoacoustic spectroscopy and uses a DFB diode laser at 2.744 μm. The concentration ratio of the CO II isotopologues is determined by measuring the absorption on a 13CO II line in comparison to a 12CO II line. In the specially selected spectral range the lines have similar strengths, although the concentrations differ by a factor of 90. Therefore, the signals are well comparable. Due to an excellent signal-noise-ratio isotope variations of less than 1% can be resolved as required for the breath test.

  6. 17 CFR 240.14c-4 - Presentation of information in information statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Presentation of information in information statement. 240.14c-4 Section 240.14c-4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations Under the Securities...

  7. 17 CFR 240.14c-4 - Presentation of information in information statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Presentation of information in... Section 14(c) § 240.14c-4 Presentation of information in information statement. (a) The information... type except that to the extent necessary for convenient presentation, financial statements and...

  8. Disposition of /sup 14/C tolrestat in laboratory animals and man

    SciTech Connect

    Ferdinandi, E.S.; Hicks, D.R.; Cayen, M.N.

    1986-03-01

    The disposition of the aldose reductase inhibitor tolrestat (T) was determined in the mouse, rat, dog, assemensis monkey, and man. Serum T and radioactivity ratios, and % of dose excreted after p.o. administration of /sup 14/C-T at a dose of 10 mk/kg (100 mg to man), are presented. Except for the rat and monkey, 55 to 95% of the urinary /sup 14/C was due to T and oxo-tolrestat (oxo-T, N-((5-(trifluoromethyl)-6-methoxy-1-napthalenyl)oxo-methyl)-N-methylglycine). Oxo-T is formed, in part, non-enzymatically from T; a potential intermediate in this transformation was detected in all the urine samples. In man and monkey, about 15% and 68%, respectively, of the urinary /sup 14/C was due to T-glucuronide. In rat urine, >90% of the /sup 14/C was due to polar metabolites; in bile, about 66% of the /sup 14/C was due to T. The composition of the serum /sup 14/C in the mouse and rat was determined. In conclusion, /sup 14/C-T was rapidly and well absorbed by all species. Except for the rat and dog, urine was the main excretion route for /sup 14/C. Urine/sup 14/ comprised mainly T, t-glucuronide of oxo-T in all the species except the rat.

  9. 17 CFR 240.14c-3 - Annual report to be furnished security holders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Annual report to be furnished... Section 14(c) § 240.14c-3 Annual report to be furnished security holders. (a) If the information...

  10. Production of [14C]fumonisin B1 by Fusarium moniliforme MRC 826 in corn cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, J F; Gelderblom, W C; Vleggaar, R; Marasas, W F; Rheeder, J P

    1993-01-01

    Kinetics of growth and fumonisin production by Fusarium moniliforme MRC 826 in corn "patty" cultures were investigated, and a technique was developed for the production of [14C]fumonisin B1 ([14C]FB1) by using L-[methyl-14C]methionine as the precursor. A significant (P < 0.01) correlation exists between fungal growth and FB1 (r = 0.89) and FB2 (r = 0.87) production in corn patties, beginning after 2 days and reaching the stationary phase after 14 days of incubation. [14C]FB1 was produced by adding L-[methyl-14C]methionine daily to cultures during the logarithmic phase of production. Incorporation of the isotope occurred at C-21 and C-22 of the fumonism molecule and was enhanced in the presence of unlabeled L-methionine. Although the concentration of exogenous unlabeled methionine is critical for incorporation of the 14C label, optimum incorporation was achieved by adding 50 mg of unlabeled L-methionine and 200 mu Ci of L-[methyl-14C]methionine to a corn patty (30 g) over a period of 9 days, yielding [14C]FB1 with a specific activity of 36 mu Ci/mmol. PMID:8368853

  11. Dilute Nuclear States: {sup 12}C, {sup 10}Be and {sup 14}C

    SciTech Connect

    Freer, M.

    2008-11-11

    The experimental evidence for dilute {alpha}-particle states in {sup 12}C, {sup 10}Be and {sup 14}C is discussed. The question of the location of the 2{sup +} excitation of the 7.65 MeV {sup 12}C state remains unresolved, as does the existence of possible analogue states in {sup 14}C.

  12. A miniature optical breathing sensor

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Jinesh; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel miniature optical breathing sensor based on an Agarose infiltrated photonic crystal fiber interferometer. The sensor detects the variation in relative humidity that occurs between inhaled and exhaled breath. The sensor interrogation system can determine the breathing pattern in real time and can also predict the breathing rate and the breathing status during respiration. The sensor is suitable for monitoring patients during a magnetic resonance imaging scan where use of sedatives and anesthetics necessitates breathing monitoring; electronic sensors are not suitable in such an environment and a visual observation of the patient's respiratory efforts is often difficult. PMID:23243581

  13. Rapid increase in cosmogenic 14C in AD 775 measured in New Zealand kauri trees indicates short-lived increase in 14C production spanning both hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güttler, D.; Adolphi, F.; Beer, J.; Bleicher, N.; Boswijk, G.; Christl, M.; Hogg, A.; Palmer, J.; Vockenhuber, C.; Wacker, L.; Wunder, J.

    2015-02-01

    In 2012, Miyake et al. reported a sudden and strong increase of the atmospheric radiocarbon (14C) content in Japanese cedar trees of 1.2% between AD 774 and 775. While their findings were quickly confirmed by a German oak chronology for the Northern Hemisphere (NH), the question remained if the effect was seen in both hemispheres. Here we present the first annually resolved Southern Hemisphere (SH) 14C record spanning the interval AD 760-787, using New Zealand kauri (Agathis australis) chronology wood. An almost identical distinct increase compared to Northern Hemisphere data was observed, suggesting a cosmic event with globally uniform impact as a potential cause for the increase. Deploying a carbon cycle box model a worldwide averaged net 14C production of 2.2 ×108 14C atoms cm-2 was estimated, which is 3.7 times higher than the average annual 14C production. The immediate appearance of the event in tree rings on both hemispheres suggests a short duration event of significantly less than 1 yr.

  14. Will there be a 14C minimum in the tropical Pacific in the 1990s

    SciTech Connect

    Toggweiler, J.R. )

    1990-01-09

    14C distributions measured during GEOSECS showed large minima in bomb 14C levels in the tropical belts of the major ocean basins. Broecker et al. (1978, JGR, 83) attributed the minima to upwelling of deep water which was free of bomb 14C. Wyrtki (1981, JPO, 11) countered that heat budgets constrain the water upwelling the the equator to be from the upper themocline. Druffel (1987, JMR, 45) built a model of the Pacific upwelling system incorporating Wyrtki's description of the upwelling system. Druffel showed that the GEOSECS 14C minimum could be reproduced with upwelled upper thermocline water because bomb 14C levels were still relatively low in the tropical thermocline at the time of GEOSECS. Druffel went on to predict that mid latitude and tropical surface 14C levels would approach a common value before the 1990s and upper thermocline water masses acquired more bomb 14C and atmospheric 14C levels declined. By studying pre-bomb coral 14C records and a model simulation in Toggweiler et al. (1989, JGR, 94), I have found confirmation that some older and colder water upwells in the tropical Pacific. Upper thermocline (22-24C) water has about the same pre-bomb 14C content as pre-bomb surface waters and cannot generate a low 14C singal prior to the bomb test. The appearance of the oldest upwelled water in the coral data is correlated in time with the cold phase of the ENSO cycle. Most of the low 14C water moves southward into the South Pacific. I will argue that intensified upwelling during the cold phase of ENSO pulls up 12-14C water from the lower layers of the Equatorial Undercurrent. Upwelling from this layer may represent an important closure mechanism for mode waters formed in the subantarctic. A source of older water makes it certain that the tropical 14C minimum will persist through the 1990s and the remainder of the post-bomb era.

  15. Breathing: Rhythmicity, Plasticity, Chemosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Jack L.; Mitchell, Gordon S.; Nattie, Eugene E.

    2010-01-01

    Breathing is a vital behavior that is particularly amenable to experimental investigation. We review recent progress on three problems of broad interest. (i) Where and how is respiratory rhythm generated? The preBötzinger Complex is a critical site, whereas pacemaker neurons may not be essential. The possibility that coupled oscillators are involved is considered. (ii) What are the mechanisms that underlie the plasticity necessary for adaptive changes in breathing? Serotonin-dependent long-term facilitation following intermittent hypoxia is an important example of such plasticity, and a model that can account for this adaptive behavior is discussed. (iii) Where and how are the regulated variables CO2 and pH sensed? These sensors are essential if breathing is to be appropriate for metabolism. Neurons with appropriate chemosensitivity are spread throughout the brainstem; their individual properties and collective role are just beginning to be understood. PMID:12598679

  16. Excretion of 14C-edrophonium and its metabolites in bile

    PubMed Central

    Back, D. J.; Calvey, T. N.

    1972-01-01

    1. The metabolism and biliary excretion of 14C-edrophonium chloride was studied in Wistar rat. 2. Approximately 5% of the dose was recovered from bile in 6 hours. Most of the radioactivity was eliminated as 14C-edrophonium glucuronide. Small amounts of the unchanged drug were also detected in bile, particularly during the first hour after administration of the drug. 3. The concentration of 14C-edrophonium glucuronide in bile was approximately 15-20 times its concentration in plasma. 4. In contrast, the concentration of unchanged 14C-edrophonium was similar in bile and plasma. 5. Evidence is presented that unchanged 14C-edrophonium is transferred from plasma to bile via the peribiliary vascular plexus. PMID:5040663

  17. Disposition of 14C-β-carotene following delivery with autologous triacylglyceride-rich lipoproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueker, Stephen R.; Vuong, Le Thuy; Faulkner, Brian; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Vogel, John S.

    2007-06-01

    Following ingestion, a fraction of β-carotene is cleaved into vitamin A in the intestine, while another is absorbed intact and distributed among tissues and organs. The extent to which this absorbed β-carotene serves as a source of vitamin A is unknown in vivo. In the present study we use the attomole sensitivity of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for 14C to quantify the disposition of 14C-β-carotene (930 ng; 60.4 nCi of activity) after intravenous injection with an autologous triacylglyceride-rich lipoprotein fraction in a single volunteer. Total 14C was quantified in serial plasma samples and also in triglyceride-rich, and low density lipoprotein, subfractions. The appearance of 14C-retinol, the circulating form of vitamin A in plasma, was determined by chromatographic separation of plasma retinol extracts prior to AMS analysis. The data showed that 14C concentrations rapidly decayed within the triglyceride-rich lipoprotein fractions after injection, whereas low density lipoprotein 14C began a significant rise in 14C 5 h post dose. Plasma 14C-retinol also appeared at 5 h post dose and its concentrations were maintained above baseline for >88 days. Based upon comparisons of 14C-retinol concentrations following an earlier study with orally dosed 14C-β-carotene, a molar vitamin A value of the absorbed β-carotene of 0.19 was derived, meaning that 1 mole of absorbed β-carotene provides 0.19 moles of vitamin A. This is the first study to show that infused β-carotene contributes to the vitamin A economy in humans in vivo.

  18. New enzymatic assay for serum urea nitrogen using urea amidolyase.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shigeki; Iyama, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Yoshihisa; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2003-01-01

    We established an enzymatic assay for measurement of serum urea nitrogen using urea amidolyase (EC 3.5.1.45) from yeast species. The method is based on hydrolysis of urea by the enzyme. In this assay, we eliminated endogenous ammonium ion by use of glutamate dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.4). Then in the presence of urea amido-lyase, ATP, bicarbonate, magnesium, and potassium ions, ammonium ion was produced proportionally to urea concentration in serum. The concentra-tion of ammonium ion formed was determined by adding GLDH to produce NADP(+) in the presence of 2-oxoglutarate and NADPH. We then monitored the change of absorbance at 340 nm. The inhibitory effect of calcium ion on this assay was eliminated by adding glyco-letherdiamine-N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid to the reaction system. The with-in-assay coefficient of variations (CVs) of the present method were 1.80-3.76% (n = 10) at 2.8-19.0 mmol/L, respectively. The day-to-day CVs were 2.23-4.59%. Analytical recovery was 92-115%. The presence of ascorbic acid, bilirubin, hemoglobin, lipemic material, ammo-nium ion, or calcium ion did not affect this assay system. The correlation be-tween values obtained with the present method (y) and those by another enzy-matic method (x) was 0.997 (y = 1.02x - 0.10 mmol/L, Sy/x = 0.841, n = 100), with a mean difference of -0.18 +/- 0.86 mmol/L [(values by reference method - that of present method) +/- SD] using the Bland-Altman technique. J. Clin. Lab. Anal. 17:52-56, 2003. PMID:12640627

  19. Trials of novel 13C-urea-containing capsule for more economic and sensitive diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Yong-Il; Park, San-Man; Kwon, Rham; Han, Hong-Hee; Park, Jung Gil; Yang, Chan-Yoo; Kim, Jung-Ae; Yoo, Bong-Kyu; Rhee, Jong-Dal; Choi, Han-Gon

    2006-10-01

    To develop a 13C-urea-containing capsule for more economic and sensitive diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection, the 13C-urea-containing capsules were prepared with various additives such as polyethylene glycol, microcrystalline cellulose, sodium lauryl sulfate and citric acid. Their dissolution test and 13C-urea Breath Test in human volunteers were then performed. Polyethylene glycol increased the initial dissolution rates of urea and difference delta 13C values from 13C-urea, while microcrystalline cellulose and sodium lauryl sulfate decreased them. Irrespective of addition of citric acid, the compositions with polyethylene glycol showed higher values from 13C-urea compared to a commercial 76 mg 13C-urea-containing capsule due to higher initial dissolution rate. The capsules with 38 mg 13C-urea and 1.9 mg polyethylene glycol, which showed higher Helicobacter pylori-positive value of about 8 per thousand at 10 min, improved the sensitivity of 13C-urea in human volunteers. Thus, the 13C-urea-containing capsule with polyethylene glycol would be a more economical and sensitive preparation for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. PMID:17121183

  20. The effect of 6-aminonicotinamide on the levels of brain amino acids and glucose, and their labeling with 14C after injection of (U-14C) glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitonde, M.K.; Lewis, L.P.; Evans, G.; Clapp, A.

    1981-10-01

    The brains of rats paralysed at 4 hr after the administration of 6-aminonicotinamide were found to contain decreased levels of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyrate. The glucose content of the brain of the treated rats was several fold higher than in controls. The incorporation of 14C into brain amino acids at 30 min after the injection of (U-14C)glucose was decreased by 16%: this was attributed to mainly decreased labeling of glutamate and associated amino acids. The results are discussed in the light of previous findings that the administration of 6-aminonicotinamide resulted in the blockade of the direct oxidation of glucose by the pentose phosphate pathway.

  1. What Is a Urea Cycle Disorder?

    MedlinePlus

    ... urine and removed from the body. In urea cycle disorders, the nitrogen accumulates in the form of ammonia, a highly toxic substance, resulting in hyperammonemia (elevated blood ... and severity of urea cycle disorders is highly variable. This depends on the ...

  2. Life and Breath

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Helen D.

    1974-01-01

    This article describes a public education program combining the screening process and a follow-up program for teaching victims of emphysema and other respiratory diseases how to better their living condition through proper breathing, avoidance of air pollutants and cigarette smoking, and taking better care of themselves physically. (PD)

  3. Metabolic breath analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, C. L.

    1971-01-01

    Instrument measures metabolic breathing rate and dynamics of human beings in atmospheres ranging from normal air to 100 percent oxygen at ambient pressures from 14.7 to 3.0 psia. Measurements are made at rest or performing tasks up to maximum physical capacity under either zero or normal gravity.

  4. Firefighter's Breathing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlan, P. B.; Giorgini, E. A.; Sullivan, J. L.; Simmonds, M. R.; Beck, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    System, based on open-loop demand-type compressed air concept, is lighter and less bulky than former systems, yet still provides thirty minutes of air supply. Comfort, visibility, donning time, and breathing resistance have been improved. Apparatus is simple to recharge and maintain and is comparable in cost to previously available systems.

  5. INTERMITTENT POSITIVE PRESSURE BREATHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efficacy of long-term intermittent positive pressure breathing (IPPB) treatment when used as an adjunct to the overall care of ambulatory outpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The evaluation compared the use of IPPB with use of a powered nebulizer.

  6. Breathing Like a Fish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsioloudis, Petros J.

    2010-01-01

    Being able to dive and breathe underwater has been a challenge for thousands of years. In 1980, Fuji Systems of Tokyo developed a series of prototype gills for divers as a way of demonstrating just how good its membranes are. Even though gill technology has not yet reached the point where recipients can efficiently use implants to dive underwater,…

  7. Oronasal breathing during exercise.

    PubMed

    Saibene, F; Mognoni, P; Lafortuna, C L; Mostardi, R

    1978-12-15

    The shift from nasal to oronasal breathing (ONBS) has been observed on 73 subjects with two independent methods. A first group of 63 subjects exercising on a bicycle ergometer at increasing work load (98--196 W) has been observed. On 35 subjects the highest value of ventilation attained with nasal breathing was 40.2 +/- 9.41 . min-1 S.D. Ten subjects breathed through the mouth at all loads, while 5 never opened the mouth. On 13 subjects it was not possible to make reliable measurements. On a second group of 10 subjects utilizing a different techniques which did not need a face mask, the ventilation at which one changes the pattern of breathing was found to be 44.2 +/- 13.51 . min-1 S.D. On the same subjects nasal resistance did not show any correlation with ONBS. It is concluded that ONBS is not solely determined by nasal resistance, though an indirect effect due to hypoventilation and hence to changes in alveolar air composition cannot be ruled out. It is likely that ONBS is also influenced by psychological factors. PMID:569826

  8. Urea Biosynthesis Using Liver Slices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teal, A. R.

    1976-01-01

    Presented is a practical scheme to enable introductory biology students to investigate the mechanism by which urea is synthesized in the liver. The tissue-slice technique is discussed, and methods for the quantitative analysis of metabolites are presented. (Author/SL)

  9. Fate of ( sup 14 C)monolinuron in potatoes and soil under outdoor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Freitag, D.; Scheunert, I. )

    1990-12-01

    (phenyl-{sup 14}C)Monolinuron was applied (2.5 and 1.9 kg/ha) to the soil surface of an outdoor lysimeter in two successive years: then, potatoes were grown. Total recovery of {sup 14}C in soil, plants, and leached water was about 55% (of {sup 14}C applied) after the first growing period and about 43% after the second growing period. Radioactivity in soil contained 77.1% (based on total {sup 14}C recovered in soil) bound residues, 15% monolinuron, and the following conversion products: N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-N'-methoxy-N'-methylurea, N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N'-methylurea. N-(4-chlorophenyl)methylcarbamate, N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-methylcarbamate, and 4-chloroformanilide. The leachate contained 0.8% (based on total {sup 14}C recovered in leachate) N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-N'-methoxy-N'-methylurea. Potato plants contained 0.106 mg/kg radioactive residues in peeled tubers after one growing period and 15.94 mg/kg in the tops; after two growing periods, peeled tubers contained 0.091 mg/kg and tops contained 18.87 mg/kg radioactive residues. These residues consisted of bound {sup 14}C (57.9% of total {sup 14}C recovered in plants), N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-N'-methoxy-N'-methylurea, N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N'-methylurea, N-(4-chlorophenyl)methylcarbamate, N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-methylcarbamate, and 4,4'-dichlorozobenzene.

  10. The distribution of Δ14C in Korea from 2010 to 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. H.; Hong, W.; Xu, X.; Park, G.; Sung, K. S.; Sung, Kilho; Lee, Jong-geol; Nakanishi, T.; Park, Hyo-Seok

    2015-10-01

    Δ14C values of leaves of a deciduous tree record to those of atmospheric CO2 within error and were used to map out Δ14C distribution in Korea. We collected ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba Linnaeus, a deciduous tree) leaf samples in mid-June to early July from 2009 to 2013 in Korea to obtain the regional distribution of Δ14C. Commonly CO2 emitted from fossil fuel consumption dilutes atmospheric 14C, while operations and accidents at nuclear power plants can increase it. The distribution maps of Δ14C from 2010 to 2013 in Korea shows that Δ14C values in the northwestern and southeastern parts of Korea are lower than those of the other parts of Korea, which is consistent with the population and industry patterns. Decrease rates of annually averaged Δ14C values in Korea over the study period are larger than those of Pt. Barrow, Alaska, USA (71.3°N, 156.5°W), so the difference between them and those of Pt. Barrow, Alaska, USA became larger annually. This may be due to the increase in fossil fuel consumption in Korea and China. The decrease rate between 2010 and 2011 was smaller than in other years. This could be the effect of the Fukushima power plant accident which occurred in March 11, 2011, but further study is needed to clarify it.

  11. Discussion: Reporting and calibration of post-bomb 14C data

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, P J; Brown, T A; Reimer, R W

    2004-10-11

    The definitive paper by Stuiver and Polach (1977) established the conventions for reporting of {sup 14}C data for chronological and geophysical studies based on the radioactive decay of {sup 14}C in the sample since the year of sample death or formation. Several ways of reporting {sup 14}C activity levels relative to a standard were also established, but no specific instructions were given for reporting nuclear weapons testing (post-bomb) {sup 14}C levels in samples. Because the use of post-bomb {sup 14}C is becoming more prevalent in forensics, biology, and geosciences, a convention needs to be adopted. We advocate the use of fraction modern with a new symbol F{sup 14}C to prevent confusion with the previously used Fm, which may or may not have been fractionation corrected. We also discuss the calibration of post-bomb {sup 14}C samples and the available datasets and compilations, but do not give a recommendation for a particular dataset.

  12. The biological fate of sup 14 C-dimercaptosuccinic acid in monkeys and rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Tillotson, J.A.; Boswell, G.; Kincannon, L.; Speckman, C.L.

    1989-09-01

    The biological fate of {sup 14}C-labeled dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) in monkeys and rabbits was determined by measuring the {sup 14}C activity in their urine, feces, and expired air ({sup 14}CO{sub 2}). Monkeys absorbed less than 20% DMSA from three oral dose levels (0.082, 0.16, and 0.5 mmol/kg) of {sup 14}C-DMSA, and the rabbits absorbed 32% DMSA or less from an oral dose of {sup 14}C-DMSA (0.5 mmol/kg). Although the bioavailability of DMSA was limited in either species, DMSA was detected in the blood of both species within minutes after oral dosing. In either species, most of the radiolabel from the absorbed {sup 14}C-DMSA was detected in the urine within 12 hours. We also developed a sensitive assay for directly measuring levels of DMSA (as free thiols) in blood. Intact DMSA was not detected in the blood of the monkeys or the rabbits more than 200 minutes after oral or intravenous dosing at 0.5 mmol DMSA/kg body weight. However, {sup 14}C activity in blood and urine of the monkeys was measurable 72 hours after this dose. Differences between measured {sup 14}C concentrations and intact DMSA concentrations in the blood suggest the presence of DMSA metabolites that have longer half-lives than DMSA. Consequently, until the biological activities of these compounds are identified, the pharmacokinetic analysis of DMSA may be incomplete.

  13. 40 CFR 721.9892 - Alkylated urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkylated urea. 721.9892 Section 721... Alkylated urea. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an alkylated urea (PMN P-93-1649) is subject to reporting under...

  14. 40 CFR 721.9892 - Alkylated urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkylated urea. 721.9892 Section 721... Alkylated urea. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an alkylated urea (PMN P-93-1649) is subject to reporting under...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1923 - Urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Urea. 184.1923 Section 184.1923 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1923 Urea. (a) Urea (CO(NH2)2, CAS Reg. No. 57-13-6) is the diamide of carbonic acid and is also...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9892 - Alkylated urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkylated urea. 721.9892 Section 721... Alkylated urea. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an alkylated urea (PMN P-93-1649) is subject to reporting under...

  17. 40 CFR 721.9892 - Alkylated urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkylated urea. 721.9892 Section 721... Alkylated urea. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an alkylated urea (PMN P-93-1649) is subject to reporting under...

  18. 40 CFR 721.9892 - Alkylated urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkylated urea. 721.9892 Section 721... Alkylated urea. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an alkylated urea (PMN P-93-1649) is subject to reporting under...

  19. Respiration of [14C]alanine by the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus.

    PubMed

    Chalot, M; Brun, A; Finlay, R D; Söderström, B

    1994-08-01

    The ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus efficiently took up exogenously supplied [14C]alanine and rapidly converted it to pyruvate, citrate, succinate, fumarate and to CO2, thus providing direct evidence for the utilisation of alanine as a respiratory substrate. [14C]alanine was further actively metabolised to glutamate, glutamine and aspartate. Exposure to aminooxyacetate completely suppressed 14CO2 evolution and greatly reduced the flow of carbon from [14C]alanine to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and amino acids, suggesting that alanine aminotransferase plays a pivotal role in alanine metabolism in Paxillus involutus. PMID:8082830

  20. Synthesis, storage, and stability of (4-/sup 14/C)oxaloacetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, M.D.; Heldt, H.W.

    1985-03-01

    A simple procedure for preparing (4-/sup 14/C)oxaloacetic acid based on the reaction between (/sup 14/C)HCO-3 and phosphoenolpyruvate catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase is described. A simple method for preparing highly purified phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from maize leaves is described and the degradation of oxaloacetate under conditions of varying pH and divalent metal ion concentration is reported. (4-/sup 14/C)Oxaloacetic acid is stable for several months in 0.1 M HCl solution at -80 degrees C.

  1. Comparison of (14)C liquid scintillation counting at NIST and NRC Canada.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Denis E; Galea, Raphael; Laureano-Pérez, Lizbeth; Zimmerman, Brian E

    2016-03-01

    An informal bilateral comparison of (14)C liquid scintillation (LS) counting at the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been completed. Two solutions, one containing (14)C-labeled sodium benzoate and one containing (14)C-labeled n-hexadecane, were measured at both laboratories. Despite observed LS cocktail instabilities, the two laboratories achieved accord in their standardizations of both solutions. At the conclusion of the comparison, the beta spectrum used for efficiency calculations was identified as inadequate and the data were reanalyzed with different inputs, improving accord. PMID:26585641

  2. Timing is Everything:The Boon and Bane of 14C Geochronology

    SciTech Connect

    Guilderson, T; Guilderson, T; Reimer, P J; Brown, T

    2004-10-29

    There are underappreciated limitations of the conversion of {sup 14}C-ages to the fixed, calendrical time-scale that bear directly upon our understanding of the dynamic climate system, or the relationship between the collapse of one civilization and it's neighbor's. In this paper we present a quantitative assessment of the limits of {sup 14}C-geochronology and calibration onto the absolute calendrical time-scale over the Holocene. We take into account not only the inherent limitations of the {sup 14}C-calendar calibration curve, but also analytical uncertainties.

  3. [*C]octanoic acid breath test to measure gastric emptying rate of solids.

    PubMed

    Maes, B D; Ghoos, Y F; Rutgeerts, P J; Hiele, M I; Geypens, B; Vantrappen, G

    1994-12-01

    We have developed a breath test to measure solid gastric emptying using a standardized scrambled egg test meal (250 kcal) labeled with [14C]octanoic acid or [13C]octanoic acid. In vitro incubation studies showed that octanoic acid is a reliable marker of the solid phase. The breath test was validated in 36 subjects by simultaneous radioscintigraphic and breath test measurements. Nine healthy volunteers were studied after intravenous administration of 200 mg erythromycin and peroral administration of 30 mg propantheline, respectively. Erythromycin significantly enhanced gastric emptying, while propantheline significantly reduced gastric emptying rates. We conclude that the [*C]octanoic breath test is a promising and reliable test for measuring the gastric emptying rate of solids. PMID:7995200

  4. Distribution of /sup 14/C after oral administration of (1-/sup 14/C)linoleic acid in rats fed different levels of essential fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, W.

    1984-09-01

    Rats from an inbred Sprague-Dawley strain were fed semisynthetic diets with a low (0.3 energy percent (en %)), normal (3 en %) or high (10 en %) content of essential fatty acids (EFA) for at least three generations. Twenty-nine- to 33-day-old male rats were given a single intragastric dose of (1-14C)linoleic acid in olive oil, and the respiratory CO2, urine and feces were collected for 46 hours (expt 1) or 20 hours (expt 2). The 14C activity in respiratory CO2, feces, urine and the carcass was determined in both experiments. In experiment 2 it was also measured in samples of the brown fat, liver, adrenals, white fat, skeletal muscles and brain. In both experiments the rats fed the low EFA diet retained significantly more 14C activity than the rats fed the normal or high EFA diets. In all groups the concentration of label was highest in the brown fat and the adrenals, but the above differences among the groups with respect to 14C retention were mainly observed in the liver, skeletal muscles and brain.

  5. Impact of liming and drying municipal sewage sludge on the amount and availability of (14)C-acetyl sulfamethoxazole and (14)C-acetaminophen residues.

    PubMed

    Geng, Chunnu; Bergheaud, Valérie; Garnier, Patricia; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Haudin, Claire-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Acetyl Sulfamethoxazole (AC-SMX) and acetaminophen (ACM) can be found in municipal sewage sludge, and their content and availability may be influenced by sludge treatments, such as drying and liming. A sludge similarly centrifuged with/without a flocculant was spiked with (14)C-labelled AC-SMX or ACM. Then, it was either limed (20% CaO) or/and dried under different laboratory conditions (1 week at ambient temperature; and 48 h at 40 or 80 °C). The total amount and distribution of the (14)C-compounds among several chemical fractions, based on the sludge floc definition, were assessed at the end of the treatments. All the (14)C-activity brought initially was recovered in the limed and/or dried sludges for AC-SMX but only between 44.4 and 84.9% for ACM, with the highest rate obtained for the limed sludge. Drying at 80 °C or liming increased the percentage of the sludge total organic carbon recovered in the extracts containing soluble extracellular polymeric substances (S-EPS) and the percentage of the total (14)C-activity extracted simultaneously. The non-extractable residues represented only 3.9-11.6% of the total (14)C-activity measured in the treated sludges for AC-SMX and 16.9-21.8% for ACM. The presence of AC-SMX and ACM residues in the treated sludges, after liming and drying under different conditions, was shown using some (14)C-labelled molecules. At this time scale and according to the extraction method selected, most of the (14)C-residues remained soluble and easily extractable for both compounds. This result implies that certain precautions should be taken when storing sludges before being spread on the field. Sludge piles, particularly the limed sludge, should be protected from rain to limit the production of lixiviates, which may contain residues of AC-SMX and ACM. PMID:26492342

  6. Intracavity Optogalvanic Spectroscopy, A New Ultra-sensitive Analytical Technique for 14C Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Murnick, Daniel E.; Dogru, Ozgur; Ilkmen, Erhan

    2009-01-01

    We show a new ultra-sensitive laser based analytical technique, intracavity optogalvanic spectroscopy, allowing extremely high sensitivity for detection of 14C labeled carbon dioxide. Capable of replacing large accelerator mass spectrometers, the technique quantifies attomoles of 14C in submicrogram samples. Based on the specificity of narrow laser resonances coupled with the sensitivity provided by standing waves in an optical cavity and detection via impedance variations, limits of detection near 10-15 14C:12C ratios are obtained. Using a 15W 14CO2 laser, a linear calibration with samples from 10-15 to >2 × 10-12 in 14C:12C ratios, as determined by accelerator mass spectrometry, is demonstrated. Possible applications include microdosing studies in drug development, individualized sub-therapeutic tests of drug metabolism, carbon dating and real time monitoring of atmospheric radiocarbon. The method can also be applied to detection of other trace entities. PMID:18533685

  7. Diffusion of /sup 14/C-labeled formocresol and glutaraldehyde in tooth structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wemes, J.C.; Purdell-Lewis, D.; Jongebloed, W.; Vaalburg, W.

    1982-09-01

    /sup 14/C-Formocresol and /sup 14/C-glutaraldehyde were placed in the root canals of freshly extracted human teeth. The outward diffusion of labeled aldehydes was then measured and autoradiograms of cross-sections taken. No diffusion of glutaraldehyde was detectable within 72 hours, whereas there was a rapidly increasing outflow of formocresol during the same period. In a separate group normal root canal treatment was completed until 2 mm. short of the roentgenologic apex with glutaraldehyde as an irrigant. The walls of the root canals of some of the specimens were examined with electron microscopy and the outflow of /sup 14/C-formocresol which was later placed in some specimens was counted. The use of glutaraldehyde as an irrigant resulted in closure of the apical third of the root canal as indicated by the absence of /sup 14/C-formocresol diffusion.

  8. Enhancement of radioactivity of /sup 14/C-/sup 12/C mixtures via partial reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, G.R.; Lauricella, T.L.

    1986-08-20

    The solution electron affinities of perdeuterated polyaromatics are less than those of the protiated materials. This observation prompted the investigation of the possibility of increasing the radioactivity of benzophenone-carbonyl-/sup 14/C (BZO-14C)-cold benzophenone (BZO-12C) mixtures via the partial reduction of these mixtures to the ketyls. The /sup 14/C-depleted benzophenones left in the reaction vessel in the form of Na/sup +/(NH/sub 3/)BZO/sup -/ can be recovered by simply adding a solution of I/sub 2/ in tetrahydrofuran to the solid salt. Further, there is no theoretical limit as to how much the radioactivity of the sample can be enhanced by passing /sup 14/C-enhanced material through this process consecutively, up to the point where the pure carbon-14 compound is obtained.

