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Sample records for 14n overtone nmr

  1. (14)N overtone NMR under MAS: signal enhancement using symmetry-based sequences and novel simulation strategies.

    PubMed

    Haies, Ibraheem M; Jarvis, James A; Bentley, Harry; Heinmaa, Ivo; Kuprov, Ilya; Williamson, Philip T F; Carravetta, Marina

    2015-03-01

    Overtone (14)N NMR spectroscopy is a promising route for the direct detection of (14)N signals with good spectral resolution. Its application is currently limited, however, by the absence of efficient polarization techniques for overtone signal enhancement and the lack of efficient numerical simulation techniques to aid in both the development of new methods and the analysis and interpretation of experimental data. In this paper we report a novel method for the transfer of polarization from (1)H to the (14)N overtone using symmetry-based R-sequences that overcome many of the limitations of adiabatic approaches that have worked successfully on static samples. Refinement of these sequences and the analysis of the resulting spectra have been facilitated through the development of an efficient simulation strategy for (14)N overtone NMR spectroscopy of spinning samples, using effective Hamiltonians on top of Floquet and Fokker-Planck equations. PMID:25662410

  2. 14N overtone NMR under MAS: signal enhancement using symmetry-based sequences and novel simulation strategies† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4cp03994g Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Haies, Ibraheem M.; Jarvis, James A.; Bentley, Harry; Heinmaa, Ivo; Kuprov, Ilya; Williamson, Philip T. F.

    2015-01-01

    Overtone 14N NMR spectroscopy is a promising route for the direct detection of 14N signals with good spectral resolution. Its application is currently limited, however, by the absence of efficient polarization techniques for overtone signal enhancement and the lack of efficient numerical simulation techniques to aid in both the development of new methods and the analysis and interpretation of experimental data. In this paper we report a novel method for the transfer of polarization from 1H to the 14N overtone using symmetry-based R-sequences that overcome many of the limitations of adiabatic approaches that have worked successfully on static samples. Refinement of these sequences and the analysis of the resulting spectra have been facilitated through the development of an efficient simulation strategy for 14N overtone NMR spectroscopy of spinning samples, using effective Hamiltonians on top of Floquet and Fokker–Planck equations. PMID:25662410

  3. 14 N NMR of tetrapropylammonium based crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dib, E.; Mineva, T.; Gaveau, P.; Alonso, B.

    2015-07-01

    We have investigated using 14N NMR different types of materials containing tetrapropylammonium cations. We consider the tetrapropylammonium bromide crystal as well as two different microporous materials silicalite-1 and AlPO-5, with MFI and AFI topology respectively, where the tetrapropylammonium cation plays the role of structure directing agent. 14N NMR quadrupolar coupling parameters were determined experimentally for all the crystals. In addition calculations based on Density Functional Theory with empirical dispersion (DFT-D) were performed on the MFI type zeolite. The sensitivity of the 14N quadrupolar coupling parameters to the spatial distribution of the anions in the zeolite's framework is emphasized.

  4. An efficient NMR method for the characterisation of 14N sites through indirect 13C detection

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, James A.; Haies, Ibraheem M.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen is one of the most abundant elements and plays a key role in the chemistry of biological systems. Despite its widespread distribution, the study of the naturally occurring isotope of nitrogen, 14N (99.6%), has been relatively limited as it is a spin-1 nucleus that typically exhibits a large quadrupolar interaction. Accordingly, most studies of nitrogen sites in biomolecules have been performed on samples enriched with 15N, limiting the application of NMR to samples which can be isotopically enriched. This precludes the analysis of naturally occurring samples and results in the loss of the wealth of structural and dynamic information that the quadrupolar interaction can provide. Recently, several experimental approaches have been developed to characterize 14N sites through their interaction with neighboring ‘spy’ nuclei. Here we describe a novel version of these experiments whereby coherence between the 14N site and the spy nucleus is mediated by the application of a moderate rf field to the 14N. The resulting 13C/14N spectra show good sensitivity on natural abundance and labeled materials; whilst the 14N lineshapes permit the quantitative analysis of the quadrupolar interaction. PMID:23589073

  5. Natural abundance 14N and 15N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Veinberg, Stanislav L.; Johnston, Karen E.; Jaroszewicz, Michael J.; Kispal, Brianna M.; Mireault, Christopher R.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Schurko, Robert W.

    2016-06-08

    14N ultra-wideline (UW), 1H{15N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and 15N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 14N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. Here, a case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW 14N SSNMR spectra of stationarymore » samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R"NH+ and RR'NH2+) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments.« less

  6. Natural abundance (14)N and (15)N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Veinberg, Stanislav L; Johnston, Karen E; Jaroszewicz, Michael J; Kispal, Brianna M; Mireault, Christopher R; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Schurko, Robert W

    2016-06-29

    (14)N ultra-wideline (UW), (1)H{(15)N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and (15)N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (14)N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. A case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW (14)N SSNMR spectra of stationary samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R''NH(+) and RR'NH2(+)) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments. Directly-excited (14)N NMR spectra were acquired using the WURST-CPMG pulse sequence, which incorporates WURST (wideband, uniform rate, and smooth truncation) pulses and a CPMG (Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill) refocusing protocol. In certain cases, spectra were acquired using (1)H → (14)N broadband cross-polarization, via the BRAIN-CP (broadband adiabatic inversion - cross polarization) pulse sequence. These spectra provide (14)N electric field gradient (EFG) tensor parameters and orientations that are particularly sensitive to variations in local structure and intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions. The (1)H{(15)N} idHETCOR spectra, acquired under conditions of fast magic-angle spinning (MAS), used CP transfers to provide (1)H-(15)N chemical shift correlations for all nitrogen environments, except for two sites in acebutolol and nicardipine. One of these two sites (RR'NH2(+) in acebutolol) was successfully detected using the DNP-enhanced (15)N{(1)H} CP/MAS measurement, and one (RNO2 in nicardipine) remained elusive due to the absence of

  7. Powder-XRD and (14) N magic angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy of some metal nitrides.

    PubMed

    Kempgens, Pierre; Britton, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Some metal nitrides (TiN, ZrN, InN, GaN, Ca3 N2 , Mg3 N2 , and Ge3 N4 ) have been studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and (14) N magic angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For Ca3 N2 , Mg3 N2 , and Ge3 N4 , no (14) N NMR signal was observed. Low speed (νr  = 2 kHz for TiN, ZrN, and GaN; νr  = 1 kHz for InN) and 'high speed' (νr  = 15 kHz for TiN; νr  = 5 kHz for ZrN; νr  = 10 kHz for InN and GaN) MAS NMR experiments were performed. For TiN, ZrN, InN, and GaN, powder-XRD was used to identify the phases present in each sample. The number of peaks observed for each sample in their (14) N MAS solid-state NMR spectrum matches perfectly well with the number of nitrogen-containing phases identified by powder-XRD. The (14) N MAS solid-state NMR spectra are symmetric and dominated by the quadrupolar interaction. The envelopes of the spinning sidebands manifold are Lorentzian, and it is concluded that there is a distribution of the quadrupolar coupling constants Qcc 's arising from structural defects in the compounds studied. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26687421

  8. Sensitivity enhanced (14)N/(14)N correlations to probe inter-beta-sheet interactions using fast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR in biological solids.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Asakura, Tetsuo; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-08-10

    (14)N/(14)N correlations are vital for structural studies of solid samples, especially those in which (15)N isotopic enrichment is challenging, time-consuming and expensive. Although (14)N nuclei have high isotopic abundance (99.6%), there are inherent difficulties in observing (14)N/(14)N correlations due to limited resolution and sensitivity related to: (i) low (14)N gyromagnetic ratio (γ), (ii) large (14)N quadrupolar couplings, (iii) integer (14)N spin quantum number (I = 1), and (iv) very weak (14)N-(14)N dipolar couplings. Previously, we demonstrated a proton-detected 3D (14)N/(14)N/(1)H correlation experiment at fast magic angle spinning (MAS) on l-histidine·HCl·H2O utilizing a through-bond (J) and residual dipolar-splitting (RDS) based heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation (J-HMQC) sequence mediated through (1)H/(1)H radio-frequency driven recoupling (RFDR). As an extension of our previous work, in this study we show the utility of dipolar-based HMQC (D-HMQC) in combination with (1)H/(1)H RFDR mixing to obtain sensitivity enhanced (14)N/(14)N correlations in more complex biological solids such as a glycyl-l-alanine (Gly-l-Ala) dipeptide, and parallel (P) and antiparallel (AP) β-strand alanine tripeptides (P-(Ala)3 and AP-(Ala)3, respectively). These systems highlight the mandatory necessity of 3D (14)N/(14)N/(1)H measurements to get (14)N/(14)N correlations when the amide proton resonances are overlapped. Moreover, the application of long selective (14)N pulses, instead of short hard ones, is shown to improve the sensitivity. Globally, we demonstrate that replacing J-scalar with dipolar interaction and hard- with selective-(14)N pulses allows gaining a factor of ca. 360 in experimental time. On the basis of intermolecular NH/NH distances and (14)N quadrupolar tensor orientations, (14)N/(14)N correlations are effectively utilized to make a clear distinction between the parallel and antiparallel arrangements of the β-strands in (Ala)3 through the

  9. Proton zero-quantum 2D NMR of 2-propenenitrile aligned by an electric field. Determination of the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruessink, B. H.; De Kanter, F. J. J.; MaClean, C.

    Zero-quantum NMR, selectively detected by 2D NMR, is applied to observe small 1H- 1H dipolar couplings in a polar liquid partially oriented by a strong electric field. The normal (single-quantum) 1H spectrum is severely broadened, which prevents the observation of small couplings. The results from the zero-quantum proton spectrum are used to calculate the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants of 2-deutero-2-propenenitrile from the 2H and 14N NMR spectra.

  10. Study of chemically inequivalent N(CH3)4 ions in [N(CH3)4]2ZnBr4 near the phase transition temperature using 1H MAS NMR, 13C CP/MAS NMR, and 14N NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2016-02-01

    The temperature dependences of the chemical shifts and intensities of 1H, 13C, and 14N nuclei in tetramethylammonium tetrabromozincate, [N(CH3)4]2ZnBr4, were investigated using single-crystal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to elucidate the structural geometry near the phase transition temperature. Based on the analysis of the 13C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR and 14N NMR spectra, the two chemically inequivalent N(1) (CH3)4 and N(2) (CH3)4 ions were distinguished. Furthermore, the 14N NMR spectrum at the phase transition temperature indicated the existence of the ferroelastic characteristics of the N(CH3)4 ions.

  11. Detection of {sup 14}N and {sup 35}Cl in cocaine base and hydrochloride using NQR, NMR, and SQUID techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yesinowski, J.P.; Buess, M.L.; Garroway, A.N.; Ziegeweid, M.; Pines, A. |

    1995-07-01

    Results from {sup 14}N pure NQR of cocaine in the free base form (cocaine base) yield a nuclear quadrupole coupling constant (NQCC) e{sup 2}Qq/h of 5.0229 ({+-}0.0001) MHz and an asymmetry parameter {eta} of 0.0395 ({+-}0.0001) at 295 K, with corresponding values of 5.0460 ({+-}0.0013) MHz and 0.0353 ({+-}0.0008) at 77 K. Both pure NQR (at 295-77 K) and a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector (at 4.2 K) were used to measure the very low (<1 MHz) {sup 14}N transition frequencies in cocaine hydrochloride; at 295 K the NQCC is 1.1780 ({+-}0.0014) MHz and the asymmetry parameter is 0.2632 ({+-}0.0034). Stepping the carrier frequency enables one to obtain a powder pattern without the severe intensity distortions that otherwise arise from finite pulse power. A powder pattern simulation using an NQCC value of 5.027 MHz and an asymmetry parameter {eta} of 0.2 agrees reasonably well with the experimental stepped-frequency spectrum. The use of pure NQR for providing nondestructive, quantitative, and highly specific detection of crystalline compounds is discussed, as are experimental strategies. 31 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Polymorphism and disorder in natural active ingredients. Low and high-temperature phases of anhydrous caffeine: Spectroscopic ((1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR/(14)N NQR) and solid-state computational modelling (DFT/QTAIM/RDS) study.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Janez; Žagar, Veselko; Apih, Tomaž; Gregorovič, Alan; Latosińska, Magdalena; Olejniczak, Grzegorz Andrzej; Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia

    2016-03-31

    The polymorphism of anhydrous caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine; 1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6-(3H,7H)-dione) has been studied by (1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance) double resonance and pure (14)N NQR (Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance) followed by computational modelling (Density Functional Theory, supplemented Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules with Reduced Density Gradient) in solid state. For two stable (phase II, form β) and metastable (phase I, form α) polymorphs the complete NQR spectra consisting of 12 lines were recorded. The assignment of signals detected in experiment to particular nitrogen sites was verified with the help of DFT. The shifts of the NQR frequencies, quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters at each nitrogen site due to polymorphic transition were evaluated. The strongest shifts were observed at N(3) site, while the smallest at N(9) site. The commercial pharmaceutical sample was found to contain approximately 20-25% of phase I and 75-80% of phase II. The orientational disorder in phase II with a local molecular arrangement mimics that in phase I. Substantial differences in the intermolecular interaction phases I and II of caffeine were analysed using computational (DFT/QTAIM/RDS) approach. The analysis of local environment of each nitrogen nucleus permitted drawing some conclusions on the topology of interactions in both polymorphs. For the most stable orientations in phase I and phase II the maps of the principal component qz of EFG tensor and its asymmetry parameter at each point of the molecular system were calculated and visualized. The relevant maps calculated for both phases I and II indicates small variation in electrostatic potential upon phase change. Small differences between packings in phases slightly disturb the neighbourhood of the N(1) and N(7) nitrogens, thus are meaningless from the biological point of view. The composition of two phases in pharmaceutical material

  13. Ferroelastic phase transitions by 14N NMR spectra in [N(CH3)4]2CoCl4 and [N(CH3)4]2ZnCl4 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2016-09-01

    Changes in the structural geometry of [N(CH3)4]2BCl4 (B=Co and Zn) crystals near the phase transition temperatures were studied by analyzing the 14N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. Two physically inequivalent a-N(1)(CH3)4 and b-N(2)(CH3)4 groups were observed in these spectra. Abrupt changes in the resonance frequency and splitting of 14N NMR signals near the phase transition temperatures were attributed to structural phase transitions, and the primary mechanism of these phase transitions exhibited ferroelastic characteristics. In addition, ferroelasticity of [N(CH3)4]2BCl4 was identified at low temperatures using optical polarizing microscopy.

  14. Determination of NH proton chemical shift anisotropy with 14N-1H heteronuclear decoupling using ultrafast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-12-01

    The extraction of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors of protons either directly bonded to 14N nuclei (I = 1) or lying in their vicinity using rotor-synchronous recoupling pulse sequence is always fraught with difficulty due to simultaneous recoupling of 14N-1H heteronuclear dipolar couplings and the lack of methods to efficiently decouple these interactions. This difficulty mainly arises from the presence of large 14N quadrupolar interactions in comparison to the rf field that can practically be achieved. In the present work it is demonstrated that the application of on-resonance 14N-1H decoupling with rf field strength ∼30 times weaker than the 14N quadrupolar coupling during 1H CSA recoupling under ultrafast MAS (90 kHz) results in CSA lineshapes that are free from any distortions from recoupled 14N-1H interactions. With the use of extensive numerical simulations we have shown the applicability of our proposed method on a naturally abundant L-Histidine HCl·H2O sample.

  15. Route No. 1 near east end, view toward Overton Beach ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Route No. 1 near east end, view toward Overton Beach and Lake Mead, view to northeast - Route No. 1-Overton-Lake Mead Road, Between Overton Beach & Park Boundary, 6 miles south of Overton, Overton, Clark County, NV

  16. Scissors modes: The first overtone

    SciTech Connect

    Hatada, Keisuke; Hayakawa, Kuniko; Palumbo, Fabrizio

    2011-07-15

    Scissors modes were predicted in the framework of the two-rotor model. This model has an intrinsic harmonic spectrum, so that the level above the scissors mode, the first overtone, has excitation energy twice that of the scissors mode. Because the latter is of the order of 3 MeV in the rare-earth region, the energy of the overtone is below threshold for nucleon emission, and its width should remain small enough for the overtone to be observable. We find that B(E2){up_arrow}{sub overtone}=(1/64 {theta}{sub 0}{sup 2})B(E2){up_arrow}{sub scissors}, where {theta}{sub 0} is the zero-point oscillation amplitude, which in the rare-earth region is of order 10{sup -1}.

  17. Gridless overtone mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Steven M; Ewing, Michael A; Clemmer, David E

    2013-11-01

    A novel overtone mobility spectrometry (OMS) instrument utilizing a gridless elimination mechanism and cooperative radio frequency confinement is described. The gridless elimination region uses a set of mobility-discriminating radial electric fields that are designed so that the frequency of field application results in selective transmission and elimination of ions. To neutralize ions with mobilities that do not match the field application frequency, active elimination regions radially defocus ions toward the lens walls. Concomitantly, a lens-dependent radio frequency waveform is applied to the transmission regions of the drift tube resulting in radial confinement for mobility-matched ions. Compared with prior techniques, which use many grids for ion elimination, the new gridless configuration substantially reduces indiscriminate ion losses. A description of the apparatus and elimination process, including detailed simulations showing how ions are transmitted and eliminated is presented. A prototype 28 cm long OMS instrument is shown to have a resolving power of 20 and is capable of attomole detection limits of a model peptide (angiotensin I) spiked into a complex mixture (in this case peptides generated from digestion of β-casein with trypsin). PMID:24125033

  18. Gridless Overtone Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Steven M.; Ewing, Michael A.; Clemmer, David E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel overtone mobility spectrometry (OMS) instrument utilizing a gridless elimination mechanism and cooperative radio frequency confinement is described. The gridless elimination region uses a set of mobility-discriminating radial electric fields that are designed so that the frequency of field application results in selective transmission and elimination of ions. To neutralize ions with mobilities that do not match the field application frequency, active elimination regions radially defocus ions towards the lens walls. Concomitantly, a lens-dependent radio frequency waveform is applied to the transmission regions of the drift tube resulting in radial confinement for mobility-matched ions. Compared with prior techniques, which use many grids for ion elimination, the new gridless configuration substantially reduces indiscriminate ion losses. A description of the apparatus and elimination process, including detailed simulations showing how ions are transmitted and eliminated is presented. A prototype 28 cm long OMS instrument is shown to have a resolving power of 20 and is capable of attomole detection limits of a model peptide (angiotensin I) spiked into a complex mixture (in this case peptides generated from digestion of β-casein with trypsin). PMID:24125033

  19. Free radical and overtone spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reilly, James P.

    1991-01-01

    In the fall of 1987 during a photoacoustic study of hydrogen peroxide's fourth vibrational overtone band, the remarkably clear and well resolved spectrum was observed. Its periodicity and K subband structure suggested that the spectrum was not of hydrogen peroxide but of a smaller near-prolate symmetric top molecule. Furthermore, the time dependent behavior of the signal indicated that chemical changes were taking place within the photoacoustic apparatus.

  20. Vibrational overtone stretching transitions in sarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryk, Michael W. P.

    2006-10-01

    The CH stretching overtone transitions of the nerve agent sarin (O-isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate) are of interest to the standoff detection of chemical warfare agents, as many of these transitions occur near regions where small, efficient, portable diode lasers (originally developed for use in the telecommunications industry) operate. However, the interpretation of experimental vibrational overtone spectra is often difficult, and the computational simulation of overtone transitions in a molecule is challenging. Presented herein are the simulated CH overtone stretching transitions in sarin. Spectral regions are simulated from overtone transition energies and intensities, both of which are calculated within the harmonically coupled anharmonic oscillator (HCAO) model. Data for HCAO calculations are obtained from ab initio calculations, without any recourse to experimental data.

  1. Overtone Mobility Spectrometry: Part 5. Simulations and Analytical Expressions Describing Overtone Limits

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, Michael A.; Zucker, Steven M.; Valentine, Stephen J.; Clemmer, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical expressions for the analytical duty cycle associated with different overtones in overtone mobility spectrometry are derived from the widths of the transmitted packets of ions under different instrumental operating conditions. Support for these derivations is provided through ion trajectory simulations. The outcome of the theory and simulations indicates that under all operating conditions there exists a limit or maximum observable overtone that will result in ion transmission. Implications of these findings on experimental design are discussed. PMID:23468094

  2. Measurements of the CO first overtone bandstrength at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caledonia, G. E.; Krech, R. H.; Wilkerson, T.

    1985-08-01

    The spectrally resolved emission from the CO first overtone vibration-rotation band has been studied over the temperature range of 1100-2600 K in a shock-tube experiment. First overtone bandstrengths have been deduced from the data. These compare favorably with theoretical expectations.

  3. 2016 ISCB Overton Prize awarded to Debora Marks.

    PubMed

    Fogg, Christiana N; Kovats, Diane E

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) recognizes the achievements of an early- to mid-career scientist with the Overton Prize each year. The Overton Prize was established to honor the untimely loss of Dr. G. Christian Overton, a respected computational biologist and founding ISCB Board member. Winners of the Overton Prize are independent investigators in the early to middle phases of their careers who are selected because of their significant contributions to computational biology through research, teaching, and service. 2016 will mark the fifteenth bestowment of the ISCB Overton Prize.  ISCB is pleased to confer this award the to Debora Marks, Assistant Professor of Systems Biology and director of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for Computational Biology at Harvard Medical School. PMID:27429747

  4. 2016 ISCB Overton Prize awarded to Debora Marks

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Christiana N.; Kovats, Diane E.

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) recognizes the achievements of an early- to mid-career scientist with the Overton Prize each year. The Overton Prize was established to honor the untimely loss of Dr. G. Christian Overton, a respected computational biologist and founding ISCB Board member. Winners of the Overton Prize are independent investigators in the early to middle phases of their careers who are selected because of their significant contributions to computational biology through research, teaching, and service. 2016 will mark the fifteenth bestowment of the ISCB Overton Prize.  ISCB is pleased to confer this award the to Debora Marks, Assistant Professor of Systems Biology and director of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for Computational Biology at Harvard Medical School. PMID:27429747

  5. Vibrational overtone stretching transitions in trimethyl phosophate and triethyl phosophate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryk, Michael W. P.

    2007-04-01

    The CH stretching overtone transitions of chemical warfare agents are of interest in the area of threat detection, including standoff threat detection, as many of these transitions occur near regions where small, efficient diode lasers operate. Further, detectors which operate in the regions where CH overtone transitions occur (i.e., in the near infrared and visible regions) are usually much more sensitive than detectors which operate in the region where fundamental CH vibrational transitions occur (i.e., in the mid infrared). However, the interpretation of experimental overtone spectra is complex, and the computational simulation of overtone spectra is challenging. Presented herein are the simulated vapour phase CH overtone stretching transitions in the nerve agent simulants trimethyl phosophate and triethyl phosophate. Spectral regions are simulated using the harmonically coupled anharmonic oscillator (HCAO) model. Data for HCAO calculations are obtained from ab initio calculations, without recourse to experimental data.

  6. Overtone spectroscopy of some benzaldehyde derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, P. K.; Rai, D. K.; Rai, S. B.

    2001-06-01

    Overtone spectrum of o, m and p-nitrobenzaldehydes and p-chlorobenzaldehyde has been studied in 2000-12000 cm-1 region. Vibrational frequencies and anharmonicity constants for aryl as well as alkyl CH stretch vibrations have been determined. We have also determined the internuclear distances for the aryl CH bond in the different molecules. The small variation observed in these distances is an indication of the substitution effect. It is observed that in the case of p-disubstituted benzenes, the shift in aryl CH bond is proportional to sum of the Hammet s of the substituents. However in thecase of o-disubstituted benzenes it is only 80% of the para- substituted shift.

  7. Methane overtone absorption by intracavity laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, James J.

    1990-01-01

    Interpretation of planetary methane (CH4) visible-near IR spectra, used to develop models of planetary atmospheres, has been hampered by a lack of suitable laboratory spectroscopic data. The particular CH4 spectral bands are due to intrinsically weak, high overtone-combination transitions too complex for classical spectroscopic analysis. The traditional multipass cell approach to measuring spectra of weakly absorbing species is insufficiently sensitive to yield reliable results for some of the weakest CH4 absorption features and is difficult to apply at the temperatures of the planetary environments. A time modulated form of intracavity laser spectroscopy (ILS), has been shown to provide effective absorption pathlengths of 100 to 200 km with sample cells less than 1 m long. The optical physics governing this technique and the experimental parameters important for obtaining reliable, quantitative results are now well understood. Quantitative data for CH4 absorption obtained by ILS have been reported recently. Illustrative ILS data for CH4 absorption in the 619.7 nm and 681.9 nm bands are presented. New ILS facilities at UM-St. Louis will be used to measure CH4 absorption in the 700 to 1000 nm region under conditions appropriate to the planetary atmospheres.

  8. ir overtone spectrum of the vibrational soliton in crystalline acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, A. C.; Gratton, E.; Shyamsunder, E.; Careri, G.

    1985-10-01

    The self-trapping (soliton) theory which was recently developed to account for the anomalous amide-I band at 1650 cm-1 in crystalline acetanilide (a model system for protein) has been extended to predict the anharmonicity constant of the overtone spectrum. These infrared-active overtones which have been detected at 3250, 4803, and 6304 cm-1 yield an anharmonicity constant that is in good agreement with the theory.

  9. ir overtone spectrum of the vibrational soliton in crystalline acetanilide

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.C.; Gratton, E.; Shyamsunder, E.; Careri, G.

    1985-10-15

    The self-trapping (soliton) theory which was recently developed to account for the anomalous amide-I band at 1650 cm/sup -1/ in crystalline acetanilide (a model system for protein) has been extended to predict the anharmonicity constant of the overtone spectrum. These infrared-active overtones which have been detected at 3250, 4803, and 6304 cm/sup -1/ yield an anharmonicity constant that is in good agreement with the theory.

  10. Comparison of various NMR methods for the indirect detection of nitrogen-14 nuclei via protons in solids.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ming; Trébosc, Julien; O'Dell, Luke A; Lafon, Olivier; Pourpoint, Frédérique; Hu, Bingwen; Chen, Qun; Amoureux, Jean-Paul

    2015-09-01

    We present an experimental comparison of several through-space Hetero-nuclear Multiple-Quantum Correlation experiments, which allow the indirect observation of homo-nuclear single- (SQ) or double-quantum (DQ) (14)N coherences via spy (1)H nuclei. These (1)H-{(14)N} D-HMQC sequences differ not only by the order of (14)N coherences evolving during the indirect evolution, t1, but also by the radio-frequency (rf) scheme used to excite and reconvert these coherences under Magic-Angle Spinning (MAS). Here, the SQ coherences are created by the application of center-band frequency-selective pulses, i.e. long and low-power rectangular pulses at the (14)N Larmor frequency, ν0((14)N), whereas the DQ coherences are excited and reconverted using rf irradiation either at ν0((14)N) or at the (14)N overtone frequency, 2ν0((14)N). The overtone excitation is achieved either by constant frequency rectangular pulses or by frequency-swept pulses, specifically Wide-band, Uniform-Rate, and Smooth-Truncation (WURST) pulse shapes. The present article compares the performances of four different (1)H-{(14)N} D-HMQC sequences, including those with (14)N rectangular pulses at ν0((14)N) for the indirect detection of homo-nuclear (i) (14)N SQ or (ii) DQ coherences, as well as their overtone variants using (iii) rectangular or (iv) WURST pulses. The compared properties include: (i) the sensitivity, (ii) the spectral resolution in the (14)N dimension, (iii) the rf requirements (power and pulse length), as well as the robustness to (iv) rf offset and (v) MAS frequency instabilities. Such experimental comparisons are carried out for γ-glycine and l-histidine.HCl monohydrate, which contain (14)N sites subject to moderate quadrupole interactions. We demonstrate that the optimum choice of the (1)H-{(14)N} D-HMQC method depends on the experimental goal. When the sensitivity and/or the robustness to offset are the major concerns, the D-HMQC sequence allowing the indirect detection of (14)N SQ

  11. Comparison of various NMR methods for the indirect detection of nitrogen-14 nuclei via protons in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ming; Trébosc, Julien; O'Dell, Luke A.; Lafon, Olivier; Pourpoint, Frédérique; Hu, Bingwen; Chen, Qun; Amoureux, Jean-Paul

    2015-09-01

    We present an experimental comparison of several through-space Hetero-nuclear Multiple-Quantum Correlation experiments, which allow the indirect observation of homo-nuclear single- (SQ) or double-quantum (DQ) 14N coherences via spy 1H nuclei. These 1H-{14N} D-HMQC sequences differ not only by the order of 14N coherences evolving during the indirect evolution, t1, but also by the radio-frequency (rf) scheme used to excite and reconvert these coherences under Magic-Angle Spinning (MAS). Here, the SQ coherences are created by the application of center-band frequency-selective pulses, i.e. long and low-power rectangular pulses at the 14N Larmor frequency, ν0(14N), whereas the DQ coherences are excited and reconverted using rf irradiation either at ν0(14N) or at the 14N overtone frequency, 2ν0(14N). The overtone excitation is achieved either by constant frequency rectangular pulses or by frequency-swept pulses, specifically Wide-band, Uniform-Rate, and Smooth-Truncation (WURST) pulse shapes. The present article compares the performances of four different 1H-{14N} D-HMQC sequences, including those with 14N rectangular pulses at ν0(14N) for the indirect detection of homo-nuclear (i) 14N SQ or (ii) DQ coherences, as well as their overtone variants using (iii) rectangular or (iv) WURST pulses. The compared properties include: (i) the sensitivity, (ii) the spectral resolution in the 14N dimension, (iii) the rf requirements (power and pulse length), as well as the robustness to (iv) rf offset and (v) MAS frequency instabilities. Such experimental comparisons are carried out for γ-glycine and L-histidine.HCl monohydrate, which contain 14N sites subject to moderate quadrupole interactions. We demonstrate that the optimum choice of the 1H-{14N} D-HMQC method depends on the experimental goal. When the sensitivity and/or the robustness to offset are the major concerns, the D-HMQC sequence allowing the indirect detection of 14N SQ coherences should be employed. Conversely

  12. Ephraim McDowell's Ovariotomy on General Overton's Wife.

    PubMed

    Ikard, Robert W

    2016-04-01

    Ephraim McDowell's removal of a massive ovarian tumor from Jane Todd Crawford in Danville, Kentucky, in 1809 revolutionized the practice of surgery. Most academic physicians then believed that operating in the abdomen would inevitably result in peritonitis and death. McDowell proved them wrong and performed numerous ovariotomies with an acceptable complication rate for the era. His expertise brought patients from afar. McDowell also operated on patients in their homes, sometimes far from Danville. This article addresses an operation done in Nashville, Tennessee, on Penelope Holmes Overton, wife of General Thomas Overton, a prominent Tennessean. PMID:27097619

  13. Theoretical and Experimental Investigations in MEMS-Based Force-Detected NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgammal, Ramez Ahmed

    This thesis describes a method of mechanically detecting magnetic resonance. The detector consists of a ferromagnet harmonically bound to a mechanical resonator and measures a magnetic force of interaction with a nearby sample via dipole-dipole coupling. Flexural modes of vibration of the resonator are induced by inversion of the sample magnetization at the mechanical resonance frequency of the device. In this method, a nominally homogeneous field at the sample allows coherent spectroscopy over the entire sample volume. Sensitivity analyses suggest that encoding an NMR signal into mechanical oscillations favors inductive detection at the micron scale and below with Brownian motion of the detection being the predominant source of noise and azimuthal eddy currents being the predominant source of damping. As such, the design issues of a MEMS-based spectrometer optimized for 50 micron samples have been investigated. Finite element methods were used and the results for magnetic softening effects, mechanical stresses, field homogeneity, magnet design, radiofrequency excitation, and the utility of capacitive transduction to provide tuning of the oscillator's mechanical resonance frequency and active shimming are discussed. A piezeoelectrically actuated microvalve is proposed as part of a microfluidic device to allow shuttling of liquid samples. We present a new means of fiber-optic interferometry for geometrically confined regions in which the light exits transverse to core axis. The use of a composite magnetic array of packed nanoparticles may reduce the damping by 10 4. The portability of the spectrometer will allow in situ spectroscopy and towards that end 14N overtone experiments were simulated. Force-detection of this transition is superior not only at reduced size scales, but over a broad range of magnetic field strengths. The line narrowing observed by detecting the overtone transition should allow detailed spectroscopic analysis not possible by observing the

  14. Vibrational transitions of coupled stretching and bending overtones in chloroform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Kai; Gerhards, Markus; Kleist, Einhard; Bettermann, Hans

    1995-08-01

    The intensities and frequencies of Fermi-coupled stretching and bending overtone transitions in CHCl3 were calculated by means of a variational method. Symmetrized two-dimensional ab initio potential and dipole moment surfaces were determined at the MP2 level using the 6-31G** basis set. The Hamiltonian for the CH- stretching motion and the simultaneously excited twofold degenerate CH- bending vibration is expressed most easily in cylindrical coordinates. Absorption intensities up to the Δv=7 CH-stretching overtone above 16 300 cm-1 are calculated and are compared to former experimental values and theoretical results. New quantitative intracavity measurements for the N=6 polyad are presented. Relative errors between absolute experimental intensities and the calculated values are less than 30%.

  15. 14N quadrupole resonance and 1H T1 dispersion in the explosive RDX.

    PubMed

    Smith, John A S; Blanz, Martin; Rayner, Timothy J; Rowe, Michael D; Bedford, Simon; Althoefer, Kaspar

    2011-12-01

    The explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-s-triazine (CH2-N-NO2)3, commonly known as RDX, has been studied by 14N NQR and 1H NMR. NQR frequencies and relaxation times for the three ν+ and ν- lines of the ring 14N nuclei have been measured over the temperature range 230-330 K. The 1H NMR T1 dispersion has been measured for magnetic fields corresponding to the 1H NMR frequency range of 0-5.4 M Hz. The results have been interpreted as due to hindered rotation of the NO2 group about the N-NO2 bond with an activation energy close to 92 kJ mol(-1). Three dips in the 1H NMR dispersion near 120, 390 and 510 kHz are assigned to the ν0, ν- and ν+ transitions of the 14NO2 group. The temperature dependence of the inverse line-width parameters T2∗ of the three ν+ and ν- ring nitrogen transitions between 230 and 320 K can be explained by a distribution in the torsional oscillational amplitudes of the NO2 group about the N-NO2 bond at crystal defects whose values are consistent with the latter being mainly edge dislocations or impurities in the samples studied. Above 310 K, the 14N line widths are dominated by the rapid decrease in the spin-spin relaxation time T2 due to hindered rotation of the NO2 group. A consequence of this is that above this temperature, the 1H T1 values at the quadrupole dips are dominated by the spin mixing time between the 1H Zeeman levels and the combined 1H and 14N spin-spin levels. PMID:21978662

  16. Some nitrogen-14 NMR studies in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pratum, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    The first order quadrupolar perturbation of the /sup 14/N NMR spectrum yields information regarding the static and dynamic properties of the surrounding electronic environment. Signal to noise problems caused by long /sup 14/N longitudinal relaxation times (T/sub 1/) and small equilibrium polarizations are reduced by rotating frame cross polarization (CP) experiments between /sup 14/N and /sup 1/H. Using quadrupolar echo and CP techniques, the /sup 14/N quadrupolar coupling constants (e/sup 2/qQ/h) and asymmetry parameters (eta) have been obtained for a variety of tetraalkylammonium compounds by observation of their quadrupolar powder patterns at various temperatures. For choline chloride and iodide the /sup 14/N NMR powder patterns exhibit the effects of anisotropic molecular motion, while choline bromide spectra show no such effects.

  17. V440 Per: the longest-period overtone Cepheid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, R.; Smolec, R.; Dimitrov, W.; Kwiatkowski, T.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.; Bartczak, P.; Fagas, M.; Borczyk, W.; Kamiński, K.; Moskalik, P.; Ratajczak, R.; Rożek, A.

    2009-07-01

    V440 Per is a Population I Cepheid with a period of 7.57d and low-amplitude, almost sinusoidal light and radial velocity curves. With no reliable data on the first harmonic, its pulsation mode identification remained controversial. We obtained a radial velocity curve of V440 Per with our new high-precision and high-throughput Poznań Spectroscopic Telescope. Our data reach an accuracy of 130ms-1 per individual measurement and yield a secure detection of the first harmonic with an amplitude of A2 = 140 +/- 15ms-1. The velocity Fourier phase φ21 of V440 Per is inconsistent at the 7.25σ level with those of fundamental-mode Cepheids, implying that the star must be an overtone Cepheid, as originally proposed by Kienzle et al. Thus, V440 Per becomes the longest-period Cepheid with securely established overtone pulsations. We show that a convective non-linear pulsation hydrocode can reproduce the Fourier parameters of V440 Per very well. The requirement to match the observed properties of V440 Per constrains the free parameters of the dynamical convection model used in the pulsation calculations, in particular the radiative loss parameter.

  18. Overtone spectroscopy of the hydroxyl stretch vibration in hydroxylamine (NH[sub 2]OH)

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, J.L.; Luckhaus, D.; Brown, S.S.; Crim, F.F. )

    1995-01-08

    We present photoacoustic spectra of the second (3[nu][sub OH]), third (4[nu][sub OH]), and fourth (5[nu][sub OH]) overtone bands of the hydroxyl stretch vibration in hydroxylamine. Asymmetric rotor simulations of the rovibrational contours provide rotational constants and an estimate of the homogeneous linewidth. The fourth overtone band appears anomalously broad relative to the two lower bands, reflecting a sharp increase in the rate of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR). By contrast, the calculated density of states increases smoothly with energy. The homogeneous linewidth of the fourth overtone transition is similar to that measured by Luo [ital et] [ital al]. [J. Chem. Phys. [bold 93], 9194 (1990)] for the predissociative sixth overtone band, supporting the conclusion that the broadening arises from increased (ro)vibrational coupling at an energy between the third and fourth overtone states.

  19. Observation of vibrational overtones by single molecule resonant photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Gang; Khanyile, Ncamiso; Brown, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    Molecular ions sympathetically cooled by a chain of laser-cooled atomic ions are ideal for performing high-precision molecular spectroscopy with applications in astrochemistry and fundamental physics. The same system can be coupled with a broadband laser to perform survey spectroscopy and discover new molecular transitions. Here we present our results using three-ion chains of Ca+ and CaH+ to observe vibrational transitions via resonance enhanced multiphoton dissociation detected by Ca+ fluorescence. Based on theoretical calculations, the observed peaks are assigned to two vibrational overtones corresponding to transitions from the ground vibrational state, ν = 0, to the excited vibrational states, ν = 9 and ν = 10. Our method allows us to track single molecular events, and it can be extended to handle any molecule by monitoring normal mode frequency shifts to detect the dissociation.

  20. Gamma rays from muon capture in 14N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocki, T. J.; Measday, D. F.; Gete, E.; Saliba, M. A.; Moftah, B. A.; Gorringe, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    Many new γ-rays have been observed, following muon capture on 14N. One had been reported before, and the low yield is confirmed, indicating that the nuclear structure of 14N is still not understood. Gamma rays from 13C resulting from the reaction 14N( μ-, νn) 13C compare favourably with states observed in the reaction 14N( γ, p) 13C. More precise energies are also given for the 7017 and 6730 keV γ-rays in 14C.

  1. Radon, lung cancer, and geology in Livingston, Overton County, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Officer, C.; Shimek, S.; Fitzgerald, F.

    1995-12-31

    During the fall of 1994 tests defined radon levels of 76 piC/l in the basement level of a home in Overton Heights development in Livingston, Tennessee. Subsequent tests confirmed this elevation and also defined a value of 52 PiC/l in the second home tested in the same area. Subsequent discussions with local residents indicated 10 to 15 probable lung cancer cases in the previous +/-5 years in a population of about 100 households. When this situation was brought to the attention of the Tennessee Program the response was to immediately offer support for additional testing. This consisted of the placement of approximately 40 was to immediately offer support for additional testing. This consisted of the placement of approximately 40 Airchek charcoal packets on a somewhat random basis in February and March of 1995. Each house was tested in the location with potential for greatest radon elevation. The results showed that elevated radon levels were widespread with values as high as 105 piC/l. More significantly, most of the homes tested showed elevations. The next phase of the program involved some retesting of previously defined elevations but the majority of this stage concentrated on repeating those tests which were inconclusive and on the extension of the test area to establish the limits of the elevated values. Retesting verified elevations as previously defined but the values were generally lower due to testing main living levels and warmer which encouraged more ventilation.

  2. Dissociative ionization of liquid water induced by vibrational overtone excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Natzle, W.C.

    1983-03-01

    Photochemistry of vibrationally activated ground electronic state liquid water to produce H/sup +/ and OH/sup -/ ions has been initiated by pulsed, single-photon excitation of overtone and combination transitions. Transient conductivity measurements were used to determine quantum yields as a function of photon energy, isotopic composition, and temperature. The equilibrium relaxation rate following perturbation by the vibrationally activated reaction was also measured as a function of temperature reaction and isotopic composition. In H/sub 2/O, the quantum yield at 283 +- 1 K varies from 2 x 10/sup -9/ to 4 x 10/sup -5/ for wave numbers between 7605 and 18140 cm/sup -1/. In D/sub 2/O, the dependence of quantum yield on wavelength has the same qualitative shape as for H/sub 2/O, but is shifted to lower quantum yields. The position of a minimum in the quantum yield versus hydrogen mole fraction curve is consistent with a lower quantum yield for excitation of HOD in D/sub 2/O than for excitation of D/sub 2/O. The ionic recombination distance of 5.8 +- 0.5 A is constant within experimental error with temperature in H/sub 2/O and with isotopic composition at 25 +- 1/sup 0/C.

  3. Pure-tone birdsong by resonance filtering of harmonic overtones

    PubMed Central

    Beckers, Gabriël J. L.; Suthers, Roderick A.; Cate, Carel ten

    2003-01-01

    Pure-tone song is a common and widespread phenomenon in birds. The mechanistic origin of this type of phonation has been the subject of long-standing discussion. Currently, there are three hypotheses. (i) A vibrating valve in the avian vocal organ, the syrinx, generates a multifrequency harmonic source sound, which is filtered to a pure tone by a vocal tract filter (“source-filter” model, analogous to human speech production). (ii) Vocal tract resonances couple with a vibrating valve source, suppressing the normal production of harmonic overtones at this source (“soprano” model, analogous to human soprano singing). (iii) Pure-tone sound is produced as such by a sound-generating mechanism that is fundamentally different from a vibrating valve. Here we present direct evidence of a source-filter mechanism in the production of pure-tone birdsong. Using tracheal thermistors and air sac pressure cannulae, we recorded sound signals close to the syringeal sound source during spontaneous, pure-tone vocalizations of two species of turtledove. The results show that pure-tone dove vocalizations originate through filtering of a multifrequency harmonic sound source. PMID:12764226

  4. Vibrationally highly excited molecules and intramolecular mode coupling through high-overtone spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J.S.; Moore, C.B.

    1981-08-01

    High overtone spectra of organic molecules can be interpreted using the local mode model for absorptions by the inequivalent C-H bonds. The spectra can be assigned using either observed C-H bond lengths or isolated fundamental frequencies. The spectra of trihalomethanes indicate that the dominant intramolecular mode coupling for the C-H stretching overtones is Fermi resonance with combination states with one less C-H stretching quantum plus two quanta of the C-H bending vibrations.

  5. DFT-D study of 14N nuclear quadrupolar interactions in tetra-n-alkyl ammonium halide crystals.

    PubMed

    Dib, Eddy; Alonso, Bruno; Mineva, Tzonka

    2014-05-15

    The density functional theory-based method with periodic boundary conditions and addition of a pair-wised empirical correction for the London dispersion energy (DFT-D) was used to study the NMR quadrupolar interaction (coupling constant CQ and asymmetry parameter ηQ) of (14)N nuclei in a homologous series of tetra-n-alkylammonium halides (C(x)H(2x+1))4N(+)X(-) (x = 1-4), (X = Br, I). These (14)N quadrupolar properties are particularly challenging for the DFT-D computations because of their very high sensitivity to tiny geometrical changes, being negligible for other spectral property calculations as, for example, NMR (14)N chemical shift. In addition, the polarization effect of the halide anions in the considered crystal mesophases combines with interactions of van der Waals type between cations and anions. Comparing experimental and theoretical results, the performance of PBE-D functional is preferred over that of B3LYP-D. The results demonstrated a good transferability of the empirical parameters in the London dispersion formula for crystals with two or more carbons per alkyl group in the cations, whereas the empirical corrections in the tetramethylammonium halides appeared to be inappropriate for the quadrupolar interaction calculation. This is attributed to the enhanced cation-anion attraction, which causes a strong polarization at the nitrogen site. Our results demonstrated that the (14)N CQ and ηQ are predominantly affected by the molecular structures of the cations, adapted to the symmetry of the anion arrangements. The long-range polarization effect of the surrounding anions at the target nitrogen site becomes more important for cells with lower spatial symmetry. PMID:24758512

  6. Moving NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico; Danieli, Ernesto; Gong, Qingxia; Greferath, Marcus; Haber, Agnes; Kolz, Jürgen; Perlo, Juan

    2008-12-01

    Initiated by the use of NMR for well logging, portable NMR instruments are being developed for a variety of novel applications in materials testing and process analysis and control. Open sensors enable non-destructive testing of large objects, and small, cup-size magnets become available for high throughput analysis by NMR relaxation and spectroscopy. Some recent developments of mobile NMR are reviewed which delineate the direction into which portable NMR is moving.

  7. Direct Excitation of the Reaction Coordinate: Overtone-Induced Predissociation of the Hydroxymethyl Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisler, Hanna; Ryazanov, Mikhail; Rodrigo, Chirantha P.

    2011-06-01

    The overtone-induced vibrational predissociation of the hydroxymethyl radical is achieved following excitation of the radical to the third O-H stretch overtone. The excited O-H stretch is also the bond that breaks; i.e. overtone excitation is in the reaction coordinate. The production of H atoms takes place via tunneling through the barrier to the H + formaldehyde channel. H-atom photofragment yield spectra in the region of the third overtone reveal two mixed bands with contributions from the third OH overtone and a combination band comprised of two quanta of OH stretch and one quantum of CH asymmetric stretch. Using velocity map imaging, sliced images of H-atom products are obtained with kinetic energy resolution sufficient to reveal the vibrational structure in the formaldehyde co-fragment. As expected, most of the formaldehyde molecules are born without vibrational excitation but some exhibit excitation in other modes, such as wagging and CO stretch. The rotational contours of the vibrational bands are well described by temperatures in the range 100-150 K. Slice imaging allows scanning the pump laser while monitoring H fragments in selected kinetic energy ranges, and in this way it is demonstrated that all the observed vibrational levels of formaldehyde have their parentage in the hydroxymethyl radical. The barrier to isomerization to methoxy is comparable to the barrier to direct dissociation and the role of isomerization is investigated by using partially deuterated radicals.

  8. Analysis of overtone flexural modes operation in quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tittel, Frank K; Sampaolo, Angelo; Patimisco, Pietro; Dong, Lei; Geras, Antonina; Starecki, Tomasz; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2016-03-21

    A detailed investigation of a set of custom quartz tuning forks (QTFs), operating in the fundamental and first overtone flexural modes is reported. Support losses are the dominant energy dissipation processes when the QTFs vibrate at the first overtone mode. These losses can be decreased by increasing the ratio between the prong length and its thickness. The QTFs were implemented in a quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) based sensor operating in the near-IR spectral range and water vapor was selected as the gas target. QTF flexural modes having the highest quality factor exhibit the largest QEPAS signal, demonstrating that, by optimizing the QTF prongs sizes, overtone modes can provide a higher QEPAS sensor performance with respect to using the fundamental mode. PMID:27136886

  9. Overtone frequency spectra for x3-dependent modes in AT-cut quartz resonators.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun; Chen, Weiqiu; Yang, Jiashi

    2013-04-01

    We study straight-crested waves and vibration modes with spatial variations along the x3 direction only in an AT-cut quartz plate resonator. The equations of anisotropic elasticity are used. Dispersion relations for face-shear and thickness-twist waves in unbounded plates are plotted. Frequency spectra are obtained for face-shear and thickness-twist vibrations of finite plates in which these modes are coupled by boundary conditions. Most importantly, our analysis produces the frequency spectra for overtone modes which do not seem to have been obtained before for x3-dependent modes. Numerical results for third- and fifth-overtone AT-cut quartz resonators are presented, showing that higher-order overtone modes are associated with more mode couplings. PMID:23549548

  10. Overtone and combination tone bands in the DRIFT spectra of molecular sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peuker, Ch.; Splett, Ch.

    1993-03-01

    The DRIFT spectra of molecular sieves of type A, X, ZSM-5 and SAPO are measured. It is demonstrated that in some cases the overtone and combination tone bands of the lattice vibrations may be used for characterizing the structure of molecular sieves. For instance crystal phase transition due to thermal or hydrothermal treatment, can easily be studied in the region between 2500 and 1500 cm -1. In general the variations in the spectra of the samples due to structural distortion are less significant in the overtone and combination tone bands than in fundamental ones.

  11. 14N Chemical Shifts and Quadrupole Coupling Constants of Inorganic Nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marburger, Simon P.; Fung, B. M.; Khitrin, A. K.

    2002-02-01

    The isotropic chemical shift and the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant for 14N were obtained for 14 inorganic nitrates by solid-state MAS NMR measurements at two different field strengths, 9.4 and 11.7 T. The compounds studied were polycrystalline powders of AgNO3, Al(NO3)3, Ba(NO3)2, Ca(NO3)2, CsNO3, KNO3, LiNO3, Mg(NO3)2, NaNO3, Pb(NO3)2, RbNO3, Sr(NO3)2, Th(NO3)4·4H2O, and UO2(NO3)2·3H2O. Even though the spectra show broadening due to 14N quadrupole interactions, linewidths of a few hundred hertz and a good signal-to-noise ratio were achieved. From the position of the central peaks at the two fields, the chemical shifts and the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants were calculated. The chemical shifts for all compounds studied range from 282 to 342 ppm with respect to NH4Cl. The nuclear quadrupole coupling constants range from 429 kHz for AgNO3 to 993 kHz for LiNO3. These data are compared with those available in the literature.

  12. On the infrared-active overtones n nu 3 of uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Merwe, P. du T.

    1993-10-01

    A perspective is provided of the infrared-active fundamental mode ν3 and the band structure of its overtones relevant for uranium hexafluoride. The treatment is based on nonlinear (Morse-type) creation and annihilation operators. The spectrum generating algebra provides ready access to anharmonic spectral features which incorporate dissociation characteristics.

  13. Vibrationally mediated photodissociation of t-butyl hydroperoxide: Vibrational overtone spectroscopy and photodissociation dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Likar, M.D.; Baggott, J.E.; Crim, F.F.

    1989-06-01

    Vibrationally mediated photodissociation is a two-photon technique for studying the spectroscopy and photodissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. In these experiments, a highly vibrationally excited t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH) molecule, prepared by excitation in the region of the third overtone of the O--H stretching vibration (4..nu../sub OH/), absorbs a second photon to dissociate to OH and t-butoxy fragments, and laser induced fluorescence determines the quantum state populations of the OH fragment. Vibrational overtone excitation spectra, obtained by varying the vibrational overtone excitation wavelength while monitoring a single OH rotational state, are nearly identical to photoacoustic spectra. We fit the coarse structure in the vibrational overtone excitation spectrum in the region of the 4..nu../sub OH/ transition and the photoacoustic spectra in the regions of the 5..nu../sub OH/ and 6..nu../sub OH/ transitions using a spectroscopic model of the interaction of the O--H bond stretching vibration with the torsional vibration about the O--O bond. This analysis determines the barrier to internal rotation of the O--H and t-butoxy groups through the trans configuration and its variation with vibrational excitation. The trans barrier in the ground vibrational state is 275 cm/sup -1/ and increases with vibrational excitation to 425, 575, and 680 cm/sup -1/ for t-BuOOH molecules with four, five, and six quanta of O--H stretching excitation, respectively.

  14. Unraveling overtone interferences in Love-wave phase velocity measurements by array-based radon transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Luo, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Surface waves contain fundamental mode and higher modes, which could interfere with each other. Different modes of surface waves have completely different sensitivities to earth structures. If they are not properly separated, the inverted Earth structures using surface waves could be biased. Especially, for Love waves propagating over oceanic paths, the group velocities of fundamental mod and first/second overtoneS are overlapped with each at periods shorter than 100 sec, resulting in strong overtone interferences in seismograms. Most surface wave tomography studies use dispersion curves of fundamental modes in imaging. One challenge in surface wave tomography is to accurately measure the fundamental-mode phase velocities and avoid the contamination by overtones. In this study, we develop an effective way by applying Linear Radon Transform (LRT) to a seismic array to separate fundamental-mode surface waves from higher modes. We apply this method to both synthetic data and real surface waves from USArray. Analysis on synthetic seismograms shows that two-station measurements on reconstructed data obtained after mode separation can completely retrieve the fundamental-mode Love-wave phase velocities. Results on USArray data show that higher mode contamination effects reach up to ˜10-15 percent for two-station and array-based measurements of Love waves, while two-station measurements on mode-separated data obtained by LRT are very close to the predicted values from a global dispersion model of GDM52, demonstrating that the contamination of overtones on fundamental-mode Love wave phase velocity measurements is effectively mitigated by the LRT method and accurate fundamental-mode Love-wave phase velocities can be measured.

  15. Radiative n 14N capture at astrophysical energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2013-06-01

    In the potential cluster model with forbidden states and classification of orbital cluster states according to Young's schemes, the possibility is considered of describing the experimental data for the total cross sections of radiative n 14N capture at energies from 25.0 meV (25•10-3 eV) to 1.0 MeV. It is shown that on the whole it is possible to successfully explain the behavior of these cross sections outside the resonant energy region on the basis of the E1 transition from the 2S1/2 scattering wave with zero phase to the bound 2Р1/2 state of the 15N nucleus in the n14N channel.

  16. Chromatographic NMR in NMR solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, Caroline; Viel, Stéphane; Delaurent, Corinne; Ziarelli, Fabio; Excoffier, Grégory; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2008-10-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that pseudo-chromatographic NMR experiments could be performed using typical chromatographic solids and solvents. This first setup yielded improved separation of the spectral components of the NMR spectra of mixtures using PFG self-diffusion measurements. The method (dubbed Chromatographic NMR) was successively shown to possess, in favorable cases, superior resolving power on non-functionalized silica, compared to its LC counterpart. To further investigate the applicability of the method, we studied here the feasibility of Chromatographic NMR in common deuterated solvents. Two examples are provided, using deuterated chloroform and water, for homologous compounds soluble in these solvents, namely aromatic molecules and alcohols, respectively.

  17. A stochastic streamflow model of the Platte River at Overton, Odessa, and Grand Island, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vecchia, A.V., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A stochastic model is developed to simulate flows for three seasons (September through February, March and April, May through August) at Overton, Odessa, and Grand Island, Nebraska on the Platte River. The model preserves the first and second order moment properties of the historical flow series, including significant autocorrelations within each station and cross-correlations between the stations. Higher order moments are preserved by a transformation technique that allows the residuals from the model to be approximately normal. An algorithm is given for simulation of combined-stations flows, and some simulations are carried out to determine the likelihood of specified flow shortages that could be detrimental to the wildlife habitat in the reach of the Platte River between Overton and Grand Island. (USGS)

  18. High-power supersonic CO laser on fundamental and overtone transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, W; Buelow, H von; Dass, S; McCord, J E; Tate, R F; Hager, G D; Ionin, Andrei A; Klimachev, Yu M; Kotkov, A A; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; McIver, J K

    2005-12-31

    Lasing parameters of a rf discharge-pumped CO laser in a subsonic gas flow with subsequent cooling of the laser medium in a supersonic flow are studied. The output power of the laser achieved 2.1 kW for the efficiency up to 21% in the spectral range 4.9-5.7 {mu}m corresponding to the V+1{yields}V fundamental vibrational transitions in the CO molecule. The laser output power at the V+2{yields}V first vibrational overtone transitions (2.6-2.7 {mu}m) was 50 W. Possible ways of improving the laser design for generating radiation at higher overtone transitions of the CO molecule are discussed. (lasers)

  19. Towards understanding the nature of the intensities of overtone vibrational transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Emile S.

