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Sample records for 14th international hla

  1. 14th International HLA and Immunogenetics Workshop Prospective Chronic Rejection Project: a three-year follow-up analysis.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, M; Terasaki, P I; Castro, R; Alberu, J; Morales-Buenrostro, L; Alvarez, I; Toledo, R; Alvez, H; Monteiro, M; Teixeira, J; Campbell, P; Ciszek, M; Charron, D; Gautreau, C; Christiansen, F; Langan, L; Conca, R; Grosse-Wilde, H; Heinemann, F; Kamoun, M; Kobayashi, T; Kupatawintu, P; LeFor, W; Mehra, N; Panigrahi, A; Norman, D; Piazza, A; Poli, F; Roy, R; Schonemann, C; Lachmann, N; Sireci, G; Tanabe, K; Ishida, H; Van den Berg-Loonen, E; Zeevi, A

    2007-01-01

    The three-year follow-up of 4,144 patients of the 14th International Workshop Prospective Chronic Rejection study has reinforced the evidence that post-transplant HLA antibodies are predictive of long-term graft loss. Three years after a single testing for HLA antibodies, 10% of kidney recipients who were antibody-positive had lost their grafts, in contrast to only 5% of antibody-negative patients (p<0.0001). The adverse effect of post-transplant antibodies on graft survival was also observed in lung, heart, and liver transplants. Donor-specific antibodies and 'strong' non-DSA had stronger association with graft loss than 'moderate' non-DSA. Periodic antibody monitoring, combined with specificity and strength analysis, would help in the early identification of allograft recipients who are at high risk of graft failure. PMID:18642456

  2. 14th International Conference 'Laser Optics 2010'

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, Artur A

    2010-10-15

    The 14th International Conference 'Laser Optics 2010' in which more than 800 scientists and experts from 35 countries took part, was held from June 28 to July 2, 2010, in St. Petersburg. (information)

  3. EDITORIAL: The 14th International Symposium on Flow Visualization, ISFV14 The 14th International Symposium on Flow Visualization, ISFV14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Chun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2011-06-01

    The 14th International Symposium on Flow Visualization (ISFV14) was held in Daegu, Korea, on 21-24 June 2010. There were 304 participants from 17 countries. The state of the art in many aspects of flow visualization was presented and discussed, and a total of 243 papers from 19 countries were presented. Two special lectures and four invited lectures, 48 paper sessions and one poster session were held in five session rooms and in a lobby over four days. Among the paper sessions, those on 'biological flows', 'micro/nano fluidics', 'PIV/PTV' and 'compressible and sonic flows' received great attention from the participants of ISFV14. Special events included presentations of 'The Asanuma Award' and 'The Leonardo Da Vinci Award' to prominent contributors. Awards for photos and movies were given to three scientists for their excellence in flow visualizations. Sixteen papers were selected by the Scientific Committee of ISFV14. After the standard peer review process of this journal, six papers were finally accepted for publication. We wish to thank the editors of MST for making it possible to publish this special feature from ISFV14. We also thank the authors for their careful and insightful work and cooperation in the preparation of revised papers. It will be our pleasure if readers appreciate the hot topics in flow visualization research as a result of this special feature. We also hope that the progress in flow visualization will create new research fields. The 15th International Symposium on Flow Visualization will be held in Minsk, Belarus in 2012. We would like to express sincere thanks to the staff at IOP Publishing for their kind support.

  4. 14th Annual international meeting of wind turbine test stations: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    These proceedings are of the 14th Annual International Meeting of Test Stations. As the original charter states these meetings are intended to be an international forum for sharing wind turbine testing experiences. By sharing their experiences they can improve testing skills and techniques. As with all new industries the quality of the products is marked by how well they learn from their experiences and incorporate this learning into the next generation of products. The test station`s role in this process is to provide accurate information to the companies they serve. This information is used by designers to conform and improve their designs. It is also used by certification agencies for confirming the quality of these designs. By sharing of experiences they are able to accomplished these goals, serve these customers better and ultimately improve the international wind energy industry.

  5. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces (Met & Props 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wei-En

    2014-03-01

    Proceedings of the 14th International Conference, Taipei, Taiwan, 17th-21st June, 2013 Taiwan Organized by: Center for Measurement Standards/Industrial Technology Research Institute Mechanical and Systems Research Laboratories/Industrial Technology Research Institute National Taiwan University National Cheng Kung University National Taiwan University of Science and Technology National Tsing Hua University Greetings from Chairman of International Programme CommitteeTom Thomas When Professor Ken Stout and I founded this series of conferences in the United Kingdom more than thirty years ago, we did not anticipate its longevity or its success. Since that first meeting at Leicester, the conference has been often held in England, but also in several other European countries: France, Poland and Sweden, as well as in the United States. Ken, sadly no longer with us, would be proud of what it has achieved and has come to represent. Generations of researchers have presented their new ideas and innovations here which are now embodied in many textbooks and international standards. But this conference in 2013 marks a new departure and perhaps a new future. For the first time it is being held in Asia, reflecting the historic rise of the economies of the Pacific Rim, adding modern technology to their long-existing traditions of ordered insight and precise craftsmanship. Many of you have travelled far to attend this meeting, and we hope you will feel your trouble has been rewarded. We have an excellent selection of papers from all over the world from many of the world's experts, embodying the consolidation of tested ideas as well as the latest advances in the subject. These will be set in context by a glittering array of keynote and invited speakers. On behalf of the International Programme Committee, I am glad to acknowledge the hard work of the members of the Local Organising Committee in putting the programme together and making all the arrangements, and to accept their

  6. 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies Task Force report on obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Guilherme R; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Andrade, Carlos A; Andreoli, Laura; Chighizola, Cecilia B; Porter, T Flint; Salmon, Jane; Silver, Robert M; Tincani, Angela; Branch, D Ware

    2014-08-01

    Pregnancy morbidity is one of the clinical manifestations used for classification criteria of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). During the 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (aPL), a Task Force with internationally-known experts was created to carry out a critical appraisal of the literature available regarding the association of aPL with obstetric manifestations present in actual classification criteria (recurrent early miscarriage, fetal death, preeclampsia and placental insufficiency) and the quality of the evidence that treatment(s) provide benefit in terms of avoiding recurrent adverse obstetric outcomes. The association of infertility with aPL and the effectiveness of the treatment of patients with infertility and positive aPL was also investigated. This report presents current knowledge and limitations of published studies regarding pregnancy morbidity, infertility and aPL, identifying areas that need better investigative efforts and proposing how critical flaws could be avoided in future studies, as suggested by participants of the Task Force. Except for fetal death, there are limitations in the quality of the data supporting the association of aPL with obstetric complications included in the current APS classification criteria. Recommended treatments for all pregnancy morbidity associated to APS also lack well-designed studies to confirm its efficacy. APL does not seem to be associated with infertility and treatment does not improve the outcomes in infertile patients with aPL. In another section of the Task Force, Dr. Jane Salmon reviewed complement-mediated inflammation in reproductive failure in APS, considering new therapeutic targets to obstetric APS (Ob APS). PMID:24650941

  7. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Transport in Interacting Disordered Systems (TIDS-14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frydman, Aviad

    2012-07-01

    The '14th Transport in interacting disordered systems - TIDS14' conference took place during 5-8 September 2011 in Acre Israel. The conference was a continuation of the biennial meeting traditionally called HRP (hopping and related phenomena) and later named TIDS (transport in interacting disordered systems). Previous conferences took place in Trieste (1985), Bratislava (1987), Chapel Hill (1989), Marburg (1991), Glasgow (1993), Jerusalem (1995), Rackeve (1997), Murcia (1999), Shefayim (2001), Trieste (2003), Egmond, aan Zee (2005), Marburg (2007) and Rackeve (2009). Central to these conferences are systems that are characterized by a large degree of disorder and hence they lack translational symmetry. In such systems interactions are usually very important. Dramatic differences in the behavior of crystalline solids and the 'disordered' systems are possible. Some examples of the latter are amorphous materials, polymer aggregates, materials whose properties are governed by impurities, granular systems and biological systems. This conference series is notable for the pleasant atmosphere and fruitful exchange of ideas between theoreticians and experimentalists in these areas. This tradition was also maintained in the conference in Israel. Specific topics of TIDS14 included: hopping, electron and Coulomb glasses, Anderson localization and many body localization, noise, magneto-transport, metal-insulator and superconductor-insulator transition, transport through low dimensional and nanostructures, quantum coherence, interference and dephasing and other related topics. Over sixty scientists from fourteen countries participated in the conference and presented papers either as oral presentations or as posters in two sessions that took place during the conference. Many of these papers are included in these proceedings. I would like to thank all the conference participants for the interesting presentations, debates and discussions that created a stimulating but pleasant

  8. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces (Met & Props 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wei-En

    2014-03-01

    Proceedings of the 14th International Conference, Taipei, Taiwan, 17th-21st June, 2013 Taiwan Organized by: Center for Measurement Standards/Industrial Technology Research Institute Mechanical and Systems Research Laboratories/Industrial Technology Research Institute National Taiwan University National Cheng Kung University National Taiwan University of Science and Technology National Tsing Hua University Greetings from Chairman of International Programme CommitteeTom Thomas When Professor Ken Stout and I founded this series of conferences in the United Kingdom more than thirty years ago, we did not anticipate its longevity or its success. Since that first meeting at Leicester, the conference has been often held in England, but also in several other European countries: France, Poland and Sweden, as well as in the United States. Ken, sadly no longer with us, would be proud of what it has achieved and has come to represent. Generations of researchers have presented their new ideas and innovations here which are now embodied in many textbooks and international standards. But this conference in 2013 marks a new departure and perhaps a new future. For the first time it is being held in Asia, reflecting the historic rise of the economies of the Pacific Rim, adding modern technology to their long-existing traditions of ordered insight and precise craftsmanship. Many of you have travelled far to attend this meeting, and we hope you will feel your trouble has been rewarded. We have an excellent selection of papers from all over the world from many of the world's experts, embodying the consolidation of tested ideas as well as the latest advances in the subject. These will be set in context by a glittering array of keynote and invited speakers. On behalf of the International Programme Committee, I am glad to acknowledge the hard work of the members of the Local Organising Committee in putting the programme together and making all the arrangements, and to accept their

  9. COMMITTEES: SQM2009 - 14th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter SQM2009 - 14th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    Local Organizing Committee Takeshi Kodama Chair, UFRJ Jun Takahashi Co-chair, UNICAMP Ignácio Bediaga e Hickman CBPF Eduardo Fraga UFRJ Frederique Grassi USP Yogiro Hama USP Gastão Krein IFT Erasmo Madureira Ferreira UFRJ Marcelo G. Munhoz USP Fernando Navarra USP Sandra Padula IFT Alejandro Szanto de Toledo USP César Augusto Zen Vasconcellos UFRGS International Advisory Committee Jörg Aichelin Nantes Federico Antinori Padova Tamás Biró Budapest Peter Braun-Munzinger GSI Jean Cleymans Cape Town Láaszló Csernai Bergen Timothy Hallman BNL Huan Zhong Huang UCLA Takeshi Kodama Rio de Janeiro Yu-Gang Ma Shanghai Jes Madsen Aarhus Ágnes Mócsy Pratt University Berndt Müller Duke University Grazyna Odyniec LBNL Helmut Oeschler Darmstadt Johann Rafelski Arizona Hans Georg Ritter LBNL Gunther Rolland MIT Karel Šafařík CERN Ladislav Sandor Kosice University Jack Sandweiss Yale University George S F Stephans MIT Horst Stöcker Frankfurt Larry McLerranBNL Helmut Satz Universitä Bielefeld Nu Xu LBNL Fuqiang Wang Purdue University William A. Zajc Columbia University Pengfei Zhuang Tsinghua University

  10. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions (HCI 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Chikashi

    2009-07-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions (HCI2008), held at the University of Electro-Communications, Chofu, Tokyo, Japan from 1-5 September 2008. This series of conferences began in Stockholm, Sweden in 1982 and has since been held every other year; in Oxford, UK (1984), Groningen, the Netherlands (1986), Grenoble, France (1988), Giessen, Germany (1990), Manhattan, Kansas, USA (1992), Vienna, Austria (1994), Omiya, Japan (1996), Bensheim, Germany (1998), Berkeley, USA (2000), Caen, France (2002), Vilnius, Lithuania (2004) and Belfast, UK (2006). Highly charged ions (HCI), which are defined as highly ionized (i.e. positively charged atomic) ions here, mainly exist in hot plasmas such as the solar corona and fusion plasmas. It is true that its importance in plasma physics has driven researchers to the spectroscopic studies of HCIs, but the spectroscopy of few-electron ions is not only important for plasmas but also interesting for fundamental atomic physics. Electrons moving fast near a heavy nucleus give a suitable system to test the fundamental atomic theory involving relativistic and quantum electro-dynamic effects in a strong field. Also, the huge potential energy of a HCI induces drastic reaction in the interaction with matter. This unique property of HCIs, coupled with the recent development of efficient ion sources, is opening the possibility to utilize them in new technologies in the field such as nano-fabrication, surface analysis, medical physics, and so on. Hence, this conference is recognized as a valuable gathering place for established practitioners and also for newcomers; we exchange information, we are introduced to the subject itself, and to unexpected interfaces with other fields. On 31 August, the day before the opening of HCI2008, we welcomed the delegates at the university's restaurant—and we were greeted with an unusually heavy summer shower! The conference then opened on

  11. 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies Task Force. Report on antiphospholipid syndrome laboratory diagnostics and trends.

    PubMed

    Bertolaccini, Maria Laura; Amengual, Olga; Andreoli, Laura; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Chighizola, Cecilia B; Forastiero, Ricardo; de Groot, Philip; Lakos, Gabriella; Lambert, Marc; Meroni, Pierluigi; Ortel, Thomas L; Petri, Michelle; Rahman, Anisur; Roubey, Robert; Sciascia, Savino; Snyder, Melissa; Tebo, Anne E; Tincani, Angela; Willis, Rohan

    2014-09-01

    Current classification criteria for definite Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) require the use of three laboratory assays to detect antiphospholipid antibodies (aCL, anti-β2GPI and LA) in the presence of at least one of the two major clinical manifestations (i.e. thrombosis or pregnancy morbidity) of the syndrome. However, several other autoantibodies shown to be directed to other proteins or their complex with phospholipids have been proposed to be relevant to APS but their clinical utility and their diagnostic value remains elusive. This report summarizes the findings, conclusions and recommendations of the "APS Task Force 3-Laboratory Diagnostics and Trends" meeting that took place during the 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (APLA 2013, September 18-21, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil). PMID:24824074

  12. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-05-01

    . We thank the International Organizing Committee for their help and advice in planning the conference, and we are grateful to the University of Birmingham Conference Service and to the Birmingham Botanical Gardens for the excellent way in which the catering and room provision was provided. David Evans School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Birmingham Simon Hands Department of Physics, Swansea University Roman Lietava School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Birmingham Rosa Romita Oliver Lodge Laboratory, The University of Liverpool Orlando Villalobos Baillie School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Birmingham Editors

  13. Proceedings of the Annual International Conference on Outdoor Recreation and Education (ICORE) (14th, Oxford, Ohio, November 7-12, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freidline, Mark, Ed.; Phipps, Maurice, Ed.; Moore, Tim, Ed.; Versteeg, Julie, Ed.

    This proceedings contains 15 conference papers and presentation summaries from the 14th annual International Conference on Outdoor Recreation and Education (ICORE). Titles are: "The Hidden Costs of Outdoor Education/Recreation Academic Training" (Christian Bisson); "The Service Learning Concept: Service Learning in the National Parks" (Tom…

  14. PREFACE: 14th Annual International Astrophysics Conference: Linear and Nonlinear Particle Energization throughout the Heliosphere and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.

    2015-09-01

    The 14th Annual International Astrophysics Conference was held at the Sheraton Tampa Riverwalk Hotel, Tampa, Florida, USA, during the week of 19-24 April 2015. The meeting drew some 75 participants from all over the world, representing a wide range of interests and expertise in the energization of particles from the perspectives of theory, modelling and simulations, and observations. The theme of the meeting was "Linear and Nonlinear Particle Energization throughout the Heliosphere and Beyond." Energetic particles are ubiquitous to plasma environments, whether collisionless such as the supersonic solar wind, the magnetospheres of planets, the exospheres of nonmagnetized planets and comets, the heliospheric-local interstellar boundary regions, interstellar space and supernova remnant shocks, and stellar wind boundaries. Energetic particles are found too in more collisional regions such as in the solar corona, dense regions of the interstellar medium, accretion flows around stellar objects, to name a few. Particle acceleration occurs wherever plasma boundaries, magnetic and electric fields, and turbulence are present. The meeting addressed the linear and nonlinear physical processes underlying the variety of particle acceleration mechanisms, the role of particle acceleration in shaping different environments, and acceleration processes common to different regions. Both theory and observations were addressed with a view to encouraging crossdisciplinary fertilization of ideas, concepts, and techniques. The meeting addressed all aspects of particle acceleration in regions ranging from the Sun to the interplanetary medium to magnetospheres, exospheres, and comets, the boundaries of the heliosphere, and beyond to supernova remnant shocks, galactic jets, stellar winds, accretion flows, and more. The format of the meeting included 25-minute presentations punctuated by two 40-minute talks, one by Len Fisk that provided an historical overview of particle acceleration in the

  15. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    It is our great pleasure to welcome you to the 14th International Conference on Micro- and Nano-Technology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications, or PowerMEMS 2014, in Awaji Island, Japan. The aim of PowerMEM is to present the latest research results in the field of miniature, micro- and nano-scale technologies for power generation and energy conversion. The conference will also- give us the opportunity to exchange informations and new ideas in the field of Power MEMS/NEMS. The current status of the field of PowerMEMS spans the full spectrum from basic research to practical applications. We will enjoy valuable discussions not only from the viewpoint of academia but from commercial and industrial perspectives. In the conference, three invited speakers lead the technical program. We received 172 abstracts and after a careful reviewing process by the Technical Program Committee a total of 133 papers were selected for presentation. These have been organized into 16 Oral sessions in two parallel streams and two poster sessions including some late-news papers. The oral and regular poster papers are published by the Institute of Physics (IOP). We have also organized a PowerMEMS School in Kobe-Sannomiya contiguous to the main conference. This two-day school will cover various topics of energy harvesting. World leading experts will give invited lectures on their main topics. This is a new experiment to broaden the technology remit of our conference by organizing mini symposiums that aim to gather the latest research on the following topics by the organizers: Microscale Combustion, Wideband Vibration Energy Harvesting, RF Energy Transfer and Industrial Application. We hope this, and other activities will make PowerMEMS2014 a memorable success. One of the important programs in an international conference is the social program, and we prepare the PowerMEMS2014 banquet in the banquet room at the Westin Awaji Island Hotel. This will provide an opportunity to

  16. 14th St. Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference 2015: Evidence, Controversies, Consensus - Primary Therapy of Early Breast Cancer: Opinions Expressed by German Experts.

    PubMed

    Jackisch, Christian; Harbeck, Nadia; Huober, Jens; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Gerber, Bernd; Kreipe, Hans-Heinrich; Liedtke, Cornelia; Marschner, Norbert; Möbus, Volker; Scheithauer, Heike; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Thomssen, Christoph; Loibl, Sibylle; Beckmann, Matthias W; Blohmer, Jens-Uwe; Costa, Serban-Dan; Decker, Thomas; Diel, Ingo; Fasching, Peter A; Fehm, Tanja; Janni, Wolfgang; Lück, Hans-Joachim; Maass, Nicolai; Scharl, Anton; Untch, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The key topics of this year's 14th St. Gallen Consensus Conference on the diagnosis and therapy of primary breast cancer were again questions about breast surgery and axillary surgery, radio-oncology and systemic therapy options in consideration of tumor biology, and the clinical application of multigene assays. This year, the consensus conference took place in Vienna. From a German perspective, it makes sense to substantiate the results of the vote of the international panel representing 19 countries in light of the updated national therapy recommendations of the AGO (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Gynäkologische Onkologie). Therefore, 14 German breast cancer experts, 3 of whom are members of the International St. Gallen Panel, have commented on the voting results of the St. Gallen Consensus Conference 2015 in relation to clinical routine in Germany.

  17. 14th St. Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference 2015: Evidence, Controversies, Consensus – Primary Therapy of Early Breast Cancer: Opinions Expressed by German Experts

    PubMed Central

    Jackisch, Christian; Harbeck, Nadia; Huober, Jens; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Gerber, Bernd; Kreipe, Hans-Heinrich; Liedtke, Cornelia; Marschner, Norbert; Möbus, Volker; Scheithauer, Heike; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Thomssen, Christoph; Loibl, Sibylle; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Blohmer, Jens-Uwe; Costa, Serban-Dan; Decker, Thomas; Diel, Ingo; Fasching, Peter A.; Fehm, Tanja; Janni, Wolfgang; Lück, Hans-Joachim; Maass, Nicolai; Scharl, Anton; Untch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary The key topics of this year's 14th St. Gallen Consensus Conference on the diagnosis and therapy of primary breast cancer were again questions about breast surgery and axillary surgery, radio-oncology and systemic therapy options in consideration of tumor biology, and the clinical application of multigene assays. This year, the consensus conference took place in Vienna. From a German perspective, it makes sense to substantiate the results of the vote of the international panel representing 19 countries in light of the updated national therapy recommendations of the AGO (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Gynäkologische Onkologie). Therefore, 14 German breast cancer experts, 3 of whom are members of the International St. Gallen Panel, have commented on the voting results of the St. Gallen Consensus Conference 2015 in relation to clinical routine in Germany. PMID:26557827

  18. 77 FR 52693 - Request for Comments on U.S. Technical Participation in the 14th Conference of the International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... 2600, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-2600. Comments may also be submitted via email to ralph.richter@nist.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Ralph Richter, International Legal Metrology Program, Office of..., Gaithersburg, MD 20899-2600; telephone: 301/975-3997; fax: 301/975- 8091; email:...

  19. Better vaccines for healthier life. Part I. Conference report of the DCVMN International 14th Annual General Meeting Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Rustan, Rahman; Huang, Weidan; Nguyen, Thuvan

    2014-11-12

    The Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers' Network (DCVMN) brought together nearly 220 senior representatives of governmental and non-governmental global health organizations, as well as corporate executives of emerging vaccine manufacturers, from 26 countries for a two-day tailored lectures, Q&A sessions, CEOs panel discussion and networking opportunities, followed by a vaccine-technology symposium and visit to manufacturing facilities in Hanoi, Vietnam. Participants included representatives of 38 vaccine manufacturers, as well as international partners and collaborating research institutions, with 39% female participants. The Vice-Minister of Health to Vietnam commended the speakers and participants to this Annual General Meeting, devoted to achieve our common goal of protecting people against infectious diseases with better vaccines, for a healthier life. He reminded the audience that the first vaccine produced in Vietnam was oral polio vaccine (OPV) in the early 1960s and contributed to polio eradication in Vietnam, in 2000. Through its manufacturing resources, Vietnam eliminated neonatal tetanus in 2005, and has controlled measles and hepatitis B spread. The Ministry of Health hopes that by sharing experiences, delegates at this conference will foster international cooperation and partnerships among organizations. CEOs elaborated on challenges and opportunities for emerging countries.

  20. Better vaccines for healthier life. Part I. Conference report of the DCVMN International 14th Annual General Meeting Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Rustan, Rahman; Huang, Weidan; Nguyen, Thuvan

    2014-11-12

    The Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers' Network (DCVMN) brought together nearly 220 senior representatives of governmental and non-governmental global health organizations, as well as corporate executives of emerging vaccine manufacturers, from 26 countries for a two-day tailored lectures, Q&A sessions, CEOs panel discussion and networking opportunities, followed by a vaccine-technology symposium and visit to manufacturing facilities in Hanoi, Vietnam. Participants included representatives of 38 vaccine manufacturers, as well as international partners and collaborating research institutions, with 39% female participants. The Vice-Minister of Health to Vietnam commended the speakers and participants to this Annual General Meeting, devoted to achieve our common goal of protecting people against infectious diseases with better vaccines, for a healthier life. He reminded the audience that the first vaccine produced in Vietnam was oral polio vaccine (OPV) in the early 1960s and contributed to polio eradication in Vietnam, in 2000. Through its manufacturing resources, Vietnam eliminated neonatal tetanus in 2005, and has controlled measles and hepatitis B spread. The Ministry of Health hopes that by sharing experiences, delegates at this conference will foster international cooperation and partnerships among organizations. CEOs elaborated on challenges and opportunities for emerging countries. PMID:24923636

  1. Better vaccines for healthier life. Part II. Conference report of the DCVMN International 14th Annual General Meeting Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Tippoo, Patrick; Sivaramakrishnan, Venkatraman; Nguyen, Thuvan

    2014-11-12

    New vaccines are required to meet the public health challenges of the next generation and many unmet global health needs can be addressed by developing countries vaccine manufacturers such as lower-cost vaccines based on single-dose, thermostable formulations, efficacious in children with compromised gastrointestinal tracts. GMP compliance is also a challenge, as sometimes innovation and clinical development focus is not accompanied by command of scale-up and quality assurance for large volume manufacturing and supply. Identifying and addressing such challenges, beyond cost and cold-chain space, including safety considerations and health worker behavior, regulatory alliances and harmonization to foster access to vaccines, will help countries to ensure sustainable immunization. There needs to be continuous and close management of the global vaccine supply both at national and international levels, requiring careful risk management, coordination and cooperation with manufacturers. Successful partnership models based on sharing a common goal, mutual respect and good communication were discussed among stakeholders.

  2. Better vaccines for healthier life. Part II. Conference report of the DCVMN International 14th Annual General Meeting Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Tippoo, Patrick; Sivaramakrishnan, Venkatraman; Nguyen, Thuvan

    2014-11-12

    New vaccines are required to meet the public health challenges of the next generation and many unmet global health needs can be addressed by developing countries vaccine manufacturers such as lower-cost vaccines based on single-dose, thermostable formulations, efficacious in children with compromised gastrointestinal tracts. GMP compliance is also a challenge, as sometimes innovation and clinical development focus is not accompanied by command of scale-up and quality assurance for large volume manufacturing and supply. Identifying and addressing such challenges, beyond cost and cold-chain space, including safety considerations and health worker behavior, regulatory alliances and harmonization to foster access to vaccines, will help countries to ensure sustainable immunization. There needs to be continuous and close management of the global vaccine supply both at national and international levels, requiring careful risk management, coordination and cooperation with manufacturers. Successful partnership models based on sharing a common goal, mutual respect and good communication were discussed among stakeholders. PMID:24923638

  3. International Congress of the International Council of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (14th, Kingston, Jamaica, July 30-August 3, 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Council on Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    Papers presented at the Fourteenth International Congress of the International Council on Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (ICHPER) are included in this document. Among the subjects discussed are suggestions for physical education in the 1970's (primary school level, research divisions for the 1970's, research needs in girls and women's…

  4. Developing Distance Education. Papers Submitted to the World Conference of the International Council for Distance Education (14th, Oslo, Norway, August 9-16, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewart, David, Ed.; Daniel, John S., Ed.

    These proceedings contain 10 keynote papers and more than 100 papers from an international conference on the theme of developing distance education. The keynote papers are: (1) "Communications Technology" (Yoshia Abe); (2) "Continuing Education. New Needs and Challenges for Distance Studies" (Urban Dahllof); (3) "Distance Education and National…

  5. The relevance of "non-criteria" clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome: 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies Technical Task Force Report on Antiphospholipid Syndrome Clinical Features.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Mirhelen M; Danowski, Adriana; Wahl, Denis G; Amigo, Mary-Carmen; Tektonidou, Maria; Pacheco, Marcelo S; Fleming, Norma; Domingues, Vinicius; Sciascia, Savino; Lyra, Julia O; Petri, Michelle; Khamashta, Munther; Levy, Roger A

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this task force was to critically analyze nine non-criteria manifestations of APS to support their inclusion as APS classification criteria. The Task Force Members selected the non-criteria clinical manifestations according to their clinical relevance, that is, the patient-important outcome from clinician perspective. They included superficial vein thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, renal microangiopathy, heart valve disease, livedo reticularis, migraine, chorea, seizures and myelitis, which were reviewed by this International Task Force collaboration, in addition to the seronegative APS (SN-APS). GRADE system was used to evaluate the quality of evidence of medical literature of each selected item. This critical appraisal exercise aimed to support the debate regarding the clinical picture of APS. We found that the overall GRADE analysis was very low for migraine and seizures, low for superficial venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, chorea, longitudinal myelitis and the so-called seronegative APS and moderate for APS nephropathy, heart valve lesions and livedo reticularis. The next step can be a critical redefinition of an APS gold standard, for instance derived from the APS ACTION registry that will include not only current APS patients but also those with antiphospholipid antibodies not meeting current classification criteria. PMID:25641203

  6. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation dynamics; and surfaces.

  7. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation & dynamics; and surfaces.

  8. HLA genotyping in the international Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Noble, Janelle A; Moonsamy, Priscilla V; Carlson, Joyce A; Varney, Michael D; Post, Jeff; Helmberg, Wolfgang; Pierce, June J; Bonella, Persia; Fear, Anna Lisa; Lavant, Eva; Louey, Anthony; Boyle, Sean; Lane, Julie A; Sali, Paul; Kim, Samuel; Rappner, Rebecca; Williams, Dustin T; Perdue, Letitia H; Reboussin, David M; Tait, Brian D; Akolkar, Beena; Hilner, Joan E; Steffes, Michael W; Erlich, Henry A

    2010-01-01

    Background Although human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQ and DR loci appear to confer the strongest genetic risk for type 1 diabetes, more detailed information is required for other loci within the HLA region to understand causality and stratify additional risk factors. The Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) study design included high-resolution genotyping of HLA-A, B, C, DRB1, DQ, and DP loci in all affected sibling pair and trio families, and cases and controls, recruited from four networks worldwide, for analysis with clinical phenotypes and immunological markers. Purpose In this article, we present the operational strategy of training, classification, reporting, and quality control of HLA genotyping in four laboratories on three continents over nearly 5 years. Methods Methods to standardize HLA genotyping at eight loci included: central training and initial certification testing; the use of uniform reagents, protocols, instrumentation, and software versions; an automated data transfer; and the use of standardized nomenclature and allele databases. We implemented a rigorous and consistent quality control process, reinforced by repeated workshops, yearly meetings, and telephone conferences. Results A total of 15,246 samples have been HLA genotyped at eight loci to four-digit resolution; an additional 6797 samples have been HLA genotyped at two loci. The genotyping repeat rate decreased significantly over time, with an estimated unresolved Mendelian inconsistency rate of 0.21%. Annual quality control exercises tested 2192 genotypes (4384 alleles) and achieved 99.82% intra-laboratory and 99.68% inter-laboratory concordances. Limitations The chosen genotyping platform was unable to distinguish many allele combinations, which would require further multiple stepwise testing to resolve. For these combinations, a standard allele assignment was agreed upon, allowing further analysis if required. Conclusions High-resolution HLA genotyping can be performed in multiple

  9. NEWTON'S APPLE 14th Season Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichmann, Sue, Ed.

    This guide was developed to help teachers use the 14th season of NEWTON'S APPLE in their classrooms and contains lessons formatted to follow the National Science Education Standards. The "Overview,""Main Activity," and "Try-This" sections were created with inquiry-based learning in mind. Each lesson page begins with "Getting Started," which…

  10. HLA typing with monoclonal antibodies: evaluation of 356 HLA monoclonal antibodies including 181 studied during the 10th International Histocompatibility Workshop.

    PubMed

    Colombani, J; Lepage, V; Raffoux, C; Colombani, M

    1989-08-01

    During the 10th International Histocompatibility Workshop (10th WS), 181 HLA MoAbs were studied using lymphocytotoxicity micro-technique (LCT) and/or enzyme immuno-assay (EIA), and their capacity to serve as typing reagents was evaluated. 129 MoAbs were tested by both techniques. Results obtained with 92 class I and 86 class II polymorphic MoAbs (10th WS) were compared to published data concerning 180 class I and 176 class II polymorphic MoAbs, listed in an HLA-MoAbs Register maintained in our laboratory. The following conclusions can be proposed: 1/HLA-A, B typing by LCT with MoAbs is possible for about 14 specificities. Some specificities are clearly recognized (HLA-A3, B8, B13, Bw4, Bw6), others are recognized as cross-reacting groups (B7+27+w22+40), others are not currently recognized by any MoAb with restricted specificity (B5, B15). Several MoAbs confirmed the existence of shared epitopes between products from a single locus (A2-A28, A25-A32), or from A and B loci (A2-B17, Bw4-A9-A32). A single HLA-Cw MoAb has been described. 2/HLA class II typing by LCT with MoAbs is more difficult than class I typing. DR2, DR3, DR4, DR5 and DR7 as well as DRw52 and DRw53 are well defined; other DR specificities are poorly or not at all defined. Particular associations (DR1+DR4, DR3+DRw6, all DR except DR7) are recognized by several MoAbs. All DQw specificities are well recognized, including new specificities defined only by MoAbs: WA (DQw4), TA10 (DQw7), 2B3 (DQw6+w8+w9). Only two HLA-DP MoAbs have been described. 3/Satisfactory results, similar to those of LCT, were obtained with EIA using lymphoid cell lines as targets. 4/Human MoAbs (12 in the Register) are satisfactory typing reagents. They could represent in the future a significant contribution to HLA typing with MoAbs. PMID:2609328

  11. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education with the North American Chapter 12th PME-NA Conference (14th, Mexico, July 15-20, 1990), Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booker, George, Ed.; Cobb, Paul, Ed.; de Mendicuti, Teresa N., Ed.

    This proceedings of the annual conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) includes the following research papers: "Children's Connections among Representations of Mathematical Ideas" (A. Alston & C.A. Maher); "Algebraic Syntax Errors: A Study with Secondary School Children" (A. Avila, F. Garcia, & T.…

  12. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education with the North American Chapter 12th PME-NA Conference (14th, Mexico, July 15-20, 1990), Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booker, George, Ed.; Cobb, Paul, Ed.; de Mendicuti, Teresa N., Ed.

    This proceedings of the annual conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) includes the following papers: "The Knowledge of Cats: Epistemological Foundations of Mathematics Education" (R.B. Davis) and "PME Algebra Research: A Working Perspective" (E. Filloy); "Some Misconceptions in Calculus: Anecdotes…

  13. Libraries and Electronic Publishing: Promises and Challenges for the 90's. Festschrift in Honor of Richard M. Dougherty. Proceedings of the International Essen Symposium (14th, Essen, Germany, October 14-17, 1991). Publications of Essen University Library, 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helal, Ahmed H., Ed.; Weiss, Joachim W., Ed.

    The goal of the Essen symposium was to bring together internationally recognized librarians and library automation specialists to discuss new developments in electronic publishing. All 16 papers included in this collection were presented at the conference: (1) "Barriers to the Introduction of New Technology" (J. Andrew Braid); (2) "Nudging a…

  14. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education with the North American Chapter 12th PME-NA Conference (14th, Mexico, July 15-20, 1990), Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booker, George, Ed.; Cobb, Paul, Ed.; de Mendicuti, Teresa N.

    This proceedings of the annual conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) contains the following research papers: "The Construct Theory of Rational Numbers: Toward a Semantic Analysis" (M. Behr & G. Harel); "Reflections on Dealing: An Analysis of One Child's Interpretations" (G. Davis); "About…

  15. The Moon in the 14th Century Frescoes in Padova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellinati, Claudio

    Padova, already in the 14th century a great cultural center of international reputation, struggled with the problems posed by the Moon with Pietro d'Abano, physician and astronomer. But it was with the great painters of that time, namely Giotto and Giusto de'Menabuoi, that its most intimate connections with the contemporary popular culture and theology were illustrated. Giotto depicts the Moon in the Giudizio Universale of the Scrovegni Chapel (1305). The Moon appears on the upper part of the painting, to the left of Christ the Judge, to crown together with the Sun, His presence. The Moon is a heavenly body similar to those appearing on Roman coins of emperors, to signify the Judge is an immortal creature. The color is pale, witeish, almost veiled. More important, the Moon has a face that by popular belief was that of Cain, condemned to amass `mucchi di rovi spinosi' for the fire of the damned (Dante Alighieri, Divina Commedia, Inferno XX, 126). Giusto de' Menabuoi on the other hand expounds, in the Crucifixion of the Duomo (1375 ca), a theological interpretation. The day of God's justice, following the death of the Savior, the Moon will burn and the Sun will pale (Isaiah, 24, 23). And indeed the Moon has a dark reddish colour. Therefore, while in Giotto the Moon is seen as in the popular beliefs, Giusto underlines the theological visions of his times with the words of the prophets.

  16. Murine antiidiotypic monoclonal antibodies that bear the internal image of HLA-DR allospecificities.

    PubMed Central

    Perosa, F; Ferrone, S

    1989-01-01

    Hybridization of murine myeloma cells P3-X63-Ag8.653 with splenocytes from a BALB/c mouse immunized with the syngeneic anti HLA-DR1,4,w6,w8,w9 MAb AC1.59 resulted in the development of 108 hybridomas secreting antiidiotypic antibodies. 100 of them inhibited the binding of MAb AC1.59 to target cells. Detailed analysis of the antiidiotypic MAb F5-444, F5-830, F5-963, F5-1126, F5-1336, and F5-1419 showed that all of them recognize idiotopes within or spatially close to the antigen combining site of MAb AC1.59. In cross-blocking experiments, the six antiidiotypic MAbs cross-blocked each other. It is likely that the six MAbs recognize spatially close, but not identical idiotopes because they elicited antiantiidiotypic antibodies of different or similar, but not identical specificity and differ in their ability to elicit anti-HLA class II antibodies. The latter, which were found only in sera from BALB/c mice immunized with antiidiotypic MAb F5-444 and F5-830, mimic the specificity of MAb AC1.59 and express the idiotope defined by the immunizing antiidiotypic MAb. These results indicate that the MAb F5-444 and F5-830 are antiidiotypes beta and the remaining four are antiidiotypes gamma. Images PMID:2474577

  17. Viruses in a 14th-century coprolite.

    PubMed

    Appelt, Sandra; Fancello, Laura; Le Bailly, Matthieu; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel; Desnues, Christelle

    2014-05-01

    Coprolites are fossilized fecal material that can reveal information about ancient intestinal and environmental microbiota. Viral metagenomics has allowed systematic characterization of viral diversity in environmental and human-associated specimens, but little is known about the viral diversity in fossil remains. Here, we analyzed the viral community of a 14th-century coprolite from a closed barrel in a Middle Ages site in Belgium using electron microscopy and metagenomics. Viruses that infect eukaryotes, bacteria, and archaea were detected, and we confirmed the presence of some of them by ad hoc suicide PCR. The coprolite DNA viral metagenome was dominated by sequences showing homologies to phages commonly found in modern stools and soil. Although their phylogenetic compositions differed, the metabolic functions of the viral communities have remained conserved across centuries. Antibiotic resistance was one of the reconstructed metabolic functions detected. PMID:24509925

  18. Photocopy of Photograph, 14th ND PHOG No. N.H.82816 U.S. Navy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of Photograph, 14th ND PHOG No. N.H.82816 U.S. Navy photograph, circa 1945. AERIAL OF MAKALAPA ADMINISTRATION ARE IN WORLD WAR II, from National Park Service, U.S.S. Arizona Memorial, 14th Naval District Photograph Collection. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Makalapa Support Facilities, Makalapa Administration Area, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. Identification of Non-HLA Genes Associated with Celiac Disease and Country-Specific Differences in a Large, International Pediatric Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashok; Liu, Xiang; Hadley, David; Hagopian, William; Liu, Edwin; Chen, Wei-Min; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Simell, Ville; Rewers, Marian; Ziegler, Anette-G.; Lernmark, Åke; Simell, Olli; Toppari, Jorma; Krischer, Jeffrey P.; Akolkar, Beena; Rich, Stephen S.; Agardh, Daniel; She, Jin-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There are significant geographical differences in the prevalence and incidence of celiac disease that cannot be explained by HLA alone. More than 40 loci outside of the HLA region have been associated with celiac disease. We investigated the roles of these non-HLA genes in the development of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA) and celiac disease in a large international prospective cohort study. Methods A total of 424,788 newborns from the US and European general populations and first-degree relatives with type 1 diabetes were screened for specific HLA genotypes. Of these, 21,589 carried 1 of the 9 HLA genotypes associated with increased risk for type 1 diabetes and celiac disease; we followed 8676 of the children in a 15 y prospective follow-up study. Genotype analyses were performed on 6010 children using the Illumina ImmunoChip. Levels of tTGA were measured in serum samples using radio-ligand binding assays; diagnoses of celiac disease were made based on persistent detection of tTGA and biopsy analysis. Data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards analyses. Results We found 54 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 5 genes associated with celiac disease (TAGAP, IL18R1, RGS21, PLEK, and CCR9) in time to celiac disease analyses (10−4>P>5.8x10−6). The hazard ratios (HR) for the SNPs with the smallest P values in each region were 1.59, 1.45, 2.23, 2.64, and 1.40, respectively. Outside of regions previously associated with celiac disease, we identified 10 SNPs in 8 regions that could also be associated with the disease (P<10−4). A SNP near PKIA (rs117128341, P = 6.5x10−8, HR = 2.8) and a SNP near PFKFB3 (rs117139146, P<2.8x10−7, HR = 4.9) reached the genome-wide association threshold in subjects from Sweden. Analyses of time to detection of tTGA identified 29 SNPs in 2 regions previously associated with celiac disease (CTLA4, P = 1.3x10−6, HR = 0.76 and LPP, P = 2.8x10−5, HR = .80) and 6 SNPs in 5 regions not previously

  20. History of On-orbit Satellite Fragmentations (14th Edition)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.; Stansbery, Eugene; Whitlock, David O.; Abercromby, Kira J.; Shoots, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Since the first serious satellite fragmentation occurred in June 1961 (which instantaneously increased the total Earth satellite population by more than 400%) the issue of space operations within the finite region of space around the Earth has been the subject of increasing interest and concern. The prolific satellite fragmentations of the 1970s and the marked increase in the number of fragmentations in the 1980s served to widen international research into the characteristics and consequences of such events. Continued events in all orbits in later years make definition and historical accounting of those events crucial to future research. Large, manned space stations and the growing number of operational robotic satellites demand a better understanding of the hazards of the dynamic Earth satellite population.

  1. PREFACE: 14th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao, Luis; Minotti, Fernando; Kelly, Hector

    2012-06-01

    These proceedings present the written contributions from participants of the Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP), which was held in Mar del Plata, Argentina, on 20-25 November 2011. This was the 14th session of the series of LAWPP biennial meetings, which started in 1982. The five-day scientific program of LAWPP 2011 consisted of 32 talks and various poster sessions, with the participation of 135 researchers from Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Puerto Rico, USA, Venezuela, as well as others from Europe and Asia. In addition, a School on Plasma Physics and a Workshop on Industrial Applications of Plasma Technology (AITP) were organized together with the main meeting. The five-day School held in the week previous to the meeting was intended for young scientists starting their research in Plasma Physics. On the other hand, the objective of the AITP Workshop was to enhance regional academic and industrial cooperation in the field of plasma assisted surface technology. Topics addressed at LAWPP 2011 included space plasmas, dusty plasmas, nuclear fusion, non-thermal plasmas, basic plasma processes, plasma simulation and industrial plasma applications. This variety of subjects is reflected in these proceedings, which the editors hope will result in enjoyable and fruitful reading for those interested in Plasma Physics. It is a pleasure to thank the Institutions that sponsored the meeting, as well as all the participants and collaborators for making this meeting possible. The Editors Luis Bilbao, Fernando Minotti and Hector Kelly LAWPP participants Participants of the 14th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics, 20-25 November 2011, Mar del Plata, Argentina International Scientific Committee Carlos Alejaldre, Spain María Virginia Alves, Brazil Ibere Caldas, Brazil Luis Felipe Delgado-Aparicio, Peru Mayo Villagrán, Mexico Kohnosuke Sato, Japan Héctor Kelly, Argentina Edberto Leal-Quirós, Puerto Rico George Morales, USA Julio Puerta

  2. DC66812 AERIAL VIEW OF THE 14TH AND 15TH STREET CORRIDORS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DC-668-12 AERIAL VIEW OF THE 14TH AND 15TH STREET CORRIDORS, LOOKING NORTH FROM ABOVE EAST POTOMAC PARK TOWARD THE MALL AND BEYOND - L'Enfant-McMillan Plan of Washington, DC, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. The 14th Annual James L. Waters Symposium at Pittcon: Raman Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy was the main topic of the 14th Annual James L. Waters Symposium, which was held in March 2003 at Pittcon. The development of the enabling technologies that have made Raman spectroscopy a routine analysis tool in many laboratories worldwide is discussed.

  4. First report on the antibody verification of HLA-DR, HLA-DQ and HLA-DP epitopes recorded in the HLA Epitope Registry.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, Rene J; Marrari, Marilyn; Tambur, Anat R; Mulder, Arend; Sousa, Luiz Cláudio Demes da Mata; da Silva, Adalberto Socorro; do Monte, Semiramis J H

    2014-11-01

    The International Registry of Antibody-Defined HLA Epitopes (http://www.epregistry.com.br) has been recently established as a tool to understand humoral responses to HLA mismatches. These epitopes can be structurally defined as eplets by three-dimensional molecular modeling and amino acid sequence differences between HLA antigens. A major goal is to identify HLA eplets that have been verified experimentally with informative antibodies. This report addresses class II epitopes encoded by genes in the HLA-D region. Our analysis included reviews of many publications about epitope specificity of class II reactive human and murine monoclonal antibodies and informative alloantibodies from HLA sensitized patients as well as our own antibody testing results. As of July 1, 2014, 24 HLA-DRB1/3/4/5, 15 DQB, 3 DQA and 8 DPB antibody-verified epitopes have been identified and recorded. The Registry is still a work-in-progress and will become a useful resource for HLA professionals interested in histocompatibility testing at the epitope level and investigating antibody responses to HLA mismatches in transplant patients. PMID:25305456

  5. Analysis of the HLA population data (AHPD) submitted to the 15th International Histocompatibility/Immunogenetics Workshop by using the Gene[rate] computer tools accommodating ambiguous data (AHPD project report).

    PubMed

    Nunes, J M; Riccio, M E; Buhler, S; Di, D; Currat, M; Ries, F; Almada, A J; Benhamamouch, S; Benitez, O; Canossi, A; Fadhlaoui-Zid, K; Fischer, G; Kervaire, B; Loiseau, P; de Oliveira, D C M; Papasteriades, C; Piancatelli, D; Rahal, M; Richard, L; Romero, M; Rousseau, J; Spiroski, M; Sulcebe, G; Middleton, D; Tiercy, J-M; Sanchez-Mazas, A

    2010-07-01

    During the 15th International Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics Workshop (IHIWS), 14 human leukocyte antigen (HLA) laboratories participated in the Analysis of HLA Population Data (AHPD) project where 18 new population samples were analyzed statistically and compared with data available from previous workshops. To that aim, an original methodology was developed and used (i) to estimate frequencies by taking into account ambiguous genotypic data, (ii) to test for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) by using a nested likelihood ratio test involving a parameter accounting for HWE deviations, (iii) to test for selective neutrality by using a resampling algorithm, and (iv) to provide explicit graphical representations including allele frequencies and basic statistics for each series of data. A total of 66 data series (1-7 loci per population) were analyzed with this standard approach. Frequency estimates were compliant with HWE in all but one population of mixed stem cell donors. Neutrality testing confirmed the observation of heterozygote excess at all HLA loci, although a significant deviation was established in only a few cases. Population comparisons showed that HLA genetic patterns were mostly shaped by geographic and/or linguistic differentiations in Africa and Europe, but not in America where both genetic drift in isolated populations and gene flow in admixed populations led to a more complex genetic structure. Overall, a fruitful collaboration between HLA typing laboratories and population geneticists allowed finding useful solutions to the problem of estimating gene frequencies and testing basic population diversity statistics on highly complex HLA data (high numbers of alleles and ambiguities), with promising applications in either anthropological, epidemiological, or transplantation studies.

  6. Defective antigen presentation by monocytes in ESRD patients not responding to hepatitis B vaccination: impaired HBsAg internalization and expression of ICAM-1 and HLA-DR/Ia molecules

    PubMed Central

    Barth, C.; Pollok, M.; Michałkiewicz, J.; Madaliński, K.; Maciejewski, J.; Baldamis, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the monocyte function of uraemic non-responders to hepatitis B vaccination. Therefore, some parameters concerning antigen processing by monocytes (Mo) as antigen presenting cells (APC) were analysed. It was found that in uraemic non-responders, (1) the internalization of HBsAg by monocytes was significantly decreasjed—HBsAg complexed with specific IgG or as immune complex isolated from patients is better internalized compared with free HBsAg; (2) during antigen presentation the expression of adhesion (ICAM-1) and accessory (HLA-DR/Ia) molecules was significantly decreased in uraemic patients, especially in non-responders; and (3) impaired internalization of HBsAg as well as a decrease in ICAM-1 and HLA-DR/Ia expression, correlated well with the blunted proliferation of CD4+ T cells stimulated by autologous monocytes induced by HBsAg. PMID:18475616

  7. 76 FR 19373 - The 14th Annual Food and Drug Administration-Orange County Regulatory Affairs Educational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The 14th Annual Food and Drug Administration-Orange County... announcing the following conference: 14th Annual Educational Conference co-sponsored with the Orange County...: 949-608-4417; or Orange County Regulatory Affairs Discussion Group, Attention to Detail,...

  8. The Second International Scientific Symposium on Tea & Human Health, September 14th, 1998.

    PubMed

    Phipps, R P

    1999-01-01

    It is fascinating to reflect that tea, the world's most widely consumed beverage next to water, began in Chinese antiquity not as a beverage but as a medicine. Several millennia later, modern scientific research is confirming that such ancient intuition has relevance to contemporary health concerns including cancer, heart disease, and antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The timeliness of this message as the 20th century concludes could not be better. The importance of a balanced diet has been recognized and studied throughout this century. The concept that we are what we eat has become a part of popular culture. If tea's health message, which future scientific research will continue to articulate, is creatively presented and embraces the romantic image that tea affords the industry, there is every reason to expect a rebirth and reinvigoration of this ancient beverage as a new millennium commences.

  9. Proceedings of the 14th annual international symposium on computer architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on the design and architecture of supercomputers and multiprocessors. Topics considered at the symposium include pipelining, special purpose hardware, data flow, Prolog, symbolic architectures, interconnection networks, interprocessor communications and synchronization, memory systems, cache-based multiprocessors, SIMD and MIMD architectures, and parallel execution of logic programs.

  10. Business of biosimilars - 14th annual conference (October 15-17, 2013 - Boston, Massachusetts, USA).

    PubMed

    Bourgoin, A

    2013-12-01

    Competition in the biological market offers a new set of opportunities and challenges within the healthcare industry. Biosimilars, like generic small-molecule drugs, can provide cost savings and increase patient access, while also promoting innovation. While large molecule manufacturers face many challenges unique to complex therapeutics, it is becoming clear that the commercialization of biosimilars shares many of the same hurdles as the generics market. The 14th Annual Business of Biosimilars Conference provided quality presentations from industry leaders regarding many commercial considerations for stakeholders interested in entering the biosimilars market. Opportunities to network with industry experts were offered, with over 120 attendees. PMID:24524098

  11. Food on foot: long-distance trade in slaughter oxen between Denmark and the Netherlands (14th-18th century).

    PubMed

    Gijsbers, W; Koolmees, P

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a short review of the long-distance trade in slaughter oxen in Northwest Europe. The long-term development of the trade is described against the social-economic background of the production and consumption areas. In the 14th century, the Danes obtained the right to sell cattle in certain Dutch cities. From 1500 onwards, the export of oxen from Denmark and the adjacent duchy of Schleswig-Holstein increased considerably. The export reached its peak in the first quarter of the 17th century; registered export in 1612 amounted to more than 52.000 oxen over land and, in 1624, about 10.000 oxen over sea. Part of that export was destined for the Dutch market. Protectionist tax measures taken by the Dutch government and the outbreaks of rinderpest put an end to the regular ox trade in the first half of the 18th century. By decree, local authorities tried to prevent the spread of contagious animal diseases. The history of international cattle trade and hauling, however, indicates that economic motives largely outweighed animal welfare issues. Thus, in addition to addressing the logistics of the trade, this paper also addresses veterinary aspects and animal welfare issues related to the transport of cattle. PMID:11762404

  12. Differential immunogenicity of HLA mismatches: HLA-A2 versus HLA-A28.

    PubMed

    Dankers, Marlies K A; Roelen, Dave L; Van Der Meer-Prins, Ellen M W; De Lange, Peter; Korfage, Nelleke; Smits, Jacqueline M A; Persijn, Guido G; Welsh, Ken I; Doxiadis, Ilias I N; Claas, Frans H J

    2003-02-15

    The immunogenicity of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 versus HLA-A28 was analyzed by antibody production, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) induction, and graft survival. We observed that an HLA-A2 mismatched child in HLA-A28 women leads to HLA-A2 specific antibodies in 32% of the women (n=31), whereas in the case of an HLA-A28 child and HLA-A2 women (n=30), no HLA-A28 specific antibodies were found ( P<0.002). Also, the CTL precursor frequencies were significantly lower against HLA-A28 compared with CTLp frequencies against HLA-A2 ( P=0.012). Finally, the kidney graft survival was slightly better in HLA-A2 positive recipients transplanted with HLA-A28 mismatches. We can conclude that single HLA-A28 mismatches are less immunogenic in HLA-A2 individuals compared with single HLA-A2 mismatches in HLA-A28 individuals, which is probably because the mismatched epitopes on the HLA-A2 molecule are unique epitopes, whereas the mismatched epitopes on HLA-A28 are shared by other HLA-A and HLA-B molecules. PMID:12589169

  13. [A medieval herbal from the 14th century, a new version of the Latin Macer?].

    PubMed

    Mauch, Ute

    2006-01-01

    A medical compendium of "Melleus liquorphysicae artis" has survived under the name Alexander Hispanus; it is in codex Ms. 8769 of the Biblioteca nacional in Madrid. Therein a herbal from the 14th century is integrated. However, today people must think that we have one herbal and two authors: Alexander Hispanus and Henrik Harpestraeng (died 1244), a physician from Scandinavia. First of all, the parts of the medical compendium are presented. We do not know which parts originally belong to the medical compendium. The examination of many handwritings suggested that the discourses about consumption and dropsy were not originally included in the compendium; that seems certain. Further it was shown that probably Alexander Hispanus did not live after all and we must see him as a fictional person. Nevertheless we should not automatically regard Henrik Harpestraeng as the author of the herbal although it contains typical plants of the North like Angelica. The oldest codex of the herbal was probably written in Bavaria or Austria because it contains old Bavarian words. This handwriting can be seen as a piece of evidence that the knowledge about Angelica was spreading from the South. We should explore the connection with handwritings of the Macer, too. The herbal could be a Latin version of the Macer, in which the original verses are abandoned. An analysis of the medical plants made it clear that the herbal is probably directed to a male readership. Especially the chapter on Galganum elucidates that. In the 14th century Galganum was thought to have a contraceptive effect, but this was kept secret from women! All in all the structure of the herbal suggests a use as a kind of reference book that was not used daily though.

  14. HLA typing in congenital toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    Meenken, C; Rothova, A; de Waal, L P; van der Horst, A R; Mesman, B J; Kijlstra, A

    1995-01-01

    HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, and HLA-D typing was performed in 47 mothers of patients suffering from ocular toxoplasmosis to investigate whether an immunogenetic predisposition exists for developing congenital toxoplasmosis in their offspring. No significant association between any HLA antigen was observed in the mothers of patients with ocular toxoplasmosis, although a total absence of the HLA-B51 antigen was found in this group. HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C typing was also performed in their children (52 patients with ocular toxoplasmosis), to investigate a possible relation between the severity of ocular toxoplasmosis and an eventual immunogenetic factor. In the patients with ocular toxoplasmosis an increased frequency of the HLA-Bw62 antigen was observed in correlation with severe ocular involvement. PMID:7612565

  15. Schools without Fear. Proceedings of the Annual International Alliance for Invitational Education Conference (14th). International Alliance for Invitational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Adrianna Hayes, Ed.

    Papers presented at the fourteenth Annual Conference of the Alliance for Invitational Education are (1) "Caring, Sharing, Daring: Three Tests to Help Develop More Inviting Policies, Programmes, and Procedures" (M. Ayers); (2) "Project: Gentlemen on the Move - Combating the Poor Academic and Social Performance of African American Male Youth" (D. F.…

  16. "May the force be with you": 14th Samuel Haughton lecture.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, P J

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents the 14th Samuel Haughton lecture delivered on the 26th of January 2008. The lecture began by describing Haughton's research on animal mechanics. Haughton opposed Charles Darwin's theory of natural selection using the argument that the skeleton obeys the 'principle of least action' and therefore must have been designed with that principle in mind. In the course of his research he dissected many animals, including albatrosses, cassowaries, llamas, tigers, jackals and jaguars. He took anatomical measurements and did calculations to prove that muscle attachment sites were optimally located. The relationship between optimality and evolution continues to be studied. Computer simulations show optimality is difficult to achieve. This is because, even if optimality could be defined, the gene recombinations required to evolve an optimal phenotype may not exist. The drive towards optimality occurs under gravitational forces. Simulations to predict mechano-regulation of tissue differentiation and remodelling have been developed and tested. They have been used to design biomechanically optimized scaffolds for regenerative medicine and to identify the mechanoregularory mechanisms in osteoporosis. It is proposed that an important development in bioengineering will be the discovery of algorithms that can be used for the prediction of mechano-responsiveness in biological tissues. PMID:18641919

  17. Report of the 14th Genomic Standards Consortium Meeting, Oxford, UK, September 17-21, 2012.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Barker, Katharine; Bicak, Mesude; Bourlat, Sarah; Coddington, Jonathan; Deck, John; Drummond, Alexei; Gilbert, Jack A.; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Kottmann, Renzo; Meyer, Chris; Morrison, Norman; Obst, Matthias; Robbins, Robert; Schriml, Lynn; Sterk, Peter; Stones-Havas, Steven

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the 14th workshop of the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) held at the University of Oxford in September 2012. The primary goal of the workshop was to work towards the launch of the Genomic Observatories (GOs) Network under the GSC. For the first time, it brought together potential GOs sites, GSC members, and a range of interested partner organizations. It thus represented the first meeting of the GOs Network (GOs1). Key outcomes include the formation of a core group of “champions” ready to take the GOs Network forward, as well as the formation of working groups. The workshop also served as the first meeting of a wide range of participants in the Ocean Sampling Day (OSD) initiative, a first GOs action. Three projects with complementary interests – COST Action ES1103, MG4U and Micro B3 – organized joint sessions at the workshop. A two-day GSC Hackathon followed the main three days of meetings.

  18. 14th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells& Modules: Materials and Processes; Summary of Discussion Sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Tan, T.; Sinton, R.; Swanson, D.

    2004-10-01

    The 14th Workshop discussion sessions addressed funding needs for Si research and for R&D to enhance U.S. PV manufacturing. The wrap-up session specifically addressed topics for the new university silicon program. The theme of the workshop, Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Leapfrogging the Barriers, was selected to reflect the astounding progress in Si PV technology during last three decades, despite a host of barriers and bottlenecks. A combination of oral, poster, and discussion sessions addressed recent advances in crystal growth technology, new cell structures and doping methods, silicon feedstock issues, hydrogen passivation and fire through metallization, and module issues/reliability. The following oral/discussion sessions were conducted: (1) Technology Update; (2) Defects and Impurities in Si/Discussion; (3) Rump Session; (4) Module Issues and Reliability/Discussion; (5) Silicon Feedstock/Discussion; (6) Novel Doping, Cells, and Hetero-Structure Designs/Discussion; (7) Metallization/Silicon Nitride Processing/Discussion; (8) Hydrogen Passivation/Discussion; (9) Characterization/Discussion; and (10) Wrap-Up. This year's workshop lasted three and a half days and, for the first time, included a session on Si modules. A rump session was held on the evening of August 8, which addressed efficiency expectations and challenges of c Si solar cells/modules. Richard King of DOE and Daren Dance of Wright Williams& Kelly (formerly of Sematech) spoke at two of the luncheon sessions. Eleven students received Graduate Student Awards from funds contributed by the PV industry.

  19. The 14th Ile residue is essential for Leptin function in regulating energy homeostasis in rat.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuyang; Zhu, Xianmin; Li, Hong; Hu, Youtian; Zhou, Jinping; He, Di; Feng, Yun; Lu, Lina; Du, Guizhen; Hu, Youjin; Liu, Tiancheng; Wang, Zhen; Ding, Guohui; Chen, Jiayu; Gao, Shaorong; Wu, Fang; Xue, Zhigang; Li, Yixue; Fan, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    LEPTIN (LEP) is a circulating hormone released primarily from white adipocytes and is crucial for regulating satiety and energy homeostasis in humans and animals. Using the CRISPR technology, we created a set of Lep mutant rats that carry either null mutations or a deletion of the 14(th) Ile (LEP(∆I14)) in the mature LEP protein. We examined the potential off-target sites (OTS) by whole-genome high-throughput sequencing and/or Sanger-sequencing analysis and found no OTS in mutant rats. Mature LEP(∆I14) is incessantly produced and released to blood at a much elevated level due to the feedback loop. Structure modeling of binding conformation between mutant LEP(∆I14) and LEPTIN receptor (LEPR) suggests that the conformation of LEP(∆I14) impairs its binding with LEPR, consistent with its inability to activate STAT3-binding element in the luciferase reporter assay. Phenotypic study demonstrated that Lep(∆I14) rats recapitulate phenotypes of Lep-null mutant rats including obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hepatic steatosis, nephropathy, and infertility. Compared to the existing ob/ob mouse models, this Lep(∆I14/∆I14) rat strain provides a robust tool for further dissecting the roles of LEP in the diabetes related kidney disease and reproduction problem, beyond its well established function in regulating energy homeostasis.

  20. The 14th Ile residue is essential for Leptin function in regulating energy homeostasis in rat

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuyang; Zhu, Xianmin; Li, Hong; Hu, Youtian; Zhou, Jinping; He, Di; Feng, Yun; Lu, Lina; Du, Guizhen; Hu, Youjin; Liu, Tiancheng; Wang, Zhen; Ding, Guohui; Chen, Jiayu; Gao, Shaorong; Wu, Fang; Xue, Zhigang; Li, Yixue; Fan, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    LEPTIN (LEP) is a circulating hormone released primarily from white adipocytes and is crucial for regulating satiety and energy homeostasis in humans and animals. Using the CRISPR technology, we created a set of Lep mutant rats that carry either null mutations or a deletion of the 14th Ile (LEP∆I14) in the mature LEP protein. We examined the potential off-target sites (OTS) by whole-genome high-throughput sequencing and/or Sanger-sequencing analysis and found no OTS in mutant rats. Mature LEP∆I14 is incessantly produced and released to blood at a much elevated level due to the feedback loop. Structure modeling of binding conformation between mutant LEP∆I14 and LEPTIN receptor (LEPR) suggests that the conformation of LEP∆I14 impairs its binding with LEPR, consistent with its inability to activate STAT3-binding element in the luciferase reporter assay. Phenotypic study demonstrated that Lep∆I14 rats recapitulate phenotypes of Lep-null mutant rats including obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hepatic steatosis, nephropathy, and infertility. Compared to the existing ob/ob mouse models, this Lep∆I14/∆I14 rat strain provides a robust tool for further dissecting the roles of LEP in the diabetes related kidney disease and reproduction problem, beyond its well established function in regulating energy homeostasis. PMID:27378381

  1. Report from the Immunogenomic Data Analysis Working Group (IDAWG) 16th International HLA and Immunogenetics Workshop (IHIW) Project: Immunogenomic Data-Management Methods

    PubMed Central

    Hollenbach, Jill A.; Holcomb, Cherie; Hurley, Carolyn Katovich; Mabdouly, Abeer; Maiers, Martin; Noble, Janelle A.; Robinson, James; Schmidt, Alexander H.; Shi, Li; Turner, Victoria; Yao, Yufeng; Mack, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The goal of the IDAWG is to facilitate the consistent analysis of HLA and KIR data, and the sharing of those data among the immunogenomic and larger genomic communities. However, the data-management approaches currently applied by immunogenomic researchers are not widely discussed or reported in the literature, and the effect of different approaches on data-analyses is not known. With ASHI’s support, the IDAWG developed a forty-five question survey on HLA and KIR data-generation, data-management, and data-analysis practices. Survey questions detailed the loci genotyped, typing systems used, nomenclature versions reported, computer operating systems and software used to manage and transmit data, the approaches applied to resolve HLA ambiguity, and the methods used for basic population-level analyses. Respondents were invited to demonstrate their HLA ambiguity resolution approaches in simulated data sets.By May 2012, 156 respondents from 35 nations had completed the survey . These survey respondents represent a broad sampling of the Immunogenomic community; 52% were European, 30% North American, 10% Asian, 4% South American, and 4% from the Pacific. The project will continue in conjunction with the 17th Workshop, with the aim of developing community data-sharing standards, ambiguity resolution documentation formats, single-task data-Management tools, and, novel data-analysis methods and applications. While additional project details and plans for the 17th IHIW will be forthcoming, we welcome the input and participation in these projects from the histocompatibility and immunogenetics community. PMID:23280068

  2. Military Librarians Workshop; Department of Defense Libraries in Transition (14th, 30 November - 2 December 1970). Conference Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Industrial Coll. of the Armed Forces (DOD), Washington, DC.

    The theme of the 14th Annual Military Librarians Workshop is: "Department of Defense Libraries in Transition." The National War College and the Industrial College libraries seek to see what support they can give each other. The ten workshops are: (1) Standardization of Bibliographic Data, (2) Evolution of Technical Reports, (3) DOD Coordination of…

  3. Coping with Catastrophe: The Black Death of the 14th Century. A Unit of Study for Grades 7-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Anne

    This unit of study explains the causes, course, characteristics, and results of the Black Death during the 14th century. The Black Death, also known as the bubonic plague, left virtually no one untouched in Europe, Asia, and Northern Africa. Europe lost a third or more of its population. In a broader context, study of the unit alerts students to…

  4. Restoring the Trust in Native Education. Annual NIEA Legislative Summit (14th, February 7-9, 2011). Briefing Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Education Association, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Several briefing papers were presented during the 14th Annual National Indian Education Association (NIEA) Legislative Summit. This briefing book contains the following papers presented during the summit: (1) Restoring the Trust in Native Education; (2) NIEA Legislative Priorities for 2011: "Talking Points"; (3) Reauthorization of the Elementary…

  5. Radio Imaging of a Type IVM Radio Burst on the 14th of August 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, H. M.; Krucker, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Raftery, C. L.

    2014-02-01

    Propagating coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by burst signatures in radio spectrogram data. We present Nançay Radioheliograph observations of a moving source of broadband radio emission, commonly referred to as a type IV radio burst (type IVM), which occurred in association with a CME on the 14th of August 2010. The event was well observed at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths by SDO/AIA and PROBA2/SWAP, and by the STEREO SECCHI and SOHO LASCO white light (WL) coronagraphs. The EUV and WL observations show the type IVM source to be cospatial with the CME core. The observed spectra is well fitted by a power law with a negative slope, which is consistent with optically thin gyrosynchrotron emission. The spectrum shows no turn over at the lowest Nançay frequencies. By comparing simulated gyrosynchrotron spectra with Nançay Radioheliograph observations, and performing a rigorous parameter search we are able to constrain several key parameters of the underlying plasma. Simulated spectra found to fit the data suggest a nonthermal electron distribution with a low energy cutoff of several tens to 100 keV, with a nonthermal electron density in the range 100-102 cm-3, in a magnetic field of a few Gauss. The nonthermal energy content of the source is found to contain 0.001%-0.1% of the sources thermal energy content. Furthermore, the energy loss timescale for this distribution equates to several hours, suggesting that the electrons could be accelerated during the CME initiation or early propagation phase and become trapped in the magnetic structure of the CME core without the need to be replenished.

  6. Effect of the bubonic plague epidemic on inbreeding in 14th century Britain.

    PubMed

    Pattison, John E

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the study reported here was to further investigate a new method of estimating inbreeding in large, relatively isolated populations over historic times, as reported by Pattison (1999, 2001). The method is based on modeling the genealogical "paradox" and produces values of Pearl's coefficients of inbreeding as a function of time for any given population curve. In particular, this study demonstrates that the new method of estimating inbreeding may be used to examine the effect of unusual features in population curves on levels of inbreeding in that population. As an example, the medieval population "bump" that spans the 13th and 14th centuries in the population of Britain, which terminated abruptly with the outbreak of bubonic plague in 1348 AD, is examined. It is first assumed that the whole population was the adult (breeding) population, corresponding to minimum inbreeding. For this case it is found that, for distant generations, about 90% of the whole population occurs in any present-day British pedigree. This value compares favorably with the values of 85% and 80% reported by Wachter (1980) and Derrida et al. (1999, 2000), respectively. The population bump causes the curves for Pearl's coefficient, for minimum inbreeding, to have a plateau of about 96% over the period from about 1220 AD to 1380 AD. The effect of introducing a single known estimate of inbreeding into the model is to produce a more realistic situation where the adult (breeding) population is considerably less than the whole population. It is found that the maximum number of different ancestors in any generation, in the average British pedigree, is about 22900 individuals and occurs about 1220 AD. More importantly, and possibly contrary to expectation, it is now found that the population bump had virtually no effect on the level of inbreeding. PMID:12552584

  7. Radio imaging of a type IVM radio burst on the 14th of August 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Bain, H. M.; Krucker, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Raftery, C. L.

    2014-02-10

    Propagating coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by burst signatures in radio spectrogram data. We present Nançay Radioheliograph observations of a moving source of broadband radio emission, commonly referred to as a type IV radio burst (type IVM), which occurred in association with a CME on the 14th of August 2010. The event was well observed at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths by SDO/AIA and PROBA2/SWAP, and by the STEREO SECCHI and SOHO LASCO white light (WL) coronagraphs. The EUV and WL observations show the type IVM source to be cospatial with the CME core. The observed spectra is well fitted by a power law with a negative slope, which is consistent with optically thin gyrosynchrotron emission. The spectrum shows no turn over at the lowest Nançay frequencies. By comparing simulated gyrosynchrotron spectra with Nançay Radioheliograph observations, and performing a rigorous parameter search we are able to constrain several key parameters of the underlying plasma. Simulated spectra found to fit the data suggest a nonthermal electron distribution with a low energy cutoff of several tens to 100 keV, with a nonthermal electron density in the range 10{sup 0}-10{sup 2} cm{sup –3}, in a magnetic field of a few Gauss. The nonthermal energy content of the source is found to contain 0.001%-0.1% of the sources thermal energy content. Furthermore, the energy loss timescale for this distribution equates to several hours, suggesting that the electrons could be accelerated during the CME initiation or early propagation phase and become trapped in the magnetic structure of the CME core without the need to be replenished.

  8. Cloning and Sequencing the First HLA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Bertrand R.

    2010-01-01

    This Perspectives article recounts the isolation and sequencing of the first human histocompatibility gene (HLA) in 1980–1981. At the time, general knowledge of the molecules of the immune system was already fairly extensive, and gene rearrangements in the immunoglobulin complex (discovered in 1976) had generated much excitement: HLA was quite obviously the next frontier. The author was able to use a homologous murine H-2 cDNA to identify putative human HLA genomic clones in a λ-phage library and thus to isolate and sequence the first human histocompatibility gene. This personal account relates the steps that led to this result, describes the highly competitive international environment, and highlights the role of location, connections, and sheer luck in such an achievement. It also puts this work in perspective with a short description of the current knowledge of histocompatibility genes and, finally, presents some reflections on the meaning of “discovery.” PMID:20457890

  9. Analysis of HLA-B15 and HLA-B27 in spondyloarthritis with peripheral and axial clinical patterns

    PubMed Central

    Londono, John; Santos, Ana Maria; Peña, Paola; Calvo, Enrique; Espinosa, Luis R; Reveille, John D; Vargas-Alarcon, Gilberto; Jaramillo, Carlos A; Valle-Oñate, Rafael; Avila, Mabel; Romero, Consuelo; Medina, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    Objective Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) B27 and HLA-B15 are associated with spondyloarthritis (SpA). Recent Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) criteria emphasise a distinction between SpA with axial and peripheral patterns. We analysed whether HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 alleles could associate with these patterns. Methods We studied 100 healthy individuals and 178 patients with SpA according to European Spondyloarthropathy Study Group (ESSG) criteria. Patients were then classified according to ASAS criteria, the axial spondyloarthritis pattern (axSpA) being defined by ascertained sacroiliitis and the peripheral pattern (pSpA) by enthesitis and/or arthritis in extremities. A combined ax/p pattern was also considered. Results Only HLA-B27 and HLA-B15 alleles were associated with SpA. ASAS criteria for axSpA were met in 152 patients (12 with isolated axSpA and 140 with a combined ax/p patterns). When the ASAS peripheral criteria were applied, 161 patients met these criteria (13 with isolated pSpA and 148 with a combined ax/p pattern). HLA-B27 was found in 83% of patients with axSpA and 43% of ax/pSpA patients according to axASAS. HLA-B27 occurred in 7% controls but not in any patient with isolated pSpA. HLA-B15 was encountered in 31% of patients with isolated pSpA and 20% of ax/pSpA patients according to pASAS criteria. Moreover, 2 healthy controls, but none of our patients with isolated axSpA were positive for HLA-B15. Conclusions Our data suggest that the presence of HLA-B15 favours the development of isolated/combined peripheral rather than isolated axSpA, while HLA-B27 promotes an isolated/combined axial disease and excludes a peripheral pattern. HLA-B15 should be considered in addition to HLA-B27 when diagnosing patients with SpA according to ASAS criteria. PMID:26560062

  10. 4th Rare Disease South Eastern Europe (See) Meeting Skopje, Macedonia (November 14th, 2015).

    PubMed

    Gucev, Zoran; Tasic, Velibor; Polenakovic, Momir

    2015-01-01

    The 4th meeting on rare diseases in South Eastern Europe (SEE) was held in Skopje, at the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts (MASA) on the 14(th) of November 2015. The focuses were metabolic, rare brain diseases as well as the rare dysmorphic syndrome. The authors of the report are particularly keen on stating that one of the main goals of the meeting, namely to help the treatment of patients with rare disease has begun to bear fruits. The talk on an iminosugar-based pharmacological chaperone compound as a drug candidate for the treatment of GM1-gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis IVB (Morquio disease type B) was enlightening. To date, there is no treatment available to be offered to patients, but chaperones lead mutated proteins to adopt a native-like conformation and to successfully traffic to their normal cellular destination. DORPHAN is developing an iminosugar-based pharmacological chaperone compound for the treatment of GM1-gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis IVB. A talk on recent developments in the laboratory diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) was particularly interesting, covering the laboratory diagnosis of the MPS diseases by a strategy of clinical examination, biochemical analysis of urine samples, enzyme tests and genetic characterization of underlying mutations. New techniques were developed, including analysis of urinary glycosaminoglycans with tandem mass spectrometry, miniaturized enzyme tests or novel synthetic substrates for enzyme assays using mass spectrometry detection of products using dried blood spots. Feasibility and cost-effectiveness of these methods in newborn screening programs have been demonstrated. Neuromuscular RDs, and especially familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) were a topic of the Bulgarian colleagues. Diagnosis, screening and the role of microglia were also topics of particular interest. In summary, this year RD meeting was exciting and productive on a wide range of diseases and on a novel insights on

  11. 4th Rare Disease South Eastern Europe (See) Meeting Skopje, Macedonia (November 14th, 2015).