  9. Fate of ( sup 14 C)arsanilic acid in pigs and chickens

    SciTech Connect

    Aschbacher, P.W.; Feil, V.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Arsanilic acid uniformly labeled with {sup 14}C in the benzene ring was used to determine the metabolic fate of oral arsanilic acid in pigs and chickens. Arsanilic acid was well absorbed in both species, and urine was the predominant route of excretion. The bile was a minor (< 5% of the dose) route of excretion in pigs; however, biliary excretion was not measured in roosters. Arsanilic acid, N-acetylarsanilic acid, and (4-acetamidophenyl)dimethylarsine oxide were isolated from pig urine (17-39%, 15-29%, and < 5% of urinary {sup 14}C, respectively). Only 25% of the {sup 14}C in pig feces was extractable, and no metabolites could be isolated. Arsanilic acid was the only radioactive compound isolated from urine of colostomized roosters, and there was no suggestion of other metabolites from the isolation scheme employed. No attempt was made to isolate {sup 14}C compounds in feces from colostomized roosters or in excreta from normal roosters.

  10. Use of [14C]lysine to detect microbial contamination in liquid foods.

    PubMed Central

    Mafart, P; Bourgeois, C; Duteurtre, B; Moll, M

    1978-01-01

    A radiometric method for microbiological control in food industries is suggested. This method, based on the labeling of cells by [14C]lysine, was tested by using nine species of yeast and two species of bacteria. PMID:354531

  11. An update on in situ cosmogenic 14C analysis at ETH Zürich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippe, K.; Kober, F.; Wacker, L.; Fahrni, S. M.; Ivy-Ochs, S.; Akçar, N.; Schlüchter, C.; Wieler, R.

    2013-01-01

    We present the improved performance of the modified in situ cosmogenic 14C extraction system at ETH Zürich. Samples are now processed faster (2 days in total) and are measured with a high analytical precision of usually <2% using the gas ion source of the MICADAS AMS facility. Measurements of the PP-4 standard sample show a good reproducibility and consistency with published values. Procedural blanks are very low at currently ∼4.0 × 10414C atoms. Analyses of samples from a ∼300 year old rock avalanche prove that we can successfully apply in situ14C exposure dating to very young surfaces. Additionally, we present a modified calculation scheme for in situ14C concentrations which differs from that used for conventional radiocarbon dating. This new approach explicitly accounts for the characteristics of in situ14C production.

  12. Breath tests sustainability in hospital settings: cost analysis and reimbursement in the Italian National Health System.

    PubMed

    Volpe, M; Scaldaferri, F; Ojetti, V; Poscia, A

    2013-01-01

    The high demand of Breath Tests (BT) in many gastroenterological conditions in time of limited resources for health care systems, generates increased interest in cost analysis from the point of view of the delivery of services to better understand how use the money to generate value. This study aims to measure the cost of C13 Urea and other most utilized breath tests in order to describe key aspects of costs and reimbursements looking at the economic sustainability for the hospital. A hospital based cost-analysis of the main breath tests commonly delivery in an ambulatory setting is performed. Mean salary for professional nurses and gastroenterologists, drugs/preparation used and disposable materials, purchase and depreciation of the instrument and the testing time was used to estimate the cost, while reimbursements are based on the 2013 Italian National Health System ambulatory pricelist. Variables that could influence the model are considered in the sensitivity analyses. The mean cost for C13--Urea, Lactulose and Lactose BT are, respectively, Euros 30,59; 45,20 and 30,29. National reimbursement often doesn't cover the cost of the analysis, especially considering the scenario with lower number of exam. On the contrary, in high performance scenario all the reimbursement could cover the cost, except for the C13 Urea BT that is high influenced by the drugs cost. However, consideration about the difference between Italian Regional Health System ambulatory pricelist are done. Our analysis shows that while national reimbursement rates cover the costs of H2 breath testing, they do not cover sufficiently C13 BT, particularly urea breath test. The real economic strength of these non invasive tests should be considered in the overall organization of inpatient and outpatient clinic, accounting for complete diagnostic pathway for each gastrointestinal disease. PMID:24443075

  13. Fate of (14)C-organic pollutant residues in composted sludge after application to soil.

    PubMed

    Haudin, Claire-Sophie; Zhang, Yuhai; Dumény, Valérie; Lashermes, Gwenaëlle; Bergheaud, Valérie; Barriuso, Enrique; Houot, Sabine

    2013-08-01

    Organic micropollutants may be present in biosolids, leading to soil contamination when they are recycled in agriculture. A sludge spiked with (14)C-labelled glyphosate (GLY), sodium linear dodecylbenzene sulphonate (LAS), fluoranthene (FLT) or 4-n-nonylphenol (NP) was composted with green waste and the fate of the (14)C-micropollutant residues remaining after composting was assessed after the compost application to the soil. (14)C-residues were mineralised in the soil and represented after 140d 20-32% of the initial activity for LAS, 16-25% for GLY, 6-9% for FLT and 4-7% for NP. The (14)C-residues at the end of composting that could not be extracted with methanol or ammonia were minimally remobilised or even increased for FLT. After 140d, non-extractable residues represented 38-52% of all of the (14)C-residues remaining in the soil for FLT, 50-67% for GLY, 91-92% for NP and 94-97% for LAS and in most cases, less than 1% of the (14)C-residues were water soluble, suggesting a low direct availability for leaching and microbial or plant assimilation. FLT was identified as the main compound among the methanol-extractable (14)C-residues that may be potentially available. The fate of the (14)C-organic pollutant residues in composts after application to soil could be assessed through a sequential chemical extraction scheme and depended on the chemical nature of the pollutant. PMID:23545187

  14. Assessing open-system behavior of 14C in terrestrial gastropod shells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rech, Jason A.; Pigati, Jeffrey S.; Lehmann, Sophie B.; McGimpsey, Chelsea N.; Grimley, David A.; Nekola, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    In order to assess open-system behavior of radiocarbon in fossil gastropod shells, we measured the 14C activity on 10 aliquots of shell material recovered from Illinoian (~190-130 ka) and pre-Illinoian (~800 ka) loess and lacustrine deposits in the Midwestern USA. Eight of the 10 aliquots yielded measurable 14C activities that ranged from 0.25 to 0.53 percent modern carbon (pMC), corresponding to apparent 14C ages between 48.2 and 42.1 ka. This small level of open-system behavior is common in many materials that are used for 14C dating (e.g. charcoal), and typically sets the upper practical limit of the technique. Two aliquots of gastropod shells from the Illinoian-aged Petersburg Silt (Petersburg Section) in central Illinois, USA, however, yielded elevated 14C activities of 1.26 and 1.71 pMC, which correspond to apparent 14C ages of 35.1 and 32.7 ka. Together, these results suggest that while many fossil gastropods shells may not suffer from major (>1%) open-system problems, this is not always the case. We then examined the mineralogy, trace element chemistry, and physical characteristics of a suite of fossil and modern gastropod shells to identify the source of contamination in the Petersburg shells and assess the effectiveness of these screening techniques at identifying samples suitable for 14C dating. Mineralogical (XRD) and trace element analyses were inconclusive, which suggests that these techniques are not suitable for assessing open-system behavior in terrestrial gastropod shells. Analysis with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), however, identified secondary mineralization (calcium carbonate) primarily within the inner whorls of the Petersburg shells. This indicates that SEM examination, or possibly standard microscope examination, of the interior of gastropod shells should be used when selecting fossil gastropod shells for 14C dating.

  15. Assessing open-system behavior of 14C in terrestrial gastropod shells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rech, J.A.; Pigati, J.S.; Lehmann, S.B.; McGimpsey, C.N.; Grimley, D.A.; Nekola, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    In order to assess open-system behavior of radiocarbon in fossil gastropod shells, we measured the 14C activity on 10 aliquots of shell material recovered from Illinoian (~190-130 ka) and pre-Illinoian (~800 ka) loess and lacustrine deposits in the Midwestern USA. Eight of the 10 aliquots yielded measurable 14C activities that ranged from 0.25 to 0.53 percent modern carbon (pMC), corresponding to apparent 14C ages between 48.2 and 42.1 ka. This small level of open-system behavior is common in many materials that are used for 14C dating (e.g. charcoal), and typically sets the upper practical limit of the technique. Two aliquots of gastropod shells from the Illinoian-aged Petersburg Silt (Petersburg Section) in central Illinois, USA, however, yielded elevated 14C activities of 1.26 and 1.71 pMC, which correspond to apparent 14C ages of 35.1 and 32.7 ka. Together, these results suggest that while many fossil gastropods shells may not suffer from major (>1%) open-system problems, this is not always the case. We then examined the mineralogy, trace element chemistry, and physical characteristics of a suite of fossil and modern gastropod shells to identify the source of contamination in the Petersburg shells and assess the effectiveness of these screening techniques at identifying samples suitable for 14C dating. Mineralogical (XRD) and trace element analyses were inconclusive, which suggests that these techniques are not suitable for assessing open-system behavior in terrestrial gastropod shells. Analysis with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), however, identified secondary mineralization (calcium carbonate) primarily within the inner whorls of the Petersburg shells. This indicates that SEM examination, or possibly standard microscope examination, of the interior of gastropod shells should be used when selecting fossil gastropod shells for 14C dating. ?? 2011 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona.

  16. 17 CFR 240.14c-2 - Distribution of information statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Regulation S-K (17 CFR 229.901(c)) and is registered (or authorized to be registered) on Form S-4 (17 CFR 229.25) or Form F-4 (17 CFR 229.34), the information statement must be distributed to security holders no... statement. 240.14c-2 Section 240.14c-2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE...

  17. Seasonally Resolved Surface Water (delta)14C Variability in the Lombok Strait: A Coralline Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Guilderson, T P; Fallon, S J; Moore, M D; Schrag, D P; Charles, C D

    2008-04-23

    We have explored surface water mixing in the Lombok Strait through a {approx}bimonthly resolved surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C time-series reconstructed from a coral in the Lombok Strait that spans 1937 through 1990. The prebomb surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C average is -60.5{per_thousand} and individual samples range from -72{per_thousand} to 134{per_thousand}. The annual average post-bomb maximum occurs in 1973 and is 122{per_thousand}. The timing of the post-bomb maximum is consistent with a primary subtropical source for the surface waters in the Indonesian Seas. During the post-bomb period the coral records regular seasonal cycles of 5-20{per_thousand}. Seasonal high {Delta}{sup 14}C occur during March-May (warm, low salinity), and low {Delta}{sup 14}C occur in September (cool, higher salinity). The {Delta}{sup 14}C seasonality is coherent and in phase with the seasonal {Delta}{sup 14}C cycle observed in Makassar Strait. We estimate the influence of high {Delta}{sup 14}C Makassar Strait (North Pacific) water flowing through the Lombok Strait using a two endmember mixing model and the seasonal extremes observed at the two sites. The percentage of Makassar Strait water varies between 16 and 70%, and between 1955 and 1990 it averages 40%. During La Nina events there is a higher percentage of Makassar Strait (high {Delta}{sup 14}C) water in the Lombok Strait.

  18. Extraction of /sup 14/C-labeled photosynthate from aquatic plants with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)

    SciTech Connect

    Filbin, G.J.; Hough, R.A.

    1984-03-01

    DMSO was tested as a solvent to extract /sup 14/C-labeled photosynthate from three species of aquatic plants in photosynthesis measurements and compared with the dry oxidation method for plant radioassay. Extraction efficiency was in the range of 96-99% of fixed /sup 14/C, and precision was comparable to, or better than, that obtained with dry oxidation. The method is simple and inexpensive, and for fresh tissue the same sample extracts can be used for chlorophyll analyses.

  19. 17 CFR 240.14c-2 - Distribution of information statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Regulation S-K (17 CFR 229.901(c)) and is registered (or authorized to be registered) on Form S-4 (17 CFR 229.25) or Form F-4 (17 CFR 229.34), the information statement must be distributed to security holders no... statement. 240.14c-2 Section 240.14c-2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE...

  20. 17 CFR 240.14c-2 - Distribution of information statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Regulation S-K (17 CFR 229.901(c)) and is registered (or authorized to be registered) on Form S-4 (17 CFR 229.25) or Form F-4 (17 CFR 229.34), the information statement must be distributed to security holders no... statement. 240.14c-2 Section 240.14c-2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE...

  1. 17 CFR 240.14c-2 - Distribution of information statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Regulation S-K (17 CFR 229.901(c)) and is registered (or authorized to be registered) on Form S-4 (17 CFR 229.25) or Form F-4 (17 CFR 229.34), the information statement must be distributed to security holders no... statement. 240.14c-2 Section 240.14c-2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE...

  2. Mapleson's Breathing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Tej K; Mittal, Geeta

    2013-01-01

    Mapleson breathing systems are used for delivering oxygen and anaesthetic agents and to eliminate carbon dioxide during anaesthesia. They consist of different components: Fresh gas flow, reservoir bag, breathing tubes, expiratory valve, and patient connection. There are five basic types of Mapleson system: A, B, C, D and E depending upon the different arrangements of these components. Mapleson F was added later. For adults, Mapleson A is the circuit of choice for spontaneous respiration where as Mapleson D and its Bains modifications are best available circuits for controlled ventilation. For neonates and paediatric patients Mapleson E and F (Jackson Rees modification) are the best circuits. In this review article, we will discuss the structure of the circuits and functional analysis of various types of Mapleson systems and their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:24249884

  3. Emergency Response Breathing Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Aerospace Design & Development, Inc.'s (ADD's) SCAMP was developed under an SBIR contract through Kennedy Space Center. SCAMP stands for Supercritical Air Mobility Pack. The technology came from the life support fuel cell support systems used for the Apollo and Space Shuttle programs. It uses supercritical cryogenic air and is able to function in microgravity environments. SCAMP's self-contained breathing apparatus(SCBA) systems are also ground-based and can provide twice as much air than traditional SCBA's due to its high-density capacity. The SCAMP system was designed for use in launch pad emergency rescues. ADD also developed a protective suit for use with SCAMP that is smaller and lighter system than the old ones. ADD's SCAMP allows for body cooling and breathing from the supercritical cryogenic air, requiring no extra systems. The improvement over the traditional SCBA allows for a reduction of injuries, such as heat stress, and makes it easier for rescuers to save lives.

  4. Fate of 14C-acrylamide in roasted and ground coffee during storage.

    PubMed

    Baum, Matthias; Böhm, Nadine; Görlitz, Jessica; Lantz, Ingo; Merz, Karl Heinz; Ternité, Rüdiger; Eisenbrand, Gerhard

    2008-05-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is formed during heating of carbohydrate rich foods in the course of the Maillard reaction. AA has been classified as probably carcinogenic to humans. Storage experiments with roasted coffee have shown that AA levels decrease depending on storage time and temperature. In the present study the fate of AA lost during storage of roasted and ground (R&G) coffee was studied, using 14C-labeled AA as radiotracer. Radiolabel was measured in coffee brew, filter residue, and volatiles. In the brew, total (14)C-label decreased during storage of R&G coffee, while activity in the filter residue built up concomitantly. [2,3-14C]-AA (14C-AA) was the only 14C-related water extractable low molecular compound in the brew detected by radio-HPLC. No formation of volatile 14C-AA-related compounds was detected during storage and coffee brewing. Close to 90% of the radiolabel in the filter residue (spent R&G coffee, spent grounds) remained firmly bound to the matrix, largely resisting extraction by aqueous ammonia, ethyl acetate, chloroform, hexane, and sequential polyenzymatic digest. Furanthiols, which are abundant as aroma components in roasted coffee, have not been found to be involved in the formation of covalent AA adducts and thus do not contribute substantially to the decrease of AA during storage. PMID:18435440

  5. AMS studies of the long-term turnover of 14C-labelled fat in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnarsson, M.; Mattsson, S.; Stenström, K.; Leide-Svegborn, S.; Erlandsson, B.; Faarinen, M.; Hellborg, R.; Kiisk, M.; Nilsson, L.-E.; Nosslin, B.; Persson, P.; Skog, G.; Åberg, M.

    2000-10-01

    To estimate the biokinetics of 14C-labelled fatty acids and the associated radiation absorbed dose to man, long-term retention of 14C from oral intake of glycerol tri[1- 14C]oleate (triolein) has been studied using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). As a complement to earlier reported data for three individuals, we present here results for one person from measurements up to 4.6 yr after administration, now also including 14C-levels in fat, muscle and bone. In this subject, a total of 44% of the administered activity was recovered in the exhaled air. Fasting increased the exhalation of 14C. The "excess" 14CO2 due to fasting had a half-life of about 400 d. AMS measurements on fat, muscle and bone biopsies taken from the same subject 4.5 yr after ingestion indicated that a small fraction of the administered activity was still present in fat. Also, bone tissue had a higher 14C specific activity than the current environmental level. No significantly increased level was found in the muscle sample.

  6. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon is revealed by nuclear bomb (14)C.

    PubMed

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Schjerling, Peter; Heinemeier, Jan; Magnusson, Stig Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Tendons are often injured and heal poorly. Whether this is caused by a slow tissue turnover is unknown, since existing data provide diverging estimates of tendon protein half-life that range from 2 mo to 200 yr. With the purpose of determining life-long turnover of human tendon tissue, we used the (14)C bomb-pulse method. This method takes advantage of the dramatic increase in atmospheric levels of (14)C, produced by nuclear bomb tests in 1955-1963, which is reflected in all living organisms. Levels of (14)C were measured in 28 forensic samples of Achilles tendon core and 4 skeletal muscle samples (donor birth years 1945-1983) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and compared to known atmospheric levels to estimate tissue turnover. We found that Achilles tendon tissue retained levels of (14)C corresponding to atmospheric levels several decades before tissue sampling, demonstrating a very limited tissue turnover. The tendon concentrations of (14)C approximately reflected the atmospheric levels present during the first 17 yr of life, indicating that the tendon core is formed during height growth and is essentially not renewed thereafter. In contrast, (14)C levels in muscle indicated continuous turnover. Our observation provides a fundamental premise for understanding tendon function and pathology, and likely explains the poor regenerative capacity of tendon tissue. PMID:23401563

  7. Urea biosensor for hemodialysis monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.

    1999-01-12

    This research discloses an electrochemical sensor capable of detecting and quantifying urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures. The sensor is based upon measurement of the pH change produced in an aqueous environment by the products of the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The sensor may be fabricated using methods amenable to mass fabrication, resulting in low-cost sensors and thus providing the potential for disposable use. In a typical application, the sensor could be used in treatment centers, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. The sensor can also be utilized to allow at-home testing to determine if dialysis was necessary. Such a home monitor is similar, in principle, to devices used for blood glucose testing by diabetics, and would require a blood droplet sample by using a finger prick. 9 figs.

  8. Urea biosensor for hemodialysis monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.

    1999-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor capable of detecting and quantifying urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures. The sensor is based upon measurement of the pH change produced in an aqueous environment by the products of the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The sensor may be fabricated using methods amenable to mass fabrication, resulting in low-cost sensors and thus providing the potential for disposable use. In a typical application, the sensor could be used in treatment centers, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. The sensor can also be utilized to allow at-home testing to determine if dialysis was necessary. Such a home monitor is similar, in principle, to devices used for blood glucose testing by diabetics, and would require a blood droplet sample by using a finger prick.

  9. Metabolism of (2-14C)acetate and its use in assessing hepatic Krebs cycle activity and gluconeogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, W.C.; Magnusson, I.; Chandramouli, V.; Kumaran, K.; Wahren, J.; Landau, B.R. )

    1991-04-15

    To examine the fate of the carbons of acetate and to evaluate the usefulness of labeled acetate in assessing intrahepatic metabolic processes during gluconeogenesis, (2-14C)acetate, (2-14C)ethanol, and (1-14C)ethanol were infused into normal subjects fasted 60 h and given phenyl acetate. Distributions of 14C in the carbons of blood glucose and glutamate from urinary phenylacetylglutamine were determined. With (2-14C)acetate and (2-14C)ethanol, carbon 1 of glucose had about twice as much 14C as carbon 3. Carbon 2 of glutamate had about twice as much 14C as carbon 1 and one-half to one-third as much as carbon 4. There was only a small amount in carbon 5. These distributions are incompatible with the metabolism of (2-14C)acetate being primarily in liver. Therefore, (2-14C)acetate cannot be used to study Krebs cycle metabolism in liver and in relationship to gluconeogenesis, as has been done. The distributions can be explained by: (a) fixation of 14CO2 from (2-14C)acetate in the formation of the 14C-labeled glucose and glutamate in liver and (b) the formation of 14C-labeled glutamate in a second site, proposed to be muscle. (1,3-14C)Acetone formation from the (2-14C)acetate does not contribute to the distributions, as evidenced by the absence of 14C in carbons 2-4 of glutamate after (1-14C)ethanol administration.

  10. Disposition of 14C-alpha-cyclodextrin in germ-free and conventional rats.

    PubMed

    Van Ommen, B; De Bie, A T H J; Bär, A

    2004-06-01

    The absorption, disposition, metabolism, and excretion of uniformly (14)C-labeled alpha-cyclodextrin ((14)C-alpha-CD) was examined in four separate experiments with Wistar rats. In Experiment 1, (14)C-alpha-CD (25 microCi, 50 mg/kg bw) was administered intravenously to four male and four female conventional rats. In Experiment 2, (14)C-alpha-CD (25 microCi, 200 mg/kg bw) was given by gavage to four male and four female germ-free rats. In Experiments 3 and 4, (14)C-alpha-CD was given to groups of four male and four female conventional rats by gavage at different dose levels (100 microCi, 200 mg/kg bw; 25 microCi, 200 and 100 mg/kg bw). In all experiments, (14)C was measured in respiratory CO(2), urine, and feces over periods of 24-48 h, and in the contents of the gastrointestinal tract, blood, main organs, and residual carcass at termination of the experiments. The chemical identity of the (14)C-labeled compounds was examined by HPLC in blood (Experiment 1), urine (Experiments 1-4), feces (Experiments 2-4), and samples of intestinal contents (Experiments 2 and 4). Recovered (14)C was expressed as percentage of the administered dose. Experiment 1 showed that intravenously administered alpha-CD is excreted rapidly with urine. During the first 2h after dosing, plasma (14)C levels decreased rapidly (t(1/2), 26 and 21 min in male and female rats, respectively). About 13% of the administered (14)C dose (range 4.6-30.6) was detected in the feces, respiratory CO(2), organs, and carcass at the end of the experiment, i.e., 24 h after dosing. The presence of about 1.9% in the intestinal contents and feces suggests that a certain fraction of systemic alpha-CD is eliminated with the bile or saliva. Conclusive evidence, either positive or negative, for a hydrolysis and further metabolism of a small fraction of the administered alpha-CD by the enzymes of the mammalian body could not be gained from this experiment. Upon oral administration of (14)C-alpha-CD to germ-free rats

  11. Laboratory Experiments to Evaluate Diffusion of 14C into Nevada Test Site Carbonate Aquifer Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Hershey; William Howcroft; Paul W. Reimus

    2003-03-01

    Determination of groundwater flow velocities at the Nevada Test Site is important since groundwater is the principal transport medium of underground radionuclides. However, 14C-based groundwater velocities in the carbonate aquifers of the Nevada Test Site are several orders of magnitude slower than velocities derived from the Underground Test Area regional numerical model. This discrepancy has been attributed to the loss or retardation of 14C from groundwater into the surrounding aquifer matrix making 14C-based groundwater ages appear much older. Laboratory experiments were used to investigate the retardation of 14C in the carbonate aquifers at the Nevada Test Site. Three sets of experiments were conducted evaluating the diffusion of 14C into the carbonate aquifer matrix, adsorption and/or isotopic exchange onto the pore surfaces of the carbonate matrix, and adsorption and/or isotopic exchange onto the fracture surfaces of the carbonate aquifer. Experimental results a nd published aquifer matrix and fracture porosities from the Lower Carbonate Aquifer were applied to a 14C retardation model. The model produced an extremely wide range of retardation factors because of the wide range of published aquifer matrix and fracture porosities (over three orders of magnitude). Large retardation factors suggest that groundwater with very little measured 14C activity may actually be very young if matrix porosity is large relative to the fracture porosity. Groundwater samples collected from highly fractured aquifers with large effective fracture porosities may have relatively small correction factors, while samples from aquifers with a few widely spaced fractures may have very large correction factors. These retardation factors were then used to calculate groundwater velocities from a proposed flow path at the Nevada Test Site. The upper end of the range of 14C correction factors estimated groundwater velocities that appear to be at least an order of magnitude too high compared

  12. The effects of the oral administration of fish oil concentrate on the release and the metabolism of (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid and (/sup 14/C)eicosapentaenoic acid by human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, A.; Terano, T.; Hamazaki, T.; Sajiki, J.; Kondo, S.; Ozawa, A.; Fujita, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Tamura, Y.; Kumagai, A.

    1982-11-01

    It has been suggested by several investigators that eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5 omega 3, EPA) might have anti-thrombotic effects. In this experiment, the effect of the oral administration of EPA rich fish oil concentrate on platelet aggregation and the release and the metabolism of (/sup 1 -14/C)arachidonic acid and ((U)-/sup 14/C)eicosapentaenoic acid by human platelets was studied. Eight healthy male subjects ingested 18 capsules of fish oil concentrate (EPA 1.4 g) per day for 4 weeks. Plasma and platelet concentrations of EPA markedly increased, while those of arachidonic acid (C20:4 omega 6, AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6 omega 3, DHA) did not change. Platelet aggregation induced by collagen and ADP was reduced. Collagen induced (/sup 14/C)thromboxane B2 (TXB2) formation from (/sup 14/C)AA prelabeled platelets decreased. There was no detectable formation of (/sup 14/C)TXB3 from (/sup 14/C)EPA prelabeled platelets, and the conversion of exogenous (/sup 14/C)EPA to (/sup 14/C)TXB3 was lower than that of (/sup 14/C)AA to (/sup 14/C)TXB2. The release of (/sup 14/C)AA from (/sup 14/C)AA prelabeled platelets by collagen was significantly decreased. These observations raise the possibility that the release of arachidonic acid from platelet lipids might be affected by the alteration of EPA content in platelets.

  13. Measuring chlorophyll. cap alpha. and /sup 14/C-labeled photosynthate in aquatic angiosperms by the use of a tissue solubilizer. [/sup 14/C-labelled photosynthate

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, S.; Stewart, A.J.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    A compound that quantitatively correlated with chlorophyll ..cap alpha.. could be measured fluorometrically in the extracts of leaves of three aquatic angiosperms (Myriophyllum heterophyllum Michx., Potamogeton crispus L., Elodea canadensis Michx.) treated with the tissue solubilizer BTS-450. Fluorescent characteristics of the solubilized plant tissues were stable for several weeks in the dark at temperatures up to 60/sup 0/C but rapidly degraded in sunlight or when acidified. /sup 14/C-Labeled photosynthate, which had been fixed by leaf discs during 1- to 10-hour exposure to H/sup 14/CO/sub 3/, was also readily extracted by the tissue solubilizer. Solubilizer extraction can, therefore, be used to determine both chlorophyll ..cap alpha.. content and /sup 14/C incorporation rates in the same leaf sample. The method is practical, because no grinding is required, the fluorescent characteristics of the extracts are stable, and analyses can be performed with very little plant material (about 3 milligrams).

  14. Persistence of the herbicides (/sup 14/C)chlorsulfuron and (/sup 14/C)metsulfuron methyl in prairie soils under laboratory conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.E.

    1986-11-01

    Metsulfuron methyl, whose structure is closely related to that of chlorsulfuron, is currently being evaluated on the Canadian prairies as a postemergence treatment for the control of broadleaf weeds in cereal crops, in non-crop land and for brush control. Although applied postemergence, some of the herbicide will come into contact with the soil making it necessary to determine the fate of metsulfuron methyl in the soil. These studies were undertaken to investigate the rate of breakdown and the fate of (/sup 14/C)metsulfuron methyl in three soils under laboratory conditions where no leaching could occur. The rate of breakdown of (/sup 14/C)chlorsulfuron was also investigated in one of the soils.

  15. Progress in automated extraction and purification of in situ 14C from quartz: Results from the Purdue in situ 14C laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, Nathaniel; Goehring, Brent; Wilson, Jim; Kubley, Thomas; Caffee, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Current extraction methods for in situ 14C from quartz [e.g., Lifton et al., (2001), Pigati et al., (2010), Hippe et al., (2013)] are time-consuming and repetitive, making them an attractive target for automation. We report on the status of in situ 14C extraction and purification systems originally automated at the University of Arizona that have now been reconstructed and upgraded at the Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab). The Purdue in situ 14C laboratory builds on the flow-through extraction system design of Pigati et al. (2010), automating most of the procedure by retrofitting existing valves with external servo-controlled actuators, regulating the pressure of research purity O2 inside the furnace tube via a PID-based pressure controller in concert with an inlet mass flow controller, and installing an automated liquid N2 distribution system, all driven by LabView® software. A separate system for cryogenic CO2 purification, dilution, and splitting is also fully automated, ensuring a highly repeatable process regardless of the operator. We present results from procedural blanks and an intercomparison material (CRONUS-A), as well as results of experiments to increase the amount of material used in extraction, from the standard 5 g to 10 g or above. Results thus far are quite promising with procedural blanks comparable to previous work and significant improvements in reproducibility for CRONUS-A measurements. The latter analyses also demonstrate the feasibility of quantitative extraction of in situ 14C from sample masses up to 10 g. Our lab is now analyzing unknowns routinely, but lowering overall blank levels is the focus of ongoing research.

  16. Plasma arginine and leucine kinetics and urea production rates in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y M; Young, V R; Castillo, L; Chapman, T E; Tompkins, R G; Ryan, C M; Burke, J F

    1995-05-01

    We measured plasma arginine and leucine kinetics and rates of urea production (appearance) in 12 severely burned patients (mean body surface burn area, 48%) during a basal state (low-dose intravenous glucose) and while receiving routine, total parenteral nutrition ([TPN] fed state) including an L-amino acid mixture, supplying a generous level of nitrogen (mean, 0.36 g N.kg-1.d-1). The two nutritional states were studied in random order using a primed 4-hour constant intravenous tracer infusion protocol. Stable-nuclide-labeled tracers were L-[guanidino-13C]arginine, L-[1-13C]leucine, [18O]urea, and NaH13CO3 (prime only), with blood and expired air samples drawn at intervals to determine isotopic abundance of arginine, citrulline, ornithine, alpha-ketoisocaproate ([KIC] for leucine), and urea in plasma and 13CO2 in breath. Results are compared with data obtained in these laboratories in healthy adults. Leucine kinetics (flux and disappearance into protein synthesis) indicated the expected higher turnover in burn patients than in healthy controls. Mean leucine oxidation rates are also higher and compared well with values predicted from urea production rates, provided that urea nitrogen recycling via intestinal hydrolysis is taken into account. The plasma urea flux was also higher than for normal subjects. Arginine fluxes as measured in the systemic whole body, via the plasma pool, were correspondingly higher in burned patients than in healthy controls and were in good agreement with values predicted from leucine-KIC kinetics. However, systemic whole-body arginine flux measured via the plasma pool was only 20% of the arginine flux estimated from the urea flux plus the rate of protein synthesis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7752916

  17. Accelerator mass spectrometry measurements of the 13C (n ,γ )14C and 14N(n ,p )14C cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, A.; Bichler, M.; Buczak, K.; Dillmann, I.; Käppeler, F.; Karakas, A.; Lederer, C.; Lugaro, M.; Mair, K.; Mengoni, A.; Schätzel, G.; Steier, P.; Trautvetter, H. P.

    2016-04-01

    The technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), offering a complementary tool for sensitive studies of key reactions in nuclear astrophysics, was applied for measurements of the 13C (n ,γ )14C and the 14N(n ,p )14C cross sections, which act as a neutron poison in s -process nucleosynthesis. Solid samples were irradiated at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology with neutrons closely resembling a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution for k T =25 keV, and also at higher energies between En=123 and 182 keV. After neutron irradiation the produced amount of 14C in the samples was measured by AMS at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) facility. For both reactions the present results provide important improvements compared to previous experimental data, which were strongly discordant in the astrophysically relevant energy range and missing for the comparably strong resonances above 100 keV. For 13C (n ,γ ) we find a four times smaller cross section around k T =25 keV than a previous measurement. For 14N(n ,p ), the present data suggest two times lower cross sections between 100 and 200 keV than had been obtained in previous experiments and data evaluations. The effect of the new stellar cross sections on the s process in low-mass asymptotic giant branch stars was studied for stellar models of 2 M⊙ initial mass, and solar and 1 /10th solar metallicity.

  18. Solar modulation of cosmic ray intensity and solar flare events inferred from (14)C contents in dated tree rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, C. Y.; Chen, T. M.; Yun, S. X.; Dai, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    The delta 14C values in 42 rings of a white spruce grown in Mackenzie Delta was measured as a continuing effort of tracing the history of solar modulation of cosmic ray intensity. The delta 14C values in six rings were measured, in search of a 14C increase due to two large solar flares that occurred in 1942. The results are presented.