    2012-11-01

    The overtone vibrational transitions, i.e., transitions between states separated by more than one vibrational quantum play important role in many fields of physics and chemistry. The overtone transition is a purely quantum process associated with the so-called dynamical tunneling [Heller, E. J., "The many faces of tunneling," J. Phys. Chem. A 103(49), 10433-10444 (1999), 10.1021/jp9924171] whose probability is small as compared to the fundamental transition. The transition probability is proportional to the Landau-Lifshitz tunneling factor similar to the Gamov factor in nuclear physics. However, as opposed to the Gamov tunneling, the Landau-Lifshitz tunneling lacks any barrier to tunnel through: Its probability looks as if the system were forced to "dive" under the barrier up to a point where the transition can be performed without any change in momentum, hence with a high probability, and then to "emerge back" in a new state. It follows that the transition probability is associated with the shape of the potential in the classically forbidden region in the same sense as the transition energy is associated with the shape of the potential in the classically allowed region, as implied by the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization rule, and in the same sense as the probability of the Gamov tunneling is associated with the shape of the potential within the barrier region. As soon as the tunneling character of the transition is recognized, the well-known extreme sensitivity of the overtone intensities to small variations of the fitting function representing the molecular potential [Lehmann, K. K. and Smith, A. M., "Where does overtone intensity come from?" J. Chem. Phys. 93(9), 6140-6147 (1990), 10.1063/1.458985] becomes fully understood: Small variations of the potential in the classical region, which do not affect the energy levels significantly, cause large variations in the forbidden region and hence do affect the tunneling factor. This dictates a clear strategy of

  20. Lateral Hopping of CO on Ag(110) by Multiple Overtone Excitation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Junepyo; Lim, Hyunseob; Arafune, Ryuichi; Jung, Jaehoon; Kawai, Maki; Kim, Yousoo

    2016-02-01

    A novel type of action spectrum representing multiple overtone excitations of the v(M-C) mode was observed for lateral hopping of a CO molecule on Ag(110) induced by inelastically tunneled electrons from the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope. The yield of CO hopping shows sharp increases at 261±4  mV, corresponding to the C-O internal stretching mode, and at 61±2, 90±2, and 148±7  mV, even in the absence of corresponding fundamental vibrational modes. The mechanism of lateral CO hopping on Ag(110) was explained by the multistep excitation of overtone modes of v(M-C) based on the numerical fitting of the action spectra, the nonlinear dependence of the hopping rate on the tunneling current, and the hopping barrier obtained from thermal diffusion experiments. PMID:26894720

  1. Lateral Hopping of CO on Ag(110) by Multiple Overtone Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Junepyo; Lim, Hyunseob; Arafune, Ryuichi; Jung, Jaehoon; Kawai, Maki; Kim, Yousoo

    2016-02-01

    A novel type of action spectrum representing multiple overtone excitations of the v (M -C ) mode was observed for lateral hopping of a CO molecule on Ag(110) induced by inelastically tunneled electrons from the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope. The yield of CO hopping shows sharp increases at 261 ±4 mV , corresponding to the C-O internal stretching mode, and at 61 ±2 , 90 ±2 , and 148 ±7 mV , even in the absence of corresponding fundamental vibrational modes. The mechanism of lateral CO hopping on Ag(110) was explained by the multistep excitation of overtone modes of v (M -C ) based on the numerical fitting of the action spectra, the nonlinear dependence of the hopping rate on the tunneling current, and the hopping barrier obtained from thermal diffusion experiments.

  2. Towards understanding the nature of the intensities of overtone vibrational transitions.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Emile S

    2012-11-01

    The overtone vibrational transitions, i.e., transitions between states separated by more than one vibrational quantum play important role in many fields of physics and chemistry. The overtone transition is a purely quantum process associated with the so-called dynamical tunneling [Heller, E. J., "The many faces of tunneling," J. Phys. Chem. A 103(49), 10433-10444 (1999)] whose probability is small as compared to the fundamental transition. The transition probability is proportional to the Landau-Lifshitz tunneling factor similar to the Gamov factor in nuclear physics. However, as opposed to the Gamov tunneling, the Landau-Lifshitz tunneling lacks any barrier to tunnel through: Its probability looks as if the system were forced to "dive" under the barrier up to a point where the transition can be performed without any change in momentum, hence with a high probability, and then to "emerge back" in a new state. It follows that the transition probability is associated with the shape of the potential in the classically forbidden region in the same sense as the transition energy is associated with the shape of the potential in the classically allowed region, as implied by the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization rule, and in the same sense as the probability of the Gamov tunneling is associated with the shape of the potential within the barrier region. As soon as the tunneling character of the transition is recognized, the well-known extreme sensitivity of the overtone intensities to small variations of the fitting function representing the molecular potential [Lehmann, K. K. and Smith, A. M., "Where does overtone intensity come from?" J. Chem. Phys. 93(9), 6140-6147 (1990)] becomes fully understood: Small variations of the potential in the classical region, which do not affect the energy levels significantly, cause large variations in the forbidden region and hence do affect the tunneling factor. This dictates a clear strategy of constructing the potential energy and dipole

  3. Peculiarities of high-overtone transition probabilities in carbon monoxide revealed by high-precision calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, Emile S.; Meshkov, Vladimir V.; Stolyarov, Andrey V.

    2015-10-21

    In the recent work devoted to the calculation of the rovibrational line list of the CO molecule [G. Li et al., Astrophys. J., Suppl. Ser. 216, 15 (2015)], rigorous validation of the calculated parameters including intensities was carried out. In particular, the Normal Intensity Distribution Law (NIDL) [E. S. Medvedev, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 174307 (2012)] was employed for the validation purposes, and it was found that, in the original CO line list calculated for large changes of the vibrational quantum number up to Δn = 41, intensities with Δn > 11 were unphysical. Therefore, very high overtone transitions were removed from the published list in Li et al. Here, we show how this type of validation is carried out and prove that the quadruple precision is indispensably required to predict the reliable intensities using the conventional 32-bit computers. Based on these calculations, the NIDL is shown to hold up for the 0 → n transitions till the dissociation limit around n = 83, covering 45 orders of magnitude in the intensity. The low-intensity 0 → n transition predicted in the work of Medvedev [Determination of a new molecular constant for diatomic systems. Normal intensity distribution law for overtone spectra of diatomic and polyatomic molecules and anomalies in overtone absorption spectra of diatomic molecules, Institute of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, 1984] at n = 5 is confirmed, and two additional “abnormal” intensities are found at n = 14 and 23. Criteria for the appearance of such “anomalies” are formulated. The results could be useful to revise the high-overtone molecular transition probabilities provided in spectroscopic databases.

  4. Concentrations of anesthetics across the water-membrane interface; the Meyer-Overton hypothesis revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.; New, M. H.; Chipot, C.

    1998-01-01

    The free energies of transferring a variety of anesthetic and nonanesthetic compounds across water-oil and water-membrane interfaces were obtained using computer simulations. Anesthetics exhibit greatly enhanced concentrations at these interfaces, compared to nonanesthetics. The substitution of the interfacial solubilites of the anesthetics for their bulk lipid solubilities in the Meyer-Overton relation, was found to give a better correlation, indicating that the potency of an anesthetic is directly proportional to its solubility at the interface.

  5. Peculiarities of high-overtone transition probabilities in carbon monoxide revealed by high-precision calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Emile S.; Meshkov, Vladimir V.; Stolyarov, Andrey V.; Gordon, Iouli E.

    2015-10-01

    In the recent work devoted to the calculation of the rovibrational line list of the CO molecule [G. Li et al., Astrophys. J., Suppl. Ser. 216, 15 (2015)], rigorous validation of the calculated parameters including intensities was carried out. In particular, the Normal Intensity Distribution Law (NIDL) [E. S. Medvedev, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 174307 (2012)] was employed for the validation purposes, and it was found that, in the original CO line list calculated for large changes of the vibrational quantum number up to Δn = 41, intensities with Δn > 11 were unphysical. Therefore, very high overtone transitions were removed from the published list in Li et al. Here, we show how this type of validation is carried out and prove that the quadruple precision is indispensably required to predict the reliable intensities using the conventional 32-bit computers. Based on these calculations, the NIDL is shown to hold up for the 0 → n transitions till the dissociation limit around n = 83, covering 45 orders of magnitude in the intensity. The low-intensity 0 → n transition predicted in the work of Medvedev [Determination of a new molecular constant for diatomic systems. Normal intensity distribution law for overtone spectra of diatomic and polyatomic molecules and anomalies in overtone absorption spectra of diatomic molecules, Institute of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, 1984] at n = 5 is confirmed, and two additional "abnormal" intensities are found at n = 14 and 23. Criteria for the appearance of such "anomalies" are formulated. The results could be useful to revise the high-overtone molecular transition probabilities provided in spectroscopic databases.

  6. Non-radial pulsation in first overtone Cepheids of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolec, R.; Śniegowska, M.

    2016-06-01

    We analyse photometry for 138 first overtone Cepheids from the Small Magellanic Cloud, in which Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment team discovered additional variability with period shorter than first overtone period, and period ratios in the P/P1O ∈ (0.60, 0.65) range. In the Petersen diagram, these stars form three well-separated sequences. The additional variability cannot correspond to other radial mode. This form of pulsation is still puzzling. We find that amplitude of the additional variability is small, typically 2-4 per cent of the first overtone amplitude, which corresponds to 2-5 mmag. In some stars, we find simultaneously two close periodicities corresponding to two sequences in the Petersen diagram. The most important finding is the detection of power excess at half the frequency of the additional variability (at subharmonic) in 35 per cent of the analysed stars. Interestingly, power excess at subharmonic frequency is detected mostly for stars of the middle sequence in the Petersen diagram (74 per cent), incidence rate is much lower for stars of the top sequence (31 per cent), and phenomenon is not detected for stars of the bottom sequence. The amplitude and/or phase of the additional periodicities strongly vary in time. Similar form of pulsation is observed in first overtone RR Lyrae stars. Our results indicate that the nature and cause of this form of pulsation is the same in the two groups of classical pulsators; consequently, a common model explaining this form of pulsation should be searched for. Our results favour the theory of the excitation of non-radial modes of angular degrees 7, 8 and 9, proposed recently by Dziembowski.

  7. Fluorosulfonic acid and chlorosulfonic acid: possible candidates for OH-stretching overtone-induced photodissociation.

    PubMed

    Lane, Joseph R; Kjaergaard, Henrik G

    2007-10-01

    We have calculated the stationary points and internal reaction coordinate pathway for the dissociation of fluorosulfonic acid (FSO3H) and chlorosulfonic acid (ClSO3H). These sulfonic acids dissociate to sulfur trioxide and hydrogen fluoride and chloride, respectively. We have calculated the frequencies and intensities of the OH-stretching transitions of FSO3H and ClSO3H with an anharmonic oscillator local mode model. We find that excitation of the fourth and third OH-stretching overtones provide adequate energy for photodissociation of FSO3H and ClSO3H, respectively. We propose that experimental detection of the products of OH-stretching overtone-induced photodissociation of FSO3H and ClSO3H would be easier than the sulfuric acid (H2SO4) equivalent. The photodissociation of H2SO4 is thought to be important in the stratosphere. The FSO3H and ClSO3H experiment could be used in proxy to support the recently proposed OH-stretching overtone-induced photodissociation mechanism of H2SO4. PMID:17764162

  8. Repetitively pulsed cryogenically cooled quasi-sealed-off slab RF discharge first-overtone CO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, A. A.; Kozlov, A. Yu.; Rulev, O. A.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    A slab first-overtone CO laser of improved design excited by repetitively pulsed RF discharge was researched and developed. Its quasi-sealed-off operation appeared to be possible only by using active gas mixture composition with extremely high content of oxygen — up to 50 % with respect to CO concentration. Average output power of the first-overtone CO laser came up to ~2 W with the efficiency of ~2 %. The laser spectrum obtained by using three sets of output couplers consisted of more than 100 vibrational-rotational spectral lines in 28 vibrational first-overtone bands of CO molecule within 2.55÷3.90 μm wavelength range. The number of laser radiation pulses which could be produced by the laser in sealed-off mode of operation (without gas mixture renovation) reached ~5×105 at the averaged output power near its maximum, and ~106 at lower (near its half-maximum) averaged output power. Special features of laser radiation temporal behavior were discussed. Under repetitively pulse pump with repetition rate from 300 up to 7500 Hz, a temporal profile of the CO laser radiation changed from the train of time-separated laser pulses with high peak power to quasi-CW mode of operation.

  9. Vibrational overtone spectroscopy of bound and predissociative states of hydrogen peroxide cooled in a supersonic expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L.; Ticich, T.M.; Likar, M.D.; Crim, F.F.

    1986-08-15

    The vibrational overtone excitation spectra of both bound and predissociative states of hydrogen peroxide molecules cooled in a supersonic expansion show features that are obscured otherwise. Spectra of p-italicr-italice-italicd-italici-italics-italics-italico-italicc-italici-italica-italict-italici-italicv-italice-italic states are measured by detecting the decomposition product following excitation of an overtone vibration. Spectra of b-italico-italicu-italicn-italicd-italic states are obtained by a two-photon excitation technique in which a second photon excites the molecule from its bound vibrational overtone state to a dissociative state. The features in the bound state (4..nu../sub OH/) spectrum are 0.08 to 0.13 cm/sup -1/ wide, reflecting small inhomogeneous broadening, but those to the predissociative state (6..nu../sub OH/) are 1.5 +- 0.3 cm/sup -1/ wide. This width, which corresponds to a lifetime of about 3.5 ps, reflects coupling into the dissociative continuum.

  10. Vibrational overtone spectroscopy of H/sub 2/O (4. gamma. /sub OH/) using energy-selective electron impact ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, C.C.; Penn, S.M.; Carlson, K.J.; Crim, F.F.

    1988-03-24

    The authors describe a new method for obtaining vibrational overtone spectra of polyatomic molecules in supersonic expansions that uses low-energy electrons to ionize the vibrationally excited molecules. Measuring the excitation spectrum of water in the region of the third overtone of the OH stretching vibration (4..sigma../sub OH/) demonstrates the technique. The ionization process is probably not direct but may occur by electron impact excitation to vibrationally and electronically excited states from which the neutral molecule is subsequently ionizes

  11. Measurement of γ rays from μ^- capture on ^14N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocki, T. J.; Gete, E.; Lange, J.; Measday, D. F.; Moftah, B. A.; Saliba, M. A.; Gorringe, T. P.

    1997-10-01

    A μ^- beam produced at TRIUMF was stopped in a liquid nitrogen target and the γ-rays produced by μ^- capture on ^14N were measured using two HPGe detectors in a back-to-back geometry. Each HPGe detector was surrounded by a NaI annulus to veto γ-rays Compton scattered from the Ge detector. Each HPGe also had a plastic scintillator in front of it, to eliminate the background from muon decay electrons. Using this technique the following ^14C muon capture γ-rays have been observed: 809, 6092, and 6727 keV. The 7010 keV line, which has been seen before,(M.Giffon et al., Phys. Rev. C \\underline24, 241 (1981). ) was also observed. Gamma rays from ^13C have been observed for the first time. The yields of these γ-rays have been measured.

  12. Box-modeling of 15N/14N in mammals.

    PubMed

    Balter, Vincent; Simon, Laurent; Fouillet, Hélène; Lécuyer, Christophe

    2006-03-01

    The 15N/14N signature of animal proteins is now commonly used to understand their physiology and quantify the flows of nutrient in trophic webs. These studies assume that animals are predictably 15N-enriched relative to their food, but the isotopic mechanism which accounts for this enrichment remains unknown. We developed a box model of the nitrogen isotope cycle in mammals in order to predict the 15N/14N ratios of body reservoirs as a function of time, N intake and body mass. Results of modeling show that a combination of kinetic isotope fractionation during the N transfer between amines and equilibrium fractionation related to the reversible conversion of N-amine into ammonia is required to account for the well-established approximately 4 per thousand 15N-enrichment of body proteins relative to the diet. This isotopic enrichment observed in proteins is due to the partial recycling of 15N-enriched urea and the urinary excretion of a fraction of the strongly 15N-depleted ammonia reservoir. For a given body mass and diet delta15N, the isotopic compositions are mainly controlled by the N intake. Increase of the urea turnover combined with a decrease of the N intake lead to calculate a delta15N increase of the proteins, in agreement with the observed increase of collagen delta15N of herbivorous animals with aridity. We further show that the low delta15N collagen values of cave bears cannot be attributed to the dormancy periods as it is commonly thought, but inversely to the hyperphagia behavior. This model highlights the need for experimental investigations performed with large mammals in order to improve our understanding of natural variations of delta15N collagen. PMID:16328553

  13. Quantum Interference in the Vibrational Relaxation of the O-H Stretch Overtone of Liquid H2O.

    PubMed

    van der Post, Sietse T; Woutersen, Sander; Bakker, Huib J

    2016-05-26

    Using femtosecond two-color infrared pump-probe spectroscopy, we study the vibrational relaxation of the O-H stretch vibrations of liquid H2O after excitation of the overtone transition. The overtone transition has its maximum at 6900 cm(-1) (1.45 μm), which is a relatively high frequency in view of the central frequency of 3400 cm(-1) of the fundamental transition. The excitation of the overtone leads to a transient induced absorption of two-exciton states of the O-H stretch vibrations. When the overtone excitation frequency is tuned from 6600 to 7200 cm(-1), the vibrational relaxation time constant of the two-exciton states increases from 400 ± 50 fs to 540 ± 40 fs. These values define a limited range of relatively long relaxation time constants compared to the range of relaxation time constants of 250-550 fs that we recently observed for the one-exciton O-H stretch vibrational state of liquid H2O ( S. T. van der Post et al., Nature Comm. 2015 , 6 , 8384 ). We explain the high central frequency and the limited range of relatively long relaxation time constants of the overtone transition from the destructive quantum interference of the mechanical and electrical anharmonic contributions to the overtone transition probability. As a result of this destructive interference, the overtone transition of liquid H2O is dominated by molecules of which the O-H groups donate relatively weak hydrogen bonds to other H2O molecules. PMID:27070075

  14. Cepheids in Magellanic Cloud star clusters - Fundamental and overtone pulsators in NGC 2157

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Madore, Barry F.

    1990-01-01

    CCD survey data are employed to examine Cepheids in young Magellanic Cloud star clusters. The properties of three Cepheids observed in NGC 2157 are described. It is detected that the two short-period (3 days) Cepheids have photometric properties that correspond to overtone pulsators and the long-period (7.7 days) Cepheid pulses in the fundamental mode. The pulsational masses for the three Cepheids are calculated to be about 5 solar masses. This mass value does not correlate with the average pulsational mass for Cepheids of 3.0 + or - 0.4 solar masses. The potential cause of this deviation in evolutionary/pulsational mass is investigated.

  15. Diode laser spectroscopy of methyl chloride overtones at 850-860 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchesini, A.; Gozzini, S.

    2016-01-01

    By using a tunable diode laser (TDL) spectrometer 156 CH3Cl overtone absorption lines have been detected in the range between 11,590 and 11,760 cm-1 (8500-8625 Å). Their strengths range around 10-26 -10-27 cm / molecule and have been measured by utilizing commercial AlGaAs/GaAs laser diodes through the wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) and the 2nd harmonic (2f) detection techniques. For one line the self-broadening coefficient has been obtained.

  16. CH-stretching overtone spectroscopy of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane.

    PubMed

    Saar, Brian G; Steeves, Adam H; Thoman, John W; Howard, Daryl L; Schofield, Daniel P; Kjaergaard, Henrik G

    2005-06-23

    We have recorded the vibrational absorption spectrum of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a) in the fundamental and first five CH-stretching overtone regions with the use of Fourier transform infrared, dispersive long-path, intracavity laser photoacoustic, and cavity ringdown spectroscopies. We compare our measured total oscillator strengths in each region with intensities calculated using an anharmonic oscillator local mode model. We calculate intensities with 1D, 2D, and 3D Hamiltonians, including one or two CH stretches and two CH stretches with the HCH bending mode, respectively. The dipole moment function is calculated ab initio with self-consistent-field Hartree-Fock and density functional theories combined with double- and triple-zeta-quality basis sets. We find that the basis set choice affects the total intensity more than the choice of the Hamiltonian. We achieve agreement between the calculated and measured total intensities of approximately a factor of 2 or better for the fundamental and first five overtones. PMID:16839056

  17. Separation of harmonic sounds using multipitch analysis and linear models for the overtone series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, Tuomas; Klapuri, Anssi

    2002-05-01

    A signal processing method for the separation of concurrent harmonic sounds is described. The method is based on a two-stage approach. First, a multiple fundamental frequency estimator is applied to find initial sound parameters which are reliable, but inaccurate and static. Second, time-varying sinusoidal parameters are estimated in an iterative algorithm. The harmonic structure is retained by keeping the frequency ratio of overtones constant over time. Overlapping harmonic components are resolved using linear models for the overtone series. In practice, the models retain the spectral envelope continuity of natural sounds. Simulation experiments were carried out using generated test signals, which were random mixtures of two to six notes from recorded natural instruments. The system is able to produce meaningful results in all polyphonies, the quality of separated sounds gradually degrading along with the polyphony. Some denoising algorithms were applied to suppress nonstationary noise component, such as drums in real-world music signals. However, the usability of the system for real musical signals is still quite limited.

  18. Origins of IR Intensity in Overtones and Combination Bands in Hydrogen Bonded Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Samantha; McCoy, Anne B.

    2010-06-01

    As the infrared spectra of an increasing number of hydrogen bonded and ion/water complexes have been investigated experimentally, we find that they often contain bands with significant intensity that cannot be attributed to fundamental transitions. In this talk, we explore several sources of the intensity of these overtone and combination bands. A common source of intensity is mode-mode coupling, as is often seen between the proton transfer coordinate and the associated heavy atom vibration. A second important mechanism involves large changes in the dipole moment due the loss of a hydrogen bond. This results in intense overtone transitions involving non-totally symmetric vibrations as well as the introduction of intense combination bands involving intramolecular bending coupled to hindered rotations. These effects will be discussed in the context of several systems, including the spectra of complexes of argon atoms with {H}_3{O}^+, F^-\\cdotH_2O, Cl^-\\cdotH_2O, protonated water clusters,^a and HOONO. T. Guasco, S. Olesen and M. A. Johnson, private communication S. Horvath, A. B. McCoy, J. R. Roscioli and M. A. Johnson, J. Phys. Chem. A, 112, 12337-44 (2008) S. Horvath, A. B. McCoy, B. M. Eliot, G. H. Weddle, J. R. Roscioli and M. A. Johnson, J. Phys. Chem. A, 115, 1556-68 (2010). A. B. McCoy, M. K. Sprague and M. Okumura, J. Phys. Chem. A, 115, 1324-33 (2010)

  19. The Binary Collision-Induced Second Overtone Band of Gaseous Hydrogen: Modelling and Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodbeck, C.; Bouanich, J.-P.; Nguyen, Van Thanh; Borysow, Aleksandra

    1999-01-01

    Collision-induced absorption (CIA) is the major source of the infrared opacity of dense planetary atmospheres which are composed of nonpolar molecules. Knowledge of CIA absorption spectra of H2-H2 pairs is important for modelling the atmospheres of planets and cold stars that are mainly composed of hydrogen. The spectra of hydrogen in the region of the second overtone at 0.8 microns have been recorded at temperatures of 298 and 77.5 K for gas densities ranging from 100 to 800 amagats. By extrapolation to zero density of the absorption coefficient measured every 10 cm(exp -1) in the spectral range from 11100 to 13800 cm(exp -1), we have determined the binary absorption coefficient. These extrapolated measurements are compared with calculations based on a model that was obtained by using simple computer codes and lineshape profiles. In view of the very weak absorption of the second overtone band, we find the agreement between results of the model and experiment to be reasonable.

  20. Atmospheric radical production by excitation of vibrational overtones via absorption of visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, D. J.; Frost, G. J.; Rosenlof, K. H.; Tuck, A. F.; Vaida, V.

    1997-11-01

    We present calculations using a radiative transfer model which predict that in the lower stratosphere at high zenith angles, significant enhancements to the photodissociation rates of HNO3 and HNO4 can result from visible wavelength excitation of OH overtone vibrations containing sufficient energy to cleave the O-O and N-O bonds. The results indicate that atmospheric chromophores such as HONO2, HO2NO2 and H2O2, could make a potentially significant contribution to the production of HOx and NOx. Calculating the relative importance of their effect requires better knowledge of the absolute absorption cross sections, both for vibrational overtones and in the near UV. Stratospheric air masses in which this process could be important are those that experience lengthy exposure at high solar zenith angles: the outer regions of the polar winter vortex and the polar summer anticyclone. We note that the general mechanism may have application elsewhere, such as in the atmospheres of other planets and in generating the diffuse interstellar bands associated with molecular clouds.

  1. Period-Luminosity relations derived from the OGLE-III first-overtone mode Cepheids in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Anupam; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Singh, Harinder P.

    2016-06-01

    We present multiband Period-Luminosity (PL) relations for first-overtone mode Cepheids in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We derive optical band PL relations and the Wesenheit function using VI mean magnitudes from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE-III) survey. We cross-match OGLE-III first-overtone mode Cepheids to the 2MASS and SAGE-SMC catalogues to derive PL relations at near-infrared (JHKs) and mid-infrared (3.6 and 4.5 μm) wavelengths. We test for possible non-linearities in these PL relations using robust statistical tests and find a significant break only in the optical band PL relations at 2.5 d for first-overtone mode Cepheids. We do not find statistical evidence for a non-linearity in these PL relations at 1 d. The multiband PL relations for fundamental-mode Cepheids in the SMC also exhibit a break at 2.5 d. We suggest that the period break around 2.5 d is related to sharp changes in the light-curve parameters for SMC Cepheids. We also derive new optical and mid-infrared band PL relations for first-overtone mode Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We compare multiband PL relations for first-overtone mode Cepheids in the Magellanic Clouds and find a significant difference in the slope of the V-band PL relations but not for I-band PL relations. The slope of PL relations are found to be consistent in most of the infrared bands. A relative distance modulus of Δμ = 0.49 ± 0.02 mag between the two clouds is estimated using multiband PL relations for the first-overtone mode Cepheids in the SMC and LMC.

  2. Laser Photoacoustic Detection of High Overtone Transitions of ClCN in the Near Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoutre, M.; Hadj Bachir, I.

    1999-09-01

    A titanium-sapphire laser associated with a photoacoustic spectrometer was used to record the spectrum of ClCN between 10 300 and 13 000 cm-1. The 0115-0110, 0005-0000, and 0006-0000 vibrational bands have been detected for both 35Cl12C14N and 37Cl12C14N molecules. The rotational structure of the 0005-0000 band has been observed at high resolution and fully analyzed for the main isotopomer 35Cl12C14N. Rotational constants of the upper state of this transition have been determined. The anharmonic vibrational constants of the ν3 mode were evaluated up to the fourth order from the new band origins and bandhead positions.

  3. Protein structure by solid-state NMR of oriented systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    A method for determining protein backbone structure from angular information obtainable by solid state NMR spectroscopy is presented. Various spin interactions including quadrupole, dipole, and chemical shift interactions and nuclei including /sup 14/N, /sup 15/N, /sup 13/C, and /sup 2/H may be observed. Angularly dependent measurements can be made when the sample has at least one direction of order along the externally applied magnetic field. Several NMR parameters are used to determine the orientation of each peptide plane with respect to the magnetic field vector, B/sub O/, to within a few symmetry related possibilities. The computer program Totlink can then be used to perform the necessary coordinate transformations and to evaluate the possible backbone structures and select for the most chemically reasonable. Experimental /sup 14/N NMR structural studies of the model peptides n-acetyl-d,l-valine, n-acetyl-l-valyl-l-leucine, and l-alanyl-glycyl-glycine and preliminary /sup 14/N NMR results on a large single crystal of orthorhombic lysozyme are presented.

  4. From light-scattering measurements to polarizability derivatives in vibrational Raman spectroscopy: The 2ν5 overtone of SF6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, D.; Rachet, F.; Chrysos, M.

    2013-05-01

    The room-temperature isotropic spectrum of SF6 was recorded at the frequency of the 2ν5 overtone by running high-sensitivity incoherent Raman experiments for two independent polarizations of the incident beam and for gas densities varying from 2 to 27 amagat. Weak yet observable pressure effects were found. A transparent analysis of the Raman cross-section problem along with the first-ever prediction of the value of the mean polarizability second derivative partial 2bar{α }/partial q52 are made and the hitherto underestimated role of the hot bands of SF6 is brought to the wider public. The emergence of an analytic hotband factor is shown whose magnitude is dramatically increased with the order of the overtone and the gas temperature and all the more so upon considering low-frequency molecular vibrations. Our formulas, which in the harmonic approximation are exact, are still applicable to real situations provided certain conditions are fulfilled. For nondegenerated modes, generalization to higher order overtones is made, an issue addressing the much challenging problem of the IR-allowed second overtone bands. The content of this paper is also an invitation towards ab initio derivative-calculations for sulfur hexafluoride, especially given the today's needs in interpreting spectra of significance for greenhouse atmospheric issues.

  5. The determination of absorption cross sections and line profiles in vibrational overtone spectra with the use of intracavity absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettermann, H.; Kleist, E.; Kok, R.

    1993-03-01

    This contribution presents quantitative absorption data concerning the 7 th CH overtone stretching vibrations of n-hexane and of methylcyclopentane. The transitions are adapted to Lorentzian and Gaussian line shapes. The bank shape analyses yield the spectral positions, absorption cross sections and linewidths of the investigated transitions.

  6. Symmetries and torsional splitting patterns in the overtone and combination vibrational states of molecules like ethane and methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzi, F.; di Lauro, C.

    2006-08-01

    The effects of head-tail coupling in the mechanism of formation of combinations and overtones of perpendicular vibrational modes, in molecules like ethane and methanol, is investigated. For uncoupled head and tail the perpendicular modes have higher degeneracies, and the species of the components of their combinations or overtones span the irreducible representations occurring in the direct products Gs× Gs in the G36(EM) group (ethane) and E× E in the G6(EM) group (methanol). Head-tail coupling operators can transform these uncoupled fundamental vibrational modes into coupled modes of lower symmetries, and then the symmetry species of combinations and overtones must be contained in the direct product of these lower symmetry sets. It is shown that the operators which generate coupled sets of fundamental vibrational states of given symmetries, also work to generate combinations and overtones with the symmetry species predicted from those of the combining fundamentals. These mechanisms are ruled by the torsional Coriolis operators, which can tune more or less to resonance basis levels linked by specific head-tail coupling operators.

  7. Reconstruction of N2O and CH4 Content by Dial Measurements at Wavelengths of Overtone CO Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovskii, O. A.; Matvienko, G. G.; Kharchenko, O. V.; Yakovlev, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the results of laboratory experiments on measurement of absorption and extinction of radiation of the overtone Co laser at wavelengths used for sensing of methane and N2O in the mid-IR spectral range with the differential absorption (DIAL) method, as well as the concentrations of the studied gases reconstructed from the analysis of experimentally obtained absorption coefficients.

  8. The 2ν1 overtone band of H28SiD3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cané, E.; Fusina, L.; Bürger, H.; Litz, M.

    2012-12-01

    The 2ν1 (A1) Si-H stretching overtone band of HSiD3 has been recorded at a resolution of ca. 0.009 cm-1 between 4200 and 4400 cm-1. About 790 ro-vibration transitions of the H28SiD3 isotopologue have been assigned, with J' up to 24 and K up to 21. The spectrum evidences the existence of several perturbations. The assigned transitions have been analyzed either neglecting or including in the model A1/E Coriolis-type interactions between v1 = 2 and nearby dark states. The standard deviation of all the fits is, however, more than one order of magnitude larger than the estimated experimental precision and is independent of the adopted model.

  9. The isomerization of 1-methylcyclopropene: A multichannel unimolecular reaction induced by overtone excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggott, J. E.; Law, D. W.

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of products resulting from the isomerization of gas phase 1-methylcyclopropene (1) induced by C-H stretch overtone excitation has been studied in a search for mode specific effects. Quantum yields for the disappearance of 1 have been determined as a function of the total pressure of a mixture of 1 and methylenecyclopropane and of the added bath gases SF6 and Ar using a combination of intracavity dye laser photolysis and end product analysis by gas chromatography. These data, together with the ratios of the yields of the major isomerization products, are adequately reproduced by RRKM theory and a weak collisional energy transfer model: no evidence for mode specificity is obtained. The experimental data demonstrate the importance of inefficient collisional energy transfer but allow some conclusions to be drawn concerning the applicability of RRKM theory which are not strongly dependent upon the details of the energy transfer model.

  10. Spatially resolved sub-Doppler overtone gain measurements on a small-scale supersonic HF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, Charles F.; Hewett, Kevin B.; Manke, Gerald C., II; Truman, C. Randall; Hager, Gordon D.

    2004-05-01

    The small signal gain of a small-scale HF overtone laser was measured using a sub-Doppler tunable diode laser system. Measurements of reactant concentration, flow velocity and gain length were also made. The spatially resolved, two-dimensional small signal gain and temperature maps that were generated show a highly inhomogeneous gain medium indicating the dominant role played by mixing of the H2 and F streams in HF laser performance. The measured gain and temperature data were analyzed with the aid of a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model. The results show that reactant mixing mechanisms have a large effect on the gain averaged over a vertical profile while kinetic rate mechanisms, including reaction rate constants and reactant concentration, have a greater effect on the maximum system gain.

  11. Overton's Rule Helps To Estimate the Penetration of Anti-Infectives into Patients' Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Djukic, Marija; Munz, Martin; Sörgel, Fritz; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Eiffert, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    In 1900, Ernst Overton found that the entry of anilin dyes through the cell membranes of living cells depended on the lipophilicity of the dyes. The brain is surrounded by barriers consisting of lipid layers that possess several inward and outward active transport systems. In the absence of meningeal inflammation, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) penetration of anti-infectives in humans estimated by the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) in CSF (AUCCSF) to that in serum (AUCCSF/AUCS) correlated positively with the lipid-water partition coefficient at pH 7.0 (log D) (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient rS = 0.40; P = 0.01) and negatively with the molecular mass (MM) (rS = −0.33; P = 0.04). The ratio of AUCCSF to the AUC of the fraction in serum that was not bound (AUCCSF/AUCS,free) strongly correlated with log D (rS = 0.67; P < 0.0001). In the presence of meningeal inflammation, AUCCSF/AUCS also correlated positively with log D (rS = 0.46; P = 0.002) and negatively with the MM (rS = −0.37; P = 0.01). The correlation of AUCCSF/AUCS,free with log D (rS = 0.66; P < 0.0001) was as strong as in the absence of meningeal inflammation. Despite these clear correlations, Overton's rule was able to explain only part of the differences in CSF penetration of the individual compounds. The site of CSF withdrawal (lumbar versus ventricular CSF), age of the patients, underlying diseases, active transport, and alterations in the pharmacokinetics by comedications also appeared to strongly influence the CSF penetration of the drugs studied. PMID:22106225

  12. Experimental plant for simultaneous production of (14)N and (15)N by (15)N/(14)N exchange in NO, NO(2)-HNO(3) system under pressure.

    PubMed

    Axente, Damian; Marcu, Cristina; Muresan, Ancuţa; Kaucsar, Martin; Misan, Ioan; Popeneciu, Gabriel; Gligan, Nicolae; Cristea, Gabriela

    2010-06-01

    An experimental study on (14)N and (15)N simultaneous separation using the chemical exchange in NO, NO(2)-HNO(3) system under pressure is presented. The influence of the pressure and of the interstage 10 M HNO(3) flow rate on the separation of (14)N and (15)N was measured on a packed column with product and waste refluxers. At steady state and 1.8 atm (absolute), the isotopic concentration at the bottom of the separation column was 0.563 at% (15)N, and in the top of the column was 0.159 at% (15)N. The height equivalent to a theoretical plate and interstage 10 M HNO(3) flow rate values, obtained in these experimental conditions, allows the separation of (14)N highly depleted of (15)N and of (15)N at 99 at% (15)N concentration. PMID:20582793

  13. Climate-Dependence of Plant-Soil 15N/14N Interactions Across Tropical Rainforests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, B. Z.; Sigman, D. M.; Hedin, L. O.

    2005-12-01

    In most areas of the world, the 15N/14N of bulk soils is higher than that of plant leaves, and the isotopic signatures of these two ecosystem N pools progressively diverge with increasing rainfall. However, both the cause for this isotopic trend and its implications for understanding interactions between climate and N cycles are largely unknown. We report 15N/14N measurements of nitrate, ammonium, and total dissolved N in soil extracts from a highly constrained rainfall sequence in Hawaii, across which this trend in ecosystem 15N/14N is captured, to examine the competing explanations for plant-soil 15N/14N uncouplings. While the isotopic influences of microbial transfers of N between nitrate and ammonium pools and plant-mycorrhizae interactions have been posited in plant-soil 15N/14N relationships, our data did not support an important role for either of these mechanisms. Instead, preferential regeneration of 14N during the breakdown of DON to ammonium explains why the 15N/14N of plants is lower than that of bulk soils. Fractionation at this step leads to two isotopically distinct N subcycles in each forest, a lower-15N/14N subcycle composed of ammonium, nitrate, and bulk plant biomass N that `spins' rapidly and a higher-15N/14N subcycle composed of bulk soil N and DON that is much less dynamic. The increased difference between soil and plant 15N/14N is due to changes in the impacts of nitrification and denitrification on the 15N/14N of ammonium and nitrate, coupled with a switch from nitrate to ammonium uptake by plants under the wettest conditions. For instance, the particularly large (~6 per mil) 15N/14N difference between plants and soils in the wettest sites is due to the lack of 15N-enrichment of ammonium by nitrification coupled with plant dependence on ammonium uptake only. Our results highlight the importance of interactions between DON breakdown, ecosystem N recycling, and gaseous N losses in the explaining the interactions between the 15N signatures of

  14. Peripheral interactions of relativistic {sup 14}N nuclei with emulsion nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Shchedrina, T. V. Bradnova, V.; Vokal, S.; Vokalova, A.; Zarubin, P. I. Zarubina, I. G.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Malakhov, A. I.; Orlova, G. I.; Rukoyatkin, P. A.; Rusakova, V. V.; Haiduc, M.; Kharlamov, S. P.; Chernyavsky, M. M.

    2007-07-15

    The results of investigation of the dissociation of the 2.86-A-GeV/c{sup 14}N nucleus in an emulsion are presented. The cross sections for various fragmentation channels are given. The invariant approach to analysis of fragmentation is used. The momentum and correlation characteristics of the {alpha} particles for the {sup 14}N {sup {yields}} 3{alpha} + X channel in the laboratory system and c.m.s. of three {alpha} particles are examined. The results obtained for the {sup 14}N nucleus are compared with similar data for the {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O nuclei.

  15. Proton-detected 3D 14N/14N/1H isotropic shift correlation experiment mediated through 1H-1H RFDR mixing on a natural abundant sample under ultrafast MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-09-01

    In this contribution, we have demonstrated a proton detection-based approach on a natural abundant powdered L-Histidine HCl-H2O sample at ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) to accomplish 14N/14N correlation from a 3D 14N/14N/1H isotropic shift correlation experiment mediated through 1H finite-pulse radio frequency-driven recoupling (fp-RFDR). Herein the heteronuclear magnetization transfer between 14N and 1H has been achieved by HMQC experiment, whereas 14N/14N correlation is attained through enhanced 1H-1H spin diffusion process due to 1H-1H dipolar recoupling during the RFDR mixing. While the use of ultrafast MAS (90 kHz) provides sensitivity enhancement through increased 1H transverse relaxation time (T2), the use of micro-coil probe which can withstand strong 14N radio frequency (RF) fields further improves the sensitivity per unit sample volume.

  16. Dipole and rotational strengths for overtone transitions of a C2-symmetry HCCH molecular fragment using Van Vleck perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbate, Sergio; Gangemi, Roberto; Longhi, Giovanna

    2002-10-01

    Contact transformation theory up to second order is employed to treat CH-stretching overtone transitions and to calculate dipole and rotational strengths. A general Hamiltonian describing two interacting CH-stretching oscillators is considered, and the Darling-Dennison resonance is appropriately taken into account. The two CH bonds are supposed to be dissymmetrically disposed, so as to represent a chiral HCCH fragment, endowed with C2 symmetry. Analytical expressions of transition moments and dipole and rotational strengths are given in the hypothesis of general electric and magnetic dipole moments with quadratic dependence on coordinates and momenta. Dipole and rotational strengths are then calculated together with frequencies for the fundamental and first three overtone regions in the simplifying hypothesis of the valence optical approach on the coupled-oscillator framework. Simplified analytical expressions thereof in the relevant parameters are presented.

  17. NMR study of ferroelastic phase transition of tetramethylammonium tetrabromocobaltate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran; Kim, Sun Ha

    2016-09-01

    Static and magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments were carried out on 1H, 13C, and 14N nuclei in order to understand the structural changes of the N(CH3)4 groups in [N(CH3)4]2CoBr4 near the ferroelastic phase transition temperature TC. The two chemically inequivalent N(CH3)4 groups were distinguished using 13C cross-polarization/(CP)MAS and 14N static NMR. The changes in chemical shifts, line intensities, and the spin-lattice relaxation time near TC can be correlated with the changing structural geometry, which underlies the phase transition. The 14N NMR spectra indicated a crystal symmetry change at TC, which is related to the ferroelastic domain with different orientations of the N(CH3)4 groups. The ferroelastic domain walls were confirmed by optical polarizing microscopy, and the wall orientations were described by the Sapriel theory. The transition to the ferroelastic phase was found to be related to the orientational ordering of the N(CH3)4 groups.

  18. 17O(p,α)14N reaction measurement at astrophysical energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; Pizzone, R. G.; Burjan, S. V.; Cherubini, S.; Coc, A.; Gulino, M.; Hammache, F.; Hons, Z.; Irgaziev, B.; Kiss, G. G.; Kroha, V.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; de Séréville, N.; Somorjai, E.; Tumino, A.

    2014-05-01

    The 17O(p,α)14N reaction is of paramount importance for the nucleosynthesis in a number of stellar sites, including red giants (RG), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, massive stars and classical novae. We report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α)14N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach recently developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultra-low energy region.

  19. The 2ν3 Raman overtone of sulfur hexafluoride: Absolute spectra, pressure effects, and polarizability properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysos, M.; Rachet, F.; Kremer, D.

    2014-03-01

    Of the six normal vibrations of SF6, ν3 has a key role in the mechanisms of radiative forcing. This vibration, though inactive in Raman, shows up through the transition 2ν3 allowing for a complementary view on the asymmetric stretch of the molecule. Here, we look back into this topic, which has already caught some interest in the past but with some points been left out. We make a systematic incoherent-light-scattering analysis of the overtone with the use of different gas pressures and polarization orientations for the incident beam. Absolute-scale isotropic and anisotropic spectra are reported along with natural and pressure-induced widths and shifts, and other spectral features such as the peaks corresponding to the (experimentally indistinguishable) interfering channels Eg and F2g hitherto seen solely as two-photon IR-absorption features. We make the first-ever prediction of the SF6 polarizability second derivative with respect to the ν3-mode coordinate and we develop a heuristic argument to explain why the superposition of the three degenerate stretching motions that are related to the ν3 mode cannot but generate a polarized Raman band.

  20. Unraveling overtone interferences in Love-wave phase velocity measurements by radon transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yinhe; Yang, Yingjie; Zhao, Kaifeng; Xu, Yixian; Xia, Jianghai

    2015-10-01

    Surface waves contain fundamental mode and higher modes, which could interfere with each other. If different modes are not properly separated, the inverted Earth structures using surface waves could be biased. In this study, we apply linear radon transform (LRT) to synthetic seismograms and real seismograms from the USArray to demonstrate the effectiveness of LRT in separating fundamental-mode Love waves from higher modes. Analysis on synthetic seismograms shows that two-station measurements on reconstructed data obtained after mode separation can completely retrieve the fundamental-mode Love-wave phase velocities. Results on USArray data show that higher mode contamination effects reach up to ˜10 per cent for two-station measurements of Love waves, while two-station measurements on mode-separated data obtained by LRT are very close to the predicted values from a global dispersion model of GDM52, demonstrating that the contamination of overtones on fundamental-mode Love-wave phase velocity measurements is effectively mitigated by the LRT method and accurate fundamental-mode Love-wave phase velocities can be measured.

  1. A New Model of Weak Acid Permeation through Membranes Revisited: Does Overton Still Rule?

    PubMed Central

    Saparov, Sapar M.; Antonenko, Yuri N.; Pohl, Peter

    2006-01-01

    According to a recent publication by Thomae, A. V., H. Wunderli-Allenspach, and S. D. Krämer (2005. Biophys. J. 89:1802–1811), membrane bilayers are well-permeable to the charged species of aromatic carboxylic acids. At physiological pH, the anions were claimed to be the major diffusing species. In contrast, calculation of the Born energy barrier predicts a 105-fold higher permeability for the uncharged (protonated) form. To test the new model, we now have measured both the current carried by the salicylate anion through solvent-free planar membranes and the amount of protons transported by the neutral species. The corresponding membrane permeabilities of the charged and protonated forms were 4 × 10−7 cm/s and 1.2 cm/s. These data are in perfect agreement with literature data gathered in the last three decades (compare, e.g., Gutknecht, J., and D. C. Tosteson. 1973. Science. 182:1258–1261). They indicate that the report by Thomae at al. represents an experimental artifact. The well-documented role of neutral species in the permeation process of weak acids and bases across artificial and natural membranes is not in question. Overton still rules. PMID:16603491

  2. The high-resolution visible overtone spectrum of CH4 and CD3H at 77 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, G. J.; Lehmann, Kevin K.; Klemperer, W.

    1984-12-01

    We have obtained visible overtone spectra with Doppler-limited resolution of methane and trideuteromethane in the vicinity of six quanta of C-H stretch. At room temperature, the methane spectrum is unresolved. Upon cooling to 77 K in a specially designed photoacoustic cell, methane shows a complicated but rotationally resolved spectrum. The widths of all features in the spectrum are consistent with Doppler broadened linewidths at 77 K. Efforts to assign this spectrum are in progress. The overtone spectrum of CD3H has been recently studied by other workers at a resolution of 0.5 cm-1 [Perry, Moll, Kupperman, and Zewail (preprint)]. The spectrum in this region consists of two parallel bands, one at 16 156 cm-1 and another at 16 230 cm-1. These are assigned as arising from a Fermi resonance between the pure C-H overtone 6ν1 and a combination with the degenerate C-H bend, 5ν1+2ν5. A high resolution spectrum taken at 77 K shows nearly completely resolved K-subband structure for both bands. The rotational constants of both states cannot be rationalized purely on the basis of the above vibrational assignment, although it is the most reasonable explanation of the observed vibrational spectrum. Our rotational analysis of the bands indicates that both of these states are in Coriolis resonance with another state or states which are not seen in our spectrum.

  3. Fourier Transform Spectrometer observations of solar carbon monoxide. I - The fundamental and first overtone bands in the quiet sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, T. R.; Testerman, L.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the 2200/cm fundamental and 4300/cm first overtone vibration-rotation band systems of solar carbon monoxide, were obtained with the Fourier Transform Spectrometer of the McMath telescope at Kitt Peak. The overtone measurements were taken at the east, north, and west heliocentric limbs, and at disk center. Observations of the strong fundamental bands were obtained at disk center and near the north limb. The low core brightness temperatures of the strongest fundamental carbon monoxide lines near the limb, reported previously by Noyes (1972) and Hall (1974), are confirmed. The possibility that thermal inhomogeneities might be responsible for the unusual behavior of the fundamental carbon dioxide lines have been examined. The somewhat discordant behavior of the fundamental lines at disk center compared with the north limb seems to favor a limb shadowing effect. The first overtone limb equivalent widths and the best-fit thermal and microvelocity models indicate a solar carbon abundance of 0.004 (on the scale with A sub H = 1) for an oxygen-to-carbon abundance ratio of 2.

  4. State-resolved product detection in the overtone vibration initiated unimolecular decomposition of HOOH(6. nu. /sub OH/)

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.R.; Hayden, C.C.; Crim, F.F.

    1984-11-15

    Excitation of reactant overtone vibrations in combination with laser induced fluorescence detection of unimolecular decomposition products permits measurements of reactant vibrational overtone excitation spectra and product state distributions for selectively excited hydrogen peroxide and its partially deuterated analog. The hydrogen peroxide excitation spectrum in the region of the fifth OH overtone vibration (6..nu../sub OH/) shows a pure local mode feature along with several others that are apparently combinations of a local mode vibration with a normal mode vibration. The product state distributions show substantial energy release into rotation with some molecules having rotational excitation approaching the limit of the total energy available. A statistical calculation incorporating conservation of total angular momentum and energy describes the observed distributions quite well for excitation of the pure local mode vibration. The products from excitation of a combination transition are in a distribution of states that differs qualitatively from a statistical outcome, possibly indicating selective energy coupling on the time scale of the unimolecular reaction.

  5. (14) N nuclear quadrupole resonance study of piroxicam: confirmation of new polymorphic form V.

    PubMed

    Lavrič, Zoran; Pirnat, Janez; Lužnik, Janko; Puc, Uroš; Trontelj, Zvonko; Srčič, Stane

    2015-06-01

    A new polymorphic crystal form of piroxicam was discovered while preparing crystalline samples of piroxicam for (14) N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) analysis. The new crystal form, designated as V, was prepared by evaporative recrystallization from dichloromethane. Three known polymorphic forms (I, II, and III) were also prepared. Our aim was to apply (14) N NQR to characterize the new polymorphic form of piroxicam and compare the results with those of the other known polymorphic forms. Additional analytical methods used for characterization were X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), thermal analysis, and vibrational spectroscopy. For the first time, a complete set of nine characteristic (14) N NQR frequencies was found for each prepared polymorph of piroxicam. The consistent set of measured frequencies and calculated characteristic quadrupole parameters found for the new polymorphic form V is a convincing evidence that we are dealing with a new form. The already known piroxicam polymorphic forms were characterized similarly. The XRPD results were in accordance with the conclusions of (14) N NQR analysis. The performed study clearly demonstrates a strong potential of (14) N NQR method to be applied as a highly discriminative spectroscopic analytical tool to characterize polymorphic forms. PMID:25776345

  6. Synthesis, crystal structure, and photocatalytical properties of Ba3Ta5O14N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anke, B.; Bredow, T.; Soldat, J.; Wark, M.; Lerch, M.

    2016-01-01

    Light yellow Ba3TaV5O14N was successfully synthesized as phase-pure material crystallizing isostructurally to well-known mixed-valence Ba3TaV4TaIVO15. The electronic structure of Ba3Ta5O14N was studied theoretically with a hybrid Hartree-Fock-DFT method. The most stable structure was obtained when nitrogen atoms were placed at 4 h sites having fourfold coordination. By incorporating nitrogen, the band gap decreases from ∼3.8 eV commonly known for barium tantalum(V) oxides to 2.8 eV for the oxide nitride, giving rise to an absorption band well in the visible-light region. Ba3Ta5O14N was also tested for photocatalytic hydrogen formation.

  7. Measurement of the 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies by the solid effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliger, J.; Žagar, V.

    2008-07-01

    1H- 14N nuclear quadrupole double resonance using magnetic field cycling between high and low magnetic field and solid effect in the low magnetic field is analyzed in details. The transition probabilities per unit time for the solid-effect transitions are calculated. The double resonance spectra are calculated in the limiting cases of fast and slow nitrogen spin-lattice relaxation. The double resonance spectra are measured in histamine and quinolinic acid. The experimental spectra are analyzed and the 14N NQR frequencies are determined.

  8. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  9. Strong overtones modes in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy with cross-conjugated molecules: a prediction from theory.

    PubMed

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C

    2013-10-22

    Cross-conjugated molecules are known to exhibit destructive quantum interference, a property that has recently received considerable attention in single-molecule electronics. Destructive quantum interference can be understood as an antiresonance in the elastic transmission near the Fermi energy and leading to suppressed levels of elastic current. In most theoretical studies, only the elastic contributions to the current are taken into account. In this paper, we study the inelastic contributions to the current in cross-conjugated molecules and find that while the inelastic contribution to the current is larger than for molecules without interference, the overall behavior of the molecule is still dominated by the quantum interference feature. Second, an ongoing challenge for single molecule electronics is understanding and controlling the local geometry at the molecule-surface interface. With this in mind, we investigate a spectroscopic method capable of providing insight into these junctions for cross-conjugated molecules: inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). IETS has the advantage that the molecule interface is probed directly by the tunneling current. Previously, it has been thought that overtones are not observable in IETS. Here, overtones are predicted to be strong and, in some cases, the dominant spectroscopic features. We study the origin of the overtones and find that the interference features in these molecules are the key ingredient. The interference feature is a property of the transmission channels of the π system only, and consequently, in the vicinity of the interference feature, the transmission channels of the σ system and the π system become equally transmissive. This allows for scattering between the different transmission channels, which serves as a pathway to bypass the interference feature. A simple model calculation is able to reproduce the results obtained from atomistic calculations, and we use this to interpret these findings

  10. Strong Overtones Modes in Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy with Cross-Conjugated Molecules: A Prediction from Theory

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cross-conjugated molecules are known to exhibit destructive quantum interference, a property that has recently received considerable attention in single-molecule electronics. Destructive quantum interference can be understood as an antiresonance in the elastic transmission near the Fermi energy and leading to suppressed levels of elastic current. In most theoretical studies, only the elastic contributions to the current are taken into account. In this paper, we study the inelastic contributions to the current in cross-conjugated molecules and find that while the inelastic contribution to the current is larger than for molecules without interference, the overall behavior of the molecule is still dominated by the quantum interference feature. Second, an ongoing challenge for single molecule electronics is understanding and controlling the local geometry at the molecule-surface interface. With this in mind, we investigate a spectroscopic method capable of providing insight into these junctions for cross-conjugated molecules: inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). IETS has the advantage that the molecule interface is probed directly by the tunneling current. Previously, it has been thought that overtones are not observable in IETS. Here, overtones are predicted to be strong and, in some cases, the dominant spectroscopic features. We study the origin of the overtones and find that the interference features in these molecules are the key ingredient. The interference feature is a property of the transmission channels of the π system only, and consequently, in the vicinity of the interference feature, the transmission channels of the σ system and the π system become equally transmissive. This allows for scattering between the different transmission channels, which serves as a pathway to bypass the interference feature. A simple model calculation is able to reproduce the results obtained from atomistic calculations, and we use this to interpret these findings

  11. Ultra-Sensitive Instrumentation in the UV-Vis-NIR Spectral Region with Applications on Overtone Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camejo, David

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is a technique widely used in molecular spectroscopy. Technology advancements are such that FT-IR spectrometers can measure vibrational transitions occurring well within the visible (Vis) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. High overtone transitions of C-H, N-H, and O-H can be measured in the near-infrared (NIR) and the Vis regions using long path cells. Despite the large sensitivity of the FT-IR spectrometers and the use of long path cells, the absorption intensities of these transitions are so low that commercial FT-IR spectrometers would not register the absorption bands. Phase shift cavity ring down (PS-CRD) and thermal lens spectroscopy (TLS) are ultra-sensitive instrumental absorption techniques very commonly used in our laboratory. These are very powerful techniques for the detection of weak absorptions in the NIR-Vis region. In the case of high overtone spectra, CRD is ideal for gas samples whereas TLS is great for liquid samples. In our laboratory we use FT-IR and UV-Vis spectrometers as complementary techniques to CRDS and TLS. In order to simulate conditions in the atmospheres of other planets, we couple our instruments to a low temperature cryostat. In this way, these ultra-sensitive techniques can be applied to the study of gases in the atmosphere and liquid cryo-solutions to simulate the lakes of Saturn's largest moon, Titan. This work shows the use of signal-to-noise ratios to determine the spectral quality of spectra obtained with the PS-CRD technique, particularly in situations where human eye cannot perceive the small differences. We evaluate the impact of some instrumental parameters involved in data acquisition process of the PS-CRD technique, as well as evaluate the spectral quality as a function of the On-Axis/Off-Axis position of the incoming beam. This work also introduces the use of a second pumping laser for the analysis of multi-component samples in thermal lens. The design facilitates

  12. Pulsed laser operating on the first vibrational overtone of the CO molecule in the 2.5-4.2-{mu}m range: 1. Multifrequency lasing

    SciTech Connect

    Basov, N G; Ionin, Andrei A; Kotkov, A A; Seleznev, L V; Kurnosov, A K; Napartovich, A P; Turkin, N G; McCord, J E; Hager, G D

    2000-09-30

    Characteristics of a pulsed, multifrequency electroionisation CO laser operating on the first vibrational overtone of the CO molecule are studied experimentally and theoretically. It is shown experimentally that a pulsed, multifrequency overtone CO laser is an efficient source of coherent radiation in the 2.5-4.1-{mu}m region whose specific output reaches 50 J l{sup -1} amagat{sup -1} and the electro-optical efficiency amounts to 11 %. A theoretical analysis based on experimental data shows the feasibility of obtaining overtone emission with efficiency as high as {approx}20 %. The alternation of the intensity of vibrational bands in the overtone CO laser is discussed. This effect is caused by the cascade mechanism of formation of the emission spectrum. The comparison of experimental data with calculations showed that they agree well with respect to spectral and energy characteristics of the overtone CO laser. Moreover, it revealed the necessity of refinement of the kinetic model of the active medium of the CO laser for obtaining an adequate description of time parameters of a laser pulse. (lasers)

  13. Pulsed laser operating on the first overtone of the CO molecule in the 2.5-4.2-{mu}m range. II. Frequency-selective lasing

    SciTech Connect

    Basov, N G; Ionin, Andrei A; Kotkov, A A; Seleznev, L V; Kurnosov, A K; Napartovich, A P; Turkin, N G; McCord, J E; Hager, G D

    2000-10-31

    Lasing properties of a pulsed electroionisation CO laser operating on the first overtone of the CO molecule in the frequency-selective regime were studied experimentally and theoretically. Lasing was observed on a large number of separate vibrational-rotational transitions {nu}+2{yields}{nu} from 13{yields}11 to 38{yields}36 (more than 400 spectral lines) in the spectral range from 2.7 to 4.2 {mu}m. The specific output energy of the overtone CO laser reached {approx}3.0 J l{sup -1} amagat{sup -1}, and the electrooptical conversion was {approx}0.6 %. The formation of emission spectra from high vibrational levels in the overtone CO laser observed for the first time is discussed. The comparison of experimental and theoretical data showed the necessity of including the multiquantum exchange on high vibrational levels into the kinetic model of the active medium of the CO laser. (lasers)

  14. Detection of vibrational bending mode ν8 and overtone bands of the propargyl radical, HCCCH2 X̃ 2B1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Sander, Stanley P; Chaimowitz, Adam; Ellison, G Barney; Stanton, John F

    2010-11-18

    Infrared (IR) absorption spectra of matrix-isolated HCCCH(2) have been measured. Propargyl radicals were generated in a supersonic pyrolysis nozzle, using a method similar to that described in a previous study (Jochnowitz, E. B.; Zhang, X.; Nimlos, M. R.; Varner, M. E.; Stanton, J. F.; Ellison, G. B. J. Phys. Chem. A 2005, 109, 3812-3821). Besides the nine vibrational modes observed in the previous study, this investigation detected the HCCCH(2) X̃ (2)B(1) out-of-plane bending mode (ν(8)) at 378.0 (±1.9) cm(-1) in a cryogenic argon matrix. This is the first experimental observation of ν(8) for the propargyl radical. In addition, seven overtone and combination bands have also been detected and assigned. Ab initio coupled-cluster anharmonic force field calculations were used to guide the analysis. Furthermore, ν(12), the HCCCH(2) in-plane bending mode, has been assigned to 333 (±10) cm(-1) based on the detection of its overtone (2ν(12), 667.7 ± 1.0 cm(-1)) and a possible combination band (ν(10) + ν(12), 1339.0 ± 0.8 cm(-1)). This is the first experimental estimation of ν(12) for the propargyl radical. PMID:20973539

  15. Overtone-based pitch selection in hermit thrush song: Unexpected convergence with scale construction in human music

    PubMed Central

    Doolittle, Emily L.; Gingras, Bruno; Endres, Dominik M.; Fitch, W. Tecumseh

    2014-01-01

    Many human musical scales, including the diatonic major scale prevalent in Western music, are built partially or entirely from intervals (ratios between adjacent frequencies) corresponding to small-integer proportions drawn from the harmonic series. Scientists have long debated the extent to which principles of scale generation in human music are biologically or culturally determined. Data from animal “song” may provide new insights into this discussion. Here, by examining pitch relationships using both a simple linear regression model and a Bayesian generative model, we show that most songs of the hermit thrush (Catharus guttatus) favor simple frequency ratios derived from the harmonic (or overtone) series. Furthermore, we show that this frequency selection results not from physical constraints governing peripheral production mechanisms but from active selection at a central level. These data provide the most rigorous empirical evidence to date of a bird song that makes use of the same mathematical principles that underlie Western and many non-Western musical scales, demonstrating surprising convergence between human and animal “song cultures.” Although there is no evidence that the songs of most bird species follow the overtone series, our findings add to a small but growing body of research showing that a preference for small-integer frequency ratios is not unique to humans. These findings thus have important implications for current debates about the origins of human musical systems and may call for a reevaluation of existing theories of musical consonance based on specific human vocal characteristics. PMID:25368163

  16. Anharmonic phonon-polariton excitation through impulsive stimulated Raman scattering and detection through wave vector overtone spectroscopy: Theory and comparison to experiments on lithium tantalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Rochín, Víctor; Koehl, Richard M.; Brennan, Ciaran J.; Nelson, Keith A.

