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Sample records for 14th international work

  1. 14th International Conference 'Laser Optics 2010'

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, Artur A

    2010-10-15

    The 14th International Conference 'Laser Optics 2010' in which more than 800 scientists and experts from 35 countries took part, was held from June 28 to July 2, 2010, in St. Petersburg. (information)

  2. EDITORIAL: The 14th International Symposium on Flow Visualization, ISFV14 The 14th International Symposium on Flow Visualization, ISFV14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Chun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2011-06-01

    The 14th International Symposium on Flow Visualization (ISFV14) was held in Daegu, Korea, on 21-24 June 2010. There were 304 participants from 17 countries. The state of the art in many aspects of flow visualization was presented and discussed, and a total of 243 papers from 19 countries were presented. Two special lectures and four invited lectures, 48 paper sessions and one poster session were held in five session rooms and in a lobby over four days. Among the paper sessions, those on 'biological flows', 'micro/nano fluidics', 'PIV/PTV' and 'compressible and sonic flows' received great attention from the participants of ISFV14. Special events included presentations of 'The Asanuma Award' and 'The Leonardo Da Vinci Award' to prominent contributors. Awards for photos and movies were given to three scientists for their excellence in flow visualizations. Sixteen papers were selected by the Scientific Committee of ISFV14. After the standard peer review process of this journal, six papers were finally accepted for publication. We wish to thank the editors of MST for making it possible to publish this special feature from ISFV14. We also thank the authors for their careful and insightful work and cooperation in the preparation of revised papers. It will be our pleasure if readers appreciate the hot topics in flow visualization research as a result of this special feature. We also hope that the progress in flow visualization will create new research fields. The 15th International Symposium on Flow Visualization will be held in Minsk, Belarus in 2012. We would like to express sincere thanks to the staff at IOP Publishing for their kind support.

  3. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces (Met & Props 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wei-En

    2014-03-01

    Proceedings of the 14th International Conference, Taipei, Taiwan, 17th-21st June, 2013 Taiwan Organized by: Center for Measurement Standards/Industrial Technology Research Institute Mechanical and Systems Research Laboratories/Industrial Technology Research Institute National Taiwan University National Cheng Kung University National Taiwan University of Science and Technology National Tsing Hua University Greetings from Chairman of International Programme CommitteeTom Thomas When Professor Ken Stout and I founded this series of conferences in the United Kingdom more than thirty years ago, we did not anticipate its longevity or its success. Since that first meeting at Leicester, the conference has been often held in England, but also in several other European countries: France, Poland and Sweden, as well as in the United States. Ken, sadly no longer with us, would be proud of what it has achieved and has come to represent. Generations of researchers have presented their new ideas and innovations here which are now embodied in many textbooks and international standards. But this conference in 2013 marks a new departure and perhaps a new future. For the first time it is being held in Asia, reflecting the historic rise of the economies of the Pacific Rim, adding modern technology to their long-existing traditions of ordered insight and precise craftsmanship. Many of you have travelled far to attend this meeting, and we hope you will feel your trouble has been rewarded. We have an excellent selection of papers from all over the world from many of the world's experts, embodying the consolidation of tested ideas as well as the latest advances in the subject. These will be set in context by a glittering array of keynote and invited speakers. On behalf of the International Programme Committee, I am glad to acknowledge the hard work of the members of the Local Organising Committee in putting the programme together and making all the arrangements, and to accept their

  4. 14th Annual international meeting of wind turbine test stations: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    These proceedings are of the 14th Annual International Meeting of Test Stations. As the original charter states these meetings are intended to be an international forum for sharing wind turbine testing experiences. By sharing their experiences they can improve testing skills and techniques. As with all new industries the quality of the products is marked by how well they learn from their experiences and incorporate this learning into the next generation of products. The test station`s role in this process is to provide accurate information to the companies they serve. This information is used by designers to conform and improve their designs. It is also used by certification agencies for confirming the quality of these designs. By sharing of experiences they are able to accomplished these goals, serve these customers better and ultimately improve the international wind energy industry.

  5. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces (Met & Props 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wei-En

    2014-03-01

    Proceedings of the 14th International Conference, Taipei, Taiwan, 17th-21st June, 2013 Taiwan Organized by: Center for Measurement Standards/Industrial Technology Research Institute Mechanical and Systems Research Laboratories/Industrial Technology Research Institute National Taiwan University National Cheng Kung University National Taiwan University of Science and Technology National Tsing Hua University Greetings from Chairman of International Programme CommitteeTom Thomas When Professor Ken Stout and I founded this series of conferences in the United Kingdom more than thirty years ago, we did not anticipate its longevity or its success. Since that first meeting at Leicester, the conference has been often held in England, but also in several other European countries: France, Poland and Sweden, as well as in the United States. Ken, sadly no longer with us, would be proud of what it has achieved and has come to represent. Generations of researchers have presented their new ideas and innovations here which are now embodied in many textbooks and international standards. But this conference in 2013 marks a new departure and perhaps a new future. For the first time it is being held in Asia, reflecting the historic rise of the economies of the Pacific Rim, adding modern technology to their long-existing traditions of ordered insight and precise craftsmanship. Many of you have travelled far to attend this meeting, and we hope you will feel your trouble has been rewarded. We have an excellent selection of papers from all over the world from many of the world's experts, embodying the consolidation of tested ideas as well as the latest advances in the subject. These will be set in context by a glittering array of keynote and invited speakers. On behalf of the International Programme Committee, I am glad to acknowledge the hard work of the members of the Local Organising Committee in putting the programme together and making all the arrangements, and to accept their

  6. 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies Task Force report on obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Guilherme R; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Andrade, Carlos A; Andreoli, Laura; Chighizola, Cecilia B; Porter, T Flint; Salmon, Jane; Silver, Robert M; Tincani, Angela; Branch, D Ware

    2014-08-01

    Pregnancy morbidity is one of the clinical manifestations used for classification criteria of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). During the 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (aPL), a Task Force with internationally-known experts was created to carry out a critical appraisal of the literature available regarding the association of aPL with obstetric manifestations present in actual classification criteria (recurrent early miscarriage, fetal death, preeclampsia and placental insufficiency) and the quality of the evidence that treatment(s) provide benefit in terms of avoiding recurrent adverse obstetric outcomes. The association of infertility with aPL and the effectiveness of the treatment of patients with infertility and positive aPL was also investigated. This report presents current knowledge and limitations of published studies regarding pregnancy morbidity, infertility and aPL, identifying areas that need better investigative efforts and proposing how critical flaws could be avoided in future studies, as suggested by participants of the Task Force. Except for fetal death, there are limitations in the quality of the data supporting the association of aPL with obstetric complications included in the current APS classification criteria. Recommended treatments for all pregnancy morbidity associated to APS also lack well-designed studies to confirm its efficacy. APL does not seem to be associated with infertility and treatment does not improve the outcomes in infertile patients with aPL. In another section of the Task Force, Dr. Jane Salmon reviewed complement-mediated inflammation in reproductive failure in APS, considering new therapeutic targets to obstetric APS (Ob APS). PMID:24650941

  7. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Transport in Interacting Disordered Systems (TIDS-14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frydman, Aviad

    2012-07-01

    The '14th Transport in interacting disordered systems - TIDS14' conference took place during 5-8 September 2011 in Acre Israel. The conference was a continuation of the biennial meeting traditionally called HRP (hopping and related phenomena) and later named TIDS (transport in interacting disordered systems). Previous conferences took place in Trieste (1985), Bratislava (1987), Chapel Hill (1989), Marburg (1991), Glasgow (1993), Jerusalem (1995), Rackeve (1997), Murcia (1999), Shefayim (2001), Trieste (2003), Egmond, aan Zee (2005), Marburg (2007) and Rackeve (2009). Central to these conferences are systems that are characterized by a large degree of disorder and hence they lack translational symmetry. In such systems interactions are usually very important. Dramatic differences in the behavior of crystalline solids and the 'disordered' systems are possible. Some examples of the latter are amorphous materials, polymer aggregates, materials whose properties are governed by impurities, granular systems and biological systems. This conference series is notable for the pleasant atmosphere and fruitful exchange of ideas between theoreticians and experimentalists in these areas. This tradition was also maintained in the conference in Israel. Specific topics of TIDS14 included: hopping, electron and Coulomb glasses, Anderson localization and many body localization, noise, magneto-transport, metal-insulator and superconductor-insulator transition, transport through low dimensional and nanostructures, quantum coherence, interference and dephasing and other related topics. Over sixty scientists from fourteen countries participated in the conference and presented papers either as oral presentations or as posters in two sessions that took place during the conference. Many of these papers are included in these proceedings. I would like to thank all the conference participants for the interesting presentations, debates and discussions that created a stimulating but pleasant

  8. COMMITTEES: SQM2009 - 14th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter SQM2009 - 14th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    Local Organizing Committee Takeshi Kodama Chair, UFRJ Jun Takahashi Co-chair, UNICAMP Ignácio Bediaga e Hickman CBPF Eduardo Fraga UFRJ Frederique Grassi USP Yogiro Hama USP Gastão Krein IFT Erasmo Madureira Ferreira UFRJ Marcelo G. Munhoz USP Fernando Navarra USP Sandra Padula IFT Alejandro Szanto de Toledo USP César Augusto Zen Vasconcellos UFRGS International Advisory Committee Jörg Aichelin Nantes Federico Antinori Padova Tamás Biró Budapest Peter Braun-Munzinger GSI Jean Cleymans Cape Town Láaszló Csernai Bergen Timothy Hallman BNL Huan Zhong Huang UCLA Takeshi Kodama Rio de Janeiro Yu-Gang Ma Shanghai Jes Madsen Aarhus Ágnes Mócsy Pratt University Berndt Müller Duke University Grazyna Odyniec LBNL Helmut Oeschler Darmstadt Johann Rafelski Arizona Hans Georg Ritter LBNL Gunther Rolland MIT Karel Šafařík CERN Ladislav Sandor Kosice University Jack Sandweiss Yale University George S F Stephans MIT Horst Stöcker Frankfurt Larry McLerranBNL Helmut Satz Universitä Bielefeld Nu Xu LBNL Fuqiang Wang Purdue University William A. Zajc Columbia University Pengfei Zhuang Tsinghua University

  9. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions (HCI 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Chikashi

    2009-07-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions (HCI2008), held at the University of Electro-Communications, Chofu, Tokyo, Japan from 1-5 September 2008. This series of conferences began in Stockholm, Sweden in 1982 and has since been held every other year; in Oxford, UK (1984), Groningen, the Netherlands (1986), Grenoble, France (1988), Giessen, Germany (1990), Manhattan, Kansas, USA (1992), Vienna, Austria (1994), Omiya, Japan (1996), Bensheim, Germany (1998), Berkeley, USA (2000), Caen, France (2002), Vilnius, Lithuania (2004) and Belfast, UK (2006). Highly charged ions (HCI), which are defined as highly ionized (i.e. positively charged atomic) ions here, mainly exist in hot plasmas such as the solar corona and fusion plasmas. It is true that its importance in plasma physics has driven researchers to the spectroscopic studies of HCIs, but the spectroscopy of few-electron ions is not only important for plasmas but also interesting for fundamental atomic physics. Electrons moving fast near a heavy nucleus give a suitable system to test the fundamental atomic theory involving relativistic and quantum electro-dynamic effects in a strong field. Also, the huge potential energy of a HCI induces drastic reaction in the interaction with matter. This unique property of HCIs, coupled with the recent development of efficient ion sources, is opening the possibility to utilize them in new technologies in the field such as nano-fabrication, surface analysis, medical physics, and so on. Hence, this conference is recognized as a valuable gathering place for established practitioners and also for newcomers; we exchange information, we are introduced to the subject itself, and to unexpected interfaces with other fields. On 31 August, the day before the opening of HCI2008, we welcomed the delegates at the university's restaurant—and we were greeted with an unusually heavy summer shower! The conference then opened on

  10. 14th International HLA and Immunogenetics Workshop Prospective Chronic Rejection Project: a three-year follow-up analysis.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, M; Terasaki, P I; Castro, R; Alberu, J; Morales-Buenrostro, L; Alvarez, I; Toledo, R; Alvez, H; Monteiro, M; Teixeira, J; Campbell, P; Ciszek, M; Charron, D; Gautreau, C; Christiansen, F; Langan, L; Conca, R; Grosse-Wilde, H; Heinemann, F; Kamoun, M; Kobayashi, T; Kupatawintu, P; LeFor, W; Mehra, N; Panigrahi, A; Norman, D; Piazza, A; Poli, F; Roy, R; Schonemann, C; Lachmann, N; Sireci, G; Tanabe, K; Ishida, H; Van den Berg-Loonen, E; Zeevi, A

    2007-01-01

    The three-year follow-up of 4,144 patients of the 14th International Workshop Prospective Chronic Rejection study has reinforced the evidence that post-transplant HLA antibodies are predictive of long-term graft loss. Three years after a single testing for HLA antibodies, 10% of kidney recipients who were antibody-positive had lost their grafts, in contrast to only 5% of antibody-negative patients (p<0.0001). The adverse effect of post-transplant antibodies on graft survival was also observed in lung, heart, and liver transplants. Donor-specific antibodies and 'strong' non-DSA had stronger association with graft loss than 'moderate' non-DSA. Periodic antibody monitoring, combined with specificity and strength analysis, would help in the early identification of allograft recipients who are at high risk of graft failure. PMID:18642456

  11. 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies Task Force. Report on antiphospholipid syndrome laboratory diagnostics and trends.

    PubMed

    Bertolaccini, Maria Laura; Amengual, Olga; Andreoli, Laura; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Chighizola, Cecilia B; Forastiero, Ricardo; de Groot, Philip; Lakos, Gabriella; Lambert, Marc; Meroni, Pierluigi; Ortel, Thomas L; Petri, Michelle; Rahman, Anisur; Roubey, Robert; Sciascia, Savino; Snyder, Melissa; Tebo, Anne E; Tincani, Angela; Willis, Rohan

    2014-09-01

    Current classification criteria for definite Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) require the use of three laboratory assays to detect antiphospholipid antibodies (aCL, anti-β2GPI and LA) in the presence of at least one of the two major clinical manifestations (i.e. thrombosis or pregnancy morbidity) of the syndrome. However, several other autoantibodies shown to be directed to other proteins or their complex with phospholipids have been proposed to be relevant to APS but their clinical utility and their diagnostic value remains elusive. This report summarizes the findings, conclusions and recommendations of the "APS Task Force 3-Laboratory Diagnostics and Trends" meeting that took place during the 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (APLA 2013, September 18-21, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil). PMID:24824074

  12. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-05-01

    . We thank the International Organizing Committee for their help and advice in planning the conference, and we are grateful to the University of Birmingham Conference Service and to the Birmingham Botanical Gardens for the excellent way in which the catering and room provision was provided. David Evans School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Birmingham Simon Hands Department of Physics, Swansea University Roman Lietava School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Birmingham Rosa Romita Oliver Lodge Laboratory, The University of Liverpool Orlando Villalobos Baillie School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Birmingham Editors

  13. Proceedings of the Annual International Conference on Outdoor Recreation and Education (ICORE) (14th, Oxford, Ohio, November 7-12, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freidline, Mark, Ed.; Phipps, Maurice, Ed.; Moore, Tim, Ed.; Versteeg, Julie, Ed.

    This proceedings contains 15 conference papers and presentation summaries from the 14th annual International Conference on Outdoor Recreation and Education (ICORE). Titles are: "The Hidden Costs of Outdoor Education/Recreation Academic Training" (Christian Bisson); "The Service Learning Concept: Service Learning in the National Parks" (Tom…

  14. PREFACE: 14th Annual International Astrophysics Conference: Linear and Nonlinear Particle Energization throughout the Heliosphere and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.

    2015-09-01

    The 14th Annual International Astrophysics Conference was held at the Sheraton Tampa Riverwalk Hotel, Tampa, Florida, USA, during the week of 19-24 April 2015. The meeting drew some 75 participants from all over the world, representing a wide range of interests and expertise in the energization of particles from the perspectives of theory, modelling and simulations, and observations. The theme of the meeting was "Linear and Nonlinear Particle Energization throughout the Heliosphere and Beyond." Energetic particles are ubiquitous to plasma environments, whether collisionless such as the supersonic solar wind, the magnetospheres of planets, the exospheres of nonmagnetized planets and comets, the heliospheric-local interstellar boundary regions, interstellar space and supernova remnant shocks, and stellar wind boundaries. Energetic particles are found too in more collisional regions such as in the solar corona, dense regions of the interstellar medium, accretion flows around stellar objects, to name a few. Particle acceleration occurs wherever plasma boundaries, magnetic and electric fields, and turbulence are present. The meeting addressed the linear and nonlinear physical processes underlying the variety of particle acceleration mechanisms, the role of particle acceleration in shaping different environments, and acceleration processes common to different regions. Both theory and observations were addressed with a view to encouraging crossdisciplinary fertilization of ideas, concepts, and techniques. The meeting addressed all aspects of particle acceleration in regions ranging from the Sun to the interplanetary medium to magnetospheres, exospheres, and comets, the boundaries of the heliosphere, and beyond to supernova remnant shocks, galactic jets, stellar winds, accretion flows, and more. The format of the meeting included 25-minute presentations punctuated by two 40-minute talks, one by Len Fisk that provided an historical overview of particle acceleration in the

  15. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    It is our great pleasure to welcome you to the 14th International Conference on Micro- and Nano-Technology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications, or PowerMEMS 2014, in Awaji Island, Japan. The aim of PowerMEM is to present the latest research results in the field of miniature, micro- and nano-scale technologies for power generation and energy conversion. The conference will also- give us the opportunity to exchange informations and new ideas in the field of Power MEMS/NEMS. The current status of the field of PowerMEMS spans the full spectrum from basic research to practical applications. We will enjoy valuable discussions not only from the viewpoint of academia but from commercial and industrial perspectives. In the conference, three invited speakers lead the technical program. We received 172 abstracts and after a careful reviewing process by the Technical Program Committee a total of 133 papers were selected for presentation. These have been organized into 16 Oral sessions in two parallel streams and two poster sessions including some late-news papers. The oral and regular poster papers are published by the Institute of Physics (IOP). We have also organized a PowerMEMS School in Kobe-Sannomiya contiguous to the main conference. This two-day school will cover various topics of energy harvesting. World leading experts will give invited lectures on their main topics. This is a new experiment to broaden the technology remit of our conference by organizing mini symposiums that aim to gather the latest research on the following topics by the organizers: Microscale Combustion, Wideband Vibration Energy Harvesting, RF Energy Transfer and Industrial Application. We hope this, and other activities will make PowerMEMS2014 a memorable success. One of the important programs in an international conference is the social program, and we prepare the PowerMEMS2014 banquet in the banquet room at the Westin Awaji Island Hotel. This will provide an opportunity to

  16. 14th St. Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference 2015: Evidence, Controversies, Consensus - Primary Therapy of Early Breast Cancer: Opinions Expressed by German Experts.

    PubMed

    Jackisch, Christian; Harbeck, Nadia; Huober, Jens; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Gerber, Bernd; Kreipe, Hans-Heinrich; Liedtke, Cornelia; Marschner, Norbert; Möbus, Volker; Scheithauer, Heike; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Thomssen, Christoph; Loibl, Sibylle; Beckmann, Matthias W; Blohmer, Jens-Uwe; Costa, Serban-Dan; Decker, Thomas; Diel, Ingo; Fasching, Peter A; Fehm, Tanja; Janni, Wolfgang; Lück, Hans-Joachim; Maass, Nicolai; Scharl, Anton; Untch, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The key topics of this year's 14th St. Gallen Consensus Conference on the diagnosis and therapy of primary breast cancer were again questions about breast surgery and axillary surgery, radio-oncology and systemic therapy options in consideration of tumor biology, and the clinical application of multigene assays. This year, the consensus conference took place in Vienna. From a German perspective, it makes sense to substantiate the results of the vote of the international panel representing 19 countries in light of the updated national therapy recommendations of the AGO (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Gynäkologische Onkologie). Therefore, 14 German breast cancer experts, 3 of whom are members of the International St. Gallen Panel, have commented on the voting results of the St. Gallen Consensus Conference 2015 in relation to clinical routine in Germany.

  17. 14th St. Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference 2015: Evidence, Controversies, Consensus – Primary Therapy of Early Breast Cancer: Opinions Expressed by German Experts

    PubMed Central

    Jackisch, Christian; Harbeck, Nadia; Huober, Jens; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Gerber, Bernd; Kreipe, Hans-Heinrich; Liedtke, Cornelia; Marschner, Norbert; Möbus, Volker; Scheithauer, Heike; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Thomssen, Christoph; Loibl, Sibylle; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Blohmer, Jens-Uwe; Costa, Serban-Dan; Decker, Thomas; Diel, Ingo; Fasching, Peter A.; Fehm, Tanja; Janni, Wolfgang; Lück, Hans-Joachim; Maass, Nicolai; Scharl, Anton; Untch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary The key topics of this year's 14th St. Gallen Consensus Conference on the diagnosis and therapy of primary breast cancer were again questions about breast surgery and axillary surgery, radio-oncology and systemic therapy options in consideration of tumor biology, and the clinical application of multigene assays. This year, the consensus conference took place in Vienna. From a German perspective, it makes sense to substantiate the results of the vote of the international panel representing 19 countries in light of the updated national therapy recommendations of the AGO (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Gynäkologische Onkologie). Therefore, 14 German breast cancer experts, 3 of whom are members of the International St. Gallen Panel, have commented on the voting results of the St. Gallen Consensus Conference 2015 in relation to clinical routine in Germany. PMID:26557827

  18. 77 FR 52693 - Request for Comments on U.S. Technical Participation in the 14th Conference of the International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... 2600, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-2600. Comments may also be submitted via email to ralph.richter@nist.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Ralph Richter, International Legal Metrology Program, Office of..., Gaithersburg, MD 20899-2600; telephone: 301/975-3997; fax: 301/975- 8091; email:...

  19. Better vaccines for healthier life. Part I. Conference report of the DCVMN International 14th Annual General Meeting Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Rustan, Rahman; Huang, Weidan; Nguyen, Thuvan

    2014-11-12

    The Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers' Network (DCVMN) brought together nearly 220 senior representatives of governmental and non-governmental global health organizations, as well as corporate executives of emerging vaccine manufacturers, from 26 countries for a two-day tailored lectures, Q&A sessions, CEOs panel discussion and networking opportunities, followed by a vaccine-technology symposium and visit to manufacturing facilities in Hanoi, Vietnam. Participants included representatives of 38 vaccine manufacturers, as well as international partners and collaborating research institutions, with 39% female participants. The Vice-Minister of Health to Vietnam commended the speakers and participants to this Annual General Meeting, devoted to achieve our common goal of protecting people against infectious diseases with better vaccines, for a healthier life. He reminded the audience that the first vaccine produced in Vietnam was oral polio vaccine (OPV) in the early 1960s and contributed to polio eradication in Vietnam, in 2000. Through its manufacturing resources, Vietnam eliminated neonatal tetanus in 2005, and has controlled measles and hepatitis B spread. The Ministry of Health hopes that by sharing experiences, delegates at this conference will foster international cooperation and partnerships among organizations. CEOs elaborated on challenges and opportunities for emerging countries.

  20. Better vaccines for healthier life. Part I. Conference report of the DCVMN International 14th Annual General Meeting Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Rustan, Rahman; Huang, Weidan; Nguyen, Thuvan

    2014-11-12

    The Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers' Network (DCVMN) brought together nearly 220 senior representatives of governmental and non-governmental global health organizations, as well as corporate executives of emerging vaccine manufacturers, from 26 countries for a two-day tailored lectures, Q&A sessions, CEOs panel discussion and networking opportunities, followed by a vaccine-technology symposium and visit to manufacturing facilities in Hanoi, Vietnam. Participants included representatives of 38 vaccine manufacturers, as well as international partners and collaborating research institutions, with 39% female participants. The Vice-Minister of Health to Vietnam commended the speakers and participants to this Annual General Meeting, devoted to achieve our common goal of protecting people against infectious diseases with better vaccines, for a healthier life. He reminded the audience that the first vaccine produced in Vietnam was oral polio vaccine (OPV) in the early 1960s and contributed to polio eradication in Vietnam, in 2000. Through its manufacturing resources, Vietnam eliminated neonatal tetanus in 2005, and has controlled measles and hepatitis B spread. The Ministry of Health hopes that by sharing experiences, delegates at this conference will foster international cooperation and partnerships among organizations. CEOs elaborated on challenges and opportunities for emerging countries. PMID:24923636

  1. Better vaccines for healthier life. Part II. Conference report of the DCVMN International 14th Annual General Meeting Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Tippoo, Patrick; Sivaramakrishnan, Venkatraman; Nguyen, Thuvan

    2014-11-12

    New vaccines are required to meet the public health challenges of the next generation and many unmet global health needs can be addressed by developing countries vaccine manufacturers such as lower-cost vaccines based on single-dose, thermostable formulations, efficacious in children with compromised gastrointestinal tracts. GMP compliance is also a challenge, as sometimes innovation and clinical development focus is not accompanied by command of scale-up and quality assurance for large volume manufacturing and supply. Identifying and addressing such challenges, beyond cost and cold-chain space, including safety considerations and health worker behavior, regulatory alliances and harmonization to foster access to vaccines, will help countries to ensure sustainable immunization. There needs to be continuous and close management of the global vaccine supply both at national and international levels, requiring careful risk management, coordination and cooperation with manufacturers. Successful partnership models based on sharing a common goal, mutual respect and good communication were discussed among stakeholders.

  2. Better vaccines for healthier life. Part II. Conference report of the DCVMN International 14th Annual General Meeting Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Tippoo, Patrick; Sivaramakrishnan, Venkatraman; Nguyen, Thuvan

    2014-11-12

    New vaccines are required to meet the public health challenges of the next generation and many unmet global health needs can be addressed by developing countries vaccine manufacturers such as lower-cost vaccines based on single-dose, thermostable formulations, efficacious in children with compromised gastrointestinal tracts. GMP compliance is also a challenge, as sometimes innovation and clinical development focus is not accompanied by command of scale-up and quality assurance for large volume manufacturing and supply. Identifying and addressing such challenges, beyond cost and cold-chain space, including safety considerations and health worker behavior, regulatory alliances and harmonization to foster access to vaccines, will help countries to ensure sustainable immunization. There needs to be continuous and close management of the global vaccine supply both at national and international levels, requiring careful risk management, coordination and cooperation with manufacturers. Successful partnership models based on sharing a common goal, mutual respect and good communication were discussed among stakeholders. PMID:24923638

  3. International Congress of the International Council of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (14th, Kingston, Jamaica, July 30-August 3, 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Council on Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    Papers presented at the Fourteenth International Congress of the International Council on Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (ICHPER) are included in this document. Among the subjects discussed are suggestions for physical education in the 1970's (primary school level, research divisions for the 1970's, research needs in girls and women's…

  4. Developing Distance Education. Papers Submitted to the World Conference of the International Council for Distance Education (14th, Oslo, Norway, August 9-16, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewart, David, Ed.; Daniel, John S., Ed.

    These proceedings contain 10 keynote papers and more than 100 papers from an international conference on the theme of developing distance education. The keynote papers are: (1) "Communications Technology" (Yoshia Abe); (2) "Continuing Education. New Needs and Challenges for Distance Studies" (Urban Dahllof); (3) "Distance Education and National…

  5. The relevance of "non-criteria" clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome: 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies Technical Task Force Report on Antiphospholipid Syndrome Clinical Features.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Mirhelen M; Danowski, Adriana; Wahl, Denis G; Amigo, Mary-Carmen; Tektonidou, Maria; Pacheco, Marcelo S; Fleming, Norma; Domingues, Vinicius; Sciascia, Savino; Lyra, Julia O; Petri, Michelle; Khamashta, Munther; Levy, Roger A

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this task force was to critically analyze nine non-criteria manifestations of APS to support their inclusion as APS classification criteria. The Task Force Members selected the non-criteria clinical manifestations according to their clinical relevance, that is, the patient-important outcome from clinician perspective. They included superficial vein thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, renal microangiopathy, heart valve disease, livedo reticularis, migraine, chorea, seizures and myelitis, which were reviewed by this International Task Force collaboration, in addition to the seronegative APS (SN-APS). GRADE system was used to evaluate the quality of evidence of medical literature of each selected item. This critical appraisal exercise aimed to support the debate regarding the clinical picture of APS. We found that the overall GRADE analysis was very low for migraine and seizures, low for superficial venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, chorea, longitudinal myelitis and the so-called seronegative APS and moderate for APS nephropathy, heart valve lesions and livedo reticularis. The next step can be a critical redefinition of an APS gold standard, for instance derived from the APS ACTION registry that will include not only current APS patients but also those with antiphospholipid antibodies not meeting current classification criteria. PMID:25641203

  6. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation dynamics; and surfaces.

  7. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation & dynamics; and surfaces.

  8. NEWTON'S APPLE 14th Season Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichmann, Sue, Ed.

    This guide was developed to help teachers use the 14th season of NEWTON'S APPLE in their classrooms and contains lessons formatted to follow the National Science Education Standards. The "Overview,""Main Activity," and "Try-This" sections were created with inquiry-based learning in mind. Each lesson page begins with "Getting Started," which…

  9. International Education (Working Paper).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruson, Edward S.

    The history, objectives, and funding patterns for international education are discussed. Attention is directed toward the language and area study centers of the U.S. Office of Education, undergraduate/graduate and scholarly exchange programs, and the support of advanced research in international studies. The main source of funds for language and…

  10. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education with the North American Chapter 12th PME-NA Conference (14th, Mexico, July 15-20, 1990), Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booker, George, Ed.; Cobb, Paul, Ed.; de Mendicuti, Teresa N., Ed.

    This proceedings of the annual conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) includes the following papers: "The Knowledge of Cats: Epistemological Foundations of Mathematics Education" (R.B. Davis) and "PME Algebra Research: A Working Perspective" (E. Filloy); "Some Misconceptions in Calculus: Anecdotes…

  11. Working Together Internationally

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Terry

    2009-01-01

    To a large extent, schools encourage collaboration all the time, especially in countries such as the United States, Britain, and Australia. Much of what goes on in schools is fairly short-term. There are, however, an increasing number of teachers who are seeing the potential value in longer-term projects in which students have to work together.…

  12. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education with the North American Chapter 12th PME-NA Conference (14th, Mexico, July 15-20, 1990), Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booker, George, Ed.; Cobb, Paul, Ed.; de Mendicuti, Teresa N., Ed.

    This proceedings of the annual conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) includes the following research papers: "Children's Connections among Representations of Mathematical Ideas" (A. Alston & C.A. Maher); "Algebraic Syntax Errors: A Study with Secondary School Children" (A. Avila, F. Garcia, & T.…

  13. Libraries and Electronic Publishing: Promises and Challenges for the 90's. Festschrift in Honor of Richard M. Dougherty. Proceedings of the International Essen Symposium (14th, Essen, Germany, October 14-17, 1991). Publications of Essen University Library, 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helal, Ahmed H., Ed.; Weiss, Joachim W., Ed.

    The goal of the Essen symposium was to bring together internationally recognized librarians and library automation specialists to discuss new developments in electronic publishing. All 16 papers included in this collection were presented at the conference: (1) "Barriers to the Introduction of New Technology" (J. Andrew Braid); (2) "Nudging a…

  14. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education with the North American Chapter 12th PME-NA Conference (14th, Mexico, July 15-20, 1990), Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booker, George, Ed.; Cobb, Paul, Ed.; de Mendicuti, Teresa N.

    This proceedings of the annual conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) contains the following research papers: "The Construct Theory of Rational Numbers: Toward a Semantic Analysis" (M. Behr & G. Harel); "Reflections on Dealing: An Analysis of One Child's Interpretations" (G. Davis); "About…

  15. The Moon in the 14th Century Frescoes in Padova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellinati, Claudio

    Padova, already in the 14th century a great cultural center of international reputation, struggled with the problems posed by the Moon with Pietro d'Abano, physician and astronomer. But it was with the great painters of that time, namely Giotto and Giusto de'Menabuoi, that its most intimate connections with the contemporary popular culture and theology were illustrated. Giotto depicts the Moon in the Giudizio Universale of the Scrovegni Chapel (1305). The Moon appears on the upper part of the painting, to the left of Christ the Judge, to crown together with the Sun, His presence. The Moon is a heavenly body similar to those appearing on Roman coins of emperors, to signify the Judge is an immortal creature. The color is pale, witeish, almost veiled. More important, the Moon has a face that by popular belief was that of Cain, condemned to amass `mucchi di rovi spinosi' for the fire of the damned (Dante Alighieri, Divina Commedia, Inferno XX, 126). Giusto de' Menabuoi on the other hand expounds, in the Crucifixion of the Duomo (1375 ca), a theological interpretation. The day of God's justice, following the death of the Savior, the Moon will burn and the Sun will pale (Isaiah, 24, 23). And indeed the Moon has a dark reddish colour. Therefore, while in Giotto the Moon is seen as in the popular beliefs, Giusto underlines the theological visions of his times with the words of the prophets.

  16. Student Interns Work on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, C. D.; Bebak, M.; Bollen, D. M.; Curtis, K.; Daniel, C.; Grigsby, B.; Herman, T.; Haynes, E.; Lineberger, D. H.; Pieruccini, S.

    2004-01-01

    The exceptional imagery and data acquired by the Mars Exploration Rovers since their January 2004 landing have captured the attention of scientists, the public, and students and teachers worldwide. One aspect of particular interest lies with a group of high school teachers and students actively engaged in the Athena Student Interns Program. The Athena Student Interns Program (ASIP) is a joint effort between NASA s Mars Public Engagement Office and the Athena Science Investigation that began in early 1999 as a pilot student-scientist research partnership program associated with the FIDO prototype Mars rover field test . The program is designed to actively engage high school students and their teachers in Mars exploration and scientific inquiry. In ASIP, groups of students and teachers from around the country work with mentors from the mission s Athena Science Team to carry out an aspect of the mission.

  17. Viruses in a 14th-century coprolite.

    PubMed

    Appelt, Sandra; Fancello, Laura; Le Bailly, Matthieu; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel; Desnues, Christelle

    2014-05-01

    Coprolites are fossilized fecal material that can reveal information about ancient intestinal and environmental microbiota. Viral metagenomics has allowed systematic characterization of viral diversity in environmental and human-associated specimens, but little is known about the viral diversity in fossil remains. Here, we analyzed the viral community of a 14th-century coprolite from a closed barrel in a Middle Ages site in Belgium using electron microscopy and metagenomics. Viruses that infect eukaryotes, bacteria, and archaea were detected, and we confirmed the presence of some of them by ad hoc suicide PCR. The coprolite DNA viral metagenome was dominated by sequences showing homologies to phages commonly found in modern stools and soil. Although their phylogenetic compositions differed, the metabolic functions of the viral communities have remained conserved across centuries. Antibiotic resistance was one of the reconstructed metabolic functions detected. PMID:24509925

  18. Internal temperature monitor for work pieces

    DOEpatents

    Berthold, J.W.

    1993-07-13

    A method and apparatus for measuring the internal temperature of a work piece comprises an excitation laser for generating laser pulses which are directed through a water cooled probe, and in an optical fiber, to a first surface of the work piece. The laser is of sufficient intensity to ablate the surface of the work piece, producing a displacement and a resulting ultrasonic pulse which propagates within the thickness of the work piece to an opposite surface. The ultrasonic pulse is reflected from the opposite surface and returns to the first surface to create a second displacement. A second continuous laser also shines its light through an optical fiber in the probe into the first surface and is used in conjunction with signal processing equipment to measure the time between the first and second displacements. This time is proportional to the time-of-flight of the ultrasonic pulse in the work piece which, with a known or detected thickness of the work piece, can be used to calculate the internal temperature of the work piece.

  19. Internal temperature monitor for work pieces

    DOEpatents

    Berthold, John W.

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring the internal temperature of a work piece comprises an excitation laser for generating laser pulses which are directed through a water cooled probe, and in an optical fiber, to a first surface of the work piece. The laser is of sufficient intensity to ablate the surface of the work piece, producing a displacement and a resulting ultrasonic pulse which propagates within the thickness of the work piece to an opposite surface. The ultrasonic pulse is reflected from the opposite surface and returns to the first surface to create a second displacement. A second continuous laser also shines its light through an optical fiber in the probe into the first surface and is used in conjunction with signal processing equipment to measure the time between the first and second displacements. This time is proportional to the time-of-flight of the ultrasonic pulse in the work piece which, with a known or detected thickness of the work piece, can be used to calculate the internal temperature of the work piece.

  20. Working towards compliance with international standards.

    PubMed

    Brückner, G K

    2004-04-01

    Developing countries are increasingly coming under pressure to improve their delivery of veterinary services as a prerequisite for entering the competitive arena of international trade in animals and animal products. The demands placed on developing countries by predominantly developed countries to comply with international disease prevention standards have also resulted in increasing demands on the financial, human and technological resources of these developing countries. The minimum requirements of the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures and the standards, guidelines and recommendations of international standard-setting organisations, such as the OIE (World organisation for animal health), are evaluated in terms of the opportunities embedded within these guidelines for developing countries. Such an evaluation indicates that the rights and obligations contained in these standards, guidelines and recommendations do not necessarily protect only the interests of developed countries but also encourage developing countries to work towards the levels of compliance and disease prevention required by their potential trade partners. The costs of this compliance can be reduced by exploiting more cost-effective alternatives for delivering services, when dictated by budgetary constraints. International organisations have illustrated on many occasions, and through a variety of development programmes, that they do indeed realise their responsibility towards developing countries in the areas of increased capacity building and technical assistance. If international organisations can refocus their interventions on the actual and specific needs of developing countries, then they can help to expedite the process of compliance with international standards. PMID:15200089

  1. International Space Station Earth Observations Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanov, William L.; Oikawa, Koki

    2015-01-01

    The multilateral Earth Observations Working Group (EOWG) was chartered in May 2012 in order to improve coordination and collaboration of Earth observing payloads, research, and applications on the International Space Station (ISS). The EOWG derives its authority from the ISS Program Science Forum, and a NASA representative serves as a permanent co-chair. A rotating co-chair position can be occupied by any of the international partners, following concurrence by the other partners; a JAXA representative is the current co-chair. Primary functions of the EOWG include, 1) the exchange of information on plans for payloads, from science and application objectives to instrument development, data collection, distribution and research; 2) recognition and facilitation of opportunities for international collaboration in order to optimize benefits from different instruments; and 3) provide a formal ISS Program interface for collection and application of remotely sensed data collected in response to natural disasters through the International Charter, Space and Major Disasters. Recent examples of EOWG activities include coordination of bilateral data sharing protocols between NASA and TsNIIMash for use of crew time and instruments in support of ATV5 reentry imaging activities; discussion of continued use and support of the Nightpod camera mount system by NASA and ESA; and review and revision of international partner contributions on Earth observations to the ISS Program Benefits to Humanity publication.