  19. A Minute Dose of 14C-b-Carotene is Absorbed and Converted to Retinoids in Humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We dosed 8 adults with 14C-all-trans [10,10',11,11'-14C]-B-carotene (1.01 nmol) to quantify its absorption and metabolism. We used accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to measure 14C eliminated in feces over 14 days, in urine over 30 days, and that was retained in plasma over 166 days since dose. We...

  20. Low-level 14C methane oxidation rate measurements modified for remote field settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, M. A.; Pohlman, J.; Ruppel, C. D.; Xu, X.

    2012-12-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation limits atmospheric methane emissions from degraded subsea permafrost and dissociated methane hydrates in high latitude oceans. Methane oxidation rate measurements are a crucial tool for investigating the efficacy of this process, but are logistically challenging when working on small research vessels in remote settings. We modified a low-level 14C-CH4 oxidation rate measurement for use in the Beaufort Sea above hydrate bearing sediments during August 2012. Application of the more common 3H-CH4 rate measurement that uses 106 times more radioactivity was not practical because the R/V Ukpik cannot accommodate a radiation van. The low-level 14C measurement does not require a radiation van, but careful isolation of the 14C-label is essential to avoid contaminating natural abundance 14C measurements. We used 14C-CH4 with a total activity of 1.1 μCi, which is far below the 100 μCi permitting level. In addition, we modified field procedures to simplify and shorten sample processing. The original low-level 14C-CH4 method requires 6 steps in the field: (1) collect water samples in glass serum bottles, (2) inject 14C-CH4 into bottles, (3) incubate for 24 hours, (4) filter to separate the methanotrophic bacterial cells from the aqueous sample, (5) kill the filtrate with sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and (6) purge with nitrogen to remove unused 14C-CH4. Onshore, the 14C-CH4 respired to carbon dioxide or incorporated into cell material by methanotrophic bacteria during incubation is quantified by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We conducted an experiment to test the possibility of storing samples for purging and filtering back onshore (steps 4 and 6). We subjected a series of water samples to steps 1-3 & 5, and preserved with mercuric chloride (HgCl2) instead of NaOH because HgCl2 is less likely to break down cell material during storage. The 14C-content of the carbon dioxide in samples preserved with HgCl2 and stored for up to 2 weeks was stable

  1. Tracing terrestrial carbon: a novel application of ∆14C in a humic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keaveney, Evelyn; Reimer, Paula J.; Foy, Robert H.

    2016-04-01

    Lakes play an important yet underrated role in global carbon cycles. Terrestrial carbon (C) is buried and/or remineralised in significant quantities, and lake function may also be affected by catchment inputs with potential feedbacks for regional and global C cycling. Changing deposition chemistry, land use and climate induced impacts on hydrology will affect soil biogeochemistry, terrestrial C export, and hence lake ecology. Autochthonous production in lakes is based on dissolved inorganic C (DIC). DIC in alkaline lakes is partially derived from weathering of carbonaceous bedrock, a proportion of which is 14C-free. The low 14C activity yields an artificial age offset leading samples to appear hundreds to thousands of years older than their actual age. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) can contain terrestrial inputs. The terrestrial inputs can be labile or detrital and their age depends to a first order on their depth in catchment soil/peat stocks. We present a pilot study that uses the radiocarbon (∆14C) method to determine the source of carbon buried in the surface sediment of Lower Lough Erne, a humic, alkaline lake in northwest Ireland. ∆14C, δ13C and δ15N values were measured from phytoplankton and other biota, dissolved inorganic, dissolved organic and particulate organic carbon. A novel radiocarbon method, Stepped Combustion1 was used to estimate the degree of the burial of terrestrial carbon in surface sediment, collected in 2011. The ∆14C values of the low temperature fractions were comparable to algal ∆14C, while the high temperature fractions were 14C-depleted (older than bulk sediment). The ∆14C end-member model indicated that ~64% of carbon in surface sediment was derived from detrital terrestrial carbon. The same proportion of detrital/labile carbon was found in surface sediment of Upper Lough Erne in 2014, despite the differences in lake type and collection date. The use of ∆14C in conjunction with

  2. Liquid scintillation counting of /sup 14/C for differentiation of synthetic ethanol from ethanol of fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, G.E.; Noakes, J.E.; Alfonso, F.C.; Figert, D.M.

    1981-09-01

    Samples containing ethanol are fractionated on a column so that the resultant ethanol content is > 93%. Determination of /sup 14/C by liquid scintillation counting on the ethanol fraction differentiates ethanol produced by fermentation from synthetic ethanol produced from fossil fuel sources. Twenty-seven samples were fractionated and analyzed for the /sup 14/C isotope. Six samples were synthetic ethanol derived from ethylene gas (direct and indirect process), and yielded a mean value for /sup 14/C isotope of 0.167 dpm/g carbon with a standard deviation (SD) of 0.066 dpm/g carbon (disintegrations per minute per gram of carbon). The remaining samples were ethanol derived from the fermentation of natural materials, such as corn, pear, sugar cane, grape, cherry, and blackberry, and yielded a mean value for /sup 14/C isotope of 16.11 dpm/g carbon with an SD of 1.27. The /sup 14/C values for specific mixtures of a synthetic and a natural ethanol compare favorably with the analytical values obtained by this procedure.

  3. Influence of increasing combustion temperature on the AMS 14C dating of modern crop phytoliths

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jinhui; Yang, Xue; Zheng, Yonggang

    2014-01-01

    Several attempts have been made to directly date phytoliths, but most 14C results are not consistent with other independent chronologies. Due to the limited dataset, there is not a clear explanation for these discrepancies. Herein, we report the 14C ages of phytolith-occluded carbon (PhytOC) from contemporary rice and millet crops that were combusted at different temperatures to investigate the relationship between the combustion temperature and resulting 14C age. Our results show that the 14C age of PhytOC increases directly with combustion temperature (up to 1100°C) and results in age overestimations of hundreds of years. Considerably older ages are observed at higher temperatures, suggesting that it may be possible to distinguish between two fractions of organic carbon in phytoliths: labile and recalcitrant carbon. These findings challenge the assumption that PhytOC is homogeneous, an assumption made by those who have previously attempted to directly date phytoliths using 14C. PMID:25288281

  4. Abundance of {sup 14}C in biomass fractions of wastes and solid recovered fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Fellner, Johann Rechberger, Helmut

    2009-05-15

    In recent years thermal utilization of mixed wastes and solid recovered fuels has become of increasing importance in European waste management. Since wastes or solid recovered fuels are generally composed of fossil and biogenic materials, only part of the CO{sub 2} emissions is accounted for in greenhouse gas inventories or emission trading schemes. A promising approach for determining this fraction is the so-called radiocarbon method. It is based on different ratios of the carbon isotopes {sup 14}C and {sup 12}C in fossil and biogenic fuels. Fossil fuels have zero radiocarbon, whereas biogenic materials are enriched in {sup 14}C and reflect the {sup 14}CO{sub 2} abundance of the ambient atmosphere. Due to nuclear weapons tests in the past century, the radiocarbon content in the atmosphere has not been constant, which has resulted in a varying {sup 14}C content of biogenic matter, depending on the period of growth. In the present paper {sup 14}C contents of different biogenic waste fractions (e.g., kitchen waste, paper, wood), as well as mixtures of different wastes (household, bulky waste, and commercial waste), and solid recovered fuels are determined. The calculated {sup 14}C content of the materials investigated ranges between 98 and 135 pMC.

  5. Abundance of (14)C in biomass fractions of wastes and solid recovered fuels.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Johann; Rechberger, Helmut

    2009-05-01

    In recent years thermal utilization of mixed wastes and solid recovered fuels has become of increasing importance in European waste management. Since wastes or solid recovered fuels are generally composed of fossil and biogenic materials, only part of the CO(2) emissions is accounted for in greenhouse gas inventories or emission trading schemes. A promising approach for determining this fraction is the so-called radiocarbon method. It is based on different ratios of the carbon isotopes (14)C and (12)C in fossil and biogenic fuels. Fossil fuels have zero radiocarbon, whereas biogenic materials are enriched in (14)C and reflect the (14)CO(2) abundance of the ambient atmosphere. Due to nuclear weapons tests in the past century, the radiocarbon content in the atmosphere has not been constant, which has resulted in a varying (14)C content of biogenic matter, depending on the period of growth. In the present paper (14)C contents of different biogenic waste fractions (e.g., kitchen waste, paper, wood), as well as mixtures of different wastes (household, bulky waste, and commercial waste), and solid recovered fuels are determined. The calculated (14)C content of the materials investigated ranges between 98 and 135pMC. PMID:19157836

  6. Release of aged 14C-atrazine residues from soil facilitated by dry-wet cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonowski, N. D.; Yu, K.; Koeppchen, S.; Burauel, P.

    2012-04-01

    Intermittent dry-wet cycles may have an important effect on soil structure and aged pesticide residues release (1). A laboratory study was conducted to assess the maximum potential of water extractable aged atrazine residues influenced by soil drying and wetting. The used soil was obtained from an outdoor lysimeter (gleyic cambisol; Corg: 1.45%), containing environmentally aged (22 years) 14C-atrazine residues. For the experiment, soil from 0-10 cm depth was used since most residual 14C activity was previously found in this layer (2,3). Triplicate soil samples with a residual water content of approx. 8% were either dried (45° C) prior water addition or directly mixed with distilled water (soil+water: 1+2, w:w). The samples were shaken (150 rmp, 60 min, at 21° C), centrifuged (approx. 2000 g), and the supernatants were filtered. Water-extracted residual 14C activity was detected via liquid scintillation counter. The total water-extracted 14C activity (the amount of residual 14C activity in a sample equals 100%) was significantly higher (p

  7. Bioavailability of the Nano-Unit 14C-Agrochemicals Under Various Water Potential.

    PubMed

    Jung, S C; Kim, H G; Kuk, Y I; Ahn, H G; Senseman, S A; Lee, D J

    2015-08-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the effects of water potential on bioavailability of the nano-unit 14C-cafenstrole, 14C-pretilachlor, 14C-benfuresate, 14C-simetryn and 14C-oxyfluorfen applied with or without dimepiperate or daimuron under various water potential conditions. The highest bioavailable concentration in soil solution (BCSS) was found at 60% soil moisture, while the lowest occurred at 50% soil moisture for soil-applied alone or in combination. All water potential conditions differed significantly from each other with variations in total bioavailable amount in soil solution (TBSS) when either dimepiperate or daimuron were added to the soil, and changes were directly proportional to variations in water potential. Across all treatments, TBSS at 80% soil moisture was three to four times greater than that at 50% soil moisture when applied alone or in combination with dimepiperate or daimuron. Cafenstrole and simetryn had distribution coefficient (Kd) values <64 ml g-1 and a TBSS ranging from 10 to 44 ng g-1 soil, regardless of water potential conditions applied alone or in combination. Pretilachlor and benfuresate had Kd values <15 ml g-1 and a TBSS range of 38 to 255 ng g-1 soil when applied with or without dimepiperate or daimuron. PMID:26369226

  8. Progress report on a novel in situ14C extraction scheme at the University of Cologne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fülöp, R.-H.; Wacker, L.; Dunai, T. J.

    2015-10-01

    We present initial results of in situ14C system blank and calibration sample measurements obtained using the in situ14C extraction scheme developed at the University of Cologne. The 14C extraction scheme specifically exploits the phase transformation of quartz to cristobalite in order to quantitatively extract the carbon as CO2 and follows a scheme that is different to that of existing extraction systems. Features are offline furnace extraction, single pass catalytic oxidation using mixed copper (I,II) oxide as catalyst, the use of UHV-compatible components and of vacuum annealed copper tubing. The design allows a relatively rapid sample throughput - two samples per day as opposed to the current 2 days per sample that can be done on other lines - and can accommodate samples ranging between 0.5 and 4 g of clean quartz. Following extraction and cleaning, the CO2 gas is measured using the gas ion source of the MICADAS AMS facility at ETH Zurich. The extraction system yields low systems blanks (10 +16/-10 × 103 atoms 14C, ±1 σ) and the initial results indicate that further improvements are achievable. Measurements of the CRONUS-A standard sample show a good reproducibility and results are consistent with published values. We also present the first in situ14C results for the CRONUS-R standard material.

  9. In vitro synthesis and purification of UDP-( sup 14 C) galacturonate

    SciTech Connect

    Mitcham, E.J. ); Gross, K.C. ); Wasserman, B.P. )

    1989-04-01

    Pectins comprise a major component of the cell wall and much research has focused on degradation of pectins during ripening and senescence. However, little research has been conducted on pectin synthesis, partly due to a lack of commercial availability of UDP-({sup 14}C)galacturonic acid for use as a substrate in assaying galacturonan synthase. We report on the modification and integration of several procedures to synthesize UDP-({sup 14}C) galacturonic acid from commercially available UDP-({sup 14}C)glucuronic acid. A microsomal pellet containing UDP-D-glucuronate-4-epimerase was extracted from 5-day-old mung bean hypocotyls (Phaseolus aureus) and radish roots (Raphanus sativus L.) by ultracentrifugation at 30,000 rpm for 50 min. The UDP-({sup 14}C)galacturonic acid produced was separated from remaining UDP-({sup 14}C)glucuronic acid and other products by electrophoresis in pyridine:acetate:H{sub 2}O on silica gel. Spots were detected by autoradiography, eluted with 80% ethanol, and purified using anion exchange chromatography.

  10. Intestinal absorption and tissue distribution of ( sup 14 C)pyrroloquinoline quinone in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Smidt, C.R.; Unkefer, C.J.; Houck, D.R.; Rucker, R.B. )

    1991-05-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) functions as a cofactor for prokaryotic oxidoreductases, such as methanol dehydrogenase and membrane-bound glucose dehydrogenase. In animals fed chemically defined diets, PQQ improves reproductive outcome and neonatal growth. Consequently, the present study was undertaken to determine the extent to which PQQ is absorbed by the intestine, its tissue distribution, and route of excretion. About 28 micrograms of PQQ (0.42 microCi/mumol), labeled with {sup 14}C derived from L-tyrosine, was administered orally to Swiss-Webster mice (18-20 g) to estimate absorption. PQQ was readily absorbed (62%, range 19-89%) in the lower intestine, and was excreted by the kidneys (81% of the absorbed dose) within 24 hr. The only tissues that retained significant amounts of ({sup 14}C)PQQ at 24 hr were skin and kidney. For kidney, it was assumed that retention of ({sup 14}C)PQQ represented primarily PQQ destined for excretion. For skin, the concentration of ({sup 14}C)PQQ increased from 0.3% of the absorbed dose at 6 hr to 1.3% at 24 hr. Furthermore, most of the ({sup 14}C)PQQ in blood (greater than 95%) was associated with the blood cell fraction, rather than plasma.

  11. Special Analysis: Revised 14C Disposal Limits for the Saltstone Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2004-03-19

    The Saltstone Special Analysis calculated a limit for 14C based on the atmospheric pathway of 52 pCi/mL using some very conservative assumptions. This was compared to the estimated Low Curie Salt concentration of 0.45 pCi/mL and since the limit was two orders of magnitude greater than the estimated concentration, the decision was made that no further analysis was needed. The 14C concentration in Tank 41 has been found to be much greater than the estimated concentration and to exceed the limit derived in the Special Analysis. A rigorous analysis of the release of 14C via the air pathway that considers the chemical effects of the Saltstone system has shown that the flux of 14C is significantly less than that assumed in the Special Analysis. The net result is an inventory limit for 14C that is significantly higher than that derived in the Special Analysis that will also meet the performance objectives of DOE Order 435.1.

  12. Uptake and metabolism of (14C)-aspartate by developing kernels of maize (Zea mays L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Muhitch, M.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Pulse-chase experiments were performed to determine the metabolic fate of (14C)-aspartate in the pedicel region and subsequent uptake into the endosperm. Kernels were removed from the cob, leaving the pedicel attached but removing glumes, palea, and lemma. The basal tips were incubated in (14C)-aspartate for 0.5 h, followed by a 2 h chase period with unlabeled aspartate. In contrast to a previous study in which 70% of the 14C from aspartate was recovered in the organic acid fraction (Lyznik, et al., Phytochemistry 24: 425, 1985), only 20 to 25% of the radioactivity found in the 2 h chase period. While a small amount of the 14C transiently appeared in alanine at the beginning of the chase period, the most heavily labeled non-fed amino acid was glutamine, which accounted for 21% of the radioactivity within the pedicel amino acid fraction by 0.5 h into the chase period. There was no evidence for asparagine synthesis within the pedicel region of the kernel. 14C recovered from the endosperm in the form of amino acids were aspartate (60%), glutamine (20%), glutamate (15%), and alanine (5%). These results suggest that some of the maternally supplied amino acids undergo metabolic conversion to other amino acids before being taken up by the endosperm.

  13. Probing plasmonic breathing modes optically

    SciTech Connect

    Krug, Markus K. Reisecker, Michael; Hohenau, Andreas; Ditlbacher, Harald; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich; Krenn, Joachim R.

    2014-10-27

    The confinement of surface plasmon modes in flat nanoparticles gives rise to plasmonic breathing modes. With a vanishing net dipole moment, breathing modes do not radiate, i.e., they are optically dark. Having thus escaped optical detection, breathing modes were only recently revealed in silver nanodisks with electron energy loss spectroscopy in an electron microscope. We show that for disk diameters >200 nm, retardation induced by oblique optical illumination relaxes the optically dark character. This makes breathing modes and thus the full plasmonic mode spectrum accessible to optical spectroscopy. The experimental spectroscopy data are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations.

  14. Clinical utility of breath ammonia for evaluation of ammonia physiology in healthy and cirrhotic adults

    PubMed Central

    Spacek, Lisa A; Mudalel, Matthew; Tittel, Frank; Risby, Terence H; Solga, Steven F

    2016-01-01

    Blood ammonia is routinely used in clinical settings to assess systemic ammonia in hepatic encephalopathy and urea cycle disorders. Despite its drawbacks, blood measurement is often used as a comparator in breath studies because it is a standard clinical test. We sought to evaluate sources of measurement error and potential clinical utility of breath ammonia compared to blood ammonia. We measured breath ammonia in real time by quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectrometry and blood ammonia in 10 healthy and 10 cirrhotic participants. Each participant contributed 5 breath samples and blood for ammonia measurement within 1 h. We calculated the coefficient of variation (CV) for 5 breath ammonia values, reported medians of healthy and cirrhotic participants, and used scatterplots to display breath and blood ammonia. For healthy participants, mean age was 22 years (±4), 70% were men, and body mass index (BMI) was 27 (±5). For cirrhotic participants, mean age was 61 years (±8), 60% were men, and BMI was 31 (±7). Median blood ammonia for healthy participants was within normal range, 10 μmol L−1 (interquartile range (IQR), 3–18) versus 46 μmol L−1 (IQR, 23–66) for cirrhotic participants. Median breath ammonia was 379 pmol mL−1 CO2 (IQR, 265–765) for healthy versus 350 pmol mL−1 CO2 (IQR, 180–1013) for cirrhotic participants. CV was 17 ± 6%. There remains an important unmet need in the evaluation of systemic ammonia, and breath measurement continues to demonstrate promise to fulfill this need. Given the many differences between breath and blood ammonia measurement, we examined biological explanations for our findings in healthy and cirrhotic participants. We conclude that based upon these preliminary data breath may offer clinically important information this is not provided by blood ammonia. PMID:26658550

  15. 21 CFR 184.1923 - Urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Urea. 184.1923 Section 184.1923 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1923 Urea. (a) Urea (CO(NH2)2, CAS Reg. No. 57-13-6) is the diamide...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1923 - Urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Urea. 184.1923 Section 184.1923 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1923 Urea. (a) Urea (CO(NH2)2, CAS Reg. No. 57-13-6) is the diamide...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1923 - Urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Urea. 184.1923 Section 184.1923 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1923 Urea. (a) Urea (CO(NH2)2, CAS Reg. No. 57-13-6) is the diamide...

  18. 14C Activity and Global Carbon Cycle Changes over the Past 50,000 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughen, K.; Lehman, S.; Southon, J.; Overpeck, J.; Marchal, O.; Herring, C.; Turnbull, J.

    2004-01-01

    A series of 14C measurements in Ocean Drilling Program cores from the tropical Cariaco Basin, which have been correlated to the annual-layer counted chronology for the Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2 (GISP2) ice core, provides a high-resolution calibration of the radiocarbon time scale back to 50,000 years before the present. Independent radiometric dating of events correlated to GISP2 suggests that the calibration is accurate. Reconstructed 14C activities varied substantially during the last glacial period, including sharp peaks synchronous with the Laschamp and Mono Lake geomagnetic field intensity minimal and cosmogenic nuclide peaks in ice cores and marine sediments. Simulations with a geochemical box model suggest that much of the variability can be explained by geomagnetically modulated changes in 14C production rate together with plausible changes in deep-ocean ventilation and the global carbon cycle during glaciation.

  19. Comparison of Varve and 14C Chronologies from Steel Lake, Minnesota, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, J; Brown, T A; Hu, F S

    2004-12-29

    Annually laminated sediments (varves) offer an effective means of acquiring high-quality paleoenvironmental records. However, the strength of a varve chronology can be compromised by a number of factors, such as missing varves, ambiguous laminations, and human counting error. We assess the quality of a varve chronology for the last three millennia from Steel Lake, Minnesota, through comparisons with nine AMS {sup 14}C dates on terrestrial plant macrofossils from the same core. These comparisons revealed an overall 8.4% discrepancy, primarily because of missing/uncountable varves within two stratigraphic intervals characterized by low carbonate concentrations and obscure laminations. Application of appropriate correction factors to these two intervals results in excellent agreement between the varve and {sup 14}C chronologies. These results, together with other varve studies, demonstrate that an independent age-determination method, such as {sup 14}C dating, is usually necessary to verify, and potentially correct, varve chronologies.

  20. Uptake and transfer of14C-simetryne through the laboratory freshwater food chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ying; Lay, J. P.; Zhang, Yongyuan

    1989-03-01

    This paper deals with the bioconcentration of14C-simetryne from water by aquatic test organisms: green algae— Monoraphidium minutum, rotifers— Brachionus rubens, daphnids— Daphnia magna, and fish— Brachydanio rerio. The chemical was bioconcentrated rapidly in all test species during the first 48 hours of experiment. The BCF values (bioconcentration factor) from all uptake studies show that simetryne has higher accumulation in algae than in rotifers, daphnids and zebra fish. The logarithm of the n-octanol/water partition coefficient of simetryne measured as 2.06±0.05 was correlated with the BCFs in the organisms as based on the lipid contents. 14C-simetryne uptake via the food-chain amounted to only 22% to 42% of the bioconcentration from water. Clearance of14C-derived residues from fish was rapid with a half-life of 2.1 days.

  1. Mobility Studies of (14)C-Chlorpyrifos in Malaysian Oil Palm Soils.

    PubMed

    Halimah, Muhamad; Ismail, B Sahid; Nashriyah, Mat; Maznah, Zainol

    2016-01-01

    The mobility of (14)C-chlorpyrifos using soil TLC was investigated in this study. It was found that chlorpyrifos was not mobile in clay, clay loam and peat soil. The mobility of (14)C-chlorpyrifos and non-labelled chlorpyrifos was also tested with silica gel TLC using three types of developing solvent hexane (100%), hexane:ethyl acetate (95:5, v/v); and hexane:ethyl acetate (98:2, v/v). The study showed that both the (14)C-labelled and non-labelled chlorpyrifos have the same Retardation Factor (Rf) for different developing solvent systems. From the soil column study on mobility of chlorpyrifos, it was observed that no chlorpyrifos residue was found below 5 cm depth in three types of soil at simulation rainfall of 20, 50 and 100 mm. Therefore, the soil column and TLC studies have shown similar findings in the mobility of chlorpyrifos. PMID:26546229

  2. Distribution of 14C-TNT and derivatives in different biochemical compartments of Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Sens, C; Scheidemann, P; Klunk, A; Werner, D

    1998-01-01

    (14)C-TNT was used to quantify the uptake rate and metabolic turnover of TNT in Phaseolus vulgaris. Seventeen plants were analysed by a special cell fractionation method with polar and nonpolar solvents and enzymes. We obtained three cytoplasmic fractions and five cell wall derived fractions. The recovery rate was 72% as measured by liquid scintillation counting. (14)C partitioned almost in equal amounts with approximately 50% in the cytoplasm and in the cell wall. The majority of the TNT-metabolites are present in the cytoplasm as was shown by GC/ECD and thin layer chromatography. The(14)C in the cell wall is bound probably resulting in long-term immobilisation of these metabolites. We conclude that plants may also be a model for nitroaromatic turnover and immobilisation in soil components. PMID:19002633

  3. A climatic record from 14C-dated wood fragments from southwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Epstein, S.; Xu, X.; Carrara, P.

    1999-01-01

    Deuterium concentrations in trees are related to the climatic temperature at which the trees grew. Deuterium analyses were made on all available (39) 14C-dated (all 14C dates cited are uncorrected) wood fragments collected from Lake Emma sediments. The 14C dates range from 9600 to 5400 'B.P.'. Tree line was above Lake Emma at 9600 'B.P.', was at Lake Emma at about 5000 'B.P.', and is 80 m below Lake Emma at the present time. The isotopic records at the various intervals of time coincide very well with this history. The range of ??D values is maximum at 9600 'B.P.' and is minimum at about 5400 'B.P.'. These data allow us to estimate the temperature range for the area between tree line and Lake Emma between these times. These results confirm previously observed cooling trends from several sources in the Western Hemisphere.

  4. {sup 14}C depth profiles in Apollo 15 and 17 cores and lunar rock 68815

    SciTech Connect

    Jull, A.J.T.; Cloudt, S.; Donahue, D.J.; Sisterson, J.M.; Reedy, R.C.; Masarik, J.

    1998-09-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was used to measure the activity vs. depth profiles of {sup 14}C produced by both solar cosmic rays (SCR) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in Apollo 15 lunar cores 15001-6 and 15008, Apollo 17 core 76001, and lunar rock 68815. Calculated GCR production rates are in good agreement with {sup 14}C measurements at depths below {approximately}10 cm. Carbon-14 produced by solar protons was observed in the top few cm of the Apollo 15 cores and lunar rock 68815, with near-surface values as high as 66 dpm/kg in 68815. Only low levels of SCR-produced {sup 14}C were observed in the Apollo 17 core 76001. New cross sections for production of {sup 14}C by proton spallation on O, Si, Al, Mg, Fe, and Ni were measured using AMS. These cross sections are essential for the analysis of the measured {sup 14}C depth profiles. The best fit to the activity-depth profiles for solar-proton-produced {sup 14}C measured in the tops of both the Apollo 15 cores and 68815 was obtained for an exponential rigidity spectral shape R{sub 0} of 110--115 MV and a 4 {pi} flux (J{sub 10}, Ep > 10 MeV) of 103--108 protons/cm{sup 2}/s. These values of R{sub 0} are higher, indicating a harder rigidity, and the solar-proton fluxes are higher than those determined from {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, and {sup 53}Mn measurements.

  5. An analytical method for 14C in environmental water based on a wet-oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Jun; Guo, Gui-Yin; Wu, Lian-Sheng; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Chao-Feng; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Qin, Hong-Juan; Shang-Guan, Zhi-Hong

    2015-04-01

    An analytical method for (14)C in environmental water based on a wet-oxidation process was developed. The method can be used to determine the activity concentrations of organic and inorganic (14)C in environmental water, or total (14)C, including in drinking water, surface water, rainwater and seawater. The wet-oxidation of the organic component allows the conversion of organic carbon to an inorganic form, and the extraction of the inorganic (14)C can be achieved by acidification and nitrogen purging. Environmental water with a volume of 20 L can be used for the wet-oxidation and extraction, and a detection limit of about 0.02 Bq/g(C) can be achieved for water with carbon content above 15 mg(C)/L, obviously lower than the natural level of (14)C in the environment. The collected carbon is sufficient for measurement with a low level liquid scintillation counter (LSC) for typical samples. Extraction or recovery experiments for inorganic carbon and organic carbon from typical materials, including analytical reagents of organic benzoquinone, sucrose, glutamic acid, nicotinic acid, humic acid, ethane diol, et cetera., were conducted with excellent results based on measurement on a total organic carbon analyzer and LSC. The recovery rate for inorganic carbon ranged tween 98.7%-99.0% with a mean of 98.9(± 0.1)%, for organic carbon recovery ranged between 93.8% and 100.0% with a mean of 97.1(± 2.6)%. Verification and an uncertainty budget of the method are also presented for a representative environmental water. The method is appropriate for (14)C analysis in environmental water, and can be applied also to the analysis of liquid effluent from nuclear facilities. PMID:25590997

  6. Effect of foliar treatments on distribution of /sup 14/C-glyphosate in Convolvulus arvensis L

    SciTech Connect

    Lauridson, T.C.

    1986-01-01

    Field bindweed is a perennial weed which produces shoots from buds on its roots. Herbicides, such as glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) used for control of field bindweed usually do not kill all shoot buds on the roots, thus field bindweed often reinfests areas within 3 to 6 weeks of treatment. This dissertation deals with the development of a technique to change glyphosate distribution in field bindweed roots and could result in less shoot regrowth after glyphosate application. In field studies eight plant growth regulators were applied in September, 3 days before 2.24 kg/ha of 2.4-D((2,4-dichlorophenoxy) acetic acid) or 1.68 kg/ha of glyphosate. Eight months later, regrowth of shoots was least where glyphosate was applied at 0.028 kg/ha as a pretreatment, followed by a standard rate of 1.68 kg/ha. In subsequent greenhouse studies, typical patterns of shoot growth and /sup 14/C-glyphosate distribution in isolated root sections taken from 15-week-old intact plants were determined. In subsequent growth chamber studies, plants were decapitated to observe the effect of shoot apical dominance on /sup 14/C-glyphosate translocation. After /sup 14/C-glyphosate was applied, intact plants had about twice as much /sup 14/C in distal root sections as in proximal or middle root sections. Decapitated plants had more /sup 14/C in proximal and middle root sections than in distal sections, and about twice as much /sup 14/C was translocated to roots of decapitated plants than intact plants. Eight concentrations of 2,4,-D or glyphosate from 1 to 5000 ppm were applied in logarithmic series to 6-week old plants.

  7. A numerical approach to 14C wiggle-match dating of organic deposits: best fits and confidence intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaauw, Maarten; Heuvelink, Gerard B. M.; Mauquoy, Dmitri; van der Plicht, Johannes; van Geel, Bas

    2003-06-01

    14C wiggle-match dating (WMD) of peat deposits uses the non-linear relationship between 14C age and calendar age to match the shape of a sequence of closely spaced peat 14C dates with the 14C calibration curve. A numerical approach to WMD enables the quantitative assessment of various possible wiggle-match solutions and of calendar year confidence intervals for sequences of 14C dates. We assess the assumptions, advantages, and limitations of the method. Several case-studies show that WMD results in more precise chronologies than when individual 14C dates are calibrated. WMD is most successful during periods with major excursions in the 14C calibration curve (e.g., in one case WMD could narrow down confidence intervals from 230 to 36 yr).

  8. Variations of 14C around AD 775 and AD 1795 - due to solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhäuser, R.; Neuhäuser, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The motivation for our study is the disputed cause for the strong variation of 14C around AD 775. Our method is to compare the 14C variation around AD 775 with other periods of strong variability. Our results are: (a) We see three periods, where 14C varied over 200 yr in a special way showing a certain pattern of strong secular variation: after a Grand Minimum with strongly increasing 14C, there is a series of strong short-term drop(s), rise(s), and again drop(s) within 60 yr, ending up to 200 yr after the start of the Grand Minimum. These three periods include the strong rises around BC 671, AD 775, and AD 1795. (b) We show with several solar activity proxies (radioisotopes, sunspots, and aurorae) for the AD 770s and 1790s that such intense rapid 14C increases can be explained by strong rapid decreases in solar activity and, hence, wind, so that the decrease in solar modulation potential leads to an increase in radioisotope production. (c) The strong rises around AD 775 and 1795 are due to three effects, (i) very strong activity in the previous cycles (i.e. very low 14C level), (ii) the declining phase of a very strong Schwabe cycle, and (iii) a phase of very weak activity after the strong 14C rise - very short and/or weak cycle(s) like the suddenly starting Dalton minimum. (d) Furthermore, we can show that the strong change at AD 1795 happened after a pair of two packages of four Schwabe cycles with certain hemispheric leadership (each package consists of two Gnevyshev-Ohl pairs, respectively two Hale-Babcock pairs). We show with several additional arguments that the rise around AD 775 was not that special. We conclude that such large, short-term rises in 14C (around BC 671, AD 775, and 1795) do not need to be explained by highly unlikely solar super-flares nor other rare events, but by extra-solar cosmic rays modulated due to solar activity variations.

