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Sample records for 14th international hla

  1. 14th International Conference 'Laser Optics 2010'

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, Artur A

    2010-10-15

    The 14th International Conference 'Laser Optics 2010' in which more than 800 scientists and experts from 35 countries took part, was held from June 28 to July 2, 2010, in St. Petersburg. (information)

  2. 14th International Headache Congress: basic science highlights.

    PubMed

    Schwedt, Todd J; Goadsby, Peter J

    2010-03-01

    During the 14th International Headache Congress the results of several innovative studies that contribute to our understanding of headache pathophysiology and treatment were presented. Here we summarize work expected to contribute substantially to understanding headache mechanisms, while an accompanying manuscript summarizes presentations regarding the treatment of headache. This manuscript highlights research on mechanisms of photophobia and phonophobia, pharmacologic inhibition of cortical spreading depression, a proposed mechanism by which oxygen effectively treats cluster headache, identification of functional and structural aberrations in people with hypnic headache, and research on functional imaging markers of a migraine attack. PMID:20456146

  3. 14th International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission ("PIXE 2015")

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybyłowicz, Wojciech Józef; Pineda-Vargas, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B contains the proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission ("PIXE 2015") that was held in Somerset West (South Africa) from 25th February to 3rd March 2015.

  4. 77 FR 52693 - Request for Comments on U.S. Technical Participation in the 14th Conference of the International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... 14th Conference of the International Organization of Legal Metrology (OIML) AGENCY: National Institute... 14th Conference of the International Organization of Legal Metrology (OIML). This conference is held... Conference. DATES: Written comments should be submitted to the NIST International Legal Metrology Program...

  5. EDITORIAL: The 14th International Symposium on Flow Visualization, ISFV14 The 14th International Symposium on Flow Visualization, ISFV14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Chun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2011-06-01

    The 14th International Symposium on Flow Visualization (ISFV14) was held in Daegu, Korea, on 21-24 June 2010. There were 304 participants from 17 countries. The state of the art in many aspects of flow visualization was presented and discussed, and a total of 243 papers from 19 countries were presented. Two special lectures and four invited lectures, 48 paper sessions and one poster session were held in five session rooms and in a lobby over four days. Among the paper sessions, those on 'biological flows', 'micro/nano fluidics', 'PIV/PTV' and 'compressible and sonic flows' received great attention from the participants of ISFV14. Special events included presentations of 'The Asanuma Award' and 'The Leonardo Da Vinci Award' to prominent contributors. Awards for photos and movies were given to three scientists for their excellence in flow visualizations. Sixteen papers were selected by the Scientific Committee of ISFV14. After the standard peer review process of this journal, six papers were finally accepted for publication. We wish to thank the editors of MST for making it possible to publish this special feature from ISFV14. We also thank the authors for their careful and insightful work and cooperation in the preparation of revised papers. It will be our pleasure if readers appreciate the hot topics in flow visualization research as a result of this special feature. We also hope that the progress in flow visualization will create new research fields. The 15th International Symposium on Flow Visualization will be held in Minsk, Belarus in 2012. We would like to express sincere thanks to the staff at IOP Publishing for their kind support.

  6. 14th Annual international meeting of wind turbine test stations: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    These proceedings are of the 14th Annual International Meeting of Test Stations. As the original charter states these meetings are intended to be an international forum for sharing wind turbine testing experiences. By sharing their experiences they can improve testing skills and techniques. As with all new industries the quality of the products is marked by how well they learn from their experiences and incorporate this learning into the next generation of products. The test station`s role in this process is to provide accurate information to the companies they serve. This information is used by designers to conform and improve their designs. It is also used by certification agencies for confirming the quality of these designs. By sharing of experiences they are able to accomplished these goals, serve these customers better and ultimately improve the international wind energy industry.

  7. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces (Met & Props 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wei-En

    2014-03-01

    Proceedings of the 14th International Conference, Taipei, Taiwan, 17th-21st June, 2013 Taiwan Organized by: Center for Measurement Standards/Industrial Technology Research Institute Mechanical and Systems Research Laboratories/Industrial Technology Research Institute National Taiwan University National Cheng Kung University National Taiwan University of Science and Technology National Tsing Hua University Greetings from Chairman of International Programme CommitteeTom Thomas When Professor Ken Stout and I founded this series of conferences in the United Kingdom more than thirty years ago, we did not anticipate its longevity or its success. Since that first meeting at Leicester, the conference has been often held in England, but also in several other European countries: France, Poland and Sweden, as well as in the United States. Ken, sadly no longer with us, would be proud of what it has achieved and has come to represent. Generations of researchers have presented their new ideas and innovations here which are now embodied in many textbooks and international standards. But this conference in 2013 marks a new departure and perhaps a new future. For the first time it is being held in Asia, reflecting the historic rise of the economies of the Pacific Rim, adding modern technology to their long-existing traditions of ordered insight and precise craftsmanship. Many of you have travelled far to attend this meeting, and we hope you will feel your trouble has been rewarded. We have an excellent selection of papers from all over the world from many of the world's experts, embodying the consolidation of tested ideas as well as the latest advances in the subject. These will be set in context by a glittering array of keynote and invited speakers. On behalf of the International Programme Committee, I am glad to acknowledge the hard work of the members of the Local Organising Committee in putting the programme together and making all the arrangements, and to accept their

  8. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Transport in Interacting Disordered Systems (TIDS-14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frydman, Aviad

    2012-07-01

    The '14th Transport in interacting disordered systems - TIDS14' conference took place during 5-8 September 2011 in Acre Israel. The conference was a continuation of the biennial meeting traditionally called HRP (hopping and related phenomena) and later named TIDS (transport in interacting disordered systems). Previous conferences took place in Trieste (1985), Bratislava (1987), Chapel Hill (1989), Marburg (1991), Glasgow (1993), Jerusalem (1995), Rackeve (1997), Murcia (1999), Shefayim (2001), Trieste (2003), Egmond, aan Zee (2005), Marburg (2007) and Rackeve (2009). Central to these conferences are systems that are characterized by a large degree of disorder and hence they lack translational symmetry. In such systems interactions are usually very important. Dramatic differences in the behavior of crystalline solids and the 'disordered' systems are possible. Some examples of the latter are amorphous materials, polymer aggregates, materials whose properties are governed by impurities, granular systems and biological systems. This conference series is notable for the pleasant atmosphere and fruitful exchange of ideas between theoreticians and experimentalists in these areas. This tradition was also maintained in the conference in Israel. Specific topics of TIDS14 included: hopping, electron and Coulomb glasses, Anderson localization and many body localization, noise, magneto-transport, metal-insulator and superconductor-insulator transition, transport through low dimensional and nanostructures, quantum coherence, interference and dephasing and other related topics. Over sixty scientists from fourteen countries participated in the conference and presented papers either as oral presentations or as posters in two sessions that took place during the conference. Many of these papers are included in these proceedings. I would like to thank all the conference participants for the interesting presentations, debates and discussions that created a stimulating but pleasant

  9. PREFACE: 14th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, Liliana; Britton, David; Glover, Nigel; Heinrich, Gudrun; Lauret, Jérôme; Naumann, Axel; Speer, Thomas; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro

    2012-06-01

    ACAT2011 This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to scientific contributions presented at the 14th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2011) which took place on 5-7 September 2011 at Brunel University, UK. The workshop series, which began in 1990 in Lyon, France, brings together computer science researchers and practitioners, and researchers from particle physics and related fields in order to explore and confront the boundaries of computing and of automatic data analysis and theoretical calculation techniques. It is a forum for the exchange of ideas among the fields, exploring and promoting cutting-edge computing, data analysis and theoretical calculation techniques in fundamental physics research. This year's edition of the workshop brought together over 100 participants from all over the world. 14 invited speakers presented key topics on computing ecosystems, cloud computing, multivariate data analysis, symbolic and automatic theoretical calculations as well as computing and data analysis challenges in astrophysics, bioinformatics and musicology. Over 80 other talks and posters presented state-of-the art developments in the areas of the workshop's three tracks: Computing Technologies, Data Analysis Algorithms and Tools, and Computational Techniques in Theoretical Physics. Panel and round table discussions on data management and multivariate data analysis uncovered new ideas and collaboration opportunities in the respective areas. This edition of ACAT was generously sponsored by the Science and Technology Facility Council (STFC), the Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology (IPPP) at Durham University, Brookhaven National Laboratory in the USA and Dell. We would like to thank all the participants of the workshop for the high level of their scientific contributions and for the enthusiastic participation in all its activities which were, ultimately, the key factors in the

  10. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces (Met & Props 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wei-En

    2014-03-01

    Proceedings of the 14th International Conference, Taipei, Taiwan, 17th-21st June, 2013 Taiwan Organized by: Center for Measurement Standards/Industrial Technology Research Institute Mechanical and Systems Research Laboratories/Industrial Technology Research Institute National Taiwan University National Cheng Kung University National Taiwan University of Science and Technology National Tsing Hua University Greetings from Chairman of International Programme CommitteeTom Thomas When Professor Ken Stout and I founded this series of conferences in the United Kingdom more than thirty years ago, we did not anticipate its longevity or its success. Since that first meeting at Leicester, the conference has been often held in England, but also in several other European countries: France, Poland and Sweden, as well as in the United States. Ken, sadly no longer with us, would be proud of what it has achieved and has come to represent. Generations of researchers have presented their new ideas and innovations here which are now embodied in many textbooks and international standards. But this conference in 2013 marks a new departure and perhaps a new future. For the first time it is being held in Asia, reflecting the historic rise of the economies of the Pacific Rim, adding modern technology to their long-existing traditions of ordered insight and precise craftsmanship. Many of you have travelled far to attend this meeting, and we hope you will feel your trouble has been rewarded. We have an excellent selection of papers from all over the world from many of the world's experts, embodying the consolidation of tested ideas as well as the latest advances in the subject. These will be set in context by a glittering array of keynote and invited speakers. On behalf of the International Programme Committee, I am glad to acknowledge the hard work of the members of the Local Organising Committee in putting the programme together and making all the arrangements, and to accept their

  11. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions (HCI 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Chikashi

    2009-07-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions (HCI2008), held at the University of Electro-Communications, Chofu, Tokyo, Japan from 1-5 September 2008. This series of conferences began in Stockholm, Sweden in 1982 and has since been held every other year; in Oxford, UK (1984), Groningen, the Netherlands (1986), Grenoble, France (1988), Giessen, Germany (1990), Manhattan, Kansas, USA (1992), Vienna, Austria (1994), Omiya, Japan (1996), Bensheim, Germany (1998), Berkeley, USA (2000), Caen, France (2002), Vilnius, Lithuania (2004) and Belfast, UK (2006). Highly charged ions (HCI), which are defined as highly ionized (i.e. positively charged atomic) ions here, mainly exist in hot plasmas such as the solar corona and fusion plasmas. It is true that its importance in plasma physics has driven researchers to the spectroscopic studies of HCIs, but the spectroscopy of few-electron ions is not only important for plasmas but also interesting for fundamental atomic physics. Electrons moving fast near a heavy nucleus give a suitable system to test the fundamental atomic theory involving relativistic and quantum electro-dynamic effects in a strong field. Also, the huge potential energy of a HCI induces drastic reaction in the interaction with matter. This unique property of HCIs, coupled with the recent development of efficient ion sources, is opening the possibility to utilize them in new technologies in the field such as nano-fabrication, surface analysis, medical physics, and so on. Hence, this conference is recognized as a valuable gathering place for established practitioners and also for newcomers; we exchange information, we are introduced to the subject itself, and to unexpected interfaces with other fields. On 31 August, the day before the opening of HCI2008, we welcomed the delegates at the university's restaurant—and we were greeted with an unusually heavy summer shower! The conference then opened on

  12. COMMITTEES: SQM2009 - 14th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter SQM2009 - 14th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    Local Organizing Committee Takeshi Kodama Chair, UFRJ Jun Takahashi Co-chair, UNICAMP Ignácio Bediaga e Hickman CBPF Eduardo Fraga UFRJ Frederique Grassi USP Yogiro Hama USP Gastão Krein IFT Erasmo Madureira Ferreira UFRJ Marcelo G. Munhoz USP Fernando Navarra USP Sandra Padula IFT Alejandro Szanto de Toledo USP César Augusto Zen Vasconcellos UFRGS International Advisory Committee Jörg Aichelin Nantes Federico Antinori Padova Tamás Biró Budapest Peter Braun-Munzinger GSI Jean Cleymans Cape Town Láaszló Csernai Bergen Timothy Hallman BNL Huan Zhong Huang UCLA Takeshi Kodama Rio de Janeiro Yu-Gang Ma Shanghai Jes Madsen Aarhus Ágnes Mócsy Pratt University Berndt Müller Duke University Grazyna Odyniec LBNL Helmut Oeschler Darmstadt Johann Rafelski Arizona Hans Georg Ritter LBNL Gunther Rolland MIT Karel Šafařík CERN Ladislav Sandor Kosice University Jack Sandweiss Yale University George S F Stephans MIT Horst Stöcker Frankfurt Larry McLerranBNL Helmut Satz Universitä Bielefeld Nu Xu LBNL Fuqiang Wang Purdue University William A. Zajc Columbia University Pengfei Zhuang Tsinghua University

  13. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-05-01

    . We thank the International Organizing Committee for their help and advice in planning the conference, and we are grateful to the University of Birmingham Conference Service and to the Birmingham Botanical Gardens for the excellent way in which the catering and room provision was provided. David Evans School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Birmingham Simon Hands Department of Physics, Swansea University Roman Lietava School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Birmingham Rosa Romita Oliver Lodge Laboratory, The University of Liverpool Orlando Villalobos Baillie School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Birmingham Editors

  14. Proceedings of the Annual International Conference on Outdoor Recreation and Education (ICORE) (14th, Oxford, Ohio, November 7-12, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freidline, Mark, Ed.; Phipps, Maurice, Ed.; Moore, Tim, Ed.; Versteeg, Julie, Ed.

    This proceedings contains 15 conference papers and presentation summaries from the 14th annual International Conference on Outdoor Recreation and Education (ICORE). Titles are: "The Hidden Costs of Outdoor Education/Recreation Academic Training" (Christian Bisson); "The Service Learning Concept: Service Learning in the National Parks" (Tom…

  15. PREFACE: 14th Annual International Astrophysics Conference: Linear and Nonlinear Particle Energization throughout the Heliosphere and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.

    2015-09-01

    The 14th Annual International Astrophysics Conference was held at the Sheraton Tampa Riverwalk Hotel, Tampa, Florida, USA, during the week of 19-24 April 2015. The meeting drew some 75 participants from all over the world, representing a wide range of interests and expertise in the energization of particles from the perspectives of theory, modelling and simulations, and observations. The theme of the meeting was "Linear and Nonlinear Particle Energization throughout the Heliosphere and Beyond." Energetic particles are ubiquitous to plasma environments, whether collisionless such as the supersonic solar wind, the magnetospheres of planets, the exospheres of nonmagnetized planets and comets, the heliospheric-local interstellar boundary regions, interstellar space and supernova remnant shocks, and stellar wind boundaries. Energetic particles are found too in more collisional regions such as in the solar corona, dense regions of the interstellar medium, accretion flows around stellar objects, to name a few. Particle acceleration occurs wherever plasma boundaries, magnetic and electric fields, and turbulence are present. The meeting addressed the linear and nonlinear physical processes underlying the variety of particle acceleration mechanisms, the role of particle acceleration in shaping different environments, and acceleration processes common to different regions. Both theory and observations were addressed with a view to encouraging crossdisciplinary fertilization of ideas, concepts, and techniques. The meeting addressed all aspects of particle acceleration in regions ranging from the Sun to the interplanetary medium to magnetospheres, exospheres, and comets, the boundaries of the heliosphere, and beyond to supernova remnant shocks, galactic jets, stellar winds, accretion flows, and more. The format of the meeting included 25-minute presentations punctuated by two 40-minute talks, one by Len Fisk that provided an historical overview of particle acceleration in the

  16. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    It is our great pleasure to welcome you to the 14th International Conference on Micro- and Nano-Technology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications, or PowerMEMS 2014, in Awaji Island, Japan. The aim of PowerMEM is to present the latest research results in the field of miniature, micro- and nano-scale technologies for power generation and energy conversion. The conference will also- give us the opportunity to exchange informations and new ideas in the field of Power MEMS/NEMS. The current status of the field of PowerMEMS spans the full spectrum from basic research to practical applications. We will enjoy valuable discussions not only from the viewpoint of academia but from commercial and industrial perspectives. In the conference, three invited speakers lead the technical program. We received 172 abstracts and after a careful reviewing process by the Technical Program Committee a total of 133 papers were selected for presentation. These have been organized into 16 Oral sessions in two parallel streams and two poster sessions including some late-news papers. The oral and regular poster papers are published by the Institute of Physics (IOP). We have also organized a PowerMEMS School in Kobe-Sannomiya contiguous to the main conference. This two-day school will cover various topics of energy harvesting. World leading experts will give invited lectures on their main topics. This is a new experiment to broaden the technology remit of our conference by organizing mini symposiums that aim to gather the latest research on the following topics by the organizers: Microscale Combustion, Wideband Vibration Energy Harvesting, RF Energy Transfer and Industrial Application. We hope this, and other activities will make PowerMEMS2014 a memorable success. One of the important programs in an international conference is the social program, and we prepare the PowerMEMS2014 banquet in the banquet room at the Westin Awaji Island Hotel. This will provide an opportunity to

  17. 14th St. Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference 2015: Evidence, Controversies, Consensus – Primary Therapy of Early Breast Cancer: Opinions Expressed by German Experts

    PubMed Central

    Jackisch, Christian; Harbeck, Nadia; Huober, Jens; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Gerber, Bernd; Kreipe, Hans-Heinrich; Liedtke, Cornelia; Marschner, Norbert; Möbus, Volker; Scheithauer, Heike; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Thomssen, Christoph; Loibl, Sibylle; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Blohmer, Jens-Uwe; Costa, Serban-Dan; Decker, Thomas; Diel, Ingo; Fasching, Peter A.; Fehm, Tanja; Janni, Wolfgang; Lück, Hans-Joachim; Maass, Nicolai; Scharl, Anton; Untch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary The key topics of this year's 14th St. Gallen Consensus Conference on the diagnosis and therapy of primary breast cancer were again questions about breast surgery and axillary surgery, radio-oncology and systemic therapy options in consideration of tumor biology, and the clinical application of multigene assays. This year, the consensus conference took place in Vienna. From a German perspective, it makes sense to substantiate the results of the vote of the international panel representing 19 countries in light of the updated national therapy recommendations of the AGO (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Gynäkologische Onkologie). Therefore, 14 German breast cancer experts, 3 of whom are members of the International St. Gallen Panel, have commented on the voting results of the St. Gallen Consensus Conference 2015 in relation to clinical routine in Germany. PMID:26557827

  18. Better vaccines for healthier life. Part I. Conference report of the DCVMN International 14th Annual General Meeting Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Rustan, Rahman; Huang, Weidan; Nguyen, Thuvan

    2014-11-12

    The Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers' Network (DCVMN) brought together nearly 220 senior representatives of governmental and non-governmental global health organizations, as well as corporate executives of emerging vaccine manufacturers, from 26 countries for a two-day tailored lectures, Q&A sessions, CEOs panel discussion and networking opportunities, followed by a vaccine-technology symposium and visit to manufacturing facilities in Hanoi, Vietnam. Participants included representatives of 38 vaccine manufacturers, as well as international partners and collaborating research institutions, with 39% female participants. The Vice-Minister of Health to Vietnam commended the speakers and participants to this Annual General Meeting, devoted to achieve our common goal of protecting people against infectious diseases with better vaccines, for a healthier life. He reminded the audience that the first vaccine produced in Vietnam was oral polio vaccine (OPV) in the early 1960s and contributed to polio eradication in Vietnam, in 2000. Through its manufacturing resources, Vietnam eliminated neonatal tetanus in 2005, and has controlled measles and hepatitis B spread. The Ministry of Health hopes that by sharing experiences, delegates at this conference will foster international cooperation and partnerships among organizations. CEOs elaborated on challenges and opportunities for emerging countries. PMID:24923636

  19. Better vaccines for healthier life. Part II. Conference report of the DCVMN International 14th Annual General Meeting Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Tippoo, Patrick; Sivaramakrishnan, Venkatraman; Nguyen, Thuvan

    2014-11-12

    New vaccines are required to meet the public health challenges of the next generation and many unmet global health needs can be addressed by developing countries vaccine manufacturers such as lower-cost vaccines based on single-dose, thermostable formulations, efficacious in children with compromised gastrointestinal tracts. GMP compliance is also a challenge, as sometimes innovation and clinical development focus is not accompanied by command of scale-up and quality assurance for large volume manufacturing and supply. Identifying and addressing such challenges, beyond cost and cold-chain space, including safety considerations and health worker behavior, regulatory alliances and harmonization to foster access to vaccines, will help countries to ensure sustainable immunization. There needs to be continuous and close management of the global vaccine supply both at national and international levels, requiring careful risk management, coordination and cooperation with manufacturers. Successful partnership models based on sharing a common goal, mutual respect and good communication were discussed among stakeholders. PMID:24923638

  20. International Congress of the International Council of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (14th, Kingston, Jamaica, July 30-August 3, 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Council on Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    Papers presented at the Fourteenth International Congress of the International Council on Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (ICHPER) are included in this document. Among the subjects discussed are suggestions for physical education in the 1970's (primary school level, research divisions for the 1970's, research needs in girls and women's…

  1. AIAA International Communication Satellite Systems Conference and Exhibit, 14th, Washington, DC, Mar. 22-26, 1992, Technical Papers. Pts. 1-3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The present conference on international communication satellite systems discusses GEO launch vehicle development, military Satcom systems, GEO mobile Satcom systems, advanced transponder technology, and digital network architecture. Attention is given to digital network architecture, the optical Satcom system, emerging launch alternatives, military and government Satcom systems, satellite communications developments in newly industrialized nations, launch options to nongeostationary orbits, and data relay satellite technology. Topics addressed include LEO satellite systems, earth terminal technology, personal communications, high data rate links via satellite, Italsat, antenna systems, Intelsat system and service development, new spacecraft system concepts, orbit/spectrum allocation and use, and ACTS technology. Also discussed are array antenna technology, VSAT and other small terminal systems, orbits, propagation, onboard satellite switching, reflector antenna technology, and panel small communication satellite systems.

  2. The relevance of "non-criteria" clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome: 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies Technical Task Force Report on Antiphospholipid Syndrome Clinical Features.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Mirhelen M; Danowski, Adriana; Wahl, Denis G; Amigo, Mary-Carmen; Tektonidou, Maria; Pacheco, Marcelo S; Fleming, Norma; Domingues, Vinicius; Sciascia, Savino; Lyra, Julia O; Petri, Michelle; Khamashta, Munther; Levy, Roger A

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this task force was to critically analyze nine non-criteria manifestations of APS to support their inclusion as APS classification criteria. The Task Force Members selected the non-criteria clinical manifestations according to their clinical relevance, that is, the patient-important outcome from clinician perspective. They included superficial vein thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, renal microangiopathy, heart valve disease, livedo reticularis, migraine, chorea, seizures and myelitis, which were reviewed by this International Task Force collaboration, in addition to the seronegative APS (SN-APS). GRADE system was used to evaluate the quality of evidence of medical literature of each selected item. This critical appraisal exercise aimed to support the debate regarding the clinical picture of APS. We found that the overall GRADE analysis was very low for migraine and seizures, low for superficial venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, chorea, longitudinal myelitis and the so-called seronegative APS and moderate for APS nephropathy, heart valve lesions and livedo reticularis. The next step can be a critical redefinition of an APS gold standard, for instance derived from the APS ACTION registry that will include not only current APS patients but also those with antiphospholipid antibodies not meeting current classification criteria. PMID:25641203

  3. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation & dynamics; and surfaces.

  4. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation dynamics; and surfaces.

  5. Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE): an underestimated risk…still: report of the 14th annual meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE).

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2012-06-01

    Today, the risk of getting tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is still underestimated in many parts of Europe and worldwide. Therefore, the 14th meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE) - a group of neurologists, general practitioners, clinicians, travel physicians, virologists, pediatricians, and epidemiologists - was held under the title "Tick-borne encephalitis: an underestimated risk…still". Among the discussed issues were: TBE, an underestimated risk in children, a case report in two Dutch travelers, the very emotional report of a tick victim, an overview of the epidemiological situation, investigations to detect new TBE cases in Italy, TBE virus (TBEV) strains circulation in Northern Europe, TBE Program of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), efforts to increase the TBE vaccination rate in the Czech Republic, positioning statement of the World Health Organization (WHO), and TBE in dogs. To answer the question raised above: Yes, the risk of getting TBE is underestimated in children and adults, because awareness is still too low. It is still underestimated in several areas of Europe, where, for a lack of human cases, TBEV is thought to be absent. It is underestimated in travelers, because they still do not know enough about the risk, and diagnostic awareness in non-endemic countries is still low. PMID:22765977

  6. NEWTON'S APPLE 14th Season Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichmann, Sue, Ed.

    This guide was developed to help teachers use the 14th season of NEWTON'S APPLE in their classrooms and contains lessons formatted to follow the National Science Education Standards. The "Overview,""Main Activity," and "Try-This" sections were created with inquiry-based learning in mind. Each lesson page begins with "Getting Started," which…

  7. Highlights from the 14th St Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference 2015 in Vienna: Dealing with classification, prognostication, and prediction refinement to personalize the treatment of patients with early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Angela; Criscitiello, Carmen; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The refinement of the classification, the risk of relapse and the prediction of response to multidisciplinary treatment for early breast cancer has been the major theme of the 14th St Gallen International Breast Cancer Consensus Conference 2015. The meeting, held in Vienna, assembled 3500–4000 participants from 134 countries worldwide. It culminated, on the final day, with the International Consensus Session, delivered by 40–50 of the world’s most experienced opinion leaders in the field of breast cancer treatment. The panelist addressed the “semantic” classification of breast cancer subtypes by pathology-based biomarkers (e.g. estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and HER2) vs genomic classifiers. They also refined the biomarker prognostication dissecting the impact of the various gene signatures and pathologic variables in predicting the outcome of patients with early breast cancer in terms of early and late relapse. Finally they addressed the challenges stemming from the intra- and inter-observer variability in the assessment of pathologic variables and the role of gene signatures for the prediction of response to specific therapeutic approach such as endocrine therapy and chemotherapy and for personalizing local treatment of patients with early breast cancer. The vast majority of the questions asked during the consensus were about controversial issues. The opinion of the panel members has been used to implement guidance for treatment choice. This is the unique feature of the St. Gallen Consensus, ensuring that the resulting recommendations will take due cognizance of the variable resource limitations in different countries. Information derived from evidence based medicine and large meta-analyses is of obvious and enormous value. The weakness of this approach is that it gives particular weight to older trials (which have accumulated more event endpoints) and is frequently unable to collect sufficient detail on the patients and tumors in the trials

  8. HLA typing with monoclonal antibodies: evaluation of 356 HLA monoclonal antibodies including 181 studied during the 10th International Histocompatibility Workshop.

    PubMed

    Colombani, J; Lepage, V; Raffoux, C; Colombani, M

    1989-08-01

    During the 10th International Histocompatibility Workshop (10th WS), 181 HLA MoAbs were studied using lymphocytotoxicity micro-technique (LCT) and/or enzyme immuno-assay (EIA), and their capacity to serve as typing reagents was evaluated. 129 MoAbs were tested by both techniques. Results obtained with 92 class I and 86 class II polymorphic MoAbs (10th WS) were compared to published data concerning 180 class I and 176 class II polymorphic MoAbs, listed in an HLA-MoAbs Register maintained in our laboratory. The following conclusions can be proposed: 1/HLA-A, B typing by LCT with MoAbs is possible for about 14 specificities. Some specificities are clearly recognized (HLA-A3, B8, B13, Bw4, Bw6), others are recognized as cross-reacting groups (B7+27+w22+40), others are not currently recognized by any MoAb with restricted specificity (B5, B15). Several MoAbs confirmed the existence of shared epitopes between products from a single locus (A2-A28, A25-A32), or from A and B loci (A2-B17, Bw4-A9-A32). A single HLA-Cw MoAb has been described. 2/HLA class II typing by LCT with MoAbs is more difficult than class I typing. DR2, DR3, DR4, DR5 and DR7 as well as DRw52 and DRw53 are well defined; other DR specificities are poorly or not at all defined. Particular associations (DR1+DR4, DR3+DRw6, all DR except DR7) are recognized by several MoAbs. All DQw specificities are well recognized, including new specificities defined only by MoAbs: WA (DQw4), TA10 (DQw7), 2B3 (DQw6+w8+w9). Only two HLA-DP MoAbs have been described. 3/Satisfactory results, similar to those of LCT, were obtained with EIA using lymphoid cell lines as targets. 4/Human MoAbs (12 in the Register) are satisfactory typing reagents. They could represent in the future a significant contribution to HLA typing with MoAbs. PMID:2609328

  9. [The international network and Italian modernization. Ruggero Ceppellini, genetics, and HLA].

    PubMed

    Capocci, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The paper reconstructs the scientific career of Ruggero Ceppellini, focusing especially on his role in the discovery of the genetic system underlying the Human Leucocyte Antigen. From his earliest investigations in blood group genetics, Ceppellini quickly became an internationally acknowledged authority in the field of immunogenetics--the study of genetics by means of immunological tools--and participated to the endeavor that ultimately yelded a new meaning for the word: thanks to the pioneering research in the HLA field, immunogenetics became the study of the genetic control of immune system. The paper will also place Ceppellini's scientific work against the backdrop of the modernization of Italian genetics after WWII, resulting from the efforts of a handful of scientists to connect to international networks and adopting new methodologies in life sciences. PMID:26292523

  10. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education with the North American Chapter 12th PME-NA Conference (14th, Mexico, July 15-20, 1990), Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booker, George, Ed.; Cobb, Paul, Ed.; de Mendicuti, Teresa N.

    This proceedings of the annual conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) contains the following research papers: "The Construct Theory of Rational Numbers: Toward a Semantic Analysis" (M. Behr & G. Harel); "Reflections on Dealing: An Analysis of One Child's Interpretations" (G. Davis); "About…

  11. Libraries and Electronic Publishing: Promises and Challenges for the 90's. Festschrift in Honor of Richard M. Dougherty. Proceedings of the International Essen Symposium (14th, Essen, Germany, October 14-17, 1991). Publications of Essen University Library, 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helal, Ahmed H., Ed.; Weiss, Joachim W., Ed.

    The goal of the Essen symposium was to bring together internationally recognized librarians and library automation specialists to discuss new developments in electronic publishing. All 16 papers included in this collection were presented at the conference: (1) "Barriers to the Introduction of New Technology" (J. Andrew Braid); (2) "Nudging a…

  12. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education with the North American Chapter 12th PME-NA Conference (14th, Mexico, July 15-20, 1990), Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booker, George, Ed.; Cobb, Paul, Ed.; de Mendicuti, Teresa N., Ed.

    This proceedings of the annual conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) includes the following research papers: "Children's Connections among Representations of Mathematical Ideas" (A. Alston & C.A. Maher); "Algebraic Syntax Errors: A Study with Secondary School Children" (A. Avila, F. Garcia, & T.…

  13. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education with the North American Chapter 12th PME-NA Conference (14th, Mexico, July 15-20, 1990), Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booker, George, Ed.; Cobb, Paul, Ed.; de Mendicuti, Teresa N., Ed.

    This proceedings of the annual conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) includes the following papers: "The Knowledge of Cats: Epistemological Foundations of Mathematics Education" (R.B. Davis) and "PME Algebra Research: A Working Perspective" (E. Filloy); "Some Misconceptions in Calculus: Anecdotes…

  14. The Moon in the 14th Century Frescoes in Padova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellinati, Claudio

    Padova, already in the 14th century a great cultural center of international reputation, struggled with the problems posed by the Moon with Pietro d'Abano, physician and astronomer. But it was with the great painters of that time, namely Giotto and Giusto de'Menabuoi, that its most intimate connections with the contemporary popular culture and theology were illustrated. Giotto depicts the Moon in the Giudizio Universale of the Scrovegni Chapel (1305). The Moon appears on the upper part of the painting, to the left of Christ the Judge, to crown together with the Sun, His presence. The Moon is a heavenly body similar to those appearing on Roman coins of emperors, to signify the Judge is an immortal creature. The color is pale, witeish, almost veiled. More important, the Moon has a face that by popular belief was that of Cain, condemned to amass `mucchi di rovi spinosi' for the fire of the damned (Dante Alighieri, Divina Commedia, Inferno XX, 126). Giusto de' Menabuoi on the other hand expounds, in the Crucifixion of the Duomo (1375 ca), a theological interpretation. The day of God's justice, following the death of the Savior, the Moon will burn and the Sun will pale (Isaiah, 24, 23). And indeed the Moon has a dark reddish colour. Therefore, while in Giotto the Moon is seen as in the popular beliefs, Giusto underlines the theological visions of his times with the words of the prophets.

  15. Guidelines for internal validation of the HLA-DQ alpha DNA typing system.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R B; Ferrara, J L; Baum, H J; Shaler, R C

    1994-05-25

    Validation experiments were performed to evaluate the HLA-DQ alpha DNA typing system for forensic casework. Temperature profiles for two Perkin Elmer TC-1 Thermal Cyclers were measured, and the efficiency of the instruments was tested by amplifying a control sample (DQ alpha 1.2,4) susceptible to allelic drop-out. DNA extraction using chelex was compared to non-organic extraction, and the amplification and hybridization procedures were evaluated at extremes of time and temperature. With the protocol in place, samples exposed to stresses commonly encountered in forensic casework were typed to determine the flexibility of the system. Mixed samples of two different bloods and blood mixed with saliva were typed to determine the threshold at which mixtures could be resolved using the reverse dot blot method. Different storage conditions were evaluated using a set of control bloodstrains, and a set of 12 postmortem blood samples was typed repeatedly over the course of 5 months to determine the effects of natural degradation on the DQ alpha results. Finally, casework stains on a variety of substrates were typed. These experiments demonstrate the flexibility of the HLA-DQ alpha system. Based upon these results, a comprehensive quality assurance program was developed to ensure the integrity of typing results for casework. PMID:7927091

  16. Murine antiidiotypic monoclonal antibodies that bear the internal image of HLA-DR allospecificities.

    PubMed Central

    Perosa, F; Ferrone, S

    1989-01-01

    Hybridization of murine myeloma cells P3-X63-Ag8.653 with splenocytes from a BALB/c mouse immunized with the syngeneic anti HLA-DR1,4,w6,w8,w9 MAb AC1.59 resulted in the development of 108 hybridomas secreting antiidiotypic antibodies. 100 of them inhibited the binding of MAb AC1.59 to target cells. Detailed analysis of the antiidiotypic MAb F5-444, F5-830, F5-963, F5-1126, F5-1336, and F5-1419 showed that all of them recognize idiotopes within or spatially close to the antigen combining site of MAb AC1.59. In cross-blocking experiments, the six antiidiotypic MAbs cross-blocked each other. It is likely that the six MAbs recognize spatially close, but not identical idiotopes because they elicited antiantiidiotypic antibodies of different or similar, but not identical specificity and differ in their ability to elicit anti-HLA class II antibodies. The latter, which were found only in sera from BALB/c mice immunized with antiidiotypic MAb F5-444 and F5-830, mimic the specificity of MAb AC1.59 and express the idiotope defined by the immunizing antiidiotypic MAb. These results indicate that the MAb F5-444 and F5-830 are antiidiotypes beta and the remaining four are antiidiotypes gamma. Images PMID:2474577

  17. Viruses in a 14th-century coprolite.

    PubMed

    Appelt, Sandra; Fancello, Laura; Le Bailly, Matthieu; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel; Desnues, Christelle

    2014-05-01

    Coprolites are fossilized fecal material that can reveal information about ancient intestinal and environmental microbiota. Viral metagenomics has allowed systematic characterization of viral diversity in environmental and human-associated specimens, but little is known about the viral diversity in fossil remains. Here, we analyzed the viral community of a 14th-century coprolite from a closed barrel in a Middle Ages site in Belgium using electron microscopy and metagenomics. Viruses that infect eukaryotes, bacteria, and archaea were detected, and we confirmed the presence of some of them by ad hoc suicide PCR. The coprolite DNA viral metagenome was dominated by sequences showing homologies to phages commonly found in modern stools and soil. Although their phylogenetic compositions differed, the metabolic functions of the viral communities have remained conserved across centuries. Antibiotic resistance was one of the reconstructed metabolic functions detected. PMID:24509925

  18. Viruses in a 14th-Century Coprolite

    PubMed Central

    Appelt, Sandra; Fancello, Laura; Le Bailly, Matthieu; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Coprolites are fossilized fecal material that can reveal information about ancient intestinal and environmental microbiota. Viral metagenomics has allowed systematic characterization of viral diversity in environmental and human-associated specimens, but little is known about the viral diversity in fossil remains. Here, we analyzed the viral community of a 14th-century coprolite from a closed barrel in a Middle Ages site in Belgium using electron microscopy and metagenomics. Viruses that infect eukaryotes, bacteria, and archaea were detected, and we confirmed the presence of some of them by ad hoc suicide PCR. The coprolite DNA viral metagenome was dominated by sequences showing homologies to phages commonly found in modern stools and soil. Although their phylogenetic compositions differed, the metabolic functions of the viral communities have remained conserved across centuries. Antibiotic resistance was one of the reconstructed metabolic functions detected. PMID:24509925

  19. 14th Young Scientists Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, G.; Golovin, A.

    2007-12-01

    The present Proceedings of Contributed Papers include 21 papers presented during 14th Young Scientists Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics which was held in Kyiv, at Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University, Faculty of Physics, from April, 23 to April 28, 2007. The aim of the annual Open Young Scientists Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics is to provide young scientists a possibility to communicate and present their scientific work. The conference is intended for participation of students, PhD students and young researches who are involved in research in one of the following fields: astrometry and geophysics, plasma physics and physics of the near space, planetary systems, small bodies of the solar system, solar physics and physics of heliosphere, stellar astrophysics, interstellar medium, extragalactic astrophysics, high-energy astrophysics, cosmology, history of astronomy and related to the mentioned above.

  20. Identification of Non-HLA Genes Associated with Celiac Disease and Country-Specific Differences in a Large, International Pediatric Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashok; Liu, Xiang; Hadley, David; Hagopian, William; Liu, Edwin; Chen, Wei-Min; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Simell, Ville; Rewers, Marian; Ziegler, Anette-G.; Lernmark, Åke; Simell, Olli; Toppari, Jorma; Krischer, Jeffrey P.; Akolkar, Beena; Rich, Stephen S.; Agardh, Daniel; She, Jin-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There are significant geographical differences in the prevalence and incidence of celiac disease that cannot be explained by HLA alone. More than 40 loci outside of the HLA region have been associated with celiac disease. We investigated the roles of these non-HLA genes in the development of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA) and celiac disease in a large international prospective cohort study. Methods A total of 424,788 newborns from the US and European general populations and first-degree relatives with type 1 diabetes were screened for specific HLA genotypes. Of these, 21,589 carried 1 of the 9 HLA genotypes associated with increased risk for type 1 diabetes and celiac disease; we followed 8676 of the children in a 15 y prospective follow-up study. Genotype analyses were performed on 6010 children using the Illumina ImmunoChip. Levels of tTGA were measured in serum samples using radio-ligand binding assays; diagnoses of celiac disease were made based on persistent detection of tTGA and biopsy analysis. Data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards analyses. Results We found 54 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 5 genes associated with celiac disease (TAGAP, IL18R1, RGS21, PLEK, and CCR9) in time to celiac disease analyses (10−4>P>5.8x10−6). The hazard ratios (HR) for the SNPs with the smallest P values in each region were 1.59, 1.45, 2.23, 2.64, and 1.40, respectively. Outside of regions previously associated with celiac disease, we identified 10 SNPs in 8 regions that could also be associated with the disease (P<10−4). A SNP near PKIA (rs117128341, P = 6.5x10−8, HR = 2.8) and a SNP near PFKFB3 (rs117139146, P<2.8x10−7, HR = 4.9) reached the genome-wide association threshold in subjects from Sweden. Analyses of time to detection of tTGA identified 29 SNPs in 2 regions previously associated with celiac disease (CTLA4, P = 1.3x10−6, HR = 0.76 and LPP, P = 2.8x10−5, HR = .80) and 6 SNPs in 5 regions not previously

  1. 1. NORTH APPROACH TO SE 14TH STREET BRIDGE CROSSING THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. NORTH APPROACH TO SE 14TH STREET BRIDGE CROSSING THE DES MOINES RIVER, LOOKING SOUTH. - Southeast Fourteenth Street Bridge, Spanning Des Moines River at U.S. Highway 65/69, Des Moines, Polk County, IA

  2. History of On-orbit Satellite Fragmentations (14th Edition)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.; Stansbery, Eugene; Whitlock, David O.; Abercromby, Kira J.; Shoots, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Since the first serious satellite fragmentation occurred in June 1961 (which instantaneously increased the total Earth satellite population by more than 400%) the issue of space operations within the finite region of space around the Earth has been the subject of increasing interest and concern. The prolific satellite fragmentations of the 1970s and the marked increase in the number of fragmentations in the 1980s served to widen international research into the characteristics and consequences of such events. Continued events in all orbits in later years make definition and historical accounting of those events crucial to future research. Large, manned space stations and the growing number of operational robotic satellites demand a better understanding of the hazards of the dynamic Earth satellite population.

  3. PREFACE: 14th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao, Luis; Minotti, Fernando; Kelly, Hector

    2012-06-01

    These proceedings present the written contributions from participants of the Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP), which was held in Mar del Plata, Argentina, on 20-25 November 2011. This was the 14th session of the series of LAWPP biennial meetings, which started in 1982. The five-day scientific program of LAWPP 2011 consisted of 32 talks and various poster sessions, with the participation of 135 researchers from Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Puerto Rico, USA, Venezuela, as well as others from Europe and Asia. In addition, a School on Plasma Physics and a Workshop on Industrial Applications of Plasma Technology (AITP) were organized together with the main meeting. The five-day School held in the week previous to the meeting was intended for young scientists starting their research in Plasma Physics. On the other hand, the objective of the AITP Workshop was to enhance regional academic and industrial cooperation in the field of plasma assisted surface technology. Topics addressed at LAWPP 2011 included space plasmas, dusty plasmas, nuclear fusion, non-thermal plasmas, basic plasma processes, plasma simulation and industrial plasma applications. This variety of subjects is reflected in these proceedings, which the editors hope will result in enjoyable and fruitful reading for those interested in Plasma Physics. It is a pleasure to thank the Institutions that sponsored the meeting, as well as all the participants and collaborators for making this meeting possible. The Editors Luis Bilbao, Fernando Minotti and Hector Kelly LAWPP participants Participants of the 14th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics, 20-25 November 2011, Mar del Plata, Argentina International Scientific Committee Carlos Alejaldre, Spain María Virginia Alves, Brazil Ibere Caldas, Brazil Luis Felipe Delgado-Aparicio, Peru Mayo Villagrán, Mexico Kohnosuke Sato, Japan Héctor Kelly, Argentina Edberto Leal-Quirós, Puerto Rico George Morales, USA Julio Puerta

  4. The 14th Annual James L. Waters Symposium at Pittcon: Raman Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy was the main topic of the 14th Annual James L. Waters Symposium, which was held in March 2003 at Pittcon. The development of the enabling technologies that have made Raman spectroscopy a routine analysis tool in many laboratories worldwide is discussed.

  5. 76 FR 19373 - The 14th Annual Food and Drug Administration-Orange County Regulatory Affairs Educational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The 14th Annual Food and Drug Administration-Orange County... announcing the following conference: 14th Annual Educational Conference co-sponsored with the Orange County...: 949-608-4417; or Orange County Regulatory Affairs Discussion Group, Attention to Detail,...

  6. Business of biosimilars - 14th annual conference (October 15-17, 2013 - Boston, Massachusetts, USA).

    PubMed

    Bourgoin, A

    2013-12-01

    Competition in the biological market offers a new set of opportunities and challenges within the healthcare industry. Biosimilars, like generic small-molecule drugs, can provide cost savings and increase patient access, while also promoting innovation. While large molecule manufacturers face many challenges unique to complex therapeutics, it is becoming clear that the commercialization of biosimilars shares many of the same hurdles as the generics market. The 14th Annual Business of Biosimilars Conference provided quality presentations from industry leaders regarding many commercial considerations for stakeholders interested in entering the biosimilars market. Opportunities to network with industry experts were offered, with over 120 attendees. PMID:24524098

  7. HLA typing in congenital toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    Meenken, C; Rothova, A; de Waal, L P; van der Horst, A R; Mesman, B J; Kijlstra, A

    1995-01-01

    HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, and HLA-D typing was performed in 47 mothers of patients suffering from ocular toxoplasmosis to investigate whether an immunogenetic predisposition exists for developing congenital toxoplasmosis in their offspring. No significant association between any HLA antigen was observed in the mothers of patients with ocular toxoplasmosis, although a total absence of the HLA-B51 antigen was found in this group. HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C typing was also performed in their children (52 patients with ocular toxoplasmosis), to investigate a possible relation between the severity of ocular toxoplasmosis and an eventual immunogenetic factor. In the patients with ocular toxoplasmosis an increased frequency of the HLA-Bw62 antigen was observed in correlation with severe ocular involvement. PMID:7612565

  8. Report from the Immunogenomic Data Analysis Working Group (IDAWG) 16th International HLA and Immunogenetics Workshop (IHIW) Project: Immunogenomic Data-Management Methods

    PubMed Central

    Hollenbach, Jill A.; Holcomb, Cherie; Hurley, Carolyn Katovich; Mabdouly, Abeer; Maiers, Martin; Noble, Janelle A.; Robinson, James; Schmidt, Alexander H.; Shi, Li; Turner, Victoria; Yao, Yufeng; Mack, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The goal of the IDAWG is to facilitate the consistent analysis of HLA and KIR data, and the sharing of those data among the immunogenomic and larger genomic communities. However, the data-management approaches currently applied by immunogenomic researchers are not widely discussed or reported in the literature, and the effect of different approaches on data-analyses is not known. With ASHI’s support, the IDAWG developed a forty-five question survey on HLA and KIR data-generation, data-management, and data-analysis practices. Survey questions detailed the loci genotyped, typing systems used, nomenclature versions reported, computer operating systems and software used to manage and transmit data, the approaches applied to resolve HLA ambiguity, and the methods used for basic population-level analyses. Respondents were invited to demonstrate their HLA ambiguity resolution approaches in simulated data sets.By May 2012, 156 respondents from 35 nations had completed the survey . These survey respondents represent a broad sampling of the Immunogenomic community; 52% were European, 30% North American, 10% Asian, 4% South American, and 4% from the Pacific. The project will continue in conjunction with the 17th Workshop, with the aim of developing community data-sharing standards, ambiguity resolution documentation formats, single-task data-Management tools, and, novel data-analysis methods and applications. While additional project details and plans for the 17th IHIW will be forthcoming, we welcome the input and participation in these projects from the histocompatibility and immunogenetics community. PMID:23280068

  9. Analysis of HLA-B15 and HLA-B27 in spondyloarthritis with peripheral and axial clinical patterns

    PubMed Central

    Londono, John; Santos, Ana Maria; Peña, Paola; Calvo, Enrique; Espinosa, Luis R; Reveille, John D; Vargas-Alarcon, Gilberto; Jaramillo, Carlos A; Valle-Oñate, Rafael; Avila, Mabel; Romero, Consuelo; Medina, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    Objective Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) B27 and HLA-B15 are associated with spondyloarthritis (SpA). Recent Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) criteria emphasise a distinction between SpA with axial and peripheral patterns. We analysed whether HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 alleles could associate with these patterns. Methods We studied 100 healthy individuals and 178 patients with SpA according to European Spondyloarthropathy Study Group (ESSG) criteria. Patients were then classified according to ASAS criteria, the axial spondyloarthritis pattern (axSpA) being defined by ascertained sacroiliitis and the peripheral pattern (pSpA) by enthesitis and/or arthritis in extremities. A combined ax/p pattern was also considered. Results Only HLA-B27 and HLA-B15 alleles were associated with SpA. ASAS criteria for axSpA were met in 152 patients (12 with isolated axSpA and 140 with a combined ax/p patterns). When the ASAS peripheral criteria were applied, 161 patients met these criteria (13 with isolated pSpA and 148 with a combined ax/p pattern). HLA-B27 was found in 83% of patients with axSpA and 43% of ax/pSpA patients according to axASAS. HLA-B27 occurred in 7% controls but not in any patient with isolated pSpA. HLA-B15 was encountered in 31% of patients with isolated pSpA and 20% of ax/pSpA patients according to pASAS criteria. Moreover, 2 healthy controls, but none of our patients with isolated axSpA were positive for HLA-B15. Conclusions Our data suggest that the presence of HLA-B15 favours the development of isolated/combined peripheral rather than isolated axSpA, while HLA-B27 promotes an isolated/combined axial disease and excludes a peripheral pattern. HLA-B15 should be considered in addition to HLA-B27 when diagnosing patients with SpA according to ASAS criteria. PMID:26560062

  10. Schools without Fear. Proceedings of the Annual International Alliance for Invitational Education Conference (14th). International Alliance for Invitational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Adrianna Hayes, Ed.

    Papers presented at the fourteenth Annual Conference of the Alliance for Invitational Education are (1) "Caring, Sharing, Daring: Three Tests to Help Develop More Inviting Policies, Programmes, and Procedures" (M. Ayers); (2) "Project: Gentlemen on the Move - Combating the Poor Academic and Social Performance of African American Male Youth" (D. F.…

  11. The 14th Ile residue is essential for Leptin function in regulating energy homeostasis in rat

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuyang; Zhu, Xianmin; Li, Hong; Hu, Youtian; Zhou, Jinping; He, Di; Feng, Yun; Lu, Lina; Du, Guizhen; Hu, Youjin; Liu, Tiancheng; Wang, Zhen; Ding, Guohui; Chen, Jiayu; Gao, Shaorong; Wu, Fang; Xue, Zhigang; Li, Yixue; Fan, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    LEPTIN (LEP) is a circulating hormone released primarily from white adipocytes and is crucial for regulating satiety and energy homeostasis in humans and animals. Using the CRISPR technology, we created a set of Lep mutant rats that carry either null mutations or a deletion of the 14th Ile (LEP∆I14) in the mature LEP protein. We examined the potential off-target sites (OTS) by whole-genome high-throughput sequencing and/or Sanger-sequencing analysis and found no OTS in mutant rats. Mature LEP∆I14 is incessantly produced and released to blood at a much elevated level due to the feedback loop. Structure modeling of binding conformation between mutant LEP∆I14 and LEPTIN receptor (LEPR) suggests that the conformation of LEP∆I14 impairs its binding with LEPR, consistent with its inability to activate STAT3-binding element in the luciferase reporter assay. Phenotypic study demonstrated that Lep∆I14 rats recapitulate phenotypes of Lep-null mutant rats including obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hepatic steatosis, nephropathy, and infertility. Compared to the existing ob/ob mouse models, this Lep∆I14/∆I14 rat strain provides a robust tool for further dissecting the roles of LEP in the diabetes related kidney disease and reproduction problem, beyond its well established function in regulating energy homeostasis. PMID:27378381

  12. Radio imaging of synchrotron emission associated with a CME on the 14th of August 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, H. M.; Krucker, S.; Raftery, C. L.; Saint-Hilaire, P.

    2012-12-01

    Radio observations can be used to identify sources of electron acceleration within flares and CMEs. In a small number of events, radio imaging has revealed the presence of synchrotron emission from nonthermal electrons in the expanding loops of the CME (Bastian et al. (2001), Maia et al. (2007) and Démoulin et al. (2012)). Events in which the synchrotron emission is sufficiently bright to be identified in the presence of plasma emission from radio bursts, which are prevalent at meter wavelengths, are infrequent. Using radio images from the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH) we present observations of synchrotron emission associated with a CME which occurred on the 14th of August 2010. Using context observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, the SWAP instrument onboard Proba2, the LASCO coronograph onboard SOHO and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), we follow the propagation of the CME out to 2-3 solar radii and characterize the associated electron distribution. We find that the synchrotron emission is cospatial with the CME core.

  13. Report of the 14th Genomic Standards Consortium Meeting, Oxford, UK, September 17-21, 2012.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Barker, Katharine; Bicak, Mesude; Bourlat, Sarah; Coddington, Jonathan; Deck, John; Drummond, Alexei; Gilbert, Jack A.; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Kottmann, Renzo; Meyer, Chris; Morrison, Norman; Obst, Matthias; Robbins, Robert; Schriml, Lynn; Sterk, Peter; Stones-Havas, Steven

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the 14th workshop of the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) held at the University of Oxford in September 2012. The primary goal of the workshop was to work towards the launch of the Genomic Observatories (GOs) Network under the GSC. For the first time, it brought together potential GOs sites, GSC members, and a range of interested partner organizations. It thus represented the first meeting of the GOs Network (GOs1). Key outcomes include the formation of a core group of “champions” ready to take the GOs Network forward, as well as the formation of working groups. The workshop also served as the first meeting of a wide range of participants in the Ocean Sampling Day (OSD) initiative, a first GOs action. Three projects with complementary interests – COST Action ES1103, MG4U and Micro B3 – organized joint sessions at the workshop. A two-day GSC Hackathon followed the main three days of meetings.

  14. The 14th Ile residue is essential for Leptin function in regulating energy homeostasis in rat.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuyang; Zhu, Xianmin; Li, Hong; Hu, Youtian; Zhou, Jinping; He, Di; Feng, Yun; Lu, Lina; Du, Guizhen; Hu, Youjin; Liu, Tiancheng; Wang, Zhen; Ding, Guohui; Chen, Jiayu; Gao, Shaorong; Wu, Fang; Xue, Zhigang; Li, Yixue; Fan, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    LEPTIN (LEP) is a circulating hormone released primarily from white adipocytes and is crucial for regulating satiety and energy homeostasis in humans and animals. Using the CRISPR technology, we created a set of Lep mutant rats that carry either null mutations or a deletion of the 14(th) Ile (LEP(∆I14)) in the mature LEP protein. We examined the potential off-target sites (OTS) by whole-genome high-throughput sequencing and/or Sanger-sequencing analysis and found no OTS in mutant rats. Mature LEP(∆I14) is incessantly produced and released to blood at a much elevated level due to the feedback loop. Structure modeling of binding conformation between mutant LEP(∆I14) and LEPTIN receptor (LEPR) suggests that the conformation of LEP(∆I14) impairs its binding with LEPR, consistent with its inability to activate STAT3-binding element in the luciferase reporter assay. Phenotypic study demonstrated that Lep(∆I14) rats recapitulate phenotypes of Lep-null mutant rats including obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hepatic steatosis, nephropathy, and infertility. Compared to the existing ob/ob mouse models, this Lep(∆I14/∆I14) rat strain provides a robust tool for further dissecting the roles of LEP in the diabetes related kidney disease and reproduction problem, beyond its well established function in regulating energy homeostasis. PMID:27378381

  15. "May the force be with you": 14th Samuel Haughton lecture.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, P J

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents the 14th Samuel Haughton lecture delivered on the 26th of January 2008. The lecture began by describing Haughton's research on animal mechanics. Haughton opposed Charles Darwin's theory of natural selection using the argument that the skeleton obeys the 'principle of least action' and therefore must have been designed with that principle in mind. In the course of his research he dissected many animals, including albatrosses, cassowaries, llamas, tigers, jackals and jaguars. He took anatomical measurements and did calculations to prove that muscle attachment sites were optimally located. The relationship between optimality and evolution continues to be studied. Computer simulations show optimality is difficult to achieve. This is because, even if optimality could be defined, the gene recombinations required to evolve an optimal phenotype may not exist. The drive towards optimality occurs under gravitational forces. Simulations to predict mechano-regulation of tissue differentiation and remodelling have been developed and tested. They have been used to design biomechanically optimized scaffolds for regenerative medicine and to identify the mechanoregularory mechanisms in osteoporosis. It is proposed that an important development in bioengineering will be the discovery of algorithms that can be used for the prediction of mechano-responsiveness in biological tissues. PMID:18641919

  16. 14th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells& Modules: Materials and Processes; Summary of Discussion Sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Tan, T.; Sinton, R.; Swanson, D.

    2004-10-01

    The 14th Workshop discussion sessions addressed funding needs for Si research and for R&D to enhance U.S. PV manufacturing. The wrap-up session specifically addressed topics for the new university silicon program. The theme of the workshop, Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Leapfrogging the Barriers, was selected to reflect the astounding progress in Si PV technology during last three decades, despite a host of barriers and bottlenecks. A combination of oral, poster, and discussion sessions addressed recent advances in crystal growth technology, new cell structures and doping methods, silicon feedstock issues, hydrogen passivation and fire through metallization, and module issues/reliability. The following oral/discussion sessions were conducted: (1) Technology Update; (2) Defects and Impurities in Si/Discussion; (3) Rump Session; (4) Module Issues and Reliability/Discussion; (5) Silicon Feedstock/Discussion; (6) Novel Doping, Cells, and Hetero-Structure Designs/Discussion; (7) Metallization/Silicon Nitride Processing/Discussion; (8) Hydrogen Passivation/Discussion; (9) Characterization/Discussion; and (10) Wrap-Up. This year's workshop lasted three and a half days and, for the first time, included a session on Si modules. A rump session was held on the evening of August 8, which addressed efficiency expectations and challenges of c Si solar cells/modules. Richard King of DOE and Daren Dance of Wright Williams& Kelly (formerly of Sematech) spoke at two of the luncheon sessions. Eleven students received Graduate Student Awards from funds contributed by the PV industry.

  17. Investigation of acceleration processes of the 14th july 2005 flare series occurred in ar 10786

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizykh, Tatyana; Kashapova, Larisa

    We present the results of acceleration process study in the flare series occurred 14th July 2005 on the western limb of the Sun. Our investigation is based on HXR data obtained by RHESSI. It was observed increasing of solar flare activity with X1.2 class flare at its culmination. The presence of accelerated electrons (the power-law component of HXR spectrum for energies more than 25 keV) was clearly signified only in the first (C3.8) and the last of studied flares. We applied lgT-1/2lgEM diagrams ( Jakimiec et al,1986) for quantitative study of HXR spectrums for all flares. For analysis of the flares showed presence of significant flux of accelerated electrons we also used diagrams made on base of parameters obtained from non-thermal part of the spectrum (flux, spectral index, spectral curvature, Grigis Benz 2009). The possible scenario of evolution of this active region is discussed.

  18. HLA and fertility

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, C.

    1995-11-01

    The recent paper by Jin et al., reporting that class 11 region major histocompatibility complex genes may influence embryonic loss in outbred couples supports previous results of our studies of HLA and fertility in the Hutterites. However, the authors have incorrectly cited our work and have omitted the reference that is most relevant to their results. The paper by Kostyu et al. is incorrectly referred to in the introduction as providing evidence for HLA sharing being associated with recurrent spontaneous abortion. The Kostyu et al. paper does not include any data on fertility or reproduction but reports frequencies of individuals who are homozygous at the HLA-A, -C, -B, -DR, and -DQ loci in the Hutterite population. In fact, recurrent spontaneous abortion has not been observed in any of the couples in our sample of >500 Hutterite couples. References more appropriate to the association between HLA sharing and recurrent miscarriage are those by Komlos et al., Schacter et al., Gerencer and Kastelan, and Beer et al. It might also be worth pointing out that many studies of recurrent miscarriage in outbred couples have not found an association with HLA sharing; examples include the studies of Ergolu et al., Oksenberg et al., and Christiansen et al., among others. 11 refs.

  19. Restoring the Trust in Native Education. Annual NIEA Legislative Summit (14th, February 7-9, 2011). Briefing Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Education Association, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Several briefing papers were presented during the 14th Annual National Indian Education Association (NIEA) Legislative Summit. This briefing book contains the following papers presented during the summit: (1) Restoring the Trust in Native Education; (2) NIEA Legislative Priorities for 2011: "Talking Points"; (3) Reauthorization of the Elementary…

  20. Reading and Reality. Proceedings of the Annual Reading Conference (14th, Terre Haute, Indiana, June 14, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Vanita M., Comp.; Waterman, David C., Comp.

    Intended for reading teachers, this pamphlet contains the presentations of the 14th annual reading conference at Indiana State University, beginning with opening remarks by David C. Waterman and welcoming comments by J. Stephen Hazlett. In the opening address, "What Good is Comprehension without Composition?" by Sharon and David Moore, the role of…

  1. Military Librarians Workshop; Department of Defense Libraries in Transition (14th, 30 November - 2 December 1970). Conference Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Industrial Coll. of the Armed Forces (DOD), Washington, DC.

    The theme of the 14th Annual Military Librarians Workshop is: "Department of Defense Libraries in Transition." The National War College and the Industrial College libraries seek to see what support they can give each other. The ten workshops are: (1) Standardization of Bibliographic Data, (2) Evolution of Technical Reports, (3) DOD Coordination of…

  2. Clinical Profile and HLA Typing of Autoimmune Hepatitis From Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Nasir; Siddiqui, Adeelur Rehman; Abbas, Zaigham; Hassan, Syed Mujahid; Soomro, Ghous Bux; Mubarak, Muhammed; Anis, Sabiha; Muzaffar, Rana; Zafar, Mirza Naqi

    2013-01-01

    Background Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing in autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) has been investigated in different populations and ethnic groups, but no such data is available from Pakistan. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical profile of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), and determine the associated antigens and alleles by performing HLA typing. Patients and Methods A total of 58 patients, diagnosed and treated as AIH in the last 10 years were reviewed. Diagnosis was based on International AIH Group criteria. Forty one patients underwent liver biopsy. HLA typing was performed in 44 patients and 912 controls by serological method for HLA A and B, and by PCR technique using sequence specific primers for DR alleles. Results Of 58 cases, 35 were females (60.3%). The median age was 14.5 (range 4-70 years), and AIH score was 14 (10-22). Thirty-six (62.0%) patients had type 1 AIH, 10 (17.2%) type 2, and the remaining 12 were seronegative with biopsy proven AIH. Forty-nine patients (84.4%) had cirrhosis. Twenty-four (41.4%) patients had ascites at the time of presentation. Among 41 patients who underwent liver biopsy, thirty-two had advance stages III and IV disease, and twenty had severe grade of inflammation. Fifteen patients had other associated autoimmune diseases and one developed hepatocellular carcinoma. HLA A2 (P = 0.036), HLA A9 (23) (P = 0.018), HLA A10 (25) (P = 0.000), HLA A19 (33) (P = 0.000), HLA B15 (63) (P = 0.007), HLA B40 (61) ( P = 0.002), HLA DR6 (P = 0.001) with its subtypes HLA-DRB1*13 (P = 0.032) and HLA-DRB1*14 (p = 0.017) were more prevalent in AIH with statistical significance than controls. Conclusions AIH in our region presents with advanced disease affecting predominantly children and adolescents. There is a genetic association of HLA DR6 along with other alleles and antigens in our patients with AIH. PMID:24358040

  3. Radio Imaging of a Type IVM Radio Burst on the 14th of August 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, H. M.; Krucker, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Raftery, C. L.

    2014-02-01

    Propagating coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by burst signatures in radio spectrogram data. We present Nançay Radioheliograph observations of a moving source of broadband radio emission, commonly referred to as a type IV radio burst (type IVM), which occurred in association with a CME on the 14th of August 2010. The event was well observed at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths by SDO/AIA and PROBA2/SWAP, and by the STEREO SECCHI and SOHO LASCO white light (WL) coronagraphs. The EUV and WL observations show the type IVM source to be cospatial with the CME core. The observed spectra is well fitted by a power law with a negative slope, which is consistent with optically thin gyrosynchrotron emission. The spectrum shows no turn over at the lowest Nançay frequencies. By comparing simulated gyrosynchrotron spectra with Nançay Radioheliograph observations, and performing a rigorous parameter search we are able to constrain several key parameters of the underlying plasma. Simulated spectra found to fit the data suggest a nonthermal electron distribution with a low energy cutoff of several tens to 100 keV, with a nonthermal electron density in the range 100-102 cm-3, in a magnetic field of a few Gauss. The nonthermal energy content of the source is found to contain 0.001%-0.1% of the sources thermal energy content. Furthermore, the energy loss timescale for this distribution equates to several hours, suggesting that the electrons could be accelerated during the CME initiation or early propagation phase and become trapped in the magnetic structure of the CME core without the need to be replenished.

  4. Radio imaging of a type IVM radio burst on the 14th of August 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Bain, H. M.; Krucker, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Raftery, C. L.

    2014-02-10

    Propagating coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by burst signatures in radio spectrogram data. We present Nançay Radioheliograph observations of a moving source of broadband radio emission, commonly referred to as a type IV radio burst (type IVM), which occurred in association with a CME on the 14th of August 2010. The event was well observed at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths by SDO/AIA and PROBA2/SWAP, and by the STEREO SECCHI and SOHO LASCO white light (WL) coronagraphs. The EUV and WL observations show the type IVM source to be cospatial with the CME core. The observed spectra is well fitted by a power law with a negative slope, which is consistent with optically thin gyrosynchrotron emission. The spectrum shows no turn over at the lowest Nançay frequencies. By comparing simulated gyrosynchrotron spectra with Nançay Radioheliograph observations, and performing a rigorous parameter search we are able to constrain several key parameters of the underlying plasma. Simulated spectra found to fit the data suggest a nonthermal electron distribution with a low energy cutoff of several tens to 100 keV, with a nonthermal electron density in the range 10{sup 0}-10{sup 2} cm{sup –3}, in a magnetic field of a few Gauss. The nonthermal energy content of the source is found to contain 0.001%-0.1% of the sources thermal energy content. Furthermore, the energy loss timescale for this distribution equates to several hours, suggesting that the electrons could be accelerated during the CME initiation or early propagation phase and become trapped in the magnetic structure of the CME core without the need to be replenished.

  5. The IMGT/HLA database.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James; Halliwell, Jason A; McWilliam, Hamish; Lopez, Rodrigo; Parham, Peter; Marsh, Steven G E

    2013-01-01

    It is 14 years since the IMGT/HLA database was first released, providing the HLA community with a searchable repository of highly curated HLA sequences. The HLA complex is located within the 6p21.3 region of human chromosome 6 and contains more than 220 genes of diverse function. Of these, 21 genes encode proteins of the immune system that are highly polymorphic. The naming of these HLA genes and alleles and their quality control is the responsibility of the World Health Organization Nomenclature Committee for Factors of the HLA System. Through the work of the HLA Informatics Group and in collaboration with the European Bioinformatics Institute, we are able to provide public access to these data through the website http://www.ebi.ac.uk/imgt/hla/. Regular updates to the website ensure that new and confirmatory sequences are dispersed to the HLA community and the wider research and clinical communities. This article describes the latest updates and additional tools added to the IMGT/HLA project. PMID:23080122

  6. HLA-B27 antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... colitis Psoriatic arthritis (arthritis associated with psoriasis) Reactive arthritis Sacroiliitis (inflammation of the sacroiliac joint) Uveitis If there are symptoms or signs of an autoimmune disease, a positive HLA-B27 test may confirm the diagnosis. However, HLA-B27 ...

  7. Predicted Indirectly Recognizable HLA Epitopes Presented by HLA-DRB1 Are Related to HLA Antibody Formation During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Geneugelijk, K; Hönger, G; van Deutekom, H W M; Thus, K A; Keşmir, C; Hösli, I; Schaub, S; Spierings, E

    2015-12-01

    Pregnancy can prime maternal immune responses against inherited paternal HLA of the fetus, leading to the production of child-specific HLA antibodies. We previously demonstrated that donor-specific HLA antibody formation after kidney transplantation is associated with donor-derived HLA epitopes presented by recipient HLA class II (predicted indirectly recognizable HLA epitopes presented by HLA class II [PIRCHE-II]). In the present study, we evaluated the role of PIRCHE-II in child-specific HLA antibody formation during pregnancy. A total of 229 mother-child pairs were HLA typed. For all mismatched HLA class I molecules of the child, we subsequently predicted the number of HLA epitopes that could be presented by maternal HLA class II molecules. Child-specific antigens were classified as either immunogenic or nonimmunogenic HLA based on the presence of specific antibodies and correlated to PIRCHE-II numbers. Immunogenic HLA contained higher PIRCHE-II numbers than nonimmunogenic HLA. Moreover, the probability of antibody production during pregnancy increased with the number of PIRCHE-II. In conclusion, our data suggest that the number of PIRCHE-II is related to the formation of child-specific HLA antibodies during pregnancy. Present confirmation of the role of PIRCHE-II in antibody formation outside the transplantation setting suggests the PIRCHE-II concept is universal. PMID:26512793

  8. Seeing Ourselves: Visualization in a Social Context. Readings from the Annual Conference of the International Visual Literacy Association (14th).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braden, Roberts A., Ed.; Walker, Alice D., Ed.

    The 40 papers in this collection cover a wide variety of topics within the broad field of visual literacy. Three preliminary papers discuss visualization through film. The second section, which emphasizes visualization in a social context, contains 10 papers addressing cultural, political, social, and psychological issues, touching upon such…

  9. Selected Papers from the International Conference on College Teaching and Learning (14th, Jacksonville, Florida, April 1-5, 2003).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jack A., Ed.

    This collection of conference papers includes: "Building a Pedagogical Model for Synchronous Distance Learning Courses" (Panagiotes S. Anastasiades); "Delivery of Courseware using CD-ROM Media" (Brian Brighouse and Denis Edgar-Nevill); "Lessons Learned from Blended Biology Classes" (Arthur L. Buikema, Jr.); "Everything I Ever Needed to Know I…

  10. What Would Peggy Do? 14th Annual Peggy Glanville-Hicks Address 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Michael Kieran

    2012-01-01

    The New Music Network established the Peggy Glanville-Hicks Address in 1999 in honour of one of Australia's great international composers. It is an annual forum for ideas relating to the creation and performance of Australian music. In the spirit of the great Australian composer Peggy Glanville-Hicks, an outstanding advocate of Australian music…

  11. The Successive CME on 13th; 14th and 15th February 2011 and Forbush decrease on 18 February 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maričić, D.; Bostasyan, N.; Dumbović, M.; Chilingarian, A.; Mailyan, B.; Rostomyan, H.; Arakelyan, K.; Vršnak, B.; Roša, D.; Hržina, D.; Romštajn, I.; Veronig, A.

    2013-02-01

    Aims. We analyze the kinematics of three interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) that occurred on 13th, 14th and 15th February 2011 in the active region AR 11155 and have shown that they appeared at the Earth orbit on February, 18th and caused Forbush decrease (FD). Methods. The solar coordinates of flares are (S19W03), (S20W14) and (S21W18). The kinematic curves were obtained using STEREO (A&B) data. Additionally, we explore the possibility of the CME-CME interaction for these three events. We compare obtained estimates of ICME arrival with the in-situ measurements from WIND satellite at L1 point and with ground-based cosmic ray data obtained from SEVAN network. Results. The acceleration of each CME is highly correlated with the associated SXR flares energy release. CMEs that erupted at 13 and 14 Feb 2011 are not associated with prominence eruption; maximum velocity was vmax550 ± 50 km/s and vmax400 ± 50 km/s, respectively. However, 15 Feb 2011 CME is connected with much more violent eruption associated with a prominence, with maximum velocity of vmax 1400 ± 50 km/s. The last overtakes 13th and 14th Feb CMEs at distances of 32 and 160 Rsolar, respectively.

  12. 14th congress of combustion by-products and their health effects-origin, fate, and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources.

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Eva; Andersson, Patrik L; Bidleman, Terry; Boman, Christoffer; Carlin, Danielle J; Collina, Elena; Cormier, Stephania A; Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra C; Gullett, Brian K; Johansson, Christer; Lucas, Donald; Lundin, Lisa; Lundstedt, Staffan; Marklund, Stellan; Nording, Malin L; Ortuño, Nuria; Sallam, Asmaa A; Schmidt, Florian M; Jansson, Stina

    2016-04-01

    The 14th International Congress on Combustion By-Products and Their Health Effects was held in Umeå, Sweden from June 14th to 17th, 2015. The Congress, mainly sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program and the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, focused on the "Origin, fate and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources". The international delegates included academic and government researchers, engineers, scientists, policymakers and representatives of industrial partners. The Congress provided a unique forum for the discussion of scientific advances in this research area since it addressed in combination the health-related issues and the environmental implications of combustion by-products. The scientific outcomes of the Congress included the consensus opinions that: (a) there is a correlation between human exposure to particulate matter and increased cardiac and respiratory morbidity and mortality; (b) because currently available data does not support the assessment of differences in health outcomes between biomass smoke and other particulates in outdoor air, the potential human health and environmental impacts of emerging air-pollution sources must be addressed. Assessment will require the development of new approaches to characterize combustion emissions through advanced sampling and analytical methods. The Congress also concluded the need for better and more sustainable e-waste management and improved policies, usage and disposal methods for materials containing flame retardants. PMID:26906006

  13. Radio imaging spectroscopy of synchrotron emission associated with a CME on the 14th of August 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Hazel; Krucker, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Raftery, C.

    2013-07-01

    We present Nancay Radioheliograph observations of a moving type IV solar radio burst which occurred in association with a CME on the 14th of August 2010. The event was well observed at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, the SWAP instrument onboard Proba2 and by the LASCO white light coronograph. The burst emission was found to be cospatial with the core of the CME. Using radio imaging spectroscopy we are able to characterize the underlying electron distribution and plasma parameters within the source. Fitted spectra reveal a clear power law component consistent with optically thin synchrotron emission from accelerated electrons trapped in the erupting flux rope. As is often observed in type IV bursts, polarization measurements show the source to be moderately polarized during the peak of the burst, before steadily increasing to around 70% as the brightness temperature of the burst decays.

  14. Strategies to work with HLA data in human populations for histocompatibility, clinical transplantation, epidemiology and population genetics: HLA-NET methodological recommendations.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Mazas, A; Vidan-Jeras, B; Nunes, J M; Fischer, G; Little, A-M; Bekmane, U; Buhler, S; Buus, S; Claas, F H J; Dormoy, A; Dubois, V; Eglite, E; Eliaou, J F; Gonzalez-Galarza, F; Grubic, Z; Ivanova, M; Lie, B; Ligeiro, D; Lokki, M L; da Silva, B Martins; Martorell, J; Mendonça, D; Middleton, D; Voniatis, D Papioannou; Papasteriades, C; Poli, F; Riccio, M E; Vlachou, M Spyropoulou; Sulcebe, G; Tonks, S; Nevessignsky, M Toungouz; Vangenot, C; van Walraven, A-M; Tiercy, J-M

    2012-12-01

    of dealing with ambiguous data, such as the 'gene[rate]' computer tools to estimate frequencies, test for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and selective neutrality on data containing any number and kind of ambiguities. WG4 (Ethical issues) proposes to adopt thorough general principles for any HLA population study to ensure that it conforms to (inter)national legislation or recommendations/guidelines. All HLA-NET guidelines and tools are available through its website http://hla-net.eu. PMID:22533604

  15. The 14 TH Annual Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition: intelligent teams creating intelligent ground robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Bernard L.; Nguyen, Dmitri

    2006-10-01

    The Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) is one of three, unmanned systems, student competitions that were founded by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) in the 1990s. The IGVC is a multidisciplinary exercise in product realization that challenges college engineering student teams to integrate advanced control theory, machine vision, vehicular electronics, and mobile platform fundamentals to design and build an unmanned system. Teams from around the world focus on developing a suite of dual-use technologies to equip ground vehicles of the future with intelligent driving capabilities. Over the past 14 years, the competition has challenged undergraduate, graduate and Ph.D. students with real world applications in intelligent transportation systems, the military and manufacturing automation. To date, teams from over 50 universities and colleges have participated. This paper describes some of the applications of the technologies required by this competition and discusses the educational benefits. The primary goal of the IGVC is to advance engineering education in intelligent vehicles and related technologies. The employment and professional networking opportunities created for students and industrial sponsors through a series of technical events over the three-day competition are highlighted. Finally, an assessment of the competition based on participant feedback is presented.