  2. Photocopy of Photograph, 14th ND PHOG No. N.H.82816 U.S. Navy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of Photograph, 14th ND PHOG No. N.H.82816 U.S. Navy photograph, circa 1945. AERIAL OF MAKALAPA ADMINISTRATION ARE IN WORLD WAR II, from National Park Service, U.S.S. Arizona Memorial, 14th Naval District Photograph Collection. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Makalapa Support Facilities, Makalapa Administration Area, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. The International Space Life Sciences Working Group.

    PubMed

    Vernikos, J; Ahlf, P R

    1998-07-01

    The International Space Life Sciences Working Group (ISLSWG) is made up of representatives from five space agencies: the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the European Space Agency (ESA), the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiale (CNES), the Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR, formerly the Deutsche Agentur fur Raumfahrtangelegenheiten or DARA), and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA). The group met for the first time in 1989, and since that time has developed a Strategic Plan and has taken concrete steps to implement this plan. The result is a closely coordinated international program of Space Life Sciences which will enable optimal utilization of space flight opportunities.

  4. 20 CFR 404.1034 - Work for an international organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... international organization entitled to enjoy privileges, exemptions, and immunities as an international organization under the International Organizations Immunities Act (59 Stat. 669), your work is excluded from..., and immunities provided in the International Organizations Immunities Act. (3) The designation must...

  5. NASA's Internal Space Weather Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Cyr, O. C.; Guhathakurta, M.; Bell, H.; Niemeyer, L.; Allen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements from many of NASA's scientific spacecraft are used routinely by space weather forecasters, both in the U.S. and internationally. ACE, SOHO (an ESA/NASA collaboration), STEREO, and SDO provide images and in situ measurements that are assimilated into models and cited in alerts and warnings. A number of years ago, the Space Weather laboratory was established at NASA-Goddard, along with the Community Coordinated Modeling Center. Within that organization, a space weather service center has begun issuing alerts for NASA's operational users. NASA's operational user community includes flight operations for human and robotic explorers; atmospheric drag concerns for low-Earth orbit; interplanetary navigation and communication; and the fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles, high altitude aircraft, and launch vehicles. Over the past three years we have identified internal stakeholders within NASA and formed a Working Group to better coordinate their expertise and their needs. In this presentation we will describe this activity and some of the challenges in forming a diverse working group.

  6. Why Internally Coupled Ears (ICE) Work Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hemmen, J. Leo

    2014-03-01

    Many vertebrates, such as frogs and lizards, have an air-filled cavity between left and right eardrum, i.e., internally coupled ears (ICE). Depending on source direction, internal time (iTD) and level (iLD) difference as experienced by the animal's auditory system may greatly exceed [C. Vossen et al., JASA 128 (2010) 909-918] the external, or interaural, time and level difference (ITD and ILD). Sensory processing only encodes iTD and iLD. We present an extension of ICE theory so as to elucidate the underlying physics. First, the membrane properties of the eardrum explain why for low frequencies iTD dominates whereas iLD does so for higher frequencies. Second, the plateau of iTD = γ ITD for constant 1 < γ < 5 and variable input frequency <ν∘ follows; e.g., for the Tockay gecko ν∘ ~ 1 . 5 kHz. Third, we use a sectorial instead of circular membrane to quantify the effect of the extracolumella embedded in the tympanum and connecting with the cochlea. The main parameters can be adjusted so that the model is species independent. Work done in collaboration with A.P. Vedurmudi and J. Goulet; partially supported by BCCN-Munich.

  7. International Technical Working Group Round Robin Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dudder, Gordon B.; Hanlen, Richard C.; Herbillion, Georges M.

    2003-02-01

    The goal of nuclear forensics is to develop a preferred approach to support illicit trafficking investigations. This approach must be widely understood and accepted as credible. The principal objectives of the Round Robin Tests are to prioritize forensic techniques and methods, evaluate attribution capabilities, and examine the utility of database. The HEU (Highly Enriched Uranium) Round Robin, and previous Plutonium Round Robin, have made tremendous contributions to fulfilling these goals through a collaborative learning experience that resulted from the outstanding efforts of the nine participating internal laboratories. A prioritized list of techniques and methods has been developed based on this exercise. Current work is focused on the extent to which the techniques and methods can be generalized. The HEU Round Robin demonstrated a rather high level of capability to determine the important characteristics of the materials and processes using analytical methods. When this capability is combined with the appropriate knowledge/database, it results in a significant capability to attribute the source of the materials to a specific process or facility. A number of shortfalls were also identified in the current capabilities including procedures for non-nuclear forensics and the lack of a comprehensive network of data/knowledge bases. The results of the Round Robin will be used to develop guidelines or a ''recommended protocol'' to be made available to the interested authorities and countries to use in real cases.

  8. 20 CFR 404.1034 - Work for an international organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Work for an international organization. 404... from Employment § 404.1034 Work for an international organization. (a) If you work as an employee of an international organization entitled to enjoy privileges, exemptions, and immunities as an...

  9. 20 CFR 404.1034 - Work for an international organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Work for an international organization. 404... from Employment § 404.1034 Work for an international organization. (a) If you work as an employee of an international organization entitled to enjoy privileges, exemptions, and immunities as an...

  10. 20 CFR 404.1034 - Work for an international organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Work for an international organization. 404... from Employment § 404.1034 Work for an international organization. (a) If you work as an employee of an international organization entitled to enjoy privileges, exemptions, and immunities as an...

  11. Report of the 14th Genomic Standards Consortium Meeting, Oxford, UK, September 17-21, 2012.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Barker, Katharine; Bicak, Mesude; Bourlat, Sarah; Coddington, Jonathan; Deck, John; Drummond, Alexei; Gilbert, Jack A.; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Kottmann, Renzo; Meyer, Chris; Morrison, Norman; Obst, Matthias; Robbins, Robert; Schriml, Lynn; Sterk, Peter; Stones-Havas, Steven

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the 14th workshop of the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) held at the University of Oxford in September 2012. The primary goal of the workshop was to work towards the launch of the Genomic Observatories (GOs) Network under the GSC. For the first time, it brought together potential GOs sites, GSC members, and a range of interested partner organizations. It thus represented the first meeting of the GOs Network (GOs1). Key outcomes include the formation of a core group of “champions” ready to take the GOs Network forward, as well as the formation of working groups. The workshop also served as the first meeting of a wide range of participants in the Ocean Sampling Day (OSD) initiative, a first GOs action. Three projects with complementary interests – COST Action ES1103, MG4U and Micro B3 – organized joint sessions at the workshop. A two-day GSC Hackathon followed the main three days of meetings.

  12. History of On-orbit Satellite Fragmentations (14th Edition)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.; Stansbery, Eugene; Whitlock, David O.; Abercromby, Kira J.; Shoots, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Since the first serious satellite fragmentation occurred in June 1961 (which instantaneously increased the total Earth satellite population by more than 400%) the issue of space operations within the finite region of space around the Earth has been the subject of increasing interest and concern. The prolific satellite fragmentations of the 1970s and the marked increase in the number of fragmentations in the 1980s served to widen international research into the characteristics and consequences of such events. Continued events in all orbits in later years make definition and historical accounting of those events crucial to future research. Large, manned space stations and the growing number of operational robotic satellites demand a better understanding of the hazards of the dynamic Earth satellite population.

  13. 40 CFR 46.145 - International travel and work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false International travel and work. 46.145... ASSISTANCE FELLOWSHIPS Applying for Fellowships § 46.145 International travel and work. (a) You may use fellowship funds for travel to or work in a foreign country only if the travel or work is approved by the...

  14. 40 CFR 46.145 - International travel and work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false International travel and work. 46.145... ASSISTANCE FELLOWSHIPS Applying for Fellowships § 46.145 International travel and work. (a) You may use fellowship funds for travel to or work in a foreign country only if the travel or work is approved by the...

  15. 40 CFR 46.145 - International travel and work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false International travel and work. 46.145... ASSISTANCE FELLOWSHIPS Applying for Fellowships § 46.145 International travel and work. (a) You may use fellowship funds for travel to or work in a foreign country only if the travel or work is approved by the...

  16. 40 CFR 46.145 - International travel and work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false International travel and work. 46.145... ASSISTANCE FELLOWSHIPS Applying for Fellowships § 46.145 International travel and work. (a) You may use fellowship funds for travel to or work in a foreign country only if the travel or work is approved by the...

  17. International scoping study: accelerator working group report

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael; Zisman, M.S.

    2006-09-30

    During the past several years, an International Scoping Study (ISS) of a Neutrino Factory was carried out, with the aim of developing an internationally accepted baseline facility design. Progress toward that goal will be described. Many of the key technical aspects of a Neutrino Factory facility design are presently being investigated experimentally, and the status of these investigations will be mentioned. Plans for the recently launched International Design Study (IDS), which serves as a follow-on to the ISS, will be briefly described.

  18. Putting the International Space Station to work.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Paul

    2003-08-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is the largest international cooperative science and technology project ever undertaken. Involving the United States, Russia, Japan, Canada and 10 ESA Member States, it is now rapidly becoming a reality in orbit, offering unprecedented access for research and applications under space conditions. Europe has invested heavily in this endeavour and plans to exploit that investment by a vigorous utilisation of the ISS for life and physical sciences research and applications, space science, Earth observation, space technology development, the promotion of commercial access to space, and the use of space for educational purposes. In recent years, ESA has engaged in an intensive promotional effort to encourage potential user communities to exploit the novel opportunities that the ISS offers. It has also made significant financial commitments to develop both multi-user facilities for life and physical sciences studies in the Columbus Laboratory, and observational and technology exposure instruments using the external Columbus mounting locations, as well as giving financial support to promote commercial and educational activities. ESA has now elaborated a European Strategy for the efficient utilisation of the ISS by European scientists and other users, which is being coordinated with the Agency's Member States contributing to the ISS Programme, and with the European Science Foundation (ESF). In cooperation with the European Commission, ESA is also fostering synergy with the European Commission's Framework Programmes in terms of shared R&D objectives. This article describes the plan that has been evolved to integrate all of these various elements.

  19. PREFACE: 14th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao, Luis; Minotti, Fernando; Kelly, Hector

    2012-06-01

    These proceedings present the written contributions from participants of the Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP), which was held in Mar del Plata, Argentina, on 20-25 November 2011. This was the 14th session of the series of LAWPP biennial meetings, which started in 1982. The five-day scientific program of LAWPP 2011 consisted of 32 talks and various poster sessions, with the participation of 135 researchers from Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Puerto Rico, USA, Venezuela, as well as others from Europe and Asia. In addition, a School on Plasma Physics and a Workshop on Industrial Applications of Plasma Technology (AITP) were organized together with the main meeting. The five-day School held in the week previous to the meeting was intended for young scientists starting their research in Plasma Physics. On the other hand, the objective of the AITP Workshop was to enhance regional academic and industrial cooperation in the field of plasma assisted surface technology. Topics addressed at LAWPP 2011 included space plasmas, dusty plasmas, nuclear fusion, non-thermal plasmas, basic plasma processes, plasma simulation and industrial plasma applications. This variety of subjects is reflected in these proceedings, which the editors hope will result in enjoyable and fruitful reading for those interested in Plasma Physics. It is a pleasure to thank the Institutions that sponsored the meeting, as well as all the participants and collaborators for making this meeting possible. The Editors Luis Bilbao, Fernando Minotti and Hector Kelly LAWPP participants Participants of the 14th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics, 20-25 November 2011, Mar del Plata, Argentina International Scientific Committee Carlos Alejaldre, Spain María Virginia Alves, Brazil Ibere Caldas, Brazil Luis Felipe Delgado-Aparicio, Peru Mayo Villagrán, Mexico Kohnosuke Sato, Japan Héctor Kelly, Argentina Edberto Leal-Quirós, Puerto Rico George Morales, USA Julio Puerta

  20. The Work of the International Electrotechnical Commission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koeter, Wim

    1979-01-01

    Describes the responsibilities and publications of the IEC in relation to educational technology and the work of two subcommittees, SC60A and SC60B, which are concerned with audio and video recording. The responsibilities of the IEC SC60C subcommittee in audiovisual, video, and television equipment and systems are also presented. (RAO)

  1. Principles of Effective Practice in International Social Work Field Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lough, Benjamin J.

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the conditions under which international social work field placements may be effectively administered. The positive and negative potential of international placements is examined. A review of empirical and theoretical literature in the related fields of service learning and international volunteering reveals that role taking,…

  2. Key Relationships for International Student University-to-Work Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popadiuk, Natalee Elizabeth; Arthur, Nancy Marie

    2014-01-01

    International student research predominantly focuses on the initial and middle stages of their sojourn. Our research, however, specifically addresses how relationships support international students to successfully navigate the late-stage transition from university to work. In this qualitative study, we interviewed 18 international students from…

  3. DC66812 AERIAL VIEW OF THE 14TH AND 15TH STREET CORRIDORS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DC-668-12 AERIAL VIEW OF THE 14TH AND 15TH STREET CORRIDORS, LOOKING NORTH FROM ABOVE EAST POTOMAC PARK TOWARD THE MALL AND BEYOND - L'Enfant-McMillan Plan of Washington, DC, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  4. The 14th Annual James L. Waters Symposium at Pittcon: Raman Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy was the main topic of the 14th Annual James L. Waters Symposium, which was held in March 2003 at Pittcon. The development of the enabling technologies that have made Raman spectroscopy a routine analysis tool in many laboratories worldwide is discussed.

  5. Measuring International Service Outcomes: Implications for International Social Work Field Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lough, Benjamin J.; McBride, Amanda Moore; Sherraden, Margaret S.

    2012-01-01

    International field placements are a unique educational opportunity for social work students to develop the skills they need for social work practice in a globalized world; however, outcomes of international placements have not been rigorously studied. This article reports on the International Volunteer Impacts Survey (IVIS), a 48-item survey…

  6. Sex work on the rise. International news.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    The AIDS epidemic has brought to the fore many social injustices; for instance, inappropriate laws. The groups of people most at risk of HIV/AIDS are women, young people, and sex workers. More appropriate laws are needed to protect their rights. In many instances sex workers are prosecuted for selling their services, but their clients are not prosecuted for seeking these services. Most people become sex workers so they can feed, clothe, and supply the basic needs for themselves and their families. Many sex workers are abandoned wives, mothers with no means of support, and poverty stricken people. A Health Ministry commission in Sweden proposed that prostitutes, clients, and pimps be prosecuted and be liable to imprisonment. Authorities in Scotland, where prostitution is illegal, have granted licenses to more than 20 clubs in Edinburgh in which sex is for sale. In the UK, the Royal College of Nursing called for a measure to decriminalize prostitution and to introduce licensed, regulated brothels. The legalization of sex clubs and brothels will occur soon in the Netherlands. In Poland, 30,000-50,000 youth, 33% of whom are underage, sell sex during holidays. Organizations are beginning to work only with male prostitutes in Belgium. In the countries of the former Soviet Union and China, prostitution is becoming more and more common. Some young girls in these countries practice currency prostitution. In almost all Asian countries except Thailand condom use is low; yet prostitution and sexually transmitted diseases are very common. Some people participate in the corrupt trade in women from Nepal to supply the sex market in Bombay, India. Sex tourism is still common in cities of Eastern Europe and the former USSR and in areas where tourism is increasing. There are more than 1 million prostitutes aged under 16 in eight Asian countries, with 400,000 in India. Sweden and the UK have taken steps to prosecute natives who have sex with children abroad. Philippine authorities

  7. 40 CFR 46.145 - International travel and work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Section 46.145 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE FELLOWSHIPS Applying for Fellowships § 46.145 International travel and work. (a) You may use fellowship funds for travel to or work in a foreign country only if the travel or work is approved by the...

  8. 76 FR 19373 - The 14th Annual Food and Drug Administration-Orange County Regulatory Affairs Educational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The 14th Annual Food and Drug Administration-Orange County... announcing the following conference: 14th Annual Educational Conference co-sponsored with the Orange County...: 949-608-4417; or Orange County Regulatory Affairs Discussion Group, Attention to Detail,...

  9. Teaching, Learning, and Working with International Students: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, D. Randall

    This case study of a program for Taiwanese students at Louisiana Tech University examined the challenges and rewards of working with international students. Data for the study come from the literature on international education, interviews with Taiwanese graduate students in the program, observations of classes, personal reflections of the…

  10. International Agencies as Social Work Settings: Opportunity, Capability, and Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Lynne M.

    1987-01-01

    Explores questions about the practice roles of social work profession in international relief and development agencies. Reviews findings of a survey of international agencies on practices which found that planning and management skills, previous overseas experience, and personal characteristics were among most important hiring credentials.…

  11. The Second International Scientific Symposium on Tea & Human Health, September 14th, 1998.

    PubMed

    Phipps, R P

    1999-01-01

    It is fascinating to reflect that tea, the world's most widely consumed beverage next to water, began in Chinese antiquity not as a beverage but as a medicine. Several millennia later, modern scientific research is confirming that such ancient intuition has relevance to contemporary health concerns including cancer, heart disease, and antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The timeliness of this message as the 20th century concludes could not be better. The importance of a balanced diet has been recognized and studied throughout this century. The concept that we are what we eat has become a part of popular culture. If tea's health message, which future scientific research will continue to articulate, is creatively presented and embraces the romantic image that tea affords the industry, there is every reason to expect a rebirth and reinvigoration of this ancient beverage as a new millennium commences.

  12. Proceedings of the 14th annual international symposium on computer architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on the design and architecture of supercomputers and multiprocessors. Topics considered at the symposium include pipelining, special purpose hardware, data flow, Prolog, symbolic architectures, interconnection networks, interprocessor communications and synchronization, memory systems, cache-based multiprocessors, SIMD and MIMD architectures, and parallel execution of logic programs.

  13. Literacy and the New Work Order. An International Literature Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Chris; Frank, Fiona; Cooke, Tony

    This book is an international review of the literature on literacy and the new work order. The book begins with an overview examining the following topics: the history of workplace literacy education, the changing nature of work, the problem of illiteracy, and literacy in the context of the workplace. Part 1 presents texts critiquing or supporting…

  14. Business of biosimilars - 14th annual conference (October 15-17, 2013 - Boston, Massachusetts, USA).

    PubMed

    Bourgoin, A

    2013-12-01

    Competition in the biological market offers a new set of opportunities and challenges within the healthcare industry. Biosimilars, like generic small-molecule drugs, can provide cost savings and increase patient access, while also promoting innovation. While large molecule manufacturers face many challenges unique to complex therapeutics, it is becoming clear that the commercialization of biosimilars shares many of the same hurdles as the generics market. The 14th Annual Business of Biosimilars Conference provided quality presentations from industry leaders regarding many commercial considerations for stakeholders interested in entering the biosimilars market. Opportunities to network with industry experts were offered, with over 120 attendees. PMID:24524098

  15. Event representations, narrative development and internal working models.

    PubMed

    Nelson, K

    1999-12-01

    In this article I summarize the theoretical framework of experientially based event representations as the basis for early cognitive development. Further work on representational levels, in particular the level of extended discourse such as narratives that incorporate new understandings of the personal, social and cultural world, is discussed. Parallels with the concept of internal working models from attachment theory, and differences between these two theoretical approaches are then laid out, with implications for further interchange between the two.

  16. International regulations on the organization of shift work.

    PubMed

    Kogi, K

    1998-01-01

    Changes since the early 1990s in international regulations on night and shift work were reviewed, including changes in complex shift systems, greater flexibility, increased female participation in night work and attention to health effects. Recent international regulations have focused on (i) a broadened scope of regulatory measures treating both genders equally, (ii) multifaceted protection, and (iii) consultation weighing many aspects of job design. The application of these international regulations depends on national laws and practice, with possible derogations. It calls for local support measures, including (i) guidelines for enterprise-level consultations on shift schedules, (ii) promotion of health and safety measures, and (iii) participatory strategies for locally adjusted shiftwork arrangements and social support.

  17. Work-Integrated Learning in Vietnam: Perspectives of Intern Work Supervisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilsland, Christine; Nagy, Helga

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses work-integrated learning program issues from the perspective of work supervisors of interns from a foreign university in an offshore market environment--Vietnam. Universities expanding their markets overseas must research all relevant aspects of the local environment when making operational expansion decisions, and continue…

  18. Food on foot: long-distance trade in slaughter oxen between Denmark and the Netherlands (14th-18th century).

    PubMed

    Gijsbers, W; Koolmees, P

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a short review of the long-distance trade in slaughter oxen in Northwest Europe. The long-term development of the trade is described against the social-economic background of the production and consumption areas. In the 14th century, the Danes obtained the right to sell cattle in certain Dutch cities. From 1500 onwards, the export of oxen from Denmark and the adjacent duchy of Schleswig-Holstein increased considerably. The export reached its peak in the first quarter of the 17th century; registered export in 1612 amounted to more than 52.000 oxen over land and, in 1624, about 10.000 oxen over sea. Part of that export was destined for the Dutch market. Protectionist tax measures taken by the Dutch government and the outbreaks of rinderpest put an end to the regular ox trade in the first half of the 18th century. By decree, local authorities tried to prevent the spread of contagious animal diseases. The history of international cattle trade and hauling, however, indicates that economic motives largely outweighed animal welfare issues. Thus, in addition to addressing the logistics of the trade, this paper also addresses veterinary aspects and animal welfare issues related to the transport of cattle. PMID:11762404

  19. The International Space Life Sciences Strategic Planning Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Ronald J.; Rabin, Robert; Lujan, Barbara F.

    1993-01-01

    Throughout the 1980s, ESA and the space agencies of Canada, Germany, France, Japan, and the U.S. have pursued cooperative projects bilaterally and multilaterally to prepare for, and to respond to, opportunities in space life sciences research previously unapproachable in scale and sophistication. To cope effectively with likely future space research opportunities, broad, multilateral, coordinated strategic planning is required. Thus, life scientists from these agencies have allied to form the International Space Life Sciences Strategic Planning Working Group. This Group is formally organized under a charter that specifies the purpose of the Working Group as the development of an international strategic plan for the space life sciences, with periodic revisions as needed to keep the plan current. The plan will be policy-, not operations-oriented. The Working Group also may establish specific implementation teams to coordinate multilateral science policy in specific areas; such teams have been established for space station utilization, and for sharing of flight equipment.

  20. Pre-departure preparation for international clinical work: a handbook.

    PubMed

    Edwardson, Jill; Owens, Lauren; Moran, Dane; Aluri, James; Kironji, Antony; Chen, Chi Chiung Grace

    2015-08-01

    International clinical experiences are increasingly popular among medical students, residents, fellows, and practitioners. Adequate pre-departure training is an integral part of a meaningful, productive, and safe international experience. At Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, we have developed a pre-departure handbook to assist practitioners in preparing for global health work. The handbook draws from current global health education literature, existing handbooks, and expert experiences, and includes information about logistical and cultural preparations. While a pre-departure handbook cannot serve as a substitute for a comprehensive pre-departure training program, it can be a useful introduction to the pre-departure process.

  1. Pre-departure preparation for international clinical work: a handbook.

    PubMed

    Edwardson, Jill; Owens, Lauren; Moran, Dane; Aluri, James; Kironji, Antony; Chen, Chi Chiung Grace

    2015-08-01

    International clinical experiences are increasingly popular among medical students, residents, fellows, and practitioners. Adequate pre-departure training is an integral part of a meaningful, productive, and safe international experience. At Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, we have developed a pre-departure handbook to assist practitioners in preparing for global health work. The handbook draws from current global health education literature, existing handbooks, and expert experiences, and includes information about logistical and cultural preparations. While a pre-departure handbook cannot serve as a substitute for a comprehensive pre-departure training program, it can be a useful introduction to the pre-departure process. PMID:25994626

  2. International Technical Working Group Cooperation to Counter Illicit Nuclear Trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D K; Niemeyer, S

    2004-09-18

    The Nuclear Smuggling International Technical Working Group (ITWG) is an international body of nuclear forensic experts that cooperate to deter the illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. The objective of the ITWG is to provide a common approach and effective technical solutions to governments who request assistance in nuclear forensics. The ITWG was chartered in 1996 and since that time more than 28 nations and organizations have participated in 9 international meetings and 2 analytical round-robin trials. Soon after its founding the ITWG adopted a general framework to guide nuclear forensics investigations that includes recommendations for nuclear crime scene security and analysis, the best application of radioanalytical methods, the conduct of traditional forensic analysis of contaminated materials, and effective data analysis to interpret the history of seized nuclear materials. This approach has been adopted by many nations as they respond to incidents of illicit nuclear trafficking.

  3. Introduction of the UNIX International Performance Management Work Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Henry

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we presented the planned direction of the UNIX International Performance Management Work Group. This group consists of concerned system developers and users who have organized to synthesize recommendations for standard UNIX performance management subsystem interfaces and architectures. The purpose of these recommendations is to provide a core set of performance management functions and these functions can be used to build tools by hardware system developers, vertical application software developers, and performance application software developers.

  4. Long life technology work at Rockwell International Space Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huzel, D. K.

    1974-01-01

    This paper presents highlights of long-life technology oriented work performed at the Space Division of Rockwell International Corporation under contract to NASA. This effort included evaluation of Saturn V launch vehicle mechanical and electromechanical components for potential extended life capabilities, endurance tests, and accelerated aging experiments. A major aspect was evaluation of the components at the subassembly level (i.e., at the interface between moving surfaces) through in-depth wear analyses and assessments. Although some of this work is still in progress, preliminary conclusions are drawn and presented, together with the rationale for each. The paper concludes with a summary of the effort still remaining.

  5. [A medieval herbal from the 14th century, a new version of the Latin Macer?].

    PubMed

    Mauch, Ute

    2006-01-01

    A medical compendium of "Melleus liquorphysicae artis" has survived under the name Alexander Hispanus; it is in codex Ms. 8769 of the Biblioteca nacional in Madrid. Therein a herbal from the 14th century is integrated. However, today people must think that we have one herbal and two authors: Alexander Hispanus and Henrik Harpestraeng (died 1244), a physician from Scandinavia. First of all, the parts of the medical compendium are presented. We do not know which parts originally belong to the medical compendium. The examination of many handwritings suggested that the discourses about consumption and dropsy were not originally included in the compendium; that seems certain. Further it was shown that probably Alexander Hispanus did not live after all and we must see him as a fictional person. Nevertheless we should not automatically regard Henrik Harpestraeng as the author of the herbal although it contains typical plants of the North like Angelica. The oldest codex of the herbal was probably written in Bavaria or Austria because it contains old Bavarian words. This handwriting can be seen as a piece of evidence that the knowledge about Angelica was spreading from the South. We should explore the connection with handwritings of the Macer, too. The herbal could be a Latin version of the Macer, in which the original verses are abandoned. An analysis of the medical plants made it clear that the herbal is probably directed to a male readership. Especially the chapter on Galganum elucidates that. In the 14th century Galganum was thought to have a contraceptive effect, but this was kept secret from women! All in all the structure of the herbal suggests a use as a kind of reference book that was not used daily though.

  6. PREFACE: European Microbeam Analysis Society's 14th European Workshop on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis (EMAS 2015), Portorož, Slovenia, 3-7 May 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovet, Xavier; Matthews, Michael B.; Čeh, Miran; Langer, Enrico; Žagar, Kristina

    2016-02-01

    This volume of the IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering contains papers from the 14th Workshop of the European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis which took place from the 3rd to the 7th of May 2015 in the Grand Hotel Bernardin, Portorož, Slovenia. The primary aim of this series of workshops is to assess the state-of-the-art and reliability of microbeam analysis techniques. The workshops also provide a forum where students and young scientists starting out on a career in microbeam analysis can meet and discuss with the established experts. The workshops have a unique format comprising invited plenary lectures by internationally recognized experts, poster presentations by the participants and round table discussions on the key topics led by specialists in the field.This workshop was organized in collaboration with the Jožef Stefan Institute and SDM - Slovene Society for Microscopy. The technical programme included the following topics: electron probe microanalysis, STEM and EELS, materials applications, cathodoluminescence and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and their applications. As at previous workshops there was also a special oral session for young scientists. The best presentation by a young scientist was awarded with an invitation to attend the 2016 Microscopy and Microanalysis meeting at Columbus, Ohio. The prize went to Shirin Kaboli, of the Department of Metals and Materials Engineering of McGill University (Montréal, Canada), for her talk entitled "Electron channelling contrast reconstruction with electron backscattered diffraction". The continuing relevance of the EMAS workshops and the high regard in which they are held internationally can be seen from the fact that 71 posters from 16 countries were on display at the meeting and that the participants came from as far away as Japan, Canada, USA, and Australia. A selection of participants with posters was invited

  7. Schools without Fear. Proceedings of the Annual International Alliance for Invitational Education Conference (14th). International Alliance for Invitational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Adrianna Hayes, Ed.

    Papers presented at the fourteenth Annual Conference of the Alliance for Invitational Education are (1) "Caring, Sharing, Daring: Three Tests to Help Develop More Inviting Policies, Programmes, and Procedures" (M. Ayers); (2) "Project: Gentlemen on the Move - Combating the Poor Academic and Social Performance of African American Male Youth" (D. F.…

  8. "May the force be with you": 14th Samuel Haughton lecture.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, P J

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents the 14th Samuel Haughton lecture delivered on the 26th of January 2008. The lecture began by describing Haughton's research on animal mechanics. Haughton opposed Charles Darwin's theory of natural selection using the argument that the skeleton obeys the 'principle of least action' and therefore must have been designed with that principle in mind. In the course of his research he dissected many animals, including albatrosses, cassowaries, llamas, tigers, jackals and jaguars. He took anatomical measurements and did calculations to prove that muscle attachment sites were optimally located. The relationship between optimality and evolution continues to be studied. Computer simulations show optimality is difficult to achieve. This is because, even if optimality could be defined, the gene recombinations required to evolve an optimal phenotype may not exist. The drive towards optimality occurs under gravitational forces. Simulations to predict mechano-regulation of tissue differentiation and remodelling have been developed and tested. They have been used to design biomechanically optimized scaffolds for regenerative medicine and to identify the mechanoregularory mechanisms in osteoporosis. It is proposed that an important development in bioengineering will be the discovery of algorithms that can be used for the prediction of mechano-responsiveness in biological tissues. PMID:18641919

  9. 14th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells& Modules: Materials and Processes; Summary of Discussion Sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Tan, T.; Sinton, R.; Swanson, D.

    2004-10-01

    The 14th Workshop discussion sessions addressed funding needs for Si research and for R&D to enhance U.S. PV manufacturing. The wrap-up session specifically addressed topics for the new university silicon program. The theme of the workshop, Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Leapfrogging the Barriers, was selected to reflect the astounding progress in Si PV technology during last three decades, despite a host of barriers and bottlenecks. A combination of oral, poster, and discussion sessions addressed recent advances in crystal growth technology, new cell structures and doping methods, silicon feedstock issues, hydrogen passivation and fire through metallization, and module issues/reliability. The following oral/discussion sessions were conducted: (1) Technology Update; (2) Defects and Impurities in Si/Discussion; (3) Rump Session; (4) Module Issues and Reliability/Discussion; (5) Silicon Feedstock/Discussion; (6) Novel Doping, Cells, and Hetero-Structure Designs/Discussion; (7) Metallization/Silicon Nitride Processing/Discussion; (8) Hydrogen Passivation/Discussion; (9) Characterization/Discussion; and (10) Wrap-Up. This year's workshop lasted three and a half days and, for the first time, included a session on Si modules. A rump session was held on the evening of August 8, which addressed efficiency expectations and challenges of c Si solar cells/modules. Richard King of DOE and Daren Dance of Wright Williams& Kelly (formerly of Sematech) spoke at two of the luncheon sessions. Eleven students received Graduate Student Awards from funds contributed by the PV industry.

  10. The 14th Ile residue is essential for Leptin function in regulating energy homeostasis in rat.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuyang; Zhu, Xianmin; Li, Hong; Hu, Youtian; Zhou, Jinping; He, Di; Feng, Yun; Lu, Lina; Du, Guizhen; Hu, Youjin; Liu, Tiancheng; Wang, Zhen; Ding, Guohui; Chen, Jiayu; Gao, Shaorong; Wu, Fang; Xue, Zhigang; Li, Yixue; Fan, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    LEPTIN (LEP) is a circulating hormone released primarily from white adipocytes and is crucial for regulating satiety and energy homeostasis in humans and animals. Using the CRISPR technology, we created a set of Lep mutant rats that carry either null mutations or a deletion of the 14(th) Ile (LEP(∆I14)) in the mature LEP protein. We examined the potential off-target sites (OTS) by whole-genome high-throughput sequencing and/or Sanger-sequencing analysis and found no OTS in mutant rats. Mature LEP(∆I14) is incessantly produced and released to blood at a much elevated level due to the feedback loop. Structure modeling of binding conformation between mutant LEP(∆I14) and LEPTIN receptor (LEPR) suggests that the conformation of LEP(∆I14) impairs its binding with LEPR, consistent with its inability to activate STAT3-binding element in the luciferase reporter assay. Phenotypic study demonstrated that Lep(∆I14) rats recapitulate phenotypes of Lep-null mutant rats including obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hepatic steatosis, nephropathy, and infertility. Compared to the existing ob/ob mouse models, this Lep(∆I14/∆I14) rat strain provides a robust tool for further dissecting the roles of LEP in the diabetes related kidney disease and reproduction problem, beyond its well established function in regulating energy homeostasis.

  11. The 14th Ile residue is essential for Leptin function in regulating energy homeostasis in rat

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuyang; Zhu, Xianmin; Li, Hong; Hu, Youtian; Zhou, Jinping; He, Di; Feng, Yun; Lu, Lina; Du, Guizhen; Hu, Youjin; Liu, Tiancheng; Wang, Zhen; Ding, Guohui; Chen, Jiayu; Gao, Shaorong; Wu, Fang; Xue, Zhigang; Li, Yixue; Fan, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    LEPTIN (LEP) is a circulating hormone released primarily from white adipocytes and is crucial for regulating satiety and energy homeostasis in humans and animals. Using the CRISPR technology, we created a set of Lep mutant rats that carry either null mutations or a deletion of the 14th Ile (LEP∆I14) in the mature LEP protein. We examined the potential off-target sites (OTS) by whole-genome high-throughput sequencing and/or Sanger-sequencing analysis and found no OTS in mutant rats. Mature LEP∆I14 is incessantly produced and released to blood at a much elevated level due to the feedback loop. Structure modeling of binding conformation between mutant LEP∆I14 and LEPTIN receptor (LEPR) suggests that the conformation of LEP∆I14 impairs its binding with LEPR, consistent with its inability to activate STAT3-binding element in the luciferase reporter assay. Phenotypic study demonstrated that Lep∆I14 rats recapitulate phenotypes of Lep-null mutant rats including obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hepatic steatosis, nephropathy, and infertility. Compared to the existing ob/ob mouse models, this Lep∆I14/∆I14 rat strain provides a robust tool for further dissecting the roles of LEP in the diabetes related kidney disease and reproduction problem, beyond its well established function in regulating energy homeostasis. PMID:27378381

  12. Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, E.; Herman, M.; Dupont, E.; Chadwick, M. B.; Danon, Y.; De Saint Jean, C.; Dunn, M.; Fischer, U.; Forrest, R. A.; Fukahori, T.; Ge, Z.; Harada, H.; Herman, M.; Igashira, M.; Ignatyuk, A.; Ishikawa, M.; Iwamoto, O.; Jacqmin, R.; Kahler, A. C.; Kawano, T.; Koning, A. J.; Leal, L.; Lee, Y. O.; McKnight, R.; McNabb, D.; Mills, R. W.; Palmiotti, G.; Plompen, A.; Salvatores, M.; Schillebeeckx, P.

    2014-06-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) organizes cooperation between the major nuclear data evaluation projects in the world. Moreover, the NEA Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluation, measurement, nuclear model calculation, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for cooperative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint activities in the framework of dedicated WPEC subgroups. Studies recently completed comprise a number of works related to nuclear data covariance and associated processing issues, as well as more specific studies related to the resonance parameter representation in the unresolved resonance region, the gamma production from fission product capture reactions, the 235U capture cross section, the EXFOR database, and the improvement of nuclear data for advanced reactor systems. Ongoing activities focus on the evaluation of 239Pu in the resonance region, scattering angular distribution in the fast energy range, and reporting/usage of experimental data for evaluation in the resolved resonance region. New activities include two subgroups on improved fission product yield evaluation methodologies and on modern nuclear database structures. Some future activities under discussion include a pilot project for a Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organization (CIELO) and methods to provide feedback from nuclear and covariance data adjustment for improvement of nuclear data. In addition to the above mentioned short-term task-oriented subgroups, WPEC also hosts a longer-term subgroup charged with reviewing and compiling the most important nuclear data requirements in a high priority request list (HPRL).

  13. Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Giuseppe Palmiotti

    2014-06-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is organizing the cooperation between the major nuclear data evaluation projects in the world. The NEA Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluation, measurement, nuclear model calculation, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for cooperative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint activities in the framework of dedicated WPEC subgroups. Studies recently completed comprise a number of works related to nuclear data covariance and associated processing issues, as well as more specific studies related to the resonance parameter representation in the unresolved resonance region, the gamma production from fission-product capture reactions, the U-235 capture cross-section, the EXFOR database, and the improvement of nuclear data for advanced reactor systems. Ongoing activities focus on the evaluation of Pu-239 in the resonance region, scattering angular distribution in the fast energy range, and reporting/usage of experimental data for evaluation in the resolved resonance region. New activities include two new subgroups on improved fission product yield evaluation methodologies and on modern nuclear database structures. Future activities under discussion include a pilot project of a Collaborative International Evaluated Library (CIELO) and methods to provide feedback from nuclear and covariance data adjustment for improvement of nuclear data. In addition to the above mentioned short-term, task-oriented subgroups, the WPEC also hosts a longer-term subgroup charged with reviewing and compiling the most important nuclear data requirements in a high priority request list (HPRL).

  14. Military Librarians Workshop; Department of Defense Libraries in Transition (14th, 30 November - 2 December 1970). Conference Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Industrial Coll. of the Armed Forces (DOD), Washington, DC.