  9. Modelling of dead carbon fraction in speleothems: a step towards reliable speleothem 14C-chronologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechleitner, Franziska A.; Jamieson, Robert A.; McIntyre, Cameron; Baldini, Lisa M.; Baldini, James U. L.; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2015-04-01

    Over the past two decades, speleothems have become one of the most versatile and promising archives for the study of past continental climate. Very precise absolute dating is often possible using the U-Th method, resulting in paleoclimate records of exceptional resolution and accuracy. However, not all speleothems are amenable to this dating method for a variety of reasons (e.g. low U concentrations, high detrital Th etc). This has lead researchers to exclude many otherwise suitable speleothems and cave sites from further investigation. 14C-dating of speleothems has so far not been applicable, due to the 'dead carbon' problem. As drip water percolates through the karst, dissolving CaCO3, a variable amount of 14C-dead carbon is added to the solution. This results in a temporally variable and site-specific reservoir effect, ultimately undermining the development of speleothem 14C -chronologies. However, a number of recent studies have shown a clear link between karst hydrology and associated proxies (e.g., Mg/Ca and δ13C) and this 'dead carbon fraction' (DCF). We take advantage of this relationship to model DCF and its changes using Mg/Ca, δ13C and 14C data from published speleothem records. Using one record for calibration purposes, we build a transfer function for the DCF in relation to δ13C and Mg/Ca, which we then apply to other 14C records. Initial model results are promising; we are able to reconstruct general long-term average DCF within uncertainties of the calculated DCF from the U-Th chronology. Large shifts in DCF related to hydrology are also often detected. In a second step, we apply the model to a speleothem from southern Poland, which so far could not be dated, due to very low U-concentrations. To construct a 14C chronology, the stalagmite was sampled at 5 mm intervals. CaCO3 powders were graphitized and measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (MICADAS) at ETH Zurich. Additional high-resolution (0.1 mm/sample) 14C measurements were performed on

  10. In situ 14C depth profile of subsurface vein quartz samples from Macraes Flat New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. J.; Lal, D.; Englert, P. A. J.; Southon, J.

    2007-06-01

    We present results of measurements of cosmogenic in situ 14C produced in a quartz vein from Macraes Flat, East Otago, New Zealand, where concentrations of in situ produced 10Be and 26Al were previously studied by Kim and Englert [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 223 (2004) 113]. 14C was extracted from the quartz samples up to depths of 400 g cm-2 using a low temperature wet extraction method [D. Lal, A.J.T. Jull, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 92 (1994) 291]. Based on the results for 10Be and 26Al, we expected that the 14C activity in the samples would be at saturation levels, in equilibrium with erosion. The surface exposure age of this site was found to be about 25 000 years using 10Be and 26Al at the surface, with a surface erosion rate of at least 10-3 cm/y [K.J. Kim, P.A.J. Englert, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 223 (2004) 113]. The measured 14C activities were compared with those expected from spallation of Si and O in quartz by energetic neutrons and fast muons, and from capture of negative muons in O in quartz [B. Heisinger, A.J.T. Jull, D. Lal, P. Kubik, S. Ivy-Ochs, K. Knie, E. Nolte, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 200 (2002) 357; B. Heisinger, D. Lal, A.J.T. Jull, P. Kubik, S. Ivy-Ochs, S. Neumaier, K. Knie, V. Lazarev, E. Nolte, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 200 (2002) 345]. Surprisingly, we found that the 14C activities were significantly greater than those expected, by factors of 2 3, especially in samples of depths <200 g cm-2. We suspect that the excess 14C probably resulted from capture of thermal neutrons in nitrogen present in the fluid inclusions in quartz. This study shows that great care has to be taken in measurements of in situ 14C in quartz, especially in samples exposed near sea level and greater depths, where rates of spallation produced 14C are low.

  11. In vivo survival of (14C)sucrose-loaded porcine carrier erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    DeLoach, J.R.

    1983-06-01

    Porcine carrier erythrocyte survival was measured in adult pigs. (14C)Sucrose-loaded erythrocytes had a biphasic survival curve, with as much as 50% of the cells removed from circulation in the first 24 hours. The remaining cells had a 35-day half-life. Encapsulation values were measured for porcine erythrocytes and entrapment of (14C)sucrose was greater than 45%. Addition of inosine and glucose to the dialyzed cells and to the final wash buffer before reinjection of autologous cells did not improve their survival.

  12. A study of placental transfer mechanisms in nonhuman primates using (/sup 14/C)phenylalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Pueschel, S.M.; Boylan, J.M.; Jackson, B.T.; Piasecki, G.J.

    1982-02-01

    Placental transfer mechanisms were investigated in pregnant Macaca Fascicularis and Macaca mulatta during the gestational age of 120 to 130 days. These primates underwent an operative procedure that allowed continuous fetal blood sampling. The administration of (/sup 14/C)phenylalanine into the maternal circulation revealed a significant increase of radioactive material in the fetal circulation, indicating an active placental transport mechanism unidirectional to the fetus. When (/sup 14/C)phenylalanine was injected into the fetus, radioactive aromatic amino acids in the maternal circulation increased only slightly over time, resembling a simple diffusion process.

  13. Carbon and 14C distribution in tropical and subtropical agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prastowo, Erwin; Grootes, Pieter; Nadeau, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Paddy soil management affects, through the alternating anoxic and oxic conditions it creates, the transport and stabilisation of soil organic matter (SOM). Irrigation water may percolate more organic materials - dissolved (DOM) and colloidal - into the subsoil during anoxic conditions. Yet a developed ploughpan tends to prevent C from going deeper in the subsoil and partly decouple C distribution in top and sub soil. We investigate the influence of different soil type and environment. We observed the C and 14C distribution in paddy and non-paddy soil profiles in three different soil types from four different climatic regions of tropical Indonesia, and subtropical China. Locations were Sukabumi (Andosol, ca. 850 m a.s.l), Bogor (clayey Alisol, ca. 240 m a.s.l), and Ngawi (Vertisol, ca. 70 m a.s.l) in Jawa, Indonesia, and Cixi (Alisol(sandy), ca. 4 - 6 m a.s.l) in Zhejiang Province, China. We compared rice paddies with selected neighbouring non-paddy fields and employed AMS 14C as a tool to study C dynamics from bulk, alkali soluble-humic, and insoluble humin samples, and macrofossils (plant remains, charcoal). Our data suggest that vegetation type determines the quantity and quality of biomass introduced as litter and root material in top and subsoil, and thus contributes to the soil C content and profile, which fits the 14C signal distribution, as well as 13C in Ngawi with C4 sugar cane as upland crop. 14C concentrations for the mobile humic acid fraction were generally higher than for bulk samples from the same depth, except when recent plant and root debris led to high 14C levels in near-surface samples. The difference in sampling, - averaged layer for bulk sample and 1-cm layer thickness for point sample - shows gradients in C and 14C across the layers, which could be a reason for discrepancies between the two. High 14C concentrations - in Andosol Sukabumi up to 111 pMC - exceed the atmospheric 14CO2concentration in the sampling year in 2012 (˜ 103 pMC) and

  14. Synthesis of 14C-labeled perfluorooctanoic and perfluorodecanoic acids; Purification of perfluorodecanoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, I.L.; Reich, H.J.; Menahan, L.A.; Peterson, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic and -decanoic acids are representative of a series of perfluorinated acids that have been used for a variety of industrial purposes primarily due to their surfactant properties. The toxicity of these compounds is being investigated in a number of laboratories. 14C-labeled materials would be useful in these studies but are not commercially available. Johncock prepared unlabeled PFOA in low yield by carbonation of the unstable perfluoroheptyllithium at -90 degrees Centigrade. We anticipated several problems in applying this procedure to the synthesis of the 14C-labeled material. Johncock's procedure was run on a fairly large scale (10 mmol) with excess CO2.

  15. Clinical applications of breath testing

    PubMed Central

    Paschke, Kelly M; Mashir, Alquam

    2010-01-01

    Breath testing has the potential to benefit the medical field as a cost-effective, non-invasive diagnostic tool for diseases of the lung and beyond. With growing evidence of clinical worth, standardization of methods, and new sensor and detection technologies the stage is set for breath testing to gain considerable attention and wider application in upcoming years. PMID:21173863

  16. BREATHE to Understand©

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swisa, Maxine

    2015-01-01

    BREATHE is an acronym for Breathe, Reflect, Empathize, Accept, Thank, Hearten, Engage. The addition of Understand allows for a holistic approach to living a healthy and balanced life both inside and outside the classroom. This paper took form as a result of my personal, spiritual journey, as well as my teaching practice. I noticed that the…

  17. Patient's breath controls comfort devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, M.; Carpenter, B.; Nichols, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Patient assist system for totally disabled persons was developed which permits a person, so paralyzed as to be unable to move, to activate by breathing, a call system to summon assistance, turn the page of a book, ajust his bed, or do any one of a number of other things. System consists of patient assist control and breath actuated switch.

  18. Percutaneous absorption of (7. 10-/sup 14/C)benzo(a)pyrene and (7,12-/sup 14/C)dimethylbenz(a)anthracene in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C.L.; Skinner, C.; Gelman, R.A.

    1984-04-01

    The percutaneous penetration, tissue distribution, and excretion of /sup 14/C-labeled benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) were studied in mice. Both BaP and DMBA rapidly penetrated the skin and were excreted more in the feces than in the urine. The proportion of BaP or DMBA absorbed was less with increasing applied dose due to apparent saturation of the uptake process. Uptake from the dorsal skin of the nose was similar to uptake from the dorsal nuchal skin. 24 references.

  19. Distribution of root exudates and mucilage in the rhizosphere: combining 14C imaging with neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, Maire; Carminati, Andrea; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Water and nutrients will be the major factors limiting food production in future. Plant roots employ various mechanisms to increase the access to limited soil resources. Low molecular weight organic substances released by roots into the rhizosphere increase nutrient availability by interactions with microorganisms, while mucilage improves water availability under low moisture conditions. Though composition and quality of these substances have intensively been investigated, studies on the spatial distribution and quantification of exudates in soil are scarce. Our aim was to quantify and visualize root exudates and mucilage distribution around growing roots using neutron radiography and 14C imaging depending on drought stress. Plants were grown in rhizotrons well suited for neutron radiography and 14C imaging. Plants were exposed to various soil water contents experiencing different levels of drought stress. The water content in the rhizosphere was imaged during several drying/wetting cycles by neutron radiography. The radiographs taken a few hours after irrigation showed a wet region around the root tips showing the allocation and distribution of mucilage. The increased water content in the rhizosphere of the young root segments was related to mucilage concentrations by parameterization described in Kroener et al. (2014). In parallel 14C imaging of root after 14CO2 labeling of shoots (Pausch and Kuzyakov 2011) showed distribution of rhizodeposits including mucilage. Three days after setting the water content, plants were labeled in 14CO2 atmosphere. Two days later 14C distribution in soil was imaged by placing a phosphor-imaging plate on the rhizobox. To quantify rhizodeposition, 14C activity on the image was related to the absolute 14C activity in the soil and root after destructive sampling. By comparing the amounts of mucilage (neutron radiography) with the amount of total root derived C (14C imaging), we were able to differentiate between mucilage and root

  20. Kinetic study of benzyl [1-14C]acetate as a potential probe for astrocytic energy metabolism in the rat brain: Comparison with benzyl [2-14C]acetate.

    PubMed

    Okada, Maki; Yanamoto, Kazuhiko; Kagawa, Tomohiko; Yoshino, Keiko; Hosoi, Rie; Abe, Kohji; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Inoue, Osamu

    2016-02-01

    Brain uptake of [(14)C]acetate has been reported to be a useful marker of astrocytic energy metabolism. In addition to uptake values, the rate of radiolabeled acetate washout from the brain appears to reflect CO2 exhaustion and oxygen consumption in astrocytes. We measured the time-radioactivity curves of benzyl [1-(14)C]acetate ([1-(14)C]BA), a lipophilic probe of [1-(14)C]acetate, and compared it with that of benzyl [2-(14)C]acetate ([2-(14)C]BA) in rat brains. The highest brain uptake was observed immediately after injecting either [1-(14)C]BA or [2-(14)C]BA, and both subsequently disappeared from the brain in a single-exponential manner. Estimated [1-(14)C]BA washout rates in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum were higher than those of [2-(14)C]BA. These results suggested that [1-(14)C]BA could be a useful probe for estimating the astrocytic oxidative metabolism. The [1-(14)C]BA washout rate in the cerebral cortex of immature rats was lower than that of mature rats. An autoradiographic study showed that the washout rates of [1-(14)C]BA from the rat brains of a lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus model were not significantly different from the values in control rat brains except for the medial septal nucleus. These results implied that the enhancement of amino acid turnover rate rather than astrocytic oxidative metabolism was increased in status epilepticus. PMID:26661153

  1. Rapid shallow breathing index.

    PubMed

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A; Pillai, Lalitha V; Arabi, Yaseen M

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  2. Breathing zone air sampler

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, John

    1989-01-01

    A sampling apparatus is provided which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

  3. Breathing rhythms and emotions.

    PubMed

    Homma, Ikuo; Masaoka, Yuri

    2008-09-01

    Respiration is primarily regulated for metabolic and homeostatic purposes in the brainstem. However, breathing can also change in response to changes in emotions, such as sadness, happiness, anxiety or fear. Final respiratory output is influenced by a complex interaction between the brainstem and higher centres, including the limbic system and cortical structures. Respiration is important in maintaining physiological homeostasis and co-exists with emotions. In this review, we focus on the relationship between respiration and emotions by discussing previous animal and human studies, including studies of olfactory function in relation to respiration and the piriform-amygdala in relation to respiration. In particular, we discuss oscillations of piriform-amygdala complex activity and respiratory rhythm. PMID:18487316

  4. Rapid shallow breathing index

    PubMed Central

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A.; Pillai, Lalitha V.; Arabi, Yaseen M.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  5. Stepped-combustion 14C dating of bomb carbon in lake sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGeehin, J.; Burr, G.S.; Hodgins, G.; Bennett, S.J.; Robbins, J.A.; Morehead, N.; Markewich, H.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we applied a stepped-combustion approach to dating post-bomb lake sediment from north-central Mississippi. Samples were combusted at a low temperature (400 ??C) and then at 900 ??C. The CO2 was collected separately for both combustions and analyzed. The goal of this work was to develop a methodology to improve the accuracy of 14C dating of sediment by combusting at a lower temperature and reducing the amount of reworked carbon bound to clay minerals in the sample material. The 14C fraction modern results for the low and high temperature fractions of these sediments were compared with well-defined 137Cs determinations made on sediment taken from the same cores. Comparison of "bomb curves" for 14C and 137Cs indicate that low temperature combustion of sediment improved the accuracy of 14C dating of the sediment. However, fraction modern results for the low temperature fractions were depressed compared to atmospheric values for the same time frame, possibly the result of carbon mixing and the low sedimentation rate in the lake system.

  6. Kinetic Distribution of 14C-Metsulfuron-methyl Residues in Paddy Soils under Different Moisture Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice paddy soils undergo several cycles of drying and wetting during a growing season. A laboratory study was conducted to determine the effect of soil moisture conditions on the distribution and kinetics of extractable and bound residues of 14C-metsulfuron-methyl in six Chinese paddy soils during 8...

  7. Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-14C]dichloroethene under Mn(IV)-reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Landmeyer, J.E.; Dinicola, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-14C]dichloroethene to14CO2 under Mn(IV)-reducing conditions was demonstrated. The results indicate that oxidative degradation of partially chlorinated solvents like dichloroethene can be significant even under anoxic conditions and demonstrate the potential importance of Mn(IV) reduction for remediation of chlorinated groundwater contaminants.

  8. Accurate lacustrine and wetland sediment accumulation rates determined from 14c activity of bulk sediment fractions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the absence of identifiable macrofossils in lacustrine sediments, 14C dating must rely on pollen or bulk sediment fractions. Bulk sediment fractions are not generally preferred because they contain an unknown mixture of organic material of variable age, they may contain dead carbon such as ligni...

  9. Pharmacodynamic behavior of (/sup 14/C)acridine in the cricket Acheta domesticus (L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, B.T.; Maggart, E.F. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    Cuticular and gastrointestinal penetration, in vivo metabolism, and excretion of (/sup 14/C)acridine were investigated in the nymphal cricket Acheta domesticus (L.) to find a pharmacodynamic basis for this insect's differential susceptibility to acridine at different life stages. Topically applied (/sup 14/C)acridine readily penetrated the cuticular exoskeleton of nymphs (half-time of penetration, 48 min). Radiolabeled compounds appeared in the hemolymph within 0.5 h after ingestion of (/sup 14/C)acridine and continued to move across the gut wall for 7.5 h. The biological half-time was 18 h and the rate constant for elimination was 0.039 h/sup -1/ after ingestion. Within 5 d after dosing, 97% of the dose was excreted. Several metabolites were present in the feces of nymphs fed (/sup 14/C)acridine, and less than 13% of the extractable radioactivity was parent compound. The cuticule and the gastrointestinal tract proved to be ineffective barriers to acridine entry in A. domesticus. However, the ability to readily metabolize and excrete acridine probably contributes to the higher acridine tolerance observed in the nymphs and adults than in the eggs, which are susceptible to toxic effects. Acridine is found in many coal and synthetic fuel by-products.

  10. Fate of organochlorine 14C-dicofol in a lab-scale wastewater treatment

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Jaime L. M.; Langenbach, Tomaz; Dezotti, Márcia

    2008-01-01

    The fate of organochlorine 14C-dicofol in activated sludge process was investigated. Results showed that the major part of radioactivity remained adsorbed on biological sludge. Consequently, its final disposal deserves special attention. The small amounts of dicofol, biotransformed or not, which remained in the treated effluent could contaminate receiving bodies. PMID:24031222

  11. Astrophysical S-Factor of Radiative T 14C Capture at Low Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.; Burtebaev, N.; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, A. V.; Alimov, D. K.

    2016-04-01

    The possibility of describing the available experimental data on the astrophysical S-factor for the reaction of p14C capture to the ground state of 15N at astrophysical energies within the framework of the modified potential cluster model is considered.

  12. 14C dating of bone using (gamma) Carboxyglutamic Acid and Carboxyglycine (Aminomalonate)

    SciTech Connect

    Southon, J R; Burky, R T; Kirner, D L; Taylor, R E; Hare, P E

    1999-04-27

    Radiocarbon determinations have been obtained on {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid [Gla] and {alpha}-carboxyglycine (aminomalonate) [Am] as well as acid- and base-hydrolyzed total amino acids isolated from a series of fossil bones. As far as they are aware, Am has not been reported previously in fossil bone and neither Gla nor Am {sup 14}C values have been measured previously. Interest in Gla, an amino acid found in the non-collagen proteins osteocalcin and matrix Gla-protein (MGP), proceeds from the suggestion that it may be preferentially retained and more resistant to diagenetic contamination affecting {sup 14}C values in bones exhibiting low and trace amounts of collagen. The data do not support these suggestions. The suite of bones examined showed a general tendency for total amino acid and Gla concentrations to decrease in concert. Even for bones retaining significant amounts of collagen, Gla (and Am extracts) can yield {sup 14}C values discordant with their expected age and with {sup 14}C values obtained on total amino-acid fractions isolated from the same bone sample.

  13. Quantitative Identification of Biogenic Nonextractable Pesticide Residues in Soil by (14)C-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Poßberg, Claudia; Schmidt, Burkhard; Nowak, Karolina; Telscher, Markus; Lagojda, Andreas; Schaeffer, Andreas

    2016-06-21

    Quantification of nonextractable residues (NER) of pesticides in soil is feasible by use of radioactively labeled compounds, but structural information on these long-term stabilized residues is usually lacking. Microorganisms incorporate parts of the radiolabeled ((14)C-) carbon from contaminants into microbial biomass, which after cell death enters soil organic matter, thus forming biogenic nonextractable residues (bioNER). The formation of bioNER is not yet determinable in environmental fate studies due to a lack of methodology. This paper focuses on the development of a feasible analytical method to quantify proteinaceous carbon, since proteins make up the largest mass portion of bacterial cells. The test substance (14)C-bromoxynil after 56 days forms more than 70% of NER in soil. For further characterization of NER the amino acids were extracted, purified, and separated by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Visualization of the (14)C-amino acids was performed by bioimaging, unambiguous identification by GC-MS and LC-MS/MS. Our analysis revealed that after 56 days of incubation about 14.5% of the (14)C-label of bromoxynil was incorporated in amino acids. Extrapolating this content based on the amount of proteins in the biomass (55%), in total about 26% of the NER is accounted for by bioNER and thus is not environmentally relevant. PMID:27192605

  14. Astrophysical S-Factor of Radiative p 14C Capture at Low Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.; Burtebaev, N.; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, A. V.; Alimov, D. K.

    2016-04-01

    The possibility of describing the available experimental data on the astrophysical S-factor for the reaction of p14C capture to the ground state of 15N at astrophysical energies within the framework of the modified potential cluster model is considered.

  15. Dating ivory by determination of 14C, 90Sr and 228/232Th.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Stefanie A K; Brunnermeier, Matthias J; Schupfner, Robert; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2012-09-10

    A method is described to determine the time of death of elephants. This is accomplished by analysis of the radionuclides 14C, 90Sr and 228/232Th in known samples of ivory, and in samples of unknown age. The reliability of this method is considerably increased by multi nuclide analysis. PMID:22717552

  16. Accuracy of post-bomb 137Cs and 14C in dating fluvial deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ely, L.L.; Webb, R.H.; Enzel, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The accuracy and precision of 137Cs and 14C for dating post-1950 alluvial deposits were evaluated for deposits from known floods on two rivers in Arizona. The presence of 137Cs reliably indicates that deposition occurred after intensive above-ground nuclear testing was initiated around 1950. There was a positive correlation between the measured level of 137Cs activity and the clay content of the sediments, although 137Cs was detected even in sandy flood sediments with low clay content. 137Cs is a valuable dating tool in arid environments where organic materials for 14C or tree-ring dating are scarce and observational records are limited. The 14C activity measured in different types of fine organic detritus yielded dates within 1 to 8 yr of a 1980 flood deposit, and the accuracy was species-dependent. However, undifferentiated mixtures of fine organic materials from several post-bomb deposits of various ages repeatedly yielded dates between 1958 and 1962, and detrital charcoal yielded a date range of 1676-1939. In semiarid environments, the residence time of most types of organic debris precludes accurate annual resolution of post-bomb 14C dates. ?? 1992.

  17. Movement of 14C-labeled Sugars into Kernels of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Sakri, Faisal A. K.; Shannon, Jack C.

    1975-01-01

    An anatomical study of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) kernels 14 days after anthesis revealed that the tracheary elements of the pericarp vascular bundle are not in direct continuity with those of the rachilla. The phloem was continuous from the rachilla into the crease of the pericarp. Shortly after exposure of the flag leaf to 14CO2, relatively high proportion of the 14C extracted from the pericarp and endosperm was found in glucose and fructose. With additional time, the percentage of 14C in the monosaccharides declined and that in sucrose increased to a maximum 3 hours after 14CO2 exposure. The monosaccharides comprised about one-half of the soluble sugars extracted from the pericarp. Based on these observations, it appeared that sucrose hydrolysis might be prerequisite to sugar movement from the terminal phloem elements in the pericarp and into the endosperm. However, when 14C-fructosyl-sucrose was injected into the peduncle, there was little additional randomization of the 14C between the glucose and fructose moieties of sucrose extracted from the pericarp and endosperm compared to the rachis sucrose. If we assume that injected sucose was transported to the kernels via the phloem, then either sucrose moves out of the terminal phloem elements in the pericarp and into the endosperm unaltered, or if hydrolysis and resynthesis are a prerequisite to transport into the endosperm, the products of hydrolysis are not freely available for isomerization. Images PMID:16659185

  18. A kinetic and microautoradiographic study of sup 14 C-sucrose translocation into developing wheat grains

    SciTech Connect

    Ning Wang; Fisher, D.B. )

    1991-05-01

    The kinetics of {sup 14}C-photosynthate import by developing wheat grains was followed after pulse-labeling the flag leaf with {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. Samples were collected from four successive points along the transport pathway to and within the grain: exuding aphid stylets on the peduncle, exuding grain pedicels, the grain crease tissues, and the liquid contents of the endosperm cavity. In addition, microautoradiographs were prepared of the grain crease tissues during movement of the {sup 14}C pulse into the grain. At all times, sucrose accounted for 93 to 97% of the total {sup 14}C present at all four sampling sites. The main features of the {sup 14}C kinetics could be accounted for by a simple compartmental model consisting of sucrose pools in series. Microautoradiographs of the crease tissues showed fairly uniform labeling of vascular parenchyma at all times, with a sharp gradient in labeling across the chalaza to the nucellus. Thus the principal resistance to post-phloem solute transport through the maternal tissues appears to be in the symplastic pathway across the chalaza.

  19. Investigation of {sup 14}C release in an engineered low-level waste disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, M.S.; Simonson, S.A.; Sullivan, T.M.

    1996-05-01

    Atmospheric releases of {sup 14}C from a generic engineered low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility and its radiological impacts are investigated. A computer model that describes microbial gas generation and the transport has been developed and used to analyze the generation of {sup 14}C contaminated gases and subsequent migration in a facility. Models are based on a chemical kinetic description of aerobic and anaerobic decomposition of organic materials coupled with attending models of oxygen transport and consumption within waste containers in a facility. Effects of radiolysis on gas generation are addressed based on the estimated dose rate for class B and C wastes. Estimates predict that annual atmospheric release of {sup 14}C due to atmospheric pressure variations could range between {approximately}2.6 {times} 10{sup 8} and 5.5 {times} 10{sup 11} Bq as a result of microbial gas generation based on a volume of 48 000 m{sup 3} LLW disposed in a facility. The associated dose to a maximally exposed individual is estimated to be dominated by ingestion pathway and strongly depends on the fraction of the food imported from an uncontaminated outside area. Dose rates are expected to be <0.04 mSv/yr, considering a reasonable distance between the facility and the exposed population. The depletion through airborne releases of {sup 14}C inventory that is available for transport through other pathways is not expected to be a significant issue.

  20. Measurement of 14C emission rates from a pressurised heavy water reactor.

    PubMed

    Joshi, M L; Ramamirtham, B; Soman, S D

    1987-06-01

    Carbon-14 is produced in pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWR), mainly as an activation product in the fuel. It is also produced in the heavy water used as the primary coolant and moderator, and is produced in the air in the annular space between the pressure tube and calandria tubes as well as in the free space in the calandria vault. The production rates in different systems of a PHWR are calculated on the basis of design parameters. During a period of 3 y, 14C released through the gaseous route has been measured at Rajasthan Atomic Power Station, Kota, India, a PHWR unit. These releases have been found to be mainly 14CO2. This reduced form of 14C is less than 5% of the releases. The normalised releases of 14C have a geometric mean of 5.17 TBq GWe-1 y-1 and a geometric standard deviation of 1.52. The 14C present in the form of carbonates in liquid effluents has also been measured and is 0.14% of the gaseous releases. PMID:3583743

  1. Enzymatic aryl-O-methyl-/sup 14/C labeling of model lignin monomers

    SciTech Connect

    Frazer, A.C.; Bossert, I.; Young, L.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Aryl-O-methyl ethers are abundant in aerobic and anaerobic environments. In particular, lignin is composed of units of this type. Lignin monomers specifically radiolabeled in methoxy, side chain, and ring carbons have been synthesized by chemical procedures and are important in studies of lignin synthesis and degradation, humus formation, and microbial O-demethylation. In this paper attention is drawn to an enzymatic procedure for preparing O-methyl-/sup 14/C-labeled aromatic lignin monomers which has not previously been exploited in microbial ecology and physiology studies and which has several advantages compared with chemical synthesis procedures. O-(methyl-/sup 14/C)vanillic and O-(methyl-/sup 14/C)ferulic acids were prepared with S-(methyl-/sup 14/C)adenosyl-L-methionine as the methyl donor, using commercially obtained porcine liver catechol-O-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.6). The specific activity of the methylated products was the same as that of the methyl donor, a maximum of about 58 ..mu..Ci/..mu..mol, and the yields were 42% (vanillate) and 35% (ferulate). Thus lignin monomers are readily prepared as O-methylated products of the catechol-O-methyltransferase reaction and, with this enzyme method of preparation, would be more widely available than labeled compounds which require chemical synthesis.

  2. DETECTION OF FECAL COLIFORMS IN WATER USING 14C-MANNITOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interest in rapid bacterial detection methods for sanitary indicator bacteria in water prompted a study of the use of 14C-mannitol (UL) to detect fecal coliforms (FC). implemethod was developed using m-FC broth, membrane filtration, and two-temperature incubation (35oC for 2 h, f...

  3. Kinetics of the uptake of sup 14 C-labeled chlorinated benzenes from soil by plants

    SciTech Connect

    Topp, E.; Scheunert, I.; Korte, F. )

    1989-04-01

    ({sup 14}C)Benzene, ({sup 14}C)1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, ({sup 14}C)pentachlorobenzene, and ({sup 14}C)hexachlorobenzene were applied to soils in outdoor lysimeters to a 10-cm depth (2 mg/kg dry soil); barley and cress plants were grown for one vegetation period and analyzed after varying time intervals. The bioaccumulation factors (concentration of radioactive substances in plants divided by that in soils) of barley were higher than those of cress, except for hexachlorobenzene. In barley, bioaccumulation factors increased with decreasing chlorine content of the molecules, except for benzene, whereas in cress hexachlorobenzene exhibited the highest bioaccumulation factor. The conversion ratios of chlorinated benzenes (percentage of conversion products based on total radioactivity in plants) were negatively correlated to the chlorine content of the molecules and, in barley, positively correlated with time; in general, they were higher in barley than in cress. The concentration of radioactive substances in the plants, as well as bioaccumulation factors, decreased with time, except for a slight increase in benzene-derived residues in barley after 125 days. This effect is due to growth dilution. The percentage of radioactivity in barley seeds, based on that in the whole plant, was negatively correlated to the chlorine content of the molecule.

  4. DERMAL PENETRATION OF [14C] CAPTAN IN YOUNG AND ADULT RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dermal penetration of [14C] Captan was determined in young (33 day old) and adult (82 day old) female Fischer 344 rats by an in vivo method and two in vitro methods. ermal penetration in vivo at 72 hours was about 9% of the dose in both young and adult rats. o significant differe...

  5. Uptake and transformation of soil [14C]-trinitrotoluene by cool-season grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the fate and uptake of [14C]-TNT from soil into orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata), perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) and tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) over a one year period in a greenhouse-controlled environment. Pots (n=4 for each grass, containing 10 mg cold TNT/kg s...

  6. Test of AMS 14C dating of pollen concentrates using tephrochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newnham, Rewi M.; Vandergoes, Marcus J.; Garnett, Mark H.; Lowe, David J.; Prior, Christine; Almond, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    Previous attempts to radiocarbon date sediments >10 kyr from the high rainfall region of Westland, New Zealand, a critical location for investigation of interhemispheric patterns of climate change, have been problematic. This study, building on recent work by Vandergoes and Prior ([2003]), shows that AMS 14C dating of pollen concentrates has potential to provide more reliable ages than other sediment constituents, including plant macrofossils. The method was applied to sediments from three sites containing the 22.6k 14C yr Kawakawa Tephra, which provided an independent test of the 14C ages. Although some minor laboratory contamination was detected in tests on background standards, the modelled relationship between sample mass and measured 14C content permitted an appropriate correction to be determined. Improved pollen concentrations derived by density separation between 1.4 and 1.2 specific gravity and sieving in the range 10-50 m provided either older ages than other fractions of the same sample or, where in situ contamination was not evident, equivalent ages. Differences in degree of in situ contamination between depositional environments indicated that, in Westland, lake sites may be less susceptible to contamination by younger carbon than peat sites, where this process may be facilitated by root penetration into underlying sediments. Copyright

  7. 21 CFR 184.1923 - Urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Urea. 184.1923 Section 184.1923 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1923 Urea....

  8. Extraction of urea and ammonium ion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmi, R. T.; Husted, R. R.; Schulz, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Water purification system keeps urea and ammonium ion concentration below toxic limits in recirculated water of closed loop aquatic habitat. Urea is first converted to ammonium ions and carbon dioxide by enzygmatic action. Ammonium ions are removed by ion exchange. Bioburden is controlled by filtration through 0.45 micron millipore filters.

  9. Metabolism of U/sup 14/C palmitic and 1-/sup 14/C caproic acids by lettuce seeds during early germination

    SciTech Connect

    Salon, C.; Raymond, P.; Pradet, A.

    1986-04-01

    Germinating lettuce embryos (before radicule emergence) were fed with either U/sup 14/C palmitic acid or 1/sup 14/C caproic acid until a metabolic steady state was reached. The bulk of labelled caproate was evolved as respiratory CO/sub 2/ (52%) and incorporated into organic and amino acids (38%) and only a small part incorporated into lipids whereas most of labelled palmitic acid was found into lipids (92%) and only 8% evolved as CO/sub 2/ and incorporated into organic and amino acids. The label distribution at steady state in intermediates linked to the T.C.A. cycle was interpreted using a metabolic model. They found that the two fatty acids were degraded by ..beta..-oxidation and incorporated into the T.C.A. cycle as acetylCoA suggesting that ..beta..-oxidation is located in the mitochondria. The results also indicate that lipids contribute for at least 90% to the carbon supply to respiration.

  10. Large Variations of Atmospheric 14C Associated With Dansgaard-Oeschger Cycles 10- 13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyhenmeyer, C. E.; Burns, S. J.; Fleitmann, D.; Mangini, A.; Matter, A.; Guilderson, T.; Reimer, P. J.