  16. Emerging topics and new perspectives on HLA-G.

    PubMed

    Fainardi, Enrico; Castellazzi, Massimiliano; Stignani, Marina; Morandi, Fabio; Sana, Gwenaëlle; Gonzalez, Rafael; Pistoia, Vito; Baricordi, Olavio Roberto; Sokal, Etienne; Peña, Josè

    2011-02-01

    Following the Fifth International Conference on non-classical HLA-G antigens (HLA-G), held in Paris in July 2009, we selected some topics which focus on emerging aspects in the setting of HLA-G functions. In particular, HLA-G molecules could play a role in: (1) various inflammatory disorders, such as multiple sclerosis, intracerebral hemorrhage, gastrointestinal, skin and rheumatic diseases, and asthma, where they may act as immunoregulatory factors; (2) the mechanisms to escape immune surveillance utilized by several viruses, such as human cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1, rabies virus, hepatitis C virus, influenza virus type A and human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1); and (3) cytokine/chemokine network and stem cell transplantation, since they seem to modulate cell migration by the downregulation of chemokine receptor expression and mesenchymal stem cell activity blocking of effector cell functions and the generation of regulatory T cells. However, the immunomodulatory circuits mediated by HLA-G proteins still remain to be clarified. PMID:21080027

  17. HLA-linked rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Hasstedt, S.J.; Clegg, D.O.; Ingles, L.; Ward, R.H.

    1994-10-01

    Twenty-eight pedigrees were ascertained through pairs of first-degree relatives diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA was confirmed in 77 pedigree members including probands; the absence of disease was verified in an additional 261 pedigree members. Pedigree members were serologically typed for HLA. We used likelihood analysis to statistically characterize the HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus. The genetic model assumed tight linkage to HLA. The analysis supported the existence of an HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus, estimated the lifetime penetrance as 41% in male homozygotes and as 48% in female homozygotes. Inheritance was recessive in males and was nearly recessive in females. In addition, the analysis attributed 78% of the variance within genotypes to genetic or environmental effects shared by siblings. The genetic model inferred in this analysis is consistent with previous association, linkage, and familial aggregation studies of RA. The inferred HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus accounts for approximately one-fifth of the RA in the population. Although other genes may account for the remaining familial RA, a large portion of RA cases may occur sporadically. 79 refs., 9 tabs.

  18. Soluble HLA in human body fluids.

    PubMed

    Aultman, D; Adamashvili, I; Yaturu, K; Langford, M; Gelder, F; Gautreaux, M; Ghali, G E; McDonald, J

    1999-03-01

    There is a growing body of information about the soluble forms of HLA in serum but there are only a few reports discussing sHLA in other body fluids. We quantitated sHLA-I and sHLA-II concentrations in sweat, saliva and tear samples from five normal individuals with known HLA-phenotypes. We also studied sweat samples from an additional 12 normal nonphenotyped subjects, as well as in CSF of 20 subjects with different illnesses, using solid phase enzyme linked immunoassay. Sweat, saliva and tears from normal subjects were found to contain very low or nondetectable amounts of sHLA-I. In contrast, sHLA-II molecules were found in each of these body fluids, although, with considerable variation between individuals. The presence of sHLA-II in saliva was further confirmed by Western-blotting. It was observed that sHLA-II having molecular mass of 43,900 and 18,100 daltons was comparable with that found in serum from normal individuals. In addition, no association of sHLA-II levels with allospecificities in either body fluid or in serum was apparent. The results of CSF sHLA concentrations in different diseases were as follows: (1) High CSF SHLA-I levels were measured during viral encephylitis (n = 3), while none of these patients contained sHLA-II in CSF; (2) The levels of sHLA-II, but not sHLA-I were elevated in CSF of patients during seizure (n = 6) and of patients with neonatal hepatitis (1 of 2) or with connective tissue disease accompanied with viral infection (n = 2); (3) No CSF sHLA-I or sHLA-II could be detected at polyneuropathy (n = 2), or in patients with syphilis (n = 3), or leukemia (n = 2) with evidence of neurologic involvement of central nervous system. Taken together, it may be concluded that the presence of sHLA in several body fluids is physiologically normal. It appears that sHLA-II is the predominant class of HLA molecules present in different body fluids. We propose that the system responsible for sHLA-II production in various body fluids must involve

  19. Frequency of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 Alleles and Haplotype Association in Syrian Population.

    PubMed

    Jazairi, Batoul; Khansaa, Issam; Ikhtiar, Adnan; Murad, Hossam

    2016-02-01

    The study of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) system is very important in health and diseases. As the HLA loci are the most polymorphic in the human genome, it plays a very important role in the immune responses to self and nonself antigens. In the light of the growing importance of typing the HLA alleles in transplantation, autoimmune diseases, cancer, and many other diseases, we studied 225 unrelated healthy Syrian subjects for their HLA class II genotypes in an attempt to reveal the distribution of the HLA (DRB1-DQB1) alleles in the general Syrian population. Our results revealed that the most common alleles for the DRB1 locus were DRB1*11 (26.4%), DRB1*04 (14%), and DRB1*07 (12%). However, the most frequent alleles for the DQB1 locus were DQB1*03 (40.9%) and DQB1*05 (25.1%). The frequent of two-locus haplotypes carry the most frequent alleles at these loci. The most frequently detected class II ''haplotypes'' are DRB1*11-DQB1*03 (8.9%), DRB1*01-DQB1*05 (3.6%), and DRB1*04-DQB1*03 (2.7%). Compared with other populations, our result, deduced from the analysis of genetic distances and the construction of neighbor-joining (NJ) dendrogram, and principal component analysis (PCA) indicates that Syrians are related to Middle Eastern populations. Our data about the Syrian population will aid researchers in studying the relation of HLA class II with different diseases in a Syrian population and will add to the available international literature associated with these loci. PMID:26853713

  20. Dealing with Diversity: A Key Issue for Educational Management. Proceedings of the ENIRDEM Conference (14th, Brno and Telc, the Czech Republic, September 22-25, 2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pol, Milan, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    An anthology of speeches of the 14th conference of the European Network for Improving Research and Development in Educational Management (ENIRDEM), held on 22 to 25 September 2005 in Brno and Telc, the Czech Republic, this book contains 13 contributions by 19 speakers and co-authors, covering various questions related to the topic of diversity in…

  1. Prevalence of HLA-B*5701 and Its Relationship with Abacavir Hypersensitivity Reaction in Iranian HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baniasadi, Shadi; Shokouhi, Shokoufeh Baradaran; Tabarsi, Payam; Alehashem, Maryam; Khalili, Hossein; Fahimi, Fanak

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) is a major adverse effect of abacavir (ABC), which occurs in 5–8% of Caucasians. The relationship between Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) and ABC HSR has been reported in various populations. It has been proposed to administer ABC only to HLA-B*5701 negative patients to avoid this reaction. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of HLA-B*5701 in Iranian HIV positive patients. We also sought to find the relationship between this allele with ABC HSR in patients who received the medication. Materials and Methods: We screened patients for HLA-B*5701 allele using SybrGreen real time PCR-melting method on blood samples from HIV positive patients who were referred to our hospital. The quality of the extracted genome was evaluated by B-globin housekeeping gene as internal control prior to HLA-B*5701 allele screening. Results: Of 198 HIV-infected patients, 6 (3.0%) had the HLA-B*5701 allele (95% CI, 1%–5%). Among the 28 patients who were given ABC, one individual had the HLA-B*5701 allele and experienced ABC HSR. Conclusion: Prevalence of HLA-B*5701 in Iranian patients was lower than that in Caucasians but was comparable with that of other Middle Eastern populations. Screening for HLA-B*5701 before ABC administration as part of antiretroviral therapy may reduce the risk of HSR.

  2. The HLA-DRA*0102 allele: correct nucleotide sequence and associated HLA haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Kralovicova, J; Marsh, S G E; Waller, M J; Hammarstrom, L; Vorechovsky, I

    2002-09-01

    Here we correct the nucleotide sequence of a single known variant of the HLA-DRA gene. We show that the coding regions of the HLA-DRA*0101 and HLA-DRA*0102 alleles do not differ at two codons as reported previously, but only in codon 217. Using nucleotide sequencing and DNA samples from individuals homozygous in the major histocompatibility complex, we found that the variant, leucine 217-encoding HLA-DRA*0102 allele was present on the haplotypes HLA-B*0801, DRB1*03011, DQB1*0201 (ancestral haplotype AH8.1), HLA-B*07021, DRB1*15011, DQB1*0602 (AH7.1), HLA-B*1501, DRB1*15011, DQB1*0602, HLA-B*1501, DRB1*1402, DQB1*03011 and HLA-A3, B*07021, DRB1*1301, DQB1*0603. The HLA-DRA*0101 allele coding for valine 217 was observed on the haplotypes HLA-B*5701, DRB1*0701, DQB1*03032 (AH57.1), HLA-DRB1*04011, DQB1*0302, HLA-DRB1*0701, DQB1*0202, and HLA-DRB1*0101, DQB1*05011. PMID:12445311

  3. PREFACE: European Microbeam Analysis Society's 14th European Workshop on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis (EMAS 2015), Portorož, Slovenia, 3-7 May 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovet, Xavier; Matthews, Michael B.; Čeh, Miran; Langer, Enrico; Žagar, Kristina

    2016-02-01

    This volume of the IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering contains papers from the 14th Workshop of the European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis which took place from the 3rd to the 7th of May 2015 in the Grand Hotel Bernardin, Portorož, Slovenia. The primary aim of this series of workshops is to assess the state-of-the-art and reliability of microbeam analysis techniques. The workshops also provide a forum where students and young scientists starting out on a career in microbeam analysis can meet and discuss with the established experts. The workshops have a unique format comprising invited plenary lectures by internationally recognized experts, poster presentations by the participants and round table discussions on the key topics led by specialists in the field.This workshop was organized in collaboration with the Jožef Stefan Institute and SDM - Slovene Society for Microscopy. The technical programme included the following topics: electron probe microanalysis, STEM and EELS, materials applications, cathodoluminescence and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and their applications. As at previous workshops there was also a special oral session for young scientists. The best presentation by a young scientist was awarded with an invitation to attend the 2016 Microscopy and Microanalysis meeting at Columbus, Ohio. The prize went to Shirin Kaboli, of the Department of Metals and Materials Engineering of McGill University (Montréal, Canada), for her talk entitled "Electron channelling contrast reconstruction with electron backscattered diffraction". The continuing relevance of the EMAS workshops and the high regard in which they are held internationally can be seen from the fact that 71 posters from 16 countries were on display at the meeting and that the participants came from as far away as Japan, Canada, USA, and Australia. A selection of participants with posters was invited

  4. Familial Aggregation between the 14th and 21st Century and Type 2 Diabetes Risk in an Isolated Dutch Population

    PubMed Central

    de Visser, Kees L.; Landman, Gijs W. D.; Meyboom-de Jong, Betty; de Visser, Wim; te Meerman, Gerard J.; Bilo, Henk J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The development of type 2 diabetes results from an interaction of hereditary factors and environmental factors. This study aimed to investigate the contribution of interrelatedness to the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in an isolated Dutch population. Materials and Methods A genealogical database from inhabitants living on the former island Urk between the 14th and 21st century was constructed. In a case-control study, effects of interrelatedness and the risk of type 2 diabetes were estimated with Kinship Coefficients (KCs). Relative risks in first, second, and third degree relatives and spouses of inhabitants with type 2 diabetes were compared to matched controls. Results Patients with type 2 diabetes were more interrelated, expressed by a higher KC compared to controls (7.2 vs. 5.2, p=0.001). First, second and third degree relatives had an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Second degree relatives had a similar risk,1.7 (1.5-2.0) as third degree relatives,1.8 (1.5-2.2). Spouses of patients with diabetes had a 3.4 (2.7-4.4) higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Conclusions Interrelatedness was higher among inhabitants with type 2 diabetes compared to controls. This differences extended beyond the nuclear family, thereby supporting the hypothesis that interrelatedness contributed to the development of type 2 diabetes on Urk. However, the size of this effect was small and the patterns of risk in first, second and third degree relatives suggested that factors other than interrelatedness were the main contributors to the development of type 2 diabetes on Urk. PMID:26193086

  5. Luminex-Based Methods in High-Resolution HLA Typing.

    PubMed

    Testi, Manuela; Andreani, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Luminex-based technology has been applied to discriminate between the different Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) alleles. The typing method consists in a reverse-SSO assay: Target DNA is PCR-amplified using biotinylated group-specific primers. A single PCR reaction is used for each HLA locus. The biotinylated PCR product is chemically denatured using a pH change and allowed to rehybridize to complementary DNA probes conjugated to microspheres. These beads are characterized by two internal fluorescent dyes that create a unique combination of color, make them identifiable. Washes are performed to eliminate any additional PCR product that does not exactly match the sequence detected by the probe. The biotinylated PCR product bound to the microsphere is labelled with streptavidin conjugated with R-phycoerythrin (SAPE). A flow analyzer identifies the fluorescent intensity SAPE on each microsphere. Software is used to assign positive or negative reactions based on the strength of the fluorescent signal. The assignment of the HLA typing is based on positive and negative probe reactions compared with published HLA gene sequences. Recently kits characterized by an extensive number of probes/beads designed to potentially reduce the number of ambiguities or to directly lead to an allele level typing, have been made available. PMID:26024639

  6. HLA-DP, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DR-restricted epitopes in GRA5 of toxoplasma gondii strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haryati, S.; Sari, Y.; APrasetyo, A.; Sariyatun, R.

    2016-02-01

    The dense granular (GRA) proteins of Toxoplasma gondii(T. gondii) have been demonstrated as potential sources of T. gondii vaccine antigens. However, data of the GRA5 protein are limited. This study analyzed twenty-one complete GRA5 sequences of T. gondii GT1, RH, ME49, VEG, MAS, RUB, FOU, p89, VAND, and GAB2-2007-GAL-DOM2 strains to identify potential epitopes restricted by Major Histocompatibility Complex class II (MHC- II) molecules (human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DP, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DR) in the protein. In all T. gondii strains, peptides positioned at amino acid (aa) 15-29, 16-30, 17-31, 18-32, 19-33, 83-97, 84-98, 86-100, 87-101, 89-103, and 90-104 were predicted to pose high affinity and binding with HLA-DRB1*0101, HLA-DRB1*0301 (DR17), HLA-DRB1*0401 (DR4Dw4), HLA-DRB1*0701, HLA-DRB1*1101, HLA-DRB1*1501 (DR2b), and/or HLA-DRB5*0101. Considering the epitope's affinity, ligation strength, and hydrophilicity, LRLLRRRRRRAIQEE sequence (aa 90-104) restricted by HLA-DRB1*0101, HlA- DRB1*0301 (DR17), and HLA-DRB1*0401 (DR4Dw4) was considered as the most potential MHC-II epitope in GRA5 of T. gondii. These results would be useful for studies concerning in developing T. gondii vaccine and diagnostic method.

  7. Measles Virus Epitope Presentation by HLA: Novel Insights into Epitope Selection, Dominance, and Microvariation

    PubMed Central

    Schellens, Ingrid M.; Meiring, Hugo D.; Hoof, Ilka; Spijkers, Sanne N.; Poelen, Martien C. M.; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A. M.; Costa, Ana I.; Vennema, Harry; Keşmir, Can; van Baarle, Debbie; van Els, Cécile A. C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Immunity to infections with measles virus (MV) can involve vigorous human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I-restricted CD8+ cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses. MV, albeit regarded monotypic, is known to undergo molecular evolution across its RNA genome. To address which regions of the MV proteome are eligible for recognition by CD8+ CTLs and how different HLA class I loci contribute to the epitope display, we interrogated the naturally processed and presented MV peptidome extracted from cell lines expressing in total a broad panel of 16 different common HLA-A, -B, and -C molecules. The repertoire and abundance of MV peptides were bona fide identified by nanoHPLC–MS/MS. ­Eighty-nine MV peptides were discovered and assignment to an HLA-A, -B, or -C allele, based on HLA-peptide affinity prediction, was in most cases successful. Length variation and presentation by multiple HLA class I molecules was common in the MV peptidome. More than twice as many unique MV epitopes were found to be restricted by HLA-B than by HLA-A, while MV peptides with supra-abundant expression rates (>5,000 cc) were rather associated with HLA-A and HLA-C. In total, 59 regions across the whole MV proteome were identified as targeted by HLA class I. Sequence coverage by epitopes was highest for internal proteins transcribed from the MV-P/V/C and -M genes and for hemagglutinin. At the genome level, the majority of the HLA class I-selected MV epitopes represented codons having a higher non-synonymous mutation rate than silent mutation rate, as established by comparison of a set of 58 unique full length MV genomes. Interestingly, more molecular variation was seen for the epitopes expressed at rates ≥1,000 cc. These data for the first time indicate that HLA class I broadly samples the MV proteome and that CTL pressure may contribute to the genomic evolution of MV. PMID:26579122

  8. The HLA-G cycle provides for both NK tolerance and immunity at the maternal-fetal interface.

    PubMed

    Tilburgs, Tamara; Evans, J Henry; Crespo, Ângela C; Strominger, Jack L

    2015-10-27

    The interaction of noncytotoxic decidual natural killer cells (dNK) and extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) at the maternal-fetal interface was studied. Confocal microscopy revealed that many dNK interact with a single large EVT. Filamentous projections from EVT enriched in HLA-G were shown to contact dNK, and may represent the initial stage of synapse formation. As isolated, 2.5% of dNK contained surface HLA-G. However, surface HLA-G-negative dNK contained internalized HLA-G. Activation of dNK resulted in the disappearance of internalized HLA-G in parallel with restoration of cytotoxicity. Surface HLA-G was reacquired by incubation with EVT. This HLA-G cycle of trogocytosis, endocytosis, degradation, and finally reacquisition provides a transient and localized acquisition of new functional properties by dNK upon interaction with EVT. Interruption of the cycle by activation of dNK by cytokines and/or viral products serves to ensure the NK control of virus infection at the interface, and is illustrated here by the response of dNK to human cytomegalo virus (HCMV)-infected decidual stromal cells. Thus, the HLA-G cycle in dNK can provide both for NK tolerance and antiviral immunity. PMID:26460007

  9. The HLA-G cycle provides for both NK tolerance and immunity at the maternal–fetal interface

    PubMed Central

    Tilburgs, Tamara; Evans, J. Henry; Crespo, Ângela C.; Strominger, Jack L.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of noncytotoxic decidual natural killer cells (dNK) and extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) at the maternal–fetal interface was studied. Confocal microscopy revealed that many dNK interact with a single large EVT. Filamentous projections from EVT enriched in HLA-G were shown to contact dNK, and may represent the initial stage of synapse formation. As isolated, 2.5% of dNK contained surface HLA-G. However, surface HLA-G–negative dNK contained internalized HLA-G. Activation of dNK resulted in the disappearance of internalized HLA-G in parallel with restoration of cytotoxicity. Surface HLA-G was reacquired by incubation with EVT. This HLA-G cycle of trogocytosis, endocytosis, degradation, and finally reacquisition provides a transient and localized acquisition of new functional properties by dNK upon interaction with EVT. Interruption of the cycle by activation of dNK by cytokines and/or viral products serves to ensure the NK control of virus infection at the interface, and is illustrated here by the response of dNK to human cytomegalo virus (HCMV)-infected decidual stromal cells. Thus, the HLA-G cycle in dNK can provide both for NK tolerance and antiviral immunity. PMID:26460007

  10. Class II HLA interactions modulate genetic risk for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dilthey, Alexander T; Xifara, Dionysia K; Ban, Maria; Shah, Tejas S; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Alfredsson, Lars; Anderson, Carl A; Attfield, Katherine E; Baranzini, Sergio E; Barrett, Jeffrey; Binder, Thomas M C; Booth, David; Buck, Dorothea; Celius, Elisabeth G; Cotsapas, Chris; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Dendrou, Calliope A; Donnelly, Peter; Dubois, Bénédicte; Fontaine, Bertrand; Fugger, Lars; Goris, An; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Graetz, Christiane; Hemmer, Bernhard; Hillert, Jan; Kockum, Ingrid; Leslie, Stephen; Lill, Christina M; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Olsson, Tomas; Oturai, Annette; Saarela, Janna; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Spurkland, Anne; Taylor, Bruce; Winkelmann, Juliane; Zipp, Frauke; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Spencer, Chris C A; Stewart, Graeme; Hafler, David A; Ivinson, Adrian J; Harbo, Hanne F; Hauser, Stephen L; De Jager, Philip L; Compston, Alastair; McCauley, Jacob L; Sawcer, Stephen; McVean, Gil

    2016-01-01

    Association studies have greatly refined the understanding of how variation within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes influences risk of multiple sclerosis. However, the extent to which major effects are modulated by interactions is poorly characterized. We analyzed high-density SNP data on 17,465 cases and 30,385 controls from 11 cohorts of European ancestry, in combination with imputation of classical HLA alleles, to build a high-resolution map of HLA genetic risk and assess the evidence for interactions involving classical HLA alleles. Among new and previously identified class II risk alleles (HLA-DRB1*15:01, HLA-DRB1*13:03, HLA-DRB1*03:01, HLA-DRB1*08:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:02) and class I protective alleles (HLA-A*02:01, HLA-B*44:02, HLA-B*38:01 and HLA-B*55:01), we find evidence for two interactions involving pairs of class II alleles: HLA-DQA1*01:01–HLA-DRB1*15:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:01–HLA-DQB1*03:02. We find no evidence for interactions between classical HLA alleles and non-HLA risk-associated variants and estimate a minimal effect of polygenic epistasis in modulating major risk alleles. PMID:26343388

  11. Improving coeliac disease risk prediction by testing non-HLA variants additional to HLA variants

    PubMed Central

    Romanos, Jihane; Rosén, Anna; Kumar, Vinod; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Szperl, Agata; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; van Diemen, Cleo C; Kanninga, Roan; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A; Steck, Andrea; Eisenbarth, Georges; van Heel, David A; Cukrowska, Bozena; Bruno, Valentina; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Núñez, Concepcion; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Mearin, M Luisa; Barisani, Donatella; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M; Ivarsson, Anneli; Boezen, H Marieke; Liu, Edwin; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of coeliac disease (CD) patients are not being properly diagnosed and therefore remain untreated, leading to a greater risk of developing CD-associated complications. The major genetic risk heterodimer, HLA-DQ2 and DQ8, is already used clinically to help exclude disease. However, approximately 40% of the population carry these alleles and the majority never develop CD. Objective We explored whether CD risk prediction can be improved by adding non-HLA-susceptible variants to common HLA testing. Design We developed an average weighted genetic risk score with 10, 26 and 57 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 2675 cases and 2815 controls and assessed the improvement in risk prediction provided by the non-HLA SNP. Moreover, we assessed the transferability of the genetic risk model with 26 non-HLA variants to a nested case–control population (n=1709) and a prospective cohort (n=1245) and then tested how well this model predicted CD outcome for 985 independent individuals. Results Adding 57 non-HLA variants to HLA testing showed a statistically significant improvement compared to scores from models based on HLA only, HLA plus 10 SNP and HLA plus 26 SNP. With 57 non-HLA variants, the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve reached 0.854 compared to 0.823 for HLA only, and 11.1% of individuals were reclassified to a more accurate risk group. We show that the risk model with HLA plus 26 SNP is useful in independent populations. Conclusions Predicting risk with 57 additional non-HLA variants improved the identification of potential CD patients. This demonstrates a possible role for combined HLA and non-HLA genetic testing in diagnostic work for CD. PMID:23704318

  12. Cryogenic engineering and superconductor technology; Proceedings of the 14th International Cryogenic Engineering Conference and International Cryogenic Materials Conference, Kiev, Ukraine, June 8-12, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarek, P.; Rizzuto, C.

    Consideration is given to application concepts of small regenerative cryocoolers in superconducting magnet systems, thermoelectric materials for Peltier cryogenic coolers, closed-cycle liquid helium refrigerators, built-in cryogenic control fixtures with electric drive, large cryogenic helium systems for superconducting magnets, low temperature adsorptive hydrogen isotope separation, cryogenic thermometry for space testing systems, performance of parallel flow He-II heat exchangers, and transient heat transfer to liquid helium at a 100 Hz pulsed heat load. Also discussed are He II cooling of a large superconducting magnet system, a computer code for simulation of thermal processes during quench in superconducting magnet windings, quench energies of multistable composite superconductors, a superconducting hydrogen-cooled switch on Nb-Sn tape, a gravity radiometer with coupled superconducting suspensions, new design of RSFQ logic family, and high-temperature Josephson junctions and their applications.

  13. 2.5 Gbps clock data recovery using 1/4th-rate quadricorrelator frequency detector and skew-calibrated multi-phase clock generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tontisirin, S.; Tielert, R.

    2006-09-01

    A Gb/s clock and data recovery (CDR) circuit using 1/4th-rate digital quadricorrelator frequency detector and skew-calibrated multi-phase voltage-controlled oscillator is presented. With 1/4th-rate clock architecture, the coil-free oscillator can have lower operation frequency providing sufficient low-jitter operation. Moreover, it is an inherent 1-to-4 DEMUX. The skew calibration scheme is applied to reduce phase offset in multi-phase clock generator. The CDR with frequency detector can have small loop bandwidth, wide pull-in range and can operate without the need for a local reference clock. This 1/4th-rate CDR is implemented in standard 0.18 μm CMOS technology. It has an active area of 0.7 mm2 and consumes 100 mW at 1.8 V supply. The CDR has low jitter operation in a wide frequency range from 1-2.25 Gb/s. Measurement of Bit-Error Rate is less than 10-12 for 2.25 Gb/s incoming data 27-1 PRBS, jitter peak-to-peak of 0.7 unit interval (UI) modulation at 10 MHz.

  14. HLA Typing for the Next Generation.

    PubMed

    Mayor, Neema P; Robinson, James; McWhinnie, Alasdair J M; Ranade, Swati; Eng, Kevin; Midwinter, William; Bultitude, Will P; Chin, Chen-Shan; Bowman, Brett; Marks, Patrick; Braund, Henny; Madrigal, J Alejandro; Latham, Katy; Marsh, Steven G E

    2015-01-01

    Allele-level resolution data at primary HLA typing is the ideal for most histocompatibility testing laboratories. Many high-throughput molecular HLA typing approaches are unable to determine the phase of observed DNA sequence polymorphisms, leading to ambiguous results. The use of higher resolution methods is often restricted due to cost and time limitations. Here we report on the feasibility of using Pacific Biosciences' Single Molecule Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing technology for high-resolution and high-throughput HLA typing. Seven DNA samples were typed for HLA-A, -B and -C. The results showed that SMRT DNA sequencing technology was able to generate sequences that spanned entire HLA Class I genes that allowed for accurate allele calling. Eight novel genomic HLA class I sequences were identified, four were novel alleles, three were confirmed as genomic sequence extensions and one corrected an existing genomic reference sequence. This method has the potential to revolutionize the field of HLA typing. The clinical impact of achieving this level of resolution HLA typing data is likely to considerable, particularly in applications such as organ and blood stem cell transplantation where matching donors and recipients for their HLA is of utmost importance. PMID:26018555

  15. HLA Typing for the Next Generation

    PubMed Central

    Mayor, Neema P.; Robinson, James; McWhinnie, Alasdair J. M.; Ranade, Swati; Eng, Kevin; Midwinter, William; Bultitude, Will P.; Chin, Chen-Shan; Bowman, Brett; Marks, Patrick; Braund, Henny; Madrigal, J. Alejandro; Latham, Katy; Marsh, Steven G. E.

    2015-01-01

    Allele-level resolution data at primary HLA typing is the ideal for most histocompatibility testing laboratories. Many high-throughput molecular HLA typing approaches are unable to determine the phase of observed DNA sequence polymorphisms, leading to ambiguous results. The use of higher resolution methods is often restricted due to cost and time limitations. Here we report on the feasibility of using Pacific Biosciences’ Single Molecule Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing technology for high-resolution and high-throughput HLA typing. Seven DNA samples were typed for HLA-A, -B and -C. The results showed that SMRT DNA sequencing technology was able to generate sequences that spanned entire HLA Class I genes that allowed for accurate allele calling. Eight novel genomic HLA class I sequences were identified, four were novel alleles, three were confirmed as genomic sequence extensions and one corrected an existing genomic reference sequence. This method has the potential to revolutionize the field of HLA typing. The clinical impact of achieving this level of resolution HLA typing data is likely to considerable, particularly in applications such as organ and blood stem cell transplantation where matching donors and recipients for their HLA is of utmost importance. PMID:26018555

  16. The IMGT/HLA sequence database.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J; Marsh, S G

    2000-01-01

    The IMGT/HLA database (wwwebi.ac.uk/imgt/hla/) specialises in sequences of the polymorphic genes of the HLA system, the humanmajor histocompatibility complex (MHC). This complex is located within the 6p213 region on the short arm of human chromosome 6 and contains more than 220 genes of diverse function. Many of the genes encode proteins of the immune system and these include the 21 highly polymorphic HLA genes, which influence the outcome of clinical transplantation and confer susceptibility to a wide range of non-infectious diseases. The database contains sequences for all HLA alleles officially recognised by the WHO Nomenclature Committee for Factors of the HLA System and provides users with online tools and facilities for their retrieval and analysis. These include allele reports, alignment tools, and detailed descriptions of the source cells. The online submission tool allows both new and confirmatory sequences to be submitted directly to the WHO Nomenclature Committee. The latest version (release 1.10.0 April 2001) contains 1329 HLA alleles, 61 HLA related sequences, derived from around 3350 component sequences from the EMBL/ GenBank/DDBJ databases. The IMGT/HLA database provides a model that will be extended to provide specialist databases for polymorphic MHC genes of other species. PMID:12361093

  17. HLA-G UTR haplotype conservation in the Malian population: association with soluble HLA-G.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Federico; Traore, Karim; Cherouat, Nissem; Roubertoux, Pierre; Buhler, Stéphane; Cortey, Martì; Simon, Sophie; Doumbo, Ogobara; Chiaroni, Jacques; Picard, Christophe; Di Cristofaro, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The HLA-G molecule plays an important role in immunomodulation. In a previous study carried out on a southern French population our team showed that HLA-G haplotypes, defined by SNPs in the coding region and specific SNPs located in 5'URR and 3'UTR regulatory regions, are associated with differential soluble HLA-G expression (sHLA-G). Furthermore, the structure of these HLA-G haplotypes appears to be conserved in geographically distant populations. The aim of our study is to confirm these expectations in a sub-Saharan African population and to explore additional factors, such as HLA-A alleles, that might influence sHLA-G expression. DNA and plasma samples were collected from 229 Malians; HLA-G and HLA-A genotyping were respectively performed by the Snap Shot® method and by Luminex™ technology. sHLA-G dosage was performed using an ELISA kit. HLA-G and HLA-A allelic and haplotypic frequencies were estimated using an EM algorithm from the Gene[Rate] program. Associations between genetic and non genetic parameters with sHLA-G were performed using a non-parametric test with GRAPH PAD Prism 5. Our results reveal a good conservation of the HLA-G UTR haplotype structure in populations with different origins and demographic histories. These UTR haplotypes appear to be involved in different sHLA-G expression patterns. Specifically, the UTR-2 haplotype was associated with low sHLA-G levels, displaying a dominant negative effect. Furthermore, an allelic effect of both HLA-G and HLA-A, as well as non genetic parameters, such as age and gender possibly linked to osteogenesis and sexual hormones, also seem to be involved in the modulation of sHLA-G. These data suggest that further investigation in larger cohorts and in populations from various ethnical backgrounds is necessary not only to detect new functional polymorphism in HLA-G regulatory regions, but also to reveal the extent of biological phenomena that influence sHLA-G secretion and this might therefore have an impact

  18. Relevance of HLA-G, HLA-E and IL-10 expression in lip carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Andréia Souza; Oliveira, Jéssica Petini; Oliveira, Carolina Ferrari Piloni; Silva, Tarcília Aparecida; Mendonça, Elismauro Francisco; Wastowski, Isabela Jubé; Batista, Aline Carvalho

    2016-09-01

    HLA-G, HLA-E and IL-10 are molecules which can provide tumor immunosuppression as well as the capacity of evasion to the immune system host. This study set out to evaluate HLA-G, HLA-E and IL-10 expression in lip squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and in a potentially malignant disorder (actinic cheilitis - AC), correlating the expression of these proteins with the degree of epithelial dysplasia. Immunohistochemistry was undertaken to identify HLA-G, HLA-E and IL-10 in samples from patients with LSCC (n=20), AC (n=30) and healthy lip mucosa (control) (n=10). A semiquantitative scoring system was used for analysis. Differences between the groups were evaluated using the Pearson Chi-Squared test. The percentage of LSCC samples showing high immunoreactivity (IRS>2) for HLA-G, HLA-E and IL-10 (neoplastic/epithelial cells) and HLA-E (stroma/connective tissue) was significantly higher that of the control (P<0.05). A tendency for a progressive increase in the proteins analyzed was observed from the control to AC and to LSCC. The degree of dysplasia in the AC samples was not significantly associated with the proteins evaluated (P>0.05). The high expression of HLA-G, HLA-E and IL-10 in AC and LSCC reflects the capacity that these pathologies have for evasion and progression. PMID:26723902

  19. HLA and Disease Associations in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Stephen; Choi, Hee-Back

    2011-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA), the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in humans has been known to reside on chromosome 6 and encodes cell-surface antigen-presenting proteins and many other proteins related to immune system function. The HLA is highly polymorphic and the most genetically variable coding loci in humans. In addition to a critical role in transplantation medicine, HLA and disease associations have been widely studied across the populations world-wide and are found to be important in prediction of disease susceptibility, resistance and of evolutionary maintenance of genetic diversity. Because recently developed molecular based HLA typing has several advantages like improved specimen stability and increased resolution of HLA types, the association between HLA alleles and a given disease could be more accurately quantified. Here, in this review, we have collected HLA association data on some autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, cancers, drug responsiveness and other diseases with unknown etiology in Koreans and attempt to summarize some remarkable HLA alleles related with specific diseases. PMID:22346771

  20. Quantification of HLA class II-specific memory B cells in HLA-sensitized individuals.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Gonca E; de Vaal, Yvonne J H; Roelen, Dave L; Buchli, Rico; Claas, Frans H J; Heidt, Sebastiaan

    2015-03-01

    For the quantification of HLA-specific memory B cells from peripheral blood of sensitized individuals, a limited number of methods are available. However, none of these are capable of detecting memory B cells directed at HLA class II molecules. Since the majority of antibodies that occur after transplantation appear to be specific for HLA class II, our aim was to develop an assay to detect and quantify HLA class II-specific memory B cells from peripheral blood. By using biotinylated soluble HLA class II molecules as detection agent, we were able to develop an HLA class II-specific memory B cell ELISPOT assay. The assay was validated using B cell-derived hybridomas that produce human monoclonal antibodies directed at specific HLA class II molecules. In pregnancy-immunized females, we found memory B cell frequencies ranging from 25 to 756 spots per 10(6) B cells specific for the immunizing paternal HLA class II molecules, whereas in non-immunized males no significant spot formation was detected. Here, we present a novel ELISPOT assay for quantifying HLA class II-specific memory B cells from peripheral blood. This technique provides a unique tool for monitoring the HLA class II-specific memory B cell pool in sensitized transplant recipients. PMID:25636565

  1. HLA Footprints for Multipurpose Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, G.; Lubow, S.; Donaldson, T.; Gillies, K.; Budavari, T.; Szalay, A.

    2010-12-01

    Footprints from the science observations of the Hubble Space Telescope are defined by a set of hierarchical geometric regions of instrument coverage; exposures, combined observations, high level science products, and mosaics. In the growing global community of networked applications, the science end-user has several use cases for visualizing and accessing footprint data including scientific proposal preparation, research and analysis of generated science products, and interoperability between archives for correlation of coverage. The Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA) at Space Telescope Science Institute, in coordination with ESO-ECF and CADC, has developed a web based science user interface built on a VO service oriented architecture system to enable varying levels of astronomical community access to science products derived from the HST archive. In this ADASS poster paper we describe new features and technologies for the HLA footprint component web browser visualization tool and the underlying footprint services utilized by the HST Astronomers Proposal Tool (APT) in compliance with an IVOA standard data access protocol. The service infrastructure is based on a high performance spherical geometric model developed by Johns Hopkins University (JHU) and database search algorithms co-developed by STScI and JHU.

  2. Complementarity of Binding Motifs is a General Property of HLA-A and HLA-B Molecules and Does Not Seem to Effect HLA Haplotype Composition.

    PubMed

    Rao, Xiangyu; De Boer, Rob J; van Baarle, Debbie; Maiers, Martin; Kesmir, Can

    2013-01-01

    Different human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes (i.e., the specific combinations of HLA-A, -B, -DR alleles inherited together from one parent) are observed in different frequencies in human populations. Some haplotypes, like HLA-A1-B8, are very frequent, reaching up to 10% in the Caucasian population, while others are very rare. Numerous studies have identified associations between HLA haplotypes and diseases, and differences in haplotype frequencies can in part be explained by these associations: the stronger the association with a severe (autoimmune) disease, the lower the expected HLA haplotype frequency. The peptide repertoires of the HLA molecules composing a haplotype can also influence the frequency of a haplotype. For example, it would seem advantageous to have HLA molecules with non-overlapping binding specificities within a haplotype, as individuals expressing such an haplotype would present a diverse set of peptides from viruses and pathogenic bacteria on the cell surface. To test this hypothesis, we collect the proteome data from a set of common viruses, and estimate the total ligand repertoire of HLA class I haplotypes (HLA-A-B) using in silico predictions. We compare the size of these repertoires to the HLA haplotype frequencies reported in the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP). We find that in most HLA-A and HLA-B pairs have fairly distinct binding motifs, and that the observed haplotypes do not contain HLA-A and -B molecules with more distinct binding motifs than random HLA-A and HLA-B pairs. In addition, the population frequency of a haplotype is not correlated to the distinctness of its HLA-A and HLA-B peptide binding motifs. These results suggest that there is a not a strong selection pressure on the haplotype level favoring haplotypes having HLA molecules with distinct binding motifs, which would result the largest possible presented peptide repertoires in the context of infectious diseases. PMID:24294213

  3. Detection of newly antibody-defined epitopes on HLA class I alleles reacting with antibodies induced during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, R J; Hönger, G; Hösli, I; Marrari, M; Schaub, S

    2016-08-01

    The determination of HLA mismatch acceptability at the epitope level can be best performed with epitopes that have been verified experimentally with informative antibodies. The website-based International Registry of HLA Epitopes (http://www.epregistry.com.br) has a list of 81 antibody-verified HLA-ABC epitopes but more epitopes need to be added. Pregnancy offers an attractive model to study antibody responses to mismatched HLA epitopes which can be readily determined from the HLA types of child and mother. This report describes a HLAMatchmaker-based analysis of 16 postpregnancy sera tested in single HLA-ABC allele binding assays. Most sera reacted with alleles carrying epitopes that have been antibody-verified, and this study focused on the reactivity of additional alleles that share other epitopes corresponding to eplets and other amino acid residue configurations. This analysis led in the identification of 16 newly antibody-defined epitopes, seven are equivalent to eplets and nine correspond to combinations of eplets in combination with other nearby residue configurations. These epitopes will be added to the repertoire of antibody-verified epitopes in the HLA Epitope Registry. PMID:27312793

  4. The HLA system and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cudworth, A G; Woodrow, J C

    1977-06-01

    There is a significant positive association between insulin dependent diabetes, irrespective of age of onset, and the HLA system, whereas there is no association of HLA antigens with non-insulin dependent diabetes. There is a significant concordance value for HLA antigen frequencies in insulin dependent diabetics from three different centres, indicating that the genes (s) conferring susceptibility to this type of diabetes is possibly present in all "juvenile-onset" diabetics and is in linkage disequilibrium with all the B locus alleles. PMID:892129

  5. Unsupervised HLA Peptidome Deconvolution Improves Ligand Prediction Accuracy and Predicts Cooperative Effects in Peptide-HLA Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bassani-Sternberg, Michal; Gfeller, David

    2016-09-15

    Ag presentation on HLA molecules plays a central role in infectious diseases and tumor immunology. To date, large-scale identification of (neo-)Ags from DNA sequencing data has mainly relied on predictions. In parallel, mass spectrometry analysis of HLA peptidome is increasingly performed to directly detect peptides presented on HLA molecules. In this study, we use a novel unsupervised approach to assign mass spectrometry-based HLA peptidomics data to their cognate HLA molecules. We show that incorporation of deconvoluted HLA peptidomics data in ligand prediction algorithms can improve their accuracy for HLA alleles with few ligands in existing databases. The results of our computational analysis of large datasets of naturally processed HLA peptides, together with experimental validation and protein structure analysis, further reveal how HLA-binding motifs change with peptide length and predict new cooperative effects between distant residues in HLA-B07:02 ligands. PMID:27511729

  6. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 methylation changes promote the occurrence and progression of Kazakh ESCC

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jian Ming; Li, Ling; Chen, Yun Zhao; Liu, Chunxia; Cui, Xiaobin; Yin, Liang; Yang, Lan; Zou, Hong; Pang, Lijuan; Zhao, Jin; Qi, Yan; Cao, Yuwen; Jiang, Jinfang; Liang, Weihua; Li, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen II (HLA-II) plays an important role in host immune responses to cancer cells. Changes in gene methylation may result in aberrant expression of HLA-II, serving a key role in the pathogenesis of Kazakh esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). We analyzed the expression level of HLA-II (HLA-DP, -DQ, and -DR) by immunohistochemistry, as well as the methylation status of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 by MassARRAY spectrometry in Xinjiang Kazakh ESCC. Expression of HLA-II in ESCC was significantly higher than that in cancer adjacent normal (ACN) samples (P < 0.05). Decreased HLA-II expression was closely associated with later clinical stages of ESCC (P < 0.05). Hypomethylation of HLA-DRB1 and hypermethylation of HLA-DQB1 was significantly correlated with occurrence of Kazakh ESCC (P < 0.01), and mainly manifested as hypomethylation of CpG9, CpG10-11, and CpG16 in HLA-DRB1 and hypermethylation of CpG6-7 and CpG16-17 in HLA-DQB1 (P < 0.01). Moreover, hypomethylation of HLA-DQB1 CpG6-7 correlated with poor differentiation in ESCCs, whereas hypermethylation of HLA-DRB1 CpG16 and hypomethylation of HLA-DQB1 CpG16-17 were significantly associated with later stages of ESCC (P < 0.05). A significant inverse association between HLA-DRB1 CpG9 methylation and HLA-II expression was found in ESCC (P < 0.05). These findings suggest aberrant HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 methylation contributes to the aberrant expression of HLA-II. These molecular changes may influence the immune response to specific tumor epitopes, promoting the occurrence and progression of Kazakh ESCC. PMID:25437052

  7. Identification of a new HLA-G allele, HLA-G*01:19, by cloning and phasing.

    PubMed

    Wang, W Y; Tian, W

    2016-08-01

    A new HLA-G allelic variant, HLA-G*01:19, was identified in a southern Chinese Han population by polymerase chain reaction-sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT), cloning and phasing. HLA-G*01:19 differs from HLA-G*01:04:01 by a nonsynonymous cytosine at position 99 in exon 2, resulting in amino acid change from valine to leucine at codon 34 of the mature HLA-G molecule. PMID:27277539

  8. The hospital microbiome project: meeting report for the UK science and innovation network UK-USA workshop ‘beating the superbugs: hospital microbiome studies for tackling antimicrobial resistance’, October 14th 2013

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The UK Science and Innovation Network UK-USA workshop ‘Beating the Superbugs: Hospital Microbiome Studies for tackling Antimicrobial Resistance’ was held on October 14th 2013 at the UK Department of Health, London. The workshop was designed to promote US-UK collaboration on hospital microbiome studies to add a new facet to our collective understanding of antimicrobial resistance. The assembled researchers debated the importance of the hospital microbial community in transmission of disease and as a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes, and discussed methodologies, hypotheses, and priorities. A number of complementary approaches were explored, although the importance of the built environment microbiome in disease transmission was not universally accepted. Current whole genome epidemiological methods are being pioneered in the UK and the benefits of moving to community analysis are not necessarily obvious to the pioneers; however, rapid progress in other areas of microbiology suggest to some researchers that hospital microbiome studies will be exceptionally fruitful even in the short term. Collaborative studies will recombine different strengths to tackle the international problems of antimicrobial resistance and hospital and healthcare associated infections.

  9. Molecular mechanism of the susceptibility difference between HLA-B*27:02/04/05 and HLA-B*27:06/09 to ankylosing spondylitis: substitution analysis, MD simulation, QSAR modelling, and in vitro assay.

    PubMed

    Cheng, X; Mei, Y; Ji, X; Xue, Q; Chen, D

    2016-05-01

    The human leukocyte antigen HLA-B27 is directly involved in the disease pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). HLA-B27 has a high degree of genetic polymorphism, with 105 currently known subtypes; the presence of aspartic acid at residue 116 (Asp116) has been found to play an essential role in AS susceptibility. Here, we systematically investigated the molecular mechanism of the susceptibility difference between the AS-associated subtypes HLA-B*27:02/04/05 and AS-unassociated subtypes HLA-B*27:06/09 to AS at sequence, structure, energetic and dynamic levels. In total seven variable residues were identified among the five studied HLA-B27 subtypes, in which Asp116 can be largely stabilized by a spatially vicinal, positively charged His114 through a salt bridge, while five other variable residues seem to have only a marginal effect on AS susceptibility. We also employed a quantitative structure-activity relationship approach to model the statistical correlation between peptide structure and affinity to HLA-B*27:05, a genetic ancestor of all other HLA-B27 subtypes and associated strongly with AS. The built regression predictor was verified rigorously through both internal cross-validation and external blind validation, and was then employed to identify potential HLA-B*27:05 binders from >20,000 cartilage-derived self-peptides. Subsequently, the binding potency of the top five antigenic peptides to HLA-B*27:05 was assayed in vitro using a FACS-based MHC stabilization experiment. Consequently, two (QRVGSDEFK and LRGAGTNEK) out of the five peptides were determined to have high affinity (BL50 = 5.5 and 15.8 nM, respectively) and, as expected, both of them possess positively charged Lys at the C-terminus. PMID:27228481

  10. Very long haplotype tracts characterized at high resolution from HLA homozygous cell lines.

    PubMed

    Norman, Paul J; Norberg, Steve J; Nemat-Gorgani, Neda; Royce, Thomas; Hollenbach, Jill A; Shults Won, Melissa; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Gunderson, Kevin L; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Parham, Peter

    2015-09-01

    The HLA region of chromosome 6 contains the most polymorphic genes in humans. Spanning ~5 Mbp the densely packed region encompasses approximately 175 expressed genes including the highly polymorphic HLA class I and II loci. Most of the other genes and functional elements are also polymorphic, and many of them are directly implicated in immune function or immune-related disease. For these reasons, this complex genomic region is subject to intense scrutiny by researchers with the common goal of aiding further understanding and diagnoses of multiple immune-related diseases and syndromes. To aid assay development and characterization of the classical loci, a panel of cell lines partially or fully homozygous for HLA class I and II was assembled over time by the International Histocompatibility Working Group (IHWG). Containing a minimum of 88 unique HLA haplotypes, we show that this panel represents a significant proportion of European HLA allelic and haplotype diversity (60-95 %). Using a high-density whole genome array that includes 13,331 HLA region SNPs, we analyzed 99 IHWG cells to map the coordinates of the homozygous tracts at a fine scale. The mean homozygous tract length within chromosome 6 from these individuals is 21 Mbp. Within HLA, the mean haplotype length is 4.3 Mbp, and 65 % of the cell lines were shown to be homozygous throughout the entire region. In addition, four cell lines are homozygous throughout the complex KIR region of chromosome 19 (~250 kbp). The data we describe will provide a valuable resource for characterizing haplotypes, designing and refining imputation algorithms and developing assay controls. PMID:26198775

  11. KIR-HLA intercourse in HIV disease

    PubMed Central

    Carrington, Mary; Martin, Maureen P.; van Bergen, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I loci are essential to an effective immune response against a wide variety of pathogenic microorganisms, and they represent the prototypes for genetic polymorphism that are sustained through balancing selection. The functional significance of HLA class I variation is better exemplified by studies involving HIV type 1 (HIV-1) than any other infectious organism. HLA class I molecules are essential to the acquired immune response, but they are also important in innate immunity as ligands for the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR), which modulate natural killer cell activity. Here we concentrate on the interaction between the HLA-B and KIR3DL1/KIR3DS1 genes, describe the effects of these loci on HIV disease, and discuss questions that remain unresolved. PMID:18976921

  12. Umbra's High Level Architecture (HLA) Interface

    SciTech Connect

    GOTTLIEB, ERIC JOSEPH; MCDONALD, MICHAEL J.; OPPEL III, FRED J.

    2002-04-01

    This report describes Umbra's High Level Architecture HLA library. This library serves as an interface to the Defense Simulation and Modeling Office's (DMSO) Run Time Infrastructure Next Generation Version 1.3 (RTI NG1.3) software library and enables Umbra-based models to be federated into HLA environments. The Umbra library was built to enable the modeling of robots for military and security system concept evaluation. A first application provides component technologies that ideally fit the US Army JPSD's Joint Virtual Battlespace (JVB) simulation framework for Objective Force concept analysis. In addition to describing the Umbra HLA library, the report describes general issues of integrating Umbra with RTI code and outlines ways of building models to support particular HLA simulation frameworks like the JVB.

  13. HLA-E polymorphism and soluble HLA-E plasma levels in chronic hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Zidi, I; Laaribi, A B; Bortolotti, D; Belhadj, M; Mehri, A; Yahia, H B; Babay, W; Chaouch, H; Zidi, N; Letaief, A; Yacoub, S; Boukadida, J; Di Luca, D; Hannachi, N; Rizzo, R

    2016-03-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection occurs in association to a deregulation of immune system. Human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E) is an immune-tolerant nonclassical HLA class I molecule that could be involved in HBV progression. To measure soluble (s) HLA-E in patients with chronic HBV hepatitis (CHB). We tested the potential association of HLA-E*01:01/01:03 A > G gene polymorphism to CHB. Our cohort consisted of 93 Tunisian CHB patients (stratified in CHB with high HBV DNA levels and CHB with low HBV DNA levels) and 245 healthy donors. Plasma sHLA-E was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primer. No association between HLA-E*01:01/01:03 A > G polymorphism and HBV DNA levels in CHB patients was found. G/G genotype is less frequent in CHB patients without significance. sHLA-E is significantly enhanced in CHB patients compared with healthy controls (P = 0.0017). Stratification according to HBV DNA levels showed that CHB patients with low HBV DNA levels have higher sHLA-E levels compared with CHB patients with high HBV DNA levels. CHB patients with G/G genotype have enhanced sHLA-E levels compared with other genotypes (P = 0.037). This significant difference is maintained only for CHB women concerning G/G genotypes (P = 0.042). Finally, we reported enhanced sHLA-E in CHB patients with advanced stages of fibrosis (P = 0.032). We demonstrate, for the first time, the association of sHLA-E to CHB. Owing to the positive correlation of HLA-E*01:01/01:03 A > G polymorphism and the association of sHLA-E to advanced fibrosis stages, HLA-E could be a powerful predictor for CHB progression. Further investigations will be required to substantiate HLA-E role as a putative clinical biomarker of CHB. PMID:26956431

  14. Polymorphism of HLA-B27: 105 subtypes currently known.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Asim

    2013-10-01

    HLA-B27 has a high degree of genetic polymorphism, with 105 known subtypes, named HLA-B*27:01 to HLA-B*27:106, encoded by 132 alleles. The most common subtypes associated with ankylosing spondylitis are HLA-B*27:05 (Caucasians), HLA-B*27:04 (Chinese), and HLA-B*27:02 (Mediterranean populations). For Chinese populations, HLA-B*27:04 is associated with a greater ankylosing spondylitis risk than HLA-B*27:05. Two subtypes, HLA-B27*06 and HLA-B27*09, seem to have no disease association. These differential disease associations of HLA-B27 subtypes, and the recent discovery that ERAP1 is associated with ankylosing spondylitis for patients with HLA-B27, have increased attempts to determine the function of HLA-B27 in disease pathogenesis by studying hemodynamic features of its protein structure, alterations of its peptidome, aberrant peptide handling, and associated molecular events. However, after 40 years we still do not fully know how HLA-B27 predisposes to ankylosing spondylitis and related spondyloarthritis. PMID:23990399

  15. HLA mismatches and hematopoietic cell transplantation: structural simulations assess the impact of changes in peptide binding specificity on transplant outcome

    PubMed Central

    Yanover, Chen; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Malkki, Mari; Gooley, Ted; Spellman, Stephen; Velardi, Andrea; Bardy, Peter; Madrigal, Alejandro; Bignon, Jean-Denis; Bradley, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The success of hematopoietic cell transplantation from an unrelated donor depends in part on the degree of Human Histocompatibility Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) matching between donor and patient. We present a structure-based analysis of HLA mismatching, focusing on individual amino acid mismatches and their effect on peptide binding specificity. Using molecular modeling simulations of HLA-peptide interactions, we find evidence that amino acid mismatches predicted to perturb peptide binding specificity are associated with higher risk of mortality in a large and diverse dataset of patient-donor pairs assembled by the International Histocompatibility Working Group in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation consortium. This analysis may represent a first step toward sequence-based prediction of relative risk for HLA allele mismatches. PMID:24482668

  16. Characterization of a new HLA-B allele (B{sup *}3702) generated by an intronic recombination event

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, S.; Vicario, J.L.; Merino, J.L.; Balas, A.

    1996-12-31

    Routine serological HLA typing of s Syrian family revealed a Bw4-associated HLA-B blank antigen showing Mendelian segregation together with the haplotype A1, Cw2, DR11, DQ7 (a father and one of his children, cells NO. 5958641 and No. 1958125). A more extensive serological analysis was done by using additional polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies (mAb; One-Lambda BL-60 and LM172 plates) as well as the 12th International Workshop class I mAb plate. Both cells showed no conclusive typing reactions with sera towards HLA-B27 and HLA-B37 antigens. Two mAb, PAMELA (27,44,38) and FAY (13,27,37,47), were able to recognize this antigen. The great majority of polyclonal reagents against B37 showed negative reactions, while weak results were frequently observed with anti-B27 allosera. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. [A monoclonal antibody recognizes a novel HLA-DQ specificity, DQWa].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, N

    1985-09-01

    A monoclonal antibody (MoAb) with a novel DQ specificity has been produced by immunizing a C3H/He mouse with a human B lymphoblastoid cell line EBV-Wa (HLA-Dw 15/DR 4/DQ blank homozygous). The MoAb, termed HU-46, reacts with panel cells associated with HLA-Dw 15/DR 4 and certain panel cells with HLA-Dw 8/DRw 8 specificity, which are typed as DQ blank. Immunochemical analyses indicated that the MoAb recognizes a new class II antigen, which is coded by the HLA-DQ sublocus. In the ninth International Histocompatibility Workshop, three HLA-DQ specificities, DQw 1, DQw 2 and DQw 3, were officially designated. But the DQ specificity detected by HU-46 has not yet been reported. We provisionally named this new DQ specificity DQWa and presumed that it is fourth DQ specificity. Furthermore, in a genetic analysis, assuming the Hardy-Weinberg condition hold, it was confirmed that DQWa is an allele of the three DQ specificities. PMID:2416664

  18. HLA genotyping in the clinical laboratory: comparison of next-generation sequencing methods.

    PubMed

    Profaizer, T; Lázár-Molnár, E; Close, D W; Delgado, J C; Kumánovics, A

    2016-07-01

    Implementation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotyping by next-generation sequencing (NGS) in the clinical lab brings new challenges to the laboratories performing this testing. With the advent of commercially available HLA-NGS typing kits, labs must make numerous decisions concerning capital equipment and address labor considerations. Therefore, careful and unbiased evaluation of available methods is imperative. In this report, we compared our in-house developed HLA NGS typing with two commercially available kits from Illumina and Omixon using 10 International Histocompatibility Working Group (IHWG) and 36 clinical samples. Although all three methods employ long range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and have been developed on the Illumina MiSeq platform, the methodologies for library preparation show significant variations. There was 100% typing concordance between all three methods at the first field when a HLA type could be assigned. Overall, HLA typing by NGS using in-house or commercially available methods is now feasible in clinical laboratories. However, technical variables such as hands-on time and indexing strategies are sufficiently different among these approaches to impact the workflow of the clinical laboratory. PMID:27524804

  19. Reduction in HLA-DR, HLA-DQ and HLA-DP expression by Leu-M3+ cells from the peripheral blood of patients with thermal injury.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, R A; Martinez, O M; Lim, R C; Horn, J K; Garovoy, M R

    1989-01-01

    Monocytes that bear HLA Class II antigens, such as HLA-DR, HLA-DQ, or HLA-DP, are obligatory for many cell-mediated immunological processes. Patients with thermal injury suffer from hypoimmunity and are at risk for developing life-threatening septic episodes. To determine whether an alteration in expression of HLA Class II antigens is involved in the defect, monocytes from the peripheral blood of burn patients and controls were double-stained with anti-Leu-M3 and either anti-HLA-DR, HLA-DQ, or HLA-DP monoclonal antibodies. As analysed by flow cytometry the percentage of Leu-M3+ monocytes from the peripheral blood from patients and controls was the same. The percentage of Leu-M3+ monocytes bearing the HLA Class II antigens and the density of antigen on the monocytes, however, was significantly reduced post-burn compared with controls. In nearly all cases these changes were detected as early as 24 h post-burn before any drug therapy was implemented. In-vivo re-expression of normal levels of HLA Class II coincided with patient recovery. In-vitro exposure of post-burn Leu-M3+ cells to IFN-gamma for 72 h restored HLA Class II expression to control levels. It is possible that the reductions in HLA Class II expression may be involved in the general immunosuppression that follows thermal injury. PMID:2495202

  20. Hematopoietic SCT from partially HLA-mismatched (HLA-haploidentical) related donors

    PubMed Central

    Symons, HJ; Fuchs, EJ

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic SCT from a partially HLA-mismatched (HLA-haploidentical) first-degree relative offers the benefits of rapid and near universal donor availability but also the risks that result from traversing the HLA barrier; namely, graft failure, severe GVHD and prolonged immunodeficiency. Improvements over the last 10 years in conditioning regimens, graft engineering and pharmacological immuno-prophylaxis of GVHD have substantially reduced the morbidity and mortality of HLA-haploidentical SCT. Highly immunosuppressive but nonmyeloablative conditioning extends the availability of HLA-haploidentical SCT to elderly hematologic malignancy patients lacking HLA-matched donors and permits recovery of autologous hematopoiesis in the event of graft failure. Current regimens for HLA-haploidentical SCT are associated with a 2-year non-relapse mortality of 20 ± 5%, relapse of 35 ± 15% and overall survival of 50 ± 20%. Major developmental areas include harnessing natural killer cell alloreactivity to reduce the risk of disease relapse and improving immune reconstitution by delayed infusions of lymphocytes selectively depleted of alloreactive cells. Hematologic malignancy patients who lack suitably matched related or unrelated donors can now be treated with HLA-haploidentical related donor or unrelated umbilical cord blood SCT. Future clinical trials will assess the relative risks and benefits of these two graft sources. PMID:18679375

  1. Identification of the HLA-DM/HLA-DR interface.

    PubMed

    Davies, Matthew N; Lamikanra, Abigail; Sansom, Clare E; Flower, Darren R; Moss, David S; Travers, Paul J

    2008-02-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DM is a critical participant in antigen presentation that catalyzes the dissociation of the Class II-associated Invariant chain-derived Peptide (CLIP) from the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II molecules. There is competition amongst peptides for access to an MHC Class II groove and it has been hypothesised that DM functions as a 'peptide editor' that catalyzes the replacement of one peptide for another within the groove. It is established that the DM catalyst interacts directly with the MHC Class II but the precise location of the interface is unknown. Here, we combine previously described mutational data with molecular docking and energy minimisation simulations to identify a putative interaction site of >4000A2 which agrees with known point mutational data for both the DR and DM molecule. The docked structure is validated by comparison with experimental data and previously determined properties of protein-protein interfaces. A possible dissociation mechanism is suggested by the presence of an acidic cluster near the N terminus of the bound peptide. PMID:17870168

  2. Some Basic Aspects of HLA-G Biology

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Landázuri, Sara; González, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a low polymorphic nonclassical HLA-I molecule restrictively expressed and with suppressive functions. HLA-G gene products are quite complex, with seven HLA-G isoforms, four membrane bound, and other three soluble isoforms that can suffer different posttranslational modifications or even complex formations. In addition, HLA-G has been described included in exosomes. In this review we will focus on HLA-G biochemistry with special emphasis to the mechanisms that regulate its expression and how the protein modifications affect the quantification in biological fluids. PMID:24818168

  3. On the possibility of the determining the average mass composition near 10 to the 14th power eV through the solar magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd-Evans, J.

    1985-01-01

    The discovery of primary ultrahigh energy (UHE) gamma-rays has spawned plans for a new generation of air shower experiments with unprecedented directional resolution. Such accuracy permits observation of a cosmic ray shadow due to the solar disc. Particle trajectory simulations through models of the large scale solar magnetic field were performed. The shadow is apparent above 10 to the 15th power eV for all cosmic ray charges /Z/ 26; at lower energies, trajectories close to the Sun are bent sufficiently for this shadow to be lost. The onset of the shadow is rigidity dependent, and occurs at an energy per nucleus of approx. Z x 10 to the 13th power eV. The possibility of determining the average mass composition near 10 to the 14th power eV from 1 year's observation at a mountain altitude array is investigated.

  4. Rapid assessment of the antigenic integrity of tetrameric HLA complexes by human monoclonal HLA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Eijsink, Chantal; Kester, Michel G D; Franke, Marry E I; Franken, Kees L M C; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Claas, Frans H J; Mulder, Arend

    2006-08-31

    The ability of tetrameric major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-peptide complexes (tetramers) to detect antigen-specific T lymphocyte responses has yielded significant information about the generation of in vivo immunity in numerous antigenic systems. Here we present a novel method for rapid validation of tetrameric HLA molecules based on the presence of allodeterminants. Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing polymorphic determinants on HLA class I were immobilized on polystyrene microparticles and used to probe the structural integrity of tetrameric HLA class I molecules by flow cytometry. A total of 22 tetramers, based on HLA-A1, A2, A3, A24, B7 and B8 were reactive with their counterpart mAbs, thus confirming their antigenic integrity. A positive outcome of this mAb test ensures that tetrameric HLA class I can be used with greater confidence in subsequent functional assays. PMID:16973172

  5. International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, 14th, San Jose, Costa Rica, April 23-30, 1980, Proceedings. Volumes 1, 2 & 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Papers are presented on remote sensing applications in resource monitoring and management, data classification and modeling procedures, and the use of remote sensing techniques in developing nations. The subjects of land use/land cover, soil mapping, crop identification, mapping of geological resources, renewable resource analysis, and oceanographic applications are discussed. Papers from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Costa Rica, the Syrian Arab Republic, the People's Republic of China, the Phillipines, Italy, Upper Volta and the United States are included.

  6. International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, 14th, San Jose, Costa Rica, April 23-30, 1980, Proceedings. Volumes 1, 2 and 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Papers are presented on remote sensing applications in resource monitoring and management, data classification and modeling procedures, and the use of remote sensing techniques in developing nations. The subjects of land use/land cover, soil mapping, crop identification, mapping of geological resources, renewable resource analysis, and oceanographic applications are discussed. Papers from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Costa Rica, the Syrian Arab Republic, the People's Republic of China, the Phillipines, Italy, Upper Volta and the United States are included.

  7. Cross-Culturalism in Children's Literature: Selected papers from the 1987 International Conference of the Children's Literature Association (14th, Ottawa, Canada, May 14-17, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon, Susan R., Ed.; Thompson, Ruth Anne, Ed.

    This conference proceedings contains a selection of the papers and awards given at a conference held at Carleton University in Canada. After the text of an address by the president of the Children's Literature Association, the following papers are included: (1) "Lone Voices in the Crowd: The Limits of Multiculturalism" (Brian Alderson); (2) "The…

  8. Selected Theoretical Studies Group contributions to the 14th International Cosmic Ray conference. [including studies on galactic molecular hydrogen, interstellar reddening, and on the origin of cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The galactic distribution of H2 was studied through gamma radiation and through X-ray, optical, and infrared absorption measurements from SAS-2 and other sources. A comparison of the latitude distribution of gamma-ray intensity with reddening data shows reddening data to give the best estimate of interstellar gas in the solar vicinity. The distribution of galactic cosmic ray nucleons was determined and appears to be identical to the supernova remnant distribution. Interactions between ultrahigh energy cosmic-ray nuclei and intergalactic photon radiation fields were calculated, using the Monte Carlo method.

  9. Research Symposium. Teacher Education in Reading: Worldwide Issues. International Reading Association World Congress on Reading (14th, Maui, Hawaii, July 14, 1992). Yearbook 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organization of Teacher Educators in Reading.

    This collection of 24 papers focuses on teacher education, literacy, and literature. Papers in the collection are: "Implementing Holistic Literacy Strategies in Chinese Teacher Preparation Programs" (R. L. Baker and M. H. Shaw-Baker); "I-Searching in Teacher Education" (A. Bartlett); "Strategies for Reducing Stress and Promoting Self-Esteem in…

  10. Prevalence of HLA-B27 antigen in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Turowska-Heydel, Dorota; Sobczyk, Małgorzata; Chudek, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Human leukocyte antigen B27 (HLA-B27) is considered as a risk factor for development of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of HLA-B27 antigen in JIA categories and its influence on disease onset and response to conventional therapy. Material and methods The retrospective analysis included 461 unselected children with JIA hospitalized in a single reference rheumatology centre between July 2007 and June 2012. The diagnosis was based on criteria by the International League of Association for Rheumatology. HLA-B27 was determined in 387 of all patients (84%) by hybridization of the amplified, labelled product to immobilize it on the microarray probe. Results HLA-B27 antigen was found in 104 of 383 affected children (27.2%), 48 of 206 girls (23.3%), and 56 of 177 boys (31.6%) – most frequently in patients with enthesitis-related arthritis (71%), psoriatic arthritis (50%) and unclassified cases (86.7%). The age of JIA onset was slightly (by 1 year) but significantly different in patients with and without HLA-B27 antigen [11 (8.5–14) vs. 10 (5–13.5) years.; p < 0.001]. The use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and corticosteroids was more frequently clinically ineffective in HLA-B27 positive than negative patients (23.1% vs. 15.2%; p = 0.09). Patients with polyarthritis, systemic, and psoriatic arthritis more frequently received biological therapy. HLA-B27 positive patients with enthesitis-related arthritis received biological therapy more frequently than HLA-B27 negative ones (20.4% vs. 0, respectively; p = 0.09). Conclusions HLA-B27 antigen is a strong risk factor for the development of enthesitis-related arthritis, and to a lesser extent for psoriatic arthritis and extended course of oligoarthritis. The presence of this antigen does not affect the disease onset but seems to predict resistance to therapy with disease-modifying drugs and corticosteroids.

  11. Contribution of a Non-classical HLA Gene, HLA-DOA, to the Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yukinori; Suzuki, Akari; Ikari, Katsunori; Terao, Chikashi; Kochi, Yuta; Ohmura, Koichiro; Higasa, Koichiro; Akiyama, Masato; Ashikawa, Kyota; Kanai, Masahiro; Hirata, Jun; Suita, Naomasa; Teo, Yik-Ying; Xu, Huji; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Takahashi, Atsushi; Momozawa, Yukihide; Matsuda, Koichi; Momohara, Shigeki; Taniguchi, Atsuo; Yamada, Ryo; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Kubo, Michiaki; Brown, Matthew A; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Despite the progress in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) causal variant mapping, independent localization of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) risk from classical HLA genes is challenging. Here, we conducted a large-scale MHC fine-mapping analysis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a Japanese population (6,244 RA cases and 23,731 controls) population by using HLA imputation, followed by a multi-ethnic validation study including east Asian and European populations (n = 7,097 and 23,149, respectively). Our study identified an independent risk of a synonymous mutation at HLA-DOA, a non-classical HLA gene, on anti-citrullinated protein autoantibody (ACPA)-positive RA risk (p = 1.4 × 10(-9)), which demonstrated a cis-expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL) effect on HLA-DOA expression. Trans-ethnic comparison revealed different linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns in HLA-DOA and HLA-DRB1, explaining the observed HLA-DOA variant risk heterogeneity among ethnicities, which was most evident in the Japanese population. Although previous HLA fine-mapping studies have identified amino acid polymorphisms of the classical HLA genes as driving genetic susceptibility to disease, our study additionally identifies the dosage contribution of a non-classical HLA gene to disease etiology. Our study contributes to the understanding of HLA immunology in human diseases and suggests the value of incorporating additional ancestry in MHC fine-mapping. PMID:27486778

  12. A gene feature enumeration approach for describing HLA allele polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Mack, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    HLA genotyping via next generation sequencing (NGS) poses challenges for the use of HLA allele names to analyze and discuss sequence polymorphism. NGS will identify many new synonymous and non-coding HLA sequence variants. Allele names identify the types of nucleotide polymorphism that define an allele (non-synonymous, synonymous and non-coding changes), but do not describe how polymorphism is distributed among the individual features (the flanking untranslated regions, exons and introns) of a gene. Further, HLA alleles cannot be named in the absence of antigen-recognition domain (ARD) encoding exons. Here, a system for describing HLA polymorphism in terms of HLA gene features (GFs) is proposed. This system enumerates the unique nucleotide sequences for each GF in an HLA gene, and records these in a GF enumeration notation that allows both more granular dissection of allele-level HLA polymorphism and the discussion and analysis of GFs in the absence of ARD-encoding exon sequences. PMID:26416087

  13. Design and validation of conditional ligands for HLA-B*08:01, HLA-B*15:01, HLA-B*35:01, and HLA-B*44:05.

    PubMed

    Frøsig, Thomas Mørch; Yap, Jiawei; Seremet, Tina; Lyngaa, Rikke; Svane, Inge Marie; Thor Straten, Per; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Grotenbreg, Gijsbert M; Hadrup, Sine Reker

    2015-10-01

    We designed conditional ligands restricted to HLA-B*08:01, -B*35:01, and -B*44:05 and proved the use of a conditional ligand previously designed for HLA-B*15:02 together with HLA-B*15:01. Furthermore, we compared the detection capabilities of specific HLA-B*15:01-restricted T cells using the HLA-B*15:01 and HLA-B*15:02 major histocompatibility complex (MHC) multimers and found remarkable differences in the staining patterns detected by flow cytometry. These new conditional ligands greatly add to the application of MHC-based technologies in the analyses of T-cell recognition as they represent frequently expressed HLA-B molecules. This expansion of conditional ligands is important to allow T-cell detection over a wide range of HLA restrictions, and provide comprehensive understanding of the T-cell recognition in a given context. PMID:26033882

  14. HLA typing from RNA-Seq sequence reads.

    PubMed

    Boegel, Sebastian; Löwer, Martin; Schäfer, Michael; Bukur, Thomas; de Graaf, Jos; Boisguérin, Valesca; Türeci, Ozlem; Diken, Mustafa; Castle, John C; Sahin, Ugur

    2012-01-01

    We present a method, seq2HLA, for obtaining an individual's human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II type and expression using standard next generation sequencing RNA-Seq data. RNA-Seq reads are mapped against a reference database of HLA alleles, and HLA type, confidence score and locus-specific expression level are determined. We successfully applied seq2HLA to 50 individuals included in the HapMap project, yielding 100% specificity and 94% sensitivity at a P-value of 0.1 for two-digit HLA types. We determined HLA type and expression for previously un-typed Illumina Body Map tissues and a cohort of Korean patients with lung cancer. Because the algorithm uses standard RNA-Seq reads and requires no change to laboratory protocols, it can be used for both existing datasets and future studies, thus adding a new dimension for HLA typing and biomarker studies. PMID:23259685

  15. Extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, M.D.; Smith, J.R.; Austin, R.K.; Kelleher, D.; Nepom, G.T.; Volk, B.; Kagnoff, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. The authors previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II ..beta..-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. They now report the isolation of this ..beta..-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP ..beta..-chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP ..beta..-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP..cap alpha..-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis. Celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion.

  16. A web resource for mining HLA associations with adverse drug reactions: HLA-ADR.

    PubMed

    Ghattaoraya, Gurpreet S; Dundar, Yenal; González-Galarza, Faviel F; Maia, Maria Helena Thomaz; Santos, Eduardo José Melo; da Silva, Andréa Luciana Soares; McCabe, Antony; Middleton, Derek; Alfirevic, Ana; Dickson, Rumona; Jones, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) are an important family of genes involved in the immune system. Their primary function is to allow the host immune system to be able to distinguish between self and non-self peptides-e.g. derived from invading pathogens. However, these genes have also been implicated in immune-mediated adverse drug reactions (ADRs), presenting a problem to patients, clinicians and pharmaceutical companies. We have previously developed the Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND) that captures the allelic and haplotype frequencies for these HLA genes across many healthy populations from around the world. Here, we report the development and release of the HLA-ADR database that captures data from publications where HLA alleles and haplotypes have been associated with ADRs (e.g. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis and drug-induced liver injury). HLA-ADR was created by using data obtained through systematic review of the literature and semi-automated literature mining. The database also draws on data already present in AFND allowing users to compare and analyze allele frequencies in both ADR patients and healthy populations. The HLA-ADR database provides clinicians and researchers with a centralized resource from which to investigate immune-mediated ADRs.Database URL: http://www.allelefrequencies.net/hla-adr/. PMID:27189608

  17. Molecular basis for universal HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8+ T-cell immunity against influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Valkenburg, Sophie A; Josephs, Tracy M; Clemens, E Bridie; Grant, Emma J; Nguyen, Thi H O; Wang, George C; Price, David A; Miller, Adrian; Tong, Steven Y C; Thomas, Paul G; Doherty, Peter C; Rossjohn, Jamie; Gras, Stephanie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-04-19

    Memory CD8(+)T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for antigenic peptides derived from internal viral proteins confer broad protection against distinct strains of influenza A virus (IAV). However, immune efficacy can be undermined by the emergence of escape mutants. To determine how T-cell receptor (TCR) composition relates to IAV epitope variability, we used ex vivo peptide-HLA tetramer enrichment and single-cell multiplex analysis to compare TCRs targeted to the largely conserved HLA-A*0201-M158and the hypervariable HLA-B*3501-NP418antigens. The TCRαβs for HLA-B*3501-NP418 (+)CTLs varied among individuals and across IAV strains, indicating that a range of mutated peptides will prime different NP418-specific CTL sets. Conversely, a dominant public TRAV27/TRBV19(+)TCRαβ was selected in HLA-A*0201(+)donors responding to M158 This public TCR cross-recognized naturally occurring M158variants complexed with HLA-A*0201. Ternary structures showed that induced-fit molecular mimicry underpins TRAV27/TRBV19(+)TCR specificity for the WT and mutant M158peptides, suggesting the possibility of universal CTL immunity in HLA-A*0201(+)individuals. Combined with the high population frequency of HLA-A*0201, these data potentially explain the relative conservation of M158 Moreover, our results suggest that vaccination strategies aimed at generating broad protection should incorporate variant peptides to elicit cross-reactive responses against other specificities, especially those that may be relatively infrequent among IAV-primed memory CTLs. PMID:27036003

  18. Molecular basis for universal HLA-A*0201–restricted CD8+ T-cell immunity against influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Valkenburg, Sophie A.; Josephs, Tracy M.; Clemens, E. Bridie; Grant, Emma J.; Nguyen, Thi H. O.; Wang, George C.; Price, David A.; Miller, Adrian; Tong, Steven Y. C.; Thomas, Paul G.; Doherty, Peter C.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Gras, Stephanie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Memory CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for antigenic peptides derived from internal viral proteins confer broad protection against distinct strains of influenza A virus (IAV). However, immune efficacy can be undermined by the emergence of escape mutants. To determine how T-cell receptor (TCR) composition relates to IAV epitope variability, we used ex vivo peptide–HLA tetramer enrichment and single-cell multiplex analysis to compare TCRs targeted to the largely conserved HLA-A*0201-M158 and the hypervariable HLA-B*3501-NP418 antigens. The TCRαβs for HLA-B*3501-NP418+ CTLs varied among individuals and across IAV strains, indicating that a range of mutated peptides will prime different NP418-specific CTL sets. Conversely, a dominant public TRAV27/TRBV19+ TCRαβ was selected in HLA-A*0201+ donors responding to M158. This public TCR cross-recognized naturally occurring M158 variants complexed with HLA-A*0201. Ternary structures showed that induced-fit molecular mimicry underpins TRAV27/TRBV19+ TCR specificity for the WT and mutant M158 peptides, suggesting the possibility of universal CTL immunity in HLA-A*0201+ individuals. Combined with the high population frequency of HLA-A*0201, these data potentially explain the relative conservation of M158. Moreover, our results suggest that vaccination strategies aimed at generating broad protection should incorporate variant peptides to elicit cross-reactive responses against other specificities, especially those that may be relatively infrequent among IAV-primed memory CTLs. PMID:27036003

  19. sHLA-G1 and HLA-G5 levels are decreased in Tunisian women with multiple abortion.