    PubMed

    Gucev, Zoran; Tasic, Velibor; Polenakovic, Momir

    2015-01-01

    The 4th meeting on rare diseases in South Eastern Europe (SEE) was held in Skopje, at the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts (MASA) on the 14(th) of November 2015. The focuses were metabolic, rare brain diseases as well as the rare dysmorphic syndrome. The authors of the report are particularly keen on stating that one of the main goals of the meeting, namely to help the treatment of patients with rare disease has begun to bear fruits. The talk on an iminosugar-based pharmacological chaperone compound as a drug candidate for the treatment of GM1-gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis IVB (Morquio disease type B) was enlightening. To date, there is no treatment available to be offered to patients, but chaperones lead mutated proteins to adopt a native-like conformation and to successfully traffic to their normal cellular destination. DORPHAN is developing an iminosugar-based pharmacological chaperone compound for the treatment of GM1-gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis IVB. A talk on recent developments in the laboratory diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) was particularly interesting, covering the laboratory diagnosis of the MPS diseases by a strategy of clinical examination, biochemical analysis of urine samples, enzyme tests and genetic characterization of underlying mutations. New techniques were developed, including analysis of urinary glycosaminoglycans with tandem mass spectrometry, miniaturized enzyme tests or novel synthetic substrates for enzyme assays using mass spectrometry detection of products using dried blood spots. Feasibility and cost-effectiveness of these methods in newborn screening programs have been demonstrated. Neuromuscular RDs, and especially familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) were a topic of the Bulgarian colleagues. Diagnosis, screening and the role of microglia were also topics of particular interest. In summary, this year RD meeting was exciting and productive on a wide range of diseases and on a novel insights on

  12. HLA and fertility

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, C.

    1995-11-01

    The recent paper by Jin et al., reporting that class 11 region major histocompatibility complex genes may influence embryonic loss in outbred couples supports previous results of our studies of HLA and fertility in the Hutterites. However, the authors have incorrectly cited our work and have omitted the reference that is most relevant to their results. The paper by Kostyu et al. is incorrectly referred to in the introduction as providing evidence for HLA sharing being associated with recurrent spontaneous abortion. The Kostyu et al. paper does not include any data on fertility or reproduction but reports frequencies of individuals who are homozygous at the HLA-A, -C, -B, -DR, and -DQ loci in the Hutterite population. In fact, recurrent spontaneous abortion has not been observed in any of the couples in our sample of >500 Hutterite couples. References more appropriate to the association between HLA sharing and recurrent miscarriage are those by Komlos et al., Schacter et al., Gerencer and Kastelan, and Beer et al. It might also be worth pointing out that many studies of recurrent miscarriage in outbred couples have not found an association with HLA sharing; examples include the studies of Ergolu et al., Oksenberg et al., and Christiansen et al., among others. 11 refs.

  13. Immunogenetics of HLA.

    PubMed

    Bach, F H

    1991-01-01

    The enormous contributions of Professor Karl Landsteiner are summarized focusing on his discovery of the ABO, MN, and P blood group systems as well as his conceptualization of the hapten concept. The HLA system, the major histocompatibility complex in humans, is discussed from the point of view of its genetic organization, the polymorphism that is recognized by T lymphocytes and the presently defined molecular polymorphism. The structure-function relationship of T cell recognition of class II molecules, based on the known crystallographic structure of an HLA class I molecule, is presented.

  14. Association of HLA-A and Non-Classical HLA Class I Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Carlini, Federico; Ferreira, Virginia; Buhler, Stéphane; Tous, Audrey; Eliaou, Jean-François; René, Céline; Chiaroni, Jacques; Picard, Christophe; Di Cristofaro, Julie

    2016-01-01

    The HLA-A locus is surrounded by HLA class Ib genes: HLA-E, HLA-H, HLA-G and HLA-F. HLA class Ib molecules are involved in immuno-modulation with a central role for HLA-G and HLA-E, an emerging role for HLA-F and a yet unknown function for HLA-H. Thus, the principal objective of this study was to describe the main allelic associations between HLA-A and HLA-H, -G, -F and -E. Therefore, HLA-A, -E, -G, -H and -F coding polymorphisms, as well as HLA-G UnTranslated Region haplotypes (referred to as HLA-G UTRs), were explored in 191 voluntary blood donors. Allelic frequencies, Global Linkage Disequilibrium (GLD), Linkage Disequilibrium (LD) for specific pairs of alleles and two-loci haplotype frequencies were estimated. We showed that HLA-A, HLA-H, HLA-F, HLA-G and HLA-G UTRs were all in highly significant pairwise GLD, in contrast to HLA-E. Moreover, HLA-A displayed restricted associations with HLA-G UTR and HLA-H. We also confirmed several associations that were previously found to have a negative impact on transplantation outcome. In summary, our results suggest complex functional and clinical implications of the HLA-A genetic region. PMID:27701438

  15. Selected Papers from the International Conference on College Teaching and Learning (14th, Jacksonville, Florida, April 1-5, 2003).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jack A., Ed.

    This collection of conference papers includes: "Building a Pedagogical Model for Synchronous Distance Learning Courses" (Panagiotes S. Anastasiades); "Delivery of Courseware using CD-ROM Media" (Brian Brighouse and Denis Edgar-Nevill); "Lessons Learned from Blended Biology Classes" (Arthur L. Buikema, Jr.); "Everything I Ever Needed to Know I…

  16. Seeing Ourselves: Visualization in a Social Context. Readings from the Annual Conference of the International Visual Literacy Association (14th).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braden, Roberts A., Ed.; Walker, Alice D., Ed.

    The 40 papers in this collection cover a wide variety of topics within the broad field of visual literacy. Three preliminary papers discuss visualization through film. The second section, which emphasizes visualization in a social context, contains 10 papers addressing cultural, political, social, and psychological issues, touching upon such…

  17. What Would Peggy Do? 14th Annual Peggy Glanville-Hicks Address 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Michael Kieran

    2012-01-01

    The New Music Network established the Peggy Glanville-Hicks Address in 1999 in honour of one of Australia's great international composers. It is an annual forum for ideas relating to the creation and performance of Australian music. In the spirit of the great Australian composer Peggy Glanville-Hicks, an outstanding advocate of Australian music…

  18. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E and HLA-F expression in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishigami, Sumiya; Arigami, Takaaki; Okumura, Hiroshi; Uchikado, Yasuto; Kita, Yoshiaki; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Maemura, Kosei; Kijima, Yuko; Ishihara, Yuka; Sasaki, Ken; Uenosono, Yoshikazu; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2015-04-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E and HLA-F are classified as non-classical HLA class Ib antigens. Ectopic HLA-E and HLA-F expression was recently detected in cancer cells; however, the clinical implication of their expression remains unknown. A total of 209 patients with gastric cancer were enrolled in this study. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the expression of HLA-E and HLA-F in gastric cancer specimens. HLA-E and HLA-F expression were seen in the cell membrane. HLA-E and HLA-F expression significantly correlated with depth of invasion, nodal involvement, lymphatic invasion, and venous invasion. No significant correlation between HLA-E and HLA-F expression was found (p<0.05, r=0.24). The five-year survival rate of the HLA-E-positive group and HLA-F-positive group were significantly poorer than that of their respective negative groups. Combination of HLA-E and HLA-F made the p-value smaller than single analysis (p<0.009). This is the first report detailing a clinical implication of HLA-E and HLA-F expression simultaneously in gastric cancer. We identified that the HLA-E and HLA-F in gastric cancer independently affected clinical factors, including postoperative outcome. For HLA-E- or HLA-F-positive gastric cancer, we should settle on a treatment strategy that reinforces the host immune response.

  19. The Successive CME on 13th; 14th and 15th February 2011 and Forbush decrease on 18 February 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maričić, D.; Bostasyan, N.; Dumbović, M.; Chilingarian, A.; Mailyan, B.; Rostomyan, H.; Arakelyan, K.; Vršnak, B.; Roša, D.; Hržina, D.; Romštajn, I.; Veronig, A.

    2013-02-01

    Aims. We analyze the kinematics of three interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) that occurred on 13th, 14th and 15th February 2011 in the active region AR 11155 and have shown that they appeared at the Earth orbit on February, 18th and caused Forbush decrease (FD). Methods. The solar coordinates of flares are (S19W03), (S20W14) and (S21W18). The kinematic curves were obtained using STEREO (A&B) data. Additionally, we explore the possibility of the CME-CME interaction for these three events. We compare obtained estimates of ICME arrival with the in-situ measurements from WIND satellite at L1 point and with ground-based cosmic ray data obtained from SEVAN network. Results. The acceleration of each CME is highly correlated with the associated SXR flares energy release. CMEs that erupted at 13 and 14 Feb 2011 are not associated with prominence eruption; maximum velocity was vmax550 ± 50 km/s and vmax400 ± 50 km/s, respectively. However, 15 Feb 2011 CME is connected with much more violent eruption associated with a prominence, with maximum velocity of vmax 1400 ± 50 km/s. The last overtakes 13th and 14th Feb CMEs at distances of 32 and 160 Rsolar, respectively.

  20. [Frequency of HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-Cw antigens in the Slovak population].

    PubMed

    Kralovicova, J; Kusikova, M; Buc, M; Holomanova, D; Sakalova, A

    2000-01-01

    Results on HLA-A, -B and -Cw antigen frequencies in the Slovak population are presented. HLA-A, -B, -Cw antigens were determined in 654 healthy unrelated individuals. The highest frequency was observed for the antigens HLA-A2, -A1; HLA-B12, -B35, and HLA-Cw8. The least frequent antigens were HLA-A34, -A36, HLA-B58, -B67, -B70, -B77, and HLA-Cw8. The results were compared with those of the previous study and with those of Czech, Austrian and Hungarian populations. No statistically significant differences were observed. (Tab. 5, Fig. 2, Ref. 9.)

  1. 14th congress of combustion by-products and their health effects-origin, fate, and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources.

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Eva; Andersson, Patrik L; Bidleman, Terry; Boman, Christoffer; Carlin, Danielle J; Collina, Elena; Cormier, Stephania A; Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra C; Gullett, Brian K; Johansson, Christer; Lucas, Donald; Lundin, Lisa; Lundstedt, Staffan; Marklund, Stellan; Nording, Malin L; Ortuño, Nuria; Sallam, Asmaa A; Schmidt, Florian M; Jansson, Stina

    2016-04-01

    The 14th International Congress on Combustion By-Products and Their Health Effects was held in Umeå, Sweden from June 14th to 17th, 2015. The Congress, mainly sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program and the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, focused on the "Origin, fate and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources". The international delegates included academic and government researchers, engineers, scientists, policymakers and representatives of industrial partners. The Congress provided a unique forum for the discussion of scientific advances in this research area since it addressed in combination the health-related issues and the environmental implications of combustion by-products. The scientific outcomes of the Congress included the consensus opinions that: (a) there is a correlation between human exposure to particulate matter and increased cardiac and respiratory morbidity and mortality; (b) because currently available data does not support the assessment of differences in health outcomes between biomass smoke and other particulates in outdoor air, the potential human health and environmental impacts of emerging air-pollution sources must be addressed. Assessment will require the development of new approaches to characterize combustion emissions through advanced sampling and analytical methods. The Congress also concluded the need for better and more sustainable e-waste management and improved policies, usage and disposal methods for materials containing flame retardants.

  2. 14th congress of combustion by-products and their health effects-origin, fate, and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources.

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Eva; Andersson, Patrik L; Bidleman, Terry; Boman, Christoffer; Carlin, Danielle J; Collina, Elena; Cormier, Stephania A; Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra C; Gullett, Brian K; Johansson, Christer; Lucas, Donald; Lundin, Lisa; Lundstedt, Staffan; Marklund, Stellan; Nording, Malin L; Ortuño, Nuria; Sallam, Asmaa A; Schmidt, Florian M; Jansson, Stina

    2016-04-01

    The 14th International Congress on Combustion By-Products and Their Health Effects was held in Umeå, Sweden from June 14th to 17th, 2015. The Congress, mainly sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program and the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, focused on the "Origin, fate and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources". The international delegates included academic and government researchers, engineers, scientists, policymakers and representatives of industrial partners. The Congress provided a unique forum for the discussion of scientific advances in this research area since it addressed in combination the health-related issues and the environmental implications of combustion by-products. The scientific outcomes of the Congress included the consensus opinions that: (a) there is a correlation between human exposure to particulate matter and increased cardiac and respiratory morbidity and mortality; (b) because currently available data does not support the assessment of differences in health outcomes between biomass smoke and other particulates in outdoor air, the potential human health and environmental impacts of emerging air-pollution sources must be addressed. Assessment will require the development of new approaches to characterize combustion emissions through advanced sampling and analytical methods. The Congress also concluded the need for better and more sustainable e-waste management and improved policies, usage and disposal methods for materials containing flame retardants. PMID:26906006

  3. [Plague and creative art. On the influential effect on art of the 14th century by black death].

    PubMed

    Seiler, R

    1990-01-01

    The present paper tries to shed light on the influence of the plague upon art. It considers above all the period after the "Black Death", i.e. the second half of the 14th century. Some changes of art are quantitative: its production is lessened by the effects of the plague--e.g. by the death of an artist--or increased by religious donations. The influence on style is similarly contradictory. Retardation as well as acceleration of the stylistic development can be observed. A third point consists in the changes in iconography of "Post-Plague-Art", showing a different interpretation of existing themes or introducing new ones. The varied conditions of production and reception of the different artistic genres makes the examination of the interaction between plague and art extremely complex.

  4. Rapid DNA typing for HLA-C using sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP): identification of serological and non-serologically defined HLA-C alleles including several new alleles.

    PubMed

    Bunce, M; Welsh, K I

    1994-01-01

    Detection of HLA-C antigens by complement mediated cytotoxicity using human alloantisera is often difficult. Between 20 to 40% of individuals in every race have undetectable HLA-C locus antigens and 9 out of the 29 sequenced HLA-C alleles so far published encode serologically undetected antigens. In addition, HLA-C molecules are expressed at the cell surface at about 10% of the levels of HLA-A and HLA-B. Recently, amplification of DNA using sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) has proved a reliable and rapid method for typing HLA-DR, HLA-DQA and HLA-DQB genes. PCR-SSP takes two hours to perform and is therefore suitable for the genotyping of cadaveric donors. We have designed a set of primers which will positively identify the HLA-C alleles corresponding to the serologically defined series HLA-Cw1, Cw2, Cw3, Cw4, Cw5, Cw6, Cw7 and Cw8. The serologically undetectable alleles have also been detected in groups according to sequence homology. In addition, three new unsequenced variants have been identified. DNA samples from 56 International Histocompatibility Workshop reference cell lines and 103 control individuals have been typed by the HLA-C PCR-SSP technique. 4/56 cell line types and 11/103 normal control individuals types were discrepant with the reported serological types. All combinations of serologically detectable and most of the serologically blank HLA-C antigens can be readily identified. DNA typing for HLA-Cw by PCR-SSP can take as little as 130 minutes from start to finish, including DNA preparation.

  5. Dealing with Diversity: A Key Issue for Educational Management. Proceedings of the ENIRDEM Conference (14th, Brno and Telc, the Czech Republic, September 22-25, 2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pol, Milan, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    An anthology of speeches of the 14th conference of the European Network for Improving Research and Development in Educational Management (ENIRDEM), held on 22 to 25 September 2005 in Brno and Telc, the Czech Republic, this book contains 13 contributions by 19 speakers and co-authors, covering various questions related to the topic of diversity in…

  6. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council of Graduate Schools in the United States (14th, Phoenix, Arizona, December 4-6, 1974).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, John W., Ed.

    The report of the 14th annual meeting of the Council of Graduate Schools presents a seminar on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Board by Lorene I. Rogers, Lincoln E. Moses, Warren W. Willingham, and Herman A. Witkin. The task force on Biomedical Sciences report is presented by Jerold Roschwalb, Lyle V. Jones, Robert H. Grant, and Penny D.…

  7. Clear Signals? Telecommunications, Convergence, and the Quality of Information. A Summary of Proceedings of the FLICC Forum on Federal Information Policies (14th, Washington, DC, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Library and Information Center Committee, Washington, DC.

    The purpose of the Federal Library and Information Center Committee (FLICC) is to make federal library and information centers' resources more effective through professional development of employees, promotion of library and information services, and coordination of available resources. This 14th Forum concerns telecommunications and information…

  8. PREFACE: European Microbeam Analysis Society's 14th European Workshop on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis (EMAS 2015), Portorož, Slovenia, 3-7 May 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovet, Xavier; Matthews, Michael B.; Čeh, Miran; Langer, Enrico; Žagar, Kristina

    2016-02-01

    This volume of the IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering contains papers from the 14th Workshop of the European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis which took place from the 3rd to the 7th of May 2015 in the Grand Hotel Bernardin, Portorož, Slovenia. The primary aim of this series of workshops is to assess the state-of-the-art and reliability of microbeam analysis techniques. The workshops also provide a forum where students and young scientists starting out on a career in microbeam analysis can meet and discuss with the established experts. The workshops have a unique format comprising invited plenary lectures by internationally recognized experts, poster presentations by the participants and round table discussions on the key topics led by specialists in the field.This workshop was organized in collaboration with the Jožef Stefan Institute and SDM - Slovene Society for Microscopy. The technical programme included the following topics: electron probe microanalysis, STEM and EELS, materials applications, cathodoluminescence and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and their applications. As at previous workshops there was also a special oral session for young scientists. The best presentation by a young scientist was awarded with an invitation to attend the 2016 Microscopy and Microanalysis meeting at Columbus, Ohio. The prize went to Shirin Kaboli, of the Department of Metals and Materials Engineering of McGill University (Montréal, Canada), for her talk entitled "Electron channelling contrast reconstruction with electron backscattered diffraction". The continuing relevance of the EMAS workshops and the high regard in which they are held internationally can be seen from the fact that 71 posters from 16 countries were on display at the meeting and that the participants came from as far away as Japan, Canada, USA, and Australia. A selection of participants with posters was invited

  9. [Chronic disease and health condition prevention in childhood--2nd part: emphases from the 14th Symposium of Preventive Pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Batinica, Maja; Grgurić, Josip; Jadrijević-Cvrlje, Filip

    2014-01-01

    Chronically ill children nowdays in developed countries are more prevalent than before, and thanks to modern therapeutic modalities more children are surviving into adulthood. Increased survival cannot be assumed to be associated with increased quality of life. With the chronically ill child holistic approach is important, which incorporates not only realisation of the highest possible standards in diagnostics and treatment, but also special care for disease prevention. All this is very important in so called integrative approach in the care of a chronically ill child, with the aim of achieving as high as possible quality of life and complete social integration. At the 14th Preventive Pediatrics Symposium, which took place in Skrad, June 1' 2013, from preventive standpoint, the following chronic childhood illnesses were discussed: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder--ADHD, migraine, thyroid gland diseases, leukemia, cystic fibrosis, chronic renal disease, chronic inflammatory liver disease, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and chronic otitis media with effusion. It is emphasized that talking about a disease prevention, there are three levels of it--primary, second- ary and tertiary prevention: how to avoid occurrence of disease, how to diagnose and treat existent disease in early stages, before it causes significant morbidity, and finally how to reduce the negative impact of existent disease by restoring function and reducing disease-related complications--how to improve quality of life of children with chronic diseases. Quaternary prevention describes methods to mitigate or avoid results of unnecessary or excessive interventions of the health system. An important process is also transition of care from child-oriented to adult-oriented care. Adults with chronic health conditions should continue to be evaluated periodically for possible late consequences of their childhood illness and previ- ous medical treatments. PMID

  10. HLA class I expression in bladder carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, T; Pedrajas, G; Cozar, J M; Garrido, A; Vicente, J; Tallada, M; Garrido, F

    2003-10-01

    HLA class I molecules are frequently lost in a large variety of human carcinomas, possibly because of T-cell immune selection of major histocompatibility complex class I deficient tumor variants. We report that this phenomenon is also a frequent event in bladder carcinomas. Of a total of 72 bladder carcinomas, 72% of the tumors had at least one alteration in HLA class I expression. These altered HLA class I phenotypes were classified as total HLA class I loss (25%; phenotype I); HLA-A or/and HLA-B locus-specific loss (12%; phenotype III); and HLA class I allelic loss (35%; phenotype II or IV). Comparison of histopathological parameters with HLA class I expression showed a statistically significant relationship with the degree of differentiation and tumor recurrence.

  11. HLA-linked rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Hasstedt, S.J.; Clegg, D.O.; Ingles, L.; Ward, R.H.

    1994-10-01

    Twenty-eight pedigrees were ascertained through pairs of first-degree relatives diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA was confirmed in 77 pedigree members including probands; the absence of disease was verified in an additional 261 pedigree members. Pedigree members were serologically typed for HLA. We used likelihood analysis to statistically characterize the HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus. The genetic model assumed tight linkage to HLA. The analysis supported the existence of an HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus, estimated the lifetime penetrance as 41% in male homozygotes and as 48% in female homozygotes. Inheritance was recessive in males and was nearly recessive in females. In addition, the analysis attributed 78% of the variance within genotypes to genetic or environmental effects shared by siblings. The genetic model inferred in this analysis is consistent with previous association, linkage, and familial aggregation studies of RA. The inferred HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus accounts for approximately one-fifth of the RA in the population. Although other genes may account for the remaining familial RA, a large portion of RA cases may occur sporadically. 79 refs., 9 tabs.

  12. A NOVel ELISPOT assay to quantify HLA-specific B cells in HLA-immunized individuals.

    PubMed

    Heidt, S; Roelen, D L; de Vaal, Y J H; Kester, M G D; Eijsink, C; Thomas, S; van Besouw, N M; Volk, H D; Weimar, W; Claas, F H J; Mulder, A

    2012-06-01

    Quantification of the humoral alloimmune response is generally achieved by measuring serum HLA antibodies, which provides no information about the cells involved in the humoral immune response. Therefore, we have developed an HLA-specific B-cell ELISPOT assay allowing for quantification of B cells producing HLA antibodies. We used recombinant HLA monomers as target in the ELISPOT assay. Validation was performed with human B-cell hybridomas producing HLA antibodies. Subsequently, we quantified B cells producing HLA antibodies in HLA-immunized individuals, non-HLA-immunized individuals and transplant patients with serum HLA antibodies. B-cell hybridomas exclusively formed spots against HLA molecules of corresponding specificity with the sensitivity similar to that found in total IgG ELISPOT assays. HLA-immunized healthy individuals showed up to 182 HLA-specific B cells per million total B cells while nonimmunized individuals had none. Patients who were immunized by an HLA-A2-mismatched graft had up to 143 HLA-A2-specific B cells per million total B cells. In conclusion, we have developed and validated a highly specific and sensitive HLA-specific B-cell ELISPOT assay, which needs further validation in a larger series of transplant patients. This technique constitutes a new tool for quantifying humoral immune responses. PMID:22390272

  13. 14th-16th century Danube floods and long-term water-level changes reflected in archaeological-sedimentary evidence - in comparison with documentary evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Andrea; Laszlovszky, József

    2014-05-01

    In the present paper an overview of published and unpublished results of archaeological and sedimentary investigations, predominantly reflect on 14th-16th-century changes, are provided and compared to documentary information on flood events and long-term changes. Long-term changes in flood behaviour and average water-level conditions had long-term detectable impacts on sedimentation and fluvio-morphological processes. Moreover, the available archaeological evidence might also provide information on the reaction of the society, in the form of changes in settlement organisation, building structures and processes. At present, information is mainly available concerning the 16th, and partly to the 14th-15th centuries. Medium and short term evidence mainly corresponds to the main flood peaks or even to single catastrophic flood events. Such processes may be identified in archaeological evidence concerning the second half of the 14th, early 15th centuries; while most of the cases listed above were connected to the flood peak (and/or generally increasing water-level conditions) of the late 15th and early 16th centuries. In other cases connections between sedimentary/archaeological evidence and the mid- and late 16th-century high flood-frequency period were presumed. Documentary evidence referring to the same period suggests that higher flood frequency and intensity periods occurred in the early and mid 16th century; a probably more prolonged flood rich period took place in the second half of the 16th century, with a peak in the late 1560s-early 1570s and maybe with another at the end of the 16th century. Earlier flood peaks in documentary evidence were detected on the Danube at the turn of the 14th-15th centuries and in the last decades of the 15th century, continuing in the early 16th century.

  14. Cryogenic engineering and superconductor technology; Proceedings of the 14th International Cryogenic Engineering Conference and International Cryogenic Materials Conference, Kiev, Ukraine, June 8-12, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarek, P.; Rizzuto, C.

    Consideration is given to application concepts of small regenerative cryocoolers in superconducting magnet systems, thermoelectric materials for Peltier cryogenic coolers, closed-cycle liquid helium refrigerators, built-in cryogenic control fixtures with electric drive, large cryogenic helium systems for superconducting magnets, low temperature adsorptive hydrogen isotope separation, cryogenic thermometry for space testing systems, performance of parallel flow He-II heat exchangers, and transient heat transfer to liquid helium at a 100 Hz pulsed heat load. Also discussed are He II cooling of a large superconducting magnet system, a computer code for simulation of thermal processes during quench in superconducting magnet windings, quench energies of multistable composite superconductors, a superconducting hydrogen-cooled switch on Nb-Sn tape, a gravity radiometer with coupled superconducting suspensions, new design of RSFQ logic family, and high-temperature Josephson junctions and their applications.

  15. Idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and HLA antigens.

    PubMed

    Gerbase-DeLima, M; Pereira-Santos, A; Sesso, R; Temin, J; Aragão, E S; Ajzen, H

    1998-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate a possible association between HLA class II antigens and idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). HLA-A, -B, -DR and -DQ antigens were determined in 19 Brazilian patients (16 white subjects and three subjects of Japanese origin) with biopsy-proven FSGS. Comparison of the HLA antigen frequencies between white patients and white local controls showed a significant increase in HLA-DR4 frequency among FSGS patients (37.7 vs 17.2%, P < 0.05). In addition, the three patients of Japanese extraction, not included in the statistical analysis, also presented HLA-DR4. In conclusion, our data confirm the association of FSGS with HLA-DR4 previously reported by others, thus providing further evidence for a role of genes of the HLA complex in the susceptibility to this disease. PMID:9698788

  16. HLA dosage effect in narcolepsy with cataplexy.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Astrid; Verduijn, Willem; Haasnoot, Geert W; Drabbels, Jos J M; Lammers, Gert J; Claas, Frans H J

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin-producing neurons in the hypothalamus. It is tightly associated with a specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-allele: HLA-DQB1*06:02. Based on this, an autoimmune process has been hypothesized. A functional HLA-DQ molecule consists of a DQα and a DQβ chain. HLA-DQB1*06:02 (DQβ) has a strong preference for binding to HLA-DQA1*01:02 (DQα), and together they form the functional DQ0602 dimer. A dosage effect would be expected if the HLA-DQ0602 dimer itself is directly involved in the aetiology. An increased expression of the HLA-DQ0602 dimer is expected in individuals homozygous for HLA-DQB1*06:02-DQA1*01:02, but is also hypothesized in individuals heterozygous for HLA-DQB1*06:02 and homozygous for HLA-DQA1*01:02. To study the impact of the expression of the HLA-DQ0602 dimer on narcolepsy susceptibility, 248 Dutch narcolepsy patients and 1272 Dutch control subjects, all of them positive for DQB1*06:02 (heterozygous and homozygous), were HLA-genotyped with attention not only to DQB1 but also to DQA1*01:02. DQB1*06:02-DQA1*01:02 homozygosity was significantly more often seen in patients compared to controls (O.R. 2.29) confirming previous observations. More importantly, a significantly higher prevalence of homozygosity for DQA1*01:02 was found in HLA-DQB1*06:02 heterozygous patients compared to controls (O.R. 2.37, p < 0.001). The latter finding clearly supports a direct role of the HLA-DQ molecule in the development of disease.

  17. Measles Virus Epitope Presentation by HLA: Novel Insights into Epitope Selection, Dominance, and Microvariation

    PubMed Central

    Schellens, Ingrid M.; Meiring, Hugo D.; Hoof, Ilka; Spijkers, Sanne N.; Poelen, Martien C. M.; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A. M.; Costa, Ana I.; Vennema, Harry; Keşmir, Can; van Baarle, Debbie; van Els, Cécile A. C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Immunity to infections with measles virus (MV) can involve vigorous human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I-restricted CD8+ cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses. MV, albeit regarded monotypic, is known to undergo molecular evolution across its RNA genome. To address which regions of the MV proteome are eligible for recognition by CD8+ CTLs and how different HLA class I loci contribute to the epitope display, we interrogated the naturally processed and presented MV peptidome extracted from cell lines expressing in total a broad panel of 16 different common HLA-A, -B, and -C molecules. The repertoire and abundance of MV peptides were bona fide identified by nanoHPLC–MS/MS. ­Eighty-nine MV peptides were discovered and assignment to an HLA-A, -B, or -C allele, based on HLA-peptide affinity prediction, was in most cases successful. Length variation and presentation by multiple HLA class I molecules was common in the MV peptidome. More than twice as many unique MV epitopes were found to be restricted by HLA-B than by HLA-A, while MV peptides with supra-abundant expression rates (>5,000 cc) were rather associated with HLA-A and HLA-C. In total, 59 regions across the whole MV proteome were identified as targeted by HLA class I. Sequence coverage by epitopes was highest for internal proteins transcribed from the MV-P/V/C and -M genes and for hemagglutinin. At the genome level, the majority of the HLA class I-selected MV epitopes represented codons having a higher non-synonymous mutation rate than silent mutation rate, as established by comparison of a set of 58 unique full length MV genomes. Interestingly, more molecular variation was seen for the epitopes expressed at rates ≥1,000 cc. These data for the first time indicate that HLA class I broadly samples the MV proteome and that CTL pressure may contribute to the genomic evolution of MV. PMID:26579122

  18. The HLA-G cycle provides for both NK tolerance and immunity at the maternal-fetal interface.

    PubMed

    Tilburgs, Tamara; Evans, J Henry; Crespo, Ângela C; Strominger, Jack L

    2015-10-27

    The interaction of noncytotoxic decidual natural killer cells (dNK) and extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) at the maternal-fetal interface was studied. Confocal microscopy revealed that many dNK interact with a single large EVT. Filamentous projections from EVT enriched in HLA-G were shown to contact dNK, and may represent the initial stage of synapse formation. As isolated, 2.5% of dNK contained surface HLA-G. However, surface HLA-G-negative dNK contained internalized HLA-G. Activation of dNK resulted in the disappearance of internalized HLA-G in parallel with restoration of cytotoxicity. Surface HLA-G was reacquired by incubation with EVT. This HLA-G cycle of trogocytosis, endocytosis, degradation, and finally reacquisition provides a transient and localized acquisition of new functional properties by dNK upon interaction with EVT. Interruption of the cycle by activation of dNK by cytokines and/or viral products serves to ensure the NK control of virus infection at the interface, and is illustrated here by the response of dNK to human cytomegalo virus (HCMV)-infected decidual stromal cells. Thus, the HLA-G cycle in dNK can provide both for NK tolerance and antiviral immunity. PMID:26460007

  19. The HLA-G cycle provides for both NK tolerance and immunity at the maternal–fetal interface

    PubMed Central

    Tilburgs, Tamara; Evans, J. Henry; Crespo, Ângela C.; Strominger, Jack L.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of noncytotoxic decidual natural killer cells (dNK) and extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) at the maternal–fetal interface was studied. Confocal microscopy revealed that many dNK interact with a single large EVT. Filamentous projections from EVT enriched in HLA-G were shown to contact dNK, and may represent the initial stage of synapse formation. As isolated, 2.5% of dNK contained surface HLA-G. However, surface HLA-G–negative dNK contained internalized HLA-G. Activation of dNK resulted in the disappearance of internalized HLA-G in parallel with restoration of cytotoxicity. Surface HLA-G was reacquired by incubation with EVT. This HLA-G cycle of trogocytosis, endocytosis, degradation, and finally reacquisition provides a transient and localized acquisition of new functional properties by dNK upon interaction with EVT. Interruption of the cycle by activation of dNK by cytokines and/or viral products serves to ensure the NK control of virus infection at the interface, and is illustrated here by the response of dNK to human cytomegalo virus (HCMV)-infected decidual stromal cells. Thus, the HLA-G cycle in dNK can provide both for NK tolerance and antiviral immunity. PMID:26460007

  20. Frequent HLA class I and DP sequence mismatches in serologically (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DR) and molecularly (HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1) HLA-identical unrelated bone marrow transplant pairs.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, P; Reinsmoen, N L; Lindstrom, A L; Boyce-Jacino, M T; Barbosa, J J; Faras, A J; McGlave, P B; Rich, S S

    1994-01-01

    The rates of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and rejection are significantly higher among recipients of unrelated donor marrow (BM) than in recipients of marrow from HLA-identical siblings, even when donors and recipients are mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) compatible and serologically and Dw identical. It has been hypothesized that phenotypically silent HLA class I and DP sequence mismatches might be associated with these differences, but little is known about their incidence. We have sequenced the HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DPA1, and HLA-DPB1 genes expressed by 12 unrelated marrow transplant pairs, 11 of whom were molecularly matched at DRB, DQA1, and DQB1 loci. Nine of these pairs were also HLA-A and HLA-B matched by serology. Six of these nine "HLA-identical" pairs were HLA-A (2 of 6), HLA-B (1 of 6), and HLA-C (6 of 6) mismatched at the sequence level. The mismatched class I alleles of all these pairs had strikingly different sequence motifs in the six specificity pockets of their antigen recognition site, and in five pairs they also had sequence differences at positions implicated in T-cell receptor (TCR) binding. Two of the three pairs who were serologically mismatched for one HLA-A or HLA-B antigen were also sequence mismatched at HLA-C. Finally, 10 of 11 pairs tested expressed different DP sequences. These data indicate that HLA class I, especially HLA-C, and DP sequence mismatches are frequent among unrelated subjects defined as HLA identical by current typing methods. We speculate that these sequence differences may explain, at least in part, the higher incidence of acute GVHD and rejection in unrelated BM transplantation as opposed to transplantation between HLA-identical siblings. Because of their high frequency, the role of HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, and HLA-DP mismatches in transplantation outcome is now amenable to direct study.

  1. HLA-DP, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DR-restricted epitopes in GRA5 of toxoplasma gondii strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haryati, S.; Sari, Y.; APrasetyo, A.; Sariyatun, R.

    2016-02-01

    The dense granular (GRA) proteins of Toxoplasma gondii(T. gondii) have been demonstrated as potential sources of T. gondii vaccine antigens. However, data of the GRA5 protein are limited. This study analyzed twenty-one complete GRA5 sequences of T. gondii GT1, RH, ME49, VEG, MAS, RUB, FOU, p89, VAND, and GAB2-2007-GAL-DOM2 strains to identify potential epitopes restricted by Major Histocompatibility Complex class II (MHC- II) molecules (human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DP, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DR) in the protein. In all T. gondii strains, peptides positioned at amino acid (aa) 15-29, 16-30, 17-31, 18-32, 19-33, 83-97, 84-98, 86-100, 87-101, 89-103, and 90-104 were predicted to pose high affinity and binding with HLA-DRB1*0101, HLA-DRB1*0301 (DR17), HLA-DRB1*0401 (DR4Dw4), HLA-DRB1*0701, HLA-DRB1*1101, HLA-DRB1*1501 (DR2b), and/or HLA-DRB5*0101. Considering the epitope's affinity, ligation strength, and hydrophilicity, LRLLRRRRRRAIQEE sequence (aa 90-104) restricted by HLA-DRB1*0101, HlA- DRB1*0301 (DR17), and HLA-DRB1*0401 (DR4Dw4) was considered as the most potential MHC-II epitope in GRA5 of T. gondii. These results would be useful for studies concerning in developing T. gondii vaccine and diagnostic method.

  2. HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 allele distribution in a large Armenian population sample.

    PubMed

    Matevosyan, L; Chattopadhyay, S; Madelian, V; Avagyan, S; Nazaretyan, M; Hyussian, A; Vardapetyan, E; Arutunyan, R; Jordan, F

    2011-07-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 gene frequencies were investigated in 4279 unrelated Armenian bone marrow donors. HLA alleles were defined by using PCR amplification with sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP) high- and low-resolution kits. The aim of this study was to examine the HLA diversity at the high-resolution level in a large Armenian population sample, and to compare HLA allele group distribution in Armenian subpopulations. The most frequently observed alleles in the HLA class I were HLA-A*0201, A*0101, A*2402, A*0301, HLA-B*5101, HLA-B*3501, and B*4901. Among DRB1 alleles, high frequencies of DRB1*1104 and DRB1*1501 were observed, followed by DRB1*1101 and DRB1*1401. The most common three-locus haplotype found in the Armenian population was A*33-B*14-DRB1*01, followed by A*03-B*35-DRB1*01. Our results show a similar distribution of alleles in Armenian subpopulations from different countries, and from different regions of the Republics of Armenia and Karabagh. The low level of genetic distances between subpopulations indicates a high level of population homogeneity, and the genetic distances between Armenians and other populations show Armenians as a distinct ethnic group relative to others, reflecting the fact that Armenians have been an 'isolated population' throughout centuries. This study is the first comprehensive investigation of HLA-allele group distribution in a subset of Armenian populations, and the first to provide HLA-allele and haplotype frequencies at a high-resolution level. It is a valuable reference for organ transplantation and for future studies of HLA-associated diseases in Armenian populations.

  3. HLA-E and HLA-G expression in classical HLA class I-negative tumors is of prognostic value for clinical outcome of early breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    de Kruijf, Esther M; Sajet, Anita; van Nes, Johanna G H; Natanov, Russ; Putter, Hein; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Liefers, Gerrit Jan; van den Elsen, Peter J; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Kuppen, Peter J K

    2010-12-15

    Nonclassical HLAs, HLA-E and HLA-G, are known to affect clinical outcome in various tumor types. We examined the clinical impact of HLA-E and HLA-G expression in early breast cancer patients, and related the results to tumor expression of classical HLA class I. Our study population (n = 677) consisted of all early breast cancer patients primarily treated with surgery in our center between 1985 and 1995. Tissue microarray sections of arrayed tumor and normal control material were immunohistochemically stained for HLA-E and HLA-G. For evaluation of HLA-E and HLA-G and the combined variable, HLA-EG, a binary score was used. Expression of classical HLA class I molecules was determined previously. HLA-E, HLA-G, and HLA-EG on breast tumors were classified as expression in 50, 60, and 23% of patients, respectively. Remarkably, only in patients with loss of classical HLA class I tumor expression, expression of HLA-E (p = 0.027), HLA-G (p = 0.035), or HLA-EG (p = 0.001) resulted in a worse relapse-free period. An interaction was found between classical and nonclassical HLA class I expression (p = 0.002), suggestive for a biological connection. We have demonstrated that, next to expression of classical HLA class I, expression of HLA-E and HLA-G is an important factor in the prediction of outcome of breast cancer patients. These results provide further evidence that breast cancer is immunogenic, but also capable of evading tumor eradication by the host's immune system, by up- or downregulation of HLA class Ia and class Ib loci.

  4. Improving coeliac disease risk prediction by testing non-HLA variants additional to HLA variants

    PubMed Central

    Romanos, Jihane; Rosén, Anna; Kumar, Vinod; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Szperl, Agata; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; van Diemen, Cleo C; Kanninga, Roan; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A; Steck, Andrea; Eisenbarth, Georges; van Heel, David A; Cukrowska, Bozena; Bruno, Valentina; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Núñez, Concepcion; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Mearin, M Luisa; Barisani, Donatella; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M; Ivarsson, Anneli; Boezen, H Marieke; Liu, Edwin; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of coeliac disease (CD) patients are not being properly diagnosed and therefore remain untreated, leading to a greater risk of developing CD-associated complications. The major genetic risk heterodimer, HLA-DQ2 and DQ8, is already used clinically to help exclude disease. However, approximately 40% of the population carry these alleles and the majority never develop CD. Objective We explored whether CD risk prediction can be improved by adding non-HLA-susceptible variants to common HLA testing. Design We developed an average weighted genetic risk score with 10, 26 and 57 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 2675 cases and 2815 controls and assessed the improvement in risk prediction provided by the non-HLA SNP. Moreover, we assessed the transferability of the genetic risk model with 26 non-HLA variants to a nested case–control population (n=1709) and a prospective cohort (n=1245) and then tested how well this model predicted CD outcome for 985 independent individuals. Results Adding 57 non-HLA variants to HLA testing showed a statistically significant improvement compared to scores from models based on HLA only, HLA plus 10 SNP and HLA plus 26 SNP. With 57 non-HLA variants, the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve reached 0.854 compared to 0.823 for HLA only, and 11.1% of individuals were reclassified to a more accurate risk group. We show that the risk model with HLA plus 26 SNP is useful in independent populations. Conclusions Predicting risk with 57 additional non-HLA variants improved the identification of potential CD patients. This demonstrates a possible role for combined HLA and non-HLA genetic testing in diagnostic work for CD. PMID:23704318

  5. Primary proton and helium spectra in the energy range 10 to the 12th to 10 to the 14th eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.; Ogata, T.; Saito, T.; Holynski, R.; Jurak, A.; Wolter, W.; Wosiek, B.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Parnell, T. A.; Jones, W. V.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of proton and helium spectra have been made in the energy range 10 to the 12th to 10 to the 14th eV. Large area thin emulsion calorimeters were used in the Japanese American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment balloon flight series. Power indices of the integral spectra for both nuclei are consistent with published data at lower energies. Absolute intensities are also consistent for helium and proton fluxes with extrapolations of previous data. No steepening of the proton spectrum is indicated.

  6. Mariculture associated with oil and gas structures: A compendium. Information transfer meeting (14th), mariculture sessions. Held in New Orleans, Louisiana on November 17, 1994. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reggio, V.C.

    1996-09-01

    Increased interest in the use of offshore oil and gas platforms for growing coastal and pelagic fish and shellfish for commercial markets led to MMS to sponsor a forum on this topic. This report encompasses the views, opinions, constraints, limitations, possibilities, and proposals from representative of the public and private sectors with interest and concern for fishery development in the Gulf of Mexico. This report provides summaries of the presentations given at the mariculture session during the 14th Annual Information transfer Meeting held in New Orleans in November 1994.

  7. HLA Typing for the Next Generation

    PubMed Central

    Mayor, Neema P.; Robinson, James; McWhinnie, Alasdair J. M.; Ranade, Swati; Eng, Kevin; Midwinter, William; Bultitude, Will P.; Chin, Chen-Shan; Bowman, Brett; Marks, Patrick; Braund, Henny; Madrigal, J. Alejandro; Latham, Katy; Marsh, Steven G. E.

    2015-01-01

    Allele-level resolution data at primary HLA typing is the ideal for most histocompatibility testing laboratories. Many high-throughput molecular HLA typing approaches are unable to determine the phase of observed DNA sequence polymorphisms, leading to ambiguous results. The use of higher resolution methods is often restricted due to cost and time limitations. Here we report on the feasibility of using Pacific Biosciences’ Single Molecule Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing technology for high-resolution and high-throughput HLA typing. Seven DNA samples were typed for HLA-A, -B and -C. The results showed that SMRT DNA sequencing technology was able to generate sequences that spanned entire HLA Class I genes that allowed for accurate allele calling. Eight novel genomic HLA class I sequences were identified, four were novel alleles, three were confirmed as genomic sequence extensions and one corrected an existing genomic reference sequence. This method has the potential to revolutionize the field of HLA typing. The clinical impact of achieving this level of resolution HLA typing data is likely to considerable, particularly in applications such as organ and blood stem cell transplantation where matching donors and recipients for their HLA is of utmost importance. PMID:26018555

  8. HLA-G UTR haplotype conservation in the Malian population: association with soluble HLA-G.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Federico; Traore, Karim; Cherouat, Nissem; Roubertoux, Pierre; Buhler, Stéphane; Cortey, Martì; Simon, Sophie; Doumbo, Ogobara; Chiaroni, Jacques; Picard, Christophe; Di Cristofaro, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The HLA-G molecule plays an important role in immunomodulation. In a previous study carried out on a southern French population our team showed that HLA-G haplotypes, defined by SNPs in the coding region and specific SNPs located in 5'URR and 3'UTR regulatory regions, are associated with differential soluble HLA-G expression (sHLA-G). Furthermore, the structure of these HLA-G haplotypes appears to be conserved in geographically distant populations. The aim of our study is to confirm these expectations in a sub-Saharan African population and to explore additional factors, such as HLA-A alleles, that might influence sHLA-G expression. DNA and plasma samples were collected from 229 Malians; HLA-G and HLA-A genotyping were respectively performed by the Snap Shot® method and by Luminex™ technology. sHLA-G dosage was performed using an ELISA kit. HLA-G and HLA-A allelic and haplotypic frequencies were estimated using an EM algorithm from the Gene[Rate] program. Associations between genetic and non genetic parameters with sHLA-G were performed using a non-parametric test with GRAPH PAD Prism 5. Our results reveal a good conservation of the HLA-G UTR haplotype structure in populations with different origins and demographic histories. These UTR haplotypes appear to be involved in different sHLA-G expression patterns. Specifically, the UTR-2 haplotype was associated with low sHLA-G levels, displaying a dominant negative effect. Furthermore, an allelic effect of both HLA-G and HLA-A, as well as non genetic parameters, such as age and gender possibly linked to osteogenesis and sexual hormones, also seem to be involved in the modulation of sHLA-G. These data suggest that further investigation in larger cohorts and in populations from various ethnical backgrounds is necessary not only to detect new functional polymorphism in HLA-G regulatory regions, but also to reveal the extent of biological phenomena that influence sHLA-G secretion and this might therefore have an impact

  9. Amino acid residues 56 to 69 of HLA-A2 specify an antigenic determinant shared by HLA-A2 and HLA-B17.

    PubMed

    Ways, J P; Rothbard, J B; Parham, P

    1986-07-01

    The mouse monoclonal antibody MA2.1 was previously used to define an epitope shared by native HLA-A2 and HLA-B17 molecules and amino acid sequence comparison of nine HLA-A,B,C molecules identified residues 62 to 65 as the region most likely to form this epitope. An unabsorbed rabbit antiserum raised against a peptide corresponding to residues 56 to 69 of HLA-A2 gives highly specific reactions with HLA-A2 and HLA-B17 heavy chains in Western blots. No interactions with native HLA-A2 and B17 molecules were detected in a variety of assays. Although the topographic relationship between the epitopes recognized by the rabbit antiserum and the monoclonal antibody could not be determined, the results show that residues 56 to 69 of HLA-A2 can form epitopes with specificity for HLA-A2 and HLA-B17.

  10. Impact of peptides on the recognition of HLA class I molecules by human HLA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Arend; Eijsink, Chantal; Kester, Michel G D; Franke, Marry E I; Kardol, Marrie J; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; van Kooten, Cees; Verreck, Frank A; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter; Koning, Frits; Doxiadis, Ilias I N; Claas, Frans H J

    2005-11-01

    MHC class I molecules expressed on cell surfaces are composed of H chain, beta2-microglobulin and any of a vast array of peptides. The role of peptide in the recognition of HLA class I by serum HLA Abs is unknown. In this study, the solid-phase assay of a series (n = 11) of HLA-A2-reactive, pregnancy-induced, human mAbs on a panel (n = 12) of recombinant monomeric HLA-A2 molecules, each containing a single peptide, revealed peptide selectivity of the mAbs. The flow cytometry membrane staining intensities on the HLA-A2-transduced cell line K562, caused by these mAbs, correlated with the number of monomer species detected by the mAbs. Flow cytometry staining on HLA-A2-bearing cell lines of a variety of lineages was indicative of tissue selectivity of these HLA-A2 mAbs. This tissue selectivity suggests that the deleterious effect on allografts is confined to alloantibodies recognizing only HLA class I loaded with peptides that are derived from tissue-specific and household proteins. Since Abs that are only reactive with HLA loaded with irrelevant peptides are expected to be harmless toward allografts, the practice of HLA Ab determination on lymphocyte-derived HLA deserves reconsideration.

  11. The hospital microbiome project: meeting report for the UK science and innovation network UK-USA workshop ‘beating the superbugs: hospital microbiome studies for tackling antimicrobial resistance’, October 14th 2013

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The UK Science and Innovation Network UK-USA workshop ‘Beating the Superbugs: Hospital Microbiome Studies for tackling Antimicrobial Resistance’ was held on October 14th 2013 at the UK Department of Health, London. The workshop was designed to promote US-UK collaboration on hospital microbiome studies to add a new facet to our collective understanding of antimicrobial resistance. The assembled researchers debated the importance of the hospital microbial community in transmission of disease and as a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes, and discussed methodologies, hypotheses, and priorities. A number of complementary approaches were explored, although the importance of the built environment microbiome in disease transmission was not universally accepted. Current whole genome epidemiological methods are being pioneered in the UK and the benefits of moving to community analysis are not necessarily obvious to the pioneers; however, rapid progress in other areas of microbiology suggest to some researchers that hospital microbiome studies will be exceptionally fruitful even in the short term. Collaborative studies will recombine different strengths to tackle the international problems of antimicrobial resistance and hospital and healthcare associated infections.

  12. HLA and Disease Associations in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Stephen; Choi, Hee-Back

    2011-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA), the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in humans has been known to reside on chromosome 6 and encodes cell-surface antigen-presenting proteins and many other proteins related to immune system function. The HLA is highly polymorphic and the most genetically variable coding loci in humans. In addition to a critical role in transplantation medicine, HLA and disease associations have been widely studied across the populations world-wide and are found to be important in prediction of disease susceptibility, resistance and of evolutionary maintenance of genetic diversity. Because recently developed molecular based HLA typing has several advantages like improved specimen stability and increased resolution of HLA types, the association between HLA alleles and a given disease could be more accurately quantified. Here, in this review, we have collected HLA association data on some autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, cancers, drug responsiveness and other diseases with unknown etiology in Koreans and attempt to summarize some remarkable HLA alleles related with specific diseases. PMID:22346771

  13. HLA-DPB1 and HLA class I confer risk of and protection from narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Ollila, Hanna M; Ravel, Jean-Marie; Han, Fang; Faraco, Juliette; Lin, Ling; Zheng, Xiuwen; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Dauvilliers, Yves; Pizza, Fabio; Hong, Seung-Chul; Jennum, Poul; Knudsen, Stine; Kornum, Birgitte R; Dong, Xiao Song; Yan, Han; Hong, Heeseung; Coquillard, Cristin; Mahlios, Joshua; Jolanki, Otto; Einen, Mali; Arnulf, Isabelle; Lavault, Sophie; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit; Crowe, Catherine; Partinen, Markku; Huang, Yu Shu; Bourgin, Patrice; Vaarala, Outi; Désautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Mack, Steven J; Mindrinos, Michael; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy, a disorder caused by a lack of hypocretin (orexin), is so strongly associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II HLA-DQA1(∗)01:02-DQB1(∗)06:02 (DQ0602) that very few non-DQ0602 cases have been reported. A known triggering factor for narcolepsy is pandemic 2009 influenza H1N1, suggesting autoimmunity triggered by upper-airway infections. Additional effects of other HLA-DQ alleles have been reported consistently across multiple ethnic groups. Using over 3,000 case and 10,000 control individuals of European and Chinese background, we examined the effects of other HLA loci. After careful matching of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ in case and control individuals, we found strong protective effects of HLA-DPA1(∗)01:03-DPB1(∗)04:02 (DP0402; odds ratio [OR] = 0.51 [0.38-0.67], p = 1.01 × 10(-6)) and HLA-DPA1(∗)01:03-DPB1(∗)04:01 (DP0401; OR = 0.61 [0.47-0.80], p = 2.07 × 10(-4)) and predisposing effects of HLA-DPB1(∗)05:01 in Asians (OR = 1.76 [1.34-2.31], p = 4.71 × 10(-05)). Similar effects were found by conditional analysis controlling for HLA-DR and HLA-DQ with DP0402 (OR = 0.45 [0.38-0.55] p = 8.99 × 10(-17)) and DP0501 (OR = 1.38 [1.18-1.61], p = 7.11 × 10(-5)). HLA-class-II-independent associations with HLA-A(∗)11:01 (OR = 1.32 [1.13-1.54], p = 4.92 × 10(-4)), HLA-B(∗)35:03 (OR = 1.96 [1.41-2.70], p = 5.14 × 10(-5)), and HLA-B(∗)51:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.25-1.78], p = 1.09 × 10(-5)) were also seen across ethnic groups in the HLA class I region. These effects might reflect modulation of autoimmunity or indirect effects of HLA class I and HLA-DP alleles on response to viral infections such as that of influenza. PMID:25574827

  14. HLA-DPB1 and HLA class I confer risk of and protection from narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Ollila, Hanna M; Ravel, Jean-Marie; Han, Fang; Faraco, Juliette; Lin, Ling; Zheng, Xiuwen; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Dauvilliers, Yves; Pizza, Fabio; Hong, Seung-Chul; Jennum, Poul; Knudsen, Stine; Kornum, Birgitte R; Dong, Xiao Song; Yan, Han; Hong, Heeseung; Coquillard, Cristin; Mahlios, Joshua; Jolanki, Otto; Einen, Mali; Arnulf, Isabelle; Lavault, Sophie; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit; Crowe, Catherine; Partinen, Markku; Huang, Yu Shu; Bourgin, Patrice; Vaarala, Outi; Désautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Mack, Steven J; Mindrinos, Michael; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy, a disorder caused by a lack of hypocretin (orexin), is so strongly associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II HLA-DQA1(∗)01:02-DQB1(∗)06:02 (DQ0602) that very few non-DQ0602 cases have been reported. A known triggering factor for narcolepsy is pandemic 2009 influenza H1N1, suggesting autoimmunity triggered by upper-airway infections. Additional effects of other HLA-DQ alleles have been reported consistently across multiple ethnic groups. Using over 3,000 case and 10,000 control individuals of European and Chinese background, we examined the effects of other HLA loci. After careful matching of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ in case and control individuals, we found strong protective effects of HLA-DPA1(∗)01:03-DPB1(∗)04:02 (DP0402; odds ratio [OR] = 0.51 [0.38-0.67], p = 1.01 × 10(-6)) and HLA-DPA1(∗)01:03-DPB1(∗)04:01 (DP0401; OR = 0.61 [0.47-0.80], p = 2.07 × 10(-4)) and predisposing effects of HLA-DPB1(∗)05:01 in Asians (OR = 1.76 [1.34-2.31], p = 4.71 × 10(-05)). Similar effects were found by conditional analysis controlling for HLA-DR and HLA-DQ with DP0402 (OR = 0.45 [0.38-0.55] p = 8.99 × 10(-17)) and DP0501 (OR = 1.38 [1.18-1.61], p = 7.11 × 10(-5)). HLA-class-II-independent associations with HLA-A(∗)11:01 (OR = 1.32 [1.13-1.54], p = 4.92 × 10(-4)), HLA-B(∗)35:03 (OR = 1.96 [1.41-2.70], p = 5.14 × 10(-5)), and HLA-B(∗)51:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.25-1.78], p = 1.09 × 10(-5)) were also seen across ethnic groups in the HLA class I region. These effects might reflect modulation of autoimmunity or indirect effects of HLA class I and HLA-DP alleles on response to viral infections such as that of influenza.

  15. HLA-DPB1 and HLA Class I Confer Risk of and Protection from Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ollila, Hanna M.; Ravel, Jean-Marie; Han, Fang; Faraco, Juliette; Lin, Ling; Zheng, Xiuwen; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Dauvilliers, Yves; Pizza, Fabio; Hong, Seung-Chul; Jennum, Poul; Knudsen, Stine; Kornum, Birgitte R.; Dong, Xiao Song; Yan, Han; Hong, Heeseung; Coquillard, Cristin; Mahlios, Joshua; Jolanki, Otto; Einen, Mali; Lavault, Sophie; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit; Crowe, Catherine; Partinen, Markku; Huang, Yu Shu; Bourgin, Patrice; Vaarala, Outi; Désautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Mack, Steven J.; Mindrinos, Michael; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy, a disorder caused by a lack of hypocretin (orexin), is so strongly associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II HLA-DQA1∗01:02-DQB1∗06:02 (DQ0602) that very few non-DQ0602 cases have been reported. A known triggering factor for narcolepsy is pandemic 2009 influenza H1N1, suggesting autoimmunity triggered by upper-airway infections. Additional effects of other HLA-DQ alleles have been reported consistently across multiple ethnic groups. Using over 3,000 case and 10,000 control individuals of European and Chinese background, we examined the effects of other HLA loci. After careful matching of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ in case and control individuals, we found strong protective effects of HLA-DPA1∗01:03-DPB1∗04:02 (DP0402; odds ratio [OR] = 0.51 [0.38–0.67], p = 1.01 × 10−6) and HLA-DPA1∗01:03-DPB1∗04:01 (DP0401; OR = 0.61 [0.47–0.80], p = 2.07 × 10−4) and predisposing effects of HLA-DPB1∗05:01 in Asians (OR = 1.76 [1.34–2.31], p = 4.71 × 10−05). Similar effects were found by conditional analysis controlling for HLA-DR and HLA-DQ with DP0402 (OR = 0.45 [0.38–0.55] p = 8.99 × 10−17) and DP0501 (OR = 1.38 [1.18–1.61], p = 7.11 × 10−5). HLA-class-II-independent associations with HLA-A∗11:01 (OR = 1.32 [1.13–1.54], p = 4.92 × 10−4), HLA-B∗35:03 (OR = 1.96 [1.41–2.70], p = 5.14 × 10−5), and HLA-B∗51:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.25–1.78], p = 1.09 × 10−5) were also seen across ethnic groups in the HLA class I region. These effects might reflect modulation of autoimmunity or indirect effects of HLA class I and HLA-DP alleles on response to viral infections such as that of influenza. PMID:25574827

  16. The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database - New developments in reporting HLA variation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James; Soormally, Anup R; Hayhurst, James D; Marsh, Steven G E

    2016-03-01

    IPD-IMGT/HLA is a constituent of the Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD), which was developed to provide a centralised system for the study of polymorphism in genes of the immune system. The IPD project works with specialist groups of nomenclature committees who provide and curate individual sections before they are submitted to IPD for online publication. The primary database within the IPD project is the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database, which provides a locus-specific database for the hyper-polymorphic allele sequences of the genes in the HLA system, also known as the human Major Histocompatibility Complex. The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database was first released over 17 years ago, building on the work of the WHO Nomenclature Committee for Factors of the HLA system that was initiated in 1968. The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database enhanced this work by providing the HLA community with an online, searchable repository of highly curated HLA sequences. Many of the genes encode proteins of the immune system and are hyper polymorphic, with some genes currently having over 4000 known allelic variants. Through the work of the HLA Informatics Group and in collaboration with the European Bioinformatics Institute we are able to provide public access to this data through the website, http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/imgt/hla.

  17. The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database - New developments in reporting HLA variation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James; Soormally, Anup R; Hayhurst, James D; Marsh, Steven G E

    2016-03-01

    IPD-IMGT/HLA is a constituent of the Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD), which was developed to provide a centralised system for the study of polymorphism in genes of the immune system. The IPD project works with specialist groups of nomenclature committees who provide and curate individual sections before they are submitted to IPD for online publication. The primary database within the IPD project is the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database, which provides a locus-specific database for the hyper-polymorphic allele sequences of the genes in the HLA system, also known as the human Major Histocompatibility Complex. The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database was first released over 17 years ago, building on the work of the WHO Nomenclature Committee for Factors of the HLA system that was initiated in 1968. The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database enhanced this work by providing the HLA community with an online, searchable repository of highly curated HLA sequences. Many of the genes encode proteins of the immune system and are hyper polymorphic, with some genes currently having over 4000 known allelic variants. Through the work of the HLA Informatics Group and in collaboration with the European Bioinformatics Institute we are able to provide public access to this data through the website, http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/imgt/hla. PMID:26826444

  18. International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, 14th, San Jose, Costa Rica, April 23-30, 1980, Proceedings. Volumes 1, 2 and 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Papers are presented on remote sensing applications in resource monitoring and management, data classification and modeling procedures, and the use of remote sensing techniques in developing nations. The subjects of land use/land cover, soil mapping, crop identification, mapping of geological resources, renewable resource analysis, and oceanographic applications are discussed. Papers from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Costa Rica, the Syrian Arab Republic, the People's Republic of China, the Phillipines, Italy, Upper Volta and the United States are included.

  19. Cross-Culturalism in Children's Literature: Selected papers from the 1987 International Conference of the Children's Literature Association (14th, Ottawa, Canada, May 14-17, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon, Susan R., Ed.; Thompson, Ruth Anne, Ed.

    This conference proceedings contains a selection of the papers and awards given at a conference held at Carleton University in Canada. After the text of an address by the president of the Children's Literature Association, the following papers are included: (1) "Lone Voices in the Crowd: The Limits of Multiculturalism" (Brian Alderson); (2) "The…

  20. Selected Theoretical Studies Group contributions to the 14th International Cosmic Ray conference. [including studies on galactic molecular hydrogen, interstellar reddening, and on the origin of cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The galactic distribution of H2 was studied through gamma radiation and through X-ray, optical, and infrared absorption measurements from SAS-2 and other sources. A comparison of the latitude distribution of gamma-ray intensity with reddening data shows reddening data to give the best estimate of interstellar gas in the solar vicinity. The distribution of galactic cosmic ray nucleons was determined and appears to be identical to the supernova remnant distribution. Interactions between ultrahigh energy cosmic-ray nuclei and intergalactic photon radiation fields were calculated, using the Monte Carlo method.

  1. HLA Engineering of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Riolobos, Laura; Hirata, Roli K; Turtle, Cameron J; Wang, Pei-Rong; Gornalusse, German G; Zavajlevski, Maja; Riddell, Stanley R; Russell, David W

    2013-01-01

    The clinical use of human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives is limited by the rejection of transplanted cells due to differences in their human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes. This has led to the proposed use of histocompatible, patient-specific stem cells; however, the preparation of many different stem cell lines for clinical use is a daunting task. Here, we develop two distinct genetic engineering approaches that address this problem. First, we use a combination of gene targeting and mitotic recombination to derive HLA-homozygous embryonic stem cell (ESC) subclones from an HLA-heterozygous parental line. A small bank of HLA-homozygous stem cells with common haplotypes would match a significant proportion of the population. Second, we derive HLA class I–negative cells by targeted disruption of both alleles of the Beta-2 Microglobulin (B2M) gene in ESCs. Mixed leukocyte reactions and peptide-specific HLA-restricted CD8+ T cell responses were reduced in class I–negative cells that had undergone differentiation in embryoid bodies. These B2M−/− ESCs could act as universal donor cells in applications where the transplanted cells do not express HLA class II genes. Both approaches used adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors for efficient gene targeting in the absence of potentially genotoxic nucleases, and produced pluripotent, transgene-free cell lines. PMID:23629003

  2. HLA genotyping in pediatric celiac disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Stanković, Biljana; Radlović, Nedeljko; Leković, Zoran; Ristić, Dragana; Radlović, Vladimir; Nikčević, Gordana; Kotur, Nikola; Vučićević, Ksenija; Kostić, Tatjana; Pavlović, Sonja; Zukić, Branka

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease in the small intestine triggered by gluten uptake that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. HLA-DQ2 protein encoded by HLA-DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 alleles is found in 90-95% of CD patients. All of the remaining patients carry HLA-DQ8 protein encoded by HLA-DQA1*03 and DQB1*03:02 alleles. Specific HLA-DQ genotypes define different risk for CD incidence. Presence of susceptible HLA-DQ genotypes does not predict certain disease development, but their absence makes CD very unlikely, close to 100%. Here we presented for the first time the distribution of HLA-DQ genotypes in the group of pediatric celiac patients from the University Children’s Hospital, Belgrade, Serbia and estimated risk for CD development that these genotypes confer. Seventy three celiac disease patients and 62 healthy individuals underwent genotyping for DQA1, DQB1 alleles and DRB1 allele. 94.5% of patients carried alleles that encode DQ2 protein variant and 2.7% carried alleles that encode DQ8 protein variant. Two patients carried single DQB1*02 allele. No patients were negative for all the alleles predisposing to CD. The highest HLA-DQ genotype risk for CD development was found in group of patients homozygous for DQ2.5 haplotype, followed by the group of heterozygous carriers of DQ2.5 haplotype in combination with DQB1*02 allele within the other haplotype. The lowest risk was observed in carriers of a single copy of DQB1*02 or DQA1*05 allele or other non-predisposing alleles. HLA genotyping, more informative than serological testing commonly used, proved to be a useful diagnostic tool for excluding CD development. PMID:25172978

  3. Unsupervised HLA Peptidome Deconvolution Improves Ligand Prediction Accuracy and Predicts Cooperative Effects in Peptide-HLA Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bassani-Sternberg, Michal; Gfeller, David

    2016-09-15

    Ag presentation on HLA molecules plays a central role in infectious diseases and tumor immunology. To date, large-scale identification of (neo-)Ags from DNA sequencing data has mainly relied on predictions. In parallel, mass spectrometry analysis of HLA peptidome is increasingly performed to directly detect peptides presented on HLA molecules. In this study, we use a novel unsupervised approach to assign mass spectrometry-based HLA peptidomics data to their cognate HLA molecules. We show that incorporation of deconvoluted HLA peptidomics data in ligand prediction algorithms can improve their accuracy for HLA alleles with few ligands in existing databases. The results of our computational analysis of large datasets of naturally processed HLA peptides, together with experimental validation and protein structure analysis, further reveal how HLA-binding motifs change with peptide length and predict new cooperative effects between distant residues in HLA-B07:02 ligands. PMID:27511729

  4. [Detection of common determinants of HLA antigens A2 and B17 by absorption using human HLA serum].

    PubMed

    Májský, A; Korínková, P

    1983-01-01

    Attempts of cross absorption where sera of anti-HLA A2 + B17, anti-HLA A2 and anti-HLA B17 with thrombocytes were absorbed from donors of HLA A2 positive, B17 negative and HLA A2 negative, B17 positive, revealed that anti-HLA A2 and anti-HLA B17 could be eliminated from the sera of both HLA types on the platelets. Thus, the findings allow the existence of a common determinant of HLA A2 and B17-antigens to be assumed. This is the first case where the evidence of a cross reaction between antigens of two different HLA loci with human sera could be established.

  5. Unsupervised HLA Peptidome Deconvolution Improves Ligand Prediction Accuracy and Predicts Cooperative Effects in Peptide-HLA Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bassani-Sternberg, Michal; Gfeller, David

    2016-09-15

    Ag presentation on HLA molecules plays a central role in infectious diseases and tumor immunology. To date, large-scale identification of (neo-)Ags from DNA sequencing data has mainly relied on predictions. In parallel, mass spectrometry analysis of HLA peptidome is increasingly performed to directly detect peptides presented on HLA molecules. In this study, we use a novel unsupervised approach to assign mass spectrometry-based HLA peptidomics data to their cognate HLA molecules. We show that incorporation of deconvoluted HLA peptidomics data in ligand prediction algorithms can improve their accuracy for HLA alleles with few ligands in existing databases. The results of our computational analysis of large datasets of naturally processed HLA peptides, together with experimental validation and protein structure analysis, further reveal how HLA-binding motifs change with peptide length and predict new cooperative effects between distant residues in HLA-B07:02 ligands.

  6. [HLA-B27 polymorphism and spondyloarthropathies].

    PubMed

    Peixoto, M J; Gonzales, T; Spinola, H; Couto, A R; Mora, M Gantes; Brehm, A; Santos, M R; Garrett, F; Armas, J Bruges

    2005-01-01

    The association of HLA-B27 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and other spondyloarthropathies (SpA), remains as one of the strongest between HLA molecules and human disease. Since it was reported, in 1973, it has been extensively studied in order to understand the underlying pathogenic mechanism. The objective of this article is to review the current knowledge on the structure and polymorphism of HLA-B27 molecule, as well as describe the main pathogenic hypotheses trying to explain its association with AS.

  7. The HLA system and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cudworth, A G; Woodrow, J C

    1977-06-01

    There is a significant positive association between insulin dependent diabetes, irrespective of age of onset, and the HLA system, whereas there is no association of HLA antigens with non-insulin dependent diabetes. There is a significant concordance value for HLA antigen frequencies in insulin dependent diabetics from three different centres, indicating that the genes (s) conferring susceptibility to this type of diabetes is possibly present in all "juvenile-onset" diabetics and is in linkage disequilibrium with all the B locus alleles. PMID:892129

  8. Molecular mechanism of the susceptibility difference between HLA-B*27:02/04/05 and HLA-B*27:06/09 to ankylosing spondylitis: substitution analysis, MD simulation, QSAR modelling, and in vitro assay.

    PubMed

    Cheng, X; Mei, Y; Ji, X; Xue, Q; Chen, D

    2016-05-01

    The human leukocyte antigen HLA-B27 is directly involved in the disease pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). HLA-B27 has a high degree of genetic polymorphism, with 105 currently known subtypes; the presence of aspartic acid at residue 116 (Asp116) has been found to play an essential role in AS susceptibility. Here, we systematically investigated the molecular mechanism of the susceptibility difference between the AS-associated subtypes HLA-B*27:02/04/05 and AS-unassociated subtypes HLA-B*27:06/09 to AS at sequence, structure, energetic and dynamic levels. In total seven variable residues were identified among the five studied HLA-B27 subtypes, in which Asp116 can be largely stabilized by a spatially vicinal, positively charged His114 through a salt bridge, while five other variable residues seem to have only a marginal effect on AS susceptibility. We also employed a quantitative structure-activity relationship approach to model the statistical correlation between peptide structure and affinity to HLA-B*27:05, a genetic ancestor of all other HLA-B27 subtypes and associated strongly with AS. The built regression predictor was verified rigorously through both internal cross-validation and external blind validation, and was then employed to identify potential HLA-B*27:05 binders from >20,000 cartilage-derived self-peptides. Subsequently, the binding potency of the top five antigenic peptides to HLA-B*27:05 was assayed in vitro using a FACS-based MHC stabilization experiment. Consequently, two (QRVGSDEFK and LRGAGTNEK) out of the five peptides were determined to have high affinity (BL50 = 5.5 and 15.8 nM, respectively) and, as expected, both of them possess positively charged Lys at the C-terminus. PMID:27228481

  9. Very long haplotype tracts characterized at high resolution from HLA homozygous cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Paul J.; Norberg, Steve; Nemat-Gorgani, Neda; Royce, Thomas; Hollenbach, Jill A.; Won, Melissa Shults; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.; Gunderson, Kevin L.; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Parham, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The HLA region of chromosome 6 contains the most polymorphic genes in humans. Spanning ~5Mbp the densely packed region encompasses approximately 175 expressed genes including the highly polymorphic HLA class I and II loci. Most of the other genes and functional elements are also polymorphic, and many of them are directly implicated in immune function or immune-related disease. For these reasons this complex genomic region is subject to intense scrutiny by researchers with the common goal of aiding further understanding and diagnoses of multiple immune-related diseases and syndromes. To aid assay development and characterization of the classical loci, a panel of cell lines partially or fully homozygous for HLA class I and II was assembled over time by the International Histocompatibility Working Group (IHWG). Containing a minimum of 88 unique HLA haplotypes, we show this panel represents a significant proportion of European HLA allelic and haplotype diversity (60–95%). Using a high-density whole genome array that includes 13,331 HLA region SNPs, we analyzed 99 IHWG cells to map the coordinates of the homozygous tracts at a fine scale. The mean homozygous tract length within chromosome 6 from these individuals is 21Mbp. Within HLA the mean haplotype length is 4.3Mbp, and 65% of the cell lines were shown to be homozygous throughout the entire region. In addition, four cell lines are homozygous throughout the complex KIR region of chromosome 19 (~250kbp). The data we describe will provide a valuable resource for characterizing haplotypes, designing and refining imputation algorithms and developing assay controls. PMID:26198775

  10. HLA mismatches and hematopoietic cell transplantation: structural simulations assess the impact of changes in peptide binding specificity on transplant outcome

    PubMed Central

    Yanover, Chen; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Malkki, Mari; Gooley, Ted; Spellman, Stephen; Velardi, Andrea; Bardy, Peter; Madrigal, Alejandro; Bignon, Jean-Denis; Bradley, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The success of hematopoietic cell transplantation from an unrelated donor depends in part on the degree of Human Histocompatibility Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) matching between donor and patient. We present a structure-based analysis of HLA mismatching, focusing on individual amino acid mismatches and their effect on peptide binding specificity. Using molecular modeling simulations of HLA-peptide interactions, we find evidence that amino acid mismatches predicted to perturb peptide binding specificity are associated with higher risk of mortality in a large and diverse dataset of patient-donor pairs assembled by the International Histocompatibility Working Group in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation consortium. This analysis may represent a first step toward sequence-based prediction of relative risk for HLA allele mismatches. PMID:24482668

  11. The HLA system: structure and function.

    PubMed Central

    Bodmer, W F

    1987-01-01

    The HLA system is the major histocompatibility system of man and was found through a search for blood group-like determinants on white blood cells that would be effective in matching for transplantation. The HLA system has its counterparts in other species of mammals, birds, and reptiles including the much studied H2 system of the mouse. The HLA system started from a series of antigens defined by a combination of relatively crude serology and genetics, supported by extensive statistical analysis. It has turned out to be a complex genetic region determining two major sets of cell surface products which mediate essential functional interactions between cells of the immune system, and so have a major role in the control of the immune response. Polymorphism in the HLA region is thus associated with a wide variety of diseases with an immune aetiology. PMID:3312304

  12. [A monoclonal antibody recognizes a novel HLA-DQ specificity, DQWa].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, N

    1985-09-01

    A monoclonal antibody (MoAb) with a novel DQ specificity has been produced by immunizing a C3H/He mouse with a human B lymphoblastoid cell line EBV-Wa (HLA-Dw 15/DR 4/DQ blank homozygous). The MoAb, termed HU-46, reacts with panel cells associated with HLA-Dw 15/DR 4 and certain panel cells with HLA-Dw 8/DRw 8 specificity, which are typed as DQ blank. Immunochemical analyses indicated that the MoAb recognizes a new class II antigen, which is coded by the HLA-DQ sublocus. In the ninth International Histocompatibility Workshop, three HLA-DQ specificities, DQw 1, DQw 2 and DQw 3, were officially designated. But the DQ specificity detected by HU-46 has not yet been reported. We provisionally named this new DQ specificity DQWa and presumed that it is fourth DQ specificity. Furthermore, in a genetic analysis, assuming the Hardy-Weinberg condition hold, it was confirmed that DQWa is an allele of the three DQ specificities. PMID:2416664

  13. HLA genotyping in the clinical laboratory: comparison of next-generation sequencing methods.

    PubMed

    Profaizer, T; Lázár-Molnár, E; Close, D W; Delgado, J C; Kumánovics, A

    2016-07-01

    Implementation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotyping by next-generation sequencing (NGS) in the clinical lab brings new challenges to the laboratories performing this testing. With the advent of commercially available HLA-NGS typing kits, labs must make numerous decisions concerning capital equipment and address labor considerations. Therefore, careful and unbiased evaluation of available methods is imperative. In this report, we compared our in-house developed HLA NGS typing with two commercially available kits from Illumina and Omixon using 10 International Histocompatibility Working Group (IHWG) and 36 clinical samples. Although all three methods employ long range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and have been developed on the Illumina MiSeq platform, the methodologies for library preparation show significant variations. There was 100% typing concordance between all three methods at the first field when a HLA type could be assigned. Overall, HLA typing by NGS using in-house or commercially available methods is now feasible in clinical laboratories. However, technical variables such as hands-on time and indexing strategies are sufficiently different among these approaches to impact the workflow of the clinical laboratory. PMID:27524804

  14. Correspondence analysis of HLA gene frequency data from 124 population samples.

    PubMed

    Greenacre, M J; Degos, L

    1977-01-01

    Correspondence analysis, a variant of principal components analysis, is used to interpret and compare gene frequencies of the HLA system for 124 samples from different populations studied in the Fifth and Sixth International Histocompatibility Workshops. The major advantage of this analysis is that populations and HLA genes are represented simultaneously with respect to the same axes in multidimensional space. This permits the visual interpretation of genetic differences between populations, the relative participation of each gene in the dispersion, and the correspondence between populations and genes. By this method a clear separation of ethnic groups in the world is obtained. Furthermore, within Europe the separation of samples from different countries is concordant with their geographical distances. The HLA system appears sufficiently polymorphic to define a population by its gene frequencies.