    1999-08-01

    We study theoretically the generation of coherent, anharmonic phonon-polariton responses through impulsive stimulated Raman scattering with intense, crossed ultrafast excitation pulses. We find that the refractive index appears modulated at the stimulated scattering wave vector and the corresponding phonon-polariton frequency, and, due to anharmonicity, at stimulated scattering wave vector overtones and their corresponding frequencies. A realistic model of the soft lattice vibrational mode of the ferroelectric crystal lithium tantalate is considered in detail. Specific predictions for the magnitudes of different wave vector overtone contributions to the lattice displacement are made compared to experimental observations of anharmonic lattice responses.

  17. Two dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schram, J.; Bellama, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Two dimensional NMR represents a significant achievement in the continuing effort to increase solution in NMR spectroscopy. This book explains the fundamentals of this new technique and its analytical applications. It presents the necessary information, in pictorial form, for reading the ''2D NMR,'' and enables the practicing chemist to solve problems and run experiments on a commercial spectrometer by using the software provided by the manufacturer.

  18. Density functional theory calculations of nuclear quadrupole coupling constants with calibrated 14N quadrupole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicilia, E.; de Luca, G.; Chiodo, S.; Russo, N.; Calaminici, P.; Koster, A. M.; Jug, K.

    Density functional calculations of the electric field gradient tensor at the nitrogen nucleus in 13 test molecules, containing 14 nitrogen sites, have been performed using the linear combination of Gaussian-type orbital Kohn-Sham density functional theory (LCGTO-KSDFT) approach. Local and gradient corrected functionals were used for all-electron calculations. All the molecular structures were optimized at their respective levels of theory with extended basis sets. Calibrated 14N nuclear quadrupole moments were obtained through a fitting procedure between calculated electric field gradients and experimental nuclear quadrupole coupling constants of the test set of molecules for each basis set and functional considered. With these calibrated 14N nuclear quadrupole moments, the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants of the following selected systems were determined: fluoromethylisonitrile, pyridine, pyrrole, imadazole, pyrazole, 1,8-bis(dimethyl-amino)naphthalene, cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine, cocaine and heroin.

  19. (14)N NQR, relaxation and molecular dynamics of the explosive TNT.

    PubMed

    Smith, John A S; Rowe, Michael D; Althoefer, Kaspar; Peirson, Neil F; Barras, Jamie

    2015-10-01

    Multiple pulse sequences are widely used for signal enhancement in NQR detection applications. Since the various (14)N NQR relaxation times, signal decay times and frequency of each NQR line have a major influence on detection sequence performance, it is important to characterise these parameters and their temperature variation, as fully as possible. In this paper we discuss such measurements for a number of the ν+ and ν- NQR lines of monoclinic and orthorhombic TNT and relate the temperature variation results to molecular dynamics. The temperature variation of the (14)N spin-lattice relaxation times T1 is interpreted as due to hindered rotation of the NO2 group about the C-NO2 bond with an activation energy of 89 kJ mol(-1) for the ortho and para groups of monoclinic TNT and 70 kJ mol(-1) for the para group of orthorhombic TNT. PMID:26440130

  20. The ^17O(p,α)^14N reaction measured using a novel technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moazen, B. H.; Blackmon, J. C.; Bardayan, D. W.; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Domizioli, C. P.; Fitzgerald, R.; Greife, U.; Hix, W. R.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Lingerfelt, E. J.; Livesay, R. J.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Pain, S. D.; Roberts, L. F.; Shriner, J. F., Jr.; Smith, M. S.; Thomas, J. S.

    2007-10-01

    We developed a new approach for measuring (p,α) reactions and applied it to measure the energy and strength of the 183 keV resonance in ^17O(p,α)^ 14N that was recently reported to significantly increase the reaction rate in novae. A beam of ^17O from the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility [ORNL] tandem accelerator bombarded hydrogen gas, which filled a differentially pumped scattering chamber at pressures up to 4 Torr. Reaction products were detected in coincidence and the vertex of the reaction was determined from the relative kinematics of the two products. Nova simulations show the new ^17O(p,α)^14N reaction rate significantly decreases ^18F production in low mass ONeMg nova but affects more energetic novae less. Results and astrophysical implications will be presented as well as comments regarding my past CEU participation. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle for the US DOE.

  1. Pulsed Fourier-transform NQR of 14N with a dc SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hürlimann, M. D.; Pennington, C. H.; Fan, N. Q.; Clarke, John; Pines, A.; Hahn, E. L.

    1992-07-01

    The zero-field free induction decay of solid ammonium perchlorate at 1.5 K has been directly detected with a dc superconducting quantum interference device. The Fourier-transform spectrum consists of three sharp lines at 17.4, 38.8, and 56.2 kHz arising from pure 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions. The absence of splittings and resonance transitions from dipolar-coupled proton spins is attributed to reorientation of the ammonium groups by quantum tunneling in combination with motional averaging in the three proton levels characterized by the irreducible representation T. The measured 14N spin-spin relaxation time is 22+/-2 ms and the spin-lattice relaxation time is 63+/-6 ms.

  2. Nuclear quadrupole resonance of 14N and 2H in pyrimidines, purines, and their nucleosides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbani, S. R.; Edmonds, D. T.; Gosling, P.

    Using nuclear quadrupole double-resonance techniques, nitrogen-14 and deuterium nuclear quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters have been measured in uracil, 5-bromouracil, cytosine, adenine, xanthine, hypoxanthine, their nucleosides, 2-aminopyrimidine, and benzimidazole. Zeeman studies and the detection of the simultaneous transitions of neighboring nuclei allowed in many cases a complete assignment of the observed spectral lines to particular 14N and 2D sites.

  3. The 2 ν1, 2 ν2 and 2 ν3 overtones of FClO 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cané, E.; Fusina, L.; Pawelke, G.; Burczyk, K.

    2007-07-01

    The infrared spectra of the 2 ν1, 2 ν2 and 2 ν3 overtones of perchloryl fluoride, FClO 3, have been recorded at high resolution using monoisotopic pure samples. Four symmetric top species have been investigated: F 35Cl 16O 3, F 37Cl 16O 3, F 35Cl 18O 3 and F 37Cl 18O 3. The vi = 2, i = 1, 2, 3 vibrationally excited states are totally symmetric, so these overtones correspond to parallel bands of medium/weak intensity, centered from 2010 to 2120 cm -1 (2 ν1), from 1390 to 1430 cm -1 (2 ν2) and from 1070 to 1100 cm -1 (2 ν3). Most of the bands are unperturbed and their analysis was straightforward. The band origins, the rotational and centrifugal molecular constants in the v1 = 2, v2 = 2 and v3 = 2 states have been determined, with standard deviations of the fits from 0.00024 to 0.00067 cm -1. The 2 ν1 overtones of F 35Cl 16O 3 and F 37Cl 16O 3 are perturbed by an A1/ E Coriolis resonance between the v1 = 2 state and one E component of the v4 = 1, v6 = 2 manifold. The 2 ν2 of F 37Cl 18O 3 is perturbed by the same kind of interaction involving the v1 = v6 = 1 ( E) state, at about 1396 cm -1. In these bands the resonance is localized on rotational levels with specific J and K values. As a consequence, a few transitions of the perpendicular bands involving the interacting levels could be identified in the spectra. A simultaneous fit of the transitions assigned to the dyads has been performed and the parameters of the excited states have been determined, including the high order Coriolis interaction coefficient C111. The anharmonic constants x11, x22, x33 of all the studied isotopologues of FClO 3, x46 of F 35Cl 16O 3, x46 + g46 of F 37Cl 16O 3 and x16 of F 37Cl 18O 3, have been derived.

  4. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs.

  5. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs.

  6. On the Ratio of Periods of the Fundamental Harmonic and First Overtone of Magnetic Tube Kink Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruderman, M. S.; Petrukhin, N. S.; Pelinovsky, E.

    2016-04-01

    We study kink oscillations of thin magnetic tubes. We assume that the density inside and outside the tube (and possibly also the cross-section radius) can vary along the tube. This variation is assumed to be of such a form that the kink speed is symmetric with respect to the tube centre and varies monotonically from the tube ends to the tube centre. Then we prove a theorem stating that the ratio of periods of the fundamental mode and first overtone is a monotonically increasing function of the ratio of the kink speed at the tube centre and the tube ends. In particular, it follows from this theorem that the period ratio is lower than two when the kink speed increases from the tube ends to its centre, while it is higher than two when the kink speed decreases from the tube ends to its centre. The first case is typical for non-expanding coronal magnetic loops, and the second for prominence threads. We apply the general results to particular problems. First we consider kink oscillations of coronal magnetic loops. We prove that, under reasonable assumptions, the ratio of the fundamental period to the first overtone is lower than two and decreases when the loop size increases. The second problem concerns kink oscillations of prominence threads. We consider three internal density profiles: generalised parabolic, Gaussian, and Lorentzian. Each of these profiles contain the parameter α that is responsible for its sharpness. We calculate the dependence of the period ratio on the ratio of the mean to the maximum density. For all considered values of α we find that a formula relating the period ratio and the ratio of the mean and maximum density suggested by Soler, Goossens, and Ballester ( Astron. Astrophys. 575, A123, 2015) gives a sufficiently good approximation to the exact dependence.

  7. NMR logging apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  8. Silver and Gold NMR

    PubMed Central

    Zangger, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    Silver and gold, together with copper, form the transition metal group IB elements in the periodic table and possess very different nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic properties. While there is only one gold isotope (197Au), which has a spin of 3/2 and therefore a quadrupole moment, silver occurs in two isotopic forms (109Ag and 109Au), both of which have a spin 1/2 and similar NMR spectroscopic properties. The unfavorable properties of gold have prevented its NMR spectroscopic investigation thus far. On the other hand, there are several reports of silver NMR. However, the low sensitivity of silver, combined with its long relaxation times have rendered the direct detection of silver possible only with concentrations greater than a few tenth molar. Reviewed here are the general limitations of silver NMR and some techniques to partially overcome these limitations, as well as a summary of currently available chemical shift and scalar coupling data on 109Ag. PMID:18475898

  9. High sensitivity cavity ring down spectroscopy of N2O near 1.22 μm: (II) 14N216O line intensity modeling and global fit of 14N218O line positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashkun, S. A.; Perevalov, V. I.; Karlovets, E. V.; Kassi, S.; Campargue, A.

    2016-06-01

    In a recent work (Karlovets et al., 2016 [1]), we reported the measurement and rovibrational assignments of more than 3300 transitions belonging to 64 bands of five nitrous oxide isotopologues (14N216O, 14N15N16O, 15N14N16O, 14N218O and 14N217O) in the high sensitivity CRDS spectrum recorded in the 7915-8334 cm-1 spectral range. The assignments were performed by comparison with predictions of the effective Hamiltonian models developed for each isotopologue. In the present paper, the large amount of measurements from our previous work mentioned above and literature are gathered to refine the modeling of the nitrous oxide spectrum in two ways: (i) improvement of the intensity modeling for the principal isotopologue, 14N216O, near 8000 cm-1 from a new fit of the relevant effective dipole moment parameters, (ii) global modeling of 14N218O line positions from a new fit of the parameters of the global effective Hamiltonian using an exhaustive input dataset collected in the literature in the 12-8231 cm-1 region. The fitted set of 81 parameters allowed reproducing near 5800 measured line positions with an RMS deviation of 0.0016 cm-1. The dimensionless weighted standard deviation of the fit is 1.22. As an illustration of the improvement of the predictive capabilities of the obtained effective Hamiltonian, two new 14N218O bands could be assigned in the CRDS spectrum in the 7915-8334 cm-1 spectral range. A line list at 296 K has been generated in the 0-10,700 cm-1 range for 14N218O in natural abundance with a 10-30 cm/molecule intensity cutoff.

  10. Science to support adaptive habitat management: Overton Bottoms North Unit, Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, Missouri [Volumes 1-6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    Extensive efforts are underway along the Lower Missouri River to rehabilitate ecosystem functions in the channel and flood plain. Considerable uncertainty inevitably accompanies ecosystem restoration efforts, indicating the benefits of an adaptive management approach in which management actions are treated as experiments, and results provide information to feed back into the management process. The Overton Bottoms North Unit of the Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge is a part of the Missouri River Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Project. The dominant management action at the Overton Bottoms North Unit has been excavation of a side-channel chute to increase hydrologic connectivity and to enhance shallow, slow current-velocity habitat. The side-channel chute also promises to increase hydrologic gradients, and may serve to alter patterns of wetland inundation and vegetation community growth in undesired ways. The U.S. Geological Survey's Central Region Integrated Studies Program (CRISP) undertook interdisciplinary research at the Overton Bottoms North Unit in 2003 to address key areas of scientific uncertainty that were highly relevant to ongoing adaptive management of the site, and to the design of similar rehabilitation projects on the Lower Missouri River. This volume presents chapters documenting the surficial geologic, topographic, surface-water, and ground-water framework of the Overton Bottoms North Unit. Retrospective analysis of vegetation community trends over the last 10 years is used to evaluate vegetation responses to reconnection of the Overton Bottoms North Unit to the river channel. Quasi-experimental analysis of cottonwood growth rate variation along hydrologic gradients is used to evaluate sensitivity of terrestrial vegetation to development of aquatic habitats. The integrated, landscape-specific understanding derived from these studies illustrates the value of scientific information in design and management of rehabilitation projects.

  11. Systematic R -matrix analysis of the 13C(p ,γ )14N capture reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Suprita; deBoer, Richard; Mukherjee, Avijit; Roy, Subinit

    2015-04-01

    Background: The proton capture reaction 13C(p ,γ )14N is an important reaction in the CNO cycle during hydrogen burning in stars with mass greater than the mass of the Sun. It also occurs in astrophysical sites such as red giant stars: the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. The low energy astrophysical S factor of this reaction is dominated by a resonance state at an excitation energy of around 8.06 MeV (Jπ=1-,T =1 ) in 14N. The other significant contributions come from the low energy tail of the broad resonance with Jπ=0-,T =1 at an excitation of 8.78 MeV and the direct capture process. Purpose: Measurements of the low energy astrophysical S factor of the radiative capture reaction 13C(p ,γ )14N reported extrapolated values of S (0 ) that differ by about 30 % . Subsequent R -matrix analysis and potential model calculations also yielded significantly different values for S (0 ) . The present work intends to look into the discrepancy through a detailed R -matrix analysis with emphasis on the associated uncertainties. Method: A systematic reanalysis of the available decay data following the capture to the Jπ=1-,T =1 resonance state of 14N around 8.06 MeV excitation had been performed within the framework of the R -matrix method. A simultaneous analysis of the 13C(p ,p0 ) data, measured over a similar energy range, was carried out with the capture data. The data for the ground state decay of the broad resonance state (Jπ=0-,T =1 ) around 8.78 MeV excitations was included as well. The external capture model along with the background poles to simulate the internal capture contribution were used to estimate the direct capture contribution. The asymptotic normalization constants (ANCs) for all states were extracted from the capture data. The multichannel, multilevel R -matrix code azure2 was used for the calculation. Results: The values of the astrophysical S factor at zero relative energy, resulting from the present analysis, are found to be consistent within the

  12. Low energy proton capture study of the 14N(p, gamma)15O reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Stephen Michael

    The 14N(p,gamma)15O reaction regulates the rate of energy production for stars slightly more massive than the sun throughout stable hydrogen burning on the main sequence. The 14N(p,gamma)15O reaction rate also determines the luminosity for all stars after leaving the main sequence when their cores have exhausted hydrogen fuel, and later when they become red giant stars. The significant role that this reaction plays in stellar evolution has far-reaching consequences, from neutrino production in our Sun, to age estimates of globular clusters in our Galaxy. The weak cross section and inherent coincidence summing in the 15O gamma-ray decay scheme make a precision measurement of the astrophysical S-factor especially challenging, particularly for the ground-state transition. The present study, performed in the Laboratory for Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics (LENA), was aimed at measuring the ground-state transition at low energy by utilizing a new 24-element, position-sensitive, NaI(Tl) detector array. Because the array is highly segmented, the 14N( p,gamma)15O S-factor was evaluated for transitions to the ground, 5.18, 6.18, and 6.79 MeV states without the need for coincidence summing corrections. Additionally, the position-sensitivity of the detector was exploited to measure the angular correlation of the two-photon cascades. Software cuts were made to the data in order to identify single and coincident gamma-ray events and a fraction fit analysis technique was used to extract the characteristic 15O peaks from the composite gamma-ray spectrum. The results from the current work demonstrated a new approach to measuring weak nuclear cross sections near astrophysically relevant energies that, with refinements, has broader applications in gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  13. General analysis of (14)N (I = 1) electron spin echo envelope modulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, H I; Doan, P E; Hoffman, B M

    1999-09-01

    The analysis methods described to date for (14)N electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) mostly deal with isotropic g- and (14)N hyperfine coupling tensors. However, many cases of rhombic tensors are encountered. In the present report we present general equations for analyzing orientation-selective ESEEM and illustrate their use. (i) We present general equations for the nuclear interactions in an electron spin system where the EPR signal arises from an isolated Kramers doublet, then give the nuclear (electron-nuclear double resonance) frequencies for I = 1 associated with such a system. (ii) These are incorporated into equations for single-crystal ESEEM amplitudes, which in turn are incorporated into general equations for the orientation-selective ESEEM that arises when the EPR envelope of a frozen-solution (powder) sample is determined by g anisotropy. (iii) This development is first used in the simplest limit of an isotropic g-tensor and leads to a more general picture of the response of the I = 1 modulation amplitude to variations in the nuclear hyperfine and quadrupole coupling constants, relative to the nuclear Zeeman interaction, than had been presented previously. We find that strong modulation occurs not only in the well-known regime where the "exact/near cancellation" condition (A/2 approximately nu(N)) is satisfied, but also when the nuclear hyperfine interaction is much larger than the nuclear Zeeman interaction (A/nu(N) > 3) with A/K = 4 approximately 5. (iv) We then describe the orientation-selective (14)N ESEEM frequency-domain patterns (g vs frequency) in the presence of anisotropic (rhombic) hyperfine and electron Zeeman interactions for both coaxial and noncoaxial cases. We derive analytical solutions when the g-, hyperfine, and nuclear quadrupole tensors are coaxial. (v) The method is applied to the ESEEM of the nitrogenase MoFe protein (Av1) to determine the full hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole tensors of (14)N nuclei interacting with the

  14. 14N NQR investigation of some thermochromic and photochromic salicylideneanilines and related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjoudis, E.; Milia, F.; Seliger, J.; Zagar, V.; Blinc, R.

    1991-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the 14N NQR frequencies have been measured in a series of thermochromic and photochromic salicylideneanilines and related compounds using nuclear quadrupole double resonance. The results show that, in agreement with previous measurements, there is a fast exchange between inequivalent sites in the OH…N bond. The energy difference Δ E of the two proton sites was calculated for all the compounds and shows that it depends on their thermochromic behavior which is connected with the structure of the compounds.

  15. Clustering Features of 9Be, 14N, 7Be, and 8B Nuclei in Relativistic Fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Artemenkov, D. A.; Shchedrina, T. V.; Stanoeva, R.; Zarubin, P. I.

    2007-05-22

    Recent studies of clustering in light nuclei with an initial energy above 1 A GeV in nuclear track emulsion are overviewed. The results of investigations of the relativistic 9Be nuclei fragmentation in emulsion, which entails the production of He fragments, are presented. It is shown that most precise angular measurements provided by this technique play a crucial role in the restoration of the excitation spectrum of the {alpha} particle system. In peripheral interactions 9Be nuclei are dissociated practically totally through the 0+ and 2+ states of the 8Be nucleus.The results of investigations of the dissociation of a 14N nucleus of momentum 2.86 A GeV/c in emulsion are presented as example of more complicated system. The momentum and correlation characteristics of {alpha} particles for the 14N{yields}3{alpha} + X channel in the laboratory system and the rest systems of 3{alpha} particles were considered in detail. Topology of charged fragments produced in peripheral relativistic dissociation of radioactive 8B, 7Be nuclei in emulsion is studied.

  16. Narcotics and explosives detection by 14N pure nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garroway, Allen N.; Buess, Michael L.; Yesinowski, James P.; Miller, Joel B.

    1994-03-01

    Pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of 14N nuclei is quite promising as a method for detecting explosives such as RDX and contraband narcotics such as cocaine and heroin in quantities of interest. Pure NQR is conducted without an external applied magnetic field, so potential concerns about damage to magnetically encoded data or exposure of personnel to large magnetic fields are not relevant. Because NQR frequencies of different compounds are quite distinct, we do not encounter false alarms from the NQR signals of other benign materials. We have constructed a proof-of-concept NQR explosives detector which interrogates a volume of 300 liters (10 ft3). With minimal modification to the existing explosives detector, we can detect operationally relevant quantities of (free base) cocaine within the 300-liter inspection volume in 6 seconds. We are presently extending this approach to the detection of heroin base and also examining 14N and 35,37Cl pure NQR for detection of the hydrochloride forms of both materials. An adaptation of this NQR approach may be suitable for scanning personnel for externally carried contraband and explosives. We first outline the basics of the NQR approach, highlighting strengths and weaknesses, and then present representative results for RDX and cocaine detection. We also present a partial compendium of relevant NQR parameters measured for some materials of interest.

  17. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy of the First CO-Stretch Overtone Band of 13CH 3OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoi-Cross, Adriana; Mellau, G. C.; Lees, R. M.; Winnewisser, B. P.

    1998-06-01

    This paper presents a high-resolution Fourier transform infrared study of the first CO-stretch overtone band of13CH3OH. The spectrum has been recorded at the Justus-Liebig University, Gießsen, Germany on their Bruker IFS 120 HR Fourier transform spectrometer. We have assigned parallel subbands in the torsional staten= 0 forKvalues up to 6. Each individual subband has been fitted to aJ(J+ 1) power series expansion in order to obtain the subband origin and the state-specific energy expansion coefficients for the first CO-stretch overtone state. The average rotational constantBin the CO-stretchvCO= 2 state was found to be 0.768 cm-1, forming a smooth series with that of 0.777 cm-1obtained in thevCO= 1 state and the ground state value of 0.787 cm-1. Modeling of the excited state torsion-vibration energy level structure derived from the subband origins is then discussed and molecular parameters in thevCO= 2 state are proposed. The value obtained for the barrier height to internal rotation is 377.06 ± 0.52 cm-1, nearly indistinguishable from the value 378.65 cm-1reported for the CO-stretchvCO= 1 state. The vibrational energy is found to be 2020.9 ± 1.4 cm-1. The harmonic wavenumber for the CO-stretch vibration in13CH3OH was calculated to be ω = 1029.9 cm-1. The anharmonicity constant of this vibration is ωx= 6.5 cm-1, givingx= 6.3 × 10-3. We have also observed asymmetry-inducedKdoubling for the subbands ofAsymmetry forKvalues from 1 to 3 at sufficiently highJvalues. The size of the splitting coefficients is similar to those observed for the CO-stretch fundamental, with the exception of those for theK= 3Adoublet, where the observed splitting is about 18% larger than that for the ground and CO-stretchvCO= 1 states.

  18. High resolution absorption spectroscopy of the ν1=2-6 acetylenic overtone bands of propyne: Spectroscopy and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campargue, A.; Biennier, L.; Garnache, A.; Kachanov, A.; Romanini, D.; Herman, M.

    1999-11-01

    The rotationally resolved nν1 (n=2-6) overtone transitions of the CH acetylenic stretching of propyne (CH3-C≡C-H) have been recorded by using Fourier transform spectroscopy (n=2), various intracavity laser absorption spectrometers (n=3, 4, and 6) and cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) (n=5). The 2ν1, 3ν1, and 6ν1 bands exhibit a well-resolved and mostly unperturbed J-rotational structure, whose analysis is reported. The 5ν1 band recorded by pulsed CRDS shows an unresolved rotational envelope. In the region of 12 700 cm-1, an anharmonic interaction is confirmed between 4ν1 and 3ν1+ν3+ν5. The band at a higher wave number in this dyad exhibits a partly resolved K-structure, whose analysis is reported. The mixing coefficient of the two interacting states is determined consistently using different procedures. The 1/35 anharmonic resonance evidenced in the 4ν1 manifold induces weaker intensity borrowing from the 2ν1 and 3ν1 levels to the ν1+ν3+ν5 and 2ν1+ν3+ν5 level, respectively, which have been predicted and identified. Several hot bands around the 2ν1, 3ν1, and 3ν1+ν3+ν5 bands arising from the ν9=1 and ν10=1 and 2 bending levels are identified and rotationally analyzed, also leading to determine x1,9 [-20.3(3) cm-1], x1,10 [-1.7975(75) cm-1], and x3,10 [-6.56 cm-1]. The J-clumps of the P and R branches in the 6ν1 band at 18 499 cm-1 show a Lorentzian homogeneous profile mostly J-independent with an average full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.17 cm-1, attributed to arising from the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution towards the bath of vibrational states. A detailed comparative examination of the fine structure in all investigated nν1 (n=2 to 7) overtone bands and the similar behavior of the cold and hot bands arising from ν10=1 definitively suggests that a highly specific low-order anharmonic coupling, still unidentified, dominates the hierarchy of interaction mechanisms connecting the nν1 levels to the background

  19. Collision-Induced Absorption by H2 Pairs in the Second Overtone Band at 298 and 77.5 K: Comparison between Experimental and Theoretical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodbeck, C.; Bouanich, J.-P.; van-Thanh, Nguyen; Fu, Y.; Borysow, A.

    1999-01-01

    The collision-induced spectra of hydrogen in the region of the second overtone at 0.8 microns have been recorded at temperatures of 298 and 77.5 K and for gas densities ranging from 100 to 800 amagats. The spectral profile defined by the absorption coefficient per squared density varies significantly with the density, so that the binary absorption coefficient has been determined by extrapolations to zero density of the measured profiles. Our extrapolated measurements and our recent ab initio quantum calculation are in relatively good agreement with one another. Taking into account the very weak absorption of the second overtone band, the agreement is, however, not as good as it has become (our) standard for strong bands.

  20. SQUID detected NMR and NQR. Superconducting Quantum Interference Device.

    PubMed

    Augustine, M P; TonThat, D M; Clarke, J

    1998-03-01

    The dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is a sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order 1 muphi0 Hz(-1/2) at liquid helium temperatures. Here phi0 = h/2e is the flux quantum. In our NMR or NQR spectrometer, a niobium wire coil wrapped around the sample is coupled to a thin film superconducting coil deposited on the SQUID to form a flux transformer. With this untuned input circuit the SQUID measures the flux, rather than the rate of change of flux, and thus retains its high sensitivity down to arbitrarily low frequencies. This feature is exploited in a cw spectrometer that monitors the change in the static magnetization of a sample induced by radio frequency irradiation. Examples of this technique are the detection of NQR in 27Al in sapphire and 11B in boron nitride, and a level crossing technique to enhance the signal of 14N in peptides. Research is now focused on a SQUID-based spectrometer for pulsed NQR and NMR, which has a bandwidth of 0-5 MHz. This spectrometer is used with spin-echo techniques to measure the NQR longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of 14N in NH4ClO4, 63+/-6 ms and 22+/-2 ms, respectively. With the aid of two-frequency pulses to excite the 359 kHz and 714 kHz resonances in ruby simultaneously, it is possible to obtain a two-dimensional NQR spectrum. As a third example, the pulsed spectrometer is used to study NMR spectrum of 129Xe after polariza-tion with optically pumped Rb. The NMR line can be detected at frequencies as low as 200 Hz. At fields below about 2 mT the longitudinal relaxation time saturates at about 2000 s. Two recent experiments in other laboratories have extended these pulsed NMR techniques to higher temperatures and smaller samples. In the first, images were obtained of mineral oil floating on water at room temperature. In the second, a SQUID configured as a thin film gradiometer was used to detect NMR in a 50 microm particle of 195Pt at 6 mT and 4.2 K. PMID:9650797

  1. Rotational Analysis of the Δ vSiH=3-6 Stretching Vibrational Overtones of HSiD 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirauch, Gabriele; Campargue, Alain; Bürger, Hans

    2002-11-01

    The nν 1 SiH stretching overtone transitions of trideuterosilane, HSiD 3, have been recorded by Fourier transform spectroscopy ( n=3 and 4) and by intracavity laser absorption spectroscopy ( n=5 and 6). The unusually weak 3ν 1 band is affected by considerable intensity and energy perturbations. The 4ν 1 band is also strongly perturbed but the interaction with the dark states is more limited and part of the rotational structure of the v1=4 upper state could be satisfactorily modeled. Less pronounced perturbations affect the v1=5 level, newly detected by ICLAS. Its rotational structure is locally perturbed by anharmonic coupling with an unidentified vibrational dark state. The global modeling of the interacting dyad allowed the determination of the perturber parameters and the assignment of extra lines due to an intensity transfer from the v1=5 bright state to the dark state. In agreement with a previous ICLAS study, the 6ν 1 band near 12 113 cm -1 was found free of perturbation. About six hundred line positions could be reproduced with an rms of 4.6×10 -3 cm -1, leading to a significantly improved set of rovibrational parameters. The striking evolution of the rotational structure, which exhibits fewer and fewer perturbations when the SiH excitation increases, is discussed.

  2. Direct production of OH radicals upon CH overtone activation of (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}COO Criegee intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fang; Beames, Joseph M.; Lester, Marsha I.

    2014-12-21

    Ozonolysis of alkenes, a principle non-photolytic source of atmospheric OH radicals, proceeds through unimolecular decay of energized carbonyl oxide intermediates, known as Criegee intermediates. In this work, cold dimethyl-substituted Criegee intermediates are vibrationally activated in the CH stretch overtone region to drive the 1,4 hydrogen transfer reaction that leads to OH radical products. IR excitation of (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}COO reveals the vibrational states with sufficient oscillator strength, coupling to the reaction coordinate, and energy to surmount the effective barrier (≤ 16.0 kcal mol{sup −1}) to reaction. Insight on the dissociation dynamics is gleaned from homogeneous broadening of the spectral features, indicative of rapid intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution and/or reaction, as well as the quantum state distribution of the OH X{sup 2}Π (v = 0) products. The experimental results are compared with complementary electronic structure calculations, which provide the IR absorption spectrum and geometric changes along the intrinsic reaction coordinate. Additional theoretical analysis reveals the vibrational modes and couplings that permit (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}COO to access to the transition state region for reaction. The experimental and theoretical results are compared with an analogous recent study of the IR activation of syn-CH{sub 3}CHOO and its unimolecular decay to OH products [F. Liu, J. M. Beames, A. S. Petit, A. B. McCoy, and M. I. Lester, Science 345, 1596 (2014)].

  3. Will water act as a photocatalyst for cluster phase chemical reactions? Vibrational overtone-induced dehydration reaction of methanediol

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Zeb C.; Takahashi, Kaito; Skodje, Rex T.; Vaida, Veronica

    2012-04-28

    The possibility of water catalysis in the vibrational overtone-induced dehydration reaction of methanediol is investigated using ab initio dynamical simulations of small methanediol-water clusters. Quantum chemistry calculations employing clusters with one or two water molecules reveal that the barrier to dehydration is lowered by over 20 kcal/mol because of hydrogen-bonding at the transition state. Nevertheless, the simulations of the reaction dynamics following OH-stretch excitation show little catalytic effect of water and, in some cases, even show an anticatalytic effect. The quantum yield for the dehydration reaction exhibits a delayed threshold effect where reaction does not occur until the photon energy is far above the barrier energy. Unlike thermally induced reactions, it is argued that competition between reaction and the irreversible dissipation of photon energy may be expected to raise the dynamical threshold for the reaction above the transition state energy. It is concluded that quantum chemistry calculations showing barrier lowering are not sufficient to infer water catalysis in photochemical reactions, which instead require dynamical modeling.

  4. The 2ν{sub 3} Raman overtone of sulfur hexafluoride: Absolute spectra, pressure effects, and polarizability properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chrysos, M. Rachet, F.; Kremer, D.

    2014-03-28

    Of the six normal vibrations of SF{sub 6}, ν{sub 3} has a key role in the mechanisms of radiative forcing. This vibration, though inactive in Raman, shows up through the transition 2ν{sub 3} allowing for a complementary view on the asymmetric stretch of the molecule. Here, we look back into this topic, which has already caught some interest in the past but with some points been left out. We make a systematic incoherent-light-scattering analysis of the overtone with the use of different gas pressures and polarization orientations for the incident beam. Absolute-scale isotropic and anisotropic spectra are reported along with natural and pressure-induced widths and shifts, and other spectral features such as the peaks corresponding to the (experimentally indistinguishable) interfering channels E{sub g} and F{sub 2g} hitherto seen solely as two-photon IR-absorption features. We make the first-ever prediction of the SF{sub 6} polarizability second derivative with respect to the ν{sub 3}-mode coordinate and we develop a heuristic argument to explain why the superposition of the three degenerate stretching motions that are related to the ν{sub 3} mode cannot but generate a polarized Raman band.

  5. Characterization of NH overtone and combination bands in the near-infrared absorption spectra of simple cyclic imides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeilly, Patrick J.; Andrea, Tariq A.; Krikorian, S. Edward

    1992-10-01

    Bands due to overtone and combination vibrational modes attributable to the imide grouping have been elucidated in the near-IR absorption spectra of small-ring cyclic imides, in which the grouping is in a cis, cis conformation. The spectra closely parallel the spectra of cis lactams except that two combination modes involving the carbonyl stretching fundamental, [ν(NH) + ν(CO)] and [2ν(C=O) + imide III], occur at higher wavenumbers in the imide spectra, reflecting the higher frequency at which this fundamental absorbs. This same factor results in a reversal in the wavenumber positions of the [2ν(CO) + imide III] and [ν(NH) + imide III] combination bands in the imide spectra relative to those in the lactam spectra. In addition, in-phase and out-of-phase vibrational coupling between the two carbonyl groups in the imides may compound the band due to the [ν(NH) + ν(CO)] combination mode. These three spectral characteristics serve to distinguish the imides from the lactams in the near-IR.

  6. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  7. The {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O reaction studied at high energy

    SciTech Connect

    Marta, Michele

    2010-03-01

    The {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O reaction is the bottleneck of the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle. Recent studies of this reaction have been performed in the low energy range E<500 keV. However, also data at higher energy are necessary to extrapolate the S-factor down to the energy range of astrophysical interest. Up to now, only one set of data from an experiment performed in 1987 extends up to 2.5 MeV. A new study has been carried out at the high-current FZD Tandetron in Dresden, in the energy region from 0.6 to 2.5 MeV. The astrophysics motivations, setup and on-going analysis are presented.

  8. 14N NQR and the Molecular Charge Topology in Coordinated Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgich, Juan; Aray, Yosslen; Ospina, Edgar

    1992-02-01

    14N NQR spectra of [Co(NH3 ) 6 ] • 3Cl, [Co(NH3 ) 5CO3 ] • NO 3 , [Zn(NH3 ) 4 ] • 2Cl, [Zn(NH3 ) 4 ] •(BF4)2, and [Ag(NH3) 4 ] • NO 3 were obtained at 77 K. The results, analyzed by means of the topology of the charge distribution obtained from ab-initio MO calculations of free and of a model of coordinated NH3 , showed that bonding to the metal-ion produces a strong decrease (Co ≫ Zn ≈Ag) in the N nonbonded density ("lone pair") and an increase in the bonded maxima found in the N - H bond direction of the N valence shell.

  9. Double-resonance spectroscopy of the high Rydberg states of HCO. III. Multiple pathways in the vibrational autoionization of the bending overtone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Eric E.; Hedderich, Hartmut G.; Grant, Edward R.

    1998-05-01

    Ultraviolet first-photon absorption selects individual rotational levels in the Renner-Teller split (020) vibronic band system in the 3pπ 2Π Rydberg state of HCO. These gateway states serve as originating levels for vertical second-photon transitions to vibrationally autoionizing Rydberg series converging to individual rotational levels associated with the (0200) and (0220) states of HCO+. Linewidths of assigned series convey information on autoionization dynamics. Resonances throughout the (020) autoionization spectrum match sharp profiles seen earlier for series converging to HCO+(010). Linewidths for autoionization via relaxation both of the bending fundamental and its overtone are measurably narrower than resonances built on CO stretch, (001), which indicates that mode-selectivity inhibiting bending autoionization relative to stretch extends to the bending overtone. Features in the (020) spectrum that fall below the threshold energy for decay by autoionization to the (010) continuum appear with diminished intensity and yet narrower linewidth. This provides evidence that vibrational autoionization in HCO conforms with a Δv=1 propensity rule that favors relaxation of (020) states to the (010) continuum over the two-quantum decay to produce HCO+(000). Analysis of detailed line shapes and intensities associated with individual vibrational angular momentum components of the relaxing-core overtone point to the way in which vibrational and orbital-electronic symmetries factor in the bound molecule and cation plus free electron, and fix the order in vibrational coordinates of necessary coupling terms.

  10. The Drosophila melanogaster homologue of the human histo-blood group Pk gene encodes a glycolipid-modifying α1,4-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Insects express arthro-series glycosphingolipids, which contain an α1,4-linked GalNAc residue. To determine the genetic basis for this linkage, we cloned a cDNA (CG17223) from Drosophila melanogaster encoding a protein with homology to mammalian α1,4-glycosyltransferases and expressed it in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Culture supernatants from the transformed yeast were found to display a novel UDP-GalNAc:GalNAcβ1,4GlcNAcβ1-R α-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase activity when using either a glycolipid, p-nitrophenylglycoside or an N-glycan carrying one or two terminal β-N-acetylgalactosamine residues. NMR and MS in combination with glycosidase digestion and methylation analysis indicate that the cloned cDNA encodes an α1,4-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase. We hypothesize that this enzyme and its orthologues in other insects are required for the biosynthesis of the N5a and subsequent members of the arthro-series of glycolipids as well as of N-glycan receptors for Bacillus thuringiensis crystal toxin Cry1Ac. PMID:15130086

  11. MULTIPLE-QUANTUM NMR IN SOLIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Y-S.

    1982-11-01

    Time domain multiple-quantum (MQ) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for spectral simplification and for providing new information on molecular dynamics. In this thesis, applications of MQ NMR are presented and show distinctly the advantages of this method over the conventional single-quantum NMR. Chapter 1 introduces the spin Hamiltonians, the density matrix formalism and some basic concepts of MQ NMR spectroscopy. In chapter 2, {sup 14}N double-quantum coherence is observed with high sensitivity in isotropic solution, using only the magnetization of bound protons. Spin echoes are used to obtain the homogeneous double-quantum spectrum and to suppress a large H{sub 2}O solvent signal. Chapter 3 resolves the main difficulty in observing high MQ transitions in solids. Due to the profusion of spin transitions in a solid, individual lines are unresolved. Excitation and detection of high quantum transitions by normal schemes are thus difficult. To ensure that overlapping lines add constructively and thereby to enhance sensitivity, time-reversal pulse sequences are used to generate all lines in phase. Up to 22-quantum {sup 1}H absorption in solid adamantane is observed. A time dependence study shows an increase in spin correlations as the excitation time increased. In chapter 4, a statistical theory of MQ second moments is developed for coupled spins of spin I = 1/2. The model reveals that the ratio of the average dipolar coupling to the rms value largely determines the dependence of second moments on the number of quanta. The results of this model are checked against computer-calculated and experimental second moments, and show good agreement. A simple scheme is proposed in chapter 5 for sensitivity improvement in a MQ experiment. The scheme involves acquiring all of the signal energy available in the detection period by applying pulsed spinlocking and sampling between pulses. Using this technique on polycrystalline adamantane, a large

  12. Dual Species NMR Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Joshua; Korver, Anna; Thrasher, Daniel; Walker, Thad

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards a dual species nuclear magnetic oscillator using synchronous spin exchange optical pumping. By applying the bias field as a sequence of alkali 2 π pulses, we generate alkali polarization transverse to the bias field. The alkali polarization is then modulated at the noble gas resonance so that through spin exchange collisions the noble gas becomes polarized. This novel method of NMR suppresses the alkali field frequency shift by at least a factor of 2500 as compared to longitudinal NMR. We will present details of the apparatus and measurements of dual species co-magnetometry using this method. Research supported by the NSF and Northrop-Grumman Corp.

  13. Screening proteins for NMR suitability

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Adelinda A.; Semesi, Anthony; Garcia, Maite; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary NMR spectroscopy is an invaluable tool in structural genomics. Identification of protein samples that are amenable to structure determination by NMR spectroscopy requires efficient screening. Here, we describe how we prepare multiple samples in parallel and screen by NMR. The method described here is applicable to large structural genomics projects but can easily be scaled down for application to small structural biology projects since all the equipments used are those commonly found in any NMR structural biology laboratory. PMID:24590717

  14. Modern NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses direct chemical information that can be obtained from modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, concentrating on the types of problems that can be solved. Shows how selected methods provide information about polymers, bipolymers, biochemistry, small organic molecules, inorganic compounds, and compounds oriented in a magnetic…

  15. Enantiodiscrimination by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Uccello-Barretta, Gloria; Balzano, Federica; Salvadori, Piero

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of enantiorecognition processes involves the detection of enantiomeric species as well as the study of chiral discrimination mechanisms. In both fields Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays a fundamental role, providing several tools, based on the use of suitable chiral auxiliaries, for observing distinct signals of enantiomers and for investigating the complexation phenomena involved in enantiodiscrimination processes. PMID:17100610

  16. Cross section measurement of 14N(p ,γ )15O in the CNO cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Görres, J.; deBoer, R. J.; Imbriani, G.; Best, A.; Kontos, A.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Uberseder, E.; Wiescher, M.

    2016-05-01

    Background: The CNO cycle is the main energy source in stars more massive than our sun; it defines the energy production and the cycle time that lead to the lifetime of massive stars, and it is an important tool for the determination of the age of globular clusters. In our sun about 1.6% of the total solar neutrino flux comes from the CNO cycle. The largest uncertainty in the prediction of this CNO flux from the standard solar model comes from the uncertainty in the 14N(p ,γ )15O reaction rate; thus, the determination of the cross section at astrophysical temperatures is of great interest. Purpose: The total cross section of the 14N(p ,γ )15O reaction has large contributions from the transitions to the Ex=6.79 MeV excited state and the ground state of 15O. The Ex=6.79 MeV transition is dominated by radiative direct capture, while the ground state is a complex mixture of direct and resonance capture components and the interferences between them. Recent studies have concentrated on cross-section measurements at very low energies, but broad resonances at higher energy may also play a role. A single measurement has been made that covers a broad higher-energy range but it has large uncertainties stemming from uncorrected summing effects. Furthermore, the extrapolations of the cross section vary significantly depending on the data sets considered. Thus, new direct measurements have been made to improve the previous high-energy studies and to better constrain the extrapolation. Methods: Measurements were performed at the low-energy accelerator facilities of the nuclear science laboratory at the University of Notre Dame. The cross section was measured over the proton energy range from Ep=0.7 to 3.6 MeV for both the ground state and the Ex=6.79 MeV transitions at θlab=0∘ , 45∘, 90∘, 135∘, and 150∘. Both TiN and implanted-14N targets were utilized. γ rays were detected by using an array of high-purity germanium detectors. Results: The excitation function as

  17. The Araucaria Project: the First-overtone Classical Cepheid in the Eclipsing System OGLE-LMC-CEP-2532

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilecki, Bogumił; Graczyk, Dariusz; Gieren, Wolfgang; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Thompson, Ian B.; Smolec, Radosław; Udalski, Andrzej; Soszyński, Igor; Konorski, Piotr; Taormina, Mónica; Gallenne, Alexandre; Minniti, Dante; Catelan, Márcio

    2015-06-01

    We present here the first spectroscopic and photometric analysis of the double-lined eclipsing binary containing the classical, first-overtone (FO) Cepheid OGLE-LMC-CEP-2532 (MACHO 81.8997.87). The system has an orbital period of 800 days and the Cepheid is pulsating with a period of 2.035 days. Using spectroscopic data from three high-class telescopes and photometry from three surveys spanning 7500 days, we are able to derive the dynamical masses for both stars with an accuracy better than 3%. This makes the Cepheid in this system one of a few classical Cepheids with an accurate dynamical mass determination ({{M}1}=3.90+/- 0.10 {{M}⊙ }). The companion is probably slightly less massive (3.82+/- 0.10 {{M}⊙ }), but may have the same mass within errors ({{M}2}/{{M}1}=0.981+/- 0.015). The system has an age of about 185 million years and the Cepheid is in a more advanced evolutionary stage. For the first time precise parameters are derived for both stars in this system. Due to the lack of the secondary eclipse for many years, not much was known about the Cepheid’s companion. In our analysis, we used extra information from the pulsations and the orbital solution from the radial velocity curve. The best model predicts a grazing secondary eclipse shallower than 1 mmag, hence undetectable in the data, about 370 days after the primary eclipse. The dynamical mass obtained here is the most accurate known for a FO Cepheid and will contribute to the solution of the Cepheid mass discrepancy problem. The research is based on observations obtained with the ESO VLT and 3.6 m telescopes for Programmes 092.D-0295(A), 091.D-0393(A), 089.D-0330(A), 088.D-0447(A), 086.D-0103(A), and 085.D-0398(A), and with the Magellan Clay and Warsaw telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory.

  18. Ultrasonic Thermometry Inside Tissues Based on High-resolution Detection of Spectral Shifts in Overtones of Scattering Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazán, I.; Ramos, A.; Ramírez, A.; Leija, L.

    Some research results of cooperation works in biomedical engineering, established among current national projects of Mexico and Spain, are resumed. They are related to coordinated activities of three R & D groups, with the aim to achieve high-resolution ultrasonic thermometry into tissue phantoms with internal reflectors of a non-invasive way. Advanced spectral techniques are being used to extract thermal information in echo-signals acquired from biological phantoms with internal structures having a quasi-regular scattering distribution as, for instance, it happens in the liver tissues where a rather regular separation between scatterers has been reported. These techniques can indicate pathologies related to thermal increases due to the presence of disease. Small changes with temperature can be detected in the location of overtones of the fundamental resonance related to the separation of internal reflectors. But, this requires discarding the influence of the echoes noise on the thermal estimation results. A first evaluation of these spectral analysis techniques is performed, using echo-signals acquired from a phantom in the temperature range with medical interest, where the noise influence is shown for different levels of SNR in the echoes, using signals derived of a mathematical model for hepatic tissue echoes, where the average power, signal to noise ratio and inter-arrival time standard deviation, were taken into account. It seems that our high-resolution spectral option could be applied to detect some pathologies in tissues having regular scattering, but new advances must be performed with real tissues, in order to confirm the potential resolution of this approach.

  19. Theoretical Study of ^14N Hyperfine Interactions in NO-Hemoglobin in R and T States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujari, Minakhi; Sahoo, N.; Das, T. P.

    2002-03-01

    The origin of the change(J. C. W. Chien and L. C. Dickinson, J. Biol. Chem. 252), 1331 (1977); M. Chevion, A. Stern, J. Peisach, W. E. Blumberg and S. Simon, Biochemistry 17, 1745 (1978). in the ^14N hyperfine splitting of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance signals in the R and T states of NO-Hb from a 9-line pattern to a 3-line one has been investigated using the first-principles Hartree-Fock procedure. The influence of various factors have been studied, namely changes from linear configuration for Fe-NO bonding to non-linear, change from a protonated imidazole ligand for the heme group to a deprotonated one, and the increase in length, and consequent weakening, of the Fe-N_ɛ bond associated with the imidazole ligand. The last factor is the only one that is able to explain the change in the EPR signal as found from earlier Extended Hückel studies(S. K. Mun, Jane C. Chang and T. P. Das, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. (USA) 76), 4842 (1979)..

  20. Nuclear microprobe analysis of wear tracks on 14N-implanted steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, B. L.; Follstaedt, D. M.; Picraux, S. T.; Yost, F. G.; Pope, L. E.; Knapp, J. A.

    1985-03-01

    Two nuclear microbeam analysis techniques [3,7 MeV(α,p) and 6 MeV(α, α)] have been used to determine the local areal density of 14N which remains in wear tracks resulting from pin-on-disc testing of nitrogen implanted 15-5 PH and 304 stainless steels. The microbeam analysis shows that the extent of N migration into the 15-5 substrate was to depths ≲ 0.5 μm, but perhaps to ≲ 1.0 μm in 304. The as-implanted layer in 15-5 PH contains up to 40-45 at.% N and consists principally of ∼ 2 μm particles of (Fe, Cr) 2N 1-x. When sufficient wear has occurred in 304 to lower the N content below 10 17 N/cm 2, an O buildup to 2 × 10 17 O/cm 2 is observed; however the presence of N does not correlate with low O levels in the wear tracks of 15-5 PH.

  1. Probing the Electronic Environment of Methylindoles using Internal Rotation and (14)N Nuclear Quadrupole Coupling.

    PubMed

    Gurusinghe, Ranil M; Tubergen, Michael J

    2016-05-26

    High-resolution rotational spectra were recorded in the 10.5-21.0 GHz frequency range for seven singly methylated indoles. (14)N nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure and spectral splittings arising from tunneling along the internal rotation of the methyl group were resolved for all indole species. The nuclear quadrupole coupling constants were used to characterize the electronic environment of the nitrogen atom, and the program XIAM was used to fit the barrier to internal rotation to the measured transition frequencies. The best fit barriers were found to be 277.1(2), 374.32(4), 414.(5), 331.6(2), 126.8675(15), 121.413(4), and 426(3) cm(-1) for 1-methylindole through 7-methylindole, respectively. The fitted barriers were found to be in good agreement with barriers calculated at the ωB97XD/6-311++G(d,p) level. The complete set of experimental barriers is compared to theoretical investigations of the origins of methyl torsional barriers and confirms that the magnitude of these barriers is an overall effect of individual hyperconjugative and structural interactions of many bonding/antibonding orbitals. PMID:27128828

  2. 224} studied by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Y; Fang, X; Kögerler, P

    2014-05-14

    7Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies have been performed to investigate magnetic properties and spin dynamics of Mn3+ (S = 2) spins in the giant polyoxometalate molecule {Mn40W224}. The 7Li-NMR line width is proportional to the external magnetic field H as expected in a paramagnetic state above 3 K. Below this temperature the line width shows a sudden increase and is almost independent of H, which indicates freezing of the local Mn3+ spins. The temperature dependence of T1 for both 1H and 7Li reveals slow spin dynamics at low temperatures, consistent with spin freezing. The slow spin dynamics is also evidenced by the observation of a peak of 1/T2 around 3 K, where the fluctuation frequency of spins is of the order of ~200 kHz. An explicit form of the temperature dependence of the fluctuation frequency of Mn3+ spins is derived from the nuclear relaxation data.

  3. Microwave absorption of gamma'-Fe2.6 Ni1.4N nanoparticles derived from nitriding counterpart precursor.

    PubMed

    Huang, H; Wang, F; Lv, B; Xue, F H; Guo, D Y; Park, W J; Lee, W J; Dong, X L

    2012-04-01

    Gamma-Fe2.6Ni1.4 nanoparticles were prepared by the arc-discharge method as the precursor and its nitride counterpart of gamma'-Fe2.6Ni14N nanoparticles was synthesized directly through a thermal ammonolysis reaction at the temperature of 673 K for two hours. The resultant product was identified as a homogeneous ternary nitride with nearly spherical shape and average size of about 60.0 nm. The electromagnetic characteristics of gamma'-Fe2.6Ni1.4N derivant and gamma-Fe2.6Ni1.4 precursor have been studied in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz. Compared with the precursor, gamma'-Fe2.6Ni1.4N nanoparticles exhibits an enhanced electromagnetic absorption property resulted from the increased dielectric loss by nitriding process. The optimal reflection loss (RL) of gamma'-Fe2.6Ni1.4N nanoparticles/paraffin composite can reach -39.9 dB at 5.2 GHz in a thickness of 2.29 mm, and the frequency band corresponding RL < -10 dB is over 2.6-18 GHz in the thickness range of 0.78-4.20 mm. PMID:22849063

  4. Modelling of Collision Induced Absorption Spectra Of H2-H2 Pairs for the Planetary Atmospheres Structure: The Second Overtone Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borysow, Aleksandra; Borysow, Jacek I.

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of the proposal was to model the collision induced, second overtone band of gaseous hydrogen at low temperatures. The aim of this work is to assist planetary scientists in their investigation of planetary atmospheres, mainly those of Uranus and Neptune. The recently completed extended database of collision induced dipole moments of hydrogen pairs allowed us, for the first time, to obtain dipole moment matrix elements responsible for the roto-vibrational collision induced absorption spectra of H2-H2 in the second overtone band. Despite our numerous attempts to publish those data, the enormous volume of the database did not allow us to do this. Instead, we deposited the data on a www site. The final part of this work has been partially supported by NASA, Division for Planetary Atmospheres. In order to use our new data for modelling purpose, we first needed to test how well we can reproduce the existing experimental data from theory, when using our new input data. Two papers resulted from this work. The obtained agreement between theoretical results and the measurements appeared to be within 10-30%. The obviously poorer agreement than observed for the first H2 overtone, the fundamental, and the rototranslational bands can be attributed to the fact that dipole moments responsible for the second overtone are much weaker, therefore susceptible to larger numerical uncertainties. At the same time, the intensity of the second overtone band is much weaker and therefore it is much harder to be measured accurately in the laboratory. We need to point out that until now, no dependable model of the 2nd overtone band was available for modelling of the planetary atmospheres. The only one, often referred to in previous works on Uranian and Neptune's atmospheres, uses only one lineshape, with one (or two) parameter(s) deduced at the effective temperature of Uranus (by fitting the planetary observation). After that, the parameter(s) was(were) made temperature

  5. The NMR phased array.

    PubMed

    Roemer, P B; Edelstein, W A; Hayes, C E; Souza, S P; Mueller, O M

    1990-11-01

    We describe methods for simultaneously acquiring and subsequently combining data from a multitude of closely positioned NMR receiving coils. The approach is conceptually similar to phased array radar and ultrasound and hence we call our techniques the "NMR phased array." The NMR phased array offers the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and resolution of a small surface coil over fields-of-view (FOV) normally associated with body imaging with no increase in imaging time. The NMR phased array can be applied to both imaging and spectroscopy for all pulse sequences. The problematic interactions among nearby surface coils is eliminated (a) by overlapping adjacent coils to give zero mutual inductance, hence zero interaction, and (b) by attaching low input impedance preamplifiers to all coils, thus eliminating interference among next nearest and more distant neighbors. We derive an algorithm for combining the data from the phased array elements to yield an image with optimum SNR. Other techniques which are easier to implement at the cost of lower SNR are explored. Phased array imaging is demonstrated with high resolution (512 x 512, 48-cm FOV, and 32-cm FOV) spin-echo images of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Data were acquired from four-element linear spine arrays, the first made of 12-cm square coils and the second made of 8-cm square coils. When compared with images from a single 15 x 30-cm rectangular coil and identical imaging parameters, the phased array yields a 2X and 3X higher SNR at the depth of the spine (approximately 7 cm). PMID:2266841

  6. NMR imaging of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Rothwell, W.P.

    1988-03-01

    A method for obtaining at least one petrophysical property of a porous material containing therein at least one preselected fluid, is described, comprising: NMR imaging the material to generate signals dependent upon both M(0) and T/sub 1/ and M(0) and T/sub 2/, generating separate M(0), T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ images from the signals, and determining at least one petrophysical property from at least one of the images.