    PubMed

    Zidi, Inès; Rizzo, Roberta; Bouaziz, Aicha; Laaribi, Ahmed Baligh; Zidi, Nour; Di Luca, Dario; Tlili, Henda; Bortolotti, Daria

    2016-04-01

    Pregnancy is associated with increased levels of soluble (s) human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G molecules, while during abortion these molecules are decreased. To date, little is known about the role of sHLA-G isoforms during abortion. In this study, we investigated the levels of total sHLA-G and its isoforms: HLA-G1 (membrane shedded isoform) and alternative spliced HLA-G5 in plasma samples obtained from 55 women who had experienced spontaneous abortion, 108 pregnant healthy women and 56 non pregnant healthy women. We found that pregnant women exhibited higher amounts of sHLA-G compared to either non pregnant women or women with abortion. Among women who had experienced spontaneous abortion, women with recurrent abortions (RSA) had lower sHLA-G than women with only one abortion. In particular, RSA women were characterized by the absence of sHLA-G1 isoform, suggesting a possible implication in abortion event. PMID:26812178

  20. HLA antigen expression in enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Ashton-Key, M; Singh, N; Pan, L X; Smith, M E

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the occurrence of abnormal patterns of HLA-ABC and HLA-DR expression in enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma and to relate such abnormalities to the Epstein Barr virus (EBV) status of the tumours. METHODS: Eleven enteropathy associated T cell lymphomas were immunostained with HC10 (HLA-ABC heavy chain) and TAL 1B5 (HLA-DR alpha chain) monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal anti-beta 2 microglobulin (beta 2m, the HLA-ABC light chain) antibodies. In situ hybridisation for EBV using EBER probes was performed on all cases. RESULTS: Tumour cells of two of 11 patients were EBER positive. One of these showed partial, and the other, complete loss of beta 2m. HLA-DR expression was undetectable in both patients. Of the remaining nine EBER negative tumours, two were HLA-ABC heavy chain negative or showed only occasional positive cells and five of nine showed partial or complete loss of the HLA-ABC light chain, beta 2m. Seven of the nine cases were either negative for HLA-DR or showed weak expression in a proportion of tumour cells. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that low or absent HLA-ABC and HLA-DR antigen expression occurs commonly in enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma. These abnormal patterns of HLA expression may be associated with escape from immune attack which, in a minority of patients, could be directed against EBV antigens. Images PMID:8813950

  1. HIV-1 Vpu Mediates HLA-C Downregulation.

    PubMed

    Apps, Richard; Del Prete, Gregory Q; Chatterjee, Pramita; Lara, Abigail; Brumme, Zabrina L; Brockman, Mark A; Neil, Stuart; Pickering, Suzanne; Schneider, Douglas K; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Walker, Bruce D; Thomas, Rasmi; Shaw, George M; Hahn, Beatrice H; Keele, Brandon F; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Carrington, Mary

    2016-05-11

    Many pathogens evade cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by downregulating HLA molecules on infected cells, but the loss of HLA can trigger NK cell-mediated lysis. HIV-1 is thought to subvert CTLs while preserving NK cell inhibition by Nef-mediated downregulation of HLA-A and -B but not HLA-C molecules. We find that HLA-C is downregulated by most primary HIV-1 clones, including transmitted founder viruses, in contrast to the laboratory-adapted NL4-3 virus. HLA-C reduction is mediated by viral Vpu and reduces the ability of HLA-C restricted CTLs to suppress viral replication in CD4+ cells in vitro. HLA-A/B are unaffected by Vpu, and primary HIV-1 clones vary in their ability to downregulate HLA-C, possibly in response to whether CTLs or NK cells dominate immune pressure through HLA-C. HIV-2 also suppresses HLA-C expression through distinct mechanisms, underscoring the immune pressure HLA-C exerts on HIV. This viral immune evasion casts new light on the roles of CTLs and NK cells in immune responses against HIV. PMID:27173934

  2. HLA Type Inference via Haplotypes Identical by Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setty, Manu N.; Gusev, Alexander; Pe'Er, Itsik

    The Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) genes play a major role in adaptive immune response and are used to differentiate self antigens from non self ones. HLA genes are hyper variable with nearly every locus harboring over a dozen alleles. This variation plays an important role in susceptibility to multiple autoimmune diseases and needs to be matched on for organ transplantation. Unfortunately, HLA typing by serological methods is time consuming and expensive compared to high throughput Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) data. We present a new computational method to infer per-locus HLA types using shared segments Identical By Descent (IBD), inferred from SNP genotype data. IBD information is modeled as graph where shared haplotypes are explored among clusters of individuals with known and unknown HLA types to identify the latter. We analyze performance of the method in a previously typed subset of the HapMap population, achieving accuracy of 96% in HLA-A, 94% in HLA-B, 95% in HLA-C, 77% in HLA-DR1, 93% in HLA-DQA1 and 90% in HLA-DQB1 genes. We compare our method to a tag SNP based approach and demonstrate higher sensitivity and specificity. Our method demonstrates the power of using shared haplotype segments for large-scale imputation at the HLA locus.

  3. Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA) Pipeline Progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Rachel E.; Casertano, S.; Lindsay, K.

    2013-01-01

    The HLA maintains a strong commitment to continuing improvement of our Hubble Space Telescope data processing pipelines with the goal of generating better science-ready data products. The HLA image processing pipeline is transitioning from the use of MultiDrizzle to AstroDrizzle for image registration and combination. It is expected that this change will allow for the creation of higher quality science products with improved astrometric solutions. Headerlets, a newly developed tool for AstroDrizzle, will be utilized and made available to simplify access to multiple astrometric solutions for a given data set. The capabilities of AstroDrizzle will allow for functionally simplified data processing, standardizing and streamlining the data reduction process and making it easier for users to reproduce our results. We are beginning with the HLA WFC3 data processing pipeline, and then plan to extend its application to other HST instrument data.

  4. Image Understanding, 14th Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, L. S.

    1983-06-01

    Technical and annual progress reports of principal investigators of image understanding are presented. Topics covered include: surface constraint from linear entents; computing visual correspondance; smoothing optical flow fields; viewframes; a connectionist model of form perception; use of difference fields in processing sensor motion; a facet approach to optic flow; special purpose automatic programming for 3-d model-based vision; MAPS: organization of a spatial data base system using imagery, terrain, and map data; segment-based stereo matching; software metrics for performance analysis of parallel hardware; scene analysis algorithms; and robot vehicles.

  5. Distribution of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles in Lak population of Iran.

    PubMed

    Varzi, Ali Mohammad; Shahsavar, Farhad; Tarrahi, Mohammad Javad

    2016-07-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes are the most polymorphic loci in the human genome and encode the highly polymorphic molecules critically involved in immune responses. Anthropological studies based on highly polymorphic HLA genes provide useful information for bone marrow donor registry, forensic medicine, disease association studies, as well as designing peptide vaccines against tumors, and infectious or autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 allele frequencies in 100 unrelated Lak individuals from Lorestan province of Iran. Finally, we compared the results with those previously described in four other Iranian populations. Commercial HLA-Type kits were used for determination of the HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 allele frequencies. Differences between populations in the distribution of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles were estimated by χ2 test with Yate's correction and Fisher's exact test. The most frequent HLA-DRB1 alleles were (*)1103=4 (23%), (*)1502 (9.5%), (*)0701 (9%), (*)0301 (8.5%), (*)1101 (7.5%) and (*)1501 (6%) while HLA-DQB1(*)0301 (40%), (*)0201 (15%), (*)0502 (10.5%), (*)0303 (10%), (*)0602=3 (9.5%), and (*)0501 (7.5%) were the most frequent alleles in Lak population. HLA-DRB1(*)0409, (*)0804, (*)1102, (*)1112, (*)1405, and HLA-DQB1(*)0503, (*)0604 were the least observed frequencies in Lak population. Our results based on HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 allele frequencies showed that the Lak population possesses the previously reported general features of the Lur and Kurd populations but still with unique, decreased or increased frequencies of several alleles. In other words, the Lak population is close to Lurs Khorramabadi and Kurd but far from Lurs Kohkiloyeh/Boyerahmad and Bakhtiari. PMID:27189628

  6. Genotyping Yersinia pestis in Historical Plague: Evidence for Long-Term Persistence of Y. pestis in Europe from the 14th to the 17th Century

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Lisa; Wiechmann, Ingrid; Harbeck, Michaela; Thomas, Astrid; Grupe, Gisela; Projahn, Michaela; Scholz, Holger C.; Riehm, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) recovered from plague victims of the second plague pandemic (14th to 17th century), excavated from two different burial sites in Germany, and spanning a time period of more than 300 years, was characterized using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. Of 30 tested skeletons 8 were positive for Yersinia pestis-specific nucleic acid, as determined by qPCR targeting the pla gene. In one individual (MP-19-II), the pla copy number in DNA extracted from tooth pulp was as high as 700 gene copies/μl, indicating severe generalized infection. All positive individuals were identical in all 16 SNP positions, separating phylogenetic branches within nodes N07_N10 (14 SNPs), N07_N08 (SNP s19) and N06_N07 (s545), and were highly similar to previously investigated plague victims from other European countries. Thus, beside the assumed continuous reintroduction of Y. pestis from central Asia in multiple waves during the second pandemic, long-term persistence of Y. pestis in Europe in a yet unknown reservoir host has also to be considered. PMID:26760973

  7. Initial deployment of the 14th Parachutist Forward Surgical Team at the beginning of the operation Sangaris in Central African Republic.

    PubMed

    Malgras, Brice; Barbier, Olivier; Pasquier, Pierre; Petit, Ludovic; Polycarpe, Aristide; Rigal, Sylvain; Pons, Francois

    2015-05-01

    As part of the operation Sangaris begun in December 2013 in the Central African Republic, the 14th Parachutist Forward Surgical Team (FST) was deployed to support French troops. The FST (role 2 in the NATO classification) is a mobile surgical-medical treatment facility. The main goal of the FST is to assure the initial damage control surgery and resuscitation for combat casualties, allowing for the early evacuation to combat support hospitals (roles 3 or 4), where further treatments are completed. During the first trimester of the operation Sangaris, 42 patients were treated at FST, of whom 29 underwent surgery. Almost 50% of patients operated on were French servicemen. All admissions were emergency admissions. Orthopedic surgery represented two-thirds of surgical interventions executed as a result of the high proportion of limb injuries. Fifty percent of injuries were specifically linked to combat. Surgery in an FST is primarily dedicated to the treatment of combat casualties with hemorrhagic injuries, but additionally plays a part in supporting general medical care of French troops. Medical aid to the general civilian population is justifiable because of the presence of medical treatment facilities, even in the initial implementation of a military operation. PMID:25939107

  8. Diffuse gamma rays with energies greater than 1 x 10 to the 14th eV observed in the Southern Hemisphere

    SciTech Connect

    Suga, K.; Toyoda, Y.; Kamata, K.; Murakami, K.; Lapointe, M.

    1988-03-01

    The data of extensive air showers with a low content of muons and hadrons, observed in the period 1964-1966 at Mount Chacaltaya in Bolivia, have been reanalyzed. Arrival directions of those showers selected so as to favor small initiation depths in the atmosphere (to enhance the contribution from gamma-ray-initiated showers) reveal a 3.8 sigma peak above an expected background from the region of alpha = 180-210 deg in the band of delta = 0 to -40 deg. The integral flux of diffuse gamma-rays above 1 x 10 to the 14th eV estimated from this excess is about 6.0 x 10 to the -12th/sq cm per sec per sr. In order to explain this very high flux, the possible contribution of gamma-rays from Loop 1 as well as the inverse Compton photons produced in the 2.7 K photon background as progeny of gamma-rays from Cyg X-3-like sources. 24 references.

  9. Genotyping Yersinia pestis in Historical Plague: Evidence for Long-Term Persistence of Y. pestis in Europe from the 14th to the 17th Century.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Lisa; Wiechmann, Ingrid; Harbeck, Michaela; Thomas, Astrid; Grupe, Gisela; Projahn, Michaela; Scholz, Holger C; Riehm, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) recovered from plague victims of the second plague pandemic (14th to 17th century), excavated from two different burial sites in Germany, and spanning a time period of more than 300 years, was characterized using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. Of 30 tested skeletons 8 were positive for Yersinia pestis-specific nucleic acid, as determined by qPCR targeting the pla gene. In one individual (MP-19-II), the pla copy number in DNA extracted from tooth pulp was as high as 700 gene copies/μl, indicating severe generalized infection. All positive individuals were identical in all 16 SNP positions, separating phylogenetic branches within nodes N07_N10 (14 SNPs), N07_N08 (SNP s19) and N06_N07 (s545), and were highly similar to previously investigated plague victims from other European countries. Thus, beside the assumed continuous reintroduction of Y. pestis from central Asia in multiple waves during the second pandemic, long-term persistence of Y. pestis in Europe in a yet unknown reservoir host has also to be considered. PMID:26760973

  10. The frequency of HLA alleles in the Romanian population.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Ileana; Boșcaiu, Voicu; Cianga, Petru; Dinu, Andrei-Antoniu; Gai, Elena; Melinte, Mihaela; Moise, Ana

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequencies is essential for bone marrow and kidney donor searches. The Romanian Caucasian population is heterogeneous and information on HLA polymorphism has not been well studied. We characterized the HLA genetic profile and allele frequencies of regional populations in Romania. HLA-A, B and DRB1 alleles were examined in 8252 individuals, belonging to the four main regions of Romania. The most common alleles found in the Romanian population are the following: HLA-A*01, A*02, A*03, A*11, A*24; HLA-B*18, B*35, B*44, B*51 and HLA-DRB1*01, DRB1*03, DRB1*07, DRB1*11, DRB1*13, DRB1*15, DRB1*16. More than half of the alleles are non-homogeneously spread in Romania. These results provide a starting point for future analyses of genetic heterogeneity in Romania. PMID:26711124

  11. Short tandem repeats haplotyping of the HLA region in preimplantation HLA matching.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Francesco; Kahraman, Semra; Karadayi, Hüseyin; Biricik, Anil; Sertyel, Semra; Karlikaya, Güvenc; Saglam, Yaman; Podini, Daniele; Nuccitelli, Andrea; Baldi, Marina

    2005-08-01

    Recently, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has been considered for several indications beyond its original purpose, not only to test embryos for genetic disease but also to select embryos for a nondisease trait, such as specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes, related to immune compatibility with an existing affected child in need of a haematopoetic stem cell (HSC) transplant. We have optimized an indirect single-cell HLA typing protocol based on a multiplex fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of short tandem repeat (STR) markers scattered throughout the HLA complex. The assay was clinically applied in 60 cycles from 45 couples. A conclusive HLA-matching diagnosis was achieved in 483/530 (91.1%) of the embryos tested. In total, 74 (15.3%) embryos revealed an HLA match with the affected siblings, 55 (11.4%) of which resulted unaffected and 46 (9.5%) have been transferred to the patients. Nine pregnancies were achieved, five healthy HLA-matched children have already been delivered and cord blood HSCs, were transplanted to three affected siblings, resulting in a successful haematopoietic reconstruction. PMID:15886713

  12. Employment and Disability: Trends and Issues for the 1990's. A Report on the 14th Mary E. Switzer Memorial Seminar (Washington, D.C., May 7-9, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Leonard G., Ed.; Hansen, Carl E., Ed.

    This report on the 14th Mary E. Switzer Memorial Seminar addresses trends and prospects for employment of persons with disabilities. The monograph begins with an introduction by Leonard G. Perlman and Carl E. Hansen, a foreword by Richard S. Materson, a list of seminar sponsors and Switzer scholars, a statement on the legacy of Mary Elizabeth…

  13. Environmental Education, The Last Measure of Man. An Anthology of Papers for the Consideration of the 14th and 15th Conference of the U.S. National Commission for UNESCO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Raymond F.

    An anthology of papers for consideration by delegates to the 14th and 15th conferences of the United States National Commission for UNESCO are presented in this book. As a wide-ranging collection of ideas, it is intended to serve as background materials for the conference theme - our responsibility for preserving and defending a human environment…

  14. Characterization of a novel HLA-B*40 allele, HLA-B*40:186:02, by cloning and sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, W Y; Zhang, W; Cai, J H; Zhu, F M; Tian, W

    2016-08-01

    A novel HLA-B*40 variant, HLA-B*40:186:02, has been identified by cloning and sequencing in a southern Chinese Han population. Aligned with HLA-B*40:01:01, HLA-B*40:186:02 has a nonsynonymous cytosine mutation at nucleotide position 165 in exon 2, leading to amino acid change from glycine to arginine at codon 56. It differs from HLA-B*40:186:01 by a synonymous change (adenine to cytosine) at position 165 in exon 2. PMID:27273892

  15. Distinct assembly profiles of HLA-B molecules

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Syed Monem; Salam, Nasir; Geng, Jie; Qi, Ying; Bream, Jay H.; Duggal, Priya; Hussain, Shehnaz K.; Martinson, Jeremy; Wolinsky, Steven; Carrington, Mary; Raghavan, Malini

    2014-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I polymorphisms are known to influence outcomes in a number of infectious diseases, cancers and inflammatory diseases. Human MHC class I heavy chains are encoded by the HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-C genes. These genes are highly polymorphic, with the HLA-B locus being the most variable. Each HLA class I protein binds to distinct set of peptide antigens, which are presented to CD8+ T cells. HLA-disease associations have been shown in some cases to link to the peptide binding characteristics of individual HLA class I molecules. Here we show that polymorphisms at the HLA-B locus profoundly influence the assembly characteristics of HLA-B molecules and the stabilities of their peptide-deficient forms. In particular, dependence on the assembly factor tapasin is highly variable, with frequent occurrence of strongly tapasin-dependent or independent allotypes. Several polymorphic HLA-B residues located near the C-terminal end of the peptide are key determinants of tapasin-independent assembly. In vitro refolded forms of tapasin-independent allotypes assemble more readily with peptides compared to tapasin-dependent allotypes that belong to the same supertype, and during refolding, reduced aggregation of tapasin-independent allotypes is observed. Paradoxically, in HIV-infected individuals, greater tapasin-independent HLA-B assembly confers more rapid progression to death, consistent with previous findings that some HLA-B allotypes shown to be tapasin-independent are associated with rapid progression to multiple AIDS outcomes. Together, these findings demonstrate significant variations in the assembly of HLA-B molecules, and indicate influences of HLA-B folding patterns upon infectious disease outcomes. PMID:24790147

  16. Serum antibodies to human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-E, HLA-F and HLA-G in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) during disease flares: Clinical relevance of HLA-F autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Jucaud, V; Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Morales-Buenrostro, L E; Hiepe, F; Rose, T; Biesen, R

    2016-03-01

    T lymphocyte hyperactivity and progressive inflammation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients results in over-expression of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-Ib on the surface of lymphocytes. These are shed into the circulation upon inflammation, and may augment production of antibodies promoting pathogenicity of the disease. The objective was to evaluate the association of HLA-Ib (HLA-E, HLA-F and HLA-G) antibodies to the disease activity of SLE. The immunoglobulin (Ig)G/IgM reactivity to HLA-Ib and β2m in the sera of 69 German, 29 Mexican female SLE patients and 17 German female controls was measured by multiplex Luminex(®)-based flow cytometry. The values were expressed as mean flourescence intensity (MFI). Only the German SLE cohort was analysed in relation to the clinical disease activity. In the controls, anti-HLA-G IgG predominated over other HLA-Ib antibodies, whereas SLE patients had a preponderance of anti-HLA-F IgG over the other HLA-Ib antibodies. The disease activity index, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI)-2000, was reflected only in the levels of anti-HLA-F IgG. Anti-HLA-F IgG with MFI level of 500-1999 was associated with active SLE, whereas inactive SLE revealed higher MFI (>2000). When anti-HLA-F IgG were cross-reactive with other HLA-Ib alleles, their reactivity was reflected in the levels of anti-HLA-E and -G IgG. The prevalence of HLA-F-monospecific antibodies in SLE patients was also associated with the clinical disease activity. Anti-HLA-F IgG is possibly involved in the clearance of HLA-F shed from lymphocytes and inflamed tissues to lessen the disease's severity, and thus emerges as a beneficial immune biomarker. Therefore, anti-HLA-Ib IgG should be considered as a biomarker in standard SLE diagnostics. PMID:26440212

  17. HLA-DQ rather than HLA-DR region might be involved in dominant nonsusceptibility to diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Sterkers, G; Zeliszewski, D; Chaussée, A M; Deschamps, I; Font, M P; Freidel, C; Hors, J; Betuel, H; Dausset, J; Levy, J P

    1988-01-01

    Since HLA-DRw15 (a subdivision of the HLA-DR2 specificity previously called DR2 long) is associated with dominant nonsusceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), while HLA-DRw16 (another subdivision of HLA-DR2, previously called DR2 short) is positively associated with the disease, we looked for particular characteristics of HLA products encoded by the DR2 haplotypes of IDDM patients. The results show the following: (i) HLA-DQ molecules of HLA-DRw15-positive IDDM patients are different from those of HLA-DRw15-positive controls, suggesting that the HLA-DQ gene of DRw15 haplotypes is involved in a protective effect. (ii) HLA-DR and -DQ products of DRw16-positive IDDM are functionally indistinguishable from those of HLA-DRw16-positive controls. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that the residue at position 57 on the DQ beta chain could play a crucial biological role in antigen presentation to T cells as far as the DRw16 haplotype is concerned. This observation fits with the recent observation of correlation between DQ beta allelic polymorphism at position 57 and both susceptibility and resistance to IDDM. PMID:2901099

  18. Identification of the new HLA-DRB1{sup *}0812 allele detected by sequencing based typing

    SciTech Connect

    Versluis, L.F.; Zwan, A.W. van der; Tilanus, M.G.J.; Savelkoul, P.H.M.; Berg-Loonen, E.M. van den

    1996-12-31

    HLA-DRB typing by polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific priming (PCR-SSP) and sequencing based typing (SBT) was studied within the framework of the Antigen and Haplotype Society 11 and the Sequencing Based Typing Component of the Twelfth International HLA workshop. Sequencing was performed as described by McGinnis and co-workers in 1995 on coded samples, including most DR2 subtypes, resulting in high resolution HLA-DR typing. Sequences were compared with a database containing 107 DRB1, four DRB3, and five DRB5 alleles in a similar way as described for HLA-DPB. One sample showed a new DR8 sequence, indicating the presence of a new allele. This individual (4390) is of Indonesian origin. The specific amplification of the DR8 allele and subsequent sequencing resulted in a sequence which did not match the database and new polymorphism was identified. The complementary strand was sequenced and confirmed the presence of a new DRB1 allele. Cloning and subsequent sequencing of the polymerase chain reaction fragment resulted in confirmation of the direct sequence data. Later this variant was officially named DRB1{sup *}0812. The complete nucleotide sequence of exon 2 of this new allele is shown. This allele differs from DRB1{sup *}0810 by one nucleotide at codon 85, resulting in an alanine (GTT), whereas DRB1{sup *}0810 carries a valine (GCT). 5 refs., 1 fig.

  19. HLA Class I and II Blocks Are Associated to Susceptibility, Clinical Subtypes and Autoantibodies in Mexican Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Reyna, Tatiana S.; Mercado-Velázquez, Pamela; Yu, Neng; Alosco, Sharon; Ohashi, Marina; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Granados, Julio; Zúñiga, Joaquin; Yunis, Edmond

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphism studies in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) have yielded variable results. These studies need to consider the genetic admixture of the studied population. Here we used our previously reported definition of genetic admixture of Mexicans using HLA class I and II DNA blocks to map genetic susceptibility to develop SSc and its complications. Methods We included 159 patients from a cohort of Mexican Mestizo SSc patients. We performed clinical evaluation, obtained SSc-associated antibodies, and determined HLA class I and class II alleles using sequence-based, high-resolution techniques to evaluate the contribution of these genes to SSc susceptibility, their correlation with the clinical and autoantibody profile and the prevalence of Amerindian, Caucasian and African alleles, blocks and haplotypes in this population. Results Our study revealed that class I block HLA-C*12:03-B*18:01 was important to map susceptibility to diffuse cutaneous (dc) SSc, HLA-C*07:01-B*08:01 block to map the susceptibility role of HLA-B*08:01 to develop SSc, and the C*07:02-B*39:05 and C*07:02-B*39:06 blocks to map the protective role of C*07:02 in SSc. We also confirmed previous associations of HLA-DRB1*11:04 and –DRB1*01 to susceptibility to develop SSc. Importantly, we mapped the protective role of DQB1*03:01 using three Amerindian blocks. We also found a significant association for the presence of anti-Topoisomerase I antibody with HLA-DQB1*04:02, present in an Amerindian block (DRB1*08:02-DQB1*04:02), and we found several alleles associated to internal organ damage. The admixture estimations revealed a lower proportion of the Amerindian genetic component among SSc patients. Conclusion This is the first report of the diversity of HLA class I and II alleles and haplotypes Mexican patients with SSc. Our findings suggest that HLA class I and class II genes contribute to the protection and susceptibility to develop SSc and its different clinical

  20. The Potential of HLA-G-Bearing Extracellular Vesicles as a Future Element in HLA-G Immune Biology.

    PubMed

    Rebmann, Vera; König, Lisa; Nardi, Fabiola da Silva; Wagner, Bettina; Manvailer, Luis Felipe Santos; Horn, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    The HLA-G molecule is a member of the non-classical HLA class I family. Its surface expression is physiologically restricted to the maternal-fetal interface and to immune privileged adult tissues. Despite the restricted tissue expression, HLA-G is detectable in body fluids as secreted soluble molecules. A unique feature of HLA-G is the structural diversity as surface expressed and as secreted molecules. Secreted HLA-G can be found in various body fluids either as free soluble HLA-G or as part of extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are composed of various antigens/ligands/receptors, bioactive lipids, cytokines, growth factors, and genetic information, such as mRNA and microRNA. Functionally, HLA-G and its secreted forms are considered to play a crucial role in the network of immune-regulatory tolerance mechanisms, preferentially interacting with the cognate inhibitory receptors LILRB1 and LILRB2. The HLA-G mediated tolerance is described in processes of pregnancy, inflammation, and cancer. However, almost all functional and clinical implications of HLA-G in vivo and in vitro have been established based on simple single ligand/receptor interactions at the cell surface, whereas HLA-G-bearing EVs were in minor research focus. Indeed, cytotrophoblast cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and cancer cells were recently described to secrete HLA-G-bearing EVs, displaying immunosuppressive effects and modulating the tumor microenvironment. However, numerous functional and clinical open questions persist. Here, we (i) introduce basic aspects of EVs biology, (ii) summarize the functional knowledge, clinical implications and open questions of HLA-G-bearing EVs, and (iii) discuss HLA-G-bearing EVs as a future element in HLA-G biology. PMID:27199995

  1. The Potential of HLA-G-Bearing Extracellular Vesicles as a Future Element in HLA-G Immune Biology

    PubMed Central

    Rebmann, Vera; König, Lisa; Nardi, Fabiola da Silva; Wagner, Bettina; Manvailer, Luis Felipe Santos; Horn, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    The HLA-G molecule is a member of the non-classical HLA class I family. Its surface expression is physiologically restricted to the maternal–fetal interface and to immune privileged adult tissues. Despite the restricted tissue expression, HLA-G is detectable in body fluids as secreted soluble molecules. A unique feature of HLA-G is the structural diversity as surface expressed and as secreted molecules. Secreted HLA-G can be found in various body fluids either as free soluble HLA-G or as part of extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are composed of various antigens/ligands/receptors, bioactive lipids, cytokines, growth factors, and genetic information, such as mRNA and microRNA. Functionally, HLA-G and its secreted forms are considered to play a crucial role in the network of immune-regulatory tolerance mechanisms, preferentially interacting with the cognate inhibitory receptors LILRB1 and LILRB2. The HLA-G mediated tolerance is described in processes of pregnancy, inflammation, and cancer. However, almost all functional and clinical implications of HLA-G in vivo and in vitro have been established based on simple single ligand/receptor interactions at the cell surface, whereas HLA-G-bearing EVs were in minor research focus. Indeed, cytotrophoblast cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and cancer cells were recently described to secrete HLA-G-bearing EVs, displaying immunosuppressive effects and modulating the tumor microenvironment. However, numerous functional and clinical open questions persist. Here, we (i) introduce basic aspects of EVs biology, (ii) summarize the functional knowledge, clinical implications and open questions of HLA-G-bearing EVs, and (iii) discuss HLA-G-bearing EVs as a future element in HLA-G biology. PMID:27199995

  2. Presentation of human minor histocompatibility antigens by HLA-B35 and HLA-B38 molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, J; Kariyone, A; Akiyama, N; Kano, K; Takiguchi, M

    1990-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones specific for human minor histocompatibility antigens (hmHAs) were produced from a patient who had been grafted with the kidneys from his mother and two HLA-identical sisters. Of eight CTL clones generated, four recognized an hmHA (hmHA-1) expressed on cells from the mother and sister 3 (second donor); two recognized another antigen (hmHA-2) on cells from the father, sister 2 (third donor), and sister 3; and the remaining two clones recognized still another antigen (hmHA-3) on cells from the father and sister 3. Panel studies revealed that CTL recognition of hmHA-1 was restricted by HLA-B35 and that of hmHA-2 and hmHA-3 was restricted by HLA-B38. The HLA-B35 restriction of the hmHA-1-specific CTL clones was substantiated by the fact that they killed HLA-A null/HLA-B null Hmy2CIR targets transfected with HLA-B35 but not HLA-B51, -Bw52, or -Bw53 transfected Hmy2CIR targets. These data demonstrated that the five amino acids substitutions on the alpha 1 domain between HLA-B35 and -Bw53, which are associated with Bw4/Bw6 epitopes, play a critical role in the relationship of hmHA-1 to HLA-B35 molecules. The fact that the hmHA-1-specific CTLs failed to kill Hmy2CIR cells expressing HLA-B35/51 chimeric molecules composed of the alpha 1 domain of HLA-B35 and other domains of HLA-B51 indicated that eight residues on the alpha 2 domain also affect the interaction of hmHA-1 and the HLA-B35 molecules. PMID:2157206

  3. A catalog of HLA type, HLA expression, and neo-epitope candidates in human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Boegel, Sebastian; Löwer, Martin; Bukur, Thomas; Sahin, Ugur; Castle, John C

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cell lines are a tremendous resource for cancer biology and therapy development. These multipurpose tools are commonly used to examine the genetic origin of cancers, to identify potential novel tumor targets, such as tumor antigens for vaccine devel­opment, and utilized to screen potential therapies in preclinical studies. Mutations, gene expression, and drug sensitivity have been determined for many cell lines using next-generation sequencing (NGS). However, the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) type and HLA expression of tumor cell lines, characterizations necessary for the development of cancer vaccines, have remained largely incomplete and, such information, when available, has been distributed in many publications. Here, we determine the 4-digit HLA type and HLA expression of 167 cancer and 10 non-cancer cell lines from publically available RNA-Seq data. We use standard NGS RNA-Seq short reads from “whole transcriptome” sequencing, map reads to known HLA types, and statistically determine HLA type, heterozygosity, and expression. First, we present previously unreported HLA Class I and II genotypes. Second, we determine HLA expression levels in each cancer cell line, providing insights into HLA downregulation and loss in cancer. Third, using these results, we provide a fundamental cell line “barcode” to track samples and prevent sample annotation swaps and contamination. Fourth, we integrate the cancer cell-line specific HLA types and HLA expression with available cell-line specific mutation information and existing HLA binding prediction algorithms to make a catalog of predicted antigenic mutations in each cell line. The compilation of our results are a fundamental resource for all researchers selecting specific cancer cell lines based on the HLA type and HLA expression, as well as for the development of immunotherapeutic tools for novel cancer treatment modalities. PMID:25960936

  4. The HLA-DRB1 allele polymorphisms and nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huimin; Yu, Kaihui; Zhang, Ruoheng; Li, Jiatong; Wei, Xiaomou; Zhang, Yuening; Zhang, Chengdong; Xiao, Feifan; Zhao, Dong; Lin, Xuandong; Wu, Huayu; Yang, Xiaoli

    2016-06-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 has been reported to influence individual's susceptibility to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) by many studies in recent years; however, these studies provided controversial results. The meta-analysis was thus conducted here to estimate the relationship between HLA-DRB1 polymorphisms and NPC. After an extensive review of journals from various databases (PubMed, the Web of Science, Embase, China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI), and Wanfang Database), 8 out of 69 case-control studies, including 778 cases and 1148 controls, were extracted. The results showed that 4 of 13 polymorphisms allele are statistically significantly associated with NPC, among them, HLA-DRB1*3, HLA-DRB1*9, and HLA-DRB1*10 may increase the risk of NPC while HLA-DRB1*01 has the opposite effect. The pooled odds ratio and 95 % confidence interval (CI) were 1.702 [95 % CI (1.047, 2.765)], 1.363 [95 % CI (1.029, 1.806)], 1.989 [95 % CI (1.042, 3.799)], and 0.461 [95 % CI (0.315, 0.676)], respectively. In a further ethnicity-based subgroup analysis, HLA-DRB1*08, HLA-DRB1*11, and HLA-DRB1*16 were found to be linked with NPC in Asian, Tunisian, and Caucasian, respectively. In Asian, HLA-DRB1*03, 08, and 10 may elevate the risk whereas HLA-DRB1*09 could lower it. In Tunisian, HLA-DRB1*01 and 11 are the protective factors while HLA-DRB1*03 is the only risk factor. In Caucasian, HLA-DRB1*01 and 03 increase the risk and HLA-DRB1*16 lowers it. The most frequent statistically associated gene is found to be HLA-DRB1*03 which has protective influence on Asian and Tunisian. In conclusion, HLA-DRB1*01, DRB1*03, DRB1*09, and DRB1*10 are related with NPC susceptibility, and the association of HLA-DRB1*08, DRB1*11, and DRB1*16 with NPC risk are significantly different in different ethnicities. PMID:27059731

  5. Effects of prenatal X-irradiation on the 14th-18th days of gestation on postnatal growth and development in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jensh, R.P.; Brent, R.L.

    1988-11-01

    Thirty-nine pregnant adult Wistar strain rats were randomly assigned to one of three exposure groups: 0, 0.75, or 1.50 Gy X-radiation total exposure. Animals were exposed from the 14th to the 18th days of gestation at 0, 0.15, or 0.30 Gy per day. At term, 15 rats were killed and morphologic analyses were completed. Twenty-four rats were allowed to deliver their offspring. On the first day of postnatal life, litters were reduced to a maximum of eight pups per litter, with equal numbers of male and female offspring wherever possible. A total of 187 pups were observed for the age of acquisition of five reflexes (air righting, surface righting, visual placing, negative geotaxis, auditory startle) and the appearance of four physiologic markers (pinna detachment, eye opening, vaginal opening, testes descent). There was significant dose-related weight reduction in term fetuses and offspring throughout the 86-day postnatal period. Postnatal growth rate (g gained/day) was unaffected. Adult offspring brain and gonadal weight and organ weight:body weight ratios were reduced. Using the PAC50 methodology, dose-related alterations occurred in the acquisition of several reflexes. All physiologic markers exhibited a dose-related delay in appearance. These results indicate that fractionated exposure to X-radiation during the fetal period in the rat results in dose-dependent alterations in postnatal growth and physiologic development. These studies are important for our understanding of the long-range effects of prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation late in gestation.

  6. Specific HLA-DQB and HLA-DRB1 alleles confer susceptibility to pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, S J; Freidmann, A; Steinman, L; Brautbar, C; Erlich, H A

    1989-01-01

    The autoimmune dermatologic disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is associated with the serotypes HLA-DR4 and HLA-DRw6. Based on nucleotide sequence and oligonucleotide probe analysis of enzymatically amplified DNA encoding HLA-DR beta chain (HLA-DRB) and HLA-DQ beta chain (HLA-DQB; henceforth HLA is omitted from designations), we showed previously that the DR4 susceptibility was associated with the Dw10 DRB1 allele [encoding the mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC)-defined Dw10 specificity]. The DRw6 susceptibility similarly was shown to be associated with a rare DQB allele (DQB1.3), which differed from another nonsusceptible allele by only a valine-to-aspartic acid substitution at position 57. Given the linkage disequilibrium that characterizes HLA haplotypes, it is difficult to assign disease susceptibility to a specific locus rather than to a closely linked gene(s) on the same haplotype. To address this problem, we have analyzed all of the polymorphic loci of the class II HLA region (DRB1, DRB3, DQA, DQB, and DPB) on the DRw6 haplotypes in patients and controls. In 22 PV patients, 4 different DRw6 haplotypes were found that encode the same DQ beta chain (DQB1.3) but contained silent nucleotide differences at the DQB locus as well as coding sequence differences in the DQA and DRB loci. These results, obtained by using a method for allele-specific polymerase chain reaction amplification, strongly support the hypothesis that the allele DQB1.3 confers susceptibility. This DQB allele is correlated with the MLC-defined Dw9 specificity and is associated with two different DRB1 alleles (the common "6A" associated with DRw13 and the rare "6B" associated with DRw14). Since 86% (19 of 22) of DRw6+ patients contain the DQB1.3 allele (vs. 3% of controls), whereas 64% (14 of 22) contain the DRB1 allele 6B (vs. 6% of the controls), we conclude that most of the DRw6 susceptibility to PV can be accounted for by the DQ beta chain. Images PMID:2503828

  7. Crystal Structure of the HLA-DM - HLA-DR1 Complex Defines Mechanisms for Rapid Peptide Selection

    PubMed Central

    Pos, Wouter; Sethi, Dhruv K.; Call, Melissa J.; Schulze, Monika-Sarah E. D.; Anders, Anne-Kathrin; Pyrdol, Jason; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary HLA-DR molecules bind microbial peptides in an endosomal compartment and present them on the cell surface for CD4 T cell surveillance. HLA-DM plays a critical role in the endosomal peptide selection process. The structure of the HLA-DM – HLA-DR complex shows major rearrangements of the HLA-DR peptide binding groove. Flipping of a tryptophan away from the HLA-DR1 P1 pocket enables major conformational changes that position hydrophobic HLA-DR residues into the P1 pocket. These conformational changes accelerate peptide dissociation and stabilize the empty HLA-DR peptide binding groove. Initially, incoming peptides have access to only part of the HLA-DR groove and need to compete with HLA-DR residues for access to the P2 site and the hydrophobic P1 pocket. This energetic barrier creates a rapid and stringent selection process for the highest-affinity binders. Insertion of peptide residues into the P2 and P1 sites reverses the conformational changes, terminating selection through DM dissociation. PMID:23260142

  8. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I Restricted Epitope Discovery in Yellow Fewer and Dengue Viruses: Importance of HLA Binding Strength

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Ole; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Maciel, Milton; Nielsen, Morten; Voldby Larsen, Mette; Lundegaard, Claus; Harndahl, Mikkel; Lamberth, Kasper; Buus, Søren; Salmon, Jérôme; August, Thomas J.; Marques, Ernesto T. A.

    2011-01-01

    Epitopes from all available full-length sequences of yellow fever virus (YFV) and dengue fever virus (DENV) restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen class I (HLA-I) alleles covering 12 HLA-I supertypes were predicted using the NetCTL algorithm. A subset of 179 predicted YFV and 158 predicted DENV epitopes were selected using the EpiSelect algorithm to allow for optimal coverage of viral strains. The selected predicted epitopes were synthesized and approximately 75% were found to bind the predicted restricting HLA molecule with an affinity, KD, stronger than 500 nM. The immunogenicity of 25 HLA-A*02:01, 28 HLA-A*24:02 and 28 HLA-B*07:02 binding peptides was tested in three HLA-transgenic mice models and led to the identification of 17 HLA-A*02:01, 4 HLA-A*2402 and 4 HLA-B*07:02 immunogenic peptides. The immunogenic peptides bound HLA significantly stronger than the non-immunogenic peptides. All except one of the immunogenic peptides had KD below 100 nM and the peptides with KD below 5 nM were more likely to be immunogenic. In addition, all the immunogenic peptides that were identified as having a high functional avidity had KD below 20 nM. A*02:01 transgenic mice were also inoculated twice with the 17DD YFV vaccine strain. Three of the YFV A*02:01 restricted peptides activated T-cells from the infected mice in vitro. All three peptides that elicited responses had an HLA binding affinity of 2 nM or less. The results indicate the importance of the strength of HLA binding in shaping the immune response. PMID:22039500

  9. HLA alleles may serve as a tool to discriminate atypical type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Mariana; Fabregat, Matías; Javiel, Gerardo; Mimbacas, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the presence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) marker could add new information to discriminated atypical diabetic type 2 patients. METHODS: We analyzed 199 patients initially diagnosed as type 2 diabetes who are treated in special care diabetes clinics (3rd level). This population was classified in “atypical” (sample A) and “classic” (sample B) according to HLA typing. We consider “classic patient” when has absence of type 1 diabetes associated HLA alleles and no difficulties in their diagnosis and treatments. By the other hand, we considered “atypical patient” when show type 1 diabetes associated HLA alleles and difficulties in their diagnosis and treatments. The standard protocol Asociacion Latinoamericana de Diabetes 2006 was used for patients follow up. To analyze differences between both populations in paraclinical parameters we used unpaired t tests and contingence tables. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were carried out using the SPSS software program. In all studies we assume differences statistically significant, with a P-value < 0.05 corrected and 95%CI. RESULTS: The typing HLA in the “atypical” populations show that 92.47% patients presented at list one type 1 diabetes associated HLA alleles (DQB1*0201-0302 and DR 3-4) and 7.53% had two of its. The results showed for categorical variables (family history, presence or absence of hypertension and/or dyslipidemia, reason for initial consultation) the only difference found was at dyslipidemia (OR = 0.45, 0.243 < OD < 0.822 (P < 0.001). In relation to continuous variables we found significant differences between atypical vs classic only in cholesterol (5.07 ± 1.1 vs 5.56 ± 1.5, P < 0.05), high density lipoproteins (1.23 ± 0.3 vs 1.33 ± 0.3, P < 0.05) and low density lipoproteins (2.86 ± 0.9 vs 3.38 ± 1.7, P < 0.01). None of the variables had discriminating power when logistic regression was done. CONCLUSION: We propose an algorithm including HLA

  10. Rapid detection of HLA-B*51 by real-time polymerase chain reaction and high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Imperiali, C; Alía-Ramos, P; Padró-Miquel, A

    2015-08-01

    HLA-B*51, a class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecule, is the strongest known genetic risk factor for Behçet disease. However, there are only few articles reporting methods to determine the presence or absence of HLA-B51. For this reason, we designed and developed an easy, fast, and inexpensive real-time high-resolution melting (HRM) assay to detect HLA-B*51. We genotyped 61 samples by our HRM assay and by conventional polymerase chain reaction, and no discrepancies were found between results. Besides, a subgroup of 25 samples was also genotyped in a different laboratory, and another subgroup of 16 samples was obtained from the International Histocompatibility Working Group DNA Bank, and a full concordance of results was observed with those obtained by HRM. Regarding the identifying system evaluated, we obtained 100% of specificity, sensibility, and repeatability, and 0% of false positive and false negative rates. Therefore, this HRM analysis is easily applicable to the rapid detection of HLA-B*51, exhibits a high speed, and requires a very low budget. PMID:26176813

  11. A Novel Trafficking Signal within the HLA-C Cytoplasmic Tail Allows Regulated Expression Upon Differentiation of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Malinda R.; Williams, Maya; Kulpa, Deanna A.; Blakely, Pennelope K.; Yaffee, Anna Q.; Collins, Kathleen L.

    2008-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC-I) present peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). In addition, HLA-C allotypes are recognized by killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIR) found on natural killer (NK) cells and effector CTLs. Compared to other classical MHC-I allotypes, HLA-C has low cell surface expression and an altered intracellular trafficking pattern. We present evidence that this results from effects of both the extracellular domain and the cytoplasmic tail. Notably, we demonstrate that the cytoplasmic tail contains a dihydrophobic (LI) internalization and lysosomal targeting signal that is partially attenuated by an aspartic acid residue (DXSLI). In addition, we provide evidence that this signal is specifically inhibited by hypophosphorylation of the adjacent serine residue upon macrophage differentiation and that this allows high HLA-C expression in this cell type. We propose that tightly regulated HLA-C surface expression facilitates immune surveillance and allows HLA-C to serve a specialized role in macrophages. PMID:18523244

  12. HLA-B polymorphisms and intracellular assembly modes.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Malini; Geng, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules are ligands for antigen receptors of cytotoxic T cells (CTL) and inhibitory receptors of natural killer (NK) cells. The high degree of HLA class I polymorphism allows for the selection of distinct and diverse sets of antigenic peptide ligands for presentation to CTL. The extensive polymorphisms of the HLA class I genes also result in large variations in their intracellular folding and assembly characteristics. Recent findings indicate that North American HLA-B variants differ significantly in the stabilities of their peptide-deficient forms and in the requirements for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident factor tapasin for proper assembly. In HIV-infected individuals, the presence of tapasin-independent HLA-B allotypes links to more rapid progression to death. Further studies are important to better understand how the intrinsic structural characteristics of HLA class I folding intermediates affect immune responses mediated by CTL and NK cells. PMID:26239417

  13. HLA-G Molecules in Autoimmune Diseases and Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Roberta; Bortolotti, Daria; Bolzani, Silvia; Fainardi, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G molecule, a non-classical HLA-Ib molecule, is less polymorphic when compared to classical HLA class I molecules. Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) was first detected on cytotrophoblast cells at the feto-maternal interface but its expression is prevalent during viral infections and several autoimmune diseases. HLA-G gene is characterized by polymorphisms at the 3′ un-translated region and 5′ upstream regulatory region that regulate its expression and are associated with autoimmune diseases and viral infection susceptibility, creating an unbalanced and pathologic environment. This review focuses on the role of HLA-G genetic polymorphisms, mRNA, and protein expression in autoimmune conditions and viral infections. PMID:25477881

  14. Involvement of position-147 for HLA-E expression

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunami, Katsuyoshi; Kusama, Tamiko; Okura, Eiji; Shirakura, Ryota; Fukuzawa, Masahiro; Miyagawa, Shuji . E-mail: miyagawa@orgtrp.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2006-09-01

    HLA-E functions as an inhibitory signaling molecule of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytolysis. However, the cell surface expression of HLA-E molecules is quite restricted because of the limited repertoire of binding peptide sequences, such as signal peptides of other HLA molecules, especially on xenogeneic cells. In this study, we successfully determined that position-147 is an important amino acid position for cell surface expression by producing point substitutions. For further studies concerning transplantation therapy, the point substitution, Ser147Cys, that resulted in a single atom change, oxygen to sulfur, designated as HLA-Ev(147), led to a much higher expression on the human and pig cell surface and a greater inhibitory function against human NK cells than wild type HLA-E in an in vitro model system of pig to human xenotransplantation. Consequently, HLA-Ev(147) might be a promising alternative gene tool for future transplantation therapy such as xenotransplantation.

  15. [The HLA system in the Moroccan population: General review].

    PubMed

    Brick, C; Atouf, O; Essakalli, M

    2015-01-01

    The Moroccan population is an interesting study model of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) polymorphism given its ethnic and genetic diversity. Through an analysis of the literature, this work proposes to establish a balance of knowledge for this population in the field of histocompatibility: HLA diversity, anthropology, transplantation and HLA associations and diseases. This analysis shows that the HLA system has not been fully explored within the Moroccan population. However, the results obtained allowed us to initiate a database reflecting the specific healthy Moroccan population HLA polymorphism to identify immigration flows and relationships with different people of the world and to reveal the association of certain HLA alleles with frequent pathologies. We also propose to analyze the reasons hindering the development of this activity in Morocco and we will try to identify some perspectives. PMID:26597780

  16. HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies of 10 918 Koreans from bone marrow donor registry in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, H; Lee, Y-J; Song, E Y; Park, M H

    2016-10-01

    The human leucocyte antigen (HLA) system is the most polymorphic genetic system in humans, and HLA matching is crucial in organ transplantation, especially in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We investigated HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies at allelic level in 10 918 Koreans from bone marrow donor registry in Korea. Intermediate resolution HLA typing was performed using Luminex technology (Wakunaga, Japan), and additional allelic level typing was performed using PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism method and/or sequence-based typing (Abbott Molecular, USA). Allele and haplotype frequencies were calculated by direct counting and maximum likelihood methods, respectively. A total of 39 HLA-A, 66 HLA-B and 47 HLA-DRB1 alleles were identified. High-frequency alleles found at a frequency of ≥5% were 6 HLA-A (A*02:01, *02:06, *11:01, *24:02, *31:01 and *33:03), 6 HLA-B (B*15:01, *35:01, *44:03, *51:01, 54:01 and *58:01) and 8 HLA-DRB1 (DRB1*01:01, *04:05, *04:06, *07:01, *08:03, *09:01, *13:02 and *15:01) alleles. At each locus, A*02, B*15 and DRB1*14 generic groups were most diverse at allelic level, consisting of 9, 12 and 11 different alleles, respectively. A total of 366, 197 and 21 different HLA-A-B-DRB1 haplotypes were estimated with frequencies of ≥0.05%, ≥0.1% and ≥0.5%, respectively. The five most common haplotypes with frequencies of ≥2.0% were A*33:03-B*44:03-DRB1*13:02 (4.97%), A*33:03-B*58:01-DRB1*13:02, A*33:03-B*44:03-DRB1*07:01, A*24:02-B*07:02-DRB1*01:01 and A*24:02-B*52:01-DRB1*15:02. Among 34 serologic HLA-A-B-DR haplotypes with frequencies of ≥0.5%, 17 haplotypes revealed allele-level diversity and majority of the allelic variation was arising from A2, A26, B61, B62, DR4 and DR14 specificities. Haplotype diversity obtained in this study is the most comprehensive data thus far reported in Koreans, and the information will be useful for unrelated stem cell transplantation as well as for disease

  17. [Histocompatibility HLA system of man. Considerations in the light of current concepts. IV. Soluble HLA class I antigens (sHLA-I)].

    PubMed

    Kedzierska, A; Turowski, G

    2001-01-01

    Soluble class I human leukocyte antigens (sHLA) have been detected in serum, sweat, lymphatic fluid, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. The levels vary among different individuals and are significantly affected by inflammatory diseases and organ rejection. This article discusses the clinical significance of levels of serum HLA class I antigens, both in patients with viral diseases and following organ transplantation, as well as the potential involvement of such antigens in the immune response. The potential use of sHLA in clinical medicine is far-reaching. sHLA-peptide complexes may find wide application, particularly for the treatment recipients. Although further in vivo studies are required, available data show the efficacy of sHLA to regulate T-cell function. PMID:11868249

  18. Class II HLA antigens in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D H; Hornabrook, R W; Dagger, J; Fong, R

    1989-01-01

    HLA typing in Wellington revealed a stronger association of multiple sclerosis with DR2 than with DQw1. The association with DQw1 appeared to be due to linkage disequilibrium of this antigen with DR2. These results, when considered in conjunction with other studies, are most easily explained by the hypothesis that susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is influenced by multiple risk factors, with DR2 being an important risk factor in Caucasoid populations. PMID:2732726

  19. Recent developments in HLA-haploidentical transplantations

    PubMed Central

    Showel, Margaret; Fuchs, Ephraim J.

    2016-01-01

    While allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations have a curative potential, several patients with hematologic malignancies cannot avail themselves of this therapeutic option due to lack of matched donor availability. Although HLA-haploidentical transplantations were previously associated with poor outcomes, recent evidence with use of post transplantation cyclophosphamide indicate improved safety and efficacy. The following paper discusses the most recent developments in this area. PMID:26590771

  20. HLA-C Downmodulation by HIV-1 Vpu.

    PubMed

    Barker, Edward; Evans, David T

    2016-05-11

    It is widely held that HIV-1 Nef downmodulates HLA-A and -B to protect infected cells from CD8(+) T cells but leaves HLA-C on the cell surface to inhibit NK cells. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Apps et al. (2016) revise this model by showing that the Vpu protein of primary HIV-1 isolates downmodulate HLA-C. PMID:27173922

  1. The implementation of distributed interactive simulator based on HLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Limin; Teng, Jianfu; Feng, Tao

    2004-03-01

    HLA (High Level Architecture) is a new architecture of distributed interactive simulation developed from DIS. We put forward a technical scheme of a distributed interactive simulator based on HLA, and bring forward a concept about distributed oriented-object simulator's engine, as well as an in-depth study on its architecture. This provides a new theoretical and practical approach in order to turn simulator's architecture into HLA.

  2. The IMGT/HLA and IPD databases.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James; Waller, Matthew J; Fail, Sylvie C; Marsh, Steven G E

    2006-12-01

    The IMGT/HLA database (www.ebi.ac.uk/imgt/hla) has provided a centralized repository for the sequences of the alleles named by the WHO Nomenclature Committee for Factors of the HLA System since 1998. Since its initial release, the database has rapidly grown in size and is recognized as the primary source of information for the study of sequences of the human major histocompatibility complex. The Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD; www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd) is a set of specialist databases related to the study of polymorphic genes in the immune system. The IPD currently consists of four databases: IPD-KIR contains the allelic sequences of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors; IPD-MHC is a database of sequences of the major histocompatibility complex of different species; IPD-HPA contains alloantigens expressed only on platelets (human platelet antigens or HPA); and IPD-ESTDAB provides access to the European Searchable Tumour Cell-Line Database, a cell bank of immunologically characterized melanoma cell lines. PMID:16944494

  3. Autoinflammation and HLA-B27: Beyond Antigen Presentation.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Cailin H

    2016-08-01

    HLA-B27 associated disorders comprise a group of inflammatory conditions which have in common an association with the HLA class I molecule, HLA-B27. Given this association, these diseases are classically considered disorders of adaptive immunity. However, mounting data are challenging this assumption and confirming that innate immunity plays a more prominent role in pathogenesis than previously suspected. In this review, the concept of autoinflammation is discussed and evidence is presented from human and animal models to support a key role for innate immunity in HLA-B27 associated disorders. PMID:27229619

  4. HLA Haplotypes and Genotypes Frequencies in Brazilian Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sippert, Emília Ângela; Silva, Cléverson de Oliveira e; Ayo, Christiane Maria; Marques, Silvia Barbosa Dutra; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila; Sell, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) have a pivotal role in immune response and may be involved in antigen recognition of periodontal pathogens. However, the associations of HLA with chronic periodontitis (CP) have not been previously studied in the Brazilian population. In an attempt to clarify the issue of genetic predisposition to CP, we examined the distribution of HLA alleles, genotypes, and haplotypes in patients from Southern Brazil. One hundred and eight CP patients and 151 healthy and unrelated controls with age-, gender-, and ethnicity-matched were HLA investigated by polymerase chain reaction with sequence specific oligonucleotides. To exclude smoking as a predisposing factor, statistical analyses were performed in the total sample and in nonsmoking individuals. The significant results showed a positive association of the A∗02/HLA-B∗40 haplotype with CP (total samples: 4.2% versus 0%, Pc = 0.03; nonsmokers: 4.3% versus 0%, Pc = 0.23) and a lower frequency of HLA-B∗15/HLA-DRB1∗11 haplotype in CP compared to controls (total samples: 0.0% versus 4.3%, Pc = 0.04; nonsmokers: 0 versus 5.1%, Pc = 1.0). In conclusion, the HLA-A∗02/B∗40 haplotype may contribute to the development of CP, while HLA-B∗15/DRB1∗11 haplotype might indicate resistance to disease among Brazilians. PMID:26339134

  5. HLA-E: A Novel Player for Histocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Thomas; Blasczyk, Rainer; Bade-Doeding, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The classical class I human leukocyte antigens (HLA-A, -B, and -C) present allele-specific self- or pathogenic peptides originated by intracellular processing to CD8+ immune effector cells. Even a single mismatch in the heavy chain (hc) of an HLA class I molecule can impact on the peptide binding profile. Since HLA class I molecules are highly polymorphic and most of their polymorphisms affect the peptide binding region (PBR), it becomes obvious that systematic HLA matching is crucial in determining the outcome of transplantation. The opposite holds true for the nonclassical HLA class I molecule HLA-E. HLA-E polymorphism is restricted to two functional versions and is thought to present a limited set of highly conserved peptides derived from class I leader sequences. However, HLA-E appears to be a ligand for the innate and adaptive immune system, where the immunological response to peptide-HLA-E complexes is dictated through the sequence of the bound peptide. Structural investigations clearly demonstrate how subtle amino acid differences impact the strength and response of the cognate CD94/NKG2 or T cell receptor. PMID:25401109

  6. The Relevance of HLA Sequencing in Population Genetics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) is currently being adapted by different biotechnological platforms to the standard typing method for HLA polymorphism, the huge diversity of which makes this initiative particularly challenging. Boosting the molecular characterization of the HLA genes through efficient, rapid, and low-cost technologies is expected to amplify the success of tissue transplantation by enabling us to find donor-recipient matching for rare phenotypes. But the application of NGS technologies to the molecular mapping of the MHC region also anticipates essential changes in population genetic studies. Huge amounts of HLA sequence data will be available in the next years for different populations, with the potential to change our understanding of HLA variation in humans. In this review, we first explain how HLA sequencing allows a better assessment of the HLA diversity in human populations, taking also into account the methodological difficulties it introduces at the statistical level; secondly, we show how analyzing HLA sequence variation may improve our comprehension of population genetic relationships by facilitating the identification of demographic events that marked human evolution; finally, we discuss the interest of both HLA and genome-wide sequencing and genotyping in detecting functionally significant SNPs in the MHC region, the latter having also contributed to the makeup of the HLA molecular diversity observed today. PMID:25126587

  7. Understanding of HLA-conferred susceptibility to chronic hepatitis B infection requires HLA genotyping-based association analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Nao; Ohashi, Jun; Khor, Seik-Soon; Sugiyama, Masaya; Tsuchiura, Takayo; Sawai, Hiromi; Hino, Keisuke; Honda, Masao; Kaneko, Shuichi; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Osamu; Koike, Kazuhiko; Kurosaki, Masayuki; Izumi, Namiki; Korenaga, Masaaki; Kang, Jong-Hon; Tanaka, Eiji; Taketomi, Akinobu; Eguchi, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Naoya; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Tamori, Akihiro; Sakaida, Isao; Hige, Shuhei; Itoh, Yoshito; Mochida, Satoshi; Mita, Eiji; Takikawa, Yasuhiro; Ide, Tatsuya; Hiasa, Yoichi; Kojima, Hiroto; Yamamoto, Ken; Nakamura, Minoru; Saji, Hiroh; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Kanto, Tatsuya; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Mizokami, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Associations of variants located in the HLA class II region with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection have been identified in Asian populations. Here, HLA imputation method was applied to determine HLA alleles using genome-wide SNP typing data of 1,975 Japanese individuals (1,033 HBV patients and 942 healthy controls). Together with data of an additional 1,481 Japanese healthy controls, association tests of six HLA loci including HLA-A, C, B, DRB1, DQB1, and DPB1, were performed. Although the strongest association was detected at a SNP located in the HLA-DP locus in a SNP-based GWAS using data from the 1,975 Japanese individuals, HLA genotyping-based analysis identified DQB1*06:01 as having the strongest association, showing a greater association with CHB susceptibility (OR = 1.76, P = 6.57 × 10−18) than any one of five HLA-DPB1 alleles that were previously reported as CHB susceptibility alleles. Moreover, HLA haplotype analysis showed that, among the five previously reported HLA-DPB1 susceptibility and protective alleles, the association of two DPB1 alleles (DPB1*09:01, and *04:01) had come from linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DR-DQ haplotypes, DRB1*15:02-DQB1*06:01 and DRB1*13:02-DQB1*06:04, respectively. The present study showed an example that SNP-based GWAS does not necessarily detect the primary susceptibility locus in the HLA region. PMID:27091392

  8. HLA-G1, but Not HLA-G3, Suppresses Human Monocyte/Macrophage-mediated Swine Endothelial Cell Lysis.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, H; Maeda, A; Lo, P C; Matsuura, R; Esquivel, E L; Asada, M; Sakai, R; Nakahata, K; Yamamichi, T; Umeda, S; Deguchi, K; Ueno, T; Okuyama, H; Miyagawa, S

    2016-05-01

    The inhibitory function of HLA-G1, a class Ib molecule, on monocyte/macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity was examined. The expression of inhibitory receptors that interact with HLA-G, immunoglobulin-like transcript 2 (ILT2), ILT4, and KIR2DL4 (CD158d) on in vitro-generated macrophages obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-activated THP-1 cells were examined by flow cytometry. cDNAs of HLA-G1, HLA-G3, HLA-E, and human β2-microglobulin were prepared, transfected into pig endothelial cells (PECs), and macrophage- and the THP-1 cell-mediated PEC cytolysis was then assessed. In vitro-generated macrophages expressed not only ILT2 and ILT4 but CD158d as well. The transgenic HLA-G1 on PEC indicated a significant suppression in macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity, which was equivalent to that of transgenic HLA-E. HLA-G1 was clearly expressed on the cell surface of PEC, whereas the levels of HLA-G3 were much lower and remained in the intracellular space. On the other hand, the PMA-activated THP-1 cell was less expressed these inhibitory molecules than in vitro-generated macrophages. Therefore, the HLA-G1 on PECs showed a significant but relatively smaller suppression to THP-1 cell-mediated cytotoxicity compared to in vitro-generated macrophages. These results indicate that by generating HLA-G1, but not HLA-G3, transgenic pigs can protect porcine grafts from monocyte/macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:27320605

  9. Structural analysis of the HLA-A/HLA-F subregion: Precise localization of two new multigene families closely associated with the HLA class I sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Pichon, L.; Carn, G.; Bouric, P.

    1996-03-01

    Positional cloning strategies for the hemochromatosis gene have previously concentrated on a target area restricted to a maximum genomic expanse of 400 kb around the HLA-A and HLA-F loci. Recently, the candidate region has been extended to 2-3 Mb on the distal side of the MHC. In this study, 10 coding sequences [hemochromatosis candidate genes (HCG) I to X] were isolated by cDNA selection using YACs covering the HLA-A/HLA-F subregion. Two of these (HCG II and HCG IV) belong to multigene families, as well as other sequences already described in this region, i.e., P5, pMC 6.7, and HLA class I. Fingerprinting of the four YACSs overlapping the region was performed and allowed partial localization of the different multigene family sequences on each YAC without defining their exact positions. Fingerprinting on cosmids isolated from the ICRF chromosome 6-specific cosmid library allowed more precise localization of the redundant sequences in all of the multigene families and revealed their apparent organization in clusters. Further examination of these intertwined sequences demonstrated that this structural organization resulted from a succession of complex phenomena, including duplications and contractions. This study presents a precise description of the structural organization of the HLA-A/HLA-F region and a determination of the sequences involved in the megabase size polymorphism observed among the A3, A24, and A31 haplotypes. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Additive and interaction effects at three amino acid positions in HLA-DQ and HLA-DR molecules drive type 1 diabetes risk

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xinli; Deutsch, Aaron J; Lenz, Tobias L; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Han, Buhm; Chen, Wei-Min; Howson, Joanna M M; Todd, John A; de Bakker, Paul I W; Rich, Stephen S; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2016-01-01

    Variation in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes accounts for one-half of the genetic risk in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Amino acid changes in the HLA-DR and HLA-DQ molecules mediate most of the risk, but extensive linkage disequilibrium complicates the localization of independent effects. Using 18,832 case-control samples, we localized the signal to 3 amino acid positions in HLA-DQ and HLA-DR. HLA-DQβ1 position 57 (previously known; P = 1 × 10−1,355) by itself explained 15.2% of the total phenotypic variance. Independent effects at HLA-DRβ1 positions 13 (P = 1 × 10−721) and 71 (P = 1 × 10−95) increased the proportion of variance explained to 26.9%. The three positions together explained 90% of the phenotypic variance in the HLA-DRB1–HLA-DQA1–HLA-DQB1 locus. Additionally, we observed significant interactions for 11 of 21 pairs of common HLA-DRB1–HLA-DQA1–HLA-DQB1 haplotypes (P = 1.6 × 10−64). HLA-DRβ1 positions 13 and 71 implicate the P4 pocket in the antigen-binding groove, thus pointing to another critical protein structure for T1D risk, in addition to the HLA-DQ P9 pocket. PMID:26168013

  11. HLA supertype variation across populations: new insights into the role of natural selection in the evolution of HLA-A and HLA-B polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Francisco, Rodrigo; Buhler, Stéphane; Nunes, José Manuel; Bitarello, Bárbara Domingues; França, Gustavo Starvaggi; Meyer, Diogo; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia

    2015-11-01

    Supertypes are groups of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles which bind overlapping sets of peptides due to sharing specific residues at the anchor positions-the B and F pockets-of the peptide-binding region (PBR). HLA alleles within the same supertype are expected to be functionally similar, while those from different supertypes are expected to be functionally distinct, presenting different sets of peptides. In this study, we applied the supertype classification to the HLA-A and HLA-B data of 55 worldwide populations in order to investigate the effect of natural selection on supertype rather than allelic variation at these loci. We compared the nucleotide diversity of the B and F pockets with that of the other PBR regions through a resampling procedure and compared the patterns of within-population heterozygosity (He) and between-population differentiation (G ST) observed when using the supertype definition to those estimated when using randomized groups of alleles. At HLA-A, low levels of variation are observed at B and F pockets and randomized He and G ST do not differ from the observed data. By contrast, HLA-B concentrates most of the differences between supertypes, the B pocket showing a particularly high level of variation. Moreover, at HLA-B, the reassignment of alleles into random groups does not reproduce the patterns of population differentiation observed with supertypes. We thus conclude that differently from HLA-A, for which supertype and allelic variation show similar patterns of nucleotide diversity within and between populations, HLA-B has likely evolved through specific adaptations of its B pocket to local pathogens. PMID:26459025

  12. Down-regulation of HLA-A and HLA-Bw6, but not HLA-Bw4, allospecificities in leukemic cells: an escape mechanism from CTL and NK attack?

    PubMed

    Demanet, Christian; Mulder, Arend; Deneys, Veronique; Worsham, Maria J; Maes, Piet; Claas, Frans H; Ferrone, Soldano

    2004-04-15

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I antigen defects may have a negative impact on the growing application of T-cell-based immunotherapeutic strategies for treatment of leukemia. Therefore in the present study, taking advantage of a large panel of HLA class I allele-specific human monoclonal antibodies, we have compared HLA class I antigen expression on leukemic cells with that on autologous and allogeneic normal cells. Down-regulation of HLA-A and/or -B allospecificities was present in the majority of the patients studied. However, down-regulation did not affect all HLA class I alleles uniformly, but was almost exclusively restricted to HLA-A allospecificities and to HLA-B allospecificities which belong to the HLA-Bw6 group. The latter allospecificities, at variance from those that belong to the HLA-Bw4 group, do not modulate the interactions of leukemic cells with natural killer (NK) cells. Therefore, our results suggest that the selective down-regulation of HLA-A and HLA-Bw6 allospecificities associated with HLA-Bw4 preservation provides leukemic cells with an escape mechanism not only from cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), but also from NK cells. As a result T-cell-based immunotherapeutic strategies for leukemia should utilize HLA-Bw4 alloantigens as restricting elements since a selective HLA-Bw4 allele loss would provide leukemic cells with an escape mechanism from CTLs, but would increase their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated lysis. PMID:15070694

  13. HLA-A*01:03, HLA-A*24:02, HLA-B*08:01, HLA-B*27:05, HLA-B*35:01, HLA-B*44:02, and HLA-C*07:01 monochain transgenic/H-2 class I null mice: novel versatile preclinical models of human T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Boucherma, Rachid; Kridane-Miledi, Hédia; Bouziat, Romain; Rasmussen, Michael; Gatard, Tanja; Langa-Vives, Francina; Lemercier, Brigitte; Lim, Annick; Bérard, Marion; Benmohamed, Lbachir; Buus, Søren; Rooke, Ronald; Lemonnier, François A

    2013-07-15

    We have generated a panel of transgenic mice expressing HLA-A*01:03, -A*24:02, -B*08:01, -B*27:05, -B*35:01, -B*44:02, or -C*07:01 as chimeric monochain molecules (i.e., appropriate HLA α1α2 H chain domains fused with a mouse α3 domain and covalently linked to human β2-microglobulin). Whereas surface expression of several transgenes was markedly reduced in recipient mice that coexpressed endogenous H-2 class I molecules, substantial surface expression of all human transgenes was observed in mice lacking H-2 class I molecules. In these HLA monochain transgenic/H-2 class I null mice, we observed a quantitative and qualitative restoration of the peripheral CD8(+) T cell repertoire, which exhibited a TCR diversity comparable with C57BL/6 WT mice. Potent epitope-specific, HLA-restricted, IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) T cell responses were generated against known reference T cell epitopes after either peptide or DNA immunization. HLA-wise, these new transgenic strains encompass a large proportion of individuals from all major human races and ethnicities. In combination with the previously created HLA-A*02:01 and -B*07:02 transgenic mice, the novel HLA transgenic mice described in this report should be a versatile preclinical animal model that will speed up the identification and optimization of HLA-restricted CD8(+) T cell epitopes of potential interest in various autoimmune human diseases and in preclinical evaluation of T cell-based vaccines. PMID:23776170

  14. A population response analysis approach to assign class II HLA-epitope restrictions

    PubMed Central

    Arlehamn, Cecilia S. Lindestam; Huang, Huang; Davis, Mark M.; McKinney, Denise M.; Scriba, Thomas Jens; Sidney, John; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Identification of the specific HLA locus and allele presenting an epitope for recognition by specific T cell receptors (HLA restriction) is necessary to fully characterize the immune response to antigens. Experimental determination of HLA restriction is complex and technically challenging. As an alternative, the restricting HLA locus and allele can be inferred by genetic association, utilizing response data in an HLA typed population. However, simple odds ratio calculations can be problematic when dealing with large numbers of subjects and antigens and because the same epitope can be presented by multiple alleles (epitope promiscuity). Here, we develop a tool, denominated Restrictor Analysis Tool for Epitopes (RATE), to extract inferred restriction from HLA class II -typed epitope responses. This automated method infers HLA class II restriction from large datasets of T cell responses in HLA class II typed subjects by calculating Odds Ratios and relative frequencies from simple data tables. The program is validated by 1. Analyzing data of previously determined HLA restrictions. 2. Experimentally determining in selected individuals new HLA restrictions using HLA transfected cell lines 3. Predicting HLA restriction of particular peptides, and showing that corresponding HLA class II tetramers efficiently bind to epitope specific T cells. We further design a specific iterative algorithm to account for promiscuous recognition by calculation of Odds Ratio values for combinations of different HLA molecules while incorporating predicted HLA binding affinity. The RATE program streamlines the prediction of HLA class II restriction across multiple T cell epitopes and HLA types. PMID:25948811

  15. New Developments in HLA-G in Cardiac Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lazarte, Julieta; Tumiati, Laura C; Rao, Vivek; Delgado, Diego H

    2016-09-01

    Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non-classical class 1b protein, whose gene is located on chromosome 6 (6p21.31). HLA-G inhibits the immune cells' cytotoxic activity by interacting with specific receptors on their membranes. Since it is a naturally occurring immune modulator, HLA-G has been investigated in transplantation. Indeed, a number of investigations reveal that HLA-G expression is influenced by genetic polymorphisms and in turn, those polymorphisms are associated with detrimental or beneficial outcomes in various pathological situations. The present review introduces the HLA-G molecule, the gene and its polymorphisms. It focuses on the expression of HLA-G and the role of polymorphisms primarily in heart transplant outcomes, secondarily in other transplant organs, as well as the role of the allograft and effect of medical therapy. We discuss the limitations in HLA-G transplant investigations and future directions. The immune inhibiting activity of HLA-G has a great deal of potential for its utilization in enhancing diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic strategies against rejection in the setting of transplantation. PMID:26707934

  16. DEVELOPMENTS AT FOURTEENTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON WATER POLLUTION RESEARCH - BRIGHTON, ENGLAND, JULY 17-22, 1988

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this report is to provide a mechanism whereby current water research developments from around the world as reported at the 14th International Conference on Water Pollution Research of the International Association on Water Pollution Research and Control can be high...

  17. 75 FR 8190 - Art Advisory Panel of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    .... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joseph E. Bothwell, C:AP:P&V:ART, 1099 14th Street, NW., Room 4200E... Internal Revenue Service Art Advisory Panel of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue Service AGENCY... Art Advisory Panel. SUMMARY: It is in the public interest to continue the existence of the...