  15. HLA antigens and asthma in Greeks.

    PubMed

    Apostolakis, J; Toumbis, M; Konstantopoulos, K; Kamaroulias, D; Anagnostakis, J; Georgoulias, V; Fessas, P; Zervas, J

    1996-04-01

    HLA-A and -B antigens were determined in a group of 76 Greek asthmatic patients: 35 children (1.5-15 years) and 41 adults (18-73 years). The results were compared to those of 400 healthy unrelated controls from the same population. The standard NIH lymphocytotoxicity test was applied. When all 76 patients were compared to the controls, a statistically significant lower frequency of HLA-B5 and -B35 antigens was noted. When adults were analysed alone, an increased frequency of HLA-B8 was found. On the other hand, in the asthmatic children sub-group, the HLA-A10 antigen was significantly higher and the HLA-B5 was significantly lower than in the controls. These data imply that different HLA antigens may be involved in the pathogenesis of several clinical forms of asthma and that, in order to study the role of immunogenetic factor(s) in the pathogenesis of this disease, more adequate grouping criteria are needed.

  16. HLA antigen expression and malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T I; Manning, L S; Davis, M R; Robinson, B W; Garlepp, M J

    1991-09-01

    The expression of HLA antigens by a tumor may determine its progression and metastatic potential by influencing the immune response to that tumor. The upregulation of HLA antigen expression on some cell types by interferons (IFNs) may contribute to their antitumor activity. Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a tumor that has a poor prognosis and is unaffected by conventional therapy, although immunotherapy has not been adequately assessed. In this study, we have examined the constitutive and IFN-inducible expression of class I and class II HLA antigens on MM cell lines using indirect immunofluorescence and Northern blotting. All MM cell lines constitutively expressed class I, but not class II, surface antigen, and all three class I loci (HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C) were expressed. The MM cell lines were heterogeneous in their response to the IFNs. Treatment with IFN-alpha marginally increased class I surface expression, but not class II. Class I mRNA was, however, clearly increased in all cell lines after IFN-alpha treatment, suggesting that class I surface antigen was already maximally expressed. IFN-gamma increased class I mRNA expression in all but one cell line and induced DR expression on three of the cell lines. DQ-beta, but not DQ-alpha, mRNA was inducible in the same three cell lines, but DQ surface antigen was never demonstrable.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Reduction in HLA-DR, HLA-DQ and HLA-DP expression by Leu-M3+ cells from the peripheral blood of patients with thermal injury.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, R A; Martinez, O M; Lim, R C; Horn, J K; Garovoy, M R

    1989-01-01

    Monocytes that bear HLA Class II antigens, such as HLA-DR, HLA-DQ, or HLA-DP, are obligatory for many cell-mediated immunological processes. Patients with thermal injury suffer from hypoimmunity and are at risk for developing life-threatening septic episodes. To determine whether an alteration in expression of HLA Class II antigens is involved in the defect, monocytes from the peripheral blood of burn patients and controls were double-stained with anti-Leu-M3 and either anti-HLA-DR, HLA-DQ, or HLA-DP monoclonal antibodies. As analysed by flow cytometry the percentage of Leu-M3+ monocytes from the peripheral blood from patients and controls was the same. The percentage of Leu-M3+ monocytes bearing the HLA Class II antigens and the density of antigen on the monocytes, however, was significantly reduced post-burn compared with controls. In nearly all cases these changes were detected as early as 24 h post-burn before any drug therapy was implemented. In-vivo re-expression of normal levels of HLA Class II coincided with patient recovery. In-vitro exposure of post-burn Leu-M3+ cells to IFN-gamma for 72 h restored HLA Class II expression to control levels. It is possible that the reductions in HLA Class II expression may be involved in the general immunosuppression that follows thermal injury. PMID:2495202

  18. Predictive value of HLA-G and HLA-E in the prognosis of colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhang-Yan; Lv, Yong-Gang; Wang, Lei; Shi, Sheng-Jia; Yang, Fan; Zheng, Guo-Xu; Wen, Wei-Hong; Yang, An-Gang

    2015-01-01

    HLA-G and HLA-E are non-classical HLA Ib molecules. Recently, increasingly more reports have shown that HLA-G is highly expressed in different malignancies. In this article, we detected the expression levels of HLA-G and HLA-E in primary colorectal cancer patients. Our results showed that 70.6% and 65.7% of the colorectal cancer tissues had positive HLA-G or HLA-E expression, respectively, and that 46.1% positively expressed both molecules. We also analyzed the correlations between the expression levels of HLA-G, HLA-E or both combined and the clinical outcomes of the patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis results showed that the expression levels of HLA-G or HLA-E alone and the combined expression of both molecules were all statistically correlated with the overall survival of colorectal cancer patients. Cox multivariate analysis showed that only HLA-G expression can serve as independent factor for OS. Our results also showed that the expression of HLA-E was significantly correlated with tumor metastasis.

  19. [Polymorphism of human HLA-DRB1 leukocyte antigen alleles and its association to juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in a sample of Colombian mestizo children].

    PubMed

    Garavito, Gloria; Malagón, Clara; Ramírez, Luis A; De La Cruz, Oscar F; Uribe, Oscar; Navarro, Edgar; Iglesias, Antonio; Martínez, Paz; Jaraquemada, Dolores; Egea, Eduardo

    2003-09-01

    Oligotypes of the human leukocyte antigen HLA Class II, DRB1 alleles were characterized at the molecular level in a group of Colombian children suffering juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). The distribution of these alleles was examined in a group of Colombian mestizo children (genetic admixture of Amerindians, Europeans and Africans) suffering from clinically distinct JRA subsets in order to detect HLA allele frequency differences in patients with different JRA subsets. A group of 65 patients with JRA and 65 controls were characterized for the subtypes of the HLA-DRB1 alleles using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (PCR-SSOP). The oligotyping protocol recommended by the 12th International Histocompatibility Workshop held in St. Malo, Paris, in 1996, was used. Subtype HLA-DRB1*1104 was the allele most strongly associated with susceptibility to JRA (Fisher's p = 0.013, odds ratio (OR) = 16.79, etiologic fraction (EF) = 0.93). HLA-DRB1*1602 was also associated with susceptibility to a lesser degree (Fisher's p = 0.016, OR = 8.98, EF = 0.88). HLA-DRB1 alleles participating in JRA protection were HLA-DRB1*1501 (preventive fraction (PF) = 0.466, p = 0.005) and HLA DRB1*1402 (PF = 0.49, p = 0.009). The relationship between some HLA-DRB1 alleles and clinical features was also compared. The presence of rheumatic factor was associated with the alleles HLA-DRB1*0407 (p = 0.05, OR = 11.2, EF = 0.45) and HLA-DRB1*1302 (p = 0.02, OR = 22.8, EF = 0.63). There was also an association between HLA-DRB1*0701 (p = 0.001, OR = 58, EF = 0.73) with expressing ANA +. We found that in the oligoarticular subset, the allele HLA-DRB1*1104 (p = 0.0034, OR = 41.53, EF = 0.97) was the one expressed most commonly. In the poliarticular group, the alleles most frequently expressed were HLA-DRB1*0404 (Fisher's p = 0.012, OR = 8.75, EF = 0.88). In patients with systemic JRA, the HLA-DRB1*1602 allele (p = 0.005, OR = 21.33, EF = 0.95) was most frequent. These

  20. Image Understanding, 14th Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, L. S.

    1983-06-01

    Technical and annual progress reports of principal investigators of image understanding are presented. Topics covered include: surface constraint from linear entents; computing visual correspondance; smoothing optical flow fields; viewframes; a connectionist model of form perception; use of difference fields in processing sensor motion; a facet approach to optic flow; special purpose automatic programming for 3-d model-based vision; MAPS: organization of a spatial data base system using imagery, terrain, and map data; segment-based stereo matching; software metrics for performance analysis of parallel hardware; scene analysis algorithms; and robot vehicles.

  1. Identification of the HLA-DM/HLA-DR interface.

    PubMed

    Davies, Matthew N; Lamikanra, Abigail; Sansom, Clare E; Flower, Darren R; Moss, David S; Travers, Paul J

    2008-02-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DM is a critical participant in antigen presentation that catalyzes the dissociation of the Class II-associated Invariant chain-derived Peptide (CLIP) from the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II molecules. There is competition amongst peptides for access to an MHC Class II groove and it has been hypothesised that DM functions as a 'peptide editor' that catalyzes the replacement of one peptide for another within the groove. It is established that the DM catalyst interacts directly with the MHC Class II but the precise location of the interface is unknown. Here, we combine previously described mutational data with molecular docking and energy minimisation simulations to identify a putative interaction site of >4000A2 which agrees with known point mutational data for both the DR and DM molecule. The docked structure is validated by comparison with experimental data and previously determined properties of protein-protein interfaces. A possible dissociation mechanism is suggested by the presence of an acidic cluster near the N terminus of the bound peptide. PMID:17870168

  2. A future with less HLA: potential clinical applications of HLA-universal cells.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, C; Blasczyk, R

    2015-06-01

    The high variability of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) remains a major obstacle to the application of allogeneic products in cell-based therapies. We have developed a strategy to decrease the immunogenicity of cell and tissues to improve their survival after allogeneic transplantation in the absence of immunosuppression. Using RNA interference technology, the expression of HLA class I and II was stably downregulated. HLA-silenced cells demonstrated to prevent a de novo and escape a pre-formed alloimmune response in vitro and in vivo. Also, they demonstrated to be capable of engraft and survive after allogeneic transplantation independently of the donor's and recipient's genetic background. The generation of HLA-universal cells has may open new horizons in the field of regenerative medicine. Some of the potential clinical applications of HLA universal cells will be discussed in this review.

  3. A future with less HLA: potential clinical applications of HLA-universal cells.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, C; Blasczyk, R

    2015-06-01

    The high variability of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) remains a major obstacle to the application of allogeneic products in cell-based therapies. We have developed a strategy to decrease the immunogenicity of cell and tissues to improve their survival after allogeneic transplantation in the absence of immunosuppression. Using RNA interference technology, the expression of HLA class I and II was stably downregulated. HLA-silenced cells demonstrated to prevent a de novo and escape a pre-formed alloimmune response in vitro and in vivo. Also, they demonstrated to be capable of engraft and survive after allogeneic transplantation independently of the donor's and recipient's genetic background. The generation of HLA-universal cells has may open new horizons in the field of regenerative medicine. Some of the potential clinical applications of HLA universal cells will be discussed in this review. PMID:25864470

  4. Genotyping Yersinia pestis in Historical Plague: Evidence for Long-Term Persistence of Y. pestis in Europe from the 14th to the 17th Century.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Lisa; Wiechmann, Ingrid; Harbeck, Michaela; Thomas, Astrid; Grupe, Gisela; Projahn, Michaela; Scholz, Holger C; Riehm, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) recovered from plague victims of the second plague pandemic (14th to 17th century), excavated from two different burial sites in Germany, and spanning a time period of more than 300 years, was characterized using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. Of 30 tested skeletons 8 were positive for Yersinia pestis-specific nucleic acid, as determined by qPCR targeting the pla gene. In one individual (MP-19-II), the pla copy number in DNA extracted from tooth pulp was as high as 700 gene copies/μl, indicating severe generalized infection. All positive individuals were identical in all 16 SNP positions, separating phylogenetic branches within nodes N07_N10 (14 SNPs), N07_N08 (SNP s19) and N06_N07 (s545), and were highly similar to previously investigated plague victims from other European countries. Thus, beside the assumed continuous reintroduction of Y. pestis from central Asia in multiple waves during the second pandemic, long-term persistence of Y. pestis in Europe in a yet unknown reservoir host has also to be considered. PMID:26760973

  5. Diffuse gamma rays with energies greater than 1 x 10 to the 14th eV observed in the Southern Hemisphere

    SciTech Connect

    Suga, K.; Toyoda, Y.; Kamata, K.; Murakami, K.; Lapointe, M.

    1988-03-01

    The data of extensive air showers with a low content of muons and hadrons, observed in the period 1964-1966 at Mount Chacaltaya in Bolivia, have been reanalyzed. Arrival directions of those showers selected so as to favor small initiation depths in the atmosphere (to enhance the contribution from gamma-ray-initiated showers) reveal a 3.8 sigma peak above an expected background from the region of alpha = 180-210 deg in the band of delta = 0 to -40 deg. The integral flux of diffuse gamma-rays above 1 x 10 to the 14th eV estimated from this excess is about 6.0 x 10 to the -12th/sq cm per sec per sr. In order to explain this very high flux, the possible contribution of gamma-rays from Loop 1 as well as the inverse Compton photons produced in the 2.7 K photon background as progeny of gamma-rays from Cyg X-3-like sources. 24 references.

  6. Genotyping Yersinia pestis in Historical Plague: Evidence for Long-Term Persistence of Y. pestis in Europe from the 14th to the 17th Century.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Lisa; Wiechmann, Ingrid; Harbeck, Michaela; Thomas, Astrid; Grupe, Gisela; Projahn, Michaela; Scholz, Holger C; Riehm, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) recovered from plague victims of the second plague pandemic (14th to 17th century), excavated from two different burial sites in Germany, and spanning a time period of more than 300 years, was characterized using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. Of 30 tested skeletons 8 were positive for Yersinia pestis-specific nucleic acid, as determined by qPCR targeting the pla gene. In one individual (MP-19-II), the pla copy number in DNA extracted from tooth pulp was as high as 700 gene copies/μl, indicating severe generalized infection. All positive individuals were identical in all 16 SNP positions, separating phylogenetic branches within nodes N07_N10 (14 SNPs), N07_N08 (SNP s19) and N06_N07 (s545), and were highly similar to previously investigated plague victims from other European countries. Thus, beside the assumed continuous reintroduction of Y. pestis from central Asia in multiple waves during the second pandemic, long-term persistence of Y. pestis in Europe in a yet unknown reservoir host has also to be considered.

  7. Genotyping Yersinia pestis in Historical Plague: Evidence for Long-Term Persistence of Y. pestis in Europe from the 14th to the 17th Century

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Lisa; Wiechmann, Ingrid; Harbeck, Michaela; Thomas, Astrid; Grupe, Gisela; Projahn, Michaela; Scholz, Holger C.; Riehm, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) recovered from plague victims of the second plague pandemic (14th to 17th century), excavated from two different burial sites in Germany, and spanning a time period of more than 300 years, was characterized using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. Of 30 tested skeletons 8 were positive for Yersinia pestis-specific nucleic acid, as determined by qPCR targeting the pla gene. In one individual (MP-19-II), the pla copy number in DNA extracted from tooth pulp was as high as 700 gene copies/μl, indicating severe generalized infection. All positive individuals were identical in all 16 SNP positions, separating phylogenetic branches within nodes N07_N10 (14 SNPs), N07_N08 (SNP s19) and N06_N07 (s545), and were highly similar to previously investigated plague victims from other European countries. Thus, beside the assumed continuous reintroduction of Y. pestis from central Asia in multiple waves during the second pandemic, long-term persistence of Y. pestis in Europe in a yet unknown reservoir host has also to be considered. PMID:26760973

  8. Initial deployment of the 14th Parachutist Forward Surgical Team at the beginning of the operation Sangaris in Central African Republic.

    PubMed

    Malgras, Brice; Barbier, Olivier; Pasquier, Pierre; Petit, Ludovic; Polycarpe, Aristide; Rigal, Sylvain; Pons, Francois

    2015-05-01

    As part of the operation Sangaris begun in December 2013 in the Central African Republic, the 14th Parachutist Forward Surgical Team (FST) was deployed to support French troops. The FST (role 2 in the NATO classification) is a mobile surgical-medical treatment facility. The main goal of the FST is to assure the initial damage control surgery and resuscitation for combat casualties, allowing for the early evacuation to combat support hospitals (roles 3 or 4), where further treatments are completed. During the first trimester of the operation Sangaris, 42 patients were treated at FST, of whom 29 underwent surgery. Almost 50% of patients operated on were French servicemen. All admissions were emergency admissions. Orthopedic surgery represented two-thirds of surgical interventions executed as a result of the high proportion of limb injuries. Fifty percent of injuries were specifically linked to combat. Surgery in an FST is primarily dedicated to the treatment of combat casualties with hemorrhagic injuries, but additionally plays a part in supporting general medical care of French troops. Medical aid to the general civilian population is justifiable because of the presence of medical treatment facilities, even in the initial implementation of a military operation. PMID:25939107

  9. Distribution of HLA-B alleles in Mexican Amerindian populations.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Hernández-Pacheco, Guadalupe; Zuñiga, Joaquín; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Manuel; Pérez-Hernández, Nonanzit; Rangel, Carlos; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Martínez-Laso, Jorge; Granados, Julio; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2003-02-01

    In the present study we analyzed by PCR-SSO technique the HLA-B gene frequencies in 281 healthy individuals from four Mexican Amerindian populations (66 Mayos, 90 Mazatecans, 72 Nahuas and 53 Teenek). The most frequent alleles in all studied populations were HLA-B35, HLA-B39, and HLA-B40; however, some differences were observed between populations. The HLA-B35 allele was the most frequent in three of the four populations studied (Mayos, Nahuas and Teenek), whereas in Mazatecans the most frequent allele was HLA-B39. HLA-B40 presented frequencies higher than 10% in all groups. On the other hand, only Mayos presented an HLA-B51 gene frequency higher than 10%. When comparisons were made, important differences between groups were observed. The Teenek group presented an increased frequency of HLA-B35 when compared to Mazatecans and the HLA-B52 allele was increased in Nahuas and Teenek when compared to Mayos. An increased frequency of HLA-B39 was observed in Mazatecans when compared to Nahuas, Mayos and Teenek. Also, an increased frequency of HLA-B51 was observed in Mayos when compared to Mazatecans and Nahuas. These data corroborate the restricted polymorphism of HLA-B alleles and the high frequency of HLA-B35, HLA-B39 and HLA-B40 alleles in autochthonous American populations. In spite of the restriction in this polymorphism, differences in frequencies of HLA-B alleles could be helpful in distinguishing each of these populations.

  10. Employment and Disability: Trends and Issues for the 1990's. A Report on the 14th Mary E. Switzer Memorial Seminar (Washington, D.C., May 7-9, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Leonard G., Ed.; Hansen, Carl E., Ed.

    This report on the 14th Mary E. Switzer Memorial Seminar addresses trends and prospects for employment of persons with disabilities. The monograph begins with an introduction by Leonard G. Perlman and Carl E. Hansen, a foreword by Richard S. Materson, a list of seminar sponsors and Switzer scholars, a statement on the legacy of Mary Elizabeth…

  11. Environmental Education, The Last Measure of Man. An Anthology of Papers for the Consideration of the 14th and 15th Conference of the U.S. National Commission for UNESCO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Raymond F.

    An anthology of papers for consideration by delegates to the 14th and 15th conferences of the United States National Commission for UNESCO are presented in this book. As a wide-ranging collection of ideas, it is intended to serve as background materials for the conference theme - our responsibility for preserving and defending a human environment…

  12. Contribution of a Non-classical HLA Gene, HLA-DOA, to the Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yukinori; Suzuki, Akari; Ikari, Katsunori; Terao, Chikashi; Kochi, Yuta; Ohmura, Koichiro; Higasa, Koichiro; Akiyama, Masato; Ashikawa, Kyota; Kanai, Masahiro; Hirata, Jun; Suita, Naomasa; Teo, Yik-Ying; Xu, Huji; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Takahashi, Atsushi; Momozawa, Yukihide; Matsuda, Koichi; Momohara, Shigeki; Taniguchi, Atsuo; Yamada, Ryo; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Kubo, Michiaki; Brown, Matthew A; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Despite the progress in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) causal variant mapping, independent localization of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) risk from classical HLA genes is challenging. Here, we conducted a large-scale MHC fine-mapping analysis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a Japanese population (6,244 RA cases and 23,731 controls) population by using HLA imputation, followed by a multi-ethnic validation study including east Asian and European populations (n = 7,097 and 23,149, respectively). Our study identified an independent risk of a synonymous mutation at HLA-DOA, a non-classical HLA gene, on anti-citrullinated protein autoantibody (ACPA)-positive RA risk (p = 1.4 × 10(-9)), which demonstrated a cis-expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL) effect on HLA-DOA expression. Trans-ethnic comparison revealed different linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns in HLA-DOA and HLA-DRB1, explaining the observed HLA-DOA variant risk heterogeneity among ethnicities, which was most evident in the Japanese population. Although previous HLA fine-mapping studies have identified amino acid polymorphisms of the classical HLA genes as driving genetic susceptibility to disease, our study additionally identifies the dosage contribution of a non-classical HLA gene to disease etiology. Our study contributes to the understanding of HLA immunology in human diseases and suggests the value of incorporating additional ancestry in MHC fine-mapping. PMID:27486778

  13. HLA-B*51 and Behçet Disease.

    PubMed

    Gul, Ahmet; Ohno, Shigeaki

    2012-02-01

    Behçet disease (BD) is a multisystem inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology. BD has a multifactorial pathogenesis, and genetics plays a critical role in the development of the disease. Association of HLA-B5/B*51 has been recognized as the strongest genetic susceptibility factor for BD discovered so far. Pathogenic role of HLA-B*51 in BD has yet to be clarified, and available data suggest that there is possibly no single mechanism associated with HLA-B*51. HLA-B*51 may accomplish its effects as a combination of different HLA class I-associated functions and/or structural properties of HLA-B*51 heavy chain. There is no evidence supporting the use of HLA-B*51 as a diagnostic or prognostic marker for BD, and more clinical data must be collected in addition to basic immunological studies to exploit the potential of HLA-B*51 as a biomarker for BD management.

  14. A gene feature enumeration approach for describing HLA allele polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Mack, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    HLA genotyping via next generation sequencing (NGS) poses challenges for the use of HLA allele names to analyze and discuss sequence polymorphism. NGS will identify many new synonymous and non-coding HLA sequence variants. Allele names identify the types of nucleotide polymorphism that define an allele (non-synonymous, synonymous and non-coding changes), but do not describe how polymorphism is distributed among the individual features (the flanking untranslated regions, exons and introns) of a gene. Further, HLA alleles cannot be named in the absence of antigen-recognition domain (ARD) encoding exons. Here, a system for describing HLA polymorphism in terms of HLA gene features (GFs) is proposed. This system enumerates the unique nucleotide sequences for each GF in an HLA gene, and records these in a GF enumeration notation that allows both more granular dissection of allele-level HLA polymorphism and the discussion and analysis of GFs in the absence of ARD-encoding exon sequences.

  15. Close genetic linkage between HLA and renal glycosuria.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, S; Cecchin, E; Basile, A; Proto, G; Donadon, W; Jengo, A; Schinella, D; Jus, A; Villalta, D; De Paoli, P

    1984-01-01

    Renal glycosuria is an inherited disorder of renal tubule function in which significant amounts of glucose are excreted in the urine in the simultaneous presence of normal blood glucose levels. Renal glucose titration analyses and HLA genotypes were performed in 5 unrelated affected families with a total of 25 patients and 40 healthy relatives. In each family the gene responsible for renal glycosuria segregates with the HLA complex suggesting a close genetic linkage. 2 cases carry intra-HLA recombinant haplotypes; in these subjects our findings indicate that the abnormal gene is closer to the HLA-A locus than the HLA-B locus. No HLA-A, HLA-B or HLA-C specific antigen is selectively increased among the 5 unrelated families affected with renal glycosuria.

  16. Hereditary angioneurotic edema and HLA types in two Danish families.

    PubMed

    Eggert, J; Zachariae, H; Svejgaard, E; Svejgaard, A; Kissmeyer-Nielsen, F

    1982-01-01

    HLA types were determined in 19 patients and 9 healthy members of 2 Danish families with hereditary angioneurotic edema. The study revealed no connections between hereditary angioneurotic edema and the HLA system. PMID:7165360

  17. HLA typing from RNA-Seq sequence reads.

    PubMed

    Boegel, Sebastian; Löwer, Martin; Schäfer, Michael; Bukur, Thomas; de Graaf, Jos; Boisguérin, Valesca; Türeci, Ozlem; Diken, Mustafa; Castle, John C; Sahin, Ugur

    2012-01-01

    We present a method, seq2HLA, for obtaining an individual's human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II type and expression using standard next generation sequencing RNA-Seq data. RNA-Seq reads are mapped against a reference database of HLA alleles, and HLA type, confidence score and locus-specific expression level are determined. We successfully applied seq2HLA to 50 individuals included in the HapMap project, yielding 100% specificity and 94% sensitivity at a P-value of 0.1 for two-digit HLA types. We determined HLA type and expression for previously un-typed Illumina Body Map tissues and a cohort of Korean patients with lung cancer. Because the algorithm uses standard RNA-Seq reads and requires no change to laboratory protocols, it can be used for both existing datasets and future studies, thus adding a new dimension for HLA typing and biomarker studies. PMID:23259685

  18. Advantage of rare HLA supertype in HIV disease progression.

    PubMed

    Trachtenberg, Elizabeth; Korber, Bette; Sollars, Cristina; Kepler, Thomas B; Hraber, Peter T; Hayes, Elizabeth; Funkhouser, Robert; Fugate, Michael; Theiler, James; Hsu, Yen S; Kunstman, Kevin; Wu, Samuel; Phair, John; Erlich, Henry; Wolinsky, Steven

    2003-07-01

    The highly polymorphic human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules help to determine the specificity and repertoire of the immune response. The great diversity of these antigen-binding molecules confers differential advantages in responding to pathogens, but presents a major obstacle to distinguishing HLA allele-specific effects. HLA class I supertypes provide a functional classification for the many different HLA alleles that overlap in their peptide-binding specificities. We analyzed the association of these discrete HLA supertypes with HIV disease progression rates in a population of HIV-infected men. We found that HLA supertypes alone and in combination conferred a strong differential advantage in responding to HIV infection, independent of the contribution of single HLA alleles that associate with progression of the disease. The correlation of the frequency of the HLA supertypes with viral load suggests that HIV adapts to the most frequent alleles in the population, providing a selective advantage for those individuals who express rare alleles.

  19. Effect of HLA-B and HLA-DR genes on susceptibility to and severity of spondyloarthropathies in Mexican patients

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Alarcon, G; Londono, J; Hernandez-Pacheco, G; Pacheco-Tena, C; Castillo, E; Cardiel, M; Granados, J; Burgos-Vargas, R

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of HLA-B and HLA-DR genes as contributors to genetic susceptibility and clinical expression of the spondyloarthropathies (SpA) in the Mexican population. Methods: The study included 172 patients with SpA (undifferentiated SpA 83, ankylosing spondylitis (AS) 64, and reactive arthritis 25) and 99 healthy controls. The HLA-B and HLA-DR alleles were detected by the polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers technique. Patient assessment included demographic data, diagnostic categories, and disease patterns. Statistical methods included the Mantel-Haenzel χ2 test, Fisher's exact test, and Woolf method for odds ratio (OR). Differences of continuous variables between HLA allele groups were calculated by Student's t test. Results: Increased frequencies of HLA-B27 (pCh10-3, OR=28.7), HLA-DR1 (pC=0.045, OR=2.77), and HLA-B15 (p=0.034, pC=NS, OR=2.04) alleles in the whole group were found. HLA-B27 strength of association (OR) was 41.4 in AS; 20.9 in undifferentiated SpA; 27.2 in reactive arthritis. HLA-DR1 and HLA-B15 were increased in undifferentiated SpA (pC=0.045, OR=2.98 and p=0.004, pC=NS, OR=2.75). By analysing 58 HLA-B27 negative patients it was found that HLA-B15 and HLA-DR1 associations with SpA were independent of HLA-B27; increased frequencies of HLA-B15 were found in the whole SpA group and in patients with undifferentiated SpA (pC=0.03, OR=3.09 and pCh0.01, OR=3.77) and of HLA-DR1 in the latter (p=0.04, pC=NS, OR=3.15). HLA-B27 positive patients were younger than HLA-B27 negative patients at onset (p=0.03), but HLA-DR1 positive patients were older than HLA-DR1 negative patients (p=0.03). Bath indices for disease activity and functioning were higher in HLA-B27 positive patients (p=0.006 and p=0.004 v HLA-B27 negative patients). In contrast, neither HLA-DR1 nor HLA-B15 influenced these indices. Conclusion: Apart from HLA-B27, there is a significant association of HLA-DR1 and HLA-B15 with SpA in Mexicans which is

  20. Molecular basis for universal HLA-A*0201–restricted CD8+ T-cell immunity against influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Valkenburg, Sophie A.; Josephs, Tracy M.; Clemens, E. Bridie; Grant, Emma J.; Nguyen, Thi H. O.; Wang, George C.; Price, David A.; Miller, Adrian; Tong, Steven Y. C.; Thomas, Paul G.; Doherty, Peter C.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Gras, Stephanie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Memory CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for antigenic peptides derived from internal viral proteins confer broad protection against distinct strains of influenza A virus (IAV). However, immune efficacy can be undermined by the emergence of escape mutants. To determine how T-cell receptor (TCR) composition relates to IAV epitope variability, we used ex vivo peptide–HLA tetramer enrichment and single-cell multiplex analysis to compare TCRs targeted to the largely conserved HLA-A*0201-M158 and the hypervariable HLA-B*3501-NP418 antigens. The TCRαβs for HLA-B*3501-NP418+ CTLs varied among individuals and across IAV strains, indicating that a range of mutated peptides will prime different NP418-specific CTL sets. Conversely, a dominant public TRAV27/TRBV19+ TCRαβ was selected in HLA-A*0201+ donors responding to M158. This public TCR cross-recognized naturally occurring M158 variants complexed with HLA-A*0201. Ternary structures showed that induced-fit molecular mimicry underpins TRAV27/TRBV19+ TCR specificity for the WT and mutant M158 peptides, suggesting the possibility of universal CTL immunity in HLA-A*0201+ individuals. Combined with the high population frequency of HLA-A*0201, these data potentially explain the relative conservation of M158. Moreover, our results suggest that vaccination strategies aimed at generating broad protection should incorporate variant peptides to elicit cross-reactive responses against other specificities, especially those that may be relatively infrequent among IAV-primed memory CTLs. PMID:27036003

  1. Molecular basis for universal HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8+ T-cell immunity against influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Valkenburg, Sophie A; Josephs, Tracy M; Clemens, E Bridie; Grant, Emma J; Nguyen, Thi H O; Wang, George C; Price, David A; Miller, Adrian; Tong, Steven Y C; Thomas, Paul G; Doherty, Peter C; Rossjohn, Jamie; Gras, Stephanie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-04-19

    Memory CD8(+)T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for antigenic peptides derived from internal viral proteins confer broad protection against distinct strains of influenza A virus (IAV). However, immune efficacy can be undermined by the emergence of escape mutants. To determine how T-cell receptor (TCR) composition relates to IAV epitope variability, we used ex vivo peptide-HLA tetramer enrichment and single-cell multiplex analysis to compare TCRs targeted to the largely conserved HLA-A*0201-M158and the hypervariable HLA-B*3501-NP418antigens. The TCRαβs for HLA-B*3501-NP418 (+)CTLs varied among individuals and across IAV strains, indicating that a range of mutated peptides will prime different NP418-specific CTL sets. Conversely, a dominant public TRAV27/TRBV19(+)TCRαβ was selected in HLA-A*0201(+)donors responding to M158 This public TCR cross-recognized naturally occurring M158variants complexed with HLA-A*0201. Ternary structures showed that induced-fit molecular mimicry underpins TRAV27/TRBV19(+)TCR specificity for the WT and mutant M158peptides, suggesting the possibility of universal CTL immunity in HLA-A*0201(+)individuals. Combined with the high population frequency of HLA-A*0201, these data potentially explain the relative conservation of M158 Moreover, our results suggest that vaccination strategies aimed at generating broad protection should incorporate variant peptides to elicit cross-reactive responses against other specificities, especially those that may be relatively infrequent among IAV-primed memory CTLs. PMID:27036003

  2. Extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, M.D.; Smith, J.R.; Austin, R.K.; Kelleher, D.; Nepom, G.T.; Volk, B.; Kagnoff, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. The authors previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II ..beta..-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. They now report the isolation of this ..beta..-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP ..beta..-chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP ..beta..-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP..cap alpha..-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis. Celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion.

  3. HLA Type Inference via Haplotypes Identical by Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setty, Manu N.; Gusev, Alexander; Pe'Er, Itsik

    The Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) genes play a major role in adaptive immune response and are used to differentiate self antigens from non self ones. HLA genes are hyper variable with nearly every locus harboring over a dozen alleles. This variation plays an important role in susceptibility to multiple autoimmune diseases and needs to be matched on for organ transplantation. Unfortunately, HLA typing by serological methods is time consuming and expensive compared to high throughput Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) data. We present a new computational method to infer per-locus HLA types using shared segments Identical By Descent (IBD), inferred from SNP genotype data. IBD information is modeled as graph where shared haplotypes are explored among clusters of individuals with known and unknown HLA types to identify the latter. We analyze performance of the method in a previously typed subset of the HapMap population, achieving accuracy of 96% in HLA-A, 94% in HLA-B, 95% in HLA-C, 77% in HLA-DR1, 93% in HLA-DQA1 and 90% in HLA-DQB1 genes. We compare our method to a tag SNP based approach and demonstrate higher sensitivity and specificity. Our method demonstrates the power of using shared haplotype segments for large-scale imputation at the HLA locus.

  4. Production of human anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, M.C.; Mercier, F.; Roger, J.; Varin, M.

    1986-03-01

    Only 40% of the several hundred anti-HLA murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that have been made detect HLA-A,B,C or DR specificities previously defined by human alloantisera, the range of recognized specificities is very narrow, and few of the MAbs have proven useful as tissue typing reagents. In hopes of obtaining HLA typing reagents, the authors are developing a protocol for the production of human anti-HLA MAbs from HLA-antigen (Ag) immunized peripheral blood B cells of volunteering renal patients, immunized to one or more HLA Ags through therapeutic blood transfusions. A simple enrichment of the donor B cells has not been sufficient for anti-HLA MAb production, the authors are currently delineating the conditions necessary for increasing the number of HLA-specific donor B cells by in vitro stimulation with cells expressing the HLA Ag to which the B cell donor is immunized. For the production of MAbs, the stimulated B cells are transformed with Epstein-Barr virus and subsequently fused with KR-4 lymphoblastoid cells. Hybridomas are selected by HAT and Ouabain. Supernatants are screened for anti-HLA activity against lymphocyte targets expressing the original immunizing HLA Ag by complement mediated /sup 51/Cr release assay. Antibody specificity is determined by the complement-dependent microcytotoxicity test used for HLA typing.

  5. Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA) Pipeline Progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Rachel E.; Casertano, S.; Lindsay, K.

    2013-01-01

    The HLA maintains a strong commitment to continuing improvement of our Hubble Space Telescope data processing pipelines with the goal of generating better science-ready data products. The HLA image processing pipeline is transitioning from the use of MultiDrizzle to AstroDrizzle for image registration and combination. It is expected that this change will allow for the creation of higher quality science products with improved astrometric solutions. Headerlets, a newly developed tool for AstroDrizzle, will be utilized and made available to simplify access to multiple astrometric solutions for a given data set. The capabilities of AstroDrizzle will allow for functionally simplified data processing, standardizing and streamlining the data reduction process and making it easier for users to reproduce our results. We are beginning with the HLA WFC3 data processing pipeline, and then plan to extend its application to other HST instrument data.

  6. HLA and autoimmune endocrine disease 1985.

    PubMed

    Farid, N R; Thompson, C

    1986-02-01

    We typed patient groups with type I diabetes (n = 78), Graves' disease (n = 81), goitrous autoimmune (n = 52), "silent" (n = 18) and postpartum thyroiditis (n = 15) for human leucocyte antigens (HLA) A, B, C, DR and DQ. The results were compared to those obtained from 256 healthy controls typed for HLA-A, -B, -C and 140 typed for -DR. All these 140 controls were genotyped. Previously described associations of DR3 (OR (odds ratio) = 2.68, p less than 0.005) and DR4 (OR = 3.26, p less than 0.0001) in type I diabetes is confirmed. In this series, however, HLA-DR3/DR4 heterozygotes were apparently at no greater risk for type I diabetes than DR3 or DR4 homozygotes. The relative risk conferred by DR3/DR4 heterozygotes (6.48) was less than that for DR3 homozygosity (2.8), suggesting a recessive major histocompatibility complex-related susceptibility to type I diabetes. Graves' disease was associated with DR3 (OR = 3.02, p less than 0.0005); the increased frequency of DR3 homozygotes in this series is consistent with recessive HLA-linked susceptibility to Graves' disease proposed on the basis of family data. Hashimoto's thyroiditis, on the other hand, was associated with HLA-DR4 (OR = 3.08, p less than 0.0001), the latter finding confirming our earlier report on 21 patients. The increase of HLA-DR4 in both post-partum and silent thyroiditis suggests that these conditions are immunogenetically related, and may well represent variants of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis.

  7. [HLA antigens in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Rumba, I V; Sochnev, A M; Kukaĭne, E M; Burshteĭn, A M; Benevolenskaia, L I

    1990-01-01

    Antigens of I class HLA system (locus A and B) were investigated in 67 patients of Latvian nationality suffering from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Associations of HLA antigens with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis partially coincided with the ones revealed earlier. Typing established an increased incidence of antigen B27 (p less than 0.01) and gaplotype A2, B40 (p less than 0.01). Antigen B15 possessed a protective action with respect to JRA. Interlocus combinations demonstrated a closer association with the disease than a single antigen. The authors also revealed markers of various clinico-anatomical variants of JRA.

  8. Frequencies of allele groups HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 in a population from the northwestern region of São Paulo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ayo, C M; da Silveira Camargo, A V; Xavier, D H; Batista, M F; Carneiro, O A; Brandão de Mattos, C C; Ricci, O; de Mattos, L C

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 allele groups frequencies in a population of 1559 volunteer bone marrow donors from the northwestern region of São Paulo State grouped according to ethnicity. An additional objective was to compare the allele frequencies of the current study with data published for other Brazilian populations. The allele groups were characterized by the PCR-rSSO method using Luminex(®) technology. Twenty HLA-A, 32 HLA-B and 13 HLA-DRB1 allele groups were identified. The most common allele groups in European descent and mixed African and European descent samples were HLA-A*02, HLA-B*35 and HLA-DRB1*13, while HLA-A*02, HLA-B*35 and HLA-DRB1*11 were more common in African descent samples. The HLA-A*23, HLA-A*36, HLA-B*58 and HLA-B*81 allele groups were more common in sample from African descent than European descent, and the HLA-DRB1*08 was more common in mixed African and European descent than in European descent. Allele group frequencies were compared with samples from other Brazilian regions. The HLA-A*30 and HLA-A*23 were more common in this study than in the populations of Rio Grande do Sul and Paraná; and the HLA-A*01, HLA-B*18, HLA-B*57 and HLA-DRB1*11 were more common in this study than in the population of Piauí. The least frequent allele groups were HLA-A*31, HLA-B*15, HLA-B*40 and HLA-DRB1*08 for the population of Piauí, HLA-A*01 and HLA-A*11 for Parana, HLA-A*02 and -A*03 for Rio Grande do Sul and HLA-DRB1*04 for Paraná, Rio Grande do Sul and Piauí. These data provide an overview on the knowledge on HLA diversity in the population of the northwestern region of São Paulo State and show that the genes of this system are useful to distinguish different ethnic groups.

  9. Familial spontaneous pneumothorax in three generations and its HLA.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Akitoshi; Takeda, Yoshitaka; Hayashi, Satoru; Shimizu, Kazuta

    2003-09-01

    We experienced a case of familial spontaneous pneumothorax in three generations. Six of 13 family members had episodes of spontaneous pneumothorax. It is well established that there are some diseases associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA). We performed HLA phenotyping for HLA of A, B and C. In our study, we detected the HLA haplotype A2, B61 in three of 4 who had episodes of spontaneous pneumothorax. The HLA haplotype A2, B70 were also detected in three of 4 who had episodes. This suggests that familial spontaneous pneumothorax might have hereditary factors.

  10. HLA polymorphism in the Havasupai: Evidence for balancing selection

    SciTech Connect

    Markow, T.; Hedrick, P.W.; Armstrong, C.; Martin, J. ); Zuerlein, K. ); Vyvial, T.; Danilov, J.

    1993-10-01

    The characterization and analysis of genetic variation at the HLA loci provides important insight for population geneticists trying to understand the evolutionary forces that have shaped human populations. This study describes the HLA-A and HLA-B loci serotyping and statistical analysis on an isolated Native American population, the Havasupai of Arizona. Four alleles at the HLA-A locus were identified, while eight alleles were found at the HLA-B locus. These variants were present as 20 of 32 potential two-locus haplotypes, with five of the six most common haplotypes exhibiting high positive linkage disequilibrium. Significant homozygote deficiency (heterozygosity excess) was detected both at HLA-A and at HLA-B. This deviation from Hardy-Weinberg proportions was not attributable to nonselective causes such as different alleles at both HLA-A and HLA-B was more even than expected from neutrality theory; that is, the observed Hardy-Weinberg homozygosity was only 62.4% of that expected under neutrality. These observations suggest that balancing selection is of major importance in maintaining genetic variation at HLA-A and HLA-B. 52 refs., 5 tabs.

  11. Abnormal urothelial HLA-DR expression in interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T J; Bottazzo, G F

    1992-03-01

    Interstitial cystitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the urinary bladder that predominantly afflicts middle-age women. The end stage of the disease is ulceration of the urothelium, the so-called Hunner's ulcer. The aetiology of interstitial cystitis remains obscure. We have studied bladder biopsies from 22 cases of interstitial cystitis and control groups consisting of six cases of bacterial cystitis and eight healthy women. Indirect immunofluorescence was performed on the biopsies using murine MoAbs to human HLA class I molecules, and class II molecules, HLA-DP, HLA-DQ and HLA-DR. In interstitial cystitis, bacterial cystitis and normal controls most cells expressed HLA class I products. In six cases of interstitial cystitis and one case of bacterial cystitis there was evidence of HLA class I hyperexpression. In normal bladder and bacterial cystitis HLA class II expression was restricted to submucosal dendritic cells, Langerhans cells macrophages, vascular endothelial cells and activated lymphocytes. All but two cases of interstitial cystitis showed surface expression of HLA-DR (but not HLA-DP or DQ). In all cases of interstitial cystitis there was an increase in the numbers of macrophages, activated lymphocytes and vascular endothelial cells expressing HLA class II molecules within the submucosa. These findings provide further evidence for the importance of inappropriate HLA molecule expression in a disease suspected of having an autoimmune pathogenesis and where cellular autoimmune mechanisms play a decisive role in the destruction of the target cells--the bladder urothelium.

  12. From HLA typing to anti-HLA antibody detection and beyond: The road ahead.

    PubMed

    Picascia, Antonietta; Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Napoli, Claudio

    2016-10-01

    The complex polymorphism of the HLA genes and the need of a proper identification of anti-HLA antibodies have led to continuously develop novel practical and feasible technologies in the field of organ and tissue transplantation. Technologies to identify HLA molecules have evolved from the serological to the molecular methods and a true innovation in the DNA sequencing has taken place with the development of next generation sequencing. An interesting field to explore is how the information resulting from the HLA-DNA sequencing can be applied in the clinical setting by including the alloimmunization assessment. Indeed, a good characterization of anti-HLA antibody at epitope level can reduce the risk of immunization. Many anti-HLA antibodies are specific for epitopes rather than for HLA antigens and the knowledge of unacceptable epitopes allows to reduce the number of mismatched antigens. Furthermore, high resolution HLA allele typing could help to understand the epitopes against which antibodies are developed. However, the improvements should not only concern the diagnostic tools in the pre-transplantation phase, but also the monitoring of post transplantation outcome. There is a growing interest in developing new non-invasive biomarkers to monitor the rejection. Currently, increasing evidence has focused on miRNAs, epigenetic markers emerged as regulators of molecular events that are differently expressed in biopsies and blood as well as in urinary samples of transplanted recipients. The implementation of next generation sequencing and genome-wide expression analysis together with functional assays may provide useful tools to evaluate the epigenetic modulation in transplantation biology but many efforts are requested for translating in the clinical arena the results obtained in experimental models. PMID:27531697

  13. The frequency of HLA alleles in the Romanian population.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Ileana; Boșcaiu, Voicu; Cianga, Petru; Dinu, Andrei-Antoniu; Gai, Elena; Melinte, Mihaela; Moise, Ana

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequencies is essential for bone marrow and kidney donor searches. The Romanian Caucasian population is heterogeneous and information on HLA polymorphism has not been well studied. We characterized the HLA genetic profile and allele frequencies of regional populations in Romania. HLA-A, B and DRB1 alleles were examined in 8252 individuals, belonging to the four main regions of Romania. The most common alleles found in the Romanian population are the following: HLA-A*01, A*02, A*03, A*11, A*24; HLA-B*18, B*35, B*44, B*51 and HLA-DRB1*01, DRB1*03, DRB1*07, DRB1*11, DRB1*13, DRB1*15, DRB1*16. More than half of the alleles are non-homogeneously spread in Romania. These results provide a starting point for future analyses of genetic heterogeneity in Romania.

  14. The frequency of HLA alleles in the Romanian population.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Ileana; Boșcaiu, Voicu; Cianga, Petru; Dinu, Andrei-Antoniu; Gai, Elena; Melinte, Mihaela; Moise, Ana

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequencies is essential for bone marrow and kidney donor searches. The Romanian Caucasian population is heterogeneous and information on HLA polymorphism has not been well studied. We characterized the HLA genetic profile and allele frequencies of regional populations in Romania. HLA-A, B and DRB1 alleles were examined in 8252 individuals, belonging to the four main regions of Romania. The most common alleles found in the Romanian population are the following: HLA-A*01, A*02, A*03, A*11, A*24; HLA-B*18, B*35, B*44, B*51 and HLA-DRB1*01, DRB1*03, DRB1*07, DRB1*11, DRB1*13, DRB1*15, DRB1*16. More than half of the alleles are non-homogeneously spread in Romania. These results provide a starting point for future analyses of genetic heterogeneity in Romania. PMID:26711124

  15. [Preliminary study on HLA-B genotyping by oligonucleotide chips].

    PubMed

    Lan, Ke; Hu, Shou-Wang; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Hui; Guan, Wei; Ding, Yu; Sun, Ou-Jun; Wang, Sheng-Qi

    2003-04-01

    HLA genes constitute a highly polymorphic multigene system. In the present study, HLA-B oligonucleotide chips were manufactured by using a set of sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes derived from polymorphic regions in exon 2 and exon 3 of HLA-B gene spotted by microarrayer onto the aldehyde modified glass slides. In addition, the sequenced HLA-B gene clones used as standard samples were amplified from exon 2 and exon 3 by PCR. Together with the correct hybridization and wash conditions, the PCR products were bound with the array probes on the chip, and the hybridization patterns were transformed to HLA-B genotypes. The results showed that the genotypes of standard samples by the HLA-B oligonucleotide chips were completely identical with the sequenced clones. In conclusion, the oligonucleotide chip method presented here for HLA-B genotyping is a rapid, accurate, sensitive and attractive high throughput biochemical way.

  16. The structure of HLA-DR52c: Comparison to other HLA-DRB3 alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Shaodong; Crawford, Frances; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W.

    2008-09-05

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHCII) molecules present antigens to CD4{sup +} T cells. In addition to the most commonly studied human MHCII isotype, HLA-DR, whose {beta} chain is encoded by the HLA-DRB1 locus, several other isotypes that use the same {alpha} chain but have {beta} chains encoded by other genes. These other DR molecules also are expressed in antigen-presenting cells and are known to participate in peptide presentation to T cells and to be recognized as alloantigens by other T cells. Like some of the HLA-DRB1 alleles, several of these alternate DR molecules have been associated with specific autoimmune diseases and T cell hypersensitivity. Here we present the structure of an HLA-DR molecule (DR52c) containing one of these alternate {beta} chains (HLA-DRB3*0301) bound to a self-peptide derived from the Tu elongation factor. The molecule shares structurally conserved elements with other MHC class II molecules but has some unique features in the peptide-binding groove. Comparison of the three major HLA-DBR3 alleles (DR52a, b, and c) suggests that they were derived from one another by recombination events that scrambled the four major peptide-binding pockets at peptide positions 1, 4, 6, and 9 but left virtually no polymorphisms elsewhere in the molecules.

  17. Identification of the new HLA-DRB1{sup *}0812 allele detected by sequencing based typing

    SciTech Connect

    Versluis, L.F.; Zwan, A.W. van der; Tilanus, M.G.J.; Savelkoul, P.H.M.; Berg-Loonen, E.M. van den

    1996-12-31

    HLA-DRB typing by polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific priming (PCR-SSP) and sequencing based typing (SBT) was studied within the framework of the Antigen and Haplotype Society 11 and the Sequencing Based Typing Component of the Twelfth International HLA workshop. Sequencing was performed as described by McGinnis and co-workers in 1995 on coded samples, including most DR2 subtypes, resulting in high resolution HLA-DR typing. Sequences were compared with a database containing 107 DRB1, four DRB3, and five DRB5 alleles in a similar way as described for HLA-DPB. One sample showed a new DR8 sequence, indicating the presence of a new allele. This individual (4390) is of Indonesian origin. The specific amplification of the DR8 allele and subsequent sequencing resulted in a sequence which did not match the database and new polymorphism was identified. The complementary strand was sequenced and confirmed the presence of a new DRB1 allele. Cloning and subsequent sequencing of the polymerase chain reaction fragment resulted in confirmation of the direct sequence data. Later this variant was officially named DRB1{sup *}0812. The complete nucleotide sequence of exon 2 of this new allele is shown. This allele differs from DRB1{sup *}0810 by one nucleotide at codon 85, resulting in an alanine (GTT), whereas DRB1{sup *}0810 carries a valine (GCT). 5 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Imputing Variants in HLA-DR Beta Genes Reveals That HLA-DRB1 Is Solely Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwangwoo; Bang, So-Young; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jun, Jae-Bum; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Jisoo; Chung, Won Tae; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Nath, Swapan K.; Lee, Hye-Soon; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    The genetic association of HLA-DRB1 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is well documented, but association with other HLA-DR beta genes (HLA-DRB3, HLA-DRB4 and HLA-DRB5) has not been thoroughly studied, despite their similar functions and chromosomal positions. We examined variants in all functional HLA-DR beta genes in RA and SLE patients and controls, down to the amino-acid level, to better understand disease association with the HLA-DR locus. To this end, we improved an existing HLA reference panel to impute variants in all protein-coding HLA-DR beta genes. Using the reference panel, HLA variants were inferred from high-density SNP data of 9,271 RA-control subjects and 5,342 SLE-control subjects. Disease association tests were performed by logistic regression and log-likelihood ratio tests. After imputation using the newly constructed HLA reference panel and statistical analysis, we observed that HLA-DRB1 variants better accounted for the association between MHC and susceptibility to RA and SLE than did the other three HLA-DRB variants. Moreover, there were no secondary effects in HLA-DRB3, HLA-DRB4, or HLA-DRB5 in RA or SLE. Of all the HLA-DR beta chain paralogs, those encoded by HLA-DRB1 solely or dominantly influence susceptibility to RA and SLE. PMID:26919467

  19. HLA-related lymphocyte responsiveness in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Gross, W L; Vorwerk, I; Westphal, E; Christophers, E; Hahn, G; Schlaak, M

    1983-01-01

    In order to find associations among the genetic, immunological and environmental factors that might be important in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, the relationship between streptococcal antigen- or mitogen-induced lymphocyte responses in vitro and HLA phenotypes was studied in 23 patients with psoriasis. Patients showed an elevated lymphocyte response to somatic A-streptococcal antigens when compared with healthy controls. In contrast, the response to mitogens (PHA, Con A, PWM) was impaired in patients with psoriasis. The impaired mitogen-induced lymphocyte transformation was found mostly in psoriatics with HLA-B13/B17. The elevated cellular immune response to somatic A-streptococcal antigens, on the other hand, was observed mainly in psoriatics without HLA-B13/B17. The results indicate that gene products of the HLA region known to be associated with psoriasis are involved in the cellular immune response, as expected from clinical trials. These findings also provide further evidence of at least two different subtypes of psoriasis, characterized by genetically and immunologically defined markers.

  20. Serum antibodies to human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-E, HLA-F and HLA-G in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) during disease flares: Clinical relevance of HLA-F autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Jucaud, V; Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Morales-Buenrostro, L E; Hiepe, F; Rose, T; Biesen, R

    2016-03-01

    T lymphocyte hyperactivity and progressive inflammation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients results in over-expression of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-Ib on the surface of lymphocytes. These are shed into the circulation upon inflammation, and may augment production of antibodies promoting pathogenicity of the disease. The objective was to evaluate the association of HLA-Ib (HLA-E, HLA-F and HLA-G) antibodies to the disease activity of SLE. The immunoglobulin (Ig)G/IgM reactivity to HLA-Ib and β2m in the sera of 69 German, 29 Mexican female SLE patients and 17 German female controls was measured by multiplex Luminex(®)-based flow cytometry. The values were expressed as mean flourescence intensity (MFI). Only the German SLE cohort was analysed in relation to the clinical disease activity. In the controls, anti-HLA-G IgG predominated over other HLA-Ib antibodies, whereas SLE patients had a preponderance of anti-HLA-F IgG over the other HLA-Ib antibodies. The disease activity index, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI)-2000, was reflected only in the levels of anti-HLA-F IgG. Anti-HLA-F IgG with MFI level of 500-1999 was associated with active SLE, whereas inactive SLE revealed higher MFI (>2000). When anti-HLA-F IgG were cross-reactive with other HLA-Ib alleles, their reactivity was reflected in the levels of anti-HLA-E and -G IgG. The prevalence of HLA-F-monospecific antibodies in SLE patients was also associated with the clinical disease activity. Anti-HLA-F IgG is possibly involved in the clearance of HLA-F shed from lymphocytes and inflamed tissues to lessen the disease's severity, and thus emerges as a beneficial immune biomarker. Therefore, anti-HLA-Ib IgG should be considered as a biomarker in standard SLE diagnostics.

  1. HLA-G and classical HLA class I expression in primary colorectal cancer and associated liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Swets, Marloes; König, Marion H; Zaalberg, Anniek; Dekker-Ensink, Neeltje G; Gelderblom, Hans; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; van den Elsen, Peter J; Kuppen, Peter J K

    2016-09-01

    De novo expression of HLA-G has been demonstrated in colorectal cancer. HLA-G, amongst others, inhibits natural killer cell function, contributing to host immune defense evasion. Another mechanism to escape anti-tumor immunity is loss of HLA class I. Therefore, we determined HLA-G and HLA class I expression on primary colorectal tumors and associated liver metastases, in order to get insight in the metastasizing process regarding escaping anti-tumor immunity. HLA-G expression was evaluated using three mAbs; 4H84, MEM-G/1 and MEM-G/2. In total 81 colorectal cancer patients were evaluated. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections of primary tumors and associated liver metastases, were immunohistochemically stained. A concordance between expression or loss/downregulation in the primary tumor and associated liver metastasis regarding HLA class I expression was observed in 80% of the cases. In contrast with the hypothesis of escaping NK cell-killing, we demonstrated for each HLA-G detecting mAbs used in this study, that the majority of the primary tumors that positively stained for HLA-G did not express HLA-G in the associated liver metastasis. Furthermore, we revealed the existence of non-specific binding and in addition we found that the different epitopes of HLA-G detected by 4H84, MEM-G/1 and MEM-G/2 mAbs were expressed differentially in colorectal tumor tissues.

  2. HLA-DQ rather than HLA-DR region might be involved in dominant nonsusceptibility to diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Sterkers, G; Zeliszewski, D; Chaussée, A M; Deschamps, I; Font, M P; Freidel, C; Hors, J; Betuel, H; Dausset, J; Levy, J P

    1988-01-01

    Since HLA-DRw15 (a subdivision of the HLA-DR2 specificity previously called DR2 long) is associated with dominant nonsusceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), while HLA-DRw16 (another subdivision of HLA-DR2, previously called DR2 short) is positively associated with the disease, we looked for particular characteristics of HLA products encoded by the DR2 haplotypes of IDDM patients. The results show the following: (i) HLA-DQ molecules of HLA-DRw15-positive IDDM patients are different from those of HLA-DRw15-positive controls, suggesting that the HLA-DQ gene of DRw15 haplotypes is involved in a protective effect. (ii) HLA-DR and -DQ products of DRw16-positive IDDM are functionally indistinguishable from those of HLA-DRw16-positive controls. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that the residue at position 57 on the DQ beta chain could play a crucial biological role in antigen presentation to T cells as far as the DRw16 haplotype is concerned. This observation fits with the recent observation of correlation between DQ beta allelic polymorphism at position 57 and both susceptibility and resistance to IDDM. PMID:2901099

  3. HLA Class I and II Blocks Are Associated to Susceptibility, Clinical Subtypes and Autoantibodies in Mexican Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Reyna, Tatiana S.; Mercado-Velázquez, Pamela; Yu, Neng; Alosco, Sharon; Ohashi, Marina; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Granados, Julio; Zúñiga, Joaquin; Yunis, Edmond

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphism studies in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) have yielded variable results. These studies need to consider the genetic admixture of the studied population. Here we used our previously reported definition of genetic admixture of Mexicans using HLA class I and II DNA blocks to map genetic susceptibility to develop SSc and its complications. Methods We included 159 patients from a cohort of Mexican Mestizo SSc patients. We performed clinical evaluation, obtained SSc-associated antibodies, and determined HLA class I and class II alleles using sequence-based, high-resolution techniques to evaluate the contribution of these genes to SSc susceptibility, their correlation with the clinical and autoantibody profile and the prevalence of Amerindian, Caucasian and African alleles, blocks and haplotypes in this population. Results Our study revealed that class I block HLA-C*12:03-B*18:01 was important to map susceptibility to diffuse cutaneous (dc) SSc, HLA-C*07:01-B*08:01 block to map the susceptibility role of HLA-B*08:01 to develop SSc, and the C*07:02-B*39:05 and C*07:02-B*39:06 blocks to map the protective role of C*07:02 in SSc. We also confirmed previous associations of HLA-DRB1*11:04 and –DRB1*01 to susceptibility to develop SSc. Importantly, we mapped the protective role of DQB1*03:01 using three Amerindian blocks. We also found a significant association for the presence of anti-Topoisomerase I antibody with HLA-DQB1*04:02, present in an Amerindian block (DRB1*08:02-DQB1*04:02), and we found several alleles associated to internal organ damage. The admixture estimations revealed a lower proportion of the Amerindian genetic component among SSc patients. Conclusion This is the first report of the diversity of HLA class I and II alleles and haplotypes Mexican patients with SSc. Our findings suggest that HLA class I and class II genes contribute to the protection and susceptibility to develop SSc and its different clinical

  4. The Potential of HLA-G-Bearing Extracellular Vesicles as a Future Element in HLA-G Immune Biology

    PubMed Central

    Rebmann, Vera; König, Lisa; Nardi, Fabiola da Silva; Wagner, Bettina; Manvailer, Luis Felipe Santos; Horn, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    The HLA-G molecule is a member of the non-classical HLA class I family. Its surface expression is physiologically restricted to the maternal–fetal interface and to immune privileged adult tissues. Despite the restricted tissue expression, HLA-G is detectable in body fluids as secreted soluble molecules. A unique feature of HLA-G is the structural diversity as surface expressed and as secreted molecules. Secreted HLA-G can be found in various body fluids either as free soluble HLA-G or as part of extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are composed of various antigens/ligands/receptors, bioactive lipids, cytokines, growth factors, and genetic information, such as mRNA and microRNA. Functionally, HLA-G and its secreted forms are considered to play a crucial role in the network of immune-regulatory tolerance mechanisms, preferentially interacting with the cognate inhibitory receptors LILRB1 and LILRB2. The HLA-G mediated tolerance is described in processes of pregnancy, inflammation, and cancer. However, almost all functional and clinical implications of HLA-G in vivo and in vitro have been established based on simple single ligand/receptor interactions at the cell surface, whereas HLA-G-bearing EVs were in minor research focus. Indeed, cytotrophoblast cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and cancer cells were recently described to secrete HLA-G-bearing EVs, displaying immunosuppressive effects and modulating the tumor microenvironment. However, numerous functional and clinical open questions persist. Here, we (i) introduce basic aspects of EVs biology, (ii) summarize the functional knowledge, clinical implications and open questions of HLA-G-bearing EVs, and (iii) discuss HLA-G-bearing EVs as a future element in HLA-G biology. PMID:27199995

  5. A catalog of HLA type, HLA expression, and neo-epitope candidates in human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Boegel, Sebastian; Löwer, Martin; Bukur, Thomas; Sahin, Ugur; Castle, John C

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cell lines are a tremendous resource for cancer biology and therapy development. These multipurpose tools are commonly used to examine the genetic origin of cancers, to identify potential novel tumor targets, such as tumor antigens for vaccine devel­opment, and utilized to screen potential therapies in preclinical studies. Mutations, gene expression, and drug sensitivity have been determined for many cell lines using next-generation sequencing (NGS). However, the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) type and HLA expression of tumor cell lines, characterizations necessary for the development of cancer vaccines, have remained largely incomplete and, such information, when available, has been distributed in many publications. Here, we determine the 4-digit HLA type and HLA expression of 167 cancer and 10 non-cancer cell lines from publically available RNA-Seq data. We use standard NGS RNA-Seq short reads from “whole transcriptome” sequencing, map reads to known HLA types, and statistically determine HLA type, heterozygosity, and expression. First, we present previously unreported HLA Class I and II genotypes. Second, we determine HLA expression levels in each cancer cell line, providing insights into HLA downregulation and loss in cancer. Third, using these results, we provide a fundamental cell line “barcode” to track samples and prevent sample annotation swaps and contamination. Fourth, we integrate the cancer cell-line specific HLA types and HLA expression with available cell-line specific mutation information and existing HLA binding prediction algorithms to make a catalog of predicted antigenic mutations in each cell line. The compilation of our results are a fundamental resource for all researchers selecting specific cancer cell lines based on the HLA type and HLA expression, as well as for the development of immunotherapeutic tools for novel cancer treatment modalities. PMID:25960936

  6. Presentation of human minor histocompatibility antigens by HLA-B35 and HLA-B38 molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, J; Kariyone, A; Akiyama, N; Kano, K; Takiguchi, M

    1990-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones specific for human minor histocompatibility antigens (hmHAs) were produced from a patient who had been grafted with the kidneys from his mother and two HLA-identical sisters. Of eight CTL clones generated, four recognized an hmHA (hmHA-1) expressed on cells from the mother and sister 3 (second donor); two recognized another antigen (hmHA-2) on cells from the father, sister 2 (third donor), and sister 3; and the remaining two clones recognized still another antigen (hmHA-3) on cells from the father and sister 3. Panel studies revealed that CTL recognition of hmHA-1 was restricted by HLA-B35 and that of hmHA-2 and hmHA-3 was restricted by HLA-B38. The HLA-B35 restriction of the hmHA-1-specific CTL clones was substantiated by the fact that they killed HLA-A null/HLA-B null Hmy2CIR targets transfected with HLA-B35 but not HLA-B51, -Bw52, or -Bw53 transfected Hmy2CIR targets. These data demonstrated that the five amino acids substitutions on the alpha 1 domain between HLA-B35 and -Bw53, which are associated with Bw4/Bw6 epitopes, play a critical role in the relationship of hmHA-1 to HLA-B35 molecules. The fact that the hmHA-1-specific CTLs failed to kill Hmy2CIR cells expressing HLA-B35/51 chimeric molecules composed of the alpha 1 domain of HLA-B35 and other domains of HLA-B51 indicated that eight residues on the alpha 2 domain also affect the interaction of hmHA-1 and the HLA-B35 molecules. PMID:2157206

  7. The HLA-DRB1 allele polymorphisms and nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huimin; Yu, Kaihui; Zhang, Ruoheng; Li, Jiatong; Wei, Xiaomou; Zhang, Yuening; Zhang, Chengdong; Xiao, Feifan; Zhao, Dong; Lin, Xuandong; Wu, Huayu; Yang, Xiaoli

    2016-06-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 has been reported to influence individual's susceptibility to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) by many studies in recent years; however, these studies provided controversial results. The meta-analysis was thus conducted here to estimate the relationship between HLA-DRB1 polymorphisms and NPC. After an extensive review of journals from various databases (PubMed, the Web of Science, Embase, China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI), and Wanfang Database), 8 out of 69 case-control studies, including 778 cases and 1148 controls, were extracted. The results showed that 4 of 13 polymorphisms allele are statistically significantly associated with NPC, among them, HLA-DRB1*3, HLA-DRB1*9, and HLA-DRB1*10 may increase the risk of NPC while HLA-DRB1*01 has the opposite effect. The pooled odds ratio and 95 % confidence interval (CI) were 1.702 [95 % CI (1.047, 2.765)], 1.363 [95 % CI (1.029, 1.806)], 1.989 [95 % CI (1.042, 3.799)], and 0.461 [95 % CI (0.315, 0.676)], respectively. In a further ethnicity-based subgroup analysis, HLA-DRB1*08, HLA-DRB1*11, and HLA-DRB1*16 were found to be linked with NPC in Asian, Tunisian, and Caucasian, respectively. In Asian, HLA-DRB1*03, 08, and 10 may elevate the risk whereas HLA-DRB1*09 could lower it. In Tunisian, HLA-DRB1*01 and 11 are the protective factors while HLA-DRB1*03 is the only risk factor. In Caucasian, HLA-DRB1*01 and 03 increase the risk and HLA-DRB1*16 lowers it. The most frequent statistically associated gene is found to be HLA-DRB1*03 which has protective influence on Asian and Tunisian. In conclusion, HLA-DRB1*01, DRB1*03, DRB1*09, and DRB1*10 are related with NPC susceptibility, and the association of HLA-DRB1*08, DRB1*11, and DRB1*16 with NPC risk are significantly different in different ethnicities. PMID:27059731

  8. HLA polymorphism in three indigenous populations of Sabah and Sarawak.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, J S; Shahnaz, M; Azrena, A; Irda, Y A; Salawati, M; Too, C L; Lee, Y Y

    2010-02-01

    One hundred and fifty-eight Kadazan, Iban and Bidayuh individuals registered with the Malaysian Marrow Donor Registry were typed for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, HLA-B and HLA-DR. Six, seven and eight HLA-A alleles as well as 13, 15 and 16 HLA-B alleles were detected in the Kadazan, Bidayuh and Iban, respectively. The most common HLA-A allele in all three groups was HLA-A*24 with a frequency of 0.456, 0.490 and 0.422 in the Kadazan, Bidayuh and Iban, respectively. The most common HLA-B allele detected in the Kadazan was HLA-B*40 with a frequency of 0.333; for the Bidayuh and the Iban it was HLA-B*15 with a frequency of 0.460 and 0.275, respectively. The HLA-DR allele with the highest frequency in the Kadazan was HLA-DR*1502 with a frequency of 0.500. In the Iban and the Bidayuh, HLA-DRB1*1202 was the most common DR allele with frequencies of 0.235 and 0.310, respectively. The two most common haplotypes for the Kadazan are A*34-B*38-DR*1502 and A*24-B*40-DR*0405, whereas for the Bidayuh they are A*24-B*15-DR*1602 and A*24-B*35-DR*1202 and for the Iban they are A*34-*B15-DR*1502 and A*24-B*15-DR*1202. PMID:20196825

  9. HLA polymorphism in three indigenous populations of Sabah and Sarawak.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, J S; Shahnaz, M; Azrena, A; Irda, Y A; Salawati, M; Too, C L; Lee, Y Y

    2010-02-01

    One hundred and fifty-eight Kadazan, Iban and Bidayuh individuals registered with the Malaysian Marrow Donor Registry were typed for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, HLA-B and HLA-DR. Six, seven and eight HLA-A alleles as well as 13, 15 and 16 HLA-B alleles were detected in the Kadazan, Bidayuh and Iban, respectively. The most common HLA-A allele in all three groups was HLA-A*24 with a frequency of 0.456, 0.490 and 0.422 in the Kadazan, Bidayuh and Iban, respectively. The most common HLA-B allele detected in the Kadazan was HLA-B*40 with a frequency of 0.333; for the Bidayuh and the Iban it was HLA-B*15 with a frequency of 0.460 and 0.275, respectively. The HLA-DR allele with the highest frequency in the Kadazan was HLA-DR*1502 with a frequency of 0.500. In the Iban and the Bidayuh, HLA-DRB1*1202 was the most common DR allele with frequencies of 0.235 and 0.310, respectively. The two most common haplotypes for the Kadazan are A*34-B*38-DR*1502 and A*24-B*40-DR*0405, whereas for the Bidayuh they are A*24-B*15-DR*1602 and A*24-B*35-DR*1202 and for the Iban they are A*34-*B15-DR*1502 and A*24-B*15-DR*1202.

  10. HLA class II genes: typing by DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Bidwell, J L; Bidwell, E A; Bradley, B A

    1990-04-01

    A detailed understanding of the structure and function of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has ensued from studies by molecular biologist during the last decade. Virtually all of the HLA genes have now been cloned, and the nucleotide sequences of their different allelic forms have been determined. Typing for these HLA alleles is a fundamental prerequisite for tissue matching in allogeneic organ transplantation. Until very recently, typing procedures have been dominated by serological and cellular methods. The availability of cloned DNA from HLA genes has now permitted the technique of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis to be applied, with remarkable success and advantage, to phenotyping of both HLA Class I and Class II determinants. For the HLA Class II genes DR and DQ, a simple two-stage RFLP analysis permits the accurate identification of all specificities defined by serology, and of many which are defined by cellular typing. At the present time, however, RFLP typing of HLA Class I genes is not as practicable or as informative as that for HLA Class II genes. The present clinical applications of HLA-DR and DQ RFLP typing are predominantly in phenotyping of living donors, including selection of HLA-matched volunteer bone marrow donors, in allograft survival studies, and in studies of HLA Class II-associated diseases. However, the time taken to perform RFLP analysis precludes its use for the typing of cadaveric kidney donors. Nucleotide sequence data for the alleles of HLA Class II genes have now permitted the development of allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) typing, a second category of DNA analysis. This has been greatly facilitated by the ability to amplify specific HLA Class II DNA 'target' sequences using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The accuracy of DNA typing techniques should ensure that this methodology will eventually replace conventional HLA phenotyping.

  11. Rapid detection of HLA-B*51 by real-time polymerase chain reaction and high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Imperiali, C; Alía-Ramos, P; Padró-Miquel, A

    2015-08-01

    HLA-B*51, a class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecule, is the strongest known genetic risk factor for Behçet disease. However, there are only few articles reporting methods to determine the presence or absence of HLA-B51. For this reason, we designed and developed an easy, fast, and inexpensive real-time high-resolution melting (HRM) assay to detect HLA-B*51. We genotyped 61 samples by our HRM assay and by conventional polymerase chain reaction, and no discrepancies were found between results. Besides, a subgroup of 25 samples was also genotyped in a different laboratory, and another subgroup of 16 samples was obtained from the International Histocompatibility Working Group DNA Bank, and a full concordance of results was observed with those obtained by HRM. Regarding the identifying system evaluated, we obtained 100% of specificity, sensibility, and repeatability, and 0% of false positive and false negative rates. Therefore, this HRM analysis is easily applicable to the rapid detection of HLA-B*51, exhibits a high speed, and requires a very low budget. PMID:26176813

  12. Rapid detection of HLA-B*51 by real-time polymerase chain reaction and high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Imperiali, C; Alía-Ramos, P; Padró-Miquel, A

    2015-08-01

    HLA-B*51, a class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecule, is the strongest known genetic risk factor for Behçet disease. However, there are only few articles reporting methods to determine the presence or absence of HLA-B51. For this reason, we designed and developed an easy, fast, and inexpensive real-time high-resolution melting (HRM) assay to detect HLA-B*51. We genotyped 61 samples by our HRM assay and by conventional polymerase chain reaction, and no discrepancies were found between results. Besides, a subgroup of 25 samples was also genotyped in a different laboratory, and another subgroup of 16 samples was obtained from the International Histocompatibility Working Group DNA Bank, and a full concordance of results was observed with those obtained by HRM. Regarding the identifying system evaluated, we obtained 100% of specificity, sensibility, and repeatability, and 0% of false positive and false negative rates. Therefore, this HRM analysis is easily applicable to the rapid detection of HLA-B*51, exhibits a high speed, and requires a very low budget.

  13. HLA alleles may serve as a tool to discriminate atypical type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Mariana; Fabregat, Matías; Javiel, Gerardo; Mimbacas, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the presence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) marker could add new information to discriminated atypical diabetic type 2 patients. METHODS: We analyzed 199 patients initially diagnosed as type 2 diabetes who are treated in special care diabetes clinics (3rd level). This population was classified in “atypical” (sample A) and “classic” (sample B) according to HLA typing. We consider “classic patient” when has absence of type 1 diabetes associated HLA alleles and no difficulties in their diagnosis and treatments. By the other hand, we considered “atypical patient” when show type 1 diabetes associated HLA alleles and difficulties in their diagnosis and treatments. The standard protocol Asociacion Latinoamericana de Diabetes 2006 was used for patients follow up. To analyze differences between both populations in paraclinical parameters we used unpaired t tests and contingence tables. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were carried out using the SPSS software program. In all studies we assume differences statistically significant, with a P-value < 0.05 corrected and 95%CI. RESULTS: The typing HLA in the “atypical” populations show that 92.47% patients presented at list one type 1 diabetes associated HLA alleles (DQB1*0201-0302 and DR 3-4) and 7.53% had two of its. The results showed for categorical variables (family history, presence or absence of hypertension and/or dyslipidemia, reason for initial consultation) the only difference found was at dyslipidemia (OR = 0.45, 0.243 < OD < 0.822 (P < 0.001). In relation to continuous variables we found significant differences between atypical vs classic only in cholesterol (5.07 ± 1.1 vs 5.56 ± 1.5, P < 0.05), high density lipoproteins (1.23 ± 0.3 vs 1.33 ± 0.3, P < 0.05) and low density lipoproteins (2.86 ± 0.9 vs 3.38 ± 1.7, P < 0.01). None of the variables had discriminating power when logistic regression was done. CONCLUSION: We propose an algorithm including HLA

  14. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I restricted epitope discovery in yellow fewer and dengue viruses: importance of HLA binding strength.