    The theme of the 14th Annual Military Librarians Workshop is: "Department of Defense Libraries in Transition." The National War College and the Industrial College libraries seek to see what support they can give each other. The ten workshops are: (1) Standardization of Bibliographic Data, (2) Evolution of Technical Reports, (3) DOD Coordination of…

  15. Coping with Catastrophe: The Black Death of the 14th Century. A Unit of Study for Grades 7-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Anne

    This unit of study explains the causes, course, characteristics, and results of the Black Death during the 14th century. The Black Death, also known as the bubonic plague, left virtually no one untouched in Europe, Asia, and Northern Africa. Europe lost a third or more of its population. In a broader context, study of the unit alerts students to…

  16. Restoring the Trust in Native Education. Annual NIEA Legislative Summit (14th, February 7-9, 2011). Briefing Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Education Association, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Several briefing papers were presented during the 14th Annual National Indian Education Association (NIEA) Legislative Summit. This briefing book contains the following papers presented during the summit: (1) Restoring the Trust in Native Education; (2) NIEA Legislative Priorities for 2011: "Talking Points"; (3) Reauthorization of the Elementary…

  17. Radio Imaging of a Type IVM Radio Burst on the 14th of August 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, H. M.; Krucker, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Raftery, C. L.

    2014-02-01

    Propagating coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by burst signatures in radio spectrogram data. We present Nançay Radioheliograph observations of a moving source of broadband radio emission, commonly referred to as a type IV radio burst (type IVM), which occurred in association with a CME on the 14th of August 2010. The event was well observed at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths by SDO/AIA and PROBA2/SWAP, and by the STEREO SECCHI and SOHO LASCO white light (WL) coronagraphs. The EUV and WL observations show the type IVM source to be cospatial with the CME core. The observed spectra is well fitted by a power law with a negative slope, which is consistent with optically thin gyrosynchrotron emission. The spectrum shows no turn over at the lowest Nançay frequencies. By comparing simulated gyrosynchrotron spectra with Nançay Radioheliograph observations, and performing a rigorous parameter search we are able to constrain several key parameters of the underlying plasma. Simulated spectra found to fit the data suggest a nonthermal electron distribution with a low energy cutoff of several tens to 100 keV, with a nonthermal electron density in the range 100-102 cm-3, in a magnetic field of a few Gauss. The nonthermal energy content of the source is found to contain 0.001%-0.1% of the sources thermal energy content. Furthermore, the energy loss timescale for this distribution equates to several hours, suggesting that the electrons could be accelerated during the CME initiation or early propagation phase and become trapped in the magnetic structure of the CME core without the need to be replenished.

  18. Effect of the bubonic plague epidemic on inbreeding in 14th century Britain.

    PubMed

    Pattison, John E

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the study reported here was to further investigate a new method of estimating inbreeding in large, relatively isolated populations over historic times, as reported by Pattison (1999, 2001). The method is based on modeling the genealogical "paradox" and produces values of Pearl's coefficients of inbreeding as a function of time for any given population curve. In particular, this study demonstrates that the new method of estimating inbreeding may be used to examine the effect of unusual features in population curves on levels of inbreeding in that population. As an example, the medieval population "bump" that spans the 13th and 14th centuries in the population of Britain, which terminated abruptly with the outbreak of bubonic plague in 1348 AD, is examined. It is first assumed that the whole population was the adult (breeding) population, corresponding to minimum inbreeding. For this case it is found that, for distant generations, about 90% of the whole population occurs in any present-day British pedigree. This value compares favorably with the values of 85% and 80% reported by Wachter (1980) and Derrida et al. (1999, 2000), respectively. The population bump causes the curves for Pearl's coefficient, for minimum inbreeding, to have a plateau of about 96% over the period from about 1220 AD to 1380 AD. The effect of introducing a single known estimate of inbreeding into the model is to produce a more realistic situation where the adult (breeding) population is considerably less than the whole population. It is found that the maximum number of different ancestors in any generation, in the average British pedigree, is about 22900 individuals and occurs about 1220 AD. More importantly, and possibly contrary to expectation, it is now found that the population bump had virtually no effect on the level of inbreeding. PMID:12552584

  19. Radio imaging of a type IVM radio burst on the 14th of August 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Bain, H. M.; Krucker, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Raftery, C. L.

    2014-02-10

    Propagating coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by burst signatures in radio spectrogram data. We present Nançay Radioheliograph observations of a moving source of broadband radio emission, commonly referred to as a type IV radio burst (type IVM), which occurred in association with a CME on the 14th of August 2010. The event was well observed at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths by SDO/AIA and PROBA2/SWAP, and by the STEREO SECCHI and SOHO LASCO white light (WL) coronagraphs. The EUV and WL observations show the type IVM source to be cospatial with the CME core. The observed spectra is well fitted by a power law with a negative slope, which is consistent with optically thin gyrosynchrotron emission. The spectrum shows no turn over at the lowest Nançay frequencies. By comparing simulated gyrosynchrotron spectra with Nançay Radioheliograph observations, and performing a rigorous parameter search we are able to constrain several key parameters of the underlying plasma. Simulated spectra found to fit the data suggest a nonthermal electron distribution with a low energy cutoff of several tens to 100 keV, with a nonthermal electron density in the range 10{sup 0}-10{sup 2} cm{sup –3}, in a magnetic field of a few Gauss. The nonthermal energy content of the source is found to contain 0.001%-0.1% of the sources thermal energy content. Furthermore, the energy loss timescale for this distribution equates to several hours, suggesting that the electrons could be accelerated during the CME initiation or early propagation phase and become trapped in the magnetic structure of the CME core without the need to be replenished.

  20. 4th Rare Disease South Eastern Europe (See) Meeting Skopje, Macedonia (November 14th, 2015).

    PubMed

    Gucev, Zoran; Tasic, Velibor; Polenakovic, Momir

    2015-01-01

    The 4th meeting on rare diseases in South Eastern Europe (SEE) was held in Skopje, at the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts (MASA) on the 14(th) of November 2015. The focuses were metabolic, rare brain diseases as well as the rare dysmorphic syndrome. The authors of the report are particularly keen on stating that one of the main goals of the meeting, namely to help the treatment of patients with rare disease has begun to bear fruits. The talk on an iminosugar-based pharmacological chaperone compound as a drug candidate for the treatment of GM1-gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis IVB (Morquio disease type B) was enlightening. To date, there is no treatment available to be offered to patients, but chaperones lead mutated proteins to adopt a native-like conformation and to successfully traffic to their normal cellular destination. DORPHAN is developing an iminosugar-based pharmacological chaperone compound for the treatment of GM1-gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis IVB. A talk on recent developments in the laboratory diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) was particularly interesting, covering the laboratory diagnosis of the MPS diseases by a strategy of clinical examination, biochemical analysis of urine samples, enzyme tests and genetic characterization of underlying mutations. New techniques were developed, including analysis of urinary glycosaminoglycans with tandem mass spectrometry, miniaturized enzyme tests or novel synthetic substrates for enzyme assays using mass spectrometry detection of products using dried blood spots. Feasibility and cost-effectiveness of these methods in newborn screening programs have been demonstrated. Neuromuscular RDs, and especially familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) were a topic of the Bulgarian colleagues. Diagnosis, screening and the role of microglia were also topics of particular interest. In summary, this year RD meeting was exciting and productive on a wide range of diseases and on a novel insights on

  1. 4th Rare Disease South Eastern Europe (See) Meeting Skopje, Macedonia (November 14th, 2015).

    PubMed

    Gucev, Zoran; Tasic, Velibor; Polenakovic, Momir

    2015-01-01

    The 4th meeting on rare diseases in South Eastern Europe (SEE) was held in Skopje, at the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts (MASA) on the 14(th) of November 2015. The focuses were metabolic, rare brain diseases as well as the rare dysmorphic syndrome. The authors of the report are particularly keen on stating that one of the main goals of the meeting, namely to help the treatment of patients with rare disease has begun to bear fruits. The talk on an iminosugar-based pharmacological chaperone compound as a drug candidate for the treatment of GM1-gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis IVB (Morquio disease type B) was enlightening. To date, there is no treatment available to be offered to patients, but chaperones lead mutated proteins to adopt a native-like conformation and to successfully traffic to their normal cellular destination. DORPHAN is developing an iminosugar-based pharmacological chaperone compound for the treatment of GM1-gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis IVB. A talk on recent developments in the laboratory diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) was particularly interesting, covering the laboratory diagnosis of the MPS diseases by a strategy of clinical examination, biochemical analysis of urine samples, enzyme tests and genetic characterization of underlying mutations. New techniques were developed, including analysis of urinary glycosaminoglycans with tandem mass spectrometry, miniaturized enzyme tests or novel synthetic substrates for enzyme assays using mass spectrometry detection of products using dried blood spots. Feasibility and cost-effectiveness of these methods in newborn screening programs have been demonstrated. Neuromuscular RDs, and especially familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) were a topic of the Bulgarian colleagues. Diagnosis, screening and the role of microglia were also topics of particular interest. In summary, this year RD meeting was exciting and productive on a wide range of diseases and on a novel insights on

  2. A Working Framework for Enabling International Science Data System Interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, J. Steven; Hardman, Sean; Crichton, Daniel J.; Martinez, Santa; Law, Emily; Gordon, Mitchell K.

    2016-07-01

    For diverse scientific disciplines to interoperate they must be able to exchange information based on a shared understanding. To capture this shared understanding, we have developed a knowledge representation framework that leverages ISO level reference models for metadata registries and digital archives. This framework provides multi-level governance, evolves independent of the implementation technologies, and promotes agile development, namely adaptive planning, evolutionary development, early delivery, continuous improvement, and rapid and flexible response to change. The knowledge representation is captured in an ontology through a process of knowledge acquisition. Discipline experts in the role of stewards at the common, discipline, and project levels work to design and populate the ontology model. The result is a formal and consistent knowledge base that provides requirements for data representation, integrity, provenance, context, identification, and relationship. The contents of the knowledge base are translated and written to files in suitable formats to configure system software and services, provide user documentation, validate input, and support data analytics. This presentation will provide an overview of the framework, present a use case that has been adopted by an entire science discipline at the international level, and share some important lessons learned.

  3. Internal Aspects of the Skill Transfer of Manual Assembly Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyo, Daisuke

    2009-01-01

    In manual assembly work, parts are often assembled by applying force with a simple tool or by hand. A worker thus needs control the force he or she applies in working, as an appropriate level of force is requisite for minimizing work failures and improving efficiency. The object of this study is to clarify the relationship between the level of…

  4. Financing Lifelong Learning for All: An International Perspective. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Gerald

    Recent international discussions provide information on various countries' responses to lifelong learning, including the following: (1) existing unmet needs and emerging needs for education and training; (2) funds required compared with what was provided; and (3) methods for acquiring additional funds, among them efficiency measures leading to…

  5. What CEOs Expect of Employees Hired for International Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirks, Ruthann; Buzzard, Janet

    1997-01-01

    Managers from 47 Kansas City companies identified skills and knowledge important for their international employees. Oral and written communication ranked highest, followed by exporting, customs, marketing, business etiquette, and protocol. Employees with high school education had markedly different overseas assignments than did college graduates.…

  6. "Identity Work in a Dialogic International Teaching Practicum"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parr, Graham; Chan, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1970s, international fieldwork has provided opportunities for small numbers of pre-service teachers to teach and learn in a culture different from their own. Research into this fieldwork suggests that pre-service teachers are positive about their experiences, although questions remain about the ethics underpinning some of these programs.…

  7. Utilizing Technology to Infuse International Content into Social Work Curriculum: A Siberian Correspondent Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bye, Lynn; Prom, Kim Boland; Tsybikdorzhieva, Bairma; Boldonova, Irina

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a model for using technology to help fulfill the Council on Social Work Education requirement for international content in the social work curriculum. The literature on including global content and using Web-based technology in social work education is reviewed. Special considerations for international Web-based discussions are…

  8. Working Time and Employment: A Review of International Evidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, William K.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Study of the employment effects of reducing working hours, controlling overtime, job sharing, leave, and early retirement in 10 countries found no significant link between job sharing and employment levels. Work time policies need to be considered in a wider context as a way to address high unemployment. (SK)

  9. Selected Papers from the International Conference on College Teaching and Learning (14th, Jacksonville, Florida, April 1-5, 2003).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jack A., Ed.

    This collection of conference papers includes: "Building a Pedagogical Model for Synchronous Distance Learning Courses" (Panagiotes S. Anastasiades); "Delivery of Courseware using CD-ROM Media" (Brian Brighouse and Denis Edgar-Nevill); "Lessons Learned from Blended Biology Classes" (Arthur L. Buikema, Jr.); "Everything I Ever Needed to Know I…

  10. Seeing Ourselves: Visualization in a Social Context. Readings from the Annual Conference of the International Visual Literacy Association (14th).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braden, Roberts A., Ed.; Walker, Alice D., Ed.

    The 40 papers in this collection cover a wide variety of topics within the broad field of visual literacy. Three preliminary papers discuss visualization through film. The second section, which emphasizes visualization in a social context, contains 10 papers addressing cultural, political, social, and psychological issues, touching upon such…

  11. What Would Peggy Do? 14th Annual Peggy Glanville-Hicks Address 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Michael Kieran

    2012-01-01

    The New Music Network established the Peggy Glanville-Hicks Address in 1999 in honour of one of Australia's great international composers. It is an annual forum for ideas relating to the creation and performance of Australian music. In the spirit of the great Australian composer Peggy Glanville-Hicks, an outstanding advocate of Australian music…

  12. The Successive CME on 13th; 14th and 15th February 2011 and Forbush decrease on 18 February 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maričić, D.; Bostasyan, N.; Dumbović, M.; Chilingarian, A.; Mailyan, B.; Rostomyan, H.; Arakelyan, K.; Vršnak, B.; Roša, D.; Hržina, D.; Romštajn, I.; Veronig, A.

    2013-02-01

    Aims. We analyze the kinematics of three interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) that occurred on 13th, 14th and 15th February 2011 in the active region AR 11155 and have shown that they appeared at the Earth orbit on February, 18th and caused Forbush decrease (FD). Methods. The solar coordinates of flares are (S19W03), (S20W14) and (S21W18). The kinematic curves were obtained using STEREO (A&B) data. Additionally, we explore the possibility of the CME-CME interaction for these three events. We compare obtained estimates of ICME arrival with the in-situ measurements from WIND satellite at L1 point and with ground-based cosmic ray data obtained from SEVAN network. Results. The acceleration of each CME is highly correlated with the associated SXR flares energy release. CMEs that erupted at 13 and 14 Feb 2011 are not associated with prominence eruption; maximum velocity was vmax550 ± 50 km/s and vmax400 ± 50 km/s, respectively. However, 15 Feb 2011 CME is connected with much more violent eruption associated with a prominence, with maximum velocity of vmax 1400 ± 50 km/s. The last overtakes 13th and 14th Feb CMEs at distances of 32 and 160 Rsolar, respectively.

  13. 76 FR 58049 - Atomic Safety and Licensing Board; Honeywell International, Inc.; Metropolis Works Uranium...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Atomic Safety and Licensing Board; Honeywell International, Inc.; Metropolis Works Uranium... assurance for its Metropolis Works uranium conversion facility in Metropolis, Illinois. \\1\\ LBP-11-19,...

  14. Bridges to Work: International Comparison of Transition Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reubens, Beatrice G.

    Using a cross-country framework which draws on the experience of the developed nations--Western Europe, Canada, the United States, and Japan--this study examines the way countries view the problems of the transition from school to work and the role of the transition services in smoothing the passage. Focus is on the formal and public transition…

  15. International Consultation and Training on Group Work in South Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Farah A.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a consultation and training for faculty and graduate students in South Asia under the auspices of the United Nations' Transfer of Knowledge Through Expatriate Nationals (TOKTEN) Program. It describes the development of a consultation relationship and training on group work. Needs assessments focusing on both cultural…

  16. In Progress Internationally: Student Voice Work in Four Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Jane

    2014-01-01

    The late Jean Rudduck led the most extensive and sustained programme of Student Voice work in the United Kingdom to date through the Economic and Social Research Council project "Consulting Pupils about Teaching and Learning". She continues to inspire discussion around Student Voice and its transformational possibilities, bequeathing…

  17. Teachers' Engagement at Work: An International Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klassen, Robert M.; Aldhafri, Said; Mansfield, Caroline F.; Purwanto, Edy; Siu, Angela F. Y.; Wong, Marina W.; Woods-McConney, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the validity of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale in a sample of 853 practicing teachers from Australia, Canada, China (Hong Kong), Indonesia, and Oman. The authors used multigroup confirmatory factor analysis to test the factor structure and measurement invariance across settings, after which they examined the relationships…

  18. NASA Pathways: Intern Employment Program Work Report Summer 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Kyle B.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the work experience and project involvement of Kyle Davidson during his tenure at Kennedy Space Center for the summer of 2014. Projects include the Nitrogen Oxygen Recharge System (NORS), Restore satellite servicing program, and mechanical handling operations for the SAGE III and Rapidscat payloads.

  19. MSW Students' Motivations for Taking an International Social Work Elective Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okech, David; Barner, John R.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents motivating factors for taking an international social work course for a sample of graduate students in the United States. Literature on international education, including courses and international field placements, provides a framework for the study. Qualitative themes showed that students were motivated primarily as a result…

  20. Report from International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG) to COSPAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    We refer to COSPAR and ILEWG ICEUM and lunar conferences and declarations [1-18]. We discuss how lunar missions SMART-1, Kaguya, Chang'E1&2, Chandrayaan-1, LCROSS, LRO, GRAIL, LADEE, Chang'E3 and upcoming missions contribute to lunar exploration objectives & roadmap. We present the GLUC/ICEUM11 declaration and give a report on ongoing relevant ILEWG community activities, with focus on: “1. Science and exploration - World-wide access to raw and derived (geophysical units) data products using consistent formats and coordinate systems will maximize return on investment. We call to develop and implement plans for generation, validation, and release of these data products. Data should be made available for scientific analysis and supporting the development and planning of future missions - There are still Outstanding Questions: Structure and composition of crust, mantle, and core and implications for the origin and evolution of the Earth-Moon system; Timing, origin, and consequences of late heavy bombardment; Impact processes and regolith evolution; Nature and origin of volatile emplacement; Implications for resource utilization. These questions require international cooperation and sharing of results in order to be answered in a cost-effective manner - Ground truth information on the lunar far side is missing and needed to address many important scientific questions, e.g. with a sample return from South Pole-Aitken Basin - Knowledge of the interior is poor relative to the surface, and is needed to address a number of key questions, e.g. with International Lunar Network for seismometry and other geophysical measurements - Lunar missions will be driven by exploration, resource utilization, and science; we should consider minimum science payload for every mission, e.g., landers and rovers should carry instruments to determine surface composition and mineralogy - It is felt important to have a shared database about previous missions available for free, so as to provide

  1. 14th congress of combustion by-products and their health effects-origin, fate, and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources.

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Eva; Andersson, Patrik L; Bidleman, Terry; Boman, Christoffer; Carlin, Danielle J; Collina, Elena; Cormier, Stephania A; Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra C; Gullett, Brian K; Johansson, Christer; Lucas, Donald; Lundin, Lisa; Lundstedt, Staffan; Marklund, Stellan; Nording, Malin L; Ortuño, Nuria; Sallam, Asmaa A; Schmidt, Florian M; Jansson, Stina

    2016-04-01

    The 14th International Congress on Combustion By-Products and Their Health Effects was held in Umeå, Sweden from June 14th to 17th, 2015. The Congress, mainly sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program and the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, focused on the "Origin, fate and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources". The international delegates included academic and government researchers, engineers, scientists, policymakers and representatives of industrial partners. The Congress provided a unique forum for the discussion of scientific advances in this research area since it addressed in combination the health-related issues and the environmental implications of combustion by-products. The scientific outcomes of the Congress included the consensus opinions that: (a) there is a correlation between human exposure to particulate matter and increased cardiac and respiratory morbidity and mortality; (b) because currently available data does not support the assessment of differences in health outcomes between biomass smoke and other particulates in outdoor air, the potential human health and environmental impacts of emerging air-pollution sources must be addressed. Assessment will require the development of new approaches to characterize combustion emissions through advanced sampling and analytical methods. The Congress also concluded the need for better and more sustainable e-waste management and improved policies, usage and disposal methods for materials containing flame retardants.

  2. 14th congress of combustion by-products and their health effects-origin, fate, and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources.

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Eva; Andersson, Patrik L; Bidleman, Terry; Boman, Christoffer; Carlin, Danielle J; Collina, Elena; Cormier, Stephania A; Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra C; Gullett, Brian K; Johansson, Christer; Lucas, Donald; Lundin, Lisa; Lundstedt, Staffan; Marklund, Stellan; Nording, Malin L; Ortuño, Nuria; Sallam, Asmaa A; Schmidt, Florian M; Jansson, Stina

    2016-04-01

    The 14th International Congress on Combustion By-Products and Their Health Effects was held in Umeå, Sweden from June 14th to 17th, 2015. The Congress, mainly sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program and the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, focused on the "Origin, fate and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources". The international delegates included academic and government researchers, engineers, scientists, policymakers and representatives of industrial partners. The Congress provided a unique forum for the discussion of scientific advances in this research area since it addressed in combination the health-related issues and the environmental implications of combustion by-products. The scientific outcomes of the Congress included the consensus opinions that: (a) there is a correlation between human exposure to particulate matter and increased cardiac and respiratory morbidity and mortality; (b) because currently available data does not support the assessment of differences in health outcomes between biomass smoke and other particulates in outdoor air, the potential human health and environmental impacts of emerging air-pollution sources must be addressed. Assessment will require the development of new approaches to characterize combustion emissions through advanced sampling and analytical methods. The Congress also concluded the need for better and more sustainable e-waste management and improved policies, usage and disposal methods for materials containing flame retardants. PMID:26906006

  3. Benefits of an international working exchange in pediatric cardiology.

    PubMed

    Finley, John P; Ramsay, James M; Bullock, Andrew; Chen, Robert P; Warren, Andrew E; Wong, Kenny K

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a 1-year exchange between members of two pediatric cardiology centers: one in Canada and one in Australia. Five cardiologists participated in sequence, fully engaging in the activities of the host department. The motivation of the exchange was broadly educational including clinical experience, shared expertise, teaching, and research collaboration. Structured debriefing confirmed the value of the exchange. In addition to the experience of working in a different medical system, eight research papers were developed, with two research projects ongoing as well as subsequent exchanges of nursing and technical personnel. Interchange between two academic departments can add strength to both and allow development of new skills and research activity.

  4. [Plague and creative art. On the influential effect on art of the 14th century by black death].

    PubMed

    Seiler, R

    1990-01-01

    The present paper tries to shed light on the influence of the plague upon art. It considers above all the period after the "Black Death", i.e. the second half of the 14th century. Some changes of art are quantitative: its production is lessened by the effects of the plague--e.g. by the death of an artist--or increased by religious donations. The influence on style is similarly contradictory. Retardation as well as acceleration of the stylistic development can be observed. A third point consists in the changes in iconography of "Post-Plague-Art", showing a different interpretation of existing themes or introducing new ones. The varied conditions of production and reception of the different artistic genres makes the examination of the interaction between plague and art extremely complex.

  5. Student Interns' Socially Constructed Work Realities: Narrowing the Work Expectation-Reality Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    New employees, including college students, often experience expectation-reality gaps about work, making the assimilation process more difficult for all. This qualitative study explores the role of the internship in narrowing the work expectation-reality gap. This article addresses two research questions: (a) What do students learn about work…

  6. Working for Change across International Borders: The Association of Headmistresses and Education for International Citizenship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Joyce

    2007-01-01

    This article contributes to the retrieval of the "lost history" of interwar internationalism that is increasingly receiving attention from historians of education. It traces the involvement of the English Association of Headmistresses (AHM) in a range of organizations that networked women educationists with women's organizations, with educational…

  7. Mass, Speed, Direction: John Buridan's 14th-Century Concept of Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graney, Christopher M.

    2013-10-01

    "Modern science began in the Middle Ages," a fact that has been forgotten thanks to the celebrated accomplishments of Copernicus and Galileo, who did not acknowledge their predecessors. So states James Hannam in a January 2010 article in History Today. Among the scientists of the Middle Ages that Hannam mentions is John Buridan, a French thinker who was the first to develop modern concepts of inertia and momentum. Buridan's work has been known to historians of science for decades2 and remains a topic of discussion among them today.3,4 However, it is not well-known in physics circles,5 although there was an American Journal of Physics discussion of Buridan 35 years ago as part of a history of inertia.6 Readers of The Physics Teacher may find Buridan of interest both as a matter of history and because Buridan presents important physics ideas in a different sort of way, which may be of value in the physics classroom.

  8. Breaking Cycles of Violence. A Work Group of the International Work Group on Death, Dying and Bereavement (IWG)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Death Studies, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Violence begets violence and it is important to understand how cycles of violence are perpetuated if we are to find solutions to the global problems they present. A multi-disciplinary group of The International Work Group on Death, Dying and Bereavement has developed a model of the cyclical events that perpetuate violence at all levels including…

  9. Internal marketing, customer orientation, and organizational commitment: moderating effects of work status.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meiju; Chen, Mei-Yen

    2013-08-01

    Associations among internal marketing, customer orientation, and organizational commitment were examined, particularly with regard to the moderating effects of work status on the relationships between internal marketing and customer orientation or organizational commitment, in a cross-sectional design with structural equation modeling. Two studies (Ns = 119 and 251) were conducted among full- and part-time service employees at Taipei Sports Centers. Internal marketing was associated with organizational commitment and customer orientation. Customer orientation was associated with organizational commitment and partially mediated the relation between internal marketing and organizational commitment. Furthermore, work status significantly moderated the relationships between internal marketing and customer orientation but not between internal marketing and organizational commitment. Implications and directions for future research were discussed.

  10. Internal marketing, customer orientation, and organizational commitment: moderating effects of work status.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meiju; Chen, Mei-Yen

    2013-08-01

    Associations among internal marketing, customer orientation, and organizational commitment were examined, particularly with regard to the moderating effects of work status on the relationships between internal marketing and customer orientation or organizational commitment, in a cross-sectional design with structural equation modeling. Two studies (Ns = 119 and 251) were conducted among full- and part-time service employees at Taipei Sports Centers. Internal marketing was associated with organizational commitment and customer orientation. Customer orientation was associated with organizational commitment and partially mediated the relation between internal marketing and organizational commitment. Furthermore, work status significantly moderated the relationships between internal marketing and customer orientation but not between internal marketing and organizational commitment. Implications and directions for future research were discussed. PMID:24340810

  11. Group Work Experiences: Domestic MBA Student Experiences and Outcomes when Working with International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafferty, Patricia D.

    2013-01-01

    This article forms part of an exploration into the results of a single-case, embedded study that was conducted to explore how domestic part-time graduate business students in the United States experience group work for summative assessment. Multiple information collection methods were utilised, including open-ended and semi-structured interviews,…

  12. International Students' Experience of Studying and Working at a Northeastern Public University in the US

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwadzo, Moses

    2014-01-01

    This study explores international students' experiences with studying and working at a North Eastern public university. Through phenomenological research approach that utilized face-to-face interview and photo-elicitation techniques, the personal experiences of twenty international students were captured. The findings of this study indicated that…

  13. International Labour Standards and Technical Co-Operation: The Case of Special Public Works Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Jean

    1989-01-01

    Applies international labor standards to results of the International Labour Office's special public works programs to discover whether program intentions have been met. Finds that while productive employment has been pursued, popular participation is not occurring and such issues as (1) forced labor, (2) child employment, and (3) inequality of…

  14. Reskilled and "Running Ahead": Teachers in an International School Talk about Their Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a study of the professional identity of expatriate teachers working in an international school in Malaysia. It examines the practical, cultural and professional challenges they experienced as they transitioned to an international school setting. Their experiences of curricular, organisational and cultural change are…

  15. Reflections and Experiences of Student Paramedics Undertaking International Work-Integrated Learning Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Paul; Thyer, Liz; Van Nugteren, Ben; Mitchell, Glen; Werner, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    International work-integrated learning (WIL) is increasingly common in health-related programs in Australian universities. Paramedicine programs are beginning to explore international WIL in line with the globalization of paramedicine as a profession and the national higher education emphasis on outward bound learning experiences. Using…

  16. Internal medicine residency redesign: proposal of the Internal Medicine Working Group.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Ralph I; Kassirer, Jerome P; Holmboe, Eric S; Humphrey, Holly J; Verghese, Abraham; Croft, Carol; Kwok, Minjung; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2011-09-01

    Concerned with the quality of internal medicine training, many leaders in the field assembled to assess the state of the residency, evaluate the decline in interest in the specialty, and create a framework for invigorating the discipline. Although many external factors are responsible, we also found ourselves culpable: allowing senior role models to opt out of important training activities, ignoring a progressive atrophy of bedside skills, and focusing on lock-step curricula, lectures, and compiled diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The group affirmed its commitment to a vision of internal medicine rooted in science and learned with mentors at the bedside. Key factors for new emphasis include patient-centered small group teaching, greater incorporation of clinical epidemiology and health services research, and better schedule control for trainees. Because previous proposals were weakened by lack of evidence, we propose to organize the Cooperative Educational Studies Group, a pool of training programs that will collect a common data set describing their programs, design interventions to be tested rigorously in multi-methodological approaches, and at the same time produce knowledge about high-quality practice. PMID:21854887

  17. Revised International Staging System for Multiple Myeloma: A Report From International Myeloma Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Antonio; Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Oliva, Stefania; Lokhorst, Henk M.; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Rosinol, Laura; Richardson, Paul; Caltagirone, Simona; Lahuerta, Juan José; Facon, Thierry; Bringhen, Sara; Gay, Francesca; Attal, Michel; Passera, Roberto; Spencer, Andrew; Offidani, Massimo; Kumar, Shaji; Musto, Pellegrino; Lonial, Sagar; Petrucci, Maria T.; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Zamagni, Elena; Morgan, Gareth; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Durie, Brian G.M.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Sonneveld, Pieter; San Miguel, Jésus; Cavo, Michele; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Moreau, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The clinical outcome of multiple myeloma (MM) is heterogeneous. A simple and reliable tool is needed to stratify patients with MM. We combined the International Staging System (ISS) with chromosomal abnormalities (CA) detected by interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization after CD138 plasma cell purification and serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) to evaluate their prognostic value in newly diagnosed MM (NDMM). Patients and Methods Clinical and laboratory data from 4,445 patients with NDMM enrolled onto 11 international trials were pooled together. The K-adaptive partitioning algorithm was used to define the most appropriate subgroups with homogeneous survival. Results ISS, CA, and LDH data were simultaneously available in 3,060 of 4,445 patients. We defined the following three groups: revised ISS (R-ISS) I (n = 871), including ISS stage I (serum β2-microglobulin level < 3.5 mg/L and serum albumin level ≥ 3.5 g/dL), no high-risk CA [del(17p) and/or t(4;14) and/or t(14;16)], and normal LDH level (less than the upper limit of normal range); R-ISS III (n = 295), including ISS stage III (serum β2-microglobulin level > 5.5 mg/L) and high-risk CA or high LDH level; and R-ISS II (n = 1,894), including all the other possible combinations. At a median follow-up of 46 months, the 5-year OS rate was 82% in the R-ISS I, 62% in the R-ISS II, and 40% in the R-ISS III groups; the 5-year PFS rates were 55%, 36%, and 24%, respectively. Conclusion The R-ISS is a simple and powerful prognostic staging system, and we recommend its use in future clinical studies to stratify patients with NDMM effectively with respect to the relative risk to their survival. PMID:26240224

  18. 76 FR 61368 - Preparation for International Conference on Harmonization Steering Committee and Expert Working...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ... Steering Committee and Expert Working Group Meetings in Seville, Spain; Regional Public Meeting AGENCY... Working Group Meetings in Seville, Spain'' to provide information and receive comments on the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) as well as the upcoming meetings in Seville, Spain. The...

  19. 77 FR 14528 - Preparation for International Conference on Harmonization Steering Committee and Expert Working...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-12

    ... Steering Committee and Expert Working Group Meetings in Fukuoka, Japan; Regional Public Meeting AGENCY... Working Group Meetings in Fukuoka, Japan'' to provide information and receive comments on the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) as well as the upcoming meetings in Fukuoka, Japan. The...

  20. After the Ink Dries: Doing Collaborative International Work in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Sue; Groen, Janet

    2009-01-01

    This article offers a contribution to the limited literature on internationalization as academic work. Using narrative inquiry incorporating a mode of research known as "car time", the authors generate narratives of practice to analyse the day-to-day work involved in their international university collaboration. The article foreshadows the…

  1. 76 FR 39918 - Honeywell International, Inc., Metropolis Works; License Amendment Request and Request for a Hearing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... FR 49139, August 28, 2007). The E-Filing process requires participants to submit and serve all... COMMISSION Honeywell International, Inc., Metropolis Works; License Amendment Request and Request for a... Metropolis Works Facility site located in Metropolis, Illinois. License No. SUB-526 authorizes the...

  2. International Social Work: A Situational Analysis of Accredited CSWE Institutions in Mid-Western USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamin, Sylvester Amara

    2012-01-01

    The importance of International social work education these days cannot be overstated as social work has been established in nearly every part of the world. Also, globalization has been pivotal as it has facilitated the movement of people, improved technology and other social problems as well. American higher education is challenged to expand and…

  3. Jet lag and shift work sleep disorders: how to help reset the internal clock.

    PubMed

    Kolla, Bhanu P; Auger, R Robert

    2011-10-01

    Jet lag sleep disorder and shift work sleep disorder are the result of dyssynchrony between the internal clock and the external light-dark cycle, brought on by rapid travel across time zones or by working a nonstandard schedule. Symptoms can be minimized by optimizing the sleep environment, by strategic avoidance of and exposure to light, and also with drug and behavioral therapies.

  4. An International Experience for Social Work Students: Self-Reflection through Poetry and Journal Writing Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furman, Rich; Coyne, Ann; Negi, Nalini Junko

    2008-01-01

    This descriptive article explores the uses of poetry and journaling exercises as means of helping students develop their self-reflective capacities within the context of international social work. First, self-reflection and its importance to social work practice and education is discussed. Second, the importance of self-reflection in international…

  5. Dealing with Diversity: A Key Issue for Educational Management. Proceedings of the ENIRDEM Conference (14th, Brno and Telc, the Czech Republic, September 22-25, 2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pol, Milan, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    An anthology of speeches of the 14th conference of the European Network for Improving Research and Development in Educational Management (ENIRDEM), held on 22 to 25 September 2005 in Brno and Telc, the Czech Republic, this book contains 13 contributions by 19 speakers and co-authors, covering various questions related to the topic of diversity in…

  6. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council of Graduate Schools in the United States (14th, Phoenix, Arizona, December 4-6, 1974).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, John W., Ed.

    The report of the 14th annual meeting of the Council of Graduate Schools presents a seminar on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Board by Lorene I. Rogers, Lincoln E. Moses, Warren W. Willingham, and Herman A. Witkin. The task force on Biomedical Sciences report is presented by Jerold Roschwalb, Lyle V. Jones, Robert H. Grant, and Penny D.…

  7. Clear Signals? Telecommunications, Convergence, and the Quality of Information. A Summary of Proceedings of the FLICC Forum on Federal Information Policies (14th, Washington, DC, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Library and Information Center Committee, Washington, DC.

    The purpose of the Federal Library and Information Center Committee (FLICC) is to make federal library and information centers' resources more effective through professional development of employees, promotion of library and information services, and coordination of available resources. This 14th Forum concerns telecommunications and information…

  8. [Chronic disease and health condition prevention in childhood--2nd part: emphases from the 14th Symposium of Preventive Pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Batinica, Maja; Grgurić, Josip; Jadrijević-Cvrlje, Filip

    2014-01-01

    Chronically ill children nowdays in developed countries are more prevalent than before, and thanks to modern therapeutic modalities more children are surviving into adulthood. Increased survival cannot be assumed to be associated with increased quality of life. With the chronically ill child holistic approach is important, which incorporates not only realisation of the highest possible standards in diagnostics and treatment, but also special care for disease prevention. All this is very important in so called integrative approach in the care of a chronically ill child, with the aim of achieving as high as possible quality of life and complete social integration. At the 14th Preventive Pediatrics Symposium, which took place in Skrad, June 1' 2013, from preventive standpoint, the following chronic childhood illnesses were discussed: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder--ADHD, migraine, thyroid gland diseases, leukemia, cystic fibrosis, chronic renal disease, chronic inflammatory liver disease, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and chronic otitis media with effusion. It is emphasized that talking about a disease prevention, there are three levels of it--primary, second- ary and tertiary prevention: how to avoid occurrence of disease, how to diagnose and treat existent disease in early stages, before it causes significant morbidity, and finally how to reduce the negative impact of existent disease by restoring function and reducing disease-related complications--how to improve quality of life of children with chronic diseases. Quaternary prevention describes methods to mitigate or avoid results of unnecessary or excessive interventions of the health system. An important process is also transition of care from child-oriented to adult-oriented care. Adults with chronic health conditions should continue to be evaluated periodically for possible late consequences of their childhood illness and previ- ous medical treatments. PMID

  9. A Qualitative Study of Work-Life Choices in Academic Internal Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaac, Carol; Byars-Winston, Angela; McSorley, Rebecca; Schultz, Alexandra; Kaatz, Anna; Carnes, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    The high attrition rate of female physicians pursuing an academic medicine research career has not been examined in the context of career development theory. We explored how internal medicine residents and faculty experience their work within the context of their broader life domain in order to identify strategies for facilitating career…

  10. FAIJU: An Assessment Center for Developing the Skills of Volunteers Working in International Youth Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurz, Tom

    2009-01-01

    The three non-profit student exchange organizations AFS, Experiment and YFU, have been running a special assessment center for the development of skills necessary for volunteers working in international student exchange. This paper presents the goals and intentions behind this tool and also discusses the use of human resource development tools in…

  11. Interaction between Preservice Teachers and School Social Work Interns in an Urban School Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kransdorf, Martha; Doster, Brenda; Alvarez, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    Examined the results of a year of collaboration and interactions between preservice teachers and social work interns in joint seminars and field-based activities within urban elementary schools. The two groups solved problems and challenges unique to urban schools in formal and informal collaborations. Results found that overall, students…

  12. Internal Working Models of Caregiving and Security of Attachment at Age Six.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Carol; Solomon, Judith

    A study concerning the mother's mental representation of herself as a caregiver focused on: (1) a conceptual framework developed for the purpose of describing and explaining internal working models of caregiving; and (2) efforts to define caregivers' representations of content and process that seem to be associated with attachment insecurity.…

  13. Ensure the Right of Citizens to Work: Problems of Domestic and International Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berdiyarova, Zhamilya; Serikbekova, Samal; Babajanyan, Yester

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the legal problems of ensuring the right to work of citizens in the Republic of Kazakhstan and to find the conformity of labor laws in the Republic of Kazakhstan to international standards. Using the method of comparison analysis of the legislation of the Republic of Kazakhstan and norms of international…

  14. Internal desynchronization in a model of night-work by forced activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Delgado, R; Angeles-Castellanos, M; Buijs, M R; Escobar, C

    2008-06-26

    Individuals engaged in shift- or night-work show disturbed diurnal rhythms, out of phase with temporal signals associated to the light/dark (LD) cycle, resulting in internal desynchronization. The mechanisms underlying internal desynchrony have been mainly investigated in experimental animals with protocols that induce phase shifts of the LD cycle and thus modify the activity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In this study we developed an animal model of night-work in which the light-day cycle remained stable and rats were required to be active in a rotating wheel for 8 h daily during their sleeping phase (W-SP). This group was compared with rats that were working in the wheel during their activity phase (W-AP) and with undisturbed rats (C). We provide evidence that forced activity during the sleeping phase (W-SP group) alters not only activity, but also the temporal pattern of food intake. In consequence W-SP rats showed a loss of glucose rhythmicity and a reversed rhythm of triacylglycerols. In contrast W-AP rats did not show such changes and exhibited metabolic rhythms similar to those of the controls. The three groups exhibited the nocturnal corticosterone increase, in addition the W-SP and W-AP groups showed increase of plasma corticosterone associated with the start of the working session. Forced activity during the sleep phase did not modify SCN activity characterized by the temporal patterns of PER1 and PER2 proteins, which remained in phase with the LD cycle. These observations indicate that a working regimen during the sleeping period elicits internal desynchronization in which activity combined with feeding uncouples metabolic functions from the biological clock which remains fixed to the LD cycle. The present data suggest that in the night worker the combination of work and eating during working hours may be the cause of internal desynchronization.