    2006-12-01

    A 1.7 m long stalagmite from Moomi Cave, Socotra Island in the Indian Ocean provides a continuous, high- resolution record of climate change between 53 and 41 kyr BP. In the northern high-latitude regions, this time period is characterized by several rapid climate change events, corresponding to Dansgaard-Oeschger (D/O) cycles 10-13. It has been suggested that these D/O cycles may be global events but high-resolution data from the low-latitude regions are scarce. As a result, the driving and feedback mechanisms of these rapid changes remain poorly understood. The presented stalagmite data of U/Th, stable isotopes (del 18O, del 13C) and radiocarbon (14C) provide unique information regarding the nature and timing of rapid climate changes in the tropics. A depth-age model for the Moomi Cave stalagmite was developed from 25 high-precision U/Th measurements, providing a solid chronology for this record. Oxygen isotope measurements of the stalagmite calcite reveal several large variations that are believed to reflect changes in the amount of precipitation, rather than temperature. A comparison to the Greenland Ice Core records shows a remarkable similarity to D/O cycles 10- 13 with warmer periods in the high-latitude regions being associated with increased precipitation in the tropics and vice versa. The stalagmite radiocarbon (14C) values from over 100 individual measurements reveal an almost identical cyclic pattern, tracing all four D/O cycles. Assuming no changes in the carbonate chemistry of the precipitating fluid, the radiocarbon values of the stalagmite calcite directly reflect changes in global atmospheric 14C concentrations. There are three possible explanations for these cyclic variations of 14C values: 1) changes in the carbonate chemistry of the drip water resulting in changes of the dead carbon fraction (DCF); 2) changes in the solar activity and/or Earth's magnetic field resulting in direct variations of atmospheric 14C concentrations; and 3) changes in

  11. Extracting in situ cosmogenic 14C from olivine: significance for the CRONUS-Earth project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigati, J. S.; Lifton, N. A.; Quade, J.; Jull, A. T.

    2005-12-01

    One of the main goals of the Cosmic-Ray-prOduced NUclide Systematics on Earth (CRONUS-Earth) project is to compare production rates of in situ cosmogenic nuclides (CNs) at several well-dated locations in various rock types. Quartz is the most commonly used target mineral for several CNs (e.g., 10Be, 26Al, 21Ne, 14C), but is generally absent in mafic volcanic terrains, where flows of different ages can constrain temporal variations in CN production at a given location. Because of its short half-life (5.73 ka), in situ cosmogenic 14C (in situ 14C) can be particularly useful for elucidating temporal variations in CN production over much shorter time scales than other CNs. While CNs such as 36Cl and 21Ne can be measured in both mafic and felsic rocks, clearly it would be advantageous to measure in situ 14C in mafic rocks as well. As such, we have worked to develop reliable protocols to extract in situ 14C from olivine. We conducted numerous stepped combustion experiments testing the efficacy of various chemical pretreatments. We were able to extract a stable and reproducible in situ 14C component from olivine using a LiBO2 flux, following pretreatment with dilute HNO3. However, measured concentrations in olivine (normalized to SiO2 composition) from two known-age basalt flows, the Tabernacle Hill flow (17.3+/-0.4 ka in age) in central Utah and the McCarty's flow (3.0+/-0.2 ka in age) in western New Mexico, were 3 to 5 times lower than predicted in situ 14C concentrations based on measurements in quartz. This discrepancy appears to arise from (1) a synthetic spinel-like mineral formed during our extraction process by the chemical interaction of the Al2O3 sample boat and olivine dissolved within the LiBO2 flux, and (2) undissolved pyroxene phenocrysts (difficult to separate in quantity from olivines). Although we do not fully understand how the formation of the synthetic mineral may affect carbon atoms liberated from olivine, the concentration of in situ 14C atoms that

  12. [Quantifying rice (Oryza sativa L.) photo-assimilated carbon input into soil organic carbon pools following continuous 14C labeling].

    PubMed

    Nie, San-An; Zhou, Ping; Ge, Ti-Da; Tong, Cheng-Li; Xiao, He-Ai; Wu, Jin-Shui; Zhang, Yang-Zhu

    2012-04-01

    The microcosm experiment was carried out to quantify the input and distribution of photo-assimilated C into soil C pools by using a 14C continuous labeling technique. Destructive samplings of rice (Oryza sativa) were conducted after labeling for 80 days. The allocation of 14C-labeled photosynthates in plants and soil C pools such as dissolved organic C (DOC) and microbial biomass C (MBC) in rice-planted soil were examined over the 14C labeling span. The amounts of rice shoot and root biomass C was ranged from 1.86 to 5.60 g x pot(-1), 0.46 to 0.78 g x pot(-1) in different tested paddy soils after labeling for 80 days, respectively. The amount of 14C in the soil organic C (14C-SOC) was also dependent on the soils, ranged from 114.3 to 348.2 mg x kg(-1), accounting for 5.09% to 6.62% of the rice biomass 14C, respectively. The amounts of 14C in the dissolved organic C (14C-DOC) and in the microbial biomass C(14C-MBC), as proportions of 14C-SOC, were 2.21%-3.54% and 9.72% -17.2%, respectively. The 14C-DOC, 14C-MBC, and 14C-SOC as proportions of total DOC, MBC, and SOC, respectively, were 6.72% -14.64%, 1.70% -7.67%, and 0.73% -1.99%, respectively. Moreover, the distribution and transformation of root-derived C had a greater influence on the dynamics of DOC and MBC than on the dynamics of SOC. Further studies are required to ascertain the functional significance of soil microorganisms (such as C-sequestering bacteria and photosynthetic bacteria) in the paddy system. PMID:22720588

  13. Urea transport through composite polyallylamine membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Kubo, L. Y.; Spitze, L. A.; Wydeven, T.; Clark, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Polyallylamine composite reverse osmosis membranes were prepared by plasma polymerization and deposition onto small-pored cellulose acetate/cellulose nitrate films. The polyallylamine coated the porous substrate with a thin uniform polymer film which exhibited water permeability and urea rejection, of interest because of the potential application of reverse osmosis to urine purification in closed environmental systems. The flux of C-14 labeled urea was studied under the influence of osmotic gradients provided by sodium chloride solutions. The urea flux was found to be enhanced by an osmotic pressure gradient in the same direction and diminished, but not prevented, by an opposing osmotic pressure gradient. Consideration is given to the mechanism of the urea transport, as well as to the influence of concentration polarization on the experimental results. The minimization of coupled flow in pores of a critical size range is apparently necessary to improve urea rejection.

  14. Formation of Bound Residues during Microbial Degradation of [14C]Anthracene in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Kästner, M.; Streibich, S.; Beyrer, M.; Richnow, H. H.; Fritsche, W.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon partitioning and residue formation during microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in soil and soil-compost mixtures were examined by using [14C]anthracenes labeled at different positions. In native soil 43.8% of [9-14C]anthracene was mineralized by the autochthonous microflora and 45.4% was transformed into bound residues within 176 days. Addition of compost increased the metabolism (67.2% of the anthracene was mineralized) and decreased the residue formation (20.7% of the anthracene was transformed). Thus, the higher organic carbon content after compost was added did not increase the level of residue formation. [14C]anthracene labeled at position 1,2,3,4,4a,5a was metabolized more rapidly and resulted in formation of higher levels of residues (28.5%) by the soil-compost mixture than [14C]anthracene radiolabeled at position C-9 (20.7%). Two phases of residue formation were observed in the experiments. In the first phase the original compound was sequestered in the soil, as indicated by its limited extractability. In the second phase metabolites were incorporated into humic substances after microbial degradation of the PAH (biogenic residue formation). PAH metabolites undergo oxidative coupling to phenolic compounds to form nonhydrolyzable humic substance-like macromolecules. We found indications that monomeric educts are coupled by C-C- or either bonds. Hydrolyzable ester bonds or sorption of the parent compounds plays a minor role in residue formation. Moreover, experiments performed with 14CO2 revealed that residues may arise from CO2 in the soil in amounts typical for anthracene biodegradation. The extent of residue formation depends on the metabolic capacity of the soil microflora and the characteristics of the soil. The position of the 14C label is another important factor which controls mineralization and residue formation from metabolized compounds. PMID:10223966

  15. Substrate metabolism in isolated rat jejunal epithelium. Analysis using /sup 14/C-radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Mallet, R.T.

    1986-01-01

    The jejunal epithelium absorbs nutrients from the intestinal lumen and is therefore the initial site for metabolism of these compounds. The purpose of this investigation is to analyze substrate metabolism in a preparation of jejunal epithelium relatively free of other tissues. Novel radioisotopic labelling techniques allow quantitation of substrate metabolism in the TCA cycle, Embden-Meyerhof (glycolytic) pathway, and hexose monophosphate shunt. For example, ratios of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from pairs of /sup 14/C-pyruvate, and /sup 14/C-succinate radioisotopes (CO/sub 2/ ratios) indicate the probability of TCA cycle intermediate efflux to generate compounds other than CO/sub 2/. With (2,3-/sup 14/C)succinate as tracer, the ratio of /sup 14/C in carbon 4 + 5 versus carbon 2 + 3 of citrate, the citrate labelling ratio, equals the probability of TCA intermediate flux to the acetyl CoA-derived portion of citrate versus flux to the oxaloacetate-derived portion. The principal metabolic substrates for the jejunal epithelium are glucose and glutamine. CO/sub 2/ ratios indicate that glutamine uptake and metabolism is partially Na/sup +/-independent, and is saturable, with a half-maximal rate at physiological plasma glutamine concentrations. Glucose metabolism in the jejunal epithelium proceeds almost entirely via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway. Conversion of substrates to multi-carbon products in this tissue allows partial conservation of reduced carbon for further utilization in other tissues. In summary, metabolic modeling based on /sup 14/C labelling ratios is a potentially valuable technique for analysis of metabolic flux patterns in cell preparations.

  16. Metabolism of [14C]methamphetamine in man, the guinea pig and the rat

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, J.; Dring, L. G.; Williams, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    1. The metabolites of (±)-2-methylamino-1-phenyl[1-14C]propane ([14C]methamphetamine) in urine were examined in man, rat and guinea pig. 2. In two male human subjects receiving the drug orally (20mg per person) about 90% of the 14C was excreted in the urine in 4 days. The urine of the first day was examined for metabolites, and the main metabolites were the unchanged drug (22% of the dose) and 4-hydroxymethamphetamine (15%). Minor metabolites were hippuric acid, norephedrine, 4-hydroxyamphetamine, 4-hydroxynorephedrine and an acid-labile precursor of benzyl methyl ketone. 3. In the rat some 82% of the dose of 14C (45mg/kg) was excreted in the urine and 2–3% in the faeces in 3–4 days. In 2 days the main metabolites in the urine were 4-hydroxymethamphetamine (31% of dose), 4-hydroxynorephedrine (16%) and unchanged drug (11%). Minor metabolites were amphetamine, 4-hydroxyamphetamine and benzoic acid. 4. The guinea pig was injected intraperitoneally with the drug at two doses, 10 and 45mg/kg. In both cases nearly 90% of the 14C was excreted, mainly in the urine after the lower dose, but in the urine (69%) and faeces (18%) after the higher dose. The main metabolites in the guinea pig were benzoic acid and its conjugates. Minor metabolites were unchanged drug, amphetamine, norephedrine, an acid-labile precursor of benzyl methyl ketone and an unknown weakly acidic metabolite. The output of norephedrine was dose-dependent, being about 19% on the higher dose and about 1% on the lower dose. 5. Marked species differences in the metabolism of methamphetamine were observed. The main reaction in the rat was aromatic hydroxylation, in the guinea pig demethylation and deamination, whereas in man much of the drug, possibly one-half, was excreted unchanged. PMID:4646771

  17. The search for cluster structure in 14C with the prototype AT-TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Adam Louis

    Certain light nuclei are known to have inherent cluster structuring, and the nature of the triple-alpha structure of carbon isotopes is a subject of active discussion in nuclear physics. Clustering in neutron-rich nuclei is of particular interest as such work could shed light on how neutrons affect alpha clustering, making 14C a logical candidate for such a study. Cluster structure in 14C was investigated at the University of Notre Dame with the prototype Active Target-Time Projection Chamber (AT-TPC). A 38.2 MeV secondary beam of 10Be was incident on an active target volume containing He:CO2 90:10 gas at 1 atm, in which trajectories of beam particles and reaction products were measured using the tracking capabilities of the prototype AT-TPC. Angular correlations of 10Be and alpha particles were used to reconstruct kinematics of scattering. Excitation functions and angular distributions were measured in both elastic and inelastic channels, which unraveled a number of resonances in 14C. Spin-parity assignments have been made for the elastic resonances by R-matrix analysis. Evidence of a positive-parity rotational band has been indicated by the 14C resonances. The proposed level scheme and the strong resonance strength observed in the inelastic channel are in line with the prediction by the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) method indicating linear-chain structure in 14C. The results also demonstrate unique and powerful potentials of active-target technology in radioactive-beam experiments and are an important step toward the construction of the full-scale AT-TPC for the ReA3 facility at NSCL.

  18. Characteristics of 14C and 13C of carbonate aerosols in dust storm events in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing; Jie, Dongmei; Shi, Meinan; Gao, Pan; Shen, Zhenxing; Uchida, Masao; Zhou, Liping; Liu, Kexin; Hu, Ke; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    In contrast with its decrease in western China deserts, the dust storm event in eastern China, Korea, and Japan shows an increase in frequency. Although the drylands in northeastern China have been recognized as an important dust source, the relative contributions of dust transport from the drylands and deserts are inconclusive, thus the quantification of dust storm sources in downwind area remains a challenge. We measured the 14C and 13C contents in carbonates of dust samples from six sites in China, which were collected for the duration of dust storm events in drylands, deserts, and urban areas. The δ13C of the dryland dust samples considerably varied in a range of - 9.7 to - 5.0‰, which partly overlapped the desert dust carbonate δ13C ranges. The 14C content of the dryland dust carbonates showed a narrow range of 60.9 ± 4.0 (as an average and 1 SD of five samples) percent modern carbon (pMC), indicating the enrichment of modern carbonate. Dust samples in desert regions contained relatively aged carbonates with the depleting 14C showing of 28.8 ± 3.3 pMC. After the long-range transport of the western China desert dust plume, the carbonates collected at the southern China remained the depletion of 14C (33.5 ± 5.3 pMC) as in the desert regions. On the other hand, the samples of dust storm events at the urban areas of eastern China showed an enrichment of 14C contents (46.2 ± 5.0 pMC, n = 7), which might be explained by the stronger contribution of modern-carbonate-rich dryland dust.

  19. Formation of bound residues during microbial degradation of [{sup 14}C]anthracene in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Kaestner, M.; Streibich, S.; Beyrer, M.; Fritsche, W.; Richnow, H.H.

    1999-05-01

    Carbon partitioning and residue formation during microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in soil and soil-compost mixtures were examined by using [{sup 14}C]anthracenes labeled at different positions. In native soil 43.8% of [9-{sup 14}C]anthracene was mineralized by the autochthonous microflora and 45.4% was transformed into bound residues within 176 days. Addition of compost increased the metabolism and decreased the residue formation (20.7% of the anthracene was transformed). Thus, the higher organic carbon content after compost was added did not increase the level of residue formation. [{sup 14}C]anthracene labeled at position 1,2,3,4,4a,5a was metabolized more rapidly and resulted in formation of higher levels of residues (28.5%) by the soil-compost mixture than [{sup 14}C]anthracene radiolabeled at position C-9 (20.7%). Two phases of residue formation were observed in the experiments. In the first phase the original compound was sequestered in the soil, as indicated by its limited extractability. In the second phase metabolites were incorporated into humic substances after microbial degradation of the PAH (biogenic residue formation). PAH metabolites undergo oxidative coupling to phenolic compounds to form nonhydrolyzable humic substance-like macromolecules. The authors found indications that monomeric educts are coupled by C-C- or either bonds. Hydrolyzable ester bonds or sorption of the parent compounds plays a minor role in residue formation. Moreover, experiments performed with {sup 14}CO{sub 2} revealed that residues may arise from CO{sub 2} in the soil in amounts typical for anthracene biodegradation. The extent of residue formation depends on the metabolic capacity of the soil microflora and the characteristics of the soil. The position of the {sup 14}C label is another important factor which controls mineralization and residue formation from metabolized compounds.

  20. Reconciling Change in Oi-Horizon 14C With Mass Loss for an Oak Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, P J; Swanston, C W; Garten, Jr., C T; Todd, D E; Trumbore, S E

    2005-06-27

    First-year litter decomposition was estimated for an upland-oak forest ecosystem using enrichment or dilution of the {sup 14}C-signature of the Oi-horizon. These isotopically-based mass-loss estimates were contrasted with measured mass-loss rates from past litterbag studies. Mass-loss derived from changes in the {sup 14}C-signature of the Oi-horizon suggested mean mass loss over 9 months of 45% which was higher than the corresponding 9-month rate extrapolated from litterbag studies ({approx}35%). Greater mass loss was expected from the isotopic approach because litterbags are known to limit mass loss processes driven by soil macrofauna (e.g., fragmentation and comminution). Although the {sup 14}C-isotope approach offers the advantage of being a non-invasive method, it exhibited high variability that undermined its utility as an alternative to routine litterbag mass loss methods. However, the {sup 14}C approach measures the residence time of C in the leaf litter, rather than the time it takes for leaves to disappear; hence radiocarbon measures are subject to C immobilization and recycling in the microbial pool, and do not necessarily reflect results from litterbag mass loss. The commonly applied two-compartment isotopic mixing model was appropriate for estimating decomposition from isotopic enrichment of near-background soils, but it produced divergent results for isotopic dilution of a multi-layered system with litter cohorts having independent {sup 14}C-signatures. This discrepancy suggests that cohort-based models are needed to adequately capture the complex processes involved in carbon transport associated with litter mass-loss. Such models will be crucial for predicting intra- and interannual differences in organic horizon decomposition driven by scenarios of climatic change.

  1. Role of higher-multipole deformations in exotic {sup 14}C cluster radioactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sawhney, Gudveen; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2011-06-15

    We have studied nine cases of spontaneous emission of {sup 14}C clusters in the ground-state decays of the same number of parent nuclei from the trans-lead region, specifically from {sup 221}Fr to {sup 226}Th, using the preformed cluster model (PCM) of Gupta and collaborators, with choices of spherical, quadrupole deformation ({beta}{sub 2}) alone, and higher-multipole deformations ({beta}{sub 2}, {beta}{sub 3}, {beta}{sub 4}) with cold ''compact'' orientations {theta}{sup c} of decay products. The calculated {sup 14}C cluster decay half-life times are found to be in nice agreement with experimental data only for the case of higher-multipole deformations ({beta}{sub 2}-{beta}{sub 4}) and {theta}{sup c} orientations of cold elongated configurations. In other words, compared to our earlier study of clusters heavier than {sup 14}C, where the inclusion of {beta}{sub 2} alone, with ''optimum'' orientations, was found to be enough to give the best comparison with data, here for {sup 14}C cluster decay the inclusion of higher-multipole deformations (up to hexadecapole), together with {theta}{sup c} orientations, is found to be essential on the basis of the PCM. Interestingly, whereas both the penetration probability and assault frequency work simply as scaling factors, the preformation probability is strongly influenced by the order of multipole deformations and orientations of nuclei. The possible role of Q value and angular-momentum effects are also considered in reference to {sup 14}C cluster radioactivity.

  2. Transport characteristics of urea transporter-B.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baoxue

    2014-01-01

    UT-B represents the major urea transporter in erythrocytes, in addition to being expressed in kidney descending vasa recta, brain, spleen, ureter, bladder, and testis. Expression of urea transporter UT-B confers high urea permeability to mammalian erythrocytes. Erythrocyte membranes are also permeable to various urea analogues, suggesting common transport pathways for urea and structurally similar solutes. UT-B is highly permeable to urea and the chemical analogues formamide, acetamide, methylurea, methylformamide, ammonium carbamate, and acrylamide, each with a Ps > 5.0 × 10(-6) cm/s at 10 °C. The amides formamide, acetamide, acrylamide, and butyramide efficiently diffuse across lipid bilayers. The urea analogues dimethylurea, acryalmide, methylurea, thiourea, and methylformamide inhibit UT-B-mediated urea transport by >60 % by a pore-blocking mechanism. UT-B is also a water channel in erythrocytes and has a single-channel water permeability that is similar to aquaporin-1. Whether UT-B is an NH3 channel still needs further study. Urea permeability (Purea) in erythrocytes differs between different mammals. Carnivores (dog, fox, cat) exhibit high Purea. In contrast, herbivores (cow, donkey, sheep) show much lower Purea. Erythrocyte Purea in human and pig (omnivores) was intermediate. Rodents and lagomorphs (mouse, rat, rabbit) have Purea intermediate between carnivores and omnivores. Birds that do not excrete urea and do not express UT-B in their erythrocytes have very low values. In contrast to Purea, water permeability is relatively similar in all mammals studied. This chapter will provide information about the transporter characteristics of UT-B. PMID:25298342

  3. Movement of NH3 through the human urea transporter B: a new gas channel

    PubMed Central

    Musa-Aziz, Raif; Enkavi, Giray; Mahinthichaichan, P.; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Boron, Walter F.

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporins and Rh proteins can function as gas (CO2 and NH3) channels. The present study explores the urea, H2O, CO2, and NH3 permeability of the human urea transporter B (UT-B) (SLC14A1), expressed in Xenopus oocytes. We monitored urea uptake using [14C]urea and measured osmotic water permeability (Pf) using video microscopy. To obtain a semiquantitative measure of gas permeability, we used microelectrodes to record the maximum transient change in surface pH (ΔpHS) caused by exposing oocytes to 5% CO2/33 mM HCO3− (pHS increase) or 0.5 mM NH3/NH4+ (pHS decrease). UT-B expression increased oocyte permeability to urea by >20-fold, and Pf by 8-fold vs. H2O-injected control oocytes. UT-B expression had no effect on the CO2-induced ΔpHS but doubled the NH3-induced ΔpHS. Phloretin reduced UT-B-dependent urea uptake (Jurea*) by 45%, Pf* by 50%, and (−ΔpHS*)NH3 by 70%. p-Chloromercuribenzene sulfonate reduced Jurea* by 25%, Pf* by 30%, and (ΔpHS*)NH3 by 100%. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of membrane-embedded models of UT-B identified the monomeric UT-B pores as the main conduction pathway for both H2O and NH3 and characterized the energetics associated with permeation of these species through the channel. Mutating each of two conserved threonines lining the monomeric urea pores reduced H2O and NH3 permeability. Our data confirm that UT-B has significant H2O permeability and for the first time demonstrate significant NH3 permeability. Thus the UTs become the third family of gas channels. Inhibitor and mutagenesis studies and results of MD simulations suggest that NH3 and H2O pass through the three monomeric urea channels in UT-B. PMID:23552862

  4. (13)C-5-FU breath test current status and future directions: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Ezzeldin, Hany H; Acosta, Edward P; Mattison, Lori K; Fourie, Jeanne; Modak, Anil; Diasio, Robert B

    2009-12-01

    Breath tests (BTs) represent a safe non-invasive alternative strategy that could provide valuable diagnostic information in conditions like fat malabsorption, carbohydrate (lactose and fructose) malabsorption, liver dysfunction, impaired gastric emptying, abnormal small bowel transit time, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and Helicobacter pylori infection. To date, despite the availability of a number of breath tests, only three have gained approval by the FDA for application in a clinical setting ((13)C-urea breath test for the detection of H. pylori; NO breath test for monitoring asthma and alkane breath test for heart transplant rejection). Unfortunately, none of these tests investigate cancer patients or response to cancer chemotherapy. Several years ago it was realized that the presence of a reliable non-invasive approach could assist in the detection of patients at risk of developing severe life-threatening toxicities prior to the administration of fluoropyrimidines (e.g. 5-FU) or related cancer chemotherapy. 5-FU toxicity results mainly from deficient uracil catabolism. This review discusses the development of a BT that utilizes an orally administered pyrimidine ([2-(13)C]-uracil) which is metabolized via the same catabolic pathway as 5-FU. This ([2-(13)C]-uracil) breath test could provide a valuable addition to the patients' standard of care. PMID:21386199

  5. 14C Terrestrial Ages of Meteorites from Desert Regions: Algeria and Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jull, A. J. T.; Wlotzka, F.; Bevan, A. W. R.; Brown, S. T.; Donahue, D. J.

    1993-07-01

    The terrestrial age or residence time on the Earth's surface is important in determining the history of a meteorite. Carbon-14 has been used for a terrestrial-age indicator since 1962 [1,2]. Since 1984, small samples of meteorites of 0.1 to 0.5 g have been dated using accelerator mass spectrometry [3-5]. The precision of terrestrial age estimates is limited by the accuracy to which the saturated activity of ^14C in the meteorite is known. Jull et al. [4,5] used Bruderheim and some other chondrites to establish a saturated activity reference level. It is important to be aware that ^14C can vary with the depth and size of the object, and ^14C as a function of accurate depth has so far been measured only for one object, Knyahinya [7]. Carbon-14 is of particular interest in warmer climatic regions, where the storage time before a meteorite weathers away is expected to be much less than other locations, for example, Antarctica. This view was originally based on the work of Boeckl [7], who determined a "weathering half life" of some 3500 yr for chondrites from the southwestern U.S. This work was reinvestigated [5] and it was determined that the ^14C age distribution of the meteorites was longer than the earlier report. We have studied ^14C ages of meteorites from Roosevelt County, New Mexico [8], and from the western Libyan desert [9]. In both these areas meteorites of ages as old as 35,000 yr are observed, and the mean survival time at both locations is well over 10,000 yr. We have studied the ^14C age distribution of a large number of meteorites from Acfer, Algeria, and the Nullarbor Plain, Australia. Figure 1 presents the ^14C age distribution of Acfer samples compared to some other locations where a substantial number of ^14C ages have been obtained. The Algerian site shows a simple exponential dependence of terrestrial age vs. time, and no meteorites of >25 K.y. age. This is in contrast to the results from the southwestern U.S. [7] and from Roosevelt County [8]. One

  6. Seasonal variations of 14C and δ13C for cave drip waters in Ryugashi Cave, Shizuoka Prefecture, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Masayo; Kato, Tomomi; Horikawa, Keiji; Nakamura, Toshio

    2015-11-01

    Speleothem 14C has recently emerged as a potentially powerful proxy for hydrology changes in comparison with atmospheric 14C calibration curve, rather than as a direct dating tool, apart from a time marker using bomb peak of 14C. Some possible causes for the relationship between speleothem 14C content (or dead carbon fraction: DCF) and karst hydrology have been proposed, such as changes in temperature, precipitation, drip water flow dynamics, cave air ventilation, soil air pCO2. In this study, we investigated seasonal variation in 14C and δ13C of drip water in Ryugashi Cave, Shizuoka Prefecture, central Japan, to examine the causes of the 14C and δ13C variations in a speleothem. The results show that different 14C concentrations and δ13C values of drip water from the Ryugashi Cave, were exhibited at different sites of the Caves No. 1, No. 3, and No. 4, which have different temperature, air pCO2, and flow paths. Further, the 14C and δ13C of drip waters showed seasonal variations at all sites, which were lower in fall and winter, and higher in spring and summer, though the extent of the variations was different among the sites. The 14C in drip waters tended to be correlated with the drip rates: 14C tended to be higher in drip waters with higher drip rates, and also correlated with rainfall amount around the Ryugashi Cave, especially for the drip waters in Cave No. 3, which are considered to have simpler flow paths. The increase in rainfall amount could bring the increase in drip rate of drip water, and then the decrease in interaction between solution and karst, resulting in 14C increase (DCF decrease) in drip water. Accordingly, the reconstruction of precipitation could be performed using 14C variation in a speleothem formed by drip water with simple flow dynamics.

  7. Utilization of [14C]phenylalanine derived from arylphorin or free amino acid in Manduca sexta pharate adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, M.; Tischler, M. E.

    1995-01-01

    The role of arylphorin as a storage protein was studied using 14C-arylphorin. 14C-arylphorin was produced optimally by incubating one-half fat body from Manduca sexta fifth instar larvae at 22 degrees C for 24 h, in 1 ml of medium containing amino acids at 25% of their physiological concentration with [U-14C]-phenylalanine (phe) provided initially without nonlabeled phenylalanine. Nonlabeled phe was provided after 1 h at 16% of its physiological concentration. The specific activity of 14C-arylphorin produced in vitro was 30 times greater than that generated in vivo. Injection of 14C-arylphorin into pharate adults was used to study the distribution of 14C-phe derived from this protein into 14CO2 and tissues for comparison with injection of free 14C-phe during the middle (days 6 to 12 pharate adult) and late (days 12 to 17 pharate adult) stages of adult development. Appearance of 14CO2 from 14C-arylphorin as compared to 14C-phenylalanine showed a slower time course during both the middle and late stages of development, in keeping with the time needed for degradation of the protein. In accord with faster phe turnover near the end of adult development, total 14CO2 production was greater and the retention of 14C in hemolymph and fat body was less compared to the middle stage of development regardless of whether 14C-arylphorin or 14C-phe was injected. In the middle stage of development, the appearance of 14C in the cuticle and head parts was greater, whereas incorporation into abdomen and thorax was less than during the late stage of development. Since the pattern of 14C distribution from 14C-arylphorin and 14C-phe was similar, one major function of arylphorin must be as a storage protein replenishing the supply of free amino acids used for synthesis of adult tissues. These results also suggest a limited contribution of M. sexta arylphorin to formation of the cuticle subsequent to day-6 pharate adult.

  8. Urea Output by L3 Teladorsagia circumcincta and some Properties of Two Urea Producing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Muhamad, N; Walker, LR; Simcock, DC; Pedley, KC; Simpson, HV; Brown, S

    2013-01-01

    Background Like several other parasites, Teladorsagia circumcincta secretes or excretes urea, but neither the rate of efflux nor the possible metabolic sources of the urea has been considered. Methods Parasites were maintained by passage through sheep. Urea efflux was measured using phenol/hypochlorite after treatment with urea aminohydrolase. The kinetics of creatine amidinohydrolase and arginine amidinohydrolase were characterised by coupling the reactions with urea aminohydrolase and glutamate dehydrogenase. Results Infective L3 T. circumcincta secreted or excreted urea at 25% of the rate of NH3/NH4 +. The rate of urea efflux was about 84 pmol h−1 (103 larvae)−1 over 4 hours, corresponding to about 11 nmol h−1 mg−1 protein. We could not detect urea aminohydrolase activity, but urea production by both creatine amidinohydrolase and arginine amidinohydrolase could be detected. The apparent K m and V max of creatine amidinohydrolase were 1.1 mM and 48 nmol h−1 mg−1 protein, respectively, and the activity was greatest at pH 8. The apparent K m and V max of arginine amidinohydrolase were 0.7 mM and 62 nmol h−1 mg−1 protein, respectively, and the activity was greatest at pH 7.9. Conclusion The activity of creatine amidinohydrolase and arginine amidinohydrolase was sufficient to account for the rate of urea secretion or excretion. PMID:23682271

  9. Concentration levels of urea in swimming pool water and reactivity of chlorine with urea.

    PubMed

    De Laat, Joseph; Feng, Wentao; Freyfer, Diab Adams; Dossier-Berne, Florence

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the reactivity of chlorine with urea which is the main nitrogen contaminant introduced into swimming pool water by bathers. In the first part of this study, analyses showed that the mean concentrations of urea and TOC determined from 50 samples of municipal swimming pool were equal to 18.0 μM (s.d. 11.7) and 3.5 mg C L(-1) (s.d. 1.6), respectively. The mean value for the urea contribution to the TOC content was 6.3% (s.d. 3.3). The rate of decomposition of urea in swimming pool water measured during the closure time of the facility was very slow (decay at the rate of ≈ 1% per hour in the presence of 1.6-1.8 mg L(-1) of free chlorine). In the second part of this work, experiments carried out with phosphate buffered solutions of urea ([Urea](0) = 1 mM; [Cl(2)](0)/[Urea](0): 0.5-15 mol/mol; pH 7.4 ± 0.2; reaction time: 0-200 h) showed that long term chlorine demand of urea was about 5 mol Cl(2)/mol of urea. Chlorination led to a complete mineralization of organic carbon into CO(2) for a chlorine dose of 3.5 mol/mol and to the formation of 0.7-0.8 mol NO(3)(-)/mol of urea for chlorine dose of 8-10 mol/mol. Experiments conducted with dilute solutions of urea ([Urea](0) = 50 μM; pH ≈ 7.3) confirmed that the degradation rate of urea by chlorine is very slow under conditions simulating real swimming pool water. PMID:21115186

  10. Palliative care - shortness of breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... to control shortness of breath: Call your doctor, palliative care team, or hospice nurse for advice Call 911 ... Bicanovsky L. Comfort care: symptom control in the dying. In: Walsh ... . 1st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2008:chap 181.

  11. Visualizing Breath using Digital Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, P. R.; Reid, I. D.; Wilton, J. B.