    PubMed

    Lund, Ole; Nascimento, Eduardo J M; Maciel, Milton; Nielsen, Morten; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Lundegaard, Claus; Harndahl, Mikkel; Lamberth, Kasper; Buus, Søren; Salmon, Jérôme; August, Thomas J; Marques, Ernesto T A

    2011-01-01

    Epitopes from all available full-length sequences of yellow fever virus (YFV) and dengue fever virus (DENV) restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen class I (HLA-I) alleles covering 12 HLA-I supertypes were predicted using the NetCTL algorithm. A subset of 179 predicted YFV and 158 predicted DENV epitopes were selected using the EpiSelect algorithm to allow for optimal coverage of viral strains. The selected predicted epitopes were synthesized and approximately 75% were found to bind the predicted restricting HLA molecule with an affinity, K(D), stronger than 500 nM. The immunogenicity of 25 HLA-A*02:01, 28 HLA-A*24:02 and 28 HLA-B*07:02 binding peptides was tested in three HLA-transgenic mice models and led to the identification of 17 HLA-A*02:01, 4 HLA-A*2402 and 4 HLA-B*07:02 immunogenic peptides. The immunogenic peptides bound HLA significantly stronger than the non-immunogenic peptides. All except one of the immunogenic peptides had K(D) below 100 nM and the peptides with K(D) below 5 nM were more likely to be immunogenic. In addition, all the immunogenic peptides that were identified as having a high functional avidity had K(D) below 20 nM. A*02:01 transgenic mice were also inoculated twice with the 17DD YFV vaccine strain. Three of the YFV A*02:01 restricted peptides activated T-cells from the infected mice in vitro. All three peptides that elicited responses had an HLA binding affinity of 2 nM or less. The results indicate the importance of the strength of HLA binding in shaping the immune response.

  15. Historical flood data series of Eastern Spanish Coast (14th-20th centuries). Improving identification of climatic patterns and human factors of flood events from primary documentary sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberola, Armando; Barriendos, Mariano; Gil-Guirado, Salvador; Pérez-Morales, Alfredo; Balasch, Carles; Castelltort, Xavier; Mazón, Jordi; Pino, David; Lluís Ruiz-Bellet, Josep; Tuset, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Historical flood data series of Eastern Spanish Coast (14th-20th centuries). Improving identification of climatic patterns and human factors of flood events from primary documentary sources Armando Alberola, Barriendos, M., Gil-Guirado, S., Pérez Morales, A., Balasch, C., Castelltort, X., Mazón, J., Pino, D., Ruiz-Bellet, J.L., Tuset, J. Historical flood events in eastern spanish coast have been studied by different research groups and projects. Complexity of flood processes, involving atmospheric, surface and human factors, is not easily understandable when long time series are required. Present analysis from PREDIFLOOD Project Consortium defines a new step of flood event databases: Improved access to primary (documentary) and secondary (bibliographical) sources, data collection for all possible locations where floods are detected, and improved system of classification (Barriendos et al., 2014). A first analysis is applied to 8 selected flood series. Long chronologies from PREDIFLOOD Project for Catalonia region (Girona, Barcelona, Tarragona, Lleida, Tortosa). In addition, to cover all sector of spanish mediterranean coast, we introduce Valencia city in Turia River basin. South Eastern sector is cover with Murcia and Caravaca cities, Segura River basin. Extension of area under study required contributions of research teams experienced in work of documentary primary sources (Alberola, 2006; Gil-Guirado, 2013). Flood frequency analysis for long scale periods show natural climatic oscillations into so-called Little Ice Age. There are general patterns, affecting most of basins, but also some local anomalies or singularities. To explain these differences and analogies it is not enough to use purely climatic factors. In this way, we analyze human factors that have been able to influence the variability of floods along last 6 centuries (demography, hydraulic infrastructures, urban development...). This approach improves strongly understanding of mechanisms producing

  16. Specific HLA-DQB and HLA-DRB1 alleles confer susceptibility to pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, S J; Freidmann, A; Steinman, L; Brautbar, C; Erlich, H A

    1989-01-01

    The autoimmune dermatologic disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is associated with the serotypes HLA-DR4 and HLA-DRw6. Based on nucleotide sequence and oligonucleotide probe analysis of enzymatically amplified DNA encoding HLA-DR beta chain (HLA-DRB) and HLA-DQ beta chain (HLA-DQB; henceforth HLA is omitted from designations), we showed previously that the DR4 susceptibility was associated with the Dw10 DRB1 allele [encoding the mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC)-defined Dw10 specificity]. The DRw6 susceptibility similarly was shown to be associated with a rare DQB allele (DQB1.3), which differed from another nonsusceptible allele by only a valine-to-aspartic acid substitution at position 57. Given the linkage disequilibrium that characterizes HLA haplotypes, it is difficult to assign disease susceptibility to a specific locus rather than to a closely linked gene(s) on the same haplotype. To address this problem, we have analyzed all of the polymorphic loci of the class II HLA region (DRB1, DRB3, DQA, DQB, and DPB) on the DRw6 haplotypes in patients and controls. In 22 PV patients, 4 different DRw6 haplotypes were found that encode the same DQ beta chain (DQB1.3) but contained silent nucleotide differences at the DQB locus as well as coding sequence differences in the DQA and DRB loci. These results, obtained by using a method for allele-specific polymerase chain reaction amplification, strongly support the hypothesis that the allele DQB1.3 confers susceptibility. This DQB allele is correlated with the MLC-defined Dw9 specificity and is associated with two different DRB1 alleles (the common "6A" associated with DRw13 and the rare "6B" associated with DRw14). Since 86% (19 of 22) of DRw6+ patients contain the DQB1.3 allele (vs. 3% of controls), whereas 64% (14 of 22) contain the DRB1 allele 6B (vs. 6% of the controls), we conclude that most of the DRw6 susceptibility to PV can be accounted for by the DQ beta chain. Images PMID:2503828

  17. HLA-A, -B and -DR allele and haplotype frequencies in Malays.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, J S; Shahnaz, M; Too, C L; Azrena, A; Maiselamah, L; Lee, Y Y; Irda, Y A; Salawati, M

    2007-03-01

    One thousand four hundreds and forty-five Malays registered with the Malaysian Marrow Donor Registry were typed for HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DR. Fifteen HLA-A, twenty nine HLA-B and fourteen HLA-DR alleles were detected. The most common HLA-A alleles and their frequencies were HLA-A24 (0.35), HLA-A11 (0.21) and HLA-A2 (0.15). The most common HLA-B alleles were HLA-B15 (0.26), HLA-B35 (0.11) and HLA-B18 (0.10) while the most common HLA-DR alleles were HLA-DR15 (0.28), HLA-DR12 (0.27) and HLA-DR7 (0.10). A24-B15-DR12 (0.047), A24-B15-DR15 (0.03) and the A24-B35-DR12 (0.03) were the most frequent haplotypes. This data may be useful in determining the probability of finding a matched donor and for estimating the incidence of HLA associated diseases.

  18. [The HLA system in the Moroccan population: General review].

    PubMed

    Brick, C; Atouf, O; Essakalli, M

    2015-01-01

    The Moroccan population is an interesting study model of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) polymorphism given its ethnic and genetic diversity. Through an analysis of the literature, this work proposes to establish a balance of knowledge for this population in the field of histocompatibility: HLA diversity, anthropology, transplantation and HLA associations and diseases. This analysis shows that the HLA system has not been fully explored within the Moroccan population. However, the results obtained allowed us to initiate a database reflecting the specific healthy Moroccan population HLA polymorphism to identify immigration flows and relationships with different people of the world and to reveal the association of certain HLA alleles with frequent pathologies. We also propose to analyze the reasons hindering the development of this activity in Morocco and we will try to identify some perspectives. PMID:26597780

  19. Rga (Rodgers) and the HLA region: linkage and associations.

    PubMed

    Giles, C M; Gedde-Dahl, T; Robson, E B; Thorsby, E; Olaisen, B; Arnason, A; Kissmeyer-Nielsen, F; Schreuder, I

    1976-08-01

    In 19 families with 97 children the segregation of Rga (Rodgers) was found to be compatible with Mendelian inheritance and five backcross and 14 intercross families were found among HLA and Bf typed families. Close linkage (lods + 17.82) without recombination was found between Rg and the HLA region, with a direct count of 96 nonrecombinant meioses for Rg-HLA-B. Rg- was strongly associated with HLA-B8 (29 of 30 haplotypes) and probably associated with Bw40, but did occur on other HLA-B haplotypes. By inference Rg- is negatively associated with Ch- (Chido). The Rg-Ch- haplotype has not been observed. Rga and Cha may or may not be coded for by different sites of the same cistron closely linked to HLA-B:C and cannot as yet be excluded from being parts of B or C.

  20. Involvement of position-147 for HLA-E expression

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunami, Katsuyoshi; Kusama, Tamiko; Okura, Eiji; Shirakura, Ryota; Fukuzawa, Masahiro; Miyagawa, Shuji . E-mail: miyagawa@orgtrp.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2006-09-01

    HLA-E functions as an inhibitory signaling molecule of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytolysis. However, the cell surface expression of HLA-E molecules is quite restricted because of the limited repertoire of binding peptide sequences, such as signal peptides of other HLA molecules, especially on xenogeneic cells. In this study, we successfully determined that position-147 is an important amino acid position for cell surface expression by producing point substitutions. For further studies concerning transplantation therapy, the point substitution, Ser147Cys, that resulted in a single atom change, oxygen to sulfur, designated as HLA-Ev(147), led to a much higher expression on the human and pig cell surface and a greater inhibitory function against human NK cells than wild type HLA-E in an in vitro model system of pig to human xenotransplantation. Consequently, HLA-Ev(147) might be a promising alternative gene tool for future transplantation therapy such as xenotransplantation.

  1. HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies of 10 918 Koreans from bone marrow donor registry in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, H; Lee, Y-J; Song, E Y; Park, M H

    2016-10-01

    The human leucocyte antigen (HLA) system is the most polymorphic genetic system in humans, and HLA matching is crucial in organ transplantation, especially in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We investigated HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies at allelic level in 10 918 Koreans from bone marrow donor registry in Korea. Intermediate resolution HLA typing was performed using Luminex technology (Wakunaga, Japan), and additional allelic level typing was performed using PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism method and/or sequence-based typing (Abbott Molecular, USA). Allele and haplotype frequencies were calculated by direct counting and maximum likelihood methods, respectively. A total of 39 HLA-A, 66 HLA-B and 47 HLA-DRB1 alleles were identified. High-frequency alleles found at a frequency of ≥5% were 6 HLA-A (A*02:01, *02:06, *11:01, *24:02, *31:01 and *33:03), 6 HLA-B (B*15:01, *35:01, *44:03, *51:01, 54:01 and *58:01) and 8 HLA-DRB1 (DRB1*01:01, *04:05, *04:06, *07:01, *08:03, *09:01, *13:02 and *15:01) alleles. At each locus, A*02, B*15 and DRB1*14 generic groups were most diverse at allelic level, consisting of 9, 12 and 11 different alleles, respectively. A total of 366, 197 and 21 different HLA-A-B-DRB1 haplotypes were estimated with frequencies of ≥0.05%, ≥0.1% and ≥0.5%, respectively. The five most common haplotypes with frequencies of ≥2.0% were A*33:03-B*44:03-DRB1*13:02 (4.97%), A*33:03-B*58:01-DRB1*13:02, A*33:03-B*44:03-DRB1*07:01, A*24:02-B*07:02-DRB1*01:01 and A*24:02-B*52:01-DRB1*15:02. Among 34 serologic HLA-A-B-DR haplotypes with frequencies of ≥0.5%, 17 haplotypes revealed allele-level diversity and majority of the allelic variation was arising from A2, A26, B61, B62, DR4 and DR14 specificities. Haplotype diversity obtained in this study is the most comprehensive data thus far reported in Koreans, and the information will be useful for unrelated stem cell transplantation as well as for disease

  2. HLA-C Downmodulation by HIV-1 Vpu.

    PubMed

    Barker, Edward; Evans, David T

    2016-05-11

    It is widely held that HIV-1 Nef downmodulates HLA-A and -B to protect infected cells from CD8(+) T cells but leaves HLA-C on the cell surface to inhibit NK cells. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Apps et al. (2016) revise this model by showing that the Vpu protein of primary HIV-1 isolates downmodulate HLA-C.

  3. HLA Genes in Mayos Population from Northeast Mexico.

    PubMed

    Arnaiz-Villena, A; Moscoso, J; Granados, J; Serrano-Vela, J I; de la Peña, A; Reguera, R; Ferri, A; Seclen, E; Izaguirre, R; Perez-Hernandez, N; Vargas-Alarcon, G

    2007-11-01

    HLA class I and class II alleles have been studied in 60 unrelated people belonging to Mayos ethnic group, which lives in the Mexican Pacific Sinaloa State. Mayos HLA profile was compared to other Amerindians and worldwide populations' profile. A total of 14,896 chromosomes were used for comparisons. Genetic distances between populations, Neigbour-Joining dendrograms and correspondence analyses were performed to determine the genetic relationship among population. The new specific Mayo HLA haplotypes found are: HLA-A*02-B*35-DRB1*1406-DQB1*0301; HLA-A*02-B*48-DRB1*0404-DQB1*0302; HLA-A*24-B*51-DRB1*0407-DQB1*0302 and HLA-A*02-B*08-DRB1*0407-DQB1*0302. However, the typical Meso American HLADRB1*0407 represents a 40% of all DRB1 alleles. While common HLA characteristics are found in Amerindian distant ethnic groups, still new group specific HLA haplotypes are being found, suggesting that a common founder effect (i.e. high DRB1*0407) is noticed. Moreover, new HLA haplotypes are almost certainly appearing along time probably due to specific pathogen (?) selection for diversity. Mayo language is close to the Tarahumara one (another geographically close group); notwithstanding both groups are not genetically close according to our results, showing again the different evolution of genes and languages, which do not correlate. Finally, Sinaloa is one of the Mexican States in which more European genes are found. However, the results presented in this paper, where no European HLA genes are seen in Mayos, should have a bearing in establishing transplant programs and in HLA and disease studies.

  4. Logistic transmission modeling of HLA and ankylosing spondylitis

    SciTech Connect

    Scofield, R.H.; Neas, B.R.; Harley, J.B.

    1994-09-01

    A nonparametric and general method of linkage analysis has been developed and used to evaluate histocompatibility (HLA) linkage to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) from the data of Berg & Moller. The conditional logistic function has been used to establish linkage by stepwise modelling of transmission from parent to progeny. Logistic transmission models have been explored to better understand the relationship of HLA to AS. The alleles at HLA-A and -B were determined in 38 families (32 monoplex and 6 multiplex). We have found that linkage is supported in this data over the random transmission of alleles at only HLA-B. Models constructed at HLA-B are powerful with, for example, coefficients for B27 of 1.9 (S.E. = 0.4) and B40 of 1.6 (S.E. = 0.8) contributing to a model with {chi}{sup 2} = 30 with 2 df and p < 3x10{sup -7}. No models are found supporting linkage at HLA-A and, therefore, the data at HLA-A does not add support for linkage beyond that present at HLA-B (e.g., {chi}{sup 2} for improvement < 1). These results establish that HLA-B is linked to AS. They further provide evidence that the gene responsible for AS is located nearer to HLA-B than it is to HLA-A. Also, the analysis shows that a number of HLA-B alleles may contribute to the risk of AS, beyond the B27 allele which has repeatedly been associated with AS.

  5. HLA Genes in Mayos Population from Northeast Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Arnaiz-Villena, A; Moscoso, J; Granados, J; Serrano-Vela, J.I; de la Peña, A.; Reguera, R; Ferri, A; Seclen, E; Izaguirre, R; Perez-Hernandez, N; Vargas-Alarcon, G

    2007-01-01

    HLA class I and class II alleles have been studied in 60 unrelated people belonging to Mayos ethnic group, which lives in the Mexican Pacific Sinaloa State. Mayos HLA profile was compared to other Amerindians and worldwide populations’ profile. A total of 14,896 chromosomes were used for comparisons. Genetic distances between populations, Neigbour-Joining dendrograms and correspondence analyses were performed to determine the genetic relationship among population. The new specific Mayo HLA haplotypes found are: HLA-A*02-B*35-DRB1*1406-DQB1*0301; HLA-A*02-B*48-DRB1*0404-DQB1*0302; HLA-A*24-B*51-DRB1*0407-DQB1*0302 and HLA-A*02-B*08-DRB1*0407-DQB1*0302. However, the typical Meso American HLADRB1*0407 represents a 40% of all DRB1 alleles. While common HLA characteristics are found in Amerindian distant ethnic groups, still new group specific HLA haplotypes are being found, suggesting that a common founder effect (i.e. high DRB1*0407) is noticed. Moreover, new HLA haplotypes are almost certainly appearing along time probably due to specific pathogen (?) selection for diversity. Mayo language is close to the Tarahumara one (another geographically close group); notwithstanding both groups are not genetically close according to our results, showing again the different evolution of genes and languages, which do not correlate. Finally, Sinaloa is one of the Mexican States in which more European genes are found. However, the results presented in this paper, where no European HLA genes are seen in Mayos, should have a bearing in establishing transplant programs and in HLA and disease studies. PMID:19412332

  6. Class II HLA antigens in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D H; Hornabrook, R W; Dagger, J; Fong, R

    1989-01-01

    HLA typing in Wellington revealed a stronger association of multiple sclerosis with DR2 than with DQw1. The association with DQw1 appeared to be due to linkage disequilibrium of this antigen with DR2. These results, when considered in conjunction with other studies, are most easily explained by the hypothesis that susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is influenced by multiple risk factors, with DR2 being an important risk factor in Caucasoid populations. PMID:2732726

  7. Recent developments in HLA-haploidentical transplantations

    PubMed Central

    Showel, Margaret; Fuchs, Ephraim J.

    2016-01-01

    While allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations have a curative potential, several patients with hematologic malignancies cannot avail themselves of this therapeutic option due to lack of matched donor availability. Although HLA-haploidentical transplantations were previously associated with poor outcomes, recent evidence with use of post transplantation cyclophosphamide indicate improved safety and efficacy. The following paper discusses the most recent developments in this area. PMID:26590771

  8. HLA-E: A Novel Player for Histocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Thomas; Blasczyk, Rainer; Bade-Doeding, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The classical class I human leukocyte antigens (HLA-A, -B, and -C) present allele-specific self- or pathogenic peptides originated by intracellular processing to CD8+ immune effector cells. Even a single mismatch in the heavy chain (hc) of an HLA class I molecule can impact on the peptide binding profile. Since HLA class I molecules are highly polymorphic and most of their polymorphisms affect the peptide binding region (PBR), it becomes obvious that systematic HLA matching is crucial in determining the outcome of transplantation. The opposite holds true for the nonclassical HLA class I molecule HLA-E. HLA-E polymorphism is restricted to two functional versions and is thought to present a limited set of highly conserved peptides derived from class I leader sequences. However, HLA-E appears to be a ligand for the innate and adaptive immune system, where the immunological response to peptide-HLA-E complexes is dictated through the sequence of the bound peptide. Structural investigations clearly demonstrate how subtle amino acid differences impact the strength and response of the cognate CD94/NKG2 or T cell receptor. PMID:25401109

  9. Multiple HLA Epitopes Contribute to Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Roark, Christina L.; Anderson, Kirsten M.; Simon, Lucas J.; Schuyler, Ronald P.; Aubrey, Michael T.; Freed, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Disease susceptibility for type 1 diabetes is strongly associated with the inheritance of specific HLA alleles. However, conventional allele frequency analysis can miss HLA associations because many alleles are rare. In addition, disparate alleles that have similar peptide-binding sites, or shared epitopes, can be missed. To identify the HLA shared epitopes associated with diabetes, we analyzed high-resolution genotyping for class I and class II loci. The HLA epitopes most strongly associated with susceptibility for disease were DQB1 A57, DQA1 V76, DRB1 H13, and DRB1 K71, whereas DPB1 YD9,57, HLA-B C67, and HLA-C YY9,116 were more weakly associated. The HLA epitopes strongly associated with resistance were DQB1 D57, DQA1 Y80, DRB1 R13, and DRB1 A71. A dominant resistance phenotype was observed for individuals bearing a protective HLA epitope, even in the presence of a susceptibility epitope. In addition, an earlier age of disease onset correlated with significantly greater numbers of susceptibility epitopes and fewer resistance epitopes (P < 0.0001). The prevalence of both DQ and DR susceptibility epitopes was higher in patients than in control subjects and was not exclusively a result of linkage disequilibrium, suggesting that multiple HLA epitopes may work together to increase the risk of developing diabetes. PMID:24357703

  10. The Relevance of HLA Sequencing in Population Genetics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) is currently being adapted by different biotechnological platforms to the standard typing method for HLA polymorphism, the huge diversity of which makes this initiative particularly challenging. Boosting the molecular characterization of the HLA genes through efficient, rapid, and low-cost technologies is expected to amplify the success of tissue transplantation by enabling us to find donor-recipient matching for rare phenotypes. But the application of NGS technologies to the molecular mapping of the MHC region also anticipates essential changes in population genetic studies. Huge amounts of HLA sequence data will be available in the next years for different populations, with the potential to change our understanding of HLA variation in humans. In this review, we first explain how HLA sequencing allows a better assessment of the HLA diversity in human populations, taking also into account the methodological difficulties it introduces at the statistical level; secondly, we show how analyzing HLA sequence variation may improve our comprehension of population genetic relationships by facilitating the identification of demographic events that marked human evolution; finally, we discuss the interest of both HLA and genome-wide sequencing and genotyping in detecting functionally significant SNPs in the MHC region, the latter having also contributed to the makeup of the HLA molecular diversity observed today. PMID:25126587

  11. HLA-G1, but Not HLA-G3, Suppresses Human Monocyte/Macrophage-mediated Swine Endothelial Cell Lysis.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, H; Maeda, A; Lo, P C; Matsuura, R; Esquivel, E L; Asada, M; Sakai, R; Nakahata, K; Yamamichi, T; Umeda, S; Deguchi, K; Ueno, T; Okuyama, H; Miyagawa, S

    2016-05-01

    The inhibitory function of HLA-G1, a class Ib molecule, on monocyte/macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity was examined. The expression of inhibitory receptors that interact with HLA-G, immunoglobulin-like transcript 2 (ILT2), ILT4, and KIR2DL4 (CD158d) on in vitro-generated macrophages obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-activated THP-1 cells were examined by flow cytometry. cDNAs of HLA-G1, HLA-G3, HLA-E, and human β2-microglobulin were prepared, transfected into pig endothelial cells (PECs), and macrophage- and the THP-1 cell-mediated PEC cytolysis was then assessed. In vitro-generated macrophages expressed not only ILT2 and ILT4 but CD158d as well. The transgenic HLA-G1 on PEC indicated a significant suppression in macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity, which was equivalent to that of transgenic HLA-E. HLA-G1 was clearly expressed on the cell surface of PEC, whereas the levels of HLA-G3 were much lower and remained in the intracellular space. On the other hand, the PMA-activated THP-1 cell was less expressed these inhibitory molecules than in vitro-generated macrophages. Therefore, the HLA-G1 on PECs showed a significant but relatively smaller suppression to THP-1 cell-mediated cytotoxicity compared to in vitro-generated macrophages. These results indicate that by generating HLA-G1, but not HLA-G3, transgenic pigs can protect porcine grafts from monocyte/macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:27320605

  12. Uncoupling the Roles of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DRB5 Genes in Multiple Sclerosis1

    PubMed Central

    Caillier, Stacy J.; Briggs, Farren; Cree, Bruce A. C.; Baranzini, Sergio E.; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo; Ramsay, Patricia P.; Khan, Omar; Royal, Walter; Hauser, Stephen L.; Barcellos, Lisa F.; Oksenberg, Jorge R.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with the MHC located on chromosome 6p21. This signal maps primarily to a 1-Mb region encompassing the HLA class II loci, and it segregates often with the HLA-DQB1*0602, -DQA1*0102, -DRB1*1501, -DRB5*0101 haplotype. However, the identification of the true predisposing gene or genes within the susceptibility haplotype has been handicapped by the strong linkage disequilibrium across the locus. African Americans have greater MHC haplotypic diversity and distinct patterns of linkage disequilibrium, which make this population particularly informative for fine mapping efforts. The purpose of this study was to establish the telomeric boundary of the HLA class II region affecting susceptibility to MS by assessing genetic association with the neighboring HLA-DRB5 gene as well as seven telomeric single nucleotide polymorphisms in a large, well-characterized African American dataset. Rare DRB5*null individuals were previously described in African populations. Although significant associations with both HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DRB5 loci were present, HLA-DRB1*1503 was associated with MS in the absence of HLA-DRB5, providing evidence for HLA-DRB1 as the primary susceptibility gene. Interestingly, the HLA-DRB5*null subjects appear to be at increased risk for developing secondary progressive MS. Thus, HLA-DRB5 attenuates MS severity, a finding consistent with HLA-DRB5’s proposed role as a modifier in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Additionally, conditional haplotype analysis revealed a susceptibility signal at the class III AGER locus independent of DRB1. The data underscore the power of the African American MS dataset to identify disease genes by association in a region of high linkage disequilibrium. PMID:18832704

  13. Understanding of HLA-conferred susceptibility to chronic hepatitis B infection requires HLA genotyping-based association analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Nao; Ohashi, Jun; Khor, Seik-Soon; Sugiyama, Masaya; Tsuchiura, Takayo; Sawai, Hiromi; Hino, Keisuke; Honda, Masao; Kaneko, Shuichi; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Osamu; Koike, Kazuhiko; Kurosaki, Masayuki; Izumi, Namiki; Korenaga, Masaaki; Kang, Jong-Hon; Tanaka, Eiji; Taketomi, Akinobu; Eguchi, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Naoya; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Tamori, Akihiro; Sakaida, Isao; Hige, Shuhei; Itoh, Yoshito; Mochida, Satoshi; Mita, Eiji; Takikawa, Yasuhiro; Ide, Tatsuya; Hiasa, Yoichi; Kojima, Hiroto; Yamamoto, Ken; Nakamura, Minoru; Saji, Hiroh; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Kanto, Tatsuya; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Mizokami, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Associations of variants located in the HLA class II region with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection have been identified in Asian populations. Here, HLA imputation method was applied to determine HLA alleles using genome-wide SNP typing data of 1,975 Japanese individuals (1,033 HBV patients and 942 healthy controls). Together with data of an additional 1,481 Japanese healthy controls, association tests of six HLA loci including HLA-A, C, B, DRB1, DQB1, and DPB1, were performed. Although the strongest association was detected at a SNP located in the HLA-DP locus in a SNP-based GWAS using data from the 1,975 Japanese individuals, HLA genotyping-based analysis identified DQB1*06:01 as having the strongest association, showing a greater association with CHB susceptibility (OR = 1.76, P = 6.57 × 10−18) than any one of five HLA-DPB1 alleles that were previously reported as CHB susceptibility alleles. Moreover, HLA haplotype analysis showed that, among the five previously reported HLA-DPB1 susceptibility and protective alleles, the association of two DPB1 alleles (DPB1*09:01, and *04:01) had come from linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DR-DQ haplotypes, DRB1*15:02-DQB1*06:01 and DRB1*13:02-DQB1*06:04, respectively. The present study showed an example that SNP-based GWAS does not necessarily detect the primary susceptibility locus in the HLA region. PMID:27091392

  14. HLA genes in Mexican Teeneks: HLA genetic relationship with other worldwide populations.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Hernández-Pacheco, Guadalupe; Moscoso, Juan; Pérez-Hernández, Nonanzit; Murguía, Luis Enrique; Moreno, Almudena; Serrano-Vela, Juan Ignacio; Granados, Julio; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2006-03-01

    The HLA allele frequency distribution of the Mexican Teenek Indians has been studied and compared with those of other First American Natives and worldwide populations (a total of 15694 chromosomes from 73 different populations were analyzed). This study corroborate the restricted HLA polymorphism in the Amerindian populations and demonstrate how the Amerindians show a relatively homogeneity as opposed to other First Native American groups. Finally, the present data support previous ones that state the lack of complete correlation between language and genetics in micro-environmental studies; Teenek Mayan language does not correspond with a close Mayan (Guatemala) relatedness.

  15. Antibody-defined epitopes on HLA-DQ alleles reacting with antibodies induced during pregnancy and the design of a DQ eplet map.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, Rene J; Hönger, Gideon; Hösli, Irene; Marrari, Marilyn; Schaub, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    The concept that HLA antibodies recognize epitopes is leading to new approaches of HLA matching at the epitope level. HLA-DQ plays an important role and many studies have identified structurally defined DQ epitopes specifically recognized by antibodies; they have been recorded in the International HLA Epitope Registry http://www.epregistry.com.br but the list is still incomplete. Pregnancy offers an attractive model to study antibody responses to HLA epitopes. The current analysis was done on 42 DQ-reactive post-pregnancy sera tested in binding assays with a panel of DQ heterodimers. The reactivity of 29 sera corresponded fully to the presence of antibody-verified DQA and DQB epitopes recorded in the Registry. Analysis of the remaining 13 sera led to the identification of additional antibody-defined DQB and DQA epitopes. We have designed the first version of an eplet map for DQ alleles which includes antibody-defined DQA and DQB epitopes and shows sequence positions with polymorphic residues which can be used in HLA epitology studies to identify new antibody-defined DQ epitopes. PMID:27374949

  16. Effect of epidermal growth factor in HLA class I and class II transcription and protein expression in human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, D. J.; Courjal, F.; Maurizis, J. C.; Bignon, Y. J.; Chollet, P.; Plagne, R.

    1992-01-01

    The spontaneous expression of HLA class I and class II molecules in two human breast carcinoma cell lines (MCF7, T47D) and their modulation during epidermal growth factor treatment are reported. Transcription was analysed by Northern blot and hybridisation with HLA class II and class I cDNA specific probes. The expression of cell surface determinants was examined by internal protein labelling with 35s-methionine, immunoprecipitation with monoclonal antibodies specific for HLA class I or class II, followed by isolation of the immune complex on protein A-Sepharose; at least a quantification of glycoprotein was performed by chromatofocusing. Glycoprotein quantification showed a significant increase of HLA class I and class II (DR) antigen expression after stimulation by epidermal growth factor (0.02 microgram ml-1) in the two cell lines, when compared with untreated cell controls. However, with epidermal growth factor treatment of MCF7 and T47D cells, low increases in the amounts of HLA class I and class II RNA were obtained. These differences between expressed antigens and correspondent RNA amounts would be explained by the fact that EGF in these two cell lines acts more in post-transcription for HLA class I and class II antigens. Images Figure 1 PMID:1637682

  17. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) pharmacogenomic tests: potential and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ann K

    2014-02-01

    Adverse drug reactions involving a range of prescribed drugs and affecting the skin, liver and other organs show strong associations with particular HLA alleles. For some reactions, HLA typing prior to prescription, so that those positive for the risk allele are not given the drug associated with the reaction, shows high positive and negative predictive values. The best example of clinical implementation relates to the hypersensitivity reaction induced by the anti-HIV drug abacavir. When this reaction is phenotyped accurately, 100% of those who develop it are positive for HLA-B*57:01. Drug regulators worldwide now recommend genotyping for HLA-B*57:01 before abacavir is prescribed. Serious skin rashes including Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrosis can be induced by carbamazepine and other anticonvulsant drugs. In certain East Asians, these reactions are significantly associated with HLA-B*15:02, and typing for this allele is now recommended prior to carbamazepine prescription in these populations. Other HLA associations have been described for skin rash induced by carbamazepine, allopurinol and nevirapine and for liver injury induced by flucloxacillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, lapatanib, lumiracoxib and ticlopidine. However, the predictive values for typing HLA alleles associated with these adverse reactions are lower. Clinical implementation therefore seems unlikely. Performing HLA typing is relatively complex compared with genotyping assays for single nucleotide polymorphisms. With emphasis on HLA-B*57:01, the approaches used commonly, including use of sequence-specific oligonucleotide PCR primers and DNA sequencing are considered, together with their successful implementation. Genotyping single nucleotide polymorphisms tagging HLA alleles is a simpler alternative to HLA typing but appears insufficiently accurate for clinical use.

  18. Molecular genetics (HLA) of Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Mizuki, N; Inoko, H; Ohno, S

    1997-12-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) has been known to be strongly associated with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B51. This B51 association has been confirmed in many different ethnic groups between the Middle East and Japan, and it has been proposed that BD is prevalent in those ethnic groups along the old Silk Route. The hypothesis could be made that B51 molecules are primarily involved in BD development through specific antigen presentation. However, polymorphic analyses of the TNFB gene and Tau-a microsatellite between the HLA-B and TNF genes indicate that the pathogenic gene of BD is not the HLA-B51 gene itself but another gene located around the HLA-B gene. HLA-C genotyping by the PCR-SSP method also suggests that the BD pathogenic gene is not the HLA-C gene itself but other gene located near the HLA-B gene. Recently we sequenced a single contig of 236,822 bp from the MICA gene (58.2 kb centromeric of HLA-B) to 90.8 kb telomeric of HLA-C and identified 8 novel genes designated NOB1-8 (NOB: new organization associated with HLA-B). During the course of the genomic sequence analysis we clarified the genetic structure of the MICA (MHC class I chain-related gene A) gene and found a triplet repeat microsatellite polymorphism of (GCT/AGC)n in the transmebrane (TM) region. Furthermore, the microsatellite allele consisting of 6 repetitions of GCT/AGC (MICA A6 allele) was present at a significantly higher frequency in the BD patient group than in the control group and a significant fraction of B51-negative patients were positive for this MICA A6 allele. These results suggest the possibility of a primary association of BD with MICA rather than HLA-B.

  19. Structural analysis of the HLA-A/HLA-F subregion: Precise localization of two new multigene families closely associated with the HLA class I sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Pichon, L.; Carn, G.; Bouric, P.

    1996-03-01

    Positional cloning strategies for the hemochromatosis gene have previously concentrated on a target area restricted to a maximum genomic expanse of 400 kb around the HLA-A and HLA-F loci. Recently, the candidate region has been extended to 2-3 Mb on the distal side of the MHC. In this study, 10 coding sequences [hemochromatosis candidate genes (HCG) I to X] were isolated by cDNA selection using YACs covering the HLA-A/HLA-F subregion. Two of these (HCG II and HCG IV) belong to multigene families, as well as other sequences already described in this region, i.e., P5, pMC 6.7, and HLA class I. Fingerprinting of the four YACSs overlapping the region was performed and allowed partial localization of the different multigene family sequences on each YAC without defining their exact positions. Fingerprinting on cosmids isolated from the ICRF chromosome 6-specific cosmid library allowed more precise localization of the redundant sequences in all of the multigene families and revealed their apparent organization in clusters. Further examination of these intertwined sequences demonstrated that this structural organization resulted from a succession of complex phenomena, including duplications and contractions. This study presents a precise description of the structural organization of the HLA-A/HLA-F region and a determination of the sequences involved in the megabase size polymorphism observed among the A3, A24, and A31 haplotypes. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Establishing a Population-Based HLA-Antibody Panel for Flow Cytometric Monitoring of Chimerism in HLA-Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Choe, Wonho; Hwang, Min-A; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Chi, Hyun-Sook; Im, Ho Joon

    2016-01-01

    Determining the chimerism in stem cell transplantation (SCT) is important in the monitoring of engraftment. Conventional monitoring methods such as short tandem repeat polymerase chain reaction (STR-PCR) are labor intensive and difficult in showing the dynamics of cell subpopulations. In HLA-haploidentical SCT, flow cytometric analysis using anti-HLA antibody for the mismatched HLA can be useful in observing changes of cell subpopulations and determining chimerism. We designed a specific panel of HLA antibody reagents for the Korean population, and verified its clinical application in flow cytometric monitoring of chimerism after haploidentical stem cell transplantation. A total of 12 anti-HLA-A, -B-antibodies were selected, which could cover 82.5% of HLA-A and 16.5% of HLA-B in Korean population. This HLA panel distinguished donor and recipient cells in 22 of 23 HLA-haploidentical SCT cases. In one case, the patient had HLA-A*02/A*24, B*48/B*61 while the donor had HLA-A*02/A*33, B*44/B*48. The donor type HLA-B*44(+) and CD3(+) T cells, and HLA-B*44(+) and CD56(+) NK cells were seen at day 14 and day 8, respectively. Increased HLA-B*44(+) cells throughout the study period indicated the engraftment of donor stem cells. We were able to design a population specific panel of HLA-antibodies, and verified that flow cytometric analysis using HLA antibody for the detection of chimerism in HLA-haploidentical SCT was a simple and sensitive monitoring technique. This method allowed us to observe the dynamic changes in cell subpopulations after HLA-haploidentical SCT. Flow cytometric analysis can be considered as a strong tool for the monitoring of engraftment in HLA-haploidentical SCT.

  1. HLA-B27 and pathogenesis of spondyloarthropathies.

    PubMed

    Turner, Matthew J; Colbert, Robert A

    2002-07-01

    Although the influence of HLA-B27 on the development of spondyloarthropathies is undisputed, its role in pathogenesis remains unclear. New ideas have focused on abnormal characteristics of HLA-B27 resulting from aberrant folding, disulfide bond formation, or both, rather than a predilection for selecting arthritogenic peptides. This reflects, in part, unanswered questions about whether immunologic recognition of HLA-B27 is required for disease. Recent studies suggest that CD4+ T cells, immunomodulatory killer cell Ig receptors, and Ig-like transcript receptors may recognize aberrant forms of HLA-B27. Other reports suggest that HLA-B27 expression can alter cytokine production from monocytes and T cells-effects that appear unrelated to antigen presentation. Novel bioinformatics approaches have led to the identification of HLA-B27-restricted pathogen-derived peptides and may prove useful in determining whether HLA-B27 presents arthritogenic peptides. Elucidating the role of HLA-B27 in the pathogenesis of these conditions will require an integration of information from animal models, genome-wide screens for susceptibility alleles, and translational studies using human samples.

  2. New Developments in HLA-G in Cardiac Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lazarte, Julieta; Tumiati, Laura C; Rao, Vivek; Delgado, Diego H

    2016-09-01

    Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non-classical class 1b protein, whose gene is located on chromosome 6 (6p21.31). HLA-G inhibits the immune cells' cytotoxic activity by interacting with specific receptors on their membranes. Since it is a naturally occurring immune modulator, HLA-G has been investigated in transplantation. Indeed, a number of investigations reveal that HLA-G expression is influenced by genetic polymorphisms and in turn, those polymorphisms are associated with detrimental or beneficial outcomes in various pathological situations. The present review introduces the HLA-G molecule, the gene and its polymorphisms. It focuses on the expression of HLA-G and the role of polymorphisms primarily in heart transplant outcomes, secondarily in other transplant organs, as well as the role of the allograft and effect of medical therapy. We discuss the limitations in HLA-G transplant investigations and future directions. The immune inhibiting activity of HLA-G has a great deal of potential for its utilization in enhancing diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic strategies against rejection in the setting of transplantation.

  3. HLA-Modeler: Automated Homology Modeling of Human Leukocyte Antigens.

    PubMed

    Amari, Shinji; Kataoka, Ryoichi; Ikegami, Takashi; Hirayama, Noriaki

    2013-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) structures of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules are indispensable for the studies on the functions at molecular level. We have developed a homology modeling system named HLA-modeler specialized in the HLA molecules. Segment matching algorithm is employed for modeling and the optimization of the model is carried out by use of the PFROSST force field considering the implicit solvent model. In order to efficiently construct the homology models, HLA-modeler uses a local database of the 3D structures of HLA molecules. The structure of the antigenic peptide-binding site is important for the function and the 3D structure is highly conserved between various alleles. HLA-modeler optimizes the use of this structural motif. The leave-one-out cross-validation using the crystal structures of class I and class II HLA molecules has demonstrated that the rmsds of nonhydrogen atoms of the sites between homology models and crystal structures are less than 1.0 Å in most cases. The results have indicated that the 3D structures of the antigenic peptide-binding sites can be reproduced by HLA-modeler at the level almost corresponding to the crystal structures.

  4. Expression of the Classical and Nonclassical HLA Molecules in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Gisela Bevilacqua Rolfsen Ferreira; Silva, Tarsia Giabardo Alves; Duarte, Roberta Aparecida; Neto, Nicolino Lia; Carrara, Hélio Humberto Angotti; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; Gonçalves, Maria Alice Guimarães; Soares, Edson Garcia; Soares, Christiane Pienna

    2013-01-01

    Considering that downregulation of HLA expression could represent a potential mechanism for breast carcinogenesis and metastasis, the aim of the present study was to use immunohistochemical methods to analyze the expression of HLA-Ia, HLA-DR, HLA-DQ, HLA-E, and HLA-G in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast and to relate this HLA profile to anatomopathological parameters. Fifty-two IDC from breast biopsies were stratified according to histological differentiation (well, moderately, and poorly differentiated) and to the presence of metastases in axillary lymph nodes. The expression of HLA molecules was assessed by immunohistochemistry, using a computer-assisted system. Overall, 31 (59.6%) out of the 52 IDC breast biopsies exhibited high expression of HLA-G, but only 14 (26.9%) showed high expression of HLA-E. A large number (41, 78.8%) of the biopsies showed low expression of HLA-Ia, while 45 (86.5%) showed high expression of HLA-DQ and 36 (69.2%) underexpressed HLA-DR. Moreover, 24 (41.2%) of 52 biopsies had both low HLA-Ia expression and high HLA-G expression, while 11 (21.2%) had low HLA-Ia expression and high HLA-E expression. These results suggest that, by different mechanisms, the downregulation of HLA-Ia, HLA-E, and HLA-DR and the upregulation of HLA-G and HLA-DQ are associated with immune response evasion and breast cancer aggressiveness. PMID:24363939

  5. Influence of HLA on human partnership and sexual satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Kromer, J.; Hummel, T.; Pietrowski, D.; Giani, A. S.; Sauter, J.; Ehninger, G.; Schmidt, A. H.; Croy, I.

    2016-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC, called HLA in humans) is an important genetic component of the immune system. Fish, birds and mammals prefer mates with different genetic MHC code compared to their own, which they determine using olfactory cues. This preference increases the chances of high MHC variety in the offspring, leading to enhanced resilience against a variety of pathogens. Humans are also able to discriminate HLA related olfactory stimuli, however, it is debated whether this mechanism is of behavioural relevance. We show on a large sample (N = 508), with high-resolution typing of HLA class I/II, that HLA dissimilarity correlates with partnership, sexuality and enhances the desire to procreate. We conclude that HLA mediates mate behaviour in humans. PMID:27578547

  6. Influence of HLA on human partnership and sexual satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Kromer, J; Hummel, T; Pietrowski, D; Giani, A S; Sauter, J; Ehninger, G; Schmidt, A H; Croy, I

    2016-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC, called HLA in humans) is an important genetic component of the immune system. Fish, birds and mammals prefer mates with different genetic MHC code compared to their own, which they determine using olfactory cues. This preference increases the chances of high MHC variety in the offspring, leading to enhanced resilience against a variety of pathogens. Humans are also able to discriminate HLA related olfactory stimuli, however, it is debated whether this mechanism is of behavioural relevance. We show on a large sample (N = 508), with high-resolution typing of HLA class I/II, that HLA dissimilarity correlates with partnership, sexuality and enhances the desire to procreate. We conclude that HLA mediates mate behaviour in humans. PMID:27578547

  7. Seven novel HLA alleles reflect different mechanisms involved in the evolution of HLA diversity: description of the new alleles and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Adamek, Martina; Klages, Cornelia; Bauer, Manuela; Kudlek, Evelina; Drechsler, Alina; Leuser, Birte; Scherer, Sabine; Opelz, Gerhard; Tran, Thuong Hien

    2015-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci are among the most polymorphic genes in the human genome. The diversity of these genes is thought to be generated by different mechanisms including point mutation, gene conversion and crossing-over. During routine HLA typing, we discovered seven novel HLA alleles which were probably generated by different evolutionary mechanisms. HLA-B*41:21, HLA-DQB1*02:10 and HLA-DQA1*01:12 likely emerged from the common alleles of their groups by point mutations, all of which caused non-synonymous amino acid substitutions. In contrast, a deletion of one nucleotide leading to a frame shift with subsequent generation of a stop codon is responsible for the appearance of a null allele, HLA-A*01:123N. Whereas HLA-B*35:231 and HLA-B*53:31 were probably products of intralocus gene conversion between HLA-B alleles, HLA-C*07:294 presumably evolved by interlocus gene conversion between an HLA-C and an HLA-B allele. Our analysis of these novel alleles illustrates the different mechanisms which may have contributed to the evolution of HLA polymorphism.

  8. Promoter methylation and mRNA expression of HLA-G in relation to HLA-G protein expression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Swets, Marloes; Seneby, Lina; Boot, Arnoud; van Wezel, Tom; Gelderblom, Hans; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; van den Elsen, Peter J; Kuppen, Peter J K

    2016-09-01

    Expression of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a suggested mechanism used by tumor cells to escape from host immune recognition and destruction. Advances in the field have made it evident that HLA-G is expressed in different types of malignancies including colorectal cancer (CRC). We analyzed HLA-G expression in 21 low passage CRC cell lines. The level of DNA methylation of the HLA-G gene and the presence of mRNA encoding HLA-G was measured. Moreover, HLA-G protein expression was determined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry (IHC). IHC was performed with three different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (4H84, MEM-G/1 and MEM-G/2). In addition, HLA-G protein expression was measured in matching primary tumor tissues. RNA analysis using RT-PCR followed by sequencing in 6 samples indicated strong homology of the PCR product with HLA-G3 in 5 samples. In accordance, in none of the cell lines, HLA-G1 expression was detected by flow-cytometry. Furthermore, no association between HLA-G DNA methylation patterns and HLA-G mRNA expression was observed. In addition, different immunohistochemical staining profiles among various anti-HLA-G mAbs were observed. In conclusion, the results of this study show that the HLA-G3 isoform was expressed in some of the CRC cell lines irrespective of the level of DNA methylation of HLA-G.

  9. Novel strategies for adoptive therapy following HLA disparate transplants.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Richard J; Hasan, Aisha; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Koehne, Guenther; Prockop, Susan

    2011-09-01

    Transplants of SBA-E- allogeneic marrow or G-CSF mobilized CD34+ (ISOLEX) E- peripheral blood progenitor cells which are adequately depleted of T-cells, when administered without post-transplant immunosuppression now induce consistent engraftment with low incidences of acute and chronic GVHD both in HLA matched and HLA disparate recipients. Furthermore, the incidence of relapse post transplant is not increased in patients transplanted for AML, MDS or ALL. In our series, the incidence of severe infections in HLA-matched recipients of such T-cell depleted grafts also does not differ from that detected following similarly matched unmodified grafts. However, in recipients of HLA-haplotype disparate T-cell depleted grafts, the risk of lethal viral infections is increased and prolonged. In many cases, this risk is closely correlated with failures of immunodominant virus-specific donor T-cells transferred in the graft to recognize infected host cells because they are restricted by HLA alleles not shared by the host. To address this limitation, we have developed a panel of artificial antigen presenting cells, each expressing a single prevalent HLA-allele. Using this panel, we are able to selectively generate virus-specific cytotoxic T-cells of desired HLA restriction, to insure their effectiveness in HLA haplotype-disparate transplant recipients. We have also shown that partially HLA-matched, third party-derived EBV-specific T-cells, selected from our bank of previously generated and characterized GMP-grade cell lines on the basis of their HLA restriction, can induce durable remissions of rituximab-refractory EBV lymphomas. These approaches may thus provide new, immediately accessible resources for the generation and broad application of immune cell therapies to treat and prevent severe viral diseases post transplant. PMID:21925091

  10. Classical HLA-DRB1 and DPB1 Alleles Account for HLA Associations with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Invernizzi, Pietro; Ransom, Michael; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kosoy, Roman; Lleo, Ana; Shigeta, Russell; Franke, Andre; Bossa, Fabrizio; Amos, Christopher I.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Cusi, Daniele; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Podda, Mauro; Gershwin, M. Eric; Seldin, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Susceptibility to primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is strongly associated with HLA region polymorphisms. To determine if associations can be explained by classical HLA determinants we studied Italian 676 cases and 1440 controls with genotyped with dense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for which classical HLA alleles and amino acids were imputed. Although previous genome-wide association studies and our results show stronger SNP associations near DQB1, we demonstrate that the HLA signals can be attributed to classical DRB1 and DPB1 genes. Strong support for the predominant role of DRB1 is provided by our conditional analyses. We also demonstrate an independent association of DPB1. Specific HLA-DRB1 genes (*08, *11 and *14) account for most of the DRB1 association signal. Consistent with previous studies, DRB1*08 (p = 1.59 × 10−11) was the strongest predisposing allele where as DRB1*11 (p = 1.42 × 10−10) was protective. Additionally DRB1*14 and the DPB1 association (DPB1*03:01) (p = 9.18 × 10−7) were predisposing risk alleles. No signal was observed in the HLA class 1 or class 3 regions. These findings better define the association of PBC with HLA and specifically support the role of classical HLA-DRB1 and DPB1 genes and alleles in susceptibility to PBC. PMID:22573116

  11. Transient Astronomical Events as Inspiration Sources of Medieval Art. III: the 13th and 14th Centuries, and the case of the French "Ordre de L'Étoile"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bònoli, F.; Incerti, M.; Polcaro, V. F.

    2015-05-01

    Going ahead in our long-term project of analysis of the role of transient astronomical events as inspirational sources of medieval art, we extend our interest towards the 13th and 14th centuries, epochs of strong changes either in society, art or science. It is our aim to verify if the relationship we found in the 11th century between the number of artworks where a star is represented, and astonishing transient astronomical events was, in this new situation, still valid. Moreover, in order to check the influence of astronomical events on the 14th-century social and cultural environment, we focus on the case of the Ordre de l'Étoile, a chivalrous society founded by John II of France (Jan le Bon, roi de France) at the end of 1351, looking in ancient chronicles for some relevant contemporary astronomical event as an inspiration source for the "star" in the Order's name, in the garb of its knights and in its motto.

  12. First report on HLA-DPA1 gene allelic distribution in the general Lebanese population

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Joseph; Shammaa, Dina; Abbas, Fatmeh; Mahfouz, Rami A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims HLA-DPA1 is an important marker in bone marrow and organ transplantation and a highly emerging screening parameter in histocompatibility laboratories. Being highly polymorphic, it has another significant value in detecting population origins and migrations. This is the first study to assess DPA1 allele frequencies in an Arab population. Methods The HLA DPA1 alleles were identified using the One-Lambda assays on a Luminex reverse SSO DNA typing system. Our study included 101 individuals coming from different Lebanese geographical areas representing the different communities and religious sects of the country. Results We compared the results of this study to 16 different populations and found very interesting similarities and differences between Lebanese people and individuals of European ancestry. Conclusion This study is the first to describe the different allelic frequencies of HLA-DPA1 in the Lebanese population and will serve as a template that can be later used for disease association studies both at the level of the country and internationally. PMID:27014585

  13. HLA and genetic susceptibility to sleepwalking.

    PubMed

    Lecendreux, M; Bassetti, C; Dauvilliers, Y; Mayer, G; Neidhart, E; Tafti, M

    2003-01-01

    HLA-DQB1 typing was performed in 60 Caucasian subjects with sleepwalking (SW) disorder and their families and 60 ethnically matched subjects without any diagnosed sleep disorder. A total of 21 sleepwalkers (35.0%) were DQB1*0501 positive vs eight (13.3%) controls (P = 0.0056; odds ratio = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.4-8.7). The family data for all HLA subtypes were further assessed for allelic association with SW using the transmission-disequilibrium test. A significant excess transmission was observed for DQB1*05 and *04 alleles in familial cases, strongly suggesting that a DQB1 polymorphic amino acid might be more tightly associated than any single allele. Sequence screening revealed that Ser74 in the second exon shared by all DQB1*05 and *04 was 20 times transmitted against 4 times non-transmitted (P = 0.001) in familial cases of SW. Thus, together with narcolepsy and REM sleep behavior disorder, these findings suggest that specific DQB1 genes are implicated in disorders of motor control during sleep. PMID:12556916

  14. Role of HLA Adaptation in HIV Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kløverpris, Henrik N.; Leslie, Alasdair; Goulder, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Killing of HIV-infected cells by CD8+ T-cells imposes strong selection pressure on the virus toward escape. The HLA class I molecules that are successful in mediating some degree of control over the virus are those that tend to present epitopes in conserved regions of the proteome, such as in p24 Gag, in which escape also comes at a significant cost to viral replicative capacity (VRC). In some instances, compensatory mutations can fully correct for the fitness cost of such an escape variant; in others, correction is only partial. The consequences of these events within the HIV-infected host, and at the population level following transmission of escape variants, are discussed. The accumulation of escape mutants in populations over the course of the epidemic already shows instances of protective HLA molecules losing their impact, and in certain cases, a modest decline in HIV virulence in association with population-level increase in mutants that reduce VRC. PMID:26834742

  15. Insulin-dependent diabetes and HLA.

    PubMed

    Dausset, J; Hors, J; Contu, L; Busson, M; Schmid, M; Cathelineau, G; Lestradet, H; Baron, D

    1979-12-01

    The study of a hundred and fifteen unrelated insulin-dependent diabetes and eight families with at least two insulin-dependent diabetes members made it possible to confirm the higher frequency of HLA-B8 and B18 (p less than 0.001) among patients, producing a RR of 2.24 and 2.47 respectively. The increased B15 frequency did not achieve statistical significance. B18 whose gametic association (delta = 0.0438) was significant only in diabetic patients was often related to Aw19-2 (Aw30 + Aw31). The B8/B18 genotype gave a relative risk (RR = 4.98) which was significantly higher than that of B8, B18 and B15 heterozygotes (1.50, 1.24 and 1.39 respectively). Pairs of diabetic siblings were more frequently HLA identical than would be expected by chance, and distribution of the pairs of affected sibs into the three categories, identical, semi-identical and different, was closer to the recessive model than to the dominant one. The fact that the B8/B18 individuals had a RR slightly higher than the B8 and B18 homozygotes and distinctly higher than the heterozygotes for only one of these genes, favours the hypothesis of two dominant genes, giving the appearance of recessivity. The gene associated with B18 in Southern Europe seems to play the same part as that of the gene associated with B15 in Northern Europe. PMID:398300

  16. The alpha1 domain of HLA-G1 and HLA-G2 inhibits cytotoxicity induced by natural killer cells: is HLA-G the public ligand for natural killer cell inhibitory receptors?

    PubMed

    Rouas-Freiss, N; Marchal, R E; Kirszenbaum, M; Dausset, J; Carosella, E D

    1997-05-13

    We have investigated the protective role of the membrane-bound HLA-G1 and HLA-G2 isoforms against natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity. For this purpose, HLA-G1 and HLA-G2 cDNAs were transfected into the HLA class I-negative human K562 cell line, a known reference target for NK lysis. The HLA-G1 protein, encoded by a full-length mRNA, presents a structure similar to that of classical HLA class I antigens. The HLA-G2 protein, deduced from an alternatively spliced transcript, consists of the alpha1 domain linked to the alpha3 domain. In this study we demonstrate that (i) HLA-G2 is present at the cell surface as a truncated class I molecule associated with beta2-microglobulin; (ii) NK cytolysis, observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in polyclonal CD3(-) CD16(+) CD56(+) NK cells obtained from 20 donors, is inhibited by both HLA-G1 and HLA-G2; this HLA-G-mediated inhibition is reversed by blocking HLA-G with a specific mAb; this led us to the conjecture that HLA-G is the public ligand for NK inhibitory receptors (NKIR) present in all individuals; (iii) the alpha1 domain common to HLA-G1 and HLA-G2 could mediate this protection from NK lysis; and (iv) when transfected into the K562 cell line, both HLA-G1 and HLA-G2 abolish lysis by the T cell leukemia NK-like YT2C2 clone due to interaction between the HLA-G isoform on the target cell surface and a membrane receptor on YT2C2. Because NKIR1 and NKIR2, known to interact with HLA-G, were undetectable on YT2C2, we conclude that a yet-unknown specific receptor for HLA-G1 and HLA-G2 is present on these cells.

  17. Clinically relevant interpretation of solid phase assays for HLA antibody

    PubMed Central

    Bettinotti, Maria P.; Zachary, Andrea A.; Leffell, Mary S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Accurate and timely detection and characterization of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies are critical for pre-transplant and post-transplant immunological risk assessment. Solid phase immunoassays have provided increased sensitivity and specificity, but test interpretation is not always straightforward. This review will discuss the result interpretation considering technical limitations; assessment of relative antibody strength; and the integration of data for risk stratification from complementary testing and the patient's immunological history. Recent findings Laboratory and clinical studies have provided insight into causes of test failures – false positive reactions because of antibodies to denatured HLA antigens and false negative reactions resulting from test interference and/or loss of native epitopes. Test modifications permit detection of complement-binding antibodies and determination of the IgG subclasses. The high degree of specificity of single antigen solid phase immunoassays has revealed the complexity and clinical relevance of antibodies to HLA-C, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DP antigens. Determination of antibody specificity for HLA epitopes enables identification of incompatible antigens not included in test kits. Summary Detection and characterization of HLA antibodies with solid phase immunoassays has led to increased understanding of the role of those antibodies in graft rejection, improved treatment of antibody-mediated rejection, and increased opportunities for transplantation. However, realization of these benefits requires careful and accurate interpretation of test results. PMID:27200498

  18. Immunoregulatory Role of HLA-G in Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Contini, Paola; Negrini, Simone; Ciprandi, Giorgio; Puppo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases are sustained by a T-helper 2 polarization leading to interleukin-4 secretion, IgE-dependent inflammation, and mast cell and eosinophil activation. HLA-G molecules, both in membrane-bound and in soluble forms, play a central role in modulation of immune responses. Elevated levels of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) molecules are detected in serum of patients with allergic rhinitis to seasonal and perennial allergens and correlate with allergen-specific IgE levels, clinical severity, drug consumption, and response to allergen-specific immunotherapy. sHLA-G molecules are also found in airway epithelium of patients with allergic asthma and high levels of sHLA-G molecules are detectable in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage of asthmatic patients correlating with allergen-specific IgE levels. Finally, HLA-G molecules are expressed by T cells, monocytes-macrophages, and Langerhans cells infiltrating the dermis of atopic dermatitis patients. Collectively, although at present it is difficult to completely define the role of HLA-G molecules in allergic diseases, it may be suggested that they are expressed and secreted by immune cells during the allergic reaction in an attempt to suppress allergic inflammation. PMID:27413762

  19. Gorgan (Turkmen in Iran) HLA genetics: transplantation, pharmacogenomics and anthropology.

    PubMed

    Rey, Diego; Amirzargar, Ali; Areces, Cristina; Enríquez-de-Salamanca, Mercedes; Marco, Javier; Abd-El-Fatah-Khalil, Sedeka; Fernández-Honrado, Mercedes; Muñiz, Ester; Martín-Villa, José Manuel; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    HLA class I and II alleles have been studied in a population from Gorgan (North East Iranian city bordering Turkmenistan). This population is composed of mainly Turkmen who speak Oghuz Turkish language. Comparison of Gorgan people HLA profile has been carried out with about 7984 HLA chromosomes from other worldwide populations; extended haplotypes and three dimension genetic distances have been calculated by using neighbor-joining and correspondence relatedness analyses. Most frequent extended HLA haplotypes show a Siberian/Mediterranean admixture and closest populations are Chuvashians (North Caspian Sea, Russia) and other geographically close populations like Siberian Mansi, Buryats and other Iranians. New extended HLA haplotypes have been found, such as: A*31:01-B*35:01-DRB1*15:01-DQB1*03:01, A*01:01-B*35:01-DRB1*03:01-DQB1*02:01. Relationships of Turkmen with Kurgan (Gorgan) archaeological mounds, Scythians and Sarmatians are discussed. This study is also useful for a future transplantation Gorgan waiting list, Gorgan HLA and disease epidemiology and HLA pharmacogenomics.

  20. Addressing questions about including environmental effects in the DMSO HLA

    SciTech Connect

    Hummel, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    The Defense Modeling and Simulation Office (DMSO) is developing a High Level Architecture (HLA) to support the DOD Modeling and Simulation (M and S) community. Many, if not all, of the simulations involve the environment in some fashion. In some applications, the simulation takes place in an acknowledged environment without any environmental functionality being taken into account. The Joint Training Federation Prototype (JTFp) is one of several prototype efforts that have been created to provide a test of the DMSO HLA. In addition to addressing the applicability of the HLA to a training community, the JTFp is also one of two prototype efforts that is explicitly including environmental effects in their simulation effort. These two prototyping efforts are examining the issues associated with the inclusion of the environment in an HLA federation. In deciding whether or not to include an environmental federation in the JTFp effort, a number of questions have been raised about the environment and the HLA. These questions have raised the issue of incompatibility between the environment and the HLA and also shown that there is something unique about including the environment in simulations. The purpose of this White Paper, which was developed with inputs from the National Air and Space [Warfare] Model Program among others, is to address the various questions that have been posed about including environmental effects in an HLA simulation.

  1. Immunoregulatory Role of HLA-G in Allergic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Murdaca, Giuseppe; Contini, Paola; Negrini, Simone; Ciprandi, Giorgio; Puppo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases are sustained by a T-helper 2 polarization leading to interleukin-4 secretion, IgE-dependent inflammation, and mast cell and eosinophil activation. HLA-G molecules, both in membrane-bound and in soluble forms, play a central role in modulation of immune responses. Elevated levels of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) molecules are detected in serum of patients with allergic rhinitis to seasonal and perennial allergens and correlate with allergen-specific IgE levels, clinical severity, drug consumption, and response to allergen-specific immunotherapy. sHLA-G molecules are also found in airway epithelium of patients with allergic asthma and high levels of sHLA-G molecules are detectable in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage of asthmatic patients correlating with allergen-specific IgE levels. Finally, HLA-G molecules are expressed by T cells, monocytes-macrophages, and Langerhans cells infiltrating the dermis of atopic dermatitis patients. Collectively, although at present it is difficult to completely define the role of HLA-G molecules in allergic diseases, it may be suggested that they are expressed and secreted by immune cells during the allergic reaction in an attempt to suppress allergic inflammation. PMID:27413762

  2. Sequence-based definition of eight short tandem repeat loci located within the HLA-region in an Austrian population.

    PubMed

    Dauber, Eva-Maria; Wenda, Sabine; Schwartz-Jungl, Elisabeth Maria; Glock, Barbara; Mayr, Wolfgang R

    2015-01-01

    Sequenced allelic ladders are a prerequisite for reliable genotyping of short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphisms and consistent results across instrument platforms. For eight STR-loci located on the short arm of chromosome 6 (6p21.3), a sequenced based nomenclature was established according to international recommendations. Publicly available reference DNA samples were sequenced enabling interested laboratories to construct their own allelic ladders. Three tetrameric (D6S2691, D6S2678, DQIV), one trimeric (D6S2906) and four dimeric repeat loci (D6S2972, D6S2792, D6S2789, D6S273) were investigated. Apart from the very complex sequence structure at the DQIV locus, three loci showed a compound and four loci a simple repeat pattern. In the flanking regions of some loci additional single nucleotide and insertion/deletion polymorphisms occurred as well as sequence polymorphisms within the repeat region of alleles with the same length. In an Austrian Caucasoid population sample (n=293) between eight and 22 alleles were found. No significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg expectations was observed, the power of discrimination ranged from 0.826 to 0.978. The loci cover the HLA-coding region from HLA-A to HLA-DQB1 and can be used for a better definition of HLA haplotypes for population and disease association studies, recombination point mapping, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation as well as for identity and relationship testing. PMID:25450788

  3. Sequence-based definition of eight short tandem repeat loci located within the HLA-region in an Austrian population.

    PubMed

    Dauber, Eva-Maria; Wenda, Sabine; Schwartz-Jungl, Elisabeth Maria; Glock, Barbara; Mayr, Wolfgang R

    2015-01-01

    Sequenced allelic ladders are a prerequisite for reliable genotyping of short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphisms and consistent results across instrument platforms. For eight STR-loci located on the short arm of chromosome 6 (6p21.3), a sequenced based nomenclature was established according to international recommendations. Publicly available reference DNA samples were sequenced enabling interested laboratories to construct their own allelic ladders. Three tetrameric (D6S2691, D6S2678, DQIV), one trimeric (D6S2906) and four dimeric repeat loci (D6S2972, D6S2792, D6S2789, D6S273) were investigated. Apart from the very complex sequence structure at the DQIV locus, three loci showed a compound and four loci a simple repeat pattern. In the flanking regions of some loci additional single nucleotide and insertion/deletion polymorphisms occurred as well as sequence polymorphisms within the repeat region of alleles with the same length. In an Austrian Caucasoid population sample (n=293) between eight and 22 alleles were found. No significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg expectations was observed, the power of discrimination ranged from 0.826 to 0.978. The loci cover the HLA-coding region from HLA-A to HLA-DQB1 and can be used for a better definition of HLA haplotypes for population and disease association studies, recombination point mapping, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation as well as for identity and relationship testing.

  4. The Monospecificity of Novel Anti-HLA-E Monoclonal Antibodies Enables Reliable Immunodiagnosis, Immunomodulation of HLA-E, and Upregulation of CD8+ T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Mepur H; Terasaki, Paul I; Pham, Tho; Jucaud, Vadim

    2015-06-01

    In human cancers, over-expression of HLA-E is marked by gene expression. However, immunolocalization of HLA-E on tumor cells is impeded by the HLA-Ia reactivity of commercial anti-HLA-E monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). So there was a clear need to develop monospecific anti-HLA-E MAbs for reliable immunodiagnosis of HLA-E, particularly considering the prognostic relevance of HLA-E in human cancer. HLA-E overexpression is correlated with disease progression and poor survival of patients, both of which are attributed to the suppression of anti-tumor activity of cytotoxic T cells mediated by HLA-E. The suppression mechanism involves the binding of HLA-E-specific amino acids located on the α1 and α2 helices of HLA-E to the inhibitory receptors (CD94/NKG2a) on CD8+ T lymphocytes. An anti-HLA-E MAb that recognizes these HLA-E-specific sequences can not only be a monospecific MAb with potential for specific immunolocalization of HLA-E but can also block the sequences from interacting with the CD94/NKG2a receptors. We therefore developed several clones that secrete such HLA-E-specific MAbs; then we assessed the ability of the MAbs to bind to the amino acid sequences interacting with the CD94/NKG2a receptors by inhibiting them from binding to HLA-E with peptides that inhibit receptor binding. Elucidation of the immunomodulatory capabilities of these monospecific MAbs showed that they can induce proliferation of CD8+ T cells with or without co-stimulation. These novel MAbs can serve a dual role in combating cancer by blocking interaction of HLA-E with CD94/NKG2a and by promoting proliferation of both non-activated and activated CD8+ cytotoxic αβ T cells.

  5. Discrimination of HLA null and low expression alleles by cytokine-induced secretion of recombinant soluble HLA.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, Jan; Figueiredo, Constança; Hirv, Kaimo; Mytilineos, Joannis; Blasczyk, Rainer; Horn, Peter A; Eiz-Vesper, Britta

    2009-04-01

    The disruption of disulfide bridges can decrease or abolish the cell surface expression of HLA class I molecules. Such disulfide bridges are formed by cysteine residues between amino acid (aa) positions 101/164 (alpha(2) domain) and 203/259 (alpha(3) domain). Sequence alterations in codons 101, 164, 203 and 259 have been observed in eleven HLA-A molecules. All of these variants except of A*3014L and A*3211Q have been reported to result in null expression alleles. In the case of HLA-A*3014L, a transversion at nucleotide position 563 replaces cysteine by serine at position 164 of the mature polypeptide. HLA-A*3014L is not detectable by standard microlymphocytotoxicity assay. To verify low or non-expression of this allele, we cloned soluble HLA-A*3014L and the reference allele HLA-A*3001 into a eukaryotic expression vector and transfected K562, C1R and HEK293 cells. Expression of soluble HLA-A*3014L and HLA-A*3001 was measured in the supernatants of transfected and untransfected cells incubated with or without IFN-gamma and/or TNF-alpha using a W6/32 and anti-beta(2)-microglobulin-based sandwich ELISA. Expression of mRNA transcripts of both alleles was determined by real-time RT-PCR. HLA-A*3014L was not detected in the supernatant of unstimulated transfectants. Stimulation with IFN-gamma and/or TNF-alpha led to an increase of HLA-A*3014L secretion to a detectable level and increased HLA-A*3001 expression up to 8-fold, but did not show any difference in the increase of mRNA levels between HLA-A*3014L and A*3001. Because of this lack of any difference in the mRNA transcription, the protein expression defect is most likely caused by the missing disulfide bond formation in the alpha2 domain. Thus, exposing the cells to cytokine stress allows to distinguish between low- and non-expressed alleles and to classify alleles with a questionable expression pattern (Q alleles). Classifying HLA alleles in expressed and non-expressed variants is essential for matching assessments

  6. Relative Resistance of HLA-B to Downregulation by Naturally Occurring HIV-1 Nef Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mahiti, Macdonald; Toyoda, Mako; Jia, Xiaofei; Kuang, Xiaomei T.; Mwimanzi, Francis; Mwimanzi, Philip; Walker, Bruce D.; Xiong, Yong; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Brockman, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Nef binds to the cytoplasmic region of HLA-A and HLA-B and downregulates these molecules from the surface of virus-infected cells, thus evading immune detection by CD8+ T cells. Polymorphic residues within the HLA cytoplasmic region may affect Nef’s downregulation activity. However, the effects of HLA polymorphisms on recognition by primary Nef isolates remain elusive, as do the specific Nef regions responsible for downregulation of HLA-A versus HLA-B. Here, we examined 46 Nef clones isolated from chronically HIV-1 subtype B-infected subjects for their ability to downregulate various HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C molecules on the surface of virus-infected cells. Overall, HLA-B exhibited greater resistance to Nef-mediated downregulation than HLA-A, regardless of the cell type examined. As expected, no Nef clone downregulated HLA-C. Importantly, the differential abilities of patient-derived Nef clones to downregulate HLA-A and HLA-B correlated inversely with the sensitivities of HIV-infected target cells to recognition by effector cells expressing an HIV-1 Gag-specific T cell receptor. Nef codon function analysis implicated amino acid variation at position 202 (Nef-202) in differentially affecting the ability to downregulate HLA-A and HLA-B, an observation that was subsequently confirmed by experiments using Nef mutants constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The in silico and mutagenesis analyses further suggested that Nef-202 may interact with the C-terminal Cys-Lys-Val residues of HLA-A, which are absent in HLA-B. Taken together, the results show that natural polymorphisms within Nef modulate its interaction with natural polymorphisms in the HLA cytoplasmic tails, thereby affecting the efficiency of HLA downregulation and consequent recognition by HIV-specific T cells. These results thus extend our understanding of this complex pathway of retroviral immune evasion. PMID:26787826

  7. Indirectly Recognized HLA-C Mismatches and Their Potential Role in Transplant Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Thus, Kirsten A.; Te Boome, Liane; Kuball, Jürgen; Spierings, Eric

    2014-01-01

    HLA-C mismatches are clearly associated to alloreactivity after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation; in a number of large cohorts, HLA-C mismatches are correlated to an increased risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) or even impaired survival. While for HLA-A and -B, both antigenic as well as allelic mismatches are associated with an increased risk of acute GVHD, such an increased risk is only observed for antigenic HLA-C mismatches and not for allelic mismatches. These observations raise the question what sets HLA-C apart from HLA-A and -B. The difference may well be related to the reduced levels of cell-surface expression of HLA-C as compared to HLA-A and -B, possibly due to, among other factors, a limited peptide-binding capacity. This limited peptide-binding capacity may retain HLA-C in the ER and enhance degradation of the HLA-C protein. Once degraded, HLA-C-derived peptides can be presented to the immune system via other HLA alleles and are thus available for indirect recognition. Indeed, such HLA-C-derived peptides have previously been eluted from other HLA alleles. We have recently developed an approach to predict indirect recognition of HLA molecules, by establishing the numbers of predicted indirectly recognizable HLA epitopes (PIRCHES). The number of PIRCHES presented on HLA class I and II (PIRCHE-I and -II, respectively), are highly correlated to clinical measures of alloreactivity, such as acute GVHD. In the present “Hypothesis & Theory,” we reviewed the current knowledge on HLA-C mismatches and alloreactivity. Moreover, we speculate about the role of direct and indirect recognition of HLA-C and the consequences for donor selection in HLA-C mismatched stem-cell transplantation. PMID:24860572

  8. Association and frequency of HLA-A, B and HLA-DR genes in south Tunisian patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA).

    PubMed

    Mahfoudh, Nadia; Siala, Mariam; Rihl, Markus; Kammoun, Arwa; Frikha, Faten; Fourati, Hela; Younes, Mohamed; Gdoura, Radhouane; Gaddour, Lilia; Hakim, Faiza; Bahloul, Zouheir; Baklouti, Sofien; Bargaoui, Naceur; Sellami, Sleheddine; Hammami, Adnene; Makni, Hafedh

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the association of HLA-A, B and HLA-DR gene expression and to assess an association of additional HLA antigens besides HLA-B27 in south Tunisian patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA). Eighty-five patients diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis (AS, n=68) and reactive arthrithis (ReA, n=17) were selected and compared with 100 healthy controls (HC). HLA class I antigens were typed serologically using microlymphocytotoxicity technique. HLA-DRB1* alleles were studied by polymerase chain reaction amplification with sequence-specific primers. The significance of differences between patients and controls was tested by chi-square analysis. We found significantly increased frequencies of HLA-A3 (30.6%; pC=0.04; OR=2.95), HLA-B27 (62.35%; pC=4.10(-17), OR=53.55), and HLA-DRB1*15 (17.2%; pC=0.026; RR=2.58) alleles in SpA patients compared to HC. The most frequent and strongest association was observed for HLA-B27 in AS (pC=6.6 ×10(-16), OR=52.23). When AS and ReA patients were analysed separately, HLA-DRB1*15 and HLA-A3 were increased only in AS (pC=0.01, OR=2.99 and pC=0.03, OR=3.14, respectively). In ReA patients, HLA-DRB1*04 (p=0.033, pC=NS, OR=2.89) was found to be the most common allele. By analysing the HLA-B27-negative subgroup, HLA-A3 and HLA-DRB1*15 expression was found to be dependent on the presence of HLA-B27. HLA-B27 expression was higher in male (45/53; 85%) as compared to female (8/53; 15%) patients (p=0.03). Apart from HLA-B27, HLA-A3 and HLA-DRB1*15 are the MHC class I and II alleles found most frequent in Tunisian patients with AS, whereas HLA-DRB1*04 was found most frequent in ReA patients. HLA-B27 is more frequent in male than in female patients. PMID:21360006

  9. Common antigenic structures of HL-A antigens

    PubMed Central

    Nakamuro, K.; Tanigaki, N.; Kreiter, V. P.; Pressman, D.