  7. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  8. High-resolution {upsilon}{sub OH} = 3{l_arrow}0 and {upsilon}{sub OH} = 4{l_arrow}0 overtone spectroscopy of HOD

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, J.R.; Votava, O.; Nesbitt, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    High-resolution (0.005 cm{sup -1}) IR overtone excitation with an injection seeded optical parametric oscillator (OPO) is used to investigate the spectroscopy of HOD in the {upsilon}{sub OH} = 3{l_arrow}0 region via room temperature photoacoustic detection methods. Comparison of the photoacoustic spectra from an H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O/HOD mixture and from pure H{sub 2}O determines the lines corresponding to {upsilon}{sub OH} = 3{l_arrow}0 absorptions in HOD. A prediction of the HOD spectrum in this region is generated from an extrapolation of {upsilon}{sub OH} = 0 and 1 rotational constants and from the {upsilon}{sub OH} = 3{l_arrow}0 band origin calculated by Tennyson and coworkers [private communication]. This predicted spectrum enables the HOD {upsilon}{sub OH} = 3{l_arrow}0 photoacoustic spectrum to be assigned; a fit of the experimental data produces the low-order rotational constants for this transition as well as a Birge-Sponer analysis of the overtone series. The vibrational dependence of the HOD rotational constants is demonstrated to be quite linear in {upsilon}{sub OH}, permitting reliable extrapolation to the {upsilon}{sub OH} = 4 manifold. As a result, the {upsilon}{sub OH} = 0, 1 and 3 constants can be used to predict the spectrum of HOD {upsilon}{sub OH} = 4{l_arrow}0, which now enables the assignment of the vibrationally mediated photodissociation spectrum measured by Crim and coworkers. The overtone spectroscopic data for HOD is further confirmed in double resonance IR and UV photolysis of HOD and HOD-containing clusters in slit supersonic expansions.

  9. Analysis of the collision-induced absorption spectra in the second overtone region of H2-H2 at 298 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Kharma, M.

    2015-02-01

    The collision-induced absorption (CIA) spectra of the second overtone band of normal hydrogen in a pure gas were recorded for a number of gas densities up to 750 amagat (1 amagat = 44.614981 mol/m3) with a two meter stainless steel absorption cell at 298 K. The profile analyses of these spectra were carried out using the Birnbaum-Cohen line shape function for the quadrupolar vibrational transitions and the Levine-Birnbaum line shape function for the overlap transitions.

  10. The Effects of Internal Rotation and 14N Quadrupole Coupling in N-Methyldiacetamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannengießer, Raphaela; Eibl, Konrad; Nguyen, Ha Vinh Lam; Stahl, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Acetyl- and nitrogen containing substances play an important role in chemical, physical, and especially biological systems. This applies in particular for acetamides, which are structurally related to peptide bonds. In this work, N-methyldiacetamide, CH_3N(COCH_3)_2, was investigated by a combination of molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. In N-methyldiacetamide, at least three large amplitude motions are possible: (1) the internal rotation of the methyl group attached to the nitrogen atom and (2, 3) the internal rotations of both acetyl methyl groups. This leads to a rather complicated torsional fine structure of all rotational transitions with additional quadrupole hyperfine splittings caused by the 14N nucleus. Quantum chemical calculations were carried out at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory to support the spectral assignment. Conformational analysis was performed by calculating a full potential energy surface depending on the orientation of the two acetyl groups. This yielded three stable conformers with a maximum energy difference of 35.2 kJ/mol. The spectrum of the lowest energy conformer was identified in the molecular beam. The quadrupole hyperfine structure as well as the internal rotation of two methyl groups could be assigned. For the N-methyl group and for one of the two acetyl methyl groups, barriers to internal rotation of 147 cm-1 and of 680 cm-1, respectively, were determined. The barrier of the last methyl group seems to be so high that no additional splittings could be resolved. Using the XIAM program, a global fit with a standard deviation on the order of our experimental accuracy could be achieved.

  11. WURST-QCPMG sequence and "spin-lock" in 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorovič, Alan; Apih, Tomaž

    2013-08-01

    14N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a promising method for the analysis of pharmaceuticals or for the detection of nitrogen based illicit compounds, but so far, the technique is still not widely used, mostly due to the very low sensitivity. This problem is already acute in the preliminary NQR stage, when a compound is being examined for the first time and the NQR frequencies are being searched for, by scanning a wide frequency range step-by-step. In the present work, we experimentally show how to increase the efficiency of this initial stage by using a combination of a wideband excitation achieved with frequency swept pulses (WURST) and a "spin-lock" state obtained with a quadrupolar-CPMG (QCPMG) sequence. In the first part we show that WURST pulses provide a much larger excitation bandwidth compared to common rectangular pulses. This increased bandwidth allows to increase the frequency step and reduces the total number of steps in a scanning stage. In the second part we show that the "spin-lock" decay time T2eff obtained with the WURST-QCPMG combination is practically identical with the T2eff obtained with the most common "spin-lock" sequence, the SLSE, despite a very different nature and length of excitation pulses. This allows for a substantial S/N increase through echo averaging in every individual step and really allows to exploit all the advantages of the wider excitation in the NQR frequency scanning stage. Our experimental results were obtained on a sample of trinitrotoluene, but identical behavior is expected for all compounds where a "spin-lock" state can be created.

  12. Bayesian reconstruction of projection reconstruction NMR (PR-NMR).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji Won

    2014-11-01

    Projection reconstruction nuclear magnetic resonance (PR-NMR) is a technique for generating multidimensional NMR spectra. A small number of projections from lower-dimensional NMR spectra are used to reconstruct the multidimensional NMR spectra. In our previous work, it was shown that multidimensional NMR spectra are efficiently reconstructed using peak-by-peak based reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) algorithm. We propose an extended and generalized RJMCMC algorithm replacing a simple linear model with a linear mixed model to reconstruct close NMR spectra into true spectra. This statistical method generates samples in a Bayesian scheme. Our proposed algorithm is tested on a set of six projections derived from the three-dimensional 700 MHz HNCO spectrum of a protein HasA. PMID:25218584

  13. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 < 5 ms. Moreover, the dependence of the relaxation rate on magnetic field strength allows the identification of 2D diffusion at the interfaces as the mechanism which governs the relaxation process (Pohlmeier et al. 2009). T2 relaxation curves are frequently measured for the rapid characterization of soils by means of the CPMG echo train. Basically, they contain the same information about the pore systems like T1 curves, since mostly the overall relaxation is dominated by surface relaxivity and the surface/volume ratio of the pores. However, one must be aware that T2 relaxation is additionally affected by diffusion in internal gradients, and this can be overcome by using sufficiently short echo times and low magnetic fields (Stingaciu et al. 2009). Second, the logic continuation of conventional relaxation measurements is the 2-dimensional experiment, where prior to the final detection of the CPMG echo train an encoding period is applied. This can be T1-encoding by an inversion pulse, or T2 encoding by a sequence of 90 and 180° pulses. During the following evolution time the separately encoded signals can mix and this reveals information about

  14. Summary of Miniature NMR Development

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Gennady; Feinerman, Alan

    2000-12-31

    The effort in this project has been in 3 distinct directions: (1) First, they focused on development of miniature microfabricated micro-coil NMR detectors with maximum Signal-to-Noise (SNR) ratio. (2) Secondly, they focused on design of miniature micro-coil NMR detectors that have minimal effect on the NMR spectrum distortions. (3) Lastly they focused on the development of a permanent magnet capable of generating fields on the order of 1 Tesla with better than 10 ppm uniformity.

  15. Geological mapping of the Rainbow Massif, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 36°14'N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ildefonse, B.; Fouquet, Y.; Hoisé, E.; Dyment, J.; Gente, P.; Thibaud, R.; Bissessur, D.; Yatheesh, V.; Momardream 2008 Scientific Party*, T.

    2008-12-01

    The Rainbow hydrothermal field at 36°14'N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is one of the few known sites hosted in ultramafic basement. The Rainbow Massif is located along the non-transform offset between the AMAR and South AMAR second-order ridge segments, and presents the characteristic dome morphology of oceanic core complexes, although no corrugated surface has been observed so far. One of the objectives of Cruises MOMAR DREAM (July 2007, R/V Pourquoi Pas ?; Aug-Sept 2008, R/V Atalante) was to study the petrological and structural context of the hydrothermal system at the scale of the Rainbow Massif. Our geological sampling complements previous ones achieved during Cruises FLORES (1997) and IRIS (2001), and consisted in dredge hauls, and submersible dives by manned submersible Nautile and ROV Victor. The tectonics of the Rainbow Massif is dominated by a N-S trending fault pattern on the western flank of the massif, and a series of SW-NW ridges on its northeastern side. The active hydrothermal site is located in the area were these two systems crosscut. The most abundant recovered rock type is peridotite (harzburgite and dunite) that presents a variety of serpentinization styles and intensity, and a variety of deformation styles (commonly undeformed, sometimes displaying ductile or brittle foliations). Serpentinites are frequently oxidized. Some peridotite samples have melt impregnation textures. Massive chromitite was recovered in one dredge haul. Variously evolved gabbroic rocks were collected as discrete samples or as centimeter to decimeter-thick dikes in peridotites. Basalts and fresh basaltic glass were also sampled in talus and sediments on the southwestern and northeastern flanks of the massif. Our sampling is consistent with the lithological variability encountered in oceanic core complexes along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and Southwest Indian Ridge. The stockwork of the hydrothermal system has been sampled on the western side of the present-day hydrothermal

  16. Influence of the anisotropic hyperfine interaction on the 14N ENDOR and the ESEEM orientation-disordered spectra.

    PubMed

    Benetis, Nikolas P; Dikanov, Sergei A

    2005-07-01

    The influence of the anisotropic hyperfine interaction on the 14N electron-nuclear double resonance/electron spin echo envelope modulation spectra is studied by approximate analytical and graphical methods for the case of the isotropic g-factor. The suggested determination of the modified characteristic directions of the magnetic field due to anisotropy enhances the insight in the structural details of the system and analytical solutions of the secular equation for these conditions are derived. The graphical method, previously used for the analysis of the orientation dependence of the 14N nuclear-transition frequencies in orientation-disordered samples for isotropic hyperfine interaction is extended to the case of arbitrary anisotropic hyperfine tensor. The above analytical and graphical methods are illustrated and tested against exact simulations in two practically important cases: (i) isotropic hyperfine interaction (hfi) exceeding other nuclear interactions in nuclear spin Hamiltonian. (ii) Cancellation of the isotropic part of the hfi. PMID:15878298

  17. Diatom-bound 15N/14N: New support for enhanced nutrient consumption in the ice age subantarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Rebecca S.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Difiore, Peter J.; Rohde, Melissa M.; Mashiotta, Tracy A.; Lea, David W.

    2005-09-01

    Diatom-bound 15N/14N was used to reconstruct the glacial nutrient status of the Subantarctic Zone in the Southern Ocean. Down-core records from both the Pacific and Indian sectors show δ15N of 5 to 6‰ during the Last Glacial Maximum and a decrease, coincident with the glacial termination, to values as low as 2‰. The effect of either diatom assemblage or physiological change on the diatom-bound 15N/14N is unknown and cannot yet be ruled out as a possible explanation for the observed change. However, the consistency between Indian and Pacific sector records and with other paleoceanographic data suggests that the glacial-interglacial difference in diatom-bound 15N/14N was driven by higher consumption of nitrate in the subantarctic surface during the last ice age. Such a change in nutrient consumption may have resulted from atmospheric iron fertilization and/or decreased glacial mixed layer depths associated with sea ice melting. Enhanced nutrient consumption in the glacial subantarctic would have worked to lower the concentration of CO2 in the ice age atmosphere. It also would have reduced the preformed nutrient content of the low-latitude thermocline, leading to decreases in low-latitude productivity, suboxia, and denitrification.

  18. Effects on ^18F production in novae from changes in the ^17O(p,α)^14N rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moazen, B. H.; Blackmon, J. C.; Bardayan, D. W.; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Domizioli, C. P.; Fitzgerald, R.; Greife, U.; Hix, W. R.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Lingerfelt, E. J.; Livesay, R. J.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Pain, S. D.; Roberts, L. F.; Shriner, J. F., Jr.; Smith, M. S.; Thomas, J. S.

    2008-04-01

    The properties of a resonance at 183 keV are important for understanding the ^17 O(p,α)^14N and ^17O(p,γ)^18F reaction rates at nova temperatures and was recently reported to significantly increase the (p,α) reaction rate. A method involving the bombardment of a hydrogen filled target chamber was recently developed at ORNL for measuring the strength and energy of (p, α) resonances and was applied to measure this resonance in ^17O(p, α)^14N. The strength of the resonance was confirmed and post-processing nova nucleosynthesis simulations show the new ^17O(p,α)^14N reaction rate significantly decreases ^18F production in low mass ONeMg novae but has little effect on more energetic novae [Moazen et. al. Phys. Rev. C 75 065801 (2007)]. Results and astrophysical implications will be presented as well as future plans to measure ^18F(p,α)^15O with this technique. ORNL is managed by UT Battelle for the US DOE

  19. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140–600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  20. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR.

    PubMed

    Nanni, Emilio A; Barnes, Alexander B; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2011-08-29

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140-600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  1. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Written for chemists and biochemists who are not NMR spectroscopists, but who wish to use the new techniques of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, this book brings together for the first time much of the practical and experimental data needed. It also serves as information source for industrial, academic, and graduate student researchers who already use NMR spectroscopy, but not yet in two dimensions. The authors describe the use of 2-D NMR in a wide variety of chemical and biochemical fields, among them peptides, steroids, oligo- and poly-saccharides, nucleic acids, natural products (including terpenoids, alkaloids, and coal-derived heterocyclics), and organic synthetic intermediates. They consider throughout the book both the advantages and limitations of using 2-D NMR.

  2. The Titan 14N/ 15N and 12C/ 13C isotopic ratios in HCN from Cassini/CIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinatier, Sandrine; Bézard, Bruno; Nixon, Conor A.

    2007-11-01

    We report the detection of H 13CN and HC 15N in mid-infrared spectra recorded by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) aboard Cassini, along with the determination of the 12C/ 13C and 14N/ 15N isotopic ratios. We analyzed two sets of limb spectra recorded near 13-15° S (Tb flyby) and 83° N (T4 flyby) at 0.5 cm -1 resolution. The spectral range 1210-1310 cm -1 was used to retrieve the temperature profile in the range 145-490 km at 13° S and 165-300 km at 83° N. These two temperature profiles were then incorporated in the atmospheric model to retrieve the abundance profile of H 12C 14N, H 13CN and HC 15N from their bands at 713, 706 and 711 cm -1, respectively. The HCN abundance profile was retrieved in the range 90-460 km at 15° S and 165-305 km at 83° N. There is no evidence for vertical variations of the isotopic ratios. Constraining the isotopic abundance profiles to be proportional to the HCN one, we find C12/C13=89-18+22 at 15° S, and 68-12+16 at 83° N, two values that are statistically consistent. A combination of these results yields a 12C/ 13C value equal to 75±12. This global result, as well as the 15° S one, envelop the value in Titan's methane ( 82.3±1) [Niemann, H.B., and 17 colleagues, 2005. Nature 438, 779-784] measured at 10° S and is slightly lower than the terrestrial inorganic standard value (89). The 14N/ 15N isotopic ratio is found equal to 56-13+16 at 15° S and 56-9+10 at 83° N. Combining the two values yields 14N/ 15N = 56 ± 8, which corresponds to an enrichment in 15N of about 4.9 compared with the terrestrial ratio. These results agree with the values obtained from previous ground-based millimeter observations [Hidayat, T., Marten, A., Bézard, B., Gautier, D., Owen, T., Matthews, H.E., Paubert, G., 1997. Icarus 126, 170-182; Marten, A., Hidayat, T., Biraud, Y., Moreno, R., 2002. Icarus 158, 532-544]. The 15N/ 14N ratio found in HCN is ˜3 times higher than in N 2 [Niemann, H.B., and 17 colleagues, 2005. Nature 438, 779

  3. The MACHO Project Large Magellanic Cloud Variable Star Inventory. XIII. Fourier Parameters for the First Overtone RR Lyrae Variables and the LMC Distance

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C; Alves, D; Axelrod, T; Becker, A; Bennett, D; Clement, C; Cook, K; Drake, A; Freeman, K; Geha, M; Griest, K; Lehner, M; Marshall, S; Minniti, D; Muzzin, A; Nelson, C; Peterson, B; Popowski, P; Pratt, M; Quinn, P; Rodgers, A; Rowe, J; Sutherland, W; Vandehei, T; Welch, D

    2003-12-31

    Shapes of RR Lyrae light curves can be described in terms of Fourier coefficients which past research has linked with physical characteristics such as luminosity, mass and temperature. Fourier coefficients have been derived for the V and R light curves of 785 overtone RR Lyrae variables in 16 MACHO fields near the bar of the LMC. In general, the Fourier phase differences {phi}{sub 21}, {phi}{sub 31} and {phi}{sub 41} increase and the amplitude ratio R{sub 21} decreases with increasing period. The coefficients for both the V and R magnitudes follow these patterns, but the phase differences for the R curves are on average slightly greater, and their amplitudes are about 20% smaller, than the ones for the V curves. The {phi}{sub 31} and R{sub 21} coefficients have been compared with those of the first overtone RR Lyrae variables in the Galactic globular clusters NGC 6441, M107, M5, M3, M2, {omega} Centauri and M68. The results indicate that many of the LMC variables have properties similar to the ones in M2, M3, M5 and the Oosterhoff type I variables in {omega} Cen, but they are different from the Oosterhoff type II variables in {omega} Cen. Equations derived from hydrodynamic pulsation models have been used to calculate the luminosity and temperature for the 330 bona fide first-overtone variables. The results indicate that they have Log L in the range 1.6 to 1.8 L{sub {center_dot}} and log T{sub eff} between 3.85 and 3.87. Based on these temperatures, a mean color excess E(V-R) = 0.08 mag, equivalent to E(B-V) = 0.14 mag, has been estimated for these 330 stars. The 80 M5-like variables (selected according to their location in the {phi}{sub 31} - log P plot) are used to determine an LMC distance. After correcting for the effects of extinction and crowding, a mean apparent magnitude < V{sub 0} > = 18.99 {+-} 0.02 (statistical) {+-} 0.16 (systematic) has been estimated for these 80 stars. Combining this with a mean absolute magnitude M{sub V} = 0.56 {+-} 0.06 for M5

  4. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Hua, D.W.

    1996-02-01

    During the 3 year term of the project, new methods have been developed for characterizing the pore structure of porous materials such as coals, carbons, and amorphous silica gels. In general, these techniques revolve around; (1) combining multiple techniques such as small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and adsorption of contrast-matched adsorbates or {sup 129}Xe NMR and thermoporometry (the change in freezing point with pore size), (2) combining adsorption isotherms over several pressure ranges to obtain a more complete description of pore filling, or (3) applying NMR ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}) techniques with well-defined porous solids with pores in the large micropore size range (>1 nm).

  5. Absorption intensity changes and frequency shifts of fundamental and first overtone bands for OH stretching vibration of methanol upon methanol-pyridine complex formation in CCl4: analysis by NIR/IR spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Futami, Yoshisuke; Ozaki, Yasushi; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2016-02-21

    Infrared (IR) and near infrared (NIR) spectra were measured for methanol and the methanol-pyridine complex in carbon tetrachloride. Upon the formation of the methanol-pyridine complex, the frequencies of both the fundamental and first overtone bands of the OH stretching vibration shifted to lower frequencies, and the absorption intensity of the fundamental increased significantly, while that of the first overtone decreased markedly. By using quantum chemical calculations, we estimated the absorption intensities and frequencies of the fundamental and first overtone bands for the OH stretching vibration based on the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation. The calculated results well reproduced the experimental results. The molecular vibration potentials and dipole moment functions of the OH stretching vibration modes were compared between methanol and the methanol-pyridine complex in terms of absorption intensity changes and frequency shifts. The large change in the dipole moment function was found to be the main cause for the variations in absorption intensity for the fundamental and first overtone bands. PMID:26862859

  6. Study of high-overtone bulk acoustic resonators based on the Me1/AlN/Me2/(100) diamond piezoelectric layered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, B. P.; Kvashnin, G. M.; Telichko, A. V.; Gordeev, G. I.; Burkov, S. I.; Blank, V. D.

    2015-07-01

    The Me1/AlN/Me2/(100) diamond structure has been theoretically analyzed and experimentally investigated in the range 0.5-10 GHz using high-overtone bulk acoustic resonators with different electrodes topologies based on the Al/AlN/Mo/(100) diamond structure. The maximum quality parameter Q × f ≈ 1014 Hz was obtained at f = 9.5 GHz. The layered structure has been analyzed using the developed HBAR software v. 2.3. It is demonstrated that the features in the frequency dependences of the parameters of such resonators are related to the behavior of a loaded thin-film piezoelectric transducer. The calculation results are in good agreement with the experiment. The frequency dependences of the equivalent parameters of the resonators have been calculated. It is shown that the synthetic type IIa diamond single crystal in combination with aluminum nitride is promising for implementation of high-Q acoustoelectronic microwave devices.

  7. Collision-induced infrared spectra of H2-He pairs at temperatures from 18 to 7000 K. II. Overtone and hot bands

    SciTech Connect

    Borysow, A.; Frommhold, L.; Texas Univ., Austin )

    1989-06-01

    The three lowest spectral moments of the collision induced absorption (CIA) spectra of H2-He pairs have been computed from first principles for temperatures T from 18 to 7000 K for a number of hydrogen overtone and hot bands involving vibrational quantum numbers nu = 0, 1, 2, 3 yields nu-prime = 0, 1, 2, 3. The data are given in a form suitable for the computation of CIA spectra of H2-He as function of frequency and temperature, using simple computer codes and model line shapes. The work is of interest for the spectroscopy of the atmospheres of the outer planets and of stars that contain neutral molecular hydrogen and helium (late stars, white dwarfs, and Population II stars) in the infrared and visible region of the spectrum. 13 refs.

  8. High-Resolution Rotational Analysis of the Lowest D-O Overtone Bands of Deuterated Hypochlorous Acid: 2ν 1 and 3ν 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yun; Ulenikov, O. N.; Bekhtereva, E. S.; Zheng, Jing-Jing; He, Sheng-Gui; Wang, Xiang-Huai; Hu, Shui-Ming; Zhu, Qing-Shi

    2001-10-01

    The high-resolution Fourier transform spectrum of the DO35Cl molecule was recorded and analyzed in the region of the two lowest D-O overtone bands, 2ν1 and 3ν1. Because of the presence of strong resonance interactions, the influence of the (130) state on the (200) state, and also that of the (221), (230) states on the (300) sate, was taken into account. Transitions belonging to the 2ν1 and 3ν1 bands were assigned up to Jmax.=35 in both cases. The sets of spectroscopic parameters and resonance coefficients obtained from the fit reproduce the 'experimental' rovibrational energies of the (200) and (300) vibrational states with accuracies close to experimental uncertainties.

  9. Analysis of the Q branch of the 3 ν3 overtone of UF 6: The implied structure of the nν3 ladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krohn, Burton J.; McDowell, Robin S.; Patterson, Chris W.; Nereson, Norris G.; Reisfeld, Martin J.; Kim, K. C.

    1988-12-01

    Spectra of the 3 ν3 region of 238UF 6 near 1875.5 cm -1 have been obtained at 256 K with path lengths up to 400 m using tunable semiconductor diode lasers. Seventeen features have been assigned to 27 Q-branch fine-structure levels, and five molecular parameters have been derived. Two of these refer to vibration-rotation interaction and agree well with earlier values determined from the ν3 fundamental band. The remaining three constants are pure vibrational. They, along with information from the ν3 fundamental, determine the excited vibrational structures of the nν3 overtones, to the second order of approximation in the formalism of Hecht. These structures are consistent with strong localization of the three individual components of the triply degenerate ν3 mode of vibration. Comparisons are made with the two-photon spectrum of Harzer, Schweizer, and Selter, and with the bond-stretching model of Halonen and Child.

  10. Polarity-inverted ScAlN film growth by ion beam irradiation and application to overtone acoustic wave (000-1)/(0001) film resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Masashi; Yanagitani, Takahiko; Odagawa, Hiroyuki

    2014-04-28

    Polarity inversion in wurtzite film is generally achieved by the epitaxial growth on a specific under-layer. We demonstrate polarity inversion of c-axis oriented ScAlN films by substrate ion beam irradiation without using buffer layer. Substrate ion beam irradiation was induced by either sputtering a small amount of oxide (as a negative ion source) onto the cathode or by applying a RF bias to the substrate. Polarity of the films was determined by a press test and nonlinear dielectric measurement. Second overtone thickness extensional mode acoustic resonance and suppression of fundamental mode resonance, indicating complete polarity inversion, were clearly observed in bilayer highly oriented (000-1)/(0001) ScAlN film.

  11. The ARAUCARIA project. OGLE-LMC-CEP-1718: An exotic eclipsing binary system composed of two classical overtone cepheids in a 413 day orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Gieren, Wolfgang; Pilecki, Bogumił; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Graczyk, Dariusz; Gallenne, Alexandre E-mail: pietrzyn@astrouw.edu.pl E-mail: dgallenne@astro-udec.cl; and others

    2014-05-10

    We have obtained extensive high-quality spectroscopic observations of the OGLE-LMC-CEP-1718 eclipsing binary system in the Large Magellanic Cloud that Soszyński et al. had identified as a candidate system for containing two classical Cepheids in orbit. Our spectroscopic data clearly demonstrate binary motion of the Cepheids in a 413 day eccentric orbit, rendering this eclipsing binary system the first ever known to consist of 2 classical Cepheid variables. After disentangling the four different radial velocity variations in the system, we present the orbital solution and the individual pulsational radial velocity curves of the Cepheids. We show that both Cepheids are extremely likely to be first overtone pulsators and determine their respective dynamical masses, which turn out to be equal to within 1.5%. Since the secondary eclipse is not observed in the orbital light curve, we cannot derive the individual radii of the Cepheids, but the sum of their radii derived from the photometry is consistent with overtone pulsation for both variables. The existence of two equal-mass Cepheids in a binary system having different pulsation periods (1.96 and 2.48 days, respectively) may pose an interesting challenge to stellar evolution and pulsation theories, and a more detailed study of this system using additional data sets should yield deeper insight about the physics of stellar evolution of Cepheid variables. Future analysis of the system using additional near-infrared photometry might also lead to a better understanding of the systematic uncertainties in current Baade-Wesselink techniques of distance determinations to Cepheid variables.

  12. Study of {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method for application to {sup 17}O nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; Pizzone, R. G.; Gulino, M.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Tudisco, S.; Tumino, A.; Coc, A.; Hammache, F.; Sereville, N. de; Kiss, G.

    2008-05-21

    Because of the still present uncertainties on its rate, the {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N is one of the most important reaction to be studied in order to get more information about the fate of {sup 17}O in different astrophysical scenarios. The preliminary study of the three-body reaction {sup 2}H({sup 17}O,{alpha}{sup 14}N)n is presented here as a first stage of the indirect study of this important {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N reaction through the Trojan Horse Method (THM)

  13. Determination of the delta(15N/14N)of Ammonium (NH4+) in Water: RSIL Lab Code 2898

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hannon, Janet E.; Böhlke, John Karl

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the technique described by Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 2898 is to determine the N isotopic composition, delta(15N/14N), abbreviated as d15N, of ammonium (NH4+) in water (freshwater and saline water). The procedure involves converting dissolved NH4+ into NH3 gas by raising the pH of the sample to above 9 with MgO and subsequently trapping the gas quantitatively as (NH4)2SO4 on a glass fiber (GF) filter. The GF filter is saturated with NaHSO4 and pressure sealed between two gas-permeable polypropylene filters. The GF filter 'sandwich' floats on the surface of the water sample in a closed bottle. NH3 diffuses from the water through the polypropylene filter and reacts with NaHSO4, forming (NH4)2SO4 on the GF filter. The GF filter containing (NH4)2SO4 is dried and then combusted with a Carlo Erba NC 2500 elemental analyzer (EA), which is used to convert total nitrogen in a solid sample into N2 gas. The EA is connected to a continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS), which determines the relative difference in ratios of the amounts of the stable isotopes of nitrogen (15N and 14N) of the product N2 gas and a reference N2 gas. The filters containing the samples are compressed in tin capsules and loaded into a Costech Zero-Blank Autosampler on the EA. Under computer control, samples then are dropped into a heated reaction tube that contains an oxidant, where combustion takes place in a He atmosphere containing an excess of O2 gas. To remove S-O gases produced from the NaHSO4, a plug of Ag-coated Cu wool is inserted at the bottom of the reaction tube. Combustion products are transported by a He carrier through a reduction furnace to remove excess O2, toconvert all nitrogen oxides to N2, and to remove any remaining S-O gases. The gases then pass through a drying tube to remove water. The gas-phase products, mainly N2 and a small amount of background CO2, are separated by a gas chromatograph (GC). The gas is then introduced

  14. Levels in 12N via the 14N (p , t ) reaction using the JENSA gas-jet target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipps, K. A.; Pain, S. D.; Greife, U.; Kozub, R. L.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Kontos, A.; Linhardt, L. E.; Matos, M.; Pittman, S. T.; Sachs, A.; Schatz, H.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Thompson, P.; Jensa Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    As one of a series of physics cases to demonstrate the unique benefit of the new Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas-jet target for enabling next-generation transfer reaction studies, the 14N (p , t )12N reaction was studied for the first time, using a pure jet of nitrogen, in an attempt to resolve conflicting information on the structure of 12N . A potentially new level at 4.561-MeV excitation energy in 12N was found.

  15. Resonance Strength Measurement at Astrophysical Energies: The 17O(p,α)14N Reaction Studied via THM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Irgaziev, B.; Tang, X. D.; Wischer, M.; Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α)14N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. The mean value of the strengths obtained in the two measurements was calculated and compared with the direct data available in literature.

  16. Resonance strength measurement at astrophysical energies: The 17O(p,α)14N reaction studied via Trojan Horse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Irgaziev, B.; Tang, X. D.; Wiescher, M.; Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V.

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α)14N reaction via the THM by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. Two measurements will be described and the experimental THM cross sections will be shown for both experiments.

  17. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  18. Integrative NMR for biomolecular research.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Dashti, Hesam; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Tonelli, Marco; Westler, William M; Butcher, Samuel E; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A; Markley, John L

    2016-04-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for determining structural and functional features of biomolecules in physiological solution as well as for observing their intermolecular interactions in real-time. However, complex steps associated with its practice have made the approach daunting for non-specialists. We introduce an NMR platform that makes biomolecular NMR spectroscopy much more accessible by integrating tools, databases, web services, and video tutorials that can be launched by simple installation of NMRFAM software packages or using a cross-platform virtual machine that can be run on any standard laptop or desktop computer. The software package can be downloaded freely from the NMRFAM software download page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/download_packages.html ), and detailed instructions are available from the Integrative NMR Video Tutorial page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/integrative.html ). PMID:27023095

  19. Polarization transfer NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; van Hulsteyn, David B.

    1990-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

  20. Study of the ferroelastic phase transition in the tetraethylammonium compound [N(C2H5)4]2ZnBr4 by magic-angle spinning and static NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2016-03-01

    The ferroelastic phase transition of tetraethylammonium compound [N(C2H5)4]2ZnBr4 at the phase transition temperature (TC) = 283 K was characterized by magic-angle spinning (MAS) and static nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and confirmed by optical polarizing spectroscopy. The structural geometry near TC was studied in terms of the chemical shifts and the spin-lattice relaxation times T1ρ in the rotating frame for 1H MAS NMR and 13C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR. The two inequivalent ethyl groups were distinguishable in the 13C NMR spectrum, and the T1ρ results indicate that they undergo tumbling motion above TC in a coupled manner. From the 14N NMR results, the two nitrogen nuclei in the N(C2H5)4+ ions were distinguishable above TC, and the splitting in the spectra below TC was related to the ferroelastic domains with different orientations.

  1. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping [sup 129]Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the [sup 131]Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  2. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping {sup 129}Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the {sup 131}Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  3. Multispectral Analysis of NMR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butterfield, R. L.; Vannier, M. W. And Associates; Jordan, D.

    1985-01-01

    Conference paper discusses initial efforts to adapt multispectral satellite-image analysis to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) scans of human body. Flexibility of these techniques makes it possible to present NMR data in variety of formats, including pseudocolor composite images of pathological internal features. Techniques do not have to be greatly modified from form in which used to produce satellite maps of such Earth features as water, rock, or foliage.

  4. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2010-06-15

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  5. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2008-11-25

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  6. Automated protein NMR resonance assignments.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Xu, Dong; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Lin, Guohui

    2003-01-01

    NMR resonance peak assignment is one of the key steps in solving an NMR protein structure. The assignment process links resonance peaks to individual residues of the target protein sequence, providing the prerequisite for establishing intra- and inter-residue spatial relationships between atoms. The assignment process is tedious and time-consuming, which could take many weeks. Though there exist a number of computer programs to assist the assignment process, many NMR labs are still doing the assignments manually to ensure quality. This paper presents (1) a new scoring system for mapping spin systems to residues, (2) an automated adjacency information extraction procedure from NMR spectra, and (3) a very fast assignment algorithm based on our previous proposed greedy filtering method and a maximum matching algorithm to automate the assignment process. The computational tests on 70 instances of (pseudo) experimental NMR data of 14 proteins demonstrate that the new score scheme has much better discerning power with the aid of adjacency information between spin systems simulated across various NMR spectra. Typically, with automated extraction of adjacency information, our method achieves nearly complete assignments for most of the proteins. The experiment shows very promising perspective that the fast automated assignment algorithm together with the new score scheme and automated adjacency extraction may be ready for practical use. PMID:16452794

  7. NMR Relaxation and Petrophysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Marc

    2011-03-01

    NMR relaxation is routinely used in the field of geosciences to give basic petrophysical properties such as porosity, pore size distribution, saturation etc. In this tutorial, we focus on the pore size distribution deduced from NMR. We recall the basic principle used in the interpretation of the NMR signal and compare the results with other standard petrophysical techniques such as mercury pore size distribution, BET specific surface measurements, thin section visualizations. The NMR pore size distribution is a unique information available on water saturated porous media and can give similar results as MICP in certain situations. The scaling of NMR relaxation time distribution (s) into pore sizes (μm) requires the knowledge of the surface relaxivity (μm/s) and we recommend using specific surface measurements as an independent determination of solid surface areas. With usual surface relaxivities, the NMR technique can explore length-scales starting from nano-meters and ending around 100 μm. Finally, we will introduce briefly recent techniques sensitive to the pore to pore diffusional exchange, providing new information on the connectivity of the pore network, but showing another possibility of discrepancy in the determination of pore size distribution with standard techniques.

  8. Theoretical study of NMR, infrared and Raman spectra on triple-decker phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Oku, Takeo

    2016-02-01

    Electronic structures and magnetic properties of multi-decker phthalocyanines were studied by theoretical calculation. Electronic structures, excited processes at multi-states, isotropic chemical shifts of 13C, 14N and 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), principle V-tensor in electronic field gradient (EFG) tensor and asymmetry parameters (η), vibration mode in infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of triple-decker phthalocyanines were calculated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT using B3LYP as basis function. Electron density distribution was delocalized on the phthalocyanine rings with electron static potential. Considerable separation of chemical shifts in 13C, 14N and 1H-NMR was originated from nuclear spin interaction between nitrogen and carbon atoms, nuclear quadrupole interaction based on EFG and η of central metal under crystal field. Calculated optical absorption at multi-excited process was derived from overlapping π-orbital on the phthalocyanine rings. The vibration modes in IR and Raman spectra were based on in-plane deformation and stretching vibrations of metal-ligand coordination bond on the deformed structure.

  9. Study of the levels in 12N using the 14N(p,t) reaction with JENSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipps, K. A.; Greife, U.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Linhardt, L. E.; Kontos, A.; Schatz, H.; Kozub, R. L.; Matos, M.; Pain, S. D.; Smith, M. S.; Pittman, S. T.; Sachs, A.; Schmitt, K. T.; Thompson, P.; Jensa Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Based on consideration of the isobaric analogues 12B and 12C, the experimental information on 12N is incomplete, with a number of inconsistencies between the compilations and the results of individual studies. As one of a series of commissioning physics measurements to demonstrate the benefit of the new Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas jet target for enabling next-generation transfer reaction studies, the 14N(p,t)12N reaction was studied using a pure 300 psig jet of nitrogen, in order to help elucidate the structure of 12N. The experiment and results will be discussed. Based on consideration of the isobaric analogues 12B and 12C, the experimental information on 12N is incomplete, with a number of inconsistencies between the compilations and the results of individual studies. As one of a series of commissioning physics measurements to demonstrate the benefit of the new Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas jet target for enabling next-generation transfer reaction studies, the 14N(p,t)12N reaction was studied using a pure 300 psig jet of nitrogen, in order to help elucidate the structure of 12N. The experiment and results will be discussed. Research supported by the US Department of Energy Office of Science.

  10. (14)N Nuclear Quadrupole Coupling and Methyl Internal Rotation in N-tert-Butylacetamide As Observed by Microwave Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kannengießer, Raphaela; Stahl, Wolfgang; Nguyen, Ha Vinh Lam; Kleiner, Isabelle

    2016-06-16

    The rotational spectrum of N-tert-butylacetamide, CH3(C═O)(NH)C(CH3)3, was measured in the frequency range from 2 to 26.5 GHz using a molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Only one conformer with trans configuration and Cs symmetry was observed. Torsional splittings up to 4.3 GHz occurred in the spectrum due to the internal rotation of the acetyl methyl group CH3(C═O) with a barrier height of approximately 65 cm(-1). Hyperfine structures arise from the quadrupole coupling of the (14)N nucleus appeared for all rotation-torsional transitions. The data set was reproduced with the programs XIAM and BELGI-C1-hyperfine, an extended version of the BELGI-C1 code that includes the effect of the (14)N quadrupole coupling, to root-mean-square deviations of 16.9 and 3.0 kHz, respectively. Quantum chemical calculations were performed to complement the experimental results. The BELGI-C1-hyperfine code was also used to refit the recently published microwave data of N-ethylacetamide to measurement accuracy. PMID:27213507

  11. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  12. jsNMR: an embedded platform-independent NMR spectrum viewer.

    PubMed

    Vosegaard, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    jsNMR is a lightweight NMR spectrum viewer written in JavaScript/HyperText Markup Language (HTML), which provides a cross-platform spectrum visualizer that runs on all computer architectures including mobile devices. Experimental (and simulated) datasets are easily opened in jsNMR by (i) drag and drop on a jsNMR browser window, (ii) by preparing a jsNMR file from the jsNMR web site, or (iii) by mailing the raw data to the jsNMR web portal. jsNMR embeds the original data in the HTML file, so a jsNMR file is a self-transforming dataset that may be exported to various formats, e.g. comma-separated values. The main applications of jsNMR are to provide easy access to NMR data without the need for dedicated software installed and to provide the possibility to visualize NMR spectra on web sites. PMID:25641013

  13. NMR Imaging: Instrumentation and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingle, Jeremy Mark

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis presents three original contributions to the field of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR): the experimental framework and analysis for the measurement of a new imaging parameter to describe perfusion; the measurement and analysis of magnetic field inhomogeneity and a practical correction system for their reduction; a novel system for the synchronous control of NMR experiments based on the microprogrammed concept. The thesis begins with an introduction to the theory of NMR. The application of NMR to imaging is also introduced with emphasis on the techniques which developed into those in common use today. Inaccurate determination of the traditional NMR parameters (T_1 and T_2 and the molecular diffusion coefficient) can be caused by non-diffusive fluid movement within the sample. The experimental basis for determining a new imaging parameter --the Perfusion coefficient--is presented. This provides a measure of forced isotropic fluid motion through an organ or tissue. The instrumentation required for conducting NMR experiments is described in order to introduce the contribution made in this area during this research: A sequence controller. The controller is based on the concept of microprogramming and enables completely synchronous output of 128 bits of data. The software for the generation and storage of control data and the regulation of the data to provide experimental control is microcomputer based. It affords precise and accurate regulation of the magnetic field gradients, the rf synthesizer and the spectrometer for spectroscopic and imaging applications. Fundamental to the science of NMR is the presence of a magnetic field. A detailed study of the analysis of magnetic field inhomogeneity in terms of spherical harmonics is presented. The field of a whole body imaging system with poor inhomogeneity was measured and analyzed to determine and describe the components of the inhomogeneity. Finally a

  14. NMR studies of osmoregulation in methanogenic archaebacteria. [NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance)

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    Methanogens are strict anaerobic archaebacteria whose metabolism centers around the reduction of CO[sub 2] to CH[sub 4]. Their environments are often extreme (high temperatures, high salt, few nutrients, etc.) and they may have evolved unique ways to handle these stresses. It is proposed that methanogenic archaebacteria respond to osmotic stress by accumulating a series of organic solutes. In two strains of marine methanogens, Methanogenium cariaci and Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus, four key organic solutes are observed: L-[alpha]-glutamate, [beta]-glutamate, N[sup e]-acetyl-[beta]-lysine, and glycine betaine. The first three of these are synthesized de novo; glycine betaine is transported into the Mg. cariaci cells from the medium. In the absence of betaine, Mg. cariaci synthesizes N[sup e]-acetyl-[beta]-lysine as the dominant osmolyte. Mc. thermolithotrophicus also synthesizes N[sup e]-acetyl-[beta]-lysine but only at salt concentrations greater than 1 M. In Mc. thermolithotrophicus intracellular potassium ion concentrations, determined by [sup 39]K NMR spectroscopy, are balanced by the total concentration of anionic amino acid species, [alpha]-glutamate and [beta]-glutamate. Turnover of the organic solutes has been monitored using [sup 13]C-pulse/[sup 12]C-chase, and [sup 15]N-pulse/[sup 14]N-chase experiments. The [beta]-amino acids exhibit slower turnover rates compared to L-[alpha]-glutamate or aspartate, consistent with their role as compatible solutes. Biosynthetic information for the [beta]-amino acids was provided by [sup 13]C-label incorporation and steady state labeling experiments. [beta]-glutamate shows a lag in [sup 13]C uptake from [sup 13]CO[sub 2], indicative of its biosynthesis from a precursor not in equilibrium with the soluble L-[alpha]-glutamate pool, probably a macromolecule. A novel biosynthetic pathway is proposed for N[sup e]-acetyl-[beta]-lysine from the diaminopimelate pathway.

  15. NMR planar microcoil for microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorli, B.; Chateaux, J. F.; Quiquerez, L.; Bouchet-Fakri, L.; Briguet, A.; Morin, P.

    2006-11-01

    This article deals with the analysis of small sample volume by using a planar microcoil and a micromachined cavity. This microcoil is used as a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) radio frequency detection coil in order to perform in vitro NMR analysis of the sample introduced into the microcavity. It is a real challenging task to develop microsystem for NMR spectrum extraction for smaller and smaller sample volume. Moreover, it is advantageous that these microsystems could be integrated in a Micro Total Analysing System (μ -TAS) as an analysing tool. In this paper, NMR theory, description, fabrication process and electrical characterization of planar microcoils receiver are described. Results obtained on NMR microspectroscopy experiments have been performed on water and ethanol, using a 1 mm diameter planar coil. This microcoil is tuned and matched at 85.13 MHz which is the Larmor frequency of proton in a 2 T magnetic field. This paper has been presented at “3e colloque interdisciplinaire en instrumentation (C2I 2004)”, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, 29 30 janvier 2004.

  16. Transfer reactions with JENSA: study of the levels in 12N using 14N(p,t)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipps, K. A.; Jensa Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas jet target, recently recommissioned in the ReA3 facility at the NSCL, will provide a state-of-the-art, dense, localized, and pure target of light, gaseous elements for various reaction studies. As one of a series of commissioning physics measurements to demonstrate the benefit of the new Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas jet target for enabling next-generation transfer reaction studies, the 14N(p,t)12N reaction was studied using a pure 300 psig jet of nitrogen, in order to help elucidate the structure of 12N. The experiment and lessons learned for future gas jet transfer reaction measurements will be discussed. Research supported by the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Science and NSF.

  17. Cross sections for n+{sup 14}N from an R-matrix analysis of the {sup 15}N system

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, G.M.; Young, P.G.; Chadwick, M.B.

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki Dose Reevaluation Program, a new evaluation of the neutron cross sections for {sup 14}N was made for ENDF/B-VI, based at energies below 2.5 MeV on a multichannel R-matrix analysis of reactions in the {sup 15}N system. The types of data used in the analysis, and the resulting cross sections and resonance structure for {sup 15}N are briefly described. The resonant features of the neutron cross sections were especially well determined by including precise, high-resolution neutron total cross section measurements from ORNL. While the new evaluated cross section appear to be significant improvements over the earlier ones, they still need to be tested more extensively against recent measurements of the differential elastic cross section from Oak Ridge.

  18. Interaction of 1p nuclei: Case of 14N+12C Elastic Scattering at 21.0 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtebayev, N.; Alimov, D.; Boztosun, I.; Burtebayeva, J.; Kerimkulov, Zh K.; Nassurlla, M.; Amangeldy, N.; Morzabayev, A. K.; Sakhiev, S. K.; Hamada, Sh

    2015-04-01

    Optical model analysis has been conducted for the elastic scattering of 1p-shell nuclei around the Coulomb barrier energies. We have used both microscopic double-folding and phenomenological potentials for the real part of the complex nuclear potential. The imaginary potential has the shape of phenomenological Wood-Saxon volume. The case 14N+12C for 1p-shell nuclei has been studied in detail and it is noticed that a large normalization of the strength of the double-folding real potential is needed to explain the structure observed in the experimental data. A good agreement between experimental data and theoretical results is obtained for the phenomenological potential case.

  19. Improving NMR Structures of RNA.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Guillermo A; Clore, G Marius; Schwieters, Charles D

    2016-05-01

    Here, we show that modern solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures of RNA exhibit more steric clashes and conformational ambiguities than their crystallographic X-ray counterparts. To tackle these issues, we developed RNA-ff1, a new force field for structure calculation with Xplor-NIH. Using seven published NMR datasets, RNA-ff1 improves covalent geometry and MolProbity validation criteria for clashes and backbone conformation in most cases, relative to both the previous Xplor-NIH force field and the original structures associated with the experimental data. In addition, with smaller base-pair step rises in helical stems, RNA-ff1 structures enjoy more favorable base stacking. Finally, structural accuracy improves in the majority of cases, as supported by complete residual dipolar coupling cross-validation. Thus, the reported advances show great promise in bridging the quality gap that separates NMR and X-ray structures of RNA. PMID:27066747

  20. 15N/14N Ratio Determination in the ISM with Herschel with High Resolution Spectroscopy of Nitrogen Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Bailleux, S.; Wlodarczak, G.; Pirali, O.; Martin-Drumel, M.-A.; Roy, P.; Roueff, E.; Gerin, M.

    2011-06-01

    The very high resolution of the HIFI instrument (134 kHz-1MHz) on board of Herschel needs very accurate laboratory measurements to detect unambiguously the signature of stable and unstable molecular species. Concerning the pure rotation spectra of new species, and particularly of open shell molecules, the first prediction could be far away and up to few hundred MHz. The 15N/14N ratio is not well measured in the ISM. However, the 15N/14N in the isotopomers is a potential tracer of the formation processes and the possible link with cometary molecules. Recent measurements include the detection of 15NH_2D N15NH+ and 15NH_3. The NH and NH_2 species are the simplest nitrogen radicals and are intermediate products in the NH_3 synthesis. They have been easily detected by Herschel and it therefore is interesting to now search for 15NH and 15NH_2. No spectrocopic data have been reported for these two radicals up to now. We present here the studies with high resolution spectroscopy in the THz range. The high sensitivity and the wide range of Synchrotron (0.6-6 THz) was essential to improve the prediction of the spectra of these two species in order to measure them in Lille (0.6-1 THz) with both a higher accuracy and resolution. The combined studies now give the most accurate predictions. ISM searches on these radicals are in progress in the HERSCHEL spectra. This work is supported by the Programme National de Physico-Chimie du Milieu Interstellaire (PCMI-CNRS) M. Gerin, N. Marcellino, N. Biver, et al., Astron. & Astrophys. 498 (2009) 9. L. Bizzochi, P. Caselli, and L. Dore, Astron. & Astrophys. 510 (2010) L5. D. C. Lis, A. Wooten, M. Gerin and E. Roueff, Astrophys. J. 710 (2010) L49.

  1. Translational diffusion in paramagnetic liquids by 1H NMR relaxometry: Nitroxide radicals in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Korpała, A.; Kubica, A.; Meier, R.; Rössler, E. A.; Moscicki, J.

    2013-01-01

    For nitroxide radicals in solution one can identify three frequency regimes in which 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate of solvent molecules depend linearly on square root of the 1H resonance frequency. Combining a recently developed theory of nuclear (proton) spin-lattice relaxation in solutions of nitroxide radicals [D. Kruk et al., J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4736854 with properties of the spectral density function associated with translational dynamics, relationships between the corresponding linear changes of the relaxation rate (for 14N spin probes) and relative translational diffusion coefficient of the solvent and solute molecules have been derived (in analogy to 15N spin probes [E. Belorizky et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 3674 (1998)], 10.1021/jp980397h). This method allows a simple and straightforward determination of diffusion coefficients in spin-labeled systems, by means of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The approach has thoroughly been tested by applying to a large set of experimental data—1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion results for solutions of different viscosity (decalin, glycerol, propylene glycol) of 14N and 15N spin probes. The experiments have been performed versus temperature (to cover a broad range of translational diffusion coefficients) using field cycling spectrometer which covers three decades in 1H resonance frequency, 10 kHz-20 MHz. The limitations of NMR relaxometry caused by the time scale of the translational dynamics as well as electron spin relaxation have been discussed. It has been shown that for spin-labeled systems NMR relaxometry gives access to considerably faster diffusion processes than for diamagnetic systems.

  2. A SENSITIVE NMR THERMOMETER FOR MULTINUCLEI FT NMR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pernicious problem in multinuclei FT NMR is accurate measurement of sample temperature. This arises from several factors including widespread use of high-power decoupling, large sample tubes (with potentially large temperature gradients across the sample volume), and lack of su...

  3. Fast detection of choline-containing metabolites in liver using 2D 1H- 14N three-bond correlation (HN3BC) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xi-an; Li, Ning; Mao, Jiezhen; Li, Qiurong; Xiao, Nan; Jiang, Bin; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Xu-xia; Liu, Maili

    2012-01-01

    Detection and quantification of total choline-containing metabolites (CCMs) in tissues by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has received considerable attention as a biomarker of cancer. Tissue CCMs are mainly choline (Cho), phosphocholine (PCho), and glycerophosphocholine (GPCho). Because the methyl 1H resonances of tissue CCMs exhibit small chemical shift differences and overlap significantly in 1D 1H MRS, quantification of individual components is precluded. Development of a MRS method capably of resolving individual components of tissue CCMs would be a significant advance. Herein, a modification of the 2D 1H- 14N HSQC technique is targeted on the two methylene 1H in the CH 2O group ( 3J1H14N = 2.7 Hz) and applied to ex vivo mouse and human liver samples at physiological temperature (37 °C). Specifically, the 1H- 14N HSQC technique is modified into a 2D 1H- 14N three-bond correlation (HN3BC) experiment, which selectively detects the 1H of CH 2O coupled to 14N in CCMs. Separate signals from Cho, PCho, and GPCho components are resolved with high detection sensitivity. A 2D HN3BC spectrum can be recorded from mouse liver in only 1.5 min and from human carcinoma liver tissue in less than 3 min with effective sample volume of 0.2 ml at 14.1 T.

  4. Human development XIII: the connection between the structure of the overtone system and the tone language of music. Some implications for our understanding of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Ventegodt, Søren; Hermansen, Tyge Dahl; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2008-01-01

    The functioning brain behaves like one highly-structured, coherent, informational field. It can be popularly described as a "coherent ball of energy", making the idea of a local highly-structured quantum field that carries the consciousness very appealing. If that is so, the structure of the experience of music might be a quite unique window into a hidden quantum reality of the brain, and even of life itself. The structure of music is then a mirror of a much more complex, but similar, structure of the energetic field of the working brain. This paper discusses how the perception of music is organized in the human brain with respect to the known tone scales of major and minor. The patterns used by the brain seem to be similar to the overtones of vibrating matter, giving a positive experience of harmonies in major. However, we also like the minor scale, which can explain brain patterns as fractal-like, giving a symmetric "downward reflection" of the major scale into the minor scale. We analyze the implication of beautiful and ugly tones and harmonies for the model. We conclude that when it comes to simple perception of harmonies, the most simple is the most beautiful and the most complex is the most ugly, but in music, even the most disharmonic harmony can be beautiful, if experienced as a part of a dynamic release of musical tension. This can be taken as a general metaphor of painful, yet meaningful, and developing experiences in human life. PMID:18661052

  5. Modeling of collision-induced infrared absorption spectra of H2 pairs in the first overtone band at temperatures from 20 to 500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Chunguang; Borysow, Aleksandra

    1995-01-01

    A simple formalism is presented that permits quick computations of the low-resolution, rotovibrational collision-induced absorption (RV CIA) spectra of H2 pairs in the first overtone band of hydrogen, at temperatures from 20 to 500 K. These spectra account for the free-free transitions. The sharp dimer features, originating from the bound-free, free-bound, and bound-bound transitions are ignored, though their integrated intensities are properly accounted for. The method employs spectral model line- shapes with parameters computed from the three lowest spectral moments. The moments are obtained from first principles expressed as analytical functions of temperature. Except for the sharp dimer features, which are absent in this model, the computed spectra reproduce closely the results of exact quantum mechanical lineshape computations. Comparisons of the computed spectra with existing experimental data also show good agreement. The work interest for the modeling of the atmospheres of the outer planets in the near-infrared region of the spectrum. The user-friendly Fortran program developed here is available on request from the authors.

  6. Investigation of the C2H2-CO2 van der Waals complex in the overtone range using cw cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauzin, C.; Didriche, K.; Liévin, J.; Herman, M.; Perrin, A.

    2009-05-01

    A slit nozzle supersonic expansion containing acetylene [492 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP)] and carbon dioxide (740 SCCM) seeded into Ar (837 SCCM) is investigated using cw-cavity ring-down spectroscopy, in the 1.5 μm range. The C2H2-CO2 van der Waals complex is observed around the ν1+ν3 acetylenic band. The rotational temperature is estimated to be close to 60 K from the comparison between observed and simulated spectra. The analysis of the main, perturbed B-type band centered near 6 549.280 cm-1, is performed. It is attributed to a dimer with the known planar, C2v geometry. The present overtone data, involving ground state levels with higher J /K states (J ≤35 and Ka≤20) than previously reported, are combined to 3 μm data [D. G. Prichard, R. N. Nandi, J. S. Muenter, and B. J. Howard, J. Chem. Phys. 89, 1245 (1988); Z. S. Huang and R. E. Miller, Chem. Phys. 132, 185 (1989)] to determine improved ground state parameters. The major perturbations affecting the upper state are accounted for through C-type Coriolis resonances involving one dark state, whose symmetry must therefore be A1. Upper state constants are obtained for the bright and dark states. The dependence upon vibrational excitation is demonstrated to arise from excitation in the acetylene unit, only, for the former, but cannot be unravelled for the latter.

  7. Overtone-induced dissociation and isomerization dynamics of the hydroxymethyl radical (CH2OH and CD2OH). II. Velocity map imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Ryazanov, M; Rodrigo, C; Reisler, H

    2012-02-28

    The dissociation of the hydroxymethyl radical, CH(2)OH, and its isotopolog, CD(2)OH, following excitation in the 4ν(1) region (OH stretch overtone, near 13,600 cm(-1)) was studied using sliced velocity map imaging. A new vibrational band near 13,660 cm(-1) arising from interaction with the antisymmetric CH stretch was discovered for CH(2)OH. In CD(2)OH dissociation, D atom products (correlated with CHDO) were detected, providing the first experimental evidence of isomerization in the CH(2)OH ↔ CH(3)O (CD(2)OH ↔ CHD(2)O) system. Analysis of the H (D) fragment kinetic energy distributions shows that the rovibrational state distributions in the formaldehyde cofragments are different for the OH bond fission and isomerization pathways. Isomerization is responsible for 10%-30% of dissociation events in all studied cases, and its contribution depends on the excited vibrational level of the radical. Accurate dissociation energies were determined: D(0)(CH(2)OH → CH(2)O + H) = 10,160 ± 70 cm(-1), D(0)(CD(2)OH → CD(2)O + H) = 10,135 ± 70 cm(-1), D(0)(CD(2)OH → CHDO + D) = 10,760 ± 60 cm(-1). PMID:22380040

  8. Protein-Inhibitor Interaction Studies Using NMR

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    Solution-state NMR has been widely applied to determine the three-dimensional structure, dynamics, and molecular interactions of proteins. The designs of experiments used in protein NMR differ from those used for small-molecule NMR, primarily because the information available prior to an experiment, such as molecular mass and knowledge of the primary structure, is unique for proteins compared to small molecules. In this review article, protein NMR for structural biology is introduced with comparisons to small-molecule NMR, such as descriptions of labeling strategies and the effects of molecular dynamics on relaxation. Next, applications for protein NMR are reviewed, especially practical aspects for protein-observed ligand-protein interaction studies. Overall, the following topics are described: (1) characteristics of protein NMR, (2) methods to detect protein-ligand interactions by NMR, and (3) practical aspects of carrying out protein-observed inhibitor-protein interaction studies. PMID:26361636

  9. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  10. Push-through Direction Injectin NMR Automation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) are the two major spectroscopic techniques successfully used in metabolomics studies. The non-invasive, quantitative and reproducible characteristics make NMR spectroscopy an excellent technique for detection of endogeno...

  11. Deuterium Exchange Kinetics by NMR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a physical chemistry experiment which allows such concepts as kinetics, catalysis, isotope shifts, coupling constants, and the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for quantitative work to be covered in the same exercise. Background information, experimental procedures used, and typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  12. Petrophysical applications of NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, W.P.; Vinegar, H.J.