    2013-02-01

    Artist Jayne Wilton and physicists Peter Hobson and Ivan Reid of Brunel University are collaborating at Brunel University on a project which aims to use a range of techniques to make visible the normally invisible dynamics of the breath and the verbal and non-verbal communication it facilitates. The breath is a source of a wide range of chemical, auditory and physical exchanges with the direct environment. Digital Holography is being investigated to enable a visually stimulating articulation of the physical trajectory of the breath as it leaves the mouth. Initial findings of this research are presented. Real time digital hologram replay allows the audience to move through holographs of breath-born particles.

  12. Liquid-Air Breathing Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Robert D.

    1990-01-01

    Compact unit supplies air longer than compressed-air unit. Emergency breathing apparatus stores air as cryogenic liquid instead of usual compressed gas. Intended for firefighting or rescue operations becoming necessary during planned potentially hazardous procedures.

  13. Enzymatic Characterization of a Prokaryotic Urea Carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, Takeshi; Kanou, Norihisa; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2004-01-01

    We identified the first prokaryotic urea carboxylase (UCA) from a member of the alpha subclass of the class Proteobacteria, Oleomonas sagaranensis. This enzyme (O. sagaranensis Uca) was composed of 1,171 amino acids, and its N-terminal region resembled the biotin carboxylase domains of various biotin-dependent carboxylases. The C-terminal region of the enzyme harbored the Met-Lys-Met motif found in biotin carboxyl carrier proteins. The primary structure of the enzyme was 45% identical to that of the urea carboxylase domain of urea amidolyase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. O. sagaranensis Uca did not harbor the allophanate hydrolase domain found in the yeast enzyme, but a separate gene with structural similarity was found to be adjacent to the uca gene. Purified recombinant O. sagaranensis Uca displayed ATP-dependent carboxylase activity towards urea (Vmax = 21.2 μmol mg−1 min−1) but not towards acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and propionyl-CoA, indicating that the gene encoded a bona fide UCA and not an acetyl-CoA or propionyl-CoA carboxylase. The enzyme also exhibited high levels of activity towards acetamide and formamide. Kinetic parameters of the enzyme reaction were determined with ATP, urea, acetamide, and formamide. O. sagaranensis could grow on urea, acetamide, and formamide as sole nitrogen sources; moreover, ATP-dependent urea-degrading activity was found in cells grown with urea but not in cells grown with ammonia. The results suggest that the UCA of this organism may be involved in the assimilation of these compounds as nitrogen sources. Furthermore, orthologues of the O. sagaranensis uca gene were found to be widely distributed among Bacteria. This implies that there are two systems of urea degradation in Bacteria, a pathway catalyzed by the previously described ureases and the UCA-allophanate hydrolase pathway identified in this study. PMID:15090492

  14. Effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates.

    PubMed

    Florenzano, F H; Politi, M J

    1997-02-01

    The effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates (aqueous and reversed micelles, vesicles and monolayers) was investigated to obtain insights into the effect of the denaturant on structured macromolecules. Direct evidence obtained from light scattering (static and dynamic), monolayer maximum isothermal compression and ionic conductivity measurements, together with indirect evidence from fluorescence photodissociation, fluorescence suppression, and thermal reactions, strongly indicates the direct interaction mechanism of urea with the aggregates. Preferential solvation of the surfactant headgroups by urea results in an increase in the monomer dissociation degree (when applied), which leads to an increase in the area per headgroup and also in the loss of counterion affinities. PMID:9239302

  15. 14C dating of small archaeological samples: neolithic to iron age in the central alpine region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, J.; Keller, W. A.; Erne, R.; Bonani, G.; Wölfli, W.

    1984-11-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon 14C dating will widen enormously the range and scope of archaeological investigations. This is due mainly to 100- to 1000-fold sample size reduction over conventional dating. In order to determine the size and the quality of samples that can be accepted for AMS 14C dating, we have selected archaeological samples relating to the Neolithic to Iron Age. The basis of our AMS target preparations is the coking (pyrolysis) of organic matter after elimination of impurities by various physical and chemical treatments. The effect of the morphology as well as of the grain size distribution of the charcoal particles was determined in order to achieve optimal conditions for accelerator dating.

  16. The dynamic transfer of 3H and 14C in mammals: a proposed generic model.

    PubMed

    Galeriu, D; Melintescu, A; Beresford, N A; Takeda, H; Crout, N M J

    2009-02-01

    Associated with the present debate regarding the potential revival of nuclear energy there is an increased interest in assessing the radiological risk to the public and also the environment. Tritium and (14)C are key radionuclides of interest in many circumstances (e.g. heavy water reactors, waste storage and fusion reactors). Because the stable analogues of these two radionuclides are integral to most biological compounds, their modelling should follow general principles from life sciences. In this paper, a model of the dynamics of (14)C and (3)H in mammals is proposed on the basis of metabolic understanding and of, as far as possible, readily available data (e.g. for organ composition and metabolism). The model is described together with validation tests (without calibration) for a range of farm animals. Despite simplifications, the model tests are encouraging for a range of animal types and products (tissues and milk), and further improvements are suggested. PMID:18830702

  17. The LLNL Accelerator Mass Spectrometry System for Biochemical 14C-Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ognibene, T J; Bench, G; Brown, T A; Vogel, J S

    2002-10-31

    We report on recent improvements made to our 1 MV accelerator mass spectrometry system that is dedicated to {sup 14}C quantification of biochemical samples. Increased vacuum pumping capacity near the high voltage terminal has resulted in a 2-fold reduction of system backgrounds to 0.04 amol {sup 14}C/mg carbon. Carbon ion transmission through the accelerator has also improved a few percent. We have also developed tritium measurement capability on this spectrometer. The {sup 3}H/{sup 1}H isotopic ratio of a milligram-sized processed tap water sample has been measured at 4 {+-} 1 x 10{sup -16} (430 {+-} 110 {micro}Bq/mg H). Measurement throughput for a typical biochemical {sup 3}H sample is estimated to be {approx}10 minutes/sample.

  18. Detection of an azido-(/sup 14/C)-atrazine labeled protein transferred to nitrocellulose paper

    SciTech Connect

    Ivey, S.; Metz, J.G.; Berg, S.P.

    1986-04-01

    An electrophoretically similar protein in spinach and maize can be covalently labeled with azido-(/sup 14/C)-atrazine and separated by 10-18% gradient LDS-PAGE. The protein profile can be transferred to nitrocellulose paper (ncp) by western blotting. The ncp containing the protein profile is sliced into 2 mm slices and counted with liquid scintillation. The labeled protein migrates as a diffuse band with a Mr of 34 kD. This band migrates at a higher Mr (40 kD) under different gel conditions. The ncp dissolves in the organic scintillation cocktail thus providing a more sensitive and quantitative detection of the /sup 14/C. This technique allows the simultaneous immunological and radiochemical identification of many electrophoretically separable proteins.

  19. Effect of chlorphentermine on incorporation of (/sup 14/C)choline in the rat lung phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Gonmori, K.; Morita, T.; Mehendale, H.M.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of chlorphentermine (CP) treatment (50 mg/kg/day, per os (po)) on the incorporation of (/sup 14/C)choline into rat lung phospholipid was studied. Total phospholipid content was increased 2.0-fold and 1.7-fold after seven and /sup 14/ days, respectively, compared with the pair-fed rats. The incorporation of (14C)choline into phosphatidylcholine (PC) was significantly inhibited by either seven or 14 days of CP treatment. Nevertheless, the PC content was significantly increased by day 7 and stayed elevated at day 14 of CP treatment. Choline and phosphorylcholine contents were significantly decreased by the CP treatment. These results suggest that the higher accumulation of PC is due to inhibition of enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of phospholipids rather than to a stimulation of the phospholipid synthesis.

  20. Astrophysical S-factor of the radiative proton capture on 14C at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, Sergey; Burtebaev, Nasurlla; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, Albert; Alimov, Dilshod

    2014-07-01

    The phase shift analysis for position location of the 2S1/2 resonance at 1.5 MeV was carried out on the basis of the known experimental measurements of the excitation functions of the p14C elastic scattering at four angles from 90° to 165° and more than 100 energy values in the range from 600-800 keV to 2200-2400 keV. Also, the possibility to describe the available experimental data on the astrophysical S-factor for the proton capture reaction on 14C to the ground state (GS) of 15N at astrophysical energies was considered in the frame of modified potential cluster model (MPCM).

  1. Behavior of sup 14 C aflatoxin M1 during camembert cheese making

    SciTech Connect

    Fremy, J.M.; Roiland, J.C.; Gaymard, A. )

    1990-05-01

    Camembert cheeses are made from raw milk spiked with aflatoxin M1. Three aflatoxin M1 levels (7.5 micrograms/L, 3 micrograms/L, and 0.3 micrograms/L) are used. In curds 35.6, 47.1, and 57.7% of aflatoxin M1, respectively, are recovered, and in wheys 64.4, 52.9, and 42.3%, respectively, are recovered. During the first 15 days of storage, the aflatoxin M1 content of different cheeses decreases 25, 55, and 75%, respectively. A similar experiment is made with milk contaminated with {sup 14}C labeled aflatoxin M1. The same results are obtained, except for the behavior of aflatoxin M1 in cheese; the same 14C activity is recovered during storage for 30 days.

  2. Changes in14c activity over time during vacuum distillation of carbon from rock pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davidson, G.R.; Yang, I.C.

    1999-01-01

    The radiocarbon activity of carbon collected by vacuum distillation from a single partially saturated tuff began to decline after approximately 60% of the water and carbon had been extracted. Disproportionate changes in 14C activity and ??13C during distillation rule out simple isotopic fractionation as a causative explanation. Additional phenomena such as matrix diffusion and ion exclusion in micropores may play a role in altering the isotopic value of extracted carbon, but neither can fully account for the observed changes. The most plausible explanation is that distillation recovers carbon from an adsorbed phase that is depleted in 14C relative to DIC in the bulk pore water. ?? 1999 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona.

  3. The hardwater effect in AMS 14C dating of food crusts on pottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippsen, Bente; Kjeldsen, Henrik; Hartz, Sönke; Paulsen, Harm; Clausen, Ingo; Heinemeier, Jan

    2010-04-01

    The pottery investigated in this study comes from late mesolithic inland sites next to rivers in Northern Germany. The first AMS 14C datings of food crusts from these sites showed surprisingly high ages, which could be caused by the hardwater effect. Modern samples from the rivers have ages of several hundred 14C years, and a modern food crust prepared from fish with a certain reservoir age shows the same age as the fish. Surprisingly, there was a large age difference between water samples and fish/mollusc shell from the same river. Associated archaeological samples of terrestrial and fluvial origin show age differences of several hundred and up to 3000 years. These high age differences are only to a limited extent transferred to the archaeological food crusts.

  4. Distribution of N-methyl-(14)C-labeled selegiline in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tekes, Kornélia; Pöstényi, Zita; Faigl, Erzsébet B; Magyar, Kálmán; Polyák, András; Trencsényi, György; Balogh, Lajos; Kalász, Huba

    2015-01-01

    Tissue distribution of selegiline including N-methyl-(14)C-selegiline was studied with three different techniques. Whole body autoradiography of labeled selegiline in rats completed the former results obtained in mice. Counting radioactivity by liquid scintillation method in various body compartments gave an in-depth numerical estimation of distribution, while RP-HPLC determination of selegiline determined the fate of intact, non-metabolized parent compound. Whole body autoradiography following 15 and 60 min of intraperitoneal application of N-methyl-(14)C-selegiline verified definite and time-dependent blood-brain penetration of selegiline. Quantitative determination of tissue concentrations by liquid scintillation and RP-HPLC methods following 5, 15, 60 and 180 min of intraperitoneal administration of selegiline unanimously verified both blood-brain and blood-testis penetration of the compound through the barrier. PMID:25886391

  5. {sup 14}C-AMS quantification of biomolecular interactions using microbore and plate separations

    SciTech Connect

    Creek, M.R.; Frantz, C.E.; Fultz, E.; Haack, K.; Redwine, K.; Shen, N.; Turteltaub, K.W.; Vogel, J.S.

    1993-10-20

    AMS sensitivity arises from the direct counting of radioisotopes without interference from molecular isobars. No chemical or physical information other than a bulk isotope ratio is available from the usual AMS instrument. Chemical or biological significance of the isotope ratio depends on the definition of the sample prior to conversion to material used in the ion source. The authors use AMS to quantify biochemical interactions between labeled xenobiotics and their potential targets of toxicity. These potential target molecules are separated and defined by various types of plate and microbore separations, including thin layer chromatography (TLC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gel electrophoresis (GE) in quantifying the binding of {sup 14}C-labeled compounds to specific DNA and protein fragments. They discuss their methods of using these microbore and plate separations of biomolecules while controlling contamination from {sup 14}C in laboratory equipment and give examples.

  6. Extraction of /sup 14/C-labeled photosynthate from aquatic plants with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)

    SciTech Connect

    Filbin, G.J.; Hough, R.A.

    1984-03-01

    DMSO was tested as a solvent to extract /sup 14/C-labeled photosynthate from three species of aquatic plants in photosynthesis measurements and compared with the dry oxidation method for plant radioassay. Extraction of ca. 300 mg of fresh or rehydrated dry plant tissue samples in 10 ml of reagent-grade DMSO for 8h at 65/sup 0/C resulted in a stable, nonviscous solution with excellent liquid scintillation counting characteristics. Extraction efficiency was in the range of 96-99% of fixed /sup 14/C, and precision was comparable to, or better than, that obtained with dry oxidation. The method is simple and inexpensive, and for fresh tissue the same sample extracts can be used for chlorophyll analyses.

  7. Hydrogen bond disruption in DNA base pairs from (14)C transmutation.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Michel; Carter, Damien J; Uberuaga, Blas P; Stanek, Christopher R; Mancera, Ricardo L; Marks, Nigel A

    2014-09-01

    Recent ab initio molecular dynamics simulations have shown that radioactive carbon does not normally fragment DNA bases when it decays. Motivated by this finding, density functional theory and Bader analysis have been used to quantify the effect of C → N transmutation on hydrogen bonding in DNA base pairs. We find that (14)C decay has the potential to significantly alter hydrogen bonds in a variety of ways including direct proton shuttling (thymine and cytosine), thermally activated proton shuttling (guanine), and hydrogen bond breaking (cytosine). Transmutation substantially modifies both the absolute and relative strengths of the hydrogen bonding pattern, and in two instances (adenine and cytosine), the density at the critical point indicates development of mild covalent character. Since hydrogen bonding is an important component of Watson-Crick pairing, these (14)C-induced modifications, while infrequent, may trigger errors in DNA transcription and replication. PMID:25127298

  8. Resonances in 14C observed in the 4He(10Be ,α )10Be reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, M.; Malcolm, J. D.; Achouri, N. L.; Ashwood, N. I.; Bardayan, D. W.; Brown, S. M.; Catford, W. N.; Chipps, K. A.; Cizewski, J.; Curtis, N.; Jones, K. L.; Munoz-Britton, T.; Pain, S. D.; Soić, N.; Wheldon, C.; Wilson, G. L.; Ziman, V. A.

    2014-11-01

    The α (10Be,α )10Be resonant scattering reaction has been measured at nine 10Be beam energies from 25 to 48 MeV, scanning out resonances in 14C from excitation energies of 13 to 24 MeV. Angular distribution measurements were used to assign the spin and parity of 5- to resonances at Ex=18.82 (2 ) and 19.67(2) MeV and 6+ at Ex=20.80 (2 ) MeV. The data also strongly indicate a 3- resonance at 17.32(2) MeV. The systematic uncertainty on the excitation energies is 175 keV. An R -matrix analysis has been performed for the excitation energy range 16.5 to 22 MeV. The data are discussed in terms of cluster bands in 14C.

  9. Measurement of choline acetyltransferase with (/sup 14/C)acetate by a cycling procedure

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, J.J.; Hruschak, K.A.

    1987-06-01

    A multiple enzyme and multisubstrate cycling system is described for the radiometric determination of cholineacetyltransferase (ChAT) activity in crude tissue homogenates. The methods employs (/sup 14/C)acetate coupled with the enzymes acetate kinase (AK) and phosphotransacetylase (PTA) for the generation of (/sup 14/C)acetyl CoA. By recycling it was possible to avoid product inhibition of ChAT by CoA, ATP was maintained constant by rephosphorylation of ADP. Kinetics of the individual enzyme reactions were studied and the parameters obtained were used to select appropriate conditions to maintain linearity of varying amounts ChAT activity over a sixty minute time course. The sensitivity of the method is limited only by the specific activity of commercially available isotope labeled acetate.

  10. Behavior of 14C aflatoxin M1 during camembert cheese making.

    PubMed

    Fremy, J M; Roiland, J C; Gaymard, A

    1990-01-01

    Camembert cheeses are made from raw milk spiked with aflatoxin M1. Three aflatoxin M1 levels (7.5 micrograms/L, 3 micrograms/L, and 0.3 micrograms/L) are used. In curds 35.6, 47.1, and 57.7% of aflatoxin M1, respectively, are recovered, and in wheys 64.4, 52.9, and 42.3%, respectively, are recovered. During the first 15 days of storage, the aflatoxin M1 content of different cheeses decreases 25, 55, and 75%, respectively. A similar experiment is made with milk contaminated with 14C labeled aflatoxin M1. The same results are obtained, except for the behavior of aflatoxin M1 in cheese; the same 14C activity is recovered during storage for 30 days. PMID:2123931

  11. A low cost optical radiocarbon (14C) sensor for greenhouse gas source attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, D.; Fleisher, A. J.; Liu, Q.; Hodges, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) provides a convenient means for the attribution of atmospheric greenhouse gases between anthropogenic and biogenic sources. Unfortunately, routine measurements are costly and require extensive sample preparation to meet sensitivity goals only achievable at large accelerator mass spectrometer facilities. We describe an alternate approach in which a laser is used to selectively record the absorption signatures of the 14C isotope of CO2. The designed instrument will allow for bench-top measurements of 14CO2 at and below ambient levels (~1.2 parts-per-trillion). The use of a commercially available mid-infrared quantum cascade laser as the optical source greatly reduces the cost of the instrument over more complicated sources and should allow for routine inline measurements.

  12. ( sup 14 C)-Sucrose uptake by guard cell protoplasts of pisum sativum, argenteum mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrig, K.; Raschke, K. )

    1991-05-01

    Guard cells rely on import for their supply with reduced carbon. The authors tested by silicone oil centrifugation the ability of guard cell protoplasts to accumulated ({sup 14}C)-sucrose. Uptake rates were corrected after measurement of {sup 14}C-sorbitol and {sup 3}H{sub 2}O spaces. Sucrose uptake followed biphasic kinetics, with a high-affinity component below 1 mM external sucrose (apparent K{sub m} 0.8 mM at 25C) and a low-affinity nonsaturable component above. Uptake depended on pH (optimum at pH 5.0). Variations in the concentrations of external KCl, CCCP, and valinomycin indicated that about one-half of the sucrose uptake rate could be related to an electrochemical gradient across the plasmalemma. Total uptake rates measured at 5 mM external sucrose seem to be sufficient to replenish emptied plastids with starch within a few hours.

  13. In vitro uptake of /sup 14/C-praziquantel by cestodes, trematodes, and a nematode

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, P.; Thomas, H.; Weber, H.

    1980-12-01

    /sup 14/C-praziquantel was rapidly taken up by Schistosoma mansoni, Fasciola hepatica, Hymenolepis nana, and isolated strobilocerci of Taenia taeniaeformis. Schistosoma mansoni lost praziquantel rapidly to drug-free medium. Chromatography of extracts prepared after incubation of S. mansoni and H. nana yielded no indication that praziquantel was metabolized. Autoradiography revealed a uniform distribution of praziquantel throughout the tissues of S. mansoni and H. nana. Uptake was considerably slower in the nematode Heterakis spumosa and apparently via the oral route.

  14. Incorporation of UDP-( sup 14 C)glucose into xyloglucan by pea membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.; Maclachlan, G. )

    1989-09-01

    The water-insoluble 1,4-{beta}-linked products formed from UDP-({sup 14}C)glucose by pea membranes were dissolved in hot dimethylsulfoxide/paraformaldehyde and fractionated on columns of controlled pore glass beads calibrated with dextran standards. The products eluted with a peak size close to 70 kilodaltons in dextran equivalents. Similar elution profiles were obtained for products formed in brief or extended incubations and at high or low substrate concentrations. Methylation analysis indicated that only a few ({sup 14}C)glucose units had been added to an endogenous acceptor to form this product. In the presence of UDP-xylose at concentrations equal to or less than UDP-({sup 14}C)glucose, incorporation from the latter was enhanced and the products elongated with time to a size range where the major components eluted between dextran 264 and 500 kilodaltons. Treatment with endo-1,4-{beta}-glucanase resulted in a mixture of oligosaccharides, including the xyloglucan subunit Glc{sub 4}Xyl{sub 3}, which were hydrolyzed further by mixed glycosidases to labeled glucose and isoprimeverose (xylosyl-1,6-{alpha}-D-glucose). In pulse-chase experiments, low molecular weight product formed from UDP-({sup 14}C)glucose alone was clearly a precursor for high molecular weight products formed subsequently in the presence of both UDP-glucose and UDP-xylose. It is concluded that the 1,4-{beta}-transglucosylation activity detected in these tests was due to an enzyme that is required for biosynthesis of the backbone of xyloglucan.

  15. Kernel abortion in maize. II. Distribution of /sup 14/C among kernel carboydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hanft, J.M.; Jones, R.J.

    1986-06-01

    This study was designed to compare the uptake and distribution of /sup 14/C among fructose, glucose, sucrose, and starch in the cob, pedicel, and endosperm tissues of maize (Zea mays L.) kernels induced to abort by high temperature with those that develop normally. Kernels cultured in vitro at 309 and 35/sup 0/C were transferred to (/sup 14/C)sucrose media 10 days after pollination. Kernels cultured at 35/sup 0/C aborted prior to the onset of linear dry matter accumulation. Significant uptake into the cob, pedicel, and endosperm of radioactivity associated with the soluble and starch fractions of the tissues was detected after 24 hours in culture on atlageled media. After 8 days in culture on (/sup 14/C)sucrose media, 48 and 40% of the radioactivity associated with the cob carbohydrates was found in the reducing sugars at 30 and 35/sup 0/C, respectively. Of the total carbohydrates, a higher percentage of label was associated with sucrose and lower percentage with fructose and glucose in pedicel tissue of kernels cultured at 35/sup 0/C compared to kernels cultured at 30/sup 0/C. These results indicate that sucrose was not cleaved to fructose and glucose as rapidly during the unloading process in the pedicel of kernels induced to abort by high temperature. Kernels cultured at 35/sup 0/C had a much lower proportion of label associated with endosperm starch (29%) than did kernels cultured at 30/sup 0/C (89%). Kernels cultured at 35/sup 0/C had a correspondingly higher proportion of /sup 14/C in endosperm fructose, glucose, and sucrose.

  16. Product inhibition of cellulases studied with 14C-labeled cellulose substrates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As a green alternative for the production of transportation fuels, the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose and subsequent fermentation to ethanol are being intensively researched. To be economically feasible, the hydrolysis of lignocellulose must be conducted at a high concentration of solids, which results in high concentrations of hydrolysis end-products, cellobiose and glucose, making the relief of product inhibition of cellulases a major challenge in the process. However, little quantitative information on the product inhibition of individual cellulases acting on cellulose substrates is available because it is experimentally difficult to assess the hydrolysis of the heterogeneous polymeric substrate in the high background of added products. Results The cellobiose and glucose inhibition of thermostable cellulases from Acremonium thermophilum, Thermoascus aurantiacus, and Chaetomium thermophilum acting on uniformly 14C-labeled bacterial cellulose and its derivatives, 14C-bacterial microcrystalline cellulose and 14C-amorphous cellulose, was studied. Cellulases from Trichoderma reesei were used for comparison. The enzymes most sensitive to cellobiose inhibition were glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 7 cellobiohydrolases (CBHs), followed by family 6 CBHs and endoglucanases (EGs). The strength of glucose inhibition followed the same order. The product inhibition of all enzymes was relieved at higher temperatures. The inhibition strength measured for GH7 CBHs with low molecular-weight model substrates did not correlate with that measured with 14C-cellulose substrates. Conclusions GH7 CBHs are the primary targets for product inhibition of the synergistic hydrolysis of cellulose. The inhibition must be studied on cellulose substrates instead of on low molecular-weight model substrates when selecting enzymes for lignocellulose hydrolysis. The advantages of using higher temperatures are an increase in the catalytic efficiency of enzymes and the relief of

  17. Biosynthesis of riboflavin. Enzymatic formation of the xylene moiety from [14C]ribulose 5-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, P; Neuberger, G; Floss, H G; Bacher, A

    1984-02-14

    We have studied the enzymatic formation of the xylene ring of riboflavin using cell extracts from the flavinogenic yeast Candida guilliermondii. 5-Amino-6-ribitylamino-2,4(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione or its 5'-phosphate could serve as substrates. In addition, a pentose phosphate or pentulose phosphate was required. Experiments with [14C]ribulose 5-phosphate gave evidence for the incorporation of the ribulose carbon atoms except C-4 into the xylene ring of the vitamin. PMID:6546684

  18. Using 14C and 3H to understand groundwater flow and recharge in an aquifer window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, A. P.; Cartwright, I.; Gilfedder, B. S.; Cendón, D. I.; Unland, N. P.; Hofmann, H.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of groundwater residence times and recharge locations is vital to the sustainable management of groundwater resources. Here we investigate groundwater residence times and patterns of recharge in the Gellibrand Valley, southeast Australia, where outcropping aquifer sediments of the Eastern View Formation form an "aquifer window" that may receive diffuse recharge from rainfall and recharge from the Gellibrand River. To determine recharge patterns and groundwater flow paths, environmental isotopes (3H, 14C, δ13C, δ18O, δ2H) are used in conjunction with groundwater geochemistry and continuous monitoring of groundwater elevation and electrical conductivity. The water table fluctuates by 0.9 to 3.7 m annually, implying recharge rates of 90 and 372 mm yr-1. However, residence times of shallow (11 to 29 m) groundwater determined by 14C are between 100 and 10 000 years, 3H activities are negligible in most of the groundwater, and groundwater electrical conductivity remains constant over the period of study. Deeper groundwater with older 14C ages has lower δ18O values than younger, shallower groundwater, which is consistent with it being derived from greater altitudes. The combined geochemistry data indicate that local recharge from precipitation within the valley occurs through the aquifer window, however much of the groundwater in the Gellibrand Valley predominantly originates from the regional recharge zone, the Barongarook High. The Gellibrand Valley is a regional discharge zone with upward head gradients that limits local recharge to the upper 10 m of the aquifer. Additionally, the groundwater head gradients adjacent to the Gellibrand River are generally upwards, implying that it does not recharge the surrounding groundwater and has limited bank storage. 14C ages and Cl concentrations are well correlated and Cl concentrations may be used to provide a first-order estimate of groundwater residence times. Progressively lower chloride concentrations from 10

  19. Release of ( sup 14 C)5-hydroxytryptamine from human platelets by red wine

    SciTech Connect

    Jarman, J.; Glover, V.; Sandler, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Red wine, at a final dilution of 1/50, caused released of ({sup 14}C)5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) from preloaded platelets, an effect which was not observed with any white wines or beers tested. Since 5-HT, is probably released from body stores during migraine attacks and red wine is known to provoke migraine episodes in susceptible individuals, release of 5-HT, possibly from central stores, could represent a plausible mechanism for its mode of action.

  20. Long-term persistence of various 14C-labeled pesticides in soils.

    PubMed

    Jablonowski, Nicolai D; Linden, Andreas; Köppchen, Stephan; Thiele, Björn; Hofmann, Diana; Mittelstaedt, Werner; Pütz, Thomas; Burauel, Peter

    2012-09-01

    The fate of the 14C-labeled herbicides ethidimuron (ETD), methabenzthiazuron (MBT), and the fungicide anilazine (ANI) in soils was evaluated after long-term aging (9-17 years) in field based lysimeters subject to crop rotation. Analysis of residual 14C activity in the soils revealed 19% (ETD soil; 0-10 cm depth), 35% (MBT soil; 0-30), and 43% (ANI soil; 0-30) of the total initially applied. Accelerated solvent extraction yielded 90% (ETD soil), 26% (MBT soil), and 41% (ANI soil) of residual pesticide 14C activity in the samples. LC-MS/MS analysis revealed the parent compounds ETD and MBT, accounting for 3% and 2% of applied active ingredient in the soil layer, as well as dihydroxy-anilazine as the primary ANI metabolite. The results for ETD and MBT were matching with values obtained from samples of a 12 year old field plot experiment. The data demonstrate the long-term persistence of these pesticides in soils based on outdoor trials. PMID:22591787

  1. Role of biotransformation, sorption and mineralization of (14)C-labelled sulfamethoxazole under different redox conditions.

    PubMed

    Alvarino, T; Nastold, P; Suarez, S; Omil, F; Corvini, P F X; Bouju, H

    2016-01-15

    (14)C-sulfamethoxazole biotransformation, sorption and mineralization was studied with heterotrophic and autotrophic biomass under aerobic and anoxic conditions, as well as with anaerobic biomass. The (14)C-radiolabelled residues distribution in the solid, liquid and gas phases was closely monitored along a total incubation time of 190 h. Biotransformation was the main removal mechanism, mineralization and sorption remaining below 5% in all the cases, although the presence of a carbon source exerted a positive effect on the mineralization rate by the aerobic heterotrophic bacteria. In fact, an influence of the type of primary substrate and the redox potential was observed in all cases on the biotransformation and mineralization rates, since an enhancement of the removal rate was observed when an external carbon source was used as a primary substrate under aerobic conditions, while a negligible effect was observed under nitrifying conditions. In the liquid phases collected from all assays, up to three additional peaks corresponding to (14)C-radiolabelled residues were detected. The highest concentration was observed under anaerobic conditions, where two radioactive metabolites were detected representing each around 15% of the total applied radioactivity after 180 h incubation. One of the metabolites detected under anoxic and anaerobic conditions, is probably resulting from ring cleavage of the isoxazole ring. PMID:26546766

  2. Enantioselective absorption and transformation of a novel chiral neonicotinoid [(14)C]-cycloxaprid in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengchen; Huang, Lei; Tang, Shenghua; Li, Zhong; Ye, Qingfu

    2016-06-01

    Neonicotinoid pesticides caused hazardous effects on pollinators and aquatic ecosystem. The new developed chiral cis-neonicotinoid cycloxaprid(CYC) is a highly potent substitute for low toxicity to bees and high efficiency on target-insects, but little is known about the metabolic dynamics of racemic CYC and its 2 enantiomers(SR and RS) in animal models. In this study, chiral separation of (14)C-labeled racemic CYC was performed in high-performance liquid chromatography under optimal conditions. For the first time that the stereoselectivity of the chiral neonicotinoid insecticide CYC was exhibited in rats after single dose oral administration using (14)C-labeled isotope trace technique. Enantioselective behaviors of racemic CYC, SR and RS were observed in blood metabolism, tissue distribution and excretion. The major deposition of (14)C were found in liver, lung, kidney and heart. After 24 h, skin and fat showed a strong bioaccumulation effect, and total excreted urine and feces of CYC, SR and RS were 50.4%, 59.7% and 74.5%, respectively. Enantiomer RS had the fastest absorption and elimination rates, and it was least bioaccumulated in rats. The results provide scientific basis and practical techniques for environmental risk assessment of chiral pesticides, especially neonicotinoids. PMID:27038208

  3. 14C and {Th}/{U} dating of Pleistocene and Holocene stromatolites from East African paleolakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Carro, Odette; Casanova, Joel

    1986-05-01

    During recent humid episodes, stromatolites were built along paleolake margins, some 60 m above the modern water level of Lakes Natron and Magadi (southern Gregory Rift Valley). Three generations of stromatolites are observed, the more recent ones frequently covering pebbles and boulders eroded from the older ones. The youngest one yielded 14C ages ranging from approximately 12,000 to 10,000 yr B.P. Their δ 13C values (≥2.6%) suggest isotopic equilibrium between the paleolake total inorganic dissolved carbon and the atmospheric CO 2, thereby lending credence to the reliability of the 14C. An initial {230Th }/{232Th } ratio in the detrital component was determined by {Th}/{U} measurements on the 14C dated stromatolites. Using this value a {230Th }/{234U } chronology for the older stromatolites was calculated. Ages of ≥240,000 and 135,000 ± 10,000 yr were obtained for the first and second generations, respectively. A humid episode apparently characterized eastern Africa during each glacial-interglacial transition. 18O and 13C measurements on stromatolites, when compared to values on modern waters and carbonates, provide paleohydrological information. Long residence time of the paleolake waters and less seasonally contrasted regimes are inferred.