  15. 14th-16th century Danube floods and long-term water-level changes reflected in archaeological-sedimentary evidence - in comparison with documentary evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Andrea; Laszlovszky, József

    2014-05-01

    In the present paper an overview of published and unpublished results of archaeological and sedimentary investigations, predominantly reflect on 14th-16th-century changes, are provided and compared to documentary information on flood events and long-term changes. Long-term changes in flood behaviour and average water-level conditions had long-term detectable impacts on sedimentation and fluvio-morphological processes. Moreover, the available archaeological evidence might also provide information on the reaction of the society, in the form of changes in settlement organisation, building structures and processes. At present, information is mainly available concerning the 16th, and partly to the 14th-15th centuries. Medium and short term evidence mainly corresponds to the main flood peaks or even to single catastrophic flood events. Such processes may be identified in archaeological evidence concerning the second half of the 14th, early 15th centuries; while most of the cases listed above were connected to the flood peak (and/or generally increasing water-level conditions) of the late 15th and early 16th centuries. In other cases connections between sedimentary/archaeological evidence and the mid- and late 16th-century high flood-frequency period were presumed. Documentary evidence referring to the same period suggests that higher flood frequency and intensity periods occurred in the early and mid 16th century; a probably more prolonged flood rich period took place in the second half of the 16th century, with a peak in the late 1560s-early 1570s and maybe with another at the end of the 16th century. Earlier flood peaks in documentary evidence were detected on the Danube at the turn of the 14th-15th centuries and in the last decades of the 15th century, continuing in the early 16th century.

  16. Cryogenic engineering and superconductor technology; Proceedings of the 14th International Cryogenic Engineering Conference and International Cryogenic Materials Conference, Kiev, Ukraine, June 8-12, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarek, P.; Rizzuto, C.

    Consideration is given to application concepts of small regenerative cryocoolers in superconducting magnet systems, thermoelectric materials for Peltier cryogenic coolers, closed-cycle liquid helium refrigerators, built-in cryogenic control fixtures with electric drive, large cryogenic helium systems for superconducting magnets, low temperature adsorptive hydrogen isotope separation, cryogenic thermometry for space testing systems, performance of parallel flow He-II heat exchangers, and transient heat transfer to liquid helium at a 100 Hz pulsed heat load. Also discussed are He II cooling of a large superconducting magnet system, a computer code for simulation of thermal processes during quench in superconducting magnet windings, quench energies of multistable composite superconductors, a superconducting hydrogen-cooled switch on Nb-Sn tape, a gravity radiometer with coupled superconducting suspensions, new design of RSFQ logic family, and high-temperature Josephson junctions and their applications.

  17. International-local remuneration differences across six countries: do they undermine poverty reduction work?

    PubMed

    Carr, Stuart C; McWha, Ishbel; Maclachlan, Malcolm; Furnham, Adrian

    2010-10-01

    Despite the rhetoric of a single global economy, professionals in poorer countries continue to be remunerated differently depending on whether they are compensated at a local vs. international rate. Project ADDUP (Are Development Discrepancies Undermining Performance?) surveyed 1290 expatriate and local professionals (response rate = 47%) from aid, education, government, and business sectors in (1) Island Nations (Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands), (2) landlocked economies (Malaŵi, Uganda), and (3) emerging economies (India, China). Difference in pay was estimated using purchasing power parity, from the World Bank's World Development Indicators 2007. Psychological measures included self-reported pay and benefits (remuneration), self-attributed ability, remuneration comparison, sense of justice in remuneration, remuneration-related motivation, thoughts of turnover and thoughts about international mobility. We included control measures of candour, culture shock, cultural values (horizontal/vertical individualism/collectivism), personality (from the "big five"), job satisfaction and work engagement. Controlling for these and country (small effects) and organization effects (medium), (a) pay ratios between international and local workers exceeded what were perceived to be acceptable pay thresholds among respondents remunerated locally; who also reported a combination of a sense of relative (b) injustice and demotivation; which (c) together with job satisfaction/work engagement predicted turnover and international mobility. These findings question the wisdom of dual salary systems in general, expose and challenge a major contradiction between contemporary development policy and practice, and have a range of practical, organizational, and theoretical implications for poverty reduction work.

  18. International-local remuneration differences across six countries: do they undermine poverty reduction work?

    PubMed

    Carr, Stuart C; McWha, Ishbel; Maclachlan, Malcolm; Furnham, Adrian

    2010-10-01

    Despite the rhetoric of a single global economy, professionals in poorer countries continue to be remunerated differently depending on whether they are compensated at a local vs. international rate. Project ADDUP (Are Development Discrepancies Undermining Performance?) surveyed 1290 expatriate and local professionals (response rate = 47%) from aid, education, government, and business sectors in (1) Island Nations (Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands), (2) landlocked economies (Malaŵi, Uganda), and (3) emerging economies (India, China). Difference in pay was estimated using purchasing power parity, from the World Bank's World Development Indicators 2007. Psychological measures included self-reported pay and benefits (remuneration), self-attributed ability, remuneration comparison, sense of justice in remuneration, remuneration-related motivation, thoughts of turnover and thoughts about international mobility. We included control measures of candour, culture shock, cultural values (horizontal/vertical individualism/collectivism), personality (from the "big five"), job satisfaction and work engagement. Controlling for these and country (small effects) and organization effects (medium), (a) pay ratios between international and local workers exceeded what were perceived to be acceptable pay thresholds among respondents remunerated locally; who also reported a combination of a sense of relative (b) injustice and demotivation; which (c) together with job satisfaction/work engagement predicted turnover and international mobility. These findings question the wisdom of dual salary systems in general, expose and challenge a major contradiction between contemporary development policy and practice, and have a range of practical, organizational, and theoretical implications for poverty reduction work. PMID:22044054

  19. Fathers' and Mothers' Work and Family Issues as Related to Internalizing and Externalizing Behavior of Children Attending Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Margaret S.; Kelley, Michelle L.

    2006-01-01

    Relationships between work and family variables and children's internalizing and externalizing behavior are examined in 132 dual-earner couples of preschool-age children. Mothers' and fathers' parenting stress and mothers' work-family conflict predict children's internalizing behavior; mothers' work-family conflict, mothers' and fathers' parenting…

  20. How do the approaches to accountability compare for charities working in international development?

    PubMed

    Kirsch, David

    2014-09-01

    Approaches to accountability vary between charities working to reduce under-five mortality in underdeveloped countries, and healthcare workers and facilities in Canada. Comparison reveals key differences, similarities and trade-offs. For example, while health professionals are governed by legislation and healthcare facilities have a de facto obligation to be accredited, charities and other international organizations are not subject to mandatory international laws or guidelines or to de facto international standards. Charities have policy goals similar to those found in the Canadian substudies, including access, quality, cost control, cost-effectiveness and customer satisfaction. However, the relative absence of external policy tools means that these goals may not be realized. Accountability can be beneficial, but too much or the wrong kind of accountability can divert resources and diminish returns. PMID:25305397

  1. Teaching `community engagement' in engineering education for international development: Integration of an interdisciplinary social work curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Dorie J.; Lehman Held, Mary; Ellzey, Janet L.; Bailey, William T.; Young, Laurie B.

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews the literature on challenges faced by engineering faculty in educating their students on community-engaged, sustainable technical solutions in developing countries. We review a number of approaches to increasing teaching modules on social and community components of international development education, from adding capstone courses and educational track seminars to integrating content from other disciplines, particularly the social sciences. After summarising recent pedagogical strategies to increase content on community-focused development, we present a case study of how one engineering programme incorporates social work students and faculty to infuse strategies for community engagement in designing and implementing student-led global engineering development projects. We outline how this interdisciplinary pedagogical approach teaches students from the two disciplines to work together in addressing power balances, economic and social issues and overall sustainability of international development projects.

  2. Consider the OIG Work Plan in your 2012 internal audit schedules.

    PubMed

    Schaum, Kathleen D

    2011-12-01

    Wound care professionals should conduct monthly internal audits of their business processes. In addition to auditing, the coding, payment, and coverage issues that are considered issues by the Medicare contractor that processes your claims and the Medicare contractors that audit your claims and payments, be sure to include the OIG Work Plan topics that pertain to your wound care business. Remember, if atopic is important enough to make the OIG Work Plan, it should be important enough to make your 2012 internal audit plan. Because the Medicare Trust Fund is important to all US citizens, everyone has a responsibility to assist in combating fraud, waste, abuse, and mismanagement in HHS programs. Therefore, the OIG Hotline accepts tips from all sources. To provide a tip to the OIG Hotline, see Table 1 for contact information.

  3. International geomagnetic reference field 1980: a report by IAGA Division I working group.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the recommendations of the working group, which suggested additions to IGRF because of the cumulative effect of the inevitable uncertainties in the secular variation models which had led to unacceptable inaccuracies in the IGRF by the late 1970's. The recommendations were accepted by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy on August 15, 1981 at the 4th Scientific Assembly, Edinburgh. An extended table sets out spherical harmonic coefficients of the IGRF 1980.-R.House

  4. Biomass Conversion Task IV 1987 program of work: International Energy Agency Bioenergy Agreement

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D.J.

    1986-12-01

    Biomass is a major, renewable energy resource through out the world, and extensive research is being conducted by many countries on bioenergy technologies. In an effort to improve communications and cooperation in the area of biomass energy, several nations have agreed to a cooperative program of work under the International Energy Agency's Bioenergy Agreement (IEA/BA). Three areas of major importance have been identified including Short Rotation Forestry, Conventional Forestry, and Biomass Conversion. This document describes the 1987 Program of Work for cooperative activities in the area of Biomass Conversion. The background of the cooperation and descriptions of specific conversion projects are presented. Details of activity funding are also provided. 3 tabs.

  5. Agent Based Modeling of Collaboration and Work Practices Onboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquisti, Alessandro; Sierhuis, Maarten; Clancey, William J.; Bradshaw, Jeffrey M.; Shaffo, Mike (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The International Space Station is one the most complex projects ever, with numerous interdependent constraints affecting productivity and crew safety. This requires planning years before crew expeditions, and the use of sophisticated scheduling tools. Human work practices, however, are difficult to study and represent within traditional planning tools. We present an agent-based model and simulation of the activities and work practices of astronauts onboard the ISS based on an agent-oriented approach. The model represents 'a day in the life' of the ISS crew and is developed in Brahms, an agent-oriented, activity-based language used to model knowledge in situated action and learning in human activities.

  6. International perspectives on psychosocial working conditions, mental health, and stress of dairy farm operators.

    PubMed

    Lunner Kolstrup, Christina; Kallioniemi, Marja; Lundqvist, Peter; Kymäläinen, Hanna-Riitta; Stallones, Lorann; Brumby, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Dairy farm operators-farmers, workers, and family members-are faced with many demands and stressors in their daily work and these appear to be shared across countries and cultures. Dairy operators experience high psychosocial demands with respect to a hard work and production ethos, economic influences, and social and environmental responsibility. Furthermore, both traditional and industrial farms are highly dependent on external conditions, such as weather, fluctuating markets, and regulations from government authorities. Possible external stressors include disease outbreaks, taxes related to dairy production, and recent negative societal attitudes to farming in general. Dairy farm operators may have very few or no opportunities to influence and control these external conditions, demands, and expectations. High work demands and expectations coupled with low control and lack of social support can lead to a poor psychosocial work environment, with increased stress levels, ill mental health, depression, and, in the worst cases, suicide. Internationally, farmers with ill mental health have different health service options depending on their location. Regardless of location, it is initially the responsibility of the individual farmer and farm family to handle mental health and stress, which can be of short- or long-term duration. This paper reviews the literature on the topics of psychosocial working conditions, mental health, stress, depression, and suicide among dairy farm operators, farm workers, and farm family members in an international perspective. PMID:23844791

  7. Reports and recommendations from COSPAR Planetary Exploration Committee (PEX) & International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Foing, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    In response to the growing importance of space exploration, the objectives of the COSPAR Panel on Exploration (PEX) are to provide high quality, independent science input to support the development of a global space exploration program while working to safeguard the scientific assets of solar system bodies. PEX engages with COSPAR Commissions and Panels, science foundations, IAA, IAF, UN bodies, and IISL to support in particular national and international space exploration working groups and the new era of planetary exploration. COSPAR's input, as gathered by PEX, is intended to express the consensus view of the international scientific community and should ultimately provide a series of guidelines to support future space exploration activities and cooperative efforts, leading to outstanding scientific discoveries, opportunities for innovation, strategic partnerships, technology progression, and inspiration for people of all ages and cultures worldwide. We shall focus on the lunar exploration aspects, where the COSPAR PEX is building on previous COSPAR, ILEWG and community conferences. An updated COSPAR PEX report is published and available online (Ehrenfreund P. et al, COSPAR planetary exploration panel report, http://www.gwu.edu/~spi/assets/COSPAR_PEX2012.pdf). We celebrate 20 years after the 1st International Conference on Exploration and Utilisation of the Moon at Beatenberg in June 1994. The International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG) was established the year after in April 1995 at an EGS meeting in Hamburg, Germany. As established in its charter, this working group reports to COSPAR and is charged with developing an international strategy for the exploration of the Moon (http://sci.esa.int/ilewg/ ). It discusses coordination between missions, and a road map for future international lunar exploration and utilisation. It fosters information exchange or potential and real future lunar robotic and human missions, as well as for new scientific and

  8. Negative childhood experiences and adult love relationships: the role of internal working models of attachment.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Gerard; Maughan, Barbara

    2010-09-01

    This study investigated links between internal working models of attachment and the quality of adult love relationships in a high risk sample of women (n = 34), all of whom reported negative parenting in childhood. Half of the sample was identified as having a history of satisfying adult love relationships, while the remainder had experienced ongoing adult relationship problems. Measures of internal working models of attachment were made using the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI). A strong association was found between attachment classifications and the quality of adult love relationships. In addition, women with satisfying love relationships demonstrated significantly higher coherence of mind ratings than those with poor relationship histories. Insecure working models of attachment were associated with problems in adult love relationships. Although secure/autonomous attachment status was linked to optimal adult relationship outcomes, some women with a history of satisfying love relationships had insecure working models of attachment. These results suggest that the ways that adults process early experiences may influence later psychosocial functioning.

  9. Cultural challenges faced by American mission control personnel working with international partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, J. L.; Ritsher, J. B.

    INTRODUCTION Operating the International Space Station ISS involves an indefinite continuous series of long-duration international missions and this requires an unprecedented degree of cooperation across multiple sites organizations and nations Both junior and senior mission control personnel have had to find ways to address the cultural challenges inherent in such work but neither have had systematic training in how to do so The goals of this study were to identify and evaluate the major cultural challenges faced by ISS mission control personnel and to highlight the approaches that they have found most effective to surmount these challenges We pay particular attention to the approaches successfully employed by the senior personnel and the training needs identified by the junior personnel We also evaluate the extent to which the identified approaches and needs are consistent across the two samples METHODS Participants included a sample of 14 senior ISS flight controllers and a contrasting sample of 12 more junior controllers All participants were mission operations specialists chosen on the basis of having worked extensively with international partners Data were collected using a semi-structured qualitative interview and content analyzed using an iterative process with multiple coders and consensus meetings to resolve discrepancies RESULTS The senior respondents had substantial consensus on several cultural challenges and on key strategies for dealing with them and they offered a wide range of specific tactics for implementing these strategies

  10. Making short-term international medical volunteer placements work: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Elnawawy, Omnia; Lee, Andrew CK; Pohl, Gerda

    2014-01-01

    Background International medical volunteering has grown in recent decades. It has the potential to benefit and harm the volunteer and host countries; but there is a paucity of literature on the impacts of international medical volunteering and a need to find ways to optimise the benefits of such placements. Aim In this study, one example of international medical volunteering was examined involving British GPs on short-term placements in Nepal. The intention was to explore the expectations and experiences of the local health workers, volunteers, and host organisation to try and understand what makes volunteer placements work. Design Qualitative study of key informant interviews. Setting Stakeholders of a short-term international medical volunteer (IMV) placement programme in Nepal. Method Key informant interviews were carried out via face-to-face or telephone/internet interviews with five previous volunteers, three representatives from a non-governmental organisation providing placements, and five local health workers in Nepal who had had contact with the IMVs. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analysed using standard thematic framework approaches. Results All the stakeholders had their own specific motives for participating in the IMV programme. The relationship between volunteers and the Nepalese health workers was complex and characterised by discrepant and occasionally unrealistic expectations. Managing these different expectations was challenging. Conclusion Contextual issues and cultural differences are important considerations in medical volunteer programmes, and this study highlights the importance of robust preparation pre-placement for the volunteer and host to ensure positive outcomes. PMID:24868070

  11. International University Co-operation: Summary Record of a Working Party on International University Co-operation. Papers-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Association of Universities, Paris (France).

    This report delineates areas, patterns, effects, and purposes of international university cooperation. Areas of international university cooperation encompass teaching and study, research, university administration and organization. Patterns of cooperation include the basic principles of governing agreements, methods for full university…

  12. International experts’ perspectives on a curriculum for psychologists working in primary health care: implication for Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Setiyawati, Diana; Colucci, Erminia; Blashki, Grant; Wraith, Ruth; Minas, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Enhancing primary health care to incorporate mental health services is a key strategy for closing the treatment gap for people with mental disorders. The integration of psychological care into primary health care is a critical step in addressing poor access to mental health specialists. As the psychology profession is increasingly called upon to prepare psychologists for primary health care settings, an international experts' consensus is valuable in guiding the development of a high-quality curriculum for psychologists working in the primary health care context. A Delphi method was used to gain a consensus on the most appropriate roles and training for psychologists. Initial constructs and themes were derived from a detailed literature review and sent to 114 international experts in primary mental health care from five continents. Overall, 52 experts who participated agreed that psychologists should have wide-ranging roles and skills including clinical, health promotion and advocacy skills. This study has identified the specific roles and training needed by psychologists to enable them to work more effectively in primary health care settings. The consensus will inform the development of a curriculum for psychologists working in primary health care in Indonesia, and is part of a broader suite of studies. PMID:25750818

  13. Primary proton and helium spectra in the energy range 10 to the 12th to 10 to the 14th eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.; Ogata, T.; Saito, T.; Holynski, R.; Jurak, A.; Wolter, W.; Wosiek, B.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Parnell, T. A.; Jones, W. V.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of proton and helium spectra have been made in the energy range 10 to the 12th to 10 to the 14th eV. Large area thin emulsion calorimeters were used in the Japanese American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment balloon flight series. Power indices of the integral spectra for both nuclei are consistent with published data at lower energies. Absolute intensities are also consistent for helium and proton fluxes with extrapolations of previous data. No steepening of the proton spectrum is indicated.

  14. Mariculture associated with oil and gas structures: A compendium. Information transfer meeting (14th), mariculture sessions. Held in New Orleans, Louisiana on November 17, 1994. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reggio, V.C.

    1996-09-01

    Increased interest in the use of offshore oil and gas platforms for growing coastal and pelagic fish and shellfish for commercial markets led to MMS to sponsor a forum on this topic. This report encompasses the views, opinions, constraints, limitations, possibilities, and proposals from representative of the public and private sectors with interest and concern for fishery development in the Gulf of Mexico. This report provides summaries of the presentations given at the mariculture session during the 14th Annual Information transfer Meeting held in New Orleans in November 1994.

  15. International studies on burnup credit criticality safety by an OECD/NEA working group

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.C.; Okuno, H.; DeHart, M.D.; Nouri, A.; Sartori, E.

    1998-11-01

    The results and conclusions from a six-year study by an international benchmarking group in the comparison of computational methods for evaluating burnup credit in criticality safety analyses is presented. Approximately 20 participants from 12 countries have provided results for most problems. Four detailed benchmark problems for pressurized-water-reactor fuel have been completed. Results from work being finalized, addressing burnup credit for boiling-water-reactor fuel, are discussed, as well as planned activities for additional benchmarks, including mixed-oxide fuels, and other activities.

  16. Public health agenda setting in a global context: the International Labor Organization's decent work agenda.

    PubMed

    Di Ruggiero, Erica; Cohen, Joanna E; Cole, Donald C; Forman, Lisa

    2015-04-01

    We drew on two agenda-setting theories usually applied at the state or national level to assess their utility at the global level: Kingdon's multiple streams theory and Baumgartner and Jones's punctuated equilibrium theory. We illustrate our analysis with findings from a qualitative study of the International Labor Organization's Decent Work Agenda. We found that both theories help explain the agenda-setting mechanisms that operate in the global context, including how windows of opportunity open and what role institutions play as policy entrepreneurs. Future application of these theories could help characterize power struggles between global actors, whose voices are heard or silenced, and their impact on global policy agenda setting.

  17. Effect of Joint Commission International Accreditation on the Nursing Work Environment in a Tertiary Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Ilya; Farkash-Fink, Naomi; Fish, Miri

    2016-01-01

    How might a tertiary hospital's nursing staff respond to the huge improvement effort required for external accreditation if they are encouraged to lead the change process themselves? This article reports the results of a concurrent evaluation of the nursing work climate at ward level, before and after accreditation by the Joint Commission International. Physician-nurse relations improved; the involvement of social workers, dieticians, and physiotherapists increased; support services responded more quickly to requests; and management-line staff relations became closer. PMID:27096904

  18. International Cooperation in the Field of International Space Station Payload Safety: Overcoming Differences and Working for Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Ozawa, Masayuki; Takeyasu, Yoshioka; Griffith, Gerald; Goto, Katsuhito; Mitsui, Masami

    2010-09-01

    The importance of international cooperation among the International Space Station(ISS) Program participants is ever increasing as the ISS nears assembly complete. In the field of payload safety assurance, NASA and JAXA have enhanced their cooperation level. The authors describe the evolution of cooperation between the two agencies and the challenges encountered and overcame. NASA and JAXA have been working toward development of a NASA Payload Safety Review Panel(PSRP) franchise panel at JAXA for several years. When the JAXA Safety Review Panel(SRP) becomes a fully franchised panel of the NASA PSRP, the JAXA SRP will have the authority review and approve all JAXA ISS payloads operated on USOS and JEM, although NASA and JAXA joint reviews may be conducted as necessary. A NASA PSRP franchised panel at JAXA will streamline the conventional review process. Japanese payload organizations will not have to go through both JAXA and NASA payload safety reviews, while NASA will be relieved of a certain amount of review activities. The persistent efforts have recently born fruit. For the past two years, NASA and JAXA have increased emphasis on efforts to develop a NASA PSRP Franchised Panel at JAXA with concrete results. In 2009, NASA and JAXA signed Charter and Joint Development Plan. At the end of 2009, NASA PSRP transferred some review responsibility to the JAXA SRP under the franchising charter. Although JAXA had long history of reviewing payloads by their own panel prior to NASA PSRP reviews, it took several years for JAXA to receive NASA PSRP approval for delegation of franchised review authority to JAXA. This paper discusses challenges JAXA and NAXA faced. Considerations were required in developing a franchise at JAXA for history and experiences of the JAXA SRP as well as language and cultural differences. The JAXA panel, not only had its own well-established processes and supporting organizational structures which had some differences from its NASA PSRP counterparts

  19. Acute Exacerbation of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. An International Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Collard, Harold R; Ryerson, Christopher J; Corte, Tamera J; Jenkins, Gisli; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Lederer, David J; Lee, Joyce S; Maher, Toby M; Wells, Athol U; Antoniou, Katerina M; Behr, Juergen; Brown, Kevin K; Cottin, Vincent; Flaherty, Kevin R; Fukuoka, Junya; Hansell, David M; Johkoh, Takeshi; Kaminski, Naftali; Kim, Dong Soon; Kolb, Martin; Lynch, David A; Myers, Jeffrey L; Raghu, Ganesh; Richeldi, Luca; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Martinez, Fernando J

    2016-08-01

    Acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis has been defined as an acute, clinically significant, respiratory deterioration of unidentifiable cause. The objective of this international working group report on acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was to provide a comprehensive update on the topic. A literature review was conducted to identify all relevant English text publications and abstracts. Evidence-based updates on the epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, prognosis, and management of acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are provided. Finally, to better reflect the current state of knowledge and improve the feasibility of future research into its etiology and treatment, the working group proposes a new conceptual framework for acute respiratory deterioration in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and a revised definition and diagnostic criteria for acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  20. Acute Exacerbation of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. An International Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Collard, Harold R; Ryerson, Christopher J; Corte, Tamera J; Jenkins, Gisli; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Lederer, David J; Lee, Joyce S; Maher, Toby M; Wells, Athol U; Antoniou, Katerina M; Behr, Juergen; Brown, Kevin K; Cottin, Vincent; Flaherty, Kevin R; Fukuoka, Junya; Hansell, David M; Johkoh, Takeshi; Kaminski, Naftali; Kim, Dong Soon; Kolb, Martin; Lynch, David A; Myers, Jeffrey L; Raghu, Ganesh; Richeldi, Luca; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Martinez, Fernando J

    2016-08-01

    Acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis has been defined as an acute, clinically significant, respiratory deterioration of unidentifiable cause. The objective of this international working group report on acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was to provide a comprehensive update on the topic. A literature review was conducted to identify all relevant English text publications and abstracts. Evidence-based updates on the epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, prognosis, and management of acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are provided. Finally, to better reflect the current state of knowledge and improve the feasibility of future research into its etiology and treatment, the working group proposes a new conceptual framework for acute respiratory deterioration in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and a revised definition and diagnostic criteria for acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27299520

  1. RECENT ACTIVITIES OF THE NUCLEAR SMUGGLING INTERNATIONAL TECHNICAL WORKING GROUP TO THWART ILLICIT TRAFFICKING

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D K; Biro, T; Chartier, B; Mayer, K; Niemeyer, S; Thompson, P

    2007-10-25

    The Nuclear Smuggling International Technical Working Group (ITWG) is an informal association of nuclear forensic practitioners working in partnership with law enforcement, first responder, and nuclear regulatory professionals that cooperate to deter the illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. The objective of the ITWG is to advance the science of nuclear forensics and to provide a common approach and effective technical solutions to governments who request assistance. the ITWG was chartered in 1996 and since that time 30 nations and organizations have participated in 12 annual meetings and two analytical round-robin trials involving plutonium and highly enriched uranium. A third analytical round-robin as well as several table-top exercises are planned for later in 2007-2008. International interest in the ITWG has grown in over the past five years measured by the number of participants at its annual meetings. This growth has spawned the ITWG Nuclear Forensics Laboratories as a companion technical affiliate focusing exclusively on the scientific aspects of nuclear forensics and nuclear smuggling incident response.

  2. Historical flood data series of Eastern Spanish Coast (14th-20th centuries). Improving identification of climatic patterns and human factors of flood events from primary documentary sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberola, Armando; Barriendos, Mariano; Gil-Guirado, Salvador; Pérez-Morales, Alfredo; Balasch, Carles; Castelltort, Xavier; Mazón, Jordi; Pino, David; Lluís Ruiz-Bellet, Josep; Tuset, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Historical flood data series of Eastern Spanish Coast (14th-20th centuries). Improving identification of climatic patterns and human factors of flood events from primary documentary sources Armando Alberola, Barriendos, M., Gil-Guirado, S., Pérez Morales, A., Balasch, C., Castelltort, X., Mazón, J., Pino, D., Ruiz-Bellet, J.L., Tuset, J. Historical flood events in eastern spanish coast have been studied by different research groups and projects. Complexity of flood processes, involving atmospheric, surface and human factors, is not easily understandable when long time series are required. Present analysis from PREDIFLOOD Project Consortium defines a new step of flood event databases: Improved access to primary (documentary) and secondary (bibliographical) sources, data collection for all possible locations where floods are detected, and improved system of classification (Barriendos et al., 2014). A first analysis is applied to 8 selected flood series. Long chronologies from PREDIFLOOD Project for Catalonia region (Girona, Barcelona, Tarragona, Lleida, Tortosa). In addition, to cover all sector of spanish mediterranean coast, we introduce Valencia city in Turia River basin. South Eastern sector is cover with Murcia and Caravaca cities, Segura River basin. Extension of area under study required contributions of research teams experienced in work of documentary primary sources (Alberola, 2006; Gil-Guirado, 2013). Flood frequency analysis for long scale periods show natural climatic oscillations into so-called Little Ice Age. There are general patterns, affecting most of basins, but also some local anomalies or singularities. To explain these differences and analogies it is not enough to use purely climatic factors. In this way, we analyze human factors that have been able to influence the variability of floods along last 6 centuries (demography, hydraulic infrastructures, urban development...). This approach improves strongly understanding of mechanisms producing

  3. Working Knowledge: Productive Learning at Work. Proceedings [of the] International Conference (Sydney, Australia, December 10-13, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symes, Colin, Ed.

    This conference proceedings contains 65 presentations and 3 colloquiums from a conference that dealt with knowledge at work and knowledge that works and with how education can be successfully integrated into work and work into education. The papers are "Reading the Contexts of Complex Incidents of Adult Education Practice" (Apte); "Models of Work…

  4. How Do Students Perceive the International Dimension in Social Work Education?: An Enquiry among Swedish and German Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trygged, Sven; Eriksson, Bodil

    2012-01-01

    Globalization, internationalization, and regionalization affect domestic social work. This paper explores how undergraduate students perceive international aspects of their social work education. A questionnaire was distributed to social work undergraduates in Stockholm, Sweden (n = 97), and Darmstadt, Germany (n = 43). Results showed that a…

  5. Effects of Group Work on English Communicative Competence of Chinese International Graduates in United States Institutions of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xue, Mo

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated 14 Chinese international graduate students' lived experiences with group work and the effects of group work on their English communicative competence. The interview results showed that these participants' attitudes towards group work went through changes from initial inadaptation or dislike to later adaptation…

  6. The hospital microbiome project: meeting report for the UK science and innovation network UK-USA workshop ‘beating the superbugs: hospital microbiome studies for tackling antimicrobial resistance’, October 14th 2013

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The UK Science and Innovation Network UK-USA workshop ‘Beating the Superbugs: Hospital Microbiome Studies for tackling Antimicrobial Resistance’ was held on October 14th 2013 at the UK Department of Health, London. The workshop was designed to promote US-UK collaboration on hospital microbiome studies to add a new facet to our collective understanding of antimicrobial resistance. The assembled researchers debated the importance of the hospital microbial community in transmission of disease and as a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes, and discussed methodologies, hypotheses, and priorities. A number of complementary approaches were explored, although the importance of the built environment microbiome in disease transmission was not universally accepted. Current whole genome epidemiological methods are being pioneered in the UK and the benefits of moving to community analysis are not necessarily obvious to the pioneers; however, rapid progress in other areas of microbiology suggest to some researchers that hospital microbiome studies will be exceptionally fruitful even in the short term. Collaborative studies will recombine different strengths to tackle the international problems of antimicrobial resistance and hospital and healthcare associated infections.

  7. A Qualitative Study of Work-Life Choices in Academic Internal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, Carol; Byars-Winston, Angela; McSorley, Rebecca; Schultz, Alexandra; Kaatz, Anna; Carnes, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    The high attrition rate of female physicians pursuing an academic medicine research career has not been examined in the context of career development theory. We explored how internal medicine residents and faculty experience their work within the context of their broader life domain in order to identify strategies for facilitating career advancement. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposeful sample of 18 residents and 34 faculty members representing male and female physicians at different career stages. Using thematic analysis, three themes emerged: 1) the love of being a physician (“Raison d’être”), 2) family obligations (“2nd Shift”), and 3) balancing work demands with non-work life (“Negotiating Academic Medicine”). Female researchers and educators reported more strategies for multiple role planning and management than female practitioners. Interventions aimed at enhancing academic internists’ planning and self-efficacy for multiple role management should be investigated as a potential means for increasing participation and facilitate advancement. PMID:23605099

  8. Community Report and Recommendations from International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    The International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG) was established in April 1995 at a meeting in Hamburg, Germany. As established in its charter, this working group reports to COSPAR and is charged with developing an international strategy for the exploration of the Moon. It discusses coordination between missions, and a road map for future international lunar exploration and utilisation. It fosters information exchange or potential and real future lunar robotic and human missions, as well as for new scientific and exploration information about the Moon. We refer to COSPAR and ILEWG ICEUM and lunar conferences and declarations [1-18], present the GLUC/ICEUM11 declaration and give a report on ongoing relevant ILEWG community activities. ILEWG supported community forums, ILEWG EuroMoonMars field campaigns and technology validation activities, as well as Young Lunar Explorers events, and activities with broad stakeholders. We discuss how lunar missions SMART-1, Kaguya, Chang'E1&2, Chandrayaan-1, LCROSS, LRO, GRAIL, LADEE, Chang'E3 and upcoming missions contribute to lunar exploration objectives & roadmap towards the Moon Village. GLUC/ICEUM11 declaration: "467 International Lunar Explorers, registered delegates from 26 countries, assembled at GLUC Global Lunar Conference including the 11th ILEWG Conference on Exploration and Utilisation of the Moon (ICEUM11) in Beijing. The conference engaged scientists, engineers, enthusiast explorers, agencies and organisations in the discussion of recent results and activities and the review of plans for exploration. Space agencies representatives gave the latest reports on their current lunar activities and programmes. GLUC-ICEUM11 was a truly historical meeting that demonstrated the world-wide interest in lunar exploration, discovery, and science. More than 400 abstracts were accepted for oral and poster presentations in the technical sessions, organised in 32 sessions within 4 symposia: Science and Exploration; Technology

  9. The Development of a Mother’s Internal Working Model of Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa F; Griffin, Junyanee; Reyna, Barbara; Lewis, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to describe changes in a mother’s early internal working model (IWM) of infant feeding. Design & Methods In this qualitative study, 12 maternal responses to the semi-structured IWM interview were audio-recorded; once in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) after infants began oral feeding and once 2 weeks post-discharge. Interviews were analyzed using directed content analysis. Results A change between mothers’ early and later nipple feeding experiences was identified. Practice Implications Nurses and other clinicians can help mothers understand the infant’s behaviors and focus on the infant’s nutritional intake while simultaneously developing a relationship with the infant. PMID:23289455

  10. On the Origins of Disorganized Attachment and Internal Working Models: Paper I. A Dyadic Systems Approach

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, Beatrice; Lachmann, Frank; Markese, Sara; Bahrick, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Despite important recent progress in understanding disorganized attachment, we still lack a full understanding of the mechanisms of disorganized attachment formation and transmission prior to 12 months. In this paper we lay out our recommendations for the study of the 4-month origins of disorganized attachment. In our subsequent Paper II we report on the results of a large empirical study that was conducted along the lines we recommend in Paper I. Both Papers I and II are based on Beebe, Jaffe, Markese, Buck, Chen, Cohen, Bahrick, Andrews, Feldstein (2010). In Paper I we describe our proposal that a detailed microanalysis of 4-month mother-infant face-to-face communication would further inform our understanding of the process of disorganized attachment formation between mother and infant. Such a microanalysis would allow us to characterize the nature of the 4-month infant’s procedural representations, or emerging “internal working models” of attachment. PMID:25392604

  11. Public health agenda setting in a global context: the International Labor Organization's decent work agenda.

    PubMed

    Di Ruggiero, Erica; Cohen, Joanna E; Cole, Donald C; Forman, Lisa

    2015-04-01

    We drew on two agenda-setting theories usually applied at the state or national level to assess their utility at the global level: Kingdon's multiple streams theory and Baumgartner and Jones's punctuated equilibrium theory. We illustrate our analysis with findings from a qualitative study of the International Labor Organization's Decent Work Agenda. We found that both theories help explain the agenda-setting mechanisms that operate in the global context, including how windows of opportunity open and what role institutions play as policy entrepreneurs. Future application of these theories could help characterize power struggles between global actors, whose voices are heard or silenced, and their impact on global policy agenda setting. PMID:25713966

  12. The working memory stroop effect: when internal representations clash with external stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kiyonaga, Anastasia; Egner, Tobias

    2014-08-01

    Working memory (WM) has recently been described as internally directed attention, which implies that WM content should affect behavior exactly like an externally perceived and attended stimulus. We tested whether holding a color word in WM, rather than attending to it in the external environment, can produce interference in a color-discrimination task, which would mimic the classic Stroop effect. Over three experiments, the WM Stroop effect recapitulated core properties of the classic attentional Stroop effect, displaying equivalent congruency effects, additive contributions from stimulus- and response-level congruency, and susceptibility to modulation by the percentage of congruent and incongruent trials. Moreover, WM maintenance was inversely related to attentional demands during the WM delay between stimulus presentation and recall, with poorer memory performance following incongruent than congruent trials. Together, these results suggest that WM and attention rely on the same resources and operate over the same representations.

  13. TWiki: A Collaborative Space of Internal Documentation, an Efficient Way to Work Together

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, E.; Eisele, A.; Schaaff, A.; Miguel, L.; Perret, E.; Brouty, M.; Bruneau, C.; Brunet, C.; Buga, M.; Genova, F.; Guéhenneux, S.; Lesteven, S.; Loup, C.; Neuville, M.; Oberto, A.; Vannier, P.; Vonflie, P.; Woelfel, F.