    1985-12-01

    A system for obtaining high-resolution NMR images of oil field cores is described. Separate proton density and T/sub 2/ relaxation images are obtained to distinguish spatial variations of fluid-filled porosity and the physical nature of the pores. Results are presented for typical sandstones.

  13. QUANTITATIVE 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Line intensities in 15N NMR spectra are strongly influenced by spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times, relaxation mechanisms and experimental conditions. Special care has to be taken in using 15N spectra for quantitative purposes. Quantitative aspects are discussed for the 1...

  14. THM determination of the 65 keV resonance strength intervening in the 17O ( p ,α)14N reaction rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; Burjan, S. V.; Cherubini, S.; Coc, A.; Gulino, M.; Hammache, F.; Hons, Z.; Irgaziev, B.; Kiss, G. G.; Kroha, V.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; de Séréville, N.; Somorjai, E.; Tumino, A.

    2015-02-01

    The 17O ( p ,α)14N reaction is of paramount importance for the nucleosynthesis in a number of stellar sites, including red giants (RG), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, massive stars and classical novae. We report on the indirect study of the 17O ( p ,α)14N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach recently developed for extracting the resonance strength of the narrow resonance at Ec.m.R = 65 keV (EX =5.673 MeV). The strength of the 65 keV resonance in the 17O ( p ,α)14N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the 17O + p radiative capture channel.

  15. Energy loss effect on color center creation in LiF crystals under irradiation with 12C, 14N, 40Ar, 84Kr, and 130Xe ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauletbekova, A.; Schwartz, K.; Sorokin, M. V.; Baizhumanov, M.; Akilbekov, A.; Zdorovets, M.

    2015-09-01

    Color center creation in LiF crystals irradiated with 12C, 14N, 40Ar, 84Kr, and 130Xe MeV ions were studied as a function of the absorbed energy (fluence). For light ions (12C, 14N) the saturation of single F centers takes place at higher absorbed energy (5 × 1023 eV/cm3) than that for 40Ar, 84Kr and 130Xe ions (∼1023 eV/cm3). The saturation concentration of F centers for 12C and 14N (2 × 1019 cm-3) is twice of that for the heavier ions. Further irradiation with light ions decreases concentration of F centers, presumably due to aggregation, whereas for heavy ions the saturation concentration remains approximately the same that can be explained by much stronger recombination losses within single tracks.

  16. Extrapolation of astrophysical S factors for the reaction {sup 14}N((p, {gamma}) {sup 15}O to near-zero energies

    SciTech Connect

    Artemov, S. V.; Igamov, S. B. Tursunmakhatov, Q. I.; Yarmukhamedov, R.

    2012-03-15

    The astrophysical S factors for the radiative-capture reaction {sup 14}N(p, {gamma}){sup 15}O in the region of ultralow energies were calculated on the basis of the R-matrix approach. The values of the radiative and protonic widths were fitted to new experimental data. The contribution of direct radiative capture to bound states of the {sup 15}O nucleus was determined with the aid of asymptotic normalization coefficients, whose values were refined in the present study on the basis of the results obtained from an analysis of the reaction {sup 14}N({sup 3}He, d){sup 15}O at three different energies of incident helium ions. A value of S(0) = 1.79 {+-} 0.31 keV b was obtained for the total astrophysical S factor, and the reaction rate was determined for the process {sup 14}N(p, {gamma}){sup 15}O.

  17. THM determination of the 65 keV resonance strength intervening in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction rate

    SciTech Connect

    Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Burjan, S. V.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Coc, A.; Hammache, F.; Irgaziev, B.; Kiss, G. G.; Somorjai, E.; Lamia, L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; and others

    2015-02-24

    The {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction is of paramount importance for the nucleosynthesis in a number of stellar sites, including red giants (RG), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, massive stars and classical novae. We report on the indirect study of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach recently developed for extracting the resonance strength of the narrow resonance at E{sub c.m.}{sup R} = 65 keV (E{sub X} =5.673 MeV). The strength of the 65 keV resonance in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the {sup 17}O+p radiative capture channel.

  18. Resonance strengths in the {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O and {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marta, Michele; Trompler, Erik; Bemmerer, Daniel; Beyer, Roland; Grosse, Eckart; Hannaske, Roland; Junghans, Arnd R.; Nair, Chithra; Schwengner, Ronald; Wagner, Andreas; Yakorev, Dmitry; Broggini, Carlo; Caciolli, Antonio; Erhard, Martin; Menegazzo, Roberto; Fueloep, Zsolt; Gyuerky, Gyoergy; Szuecs, Tamas; Vezzu, Simone

    2010-05-15

    The {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O reaction is the slowest reaction of the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen cycle of hydrogen burning in stars. As a consequence, it determines the rate of the cycle. The {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C reaction is frequently used in inverse kinematics for hydrogen depth profiling in materials. The {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O and {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C reactions have been studied simultaneously, using titanium nitride targets of natural isotopic composition and a proton beam. The strengths of the resonances at E{sub p} = 1058 keV in {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O and at E{sub p} = 897 and 430 keV in {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C have been determined with improved precision, relative to the well-known resonance at E{sub p} = 278 keV in {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O. The new recommended values are omegagamma=0.353+-0.018, 362+-20, and 21.9+-1.0 eV for their respective strengths. In addition, the branching ratios for the decay of the E{sub p} = 1058 keV resonance in {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O have been redetermined. The data reported here should facilitate future studies of off-resonant capture in the {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O reaction that are needed for an improved R-matrix extrapolation of the cross section. In addition, the data on the 430 keV resonance in {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C may be useful for hydrogen depth profiling.

  19. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  20. Solution NMR of large molecules and assemblies†

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Mark P.; McElroy, Craig A.; Amero, Carlos D.

    2008-01-01

    Solution NMR spectroscopy represents a powerful tool for examining the structure and function of biological macromolecules. The advent of multidimensional (2D–4D) NMR, together with the widespread use of uniform isotopic labeling of proteins and RNA with the NMR-active isotopes, 15N and 13C, opened the door to detailed analyses of macromolecular structure, dynamics and interactions of smaller macromolecules (< ~25 kDa). Over the past 10 years, advances in NMR and isotope labeling methods have expanded the range of NMR-tractable targets by at least an order of magnitude. Here we briefly describe the methodological advances that allow NMR spectroscopy of large macromolecules and their complexes, and provide a perspective on the wide range of applications of NMR to biochemical problems. PMID:17209543

  1. First direct measurement of the 11C (α ,p )14N stellar reaction by an extended thick-target method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, S.; Kubono, S.; Kahl, D.; Yamaguchi, H.; Binh, D. N.; Hashimoto, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; He, J. J.; Iwasa, N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Teranishi, T.

    2016-06-01

    The 11C(α,p ) 14N reaction is an important α -induced reaction competing with β -limited hydrogen-burning processes in high-temperature explosive stars. We directly measured its reaction cross sections both for the ground-state transition (α ,p0) and the excited-state transitions (α ,p1) and (α ,p2) at relevant stellar energies 1.3-4.5 MeV by an extended thick-target method featuring time of flight for the first time. We revised the reaction rate by numerical integration including the (α ,p1) and (α ,p2) contributions and also low-lying resonances of (α ,p0) using both the present and the previous experimental data which were totally neglected in the previous compilation works. The present total reaction rate lies between the previous (α ,p0) rate and the total rate of the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model calculation, which is consistent with the relevant explosive hydrogen-burning scenarios such as the ν p process.

  2. The Fundamental Quadrupole Band of (14)N2: Line Positions from High-Resolution Stratospheric Solar Absorption Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Zander, R.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Grunson, M. R.; Farmer, C. B.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to report accurate measurements of the positions of O- and S-branch lines of the (1-0) vibration-rotation quadrupole band of molecular nitrogen ((14)N2) and improved Dunham coefficients derived from a simultaneous least-squares analysis of these measurements and selected infrared and far infrared data taken from the literature. The new measurements have been derived from stratospheric solar occultation spectra recorded with Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) instruments operated at unapodized spectral resolutions of 0.002 and 0.01 /cm. The motivation for the present investigation is the need for improved N2 line parameters for use in IR atmospheric remote sensing investigations. The S branch of the N2 (1-0) quadrupole band is ideal for calibrating the line-of-sight airmasses of atmospheric spectra since the strongest lines are well placed in an atmospheric window, their absorption is relatively insensitive to temperature and is moderately strong (typical line center depths of 10 to 50% in high-resolution ground-based solar spectra and in lower stratospheric solar occultation spectra), and the volume mixing ratio of nitrogen is constant in the atmosphere and well known. However, a recent investigation has'shown the need to improve the accuracies of the N2 fine positions, intensities, air-broadened half-widths, and their temperature dependences to fully exploit this calibration capability (1). The present investigation addresses the problem of improving the accuracy of the N2 line positions.

  3. Radiative Neutron Capture on 9Be, 14C, 14N, 15N and 16O at Thermal and Astrophysical Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, Sergey; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, Albert; Afanasyeva, Nadezhda

    2013-10-01

    The total cross-sections of the radiative neutron capture processes on 9Be, 14C, 14N, 15N and 16O are described in the framework of the modified potential cluster model with the classification of orbital states according to Young tableaux. The continued interest in the study of these reactions is due, on the one hand, to the important role played by this process in the analysis of many fundamental properties of nuclei and nuclear reactions, and, on the other hand, to the wide use of the capture cross-section data in the various applications of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics, and, also, to the importance of the analysis of primordial nucleosynthesis in the Universe. This article is devoted to the description of results for the processes of the radiative neutron capture on certain light atomic nuclei at thermal and astrophysical energies. The considered capture reactions are not part of stellar thermonuclear cycles, but involve in the reaction chains of inhomogeneous Big Bang models.

  4. 15N/14N variations in Cretaceous Atlantic sedimentary sequences: implication for past changes in marine nitrogen biogeochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rau, G.H.; Arthur, M.A.; Dean, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    At two locations in the Atlantic Ocean (DSDP Sites 367 and 530) early to middle Cretaceous organic-carbon-rich beds ("black shales") were found to have significantly lower ??15N values (lower 15N/14N ratios) than adjacent organic-carbon-poor beds (white limestones or green claystones). While these lithologies are of marine origin, the black strata in particular have ??15N values that are significantly lower than those previously found in the marine sediment record and most contemporary marine nitrogen pools. In contrast, black, organic-carbon-rich beds at a third site (DSDP Site 603) contain predominantly terrestrial organic matter and have C- and N-isotopic compositions similar to organic matter of modern terrestrial origin. The recurring 15N depletion in the marine-derived Cretaceous sequences prove that the nitrogen they contain is the end result of an episodic and atypical biogeochemistry. Existing isotopic and other data indicate that the low 15N relative abundance is the consequence of pelagic rather than post-depositional processes. Reduced ocean circulation, increased denitrification, and, hence, reduced euphotic zone nitrate availability may have led to Cretaceous phytoplankton assemblages that were periodically dominated by N2-fixing blue-green algae, a possible source of this sediment 15N-depletion. Lack of parallel isotopic shifts in Cretaceous terrestrially-derived nitrogen (Site 603) argues that the above change in nitrogen cycling during this period did not extend beyond the marine environment. ?? 1987.

  5. INVESTIGATION OF MOLECULAR CLOUD STRUCTURE AROUND INFRARED BUBBLES: CARMA OBSERVATIONS OF N14, N22, AND N74

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Reid A.

    2012-11-20

    We present CARMA observations in 3.3 mm continuum and several molecular lines of the surroundings of N14, N22, and N74, three infrared bubbles from the GLIMPSE catalog. We have discovered 28 compact continuum sources and confirmed their associations with the bubbles using velocity information from HCO{sup +} and HCN. We have also mapped small-scale structures of N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission in the vicinity of the bubbles. By combining our data with survey data from GLIMPSE, MIPSGAL, BGPS, and MAGPIS, we establish about half of our continuum sources as star-forming cores. We also use survey data with the velocity information from our molecular line observations to describe the morphology of the bubbles and the nature of the fragmentation. We conclude from the properties of the continuum sources that N74 likely is at the near kinematic distance, which was previously unconfirmed. We also present tentative evidence of molecular clouds being more fragmented on bubble rims compared to dark clouds, suggesting that triggered star formation may occur, though our findings do not conform to a classic collect-and-collapse model.

  6. Differentiation of Pigment in Eggs Using Carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and Nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) Stable Isotopes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Feng M; Shi, Guang Y; Wang, Hui W

    2016-07-01

    Consumers prefer natural and healthy food, but artificial pigments are often abused in egg products. The study aimed at differentiating the origin of pigments in eggs by applying the technique of carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) stable isotope analysis. Five hundred sixty laying hens were randomly distributed into 14 treatments, which were divided into four groups: maize, carophyll red pigment, carophyll yellow pigment, and a mixture of carophyll red and yellow pigments. Eggs were collected and pretreated to determe the values of the Roche Yolk Color Fan (RCF), δ(13)C, and δ(15)N. With increasing maize content, the RCF and δ(13)C values of yolks increased. Moreover, the RCF values in the three pigment groups were significantly influenced by the artificial colors, but δ(13)C values were not significantly different, regardless of the existence of pigment. The δ(15)N values in all treatments did not vary as regularly as the carbon stable isotope. A strong positive correlation was found between RCF and δ(13)C in the maize group, but no such correlation was be observed in the pigment groups. It is concluded that carbon stable isotope ratio analysis (δ(13)C) of the yolk can be used to differentiate the origin of the pigment added to eggs. PMID:27302905

  7. Two-dimensional NMR spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, T.C.

    1987-06-01

    This article is the second in a two-part series. In part one (ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, May 15) the authors discussed one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and some relatively advanced nuclear spin gymnastics experiments that provide a capability for selective sensitivity enhancements. In this article and overview and some applications of two-dimensional NMR experiments are presented. These powerful experiments are important complements to the one-dimensional experiments. As in the more sophisticated one-dimensional experiments, the two-dimensional experiments involve three distinct time periods: a preparation period, t/sub 0/; an evolution period, t/sub 1/; and a detection period, t/sub 2/.

  8. NMR investigation of Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kwanghyo; Jang, Zeehoon

    2013-01-01

    109Ag nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and relaxation measurements have been performed on two powder samples of Ag nanoparticles with average sizes of 20 nm and 80 nm. The measurements have been done in an external field of 9.4 T and in the temperature range 10 K < T < 280 K. The 109Ag NMR spectra for both samples have close to Lorentzian shapes and turn out to be mixtures of homogeneous and inhomogeneous lines. The linewidth Δ ν at room temperature is 1.3 kHz for both samples and gradually increases with decreasing temperature. Both the Knight shift ( K) and the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/ T 1) are observed to be almost identical to the values reported for the bulk Ag metal, whereby the Korringa ratio R(= K 2 T 1 T/S) is found to be 2.0 for both samples in the investigated temperature range.

  9. REDOR NMR for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-01-01

    Rotational-Echo DOuble-Resonance (REDOR) NMR is a powerful and versatile solid-state NMR measurement that has been recruited to elucidate drug modes of action and to drive the design of new therapeutics. REDOR has been implemented to examine composition, structure, and dynamics in diverse macromolecular and whole-cell systems, including taxol-bound microtubules, enzyme-cofactor-inhibitor ternary complexes, and antibiotic-whole-cell complexes. The REDOR approach involves the integrated design of specific isotopic labeling strategies and the selection of appropriate REDOR experiments. By way of example, this digest illustrates the versatility of the REDOR approach, with an emphasis on the practical considerations of experimental design and data interpretation. PMID:24035486

  10. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-11-15

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10{sup −9} at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10{sup −11} τ{sup −1/2} up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  11. NMR Hyperpolarization Techniques for Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Goodson, Boyd M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in NMR hyperpolarization have enabled a wide array of new in vivo molecular imaging modalities—ranging from functional imaging of the lungs to metabolic imaging of cancer. This Concept article explores selected advances in methods for the preparation and use of hyperpolarized contrast agents, many of which are already at or near the phase of their clinical validation in patients. PMID:25470566

  12. Measurement of deformations by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytchenkoff, Dimitri; Rodts, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Two NMR data acquisition protocols together with corresponding data processing algorithms for locating macroscopic objects, measuring distances between them or monitoring their displacements or deformations with microscopic precision are presented and discussed. The performance of the methods is demonstrated by applying them to the measurement of deformations of a freely supported beam under loading. We believe that our methods will find their applications in mechanics, civil engineering and medicine.

  13. Hyperpolarized 131Xe NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stupic, Karl F.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 131Xe with up to 2.2% spin polarization (i.e., 5000-fold signal enhancement at 9.4 T) was obtained after separation from the rubidium vapor of the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process. The SEOP was applied for several minutes in a stopped-flow mode, and the fast, quadrupolar-driven T1 relaxation of this spin I = 3/2 noble gas isotope required a rapid subsequent rubidium removal and swift transfer into the high magnetic field region for NMR detection. Because of the xenon density dependent 131Xe quadrupolar relaxation in the gas phase, the SEOP polarization build-up exhibits an even more pronounced dependence on xenon partial pressure than that observed in 129Xe SEOP. 131Xe is the only stable noble gas isotope with a positive gyromagnetic ratio and shows therefore a different relative phase between hp signal and thermal signal compared to all other noble gases. The gas phase 131Xe NMR spectrum displays a surface and magnetic field dependent quadrupolar splitting that was found to have additional gas pressure and gas composition dependence. The splitting was reduced by the presence of water vapor that presumably influences xenon-surface interactions. The hp 131Xe spectrum shows differential line broadening, suggesting the presence of strong adsorption sites. Beyond hp 131Xe NMR spectroscopy studies, a general equation for the high temperature, thermal spin polarization, P, for spin I⩾1/2 nuclei is presented. PMID:21051249

  14. FOURIER TRANSFORM EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY OF THE A {sup 2}{Pi}-X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} (RED) SYSTEM OF {sup 13}C{sup 14}N

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, R. S.; Bernath, P. F.; Wallace, L.; Hinkle, K.

    2010-06-15

    Emission spectra of the A {sup 2{Pi}}-X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} transition (red system) of {sup 13}C{sup 14}N have been measured in the 4000-15,000 cm{sup -1} region using the Fourier transform spectrometer associated with the McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope of the National Solar Observatory. The {sup 13}C{sup 14}N free radical was produced in microwave discharge of a mixture of {sup 13}CH{sub 4} and {sup 14}N{sub 2}. Rotational analysis of 22 vibrational bands involving vibrational levels up to v' = 8 and v'' = 5 of the excited and ground states has been obtained and much improved spectroscopic constants have been determined. An experimental line list and calculated term values are provided. The results of the present analysis are useful for the identification of {sup 13}C{sup 14}N lines in late-type stars in the red and near-infrared spectral regions.

  15. Calculating (14)N(16)O2 spectral line parameters in an infrared range: A comparison of "global" and "local" effective operator methods.

    PubMed

    Voitsekhovskaya, O K; Egorov, O V; Kashirskii, D E

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen dioxide, (14)N(16)O2, line positions and intensities calculated by us based on a "local" effective operator method are compared to the recent results of the "global" calculation. The comparison was made for theoretical absorption coefficients in the spectral range of 600-3700cm(-1) using the measured data taken from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In order to conduct the calculations, empirical parameters of the effective rotational Hamiltonian of the twenty-one vibrational states were applied from the most recent experimental works. The second order parameters of the dipole moment function of (14)N(16)O2 were determined for the first time. The "local" line list in this research consists of one hundred and four bands and includes the line intensities of the v1+v2+v3 band of (14)N(16)O2 that have not yet been investigated in the literature. Among these bands, only eleven bands are included in HITRAN2012. The reasons behind the disagreements between the theoretical and measured absorption coefficients of (14)N(16)O2 are discussed. PMID:27111152

  16. Calculating 14N16O2 spectral line parameters in an infrared range: A comparison of "global" and "local" effective operator methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsekhovskaya, O. K.; Egorov, O. V.; Kashirskii, D. E.

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen dioxide, 14N16O2, line positions and intensities calculated by us based on a "local" effective operator method are compared to the recent results of the "global" calculation. The comparison was made for theoretical absorption coefficients in the spectral range of 600-3700 cm- 1 using the measured data taken from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In order to conduct the calculations, empirical parameters of the effective rotational Hamiltonian of the twenty-one vibrational states were applied from the most recent experimental works. The second order parameters of the dipole moment function of 14N16O2 were determined for the first time. The "local" line list in this research consists of one hundred and four bands and includes the line intensities of the v1 + v2 + v3 band of 14N16O2 that have not yet been investigated in the literature. Among these bands, only eleven bands are included in HITRAN2012. The reasons behind the disagreements between the theoretical and measured absorption coefficients of 14N16O2 are discussed.

  17. The 17O(p,α)14N reaction measurement via the Trojan horse method and its application to 17O nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; Pizzone, R. G.; Burjan, S. V.; Cherubini, S.; Coc, A.; Gulino, M.; Hammache, F.; Hons, Z.; Irgaziev, B.; Kiss, G. G.; Kroha, V.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; de Séréville, N.; Somorjai, E.; Tumino, A.

    2014-05-01

    The role of oxygen in astrophysics is related to different problems as novae nucleosynthesis and gamma-ray astronomy. In particular, owing to the still present uncertainties on its rate, the 17O(p,α)14N is one of the most important reaction to be studied in order to get more information about the fate of oxygen in different astrophysical scenarios.

  18. Genome Sequence of a Novel H14N7 Subtype Influenza A Virus Isolated from a Blue-Winged Teal (Anas discors) Harvested in Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Ramey, Andrew M; Reeves, Andrew B; Poulson, Rebecca L; Carter, Deborah L; Davis-Fields, Nicholas; Stallknecht, David E

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a novel H14N7 subtype influenza A virus (IAV) isolated from a blue-winged teal (Anas discors) harvested in Texas, USA. The genomic characteristics of this IAV strain with a previously undetected subtype combination suggest recent viral evolution within the New World wild-bird IAV reservoir. PMID:27284136

  19. Genome Sequence of a Novel H14N7 Subtype Influenza A Virus Isolated from a Blue-Winged Teal (Anas discors) Harvested in Texas, USA

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Andrew B.; Poulson, Rebecca L.; Carter, Deborah L.; Davis-Fields, Nicholas; Stallknecht, David E.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a novel H14N7 subtype influenza A virus (IAV) isolated from a blue-winged teal (Anas discors) harvested in Texas, USA. The genomic characteristics of this IAV strain with a previously undetected subtype combination suggest recent viral evolution within the New World wild-bird IAV reservoir. PMID:27284136

  20. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm2 silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  1. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips.

    PubMed

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-08-19

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm(2) silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  2. Advanced NMR technology for bioscience and biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Hernandez, G.; Trewhella, J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Boumenthal, D.K.; Kennedy, M.A.; Moore, G.J.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). NMR plays critical roles in bioscience and biotechnology in both imaging and structure determination. NMR is limited, however, by the inherent low sensitivity of the NMR experiment and the demands for spectral resolution required to study biomolecules. The authors addressed both of these issues by working on the development of NMR force microscopy for molecular imaging, and high field NMR with isotope labeling to overcome limitations in the size of biomolecules that can be studied using NMR. A novel rf coil design for NMR force microscopy was developed that increases the limits of sensitivity in magnetic resonance detection for imaging, and the authors demonstrated sub-surface spatial imaging capabilities. The authors also made advances in the miniaturization of two critical NMR force microscope components. They completed high field NMR and isotope labeling studies of a muscle protein complex which is responsible for regulating muscle contraction and is too large for study using conventional NMR approaches.

  3. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. We propose to investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 2}H{sub 2}, {sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}, {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and the pore surfaces in coals. These molecules have been selected for their chemical and physical properties.

  4. Trophic guilds of generalist feeders in soil animal communities as indicated by stable isotope analysis (15N/14N).

    PubMed

    Oelbermann, K; Scheu, S

    2010-10-01

    We investigated if the commonly used aggregation of organisms into trophic guilds, such as detritivores and predators, in fact represent distinct trophic levels. Soil arthropods of a forest-meadow transect were ascribed a priori to trophic guilds (herbivores, detritivores, predators and necrovores), which are often used as an equivalent to trophic levels. We analysed natural variations in 15N/14N ratios of the animals in order to investigate the trophic similarity of organisms within (a priori defined) trophic guilds. Using trophic guilds as an equivalent to trophic level, the assumed stepwise enrichment of 15N by 3.4 per thousand per trophic level did not apply to detritivores; they were only enriched in 15N by on average 1.5 per thousand compared to litter materials. Predators on average were enriched in 15N by 3.5 per thousand compared to detritivores. Within detritvores and predators delta15N signatures varied markedly, indicating that these trophic guilds are dominated by generalist feeders which form a gradient of organisms feeding on different resources. The results indicate that commonly used trophic guilds, in particular detritivores and predators, do not represent trophic levels but consist of subguilds, i.e. subsets of organisms differing in resource utilization. In particular, in soil and litter food webs where trophic level omnivory is common, the use of distinct trophic levels may be inappropriate. Guilds of species delineated by natural variations of stable isotope ratios are assumed to more adequately represent the structure of litter and soil food webs allowing a more detailed understanding of their functioning. PMID:20109270

  5. Target mass dependence of neutron emission in collisions with 35 MeV/nucleon /sup 14/N ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, A.; Deak, F.; Seres, Z.; Caskey, G.; Galonsky, A.; Heilbronn, L.; Remington, B.

    1988-07-01

    Energy and angular distributions of neutrons emitted from collisions of 35 MeV/nucleon /sup 14/N ions with carbon, nickel, and holmium nuclei were measured. The neutrons were in coincidence with Li, Be, B, or C fragments at angles from 7/sup 0/ to 23/sup 0/ in the plane of the neutron detectors and at 15/sup 0/ out of this plane. Using fragment velocity bins of width corresponding to E/A = 7 MeV, we find the shapes of the neutron spectra above 15 MeV to be similar for the different targets for a given coincident fragment species, velocity bin, and angle. The cross sections are discussed in terms of moving thermal sources. In all cases the velocity and temperature parameters of the intermediate rapidity source are consistent with E/A = 8.5 +- 2.5 MeV and T = 9 +- 2.5 MeV, respectively. In agreement with a simple stripping-pickup model, the associated neutron multiplicities of this source decrease approximately linearly with the velocity of the coincident light fragments for fragment angles less than or equal to15/sup 0/. Using the model to compute the mass of the source, we find that, with some fluctuations, these multiplicities are proportional to the mass. Also, the linear relationship is approximately the same for the three targets. The temperature parameters of the target-like source are between 1 and 3.5 MeV for all three targets, while the associated neutron multiplicities increase considerably with target mass. For colinear neutron-fragment coincidences for a given projectile-like isotope, the neutron multiplicities associated with the projectile-like source are about the same for all three targets, indicating that the average excitations of the parent fragments are similar.

  6. Methyl quantum tunneling and nitrogen-14 NQR NMR studies using a SQUID magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Black, B.E. |

    1993-07-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques have been very successful in obtaining molecular conformation and dynamics information. Unfortunately, standard NMR and NQR spectrometers are unable to adequately detect resonances below a few megahertz due to the frequency dependent sensitivity of their Faraday coil detectors. For this reason a new spectrometer with a dc SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) detector, which has no such frequency dependence, has been developed. Previously, this spectrometer was used to observe {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al NQR resonances. The scope of this study was increased to include {sup 23}Na, {sup 51}V, and {sup 55}Mn NQR transitions. Also, a technique was presented to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances through cross relaxation of the nitrogen polarization to adjacent proton spins. When the proton Zeeman splitting matches one nitrogen quadrupoler transition the remaining two {sup 14}N transitions can be detected by sweeping a saturating rf field through resonance. Additionally, simultaneous excitation of two nitrogen resonances provides signal enhancement which helps to connect transitions from the same site. In this way, nitrogen-14 resonances were observed in several amino acids and polypeptides. This spectrometer has also been useful in the direct detection of methyl quantum tunneling splittings at 4.2 K. Tunneling, frequencies of a homologous series of carboxylic acids were measured and for solids with equivalent crystal structures, an exponential correlation between the tunneling frequency and the enthalpy of fusion is observed. This correlation provides information about the contribution of intermolecular interactions to the energy barrier for methyl rotation.

  7. Development of LC-13C NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, H. C.; Wang, J. S.; Glass, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    This study involves the development of C-13 nuclear resonance as an on-line detector for liquid chromatography (LC-C-13 NMR) for the chemical characterization of aviation fuels. The initial focus of this study was the development of a high sensitivity flow C-13 NMR probe. Since C-13 NMR sensitivity is of paramount concern, considerable effort during the first year was directed at new NMR probe designs. In particular, various toroid coil designs were examined. In addition, corresponding shim coils for correcting the main magnetic field (B sub 0) homogeneity were examined. Based on these initial probe design studies, an LC-C-13 NMR probe was built and flow C-13 NMR data was obtained for a limited number of samples.

  8. Pseudogap in Fe2VGa: NMR evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, C. S.; Ross, Joseph H.

    2001-02-01

    We report the results of a 51V and 69Ga nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of Fe2VGa at temperatures between 4 and 450 K. The presence of magnetic antisite defects is deduced from the NMR linewidth, which displays a Curie-law temperature dependence. The absence of associated NMR shifts indicates the material to be intrinsically nonmagnetic. At low temperatures the NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate exhibits Korringa behavior, indicating a small carrier density at the Fermi level. At elevated temperatures, the Knight shifts and NMR relaxation rates go over to a thermally activated response, a semiconductor-like behavior. These results are consistent with pseudogap features identified by recent band structure calculations. The Fermi level density of states deduced from NMR is considerably smaller than given by the specific heat coefficient, γ. The electronic properties are compared to the isostructural semimetal Fe2VAl.

  9. Applications of NMR in Dairy Research

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Anthony D.; Rochfort, Simone J.

    2014-01-01

    NMR is a robust analytical technique that has been employed to investigate the properties of many substances of agricultural relevance. NMR was first used to investigate the properties of milk in the 1950s and has since been employed in a wide range of studies; including properties analysis of specific milk proteins to metabolomics techniques used to monitor the health of dairy cows. In this brief review, we highlight the different uses of NMR in the dairy industry. PMID:24958391

  10. Hyphenated low-field NMR techniques: combining NMR with NIR, GPC/SEC and rheometry.

    PubMed

    Räntzsch, Volker; Wilhelm, Manfred; Guthausen, Gisela

    2016-06-01

    Hyphenated low-field NMR techniques are promising characterization methods for online process analytics and comprehensive offline studies of soft materials. By combining different analytical methods with low-field NMR, information on chemical and physical properties can be correlated with molecular dynamics and complementary chemical information. In this review, we present three hyphenated low-field NMR techniques: a combination of near-infrared spectroscopy and time-domain NMR (TD-NMR) relaxometry, online (1) H-NMR spectroscopy measured directly after size exclusion chromatographic (SEC, also known as GPC) separation and a combination of rheometry and TD-NMR relaxometry for highly viscous materials. Case studies are reviewed that underline the possibilities and challenges of the different hyphenated low-field NMR methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25854997

  11. Probing surface interactions by combining NMR cryoporometry and NMR relaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J.; Stark, S. C.; Strange, J. H.

    2005-06-01

    To further expand on the understanding of surface interactions at the liquid/solid interface on pore walls, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques of cryoporometry and relaxometry have been combined. The combination of these techniques allows variations in NMR relaxation parameters from pore surface to volume ratio changes and from surface interaction changes to be distinguished. By studying a range of sol-gel silicas from two different sources, it was noted that the relaxation time measurements were not consistent with the pore diameters determined by cryoporometry and N2 gas adsorption. Instead distinctly different relaxivity constants were determined for each absorbate in each of the two brands of silica. It was clear that the relaxation times were modified by more than just the pore geometry. Independent experiments on the two brands of silica suggested that the relaxometry results were heavily influenced by the concentration of paramagnetic relaxation centres in the silica gels. The strength of surface interaction, and hence surface affinity, was seen to depend on the liquid in the pores. Using this difference in surface affinities, binary mixtures of alkanes placed in sol-gel silicas were separated via preferential absorption and their components identified using cryoporometry, whereas the components could not be distinguished in the bulk liquid.

  12. Spin-Exchange-Pumped NMR Gyros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. G.; Larsen, M. S.

    We present the basic theory governing spin-exchange pumped NMR gyros. We review the basic physics of spin-exchange collisions and relaxation as they pertain to precision NMR. We present a simple model of operation as an NMR oscillator and use it to analyze the dynamic response and noise properties of the oscillator. We discuss the primary systematic errors (differential alkali fields, quadrupole shifts, and offset drifts) that limit the bias stability, and discuss methods to minimize them. We give with a brief overview of a practical implementation and performance of an NMR gyro built by Northrop-Grumman Corporation, and conclude with some comments about future prospects.

  13. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, A.

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  14. Solid-state NMR and Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2015-01-01

    The native environment for a membrane protein is a phospholipid bilayer. Because the protein is immobilized on NMR timescales by the interactions within a bilayer membrane, solid-state NMR methods are essential to obtain high-resolution spectra. Approaches have been developed for both unoriented and oriented samples, however, they all rest on the foundation of the most fundamental aspects solid-state NMR, and the chemical shift and homo- and hetero-nuclear dipole-dipole interactions. Solid-state NMR has advanced sufficiently to enable the structures of membrane proteins to be determined under near-native conditions in phospholipid bilayers. PMID:25681966

  15. NMR exposure sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ghibelli, L; Cerella, C; Cordisco, S; Clavarino, G; Marazzi, S; De Nicola, M; Nuccitelli, S; D'Alessio, M; Magrini, A; Bergamaschi, A; Guerrisi, V; Porfiri, L M

    2006-03-01

    NMR technology has dramatically contributed to the revolution of image diagnostic. NMR apparatuses use combinations of microwaves over a homogeneous strong (1 Tesla) static magnetic field. We had previously shown that low intensity (0.3-66 mT) static magnetic fields deeply affect apoptosis in a Ca2+ dependent fashion (Fanelli et al., 1999 FASEBJ., 13;95-102). The rationale of the present study is to examine whether exposure to the static magnetic fields of NMR can affect apoptosis induced on reporter tumor cells of haematopoietic origin. The impressive result was the strong increase (1.8-2.5 fold) of damage-induced apoptosis by NMR. This potentiation is due to cytosolic Ca2+ overload consequent to NMR-promoted Ca2+ influx, since it is prevented by intracellular (BAPTA-AM) and extracellular (EGTA) Ca2+ chelation or by inhibition of plasma membrane L-type Ca2+ channels. Three-days follow up of treated cultures shows that NMR decrease long term cell survival, thus increasing the efficiency of cytocidal treatments. Importantly, mononuclear white blood cells are not sensitised to apoptosis by NMR, showing that NMR may increase the differential cytotoxicity of antitumor drugs on tumor vs normal cells. This strong, differential potentiating effect of NMR on tumor cell apoptosis may have important implications, being in fact a possible adjuvant for antitumor therapies. PMID:16528477

  16. 1-D Imaging of the Dynamical Atmosphere of the Red Supergiant Betelgeuse in the CO First Overtone Lines with VLTI/AMBER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.

    2014-09-01

    We present high-spatial and high-spectral resolution observations of the red supergiant Betelgeuse in the CO first overtone lines near 2.3μm with the AMBER instrument at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). Our AMBER observations in 2008 spatially resolved the gas motions in a stellar atmosphere (photosphere and extended molecular outer atmosphere) for the first time other than the Sun. From our second observations one year later, we have reconstructed 1-D images in the individual CO lines with an angular resolution of 9.8 mas and a spectral resolution of 6000 by applying the self-calibration technique to restore the Fourier phase from the differential phase measurements. The reconstructed 1-D images reveal that the star appears different in the blue and red wing of the individual CO lines. In the blue wing, the star shows a pronounced, asymmetrically extended component at least up to 1.3 R⋆, while such a component does not appear in the red wing 1-D image. This can be explained by a model in which the CO gas patch (or clump) more than half as large as the star is moving slightly outward with 0-5 km s-1, while the gas in the remaining region is infalling fast with 20-30 km s-1. Comparison between the CO line data taken in 2008 and 2009 shows a significant time variation in the dynamics of the photosphere and outer atmosphere. However, the 1-D images in the continuum show only a slight deviation from a limb-darkened disk with an angular diameter of 42.49±0.06 mas, which leads to an effective temperature of 3690± 54 K. Moreover, the continuum data taken in 2008 and 2009 reveal no or only marginal time variations, much smaller than the maximum variation predicted by the current 3-D convection simulation. The derived continuum diameter also shows that the near-IR size of Betelgeuse has been nearly constant over the last 18 years, in marked contrast to the recently reported noticeable decrease in the mid-IR size.

  17. Probing Heat Transfer Through Infrared (IR), Near-IR, and Visible Spectroscopy of Lattice Modes, Overtones, Hydrogen Species, and Electronic Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, A. M.

    2006-05-01

    between the constituent grains down the temperature gradient. This process can only be quantified from absorption spectra as function of T and P simultaneously. Such data are not available. However, using available data in a revised spectroscopic model that accounts for grain size and interface reflections (Hofmeister 2004 PEPI; 2005 J. Geodynamics) reveals that near-IR absorbance, which is governed by overtones of Si-O vibrations, many types of O-H vibrations, and low-lying electronic transitions of Fe2+, largely controls krad,dif in the upper mantle, whereas electronic absorptions in visible and UV regions are important for the lower mantle. Advancing our understanding of deep mantle heat transfer calls for absorption spectroscopy over a wide spectral range at simultaneously high T and P.

  18. Analytical Applications of NMR: Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stuart A.

    1982-01-01

    Highlights a symposium on analytical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), discussing pulse Fourier transformation technique, two-dimensional NMR, solid state NMR, and multinuclear NMR. Includes description of ORACLE, an NMR data processing system at Syracuse University using real-time color graphics, and algorithms for…

  19. Access to NMR Spectroscopy for Two-Year College Students: The NMR Site at Trinity University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Nancy S.; Shanklin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Students at two-year colleges and small four-year colleges have often obtained their exposure to NMR spectroscopy through "canned" spectra because the cost of an NMR spectrometer, particularly a high-field spectrometer, is prohibitive in these environments. This article describes the design of a NMR site at Trinity University in which spectral…

  20. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  1. Picoliter H-1 NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R. ); Wind, Robert A. )

    2002-02-01

    A RF probe that fits inside the bore of a small gradient coil package is described for routine 1H-NMR microscopy measurements on small samples. The probe operates at 500 MHz and houses a 267-um-diameter solenoid transceiver. When used in three dimensional chemical shift imaging (3D-CSI) experiments, the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is shown to be within 20-30 percent of theoretical limits formulated by only considering the solenoid's resistive losses. This is illustrated using a 100-um-diameter globule of triacylglycerols ({approx}900mM) that may be an oocyte precursor in young Xenopus Laevis frogs, and water sample containing choline at a concentration often found in live cells ({approx}33mM). In chemical shift images generated using a few thousand scans, the choline methyl line is found to have an acceptable SNR in resolved from just 5 picoliters in the Xenopus globule. It is concluded that the probe's sensitivity is sufficient for performing 1H-NMR on picoliter-scale volumes in biological cells and tissues.

  2. FOURIER TRANSFORM EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY OF THE B {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}-X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} (VIOLET) SYSTEM OF {sup 13}C{sup 14}N

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, R. S.; Bernath, P. F.

    2011-06-01

    Emission spectra of the B {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}-X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} transition of {sup 13}C{sup 14}N have been observed at high resolution using the Fourier transform spectrometer associated with the McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope of the National Solar Observatory. The spectra have been measured in the 21000-30000 cm{sup -1} region and a total of 52 vibrational bands involving vibrational levels up to v = 15 of the ground and excited states have been rotationally analyzed to provide a much improved set of spectroscopic constants. An experimental line list and calculated term values are provided. The results of the present analysis should prove useful in the identification of additional {sup 13}C{sup 14}N lines in comets and cool stars, and will help in the determination of the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C abundance ratio.

  3. The AGB star nucleosynthesis in the light of the recent 17O ( p ,α)14N and 18O ( p ,α)15N reaction rate determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.

    2015-02-01

    Presolar grains form in the cold and dusty envelopes of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. These solides, once that have been ejected by stellar winds, come to us as inclusions in meteorites providing invaluable benchmarks and constraints for our knowledge of low temeperature H-burning in stars. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of the 17O ( p ,α)14N and 18O ( p ,α)15N reactions. Moreover, the strength of the 65 keV resonance in the 17O ( p ,α)14N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the 17O + p radiative capture channel. The new estimates of the reaction rates have been introduced into calculations of AGB star nucleosynthesis and the results have been compared with geochemical analysis of "presolar" grains to determine their impact on astrophysical environments.

  4. Experimental Study of 17O(p,{alpha})14N and 17O(p,{gamma})18F for Classical Nova Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chafa, A.; Ouichaoui, S.; Tatischeff, V.; Coc, A.; Garrido, F.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Thibaud, J.-P.; Aguer, P.; Barhoumi, S.; Hernanz, M.; Jose, J.; Sereville, N. de

    2006-04-26

    We investigated the proton-capture reactions on 17O occurring in classical nova explosions. We observed a previously undiscovered resonance at E{sub R}{sup lab}=194.1{+-}0.6 keV in the 17O(p,{alpha})14N reaction, with a measured resonance strength {omega}{gamma}p{alpha}=1.6{+-}0.2 meV. We studied in the same experiment the 17O(p,{gamma})18F reaction by an activation method and the resonance-strength ratio was found to be {omega}{gamma}p{alpha}/{omega}{gamma}p{gamma}=470{+-}50. The corresponding excitation energy in the 18F compound nucleus was determined to be 5789.8{+-}0.3 keV by {gamma}-ray measurements using the 14N({alpha},{gamma})18F reaction. These new resonance properties have important consequences for 17O nucleosynthesis and {gamma}-ray astronomy of classical novae.

  5. Direct measurement of the {sup 11}C({alpha},p){sup 14}N reaction at CRIB: A path from pp-chain to CNO

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, S.; Kubono, S.; Kahl, D.; Yamaguchi, H.; Binh, D. N.; Hashimoto, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; He, J. J.; Iwasa, N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Teranishi, T.; Wanajo, S.

    2012-11-20

    We determined the total reaction rate of the {sup 11}C({alpha},p){sup 14}N reaction relevant to the nucleosynthesis in explosive hydrogen-burning stars. The measurement was performed by means of the thick target method in inverse kinematics with {sup 11}C RI beams. We performed the identification of the ground-state transition and excited-state transitions using time-of-flight information for the first time.

  6. Direct measurement of the breakout reaction {sup 11}C({alpha},p){sup 14}N in explosive hydrogen-burning process

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, S.; Kubono, S.; Kahl, D.; Yamaguchi, H.; Binh, Dam N.; Hashimoto, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; He, J. J.; Iwasa, N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Teranishi, T.; Wanajo, S.

    2012-11-12

    We determined the {sup 11}C({alpha},p){sup 14}N reaction rate relevant to the nucleosynthesis in explosive hydrogen-burning stars. The measurement was performed by means of the thick target method in inverse kinematics with {sup 11}C RI beams. We derived the excitation functions for the ground-state transition and excited-state transitions using time-of-flight information for the first time. The present reaction rate is compared to the previous one.

  7. Carbon-rich Presolar Grains from Massive Stars: Subsolar 12C/13C and 14N/15N Ratios and the Mystery of 15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatari, M.; Zinner, E.; Hoppe, P.; Jordan, C. J.; Gibson, B. K.; Trappitsch, R.; Herwig, F.; Fryer, C.; Hirschi, R.; Timmes, F. X.

    2015-08-01

    Carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies compared to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C and low-density (LD) graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. We present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. Different explosion energies and H concentrations are considered. If the supernova shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the puzzle of the Ne-E(L) component in LD graphite grains. This scenario is attractive for the SiC grains of type AB with 14N/15N ratios lower than solar, and provides an alternative solution for SiC grains originally classified as nova grains. Finally, this process may contribute to the production of 14N and 15N in the Galaxy, helping to produce the 14N/15N ratio in the solar system.

  8. Genome sequence of a novel H14N7 subtype influenza A virus isolated from a blue-winged teal (Anas discors) harvested in Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andy M.; Reeves, Andrew; Poulson, Rebecca L.; Carter, Deborah L.; Davis-Fields, Nicholas; Stallknecht, David E.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a novel H14N7 subtype influenza A virus (IAV) isolated from a blue-winged teal (Anas discors) harvested in Texas, USA. The genomic characteristics of this IAV strain with a previously undetected subtype combination suggest recent viral evolution within the New World wild-bird IAV reservoir.                   

  9. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…

  10. An Integrated Laboratory Project in NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Pendley, Bradford D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an advanced NMR project that can be done with a 60-MHz continuous-wave proton spectrometer. Points out the main purposes are to give students experience in second-order NMR analysis, the simplification of spectra by raising the frequency, and the effect of non-hydrogen nuclei on proton resonances. (MVL)

  11. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this…

  12. Using Cloud Storage for NMR Data Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soulsby, David

    2012-01-01

    An approach using Google Groups as method for distributing student-acquired NMR data has been implemented. We describe how to configure NMR spectrometer software so that data is uploaded to a laboratory section specific Google Group, thereby removing bottlenecks associated with printing and processing at the spectrometer workstation. Outside of…

  13. A Guided Inquiry Approach to NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, Laura E.; Lisensky, George C.; Spencer, Brock

    1998-04-01

    We present a novel way to introduce NMR spectroscopy into the general chemistry curriculum as part of a week-long aspirin project in our one-semester introductory course. Aspirin is synthesized by reacting salicylic acid and acetic anhydride. Purity is determined by titration and IR and NMR spectroscopy. Students compare IR and NMR spectra of their aspirin product to a series of reference spectra obtained by the class. Students are able to interpret the IR spectra of their aspirin using IR data from previous experiments. NMR is introduced by having students collect 1H NMR spectra of a series of reference compounds chosen to include some of the structural features of aspirin and compare spectra and structures of the reference compounds to develop a correlation chart for chemical shifts. This process is done in small groups using shared class data and is guided by a series of questions designed to relate the different kinds of hydrogen atoms to number and position of peaks in the NMR spectrum. Students then identify the peaks in the NMR spectrum of their aspirin product and relate percent purity by titration with spectral results and percent yield. This is an enjoyable project that combines the synthesis of a familiar material with a guided inquiry-based introduction to NMR spectroscopy.

  14. Large NMR signals and polarization asymmetries.

    SciTech Connect

    Penttila, S. I.

    1998-11-25

    A large modulation in the series Q-meter can lead to nonlinear NMR signals and asymmetric polarization values. With a careful circuit analysis the nonlinearity can be estimated and corrections to polarization can be determined as a function of the strength of the modulation. We describe the recent LAMPF polarized proton target experiment, its NMR measurement and corrections to the measured polarizations.

  15. Millimeter-Wave Observations of Circumstellar 14N/15N and 12C/13C Ratios: New Insights into J-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adande, Gilles; Ziurys, Lucy M.; Woolf, Neville

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of 14N/15N and 12C/13C isotopic ratios have been conducted towards circumstellar envelopes of a sample of evolved stars using the J = 3→2 rotational transitions of the isotopologues of HCN, observed with the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). Towards the J-type stars Y CVn and RY Dra, where 12C/13C ~ 3, the 14N/15N ratios were found to be 120-180 and 225, respectively. The 14N/15N ratio is thus anomalously low relative to interstellar values and a factor ~100 lower than equilibrium values predicted from the CNO cycle. Combining these results with previous chemical and isotopic prior observations of these stars, we conclude that two anomalous behaviors are likely to have occurred in Y CVn and RY Dra. First, the stellar envelope failed to participate in the normal mixing seen in low mass red giants, in which C and then O are substantially converted to N. Secondly, both the carbon enrichment and anomalous isotopic composition of both 13C and15N could have been caused by a plume of hot gas, hydrogen poor but enriched in 12C, from a helium flash mixing into the envelope.

  16. An analytical method for estimating the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance parameters of organic compounds with complex free induction decays for radiation effects studies

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.

    1992-12-31

    The use of {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as a radiation dosimetry tool has only recently been explored. An analytical method for analyzing {sup 14}N NQR complex free induction decays is presented with the background necessary to conduct pulsed NQR experiments. The {sup 14}N NQR energy levels and possible transitions are derived in step-by-step detail. The components of a pulsed NQR spectrometer are discussed along with the experimental techniques for conducting radiation effects experiments using the spectrometer. Three data analysis techniques -- the power spectral density Fourier transform, state space singular value decomposition (HSVD), and nonlinear curve fitting (using the downhill simplex method of global optimization and the Levenberg-Marquart method) -- are explained. These three techniques are integrated into an analytical method which uses these numerical techniques in this order to determine the physical NQR parameters. Sample data sets of urea and guanidine sulfate data are used to demonstrate how these methods can be employed to analyze both simple and complex free induction decays. By determining baseline values for biologically significant organics, radiation effects on the NQR parameters can be studied to provide a link between current radiation dosimetry techniques and the biological effects of radiation.

  17. Robust, integrated computational control of NMR experiments to achieve optimal assignment by ADAPT-NMR.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Sahu, Sarata C; Singarapu, Kiran K; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Markley, John L

    2012-01-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) represents a groundbreaking prototype for automated protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. With a [(13)C,(15)N]-labeled protein sample loaded into the NMR spectrometer, ADAPT-NMR delivers complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure in an optimal fashion without human intervention. ADAPT-NMR achieves this by implementing a strategy in which the goal of optimal assignment in each step determines the subsequent step by analyzing the current sum of available data. ADAPT-NMR is the first iterative and fully automated approach designed specifically for the optimal assignment of proteins with fast data collection as a byproduct of this goal. ADAPT-NMR evaluates the current spectral information, and uses a goal-directed objective function to select the optimal next data collection step(s) and then directs the NMR spectrometer to collect the selected data set. ADAPT-NMR extracts peak positions from the newly collected data and uses this information in updating the analysis resonance assignments and secondary structure. The goal-directed objective function then defines the next data collection step. The procedure continues until the collected data support comprehensive peak identification, resonance assignments at the desired level of completeness, and protein secondary structure. We present test cases in which ADAPT-NMR achieved results in two days or less that would have taken two months or more by manual approaches. PMID:22427982

  18. NMR and MRI apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Kelso, Nathan; Lee, SeungKyun; Moessle, Michael; Myers, Whittier; McDermott, Robert; ten Haken, Bernard; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas

    2007-03-06

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. Additional signal to noise benefits are obtained by use of a low noise polarization coil, comprising litz wire or superconducting materials. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  19. Probing Cancer Cell Metabolism Using NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hollinshead, Kate E R; Williams, Debbie S; Tennant, Daniel A; Ludwig, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular metabolism is now accepted to be at the core of many diseases including cancer. Over the past 20 years, NMR has become a core technology to study these metabolic perturbations in detail. This chapter reviews current NMR-based methods for steady-state metabolism and, in particular, the use of non-radioactive stable isotope-enriched tracers. Opportunities and challenges for each method, such as 1D (1)H NMR spectroscopy and (13)C carbon-based NMR spectroscopic methods, are discussed. Ultimately, the combination of NMR and mass spectra as orthogonal technologies are required to compensate for the drawbacks of each technique when used singly are discussed. PMID:27325263

  20. Nonlinear thermal lens signal of the (Δυ = 6) C-H vibrational overtone of C6H6 in liquid solutions of n-C6H14 and CCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyaupane, Parashu R.; Diez-y-Riega, Helena; Camejo, David; Manzanares, Carlos E.

    2016-05-01

    The thermal lens technique is applied to vibrational overtone spectroscopy of solutions of benzene. The pump and probe thermal lens technique has been found to be very sensitive for detecting samples of low concentration in transparent solvents. The C-H fifth vibrational (Δ υ = 6) overtone spectrum of benzene is detected at room temperature for compositions per volume in the range (1 to 1 × 10-4) using CCl4 and n-C6H14 as solvents. By detecting the absorption band in a 100-ppm solution, the peak absorption of the signal is approximately (2.2 ± 0.3) × 10-7 cm-1. The parameters that determine the magnitude of the thermal lens signal such as the pump laser power and the thermodynamic properties of the solvent and solute are discussed. A plot of normalized integrated intensity as a function of composition of benzene in solution reveals a nonlinear behavior. The nonlinearity cannot be explained assuming solvent enhancement at low concentrations. A two-color absorption model that includes the simultaneous absorption of the pump and probe lasers explains the enhanced magnitude and the nonlinear behavior of the thermal lens signal for solutions of composition below 0.01.

  1. Cloning and expression of porcine β1,4 N-acetylgalactosaminyl transferase encoding a new xenoreactive antigen

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Guerard W; Du, Zeji; Stalboerger, Paul; Kogelberg, Heide; McGregor, Christopher G A

    2014-01-01

    Background Xenograft rejection of pigs organs with an engineered mutation in the GGTA-1 gene (GTKO) remains a predominantly antibody mediated process which is directed to a variety of non-Gal protein and carbohydrate antigens. We previously used an expression library screening strategy to identify six porcine endothelial cell cDNAs which encode pig antigens that bind to IgG induced after pig-to-primate cardiac xenotransplantation. One of these gene products was a glycosyltransferase with homology to the bovine β1,4 N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (B4GALNT2). We now characterize the porcine B4GALNT2 gene sequence, genomic organization, expression, and functional significance. Methods The porcine B4GALNT2 cDNA was recovered from the original library isolate, subcloned, sequenced, and used to identify a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) containing the entire B4GALNT2 locus from the Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute BACPAC Resource Centre (#AC173453). PCR primers were designed to map the intron/exon genomic organization in the BAC clone. A stable human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell line expressing porcine B4GALNT2 (HEK-B4T) was produced. Expression of porcine B4GALNT2 in HEK-B4T cells was characterized by immune staining and siRNA transfection. The effects of B4GALNT2 expression in HEK-B4T cells was measured by flow cytometry and complement mediated lysis. Antibody binding to HEK and HEK-B4T cells was used to detect an induced antibody response to the B4GALNT2 produced glycan and the results were compared to GTKO PAEC specific non-Gal antibody induction. Expression of porcine B4GALNT2 in pig cells and tissues was measured by qualitative and quantitative real time reverse transcriptase PCR and by Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) tissue staining. Results The porcine B4GALNT2 gene shares a conserved genomic organization and encodes an open reading frame with 76 and 70% amino acid identity to the human and murine B4GALNT2 genes, respectively. The B4GALNT2 gene is expressed in porcine endothelial cells and shows a broadly distributed expression pattern. Expression of porcine B4GALNT2 in human HEK cells (HEK-B4T) results in increased binding of antibody to the B4GALNT2 enzyme, and increased reactivity with anti-Sda and DBA. HEK-B4T cells show increased sensitivity to complement mediated lysis when challenged with serum from primates after pig to primate cardiac xenotransplantation. In GTKO and GTKO:CD55 cardiac xenotransplantation recipients there is a significant correlation between the induction of a non-Gal antibody, measured using GTKO PAECs, and the induction of antibodies which preferentially bind to HEK-B4T cells. Conclusion The functional isolation of the porcine B4GALNT2 gene from a PAEC expression library, the pattern of B4GALNT2 gene expression and its sensitization of HEK-B4T cells to antibody binding and complement mediated lysis indicates that the enzymatic activity of porcine B4GALNT2 produces a new immunogenic non-Gal glycan which contributes in part to the non-Gal immune response detected after pig-to-baboon cardiac xenotransplantation. PMID:25176027

  2. Background suppression in MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jeffery L.; Beck, Larry W.; Ferguson, David B.; Haw, James F.

    Pulse sequences for suppressing background signals from spinning modules used in magic-angle spinning NMR are described. These pulse sequences are based on spatially selective composite 90° pulses originally reported by Bax, which provide for no net excitation of spins outside the homogeneous region of the coil. We have achieved essentially complete suppression of background signals originating from our Vespel spinning module (which uses a free-standing coil) in both 1H and 13C spectra without notable loss in signal intensity. Successful modification of both Bloch decay and cross-polarization pulse sequences to include spatially selective pulses was essential to acquire background-free spectra for weak samples. Background suppression was also found to be particularly valuable for both T1 and T1 ϱ, relaxation measurements.

  3. Experimental determination of the {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N and {sup 17}O(p,{gamma}){sup 18}F reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Chafa, A.; Ouichaoui, S.; Tatischeff, V.; Coc, A.; Garrido, F.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Thibaud, J.-P.; Aguer, P.; Barhoumi, S.; Hernanz, M.; Jose, J.; Sereville, N. de

    2007-03-15

    The {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N and {sup 17}O(p,{gamma}){sup 18}F reactions are of major importance to hydrogen-burning nucleosynthesis in a number of different stellar sites. In particular, {sup 17}O and {sup 18}F nucleosynthesis in classical novae is strongly dependent on the thermonuclear rates of these two reactions. The previously estimated rate for {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N carries very large uncertainties in the temperature range of classical novae (T=0.01-0.4 GK), whereas a recent measurement has reduced the uncertainty of the {sup 17}O(p,{gamma}){sup 18}F rate. We report on the observation of a previously undiscovered resonance at E{sub c.m.}=183.3 keV in the {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N reaction, with a measured resonance strength {omega}{gamma}{sub p{alpha}}=(1.6{+-}0.2)x10{sup -3} eV. We studied in the same experiment the {sup 17}O(p,{gamma}){sup 18}F reaction by an activation method, and the resonance strength was found to amount to {omega}{gamma}{sub p{gamma}}=(2.2{+-}0.4)x10{sup -6} eV. The excitation energy of the corresponding level in {sup 18}F was determined to be 5789.8{+-}0.3 keV in a Doppler shift attenuation method measurement, which yielded a value of {tau}<2.6 fs for the level lifetime. The {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N and {sup 17}O(p,{gamma}){sup 18}F reaction rates were calculated using the measured resonance properties and reconsidering some previous analyses of the contributions of other levels or processes. The {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N rate is now well established below T=1.5 GK, with uncertainties reduced by orders of magnitude in the temperature range T=0.1-0.4 GK. The uncertainty in the {sup 17}O(p,{gamma}){sup 18}F rate is somewhat larger because of remaining obscurities in the knowledge of the direct capture process. These new resonance properties have important consequences for {sup 17}O nucleosynthesis and {gamma}-ray emission of classical novae.