  4. Histamine metabolism in cluster headache and migraine. Catabolism of 14C histamine.

    PubMed

    Sjaastad, O; Sjaastad, O V

    1977-09-12

    Various parameters of histamine metabolism were studied in patients with migraine, cluster headache and chronic paroxysmal hemicrania. These included urinary excretion of radioactivity and of 14C histamine and its metabolites, exhaled 14CO2 and fecal radioactivity after oral as well as subcutaneous administration of radioactive histamine. No marked deviation from the normal was found except in one patient with the cluster headache variant, chronic paroxysmal hemicrania, in whom an aberration in 14C histamine degradation seemed to be present. Only minute quantities of the 14C histamine metabolite C14 imidazoleacetic acid riboside seemed to be formed during a period with severe paroxysms. During a symptom-free period no deviation from normal was observed. The most likely explanation for this finding seems to be a defect in the conversion of imidazoleacetic acid to its riboside. This defect may possibly explain the increased urinary excretion of histamine in this particular patient. The relationship of this metabolic aberration to the production of headache still remains dubious for various reasons. PMID:72800

  5. Methods for high precision 14C AMS measurement of atmospheric CO2 at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Graven, H D; Guilderson, T P; Keeling, R F

    2006-10-18

    Development of {sup 14}C analysis with precision better than 2{per_thousand} has the potential to expand the utility of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} measurements for carbon cycle investigations as atmospheric gradients currently approach traditional measurement precision of 2-5{per_thousand}. The AMS facility at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, produces high and stable beam currents that enable efficient acquisition times for large numbers of {sup 14}C counts. One million {sup 14}C atoms can be detected in approximately 25 minutes, suggesting that near 1{per_thousand} counting precision is economically feasible at LLNL. The overall uncertainty in measured values is ultimately determined by the variation between measured ratios in several sputtering periods of the same sample and by the reproducibility of replicate samples. Experiments on the collection of one million counts on replicate samples of CO{sub 2} extracted from a whole air cylinder show a standard deviation of 1.7{per_thousand} in 36 samples measured over several wheels. This precision may be limited by the reproducibility of Oxalic Acid I standard samples, which is considerably poorer. We outline the procedures for high-precision sample handling and analysis that have enabled reproducibility in the cylinder extraction samples at the <2{per_thousand} level and describe future directions to continue increasing measurement precision at LLNL.

  6. Pollen-based biomes for Beringia 18,000, 6000 and 0 14C yr BP

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, M.E.; Anderson, P.M.; Brubaker, L.B.; Ager, T.A.; Andreev, A.A.; Bigelow, N.H.; Cwynar, L.C.; Eisner, Wendy R.; Harrison, S.P.; Hu, F.-S.; Jolly, D.; Lozhkin, A.V.; MacDonald, G.M.; Mock, C.J.; Ritchie, J.C.; Sher, A.V.; Spear, R.W.; Williams, J.W.; Yu, G.

    2000-01-01

    The objective biomization method developed by Prentice et al. (1996) for Europe was extended using modern pollen samples from Beringia and then applied to fossil pollen data to reconstruct palaeovegetation patterns at 6000 and 18,000 14C yr BP. The predicted modern distribution of tundra, taiga and cool conifer forests in Alaska and north-western Canada generally corresponds well to actual vegetation patterns, although sites in regions characterized today by a mosaic of forest and tundra vegetation tend to be preferentially assigned to tundra. Siberian larch forests are delimited less well, probably due to the extreme under-representation of Larix in pollen spectra. The biome distribution across Beringia at 6000 14C yr BP was broadly similar to today, with little change in the northern forest limit, except for a possible northward-advance in the Mackenzie delta region. The western forest limit in Alaska was probably east of its modern position. At 18,000 14C yr BP the whole of Beringia was covered by tundra. However, the importance of the various plant functional types varied from site to site, supporting the idea that the vegetation cover was a mosaic of different tundra types.

  7. In vitro covalent binding of 3-(/sup 14/C)methylindole metabolites in goat tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, T.M.; Carlson, J.R.; Nocerini, M.R.

    1984-05-01

    Covalent binding of 3-(/sup 14/C)methylindole (3(/sup 14/C)MI) in crude microsomal preparations of goat lung, liver, and kidney was measured to determine if a reactive intermediate was formed during the in vitro metabolism of 3-methylindole (3MI). The bound radioactivity was highest in lung compared to liver and kidney. The amount of bound radioactivity per nanomole of cytochrome P-450 was approximately 10 times higher in the lung compared to the liver. No detectable bound radioactivity was found when 3-(/sup 3/H)methyloxindole was used as the substrate. Cofactor requirements and the effects of inhibitors indicate that a mixed function oxidase (MFO) system is involved in formation of a reactive intermediate. Inhibitors and conjugating agents that are known to reduce the severity of 3MI-induced lung injury such as piperonyl butoxide (MFO inhibitor) and glutathione (conjugating agent) significantly decreased the in vitro binding of 3(/sup 14/C)MI. The results indicate that a reactive intermediate is produced during the metabolism of 3MI by the MFO system. The organ specificity in binding suggests that covalent binding by lung microsomes may be related to the mechanism of 3MI-induced lung injury.

  8. Tips and traps in the 14C Bio-AMS preparation laboratory (WSam 7)

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B A; Haack, K W; Stewart, P H; Vogel, J S

    1999-10-12

    Maintaining a contamination free sample preparation lab for biological 14 C AMS requires the same or more diligence as a radiocarbon dating prep lab. Isotope ratios of materials routinely range over 4-8 orders of magnitude in a single experiment, dosing solutions contain thousands of DPM and gels used to separate proteins possess 14 C ratios of 1pMC. Radiocarbon contamination is a legacy of earlier tracer work in most biological laboratories, even if they were never hot labs. Removable surface contamination can be found and monitored using swipes. Contamination can be found on any surface routinely touched: door knobs, light switches, drawer handles, water faucets. In general, all surfaces routinely touched need to be covered with paper, foil, or plastic that can be changed frequently. Shared air supplies can also present problems by distributing hot aerosols throughout a building. Aerosols can be monitored for 14 C content using graphitized coal or fullerene soot mixed with metal powder as an absorber. The monitors can be set out in work spaces for 1-2 weeks and measured by AMS with regular samples. Frequent air changes help minimize aerosol contamination in many cases. Cross contamination of samples can be minimized by using disposable plastic or glassware in the prep lab, isolating samples from the air when possible and using positive displacement pipetters.

  9. 14C dating of the Early to Late Bronze Age stratigraphic sequence of Aegina Kolonna, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, E. M.; Gauß, W.; Forstenpointner, G.; Lindblom, M.; Smetana, R.; Steier, P.; Thanheiser, U.; Weninger, F.

    2010-04-01

    Aegina Kolonna, located in the center of the Saronic Gulf in the Aegean Mediterranean (Greece), is one of the major archaeological sites of the Aegean Bronze Age with a continuous stratigraphic settlement sequence from the Late Neolithic to the Late Bronze Age. Due to its position next to the maritime cross roads between central mainland Greece, the northeast Peloponnese, the Cyclades and Crete, the island played an important role in the trade between these regions. In the course of new excavations, which focused on the exploration of the Early, Middle and Late Bronze Age at Kolonna, several short lived samples from different settlement phases have been 14C-dated with the AMS method at the VERA laboratory. Bayesian sequencing of the 14C data according to the stratigraphic position of the samples in the profile was performed to enable estimates of the transition time between the cultural phases. The Aegina Kolonna 14C sequence is one of the longest existing so far for the Aegean Bronze Age, and therefore of major importance for the absolute Bronze Age chronology in this region. Preliminary results indicate that the Middle Helladic period seems to have started earlier and lasted longer than traditionally assumed. Further, at the present stage of our investigation we can give also a very tentative time frame for the Santorini volcanic eruption which seems to be in agreement with the science derived VDL date.

  10. Characterization of nonexchangeable radioactivity in L1210 cells incubated with ( sup 14 C)thiotepa: Labeling of phosphatidylethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Egorin, M.J.; Snyder, S.W. )

    1990-07-01

    N,N',N''-Triethylenethiophosphoramide ((14C)thiotepa) accumulation by L1210 cells is a biphasic process. A very rapid initial phase is followed by a much slower second phase that reflects accumulation of radioactivity in a form that is not lost or exchanged when cells are resuspended and incubated in drug-free medium for up to 8 h. In this study we attempted to characterize this nonexchangeable radioactivity. Nuclei (10(7)) isolated from L1210 cells and incubated with (14C)thiotepa did not accumulate 14C during incubations of up to 5 h. Similarly, nuclei isolated from 10(7) L1210 cells that had been shown to accumulate nonexchangeable 14C after incubation with (14C)thiotepa did not show an increase in nuclear-associated 14C. Eighty to 85% of nonexchangeable 14C in L1210 cells incubated with (14C)thiotepa was soluble in ethanol or chloroform:methanol (2:1, v/v), and although most of this cell-associated nonexchangeable 14C was precipitated by trichloroacetic acid, subsequent treatment of that precipitate with methanol solubilized most of the 14C so that only 15 to 20% remained with the final precipitate. When chloroform:methanol-soluble nonexchangeable 14C was analyzed with thin-layer chromatography systems suitable for thiotepa or simple lipids, all radioactivity remained at the origin. In contrast, when analyzed with one- and two-dimensional thin-layer chromatographic systems suitable for complex lipids, all chloroform:methanol-soluble radioactivity was associated with a single lipid spot. This lipid cochromatographed with phosphatidylethanolamine, reacted with ninhydrin but not with 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine or the Dragendorff choline reagent, and was digested by phospholipases C and D, all of which lead to its identification as phosphatidylethanolamine.

  11. Urea and deuterium mixtures at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, M. Husband, R. J.; Frantzana, A. D.; Loveday, J. S.; Bull, C. L.; Klotz, S.

    2015-03-28

    Urea, like many network forming compounds, has long been known to form inclusion (guest-host) compounds. Unlike other network formers like water, urea is not known to form such inclusion compounds with simple molecules like hydrogen. Such compounds if they existed would be of interest both for the fundamental insight they provide into molecular bonding and as potential gas storage systems. Urea has been proposed as a potential hydrogen storage material [T. A. Strobel et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 478, 97 (2009)]. Here, we report the results of high-pressure neutron diffraction studies of urea and D{sub 2} mixtures that indicate no inclusion compound forms up to 3.7 GPa.

  12. Metabolic fate of the (14)C-labeled herbicide clodinafop-propargyl in soil.

    PubMed

    Jaquet, Jasmin; Weitzel, Pascal; Junge, Thorsten; Schmidt, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic fate of (14)C-phenyl-labeled herbicide clodinafop-propargyl (CfP) was studied for 28 days in lab assays using a soil from Germany (Ap horizon, silt loam, and cambisol). Mineralization amounted to 12.40% of applied (14)C after 28 days showing a distinct lag phase until day 7 of incubation. Portions of radioactivity extractable by means of 0.01 M CaCl2 solution (bioavailable fraction) decreased rapidly and were 4.41% after 28 days. Even immediately after application, only 57.31% were extracted with the aqueous solvent. Subsequent extraction using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE; acetonitrile/water 4:1, v/v) released 39.91% of applied (14)C with day 0 and 26.16% with day 28 of incubation from the samples. Non-extractable portions of radioactivity thus, increased with time amounting to 11.99% (day 0) and 65.00% (day 28). A remarkable increase was observed between 14 and 28 days correlating with the distinct increase of mineralization. No correlation was found throughout incubation with general microbial activity as determined by DMSO reduction. Analysis of the CaCl2 and ASE extracts by radio-TLC, radio-HPLC and GC/MS revealed that CfP was rapidly cleaved to free acid clodinafop (Cf), which was further (bio-) transformed; DT50 values (based on radio-TLC detection of the parent compound) were far below 1 day (CfP) and about 7 days (Cf). TLC analysis pointed to 2-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)-propionic acid as further metabolite. Due to fractionation of non-extractable residues, most of the (14)C was associated with fulvic and humic acids, portions in humin fractions and non-humics were moderate and low, respectively. Using a special strategy, which included pre-incubation of the soil with CfP and then mineralization of (14)C-CfP as criterion, a microorganism was isolated from the soil examined. The microorganism grew using CfP as sole carbon source with concomitant evolution of (14)CO2. The bacterium was characterized by growth on commonly used carbon

  13. Flux of carbon from 14C-enriched leaf litter throughout a forest soil mesocosm

    SciTech Connect

    Froberg, Mats J.; Hanson, Paul J; Trumbore, Susan E.; Swanston, Christopher W.; Todd Jr, Donald E

    2009-01-01

    The role of DOC for the build-up of soil organic carbon pools is still not well known, but it is thought to play a role in the transport of carbon to a greater depth where it becomes more stable. The aim of this study was to elucidate within-year dynamics of carbon transport from litter to the O (Oe and Oa) and A horizons. Mesocosms with constructed soil profiles were used to study dynamics of C transport from 14C-enriched (about 1000 ) leaf litter to the Oe/Oa and A horizons as well as the mineralization of leaf litter. The mesocosms were placed in the field for 17 months during which time fluxes and 14C content of DOC and CO2 were measured. Changes in 14C in leaf litter and bulk soil C pools were also recorded. Significant simultaneous release and immobilization of DOC occurring in both the O and A horizons was hypothesized. Contrary to our hypothesis, DOC released from the labeled Oi horizon was not retained within the Oe/Oa layer. DOC originating in the unlabeled Oe/Oa layer was also released for transport. Extensive retention of DOC occurred in the A horizon. DOC leaching from A horizon consisted of a mix of DOC from different sources, with a main fraction originating in the A horizon and a smaller fraction leached from the overlaying horizons. The C and 14C budget for the litter layer also indicated a surprisingly large amount of carbon with ambient Δ14C-signature to be respired from this layer. Data for this site also suggested significant contributions from throughfall to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transport into and respiration from the litter layer. The results from this study showed that DOC retentionwas low in the O horizon and therefore not important for the O horizon carbon budget. In the A horizon DOC retention was extensive, but annual DOC input was small compared to C stocks and therefore not important for changes in soil C on an annual timescale.

  14. Does the 14C method estimate net photosynthesis? II. Implications from cyclostat studies of marine phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Shaofeng; Laws, Edward A.

    2014-09-01

    Two species of marine phytoplankton, Isochrysis galbana and Chlorella kessleri, were grown in a continuous culture system on a 12-h:12-h light:dark cycle of illumination under nitrate-limited growth conditions. At growth rates of ~1 d-1, production rates estimated from 14C uptake were not significantly different from production rates estimated from changes in particulate organic carbon (POC) and total organic carbon (TOC). At growth rates of ~0.35 d-1, however, production rates based on uptake of 14C significantly (p<0.05) overestimated production rates based on changes in POC and TOC in all cases for C. kessleri and after 24 h for I. galbana. The ratio of production based on 14C uptake to production based on changes in POC and TOC concentrations was in all cases higher after 24 h than after 12 h. The extent of overestimation after a 24-h incubation at ~0.35 d-1 was about 23 and 40% in the cases of I. galbana and C. kessleri, respectively. Dark respiration rates estimated from changes in 14C activity during the dark period were lower than the rates estimated from changes of POC and TOC concentrations during the 12 h of darkness because only about 73% of the carbon respired during the dark period had been fixed during the previous 12-h photoperiod. The fact that the 14C method tends to overestimate net carbon assimilation by a greater percentage at low growth rates than at high growth rates probably reflects the greater efficiency of intracellular recycling of respired CO2 at high growth rates. The fact that the extent of overestimation is greater when cells are grown on a light:dark cycle probably reflects the fact that not all carbon respired in the dark was fixed during the previous photoperiod and that intracellular recycling of respired CO2 during the photoperiod is inefficient during some phases of the synchronized growth that tends to be entrained by light:dark cycles.

  15. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862....1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862....1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862....1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  18. 21 CFR § 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2015-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2015-04-01 2015-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. § 862.1770 Section Â... Systems § 862.1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum,...

  19. Tritium and 14C background levels in pristine aquatic systems and their potential sources of variability.

    PubMed

    Eyrolle-Boyer, Frédérique; Claval, David; Cossonnet, Catherine; Zebracki, Mathilde; Gairoard, Stéphanie; Radakovitch, Olivier; Calmon, Philippe; Leclerc, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Tritium and (14)C are currently the two main radionuclides discharged by nuclear industry. Tritium integrates into and closely follows the water cycle and, as shown recently the carbon cycle, as does (14)C (Eyrolle-Boyer et al., 2014a, b). As a result, these two elements persist in both terrestrial and aquatic environments according to the recycling rates of organic matter. Although on average the organically bound tritium (OBT) activity of sediments in pristine rivers does not significantly differ today (2007-2012) from the mean tritiated water (HTO) content on record for rainwater (2.4 ± 0.6 Bq/L and 1.6 ± 0.4 Bq/L, respectively), regional differences are expected depending on the biomass inventories affected by atmospheric global fallout from nuclear testing and the recycling rate of organic matter within watersheds. The results obtained between 2007 and 2012 for (14)C show that the levels varied between 94.5 ± 1.5 and 234 ± 2.7 Bq/kg of C for the sediments in French rivers and across a slightly higher range of 199 ± 1.3 to 238 ± 3.1 Bq/kg of C for fish. This variation is most probably due to preferential uptake of some organic carbon compounds by fish restraining (14)C dilution with refractory organic carbon and/or with old carbonates both depleted in (14)C. Overall, most of these ranges of values are below the mean baseline value for the terrestrial environment (232.0 ± 1.8 Bq/kg of C in 2012, Roussel-Debet, 2014a) in relation to dilution by the carbonates and/or fossil organic carbon present in aquatic systems. This emphasises yet again the value of establishing regional baseline value ranges for these two radionuclides in order to account for palaeoclimatic and lithological variations. Besides, our results obtained from sedimentary archive investigation have confirmed the delayed contamination of aquatic sediments by tritium from the past nuclear tests atmospheric fallout, as recently demonstrated from data chronicles (Eyrolle

  20. OSL versus 14C dating of sandy pedosediments as paleo-ecological archives in cultural landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Mourik, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    Late glacial aeolian coversand dominates the surface geology of an extensive area in Northwest Europe. During prehistoric and early historic time, forest grazing, wood cutting and shifting cultivation gradually transformed natural forest into heath land. Subsequently the use of the heath for the production of organic manure during the period of plaggen agriculture (from early Middle Ages to the invention of chemical fertilizers around 1900 AD) resulted in the comeback of active sand drifting. Locally the coversand landscape transformed into a driftsand landscape with characteristic new landforms and soils. Important parts of soil archives in these cultural landscapes are fimic covers, records of a long period of agricultural history and polycyclic driftsand deposits, records of alternating instable and stable phases in landscape development. Based on pollen analysis of fimic covers and buried humic soil horizons in polycyclic driftsand sequences, a lot of paleoecological information is available to reconstruct the development of soils and landforms in cultural landscapes, but we need a correct chronological framework to correlate information of various sources and sites. Traditionally 14C dating was applied on humic horizons of buried soils and a 14C based chronological framework was designed to estimate the accumulation rate of fimic covers and to date stable and instable periods in polycyclic driftsand profiles. However, 14C dates of extracted SOM (soil organic matter) are not always reliable. Firstly, in studies of fimic antrosols arose disagreement between paleoecological and historical interpretators of the evolution of these antrosols. The results of soil micromorphology and 14C dating, applied on separated SOM fractions (humine, humic acids and fulvic acids) showed that SOM, present in fimic horizons, consists of a complex mix of compounds of different ages and sources. Secondly, 14C dates of buried humic soil horizons are not always reliable. In thin

  1. A Brief Review of the Application of 14C in Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Guilderson, T; Mcfarlane, K

    2009-10-22

    An over-arching goal of the DOE TCP program is to understand the mechanistic controls over the fate, transport, and residence time of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere. Many of the modern process and modeling studies focus on seasonal to interannual variability. However, much of the carbon on the landscape and in soils is in separate reservoirs with turnover times that are multi-decadal to millennial. It is the controls on these longer term pools or reservoirs that is a critical unknown in the face of rising GHGs and climate change and uncertainties of the terrestrial biosphere as a future global sink or source of atmospheric CO{sub 2} [eg., Friedlingstein et al., 2006; Govindasamy et al., 2005; Thompson et al., 2004]. Radiocarbon measurements, in combination with other data, can provide insight into, and constraints on, terrestrial carbon cycling. Radiocarbon (t{sub 1/2} 5730yrs) is produced naturally in the stratosphere when secondary neutrons generated by cosmic rays collide with {sup 14}N atoms [Libby 1946; Arnold and Libby, 1949]. Upon formation, {sup 14}C is rapidly oxidized to CO and then to CO{sub 2}, and is incorporated into the carbon cycle. Due to anthropogenic activities, the amount of {sup 14}C in the atmosphere doubled in the mid/late 1950s and early 1960s from its preindustrial value of {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio of 1.18 x 10{sup -12} [eg., Nydal and Lovseth, 1983]. Following the atmospheric weapons test ban in 1963, the {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio, has decreased due to the net isotopic exchange between the ocean and terrestrial biosphere [eg., Levin and Hessheimer, 2000] and a dilution effect due to the burning of {sup 14}C-free fossil fuel carbon, the 'Suess Effect' [Suess, 1955]. In the carbon cycle literature, radiocarbon measurements are generally reported as {Delta}{sup 14}C, which includes a correction for mass dependent fractionation [Stuiver and Polach, 1977]. In the context of carbon cycle studies radiocarbon measurements can be used to

  2. Standardization of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) collection using a feedback regulated breathing pattern

    EPA Science Inventory

    Collection of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) fluid by cooling of expired breath is a potentially valuable approach for the detection of biomarkers associated with disease or exposure to xenobiotics. EBC is generally collected using unregulated breathing patterns, perceived to el...

  3. Studies on the metabolism of [1-14C]5.8.11-eicosatrienoic (Mead) acid in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Retterstøl, K; Woldseth, B; Christophersen, B O

    1995-10-26

    The oxidation, esterification and formation of chain elongated and desaturated products of [1-14C]5,8,11-eicosatrienoic (Mead) acid was studied. Liver cells from essentially fatty acid deficient (EFAD) and control rats were used. The metabolism of [1-14C]20:4, n-6 and [1-14C]20:5, n-3 were studied under the same experimental conditions. More 20:3, n-9 than 20:4, n-6 and 20:5, n-3 was oxidised both in EFAD and control cells. 20:3, n-9 was elongated to [14C]22:3, n-9 in both cell types and significant amounts of [14C]22:4, n-9 were formed in EFAD cells. Less 20:3, n-9 was esterified in phospholipids and more in triacylglycerol than observed with 20:4, n-6 and 20:5, n-3 in both cell types. 20:3, n-9 was mainly esterified in phosphatidylcholine and little was esterified in phosphatidylethanolamine compared to 20:4, n-6 and 20:5, n-3. In comparison, 20:3, n-9 was rather efficiently esterified in phosphatidylinositol as 18:0-20:3. [14C]22:4, n-9 formed from 20:3, n-9 in EFAD hepatocytes was esterified in triacylglycerol, not in phospholipids, unlike [14C]22:5, n-6 and [14C]22:6, n-3 which were mainly esterified in phospholipids. PMID:7492619

  4. The influence of Bacillus subtilis RB14-C on the development of Rhizoctonia solani and indigenous microorganisms in the soil.

    PubMed

    Szczech, Magdalena; Shoda, Makoto

    2005-05-01

    The effect of soil inoculation with an antagonistic strain Bacillus subtilis RB14-C on the development of Rhizoctonia solani and changes occurring in soil and rhizosphere microbial communities were studied. RB14-C was added to the soil as a water suspension of the cells or as a broth culture. Application of cell suspensions to non-planted soil reduced the number of culturable bacteria. The density of R. solani and the number of filamentous fungi were not significantly affected by RB14-C. A similar effect was observed in the rhizosphere of tomato plants growns in bacterized soil. Broth cultures of RB14-C suppressed R. solani 1 d after inoculation, but after 3 d there was no difference in the pathogen density between soil amended with broth culture and control soil. In microcosm studies, cell suspensions of RB14-C also did not inhibit growth of R. solani on filters buried in soil. However, an inhibitory effect was obtained when a broth culture of the bacterium was used. The effect of RB14-C on fungal biomass was also estimated by measurement of ergosterol concentration in soil. It was found that ergosterol was mostly derived from R. solani and that there were no significant differences in its content between untreated soil and soil treated with RB14-C. The results suggest that suppression of Rhizoctonia damping-off by B. subtilis RB14-C probably is not related to the reduction of the pathogen population in the soil. PMID:16088336

  5. 50 CFR Table 14c to Part 679 - At-sea Operation Type Codes To Be Used as Port Codes for Vessels Matching This Type of Operation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false At-sea Operation Type Codes To Be Used as Port Codes for Vessels Matching This Type of Operation 14c Table 14c to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries... COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 14c Table 14c...

  6. 50 CFR Table 14c to Part 679 - At-sea Operation Type Codes To Be Used as Port Codes for Vessels Matching This Type of Operation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false At-sea Operation Type Codes To Be Used as Port Codes for Vessels Matching This Type of Operation 14c Table 14c to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries... COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 14c Table 14c...

  7. 50 CFR Table 14c to Part 679 - At-sea Operation Type Codes To Be Used as Port Codes for Vessels Matching This Type of Operation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false At-sea Operation Type Codes To Be Used as Port Codes for Vessels Matching This Type of Operation 14c Table 14c to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries... COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 14c Table 14c...

  8. Variability of the northeast Atlantic sea surface Δ 14C and marine reservoir age and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisnérat-Laborde, Nadine; Paterne, Martine; Métivier, Bernard; Arnold, Maurice; Yiou, Pascal; Blamart, Dominique; Raynaud, Stéphane

    2010-09-01

    We compiled new 14C analyses of mollusc shells (bivalves and gastropods) of known age from the collection of the Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle de Paris and previously published data to investigate changes in the sea surface Δ 14C and reservoir age in the northeast Atlantic sector (NEA) between 1823 and 1952 AD. The mollusc shells are mainly located off the Atlantic margin between 45°N and 60°N downstream of the North Atlantic Current (NAC). We show that the temporal variability of the NEA Δ 14C is independent of the mollusc species, depth habitat, diet and latitudinal distribution. The quasi-null difference between mollusc Δ 14C and the marine model indicate that the mollusc Δ 14C reflects the Δ 14C values of open marine conditions. Between 1823 and 1850 AD, the pre-anthropogenic mean of Δ 14C is -45 ± 5‰, corresponding to a reservoir age of 380 ± 60 years and a Δ R value of -7 ± 50 years, in agreement with previous estimates. The Δ 14C values show a significant long-term decrease of ˜12‰ from 1823 to 1952 AD attributed to changes in 14C production between 1823 and 1900 AD and the Suess effect between 1900 and 1952 AD. Between 1885 and 1950 AD, Δ 14C fluctuations of ˜10‰ up to 18‰ occurred in the northeast Atlantic, corresponding to reservoir age variations of ˜90 years up to 170 years. These fluctuations are very similar to changes of Δ 14C in the southern Norwegian Sea. Spectral analyses of the NEA Δ 14C exhibit quasi-periodic cycles of about 7.4 years, almost equivalent to the quasi-periodic cycles of the winter index of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) with a period around 6.5 years. We find that changes of NEA Δ 14C cannot be attributed to changes in river runoff or the precipitation/evaporation budget. The Δ 14C lows (or high reservoir ages) correspond to the more intense phase of the winter NAO, with a time lag of ˜1-3 years. Such a time lag may reflect the eastward transit time of upstream changes originating in the

  9. Δ14C level of annual plants and fossil fuel derived CO2 distribution across different regions of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, X. T.; Ding, X. F.; Fu, D. P.; Zhou, L. P.; Liu, K. X.

    2013-01-01

    The 14C level in annual plants is a sensitive tracer for monitoring fossil fuel derived CO2 in the atmosphere. Corn leave samples were selected from different regions of China, including high mountains in the Tibetan Plateau, grassland in Inner Mongolia, and inland and coastal cities during the summer of 2010. The 14C/12C ratio of the samples was measured with the NEC compact AMS system at the Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University. The fossil fuel derived CO2 was estimated by comparing the measured Δ14C values of corn leave samples to background atmospheric Δ14C level. The influences of topography, meteorological conditions and carbon cycling processes on the fossil fuel derived CO2 concentration are considered when interpreting the data. Our results show a clear association of the low Δ14C values with regions where human activities are intensive.

  10. Changes in Atmospheric 14C Between 55 and 42 ky BP Recorded in a Stalagmite From Socotra Island, Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyhenmeyer, C. E.; Burns, S. J.; Fleitmann, D.; Kramers, J. D.; Matter, A.; Waber, H. N.; Reimer, P. J.

    2003-12-01

    A record of atmospheric radiocarbon (14C) variations for a part of the last glacial period was obtained from a 1.7 m long stalagmite, M1-2, from Socotra Island in the Indian Ocean. The stalagmite radiocarbon values were corrected for 14C-free carbon added by water-rock interaction (dead carbon fraction), by using del 13C values of the calcite as a constraint. An age-depth model was developed from 25 high-precision U/Th measurements. The base of the stalagmite dates to 54.7 ky BP and it stopped growing around 42.2 ky BP. The difference between U/Th and 14C ages shows a smooth, steady increase from about 5,000 years at the base of the stalagmite to about 8,000 years at its top. Correspondingly, Delta 14C values increase from 500 per mil to about 1300 per mil, which indicates that concentrations of atmospheric 14C steadily increased between 55 and 42 yr BP. The record from Socotra Island does not show the large and rapid D14C changes previously recorded in a stalagmite from the Bahamas (Beck et al, Science 2001). The D14C values estimated from M1-2 are significantly higher than those estimated from a marine 14C record (foraminifera) from Cariaco Basin for the same time period (Hughen et al. in prep). In the latter, D14C values decrease to near 0 at about 44 ky BP. The most likely reason for this discrepancy are the two different time scales used; the Cariaco Basin is matched to the GISP2 timescale, which is approximately 5000 years younger than indicated by the stalagmite U/Th chronology (Burns et al, Science 2003). When the Cariaco basin record is adjusted to the M1-2 timescale, the D14C values for both datasets are similar.

  11. A comparison of U/Th and rapid-screen 14C dates from Line Island fossil corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grothe, Pamela R.; Cobb, Kim M.; Bush, Shari L.; Cheng, Hai; Santos, Guaciara M.; Southon, John R.; Lawrence Edwards, R.; Deocampo, Daniel M.; Sayani, Hussein R.

    2016-03-01

    Time-consuming and expensive radiometric dating techniques limit the number of dates available to construct absolute chronologies for high-resolution paleoclimate reconstructions. A recently developed rapid-screen 14C dating technique reduces sample preparation time and per sample costs by 90%, but its accuracy has not yet been tested on shallow-water corals. In this study, we test the rapid-screen 14C dating technique on shallow-water corals by comparing 44 rapid-screen 14C dates to both high-precision 14C dates and U/Th dates from mid- to late-Holocene fossil corals collected from the central tropical Pacific (2-4°N, 157-160°W). Our results show that 42 rapid-screen 14C and U/Th dates agree within uncertainties, confirming closed-system behavior and ensuring chronological accuracy. However, two samples that grew ˜6500 years ago have calibrated 14C ages ˜1000 years younger than the corresponding U/Th ages, consistent with diagenetic alteration as indicated by the presence of 15-23% calcite. Mass balance calculations confirm that the observed dating discrepancies are consistent with 14C addition and U removal, both of which occur during diagenetic calcite recrystallization. Under the assumption that aragonite-to-calcite replacement is linear through time, we estimate the samples' true ages using the measured 14C and U/Th dates and percent calcite values. Results illustrate that the rapid-screen 14C dates of Holocene-aged fossil corals are accurate for samples with less than 2% calcite. Application of this rapid-screen 14C method to the fossil coral rubble fields from Kiritimati Island reveal significant chronological clustering of fossil coral across the landscape, with older ages farther from the water's edge.