    2015-04-01

    The documentalists at Strasbourg astronomical Data Center (CDS) mine publications in order to update the SIMBAD and VizieR databases with astronomical data. The process of mining publications is quite complex and, over time, the databases and tools used evolve as the field of astronomy evolves. The ingest process needs to be agreed upon, well described, and shared by all involved. This requires specific knowledge and mutual support among the documentalists in interaction with computer engineers and astronomers. The documentalists at CDS have therefore organized and enriched their internal documentation; the wiki collaborative tool is an efficient framework to do so. For more than a decade, the CDS has been developing a "TWiki" collaborative space. Recently, we have created a working group to refurbish the collaborative space and it is now better structured and clearer and this provides new functionality, giving the user a better experience.

  14. Semi-Annual Report on Work Supporting the International Forum for Reactor Aging Management (IFRAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Leonard J.; Brenchley, David L.

    2011-11-30

    During the first six months of this project, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has provided planning and leadership support for the establishment of the International Forum for Reactor Aging Management (IFRAM). This entailed facilitating the efforts of the Global Steering Committee to prepare the charter, operating guidelines, and other documents for IFRAM. It also included making plans for the Inaugural meeting and facilitating its success. This meeting was held on August 4 5, 2011, in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Representatives from Asia, Europe, and the United States met to share information on reactor aging management and to make plans for the future. Professor Tetsuo Shoji was elected chairperson of the Leadership Council. This kick-off event transformed the dream of an international forum into a reality. On August 4-5, 2011, IFRAM began to achieve its mission. The work completed successfully during this period was built upon important previous efforts. This included the development of a proposal for establishing IFRAM and engaging experts in Asia and Europe. The proposal was presented at Engagement workshops in Seoul, Korea (October 2009) and Petten, The Netherlands (May 2010). Participants in both groups demonstrated strong interest in the establishment of IFRAM. Therefore, the Global Steering Committee was formed to plan and carry out the start-up of IFRAM in 2011. This report builds on the initial activities and documents the results of activities over the last six months.

  15. [Croatian and international regulations on the protection and rights of workers exposed to asbestos at work].

    PubMed

    Zavalić, Marija; Macan, Jelena

    2009-11-01

    New regulations on the protection and rights of workers occupationally exposed to asbestos were introduced in Croatia in 2007 and 2008. They have been harmonised with the European Union (EU) and International Labour Organization (ILO) regulations, and make a step forward in safety at work, health protection, social rights, and pension schemes for Croatian workers occupationally exposed to asbestos. The 2007 Croatian regulation on the protection of workers from the risks related to exposure to asbestos at work defines and describes activities in which workers can be occupationally exposed to asbestos, defines the threshold value of asbestos in the air at work, defines valid methods for measurement of asbestos concentrations in the air, and establishes measures to reduce asbestos exposure at work or protect the exposed workers. Croatian law regulating obligatory health surveillance of workers occupationally exposed to asbestos from year 2007 defines activities and competent authorities to implement health surveillance of workers occupationally exposed to asbestos and to diagnose occupational diseases related to asbestos. This law also defines "occupational exposure to asbestos", and "occupational asbestos-related diseases", including asbestosis (pulmonary asbestos-related fibrosis), pleural asbestos-related disorders (plaques, pleural thickening, and benign effusion), lung and bronchial cancer, and malignant mesothelioma of serous membranes. These regulations have been harmonised with ILO, Directive 2003/18/EC amending Council Directive 83/477/EEC on the protection of workers from the risks related to exposure to asbestos at work, and with the Commission Recommendation 2003/670/EC concerning the European schedule of occupational diseases. The 2008 Croatian regulation on conditions of health surveillance, diagnostic procedures and criteria for confirmation of occupational asbestos-related diseases "defines the terms and the content of medical examination of workers

  16. International Law: Working for Peace and Justice to Preserve Your Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, Donald K.

    1983-01-01

    The rules and principles of international law developed as people of different nations interacted with one another. The need for international law has never been greater than it is today. Ten traditional categories of international law serve as the focus for educating students and adults about international law. (AM)

  17. Rural Partnerships: Working Together. Proceedings of the Annual National Conference of the American Council on Rural Special Education (ACRES) (14th, Austin, Texas, March 23-26, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Diane, Ed.

    This proceedings contains 60 conference papers that address critical issues related to rural education, special education, teacher training, school reform, and services for students who are at risk. The conference theme of rural partnerships recognizes the diversity of the ACRES membership and the need for developing and maintaining successful…

  18. New Working Practices: Benchmarking Flexible Scheduling, Staffing, and Work Location in an International Context. Workscape 21: The Ecology of New Ways of Working.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Franklin; Quinn, Kristen L.; Rappaport, Andrew J.; Sims, William R.

    This report identifies the range and extent of innovative workplace practices in place among 16 international organizations participating in the International Workplace Studies Program (IWSP). Information comes from interviews with organization representatives, written reports, summaries prepared by the organizations, and an extensive literature…

  19. International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, 14th, San Jose, Costa Rica, April 23-30, 1980, Proceedings. Volumes 1, 2 and 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Papers are presented on remote sensing applications in resource monitoring and management, data classification and modeling procedures, and the use of remote sensing techniques in developing nations. The subjects of land use/land cover, soil mapping, crop identification, mapping of geological resources, renewable resource analysis, and oceanographic applications are discussed. Papers from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Costa Rica, the Syrian Arab Republic, the People's Republic of China, the Phillipines, Italy, Upper Volta and the United States are included.

  20. Cross-Culturalism in Children's Literature: Selected papers from the 1987 International Conference of the Children's Literature Association (14th, Ottawa, Canada, May 14-17, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon, Susan R., Ed.; Thompson, Ruth Anne, Ed.

    This conference proceedings contains a selection of the papers and awards given at a conference held at Carleton University in Canada. After the text of an address by the president of the Children's Literature Association, the following papers are included: (1) "Lone Voices in the Crowd: The Limits of Multiculturalism" (Brian Alderson); (2) "The…

  1. Selected Theoretical Studies Group contributions to the 14th International Cosmic Ray conference. [including studies on galactic molecular hydrogen, interstellar reddening, and on the origin of cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The galactic distribution of H2 was studied through gamma radiation and through X-ray, optical, and infrared absorption measurements from SAS-2 and other sources. A comparison of the latitude distribution of gamma-ray intensity with reddening data shows reddening data to give the best estimate of interstellar gas in the solar vicinity. The distribution of galactic cosmic ray nucleons was determined and appears to be identical to the supernova remnant distribution. Interactions between ultrahigh energy cosmic-ray nuclei and intergalactic photon radiation fields were calculated, using the Monte Carlo method.

  2. Community Report and Recommendations from International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    The International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG) was established in April 1995 at a meeting in Hamburg, Germany. As established in its charter, this working group reports to COSPAR and is charged with developing an international strategy for the exploration of the Moon. It discusses coordination between missions, and a road map for future international lunar exploration and utilisation. It fosters information exchange or potential and real future lunar robotic and human missions, as well as for new scientific and exploration information about the Moon. We refer to COSPAR and ILEWG ICEUM and lunar conferences and declarations [1-18], present the GLUC/ICEUM11 declaration and give a report on ongoing relevant ILEWG community activities. ILEWG supported community forums, ILEWG EuroMoonMars field campaigns and technology validation activities, as well as Young Lunar Explorers events, and activities with broad stakeholders. We discuss how lunar missions SMART-1, Kaguya, Chang'E1&2, Chandrayaan-1, LCROSS, LRO, GRAIL, LADEE, Chang'E3 and upcoming missions contribute to lunar exploration objectives & roadmap towards the Moon Village. GLUC/ICEUM11 declaration: "467 International Lunar Explorers, registered delegates from 26 countries, assembled at GLUC Global Lunar Conference including the 11th ILEWG Conference on Exploration and Utilisation of the Moon (ICEUM11) in Beijing. The conference engaged scientists, engineers, enthusiast explorers, agencies and organisations in the discussion of recent results and activities and the review of plans for exploration. Space agencies representatives gave the latest reports on their current lunar activities and programmes. GLUC-ICEUM11 was a truly historical meeting that demonstrated the world-wide interest in lunar exploration, discovery, and science. More than 400 abstracts were accepted for oral and poster presentations in the technical sessions, organised in 32 sessions within 4 symposia: Science and Exploration; Technology

  3. International Social Work Field Placement or Volunteer Tourism? Developing an Asset-Based Justice-Learning Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sossou, Marie-Antoinette; Dubus, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines a developing model for building an international social work placement that meets the needs of the host agency and community first. The paper addresses the challenges for social work departments to develop a strong learning environment while also keeping primary the needs of the host community and agency.

  4. Biosimilar Medicines Group - 14th Annual Medicines for Europe Conference (April 28-29, 2016 - London, UK).

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, L

    2016-05-01

    Biotechnology has enabled the development of treatments for many diseases benefiting millions of people. Similar biologics or 'biosimilar' versions of originator biologic medicines are a relatively new category of biologics, usually developed when the originator is protected by patent exclusivity and introduced to healthcare systems as a cheaper option to treat disease. Biosimilars provide value and thus access for new groups of patients because they bring cost savings to the healthcare ecosystem. Generics achieved cost savings of EUR 100 billion in 2014, which allows the system to finance more innovative methods of bringing medicines to patients. The Medicines for Europe Biosimilars Medicines Group Conference in London is the main annual biosimilars gathering and attracts the world's experts. A recurring theme throughout this year's conference was the promotion of a multi-stakeholder approach; if stakeholders work together they will collectively give patients more opportunity to benefit from biologic medicines. In discussion were the latest developments in the biosimilars market, including the ongoing challenges against adoption of biosimilars. PMID:27376164

  5. International Myeloma Working Group consensus criteria for response and minimal residual disease assessment in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shaji; Paiva, Bruno; Anderson, Kenneth C; Durie, Brian; Landgren, Ola; Moreau, Philippe; Munshi, Nikhil; Lonial, Sagar; Bladé, Joan; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Dimopoulos, Meletios; Kastritis, Efstathios; Boccadoro, Mario; Orlowski, Robert; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Spencer, Andrew; Hou, Jian; Chng, Wee Joo; Usmani, Saad Z; Zamagni, Elena; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Jagannath, Sundar; Johnsen, Hans E; Terpos, Evangelos; Reiman, Anthony; Kyle, Robert A; Sonneveld, Pieter; Richardson, Paul G; McCarthy, Philip; Ludwig, Heinz; Chen, Wenming; Cavo, Michele; Harousseau, Jean-Luc; Lentzsch, Suzanne; Hillengass, Jens; Palumbo, Antonio; Orfao, Alberto; Rajkumar, S Vincent; San Miguel, Jesus; Avet-Loiseau, Herve

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of multiple myeloma has substantially changed over the past decade with the introduction of several classes of new effective drugs that have greatly improved the rates and depth of response. Response criteria in multiple myeloma were developed to use serum and urine assessment of monoclonal proteins and bone marrow assessment (which is relatively insensitive). Given the high rates of complete response seen in patients with multiple myeloma with new treatment approaches, new response categories need to be defined that can identify responses that are deeper than those conventionally defined as complete response. Recent attempts have focused on the identification of residual tumour cells in the bone marrow using flow cytometry or gene sequencing. Furthermore, sensitive imaging techniques can be used to detect the presence of residual disease outside of the bone marrow. Combining these new methods, the International Myeloma Working Group has defined new response categories of minimal residual disease negativity, with or without imaging-based absence of extramedullary disease, to allow uniform reporting within and outside clinical trials. In this Review, we clarify several aspects of disease response assessment, along with endpoints for clinical trials, and highlight future directions for disease response assessments. PMID:27511158

  6. Geriatric assessment predicts survival and toxicities in elderly myeloma patients: an International Myeloma Working Group report

    PubMed Central

    Bringhen, Sara; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Larocca, Alessandra; Facon, Thierry; Kumar, Shaji K.; Offidani, Massimo; McCarthy, Philip; Evangelista, Andrea; Lonial, Sagar; Zweegman, Sonja; Musto, Pellegrino; Terpos, Evangelos; Belch, Andrew; Hajek, Roman; Ludwig, Heinz; Stewart, A. Keith; Moreau, Philippe; Anderson, Kenneth; Einsele, Hermann; Durie, Brian G. M.; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Landgren, Ola; San Miguel, Jesus F.; Richardson, Paul; Sonneveld, Pieter; Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a pooled analysis of 869 individual newly diagnosed elderly patient data from 3 prospective trials. At diagnosis, a geriatric assessment had been performed. An additive scoring system (range 0-5), based on age, comorbidities, and cognitive and physical conditions, was developed to identify 3 groups: fit (score = 0, 39%), intermediate fitness (score = 1, 31%), and frail (score ≥2, 30%). The 3-year overall survival was 84% in fit, 76% in intermediate-fitness (hazard ratio [HR], 1.61; P = .042), and 57% in frail (HR, 3.57; P < .001) patients. The cumulative incidence of grade ≥3 nonhematologic adverse events at 12 months was 22.2% in fit, 26.4% in intermediate-fitness (HR, 1.23; P = .217), and 34.0% in frail (HR, 1.74; P < .001) patients. The cumulative incidence of treatment discontinuation at 12 months was 16.5% in fit, 20.8% in intermediate-fitness (HR, 1.41; P = .052), and 31.2% in frail (HR, 2.21; P < .001) patients. Our frailty score predicts mortality and the risk of toxicity in elderly myeloma patients. The International Myeloma Working group proposes this score for the measurement of frailty in designing future clinical trials. These trials are registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01093136 (EMN01), #NCT01190787 (26866138MMY2069), and #NCT01346787 (IST-CAR-506). PMID:25628469

  7. International standardisation work on the measurement of radon in air and water.

    PubMed

    Calmet, D; Ameon, R; Beck, T; Bombard, A; Bourquin, M N; Brun, S; De Jong, P; Forte, M; Fournier, M; Herranz, M; Jerome, S; Klett, A; Kwakman, P; Llaurado, M; Loyen, J; Michel, R; Nardoux, P; Richards, T; Schuler, C; Tokonami, S; Woods, M

    2011-05-01

    Radon is considered to be the main source of human exposure to natural radiation. As stated by the World Health Organization, the exposure due to the inhalation of indoor radon is much greater than the one via the ingestion of water as radon degasses from water during handling. In response to these concerns about the universal presence of radon, environmental assessment studies are regularly commissioned to assess the radon exposure of public and workers. The credibility of such studies relies on the quality and reliability of radon analysis as well as on the sample representativeness of the radiological situation. The standard-setting approach, based on consensus, seemed to lend itself to a settlement of technical aspects of potential comparison. At present, two Working Groups of the International Standardization Organization are focussing on drafting standards on radon and its decay products measurement in air and water. These standards, which aim for a set of rigorous metrology practices, will be useful for persons in charge of the initial characterisation of a site with respect to natural radioactivity as well as to those performing the routine surveillance of specific sites. PMID:21498866

  8. Management of relapsed multiple myeloma: recommendations of the International Myeloma Working Group.

    PubMed

    Laubach, J; Garderet, L; Mahindra, A; Gahrton, G; Caers, J; Sezer, O; Voorhees, P; Leleu, X; Johnsen, H E; Streetly, M; Jurczyszyn, A; Ludwig, H; Mellqvist, U-H; Chng, W-J; Pilarski, L; Einsele, H; Hou, J; Turesson, I; Zamagni, E; Chim, C S; Mazumder, A; Westin, J; Lu, J; Reiman, T; Kristinsson, S; Joshua, D; Roussel, M; O'Gorman, P; Terpos, E; McCarthy, P; Dimopoulos, M; Moreau, P; Orlowski, R Z; Miguel, J S; Anderson, K C; Palumbo, A; Kumar, S; Rajkumar, V; Durie, B; Richardson, P G

    2016-05-01

    The prognosis for patients multiple myeloma (MM) has improved substantially over the past decade with the development of new, more effective chemotherapeutic agents and regimens that possess a high level of anti-tumor activity. In spite of this important progress, however, nearly all MM patients ultimately relapse, even those who experience a complete response to initial therapy. Management of relapsed MM thus represents a vital aspect of the overall care for patients with MM and a critical area of ongoing scientific and clinical research. This comprehensive manuscript from the International Myeloma Working Group provides detailed recommendations on management of relapsed disease, with sections dedicated to diagnostic evaluation, determinants of therapy, and general approach to patients with specific disease characteristics. In addition, the manuscript provides a summary of evidence from clinical trials that have significantly impacted the field, including those evaluating conventional dose therapies, as well as both autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Specific recommendations are offered for management of first and second relapse, relapsed and refractory disease, and both autologous and allogeneic transplant. Finally, perspective is provided regarding new agents and promising directions in management of relapsed MM. PMID:26710887

  9. STS-113 Astronauts Work on Port One (P1) Truss on International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The 16th American assembly flight and 112th overall American flight to the International Space Station (ISS) launched on November 23, 2002 from Kennedy's launch pad 39A aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-113. Mission objectives included the delivery of the Expedition Six Crew to the ISS, the return of Expedition Five crew back to Earth, and the installation and activation of the Port 1 Integrated Truss Assembly (P1). The first major component installed on the left side of the Station, the P1 truss provides an additional three External Thermal Control System radiators. Weighing in at 27,506 pounds, the P1 truss is 45 feet (13.7 meters) long, 15 feet (4.6 meters) wide, and 13 feet (4 meters) high. Three space walks, aided by the use of the Robotic Manipulator Systems of both the Shuttle and the Station, were performed in the installation of P1. In this photograph, astronauts Michael E. Lopez-Alegria (above) and John B. Herrington (below) work on the newly installed P1 truss during the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity. The space walk lasted 6 hours, 10 minutes. The end effector of the Canadarm2 or Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and Earth's horizon are visible in the bottom of frame.

  10. International Myeloma Working Group consensus criteria for response and minimal residual disease assessment in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shaji; Paiva, Bruno; Anderson, Kenneth C; Durie, Brian; Landgren, Ola; Moreau, Philippe; Munshi, Nikhil; Lonial, Sagar; Bladé, Joan; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Dimopoulos, Meletios; Kastritis, Efstathios; Boccadoro, Mario; Orlowski, Robert; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Spencer, Andrew; Hou, Jian; Chng, Wee Joo; Usmani, Saad Z; Zamagni, Elena; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Jagannath, Sundar; Johnsen, Hans E; Terpos, Evangelos; Reiman, Anthony; Kyle, Robert A; Sonneveld, Pieter; Richardson, Paul G; McCarthy, Philip; Ludwig, Heinz; Chen, Wenming; Cavo, Michele; Harousseau, Jean-Luc; Lentzsch, Suzanne; Hillengass, Jens; Palumbo, Antonio; Orfao, Alberto; Rajkumar, S Vincent; San Miguel, Jesus; Avet-Loiseau, Herve

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of multiple myeloma has substantially changed over the past decade with the introduction of several classes of new effective drugs that have greatly improved the rates and depth of response. Response criteria in multiple myeloma were developed to use serum and urine assessment of monoclonal proteins and bone marrow assessment (which is relatively insensitive). Given the high rates of complete response seen in patients with multiple myeloma with new treatment approaches, new response categories need to be defined that can identify responses that are deeper than those conventionally defined as complete response. Recent attempts have focused on the identification of residual tumour cells in the bone marrow using flow cytometry or gene sequencing. Furthermore, sensitive imaging techniques can be used to detect the presence of residual disease outside of the bone marrow. Combining these new methods, the International Myeloma Working Group has defined new response categories of minimal residual disease negativity, with or without imaging-based absence of extramedullary disease, to allow uniform reporting within and outside clinical trials. In this Review, we clarify several aspects of disease response assessment, along with endpoints for clinical trials, and highlight future directions for disease response assessments.

  11. Determination of the internal exposure hazard from plutonium work in an open front hood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Cheryl Lynn

    Work with hazardous substances, such as radioactive material, can be done safely when engineered controls are used to maintain the worker effective dose below the International Commission on Radiological Protection ICRP 60 recommendation of 0.02 Sv/year and reduce the worker exposure to material to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A primary engineered control used at a Los Alamos National Laboratory facility is the open-front hood. An open-front hood, also known as an open-front box, is a laboratory containment box that is fully enclosed except for a 15-cm opening along the front of the box. This research involved collection of the aerosol escaping an open-front hood while PuO2 sample digestion was simulated. Sodium chloride was used as a surrogate to mimic the behavior of PuO2. The NaCl aerosol was binned as a function of median aerodynamic diameter using a Micro-orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI, MSP Corporation, Shoreview, MN) cascade impactor. Using neutron activation analysis (NAA) to measure the mass of material in each of the nine bins of the MOUDI, the mass median diameter of the escaping aerosol was determined. Using the mass median diameter and the total mass of the particle distribution, dose was calculated using ICRP 60 methodology. Experimental conditions mimicked a stationary worker and a worker moving her hands in and out of the open front hood. Measurements were also done in the hood for comparison. The effect of the hands moving in and out of the box was modeled. Information necessary for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling is given, such as volumetric flow rates out of the open front hood and into the experimental room, detailed sketches of the experimental set-up, and energy provided by the hot plate and worker. This research is unique as it measures particle size distribution from routine working conditions. Current research uses tracer gases or describes non-routine conditions. It is important to have results that mimic

  12. Agreement of a work-capacity assessment with the World Health Organisation International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health pain sets and back-to-work predictors.

    PubMed

    Schult, Marie-Louise; Ekholm, Jan

    2006-09-01

    The degree of agreement between a clinical multi-professional work-capacity assessment and the Comprehensive World Health Organisation International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Sets for chronic pain and risk factors for no return to work was investigated. A review of data records and interviews with team members included measures of body function/structure, activities/participation and environmental factors. Predictors for return to work were reviewed. The team used eight different methods for data collection. Of the 29 categories concerning environmental factors, two were excluded; the methods used were more unstructured, e.g. interviews. The agreement with the 41 predictors of work resumption was high. The clinical work-capacity assessment agreed largely with the Comprehensive ICF Core Sets for the components body function, body structure, activities and participation. Nine categories out of 69 were not included. The clinical work-capacity assessment agreed largely with the Comprehensive ICF Core Sets for chronic pain conditions and with 40 predictors of work resumption. Clinically speaking, however, the current work-capacity assessment lacks on-the-job site evaluations and this most certainly affects reliability. The same is true for ICF, although the structure lacks proper coding for relevant factors found at work.

  13. International Myeloma Working Group Recommendations for the Treatment of Multiple Myeloma–Related Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Terpos, Evangelos; Morgan, Gareth; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Drake, Matthew T.; Lentzsch, Suzanne; Raje, Noopur; Sezer, Orhan; García-Sanz, Ramón; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Turesson, Ingemar; Reiman, Tony; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Merlini, Giampaolo; Spencer, Andrew; Leleu, Xavier; Cavo, Michele; Munshi, Nikhil; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Durie, Brian G.M.; Roodman, G. David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the International Myeloma Working Group was to develop practice recommendations for the management of multiple myeloma (MM) –related bone disease. Methodology An interdisciplinary panel of clinical experts on MM and myeloma bone disease developed recommendations based on published data through August 2012. Expert consensus was used to propose additional recommendations in situations where there were insufficient published data. Levels of evidence and grades of recommendations were assigned and approved by panel members. Recommendations Bisphosphonates (BPs) should be considered in all patients with MM receiving first-line antimyeloma therapy, regardless of presence of osteolytic bone lesions on conventional radiography. However, it is unknown if BPs offer any advantage in patients with no bone disease assessed by magnetic resonance imaging or positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Intravenous (IV) zoledronic acid (ZOL) or pamidronate (PAM) is recommended for preventing skeletal-related events in patients with MM. ZOL is preferred over oral clodronate in newly diagnosed patients with MM because of its potential antimyeloma effects and survival benefits. BPs should be administered every 3 to 4 weeks IV during initial therapy. ZOL or PAM should be continued in patients with active disease and should be resumed after disease relapse, if discontinued in patients achieving complete or very good partial response. BPs are well tolerated, but preventive strategies must be instituted to avoid renal toxicity or osteonecrosis of the jaw. Kyphoplasty should be considered for symptomatic vertebral compression fractures. Low-dose radiation therapy can be used for palliation of uncontrolled pain, impending pathologic fracture, or spinal cord compression. Orthopedic consultation should be sought for long-bone fractures, spinal cord compression, and vertebral column instability. PMID:23690408

  14. International perspectives on work-family policies: lessons from the world's most competitive economies.

    PubMed

    Earle, Alison; Mokomane, Zitha; Heymann, Jody

    2011-01-01

    The United States does not guarantee families a wide range of supportive workplace policies such as paid maternity and paternity leave or paid leave to care for sick children. Proposals to provide such benefits are invariably met with the complaint that the costs would reduce employment and undermine the international competitiveness of American businesses. In this article, Alison Earle, Zitha Mokomane, and Jody Heymann explore whether paid leave and other work-family policies that support children's development exist in countries that are economically competitive and have low unemployment rates. Their data show that the answer is yes. Using indicators of competitiveness gathered by the World Economic Forum, the authors identify fifteen countries, including the United States, that have been among the top twenty countries in competitiveness rankings for at least eight of ten years. To this group they add China and India, both rising competitors in the global economy. They find that every one of these countries, except the United States, guarantees some form of paid leave for new mothers as well as annual leave. And all but Switzerland and the United States guarantee paid leave for new fathers. The authors perform a similar exercise to identify thirteen advanced countries with consistently low unemployment rates, again including the United States. The majority of these countries provide paid leave for new mothers, paid leave for new fathers, paid leave to care for children's health care needs, breast-feeding breaks, paid vacation leave, and a weekly day of rest. Of these, the United States guarantees only breast-feeding breaks (part of the recently passed health care legislation). The authors' global examination of the most competitive economies as well as the economies with low unemployment rates makes clear that ensuring that all parents are available to care for their children's healthy development does not preclude a country from being highly competitive

  15. An International Study in Competency Education: Postcards from Abroad. CompetencyWorks Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bristow, Sara Frank; Patrick, Susan

    2014-01-01

    "An International Study in Competency Education: Postcards from Abroad" seeks to highlight components of competency education in international practice, to inform US policymakers and decision makers seeking to implement high-quality competency pathways at the state or local level. Other countries are studying our innovations, and we are…

  16. International Work Assignments for Co-op Students: Some Issues to be Considered.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprinkle, Robert M.

    1981-01-01

    Issues involved in international educational exchange include (1) goals and purposes for international cooperative programs; (2) standards in program design and administration; (3) the role of employers and governments; (4) reciprocity; and (5) the enrollment of foreign students as full-time co-op students in United States Schools. (SK)

  17. An Atlantic Crossing? The Work of the International Examination Inquiry, Its Researchers, Methods and Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawn, Martin, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    This book focuses on the International Examinations Inquiry (IEI), an international, well-funded scientific project that operated in the 1930s, attracting key world figures in educational research, and which undertook significant exchanges of data. Originally involving the USA, Scotland, England, France, Germany and Switzerland, the IEI grew to…

  18. Image Understanding, 14th Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, L. S.

    1983-06-01

    Technical and annual progress reports of principal investigators of image understanding are presented. Topics covered include: surface constraint from linear entents; computing visual correspondance; smoothing optical flow fields; viewframes; a connectionist model of form perception; use of difference fields in processing sensor motion; a facet approach to optic flow; special purpose automatic programming for 3-d model-based vision; MAPS: organization of a spatial data base system using imagery, terrain, and map data; segment-based stereo matching; software metrics for performance analysis of parallel hardware; scene analysis algorithms; and robot vehicles.

  19. Genotyping Yersinia pestis in Historical Plague: Evidence for Long-Term Persistence of Y. pestis in Europe from the 14th to the 17th Century.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Lisa; Wiechmann, Ingrid; Harbeck, Michaela; Thomas, Astrid; Grupe, Gisela; Projahn, Michaela; Scholz, Holger C; Riehm, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) recovered from plague victims of the second plague pandemic (14th to 17th century), excavated from two different burial sites in Germany, and spanning a time period of more than 300 years, was characterized using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. Of 30 tested skeletons 8 were positive for Yersinia pestis-specific nucleic acid, as determined by qPCR targeting the pla gene. In one individual (MP-19-II), the pla copy number in DNA extracted from tooth pulp was as high as 700 gene copies/μl, indicating severe generalized infection. All positive individuals were identical in all 16 SNP positions, separating phylogenetic branches within nodes N07_N10 (14 SNPs), N07_N08 (SNP s19) and N06_N07 (s545), and were highly similar to previously investigated plague victims from other European countries. Thus, beside the assumed continuous reintroduction of Y. pestis from central Asia in multiple waves during the second pandemic, long-term persistence of Y. pestis in Europe in a yet unknown reservoir host has also to be considered. PMID:26760973

  20. Diffuse gamma rays with energies greater than 1 x 10 to the 14th eV observed in the Southern Hemisphere

    SciTech Connect

    Suga, K.; Toyoda, Y.; Kamata, K.; Murakami, K.; Lapointe, M.

    1988-03-01

    The data of extensive air showers with a low content of muons and hadrons, observed in the period 1964-1966 at Mount Chacaltaya in Bolivia, have been reanalyzed. Arrival directions of those showers selected so as to favor small initiation depths in the atmosphere (to enhance the contribution from gamma-ray-initiated showers) reveal a 3.8 sigma peak above an expected background from the region of alpha = 180-210 deg in the band of delta = 0 to -40 deg. The integral flux of diffuse gamma-rays above 1 x 10 to the 14th eV estimated from this excess is about 6.0 x 10 to the -12th/sq cm per sec per sr. In order to explain this very high flux, the possible contribution of gamma-rays from Loop 1 as well as the inverse Compton photons produced in the 2.7 K photon background as progeny of gamma-rays from Cyg X-3-like sources. 24 references.

  1. Genotyping Yersinia pestis in Historical Plague: Evidence for Long-Term Persistence of Y. pestis in Europe from the 14th to the 17th Century.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Lisa; Wiechmann, Ingrid; Harbeck, Michaela; Thomas, Astrid; Grupe, Gisela; Projahn, Michaela; Scholz, Holger C; Riehm, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) recovered from plague victims of the second plague pandemic (14th to 17th century), excavated from two different burial sites in Germany, and spanning a time period of more than 300 years, was characterized using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. Of 30 tested skeletons 8 were positive for Yersinia pestis-specific nucleic acid, as determined by qPCR targeting the pla gene. In one individual (MP-19-II), the pla copy number in DNA extracted from tooth pulp was as high as 700 gene copies/μl, indicating severe generalized infection. All positive individuals were identical in all 16 SNP positions, separating phylogenetic branches within nodes N07_N10 (14 SNPs), N07_N08 (SNP s19) and N06_N07 (s545), and were highly similar to previously investigated plague victims from other European countries. Thus, beside the assumed continuous reintroduction of Y. pestis from central Asia in multiple waves during the second pandemic, long-term persistence of Y. pestis in Europe in a yet unknown reservoir host has also to be considered.

  2. Genotyping Yersinia pestis in Historical Plague: Evidence for Long-Term Persistence of Y. pestis in Europe from the 14th to the 17th Century

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Lisa; Wiechmann, Ingrid; Harbeck, Michaela; Thomas, Astrid; Grupe, Gisela; Projahn, Michaela; Scholz, Holger C.; Riehm, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) recovered from plague victims of the second plague pandemic (14th to 17th century), excavated from two different burial sites in Germany, and spanning a time period of more than 300 years, was characterized using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. Of 30 tested skeletons 8 were positive for Yersinia pestis-specific nucleic acid, as determined by qPCR targeting the pla gene. In one individual (MP-19-II), the pla copy number in DNA extracted from tooth pulp was as high as 700 gene copies/μl, indicating severe generalized infection. All positive individuals were identical in all 16 SNP positions, separating phylogenetic branches within nodes N07_N10 (14 SNPs), N07_N08 (SNP s19) and N06_N07 (s545), and were highly similar to previously investigated plague victims from other European countries. Thus, beside the assumed continuous reintroduction of Y. pestis from central Asia in multiple waves during the second pandemic, long-term persistence of Y. pestis in Europe in a yet unknown reservoir host has also to be considered. PMID:26760973

  3. Initial deployment of the 14th Parachutist Forward Surgical Team at the beginning of the operation Sangaris in Central African Republic.

    PubMed

    Malgras, Brice; Barbier, Olivier; Pasquier, Pierre; Petit, Ludovic; Polycarpe, Aristide; Rigal, Sylvain; Pons, Francois

    2015-05-01

    As part of the operation Sangaris begun in December 2013 in the Central African Republic, the 14th Parachutist Forward Surgical Team (FST) was deployed to support French troops. The FST (role 2 in the NATO classification) is a mobile surgical-medical treatment facility. The main goal of the FST is to assure the initial damage control surgery and resuscitation for combat casualties, allowing for the early evacuation to combat support hospitals (roles 3 or 4), where further treatments are completed. During the first trimester of the operation Sangaris, 42 patients were treated at FST, of whom 29 underwent surgery. Almost 50% of patients operated on were French servicemen. All admissions were emergency admissions. Orthopedic surgery represented two-thirds of surgical interventions executed as a result of the high proportion of limb injuries. Fifty percent of injuries were specifically linked to combat. Surgery in an FST is primarily dedicated to the treatment of combat casualties with hemorrhagic injuries, but additionally plays a part in supporting general medical care of French troops. Medical aid to the general civilian population is justifiable because of the presence of medical treatment facilities, even in the initial implementation of a military operation. PMID:25939107

  4. Internal Working Models and Adjustment of Physically Abused Children: The Mediating Role of Self-Regulatory Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Amy L.; Haskett, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Abused children's internal working models (IWM) of relationships are known to relate to their socioemotional adjustment, but mechanisms through which negative representations increase vulnerability to maladjustment have not been explored. We sought to expand the understanding of individual differences in IWM of abused children and…

  5. Attitudes Towards Seeking Psychological Help among a Sample of Turkish University Students: The Roles of Rumination and Internal Working Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turan, Numan; Erdur-Baker, Özgür

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigates how attitudes towards seeking psychological help relate to internal working models of attachment (self-model and other-model) and ruminative tendencies. The study includes 589 Turkish university students (278 females, 308 males and 3 unknown) by implementing a convenient sampling procedure. The average age of the…

  6. 75 FR 57803 - Preparation for International Conference on Harmonisation Steering Committee and Expert Working...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... six ICH sponsors are the European Commission; the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries.../industry project to improve, through harmonization, the efficiency of the process for developing and... regulatory authorities and industry associations to promote international harmonization of...

  7. Genotoxicity Testing on the International Space Station: Preparatory Work on the Experiment TRIPLE-LUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojicic, N.; Walrafen, D.; Rabbow, E.; Baumstark-Khan, C.; Rettberg, P.; Weisshaar, M. P.; Horneck, G.

    Harmful environmental factors - namely ionizing radiation - will continue to influence future manned space missions. The Radiation Biology Unit at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) develops cellular monitoring systems, which include bacterial and mammalian cell systems capable of recognizing DNA damage as a consequence of the presence of genotoxic conditions. Such a bioassay is the SWITCH test, which is part of the German space experiment ``Gene, immune and cellular responses to single and combined space flight conditions'' (TRIPLE-LUX) which has been selected by NASA to be performed on the International Space Station. It will supply basic information on the genotoxic response to radiation applied in microgravity. The biological end-point under investigation will depend on the bacterial SOS response brought about by genetically modified bacteria that are transformed with the pSWITCH plasmid (constructed from the plasmids pPLS-1 and pGFPuv). This luminescent/fluorescent bioassay for rapid toxicity (genotoxicity and cytotoxicity) testing, the SWITCH test (SWITCH: {S}almonella {W}eighting of {I}nduced {T}oxicity {C}yto/GenoTox for Human {H}ealth), makes use of two sensing and reporting systems for the two biological endpoints under investigation: the SOS-Lux test and the LAC-Fluoro test. The SWICH plasmid carries the promoterless lux operon of Photobacterium leiognathi as reporter element under the control of the DNA-damage dependent SOS promoter of ColD as sensor element (for genotoxicity testing) and the sequences for a hybrid protein consisting of ß-galactosidase and GFPuv of Aequorea victoria as reporter element under the control of the (in Salmonella constitutively active) LAC promoter of Escherichia coli as sensor element (for cytotoxicity testing). The system has worked properly for terrestrial applications during the first experiments. Experiments using X-rays and UV radiation of various qualities (from UVC to UVA) have given insights into cellular mechanisms

  8. Employment and Disability: Trends and Issues for the 1990's. A Report on the 14th Mary E. Switzer Memorial Seminar (Washington, D.C., May 7-9, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Leonard G., Ed.; Hansen, Carl E., Ed.

    This report on the 14th Mary E. Switzer Memorial Seminar addresses trends and prospects for employment of persons with disabilities. The monograph begins with an introduction by Leonard G. Perlman and Carl E. Hansen, a foreword by Richard S. Materson, a list of seminar sponsors and Switzer scholars, a statement on the legacy of Mary Elizabeth…

  9. Environmental Education, The Last Measure of Man. An Anthology of Papers for the Consideration of the 14th and 15th Conference of the U.S. National Commission for UNESCO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Raymond F.

    An anthology of papers for consideration by delegates to the 14th and 15th conferences of the United States National Commission for UNESCO are presented in this book. As a wide-ranging collection of ideas, it is intended to serve as background materials for the conference theme - our responsibility for preserving and defending a human environment…

  10. [Stress prevention programs--strategies, techniques, effectiveness. Part I. National and international activities to prevent stress at work].

    PubMed

    Waszkowska, Małgorzata; Merecz, Dorota; Drabek, Marcin

    2009-01-01

    Work stress is nowadays one of the major world-wide problems because of its negative impact on health and socio-economic consequences. Therefore, many organizations, established to protect occupational health and safety, include stress-related issues into their preventive activities. This article is the first part of a broader review of approaches to work stress prevention and existing practices in Europe. It presents anti-stress interventions elaborated and implemented at international and national levels, such as: legal and research initiatives, educational actions, supporting the development of knowledge of occupational stress, and promoting the idea of healthy work place.

  11. [Gerontosocial work in the context of Russian culture and recommendations of Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing].

    PubMed

    Danilova, R I; Golubeva, E Iu

    2007-01-01

    The definition of gerontosocial work adopted in the majority of the European countries in the context of the Russian culture and priority trends of the Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing has been discussed. In the article the interaction and differences between terms being used in social work with the elderly people in Russia have been showed; tasks and peculiarities of gerontosocial work have been defined. Peculiarities of interaction between personnel and elderly patients have been studied; the increasing requirements to the professionalism of gerontosocial workers have been proved.