    1974-01-01

    Spent culture media of all the human cell lines tested have been found to contain the antigenic activity present on the 11,000-Dalton HL-A common portion fragment of the HL-A antigen molecule that appears to be a characteristic, invariant portion of HL-A antigen molecules. From the culture medium of one of these lines, RPMI 1788, a lymphoid cell line, the substance carrying HL-A common activity was isolated, which was shown to be identical to the HL-A common portion fragment with respect to molecular size, electrophoretic mobility, isoelectric focusing patterns, and certain antigenic characteristics. By an isolation procedure involving differential ultrafiltration, gel filtration, and column electrophoresis, 8 litres of the culture medium yielded 1.5–2.0 A280 units of the substance representing 15–20 per cent of the HL-A common antigenic activity originally present. A single protein band with a Rf of 0.47 was obtained by disc electrophoresis. The molecular size was shown to be about 11,000 Daltons by gel filtration and by sodium dodecyl sulphate—acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Upon isoelectric focusing two bands were obtained which corresponded exactly to those obtained with HL-A common portion fragment prepared from papain-solubilized HL-A antigen preparations by acid dissociation. The isoelectric point of the major band was 5.0. The reactions of this substance with rabbit antisera against human lymphoid cell membrane and against the substance were essentially identical to the reactions of HL-A common portion fragment with these same antisera. ImagesFIG. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4476726

  10. Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Regulations of the HLA-G Gene

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Erick C.; Veiga-Castelli, Luciana C.; Yaghi, Layale; Donadi, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    HLA-G has a relevant role in immune response regulation. The overall structure of the HLA-G coding region has been maintained during the evolution process, in which most of its variable sites are synonymous mutations or coincide with introns, preserving major functional HLA-G properties. The HLA-G promoter region is different from the classical class I promoters, mainly because (i) it lacks regulatory responsive elements for IFN-γ and NF-κB, (ii) the proximal promoter region (within 200 bases from the first translated ATG) does not mediate transactivation by the principal HLA class I transactivation mechanisms, and (iii) the presence of identified alternative regulatory elements (heat shock, progesterone and hypoxia-responsive elements) and unidentified responsive elements for IL-10, glucocorticoids, and other transcription factors is evident. At least three variable sites in the 3′ untranslated region have been studied that may influence HLA-G expression by modifying mRNA stability or microRNA binding sites, including the 14-base pair insertion/deletion, +3142C/G and +3187A/G polymorphisms. Other polymorphic sites have been described, but there are no functional studies on them. The HLA-G coding region polymorphisms might influence isoform production and at least two null alleles with premature stop codons have been described. We reviewed the structure of the HLA-G promoter region and its implication in transcriptional gene control, the structure of the HLA-G 3′UTR and the major actors of the posttranscriptional gene control, and, finally, the presence of regulatory elements in the coding region. PMID:24741620

  11. Nucleotide sequence analysis of HLA-B*1523 and B*8101. Dominant alpha-helical motifs produce complex serologic recognition patterns for the HLA-B"DT" and HLA-B"NM5" antigens.

    PubMed

    Ellexson, M E; Zhang, G; Stewart, D; Lau, M; Teresi, G; Terasaki, P; Roe, B; Hildebrand, W

    1995-10-01

    Assigning a precise serologic specificity to the class I HLA-B"NM5" and HLA-B"DT" molecules has proven difficult, with patterns of serologic cross-reactivity suggesting that NM5 is most like antigens in the B5 CREG and that DT is either B7 or B40 like. To better understand the relationship these antigens share with other HLA-B molecules we determined the nucleotide sequence of the alleles encoding HLA-B"NM5" and HLA-B"DT". Sequencing results show that NM5 shares the most overall sequence homology with the B70 antigens and that differences at the alpha-helical Bw4/Bw6 epitope preclude serologic cross-reactivity between NM5 and the B70 antigens. Accordingly, NM5 has been assigned the name B*1523. The strong serologic impact of helical sequence conservations and variations is reiterated for the class I HLA-B"DT" molecule. Comparative analysis demonstrates that sequence conservations in the first domain's alpha-helix stimulate cross-reactivity between HLA-B"DT" and HLA-B7, whereas epitopes conserved in the second domain's alpha-helix impel cross-reactivity between HLA-B"DT" and HLA-B48. To convey the unique lineage of this hybrid B7/B48 molecule the name HLA-B*8101 has been assigned to HLA-B"DT".

  12. Specific human B lymphocyte alloantigens linked to HL-A.

    PubMed Central

    Mann, D L; Abelson, L; Henkart, P; Harris, S D; Amos, D B

    1975-01-01

    Sera, previously found to react specifically with B lymphoid cultured cells, were tested on isolated T and B peripheral blood lymphocytes in a microcytotoxicity assay. Studies were performed on lymphocytes obtained from several large Amish families. The sera used in these studies were cytotoxic to peripheral blood, B lymphocytes, but not cytotoxic to T lymphocytes. The antigens detected followed the inheritance pattern of HL-A haplotypes. The strong linkage disequilibrium with HL-A antigens suggests that genes controlling the expression of B lymphocyte antigens are linked to genes controlling HL-A alloantigens. PMID:1082138

  13. Development of a high-resolution NGS-based HLA-typing and analysis pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Wittig, Michael; Anmarkrud, Jarl A.; Kässens, Jan C.; Koch, Simon; Forster, Michael; Ellinghaus, Eva; Hov, Johannes R.; Sauer, Sascha; Schimmler, Manfred; Ziemann, Malte; Görg, Siegfried; Jacob, Frank; Karlsen, Tom H.; Franke, Andre

    2015-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex contains the most polymorphic genes in the human genome. The classical HLA class I and II genes define the specificity of adaptive immune responses. Genetic variation at the HLA genes is associated with susceptibility to autoimmune and infectious diseases and plays a major role in transplantation medicine and immunology. Currently, the HLA genes are characterized using Sanger- or next-generation sequencing (NGS) of a limited amplicon repertoire or labeled oligonucleotides for allele-specific sequences. High-quality NGS-based methods are in proprietary use and not publicly available. Here, we introduce the first highly automated open-kit/open-source HLA-typing method for NGS. The method employs in-solution targeted capturing of the classical class I (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C) and class II HLA genes (HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, HLA-DPA1, HLA-DPB1). The calling algorithm allows for highly confident allele-calling to three-field resolution (cDNA nucleotide variants). The method was validated on 357 commercially available DNA samples with known HLA alleles obtained by classical typing. Our results showed on average an accurate allele call rate of 0.99 in a fully automated manner, identifying also errors in the reference data. Finally, our method provides the flexibility to add further enrichment target regions. PMID:25753671

  14. Development of a high-resolution NGS-based HLA-typing and analysis pipeline.

    PubMed

    Wittig, Michael; Anmarkrud, Jarl A; Kässens, Jan C; Koch, Simon; Forster, Michael; Ellinghaus, Eva; Hov, Johannes R; Sauer, Sascha; Schimmler, Manfred; Ziemann, Malte; Görg, Siegfried; Jacob, Frank; Karlsen, Tom H; Franke, Andre

    2015-06-23

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex contains the most polymorphic genes in the human genome. The classical HLA class I and II genes define the specificity of adaptive immune responses. Genetic variation at the HLA genes is associated with susceptibility to autoimmune and infectious diseases and plays a major role in transplantation medicine and immunology. Currently, the HLA genes are characterized using Sanger- or next-generation sequencing (NGS) of a limited amplicon repertoire or labeled oligonucleotides for allele-specific sequences. High-quality NGS-based methods are in proprietary use and not publicly available. Here, we introduce the first highly automated open-kit/open-source HLA-typing method for NGS. The method employs in-solution targeted capturing of the classical class I (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C) and class II HLA genes (HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, HLA-DPA1, HLA-DPB1). The calling algorithm allows for highly confident allele-calling to three-field resolution (cDNA nucleotide variants). The method was validated on 357 commercially available DNA samples with known HLA alleles obtained by classical typing. Our results showed on average an accurate allele call rate of 0.99 in a fully automated manner, identifying also errors in the reference data. Finally, our method provides the flexibility to add further enrichment target regions.

  15. Prospective HLA-DR matching in cadaveric renal transplants: a single center study.

    PubMed

    Mendez, R; Iwaki, Y; Mendez, R; Bogaard, T; Self, B

    1983-03-01

    We reviewed 77 potential cadaveric allograft recipients who had undergone prospective HLA-A and B locus and HLA-DR antigen identification. Matching was accomplished, giving first priority to HLA-DR compatibility and relying on HLA-A and B antigen matching only in situations of total HLA-DR incompatibility. Complete HLA-DR identification occurred in 56 per cent of all patients. There were 15 patients (19.5 per cent) who received a 2/2 HLA-DR perfect match, with 86.7 plus or minus 8.8 per cent 1-year actuarial graft survival, and 41 (53 per cent) who received a 1/2 HLA-DR match, with 58.2 plus or minus 7.8 per cent 1-year actual allograft survival. Finally, 21 patients (27 per cent) received a 0/2 HLA-DR match, with 64.9 plus or minus 10.7 per cent actual survival. These results and their mirrored mismatching results showed statistically significant allograft success in only the HLA-DR 2/2 matches. Matching for HLA 2 DR donors proved a statistically significant success over the other HLA-DR allograft matches and the older controversial matching system based on HLA-A and B locus antigens. The restricted gene polymorphism of the HLA-DR systems allows for a relatively high percentage of perfect HLA-DR matches.

  16. Interplay between immune responses to HLA and non-HLA self-antigens in allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Angaswamy, Nataraju; Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Sarma, Nayan J; Subramanian, Vijay; Klein, Christina; Wellen, Jason; Shenoy, Surendra; Chapman, William C; Mohanakumar, T

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies strongly suggest an increasing role for immune responses against self-antigens (Ags) which are not encoded by the major histocompatibility complex in the immunopathogenesis of allograft rejection. Although, improved surgical techniques coupled with improved methods to detect and avoid sensitization against donor human leukocyte antigen (HLA) have improved the immediate and short term function of transplanted organs. However, acute and chronic rejection still remains a vexing problem for the long term function of the transplanted organ. Immediately following organ transplantation, several factors both immune and non immune mechanisms lead to the development of local inflammatory milieu which sets the stage for allograft rejection. Traditionally, development of antibodies (Abs) against mismatched donor HLA have been implicated in the development of Ab mediated rejection. However, recent studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that development of humoral and cellular immune responses against non-HLA self-Ags may contribute in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection. There are reports demonstrating that immune responses to self-Ags especially Abs to the self-Ags as well as cellular immune responses especially through IL17 has significant pro-fibrotic properties leading to chronic allograft failure. This review summarizes recent studies demonstrating the role for immune responses to self-Ags in allograft immunity leading to rejection as well as present recent evidence suggesting there is interplay between allo- and autoimmunity leading to allograft dysfunction.

  17. International trends in health science librarianship part 14: East Africa (Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda).

    PubMed

    Gathoni, Nasra; Kamau, Nancy; Nannozi, Judith; Singirankabo, Marcel

    2015-06-01

    This is the 14th in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship in the 21st century. This is the second of four articles pertaining to different regions in the African continent. The present issue focuses on countries in East Africa (Kenya, Uganda and Rwanda). The next feature column will investigate trends in West Africa. JM.

  18. 75 FR 8190 - Art Advisory Panel of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    .... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joseph E. Bothwell, C:AP:P&V:ART, 1099 14th Street, NW., Room 4200E... discussions must include tax return information. Therefore, the Panel meetings will be closed to the public... confidentiality of tax returns and return information as required by section 6103 of the Internal Revenue...

  19. 77 FR 13389 - Art Advisory Panel of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Ruth Vriend, C:AP:P&V:ART, 1099 14th Street NW., Room 4200E, Washington, DC 20005... include tax return information. Therefore, the Panel meetings will be closed to the public since all... confidentiality of tax returns and return information as required by section 6103 of the Internal Revenue...

  20. Analysis of the functional epitopes on different HLA-A2 molecules.

    PubMed

    Goulmy, E; van der Poel, J; Giphart, M; van Rood, J J

    1984-01-01

    Recent studies show that the serologically defined HLA-A2 molecule can be subdivided according to functional and biochemical characteristics. By the use of various HLA-A2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and isoelectric focusing, the serologically homogeneous HLA-A2 molecule can be divided into four subtypes. The polymorphism of the serologically defined HLA-A2 molecule has also been demonstrated by the use of HLA-A2-restricted CTLs. This study was designed to analyze the functional epitopes on different HLA-A2 molecules with special regard to the recognition patterns of different types of HLA-A2-restricted CTLs directed against minor histocompatibility (minor H) antigens. Fifteen so-called HLA-A2 variants belonging to distinct HLA-A2 subtypes were tested as target cells in the cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) assay against (1) HLA-A2-restricted antiminor H-Y CTLs, (2) HLA-A2 and -B7-restricted antiminor H-Y CTLs, and (3) HLA-A2, -Bw62 and -B27-restricted antiminor "HA" CTLs. We found that those three CTLs recognized only one of those HLA-A2 variants. Furthermore, positive reactions by the antiminor H CTLs were only observed on those variant cells which carried, in addition to the HLA-A2 variant, either another "normal" HLA-A2 molecule or another required restricting class I molecule necessary for associative recognition. These results indicate that the absence of HLA-A2 normal allotypic target determinant(s) leads to the loss of epitope(s) necessary for recognition of minor H-Y and minor "HA" transplantation antigens by HLA-restricted CTLs. We can conclude from the present study that HLA-A2-restricted antiminor H CTLs use, in general, the same epitope (or cluster of epitopes) for cellular recognition as alloimmune HLA-A2-specific CTLs. PMID:6204938

  1. Identification of HLA-A*0201-Restricted Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitopes Derived from HLA-DOβ as a Novel Target for Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yoon Joong; Zeng, Wanyong; Song, Weihua; Reinhold, Bruce; Choi, Jaewon; Brusic, Vladimir; Yamashita, Takuto; Munshi, Aditya; Li, Cheng; Minvielle, Stephane; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Munshi, Nikhil; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Sasada, Tetsuro

    2014-01-01

    Summary Despite the recent development of effective therapeutic agents against multiple myeloma (MM), new therapeutic approaches, including immunotherapies, remain to be developed. Here we identified novel human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201 (HLAA2)-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes from a B cell specific molecule HLA-DOβ (DOB) as a potential target for MM. By DNA microarray analysis, the HLADOB expression in MM cells was significantly higher than that in normal plasma cells. Twenty-five peptides were predicted to bind to HLA-A2 from the amino acid sequence of HLA-DOB. When screened for the immunogenicity in HLA-A2-transgenic mice immunized with HLA-DOB cDNA, 4 peptides were substantially immunogenic. By mass spectrometry analysis of peptides eluted from HLA-A2-immunoprecipitates of MM cell lines, only two epitopes, HLA-DOB232-240 (FLLGLIFLL) and HLA-DOB185-193 (VMLEMTPEL), were confirmed for their physical presence on cell surface. When healthy donor blood was repeatedly stimulated in vitro with these two peptides and assessed by antigen-specific γ-interferon secretion, HLA-DOB232-240 was more immunogenic than HLA-DOB185-193. Additionally, the HLA-DOB232-240-specific CTLs, but not the HLA-DOB185-193-specific CTLs, displayed an major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted reactivity against MM cell lines expressing both HLA-A2 and HLA-DOB. Taken together, based on the physical presence on tumour cell surface and high immunogenicity, HLA-DOB232-240 might be useful for developing a novel immunotherapy against MM. PMID:24032635

  2. Soluble monomers, dimers and HLA-G-expressing extracellular vesicles: the three dimensions of structural complexity to use HLA-G as a clinical biomarker.

    PubMed

    Nardi, F da Silva; König, L; Wagner, B; Giebel, B; Santos Manvailer, L F; Rebmann, V

    2016-09-01

    The HLA-G molecule belongs to the family of nonclassical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I. At variance to classical HLA class I, HLA-G displays (i) a low number of nucleotide variations within the coding region, (ii) a high structural diversity, (iii) a restricted peptide repertoire, (iv) a limited tissue distribution and (v) strong immune-suppressive properties. The physiological HLA-G surface expression is restricted to the maternal-fetal interface and to immune-privileged adult tissues. Soluble forms of HLA-G (sHLA-G) are detectable in various body fluids. Cellular activation and pathological processes are associated with an aberrant or a neo-expression of HLA-G/sHLA-G. Functionally, HLA-G and its secreted forms are considered to be key players in the induction of short- and long-term tolerance. Thus, its unique expression profile and tolerance-inducing functions render HLA-G/sHLA-G an attractive biomarker to monitor the systemic health/disease status and disease activity/progression for clinical approaches in disease management and treatments. Here, we place emphasis on (i) the current status of the tolerance-inducing functions by HLA-G/sHLA-G, (ii) the current complexity to implement this molecule as a meaningful clinical biomarker regarding the three dimensions of structural diversity (monomers, dimers and HLA-G-expressing extracellular vesicles) with its functional implications, and (iii) novel and future approaches to detect and quantify sHLA-G structures and functions.

  3. HLA-B15: a widespread and diverse family of HLA-B alleles.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, W H; Domena, J D; Shen, S Y; Lau, M; Terasaki, P I; Bunce, M; Marsh, S G; Guttridge, M G; Bias, W B; Parham, P

    1994-04-01

    HLA-B15 embraces a multiplicity of antigenic specificities which vary in their distribution amongst human populations. To correlate B15 molecular structure with the serological picture we have sequenced alleles encoding the various subspecificities of the B15 antigen: B62, B63, B75, B76 and B77, and a number of "variants" of these antigens including the 8w66 split of B63. HLA-B63 (B*1517) and 8w66 (B*1516) heavy chains have sequence identity to B17 in the alpha 1 helix correlating with the antigenic crossreactivity of these molecules. HLA-B77(B*1513) and B75 (B*1502) heavy chains differ solely in segments determining the Bw4 and Bw6 public epitopes, consistent with the serological description of the B77 and B75 antigens. One allele encoding the B76 antigen (B*1512) appears to be the product of gene conversion between the HLA-A and -B loci and differs from B*1501 in codons 166 and 167. In contrast, a second allele encoding the B76 antigen (B*1514) differs from B*1501 by an unrelated substitution in codon 167 which confers similarily with B45, an antigen crossreactive with B76. A third allele encoding B76, B*1519, differs from B*1512 by a unique point substitution in exon 4. Three alleles encoding variant B15 and B62 antigens (B*1508, B*1511 and B*1515) differ from B*1501 by localized clusters of substitutions that probably result from interallelic conversion. The B15 sequences described in this paper, in combination with those previously determined, define a family of 22 alleles, including those encoding the B46 and B70 antigens. Within this family the patterns of allelic substitution are analogous to those of other HLA-A and -B families, in that pairwise differences almost always involve functional positions of the antigen recognition site and recombination is the major agent of diversification.

  4. HLA ASSOCIATIONS IN OBESE WHITE AND BLACK ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Merlin G.; Walton, Dominique; Zhu, Weitong; Niblack, Gary

    2016-01-01

    We summarized HLA-A and -B data from 1095 black and white adult men and women with or without obesity to determine if specific HLA tissue types are overrepresented in obese individuals compared with nonobese. None of the three HLA types (Aw30, B18, Bw35) previously reported to relate to obesity was overrepresented in obese subjects in our study. However, B14 and B41 haplotypes were overrepresented in obese white men compared with nonobese men, and B7 was overrepresented in obese black men compared with nonobese men. Additional research will be required to confirm the HLA associations we found and to determine if methodologic differences could account for the differences among the previous studies.

  5. Reappraisal of HLA antibody analysis and crossmatching in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Po-Chang; Ozawa, Miyuki

    2007-01-01

    It has been established that preformed IgG antibodies specific for donor HLA antigens may accelerate graft failure. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated adverse graft survival in patients who have anti-HLA antibodies, whether preformed or developed post-transplant. More recently, ELISA and flow cytometric techniques were introduced to overcome the limited sensitivity and specificity of the CDC assay. These emerging approaches can be reliably used to predict crossmatches in highly sensitized patients and also to monitor the development of clinically relevant anti-HLA antibody after transplantation. This retrospective study used LAT-M screening and Luminex HLA class I and II specificity assay to re-examine: (a), the impact of pre-transplant HLA antibody on long term graft survival; (b), the accuracy with which detection of HLA antibody and specificity by ELISA predicts pretransplant CDC crossmatch; (c), a comparison of Luminex and ELISA methods in detecting HLA antibodies. In this study, pre-transplant sera from 288 renal patients followed up at NCKUH were tested by the ELISA method, LAT-M. The tests showed that 19% had HLA antibodies before transplantation. Among the 234 of the patients who did not have pre-transplant antibodies, 85% enjoyed 5-year functional graft survival, 76% 10-year, and 56% 15-year functional graft survival. The corresponding functional graft survival for the 54 patients who tested HLA antibody-positive was 65%, 53% and 28% (P=0.0021). Sera from 481 patients awaiting kidney transplantation at NCKUH were tested by the ELISA method LAT-M and by CDC to determine how well HLA antibodies detected by ELISA predict the crossmatches shown by CDC. HLA antibodies found by ELISA ranged from 24% weak reactivity (OD "2") to 17% strongly reactive (OD "8"). The positive predictive value (PPV) of ELISA-detected antibodies for positive CDC crossmatch at the time of transplant was found to be 43-54%. The negative predictive value (NPV)-ELISA found

  6. Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia due to HLA-A2 antibody.

    PubMed

    Chow, M P; Sun, K J; Yung, C H; Hu, H Y; Tzeng, J L; Lee, T D

    1992-01-01

    A male, full-term baby with thrombocytopenia was born by a G3P2A1 mother who was not associated with autoimmune disease. Platelet antibody screening was positive by using lymphocytotoxicity test, platelet suspension immunofluorescence test and solid-phase red cell adherence test. The identified HLA antibody was of A2 specificity. It was confirmed by testing the mother's and the baby's sera against the lymphocytes and platelets of 10 HLA-A2-positive donors. The possibility of platelet-specific antibody as the cause of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia was ruled out by testing against platelets of 10 HLA-A2-negative donors and the known platelet-specific antigens utilizing immobilized, purified platelet glycoprotein as targets. The mother's serum reacted strongly with both the father's and the baby's platelets and lymphocytes. This neonatal thrombocytopenia was most likely due to the maternal HLA antibody, which was induced by her antecedent gestations.

  7. [Pitfalls in interpreting anti-HLA antibodies by Luminex technology].

    PubMed

    Moalic-Allain, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    The Luminex technology has become an important tool for HLA antibody screening and identification. This is the most sensitive technology to detect HLA antibodies for transplant patients and patients on awaiting list, and it has ushered a new strategy to determine HLA compatibility between donor and recipient. Moreover, the clinical relevance of all detected anti-HLA antibodies is not well understood, because this technique was shown to be prone to many artefacts or interferences, leading to a complicated interpretation for biologists and clinicians. Our objective in this article is to provide a careful consideration about this solid phase assay, and to focus attention on raised questions about technical performance and interpretation of the results. We should keep in mind that our results could change the clinical management of sensitized patients, their aptitude to receive a graft, and their follow-up. PMID:24736137

  8. Cross-reactions in the HLA system revealed by red blood cells expressing HLA determinants, with particular reference to cross-reaction between HLA-A2 and B17.

    PubMed

    Nordhagen, R

    1983-01-01

    Sera with cytotoxic and haemagglutinating activity towards HLA-A2/28 were also shown to react with red blood cells (RBC) expressing the HLA-B17 antigen determinant. Absorption procedures with white blood cells (WBC) indicated that this was due to an HLA-A2/B17 cross-reaction. Absorption experiments with some other sera which previously had shown cytotoxic and haemagglutinating activity towards different HLA specificities, revealed broad cross-reaction related to HLA-B locus antigens.

  9. The role of HLA antibodies in allogeneic SCT: is the 'type-and-screen' strategy necessary not only for blood type but also for HLA?

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, S; Taniguchi, K; Ogawa, H; Saji, H

    2012-12-01

    The role of HLA antibodies in SCT has drawn increasing attention because of the significantly increased number of patients who receive HLA-mismatched SCT, including cord blood transplantation, haploidentical SCT and unrelated SCT. Technical advancements in the methods of HLA Ab testing have realized rapid, accurate and objective identification, as well as quantification of specific HLA antibodies. Recent clinical studies have suggested that the presence of donor-specific HLA antibodies (DSA) in patients is associated with graft failure in HLA-mismatched SCT when the above-listed stem cell sources are used and results in different impacts. Of note, most of the 'HLA-matched' unrelated SCT actually involve HLA mismatches in HLA-DP and the presence of antibodies against this locus has been reported to be associated with graft failure. Thus, HLA Ab should be examined as a work-up for all patients who undergo SCT from 'alternative donors.' The simplest route for preventing HLA Ab-mediated graft failure in Ab-positive patients is to avoid donors who possess the target Ag of HLA antibodies. If SCT from such donors must be performed, treatment for DSA before SCT may improve the chances of successful donor engraftment.

  10. Does Rh Immune Globulin Suppress HLA Sensitization in Pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Richard M.; Schlumpf, Karen S.; Wright, David J.; Triulzi, Darrell J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND How Rh immune globulin (RhIG) prevents sensitization to D antigen is unclear. If RhIG Fc delivers a nonspecific immunosuppressive signal, then RhIG may inhibit sensitization to antigens other than D. HLA antibody prevalence was compared in previously pregnant RhD negative versus RhD positive women to investigate whether RhIG suppresses HLA sensitization. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS In the Leukocyte Antibody Prevalence Study (LAPS)1, 7,920 volunteer blood donors were screened for anti-HLA antibodies and surveyed about prior pregnancies and transfusions. A secondary analysis of the LAPS database was performed. RESULTS RhD negative women ≤40 years old (presumed to have received antenatal ± postpartum RhIG in all pregnancies) had a significantly lower HLA sensitization rate than RhD positive women (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.40–0.83). When stratified by deliveries (1, 2, 3, or ≥4), RhD negative women ≤40 were HLA sensitized less often than RhD positive women in every case. In contrast, a clear relationship between RhD type and HLA sensitization was not seen in older previously pregnant women whose childbearing years are presumed to have preceded the use of routine RhIG prophylaxis. In a multivariable logistic regression model, RhD negative women ≤40 years old remained significantly less likely to be HLA sensitized compared with RhD positive women after adjusting for parity, time from last pregnancy, lost pregnancies, and transfusions (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.34–0.88). CONCLUSION Consistent with a nonspecific immunosuppressive effect of RhIG, younger previously pregnant RhD negative women were less likely than previously pregnant RhD positive women to be HLA sensitized. PMID:23252646

  11. Calreticulin recognizes misfolded HLA-A2 heavy chains.

    PubMed

    Mancino, Laura; Rizvi, Syed Monem; Lapinski, Philip Edward; Raghavan, Malini

    2002-04-30

    Our studies investigated functional interactions between calreticulin, an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Using in vitro thermal aggregation assays, we established that calreticulin can inhibit heat-induced aggregation of soluble, peptide-deficient HLA-A2 purified from supernatants of insect cells. The presence of HLA-A2-specific peptides also inhibits heat-induced aggregation. Inhibition of heat-induced aggregation of peptide-deficient HLA-A2 by calreticulin correlates with a rescue of the HLA-A2 heavy chain from precipitation, by forming high-molecular-weight complexes with calreticulin. Complex formation between HLA-A2 heavy chains and calreticulin occurs at 50 degrees C but not 37 degrees C, suggesting polypeptide-based interactions between the HLA-A2 heavy chain and calreticulin. Once complexes are formed, the addition of peptide is not sufficient to trigger efficient assembly of heavy chain/beta2m/peptide complexes. Using a fluorescent peptide-based binding assay, we show that calreticulin does not enhance peptide binding by HLA-A2 at 37 degrees C. We also show that calreticulin itself is converted to oligomeric species on exposure to 37 degrees C or higher temperatures, and that oligomeric forms of calreticulin are active in inhibiting thermal aggregation of peptide-deficient HLA-A2. Taken together, these results suggest that calreticulin functions in the recognition of misfolded MHC class I heavy chains in the endoplasmic reticulum. However, in the absence of other endoplasmic reticulum components, calreticulin by itself does not enhance the assembly of misfolded MHC class I heavy chains with beta2m and peptides. PMID:11983893

  12. Hybrid genes between HLA-A2 and HLA-A3 constructed by in vivo recombination allow mapping of HLA-A2 and HLA-A3 polymorphic antigenic determinants.

    PubMed

    Sire, J; Chimini, G; Boretto, J; Toubert, A; Kahn-Perles, B; Layet, C; Sodoyer, R; Lemonnier, F; Jordan, B

    1988-04-01

    HLA-A2 and -A3 genes have been modified in their third exon (second domain) by using in vivo recombination. In this method Escherichia coli are transfected with a plasmid which contains two highly homologous sequences (e.g., the third exons of HLA-A2 and -A3) and has been linearized by cleavage between these two sequences. Circularization takes place in the bacteria by homologous recombination leading to hybrid A2-A3 sequences. The analysis by DNA sequencing of a number of such recombinants shows that they indeed occur by homologous recombination (no insertions or deletions) and that the probability of crossing over decreases as the distance from the free end of DNA in the homologous region increases. No double recombinants were observed. These hybrid exons were reinserted into either HLA-A2 or HLA-A3 genes, thus generating a panel of functional hybrid genes containing one or several HLA-A2 specific substitutions in an HLA-A3 background or vice versa. These genes were expressed by transfection into murine P815-high transfection efficiency recipient cells. Serologic analysis leads to the conclusion that expression of polymorphic antigenic determinants specific for HLA-A2 (detected with M58, A2A28M1, and CR11.351 mAb) is linked to the presence of threonine residue (amino acid (AA) 142) and/or histidine residue (AA 145) and valine residue (AA 152). The expression of specific HLA-A3 polymorphic determinants (recognized by GAP-A3 mAb) is correlated with the existence of a asparagine residue (AA 127) and a aspartic residue (AA 161). But aspartic residue 161 contributes with glutamic acid residue 152 in the formation of the A3 epitope recognized by the anti-A3 mAb X1.23.2. PMID:2450922

  13. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DR4. Positive association with rapidly progressing periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Katz, J; Goultschin, J; Benoliel, R; Brautbar, C

    1987-09-01

    The relationship between human leukocyte antigens (HLA) determinants and periodontitis has been examined by several authors without showing any particular pattern. However, no study has investigated the HLA-D determinants, which are generally associated with immune disorders, and rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP). The HLA profile of 10 RPP patients was compared with that of a healthy control population (n = 120). Although no significant difference was found for HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C, HLA-DR4 of the HLA-D group was found in 80% of patients but only in 38.3% of controls. A high frequency of HLA-DR4 has been reported in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. This finding may be significant in light of previous reports highlighting similarities between RA and periodontal disease. PMID:3498813

  14. A novel and major association of HLA-C in Graves' disease that eclipses the classical HLA-DRB1 effect.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Matthew J; Howson, Joanna M M; Heward, Joanne M; Carr-Smith, Jackie; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

    2007-09-15

    Association of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-encoded HLA-DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 haplotype with Graves' disease (GD) has been known for several years. Recent evidence from other autoimmune diseases has suggested that the HLA class I encoded HLA-B/-C molecules could be conferring HLA-DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 independent effects on disease. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of HLA-B and HLA-C in GD in a white ethnic group of 806 patients with GD and 487 control subjects from the UK. Of the five loci (HLA-B, -C, -DRB1, -DQA1, -DQB1), HLA-C demonstrated the strongest association (P = 1.20 x 10(-20)) with HLA-C*07 predisposing [OR = 1.63, 95% CI (1.23-2.17)] and both HLA-C*03 [OR = 0.54, 95% CI (0.38-0.77)], HLA-C*16 [OR = 0.36, 95% CI (0.21-0.61)] protective. The other loci were then tested for HLA-C-independent associations. HLA-B was found to be associated independently of HLA-C (P = 1.54 x 10(-6)) with the other three loci, HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DQA1, also improving the model but with less confidence (P > 10(-5)). This study has for the first time provided evidence of a primary association of HLA-C, and to a lesser extent HLA-B, with GD. Class II loci could still have effects on GD, but they appear smaller than the HLA-C association. A full investigation of the MHC region, including all class I and II loci is now required. Our results point to a primary role for class I-mediated responses in GD, a condition classically assumed to be a straightforward HLA-class II-restricted autoantibody response to the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor. PMID:17597093

  15. A novel and major association of HLA-C in Graves' disease that eclipses the classical HLA-DRB1 effect.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Matthew J; Howson, Joanna M M; Heward, Joanne M; Carr-Smith, Jackie; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

    2007-09-15

    Association of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-encoded HLA-DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 haplotype with Graves' disease (GD) has been known for several years. Recent evidence from other autoimmune diseases has suggested that the HLA class I encoded HLA-B/-C molecules could be conferring HLA-DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 independent effects on disease. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of HLA-B and HLA-C in GD in a white ethnic group of 806 patients with GD and 487 control subjects from the UK. Of the five loci (HLA-B, -C, -DRB1, -DQA1, -DQB1), HLA-C demonstrated the strongest association (P = 1.20 x 10(-20)) with HLA-C*07 predisposing [OR = 1.63, 95% CI (1.23-2.17)] and both HLA-C*03 [OR = 0.54, 95% CI (0.38-0.77)], HLA-C*16 [OR = 0.36, 95% CI (0.21-0.61)] protective. The other loci were then tested for HLA-C-independent associations. HLA-B was found to be associated independently of HLA-C (P = 1.54 x 10(-6)) with the other three loci, HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DQA1, also improving the model but with less confidence (P > 10(-5)). This study has for the first time provided evidence of a primary association of HLA-C, and to a lesser extent HLA-B, with GD. Class II loci could still have effects on GD, but they appear smaller than the HLA-C association. A full investigation of the MHC region, including all class I and II loci is now required. Our results point to a primary role for class I-mediated responses in GD, a condition classically assumed to be a straightforward HLA-class II-restricted autoantibody response to the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor.

  16. HLA-C expression levels define permissible mismatches in hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gooley, Theodore A.; Malkki, Mari; Bacigalupo, Andrea P.; Cesbron, Anne; Du Toit, Ernette; Ehninger, Gerhard; Egeland, Torstein; Fischer, Gottfried F.; Gervais, Thibaut; Haagenson, Michael D.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Hsu, Katharine; Jindra, Pavel; Madrigal, Alejandro; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Ringdén, Olle; Schroeder, Marlis L.; Spellman, Stephen R.; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Velardi, Andrea; Witt, Campbell S.; O’Huigin, Colm; Apps, Richard; Carrington, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Life-threatening graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) limits the use of HLA-C-mismatched unrelated donors in transplantation. Clinicians lack criteria for donor selection when HLA-C-mismatched donors are a patient’s only option for cure. We examined the role for HLA-C expression levels to identify permissible HLA-C mismatches. The median fluorescence intensity, a proxy of HLA-C expression, was assigned to each HLA-C allotype in 1975 patients and their HLA-C-mismatched unrelated transplant donors. The association of outcome with the level of expression of patients’ and donors’ HLA-C allotypes was evaluated in multivariable models. Increasing expression level of the patient’s mismatched HLA-C allotype was associated with increased risks of grades III to IV acute GVHD, nonrelapse mortality, and mortality. Increasing expression level among HLA-C mismatches with residue 116 or residue 77/80 mismatching was associated with increased nonrelapse mortality. The immunogenicity of HLA-C mismatches in unrelated donor transplantation is influenced by the expression level of the patient’s mismatched HLA-C allotype. HLA-C expression levels provide new information on mismatches that should be avoided and extend understanding of HLA-C-mediated immune responses in human disease. PMID:25323824

  17. Identification of multiple independent susceptibility loci in the HLA region in Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Travis; Coit, Patrick; Adler, Adam; Yilmaz, Vuslat; Aksu, Kenan; Düzgün, Nursen; Keser, Gokhan; Cefle, Ayse; Yazici, Ayten; Ergen, Andac; Alpsoy, Erkan; Salvarani, Carlo; Casali, Bruno; Kötter, Ina; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Wijmenga, Cisca; Direskeneli, Haner; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Sawalha, Amr H

    2013-03-01

    Behçet's disease is an inflammatory disease characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers and significant organ involvement. Localizing the genetic association between HLA-B*51 and Behçet's disease and exploring additional susceptibility loci in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region are complicated by the strong linkage disequilibrium in this region. We genotyped 8,572 variants in the extended HLA locus and carried out imputation and meta-analysis of 24,834 variants in 2 independent Behçet's disease cohorts from 2 ancestry groups. Genotyped SNPs were used to infer classical HLA alleles in the HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DRB1 loci. Our data suggest that the robust HLA-B*51 association in Behçet's disease is explained by a variant located between the HLA-B and MICA genes (rs116799036: odds ratio (OR) = 3.88, P = 9.42 × 10(-50)). Three additional independent genetic associations within PSORS1C1 (rs12525170: OR = 3.01, P = 3.01 × 10(-26)), upstream of HLA-F-AS1 (rs114854070: OR = 1.95, P = 7.84 × 10(-14)) and with HLA-Cw*1602 (OR = 5.38, P = 6.07 × 10(-18)) were also identified and replicated.

  18. Definition of four HLA-A2 subtypes by CML typing and biochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    van der Poel, J J; Mölders, H; Thompson, A; Ploegh, H L

    1983-01-01

    The population of HLA-A2-positive individuals, currently considered serologically homogeneous, can be divided into three subtypes on the basis of antigen recognition by various HLA-A2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). When these three types of HLA-A2 antigens were analyzed biochemically, they were found to be distinct. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) of HLA antigens digested with neuraminidase (NANAse) suggested that the difference(s) reside in the polypeptide backbone of the HLA-A2 heavy chain. Biochemical analysis distinguishes three distinct categories of HLA-A2 antigens: (1) a major subtype, designated HLA-A2.I, (2) a minor subtype, designated HLA-A2.II, possessing a more basic isoelectric point (IEP) and (3) a minor HLA-A2 subtype more acidic in its IEP than HLA-A2.I, designated HLA-A2.III. A fourth HLA-A2 subtype could be defined by discordance between cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) typing and biochemical analysis. The latter HLA-A2 antigen was defined as a variant by CTL, but was biochemically indistinguishable from the major subtype HLA-A2.I. PMID:6407985

  19. Utility of HLA Antibody Testing in Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Konvalinka, Ana

    2015-01-01

    HLA antigens are polymorphic proteins expressed on donor kidney allograft endothelium and are critical targets for recipient immune recognition. HLA antibodies are risk factors for acute and chronic rejection and allograft loss. Solid-phase immunoassays for HLA antibody detection represent a major advance in sensitivity and specificity over cell-based methods and are widely used in organ allocation and pretransplant risk assessment. Post-transplant, development of de novo donor–specific HLA antibodies and/or increase in donor-specific antibodies from pretransplant levels are associated with adverse outcomes. Although single antigen bead assays have allowed sensitive detection of recipient HLA antibodies and their specificities, a number of interpretive considerations must be appreciated to understand test results in clinical and research contexts. This review, which is especially relevant for clinicians caring for transplant patients, discusses the technical aspects of single antigen bead assays, emphasizes their quantitative limitations, and explores the utility of HLA antibody testing in identifying and managing important pre- and post-transplant clinical outcomes. PMID:25804279

  20. Types of HLA in the bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC).

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Erkan; Uğur Özalp, Ali; Cekmen, Arman; Eren, Bülent; Onal, Bülent; Akkuş, Emre; Erdoğan, Ergun

    2013-02-01

    HLA plays a complementary role in the interaction between tumor and body immunology. The aim of this study was to determine the existence of the association between the HLA system and transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Using standard micro-lymphocytotoxic method of Terasaki, HLA-A, B, DR and DQ antigen types of 30 patients with TCC of the bladder were compared with the control group (30 healthy people). In the TCC patient group, HLA -DQ6(1) and HLA -DQ7(3) antigens were detected with a significantly higher frequency than in the control group (p=0.018 and p=0.038, respectively), whereas HLA-A10, B4, DR53 and DQ1 antigens were detected with significantly higher frequency in the control group (p less 0.05 in all). It suggests that patients who had the antigens detected were at higher risk of TCC, and the ones who had the antigens displaying protective features as were detected in the control group, were at lesser risk.

  1. HLA-G and susceptibility to develop celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Catamo, Eulalia; Zupin, Luisa; Segat, Ludovica; Celsi, Fulvio; Crovella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The Human Leukocyte Antigen-G has immunomodulatory function and its expression has been associated with several diseases. In our study we analyzed HLA-G polymorphisms in order to evaluate their possible association with susceptibility to celiac disease development. A total of 420 celiac patients and 509 controls were genotyped for HLA-G polymorphisms. We sequenced 800bp upstream the ATG codon (5' upstream regulatory region) and the whole 3' untranslated region of the HLA-G gene, whereas the ΔC deletion at exon 3 was detected by RFLP-PCR. Five polymorphisms (namely -477 C>G, -369 C>A, 14bp del/ins, 3187 A>G, 3196 C>G) and one haplotype (TCGGTACGAAITCCCGAG) were significantly more frequent in celiac patients than controls and associated with increased disease susceptibility. The 14bp I/I, 3187 G/G, 3196 G/G genotypes and TCGGTACGAAITCCCGAG haplotype, were still significantly associated with increased disease susceptibility (and in addition also the 3003 C/C genotype) when the analysis was restricted to patients and controls presenting the DQ2.5 or DQ8 HLA-DQ celiac disease risk haplotypes. Our findings indicate an association between HLA-G gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to celiac disease development, suggesting that HLA-G molecule is possibly involved in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  2. HLA-B27/microbial mimicry: an in vivo analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Kapasi, K; Chui, B; Inman, R D

    1992-01-01

    The association between three major spondyloarthritic diseases, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, and reactive arthritis, and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class 1 antigen HLA-B27 is well documented. The hypothesis of cross-reactivity between HLA-B27 and the antecedent infection-causing Gram-negative pathogens such as Salmonella, Shigella and Yersinia has been suggested by in vitro studies employing monoclonal antibodies. We have examined the possibility of such cross-reactivity in vivo using various rabbit immune sera and patient sera as the source of cross-reacting antibody. Mouse L cells were transfected with HLA-A3 or HLA-B27 and used as a source of antigen. Western blot analysis employing denatured antigen, FACS analysis employing native antigen and immunoprecipitation studies were undertaken to detect cross-reacting antibodies generated in vivo to HLA-B27 antigen. Antibodies generated in vivo by infection in patients or immunization in animals against arthritogenic bacteria did not demonstrate any cross-reactivity with HLA-B27 by any of the methods used. As defined by the humoral immune response, molecular mimicry appears unlikely to explain the role of B27 in the pathogenesis of reactive arthritis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:1478690

  3. Effect of proteasome inhibitors on expression of HLA-G isoforms.

    PubMed

    Poláková, K; Bandzuchová, E; Bystrická, M; Pancuchárová, H; Russ, G

    2006-01-01

    HLA-G primary transcript is alternatively spliced into a number of mRNAs. In addition to full length HLA-G1 protein isoform these mRNAs might also encode truncated HLA-G protein isoforms lacking one or two extracellular domains. Whereas HLA-G1 protein isoform is regularly identified, truncated HLAG protein isoforms are not detected even if all alternative spliced mRNAs are present in cells. The absence of entire domain(s) renders the truncated HLA-G protein isoforms incapable of binding peptide and beta2-microglobulin. These features of truncated HLA-G protein isoforms may result in their rapid degradation by proteasomes. Here we show that despite the presence of all alternatively spliced HLA-G transcripts in JEG-3 cells pretreated with proteasome inhibitors only a full length HLA-G1 protein isoform was regularly detected. Interestingly, immunoblot analysis showed slight increase of HLA-G1 protein in cells pretreated with proteasome inhibitors, although the expression of HLA-G1 transcript was basically not affected. Expression of HLA-G3 transcript increased in JEG-3 cells pre-incubated with LLL, however, neither HLA-G3 nor other HLA-G short protein isoform was regularly detected. In K562 transfectants proteasome inhibitor LLL greatly enhanced expression of the HLA-G1 and -G2 transcripts as well as corresponding protein isoforms. Flow cytometry analysis showed that in cells pre-treated with proteasome inhibitors cell surface expression of HLA-G1 protein decreased but the quantity of intracellularly localized HLA-G antigens increased. Altogether our results suggest that truncated HLA-G proteins isoforms are not detected in JEG-3 cells as a result of their instability and the low translation efficiency of truncated HLA-G transcripts.

  4. 5' and 3' untranslated regions contribute to the differential expression of specific HLA-A alleles.

    PubMed

    René, Céline; Lozano, Claire; Villalba, Martin; Eliaou, Jean-François

    2015-12-01

    In hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), when no HLA full-matched donor is available, alternative donors could include one HLA-mismatched donor. Recently, the low expressed HLA-C alleles have been identified as permissive mismatches for the best donor choice. Concerning HLA-A, the degree of variability of expression is poorly understood. Here, we evaluated HLA-A expression in healthy individuals carrying HLA-A*02 allele in different genotypes using flow cytometry and allele-specific quantitative RT-PCR. While an interindividual variability of HLA-A*02 cell surface expression, not due to the allele associated, was observed, no difference of the mRNA expression level was shown, suggesting the involvement of the posttranscriptional regulation. The results of qRT-PCR analyses exhibit a differential expression of HLA-A alleles with HLA-A*02 as the strongest expressed allele independently of the second allele. The associated non-HLA-A*02 alleles were differentially expressed, particularly the HLA-A*31 and HLA-A*33 alleles (strong expression) and the HLA-A*29 (low expression). The presence of specific polymorphisms in the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the HLA-A*31 and HLA-A*33 alleles could contribute to this high level of expression. As previously described for HLA-C, low-expressed HLA-A alleles, such as HLA-A*29, could be considered as a permissive mismatch, although this needs to be confirmed by clinical studies.

  5. Suppression of allo-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies secreted by B memory cells in vitro: intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) versus a monoclonal anti-HLA-E IgG that mimics HLA-I reactivities of IVIg

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, D; Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Miyazaki, T; Pham, T; Jucaud, V

    2014-01-01

    B memory cells remain in circulation and secrete alloantibodies without antigen exposure > 20 years after alloimmunization postpartum or by transplantation. These long-lived B cells are resistant to cytostatic drugs. Therapeutically, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is administered to reduce allo-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies pre- and post-transplantation, but the mechanism of reduction remains unclear. Recently, we reported that IVIg reacts with several HLA-I alleles and the HLA reactivity of IVIg is lost after its HLA-E reactivity is adsorbed out. Therefore, we have generated an anti-HLA-E monoclonal antibody that mimics the HLA-reactivity of IVIg to investigate whether this antibody suppresses IgG secretion, as does IVIg. B cells were purified from the blood of a woman in whose blood the B memory cells remained without antigen exposure > 20 years after postpartum alloimmunization. The B cells were stimulated with cytokines using a well-defined culture system. The anti-HLA-E monoclonal antibody (mAb) significantly suppressed the allo-HLA class-II IgG produced by the B cells, and that this suppression was far superior to that by IVIg. These findings were confirmed with HLA-I antibody secreted by the immortalized B cell line, developed from the blood of another alloimmunized woman. The binding affinity of the anti-HLA-E mAb for peptide sequences shared (i.e. shared epitopes) between HLA-E and other β2-microglobulin-free HLA heavy chains (open conformers) on the cell surface of B cells may act as a ligand and signal suppression of IgG production of activated B memory cells. We propose that anti-HLA-E monoclonal antibody may also be useful to suppress allo-HLA IgG production in vivo. PMID:24611451

  6. Non-HLA type 1 diabetes genes modulate disease risk together with HLA-DQ and islet autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Maziarz, M; Hagopian, W; Palmer, JP; Sanjeevi, CB; Kockum, I; Breslow, N; Lernmark, Å

    2015-01-01

    The possible interrelations between HLA-DQ, non-HLA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and islet autoantibodies were investigated at clinical onset in 1-34 year old type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients (n=305) and controls (n=203). Among the non-HLA SNPs reported by the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium, 24% were supported in this Swedish replication set including that the increased risk of minor PTPN22 allele and high risk HLA was modified by GAD65 autoantibodies. The association between T1D and the minor AA+AC genotype in ERBB3 gene was stronger among IA-2 autoantibody-positive patients (comparison p=0.047). The association between T1D and the common insulin (AA) genotype was stronger among insulin autoantibody (IAA)-positive patients (comparison p=0.008). In contrast, the association between T1D and unidentified 26471 gene was stronger among IAA-negative (comparison p=0.049) and IA-2 autoantibody-negative (comparison p=0.052) patients. Finally, the association between IL2RA and T1D was stronger among IAA-positive than among IAA-negative patients (comparison p=0.028). These results suggest that the increased risk of T1D by non-HLA genes is often modified by both islet autoantibodies and HLA-DQ. The interactions between non-HLA genes, islet autoantibodies and HLA-DQ should be taken into account in T1D prediction studies as well as in prevention trials aimed at inducing immunological tolerance to islet autoantigens. PMID:26513234

  7. The distribution of KIR-HLA functional blocks is different from north to south of Italy.

    PubMed

    Fasano, M E; Rendine, S; Pasi, A; Bontadini, A; Cosentini, E; Carcassi, C; Capittini, C; Cornacchini, G; Espadas de Arias, A; Garbarino, L; Carella, G; Mariotti, M L; Mele, L; Miotti, V; Moscetti, A; Nesci, S; Ozzella, G; Piancatelli, D; Porfirio, B; Riva, M R; Romeo, G; Tagliaferri, C; Lombardo, C; Testi, M; Amoroso, A; Martinetti, M

    2014-03-01

    The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR)-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) interaction represents an example of genetic epistasis, where the concomitant presence of specific genes or alleles encoding receptor-ligand units is necessary for the activity of natural killer (NK) cells. Although KIR and HLA genes segregate independently, they co-evolved under environmental pressures to maintain particular KIR-HLA functional blocks for species survival. We investigated, in 270 Italian healthy individuals, the distribution of KIR and HLA polymorphisms in three climatic areas (from cold north to warm south), to verify their possible geographical stratification. We analyzed the presence of 13 KIR genes and genotyped KIR ligands belonging to HLA class I: HLA-C, HLA-B and HLA-A. We did not observe any genetic stratification for KIR genes and HLA-C ligands in Italy. By contrast, in a north-to-south direction, we found a decreasing trend for the HLA-A3 and HLA-A11 ligands (P = 0.012) and an increasing trend for the HLA-B ligands carrying the Bw4 epitope (P = 0.0003) and the Bw4 Ile80 epitope (P = 0.0005). The HLA-A and HLA-B KIR ligands were in negative linkage disequilibrium (correlation coefficient -0.1211), possibly as a consequence of their similar function in inhibiting NK cells. The distribution of the KIR-HLA functional blocks was different along Italy, as we observed a north-to-south ascending trend for KIR3DL1, when coupled with HLA-B Bw4 ligands (P = 0.0067) and with HLA-B Bw4 Ile80 (P = 0.0027), and a descending trend for KIR3DL2 when coupled with HLA-A3 and HLA-A11 ligands (P = 0.0044). Overall, people from South Italy preferentially use the KIR3DL1-HLA-B Bw4 functional unit, while those from the North Italy equally use both the KIR3DL2-HLA-A3/A11 and the KIR3DL1-HLA-B Bw4 functional units to fight infections. Thus, only KIR3DL receptors, which exert the unique role of microbial sensors through the specific D0 domain, and their cognate

  8. Oligoclonal band phenotypes in MS differ in their HLA class II association, while specific KIR ligands at HLA class I show association to MS in general.

    PubMed

    Gustavsen, Marte W; Viken, Marte K; Celius, Elisabeth G; Berge, Tone; Mero, Inger-Lise; Berg-Hansen, Pål; Aarseth, Jan H; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Søndergaard, Helle B; Sellebjerg, Finn; Oturai, Annette B; Hillert, Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Olsson, Tomas; Kockum, Ingrid; Lie, Benedicte A; Harbo, Hanne F

    2014-09-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have been reported to have different HLA class II allele profiles depending on oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in the cerebrospinal fluid, but HLA class I alleles and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) ligands have not been studied. We investigated the association of HLA alleles and KIR ligands according to OCB status in MS patients (n=3876). Specific KIR ligands were associated with patients when compared to controls (n=3148), supporting a role for NK cells in MS pathogenesis. HLA class I alleles and KIR ligands did not differ between OCB phenotypes, but HLA class II associations were convincingly replicated.

  9. Interaction between des-Tyr1-gamma-endorphin and HLA class I molecules: serological detection of an HLA-A2 subtype.

    PubMed

    Claas, F H; van der Poel, J J; Castelli-Visser, R; Pool, J; Chen, R B; Xu, K Y; van Rood, J J

    1985-01-01

    Preincubation of lymphocytes with des-Tyr1-gamma-endorphin (DT gamma E) inhibits the reaction between some HLA alloantisera and their corresponding antigens. One HLA-A2-specific antiserum was found which could detect a subtype of the HLA-A2 antigen on DT gamma E-treated lymphocytes from some donors. Comparison with the HLA-A2 subtypes as defined by a combination of cytotoxic T lymphocyte typing and biochemistry showed a complete correlation with the previously described HLA-A2.3 subtype. PMID:3876989

  10. The nucleotide sequence of HLA-B{sup *}2704 reveals a new amino acid substitution in exon 4 which is also present in HLA-B{sup *}2706

    SciTech Connect

    Rudwaleit, M.; Bowness, P.; Wordsworth, P.

    1996-12-31

    The HLA-B27 subtype HLA-B{sup *}2704 is virtually absent in Caucasians but common in Orientals, where it is associated with ankylosing spondylitis. The amino acid sequence of HLA-B{sup *}2704 has been established by peptide mapping and was shown to differ by two amino acids from HLA-B{sup *}2705, HLA-B{sup *}2704 is characterized by a serine for aspartic acid substitution at position 77 and glutamic acid for valine at position 152. To date, however, no nucleotide sequence confirming these changes at the DNA level has been published. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Update of the HLA class I eplet database in the website based registry of antibody-defined HLA epitopes.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, R J

    2014-06-01

    Eplets are small configurations of polymorphic amino acid residues on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules and are considered as essential components of HLA epitopes recognized by antibodies. This report describes a new design of the eplet repertoire in HLA-ABC alleles used in Luminex kits for antibody testing. There were three steps (1): identify all combinations of polymorphic residues with HLA molecular modeling within a 3-Å radius, (2) determine polymorphic residue compositions of 3 Å patches from amino acid sequences of HLA alleles in Luminex panels and (3) annotate eplets from one or more patches present on one allele or shared by the same group of alleles. There are now 270 HLA-ABC eplets in the Registry, of which 219 are in antibody-accessible positions on the molecular surface and 51 are defined solely by residue polymorphisms located below the molecular surface. Each eplet has a list of Luminex and non-Luminex alleles for which mismatch acceptability can be determined.

  12. HLA and epidermolysis bullosa: evidence for independent assortment of Weber-Cockayne subtype of epidermolysis bullosa and HLA complex.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, S; Tyring, S K; Feldkamp, M; Johnson, L B; Fine, J D

    1991-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the genetic linkage (but not the association) between HLA complex and Weber-Cockayne Subtype of epidermolysis bullosa (EBS-WC). We HLA typed 44 members of three multi-generation families in which 24 members have the clinical evidence of EBS-WC. The patterns of inheritance of various HLA haplotypes and the disease were mathematically analyzed to estimate frequency of recombination (i.e. genetic distance) between HLA complex and the disease by calculating Lod Scores for each family separately as well as all for three families combined. Our results show that only one family had a positive Lod Score. The Lod Scores for the remaining two families as well as the combined Lod Score for all three families were negative. These data suggest that odds are against the genetic linkage between HLA complex and Weber-Cockayne Subtype of epidermolysis bullosa and in favor of independent assortment of the disease and HLA complex.

  13. Soluble HLA-G and HLA-E Levels in Bone Marrow Plasma Samples Are Related to Disease Stage in Neuroblastoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Fabio; Pozzi, Sarah; Carlini, Barbara; Amoroso, Loredana; Pistoia, Vito; Corrias, Maria Valeria

    2016-01-01

    The role of nonclassical HLA-class Ib molecules HLA-G and HLA-E in the progression of Neuroblastoma (NB), the most common pediatric extracranial solid tumor, has been characterized in the last years. Since BM infiltration by NB cells is an adverse prognostic factor, we have here analyzed for the first time the concentration of soluble (s)HLA-G and HLA-E in bone marrow (BM) plasma samples from NB patients at diagnosis and healthy donors. sHLA-G and sHLA-E are present in BM plasma samples, and their levels were similar between NB patients and controls, thus suggesting that these molecules are physiologically released by resident or stromal BM cell populations. This hypothesis was supported by the finding that sHLA-G and sHLA-E levels did not correlate with BM infiltration and other adverse prognostic factors (MYCN amplification and age at diagnosis). In contrast, BM plasma levels of both molecules were higher in patients with metastatic disease than in patients with localized NB, thus suggesting that concentration of these molecules might be correlated with disease progression. The prognostic role of sHLA-G and sHLA-E concentration in the BM plasma for NB patients will be evaluated in future studies, by analyzing the clinical outcome of the same NB patients at follow-up. PMID:27610393

  14. Soluble HLA-G and HLA-E Levels in Bone Marrow Plasma Samples Are Related to Disease Stage in Neuroblastoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Sarah; Carlini, Barbara; Amoroso, Loredana; Corrias, Maria Valeria

    2016-01-01

    The role of nonclassical HLA-class Ib molecules HLA-G and HLA-E in the progression of Neuroblastoma (NB), the most common pediatric extracranial solid tumor, has been characterized in the last years. Since BM infiltration by NB cells is an adverse prognostic factor, we have here analyzed for the first time the concentration of soluble (s)HLA-G and HLA-E in bone marrow (BM) plasma samples from NB patients at diagnosis and healthy donors. sHLA-G and sHLA-E are present in BM plasma samples, and their levels were similar between NB patients and controls, thus suggesting that these molecules are physiologically released by resident or stromal BM cell populations. This hypothesis was supported by the finding that sHLA-G and sHLA-E levels did not correlate with BM infiltration and other adverse prognostic factors (MYCN amplification and age at diagnosis). In contrast, BM plasma levels of both molecules were higher in patients with metastatic disease than in patients with localized NB, thus suggesting that concentration of these molecules might be correlated with disease progression. The prognostic role of sHLA-G and sHLA-E concentration in the BM plasma for NB patients will be evaluated in future studies, by analyzing the clinical outcome of the same NB patients at follow-up.

  15. Soluble HLA-G and HLA-E Levels in Bone Marrow Plasma Samples Are Related to Disease Stage in Neuroblastoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Sarah; Carlini, Barbara; Amoroso, Loredana; Corrias, Maria Valeria

    2016-01-01

    The role of nonclassical HLA-class Ib molecules HLA-G and HLA-E in the progression of Neuroblastoma (NB), the most common pediatric extracranial solid tumor, has been characterized in the last years. Since BM infiltration by NB cells is an adverse prognostic factor, we have here analyzed for the first time the concentration of soluble (s)HLA-G and HLA-E in bone marrow (BM) plasma samples from NB patients at diagnosis and healthy donors. sHLA-G and sHLA-E are present in BM plasma samples, and their levels were similar between NB patients and controls, thus suggesting that these molecules are physiologically released by resident or stromal BM cell populations. This hypothesis was supported by the finding that sHLA-G and sHLA-E levels did not correlate with BM infiltration and other adverse prognostic factors (MYCN amplification and age at diagnosis). In contrast, BM plasma levels of both molecules were higher in patients with metastatic disease than in patients with localized NB, thus suggesting that concentration of these molecules might be correlated with disease progression. The prognostic role of sHLA-G and sHLA-E concentration in the BM plasma for NB patients will be evaluated in future studies, by analyzing the clinical outcome of the same NB patients at follow-up. PMID:27610393

  16. Association between HLA-C*04 and American cutaneous leishmaniasis in endemic region of southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ribas-Silva, R C; Ribas, A D; Ferreira, E C; Silveira, T G V; Borelli, S D

    2015-11-23

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic infectious disease with global repercussions. American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) is endemic in southern Brazil and its pathogenesis varies according to parasite species, immune response, and host genetics. In terms of immunogenetics, many host genes, including HLA (human leukocyte antigen), could be involved in susceptibility to and protection against ACL. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between HLA class I genes (HLA-A, -B, and -C) and ACL in an endemic region of southern Brazil. The allele frequencies of 186 patients diagnosed with ACL and 278 healthy individuals were compared. HLA class I (HLA-A, -B, and -C) typing was carried out by PCR-SSO using Luminex technology. The results revealed an association between the HLA-C*04 allele and the patient study group, in which it appeared more frequently than in the control group [21.5 vs 13.49% (P = 0.0016 and Pc = 0.0258; OR = 1.7560; 95%CI = 1.2227-2.5240)], thereby suggesting an increased susceptibility to ACL. Additional allelic groups such as HLA-A*02, HLA-B*35, HLA-B*45, HLA-C*01, and HLA-C*15 were also implicated; however, further investigation is necessary to confirm their association with ACL. Therefore, the results obtained in this study demonstrate the involvement of HLA class I genes in the susceptibility or resistance to ACL, with significant association between HLA-C*04 and ACL susceptibility.

  17. Clinical implication of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-F expression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Harada, Aya; Ishigami, Sumiya; Kijima, Yuko; Nakajo, Akihiro; Arigami, Takaaki; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Kita, Yoshiaki; Yoshinaka, Heiji; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2015-11-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-F is one of the non-classical HLA class I molecules that protects the fetus in pregnancy. HLA-F expression was immunohistochemically examined and the association between clinical parameters and HLA-F expression was analyzed. Cancerous HLA-F and stromal HLA-F-positive infiltrating cells were detected in 91 (40.0%) and 186 (81.6%) cases, respectively. HLA-F positivity in cancer cells was significantly associated with tumor size (P < 0.05). There was a weak correlation between HLA-F positivity of cancer cells and HLA-F positive infiltrative cells (P < 0.01, r = 0.11). HLA-F positivity did not affect patients' survival in 209 breast cancer. However, confined to stage II breast cancer, the HLA-F positive group showed significantly poorer outcomes than the HLA-F negative group (P < 0.05). The present study provides the first evidence that HLA-F positivity in breast carcinoma affects clinicopathological factors and could be selected as a prognostic marker for limited clinical stage.

  18. Establishing Assay Cutoffs for HLA Antibody Screening of Apheresis Donors

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, Danielle M.; Norris, Philip J.; Endres, Robert O.; Pandey, Suchitra; Kleinman, Steven H.; Wright, David; Sun, Yu; Busch, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND TRALI is the leading cause of transfusion-related deaths. Donor HLA antibodies have been implicated in TRALI cases. Blood centers are implementing TRALI risk reduction strategies based on HLA antibody screening of some subpopulations of ever-pregnant apheresis platelet donors. However, if screening assay cutoffs are too sensitive, donation loss may adversely impact blood availability. STUDY DESIGN Pregnancy history and HLA antibody screening and single antigen bead (SAB) data from blood donors in the REDS-II Leukocyte Antibody Prevalence Study (LAPS) were evaluated for correlations between assay screening values, HLA antibody titer, and number of HLA antigen specificities. The probabilities of matching a cognate antigen in a recipient were calculated and examined in association with total number of specificities observed and screening values. The relative impact of imposing various screening assay cutoffs or pregnancy stratification was examined in relation to detection of HLA antibody reactive donations and loss of donors and donations. RESULTS We provide evidence that higher HLA Ab screening assay values are associated with maintaining higher screening signals upon dilution and an increased breadth of specificities compared with lower screening values; the latter correlated with an increased risk of a cognate antigen match in potential recipients. Depending upon the TRALI risk reduction strategy used, the potential loss of donations ranged between 0.9 and 6.0%. CONCLUSION This analysis should enable blood centers to decide upon a TRALI risk reduction strategy for apheresis platelets that is consistent with how much donation loss the blood center can tolerate. PMID:21332726

  19. Soluble HLA-G generated by proteolytic shedding inhibits NK-mediated cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Gyu Man; Lee, Sunray; Park, Boyoun; Kim, Eunkyung; Shin, Jinwook; Cho, Kwangmin; Ahn, Kwangseog

    2004-01-16

    In contrast to the classical HLA class Ia molecules, the nonclassical HLA-G primary transcript is alternatively spliced to generate several mRNAs that encode four membrane-bound and three soluble isoforms. This study demonstrated that the soluble form of HLA-G can also be generated by metalloproteinase-dependent shedding at post-translational level. These soluble HLA-G1 molecules generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound HLA-G1 associate with beta2-microglobulin and contain bound peptides that are stable at physiological conditions. This report further showed that the soluble HLA-G1 is able to protect HLA class I-negative K562 cells from NK lysis, suggesting that soluble HLA-G could act as an immunoregulator in NK cell recognition and possibly in other immune responses.

  20. Contrasting Roles of Interallelic Recombination at the Hla-a and Hla-B Loci

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, A. L.; Hughes, M. K.; Watkins, D. I.

    1993-01-01

    A statistical study of DNA sequences of alleles at the highly polymorphic class I MHC loci of humans, HLA-A and HLA-B, showed evidence of both large-scale recombination events (involving recombination of exons 1-2 of one allele with exons 3-8 of another) and small-scale recombination events (involving apparent exchange of short DNA segments). The latter events occurred disproportionately in the region of the gene encoding the antigen recognition site (ARS) of the class I molecule. Furthermore, they involved the ARS codons which are under the strongest selection favoring allelic diversity at the amino acid level. Thus, the frequency of recombinant alleles appears to have been increased by some form of balancing selection (such as overdominant selection) favoring heterozygosity in the ARS. These analyses also revealed a striking difference between the A and B loci. Recombination events appear to have occurred about twice as frequently at the B locus, and recombinants at the B locus were significantly more likely to affect polymorphic sites in the ARS. At the A locus, there are well-defined allelic lineages that have persisted since prior to the human-chimpanzee divergence; but at the B locus, there is no evidence for such long-lasting allelic lineages. Thus, relatively frequent interallelic recombination has apparently been a feature of the long-term evolution of the B locus but not of the A locus. PMID:8454208

  1. Contrasting roles of interallelic recombination at the HLA-A and HLA-B loci

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, A.L.; Hughes, M.K. ); Watkins, D.I. )

    1993-03-01

    A statistical study of DNA sequences of alleles at the highly polymorphic class I MHC loci of humans, HLA-A and HLA-B, showed evidence of both large-scale recombination events(involving recombination of exons 1-2 of one allele with exons 3-8 of another) and small scale recombination events (involving apparent exchange of short DNA segments). The latter events occurred disproportionately in the region of the gene encoding the antigen recognition site (ARS) of the class I molecule. Furthermore, they involved the ARS codons which are under the strongest selection favoring allelic diversity at the amino acid level. Thus, the frequency of recombinant alleles appears to have been increased by some form of balancing selection (such as overdominant selection) favoring heterozygosity in the ARS. These analyses also revealed a striking difference between the A and B loci. Recombination events appear to have occurred about twice as frequently at the B locus, and recombinants at the B locus were significantly more likely to affect polymorphic sites in the ARS. At the A locus, there are well-defined allelic lineages that have persisted since prior to the human-chimpanzee divergence; but at the B locus, there is no evidence for such long-lasting allelic lineages. Thus, relatively frequent interallelic recombination has apparently been a feature of the long-term evolution of the B locus but not of the A locus. 45 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Low-cost simultaneous detection of CCR5-delta32 and HLA-B*5701 alleles in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected patients by selective multiplex endpoint PCR.

    PubMed

    Rosi, Andrea; Meini, Genny; Materazzi, Angelo; Vicenti, Ilaria; Saladini, Francesco; Zazzi, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Host genetic traits impact susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, disease progression as well as antiretroviral drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity. Remarkable examples include a 32-bp deletion in the CCR5 coreceptor molecule (CCR5-delta32) impairing attachment of monocytotropic HIV-1 to the host cell membrane and the HLA-B*5701 allele, strongly associated with a potentially fatal hypersensitivity reaction triggered by abacavir, a nucleoside inhibitor of HIV reverse transcriptase. We developed a simple selective multiplex endpoint PCR method for simultaneous analysis of both genetic traits. Two primers were designed for amplification of a region surrounding the CCR5 32-bp deletion site. One common forward primer and two reverse primers with different 3' termini targeting the HLA-B*570101 and HLA-B*570102 alleles were designed for HLA-B*5701 analysis. A panel of 110 reference DNA samples typed in the HLA-B locus was used for development and blind validation of the assay. All the 45 HLA-B*5701 positive and the 55 HLA-B*5701 negative samples were correctly identified. The CCR5-delta32 allele was readily detected in 7 samples and did not interfere with detection of HLA-B*5701 while providing an internal amplification control. Multiplex PCR products were easily identified in agarose gels with no background noise. This simple and low-cost end-point selective multiplex PCR can conveniently screen HIV patients for the protective CCR5-delta32 allele and the risk of developing abacavir hypersensitivity reaction.

  3. Profiling antibodies to class II HLA in transplant patient sera.

    PubMed

    McMurtrey, Curtis; Lowe, Dave; Buchli, Rico; Daga, Sunil; Royer, Derek; Humphrey, Alisha; Cate, Steven; Osborn, Sean; Mojsilovic, Aleksandar; VanGundy, Rodney; Bardet, Wilfried; Duty, Andrew; Mojsilovic, Danijela; Jackson, Kenneth; Stastny, Peter; Briggs, David; Zehnder, Daniel; Higgins, Rob; Hildebrand, William

    2014-03-01

    Immunizing events including pregnancy, transfusions, and transplantation promote strong alloantibody responses to HLA. Such alloantibodies to HLA preclude organ transplantation, foster hyperacute rejection, and contribute to chronic transplant failure. Diagnostic antibody-screening assays detect alloreactive antibodies, yet key attributes including antibody concentration and isotype remain largely unexplored. The goal here was to provide a detailed profile of allogeneic antibodies to class II HLA. Methodologically, alloantibodies were purified from sensitized patient sera using an HLA-DR11 immunoaffinity column and subsequently categorized. Antibodies to DR11 were found to fix complement, exist at a median serum concentration of 2.3μg/mL, consist of all isotypes, and isotypes IgG2, IgM, and IgE were elevated. Because multimeric isotypes can confound diagnostic determinations of antibody concentration, IgM and IgA isotypes were removed and DR11-IgG tested alone. Despite removal of multimeric isotypes, patient-to-patient antibody concentrations did not correlate with MFI values. In conclusion, allogeneic antibody responses to DR11 are comprised of all antibody isotypes at differing proportions, these combined isotypes fix complement at nominal serum concentrations, and enhancements other than the removal of IgM and IgA multimeric isotypes may be required if MFI is to be used as a means of determining anti-HLA serum antibody concentrations in diagnostic clinical assays.

  4. HLA in anthropology: the enigma of Easter Island.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia; Thorsby, Erik

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we first present four significant cases where human leukocyte antigen (HLA) studies have been useful for the reconstruction of human peopling history on the worldwide scale; i.e., the spread of modern humans from East Africa, the colonization of East Asia along two geographic routes, the co-evolution of genes and languages in Africa, and the peopling of Europe through a main northward migration. These examples show that natural selection did not erase the genetic signatures of our past migrations in the HLA genetic diversity patterns observed today. In the second part, we summarize our studies on Easter Island. Using genomic HLA typing, we could trace an introduction of HLA alleles of native American (Amerindian) origin to Easter Island before the Peruvian slave trades; i.e., before the 1860s, and provide suggestive evidence that they may have already been introduced in prehistoric time. Our results give further support to an initial Polynesian population of the island, but also reveal an early contribution by Amerindians. Together, our data illustrate the usefulness of typing for HLA alleles to complement genetic analyses in anthropological investigations.

  5. 16(th) IHIW : review of HLA typing by NGS.

    PubMed

    De Santis, D; Dinauer, D; Duke, J; Erlich, H A; Holcomb, C L; Lind, C; Mackiewicz, K; Monos, D; Moudgil, A; Norman, P; Parham, P; Sasson, A; Allcock, R J N

    2013-02-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) genes play an important role in the success of organ transplantation and are associated with autoimmune and infectious diseases. Current DNA-based genotyping methods, including Sanger sequence-based typing (SSBT), have identified a high degree of polymorphism. This level of polymorphism makes high-resolution HLA genotyping challenging, resulting in ambiguous typing results due to an inability to resolve phase and/or defining polymorphisms lying outside the region amplified. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) may resolve the issue through the combination of clonal amplification, which provides phase information, and the ability to sequence larger regions of genes, including introns, without the additional effort or cost associated with current methods. The NGS HLA sequencing project of the 16IHIW aimed to discuss the different approaches to (i) template preparation including short- and long-range PCR amplicons, exome capture and whole genome; (ii) sequencing platforms, including GS 454 FLX, Ion Torrent PGM, Illumina MiSeq/HiSeq and Pacific Biosciences SMRT; (iii) data analysis, specifically allele-calling software. The pilot studies presented at the workshop demonstrated that although individual sequencers have very different performance characteristics, all produced sequence data suitable for the resolution of HLA genotyping ambiguities. The developments presented at this workshop clearly highlight the potential benefits of NGS in the HLA laboratory.

  6. Mapping the HLA diversity of the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Romòn, Iñigo; Montes, Carmen; Ligeiro, Dario; Trindade, Hélder; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia; Nunes, José Manuel; Buhler, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    The polymorphism of HLA genes can be used to reconstruct human peopling history. However, this huge diversity impairs successful matching in stem cell transplantation, a situation which has led to the recruitment of millions of donors worldwide. In parallel to the increase of recruitment, registries are progressively relying on information from population genetics to optimize their donor pools in terms of HLA variability. In this study, the HLA data of 65,000 Spanish bone marrow donors were analyzed together with 60,000 Portuguese individuals to provide a comprehensive HLA genetic map of the Iberian Peninsula. The frequencies of many alleles were shown to vary continuously across the Peninsula, either increasing or decreasing from the Mediterranean coast to the Atlantic domain or from the Strait of Gibraltar to the Pyrenees and Bay of Biscay. Similar patterns were observed for several haplotypes. In addition, within some regions neighboring provinces share a close genetic similarity. These results outline the genetic landscape of the Iberian Peninsula, and confirm that the analysis of the HLA polymorphism may reveal relevant signatures of past demographic events even when data from donor registries are used. This conclusion stimulates future developments of the Spanish registry, presented here for the first time. PMID:27377016

  7. Heterogeneity of HLA genetic factors in IDDM susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Martell, M; Marcadet, A; Moine, A; Boitard, C; Deschamps, I; Dausset, J; Bach, J F; Cohen, D

    1990-01-01

    The association of certain HLA-D alleles with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is well known. One hundred and sixty-one non-related diabetic individuals and 142 non-related healthy controls were typed for the HLA DR-DQw-Dw association, using a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing method that combines three probe/enzyme systems: DRB/Taq I, DQB/Taq I, and DQB/Bam HI. Comparison of frequencies in both diabetics and controls confirms previous results in terms of HLA class II and IDDM association. Moreover, we have found that DR3/3 heterozygous individuals are more susceptible to IDDM when they are also Dw25 (associated with B18) than when they are Dw24 (associated with B8). Using oligonucleotide dot-blot hybridizations we analyzed the HLA-DQB1 sequence of DR3,Dw24 and DR3,Dw25 homozygous individuals, and we found no difference at position 57 between these two DR3-carrying haplotypes. This observation points to the heterogeneity of HLA genetic factors in IDDM susceptibility. PMID:1970333

  8. Clinical Relevance of HLA Gene Variants in HBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Zou, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Host gene variants may influence the natural history of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in humans, is one of the most important host factors that are correlated with the clinical course of HBV infection. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near certain HLA gene loci are strongly associated with not only persistent HBV infection but also spontaneous HBV clearance and seroconversion, disease progression, and the development of liver cirrhosis and HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB). These variations also influence the efficacy of interferon (IFN) and nucleot(s)ide analogue (NA) treatment and response to HBV vaccines. Meanwhile, discrepant conclusions were reached with different patient cohorts. It is therefore essential to identify the associations of specific HLA allele variants with disease progression and viral clearance in chronic HBV infection among different ethnic populations. A better understanding of HLA polymorphism relevance in HBV infection outcome would enable us to elucidate the roles of HLA SNPs in the pathogenesis and clearance of HBV in different areas and ethnic groups, to improve strategies for the prevention and treatment of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27243039

  9. HLA class II profile and distribution of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles and haplotypes among Lebanese and Bahraini Arabs.