  18. Historical flood data series of Eastern Spanish Coast (14th-20th centuries). Improving identification of climatic patterns and human factors of flood events from primary documentary sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberola, Armando; Barriendos, Mariano; Gil-Guirado, Salvador; Pérez-Morales, Alfredo; Balasch, Carles; Castelltort, Xavier; Mazón, Jordi; Pino, David; Lluís Ruiz-Bellet, Josep; Tuset, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Historical flood data series of Eastern Spanish Coast (14th-20th centuries). Improving identification of climatic patterns and human factors of flood events from primary documentary sources Armando Alberola, Barriendos, M., Gil-Guirado, S., Pérez Morales, A., Balasch, C., Castelltort, X., Mazón, J., Pino, D., Ruiz-Bellet, J.L., Tuset, J. Historical flood events in eastern spanish coast have been studied by different research groups and projects. Complexity of flood processes, involving atmospheric, surface and human factors, is not easily understandable when long time series are required. Present analysis from PREDIFLOOD Project Consortium defines a new step of flood event databases: Improved access to primary (documentary) and secondary (bibliographical) sources, data collection for all possible locations where floods are detected, and improved system of classification (Barriendos et al., 2014). A first analysis is applied to 8 selected flood series. Long chronologies from PREDIFLOOD Project for Catalonia region (Girona, Barcelona, Tarragona, Lleida, Tortosa). In addition, to cover all sector of spanish mediterranean coast, we introduce Valencia city in Turia River basin. South Eastern sector is cover with Murcia and Caravaca cities, Segura River basin. Extension of area under study required contributions of research teams experienced in work of documentary primary sources (Alberola, 2006; Gil-Guirado, 2013). Flood frequency analysis for long scale periods show natural climatic oscillations into so-called Little Ice Age. There are general patterns, affecting most of basins, but also some local anomalies or singularities. To explain these differences and analogies it is not enough to use purely climatic factors. In this way, we analyze human factors that have been able to influence the variability of floods along last 6 centuries (demography, hydraulic infrastructures, urban development...). This approach improves strongly understanding of mechanisms producing

  19. HLA-B27, but not HLA-B7, immunodominance to influenza is ERAP dependent.

    PubMed

    Akram, Ali; Lin, Aifeng; Gracey, Eric; Streutker, Catherine J; Inman, Robert D

    2014-06-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum-associated aminopeptidase-1 (ERAP1) plays a critical role in the processing of peptides prior to binding to MHC class I molecules. In this article, we show for the first time, to our knowledge, that the HLA-B27 immunodominant influenza nucleoprotein (NP) 383-391 epitope is made as an N-terminally extended 14-mer before it is trimmed by ERAP. In the absence of ERAP, there is a significant reduction in the CTL response to the B27/NP383-391 epitope in influenza A (flu)-infected B27/ERAP(-/-) mice. With the use of tetramer staining, the number of naive CD8(+) T cells expressing TCR Vβ8.1 in B27/ERAP(-/-) transgenic mice is significantly lower than that seen in B27/ERAP(+/+) mice. HLA-B27 surface expression in naive and flu-infected B27/ERAP(-/-) mice is also lower than the expression seen for the same allele in naive and flu-infected B27/ERAP(+/+) mice. In contrast, surface expression of HLA-B7 was unaffected by the absence of ERAP in B7/ERAP(-/-) transgenic mice. The B7-restricted NP418-426 CTL response in flu-infected B7/ERAP(-/-) and B7/ERAP(+/+) mice was also similar. These results provide, to our knowledge, the first in vivo demonstration of ERAP functionally influencing host immune response in an HLA allele-specific manner. This principle has relevance to diseases such as ankylosing spondylitis, in which HLA-B27 and ERAP jointly contribute to disease predisposition. PMID:24835397

  20. Influence of HLA on human partnership and sexual satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Kromer, J.; Hummel, T.; Pietrowski, D.; Giani, A. S.; Sauter, J.; Ehninger, G.; Schmidt, A. H.; Croy, I.

    2016-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC, called HLA in humans) is an important genetic component of the immune system. Fish, birds and mammals prefer mates with different genetic MHC code compared to their own, which they determine using olfactory cues. This preference increases the chances of high MHC variety in the offspring, leading to enhanced resilience against a variety of pathogens. Humans are also able to discriminate HLA related olfactory stimuli, however, it is debated whether this mechanism is of behavioural relevance. We show on a large sample (N = 508), with high-resolution typing of HLA class I/II, that HLA dissimilarity correlates with partnership, sexuality and enhances the desire to procreate. We conclude that HLA mediates mate behaviour in humans. PMID:27578547

  1. Sex ratios and hormones in HLA related rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed Central

    James, W H

    1991-01-01

    The major diseases associated with HLA-B27 (Reiter's disease, ankylosing spondylitis, acute anterior uveitis, and psoriatic arthritis) all occur much more commonly in men. Published evidence indicates that the antigen HLA-B27 is associated with high testosterone concentrations in men. Moreover, the antigen HLA-B44 exerts a protective effect on one of these diseases (psoriatic arthritis), and there are external grounds for supposing that HLA-B44 indexes an antiandrogenic process. These data are interpreted as support for the hypothesis (first adumbrated nearly 20 years ago) that HLA antigens index unusual hormone concentrations, which in turn are causally related to the diseases. An examination of published reports suggests that sibs of probands with ankylosing spondylitis (and perhaps Reiter's disease) contain an excess of men, and that sibs of probands with rheumatoid arthritis contain an excess of women. These data lend further support to the hypothesis. PMID:2059084

  2. Influence of HLA on human partnership and sexual satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Kromer, J; Hummel, T; Pietrowski, D; Giani, A S; Sauter, J; Ehninger, G; Schmidt, A H; Croy, I

    2016-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC, called HLA in humans) is an important genetic component of the immune system. Fish, birds and mammals prefer mates with different genetic MHC code compared to their own, which they determine using olfactory cues. This preference increases the chances of high MHC variety in the offspring, leading to enhanced resilience against a variety of pathogens. Humans are also able to discriminate HLA related olfactory stimuli, however, it is debated whether this mechanism is of behavioural relevance. We show on a large sample (N = 508), with high-resolution typing of HLA class I/II, that HLA dissimilarity correlates with partnership, sexuality and enhances the desire to procreate. We conclude that HLA mediates mate behaviour in humans. PMID:27578547

  3. Extensive HLA class I allele promiscuity among viral CTL epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Frahm, Nicole; Yusim, Karina; Suscovich, Todd J.; Adams, Sharon; Sidney, John; Hraber, Peter; Hewitt, Hannah S.; Linde, Caitlyn H.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.; Woodberry, Tonia; Henry, Leah M.; Faircloth, Kellie; Listgarten, Jennifer; Kadie, Carl; Jojic, Nebojsa; Sango, Kaori; Brown, Nancy V.; Pae, Eunice; Zaman, M. Tauheed; Bihl, Florian; Khatri, Ashok; John, Mina; Mallal, Simon; Marincola, Francesco M.; Walker, Bruce D.; Sette, Alessandro; Heckerman, David; Korber, Bette T.; Brander, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Summary Promiscuous binding of T helper epitopes to MHC class II molecules has been well established, but few examples of promiscuous class I restricted epitopes exist. To address the extent of promiscuity of HLA class I peptides, responses to 242 well-defined viral epitopes were tested in 100 subjects regardless of the individuals’ HLA type. Surprisingly, half of all detected responses were seen in the absence of the originally reported restricting HLA class I allele, and only 3% of epitopes were recognized exclusively in the presence of their original allele. Functional assays confirmed the frequent recognition of HLA class I-restricted T cell epitopes on several alternative alleles across HLA class I supertypes and encoded on different class I loci. These data have significant implications for the understanding of MHC class I restricted antigen presentation and vaccine development. PMID:17705138

  4. HLA antigens in cardiomyopathic Chilean chagasics.

    PubMed Central

    Llop, E; Rothhammer, F; Acuña, M; Apt, W

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of HLA antigens in a sample of 124 Chagas serologically positive Chilean individuals was studied. The sample was subdivided according to the presence or absence of chagasic cardiomyopathy, in order to search for genetic differences associated with this pathological condition. The frequency of antigen B40 in the presence of antigen Cw3 was found to be significantly lower in subjects with cardiomyopathy. We tentatively suggest that the presence of these antigens among noncardiomyopathics is associated with a decreased susceptibility to develop chagasic cardiomyopathy in the Chilean population. PMID:3189340

  5. First report on HLA-DPA1 gene allelic distribution in the general Lebanese population

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Joseph; Shammaa, Dina; Abbas, Fatmeh; Mahfouz, Rami A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims HLA-DPA1 is an important marker in bone marrow and organ transplantation and a highly emerging screening parameter in histocompatibility laboratories. Being highly polymorphic, it has another significant value in detecting population origins and migrations. This is the first study to assess DPA1 allele frequencies in an Arab population. Methods The HLA DPA1 alleles were identified using the One-Lambda assays on a Luminex reverse SSO DNA typing system. Our study included 101 individuals coming from different Lebanese geographical areas representing the different communities and religious sects of the country. Results We compared the results of this study to 16 different populations and found very interesting similarities and differences between Lebanese people and individuals of European ancestry. Conclusion This study is the first to describe the different allelic frequencies of HLA-DPA1 in the Lebanese population and will serve as a template that can be later used for disease association studies both at the level of the country and internationally. PMID:27014585

  6. Insulin-dependent diabetes and HLA.

    PubMed

    Dausset, J; Hors, J; Contu, L; Busson, M; Schmid, M; Cathelineau, G; Lestradet, H; Baron, D

    1979-12-01

    The study of a hundred and fifteen unrelated insulin-dependent diabetes and eight families with at least two insulin-dependent diabetes members made it possible to confirm the higher frequency of HLA-B8 and B18 (p less than 0.001) among patients, producing a RR of 2.24 and 2.47 respectively. The increased B15 frequency did not achieve statistical significance. B18 whose gametic association (delta = 0.0438) was significant only in diabetic patients was often related to Aw19-2 (Aw30 + Aw31). The B8/B18 genotype gave a relative risk (RR = 4.98) which was significantly higher than that of B8, B18 and B15 heterozygotes (1.50, 1.24 and 1.39 respectively). Pairs of diabetic siblings were more frequently HLA identical than would be expected by chance, and distribution of the pairs of affected sibs into the three categories, identical, semi-identical and different, was closer to the recessive model than to the dominant one. The fact that the B8/B18 individuals had a RR slightly higher than the B8 and B18 homozygotes and distinctly higher than the heterozygotes for only one of these genes, favours the hypothesis of two dominant genes, giving the appearance of recessivity. The gene associated with B18 in Southern Europe seems to play the same part as that of the gene associated with B15 in Northern Europe. PMID:398300

  7. HLA and genetic susceptibility to sleepwalking.

    PubMed

    Lecendreux, M; Bassetti, C; Dauvilliers, Y; Mayer, G; Neidhart, E; Tafti, M

    2003-01-01

    HLA-DQB1 typing was performed in 60 Caucasian subjects with sleepwalking (SW) disorder and their families and 60 ethnically matched subjects without any diagnosed sleep disorder. A total of 21 sleepwalkers (35.0%) were DQB1*0501 positive vs eight (13.3%) controls (P = 0.0056; odds ratio = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.4-8.7). The family data for all HLA subtypes were further assessed for allelic association with SW using the transmission-disequilibrium test. A significant excess transmission was observed for DQB1*05 and *04 alleles in familial cases, strongly suggesting that a DQB1 polymorphic amino acid might be more tightly associated than any single allele. Sequence screening revealed that Ser74 in the second exon shared by all DQB1*05 and *04 was 20 times transmitted against 4 times non-transmitted (P = 0.001) in familial cases of SW. Thus, together with narcolepsy and REM sleep behavior disorder, these findings suggest that specific DQB1 genes are implicated in disorders of motor control during sleep. PMID:12556916

  8. Role of HLA Adaptation in HIV Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kløverpris, Henrik N.; Leslie, Alasdair; Goulder, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Killing of HIV-infected cells by CD8+ T-cells imposes strong selection pressure on the virus toward escape. The HLA class I molecules that are successful in mediating some degree of control over the virus are those that tend to present epitopes in conserved regions of the proteome, such as in p24 Gag, in which escape also comes at a significant cost to viral replicative capacity (VRC). In some instances, compensatory mutations can fully correct for the fitness cost of such an escape variant; in others, correction is only partial. The consequences of these events within the HIV-infected host, and at the population level following transmission of escape variants, are discussed. The accumulation of escape mutants in populations over the course of the epidemic already shows instances of protective HLA molecules losing their impact, and in certain cases, a modest decline in HIV virulence in association with population-level increase in mutants that reduce VRC. PMID:26834742

  9. HLA typing by direct DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Smith, Linda K

    2012-01-01

    Sequencing-based typing is a high resolution method for the identification of HLA polymorphisms. The majority of HLA Class I alleles can be discriminated by their exon 2 and 3 sequence, and for Class II alleles, exon 2 is generally sufficient. There are polymorphic positions in other exons which may require additional sequencing to exclude certain alleles with differences outside exon 2 and 3, depending on the clinical requirement and relevant accredition guidelines. The process involves selective amplification of target alleles by PCR, agarose gel electrophoresis of the PCR products to assess the quantity and quality, followed by purification of PCR amplicons to remove excess primer and dNTPs. Cycle sequencing reactions using Applied Biosystems™ BigDye(®) Terminator Ready Reaction v1.1 or v3.1 Kit are performed, then purification of sequence reactions before electrophoresing using Applied Biosystems™ 3730 or 3730XL Genetic Analyser (or similar). Data is processed by specialised software packages, which compare the sample sequence to the sequences of all possible theoretical allele combinations to assign an accurate genotype. Examination of all nucleotides, both at conserved and polymorphic positions enables the direct identification of new alleles, which may not be possible with techniques such as SSP and SSO typing. PMID:22665229

  10. HLA-B27 misfolding and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Colbert, Robert A; Tran, Tri M; Layh-Schmitt, Gerlinde

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how HLA-B27 contributes to the pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis continues to be an important goal. Current efforts are aimed largely on three areas of investigation; peptide presentation to CD8T cells, abnormal forms of the HLA-B27 heavy chain and their recognition by leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors on immune effector cells, and HLA-B27 heavy chain misfolding and intrinsic biological effects on affected cells. In this chapter we review our current understanding of the causes and consequences of HLA-B27 misfolding, which can be defined biochemically as a propensity to oligomerize and form complexes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) with the chaperone BiP (HSPA5/GRP78). HLA-B27 misfolding is linked to an unusual combination of polymorphisms that identify this allele, and cause the heavy chain to fold and load peptides inefficiently. Misfolding can result in ER-associated degradation (ERAD) of heavy chains, which is mediated in part by the E3 ubiquitin ligase HRD1 (SYVN1), and the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme UBE2JL. Upregulation of HLA-B27 and accumulation of misfolded heavy chains can activate ER stress signaling pathways that orchestrate the unfolded protein response. In transgenic rats where HLA-B27 is overexpressed, UPR activation is prominent. However, it is specific for heavy chain misfolding, since overexpression of HLA-B7, an allele that does not misfold, fails to generate ER stress. UPR activation has been linked to cytokine dysregulation, promoting lL-23, IFNβ, and lL-1α production, and may activate the IL-23/IL-17 axis in these rats. IL-1α and IFNβ are pro- and anti-osteoclastogenic cytokines, respectively, that modulate osteoclast development in HLA-B27-expressing transgenic rat monocytes. Translational studies of patient derived cells expressing HLA-B27 at physiologic levels have provided evidence that ER stress and UPR activation can occur in peripheral blood, but this has not been reported to date in isolated macrophages

  11. HLA-B27 Misfolding and Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Colbert, Robert A.; Tran, Tri M.; Layh-Schmitt, Gerlinde

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how HLA-B27 contributes to the pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis continues to be an important goal. Current efforts are aimed largely on three areas of investigation; peptide presentation to CD8 T cells, abnormal forms of the HLA-B27 heavy chain and their recognition by leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors on immune effector cells, and HLA-B27 heavy chain misfolding and intrinsic biological effects on affected cells. In this chapter we review our current understanding of the causes and consequences of HLA-B27 misfolding, which can be defined biochemically as a propensity to oligomerize and form complexes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) with the chaperone BiP (HSPA5/GRP78). HLA-B27 misfolding is linked to an unusual combination of polymorphisms that identify this allele, and cause the heavy chain to fold and load peptides inefficiently. Misfolding can result in ER-associated degradation (ERAD) of heavy chains, which is mediated in part by the E3 ubiquitin ligase HRD1 (SYVN1), and the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme UBE2JL. Upregulation of HLA-B27 and accumulation of misfolded heavy chains can activate ER stress signaling pathways that orchestrate the unfolded protein response. In transgenic rats where HLA-B27 is overexpressed, UPR activation is prominent. However, it is specific for heavy chain misfolding, since overexpression of HLA-B7, an allele that does not misfold, fails to generate ER stress. UPR activation has been linked to cytokine dysregulation, promoting lL-23, IFNβ, and lL-1α production, and may activate the IL-23/IL-17 axis in these rats. IL-1α and IFNβ are pro- and anti-osteoclastogenic cytokines, respectively, that modulate osteoclast development in HLA-B27-expressing transgenic rat monocytes. Translational studies of patient derived cells expressing HLA-B27 at physiologic levels have provided evidence that ER stress and UPR activation can occur in peripheral blood, but this has not been reported to date in isolated macrophages

  12. HLA-G as a Tolerogenic Molecule in Transplantation and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Nardi, Fabiola; Wagner, Bettina; Horn, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    HLA-G is a nonclassical HLA class I molecule. In allogeneic situations such as pregnancy or allograft transplantation, the expression of HLA-G has been related to a better acceptance of the fetus or the allograft. Thus, it seems that HLA-G is crucially involved in mechanisms shaping an allogeneic immune response into tolerance. In this contribution we focus on (i) how HLA-G is involved in transplantation and human reproduction, (ii) how HLA-G is regulated by genetic and microenvironmental factors, and (iii) how HLA-G can offer novel perspectives with respect to therapy. PMID:25143957

  13. Modern approaches to HLA-haploidentical blood or marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kanakry, Christopher G.; Fuchs, Ephraim J.; Luznik, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic blood or bone-marrow transplantation (alloBMT) is a potentially curative treatment for a variety of haematological malignancies and nonmalignant diseases. Historically, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched siblings have been the preferred source of donor cells owing to superior outcomes compared with alloBMT using other donors. Although only approximately one-third of patients have an HLA-matched sibling, nearly all patients have HLA-haploidentical related donors. Early studies using HLA-haploidentical alloBMT resulted in unacceptably high rates of graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), leading to high nonrelapse mortality and consequently poor survival. Several novel approaches to HLA-haploidentical alloBMT have yielded encouraging results with high rates of successful engraftment, effective GVHD control and favourable outcomes. In fact, outcomes of several retrospective comparative studies seem similar to those seen using other allograft sources, including those of HLA-matched-sibling alloBMT. In this Review, we provide an overview of the three most-developed approaches to HLA-haploidentical alloBMT: T-cell depletion with ‘megadose’ CD34+ cells; granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-primed allografts combined with intensive pharmacological immunosuppression, including antithymocyte globulin; and high-dose, post-transplantation cyclophosphamide. We review the preclinical and biological data supporting each approach, results from major clinical studies, and completed or ongoing clinical studies comparing these approaches with other alloBMT platforms. PMID:26305035

  14. HLA-C and HIV-1: friends or foes?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class I protein HLA-C plays a crucial role as a molecule capable of sending inhibitory signals to both natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) via binding to killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIR). Recently HLA-C has been recognized as a key molecule in the immune control of HIV-1. Expression of HLA-C is modulated by a microRNA binding site. HLA-C alleles that bear substitutions in the microRNA binding site are more expressed at the cell surface and associated with the control of HIV-1 viral load, suggesting a role of HLA-C in the presentation of antigenic peptides to CTLs. This review highlights the role of HLA-C in association with HIV-1 viral load, but also addresses the contradiction of the association between high cell surface expression of an inhibitory molecule and strong cell-mediated immunity. To explore additional mechanisms of control of HIV-1 replication by HLA-C, we address specific features of the molecule, like its tendency to be expressed as open conformer upon cell activation, which endows it with a unique capacity to associate with other cell surface molecules as well as with HIV-1 proteins. PMID:22571741

  15. Addressing questions about including environmental effects in the DMSO HLA

    SciTech Connect

    Hummel, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    The Defense Modeling and Simulation Office (DMSO) is developing a High Level Architecture (HLA) to support the DOD Modeling and Simulation (M and S) community. Many, if not all, of the simulations involve the environment in some fashion. In some applications, the simulation takes place in an acknowledged environment without any environmental functionality being taken into account. The Joint Training Federation Prototype (JTFp) is one of several prototype efforts that have been created to provide a test of the DMSO HLA. In addition to addressing the applicability of the HLA to a training community, the JTFp is also one of two prototype efforts that is explicitly including environmental effects in their simulation effort. These two prototyping efforts are examining the issues associated with the inclusion of the environment in an HLA federation. In deciding whether or not to include an environmental federation in the JTFp effort, a number of questions have been raised about the environment and the HLA. These questions have raised the issue of incompatibility between the environment and the HLA and also shown that there is something unique about including the environment in simulations. The purpose of this White Paper, which was developed with inputs from the National Air and Space [Warfare] Model Program among others, is to address the various questions that have been posed about including environmental effects in an HLA simulation.

  16. Clinically relevant interpretation of solid phase assays for HLA antibody

    PubMed Central

    Bettinotti, Maria P.; Zachary, Andrea A.; Leffell, Mary S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Accurate and timely detection and characterization of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies are critical for pre-transplant and post-transplant immunological risk assessment. Solid phase immunoassays have provided increased sensitivity and specificity, but test interpretation is not always straightforward. This review will discuss the result interpretation considering technical limitations; assessment of relative antibody strength; and the integration of data for risk stratification from complementary testing and the patient's immunological history. Recent findings Laboratory and clinical studies have provided insight into causes of test failures – false positive reactions because of antibodies to denatured HLA antigens and false negative reactions resulting from test interference and/or loss of native epitopes. Test modifications permit detection of complement-binding antibodies and determination of the IgG subclasses. The high degree of specificity of single antigen solid phase immunoassays has revealed the complexity and clinical relevance of antibodies to HLA-C, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DP antigens. Determination of antibody specificity for HLA epitopes enables identification of incompatible antigens not included in test kits. Summary Detection and characterization of HLA antibodies with solid phase immunoassays has led to increased understanding of the role of those antibodies in graft rejection, improved treatment of antibody-mediated rejection, and increased opportunities for transplantation. However, realization of these benefits requires careful and accurate interpretation of test results. PMID:27200498

  17. Immunoregulatory Role of HLA-G in Allergic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Murdaca, Giuseppe; Contini, Paola; Negrini, Simone; Ciprandi, Giorgio; Puppo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases are sustained by a T-helper 2 polarization leading to interleukin-4 secretion, IgE-dependent inflammation, and mast cell and eosinophil activation. HLA-G molecules, both in membrane-bound and in soluble forms, play a central role in modulation of immune responses. Elevated levels of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) molecules are detected in serum of patients with allergic rhinitis to seasonal and perennial allergens and correlate with allergen-specific IgE levels, clinical severity, drug consumption, and response to allergen-specific immunotherapy. sHLA-G molecules are also found in airway epithelium of patients with allergic asthma and high levels of sHLA-G molecules are detectable in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage of asthmatic patients correlating with allergen-specific IgE levels. Finally, HLA-G molecules are expressed by T cells, monocytes-macrophages, and Langerhans cells infiltrating the dermis of atopic dermatitis patients. Collectively, although at present it is difficult to completely define the role of HLA-G molecules in allergic diseases, it may be suggested that they are expressed and secreted by immune cells during the allergic reaction in an attempt to suppress allergic inflammation. PMID:27413762

  18. Immunoregulatory Role of HLA-G in Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Contini, Paola; Negrini, Simone; Ciprandi, Giorgio; Puppo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases are sustained by a T-helper 2 polarization leading to interleukin-4 secretion, IgE-dependent inflammation, and mast cell and eosinophil activation. HLA-G molecules, both in membrane-bound and in soluble forms, play a central role in modulation of immune responses. Elevated levels of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) molecules are detected in serum of patients with allergic rhinitis to seasonal and perennial allergens and correlate with allergen-specific IgE levels, clinical severity, drug consumption, and response to allergen-specific immunotherapy. sHLA-G molecules are also found in airway epithelium of patients with allergic asthma and high levels of sHLA-G molecules are detectable in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage of asthmatic patients correlating with allergen-specific IgE levels. Finally, HLA-G molecules are expressed by T cells, monocytes-macrophages, and Langerhans cells infiltrating the dermis of atopic dermatitis patients. Collectively, although at present it is difficult to completely define the role of HLA-G molecules in allergic diseases, it may be suggested that they are expressed and secreted by immune cells during the allergic reaction in an attempt to suppress allergic inflammation. PMID:27413762

  19. Competition-based cellular peptide binding assays for 13 prevalent HLA class I alleles using fluorescein-labeled synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Jan H; Mommaas, Bregje; Mutis, Tuna; Huijbers, Ivo; Vissers, Debby; Benckhuijsen, Willemien E; Schreuder, Geziena M Th; Offringa, Rienk; Goulmy, Els; Melief, Cornelis J M; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Drijfhout, Jan W

    2003-02-01

    We report the development, validation, and application of competition-based peptide binding assays for 13 prevalent human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles. The assays are based on peptide binding to HLA molecules on living cells carrying the particular allele. Competition for binding between the test peptide of interest and a fluorescein-labeled HLA class I binding peptide is used as read out. The use of cell membrane-bound HLA class I molecules circumvents the need for laborious biochemical purification of these molecules in soluble form. Previously, we have applied this principle for HLA-A2 and HLA-A3. We now describe the assays for HLA-A1, HLA-A11, HLA-A24, HLA-A68, HLA-B7, HLA-B8, HLA-B14, HLA-B35, HLA-B60, HLA-B61, and HLA-B62. Together with HLA-A2 and HLA-A3, these alleles cover more than 95% of the Caucasian population. Several allele-specific parameters were determined for each assay. Using these assays, we identified novel HLA class I high-affinity binding peptides from HIVpol, p53, PRAME, and minor histocompatibility antigen HA-1. Thus these convenient and accurate peptide-binding assays will be useful for the identification of putative cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes presented on a diverse array of HLA class I molecules. PMID:12559627

  20. The Monospecificity of Novel Anti-HLA-E Monoclonal Antibodies Enables Reliable Immunodiagnosis, Immunomodulation of HLA-E, and Upregulation of CD8+ T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Mepur H; Terasaki, Paul I; Pham, Tho; Jucaud, Vadim

    2015-06-01

    In human cancers, over-expression of HLA-E is marked by gene expression. However, immunolocalization of HLA-E on tumor cells is impeded by the HLA-Ia reactivity of commercial anti-HLA-E monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). So there was a clear need to develop monospecific anti-HLA-E MAbs for reliable immunodiagnosis of HLA-E, particularly considering the prognostic relevance of HLA-E in human cancer. HLA-E overexpression is correlated with disease progression and poor survival of patients, both of which are attributed to the suppression of anti-tumor activity of cytotoxic T cells mediated by HLA-E. The suppression mechanism involves the binding of HLA-E-specific amino acids located on the α1 and α2 helices of HLA-E to the inhibitory receptors (CD94/NKG2a) on CD8+ T lymphocytes. An anti-HLA-E MAb that recognizes these HLA-E-specific sequences can not only be a monospecific MAb with potential for specific immunolocalization of HLA-E but can also block the sequences from interacting with the CD94/NKG2a receptors. We therefore developed several clones that secrete such HLA-E-specific MAbs; then we assessed the ability of the MAbs to bind to the amino acid sequences interacting with the CD94/NKG2a receptors by inhibiting them from binding to HLA-E with peptides that inhibit receptor binding. Elucidation of the immunomodulatory capabilities of these monospecific MAbs showed that they can induce proliferation of CD8+ T cells with or without co-stimulation. These novel MAbs can serve a dual role in combating cancer by blocking interaction of HLA-E with CD94/NKG2a and by promoting proliferation of both non-activated and activated CD8+ cytotoxic αβ T cells. PMID:26090591

  1. Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Regulations of the HLA-G Gene

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Erick C.; Veiga-Castelli, Luciana C.; Yaghi, Layale; Donadi, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    HLA-G has a relevant role in immune response regulation. The overall structure of the HLA-G coding region has been maintained during the evolution process, in which most of its variable sites are synonymous mutations or coincide with introns, preserving major functional HLA-G properties. The HLA-G promoter region is different from the classical class I promoters, mainly because (i) it lacks regulatory responsive elements for IFN-γ and NF-κB, (ii) the proximal promoter region (within 200 bases from the first translated ATG) does not mediate transactivation by the principal HLA class I transactivation mechanisms, and (iii) the presence of identified alternative regulatory elements (heat shock, progesterone and hypoxia-responsive elements) and unidentified responsive elements for IL-10, glucocorticoids, and other transcription factors is evident. At least three variable sites in the 3′ untranslated region have been studied that may influence HLA-G expression by modifying mRNA stability or microRNA binding sites, including the 14-base pair insertion/deletion, +3142C/G and +3187A/G polymorphisms. Other polymorphic sites have been described, but there are no functional studies on them. The HLA-G coding region polymorphisms might influence isoform production and at least two null alleles with premature stop codons have been described. We reviewed the structure of the HLA-G promoter region and its implication in transcriptional gene control, the structure of the HLA-G 3′UTR and the major actors of the posttranscriptional gene control, and, finally, the presence of regulatory elements in the coding region. PMID:24741620

  2. Infection and HLA-G Molecules in Nasal Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Roberta; Malagutti, Nicola; Bortolotti, Daria; Gentili, Valentina; Rotola, Antonella; Fainardi, Enrico; Pezzolo, Teresa; Aimoni, Claudia; Pelucchi, Stefano; Di Luca, Dario; Pastore, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Sinonasal polyposis (SNP) is a chronic inflammatory pathology with an unclear aetiopathogenesis. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is one candidate for the development of SNP for its epithelial cell trophism, hyperproliferative effect, and the induction of immune-modulatory molecules as HLA-G. We enrolled 10 patients with SNP without concomitant allergic diseases (SNP-WoAD), 10 patients with SNP and suffering from allergic diseases (SNP-WAD), and 10 control subjects who underwent rhinoplasty. We analyzed the presence of high- and low-risk HPV DNA and the expression of membrane HLA-G (mHLA-G) and IL-10 receptor (IL-10R) and of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) and IL-10 by polyp epithelial cells. The results showed the presence of HPV-11 in 50% of SNP-WoAD patients (OR:5.5), all characterized by a relapsing disease. HPV-11 infection was absent in nonrelapsing SNP-WoAD patients, in SNP-WAD patients and in controls, supporting the hypothesis that HPV-11 increases risk of relapsing disease. HPV-11 positive SNP-WoAD patients presented with mHLA-G and IL-10R on epithelial cells from nasal polyps and showed secretion of sHLA-G and IL-10 in culture supernatants. No HLA-G expression was observed in HPV negative polyps. These data highlight new aspects of polyposis aetiopathogenesis and suggest HPV-11 and HLA-G/IL-10 presence as prognostic markers in the follow-up of SNP-WoAD. PMID:24741599

  3. The HLA genomic loci map: expression, interaction, diversity and disease.

    PubMed

    Shiina, Takashi; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Kulski, Jerzy K

    2009-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) super-locus is a genomic region in the chromosomal position 6p21 that encodes the six classical transplantation HLA genes and at least 132 protein coding genes that have important roles in the regulation of the immune system as well as some other fundamental molecular and cellular processes. This small segment of the human genome has been associated with more than 100 different diseases, including common diseases, such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, asthma and various other autoimmune disorders. The first complete and continuous HLA 3.6 Mb genomic sequence was reported in 1999 with the annotation of 224 gene loci, including coding and non-coding genes that were reviewed extensively in 2004. In this review, we present (1) an updated list of all the HLA gene symbols, gene names, expression status, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) numbers, including new genes, and latest changes to gene names and symbols, (2) a regional analysis of the extended class I, class I, class III, class II and extended class II subregions, (3) a summary of the interspersed repeats (retrotransposons and transposons), (4) examples of the sequence diversity between different HLA haplotypes, (5) intra- and extra-HLA gene interactions and (6) some of the HLA gene expression profiles and HLA genes associated with autoimmune and infectious diseases. Overall, the degrees and types of HLA super-locus coordinated gene expression profiles and gene variations have yet to be fully elucidated, integrated and defined for the processes involved with normal cellular and tissue physiology, inflammatory and immune responses, and autoimmune and infectious diseases. PMID:19158813

  4. Relative Resistance of HLA-B to Downregulation by Naturally Occurring HIV-1 Nef Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mahiti, Macdonald; Toyoda, Mako; Jia, Xiaofei; Kuang, Xiaomei T.; Mwimanzi, Francis; Mwimanzi, Philip; Walker, Bruce D.; Xiong, Yong; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Brockman, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Nef binds to the cytoplasmic region of HLA-A and HLA-B and downregulates these molecules from the surface of virus-infected cells, thus evading immune detection by CD8+ T cells. Polymorphic residues within the HLA cytoplasmic region may affect Nef’s downregulation activity. However, the effects of HLA polymorphisms on recognition by primary Nef isolates remain elusive, as do the specific Nef regions responsible for downregulation of HLA-A versus HLA-B. Here, we examined 46 Nef clones isolated from chronically HIV-1 subtype B-infected subjects for their ability to downregulate various HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C molecules on the surface of virus-infected cells. Overall, HLA-B exhibited greater resistance to Nef-mediated downregulation than HLA-A, regardless of the cell type examined. As expected, no Nef clone downregulated HLA-C. Importantly, the differential abilities of patient-derived Nef clones to downregulate HLA-A and HLA-B correlated inversely with the sensitivities of HIV-infected target cells to recognition by effector cells expressing an HIV-1 Gag-specific T cell receptor. Nef codon function analysis implicated amino acid variation at position 202 (Nef-202) in differentially affecting the ability to downregulate HLA-A and HLA-B, an observation that was subsequently confirmed by experiments using Nef mutants constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The in silico and mutagenesis analyses further suggested that Nef-202 may interact with the C-terminal Cys-Lys-Val residues of HLA-A, which are absent in HLA-B. Taken together, the results show that natural polymorphisms within Nef modulate its interaction with natural polymorphisms in the HLA cytoplasmic tails, thereby affecting the efficiency of HLA downregulation and consequent recognition by HIV-specific T cells. These results thus extend our understanding of this complex pathway of retroviral immune evasion. PMID:26787826

  5. Sequence-based definition of eight short tandem repeat loci located within the HLA-region in an Austrian population.

    PubMed

    Dauber, Eva-Maria; Wenda, Sabine; Schwartz-Jungl, Elisabeth Maria; Glock, Barbara; Mayr, Wolfgang R

    2015-01-01

    Sequenced allelic ladders are a prerequisite for reliable genotyping of short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphisms and consistent results across instrument platforms. For eight STR-loci located on the short arm of chromosome 6 (6p21.3), a sequenced based nomenclature was established according to international recommendations. Publicly available reference DNA samples were sequenced enabling interested laboratories to construct their own allelic ladders. Three tetrameric (D6S2691, D6S2678, DQIV), one trimeric (D6S2906) and four dimeric repeat loci (D6S2972, D6S2792, D6S2789, D6S273) were investigated. Apart from the very complex sequence structure at the DQIV locus, three loci showed a compound and four loci a simple repeat pattern. In the flanking regions of some loci additional single nucleotide and insertion/deletion polymorphisms occurred as well as sequence polymorphisms within the repeat region of alleles with the same length. In an Austrian Caucasoid population sample (n=293) between eight and 22 alleles were found. No significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg expectations was observed, the power of discrimination ranged from 0.826 to 0.978. The loci cover the HLA-coding region from HLA-A to HLA-DQB1 and can be used for a better definition of HLA haplotypes for population and disease association studies, recombination point mapping, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation as well as for identity and relationship testing. PMID:25450788

  6. [The HLA antigen system in patients with pneumoconiosis].

    PubMed

    Kleĭner, A I; Makotchenko, V M; Nabrinskiĭ, S I; Prilipskaia, N I; Tkach, S I

    1992-01-01

    The antigenic HLA spectra, loci A, B and C, were explored in 102 patients suffering from pneumoconiosis of workers exposed to dust in machine building. Significant frequency differences were discovered in some antigens and their complexes (AI; A I B 8; Bw35 Cw4) between the patients and control group subjects (112 healthy persons). The patients with uncomplicated pneumoconiosis and coniotuberculosis manifested appreciable differences in the antigenic HLA spectra. The authors propose an algorithm of predicting risk at pneumoconiosis as well as risk at coniotuberculosis, resting on the results of the typing of the antigenic HLA spectra. PMID:1523545

  7. Development of a high-resolution NGS-based HLA-typing and analysis pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Wittig, Michael; Anmarkrud, Jarl A.; Kässens, Jan C.; Koch, Simon; Forster, Michael; Ellinghaus, Eva; Hov, Johannes R.; Sauer, Sascha; Schimmler, Manfred; Ziemann, Malte; Görg, Siegfried; Jacob, Frank; Karlsen, Tom H.; Franke, Andre

    2015-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex contains the most polymorphic genes in the human genome. The classical HLA class I and II genes define the specificity of adaptive immune responses. Genetic variation at the HLA genes is associated with susceptibility to autoimmune and infectious diseases and plays a major role in transplantation medicine and immunology. Currently, the HLA genes are characterized using Sanger- or next-generation sequencing (NGS) of a limited amplicon repertoire or labeled oligonucleotides for allele-specific sequences. High-quality NGS-based methods are in proprietary use and not publicly available. Here, we introduce the first highly automated open-kit/open-source HLA-typing method for NGS. The method employs in-solution targeted capturing of the classical class I (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C) and class II HLA genes (HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, HLA-DPA1, HLA-DPB1). The calling algorithm allows for highly confident allele-calling to three-field resolution (cDNA nucleotide variants). The method was validated on 357 commercially available DNA samples with known HLA alleles obtained by classical typing. Our results showed on average an accurate allele call rate of 0.99 in a fully automated manner, identifying also errors in the reference data. Finally, our method provides the flexibility to add further enrichment target regions. PMID:25753671

  8. Clinical and immunological significance of HLA-E in stem cell transplantation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Wieten, L; Mahaweni, N M; Voorter, C E M; Bos, G M J; Tilanus, M G J

    2014-12-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-E (HLA-E) is a nonclassical HLA class I molecule that canonically binds peptides derived from the leader sequence of classical HLA class I. HLA-E can also bind peptides from stress protein [e.g. heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60)] and pathogens, illustrating the importance of HLA-E for anti-viral and anti-tumor immunity. Like classical HLA class I molecules, HLA-E is ubiquitously expressed, however, it is characterized by only a very limited sequence variability and two dominant protein forms have been described (HLA-E*01:01 and HLA-E*01:03). HLA-E influences both the innate and the adaptive arms of the immune system by the engagement of inhibitory (e.g. NKG2A) and activating receptors [e.g. αβ T cell receptor (αβTCR) or NKG2C] on NK cells and CD8 T cells. The effects of HLA-E on the cellular immune response are therefore complex and not completely understood yet. Here, we aim to provide an overview of the immunological and clinical relevance of HLA-E and HLA-E polymorphism in stem cell transplantation and in cancer. We review novel insights in the mechanism via which HLA-E expression levels are controlled and how the cellular immune response in transplantation and cancer is influenced by HLA-E. PMID:25413103

  9. Interplay between Immune responses to HLA and Non-HLA self-antigens in allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Angaswamy, Nataraju; Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Sarma, Nayan J; Subramanian, Vijay; Klein, Christina; Wellen, Jason; Shenoy, Surendra; Chapman, William C; Mohanakumar, T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies strongly suggest an increasing role for immune responses against self-antigens (Ags) which are not encoded by the major histocompatibility complex in the immunopathogenesis of allograft rejection. Although, improved surgical techniques coupled with improved methods to detect and avoid sensitization against donor human leukocyte antigen (HLA) have improved the immediate and short term function of transplanted organs. However, acute and chronic rejection still remains a vexing problem for the long term function of the transplanted organ. Immediately following organ transplantation, several factors both immune and non immune mechanisms lead to the development of local inflammatory milieu which sets the stage for allograft rejection. Traditionally, development of antibodies (Abs) against mismatched donor HLA have been implicated in the development of Ab mediated rejection. However, recent studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that development of humoral and cellular immune responses against non-HLA self-Ags may contribute in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection. There are reports demonstrating that immune responses to self-Ags especially Abs to the self-Ags as well as cellular immune responses especially through IL17 has significant pro-fibrotic properties leading to chronic allograft failure. This review summarizes recent studies demonstrating the role for immune responses to self-Ags in allograft immunity leading to rejection as well as present recent evidence suggesting there is interplay between allo- and autoimmunity leading to allograft dysfunction. PMID:23876679

  10. HLA-B27-restricted antigen presentation in the absence of tapasin reveals polymorphism in mechanisms of HLA class I peptide loading.

    PubMed

    Peh, C A; Burrows, S R; Barnden, M; Khanna, R; Cresswell, P; Moss, D J; McCluskey, J

    1998-05-01

    Tapasin is a resident ER protein believed to be critical for antigen presentation by HLA class I molecules. We demonstrate that allelic variation in MHC class I molecules influences their dependence on tapasin for peptide loading and antigen presentation. HLA-B*2705 molecules achieve high levels of surface expression and present specific viral peptides in the absence of tapasin. In contrast, HLA-B*4402 molecules are highly dependent upon human tapasin for these functions, while HLA-B8 molecules are intermediate in this regard. Significantly, HLA-B*2705 like HLA-B*4402, requires tapasin to associate efficiently with TAP (transporters associated with antigen processing). The unusual ability of HLA-B*2705 to form peptide complexes without associating with TAP or tapasin confers flexibility in the repertoire of peptides presented by this molecule. We speculate that these properties might contribute to the role of HLA-B27 in conferring susceptibility to inflammatory spondyloarthropathies. PMID:9620674

  11. Identification of a novel HLA-A allele, HLA-A*01:195, in a UAE national.

    PubMed

    Abdrabou, Wael; Witzel, Ini-Isabée; Paduch, Agnieszka; Tay, Guan; Alsafar, Habiba

    2016-07-01

    A novel human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-A allele, HLA-A*01:195, was identified by sequence-based typing (SBT) in a UAE national subject. The novel allele is identical to its closest known allele, HLA-A*01:01:01:01, in exon 2, 3 and 4, except for a single nucleotide mutation of A to G at position 442 in exon 3 (codon 124 in the α2 domain of the α chain of the mature protein). This A to G mutation results in an amino acid change of isoleucine #124 to valine. PMID:27184862

  12. Interaction between HLA-B60 and HLA-B27 as a Better Predictor of Ankylosing Spondylitis in a Taiwanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yu-Wen; Wen, Ya-Feng; Wang, Wen-Chang; Wong, Ruey-Hong; Lu, Hsing-Fang; van Gaalen, Floris A.; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2015-01-01

    Objective Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a form of chronic inflammatory spondyloarthritis (SpA) that causes pain and stiffness in spines or joints. Human leukocyte antigen B27 (HLA-B27) and B60 (HLA-B60) have been reported as major genetic risk factors of AS. In addition, rs13202464, located on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, showed high sensitivity (98.7%) and specificity (98.0%) for HLA-B27. Design The aim of our study is to test whether the interaction between HLA-B60 and HLA-B27 (rs13202464) can serve as a better predictor of AS. We have genotyped HLA-B60 and rs13202464 among 471 patients with AS and 557 healthy subjects. Combined risk factors were investigated to test the biological interaction. Results Our results indicated that the relative risk (RR) for HLA-B27+/HLA-B60− was 152 (95% CI 91 to 255) and it increased to 201 (95% CI 85 to 475) in HLA-B27+/HLA-B60+ patients (with HLA-B27−/HLA-B60− as reference). Combinational analysis of two risk factors (HLA-B27+/HLA-B60+) showed a relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) of 46.79 (95% CI: -117.58 to 211.16), attributable proportion (AP) of 0.23 (95% CI: -0.41 to 0.88) and a synergy index (S) of 1.31 (95% CI: 0.56 to 3.04). Conclusion In conclusion, genetic interaction analysis revealed that the interaction between HLA-B60 and HLA-B27 is a better marker for the risk of AS susceptibility in a Taiwanese population. PMID:26469786

  13. HLA ASSOCIATIONS IN OBESE WHITE AND BLACK ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Merlin G.; Walton, Dominique; Zhu, Weitong; Niblack, Gary

    2016-01-01

    We summarized HLA-A and -B data from 1095 black and white adult men and women with or without obesity to determine if specific HLA tissue types are overrepresented in obese individuals compared with nonobese. None of the three HLA types (Aw30, B18, Bw35) previously reported to relate to obesity was overrepresented in obese subjects in our study. However, B14 and B41 haplotypes were overrepresented in obese white men compared with nonobese men, and B7 was overrepresented in obese black men compared with nonobese men. Additional research will be required to confirm the HLA associations we found and to determine if methodologic differences could account for the differences among the previous studies.

  14. [Pitfalls in interpreting anti-HLA antibodies by Luminex technology].

    PubMed

    Moalic-Allain, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    The Luminex technology has become an important tool for HLA antibody screening and identification. This is the most sensitive technology to detect HLA antibodies for transplant patients and patients on awaiting list, and it has ushered a new strategy to determine HLA compatibility between donor and recipient. Moreover, the clinical relevance of all detected anti-HLA antibodies is not well understood, because this technique was shown to be prone to many artefacts or interferences, leading to a complicated interpretation for biologists and clinicians. Our objective in this article is to provide a careful consideration about this solid phase assay, and to focus attention on raised questions about technical performance and interpretation of the results. We should keep in mind that our results could change the clinical management of sensitized patients, their aptitude to receive a graft, and their follow-up. PMID:24736137

  15. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies for high resolution HLA typing.

    PubMed

    Cereb, Nezih; Kim, Hwa Ran; Ryu, Jaejun; Yang, Soo Young

    2015-12-01

    This communication describes our experience in large-scale G group-level high resolution HLA typing using three different DNA sequencing platforms - ABI 3730 xl, Illumina MiSeq and PacBio RS II. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies, so-called next generation sequencing (NGS), have brought breakthroughs in deciphering the genetic information in all living species at a large scale and at an affordable level. The NGS DNA indexing system allows sequencing multiple genes for large number of individuals in a single run. Our laboratory has adopted and used these technologies for HLA molecular testing services. We found that each sequencing technology has its own strengths and weaknesses, and their sequencing performances complement each other. HLA genes are highly complex and genotyping them is quite challenging. Using these three sequencing platforms, we were able to meet all requirements for G group-level high resolution and high volume HLA typing. PMID:26423536

  16. Transient Astronomical Events as Inspiration Sources of Medieval Art. III: the 13th and 14th Centuries, and the case of the French "Ordre de L'Étoile"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bònoli, F.; Incerti, M.; Polcaro, V. F.

    2015-05-01

    Going ahead in our long-term project of analysis of the role of transient astronomical events as inspirational sources of medieval art, we extend our interest towards the 13th and 14th centuries, epochs of strong changes either in society, art or science. It is our aim to verify if the relationship we found in the 11th century between the number of artworks where a star is represented, and astonishing transient astronomical events was, in this new situation, still valid. Moreover, in order to check the influence of astronomical events on the 14th-century social and cultural environment, we focus on the case of the Ordre de l'Étoile, a chivalrous society founded by John II of France (Jan le Bon, roi de France) at the end of 1351, looking in ancient chronicles for some relevant contemporary astronomical event as an inspiration source for the "star" in the Order's name, in the garb of its knights and in its motto.

  17. Genetic study confirms association of HLA-DPA1(∗)01:03 subtype with ankylosing spondylitis in HLA-B27-positive populations.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Peña, Roberto; Castro-Santos, Patricia; Aransay, Ana M; Brüges-Armas, Jacome; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2013-06-01

    The association of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has been known for over 38 years. However, it is not the only gene associated with AS. The aim of this study was to confirm the association of HLA markers around HLA-DPA1/DPB1 region with AS in HLA-B27 positive populations. Five SNPs (rs422544, rs6914849, rs92777535, rs3128968 and rs2295119) from the HLA-DPA1/DPB1 region were genotyped in 340 individuals HLA-B27-positive from Portugal (137 AS patients and 203 healthy controls). Characterizations of HLA-DPA1/DPB1 alleles were also performed. rs422544 revealed a significant association with AS (P<0.05) and sliding windows (SW) analysis showed association of some groups of adjacent SNPs within HLA-DPA1/DPB1 region with AS (P<0.05). We also found association of the HLA-DPA1(∗)01:03 allele with AS (P<0.05). This is the first study that confirms the association of HLA markers and haplotypes around HLA-DPA1 and HLA-DPB1 with AS. PMID:23459078

  18. Does Rh Immune Globulin Suppress HLA Sensitization in Pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Richard M.; Schlumpf, Karen S.; Wright, David J.; Triulzi, Darrell J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND How Rh immune globulin (RhIG) prevents sensitization to D antigen is unclear. If RhIG Fc delivers a nonspecific immunosuppressive signal, then RhIG may inhibit sensitization to antigens other than D. HLA antibody prevalence was compared in previously pregnant RhD negative versus RhD positive women to investigate whether RhIG suppresses HLA sensitization. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS In the Leukocyte Antibody Prevalence Study (LAPS)1, 7,920 volunteer blood donors were screened for anti-HLA antibodies and surveyed about prior pregnancies and transfusions. A secondary analysis of the LAPS database was performed. RESULTS RhD negative women ≤40 years old (presumed to have received antenatal ± postpartum RhIG in all pregnancies) had a significantly lower HLA sensitization rate than RhD positive women (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.40–0.83). When stratified by deliveries (1, 2, 3, or ≥4), RhD negative women ≤40 were HLA sensitized less often than RhD positive women in every case. In contrast, a clear relationship between RhD type and HLA sensitization was not seen in older previously pregnant women whose childbearing years are presumed to have preceded the use of routine RhIG prophylaxis. In a multivariable logistic regression model, RhD negative women ≤40 years old remained significantly less likely to be HLA sensitized compared with RhD positive women after adjusting for parity, time from last pregnancy, lost pregnancies, and transfusions (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.34–0.88). CONCLUSION Consistent with a nonspecific immunosuppressive effect of RhIG, younger previously pregnant RhD negative women were less likely than previously pregnant RhD positive women to be HLA sensitized. PMID:23252646

  19. HLA-A Disparities Illustrate Challenges for Ranking the Impact of HLA Mismatches on Bone Marrow Transplant Outcomes in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Baxter-Lowe, Lee Ann; Maiers, Martin; Spellman, Stephen R.; Haagenson, Michael D.; Wang, Tao; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Marsh, Steven G.E.; Horowitz, Mary; Hurley, Carolyn Katovich

    2009-01-01

    HLA disparity between hematopoietic stem cell donors and recipients is one of the most important factors influencing transplant outcomes, but there are no well accepted guidelines to aid in selecting the optimal donor amongst several HLA mismatched donors. In this report, HLA-A is used as a model to illustrate factors that are barriers to delineating the relationship between specific HLA mismatches and transplant outcomes in the United States. Patients in this investigation received transplants for hematological malignancies that were facilitated by the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) between 1990 and 2002 (n=4,226). High resolution HLA typing was performed for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DQA1, -DQB1, -DPA1 and -DPB1. HLA-A mismatches were observed in 745 donor-recipient pairs and 62% of these pairs also had disparities at HLA-B, -C and/or -DRB1. The HLA-A mismatches involved 190 different combinations of HLA-A alleles and 51% of these were observed in only one pair. Addition of a single HLA-A disparity when HLA-B, -C, and -DRB1 were matched (n=282) was associated with increased mortality (OR=1.32, CI 1.07-1.63). When HLA-B, -C, and DRB1 were matched, the most frequent HLA-A mismatches were HLAA*0201:0205 (n=28), HLA-A *0301:0302 (n=15), HLA-A *0201:0206 (n=15), HLAA *0201:6801 (n=12), HLA-A*0101:1101 (n=11) and HLA-A*0101:0201 (n=10). There were no statistically significant relationships between any of these disparities and transplant outcomes (engraftment, acute and chronic GVHD, relapse, transplant-related mortality or overall survival) when adjustments for multiple comparisons were considered. Achieving 80% power to detect an effect of any one of these six HLA-A disparities on survival is estimated to require a total transplant population of 11,000 to more than one million U.S. donor-recipient pairs depending upon the HLA disparity. Thus, alternative approaches are required to develop a clinically relevant ranking system for specific HLA disparities in the U

  20. A novel and major association of HLA-C in Graves' disease that eclipses the classical HLA-DRB1 effect.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Matthew J; Howson, Joanna M M; Heward, Joanne M; Carr-Smith, Jackie; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

    2007-09-15

    Association of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-encoded HLA-DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 haplotype with Graves' disease (GD) has been known for several years. Recent evidence from other autoimmune diseases has suggested that the HLA class I encoded HLA-B/-C molecules could be conferring HLA-DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 independent effects on disease. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of HLA-B and HLA-C in GD in a white ethnic group of 806 patients with GD and 487 control subjects from the UK. Of the five loci (HLA-B, -C, -DRB1, -DQA1, -DQB1), HLA-C demonstrated the strongest association (P = 1.20 x 10(-20)) with HLA-C*07 predisposing [OR = 1.63, 95% CI (1.23-2.17)] and both HLA-C*03 [OR = 0.54, 95% CI (0.38-0.77)], HLA-C*16 [OR = 0.36, 95% CI (0.21-0.61)] protective. The other loci were then tested for HLA-C-independent associations. HLA-B was found to be associated independently of HLA-C (P = 1.54 x 10(-6)) with the other three loci, HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DQA1, also improving the model but with less confidence (P > 10(-5)). This study has for the first time provided evidence of a primary association of HLA-C, and to a lesser extent HLA-B, with GD. Class II loci could still have effects on GD, but they appear smaller than the HLA-C association. A full investigation of the MHC region, including all class I and II loci is now required. Our results point to a primary role for class I-mediated responses in GD, a condition classically assumed to be a straightforward HLA-class II-restricted autoantibody response to the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor. PMID:17597093

  1. HLA-C expression levels define permissible mismatches in hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Petersdorf, Effie W; Gooley, Theodore A; Malkki, Mari; Bacigalupo, Andrea P; Cesbron, Anne; Du Toit, Ernette; Ehninger, Gerhard; Egeland, Torstein; Fischer, Gottfried F; Gervais, Thibaut; Haagenson, Michael D; Horowitz, Mary M; Hsu, Katharine; Jindra, Pavel; Madrigal, Alejandro; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Ringdén, Olle; Schroeder, Marlis L; Spellman, Stephen R; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Velardi, Andrea; Witt, Campbell S; O'Huigin, Colm; Apps, Richard; Carrington, Mary

    2014-12-18

    Life-threatening graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) limits the use of HLA-C-mismatched unrelated donors in transplantation. Clinicians lack criteria for donor selection when HLA-C-mismatched donors are a patient's only option for cure. We examined the role for HLA-C expression levels to identify permissible HLA-C mismatches. The median fluorescence intensity, a proxy of HLA-C expression, was assigned to each HLA-C allotype in 1975 patients and their HLA-C-mismatched unrelated transplant donors. The association of outcome with the level of expression of patients' and donors' HLA-C allotypes was evaluated in multivariable models. Increasing expression level of the patient's mismatched HLA-C allotype was associated with increased risks of grades III to IV acute GVHD, nonrelapse mortality, and mortality. Increasing expression level among HLA-C mismatches with residue 116 or residue 77/80 mismatching was associated with increased nonrelapse mortality. The immunogenicity of HLA-C mismatches in unrelated donor transplantation is influenced by the expression level of the patient's mismatched HLA-C allotype. HLA-C expression levels provide new information on mismatches that should be avoided and extend understanding of HLA-C-mediated immune responses in human disease. PMID:25323824

  2. HLA-C expression levels define permissible mismatches in hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gooley, Theodore A.; Malkki, Mari; Bacigalupo, Andrea P.; Cesbron, Anne; Du Toit, Ernette; Ehninger, Gerhard; Egeland, Torstein; Fischer, Gottfried F.; Gervais, Thibaut; Haagenson, Michael D.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Hsu, Katharine; Jindra, Pavel; Madrigal, Alejandro; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Ringdén, Olle; Schroeder, Marlis L.; Spellman, Stephen R.; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Velardi, Andrea; Witt, Campbell S.; O’Huigin, Colm; Apps, Richard; Carrington, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Life-threatening graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) limits the use of HLA-C-mismatched unrelated donors in transplantation. Clinicians lack criteria for donor selection when HLA-C-mismatched donors are a patient’s only option for cure. We examined the role for HLA-C expression levels to identify permissible HLA-C mismatches. The median fluorescence intensity, a proxy of HLA-C expression, was assigned to each HLA-C allotype in 1975 patients and their HLA-C-mismatched unrelated transplant donors. The association of outcome with the level of expression of patients’ and donors’ HLA-C allotypes was evaluated in multivariable models. Increasing expression level of the patient’s mismatched HLA-C allotype was associated with increased risks of grades III to IV acute GVHD, nonrelapse mortality, and mortality. Increasing expression level among HLA-C mismatches with residue 116 or residue 77/80 mismatching was associated with increased nonrelapse mortality. The immunogenicity of HLA-C mismatches in unrelated donor transplantation is influenced by the expression level of the patient’s mismatched HLA-C allotype. HLA-C expression levels provide new information on mismatches that should be avoided and extend understanding of HLA-C-mediated immune responses in human disease. PMID:25323824

  3. HLA-B27/microbial mimicry: an in vivo analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Kapasi, K; Chui, B; Inman, R D

    1992-01-01

    The association between three major spondyloarthritic diseases, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, and reactive arthritis, and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class 1 antigen HLA-B27 is well documented. The hypothesis of cross-reactivity between HLA-B27 and the antecedent infection-causing Gram-negative pathogens such as Salmonella, Shigella and Yersinia has been suggested by in vitro studies employing monoclonal antibodies. We have examined the possibility of such cross-reactivity in vivo using various rabbit immune sera and patient sera as the source of cross-reacting antibody. Mouse L cells were transfected with HLA-A3 or HLA-B27 and used as a source of antigen. Western blot analysis employing denatured antigen, FACS analysis employing native antigen and immunoprecipitation studies were undertaken to detect cross-reacting antibodies generated in vivo to HLA-B27 antigen. Antibodies generated in vivo by infection in patients or immunization in animals against arthritogenic bacteria did not demonstrate any cross-reactivity with HLA-B27 by any of the methods used. As defined by the humoral immune response, molecular mimicry appears unlikely to explain the role of B27 in the pathogenesis of reactive arthritis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:1478690

  4. Utility of HLA Antibody Testing in Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Konvalinka, Ana

    2015-01-01

    HLA antigens are polymorphic proteins expressed on donor kidney allograft endothelium and are critical targets for recipient immune recognition. HLA antibodies are risk factors for acute and chronic rejection and allograft loss. Solid-phase immunoassays for HLA antibody detection represent a major advance in sensitivity and specificity over cell-based methods and are widely used in organ allocation and pretransplant risk assessment. Post-transplant, development of de novo donor–specific HLA antibodies and/or increase in donor-specific antibodies from pretransplant levels are associated with adverse outcomes. Although single antigen bead assays have allowed sensitive detection of recipient HLA antibodies and their specificities, a number of interpretive considerations must be appreciated to understand test results in clinical and research contexts. This review, which is especially relevant for clinicians caring for transplant patients, discusses the technical aspects of single antigen bead assays, emphasizes their quantitative limitations, and explores the utility of HLA antibody testing in identifying and managing important pre- and post-transplant clinical outcomes. PMID:25804279

  5. Pathogen selection drives nonoverlapping associations between HLA loci

    PubMed Central

    Penman, Bridget S.; Ashby, Ben; Buckee, Caroline O.; Gupta, Sunetra

    2013-01-01

    Pathogen-mediated selection is commonly invoked as an explanation for the exceptional polymorphism of the HLA gene cluster, but its role in generating and maintaining linkage disequilibrium between HLA loci is unclear. Here we show that pathogen-mediated selection can promote nonrandom associations between HLA loci. These associations may be distinguished from linkage disequilibrium generated by other population genetic processes by virtue of being nonoverlapping as well as nonrandom. Within our framework, immune selection forces the pathogen population to exist as a set of antigenically discrete strains; this then drives nonoverlapping associations between the HLA loci through which recognition of these antigens is mediated. We demonstrate that this signature of pathogen-driven selection can be observed in existing data, and propose that analyses of HLA population structure can be combined with laboratory studies to help us uncover the functional relationships between HLA alleles. In a wider coevolutionary context, our framework also shows that the inclusion of memory immunity can lead to robust cyclical dynamics across a range of host–pathogen systems. PMID:24225852

  6. IMGT/HLA and the Immuno Polymorphism Database.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James; Halliwell, Jason A; Marsh, Steven G E

    2014-01-01

    The IMGT/HLA Database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/imgt/hla/) was first released over 15 years ago, providing the HLA community with a searchable repository of highly curated HLA sequences. The HLA complex is located within the 6p21.3 region of human chromosome 6 and contains more than 220 genes of diverse function. Many of the genes encode proteins of the immune system and are highly polymorphic, with some genes currently having over 3,000 known allelic variants. The Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD) (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/) expands on this model, with a further set of specialist databases related to the study of polymorphic genes in the immune system. The IPD project works with specialist groups or nomenclature committees who provide and curate individual sections before they are submitted to IPD for online publication. IPD currently consists of four databases: IPD-KIR contains the allelic sequences of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors; IPD-MHC is a database of sequences of the major histocompatibility complex of different species; IPD-HPA, alloantigens expressed only on platelets; and IPD-ESTDAB, which provides access to the European Searchable Tumour Cell-Line Database, a cell bank of immunologically characterized melanoma cell lines. Through the work of the HLA Informatics Group and in collaboration with the European Bioinformatics Institute we are able to provide public access to this data through the website http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/. PMID:25048120

  7. Association between sHLA-G and HLA-G 14-bp deletion/insertion polymorphism in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Zidi, Inès; Ben Yahia, Hamza; Bortolotti, Daria; Mouelhi, Leila; Laaribi, Ahmed Baligh; Ayadi, Shema; Zidi, Nour; Houissa, Fatma; Debbech, Radhouane; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Najjar, Taoufik; Di Luca, Dario; Rizzo, Roberta

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the HLA-G 14-bp deletion/insertion (Del/Ins) polymorphism and soluble (s) HLA-G production in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). We analyzed also the sHLA-G molecules by ELISA and western blot in plasma samples. Among unselected patients, the 14-bp Del/Ins polymorphism was not significantly associated with increased CD risk neither for alleles (P = 0.371) nor for genotypes (P = 0.625). However, a significant association was reported between the 14-bp Del/Ins polymorphism and CD, in particular in young-onset CD patients for alleles [P = 0.020, odds ratio (OR) = 2.438, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.13-5.25] but not with adult-onset CD patients. A significant association was reported concerning the genotype Ins/Ins for young-onset CD patients (P = 0.029, OR = 3.257, 95% CI: 1.08-9.77). We observed also a significant increase in sHLA-G measured by ELISA in CD patients compared to controls (P = 0.002). The 14-bp Del/Del and 14-bp Del/Ins genotypes are the high HLA-G producers. Among sHLA-G(positive) patients, 43% of subjects present dimers of HLA-G. The presence of dimers seems to be related to the advanced stages of the disease. The 14-bp Del/Ins polymorphism is associated with an increased risk of CD particularly in young-onset CD patients and controls sHLA-G plasma levels. Dimers of sHLA-G are frequent in advanced disease stages. The above findings indicate that the genetic 14-bp Del/Ins polymorphism in exon 8 of the HLA-G gene is associated with the risk of CD and suggest a role for sHLA-G as a prognostic marker for progressive disease. PMID:25577194

  8. Non-HLA type 1 diabetes genes modulate disease risk together with HLA-DQ and islet autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Maziarz, M; Hagopian, W; Palmer, JP; Sanjeevi, CB; Kockum, I; Breslow, N; Lernmark, Å

    2015-01-01

    The possible interrelations between HLA-DQ, non-HLA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and islet autoantibodies were investigated at clinical onset in 1-34 year old type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients (n=305) and controls (n=203). Among the non-HLA SNPs reported by the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium, 24% were supported in this Swedish replication set including that the increased risk of minor PTPN22 allele and high risk HLA was modified by GAD65 autoantibodies. The association between T1D and the minor AA+AC genotype in ERBB3 gene was stronger among IA-2 autoantibody-positive patients (comparison p=0.047). The association between T1D and the common insulin (AA) genotype was stronger among insulin autoantibody (IAA)-positive patients (comparison p=0.008). In contrast, the association between T1D and unidentified 26471 gene was stronger among IAA-negative (comparison p=0.049) and IA-2 autoantibody-negative (comparison p=0.052) patients. Finally, the association between IL2RA and T1D was stronger among IAA-positive than among IAA-negative patients (comparison p=0.028). These results suggest that the increased risk of T1D by non-HLA genes is often modified by both islet autoantibodies and HLA-DQ. The interactions between non-HLA genes, islet autoantibodies and HLA-DQ should be taken into account in T1D prediction studies as well as in prevention trials aimed at inducing immunological tolerance to islet autoantigens. PMID:26513234

  9. Suppression of allo-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies secreted by B memory cells in vitro: intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) versus a monoclonal anti-HLA-E IgG that mimics HLA-I reactivities of IVIg

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, D; Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Miyazaki, T; Pham, T; Jucaud, V

    2014-01-01

    B memory cells remain in circulation and secrete alloantibodies without antigen exposure > 20 years after alloimmunization postpartum or by transplantation. These long-lived B cells are resistant to cytostatic drugs. Therapeutically, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is administered to reduce allo-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies pre- and post-transplantation, but the mechanism of reduction remains unclear. Recently, we reported that IVIg reacts with several HLA-I alleles and the HLA reactivity of IVIg is lost after its HLA-E reactivity is adsorbed out. Therefore, we have generated an anti-HLA-E monoclonal antibody that mimics the HLA-reactivity of IVIg to investigate whether this antibody suppresses IgG secretion, as does IVIg. B cells were purified from the blood of a woman in whose blood the B memory cells remained without antigen exposure > 20 years after postpartum alloimmunization. The B cells were stimulated with cytokines using a well-defined culture system. The anti-HLA-E monoclonal antibody (mAb) significantly suppressed the allo-HLA class-II IgG produced by the B cells, and that this suppression was far superior to that by IVIg. These findings were confirmed with HLA-I antibody secreted by the immortalized B cell line, developed from the blood of another alloimmunized woman. The binding affinity of the anti-HLA-E mAb for peptide sequences shared (i.e. shared epitopes) between HLA-E and other β2-microglobulin-free HLA heavy chains (open conformers) on the cell surface of B cells may act as a ligand and signal suppression of IgG production of activated B memory cells. We propose that anti-HLA-E monoclonal antibody may also be useful to suppress allo-HLA IgG production in vivo. PMID:24611451

  10. Update of the HLA class I eplet database in the website based registry of antibody-defined HLA epitopes.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, R J

    2014-06-01

    Eplets are small configurations of polymorphic amino acid residues on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules and are considered as essential components of HLA epitopes recognized by antibodies. This report describes a new design of the eplet repertoire in HLA-ABC alleles used in Luminex kits for antibody testing. There were three steps (1): identify all combinations of polymorphic residues with HLA molecular modeling within a 3-Å radius, (2) determine polymorphic residue compositions of 3 Å patches from amino acid sequences of HLA alleles in Luminex panels and (3) annotate eplets from one or more patches present on one allele or shared by the same group of alleles. There are now 270 HLA-ABC eplets in the Registry, of which 219 are in antibody-accessible positions on the molecular surface and 51 are defined solely by residue polymorphisms located below the molecular surface. Each eplet has a list of Luminex and non-Luminex alleles for which mismatch acceptability can be determined. PMID:24828055

  11. Nonmyeloablative HLA-Haploidentical BMT with High-Dose Posttransplantation Cyclophosphamide: Effect of HLA Disparity on Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Kasamon, Yvette L.; Luznik, Leo; Leffell, Mary S.; Kowalski, Jeanne; Tsai, Hua-Ling; Bolanos-Meade, Javier; Morris, Lawrence E.; Crilley, Pamela A.; O’Donnell, Paul V.; Rossiter, Nancy; Huff, Carol Ann; Brodsky, Robert A.; Matsui, William H.; Swinnen, Lode J.; Borrello, Ivan; Powell, Jonathan D.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Jones, Richard J.; Fuchs, Ephraim J.

    2010-01-01

    Although some reports have found increasing HLA disparity between donor and recipient to be associated with fewer relapses after allogeneic blood or marrow transplantation (BMT), this potential benefit has been offset by more graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and nonrelapse mortality. However, the type of GVHD prophylaxis could influence the balance between GVHD toxicity and relapse. We analyzed the impact of greater HLA disparity on outcomes of a specific platform for nonmyeloablative, HLA-haploidentical transplantation. A retrospective analysis was performed on 185 patients with hematologic malignancies enrolled on three similar trials of nonmyeloablative, related donor, haploidentical BMT incorporating high-dose posttransplantation cyclophosphamide for GVHD prophylaxis. No significant association was found between the number of HLA mismatches (HLA-A, -B, -Cw, and -DRB1 combined) and risk of acute grade II–IV GVHD (hazard ratio .89, P = .68 for 3–4 versus fewer antigen mismatches). More mismatching also had no detrimental effect on event-free survival (on multivariate analysis, hazard ratio .60, P = .03 for 3–4 versus fewer antigen mismatches; hazard ratio .55, P = .03 for 3–4 versus fewer allele mismatches). Thus, greater HLA disparity does not appear to worsen overall outcomes after nonmyeloablative haploidentical BMT with high-dose posttransplantation cyclophosphamide. PMID:19925877

  12. The distribution of KIR-HLA functional blocks is different from north to south of Italy.

    PubMed

    Fasano, M E; Rendine, S; Pasi, A; Bontadini, A; Cosentini, E; Carcassi, C; Capittini, C; Cornacchini, G; Espadas de Arias, A; Garbarino, L; Carella, G; Mariotti, M L; Mele, L; Miotti, V; Moscetti, A; Nesci, S; Ozzella, G; Piancatelli, D; Porfirio, B; Riva, M R; Romeo, G; Tagliaferri, C; Lombardo, C; Testi, M; Amoroso, A; Martinetti, M

    2014-03-01

    The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR)-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) interaction represents an example of genetic epistasis, where the concomitant presence of specific genes or alleles encoding receptor-ligand units is necessary for the activity of natural killer (NK) cells. Although KIR and HLA genes segregate independently, they co-evolved under environmental pressures to maintain particular KIR-HLA functional blocks for species survival. We investigated, in 270 Italian healthy individuals, the distribution of KIR and HLA polymorphisms in three climatic areas (from cold north to warm south), to verify their possible geographical stratification. We analyzed the presence of 13 KIR genes and genotyped KIR ligands belonging to HLA class I: HLA-C, HLA-B and HLA-A. We did not observe any genetic stratification for KIR genes and HLA-C ligands in Italy. By contrast, in a north-to-south direction, we found a decreasing trend for the HLA-A3 and HLA-A11 ligands (P = 0.012) and an increasing trend for the HLA-B ligands carrying the Bw4 epitope (P = 0.0003) and the Bw4 Ile80 epitope (P = 0.0005). The HLA-A and HLA-B KIR ligands were in negative linkage disequilibrium (correlation coefficient -0.1211), possibly as a consequence of their similar function in inhibiting NK cells. The distribution of the KIR-HLA functional blocks was different along Italy, as we observed a north-to-south ascending trend for KIR3DL1, when coupled with HLA-B Bw4 ligands (P = 0.0067) and with HLA-B Bw4 Ile80 (P = 0.0027), and a descending trend for KIR3DL2 when coupled with HLA-A3 and HLA-A11 ligands (P = 0.0044). Overall, people from South Italy preferentially use the KIR3DL1-HLA-B Bw4 functional unit, while those from the North Italy equally use both the KIR3DL2-HLA-A3/A11 and the KIR3DL1-HLA-B Bw4 functional units to fight infections. Thus, only KIR3DL receptors, which exert the unique role of microbial sensors through the specific D0 domain, and their cognate

  13. The nucleotide sequence of HLA-B{sup *}2704 reveals a new amino acid substitution in exon 4 which is also present in HLA-B{sup *}2706

    SciTech Connect

    Rudwaleit, M.; Bowness, P.; Wordsworth, P.