  12. Critical Friendship as a Contribution to Master's-Level Work in an International Programme of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Swet, Jacqueline; Smit, Ben H. J.; Corvers, Louise; van Dijk, Ineke

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on an action research project in which the value of critical friendship for students doing research and writing their dissertations within an international master's course has been explored. This course is run jointly by Roehampton University (London, UK), Charles University (Prague, Czech Republic) together with Fontys OSO…

  13. International Aspects of Mental Health Work with Refugees and Future Directions: A European Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauff, Edvard

    This paper describes past and present European efforts to address the mental health needs of refugees. It begins with a brief historical survey of mental health services for refugees after the Second World War and delineates the policy recommendations from the 1948 International Congress on Mental Health. The next section describes current…

  14. The Economics of International Differences in Educational Achievement. NBER Working Paper No. 15949

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanushek, Eric A.; Woessmann, Ludger

    2010-01-01

    An emerging economic literature over the past decade has made use of international tests of educational achievement to analyze the determinants and impacts of cognitive skills. The cross-country comparative approach provides a number of unique advantages over national studies: It can exploit institutional variation that does not exist within…

  15. International Perspectives on Work-Family Policies: Lessons from the World's Most Competitive Economies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earle, Alison; Mokomane, Zitha; Heymann, Jody

    2011-01-01

    The United States does not guarantee families a wide range of supportive workplace policies such as paid maternity and paternity leave or paid leave to care for sick children. Proposals to provide such benefits are invariably met with the complaint that the costs would reduce employment and undermine the international competitiveness of American…

  16. Health Workforce and International Migration: Can New Zealand Compete? OECD Health Working Papers No. 33

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurn, Pascal; Dumont, Jean-Christophe

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines health workforce and migration policies in New Zealand, with a special focus on the international recruitment of doctors and nurses. The health workforce in New Zealand, as in all OECD countries, plays a central role in the health system. Nonetheless, maybe more than for any other OECD country, the health workforce in New…

  17. Building Teacher Competency to Work with Diverse Learners in the Context of International Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dantas, Maria Luiza

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on an international experience designed, within a sociocultural frame, for teacher education students to examine theoretical knowledge and make visible local knowledge on diversity issues, and the interrelatedness and complexity of language, literacy and culture and its impact on educational practices. It examines the context of…

  18. International Ethical Dilemmas Confronting Australian Managers: Implications for the Training and Development of Employees Working Overseas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedigo, Kerry; Marshall, Verena

    2004-01-01

    Globalisation has seen diverse cultures becoming increasingly entwined and interdependent as business organisations operate in a borderless world. When organisations operate internationally they often find that countries differ in what is considered wrong or right. The objectives of the research were to identify cross-cultural ethical dilemmas…

  19. Chinese-Born International Students' Transition Experiences from Study to Work in New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Suzette; Lu, Fen

    2010-01-01

    A growing number of Chinese-born international students are seeking permanent residency and paid employment in New Zealand after graduation. As yet, little is known about their post-study transitions to permanent residency and paid employment. This article reports on research investigating the transition experiences of 10 Chinese-born…

  20. World-Class Care: Boston Welcome Back Center Puts Internationally Educated Nurses Back to Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fifield, Mary L.

    2008-01-01

    Massachusetts alone needs an estimated 5,000 nurses, and the shortage is deepening. Nurses are retiring and quitting faster than new nurses can be trained. In this article, the author describes Bunker Hill Community College's Welcome Back Center, a workforce development program that has thus far helped 47 internationally educated nurses from 29…

  1. "Pawns and Prawns": International Academics' Observations on Their Transition to Working in an Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltmarsh, Sue; Swirski, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Internationalisation in the Australian higher education sector has most usually been considered in relation to issues concerned with the attraction, retention and experience of students studying both on and offshore at Australian universities. Less attention has been paid to the experiences of the international academics that represent a…

  2. Leaping into the Unknown: Experience of Counseling Students Participating in Group Work with International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Kyoung Mi; Protivnak, Jake J.

    2016-01-01

    This research study used qualitative phenomenological methodology to explore counseling graduate students' experiences leading support groups for international students. Participants included 6 master's-level counseling students. The following 4 themes emerged to describe the counseling students' experience as group leaders: (a) individualistic…

  3. Working with School Age International Students: Considerations and Strategies for School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards-Joseph, Arline

    2012-01-01

    The number of school age international students and their parents matriculating in U.S. schools continues to increase. These students and their families have a myriad of unique needs that are multidimensional and continue to evolve as they transition into U.S. culture. Strategically placed to help these students become familiar with school…

  4. Teaching "Community Engagement" in Engineering Education for International Development: Integration of an Interdisciplinary Social Work Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Dorie J.; Held, Mary Lehman; Ellzey, Janet L.; Bailey, William T.; Young, Laurie B.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on challenges faced by engineering faculty in educating their students on community-engaged, sustainable technical solutions in developing countries. We review a number of approaches to increasing teaching modules on social and community components of international development education, from adding capstone…

  5. The Interns Play: A Mimetic Approach to Introducing and Working with Countertransference in Professional Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMino, John L.

    2009-01-01

    An approach is presented that introduces the concept of countertransference to predoctoral interns and externs in a unique way during their professional training. This approach goes beyond a didactic presentation of the concept and even beyond discussion of case material in supervision. Through an experiential role-play process called Mimesis,…

  6. International Workforce Initiatives: Definitions, Design Options, and Project Profiles. Working Paper Series. No. 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, J.W., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This publication is intended for three primary audiences: international development professionals who want to define "workforce" for program design purposes, those who seek information about field activities, and those who want to reflect on the implementation of successful, high impact programs--whether they were broad-based or sector-specific…

  7. Institutionalisation of Internal Quality Assurance: Focusing on Institutional Work and the Significance of Disciplinary Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vukasovic, Martina

    2014-01-01

    The study suggests that institutionalisation of a comprehensive and systematic approach to internal quality assurance of higher education institutions inspired by the Bologna Process has regulative, normative and cultural-cognitive dimensions. It includes development of structures and procedures for quality assurance, as well as boosting of the…

  8. How To Make International Strategic Alliances Work: One More Business Lesson from the Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffield, Barney T., III

    International strategic alliances are established by two or more companies as synergistic relationships to achieve a common goal where both parties benefit. The evolving global market has focused renewed interest on these alliances as an important tool in penetrating new markets. No country has achieved as much success as Japan in forging such…

  9. Working to My Potential: The Postsecondary Experiences of CPS Students in the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coca, Vanessa; Johnson, David; Kelley-Kemple, Thomas; Roderick, Melissa; Moeller, Eliza; Williams, Nicole; Moragne, Kafi

    2012-01-01

    In 1997, Chicago Public Schools (CPS) announced an ambitious plan to open 13 International Baccalaureate Diploma Programs (IBDP) in neighborhood high schools throughout the city. Hoping to replicate the success achieved in the long-standing IB program at Lincoln Park High School, the scale of the IB experiment was unmatched by any other school…

  10. International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation working formulation of a standardized nomenclature for cardiac allograft vasculopathy-2010.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Crespo-Leiro, Maria G; Dipchand, Anne; Ensminger, Stephan M; Hiemann, Nicola E; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Madsen, Joren; Parameshwar, Jayan; Starling, Randall C; Uber, Patricia A

    2010-07-01

    The development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy remains the Achilles heel of cardiac transplantation. Unfortunately, the definitions of cardiac allograft vasculopathy are diverse, and there are no uniform international standards for the nomenclature of this entity. This consensus document, commissioned by the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation Board, is based on best evidence and clinical consensus derived from critical analysis of available information pertaining to angiography, intravascular ultrasound imaging, microvascular function, cardiac allograft histology, circulating immune markers, non-invasive imaging tests, and gene-based and protein-based biomarkers. This document represents a working formulation for an international nomenclature of cardiac allograft vasculopathy, similar to the development of the system for adjudication of cardiac allograft rejection by histology.

  11. International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation working formulation of a standardized nomenclature for cardiac allograft vasculopathy-2010.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Crespo-Leiro, Maria G; Dipchand, Anne; Ensminger, Stephan M; Hiemann, Nicola E; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Madsen, Joren; Parameshwar, Jayan; Starling, Randall C; Uber, Patricia A

    2010-07-01

    The development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy remains the Achilles heel of cardiac transplantation. Unfortunately, the definitions of cardiac allograft vasculopathy are diverse, and there are no uniform international standards for the nomenclature of this entity. This consensus document, commissioned by the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation Board, is based on best evidence and clinical consensus derived from critical analysis of available information pertaining to angiography, intravascular ultrasound imaging, microvascular function, cardiac allograft histology, circulating immune markers, non-invasive imaging tests, and gene-based and protein-based biomarkers. This document represents a working formulation for an international nomenclature of cardiac allograft vasculopathy, similar to the development of the system for adjudication of cardiac allograft rejection by histology. PMID:20620917

  12. International postgraduate nursing students: implications for studying and working within a different culture.

    PubMed

    Kilstoff, Kathleen; Baker, Jacqueline

    2006-07-01

    The aims of this paper are twofold, firstly, to review the literature about the experiences of students studying abroad. Secondly, to discuss the results and the issues arising from a quality assurance project that explored the expectations and experiences of international students enrolled in a postgraduate nursing program in an Australian university. International postgraduate nursing students enrolled in either the Graduate Diploma or Master of Nursing programs were approached to participate in a quality assurance project. The open ended descriptive survey explored the participants' expectations and perceptions of their learning in the programs. The results indicated that the participants in this survey struggled not only with their English language skills, both academically and clinically but also with nursing practices and perspectives. Strategies to ameliorate the difficulties experienced by these students are discussed and include: assisting adaptation to the academic program and assessment tasks; orientation to the clinical practice setting; and preparation of culturally competent clinical facilitators who are able to support students' English language skill development. It is concluded that both academic and clinical staff need to develop structured support programs in order to smooth the progress of international postgraduate nursing students' learning and minimize aspects of cultural shock. PMID:16863406

  13. Nuclear Forensics International Technical Working Group (ITWG): a collaboration of scientists, law enforcement officials, and regulators working to combat nuclear terrorism and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.

    2013-10-25

    Founded in 1996 upon the initiative of the “Group of 8” governments (G8), the Nuclear Forensics International Technical Working Group (ITWG) is an ad hoc organization of official Nuclear Forensics practitioners (scientists, law enforcement, and regulators) that can be called upon to provide technical assistance to the global community in the event of a seizure of nuclear or radiological materials. The ITWG is supported by and is affiliated with nearly 40 countries and international partner organizations including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), EURATOM, INTERPOL, EUROPOL, and the United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute (UNICRI) (Figure 1). Besides providing a network of nuclear forensics laboratories that are able to assist the global community during a nuclear smuggling event, the ITWG is also committed to the advancement of the science of nuclear forensic analysis, largely through participation in periodic table top and Collaborative Materials Exercises (CMXs). Exercise scenarios use “real world” samples with realistic forensics investigation time constraints and reporting requirements. These exercises are designed to promote best practices in the field and test, evaluate, and improve new technical capabilities, methods and techniques in order to advance the science of nuclear forensics. Past efforts to advance nuclear forensic science have also included scenarios that asked laboratories to adapt conventional forensics methods (e.g. DNA, fingerprints, tool marks, and document comparisons) for collecting and preserving evidence comingled with radioactive materials.

  14. Developing International Links through Work Exchange. An Exchange between Australia and Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Rosie

    2001-01-01

    Describes a work exchange experience between volunteer managers in Australia and Canada. Offers guidelines for initiating the program including developing a rationale and an exchange agreement. Discusses first impressions, initial problems, and differences and similarities between the two contexts. (JOW)

  15. The International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW TBE): Review of 17 years of activity and commitment.

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2016-04-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) has been a growing public health problem in Europe and other parts of the world for the past 20 years. In 1999, in order to encourage the control of TBE, international experts created a new body: The International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE). This Working Group has been composed of internationally recognized scientific experts from tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEv)-endemic and non-endemic regions with extensive personal expertise in the field and a high level of commitment to improve the knowledge of TBE and to increase the public awareness of TBE. Since the foundation of the Working Group, ISW-TBE members meet annually. Every meeting is dedicated to a specific topic, and since 2004 a yearly conference report has been published to inform the scientific community about the latest developments. Among the specific issues that have been extensively discussed over the years were the following: clinical aspects of the disease, TBE in children and golden agers, epidemiology, possible causes for the increase in TBE incidence in Europe, TBE and awareness, TBE and travel, (low) vaccination rates, and the cooperation with the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). This paper gives an overview of the most important activities and achievements of the ISW-TBE over the past 17 years. PMID:26795231

  16. The politics of agenda setting at the global level: key informant interviews regarding the International Labour Organization Decent Work Agenda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Global labour markets continue to undergo significant transformations resulting from socio-political instability combined with rises in structural inequality, employment insecurity, and poor working conditions. Confronted by these challenges, global institutions are providing policy guidance to protect and promote the health and well-being of workers. This article provides an account of how the International Labour Organization’s Decent Work Agenda contributes to the work policy agendas of the World Health Organization and the World Bank. Methods This qualitative study involved semi-structured interviews with representatives from three global institutions – the International Labour Organization (ILO), the World Health Organization and the World Bank. Of the 25 key informants invited to participate, 16 took part in the study. Analysis for key themes was followed by interpretation using selected agenda setting theories. Results Interviews indicated that through the Decent Work Agenda, the International Labour Organization is shaping the global policy narrative about work among UN agencies, and that the pursuit of decent work and the Agenda were perceived as important goals with the potential to promote just policies. The Agenda was closely linked to the World Health Organization’s conception of health as a human right. However, decent work was consistently identified by World Bank informants as ILO terminology in contrast to terms such as job creation and job access. The limited evidence base and its conceptual nature were offered as partial explanations for why the Agenda has yet to fully influence other global institutions. Catalytic events such as the economic crisis were identified as creating the enabling conditions to influence global work policy agendas. Conclusions Our evidence aids our understanding of how an issue like decent work enters and stays on the policy agendas of global institutions, using the Decent Work Agenda as an illustrative

  17. Understanding and reducing work-related psychological distress in interns: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Facey, A D; Tallentire, V; Selzer, R M; Rotstein, L

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to collate and evaluate studies investigating either the factors influencing work-related psychological distress in postgraduate year one (PGY1) doctors or the strategies designed to reduce it. This is a systematic review conducted in May 2014. The data sources were key databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Embase) and manual searches of reference lists for relevant studies published in the last 15 years. This study is an empirical research designed either to elucidate the factors influencing work-related psychological distress in PGY1 doctors, or examine the effects of an intervention designed to reduce it. Key information was extracted into an electronic data extraction form, which incorporated elements of Murphy's model of work stress factors. A total of 21 studies was included in the review; 16 studies had examined the factors influencing work-related psychological distress, four studies had investigated strategies to reduce it, and a single study addressed both. Analysis of the findings of each individual study through the conceptual framework provided by Murphy's model revealed a discrepancy between the factors influencing work-related psychological distress and the focus of strategies designed to reduce it. Factors such as career progression and a PGY1 doctor's role within the organisation were not addressed in the interventions identified. Significant sources of psychological distress in PGY1 doctors remain overlooked by current interventions. Strategies designed to prevent or reduce psychological distress should be broad-based and grounded in both the literature exploring salient factors and existing theories of work-related stress.

  18. Understanding and reducing work-related psychological distress in interns: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Facey, A D; Tallentire, V; Selzer, R M; Rotstein, L

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to collate and evaluate studies investigating either the factors influencing work-related psychological distress in postgraduate year one (PGY1) doctors or the strategies designed to reduce it. This is a systematic review conducted in May 2014. The data sources were key databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Embase) and manual searches of reference lists for relevant studies published in the last 15 years. This study is an empirical research designed either to elucidate the factors influencing work-related psychological distress in PGY1 doctors, or examine the effects of an intervention designed to reduce it. Key information was extracted into an electronic data extraction form, which incorporated elements of Murphy's model of work stress factors. A total of 21 studies was included in the review; 16 studies had examined the factors influencing work-related psychological distress, four studies had investigated strategies to reduce it, and a single study addressed both. Analysis of the findings of each individual study through the conceptual framework provided by Murphy's model revealed a discrepancy between the factors influencing work-related psychological distress and the focus of strategies designed to reduce it. Factors such as career progression and a PGY1 doctor's role within the organisation were not addressed in the interventions identified. Significant sources of psychological distress in PGY1 doctors remain overlooked by current interventions. Strategies designed to prevent or reduce psychological distress should be broad-based and grounded in both the literature exploring salient factors and existing theories of work-related stress. PMID:25871700

  19. An advisory statement from the Pediatric Working Group of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Kattwinkel, J; Niermeyer, S; Nadkarni, V; Tibballs, J; Phillips, B; Zideman, D; Van Reempts, P; Osmond, M

    1999-04-01

    The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR), with representation from North America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Africa, and South America, was formed in 1992 to provide a forum for liaison between resuscitation organizations in the developed world. This consensus document on resuscitation extends previously published ILCOR advisory statements on resuscitation to address the unique and changing physiology of the newly born infant within the first few hours after birth and the techniques for providing advanced life support. After careful review of the international resuscitation literature and after discussion of key and controversial issues, consensus was reached on almost all aspects of neonatal resuscitation, and areas of controversy and high priority for additional research were delineated. Consensus on resuscitation for the newly born infant included the following principles: Common or controversial medications (epinephrine, volume expansion, naloxone, bicarbonate), special resuscitation circumstances affecting care of the newly born, continuing care of the newly born after resuscitation, and ethical considerations for initiation and discontinuation of resuscitation are discussed. There was agreement that insufficient data exist to recommend changes to current guidelines regarding the use of 21% versus 100% oxygen, neuroprotective interventions such as cerebral hypothermia, use of a laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and use of high-dose epinephrine. Areas of controversy are identified, as is the need for additional research to improve the scientific justification of each component of current and future resuscitation guidelines. PMID:10103348

  20. Utilizing International Clinical Practice to Build Inter-Cultural Sensitivity in Social Work Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krajewski-Jaime, Elvia R.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-three undergraduate social work students from Eastern Michigan University completed a seven-week internship in a geriatric unit at a Mexico City hospital. Analyzes stages that students went through as they began to realize the importance of cultural context and to understand cultural differences in human behavior and service provision.…

  1. Bridging the Hemispheres through the Use of Technology: International Collaboration in Social Work Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rautenbach, John Victor; Black-Hughes, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The social work programs of the University of Fort Hare, East London, South Africa, and Minnesota State University, Mankato, United States, began using various technologies in 2007 to facilitate interaction. This project included conducting practicum supervision and seminars via videoconferencing (using Breeze, Adobe Connect, and Skype) and…

  2. Where Does Australia Fit in Internationally with Work and Family Issues?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Graeme; Bourke, Juliet

    1999-01-01

    Examines the status of work and family initiatives in Australia in terms of legal responses to global trends, the adoption of workplace policies and programs, and innovative organizational responses. States that these issues need to be approached from a strategic business perspective and that globalization of organizations needs to be taken into…

  3. 75 FR 18848 - Preparation for International Conference on Harmonisation Steering Committee and Expert Working...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... presentations, to the contact person by April 30, 2010. Interested persons may present data, information, or... Working Group Meetings in Tallinn, Estonia'' to provide information and receive comments on the...-0003. Registration and Requests for Oral Presentations: Send registration information (including...

  4. Financing Lifelong Learning for All: An International Perspective. Working Paper No. 46

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Gerald

    2002-01-01

    Improvements in lifelong learning are necessary for a range of overlapping reasons, including changing needs of the labour force in a globalised economy, the aging of the population in high-income countries and inequalities in education, work and income. Increased lifelong learning, for all, is important for productivity, but also to support…

  5. International Perspectives on the School-to-Work Transition. Series on Literacy: Research, Policy and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, David, Ed.; Wagner, Daniel A., Ed.

    This book provides a policy update on the school-to-work (STW) transition in a wide range of countries. Fourteen chapters give a comprehensive overview of the main issues in policy formulation and a detailed consideration of how policies have been considered and implemented in those countries. The chapters are: "Introduction: STW Policies in…

  6. ICME International Survey on Teachers Working and Learning through Collaboration: June 2016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robutti, Ornella; Cusi, Annalisa; Clark-Wilson, Alison; Jaworski, Barbara; Chapman, Olive; Esteley, Cristina; Goos, Merrilyn; Isoda, Masami; Joubert, Marie

    2016-01-01

    This article presents preliminary results from a survey commissioned for ICME 13 (2016) focusing on "Teachers Working and Learning Through Collaboration". It takes as a starting point a previous survey, commissioned for ICME 10 in 2004 that focused on Mathematics Teacher Education. The current survey focuses centrally on teachers…

  7. International variation in absence from work attributed to musculoskeletal illness: findings from the CUPID study

    PubMed Central

    Coggon, David; Ntani, Georgia; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Martinez, José Miguel; Serra, Consol; Benavides, Fernando G; Palmer, Keith T

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To quantify the variation in rates of absence due to musculoskeletal pain across 47 occupational groups (mostly nurses and office workers) from 18 countries, and to explore personal and group-level risk factors that might explain observed differences. Methods A standardised questionnaire was used to obtain information about musculoskeletal pain, sickness absence and possible risk factors in a cross-sectional survey of 12 416 workers (92–1017 per occupational group). Additionally, group-level data on socioeconomic variables, such as sick pay and unemployment rates, were assembled by members of the study team in each country. Associations of sickness absence with risk factors were examined by Poisson regression. Results Overall, there were more than 30-fold differences between occupational groups in the 12-month prevalence of prolonged musculoskeletal sickness absence, and even among office workers carrying out similar occupational tasks, the variation was more than tenfold. Personal risk factors included older age, lower educational level, tendency to somatise, physical loading at work and prolonged absence for non-musculoskeletal illness. However, these explained little of the variation between occupational groups. After adjustment for individual characteristics, prolonged musculoskeletal sickness absence was more frequent in groups with greater time pressure at work, lower job control and more adverse beliefs about the work-relatedness of musculoskeletal disorders. Conclusions Musculoskeletal sickness absence might be reduced by eliminating excessive time pressures in work, maximising employees’ responsibility and control and providing flexibility of duties for those with disabling symptoms. Care should be taken not to overstate work as a cause of musculoskeletal injury. PMID:23695413

  8. Report of the International Astronomical Union Division I Working Group on Precession and the Ecliptic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, J. L.; Capitaine, N.; Chapront, J.; Ferrandiz, J. M.; Fienga, A.; Fukushima, T.; Getino, J.; Mathews, P.; Simon, J.-L.; Soffel, M.; Vondrak, J.; Wallace, P.; Williams, J.

    2006-03-01

    The IAU Working Group on Precession and the Equinox looked at several solutions for replacing the precession part of the IAU 2000A precession nutation model, which is not consistent with dynamical theory. These comparisons show that the (Capitaine et al., Astron. Astrophys., 412, 2003a) precession theory, P03, is both consistent with dynamical theory and the solution most compatible with the IAU 2000A nutation model. Thus, the working group recommends the adoption of the P03 precession theory for use with the IAU 2000A nutation. The two greatest sources of uncertainty in the precession theory are the rate of change of the Earth’s dynamical flattening, ΔJ 2, and the precession rates (i.e. the constants of integration used in deriving the precession). The combined uncertainties limit the accuracy in the precession theory to approximately 2 mas cent-2.

  9. [Health at work: harmonization of terminology, laws and practice with international standards].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The terminology, laws and practice of workers' health protection in Russian Federation are considered in the light of harmonization with documents of WHO, ILO, EU as well as good foreign practice. The proposals are put forward as to functions, structure and staff of workers' health protection units taking into account the new problems and risk factors. Instead of notion "labour protection" the term "health and safety at work" is proposed. PMID:23088017

  10. Boundary work for sustainable development: Natural resource management at the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR).

    PubMed

    Clark, William C; Tomich, Thomas P; van Noordwijk, Meine; Guston, David; Catacutan, Delia; Dickson, Nancy M; McNie, Elizabeth

    2016-04-26

    Previous research on the determinants of effectiveness in knowledge systems seeking to support sustainable development has highlighted the importance of "boundary work" through which research communities organize their relations with new science, other sources of knowledge, and the worlds of action and policymaking. A growing body of scholarship postulates specific attributes of boundary work that promote used and useful research. These propositions, however, are largely based on the experience of a few industrialized countries. We report here on an effort to evaluate their relevance for efforts to harness science in support of sustainability in the developing world. We carried out a multicountry comparative analysis of natural resource management programs conducted under the auspices of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research. We discovered six distinctive kinds of boundary work contributing to the successes of those programs-a greater variety than has been documented in previous studies. We argue that these different kinds of boundary work can be understood as a dual response to the different uses for which the results of specific research programs are intended, and the different sources of knowledge drawn on by those programs. We show that these distinctive kinds of boundary work require distinctive strategies to organize them effectively. Especially important are arrangements regarding participation of stakeholders, accountability in governance, and the use of "boundary objects." We conclude that improving the ability of research programs to produce useful knowledge for sustainable development will require both greater and differentiated support for multiple forms of boundary work.

  11. Return-to-Work Following Open Reduction and Internal Fixation of Proximal Humerus Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Michael; Wasmer, Mathias; Platz, Andreas; Spross, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Objectives : Shoulder disorders have an important impact on a patient’s capacity to work. We investigated whether there is a relationship between subjective or objective outcome measures and the ability and time for returning to work (RTW) after a proximal humerus fracture (PHF). Design : Retrospective single-centre study from March 2003 to June 2008. Setting : City hospital, trauma level one centre. Intervention : All PHF stabilized with a PHILOS®. Main Outcome Measurements : Routine follow-up examinations (X-ray, Constant-Murley Score (CMS), Short-Form 36 (SF-36)) were performed prospectively after 1.5, 3, 6 and 12 months or until RTW. Primary interest was the comparison of the outcome scores with the time needed for RTW. Results : 72 patients (52 years (22-64), 37 (51%) women) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. We distinguished “office-workers” (OW) (n = 49, 68%) from patients who worked at a physically demanding job (PW) (n = 23, 32%). Although time for RTW was fundamentally different (42 (OW) vs 118 days (PW), p<0.001), CMS (64.7 vs 64.1) and SF-36 (66.8 vs 69.9) at time of RTW were almost identical. At follow-up, CMS and SF-36 were always lower in the PW group. Conclusion : Jobs which require higher physical demands were likely to influence and to delay RTW. This study identifies cut off values for CMS and SF-36 at which a patient feels capable or willing to RTW after PHF. These values show the importance and impact of a patient’s occupation or demands on RTW. We were able to show, that besides age, sex and fracture, the type of occupation might alter the scores in postoperative outcomes. PMID:25246994

  12. Research in radiobiology: Annual report of work in progress in the internal irradiation program

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.C.; Buster, D.S.

    1987-12-31

    In the early 1950's the Atomic Energy Commission established at the University of Utah a large, long-term study designed to investigate the toxicity of internally deposited radionuclides in beagles. The first animals were injected on December 1, 1952 and thus began an odyssey unusual in modern science both for its duration and continued scientific interest and relevance. The original dogs were injected with /sup 239/Pu and /sup 226/Ra. Later, studies were initiated with /sup 241/Am, /sup 249/Cf, /sup 252/Cf, /sup 253/Es, /sup 224/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, /sup 90/Sr, and /sup 228/Th. These studies were unique and have and will continue to contribute valuable scientific information on the behavior and effects of these substances in biological systems. We feel that the data collected from these studies will be useful for many decades to come as we ask more demanding questions relative to radionuclides and environmental, biological and health issues. While this publication will be the last of our series Research in Radiobiology, the lifespan carcinogenesis studies are continuing under a collaborative arrangement with the I.T.R.I. Beginning in 1988, the colony status tables of dogs in the Utah studies and reports of research by the Radiobiology faculty will be included in the annual I.T.R.I. report. Under our new collaborative arrangements with the I.T.R.I. for the conduct of the lifespan carcinogenesis studies, we expect a continued high level of scientific productivity from our faculty.

  13. Tenth international meeting on Trypanosoma evansi: report of the working group. Paris, 24 May 1989.

    PubMed

    Touratier, L

    1990-12-01

    Some epidemiological surveys have provided information on the incidence of Trypanosoma evansi infection among dromedaries in Mali, and among buffaloes in Java and Indonesia. The disease among camels has been reported again from Kazakhstan in the USSR, with the coexistence of T. evansi and Cephalopina titillator in animals which developed acute infection. The disease has been studied among horses in Venezuela and among buffaloes in Vietnam and Indonesia, and suspected among horses in Brazil. Diagnostic kits for rapid and reliable detection of T. evansi are being made available free of charge, upon request, by the institutes which have developed these new techniques, namely: detecting the parasite by agglutination-lysis; detecting antibody (by a modification of CATT); detecting antigen (by using monoclonal antibodies). Once these various diagnostic procedures developed by competent institutes have been evaluated and used widely, the next step will be to standardise the techniques and the antigens. Differential diagnosis of T. evansi and T. equiperdum is still difficult in the case of akinetoplastic strains. For improved evaluation of T. evansi isolates, a proposal has been made to form collections of complementary DNA (cDNA) with a view to exchanging these copies and the original strains. The advice of the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature has been requested for definitive adoption of a binomial designation for the species T. evansi. With more extensive data on the pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of Cymelarsan and laboratory testing of a new trypanocide called "IMOL 881", research on trypanocides continues. PMID:2132713

  14. Working with Concepts: The Role of Community in International Collaborative Biomedical Research

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, V. M.; Kamuya, D. K.; Parker, M. J.; Molyneux, C. S.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of communities in strengthening the ethics of international collaborative research is increasingly highlighted, but there has been much debate about the meaning of the term ‘community’ and its specific normative contribution. We argue that ‘community’ is a contingent concept that plays an important normative role in research through the existence of morally significant interplay between notions of community and individuality. We draw on experience of community engagement in rural Kenya to illustrate two aspects of this interplay: (i) that taking individual informed consent seriously involves understanding and addressing the influence of communities in which individuals’ lives are embedded; (ii) that individual participation can generate risks and benefits for communities as part of the wider implications of research. We further argue that the contingent nature of a community means that defining boundaries is generally a normative process itself, with ethical implications. Community engagement supports the enactment of normative roles; building mutual understanding and trust between researchers and community members have been important goals in Kilifi, requiring a broad range of approaches. Ethical dilemmas are continuously generated as part of these engagement activities, including the risks of perverse outcomes related to existing social relations in communities and conditions of ‘half knowing’ intrinsic to processes of developing new understandings. PMID:21416064

  15. Core competencies for shared decision making training programs: insights from an international, interdisciplinary working group.

    PubMed

    Légaré, France; Moumjid-Ferdjaoui, Nora; Drolet, Renée; Stacey, Dawn; Härter, Martin; Bastian, Hilda; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Borduas, Francine; Charles, Cathy; Coulter, Angela; Desroches, Sophie; Friedrich, Gwendolyn; Gafni, Amiram; Graham, Ian D; Labrecque, Michel; LeBlanc, Annie; Légaré, Jean; Politi, Mary; Sargeant, Joan; Thomson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Shared decision making is now making inroads in health care professionals' continuing education curriculum, but there is no consensus on what core competencies are required by clinicians for effectively involving patients in health-related decisions. Ready-made programs for training clinicians in shared decision making are in high demand, but existing programs vary widely in their theoretical foundations, length, and content. An international, interdisciplinary group of 25 individuals met in 2012 to discuss theoretical approaches to making health-related decisions, compare notes on existing programs, take stock of stakeholders concerns, and deliberate on core competencies. This article summarizes the results of those discussions. Some participants believed that existing models already provide a sufficient conceptual basis for developing and implementing shared decision making competency-based training programs on a wide scale. Others argued that this would be premature as there is still no consensus on the definition of shared decision making or sufficient evidence to recommend specific competencies for implementing shared decision making. However, all participants agreed that there were 2 broad types of competencies that clinicians need for implementing shared decision making: relational competencies and risk communication competencies. Further multidisciplinary research could broaden and deepen our understanding of core competencies for shared decision making training.

  16. Working with Concepts: The Role of Community in International Collaborative Biomedical Research.

    PubMed

    Marsh, V M; Kamuya, D K; Parker, M J; Molyneux, C S

    2011-04-01

    The importance of communities in strengthening the ethics of international collaborative research is increasingly highlighted, but there has been much debate about the meaning of the term 'community' and its specific normative contribution. We argue that 'community' is a contingent concept that plays an important normative role in research through the existence of morally significant interplay between notions of community and individuality. We draw on experience of community engagement in rural Kenya to illustrate two aspects of this interplay: (i) that taking individual informed consent seriously involves understanding and addressing the influence of communities in which individuals' lives are embedded; (ii) that individual participation can generate risks and benefits for communities as part of the wider implications of research. We further argue that the contingent nature of a community means that defining boundaries is generally a normative process itself, with ethical implications. Community engagement supports the enactment of normative roles; building mutual understanding and trust between researchers and community members have been important goals in Kilifi, requiring a broad range of approaches. Ethical dilemmas are continuously generated as part of these engagement activities, including the risks of perverse outcomes related to existing social relations in communities and conditions of 'half knowing' intrinsic to processes of developing new understandings. PMID:21416064

  17. Predicting social work students' interest in gerontology: results from an international sample.

    PubMed

    Chonody, Jill M; Wang, Donna

    2014-01-01

    The need for social workers with a specialization in gerontology has become a global priority. The purpose of this study was to explore social work students' interest in gerontology. This cross-sectional survey was completed by 1,042 students from the United States, England, and Australia, and only 5.4% of the sample indicated an interest in gerontology. Results of the logistic regression found that personal aging beliefs and the frequency of time spent with an older adult were significant in explaining gerontological interest. The infusion of aging content may facilitate further advancement in the field, but additional strategies may also be needed.

  18. External And Internal Work Of A T-6 Paraplegic Propelling A Wheelchair And Arm Cranking A Cycle Ergometer: Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Charles W.

    1982-02-01

    In this, the International Year of the Disabled, attention is directed among other areas toward rehabilitation and sports participation of wheelchair users. As an application of movement analysis in medicine and rehabilitation and as an application of sports research using biomechanics, this investigation was performed to compare the results of two methods of gathering data on the stress of wheelchair propelling at equivalent work loads and to account for differences in physiological responses with a mechanical analysis of wheelchair propelling. Physiological data collected were heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and rate-pressure product. A biomechanical cinematography analysis was used to determine external work in wheelchair propelling and to determine the extent to which modifications in segment actionsoccurred during increasing magnitude of work. A cycle ergometer was adjusted to replicate external work loads performed during wheelchair propelling. A t-test of equivalent external work loads indicated that heart rate was not different between the two exercise modes at the .05 level of significance. The t-test did indicate a significant difference in systolic blood pressure and rate-pressure product at the .05 level of significance. The biomechanical analysis of wheelchair propelling established that an increase in external work was accomplished by a decrease in the range of motion and an increase in the speed of movement. During cycle ergometry the range and speed of movement remained the same while resistance was increased. Results of the study established that while heart rate for equivalent external work loads was the same for wheelchair propelling and arm cranking cycle ergometry, systolic blood pressure and rate-pressure product were not the same. The suggestion was that some means of propelling a wheelchair other than that which is con-sidered "standard" might be considered which produces less stressful responses in wheelchair users.

  19. Lean production and work-related musculoskeletal disorders: overviews of international and Swedish studies.

    PubMed

    Brännmark, Mikael; Håkansson, Malin

    2012-01-01

    This paper aimed at summarizing the knowledge of the relationship between Lean and work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD), and WMSD risk factors, in manufacturing companies. Literature search processes identified 23 publications studying this, in scientific journals. Eight included measurements of WMSD; three were mostly negative, two showed mixed results, one showed no results and two were mostly positive. Eighteen publications included measurements of WMSD risk factors; seven showed mostly negative results, eight showed mixed results, two showed mostly positive results and one was inconclusive. Three literature reviews were identified, which studied this question; two were mostly negative, while the third was inconclusive. Also, 12 publications of grey literature studying Lean and WMSD risk factors in Swedish organizations were identified; nine showed mixed results, two showed mostly positive results and one showed mostly negative results. Due to the varying quality and study design of the publications, together with the few identified studies, it is difficult to compare them. The context and the implementation also likely affect the results. The general conclusion was that a Lean implementation may increase the risk of WMSD and risk factors for WMSD, if it is not accompanied with an ergonomic intervention. PMID:22317062

  20. Lean production and work-related musculoskeletal disorders: overviews of international and Swedish studies.

    PubMed

    Brännmark, Mikael; Håkansson, Malin

    2012-01-01

    This paper aimed at summarizing the knowledge of the relationship between Lean and work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD), and WMSD risk factors, in manufacturing companies. Literature search processes identified 23 publications studying this, in scientific journals. Eight included measurements of WMSD; three were mostly negative, two showed mixed results, one showed no results and two were mostly positive. Eighteen publications included measurements of WMSD risk factors; seven showed mostly negative results, eight showed mixed results, two showed mostly positive results and one was inconclusive. Three literature reviews were identified, which studied this question; two were mostly negative, while the third was inconclusive. Also, 12 publications of grey literature studying Lean and WMSD risk factors in Swedish organizations were identified; nine showed mixed results, two showed mostly positive results and one showed mostly negative results. Due to the varying quality and study design of the publications, together with the few identified studies, it is difficult to compare them. The context and the implementation also likely affect the results. The general conclusion was that a Lean implementation may increase the risk of WMSD and risk factors for WMSD, if it is not accompanied with an ergonomic intervention.

  1. Celebration of the International Year of Planet Earth in Canada: A Work in Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowlan, G. S.; Boyd, J. D.; Reimer, J.

    2009-05-01

    The International Year of Planet Earth (IYPE, 2007-2009) has been the inspiration for a variety of projects across Canada. Local events, including speaker series and educational programs in Earth sciences have taken place in several parts of the country in 2008-09. Most Canadian conferences for Earth scientists have developed programs reflecting IYPE in 2008 and 2009. The Walcott Conference, celebrating the 100th anniversary of the discovery of the Burgess Shale fauna, to be held in Banff in August 2009 has sponsorship from IYPE. All these projects have served to raise the local and national profile of IYPE and provide learning opportunities for many Canadians. The Canadian National Committee for IYPE developed the theme WHERE, which is an acronym for Water, Hazards, Energy, Resources and Environment. The tag line is Where on Earth? Where in Canada? Proposals for projects were sought nationally for projects that would leave a legacy following the completion of IYPE. The initial proposals were recast into a program of consolidated projects and funds were sought to support them, mainly from the private sector. Already completed are 32 fact sheets on mineral and energy resources and a poster on the resources required to build and run a snowmobile. There are several projects in various states of completion at the time of writing: these are showcased at www.EarthSciencesCanada.com and are intended to form a legacy that will last for years to come. Other projects were funded directly by local agencies to celebrate IYPE; an example is new signage in Alberta Provincial Parks funded by the Alberta Geological Survey. The WHERE Challenge asks Canadians aged 10-14 to answer two simple questions: What on Earth is in your stuff and where on Earth does it come from? Thousands of students are expected to enter this contest by the end of February by telling a story about the Earth resources required to build everyday objects. The story can be told in any medium and the more

  2. [WORK-REST CYCLE OF COSMONAUTS IN MISSIONS 22/23-39/40 OF THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION].