    PubMed

    Almawi, Wassim Y; Busson, Marc; Tamim, Hala; Al-Harbi, Einas M; Finan, Ramzi R; Wakim-Ghorayeb, Saria F; Motala, Ayesha A

    2004-07-01

    The gene frequencies of HLA class II alleles were studied in 95 healthy Lebanese Arab and 72 healthy Bahraini Arab subjects. Our aim was to establish the genetic relationship between Bahraini and Lebanese Arabs in terms of HLA class II gene and haplotype frequencies and to compare these results with frequencies for other countries with populations of Caucasian and non-Caucasian descent. Subjects were unrelated and of both sexes, and HLA-DRB1 and -DQB1 genotyping was done by the PCR sequence-specific primer technique. Comparative analysis of the HLA-DR and -DQ alleles revealed differences in the allelic distribution among Bahraini and Lebanese subjects. Analysis of the 25 HLA-DRB1 alleles that have been investigated showed that the DRB1*040101 and DRB1*110101 alleles were more frequent among Lebanese, whereas DRB1*030101 and DRB1*160101 alleles were more frequent among Bahrainis. Similarly, of the seven HLA-DQB1 alleles analyzed, the presence of DQB1*0201 was more frequent among Bahrainis, whereas DQB1*030101 was more frequent among Lebanese. The DRB1*160101-DQB1*050101 (0.1318 versus 0.0379%) and DRB1*030101-DQB1*0201 (0.1202 versus 0.0321%) haplotypes were more frequent among Bahrainis, while the DRB1*110101-DQB1*030101 (0.3142 versus 0.1198%) and DRB1*040101-DQB1*0302 (0.1416 versus 0.0278%) haplotypes were more frequent in Lebanese subjects. Furthermore, a high prevalence of the DRB1*040101-DRB1*110101-DQB1*0302-DQB1*030101 (12.63 versus 1.35%, P = 0.015) and the homozygous DRB1*110101-DRB1*110101-DQB1*030101-DQB1*030101 (7.37 versus 0.00%, P = 0.046) genotypes was seen among Lebanese, and DRB1*070101-DRB1*160101-DQB1*0201-DQB1*050101 (6.76 versus 0.00%, P = 0.034) was seen more frequently among Bahraini subjects. Our results underline significant differences between these two populations in HLA class II distribution, provide basic information for further studies of major histocompatibility complex heterogeneity among Arabic-speaking countries, and serve as a

  10. HLA Class II Profile and Distribution of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 Alleles and Haplotypes among Lebanese and Bahraini Arabs

    PubMed Central

    Almawi, Wassim Y.; Busson, Marc; Tamim, Hala; Al-Harbi, Einas M.; Finan, Ramzi R.; Wakim-Ghorayeb, Saria F.; Motala, Ayesha A.

    2004-01-01

    The gene frequencies of HLA class II alleles were studied in 95 healthy Lebanese Arab and 72 healthy Bahraini Arab subjects. Our aim was to establish the genetic relationship between Bahraini and Lebanese Arabs in terms of HLA class II gene and haplotype frequencies and to compare these results with frequencies for other countries with populations of Caucasian and non-Caucasian descent. Subjects were unrelated and of both sexes, and HLA-DRB1 and -DQB1 genotyping was done by the PCR sequence-specific primer technique. Comparative analysis of the HLA-DR and -DQ alleles revealed differences in the allelic distribution among Bahraini and Lebanese subjects. Analysis of the 25 HLA-DRB1 alleles that have been investigated showed that the DRB1*040101 and DRB1*110101 alleles were more frequent among Lebanese, whereas DRB1*030101 and DRB1*160101 alleles were more frequent among Bahrainis. Similarly, of the seven HLA-DQB1 alleles analyzed, the presence of DQB1*0201 was more frequent among Bahrainis, whereas DQB1*030101 was more frequent among Lebanese. The DRB1*160101-DQB1*050101 (0.1318 versus 0.0379%) and DRB1*030101-DQB1*0201 (0.1202 versus 0.0321%) haplotypes were more frequent among Bahrainis, while the DRB1*110101-DQB1*030101 (0.3142 versus 0.1198%) and DRB1*040101-DQB1*0302 (0.1416 versus 0.0278%) haplotypes were more frequent in Lebanese subjects. Furthermore, a high prevalence of the DRB1*040101-DRB1*110101-DQB1*0302-DQB1*030101 (12.63 versus 1.35%, P = 0.015) and the homozygous DRB1*110101-DRB1*110101-DQB1*030101-DQB1*030101 (7.37 versus 0.00%, P = 0.046) genotypes was seen among Lebanese, and DRB1*070101-DRB1*160101-DQB1*0201-DQB1*050101 (6.76 versus 0.00%, P = 0.034) was seen more frequently among Bahraini subjects. Our results underline significant differences between these two populations in HLA class II distribution, provide basic information for further studies of major histocompatibility complex heterogeneity among Arabic-speaking countries, and serve as a

  11. HLA-G coding region and 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) in two Chinese Han populations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen Yi; Tian, Wei; Liu, Xue Xiang; Li, Li Xin

    2016-08-01

    In this study, exons 2-4 and 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G gene were investigated for 201 and 104 healthy unrelated Han samples recruited from Hunan Province, southern China and central Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, northern China, respectively, using sequence-based typing and cloning methods. Totally 12 HLA-G alleles in the coding region, 9 variable sites in 3'UTR, 8 3'UTR haplotypes and 15 HLA-G extended haplotypes (EHs) incorporating the coding region and 3'UTR were observed. Very strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) was observed between HLA-A and HLA-G, and between HLA-G coding region and 3'UTR in each population (all global P=0.0000). Seven HLA-A-G haplotypes showed significant LD in both populations. Three HLA-G alleles in the coding region, 4 polymorphic sites in the 3'UTR, 3 3'UTR haplotypes and 4 HLA-G EHs differed significantly in their distributions between the 2 Chinese Han populations (all P≤0.0001). There was evidence for balancing selection acting on HLA-G 3'UTR positions +3010, +3142 and +3187 in the two populations. The NJ dendrograms demonstrated the existence of two basic HLA-G lineages and indicated that, HLA-G*01:01:01, the most common HLA-G allele, formed a separate lineage from other alleles. Our results shed new lights into HLA-G genetics among Chinese Han populations. The findings reported here are of importance for future studies related to post-transcriptional regulation of HLA-G allelic expression and the potential role of HLA-G in disease association in populations of Chinese ancestry. PMID:27262928

  12. HLA-G coding region and 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) in two Chinese Han populations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen Yi; Tian, Wei; Liu, Xue Xiang; Li, Li Xin

    2016-08-01

    In this study, exons 2-4 and 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G gene were investigated for 201 and 104 healthy unrelated Han samples recruited from Hunan Province, southern China and central Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, northern China, respectively, using sequence-based typing and cloning methods. Totally 12 HLA-G alleles in the coding region, 9 variable sites in 3'UTR, 8 3'UTR haplotypes and 15 HLA-G extended haplotypes (EHs) incorporating the coding region and 3'UTR were observed. Very strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) was observed between HLA-A and HLA-G, and between HLA-G coding region and 3'UTR in each population (all global P=0.0000). Seven HLA-A-G haplotypes showed significant LD in both populations. Three HLA-G alleles in the coding region, 4 polymorphic sites in the 3'UTR, 3 3'UTR haplotypes and 4 HLA-G EHs differed significantly in their distributions between the 2 Chinese Han populations (all P≤0.0001). There was evidence for balancing selection acting on HLA-G 3'UTR positions +3010, +3142 and +3187 in the two populations. The NJ dendrograms demonstrated the existence of two basic HLA-G lineages and indicated that, HLA-G*01:01:01, the most common HLA-G allele, formed a separate lineage from other alleles. Our results shed new lights into HLA-G genetics among Chinese Han populations. The findings reported here are of importance for future studies related to post-transcriptional regulation of HLA-G allelic expression and the potential role of HLA-G in disease association in populations of Chinese ancestry.

  13. Specific lysis of murine cells expressing HLA molecules by allospecific human and murine H-2-restricted anti-HLA T killer lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Achour, A; Begue, B; Gomard, E; Paul, P; Sayagh, B; Van Pel, A; Levy, J P

    1986-06-01

    The lysis by human and murine anti-HLA cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) of murine cells expressing class I HLA molecule after gene transfection has been studied using two different murine cells: LMTK- and P815-HTR-TK-. Weak but significant HLA-A11-specific lysis was found occasionally with human CTL on the HLA-A11+ L cells. On the contrary, P815-A11 or P815-A2 cells were lysed strongly and specifically by HLA-A11 or HLA-A2-specific human CTL. The T8+T4- phenotype of the effector cells was confirmed and the reaction was inhibited by anti-HLA class I monoclonal antibodies. Despite their higher sensitivity to human CTL, the P815-HLA+ cells did not express higher levels of HLA antigens than L cells, and the presence or the absence of human beta 2 microglobulin was irrelevant. Anti-human LFA-1 antibodies abrogated the lysis of P815-A11+ cells showing that the LFA-1 receptor which is apparently lacking on the L cell surface was on the contrary expressed on P815 cells. On the other hand, murine anti-HLA CTL have been prepared by immunizing mice against syngeneic HLA-A11+ L cells. They lysed very efficiently and specifically these cells, but appeared completely devoid of activity against human HLA-A11 target cells. This barrier was apparently due to the H-2 restriction of these H-2k anti-HLA murine CTL, as shown by their inability to lyse allogeneic H-2d cells expressing HLA-A11, and by the blocking of their activity by anti H-2k antibodies. By contrast, xenogeneic anti-HLA CTL obtained by immunizing murine lymphocytes against human cells lysed both human and murine HLA+ cells but they reacted with a monomorphic epitope of the HLA molecule in a nonrestricted way. These results show that human cells lyse very efficiently P815 murine cells expressing HLA class I antigens; the higher sensitivity of P815 cells compared to L cells is probably due to the presence of a LFA-1 receptor on these cells; a class I molecule of human origin can be seen as an H-2-restricted minor

  14. Flow cytometry with anti HLA-antibodies: a simple but highly sensitive method for monitoring chimerism and minimal residual disease after HLA-mismatched stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schumm, M; Feuchtinger, T; Pfeiffer, M; Hoelle, W; Bethge, W; Ebinger, M; Kuci, S; Handgretinger, R; Lang, P

    2007-06-01

    Transplantation of HLA-mismatched stem cells may allow determination of chimerism status of single cells by differential expression of HLA molecules. Monoclonal antibodies against HLA antigens can be used to determine the HLA type of sub-populations by standard flow cytometry. Blood samples from 23 patients transplanted from HLA-mismatched family donors were monitored using HLA-specific antibodies. Suitable antibodies could be found for all donor recipient pairs by using differences in HLA Bw4 and Bw6 groups or other serological antigens. Pretransplant controls of donor and recipient were used to correct for variable fluorescence intensities of the antibodies and sub-populations. Owing to the high sensitivity, cell populations with a minimum frequency of 0.1% were detectable. Flow-cytometric analysis was confirmed by chimerism analysis of immunomagnetically isolated T cells by standard PCR technique. In addition to chimerism evaluation, HLA antibodies improved the detection of leukemic cells after transplantation with aberrant phenotype. In conclusion, flow cytometry using antibodies against HLA antigens is an interesting tool for determination of chimerism and minimal residual disease after HLA-mismatched transplantation. Information about the chimerism status is given on a single-cell level and allows fast and convenient analysis of sub-populations.

  15. Complete sequence of HLA-B27 cDNA identified through the characterization of structural markers unique to the HLA-A, -B, and -C allelic series

    SciTech Connect

    Szoets, H.; Reithmueller, G.; Weiss, E.; Meo, T.

    1986-03-01

    Antigen HLA-B27 is a high-risk genetic factor with respect to a group of rheumatoid disorders, especially ankylosing spondylitis. A cDNA library was constructed from an autozygous B-cell line expressing HLA-B27, HLA-Cw1, and the previously cloned HLA-A2 antigen. Clones detected with an HLA probe were isolated and sorted into homology groups by differential hybridization and restriction maps. Nucleotide sequencing allowed the unambiguous assignment of cDNAs to HLA-A, -B, and -C loci. The HLA-B27 mRNA has the structure features and the codon variability typical of an HLA class I transcript but it specifies two uncommon amino acid replacements: a cysteine in position 67 and a serine in position 131. The latter substitution may have functional consequences, because it occurs in a conserved region and at a position invariably occupied by a species-specific arginine in humans and lysine in mice. The availability of the complete sequence of HLA-B27 and of the partial sequence of HLA-Cw1 allows the recognition of locus-specific sequence markers, particularly, but not exclusively, in the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains.

  16. Closing the gap: discrimination of the expression profile of HLA questionable alleles by a cytokine-induced secretion approach using HLA-A*32:11Q.

    PubMed

    Föll, D; Hinrichs, J; Tischer, S; Battermann, A; Schambach, A; Figueiredo, C; Immenschuh, S; Blasczyk, R; Eiz-Vesper, B

    2012-05-01

    Matching of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles between donors and recipients plays a major role in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Null or questionably expressed HLA allelic variants are a major issue in HLA matching, because the aberrant expression of such alleles can have a major impact on the outcome of HSCT and/or its complications such as graft-versus-host disease. The goal of this study was to investigate the potential of a recently developed cytokine-induced secretion assay to differentiate the expression levels of HLA-A*32:11Q (questionable) into a null (N) or low (L) expression variant. An amino acid mutation at position 164 of HLA-A*32:11Q disrupts the disulfide bridge in the α2 domain. HLA-A*32:11Q is not detectable by standard microlymphocytotoxicity assay. To this end, we cloned soluble HLA-A*32:11Q and a reference allele (HLA-A*32:01) into expression vectors and transfected/transduced HEK293 and K562 cells. Allele-expressing K562 cells were simultaneously transfected/transduced with a β2-microglobulin (B2M)-encoding vector to ensure the intact HLA structure with B2M. After treatment with proinflammatory cytokines, secreted soluble HLA molecules were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in the supernatant and intracellular accumulation of the recombinant proteins by flow cytometry. HLA-A*32:11Q was nearly undetectable in untreated transfectants. Cytokine treatment increased the secretion of HLA-A*32:11Q to detectable levels and resulted in intracellular accumulation of the allele. There was no difference in mRNA transcription between the A*32 alleles. On the basis of these results, we recommend reclassification of HLA-A*32:11Q as a low expression (L) variant.

  17. HLA-B67 may be a male-specific HLA marker of susceptibility to relapsed childhood ALL in Hong Kong Chinese and HLA-A33 or HLA-B17 signifies a higher presentation leukocytosis: A retrospective analysis on 53 transplant candidates (1989-2003).

    PubMed

    Ng, Margaret H L; Lau, K M; Hawkins, B R; Chik, K W; Chan, Natalie P H; Wong, W S; Tsang, K S; Shing, Matthew M K; Li, C K

    2006-08-01

    We performed a retrospective analysis on the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) data of 53 consecutive Chinese patients with high-risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) diagnosed from 1989 to 2003. A significantly higher frequency of HLA-B67 in the male relapse group of patients [OR, 23.08; 95% CI, 5.31-100.36; p = 0.0042; for statistical significance after Bonferroni correction (Bc) p (Bc) < 0.0083] was identified after Bonferroni correction. Although not surviving the Bonferroni correction, gender effects on the association were also observed with HLA-A11, HLA-A32, HLA-A33, and HLA-B22, which were however more prevalent in the female patients and particularly those developing relapse. Two patients with HLA-A29 and HLA-B7 revealed significantly shortened survivals, suggestive of their potential prognostic impacts. Notably, for the first time, we found a significant correlation of leukocyte count with HLA types, where HLA-A33 (p = 0.006) or HLA-B17 (p < 0.001) signifies higher leukocytosis at presentation. Taken together, our findings support the involvement of HLA in Chinese high-risk childhood ALL.

  18. Class I gene contraction within the HLA-A subregion of the human MHC

    SciTech Connect

    Venditti, C.P.; Chorney, M.J. )

    1992-12-01

    Individuals expressing either the HLA-A24 or the HLA-A23 histocompatibility antigens have been found to possess an HLA-A class I subregion approximately 50 kb smaller in size than those studied from individuals expressing other HLA-A haplotypes. This originally manifested itself as a haplotype-associated size variation in the NotI and MluI megabase fragments observed on pulsed-field electrophoresis gels after blotting and probing with HLA-A subregion-specific genomic probes. The contracted region falls between the HLA-A and the HLA-G class I genes and specifically includes the novel HLA-A-related pseudogene, HLA-H, as well as the adjacent deteriorated class I pseudogene, 7.0 p. The intactness of locus D6S128, defined by probe pMC6.7 located telomeric to the HLA-H gene, demonstrates that the distal rearrangement point falls within a 20-kb stretch of DNA separating HLA-H from pMC6.7. This extends a previous report regarding variation in class I gene number within the human major histocompatibility complex and precisely localizes the genomic residence of sequences that may define a recombination hot spot. Because the size variation maps to a recombinogenic area, its characterization may ultimately reveal important biological information relevant to the events that shaped the organization of the human HLA class I multigene family. 54 refs., 7 figs.

  19. HLA-B17 and the HLA-A1, B17 haplotype in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Heise, E; Parrish, E; Cooper, R

    1979-08-01

    Seventy-nine Caucasians with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) were genotyped to determine whether AML, the induction of remission or patient survival were associated with particular HLA phenotypes or haplotypes. HLA-B17 and B27 were increased in AML patients over 40 years of age. Combined analysis of four independent studies indicates that HLA-B17 is significantly but weakly associated with AML, relative risk = 1.48 (.01 less than P less than .025). The A1, B17 and Aw24, Bw35 haplotypes occurred more frequently in the AML group as compared to racial and geographic controls (uncorrected P = 0.0068 and 0.0098, respectively Fisher's Exact Test). Induction of remission occurred less frequently in patients with the B17 phenotype as compared to patients lacking this antigen (P = 0.047). Patient survival was associated with remission status (P = 0.002) but was not significantly associated with particular HLA phenotypes or haplotypes. These results indicate that a gene or genes in the HLA-B region of the major histocompatibility complex can influence susceptibility to AML and also the response to chemotherapy.

  20. Analysis of HLA-DQB and HLA-DPB alleles in Graves' disease by oligonucleotide probing of enzymatically amplified DNA.

    PubMed

    Weetman, A P; Zhang, L; Webb, S; Shine, B

    1990-07-01

    We have tested the possible association of HLA-DQB and HLA-DPB alleles with Graves' thyrotoxicosis, with or without severe ophthalmopathy, by polymerase chain amplification of genomic DNA and allele-specific oligonucleotide probing. There was no significantly abnormal distribution of DQB alleles compared to 50 control subjects except for a reduced prevalence of DQw 3.1 in the Graves' patients with severe ophthalmopathy (X2 = 6.23, P less than 0.02). HLA-DPB 2.1/8 was found in only 1 of 40 of these patients compared with 15 of the controls (X2 = 11.49, P less than 0.001). Ten of 48 patients with Graves' disease but without clinically significant eye involvement were HLA-DPB 2.1/8 positive, not significantly different from controls, but significantly different from the ophthalmopathy group (X2 = 6.70, P less than 0.01). The other DPB alleles in both groups of Graves' disease patients were the same as controls. These results suggest that HLA-DPB 2.1/8 may confer a protective effect in Graves' disease with respect to ophthalmopathy. PMID:2401099

  1. The HLA-A2-supermotif: a QSAR definition.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini; Flower, Darren

    2003-08-01

    Identification of epitopes capable of binding multiple HLA types will significantly rationalise the development of epitope-based vaccines. A quantitative method assessing the contribution of each amino acid at each position was applied to over 500 nonamer peptides binding to 5 MHC alleles--A*0201, A*0202, A*0203, A*0206 and A*6802--which together define the HLA-A2-like supertype. FXIGXI (L)IFV was identified as a supermotif for the A2-supertype based on the contributions of the common preferred amino acids at each of the nine positions. The results indicate that HLA-A*6802 is an intermediate allele standing between A2 and A3 supertypes: at anchor position 2 it is closer to A3 and at anchor position 9 it is nearer to A2. Models are available free on-line at http://www.jenner.ac.uk/MHCPred and can be used for binding affinity prediction. PMID:12948188

  2. [HLA and keloids: antigenic frequency and therapeutic response].

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Bozzi, M

    1989-01-01

    Twenty keloid subjects were typed for class 1 (HLA-A, B and C) and class 2 (HLA-DR and DQ) histocompatibility antigens. Their frequencies were compared to those found in control populations. Of all the antigens belonging to class 1, B 21 was more prevalent in patients. The findings regarding class 2 antigens were noteworthy: in keloid patients there was a significant prevalence of DR 5 (RR = 3.54 and 7.93 respectively for the two control groups) and DQw 3 (RR = 16.8). The patients typed for HLA-antigens were treated with corticosteroid infiltrations. The responses to the treatments were no related to the histocompatibility antigens. PMID:2628278

  3. The Role of HLA in Cord Blood Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Stavropoulos-Giokas, Catherine; Dinou, Amalia; Papassavas, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, umbilical cord blood (CB), a rich source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), has been used successfully as an alternative HSC source to treat a variety of hematologic, immunologic, genetic, and oncologic disorders. CB has several advantages, including prompt availability of the transplant, decrease of graft versus host disease (GVHD) and better long-term immune recovery, resulting in a similar long-term survival. Studies have shown that some degree of HLA mismatches is acceptable. This review is intended to outline the main aspects of HLA matching in different settings (related, pediatric, adult, or double-unit HSCT), its effect on transplantation outcome and the role of HLA in donor selection. PMID:23097706

  4. HLA antigens in individuals with down syndrome and alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    Estefan, Juliany L; Oliveira, Juliana C; Abad, Eliane D; Saintive, Simone B; Porto, Luis Cristóvão MS; Ribeiro, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To describe human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles in individuals with Down syndrome and alopecia areata. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted, which evaluated 109 individuals. Ten with down syndrome (DS) and alopecia areata (AA), ten with DS without AA and ten with AA without DS, and their families. The individuals were matched by gender and age. The following data were computed: gender, age, ethnic group, karyotype, clinical presentation and family history of alopecia areata. Descriptive analysis: measures of central tendency and frequency distribution. Inferential analysis: Fisher’s exact test to compare categorical data between the three groups and Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA test for numerical data. RESULTS: Seventy per cent of evaluated individuals in the DS and AA group were male; presented mean age of 18.6 (SD ± 7.2) years and 70% were Caucasian. We observed involvement of the scalp, with a single lesion in 10% and multiple in 90% of subjects. It was observed that there is no significant difference in the frequency distributions of the alleles HLA loci A, B, C, DRB1 and DQB1 of subjects studied. However, according to Fisher’s exact test, there is a trend (P = 0.089) of DS group to present higher proportions of HLA-A 36 and HLA-B 15 than the AA group and AA and DS group. CONCLUSION: There was a tendency for the DS group, to present proportion of HLA-A 36 and HLA-B 15 higher than the AA group and group of individuals with AA and DS. However, there was no significant difference in the frequency distribution of the alleles. PMID:25325065

  5. Endocytosis of HLA and H-2 molecules on transformed murine cells measured by fluorescence dequenching of liposome-encapsulated carboxyfluorescein.

    PubMed Central

    Truneh, A; Machy, P; Barbet, J; Mishal, Z; Lemonnier, F A; Leserman, L D

    1983-01-01

    We have studied internalization of cell surface proteins encoded by genes of the human major histocompatibility complex (HLA) transferred into murine L cells, in comparison with mouse (H-2) histocompatibility determinants. This internalization was measured by the use of monoclonal antibodies directed at these determinants, to which were bound methotrexate- and carboxyfluorescein-containing liposomes covalently coupled to protein A. In addition to the effect of methotrexate on the cells, the technique of fluorescence self-quenching release was used to measure the kinetics of internalization for single cells using a flow cytofluorometer. The native and foreign gene products were internalized in an apparently identical manner. These techniques can be applied to cells expressing genes with altered or deleted segments thus providing a basis for the analysis of the effect of sequence modifications on the internalization of the encoded molecule. PMID:6199195

  6. HLA-mismatched cord blood transplantation: immunological studies.

    PubMed

    Vilmer, E; Quelvennec, E; Plouvier, E; Denamur, E; Rohrlich, P; Elion, J; Sterkers, G

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of HLA partially matched related cord blood transplantation were reported. The first patient remains healthy more than 4 years after graft. The second patient died from acute GVHD. In the first case, the immune reconstitution was studied over a 2 year period after graft: the alloreactive cytotoxic T-cell precursor (CTLp) frequencies were comparable between the donor and the recipient. Indirect evidence suggested that the resolution of GVHD was not due to a specific deletion of CTLp against the HLA antigens unshared between donor and recipient.

  7. A novel HLA-A allele: A*0257.

    PubMed

    García-Ortiz, J E; Cox, S T; Sandoval-Ramirez, L; Little, A M; Marsh, S G E; Madrigal, J A; Argüello, J R

    2004-01-01

    A novel human leucocyte antigen-A*02 (HLA-A*02) allele was detected by reference strand-mediated conformation analysis (RSCA) of a DNA sample from a Tarahumara individual. Direct sequencing of HLA-A locus polymerase chain reaction products identified a mutation in one of the alleles. Cloning and sequencing confirmed the presence of a new allele, A*0257 which differed from A*0206 by two nucleotides at positions 355 and 362, inducing changes in residues 95 and 97, respectively, within the peptide-binding site. Those changes suggest that allele A*0257 may have resulted from an intralocus recombination event.

  8. HLA and multiple sclerosis in south east Wales.

    PubMed Central

    Swingler, R J; Kirk, P F; Darke, C; Compston, D A

    1987-01-01

    A stronger association has been found between multiple sclerosis and HLA-DR2 than -DQwl in south east Wales (prevalence c 113/10(5)) in contrast to recent observations in north east Scotland (prevalence 178/10(5). The complex relationship between the HLA system and multiple sclerosis, demonstrated in this and other studies, is explained more easily under a polygenic model of inheritance, in which environmental events and genes interact, than by the presence of a single susceptibility gene. PMID:3499485

  9. HLA-sharing, recurrent spontaneous abortion, and the genetic hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, P.W.

    1988-05-01

    A number of studies indicates that there is a high sharing of HLA antigens in couples having recurrent spontaneous abortions. The genetic hypothesis to explain this phenomenon suggests that this fetal loss results from homozygosity of recessive lethal or deleterius alleles in gametic disequilibrium with HLA antigens. Theory predicting the lethality rate is derived when antigens are shared at one, two or three loci, given the disequilibrium is absolute. In addition, the effects of partial disequilibrium, inbreeding, and segregation distortion on the lethal proportion are examined.

  10. The MHC class II cofactor, HLA-DM, interacts with immunoglobulin in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Ayyangar, Sashi; Jiang, Wei; Rajasekaran, Narendiran; Spura, Armin; Hessell, Ann J.; Madec, Anne-Marie; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2014-01-01

    B cells internalize extracellular antigen into endosomes using the immunoglobulin (Ig) component of the B cell receptor. In endosomes, antigen-derived peptides are loaded onto MHC class II proteins (MHC-II). How these pathways intersect remains unclear. We find that HLA-DM (DM), a catalyst for MHC-II peptide loading, co-precipitates with Ig in lysates from human tonsillar B cells and B cell lines. The molecules in the Ig/DM complexes have mature glycans, and the complexes co-localize with endosomal markers in intact cells. A larger fraction of Ig precipitates with DM after BCR crosslinking, implying that complexes can form when DM meets endocytosed Ig. In vitro, in the endosomal pH range, soluble HLA-DM (sDM) directly binds the Ig Fab domain, and increases levels of free antigen released from immune complexes. Together, these results argue that DM and Ig intersect in the endocytic pathway of B cells with potential functional consequences. PMID:25098292

  11. HLA-G 3’UTR Polymorphisms Impact the Prognosis of Stage II-III CRC Patients in Fluoropyrimidine-Based Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Garziera, Marica; Bidoli, Ettore; Cecchin, Erika; Mini, Enrico; Nobili, Stefania; Lonardi, Sara; Buonadonna, Angela; Errante, Domenico; Pella, Nicoletta; D’Andrea, Mario; De Marchi, Francesco; De Paoli, Antonino; Zanusso, Chiara; De Mattia, Elena; Tassi, Renato; Toffoli, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    An important hallmark of CRC is the evasion of immune surveillance. HLA-G is a negative regulator of host’s immune response. Overexpression of HLA-G protein in primary tumour CRC tissues has already been associated to worse prognosis; however a definition of the role of immunogenetic host background is still lacking. Germline polymorphisms in the 3’UTR region of HLA-G influence the magnitude of the protein by modulating HLA-G mRNA stability. Soluble HLA-G has been associated to 3’UTR +2960 Ins/Ins and +3035 C/T (lower levels) and +3187 G/G (high levels) genotypes. HLA-G 3’UTR SNPs have never been explored in CRC outcome. The purpose of this study was to investigate if common HLA-G 3’UTR polymorphisms have an impact on DFS and OS of 253 stage II-III CRC patients, after primary surgery and ADJ-CT based on FL. The 3’UTR was sequenced and SNPs were analyzed for their association with survival by Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox models; results underwent internal validation using a resampling method (bootstrap analysis). In a multivariate analysis, we estimated an association with improved DFS in Ins allele (Ins/Del +Ins/Ins) carriers (HR 0.60, 95% CI 0.38–0.93, P = 0.023) and in patients with +3035 C/T genotype (HR 0.51, 95% CI 0.26–0.99, P = 0.045). The +3187 G/G mutated carriers (G/G vs A/A+A/G) were associated to a worst prognosis in both DFS (HR 2.46, 95% CI 1.19–5.05, P = 0.015) and OS (HR 2.71, 95% CI 1.16–6.63, P = 0.022). Our study shows a prognostic and independent role of 3 HLA-G 3’UTR SNPs, +2960 14-bp INDEL, +3035 C>T, and +3187 A>G. PMID:26633805

  12. Promoting A-Priori Interoperability of HLA-Based Simulations in the Space Domain: The SISO Space Reference FOM Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moller, Bjorn; Garro, Alfredo; Falcone, Alberto; Crues, Edwin Z.; Dexter, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Distributed and Real-Time Simulation plays a key-role in the Space domain being exploited for missions and systems analysis and engineering as well as for crew training and operational support. One of the most popular standards is the 1516-2010 IEEE Standard for Modeling and Simulation (M&S) High Level Architecture (HLA). HLA supports the implementation of distributed simulations (called Federations) in which a set of simulation entities (called Federates) can interact using a Run-Time Infrastructure (RTI). In a given Federation, a Federate can publish and/or subscribes objects and interactions on the RTI only in accordance with their structures as defined in a FOM (Federation Object Model). Currently, the Space domain is characterized by a set of incompatible FOMs that, although meet the specific needs of different organizations and projects, increases the long-term cost for interoperability. In this context, the availability of a reference FOM for the Space domain will enable the development of interoperable HLA-based simulators for related joint projects and collaborations among worldwide organizations involved in the Space domain (e.g. NASA, ESA, Roscosmos, and JAXA). The paper presents a first set of results achieved by a SISO standardization effort that aims at providing a Space Reference FOM for international collaboration on Space systems simulations.

  13. HLA-A2 mutants immunoselected in vitro. Definition of residues contributing to an HLA-A2-specific serological determinant.

    PubMed

    Krangel, M S; Taketani, S; Pious, D; Strominger, J L

    1983-01-01

    The HLA-A2-specific mouse monoclonal antibody BB7.2 plus complement has been used to immunoselect variant clones of the lymphoblastoid cell line T5-1 (HLA-A1, -A2, -B8, and -B27). Members of one class of variant clones appear to express cell surface HLA-A2 molecules that display reduced reactivity with the selecting antibody, but normal or near normal reactivities with some other HLA-A2-specific monoclonal antibodies and human alloantisera. The HLA-A2 heavy chains derived from two of these variant clones were characterized by comparative double-label tryptic peptide mapping in conjunction with microsequence analysis. These heavy chains were found to carry distinct mutations in the same peptide in the molecule. We conclude that residues within this short segment of the polypeptide contribute to an HLA-A2-specific serological determinant. PMID:6184441

  14. Genetically engineered blood pharming: generation of HLA-universal platelets derived from CD34+ progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Constança; Blaszczyk, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Blood pharming is a recently designed concept to enable in vitro production of blood cells that are safe, effective and readily available. This approach represents an alternative to blood donation and may contribute to overcome the shortage of blood products. However, the high variability of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci remains a major hurdle to the application of off-the-shelf blood products. Refractoriness to platelet (PLT) transfusion caused by alloimmunization against HLA class I antigens constitutes a relevant clinical problem. Thus, it would be desirable to generate PLT units devoid of HLA antigens. To reduce the immunogenicity of cell-based therapeutics, we have permanently reduced HLA class I expression using an RNA interference strategy. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the generation of HLA class I-silenced (HLA-universal) PLTs from CD34+ progenitor cells using an shRNA targeting β2-microglobulin transcripts is feasible. CD34+ progenitor cells derived from G-CSF mobilised donors were transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding for the β2-microglobulin-specific shRNA and differentiated into PLTs using a liquid culture system. The functionality of HLA-silenced PLTs and their ability to escape HLA antibody-mediated cytotoxicity were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Platelet activation in response to ADP and thrombin were assessed in vitro. The immune-evasion capability of HLA-universal megakaryocytes (MKs) and PLTs was tested in lymphocytotoxicity assays using anti-HLA antibodies. To assess the functionality of HLA-universal PLTs in vivo, HLA-silenced MKs were infused into NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc(-/-) mice with or without anti-HLA antibodies. PLT generation was evaluated by flow cytometry using anti-CD42a and CD61 antibodies. HLA-universal PLTs demonstrated to be functionally similar to blood-derived PLTs. Lymphocytotoxicity assays showed that HLA-silencing efficiently protects MKs against HLA antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity. 80

  15. Detection of soluble HLA-G molecules in plasma and amniotic fluid.

    PubMed

    Rebmann, V; Pfeiffer, K; Pässler, M; Ferrone, S; Maier, S; Weiss, E; Grosse-Wilde, H

    1999-01-01

    Although the cDNA sequence of HLA-G antigens is compatible with their expression as soluble molecules (sHLA-G), the determination of native sHLA-G levels in body fluids has not yet been described. The lack of this information is likely to reflect the difficulties in developing an assay suitable to measure sHLA-G antigens in the presence of soluble HLA-A, -B and -C (sHLA-I) antigens, since most of the available anti-HLA-G mAb do not detect soluble beta2-m associated HLA-G antigens or crossreact with sHLA-I antigens. Therefore, we have developed a two-step assay which eliminates the interference of classical HLA class I antigens. In the first step, the sample is depleted of sHLA-I antigens and of HLA-E antigens with mAb TP25.99. Then, HLA-G antigens are captured with mAb W6/32 and detected with anti-beta2-m mAb in ELISA. Utilizing this assay, sHLA-G antigen levels were measured in EDTA plasma from 92 controls with known HLA types, 28 women at delivery and the corresponding cord bloods and in 50 amniotic fluids. Mean sHLA-G plasma levels did not differ between males (24.9+/-3.0 SEM ng/ml; n=42) and females (20.1+/-2.1 SEM ng/ml; n = 50). However, sHLA-G levels in HLA-A11 positive probands (mean: 13.0+/-4.4 SEM ng/ml; n=12) were significantly (P<0.05) lower than in HLA-A11 negative ones (mean: 24.5+/-2.0 SEM ng/ml; n=80). sHLA-G levels in women at delivery (mean: 22.9+/-2.2 SEM ng/ml; n=28) were in the range of controls but were significantly (P<0.001) reduced in the corresponding cord bloods (mean: 13.8+/-1.5 SEM ng/ml; n=28). sHLA-G levels in amniotic fluids (mean: 15.5 + 1.0 SEM ng/ml; n=50) were significantly (P<0.001) lower than in plasma. sHLA-G levels were 5 and 11% of those of sHLA-I antigens in plasmas and amniotic fluids, respectively. Individual sHLA-G levels were not correlated with sHLA-I levels. SDS-PAGE analysis of plasma sHLA-G antigens revealed two molecular variants with a 35 kD and a 27 kD MW corresponding to the sizes of sHLA-G1 and -G2 isoforms. In

  16. Genetically engineered blood pharming: generation of HLA-universal platelets derived from CD34+ progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Constança; Blaszczyk, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Blood pharming is a recently designed concept to enable in vitro production of blood cells that are safe, effective and readily available. This approach represents an alternative to blood donation and may contribute to overcome the shortage of blood products. However, the high variability of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci remains a major hurdle to the application of off-the-shelf blood products. Refractoriness to platelet (PLT) transfusion caused by alloimmunization against HLA class I antigens constitutes a relevant clinical problem. Thus, it would be desirable to generate PLT units devoid of HLA antigens. To reduce the immunogenicity of cell-based therapeutics, we have permanently reduced HLA class I expression using an RNA interference strategy. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the generation of HLA class I-silenced (HLA-universal) PLTs from CD34+ progenitor cells using an shRNA targeting β2-microglobulin transcripts is feasible. CD34+ progenitor cells derived from G-CSF mobilised donors were transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding for the β2-microglobulin-specific shRNA and differentiated into PLTs using a liquid culture system. The functionality of HLA-silenced PLTs and their ability to escape HLA antibody-mediated cytotoxicity were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Platelet activation in response to ADP and thrombin were assessed in vitro. The immune-evasion capability of HLA-universal megakaryocytes (MKs) and PLTs was tested in lymphocytotoxicity assays using anti-HLA antibodies. To assess the functionality of HLA-universal PLTs in vivo, HLA-silenced MKs were infused into NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc(-/-) mice with or without anti-HLA antibodies. PLT generation was evaluated by flow cytometry using anti-CD42a and CD61 antibodies. HLA-universal PLTs demonstrated to be functionally similar to blood-derived PLTs. Lymphocytotoxicity assays showed that HLA-silencing efficiently protects MKs against HLA antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity. 80

  17. Localization of type 1 diabetes susceptibility to the MHC class I genes HLA-B and HLA-A

    PubMed Central

    Nejentsev, Sergey; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Walker, Neil M.; Szeszko, Jeffrey; Field, Sarah F.; Stevens, Helen E.; Reynolds, Pamela; Hardy, Matthew; King, Erna; Masters, Jennifer; Hulme, John; Maier, Lisa M.; Smyth, Deborah; Bailey, Rebecca; Cooper, Jason D.; Ribas, Gloria; Campbell, R. Duncan; Clayton, David G.; Todd, John A.

    2009-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on chromosome 6 is associated with susceptibility to more common diseases than any other region of the human genome, including almost all disorders classified as autoimmune. In type 1 diabetes the major genetic susceptibility determinants have been mapped to the MHC class II genes HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DRB1 (refs 1-3), but these genes cannot completely explain the association between type 1 diabetes and the MHC region4-11. Owing to the region’s extreme gene density, the multiplicity of disease-associated alleles, strong associations between alleles, limited genotyping capability, and inadequate statistical approaches and sample sizes, which, and how many, loci within the MHC determine susceptibility remains unclear. Here, in several large type 1 diabetes data sets, we analyse a combined total of 1,729 polymorphisms, and apply statistical methods—recursive partitioning and regression—to pinpoint disease susceptibility to the MHC class I genes HLA-B and HLA-A (risk ratios>1.5; Pcombined=2.01×10-19 and 2.35×10-13, respectively) in addition to the established associations of the MHC class II genes. Other loci with smaller and/or rarer effects might also be involved, but to find these, future searches must take into account both the HLA class II and class I genes and use even larger samples. Taken together with previous studies4-8,10-16, we conclude that MHC-class-I-mediated events, principally involving HLA-B*39, contribute to the aetiology of type 1 diabetes. PMID:18004301

  18. Clonal T lymphocyte recognition of the fine structure of the HLA-A2 molecule.

    PubMed

    Brenner, M B; McLean, J; Yang, S Y; van der Poel, J J; Pious, D; Strominger, J L

    1985-07-01

    A human alloimmune cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clone (4E4) was generated against the HLA-A2 molecule. Lysis of 51Cr-labeled HLA-A2 target cells was blocked by monoclonal antibodies (mAb), including mAb PA2.1 (anti-HLA-A2), mAb BB7.2 (anti-HLA-A2), mAb 4B (anti-HLA-A2-plus-A28), mAb MA2.1 (anti-HLA-A2-plus-B17), and mAb W6/32 (anti-HLA-A,B,C), which are directed against different serologic epitopes on the HLA-A2 molecule. However, HLA-A2 mutant lines lacking the serologic epitope recognized by mAb BB7.2 (anti-HLA-A2) were efficiently lysed by CTL 4E4. Thus, although mAb may block cytolysis, the HLA-A2 epitope recognized the 4E4 CTL clone is distinct from the HLA-A2-specific epitope recognized by serologic reagents. Moreover, analysis of HLA-A2 population variants revealed that only the predominant HLA-A2.1 subtype molecule was recognized by CTL 4E4. No cross-reactivity on other, biochemically related HLA-A2 population subtypes was observed, including HLA-A2.2 cells (Hill, CVE, ZYL, M7), HLA-A2.3 cells (TENJ, DK1), or HLA-A2.4 cells (CLA, KNE). This CTL clone appears to recognize a single epitope and, like monoclonal antibody counterparts, can be used to discriminate among immunogenic cellular and serologic epitopes on closely related HLA-A2 molecules. On the basis of the known sequence changes in mutant and subtype HLA-A2 molecules, it appears that the sequence spanning residues 147 to 157 may be critical for cellular recognition of this Class I MHC molecule. PMID:2582041

  19. Conservation and Diversity of Influenza A H1N1 HLA-Restricted T Cell Epitope Candidates for Epitope-Based Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Paul ThiamJoo; Heiny, A. T.; Miotto, Olivo; Salmon, Jerome; Marques, Ernesto T. A.; Lemonnier, Francois; August, J. Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Background The immune-related evolution of influenza viruses is exceedingly complex and current vaccines against influenza must be reformulated for each influenza season because of the high degree of antigenic drift among circulating influenza strains. Delay in vaccine production is a serious problem in responding to a pandemic situation, such as that of the current H1N1 strain. Immune escape is generally attributed to reduced antibody recognition of the viral hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins whose rate of mutation is much greater than that of the internal non-structural proteins. As a possible alternative, vaccines directed at T cell epitope domains of internal influenza proteins, that are less susceptible to antigenic variation, have been investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings HLA transgenic mouse strains expressing HLA class I A*0201, A*2402, and B*0702, and class II DRB1*1501, DRB1*0301 and DRB1*0401 were immunized with 196 influenza H1N1 peptides that contained residues of highly conserved proteome sequences of the human H1N1, H3N2, H1N2, H5N1, and avian influenza A strains. Fifty-four (54) peptides that elicited 63 HLA-restricted peptide-specific T cell epitope responses were identified by IFN-γ ELISpot assay. The 54 peptides were compared to the 2007–2009 human H1N1 sequences for selection of sequences in the design of a new candidate H1N1 vaccine, specifically targeted to highly-conserved HLA-restricted T cell epitopes. Conclusions/Significance Seventeen (17) T cell epitopes in PB1, PB2, and M1 were selected as vaccine targets based on sequence conservation over the past 30 years, high functional avidity, non-identity to human peptides, clustered localization, and promiscuity to multiple HLA alleles. These candidate vaccine antigen sequences may be applicable to any avian or human influenza A virus. PMID:20090904

  20. Interaction of the LILRB1 inhibitory receptor with HLA class Ia dimers.

    PubMed

    Baía, Diogo; Pou, Jordi; Jones, Des; Mandelboim, Ofer; Trowsdale, John; Muntasell, Aura; López-Botet, Miguel

    2016-07-01

    Leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor subfamily B member 1 (LILRB1) has been reported to interact with a wide spectrum of HLA class I (HLA-I) molecules, albeit with different affinities determined by allelic polymorphisms and conformational features. HLA-G dimerization and the presence of intracellular Cys residues in HLA-B7 have been shown to be critical for their recognition by LILRB1. We hypothesized that dimerization of classical HLA class Ia molecules, previously detected in exosomes, might enhance their interaction with LILRB1. A soluble LILRB1-Fc fusion protein and a sensitive cellular reporter system expressing a LILRB1-ζ chimera were employed to assess receptor interaction with different HLA class Ia molecules transfected in the human lymphoblastoid 721.221 cell line. Under these conditions, intracellular Cys residues and HLA-I dimerization appeared associated with increased LILRB1 recognition. On the other hand, a marginal interaction of LILRB1 with primary monocytic cells, irrespective of their high HLA-I expression, was enhanced by type I interferon (IFN). This effect appeared disproportionate to the cytokine-induced increase of surface HLA-I expression and was accompanied by detection of HLA class Ia dimers. Altogether, the results support that a regulated assembly of these noncanonical HLA-I conformers during the immune response may enhance the avidity of their interaction with LILRB1.

  1. Structural analysis of HLA-A2 antigen from immunoselected mutant 8.6.1: further definition of an HLA-A2-specific serological determinant.

    PubMed

    Taketani, S; Krangel, M S; Pious, D; Strominger, J L

    1983-12-01

    The HLA-A2 mutant cell line 8.6.1 was isolated previously from the lymphoblastoid B cell line T5-1 (HLA-A1, -A2, -B8, and -B27) by immunoselection with the mouse HLA-A2-specific monoclonal antibody BB7.2 and complement. The HLA-A2 molecules synthesized by 8.6.1 do not react with either the selecting antibody or with a second HLA-A2-specific monoclonal antibody, PA2.1. In this study, HLA-A2 heavy chains derived from 8.6.1 and those from the parent T5-1 cells have been analyzed by double-labeled tryptic peptide mapping by using reverse-phase HPLC, cation exchange chromatography, and microsequence analysis. We detect only a single difference between these molecules: 8.6.1 HLA-A2 differs from T5-1 HLA-A2 by the substitution of lysine for glutamic acid at position 161. This result is consistent with data derived from other immunoselected mutants, which implicate the second heavy chain domain (alpha 2) in the expression of the PA2.1 and BB7.2 epitopes, and suggests a crucial role for glutamic acid at position 161 in the formation of an HLA-A2-specific determinant. PMID:6196407

  2. HLA class II gene associations in African American Type 1 diabetes reveal a protective HLA-DRB1*03 haplotype

    PubMed Central

    Howson, J M M; Roy, M S; Zeitels, L; Stevens, H; Todd, J A

    2013-01-01

    Aims Owing to strong linkage disequilibrium between markers, pinpointing disease associations within genetic regions is difficult in European ancestral populations, most notably the very strong association of the HLA-DRB1*03-DQA1*05:01-DQB1*02:01 haplotype with Type 1 diabetes risk, which is assumed to be because of a combination of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1. In contrast, populations of African ancestry have greater haplotype diversity, offering the possibility of narrowing down regions and strengthening support for a particular gene in a region being causal. We aimed to study the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region in African American Type 1 diabetes. Methods Two hundred and twenty-seven African American patients with Type 1 diabetes and 471 African American control subjects were tested for association at the HLA class II genes, HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1 and 5147 single nucleotide polymorphisms across the major histocompatibility complex region using logistic regression models. Population admixture was accounted for with principal components analysis. Results Single nucleotide polymorphism marker associations were explained by the HLA associations, with the major peak over the class II loci. The HLA association overall was extremely strong, as expected for Type 1 diabetes, even in African Americans in whom diabetes diagnosis is heterogeneous. In addition, there were unique features: the HLA-DRB1*03 haplotype was split into HLA-DRB1*03:01, which confers greatest susceptibility in these samples (odds ratio 3.17, 95% CI 1.72–5.83) and HLA-DRB1*03:02, an allele rarely observed in Europeans, which confers the greatest protection in these African American samples (odds ratio 0.22, 95% CI 0.09–0.55). Conclusions The unique diversity of the African HLA region we have uncovered supports a specific and major role for HLA-DRB1 in HLA-DRB1*03 haplotype-associated Type 1 diabetes risk. PMID:23398374

  3. Analysis of the distribution of HLA-A alleles in populations from five continents.

    PubMed

    Middleton, D; Williams, F; Meenagh, A; Daar, A S; Gorodezky, C; Hammond, M; Nascimento, E; Briceno, I; Perez, M P

    2000-10-01

    The variation and frequency of HLA-A genotypes were established by PCR-SSOP typing in diverse geographically distributed populations: Brazilian, Colombian Kogui, Cuban, Mexican, Omani, Singapore Chinese, and South African Zulu. HLA-A allelic families with only one allele were identified for HLA-A*01, -A*23, -A*25, -A*31, -A*32, -A*36, -A*43, -A*69, -A*80; and with two alleles for HLA-A*03, -A*11, -A*26, -A*29, -A*33, -A*34, and -A*66. Greater variation was detected for HLA-A*02, -A*24, and -A*68 allele families. Colombian Kogui and Mexican Seris showed the least diversity with respect to HLA-A alleles, albeit with small numbers tested, with only four and five HLA-A alleles identified, respectively. It would appear by their presence in all populations studied, either rural or indigenous, that certain alleles are very important in pathogen peptide presentation. PMID:11082518

  4. Clinical value of non-HLA antibodies in kidney transplantation: Still an enigma?

    PubMed

    Michielsen, Laura A; van Zuilen, Arjan D; Krebber, Merle M; Verhaar, Marianne C; Otten, Henny G

    2016-10-01

    HLA antibodies play a major role in the recipient's immune response against the renal allograft and are an established risk factor for antibody-mediated rejection and subsequent impaired graft survival. Evidence originating from HLA-identical donor-recipient pairs indicates that non-HLA antibodies may play a role as well. Numerous non-HLA antibodies have been identified in renal organ transplantation, directed against a heterogeneous subset of both allo- and autoantigens including MHC Class-I-related chain A (MICA) and Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). In this review, we will discuss the mechanisms predisposing to non-HLA antibody formation, the possible synergy with HLA-antibodies in their pathologic potential and the mechanisms involved in allograft damage. Furthermore, an overview of the identified non-HLA antibodies and antigens and their relation with rejection and graft survival will be provided. PMID:27395083

  5. Analysis of the distribution of HLA-A alleles in populations from five continents.

    PubMed

    Middleton, D; Williams, F; Meenagh, A; Daar, A S; Gorodezky, C; Hammond, M; Nascimento, E; Briceno, I; Perez, M P

    2000-10-01

    The variation and frequency of HLA-A genotypes were established by PCR-SSOP typing in diverse geographically distributed populations: Brazilian, Colombian Kogui, Cuban, Mexican, Omani, Singapore Chinese, and South African Zulu. HLA-A allelic families with only one allele were identified for HLA-A*01, -A*23, -A*25, -A*31, -A*32, -A*36, -A*43, -A*69, -A*80; and with two alleles for HLA-A*03, -A*11, -A*26, -A*29, -A*33, -A*34, and -A*66. Greater variation was detected for HLA-A*02, -A*24, and -A*68 allele families. Colombian Kogui and Mexican Seris showed the least diversity with respect to HLA-A alleles, albeit with small numbers tested, with only four and five HLA-A alleles identified, respectively. It would appear by their presence in all populations studied, either rural or indigenous, that certain alleles are very important in pathogen peptide presentation.

  6. The Next Generation of HLA Image Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, N. I.; Casertano, S.; Ferguson, B.

    2012-09-01

    We present the re-engineered pipeline based on existing and improved algorithms with the aim of improving processing quality, cross-instrument portability, data flow management, and software maintenance. The Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA) is a project to add value to the Hubble Space Telescope data archive by producing and delivering science-ready drizzled data products and source lists derived from these products. Initially, ACS, NICMOS, and WFCP2 data were combined using instrument-specific pipelines based on scripts developed to process the ACS GOODS data and a separate set of scripts to generate source extractor and DAOPhot source lists. The new pipeline, initially designed for WFC3 data, isolates instrument-specific processing and is easily extendable to other instruments and to generating wide-area mosaics. Significant improvements have been made in image combination using improved alignment, source detection, and background equalization routines. It integrates improved alignment procedures, better noise model, and source list generation within a single code base. Wherever practical, PyRAF based routines have been replaced with non-IRAF based python libraries (e.g. NumPy and PyFITS). The data formats have been modified to handle better and more consistent propagation of information from individual exposures to the combined products. A new exposure layer stores the effective exposure time for each pixel in the sky which is key in properly interpreting combined images from diverse data that were not initially planned to be mosaiced. We worked to improve the validity of the metadata within our FITS headers for these products relative to standard IRAF/PyRAF processing. Any keywords that pertain to individual exposures have been removed from the primary and extension headers and placed in a table extension for more direct and efficient perusal. This mechanism also allows for more detailed information on the processing of individual images to be stored and propagated

  7. A comparative reference study for the validation of HLA-matching algorithms in the search for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell donors and cord blood units.

    PubMed

    Bochtler, W; Gragert, L; Patel, Z I; Robinson, J; Steiner, D; Hofmann, J A; Pingel, J; Baouz, A; Melis, A; Schneider, J; Eberhard, H-P; Oudshoorn, M; Marsh, S G E; Maiers, M; Müller, C R

    2016-06-01

    The accuracy of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matching algorithms is a prerequisite for the correct and efficient identification of optimal unrelated donors for patients requiring hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The goal of this World Marrow Donor Association study was to validate established matching algorithms from different international donor registries by challenging them with simulated input data and subsequently comparing the output. This experiment addressed three specific aspects of HLA matching using different data sets for tasks of increasing complexity. The first two tasks targeted the traditional matching approach identifying discrepancies between patient and donor HLA genotypes by counting antigen and allele differences. Contemporary matching procedures predicting the probability for HLA identity using haplotype frequencies were addressed by the third task. In each task, the identified disparities between the results of the participating computer programs were analyzed, classified and quantified. This study led to a deep understanding of the algorithms participating and finally produced virtually identical results. The unresolved discrepancies total to less than 1%, 4% and 2% for the three tasks and are mostly because of individual decisions in the design of the programs. Based on these findings, reference results for the three input data sets were compiled that can be used to validate future matching algorithms and thus improve the quality of the global donor search process. PMID:27219013

  8. The importance of non-HLA antibodies in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuheng; Reed, Elaine F

    2016-08-01

    The development of post-transplantation antibodies against non-HLA autoantigens is associated with rejection and decreased long-term graft survival. Although our knowledge of non-HLA antibodies is incomplete, compelling experimental and clinical findings demonstrate that antibodies directed against autoantigens such as angiotensin type 1 receptor, perlecan and collagen, contribute to the process of antibody-mediated acute and chronic rejection. The mechanisms that underlie the production of autoantibodies in the setting of organ transplantation is an important area of ongoing investigation. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury, surgical trauma and/or alloimmune responses can result in the release of organ-derived autoantigens (such as soluble antigens, extracellular vesicles or apoptotic bodies) that are presented to B cells in the context of the transplant recipient's antigen presenting cells and stimulate autoantibody production. Type 17 T helper cells orchestrate autoantibody production by supporting the proliferation and maturation of autoreactive B cells within ectopic tertiary lymphoid tissue. Conversely, autoantibody-mediated graft damage can trigger alloimmunity and the development of donor-specific HLA antibodies that can act in synergy to promote allograft rejection. Identification of the immunologic phenotypes of transplant recipients at risk of non-HLA antibody-mediated rejection, and the development of targeted therapies to treat such rejection, are sorely needed to improve both graft and patient survival. PMID:27345243

  9. HLA class II and autoimmunity: epitope selection vs differential expression.

    PubMed

    Müller-Hilke, Brigitte

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA), multiple sclerosis, psoriasis and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus are subject to a complex pathogenesis controlled by multiple genes and numerous environmental factors. The strongest genetic association is with certain HLA class II haplotypes and we here summarize the evidence supporting differential expression as a mechanism supporting the autoimmune process. PMID:19118870

  10. [Idiopathic hemochromatosis linkage with the HLA system (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lipinski, M; Hors, J; Saleun, J P; Saddi, R; Passa, P; Feingold, J; Lafaurie, S; Dausset, J

    1978-06-01

    Fourteen selected families containing two or more subjects suffering from idiopathic hemochromatosis and 34 unrelated cases have been studied for their HLA markers. A 3 was present in 75% of the unrelated cases vs 26% in the normal population (p less than 10(-8)). The frequencies of B 7 (38% vs 19%) and B 14 (23% vs 9%) were also increased (p lessthan 0,05). Inevitably, in most cases both antigens in the B locus were associated with A 3. Seven of nine affected sib pairs shared both HLA haplotypes, while two shared only one. Significant association between HLA haplotypes and diseases segregation has been demonstrated in family studies. These facts are consistent with the recessive inheritance of a strongly A 3 linked "disease" gene responsible for abnormal iron stores in the heterozygote state. This hypothesis would account for 64% of our present cases. Most of discordances (26%) were females who are physiologically protected, or children under 17 who might later develop the disease. The remaining 10% of disordant cases could be explained by crossing-over between "disease" gene and HLA loci or by an heterogeneity of the disease. This provides a method for screening for high risk subjects and perhaps an opportunity for anticipatory prevention. PMID:680310

  11. HLA antigens and insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. A family study.

    PubMed

    Savi, M; Neri, T M; Zavaroni, I; Coscelli, I

    1977-12-01

    Sixteen insulin dependent diabetic patients (age at onset less than 35 years) and their families were tissue typed for HLA antigens. Glucose tolerance of relatives was also tested. Among diabetic patients two HLA antigens were found with increased frequency: B8 (31 percent, control 15 percent) and Bw35 (38 percent, control 23 percent). Among normal relatives B8 and Bw35 had the same frequency as the control group. Bw15 frequency was not increased in either group. In relatives, no correlation between HLA antigens (B8 or Bw35) and abnormal glucose tolerance, obesity and over-weight at birth was found. Present data confirm previous reports of high B8 frequency in early onset diabetic patients, but fail to demonstrate a raised frequency of abnormal glucose tolerance among relatives bearing B8 (or, in our cases, Bw35). B8 may be considered a genetic indicator for susceptibility to juvenile diabetes. On the basis of present results in families, however non genetic factors clearly also play a determinant role. Furthermore, that diabetogenesis arises from a link between Ir-genes and HLA-B8 antigen should only be considered a suggestive hypothesis. PMID:413751

  12. Effect of Selenium on HLA-DR Expression of Thyrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Balázs, Csaba; Kaczur, Viktória

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) represent the most frequent forms of the organ-specific autoimmune thyroid disorders that result from interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Selenium has been shown to exert a beneficial effect on the autoimmune thyroiditis. In spite of therapeutical effect of selenium on autoimmunity, the mechanism of its action has not been revealed. Objective. To determine whether selenium in vitro thyrocytes cultures are able to influence the HLA-DR molecule expression of human thyrocytes and production of free oxygen radicals. Method. Thyrocytes were prepared from human thyroid gland and cultured in vitro in the presence of interferon-γ and sodium selenite. The expression of HLA-DR molecules induced by interferon-γ in the presence of sodium selenite of various concentration was measured by fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Results. Selenium has a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the expression of HLA-DR molecules of thyrocytes induced by interferon-γ. This effect of selenium was in the inverse correlation with antioxidative capacity. Conclusion. Beneficial effect of selenium on autoimmune mechanism is a complex mechanism in which the inhibitory effect on HLA-DR molecule expression and antioxidative capacity are involved into therapy of autoimmune thyroiditis. PMID:22400102

  13. HLA and other gene associations with dengue disease severity.

    PubMed

    Stephens, H A F

    2010-01-01

    Large case control gene association studies have been performed on cohorts of dengue virus (DENV) infected patients identified in mainland Southeast Asia, South Asia and the Caribbean. Candidate genes that have shown statistically significant associations with DENV disease severity encode HLA molecules, cell receptors for IgG (FcGII), vitamin D and ICAM3 (DCSIGN or CD209), pathogen recognition molecules such as mannose binding lectin (MBL), blood related antigens including ABO and human platelet antigens (HPA1 and HPA2). In ethnic Thais with secondary infections a variety of HLA class I alleles (HLA-A 0203, 0207, A11, B 15, B 44, B 46, B 48, B 51, B 52), DCSIGN promoter polymorphisms and the AB blood group, independently associate with either susceptibility or resistance to dengue fever (DF) and the more severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). There is also evidence that some HLA associations with disease severity correlate with the DENV serotype inducing secondary infections. Taken together, there is now evidence that allelic variants of multiple gene loci involved in both acquired and innate immune responses contribute significantly to DENV disease outcome and severity. Further analysis of the genetic basis of severe DENV disease in different at risk populations may contribute to the development of new preventative and therapeutic interventions.

  14. Nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch increases mortality after myeloablative unrelated allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Stephanie J.; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Spellman, Stephen; Wang, Hai-Lin; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Askar, Medhat; Dehn, Jason; Fernandez Viña, Marcelo; Gratwohl, Alois; Gupta, Vikas; Hanna, Rabi; Horowitz, Mary M.; Hurley, Carolyn K.; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Kassim, Adetola A.; Nishihori, Taiga; Mueller, Carlheinz; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Prasad, Vinod; Robinson, James; Saber, Wael; Schultz, Kirk R.; Shaw, Bronwen; Storek, Jan; Wood, William A.; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Anasetti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    We examined current outcomes of unrelated donor allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to determine the clinical implications of donor-recipient HLA matching. Adult and pediatric patients who had first undergone myeloablative-unrelated bone marrow or peripheral blood HCT for acute myelogenous leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome between 1999 and 2011 were included. All had high-resolution typing for HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1. Of the total (n = 8003), cases were 8/8 (n = 5449), 7/8 (n = 2071), or 6/8 (n = 483) matched. HLA mismatch (6-7/8) conferred significantly increased risk for grades II to IV and III to IV acute graft vs host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD, transplant-related mortality (TRM), and overall mortality compared with HLA-matched cases (8/8). Type (allele/antigen) and locus (HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1) of mismatch were not associated with overall mortality. Among 8/8 matched cases, HLA-DPB1 and -DQB1 mismatch resulted in increased acute GVHD, and HLA-DPB1 mismatch had decreased relapse. Nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 allele mismatch was associated with higher TRM compared with permissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch or HLA-DPB1 match and increased overall mortality compared with permissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch in 8/8 (and 10/10) matched cases. Full matching at HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1 is required for optimal unrelated donor HCT survival, and avoidance of nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 mismatches in otherwise HLA-matched pairs is indicated. PMID:25161269

  15. The Protective Role of HLA-DRB1(∗)13 in Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Bettencourt, Andreia; Carvalho, Cláudia; Leal, Bárbara; Brás, Sandra; Lopes, Dina; Martins da Silva, Ana; Santos, Ernestina; Torres, Tiago; Almeida, Isabel; Farinha, Fátima; Barbosa, Paulo; Marinho, António; Selores, Manuela; Correia, João; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Costa, Paulo P; da Silva, Berta Martins

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are characterized by a multifactorial aetiology and a complex genetic background, with the MHC region playing a major role. We genotyped for HLA-DRB1 locus 1228 patients with AIDs-213 with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), 166 with Psoriasis or Psoriatic Arthritis (Ps + PsA), 153 with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), 67 with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc), 536 with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), and 93 with Myasthenia Gravis (MG) and 282 unrelated controls. We confirmed previously established associations of HLA-DRB1(∗)15 (OR = 2.17) and HLA-DRB1(∗)03 (OR = 1.81) alleles with MS, HLA-DRB1(∗)03 with SLE (OR = 2.49), HLA-DRB1(∗)01 (OR = 1.79) and HLA-DRB1(∗)04 (OR = 2.81) with RA, HLA-DRB1(∗)07 with Ps + PsA (OR = 1.79), HLA-DRB1(∗)01 (OR = 2.28) and HLA-DRB1(∗)08 (OR = 3.01) with SSc, and HLA-DRB1(∗)03 with MG (OR = 2.98). We further observed a consistent negative association of HLA-DRB1(∗)13 allele with SLE, Ps + PsA, RA, and SSc (18.3%, 19.3%, 16.3%, and 11.9%, resp., versus 29.8% in controls). HLA-DRB1(∗)13 frequency in the AIDs group was 20.0% (OR = 0.58). Although different alleles were associated with particular AIDs, the same allele, HLA-DRB1(∗)13, was underrepresented in all of the six diseases analysed. This observation suggests that this allele may confer protection for AIDs, particularly for systemic and rheumatic disease. The protective effect of HLA-DRB1(∗)13 could be explained by a more proficient antigen presentation by these molecules, favouring efficient clonal deletion during thymic selection. PMID:26605347

  16. An Object-Oriented Regression for Building Disease Predictive Models with Multiallelic HLA Genes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lue Ping; Bolouri, Hamid; Zhao, Michael; Geraghty, Daniel E; Lernmark, Åke

    2016-05-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies confirm that human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes have the strongest associations with several autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes (T1D), providing an impetus to reduce this genetic association to practice through an HLA-based disease predictive model. However, conventional model-building methods tend to be suboptimal when predictors are highly polymorphic with many rare alleles combined with complex patterns of sequence homology within and between genes. To circumvent this challenge, we describe an alternative methodology; treating complex genotypes of HLA genes as "objects" or "exemplars," one focuses on systemic associations of disease phenotype with "objects" via similarity measurements. Conceptually, this approach assigns disease risks base on complex genotype profiles instead of specific disease-associated genotypes or alleles. Effectively, it transforms large, discrete, and sparse HLA genotypes into a matrix of similarity-based covariates. By the Kernel representative theorem and machine learning techniques, it uses a penalized likelihood method to select disease-associated exemplars in building predictive models. To illustrate this methodology, we apply it to a T1D study with eight HLA genes (HLA-DRB1, HLA-DRB3, HLA-DRB4, HLA-DRB5, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, HLA-DPA1, and HLA-DPB1) to build a predictive model. The resulted predictive model has an area under curve of 0.92 in the training set, and 0.89 in the validating set, indicating that this methodology is useful to build predictive models with complex HLA genotypes. PMID:27080919

  17. The Protective Role of HLA-DRB1∗13 in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bettencourt, Andreia; Carvalho, Cláudia; Leal, Bárbara; Brás, Sandra; Lopes, Dina; Martins da Silva, Ana; Santos, Ernestina; Torres, Tiago; Almeida, Isabel; Farinha, Fátima; Barbosa, Paulo; Marinho, António; Selores, Manuela; Correia, João; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Costa, Paulo P.; da Silva, Berta Martins

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are characterized by a multifactorial aetiology and a complex genetic background, with the MHC region playing a major role. We genotyped for HLA-DRB1 locus 1228 patients with AIDs-213 with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), 166 with Psoriasis or Psoriatic Arthritis (Ps + PsA), 153 with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), 67 with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc), 536 with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), and 93 with Myasthenia Gravis (MG) and 282 unrelated controls. We confirmed previously established associations of HLA-DRB1∗15 (OR = 2.17) and HLA-DRB1∗03 (OR = 1.81) alleles with MS, HLA-DRB1∗03 with SLE (OR = 2.49), HLA-DRB1∗01 (OR = 1.79) and HLA-DRB1∗04 (OR = 2.81) with RA, HLA-DRB1∗07 with Ps + PsA (OR = 1.79), HLA-DRB1∗01 (OR = 2.28) and HLA-DRB1∗08 (OR = 3.01) with SSc, and HLA-DRB1∗03 with MG (OR = 2.98). We further observed a consistent negative association of HLA-DRB1∗13 allele with SLE, Ps + PsA, RA, and SSc (18.3%, 19.3%, 16.3%, and 11.9%, resp., versus 29.8% in controls). HLA-DRB1∗13 frequency in the AIDs group was 20.0% (OR = 0.58). Although different alleles were associated with particular AIDs, the same allele, HLA-DRB1∗13, was underrepresented in all of the six diseases analysed. This observation suggests that this allele may confer protection for AIDs, particularly for systemic and rheumatic disease. The protective effect of HLA-DRB1∗13 could be explained by a more proficient antigen presentation by these molecules, favouring efficient clonal deletion during thymic selection. PMID:26605347

  18. HLA-class II genes in Mexican Amerindian Mayas: relatedness with Guatemalan Mayans and other populations.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Granados, Julio; Pérez-Hernández, Nonanzit; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Manuel; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón Mauricio; Areces, Cristina; Gómez-Prieto, Pablo; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the HLA class II allele frequencies in 50 healthy unrelated Mayan individuals. The relationship with other worldwide populations was studied by using HLA data from 71 different populations. The most frequent alleles were HLA-DRB1*04, HLA-DRB1*01, HLA-DQB1*0302 and HLA-DQB1*0501. When comparisons with other Mexican Amerindian groups were made, some differences were observed. Mayans showed an increased frequency of HLA-DRB1*01 when compared to Nahuas, Mayos, Teenek and Mazatecans (p < 0.05), whereas the HLA-DRB1*04 was increased in Mayans when compared to Nahuas (p < 0.05). The analysis of HLA-DQB1 alleles showed an increased frequency of DQB1*0302 in Mayans when compared to Nahuas and Mazatecans (p < 0.05), whereas the frequency of HLA-DQB1*0301 was decreased in Mayans when compared to Nahuas, Mayos, Teenek and Mazatecans (p < 0.05). Decreased frequency of HLA-DQB1*0501 in Mayans when compared to Nahuas was found. Neighbour Joining dendrogram shows that Mexican Mayans are genetically close to some of the most ancient groups living in Mexico and some South American Amerindians. However, Guatemalan Mayans do not cluster together with Mexican Mayas showing that languages do not correlate with genes, particularly in Amerindians. The data corroborate the restricted polymorphism of HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 alleles and the high frequency of HLA-DRB1*04 and HLA-DQB1*0302 in Mayans from Mexico.

  19. Extraembryonic expression of the human MHC class I gene HLA-G in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, C.M.; Ehlenfeldt, R.G.; Athanasiou, M.C.; Duvick, L.A.; Orr, H.T. ); Hubert, H.

    1993-09-01

    Trophoblast, the only fetal tissue in direct contact with maternal cells, fails to express the polymorphic HLA class I molecules HLA-A and -B, but does express the nonpolymorphic class I molecule HLA-G. It is thought that HLA-G may provide some of the functions of a class I molecule without stimulating maternal immune rejection of the fetal semiallograft. As a first step in identifying the cis-acting DNA regulatory elements involved in the control of class I expression by extraembryonic tissue, several types of transgenic mice were produced. Two HLA-G genomic fragments were used, 5.7 and 6.0 kb in length. These include the entire HLA-G coding region, 1 kb of 3' flanking sequence, and 1.2 or 1.4 kb of 5' flanking sequence, respectively. A hybrid transgene, HLA-A2/G, was produced by replacing the 5' flanking sequence, first exon, and early first intron of HLA-G with the corresponding elements of HLA-A. Comparison of transgene mRNA expression patterns seen in HLA-A2/G and HLA-G transgenic mice suggests that 5' flanking sequences are largely responsible for the differing patterns of expression typical of the classical class I and HLA-G genes. Studies comparing the extraembryonic HLA-G expression levels of founder embryos transgenic for either the 5.7 - or 6.0-kb HLA-G transgene showed that the 6.0-kb transgene directed HLA-G expression far more efficiently than did the 5.7-kb HLA-G transgene, producing extraembryoinc HLA-G mRNA levels similar to those seen in human extraembryoinic tissues. The results of these studies suggest that the 250-bp fragment present at the extreme 5' end of the 6.0-kb HLA-G transgene and absent from the 5.7-kb HLA-G transgene contains an important positive regulatory element. This 250-bp fragment lies further upstream than any of the previously documented class I regulatory regions and may function as a locus control region.

  20. Celtic ancestry, HLA phenotype and increased risk of skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Long, C C; Darke, C; Marks, R

    1998-04-01

    Individuals of Celtic ancestry are claimed to be at greater risk of skin cancer than non-Celts, and various positive and negative associations between certain human leucocyte antigen (HLA) phenotypes and the development of skin cancer have been described. The aims of this study were to determine whether any HLA phenotypes are associated either with Celtic or non-Celtic ancestry, or skin type. One thousand and ten members of the Welsh Bone Marrow Donor Registry (WBMDR), whose HLA phenotypes are known, were asked to complete a questionnaire which enquired as to their family origins and their 'Index of Celtic Ancestry' scored out of 12. Three groups were identified: non-Celts (score < 3), Celts (score > 9), and a subset of the Celts--'high scoring' Celts (score > 10). Details of hair and eye colour and skin type were also requested. Skin type and HLA-A, -B, -DR and -DQ frequencies were compared between the three groups (Celts, non-Celts and 'high scoring' Celts), and a random indigenous population of 9196 members of the WBMDR. Seven hundred and thirty-six replies were received (279 male, 457 female, mean age 31 years). One hundred and forty-four Celts, 51 'high scoring' Celts and 170 non-Celts were identified. Forty-six (32%) Celts had skin type I or II compared with 36 (21%) non-Celts (P = 0.039), and 37 (73%) 'high scoring' Celts had skin type I or II (P < 0.0001). However, there were no significant differences between the groups with regard to hair colour, eye colour or number of episodes of painful sunburn. The frequency of HLA-DR4 was 32% in the non-Celtic group, 44% in the Celtic group (not significant), and 53% in the 'high scoring' Celts (P = 0.008). However, the difference was not significant after correction. There were no significant associations between skin type and HLA phenotype. HLA-DR4 is known to be associated with an increased risk of both basal cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma and its increased frequency in Celts may be an independent risk

  1. The CD8 coreceptor interaction with the alpha 3 domain of HLA class I is critical to the differentiation of human cytotoxic T-lymphocytes specific for HLA-A2 and HLA-Cw4.

    PubMed

    Wesley, P K; Clayberger, C; Lyu, S C; Krensky, A M

    1993-03-01

    The CD8 coreceptor interacts with MHC class I molecules through an acidic loop in the MHC alpha 3 domain. Mutations in this region reduced binding between cells expressing mutant HLA molecules and CHO cells transfected with CD8 alpha chain, with mutations at residue 227 having the greatest effects. This study was undertaken to examine the role of the CD8-HLA interaction in the generation of primary and long-term CTLs. HLA-A*0201 genes (wild type or mutated at residue 227) were transfected into a cell line that lacked expression of HLA-A or B molecules but expressed HLA-Cw4. These cells were used as stimulators for PBLs from a normal donor. Cultures were tested for cytotoxicity at various times thereafter. Transfectants expressing the HLA-A*0201 mutant gene were poor stimulators of primary HLA-A2-specific CTLs. In long-term culture, HLA-Cw4-specific CTLs predominated, indicating that continuous expansion of allogeneic CTLs depends upon an efficient CD8-MHC class I interaction. PMID:8320133

  2. Modification of Multiple Sclerosis Phenotypes by African Ancestry at HLA

    PubMed Central

    Cree, Bruce A. C.; Reich, David E.; Khan, Omar; De Jager, Philip L.; Nakashima, Ichiro; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Bar-Or, Amit; Tong, Christine; Hauser, Stephen L.; Oksenberg, Jorge R.