    1996-12-31

    The HLA-B27 subtype HLA-B{sup *}2704 is virtually absent in Caucasians but common in Orientals, where it is associated with ankylosing spondylitis. The amino acid sequence of HLA-B{sup *}2704 has been established by peptide mapping and was shown to differ by two amino acids from HLA-B{sup *}2705, HLA-B{sup *}2704 is characterized by a serine for aspartic acid substitution at position 77 and glutamic acid for valine at position 152. To date, however, no nucleotide sequence confirming these changes at the DNA level has been published. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  14. The correlation between HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 gene polymorphisms and cytokines in HPV16 infected women with advanced cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Zhang, Jian; Jia, Zhong-Ming; Li, Ji-Chang; Dong, Chun-Hua; Li, Yong-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the distribution of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles and its correlation with IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10 in HPV16 infected women with advanced cervical carcinoma. Methods: We collected 137 blood samples of cervical carcinoma patients diagnosed by pathology as cervical cancer in stage IIb-IVb before the treatment, and we gathered 175 blood samples of healthy women living in the local. We determined the genetic subtypes of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1, and we measured the concentration of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10. We compared the difference of cytokines in patients with different clinical stages and the healthy in the control group. According to genetic subtypes of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1, we also compared the concentration of cytokine (CK) in different genetic subtypes. Results: Eight HLA-DRB1 alleles and four HLA-DQB1 alleles were found. There were not significant differences between each allele in the concentration of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-6, and IL-10. Conclusion: HLA-DRB1*07, HLA-DQB1*02 and HLA-DQB1*03 were the differentially expressed gene in HPV16 infected patients with advanced cervical cancer. There may be correlations between the occurrence, development of cervical cancer and IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10. PMID:26379968

  15. Soluble HLA-G and HLA-E Levels in Bone Marrow Plasma Samples Are Related to Disease Stage in Neuroblastoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Fabio; Pozzi, Sarah; Carlini, Barbara; Amoroso, Loredana; Pistoia, Vito; Corrias, Maria Valeria

    2016-01-01

    The role of nonclassical HLA-class Ib molecules HLA-G and HLA-E in the progression of Neuroblastoma (NB), the most common pediatric extracranial solid tumor, has been characterized in the last years. Since BM infiltration by NB cells is an adverse prognostic factor, we have here analyzed for the first time the concentration of soluble (s)HLA-G and HLA-E in bone marrow (BM) plasma samples from NB patients at diagnosis and healthy donors. sHLA-G and sHLA-E are present in BM plasma samples, and their levels were similar between NB patients and controls, thus suggesting that these molecules are physiologically released by resident or stromal BM cell populations. This hypothesis was supported by the finding that sHLA-G and sHLA-E levels did not correlate with BM infiltration and other adverse prognostic factors (MYCN amplification and age at diagnosis). In contrast, BM plasma levels of both molecules were higher in patients with metastatic disease than in patients with localized NB, thus suggesting that concentration of these molecules might be correlated with disease progression. The prognostic role of sHLA-G and sHLA-E concentration in the BM plasma for NB patients will be evaluated in future studies, by analyzing the clinical outcome of the same NB patients at follow-up. PMID:27610393

  16. Soluble HLA-G and HLA-E Levels in Bone Marrow Plasma Samples Are Related to Disease Stage in Neuroblastoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Sarah; Carlini, Barbara; Amoroso, Loredana; Corrias, Maria Valeria

    2016-01-01

    The role of nonclassical HLA-class Ib molecules HLA-G and HLA-E in the progression of Neuroblastoma (NB), the most common pediatric extracranial solid tumor, has been characterized in the last years. Since BM infiltration by NB cells is an adverse prognostic factor, we have here analyzed for the first time the concentration of soluble (s)HLA-G and HLA-E in bone marrow (BM) plasma samples from NB patients at diagnosis and healthy donors. sHLA-G and sHLA-E are present in BM plasma samples, and their levels were similar between NB patients and controls, thus suggesting that these molecules are physiologically released by resident or stromal BM cell populations. This hypothesis was supported by the finding that sHLA-G and sHLA-E levels did not correlate with BM infiltration and other adverse prognostic factors (MYCN amplification and age at diagnosis). In contrast, BM plasma levels of both molecules were higher in patients with metastatic disease than in patients with localized NB, thus suggesting that concentration of these molecules might be correlated with disease progression. The prognostic role of sHLA-G and sHLA-E concentration in the BM plasma for NB patients will be evaluated in future studies, by analyzing the clinical outcome of the same NB patients at follow-up. PMID:27610393

  17. Biological significance of HLA locus matching in unrelated donor bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwase, Koichi; Matsuo, Keitaro; Azuma, Fumihiro; Morishima, Satoko; Onizuka, Makoto; Yabe, Toshio; Murata, Makoto; Doki, Noriko; Eto, Tetsuya; Mori, Takehiko; Miyamura, Koichi; Sao, Hiroshi; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Saji, Hiroo; Kato, Shunichi; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Kawa, Keisei; Kodera, Yoshihisa; Sasazuki, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that the compatibility of each HLA loci between donor and patient induced divergent transplant-related immunologic responses, which attributed to the individualized manifestation of clinical outcomes. Here, we analyzed 7898 Japanese pairs transplanted with T-cell–replete marrow from an unrelated donor with complete HLA allele typing data. Multivariable competing risk regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the relative risk (RR) of clinical outcomes after transplantation. A significant RR of HLA allele mismatch compared with match was seen with HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DPB1 for grade III-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and HLA-C for chronic GVHD. Of note, only HLA-C and HLA-DPB1 mismatch reduced leukemia relapse, and this graft-versus-leukemia effect of HLA-DPB1 was independent of chronic GVHD. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 double (DRB1_DQB1) mismatch was revealed to be a significant RR for acute GVHD and mortality, whereas single mismatch was not. Thus, the number of HLA-A, -B, -C, -DPB1, and DRB1_DQB1 mismatches showed a clear-cut risk difference for acute GVHD, whereas the number of mismatches for HLA-A, -B, -C, and DRB1_DQB1 showed the same for mortality. In conclusion, we determined the biological response to HLA locus mismatch in transplant-related immunologic events, and provide a rationale for use of a personalized algorithm for unrelated donor selection. PMID:25519752

  18. Type 1 Diabetes-associated HLA-DQ8 Transdimer Accommodates a Unique Peptide Repertoire*

    PubMed Central

    van Lummel, Menno; van Veelen, Peter A.; Zaldumbide, Arnaud; de Ru, Arnoud; Janssen, George M. C.; Moustakas, Antonis K.; Papadopoulos, George K.; Drijfhout, Jan W.; Roep, Bart O.; Koning, Frits

    2012-01-01

    HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 are strongly predisposing haplotypes for type 1 diabetes (T1D). Yet HLA-DQ2/8 heterozygous individuals have a synergistically increased risk compared with HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 homozygote subjects that may result from the presence of a transdimer formed between the α-chain of HLA-DQ2 (DQA1*05:01) and the β-chain of HLA-DQ8 (DQB1*03:02). We generated cells exclusively expressing this transdimer (HLA-DQ8trans), characterized its peptide binding repertoire, and defined a unique transdimer-specific peptide binding motif that was found to be distinct from those of HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8. This motif predicts an array of peptides of islet autoantigens as candidate T cell epitopes, many of which selectively bind to the HLA transdimer, whereas others bind to both HLA-DQ8 and transdimer with similar affinity. Our findings provide a molecular basis for the association between HLA-DQ transdimers and T1D and set the stage for rational testing of potential diabetogenic peptide epitopes. PMID:22184118

  19. Soluble plasma HLA peptidome as a potential source for cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Bassani-Sternberg, Michal; Barnea, Eilon; Beer, Ilan; Avivi, Irit; Katz, Tami; Admon, Arie

    2010-01-01

    The HLA molecules are membrane-bound transporters that carry peptides from the cytoplasm to the cell surface for surveillance by circulating T lymphocytes. Although low levels of soluble HLA molecules (sHLA) are normally released into the blood, many types of tumor cells release larger amounts of these sHLA molecules, presumably to counter immune surveillance by T cells. Here we demonstrate that these sHLA molecules are still bound with their authentic peptide repertoires, similar to those of the membranal HLA molecules (mHLA). Therefore, a single immunoaffinity purification of the plasma sHLA molecules, starting with a few milliliters of patients’ blood, allows for identification of very large sHLA peptidomes by mass spectrometry, forming a foundation for development of a simple and universal blood-based cancer diagnosis. The new methodology was validated using plasma and tumor cells of multiple-myeloma and leukemia patients, plasma of healthy controls, and with cultured cancer cells. The analyses identified thousands of sHLA peptides, including some cancer-related peptides, present among the sHLA peptidomes of the cancer patients. Furthermore, because the HLA peptides are the degradation products of the cellular proteins, this sHLA peptidomics approach opens the way for investigation of the patterns of protein synthesis and degradation within the tumor cells. PMID:20974924

  20. MHC microsatellite diversity and linkage disequilibrium among common HLA-A, HLA-B, DRB1 haplotypes: implications for unrelated donor hematopoietic transplantation and disease association studies.

    PubMed

    Malkki, M; Single, R; Carrington, M; Thomson, G; Petersdorf, E

    2005-08-01

    Twenty-two human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region microsatellite (Msat) markers were studied for diversity and linkage disequilibrium (LD) with HLA loci in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients and their HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1, and HLA-DQB1 allele-matched unrelated donors. These Msats showed highly significant LD over much of the MHC region. The Msat diversity of five common Caucasian haplotypes (HLA-A1-B8-DR3, A3-B7-DR15, A2-B44-DR4, A29-B44-DR7, and A2-B7-DR15) was examined using a new measure called 'haplotype specific heterozygosity' (HSH). Each of the five haplotypes had at least one Msat marker with an HSH value of zero indicating that only one Msat allele was observed for the particular HLA haplotype. In addition, the ability of Msats to predict HLA-A-B-DRB1 haplotypes was studied. Over 90% prediction probability of two common haplotypes (HLA-A1-B8-DR3 and HLA-A3-B7-DR15) was achieved with information from three Msats (D6S265/D6S2787/D6S2894 and D6S510/D6S2810/D6S2876, respectively). We demonstrate how the HSH index can be used in the selection of informative Msats for transplantation and disease association studies. Markers with low HSH values can be used to predict specific HLA haplotypes or multilocus genotypes to supplement the screening of HLA-matched donors for transplantation. Markers with high HSH values will be most informative in studies investigating MHC region disease-susceptibility genes where HLA haplotypic effects are known to exist. PMID:16029431

  1. Promoter methylation and mRNA expression of HLA-G in relation to HLA-G protein expression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Swets, Marloes; Seneby, Lina; Boot, Arnoud; van Wezel, Tom; Gelderblom, Hans; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; van den Elsen, Peter J; Kuppen, Peter J K

    2016-09-01

    Expression of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a suggested mechanism used by tumor cells to escape from host immune recognition and destruction. Advances in the field have made it evident that HLA-G is expressed in different types of malignancies including colorectal cancer (CRC). We analyzed HLA-G expression in 21 low passage CRC cell lines. The level of DNA methylation of the HLA-G gene and the presence of mRNA encoding HLA-G was measured. Moreover, HLA-G protein expression was determined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry (IHC). IHC was performed with three different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (4H84, MEM-G/1 and MEM-G/2). In addition, HLA-G protein expression was measured in matching primary tumor tissues. RNA analysis using RT-PCR followed by sequencing in 6 samples indicated strong homology of the PCR product with HLA-G3 in 5 samples. In accordance, in none of the cell lines, HLA-G1 expression was detected by flow-cytometry. Furthermore, no association between HLA-G DNA methylation patterns and HLA-G mRNA expression was observed. In addition, different immunohistochemical staining profiles among various anti-HLA-G mAbs were observed. In conclusion, the results of this study show that the HLA-G3 isoform was expressed in some of the CRC cell lines irrespective of the level of DNA methylation of HLA-G. PMID:27245757

  2. Extending killer Ig-like receptor function: from HLA class I recognition to sensors of microbial products.

    PubMed

    Sivori, Simona; Falco, Michela; Moretta, Lorenzo; Moretta, Alessandro

    2010-08-01

    Killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) are human natural killer (NK) receptors that recognize allotypic determinants of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I. Inhibitory KIRs discriminate normal cells from tumour or virus-infected cells that have lost or reduced HLA class I expression. Donor NK cell "alloeffector" responses are exploited in haploidentical haematopoietic stem cell transplantation to treat leukaemia. NK cells also express several toll-like receptors (TLRs) that increase NK cell cytotoxicity and cytokine release in response to ligands. Surprisingly, KIR3DL2 binds the TLR ligand CpG-oligodexynucleotides, and together, they are co-internalized and translocated to TLR9-rich early endosomes. This novel KIR-associated function offers clues to understanding the NK cell response to microbial infection, and extends the role played by KIRs in immune defence. PMID:20630802

  3. Contrasting roles of interallelic recombination at the HLA-A and HLA-B loci

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, A.L.; Hughes, M.K. ); Watkins, D.I. )

    1993-03-01

    A statistical study of DNA sequences of alleles at the highly polymorphic class I MHC loci of humans, HLA-A and HLA-B, showed evidence of both large-scale recombination events(involving recombination of exons 1-2 of one allele with exons 3-8 of another) and small scale recombination events (involving apparent exchange of short DNA segments). The latter events occurred disproportionately in the region of the gene encoding the antigen recognition site (ARS) of the class I molecule. Furthermore, they involved the ARS codons which are under the strongest selection favoring allelic diversity at the amino acid level. Thus, the frequency of recombinant alleles appears to have been increased by some form of balancing selection (such as overdominant selection) favoring heterozygosity in the ARS. These analyses also revealed a striking difference between the A and B loci. Recombination events appear to have occurred about twice as frequently at the B locus, and recombinants at the B locus were significantly more likely to affect polymorphic sites in the ARS. At the A locus, there are well-defined allelic lineages that have persisted since prior to the human-chimpanzee divergence; but at the B locus, there is no evidence for such long-lasting allelic lineages. Thus, relatively frequent interallelic recombination has apparently been a feature of the long-term evolution of the B locus but not of the A locus. 45 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. HLA-A11-mediated protection from NK cell-mediated lysis: role of HLA-A11-presented peptides.

    PubMed

    Gavioli, R; Zhang, Q J; Masucci, M G

    1996-08-01

    The capacity of MHC class I to protect target cells from NK is well established, but the mechanism by which these molecules influence NK recognition and the physical properties associated with this function remain poorly defined. We have examined this issue using as a model the HLA-A11 allele. HLA-A11 expression correlated with reduced susceptibility to NK and interferon-activated cytotoxicity in transfected sublines of the A11-defective Burkitt's lymphoma WW2-BL and the HLA class I A,B-null C1R cell line. Protection was also achieved by transfection of HLA-A11 in the peptide processing mutant T2 cells line (T2/A11), despite a very low expression of the transfected product at the cell surface. Induction of surface HLA-A11 by culture of T2/A11 cells at 26 degrees C or in the presence of beta 2m did not affect lysis, whereas NK sensitivity was restored by culture in the presence of HLA-All-binding synthetic peptides derived from viral or cellular proteins. Acid treatment rendered T2/A11 and C1R/A11 cells sensitive to lysis, but protection was restored after preincubation with peptide preparations derived from surface stripping of T2/A11 cells. Similar peptide preparations from T2 cells had no effect. The results suggest that NK protection is mediated by HLA-A11 molecules carrying a particular set of peptides that are translocated to the site of MHC class I assembly in the ER in a TAP-independent fashion. PMID:8839770

  5. Toward understanding MHC disease associations: partial resequencing of 46 distinct HLA haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Wade P; Vu, Quyen; Li, Shuying Sue; Hansen, John A; Zhao, Lue Ping; Geraghty, Daniel E

    2006-05-01

    We carried out a resequencing project that examined 552 kb of sequence from each of 46 individual HLA haplotypes representing a diversity of HLA allele types, generating nearly 27 Mb of fully phased genomic sequence. Haplotype blocks were defined extending from telomeric of HLA-F to centromeric of HLA-DP including in total 5186 MHC SNPs. To investigate basic questions about the evolutionary origin of common HLA haplotypes, and to obtain an estimate of rare variation in the MHC, we similarly examined two additional sets of samples. In 19 independent HLA-A1, B8, DR3 chromosomes, the most common HLA haplotype in Northern European Caucasians, variation was found at 11 SNP positions in the 3600-kb region from HLA-A to DR. Partial resequencing of 282 individuals in the gene-dense class III region identified significant variability beyond what could have been detected by linkage to common SNPs. PMID:16434165

  6. Clinical Relevance of HLA Gene Variants in HBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Zou, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Host gene variants may influence the natural history of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in humans, is one of the most important host factors that are correlated with the clinical course of HBV infection. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near certain HLA gene loci are strongly associated with not only persistent HBV infection but also spontaneous HBV clearance and seroconversion, disease progression, and the development of liver cirrhosis and HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB). These variations also influence the efficacy of interferon (IFN) and nucleot(s)ide analogue (NA) treatment and response to HBV vaccines. Meanwhile, discrepant conclusions were reached with different patient cohorts. It is therefore essential to identify the associations of specific HLA allele variants with disease progression and viral clearance in chronic HBV infection among different ethnic populations. A better understanding of HLA polymorphism relevance in HBV infection outcome would enable us to elucidate the roles of HLA SNPs in the pathogenesis and clearance of HBV in different areas and ethnic groups, to improve strategies for the prevention and treatment of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27243039

  7. Molecular analysis of HLA-B in the Malaysian aborigines.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, K; Zaidi, A S; Lokman Hakim, S; Kimura, A; Ong, K J; Kikuchi, M; Nasuruddin, H A; Kojima, S; Mak, J W

    1996-12-01

    We have examined 56 unrelated individuals from Malaysian aborigines for their DNA polymorphism of the HLA-B gene by sequence specific oligonucleotide probe (SSO) method. Using the SSO hybridization, we found that one specific DNA allele with a B*1513 like pattern of epitope combination (ECB1513) was dominant among the Melayu Asli (Af = 41.9%) and the Senoi (Af = 24%). To determine the nucleotide sequences of ECB1513, a DNA fragment spanning from the beginning of exon 1 to the middle of exon 4 of the HLA-B gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from two ECB1513 positive individuals, and the PCR products were cloned and sequenced. This sequencing analysis confirmed that ECB1513 was identical to HLA-B*1513 in exon 1, 2, 3, and 4. Amino acid sequence of this major allele, HLA-B*1513, in the aborigines especially around the peptide binding groove (B and F pockets), was compared with that of African B*5301 that had been suggested to confer resistance to malaria infection in Africa. The amino acid residues composing of the F pocket were completely identical in B*1513 and B*5301. These observations suggest that a common environmental factor, the malaria infection, might have independently enhanced the selection of functional change in the polymorphic portion of HLA-B gene in Africa and in South-East Asia. PMID:9008312

  8. Mapping the HLA diversity of the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Romòn, Iñigo; Montes, Carmen; Ligeiro, Dario; Trindade, Hélder; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia; Nunes, José Manuel; Buhler, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    The polymorphism of HLA genes can be used to reconstruct human peopling history. However, this huge diversity impairs successful matching in stem cell transplantation, a situation which has led to the recruitment of millions of donors worldwide. In parallel to the increase of recruitment, registries are progressively relying on information from population genetics to optimize their donor pools in terms of HLA variability. In this study, the HLA data of 65,000 Spanish bone marrow donors were analyzed together with 60,000 Portuguese individuals to provide a comprehensive HLA genetic map of the Iberian Peninsula. The frequencies of many alleles were shown to vary continuously across the Peninsula, either increasing or decreasing from the Mediterranean coast to the Atlantic domain or from the Strait of Gibraltar to the Pyrenees and Bay of Biscay. Similar patterns were observed for several haplotypes. In addition, within some regions neighboring provinces share a close genetic similarity. These results outline the genetic landscape of the Iberian Peninsula, and confirm that the analysis of the HLA polymorphism may reveal relevant signatures of past demographic events even when data from donor registries are used. This conclusion stimulates future developments of the Spanish registry, presented here for the first time. PMID:27377016

  9. Heterogeneity of HLA genetic factors in IDDM susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Martell, M; Marcadet, A; Moine, A; Boitard, C; Deschamps, I; Dausset, J; Bach, J F; Cohen, D

    1990-01-01

    The association of certain HLA-D alleles with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is well known. One hundred and sixty-one non-related diabetic individuals and 142 non-related healthy controls were typed for the HLA DR-DQw-Dw association, using a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing method that combines three probe/enzyme systems: DRB/Taq I, DQB/Taq I, and DQB/Bam HI. Comparison of frequencies in both diabetics and controls confirms previous results in terms of HLA class II and IDDM association. Moreover, we have found that DR3/3 heterozygous individuals are more susceptible to IDDM when they are also Dw25 (associated with B18) than when they are Dw24 (associated with B8). Using oligonucleotide dot-blot hybridizations we analyzed the HLA-DQB1 sequence of DR3,Dw24 and DR3,Dw25 homozygous individuals, and we found no difference at position 57 between these two DR3-carrying haplotypes. This observation points to the heterogeneity of HLA genetic factors in IDDM susceptibility. PMID:1970333

  10. Advances in the study of HLA-restricted epitope vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lingxiao; Zhang, Min; Cong, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination is a proven strategy for protection from disease. An ideal vaccine would include antigens that elicit a safe and effective protective immune response. HLA-restricted epitope vaccines, which include T-lymphocyte epitopes restricted by HLA alleles, represent a new and promising immunization approach. In recent years, research in HLA-restricted epitope vaccines for the treatment of tumors and for the prevention of viral, bacterial, and parasite-induced infectious diseases have achieved substantial progress. Approaches for the improvement of the immunogenicity of epitope vaccines include (1) improving the accuracy of the methods used for the prediction of epitopes, (2) making use of additional HLA-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitopes, (3) the inclusion of specific CD4+ T-cell epitopes, (4) adding B-cell epitopes to the vaccine construction, (5) finding more effective adjuvants and delivery systems, (6) using immunogenic carrier proteins, and (7) using multiple proteins as epitopes sources. In this manuscript, we review recent research into HLA-restricted epitope vaccines. PMID:23955319

  11. HLA-G coding region and 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) in two Chinese Han populations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen Yi; Tian, Wei; Liu, Xue Xiang; Li, Li Xin

    2016-08-01

    In this study, exons 2-4 and 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G gene were investigated for 201 and 104 healthy unrelated Han samples recruited from Hunan Province, southern China and central Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, northern China, respectively, using sequence-based typing and cloning methods. Totally 12 HLA-G alleles in the coding region, 9 variable sites in 3'UTR, 8 3'UTR haplotypes and 15 HLA-G extended haplotypes (EHs) incorporating the coding region and 3'UTR were observed. Very strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) was observed between HLA-A and HLA-G, and between HLA-G coding region and 3'UTR in each population (all global P=0.0000). Seven HLA-A-G haplotypes showed significant LD in both populations. Three HLA-G alleles in the coding region, 4 polymorphic sites in the 3'UTR, 3 3'UTR haplotypes and 4 HLA-G EHs differed significantly in their distributions between the 2 Chinese Han populations (all P≤0.0001). There was evidence for balancing selection acting on HLA-G 3'UTR positions +3010, +3142 and +3187 in the two populations. The NJ dendrograms demonstrated the existence of two basic HLA-G lineages and indicated that, HLA-G*01:01:01, the most common HLA-G allele, formed a separate lineage from other alleles. Our results shed new lights into HLA-G genetics among Chinese Han populations. The findings reported here are of importance for future studies related to post-transcriptional regulation of HLA-G allelic expression and the potential role of HLA-G in disease association in populations of Chinese ancestry. PMID:27262928

  12. Low-cost simultaneous detection of CCR5-delta32 and HLA-B*5701 alleles in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected patients by selective multiplex endpoint PCR.

    PubMed

    Rosi, Andrea; Meini, Genny; Materazzi, Angelo; Vicenti, Ilaria; Saladini, Francesco; Zazzi, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Host genetic traits impact susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, disease progression as well as antiretroviral drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity. Remarkable examples include a 32-bp deletion in the CCR5 coreceptor molecule (CCR5-delta32) impairing attachment of monocytotropic HIV-1 to the host cell membrane and the HLA-B*5701 allele, strongly associated with a potentially fatal hypersensitivity reaction triggered by abacavir, a nucleoside inhibitor of HIV reverse transcriptase. We developed a simple selective multiplex endpoint PCR method for simultaneous analysis of both genetic traits. Two primers were designed for amplification of a region surrounding the CCR5 32-bp deletion site. One common forward primer and two reverse primers with different 3' termini targeting the HLA-B*570101 and HLA-B*570102 alleles were designed for HLA-B*5701 analysis. A panel of 110 reference DNA samples typed in the HLA-B locus was used for development and blind validation of the assay. All the 45 HLA-B*5701 positive and the 55 HLA-B*5701 negative samples were correctly identified. The CCR5-delta32 allele was readily detected in 7 samples and did not interfere with detection of HLA-B*5701 while providing an internal amplification control. Multiplex PCR products were easily identified in agarose gels with no background noise. This simple and low-cost end-point selective multiplex PCR can conveniently screen HIV patients for the protective CCR5-delta32 allele and the risk of developing abacavir hypersensitivity reaction. PMID:26341061

  13. Non-classical HLA-class I expression in serous ovarian carcinoma: Correlation with the HLA-genotype, tumor infiltrating immune cells and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Emilia; Poschke, Isabel; Villabona, Lisa; Carlson, Joseph W; Lundqvist, Andreas; Kiessling, Rolf; Seliger, Barbara; Masucci, Giuseppe V

    2016-01-01

    In our previous studies, we have shown that patients with serous ovarian carcinoma in advanced surgical stage disease have a particularly poor prognosis if they carry the HLA-A*02 genotype. This represent a stronger prognostic factor than loss or downregulation of the MHC class I heavy chain (HC) on tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the expression of the non-classical, immune tolerogenic HLA -G and -E on the tumor cells along with the infiltration of immune cells in the tumor microenvironment. FFPE primary tumors from 72 patients with advanced stages of serous adenocarcinoma and metastatic cells present in ascites fluid from 8 additional patients were included in this study. Both expression of HLA-G and aberrant expression of HLA-E were correlated to a significant worse prognosis in patients with HLA-A*02, but not with different HLA genotypes. Focal cell expression of HLA-G correlated to a site-specific downregulation of classical MHC class I HC products and aberrant HLA-E expression, showing a poor survival. HLA-G was more frequently expressed in metastatic cells than in primary tumor lesions and the expression of HLA-G inversely correlated with the frequency of tumor infiltrating immune cells. All these parameters can contribute together to identify and discriminate subpopulations of patients with extremely poor prognosis and can give them the opportunity to receive, and benefit of individually tailored treatments. PMID:26942060

  14. Complete sequence of HLA-B27 cDNA identified through the characterization of structural markers unique to the HLA-A, -B, and -C allelic series.

    PubMed Central

    Szöts, H; Riethmüller, G; Weiss, E; Meo, T

    1986-01-01

    Antigen HLA-B27 is a high-risk genetic factor with respect to a group of rheumatoid disorders, especially ankylosing spondylitis. A cDNA library was constructed from an autozygous B-cell line expressing HLA-B27, HLA-Cw1, and the previously cloned HLA-A2 antigen. Clones detected with an HLA probe were isolated and sorted into homology groups by differential hybridization and restriction maps. Nucleotide sequencing allowed the unambiguous assignment of cDNAs to HLA-A, -B, and -C loci. The HLA-B27 mRNA has the structural features and the codon variability typical of an HLA class I transcript but it specifies two uncommon amino acid replacements: a cysteine in position 67 and a serine in position 131. The latter substitution may have functional consequences, because it occurs in a conserved region and at a position invariably occupied by a species-specific arginine in humans and lysine in mice. The availability of the complete sequence of HLA-B27 and of the partial sequence of HLA-Cw1 allows the recognition of locus-specific sequence markers, particularly, but not exclusively, in the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. Images PMID:3485286

  15. The impact of next-generation sequencing technologies on HLA research

    PubMed Central

    Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Shiina, Takashi; Tajima, Atsushi; Inoue, Ituro

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, the development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) has paved the way for whole-genome analysis in individuals. Research on the human leukocyte antigen (HLA), an extensively studied molecule involved in immunity, has benefitted from NGS technologies. The HLA region, a 3.6-Mb segment of the human genome at 6p21, has been associated with more than 100 different diseases, primarily autoimmune diseases. Recently, the HLA region has received much attention because severe adverse effects of various drugs are associated with particular HLA alleles. Owing to the complex nature of the HLA genes, classical direct sequencing methods cannot comprehensively elucidate the genomic makeup of HLA genes. Thus far, several high-throughput HLA-typing methods using NGS have been developed. In HLA research, NGS facilitates complete HLA sequencing and is expected to improve our understanding of the mechanisms through which HLA genes are modulated, including transcription, regulation of gene expression and epigenetics. Most importantly, NGS may also permit the analysis of HLA-omics. In this review, we summarize the impact of NGS on HLA research, with a focus on the potential for clinical applications. PMID:26311539

  16. The impact of next-generation sequencing technologies on HLA research.

    PubMed

    Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Shiina, Takashi; Tajima, Atsushi; Inoue, Ituro

    2015-11-01

    In the past decade, the development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) has paved the way for whole-genome analysis in individuals. Research on the human leukocyte antigen (HLA), an extensively studied molecule involved in immunity, has benefitted from NGS technologies. The HLA region, a 3.6-Mb segment of the human genome at 6p21, has been associated with more than 100 different diseases, primarily autoimmune diseases. Recently, the HLA region has received much attention because severe adverse effects of various drugs are associated with particular HLA alleles. Owing to the complex nature of the HLA genes, classical direct sequencing methods cannot comprehensively elucidate the genomic makeup of HLA genes. Thus far, several high-throughput HLA-typing methods using NGS have been developed. In HLA research, NGS facilitates complete HLA sequencing and is expected to improve our understanding of the mechanisms through which HLA genes are modulated, including transcription, regulation of gene expression and epigenetics. Most importantly, NGS may also permit the analysis of HLA-omics. In this review, we summarize the impact of NGS on HLA research, with a focus on the potential for clinical applications. PMID:26311539

  17. Analysis of HLA-DQB and HLA-DPB alleles in Graves' disease by oligonucleotide probing of enzymatically amplified DNA.

    PubMed

    Weetman, A P; Zhang, L; Webb, S; Shine, B

    1990-07-01

    We have tested the possible association of HLA-DQB and HLA-DPB alleles with Graves' thyrotoxicosis, with or without severe ophthalmopathy, by polymerase chain amplification of genomic DNA and allele-specific oligonucleotide probing. There was no significantly abnormal distribution of DQB alleles compared to 50 control subjects except for a reduced prevalence of DQw 3.1 in the Graves' patients with severe ophthalmopathy (X2 = 6.23, P less than 0.02). HLA-DPB 2.1/8 was found in only 1 of 40 of these patients compared with 15 of the controls (X2 = 11.49, P less than 0.001). Ten of 48 patients with Graves' disease but without clinically significant eye involvement were HLA-DPB 2.1/8 positive, not significantly different from controls, but significantly different from the ophthalmopathy group (X2 = 6.70, P less than 0.01). The other DPB alleles in both groups of Graves' disease patients were the same as controls. These results suggest that HLA-DPB 2.1/8 may confer a protective effect in Graves' disease with respect to ophthalmopathy. PMID:2401099

  18. Internalization of MHC class I molecules is a prerequisite for endocytosis of endorphin by lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Mommaas, A M; Wijsman, M C; Verduijn, W; Vermeer, B J; Claas, F M

    1991-01-01

    The nature of the interaction between gamma-type endorphins and the HLA class I molecules was studied by immunoelectronmicroscopy. The HLA molecules were not involved in the actual binding of endorphin to the cell. In contrast, for the endocytosis of gamma-endorphin, co-internalization of the HLA class I molecules is essential. The internalization process starts with clustering of gamma-endorphin and HLA class I molecules in coated pits. Cells that do not carry HLA class I molecules (Daudi) or do not internalize HLA class I molecules (EBV-transformed B cells) bind but do not internalize gamma-endorphin. On the basis of these observations, we suggest that the MHC class I molecules may function as transport molecules. Whether it is a general phenomenon that non-immunological ligands use the HLA class I molecules to get into the cell and immunological ligands (viral proteins) to reach the cell surface, remains to be established. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2015708

  19. Relative expression levels of the HLA class-I proteins in normal and HIV-infected cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Apps, Richard; Meng, Zhaojing; Del Prete, Gregory Q.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Zhou, Ming; Carrington, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The expression level of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) is known to influence pathological outcomes: pathogens downregulate HLA to evade host immune responses, host inflammatory reactions upregulate HLA, and differences between people in steady-state expression levels of HLA associate with disease susceptibility. Yet precise quantification of relative expression levels of the various HLA loci is difficult due to the tremendous polymorphism of HLA. We report relative expression levels of HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C and HLA-E proteins for the specific haplotype A*02:01, B*44:02, C*05:01, characterized using two independent methods based on flow cytometry and mass spectrometry. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from normal donors showed that HLA-A and HLA-B proteins are expressed at similar levels, which are 13-18 times higher than HLA-C by flow cytometry and 4-5 times higher than HLA-C by mass spectrometry, differences that may reflect variation in the conformation or location of proteins detected. HLA-E was detected at a level 25 times lower than that of HLA-C by mass spectrometry. Primary CD4+ T cells infected with HIV in vitro were also studied since HIV downregulates selective HLA types. HLA-A and -B were reduced on HIV-infected cells by a magnitude that varied between cells in an infected culture. Averaging all infected cells from an individual showed HLA-A to be 1-3 and HLA-B to be 2-5 times higher than HLA-C for different individuals by flow cytometry. These results quantify substantial differences in expression levels of the proteins from different HLA loci, which are very likely physiologically significant on both uninfected and HIV-infected cells. PMID:25754738

  20. The HLA-A2-supermotif: a QSAR definition.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini; Flower, Darren

    2003-08-01

    Identification of epitopes capable of binding multiple HLA types will significantly rationalise the development of epitope-based vaccines. A quantitative method assessing the contribution of each amino acid at each position was applied to over 500 nonamer peptides binding to 5 MHC alleles--A*0201, A*0202, A*0203, A*0206 and A*6802--which together define the HLA-A2-like supertype. FXIGXI (L)IFV was identified as a supermotif for the A2-supertype based on the contributions of the common preferred amino acids at each of the nine positions. The results indicate that HLA-A*6802 is an intermediate allele standing between A2 and A3 supertypes: at anchor position 2 it is closer to A3 and at anchor position 9 it is nearer to A2. Models are available free on-line at http://www.jenner.ac.uk/MHCPred and can be used for binding affinity prediction. PMID:12948188

  1. [HLA and keloids: antigenic frequency and therapeutic response].

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Bozzi, M

    1989-01-01

    Twenty keloid subjects were typed for class 1 (HLA-A, B and C) and class 2 (HLA-DR and DQ) histocompatibility antigens. Their frequencies were compared to those found in control populations. Of all the antigens belonging to class 1, B 21 was more prevalent in patients. The findings regarding class 2 antigens were noteworthy: in keloid patients there was a significant prevalence of DR 5 (RR = 3.54 and 7.93 respectively for the two control groups) and DQw 3 (RR = 16.8). The patients typed for HLA-antigens were treated with corticosteroid infiltrations. The responses to the treatments were no related to the histocompatibility antigens. PMID:2628278

  2. Gestosis and fetal rejection: immunopathogenetic role of HLA-DR.

    PubMed

    De Luca Brunori, I; Battini, L; Mariotti, M L; Pecori, F; Urbano, M; Filippeschi, M; Scida, P; Simonelli, M

    1994-01-01

    In this study we faced the problem of etiopathogenesis of EPH Gestosis, focusing our attention on the role of immunitary aspects in determining its onset. We typed HLA-DR in 20 couples with gestosic patient and in 20 control couples. Blood samples were taken into heparin-treated test tubes, from all the couples and HLA typed through standard lymphotoxicity technique in accordance with Terasaky (1). Our results in couples with a gestosic patient, showed homozygosis in 65% of patients and in 70% of partners; in 35% of cases homozygosis was present in both partners, and these were the most severe cases. It is also worth mentioning that in all the couples with gestosic patient, at least one of the partners resulted homozygotic. Homozygosis would therefore represent a predisposing factor in the etiopathogenesis of gestosis, and pre-conception HLA-DR typing of the couple could prove to be a valid alarm signal for gestosis risk. PMID:7994872

  3. Research and implementation of object model in HLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xia; Huang, Shabai

    2004-03-01

    High Level Architecture (HLA) is a new architecture for distributed simulation. Its purpose is to facilitate interoperability among the simulation applications and to promote reuse of simulations and their components. Object Model is important to implement purpose of HLA. OM provides a standard template to describe the abilities of simulations joining federate and the demands of outer systems. This paper introduces the basic content of HLA and describes the components of OM. Based on the authors' comprehend and practice, the paper analyzes the object-oriented characteristic of OM and the ability to support interoperability and reuse of OM. With the primary practice of navy slavage drilling simulation system, the authors give the designing of OM with an example acccording to the designing principle of OM.

  4. HIV and HLA Class I: an evolving relationship

    PubMed Central

    Goulder, Philip J.R.; Walker, Bruce D

    2014-01-01

    Successful vaccine development for infectious diseases has largely been achieved in settings where natural immunity to the pathogen results in clearance in at least some individuals. HIV presents an additional challenge in that natural clearance of infection does not occur, and the correlates of immune protection are still uncertain. However, partial control of viremia and markedly different outcomes of disease are observed in HIV infected persons. Here we examine the antiviral mechanisms implicated by one variable that has been consistently associated with extremes of outcome, namely HLA class I alleles, and in particular HLA-B, and examine the mechanisms by which this modulation is likely to occur, and the impact of these interactions on evolution of the virus and the host. Studies to date provide evidence for both HLA-dependent and epitope-dependent influences on viral control and viral evolution, and have important implications for the continued quest for an effective HIV vaccine. PMID:22999948

  5. HLA antigens in individuals with down syndrome and alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    Estefan, Juliany L; Oliveira, Juliana C; Abad, Eliane D; Saintive, Simone B; Porto, Luis Cristóvão MS; Ribeiro, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To describe human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles in individuals with Down syndrome and alopecia areata. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted, which evaluated 109 individuals. Ten with down syndrome (DS) and alopecia areata (AA), ten with DS without AA and ten with AA without DS, and their families. The individuals were matched by gender and age. The following data were computed: gender, age, ethnic group, karyotype, clinical presentation and family history of alopecia areata. Descriptive analysis: measures of central tendency and frequency distribution. Inferential analysis: Fisher’s exact test to compare categorical data between the three groups and Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA test for numerical data. RESULTS: Seventy per cent of evaluated individuals in the DS and AA group were male; presented mean age of 18.6 (SD ± 7.2) years and 70% were Caucasian. We observed involvement of the scalp, with a single lesion in 10% and multiple in 90% of subjects. It was observed that there is no significant difference in the frequency distributions of the alleles HLA loci A, B, C, DRB1 and DQB1 of subjects studied. However, according to Fisher’s exact test, there is a trend (P = 0.089) of DS group to present higher proportions of HLA-A 36 and HLA-B 15 than the AA group and AA and DS group. CONCLUSION: There was a tendency for the DS group, to present proportion of HLA-A 36 and HLA-B 15 higher than the AA group and group of individuals with AA and DS. However, there was no significant difference in the frequency distribution of the alleles. PMID:25325065

  6. HLA-sharing, recurrent spontaneous abortion, and the genetic hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, P.W.

    1988-05-01

    A number of studies indicates that there is a high sharing of HLA antigens in couples having recurrent spontaneous abortions. The genetic hypothesis to explain this phenomenon suggests that this fetal loss results from homozygosity of recessive lethal or deleterius alleles in gametic disequilibrium with HLA antigens. Theory predicting the lethality rate is derived when antigens are shared at one, two or three loci, given the disequilibrium is absolute. In addition, the effects of partial disequilibrium, inbreeding, and segregation distortion on the lethal proportion are examined.

  7. HLA and multiple sclerosis in south east Wales.

    PubMed Central

    Swingler, R J; Kirk, P F; Darke, C; Compston, D A

    1987-01-01

    A stronger association has been found between multiple sclerosis and HLA-DR2 than -DQwl in south east Wales (prevalence c 113/10(5)) in contrast to recent observations in north east Scotland (prevalence 178/10(5). The complex relationship between the HLA system and multiple sclerosis, demonstrated in this and other studies, is explained more easily under a polygenic model of inheritance, in which environmental events and genes interact, than by the presence of a single susceptibility gene. PMID:3499485

  8. Dynamic Co-Operative Scheduling Based on HLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirase, Keiichi; Wakamatsu, Hidefumi; Tsumaya, Akira; Arai, Eiji

    In an advanced factory, higher and higher flexibility is required to meet a great variety of customers' requirements. In this environment, a dynamic management architecture is required for distributed production system. In this paper, a newly distributed simulation architecture called HLA (High Level Architecture) is utilized to achieve a distributed scheduling simulation for dynamic work assignment and flexible working group configuration in a distributed production system. It is verified that the distributed scheduling simulation based on HLA is effective to achieve higher flexibility for a distributed production system, by some case studies.

  9. Localization of type 1 diabetes susceptibility to the MHC class I genes HLA-B and HLA-A

    PubMed Central

    Nejentsev, Sergey; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Walker, Neil M.; Szeszko, Jeffrey; Field, Sarah F.; Stevens, Helen E.; Reynolds, Pamela; Hardy, Matthew; King, Erna; Masters, Jennifer; Hulme, John; Maier, Lisa M.; Smyth, Deborah; Bailey, Rebecca; Cooper, Jason D.; Ribas, Gloria; Campbell, R. Duncan; Clayton, David G.; Todd, John A.

    2009-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on chromosome 6 is associated with susceptibility to more common diseases than any other region of the human genome, including almost all disorders classified as autoimmune. In type 1 diabetes the major genetic susceptibility determinants have been mapped to the MHC class II genes HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DRB1 (refs 1-3), but these genes cannot completely explain the association between type 1 diabetes and the MHC region4-11. Owing to the region’s extreme gene density, the multiplicity of disease-associated alleles, strong associations between alleles, limited genotyping capability, and inadequate statistical approaches and sample sizes, which, and how many, loci within the MHC determine susceptibility remains unclear. Here, in several large type 1 diabetes data sets, we analyse a combined total of 1,729 polymorphisms, and apply statistical methods—recursive partitioning and regression—to pinpoint disease susceptibility to the MHC class I genes HLA-B and HLA-A (risk ratios>1.5; Pcombined=2.01×10-19 and 2.35×10-13, respectively) in addition to the established associations of the MHC class II genes. Other loci with smaller and/or rarer effects might also be involved, but to find these, future searches must take into account both the HLA class II and class I genes and use even larger samples. Taken together with previous studies4-8,10-16, we conclude that MHC-class-I-mediated events, principally involving HLA-B*39, contribute to the aetiology of type 1 diabetes. PMID:18004301

  10. Loss of Mismatched HLA on the Leukemic Blasts of Patients With Relapsed Lymphoid Malignancies Following Bone Marrow Transplantation From Related Donors With HLA Class II Mismatches in the Graft Versus Host Direction.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Koichi; Kurata, Takashi; Horiuchi, Kazuki; Saito, Shoji; Shigemura, Tomonari; Tanaka, Miyuki; Yanagisawa, Ryu; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Sakashita, Kazuo; Koike, Kenichi; Nakazawa, Yozo

    2016-04-01

    Mechanisms of relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) after human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remain unclear. We report two children with relapsed ALL after HSCT from related donors with HLA-DRB1 and -DQB1 mismatches in the graft versus host direction. One lost HLA-DRB1, DQB1, and DPB1 alleles, and the other lost one HLA haplotype of the leukemic blasts at relapse. HLA class II loss may be a triggering event for ALL relapse after partially HLA-mismatched-related HSCT. In addition, HLA typing of relapsed leukemic blasts could be vital in the selection of retransplant donors. PMID:26544669

  11. Promoting A-Priori Interoperability of HLA-Based Simulations in the Space Domain: The SISO Space Reference FOM Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moller, Bjorn; Garro, Alfredo; Falcone, Alberto; Crues, Edwin Z.; Dexter, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Distributed and Real-Time Simulation plays a key-role in the Space domain being exploited for missions and systems analysis and engineering as well as for crew training and operational support. One of the most popular standards is the 1516-2010 IEEE Standard for Modeling and Simulation (M&S) High Level Architecture (HLA). HLA supports the implementation of distributed simulations (called Federations) in which a set of simulation entities (called Federates) can interact using a Run-Time Infrastructure (RTI). In a given Federation, a Federate can publish and/or subscribes objects and interactions on the RTI only in accordance with their structures as defined in a FOM (Federation Object Model). Currently, the Space domain is characterized by a set of incompatible FOMs that, although meet the specific needs of different organizations and projects, increases the long-term cost for interoperability. In this context, the availability of a reference FOM for the Space domain will enable the development of interoperable HLA-based simulators for related joint projects and collaborations among worldwide organizations involved in the Space domain (e.g. NASA, ESA, Roscosmos, and JAXA). The paper presents a first set of results achieved by a SISO standardization effort that aims at providing a Space Reference FOM for international collaboration on Space systems simulations.

  12. HLA-G 3’UTR Polymorphisms Impact the Prognosis of Stage II-III CRC Patients in Fluoropyrimidine-Based Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Garziera, Marica; Bidoli, Ettore; Cecchin, Erika; Mini, Enrico; Nobili, Stefania; Lonardi, Sara; Buonadonna, Angela; Errante, Domenico; Pella, Nicoletta; D’Andrea, Mario; De Marchi, Francesco; De Paoli, Antonino; Zanusso, Chiara; De Mattia, Elena; Tassi, Renato; Toffoli, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    An important hallmark of CRC is the evasion of immune surveillance. HLA-G is a negative regulator of host’s immune response. Overexpression of HLA-G protein in primary tumour CRC tissues has already been associated to worse prognosis; however a definition of the role of immunogenetic host background is still lacking. Germline polymorphisms in the 3’UTR region of HLA-G influence the magnitude of the protein by modulating HLA-G mRNA stability. Soluble HLA-G has been associated to 3’UTR +2960 Ins/Ins and +3035 C/T (lower levels) and +3187 G/G (high levels) genotypes. HLA-G 3’UTR SNPs have never been explored in CRC outcome. The purpose of this study was to investigate if common HLA-G 3’UTR polymorphisms have an impact on DFS and OS of 253 stage II-III CRC patients, after primary surgery and ADJ-CT based on FL. The 3’UTR was sequenced and SNPs were analyzed for their association with survival by Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox models; results underwent internal validation using a resampling method (bootstrap analysis). In a multivariate analysis, we estimated an association with improved DFS in Ins allele (Ins/Del +Ins/Ins) carriers (HR 0.60, 95% CI 0.38–0.93, P = 0.023) and in patients with +3035 C/T genotype (HR 0.51, 95% CI 0.26–0.99, P = 0.045). The +3187 G/G mutated carriers (G/G vs A/A+A/G) were associated to a worst prognosis in both DFS (HR 2.46, 95% CI 1.19–5.05, P = 0.015) and OS (HR 2.71, 95% CI 1.16–6.63, P = 0.022). Our study shows a prognostic and independent role of 3 HLA-G 3’UTR SNPs, +2960 14-bp INDEL, +3035 C>T, and +3187 A>G. PMID:26633805

  13. HLA antigens in Bali (Indonesia) with a special reference to an isolated community.

    PubMed

    Breguet, G; Wolnizer, C M; Doran, T; Bashir, H; Jeannet, M; Benzonana, G; Ney, R; Adiputra, N; Scherz, R; Blake, N M

    1982-10-01

    One hundred eighty-two Balinese were typed for HLA-A and -B locus antigens. From these, 103 were also typed for HLA-C, 51 for HLA-DR, 172 for Bf and 173 for GLO. These results and the significant phenotypic associations are situated with respect to other South-East Asian populations. In addition to this first study, 175 individuals from an isolated Balinese village typed for HLA-A, -B, -DR, Bf and GLO are presented. The effect of isolation on haplotype (HLA-A/-B/Bf/-DR) variability is discussed. PMID:6815824

  14. A novel HLA-B allele, HLA-B*35:279, identified by sequencing-based typing in a Czech patient.

    PubMed

    Mrazek, F; Onderkova, J; Königova, N; Siffnerova, V; Vrana, M; Ambruzova, Z; Skoumalova, I; Petrek, M; Raida, L

    2016-08-01

    The identification of a novel HLA-B*35:279 allele in a Czech patient is described. This allele is identical to the B*35:03:01 variant except the G/A nucleotide exchange at position 652 of the HLA-B gene that corresponds to the amino acid substitution from valine to isoleucine in alpha 3 domain of the HLA-B antigen. PMID:27273911

  15. Risk associations between HLA-DPB1 T-cell epitope matching and outcome of unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation are independent of HLA-DPA1.

    PubMed

    Fleischhauer, K; Fernandez-Viña, M A; Wang, T; Haagenson, M; Battiwalla, M; Baxter-Lowe, L A; Ciceri, F; Dehn, J; Gajewski, J; Hale, G A; Heemskerk, M B A; Marino, S R; McCarthy, P L; Miklos, D; Oudshoorn, M; Pollack, M S; Reddy, V; Senitzer, D; Shaw, B E; Waller, E K; Lee, S J; Spellman, S R

    2014-09-01

    HLA-DP antigens are beta-alpha heterodimers encoded by polymorphic HLA-DPB1 and -DPA1 alleles, respectively, in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) with each other. Non-permissive unrelated donor (UD)-recipient HLA-DPB1 mismatches across three different T-cell epitope (TCE) groups are associated with increased mortality after hematopoietic SCT (HCT), but the role of HLA-DPA1 is unclear. We studied 1281 onco-hematologic patients after 10/10 HLA-matched UD-HCT facilitated by the National Marrow Donor Program. Non-permissive mismatches defined solely by HLA-DPB1 TCE groups were associated with significantly higher risks of TRM compared to permissive mismatches (hazard ratio (HR) 1.30, confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.53; P=0.009) or allele matches. Moreover, non-permissive HLA-DPB1 TCE group mismatches in the graft versus host (GvH) direction significantly decreased the risk of relapse compared to permissive mismatches (HR 0.55, CI 0.37-0.80; P=0.002) or allele matches. Splitting each group into HLA-DPA1*02:01 positive or negative, in frequent LD with HLA-DPB1 alleles from two of the three TCE groups, or into HLA-DPA1 matched or mismatched, did not significantly alter the observed risk associations. Our findings suggest that the effects of clinically non-permissive HLA-DPB1 TCE group mismatches are independent of HLA-DPA1, and that selection of donors with non-permissive DPB1 TCE mismatches in GvH direction might provide some protection from disease recurrence. PMID:24955785

  16. Risk-associations between HLA-DPB1 T cell epitope matching and outcome of unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation are independent from HLA-DPA1

    PubMed Central

    Fleischhauer, Katharina; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo A.; Wang, Tao; Haagenson, Michael; Battiwalla, Minoo; Baxter-Lowe, Lee Ann; Ciceri, Fabio; Dehn, Jason; Gajewski, James; Hale, Gregory A.; Heemskerk, Martin BA; Marino, Susana R.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Miklos, David; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Pollack, Marilyn S.; Reddy, Vijay; Senitzer, David; Shaw, Bronwen E.; Waller, Edmund K.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Spellman, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    HLA-DP antigens are beta-alpha heterodimers encoded by polymorphic HLA-DPB1 and -DPA1 alleles, respectively, in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) with each other. Non-permissive unrelated donor (UD)-recipient HLA-DPB1 mismatches across three different T cell epitope (TCE) groups are associated with increased mortality after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but the role of HLA-DPA1 is unclear. We studied 1281 onco-hematologic patients after 10/10 HLA-matched UD-HCT facilitated by the National Marrow Donor Program. Non-permissive mismatches defined solely by HLA-DPB1 TCE groups were associated with significantly higher risks of treatment-related mortality compared to permissive mismatches (HR 1.30, CI 1.06–1.53; p=0.009) or allele matches. Moreover, non-permissive HLA-DPB1 TCE group mismatches in the graft versus host (GvH) direction significantly decreased the risk of relapse compared to permissive mismatches (HR 0.55, CI 0.37–0.80; p=0.002) or allele matches. Splitting each group into HLA-DPA1*02:01 positive or negative, in frequent LD with HLA-DPB1 alleles from two of the three TCE groups, or into HLA-DPA1 matched or mismatched, did not significantly alter the observed risk associations. Our findings suggest that the effects of clinically non-permissive HLA-DPB1 TCE group mismatches are independent of HLA-DPA1, and that selection of donors with non-permissive DPB1 TCE mismatches in GvH direction might provide some protection from disease recurrence. PMID:24955785

  17. Alloantibody Responses After Renal Transplant Failure Can Be Better Predicted by Donor-Recipient HLA Amino Acid Sequence and Physicochemical Disparities Than Conventional HLA Matching.

    PubMed

    Kosmoliaptsis, V; Mallon, D H; Chen, Y; Bolton, E M; Bradley, J A; Taylor, C J

    2016-07-01

    We have assessed whether HLA immunogenicity as defined by differences in donor-recipient HLA amino-acid sequence (amino-acid mismatch score, AMS; and eplet mismatch score, EpMS) and physicochemical properties (electrostatic mismatch score, EMS) enables prediction of allosensitization to HLA, and also prediction of the risk of an individual donor-recipient HLA mismatch to induce donor-specific antibody (DSA). HLA antibody screening was undertaken using single-antigen beads in 131 kidney transplant recipients returning to the transplant waiting list following first graft failure. The effect of AMS, EpMS, and EMS on the development of allosensitization (calculated reaction frequency [cRF]) and DSA was determined. Multivariate analyses, adjusting for time on the waiting list, maintenance on immunosuppression after transplant failure, and graft nephrectomy, showed that AMS (odds ratio [OR]: 1.44 per 10 units, 95% CI: 1.02-2.10, p = 0.04) and EMS (OR: 1.27 per 10 units, 95% CI: 1.02-1.62, p = 0.04) were independently associated with the risk of developing sensitization to HLA (cRF > 15%). AMS, EpMS, and EMS were independently associated with the development of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ DSA, but only EMS correlated with the risk of HLA-A and -B DSA development. Differences in donor-recipient HLA amino-acid sequence and physicochemical properties enable better assessment of the risk of HLA-specific sensitization than conventional HLA matching. PMID:26755448

  18. Interaction of the LILRB1 inhibitory receptor with HLA class Ia dimers.

    PubMed

    Baía, Diogo; Pou, Jordi; Jones, Des; Mandelboim, Ofer; Trowsdale, John; Muntasell, Aura; López-Botet, Miguel

    2016-07-01

    Leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor subfamily B member 1 (LILRB1) has been reported to interact with a wide spectrum of HLA class I (HLA-I) molecules, albeit with different affinities determined by allelic polymorphisms and conformational features. HLA-G dimerization and the presence of intracellular Cys residues in HLA-B7 have been shown to be critical for their recognition by LILRB1. We hypothesized that dimerization of classical HLA class Ia molecules, previously detected in exosomes, might enhance their interaction with LILRB1. A soluble LILRB1-Fc fusion protein and a sensitive cellular reporter system expressing a LILRB1-ζ chimera were employed to assess receptor interaction with different HLA class Ia molecules transfected in the human lymphoblastoid 721.221 cell line. Under these conditions, intracellular Cys residues and HLA-I dimerization appeared associated with increased LILRB1 recognition. On the other hand, a marginal interaction of LILRB1 with primary monocytic cells, irrespective of their high HLA-I expression, was enhanced by type I interferon (IFN). This effect appeared disproportionate to the cytokine-induced increase of surface HLA-I expression and was accompanied by detection of HLA class Ia dimers. Altogether, the results support that a regulated assembly of these noncanonical HLA-I conformers during the immune response may enhance the avidity of their interaction with LILRB1. PMID:27109306

  19. Analysis of the distribution of HLA-A alleles in populations from five continents.

    PubMed

    Middleton, D; Williams, F; Meenagh, A; Daar, A S; Gorodezky, C; Hammond, M; Nascimento, E; Briceno, I; Perez, M P

    2000-10-01

    The variation and frequency of HLA-A genotypes were established by PCR-SSOP typing in diverse geographically distributed populations: Brazilian, Colombian Kogui, Cuban, Mexican, Omani, Singapore Chinese, and South African Zulu. HLA-A allelic families with only one allele were identified for HLA-A*01, -A*23, -A*25, -A*31, -A*32, -A*36, -A*43, -A*69, -A*80; and with two alleles for HLA-A*03, -A*11, -A*26, -A*29, -A*33, -A*34, and -A*66. Greater variation was detected for HLA-A*02, -A*24, and -A*68 allele families. Colombian Kogui and Mexican Seris showed the least diversity with respect to HLA-A alleles, albeit with small numbers tested, with only four and five HLA-A alleles identified, respectively. It would appear by their presence in all populations studied, either rural or indigenous, that certain alleles are very important in pathogen peptide presentation. PMID:11082518

  20. A uniquely high level of recombination at the HLA-B locus.

    PubMed Central

    McAdam, S N; Boyson, J E; Liu, X; Garber, T L; Hughes, A L; Bontrop, R E; Watkins, D I

    1994-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) loci are some of the most polymorphic genes in the animal kingdom. Recently, it has been suggested that although most of the human MHC loci are relatively stable, the HLA-B locus can undergo rapid changes, especially in isolated populations. To investigate the mechanisms of HLA-B evolution we have compared the sequences of 19 HLA-B homologues from chimpanzees and bonobos to 65 HLA-B sequences. Analysis of the chimpanzee and bonobo HLA-B homologues revealed that despite obvious similarities between chimpanzee and human alleles in exon 2, there was little conservation of exon 3 between humans and the two chimpanzee species. This finding suggests that, unlike all other HLA loci, recombination has characterized the HLA-B locus and its homologues for over 5 million years. PMID:8016085

  1. HLA-A2, HLA-B44 and HLA-DR15 are associated with lower risk of BK viremia

    PubMed Central

    Masutani, Kosuke; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Randhawa, Parmjeet

    2013-01-01

    Background Human leucocyte antigens (HLAs) modulate immunity to polyomavirus BK (BKV). Identification of HLAs that alter the course of infection will facilitate risk stratification, and customization of pre-emptive intervention strategies. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study with 998 kidney transplant patients with BKV infection status confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Clinical parameters and donor–recipient matching for specific HLAs were examined in relation to occurrence of viremia. An emphasis was placed on donor–recipient matching rather than the actual frequency of specific HLA-alleles, since a successful immune response requires sharing of HLAs between a virus-infected target cell and the anti-viral effector cell. Results Using multivariate statistics, low risk of BK viremia was associated with matching of HLA-A2 [hazard ratio (HR) 0.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.28–0.85], HLA-B44 (HR 0.31, 95% CI 0.076–0.85) and HLA-DR15 (HR 0.35, 95% CI 0.084–0.93) (P < 0.05), whereas high risk of viremia was associated with male gender (HR 2.38, 95% CI 1.46–4.09, P < 0.001). Conclusions HLAs that associated with a lower predisposition to the development of BK viremia have been identified. Evaluation of donor–recipient mismatching for these HLAs could potentially be used to (i) fine tune virus screening strategies for BKV in individual patients and (ii) facilitate discovery of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II binding peptides that can elicit clinically meaningful BKV-specific immunity. PMID:24084328

  2. [Idiopathic hemochromatosis linkage with the HLA system (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lipinski, M; Hors, J; Saleun, J P; Saddi, R; Passa, P; Feingold, J; Lafaurie, S; Dausset, J

    1978-06-01

    Fourteen selected families containing two or more subjects suffering from idiopathic hemochromatosis and 34 unrelated cases have been studied for their HLA markers. A 3 was present in 75% of the unrelated cases vs 26% in the normal population (p less than 10(-8)). The frequencies of B 7 (38% vs 19%) and B 14 (23% vs 9%) were also increased (p lessthan 0,05). Inevitably, in most cases both antigens in the B locus were associated with A 3. Seven of nine affected sib pairs shared both HLA haplotypes, while two shared only one. Significant association between HLA haplotypes and diseases segregation has been demonstrated in family studies. These facts are consistent with the recessive inheritance of a strongly A 3 linked "disease" gene responsible for abnormal iron stores in the heterozygote state. This hypothesis would account for 64% of our present cases. Most of discordances (26%) were females who are physiologically protected, or children under 17 who might later develop the disease. The remaining 10% of disordant cases could be explained by crossing-over between "disease" gene and HLA loci or by an heterogeneity of the disease. This provides a method for screening for high risk subjects and perhaps an opportunity for anticipatory prevention. PMID:680310

  3. HLA antigens and insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. A family study.

    PubMed

    Savi, M; Neri, T M; Zavaroni, I; Coscelli, I

    1977-12-01

    Sixteen insulin dependent diabetic patients (age at onset less than 35 years) and their families were tissue typed for HLA antigens. Glucose tolerance of relatives was also tested. Among diabetic patients two HLA antigens were found with increased frequency: B8 (31 percent, control 15 percent) and Bw35 (38 percent, control 23 percent). Among normal relatives B8 and Bw35 had the same frequency as the control group. Bw15 frequency was not increased in either group. In relatives, no correlation between HLA antigens (B8 or Bw35) and abnormal glucose tolerance, obesity and over-weight at birth was found. Present data confirm previous reports of high B8 frequency in early onset diabetic patients, but fail to demonstrate a raised frequency of abnormal glucose tolerance among relatives bearing B8 (or, in our cases, Bw35). B8 may be considered a genetic indicator for susceptibility to juvenile diabetes. On the basis of present results in families, however non genetic factors clearly also play a determinant role. Furthermore, that diabetogenesis arises from a link between Ir-genes and HLA-B8 antigen should only be considered a suggestive hypothesis. PMID:413751

  4. Association of HLA-DRw2 with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Karpatkin, S; Fotino, M; Gibofsky, A; Winchester, R J

    1979-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes from 38 patients with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP) were tested for HLA-A, -B, and -C alloantigens. Isolated B lymphocytes from 20 of these patients were tested for HLA-DRw (Ia) alloantigens. The profile of HLA alloantigens in the patients with AITP was significantly different from that of a matched control population. The most significant finding was the presence of the HLA-DRw2 alloantigen in 75% of patients as compared with 23% in the control population, P less than 0.001, relative risk 10.0 (A relative risk of 1 would indicate no association between the presence of the antigen and the disease.) The co-occurrence of either A3 and B7 (known to be in linkage disequilibrium with DRw2) or A26 and Bw38 was significantly increased as compared with the control population (P less than 0.001). Of the patients positive for DRw2, 47% had the association A26 and Bw38 as compared with the control population association incidence of 21% (P less than 0.1). Thus, in the patient population, A26-Bw38 appears to be a haplotype that is in linkage disequilibrium with DRw2 (as presumably is the case with A3-B7). These data indicate that a predisposition to AITP is inherited with a DRw2 gene of the major histocompatibility system. PMID:571874

  5. The importance of non-HLA antibodies in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuheng; Reed, Elaine F

    2016-08-01

    The development of post-transplantation antibodies against non-HLA autoantigens is associated with rejection and decreased long-term graft survival. Although our knowledge of non-HLA antibodies is incomplete, compelling experimental and clinical findings demonstrate that antibodies directed against autoantigens such as angiotensin type 1 receptor, perlecan and collagen, contribute to the process of antibody-mediated acute and chronic rejection. The mechanisms that underlie the production of autoantibodies in the setting of organ transplantation is an important area of ongoing investigation. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury, surgical trauma and/or alloimmune responses can result in the release of organ-derived autoantigens (such as soluble antigens, extracellular vesicles or apoptotic bodies) that are presented to B cells in the context of the transplant recipient's antigen presenting cells and stimulate autoantibody production. Type 17 T helper cells orchestrate autoantibody production by supporting the proliferation and maturation of autoreactive B cells within ectopic tertiary lymphoid tissue. Conversely, autoantibody-mediated graft damage can trigger alloimmunity and the development of donor-specific HLA antibodies that can act in synergy to promote allograft rejection. Identification of the immunologic phenotypes of transplant recipients at risk of non-HLA antibody-mediated rejection, and the development of targeted therapies to treat such rejection, are sorely needed to improve both graft and patient survival. PMID:27345243

  6. Prevalence of HLA-B27 in the New Zealand population: effect of age and ethnicity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction HLA-B27 genotyping is commonly used to support a diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A recent study has suggested that HLA-B27 may adversely affect longevity. The objectives of this study were to determine, for the first time, the prevalence of HLA-B27 in the New Zealand population, and to test whether HLA-B27 prevalence declines with age. Methods 117 Caucasian controls, 111 New Zealand Māori controls, and 176 AS patients were directly genotyped for HLA-B27 using PCR-SSP. These participants and a further 1103 Caucasian controls were genotyped for the HLA-B27 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs4349859 and rs116488202. All AS patients testing positive for HLA-B27 of New Zealand Māori ancestry underwent high resolution typing to determine sub-allele status. Results HLA-B27 prevalence was 9.2% in New Zealand Caucasian controls and 6.5% in Māori controls. No decline in HLA-B27 prevalence with age was detected in Caucasian controls (p = 0.92). Concordance between HLA-B27 and SNP genotypes was 98.7-99.3% in Caucasians and 76.9-86% in Māori. Of the 14 AS patients of Māori ancestry, 1 was negative for HLA-B27, 10 were positive for HLAB*2705, and 3 positive for HLAB*2704. All cases of genotype discordance were explained by the presence of HLAB*2704. Conclusions HLA-B27 prevalence in New Zealand Caucasians is consistent with that of Northern European populations and did not decline with increasing age. In Māori with AS who were HLA-B27 positive, 76.9% were positive for HLA-B*2705, suggesting that genetic susceptibility to AS in Māori is primarily due to admixture with Caucasians. PMID:24286455

  7. An Object-Oriented Regression for Building Disease Predictive Models with Multiallelic HLA Genes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lue Ping; Bolouri, Hamid; Zhao, Michael; Geraghty, Daniel E; Lernmark, Åke

    2016-05-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies confirm that human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes have the strongest associations with several autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes (T1D), providing an impetus to reduce this genetic association to practice through an HLA-based disease predictive model. However, conventional model-building methods tend to be suboptimal when predictors are highly polymorphic with many rare alleles combined with complex patterns of sequence homology within and between genes. To circumvent this challenge, we describe an alternative methodology; treating complex genotypes of HLA genes as "objects" or "exemplars," one focuses on systemic associations of disease phenotype with "objects" via similarity measurements. Conceptually, this approach assigns disease risks base on complex genotype profiles instead of specific disease-associated genotypes or alleles. Effectively, it transforms large, discrete, and sparse HLA genotypes into a matrix of similarity-based covariates. By the Kernel representative theorem and machine learning techniques, it uses a penalized likelihood method to select disease-associated exemplars in building predictive models. To illustrate this methodology, we apply it to a T1D study with eight HLA genes (HLA-DRB1, HLA-DRB3, HLA-DRB4, HLA-DRB5, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, HLA-DPA1, and HLA-DPB1) to build a predictive model. The resulted predictive model has an area under curve of 0.92 in the training set, and 0.89 in the validating set, indicating that this methodology is useful to build predictive models with complex HLA genotypes. PMID:27080919

  8. Nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch increases mortality after myeloablative unrelated allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Stephanie J.; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Spellman, Stephen; Wang, Hai-Lin; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Askar, Medhat; Dehn, Jason; Fernandez Viña, Marcelo; Gratwohl, Alois; Gupta, Vikas; Hanna, Rabi; Horowitz, Mary M.; Hurley, Carolyn K.; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Kassim, Adetola A.; Nishihori, Taiga; Mueller, Carlheinz; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Prasad, Vinod; Robinson, James; Saber, Wael; Schultz, Kirk R.; Shaw, Bronwen; Storek, Jan; Wood, William A.; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Anasetti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    We examined current outcomes of unrelated donor allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to determine the clinical implications of donor-recipient HLA matching. Adult and pediatric patients who had first undergone myeloablative-unrelated bone marrow or peripheral blood HCT for acute myelogenous leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome between 1999 and 2011 were included. All had high-resolution typing for HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1. Of the total (n = 8003), cases were 8/8 (n = 5449), 7/8 (n = 2071), or 6/8 (n = 483) matched. HLA mismatch (6-7/8) conferred significantly increased risk for grades II to IV and III to IV acute graft vs host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD, transplant-related mortality (TRM), and overall mortality compared with HLA-matched cases (8/8). Type (allele/antigen) and locus (HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1) of mismatch were not associated with overall mortality. Among 8/8 matched cases, HLA-DPB1 and -DQB1 mismatch resulted in increased acute GVHD, and HLA-DPB1 mismatch had decreased relapse. Nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 allele mismatch was associated with higher TRM compared with permissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch or HLA-DPB1 match and increased overall mortality compared with permissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch in 8/8 (and 10/10) matched cases. Full matching at HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1 is required for optimal unrelated donor HCT survival, and avoidance of nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 mismatches in otherwise HLA-matched pairs is indicated. PMID:25161269

  9. Prevalence of Obesity was Related to HLA-DQ in 2–4 Year Old Children at Genetic Risk for Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jimin; Lernmark, Åke; Uusitalo, Ulla M.; Lynch, Kristian F.; Veijola, Riitta; Winkler, Christiane; Larsson, Helena Elding; Rewers, Marian; She, Jin-Xiong; Ziegler, Anette G.; Simell, Olli G.; Hagopian, William A.; Akolkar, Beena; Krischer, Jeffrey P.; Vehik, Kendra

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Body size is postulated to modulate type 1 diabetes as either a trigger of islet autoimmunity or an accelerator to clinical onset after seroconversion. As overweight and obesity continue to rise among children, the aim of this study was to determine whether human leukocyte antigen DQ (HLA-DQ) genotypes may be related to body size among children genetically at risk for type 1 diabetes. METHODS Repeated measures of weight and height were collected from 5 969 children 2–4 years of age enrolled in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young prospective study. Overweight and obesity was determined by the International Obesity Task Force cutoff values that correspond to body mass index of 25 and 30 kg/m2 at age 18. RESULTS The average BMI was comparable across specific HLA genotypes at every age point. The proportion of overweight was not different by HLA, but percent obesity varied by age with a decreasing trend among DQ2/8 carriers (p for trend = 0.0315). A multivariable regression model suggested DQ2/2 was associated with higher obesity risk at age four (OR, 2.41; 95% CI, 1.21–4.80) after adjusting for the development of islet autoantibody and/or type 1 diabetes. CONCLUSIONS The HLA-DQ2/2 genotype may predispose to obesity among 2–4 year old children with genetic risk for type 1 diabetes. PMID:24694666

  10. A comparative reference study for the validation of HLA-matching algorithms in the search for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell donors and cord blood units.

    PubMed

    Bochtler, W; Gragert, L; Patel, Z I; Robinson, J; Steiner, D; Hofmann, J A; Pingel, J; Baouz, A; Melis, A; Schneider, J; Eberhard, H-P; Oudshoorn, M; Marsh, S G E; Maiers, M; Müller, C R

    2016-06-01

    The accuracy of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matching algorithms is a prerequisite for the correct and efficient identification of optimal unrelated donors for patients requiring hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The goal of this World Marrow Donor Association study was to validate established matching algorithms from different international donor registries by challenging them with simulated input data and subsequently comparing the output. This experiment addressed three specific aspects of HLA matching using different data sets for tasks of increasing complexity. The first two tasks targeted the traditional matching approach identifying discrepancies between patient and donor HLA genotypes by counting antigen and allele differences. Contemporary matching procedures predicting the probability for HLA identity using haplotype frequencies were addressed by the third task. In each task, the identified disparities between the results of the participating computer programs were analyzed, classified and quantified. This study led to a deep understanding of the algorithms participating and finally produced virtually identical results. The unresolved discrepancies total to less than 1%, 4% and 2% for the three tasks and are mostly because of individual decisions in the design of the programs. Based on these findings, reference results for the three input data sets were compiled that can be used to validate future matching algorithms and thus improve the quality of the global donor search process. PMID:27219013

  11. HLA genetic profile of Mapuche (Araucanian) Amerindians from Chile.

    PubMed

    Rey, Diego; Parga-Lozano, Carlos; Moscoso, Juan; Areces, Cristina; Enriquez-de-Salamanca, Mercedes; Fernández-Honrado, Mercedes; Abd-El-Fatah-Khalil, Sedeka; Alonso-Rubio, Javier; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    Amerindian Mapuche (Araucanians) are now living in Chile and Argentina at both sides of Andean Mountains. They are anthropologically and genetically different from southernmost South America Patagonian Amerindians. Most of the HLA alleles found in our Mapuche sample are frequent or very frequent in North and South America Amerindians: (1) Class I: A*02:01, A*03:01, A*68:01, B*39:09, B*51:01, (2) Class II: DRB1*03:01, DRB1*04:03, DRB1*07:01, DRB1*08:02, DRB1*14:02, DRB1*16:02. One of the nine most frequent extended haplotypes seems to be from European origin, suggesting the existence of a degree of admixture with Europeans in our Mapuche sample. It has been calculated of about 11 % admixture. Three of the extended haplotypes are also found in other Amerindians and five of them are newly found in Mapuche Amerindians: A*68:01-B*39:09-DRB1*08:02-DQB1*04:02; A*68:01-B*51:01-DRB1*04:03-DQB1*03:02; A*29:01-B*08:01-DRB1*03:01-DQB1*02:01; A*02:01-B*15:01-DRB1*04:03-DQB1*03:02; A*33:01-B*14:02-DRB1*07:01-DQB1*03:03. The medical importance of calculating HLA profile is discussed on the diagnostic (HLA and disease) and therapeutical bases of HLA pharmacogenomics and on the construction of a virtual transplantation HLA list profile. Also, anthropological conclusions are drawn. PMID:23666052

  12. HLA class I supertypes: a revised and updated classification

    PubMed Central

    Sidney, John; Peters, Bjoern; Frahm, Nicole; Brander, Christian; Sette, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    Background Class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules bind, and present to T cells, short peptides derived from intracellular processing of proteins. The peptide repertoire of a specific molecule is to a large extent determined by the molecular structure accommodating so-called main anchor positions of the presented peptide. These receptors are extremely polymorphic, and much of the polymorphism influences the peptide-binding repertoire. However, despite this polymorphism, class I molecules can be clustered into sets of molecules that bind largely overlapping peptide repertoires. Almost a decade ago we introduced this concept of clustering human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and defined nine different groups, denominated as supertypes, on the basis of their main anchor specificity. The utility of this original supertype classification, as well several other subsequent arrangements derived by others, has been demonstrated in a large number of epitope identification studies. Results Following our original approach, in the present report we provide an updated classification of HLA-A and -B class I alleles into supertypes. The present analysis incorporates the large amount of class I MHC binding data and sequence information that has become available in the last decade. As a result, over 80% of the 945 different HLA-A and -B alleles examined to date can be assigned to one of the original nine supertypes. A few alleles are expected to be associated with repertoires that overlap multiple supertypes. Interestingly, the current analysis did not identify any additional supertype specificities. Conclusion As a result of this updated analysis, HLA supertype associations have been defined for over 750 different HLA-A and -B alleles. This information is expected to facilitate epitope identification and vaccine design studies, as well as investigations into disease association and correlates of immunity. In addition, the approach utilized has been made more

  13. 14th Annual ALS Users' Association meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Art

    2001-11-29

    Sponsored by the Users' Executive Committee (UEC) and spread over three days from October 15-17, the fourteen annual ALS Users' Association Meeting featured an exceptional program with science as the main theme. While the first day was reserved for the traditional facility and Washington reports and for science highlights, the following two days, devoted to several workshops covering topics from theory to detectors, new experimental facilities, and forefront science, were strong draws. As a result, it should not be surprising that the number of registered attendees jumped to a record level of 352, more than 100 above the typical attendance in recent years. The successful commissioning of the long-awaited superconducting bend magnets, or superbends, in the ALS storage-ring lattice just before the meeting opened also helped stimulate interest.

  14. The impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) micropolymorphism on ligand specificity within the HLA-B*41 allotypic family

    SciTech Connect

    Bade-Döding, Christina; Theodossis, Alex; Gras, Stephanie; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Eiz-Vesper, Britta; Seltsam, Axel; Huyton, Trevor; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James; Blasczyk, Rainer

    2011-09-28

    Polymorphic differences between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules affect the specificity and conformation of their bound peptides and lead to differential selection of the T-cell repertoire. Mismatching during allogeneic transplantation can, therefore, lead to immunological reactions. We investigated the structure-function relationships of six members of the HLA-B*41 allelic group that differ by six polymorphic amino acids, including positions 80, 95, 97 and 114 within the antigen-binding cleft. Peptide-binding motifs for B*41:01, *41:02, *41:03, *41:04, *41:05 and *41:06 were determined by sequencing self-peptides from recombinant B*41 molecules by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The crystal structures of HLA-B*41:03 bound to a natural 16-mer self-ligand (AEMYGSVTEHPSPSPL) and HLA-B*41:04 bound to a natural 11-mer self-ligand (HEEAVSVDRVL) were solved. Peptide analysis revealed that all B*41 alleles have an identical anchor motif at peptide position 2 (glutamic acid), but differ in their choice of C-terminal p{Omega} anchor (proline, valine, leucine). Additionally, B*41:04 displayed a greater preference for long peptides (>10 residues) when compared to the other B*41 allomorphs, while the longest peptide to be eluted from the allelic group (a 16mer) was obtained from B*41:03. The crystal structures of HLA-B*41:03 and HLA-B*41:04 revealed that both alleles interact in a highly conserved manner with the terminal regions of their respective ligands, while micropolymorphism-induced changes in the steric and electrostatic properties of the antigen-binding cleft account for differences in peptide repertoire and auxiliary anchoring. Differences in peptide repertoire, and peptide length specificity reflect the significant functional evolution of these closely related allotypes and signal their importance in allogeneic transplantation, especially B*41:03 and B*41:04, which accommodate longer peptides, creating structurally distinct peptide-HLA

  15. An extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, M D; Smith, J R; Austin, R K; Kelleher, D; Nepom, G T; Volk, B; Kagnoff, M F

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. We previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II beta-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. We now report the isolation of this beta-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP beta chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP beta-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP alpha-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP alpha-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis; 84% of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 patients had a 16-kb Xba I fragment that was present in only 36% of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 controls. Moreover, 79% of these patients had both alpha- and beta-chain polymorphisms in contrast to 27% of controls. Thus, celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP alpha- and beta-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion. Images PMID:2893373

  16. Immunogenicity of HLA Class I and II Double Restricted Influenza A-Derived Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Sara Ram; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Buus, Søren; Rasmussen, Michael; Korsholm, Karen Smith; Nielsen, Morten; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify influenza A-derived peptides which bind to both HLA class I and -II molecules and by immunization lead to both HLA class I and class II restricted immune responses. Eight influenza A-derived 9-11mer peptides with simultaneous binding to both HLA-A*02:01 and HLA-DRB1*01:01 molecules were identified by bioinformatics and biochemical technology. Immunization of transgenic HLA-A*02:01/HLA-DRB1*01:01 mice with four of these double binding peptides gave rise to both HLA class I and class II restricted responses by CD8 and CD4 T cells, respectively, whereas four of the double binding peptides did result in HLA-A*02:01 restricted responses only. According to their cytokine profile, the CD4 T cell responses were of the Th2 type. In influenza infected mice, we were unable to detect natural processing in vivo of the double restricted peptides and in line with this, peptide vaccination did not decrease virus titres in the lungs of intranasally influenza challenged mice. Our data show that HLA class I and class II double binding peptides can be identified by bioinformatics and biochemical technology. By immunization, double binding peptides can give rise to both HLA class I and class I restricted responses, a quality which might be of potential interest for peptide-based vaccine development. PMID:26731261

  17. Impact of HLA-G analysis in prevention, diagnosis and treatment of pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotti, Daria; Gentili, Valentina; Rotola, Antonella; Cassai, Enzo; Rizzo, Roberta; Luca, Dario Di

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non-classical HLA class I molecule that differs from classical HLA class I molecules by low polymorphism and tissue distribution. HLA-G is a tolerogenic molecule with an immune-modulatory and anti-inflammatory function on both innate and adaptative immunity. This peculiar characteristic of HLA-G has led to investigations of its role in pathological conditions in order to define possible uses in diagnosis, prevention and treatment. In recent years, HLA-G has been shown to have an important implication in different inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, pregnancy complications, tumor development and aggressiveness, and susceptibility to viral infections. In fact, HLA-G molecules have been reported to alternate at both genetic and protein level in different disease situations, supporting its crucial role in pathological conditions. Specific pathologies show altered levels of soluble (s)HLA-G and different HLA-G gene polymorphisms seem to correlate with disease. This review aims to update scientific knowledge on the contribution of HLA-G in managing pathological conditions. PMID:25237627

  18. HLA-G Expression and Role in Advanced-Stage Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Caocci, G.; Greco, M.; Fanni, D.; Senes, G.; Littera, R.; Lai, S.; Risso, P.; Carcassi, C.; Faa, G.; La Nasa, G.