    PubMed

    Stepanova, S I; Karpova, O I; Galichiy, V A; Nesterov, V F; Saraev, I F

    2016-01-01

    Analyzed were the results of in-flight monitoring of the work-rest cycle (WRC) of Russian crewmembers during 17 instances of the International space station crew rotation in the period of 2010-2014. Weakly crew health reports of the MCC-M medical group were reviewed as well as documented overworks, sleep shifts and consequent health complaints as testimonies of WRC intensity level. Hard work schedule characterized 69% of the flight weeks. The contributing factors were extravehicular activities, dock and undock operations with transport vehicles and redock operations with orbital modules, joint work with space shuttle crews, preparations for landing, off-nominal events, cargo transfer, procedures from the Task List and requested by the MCC-M. Facts stated by the analysis give grounds to believe that distribution of equally extra and planned works over days and weeks in 2013-2014 was more uniform as compared with 2010-2012. This seems to somewhat obviate "critical" workload levels on the days of particularly important operations. PMID:27344851

  3. [WORK-REST CYCLE OF COSMONAUTS IN MISSIONS 22/23-39/40 OF THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION].

    PubMed

    Stepanova, S I; Karpova, O I; Galichiy, V A; Nesterov, V F; Saraev, I F

    2016-01-01

    Analyzed were the results of in-flight monitoring of the work-rest cycle (WRC) of Russian crewmembers during 17 instances of the International space station crew rotation in the period of 2010-2014. Weakly crew health reports of the MCC-M medical group were reviewed as well as documented overworks, sleep shifts and consequent health complaints as testimonies of WRC intensity level. Hard work schedule characterized 69% of the flight weeks. The contributing factors were extravehicular activities, dock and undock operations with transport vehicles and redock operations with orbital modules, joint work with space shuttle crews, preparations for landing, off-nominal events, cargo transfer, procedures from the Task List and requested by the MCC-M. Facts stated by the analysis give grounds to believe that distribution of equally extra and planned works over days and weeks in 2013-2014 was more uniform as compared with 2010-2012. This seems to somewhat obviate "critical" workload levels on the days of particularly important operations.

  4. International note: Prediction of mathematics work ethic and performance from behavioral, normative, and control beliefs among Qatari adolescents.

    PubMed

    Areepattamannil, Shaljan; Abdelfattah, Faisal; Mahasneh, Randa Ali; Khine, Myint Swe; Welch, Anita G; Melkonian, Michael; Al Nuaimi, Samira Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Over half-a-million adolescents take part in each cycle of the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA). Yet often, researchers and policy makers across the globe tend to focus their attention primarily on the academic trajectories of adolescents hailing from highly successful education systems. Hence, a vast majority of the adolescent population who regionally and globally constitute the 'long tail of underachievement' often remain unnoticed and underrepresented in the growing literature on adolescents' academic trajectories. The present study, therefore, explored the relations of dispositions toward mathematics, subjective norms in mathematics, and perceived control of success in mathematics to mathematics work ethic as well as mathematics performance; and the mediational role of mathematics work ethic in the association between dispositional, normative, and control beliefs and mathematics performance among adolescents in one of the lowest performing education systems, Qatar. Structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses revealed that Qatari adolescents' dispositional, normative, and control beliefs about mathematics were significantly associated with their mathematics work ethic and mathematics performance, and mathematics work ethic significantly mediated the relationship between dispositional, normative, and control beliefs about mathematics and mathematics performance. However, multi-group SEM analyses indicated that these relationships were not invariant across the gender and the SES groups.

  5. Boundary work for sustainable development: Natural resource management at the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR)

    PubMed Central

    Clark, William C.; Tomich, Thomas P.; van Noordwijk, Meine; Guston, David; Catacutan, Delia; Dickson, Nancy M.; McNie, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Previous research on the determinants of effectiveness in knowledge systems seeking to support sustainable development has highlighted the importance of “boundary work” through which research communities organize their relations with new science, other sources of knowledge, and the worlds of action and policymaking. A growing body of scholarship postulates specific attributes of boundary work that promote used and useful research. These propositions, however, are largely based on the experience of a few industrialized countries. We report here on an effort to evaluate their relevance for efforts to harness science in support of sustainability in the developing world. We carried out a multicountry comparative analysis of natural resource management programs conducted under the auspices of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research. We discovered six distinctive kinds of boundary work contributing to the successes of those programs—a greater variety than has been documented in previous studies. We argue that these different kinds of boundary work can be understood as a dual response to the different uses for which the results of specific research programs are intended, and the different sources of knowledge drawn on by those programs. We show that these distinctive kinds of boundary work require distinctive strategies to organize them effectively. Especially important are arrangements regarding participation of stakeholders, accountability in governance, and the use of “boundary objects.” We conclude that improving the ability of research programs to produce useful knowledge for sustainable development will require both greater and differentiated support for multiple forms of boundary work. PMID:21844351

  6. Management of prostate cancer in older patients: updated recommendations of a working group of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Droz, Jean-Pierre; Aapro, Matti; Balducci, Lodovico; Boyle, Helen; Van den Broeck, Thomas; Cathcart, Paul; Dickinson, Louise; Efstathiou, Eleni; Emberton, Mark; Fitzpatrick, John M; Heidenreich, Axel; Hughes, Simon; Joniau, Steven; Kattan, Michael; Mottet, Nicolas; Oudard, Stéphane; Payne, Heather; Saad, Fred; Sugihara, Toru

    2014-08-01

    In 2010, the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) developed treatment guidelines for men with prostate cancer who are older than 70 years old. In 2013, a new multidisciplinary SIOG working group was formed to update these recommendations. The consensus of the task force is that older men with prostate cancer should be managed according to their individual health status, not according to age. On the basis of a validated rapid health status screening instrument and simple assessment, the task force recommends that patients are classed into three groups for treatment: healthy or fit patients who should have the same treatment options as younger patients; vulnerable patients with reversible impairment who should receive standard treatment after medical intervention; and frail patients with non-reversible impairment who should receive adapted treatment.

  7. Data sharing in stem cell translational science: policy statement by the International Stem Cell Forum Ethics Working Party.

    PubMed

    Bredenoord, Annelien L; Mostert, Menno; Isasi, Rosario; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2015-01-01

    Data and sample sharing constitute a scientific and ethical imperative but need to be conducted in a responsible manner in order to protect individual interests as well as maintain public trust. In 2014, the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH) adopted a common Framework for Responsible Sharing of Genomic and Health-Related Data. The GA4GH Framework is applicable to data sharing in the stem cell field, however, interpretation is required so as to provide guidance for this specific context. In this paper, the International Stem Cell Forum Ethics Working Party discusses those principles that are specific to translational stem cell science, including engagement, data quality and safety, privacy, security and confidentiality, risk-benefit analysis and sustainability.

  8. Publishing SNP genotypes of human embryonic stem cell lines: policy statement of the International Stem Cell Forum Ethics Working Party.

    PubMed

    Knoppers, Bartha M; Isasi, Rosario; Benvenisty, Nissim; Kim, Ock-Joo; Lomax, Geoffrey; Morris, Clive; Murray, Thomas H; Lee, Eng Hin; Perry, Margery; Richardson, Genevra; Sipp, Douglas; Tanner, Klaus; Wahlström, Jan; de Wert, Guido; Zeng, Fanyi

    2011-09-01

    Novel methods and associated tools permitting individual identification in publicly accessible SNP databases have become a debatable issue. There is growing concern that current technical and ethical safeguards to protect the identities of donors could be insufficient. In the context of human embryonic stem cell research, there are no studies focusing on the probability that an hESC line donor could be identified by analyzing published SNP profiles and associated genotypic and phenotypic information. We present the International Stem Cell Forum (ISCF) Ethics Working Party's Policy Statement on "Publishing SNP Genotypes of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines (hESC)". The Statement prospectively addresses issues surrounding the publication of genotypic data and associated annotations of hESC lines in open access databases. It proposes a balanced approach between the goals of open science and data sharing with the respect for fundamental bioethical principles (autonomy, privacy, beneficence, justice and research merit and integrity).

  9. Treatment of multiple myeloma with high-risk cytogenetics: a consensus of the International Myeloma Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Lonial, Sagar; Usmani, Saad; Siegel, David; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Chng, Wee-Joo; Moreau, Philippe; Attal, Michel; Kyle, Robert A.; Caers, Jo; Hillengass, Jens; San Miguel, Jesús; van de Donk, Niels W. C. J.; Einsele, Hermann; Bladé, Joan; Durie, Brian G. M.; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Mateos, María-Victoria; Palumbo, Antonio; Orlowski, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The International Myeloma Working Group consensus updates the definition for high-risk (HR) multiple myeloma based on cytogenetics Several cytogenetic abnormalities such as t(4;14), del(17/17p), t(14;16), t(14;20), nonhyperdiploidy, and gain(1q) were identified that confer poor prognosis. The prognosis of patients showing these abnormalities may vary with the choice of therapy. Treatment strategies have shown promise for HR cytogenetic diseases, such as proteasome inhibition in combination with lenalidomide/pomalidomide, double autologous stem cell transplant plus bortezomib, or combination of immunotherapy with lenalidomide or pomalidomide. Careful analysis of cytogenetic subgroups in trials comparing different treatments remains an important goal. Cross-trial comparisons may provide insight into the effect of new drugs in patients with cytogenetic abnormalities. However, to achieve this, consensus on definitions of analytical techniques, proportion of abnormal cells, and treatment regimens is needed. Based on data available today, bortezomib and carfilzomib treatment appear to improve complete response, progression-free survival, and overall survival in t(4;14) and del(17/17p), whereas lenalidomide may be associated with improved progression-free survival in t(4;14) and del(17/17p). Patients with multiple adverse cytogenetic abnormalities do not benefit from these agents. FISH data are implemented in the revised International Staging System for risk stratification. PMID:27002115

  10. Intern at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffrin, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Leadership Academy and Urban Network for Chicago (LAUNCH), a joint venture between the Chicago Public Schools, the local principal's association, and Northwestern University which pairs aspiring principals with practicing principals, offering them a chance to experience principal responsibilities. LAUNCH graduates who became…

  11. The Volcano Disaster Assistance Program: Working with International Partners to Reduce the Risk from Volcanic Eruptions Worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayberry, G. C.; Pallister, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP) is a joint effort between USGS and the U.S. Agency for International Development's (USAID) Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA). OFDA leads and coordinates disaster responses overseas for the U.S. government and is a unique stakeholder concerned with volcano disaster risk reduction as an international humanitarian assistance donor. One year after the tragic eruption of Nevado del Ruiz in 1985, OFDA began funding USGS to implement VDAP. VDAP's mission is to reduce the loss of life and property and limit the economic impact from foreign volcano crises, thereby preventing such crises from becoming disasters. VDAP fulfills this mission and complements OFDA's humanitarian assistance by providing crisis response, capacity-building, technical training, and hazard assessments to developing countries before, during, and after eruptions. During the past 30 years, VDAP has responded to more than 27 major volcanic crises, built capacity in 12+ countries, and helped counterparts save tens of thousands of lives and hundreds of millions of dollars in property. VDAP responses have evolved as host-country capabilities have grown, but the pace of work has not diminished; as a result of VDAP's work at 27 volcanoes in fiscal year 2014, more than 1.3 million people who could have been impacted by volcanic activity benefitted from VDAP assistance, 11 geological policies were modified, 188 scientists were trained, and several successful eruption forecasts were made. VDAP is developing new initiatives to help counterparts monitor volcanoes and communicate volcanic risk. These include developing the Eruption Forecasting Information System (EFIS) to learn from compiled crisis data from 30 years of VDAP responses, creating event trees to forecast eruptions at restless volcanoes, and exploring the use of unmanned aerial systems for monitoring. The use of these new methods, along with traditional VDAP assistance, has improved VDAP

  12. Modified international e-Delphi survey to define healthcare professional competencies for working with teenagers and young adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Rachel M; Feltbower, Richard G; Aslam, Natasha; Raine, Rosalind; Whelan, Jeremy S; Gibson, Faith

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To provide international consensus on the competencies required by healthcare professionals in order to provide specialist care for teenagers and young adults (TYA) with cancer. Design Modified e-Delphi survey. Setting International, multicentre study. Participants Experts were defined as professionals having worked in TYA cancer care for more than 12 months. They were identified through publications and professional organisations. Methods Round 1, developed from a previous qualitative study, included 87 closed-ended questions with responses on a nine-point Likert scale and further open-ended responses to identify other skills, knowledge and attitudes. Round 2 contained only items with no consensus in round 1 and suggestions of additional items of competency. Consensus was defined as a median score ranging from 7 to 9 and strength of agreement using mean absolute deviation of the median. Results A total of 179 registered to be members of the expert panel; valid responses were available from 158 (88%) in round 1 and 136/158 (86%) in round 2. The majority of participants were nurses (35%) or doctors (39%) from Europe (55%) or North America (35%). All 87 items in round 1 reached consensus with an additional 15 items identified for round 2, which also reached consensus. The strength of agreement was mostly high for statements. The areas of competence rated most important were agreed to be: ‘Identify the impact of disease on young people's life’ (skill), ‘Know about side effects of treatment and how this might be different to those experienced by children or older adults’ (knowledge), ‘Honesty’ (attitude) and ‘Listen to young people's concerns’ (aspect of communication). Conclusions Given the high degree of consensus, this list of competencies should influence education curriculum, professional development and inform workforce planning. Variation in strength of agreement for some competencies between professional groups should be explored

  13. Transient Astronomical Events as Inspiration Sources of Medieval Art. III: the 13th and 14th Centuries, and the case of the French "Ordre de L'Étoile"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bònoli, F.; Incerti, M.; Polcaro, V. F.

    2015-05-01

    Going ahead in our long-term project of analysis of the role of transient astronomical events as inspirational sources of medieval art, we extend our interest towards the 13th and 14th centuries, epochs of strong changes either in society, art or science. It is our aim to verify if the relationship we found in the 11th century between the number of artworks where a star is represented, and astonishing transient astronomical events was, in this new situation, still valid. Moreover, in order to check the influence of astronomical events on the 14th-century social and cultural environment, we focus on the case of the Ordre de l'Étoile, a chivalrous society founded by John II of France (Jan le Bon, roi de France) at the end of 1351, looking in ancient chronicles for some relevant contemporary astronomical event as an inspiration source for the "star" in the Order's name, in the garb of its knights and in its motto.

  14. Importance of and satisfaction with work and professional interpersonal issues: a survey of physicians practicing general internal medicine in Ontario.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, D J; Griffith, L E; Sackett, D L

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the importance of and satisfaction with clinical responsibilities, teaching, research and interpersonal issues among general internists; to understand the barriers to satisfaction in these domains and the usefulness of potential solutions to these problems. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey conducted from November 1992 to June 1994. SETTING: Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: General internists who were fellows of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and members of the Ontario Medical Association. Of 1192 physicians, 1007 (84.5%) returned a completed questionnaire; only the 199 who devoted at least 50% of their time to the practice of general internal medicine were included in this analysis. RESULTS: The respondents were satisfied with their primary role as clinicians dealing with complex, undifferentiated problems caring for the total patient and providing consultation. Guidelines for the referral of patients to general internists, computerization of test results, recruitment of general internal medicine fellows and more confidence in the future of general internal medicine were some of the solutions considered likely to increase professional satisfaction. The respondents involved in teaching suggested additional solutions, such as an opportunity to improve their teaching and evidence-based medicine skills and a greater recognition for their teaching efforts. Few of the general internists conducted research, barriers included lack of personal and project funding, and pressure to generate clinical earnings. In the domain of professional interpersonal issues, women were significantly more likely than men to rate having a mentor, peer support groups, ongoing career counselling, promotion and tenure guidelines for parental leave, availability of on-site day care, addressing gender discrimination and adoption of gender-neutral language as likely to improve the work environment. CONCLUSIONS: The primary role of general internists is that of

  15. Profile of the International Work of Canadian Universities=Profil de la collaboration internationale des universites Canadiennes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstone, Jennifer, Ed.; Gibbs, Darlene, Ed.

    This directory describes international cooperation programs at 66 Canadian colleges and universities. Listed alphabetically, each institution briefly summarizes its international initiatives, provides information on the history and administrative structure of the international activities, includes a list of programs, and provides contact…

  16. Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Fanconi Anemia: Report from the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Tolar, Jakub; Adair, Jennifer E; Antoniou, Michael; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Becker, Pamela S; Blazar, Bruce R; Bueren, Juan; Carroll, Thomas; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Clapp, D Wade; Dalgleish, Robert; Galy, Anne; Gaspar, H Bobby; Hanenberg, Helmut; Von Kalle, Christof; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Lindeman, Dirk; Naldini, Luigi; Navarro, Susana; Renella, Raffaele; Rio, Paula; Sevilla, Julián; Schmidt, Manfred; Verhoeyen, Els; Wagner, John E; Williams, David A; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    Survival rates after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) have increased dramatically since 2000. However, the use of autologous stem cell gene therapy, whereby the patient's own blood stem cells are modified to express the wild-type gene product, could potentially avoid the early and late complications of allogeneic HCT. Over the last decades, gene therapy has experienced a high degree of optimism interrupted by periods of diminished expectation. Optimism stems from recent examples of successful gene correction in several congenital immunodeficiencies, whereas diminished expectations come from the realization that gene therapy will not be free of side effects. The goal of the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting was to determine the optimal strategy for moving stem cell gene therapy into clinical trials for individuals with FA. To this end, key investigators examined vector design, transduction method, criteria for large-scale clinical-grade vector manufacture, hematopoietic cell preparation, and eligibility criteria for FA patients most likely to benefit. The report summarizes the roadmap for the development of gene therapy for FA. PMID:21540837

  17. McGraw Hill encyclopedia of science and technology. An international reference work in fifteen volumes including an index

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    This extensively revised and updated 5th Edition features contributions by 3000 distinguished experts - including 16 Nobel Prize winners - working with an international advisory board and 60 consulting editors. Thorough coverage is devoted to 75 separate disciplines in science and technology, from acoustics and biochemistry through fluid mechanics and geophysics to thermodynamics and vertebrate zoology. Detailed entries examine not only the physical and natural sciences, but also all engineering disciplines, discussing both the basic and the most recent theories, concepts, terminology, discoveries, materials, methods, and techniques. All of the new developments and technical advances that have occurred during the last five years - in each of the 75 disciplines - have been added to the encyclopedia and are explored in depth. Completely new material deals with such timely and newsworthy subjects as genetic engineering, artificial intelligence, nuclear medicine, desertification, psycholinguistics, industrial robots, and immunoassay. Also covered in extensive entries are such current topics as video disk recording, metallic glasses, acoustic levitation, magnetic bubble memory, gluons, and computerized tomography. The encyclopedia includes more than 15,000 photographs, drawings, maps, charts, and diagrams, shown in full-color, two-color, or black-and-white reproductions.

  18. International trends in health science librarianship part 14: East Africa (Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda).

    PubMed

    Gathoni, Nasra; Kamau, Nancy; Nannozi, Judith; Singirankabo, Marcel

    2015-06-01

    This is the 14th in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship in the 21st century. This is the second of four articles pertaining to different regions in the African continent. The present issue focuses on countries in East Africa (Kenya, Uganda and Rwanda). The next feature column will investigate trends in West Africa. JM.

  19. 75 FR 8190 - Art Advisory Panel of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    .... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joseph E. Bothwell, C:AP:P&V:ART, 1099 14th Street, NW., Room 4200E... discussions must include tax return information. Therefore, the Panel meetings will be closed to the public... confidentiality of tax returns and return information as required by section 6103 of the Internal Revenue...

  20. 77 FR 13389 - Art Advisory Panel of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Ruth Vriend, C:AP:P&V:ART, 1099 14th Street NW., Room 4200E, Washington, DC 20005... include tax return information. Therefore, the Panel meetings will be closed to the public since all... confidentiality of tax returns and return information as required by section 6103 of the Internal Revenue...

  1. Teachers' Work in Curricular Markets: Conditions of Design and Relations between the International Baccalaureate Diploma and the Local Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Catherine; Shield, Paul

    2012-01-01

    School-level strategy enabled by neoliberal choice policies can produce internal curricular markets whereby branded curricula such as the International Baccalaureate are offered alongside the local government curriculum in the same school. This project investigated how such curricular markets operating in Australian schools impacted on teachers'…

  2. International-Local Visionary, Policy Advocate and Formidable Networker: The Life, Times and Work of Jarl Bengtsson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuetze, Hans G.; Duke, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The authors show ways in which Jarl Bengtsson, a Swedish social scientist and policy analyst, has influenced international policy making. As a member and later director of the OECD's Centre for Educational Research and Innovation from the beginning of the 1970s to the end of the twentieth century, he has contributed to the international discussion…

  3. Academic Civic Mindedness and Model Citizenship in the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme. Working Paper WR-1044-IBO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saavedra, Anna Rosefsky

    2014-01-01

    Originally founded as a private means for diplomats' children to earn an internationally recognized high school diploma, today the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme (DP) serves students from a variety of backgrounds in 144 countries. The IB mission and Learner Profile--consisting of ten attributes to foster in students--suggest…

  4. PV Standards Work: Photovoltaic System and Component Certification, Test Facility Accreditation, and Solar Photovoltaic Energy Systems International Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Basso, T. S.; Chalmers, S.; Barikmo, H. O.

    2005-11-01

    This paper discusses efforts led by two companies (PowerMark Corporation and Sunset Technologies Inc.) to support both U.S. domestic and international photovoltaic (PV) system and component certification and test facility accreditation programs and the operation of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC-82) Photovoltaic Energy Systems. International and national PV certification/accreditation programs are successfully facilitating entry of only the highest quality PV products into the marketplace. Standards also continue to be a cornerstone for assuring global PV product conformity assessment, reducing non-tariff trade barriers, and ultimately improving PV products while lowering cost.

  5. The Influence of Problems Faced during Internships on Interns' Views of Their Profession and Their Intention to Work in the Tourism Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasli, Mehmet; Ilban, Mehmet Oguzhan

    2013-01-01

    Problem Statement: The problem of this research is identifying the difficulties that undergraduate students experience during their internships and assessing their future intention to work in the tourism industry. Purpose of Study: This research aims to identify the problems undergraduate students encounter as interns in tourism programs and to…

  6. More than a Body's Work: Widening Cultural Participation through an International Exploration of Young People's Construction of Visual Image and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchi, June

    2008-01-01

    The article presents the rationale, methodology, and selected outcomes from "More than a body's work," a collaborative, international, arts educational interactive research project. The project, taking place in both New York and England, explored the ways in which young people construct and "perform" identity through the construction of their body…

  7. The Importance of Internal Conversations and Reflexivity for Work-Based Students in Higher Education: Valuing Contextual Continuity and "Giving Something Back"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bovill, Helen

    2012-01-01

    This paper utilises the theories of Archer to explore the impact of student "internal conversations" upon the development of reflexive approaches employed by work-based students (WBS). The study informing this paper draws on the voices of a range of WBS on a Foundation Degree in Educational Support within a new university. A range of reflexivities…

  8. Status and Plans for the Accelerator Working Group of the International Design Study of the Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J. Scott

    2010-03-30

    The purpose of the International Design Study of the Neutrino Factory (IDS-NF) is to produce a design report for a neutrino factory in 2013. I report the status of the accelerator design and plans for future studies.

  9. Geriatric assessment in multiple myeloma patients: validation of the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) score and comparison with other common comorbidity scores.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Monika; Dold, Sandra Maria; Ihorst, Gabriele; Zober, Alexander; Möller, Mandy; Reinhardt, Heike; Hieke, Stefanie; Schumacher, Martin; Wäsch, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    This first validation of the International Myeloma Working Group geriatric assessment in 125 newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients was performed using the International Myeloma Working Group score based on age, the Charlson Comorbidity Index and cognitive and physical conditions (Activities of Daily Living / Instrumental Activities of Daily Living) to classify patients as fit, intermediate-fit or frail. We verified the International Myeloma Working Group score's impact on outcome, and whether additional tools complement it. Since our prior analyses determined renal, lung and Karnofsky performance impairment as multivariate risks, and the inclusion of frailty, age and cytogenetics complements this, we included the revised myeloma comorbidity index, the Charlson Comorbidity Index, the Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation-Comorbidity Index and the Kaplan-Feinstein Index in this assessment. Multivariate analysis confirmed cytogenetics, Activities of Daily Living, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living and the Charlson Comorbidity Index as risks: 3-year overall survival for fit, intermediate-fit and frail patients was 91%, 77% and 47%, respectively. Using the Charlson Comorbidity Index, the Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation-Comorbidity Index, the Kaplan-Feinstein Index and the revised Myeloma Comorbidity Index allowed us to define fit and frail patients with distinct progression-free and overall survival rates, with the most pronounced differences evidenced via the International Myeloma Working Group score, the Charlson Comorbidity Index and the revised Myeloma Comorbidity Index. Since the Charlson Comorbidity Index is included in the International Myeloma Working Group score, we propose the latter and the revised Myeloma Comorbidity Index for future frailty measurements. Both are useful instruments for identifying myeloma patients with a geriatric risk profile and have a strong prognostic value for functional decline and overall survival. The study was registered

  10. Geriatric assessment in multiple myeloma patients: validation of the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) score and comparison with other common comorbidity scores

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, Monika; Dold, Sandra Maria; Ihorst, Gabriele; Zober, Alexander; Möller, Mandy; Reinhardt, Heike; Hieke, Stefanie; Schumacher, Martin; Wäsch, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    This first validation of the International Myeloma Working Group geriatric assessment in 125 newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients was performed using the International Myeloma Working Group score based on age, the Charlson Comorbidity Index and cognitive and physical conditions (Activities of Daily Living / Instrumental Activities of Daily Living) to classify patients as fit, intermediate-fit or frail. We verified the International Myeloma Working Group score’s impact on outcome, and whether additional tools complement it. Since our prior analyses determined renal, lung and Karnofsky performance impairment as multivariate risks, and the inclusion of frailty, age and cytogenetics complements this, we included the revised myeloma comorbidity index, the Charlson Comorbidity Index, the Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation-Comorbidity Index and the Kaplan-Feinstein Index in this assessment. Multivariate analysis confirmed cytogenetics, Activities of Daily Living, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living and the Charlson Comorbidity Index as risks: 3-year overall survival for fit, intermediate-fit and frail patients was 91%, 77% and 47%, respectively. Using the Charlson Comorbidity Index, the Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation-Comorbidity Index, the Kaplan-Feinstein Index and the revised Myeloma Comorbidity Index allowed us to define fit and frail patients with distinct progression-free and overall survival rates, with the most pronounced differences evidenced via the International Myeloma Working Group score, the Charlson Comorbidity Index and the revised Myeloma Comorbidity Index. Since the Charlson Comorbidity Index is included in the International Myeloma Working Group score, we propose the latter and the revised Myeloma Comorbidity Index for future frailty measurements. Both are useful instruments for identifying myeloma patients with a geriatric risk profile and have a strong prognostic value for functional decline and overall survival. The study was registered

  11. The Preferred Work Paradigm for Generation Y in the Hotel Industry: A Case Study of the International Tourism and Hospitality International Programme, Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhevabanchachai, Nate-tra; Muangasame, Kaewta

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that hospitality work is physically demanding and involves mental stress and, at times, an uncompetitive compensation package. This has resulted in a high employee turnover rate in recent years. Staff retention is thus a challenge, especially for employees belonging to Generation Y (Gen Y). The situation in Thailand is not…

  12. Bidding for Brains: Intellectual Property Rights and the International Migration of Knowledge Workers. NBER Working Paper No. 15486

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAusland, Carol; Kuhn, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce international mobility of knowledge workers into a model of Nash equilibrium IPR policy choice among countries. We show that governments have incentives to use IPRs in a bidding war for global talent, resulting in Nash equilibrium IPRs that can be too high, rather than too low, from a global welfare perspective. These incentives…

  13. International Partnership on the American Continent: U.S. Educators and Students Working with Children and Teachers in Bolivia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Lizzie; Szecsi, Tunde

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to prepare future educators to function effectively through interdependence in the global community, teacher education programs provide students and faculty members with experiences that foster the development of intercultural understanding. This article reports on an international educational partnership developed by the senior…

  14. Utility of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) for Educational Psychologists' Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aljunied, Mariam; Frederickson, Norah

    2014-01-01

    Despite embracing a bio-psycho-social perspective, the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) assessment framework has had limited application to date with children who have special educational needs (SEN). This study examines its utility for educational psychologists' work…

  15. Highly Skilled Labour and International Mobility in South America. OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers, 2004/10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrere, Rodolfo; Luchilo, Lucas; Raffo, Julio

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the main trends in respect of the supply of human resources in science and technology (HRST) in Latin America and the international mobility of its highly skilled labour. This will be done through the identification of potential data sources, followed by a presentation of indicators drawn from these sources. In addition, a…

  16. The North/South Debate: Technology, Basic Human Needs and the New International Economic Order. Working Paper Number Twelve. 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galtung, Johan

    This document contains two articles by Johan Galtung presented as papers at an international conference on the relationship of technology to the environment and human needs. The monograph is part of a series intended to stimulate research, education, dialogue, and political action toward a just world order. The first paper, "Towards a New…

  17. Student Loans as a Means of Financing Higher Education: Lessons from International Experience. World Bank Staff Working Papers Number 599.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodhall, Maureen

    International experience with student loans as a means of financing higher education is examined, with particular reference to developing countries. After summarizing the main purposes and kinds of student loan programs and practices in developed countries, advantages and disadvantages of loans as a means of financing higher education are…

  18. Cross-Cultural Collisions in Cyberspace: Case Studies of International Legal Issues for Educators Working in Globally Networked Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rife, Martine Courant

    2010-01-01

    This article explores some of the legal and law-related challenges educators face in designing, implementing, and sustaining globally networked learning environments (GNLEs) in the context of conflicting international laws on intellectual property and censorship/free speech. By discussing cases and areas involving such legal issues, the article…

  19. Attractiveness of Vocational Education and Training: Permeability Successful School-to-Work Transitions and International Mobility. Selected Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linten, Markus, Comp.; Prustel, Sabine, Comp.; Woll, Christian, Comp.; Roth, Uta, Comp.; Wurdak, Alix, Comp.

    2014-01-01

    This bibliography covers the topics of international mobility, transfer and transitions in TVET, and their role in increasing its attractiveness. It features the range of currently available literature such as articles, books, government reports, UN agency documents, donor community documents, research theses, and other sources published in the…

  20. International surgical residency electives: a collaborative effort from trainees to surgeons working in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Grigorian, Areg; Sicklick, Jason K; Kingham, T Peter

    2014-01-01

    In today's ever-globalizing climate, the academic sector bears a certain responsibility to incorporate global health opportunities into residency training programs. The worldwide unmet surgical need has been growing; it has been estimated by the World Health Organization that by 2030, surgical diseases will contribute significantly to the burden of global health. International electives (IE) offered during training may partially address this growing need. In addition, it can help trainees develop a heightened awareness of the social determinants of health in resource-limited areas, as well as gain insight into different cultures, health beliefs, and pathologic conditions. General surgery residency programs that offer IE may also stand to benefit by attracting a broader applicant pool, as well as by having the ability to train residents to rely less upon expensive tests and equipment, while further developing residents' physical examination and communications skills. The challenges that IE pose for trainees include the required adaptation to an environment devoid of an advanced and modern medical system, and a difficulty in learning a new language, culture, and local customs. However, IE may also be hazardous for home institutions as they may drain local resources and take limited educational experiences away from local providers. Despite the active promotion of international volunteerism by the American Board of Surgery, few surgery residency programs offer IE as part of the curriculum, with cost and supervision being the major obstacles to overcome. Consequently, it may be difficult to generate American surgical leaders in international health. In this article, we outline the steps needed to bring IE to an institution and how general surgery residency programs can help bridge the gap between surgeons in high-income countries and the growing surgical needs of the international community.

  1. [Experience gained with the training of interns-hygienists and its use in creating the structure of an integrated licensing examination "Step 3 - Sanitary-Hygienist Work"].

    PubMed

    Iavorovs'kyĭ, O P; Bardov, V H; Stepanenko, H P; Suchkov, B P; Omel'chuk, S T

    2001-01-01

    The experience gained with the training of interns-hygienists at the National Medical University has proved its value, contributing to which fact were modern material-and-technical resources, close cooperation of chairs of hygiene with sanitary epidemiologic stations and scientific-research institutes, highly skilled scientific and teaching personnel, systematic sharing of experience gained in training of specialists with institutions of higher learning of Ukraine. However, interns, Masters, practitioners are still in great need of modern educational literature/training aids. There has not yet been developed a general concept of structure of sanitary epidemiological service of Ukraine, forms and methods of its work under present-day conditions. Publication of joint educational literature and textbooks of methodics to complete training of physicians-hygienists, Masters in hygiene and epidemiology, introduction of an integrated licensed examination "Step 3--Sanitarno-Gigiyenicheskoye Delo" (sanitation-and-hygiene-related work) will, we believe, help in solving the above problems. PMID:11560015

  2. The International Deep Brain Stimulation Registry and Database for Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome: How Does It Work?

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, Wissam; Rossi, Peter J.; Porta, Mauro; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Servello, Domenico; Silburn, Peter; Coyne, Terry; Leckman, James F.; Foltynie, Thomas; Hariz, Marwan; Joyce, Eileen M.; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Kefalopoulou, Zinovia; Welter, Marie-Laure; Karachi, Carine; Mallet, Luc; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Shahed-Jimenez, Joohi; Meng, Fan-Gang; Klassen, Bryan T.; Mogilner, Alon Y.; Pourfar, Michael H.; Kuhn, Jens; Ackermans, L.; Kaido, Takanobu; Temel, Yasin; Gross, Robert E.; Walker, Harrison C.; Lozano, Andres M.; Khandhar, Suketu M.; Walter, Benjamin L.; Walter, Ellen; Mari, Zoltan; Changizi, Barbara K.; Moro, Elena; Baldermann, Juan C.; Huys, Daniel; Zauber, S. Elizabeth; Schrock, Lauren E.; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Hu, Wei; Foote, Kelly D.; Rizer, Kyle; Mink, Jonathan W.; Woods, Douglas W.; Gunduz, Aysegul; Okun, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disease characterized by a combination of motor and vocal tics. Deep brain stimulation (DBS), already widely utilized for Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders, is an emerging therapy for select and severe cases of TS that are resistant to medication and behavioral therapy. Over the last two decades, DBS has been used experimentally to manage severe TS cases. The results of case reports and small case series have been variable but in general positive. The reported interventions have, however, been variable, and there remain non-standardized selection criteria, various brain targets, differences in hardware, as well as variability in the programming parameters utilized. DBS centers perform only a handful of TS DBS cases each year, making large-scale outcomes difficult to study and to interpret. These limitations, coupled with the variable effect of surgery, and the overall small numbers of TS patients with DBS worldwide, have delayed regulatory agency approval (e.g., FDA and equivalent agencies around the world). The Tourette Association of America, in response to the worldwide need for a more organized and collaborative effort, launched an international TS DBS registry and database. The main goal of the project has been to share data, uncover best practices, improve outcomes, and to provide critical information to regulatory agencies. The international registry and database has improved the communication and collaboration among TS DBS centers worldwide. In this paper we will review some of the key operation details for the international TS DBS database and registry. PMID:27199634

  3. The independence of international civil servants during the neoliberal decades: implications of the work stoppage involving 700 staff of the World Health Organization in November 2005.

    PubMed

    Katz, Alison

    2008-01-01

    The independence of international civil servants is critical to the fulfillment of their organizations' mandates, but it has been seriously undermined during 25 years of neoliberal influence in U.N. agencies, including the World Health Organization. In November 2005, 700 staff at WHO headquarters participated in a one-hour work stoppage--the first industrial action in the organization's history. Hierarchical and arbitrary management, abuse of rules and procedures, nepotism and harassment, and undue influence of international financial institutions, powerful member states, and transnational corporations have exhausted morale and motivation, creating a conformist environment and interfering with technical health work. In the neoliberal era, WHO staff confront conflicting duties of loyalty to a handful of member states and their private interests and loyalty to WHO's constitutional mandate. International civil servants need support from governing bodies and from the world's people in finding the correct balance. A first essential step would be respect for international labor standards within the U.N. family and, in particular, negotiation status and collective bargaining--human rights in the workplace and prerequisites for staff independence, integrity, and competence, qualities required to serve the world's people. PMID:18341128

  4. The role of dopamine in the maintenance of working memory in prefrontal cortex neurons: input-driven versus internally-driven networks.

    PubMed

    Versace, Massimiliano; Zorzi, Marco

    2010-08-01

    How do organisms select and organize relevant sensory input in working memory (WM) in order to deal with constantly changing environmental cues? Once information has been stored in WM, how is it protected from and altered by the continuous stream of sensory input and internally generated planning? The present study proposes a novel role for dopamine (DA) in the maintenance of WM in the prefrontal cortex (Pfc) neurons that begins to address these issues. In particular, DA mediates the alternation of the Pfc network between input-driven and internally-driven states, which in turn drives WM updates and storage. A biologically inspired neural network model of Pfc is formulated to provide a link between the mechanisms of state switching and the biophysical properties of Pfc neurons. This model belongs to the recurrent competitive fields(33) class of dynamical systems which have been extensively mathematically characterized and exhibit the two functional states of interest: input-driven and internally-driven. This hypothesis was tested with two working memory tasks of increasing difficulty: a simple working memory task and a delayed alternation task. The results suggest that optimal WM storage in spite of noise is achieved with a phasic DA input followed by a lower DA sustained activity. Hypo and hyper-dopaminergic activity that alter this ideal pattern lead to increased distractibility from non-relevant pattern and prolonged perseverations on presented patterns, respectively.

  5. World disparities in risk definition and management of retinoblastoma: a report from the International Retinoblastoma Staging Working Group.