  12. Prediction of [3-(14)C]phenyldodecane biodegradation in cable insulating oil-spiked soil using selected extraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Dew, Nadia M; Paton, Graeme I; Semple, Kirk T

    2005-11-01

    This study investigated the use of an aqueous hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) shake extraction in predicting microbial mineralisation and total loss of [3-(14)C]phenyldodecane associated activity in soils spiked with cable insulating oil; phenyldodecane represents a major constituent of cable insulating oil. Direct comparisons were made between freshly spiked and aged soils, and following composting. Soil was spiked with [3-(14)C]phenyldodecane (10mg kg(-1)) and stored in microcosms and aged for 1, 23, 44, 65, 90 and 153 d. At each sample time point, a variety of analyses were performed to assess the relationship between chemical and biological techniques in determining mineralisation and loss of (14)C-activity in soils under composting and non-composting conditions. Methods included determination of total (14)C-activity remaining, dichloromethane (DCM) and HPCD extractions. Mineralisation assays were also carried out to quantify the fraction of (14)C-phenyldodecane associated activity available for degradation in the soil at each time point. DCM and HPCD extractability were compared to contaminant mineralisation and to total loss of (14)C-phenyldodecane associated activity from the microcosms, after 153 d incubation. Poor relationships were found between (i) the amount of (14)C-activity mineralised and the fraction removed from the soils using DCM extraction and (ii) DCM extraction and total loss of [(14)C]phenyldodecane associated activity from the soil systems. Good relationships were observed between (i) the amount of (14)C-activity mineralised and the fraction removed from the soils using the HPCD extraction and (ii) HPCD extraction and total loss of [(14)C]phenyldodecane associated activity from the soil systems. The results of this study indicate that an aqueous HPCD extraction may be a useful tool in assessing the microbial availability of phenyldodecane in freshly and aged spiked soils. PMID:15949878

  13. A Study of the Effects of Breath Management Instruction on the Breathing Mode, Knowledge of Breathing, and Performance Skills of College-Level Brass Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Kenneth H.; Sehmann, Karin Harfst

    1990-01-01

    Investigates the effectiveness of breathing instruction on the breath management, performance, and knowledge of breathing among college-level brass musicians. Finds that breathing instruction significantly improved the breath management and knowledge of the breathing for the experimental groups and the musical range of the trombone players in the…

  14. A Proof of Concept Study to Detect Urease Producing Bacteria in Lungs Using Aerosolized 13C-Urea

    PubMed Central

    Timmins, Graham; Davies, Lea; Heynekamp, Theresa; Harkins, Michelle; Sharp, Zachary D.; Kelly, H. William

    2016-01-01

    This is a “proof of concept” study to determine whether inhalation of 13C-urea can be safely used to detect the presence of urease producing bacteria in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) by detecting 13CO2 in breath. This was a prospective, 2-part, open label, single-center, single-arm, single-administration, dose-escalation investigational device exemption trial. First, the safety of 20 and 50 mg inhaled 13C-urea was evaluated in 6 healthy adult participants. Then, 3 adult CF participants colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa were enrolled for each dose of inhaled 13C-urea. The safety of inhaled 13C-urea was assessed by spirometry and physical examination. 13C-urea was administered using a jet nebulizer, followed by serial spirometry (10 min and 30 min post inhalation) and collection of exhaled breath at 5, 10, and 15 min post inhalation. There was no clinical significant change in any of the spirometry values compared to baseline in healthy participants and CF patients. Mean of 13CO2/12CO2 delta over baseline (DOB) values in CF participants at 5, 10, and 15 min post inhalation was as follows: 20 mg dose 4‰ (2.2‰–4.9‰), 1‰ (1.0‰–1.4‰), and 1‰ (0.4‰–1.5‰); 50 mg dose: 10‰ (6.2‰–14.5‰), 3‰ (2.1‰–4.3‰), and 1.5‰ (0.6‰–2.3‰). Inhaled 13C-urea for detection of urease producing bacteria was safe, and preliminary data suggest that 13CO2/12CO2 DOB values may be higher in CF patients with P. aeruginosa at 5–10 min after inhalation of 13C-urea. A future direction is to investigate use of inhaled 13C-urea in young children who have difficulty producing sputum for culturing. PMID:27458537

  15. Breath Ketone Testing: A New Biomarker for Diagnosis and Therapeutic Monitoring of Diabetic Ketosis

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yue; Gao, Zhaohua; Liu, Yong; Cheng, Yan; Yu, Mengxiao; Zhao, Lingling

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acetone, β-hydroxybutyric acid, and acetoacetic acid are three types of ketone body that may be found in the breath, blood, and urine. Detecting altered concentrations of ketones in the breath, blood, and urine is crucial for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic ketosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the advantages of different detection methods for ketones, and to establish whether detection of the concentration of ketones in the breath is an effective and practical technique. Methods. We measured the concentrations of acetone in the breath using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and β-hydroxybutyrate in fingertip blood collected from 99 patients with diabetes assigned to groups 1 (−), 2 (±), 3 (+), 4 (++), or 5 (+++) according to urinary ketone concentrations. Results. There were strong relationships between fasting blood glucose, age, and diabetic ketosis. Exhaled acetone concentration significantly correlated with concentrations of fasting blood glucose, ketones in the blood and urine, LDL-C, creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen. Conclusions. Breath testing for ketones has a high sensitivity and specificity and appears to be a noninvasive, convenient, and repeatable method for the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of diabetic ketosis. PMID:24900994

  16. Photoacoustic sensor for VOCs: first step towards a lung cancer breath test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Marcus; Groninga, Hinrich G.; Dressler, Matthias; Harde, Hermann

    2005-08-01

    Development of new optical sensor technologies has a major impact on the progression of diagnostic methods. Specifically, the optical analysis of breath is an extraordinarily promising technique. Spectroscopic sensors for the non-invasive 13C-breath tests (the Urea Breath Test for detection of Helicobacter pylori is most prominent) are meanwhile well established. However, recent research and development go beyond gastroenterological applications. Sensitive and selective detection of certain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a patient's breath, could enable the diagnosis of diseases that are very difficult to diagnose with contemporary techniques. For instance, an appropriate VOC biomarker for early-stage bronchial carcinoma (lung cancer) is n-butane (C4H10). We present a new optical detection scheme for VOCs that employs an especially compact and simple set-up based on photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS). This method makes use of the transformation of absorbed modulated radiation into a sound wave. Employing a wavelength-modulated distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser and taking advantage of acoustical resonances of the sample cell, we performed very sensitive and selective measurements on butane. A detection limit for butane in air in the ppb range was achieved. In subsequent research the sensitivity will be successively improved to match the requirements of the medical application. Upon optimization, our photoacoustic sensor has the potential to enable future breath tests for early-stage lung cancer diagnostics.

  17. Source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosol in Sao Paulo using 13C and 14C measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Beatriz; Andrade, Maria de Fatima; Holzinger, Rupert; Röckmann, Thomas; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Dusek, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    The Metropolitan Area of Sao Paulo is affected by high aerosol concentrations, which contain a large fraction of organic material. Up to date, not much is known about the composition and origin of the organic aerosol in this city. We present the first source apportionment of the carbonaceous aerosol fraction in Sao Paulo, using stable (13C) and radioactive carbon isotopes (14C). 14C provides a clear-cut distinction between fossil sources, which contain no 14C, and contemporary sources such as biofuels, biomass burning, or biogenic sources, which contain a typical contemporary 14C/12C ratio. 13C can be used to distinguish C3 plants, such as maize and sugarcane, from C4 plants. This can help to identify a possible impact of sugarcane field burning in the rural areas of Sao Paulo State on the aerosol carbon in the city. In the first part of the study, we compare two tunnel studies: Tunnel 1 is frequented only by light duty vehicles, which run mainly on mixtures of gasoline with ethanol (gasohol, 25% ethanol and 85% gasoline) or hydrated ethanol (5% water and 95% ethanol). Tunnel 2 contains a significant fraction of heavy-duty diesel vehicles, and therefore the fraction of biofuels in the average fleet is lower. Comparison of 14C in organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) shows that in both tunnels there is no significant contribution of biofuels to EC. Combusting ethanol-gasoline fuels in a vehicle engine does apparently not result in significant EC formation from ethanol. Biofuels contribute around 45% to OC in Tunnel 1 an only 20% in Tunnel 2, reflecting a strong impact of diesel vehicles in Tunnel 2. In the second part of the study we conduct a source apportionment of ambient aerosol carbon collected in a field study during winter (July-August) 2012. Ambient EC has two main sources, vehicular emissions and biomass burning. We estimate a contribution of vehicular sources to EC of roughly 90% during weekdays and 80% during weekends, using the 14C values measured in

  18. Longevity and growth of Acacia tortilis; insights from 14C content and anatomy of wood

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Gidske L; Krzywinski, Knut

    2007-01-01

    Background Acacia tortilis is a keystone species across arid ecosystems in Africa and the Middle East. Yet, its life-history, longevity and growth are poorly known, and consequently ongoing changes in tree populations cannot be managed in an appropriate manner. In other arid areas parenchymatic bands marking growth zones in the wood have made dendrochronological studies possible. The possibilities for using pre- and post-bomb 14C content in wood samples along with the presence of narrow marginal parenchymatic bands in the wood is therefore tested to gain further insight into the age, growth and growth conditions of A. tortilis in the hyper-arid Eastern Desert of Egypt. Results Based on age scenarios and the Gompertz growth equation, the age of trees studied seems to be from 200 up to 650 years. Annual radial growth estimated from calibrated dates based on the post-bomb 14C content of samples is up to 2.4 mm, but varies both spatially and temporally. Parenchymatic bands are not formed regularly. The correlation in band pattern among trees is poor, both among and within sites. Conclusion The post-bomb 14C content of A. tortilis wood gives valuable information on tree growth and is required to assess the age scenario approach applied here. This approach indicates high longevities and slow growth of trees. Special management measures should therefore be taken at sites where the trend in tree population size is negative. The possibilities for dendrochronological studies based on A. tortilis from the Eastern Desert are poor. However, marginal parenchymatic bands can give insight into fine scale variation in growth conditions and the past management of trees. PMID:17573964

  19. Using 14C and 3H to understand groundwater flow and recharge in an aquifer window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, A. P.; Cartwright, I.; Gilfedder, B. S.; Cendón, D. I.; Unland, N. P.; Hofmann, H.

    2014-06-01

    Knowledge of groundwater residence times and recharge locations are vital to the sustainable management of groundwater resources. Here we investigate groundwater residence times and patterns of recharge in the Gellibrand Valley, southeast Australia, where outcropping aquifer sediments of the Eastern View Formation form an "aquifer window" that may receive diffuse recharge and recharge from the Gellibrand River. To determine recharge patterns and groundwater flowpaths, environmental isotopes (3H, 14C, δ13C, δ18O, δ2H) are used in conjunction with groundwater geochemistry and continuous monitoring of groundwater elevation and electrical conductivity. Despite the water table fluctuating by 0.9-3.7 m annually producing estimated recharge rates of 90 and 372 mm yr-1, residence times of shallow (11-29 m) groundwater determined by 14C ages are between 100 and 10 000 years. 3H activities are negligible in most of the groundwater and groundwater electrical conductivity in individual areas remains constant over the period of study. Although diffuse local recharge is evident, the depth to which it penetrates is limited to the upper 10 m of the aquifer. Rather, groundwater in the Gellibrand Valley predominantly originates from the regional recharge zone, the Barongarook High, and acts as a regional discharge zone where upward head gradients are maintained annually, limiting local recharge. Additionally, the Gellibrand River does not recharge the surrounding groundwater and has limited bank storage. 14C ages and Cl concentrations are well correlated and Cl concentrations may be used to provide a first-order estimate of groundwater residence times. Progressively lower chloride concentrations from 10 000 years BP to the present day are interpreted to indicate an increase in recharge rates on the Barongarook High.

  20. Concentrations and 14C age of nonstructural carbon in California oaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czimczik, C. I.; Druffel-Rodriguez, K.; Trumbore, S. E.

    2008-12-01

    Plants store photosynthetic assimilates as nonstructural carbon (NSC), mainly glucose, fructose, sucrose, and starch. NSC fuels processes such as respiration and growth. Research suggests that NSC represents a significant fraction of a plant's annual C budget, but temporal dynamics of NSC are poorly understood. We used concentration and radiocarbon (14C) measurements of NSC to investigate how temporal dynamics of NSC vary with life strategy and throughout a species' range. In Mediterranean environments, oaks have developed two strategies (evergreen and deciduous) to cope with drought. Within California, the uncertainty of annual winter rain increases from north to south. We compared two evergreen and deciduous species: Coastal and Interior live oak (Quercus agrifolia and wislizenii) and Valley and Blue oak (Q. lobata and douglasii). Samples (4 mm cores to 20 cm depth at dbh) were taken in 2008 before leaf-out and fall at five sites which represent an inland to coast temperature gradient from high to low summer temperatures as well as a north- south precipitation gradient. Sugars were isolated by shaking in methanol-water and quantified using a spectrometric micro-plate technique. Starch was isolated by boiling in ethanol followed by HCl digestion and quantified manometrically. 14C contents were measured by AMS. Preliminary findings indicate that in live oaks, winter sugar concentrations are constant throughout the tree and across sites, while 14C concentrations increase towards a tree's center. This suggests that the NSC pool oaks is not well mixed. Future work will elucidate whether plants can access these older NSC stores.

  1. Uptake of (/sup 14/C)deoxyglucose into brain of young rats with inherited hydrocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, H.K.; Bucknall, R.M.; Jones, H.C.; Pickard, J.D.

    1989-02-01

    The effect of hydrocephalus on cerebral glucose utilization as reflected by deoxyglucose uptake has been examined in rats with inherited hydrocephalus at 10, 20, and 28 days after birth using a semiquantitative method. Injection of (14C)deoxyglucose intraperitoneally was followed by freezing the brain, sectioning, and quantitative autoradiography of 10 brain regions. Brain (14C) concentration, cortical thickness, and plasma glucose concentrations were measured. Maximal thinning of the cerebral cortex had already occurred by 10 days after birth, although obvious symptoms such as gait disturbance developed after 20 days. In control rats, the cerebral isotope concentration was lower and more homogeneous at 10 days than at 20 or 28 days, which may be a reflection of the use of metabolic substrates other than glucose in younger animals. In order to make comparisons between control and hydrocephalic groups, tissue isotope concentrations were normalized to cerebellar cortex which was not affected by the hydrocephalus at any age. In hydrocephalic rats at 10 and 20 days, the concentration of (14C) was lower in all areas except the inferior colliculi and pons but the reduction was only significant in the sensory-motor cortex at 10 days and in the caudate nuclei at 20 days. By 28 days after birth, all areas except the cerebellum (six cortical regions, inferior colliculi, pons, and caudate) had significantly lower isotope concentrations in the hydrocephalic group. It is concluded that cerebral glucose metabolism is significantly reduced by 28 days after birth in H-Tx rats with congenital hydrocephalus and that less marked reductions occur prior to 28 days.

  2. Low-Charge State AMS for High Throughput 14C Quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Ognibene, T.J.; Roberts, M.L.; Southon, J.R.; Vogel, J.S.

    2000-06-16

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) quantifies attomole (10{sup -18}) amounts of {sup 14}C in milligram sized samples. This sensitivity is used to trace nutrients, toxins and therapeutics in humans and animals at less than {micro}g/kg doses containing 1-100 nCi of {sup 14}C. Widespread use of AMS in pharmaceutical development and biochemical science has been hampered by the size and expense of the typical spectrometer that has been developed for high precision radiocarbon dating. The precision of AMS can be relaxed for biochemical tracing, but sensitivity, accuracy and throughput are important properties that must be maintained in spectrometers designed for routine quantification. We are completing installation of a spectrometer that will maintain the high throughput of our primary spectrometer but which requires less than 20% of the floor space and of the cost. Sensitivity and throughput are kept high by using the LLNL intense cesium sputter ion source with solid graphitic samples. Resultant space-charge effects are minimized by careful modeling to find optimal ion transport in the spectrometer. A long charge-changing ''stripper gas'' volume removes molecular isobars at potentials of a few hundred kiloVolts, reducing the size of the accelerating component. Fast ion detectors count at high rates to keep a wide dynamic range for 14 C concentrations. Solid sample presentation eliminates the sample cross contamination that degrades accuracy and the effects of ''memory'' in the ion source. Automated processes are under development for conversion of liquid and solid biological samples to the preferred graphitic form for the ion source.

  3. Double labeling autoradiography. Cell kinetic studies with /sup 3/H- and /sup 14/C-thymidine

    SciTech Connect

    Schultze, B.

    1981-01-01

    Examples of the multiple applicability of the double labeling method with /sup 3/H- and /sup 14/C-TdR are demonstrated. Double labeling with /sup 3/H- and /sup 14/C-TdR makes it possible to determine the cycle and its phases with high precision by modifying the usual percent labeled mitoses method with a single injection of /sup 3/H-TdR. In addition, data is provided on the variances of the transit times through the cycle phases. For example, in the case of the jejunal crypt cells of the mouse, the transit times through successive cycle phases are uncorrelated. In the case of glial cells the double labeling method provides cell kinetic parameters despite the paucity of proliferating glial cells. In the adult untreated animal, glial cell mitoses are so rare that the percent labeled mitoses method can not be utilized. However, the S-phase duration can be measured by double labeling and the cycle time can be determined by the so-called method of labeled S phases. With the latter method the passage through the S phase of the /sup 3/H-TdR-labeled S phase cells can be registered by injecting /sup 14/C-TdR at different time intervals following /sup 3/H-TdR application. In this way an S-phase duration of about 10 hr and a cycle time of about 20 hr was found for glial cells in the adult untreated mouse. An exchange of glial cells between the growth fraction and the nongrowth fraction has also been shown by double labeling. A quite different application of the double labeling method with 3H- and /sup 14/C-TdR is the in vivo study of the cell cycle phase-specific effect of drugs used in chemotherapy of tumors. The effect of vincristine on these cells has been studied. Vincristine affects cells in S and G2 in such a manner that they are arrested during the next metaphase and subsequently become necrotic. It has no effect on G1 cells.

  4. Magmatic CO2 emissions at Mammoth Mountain, California, tracked by 14C in tree core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, B.; Mangan, M.; McGeehin, J. P.; King, J.; Lewicki, J. L.; Hilley, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    Magmatic CO2 efflux to the atmosphere causes persistent depletion of 14C in the wood of trees that grow in areas of strong emissions. The record of 14C depletion in core from a surviving tree at the Horseshoe Lake tree-kill area, on the S flank of Mammoth Mountain volcano, has been updated to cover the time period 1984 to 2010. The amount of depletion was reasonably stable in annual growth rings for years 1995-2009 and indicates that the magmatic CO2 component in air at canopy height was 31±7 ppmv. Depletion increased sharply in the 2010 ring, yielding a magmatic CO2 concentration of 56 ppmv. This observation is consistent with accumulation chamber and eddy covariance measurements from the area, which indicate that magmatic CO2 effluxes and near-surface atmospheric concentrations increased during 2010. The agreement between tree-core and direct gas measurements suggests that the selected tree may be suitable for constraining the long-term record of CO2 emission strength at Horseshoe Lake, but the ability of a single tree to constrain total CO2 discharge from a broad region of diffuse emissions needs investigation. New concentration source-area modeling based on local atmospheric data measured by a 3-m tall eddy covariance tower suggests that the 13-m tall tree cored may provide a weighted integration of CO2 emission strength over an area at least as large as the Horseshoe Lake gas anomaly (0.3 km2). If the tree-core record accurately reflects total CO2 discharge, then emission strength in 2010 approached that in 1990, when anomalous gas efflux began in the aftermath of a 6-month seismic swarm linked to upflow of magmatic fluids. The apparent increase in emission strength in 2010 may correlate with a recent resurgence in seismicity beneath Mammoth Mountain and an increase in the 3He/4He ratio in fumarolic emissions near the summit, both of which began in 2009. If so, a correlative increase in 14C depletion is likely to exist in trees at other areas around the

  5. Transformation of (14)C-pyrimidynyloxybenzoic herbicide ZJ0273 in aerobic soils.

    PubMed

    Haiyan, Wang; Zhiyang, Yu; Ling, Yue; Ailiang, Han; Yanfei, Zhang; Juying, Li; Qingfu, Ye; Zhengmin, Yang; Long, Lu

    2010-04-15

    A soil metabolism study of propyl 4-(2-(4,6-dimethoxypyrimidin-2-yloxy)benzylamino)benzoate (ZJ0273), a novel broad-spectrum herbicide, was carried out using (14)C labeled on two different rings, i.e., [pyrimidine-4,6-(14)C] ZJ0273 and [benzyl-U-(14)C] ZJ0273. Ultralow liquid scintillation counting and LC-MS/MS were used to identify the degradation intermediates and quantify their dynamics in aerobic soils. Four aromatic intermediates, 4-(2-(4,6-dimethoxypyrimidin-2-yloxy)benzylamino)benzoic acid (M1), 4-(2-(4,6-dimethoxypyrimidin-2-yloxy)benzamido)benzoic acid (M2), 2-(4,6-dimethoxypyrimidin-2-yloxy)benzoic acid (M3), and 4,6-dimethoxypyrimidin-2-ol (M4), were identified and their identity was further confirmed against authentic standards. Analysis of metabolites suggested two degradation pathways: (1) Upon loss of the propyl group, M1 was produced via hydrolysis of propyl 4-(2-(4,6-dimethoxypyrimidin-2-yloxy)benzylamino)benzoate after which the C-N bond between rings A and B was cleaved by oxidation and biochemical degradation to yield M3, which was further converted into M4 and finally mineralized to CO(2); and (2) the first step was the same as in pathway 1, but M1 first underwent a carbonylation to form M2. The C-N bond between rings A and B of M2 was cleaved by hydrolysis to yield M3. Dynamic changes in the four metabolites in aerobic soils were also investigated by HPLC coupled analysis of radioactivity of isolated peaks. After a 100-day incubation, 1.7-9.7% of applied (14)C was found as M1, 0.3-1.1% as M2, 14.5-20.9% as M3, and 3.7-6.7% as M4 in the soils, and pH appeared to be the most influential soil property affecting the formation and dissipation of these metabolites. PMID:20189632

  6. Excised barley root uptake of several /sup 14/C labeled organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, C.; Wickliff, C.

    1985-01-01

    Many organic pollutants potentially are available for uptake by plants and thus bioaccumulation and food contamination. One method of studying uptake is with excised roots, a technique extensively used with plant nutrients. A similar method was developed and used to evaluate uptake patterns of several /sup 14/C-labeled organic chemicals. Uptake rate constants for the chemicals tested occurred in the following order: captan approx. phenol > aniline > ethanol approx. indole approx. trifluralin approx. propanil > 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene(TCB) > nitrobenzene approx. atrazine > bromacil > simazine > monuron.

  7. Searching For A Suitable Gas Ion Source For 14C Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Reden, Karl von; Roberts, Mark; Han, Baoxi; Schneider, Robert; Wills, John

    2007-08-10

    This paper describes the challenges facing 14C Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) in the effort to directly analyze the combusted effluent of a chromatograph (or any other continuous source of sample material). An efficient, low-memory negative gas ion source would greatly simplify the task to make this a reality. We discuss our tests of a microwave ion source charge exchange canal combination, present an improved design, and hope to generate more interest in the negative ion source community to develop a direct-extraction negative carbon gas ion source for AMS.

  8. Tritium and(14)C counting in tissue samples by using liquid scintillation method.

    PubMed

    Parekh, C K; Eigen, E

    1968-05-01

    The combustion method has been modified to increase the recovery of tritiated water after combustion of a tritium-labeled tissue sample. This was accomplished by cooling the bottom of the combustion flask in a dry ice-acetone bath while irradiating the top with an infrared lamp. The procedure resulted in at least 92% to 102% recovery of the tritiated water. The NCS solubilizer was found to be superior to hyamine for solubilizing(14)C labeled tissue samples. The samples yielded light yellow-colored solutions when incubated for 15 hr at 50-55C. The counting efficiency of this solution was 75% or higher. PMID:17805860

  9. A batch preparation method for graphite targets with low background for AMS [sup 14]C measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kitagawa, Hiroyuki International Research Center for Japanese Studies, Nishikyp-ku, Kyoto ); Masuzawa, Toshiyuki; Matsumoto, Eiji ); Makamura, Toshio )

    1993-01-01

    The authors have developed a method of graphitization from CO[sub 2] samples for accurate [sup 14]C measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry. Their batch method, using a sealed Vycor tube, reduces the risk of contamination during graphitization and makes it possible to prepare many samples in a short time (typically 20 samples per day). They also describe details of the target-preparation method involving carbon isotopic fractionation during graphitization, yield of graphite from CO[sub 2], ion-beam intensity of the target, and background (or blank) level estimated using bituminous coal.

  10. Accumulation and elimination of (9-/sup 14/C)phenanthrene in the calico clam (Macrocallista maculata)

    SciTech Connect

    Solbakken, J.E.; Jeffrey, F.M.H.; Knap, A.H.; Palmork, K.H.

    1982-05-01

    The accumulation and elimination of radoactivity is studied after exposure of (9-/sup 14/C) phenanthrene in various tissues in the calico clam (Macrocallista maculata). Results show that accumulation is highest in the lipid-rich hepatopancreas, and the elimination is very efficient compared to the horse mussel. The calico clam, which is a sand-dwelling organism, can easily come in contact with hydrocarbon contaminated sedments and might accumulate the hydrocarbons at different extents in various tissues. The efficient elimination, however, will prevent a lasting accumulation. (JMT)

  11. Accelerated degradation of 14C-atrazine in an atrazine adapted field soil from Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Georg; Jablonowski, Nicolai David; Martinazzo, Rosane; Accinelli, Cesare; Köppchen, Stephan; Langen, Ulrike; Linden, Andreas; Krause, Martina; Burauel, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Atrazine [2-chloro-4-(ethylamino)-6-(isopropylamino)-s-triazine] is one of the most widely used herbicides in the world. Atrazine is considered to be mobile in soil and has often been characterized as a rather recalcitrant compound in the environment. In the present study the accelerated atrazine degradation in an agriculturally used soil was examined. Soil samples were collected from a Belgian field which was used for corn-plantations and was regularly treated with atrazine during the last 30 years. The experiment was conducted under controlled laboratory conditions (GLP) using 14C-labelled and unlabelled atrazine in accordance to the reported field application dose of 1 mg kg-1. Triplicates of treated subsamples were incubated at 50% WHCmax and under slurry conditions (1:4 soil:solution ratio, using distilled water) in the dark at 20° C. Control samples were collected at an adjacent pear orchard where no atrazine or other triazine pesticides application was reported. After 92 days of incubation, the mineralized amount of atrazine reached 83% of the initially applied 14C-activity in the atrazine treated soil for the slurry setup. A maximum of atrazine mineralization was observed in the treated field soil between 6 and 7 days of incubation for both, 50% WHCmax and slurry setups. The total 14C-atrazine mineralization was equally high for 50% WHCmax in the atrazine treated soil. After an extended lag-phase in comparison to the treated soil the overall mineralization of 14C-atrazine of 81% was observed in the atrazine untreated soil under slurry conditions. This observation might be due to a possible cross adaption of the microflora. These results could be attributed to an atrazine drift during application since the control samples were taken in an adjacent pear orchard with no atrazine application history. These results demonstrate an adaption of the microflora to mineralize atrazine rapidly. The formation of desorbable metabolites as well as the formation of

  12. Nitrous Oxide Gas Fluxes in a Potato Field Following Application of Urea and Coated Urea Fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of urea and other forms of nitrogen (N) fertilizer can generate atmospheric emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), which is a potent greenhouse gas. Field experiments were conducted on a loamy sand soil in Becker, Minnesota to evaluate the effects of soluble and coated forms of urea on N2O fl...

  13. Winter Wheat and Maize Response to Urea Ammonium Nitrate and a New Urea Formaldehyde Polymer Fertilizer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slow release nitrogen (N) fertilizers have potential to improve yield and nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and maize (Zea mays L.). A slow release urea formaldehyde polymer (UFP) was compared with conventional aqueous urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN) [(NH2)2CO, NH4NO3]...

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Branched Poly(ester urea)s with Different Branch Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiayi; Becker, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    A new class of L-phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s (PEU) was developed that possess tunable mechanical properties, water uptake ability and degradation rates. Our preliminary data has shown that 1,6-hexanediol L - phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s possesses an elastic modulus nearly double that of poly(lactic acid). My work details the synthesis of a series of L - phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s possessing a variation in diol chain length and in branch density and shows how these subtle structural differences influence the mechanical properties and in vitro biodegradation rates. The elastic moduli span a range of values that overlap with several currently clinically available degradable polymers. Increasingly the diol chain lengths increases the amount of flexible segment in the chemical structure, which results in reduced elastic modulus values and increased values of elongation at break. Increasing the amount of branch monomer incorporated into the system reduces the molecular entanglement, which also results in decreased elastic modulus values and increased values of elongation at break. The L - phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s also exhibited a diol length dependent degradation process that varied between 1-5 % over 16 weeks. Compared with PLLA, PEUs degrade more quickly and the rate can be tuned by changing the diol chain length. PEUs absorb more water and the water uptake ability can be tuned by changing the branch density. This work was supported by Akron Functional Materials Center.

  15. Detection of Helicobacter pylori infection by examination of human breath odor using electronic nose Bloodhound-214ST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shnayder, E. P.; Moshkin, M. P.; Petrovskii, D. V.; Shevela, A. I.; Babko, A. N.; Kulikov, V. G.

    2009-05-01

    Our aim was to examine the possibility of use e-nose Bloodhound-214ST to determine presence or absence of H. pylori infection using exhalation samples of patients. Breath samples were collected twice: at baseline and after oral administration of 500 mg of urea. H. pylori status of patients was confirmed by antral biopsy. Using two approaches for the data analysis we showed the possibility to distinguish H. pylori free and infected patients.

  16. Beware Postpartum Shortness of Breath

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Guleser; Ipekci, Afsin; Gulen, Bedia; Ikizceli, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is one of the potentially life-threatening complications of pregnancy. We report a case of a 36-year-old female patient who presented with shortness of breath, swelling of feet after giving birth to triplets, and her tests revealed that left ventricle is dilated with its diameter on the borderline and she had EF 35% with advanced systolic dysfunction. Anterior wall and septum were severely hypokinetic. In the presence of these findings, the patient was evaluated as PPCM. PPCM must be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with shortness of breath and swelling of feet, which are also common in pregnancy. PMID:26649031

  17. Beware Postpartum Shortness of Breath.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Guleser; Ipekci, Afsin; Gulen, Bedia; Ikizceli, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is one of the potentially life-threatening complications of pregnancy. We report a case of a 36-year-old female patient who presented with shortness of breath, swelling of feet after giving birth to triplets, and her tests revealed that left ventricle is dilated with its diameter on the borderline and she had EF 35% with advanced systolic dysfunction. Anterior wall and septum were severely hypokinetic. In the presence of these findings, the patient was evaluated as PPCM. PPCM must be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with shortness of breath and swelling of feet, which are also common in pregnancy. PMID:26649031

  18. Retention of 14C-Labeled Tuberculin Purified Protein Derivative in the Skin of Sensitized and Nonsensitized Animals

    PubMed Central

    Landi, Silvio; Tseng, Men C.; Held, Hans R.

    1974-01-01

    Tuberculin purified protein derivative labeled with 14C ([14C]PPD) with a biological potency equivalent to the International Standard for tuberculin PPD was used to study the retention of tuberculin PPD in the skin of sensitized and nonsensitized animals. We found that [14C]PPD was almost entirely cleared from the skin test site during the first 18 to 24 h after injection and that when approximately 5% of the initial concentration of [14C]PPD was present in the skin test site, the size of the tuberculin skin reaction in sensitized guinea pigs was at its maximum. Furthermore, the addition of 5 or 50 μg of Tween 80 per ml to a solution of PPD did not change either the rate of clearance of PPD from the skin test sites of sensitized guinea pigs or the size of the tuberculin skin reactions. There was no difference in the rate of clearance of [14C]PPD from the skin test sites between sensitized and nonsensitized guinea pigs and between guinea pigs of different age. However, there was a significant difference in the rate of clearance of [14C]PPD between the guinea pig and the mouse. Finally, the percentage of [14C]PPD retained in the site of injection at 24 h was in the neighborhood of 5% of the initial concentration of the solution of PPD injected. The significance of these phenomena is discussed. Images PMID:4208638

  19. Energy metabolism used as a tool to model the transfer of 14C and 3H in animals.

    PubMed

    Melintescu, A; Galeriu, D

    2010-11-01

    The transfer through the environment of (3)H and (14)C must be modelled differently than that of other radionuclides released from nuclear reactors because hydrogen and carbon enter straight into the life cycle. A solid understanding of the behaviour of (3)H and (14)C in the food chain is essential because (3)H may be released in large quantities from future thermonuclear reactors, and (14)C accumulates in the environment because of its long half-life. For the present study, the hypothesis that both (3)H and (14)C metabolism in mammals can be modelled based on the understanding of energy metabolism has been tested. Recently published results demonstrate that the loss rate of organically bound tritium and (14)C from tissues of laboratory and farm animals can be assessed based upon their specific metabolic rates and enthalpy of combustion; the same is true for human beings. The improved model presented here relates the dynamics of organically bound tritium and (14)C within organs to the whole body and has been expanded to account for the growth of ruminants. The improved model has been expanded and applied for (14)C transfer in wild mammals and has been modified to apply to birds. PMID:20532542

  20. Distribution of aged atrazine related 14C-residues in natural soil following incubation with the earthworm Apporectodea caliginosa.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreou, K.; Jablonowski, N.; Jones, K.; Burauel, P.; Semple, K.

    2009-04-01

    The distribution and localisation of atrazine related 14C-residues into the different physical fractions of soil may reveal information on processes taking place in soil. Soils amended with 14C-atrazine, were aged for 22 years under environmental conditions in a lysimeter in Germany. The soil was sampled and subjected to physical and chemical fractionation before and after incubation for 7 days with the earthworm Apporectodea caliginosa. No significant change in the soil physical and chemical fractionation of the atrazine related 14C-residues and organic carbon was observed in this study due to the activity of the A. caliginosa. The smaller size soil fractions (Microaggregates and Colloids) were highly enriched with aged atrazine 14C-residues equivalents and organic carbon. Also the humic acid extracted using a simple alkaline extraction have were also enriched with aged atrazine 14C-residues equivalents. The low organic carbon content of the soil, the absence of relatively fresh organic matter and the long ageing time might explain the limited bioavailability of the atrazine related 14C-residues to the earthworm. This finding is of particular importance given that the soil used here was aged under natural environmental conditions compared to laboratory studies. Earthworms are important species in soil ecology and thus, the question of the bioavailability of aged pesticide residues to such organism is critical. The bioavalability of the atrazine 14C-residues equivalent was absent in the current study illustrating that those aged residues posed minimal risk to earthworms.