  4. NMR solution structure of butantoxin.

    PubMed

    Holaday, S K; Martin, B M; Fletcher, P L; Krishna, N R

    2000-07-01

    The NMR structure of a new toxin, butantoxin (BuTX), which is present in the venoms of the three Brazilian scorpions Tityus serrulatus, Tityus bahiensis, and Tityus stigmurus, has been investigated. This toxin was shown to reversibly block the Shaker B potassium channels (K(d) approximately 660 nM) and inhibit the proliferation of T-cells and the interleukin-2 production of antigen-stimulated T-helper cells. BuTX is a 40 amino acid basic protein stabilized by the four disulfide bridges: Cys2-Cys5, Cys10-Cys31, Cys16-Cys36, and Cys20-Cys38. The latter three are conserved among all members of the short-chain scorpion toxin family, while the first is unique to BuTX. The three-dimensional structure of BuTX was determined using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. NOESY, phase sensitive COSY (PH-COSY), and amide hydrogen exchange data were used to generate constraints for molecular modeling calculations. Distance geometry and simulated annealing calculations were performed to generate a family of 49 structures free of constraint violations. The secondary structure of BuTX consists of a short 2(1/2) turn alpha-helix (Glu15-Phe23) and a beta-sheet. The beta-sheet is composed of two well-defined antiparallel strands (Gly29-Met32 and Lys35-Cys38) connected by a type-I' beta-turn (Asn33-Asn34). Residues Cys5-Ala9 form a quasi-third strand of the beta-sheet. The N-terminal C2-C5 disulfide bridge unique to this toxin does not appear to confer stability to the protein. PMID:10864437

  5. High spectral resolution imaging of the dynamical atmosphere of the red supergiant Antares in the CO first overtone lines with VLTI/AMBER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Schertl, D.; Weigelt, G.; Baffa, C.; Chelli, A.; Petrov, R.; Robbe-Dubois, S.

    2013-07-01

    Aims: We present aperture-synthesis imaging of the red supergiant Antares (α Sco) in the CO first overtone lines. Our goal is to probe the structure and dynamics of the outer atmosphere. Methods: Antares was observed between 2.28 μm and 2.31 μm with VLTI/AMBER with spectral resolutions of up to 12 000 and angular resolutions as high as 7.2 mas at two epochs with a time interval of one year. Results: The reconstructed images in individual CO lines reveal that the star appears differently in the blue wing, line center, and red wing. In 2009, the images in the line center and red wing show an asymmetrically extended component, while the image in the blue wing shows little trace of it. In 2010, however, the extended component appears in the line center and blue wing, and the image in the red wing shows only a weak signature of the extended component. Our modeling of these AMBER data suggests that there is an outer atmosphere (MOLsphere) extending to 1.2-1.4 R⋆ with CO column densities of (0.5-1) × 1020 cm-2 and a temperature of ~2000 K. The CO line images observed in 2009 can be explained by a model in which a large patch or clump of CO gas is infalling at only 0-5 km s-1, while the CO gas in the remaining region is moving outward much faster at 20-30 km s-1. The images observed in 2010 suggest that a large clump of CO gas is moving outward at 0-5 km s-1, while the CO gas in the remaining region is infalling much faster at 20-30 km s-1. In contrast to the images in the CO lines, the AMBER data in the continuum show only a slight deviation from limb-darkened disks and only marginal time variations. We derive a limb-darkened disk diameter of 37.38 ± 0.06 mas and a power-law-type limb-darkening parameter of (8.7 ± 1.6) × 10-2 (2009) and 37.31 ± 0.09 mas and (1.5 ± 0.2) × 10-1 (2010). We also obtain an effective temperature of 3660 ± 120 K (the error includes the effects of the temporal flux variation that is assumed to be the same as Betelgeuse) and a

  6. Characterization of a Mixture of CO2 Adsorption Products in Hyperbranched Aminosilica Adsorbents by (13)C Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jeremy K; Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Chaikittisilp, Watcharop; Mehta, Anil K; Conradi, Mark S; Jones, Christopher W; Hayes, Sophia E

    2015-11-17

    Hyperbranched amine polymers (HAS) grown from the mesoporous silica SBA-15 (hereafter "SBA-15-HAS") exhibit large capacities for CO2 adsorption. We have used static in situ and magic-angle spinning (MAS) ex situ (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to examine the adsorption of CO2 by SBA-15-HAS. (13)C NMR distinguishes the signal of gas-phase (13)CO2 from that of the chemisorbed species. HAS polymers possess primary, secondary, and tertiary amines, leading to multiple chemisorption reaction outcomes, including carbamate (RnNCOO(-)), carbamic acid (RnNCOOH), and bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) moieties. Carbamates and bicarbonate fall within a small (13)C chemical shift range (162-166 ppm), and a mixture was observed including carbamic acid and carbamate, the former disappearing upon evacuation of the sample. By examining the (13)C-(14)N dipolar coupling through low-field (B0 = 3 T) (13)C{(1)H} cross-polarization MAS NMR, carbamate is confirmed through splitting of the (13)C resonance. A third species that is either bicarbonate or a second carbamate is evident from bimodal T2 decay times of the ∼163 ppm peak, indicating the presence of two species comprising that single resonance. The mixture of products suggests that (1) the presence of amines and water leads to bicarbonate being present and/or (2) the multiple types of amine sites in HAS permit formation of chemically distinct carbamates. PMID:26477882

  7. An Introduction to Biological NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). PMID:23831612

  8. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  9. Scalar operators in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Boqin

    1991-11-01

    Selectivity and resolution of solid-state NMR spectra are determined by dispersion of local magnetic fields originating from relaxation effects and orientation-dependent resonant frequencies of spin nuclei. Theoretically, the orientation-dependent resonant frequencies can be represented by a set of irreducible tensors. Among these tensors, only zero rank tensors (scalar operators) are capable of providing high resolution NMR spectra. This thesis presents a series of new developments in high resolution solid-state NMR concerning the reconstruction of various scalar operators motion in solid C{sub 60} is analyzed.

  10. Probing porous media with gas diffusion NMR.

    PubMed

    Mair, R W; Wong, G P; Hoffmann, D; Hurlimann, M D; Patz, S; Schwartz, L M; Walsworth, R L

    1999-10-18

    We show that gas diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (GD-NMR) provides a powerful technique for probing the structure of porous media. In random packs of glass beads, using both laser-polarized and thermally polarized xenon gas, we find that GD-NMR can accurately measure the pore space surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V rho, and the tortuosity, alpha (the latter quantity being directly related to the system's transport properties). We also show that GD-NMR provides a good measure of the tortuosity of sandstone and complex carbonate rocks. PMID:11543587

  11. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies.

    PubMed

    Suiter, Christopher L; Quinn, Caitlin M; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates. PMID:25797001

  12. On electrophoretic NMR. Exploring high conductivity samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielejewski, Michał; Giesecke, Marianne; Furó, István

    2014-06-01

    The performance of a new electrophoretic NMR (eNMR) method that uses a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill echo train with repeated electric field reversal is investigated. We show that this pulse sequence, with acronym CPMGER, yields strongly reduced artifacts from convective flow effects caused by the simultaneous presence of electroosmotic and thermal driving forces. We demonstrate the achieved improvements in various aqueous solutions. Ultimately, the method can be used for obtaining electrophoretic mobilities by eNMR without relying on uncharged reference molecules, otherwise a significant limitation for electrophoretic experiments performed with nuclei other than 1H.

  13. Probing porous media with gas diffusion NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Wong, G. P.; Hoffmann, D.; Hurlimann, M. D.; Patz, S.; Schwartz, L. M.; Walsworth, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    We show that gas diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (GD-NMR) provides a powerful technique for probing the structure of porous media. In random packs of glass beads, using both laser-polarized and thermally polarized xenon gas, we find that GD-NMR can accurately measure the pore space surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V rho, and the tortuosity, alpha (the latter quantity being directly related to the system's transport properties). We also show that GD-NMR provides a good measure of the tortuosity of sandstone and complex carbonate rocks.

  14. NMR data handbook for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, P.T.; Amtey, S.R.; Kasturi, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    The text is divided into 10 chapters, each of which covers a specific block of material and has its own references. The volume is meant to serve as a laboratory handbook and a desk reference, containing basic NMR theory, useful formulae and physical constants, and compiled data from the NMR literature. The volume attempts to cover the development of biological NMR through several decades of in vitro experiments that have laid the groundwork for and pointed to profitable areas of investigation for new in vivo techniques.

  15. NMR Analysis of Unknowns: An Introduction to 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, David E.; Warren, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    A study combined 1D (one-dimensional) and 2D (two-dimensional) NMR spectroscopy to solve structural organic problems of three unknowns, which include 2-, 3-, and 4-heptanone. Results showed [to the first power]H NMR and [to the thirteenth power]C NMR signal assignments for 2- and 3-heptanone were more challenging than for 4-heptanone owing to the…

  16. Improvement of the high-accuracy 17O(p ,α )14N reaction-rate measurement via the Trojan Horse method for application to 17O nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Tang, X. D.; Bucher, B.; Couder, M.; Davies, P.; deBoer, R.; Fang, X.; Lamm, L.; Ma, C.; Notani, M.; O'Brien, S.; Roberson, D.; Tan, W.; Wiescher, M.; Irgaziev, B.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V.

    2015-06-01

    The 17O(p ,α )14N and 17O(p ,γ )18F reactions are of paramount importance for the nucleosynthesis in a number of stellar sites, including red giants (RGs), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, massive stars, and classical novae. In particular, they govern the destruction of 17O and the formation of the short-lived radioisotope 18F, which is of special interest for γ -ray astronomy. At temperatures typical of the above-mentioned astrophysical scenario, T =0.01 -0.1 GK for RG, AGB, and massive stars and T =0.1 -0.4 GK for a classical nova explosion, the 17O(p ,α )14N reaction cross section is dominated by two resonances: one at about ERc m=65 keV above the 18F proton threshold energy, corresponding to the EX=5.673 MeV level in 18F, and another one at ERc m=183 keV (EX=5.786 MeV). We report on the indirect study of the 17O(p ,α )14N reaction via the Trojan Horse method by applying the approach recently developed for extracting the strength of narrow resonance at ultralow energies. The mean value of the strengths obtained in the two measurements was calculated and compared with the direct data available in literature. This value was used as input parameter for reaction-rate determination and its comparison with the result of the direct measurement is also discussed in the light of the electron screening effect.

  17. THE EFFECT OF THE {sup 14}N(p, {gamma}){sup 15}O REACTION ON THE BLUE LOOPS IN INTERMEDIATE-MASS STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Halabi, Ghina M.; El Eid, Mounib F.; Champagne, Arthur

    2012-12-10

    We present stellar evolutionary sequences of stars in the mass range 5-12 M{sub Sun }, having solar-like initial composition. The stellar models are obtained using updated input physics, including recent rates of thermonuclear reactions. We investigate the effects of a modification of the {sup 14}N(p, {gamma}){sup 15}O reaction rate, as suggested by recent evaluations, on the formation and extension of the blue loops encountered during the evolution of the stars in the above mass range. We find that a reduced {sup 14}N(p, {gamma}){sup 15}O rate, as described in the text, has a striking impact on the physical conditions of burning and mixing during shell hydrogen burning when the blue loops are formed. In particular, we find that the efficiency of shell hydrogen burning is crucial for the formation of an extended blue loop. We show that a significantly reduced {sup 14}N(p, {gamma}){sup 15}O rate affects severely the extension of the blue loops and the time spent by the star in the blue part of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram in the mass range 5-7 M{sub Sun} if the treatment of convection is based on the Schwarzschild criterion only. In this case, envelope overshooting helps to restore well-extended blue loops as supported by the observations of the Cepheid stars. If core overshooting is included during the core hydrogen and core helium burning phases, the loop formation and its properties depend on how this overshooting is treated for a given stellar mass range, as well as on its efficiency.

  18. NMR Methods to Study Dynamic Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Grutsch, Sarina; Brüschweiler, Sven; Tollinger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a unique toolbox of experimental probes for studying dynamic processes on a wide range of timescales, ranging from picoseconds to milliseconds and beyond. Along with NMR hardware developments, recent methodological advancements have enabled the characterization of allosteric proteins at unprecedented detail, revealing intriguing aspects of allosteric mechanisms and increasing the proportion of the conformational ensemble that can be observed by experiment. Here, we present an overview of NMR spectroscopic methods for characterizing equilibrium fluctuations in free and bound states of allosteric proteins that have been most influential in the field. By combining NMR experimental approaches with molecular simulations, atomistic-level descriptions of the mechanisms by which allosteric phenomena take place are now within reach. PMID:26964042

  19. Epitope mapping by solution NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, M; Livoti, E; Simonelli, L; Pedotti, M; Moraes, A; Valente, A P; Varani, L

    2015-06-01

    Antibodies play an ever more prominent role in basic research as well as in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical sectors. Characterizing their epitopes, that is, the region that they recognize on their target molecule, is useful for purposes ranging from molecular biology research to vaccine design and intellectual property protection. Solution NMR spectroscopy is ideally suited to the atomic level characterization of intermolecular interfaces and, as a consequence, to epitope discovery. Here, we illustrate how NMR epitope mapping can be used to rapidly and accurately determine protein antigen epitopes. The basic concept is that differences in the NMR signal of an antigen free or bound by an antibody will identify epitope residues. NMR epitope mapping provides more detailed information than mutagenesis or peptide mapping and can be much more rapid than X-ray crystallography. Advantages and drawbacks of this technique are discussed together with practical considerations. PMID:25726811

  20. Quantitative analysis of NMR spectra with chemometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winning, H.; Larsen, F. H.; Bro, R.; Engelsen, S. B.

    2008-01-01

    The number of applications of chemometrics to series of NMR spectra is rapidly increasing due to an emerging interest for quantitative NMR spectroscopy e.g. in the pharmaceutical and food industries. This paper gives an analysis of advantages and limitations of applying the two most common chemometric procedures, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR), to a designed set of 231 simple alcohol mixture (propanol, butanol and pentanol) 1H 400 MHz spectra. The study clearly demonstrates that the major advantage of chemometrics is the visualisation of larger data structures which adds a new exploratory dimension to NMR research. While robustness and powerful data visualisation and exploration are the main qualities of the PCA method, the study demonstrates that the bilinear MCR method is an even more powerful method for resolving pure component NMR spectra from mixtures when certain conditions are met.

  1. A New Microcell Technique for NMR Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Sophia J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a new laboratory technique for working with small samples of compounds used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Demonstrates how microcells can be constructed for each experiment and samples can be recycled. (TW)

  2. NMR and optical studies of piezoelectric polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, V.H.; Tuthill, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    Progress is reported in several areas dealing with piezoelectric (electroactive) polymers (mostly vinylidene fluoride, trifluoroethylene, copolymers, PVF[sub 2]) and liquid crystals. Optical studies, neutron scattering, NMR, thermal, theory and modeling were done.

  3. NMR-Assisted Molecular Docking Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Sturlese, Mattia; Bellanda, Massimo; Moro, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular docking are regularly being employed as helpful tools of drug discovery research. Molecular docking is an extremely rapid method to evaluate possible binders from a large chemical library in a fast and cheap manner. NMR techniques can directly detect a protein-ligand interaction, can determine the corresponding association constant, and can consistently identify the ligand binding cavity. Consequently, molecular docking and NMR techniques are naturally complementary techniques where the combination of the two has the potential to improve the overall efficiency of drug discovery process. In this review, we would like to summarize the state of the art of docking methods which have been recently bridged to NMR experiments to identify novel and effective therapeutic drug candidates. PMID:27490497

  4. Interfaces in polymer nanocomposites - An NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Ute; Scheler, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is applied for the investigation of polymer nanocomposites. Solid-state NMR is applied to study the modification steps to compatibilize layered double hydroxides with non-polar polymers. 1H relaxation NMR gives insight on the polymer dynamics over a wide range of correlation times. For the polymer chain dynamics the transverse relaxation time T2 is most suited. In this presentation we report on two applications of T2 measurements under external mechanical stress. In a low-field system relaxation NMR studies are performed in-situ under uniaxial stress. High-temperature experiments in a Couette cell permit the investigation of the polymer dynamics in the melt under shear flow.

  5. Rheology of Blood by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Song-I.; Marseille, Oliver; Gehlen, Christa; Blümich, Bernhard

    2001-09-01

    Pipe flow of blood in tubes of 1 and 7 mm inner diameter, respectively, was investigated employing two-dimensional NMR velocity imaging and PFG propagator measurements at different Reynolds numbers between 10 and 3500. The results are compared to flow of a water/glycerol mixture of matching viscosity under identical conditions. The transition from laminar to turbulent flow is observed by both a flattening of the velocity profile and a change of the propagator shape. For blood flow this transition is found to be shifted toward higher Reynolds numbers as compared to the transition of the water/glycerol mixture. This observation is in agreement with predictions from hydraulic measurements and is a consequence of the non-Newtonian flow characteristics of blood as a suspension of erythrocytes and plasma. Likewise, a deviation from the laminar flow condition is observed for blood at low Reynolds numbers between 10 and 100. This phenomenon is unknown for Newtonian liquids and is explained by the onset of a geometrical arrangement of the erythrocytes, the so-called rouleaux effect.

  6. Rheology of blood by NMR.

    PubMed

    Han, S I; Marseille, O; Gehlen, C; Blümich, B

    2001-09-01

    Pipe flow of blood in tubes of 1 and 7 mm inner diameter, respectively, was investigated employing two-dimensional NMR velocity imaging and PFG propagator measurements at different Reynolds numbers between 10 and 3500. The results are compared to flow of a water/glycerol mixture of matching viscosity under identical conditions. The transition from laminar to turbulent flow is observed by both a flattening of the velocity profile and a change of the propagator shape. For blood flow this transition is found to be shifted toward higher Reynolds numbers as compared to the transition of the water/glycerol mixture. This observation is in agreement with predictions from hydraulic measurements and is a consequence of the non-Newtonian flow characteristics of blood as a suspension of erythrocytes and plasma. Likewise, a deviation from the laminar flow condition is observed for blood at low Reynolds numbers between 10 and 100. This phenomenon is unknown for Newtonian liquids and is explained by the onset of a geometrical arrangement of the erythrocytes, the so-called rouleaux effect. PMID:11531367

  7. Assessment of experimental d-PIGE γ-ray production cross sections for 12C, 14N and 16O and comparison with absolute thick target yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csedreki, L.; Halász, Z.; Kiss, Á. Z.

    2016-08-01

    Measured differential cross sections for deuteron induced γ-ray emission from the reactions 12C(d,pγ)13C, (Eγ = 3089 keV), 14N(d,pγ)15N (Eγ = 8310 keV) and 16O(d,pγ)17O (Eγ = 871 keV) available in the literature were assessed. In order to cross check the assessed γ-ray production cross section data, thick target γ-yields calculated from the differential cross sections were compared with available measured thick target yields. Recommended differential cross section data for each reaction were deduced for particle induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) applications.

  8. Resonance strength measurement at astrophysical energies: The {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction studied via Trojan Horse Method

    SciTech Connect

    Sergi, M. L. La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Lamia, L.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Irgaziev, B.; Tang, X. D.; Wiescher, M.; Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V.

    2015-10-15

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on {sup 17}O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction via the THM by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. Two measurements will be described and the experimental THM cross sections will be shown for both experiments.

  9. A direct underground measurement of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction cross-section at energies of astrophysical interest

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, C. G.; Collaboration, LUNA

    2014-05-09

    The {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction plays a key role in many stellar sites, including classical novae and massive stars. Our knowledge of these scenarios might be improved by a precise measurement of the reaction’s cross-section at astrophysical energies. A direct attempt is currently underway in the Gran Sasso Laboratory, Italy, using the underground LUNA 400kV accelerator. The background reduction afforded by the underground environment is essential to the success of this challenging measurement. A purpose-built experimental setup has been simulated and commissioned. Preliminary results are presented.

  10. Detection of 15NNH+ in L1544: non-LTE modelling of dyazenilium hyperfine line emission and accurate 14N/15N values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzocchi, L.; Caselli, P.; Leonardo, E.; Dore, L.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Samples of pristine solar system material found in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles are highly enriched in 15N. Conspicuous nitrogen isotopic anomalies have also been measured in comets, and the 14N/15N abundance ratio of the Earth is itself higher than the recognised presolar value by almost a factor of two. Low-temperature ion/molecule reactions in the proto-solar nebula have been repeatedly indicated as being responsible for these 15N-enhancements. Aims: We have searched for 15N variants of the N2H+ ion in L1544, a prototypical starless cloud core that is one of the best candidate sources for detection owing to its low central core temperature and high CO depletion. The goal is to evaluate accurate and reliable 14N/15N ratio values for this species in the interstellar gas. Methods: A deep integration of the 15NNH+(1-0) line at 90.4 GHz was obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope. Non-LTE radiative transfer modelling was performed on the J = 1-0 emissions of the parent and 15N-containing dyazenilium ions, using a Bonnor-Ebert sphere as a model for the source. Results: A high-quality fit of the N2H+(1-0) hyperfine spectrum has allowed us to derive a revised value of the N2H+ column density in L1544. Analysis of the observed N15NH+ and 15NNH+ spectra yielded an abundance ratio N(N15NH+)/N(15NNH+) = 1.1 ± 0.3. The obtained 14N/15N isotopic ratio is ~1000 ± 200, suggestive of a sizeable 15N depletion in this molecular ion. Such a result is not consistent with the prediction of the current nitrogen chemical models. Conclusions: Since chemical models predict high 15N fractionation of N2H+, we suggest that 15N14N, or 15N in some other molecular form, tends to deplete onto dust grains. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).Full Tables B.1-B.6 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http

  11. Heat of Mixing and Solution of N,N,N',N'-Tetramethylmethanediamine C5H14N2 + C16H34 Hexadecane (HMSD1111, LB3839_H)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibulka, I.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Sosnkowska-Kehiaian, K.; Kehiaian, H. V.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Binary Liquid Systems of Nonelectrolytes II' of Volume 26 'Heats of Mixing, Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium, and Volumetric Properties of Mixtures and Solutions' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It contains the Chapter 'Heat of Mixing and Solution of N,N,N',N'-Tetramethylmethanediamine C5H14N2 + C16H34 Hexadecane (HMSD1111, LB3839_H)' providing data from direct low-pressure calorimetric measurement of molar excess enthalpy at variable mole fraction and constant temperature.

  12. Three-body final state breakup in the27Al(14N, X) reaction at 116 MeV bombarding energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrascu, M.; Isbasescu, A.; Lazar, I.; Mihai, I.; Petrascu, H.; Rudchik, A. T.; Chernievski, V. A.; Ponkratenko, O. A.; Ziman, V. A.

    1993-12-01

    The energy spectra and angular distributions of products in the reaction27Al(14N, X) have been measured at 116 MeV bombarding energy. It is shown that the energy spectra of the products lighter than the projectile, are well described by a three-body breakup calculation. The experimental total breakup cross-section estimated in the present work, together with Glas-Mosel calculation of the fusion cross-section, are in a reasonable agreement with the optical model total reaction cross-section.

  13. Modern NMR spectroscopy: a guide for chemists

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, J.K.M.; Hunter, B.K.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the authors of Modern NMR Spectroscopy is to bridge the communication gap between the chemist and the spectroscopist. The approach is nonmathematical, descriptive, and pictorial. To illustrate the ideas introduced in the text, the authors provide original spectra obtained specially for this purpose. Examples include spectroscopy of protons, carbon, and less receptive nuclei of interest to inorganic chemists. The authors succeed in making high-resolution NMR spectroscopy comprehensible for the average student or chemist.

  14. Frontiers of NMR in Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-25

    NMR spectroscopy is expanding the horizons of structural biology by determining the structures and describing the dynamics of blobular proteins in aqueous solution, as well as other classes of proteins including membrane proteins and the polypeptides that form the aggregates diagnostic of prion and amyloid diseases. Significant results are also emerging on DNA and RNA oligomers and their complexes with proteins. This meeting focused attention on key structural questions emanating from molecular biology and how NMR spectroscopy can be used to answer them.

  15. NMR of Membrane Proteins: Beyond Crystals.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Bonev, Boyan B

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential for the flow of signals, nutrients and energy between cells and between compartments of the cell. Their mechanisms can only be fully understood once the precise structures, dynamics and interactions involved are defined at atomic resolution. Through advances in solution and solid state NMR spectroscopy, this information is now available, as demonstrated by recent studies of stable peripheral and transmembrane proteins. Here we highlight recent cases of G-protein coupled receptors, outer membrane proteins, such as VDAC, phosphoinositide sensors, such as the FAPP-1 pleckstrin homology domain, and enzymes including the metalloproteinase MMP-12. The studies highlighted have resulted in the determination of the 3D structures, dynamical properties and interaction surfaces for membrane-associated proteins using advanced isotope labelling strategies, solubilisation systems and NMR experiments designed for very high field magnets. Solid state NMR offers further insights into the structure and multimeric assembly of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, as well as into interactions with ligands and targets. Remaining challenges for wider application of NMR to membrane structural biology include the need for overexpression and purification systems for the production of isotope-labelled proteins with fragile folds, and the availability of only a few expensive perdeuterated detergents.Step changes that may transform the field include polymers, such as styrene maleic acid, which obviate the need for detergent altogether, and allow direct high yield purification from cells or membranes. Broader demand for NMR may be facilitated by MODA software, which instantly predicts membrane interactive residues that can subsequently be validated by NMR. In addition, recent developments in dynamic nuclear polarization NMR instrumentation offer a remarkable sensitivity enhancement from low molarity samples and cell surfaces. These advances illustrate the current

  16. NMR studies of multiphase flows II

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, S.A.; Caprihan, A.; Fukushima, E.

    1995-12-31

    NMR techniques for measurements of spatial distribution of material phase, velocity and velocity fluctuation are being developed and refined. Versions of these techniques which provide time average liquid fraction and fluid phase velocity have been applied to several concentrated suspension systems which will not be discussed extensively here. Technical developments required to further extend the use of NMR to the multi-phase flow arena and to provide measurements of previously unobtainable parameters are the focus of this report.

  17. Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy in a single scan.

    PubMed

    Gal, Maayan; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-11-01

    Multidimensional NMR has become one of the most widespread spectroscopic tools available to study diverse structural and functional aspects of organic and biomolecules. A main feature of multidimensional NMR is the relatively long acquisition times that these experiments demand. For decades, scientists have been working on a variety of alternatives that would enable NMR to overcome this limitation, and deliver its data in shorter acquisition times. Counting among these methodologies is the so-called ultrafast (UF) NMR approach, which in principle allows one to collect arbitrary multidimensional correlations in a single sub-second transient. By contrast to conventional acquisitions, a main feature of UF NMR is a spatiotemporal manipulation of the spins that imprints the chemical shift and/or J-coupling evolutions being sought, into a spatial pattern. Subsequent gradient-based manipulations enable the reading out of this information and its multidimensional correlation into patterns that are identical to those afforded by conventional techniques. The current review focuses on the fundamental principles of this spatiotemporal UF NMR manipulation, and on a few of the methodological extensions that this form of spectroscopy has undergone during the years. PMID:26249041

  18. 33S NMR cryogenic probe for taurine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobo, Fumio; Takahashi, Masato; Maeda, Hideaki

    2009-03-01

    With the goal of a S33 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe applicable to in vivo NMR on taurine-biological samples, we have developed the S33 NMR cryogenic probe, which is applicable to taurine solutions. The NMR sensitivity gain relative to a conventional broadband probe is as large as 3.5. This work suggests that improvements in the preamplifier could allow NMR measurements on 100 μM taurine solutions, which is the level of sensitivity necessary for biological samples.

  19. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 9, October 1, 1993--December 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1993-12-31

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and dosed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal`s structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. Small angle scattering could be improved by combining scattering and adsorption measurements. Also, the measurement of NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide pore structure information. We will investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}, {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and pore surface. Our current work may be divided into three areas: small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), adsorption, and NMR.

  20. Pulsed laser operating on the first vibrational overtone of the CO molecule in the 2.5 - 4.2-{mu}m range: 3. The gain and kinetic processes on high vibrational levels

    SciTech Connect

    Basov, N G; Ionin, Andrei A; Klimachev, Yu M; Kotkov, A A; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Kurnosov, A K; Napartovich, A P; Shnyrev, S L; McCord, J E; Hager, G D

    2002-05-31

    The gain dynamics in the active medium of an overtone CO laser operating on the transitions between high vibrational levels is studied experimentally and theoretically. The gain dynamics is measured on the vibration - rotation transitions of the CO molecule [the P(12) spectral line in the vibrational bands from 20 {yields} 18 to 36 {yields} 34] in CO - He and CO - N{sub 2} laser mixtures. The maximum small-signal gain was 0.43 m{sup -1}. The theoretical model of the CO laser was significantly improved. It was shown that multiquantum and asymmetric VV-exchange processes should be included in the analysis of the population dynamics of high vibrational levels of the CO molecule. (lasers)

  1. Sensitivity of nonuniform sampling NMR.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Melissa R; Suiter, Christopher L; Henry, Geneive E; Rovnyak, James; Hoch, Jeffrey C; Polenova, Tatyana; Rovnyak, David

    2015-06-01

    Many information-rich multidimensional experiments in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can benefit from a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancement of up to about 2-fold if a decaying signal in an indirect dimension is sampled with nonconsecutive increments, termed nonuniform sampling (NUS). This work provides formal theoretical results and applications to resolve major questions about the scope of the NUS enhancement. First, we introduce the NUS Sensitivity Theorem in which any decreasing sampling density applied to any exponentially decaying signal always results in higher sensitivity (SNR per square root of measurement time) than uniform sampling (US). Several cases will illustrate this theorem and show that even conservative applications of NUS improve sensitivity by useful amounts. Next, we turn to a serious limitation of uniform sampling: the SNR by US decreases for extending evolution times, and thus total experimental times, beyond 1.26T2 (T2 = signal decay constant). Thus, SNR and resolution cannot be simultaneously improved by extending US beyond 1.26T2. We find that NUS can eliminate this constraint, and we introduce the matched NUS SNR Theorem: an exponential sampling density matched to the signal decay always improves the SNR with additional evolution time. Though proved for a specific case, broader classes of NUS densities also improve SNR with evolution time. Applications of these theoretical results are given for a soluble plant natural product and a solid tripeptide (u-(13)C,(15)N-MLF). These formal results clearly demonstrate the inadequacies of applying US to decaying signals in indirect nD-NMR dimensions, supporting a broader adoption of NUS. PMID:25901905

  2. Precision Measurements of the 278 keV {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}) and the 151 keV {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}) Resonance Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Borowski, M.; Lieb, K. P.; Uhrmacher, M.; Bolse, W.

    2009-01-28

    In thin film technology, analytical methods for monitoring the deposition of oxide and nitride coatings and the effects of corrosive, laser and ion-beam treatments have attracted considerable attention. For depth-profiling the concentrations of light isotopes, resonant nuclear reaction analysis is an excellent non-destructive ion-beam analytical tool. We report here on precision measurements of the 278 keV {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}) and the 151 keV {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}) resonances using the high-resolution proton beam of the Goettingen IONAS accelerator. The deduced resonance energies E{sub R} and total widths {gamma}(in the laboratory system) are E{sub R} = 277.60(27) keV and {gamma} = 1115(33) eV for the {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}) resonance, and E{sub R} = 150.97(26) keV and {gamma} = 178(35) eV for the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}) resonance. These values are significantly more precise than the ones quoted in the literature.

  3. Submillimeter Observations of Titan: Global Measures of Stratospheric Temperature, CO, HCN, HC3N, and the Isotopic Ratios 12C/13C and 14N/15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurwell, Mark A.

    2004-11-01

    Interferometric observations of the atmosphere of Titan were performed with the Submillimeter Array on two nights in 2004 February to investigate the global average vertical distributions of several molecular species above the tropopause. Rotational transitions of CO, isomers of HCN, and HC3N were simultaneously recorded. The abundance of CO is determined to be 51+/-4 parts per million (ppm), constant with altitude. The vertical profile of HCN is dependent on the assumed temperature but generally increases from 30 parts per billion at the condensation altitude (~83 km) to 5 ppm at ~300 km. Furthermore, the central core of the HCN emission is strong and can be reproduced only if the upper stratospheric temperature increases with altitude. The isotopic ratios are determined to be 12C/13C=132+/-25 and 14N/15N=94+/-13 assuming the Coustenis & Bézard temperature profile. If the Lellouch temperature profile is assumed, the ratios decrease to 12C/13C=108+/-20 and 14N/15N=72+/-9. The vertical profile of HC3N is consistent with that derived by Marten et al.

  4. A Multispectrum Analysis of the 2v2 Spectral Region of H12C14N: Intensities, Broadening and Pressure-Shift Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Devi, V M.; Benner, D C.; Smith, M.A.H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.

    2004-09-01

    High-resolution (0.005 cm-1) infrared absorption spectra of HCN in the 2v2 band region near 1411 cm-1 have been recorded at room temperature using the Bruker IFS120HR Fourier transform spectrometer located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Four spectra of high-purity (99.8%) HCN together with three spectra of lean mixtures ({approx}3%) of HCN in dry air were simultaneously fit using a multispectrum non-linear least-squares procedure. The analysis yielded room temperature values for absolute intensities, self- and air-broadening coefficients, and self- and air-broadening coefficients for numerous lines in the 2v2 band of H13C14N, were also determined. Since there are no previous measurements of broadening and shift parameters reported in the 2v2 band, our results are compared with values recently determined in the v1 band of H13C14N and with current HITRAN values.

  5. Accelerator mass spectrometry measurements of the 13C (n ,γ )14C and 14N(n ,p )14C cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, A.; Bichler, M.; Buczak, K.; Dillmann, I.; Käppeler, F.; Karakas, A.; Lederer, C.; Lugaro, M.; Mair, K.; Mengoni, A.; Schätzel, G.; Steier, P.; Trautvetter, H. P.

    2016-04-01

    The technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), offering a complementary tool for sensitive studies of key reactions in nuclear astrophysics, was applied for measurements of the 13C (n ,γ )14C and the 14N(n ,p )14C cross sections, which act as a neutron poison in s -process nucleosynthesis. Solid samples were irradiated at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology with neutrons closely resembling a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution for k T =25 keV, and also at higher energies between En=123 and 182 keV. After neutron irradiation the produced amount of 14C in the samples was measured by AMS at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) facility. For both reactions the present results provide important improvements compared to previous experimental data, which were strongly discordant in the astrophysically relevant energy range and missing for the comparably strong resonances above 100 keV. For 13C (n ,γ ) we find a four times smaller cross section around k T =25 keV than a previous measurement. For 14N(n ,p ), the present data suggest two times lower cross sections between 100 and 200 keV than had been obtained in previous experiments and data evaluations. The effect of the new stellar cross sections on the s process in low-mass asymptotic giant branch stars was studied for stellar models of 2 M⊙ initial mass, and solar and 1 /10th solar metallicity.

  6. The effects of methyl internal rotation and {sup 14}N quadrupole coupling in the microwave spectra of two conformers of N,N-diethylacetamide

    SciTech Connect

    Kannengießer, Raphaela; Klahm, Sebastian; Vinh Lam Nguyen, Ha Lüchow, Arne; Stahl, Wolfgang

    2014-11-28

    The gas phase structures and internal dynamics of N,N-diethylacetamide were determined with very high accuracy using a combination of molecular beam Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations at high levels. Conformational studies yielded five stable conformers with C{sub 1} symmetry. The two most energetically favorable conformers, conformer I and II, could be found in the experimental spectrum. For both conformers, quadrupole hyperfine splittings of the {sup 14}N nucleus and torsional fine splittings due to the internal rotation of the acetyl methyl group occurred in the same order of magnitude and were fully assigned. The rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants as well as the quadrupole coupling constants of the {sup 14}N nucleus were determined and fitted to experimental accuracy. The V{sub 3} potentials were found to be 517.04(13) cm{sup −1} and 619.48(91) cm{sup −1} for conformer I and II, respectively, and compared to the V{sub 3} potentials found in other acetamides. Highly accurate CCSD(T) and DMC calculations were carried out for calculating the barriers to internal rotation in comparison with the experimentally deduced V{sub 3} values.

  7. Use of NMR and NMR Prediction Software to Identify Components in Red Bull Energy Drinks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andre J.; Shirzadi, Azadeh; Burrow, Timothy E.; Dicks, Andrew P.; Lefebvre, Brent; Corrin, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed as part of an upper-level undergraduate analytical chemistry course is described. Students investigate two popular soft drinks (Red Bull Energy Drink and sugar-free Red Bull Energy Drink) by NMR spectroscopy. With assistance of modern NMR prediction software they identify and quantify major components in each…

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Fukushima, Eiichi; Roeder, Stephen B. W.; Assink, Roger A.; Gibson, Atholl A. V.

    1986-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio-frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  9. Calibration of NMR well logs from carbonate reservoirs with laboratory NMR measurements and μXRCT

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Harris E.; Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log data has the potential to provide in-situ porosity, pore size distributions, and permeability of target carbonate CO₂ storage reservoirs. However, these methods which have been successfully applied to sandstones have yet to be completely validated for carbonate reservoirs. Here, we have taken an approach to validate NMR measurements of carbonate rock cores with independent measurements of permeability and pore surface area to volume (S/V) distributions using differential pressure measurements and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) imaging methods, respectively. We observe that using standard methods for determining permeability from NMR data incorrectly predicts these values by orders of magnitude. However, we do observe promise that NMR measurements provide reasonable estimates of pore S/V distributions, and with further independent measurements of the carbonate rock properties that universally applicable relationships between NMR measured properties may be developed for in-situ well logging applications of carbonate reservoirs.

  10. Correlating nuclear frequencies by two-dimensional ELDOR-detected NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminker, Ilia; Wilson, Tiffany D.; Savelieff, Masha G.; Hovav, Yonatan; Zimmermann, Herbert; Lu, Yi; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2014-03-01

    ELDOR (Electron Double Resonance)-detected NMR (EDNMR) is a pulse EPR experiment that is used to measure the transition frequencies of nuclear spins coupled to electron spins. These frequencies are further used to determine hyperfine and quadrupolar couplings, which are signatures of the electronic and spatial structures of paramagnetic centers. In recent years, EDNMR has been shown to be particularly useful at high fields/high frequencies, such as W-band (∼95 GHz, ∼3.5 T), for low γ quadrupolar nuclei. Although at high fields the nuclear Larmor frequencies are usually well resolved, the limited resolution of EDNMR still remains a major concern. In this work we introduce a two dimensional, triple resonance, correlation experiment based on the EDNMR pulse sequence, which we term 2D-EDNMR. This experiment allows circumventing the resolution limitation by spreading the signals in two dimensions and the observed correlations help in the assignment of the signals. First we demonstrate the utility of the 2D-EDNMR experiment on a nitroxide spin label, where we observe correlations between 14N nuclear frequencies. Negative cross-peaks appear between lines belonging to different MS electron spin manifolds. We resolved two independent correlation patterns for nuclear frequencies arising from the EPR transitions corresponding to the 14N mI = 0 and mI = -1 nuclear spin states, which severely overlap in the one dimensional EDNMR spectrum. The observed correlations could be accounted for by considering changes in the populations of energy levels that S = 1/2, I = 1 spin systems undergo during the pulse sequence. In addition to these negative cross-peaks, positive cross-peaks appear as well. We present a theoretical model based on the Liouville equation and use it to calculate the time evolution of populations of the various energy levels during the 2D-EDNMR experiment and generated simulated 2D-EDMR spectra. These calculations show that the positive cross-peaks appear due

  11. Correlating nuclear frequencies by two-dimensional ELDOR-detected NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kaminker, Ilia; Wilson, Tiffany D; Savelieff, Masha G; Hovav, Yonatan; Zimmermann, Herbert; Lu, Yi; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2014-03-01

    ELDOR (Electron Double Resonance)-detected NMR (EDNMR) is a pulse EPR experiment that is used to measure the transition frequencies of nuclear spins coupled to electron spins. These frequencies are further used to determine hyperfine and quadrupolar couplings, which are signatures of the electronic and spatial structures of paramagnetic centers. In recent years, EDNMR has been shown to be particularly useful at high fields/high frequencies, such as W-band (∼95 GHz, ∼3.5 T), for low γ quadrupolar nuclei. Although at high fields the nuclear Larmor frequencies are usually well resolved, the limited resolution of EDNMR still remains a major concern. In this work we introduce a two dimensional, triple resonance, correlation experiment based on the EDNMR pulse sequence, which we term 2D-EDNMR. This experiment allows circumventing the resolution limitation by spreading the signals in two dimensions and the observed correlations help in the assignment of the signals. First we demonstrate the utility of the 2D-EDNMR experiment on a nitroxide spin label, where we observe correlations between (14)N nuclear frequencies. Negative cross-peaks appear between lines belonging to different MS electron spin manifolds. We resolved two independent correlation patterns for nuclear frequencies arising from the EPR transitions corresponding to the (14)N mI=0 and mI=-1 nuclear spin states, which severely overlap in the one dimensional EDNMR spectrum. The observed correlations could be accounted for by considering changes in the populations of energy levels that S=1/2, I=1 spin systems undergo during the pulse sequence. In addition to these negative cross-peaks, positive cross-peaks appear as well. We present a theoretical model based on the Liouville equation and use it to calculate the time evolution of populations of the various energy levels during the 2D-EDNMR experiment and generated simulated 2D-EDMR spectra. These calculations show that the positive cross-peaks appear due to

  12. BOOK REVIEW: NMR Imaging of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of materials is a field of increasing importance. Applications extend from fundamental science like the characterization of fluid transport in porous rock, catalyst pellets and hemodialysers into various fields of engineering for process optimization and product quality control. While the results of MRI imaging are being appreciated by a growing community, the methods of imaging are far more diverse for materials applications than for medical imaging of human beings. Blümich has delivered the first book in this field. It was published in hardback three years ago and is now offered as a paperback for nearly half the price. The text provides an introduction to MRI imaging of materials covering solid-state NMR spectroscopy, imaging methods for liquid and solid samples, and unusual MRI in terms of specialized approaches to spatial resolution such as an MRI surface scanner. The book represents an excellent and thorough treatment which will help to grow research in materials MRI. Blümich developed the treatise over many years for his research students, graduates in chemistry, physics and engineering. But it may also be useful for medical students looking for a less formal discussion of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The structure of this book is easy to perceive. The first three chapters cover an introduction, the fundamentals and methods of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The book starts at the ground level where no previous knowledge about NMR is assumed. Chapter 4 discusses a wide variety of transformations beyond the Fourier transformation. In particular, the Hadamard transformation and the 'wavelet' transformation are missing from most related books. This chapter also includes a description of noise-correlation spectroscopy, which promises the imaging of large objects without the need for extremely powerful radio-frequency transmitters. Chapters 5 and 6 cover basic imaging methods. The following chapter about the use of relaxation and

  13. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy. NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

  14. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  15. Theoretical NMR correlations based Structure Discussion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The constitutional assignment of natural products by NMR spectroscopy is usually based on 2D NMR experiments like COSY, HSQC, and HMBC. The actual difficulty of the structure elucidation problem depends more on the type of the investigated molecule than on its size. The moment HMBC data is involved in the process or a large number of heteroatoms is present, a possibility of multiple solutions fitting the same data set exists. A structure elucidation software can be used to find such alternative constitutional assignments and help in the discussion in order to find the correct solution. But this is rarely done. This article describes the use of theoretical NMR correlation data in the structure elucidation process with WEBCOCON, not for the initial constitutional assignments, but to define how well a suggested molecule could have been described by NMR correlation data. The results of this analysis can be used to decide on further steps needed to assure the correctness of the structural assignment. As first step the analysis of the deviation of carbon chemical shifts is performed, comparing chemical shifts predicted for each possible solution with the experimental data. The application of this technique to three well known compounds is shown. Using NMR correlation data alone for the description of the constitutions is not always enough, even when including 13C chemical shift prediction. PMID:21797997

  16. NMR structural studies on antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Sönnichsen, F D; Davies, P L; Sykes, B D

    1998-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a structurally diverse class of proteins that bind to ice and inhibit its growth in a noncolligative manner. This adsorption-inhibition mechanism operating at the ice surface results in a lowering of the (nonequilibrium) freezing point below the melting point. A lowering of approximately 1 degree C, which is sufficient to prevent fish from freezing in ice-laden seawater, requires millimolar AFP levels in the blood. The solubility of AFPs at these millimolar concentrations and the small size of the AFPs (typically 3-15 kDa) make them ideal subjects for NMR analysis. Although fish AFPs are naturally abundant, seasonal expression, restricted access to polar fishes, and difficulties in separating numerous similar isoforms have made protein expression the method of choice for producing AFPs for structural studies. Expression of recombinant AFPs has also facilitated NMR analysis by permitting isotopic labeling with 15N and 13C and has permitted mutations to be made to help with the interpretation of NMR data. NMR analysis has recently solved two AFP structures and provided valuable information about the disposition of ice-binding side chains in a third. The potential exists to solve other AFP structures, including the newly described insect AFPs, and to use solid-state NMR techniques to address fundamental questions about the nature of the interaction between AFPs and ice. PMID:9923697

  17. Upper limits to the fractionation of isotopes due to atmospheric escape: Implications for potential 14N/15N in Pluto's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandt, K.; Mousis, O.

    2014-12-01

    Formation and evolution of the solar system is studied in part using stable isotope ratios that are presumed to be primordial, or representative of conditions in the protosolar Nebula. Comets, meteorites and giant planet atmospheres provide measurements that can reasonably be presumed to represent primordial conditions while the terrestrial planets, Pluto and Saturn's moon Titan have atmospheres that have evolved over the history of the solar system. The stable isotope ratios measured in these atmospheres are, therefore, first a valuable tool for evaluating the history of atmospheric escape and once escape is constrained can provide indications of conditions of formation. D/H ratios in the atmosphere of Venus provide indications of the amount of water lost from Venus over the history of the solar system, while several isotope ratios in the atmosphere of Mars provide evidence for long-term erosion of the atmosphere. We have recently demonstrated that the nitrogen ratios, 14N/15N, in Titan's atmosphere cannot evolve significantly over the history of the solar system and that the primordial ratio for Titan must have been similar to the value recently measured for NH3 in comets. This implies that the building blocks for Titan formed in the protosolar nebula rather than in the warmer subnebula surrounding Saturn at the end of its formation. Our result strongly contrasts with works showing that 14N/15N in the atmosphere of Mars can easily fractionate from the terrestrial value to its current value due to escape processes within the lifetime of the solar system. The difference between how nitrogen fractionates in Mars and Titan's atmospheres presents a puzzle for the fractionation of isotopes in an atmosphere due to atmospheric escape. Here, we present a method aiming at determining an upper limit to the amount of fractionation allowed to occur due to escape, which is a function of the escape flux and the column density of the atmospheric constituent. Through this

  18. SU-E-J-142: Prompt Gamma Emission Measurements From a Passively Scattered Proton Beam On Targets Containing 16O, 12C and 14N

    SciTech Connect

    Jeyasugiththan, J; Peterson, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To measure the prompt gamma emission from the important elements found in tissue ({sup 16}O,{sup 12}C and {sup 14}N) in a clinical passive-scatter treatment environment. Methods: The targets (composed of water, Perspex, graphite and liquid nitrogen) were irradiated with a 200 MeV passive-scatter proton beam and the discrete prompt gamma energy spectra was detected by a high resolution 2′ × 2′ LaBr. detector. In order to reduce the high level of radiation produced by the beam line elements, the detector was surrounded by 10 cm of lead to attenuate the scattered gamma-rays entering the detector with an extra 5 cm thick layer of lead added along the beam direction. A 10 cm thick collimator with a 5 cm × 10 cm rectangular opening was also used. Results: The prompt gamma peaks at 6.13 MeV and 4.44 MeV were clearly identified as a Result of the inelastic nuclear reaction between the protons and the 16O atoms found in the water target. The 6.13 MeV peak was 5% higher than the peak at 4.44 MeV for the water target. The 4.44 MeV peak was the only identified emission in the prompt gamma energy spectra from the graphite target ({sup 12}C). The expected 2.313 MeV peak form the{sup 14}N (liquid nitrogen target) was identified, but the other expected {sup 14}N peaks could not be resolved. Conclusion: Prompt gamma measurements with a passive-scatter proton beam are possible, but the presence of a high amount of background radiation from the patient final collimator presents a challenge at the treatment isocenter. The prominent prompt gamma peaks at 6.13 MeV and 4.44 MeV were identified from the water, Perspex and graphite targets. The prompt gammas from the liquid nitrogen target were difficult to see, but may not be significant in the in-vivo verification process.

  19. Wide-line NMR and protein hydration.

    PubMed

    Tompa, K; Bokor, M; Tompa, P

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, the reader is introduced to the basics of wide-line NMR, with particular focus on the following: (1) basic theoretical and experimental NMR elements, necessary before switching the spectrometer and designing the experiment, (2) models/theories for the interpretation of measured data, (3) definition of wide-line NMR spectrometry, the description of the measurement and evaluation variants, useful hints for the novice, (4) advice on selecting the solvent, which is not a trivial task, (5) a note of warning that not all data are acceptable in spite of the statistical confidence. Finally, we wrap up the chapter with the results on two proteins (a globular and an intrinsically disordered). PMID:22760320

  20. Remote tuning of NMR probe circuits.

    PubMed

    Kodibagkar, V D; Conradi, M S

    2000-05-01

    There are many circumstances in which the probe tuning adjustments cannot be located near the rf NMR coil. These may occur in high-temperature NMR, low-temperature NMR, and in the use of magnets with small diameter access bores. We address here circuitry for connecting a fixed-tuned probe circuit by a transmission line to a remotely located tuning network. In particular, the bandwidth over which the probe may be remotely tuned while keeping the losses in the transmission line acceptably low is considered. The results show that for all resonant circuit geometries (series, parallel, series-parallel), overcoupling of the line to the tuned circuit is key to obtaining a large tuning bandwidth. At equivalent extents of overcoupling, all resonant circuit geometries have nearly equal remote tuning bandwidths. Particularly for the case of low-loss transmission line, the tuning bandwidth can be many times the tuned circuit's bandwidth, f(o)/Q. PMID:10783273

  1. Review of NMR characterization of pyrolysis oils

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hao, Naijia; Ben, Haoxi; Yoo, Chang Geun; Adhikari, Sushil; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-08-24

    Here, pyrolysis of renewable biomass has been developed as a method to produce green fuels and chemicals in response to energy security concerns as well as to alleviate environmental issues incurred with fossil fuel usage. However, pyrolysis oils still have limited commercial application, mainly because unprocessed oils cannot be readily blended with current petroleum-based transportation fuels. To better understand these challenges, researchers have applied diverse characterization techniques in the development of bio-oil studies. In particular, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a key spectroscopic characterization method through analysis of bio-oil components. This review highlights the NMR strategies for pyrolysis oil characterizationmore » and critically discusses the applications of 1H, 13C, 31P, 19F, and two-dimensional (2-D NMR) analyses such as heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) in representative pyrolysis oil studies.« less

  2. A modularized pulse programmer for NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenping; Bao, Qingjia; Yang, Liang; Chen, Yiqun; Liu, Chaoyang; Qiu, Jianqing; Ye, Chaohui

    2011-02-01

    A modularized pulse programmer for a NMR spectrometer is described. It consists of a networked PCI-104 single-board computer and a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The PCI-104 is dedicated to translate the pulse sequence elements from the host computer into 48-bit binary words and download these words to the FPGA, while the FPGA functions as a sequencer to execute these binary words. High-resolution NMR spectra obtained on a home-built spectrometer with four pulse programmers working concurrently demonstrate the effectiveness of the pulse programmer. Advantages of the module include (1) once designed it can be duplicated and used to construct a scalable NMR/MRI system with multiple transmitter and receiver channels, (2) it is a totally programmable system in which all specific applications are determined by software, and (3) it provides enough reserve for possible new pulse sequences.

  3. An NMR Study of Microvoids in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattrix, Larry

    1996-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is most crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally not be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active Xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb and Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe-129-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts in Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of Xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A series of spectra were obtained interspersed with applications of vacuum and heating to drive out the adsorbed Xe and determine the role of Xe-Xe interactions in the observed chemical shift.

  4. Hyperpolarized Xenon for NMR and MRI Applications

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Christopher; Kunth, Martin; Döpfert, Jörg; Rossella, Federica; Schröder, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) suffer from intrinsic low sensitivity because even strong external magnetic fields of ~10 T generate only a small detectable net-magnetization of the sample at room temperature 1. Hence, most NMR and MRI applications rely on the detection of molecules at relative high concentration (e.g., water for imaging of biological tissue) or require excessive acquisition times. This limits our ability to exploit the very useful molecular specificity of NMR signals for many biochemical and medical applications. However, novel approaches have emerged in the past few years: Manipulation of the detected spin species prior to detection inside the NMR/MRI magnet can dramatically increase the magnetization and therefore allows detection of molecules at much lower concentration 2. Here, we present a method for polarization of a xenon gas mixture (2-5% Xe, 10% N2, He balance) in a compact setup with a ca. 16000-fold signal enhancement. Modern line-narrowed diode lasers allow efficient polarization 7 and immediate use of gas mixture even if the noble gas is not separated from the other components. The SEOP apparatus is explained and determination of the achieved spin polarization is demonstrated for performance control of the method. The hyperpolarized gas can be used for void space imaging, including gas flow imaging or diffusion studies at the interfaces with other materials 8,9. Moreover, the Xe NMR signal is extremely sensitive to its molecular environment 6. This enables the option to use it as an NMR/MRI contrast agent when dissolved in aqueous solution with functionalized molecular hosts that temporarily trap the gas 10,11. Direct detection and high-sensitivity indirect detection of such constructs is demonstrated in both spectroscopic and imaging mode. PMID:22986346

  5. An optical NMR spectrometer for Larmor-beat detection and high-resolution POWER NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, J. G.; Marohn, J. A.; Carson, P. J.; Shykind, D. A.; Hwang, J. Y.; Miller, M. A.; Weitekamp, D. P.

    2008-06-01

    Optical nuclear magnetic resonance (ONMR) is a powerful probe of electronic properties in III-V semiconductors. Larmor-beat detection (LBD) is a sensitivity optimized, time-domain NMR version of optical detection based on the Hanle effect. Combining LBD ONMR with the line-narrowing method of POWER (perturbations observed with enhanced resolution) NMR further enables atomically detailed views of local electronic features in III-Vs. POWER NMR spectra display the distribution of resonance shifts or line splittings introduced by a perturbation, such as optical excitation or application of an electric field, that is synchronized with a NMR multiple-pulse time-suspension sequence. Meanwhile, ONMR provides the requisite sensitivity and spatial selectivity to isolate local signals within macroscopic samples. Optical NMR, LBD, and the POWER method each introduce unique demands on instrumentation. Here, we detail the design and implementation of our system, including cryogenic, optical, and radio-frequency components. The result is a flexible, low-cost system with important applications in semiconductor electronics and spin physics. We also demonstrate the performance of our systems with high-resolution ONMR spectra of an epitaxial AlGaAs /GaAs heterojunction. NMR linewidths down to 4.1Hz full width at half maximum were obtained, a 103-fold resolution enhancement relative any previous optically detected NMR experiment.

  6. 13C NMR Metabolomics: INADEQUATE Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clendinen, Chaevien S.; Pasquel, Christian; Ajredini, Ramadan; Edison, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    The many advantages of 13C NMR are often overshadowed by its intrinsically low sensitivity. Given that carbon makes up the backbone of most biologically relevant molecules, 13C NMR offers a straightforward measurement of these compounds. Two-dimensional 13C-13C correlation experiments like INADEQUATE (incredible natural abundance double quantum transfer experiment) are ideal for the structural elucidation of natural products and have great but untapped potential for metabolomics analysis. We demonstrate a new and semi-automated approach called INETA (INADEQUATE network analysis) for the untargeted analysis of INADEQUATE datasets using an in silico INADEQUATE database. We demonstrate this approach using isotopically labeled Caenorhabditis elegans mixtures. PMID:25932900

  7. 1H NMR relaxation in urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Bacher, Alfred D.; Dybowski, C.

    2007-11-01

    Proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation times T1 were measured for urea as a function of temperature. An activation energy of 46.3 ± 4.7 kJ/mol was extracted and compared with the range of 38-65 kJ/mol previously reported in the literature as measured by different magnetic resonance techniques. In addition, proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame T1 ρ were measured as a function of temperature. These measurements provide acquisition conditions for the 13C and 15N CP/MAS spectra of pure urea in the crystalline phase.

  8. Tritiation methods and tritium NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiswal, D.K.; Morimoto, H.; Salijoughian, M.; Williams, P.G.

    1991-09-01

    We have used a simple process for the production of highly tritiated water and characterized the product species by {sup 1}H and {sup 3}H NMR spectroscopy. The water is readily manipulated and used in subsequent reactions either as T{sub 2}O, CH{sub 3}COOT or CF{sub 3}COOT. Development of tritiated diimide has progressed to the point where cis-hydrogenated products at 1-20 Ci/mmole S.A. are possible. Tri-n-butyl tin tritide has been produced at >95% tritium content and well characterized by multinuclear NMR techniques. 27 refs., 3 figs.

  9. NMR investigation of the quantum pigeonhole effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V. S., Anjusha; Hegde, Swathi S.; Mahesh, T. S.

    2016-02-01

    NMR quantum simulators have been used for studying various quantum phenomena. Here, using a four-qubit NMR quantum simulator, we investigate the recently postulated quantum pigeonhole effect. In this phenomenon, a set of three particles in a two-path interferometer often appears to be in such a superposition that no two particles can be assigned a single path, thus exhibiting the nonclassical behavior. In our experiments, quantum pigeons are emulated by three nuclear qubits whose states are probed jointly and noninvasively by an ancillary spin. The experimental results are in good agreement with quantum theoretical predictions.