    2015-01-01

    Background In those with multiple sclerosis (MS), African American individuals have a more severe disease course, an older age at onset, and more often have clinical manifestations restricted to the optic nerves and spinal cord (opticospinal MS) than white persons. Objective To determine whether genetic variation influences clinical MS patterns. Design Retrospective multicenter cohort study. Participants Six hundred seventy-three African American and 717 white patients with MS. Main Outcome Measures Patients with MS were geno-typed for HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles. The proportion of European ancestry at HLA was estimated by genotyping single-nucleotide polymorphisms with known significant frequency differences in West African and European populations. These genotypes were correlated with the opticospinal disease phenotype, disability measures, and age at onset. Results Subjects with DRB1*15 alleles were twice as likely to have typical MS rather than opticospinal MS (P = .001). Of the subjects with opticospinal MS or a history of recurrent transverse myelitis who were seropositive for anti–aquaporin 4 antibodies (approximately 5%), none carried DRB1*15 alleles (P = .008). Independently of DRB1* 15, African ancestry at HLA correlated with disability as measured by the Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (P < .001) andriskof cane dependency (hazard ratio, 1.36; P < .001); DRB1*15 alleles were associated with a 2.1-year earlier age at onset (P < .001). Conclusions These data indicate that the role of HLA in MS is not limited to disease susceptibility but that genes embedded in this locus also influence clinical outcomes. PMID:19204159

  3. HLA and trisomy 21. Confirmation of a trend of restricted HLA heterogeneity in parents of Down syndrome children.

    PubMed

    Aymé, S; Mercier, P; Dallest, R; Mattei, J F

    1984-03-01

    As the HLA system could play a role in the in utero selection process against abnormal fetuses, HLA-A and -B antigens were evidenced in 30 children with trisomy 21 and in their parents, using a standard microlymphocytotoxicity test. The comparison group included 60 families among whom 39 had HLA typing for paternity exclusion and 21 had been previously selected for a segregation study. Both groups consisted of nonconsanguineous Caucasians from the same geographical area. The Down syndrome (DS) children did not show a significant association with a specific HLA antigen. However, six out of 30 couples having a DS child showed two antigens shared at the A and/or B locus, compared to seven out of 60 control couples. The shared parental antigens were not selectively inherited, and the proportion of homozygote children at one locus was lower for DS (5/30) than for controls (13/60). These findings demonstrate the same trend as previously published but need to be confirmed by other investigators. Perhaps a strong selective pressure in favor of heterozygotes contributes to a better survival rate, as suggested from histocompatibility studies in animals.

  4. HLA-DQA1-HLA-DRB1 variants confer susceptibility to pancreatitis induced by thiopurine immunosuppressants.

    PubMed

    Heap, Graham A; Weedon, Michael N; Bewshea, Claire M; Singh, Abhey; Chen, Mian; Satchwell, Jack B; Vivian, Julian P; So, Kenji; Dubois, Patrick C; Andrews, Jane M; Annese, Vito; Bampton, Peter; Barnardo, Martin; Bell, Sally; Cole, Andy; Connor, Susan J; Creed, Tom; Cummings, Fraser R; D'Amato, Mauro; Daneshmend, Tawfique K; Fedorak, Richard N; Florin, Timothy H; Gaya, Daniel R; Greig, Emma; Halfvarson, Jonas; Hart, Alisa; Irving, Peter M; Jones, Gareth; Karban, Amir; Lawrance, Ian C; Lee, James C; Lees, Charlie; Lev-Tzion, Raffi; Lindsay, James O; Mansfield, John; Mawdsley, Joel; Mazhar, Zia; Parkes, Miles; Parnell, Kirstie; Orchard, Timothy R; Radford-Smith, Graham; Russell, Richard K; Reffitt, David; Satsangi, Jack; Silverberg, Mark S; Sturniolo, Giacomo C; Tremelling, Mark; Tsianos, Epameinondas V; van Heel, David A; Walsh, Alissa; Watermeyer, Gill; Weersma, Rinse K; Zeissig, Sebastian; Rossjohn, Jamie; Holden, Arthur L; Ahmad, Tariq

    2014-10-01

    Pancreatitis occurs in approximately 4% of patients treated with the thiopurines azathioprine or mercaptopurine. Its development is unpredictable and almost always leads to drug withdrawal. We identified patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who had developed pancreatitis within 3 months of starting these drugs from 168 sites around the world. After detailed case adjudication, we performed a genome-wide association study on 172 cases and 2,035 controls with IBD. We identified strong evidence of association within the class II HLA region, with the most significant association identified at rs2647087 (odds ratio 2.59, 95% confidence interval 2.07-3.26, P = 2 × 10(-16)). We replicated these findings in an independent set of 78 cases and 472 controls with IBD matched for drug exposure. Fine mapping of the HLA region identified association with the HLA-DQA1*02:01-HLA-DRB1*07:01 haplotype. Patients heterozygous at rs2647087 have a 9% risk of developing pancreatitis after administration of a thiopurine, whereas homozygotes have a 17% risk. PMID:25217962

  5. The impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) micropolymorphism on ligand specificity within the HLA-B*41 allotypic family

    SciTech Connect

    Bade-Döding, Christina; Theodossis, Alex; Gras, Stephanie; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Eiz-Vesper, Britta; Seltsam, Axel; Huyton, Trevor; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James; Blasczyk, Rainer

    2011-09-28

    Polymorphic differences between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules affect the specificity and conformation of their bound peptides and lead to differential selection of the T-cell repertoire. Mismatching during allogeneic transplantation can, therefore, lead to immunological reactions. We investigated the structure-function relationships of six members of the HLA-B*41 allelic group that differ by six polymorphic amino acids, including positions 80, 95, 97 and 114 within the antigen-binding cleft. Peptide-binding motifs for B*41:01, *41:02, *41:03, *41:04, *41:05 and *41:06 were determined by sequencing self-peptides from recombinant B*41 molecules by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The crystal structures of HLA-B*41:03 bound to a natural 16-mer self-ligand (AEMYGSVTEHPSPSPL) and HLA-B*41:04 bound to a natural 11-mer self-ligand (HEEAVSVDRVL) were solved. Peptide analysis revealed that all B*41 alleles have an identical anchor motif at peptide position 2 (glutamic acid), but differ in their choice of C-terminal p{Omega} anchor (proline, valine, leucine). Additionally, B*41:04 displayed a greater preference for long peptides (>10 residues) when compared to the other B*41 allomorphs, while the longest peptide to be eluted from the allelic group (a 16mer) was obtained from B*41:03. The crystal structures of HLA-B*41:03 and HLA-B*41:04 revealed that both alleles interact in a highly conserved manner with the terminal regions of their respective ligands, while micropolymorphism-induced changes in the steric and electrostatic properties of the antigen-binding cleft account for differences in peptide repertoire and auxiliary anchoring. Differences in peptide repertoire, and peptide length specificity reflect the significant functional evolution of these closely related allotypes and signal their importance in allogeneic transplantation, especially B*41:03 and B*41:04, which accommodate longer peptides, creating structurally distinct peptide-HLA

  6. An extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, M D; Smith, J R; Austin, R K; Kelleher, D; Nepom, G T; Volk, B; Kagnoff, M F

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. We previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II beta-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. We now report the isolation of this beta-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP beta chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP beta-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP alpha-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP alpha-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis; 84% of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 patients had a 16-kb Xba I fragment that was present in only 36% of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 controls. Moreover, 79% of these patients had both alpha- and beta-chain polymorphisms in contrast to 27% of controls. Thus, celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP alpha- and beta-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion. Images PMID:2893373

  7. Molecular analysis of HLA-B35 alleles and their relationship to HLA-B15 alleles.

    PubMed

    Cereb, N; Kim, C; Hughes, A L; Yang, S Y

    1997-04-01

    The HLA-B35 serotype is one of the largest allelic groups of HLA class I molecules and includes four isotypes. Of the four, the B35 variant isoform is relatively rare and is the most acidic form. DNA sequencing of the rare isoforms revealed three alleles, B*1522, B*3511, and B*3517. A phylogenetic tree of HLA-B15- and HLA-B35-related alleles for the exon 2 and 3 nucleotide sequences showed that exon 2 of B*1522 clusters with B35 alleles whereas exon 3 clusters with B15 alleles. Branches of the tree suggest that the serodeterminants of B35, B62, B63, and B70 may reside in the alpha 1 domain, encoded by exon 2. The B*1520 and B*1522 genes, which type as B62 and B35, respectively, are hybrid molecules alternatively using exon 2 and exon 3 sequences of B*3501 and B*1501. A comparison of intron 2 sequences for B*3501, B*1501 and B*1522 suggests that the recombination site may have been in the region at the 3' end of intron 2. Despite being flanked by two highly polymorphic exons (exons 2 and 3), intron 2 is relatively well conserved in the B-locus, and it is characterized by seven to eight tandem repeats of the CGGGG pentanucleotide. A high degree of sequence homology and repetitive sequences are essential for a significant frequency of recombination. In this report, we reveal more about the complex evolutionary history of the HLA-B alleles.

  8. Charting improvements in US registry HLA typing ambiguity using a typing resolution score.

    PubMed

    Paunić, Vanja; Gragert, Loren; Schneider, Joel; Müller, Carlheinz; Maiers, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Unrelated stem cell registries have been collecting HLA typing of volunteer bone marrow donors for over 25years. Donor selection for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is based primarily on matching the alleles of donors and patients at five polymorphic HLA loci. As HLA typing technologies have continually advanced since the beginnings of stem cell transplantation, registries have accrued typings of varied HLA typing ambiguity. We present a new typing resolution score (TRS), based on the likelihood of self-match, that allows the systematic comparison of HLA typings across different methods, data sets and populations. We apply the TRS to chart improvement in HLA typing within the Be The Match Registry of the United States from the initiation of DNA-based HLA typing to the current state of high-resolution typing using next-generation sequencing technologies. In addition, we present a publicly available online tool for evaluation of any given HLA typing. This TRS objectively evaluates HLA typing methods and can help define standards for acceptable recruitment HLA typing. PMID:27163154

  9. Improved Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying HLA Class I Antigen Presentation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Man; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Jie; Wei, Xundong; Phiwpan, Krung; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhou, Xuyu

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I (HLA-I) transgenic mice have proven to be useful models for studying human MHC-related immune responses over the last two decades. However, differences in the processing and presentation machinery between humans and mice may have profound effects on HLA-I restricted antigen presentation. In this study, we generated a novel human TAP-LMP (hTAP-LMP) gene cluster transgenic mouse model carrying an intact human TAP complex and two human immunoproteasome LMP subunits, PSMB8/PSMB9. By crossing the hTAP-LMP strain with different HLA-I transgenic mice, we found that the expression levels of human HLA-I molecules, especially the A3 supertype members (e.g., A11 and A33), were remarkably enhanced in corresponding HLA-I/hTAP-LMP transgenic mice. Moreover, we found that humanized processing and presentation machinery increased antigen presentation of HLA-A11-restricted epitopes and promoted the rapid reduction of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in HLA-A11/hTAP-LMP mice. Together, our study highlights that HLA-I/hTAP-LMP mice are an improved model for studying antigen presentation of HLA-I molecules and their related CTL responses. PMID:27634283

  10. HLA Class Ib Molecules and Immune Cells in Pregnancy and Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Djurisic, Snezana; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F.

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the highly prevalent pregnancy complication preeclampsia, “the disease of theories,” has remained an enigma. Indeed, the etiology of preeclampsia is largely unknown. A compiling amount of studies indicates that the pathological basis involves a complex array of genetic predisposition and immunological maladaptation, and that a contribution from the mother, the father, and the fetus is likely to be important. The Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-G is an increasing focus of research in relation to preeclampsia. The HLA-G molecule is primarily expressed by the extravillous trophoblast cells lining the placenta together with the two other HLA class Ib molecules, HLA-E and HLA-F. Soluble isoforms of HLA-G have been detected in the early endometrium, the matured cumulus–oocyte complex, maternal blood of pregnant women, in umbilical cord blood, and lately, in seminal plasma. HLA-G is believed to be involved in modulating immune responses in the context of vascular remodeling during pregnancy as well as in dampening potential harmful immune attacks raised against the semi-allogeneic fetus. In addition, HLA-G genetic variants are associated with both membrane-bound and soluble forms of HLA-G, and, in some studies, with preeclampsia. In this review, a genetic contribution from the mother, the father, and the fetus, together with the presence and function of various immune cells of relevance in pregnancy are reviewed in relation to HLA-G and preeclampsia. PMID:25566263

  11. Toward eliminating HLA class I expression to generate universal cells from allogeneic donors

    PubMed Central

    Torikai, Hiroki; Reik, Andreas; Soldner, Frank; Warren, Edus H.; Yuen, Carrie; Zhou, Yuanyue; Crossland, Denise L.; Huls, Helen; Littman, Nicholas; Zhang, Ziying; Tykodi, Scott S.; Kebriaei, Partow; Lee, Dean A.; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Rebar, Edward J.; Holmes, Michael C.; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Champlin, Richard E.; Gregory, Philip D.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term engraftment of allogeneic cells necessitates eluding immune-mediated rejection, which is currently achieved by matching for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) expression, immunosuppression, and/or delivery of donor-derived cells to sanctuary sites. Genetic engineering provides an alternative approach to avoid clearance of cells that are recognized as “non-self” by the recipient. To this end, we developed designer zinc finger nucleases and employed a “hit-and-run” approach to genetic editing for selective elimination of HLA expression. Electro-transfer of mRNA species coding for these engineered nucleases completely disrupted expression of HLA-A on human T cells, including CD19-specific T cells. The HLA-Aneg T-cell pools can be enriched and evade lysis by HLA-restricted cytotoxic T-cell clones. Recognition by natural killer cells of cells that had lost HLA expression was circumvented by enforced expression of nonclassical HLA molecules. Furthermore, we demonstrate that zinc finger nucleases can eliminate HLA-A expression from embryonic stem cells, which broadens the applicability of this strategy beyond infusing HLA-disparate immune cells. These findings establish that clinically appealing cell types derived from donors with disparate HLA expression can be genetically edited to evade an immune response and provide a foundation whereby cells from a single donor can be administered to multiple recipients. PMID:23741009

  12. Study of Soluble HLA-G in Congenital Human Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielli, Liliana; Bortolotti, Daria; Gentili, Valentina; Piccirilli, Giulia; Chiereghin, Angela; Pavia, Claudia; Bolzani, Silvia; Guerra, Brunella; Simonazzi, Giuliana; Cervi, Francesca; Capretti, Maria Grazia; Luca, Dario Di; Landini, Maria Paola; Lazzarotto, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical HLA class I antigen that is expressed during pregnancy contributing to maternal-fetal tolerance. HLA-G can be expressed as membrane-bound and soluble forms. HLA-G expression increases strongly during viral infections such as congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, with functional consequences in immunoregulation. In this work we investigated the expression of soluble (s)HLA-G and beta-2 microglobulin (component of HLA) molecules in correlation with the risk of transmission and severity of congenital HCMV infection. We analyzed 182 blood samples from 130 pregnant women and 52 nonpregnant women and 56 amniotic fluid samples from women experiencing primary HCMV infection. The median levels of sHLA-G in maternal serum of women with primary HCMV infection were higher in comparison with nonprimary and uninfected pregnant women (p < 0.001). AF from HCMV symptomatic fetuses presented higher sHLA-G levels in comparison with infected asymptomatic fetuses (p < 0.001), presence of HLA-G free-heavy chain, and a concentration gradient from amniotic fluid to maternal blood. No significant statistical difference of beta-2 microglobulin median levels was observed between all different groups. Our results suggest the determination of sHLA-G molecules in both maternal blood and amniotic fluid as a promising biomarker of diagnosis of maternal HCMV primary infection and fetal HCMV disease. PMID:27699182

  13. Study of Soluble HLA-G in Congenital Human Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielli, Liliana; Bortolotti, Daria; Gentili, Valentina; Piccirilli, Giulia; Chiereghin, Angela; Pavia, Claudia; Bolzani, Silvia; Guerra, Brunella; Simonazzi, Giuliana; Cervi, Francesca; Capretti, Maria Grazia; Luca, Dario Di; Landini, Maria Paola; Lazzarotto, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical HLA class I antigen that is expressed during pregnancy contributing to maternal-fetal tolerance. HLA-G can be expressed as membrane-bound and soluble forms. HLA-G expression increases strongly during viral infections such as congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, with functional consequences in immunoregulation. In this work we investigated the expression of soluble (s)HLA-G and beta-2 microglobulin (component of HLA) molecules in correlation with the risk of transmission and severity of congenital HCMV infection. We analyzed 182 blood samples from 130 pregnant women and 52 nonpregnant women and 56 amniotic fluid samples from women experiencing primary HCMV infection. The median levels of sHLA-G in maternal serum of women with primary HCMV infection were higher in comparison with nonprimary and uninfected pregnant women (p < 0.001). AF from HCMV symptomatic fetuses presented higher sHLA-G levels in comparison with infected asymptomatic fetuses (p < 0.001), presence of HLA-G free-heavy chain, and a concentration gradient from amniotic fluid to maternal blood. No significant statistical difference of beta-2 microglobulin median levels was observed between all different groups. Our results suggest the determination of sHLA-G molecules in both maternal blood and amniotic fluid as a promising biomarker of diagnosis of maternal HCMV primary infection and fetal HCMV disease.

  14. HLA-G Expression and Role in Advanced-Stage Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Caocci, G.; Greco, M.; Fanni, D.; Senes, G.; Littera, R.; Lai, S.; Risso, P.; Carcassi, C.; Faa, G.; La Nasa, G.

    2016-01-01

    Non-classical human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G class I molecules have an important role in tumor immune escape mechanisms. We investigated HLA-G expression in lymphonode biopsies taken from 8 controls and 20 patients with advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), in relationship to clinical outcomes and the HLA-G 14-basepair (14-bp) deletion-insertion (del-ins) polymorphism. Lymphnode tissue sections were stained using a specific murine monoclonal HLA-G antibody. HLA-G protein expression was higher in cHL patients than controls. In the group of PET-2 positive (positron emission tomography carried out after 2 cycles of standard chemotherapy) patients with a 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS) of 40%, we observed high HLA-G protein expression within the tumor microenvironment with low expression on Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. Conversely, PET-2 negative patients with a PFS of 86% had higher HLA-G protein expression levels on HRS cells compared to the microenvironment. Lower expression on HRS cells was significantly associated with the HLA-G 14-bp ins/ins genotype. These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2. PMID:27349312

  15. Immunogenicity of HLA Class I and II Double Restricted Influenza A-Derived Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Sara Ram; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Buus, Søren; Rasmussen, Michael; Korsholm, Karen Smith; Nielsen, Morten; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify influenza A-derived peptides which bind to both HLA class I and -II molecules and by immunization lead to both HLA class I and class II restricted immune responses. Eight influenza A-derived 9-11mer peptides with simultaneous binding to both HLA-A*02:01 and HLA-DRB1*01:01 molecules were identified by bioinformatics and biochemical technology. Immunization of transgenic HLA-A*02:01/HLA-DRB1*01:01 mice with four of these double binding peptides gave rise to both HLA class I and class II restricted responses by CD8 and CD4 T cells, respectively, whereas four of the double binding peptides did result in HLA-A*02:01 restricted responses only. According to their cytokine profile, the CD4 T cell responses were of the Th2 type. In influenza infected mice, we were unable to detect natural processing in vivo of the double restricted peptides and in line with this, peptide vaccination did not decrease virus titres in the lungs of intranasally influenza challenged mice. Our data show that HLA class I and class II double binding peptides can be identified by bioinformatics and biochemical technology. By immunization, double binding peptides can give rise to both HLA class I and class I restricted responses, a quality which might be of potential interest for peptide-based vaccine development. PMID:26731261

  16. Improved Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying HLA Class I Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Man; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Jie; Wei, Xundong; Phiwpan, Krung; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhou, Xuyu

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I (HLA-I) transgenic mice have proven to be useful models for studying human MHC-related immune responses over the last two decades. However, differences in the processing and presentation machinery between humans and mice may have profound effects on HLA-I restricted antigen presentation. In this study, we generated a novel human TAP-LMP (hTAP-LMP) gene cluster transgenic mouse model carrying an intact human TAP complex and two human immunoproteasome LMP subunits, PSMB8/PSMB9. By crossing the hTAP-LMP strain with different HLA-I transgenic mice, we found that the expression levels of human HLA-I molecules, especially the A3 supertype members (e.g., A11 and A33), were remarkably enhanced in corresponding HLA-I/hTAP-LMP transgenic mice. Moreover, we found that humanized processing and presentation machinery increased antigen presentation of HLA-A11-restricted epitopes and promoted the rapid reduction of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in HLA-A11/hTAP-LMP mice. Together, our study highlights that HLA-I/hTAP-LMP mice are an improved model for studying antigen presentation of HLA-I molecules and their related CTL responses. PMID:27634283

  17. Rare HLA drive additional HIV evolution compared to more frequent alleles.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Christine M; Lockhart, David W; Listgarten, Jennifer; Maley, Stephen N; Kadie, Carl; Learn, Gerald H; Nickle, David C; Heckerman, David E; Deng, Wenjie; Brander, Christian; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Coovadia, Hoosen; Goulder, Philip J R; Korber, Bette T; Walker, Bruce D; Mullins, James I

    2009-03-01

    HIV-1 can evolve HLA-specific escape variants in response to HLA-mediated cellular immunity. HLA alleles that are common in the host population may increase the frequency of such escape variants at the population level. When loss of viral fitness is caused by immune escape variation, these variants may revert upon infection of a new host who does not have the corresponding HLA allele. Furthermore, additional escape variants may appear in response to the nonconcordant HLA alleles. Because individuals with rare HLA alleles are less likely to be infected by a partner with concordant HLA alleles, viral populations infecting hosts with rare HLA alleles may undergo a greater amount of evolution than those infecting hosts with common alleles due to the loss of preexisting escape variants followed by new immune escape. This hypothesis was evaluated using maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees of each gene from 272 full-length HIV-1 sequences. Recent viral evolution, as measured by the external branch length, was found to be inversely associated with HLA frequency in nef (p < 0.02), env (p < 0.03), and pol (p < or = 0.05), suggesting that rare HLA alleles provide a disproportionate force driving viral evolution compared to common alleles, likely due to the loss of preexisting escape variants during early stages postinfection.

  18. Rapid evaluation of soluble HLA-G levels in supernatants of in vitro fertilized embryos.

    PubMed

    Rebmann, Vera; Switala, Magdalena; Eue, Ines; Schwahn, Eva; Merzenich, Markus; Grosse-Wilde, Hans

    2007-04-01

    Human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) molecules are crucial for the maternal tolerance against the fetus during pregnancy. Thus, the presence of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) in embryo cultures is thought to be correlated to a successful pregnancy after assisted reproductive techniques (ART). Here, we established a rapid detection assay based on Luminex technology, which can be integrated into ART proceedings, allowing sHLA-G quantification in sample volumes of only 10 microl within 1.5 hours. Using this method, sHLA-G levels of 526 single-embryo cultures, 47 two-embryo cultures, and 15 three-embryo cultures were analyzed corresponding to 313 ART cycles. In 117 embryo cultures, sHLA-G was detectable. In single-embryo cultures, the sHLA-G levels were positively correlated to embryo quality (p = 0.048, r = 0.20, n = 100). The presence of sHLA-G in embryo cultures was significantly (p < 0.0001) associated with clinical pregnancy after intracytoplasmatic sperm injections (ICSI), especially in couples with male factor infertility, but not after in vitro fertilization (IVF) or in couples with female infertility. Importantly, in sHLA-G negative embryos, the abortion rate was increased threefold (p = 0.04). In conclusion, the results obtained by our novel method support strongly the diagnostic relevance of sHLA-G for predicting pregnancy outcome after ART. The ultimate conditions for this prediction have to be further investigated in a multicenter study.

  19. [Identification and sequence analysis of a novel HLA-A * 3018 allele].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Zou, Hong-Yan; Shao, Chao-Peng; Sun, Ge; Jin, Shi-Zheng; Cheng, Liang-Hong

    2007-10-01

    To identify HLA novel allele in Chinese Han individuals, an unknown HLA-A allele was detected by PCR-SSP and FLOW-SSO in Chinese Han individuals. Heterozygous sequence-based typing (SBT) showed that there were 3 differences compared with database in exon 2. Its anomalous patterns suggested the possible presence of either a novel A * 30 or a novel A * 24. To separate the two alleles and to determine whether the allele is novel, the HLA-A * 30 and HLA-A * 24 alleles were amplified separately by using a commercial kit for the single allele-specific sequencing strategy, and both alleles for exons 2 - 4 were sequenced according to the manufacturer' protocol. To prepare B-lymphoblastoid cell line of the novel HLA allele by using Epstein-Barr virus-infected B-lymphoblastoid cells in the peripheral blood. The results indicated that the sequencing results showed HLA-A alleles of the sample to be HLA-A * 240201 and a new A * 30 allele. The sequences of the new A*30 were identical to those of HLA-A * 300101 except for three nucleotide changes in exon 2: at nt 121 (A-->C), nt 123 (T-->C) and nt 126 (A-->G), resulting in an amino acid residue substitution from S (AGT) to R (CGC) at codon 17 and a synonymous substitution from G (GGA) to G (GGG) at codon 18. Immortalized B-lymphoblastoid cell line of the novel HLA-A * 3018 allele was achieved, the sequence of HLA-A * 3018 allele was submitted to GenBank and its accession number was DQ872509. In conclusion, the HLA-A * 3018 is a novel HLA-A allele and has been officially named HLA-A * 3018 by the WHO Nomenclature committee in August 2006 (HWS10004039).

  20. Gene Map of the HLA Region, Graves' Disease and Hashimoto Thyroiditis, and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sasazuki, Takehiko; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Morishima, Satoko; Morishima, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genomic region spanning about 4 Mb is the most gene dense and the polymorphic stretches in the human genome. A total of the 269 loci were identified, including 145 protein coding genes mostly important for immunity and 50 noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Biological function of these ncRNAs remains unknown, becoming hot spot in the studies of HLA-associated diseases. The genomic diversity analysis in the HLA region facilitated by next-generation sequencing will pave the way to molecular understanding of linkage disequilibrium structure, population diversity, histocompatibility in transplantation, and associations with autoimmune diseases. The 4-digit DNA genotyping of HLA for six HLA loci, HLA-A through DP, in the patients with Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) identified six susceptible and three resistant HLA alleles. Their epistatic interactions in controlling the development of these diseases are shown. Four susceptible and one resistant HLA alleles are shared by GD and HT. Two HLA alleles associated with GD or HT control the titers of autoantibodies to thyroid antigens. All these observations led us to propose a new model for the development of GD and HT. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from unrelated donor (UR-HSCT) provides a natural experiment to elucidate the role of allogenic HLA molecules in immune response. Large cohort studies using HLA allele and clinical outcome data have elucidated that (1) HLA locus, allele, and haplotype mismatches between donor and patient, (2) specific amino acid substitution at specific positions of HLA molecules, and (3) ethnic background are all responsible for the immunological events related to UR-HSCT including acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD, graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect, and graft failure.

  1. HLA-G and MHC Class II Protein Expression in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jesionek-Kupnicka, Dorota; Bojo, Marcin; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Szumera-Ciećkiewicz, Anna; Jabłońska, Joanna; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Kordek, Radzisław; Młynarski, Wojciech; Robak, Tadeusz; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Lech-Maranda, Ewa

    2016-06-01

    The expression of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) and HLA class II protein was studied by immunohistochemical staining of lymph nodes from 148 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and related to the clinical course of the disease. Negative HLA-G expression was associated with a lower probability of achieving a complete remission (p = 0.04). Patients with negative HLA-G expression tended towards a lower 3-year overall survival (OS) rate compared to those with positive expression of HLA-G (p = 0.08). When restricting the analysis to patients receiving chemotherapy with rituximab, the estimated 3-year OS rate of patients with positive HLA-G expression was 73.3 % compared with 47.5 % (p = 0.03) in those with negative expression. Patients with negative HLA class II expression presented a lower 3-year OS rate compared to subjects with positive expression (p = 0.04). The loss of HLA class II expression (p = 0.05) and belonging to the intermediate high/high IPI risk group (p = 0.001) independently increased the risk of death. HLA class II expression also retained its prognostic value in patients receiving rituximab; the 3-year OS rate was 65.3 % in patients with positive HLA class II expression versus 29.6 % (p = 0.04) in subjects that had loss of HLA class II expression. To our knowledge, for the first time, the expression of HLA-G protein in DLBCL and its association with the clinical course of the disease was demonstrated. Moreover, the link between losing HLA class II protein expression and poor survival of patients treated with immunochemotherapy was confirmed.

  2. In silico analysis of HLA associations with drug-induced liver injury: use of a HLA-genotyped DNA archive from healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is one of the most common adverse reactions leading to product withdrawal post-marketing. Recently, genome-wide association studies have identified a number of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles associated with DILI; however, the cellular and chemical mechanisms are not fully understood. Methods To study these mechanisms, we established an HLA-typed cell archive from 400 healthy volunteers. In addition, we utilized HLA genotype data from more than four million individuals from publicly accessible repositories such as the Allele Frequency Net Database, Major Histocompatibility Complex Database and Immune Epitope Database to study the HLA alleles associated with DILI. We utilized novel in silico strategies to examine HLA haplotype relationships among the alleles associated with DILI by using bioinformatics tools such as NetMHCpan, PyPop, GraphViz, PHYLIP and TreeView. Results We demonstrated that many of the alleles that have been associated with liver injury induced by structurally diverse drugs (flucloxacillin, co-amoxiclav, ximelagatran, lapatinib, lumiracoxib) reside on common HLA haplotypes, which were present in populations of diverse ethnicity. Conclusions Our bioinformatic analysis indicates that there may be a connection between the different HLA alleles associated with DILI caused by therapeutically and structurally different drugs, possibly through peptide binding of one of the HLA alleles that defines the causal haplotype. Further functional work, together with next-generation sequencing techniques, will be needed to define the causal alleles associated with DILI. PMID:22732016

  3. HLA-A2 as a target for cell-mediated lympholysis: evidence from immunoselected HLA-A2 negative mutant cell lines.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, P E; Apgar, J R; Cresswell, P

    1980-07-01

    Cloned mutants of the human B lymphoblastoid cell line SB have been isolated using mutagenesis with ethyl methanesulfonate followed by negative selection with an anti-HLA-A2 serum and complement. Absorption analysis with 125I Staphylococcus aureus protein A binding to antibody sensitized cells. HLA typing, and immune precipitation analysis showed the mutants to be serologically identical to the SB parent except for the loss of HLA-A2. When tested as target cells for cell-mediated lympholysis by cytotoxic T lymphocytes generated in the mixed lymphocyte response, the SB and mutant cell lines demonstrated comparable susceptibility when the putative targets were HLA antigens other than HLA-A2. However, when compared for susceptibility to lysis by cytotoxic T lymphocytes considered to be HLA-A2 specific, the SB parent was effectively killed whereas little or no killing of the HLA-A2 mutants was observed. The results provide a new line of evidence that HLA antigens recognized by antibody can also be the true molecular targets for cytotoxic T lymphocytes. PMID:7263311

  4. Unraveling Multiple MHC Gene Associations with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Model Choice Indicates a Role for HLA Alleles and Non-HLA Genes in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Morris, David L.; Taylor, Kimberly E.; Fernando, Michelle M.A.; Nititham, Joanne; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Barcellos, Lisa F.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Cotsapas, Chris; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Graham, Robert R.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Harley, John B.; Hauser, Stephen L.; Hom, Geoffrey; Langefeld, Carl D.; Noble, Janelle A.; Rioux, John D.; Seldin, Michael F.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Vyse, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    We have performed a meta-analysis of the major-histocompatibility-complex (MHC) region in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) to determine the association with both SNPs and classical human-leukocyte-antigen (HLA) alleles. More specifically, we combined results from six studies and well-known out-of-study control data sets, providing us with 3,701 independent SLE cases and 12,110 independent controls of European ancestry. This study used genotypes for 7,199 SNPs within the MHC region and for classical HLA alleles (typed and imputed). Our results from conditional analysis and model choice with the use of the Bayesian information criterion show that the best model for SLE association includes both classical loci (HLA-DRB1∗03:01, HLA-DRB1∗08:01, and HLA-DQA1∗01:02) and two SNPs, rs8192591 (in class III and upstream of NOTCH4) and rs2246618 (MICB in class I). Our approach was to perform a stepwise search from multiple baseline models deduced from a priori evidence on HLA-DRB1 lupus-associated alleles, a stepwise regression on SNPs alone, and a stepwise regression on HLA alleles. With this approach, we were able to identify a model that was an overwhelmingly better fit to the data than one identified by simple stepwise regression either on SNPs alone (Bayes factor [BF] > 50) or on classical HLA alleles alone (BF > 1,000). PMID:23084292

  5. HLA-A 31:01 and HLA-B 15:02 as genetic markers for carbamazepine hypersensitivity in children.

    PubMed

    Amstutz, U; Ross, C J D; Castro-Pastrana, L I; Rieder, M J; Shear, N H; Hayden, M R; Carleton, B C

    2013-07-01

    The occurrence of hypersensitivity reactions including rare but life-threatening Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (HSS) limits the use of the anticonvulsant carbamazepine (CBZ). Human leukocyte antigen-B (HLA)-B 15:02 and HLA-A 31:01 have been identified as predictive genetic markers for CBZ hypersensitivity in Asian and European patients. To replicate these genetic associations in pediatric patients from North America with a diverse ethnic background, we investigated HLA-A 31:01 and HLA-B 15:02 in 42 children with CBZ hypersensitivity and 91 CBZ-tolerant children from across Canada. HLA-A 31:01 was significantly associated with CBZ-HSS (odds ratio (OR): 26.4, P = 0.0025) and maculopapular exanthema (MPE) (OR: 8.6, P = 0.0037) but not with CBZ-SJS. Conversely, HLA-B 15:02 was associated with CBZ-SJS (OR: 38.6, P = 0.002) but not HSS or MPE. This study is the first to demonstrate the association of HLA-A 31:01 with CBZ hypersensitivity in children, providing important replication of this association and highlighting the importance of HLA-A 31:01 as a predictive biomarker across various ancestries.

  6. Detection of 549 new HLA alleles in potential stem cell donors from the United States, Poland and Germany.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Frederick, C J; Cereb, N; Giani, A S; Ruppel, J; Maraszek, A; Pingel, J; Sauter, J; Schmidt, A H; Yang, S Y

    2016-01-01

    We characterized 549 new human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II alleles found in newly registered stem cell donors as a result of high-throughput HLA typing. New alleles include 101 HLA-A, 132 HLA-B, 105 HLA-C, 2 HLA-DRB1, 89 HLA-DQB1 and 120 HLA-DPB1 alleles. Mainly, new alleles comprised single nucleotide variations when compared with homologous sequences. We identified nonsynonymous nucleotide mutations in 70.7% of all new alleles, synonymous variations in 26.4% and nonsense substitutions in 2.9% (null alleles). Some new alleles (55, 10.0%) were found multiple times, HLA-DPB1 alleles being the most frequent among these. Furthermore, as several new alleles were identified in individuals from ethnic minority groups, the relevance of recruiting donors belonging to such groups and the importance of ethnicity data collection in donor centers and registries is highlighted.

  7. Diversity of Extended HLA-DRB1 Haplotypes in the Finnish Population

    PubMed Central

    Wennerström, Annika; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Lahtela, L. Elisa; Paakkanen, Riitta; Eronen, Katja T.; Seppänen, Mikko; Lokki, Marja-Liisa

    2013-01-01

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC, 6p21) codes for traditional HLA and other host response related genes. The polymorphic HLA-DRB1 gene in MHC Class II has been associated with several complex diseases. In this study we focus on MHC haplotype structures in the Finnish population. We explore the variability of extended HLA-DRB1 haplotypes in relation to the other traditional HLA genes and a selected group of MHC class III genes. A total of 150 healthy Finnish individuals were included in the study. Subjects were genotyped for HLA alleles (HLA-A, -B, -DRB1, -DQB1, and -DPB1). The polymorphism of TNF, LTA, C4, BTNL2 and HLA-DRA genes was studied with 74 SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism). The C4A and C4B gene copy numbers and a 2-bp silencing insertion at exon 29 in C4A gene were analysed with quantitative genomic realtime-PCR. The allele frequencies for each locus were calculated and haplotypes were constructed using both the traditional HLA alleles and SNP blocks. The most frequent Finnish A∼B∼DR -haplotype, uncommon in elsewhere in Europe, was A*03∼B*35∼DRB1*01∶01. The second most common haplotype was a common European ancestral haplotype AH 8.1 (A*01∼B*08∼DRB1*03∶01). Extended haplotypes containing HLA-B, TNF block, C4 and HLA-DPB1 strongly increased the number of HLA-DRB1 haplotypes showing variability in the extended HLA-DRB1 haplotype structures. On the contrary, BTNL2 block and HLA-DQB1 were more conserved showing linkage with the HLA-DRB1 alleles. We show that the use of HLA-DRB1 haplotypes rather than single HLA-DRB1 alleles is advantageous when studying the polymorphisms and LD patters of the MHC region. For disease association studies the HLA-DRB1 haplotypes with various MHC markers allows us to cluster haplotypes with functionally important gene variants such as C4 deficiency and cytokines TNF and LTA, and provides hypotheses for further assessment. Our study corroborates the importance of studying population-specific MHC

  8. Phase-defined complete sequencing of the HLA genes by next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, the 3.8-Mb segment of the human genome at 6p21, has been associated with more than 100 different diseases, mostly autoimmune diseases. Due to the complex nature of HLA genes, there are difficulties in elucidating complete HLA gene sequences especially HLA gene haplotype structures by the conventional sequencing method. We propose a novel, accurate, and cost-effective method for generating phase-defined complete sequencing of HLA genes by using indexed multiplex next generation sequencing. Results A total of 33 HLA homozygous samples, 11 HLA heterozygous samples, and 3 parents-child families were subjected to phase-defined HLA gene sequencing. We applied long-range PCR to amplify six HLA genes (HLA-A, -C, -B, DRB1, -DQB1, and –DPB1) followed by transposase-based library construction and multiplex sequencing with the MiSeq sequencer. Paired-end reads (2 × 250 bp) derived from the sequencer were aligned to the six HLA gene segments of UCSC hg19 allowing at most 80 bases mismatch. For HLA homozygous samples, the six amplicons of an individual were pooled and simultaneously sequenced and mapped as an individual-tagging method. The paired-end reads were aligned to corresponding genes of UCSC hg19 and unambiguous, continuous sequences were obtained. For HLA heterozygous samples, each amplicon was separately sequenced and mapped as a gene-tagging method. After alignments, we detected informative paired-end reads harboring SNVs on both forward and reverse reads that are used to separate two chromosomes and to generate two phase-defined sequences in an individual. Consequently, we were able to determine the phase-defined HLA gene sequences from promoter to 3′-UTR and assign up to 8-digit HLA allele numbers, regardless of whether the alleles are rare or novel. Parent–child trio-based sequencing validated our sequencing and phasing methods. Conclusions Our protocol generated phased-defined sequences of the entire

  9. Unique features of HLA-mediated HIV evolution in a Mexican cohort: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Avila-Rios, Santiago; Ormsby, Christopher E; Carlson, Jonathan M; Valenzuela-Ponce, Humberto; Blanco-Heredia, Juan; Garrido-Rodriguez, Daniela; Garcia-Morales, Claudia; Heckerman, David; Brumme, Zabrina L; Mallal, Simon; John, Mina; Espinosa, Enrique; Reyes-Teran, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    Background Mounting evidence indicates that HLA-mediated HIV evolution follows highly stereotypic pathways that result in HLA-associated footprints in HIV at the population level. However, it is not known whether characteristic HLA frequency distributions in different populations have resulted in additional unique footprints. Methods The phylogenetic dependency network model was applied to assess HLA-mediated evolution in datasets of HIV pol sequences from free plasma viruses and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-integrated proviruses in an immunogenetically unique cohort of Mexican individuals. Our data were compared with data from the IHAC cohort, a large multi-center cohort of individuals from Canada, Australia and the USA. Results Forty three different HLA-HIV codon associations representing 30 HLA-HIV codon pairs were observed in the Mexican cohort (q < 0.2). Strikingly, 23 (53%) of these associations differed from those observed in the well-powered IHAC cohort, strongly suggesting the existence of unique characteristics in HLA-mediated HIV evolution in the Mexican cohort. Furthermore, 17 of the 23 novel associations involved HLA alleles whose frequencies were not significantly different from those in IHAC, suggesting that their detection was not due to increased statistical power but to differences in patterns of epitope targeting. Interestingly, the consensus differed in four positions between the two cohorts and three of these positions could be explained by HLA-associated selection. Additionally, different HLA-HIV codon associations were seen when comparing HLA-mediated selection in plasma viruses and PBMC archived proviruses at the population level, with a significantly lower number of associations in the proviral dataset. Conclusion Our data support universal HLA-mediated HIV evolution at the population level, resulting in detectable HLA-associated footprints in the circulating virus. However, it also strongly suggests that unique genetic

  10. Comparison of Outcomes of HLA-Matched Related, Unrelated, or HLA-Haploidentical Related Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation following Nonmyeloablative Conditioning for Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, Lauri M.; O’Donnell, Paul V.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Storer, Barry E.; Luznik, Leo; Symons, Heather J.; Jones, Richard J.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Maris, Michael B.; Blume, Karl G.; Niederwieser, Dietger W.; Bruno, Benedetto; Maziarz, Richard T.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Petersen, Finn B.; Storb, Rainer; Fuchs, Ephraim J.; Maloney, David G.

    2008-01-01

    We compared the outcome of nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) based on donor cell source. Ninety patients with HL were treated with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by HCT from HLA-matched related, n = 38, unrelated, n = 24, or HLA-haploidentical related, n = 28 donors. Patients were heavily pretreated with a median of 5 regimens and most patients had failed autologous HCT (92%) and local radiation therapy (83%). With a median follow-up of 25 months, 2-year overall survivals, progression-free survivals (OS)/(PFS), and incidences of relapsed/progressive disease were 53%, 23%, and 56% (HLA-matched related), 58%, 29%, and 63% (unrelated), and 58%, 51%, and 40% (HLA-haploidentical related), respectively. Nonrelapse mortality (NRM) was significantly lower for HLA-haploidentical related (P =.02) recipients compared to HLA-matched related recipients. There were also significantly decreased risks of relapse for HLA-haploidentical related recipients compared to HLA-matched related (P = .01) and unrelated (P = .03) recipients. The incidences of acute grades III–IV and extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD, cGVHD) were 16%/50% (HLA-matched related), 8%/63% (unrelated), and 11%/35% (HLA-haploidentical related). These data suggested that salvage allogeneic HCTusing nonmyeloablative conditioning provided antitumor activity in patients with advanced HL; however, disease relapse/progression continued to be major problems. Importantly, alternative donor stem cell sources are a viable option. PMID:18940683

  11. A study of functionally active amino acids involved in the interaction of HLA-A2 or HLA-A3 molecules with cytolytic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Healy, F; Sire, J; Gomard, E; Yssel, H; Jordan, B; Levy, J P

    1988-10-01

    A large series of HLA-A2/HLA-A3 recombinant genes were generated by using the in vivo recombination technique. These genes have each been modified in the last two-thirds of the third exon such that one or several HLA-A2-specific substitutions have been made in the HLA-A3 gene and vice versa. The recombinant genes were transfected into the murine cell line P815 and the transfectants were used as targets for a series of 20 human CTL lines or clones specific for HLA-A2 or HLA-A3, or restricted by HLA-A2 and specific for influenza A. Several patterns of anti-HLA-A2, anti-HLA-A3, and HLA-A2-restricted anti-influenza CTL activity were observed and when uncloned cell lines were studied, a progressive selection of some clones with a similar pattern of activity was regularly found. From the comparison of these different patterns the following conclusions can be drawn: 1) In most but not all cases both domains of the class I molecule were essential for CTL recognition, but residue 152 was critically important for the majority of CTL tested; 2) amino acids 114/116 were also critical in most cases, and their position close to amino acid 152 in the tertiary structure of the molecule may have some functional significance; and 3) amino acid 161, although highly conserved, plays an unexpected but very important role in CTL function. PMID:2459213

  12. An Evaluation of the High Level Architecture (HLA) as a Framework for NASA Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Michael R.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The High Level Architecture (HLA) is a current US Department of Defense and an industry (IEEE-1516) standard architecture for modeling and simulations. It provides a framework and set of functional rules and common interfaces for integrating separate and disparate simulators into a larger simulation. The goal of the HLA is to reduce software costs by facilitating the reuse of simulation components and by providing a runtime infrastructure to manage the simulations. In order to evaluate the applicability of the HLA as a technology for NASA space mission simulations, a Simulations Group at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) conducted a study of the HLA and developed a simple prototype HLA-compliant space mission simulator. This paper summarizes the prototyping effort and discusses the potential usefulness of the HLA in the design and planning of future NASA space missions with a focus on risk mitigation and cost reduction.

  13. HLA antibody detection with solid phase assays: great expectations or expectations too great?

    PubMed

    Gebel, H M; Bray, R A

    2014-09-01

    Alloantibodies directed against HLA antigens, are a barrier to long-term solid organ allograft survival. The clinical impact of preformed, donor-directed HLA alloantibodies range from acceptable risk to unequivocal contraindication for organ transplantation. HLA antibodies are key factors that limit patient access to donor organs. Serological methods were once the only approach to identify HLA antigens and antibodies. Limitations in these technologies led to the development of solid phase approaches. In the early 1990s, the development of the polymerase chain reaction enabled DNA-based HLA antigen testing to be performed. By the mid-1990s, microparticle-based technology that utilized flow cytometry for analysis was developed to detect both classes I and II HLA antibodies. These methodologies revolutionized clinical histocompatibility testing. The strengths and weaknesses of these assays are described in detail in this review.

  14. Origin of Aymaras from Bolivia and their relationship with other Amerindians according to HLA genes.

    PubMed

    Arnaiz-Villena, A; Siles, N; Moscoso, J; Zamora, J; Serrano-Vela, J I; Gomez-Casado, E; Castro, M J; Martinez-Laso, J

    2005-04-01

    Aymara Amerindians from the Titicaca Lake Andean highlands are studied for HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 gene frequencies. Genetic distances, neighbour-joining and correspondence analyses are performed by using other Amerindian and worldwide populations (15384 chromosomes are studied). The HLA genetic profile of Aymaras is different from neighbouring and language-related Quechuas (Incas). Both Quechuas and Aymaras seem to present an HLA-DRB1*0901 high frequency, which is present in a very low frequency or absent in Mesoamericans (Mazatecans, Mayans) and most studied Amerindians. Moreover, it is observed a closer relatedness of Aymaras with Amerindians from the Amazon Basin and Chaco lowlands, compared to Quechuans.

  15. A simple and safe method for single HLA-antigen-typing by a solid phase assay.

    PubMed

    Häcker-Shahin, B; Giannitsis, D J

    1991-01-01

    A rapid solid phase assay for detection of single HLA-antigens on platelets was developed. The platelets were attached to the surface of polystyrene microtitre plate wells by means of a sodium carbonate buffer and centrifugation. Uncovered areas were blocked by a gelatin blocking buffer. After incubation with commercially available anti-HLA-sera the bound anti-HLA-specific antibodies directed against HLA-antigens present on the platelets were made visible by anti-IgG-coated indicator red cells and a brief centrifugation. A positive result, meaning the presence of an HLA-antigen, was indicated by a slight red cell adherence over the reaction surface. In the absence of the HLA-antigen no binding occurred and the indicator red cells formed a small red disc-like pellet.

  16. High Level Architecture (HLA) federation with Umbra and OPNET federates.

    SciTech Connect

    Oppel, Fred John III; Hart, Brian; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.

    2004-03-01

    Network-centric systems that depend on mobile wireless ad hoc networks for their information exchange require detailed analysis to support their development. In many cases, this critical analysis is best provided with high-fidelity system simulations that include the effects of network architectures and protocols. In this research, we developed a high-fidelity system simulation capability using an HLA federation. The HLA federation, consisting of the Umbra system simulator and OPNET Modeler network simulator, provides a means for the system simulator to both affect, and be affected by, events in the network simulator. Advances are also made in increasing the fidelity of the wireless communication channel and reducing simulation run-time with a dead reckoning capability. A simulation experiment is included to demonstrate the developed modeling and simulation capability.

  17. HLA-associated susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Fabio, G; Scorza, R; Lazzarin, A; Marchini, M; Zarantonello, M; D'Arminio, A; Marchisio, P; Plebani, A; Luzzati, R; Costigliola, P

    1992-01-01

    We studied HLA antigen distribution of 50 heterosexual partners of HIV+ drug abusers with more than 1 year of sexual exposure to HIV, 36 children born to seropositive mothers and 61 haemophiliac patients exposed to presumably infectious clotting factor concentrates. B52 and B44 antigens were associated with HIV resistance while B51 was associated with HIV susceptibility. Forty-nine HIV+ drug abusers, spouses of heterosexual partners studied and 25 HIV+ mothers of the children were also typed. DR11 phenotype was associated with infectiousness of HIV+ subjects. Our data suggest that the HLA region controls susceptibility to infection with HIV and infectiousness of HIV+ subjects in different risk groups. PMID:1733633

  18. Recognition of hybrid HLA molecules expressed on murine P815 cells using human alloreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Healy, F; Sire, J; Kahn-Perles, B; Gomard, E; Levy, J P; Jordan, B R

    1987-01-01

    The HLA-A2 and -A3 genes were used to construct intra-exon hybrids in which part of the third exon (corresponding to the second domain) was of one type and the rest of the other. Murine P815 cells expressing these hybrid constructs were assayed with human alloreactive cytotoxic T-lymphocyte lines specific for either HLA-A2 or HLA-A3. Specific recognition patterns were obtained which indicate that, in some cases, a small portion of the HLA-A2 sequence in an HLA-A3 background is sufficient for recognition by HLA-A2-specific cytotoxic T cells. PMID:3107590

  19. Analysis of HLA class I expression in different metastases from two melanoma patients undergoing peptide immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mendez, R; Serrano, A; Jäger, E; Maleno, I; Ruiz-Cabello, F; Knuth, A; Garrido, F

    2001-06-01

    We characterized the HLA class I alterations in five metastases obtained from two patients with melanoma immunized with Melan A/MART-1, tyrosinase and gp100 tumor peptides. All three metastases analyzed in the first patient (NW145) showed a similar HLA class I alteration with a dual population of melanoma cells. One population was HLA class I antigen positive and the other had loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the short arm of chromosome 6 leading to an HLA haplotype loss (A02011, B4007, Cw1). The absence of HLA-A2 antigen may explain why this patient did not develop HLA-A2 restricted, Melan A/MART-1 specificity immunization, since this HLA molecule is the restriction element for the tumor peptides used. However, this HLA-deficient population was not selected after peptide immunotherapy. The primary tumor in this patient presented LOH in region 6q, but only in the vertical growth phase of the lesion, whereas LOH at 6p was observed only in DNA from metastatic material. The second patient (NW16) also presented two metastatic lesions with an identical HLA molecular defect, i.e. HLA B locus downregulation (HLA B51011: serological B51; B1503: serological B70). One lesion expressed the tumor antigen (Melan A/ MART-1), but the other did not. Interestingly, the antigen-positive metastasis regressed after peptide immunotherapy, whereas the other progressed rapidly. These findings provide the first indication that multiple metastases generated in the same host can have identically altered HLA class I phenotypes.

  20. Characteristics of HLA-E Restricted T-Cell Responses and Their Role in Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Human HLA-E can, in addition to self-antigens, also present pathogen-derived sequences, which elicit specific T-cell responses. T-cells recognize their antigen presented by HLA-E highly specifically and have unique functional and phenotypical properties. Pathogen specific HLA-E restricted CD8+ T-cells are an interesting new player in the field of immunology. Future work should address their exact roles and relative contributions in the immune response against infectious diseases.

  1. Activation of HLA-A2-specific memory B cells in severe combined immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Niguma, T; DeVito, L D; Grailer, A P; Fechner, J H; Sollinger, H W; Burlingham, W J

    1993-05-01

    Peripheral blood leukocytes of all five HLA-A2-sensitized patients produced significant levels of human IgG (> or = 0.25 micrograms/ml) following polyclonal activation in vitro, but PBLs from only one patient (K.H.) who had been transfused recently (< 4 weeks) produced detectable anti-HLA-A2 IgG. PBLs from this in vitro responder and from one in vitro nonresponder (L.G.) were transferred intraperitoneally into SCID mice. A low level (range, 5-40 ng/ml) of human anti-HLA-A2 IgG was detected in the serum of the mice without additional stimulation. This anti-HLA-A2 IgG response was boosted (range, 40-200 ng/ml) when mice received a human skin xenograft or an early challenge with x-irradiated human leukocytes intraperitoneally. Although the anti-HLA antibodies produced were specific for HLA-A2, the boosting of anti-HLA-A2 IgG production did not require the expression of the HLA-A2 protein, since either HLA-A2-negative skin xenografts or HLA-identical x-irradiated PBLs enhanced the production of anti-HLA-A2 IgG. Dose-response of transferred PBLs and kappa:lambda composition of individual mouse anti-HLA-A2 production suggested that low-frequency human memory B-cell clones were stimulated to proliferate and/or triggered to become high Ab secretors by skin graft or PBL boost. PMID:8376189

  2. HLA-G expression and role in advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Caocci, G; Greco, M; Fanni, D; Senes, G; Littera, R; Lai, S; Risso, P; Carcassi, C; Faa, G; La Nasa, G

    2016-01-01

    Non-classical human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G class I molecules have an important role in tumor immune escape mechanisms. We investigated HLA-G expression in lymphonode biopsies taken from 8 controls and 20 patients with advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), in relationship to clinical outcomes and the HLA-G 14-basepair (14-bp) deletion-insertion (del-ins) polymorphism. Lymphnode tissue sections were stained using a specific murine monoclonal HLA-G antibody. HLA-G protein expression was higher in cHL patients than controls. In the group of PET-2 positive (positron emission tomography carried out after 2 cycles of standard chemotherapy) patients with a 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS) of 40%, we observed high HLA-G protein expression within the tumor microenvironment with low expression on Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. Conversely, PET-2 negative patients with a PFS of 86% had higher HLA-G protein expression levels on HRS cells compared to the microenvironment. Lower expression on HRS cells was significantly associated with the HLA-G 14-bp ins/ins genotype. These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2.These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2. PMID:27349312

  3. The heterogeneous HLA genetic makeup of the Swiss population.

    PubMed

    Buhler, Stéphane; Nunes, José Manuel; Nicoloso, Grazia; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    This study aims at investigating the HLA molecular variation across Switzerland in order to determine possible regional differences, which would be highly relevant to several purposes: optimizing donor recruitment strategies in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), providing reliable reference data in HLA and disease association studies, and understanding the population genetic background(s) of this culturally heterogeneous country. HLA molecular data of more than 20,000 HSCT donors from 9-13 recruitment centers of the whole country were analyzed. Allele and haplotype frequencies were estimated by using new computer tools adapted to the heterogeneity and ambiguity of the data. Non-parametric and resampling statistical tests were performed to assess Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, selective neutrality and linkage disequilibrium among different loci, both in each recruitment center and in the whole national registry. Genetic variation was explored through genetic distance and hierarchical analysis of variance taking into account both geographic and linguistic subdivisions in Switzerland. The results indicate a heterogeneous genetic makeup of the Swiss population: first, allele frequencies estimated on the whole national registry strongly deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, by contrast with the results obtained for individual centers; second, a pronounced differentiation is observed for Ticino, Graubünden, and, to a lesser extent, Wallis, suggesting that the Alps represent(ed) a barrier to gene flow; finally, although cultural (linguistic) boundaries do not represent a main genetic differentiation factor in Switzerland, the genetic relatedness between population from south-eastern Switzerland and Italy agrees with historical and linguistic data. Overall, this study justifies the maintenance of a decentralized donor recruitment structure in Switzerland allowing increasing the genetic diversity of the national--and hence global--donor registry. It also

  4. HLA-B*15 diversity in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Lee, K W; Jeon, H; Park, J Y

    2000-11-01

    Alleles in the HLA-B*15 group encode molecules belonging to several serologic subgroups, B15 (B62, B63, B75, B76, B77) and B70 (B71, B72), representing many of the most problematic types to assign in routine clinical typing laboratories due to their serologic cross-reactivity resulting from structural similarity. More than 25% of Koreans express HLA-B molecules encoded by the HLA-B*15 alleles. To further characterize HLA-B*15 in this population, B*15-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe (SSOP) hybridization analysis using 39 digoxigenin-labeled probes were applied to DNA samples obtained from 237 B15/B70 serologically positive unrelated individuals. Nine B*15 alleles were identified. B*1501 was the most frequent allele (64.8%) followed by B*1511 (14.1%), B*1507 (8.6%), and B*1518 (5.5%) comprising more than 90% of B*15-positive samples. B62 molecules encoded by 4 of the identified alleles (B*1501, B*1507, B*1525, and B*1527) could not be discriminated by serologic reaction patterns. Among the fifteen B15/B70 apparent homozygotes, eight were heterozygotes carrying two different B*15 alleles. Several B*15 alleles exhibited strong associations with specific Cw, DRB1, and A allelic types (e.g., B*1507-Cw3 (22/22); B*1507-DRB1*04 (21/22), B*1507-A24 (17/22)). The data obtained in this study confirmed B*15 diversity in the study population and will be useful in hematopoietic stem cell donor searches as well as in determining the supplementary DNA typing strategy for B15/B70-positive samples in this population.

  5. Characterization of recombination in the HLA class II region

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, M.; Carrington, M.; Noble, J.

    1997-02-01

    Studies of linkage disequilibrium across the HLA class II region have been useful in predicting where recombination is most likely to occur. The strong associations between genes within the 85-kb region from DQB1 to DRB1 are consistent with low frequency of recombination in this segment of DNA. Conversely, a lack of association between alleles of TAP1 and TAP2 ({approximately}15 kb) has been observed, suggesting that recombination occurs here with relatively high frequency. Much of the HLA class II region has now been sequenced, providing the tools to undertake detailed analysis of recombination. Twenty-seven families containing one or two recombinant chromosomes within the 500-kb interval between the DPB1 and DRB1 genes were used to determine patterns of recombination across this region. SSCP analysis and microsatellite typing yielded identification of 127 novel polymorphic markers distributed throughout the class II region, allowing refinement of the site of crossover in 30 class II recombinant chromosomes. The three regions where recombination was observed most frequently are as follows: the 45-kb interval between HLA-DNA and RING3 (11 cases), the 50-kb interval between DQB3 and DQB1 (6 cases), and an 8.8-kb segment of the TAP2 gene (3 cases). Six of the 10 remaining recombinants await further characterization, pending identification of additional informative markers, while four recombinants were localized to other intervals (outliers). Analysis of association between markers flanking HLA-DNA to RING3 (45 kb), as well as TAP1 to TAP2 (15 kb), by use of independent CEPH haplotypes indicated little or no linkage disequilibrium, supporting the familial recombination data. A notable sequence motif located within a region associated with increased rates of recombination consisted of a (TGGA){sub 12} tandem repeat within the TAP2 gene. 74 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. HLA-DR alleles determine responsiveness to Borrelia burgdoferi antigens

    PubMed Central

    Iliopoulou, Bettina Panagiota; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Huber, Brigitte T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Arthritis is a prominent manifestation of Lyme disease, caused upon infection with Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb). Persistent chronic Lyme arthritis, even after antibiotic treatment, is linked to HLA-DRB1*0401 (DR4) and related alleles. On the contrary, Lyme patients who resolve arthritis within 3 months post-infection show an increased frequency of HLA-DRB1*1101 (DR11). The aim of this study was to analyze the underlying mechanism by which HLA-DR alleles confer genetic susceptibility or resistance to antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis. Methods We generated DR11 transgenic (tg) mice on a murine class II−/− background and compared their immune response to Bb-antigens to that of DR4 tg mice after immunization with Bb outer surface protein (Osp)A or infection with live Bb. Results We report that the T cells of OspA-immunized and Bb-infected DR11 tg mice were defective in IFN-γ production compared to those of DR4 mice. On the other hand, DR11 tg mice developed higher titers of anti-OspA and anti-Bb Abs, respectively, than DR4 mice. In accordance with this observation, we found that Bb-infected DR11 tg mice had decreased spirochetal burden compared to DR4 mice, measured by qPCR. Conclusion This study provides direct evidence that in the presence of HLA-DR11 the immune response against Bb-antigens is directed towards a protective Ab response. In contrast, an inflammatory Th1 response is induced in the presence of DR4. These observations offer an explanation for the differential genetic susceptibility of DR4+ and DR11+ individuals for the development of chronic Lyme arthritis and eventually the progression to antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis. PMID:19950279

  7. Polymorphisms of HLA-A, -B, -Cw and DRB1 antigens in Moroccan patients with ankylosing spondylitis and a comparison of clinical features with frequencies of HLA-B*27.

    PubMed

    El Mouraghi, I; Ouarour, A; Ghozlani, I; Collantes, E; Solana, R; El Maghraoui, A

    2015-02-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is very often associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA), particularly HLA-B*27. However, the strength of this association and clinical features may vary in different ethnic groups. Our study aims to assess the distribution of HLA-A, -B, -Cw and DRB1 alleles in Moroccan patients with AS and to compare the clinical features of AS and the frequencies of HLA-B27 in patients from Morocco with other series. Seventy-five patients diagnosed with AS and assessed for clinical manifestations were selected and compared to 100 healthy controls. HLA class I and II antigens were typed by polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific oligonucleotide. HLA-B27 subtypes were studied by polymerase chain reaction amplification with sequence-specific primers. HLA-B27 was found in 64% of patients. It was positively associated with younger age at disease onset, family history, and uveitis while it had a negative association with late onset. Six B*27 subtypes were identified in the AS group. HLA-B*2705 and B*2702 were the most common observed subtypes. Among other HLA genes, a significant increase in the prevalence of HLA-Cw*02 and HLA-DRB*15 was found in AS patients. HLA-B27 is involved in the predisposition of AS in the Moroccan population. HLA-B*2705 and B*2702 were the predominant subtypes supporting previous reports in Caucasian spondyloarthropathies. Other HLA genes, HLA-Cw*02 and HLA-DRB1*15, seem to confer predisposing effect to the disease. However, the lower frequency of HLA-B27 compared to the literature in our study suggests the existence of different genetic and/or environmental factors in Morocco.

  8. HLA haplotype is associated with diabetes among atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tomonori; Fujiwara, Saeko; Morishita, Yukari; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Nakashima, Eiji; Nakanishi, Shuhei; Suzuki, Gen; Nakachi, Kei; Kyoizumi, Seishi

    2003-09-01

    We examined radiation effects on the relationship between diabetes development and genetic background in atomic-bomb (A-bomb) survivors. Our main aim in this study was to shed light on the role of genetic background in diabetes onset among A-bomb survivors by studying possible relationships between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes and the diabetes in patients and controls. We examined the effects of different HLA haplotypes on type 2 diabetes development by determining the DQA1 and DRB1 alleles of Hiroshima A-bomb survivors (111 diabetic patients and 774 controls) using the polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific oligonucleotide probes (PCR-SSOP) method. We noted an increased risk of diabetes in the higher dose group among these patients (trend p = 0.001). The risk of the most heavily exposed group was significantly higher than that of the unexposed group or the low-dose group especially in survivors with the DQA1*03-DRB1*09 or DQA1*0401-DRB1*08 haplotypes (trend p = 0.002 or p = 0.05, respectively). By contrast, in people with other haplotypes, the risk did not increase significantly with increasing dose. These results suggest that individuals with specific HLA haplotypes may have an increased risk of diabetes with increased-dose categories.

  9. Simulation shows that HLA-matched stem cell donors can remain unidentified in donor searches.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Jürgen; Solloch, Ute V; Giani, Anette S; Hofmann, Jan A; Schmidt, Alexander H

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of HLA information in real-life stem cell donor registries may hamper unrelated donor searches. It is even possible that fully HLA-matched donors with incomplete HLA information are not identified. In our simulation study, we estimated the probability of these unnecessarily failed donor searches. For that purpose, we carried out donor searches in several virtual donor registries. The registries differed by size, composition with respect to HLA typing levels, and genetic diversity. When up to three virtual HLA typing requests were allowed within donor searches, the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches ranged from 1.19% to 4.13%, thus indicating that non-identification of completely HLA-matched stem cell donors is a problem of practical relevance. The following donor registry characteristics were positively correlated with the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches: large registry size, high genetic diversity, and, most strongly correlated, large fraction of registered donors with incomplete HLA typing. Increasing the number of virtual HLA typing requests within donor searches up to ten had a smaller effect. It follows that the problem of donor non-identification can be substantially reduced by complete high-resolution HLA typing of potential donors.

  10. Simulation shows that HLA-matched stem cell donors can remain unidentified in donor searches

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Jürgen; Solloch, Ute V.; Giani, Anette S.; Hofmann, Jan A.; Schmidt, Alexander H.

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of HLA information in real-life stem cell donor registries may hamper unrelated donor searches. It is even possible that fully HLA-matched donors with incomplete HLA information are not identified. In our simulation study, we estimated the probability of these unnecessarily failed donor searches. For that purpose, we carried out donor searches in several virtual donor registries. The registries differed by size, composition with respect to HLA typing levels, and genetic diversity. When up to three virtual HLA typing requests were allowed within donor searches, the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches ranged from 1.19% to 4.13%, thus indicating that non-identification of completely HLA-matched stem cell donors is a problem of practical relevance. The following donor registry characteristics were positively correlated with the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches: large registry size, high genetic diversity, and, most strongly correlated, large fraction of registered donors with incomplete HLA typing. Increasing the number of virtual HLA typing requests within donor searches up to ten had a smaller effect. It follows that the problem of donor non-identification can be substantially reduced by complete high-resolution HLA typing of potential donors. PMID:26876789

  11. Embedded real-time high-level architecture (HLA) application case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkelberger, Kirk A.

    2000-06-01

    This paper presents the Joint Communication Simulator (JCS) system design as a case study of both the conceptual and implementation applicability of High Level Architecture (HLA) in this difficult context. Specific technical topics to be covered include an overview of JCS requirements, an overview of the modeling concept and system architecture in terms of the HLA, a definition of the subset of Run Time Infrastructure (RTI) functionality and HLA interface specification applied, and an overview of the RTI subset implementation. In addition, it addresses the political questions of HLA compliance, the openness of RTI designs and implementation, and the issue of RTI certification.

  12. Genetic editing of HLA expression in hematopoietic stem cells to broaden their human application

    PubMed Central

    Torikai, Hiroki; Mi, Tiejuan; Gragert, Loren; Maiers, Martin; Najjar, Amer; Ang, Sonny; Maiti, Sourindra; Dai, Jianliang; Switzer, Kirsten C.; Huls, Helen; Dulay, Gladys P.; Reik, Andreas; Rebar, Edward J.; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Champlin, Richard E.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2016-01-01

    Mismatch of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) adversely impacts the outcome of patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (alloHSCT). This translates into the clinical requirement to timely identify suitable HLA-matched donors which in turn curtails the chances of recipients, especially those from a racial minority, to successfully undergo alloHSCT. We thus sought to broaden the existing pool of registered unrelated donors based on analysis that eliminating the expression of the HLA-A increases the chance for finding a donor matched at HLA-B, -C, and -DRB1 regardless of a patient’s race. Elimination of HLA-A expression in HSC was achieved using artificial zinc finger nucleases designed to target HLA-A alleles. Significantly, these engineered HSCs maintain their ability to engraft and reconstitute hematopoiesis in immunocompromised mice. This introduced loss of HLA-A expression decreases the need to recruit large number of donors to match with potential recipients and has particular importance for patients whose HLA repertoire is under-represented in the current donor pool. Furthermore, the genetic engineering of stem cells provides a translational approach to HLA-match a limited number of third-party donors with a wide number of recipients. PMID:26902653

  13. Genetic analysis of HLA in the U.S. Schmiedenleut Hutterites.

    PubMed Central

    Kostyu, D D; Ober, C L; Dawson, D V; Ghanayem, M; Elias, S; Martin, A O

    1989-01-01

    The Hutterites are an Anabaptist population, highly inbred, with large family sizes and extensively documented pedigrees. As part of genetic-epidemiologic studies of the impact of HLA on fertility, HLA-A, -B, -C, -DR, and -DQ typing was performed on a total of 650 Schmiedenleut Hutterities in South Dakota. An extraordinary degree of homogeneity was found. HLA-A1, -A2, -A3, -A24, and -A26 accounted for 83%, HLA-B8, -B27, -B35, -B51, -Bw60, and -Bw62 for 75%, and HLA-DR1, -DR2, -DR3, and -DR4 for 66% of the antigens at the respective HLA-A, -B, and -DR loci. All Hutterites characterized for HLA were descendants of no more than 78 ancestors. However, family analysis identified only 45 unique HLA haplotypes thought to reflect the original gene pool. Eight haplotypes were particularly frequent, accounting for nearly 50% of all observed haplotypes; four of these were consistent with a European ancestry. Coefficients measuring linkage disequilibrium were computed from haplotypes identified by family analysis. Overall, HLA analysis portrayed the Schmiedenleut Hutterities as a homogeneous and unique population, with disequilibrium among particular alleles and a spectrum of common and uncommon European haplotypes. PMID:2757031

  14. [Identification of a novel HLA allele, HLA-DRB1*03:80, by sequencing-based typing].

    PubMed

    Nie, Xiang-Min; Zhang, Yi; Zhuang, Yun-Long; Song, Yong-Hong; Qiao, Wen-Ben; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Chuan-Fu

    2014-04-01

    This study was aimed to identify a novel HLA-DRB1 allele from a Chinese potential hemopoietic stem cell donor of Northeast China. A rare HLA-DRB1 allele was initially detected by Luminex PCR-SSO typing, then the sample was sequenced by sequence-based typing (SBT) and the alignments of sample's alleles was identified by single allele-specific sequencing strategy. The results revealed the existence of a new allele which differs from the closest matching allele DRB1*03:06 by a single nucleotide substitution at position 239, where C→G in exon 2, resulting in an amino acid exchange from Thr to Arg at codon 51. It is concluded that a novel allele has been confirmed and its name DRB1*03:80 is officially assigned by the WHO Nomenclature Committee in February 2012.

  15. The spectrum of HLA-DQ and HLA-DR alleles, 2006: a listing correlating sequence and structure with function.

    PubMed

    Bondinas, George P; Moustakas, Antonis K; Papadopoulos, George K

    2007-07-01

    The list of alleles in the HLA-DRB, HLA-DQA, and HLA-DQB gene loci has grown enormously since the last listing in this journal 8 years ago. Crystal structure determination of several human and mouse HLA class II alleles, representative of two gene loci in each species, enables a direct comparison of ortholog and paralog loci. A new numbering system is suggested, extending earlier suggestions by [Fremont et al. in Immunity 8:305-317, (1998)], which will bring in line all the structural features of various gene loci, regardless of animal species. This system allows for structural equivalence of residues from different gene loci. The listing also highlights all amino acid residues participating in the various functions of these molecules, from antigenic peptide binding to homodimer formation, CD4 binding, membrane anchoring, and cytoplasmic signal transduction, indicative of the variety of functions of these molecules. It is remarkable that despite the enormous number of unique alleles listed thus far (DQA = 22, DQB = 54, DRA = 2, and DRB = 409), there is invariance at many specific positions in man, but slightly less so in mouse or rat, despite their much lower number of alleles at each gene locus in the latter two species. Certain key polymorphisms (from substitutions to an eight-residue insertion in the cytoplasmic tail of certain DQB alleles) that have thus far gone unnoticed are highly suggestive of differences or diversities in function and thus call for further investigation into the properties of these specific alleles. This listing is amenable to supplementation by future additions of new alleles and the highlighting of new functions to be discovered, providing thus a unifying platform of reference in all animal species for the MHC class II allelic counterparts, aiding research in the field and furthering our understanding of the functions of these molecules. PMID:17497145

  16. HLA Allele Frequencies in 5802 Koreans: Varied Allele Types Associated with SJS/TEN According to Culprit Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Jung; Kim, Young Joo; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Junho; Park, Kyung Hee; Park, Jung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are very serious forms of drug-induced cutaneous adverse reaction. SJS/TEN induced by certain drug is well known to be associated with some human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene type. We aimed to explore HLA allele frequencies and their association with SJS/TEN according to culprit drugs in Korea. Materials and Methods We enrolled 5802 subjects who had results of HLA typing test from August 2005 to July 2014. Total 28 SJS/TEN patients were categorized based on culprit drugs (allopurinol, lamotrigine, carbamazepine) and identified the presence of HLA-B*58:01, HLA-B*44:03, HLA-B*15:02, and HLA-A*31:01. Results HLA-A*24:02 (20.5%), HLA-B*44:03 (10.0%), and HLA-Cw*01:02 (17.1%) were the most frequent type in HLA-A, -B, and -C genes, respectively. Allele frequencies of HLA-B*58:01, HLA-B*44:03, HLA-A*31:01, and HLA-B*15:02 were 7.0%, 10.0%, 5.0%, and 0.3%, respectively. In 958 allopurinol users, 9 subjects (0.9%) were diagnosed with SJS/TEN. Among them, 8 subjects possessed HLA-B*58:01 allele. SJS/TEN induced by allopurinol was more frequently developed in subjects with HLA-B*58:01 than in subjects without it [odds ratio: 57.4; confidence interval (CI) 7.12-463.50; p<0.001]. Allopurinol treatment, based on screening by HLA-B*58:01 genotyping, could be more cost-effective than that not based on screening. HLA-B*44:03 may be associated with lamotrigine-induced SJS/TEN (odds ratio: 12.75; CI 1.03-157.14; p=0.053). Among carbamazepine users, only two patients experienced SJS/TEN and possessed neither HLA-B*15:02 nor HLA-A*31:03. Conclusion HLA gene frequencies varied in Korea. Screening of HLA-B*58:01 before the use of allopurinol might be needed to anticipate probability of SJS/TEN. PMID:26632391

  17. Increased epithelial expression of HLA-DQ and HLA-DP molecules in salivary glands from patients with Sjögren's syndrome compared with obstructive sialadenitis.