    2016-01-01

    Non-classical human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G class I molecules have an important role in tumor immune escape mechanisms. We investigated HLA-G expression in lymphonode biopsies taken from 8 controls and 20 patients with advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), in relationship to clinical outcomes and the HLA-G 14-basepair (14-bp) deletion-insertion (del-ins) polymorphism. Lymphnode tissue sections were stained using a specific murine monoclonal HLA-G antibody. HLA-G protein expression was higher in cHL patients than controls. In the group of PET-2 positive (positron emission tomography carried out after 2 cycles of standard chemotherapy) patients with a 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS) of 40%, we observed high HLA-G protein expression within the tumor microenvironment with low expression on Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. Conversely, PET-2 negative patients with a PFS of 86% had higher HLA-G protein expression levels on HRS cells compared to the microenvironment. Lower expression on HRS cells was significantly associated with the HLA-G 14-bp ins/ins genotype. These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2. PMID:27349312

  19. HLA Class Ib Molecules and Immune Cells in Pregnancy and Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Djurisic, Snezana; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F.

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the highly prevalent pregnancy complication preeclampsia, “the disease of theories,” has remained an enigma. Indeed, the etiology of preeclampsia is largely unknown. A compiling amount of studies indicates that the pathological basis involves a complex array of genetic predisposition and immunological maladaptation, and that a contribution from the mother, the father, and the fetus is likely to be important. The Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-G is an increasing focus of research in relation to preeclampsia. The HLA-G molecule is primarily expressed by the extravillous trophoblast cells lining the placenta together with the two other HLA class Ib molecules, HLA-E and HLA-F. Soluble isoforms of HLA-G have been detected in the early endometrium, the matured cumulus–oocyte complex, maternal blood of pregnant women, in umbilical cord blood, and lately, in seminal plasma. HLA-G is believed to be involved in modulating immune responses in the context of vascular remodeling during pregnancy as well as in dampening potential harmful immune attacks raised against the semi-allogeneic fetus. In addition, HLA-G genetic variants are associated with both membrane-bound and soluble forms of HLA-G, and, in some studies, with preeclampsia. In this review, a genetic contribution from the mother, the father, and the fetus, together with the presence and function of various immune cells of relevance in pregnancy are reviewed in relation to HLA-G and preeclampsia. PMID:25566263

  20. Charting improvements in US registry HLA typing ambiguity using a typing resolution score.

    PubMed

    Paunić, Vanja; Gragert, Loren; Schneider, Joel; Müller, Carlheinz; Maiers, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Unrelated stem cell registries have been collecting HLA typing of volunteer bone marrow donors for over 25years. Donor selection for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is based primarily on matching the alleles of donors and patients at five polymorphic HLA loci. As HLA typing technologies have continually advanced since the beginnings of stem cell transplantation, registries have accrued typings of varied HLA typing ambiguity. We present a new typing resolution score (TRS), based on the likelihood of self-match, that allows the systematic comparison of HLA typings across different methods, data sets and populations. We apply the TRS to chart improvement in HLA typing within the Be The Match Registry of the United States from the initiation of DNA-based HLA typing to the current state of high-resolution typing using next-generation sequencing technologies. In addition, we present a publicly available online tool for evaluation of any given HLA typing. This TRS objectively evaluates HLA typing methods and can help define standards for acceptable recruitment HLA typing. PMID:27163154

  1. A rapid and efficient strategy to generate allele-specific anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Satoshi; Suzuki, Nao; Saito, Tsuneyoshi; Ishii, Yumiko; Takiguchi, Masafumi; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Watanabe, Nobukazu

    2009-03-31

    That generation of allele-specific anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) monoclonal antibodies (ASHmAb) is very difficult is well known. This is thought to be due to the unique epitope structure, an assemblage of amino acid residues that lie separately in the amino acid sequence of human HLA, and to its low antigenicity compared with that of common epitopes recognized as xenogeneic determinants by mice. Here we report a rapid and efficient strategy to generate ASHmAb. Different from usual immunization methods is that we suppressed the production of non-allele-specific anti-HLA antibodies against xenogeneic determinants of HLA molecules by immunizing human HLA-B51 transgenic mice against non-HLA-B51 HLA tetramers. In addition, HLA-coated beads enabled rapid and efficient screening for ASHmAb. ASHmAb generated by this strategy will be useful for HLA typing and for clinical diagnosis, such as flow cytometry-based chimerism analysis for early detection of graft failure and relapse of leukemia after HLA-mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:19187783

  2. IMGT/HLA Database—a sequence database for the human major histocompatibility complex

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, James; Waller, Matthew J.; Parham, Peter; Bodmer, Julia G.; Marsh, Steven G. E.

    2001-01-01

    The IMGT/HLA Database (www.ebi.ac.uk/imgt/hla/) specialises in sequences of polymorphic genes of the HLA system, the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The HLA complex is located within the 6p21.3 region on the short arm of human chromosome 6 and contains more than 220 genes of diverse function. Many of the genes encode proteins of the immune system and these include the 21 highly polymorphic HLA genes, which influence the outcome of clinical transplantation and confer susceptibility to a wide range of non-infectious diseases. The database contains sequences for all HLA alleles officially recognised by the WHO Nomenclature Committee for Factors of the HLA System and provides users with online tools and facilities for their retrieval and analysis. These include allele reports, alignment tools and detailed descriptions of the source cells. The online IMGT/HLA submission tool allows both new and confirmatory sequences to be submitted directly to the WHO Nomenclature Committee. The latest version (release 1.7.0 July 2000) contains 1220 HLA alleles derived from over 2700 component sequences from the EMBL/GenBank/DDBJ databases. The HLA database provides a model which will be extended to provide specialist databases for polymorphic MHC genes of other species. PMID:11125094

  3. IMGT/HLA Database--a sequence database for the human major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J; Waller, M J; Parham, P; Bodmer, J G; Marsh, S G

    2001-01-01

    The IMGT/HLA Database (www.ebi.ac.uk/imgt/hla/) specialises in sequences of polymorphic genes of the HLA system, the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The HLA complex is located within the 6p21.3 region on the short arm of human chromosome 6 and contains more than 220 genes of diverse function. Many of the genes encode proteins of the immune system and these include the 21 highly polymorphic HLA genes, which influence the outcome of clinical transplantation and confer susceptibility to a wide range of non-infectious diseases. The database contains sequences for all HLA alleles officially recognised by the WHO Nomenclature Committee for Factors of the HLA System and provides users with online tools and facilities for their retrieval and analysis. These include allele reports, alignment tools and detailed descriptions of the source cells. The online IMGT/HLA submission tool allows both new and confirmatory sequences to be submitted directly to the WHO Nomenclature Committee. The latest version (release 1.7.0 July 2000) contains 1220 HLA alleles derived from over 2700 component sequences from the EMBL/GenBank/DDBJ databases. The HLA database provides a model which will be extended to provide specialist databases for polymorphic MHC genes of other species. PMID:11125094

  4. Rare HLA Drive Additional HIV Evolution Compared to More Frequent Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, David W.; Listgarten, Jennifer; Maley, Stephen N.; Kadie, Carl; Learn, Gerald H.; Nickle, David C.; Heckerman, David E.; Deng, Wenjie; Brander, Christian; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Coovadia, Hoosen; Goulder, Philip J.R.; Korber, Bette T.; Walker, Bruce D.; Mullins, James I.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract HIV-1 can evolve HLA-specific escape variants in response to HLA-mediated cellular immunity. HLA alleles that are common in the host population may increase the frequency of such escape variants at the population level. When loss of viral fitness is caused by immune escape variation, these variants may revert upon infection of a new host who does not have the corresponding HLA allele. Furthermore, additional escape variants may appear in response to the nonconcordant HLA alleles. Because individuals with rare HLA alleles are less likely to be infected by a partner with concordant HLA alleles, viral populations infecting hosts with rare HLA alleles may undergo a greater amount of evolution than those infecting hosts with common alleles due to the loss of preexisting escape variants followed by new immune escape. This hypothesis was evaluated using maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees of each gene from 272 full-length HIV-1 sequences. Recent viral evolution, as measured by the external branch length, was found to be inversely associated with HLA frequency in nef (p < 0.02), env (p < 0.03), and pol (p ≤ 0.05), suggesting that rare HLA alleles provide a disproportionate force driving viral evolution compared to common alleles, likely due to the loss of preexisting escape variants during early stages postinfection. PMID:19327049

  5. HLA-B alleles of the Cayapa of Ecuador: New B39 and B15 alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, T.L.; Butler, L.M.; Watkins, D.I.

    1995-05-01

    Recent data suggest that HLA-B locus alleles can evolve quickly in native South American populations. To investigate further this phenomenon of new HLA-B variants among Amerindians, we studied samples from another South American tribe, the Cayapa from Ecuador. We selected individuals for HLA-B molecular typing based upon their HLA class II typing results. Three new variants of HLA-B39 and one new variant of HLA-B15 were found in the Cayapa: HLA-B*3905, HLA-B*3906, HLA-B*3907, and HLA-B*1522. A total of thirteen new HLA-B alleles have now been found in the four South American tribes studied. Each of these four tribes studied, including the Cayapa, had novel alleles that were not found in any of the other tribes, suggesting that many of these new HLA-B alleles may have evolved since the Paleo-Indians originally populated South America. Each of these 13 new alleles contained predicted amino acid replacements that were located in the peptide binding site. These amino acid replacements may affect the sequence motif of the bound peptides, suggesting that these new alleles have been maintained by selection. New allelic variants have been found for all common HLA-B locus antigenic groups present in South American tribes with the exception of B48. In spite of its high frequency in South American tribes, no evidence for variants of B48 has been found in all the Amerindians studied, suggesting that B48 may have unique characteristics among the B locus alleles. 70 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Gene Map of the HLA Region, Graves' Disease and Hashimoto Thyroiditis, and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sasazuki, Takehiko; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Morishima, Satoko; Morishima, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genomic region spanning about 4 Mb is the most gene dense and the polymorphic stretches in the human genome. A total of the 269 loci were identified, including 145 protein coding genes mostly important for immunity and 50 noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Biological function of these ncRNAs remains unknown, becoming hot spot in the studies of HLA-associated diseases. The genomic diversity analysis in the HLA region facilitated by next-generation sequencing will pave the way to molecular understanding of linkage disequilibrium structure, population diversity, histocompatibility in transplantation, and associations with autoimmune diseases. The 4-digit DNA genotyping of HLA for six HLA loci, HLA-A through DP, in the patients with Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) identified six susceptible and three resistant HLA alleles. Their epistatic interactions in controlling the development of these diseases are shown. Four susceptible and one resistant HLA alleles are shared by GD and HT. Two HLA alleles associated with GD or HT control the titers of autoantibodies to thyroid antigens. All these observations led us to propose a new model for the development of GD and HT. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from unrelated donor (UR-HSCT) provides a natural experiment to elucidate the role of allogenic HLA molecules in immune response. Large cohort studies using HLA allele and clinical outcome data have elucidated that (1) HLA locus, allele, and haplotype mismatches between donor and patient, (2) specific amino acid substitution at specific positions of HLA molecules, and (3) ethnic background are all responsible for the immunological events related to UR-HSCT including acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD, graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect, and graft failure. PMID:26791860

  7. Lesion HLA-G5/-G6 isoforms expression in patients with ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Han, Qiu-Yue; Li, Jing-Bo; Ruan, Yan-Yun; Yan, Wei-Hua; Lin, Aifen

    2016-09-01

    HLA-G is an immune tolerant with seven isoforms. HLA-G expression was observed to be associated with tumor cell immune escaping, invasion and metastasis, and with poor prognosis in cancer patients. Different types of HLA-G isoforms could be expressed in clinical settings when meet different cellular and environmental conditions. Lesion total HLA-G expression detected by the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4H84 was widely investigated in previous studies, while specific HLA-G isoforms such as HLA-G5/-G6 remains to be clarified. In this study, 118 primary ovarian cancer lesions were probed with mAb 5A6G7 which recognizes HLA-G5/-G6 was performed by immunohistochemistry. Data showed that HLA-G5/-G6 was expressed in 79.7% (94/118) of these ovarian cancer lesions, where HLA-G5/-G6 expression was observed in 75.7% (53/70) serous, 63.6% (7/11) mucinous cystadenocarcinoma and in 100% (11/11) endometrioid adenocarcinoma, in 85.7% (6/7) clear cell carcinoma, 100% (10/10) sex cord-stromal tumor and 77.8% (7/9) germ cell tumors. However, lesion HLA-G5/-G6 expression was unrelated to histological type, patient age, FIGO stage and patient survival. Unlike total HLA-G expression, no clinical significance of HLA-G5/-G6 expression in ovarian cancer lesion was observed in this study. Our findings indicated that different HLA-G isoforms might have different biological functions in malignancies. PMID:26687271

  8. HLA-G and MHC Class II Protein Expression in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jesionek-Kupnicka, Dorota; Bojo, Marcin; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Szumera-Ciećkiewicz, Anna; Jabłońska, Joanna; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Kordek, Radzisław; Młynarski, Wojciech; Robak, Tadeusz; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Lech-Maranda, Ewa

    2016-06-01

    The expression of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) and HLA class II protein was studied by immunohistochemical staining of lymph nodes from 148 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and related to the clinical course of the disease. Negative HLA-G expression was associated with a lower probability of achieving a complete remission (p = 0.04). Patients with negative HLA-G expression tended towards a lower 3-year overall survival (OS) rate compared to those with positive expression of HLA-G (p = 0.08). When restricting the analysis to patients receiving chemotherapy with rituximab, the estimated 3-year OS rate of patients with positive HLA-G expression was 73.3 % compared with 47.5 % (p = 0.03) in those with negative expression. Patients with negative HLA class II expression presented a lower 3-year OS rate compared to subjects with positive expression (p = 0.04). The loss of HLA class II expression (p = 0.05) and belonging to the intermediate high/high IPI risk group (p = 0.001) independently increased the risk of death. HLA class II expression also retained its prognostic value in patients receiving rituximab; the 3-year OS rate was 65.3 % in patients with positive HLA class II expression versus 29.6 % (p = 0.04) in subjects that had loss of HLA class II expression. To our knowledge, for the first time, the expression of HLA-G protein in DLBCL and its association with the clinical course of the disease was demonstrated. Moreover, the link between losing HLA class II protein expression and poor survival of patients treated with immunochemotherapy was confirmed. PMID:26667793

  9. HLA variants related to primary sclerosing cholangitis influence rejection after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fosby, Bjarte; Næss, Sigrid; Hov, Johannes R; Traherne, James; Boberg, Kirsten M; Trowsdale, John; Foss, Aksel; Line, Pål-Dag; Franke, Andre; Melum, Espen; Scott, Helge; Karlsen, Tom H

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate influence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and killer immunoglobuline-like receptor (KIR) genotypes on risks of acute rejection (AR) after liver transplantation (LTX). METHODS: In this retrospective study we included 143 adult donor-recipient pairs with a minimum of 6 mo follow-up after LTX for whom DNA was available from both donor and recipients. Clinical data, all early complications including episodes and severity of AR and graft/patient survival were registered. The diagnosis of AR was based on clinical, biochemical and histological criteria. All suspected episodes of AR were biopsy confirmed. Key classical HLA loci (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C and HLA-DRB1) were genotyped using Sanger sequencing. 16 KIR genes were genotyped using a novel real time PCR approach which allows for determination of the diploid copy number of each KIR gene. Immunohistochemical staining for T (CD3), B (CD20) and natural killer (NK) cells (CD56 and CD57) were performed on liver biopsies from 3 different patient groups [primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), primary biliary cirrhosis and non-autoimmune liver disease], 10 in each group, with similar grade of AR. RESULTS: Fourty-four (31%) patients were transplanted on the basis of PSC, 40% of them had AR vs 24% in the non-PSC group (P = 0.04). No significant impact of donor-recipient matching for HLA and KIR genotypes was detected. In the overall recipient population an increased risk of AR was detected for HLA-B*08 (P = 0.002, OR = 2.5; 95%CI: 1.4-4.6), HLA-C*07 (P = 0.001, OR = 2.4; 95%CI: 1.4-4.0) and HLA-DRB1*03 (P = 0.03, OR = 1.9; 95%CI: 1.0-3.3) and a decreased risk for HLA-DRB1*04 (P = 0.001, OR = 0.2; 95%CI: 0.1-0.5). For HLA-B*08, HLA-C*07 and DRB1*04 the associations remained evident in a subgroup analysis of non-PSC recipients (P = 0.04, P = 0.003 and P = 0.02, respectively). In PSC recipients corresponding P values were 0.002, 0.17 and 0.01 for HLA-B*08, HLA-C*07 and DRB1*04, respectively. A dosage effect of AR

  10. Detection of 549 new HLA alleles in potential stem cell donors from the United States, Poland and Germany.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Frederick, C J; Cereb, N; Giani, A S; Ruppel, J; Maraszek, A; Pingel, J; Sauter, J; Schmidt, A H; Yang, S Y

    2016-01-01

    We characterized 549 new human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II alleles found in newly registered stem cell donors as a result of high-throughput HLA typing. New alleles include 101 HLA-A, 132 HLA-B, 105 HLA-C, 2 HLA-DRB1, 89 HLA-DQB1 and 120 HLA-DPB1 alleles. Mainly, new alleles comprised single nucleotide variations when compared with homologous sequences. We identified nonsynonymous nucleotide mutations in 70.7% of all new alleles, synonymous variations in 26.4% and nonsense substitutions in 2.9% (null alleles). Some new alleles (55, 10.0%) were found multiple times, HLA-DPB1 alleles being the most frequent among these. Furthermore, as several new alleles were identified in individuals from ethnic minority groups, the relevance of recruiting donors belonging to such groups and the importance of ethnicity data collection in donor centers and registries is highlighted. PMID:26812061

  11. Unique features of HLA-mediated HIV evolution in a Mexican cohort: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Avila-Rios, Santiago; Ormsby, Christopher E; Carlson, Jonathan M; Valenzuela-Ponce, Humberto; Blanco-Heredia, Juan; Garrido-Rodriguez, Daniela; Garcia-Morales, Claudia; Heckerman, David; Brumme, Zabrina L; Mallal, Simon; John, Mina; Espinosa, Enrique; Reyes-Teran, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    Background Mounting evidence indicates that HLA-mediated HIV evolution follows highly stereotypic pathways that result in HLA-associated footprints in HIV at the population level. However, it is not known whether characteristic HLA frequency distributions in different populations have resulted in additional unique footprints. Methods The phylogenetic dependency network model was applied to assess HLA-mediated evolution in datasets of HIV pol sequences from free plasma viruses and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-integrated proviruses in an immunogenetically unique cohort of Mexican individuals. Our data were compared with data from the IHAC cohort, a large multi-center cohort of individuals from Canada, Australia and the USA. Results Forty three different HLA-HIV codon associations representing 30 HLA-HIV codon pairs were observed in the Mexican cohort (q < 0.2). Strikingly, 23 (53%) of these associations differed from those observed in the well-powered IHAC cohort, strongly suggesting the existence of unique characteristics in HLA-mediated HIV evolution in the Mexican cohort. Furthermore, 17 of the 23 novel associations involved HLA alleles whose frequencies were not significantly different from those in IHAC, suggesting that their detection was not due to increased statistical power but to differences in patterns of epitope targeting. Interestingly, the consensus differed in four positions between the two cohorts and three of these positions could be explained by HLA-associated selection. Additionally, different HLA-HIV codon associations were seen when comparing HLA-mediated selection in plasma viruses and PBMC archived proviruses at the population level, with a significantly lower number of associations in the proviral dataset. Conclusion Our data support universal HLA-mediated HIV evolution at the population level, resulting in detectable HLA-associated footprints in the circulating virus. However, it also strongly suggests that unique genetic

  12. Diversity of Extended HLA-DRB1 Haplotypes in the Finnish Population

    PubMed Central

    Wennerström, Annika; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Lahtela, L. Elisa; Paakkanen, Riitta; Eronen, Katja T.; Seppänen, Mikko; Lokki, Marja-Liisa

    2013-01-01

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC, 6p21) codes for traditional HLA and other host response related genes. The polymorphic HLA-DRB1 gene in MHC Class II has been associated with several complex diseases. In this study we focus on MHC haplotype structures in the Finnish population. We explore the variability of extended HLA-DRB1 haplotypes in relation to the other traditional HLA genes and a selected group of MHC class III genes. A total of 150 healthy Finnish individuals were included in the study. Subjects were genotyped for HLA alleles (HLA-A, -B, -DRB1, -DQB1, and -DPB1). The polymorphism of TNF, LTA, C4, BTNL2 and HLA-DRA genes was studied with 74 SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism). The C4A and C4B gene copy numbers and a 2-bp silencing insertion at exon 29 in C4A gene were analysed with quantitative genomic realtime-PCR. The allele frequencies for each locus were calculated and haplotypes were constructed using both the traditional HLA alleles and SNP blocks. The most frequent Finnish A∼B∼DR -haplotype, uncommon in elsewhere in Europe, was A*03∼B*35∼DRB1*01∶01. The second most common haplotype was a common European ancestral haplotype AH 8.1 (A*01∼B*08∼DRB1*03∶01). Extended haplotypes containing HLA-B, TNF block, C4 and HLA-DPB1 strongly increased the number of HLA-DRB1 haplotypes showing variability in the extended HLA-DRB1 haplotype structures. On the contrary, BTNL2 block and HLA-DQB1 were more conserved showing linkage with the HLA-DRB1 alleles. We show that the use of HLA-DRB1 haplotypes rather than single HLA-DRB1 alleles is advantageous when studying the polymorphisms and LD patters of the MHC region. For disease association studies the HLA-DRB1 haplotypes with various MHC markers allows us to cluster haplotypes with functionally important gene variants such as C4 deficiency and cytokines TNF and LTA, and provides hypotheses for further assessment. Our study corroborates the importance of studying population-specific MHC

  13. Diversity of extended HLA-DRB1 haplotypes in the Finnish population.

    PubMed

    Wennerström, Annika; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Lahtela, L Elisa; Paakkanen, Riitta; Eronen, Katja T; Seppänen, Mikko; Lokki, Marja-Liisa

    2013-01-01

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC, 6p21) codes for traditional HLA and other host response related genes. The polymorphic HLA-DRB1 gene in MHC Class II has been associated with several complex diseases. In this study we focus on MHC haplotype structures in the Finnish population. We explore the variability of extended HLA-DRB1 haplotypes in relation to the other traditional HLA genes and a selected group of MHC class III genes. A total of 150 healthy Finnish individuals were included in the study. Subjects were genotyped for HLA alleles (HLA-A, -B, -DRB1, -DQB1, and -DPB1). The polymorphism of TNF, LTA, C4, BTNL2 and HLA-DRA genes was studied with 74 SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism). The C4A and C4B gene copy numbers and a 2-bp silencing insertion at exon 29 in C4A gene were analysed with quantitative genomic realtime-PCR. The allele frequencies for each locus were calculated and haplotypes were constructed using both the traditional HLA alleles and SNP blocks. The most frequent Finnish A∼B∼DR -haplotype, uncommon in elsewhere in Europe, was A*03∼B*35∼DRB1*01∶01. The second most common haplotype was a common European ancestral haplotype AH 8.1 (A*01∼B*08∼DRB1*03∶01). Extended haplotypes containing HLA-B, TNF block, C4 and HLA-DPB1 strongly increased the number of HLA-DRB1 haplotypes showing variability in the extended HLA-DRB1 haplotype structures. On the contrary, BTNL2 block and HLA-DQB1 were more conserved showing linkage with the HLA-DRB1 alleles. We show that the use of HLA-DRB1 haplotypes rather than single HLA-DRB1 alleles is advantageous when studying the polymorphisms and LD patters of the MHC region. For disease association studies the HLA-DRB1 haplotypes with various MHC markers allows us to cluster haplotypes with functionally important gene variants such as C4 deficiency and cytokines TNF and LTA, and provides hypotheses for further assessment. Our study corroborates the importance of studying population-specific MHC

  14. Comparison of Class II HLA antigen expression in normal and carcinomatous human breast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, D.J.; Maurizis, J.C.; Chassagne, J.; Chollet, P.; Plagne, R.

    1985-03-01

    Class II HLA antigen expression in breast carcinoma and normal breast gland cells was compared using a method more accurate than immunofluorescence. This new method involves labeling membrane proteins with /sup 131/I and the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody with /sup 125/I. The isolation and purification of the doubly labeled (/sup 125/I-/sup 131/I) immune complex was performed by affinity chromatography and chromatofocusing successively. When the specific activity of glycoproteins is known, the amount of glycoprotein which bind specifically to the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody can be deduced. In breast carcinoma cells, 1.5 to 2% of the purified glycoproteins bind specifically to the monoclonal antibody, whereas less than 0.3% of normal breast gland cells binds. In contrast, leukemic cells, of which 80 to 90% possess Class II HLA antigens, 2 to 3% of Class II HLA glycoproteins bind specifically with the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody.

  15. A simple and safe method for single HLA-antigen-typing by a solid phase assay.

    PubMed

    Häcker-Shahin, B; Giannitsis, D J

    1991-01-01

    A rapid solid phase assay for detection of single HLA-antigens on platelets was developed. The platelets were attached to the surface of polystyrene microtitre plate wells by means of a sodium carbonate buffer and centrifugation. Uncovered areas were blocked by a gelatin blocking buffer. After incubation with commercially available anti-HLA-sera the bound anti-HLA-specific antibodies directed against HLA-antigens present on the platelets were made visible by anti-IgG-coated indicator red cells and a brief centrifugation. A positive result, meaning the presence of an HLA-antigen, was indicated by a slight red cell adherence over the reaction surface. In the absence of the HLA-antigen no binding occurred and the indicator red cells formed a small red disc-like pellet. PMID:1954783

  16. HLA reduces KIR expression level and frequency in a humanized mouse model1

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Jeroen; Thompson, Allan; Retière, Christelle; van Pel, Melissa; Salvatori, Daniela; Lemonnier, François; Raulet, David; Trowsdale, John; Koning, Frits

    2014-01-01

    Many human Natural Killer (NK) cells are prevented from killing autologous cells by virtue of inhibitory Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR) binding `self' HLA class I molecules. Individual NK cells stably express a selected set of KIR, but it is currently disputed whether the fraction of NK cells expressing a particular inhibitory KIR is influenced by the presence of the corresponding HLA ligand. This issue has been particularly hard to tackle in a statistically meaningful way due to the extreme polymorphism of the KIR and HLA loci, with widely varying affinities for individual KIR and HLA allele combinations. Here, we use a transgenic mouse model to investigate the effect of HLA on KIR repertoire and function. In this model system, a functional interaction between HLA-Cw3 and KIR2DL2 reduced both the surface expression of KIR2DL2 as well as the frequency of KIR2DL2+ cells. PMID:23390293

  17. An Evaluation of the High Level Architecture (HLA) as a Framework for NASA Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Michael R.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The High Level Architecture (HLA) is a current US Department of Defense and an industry (IEEE-1516) standard architecture for modeling and simulations. It provides a framework and set of functional rules and common interfaces for integrating separate and disparate simulators into a larger simulation. The goal of the HLA is to reduce software costs by facilitating the reuse of simulation components and by providing a runtime infrastructure to manage the simulations. In order to evaluate the applicability of the HLA as a technology for NASA space mission simulations, a Simulations Group at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) conducted a study of the HLA and developed a simple prototype HLA-compliant space mission simulator. This paper summarizes the prototyping effort and discusses the potential usefulness of the HLA in the design and planning of future NASA space missions with a focus on risk mitigation and cost reduction.

  18. Selective elution of HLA antigens and beta 2-microglobulin from human platelets by chloroquine diphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, K.J.

    1988-01-01

    To determine whether chloroquine can specifically elute HLA antigens and beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-M) from the platelet surface, quantitative immunofluorescence flow cytometry and monoclonal antibodies were used to show that HLA antigens and beta 2-M were proportionally eluted from the platelet surface without affecting the membrane glycoproteins IIb and IIIa. Second, an autoradiogram of electrophoresed I-125-labeled platelets showed that only beta 2-M but not other I-125-labeled membrane proteins could be eluted. Although HLA antigens were poorly labeled by I-125 and could not be detected on the autoradiogram, the eluted HLA antigens could be detected by anti-HLA monoclonal antibody and immunoblotting techniques. No loss of plasma membrane integrity was observed by transmission electron microscopy after chloroquine treatment of platelets. The results indicate that chloroquine selectively elutes HLA antigens and their noncovalently associated beta 2-M without affecting other integral platelet membrane proteins.

  19. Next-Generation HLA Sequencing Using the 454 GS FLX System

    PubMed Central

    Trachtenberg, Elizabeth A.; Holcomb, Cherie L.

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of HLA class I and II loci (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, DRB5, DQA1, DQB1, DPB1) is described here in detail using the 454 Life Sciences GS FLX System and Titanium chemistry. An overview of the protocol with our experience on sequence performance efficiencies, read depth and ambiguity analyses using the GS FLX System are also presented. A total of 14 HLA primer pairs with multiplex identifiers (MIDs) are used in clonal, amplicon-based pyrosequencing of up to 44 samples per plate using the GS FLX. Genotype assignment and ambiguity reduction analysis is performed using Conexio Assign ATF 454 software. Clonal NGS gives a significant reduction in genotyping ambiguity during analysis of the highly complex HLA system. PMID:23775738

  20. Web-HLA and Service-Enabled RTI in the Simulation Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jijie; Li, Bo Hu; Chai, Xudong; Zhang, Lin

    HLA-based simulations in a grid environment have now become a main research hotspot in the M&S community, but there are many shortcomings of the current HLA running in a grid environment. This paper analyzes the analogies between HLA and OGSA from the software architecture point of view, and points out the service-oriented method should be introduced into the three components of HLA to overcome its shortcomings. This paper proposes an expanded running architecture that can integrate the HLA with OGSA and realizes a service-enabled RTI (SE-RTI). In addition, in order to handle the bottleneck problem that is how to efficiently realize the HLA time management mechanism, this paper proposes a centralized way by which the CRC of the SE-RTI takes charge of the time management and the dispatching of TSO events of each federate. Benchmark experiments indicate that the running velocity of simulations in Internet or WAN is properly improved.

  1. The Perfect Storm: HLA Antibodies, Complement, FcγRs and Endothelium in Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Kimberly A.; Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in solid organ transplants is multi-faceted and predominantly caused by antibodies directed against polymorphic donor human leukocyte antigens (HLA). Despite the clearly detrimental impact of HLA antibodies (HLA-Ab) on graft function and survival, the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of AMR remain a challenge. Histological manifestations of AMR reflect signatures of HLA-Ab-triggered injury, specifically endothelial changes, recipient leukocytic infiltrate, and complement deposition. We review the interconnected mechanisms of HLA-Ab-mediated injury that might synergize in a “perfect storm” of inflammation. Characterization of antibody features that are critical for effector functions may help identify HLA-Ab more likely to cause rejection. We also highlight recent advancements that may pave the way for new, more effective therapeutics. PMID:25801125

  2. High Level Architecture (HLA) federation with Umbra and OPNET federates.

    SciTech Connect

    Oppel, Fred John III; Hart, Brian; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.

    2004-03-01

    Network-centric systems that depend on mobile wireless ad hoc networks for their information exchange require detailed analysis to support their development. In many cases, this critical analysis is best provided with high-fidelity system simulations that include the effects of network architectures and protocols. In this research, we developed a high-fidelity system simulation capability using an HLA federation. The HLA federation, consisting of the Umbra system simulator and OPNET Modeler network simulator, provides a means for the system simulator to both affect, and be affected by, events in the network simulator. Advances are also made in increasing the fidelity of the wireless communication channel and reducing simulation run-time with a dead reckoning capability. A simulation experiment is included to demonstrate the developed modeling and simulation capability.

  3. [Genetic aspects in multiple sclerosis. II: HLA system].

    PubMed

    De Rezende, P A; Arruda, W O

    1996-09-01

    Review of studies about HLA antigens and multiple sclerosis (MS). The HLA system, in special class II antigens, subregions DR and DQ, is probably involved in the immunopathogenesis of MS. Haplotype DRB1*1501.DQA1*0102.DQB1*0602, corresponding to phenotype DR2.Dw2.DQ6, is positively associated with MS in several caucasoid populations. Clinical heterogeneity of MS, as well as different diagnostic criteria adopted by investigators are potential sources of confusion and may lead to discrepant results. A better standardization of clinical and laboratorial methodology, appropriate subdivision of patients with different clinical forms of MS, may allow a more accurate evaluation of the role of genetic factors in the pathogenesis of MS. PMID:9109989

  4. NetMHCIIpan-3.0, a common pan-specific MHC class II prediction method including all three human MHC class II isotypes, HLA-DR, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ

    PubMed Central

    Karosiene, Edita; Rasmussen, Michael; Blicher, Thomas; Lund, Ole; Buus, Søren; Nielsen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) molecules play an important role in cell-mediated immunity. They present specific peptides derived from endosomal proteins for recognition by T helper cells. The identification of peptides that bind to MHCII molecules is therefore of great importance for understanding the nature of immune responses and identifying T cell epitopes for the design of new vaccines and immunotherapies. Given the large number of MHC variants, and the costly experimental procedures needed to evaluate individual peptide–MHC interactions, computational predictions have become particularly attractive as first-line methods in epitope discovery. However, only a few so-called pan-specific prediction methods capable of predicting binding to any MHC molecule with known protein sequence are currently available, and all of them are limited to HLA-DR. Here, we present the first pan-specific method capable of predicting peptide binding to any HLA class II molecule with a defined protein sequence. The method employs a strategy common for HLA-DR, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ molecules to define the peptide-binding MHC environment in terms of a pseudo sequence. This strategy allows the inclusion of new molecules even from other species. The method was evaluated in several benchmarks and demonstrates a significant improvement over molecule-specific methods as well as the ability to predict peptide binding of previously uncharacterised MHCII molecules. To the best of our knowledge, the NetMHCIIpan-3.0 method is the first pan-specific predictor covering all HLA class II molecules with known sequences including HLA-DR, HLA-DP, and HLA-DQ. The NetMHCpan-3.0 method is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCIIpan-3.0. PMID:23900783

  5. Triploidy with cyclopia and identical HLA alleles in the parents.

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, J C; Philip, P; Charpentier, G; Ferrari, M; Donzeau, M; Ayraud, N

    1984-01-01

    A 22-week pregnancy was terminated after discovery of serious echographic abnormalities. Fetal examination showed cyclopia, sacral meningocele, and syndactyly. The karyotype was 69,XXX. The parents had identical HLA alleles A1, A2, and Bw21. The mechanism of the triploidy was determined by chromosome marker analysis to be digyny. The association of triploidy with holoprosencephaly and the parents' identical immunological status are discussed. Images PMID:6607355

  6. HLA-G expression and role in advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Caocci, G; Greco, M; Fanni, D; Senes, G; Littera, R; Lai, S; Risso, P; Carcassi, C; Faa, G; La Nasa, G

    2016-01-01

    Non-classical human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G class I molecules have an important role in tumor immune escape mechanisms. We investigated HLA-G expression in lymphonode biopsies taken from 8 controls and 20 patients with advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), in relationship to clinical outcomes and the HLA-G 14-basepair (14-bp) deletion-insertion (del-ins) polymorphism. Lymphnode tissue sections were stained using a specific murine monoclonal HLA-G antibody. HLA-G protein expression was higher in cHL patients than controls. In the group of PET-2 positive (positron emission tomography carried out after 2 cycles of standard chemotherapy) patients with a 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS) of 40%, we observed high HLA-G protein expression within the tumor microenvironment with low expression on Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. Conversely, PET-2 negative patients with a PFS of 86% had higher HLA-G protein expression levels on HRS cells compared to the microenvironment. Lower expression on HRS cells was significantly associated with the HLA-G 14-bp ins/ins genotype. These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2.These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2. PMID:27349312

  7. Role of HLA, KIR, MICA, and Cytokines Genes in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Jarduli, Luciana Ribeiro; Sell, Ana Maria; Reis, Pâmela Guimarães; Ayo, Christiane Maria; Mazini, Priscila Saamara; Alves, Hugo Vicentin; Teixeira, Jorge Juarez Vieira; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2013-01-01

    Many genes including HLA, KIR, and MICA genes, as well as polymorphisms in cytokines have been investigated for their role in infectious disease. HLA alleles may influence not only susceptibility or resistance to leprosy, but also the course of the disease. Some combinations of HLA and KIR may result in negative as well as positive interactions between NK cells and infected host cells with M. leprae, resulting in activation or inhibition of NK cells and, consequently, in death of bacillus. In addition, studies have demonstrated the influence of MICA genes in the pathogenesis of leprosy. Specifically, they may play a role in the interaction between NK cells and infected cells. Finally, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been influencing the clinical course of leprosy. Data from a wide variety of sources support the existence of genetic factors influencing the leprosy pathogenesis. These sources include twin studies, segregation analyses, family-based linkage and association studies, candidate gene association studies, and, most recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The purpose of this brief review was to highlight the importance of some immune response genes and their correlation with the clinical forms of leprosy, as well as their implications for disease resistance and susceptibility. PMID:23936864

  8. Association of HLA Polymorphisms with Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in Solid-Organ Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Reshef, R; Luskin, MR; Kamoun, M; Vardhanabhuti, S; Tomaszewski, JE; Stadtmauer, EA; Porter, DL; Heitjan, DF; Tsai, DE

    2011-01-01

    The association between HLA polymorphisms and PTLD was investigated in a case-control study, comparing 110 predominantly adult solid-organ transplant recipients who developed PTLD to 5601 who did not. Donor and recipient HLA were analyzed. We detected a significant association between recipient HLA-A26 and the development of PTLD (OR 2.74; P=0.0007). In Caucasian recipients, both recipient and donor HLA-A26 were independently associated with development of PTLD (recipient A26 OR 2.99; P=0.0004, donor A26 OR 2.81; P=0.002). Analysis of HLA-A and -B haplotypes revealed that recipient HLA-A26, B38 haplotype was strongly correlated with a higher incidence of EBV-positive PTLD (OR 3.99; p=0.001). The common ancestral haplotype HLA-A1, B8, DR3, when carried by the donor, was protective against PTLD (OR 0.41; p=0.05). Several other HLA specificities demonstrated associations with clinical and pathological characteristics as well as survival. These findings demonstrate the importance of HLA polymorphisms in modulating the risk for PTLD, and may be useful in risk stratification and development of monitoring and prophylaxis strategies. PMID:21401872

  9. Prevention of HLA alloimmunization: role of leukocyte depletion and UV-B irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, E. L.

    1990-01-01

    HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of the platelet refractory state. The stimulus for HLA alloimmunization is believed to derive from incompatibility between the recipient's lymphocytes and the passenger donor lymphocytes contained in transfused red cells or platelet concentrates. Two techniques to prevent post-transfusion HLA alloimmunization include filtration, which physically removes the donor lymphocytes, and UV-B irradiation, which renders the donor leukocytes biologically inactive. The role of these two techniques in the prevention of HLA alloimmunization is the focus of this review. PMID:2293501

  10. Cell-surface MHC density profiling reveals instability of autoimmunity-associated HLA

    PubMed Central

    Miyadera, Hiroko; Ohashi, Jun; Lernmark, Åke; Kitamura, Toshio; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphisms within HLA gene loci are strongly associated with susceptibility to autoimmune disorders; however, it is not clear how genetic variations in these loci confer a disease risk. Here, we devised a cell-surface MHC expression assay to detect allelic differences in the intrinsic stability of HLA-DQ proteins. We found extreme variation in cell-surface MHC density among HLA-DQ alleles, indicating a dynamic allelic hierarchy in the intrinsic stability of HLA-DQ proteins. Using the case-control data for type 1 diabetes (T1D) for the Swedish and Japanese populations, we determined that T1D risk–associated HLA-DQ haplotypes, which also increase risk for autoimmune endocrinopathies and other autoimmune disorders, encode unstable proteins, whereas the T1D–protective haplotypes encode the most stable HLA-DQ proteins. Among the amino acid variants of HLA-DQ, alterations in 47α, the residue that is located on the outside of the peptide-binding groove and acts as a key stability regulator, showed strong association with T1D. Evolutionary analysis suggested that 47α variants have been the target of positive diversifying selection. Our study demonstrates a steep allelic hierarchy in the intrinsic stability of HLA-DQ that is associated with T1D risk and protection, suggesting that HLA instability mediates the development of autoimmune disorders. PMID:25485681

  11. Association of HLA polymorphisms with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in solid-organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Reshef, R; Luskin, M R; Kamoun, M; Vardhanabhuti, S; Tomaszewski, J E; Stadtmauer, E A; Porter, D L; Heitjan, D F; Tsai, De E

    2011-04-01

    The association between HLA polymorphisms and PTLD was investigated in a case-control study, comparing 110 predominantly adult solid-organ transplant recipients who developed PTLD to 5601 who did not. Donor and recipient HLA were analyzed. We detected a significant association between recipient HLA-A26 and the development of PTLD (OR 2.74; p = 0.0007). In Caucasian recipients, both recipient and donor HLA-A26 were independently associated with development of PTLD (recipient A26 OR 2.99; p = 0.0004, donor A26 OR 2.81; p = 0.002). Analysis of HLA-A and -B haplotypes revealed that recipient HLA-A26, B38 haplotype was strongly correlated with a higher incidence of EBV-positive PTLD (OR 3.99; p = 0.001). The common ancestral haplotype HLA-A1, B8, DR3, when carried by the donor, was protective against PTLD (OR 0.41; p = 0.05). Several other HLA specificities demonstrated associations with clinical and pathological characteristics as well as survival. These findings demonstrate the importance of HLA polymorphisms in modulating the risk for PTLD, and may be useful in risk stratification and development of monitoring and prophylaxis strategies. PMID:21401872

  12. Genetic editing of HLA expression in hematopoietic stem cells to broaden their human application

    PubMed Central

    Torikai, Hiroki; Mi, Tiejuan; Gragert, Loren; Maiers, Martin; Najjar, Amer; Ang, Sonny; Maiti, Sourindra; Dai, Jianliang; Switzer, Kirsten C.; Huls, Helen; Dulay, Gladys P.; Reik, Andreas; Rebar, Edward J.; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Champlin, Richard E.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2016-01-01

    Mismatch of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) adversely impacts the outcome of patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (alloHSCT). This translates into the clinical requirement to timely identify suitable HLA-matched donors which in turn curtails the chances of recipients, especially those from a racial minority, to successfully undergo alloHSCT. We thus sought to broaden the existing pool of registered unrelated donors based on analysis that eliminating the expression of the HLA-A increases the chance for finding a donor matched at HLA-B, -C, and -DRB1 regardless of a patient’s race. Elimination of HLA-A expression in HSC was achieved using artificial zinc finger nucleases designed to target HLA-A alleles. Significantly, these engineered HSCs maintain their ability to engraft and reconstitute hematopoiesis in immunocompromised mice. This introduced loss of HLA-A expression decreases the need to recruit large number of donors to match with potential recipients and has particular importance for patients whose HLA repertoire is under-represented in the current donor pool. Furthermore, the genetic engineering of stem cells provides a translational approach to HLA-match a limited number of third-party donors with a wide number of recipients. PMID:26902653

  13. Genetic analysis of HLA in the U.S. Schmiedenleut Hutterites.

    PubMed Central

    Kostyu, D D; Ober, C L; Dawson, D V; Ghanayem, M; Elias, S; Martin, A O

    1989-01-01

    The Hutterites are an Anabaptist population, highly inbred, with large family sizes and extensively documented pedigrees. As part of genetic-epidemiologic studies of the impact of HLA on fertility, HLA-A, -B, -C, -DR, and -DQ typing was performed on a total of 650 Schmiedenleut Hutterities in South Dakota. An extraordinary degree of homogeneity was found. HLA-A1, -A2, -A3, -A24, and -A26 accounted for 83%, HLA-B8, -B27, -B35, -B51, -Bw60, and -Bw62 for 75%, and HLA-DR1, -DR2, -DR3, and -DR4 for 66% of the antigens at the respective HLA-A, -B, and -DR loci. All Hutterites characterized for HLA were descendants of no more than 78 ancestors. However, family analysis identified only 45 unique HLA haplotypes thought to reflect the original gene pool. Eight haplotypes were particularly frequent, accounting for nearly 50% of all observed haplotypes; four of these were consistent with a European ancestry. Coefficients measuring linkage disequilibrium were computed from haplotypes identified by family analysis. Overall, HLA analysis portrayed the Schmiedenleut Hutterities as a homogeneous and unique population, with disequilibrium among particular alleles and a spectrum of common and uncommon European haplotypes. PMID:2757031

  14. Prevention of HLA alloimmunization: Role of leukocyte depletion and UV-B irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, E.L. )

    1990-09-01

    HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of the platelet refractory state. The stimulus for HLA alloimmunization is believed to derive from incompatibility between the recipient's lymphocytes and the passenger donor lymphocytes contained in transfused red cells or platelet concentrates. Two techniques to prevent post-transfusion HLA alloimmunization include filtration, which physically removes the donor lymphocytes, and UV-B irradiation, which renders the donor leukocytes biologically inactive. The role of these two techniques in the prevention of HLA alloimmunization is the focus of this review.42 references.

  15. Increased epithelial expression of HLA-DQ and HLA-DP molecules in salivary glands from patients with Sjögren's syndrome compared with obstructive sialadenitis.

    PubMed Central

    Thrane, P S; Halstensen, T S; Haanaes, H R; Brandtzaeg, P

    1993-01-01

    Salivary gland specimens from 10 patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) were examined by two-colour immunofluorescence with various combinations of monoclonal and polyclonal antibody reagents of the following specificities: human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II (DR, DP and DQ), CD3, CD45 (leucocyte common antigen), various cytokeratins, and factor VIII-related antigen. Tissue specimens from 10 normal glands and 10 glands with obstructive sialadenitis (no known autoimmunity) served as controls. Only some intercalated ducts and scattered acini of the normal major glands expressed HLA class II determinants (< 5% of total epithelial area); the relative proportion of positive elements indicated differential expression (DR > DP > DQ). SS glands contained substantial T cell infiltrates and increased numbers of activated (DR+) T cells; adjacent epithelium showed extensive differential expression of HLA class II determinants (DR > DP > DQ). Glands with obstructive sialadenitis showed similarly increased epithelial expression of HLA-DR but with surprisingly small amounts of concomitant HLA-DP and -DQ expression. Epithelial HLA class II expression probably depends on cytokines as an inductive event, which is not unique for SS but particularly prominent in this disorder. Our results suggest that epithelial expression of HLA-DP or -DQ, rather than -DR, might be a prerequisite for the autoimmune process of SS to develop in genetically susceptible individuals. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8485911

  16. Is there any impact of HLA-DPB1 disparity in 10/10 HLA-matched unrelated hematopoietic SCT? Results of a French multicentric retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Gagne, K; Loiseau, P; Dubois, V; Dufossé, F; Perrier, P; Dormoy, A; Jollet, I; Renac, V; Masson, D; Picard, C; Lafarge, X; Hanau, D; Quainon, F; Delbos, F; Coeffic, B; Absi, Léna; Eliaou, J-F; Moalic, V; Fort, M; de Matteis, M; Theodorou, I; Hau, F; Batho, A; Pedron, B; Caillat-Zucman, S; Marry, E; Raus, N; Yakoub-Agha, I; Cesbron, A

    2015-02-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the impact of HLA-DPB1 mismatches in a large cohort of 1342 French patients who underwent 10/10 HLA-matched unrelated HSCT. A significant impact of HLA-DPB1 allelic mismatches (2 vs 0) was observed in severe acute GVHD (aGVHDIII-IV) (risk ratio (RR)=1.73, confidence interval (CI) 95% 1.09-2.73, P=0.019) without impact on OS, TRM, relapse and chronic GVHD (cGVHD). According to the T-cell epitope 3 (TCE3)/TCE4 HLA-DPB1 disparity algorithm, 37.6% and 58.4% pairs had nonpermissive HLA-DPB1, respectively. TCE3 and TCE4 disparities had no statistical impact on OS, TRM, relapse, aGVHD and cGVHD. When TCE3/TCE4 disparities were analyzed in the graft-vs-host or host-vs-graft (HVG) direction, only a significant impact of TCE4 nonpermissive disparities in the HVG direction was observed on relapse (RR=1.34, CI 95% 1.00-1.80, P=0.048). In conclusion, this French retrospective study shows an adverse prognosis of HLA-DPB1 mismatches (2 vs 0) on severe aGVHD and of nonpermissive TCE4 HVG disparities on relapse after HLA-matched 10/10 unrelated HSCT. PMID:25365066

  17. Conditional analyses on the T1DGC MHC dataset: novel associations with type 1 diabetes around HLA-G and confirmation of HLA-B.

    PubMed

    Eike, M C; Becker, T; Humphreys, K; Olsson, M; Lie, B A

    2009-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is known to harbour genetic risk factors for type 1 diabetes (T1D) additional to the class II determinants HLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1, but strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) has made efforts to establish their location difficult. This study utilizes a dataset generated by the T1D genetics consortium (T1DGC), with genotypes for 2965 markers across the MHC in 2321 T1D families of multiple (mostly Caucasian) ethnicities. Using a comprehensive approach consisting of complementary conditional methods and LD analyses, we identified three regions with T1D association, independent both of the known class II determinants and of each other. A subset of polymorphisms that could explain most of the association in each region included single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the vicinity of HLA-G, particular HLA-B and HLA-DPB1 alleles, and SNPs close to the COL11A2 and RING1 genes. Apart from HLA-B and HLA-DPB1, all of these represent novel associations, and subpopulation analyses did not indicate large population-specific differences among Caucasians for our findings. On account of the unusual genetic complexity of the MHC, further fine mapping is demanded, with the possible exception of HLA-B. However, our results mean that these efforts can be focused on narrow, defined regions of the MHC. PMID:18830248

  18. CD94-NKG2A Recognition of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-E Bound to an HLA Class I Leader Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie,E.; Clements, C.; Lin, J.; Sullivan, L.; Johnson, D.; Huyton, T.; Heroux, A.; Hoare, H.; Beddoe, T.; et al

    2008-01-01

    The recognition of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E by the heterodimeric CD94-NKG2 natural killer (NK) receptor family is a central innate mechanism by which NK cells monitor the expression of other HLA molecules, yet the structural basis of this highly specific interaction is unclear. Here, we describe the crystal structure of CD94-NKG2A in complex with HLA-E bound to a peptide derived from the leader sequence of HLA-G. The CD94 subunit dominated the interaction with HLA-E, whereas the NKG2A subunit was more peripheral to the interface. Moreover, the invariant CD94 subunit dominated the peptide-mediated contacts, albeit with poor surface and chemical complementarity. This unusual binding mode was consistent with mutagenesis data at the CD94-NKG2A-HLA-E interface. There were few conformational changes in either CD94-NKG2A or HLA-E upon ligation, and such a 'lock and key' interaction is typical of innate receptor-ligand interactions. Nevertheless, the structure also provided insight into how this interaction can be modulated by subtle changes in the peptide ligand or by the pairing of CD94 with other members of the NKG2 family. Differences in the docking strategies used by the NKG2D and CD94-NKG2A receptors provided a basis for understanding the promiscuous nature of ligand recognition by NKG2D compared with the fidelity of the CD94-NKG2 receptors.

  19. HLA Allele Frequencies in 5802 Koreans: Varied Allele Types Associated with SJS/TEN According to Culprit Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Jung; Kim, Young Joo; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Junho; Park, Kyung Hee; Park, Jung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are very serious forms of drug-induced cutaneous adverse reaction. SJS/TEN induced by certain drug is well known to be associated with some human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene type. We aimed to explore HLA allele frequencies and their association with SJS/TEN according to culprit drugs in Korea. Materials and Methods We enrolled 5802 subjects who had results of HLA typing test from August 2005 to July 2014. Total 28 SJS/TEN patients were categorized based on culprit drugs (allopurinol, lamotrigine, carbamazepine) and identified the presence of HLA-B*58:01, HLA-B*44:03, HLA-B*15:02, and HLA-A*31:01. Results HLA-A*24:02 (20.5%), HLA-B*44:03 (10.0%), and HLA-Cw*01:02 (17.1%) were the most frequent type in HLA-A, -B, and -C genes, respectively. Allele frequencies of HLA-B*58:01, HLA-B*44:03, HLA-A*31:01, and HLA-B*15:02 were 7.0%, 10.0%, 5.0%, and 0.3%, respectively. In 958 allopurinol users, 9 subjects (0.9%) were diagnosed with SJS/TEN. Among them, 8 subjects possessed HLA-B*58:01 allele. SJS/TEN induced by allopurinol was more frequently developed in subjects with HLA-B*58:01 than in subjects without it [odds ratio: 57.4; confidence interval (CI) 7.12-463.50; p<0.001]. Allopurinol treatment, based on screening by HLA-B*58:01 genotyping, could be more cost-effective than that not based on screening. HLA-B*44:03 may be associated with lamotrigine-induced SJS/TEN (odds ratio: 12.75; CI 1.03-157.14; p=0.053). Among carbamazepine users, only two patients experienced SJS/TEN and possessed neither HLA-B*15:02 nor HLA-A*31:03. Conclusion HLA gene frequencies varied in Korea. Screening of HLA-B*58:01 before the use of allopurinol might be needed to anticipate probability of SJS/TEN. PMID:26632391

  20. HLA-B27-Homodimer-Specific Antibody Modulates the Expansion of Pro-Inflammatory T-Cells in HLA-B27 Transgenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Marroquin Belaunzaran, Osiris; Kleber, Sascha; Schauer, Stefan; Hausmann, Martin; Nicholls, Flora; Van den Broek, Maries; Payeli, Sravan; Ciurea, Adrian; Milling, Simon; Stenner, Frank; Shaw, Jackie; Kollnberger, Simon; Bowness, Paul; Petrausch, Ulf; Renner, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Objectives HLA-B27 is a common genetic risk factor for the development of Spondyloarthritides (SpA). HLA-B27 can misfold to form cell-surface heavy chain homodimers (B272) and induce pro-inflammatory responses that may lead to SpA pathogenesis. The presence of B272 can be detected on leukocytes of HLA-B27+ Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients and HLA-B27 transgenic rats. We characterized a novel B272–specific monoclonal antibody to study its therapeutic use in HLA-B27 associated disorders. Methods The monoclonal HD5 antibody was selected from a phage library to target cell-surface B272 homodimers and characterized for affinity, specificity and ligand binding. The immune modulating effect of HD5 was tested in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. Onset and progression of disease profiles were monitored during therapy. Cell-surface B272 and expansion of pro-inflammatory cells from blood, spleen and draining lymph nodes were assessed by flow cytometry. Results HD5 bound B272 with high specificity and affinity (Kd = 0.32 nM). HD5 blocked cell-surface interaction of B272 with immune regulatory receptors KIR3DL2, LILRB2 and Pirb. In addition, HD5 modulated the production of TNF from CD4+ T-cells by limiting B272 interactions in vitro. In an HLA-B27 transgenic rat model repetitive dosing of HD5 reduced the expansion of pro-inflammatory CD4+ T-cells, and decreased the levels of soluble TNF and number of cell-surface B272 molecules. Conclusion HD5 predominantly inhibits early TNF production and expansion of pro-inflammatory CD4+ T-cells in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. Monoclonal antibodies targeting cell-surface B272 propose a new concept for the modulation of inflammatory responses in HLA-B27 related disorders. PMID:26125554

  1. NRAMP1, VDR, HLA-DRB1, and HLA-DQB1 Gene Polymorphisms in Susceptibility to Tuberculosis among the Chinese Kazakh Population: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fang; Zhang, Wanjiang; Zhang, Le; Wu, Jiangdong; Li, Chunzhu; Meng, Xianjie; Wang, Xi; He, Peng; Zhang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Background. To explore the potential role of natural-resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1) gene, vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene, (human leukocyte antigen, (HLA-DRB1) HLA) -DRB1 gene, and HLA-DQB1 gene polymorphisms in susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB) in the Chinese Kazakh population. Methods. A case-control study was performed on the Chinese Kazak population. Genetic polymorphisms of NRAMP1 gene (3′UTR) and VDR gene (TaqI and FokI) were analysed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and sequencing analysis in TB patients and healthy controls. Genetic polymorphisms of HLA-DRB1 gene and HLA-DQB1 gene in the two groups were detected with polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSPs) technique and sequencing analysis. Results. There was statistically significant difference in the 3′UTR polymorphism between the TB patients and healthy controls in the Chinese Kazak population (P = 0.002; OR = 1.859; 95% CI = 1.182–2.926). Significant difference was observed in the FokI polymorphism between the TB patients and healthy controls (P = 0.001; OR = 1.530; 95% CI = 1.007–2.325). It does not disclose any significant association between the disease and TaqI (P > 0.05). Alleles HLA-DRB1∗04 and HLA-DQB1∗0201 occurred more frequently in patients than in controls (P = 0.011 and 0.002; OR = 1.889 and 1.802; 95% CI = 1.153–3.095 and 1.230–2.639, resp.). Conclusions. Polymorphisms in the NRAMP1 gene, VDR gene, HLA-DRB1 gene, and HLA-DQB1 gene are statistically associated with susceptibility to TB in the Chinese Kazakh population. PMID:24024195

  2. Association of HLA-DR4/HLA-DRB1*04 with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Tingkun; Lv, Wenjuan; Zhang, Li; Chen, Jianhuan; Chen, Haoyu

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR4/HLA-DRB1*04 has been reported to be a risk factor for Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease (VKH) with various strength of association. Its sub-alleles were also found to be associated with VKH. However the results were inconsistent. In this study, we systematically searched the related literature, pooled the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of association of HLA-DR4/HLA-DRB1*04 or its sub-alleles with VKH from individual studies, and explored the potential source of heterogeneity. A total of 1853 VKH patients and 4164 controls from 21 articles were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled OR of association of HLA-DR4/HLA-DRB1*04 and VKH was 8.42 (95% CI: 5.69–12.45). There were significant heterogeneity (I2 = 71%). Subgroup analysis indicated that ethnicity was the source of heterogeneity (all I2 = 0, ORs ranged from 2.09–13.69 in subgroups). The sub-alleles, HLA-DRB1*0404 (OR = 2.57), 0405 (OR = 10.31) and 0410 (OR = 6.52) increased the risk of VKH; 0401 (OR = 0.21) protected VKH; while other sub-alleles were not associated with VKH. Our meta-analysis confirmed the association between VKH and HLA-DR4/DRB1*04, found the strength of association is different in different ethnic groups, and identified HLA-DRB1*0404, 0405 and 0410 as risk sub-alleles while 0401 as protective sub-allele. PMID:25382027

  3. The production and crystallization of the human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 complexed with deamidated gliadin peptides implicated in coeliac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Kate N.; Reid, Hugh H.; Borg, Natalie A.; Broughton, Sophie E.; Huyton, Trevor; Anderson, Robert P.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2007-12-01

    The production and crystallization of human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with deamidated gliadin peptides is reported. Crystals of HLA-DQ2{sup PQPELPYPQ} diffracted to 3.9 Å, while the HLA-DQ8{sup EGSFQPSQE} crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å, allowing structure determination by molecular replacement. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 are key risk factors in coeliac disease, as they bind deamidated gluten peptides that are subsequently recognized by CD4{sup +} T cells. Here, the production and crystallization of both HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with the deamidated gliadin peptides DQ2 α-I (PQPELPYPQ) and DQ8 α-I (EGSFQPSQE), respectively, are reported.

  4. Clinical correlates of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G in systemic sclerosis1

    PubMed Central

    Favoino, E; Favia, I E; Vettori, S; Vicenti, C; Prete, M; Valentini, G; Perosa, F

    2015-01-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G has a tolerogenic function and could play a role in the pathogenesis of immune-mediated diseases, including systemic sclerosis (SSc). The aim of this study was to evaluate HLA-G serum expression (sHLA-G) and the HLA-G gene 14 base pairs (bp) insertion/deletion (del−/del+) polymorphism in patients with Ssc, to search for possible associations with clinical and laboratory variables. sHLA-G was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in sera from 77 patients with SSc and 32 healthy donors (HD); the 14 bp del−/del+ polymorphism was evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) genomic DNA. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis identified the HLA-G cut-off that best discriminated dichotomized clinical and serological variables, that was subsequently employed to subdivide SSc patients into HLA-G high (HLA-G+) and low (HLA-G−) profile groups. sHLA-G were not statistically different between SSc patients and HD, nor between distinct SSc autoantibody subsets. Subdividing SSc patients by HLA-G positivity or negativity yielded significant differences for the modified Rodnan skin score (mRss) (P = 0·032), ‘general’ (P = 0·031) and ‘kidney’ (P = 0·028) Medsger severity scores (MSS) and disease activity index, and especially Δ heart/lung (P = 0·005). A worse ‘general’ MSS (P = 0·002) and Δ heart/lung (P = 0·011) were more frequent in the low sHLA-G group. These two variables and mRss were associated with sHLA-G levels at logistic regression analysis. Treatment had no influence on sHLA-G. Moreover, a higher frequency of scleredema was detected in the del+/del+ than the del-/del+ group (P = 0.04). These data suggest modulatory effects of sHLA-G on SSc. Prospective studies are needed to investigate a role in predicting the disease course. PMID:25847615

  5. Primary sclerosing cholangitis in genetically diverse populations listed for liver transplantation: Unique clinical and HLA associations

    PubMed Central

    Bowlus, Christopher L.; Li, Chin-Shang; Karlsen, Tom H.; Lie, Benedicte A.; Selmi, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is well characterized in European populations. We aimed to characterize clinical characteristics and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations in a population of European American, Hispanic and African-American PSC patients listed for liver transplantation. Demographic, clinical, and HLA data stratified by population from 6,767 liver transplant (LT) registrants of the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) with a diagnosis of PSC (4.7% of registrants) were compared to registrants with other diagnoses. Compared to European Americans and Hispanics, African American cases were significantly younger (46.6 ± 13.7, 42.3 ± 15.9, and 39.7 ± 13.1, respectively; p = 0.002), listed with a higher Model of End Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score (15.2 ± 7.5, 14.9 ± 7.6, and 18.1 ± 9.3, respectively; p = 0.001), and less frequently noted to have inflammatory bowel disease (71.4% versus 60.5%, p < 0.01) compared to European Americans. In multivariate analysis, African origin was a significant factor associated with listing for LT with PSC (OR relative to European Americans 1.33, 95% C.I. 1.27 – 1.41). HLA associations in European Americans, Hispanics and African Americans with PSC compared to alcoholic liver disease were detected for HLA-B8, HLA-DR13 and the protective HLA-DR4. However, HLA-DR3, which is in linkage disequilibrium with HLA-B8, only showed associations in European Americans and Hispanics. African Americans with PSC listed for LT differ clinically from European Americans and Hispanics. The association with HLA-B8 but not HLA-DR3 in African Americans should make possible the refinement of the HLA associations in PSC. PMID:21031548

  6. Association of HLA-G 3' untranslated region variants with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    de Albuquerque, Rafael S; Mendes-Junior, Celso Teixeira; Lucena-Silva, Norma; da Silva, Camila Leal Lopes; Rassi, Diane Meire; Veiga-Castelli, Luciana C; Foss-Freitas, Maria Cristina; Foss, Milton César; Deghaide, Neifi Hassan Saloum; Moreau, Philippe; Gregori, Silvia; Castelli, Erick C; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio

    2016-04-01

    Besides the well recognized association of HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 alleles with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D), linkage studies have identified a gene region close to the non-classical class I HLA-G gene as an independent susceptibility marker. HLA-G is constitutively expressed in the endocrine compartment of the human pancreas and may play a role in controlling autoimmune responses. We evaluated the genetic diversity of the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of HLA-G, which have been associated with HLA-G mRNA post-transcriptional regulation, in 120 Brazilian T1D patients and in 120 healthy controls. We found the +3001 T allele was observed only in T1D patients. Notably, the +3001 T allele was in linkage disequilibrium with polymorphic sites associated with low production of HLA-G mRNA or soluble HLA-G levels. Moreover, T1D patients showed a low frequency of the HLA-G 3'UTR-17 (14bpINS/+3001T/+3003T/+3010C/+3027C/+3035T/+3142G/+3187A/+3196C). The +3010 CC genotype and the UTR-3 haplotype (14bpDEL/+3001C/+3003T/+3010C/+3027C/+3035C/+3142G/+3187A/+3196C), associated with low and moderate soluble HLA-G expression, respectively, were underrepresented in patients. The decreased expression of HLA-G at the pancreas level should be detrimental in individuals genetically prone to produce less HLA-G. PMID:26883941

  7. EDEM1 targets misfolded HLA-B27 dimers for endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation

    PubMed Central

    Guiliano, David B.; Fussell, Helen; Lenart, Izabela; Tsao, Edward; Nesbeth, Darren; Fletcher, Adam J.; Campbell, Elaine C.; Yousaf, Nasim; Williams, Sarah; Santos, Susana; Cameron, Amy; Towers, Greg J.; Kellam, Paul; Hebert, Daniel N.; Gould, Keith; Powis, Simon J.; Antoniou, Antony N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective HLA-B27 forms misfolded heavy chain dimers, which may predispose individuals to inflammatory arthritis by inducing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR). We wanted to define the role of the UPR induced ER associated degradation (ERAD) pathway in the disposal of HLA-B27 dimeric conformers. Methods HeLa cell lines expressing only two copies of a carboxy terminally Sv5 tagged HLA-B27 were generated. The ER stress induced EDEM1 protein was over expressed by transfection and dimer levels monitored by immunoblotting. EDEM1, the UPR associated transcription factor XBP-1, the E3 ubiquitin ligase HRD1, the degradation associated derlin 1 and 2 proteins were inhibited by either short hairpin RNA or dominant negative mutants. The UPR associated ERAD of HLA-B27 was confirmed using ER stress inducing pharamacological agents in kinetic and pulse chase assays. Results We demonstrate that UPR induced machinery can target HLA-B27 dimers, and that dimer formation can be controlled by alterations to expression levels of components of the UPR induced ERAD pathway. HLA-B27 dimers and misfolded MHC class I monomeric molecules were detected bound to EDEM1, with overexpression of EDEM1 inhibiting HLA-B27 dimer formation. EDEM1 inhibition resulted in upregulation of HLA-B27 dimers, whilst UPR induced ERAD of dimers was prevented in the absence of EDEM1. HLA-B27 dimer formation was also enhanced in the absence of XBP-1, HRD1 and derlin1/2. Conclusion The UPR ERAD pathway as described here can dispose of HLA-B27 dimers and presents a potential novel therapeutic target for the modulation of HLA-B27 associated inflammatory disease. PMID:25132672

  8. Role of HLA-G1 in trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Feng; Zhao, Hongxi; Wang, Li; Guo, Xinyu; Wang, Xiaohong; Yin, Guowu; Hu, Yunsheng; Li, Yi; Yao, Yuanqing

    2015-02-27

    Trophoblast cells are important in embryo implantation and fetomaternal tolerance. HLA-G is specifically expressed at the maternal–fetal interface and is a regulator in pregnancy. The aim of the present study was to detect the effect of HLA-G1 on trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion, and invasion. Human trophoblast cell lines (JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells) were infected with HLA-G1-expressing lentivirus. After infection, HLA-G1 expression of the cells was detected by western blotting. Cell proliferation was detected by the BrdU assay. The cell cycle and apoptosis of JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells was measured by flow cytometry (FCM). The invasion of the cells under different conditions was detected by the transwell invasion chamber assay. HLA-G1 didn't show any significant influence on the proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and invasion of trophocytes in normal culture conditions. However, HLA-G1 inhibited JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells invasion induced by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) under normal oxygen conditions. In conditions of hypoxia, HLA-G1 couldn't inhibit the induction of cell invasion by HGF. HLA-G1 is not an independent factor for regulating the trophocytes. It may play an indirect role in embryo implantation and formation of the placenta. - Highlights: • HLA-G1 could not influence trophocytes under normal conditions. • HLA-G1 inhibited cell invasion induced by HGF under normal oxygen condition. • HLA-G1 could not influence cell invasion under hypoxia conditions.

  9. HLA antigen changes in malignant cells: epigenetic mechanisms and biologic significance

    PubMed Central

    Campoli, Michael; Ferrone, Soldano

    2009-01-01

    Changes in classical and non-classical HLA class I as well as HLA class II antigens have been identified in malignant lesions. These changes which are described in this paper are believed to play a major role in the clinical course of the disease since both HLA class I and class II antigens are critical to the interaction between tumor cells and components of both innate and adaptive immune system. Abnormalities in HLA antigen expression in malignant cells, which range in frequency from 0-90%, are caused by distinct mechanisms. They include defects in β2-microglobulin (β2m) synthesis, loss of the gene(s) encoding HLA antigen heavy chain(s), mutations which inhibit HLA antigen heavy chain transcription or translation, defects in the regulatory mechanisms which control HLA antigen expression and/or abnormalities in one or more of the antigen processing machinery (APM) components. More recently, epigenetic events associated with tumor development and progression have been found to underlie changes in HLA antigen, APM component, co-stimulatory molecule and TA expression in malignant cells. The types of epigenetic modifications that may occur in normal and malignant cells as well as their role underlying changes in HLA expression by malignant cells have been reviewed. The epigenetic events associated with alterations in HLA antigen expression may be clinically relevant since, in some case, they have been shown to impair the recognition of tumor cells by components of the adaptive immune system. The functional relevance and potential clinical significance of these epigenetic alterations have been addressed. Lastly, unlike genetic alterations, epigenetic modifications can, in some cases, be reversed with pharmacologic agents that induce DNA hypomethylation or inhibit histone deacetylation. Therefore strategies to overcome epigenetic modifications underlying changes in HLA expression in malignant cells have been discussed. PMID:18836468

  10. Regulation and trafficking of the HLA-E molecules during monocyte-macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Camilli, Giorgio; Cassotta, Antonino; Battella, Simone; Palmieri, Gabriella; Santoni, Angela; Paladini, Fabiana; Fiorillo, Maria Teresa; Sorrentino, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    HLA-E is a nonclassical HLA-class I molecule whose best known role is to protect from the natural killer cells. More recently, an additional function more similar to that of classical HLA-class I molecules, i.e., antigen presentation to T cells, is emerging. However, much remains to be explored about the intracellular trafficking of the HLA-E molecules. With the use of 3 different cellular contexts, 2 monocytic cell lines, U937 and THP1, and peripheral blood monocytes, we show here a remarkable increase of HLA-E during monocyte-macrophage differentiation. This goes independently from the classical HLA-class I, the main source of HLA-E-specific peptides, which is found strongly up-regulated upon differentiation of peripheral blood monocytes but not at all in the case of U937 and THP1 cell lines. Although in all cases, there was a moderate increase of HLA-E expressed in the cell surface, lysis by natural killer cells is comparably restored by an anti-NKG2A antibody in untreated as well as in PMA-differentiated U937 cells. Instead, the great majority of the HLA-E is retained in the vesicles of the autophagy-lysosome network, where they colocalize with the microtubule-associated protein light chain 3, as well as with the lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1. We conclude that differently from the classical HLA-class I molecules, the primary destination of the newly synthesized HLA-E molecules in macrophages is, rather than the cell membrane, the intracellular autophagy-lysosomal vesicles where they are stored and where they can encounter the exogenous antigens. PMID:26310830

  11. Identification of a novel HLA-G+ regulatory population in blood: expansion after allogeneic transplantation and de novo HLA-G expression at graft-versus-host disease sites

    PubMed Central

    Lazana, Ioanna; Zoudiari, Anastasia; Kokkinou, Dimitra; Themeli, Maria; Liga, Maria; Papadaki, Helen; Papachristou, Dionysios; Spyridonidis, Alexandros

    2012-01-01

    Background The human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) has been considered to be an important tolerogeneic molecule playing an essential role in maternal-fetal tolerance, which constitutes the perfect example of successful physiological immunotolerance of semi-allografts. In this context, we investigated the putative role of this molecule in the allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation setting. Design and Methods The percentage of HLA-G+ cells in peripheral blood of healthy donors and allo-transplanted patients was evaluated by flow cytometry. Their immunoregulatory and tolerogeneic properties were investigated in in vitro immunostimulatory and immunosuppression assays. Immunohistochemical analysis for HLA-G expression was performed in skin biopsies from allo-transplanted patients and correlated with the occurrence of graft-versus-host disease. Results We identified a CD14+HLA-Gpos population with an HLA-DRlow phenotype and decreased in vitro immunostimulatory capacity circulating in peripheral blood of healthy individuals. Naturally occurring CD14+HLA-Gpos cells suppressed T-cell responses and exerted an immunotolerogenic action on T cells by rendering them hyporesponsive and immunosuppressive in vitro. After allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, HLA-Gpos cells increase in blood. Interestingly, besides an increase in CD14+HLA-Gpos cells, there was also a pronounced expansion of CD3+HLA-Gpos cells. Of note, CD3+HLA-Gpos and CD14+HLA-Gpos cells from transplanted patients were suppressive in in vitro lymphoproliferation assays. Furthermore, we found an upregulation of HLA-G expression in skin specimens from transplanted patients that correlated with graft-versus-host disease. Inflammatory cells infiltrating the dermis of transplanted patients were also HLA-Gpos. Conclusions We report the presence of naturally occurring HLA-Gpos monocytic cells with in vitro suppressive properties. HLA-G expressing regulatory blood cells were found in increased numbers after

  12. The production and crystallization of the human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 complexed with deamidated gliadin peptides implicated in coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Kate N.; Reid, Hugh H.; Borg, Natalie A.; Broughton, Sophie E.; Huyton, Trevor; Anderson, Robert P.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2007-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 are key risk factors in coeliac disease, as they bind deamidated gluten peptides that are subsequently recognized by CD4+ T cells. Here, the production and crystallization of both HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with the deamidated gliadin peptides DQ2 α-I (PQPELPYPQ) and DQ8 α-I (EGSFQPSQE), respectively, are reported. PMID:18084083

  13. The diversity of the HLA-E-restricted peptide repertoire explains the immunological impact of the Arg107Gly mismatch.