  10. NMR Microscopy - Micron-Level Resolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Wing-Chi Edmund

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been developed into a powerful and widely used diagnostic tool since the invention of techniques using linear magnetic field gradients in 1973. The variety of imaging contrasts obtainable in MRI, such as spin density, relaxation times and flow rate, gives MRI a significant advantage over other imaging techniques. For common diagnostic applications, image resolutions have been in the order of millimeters with slice thicknesses in centimeters. For many research applications, however, resolutions in the order of tens of microns or smaller are needed. NMR Imaging in these high resolution disciplines is known as NMR microscopy. Compared with conventional microscopy, NMR microscopy has the advantage of being non-invasive and non-destructive. The major obstacles of NMR microscopy are low signal-to-noise ratio and effects due to spin diffusion. To overcome these difficulties, more sensitive RF probes and very high magnetic field gradients have to be used. The most effective way to increase sensitivity is to build smaller probes. Microscope probes of different designs have been built and evaluated. Magnetic field gradient coils that can produce linear field gradients up to 450 Gauss/cm were also assembled. In addition, since microscope probes often employ remote capacitors for RF tuning, the associated signal loss in the transmission line was studied. Imaging experiments have been carried out in a 2.1 Tesla small bore superconducting magnet using the typical two-dimensional spin warp imaging technique. Images have been acquired for both biological and non-biological samples. The highest resolution was obtained in an image of a nerve bundle from the spinal cord of a racoon and has an in-plane resolution of 4 microns. These experiments have demonstrated the potential application of NMR microscopy to pathological research, nervous system study and non -destructive testings of materials. One way to further improve NMR microscopy is

  11. Magic Angle Spinning NMR of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Caitlin; Lu, Manman; Suiter, Christopher L.; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Viruses, relatively simple pathogens, are able to replicate in many living organisms and to adapt to various environments. Conventional atomic-resolution structural biology techniques, X-ray crystallography and solution NMR spectroscopy provided abundant information on the structures of individual proteins and nucleic acids comprising viruses; however, viral assemblies are not amenable to analysis by these techniques because of their large size, insolubility, and inherent lack of long-range order. In this article, we review the recent advances in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy that enabled atomic-resolution analysis of structure and dynamics of large viral systems and give examples of several exciting case studies. PMID:25919197

  12. Sensitive detection of NMR for thin films.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soonchil

    2015-10-01

    NMR can provide valuable information about thin films, but its relatively low sensitivity allows data acquisition only from bulk samples. The sensitivity problem is circumvented by detection schemes with higher sensitivity and/or enhanced polarization. In most of these ingenious techniques, electrons play a central role through hyperfine interactions with the nuclei of interest or the conversion of the spin orientation to an electric charge. The state of the art in NMR is the control of a single nuclear spin state, the complete form of which is one of the ultimate goals of nanotechnology. PMID:26549846

  13. The Quiet Renaissance of Protein NMR

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Paul J.; Chen, Jiang; Cho, Min-Kyu; Kim, Ji-Hun; Lu, Zhenwei; Mathew, Sijo; Peng, Dungeng; Song, Yuanli; Van Horn, Wade D.; Zhuang, Tiandi; Sönnichsen, Frank D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    From roughly 1985 through the start of the new millennium, the cutting edge of solution protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was to a significant extent driven by the aspiration to determine structures. Here we survey recent advances in protein NMR that herald a renaissance in which a number of its most important applications reflect the broad problem-solving capability displayed by this method during its classical era during the 1970s and early 80s. “Without receivers fitted and kept in order, the air may tingle and thrill with the message, but it will not reach my spirit and consciousness.” Mary Slessor, Calabar, circa 1910 PMID:23368985

  14. NO3- Coordination in Aqueous Solutions by 15N/14N and 18O/natO Isotopic Substitution: What Can We Learn from Molecular Simulation?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chialvo, Ariel A.; Vlcek, Lukas

    2014-12-16

    We explore the deconvolution of the water-nitrate correlations by the first-order difference approach involving neutron diffraction of heavy- and null-aqueous solutions of KNO3 under 14N 15N and natON 18ON substitutions to achieve a full characterization of the first water coordination around the nitrate ion. For that purpose we performed isobaric-isothermal simulations of 3.5m KNO3 aqueous solutions at ambient conditions to generate the relevant radial distribution functions (RDF) required in the analysis (a) to identify the individual partial contributions to the total neutron weighted distribution function, (b) to isolate and assess the contribution of NO3 -!K+ pair formation, (c) to testmore » the accuracy of the NDIS-based coordination calculations and XRDbased assumptions, and (d) to describe the water coordination around both the nitrogen and oxygen sites of the nitrate ion.« less

  15. Astrophysical S-factor for the radiative-capture reaction p{sup 13}C {yields} {sup 14}N{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2012-02-15

    The possibility of describing experimental data on the astrophysical S factor for radiative proton capture on a {sup 13}C nucleus at energies in the range 0.03-0.8 MeV is considered within the potential cluster model involving forbidden states. It is shown that the energy dependence of this astrophysical S factor can be reasonably explained on the basis of the E1 transition to the {sup 3}P{sub 1}-wave bound state of the {sup 14}N nucleus in the p{sup 13}C channel from the {sup 3}S{sub 1} wave of p{sup 13}C scattering in the resonance energy region around 0.55 MeV in the laboratory frame.

  16. Radiative neutron capture by {sup 2}H, {sup 7}Li, {sup 14}C, and {sup 14}N nuclei at astrophysical energies

    SciTech Connect

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2013-07-15

    The possibility of describing experimental data on the total cross sections for the n{sup 2}H, n{sup 7}Li, n{sup 14}C, and n{sup 14}N radiative-capture processes within the potential cluster model involving forbidden states and their classification according to Young's tableaux is considered. It is shown that this model and the methods used here to construct potentials make it possible to describe correctly the behavior of the experimental cross sections at energies between 5 to 10 meV (5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}-10 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} eV) and 1 to 15MeV.

  17. Intramolecular charge delocalization and nonlinear optical properties of push-pull chromophore 1-(4-N,N-dimethylaminopyridinium) acetic acid bromide monohydrate from vibrational spectra.

    PubMed

    John, C Jesintha; Amalanathan, M; Sajan, D; Lakshmi, K Udaya; Joe, I Hubert

    2011-01-01

    FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra of the nonlinear optical crystal 1-(4-N,N-dimethylaminopyridinium) acetic acid bromide monohydrate have been recorded and analyzed. The equilibrium geometry, vibrational wavenumbers and the first order hyperpolarizability of the crystal have been calculated with the help of density functional theory computations. The assignments of the vibrational spectra have been carried out with the help of Scaled Quantum Mechanic force field theory. Optimized geometry gives the charge transfer interaction of the pyridine ring and the amino group in the electron-donor side of the nonlinear optic chromophore. Electron-phonon coupling and O-H⋯O interactions in making the molecule nonlinear optical active have been analyzed based on the vibrational spectral features. The Natural Bond Orbital analysis confirms the occurrence of strong intermolecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bonding. PMID:21036101

  18. NMR Stark Spectroscopy: New Methods to Calibrate NMR Sensitivity to Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.

    The influence of electrostatics on NMR parameters is well accepted. Thus, NMR is a promising route to probe electrical features within molecules and materials. However, applications of NMR Stark effects (E-field induced changes in spin energy levels) have been elusive. I have developed new approaches to resolve NMR Stark effects from an applied E field. This calibrates nuclear probes whose spectral response might later be used to evaluate internal E fields that are critical to function, such as those due to local charge distributions or sample structure. I will present two novel experimental approaches for direct calibration of NMR quadrupolar Stark effects (QSEs). In the first, steady-state (few-second) excitation by an E field at twice the NMR frequency (2ω 0) is used to saturate spin magnetization. The extent of saturation vs. E-field amplitude calibrates the QSE response rate, while measurements vs sample orientation determine tensorial character. The second method instead synchronizes short (few µs) pulses of the 2ω0 E field with a multiple-pulse NMR sequence. This, “POWER” (Perturbations Observed With Enhanced Resolution) approach enables more accurate measure of small QSEs (i.e. few Hz spectral changes). A 2nd key advantage is the ability to define tensorial response without reorienting the sample, but instead varying the phase of the 2ω0 field. I will describe these experiments and my home-built NMR “Stark probe”, employed on a conventional wide-bore solid-state NMR system. Results with GaAs demonstrate each method, while extensions to a wider array of molecular and material systems may now be possible using these methods.

  19. Anisotropic Fermi Couplings due to Large Unquenched Orbital Angular Momentum: Q-band 1H, 14N and 11B ENDOR of bistrispyrazolylborate Co(II)

    PubMed Central

    Myers, William K.; Scholes, Charles P.; Tierney, David L.

    2009-01-01

    We report Q-band ENDOR of 1H, 14N, and 11B at the g|| extreme of the EPR spectrum of bistrispyrazolylborate Co(II), Co(Tp)2 and two structural analogs. This trigonally symmetric, high-spin (hs) S = 3/2 Co(II) complex shows large unquenched ground–state orbital angular momentum, which leads to highly anisotropic electronic g-values [g|| = 8.48, g⊥ = 1.02]. The large g-anisotropy is shown to result in large dipolar couplings near g|| and uniquely anisotropic 14N Fermi couplings, which arise from spin transferred to the nitrogen 2s orbital (2.2 %) via anti-bonding interactions with singly occupied metal dx2−y2 and dz2 orbitals. Large, well-resolved 1H and 11B dipolar couplings were also observed. Taken in concert with our previous X-band ENDOR measurements at g⊥ (Myers, et al, Inorg. Chem. 2008, 47, 6701–6710), the present data allow a detailed analysis of the dipolar hyperfine tensors of two of the four symmetry distinct protons in the parent molecule. In the substituted analogs, changes in hyperfine coupling due to altered metal-proton distances give further evidence of an anisotropic Fermi contact interaction. For the pyrazolyl 3H proton, the data indicate a 0.2 MHz anisotropic contact interaction and ~ 4 % transfer of spin away from Co(II). Dipolar coupling also dominates for the axial boron atoms, consistent with their distance from the Co(II) ion, and resolved 11B quadrupolar coupling showed ~ 30 % electronic inequivalence between the B-H and B-C sp3 bonds. This is the first comprehensive ENDOR study of any hs Co(II) species and lays the foundation for future development. PMID:19591466

  20. Solid-state NMR imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Dieckman, Stephen L.; Ellingson, William A.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.

  1. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R.; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H.

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized) molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments. PMID:24441771

  2. A Primer of Fourier Transform NMR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macomber, Roger S.

    1985-01-01

    Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a new spectroscopic technique that is often omitted from undergraduate curricula because of lack of instructional materials. Therefore, information is provided to introduce students to the technique of data collection and transformation into the frequency domain. (JN)

  3. Solid-state NMR for bacterial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria associate with surfaces and one another by elaborating an extracellular matrix to encapsulate cells, creating communities termed biofilms. Biofilms are beneficial in some ecological niches, but also contribute to the pathogenesis of serious and chronic infectious diseases. New approaches and quantitative measurements are needed to define the composition and architecture of bacterial biofilms to help drive the development of strategies to interfere with biofilm assembly. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is uniquely suited to the examination of insoluble and complex macromolecular and whole-cell systems. This article highlights three examples that implement solid-state NMR to deliver insights into bacterial biofilm composition and changes in cell-wall composition as cells transition to the biofilm lifestyle. Most recently, solid-state NMR measurements provided a total accounting of the protein and polysaccharide components in the extracellular matrix of an Escherichia coli biofilm and transformed our qualitative descriptions of matrix composition into chemical parameters that permit quantitative comparisons among samples. We present additional data for whole biofilm samples (cells plus the extracellular matrix) that complement matrix-only analyses. The study of bacterial biofilms by solid-state NMR is an exciting avenue ripe with many opportunities and we close the article by articulating some outstanding questions and future directions in this area.

  4. Solid-state NMR imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Dieckman, S.L.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    An accessory for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.

  5. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  6. Increasing the quantitative bandwidth of NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Power, J E; Foroozandeh, M; Adams, R W; Nilsson, M; Coombes, S R; Phillips, A R; Morris, G A

    2016-02-18

    The frequency range of quantitative NMR is increased from tens to hundreds of kHz by a new pulse sequence, CHORUS. It uses chirp pulses to excite uniformly over very large bandwidths, yielding accurate integrals even for nuclei such as (19)F that have very wide spectra. PMID:26789115

  7. NMR analysis of a fluorocarbon copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.; Smith, C.H.

    1987-10-01

    Vinylidene fluoride (VF/sub 2/) can be copolymerized with chlorotrifluoroethylene (CTFE) in an aqueous emulsion using a peroxide chain initiator. The physical properties of the resulting fluorocarbon polymer depend on the ratio of VF/sub 2/ to CTFE and the randomness of the copolymerization. When CTFE and VF are polymerized in an approximately 3:1 mole ratio, the resulting polymer is soluble in acetone (and other solvents) at room temperature. Using proton and fluorine-19 NMR, the mole ratio of CTFE to VF/sub 2/, the emulsifier (perfluorodecanoate) concentration, and the randomness of copolymerization can be determined. A trifluorotoluene internal standard is added to a d/sub 6/-acetone solution of the fluoropolymer. Proton NMR is used to determine the amount of VF/sub 2/. Fluorine-19 NMR is used to measure the amount of emulsifier and the randomness of copolymerization. Each analysis requires about 5 minutes, and is quite precise, with relative standard deviations from 3 to 10% (10 replicates analyzed). In addition, the results from NMR analyses agree well with wet chemical analyses. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. SQUID detected NMR in microtesla magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlachov, Andrei N.; Volegov, Petr L.; Espy, Michelle A.; George, John S.; Kraus, Robert H.

    2004-09-01

    We have built an NMR system that employs a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector and operates in measurement fields of 2-25 μT. The system uses a pre-polarizing field from 4 to 30 mT generated by simple room-temperature wire-wound coils that are turned off during measurements. The instrument has an open geometry with samples located outside the cryostat at room-temperature. This removes constraints on sample size and allows us to obtain signals from living tissue. We have obtained 1H NMR spectra from a variety of samples including water, mineral oil, and a live frog. We also acquired gradient encoded free induction decay (FID) data from a water-plastic phantom in the μT regime, from which simple projection images were reconstructed. NMR signals from samples inside metallic containers have also been acquired. This is possible because the penetration skin depth is much greater at the low operating frequencies of this system than for conventional systems. Advantages to ultra-low field NMR measurements include lower susceptibility artifacts caused by high strength polarizing and measurement fields, and negligible line width broadening due to measurement field inhomogeneity, reducing the burden of producing highly homogeneous fields.

  9. Advanced Laboratory NMR Spectrometer with Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biscegli, Clovis; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of an inexpensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer suitable for use in advanced laboratory courses. Applications to the nondestructive analysis of the oil content in corn seeds and in monitoring the crystallization of polymers are presented. (SK)

  10. Solid-State NMR Reveals the Hydrophobic-Core Location of Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimers in Biomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Pieter E. S.; Brender, Jeffrey R.; Dürr, Ulrich H. N.; Xu, Jiadi; Mullen, Douglas G.; Banaszak Holl, Mark M.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2010-01-01

    Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer nanobiotechnology shows great promise in targeted drug delivery and gene therapy. Because of the involvement of cell membrane lipids with the pharmacological activity of dendrimer nanomedicines, the interactions between dendrimers and lipids are of particular relevance to the pharmaceutical applications of dendrimers. In this study, solid-state NMR was used to obtain a molecular image of the complex of generation 5 PAMAM dendrimer with the lipid bilayer. Using 1H radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR) and 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) techniques, we show that dendrimers are thermodynamically stable when inserted into zwitterionic lipid bilayers. 14N and 31P NMR experiments on static samples and measurements of the mobility of C–H bonds using a 2D proton detected local field protocol under MAS corroborate these results. The localization of dendrimers in the hydrophobic core of lipid bilayers restricts the motion of bilayer lipid tails, with the smaller G5 dendrimer having more of an effect than the larger G7 dendrimer. Fragmentation of the membrane does not occur at low dendrimer concentrations in zwitterionic membranes. Because these results show that the amphipathic dendrimer molecule can be stably incorporated in the interior of the bilayer (as opposed to electrostatic binding at the surface), they are expected to be useful in the design of dendrimer-based nanobiotechnologies. PMID:20481633

  11. Combining solid-state NMR spectroscopy with first-principles calculations - a guide to NMR crystallography.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; McKay, David

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in the application of first-principles calculations of NMR parameters to periodic systems have resulted in widespread interest in their use to support experimental measurement. Such calculations often play an important role in the emerging field of "NMR crystallography", where NMR spectroscopy is combined with techniques such as diffraction, to aid structure determination. Here, we discuss the current state-of-the-art for combining experiment and calculation in NMR spectroscopy, considering the basic theory behind the computational approaches and their practical application. We consider the issues associated with geometry optimisation and how the effects of temperature may be included in the calculation. The automated prediction of structural candidates and the treatment of disordered and dynamic solids are discussed. Finally, we consider the areas where further development is needed in this field and its potential future impact. PMID:27117884

  12. An NMR study of microvoids in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattix, Larry

    1995-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb the Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe(129)-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts line Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A single Xe-129 line at 83.003498 Mhz (with protons at 300 Mhz) was observed for the gas. With the xenon charged PMR-15 samples, a second broader line is observed 190 ppm downfield from the gas line (also observed). The width of the NMR line from the Xe-129 absorbed in the polymer is at least partially due to the distribution of microvoid sizes. From the chemical shift (relative to the gas line) and the line width, we estimate the average void sizes to be 2.74 +/- 0.20 angstroms. Since Xe-129 has such a large chemical shift range (approximately 5000 ppm), we expect the chemical shift anisotropy to contribute to the

  13. The Cheshire-cat-like Behavior of 2nu(sub 3) Overtone of Co2 near 2.134 micron: NIR Lab Spectra of Solid CO2 in H2O and CH3OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Max; Sandford, Scott; Cruikshank, Dale

    2005-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectra have demonstrated that solid H2O is very common in the outer Solar System, and solid carbon dioxide (CO2) has been detected on icy satellites, comets, and planetismals throughout the outer Solar System. In such environments, CO2 and H2O must sometimes be mixed at a molecular level, changing their IR absorption features. In fact, the IR spectra of CO2-H2O mixtures are not equivalent to a linear combination of the spectra of the pure materials. Laboratory IR spectra of pure CO2 and H2O have been published but a lack of near-IR spectra of CO2-H2O mixtures has made the interpretation of outer Solar System spectra more difficult. We present near infrared (IR) spectra of CO2 in H2O and in CH3OH compared to that of pure solid CO2 and find significant differences. Peaks not present in either pure H2O or pure CO2 spectra become evident. First, the CO2 (2nu(sub 3)) overtone near 2.134 micron (4685/ cm) that is not seen in pure solid CO2 is prominent in the spectrum of a CO2/H2O = 25 mixture. Second, a 2.74 micron (3650/ cm) dangling OH feature of water (and a potentially related peak at 1.89 micron) appear in the spectra of CO2-H2O ice mixtures, but may not be specific to the presence of CO2. Other CO2 peaks display shifts in position and increased width because of intermolecular interactions with water. Changes in CO2 peak positions and profiles on warming of a CO2/H2O = 5 mixture are consistent with 'segregation' of the ice into nearly pure separate components. Absolute strengths for absorptions of CO2 in solid H2O are estimated. Similar results are observed for CO2 in solid CH3OH. Since the CO2 ( 2nu(sub 3)) overtone near 2.134 micron (4685/ cm) is not present in pure CO2 but prominent in mixtures it may be a good observational indicator of whether solid CO2 is a pure material or intimately mixed with other molecules. Significant changes in the near IR spectrum of solid CO2 in the presence of H2O and CH3OH means that the abundance of solid CO2 in the

  14. Superoxygenated Water as an Experimental Sample for NMR Relaxometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Dakkouri, Marwan; Rauscher, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    The increase in NMR relaxation rates as a result of dissolved paramagnetic species on the sample of superoxygenated drinking water is demonstrated. It is concluded that oxygen content in NMR samples is an important issue and can give rise to various problems in the interpretation of both spectroscopic and NMR imaging or relaxation experiments.

  15. Applications of Diffusion Ordered Spectroscopy (DOSY-NMR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diffusion-ordered NMR (DOSY-NMR) is a powerful, but under-utilized, technique for the investigation of mixtures based on translational diffusion rates. DOSY spectra allow for determination by NMR of components that may differ in molecular weight, geometry or complexation. Typical applications coul...

  16. Solid-state NMR studies of supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Grey, Clare P

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors, or 'supercapacitors' are attracting increasing attention as high-power energy storage devices for a wide range of technological applications. These devices store charge through electrostatic interactions between liquid electrolyte ions and the surfaces of porous carbon electrodes. However, many aspects of the fundamental mechanism of supercapacitance are still not well understood, and there is a lack of experimental techniques which are capable of studying working devices. Recently, solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool for studying the local environments and behaviour of electrolyte ions in supercapacitor electrodes. In this Trends article, we review these recent developments and applications. We first discuss the basic principles underlying the mechanism of supercapacitance, as well as the key NMR observables that are relevant to the study of supercapacitor electrodes. We then review some practical aspects of the study of working devices using ex situ and in situ methodologies and explain the key advances that these techniques have allowed on the study of supercapacitor charging mechanisms. NMR experiments have revealed that the pores of the carbon electrodes contain a significant number of electrolyte ions in the absence of any charging potential. This has important implications for the molecular mechanisms of supercapacitance, as charge can be stored by different ion adsorption/desorption processes. Crucially, we show how in situ NMR experiments can be used to quantitatively study and characterise the charging mechanism, with the experiments providing the most detailed picture of charge storage to date, offering the opportunity to design enhanced devices. Finally, an outlook for future directions for solid-state NMR in supercapacitor research is offered. PMID:26974032

  17. Solid-state (185/187)Re NMR and GIPAW DFT study of perrhenates and Re2(CO)10: chemical shift anisotropy, NMR crystallography, and a metal-metal bond.

    PubMed

    Widdifield, Cory M; Perras, Frédéric A; Bryce, David L

    2015-04-21

    Advances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) methods, such as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), intricate pulse sequences, and increased applied magnetic fields, allow for the study of systems which even very recently would be impractical. However, SSNMR methods using certain quadrupolar probe nuclei (i.e., I > 1/2), such as (185/187)Re remain far from fully developed due to the exceedingly strong interaction between the quadrupole moment of these nuclei and local electric field gradients (EFGs). We present a detailed high-field (B0 = 21.1 T) experimental SSNMR study on several perrhenates (KReO4, AgReO4, Ca(ReO4)2·2H2O), as well as ReO3 and Re2(CO)10. We propose solid ReO3 as a new rhenium SSNMR chemical shift standard due to its reproducible and sharp (185/187)Re NMR resonances. We show that for KReO4, previously poorly understood high-order quadrupole-induced effects (HOQIE) on the satellite transitions can be used to measure the EFG tensor asymmetry (i.e., ηQ) to nearly an order-of-magnitude greater precision than competing SSNMR and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) approaches. Samples of AgReO4 and Ca(ReO4)2·2H2O enable us to comment on the effects of counter-ions and hydration upon Re(vii) chemical shifts. Calcium-43 and (185/187)Re NMR tensor parameters allow us to conclude that two proposed crystal structures for Ca(ReO4)2·2H2O, which would be considered as distinct, are in fact the same structure. Study of Re2(CO)10 provides insights into the effects of Re-Re bonding on the rhenium NMR tensor parameters and rhenium oxidation state on the Re chemical shift value. As overtone NQR experiments allowed us to precisely measure the (185/187)Re EFG tensor of Re2(CO)10, we were able to measure rhenium chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) for the first time in a powdered sample. Experimental observations are supported by gauge-including projector augmented-wave (GIPAW) density functional theory (DFT) calculations, with NMR tensor calculations also

  18. NMR Constraints Analyser: a web-server for the graphical analysis of NMR experimental constraints.

    PubMed

    Heller, Davide Martin; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy together with X-ray crystallography, are the main techniques used for the determination of high-resolution 3D structures of biological molecules. The output of an NMR experiment includes a set of lower and upper limits for the distances (constraints) between pairs of atoms. If the number of constraints is high enough, there will be a finite number of possible conformations (models) of the macromolecule satisfying the data. Thus, the more constraints are measured, the better defined these structures will be. The availability of a user-friendly tool able to help in the analysis and interpretation of the number of experimental constraints per residue, is thus of valuable importance when assessing the levels of structure definition of NMR solved biological macromolecules, in particular, when high-quality structures are needed in techniques such as, computational biology approaches, site-directed mutagenesis experiments and/or drug design. Here, we present a free publicly available web-server, i.e. NMR Constraints Analyser, which is aimed at providing an automatic graphical analysis of the NMR experimental constraints atom by atom. The NMR Constraints Analyser server is available from the web-page http://molsim.sci.univr.it/constraint. PMID:20513646

  19. OPENCORE NMR: open-source core modules for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2008-06-01

    A tool kit for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer [K. Takeda, A highly integrated FPGA-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78 (2007) 033103], referred to as the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer, is open to public. The system is composed of an FPGA chip and several peripheral boards for USB communication, direct-digital synthesis (DDS), RF transmission, signal acquisition, etc. Inside the FPGA chip have been implemented a number of digital modules including three pulse programmers, the digital part of DDS, a digital quadrature demodulator, dual digital low-pass filters, and a PC interface. These FPGA core modules are written in VHDL, and their source codes are available on our website. This work aims at providing sufficient information with which one can, given some facility in circuit board manufacturing, reproduce the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer presented here. Also, the users are encouraged to modify the design of spectrometer according to their own specific needs. A home-built NMR spectrometer can serve complementary roles to a sophisticated commercial spectrometer, should one comes across such new ideas that require heavy modification to hardware inside the spectrometer. This work can lower the barrier of building a handmade NMR spectrometer in the laboratory, and promote novel and exciting NMR experiments. PMID:18374613

  20. Hyperpolarization of “Neat” Liquids by NMR Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report NMR Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange (SABRE) hyperpolarization of the rare isotopes in “neat” liquids, each composed only of an otherwise pure target compound with isotopic natural abundance (n.a.) and millimolar concentrations of dissolved catalyst. Pyridine (Py) or Py derivatives are studied at 0.4% isotopic natural abundance 15N, deuterated, 15N enriched, and in various combinations using the SABRE-SHEATH variant (microTesla magnetic fields to permit direct 15N polarization from parahydrogen via reversible binding and exchange with an Ir catalyst). We find that the dilute n.a. 15N spin bath in Py still channels spin order from parahydrogen to dilute 15N spins, without polarization losses due to the presence of 14N or 2H. We demonstrate P15N ≈ 1% (a gain of 2900 fold relative to thermal polarization at 9.4 T) at high substrate concentrations. This fundamental finding has a significant practical benefit for screening potentially hyperpolarizable contrast agents without labeling. The capability of screening at n.a. level of 15N is demonstrated on examples of mono- and dimethyl-substituted Py (picolines and lutidines previously identified as promising pH sensors), showing that the presence of a methyl group in the ortho position significantly decreases SABRE hyperpolarization. PMID:26029349

  1. I: Low Frequency NMR and NQR Using a dc SQUID. II: Variable-temperature 13C CP/MAS of Organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegeweid, M.A.

    1995-11-29

    NMR and NQR at low frequencies are difficult prospects due to small nuclear spin polarization. Furthermore, the sensitivity'of the inductive pickup circuitry of standard spectrometers is reduced as the frequency is lowered. I have used a cw-SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) spectrometer, which has no such frequency dependence, to study the local atomic environment of {sup 14}N via the quadrupolar interaction. Because {sup 14}N has spin I = 1 and a 0-6 MHz frequency range, it is not possible to obtain well-resolved spectra in high magnetic fields. I have used a technique to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances via their effect on neighboring protons mediated by the heteronuclear dipolar interaction to study peptides and narcotics. The sensitivity of the SQUID is not enough to measure low-frequency surface (or other low spin density) systems. The application of spin-polarized xenon has been previously used to enhance polarization in conventional NMR experiments. Because xenon only polarizes spins with which it is in contact, it is surface selective. While differences in chemical shifts between surface and bulk spins are not large, it is expected that the differences in quadrupole coupling constant should be very large due to the drastic change of the electric field gradient surrounding spins at the surface. With this in mind, I have taken preliminary steps to measure SQUID detected polarization transfer from Xe to another spin species at 4.2 K and in small magnetic fields (<50 G). In this regime, the spin-lattice relaxation of xenon is dependent on the applied magnetic field. The results of our efforts to characterize the relaxation of xenon are presented. The final section describes the solid-state variable-temperature (VT) one- and two-dimensional {sup 13}C cross polarization (CP)/magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of Hf({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}({eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, Zr({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 3}({eta}{sup 1}-C

  2. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 7, April 1, 1993--June 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1993-09-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultramicro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal`s structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. Small angle scattering could be improved by combining scattering and adsorption measurements. Also, the measurement of NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide pore structure information. We will investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 2}H{sub 2},{sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, {sup 15}N{sub 2},{sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and the pore surfaces in coals.

  3. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarter report {number_sign}8, 7/1/93--9/30/93

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1993-12-31

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultramicro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal`s structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. Small angle scattering could be improved by combining scattering and adsorption measurements. Also, the measurement of NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide pore structure information. The dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals is investigated. In particular, the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 14}N{sub 2},{sup 14}NH{sub 3},{sup 15}N{sub 2},{sup 13} CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and pore surface is studied.

  4. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 6, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1993-08-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal`s structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. Small angle scattering could be improved by combining scattering and adsorption measurements. Also, the measurement of NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide pore structure information. We will investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 2}H{sub 2}, {sup 14}N{sub 2},{sup 14}NH{sub 3}, {sup 15}N{sup 2}, {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and the pore surfaces in coals.

  5. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2007-05-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  6. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-05-30

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  7. SQUID detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-10-03

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  8. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander; McDermott, Robert F.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2008-12-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  9. Lifetime Measurement of the 6.79 MeV Excited State of 15O to Help Constrain the 14N(p,gamma)15O Reaction Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinski, Naomi

    2013-12-01

    In main sequence stars such as our Sun, the source of energy comes from converting hydrogen into helium. There are two competing mechanisms via which this can happen: the pp chain and CNO cycle. The latter is a cycle of reactions involving carbon, nitrogen and oxygen which are catalysts for the conversion of hydrogen into helium. The slowest reaction 14N(p, gamma) 15O in the cycle will affect the energy generation timescale and the amount of helium ash produced via the CNO cycle. This has several astrophysical impacts. It affects the evolutionary timescale of main sequence stars from which the ages of globular clusters can be calculated, the nucleosynthesis of heavier elements in H burning shells of red giant stars, and the fraction of energy produced by the CNO cycle compared to the pp chain in our Sun which helps determine the interior composition of the Sun. For main sequence stars the CNO cycle dominates over the pp chain for core temperatures T ≳ 0.02 GK. For the 14N(p, gamma)15O reaction this corresponds to a low center of mass energy Ecm = 30 keV. This is lower than the low energy limit of the reaction rate measurable in the laboratory. This means that we need to extrapolate down to low energy using theory. The largest remaining uncertainty in the theoretical calculations is due to the lifetime tau of the 6.79 MeV state of 15O. In this work the lifetimes of three excited states of 15O were measured using the Doppler shift attenuation method (DSAM) populating the states via the 3He(16O,alpha)15O reaction at a beam energy of 50 MeV. The low lifetime limit measurable using the DSAM is ˜1 fs. The lifetime of the 6.79 MeV state is near that limit, making this measurement challenging. A 1.8 fs upper limit (68.3% C.L.) on this lifetime is reported here. In addition we measured the lifetimes of the 6.17 and 6.86 MeV state in 15O which were < 2.5 fs and 13.3+0.8-1.2 fs (68.3% C.L.) respectively. iii Acknowledgments

  10. NMR CHARACTERIZATIONS OF PROPERTIES OF HETEROGENEOUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    C.T. Philip Chang; Changho Choi; Jeromy T. Hollenshead; Rudi Michalak; Jack Phan; Ramon Saavedra; John C. Slattery; Jinsoo Uh; Randi Valestrand; A. Ted Watson; Song Xue

    2005-01-01

    A critical and long-standing need within the petroleum industry is the specification of suitable petrophysical properties for mathematical simulation of fluid flow in petroleum reservoirs (i.e., reservoir characterization). The development of accurate reservoir characterizations is extremely challenging. Property variations may be described on many scales, and the information available from measurements reflect different scales. In fact, experiments on laboratory core samples, well-log data, well-test data, and reservoir-production data all represent information potentially valuable to reservoir characterization, yet they all reflect information about spatial variations of properties at different scales. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) provide enormous potential for developing new descriptions and understandings of heterogeneous media. NMR has the rare capability to probe permeable media non-invasively, with spatial resolution, and it provides unique information about molecular motions and interactions that are sensitive to morphology. NMR well-logging provides the best opportunity ever to resolve permeability distributions within petroleum reservoirs. We develop MRI methods to determine, for the first time, spatially resolved distributions of porosity and permeability within permeable media samples that approach the intrinsic scale: the finest resolution of these macroscopic properties possible. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the permeability is actually resolved at a scale smaller than the sample. In order to do this, we have developed a robust method to determine of relaxation distributions from NMR experiments and a novel implementation and analysis of MRI experiments to determine the amount of fluid corresponding to imaging regions, which are in turn used to determine porosity and saturation distributions. We have developed a novel MRI experiment to determine velocity distributions within flowing experiments, and

  11. Effect of quenching conditions on the formation of the grain structure and the mechanical properties of high-nitrogen austenitic 02Kh20AG14N8MF and 02Kh20AG12N4 steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannykh, I. O.

    2015-11-01

    The formation of the grain structure of high-nitrogen 02Kh20AG14N8MF and 02Kh20AG12N4 steels in forging and quenching and their mechanical properties in this state have been studied. It is found that both steels have close mechanical properties under the same quenching conditions. In 02Kh20AG14N8MF steel, a homogeneous structure of primarily recrystallized austenite grains forms under the quenching conditions under study. In 02Kh20AG12N4 steel, the processes of secondary recrystallization and normal grain growth take place.

  12. Sodium ion effect on silk fibroin conformation characterized by solid-state NMR and generalized 2D NMR NMR correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Qing-Xia; Zhou, Ping

    2008-07-01

    In the present work, we investigated Na + ion effect on the silk fibroin (SF) conformation. Samples are Na +-involved regenerated silk fibroin films. 13C CP-MAS NMR demonstrates that as added [Na +] increases, partial silk fibroin conformation transit from helix-form to β-form at certain Na + ion concentration which is much higher than that in Bombyx mori silkworm gland. The generalized two-dimensional NMR-NMR correlation analysis reveals that silk fibroin undergoes several intermediate states during its conformation transition process as [Na +] increase. The appearance order of the intermediates is followed as: helix and/or random coil → helix-like → β-sheet-like → β-sheet, which is the same as that produced by pH decrease from 6.8 to 4.8 in the resultant regenerated silk fibroin films. The binding sites of Na + to silk fibroin might involve the carbonyl oxygen atom of certain amino acids sequence which could promote the formation of β-sheet conformation. Since the Na +sbnd O bond is weak, the ability of Na + inducing the secondary structure transition is weaker than those of Ca 2+, Cu 2+ and even K +. It is maybe a reason why the sodium content is much lower than potassium in the silkworm gland.

  13. Multiecho scheme advances surface NMR for aquifer characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunewald, Elliot; Walsh, David

    2013-12-01

    nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is increasingly used as a method to noninvasively characterize aquifers. This technology follows a successful history of NMR logging, applied over decades to estimate hydrocarbon reservoir properties. In contrast to logging, however, surface methods have utilized relatively simple acquisition sequences, from which pore-scale properties may not be reliably and efficiently estimated. We demonstrate for the first time the capability of sophisticated multiecho measurements to rapidly record a surface NMR response that more directly reflects aquifer characteristics. Specifically, we develop an adaptation of the multipulse Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence, widely used in logging, to measure the T2 relaxation response in a single scan. We validate this approach in a field surface NMR data set and by direct comparison with an NMR log. Adoption of the CPMG marked a landmark advancement in the history of logging NMR; we have now realized this same advancement in the surface NMR method.

  14. NMR shielding calculations across the periodic table: diamagnetic uranium compounds. 2. Ligand and metal NMR.

    PubMed

    Schreckenbach, Georg

    2002-12-16

    In this and a previous article (J. Phys. Chem. A 2000, 104, 8244), the range of application for relativistic density functional theory (DFT) is extended to the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shieldings and chemical shifts in diamagnetic actinide compounds. Two relativistic DFT methods are used, ZORA ("zeroth-order regular approximation") and the quasirelativistic (QR) method. In the given second paper, NMR shieldings and chemical shifts are calculated and discussed for a wide range of compounds. The molecules studied comprise uranyl complexes, [UO(2)L(n)](+/-)(q); UF(6); inorganic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)Cl(n), n = 0-6; and organometallic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n), n = 0-5. Uranyl complexes include [UO(2)F(4)](2-), [UO(2)Cl(4)](2-), [UO(2)(OH)(4)](2-), [UO(2)(CO(3))(3)](4-), and [UO(2)(H(2)O)(5)](2+). For the ligand NMR, moderate (e.g., (19)F NMR chemical shifts in UF(6-n)Cl(n)) to excellent agreement [e.g., (19)F chemical shift tensor in UF(6) or (1)H NMR in UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n)] has been found between theory and experiment. The methods have been used to calculate the experimentally unknown (235)U NMR chemical shifts. A large chemical shift range of at least 21,000 ppm has been predicted for the (235)U nucleus. ZORA spin-orbit appears to be the most accurate method for predicting actinide metal chemical shifts. Trends in the (235)U NMR chemical shifts of UF(6-n)L(n) molecules are analyzed and explained in terms of the calculated electronic structure. It is argued that the energy separation and interaction between occupied and virtual orbitals with f-character are the determining factors. PMID:12470051

  15. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner. PMID:24149218

  16. NMR with excitation modulated by Frank sequences.

    PubMed

    Blümich, Bernhard; Gong, Qingxia; Byrne, Eimear; Greferath, Marcus

    2009-07-01

    Miniaturized NMR is of growing importance in bio-, chemical, and -material sciences. Other than the magnet, bulky components are the radio-frequency power amplifier and the power supply or battery pack. We show that constant flip-angle excitation with phase modulation following a particular type of polyphase perfect sequences results in low peak excitation power at high response peak power. It has ideal power distribution in both the time domain and the frequency domain. A savings in peak excitation power of six orders of magnitude has been realized compared to conventionally pulsed excitation. Among others, the excitation promises to be of use for button-cell operated miniature NMR devices as well as for complying with specific-absorption-rate regulations in high-field medical imaging. PMID:19386525

  17. NMR-based diffusion lattice imaging.

    PubMed

    Laun, Frederik Bernd; Müller, Lars; Kuder, Tristan Anselm

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion experiments are widely employed as they yield information about structures hindering the diffusion process, e.g., about cell membranes. While it has been shown in recent articles that these experiments can be used to determine the shape of closed pores averaged over a volume of interest, it is still an open question how much information can be gained in open well-connected systems. In this theoretical work, it is shown that the full structure information of connected periodic systems is accessible. To this end, the so-called "SEquential Rephasing by Pulsed field-gradient Encoding N Time intervals" (SERPENT) sequence is used, which employs several diffusion encoding gradient pulses with different amplitudes. Two two-dimensional solid matrices that are surrounded by an NMR-visible medium are considered: a hexagonal lattice of cylinders and a rectangular lattice of isosceles triangles. PMID:27078384

  18. Nuclear spin noise in NMR revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrand, Guillaume; Luong, Michel

    2015-09-07

    The theoretical shapes of nuclear spin-noise spectra in NMR are derived by considering a receiver circuit with finite preamplifier input impedance and a transmission line between the preamplifier and the probe. Using this model, it becomes possible to reproduce all observed experimental features: variation of the NMR resonance linewidth as a function of the transmission line phase, nuclear spin-noise signals appearing as a “bump” or as a “dip” superimposed on the average electronic noise level even for a spin system and probe at the same temperature, pure in-phase Lorentzian spin-noise signals exhibiting non-vanishing frequency shifts. Extensive comparisons to experimental measurements validate the model predictions, and define the conditions for obtaining pure in-phase Lorentzian-shape nuclear spin noise with a vanishing frequency shift, in other words, the conditions for simultaneously obtaining the spin-noise and frequency-shift tuning optima.

  19. Multifunctional pulse sequence generator for pulse NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongsheng

    1988-06-01

    A new multifunctional pulse sequence generator has been designed and constructed. It can conveniently generate various pulse sequences used in nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) to measure the spin-lattice relaxation time T1, the spin-spin relaxation time T2, and the spin-locking relaxation time T1 ρ. It can also be used in pulse Fourier transform NMR and double resonance. The intervals of pulses can increase automatically with sequence repetitions and the generator can be used in two-dimensional spectrum measurement and spin-density imaging research. The sequences can be generated through four different triggering methods and there are two synchronous pulse outputs and fifteen auxiliary pulse outputs, so the generator can be conveniently interfaced with a computer or other instruments. The circuitry, functions, and features of the generator are described in this article.

  20. NMR spectral analysis using prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Takuma; Nagata, Kenji; Okada, Masato; Kigawa, Takanori

    2016-03-01

    Signal assignment is a fundamental step for analyses of protein structure and dynamics with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Main-chain signal assignment is achieved with a sequential assignment method and/or an amino-acid selective stable isotope labeling (AASIL) method. Combinatorial selective labeling (CSL) methods, as well as our labeling strategy, stable isotope encoding (SiCode), were developed to reduce the required number of labeled samples, since one of the drawbacks of AASIL is that many samples are needed. Signal overlapping in NMR spectra interferes with amino-acid determination by CSL and SiCode. Since spectral deconvolution by peak fitting with a gradient method cannot resolve closely overlapped signals, we developed a new method to perform both peak fitting and amino acid determination simultaneously, with a replica exchange Monte Carlo method, incorporating prior knowledge of stable-isotope labeling ratios and the amino-acid sequence of the protein.

  1. NMR-based diffusion lattice imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laun, Frederik Bernd; Müller, Lars; Kuder, Tristan Anselm

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion experiments are widely employed as they yield information about structures hindering the diffusion process, e.g., about cell membranes. While it has been shown in recent articles that these experiments can be used to determine the shape of closed pores averaged over a volume of interest, it is still an open question how much information can be gained in open well-connected systems. In this theoretical work, it is shown that the full structure information of connected periodic systems is accessible. To this end, the so-called "SEquential Rephasing by Pulsed field-gradient Encoding N Time intervals" (SERPENT) sequence is used, which employs several diffusion encoding gradient pulses with different amplitudes. Two two-dimensional solid matrices that are surrounded by an NMR-visible medium are considered: a hexagonal lattice of cylinders and a rectangular lattice of isosceles triangles.

  2. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2013-12-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner.

  3. Nuclear spin noise in NMR revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrand, Guillaume; Huber, Gaspard; Luong, Michel; Desvaux, Hervé

    2015-09-01

    The theoretical shapes of nuclear spin-noise spectra in NMR are derived by considering a receiver circuit with finite preamplifier input impedance and a transmission line between the preamplifier and the probe. Using this model, it becomes possible to reproduce all observed experimental features: variation of the NMR resonance linewidth as a function of the transmission line phase, nuclear spin-noise signals appearing as a "bump" or as a "dip" superimposed on the average electronic noise level even for a spin system and probe at the same temperature, pure in-phase Lorentzian spin-noise signals exhibiting non-vanishing frequency shifts. Extensive comparisons to experimental measurements validate the model predictions, and define the conditions for obtaining pure in-phase Lorentzian-shape nuclear spin noise with a vanishing frequency shift, in other words, the conditions for simultaneously obtaining the spin-noise and frequency-shift tuning optima.

  4. Haldane-gap excitations in the low-Hc one-dimensional quantum antiferromagnet Ni(C5D14N2)2N3(PF6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheludev, A.; Chen, Y.; Broholm, C. L.; Honda, Z.; Katsumata, K.

    2001-03-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering on deuterated single-crystal samples is used to study Haldane-gap excitations in the new S=1 one-dimensional quantum antiferromagnet Ni(C5D14N2)2N3(PF6), that was recently recognized as an ideal model system for high-field studies. The Haldane gap energies Δx=0.42(3) meV, Δy=0.52(6) meV, and Δz=1.9(1) meV, for excitations polarized along the a, b, and c crystallographic axes, respectively, are measured. The dispersion relation is studied for momentum transfers both along and perpendicular to the chains' direction. The in-chain exchange constant J=2.8 meV is found to be much larger than interchain coupling, Jy=1.8(4)×10-3 meV and Jx=4(3)×10-4 meV, along the b and a axes, respectively. The results are discussed in the context of future experiments in high magnetic fields.

  5. beta1,4-N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase III potentiates beta1 integrin-mediated neuritogenesis induced by serum deprivation in Neuro2a cells.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, Masaki; Shibukawa, Yukinao; Ihara, Hideyuki; Miyoshi, Eiji; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Gu, Jianguo

    2006-06-01

    Aspects of the biological significance of the bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) structure on N-glycans introduced by beta1,4-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III (GnT-III) in Neuro2a cell differentiation are demonstrated. The overexpression of GnT-III in the cells led to the induction of axon-like processes with numerous neurites and swellings, in which beta1 integrin was localized, under conditions of serum starvation. This enhancement in neuritogenesis was suppressed by either the addition of a bisecting GlcNAc-containing N-glycan or erythroagglutinating phytohemagglutinin (E(4)-PHA), which preferentially recognizes the bisecting GlcNAc. GnT-III-promoted neuritogenesis was also significantly perturbed by treatment with a functional blocking anti-beta1 integrin antibody. In fact, beta1 integrin was found to be one of the target proteins of GnT-III, as confirmed by a pull-down assay with E(4)-PHA. These data suggest that N-glycans with a bisecting GlcNAc on target molecules, such as beta1 integrin, play important roles in the regulation of neuritogenesis. PMID:16531477

  6. Earth's magnetic field enabled scalar coupling relaxation of 13C nuclei bound to fast-relaxing quadrupolar 14N in amide groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiavazza, Enrico; Kubala, Eugen; Gringeri, Concetta V.; Düwel, Stephan; Durst, Markus; Schulte, Rolf F.; Menzel, Marion I.

    2013-02-01

    Scalar coupling relaxation, which is usually only associated with closely resonant nuclei (e.g., 79Br-13C), can be a very effective relaxation mechanism. While working on hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, fast liquid-state polarization decay during transfer to the MRI scanner was observed. This behavior could hypothetically be explained by substantial T1 shortening due to a scalar coupling contribution (type II) to the relaxation caused by the fast-relaxing quadrupolar 14N adjacent to the 13C nucleus in the amide group. This contribution is only effective in low magnetic fields (i.e., less than 800 μT) and prevents the use of molecules bearing the 13C-amide group as hyperpolarized MRS/MRI probes. In the present work, this hypothesis is explored both theoretically and experimentally. The results show that high hyperpolarization levels can be retained using either a 15N-labeled amide or by applying a magnetic field during transfer of the sample from the polarizer to the MRI scanner.

  7. Theoretical 13C chemical shift, 14N, and 2H quadrupole coupling- constant studies of hydrogen bonding in L-alanylglycine dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Tafazzoli, M; Amini, S K

    2008-04-01

    (13)C chemical shieldings and (14)N and (2)H electric field gradient (EFG) tensors of L-alanylglycine (L-alagly) dipeptide were calculated at RHF/6-31 + + G** and B3LYP/6-31 + + G** levels of theory respectively. For these calculations a crystal structure of this dipeptide obtained from X-ray crystallography was used. Atomic coordinates of different clusters containing several L-alagly molecules were used as input files for calculations. These clusters consist of central and surrounding L-alagly molecules, the latter forming short, strong, hydrogen bonds with the central molecule. Since the calculations did not converge for these clusters, the surrounding L-alagly molecules were replaced by glycine molecules. In order to improve the accuracy of calculated chemical shifts and nuclear quadrupole coupling constants (NQCCs), different geometry-optimization strategies were applied for hydrogen nuclei. Agreement between calculated and experimental data confirms that our optimized coordinates for hydrogen nuclei are more accurate than those obtained by X-ray diffraction. PMID:18273875

  8. Highly flexible pulse programmer for NMR applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dart, J.; Burum, D. P.; Rhim, W. K.

    1980-01-01

    A pulse generator for NMR application is described. Eighteen output channels are provided to allow use in single and double resonance experiments. Complex pulse sequences may be generated by loading instructions into a 256-word by 16-bit program memory. Features of the pulse generator include programmable time delays from 0.5 micros to 1000 s, branching and looping instructions, and the ability to be loaded and operated either manually or from a PDP-11/10 computer.

  9. Quantitative calibration of radiofrequency NMR Stark effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.; Kempf, James G.

    2011-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) Stark responses can occur in quadrupolar nuclei for an electric field oscillating at twice the usual NMR frequency (2ω0). Calibration of responses to an applied E field is needed to establish nuclear spins as probes of native E fields within material and molecular systems. We present an improved approach and apparatus for accurate measurement of quadrupolar Stark effects. Updated values of C14 (the response parameter in cubic crystals) were obtained for both 69Ga and 75As in GaAs. Keys to improvement include a modified implementation of voltage dividers to assess the 2ω0 amplitude, |E|, and the stabilization of divider response by reduction of stray couplings in 2ω0 circuitry. Finally, accuracy was enhanced by filtering sets of |E| through a linear response function that we established for the radiofrequency amplifier. Our approach is verified by two types of spectral results. Steady-state 2ω0 excitation to presaturate NMR spectra yielded C14 = (2.59 ± 0.06) × 1012 m-1 for 69Ga at room-temperature and 14.1 T. For 75As, we obtained (3.1 ± 0.1) × 1012 m-1. Both values reconcile with earlier results from 77 K and below 1 T, whereas current experiments are at room temperature and 14.1 T. Finally, we present results where few-microsecond pulses of the 2ω0 field induced small (tens of Hz) changes in high-resolution NMR line shapes. There too, spectra collected vs |E| agree with the model for response, further establishing the validity of our protocols to specify |E|.

  10. Theory of NMR in Superconducting Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboki, Kazuhiro; Fukuyama, Hidetoshi

    1988-09-01

    Motivated by experiments of NMR on superconductor(S)-normal-metal(N) multi-layer system, we have calculated the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate, T1-1, for both N and S layers based on the bilayer model of McMillan for the proximity effect. The results of calculation are in essential agreement with experiments by Aoki et al. and Imai et al.

  11. Theory of NMR for superconducting superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboki, Kazuhiro; Fukuyama, Hidetoshi

    1988-06-01

    Motivated by experiments of NMR on superconductor(S)-normal-metal(N) multilayer system, we have calculated the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate,T1-1, for both N and S metals based on the bilayer model of McMillan for the proximity effect. The results of calculations are in essential agreement with experiments by Aoki et al. and Imai et al.

  12. Multiple-quantum NMR in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Yu-Sze; Pines, A.

    1983-03-01

    Multiple-quantum NMR has typically been observed in small groups of spins in isolated molecules. Due to the profusion of spin transitions in a solid, individual lines are unresolved. Excitation of high quantum transitions by normal schemes is thus difficult. To ensure that overlapping lines add constructively and to enhance sensitivity, time-reversal pulse sequences are used to generate all lines in phase. Up to 22-quantum 1H absorption in solid adamantane is observed.

  13. Multiple-quantum NMR in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Y.; Pines, A.

    1983-03-15

    Multiple-quantum NMR has typically been observed in small groups of spins in isolated molecules. Due to the profusion of spin transitions in a solid, individual lines are unresolved. Excitation of high quantum transitions by normal schemes is thus difficult. To ensure that overlapping lines add constructively and to enhance sensitivity, time-reversal pulse sequences are used to generate all lines in phase. Up to 22-quantum /sup 1/H absorption in solid adamantane is observed.

  14. Nonclassical correlation in NMR quadrupolar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Soares-Pinto, D. O.; Auccaise, R.; Azevedo, E. R. de; Bonagamba, T. J.; Celeri, L. C.; Maziero, J.; Serra, R. M.; Fanchini, F. F.

    2010-06-15

    The existence of quantum correlation (as revealed by quantum discord), other than entanglement and its role in quantum-information processing (QIP), is a current subject for discussion. In particular, it has been suggested that this nonclassical correlation may provide computational speedup for some quantum algorithms. In this regard, bulk nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been successfully used as a test bench for many QIP implementations, although it has also been continuously criticized for not presenting entanglement in most of the systems used so far. In this paper, we report a theoretical and experimental study on the dynamics of quantum and classical correlations in an NMR quadrupolar system. We present a method for computing the correlations from experimental NMR deviation-density matrices and show that, given the action of the nuclear-spin environment, the relaxation produces a monotonic time decay in the correlations. Although the experimental realizations were performed in a specific quadrupolar system, the main results presented here can be applied to whichever system uses a deviation-density matrix formalism.

  15. Statistical filtering for NMR based structure generation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The constitutional assignment of natural products by NMR spectroscopy is usually based on 2D NMR experiments like COSY, HSQC, and HMBC. The difficulty of a structure elucidation problem depends more on the type of the investigated molecule than on its size. Saturated compounds can usually be assigned unambiguously by hand using only COSY and 13C-HMBC data, whereas condensed heterocycles are problematic due to their lack of protons that could show interatomic connectivities. Different computer programs were developed to aid in the structural assignment process, one of them COCON. In the case of unsaturated and substituted molecules structure generators frequently will generate a very large number of possible solutions. This article presents a "statistical filter" for the reduction of the number of results. The filter works by generating 3D conformations using smi23d, a simple MD approach. All molecules for which the generation of constitutional restraints failed were eliminated from the result set. Some structural elements removed by the statistical filter were analyzed and checked against Beilstein. The automatic removal of molecules for which no MD parameter set could be created was included into WEBCOCON. The effect of this filter varies in dependence of the NMR data set used, but in no case the correct constitution was removed from the resulting set. PMID:21835037

  16. NMR methodologies for studying mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Alves, Tiago C; Jarak, Ivana; Carvalho, Rui A

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a technique with an increasing importance in the study of metabolic diseases. Its initial important role in the determination of chemical structures (1, 2) has been considerably overcome by its potential for the in vivo study of metabolism (3-5). The main characteristic that makes this technique so attractive is its noninvasiveness. Only nuclei capable of transitioning between energy states, in the presence of an intense and constant magnetic field, are studied. This includes abundant nuclei such as proton ((1)H) and phosphorous ((31)P), as well as stable isotopes such as deuterium ((2)H) and carbon 13 ((13)C). This allows a wide range of applications that vary from the determination of water distribution in tissues (as obtained in a magnetic resonance imaging scan) to the calculation of metabolic fluxes under ex vivo and in vivo conditions without the need to use radioactive tracers or tissue biopsies (as in a magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) scan). In this chapter, some technical aspects of the methodology of an NMR/MRS experiment as well as how it can be used to study mitochondrial bioenergetics are overviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of in vivo MRS versus high-resolution NMR using proton high rotation magic angle spinning (HRMAS) of tissue biopsies and tissue extracts are also discussed. PMID:22057574

  17. Sol-gel kinetics by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, R.A.; Kay, B.D.

    1991-01-01

    The chemical synthesis of advanced ceramic and glass materials by the sol-gel process has become an area of increasing activity in the field of material science. The sol-gel process provides a means to prepare homogeneous, high purity materials with tailored chemical and physical properties. This paper surveyed the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of silicon-based sol-gel kinetics. A review of the various models which have been used to analyze the chemical kinetics of various sol-gel systems was presented. The utility of NMR spectroscopy was demonstrated in investigating the influence that various reaction conditions have on the reaction pathways by which sol-gel derived materials are synthesized. By observing in a direct fashion the chemical pathway of the sol-gel, it is often possible to relate the final properties of the material to the formulation and reaction conditions of the sol-gel. The study of reaction kinetics by NMR is expected to play an increasingly important role in understanding sol-gel processing and material properties. 15 refs. (DP)

  18. DFT and NMR parameterized conformation of valeranone.

    PubMed

    Torres-Valencia, J Martín; Meléndez-Rodríguez, Myriam; Alvarez-García, Rocío; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2004-10-01

    A Monte Carlo random search using molecular mechanics, followed by geometry optimization of each minimum energy structure employing density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G* level and a Boltzmann analysis of the total energies, generated accurate molecular models which describe the conformational behavior of the antispasmodic bicyclic sesquiterpene valeranone (1). The theoretical H-C-C-H dihedral angles gave the corresponding 1H, 1H vicinal coupling constants using a generalized Karplus-type equation. In turn, the 3J(H,H) values were used as initial input data for the spectral simulation of 1, which after iteration provided an excellent correlation with the experimental 1H NMR spectrum. The calculated 3J(H,H) values closely predicted the experimental values, excepting the coupling constant between the axial hydrogen alpha to the carbonyl group and the equatorial hydrogen beta to the carbonyl group (J(2beta, 3beta)). The difference is explained in terms of the electron density distribution found in the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of 1. The simulated spectrum, together with 2D NMR experiments, allowed the total assignment of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of 1. PMID:15366065

  19. Rhodopsin-lipid interactions studied by NMR.

    PubMed

    Soubias, Olivier; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the lipid matrix are known to influence function of integral membrane proteins. We report on a sample preparation method for reconstitution of membrane proteins which uses porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) filters with 200-nm-wide pores of high density. The substrate permits formation of tubular, single membranes that line the inner surface of pores. One square centimeter of filter with a thickness of 60μm yields on the order of 500cm(2) of solid-supported single bilayer surface, sufficient for NMR studies. The tubular bilayers are free of detergent, fully hydrated, and accessible for ligands from one side of the membrane. The use of AAO filters greatly improves reproducibility of the reconstitution process such that the influence of protein on lipid order parameters can be studied with high resolution. As an example, results for the G protein-coupled receptor of class A, bovine rhodopsin, are shown. By (2)H NMR order parameter measurements, it is detected that rhodopsin insertion elastically deforms membranes near the protein. Furthermore, by (1)H saturation-transfer NMR under conditions of magic angle spinning, we demonstrate detection of preferences in interactions of rhodopsin with particular lipid species. It is assumed that function of integral membrane proteins depends on both protein-induced elastic deformations of the lipid matrix and preferences for interaction of the protein with particular lipid species in the first layer of lipids surrounding the protein. PMID:23374188

  20. NMR quantitation: influence of RF inhomogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Huaping; Harwood, John; Raftery, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The NMR peak integral is ideally linearly dependent on the sine of excitation angle (θ), which has provided unsurpassed flexibility in quantitative NMR by allowing the use of a signal of any concentration as the internal concentration reference. Controlling the excitation angle is particularly critical for solvent proton concentration referencing to minimize the negative impact of radiation damping, and to reduce the risk of receiver gain compression. In practice, due to the influence of RF inhomogeneity for any given probe, the observed peak integral is not exactly proportional to sin θ. To evaluate the impact quantitatively, we introduce a RF inhomogeneity factor I(θ) as a function of the nominal pulse excitation angle and propose a simple calibration procedure. Alternatively, I(θ) can be calculated from the probe’s RF profile, which can be readily obtained as a gradient image of an aqueous sample. Our results show that without consideration of I(θ), even for a probe with good RF homogeneity, up to 5% error can be introduced due to different excitation pulse angles used for the analyte and the reference. Hence, a simple calibration of I(θ) can eliminate such errors and allow an accurate description of the observed NMR signal’s dependence on the excitation angle in quantitative analysis. PMID:21919056

  1. Earth's field NMR; a surface moisture detector?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Eiichi; Altobelli, Stephen; McDowell, Andrew; Zhang, Tongsheng

    2012-10-01

    Earth's field NMR (EFNMR), being free of magnets, would be an ideal teaching medium as well as a mobile NMR technique except for its weak S/N. The common EFNMR apparatus uses a powerful prepolarization field to enhance the spin magnetization before the experiment. We introduce a coil design geared to larger but manageable samples with sufficient sensitivity without prepolarization to move EFNMR closer to routine use and to provide an inexpensive teaching tool. Our coil consists of parallel wires spread out on a plywood to form a current sheet with the current return wires separated so they will not influence the main part of the coil assembly. The sensitive region is a relatively thin region parallel to the coil and close to it. A single turn of the coil is wound to be topologically equivalent to a figure-8. The two crossing segments in the center of a figure-8 form two of the parallel wires of the flat coil. Thus, a two-turn figure-8 has four crossing wires so its topologically equivalent coil will have four parallel wires with currents in phase. Together with the excellent sensitivity, this coil offers outstanding interference rejection because of the figure-8 geometry. An example of such a coil has 328 parallel wires covering a ˜1 meter square plywood which yields a good NMR signal from 26 liters of water spread out roughly over the area of the coil in less than one minute in a nearby park.