    PubMed Central

    Thrane, P S; Halstensen, T S; Haanaes, H R; Brandtzaeg, P

    1993-01-01

    Salivary gland specimens from 10 patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) were examined by two-colour immunofluorescence with various combinations of monoclonal and polyclonal antibody reagents of the following specificities: human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II (DR, DP and DQ), CD3, CD45 (leucocyte common antigen), various cytokeratins, and factor VIII-related antigen. Tissue specimens from 10 normal glands and 10 glands with obstructive sialadenitis (no known autoimmunity) served as controls. Only some intercalated ducts and scattered acini of the normal major glands expressed HLA class II determinants (< 5% of total epithelial area); the relative proportion of positive elements indicated differential expression (DR > DP > DQ). SS glands contained substantial T cell infiltrates and increased numbers of activated (DR+) T cells; adjacent epithelium showed extensive differential expression of HLA class II determinants (DR > DP > DQ). Glands with obstructive sialadenitis showed similarly increased epithelial expression of HLA-DR but with surprisingly small amounts of concomitant HLA-DP and -DQ expression. Epithelial HLA class II expression probably depends on cytokines as an inductive event, which is not unique for SS but particularly prominent in this disorder. Our results suggest that epithelial expression of HLA-DP or -DQ, rather than -DR, might be a prerequisite for the autoimmune process of SS to develop in genetically susceptible individuals. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8485911

  18. CD94-NKG2A Recognition of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-E Bound to an HLA Class I Leader Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie,E.; Clements, C.; Lin, J.; Sullivan, L.; Johnson, D.; Huyton, T.; Heroux, A.; Hoare, H.; Beddoe, T.; et al

    2008-01-01

    The recognition of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E by the heterodimeric CD94-NKG2 natural killer (NK) receptor family is a central innate mechanism by which NK cells monitor the expression of other HLA molecules, yet the structural basis of this highly specific interaction is unclear. Here, we describe the crystal structure of CD94-NKG2A in complex with HLA-E bound to a peptide derived from the leader sequence of HLA-G. The CD94 subunit dominated the interaction with HLA-E, whereas the NKG2A subunit was more peripheral to the interface. Moreover, the invariant CD94 subunit dominated the peptide-mediated contacts, albeit with poor surface and chemical complementarity. This unusual binding mode was consistent with mutagenesis data at the CD94-NKG2A-HLA-E interface. There were few conformational changes in either CD94-NKG2A or HLA-E upon ligation, and such a 'lock and key' interaction is typical of innate receptor-ligand interactions. Nevertheless, the structure also provided insight into how this interaction can be modulated by subtle changes in the peptide ligand or by the pairing of CD94 with other members of the NKG2 family. Differences in the docking strategies used by the NKG2D and CD94-NKG2A receptors provided a basis for understanding the promiscuous nature of ligand recognition by NKG2D compared with the fidelity of the CD94-NKG2 receptors.

  19. Is there any impact of HLA-DPB1 disparity in 10/10 HLA-matched unrelated hematopoietic SCT? Results of a French multicentric retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Gagne, K; Loiseau, P; Dubois, V; Dufossé, F; Perrier, P; Dormoy, A; Jollet, I; Renac, V; Masson, D; Picard, C; Lafarge, X; Hanau, D; Quainon, F; Delbos, F; Coeffic, B; Absi, Léna; Eliaou, J-F; Moalic, V; Fort, M; de Matteis, M; Theodorou, I; Hau, F; Batho, A; Pedron, B; Caillat-Zucman, S; Marry, E; Raus, N; Yakoub-Agha, I; Cesbron, A

    2015-02-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the impact of HLA-DPB1 mismatches in a large cohort of 1342 French patients who underwent 10/10 HLA-matched unrelated HSCT. A significant impact of HLA-DPB1 allelic mismatches (2 vs 0) was observed in severe acute GVHD (aGVHDIII-IV) (risk ratio (RR)=1.73, confidence interval (CI) 95% 1.09-2.73, P=0.019) without impact on OS, TRM, relapse and chronic GVHD (cGVHD). According to the T-cell epitope 3 (TCE3)/TCE4 HLA-DPB1 disparity algorithm, 37.6% and 58.4% pairs had nonpermissive HLA-DPB1, respectively. TCE3 and TCE4 disparities had no statistical impact on OS, TRM, relapse, aGVHD and cGVHD. When TCE3/TCE4 disparities were analyzed in the graft-vs-host or host-vs-graft (HVG) direction, only a significant impact of TCE4 nonpermissive disparities in the HVG direction was observed on relapse (RR=1.34, CI 95% 1.00-1.80, P=0.048). In conclusion, this French retrospective study shows an adverse prognosis of HLA-DPB1 mismatches (2 vs 0) on severe aGVHD and of nonpermissive TCE4 HVG disparities on relapse after HLA-matched 10/10 unrelated HSCT.

  20. A human monoclonal antibody, produced following in vitro immunization, recognizing an epitope shared by HLA-A2 subtypes and HLA-A28.

    PubMed

    Mulder, A; Kardol, M; Blom, J; Jolley, W B; Melief, C J; Bruning, H

    1993-07-01

    In vitro immunization and subsequent immortalization of peripheral blood cells of a multiparous woman has resulted in the production of a stable human mouse heterohybridoma, 5C2A2, secreting an HLA-A2/A28-specific human monoclonal antibody. Although possibly exposed to HLA-A2 by transfusions, the cell donor showed no HLA-A2-specific serum antibodies. The present protocol for in vitro immunization includes the elimination of suppressor cells from the responder cell population, the presence of irradiated allogeneic lymphocytes as a source of antigen, as well as stimuli--recombinant interleukin-2 and a B-cell specific nucleoside analogue--causing the proliferation of B lymphocytes, prior to immortalization. The ability of the antibody 5C2A2 to detect all known HLA-A2 subtypes, except A2.3, and A28, allows identification of the serological epitope on the HLA-A2 molecule. Application of this in vitro immunization method allows the production of a set of HLA monoclonal antibody-secreting human hybridomas, independent of the existence of serum HLA antibodies in the lymphocyte donors. PMID:7504327

  1. Allele frequency net 2015 update: new features for HLA epitopes, KIR and disease and HLA adverse drug reaction associations

    PubMed Central

    González-Galarza, Faviel F.; Takeshita, Louise Y.C.; Santos, Eduardo J.M.; Kempson, Felicity; Maia, Maria Helena Thomaz; Silva, Andrea Luciana Soares da; Silva, André Luiz Teles e; Ghattaoraya, Gurpreet S.; Alfirevic, Ana; Jones, Andrew R.; Middleton, Derek

    2015-01-01

    It has been 12 years since the Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND; http://www.allelefrequencies.net) was first launched, providing the scientific community with an online repository for the storage of immune gene frequencies in different populations across the world. There have been a significant number of improvements from the first version, making AFND a primary resource for many clinical and scientific areas including histocompatibility, immunogenetics, pharmacogenetics and anthropology studies, among many others. The most widely used part of AFND stores population frequency data (alleles, genes or haplotypes) related to human leukocyte antigens (HLA), killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR), major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related genes (MIC) and a number of cytokine gene polymorphisms. AFND now contains >1400 populations from more than 10 million healthy individuals. Here, we report how the main features of AFND have been updated to include a new section on ‘HLA epitope’ frequencies in populations, a new section capturing the results of studies identifying HLA associations with adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and one for the examination of infectious and autoimmune diseases associated with KIR polymorphisms—thus extending AFND to serve a new user base in these growing areas of research. New criteria on data quality have also been included. PMID:25414323

  2. The production and crystallization of the human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 complexed with deamidated gliadin peptides implicated in coeliac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Kate N.; Reid, Hugh H.; Borg, Natalie A.; Broughton, Sophie E.; Huyton, Trevor; Anderson, Robert P.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2007-12-01

    The production and crystallization of human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with deamidated gliadin peptides is reported. Crystals of HLA-DQ2{sup PQPELPYPQ} diffracted to 3.9 Å, while the HLA-DQ8{sup EGSFQPSQE} crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å, allowing structure determination by molecular replacement. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 are key risk factors in coeliac disease, as they bind deamidated gluten peptides that are subsequently recognized by CD4{sup +} T cells. Here, the production and crystallization of both HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with the deamidated gliadin peptides DQ2 α-I (PQPELPYPQ) and DQ8 α-I (EGSFQPSQE), respectively, are reported.

  3. HLA-DRB1 alleles and HLA-DRB1 shared epitopes are markers for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis subgroups in Colombian mestizos.

    PubMed

    Garavito, Gloria; Yunis, Edmond J; Egea, Eduardo; Ramirez, Luis A; Malagón, Clara; Iglesias, Antonio; De La Cruz, Oscar F; Uribe, Oscar; Navarro, Edgar; Martinez, Paz; Jaraquemada, Dolores

    2004-04-01

    We studied the association of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles and HLA haplotypes with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) in 65 patients and 65 controls from Colombia. The JRA subsets were distinguished on the basis of criteria established by the American College of Rheumatology. Two alleles were associated with protection, HLA-DRB1*1501 (p = 0.002) and HLA-DRB1*1402 (p = 0.01). HLA-DRB1*1602 (p = 0.0000002) was associated with susceptibility for systemic JRA and HLA-DRB1*1104 (p = 0.0002) for pauciarticular JRA. Amino acid sequences at residues 70-74 of DRB1 chain shared by HLA-DRB1 alleles (shared epitomes) were also informative. The polyarticular JRA subset revealed association with (70)QRRAA(74), which includes HLA-DRB1*04, 01, and (70)DRRAA(74), which includes DRB1*1601, 1602, 1101, and 1104. Two new findings of interest were the association of the haplotypes DRB1*1104, DQB1*0301(p = 0.0002) with pauciarticular JRA and DRB1*1602, DQB1*0301 (p = 0.0000002) association with systemic JRA. The DRB1 alleles of these two haplotypes share the epitope (70)DRRAA(74)and were associated with both the pauciarticular and the systemic subset of JRA. Our results suggest that studies of disease susceptibility in populations of admixed genetic background should take into account the contribution of different ethnic groups or nationalities in the recruitment of controls and patients studied in order to rule out genetic stratification.

  4. The HLA-net GENE[RATE] pipeline for effective HLA data analysis and its application to 145 population samples from Europe and neighbouring areas.

    PubMed

    Nunes, J M; Buhler, S; Roessli, D; Sanchez-Mazas, A

    2014-05-01

    In this review, we present for the first time an integrated version of the Gene[rate] computer tools which have been developed during the last 5 years to analyse human leukocyte antigen (HLA) data in human populations, as well as the results of their application to a large dataset of 145 HLA-typed population samples from Europe and its two neighbouring areas, North Africa and West Asia, now forming part of the Gene[va] database. All these computer tools and genetic data are, from now, publicly available through a newly designed bioinformatics platform, HLA-net, here presented as a main achievement of the HLA-NET scientific programme. The Gene[rate] pipeline offers user-friendly computer tools to estimate allele and haplotype frequencies, to test Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE), selective neutrality and linkage disequilibrium, to recode HLA data, to convert file formats, to display population frequencies of chosen alleles and haplotypes in selected geographic regions, and to perform genetic comparisons among chosen sets of population samples, including new data provided by the user. Both numerical and graphical outputs are generated, the latter being highly explicit and of publication quality. All these analyses can be performed on the pipeline after scrupulous validation of the population sample's characterisation and HLA typing reporting according to HLA-NET recommendations. The Gene[va] database offers direct access to the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DQA1, -DQB1, -DRB1 and -DPB1 frequencies and summary statistics of 145 population samples having successfully passed these HLA-NET 'filters', and representing three European subregions (South-East, North-East and Central-West Europe) and two neighbouring areas (North Africa, as far as Sudan, and West Asia, as far as South India). The analysis of these data, summarized in this review, shows a substantial genetic variation at the regional level in this continental area. These results have main implications for population genetics

  5. Association of HLA-DR4/HLA-DRB1*04 with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Tingkun; Lv, Wenjuan; Zhang, Li; Chen, Jianhuan; Chen, Haoyu

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR4/HLA-DRB1*04 has been reported to be a risk factor for Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease (VKH) with various strength of association. Its sub-alleles were also found to be associated with VKH. However the results were inconsistent. In this study, we systematically searched the related literature, pooled the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of association of HLA-DR4/HLA-DRB1*04 or its sub-alleles with VKH from individual studies, and explored the potential source of heterogeneity. A total of 1853 VKH patients and 4164 controls from 21 articles were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled OR of association of HLA-DR4/HLA-DRB1*04 and VKH was 8.42 (95% CI: 5.69–12.45). There were significant heterogeneity (I2 = 71%). Subgroup analysis indicated that ethnicity was the source of heterogeneity (all I2 = 0, ORs ranged from 2.09–13.69 in subgroups). The sub-alleles, HLA-DRB1*0404 (OR = 2.57), 0405 (OR = 10.31) and 0410 (OR = 6.52) increased the risk of VKH; 0401 (OR = 0.21) protected VKH; while other sub-alleles were not associated with VKH. Our meta-analysis confirmed the association between VKH and HLA-DR4/DRB1*04, found the strength of association is different in different ethnic groups, and identified HLA-DRB1*0404, 0405 and 0410 as risk sub-alleles while 0401 as protective sub-allele. PMID:25382027

  6. MicroRNAs targeting the immunomodulatory HLA-G gene: a new survey searching for microRNAs with potential to regulate HLA-G.

    PubMed

    Porto, Iane O P; Mendes-Junior, Celso T; Felício, Leandro P; Georg, Raphaela C; Moreau, Philippe; Donadi, Eduardo A; Chies, José Artur Bogo; Castelli, Erick C

    2015-06-01

    The HLA-G gene is a non-classical class I MHC, responsible for modulating immune responses by inhibiting Natural Killer and cytotoxic T cells, presenting a crucial role in maternal tolerance to the fetus. In non-pathological conditions, its expression is restricted to certain tissues such as cornea and placenta. The HLA-G 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) has been reported to play an important role in the control of mRNA and protein levels, and polymorphisms in this region may influence mRNA stability and microRNA binding. In this study, we propose an approach to detect and classify microRNAs regarding their ability to bind the target (in this case, HLA-G 3'UTR) and the specificity of such interactions. Then, a panel of microRNAs with potential to modulate HLA-G expression is proposed, in which some microRNAs, such as miR-139-3p, would bind to non-polymorphic sequences of the HLA-G 3'UTR in a stable and specific manner, while others, such as miR-608, binds to polymorphic sequences and therefore the binding might be influenced by the variant actually present. Additionally, both HLA-G 3'UTR polymorphisms and the microRNA microenvironment must be considered when studies correlating HLA-G expression profiles and polymorphisms are being conducted. These new data may provide a remarkable contribution to the understanding of the mechanisms underlying HLA-G post-transcriptional regulation, disclosing the impact of variable and non-variable regions on HLA-G biology and providing a unique microRNA repertoire for future functional studies and therapeutic use.

  7. HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies in 6384 umbilical cord blood units and transplantation matching and engraftment statistics in the Zhejiang cord blood bank of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, F; He, J; Chen, S; Qin, F; Dai, B; Zhang, W; Zhu, F M; Lv, H J

    2014-02-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a widely accepted source of progenitor cells, and now, many cord blood banks were established. Here, we analysed the HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies, HLA matching possibilities for searching potential donors and outcome of UCB transplantations in Zhejiang cord blood bank of China. A total of 6384 UCB units were characterized for 17 HLA-A, 30 HLA-B and 13 HLA-DRB1 alleles at the first field resolution level. Additionally, B*14, B*15 and B*40 were typed to the second field level. A total of 1372 distinct A-B-DRB1 haplotypes were identified. The frequencies of 7 haplotypes were more than 1%, and 439 haplotypes were <0.01%. A*02-B*46-DRB1*09, A*33-B*58-DRB1*03 and A*30-B*13-DRB1*07 were the most common haplotypes, with frequencies of 4.4%, 3.3%, and 2.9%, respectively. Linkage disequilibrium(LD) analysis showed that there were 83 A-B, 106 B-DRB1, 54 A-DRB1 haplotypes with positive LD, in which 51 A-B, 60 B-DRB1, 32 A-DRB1 haplotypes exhibited a significant LD (P < 0.05). In 682 search requests, 12.9%, 40.0% and 42.7% of patients were found to have 6 of 6, 5 of 6 and 4 of 6 HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 matching donors, respectively. A total of 30 UCB units were transplanted to 24 patients (3 patients not evaluated due to early death); 14 of 21 patients (66.7%) engrafted. This study reveals the HLA distribution and its transplantation application in the cord blood bank of Zhejiang province. These data can help to select potential UCB donors for transplantation and used to assess the scale of new cord blood banking endeavours.

  8. Using HLA-A2.1 Transgenic Rabbit Model to Screen and Characterize New HLA-A2.1 Restricted Epitope DNA Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiafen; Schell, Todd D.; Peng, Xuwen; Cladel, Nancy M.; Balogh, Karla K.; Christensen, Neil D.

    2011-01-01

    We have established an HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbit /cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) infection model. Using this novel transgenic animal model, we reported earlier that a multivalent epitope DNA vaccine (CRPVE1ep1-5) containing five HLA-A2.1 restricted epitopes from CRPVE1 (42-50, 149-157, 161-169, 245-253 and 303-311) was successful in providing strong and specific protective and therapeutic immunity. Among these five epitopes, two (161-169 and 303-311) have been proven to stimulate strong immunity in both HLA-A2.1 transgenic mouse and rabbit models. In the current study, we further identified the remaining three epitopes (CRPVE1/42-50,149-157, 245-253) in both animal models. CRPVE1/149-157 was able to induce specific CTL responses in HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice by DNA immunization but undetectable by peptide immunization. CRPVE1/42-50 and 245-253 failed to respond in HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice either by peptide or DNA immunization. All the three epitopes when administrated as DNA vaccines, however, were able to stimulate strong protective immunity in HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits in a dose dependent manner. Among the five epitopes, two (CRPVE1/ 303-311and CRPVE1/149-157) DNA vaccines also showed specific therapeutic effects in CRPV-infected HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits. Taken together, the HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbit model recognized more epitopes than did the HLA-A2.1 transgenic mouse model. Our data demonstrate that the HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbit model can complement the HLA-A2.1 transgenic mouse model for the development and testing of new HLA-A2.1 restricted prophylactic and therapeutic T cell based DNA vaccines. PMID:21572916

  9. A cis-eQTL of HLA-DRB1 and a frameshift mutation of MICA contribute to the pattern of association of HLA alleles with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2014-04-01

    The association of classic human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles with risk of cervical cancer has been extensively studied, and a protective effect has consistently been found for DRB1*1301, DQA1*0103, and/or DQB1*0603 (these three alleles are in perfect linkage disequilibrium [LD] and often occur on the same haplotype in Europeans), while reports have differed widely with respect to the effect of HLA-B*07, DRB1*1501, and/or DQB1*0602 (the last two alleles are also in perfect LD in Europeans). It is not clear whether the reported HLA alleles are responsible for the differences in cervical cancer susceptibility, or if functional variants at other locations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region may explain the effect. In order to assess the relative contribution of both classic HLA alleles and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC region to cervical cancer susceptibility, we have imputed classic HLA alleles in 1034 cervical cancer patients and 3948 controls in a Swedish population for an integrated analysis. We found that the protective haplotype DRB1*1301-DQA1*0103-DQB1*0603 has a direct effect on cervical cancer and always occurs together with the C allele of a HLA-DRB1 cis-eQTL (rs9272143), which increases the expression of HLA-DRB1. The haplotype rs9272143C-DRB1*1301-DQA1*0103-DQB1*0603 conferred the strongest protection against cervical cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 0.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.32-0.52, P = 6.2 × 10(-13)). On the other hand, the associations with HLA-B*0702 and DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 are attributable to the joint effects of both the HLA-DRB1 cis-eQTL (rs9272143) and a frameshift mutation (G inserion of rs67841474, also known as A5.1) of the MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A gene (MICA). Variation in LD between the classic HLA loci, rs9272143 and rs67841474 between populations may explain the different associations of HLA-B*07 and DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 with cervical cancer between studies. The

  10. Description of a novel HLA-B allele, B*5613, identified during HLA-typing using sequence-specific oligonucleotide hybridization and sequence-specific amplification.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, B; Heymann, G A; Schoenemann, C; Nagy, M; Kiesewetter, H; Salama, A

    2004-11-01

    Here, we report on the characterization of a novel human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B allele, B*5613. The allele was identified in an adult male from North Africa who was suffering from sickle cell anemia. HLA-B*5613 most closely matches to B*5601 differing only by a substitution of three nucleotides of codon 180. Due to this substitution, low-resolution HLA-typing using sequence-specific oligonucleotide hybridization or amplification using sequence-specific primers gave inconclusive results. DNA sequencing confirmed a variation of codon 180 (CTG-->GAC) resulting in an amino acid substitution Leu156Asp. PMID:15496207

  11. Recognition of HLA-A2 mutant and variant target cells by an HLA-A2 allospecific human cytotoxic T lymphocyte line.

    PubMed

    Ware, C F; Krangel, M S; Pious, D; Burakoff, S J; Strominger, J L

    1983-09-01

    HLA-A2 specific human cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) cell lines have been developed using T cell growth factor and coculture of peripheral blood lymphocytes with selected allogeneic target cell lines. The CTL-8 line showed specificity for human leukocyte antigens (HLA)-A2 bearing target cells after 5 weeks in culture when tested against a panel of 14 lymphoblastoid cell lines in a 51Chromium (51Cr) release assay. Purified anti-human leukocyte antigens (HLA) monoclonal antibodies W6/32 and PA2.1 inhibited cytolysis by 85% and 60%, respectively. The CTL-8 line lysed non-HLA-A2 target cells in the presence of lectins concanavalin A (Con A) or phytohemagglutinin-P lectin (PHA-P) indicating the specificity of cytolysis was not due to nonspecific resistance of target cells to the CTL-lytic mechanism. The T5-1 HLA-A2 mutant cell series were tested as targets for the CTL-8 line. Cell clones 8.18.1, 8.21.1 and 8.6.1, which express altered HLA-A2 molecules as determined by their decreased reactivity with allospecific monoclonal antibodies, were lysed by the CTL-8 line as efficiently as the T5-1 wild type. These cell lines also acted as efficient cold target competitors for a normal HLA-A2 target cell. The 8.14.1 cell clone expressed a lower amount of HLA-A2 alloantigen and showed a corresponding decreased reactivity with CTL-8 in direct cytolytic and cold target competitive inhibition assays. In contrast, the M7 and DK1 HLA-A2 variant cell lines, which express normal HLA-A2 serological determinants, were inefficiently lysed by CTL-8 and did not act as competitive inhibitors of normal HLA-A2 target cells. These results support the concept that the alloantigenic determinant(s) recognized by T cells and antibodies occur at separate regions on the HLA-A2 molecule. PMID:6193184

  12. Controlling the Immunological Crosstalk during Conception and Pregnancy: HLA-G in Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Lynge Nilsson, Line; Djurisic, Snezana; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F.

    2014-01-01

    In several years after its discovery in the placenta, the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ib protein, HLA-G, was not given much attention, nor was it assigned great importance. As time has unraveled, HLA-G has proven to have distinctive functions and an unforeseen and possibly important role in reproduction. HLA-G is characterized mainly by its low polymorphism and restricted tissue distribution in non-pathological conditions. In fact, its expression pattern is primarily limited to extravillous cytotrophoblast cells at the maternal-fetal interface during pregnancy. Due to low polymorphism, almost the same protein is expressed by virtually all individuals. It is these unique features that make HLA-G differ from its highly polymorphic HLA class Ia counterparts, the HLA-A, -B, and -C molecules. Its function, seemingly diverse, is typically receptor-mediated, and involves interactions with a wide range of immune cells. As the expression of HLA-G primarily is limited to gestation, this has given rise to the hypothesis that HLA-G plays an important role in the immunological tolerance of the fetus by the mother. In keeping with this, it might not be surprising that polymorphisms in the HLA-G gene, and levels of HLA-G expression, have been linked to reproductive failure and pre-eclampsia. Based on recent studies, we speculate that HLA-G might be involved in mechanisms in reproductive immunology even before conception because HLA-G can be detected in the genital tract and in the blood of non-pregnant women, and is present in seminal fluid from men. In addition, HLA-G expression has been found in the pre-implanted embryo. Therefore, we propose that a combined contribution from the mother, the father, and the embryo/fetus is likely to be important. Furthermore, this review presents important aspects of HLA-G in relation to reproduction: from genetics to physiological effects, from pregnancy and pregnancy complications to a short discussion on future possible means of

  13. EDEM1 targets misfolded HLA-B27 dimers for endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation

    PubMed Central

    Guiliano, David B.; Fussell, Helen; Lenart, Izabela; Tsao, Edward; Nesbeth, Darren; Fletcher, Adam J.; Campbell, Elaine C.; Yousaf, Nasim; Williams, Sarah; Santos, Susana; Cameron, Amy; Towers, Greg J.; Kellam, Paul; Hebert, Daniel N.; Gould, Keith; Powis, Simon J.; Antoniou, Antony N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective HLA-B27 forms misfolded heavy chain dimers, which may predispose individuals to inflammatory arthritis by inducing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR). We wanted to define the role of the UPR induced ER associated degradation (ERAD) pathway in the disposal of HLA-B27 dimeric conformers. Methods HeLa cell lines expressing only two copies of a carboxy terminally Sv5 tagged HLA-B27 were generated. The ER stress induced EDEM1 protein was over expressed by transfection and dimer levels monitored by immunoblotting. EDEM1, the UPR associated transcription factor XBP-1, the E3 ubiquitin ligase HRD1, the degradation associated derlin 1 and 2 proteins were inhibited by either short hairpin RNA or dominant negative mutants. The UPR associated ERAD of HLA-B27 was confirmed using ER stress inducing pharamacological agents in kinetic and pulse chase assays. Results We demonstrate that UPR induced machinery can target HLA-B27 dimers, and that dimer formation can be controlled by alterations to expression levels of components of the UPR induced ERAD pathway. HLA-B27 dimers and misfolded MHC class I monomeric molecules were detected bound to EDEM1, with overexpression of EDEM1 inhibiting HLA-B27 dimer formation. EDEM1 inhibition resulted in upregulation of HLA-B27 dimers, whilst UPR induced ERAD of dimers was prevented in the absence of EDEM1. HLA-B27 dimer formation was also enhanced in the absence of XBP-1, HRD1 and derlin1/2. Conclusion The UPR ERAD pathway as described here can dispose of HLA-B27 dimers and presents a potential novel therapeutic target for the modulation of HLA-B27 associated inflammatory disease. PMID:25132672

  14. Upregulation of HLA Expression in Primary Uveal Melanoma by Infiltrating Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    van Essen, T. Huibertus; van Pelt, Sake I.; Bronkhorst, Inge H. G.; Versluis, Mieke; Némati, Fariba; Laurent, Cécile; Luyten, Gregorius P. M.; van Hall, Thorbald; van den Elsen, Peter J.; van der Velden, Pieter A.; Decaudin, Didier; Jager, Martine J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Uveal melanoma (UM) with an inflammatory phenotype, characterized by infiltrating leukocytes and increased human leukocyte antigen (HLA) expression, carry an increased risk of death due to metastases. These tumors should be ideal for T-cell based therapies, yet it is not clear why prognostically-infaust tumors have a high HLA expression. We set out to determine whether the level of HLA molecules in UM is associated with other genetic factors, HLA transcriptional regulators, or microenvironmental factors. Methods 28 enucleated UM were used to study HLA class I and II expression, and several regulators of HLA by immunohistochemistry, PCR microarray, qPCR and chromosome SNP-array. Fresh tumor samples of eight primary UM and four metastases were compared to their corresponding xenograft in SCID mice, using a PCR microarray and SNP array. Results Increased expression levels of HLA class I and II showed no dosage effect of chromosome 6p, but, as expected, were associated with monosomy of chromosome 3. Increased HLA class I and II protein levels were positively associated with their gene expression and with raised levels of the peptide-loading gene TAP1, and HLA transcriptional regulators IRF1, IRF8, CIITA, and NLRC5, revealing a higher transcriptional activity in prognostically-bad tumors. Implantation of fresh human tumor samples into SCID mice led to a loss of infiltrating leukocytes, and to a decreased expression of HLA class I and II genes, and their regulators. Conclusion Our data provides evidence for a proper functioning HLA regulatory system in UM, offering a target for T-cell based therapies. PMID:27764126

  15. HLA class II allele polymorphism in an outbreak of chikungunya fever in Middle Andaman, India

    PubMed Central

    Chaaithanya, Itta Krishna; Muruganandam, Nagarajan; Anwesh, Maile; Rajesh, Reesu; Ghosal, Sruti R; Kartick, Chinnaiah; Prasad, Kadiyala Nageswara; Muthumani, Karuppiah; Vijayachari, Paluru

    2013-01-01

    A sudden upsurge of fever cases with joint pain was observed in the outpatient department, Community Health Centre, Rangat during July–August 2010 in Rangat Middle Andaman, India. The aetiological agent responsible for the outbreak was identified as chikungunya virus (CHIKV), by using RT-PCR and IgM ELISA. The study investigated the association of polymorphisms in the human leucocyte antigen class II genes with susceptibility or protection against CHIKV. One hundred and one patients with clinical features suggestive of CHIKV infection and 104 healthy subjects were included in the study. DNA was extracted and typed for HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 alleles. Based on the amino acid sequences of HLA-DQB1 retrieved from the IMGT/HLA database, critical amino acid differences in the specific peptide-binding pockets of HLA-DQB1 molecules were investigated. The frequencies of HLA-DRB1 alleles were not significantly different, whereas lower frequency of HLA-DQB1*03:03 was observed in CHIKV patients compared with the control population [P = 0·001, corrected P = 0·024; odds ratio (OR) = 0, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0·0–0·331; Peto's OR = 0·1317, 95% CI 0·0428–0·405). Significantly lower frequency of glutamic acid at position 86 of peptide-binding pocket 1 coding HLA-DQB1 genotypes was observed in CHIKV patients compared with healthy controls (P = 0·004, OR = 0·307, 95% CI 0·125–0·707). Computational binding predictions of CD4 epitopes of CHIKV by NetMHCII revealed that HLA-DQ molecules are known to bind more CHIKV peptides than HLA-DRB1 molecules. The results suggest that HLA-DQB1 alleles and critical amino acid differences in the peptide-binding pockets of HLA-DQB1 alleles might have role in influencing infection and pathogenesis of CHIKV. PMID:23710940

  16. Primary sclerosing cholangitis in genetically diverse populations listed for liver transplantation: Unique clinical and HLA associations

    PubMed Central

    Bowlus, Christopher L.; Li, Chin-Shang; Karlsen, Tom H.; Lie, Benedicte A.; Selmi, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is well characterized in European populations. We aimed to characterize clinical characteristics and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations in a population of European American, Hispanic and African-American PSC patients listed for liver transplantation. Demographic, clinical, and HLA data stratified by population from 6,767 liver transplant (LT) registrants of the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) with a diagnosis of PSC (4.7% of registrants) were compared to registrants with other diagnoses. Compared to European Americans and Hispanics, African American cases were significantly younger (46.6 ± 13.7, 42.3 ± 15.9, and 39.7 ± 13.1, respectively; p = 0.002), listed with a higher Model of End Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score (15.2 ± 7.5, 14.9 ± 7.6, and 18.1 ± 9.3, respectively; p = 0.001), and less frequently noted to have inflammatory bowel disease (71.4% versus 60.5%, p < 0.01) compared to European Americans. In multivariate analysis, African origin was a significant factor associated with listing for LT with PSC (OR relative to European Americans 1.33, 95% C.I. 1.27 – 1.41). HLA associations in European Americans, Hispanics and African Americans with PSC compared to alcoholic liver disease were detected for HLA-B8, HLA-DR13 and the protective HLA-DR4. However, HLA-DR3, which is in linkage disequilibrium with HLA-B8, only showed associations in European Americans and Hispanics. African Americans with PSC listed for LT differ clinically from European Americans and Hispanics. The association with HLA-B8 but not HLA-DR3 in African Americans should make possible the refinement of the HLA associations in PSC. PMID:21031548

  17. Role of HLA-G1 in trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Feng; Zhao, Hongxi; Wang, Li; Guo, Xinyu; Wang, Xiaohong; Yin, Guowu; Hu, Yunsheng; Li, Yi; Yao, Yuanqing

    2015-02-27

    Trophoblast cells are important in embryo implantation and fetomaternal tolerance. HLA-G is specifically expressed at the maternal–fetal interface and is a regulator in pregnancy. The aim of the present study was to detect the effect of HLA-G1 on trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion, and invasion. Human trophoblast cell lines (JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells) were infected with HLA-G1-expressing lentivirus. After infection, HLA-G1 expression of the cells was detected by western blotting. Cell proliferation was detected by the BrdU assay. The cell cycle and apoptosis of JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells was measured by flow cytometry (FCM). The invasion of the cells under different conditions was detected by the transwell invasion chamber assay. HLA-G1 didn't show any significant influence on the proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and invasion of trophocytes in normal culture conditions. However, HLA-G1 inhibited JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells invasion induced by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) under normal oxygen conditions. In conditions of hypoxia, HLA-G1 couldn't inhibit the induction of cell invasion by HGF. HLA-G1 is not an independent factor for regulating the trophocytes. It may play an indirect role in embryo implantation and formation of the placenta. - Highlights: • HLA-G1 could not influence trophocytes under normal conditions. • HLA-G1 inhibited cell invasion induced by HGF under normal oxygen condition. • HLA-G1 could not influence cell invasion under hypoxia conditions.

  18. Regulation and trafficking of the HLA-E molecules during monocyte-macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Camilli, Giorgio; Cassotta, Antonino; Battella, Simone; Palmieri, Gabriella; Santoni, Angela; Paladini, Fabiana; Fiorillo, Maria Teresa; Sorrentino, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    HLA-E is a nonclassical HLA-class I molecule whose best known role is to protect from the natural killer cells. More recently, an additional function more similar to that of classical HLA-class I molecules, i.e., antigen presentation to T cells, is emerging. However, much remains to be explored about the intracellular trafficking of the HLA-E molecules. With the use of 3 different cellular contexts, 2 monocytic cell lines, U937 and THP1, and peripheral blood monocytes, we show here a remarkable increase of HLA-E during monocyte-macrophage differentiation. This goes independently from the classical HLA-class I, the main source of HLA-E-specific peptides, which is found strongly up-regulated upon differentiation of peripheral blood monocytes but not at all in the case of U937 and THP1 cell lines. Although in all cases, there was a moderate increase of HLA-E expressed in the cell surface, lysis by natural killer cells is comparably restored by an anti-NKG2A antibody in untreated as well as in PMA-differentiated U937 cells. Instead, the great majority of the HLA-E is retained in the vesicles of the autophagy-lysosome network, where they colocalize with the microtubule-associated protein light chain 3, as well as with the lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1. We conclude that differently from the classical HLA-class I molecules, the primary destination of the newly synthesized HLA-E molecules in macrophages is, rather than the cell membrane, the intracellular autophagy-lysosomal vesicles where they are stored and where they can encounter the exogenous antigens.

  19. DNA typing for HLA class I alleles: I. Subsets of HLA-A2 and of -A28.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Viña, M A; Falco, M; Sun, Y; Stastny, P

    1992-03-01

    A group of HLA-A locus alleles known to be comprised of approximately 14 closely related variants are collectively called HLA-A2 and -A28. Variations among these alleles are given by differences in only a few codons, and in the case of A*6901, elements of A*6801 (exons 1 and 2) and of A*0201 are combined. The purpose of these experiments was to determine the possibility of designing oligonucleotide probes to identify and develop a typing method for all or most of the A2 and A28 variants. Because the regions of interest are also shared by alleles of other groups, allele-specific or group-specific primers were needed to amplify only the alleles under study. HLA-A2-specific amplification of exon 2 and selective amplification of portions of exon 3 of the A2-A28 group were accomplished with sequence-specific primers and after appropriate adjustments of the PCR conditions. Hybridization patterns using products of four PCR reactions with our set of probes distinguished 11 alleles. Two other alleles might be recognized with the reagents used, but were not found in the panels in this study. A*0201 and A*0209, which are different in exon 4, were not resolved because exon 4 was not tested. A new variant of Aw68, defined by a hybridization pattern obtained with our probes, was different from A*6801 only in that it was negative with probe A6. It was called A*68.3. Population studies were performed in North American whites, blacks, and Indians and in a sample of subjects from North China. HLA-A*0201 was the most frequent allele. A*0202 was found only in blacks, and A*0203 and A*0207 were found only in Chinese. Among the A28-positive subjects, Caucasoids were predominantly A*6801 or A*68.3; A*6802 was the most frequent subtype in American blacks; among American Indians the predominant type was A*68.3. The two A28-positive Chinese subjects studied had A*6901. The results obtained demonstrate that DNA typing is an efficient method for determining these alleles. The methodology

  20. HLA-DQ Genotype Is Associated with Accelerated Small Bowel Transit in Patients with Diarrhea-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Roque, Maria I.; Camilleri, Michael; Carlson, Paula; McKinzie, Sanna; Murray, Joseph A.; Brantner, Tricia L.; Burton, Duane D.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Colonic transit (CT) is accelerated in 46% of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D). Improvement in IBS-D with gluten withdrawal is associated with HLA-DQ2 positivity; the mechanism of improvement is unclear. Objective To determine if HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 positive IBS-D patients have faster small bowel (SB) or CT than HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 negative patients. Methods Among 94 IBS-D patients who previously provided DNA samples, 64 had undergone validated measurements of CT (geometric center at 24h [GC24]); 50 of the patients also had measurement of gastric emptying (GE) and 54 of SB transit (colonic filling at 6h [CF6h]). HLA-DQ status was determined by tag SNP approach. Associations of CF6h and GC24 with HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 status were assessed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), adjusting for BMI. Results Mean age was 40.8±1.6y; 98.5% were female. In 60/64 patients, celiac disease was excluded by serology or histology. There were no significant differences in age or BMI among the different HLA-DQ groups. Independently, patients positive for HLA-DQ2 had numerically greater CF6h compared to HLA-DQ2 negative (p=0.065), and those positive for HLA-DQ8 had greater CF6h compared to HLA-DQ8 negative patients (p=0.021). GE was not associated with HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 status. Patients positive for both HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 had greater CF6 (p=0.013) and numerically higher, but not significant, GC24 (p=0.38) compared to HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 negative patients. Conclusion IBS-D patients positive for HLA-DQ8 or for both HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 have faster SB transit. The mechanism of the accelerated SB transit and the effect of gluten withdrawal on SB function in IBS-D deserve further investigation. PMID:21490506

  1. The diversity of the HLA-E-restricted peptide repertoire explains the immunological impact of the Arg107Gly mismatch.

    PubMed

    Celik, Alexander A; Kraemer, Thomas; Huyton, Trevor; Blasczyk, Rainer; Bade-Döding, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E molecules are potent inhibitors of NK cell-mediated killing. Low in polymorphisms, two alleles are widely expressed among diverse populations: HLA-E*01:01 and HLA-E*01:03. Both alleles are distinguished by one SNP resulting in the substitution Arg107Gly. Both alleles present a limited set of peptides derived from class I leader sequences physiologically; however, HLA-E*01:01 presents non-canonical peptides in the absence of HLA class I molecules. To further assess the functional differences between both alleles, we analyzed the peptide repertoire of HLA-E*01:03 by applying soluble HLA technology followed by mass-spectrometric peptide sequencing. HLA-E*01:03 restricted peptides showed a length of 9-17 amino acids and differed in their biophysical properties, no overlap in the peptide repertoire of both allelic variants could be observed; however, both alleles shared marginal peptides from the same proteomic content. Artificial APCs expressing empty HLA-E*01:01 or E*01:03 molecules were generated and stabilized using cognate HLA class I-derived peptide ligands to analyze the impact of residue 107 within the HLA-E heavy chain on the NKG2/CD94 receptor engagement. Differences in peptide stabilization could be translated to the density and half-life time of peptide-HLA-E molecules on the cell surface that subsequently impacted NK cell inhibition as verified by cytotoxicity assays. Taken together, these data illustrate functional differences of HLA-E allelic variants induced by a single amino acid. Furthermore, the function of HLA-E in pathophysiologic situations when the HLA processing machinery is interrupted seems to be more emphasized than previously described, implying a crucial role for HLA-E in tumor or viral immune episodes.

  2. Common genomic HLA haplotypes contributing to successful donor search in unrelated hematopoietic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pedron, B; Duval, M; Elbou, O M; Moskwa, M; Jambou, M; Vilmer, E; Sterkers, G

    2003-03-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the most frequent HLA haplotypes in order to optimize donor searches in unrelated hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation. Pediatric patients from the north of France who underwent initial HLA typing for donor search in our center were included. Patients and family members were broadly typed for HLA class I and II. Patients were further DNA typed at the sequence level for HLA-A, -B, -Cw, -DRB1, and -DQB1 alleles. In 200 of 207 patients HLA haplotypes were assigned by the mode of inheritance. The most common haplotypes were defined based on frequencies over 0.75%. Searches for unrelated donors were completed for 86 patients lacking a family donor. Matching criteria were either the optimal level of 10 alleles or a one-HLA class I mismatch as a second choice. Rates of successful search reach 85% for patients (n=20) who express at least one common five-allele (HLA-A/B/Cw/DRB1/DQB1) haplotype, but also 77% for more patients (n=53) who express at least one of the 20 most frequent three-allele (HLA-A/B/Cw) haplotypes. Success rates are clearly less (39%) in patients lacking these haplotypes. The use of these data to delineate search strategies is discussed.

  3. Role of Chlamydia trachomatis and HLA-B27 in sexually acquired reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Keat, A C; Maini, R N; Nkwazi, G C; Pegrum, G D; Ridgway, G L; Scott, J T

    1978-03-11

    Inflammatory arthritis, tendinitis, and fasciitis after non-specific urethritis ("sexually acquired reactive arthritis" (SARA)) was studied prospectively in 531 men with non-specific urethritis, with particular reference to the frequency of isolation of Chlamydia trachomatis and the presence of HLA-B27. Satisfactory cultures were obtained from the urethral swabs from 384 patients; and HLA typing was performed on 482, of whom 30 (6%) were HLA-B27-positive. Arthritis developed in 16 patients, and five of the 14 (36%) with satisfactory cultures were positive for C trachomatis; 135 of the patients without arthritis were also positive for C trachomatis, an identical proportion. Seven of the 15 patients (40%) with arthritis who were HLA-typed were HLA-B27-positive. Six of the 30 patients with HLA-B27 developed peripheral arthritis in contrast to only nine of the 452 patients lacking the antigen, suggesting a tenfold increase susceptibility. C trachomatis, however, was no more prevalent in cultures from HLA-B27-positive men than from the others. Thus carriage of C trachomatis is unlikely to be influenced by HLA-B27. C trachomatis may be an important pathogen in some cases of SARA but does not appear to be an exclusive trigger factor for this condition.

  4. Predominance of histocompatibility antigen HL-A8 in patients with gluten-sensitive enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Falchuk, Z. Myron; Rogentine, G. Nicholas; Strober, Warren

    1972-01-01

    HL-A phenotypes were determined in 24 unrelated patients with gluten-sensitive enteropathy (GSE) using a lymphocyte microcytotoxicity test. 21 of the 24 patients had HL-A8 in the second segregant series, a frequency of 0.875. In contrast, the HL-A8 frequency in 200 normal individuals was 0.215 (difference significant at P < 0.002), and in 6 patients with villous atrophy due to tropical sprue or hypogammaglobulinemia the HL-A8 frequency was 0.17 (difference from normal not significant). The HL-A types in the families of three HL-A8 positive patients with GSE indicated that the HL-A8 antigen was inherited as an autosomal dominant. Frequencies of the other HL-A antigens in the GSE group did not differ significantly from that of the normal group. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that GSE is due to the presence of an abnormal “immune response (Ir) gene,” leading to the production of pathogenic antigluten antibody or, alternatively, to the presence of a particular membrane configuration leading to the binding of gluten to epithelial cells with subsequent tissue damage. PMID:5024049

  5. Allele and haplotype frequencies for HLA-DQ in Iranian celiac disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Romanos, Jihane; Rostami, Kamran; Ganji, Azita; Ehsani-Ardakani, Mohammad Javad; Bakhshipour, Ali-Reza; Zojaji, Homayoun; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Zali, Mohammad-Reza; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the distribution of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 and -DQ8 in Iranian celiac disease (CD) patients and compare them to healthy Iranian controls. METHODS: To predict the HLA-DQA1 and -DQB1 genes, we used six previously reported HLA-tagging single nucleotide polymorphism to determine HLA genotypes in 59 Iranian patients with ‘biopsy-confirmed’ CD and in 151 healthy Iranian individuals. To test the transferability of the method, 50 cases and controls were also typed using a commercial kit that identifies individual carriers of DQ2, DQ7 and DQ8 alleles. RESULTS: In this pilot study 97% of CD cases (n = 57) and 58% of controls (n = 87) were carriers of HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 heterodimers, either in the homozygous or heterozygous state. The HLA-DQ pattern of these 57 CD patients: heterozygous DQ2.2 (n = 14) and homozygous DQ2.2 (n = 1), heterozygous DQ2.5 (n = 33) and homozygous DQ2.5 (n = 8), heterozygous DQ8 (n = 13) and homozygous DQ8 (n = 2). Two CD patients were negative for both DQ2 and DQ8 (3%). CONCLUSION: The prevalence of DQ8 in our CD population was higher than that reported in other populations (25.4%). As reported in other populations, our results underline the primary importance of HLA-DQ alleles in the Iranian population’s susceptibility to CD. PMID:24876751

  6. Hu Ly-m5: a unique antigen physically associated with HLA molecules.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, R L; McKenzie, I F

    1983-05-01

    A new human cell surface antigen (Hu Ly-m5) detected by a murine monoclonal antibody (E4.3) is described. The tissue distribution of the Hu Ly-m5 antigen is similar to the HLA antigens (with which it was initially confused) but it is not present on all bone marrow cells nor the U266 myeloma, and is expressed on the HLA-negative K562 cell line. Nevertheless, the Hu Ly-m5 antigen has some affinity for HLA molecules as the two entities cocap and the Hu Ly-m5 antigen copurifies with the HLA antigens on an anti-beta 2-microglobulin immunoabsorbent column; however, the antigen complexes did not withstand the procedures used for coprecipitation. Despite their similarities, the Hu Ly-m5 and HLA antigens are distinct molecular entities--Hu Ly-m5 consists of two bands of apparent molecular weight 69 and 60 K while HLA is comprised of the 43 and 12 K bands of the HLA heavy chain and beta 2-microglobulin, respectively. The function of the Hu Ly-m5 antigen is unknown, but no involvement in the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response to influenza virus-infected cells could be demonstrated. The two properties described (apparent molecular weight and physical association with the HLA antigens) suggests that the Hu Ly-m5 antigen may be a viral-encoded protein.

  7. Associations of HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 Types with Oral Diseases in Swiss Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mauramo, Matti; Ramseier, Adrian Markus; Buser, Andreas; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Weiger, Roland; Waltimo, Tuomas

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) are crucial components of host defense against microbial challenge but the associations of HLA types with oral infectious diseases have not been studied in detail. This prospective cross-sectional study examined associations of HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 types with common oral diseases in a healthy Swiss adult population. 257 subjects (107 m, 150 f, mean age: 43.5 yr; range: 21–58 yr) with known HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 profiles and comprehensive medical records were included. A thorough anamnesis was followed by oral examinations including saliva flow measurements, the DMFT score for cariological status, complete periodontal status with plaque and bleeding indexes as well as assessment of mucosal alterations and temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). Student’s t-test and Pearson chi-square test were utilized to compare the oral diseases between HLA positive and negative subjects. Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was used and PBonf<0.05 was considered statistically significant. HLA types -B15 (PBonf = 0.002), -B51 (PBonf = 0.02) and -DRB1*12 (PBonf = 0.02) were associated with less periodontal disease manifestations. HLA-A32 had a positive association with TMD dysfunction (PBonf = 0.012). No other statistically significant associations were observed. In conclusion, HLA types may contribute to the development of oral diseases in generally healthy Caucasian adults. PMID:25072155

  8. Distribution of HLA haplotypes across Japanese Archipelago: similarity, difference and admixture.

    PubMed

    Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Inoue, Ituro

    2015-11-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region is the most polymorphic region in the human genome. The polymorphic nature of the HLA region is thought to have been shaped from balancing selection. The complex migration events during the Out-of-Africa expansion have influenced geographic patterns of HLA allele frequencies and diversities across present-day human populations. Differences in the HLA allele frequency may contribute geographic differences in the susceptibility to many diseases, such as infectious, autoimmune and metabolic diseases. Here we briefly reviewed characteristics of frequency distribution of HLA alleles and haplotypes in Japanese population. A large part of HLA alleles and haplotypes that are common in Japanese are shared with neighboring Asian populations. The differentiations in HLA alleles and haplotypes across Japanese regional populations may provide clues to model for peopling of Japanese Archipelago and for design of genetic association studies. Finally, we introduce recent topics that new HLA alleles derived from ancient admixtures with Neanderthals and Denisovans are thought to have played an important role in the adaptation of modern humans to local pathogens during Out-of-Africa expansion. PMID:26202576

  9. HLA-B locus polymorphism: studies with a specific hybridization probe.

    PubMed Central

    Coppin, H L; Denny, D W; Weissman, S M; McDevitt, H O

    1985-01-01

    The large number of class I histocompatibility genes (HLA) and their extensive homology has made it difficult to assign bands on genomic Southern blots to known genes. Therefore, we have tried to obtain nucleic acid probes for class I genes that are locus specific or have restricted locus specificity. Computer sequence-homology analysis was used to compare the nucleic acid sequences of two genomic clones, one coding for the HLA-B7 antigen (JY150) and one containing a class I pseudogene (pHLA12.4). A sequence in the 3' untranslated region with very low homology was identified. This sequence from the HLA-B7 gene was subcloned into M13 phage. This fragment, JY150/C5, hybridized with two genomic bands in DNA from human HLA homozygotes--presumably the HLA-B locus gene and a closely related gene. The probe was used to assess restriction fragment polymorphism at the HLA-B locus in homozygous consanguineous cell lines. This analysis permitted the association of certain polymorphic restriction enzyme fragments with some alleles of this locus. However, many HLA-B alleles have identical restriction fragments produced by a number of restriction endonucleases. Images PMID:3001712

  10. Role of microRNAs on HLA-G expression in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Barbara

    2016-09-01

    The non-classical human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) known to protect the embryo from immune cell destruction leading to fetal maternal tolerance is often overexpressed in human tumors of distinct origin thereby leading to an escape from T and NK cell-mediated immune response. The molecular mechanisms controlling HLA-G expression are complex and involve deregulation at the transcriptional, epigenetic and posttranscriptional level. Using bioinformatics and high through put analyses a number of microRNAs (miRs) have been identified, which were able to bind to the 3' UTR of HLA-G with distinct efficacy. This caused by a downregulation of HLA-G surface expression, which was associated with an increased immune response thereby overcoming the HLA-G-mediated immune tolerance. Reduced expression of HLA-G-specific miRs was associated with tumor progression and metastases and appear to affect directly or indirectly tumor characteristics, such as cell proliferation, apoptosis and resistance to chemotherapy. Recently, an interaction between long non-coding RNAs, such as HOTAIR, and HLA-G-specific miRs has also been demonstrated. This review summarizes the control of HLA-G expression and function by microRNAs as well as its clinical significance.

  11. HLA Class I: an Unexpected Role in Integrin β4 Signaling in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohai; Reed, Elaine F.

    2012-01-01

    The production of anti-donor antibodies to HLA class I and class II antigens following transplantation is associated with development of transplant vasculopathy and graft loss. Antibodies against HLA class I (HLA-I) molecules are thought to contribute to transplant vasculopathy by triggering signals that elicit the activation and proliferation of endothelial cells. The proximal molecular events that regulate HLA-I dependent signal transduction are not well understood. We demonstrated a mutual dependency between HLA-I and integrin β4 to stimulate signal transduction and cell proliferation. Similarly, we found that integrin β4-mediated cell migration was dependent upon its interactions with HLA-I molecules. Since integrin β4 has been implicated in angiogenesis and tumor formation, associations between integrin β4 and HLA-I may play an important role in cancer. Further characterization of interactions between HLA-I and integrin β4 may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for the treatment and prevention of chronic allograft rejection and cancer. PMID:22789625

  12. HLA-A gene polymorphisms contribute to osteoporosis susceptibility in postmenopausal Han Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Li, S M; Guo, H; Yang, H J; Lv, M Q; Zhou, D X

    2015-08-28

    Osteoporosis is a common disease characterized by low bone mineral density, deterioration in bone microarchitecture, and increased fracture risk and is more prevalent in postmenopausal women. HLA is a complex gene family; previous studies have shown that it plays an important role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis among Japanese and Greek populations. Prompted by these findings, this study was designed to explore the associations between HLA-A gene polymorphisms and postmenopausal osteoporosis in the Han Chinese population. The polymerase chain reaction-sequence-based typing method was used for DNA genotyping at the HLA-A locus in 70 patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis and 73 healthy controls. We identified 17 HLA-A alleles in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis and 20 HLA-A alleles in control subjects. Furthermore, we found that the frequency of the HLA-A* 02:07 allele was significantly higher in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis than in control subjects (P = 0.023), and the relative risk was 4.065 (95% confidence interval = 1.109-14.893). Our study provides supportive evidence for the contribution of HLA-A gene polymorphisms to the susceptibility to postmenopausal osteoporosis and suggests that HLA-A* 02:07 is likely an important genetic risk factor for postmenopausal osteoporosis in the Han Chinese population.

  13. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes an antigenic determinant shared by HLA A2 and B17.

    PubMed

    McMichael, A J; Parham, P; Rust, N; Brodsky, F

    1980-09-01

    A hybridoma monoclonal anti-HLA antibody has been produced by the technique of Kohler and Milstein [1]. This antibody recognizes a new specificity common to HLA A2 and B17. It was shown to be a single antibody by isoelectric focusing and absorption experiments.

  14. HLA-DR antigens in normal, inflammatory, and neoplastic salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Zarbo, R J; Regezi, J A; Lloyd, R V; Crissman, J D; Batsakis, J G

    1987-11-01

    A monoclonal antibody to HLA-DR antigens that is reactive in formalin-fixed tissues was used with the immunoperoxidase method to evaluate 212 salivary gland lesions (normal, nonspecific, and autoimmune inflammatory, benign, and malignant tumors). Results of immunostaining showed that (1) intercalated ducts, myoepithelial cells, and acinous cells of normal salivary glands express HLA-DR antigens, (2) autoimmune salivary gland disease results in greater HLA-DR expression than that seen in nonspecific inflammatory lesions or normal glands, (3) stromal cells associated with benign and malignant salivary gland tumors express HLA-DR antigens, and (4) numerous benign and malignant salivary gland tumors express HLA-DR antigens. It was of interest that lymphocyte-rich Warthin's tumors displayed epithelial immunoreactivity, whereas oncocytomas devoid of a lymphocytic component were invariably negative. This suggests a lymphocyte-mediated role in salivary epithelial HLA-DR expression. It appears that HLA-DR expression is both a normal and an inducible phenomenon in salivary glands, salivary gland neoplasia, and the desmoplastic host response. There is no discriminatory role in the immunologic detection of HLA-DR for differential diagnosis of salivary gland tumors.

  15. HLA-G5 and G7 Isoforms in Pregnant Women.

    PubMed

    Abediankenari, Saeid; Farzad, Faramars; Rahmani, Zahra; Hashemi-Soteh, Mohammad Bagher

    2015-04-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G which is an immune tolerance effecter molecule has an important role in the maintenance of fetus during pregnancy. Abortion is one of the complications of pregnancy period.  In this research, we have studied levels of HLA-G 5, HLA-G7 isoforms in the abortion-threatened pregnant women in comparison with controls. In a case-control study, 101 abortion-threatened women and 101 healthy pregnant women (healthy controls) with age range 21-32 years were studied. Gene expression of HLA-5 and HLA-7 isoforms was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction after mRNA extraction and cDNA synthesis. The results indicated that HLA-G5 was significantly lower in abortion-threatened women in comparison with the control group whereas HLA-G7 was not significantly differentbetween the 2 groups. HLA-G is a vital molecule during pregnancy that can be a key factor in prevention of abortion. It is concluded that determination of HLA-G5 can be of value in pregnancy. PMID:25780888

  16. Genetic Association of HLA-A*26, -A*31, and -B*51 with Behcet’s Disease in Saudi Patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Okaily, Fahda; Al-Rashidi, Seham; Al-Balawi, Maysoon; Mustafa, Md.; Arfin, Misbahul; Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND HLA-B*51 has been universally associated with Behcet’s disease (BD) susceptibility, while different alleles of HLA-A have also been identified as independent BD susceptibility loci in various ethnic populations. The objective of this study was to investigate associations of HLA-A and -B alleles with BD in Saudi patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS Genotyping for HLA-A and HLA-B was performed using HLA genotyping kit (Lab type(R) SSO) in 120 Saudi subjects, including 60 BD patients and 60 matched healthy controls. RESULTS Our results revealed that frequencies of HLA-A*26, -A*31, and -B*51 were significantly higher in BD patients than in controls, suggesting that HLA-A*26, -A*31, and -B*51 are associated with BD. The frequency of HLA-B*15 was significantly lower in BD patients than in controls. Stratification of genotyping results into active and nonactive forms of BD revealed that the frequency of HLA-A*31 was significantly higher in the nonactive form than in the active form of BD, while there was no significant difference in the distribution of other alleles between the two forms of BD. CONCLUSION This study suggests that HLA-A*26, -A*31, and -B*51 are associated with susceptibility risk to BD, while HLA-B*15 may be protective in Saudi patients. However, larger scale studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27547040

  17. HLA genetic diversity in Hungarians and Hungarian Gypsies: complementary differentiation patterns and demographic signals revealed by HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Inotai, D; Szilvasi, A; Benko, S; Boros-Major, A; Illes, Z; Bors, A; Kiss, K P; Rajczy, K; Gelle-Hossó, A; Buhler, S; Nunes, J M; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Tordai, A

    2015-08-01

    Systematic analyses of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) profiles in different populations may increase the efficiency of bone marrow donor selection and help reconstructing human peopling history. We typed HLA-A, -B, and -DRB1 allele groups in two bone marrow donor cohorts of 2402 Hungarians and 186 Hungarian Gypsies and compared them with several Central-European, Spanish Gypsy, and Indian populations. Our results indicate that different European Gypsy populations share a common origin but diverged genetically as a consequence of founder effect and rapid genetic drift, whereas other European populations are related genetically in relation to geography. This study also suggests that while HLA-A accurately depicts the effects of genetic drift, HLA-B, and -DRB1 conserve more signatures of ancient population relationships, as a result of balancing selection. PMID:26149581

  18. HLA genetic diversity in Hungarians and Hungarian Gypsies: complementary differentiation patterns and demographic signals revealed by HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Inotai, D; Szilvasi, A; Benko, S; Boros-Major, A; Illes, Z; Bors, A; Kiss, K P; Rajczy, K; Gelle-Hossó, A; Buhler, S; Nunes, J M; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Tordai, A

    2015-08-01

    Systematic analyses of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) profiles in different populations may increase the efficiency of bone marrow donor selection and help reconstructing human peopling history. We typed HLA-A, -B, and -DRB1 allele groups in two bone marrow donor cohorts of 2402 Hungarians and 186 Hungarian Gypsies and compared them with several Central-European, Spanish Gypsy, and Indian populations. Our results indicate that different European Gypsy populations share a common origin but diverged genetically as a consequence of founder effect and rapid genetic drift, whereas other European populations are related genetically in relation to geography. This study also suggests that while HLA-A accurately depicts the effects of genetic drift, HLA-B, and -DRB1 conserve more signatures of ancient population relationships, as a result of balancing selection.

  19. MICA, MICB Polymorphisms and Linkage Disequilibrium with HLA-B in a Chinese Mongolian Population.

    PubMed

    Wang, W Y; Tian, W; Zhu, F M; Liu, X X; Li, L X; Wang, F

    2016-06-01

    In this study, polymorphisms of major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related genes A and B (MICA and MICB) and human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B gene were investigated for 158 unrelated Chinese Mongolian subjects recruited from central Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, northern China, by polymerase chain reaction-sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT) and cloning. Collectively, 79 alleles, including 20 MICA, 12 MICB and 47 HLA-B alleles, were identified. MICA*008:01 (21.2%), MICB*005:02 (48.1%) and HLA-B*51:01 (7.91%) were the most common alleles. Significant global linkage disequilibrium (LD) was detected between HLA-B and MICA, HLA-B and MICB, and MICA and MICB loci (all P < 0.000001). The most frequent haplotypes were HLA-B*51:01-MICA*009:01 (7.28%), HLA-B*58:01-MICB*008 (6.96%), MICA*010-MICB*005:02 (13.92%) and HLA-B*58:01-MICA*002:01-MICB*008 (6.96%). HLA-B-MICA haplotypes such as HLA-B*50:01-MICA*009:02 were associated with single MICB allele. Some HLA-B-MICA haplotypes were associated with multiple MICB alleles, including HLA-B*51:01-MICA*009:01. One novel MICB allele, MICB*031, was identified, which has possibly arisen from MICB*002:01 through single mutation event. We also confirmed the existence of a recently recognized MICA allele, MICA*073, whose ethnic origin has not been previously described. Genotype distributions at MICA, MICB and HLA-B were consistent with a neutrality model. Our results provide new insight into MIC genetic polymorphisms in Chinese ethnic groups. Findings shown here are important from an anthropologic perspective and will inform future studies of the potential role of MIC genes in allogeneic organ transplantation and HLA-linked disease association in populations of related ancestry.

  20. Association of Parkinson disease with structural and regulatory variants in the HLA region.

    PubMed

    Wissemann, William T; Hill-Burns, Erin M; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Factor, Stewart A; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos; Hoglund, Bryan; Holcomb, Cherie; Donahue, Ryan J; Thomson, Glenys; Erlich, Henry; Payami, Haydeh

    2013-11-01

    Historically, association of disease with the major histocompatibility complex (HLA) genes has been tested with HLA alleles that encode antigen-binding affinity. The association with Parkinson disease (PD), however, was discovered with noncoding SNPs in a genome-wide association study (GWAS). We show here that several HLA-region SNPs that have since been associated with PD form two blocks tagged by rs3129882 (p = 9 × 10(-11)) and by rs9268515 and/or rs2395163 (p = 3 × 10(-11)). We investigated whether these SNP-associations were driven by HLA-alleles at adjacent loci. We imputed class I and class II HLA-alleles for 2000 PD cases and 1986 controls from the NeuroGenetics Research Consortium GWAS and sequenced a subset of 194 cases and 204 controls. We were therefore able to assess accuracy of two imputation algorithms against next-generation-sequencing while taking advantage of the larger imputed data sets for disease study. Additionally, we imputed HLA alleles for 843 cases and 856 controls from another GWAS for replication. PD risk was positively associated with the B(∗)07:02_C(∗)07:02_DRB5(∗)01_DRB1(∗)15:01_DQA1(∗)01:02_DQB1(∗)06:02 haplotype and negatively associated with the C(∗)03:04, DRB1(∗)04:04 and DQA1(∗)03:01 alleles. The risk haplotype and DQA1(∗)03:01 lost significance when conditioned on the SNPs, but C(∗)03:04 (OR = 0.72, p = 8 × 10(-6)) and DRB1(∗)04:04 (OR = 0.65, p = 4 × 10(-5)) remained significant. Similarly, rs3129882 and the closely linked rs9268515 and rs2395163 remained significant irrespective of HLA alleles. rs3129882 and rs2395163 are expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) for HLA-DR and HLA-DQ (9 × 10(-5) ≥ PeQTL ≥ 2 × 10(-79)), suggesting that HLA gene expression might influence PD. Our data suggest that PD is associated with both structural and regulatory elements in HLA. Furthermore, our study demonstrates that noncoding SNPs in the HLA region can be associated with disease irrespective of HLA

  1. Association of Parkinson Disease with Structural and Regulatory Variants in the HLA Region

    PubMed Central

    Wissemann, William T.; Hill-Burns, Erin M.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Factor, Stewart A.; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos; Hoglund, Bryan; Holcomb, Cherie; Donahue, Ryan J.; Thomson, Glenys; Erlich, Henry; Payami, Haydeh

    2013-01-01

    Historically, association of disease with the major histocompatibility complex (HLA) genes has been tested with HLA alleles that encode antigen-binding affinity. The association with Parkinson disease (PD), however, was discovered with noncoding SNPs in a genome-wide association study (GWAS). We show here that several HLA-region SNPs that have since been associated with PD form two blocks tagged by rs3129882 (p = 9 × 10−11) and by rs9268515 and/or rs2395163 (p = 3 × 10−11). We investigated whether these SNP-associations were driven by HLA-alleles at adjacent loci. We imputed class I and class II HLA-alleles for 2000 PD cases and 1986 controls from the NeuroGenetics Research Consortium GWAS and sequenced a subset of 194 cases and 204 controls. We were therefore able to assess accuracy of two imputation algorithms against next-generation-sequencing while taking advantage of the larger imputed data sets for disease study. Additionally, we imputed HLA alleles for 843 cases and 856 controls from another GWAS for replication. PD risk was positively associated with the B∗07:02_C∗07:02_DRB5∗01_DRB1∗15:01_DQA1∗01:02_DQB1∗06:02 haplotype and negatively associated with the C∗03:04, DRB1∗04:04 and DQA1∗03:01 alleles. The risk haplotype and DQA1∗03:01 lost significance when conditioned on the SNPs, but C∗03:04 (OR = 0.72, p = 8 × 10−6) and DRB1∗04:04 (OR = 0.65, p = 4 × 10−5) remained significant. Similarly, rs3129882 and the closely linked rs9268515 and rs2395163 remained significant irrespective of HLA alleles. rs3129882 and rs2395163 are expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) for HLA-DR and HLA-DQ (9 × 10−5 ≥ PeQTL ≥ 2 × 10−79), suggesting that HLA gene expression might influence PD. Our data suggest that PD is associated with both structural and regulatory elements in HLA. Furthermore, our study demonstrates that noncoding SNPs in the HLA region can be associated with disease irrespective of HLA alleles, and that

  2. MICA, MICB Polymorphisms and Linkage Disequilibrium with HLA-B in a Chinese Mongolian Population.

    PubMed

    Wang, W Y; Tian, W; Zhu, F M; Liu, X X; Li, L X; Wang, F

    2016-06-01

    In this study, polymorphisms of major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related genes A and B (MICA and MICB) and human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B gene were investigated for 158 unrelated Chinese Mongolian subjects recruited from central Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, northern China, by polymerase chain reaction-sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT) and cloning. Collectively, 79 alleles, including 20 MICA, 12 MICB and 47 HLA-B alleles, were identified. MICA*008:01 (21.2%), MICB*005:02 (48.1%) and HLA-B*51:01 (7.91%) were the most common alleles. Significant global linkage disequilibrium (LD) was detected between HLA-B and MICA, HLA-B and MICB, and MICA and MICB loci (all P < 0.000001). The most frequent haplotypes were HLA-B*51:01-MICA*009:01 (7.28%), HLA-B*58:01-MICB*008 (6.96%), MICA*010-MICB*005:02 (13.92%) and HLA-B*58:01-MICA*002:01-MICB*008 (6.96%). HLA-B-MICA haplotypes such as HLA-B*50:01-MICA*009:02 were associated with single MICB allele. Some HLA-B-MICA haplotypes were associated with multiple MICB alleles, including HLA-B*51:01-MICA*009:01. One novel MICB allele, MICB*031, was identified, which has possibly arisen from MICB*002:01 through single mutation event. We also confirmed the existence of a recently recognized MICA allele, MICA*073, whose ethnic origin has not been previously described. Genotype distributions at MICA, MICB and HLA-B were consistent with a neutrality model. Our results provide new insight into MIC genetic polymorphisms in Chinese ethnic groups. Findings shown here are important from an anthropologic perspective and will inform future studies of the potential role of MIC genes in allogeneic organ transplantation and HLA-linked disease association in populations of related ancestry. PMID:27028549

  3. A simplified PCR-SSP method for HLA-A2 subtype in a population of Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bing; Zhu, Lijun; Liang, Zhihui; Weng, Xiufang; Lu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Cai'e; Li, Hui; Wu, Xiongwen

    2006-12-01

    HLA-A2 is the most frequent HLA-A allele in all ethnic populations, and an important restriction element for peptide presentation to T cells in infectious disease and cancer. However, the HLA-A2 supertype consisting of up to 75 subtypes, mutation studies and analyses using cytotoxic T lymphocytes suggest the functional relevance of subtype-specific differences in HLA-A2 molecules for peptide binding and T-cell recognition. Therefore, it is necessary for T-cell response study to discriminate the HLA-A2 subtypes and to understand the profile of HLA-A2 allelic distribution in a given population. In this study, we developed a simple, robust approach based on the nested polymerase chain reaction using sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) to discriminate 17 HLA-A2 subtypes which cover the most HLA-A2 alleles (> 99% allele frequency) reported in Chinese, using 15 combinations of 19 allelic specific primers. In the first round of PCR, 3 combinations of 5 primers were used to determine whether the tested sample was HLA-A2 positive, meanwhile the subtypes of HLA-A*0209 and HLA-A*0215N were determined for the variant position of these two subtypes is in exon 4 instead of exon 2, 3. Samples of HLA-A2 positive were subtyped in the second round of PCR, using PCR products of the first round as templates. This strategy was applied to test the samples of 78 random HLA-A2 positive individuals for their HLA-A2 subtypes. Those samples were screened for HLA-A2 positive by the first round PCR-SSP from 154 healthy blood donors in Wuhan, China. The subtyping results were verified by using flow cytometric analysis (FCM) with HLA-A2 specific monoclonal antibody BB7.2 and DNA sequencing. The typing results of the samples show 50.7% random individuals in the population carry HLA-A2, HLA-A*0201 ranks the first (allele frequency = 15.5%), followed by A*0207 (5.8%), A*0206 (4.7%), A*0203 (2.6%), A*0210 (0.7%), and these 5 alleles account for 99.0% HLA-A2 subtypes of allele frequency. Our study

  4. HLA Allele E*01:01 Is Associated with a Reduced Risk of EBV-Related Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Independently of HLA-A*01/*02

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Paloma; Krsnik, Isabel; Navarro, Belen; Provencio, Mariano; García, Juan F.; Bellas, Carmen; Vilches, Carlos; Gomez-Lozano, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Background An inefficient immune response against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is related to the pathogenesis of a subgroup of classical Hodgkin lymphomas (cHL). Some EBV immune-evasion mechanisms target HLA presentation, including the non-classical HLA-E molecule. HLA-E can be recognized by T cells via the TCR, and it also regulates natural killer (NK) cell signaling through the inhibitory CD94/NKG2A receptor. Some evidences indicate that EBV-infected B-cells promote the proliferation of NK subsets bearing CD94/NKG2A, suggesting a relevant function of these cells in EBV control. Variations in CD94/NKG2A-HLA-E interactions could affect NK cell-mediated immunity and, consequently, play a role in EBV-driven transformation and lymphomagenesis. The two most common HLA-E alleles, E*01:01 and E*01:03, differ by a single amino acid change that modifies the molecule function. We hypothesized that the functional differences in these variants might participate in the pathogenicity of EBV. Aim We studied two series of cHL patients, both with EBV-positive and-negative cases, and a cohort of unrelated controls, to assess the impact of HLA-E variants on EBV-related cHL susceptibility. Results We found that the genotypes with at least one copy of E*01:01 (i.e., E*01:01 homozygous and heterozygous) were underrepresented among cHL patients from both series compared to controls (72.6% and 71.6% vs 83%, p = 0.001). After stratification by EBV status, we found low rates of E*01:01-carriers mainly among EBV-positive cases (67.6%). These reduced frequencies are seen independently of other factors such as age, gender, HLA-A*01 and HLA-A*02, HLA alleles positively and negatively associated with the disease (adjusted OR = 0.4, p = 0.001). Furthermore, alleles from both HLA loci exert a cumulative effect on EBV-associated cHL susceptibility. Conclusions These results indicate that E*01:01 is a novel protective genetic factor in EBV-associated cHL and support a role for HLA

  5. Distribution of HLA-G extended haplotypes and one HLA-E polymorphism in a large-scale study of mother-child dyads with and without severe preeclampsia and eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, L L; Djurisic, S; Andersen, A-M N; Melbye, M; Bjerre, D; Ferrero-Miliani, L; Hackmon, R; Geraghty, D E; Hviid, T V F

    2016-10-01

    The etiological pathways and pathogenesis of preeclampsia have rendered difficult to disentangle. Accumulating evidence points toward a maladapted maternal immune system, which may involve aberrant placental expression of immunomodulatory human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ib molecules during pregnancy. Several studies have shown aberrant or reduced expression of HLA-G in the placenta and in maternal blood in cases of preeclampsia compared with controls. Unlike classical HLA class Ia loci, the nonclassical HLA-G has limited polymorphic variants. Most nucleotide variations are clustered in the 5'-upstream regulatory region (5'URR) and 3'-untranslated regulatory region (3'UTR) of HLA-G and reflect a stringent expressional control. Based on genotyping and full gene sequencing of HLA-G in a large number of cases and controls (n > 900), the present study, which to our knowledge is the largest and most comprehensive performed, investigated the association between the HLA-G 14-bp ins/del (rs66554220) and HLA-E polymorphisms in mother and newborn dyads from pregnancies complicated by severe preeclampsia/eclampsia and from uncomplicated pregnancies. Furthermore, results from extended HLA-G haplotyping in the newborns are presented in order to assess whether a combined contribution of nucleotide variations spanning the 5'URR, coding region, and 3'UTR of HLA-G describes the genetic association with severe preeclampsia more closely. In contrast to earlier findings, the HLA-G 14-bp ins/del polymorphism was not associated with severe preeclampsia. Furthermore, the polymorphism (rs1264457) defining the two nonsynonymous HLA-E alleles, HLA-E*01:01:xx:xx and HLA-E*01:03:xx:xx, were not associated with severe preeclampsia. Finally, no specific HLA-G haplotypes were significantly associated with increased risk of developing severe preeclampsia/eclampsia. PMID:27596021

  6. Distribution of HLA-G extended haplotypes and one HLA-E polymorphism in a large-scale study of mother-child dyads with and without severe preeclampsia and eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, L L; Djurisic, S; Andersen, A-M N; Melbye, M; Bjerre, D; Ferrero-Miliani, L; Hackmon, R; Geraghty, D E; Hviid, T V F

    2016-10-01

    The etiological pathways and pathogenesis of preeclampsia have rendered difficult to disentangle. Accumulating evidence points toward a maladapted maternal immune system, which may involve aberrant placental expression of immunomodulatory human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ib molecules during pregnancy. Several studies have shown aberrant or reduced expression of HLA-G in the placenta and in maternal blood in cases of preeclampsia compared with controls. Unlike classical HLA class Ia loci, the nonclassical HLA-G has limited polymorphic variants. Most nucleotide variations are clustered in the 5'-upstream regulatory region (5'URR) and 3'-untranslated regulatory region (3'UTR) of HLA-G and reflect a stringent expressional control. Based on genotyping and full gene sequencing of HLA-G in a large number of cases and controls (n > 900), the present study, which to our knowledge is the largest and most comprehensive performed, investigated the association between the HLA-G 14-bp ins/del (rs66554220) and HLA-E polymorphisms in mother and newborn dyads from pregnancies complicated by severe preeclampsia/eclampsia and from uncomplicated pregnancies. Furthermore, results from extended HLA-G haplotyping in the newborns are presented in order to assess whether a combined contribution of nucleotide variat