    PubMed

    Celik, Alexander A; Kraemer, Thomas; Huyton, Trevor; Blasczyk, Rainer; Bade-Döding, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E molecules are potent inhibitors of NK cell-mediated killing. Low in polymorphisms, two alleles are widely expressed among diverse populations: HLA-E*01:01 and HLA-E*01:03. Both alleles are distinguished by one SNP resulting in the substitution Arg107Gly. Both alleles present a limited set of peptides derived from class I leader sequences physiologically; however, HLA-E*01:01 presents non-canonical peptides in the absence of HLA class I molecules. To further assess the functional differences between both alleles, we analyzed the peptide repertoire of HLA-E*01:03 by applying soluble HLA technology followed by mass-spectrometric peptide sequencing. HLA-E*01:03 restricted peptides showed a length of 9-17 amino acids and differed in their biophysical properties, no overlap in the peptide repertoire of both allelic variants could be observed; however, both alleles shared marginal peptides from the same proteomic content. Artificial APCs expressing empty HLA-E*01:01 or E*01:03 molecules were generated and stabilized using cognate HLA class I-derived peptide ligands to analyze the impact of residue 107 within the HLA-E heavy chain on the NKG2/CD94 receptor engagement. Differences in peptide stabilization could be translated to the density and half-life time of peptide-HLA-E molecules on the cell surface that subsequently impacted NK cell inhibition as verified by cytotoxicity assays. Taken together, these data illustrate functional differences of HLA-E allelic variants induced by a single amino acid. Furthermore, the function of HLA-E in pathophysiologic situations when the HLA processing machinery is interrupted seems to be more emphasized than previously described, implying a crucial role for HLA-E in tumor or viral immune episodes. PMID:26552660

  14. HLA analysis in patients with degenerative diseases of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Learreta, Jorge A; Bono, Andrea E; Durst, Andreas C

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence of HLA alleles, specifically HLA-DR alleles, and to correlate them with clinical and radiological features of patients with degenerative processes (DP) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The final goal was to determine which allele can be used to identify patients having more aggressive forms of the articular pathologies. Thirty-two (32) Caucasian patients with DP of the TMJ were included in the study. The SSOP (Luminex Corp., Austin, TX) method was used to determine class II HLA alleles. The presence of HLA-II DR in patients with DP of the TMJ was 98%. The presence of HLA was significantly higher in patients with DP of the TMJ than in healthy subjects (66%) (p=0.003). HLA DR52 was significantly more frequent in patients than in healthy individuals (40.62% vs. 13.79%, p = 0.041). While the percentage of DR11 positive individuals was also higher among patients than among healthy control subjects, the association with DP of the TMJ was not significant (p=0.220). Patients having the DR52 allele had higher deformation or DP. It was concluded that HLA-DR54 and DR11 alleles are associated with a higher susceptibility to DP of the TMJ, and HLA-DR54 and DR52 are associated with a higher severity of DP. PMID:21370767

  15. Genetic heterogeneity within the HLA region in three distinct clinical subgroups of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Hughes, Travis; Yilmaz, Vuslat; Durmus, Hacer; Adler, Adam; Alahgholi-Hajibehzad, Mahdi; Aysal, Fikret; Yentür, Sibel P; Akalin, Mehmet Ali; Dogan, Oner; Marx, Alexander; Gülsen-Parman, Yesim; Oflazer, Piraye; Deymeer, Feza; Sawalha, Amr H

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to investigate genetic susceptibility to early-onset and late-onset anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis (EOMG and LOMG) and anti-muscle specific kinase antibody positive MG (MuSK-MG) at genome-wide level in a single population. Using a custom-designed array and imputing additional variants and the classical HLA alleles in 398 patients, we detected distinct associations. In EOMG, rs113519545 in the HLA class I region (OR=5.71 [3.77-8.66], P=2.24×10(-16)), HLA-B*08:01 (OR=7.04 [3.95-12.52], P=3.34×10(-11)) and HLA-C*07:01 (OR=2.74 [1.97-3.81], P=2.07(-9)), in LOMG, rs111256513 in the HLA class II region (OR=2.22 [1.59-3.09], P=2.48×10(-6)) and in MuSK-MG, an intronic variant within HLA-DQB1 (rs68081734, OR=5.86, P=2.25×10(-14)) and HLA-DQB1*05:02 (OR=8.56, P=6.88×10(-13)) revealed the most significant associations for genome-wide significance. Differential genetic susceptibility within the HLA to EOMG, LOMG and MuSK-MG has been established in a population from Turkey. PMID:27181991

  16. Role of Chlamydia trachomatis and HLA-B27 in sexually acquired reactive arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Keat, A C; Maini, R N; Nkwazi, G C; Pegrum, G D; Ridgway, G L; Scott, J T

    1978-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritis, tendinitis, and fasciitis after non-specific urethritis ("sexually acquired reactive arthritis" (SARA)) was studied prospectively in 531 men with non-specific urethritis, with particular reference to the frequency of isolation of Chlamydia trachomatis and the presence of HLA-B27. Satisfactory cultures were obtained from the urethral swabs from 384 patients; and HLA typing was performed on 482, of whom 30 (6%) were HLA-B27-positive. Arthritis developed in 16 patients, and five of the 14 (36%) with satisfactory cultures were positive for C trachomatis; 135 of the patients without arthritis were also positive for C trachomatis, an identical proportion. Seven of the 15 patients (40%) with arthritis who were HLA-typed were HLA-B27-positive. Six of the 30 patients with HLA-B27 developed peripheral arthritis in contrast to only nine of the 452 patients lacking the antigen, suggesting a tenfold increase susceptibility. C trachomatis, however, was no more prevalent in cultures from HLA-B27-positive men than from the others. Thus carriage of C trachomatis is unlikely to be influenced by HLA-B27. C trachomatis may be an important pathogen in some cases of SARA but does not appear to be an exclusive trigger factor for this condition. PMID:630254

  17. HLA-B27 frequency in a group of patients with psoriatic arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Danilo Garcia; de Azevedo, Mário Newton Leitão; Lupi, Omar

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND HLA-B27 is associated with spondyloarthritis, a group of diseases that includes psoriatic arthritis. OBJECTIVES To describe the HLA-B27 frequency in a group of Brazilian patients with psoriatic arthritis and correlate its presence or absence with their clinical manifestations. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 44 psoriatic arthritis patients of a Rheumatology clinic. Demographic and social data were recorded, as were skin and joints clinical examination. HLA-B27 was tested. All data were processed descriptively and comparatively by appropriate software. Parametric and non parametric tests were used with 5% statistical significance. RESULTS HLA-B27 was negative in 32 of the 44 patients (72,7%). Most of them were male, Caucasian, living in Rio de Janeiro, with plaque type psoriasis and average age of 52,9 years. There was statistical significant correlation between positive HLA-B27 and male gender (p=0,004). Negative HLA-B27 had a tendency to correlate with hands and wrists arthritis (p=0,07). There was an inverse significant correlation between HLA values and Schöber's test (p=0,02). CONCLUSION Although HLA-B27 is negative in most of patients, it is significantly associated to male gender and inversely correlated with Schöber's test. PMID:23197202

  18. Genetic interplay between HLA-C and MIR148A in HIV control and Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Smita; Qi, Ying; O'hUigin, Colm; Pereyra, Florencia; Ramsuran, Veron; McLaren, Paul; Fellay, Jacques; Nelson, George; Chen, Haoyan; Liao, Wilson; Bass, Sara; Apps, Richard; Gao, Xiaojiang; Yuki, Yuko; Lied, Alexandra; Ganesan, Anuradha; Hunt, Peter W; Deeks, Steven G; Wolinsky, Steven; Walker, Bruce D; Carrington, Mary

    2013-12-17

    Variation in the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of the HLA-C locus determines binding of the microRNA Hsa-miR-148a, resulting in lower cell surface expression of alleles that bind miR-148a relative to those alleles that escape its binding. The HLA-C 3'UTR variant was shown to associate with HIV control, but like the vast majority of disease associations in a region dense with causal candidates, a direct effect of HLA-C expression level on HIV control was not proven. We demonstrate that a MIR148A insertion/deletion polymorphism associates with its own expression levels, affecting the extent to which HLA-C is down-regulated, the level of HIV control, and the risk of Crohn disease only among those carrying an intact miR-148a binding site in the HLA-C 3'UTR. These data illustrate a direct effect of HLA-C expression level on HIV control that cannot be attributed to other HLA loci in linkage disequilibrium with HLA-C and highlight the rich complexity of genetic interactions in human disease. PMID:24248364

  19. Significant association of HLA-DQ5 with autoimmune hepatitis in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Koay, Lok-Beng; Sun, Chi-Shu; Tsai, Sun-Lung; Lin, Ching-Yih

    2007-12-01

    Genetic predisposition is known to be an important etiopathogenic factor of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). HLA antigens associated with AIH have been well studied in Western countries and Japan, but there is no HLA typing data of AIH patients in Taiwan. We therefore investigated HLA phenotypes and their association with AIH patients and compared the results with those of normal subjects and patients with chronic liver disease. Group 1 consisted of 22 AIH patients. All were born in Taiwan with no history of blood transfusion. Group 2 consisted of 19 chronic liver disease patients. Group 3 consisted of 81 unrelated healthy subjects who were normal blood donors. All three groups were tested for HLA phenotypes (HLAA, B, C, DR, DQ) using the polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific probe method. The statistical method used was Fisher's exact test. We found that HLA-DQ5 was significantly more frequent in the AIH group compared to the control group (RR, 2.03; p = 0.034). Low frequency of A1 (n = 2/22), B8 (n = 1/22) and DR3 (n = 0/22) were noted compared to results from the West; only HLA-DR4 showed a higher rate in our AIH patients (n = 8/22). This is a preliminary report of our study of HLA antigens in AIH patients. Further investigation to characterize AIH patients into HLA allelic subgroups is being done. PMID:18194915

  20. Distribution of HLA haplotypes across Japanese Archipelago: similarity, difference and admixture.

    PubMed

    Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Inoue, Ituro

    2015-11-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region is the most polymorphic region in the human genome. The polymorphic nature of the HLA region is thought to have been shaped from balancing selection. The complex migration events during the Out-of-Africa expansion have influenced geographic patterns of HLA allele frequencies and diversities across present-day human populations. Differences in the HLA allele frequency may contribute geographic differences in the susceptibility to many diseases, such as infectious, autoimmune and metabolic diseases. Here we briefly reviewed characteristics of frequency distribution of HLA alleles and haplotypes in Japanese population. A large part of HLA alleles and haplotypes that are common in Japanese are shared with neighboring Asian populations. The differentiations in HLA alleles and haplotypes across Japanese regional populations may provide clues to model for peopling of Japanese Archipelago and for design of genetic association studies. Finally, we introduce recent topics that new HLA alleles derived from ancient admixtures with Neanderthals and Denisovans are thought to have played an important role in the adaptation of modern humans to local pathogens during Out-of-Africa expansion. PMID:26202576

  1. Role of microRNAs on HLA-G expression in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Barbara

    2016-09-01

    The non-classical human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) known to protect the embryo from immune cell destruction leading to fetal maternal tolerance is often overexpressed in human tumors of distinct origin thereby leading to an escape from T and NK cell-mediated immune response. The molecular mechanisms controlling HLA-G expression are complex and involve deregulation at the transcriptional, epigenetic and posttranscriptional level. Using bioinformatics and high through put analyses a number of microRNAs (miRs) have been identified, which were able to bind to the 3' UTR of HLA-G with distinct efficacy. This caused by a downregulation of HLA-G surface expression, which was associated with an increased immune response thereby overcoming the HLA-G-mediated immune tolerance. Reduced expression of HLA-G-specific miRs was associated with tumor progression and metastases and appear to affect directly or indirectly tumor characteristics, such as cell proliferation, apoptosis and resistance to chemotherapy. Recently, an interaction between long non-coding RNAs, such as HOTAIR, and HLA-G-specific miRs has also been demonstrated. This review summarizes the control of HLA-G expression and function by microRNAs as well as its clinical significance. PMID:27142884

  2. Induction of obliterative airway disease by anti-HLA class I antibodies.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Takahiro; Jaramillo, Andrés; Narayanan, Kishore; Higuchi, Toru; Mohanakumar, T

    2005-09-01

    Anti-HLA class I Abs are associated with the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) after lung transplantation. BOS is characterized histologically by fibrosis and airway epithelial cell apoptosis. We have previously shown that anti-HLA class I Abs induce proliferation, growth factor production and apoptosis in airway epithelial cells in vitro. Thus, this study was designed to determine whether anti-HLA class I Abs alone could induce obliterative airway disease (OAD) in heterotopic murine tracheal allografts. Toward this, HLA-A*0201-transgenic tracheal allografts were transplanted into Rag1-deficient mice treated with the W6/32 anti-HLA class I mAb. Allografts were harvested at days +30, +45, +60 and +90. Allografts displayed epithelial metaplasia by day +45, epithelial destruction and mild cellular infiltration by day +60 and complete lumen obliteration and moderate cellular infiltration by day +90. Anti-HLA class I Abs induced the production of several growth factors and growth factor receptors and apoptosis of parenchymal cells in the allograft. In addition, anti-HLA class I Abs induced macrophages and granulocytes infiltration. The results from this study demonstrate that anti-HLA class I Abs play an important role in the pathogenesis of OAD by inducing growth factor production, apoptosis and chemotaxis of inflammatory cells. PMID:16095491

  3. HLA mismatching as a strategy to reduce relapse after alternative donor transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fleischhauer, Katharina; Beelen, Dietrich W

    2016-04-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatches are targets of alloreactive T cells, mediators of graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) after alternative donor transplantation. Exploitation of HLA mismatching in order to reduce relapse is hampered by necessary interventions aimed at controlling GvHD on the one hand, and by the possibility of immune escape through selective loss of mismatched HLA in relapsing leukemia on the other. Retrospective studies reporting the impact of HLA mismatches on post-transplant relapse need to be interpreted with caution, due to many confounding factors, including disease and use of T-cell depletion, and to be constantly updated to the rapidly changing clinical protocols. Current evidence suggests similar relapse rates for 8/8, 7/8 HLA-matched unrelated, T-cell-replete haploidentical and umbilical cord blood transplantation; however, investigations of locus-specific effects are still scarce in the latter two settings. In unrelated transplantation, a specific role for mismatches at HLA-C and HLA-DPB1, and therein of permissive mismatches defined on the basis of T-cell alloreactivity and/or expression levels, in reducing relapse has been demonstrated in independent studies. This observation suggests new approaches to utilize HLA matching in unrelated donor searches, and the need for further research in the field. PMID:27000727

  4. Distribution of HLA class II alleles among Spanish patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    González-Escribano, M F; Jiménez, G; Walter, K; Montes, M; Perez-Bernal, A M; Rodríguez, M R; Conejo-Mir, J S; Núñez-Roldán, A

    1998-09-01

    Twenty-six unrelated Spanish Caucasian individuals affected by pemphigus vulgaris (PV) were HLA typed and frequencies compared with those of 200 ethnically matched healthy controls. Twenty-three out of 26 patients were HLA-DR4. The frequency of HLA-DR14 was also increased (31%; controls: 4%). Of the 23 patients positive for HLA-DR4, 21 carried the DRB1*0402 allele. Therefore, the frequency of HLA-DRB1*0402 among patients was 81% (4% in controls; P=4.7x10(-27), OR=100.8). Interestingly, HLA-DR13, a frequent HLA-DR specificity in the Spanish general population (27%), was absent among the PV patients (P=0.009; Pc=0.1; OR=0.05). Taking together these data, we can conclude that, in the Spanish population, PV is preferentially and strongly associated with HLA-DRB1*0402, whereas DRB1*13 seems to confer a protective effect in our population. PMID:9802608

  5. NKG2C, HLA-E and their association with psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Forum; Marusina, Alina I; Duong, Christopher; Adamopoulos, Iannis E; Maverakis, Emanual

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activation is regulated by the integration of signals from inhibitory and activating cell surface receptors. Both NKG2A and NKG2C, pair with CD94 to form inhibitory and activating receptors specific for the HLA-E-canonical peptide complex. HLA-E is a nonclassical MHC Class Ib molecule with limited polymorphism. It preferentially binds to and presents leader sequence peptides derived from classical MHC class I molecules. Wilson Liao and colleagues have identified an association between NKG2C deficiency and psoriasis. They have also discovered an HLA-C-dependent association between HLA-E and psoriasis. Their research highlights the importance of NK cells in the pathophysiology of psoriasis. Herein we propose two different models to explain the association between NKG2C, HLA-E, and psoriasis. In the first model we hypothesize that NKG2C deficiency and/or HLA-E O1:01 can inhibit the ability of NK cells to regulate autoreactive T cells, predisposing to psoriasis. The second model proposes that HLA-E 01:03 can disrupt the presentation of the psoriasis-inducing self-determinant by HLA-C, thereby protecting against psoriasis. PMID:24279916

  6. HLA Class I and Class II Associations with ESRD in Saudi Arabian Population

    PubMed Central

    Hamdi, Nuha Mahmoud; Al-Hababi, Fadel Hassan; Eid, Amr Ekhlas

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic renal failure (CRF) leads in the majority of instances to end stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring renal replacement therapy. Our interest was to evaluate the possible associations of HLA class I and class II antigens with ESRD independent of other factors, in Saudi Arabia population. Methodology A retrospective study to determine the HLA class I and class II polymorphisms and their association with ESRD, was performed on 350 patients with ESRD, and 105 healthy unrelated control. Patients and control groups were typed by SSOP lumenix techniques. The alleles positively associated to the ESRD were: HLA-B*15, B*18, B*49 - DRB1*03, negatively associated alleles were A*26, HLA-B*39, B*50. The haplotypes positively associated with ESRD were: HLA-A*01-DRB1*13 and HLA-A*30-DRBI*03. The negatively associated haplotypes were: HLA-A*02-B*39, A*02-B*50, A*24-B*35, A*24-B*58, A*24-DRB1*16, A*68-DRB1*04, A*02-DQB1*03, A*29-DQB1*02, A*29-DOB1*05 and B*27-DRB1*07 and the last one is the most significant protective haplotypes. Conclusion The high Relative Risk (RR) observed and its statistical correlation reflect the strength of the described association between HLA antigens and ESRD. PMID:25380295

  7. Associations of HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 Types with Oral Diseases in Swiss Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mauramo, Matti; Ramseier, Adrian Markus; Buser, Andreas; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Weiger, Roland; Waltimo, Tuomas

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) are crucial components of host defense against microbial challenge but the associations of HLA types with oral infectious diseases have not been studied in detail. This prospective cross-sectional study examined associations of HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 types with common oral diseases in a healthy Swiss adult population. 257 subjects (107 m, 150 f, mean age: 43.5 yr; range: 21–58 yr) with known HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 profiles and comprehensive medical records were included. A thorough anamnesis was followed by oral examinations including saliva flow measurements, the DMFT score for cariological status, complete periodontal status with plaque and bleeding indexes as well as assessment of mucosal alterations and temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). Student’s t-test and Pearson chi-square test were utilized to compare the oral diseases between HLA positive and negative subjects. Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was used and PBonf<0.05 was considered statistically significant. HLA types -B15 (PBonf = 0.002), -B51 (PBonf = 0.02) and -DRB1*12 (PBonf = 0.02) were associated with less periodontal disease manifestations. HLA-A32 had a positive association with TMD dysfunction (PBonf = 0.012). No other statistically significant associations were observed. In conclusion, HLA types may contribute to the development of oral diseases in generally healthy Caucasian adults. PMID:25072155

  8. Genetic Association of HLA-A*26, -A*31, and -B*51 with Behcet’s Disease in Saudi Patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Okaily, Fahda; Al-Rashidi, Seham; Al-Balawi, Maysoon; Mustafa, Md.; Arfin, Misbahul; Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND HLA-B*51 has been universally associated with Behcet’s disease (BD) susceptibility, while different alleles of HLA-A have also been identified as independent BD susceptibility loci in various ethnic populations. The objective of this study was to investigate associations of HLA-A and -B alleles with BD in Saudi patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS Genotyping for HLA-A and HLA-B was performed using HLA genotyping kit (Lab type(R) SSO) in 120 Saudi subjects, including 60 BD patients and 60 matched healthy controls. RESULTS Our results revealed that frequencies of HLA-A*26, -A*31, and -B*51 were significantly higher in BD patients than in controls, suggesting that HLA-A*26, -A*31, and -B*51 are associated with BD. The frequency of HLA-B*15 was significantly lower in BD patients than in controls. Stratification of genotyping results into active and nonactive forms of BD revealed that the frequency of HLA-A*31 was significantly higher in the nonactive form than in the active form of BD, while there was no significant difference in the distribution of other alleles between the two forms of BD. CONCLUSION This study suggests that HLA-A*26, -A*31, and -B*51 are associated with susceptibility risk to BD, while HLA-B*15 may be protective in Saudi patients. However, larger scale studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27547040

  9. HLA genetic diversity in Hungarians and Hungarian Gypsies: complementary differentiation patterns and demographic signals revealed by HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Inotai, D; Szilvasi, A; Benko, S; Boros-Major, A; Illes, Z; Bors, A; Kiss, K P; Rajczy, K; Gelle-Hossó, A; Buhler, S; Nunes, J M; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Tordai, A

    2015-08-01

    Systematic analyses of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) profiles in different populations may increase the efficiency of bone marrow donor selection and help reconstructing human peopling history. We typed HLA-A, -B, and -DRB1 allele groups in two bone marrow donor cohorts of 2402 Hungarians and 186 Hungarian Gypsies and compared them with several Central-European, Spanish Gypsy, and Indian populations. Our results indicate that different European Gypsy populations share a common origin but diverged genetically as a consequence of founder effect and rapid genetic drift, whereas other European populations are related genetically in relation to geography. This study also suggests that while HLA-A accurately depicts the effects of genetic drift, HLA-B, and -DRB1 conserve more signatures of ancient population relationships, as a result of balancing selection. PMID:26149581

  10. HLA-B27 subtypes in the spondarthropathies.

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, I L; Iqball, S; Woo, P; Keat, A C; Hughes, R A; Kingsley, G H; Knight, S C

    1993-01-01

    The spondarthropathy (Sp)-associated HLA-B27 antigen includes at least seven subtypes, B*2701-07, of which 01, 02, 05 and 07 occur in Caucasians. This study examined the B27 subtype distribution in British patients with Sp. The 133 HLA-B27+ subjects comprised 94 European Caucasian Sp (58 ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 22 reactive arthritis (ReA; 11 sexually acquired (SARA), 11 enteric (EReA)), eight undifferentiated Sp (USp), and six pauciarticular juvenile-onset chronic arthritis (pJCA)) patients, and 34 healthy Caucasian controls, together with four Asian Indian and one Chinese. 35S-labelled B27 was immunoprecipitated with anti-B27 MoAbs, and subtyped according to isoelectric point (pI) following isoelectric focussing. The use of B27 MoAb permitted subtype assignment without full class I HLA typing. The vast majority (95%) were B*2705 (Caucasian controls 31/34; AS 55/58; ReA 21/22; USp 8/8, and pJCA 6/6; Indian control 1/1 and AS 2/3; Chinese pJCA 1/1), and the remainder B*2702. No B*2701 or 07 subjects were identified. AS occurs in both B*2702 and 05 subjects, and we extend this observation to small numbers of ReA and of Indian AS subjects. This implicates molecular features shared between B27 subtypes, rather than subtype-determining regions of the antigen, in Sp pathogenesis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8428388

  11. HLA-DQw alloantigens and pulmonary dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wise, R A; Wigley, F M; Scott, T E; Hochberg, M C

    1988-09-01

    HLA-DR4 and keratoconjunctivitis sicca (secondary Sjögren's syndrome) are associated with abnormal pulmonary function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Since recent investigations have found that much of the genomic polymorphism of the HLA-DR4 haplotype comes from the closely linked DQw allele, we reanalyzed this set of data to evaluate the relationship between the DQw allotypes and pulmonary function in rheumatoid arthritis. Using a step-wise regression analysis, we found that the presence of DQw1 was a stronger predictor of an abnormal forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (D) than the presence of DR4, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, smoking status, or any other clinical parameter. DQw1-positive patients had a mean (+/- SD) percent of predicted FEV1, FVC, and D of 84.2 (+/- 19.8), 88.0 (+/- 17.9) and 85.6 (+/- 20.9) percent, respectively, all significantly lower than DQw-1 negative patients (p = 0.02, 0.02, and 0.03). Smokers with the heterozygous phenotype, DQw1/DQw3, tended to have obstructive disease of the airways, with a mean (+/- SD) FEV1 of 80.1 +/- 24.4 percent of predicted, compared to 95.7 +/- 12.1 percent of predicted in DQw1/DQw3-negative individuals (p = 0.03). Patients who had a DQw2 allele were more likely to have normal pulmonary function. We conclude that the HLA-DQw1 allotype is a strong predictor of abnormal pulmonary function and that it may identify smoking subjects with rheumatoid arthritis subjects who are prone to develop obstruction of airflow. PMID:3409744

  12. HLA and MICA polymorphism in Polynesians and New Zealand Maori: implications for ancestry and health.

    PubMed

    Edinur, H A; Dunn, P P J; Hammond, L; Selwyn, C; Brescia, P; Askar, M; Reville, P; Velickovic, Z M; Lea, R A; Chambers, G K

    2013-09-01

    Data from HLA typing studies have made significant contributions to genetic theories about the Austronesian diaspora and the health of descendant populations. To help further unravel pattern and process elements, we have typed HLA and MICA loci at high resolution in DNA samples from well defined groups of Maori and Polynesian individuals. Our results show a restricted set of HLA class I alleles compared with other well characterised populations. In contrast, the class II HLA-DRB1 locus seems to be diverse in Maori and Polynesians and both groups show high frequencies of HLA-DRB1(∗)04:03, -DRB1(∗)08:03, -DRB1(∗)09:01 and -DRB1(∗)12:01. Our survey also provides the first ever MICA datasets for Polynesians and reveal unusual distributions and associations with the HLA-B locus. Overall, our data provide further support for a hybrid origin for Maori and Polynesians. One novel feature of our study is the finding that the gene sequence of the HLA-B(∗)40:10 allele in Polynesians is a recombinant of HLA-B(∗)55:02 and -B(∗)40:01. HLA-B(∗)40:10 is in close association with HLA-C(∗)04:03, an allele identified as a hybrid of HLA-C(∗)04 and -C(∗)02. In this respect, our data resemble those reports on Amerindian tribes where inter-allele recombination has been a common means of generating diversity. However, we emphasize that Amerindian gene content per se is only a very minor element of the overall Polynesian genepool. The wider significance of HLA and MICA allele frequencies across the Pacific for modern day health is also discussed in terms of the frequency relative to reference populations of disease known to be associated with specific HLA and MICA markers. Thus, Polynesians and Maori are largely unaffected by "European autoimmune diseases" such as ankylosing spondylitis, uveitis and coeliacs disease, yet there are several Maori- and Polynesian-specific autoimmune diseases where the HLA and MICA associations are still to be determined. PMID:23792058

  13. MICA, MICB Polymorphisms and Linkage Disequilibrium with HLA-B in a Chinese Mongolian Population.

    PubMed

    Wang, W Y; Tian, W; Zhu, F M; Liu, X X; Li, L X; Wang, F

    2016-06-01

    In this study, polymorphisms of major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related genes A and B (MICA and MICB) and human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B gene were investigated for 158 unrelated Chinese Mongolian subjects recruited from central Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, northern China, by polymerase chain reaction-sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT) and cloning. Collectively, 79 alleles, including 20 MICA, 12 MICB and 47 HLA-B alleles, were identified. MICA*008:01 (21.2%), MICB*005:02 (48.1%) and HLA-B*51:01 (7.91%) were the most common alleles. Significant global linkage disequilibrium (LD) was detected between HLA-B and MICA, HLA-B and MICB, and MICA and MICB loci (all P < 0.000001). The most frequent haplotypes were HLA-B*51:01-MICA*009:01 (7.28%), HLA-B*58:01-MICB*008 (6.96%), MICA*010-MICB*005:02 (13.92%) and HLA-B*58:01-MICA*002:01-MICB*008 (6.96%). HLA-B-MICA haplotypes such as HLA-B*50:01-MICA*009:02 were associated with single MICB allele. Some HLA-B-MICA haplotypes were associated with multiple MICB alleles, including HLA-B*51:01-MICA*009:01. One novel MICB allele, MICB*031, was identified, which has possibly arisen from MICB*002:01 through single mutation event. We also confirmed the existence of a recently recognized MICA allele, MICA*073, whose ethnic origin has not been previously described. Genotype distributions at MICA, MICB and HLA-B were consistent with a neutrality model. Our results provide new insight into MIC genetic polymorphisms in Chinese ethnic groups. Findings shown here are important from an anthropologic perspective and will inform future studies of the potential role of MIC genes in allogeneic organ transplantation and HLA-linked disease association in populations of related ancestry. PMID:27028549

  14. Association between HLA genes and American cutaneous leishmaniasis in endemic regions of Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The present study sought to investigate the association between HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 genes and susceptibility or resistance to the different clinical manifestations of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) in southern Brazil. Methods The sample consisted of 169 patients with a diagnosis of ACL and 270 healthy subjects for comparison. HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 were typed by PCR-SSO reverse dot blot. Results Results showed a trend towards susceptibility to cutaneous lesions for alleles HLA-DRB1*13 (P=0.0228; Pc=0.3420; OR=1.66; 95%CI=1.08 – 2.56), HLA-B*35 (P=0.0218; Pc=0.6758; OR=1.67; 95%CI=1.08 – 2.29) and HLA-B*44 (P=0.0290; Pc=0.8990; OR=1.67; 95%CI=1.05 – 2.64). Subjects with allele HLA-B*27 (P=0.0180; Pc=0.5580; OR=7.1111; 95%CI=1.7850 – 28.3286) tended towards susceptibility to mucocutaneous lesions, those with HLA-B*49 (P=0.0101; Pc=0.3131; OR=6.4000; 95%CI=1.8472 – 22.1743) to recurrent ACL, and HLA-B*52 (P=0.0044; Pc=0.1360; OR=12.61; 95%CI=3.08 – 51.66), to re-infection. Presence of HLA-B*45 (P=0.0107; Pc=0.3317) tended to provide protection against the cutaneous form of ACL. The most frequent haplotypes that may be associated with susceptibility to ACL were A*02 B*44 DRB1*07 (P = 0.0236) and A*24 B*35 DRB1*01 (P = 0.0236). Conclusion Some Class I and Class II HLA genes appear to contribute towards susceptibility to and protection against different clinical manifestations of ACL. Other genetic marker studies may contribute toward future prophylactic and therapeutic interventions in ACL. PMID:23638805

  15. HLA Allele E*01:01 Is Associated with a Reduced Risk of EBV-Related Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Independently of HLA-A*01/*02

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Paloma; Krsnik, Isabel; Navarro, Belen; Provencio, Mariano; García, Juan F.; Bellas, Carmen; Vilches, Carlos; Gomez-Lozano, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Background An inefficient immune response against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is related to the pathogenesis of a subgroup of classical Hodgkin lymphomas (cHL). Some EBV immune-evasion mechanisms target HLA presentation, including the non-classical HLA-E molecule. HLA-E can be recognized by T cells via the TCR, and it also regulates natural killer (NK) cell signaling through the inhibitory CD94/NKG2A receptor. Some evidences indicate that EBV-infected B-cells promote the proliferation of NK subsets bearing CD94/NKG2A, suggesting a relevant function of these cells in EBV control. Variations in CD94/NKG2A-HLA-E interactions could affect NK cell-mediated immunity and, consequently, play a role in EBV-driven transformation and lymphomagenesis. The two most common HLA-E alleles, E*01:01 and E*01:03, differ by a single amino acid change that modifies the molecule function. We hypothesized that the functional differences in these variants might participate in the pathogenicity of EBV. Aim We studied two series of cHL patients, both with EBV-positive and-negative cases, and a cohort of unrelated controls, to assess the impact of HLA-E variants on EBV-related cHL susceptibility. Results We found that the genotypes with at least one copy of E*01:01 (i.e., E*01:01 homozygous and heterozygous) were underrepresented among cHL patients from both series compared to controls (72.6% and 71.6% vs 83%, p = 0.001). After stratification by EBV status, we found low rates of E*01:01-carriers mainly among EBV-positive cases (67.6%). These reduced frequencies are seen independently of other factors such as age, gender, HLA-A*01 and HLA-A*02, HLA alleles positively and negatively associated with the disease (adjusted OR = 0.4, p = 0.001). Furthermore, alleles from both HLA loci exert a cumulative effect on EBV-associated cHL susceptibility. Conclusions These results indicate that E*01:01 is a novel protective genetic factor in EBV-associated cHL and support a role for HLA

  16. A study of the occurrence of HLA DR2 in 124 narcoleptics: clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Roth, B; Nevsímalová, S; Sonka, K; Docekal, P; Schulz, H; Geisler, P; Pollmächer, T; Andreas-Zietz, A; Keller, E; Scholz, S

    1988-01-01

    The authors examined HLA antigens in 124 narcoleptics. In addition to narcolepsy, 122 patients suffered also from cataplexy. The two patients without cataplexy suffered also from sleep paralysis and hypnagogic hallucinations. These two symptoms were also present in many of the other patients. HLA group DR2 was found in 120 patients including all six symptomatic cases. In four patients HLA DR2 was not present. Two of these were fully pronounced narcolepsy-cataplexy cases whereas the two other did not suffer from cataplexy. Since several other cases with negative DR2 have already been published it is necessary to admit the existence of DR2-negative narcolepsy, albeit very rare. Among 5 patients with isolated sleep paralysis HLA DR2 was present in one familial and 1 sporadic case. The authors further discuss some aspects of the classification of narcolepsies in the light of recent HLA studies as well as their delimitation from idiopathic hypersomnia. PMID:2459761

  17. Characterization of signaling function and expression of HLA class I molecules in medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Courtney; Santi, Mariarita; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Cornelison, Robert; MacDonald, Tobey J.

    2011-01-01

    Although known for the important function in the immune system, MHC class I molecules are increasingly ascribed an alternative role in modifying signal transduction. In medulloblastoma, HLA class I molecules are associated with poor prognosis, and can induce ERK1/2 activation upon engagement with ligands that bind to incompletely assembled complexes (so called open conformers). We here demonstrate that ERK1/2 activation in medulloblastoma can occur in the absence of endogenously synthesized β2m, formally excluding involvement of closed HLA class conformation. In addition, several experimental observations suggest that heterogeneity of HLA class I expression may be a reflection of the status of original cells before transformation, rather than a consequence of immune-based selection of HLA-loss mutants. These results contribute to our understanding of an immune system-independent role of HLA class I in the pathology of medulloblastoma, and cancer in general. PMID:20811766

  18. Characterization of signaling function and expression of HLA class I molecules in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Smith, Courtney; Santi, Mariarita; Rushing, Elisabeth J; Cornelison, Robert; MacDonald, Tobey J; Vukmanovic, Stanislav

    2011-06-01

    Although known for the important function in the immune system, MHC class I molecules are increasingly ascribed an alternative role in modifying signal transduction. In medulloblastoma, HLA class I molecules are associated with poor prognosis, and can induce ERK1/2 activation upon engagement with ligands that bind to incompletely assembled complexes (so called open conformers). We here demonstrate that ERK1/2 activation in medulloblastoma can occur in the absence of endogenously synthesized β2m, formally excluding involvement of closed HLA class conformation. In addition, several experimental observations suggest that heterogeneity of HLA class I expression may be a reflection of the status of original cells before transformation, rather than a consequence of immune-based selection of HLA-loss mutants. These results contribute to our understanding of an immune system-independent role of HLA class I in the pathology of medulloblastoma, and cancer in general. PMID:20811766

  19. Expression of classical HLA class I molecules: regulation and clinical impacts: Julia Bodmer Award Review 2015.

    PubMed

    René, C; Lozano, C; Eliaou, J-F

    2016-05-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I genes are ubiquitously expressed, but in a tissue specific-manner. Their expression is primarily regulated at the transcriptional level and can be modulated both positively and negatively by different stimuli. Advances in sequencing technologies led to the identification of new regulatory variants located in the untranslated regions (UTRs), which could influence the expression. After a brief description of the mechanisms underlying the transcriptional regulation of HLA class I genes expression, we will review how the expression levels of HLA class I genes could affect biological and pathological processes. Then, we will discuss on the differential expression of HLA class I genes according to the locus, allele and UTR polymorphisms and its clinical impact. This interesting field of study led to a new dimension of HLA typing, going beyond a qualitative aspect. PMID:27060357

  20. Submit and disulfide structure of monomeric and dimeric forms of detergent-soluble HLA antigens.

    PubMed

    Springer, T A; Robb, R J; Terhorst, C; Strominger, J L

    1977-07-10

    The structure of monomeric and disulfide-bonded dimeric forms of HLA antigens has been studied. Detergent-soluble HLA antigen heavy chains contain one or two easily reduced sulfhydryl groups not found in papain-solubilized HLA antigens, as demonstrated by amino acid analysis (Springer, T. A., and Strominger, J.L. (1976) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 73, 2481-2485, and Terhorst, C., Parham, P., Mann, D.L., and Strominger, J.L. (1976) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 73, 910-914) and by labeling with iodo[3H]acetate. Dimer formation occurred during purification, since it was prevented by pretreatment of membranes containing HLA antigen with iodoacetamide. Cross-linking studies showed that the non-disulfide-bonded form of HLA antigens contains one subunit each of the Mr = 44,000 heavy chain and the Mr = 12,000 light chain (beta2-microglobulin). PMID:873911

  1. Predicting HLA Class I Non-Permissive Amino Acid Residues Substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Binkowski, T. Andrew; Marino, Susana R.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of peptide binding to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules is essential to a wide range of clinical entities from vaccine design to stem cell transplant compatibility. Here we present a new structure-based methodology that applies robust computational tools to model peptide-HLA (p-HLA) binding interactions. The method leverages the structural conservation observed in p-HLA complexes to significantly reduce the search space and calculate the system’s binding free energy. This approach is benchmarked against existing p-HLA complexes and the prediction performance is measured against a library of experimentally validated peptides. The effect on binding activity across a large set of high-affinity peptides is used to investigate amino acid mismatches reported as high-risk factors in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:22905104

  2. Is there a common pathogenesis in aggressive periodontitis & ankylosing spondylitis in HLA-B27 patient?

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Neeraj; Agarwal, Kavita; Varshney, Atul; Agrawal, Navneet; Dubey, Ashutosh

    2016-05-01

    HLA-B27 is having strong association to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and other inflammatory diseases collectively known as seronegative spondyloarthropathy. In literature, although the evidence for association between AS and periodontitis as well as AS and HLA-B27 are there but the association of aggressive periodontitis in HLA-B27 positive patient with AS are not there. We hypothesize that there may be a common pathogenesis in aggressive periodontitis and ankylosing spondylitis in HLA-B27 patient. A 27-years-old female presented with the features of generalized aggressive periodontitis and difficulty in walking. On complete medical examination, ankylosing spondylitis was diagnosed with further positive HLA-B27 phenotype and negative rheumatic factor. This report may open up a new link to explore in the pathogenesis of aggressive periodontitis. PMID:27063088

  3. Review for Disease of the Year: Epidemiology of HLA-B27 Associated Ocular Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kopplin, Laura J; Mount, George; Suhler, Eric B

    2016-08-01

    Acute anterior uveitis is generally recognized as the most common form of uveitis. An association with HLA-B27 is seen in approximately half of cases of acute anterior uveitis. The prevalence of HLA-B27 varies widely between ethnic populations, with an approximate 8-10% prevalence in non-Hispanic whites and lower prevalence in Mexican- (4%) and African- (2-4%) Americans. A group of systemic inflammatory diseases, the spondyloarthropathies, similarly demonstrates a strong association with HLA-B27. The strength of association varies, depending on the specific spondyloarthropathy, with the strongest association found in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The majority of patients with HLA-B27 associated uveitis will have an underlying spondyloarthropathy. Suspicion for HLA-B27 associated uveitis should prompt a careful clinical history to assess for features of a spondyloarthropathy as the characteristics of any associated uveitis may vary. PMID:27232197

  4. Epstein-Barr virus uses HLA class II as a cofactor for infection of B lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Q; Spriggs, M K; Kovats, S; Turk, S M; Comeau, M R; Nepom, B; Hutt-Fletcher, L M

    1997-01-01

    Infection of B lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) requires attachment of virus via binding of viral glycoprotein gp350 to CD21 on the cell surface. Penetration of the cell membrane additionally involves a complex of three glycoproteins, gH, gL, and gp42. Glycoprotein gp42 binds to HLA-DR. Interference with this interaction with a soluble form of gp42, with a monoclonal antibody (MAb) to gp42, or with a MAb to HLA-DR inhibited virus infection. It was not possible to superinfect cells that failed to express HLA-DR unless expression was restored by transfection or creation of hybrid cell lines with complementing deficiencies in expression of HLA class II. HLA class II molecules thus serve as cofactors for infection of human B cells. PMID:9151859

  5. The research of distributed interactive simulation based on HLA in coal mine industry inherent safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Zhi-Wu

    2010-08-01

    To solve the inherent safety problem puzzling the coal mining industry, analyzing the characteristic and the application of distributed interactive simulation based on high level architecture (DIS/HLA), a new method is proposed for developing coal mining industry inherent safety distributed interactive simulation adopting HLA technology. Researching the function and structure of the system, a simple coal mining industry inherent safety is modeled with HLA, the FOM and SOM are developed, and the math models are suggested. The results of the instance research show that HLA plays an important role in developing distributed interactive simulation of complicated distributed system and the method is valid to solve the problem puzzling coal mining industry. To the coal mining industry, the conclusions show that the simulation system with HLA plays an important role to identify the source of hazard, to make the measure for accident, and to improve the level of management.

  6. HLA-DR4 and career prospects in rheumatology: is there a link?

    PubMed Central

    Gough, A.; Faint, J.; Salmon, M.; Bacon, P.; Emery, P.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether HLA type is associated with career progress in rheumatology. DESIGN--Comparison of HLA type after HLA analysis of samples of venous blood. SETTING--Department of Rheumatology Research, University of Birmingham. SUBJECTS--All (37) staff in the department. RESULTS--All the senior academics and most staff with a PhD expressed HLA-DR4. The prevalence of expression in each of these groups was significantly greater than that found in the controls. None of the junior doctors or secretaries expressed DR4. CONCLUSION--The junior doctors in the department have poor career prospects as HLA-DR4 seems to be associated with academic achievement. Images p1666-a PMID:8541751

  7. Structure of HLA-A*0301 in complex with a peptide of proteolipid protein: insights into the role of HLA-A alleles in susceptibility to multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Róisín M.; Friis, Lone; Siebold, Christian; Friese, Manuel A.; Fugger, Lars; Jones, E. Yvonne

    2011-05-01

    The structure of the human major histocompatability (MHC) class I molecule HLA-A*0301 (HLA-A3) in complex with a nonameric peptide (KLIETYFSK) has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.7 Å resolution. The structure of the human major histocompatability (MHC) class I molecule HLA-A*0301 (HLA-A3) in complex with a nonameric peptide (KLIETYFSK) has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.7 Å resolution. HLA-A3 is a predisposing allele for multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. The KLIETYFSK peptide is a naturally processed epitope of proteolipid protein, a myelin protein and candidate target for immune-mediated myelin destruction in MS. Comparison of the structure of HLA-A3 with that of HLA-A2, an MHC class I molecule which is protective against MS, indicates that both MHC class I molecules present very similar faces for T-cell receptor recognition whilst differing in the specificity of their peptide-binding grooves. These characteristics may underlie the opposing (predisposing versus protective) associations that they exhibit both in humans and in mouse models of MS-like disease. Furthermore, subtle alterations within the peptide-binding groove of HLA-A3 and other A3-like MHC class I molecules, members of the so-called A3 superfamily, may be sufficient to alter their presentation of autoantigen peptides such as KLIETYFSK. This in turn may modulate their contribution to the associated risk of autoimmune disease.

  8. MHC class II super-enhancer increases surface expression of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ and affects cytokine production in autoimmune vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Cavalli, Giulio; Hayashi, Masahiro; Jin, Ying; Yorgov, Daniel; Santorico, Stephanie A.; Holcomb, Cherie; Rastrou, Melinda; Erlich, Henry; Tengesdal, Isak W.; Dagna, Lorenzo; Neff, C. Preston; Palmer, Brent E.; Spritz, Richard A.; Dinarello, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic risk for autoimmunity in HLA genes is most often attributed to structural specificity resulting in presentation of self-antigens. Autoimmune vitiligo is strongly associated with the MHC class II region. Here, we fine-map vitiligo MHC class II genetic risk to three SNPs only 47 bp apart, located within a predicted super-enhancer in an intergenic region between HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQA1, localized by a genome-wide association study of 2,853 Caucasian vitiligo patients. The super-enhancer corresponds to an expression quantitative trait locus for expression of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ RNA; we observed elevated surface expression of HLA-DR (P = 0.008) and HLA-DQ (P = 0.02) on monocytes from healthy subjects homozygous for the high-risk SNP haplotype. Unexpectedly, pathogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from subjects homozygous for the high-risk super-enhancer haplotype exhibited greater increase in production of IFN-γ and IL-1β than cells from subjects homozygous for the low-risk haplotype. Specifically, production of IFN-γ on stimulation of dectin-1, mannose, and Toll-like receptors with Candida albicans and Staphylococcus epidermidis was 2.5- and 2.9-fold higher in high-risk subjects than in low-risk subjects, respectively (P = 0.007 and P = 0.01). Similarly, production of IL-1β was fivefold higher in high-risk subjects than in low-risk subjects (P = 0.02). Increased production of immunostimulatory cytokines in subjects carrying the high-risk haplotype may act as an “adjuvant” during the presentation of autoantigens, tying together genetic variation in the MHC with the development of autoimmunity. This study demonstrates that for risk of autoimmune vitiligo, expression level of HLA class II molecules is as or more important than antigen specificity. PMID:26787888

  9. LILRB2 interaction with HLA class I correlates with control of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Bashirova, Arman A; Martin-Gayo, Enrique; Jones, Des C; Qi, Ying; Apps, Richard; Gao, Xiaojiang; Burke, Patrick S; Taylor, Craig J; Rogich, Jerome; Wolinsky, Steven; Bream, Jay H; Duggal, Priya; Hussain, Shehnaz; Martinson, Jeremy; Weintrob, Amy; Kirk, Gregory D; Fellay, Jacques; Buchbinder, Susan P; Goedert, James J; Deeks, Steven G; Pereyra, Florencia; Trowsdale, John; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Telenti, Amalio; Walker, Bruce D; Allen, Rachel L; Carrington, Mary; Yu, Xu G

    2014-03-01

    Natural progression of HIV-1 infection depends on genetic variation in the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I locus, and the CD8+ T cell response is thought to be a primary mechanism of this effect. However, polymorphism within the MHC may also alter innate immune activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by changing interactions of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules with leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILR), a group of immunoregulatory receptors mainly expressed on myelomonocytic cells including dendritic cells (DCs). We used previously characterized HLA allotype-specific binding capacities of LILRB1 and LILRB2 as well as data from a large cohort of HIV-1-infected individuals (N = 5126) to test whether LILR-HLA class I interactions influence viral load in HIV-1 infection. Our analyses in persons of European descent, the largest ethnic group examined, show that the effect of HLA-B alleles on HIV-1 control correlates with the binding strength between corresponding HLA-B allotypes and LILRB2 (p = 10(-2)). Moreover, overall binding strength of LILRB2 to classical HLA class I allotypes, defined by the HLA-A/B/C genotypes in each patient, positively associates with viral replication in the absence of therapy in patients of both European (p = 10(-11)-10(-9)) and African (p = 10(-5)-10(-3)) descent. This effect appears to be driven by variations in LILRB2 binding affinities to HLA-B and is independent of individual class I allelic effects that are not related to the LILRB2 function. Correspondingly, in vitro experiments suggest that strong LILRB2-HLA binding negatively affects antigen-presenting properties of DCs. Thus, we propose an impact of LILRB2 on HIV-1 disease outcomes through altered regulation of DCs by LILRB2-HLA engagement. PMID:24603468

  10. Dynamic characterization of HLA-B*44 Alleles: A comparative molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Pemra

    2016-06-01

    Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) are highly polymorphic proteins that play a key role in the immune system. HLA molecule is present on the cell membrane of antigen-presenting cells of the immune system and presents short peptides, originating from the proteins of invading pathogens or self-proteins, to the T-cell Receptor (TCR) molecule of the T-cells. In this study, peptide-binding characteristics of HLA-B*44:02, 44:03, 44:05 alleles bound to three nonameric peptides were studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Polymorphisms among these alleles (Asp116Tyr and Asp156Leu) result in major differences in the allele characteristics. While HLA-B*44:02 (Asp116, Asp156) and HLA-B*44:03 (Asp116, Leu156) depend on tapasin for efficient peptide loading, HLA-B*44:05 (Tyr116, Asp156) is tapasin independent. On the other hand, HLA-B*44:02 and HLA-B*44:03 mismatch is closely related to transplant rejection and acute-graft-versus-host disease. In order to understand the dynamic characteristics, the simulation trajectories were analyzed by applying Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) and Root Mean Square Fluctuation (RMSF) calculations and hydrogen bonding analysis. Binding dynamics of the three HLA-B*44 alleles and peptide sequences are comparatively discussed. In general, peptide binding stability is found to depend on the peptide rather than the allele type for HLA-B*44 alleles. PMID:27016630

  11. Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibits HLA Class I Antibody-Dependent Endothelial Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, Vijith; Hiller, Oliver; Figueiredo, Constanca; Aljabri, Abid; Blasczyk, Rainer; Theilmeier, Gregor; Becker, Jan Ulrich; Larmann, Jan; Immenschuh, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is a key limiting factor for long-term graft survival in solid organ transplantation. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I (HLA I) antibodies (Abs) play a major role in the pathogenesis of AMR via their interactions with HLA molecules on vascular endothelial cells (ECs). The antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase (HO)-1 has anti-inflammatory functions in the endothelium. As complement-independent effects of HLA I Abs can activate ECs, it was the goal of the current study to investigate the role of HO-1 on activation of human ECs by HLA I Abs. In cell cultures of various primary human macro- and microvascular ECs treatment with monoclonal pan- and allele-specific HLA I Abs up-regulated the expression of inducible proinflammatory adhesion molecules and chemokines (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [VCAM-1], intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 [ICAM-1], interleukin-8 [IL-8] and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 [MCP-1]). Pharmacological induction of HO-1 with cobalt-protoporphyrin IX reduced, whereas inhibition of HO-1 with either zinc-protoporphyrin IX or siRNA-mediated knockdown increased HLA I Ab-dependent up-regulation of VCAM-1. Treatment with two carbon monoxide (CO)-releasing molecules, which liberate the gaseous HO product CO, blocked HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation. Finally, in an in vitro adhesion assay exposure of ECs to HLA I Abs led to increased monocyte binding, which was counteracted by up-regulation of HO-1. In conclusion, HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation is modulated by endothelial HO-1 and targeted induction of this enzyme may be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of AMR in solid organ transplantation. PMID:26690352

  12. Defining KIR and HLA Class I Genotypes at Highest Resolution via High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Norman, Paul J; Hollenbach, Jill A; Nemat-Gorgani, Neda; Marin, Wesley M; Norberg, Steven J; Ashouri, Elham; Jayaraman, Jyothi; Wroblewski, Emily E; Trowsdale, John; Rajalingam, Raja; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Chiaroni, Jacques; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Traherne, James A; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Parham, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The physiological functions of natural killer (NK) cells in human immunity and reproduction depend upon diverse interactions between killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and their HLA class I ligands: HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C. The genomic regions containing the KIR and HLA class I genes are unlinked, structurally complex, and highly polymorphic. They are also strongly associated with a wide spectrum of diseases, including infections, autoimmune disorders, cancers, and pregnancy disorders, as well as the efficacy of transplantation and other immunotherapies. To facilitate study of these extraordinary genes, we developed a method that captures, sequences, and analyzes the 13 KIR genes and HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C from genomic DNA. We also devised a bioinformatics pipeline that attributes sequencing reads to specific KIR genes, determines copy number by read depth, and calls high-resolution genotypes for each KIR gene. We validated this method by using DNA from well-characterized cell lines, comparing it to established methods of HLA and KIR genotyping, and determining KIR genotypes from 1000 Genomes sequence data. This identified 116 previously uncharacterized KIR alleles, which were all demonstrated to be authentic by sequencing from source DNA via standard methods. Analysis of just two KIR genes showed that 22% of the 1000 Genomes individuals have a previously uncharacterized allele or a structural variant. The method we describe is suited to the large-scale analyses that are needed for characterizing human populations and defining the precise HLA and KIR factors associated with disease. The methods are applicable to other highly polymorphic genes. PMID:27486779

  13. HLA Class II Antigen Expression in Colorectal Carcinoma Tumors as a Favorable Prognostic Marker12

    PubMed Central

    Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Zlobec, Inti; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Arriga, Roberto; Coppola, Andrea; Caratelli, Sara; Spagnoli, Giulio Cesare; Lauro, Davide; Lugli, Alessandro; Han, Junyi; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Ferrone, Cristina; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Tornillo, Luigi; Droeser, Raoul; Rossi, Piero; Attanasio, Antonio; Ferrone, Soldano; Terracciano, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the frequency of HLA class II antigen expression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) tumors, its association with the clinical course of the disease, and the underlying mechanism(s). Two tissue microarrays constructed with 220 and 778 CRC tumors were stained with HLA-DR, DQ, and DP antigen-specific monoclonal antibody LGII-612.14, using the immunoperoxidase staining technique. The immunohistochemical staining results were correlated with the clinical course of the disease. The functional role of HLA class II antigens expressed on CRC cells was analyzed by investigating their in vitro interactions with immune cells. HLA class II antigens were expressed in about 25% of the 220 and 21% of the 778 tumors analyzed with an overall frequency of 23%. HLA class II antigens were detected in 19% of colorectal adenomas. Importantly, the percentage of stained cells and the staining intensity were significantly lower than those detected in CRC tumors. However, HLA class II antigen staining was weakly detected only in 5.4% of 37 normal mucosa tissues. HLA class II antigen expression was associated with a favorable clinical course of the disease. In vitro stimulation with interferon gamma (IFNγ) induced HLA class II antigen expression on two of the four CRC cell lines tested. HLA class II antigen expression on CRC cells triggered interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production by resting monocytes. HLA class II antigen expression in CRC tumors is a favorable prognostic marker. This association may reflect stimulation of IL-1β production by monocytes. PMID:24563618

  14. Mechanisms of allele-selective down-regulation of HLA class I in Burkitt's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Imreh, M P; Zhang, Q J; de Campos-Lima, P O; Imreh, S; Krausa, P; Browning, M; Klein, G; Masucci, M G

    1995-07-01

    Burkitt lymphomas (BL) that arise in HLA-AII-positive individuals are characterized by selective loss/down-regulation of the HLA AII polypeptide. We have investigated the molecular basis of such down-regulation by comparing 5 pairs of BL lines and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) derived from the normal B cells of the same individuals. The presence of apparently intact HLA AII genes was confirmed in all 5 BL/LCL pairs by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) typing and by Southern-blot hybridization with HLA A locus-specific probes. Northern-blot analysis with locus- and allele-specific probes revealed a significantly lower expression or absence of AII-specific mRNA in all 5 BL lines compared to the corresponding LCLs. Up-regulation of AII-specific mRNA was achieved by IFN alpha treatment of 2 BL lines with low HLA AII expression (BL-28 and BL-72) while the treatment had no effect in 3 BL lines (WWI-BL, WW2-BL and BL41) that did not express the endogenous gene. HLA AII expression was restored by transfection of the gene in WWI-BL whereas transfectants of BL-41 remained AII-negative. An HLA-AII-promoter-driven chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene (pAIICAT) was active in WWI-BL but not in BL-41. HLA-AII was expressed in hybrids of BL-41 with an AII-positive LCL, while expression of the endogenous HLA AII gene could not be restored by fusion of BL-41 with an AII-negative LCL, although an adequate set of transcription factors was present in the hybrid. Our results suggest that genetic defects and lack of transcription factors may contribute to the selective down-regulation of HLA AII in BL cells. PMID:7601573

  15. Recombinant HLA-G as Tolerogenic Immunomodulant in Experimental Small Bowel Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    von Websky, Martin W.; Kitamura, Koji; Ludwig-Portugall, Isis; Kurts, Christian; von Laffert, Maximilian; LeMaoult, Joel; Carosella, Edgardo D.; Abu-Elmagd, Kareem; Kalff, Joerg C.; Schäfer, Nico

    2016-01-01

    The non-classical MHC I paralogue HLA-G is expressed by cytotrophoblast cells and implicated with fetomaternal tolerance by downregulating the maternal adaptive and innate immune response against the fetus. HLA-G expression correlates with favorable graft outcome in humans and recently promising immunosuppressive effects of therapeutic HLA-G in experimental transplantation (skin allograft acceptance) were shown. Consequently, we examined this novel therapeutic approach in solid organ transplantation. In this study, therapeutic recombinant HLA-G5 was evaluated for the first time in a solid organ model of acute rejection (ACR) after orthotopic intestinal transplantation (ITX). Allogenic ITX was performed in rats (Brown Norway to Lewis) with and without HLA-G treatment. It was found that HLA-G treatment significantly reduced histologically proven ACR at both an early and late postoperative timepoint (POD 4/7), concomitant to a functionally preserved graft contractility at POD 7. Interestingly, graft infiltration by myeloperoxidase+ cells was significantly reduced at POD7 by HLA-G treatment. Moreover, HLA-G treatment showed an effect on the allogenic T-cell immune response as assessed by flow cytometry: The influx of recipient-derived CD8+ T-cells into the graft mesenteric lymphnodes at POD7 was significantly reduced while CD4+ populations were not affected. As a potential mechanism of action, an induction of T-reg populations in the mesenteric lymphnodes was postulated, but flow cytometric analysis of classical CD4+/CD25+/FoxP3+Treg-cells showed no significant alteration by HLA-G treatment. The novel therapeutic approach using recombinant HLA-G5 reported herein demonstrates a significant immunosuppressive effect in this model of allogenic experimental intestinal transplantation. This effect may be mediated via inhibition of recipient-derived CD8+ T-cell populations either directly or by induction of non-classical Treg populations. PMID:27404095

  16. Structural requirements for recognition of the HLA-Dw14 class II epitope: A key HLA determinant associated with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraiwa, Akikazu; Yamanaka, Katsuo; Kwok, W.W.; Nepom, G.T. ); Mickelson, E.M.; Masewicz, S.; Hansen, J.A. ); Radka, S.F. )

    1990-10-01

    Although HLA genes have been shown to be associated with certain diseases, the basis for this association is unknown. Recent studies, however, have documented patterns of nucleotide sequence variation among some HLA genes associated with a particular disease. For rheumatoid arthritis, HLA genes in most patients have a shared nucleotide sequence encoding a key structural element of an HLA class II polypeptide; this sequence element is critical for the interaction of the HLA molecule with antigenic peptides and with responding T cells, suggestive of a direct role for this sequence element in disease susceptibility. The authors describe the serological and cellular immunologic characteristics encoded by this rheumatoid arthritis-associated sequence element. Site-directed mutagenesis of the DRB1 gene was used to define amino acids critical for antibody and T-cell recognition of this structural element, focusing on residues that distinguish the rheumatoid arthritis-associated alleles Dw4 and Dw14 from a closely related allele, Dw10, not associated with disease. Both the gain and loss of rheumatoid arthritis-associated epitopes were highly dependent on three residues within a discrete domain of the HLA-DR molecule. Recognition was most strongly influenced by the following amino acids (in order): 70 > 71 > 67. Some alloreactive T-cell clones were also influenced by amino acid variation in portions of the DR molecule lying outside the shared sequence element.

  17. Alternative splicing of HLA-DQB transcripts and secretion of HLA-DQ beta-chain proteins: allelic polymorphism in splicing and polyadenylylation sites.

    PubMed Central

    Briata, P; Radka, S F; Sartoris, S; Lee, J S

    1989-01-01

    HLA class II antigens are highly polymorphic cell-surface proteins involved in initiation and regulation of the immune response. Allelic sequence variation primarily affects the structure of the first external domains of alpha and beta component chains. Here we provide evidence for other types of allelic polymorphism for the genes encoding these chains. Sequences of two cDNA clones corresponding to HLA-DQB mRNAs from an HLA-homozygous cell line exhibit both alternative splicing and read-through of polyadenylylation. Furthermore, alternative splicing that deletes the transmembrane exon is associated with only a subset of HLA-DQB alleles, while the polyadenylylation-site read-through is found in a larger subset. This suggest that polymorphic cis-acting elements within the HLA-DQB gene control both processing steps. Proteins, presumably encoded by alternatively spliced mRNAs lacking transmembrane exons, are immunoprecipitated with a monomorphic monoclonal antibody directed against HLA-DQ. These proteins are found in supernatants of cultured cell lines for which secretion is predicted, but not in those of cell lines that do not contain alternatively spliced mRNAs. Images PMID:2464826

  18. Human HLA class I- and HLA class II-restricted cloned cytotoxic T lymphocytes identify a cluster of epitopes on the measles virus fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    van Binnendijk, R S; Versteeg-van Oosten, J P; Poelen, M C; Brugghe, H F; Hoogerhout, P; Osterhaus, A D; Uytdehaag, F G

    1993-01-01

    The transmembrane fusion (F) glycoprotein of measles virus is an important target antigen of human HLA class I- and class II-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Genetically engineered F proteins and nested sets of synthetic peptides spanning the F protein were used to determine sequences of F recognized by a number of F-specific CTL clones. Combined N- and C-terminal deletions of the respective peptides revealed that human HLA class I and HLA class II-restricted CTL efficiently recognize nonapeptides or decapeptides representing epitopes of F. Three distinct sequences recognized by three different HLA class II (DQw1, DR2, and DR4/w53)-restricted CTL clones appear to cluster between amino acids 379 and 466 of F, thus defining an important T-cell epitope area of F. Within this same region, a nonamer peptide of F was found to be recognized by an HLA-B27-restricted CTL clone, as expected on the basis of the structural homology between this peptide and other known HLA-B27 binding peptides. PMID:7680390

  19. HLA-A68 and HLA-B15 alleles correlate with poor immune response among AIDS patients on combined antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    El-Beeli, Marah; Al-Mahrooqi, Samira Hamad; Youssef, Randa Mahmoud; Zadjali, Fahad; Balkhair, Abdullah; Al-Balushi, Mohammed Said; Said, Elias Anthony; Hasson, Sidgi Syed; Al-Jabri, Ali Abdullah

    2016-06-01

    Around 15-30% of AIDS patients fail to recover their CD4(+) T cell levels following combined antiretroviral therapy despite successful inhibition of HIV-1 replication. The exact reasons for this immune recovery failure are not completely understood. HLA alleles are among the candidate that may explain this failure. A total of 65 adult AIDS patients, with viral load of <50 copies per ml were investigated. Viral load and CD4 T cells counts were performed following standard techniques. HLA genotyping was performed using PCR-SSP technique. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 19) was used for data processing and analysis. A significantly higher proportion of poor immune responders were carrying HLA-A68 (4.8% compared to 25.0%, P=0.025) and HLA-B15 (2.4% compared to 20.8%, P=0.023). The etiological fraction (Efe%) among carriers of HLA-A68 was 57.89% (95% CI=26.79, 75.79) and was 61.35% (95% CI=35.33, 76.91) among carriers of HLA-B15. PMID:27067905

  20. HLA genes in Uros from Titikaka Lake, Peru: origin and relationship with other Amerindians and worldwide populations.

    PubMed

    Arnaiz-Villena, A; Gonzalez-Alcos, V; Serrano-Vela, J I; Reguera, R; Barbolla, L; Parga-Lozano, C; Gómez-Prieto, P; Abd-El-Fatah-Khalil, S; Moscoso, J

    2009-06-01

    Uros population from the Titikaka Lake live in about 42 floating reed ('totora') islands in front of Puno City (Peru) at a 4000 m high altiplano. They present both an mtDNA and a human leucocyte antigen (HLA) profile different from the surrounding populations: mtDNA A2 haplogroup is common to Uros and Amazon forest lowland Amerindians. HLA genetic distances between populations have been calculated and neighbour-joining dendrograms and correspondence analyses were carried out. Approximately 15 006 HLA chromosomes from worldwide populations have been used for comparisons. Only eight HLA-A alleles have been found, three of them accounting for most of the frequencies. The same phenomenon is seen for HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles: a few alleles (3, 4 and 3, respectively) are present in most individuals. The presence of HLA-B*4801 and HLA-DRB1*0901 alleles in a relatively high frequency (although not the most frequent alleles found) is a characteristic shared with Asians and some populations from the Andean altiplano. Three specific Uros haplotypes have been found among the most frequent ones: HLA-A*680102-B*3505-DRB1*0403-DQB1*0302; HLA-A*2402-B*1504-DRB1*1402-DQB1*0301; and HLA-A*2402-B*4801-DRB1*0403-DQB1*0302. The present study suggests that Uros may have been one of the first populations from the shores of the Titikaka Lake coming from the Amazonian forest, which might have given rise to other later differentiated ethnic group (i.e. Aymaras). Uros HLA profile is also useful to study genetic epidemiology of diseases linked to HLA and to construct a future transplant waiting list by adding up regional lists in order to get a bigger pool for transplanting with better HLA matching. PMID:19490211

  1. HLA and Celiac Disease Susceptibility: New Genetic Factors Bring Open Questions about the HLA Influence and Gene-Dosage Effects

    PubMed Central

    Medrano, Luz María; Dema, Bárbara; López-Larios, Arturo; Maluenda, Carlos; Bodas, Andrés; López-Palacios, Natalia; Figueredo, M. Ángeles; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; Núñez, Concepción

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder triggered after gluten ingestion in genetically susceptible individuals. The major genetic determinants are HLA-DQA1*05 and HLA-DQB1*02, which encode the DQ2 heterodimer. These alleles are commonly inherited in cis with DRB1*03∶01, which is associated with numerous immune-related disorders, in some cases contributing with a different amount of risk depending on the haplotype context. We aimed at investigating those possible differences involving DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes in CD susceptibility. A family (274 trios) and a case-control sample (369 CD cases/461 controls) were analyzed. DRB1*03∶01-carrying individuals were classified according to the haplotype present (ancestral haplotype (AH) 8.1, AH 18.2 or non-conserved haplotype) after genotyping of HLA-DRB1, -DQA1, -DQB1, -B8, TNF -308, TNF -376 and the TNFa and TNFb microsatellites. We observe that the AH 8.1 confers higher risk than the remaining DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes, and this effect only involves individuals possessing a single copy of DQB1*02. CD risk for these individuals is similar to the one conferred by inherit DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 in trans. It seems that an additional CD susceptibility factor is present in the AH 8.1 but not in other DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes. This factor could be shared with individuals possessing DQ2.5 trans, according to the similar risk observed in those two groups of individuals. PMID:23119005

  2. HLA and celiac disease susceptibility: new genetic factors bring open questions about the HLA influence and gene-dosage effects.

    PubMed

    Medrano, Luz María; Dema, Bárbara; López-Larios, Arturo; Maluenda, Carlos; Bodas, Andrés; López-Palacios, Natalia; Figueredo, M Ángeles; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; Núñez, Concepción

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder triggered after gluten ingestion in genetically susceptible individuals. The major genetic determinants are HLA-DQA1*05 and HLA-DQB1*02, which encode the DQ2 heterodimer. These alleles are commonly inherited in cis with DRB1*03∶01, which is associated with numerous immune-related disorders, in some cases contributing with a different amount of risk depending on the haplotype context. We aimed at investigating those possible differences involving DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes in CD susceptibility. A family (274 trios) and a case-control sample (369 CD cases/461 controls) were analyzed. DRB1*03∶01-carrying individuals were classified according to the haplotype present (ancestral haplotype (AH) 8.1, AH 18.2 or non-conserved haplotype) after genotyping of HLA-DRB1, -DQA1, -DQB1, -B8, TNF -308, TNF -376 and the TNFa and TNFb microsatellites. We observe that the AH 8.1 confers higher risk than the remaining DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes, and this effect only involves individuals possessing a single copy of DQB1*02. CD risk for these individuals is similar to the one conferred by inherit DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 in trans. It seems that an additional CD susceptibility factor is present in the AH 8.1 but not in other DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes. This factor could be shared with individuals possessing DQ2.5 trans, according to the similar risk observed in those two groups of individuals. PMID:23119005

  3. Race/ethnicity affects the probability of finding an HLA-A, -B, -C and -DRB1 allele-matched unrelated donor and likelihood of subsequent transplant utilization

    PubMed Central

    Pidala, J; Kim, J; Schell, M; Lee, SJ; Hillgruber, R; Nye, V; Ayala, E; Alsina, M; Betts, B; Bookout, R; Fernandez, HF; Field, T; Locke, FL; Nishihori, T; Ochoa, JL; Perez, L; Perkins, J; Shapiro, J; Tate, C; Tomblyn, M; Anasetti, C

    2015-01-01

    Factors relevant to finding a suitable unrelated donor and barriers to effective transplant utilization are incompletely understood. Among a consecutive series of unrelated searches (n = 531), an 8/8 HLA-A, -B, -C and -DRB1-matched unrelated donor was available for 289 (54%) patients, 7/8 for 159 (30%) and no donor for 83 (16%). Patients of Caucasian race (P < 0.0001) were more likely to find a donor. Younger age (P = 0.01), Caucasian race (P = 0.03), lower CIBMTR (Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplantation Research) risk (P = 0.005), and 8/8 HLA matching (P = 0.005) were associated with higher odds of reaching hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In a univariate analysis of OS, finding a donor was associated with hazard ratio (HR) of 0.85 (95% CI 0.63–1.2), P = 0.31. Karnofsky performance status (KPS) accounted for interaction between having a donor and survival. Patients with KPS 90–100 and a donor had significantly reduced hazard for death (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.38–0.90, P = 0.02). These data provide estimates of the probability to find an unrelated donor in the era of high-resolution HLA typing, and identify potentially modifiable barriers to reaching HCT. Further efforts are needed to enhance effective donor identification and transplant utilization, particularly in non-Caucasian ethnic groups. PMID:22863723

  4. Molecular mapping of interactions between a Mycobacterium leprae-specific T cell epitope, the restricting HLA-DR2 molecule, and two specific T cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D C; van Schooten, W C; Janson, A; Barry, M E; de Vries, R R

    1990-04-01

    A systematic series of 89 single residue substitution analogs of the Mycobacterium leprae 65-kDa protein-derived peptide LQAAPALDKL were tested for stimulation of two HLA-DR2 restricted 65 kDa-reactive T cell clones from a tuberculoid leprosy patient. Some analogs with substitutions outside a "core" region showed enhanced stimulation of the T cell clones. This core region of seven or eight residues was essential for recognition, whereas substitution of amino acids outside this region did not affect T cell recognition although these residues could not be omitted. Thus these core residues interact directly with the presenting HLA-DR2 molecule and/or the TCR. Except for analogs of position 419 for clone 2B6, the majority of the nonstimulatory substitution analogs did not inhibit the presentation of LQAAPALDKL and thus probably failed to bind to the HLA-DR2 molecule. Unless all of the core residues are physically involved in binding to DR2, substitution at a position not directly involved in binding appears to have an influence on other residues that do bind to the DR2 molecule. Active peptide analogs with two or more internal prolines suggest that not all analogs need be helical for activity with clone 2F10. PMID:1690768

  5. Specific combinations of donor and recipient KIR-HLA genotypes predict for large differences in outcome after cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Takuya; Marin, David; Cao, Kai; Li, Li; Mehta, Pramod; Shaim, Hila; Sobieski, Catherine; Jones, Roy; Oran, Betul; Hosing, Chitra; Rondon, Gabriela; Alsuliman, Abdullah; Paust, Silke; Andersson, Borje; Popat, Uday; Kebriaei, Partow; Muftuoglu, Muharrem; Basar, Rafet; Kondo, Kayo; Nieto, Yago; Shah, Nina; Olson, Amanda; Alousi, Amin; Liu, Enli; Sarvaria, Anushruti; Parmar, Simrit; Armstrong-James, Darius; Imahashi, Nobuhiko; Molldrem, Jeffrey; Champlin, Richard; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2016-07-14

    The ability of cord blood transplantation (CBT) to prevent relapse depends partly on donor natural killer (NK) cell alloreactivity. NK effector function depends on specific killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and HLA interactions. Thus, it is important to identify optimal combinations of KIR-HLA genotypes in donors and recipients that could improve CBT outcome. We studied clinical data, KIR and HLA genotypes, and NK-cell reconstitution in CBT patients (n = 110). Results were validated in an independent cohort (n = 94). HLA-KIR genotyping of recipient germline and transplanted cord blood (CB) grafts predicted for large differences in outcome. Patients homozygous for HLA-C2 group alleles had higher 1-year relapse rate and worse survival after CBT than did HLA-C1/C1 or HLA-C1/C2 (HLA-C1/x) patients: 67.8% vs 26.0% and 15.0% vs 52.9%, respectively. This inferior outcome was associated with delayed posttransplant recovery of NK cells expressing the HLA-C2-specific KIR2DL1/S1 receptors. HLA-C1/x patients receiving a CB graft with the combined HLA-C1-KIR2DL2/L3/S2 genotype had lower 1-year relapse rate (6.7% vs 40.1%) and superior survival (74.2% vs 41.3%) compared with recipients of grafts lacking KIR2DS2 or HLA-C1 HLA-C2/C2 patients had lower relapse rate (44.7% vs 93.4%) and better survival (30.1% vs 0%) if they received a graft with the combined HLA-C2-KIR2DL1/S1 genotype. Relapsed/refractory disease at CBT, recipient HLA-C2/C2 genotype, and donor HLA-KIR genotype were independent predictors of outcome. Thus, we propose the inclusion of KIR genotyping in graft selection criteria for CBT. HLA-C1/x patients should receive an HLA-C1-KIR2DL2/L3/S2 CB graft, while HLA-C2/C2 patients may benefit from an HLA-C2-KIR2DL1/S1 graft. PMID:27247137

  6. HLA non-class II genes may confer type I diabetes susceptibility in a Mapuche (Amerindian) affected family.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bravo, Francisco; Martinez-Laso, Jorge; Martin-Villa, Jose M; Moscoso, Juan; Moreno, Almudena; Serrano-Vela, Juan I; Zamora, Jorge; Asenjo, Silvia; Gleisner, Andrea; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    A rare case of type I diabetes is studied in an Amerindian (Mapuche) family from Chile, analyzing glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet-cell autoantibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes. The affected sib is the only one that has one specific HLA haplotype combination that differs from the other sibs only in the HLA class I genes. It is concluded that HLA diabetes susceptibility factors may be placed outside the class II region or even that susceptibility factors do not exist in the HLA region in this Amerindian family. PMID:16473308

  7. [Features of the distribution of alleles of the HLA-DRB1 04 and HLA-DQB1 03 genes among healthy people of European origin in Western Siberia].