  2. NMR Studies of Dynamic Biomolecular Conformational Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Torchia, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR approaches can provide nearly complete sequential signal assignments of isotopically enriched biomolecules. The availability of assignments together with measurements of spin relaxation rates, residual spin interactions, J-couplings and chemical shifts provides information at atomic resolution about internal dynamics on timescales ranging from ps to ms, both in solution and in the solid state. However, due to the complexity of biomolecules, it is not possible to extract a unique atomic-resolution description of biomolecular motions even from extensive NMR data when many conformations are sampled on multiple timescales. For this reason, powerful computational approaches are increasingly applied to large NMR data sets to elucidate conformational ensembles sampled by biomolecules. In the past decade, considerable attention has been directed at an important class of biomolecules that function by binding to a wide variety of target molecules. Questions of current interest are: “Does the free biomolecule sample a conformational ensemble that encompasses the conformations found when it binds to various targets; and if so, on what time scale is the ensemble sampled?” This article reviews recent efforts to answer these questions, with a focus on comparing ensembles obtained for the same biomolecules by different investigators. A detailed comparison of results obtained is provided for three biomolecules: ubiquitin, calmodulin and the HIV-1 trans-activation response RNA. PMID:25669739

  3. Discrete analysis of stochastic NMR.II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. T. S.; Rods, M. S.; Newmark, R. D.; Budinger, T. F.

    Stochastic NMR is an efficient technique for high-field in vivo imaging and spectroscopic studies where the peak RF power required may be prohibitively high for conventional pulsed NMR techniques. A stochastic NMR experiment excites the spin system with a sequence of RF pulses where the flip angles or the phases of the pulses are samples of a discrete stochastic process. In a previous paper the stochastic experiment was analyzed and analytic expressions for the input-output cross-correlations, average signal power, and signal spectral density were obtained for a general stochastic RF excitation. In this paper specific cases of excitation with random phase, fixed flip angle, and excitation with two random components in quadrature are analyzed. The input-output cross-correlation for these two types of excitations is shown to be Lorentzian. Line broadening is the only spectral distortion as the RF excitation power is increased. The systematic noise power is inversely proportional to the number of data points N used in the spectral reconstruction. The use of a complete maximum length sequence (MLS) may improve the signal-to-systematic-noise ratio by 20 dB relative to random binary excitation, but peculiar features in the higher-order autocorrelations of MLS cause noise-like distortion in the reconstructed spectra when the excitation power is high. The amount of noise-like distortion depends on the choice of the MLS generator.

  4. Calibration of NMR well logs from carbonate reservoirs with laboratory NMR measurements and μXRCT

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mason, Harris E.; Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log data has the potential to provide in-situ porosity, pore size distributions, and permeability of target carbonate CO₂ storage reservoirs. However, these methods which have been successfully applied to sandstones have yet to be completely validated for carbonate reservoirs. Here, we have taken an approach to validate NMR measurements of carbonate rock cores with independent measurements of permeability and pore surface area to volume (S/V) distributions using differential pressure measurements and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) imaging methods, respectively. We observe that using standard methods for determining permeability from NMR data incorrectlymore » predicts these values by orders of magnitude. However, we do observe promise that NMR measurements provide reasonable estimates of pore S/V distributions, and with further independent measurements of the carbonate rock properties that universally applicable relationships between NMR measured properties may be developed for in-situ well logging applications of carbonate reservoirs.« less

  5. Guiding automated NMR structure determination using a global optimization metric, the NMR DP score.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Mao, Binchen; Xu, Fei; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2015-08-01

    ASDP is an automated NMR NOE assignment program. It uses a distinct bottom-up topology-constrained network anchoring approach for NOE interpretation, with 2D, 3D and/or 4D NOESY peak lists and resonance assignments as input, and generates unambiguous NOE constraints for iterative structure calculations. ASDP is designed to function interactively with various structure determination programs that use distance restraints to generate molecular models. In the CASD-NMR project, ASDP was tested and further developed using blinded NMR data, including resonance assignments, either raw or manually-curated (refined) NOESY peak list data, and in some cases (15)N-(1)H residual dipolar coupling data. In these blinded tests, in which the reference structure was not available until after structures were generated, the fully-automated ASDP program performed very well on all targets using both the raw and refined NOESY peak list data. Improvements of ASDP relative to its predecessor program for automated NOESY peak assignments, AutoStructure, were driven by challenges provided by these CASD-NMR data. These algorithmic improvements include (1) using a global metric of structural accuracy, the discriminating power score, for guiding model selection during the iterative NOE interpretation process, and (2) identifying incorrect NOESY cross peak assignments caused by errors in the NMR resonance assignment list. These improvements provide a more robust automated NOESY analysis program, ASDP, with the unique capability of being utilized with alternative structure generation and refinement programs including CYANA, CNS, and/or Rosetta. PMID:26081575

  6. Chemical shift and electric field gradient tensors for the amide and carboxyl hydrogens in the model peptide N-acetyl-D,L-valine. Single-crystal deuterium NMR study.

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, R. E., II; Bernhard, T.; Haeberlen, U.; Rendell, J.; Opella, S.; Chemical Engineering

    1993-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is well established as a method for describing molecular structure with resolution on the atomic scale. Many of the NMR observables result from anisotropic interactions between the nuclear spin and its environment. These observables can be described by second-rank tensors. For example, the eigenvalues of the traceless symmetric part of the hydrogen chemical shift (CS) tensor provide information about the strength of inter- or intramolecular hydrogen bonding. On the other hand, the eigenvectors of the deuterium electric field gradient (EFG) tensor give deuteron/proton bond directions with an accuracy rivalled only by neutron diffraction. In this paper the authors report structural information of this type for the amide and carboxyl hydrogen sites in a single crystal of the model peptide N-acetyl-D,L-valine (NAV). They use deuterium NMR to infer both the EFG and CS tensors at the amide and carboxyl hydrogen sites in NAV. Advantages of this technique over multiple-pulse proton NMR are that it works in the presence of {sup 14}N spins which are very hard to decouple from protons and that additional information in form of the EFG tensors can be derived. The change in the CS and EFG tensors upon exchange of a deuteron for a proton (the isotope effect) is anticipated to be very small; the effect on the CS tensors is certainly smaller than the experimental errors. NAV has served as a model peptide before in a variety of NMR studies, including those concerned with developing solid-state NMR spectroscopy as a method for determining the structure of proteins. NMR experiments on peptide or protein samples which are oriented in at least one dimension can provide important information about the three-dimensional structure of the peptide or the protein. In order to interpret the NMR data in terms of the structure of the polypeptide, the relationship of the CS and EFG tensors to the local symmetry elements of an amino acide, e.g., the peptide plane, is

  7. Development of Halbach magnet for portable NMR device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doğan, N.; Topkaya, R.; Subaşi, H.; Yerli, Y.; Rameev, B.

    2009-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has enormous potential for various applications in industry as the on-line or at-line test/control device of process environments. Advantage of NMR is its non-destructive nature, because it does not require the measurement probe to have a contact with the tested media. Despite of the recent progress in this direction, application of NMR in industry is still very limited. This is related to the technical and analytical complications of NMR as a method, and high cost of NMR analyzers available at the market. However in many applications, NMR is a very useful technique to test various products and to monitor quantitatively industrial processes. Fortunately usually there is no need in a high-field superconducting magnets to obtain the high-resolution spectra with the detailed information on chemical shifts and coupling-constant. NMR analyzers are designed to obtain the relaxation parameters by measuring the NMR spectra in the time domain rather than in frequency domain. Therefore it is possible to use small magnetic field (and low frequency of 2-60 MHz) in NMR systems, based on permanent magnet technology, which are specially designed for specific at-line and on-line process applications. In this work we present the permanent magnet system developed to use in the portative NMR devices. We discuss the experimental parameters of the designed Halbach magnet system and compare them with results of theoretical modelling.

  8. Protein Structure Determination Using Protein Threading and Sparse NMR Data

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, O.H.; Einstein, J.R.; Xu, D.; Xu, Y.

    1999-11-14

    It is well known that the NMR method for protein structure determination applies to small proteins and that its effectiveness decreases very rapidly as the molecular weight increases beyond about 30 kD. We have recently developed a method for protein structure determination that can fully utilize partial NMR data as calculation constraints. The core of the method is a threading algorithm that guarantees to find a globally optimal alignment between a query sequence and a template structure, under distance constraints specified by NMR/NOE data. Our preliminary tests have demonstrated that a small number of NMR/NOE distance restraints can significantly improve threading performance in both fold recognition and threading-alignment accuracy, and can possibly extend threading's scope of applicability from structural homologs to structural analogs. An accurate backbone structure generated by NMR-constrained threading can then provide a significant amount of structural information, equivalent to that provided by the NMR method with many NMR/NOE restraints; and hence can greatly reduce the amount of NMR data typically required for accurate structure determination. Our preliminary study suggests that a small number of NMR/NOE restraints may suffice to determine adequately the all-atom structure when those restraints are incorporated in a procedure combining threading, modeling of loops and sidechains, and molecular dynamics simulation. Potentially, this new technique can expand NMR's capability to larger proteins.

  9. The Trojan Horse Method as a tool to investigate low-energy resonances: the {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N cases

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Kiss, G.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Goldberg, V.; Tribble, R.; Coc, A.; Hammache, F.; Sereville, N. de; Tumino, A.

    2010-08-12

    The {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N reactions are of primary importance in several as-trophysical scenarios, including nucleosynthesis inside Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and oxygen and nitrogen isotopic ratios in meteorite grains. They are also key reactions to understand exotic systems such as R-Coronae Borealis stars and novae. Thus, the measurement of their cross sections in the low energy region can be crucial to reduce the nuclear uncertainty on theoretical predictions, because the resonance parameters are poorly determined. The Trojan Horse Method, in its newly developed form particularly suited to investigate low-energy resonances, has been applied to the {sup 2}H({sup 18}O, {alpha}{sup 15}N)n and {sup 2}H({sup 17}O, {alpha}{sup 14}N)n reactions to deduce the {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N cross sections at low energies. Resonances in the {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N excitation functions have been studied and the resonance parameters deduced.

  10. NMR spectroscopy of experimentally shocked single crystal quartz: A reexamination of the NMR shock barometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiske, P. S.; Gratz, A. J.; Nellis, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Cygan and others report a broadening of the Si-29 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) peak for synthetic quartz powders with increasing shock pressure which they propose as a shock wave barometer for natural systems. These results are expanded by studying single crystal quartz shocked to 12 and 33 GPa using the 6.5 m two-stage light-gas gun at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Our NMR results differ substantially from those of Cygan and others and suggest that the proposed shock wave barometer may require refinement. The difference in results between this study and that of Cygan and others is most likely caused by different starting materials (single crystal vs. powder) and different shock loading histories. NMR results from single crystal studies may be more applicable to natural systems.

  11. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 1, September 1, 1991--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1991-12-31

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. We propose to investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 2}H{sub 2}, {sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}, {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and the pore surfaces in coals. These molecules have been selected for their chemical and physical properties.

  12. Crystal structure, NMR study, dc-conductivity and dielectric relaxation studies of a new compound [C2H10N2]Cd(SCN)2Cl2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, K.; Kamoun, S.; Ayedi, H. F.; Gargouri, M.

    2012-06-01

    The crystal structure, the solid NMR spectroscopy and the complex impedance study have been carried out on [C2H10N2]CdCl2(SCN)2. Characterization by single crystal X-ray crystallography shows that the cadmium atoms have à 2N2S2Cl hexa-coordination sphere, exhibiting pseudo-octahedral geometry. The cadmium atoms are bridged by two thiocyanate ions generating 1-D polymeric-chains. These chains are themselves interconnected by means of N-H…Cl(NCS) hydrogen bonds originating from the organic cation [(NH3)2(CH2)2]2+. 111Cd isotropic chemical shifts span a range of 268ppm. The cadmium atom exhibits multiplets that result from 111Cd-14N spin-spin coupling. Examination of 111Cd and 13C MAS line shapes shows direct measurement of the indirect spin-spin coupling constant 2J(111Cd, 14N) = 105Hz and the dipolar coupling constant of 1381Hz . Impedance spectroscopy measurements of [C2H10N2]CdCl2(SCN)2 have been studied from 209Hz to 5 MHz over the temperature range 300-370 K. The Cole-Cole (Z" versus Z') plots are fitted to two equivalent circuits models. The formalism of complex permittivity and impedance were employed to analyze the experimental data. The dc conductivity follows the Arrhenius relation with an activation energy Ea = 0.54 (3) eV.

  13. NMR and NQR study of Si-doped (6,0) zigzag single-walled aluminum nitride nanotube as n or P-semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Baei, Mohammad T; Peyghan, Ali Ahmadi; Tavakoli, Khadijeh; Babaheydari, Ali Kazemi; Moghimi, Masoumeh

    2012-09-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to investigate the electronic structure properties of pristine and Si-doped aluminum nitride nanotubes as n or P-semiconductors at the B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory in order to evaluate the influence of Si-doped in the (6,0) zigzag AlNNTs. We extended the DFT calculation to predict the electronic structure properties of Si-doped aluminum nitride nanotubes, which are very important for production of solid-state devices and other applications. To this aim, pristine and Si-doped AlNNT structures in two models (Si(N) and Si(Al)) were optimized, and then the electronic properties, the isotropic (CS(I)) and anisotropic (CS(A)) chemical shielding parameters for the sites of various (27)Al and (14)N atoms, NQR parameters for the sites of various of (27)Al and (14)N atoms, and quantum molecular descriptors were calculated in the optimized structures. The optimized structures, the electronic properties, NMR and NQR parameters, and quantum molecular descriptors for the Si(N) and Si(Al) models show that the Si(N) model is a more reactive material than the pristine or Si(Al) model. PMID:22588584

  14. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  15. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C; Markley, John L

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-(13)C, U-(15)N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use. PMID:24091140

  16. NMR Wool Tube: a novel method for NMR solution analysis of derivatized glass surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cholewa, Olivia Maria

    2004-08-13

    Glass wool was placed within an NMR tube as a solid support for the covalent attachment of a molecule to allow for a simple one-dimensional 1H FT NMR solution analysis. This novel procedure avoids the use of expensive sample tubes or platforms, as required for magic angle or fast spinning, exotic pulse sequences, isotopic labeling or the use of a large number of scans to provide the ability to analyze the structure, mobility, ligand binding, and solvent interactions of the surface bound molecule. PMID:15387199

  17. MILLIMETER-WAVE OBSERVATIONS OF CN AND HNC AND THEIR {sup 15}N ISOTOPOLOGUES: A NEW EVALUATION OF THE {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N RATIO ACROSS THE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Adande, G. R.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2012-01-10

    The N = 1 {yields} 0 transitions of CN and C{sup 15}N (X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}), as well as the J = 1 {yields} 0 lines of HN{sup 13}C and H{sup 15}NC, have been observed toward 11 molecular clouds using the new 3 mm ALMA-type receiver of the 12 m telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory. These sources span a wide range of distances from the Galactic center and are all regions of star formation. From these observations, {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios have been determined using two independent methods. First, the measurements of C{sup 14}N and C{sup 15}N were directly compared to establish this ratio, correcting for high opacities when needed, as indicated by the nitrogen hyperfine intensities. Second, the ratio was calculated from the quantity [HN{sup 13}C]/[H{sup 15}NC], determined from the HNC data, and then scaled by {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios previously established, i.e., the so-called double isotope method. Values from both methods are in reasonable agreement, and fall in the range {approx}120-400, somewhat lower than previous {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios derived from HCN. The ratios exhibit a distinct positive gradient with distance from the Galactic center, following the relationship{sup 14}N/{sup 15}N = 21.1 (5.2) kpc{sup -1} D{sub GC} + 123.8 (37.1). This gradient is consistent with predictions of Galactic chemical evolution models in which {sup 15}N has a secondary origin in novae, while primary and secondary sources exist for {sup 14}N. The local interstellar medium value was found to be {sup 4}N/{sup 15}N = 290 {+-} 40, in agreement with the ratio found in nearby diffuse clouds and close to the value of 272 found in Earth's atmosphere.

  18. Monitoring and understanding the paraelectric-ferroelectric phase transition in the metal-organic framework [NH4 ][M(HCOO)3 ] by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Lucier, Bryan E G; Sinelnikov, Regina; Terskikh, Victor V; Staroverov, Viktor N; Huang, Yining

    2015-10-01

    The paraelectric-ferroelectric phase transition in two isostructural metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) [NH4 ][M(HCOO)3 ] (M=Mg, Zn) was investigated by in situ variable-temperature (25) Mg, (67) Zn, (14) N, and (13) C solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy. With decreasing temperature, a disorder-order transition of NH4 (+) cations causes a change in dielectric properties. It is thought that [NH4 ][Mg(HCOO)3 ] exhibits a higher transition temperature than [NH4 ][Zn(HCOO)3 ] due to stronger hydrogen-bonding interactions between NH4 (+) ions and framework oxygen atoms. (25) Mg and (67) Zn NMR parameters are very sensitive to temperature-induced changes in structure, dynamics, and dielectric behavior; stark spectral differences across the paraelectric-ferroelectric phase transition are intimately related to subtle changes in the local environment of the metal center. Although (25) Mg and (67) Zn are challenging nuclei for SSNMR experiments, the highly spherically symmetric metal-atom environments in [NH4 ][M(HCOO)3 ] give rise to relatively narrow spectra that can be acquired in 30-60 min at a low magnetic field of 9.4 T. Complementary (14) N and (13) C SSNMR experiments were performed to probe the role of NH4 (+) -framework hydrogen bonding in the paraelectric-ferroelectric phase transition. This multinuclear SSNMR approach yields new physical insights into the [NH4 ][M(HCOO)3 ] system and shows great potential for molecular-level studies on electric phenomena in a wide variety of MOFs. PMID:26397187

  19. Stable isotope ((13)C/(12)C and (15)N/(14)N) composition of the woolly rhinoceros Coelodonta antiquitatis horn suggests seasonal changes in the diet.

    PubMed

    Tiunov, Alexei V; Kirillova, Irina V

    2010-11-15

    The extinct woolly rhinoceros Coelodonta antiquitatis is a prominent member of the Mammuthus-Coelodonta faunal complex, but its biology is poorly known, partly because very few specimens with well-preserved soft tissues have been discovered to date. However, the permafrost-preserved horns of the woolly rhinoceros are recording structures which contain isotopic records of the diet, environmental conditions and physiological status of the animal during most of its life. In this study we report the first data on the pattern of carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) isotopic composition along the nasal horn of woolly rhinoceros. We found systematic variations in δ(13)C and δ(15)N values associated with morphologically expressed transverse banding of the horn. The comparative analysis of isotopic variation in keratinous tissues of extant and extinct herbivores suggests that the oscillation in isotopic composition of the horn was induced by seasonal changes in the diet. Although the compiled evidence is in part contradictory, we suggest that more positive δ(13)C and δ(15)N values associated with dark-colored and less dense zones of the horn indicate a summer diet. More dense and light-colored zones of the horn have lower δ(13)C and δ(15)N values possibly indicating a larger proportion of woody and shrub vegetation in the winter diet. The validity of these conclusions has to be proven in further investigations, but our data underline the potential of isotopic analysis for studies on diet and habitat use by extinct members of Pleistocene fauna. PMID:20941761

  20. 13C/12C and 15N/14N Isotope Analysis to Characterize Natural Degradation of Atrazine: Evidence from Parent and Daughter Compound Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Martin; Meyer, Armin

    2013-04-01

    The mobile and still herbicidal metabolites desethylatrazine (DEA) and desisopropylatrazine (DIA) are frequently detected together with its parent compound atrazine (Atz) in the aquatic environment. Interpretation of their transformation state is often difficult with current methods, which are mainly measuring concentrations. Alternatively, compound specific isotope analyses (CSIA) has become a novel tool to detect degradation processes of contaminants in groundwater. The aim of our study was to investigate on the lab scale 13C/12C and 15N/14N isotope trends in parent and daughter compounds associated with different degradation scenarios of atrazine likely to occur in the environment. Thus atrazine was dealkylated with (i) permanganate and (ii) the bacterium Rhodococcus sp. NI86/21. In both transformations, 13C/12C ratios of atrazine increased strongly (epsilon carbon/permanganate = -4.6 ± 0.6 ‰ and epsilon carbon/Rhodoccoccus = -3.8 ± 0.2 ‰) whereas nitrogen isotope fractionation was small. 13C/12C ratios of DEA showed the following trends. (i) When DEA was formed as only product (Atz + permanganate) 13C/12C remained constant, close to the initial value of Atz. (ii) When DEA was formed together with deisopropylatrazine (biodegradation of Atz) 13C/12C increased, but only within 2‰. (iii) When DEA and DIA was further biodegraded, 13C/12C increased for both metabolites up to 9‰. Thus strong enrichment of 13C/12C in the metabolites in comparison to Atz can give strong testimony for further breakdown of the metabolite.

  1. Radical Prostatectomy versus External Beam Radiotherapy for cT1-4N0M0 Prostate Cancer: Comparison of Patient Outcomes Including Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Satoru; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Shiraishi, Kenshiro; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Morikawa, Teppei; Kakutani, Shigenori; Takeshima, Yuta; Miyazaki, Hideyo; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Tohru; Kume, Haruki; Homma, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Background Although radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) have been considered as comparable treatments for localized prostate cancer (PC), it is controversial which treatment is better. The present study aimed to compare outcomes, including mortality, of RP and EBRT for localized PC. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 891 patients with cT1-4N0M0 PC who underwent either RP (n = 569) or EBRT (n = 322) with curative intent at our single institution between 2005 and 2012. Of the EBRT patients, 302 (93.8%) underwent intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Primary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS). Related to these, other-cause mortality (OCM) was also calculated. Biochemical recurrence-free survival was assessed as a secondary endpoint. Cox proportional hazards model was used for multivariate analysis. Results Median follow-up durations were 53 and 45 months, and median ages were 66 and 70 years (P <0.0001), in the RP and EBRT groups, respectively. As a whole, significantly better prognoses of the RP group than the EBRT group were observed for both OS and CSS, although OCM was significantly higher in the EBRT group. There was no death from PC in men with low and intermediate D’Amico risks, except one with intermediate-risk in the EBRT group. In high-risk patients, significantly more patients died from PC in the EBRT group than the RP group. Multivariate analysis demonstrated the RP group to be an independent prognostic factor for better CSS. On the other hand, the EBRT group had a significantly longer biochemical recurrence-free survival than the RP group. Conclusions Mortality outcomes of both RP and EBRT were generally favorable in low and intermediate risk patients. Improvement of CSS in high risk patients was seen in patients receiving RP over those receiving EBRT. PMID:26506569

  2. Analysis of microearthquakes at the non-transform offset of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge hosting the Rainbow hydrothermal system (36°14'N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horning, G.; Canales, J. P.; Sohn, R. A.; Dunn, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Rainbow hydrothermal field is an active, ultramafic-hosted system located on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) at 36° 14'N. It is located at a non-transform discontinuity (NTD) of the MAR at the AMAR-AMAR minor segment intersection [German et al., 1996]. Rainbow, in contrast to other ultramafic-hosted systems such as Lost City, is a high-temperature site with fluids up to 365 °C [Douville et al., 2002]. A magmatic heat source must be present to account for the long-lived, high-temperature, heat flux of 1-5 GW [Thurnherr and Richards, 2001], but the nearest, known neovolcanic activity is 15-20 km away on the AMAR segment [German and Parson, 1998]. In 2013, a long-term, ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) microearthquake network of 13 instruments was deployed as part of the MARINER geophysical experiment [Dunn et al., 2013]. Over 40,000 events were detected and located within ~16 km of the active hydrothermal field during the ~200 day deployment. We present hypocenters estimated using P- and S-wave arrival times and a crustal velocity model derived from the active-source tomography component of the MARINER experiment. Moment/magnitude estimates from spectral methods indicate that the majority of events have local magnitudes (ML) of 0-1, with the largest events approaching ML ~2. First arrival polarity data demonstrate that many of the events have non-double couple source mechanisms, and we explore the use of P/S-wave amplitude ratios to constrain these focal mechanisms. The detection of predominantly non-double events indicates processes other than simple fault slip (e.g., serpentinization) are contributing to the observed seismicity and deformation. We use the spatial distribution, magnitudes, rate, and source mechanisms of the seismic events to constrain the coupled processes of hydrothermal circulation and deformation at the Rainbow massif.

  3. Modelling of hydrothermal fluid circulation in a heterogeneous medium: Application to the Rainbow Vent site (Mid-Atlantic-Ridge, 36°14N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, F.; Mügler, C.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Charlou, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrothermal activity at the axis of mid-ocean ridges is a key driver for energy and matter transfer from the interior of the Earth to the ocean floor. At mid-ocean ridges, seawater penetrates through the permeable young crust, warms at depth and exchanges chemicals with the surrounding rocks. This hot fluid focuses and flows upwards, then is expelled from the crust at hydrothermal vent sites in the form of black or white smokers completed by diffusive emissions. We developed a new numerical tool in the Cast3M software framework to model such hydrothermal circulations. Thermodynamic properties of one-phase pure water were calculated from the IAPWS formulation. This new numerical tool was validated on several test cases of convection in closed-top and open-top boxes. Simulations of hydrothermal circulation in a homogeneous-permeability porous medium also gave results in good agreement with already published simulations. We used this new numerical tool to construct a geometric and physical model configuration of the Rainbow Vent site at 36°14'N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In this presentation, several configurations will be discussed, showing that high temperatures and high mass fluxes measured at the Rainbow site cannot be modelled with hydrothermal circulation in a homogeneous-permeability porous medium. We will show that these high values require the presence of a fault or a preferential pathway right below the venting site. We will propose and discuss a 2-D one-path model that allows us to simulate both high temperatures and high mass fluxes. This modelling of the hydrothermal circulation at the Rainbow site constitutes a first but necessary step to understand the origin of high concentrations of hydrogen issued from this ultramafic-hosted vent field.

  4. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  5. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

  6. Magic-angle-spinning NMR studies of zeolite SAPO-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freude, D.; Ernst, H.; Hunger, M.; Pfeifer, H.; Jahn, E.

    1988-01-01

    SAPO-5 was synthesized using triethylamine as template. Magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR of 1H, 27Al, 29Si and 31P was used to study the silicon incorporation into the framework and the nature of the Brønsted sites. 1H MAS NMR shows two types of bridging hydroxyl groups. 29Si MAS NMR indicates that silicon substitutes mostly for phosphorus and that there is a small amount of crystalline SiO 2 in the zeolite powder.

  7. Lithium Polymer Electrolytes and Solid State NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkeley, Emily R.

    2004-01-01

    Research is being done at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) developing new kinds of batteries that do not depend on a solution. Currently, batteries use liquid electrolytes containing lithium. Problems with the liquid electrolyte are (1) solvents used can leak out of the battery, so larger, more restrictive, packages have to be made, inhibiting the diversity of application and decreasing the power density; (2) the liquid is incompatible with the lithium metal anode, so alternative, less efficient, anodes are required. The Materials Department at GRC has been working to synthesize polymer electrolytes that can replace the liquid electrolytes. The advantages are that polymer electrolytes do not have the potential to leak so they can be used for a variety of tasks, small or large, including in the space rover or in space suits. The polymers generated by Dr. Mary Ann Meador's group are in the form of rod -coil structures. The rod aspect gives the polymer structural integrity, while the coil makes it flexible. Lithium ions are used in these polymers because of their high mobility. The coils have repeating units of oxygen which stabilize the positive lithium by donating electron density. This aids in the movement of the lithium within the polymer, which contributes to higher conductivity. In addition to conductivity testing, these polymers are characterized using DSC, TGA, FTIR, and solid state NMR. Solid state NMR is used in classifying materials that are not soluble in solvents, such as polymers. The NMR spins the sample at a magic angle (54.7') allowing the significant peaks to emerge. Although solid state NMR is a helpful technique in determining bonding, the process of preparing the sample and tuning it properly are intricate jobs that require patience; especially since each run takes about six hours. The NMR allows for the advancement of polymer synthesis by showing if the expected results were achieved. Using the NMR, in addition to looking at polymers, allows for

  8. Understanding NMR relaxometry of partially water-saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Jorand, R.; Nordlund, C.; Klitzsch, N.

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry measurements are commonly used to characterize the storage and transport properties of water-saturated rocks. Estimations of these properties are based on the direct link of the initial NMR signal amplitude to porosity (water content) and of the NMR relaxation time to pore size. Herein, pore shapes are usually assumed to be spherical or cylindrical. However, the NMR response at partial water saturation for natural sediments and rocks may differ strongly from the responses calculated for spherical or cylindrical pores, because these pore shapes do not account for water menisci remaining in the corners of desaturated angular pores. Therefore, we consider a bundle of pores with triangular cross sections. We introduce analytical solutions of the NMR equations at partial saturation of these pores, which account for water menisci of desaturated pores. After developing equations that describe the water distribution inside the pores, we calculate the NMR response at partial saturation for imbibition and drainage based on the deduced water distributions. For this pore model, the NMR amplitudes and NMR relaxation times at partial water saturation strongly depend on pore shape, i.e., arising from the capillary pressure and pore shape-dependent water distribution in desaturated pores with triangular cross sections. Even so, the NMR relaxation time at full saturation only depends on the surface-to-volume ratio of the pore. Moreover, we show the qualitative agreement of the saturation-dependent relaxation-time distributions of our model with those observed for rocks and soils.

  9. Rotational Doppler Effect and Barnett Field in Spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudo, Hiroyuki; Harii, Kazuya; Matsuo, Mamoru; Ieda, Jun'ichi; Ono, Masao; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-04-01

    We report the observation of the rotational Doppler effect using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We have developed a coil-spinning technique that enables measurements by rotating a detector and fixing a sample. We found that the rotational Doppler effect gives rise to NMR frequency shifts equal to the rotation frequency. We formulate the rotational Doppler effect and the Barnett field using a vector model for the nuclear magnetic moment. This formulation reveals that, with just the sample rotating, both effects cancel each other, thereby explaining the absence of an NMR frequency shift in conventional sample-spinning NMR measurements.

  10. Measurement of vorticity diffusion by NMR microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer R; Callaghan, Paul T

    2010-05-01

    In a Newtonian fluid, vorticity diffuses at a rate determined by the kinematic viscosity. Here we use rapid NMR velocimetry, based on a RARE sequence, to image the time-dependent velocity field on startup of a fluid-filled cylinder and therefore measure the diffusion of vorticity. The results are consistent with the solution to the vorticity diffusion equation where the angular velocity on the outside surface of the fluid, at the cylinder's rotating wall, is fixed. This method is a means of measuring kinematic viscosity for low viscosity fluids without the need to measure stress. PMID:20189854

  11. Analysis of multiple pulse NMR in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W.-K.; Elleman, D. D.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The general problems associated with the removal of the effects of dipolar broadening from solid-state NMR spectra are analyzed. The effects of finite pulse width and H sub 1 inhomogeneity are shown to have limited the resolution of previous pulse cycles, and a new eight-pulse cycle designed to minimize these problems is discussed. Spectra for F-19 in CaF2 taken with this cycle are presented which show residual linewidth near 10 Hz. The feasibility of measuring proton chemical shift tensors is discussed.

  12. NMR Characterizations of Properties of Heterogeneous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Uh, Jinsoo; Phan, Jack; Xue, Dong; Watson, A. Ted

    2003-01-28

    The overall goal of this project was to develop reliable methods for resolving macroscopic properties important for describing the flow of one or more fluid phases in reservoirs from formation measurements. During this reporting period, the determination of surface relaxivity from NMR data was investigated. A new method for determining the surface relaxivity from measured data was developed and tested with data obtained from an Exxon sample. The new method avoids the use of a certain mathematical short-time approximation in the data analysis, which has been shown to be unsuitable.

  13. NMR measurements in SSC dipole D00001

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.; Hanft, R.W.; Strait, J.B.

    1986-09-12

    The first 16.5 m long SSC dipole magnet (D00001) had its field intensity measured as a function of position with a custom made NMR magnetometer. A short description of the probe is presented. The data obtained (most of it near 2 T spaced apart by one inch) shows an average transfer function of 1.02830 T/KA with position dependent values deviating from the average by up to .00130 T/KA revealing contruction inhomogeneities that were measured with a sensitivity of 25 ppM.

  14. Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR of Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with a number of human diseases. These aggregatively misfolded intermolecular β-sheet assemblies constitute some of the most challenging targets in structural biology because to their complexity, size, and insolubility. Here, protocols and controls are described for experiments designed to study hydrogen-bonding in amyloid fibrils indirectly, by transferring information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils to the dimethyl sulfoxide-denatured state. Since the denatured state is amenable to solution NMR spectroscopy, the method can provide residue-level-resolution data on hydrogen exchange for the monomers that make up the fibrils. PMID:26453215

  15. High resolution 1H NMR of a lipid cubic phase using a solution NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle-Roden, E.; Hoefer, N.; Dey, K. K.; Grandinetti, P. J.; Caffrey, M.

    2007-11-01

    The cubic mesophase formed by monoacylglycerols and water is an important medium for the in meso crystallogenesis of membrane proteins. To investigate molecular level lipid and additive interactions within the cubic phase, a method was developed for improving the resolution of 1H NMR spectra when using a conventional solution state NMR probe. Using this approach we obtained well-resolved J-coupling multiplets in the one-dimensional NMR spectrum of the cubic-Ia3d phase prepared with hydrated monoolein. A high resolution t-ROESY two-dimensional 1H NMR spectrum of the cubic-Ia3d phase is also reported. Using this new methodology, we have investigated the interaction of two additive molecules, L-tryptophan and ruthenium-tris(2,2-bipyridyl) dichloride (rubipy), with the cubic mesophase. Based on the measured chemical shift differences when changing from an aqueous solution to the cubic phase, we conclude that L-tryptophan experiences specific interactions with the bilayer interface, whereas rubipy remains in the aqueous channels and does not associate with the lipid bilayer.

  16. Touch NMR: An NMR Data Processing Application for the iPad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Qiyue; Chen, Zhiwei; Yan, Zhiping; Wang, Cheng; Chen, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful technologies to aid research in numerous scientific disciplines. With the development of consumer electronics, mobile devices have played increasingly important roles in our daily life. However, there is currently no application available for mobile devices able to…

  17. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoaceticum metabolic profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G.; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrey V.; Sears, Jesse A.; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Majors, Paul D.

    2014-06-20

    An in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch-growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution, high sensitivity NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In-situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at an NMR frequency of 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600 MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in-situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process in real time, enabling identification of intermediate and end-point metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with the HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  18. NMR assessment on bone simulated under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Q.; Qin, Y.

    Introduction Microgravity-induced bone loss has been suggested to be similar to disuse-osteoporosis on Earth which constitutes a challenging public health problem No current non-destructive method can provide the microstructural changes in bone particularly on cortical bone Recently the authors have applied low field nuclear magnetic resonance NMR spin-spin relaxation technique and computational analysis method to determine the porosity pore size distribution and microdamage of cortical bone 1-3 The studies by the authors have shown that this technology can be used to characterize microstructural changes as well as bone water distribution bound and mobile water changes of weightless treated simulating a microgravity condition turkey and mouse cortical bone We further determinate that the NMR spin-spin relaxation time T 2 spectrum derived parameters can be used as descriptions of bone quality e g matrix water distribution and porosity size distributions and alone or in combination with current techniques bone mineral density measurements more accurately predict bone mechanical properties Methods underline Bone sample preparation Two kinds of animal samples were collected and prepared for designed experiments from SUNY Cortical bones of the mid-diaphyses of the ulnae of 1-year-old male turkeys were dissected from freshly slaughtered animals Eight samples were categorized from normal or control and four samples were 4-week disuse treated by functionally isolated osteotomies disuse A total of 12

  19. Characterizing carbohydrate-protein interactions by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Carole A.; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between proteins and soluble carbohydrates and/or surface displayed glycans are central to countless recognition, attachment and signaling events in biology. The physical chemical features associated with these binding events vary considerably, depending on the biological system of interest. For example, carbohydrate-protein interactions can be stoichiometric or multivalent, the protein receptors can be monomeric or oligomeric, and the specificity of recognition can be highly stringent or rather promiscuous. Equilibrium dissociation constants for carbohydrate binding are known to vary from micromolar to millimolar, with weak interactions being far more prevalent; and individual carbohydrate binding sites can be truly symmetrical or merely homologous, and hence, the affinities of individual sites within a single protein can vary, as can the order of binding. Several factors, including the weak affinities with which glycans bind their protein receptors, the dynamic nature of the glycans themselves, and the non-equivalent interactions among oligomeric carbohydrate receptors, have made NMR an especially powerful tool for studying and defining carbohydrate-protein interactions. Here we describe those NMR approaches that have proven to be the most robust in characterizing these systems, and explain what type of information can (or cannot) be obtained from each. Our goal is to provide to the reader the information necessary for selecting the correct experiment or sets of experiments to characterize their carbohydrate-protein interaction of interest. PMID:23784792

  20. The D0 solenoid NMR magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sten Uldall Hansen Terry Kiper, Tom Regan, John Lofgren et al.

    2002-11-20

    A field monitoring system for the 2 Tesla Solenoid of the D0 detector is described. It is comprised of a very small NMR probe cabled to a DSP based signal processing board. The design magnetic field range is from 1.0 to 2.2 Tesla, corresponding to an RF frequency range of 42.57 to 93.67 MHz. The desired an accuracy is one part in 10{sup 5}. To minimize material in the interaction region of the D0 detector, the overall thickness of the NMR probe is 4 mm, including its mounting plate, and its width is 10 mm. To minimize cable mass, 4mm diameter IMR-100A cables are used for transmitting the RF signals from a nearby patch panel 25 meters to each of four probes mounted within the bore of the solenoid. RG213U cables 45 meters long are used to send the RF from the movable counting house to the patch panel. With this setup, the detector signal voltage at the moving counting room is in the range of 250-400 mV.

  1. Algorithmic cooling and scalable NMR quantum computers

    PubMed Central

    Boykin, P. Oscar; Mor, Tal; Roychowdhury, Vwani; Vatan, Farrokh; Vrijen, Rutger

    2002-01-01

    We present here algorithmic cooling (via polarization heat bath)—a powerful method for obtaining a large number of highly polarized spins in liquid nuclear-spin systems at finite temperature. Given that spin-half states represent (quantum) bits, algorithmic cooling cleans dirty bits beyond the Shannon's bound on data compression, by using a set of rapidly thermal-relaxing bits. Such auxiliary bits could be implemented by using spins that rapidly get into thermal equilibrium with the environment, e.g., electron spins. Interestingly, the interaction with the environment, usually a most undesired interaction, is used here to our benefit, allowing a cooling mechanism. Cooling spins to a very low temperature without cooling the environment could lead to a breakthrough in NMR experiments, and our “spin-refrigerating” method suggests that this is possible. The scaling of NMR ensemble computers is currently one of the main obstacles to building larger-scale quantum computing devices, and our spin-refrigerating method suggests that this problem can be resolved. PMID:11904402

  2. Assessment of Bone Microstructural Changes by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qingwen; Wang, Xiaodu

    2008-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that age related increases in bone porosity without significant changes in bone mineral density (BMD) (without bone microstructural information) result in a decrease in bone strength. Bone fracture toughness is also significantly correlated to changes in porosity, microarchitecture, collagen integrity, microdamage, and water distribution, all of which are measures of bone quality. Unfortunately, current technology does not allow the non-destructive and non-invasive detection of bone water distribution or other measures of bone quality including microporosity. On the other hand, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) proton spin-spin (T2) relaxation time measurements and computational analytical method have been used to determine microstructural characteristics of various types of fluid filled porous materials. The study in here is to demonstrate that non-destructive and non-invasive NMR proton spin-spin (T2) relaxation techniques has been developed and applied to quantify the porosity, pore size distribution and water distribution in human cortical bone. This new bone microstructural information can then be used as descriptions of bone quality and, along or in combination with existing method (BMD) to more accurately assess bone fracture risk, and the results could help doctors and researchers to detect osteoporosis and other conditions related to weak bones in persons.

  3. NMR crystallography: the use of chemical shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Robin K.

    2004-10-01

    Measurements of chemical shifts obtained from magic-angle spinning NMR spectra (together with quantum mechanical computations of shielding) can provide valuable information on crystallography. Examples are given of the determination of crystallographic asymmetric units, of molecular symmetry in the solid-state environment, and of crystallographic space group assignment. Measurements of full tensor components for 199Hg have given additional coordination information. The nature of intermolecular hydrogen bonding in cortisone acetate polymorphs and solvates is obtained from chemical shift information, also involving measurement of the full tensor parameters. The resulting data have been used as restraints, built into the computation algorithm, in the analysis of powder diffraction patterns to give full crystal structures. A combination of quantum mechanical computation of shielding and measurement of proton chemical shifts (obtained by high-speed MAS) leads to the determination of the position of a proton in an intermolecular hydrogen bond. A recently-developed computer program specifically based on crystallographic repetition has been shown to give acceptable results. Moreover, NMR chemical shifts can distinguish between static and dynamic disorder in crystalline materials and can be used to determine modes and rates of molecular exchange motion.

  4. Methods for spatial localization in NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    Several unique coil configurations were developed that have applications in nuclear magnetic resonance. These include a number of designs appropriate for use as rf surface coils, and two configurations developed as NMR magnets. The magnetic field profiles were calculated for each of these designs, from which field strength and homogeneity information were obtained. The rf coil configurations modelled include the opposed loop, opposed half loop, bicycle wheel, opposed bicycle wheel, and semi-toroid. The opposed loop design was studied in detail in terms of the theoretical spatial sensitivity and selectivity it offers. A number of NMR experiments were performed to test the validity of these theoretical calculations. This configuration produces a field that is substantially reduced near the coil itself, compared with the field produced by a single loop surface coil, but that rises to a maximum along the coil axis yielding a somewhat homogeneous region that may be used to achieve a degree of spatial localization. Several comparison schemes are used to evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of both the single loop and the opposed loop coil. The opposed coil concept also has been applied to the design of magnets. The results of calculations on the homogeneity and field strength possible with an opposed solenoid magnet are presented.

  5. NMR measurements in solutions of dialkylimidazolium haloaluminates

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.; Saboungi, M.L.; Klingler, R.J.; Chen, M.J.; Rathke, J.W.

    1992-06-01

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 35}Cl NMR spectra of AlCl{sub 3}-1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) melts were measured for initial compositions ranging from 50 to 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} at various temperatures. It was shown by changing the preaquisition delay time (DE value) that the dominant aluminum species are AlCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} in the melt formed by mixing 50 mol % with EMIC and Al{sub 2}Cl{sub 7}{sup {minus}} in the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} melt. In the equimolar mixture, the chemical shift of {sup 27}Al NMR spectrum is 103.28 ppm and the line width is 22.83Hz. In the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixture, the chemical shift is 103.41 ppm and the line width is 2624Hz. A third species observed at 97 ppm in the {sup 27}Al spectra for the 55 and 60 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixtures is identified to be a product of the reaction with residual water. The relaxation rates for each species in the melts were determined.

  6. Removal of 14 N-terminal amino acids of lactoferrin enhances its affinity for parenchymal liver cells and potentiates the inhibition of beta- very low density lipoprotein binding.

    PubMed

    Ziere, G J; Bijsterbosch, M K; van Berkel, T J

    1993-12-25

    Lactoferrin inhibits the hepatic uptake of lipoprotein remnants, and we showed earlier that arginine residues of lactoferrin are involved. In this study, lactoferrin was treated with aminopeptidase M (APM), which resulted in removal of 14 N-terminal amino acids, including 4 clustered arginine residues at positions 2-5 (APM-lactoferrin). After intravenous injection into rats, 125I-labeled APM-lactoferrin was cleared within 10 min by the liver parenchymal cells (74.7% of the dose). In contrast to native lactoferrin, APM-lactoferrin was rapidly internalized after liver association (> 80% of the liver-associated radioactivity was internalized within 10 min). Binding of APM-lactoferrin to isolated parenchymal liver cells was saturable with a Kd of 186 nM (750,000 sites/cell). This is in striking contrast to the binding of native lactoferrin (Kd 10 microM; 20 x 10(6) sites/cell). Preinjection of rats with 20 mg of APM-lactoferrin/kg of body weight reduced the liver association of beta-very low density lipoprotein (beta-VLDL) by 50%, whereas lactoferrin had no effect at this dose. With isolated parenchymal liver cells, APM-lactoferrin was a more effective competitor for beta-VLDL binding than native lactoferrin (50% inhibition at 0.5 mg/ml versus 8.0 mg/ml). Selective modification of the arginines of APM-lactoferrin with 1,2-cyclohexanedione reduced the liver association by approximately 60% and abolished the capacity of APM-lactoferrin to inhibit the binding of 125I-labeled beta-VLDL in vitro. In conclusion, our data indicate that the four-arginine cluster of lactoferrin at positions 2-5 is involved in its massive, low affinity association of lactoferrin with the liver, possibly to proteoglycans, but is not essential for the inhibition of lipoprotein remnant uptake. The Arg-Lys sequence at positions 25-31, which resembles the binding site of apolipoprotein E, may mediate the high affinity binding of lactoferrin and block the binding of beta-VLDL to the remnant receptor

  7. A Multispectrum Analysis of the {nu}{sub 2} Band of H{sup 12}C{sup 14}N: Part I. Intensities, Broadening and Shift Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Devi, V M.; Benner, D C.; Smith, M.A.H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Predoi-Cross, A; Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.; Boulet, C; Bouanich, J P.

    2005-05-01

    Absolute intensities, self- and air-broadening coefficients, self- and air-induced shift coefficients and their temperature dependences have been determined for lines belonging to the P- and R-branches of the {nu}{sub 2} band of H{sup 12}C{sup 14}N centered near 712 cm{sup -1}. Infrared spectra of HCN in the 14-{micro}m region were obtained at high resolution (0.002-0.008 cm{sup -1}) using two different Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS), the McMath-Pierce FTS at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak and the Bruker IFS 120HR FTS at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Spectra were recorded with 99.8% pure HCN as well as lean mixtures of HCN in air at various temperatures ranging between +26 C and -60 C. A multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique was used to fit selected intervals of 36 spectra simultaneously to obtain the line positions, intensities, broadening and shift parameters. The measured line intensities were analyzed to determine the vibrational band intensity and the Herman-Wallis coefficients. The measured self-broadening coefficients vary between 0.2 and 1.2 cm{sup -1} atm{sup -1} at 296 K, and the air broadening coefficients range from 0.08 to 0.14 cm{sup -1} atm{sup -1} at 296 K. The temperature dependence exponents of self-broadening range from 1.46 to -0.12 while the corresponding exponents for air broadening vary between 0.58 and 0.86. The present measurements are the first known determination of negative values for the temperature dependence exponents of HCN broadening coefficients. We were able to support our self-broadening measurements with appropriate theoretical calculations. Our present measurements are compared, where possible, with previous measurements for this and other HCN bands, as well as the parameters that are included in the 2000 and 2004 editions of the HITRAN (HIgh-resolution TRANsmission) database.

  8. Line-narrowing in proton-detected nitrogen-14 NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavadini, Simone; Vitzthum, Veronika; Ulzega, Simone; Abraham, Anuji; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    In solids spinning at the magic angle, the indirect detection of single-quantum (SQ) and double-quantum (DQ) 14N spectra ( I = 1) via spy nuclei S = 1/2 such as protons can be achieved in the manner of heteronuclear single- or multiple-quantum correlation (HSQC or HMQC) spectroscopy. The HMQC method relies on the excitation of two-spin coherences of the type T11IT11S and T21IT11S at the beginning of the evolution interval t1. The spectra obtained by Fourier transformation from t1 to ω1 may be broadened by the homogenous decay of the transverse terms of the spy nuclei S. This broadening is mostly due to homonuclear dipolar S- S' interactions between the proton spy nuclei. In this work we have investigated the possibility of inserting rotor-synchronized symmetry-based C or R sequences and decoupling schemes such as Phase-Modulated Lee-Goldburg (PMLG) sequences in the evolution period. These schemes reduce the homonuclear proton-proton interactions and lead to an enhancement of the resolution of both SQ and DQ proton-detected 14N HMQC spectra. In addition, we have investigated the combination of HSQC with symmetry-based sequences and PMLG and shown that the highest resolution in the 14N dimension is achieved by using HSQC in combination with symmetry-based sequences of the R-type. We show improvements in resolution in samples of L-alanine and the tripeptide ala-ala-gly (AAG). In particular, for L-alanine the width of the 14N SQ peak is reduced from 2 to 1.2 kHz, in agreement with simulations. We report accurate measurements of quadrupolar coupling constants and asymmetry parameters for amide 14N in AAG peptide bonds.

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF METABOLITES IN SMALL FISH BIOFLUIDS AND TISSUES BY NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been utilized for assessing ecotoxicity in small fish models by means of metabolomics. Two fundamental challenges of NMR-based metabolomics are the detection limit and characterization of metabolites (or NMR resonance assignments...

  10. NMR of platinum catalysts: Double NMR of chemisorbed carbon monoxide and a model for the platinum NMR line shape

    SciTech Connect

    Makowka, C.D.; Slichter, C.P. ); Sinfelt, J.H. )

    1985-05-01

    The authors report observation of the NMR line of {sup 195}Pt atoms in the surface layer of small platinum-metal particles on which {sup 13}CO has been chemisorbed. The surface {sup 195}Pt atoms are resolved from those of {sup 195}Pt atoms deeper in the particle by spin-echo double resonance between {sup 195}Pt and {sup 13}C. The particles, supported on {eta}-alumina, had dispersions (fraction of the atoms that are on the surface) of 26% and 76%. Comparison with {sup 195}Pt resonance in Pt carbonyls suggests that the magnitude of the Knight shift of the surface Pt is less than 0.2%. Analysis of the {sup 195}Pt spin-lattice relaxation indicates that the small surface Knight shift results from cancellation of 6s and 5d core-polarization contributions as was found theoretically by Weinert and Freeman for clean Pt surfaces. The {sup 13}C-{sup 195}Pt indirect spin coupling is found to be very similar to those in diamagnetic platinum carbonyl molecules. The results show that CO bonds via the C atom and verify that concepts from studies of large single crystals are valid for the small particles. The key features of the {sup 195}Pt line shapes in these small platinum particles are described by a simple phenomenological model of the spatial Knight-shift variation inside these particles. The model successfully describes the major structure seen in the NMR line shapes of samples with dispersions ranging from 5% to 76%.

  11. Probe for high resolution NMR with sample reorientation

    DOEpatents

    Pines, A.; Samoson, A.

    1990-02-06

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions are zero. 8 figs.

  12. Chemical Equilibrium in Supramolecular Systems as Studied by NMR Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gaitano, Gustavo; Tardajos, Gloria

    2004-01-01

    Undergraduate students are required to study the chemical balance in supramolecular assemblies constituting two or more interacting species, by using proton NMR spectrometry. A good knowledge of physical chemistry, fundamentals of chemical balance, and NMR are pre-requisites for conducting this study.

  13. Structure calculation, refinement and validation using CcpNmr Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Simon P.; Goult, Benjamin T.; Fogh, Rasmus H.; Boucher, Wayne; Stevens, Tim J.; Laue, Ernest D.; Vuister, Geerten W.

    2015-01-01

    CcpNmr Analysis provides a streamlined pipeline for both NMR chemical shift assignment and structure determination of biological macromolecules. In addition, it encompasses tools to analyse the many additional experiments that make NMR such a pivotal technique for research into complex biological questions. This report describes how CcpNmr Analysis can seamlessly link together all of the tasks in the NMR structure-determination process. It details each of the stages from generating NMR restraints [distance, dihedral, hydrogen bonds and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs)], exporting these to and subsequently re-importing them from structure-calculation software (such as the programs CYANA or ARIA) and analysing and validating the results obtained from the structure calculation to, ultimately, the streamlined deposition of the completed assignments and the refined ensemble of structures into the PDBe repository. Until recently, such solution-structure determination by NMR has been quite a laborious task, requiring multiple stages and programs. However, with the new enhancements to CcpNmr Analysis described here, this process is now much more intuitive and efficient and less error-prone. PMID:25615869

  14. Heteronuclear Multidimensional Protein NMR in a Teaching Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Nathan T.

    2016-01-01

    Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR techniques are commonly used to study protein structure, function, and dynamics, yet they are rarely taught at the undergraduate level. Here, we describe a senior undergraduate laboratory where students collect, process, and analyze heteronuclear multidimensional NMR experiments using an unstudied Ig domain (Ig2…

  15. Probe for high resolution NMR with sample reorientation

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions are zero.

  16. Straightforward and complete deposition of NMR data to the PDBe.

    PubMed

    Penkett, Christopher J; van Ginkel, Glen; Velankar, Sameer; Swaminathan, Jawahar; Ulrich, Eldon L; Mading, Steve; Stevens, Tim J; Fogh, Rasmus H; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Henrick, Kim; Vranken, Wim F

    2010-10-01

    We present a suite of software for the complete and easy deposition of NMR data to the PDB and BMRB. This suite uses the CCPN framework and introduces a freely downloadable, graphical desktop application called CcpNmr Entry Completion Interface (ECI) for the secure editing of experimental information and associated datasets through the lifetime of an NMR project. CCPN projects can be created within the CcpNmr Analysis software or by importing existing NMR data files using the CcpNmr FormatConverter. After further data entry and checking with the ECI, the project can then be rapidly deposited to the PDBe using AutoDep, or exported as a complete deposition NMR-STAR file. In full CCPN projects created with ECI, it is straightforward to select chemical shift lists, restraint data sets, structural ensembles and all relevant associated experimental collection details, which all are or will become mandatory when depositing to the PDB. Instructions and download information for the ECI are available from the PDBe web site at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pdbe/nmr/deposition/eci.html . PMID:20680401

  17. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect

    George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-09-05

    The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

  18. {sup 17}O NMR investigations of oxidative degradation in polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, T.M.; Celina, M.; Assink, R.A.; Gillen, K.T.; Clough, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    We have initiated studies using both solution and solid state magic angle spinning {sup 17}O NMR for a series of oxidatively aged polymers. This short note reports the solution {sup 17}O NMR for oxidatively degraded polypropylene, ethylene-propylene-diene, polyisoprene, and nitrile rubber. Enriched O{sub 2} is used during the accelerated aging. 3 figs, 7 refs.

  19. NMR-Metabolic Methodology in the Study of GM Foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 1H NMR methodology used in the study of genetically modified (GM) foodstuff is discussed. The study of transgenic lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv "Luxor") over-expressing the KNAT1 gene from Arabidopsis is presented as a novel study-case. The 1H NMR metabolic profiling was carried out. Twenty-two wat...

  20. Functional groups identified by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure is generally high in organic matter intensity so it is well suitable for 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Solid-state 13C NMR techniques used in characterizing organic matter and its components include, but are not limited to, cross-polarization /magic angle spinning (CP...