    PubMed

    Sartakova, M L; Konenkov, V I; Kimura, A

    1993-04-01

    The allelic HLA-DRB1 04 and HLA-DQB1 03 polymorphism in caucasians living among the West Siberia Mongoloid aborigenes was studied. As a result of our studies, it was shown that the HLA-DRB1 0403/07 predominates and HLA-DRB1 0404/08 is absent in the Russian population of West Siberia, in contrast to those among Caucasians living in West Europe and North America. The frequencies of HLA-DQB1 03 alleles are similar to those observed among the all Caucasians. Gametic association HLA-DR4 - HLA-DQw was found for the first time in Caucasians of West Siberia. PMID:8354474

  8. [Extending preimplantation genetic diagnosis to HLA typing: the French exception].

    PubMed

    Steffann, Julie; Frydman, Nelly; Burlet, Philippe; Gigarel, Nadine; Hesters, Laetitia; Kerbrat, Violaine; Lamazou, Frédéric; Munnich, Arnold; Frydman, René

    2011-01-01

    Umut-Talha, a "sibling savior", was born on 26 January 2011 at Beclère Hospital after embryo selection at the Paris preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) center. His birth revived the controversy over "double PGD". This procedure, authorized in France since 2006, allows couples who already have a child with a serious, incurable genetic disease, to opt for PGD in order to select a healthy embryo that is HLA-matched to the affected sibling and who may thus serve as an ombilical cord blood donor. The procedure is particularly complex and the baby take-home rate is still very low. Double PGD is strictly regulated in France, and candidate couples must first receive individual authorization from the Biomedicine Agency. In our experience, these couples have a strong desire to have children, as reflected by the large number of prior spontaneous pregnancies (25% of couples). Likewise, most of these couples request embryo transfer even when there is no HLA-matched embryo, which accounts for more than half of embryo transfers. The controversy surrounding this practice has flared up again in recent weeks, over the concepts of "designer babies" and "double savior siblings" (the baby is selected to be free of the hereditary disease, and may also serve as a stem cell donor for the affected sibling). PMID:22375367

  9. Molecular diversity of HLA-DR4 haplotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Gregersen, P K; Shen, M; Song, Q L; Merryman, P; Degar, S; Seki, T; Maccari, J; Goldberg, D; Murphy, H; Schwenzer, J

    1986-01-01

    Complementary DNA (cDNA) clones encoding beta chains of the DR and DQ regions and alpha chains of the DQ region were isolated and sequenced from four homozygous DR4 cell lines of different HLA-D types: GM3103(Dw4), FS(Dw10), BIN(Dw14), and KT3(Dw15). When compared with each other and with a previously published sequence from a DR4 (Dw13 cell line), the variability of DR beta 1 gene products is generally restricted to the region around amino acid position 70, with an additional polymorphism at position 86. Many of these differences, including an unusual amino acid substitution at position 57 in the Japanese cell line KT3(Dw15), may be due to gene conversion events from the DR beta 2 or DX beta genes. In contrast, DR beta 2 molecules are identical in Dw15, Dw10, and Dw4 cell lines. DQ beta chains isolated from GM3103(Dw4), FS(Dw10), and BIN40(Dw14) are also identical. However, the DQ beta sequence from cell line KT3(Dw15) differs substantially from all other previously reported DQ beta alleles, consistent with its serological designation, DQ "blank." The first domain sequences of DQ alpha chains were identical in all four cell lines. The data suggest that relatively circumscribed amino acid changes in the DR beta 1 molecule are responsible for the HLA-D typing differences between some haplotypes. PMID:3458223

  10. HLA polymorphism in Israel. 9. An overall comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Bonné-Tamir, B; Bodmer, J G; Bodmer, W F; Pickbourne, P; Brautbar, C; Gazit, E; Nevo, S; Zamir, R

    1978-03-01

    HLA gene frequencies in 11 Israeli populations and nine other relevant populations were used to calculate genetic distances in a quantitative assessment of their similarities and differences. The shortest distance found is between Polish and Rumanian Jews, while the largest is between Russian Jews and Black Africans. Estimates of "average" distances within major population groups suggest that the Ashkenazi Jews (Poles, Russians, Rumanians and Germans) are a more homogeneous population than East European non-Jews or than Middle-Eastern populations (Arabs, Armenians, Lebanese and Turks). A cline of distances between Ashkenazi Jews and other Jewish communities parallels their geographic distribution; however, the relatively large distance between the two North African communities (Libyans and Moroccans) demonstrates that geographic proximity is not necessarily correlated with genetic similarity. The Jewish populations, especially the Ashkenazi, show a clear divergence from their neighboring non-Jewish populations, among whom they have lived for many centuries. There are indications in the HLA data of a common origin for the diverse Jewish populations. PMID:653718

  11. Multiresolution modeling with a JMASS-JWARS HLA Federation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, John D.; Painter, Ron D.; Pendell, Brian; Richert, Walt; Wolcott, Christopher

    2002-07-01

    CACI, Inc.-Federal has built, tested, and demonstrated the use of a JMASS-JWARS HLA Federation that supports multi- resolution modeling of a weapon system and its subsystems in a JMASS engineering and engagement model environment, while providing a realistic JWARS theater campaign-level synthetic battle space and operational context to assess the weapon system's value added and deployment/employment supportability in a multi-day, combined force-on-force scenario. Traditionally, acquisition analyses require a hierarchical suite of simulation models to address engineering, engagement, mission and theater/campaign measures of performance, measures of effectiveness and measures of merit. Configuring and running this suite of simulations and transferring the appropriate data between each model is both time consuming and error prone. The ideal solution would be a single simulation with the requisite resolution and fidelity to perform all four levels of acquisition analysis. However, current computer hardware technologies cannot deliver the runtime performance necessary to support the resulting extremely large simulation. One viable alternative is to integrate the current hierarchical suite of simulation models using the DoD's High Level Architecture in order to support multi- resolution modeling. An HLA integration eliminates the extremely large model problem, provides a well-defined and manageable mixed resolution simulation and minimizes VV&A issues.

  12. HLA antigens in Japanese patients with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuki, K; Juji, T; Tokunaga, K; Takamizawa, M; Maeda, H; Soda, M; Nomura, Y; Segawa, M

    1990-01-01

    HLA antigens in 104 Japanese patients and 41 families with myasthenia gravis (MG) were investigated. The frequencies of DR9 and DRw13 were significantly increased in the patients who developed MG before 3 yr of age. The DQw3 antigen was positive for all the patients that developed MG before 15 yr with only one exception. All the examined cases that developed MG before 3 yr (including this DQw3 negative patient) had the same DQA and DQB DNA restriction fragments. These HLA frequencies decreased as the age of onset increased, and no significant association was observed in adult-onset MG. No patients had B8, DR3, and DQw2. The relative risk was higher for the DR9/DRw13 heterozygotes (37.4) than for DR9 (16.4) or DRw13 (7.1) in the childhood-onset MG. Statistical analysis suggested that DR9 and DRw13 (or DQw1 and DQw3) act synergistically in the disease development. Family study revealed diverse DR9 haplotypes. The most frequent DRw13 haplotype was Bw44-BFF-C4A3B1-DRw13-DQw1, which may be evolutionarily related to the caucasian B8-DR3-DQw2 haplotype. These results showed that MG in early childhood in Japanese individuals is genetically different from that in adulthood and that in caucasians. Images PMID:1974553

  13. The IPD and IMGT/HLA database: allele variant databases

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, James; Halliwell, Jason A.; Hayhurst, James D.; Flicek, Paul; Parham, Peter; Marsh, Steven G. E.

    2015-01-01

    The Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD) was developed to provide a centralized system for the study of polymorphism in genes of the immune system. Through the IPD project we have established a central platform for the curation and publication of locus-specific databases involved either directly or related to the function of the Major Histocompatibility Complex in a number of different species. We have collaborated with specialist groups or nomenclature committees that curate the individual sections before they are submitted to IPD for online publication. IPD consists of five core databases, with the IMGT/HLA Database as the primary database. Through the work of the various nomenclature committees, the HLA Informatics Group and in collaboration with the European Bioinformatics Institute we are able to provide public access to this data through the website http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/. The IPD project continues to develop with new tools being added to address scientific developments, such as Next Generation Sequencing, and to address user feedback and requests. Regular updates to the website ensure that new and confirmatory sequences are dispersed to the immunogenetics community, and the wider research and clinical communities. PMID:25414341

  14. HLA-B27 Anterior Uveitis: Immunology and Immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Denis; Yates, William; Amjadi, Shahriar; McCluskey, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Acute anterior uveitis (AAU) is the commonest type of uveitis and HLA-B27 AAU is the most frequently recognized type of acute anterior uveitis and anterior uveitis overall. Recent evidence indicates that acute anterior uveitis is a heterogenous disease, is polygenic and is frequently associated with the spondyloarthropathies (SpA). Studies of patients with AAU and animal models of disease indicate a role for innate immunity, the IL-23 cytokine pathway and exogenous factors, in the pathogenesis of both SpA and acute anterior uveitis. Recently described genetic associations cluster around immunologic pathways, including the IL-17 and IL-23 pathways, antigen processing and presentation, and lymphocyte development and activation. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and AAU share other genetic markers, such as ERAP-1, which show strong evidence of gene-gene interaction and point to new mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. These observations have major implications for understanding the pathogenesis of HLA-B27 diseases, such as AAU, and may lead to the development of more specific therapy for AAU. Received 6 January 2016; revised 6 February 2016; accepted 18 February 2016; published online 31 May 2016. PMID:27245590

  15. Role of HLA antigens in Rh (D) alloimmunized pregnant women from Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, U Shankar; Ghosh, K; Gupte, S S; Gupte, S C; Mohanty, D

    2002-03-01

    Immunogenetic studies in various diseases provide potential genetic markers. We have studied the incidence of HLA A, B, C, DR and DQ loci antigen in Rh (D) antigen isoimmunized mothers compared to those nonimmunized isoimmunized Rh negative mothers. Seventy six mothers who were immunized to Rh (D) antigen due to pregnancy (responders) and fifty four mothers who did not develop Rh (D) isoimmunization despite positive pregnancies (nonresponders) were selected for the study. Standard methods of serological HLA typing, ABO and Rh (D) groups, and screening for Rh D antibodies were used. 392 unrelated individuals from the population were compared as controls. In addition 45 unrelated individuals from the same population were typed for HLA DRB and DQB gene using PCR-SSP kits. The genotype frequencies of HLA A2, A3, A28, B13, B17, B35, B52, B60, Cw2, Cw6, DR4, and DQ3 were significantly increased, while the frequencies of the HLA A11, A29, A31, B7, B37, B51, Cw1 and DR9 were decreased in the responder women when compared to the non-responder women. HLA A30 (19) split antigen was not identified in immunized women while HLA A23 (9) split antigen was not identified in non immunized women. HLA A3, B17, Cw2 and DR4 showed a significant relative risk among the immunized responder women. When compared with Rh immunized women (responders) reported from USA, England and Hungary the phenotype frequencies of HLA A11, A24, A28, B5, B17, B40, DR2 and DR5 were increased while HLA A23, B8, B18, and DR6 were decreased in the Indian Rh immunized women. Two locus haplotype frequency analysis observed among the responders women revealed that among the significant haplotypes expressed A2-B5, B7-Cw1, DR2-DQ1 were highly significant haplotypes in positive linkage, while A1-B5, and A1-B7 were in significant negative linkage disequilibrium. The haplotype frequencies were

  16. The role of soluble HLA-G and HLA-G receptors in patients with hematological malignancies after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Biedroń, Monika; Rybka, Justyna; Wróbel, Tomasz; Prajs, Iwona; Poręba, Rafał; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz

    2015-08-01

    HLA-G is a non-classical MHC class I molecule whose suppressive activity on immune effector cells is exerted due to interactions with receptors ILT2, ILT4 and KIR2DL4. These receptors are expressed mainly on NK cells and monocytes, and their intensity of expression changes depending on HLA-G level. HLA-G plays an important role in the development of tolerance following organ transplantations and bone marrow stem cell transplantations. HLA-G also participates in the modulation of the immune response during cancerogenesis. The aim of this study was to assess HLA-G level in blood serum, the percentage of NK cells and monocytes with expression of receptors for HLA-G (ILT2, ILT4, KIR2DL4 and NKG2D) in patients who received allogeneic stem cell transplantations, and their influence on the occurrence of graft-versus-host reaction. The study included 32 patients with bone marrow diseases (acute leukemias, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myeloid leukemia, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria) who received allogeneic stem cell transplantations. We assessed the expression of receptors ILT2, ILT4, KIR2DL4 and NKG2D on monocytes and NK cells, as well as the level of HLA-G in blood serum in patients before conditioning, in the transplant hematopoietic reconstitution period following allogeneic bone marrow stem cell transplantation. The percentage of NK cells with expression of KIR2DL4, ILT2 and ILT4 receptors was higher in patients with 0-I grade GVHD than in patients with II-IV grade GVHD. The percentage of monocytes with expression of ILT4 and ILT2 receptors was higher in patients with 0-I grade GVHD than in patients with II-IV grade GVHD. The level of HLA-G in patients' blood serum was higher after the stem cell transplantation compared with the period before transplantation. HLA-G level and HLA-G receptors are related to intensity of GVHD and may play the role of a prognostic factor for the development of GVHD and the clinical course of this reaction. PMID:26187179

  17. The Structure and Stability of the Monomorphic HLA-G Are Influenced by the Nature of the Bound Peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Walpole, Nicholas G.; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Kostenko, Lyudmila; McCluskey, James; Brooks, Andrew G.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Clements, Craig S.

    2010-03-26

    The highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex class Ia (MHC-Ia) molecules present a broad array of peptides to the clonotypically diverse {alpha}{beta} T-cell receptors. In contrast, MHC-Ib molecules exhibit limited polymorphism and bind a more restricted peptide repertoire, in keeping with their major role in innate immunity. Nevertheless, some MHC-Ib molecules do play a role in adaptive immunity. While human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E), the MHC-Ib molecule, binds a very restricted repertoire of peptides, the peptide binding preferences of HLA-G, the class Ib molecule, are less stringent, although the basis by which HLA-G can bind various peptides is unclear. To investigate how HLA-G can accommodate different peptides, we compared the structure of HLA-G bound to three naturally abundant self-peptides (RIIPRHLQL, KGPPAALTL and KLPQAFYIL) and their thermal stabilities. The conformation of HLA-G{sup KGPPAALTL} was very similar to that of the HLA-G{sup RIIPRHLQL} structure. However, the structure of HLA-G{sup KLPQAFYIL} not only differed in the conformation of the bound peptide but also caused a small shift in the {alpha}2 helix of HLA-G. Furthermore, the relative stability of HLA-G was observed to be dependent on the nature of the bound peptide. These peptide-dependent effects on the substructure of the monomorphic HLA-G are likely to impact on its recognition by receptors of both innate and adaptive immune systems.

  18. The immunosuppressive effect of domain-deleted dimer of HLA-G2 isoform in collagen-induced arthritis mice.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ami; Kuroki, Kimiko; Okabe, Yuki; Kasai, Yoshiyuki; Matsumoto, Naoki; Yamada, Chisato; Takai, Toshiyuki; Ose, Toyoyuki; Kon, Shigeyuki; Matsuda, Tadashi; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2016-09-01

    HLA-G is involved in maternal-fetal immune tolerance and is reported to be a natural tolerogenic molecule. Seven-spliced isoforms including dimeric and β2m-free forms have been identified. The major isoform, HLA-G1 (and its soluble type HLA-G5), binds to the inhibitory immune receptors, leukocyte immunoglobulin (Ig)-like receptor (LILR) B1 and LILRB2. We previously reported that HLA-G1 also binds to paired Ig-like receptor (PIR)-B, a mouse homolog of LILRBs, and had a significant immunosuppressive effect in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice. Although HLA-G2 and its soluble form HLA-G6 bind specifically to LILRB2, its functional characteristics are largely unknown. In this study, we report the significant immunosuppressive effect of HLA-G2 dimer in CIA mice. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed a specific interaction of HLA-G2 with PIR-B. CIA mice were administered HLA-G2 protein subcutaneously once in the left footpad and clinical severity was evaluated in a double-blind study. A single administration of HLA-G2 maintained a suppressive effect for over 1month. These results suggested that the HLA-G2 protein might be a useful biopharmaceutical for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis by binding to inhibitory PIR-B. PMID:26805457

  19. HLA-E(⁎)01:03 Allele in Lung Transplant Recipients Correlates with Higher Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction Occurrence.

    PubMed

    Di Cristofaro, Julie; Pelardy, Mathieu; Loundou, Anderson; Basire, Agnès; Gomez, Carine; Chiaroni, Jacques; Thomas, Pascal; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine; Picard, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is a valid therapeutic option for selected patients with end-stage lung disease. HLA-E seems to play a major role in the immune response to different viral infections and to affect transplantation outcome, in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, for example. Two nonsynonymous alleles, HLA-E(⁎)01:01 and HLA-E(⁎)01:03, have functional differences, involving relative peptide affinity, cell surface expression, and potential lytic activity of NK cells. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the impact of these two alleles for LTx recipients on anti-HLA alloimmunization risk, overall survival, and chronic rejection (CLAD). HLA-E was genotyped in 119 recipients who underwent LTx from 1998 to 2010 in a single transplantation center. In univariate analysis, both HLA-E homozygous states were associated with impaired overall survival compared to heterozygous HLA-E alleles (p = 0.01). In multivariate analysis, HLA-E(⁎)01:03 allele showed increased CLAD occurrence when compared to homozygous HLA-E(⁎)01:01 status (HR: 3.563 (CI 95%, 1.016-12), p = 0.047). HLA-E allele did not affect pathogen infection or the production of de novo DSA. This retrospective study shows an uninvestigated, deleterious association of HLA-E alleles with LTx and requires verification using a larger cohort. PMID:27493971

  20. HLA-E⁎01:03 Allele in Lung Transplant Recipients Correlates with Higher Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Di Cristofaro, Julie; Basire, Agnès; Gomez, Carine; Chiaroni, Jacques; Thomas, Pascal; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is a valid therapeutic option for selected patients with end-stage lung disease. HLA-E seems to play a major role in the immune response to different viral infections and to affect transplantation outcome, in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, for example. Two nonsynonymous alleles, HLA-E⁎01:01 and HLA-E⁎01:03, have functional differences, involving relative peptide affinity, cell surface expression, and potential lytic activity of NK cells. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the impact of these two alleles for LTx recipients on anti-HLA alloimmunization risk, overall survival, and chronic rejection (CLAD). HLA-E was genotyped in 119 recipients who underwent LTx from 1998 to 2010 in a single transplantation center. In univariate analysis, both HLA-E homozygous states were associated with impaired overall survival compared to heterozygous HLA-E alleles (p = 0.01). In multivariate analysis, HLA-E⁎01:03 allele showed increased CLAD occurrence when compared to homozygous HLA-E⁎01:01 status (HR: 3.563 (CI 95%, 1.016–12), p = 0.047). HLA-E allele did not affect pathogen infection or the production of de novo DSA. This retrospective study shows an uninvestigated, deleterious association of HLA-E alleles with LTx and requires verification using a larger cohort. PMID:27493971

  1. Combined influences of Gm and HLA phenotypes upon multiple sclerosis susceptibility and severity.

    PubMed Central

    Salier, J P; Sesboüé, R; Martin-Mondière, C; Daveau, M; Cesaro, P; Cavelier, B; Coquerel, A; Legrand, L; Goust, J M; Degos, J D

    1986-01-01

    In some Caucasian populations, multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility has been independently related to given alleles of HLA or Gm systems that respectively code for major histocompatibility complex class I and II antigens or immunoglobulin G heavy chains. Whether given combinations of alleles at both series of loci simultaneously influence MS susceptibility and/or severity was investigated by comparing 147 French MS patients and 226 geographically-matched healthy controls. The G2m(-23)/HLA-B35 phenotype and G1m(-1)/HLA-B7(-)/HLA-DR2 phenotype were respectively associated with significant protection against (relative risk = 0.05) and susceptibility to (relative risk = 4.3) MS. When considering MS severity, the presence of HLA-B7 antigen correlated with a more severe disease in Gm1/Gm3 heterozygous patients, but not in Gm3/Gm3 homozygous patients. Conversely, an HLA-B12-associated milder disease was restricted to Gm3/Gm3 homozygotes. These results demonstrate the combined influence on MS of genetic loci that are unlinked but immune response-associated. Combined Gm and HLA typing is very likely able to serve as a prognostic indicator in this disease. PMID:3461005

  2. Combined influences of Gm and HLA phenotypes upon multiple sclerosis susceptibility and severity.

    PubMed

    Salier, J P; Sesboüé, R; Martin-Mondière, C; Daveau, M; Cesaro, P; Cavelier, B; Coquerel, A; Legrand, L; Goust, J M; Degos, J D

    1986-08-01

    In some Caucasian populations, multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility has been independently related to given alleles of HLA or Gm systems that respectively code for major histocompatibility complex class I and II antigens or immunoglobulin G heavy chains. Whether given combinations of alleles at both series of loci simultaneously influence MS susceptibility and/or severity was investigated by comparing 147 French MS patients and 226 geographically-matched healthy controls. The G2m(-23)/HLA-B35 phenotype and G1m(-1)/HLA-B7(-)/HLA-DR2 phenotype were respectively associated with significant protection against (relative risk = 0.05) and susceptibility to (relative risk = 4.3) MS. When considering MS severity, the presence of HLA-B7 antigen correlated with a more severe disease in Gm1/Gm3 heterozygous patients, but not in Gm3/Gm3 homozygous patients. Conversely, an HLA-B12-associated milder disease was restricted to Gm3/Gm3 homozygotes. These results demonstrate the combined influence on MS of genetic loci that are unlinked but immune response-associated. Combined Gm and HLA typing is very likely able to serve as a prognostic indicator in this disease. PMID:3461005

  3. Association between HLA-E gene polymorphism and unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) in Iranian women

    PubMed Central

    Fotoohi, Maryam; Ghasemi, Nasrin; Mirghanizadeh, Seyed Ali; Vakili, Mahmood; Samadi, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human leukocyte antigen-E (HLA-E)is a non-classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigens which expressed on extra villous cytotrophoblast, which interacts with NKG2A, is an inhibitory receptor on natural killer (NK) cells and leading to down regulation of immune response in the maternal-fetal interface and provides maternal immune tolerance of the fetus. Objective: This study was designated to investigate the gene frequencies of E0101 and E0103 in HLA-E gene in Iranian women with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA). Materials and Methods: Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS-PCR) technique was carried out to detect polymorphism in exon 3 of the HLA-E gene in women with RSA and controls (n=200). Differences between groups were analyzed by SPSS19 software using 2 test. Results: There was no significant difference in the allele frequencies of the HLA-E polymorphism between RSA and fertile controls but HLA-E 0101/0103 heterozygous genotype was found to be significantly higher in RSA group (p=0.006, OR=1.73), so this genotype might confer susceptibility to RSA. Conclusion: Our results suggest that HLA-E 0101/0103 heterozygous genotype leads to increase of RSA risk. It seems that by genotyping of HLA-E polymorphism, we can predict the risk of RSA in infertile women. PMID:27525333

  4. Genetic response to an environmental pathogenic agent: HLA-DQ and onchocerciasis in northwestern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, F; Garzoli, A; Battistini, A; Iorio, A; De Stefano, G F

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study is to explore human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ variability in two populations (Cayapas Amerindians and Afro-Ecuadorians) who live near one another along the Cayapa River and who are exposed to the same environmental stresses, such as infection by Onchocerca volvulus. HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 of 149 unrelated individuals (74 Cayapas and 75 Afro-Ecuadorians) have been analyzed. HLA high-resolution molecular typing was performed by sequence-based typing, sequence-specific oligonucleotides hybridization and sequence-specific primer (SSP) amplification. The comparison between affected (cases) and unaffected people (controls) in both populations shows the key role of several HLA-DQA1 alleles in susceptibility and protection against onchocerciasis. In both populations, there is strong evidence related to the protective role of DQA1*0401 against onchocerciasis. Alleles HLA-DQA1*0102 and *0103 seem to represent risk factors in Afro-Ecuadorians, while HLA-DQA1*0301 is only a suggestive susceptibility allele in Cayapas. These findings represent new positive/negative associations with onchocerciasis in South America, whereas previous findings pertained only to African populations. PMID:22117902

  5. Dual, HLA-B27 Subtype-dependent Conformation of a Self-peptide

    PubMed Central

    Hülsmeyer, Martin; Fiorillo, Maria Teresa; Bettosini, Francesca; Sorrentino, Rosa; Saenger, Wolfram; Ziegler, Andreas; Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The products of the human leukocyte antigen subtypes HLA-B*2705 and HLA-B*2709 differ only in residue 116 (Asp vs. His) within the peptide binding groove but are differentially associated with the autoimmune disease ankylosing spondylitis (AS); HLA-B*2705 occurs in AS-patients, whereas HLA-B*2709 does not. The subtypes also generate differential T cell repertoires as exemplified by distinct T cell responses against the self-peptide pVIPR (RRKWRRWHL). The crystal structures described here show that pVIPR binds in an unprecedented dual conformation only to HLA-B*2705 molecules. In one binding mode, peptide pArg5 forms a salt bridge to Asp116, connected with drastically different interactions between peptide and heavy chain, contrasting with the second, conventional conformation, which is exclusively found in the case of B*2709. These subtype-dependent differences in pVIPR binding link the emergence of dissimilar T cell repertoires in individuals with HLA-B*2705 or HLA-B*2709 to the buried Asp116/His116 polymorphism and provide novel insights into peptide presentation by major histocompatibility antigens. PMID:14734527

  6. HLA-DMA polymorphisms differentially affect MHC class II peptide loading.

    PubMed

    Álvaro-Benito, Miguel; Wieczorek, Marek; Sticht, Jana; Kipar, Claudia; Freund, Christian

    2015-01-15

    During the adaptive immune response, MHCII proteins display antigenic peptides on the cell surface of APCs for CD4(+) T cell surveillance. HLA-DM, a nonclassical MHCII protein, acts as a peptide exchange catalyst for MHCII, editing the peptide repertoire. Although they map to the same gene locus, MHCII proteins exhibit a high degree of polymorphism, whereas only low variability has been observed for HLA-DM. As HLA-DM activity directly favors immunodominant peptide presentation, polymorphisms in HLA-DM (DMA or DMB chain) might well be a contributing risk factor for autoimmunity and immune disorders. Our systematic comparison of DMA*0103/DMB*0101 (DMA-G155A and DMA-R184H) with DMA*0101/DMB*0101 in terms of catalyzed peptide exchange and dissociation, as well as direct interaction with several HLA-DR/peptide complexes, reveals an attenuated catalytic activity of DMA*0103/DMB*0101. The G155A substitution dominates the catalytic behavior of DMA*0103/DMB*0101 by decreasing peptide release velocity. Preloaded peptide-MHCII complexes exhibit ∼2-fold increase in half-life in the presence of DMA*0103/DMB*0101 when compared with DMA*0101/DMB*0101. We show that this effect leads to a greater persistence of autoimmunity-related Ags in the presence of high-affinity competitor peptide. Our study therefore reveals that HLA-DM polymorphic residues have a considerable impact on HLA-DM catalytic activity. PMID:25505276

  7. Fine-mapping of HLA associations with chronic lymphocytic leukemia in US populations

    PubMed Central

    Fingerson, Stephanie; Albrecht, Mark; Maiers, Martin; Kalaycio, Matt; Hill, Brian T.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) displays remarkable ethnic predisposition for whites, with relative sparing of African-American and Asian populations. In addition, CLL displays among the highest familial predispositions of all hematologic malignancies, yet the genetic basis for these differences is not clearly defined. The highly polymorphic HLA genes of the major histocompatibility complex play a central role in immune surveillance and confer risk for autoimmune and infectious diseases and several different cancers, the role for which in the development of CLL has not been extensively investigated. The National Marrow Donor Program/Be The Match has collected HLA typing from CLL patients in need of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant and has recruited millions of volunteers to potentially donate hematopoietic stem cells. HLA genotypes for 3491 US white, 397 African-American, and 90 Hispanic CLL patients were compared with 50 000 controls per population from the donor registry. We identified several HLA alleles associated with CLL susceptibility in each population, reconfirming predisposing roles of HLA-A*02:01 and HLA-DRB4*01:01 in whites. Associations for haplotype DRB4*01:01∼DRB1*07:01∼DQB1*03:03 were replicated across all 3 populations. These findings provide a comprehensive assessment of the role of HLA in the development of severe CLL. PMID:25232063

  8. Role of 14-Bp HLA-G, INDEL Polymorphism in Recurrent Miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Afkhami, Fateme; Yazdani, Neda; Khaniani, Mahmoud Shekari; Derakhshan, Sima Mansoori

    2016-01-01

    Mothers and their fetuses are hereditarily unlike. Surprisingly, no less than 50% human pregnancies reach full term despite the tendency of the immune system to eliminate of non-self units. Reduction of adaptive maternal immune answer, which is planned to reject strange factors, is essential for a pregnancy to reach full term. However, approximately 5% couples trying to conceive experience 2 recurrent miscarriages (RMs).HLA-G, which is produced by the external trophectoderm layer and has unique biological features, is involved in the implantation and maintenance of fetus. Serum HLA-G levels are correlated with the risk of RM. Recent studies indicate that a 14-bp HLA-G, INDEL polymorphism decreases the level of HLA-G mRNA, which in turn decreases the amount of HLA-G produced. An understanding of gene parameter and the function of polymorphic sites in the functioning of HLA-G products may enable the development of approaches targeting HLA-G for more detail of causes of RM. PMID:27357874

  9. IMGT/HLA database--a sequence database for the human major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J; Malik, A; Parham, P; Bodmer, J G; Marsh, S G

    2000-03-01

    The IMGT/HLA Database is a specialist database for sequences of the human major histocompatibility (MHC) system. It includes all the HLA sequences officially recognised and named by the WHO Nomenclature Committee for Factors of the HLA System. The database provides users with online tools and facilities for the retrieval and analysis of these sequences. These include allele reports, alignment tools and a detailed database of all source cells. The online IMGT/HLA submission tool allows the submission of both new and confirmatory allele sequences directly to the WHO Nomenclature Committee for Factors of the HLA System. The latest version (release 1.4.1, November 1999) contains 1,015 HLA alleles from over 2,270 component sequences derived from the EMBL/GenBank/DDBJ databases. From its release in December 1998 until December 1999 the IMGT/HLA website received approximately 100,000 hits. The database currently focuses on the human major histocompatibility complex but will be used as a model system to provide specialist databases for the MHC sequences of other species. PMID:10777106

  10. HLA-A11 is associated with poor prognosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    PubMed

    Orgad, S; Cohen, I J; Neumann, Y; Vogel, R; Kende, G; Ramot, B; Zaizov, R; Gazit, E

    1988-12-01

    A possible association between HLA antigens, susceptibility or resistance to leukemia, and responsiveness to treatment has been studied in 144 patients with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and compared to other prognostic factors, i.e. white blood cell (WBC) counts, age at onset, sex, ethnic origin, and cell surface markers. All sequentially newly diagnosed children (97) comprised the group for the prospective study (PSG) and were followed for 6 years. The group included 37 patients classified as T-ALL, 41 as CALLA+, 27 as NULL, 12 as B and pre-B, and 27 unclassified patients, who were diagnosed before 1980. During the follow-up period, 45 patients of the PSG died. Forty-seven patients designated long-term survivors (LTS) have been followed 6-20 years after diagnosis, having completed a 3-5 year course of anti-leukemia therapy, and having remained disease free thereafter. High WBC counts at diagnosis and T-cell-surface markers were associated with poor prognosis, as were enthnic origin and specific HLA antigens. Thus, there was one (1) a significant increase in HLA-A30 and a decrease in HLA B-14 in the PSG Jewish patients; and (2) a complete absence of HLA-ALL in LTS while, in the PSG, 8 of 9 HLA-All-positive patients died during the follow-up period. This suggests that HLA-All is associated with poor prognosis in childhood ALL. PMID:3199882

  11. The Genetic Profile from HLA and Non-HLA Loci Allows Identification of Atypical Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fabregat, Matias; Fernandez, Mariana; Javiel, Gerardo; Vitarella, Graciela; Mimbacas, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    The complex diagnosis and treatment of diabetes highlight the need for markers to define how to monitor patients correctly during the course of their disease. Different studies demonstrate the existence of patients who cannot be clearly classified. We have previously shown that it is possible to differentiate “atypical diabetic patients” based on genotyping the HLA. In this work we show that the analysis of non-HLA related to type 1 diabetes in the INS-VNTR, SNP rs689, and rs3842753 improves the identification of these patients. We genotyped 913 individuals comprising controls from the general population and “classic” and “atypical” diabetic patients. We compared the distribution of these loci and analyzed linkage disequilibrium. The haplotype was in LD for all the SNPs that were evaluated. Regarding their association with the disease, the haplotype IAC was associated with type 1 (odds 2.60, 1.82–3.72, CI 95%) and “atypical diabetes” (odds 1.50, 1.01–2.23, CI 95%), whereas we did not observe an association with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, our results confirm that atypical diabetes is a different entity of the disease where the patient presents with a genetic background of T1D and a T2D phenotype, findings that are likely to be relevant for patient diagnosis and management in the clinic. PMID:26273670

  12. Clozapine-induced agranulocytosis is associated with rare HLA-DQB1 and HLA-B alleles

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Jacqueline I; Jarskog, L Fredrik; Hilliard, Chris; Alfirevic, Ana; Duncan, Laramie; Fourches, Denis; Huang, Hailiang; Lek, Monkol; Neale, Benjamin M; Ripke, Stephan; Shianna, Kevin; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Tropsha, Alexander; van den Oord, Edwin JCG; Cascorbi, Ingolf; Dettling, Michael; Gazit, Ephraim; Goff, Donald C; Holden, Arthur L; Kelly, Deanna L; Malhotra, Anil K; Nielsen, Jimmi; Pirmohamed, Munir; Rujescu, Dan; Werge, Thomas; Levy, Deborah L; Josiassen, Richard C; Kennedy, James L; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Daly, Mark J; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2014-01-01

    Clozapine is a particularly effective antipsychotic medication but its use is curtailed by the risk of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis/granulocytopenia (CIAG), a severe adverse drug reaction occurring in up to 1% of treated individuals. Identifying genetic risk factors for CIAG could enable safer and more widespread use of clozapine. Here we perform the largest and most comprehensive genetic study of CIAG to date by interrogating 163 cases using genome-wide genotyping and whole-exome sequencing. We find that two loci in the major histocompatibility complex are independently associated with CIAG: a single amino acid in HLA-DQB1 (126Q) (P=4.7×10−14, odds ratio, OR=0.19, 95% CI 0.12–0.29) and an amino acid change in the extracellular binding pocket of HLA-B (158T) (P=6.4×10−10, OR=3.3, 95% CI 2.3–4.9). These associations dovetail with the roles of these genes in immunogenetic phenotypes and adverse drug responses for other medications, and provide insight into the pathophysiology of CIAG. PMID:25187353

  13. pH-susceptibility of HLA-DO tunes DO/DM ratios to regulate HLA-DM catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Strohman, Michael J.; Somasundaram, Sriram; Ayyangar, Sashi; Hou, Tieying; Wang, Nan; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2015-01-01

    The peptide-exchange catalyst, HLA-DM, and its inhibitor, HLA-DO control endosomal generation of peptide/class II major histocompatibility protein (MHC-II) complexes; these complexes traffic to the cell surface for inspection by CD4+ T cells. Some evidence suggests that pH influences DO regulation of DM function, but pH also affects the stability of polymorphic MHC-II proteins, spontaneous peptide loading, DM/MHC-II interactions and DM catalytic activity, imposing challenges on approaches to determine pH effects on DM-DO function and their mechanistic basis. Using optimized biochemical methods, we dissected pH-dependence of spontaneous and DM-DO-mediated class II peptide exchange and identified an MHC-II allele-independent relationship between pH, DO/DM ratio and efficient peptide exchange. We demonstrate that active, free DM is generated from DM-DO complexes at late endosomal/lysosomal pH due to irreversible, acid-promoted DO destruction rather than DO/DM molecular dissociation. Any soluble DM that remains in complex with DO stays inert. pH-exposure of DM-DO in cell lysates corroborates such a pH-regulated mechanism, suggesting acid-activated generation of functional DM in DO-expressing cells. PMID:26610428

  14. Is there a stronger graft-versus-leukemia effect using HLA-haploidentical donors compared with HLA-identical siblings?

    PubMed

    Ringdén, O; Labopin, M; Ciceri, F; Velardi, A; Bacigalupo, A; Arcese, W; Ghavamzadeh, A; Hamladji, R M; Schmid, C; Nagler, A; Mohty, M

    2016-02-01

    Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCTs) are increasingly used, but it is unknown whether they have a stronger graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect. We analyzed 10 679 acute leukemia patients who underwent HSCT from an HLA-matched sibling donor (MSD, n=9815) or a haploidentical donor (⩾2 HLA-antigen disparity, n=864) between 2007 and 2012, reported to the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. In a Cox regression model, acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was added as time-dependent variables. There was no difference in probability of relapse between recipients of haploidentical and MSD grafts. Factors of importance for relapse after T-cell-replete grafts included remission status at HSCT, Karnofsky score ⩽80, acute GVHD of grade II or higher and chronic GVHD (P<10(-5)). Patients with post-transplant cyclophosphamide (n=194) had similar outcome as other T-cell-replete haploidentical transplants (n=369). Non-relapse mortality was significantly higher in the haploidentical group compared with that in MSD patients (P<10(-5)). Leukemia-free survival was superior in the MSD patients receiving T-cell-replete (P<10(-5)) or T-cell-depleted grafts (P=0.0006). The risk of relapse was the same in acute leukemia patients who received haploidentical donor grafts as in those given MSD transplants, suggesting a similar GVL effect. PMID:26293645

  15. Clozapine-induced agranulocytosis is associated with rare HLA-DQB1 and HLA-B alleles.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Jacqueline I; Jarskog, L Fredrik; Hilliard, Chris; Alfirevic, Ana; Duncan, Laramie; Fourches, Denis; Huang, Hailiang; Lek, Monkol; Neale, Benjamin M; Ripke, Stephan; Shianna, Kevin; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Tropsha, Alexander; van den Oord, Edwin J C G; Cascorbi, Ingolf; Dettling, Michael; Gazit, Ephraim; Goff, Donald C; Holden, Arthur L; Kelly, Deanna L; Malhotra, Anil K; Nielsen, Jimmi; Pirmohamed, Munir; Rujescu, Dan; Werge, Thomas; Levy, Deborah L; Josiassen, Richard C; Kennedy, James L; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Daly, Mark J; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2014-01-01

    Clozapine is a particularly effective antipsychotic medication but its use is curtailed by the risk of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis/granulocytopenia (CIAG), a severe adverse drug reaction occurring in up to 1% of treated individuals. Identifying genetic risk factors for CIAG could enable safer and more widespread use of clozapine. Here we perform the largest and most comprehensive genetic study of CIAG to date by interrogating 163 cases using genome-wide genotyping and whole-exome sequencing. We find that two loci in the major histocompatibility complex are independently associated with CIAG: a single amino acid in HLA-DQB1 (126Q) (P=4.7 × 10(-14), odds ratio (OR)=0.19, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.12-0.29) and an amino acid change in the extracellular binding pocket of HLA-B (158T) (P=6.4 × 10(-10), OR=3.3, 95% CI=2.3-4.9). These associations dovetail with the roles of these genes in immunogenetic phenotypes and adverse drug responses for other medications, and provide insight into the pathophysiology of CIAG. PMID:25187353

  16. The Royan Public Umbilical Cord Blood Bank: Does It Cover All Ethnic Groups in Iran Based on HLA Diversity?

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimkhani, Saeideh; Farjadian, Shirin; Ebrahimi, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Umbilical cord blood (UCB) stem cells allow the transplantation of partially human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched grafts and are a valuable resource for the treatment of hematologic malignancies and heritable hematologic, immunologic and metabolic diseases, especially when a compatible bone marrow donor is unavailable. The aim of this study was to determine how many ethnic groups in Iran are covered by the available UCB units based on HLA diversity. Methods From 2009 until mid-2013, 4,981 (30.3%) of the 16,437 UCB samples collected met the storage criteria and were cryopreserved at a public cord blood bank (CBB) in Tehran, Iran. HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 were typed in 1,793 samples. Results The mean volume of the cryopreserved samples was 81.25 ± 20.3 ml. The range of total nucleated cells per unit was 51 × 107-107 × 107. The most common HLA alleles were HLA-A*2 (17%) and HLA-A*24 (15.6%), HLA-B*35 (16.8%) and HLA-B*51 (13.9%), and HLA-DRB1*11 (20%) and HLA-DRB1*15 (14%). The predominant haplotypes were HLA-A*24-B*35-DRB1*11 (2%), HLA-A*02-B*50-DR*07 (1.8%), and HLA-A*02-B*51-DRB1*11 (1.5%). Conclusions Based on the HLA-DRB1 profiles, the UCB units available at the Royan public UCB bank are a potentially adequate resource for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for Iranian recipients belonging to particular ethnic groups. Regular educational programs to improve the public knowledge of UCB for transplantation can enhance the public CBB stocks for all Iranian ethnic groups in the future. PMID:24847189

  17. HLA-E: Presentation of a Broader Peptide Repertoire Impacts the Cellular Immune Response—Implications on HSCT Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Thomas; Celik, Alexander A.; Huyton, Trevor; Kunze-Schumacher, Heike; Blasczyk, Rainer; Bade-Döding, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The HLA-E locus encodes a nonclassical class Ib molecule that serves many immune functions from inhibiting NK cells to activating CTLs. Structural analysis of HLA-E/NKG2A complexes visualized fine-tuning of protective immune responses through AA interactions between HLA-E, the bound peptide, and NKG2A/CD94. A loss of cellular protection through abrogation of the HLA-E/NKG2A engagement is dependent on the HLA-E bound peptide. The role of HLA-E in posttransplant outcomes is not well understood but might be attributed to its peptide repertoire. To investigate the self-peptide repertoire of HLA-E∗01:01 in the absence of protective HLA class I signal peptides, we utilized soluble HLA technology in class I negative LCL cells in order to characterize HLA-E∗01:01-bound ligands by mass-spectrometry. To understand the immunological impact of these analyzed ligands on NK cell reactivity, we performed cellular assays. Synthesized peptides were loaded onto recombinant T2 cells expressing HLA-E∗01:01 molecules and applied in cytotoxicity assays using the leukemia derived NK cell line (NKL) as effector. HLA-E in complex with the self-peptides demonstrated a shift towards cytotoxicity and a loss of cell protection. Our data highlights the fact that the HLA-E-peptidome is not as restricted as previously thought and support the suggestion of a posttransplant role for HLA-E. PMID:26366178

  18. Monoclonal antibodies to HLA-E bind epitopes carried by unfolded β2 m-free heavy chains.

    PubMed

    Tremante, Elisa; Lo Monaco, Elisa; Ingegnere, Tiziano; Sampaoli, Camilla; Fraioli, Rocco; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2015-08-01

    Since HLA-E heavy chains accumulate free of their light β2 -microglobulin (β2 m) subunit, raising mAbs to folded HLA-E heterodimers has been difficult, and mAb characterization has been controversial. Herein, mAb W6/32 and 5 HLA-E-restricted mAbs (MEM-E/02, MEM-E/07, MEM-E/08, DT9, and 3D12) were tested on denatured, acid-treated, and natively folded (both β2 m-associated and β2 m-free) HLA-E molecules. Four distinct conformations were detected, including unusual, partially folded (and yet β2 m-free) heavy chains reactive with mAb DT9. In contrast with previous studies, epitope mapping and substitution scan on thousands of overlapping peptides printed on microchips revealed that mAbs MEM-E/02, MEM-E/07, and MEM-E/08 bind three distinct α1 and α2 domain epitopes. All three epitopes are linear since they span just 4-6 residues and are "hidden" in folded HLA-E heterodimers. They contain at least one HLA-E-specific residue that cannot be replaced by single substitutions with polymorphic HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-F, and HLA-G residues. Finally, also the MEM-E/02 and 3D12 epitopes are spatially distinct. In summary, HLA-E-specific residues are dominantly immunogenic, but only when heavy chains are locally unfolded. Consequently, the available mAbs fail to selectively bind conformed HLA-E heterodimers, and HLA-E expression may have been inaccurately assessed in some previous oncology, reproductive immunology, virology, and transplantation studies. PMID:25982269

  19. HLA-E: Presentation of a Broader Peptide Repertoire Impacts the Cellular Immune Response-Implications on HSCT Outcome.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Thomas; Celik, Alexander A; Huyton, Trevor; Kunze-Schumacher, Heike; Blasczyk, Rainer; Bade-Döding, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The HLA-E locus encodes a nonclassical class Ib molecule that serves many immune functions from inhibiting NK cells to activating CTLs. Structural analysis of HLA-E/NKG2A complexes visualized fine-tuning of protective immune responses through AA interactions between HLA-E, the bound peptide, and NKG2A/CD94. A loss of cellular protection through abrogation of the HLA-E/NKG2A engagement is dependent on the HLA-E bound peptide. The role of HLA-E in posttransplant outcomes is not well understood but might be attributed to its peptide repertoire. To investigate the self-peptide repertoire of HLA-E (∗) 01:01 in the absence of protective HLA class I signal peptides, we utilized soluble HLA technology in class I negative LCL cells in order to characterize HLA-E (∗) 01:01-bound ligands by mass-spectrometry. To understand the immunological impact of these analyzed ligands on NK cell reactivity, we performed cellular assays. Synthesized peptides were loaded onto recombinant T2 cells expressing HLA-E (∗) 01:01 molecules and applied in cytotoxicity assays using the leukemia derived NK cell line (NKL) as effector. HLA-E in complex with the self-peptides demonstrated a shift towards cytotoxicity and a loss of cell protection. Our data highlights the fact that the HLA-E-peptidome is not as restricted as previously thought and support the suggestion of a posttransplant role for HLA-E. PMID:26366178

  20. HLA Class I Sensitization in Islet Transplant Recipients – Report from the Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry

    PubMed Central

    Naziruddin, Bashoo; Wease, Steve; Stablein, Donald; Barton, Franca B.; Berney, Thierry; Rickels, Michael R.; Alejandro, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation is a promising treatment option for patients severely affected with type 1 diabetes. This report from CITR presents pre- and post-transplant human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I sensitization rates in islet alone transplantation. Data came from 303 recipients transplanted with islet alone between January 1999 and December 2008. HLA class I sensitization was determined by the presence of anti-HLA class I antibodies. Panel-reactive antibodies (PRA) from prior to islet infusion and at 6 months, and yearly post-transplant was correlated to measures of islet graft failure. The cumulative number of mismatched HLA alleles increased with each additional islet infusion from a median of 3 for one infusion to 9 for three infusions. Pre-transplant PRA was not predictive of islet graft failure. However, development of PRA ≥20% post-transplant was associated with 3.6 fold (p=.001) increased hazard ratio for graft failure. Patients with complete graft loss who had discontinued immunosuppression had significantly higher rate of PRA ≥ 20% compared to those with functioning grafts who remained on immunosuppression. Exposure to repeat HLA class I mismatch at second or third islet infusions resulted in less frequent development of de novo HLA class I antibodies when compared to increased class I mismatch. The development of HLA class I antibodies while on immunosuppression is associated with subsequent islet graft failure. The risk of sensitization may be reduced by minimizing the number of islet donors used per recipient, and in the absence of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies, repeating HLA class I mismatches with subsequent islet infusions. PMID:22080832

  1. Association of HLA class II genes with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung-Ho; Oh, Heung-Bum; Kim, Hyun-Kuk; Hong, Suk-Chan; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Dong Soon; Lee, Sang-Do

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the frequency of the HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles in Korean patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and in normal controls and to determine any association that may exist between clinical characteristics of IPAH and specific HLA alleles. IPAH patients seen between October 1998 and September 2001 were retrospectively assessed, and 19 patients and 193 controls were HLA typed at the HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 loci. Clinical characteristics and hemodynamic parameters were reviewed. The patients with IPAH had a significantly higher frequency of the HLA-DRB1*0406 allele (18% vs. 6%, p = 0.004) and the HLA-DQB1*0302 allele (24% vs. 12%, p = 0.034), as well as a significantly higher frequency of haplotype DRB1*0406-DQB1*0302 (p = 0.0006). All 6 patients with haplotype DRB1*0406-DQB1*0302 (H+ group) were women, compared with 8 of the 13 patients lacking the DRB1*0406-DQB1*0302 haplotype (H- group), but without statistical significance. Three of 19 patients showed a positive short-term hemodynamic response to NO inhalation, all 3 of whom had the DRB1*0406-DQB1*0302 haplotype. There were no other significant differences in clinical characteristics and hemodynamic parameters between the H+ and H- groups. We conclude from this study that the HLA-DRB1*0406-DQB1*0302 haplotype is associated with IPAH in Korean patients. These results suggest that certain clinical characteristics of IPAH may be controlled in part by patients' HLA alleles. PMID:17406941

  2. Insights into HLA-G Genetics Provided by Worldwide Haplotype Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Erick C.; Ramalho, Jaqueline; Porto, Iane O. P.; Lima, Thálitta H. A.; Felício, Leandro P.; Sabbagh, Audrey; Donadi, Eduardo A.; Mendes-Junior, Celso T.

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) belongs to the family of non-classical HLA class I genes, located within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). HLA-G has been the target of most recent research regarding the function of class I non-classical genes. The main features that distinguish HLA-G from classical class I genes are (a) limited protein variability, (b) alternative splicing generating several membrane bound and soluble isoforms, (c) short cytoplasmic tail, (d) modulation of immune response (immune tolerance), and (e) restricted expression to certain tissues. In the present work, we describe the HLA-G gene structure and address the HLA-G variability and haplotype diversity among several populations around the world, considering each of its major segments [promoter, coding, and 3′ untranslated region (UTR)]. For this purpose, we developed a pipeline to reevaluate the 1000Genomes data and recover miscalled or missing genotypes and haplotypes. It became clear that the overall structure of the HLA-G molecule has been maintained during the evolutionary process and that most of the variation sites found in the HLA-G coding region are either coding synonymous or intronic mutations. In addition, only a few frequent and divergent extended haplotypes are found when the promoter, coding, and 3′UTRs are evaluated together. The divergence is particularly evident for the regulatory regions. The population comparisons confirmed that most of the HLA-G variability has originated before human dispersion from Africa and that the allele and haplotype frequencies have probably been shaped by strong selective pressures. PMID:25339953

  3. Frequent HLA class I alterations in human prostate cancer: molecular mechanisms and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Carretero, Francisco Javier; Del Campo, Ana Belen; Flores-Martín, Jose Francisco; Mendez, Rosa; García-Lopez, Cesar; Cozar, Jose Manuel; Adams, Victoria; Ward, Stephen; Cabrera, Teresa; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco; Garrido, Federico; Aptsiauri, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Reduced expression of HLA class I is an important immune escape mechanism from cytotoxic T cells described in various types of malignancy. It often correlates with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy. However, current knowledge about the frequency, underlying molecular mechanisms, and prognostic value of HLA class I and II alterations in prostate cancer (PC) is limited. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that 88 % of the 42 studied cryopreserved prostate tumors have at least one type of HLA alteration as compared to adjacent normal prostate epithelium or benign hyperplasia. Total loss of HLA-I expression found in 50 % of tumors showed an association with increased incidence of tumor relapse, perineural invasion, and high D'Amico risk. The remaining HLA-I-positive tumors demonstrated locus and allelic losses detected in 26 and 12 % of samples, respectively. Loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 6 was detected in 32 % of the studied tumors. Molecular analysis revealed a reduced expression of B2M, TAP2, tapasin and NLRC5 mRNA in microdissected HLA-I-negative tumors. Analysis of twelve previously unreported cell lines derived from neoplastic and normal epithelium of cancerous prostate revealed different types of HLA-I aberration, ranging from locus and/or allelic downregulation to a total absence of HLA-I expression. The high incidence of HLA-I loss observed in PC, caused by both regulatory and structural defects, is associated with more aggressive disease development and may pose a real threat to patient health by increasing cancer progression and resistance to T-cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:26611618

  4. Definition of supertypes for HLA molecules using clustering of specificity matrices.

    PubMed

    Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten; Kesmir, Can; Petersen, Anders Gorm; Lundegaard, Claus; Worning, Peder; Sylvester-Hvid, Christina; Lamberth, Kasper; Røder, Gustav; Justesen, Sune; Buus, Søren; Brunak, Søren

    2004-03-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins are encoded by extremely polymorphic genes and play a crucial role in immunity. However, not all genetically different MHC molecules are functionally different. Sette and Sidney (1999) have defined nine HLA class I supertypes and showed that with only nine main functional binding specificities it is possible to cover the binding properties of almost all known HLA class I molecules. Here we present a comprehensive study of the functional relationship between all HLA molecules with known specificities in a uniform and automated way. We have developed a novel method for clustering sequence motifs. We construct hidden Markov models for HLA class I molecules using a Gibbs sampling procedure and use the similarities among these to define clusters of specificities. These clusters are extensions of the previously suggested ones. We suggest splitting some of the alleles in the A1 supertype into a new A26 supertype, and some of the alleles in the B27 supertype into a new B39 supertype. Furthermore the B8 alleles may define their own supertype. We also use the published specificities for a number of HLA-DR types to define clusters with similar specificities. We report that the previously observed specificities of these class II molecules can be clustered into nine classes, which only partly correspond to the serological classification. We show that classification of HLA molecules may be done in a uniform and automated way. The definition of clusters allows for selection of representative HLA molecules that can cover the HLA specificity space better. This makes it possible to target most of the known HLA alleles with known specificities using only a few peptides, and may be used in construction of vaccines. Supplementary material is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/researchgroups/immunology/supertypes.html. PMID:14963618

  5. New susceptibility variants to narcolepsy identified in HLA class II region.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Taku; Toyoda, Hiromi; Hirataka, Akane; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Imanishi, Aya; Sagawa, Yohei; Kotorii, Nozomu; Kotorii, Tatayu; Hashizume, Yuji; Ogi, Kimihiro; Hiejima, Hiroshi; Kamei, Yuichi; Hida, Akiko; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Imai, Makoto; Fujimura, Yota; Tamura, Yoshiyuki; Ikegami, Azusa; Wada, Yamato; Moriya, Shunpei; Furuya, Hirokazu; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Omata, Naoto; Kojima, Hiroto; Kashiwase, Koichi; Saji, Hiroh; Khor, Seik-Soon; Yamasaki, Maria; Wada, Yuji; Ishigooka, Jun; Kuroda, Kenji; Kume, Kazuhiko; Chiba, Shigeru; Yamada, Naoto; Okawa, Masako; Hirata, Koichi; Uchimura, Naohisa; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Inoue, Yuichi; Honda, Yutaka; Mishima, Kazuo; Honda, Makoto; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2015-02-01

    Narcolepsy, a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy and rapid eye movement sleep abnormalities, is tightly associated with human leukocyte antigen HLA-DQB1*06:02. DQB1*06:02 is common in the general population (10-30%); therefore, additional genetic factors are needed for the development of narcolepsy. In the present study, HLA-DQB1 in 664 Japanese narcoleptic subjects and 3131 Japanese control subjects was examined to determine whether HLA-DQB1 alleles located in trans of DQB1*06:02 are associated with narcolepsy. The strongest association was with DQB1*06:01 (P = 1.4 × 10(-10), odds ratio, OR = 0.39), as reported in previous studies. Additional predisposing effects of DQB1*03:02 were also found (P = 2.5 × 10(-9), OR = 1.97). A comparison between DQB1*06:02 heterozygous cases and controls revealed dominant protective effects of DQB1*06:01 and DQB1*05:01. In addition, a single-nucleotide polymorphism-based conditional analysis controlling for the effect of HLA-DQB1 was performed to determine whether there were other independent HLA associations outside of HLA-DQB1. This analysis revealed associations at HLA-DPB1 in the HLA class II region (rs3117242, P = 4.1 × 10(-5), OR = 2.45; DPB1*05:01, P = 8.1 × 10(-3), OR = 1.39). These results indicate that complex HLA class II associations contribute to the genetic predisposition to narcolepsy. PMID:25256355

  6. Selective changes in expression of HLA class I polymorphic determinants in human solid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Natali, P.G.; Nicotra, M.R.; Bigotti, A.; Venturo, I.; Giacomini, P. ); Marcenaro, L.; Russo, C. )

    1989-09-01

    Analysis of surgical biopsies with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to framework determinants of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens has shown that malignant transformation is frequently associated with a marked loss of these cell surface molecules. The present study sought to determine whether more selective losses of major histocompatibility complex class I expression occur. Multiple specimens from 13 different types of primary and metastatic tumors were tested utilizing mAb BB7.2, which recognizes a polymorphic HLA-A2 epitope. In each case, expression of HLA-A,B,C molecules was determined by testing with mAb W6/32 directed to a framework HLA class I determinant. The authors have found that in HLA-A2-positive patients, HLA-A2 products are not detectable or are reduced in their expression in 70-80% of endometrial, colorectal, mammary, and renal tumors; in 40-60% of soft-tissue, skin, ovary, urinary bladder, prostate, and stomach tumors; and in 25-30% of melanomas and lung carcinomas tested. All tumors expressed the framework HLA-A,B.C determinant. The HLA-A2 epitope recognized by mAb BB7.2 is located in a portion of the HLA-A2 molecule postulated to react with the T-cell receptor. The selective loss of an HLA class I polymorphic epitope shown in this study may explain the mechanism by which tumor cells escape both T-cell recognition and natural killer cell surveillance.

  7. Identification of Conserved and HLA Promiscuous DENV3 T-Cell Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Mailliard, Robbie B.; Khan, Asif M.; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Guzman, Nicole; Paulaitis, Michael; de Melo, Andréa Barbosa; Cordeiro, Marli T.; Gil, Laura V. G.; Lemonnier, Françoir; Rinaldo, Charles; August, J. Thomas; Marques, Ernesto T. A.

    2013-01-01

    Anti-dengue T-cell responses have been implicated in both protection and immunopathology. However, most of the T-cell studies for dengue include few epitopes, with limited knowledge of their inter-serotype variation and the breadth of their human leukocyte antigen (HLA) affinity. In order to expand our knowledge of HLA-restricted dengue epitopes, we screened T-cell responses against 477 overlapping peptides derived from structural and non-structural proteins of the dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV3) by use of HLA class I and II transgenic mice (TgM): A2, A24, B7, DR2, DR3 and DR4. TgM were inoculated with peptides pools and the T-cell immunogenic peptides were identified by ELISPOT. Nine HLA class I and 97 HLA class II novel DENV3 epitopes were identified based on immunogenicity in TgM and their HLA affinity was further confirmed by binding assays analysis. A subset of these epitopes activated memory T-cells from DENV3 immune volunteers and was also capable of priming naïve T-cells, ex vivo, from dengue IgG negative individuals. Analysis of inter- and intra-serotype variation of such an epitope (A02-restricted) allowed us to identify altered peptide ligands not only in DENV3 but also in other DENV serotypes. These studies also characterized the HLA promiscuity of 23 HLA class II epitopes bearing highly conserved sequences, six of which could bind to more than 10 different HLA molecules representing a large percentage of the global population. These epitope data are invaluable to investigate the role of T-cells in dengue immunity/pathogenesis and vaccine design. PMID:24130917

  8. Non-HLA antibodies against endothelial targets bridging allo- and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Dragun, Duska; Catar, Rusan; Philippe, Aurélie

    2016-08-01

    Detrimental actions of donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) directed against both major histocompatibility antigens (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]) and specific non-HLA antigens expressed on the allograft endothelium are a flourishing research area in kidney transplantation. Newly developed solid-phase assays enabling detection of functional non-HLA antibodies targeting G protein-coupled receptors such as angiotensin type I receptor and endothelin type A receptor were instrumental in providing long-awaited confirmation of their broad clinical relevance. Numerous recent clinical studies implicate angiotensin type I receptor and endothelin type A receptor antibodies as prognostic biomarkers for earlier occurrence and severity of acute and chronic immunologic complications in solid organ transplantation, stem cell transplantation, and systemic autoimmune vascular disease. Angiotensin type 1 receptor and endothelin type A receptor antibodies exert their pathophysiologic effects alone and in synergy with HLA-DSA. Recently identified antiperlecan antibodies are also implicated in accelerated allograft vascular pathology. In parallel, protein array technology platforms enabled recognition of new endothelial surface antigens implicated in endothelial cell activation. Upon target antigen recognition, non-HLA antibodies act as powerful inducers of phenotypic perturbations in endothelial cells via activation of distinct intracellular cell-signaling cascades. Comprehensive diagnostic assessment strategies focusing on both HLA-DSA and non-HLA antibody responses could substantially improve immunologic risk stratification before transplantation, help to better define subphenotypes of antibody-mediated rejection, and lead to timely initiation of targeted therapies. Better understanding of similarities and dissimilarities in HLA-DSA and distinct non-HLA antibody-related mechanisms of endothelial damage should facilitate discovery of common downstream signaling targets and pave the

  9. Association of HLA and post-schistosomal hepatic disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Huy, Nguyen Tien; Hamada, Mohamed; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Lan, Nguyen Thi Phuong; Yasunami, Michio; Zamora, Javier; Hirayama, Kenji

    2011-12-01

    Several human genetic variants, HLA antigens and alleles are reportedly linked to post-schistosomal hepatic disorder (PSHD), but the results from these reports are highly inconclusive. In order to estimate overall associations between human genetic variants, HLA antigens, HLA alleles and PSHD, we systematically reviewed and performed a meta-analysis of relevant studies in both post-schistosomal hepatic disorder and post-schistosomal non-hepatic disorder patients. PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, The HuGE Published Literature database, Cochrane Library, and manual search of reference lists of articles published before July 2009 were used to retrieve relevant studies. Two reviewers independently selected articles and extracted data on study characteristics and data regarding the association between genetic variants, HLA antigens, HLA alleles and PSHD in the form of 2×2 tables. A meta-analysis using fixed-effects or random-effects models to pooled odds ratios (OR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated only if more than one study had investigated particular variation. We found 17 articles that met our eligibility criteria. Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum were reported as the species causing PSHD. Since human genetic variants were only investigated in one study, these markers were not assessed by meta-analysis. Thus, only HLA-genes (a total of 66 HLA markers) were conducted in the meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis showed that human leucocyte antigens HLA-DQB1*0201 (OR=2.64, P=0.018), DQB1*0303 (OR=1.93, P=0.008), and DRB1*0901 (OR=2.14, P=0.002) alleles and HLA-A1 (OR=5.10, P=0.001), A2 (OR=2.17, P=0.005), B5 (OR=4.63, P=0.001), B8 (OR=2.99, P=0.02), and B12 (OR=5.49, P=0.005) serotypes enhanced susceptibility to PSHD, whereas HLA-DQA1*0501 (OR=0.29, P≤0.001) and DQB1*0301 (OR=0.58, P=0.007) were protective factors against the disease. We further suggested that the DRB1*0901-DQB1*0201, DRB1*0901-DQB1*0303 and A1-B8 haplotypes

  10. Association of HLA-G +3142 C>G polymorphism and breast cancer in Tunisian population.

    PubMed

    Zidi, Inès; Dziri, Olfa; Zidi, Nour; Sebai, Refaat; Boujelebene, Nadia; Ben Hassine, Amna; Ben Yahia, Hamza; Laaribi, Ahmed Baligh; Babay, Wafa; Rifi, Hela; Mezlini, Amel; Chelbi, Hanene

    2016-08-01

    HLA-G is highly expressed in cancer. Also, it is associated to its progression. Here, we explored the relationship between two HLA-G polymorphisms with breast cancer (BC) and tried to make a correlation with sHLA-G levels. We genotyped 104 patients with BC and 83 controls (CTRL) for HLA-G 14-bp insertion/deletion (Ins/Del) and HLA-G +3142 C>G polymorphisms. The mutations were identified with PCR and PCR-RFLP. The sHLA-G dosage was performed on plasma samples by a specific ELISA. A significant association with BC was found concerning the G allele in the +3142 C>G polymorphism (p = 0.0004). The G/G genotype is the protective genotype (1 % in BC patients vs. 13.1 % in CTRL, OR 0.065, 95 % CI 0.008-0.523). No statistically significant differences were observed for the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism between BC patients and controls frequencies. The protection by G/G genotype of +3142 C>G polymorphism is maintained in young patients (<50 years, p = 0.0006) and in early-diagnosed BC patients (<50 years, p = 0.0033). In addition, an association was found between the haplotypes inferred by both HLA-G polymorphisms and BC susceptibility. Indeed, the (DelG) haplotype is found as the protective haplotype against BC (OR 0.269, 95 % CI 0.081-0.895, p = 0.023). The ELISA dosage of sHLA-G revealed increased levels in BC compared to CTRL (p < 0.0001). We demonstrated also that sHLA-G is closely associated with advanced stages of BC without significance. sHLA-G is increased in TNM IV and SBR III subgroups. It is also enhanced in patients with a tumor size over 20 mm and in triple-negative patients. Taken together, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, the association of HLA-G +3142 C>G polymorphism with BC susceptibility in Tunisian population. Our results revealed also a potential implication of sHLA-G in advanced stages of BC. PMID:26754763

  11. Elevation of HLA-G-expressing DC-10 cells in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan-Ping; Shi, Wei-Wu; Zhang, Tong-Tong; Lv, Hai-Yan; Li, Jing-Bo; Lin, Aifen; Yan, Wei-Hua

    2016-09-01

    DC-10 is a distinct subset of human tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) which express high levels of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G). DC-10 could induce adaptive type 1 regulatory T cells through the IL-10 dependent ILT4/HLA-G signaling pathway. However, the significance of DC-10 in malignancies remains unclear. In this study, the frequency and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of HLA-G+ DC-10 in the peripheral blood of 124 patients with gastric cancer (GC) and 130 normal controls was analyzed with flow cytometry. Plasma sHLA-G was analyzed with ELISA. Results showed both the percentages of peripheral HLA-G+ DC-10 (median: 0.13% vs 0.01%; p<0.01) and MFI of HLA-G on these cells (median: 310.0 vs 91.5; p<0.01) were dramatically increased in GC patients than in normal controls. The frequency of HLA-G+ DC-10 in GC patients was strongly relative to the tumor grade (p=0.021). sHLA-G levels in GC patients were significantly higher than in healthy controls (median: 85.80U/ml vs 61.20U/ml; p<0.01). There was no significant correlation between the percentage of DC-10 and plasma sHLA-G (p>0.05). However, the increased HLA-G+ DC-10, HLA-G MFI and plasma sHLA-G in patients with gastric cancer could be a diagnostic factor with the area under the ROC curve with 0.947 (p<0.01), 0.882 (p<0.01) and 0.700 (p<0.01) respectively. Given the immune tolerant function of DC-10 could play, the increased DC-10 might play an important role in immune suppression for patients with gastric cancer, while more studies are necessary to illustrate the clinical relevance of DC-10 in cancer patients. PMID:26773190

  12. Association between HLA-A1 and -A2 types and Epstein-Barr virus status of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Amelie; Sundström, Christer; Tufveson, Gunnar; Glimelius, Ingrid

    2016-10-01

    The susceptibility to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) may be affected by the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) type. We investigated HLA-A and HLA-B allele frequencies, focusing on HLA-A1 and -A2, in a population-based case series of EBV + (n = 60) and EBV- (n = 44) PTLD after solid organ transplantation. The proportion of EBV + PTLD was highest in HLA-A1 homozygotes (100%), lower in carriers of HLA-A1/AX (79%), HLA-A1/A2 (55%), HLA-A2/AX (54%), and lowest in HLA-A2 homozygotes (37%). HLA-A1 type was overrepresented (22% versus 7%, p = 0.05) and HLA-A2 type underrepresented (57% versus 80%, p = 0.01) in patients with EBV + compared with EBV - PTLD. EBV + PTLD in HLA-A1 carriers developed almost exclusively in already EBV-seropositive individuals. EBV status of PTLD was not related to any other HLA-A or HLA-B type. Our findings suggest that HLA-A1 carriers may have an increased risk of EBV + PTLD due to a decreased ability to control the latent EBV infection. PMID:27104753

  13. 22nd International Conference on Ion Beam Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radović, Iva Bogdanović; Jakšić, Milko; Fazinić, Stjepko

    2016-03-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B contains the proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Ion Beam Analysis (IBA 2015). The conference was held in Grand Hotel 4 Opatijska Cvijeta in Opatija, Croatia, between 14th and 19th June 2015. Opatija, one of the Croatia's most famous touristic destinations, often called the pearl of the Adriatic, is celebrating this year 170 years of tourism. During the past, kings and emperors, writers, philosophers, poets and composers, but also scientists, used to stay in the town mainly built at the turn of the 20th century.

  14. Cytomegalovirus Infection in Ireland: Seroprevalence, HLA Class I Alleles, and Implications.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Jaythoon; O'Neill, Derek; Honari, Bahman; De Gascun, Cillian; Connell, Jeff; Keogan, Mary; Hickey, David

    2016-02-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections occur worldwide and primary infection usually occurs in early childhood and is often asymptomatic whereas primary infection in adults may result in symptomatic illness. CMV establishes a chronic latent infection with intermittent periods of reactivation. Primary infection or reactivation associate with increased mortality and morbidity in those who are immunocompromised. Transplacental transmission may result in significant birth defects or long-term sensorineural hearing loss.We performed a study to determine the CMV seroprevalence and the association between HLA Class I alleles and frequency of CMV infection in Ireland. The presence of CMV IgG, a marker of previous CMV infection, was determined for a cohort of 1849 HLA typed solid organ transplant donors between 1990 and 2013. The presence of CMV IgG was correlated with HLA type.The CMV seroprevalence in solid organ transplant donors was 33.4% (range 22-48% per annum) over the time period 1990 to 2013. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that both age and HLA alleles were associated with CMV seropositivity. A significant and positive relationship between age and CMV seropositivity was observed (OR = 1.013, P < 0.001, CI [1.007, 1.019]). Chi-square analysis revealed that the female gender was independently associated with CMV seropositivity (P < 0.01). Seroprevalence in women of reproductive age (20-39 years) was significantly higher than men of the same age (37% vs 26%, P < 0.01). The frequencies of HLA-A1, HLA-A2, and HLA-A3 in our cohort were 40.8%, 48.8%, and 25.9%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of HLA-A1 but not HLA-A2 or HLA-A3 was independently associated with CMV seronegativity (P < 0.01). Interestingly, individuals who co-expressed HLA-A2 and HLA-A3 alleles were significantly more likely to be CMV seropositive (P < 0.02). The frequencies of HLA-B5, HLA-B7, and HLA-B8 in our cohort were 6.1%, 31

  15. Protective Effect of HLA-B*5701 and HLA-C -35 Genetic Variants in HIV-Positive Caucasians from Northern Poland

    PubMed Central

    Leszczyszyn-Pynka, Magdalena; Aksak-Wąs, Bogusz; Urbańska, Anna; Parczewski, Miłosz

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the Study Association of two HLA class I variants with HIV-1 pretreatment viremia, CD4+ T cell count at the care-entry and CD4+ T cell nadir. Methods 414 HIV-positive Caucasians (30% women) aged 19-73 years were genotyped for HLA-C -35 (rs9264942) and HLA-B*5701 variants. HIV-1 viral load, as well as CD4+ T cell count at care-entry and nadir, were compared across alleles, genotypes and haplotypes. Results HLA-C -35 C/C genotype was found in 17.6% patients, C/T genotype in 48.1%, and T/T genotype in 34.3% patients. HLA-B*5701 variant was present in 5.8% of studied population. HIV plasma viremia in the group with C allele was significantly lower (p=0.0002) compared to T/T group [mean:4.66 log (SD:1.03) vs. 5.07 (SD:0.85) log HIV-RNA copies/ml, respectively], while CD4+ T cell count at baseline was notably higher among C allele carriers compared to T/T homozygotes [median: 318 (IQR:127-537) cells/μl vs. median: 203 (IQR:55-410) cells/μl, respectively] (p=0.0007). Moreover, CD4+ T cell nadir among patients with C allele [median: 205 (IQR:83.5-390) cells/μl] was significantly higher compared to T/T group [median: 133 (IQR:46-328) cells/μl] (p=0.006). Among cases with HLA-B*5701 allele, significantly lower pretreatment viremia and higher baseline CD4+ T cell count were found (mean: 4.08 [SD: 1.2] vs. mean: 4.84 [SD:0.97] log HIV-RNA copies/ml, p=0.003 and 431 vs. 270 cells/μl, p=0.04, respectively) compared to HLA-B*5701 negative individuals. The lowest viremia (mean: 3.85 log [SD:1.3]) HIV-RNA copies/ml and the highest baseline and nadir CD4+ T cell [median: 476 (IQR:304-682) vs. median: 361 (IQR: 205-574) cells/μl, respectively) were found in individuals with HLA-B*5701(+)/HLA-C –35 C/C haplotype. Conclusions HLA-C -35 C and HLA-B*5701 allele exert a favorable effect on the immunological (higher baseline and nadir CD4+ T cell count) and virologic (lower pretreatment HIV viral load) variables. This protective effect is additive for the compound HLA-B*5701

  16. HLA-G is a component of the chronic lymphocytic leukemia escape repertoire to generate immune suppression: impact of the HLA-G 14 base pair (rs66554220) polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Roberta; Audrito, Valentina; Vacca, Paola; Rossi, Davide; Brusa, Davide; Stignani, Marina; Bortolotti, Daria; D’Arena, Giovanni; Coscia, Marta; Laurenti, Luca; Forconi, Francesco; Gaidano, Gianluca; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; Malavasi, Fabio; Deaglio, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates the possibility that HLA-G, a molecule modulating innate and adaptive immunity, is part of an immune escape strategy of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. A 14 base pair insertion/deletion polymorphism (rs66554220) in the 3′-untranslated region of HLA-G influences mRNA stability and protein expression. The analysis of a cohort of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia confirmed that del/del individuals are characterized by higher levels of surface and soluble HLA-G than subjects with the other two genotypes. In line with its role in immunomodulation, the percentage of regulatory T lymphocytes is higher in del/del patients than in patients with the other genotypes and correlates with the amounts of surface or soluble HLA-G. Furthermore, addition of sHLA-G-rich plasma from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia induces natural killer cell apoptosis and impairs natural killer cell lysis, with effects proportional to the amount of soluble HLA-G added. Lastly, the presence of an HLA-G 14 base pair polymorphism is of prognostic value, with del/del patients showing reduced overall survival, as compared to those with other genotypes. These results suggest that: (i) the HLA-G 14 base pair polymorphism influences the levels of surface and soluble HLA-G expression, and (ii) the over-expression of HLA-G molecules contributes to creating tolerogenic conditions. PMID:24362551

  17. Lab-on-a-chip enabled HLA diagnostic: combined sample preparation and real time PCR for HLA-B57 diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gärtner, Claudia; Becker, Holger; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Klemm, Richard; Moche, Christian; Schattschneider, Sebastian; Frank, Rainer; Willems, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    The diverse human HLA (human leukocyte antigen) system is responsible for antigen presentation and recognition. It is essential for the immune system to maintain a