    PubMed

    Chantada, Guillermo L; Doz, François; Orjuela, Manuela; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Sitorus, Rita S; Kepak, Tomas; Furmanchuk, Anna; Castellanos, Mauricio; Sharma, Tarun; Chevez-Barrios, Patricia; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos

    2008-03-01

    Following from the publication of the International Retinoblastoma Staging System, an open internet discussion group was created at the www.cure4kids.org resource. The results of a survey distributed among participants are discussed. Although most patients with retinoblastoma were treated under prospective protocols, there was a wide variation in the definition of risk criteria and in the criteria for giving adjuvant chemotherapy following enucleation. Definition of high-risk histological features and the criteria for use of adjuvant therapy will be standardized in future studies. Internet meetings are a valuable mechanism for enabling participation from under-resourced countries in the development of cooperative studies. PMID:18059037

  6. Medulloblastoma Down Under 2013: a report from the third annual meeting of the International Medulloblastoma Working Group.

    PubMed

    Gottardo, Nicholas G; Hansford, Jordan R; McGlade, Jacqueline P; Alvaro, Frank; Ashley, David M; Bailey, Simon; Baker, David L; Bourdeaut, Franck; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Clay, Moira; Clifford, Steven C; Cohn, Richard J; Cole, Catherine H; Dallas, Peter B; Downie, Peter; Doz, François; Ellison, David W; Endersby, Raelene; Fisher, Paul G; Hassall, Timothy; Heath, John A; Hii, Hilary L; Jones, David T W; Junckerstorff, Reimar; Kellie, Stewart; Kool, Marcel; Kotecha, Rishi S; Lichter, Peter; Laughton, Stephen J; Lee, Sharon; McCowage, Geoff; Northcott, Paul A; Olson, James M; Packer, Roger J; Pfister, Stefan M; Pietsch, Torsten; Pizer, Barry; Pomeroy, Scott L; Remke, Marc; Robinson, Giles W; Rutkowski, Stefan; Schoep, Tobias; Shelat, Anang A; Stewart, Clinton F; Sullivan, Michael; Taylor, Michael D; Wainwright, Brandon; Walwyn, Thomas; Weiss, William A; Williamson, Dan; Gajjar, Amar

    2014-02-01

    Medulloblastoma is curable in approximately 70% of patients. Over the past decade, progress in improving survival using conventional therapies has stalled, resulting in reduced quality of life due to treatment-related side effects, which are a major concern in survivors. The vast amount of genomic and molecular data generated over the last 5-10 years encourages optimism that improved risk stratification and new molecular targets will improve outcomes. It is now clear that medulloblastoma is not a single-disease entity, but instead consists of at least four distinct molecular subgroups: WNT/Wingless, Sonic Hedgehog, Group 3, and Group 4. The Medulloblastoma Down Under 2013 meeting, which convened at Bunker Bay, Australia, brought together 50 leading clinicians and scientists. The 2-day agenda included focused sessions on pathology and molecular stratification, genomics and mouse models, high-throughput drug screening, and clinical trial design. The meeting established a global action plan to translate novel biologic insights and drug targeting into treatment regimens to improve outcomes. A consensus was reached in several key areas, with the most important being that a novel classification scheme for medulloblastoma based on the four molecular subgroups, as well as histopathologic features, should be presented for consideration in the upcoming fifth edition of the World Health Organization's classification of tumours of the central nervous system. Three other notable areas of agreement were as follows: (1) to establish a central repository of annotated mouse models that are readily accessible and freely available to the international research community; (2) to institute common eligibility criteria between the Children's Oncology Group and the International Society of Paediatric Oncology Europe and initiate joint or parallel clinical trials; (3) to share preliminary high-throughput screening data across discovery labs to hasten the development of novel therapeutics

  7. 76 FR 29797 - International Automotive Components, North America, Including On-Site Leased Workers From At-Work...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... notice was published in the Federal Register on April 22, 2011 (76 FR 22732). At the request of the State... Federal Register on February 23, 2009 (74 FR 8115). In order to avoid an overlap in worker group coverage... Leased Workers From At-Work Personnel and CJR Solutions, d/b/a Harvard Resources Solutions, Lebanon,...

  8. Hard Labour? Academic Work and the Changing Landscape of Higher Education. International Perspectives on Higher Education Research. Volume 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Tanya, Ed.; White, Julie, Ed.; Gunter, Helen M., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book was written across a period of intense turmoil and change in higher education in Australia and England. The authors are deeply unsettled by these changes and wish to open up the discussion about what it means to be an academic and engage in academic work in the 21st century. Accordingly, each of the authors has nominated a theme or lens…

  9. The double meaning of control: three-way interactions between internal resources, job control, and stressors at work.

    PubMed

    Meier, Laurenz L; Semmer, Norbert K; Elfering, Achim; Jacobshagen, Nicola

    2008-07-01

    The Job Demand-Control model postulates that job control attenuates the effects of job demands on health and well-being. Support for this interactive effect is rather weak. Conceivably, it holds only when there is a match between job control and individual characteristics that relate to exercising control options, such as locus of control, or self-efficacy. This three-way interaction was tested in a sample of 96 service employees, with affective strain and musculoskeletal pain as dependent variables. As hypothesized, job control attenuated the effects of stressors only for people with an internal locus of control. For people with an external locus of control, job control actually predicted poorer well-being and health as stressors increased. For self-efficacy, the corresponding three-way interaction was significant with regard to affective strain. PMID:18572995

  10. Site-specific labeling of RNA at internal ribose hydroxyl groups: terbium-assisted deoxyribozymes at work.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Lea; Javadi-Zarnaghi, Fatemeh; Höbartner, Claudia

    2014-06-01

    A general and efficient single-step method was established for site-specific post-transcriptional labeling of RNA. Using Tb(3+) as accelerating cofactor for deoxyribozymes, various labeled guanosines were site-specifically attached to 2'-OH groups of internal adenosines in in vitro transcribed RNA. The DNA-catalyzed 2',5'-phosphodiester bond formation proceeded efficiently with fluorescent, spin-labeled, biotinylated, or cross-linker-modified guanosine triphosphates. The sequence context of the labeling site was systematically analyzed by mutating the nucleotides flanking the targeted adenosine. Labeling of adenosines in a purine-rich environment showed the fastest reactions and highest yields. Overall, practically useful yields >70% were obtained for 13 out of 16 possible nucleotide (nt) combinations. Using this approach, we demonstrate preparative labeling under mild conditions for up to ~160-nt-long RNAs, including spliceosomal U6 small nuclear RNA and a cyclic-di-AMP binding riboswitch RNA.

  11. Combining fluorescent in situ hybridization data with ISS staging improves risk assessment in myeloma: an International Myeloma Working Group collaborative project

    PubMed Central

    Avet-Loiseau, H; Durie, BGM; Cavo, M; Attal, M; Gutierrez, N; Haessler, J; Goldschmidt, H; Hajek, R; Lee, JH; Sezer, O; Barlogie, B; Crowley, J; Fonseca, R; Testoni, N; Ross, F; Rajkumar, SV; Sonneveld, P; Lahuerta, J; Moreau, P; Morgan, G

    2014-01-01

    The combination of serum β2-microglobulin and albumin levels has been shown to be highly prognostic in myeloma as the International Staging System (ISS). The aim of this study was to assess the independent contributions of ISS stage and cytogenetic abnormalities in predicting outcomes. A retrospective analysis of international studies looking at both ISS and cytogenetic abnormalities was performed in order to assess the potential role of combining ISS stage and cytogenetics to predict survival. This international effort used the International Myeloma Working Group database of 12 137 patients treated worldwide for myeloma at diagnosis, of whom 2309 had cytogenetic studies and 5387 had analyses by fluorescent in situ hybridization (iFISH). Comprehensive analyses used 2642 patients with sufficient iFISH data available. Using the comprehensive iFISH data, combining both t(4;14) and deletion (17p), along with ISS stage, significantly improved the prognostic assessment in terms of progression-free survival and overall survival. The additional impact of patient age and use of high-dose therapy was also demonstrated. In conclusion, the combination of iFISH data with ISS staging significantly improves risk assessment in myeloma. PMID:23032723

  12. Ergonomics support for local initiative in improving safety and health at work: International Labour Organization experiences in industrially developing countries.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, T; Kogi, K

    2005-04-15

    Ergonomics has played essential roles in the technical cooperation activities of the International Labour Organization (ILO) in occupational safety and health in industrially developing countries. Ergonomics support focusing on practical day-to-day needs at the grass-root workplace has strengthened the local initiative in improving safety and health. Practical action-tools such as ergonomics checklists, local good example photos and group discussions have assisted workers and employers in identifying feasible solutions using locally available resources. Direct participation of workers and employers has been promoted in ergonomics training aimed at immediate solutions. ILO Guidelines on Occupational Safety and Health Management Systems have played increasingly important roles in the systematic planning of local improvement actions. Policy-level programmes to develop network support mechanisms to the grass-root workplace were essential for following up and sustaining local achievements. Practical ergonomics support tools, such as action checklists and low-cost improvement guides, should be developed and widely applied so as to reach grass-root levels and help local people create safer and healthier workplaces.

  13. The UNESCO-IHP Working Group on Land Subsidence: Four Decades of International Contributions to Hydrogeological Related Subsidence Research and Knowledge Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, D. L.; Carreon-Freyre, D.; Teatini, P.; Ye, S.

    2015-12-01

    Subsidence is globally prevalent and because much of it is related to hydrological processes affected by human development of local land and water resources, "Land Subsidence" was included in the UNESCO programme of the International Hydrological Decade (IHD), 1965-1974 and an ad hoc working group on land subsidence was formed. In 1975 subsidence was retained under the framework of the UNESCO IHP (subproject 8.4: "Investigation of Land Subsidence due to Groundwater Exploitation"), and UNESCO IHP formerly codified the Working Group on Land Subsidence (WGLS). In 1984 the WGLS produced a comprehensive guidebook to serve scientists and engineers, confronting land subsidence problems, particularly in developing countries (http://unesdoc.unesco.org/$other/unesdoc/pdf/065167eo.pdf). During the IHD, UNESCO IHP convened the 1st International Symposium on Land Subsidence in 1969 in Tokyo, Japan. In collaboration with UNESCO IHP, IAHS, and other scientific organizations, the WGLS has convened eight more International Symposia on Land Subsidence in different countries in Asia, Europe and North America. The 9 published symposia proceedings constitute an important source of global subsidence research and case studies during the past 45 years, covering both anthropogenic and natural subsidence processes. Currently, the WGLS comprising 20 subsidence experts from 9 countries promotes and facilitates the international exchange of information regarding the design, implementation and evaluation of risk assessments and mitigation measures, the definition of water and land resource-management strategies that support sustainable development in areas vulnerable to subsidence (http://landsubsidence-unesco.org), and the assessment of related geological risks such as earth fissuring and fault activation (www.igcp641.org). The WGLS has become an important global leader in promoting subsidence awareness, scientific research and its application to subsidence monitoring, analysis and management.

  14. COPD uncovered: an international survey on the impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] on a working age population

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Approximately 210 million people are estimated to have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] worldwide. The burden of disease is known to be high, though less is known about those of a younger age. The aim of this study was to investigate the wider personal, economic and societal burden of COPD on a cross country working-age cohort. Methods A cross-country [Brazil, China, Germany, Turkey, US, UK] cross-sectional survey methodology was utilised to answer the research questions. 2426 participants aged 45-67 recruited via a number of recruitment methods specific to each country completed the full survey. Inclusion criteria were a recalled physician diagnosis of COPD, a smoking history of > 10 pack years and the use of COPD medications in the previous 3 months prior to questioning. The survey included items from the validated Work Productivity and Activity Impairment [WPAI] scale and the EuroQoL 5 Dimension [EQ-5D] scale. Disease severity was measured using the 5-point MRC [Medical Research Council] dyspnoea scale as a surrogate measure. Results 64% had either moderate [n = 1012] or severe [n = 521] COPD, although this varied by country. 75% of the cohort reported at least one comorbid condition. Quality of life declined with severity of illness [mild, mean EQ-5D score = 0.84; moderate 0.58; severe 0.41]. The annual cost of healthcare utilisation [excluding treatment costs and diagnostic tests] per individual was estimated to be $2,364 [£1,500]. For those remaining in active employment [n: 677]: lost time from work cost the individual an average of $880 [£556] per annum and lifetime losses of $7,365 [£4,661] amounting to $596,000 [£377,000] for the cohort. 447 [~40%] of the working population had retired prematurely because of COPD incurring individual estimated lifetime income losses of $316,000 [£200,000] or a combined total of $141 m [£89.6 m]. As the mean age of retirees was 58.3 and average time since retirement was 4 years, this suggests

  15. On A Project Work for International Students Paired with Japanese Partners in a Summer Intensive Japanese Program for Science and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fudano, Hiroko

    A project work in which learners of a foreign language engage in a task with the native speakers is one of the effective ways to bring in ample real communication opportunities to a classroom. This scheme also gives both parties meaningful experiences for intercultural understanding. This paper reports a “Pythagoras” machine production project in which international students were paired up with Japanese students as a part of a Japanese for science and technology course in a summer intensive program. Based on the participants‧ course evaluation data, the paper also discusses the effectiveness of the project for Japanese language learning and for promoting intercultural understanding.

  16. Antimicrobial Use Guidelines for Treatment of Urinary Tract Disease in Dogs and Cats: Antimicrobial Guidelines Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Weese, J. Scott; Blondeau, Joseph M.; Boothe, Dawn; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.; Guardabassi, Luca; Hillier, Andrew; Lloyd, David H.; Papich, Mark G.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Turnidge, John D.; Sykes, Jane E.

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract disease is a common reason for use (and likely misuse, improper use, and overuse) of antimicrobials in dogs and cats. There is a lack of comprehensive treatment guidelines such as those that are available for human medicine. Accordingly, guidelines for diagnosis and management of urinary tract infections were created by a Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases. While objective data are currently limited, these guidelines provide information to assist in the diagnosis and management of upper and lower urinary tract infections in dogs and cats. PMID:21776346

  17. Masters International Program in Natural Hazards: a joint program between Michigan Tech and US Peace Corps begins move to work in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, W. I.; Carn, S. A.; Waite, G. P.; Gierke, J. S.; Wellik, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    We are in the seventh year of developing a unique graduate degree program in which each student serves in the U.S. Peace Corps for two years while conducting his/her field research. Our program allows candidates to work on natural hazard mitigation projects in a country where natural hazards are important parts of life. For US students, living abroad provides a vital broadening experience and the Peace Corps emphasis on social context adds cultural understanding to their hazards work. Up until now, we have mostly worked in Central America, and 33 students have enrolled in the program. The greatest focus to date has been in Volcanic Hazards, including slope stability and debris flows, and our work is fostering long-term infrastructure-building relationships with partner agencies within the 8 countries where we have worked. This year we sent a student (Jay Wellik) to a Peace Corps site in East Java, Indonesia where he will work with schools in his village and commute weekly to the Raung Observatory Post to work with CVGHM scientists on volcano seismology and public outreach projects.. We recruit 4-6 new students each year, and we hope more will soon be in Indonesia as Peace Corps expands their new program in that country. Although the Peace Corps Masters International (PCMI) students must be US citizens, we also have regular undergraduate and graduate (MS and PhD) degree students in geology, geological engineering and geophysics who come from all over the world. We are especially interested in people from partner Peace Corps countries. Annually our natural-hazards group consists of 5 faculty, 2 post-doctoral researchers, several Ph.D and traditional M.S. students, 12 PCMI students, and roughly 20 undergraduate students. Support for our program has come from NSF and we have also benefitted from a supportive cooperation with USGS VDAP. In the past two years we have built a complementary dual degree partnership with the Université Blaise-Pascal, Clermont Ferrand

  18. The origin of islands in the Kandalaksha Gulf of the White Sea: joint work of internal and external geodynamic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosevich, Natalia; Romanovskaya, Maria

    2016-04-01

    deposits and bedrock outcrops; structural denudation landforms dominate over the marine and biogenic landforms in this case, rocky surfaces of these islands predominate over others. The relief of islands is a combination of smoothed rounded top bedrock surfaces (massifs) with subhorizontal sites that are covered with loose marine deposits. Analysis of the spatial distribution of the genetic types of islands in the Kandalaksha Gulf has revealed that in the apical part of the gulf all genetic types of islands occur, while upon approaching the mouth, one type (tectonic-glacial-accumulative-denudation with marine reworking) becomes predominant. Thus, geological, structural, geomorphic features of Kandalahksha Gulf islands are the results of the complex interaction of the internal and external geodynamic processes. Kosevich N. Geological-geomorphological types of islands in the Kandalaksha Gulf, White Sea. Moscow Univ. Geol.Bull., 2015, vol. 70, N 4. P. 318-326.

  19. First on-line survey of an international multidisciplinary working group (MightyMedic) on current practice in diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of dyslipidemias.

    PubMed

    Stefanutti, C; D'Alessandri, G; Petta, A; Harada-Shiba, M; Julius, U; Soran, H; Moriarty, P M; Romeo, S; Drogari, E; Jaeger, B R

    2015-05-01

    The MightyMedic (Multidisciplinary International Group for Hemapheresis TherapY and MEtabolic DIsturbances Contrast) Working Group has been founded in 2013. The leading idea was to establish an international network of interdisciplinary nature aimed at working to cross national borders research projects, clinical trials, educational initiatives (meetings, workshops, summer schools) in the field of metabolic diseases, namely hyperlipidemias, and diabetes, preventive cardiology, and atherosclerosis. Therapeutic apheresis, its indications and techniques, is a parallel field of investigation. The first on-line survey of the Group has been completed in the first half of 2014. The survey included # 24 Centers in Italy, Germany, Greece, UK, Sweden, Japan and USA. Relevant data have been collected on current practice in diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of dyslipidemias. 240 subjects with hyperlipidemia and treated with lipoprotein apheresis have been reported in the survey, but a large percentage of patients (35%) who could benefit from this therapeutic option are still treated by conventional drug approach. Genetic molecular diagnosis is performed in only 33% of patients while Lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) is included in cardiovascular disease risk assessment in 71% of participating Centers. New detailed investigations and prospective multicenter studies are needed to evaluate changes induced by the impact of updated indications and strategies, as well as new treatment options, targeting standardization of therapeutic and diagnostic approaches.

  20. On the Origins of Disorganized Attachment and Internal Working Models: Paper II. An Empirical Microanalysis of 4-Month Mother-Infant Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, Beatrice; Lachmann, Frank; Markese, Sara; Buck, Karen A.; Bahrick, Lorraine E.; Chen, Henian; Cohen, Patricia; Andrews, Howard; Feldstein, Stanley; Jaffe, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A microanalysis of 4-month mother-infant face-to-face communication predicted 12-month infant disorganized (vs. secure) attachment outcomes in an urban community sample. We documented a dyadic systems view of the roles of both partners, the roles of both self- and interactive contingency, and the importance of attention, orientation and touch, and as well as facial and vocal affect, in the co-construction of attachment disorganization. The analysis of different communication modalities identified striking intrapersonal and interpersonal intermodal discordance or conflict, in the context of intensely distressed infants, as the central feature of future disorganized dyads at 4 months. Lowered maternal contingent coordination, and failures of maternal affective correspondence, constituted maternal emotional withdrawal from distressed infants. This maternal withdrawal compromises infant interactive agency and emotional coherence. We characterize of the nature of emerging internal working models of future disorganized infants as follows: Future disorganized infants represent states of not being sensed and known by their mothers, particularly in moments of distress; they represent confusion about both their own and their mothers’ basic emotional organization, and about their mothers’ response to their distress. This internal working model sets a trajectory in development which may disturb the fundamental integration of the person. The remarkable specificity of our findings has the potential to lead to more finely-focused clinical interventions. PMID:23066334

  1. Does Simulator-Based Clinical Performance Correlate with Actual Hospital Behavior? The Effect of Extended Work Hours on Patient Care Provided by Medical Interns

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, James A.; Alexander, Erik K.; Lockley, Steven W.; Flynn-Evans, Erin; Venkatan, Suresh K.; Landrigan, Christopher P.; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The correlation between simulator-based medical performance and real-world behavior remains unclear. The authors conducted this study to explore whether the effects of extended work hours on clinical performance, as reported in prior hospital-based studies, could be observed in a simulator-based testing environment. Method Intern volunteers reported to the simulator laboratory in a rested state and again in a sleep-deprived state (after a traditional 24–30 hour overnight shift [n=17]). A subset also presented after a shortened overnight shift (maximum of 16 scheduled hours [n=8]). During each laboratory visit, participants managed two critically ill patients. An on-site physician scored each case, as did a blinded rater later watching videotapes of the performances (score=1 [worst] to 8 [best]; average of both cases = session score). Results Among all participants, the average simulator session score was 6.0 (95% CI: 5.6–6.4) in the rested state, and declined to 5.0 (95% CI: 4.6–5.4) after the traditional overnight shift (P<0.001). Among those who completed the shortened overnight shift, the average post-shift simulator session score was 5.8 (95% CI: 5.0–6.6) compared to 4.3 [95%CI: 3.8–4.9]) after a traditional extended shift (P<0.001). Conclusions In a clinical simulation test, medical interns performed significantly better after working a shortened overnight shift compared to a traditional extended shift. These findings are consistent with real-time hospital studies using the same shift schedule. Such an independent correlation not only confirms the detrimental impact of extended work hours on medical performance, but also supports the validity of simulation as a clinical performance assessment tool. PMID:20881679

  2. Comparative Tensile Flow and Work-Hardening Behavior of 9 Pct Chromium Ferritic-Martensitic Steels in the Framework of the Estrin-Mecking Internal-Variable Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, B. K.; Christopher, J.

    2016-06-01

    The comparative tensile flow and work-hardening behavior of P9 steel in two different product forms, normalized and tempered plate and thick section tube plate forging, and P91 steel were investigated in the framework of the dislocation dynamics based Estrin-Mecking (E-M) one-internal-variable approach. The analysis indicated that the flow behavior of P9 and P91 steels was adequately described by the E-M approach in a wide range of temperatures. It was suggested that dislocation dense martensite lath/cell boundaries and precipitates together act as effective barriers to dislocation motion in P9 and P91 steels. At room and intermediate temperatures, the evolution of the internal-state variable, i.e., the dislocation density with plastic strain, exhibited insignificant variations with respect to temperature. At high temperatures, a rapid evolution of dislocation density with plastic strain toward saturation with increasing temperature was observed. The softer P9 steel tube plate forging exhibited higher work hardening in terms of larger gains in the dislocation density and flow stress contribution from dislocations than the P9 steel plate and P91 steel at temperatures ranging from 300 K to 873 K (27 °C to 600 °C). The evaluation of activation energy suggests that the deformation is controlled by cross-slip of dislocations at room and intermediate temperatures, and climb of dislocations at high temperatures. The relative influence of initial microstructure on flow and work-hardening parameters associated with the E-M approach was discussed in the three temperature regimes displayed by P9 and P91 steels.

  3. Policies for solidarity. A personal view of the Second International Conference for non governmental organizations working on AIDS, Paris 1-4 November 1990.

    PubMed

    Lucas, S

    1991-01-01

    A summary of events at the Second International Conference for Non-Governmental Organizations working on AIDS, held in Paris November 1-4, 1990 is presented with comments on the effectiveness of arrangement, planning and sessions. The meeting was fraught with obstacles, the worst of which was a change of venue from San Francisco to Paris at the last minute, with serious consequences to speakers whose U.S. travel funds had to be found elsewhere. The goal of the conference was to facilitate international networking among AIDS Service, national and regional organizations. To this end 44 sessions were held informally. Plenary sessions were marked by moving presentations of such items as an international memorial quilt, and topics such as how children and women are affected by HIV, and how human rights abuses are often unseen. The need for solidarity among NGOs was stressed by Dr. J. Mann, who noted that NGOs perform up to half the health care in some countries. The major substance of the conference was 5 Seminar tracks of 5.5 hours duration on the topics of services and care, education and prevention, drugs and treatment, human rights, and organizational development. Human rights recognized internationally were described, but in some places lack of resources makes them a privilege. Illegal drug programs, decriminalization and research on cultural obstacles were within the broad range of issues addressed under services and care. While traditional symptomatic treatments and older drugs such as gentian violet as a treatment for candidiasis are being developed in African countries, serious social problems arise when people sell their possessions for a few doses of AZT or Kemron there. In the seminars on organizational development useful exchanges between major donors and project organizers explored professional methods of applying for grants, as well as accounting for funds spent later. ICASO the International Council of AIDS Service Organizations was ratified and a

  4. Coping with Social Change: Programs That Work. Proceedings of a Conference (Acapulco, Mexico, June 1989) = Como enfrentarse al cambio social: programas eficaces. Actas de uno Conferencia (Acapulco, Mexico, Junio de 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskins, Irene, Ed.

    Written in English and Spanish, this document contains the proceedings of the 14th International Congress of Gerontology on concerns about the impact of rapid social change on the well-being of older women and families in Latin American and the Caribbean and about effective programs that address the needs of the older populations. The first…

  5. The impact of the document international work group in death, dying and bereavement: assumptions and principles underlying standards for terminal care.

    PubMed

    Vachon, Mary L S

    This article reflects on the development and impact of the International Workgroup on Death, Dying and Bereavement's (IWG) pivotal document on The Assumptions and Principles Underlying Standards for Terminal Care. It was at the Ars Moriendi meetings in Columbia, Maryland that the author first met Bob and Bunny Kastenbaum. The meeting led to the development of IWG and the first task of this group was the development of the "Standards" document. The initial document reflected the pioneering work already being done by Kastenbaum and others on the committee and then was formative in the development of other documents such as the National Hospice Association Standards. Participants in the original workgroup were asked for their reflections on the significance of the document and the literature was surveyed to assess the impact of the "Standards" document on the field.

  6. The impact of the document international work group in death, dying and bereavement: assumptions and principles underlying standards for terminal care.

    PubMed

    Vachon, Mary L S

    This article reflects on the development and impact of the International Workgroup on Death, Dying and Bereavement's (IWG) pivotal document on The Assumptions and Principles Underlying Standards for Terminal Care. It was at the Ars Moriendi meetings in Columbia, Maryland that the author first met Bob and Bunny Kastenbaum. The meeting led to the development of IWG and the first task of this group was the development of the "Standards" document. The initial document reflected the pioneering work already being done by Kastenbaum and others on the committee and then was formative in the development of other documents such as the National Hospice Association Standards. Participants in the original workgroup were asked for their reflections on the significance of the document and the literature was surveyed to assess the impact of the "Standards" document on the field. PMID:25351588

  7. The effect of an ergonomic intervention on musculoskeletal, psychosocial and visual strain of VDT entry work: organization and methodology of the international study.

    PubMed

    Dainoff, Marvin J; Aarås, Arne; Horgen, Gunnar; Konarska, Maria; Larsen, Stig; Thoresen, Magne; Cohen, Barbara G F

    2005-01-01

    This special issue of the International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics (JOSE) reports the results from an extensive multinational and multidisciplinary collaborative investigation of the impacts on visual display terminal (VDT) work of musculoskeletal, visual, ergonomic, and psychosocial factors. For brevity, this effort has been referred to as the MEPS project (musculoskeletal--eyestrain--psychosocial--stress). This paper lays out the basic methodological structure of the study. The study was conducted in 4 countries utilizing VDT data entry workers as the primary subject population. A battery of objective and subject assessment measures, including muscle load, visual function, physical and visual strain, postural, ergonomic and psychosocial factors, were assessed at 3 different points in time. A pre-test was given prior to an ergonomic intervention. Two post-tests were given 1 month and 1 year after the ergonomic intervention.

  8. Quality and Learning: Perspectives from Development Co-Operation. A Report from the Meeting of the International Working Group on Education (IWGE) (Florence, Italy, June 13-16, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iredale, Roger

    The International Working Group on Education met in Florence, Italy, in June 2000. Participants came from 28 institutions representing 10 international agencies or institutions, 1 foundation, and 14 bilateral agencies. This publication is a summary of the proceedings of that meeting. Meeting participants reviewed progress on the Education for All…

  9. The Power of Cooperation in International Paleoclimate Science: Examples from the PAGES 2k Network and the Ocean2k Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addison, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Past Global Changes (PAGES) project of IGBP and Future Earth supports research to understand the Earth's past environment to improve future climate predictions and inform strategies for sustainability. Within this framework, the PAGES 2k Network was established to provide a focus on the past 2000 years, a period that encompasses Medieval Climate Anomaly warming, Little Ice Age cooling, and recent anthropogenically-forced climate change. The results of these studies are used for testing earth system models, and for understanding decadal- to centennial-scale variability, which is needed for long-term planning. International coordination and cooperation among the nine regional Working Groups that make up the 2k Network has been critical to the success of PAGES 2k. The collaborative approach is moving toward scientific achievements across the regional groups, including: (i) the development of a community-driven open-access proxy climate database; (ii) integration of multi-resolution proxy records; (iii) development of multivariate climate reconstructions; and (iv) a leap forward in the spatial resolution of paleoclimate reconstructions. The last addition to the 2k Network, the Ocean2k Working Group has further innovated the collaborative approach by: (1) creating an open, receptive environment to discuss ideas exclusively in the virtual space; (2) employing an array of real-time collaborative software tools to enable communication, group document writing, and data analysis; (3) consolidating executive leadership teams to oversee project development and manage grassroots-style volunteer pools; and (4) embracing the value-added role that international and interdisciplinary science can play in advancing paleoclimate hypotheses critical to understanding future change. Ongoing efforts for the PAGES 2k Network are focused on developing new standards for data quality control and archiving. These tasks will provide the foundation for new and continuing "trans-regional" 2k

  10. [Our viewpoints on Deqi in the later ages after birth of classical works "The Yellow Emperor's Internal Classic" and "Canon of Difficult Medical Problems"].

    PubMed

    Hao, Jie; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Peng; Xin, Si-Yuan; Qi, Dan-Dan; Hu, Ni-Juan; Lin, Chi; Wang, Pei; Zhao, Min-Yi; Hu, Shang-Qing; Wu, Gui-Wen

    2015-04-01

    In our previous paper, we analyzed "Deqi" in book Huangdi Neijing (The Yellow Emperor's Internal Classic) and Nanjing (Canon of Difficult Medical Problems) from "Zhishen"(Treating mentality) and Tiaoqi (Regulating qi). In the present paper, the authors discuss the connotations of "Deqi" and related events in the later ages of the abovementioned two classic books to the later stage of the Qing Dynasty when involves about 20 classical works as Zhenjiu Dacheng ( The Great Compendium of Acupuncture and Moxibustion), Zhenjing Zhinan (Guide to the classics of Acupuncture), Zhenjiu Daquan (A Complete Works of Acupuncture and Moxibustion) etc. from 1) close association between "Deqi" and patients' mental activity; 2) how to wait for arrival of qi if the needling does not induce "Deqi" for the time being; 3) how to identify "qi-arrival" and then, performing suitable manipulations; 4) Deqi and shallow- or deep-needling; 5) putting more emphasis on patients' feeling and reactions, rather than the practitioners perception beneath the needle which is described in book Huangdi Neijing; and 6) not withdrawing the acupuncture needles if qi does not arrive. Generally, in the later ages, the connotations of Deqi are enriched greatly. PMID:26054205

  11. Ten key points for the appropriate use of antibiotics in hospitalised patients: a consensus from the Antimicrobial Stewardship and Resistance Working Groups of the International Society of Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Levy Hara, Gabriel; Kanj, Souha S; Pagani, Leonardo; Abbo, Lilian; Endimiani, Andrea; Wertheim, Heiman F L; Amábile-Cuevas, Carlos; Tattevin, Pierre; Mehtar, Shaheen; Lopes Cardoso, Fernando; Unal, Serhat; Gould, Ian

    2016-09-01

    The Antibiotic Stewardship and Resistance Working Groups of the International Society for Chemotherapy propose ten key points for the appropriate use of antibiotics in hospital settings. (i) Get appropriate microbiological samples before antibiotic administration and carefully interpret the results: in the absence of clinical signs of infection, colonisation rarely requires antimicrobial treatment. (ii) Avoid the use of antibiotics to 'treat' fever: use them to treat infections, and investigate the root cause of fever prior to starting treatment. (iii) Start empirical antibiotic treatment after taking cultures, tailoring it to the site of infection, risk factors for multidrug-resistant bacteria, and the local microbiology and susceptibility patterns. (iv) Prescribe drugs at their optimal dosing and for an appropriate duration, adapted to each clinical situation and patient characteristics. (v) Use antibiotic combinations only where the current evidence suggests some benefit. (vi) When possible, avoid antibiotics with a higher likelihood of promoting drug resistance or hospital-acquired infections, or use them only as a last resort. (vii) Drain the infected foci quickly and remove all potentially or proven infected devices: control the infection source. (viii) Always try to de-escalate/streamline antibiotic treatment according to the clinical situation and the microbiological results. (ix) Stop unnecessarily prescribed antibiotics once the absence of infection is likely. And (x) Do not work alone: set up local teams with an infectious diseases specialist, clinical microbiologist, hospital pharmacist, infection control practitioner or hospital epidemiologist, and comply with hospital antibiotic policies and guidelines. PMID:27502752

  12. International Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... create refugee populations with immediate and long-term health problems. Some of the major diseases currently affecting ... also an international problem which can affect people's health. Many countries and health organizations are working together ...

  13. International Solar Cycle Studies (ISCS), "Solar Energy Flux Study: from the interior to the outer layer" — Working Group 1 report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pap, Judit; Fröhlich, Claus

    The purpose of this report is to describe the research activities and plans of Working Group 1: "Solar Energy Flux Study: From the Interior to the Outer Layer" of the International Solar Cycle Study (ISCS), which is an international research organization operating under the auspices of the Scientific Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Physics (SCOSTEP). As part of the report, we also summarize the status of the measurements and results on the solar energy flux variations. The main objective of ISCS's Working Group 1 is to coordinate and support comprehensive international research of the variations in the solar energy flux during the rising portion and maximum of solar cycle 23. The research activities of ISCS's Working Group 1 will concentrate on the following tasks: (1) to measure and study the variations in the solar radiative and mass output and solar activity indices during the solar activity cycle, (2) to understand why the solar radiative and mass output and the solar activity indices vary during the solar cycle, and (3) to study the role of solar variability in solar-terrestrial changes and its contribution to global change. ISCS WG1 "Solar Energy Flux Study: From the Interior to the Outer Layer" has been divided into three panels: •| Panel 1: Variations in Total and Spectral Irradiance from Infrared to Far UV. Panel leaders: Martin Anklin of the Physikalisch-Meteorologishes Observatorium Davos, Switzerland (total irradiance), Gerard Thuillier of the Service d'Aeronomie-CNRS, Verrieres, France (visible and infrared), and Linton Floyd of the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, USA (ultraviolet). •| Panel 2: Variations in EUV, X-ray and Particle Fluxes. Panel leaders: Gerhard Schmidtke of Fraunhofer IPM, Freiburg, Germany and W. Kent Tobiska of FDC/Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, USA (EUV/XUV), and David Winningham of the Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX, USA (particles). •| Panel 3: Solar Indices, Cosmogenic Isotopes, Solar

  14. Standardized evaluation of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer: results of the ring studies of the international immuno-oncology biomarker working group.

    PubMed

    Denkert, Carsten; Wienert, Stephan; Poterie, Audrey; Loibl, Sibylle; Budczies, Jan; Badve, Sunil; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Bane, Anita; Bedri, Shahinaz; Brock, Jane; Chmielik, Ewa; Christgen, Matthias; Colpaert, Cecile; Demaria, Sandra; Van den Eynden, Gert; Floris, Giuseppe; Fox, Stephen B; Gao, Dongxia; Ingold Heppner, Barbara; Kim, S Rim; Kos, Zuzana; Kreipe, Hans H; Lakhani, Sunil R; Penault-Llorca, Frederique; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Rimm, David L; Schnitt, Stuart J; Sinn, Bruno V; Sinn, Peter; Sirtaine, Nicolas; O'Toole, Sandra A; Viale, Giuseppe; Van de Vijver, Koen; de Wind, Roland; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Klauschen, Frederick; Untch, Michael; Fasching, Peter A; Reimer, Toralf; Willard-Gallo, Karen; Michiels, Stefan; Loi, Sherene; Salgado, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    Multiple independent studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) are prognostic in breast cancer with potential relevance for response to immune-checkpoint inhibitor therapy. Although many groups are currently evaluating TIL, there is no standardized system for diagnostic applications. This study reports the results of two ring studies investigating TIL conducted by the International Working Group on Immuno-oncology Biomarkers. The study aim was to determine the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for evaluation of TIL by different pathologists. A total of 120 slides were evaluated by a large group of pathologists with a web-based system in ring study 1 and a more advanced software-system in ring study 2 that included an integrated feedback with standardized reference images. The predefined aim for successful ring studies 1 and 2 was an ICC above 0.7 (lower limit of 95% confidence interval (CI)). In ring study 1 the prespecified endpoint was not reached (ICC: 0.70; 95% CI: 0.62-0.78). On the basis of an analysis of sources of variation, we developed a more advanced digital image evaluation system for ring study 2, which improved the ICC to 0.89 (95% CI: 0.85-0.92). The Fleiss' kappa value for <60 vs ≥60% TIL improved from 0.45 (ring study 1) to 0.63 in RS2 and the mean concordance improved from 88 to 92%. This large international standardization project shows that reproducible evaluation of TIL is feasible in breast cancer. This opens the way for standardized reporting of tumor immunological parameters in clinical studies and diagnostic practice. The software-guided image evaluation approach used in ring study 2 may be of value as a tool for evaluation of TIL in clinical trials and diagnostic practice. The experience gained from this approach might be applicable to the standardization of other diagnostic parameters in histopathology. PMID:27363491

  15. Standardized evaluation of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer: results of the ring studies of the international immuno-oncology biomarker working group.

    PubMed

    Denkert, Carsten; Wienert, Stephan; Poterie, Audrey; Loibl, Sibylle; Budczies, Jan; Badve, Sunil; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Bane, Anita; Bedri, Shahinaz; Brock, Jane; Chmielik, Ewa; Christgen, Matthias; Colpaert, Cecile; Demaria, Sandra; Van den Eynden, Gert; Floris, Giuseppe; Fox, Stephen B; Gao, Dongxia; Ingold Heppner, Barbara; Kim, S Rim; Kos, Zuzana; Kreipe, Hans H; Lakhani, Sunil R; Penault-Llorca, Frederique; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Rimm, David L; Schnitt, Stuart J; Sinn, Bruno V; Sinn, Peter; Sirtaine, Nicolas; O'Toole, Sandra A; Viale, Giuseppe; Van de Vijver, Koen; de Wind, Roland; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Klauschen, Frederick; Untch, Michael; Fasching, Peter A; Reimer, Toralf; Willard-Gallo, Karen; Michiels, Stefan; Loi, Sherene; Salgado, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    Multiple independent studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) are prognostic in breast cancer with potential relevance for response to immune-checkpoint inhibitor therapy. Although many groups are currently evaluating TIL, there is no standardized system for diagnostic applications. This study reports the results of two ring studies investigating TIL conducted by the International Working Group on Immuno-oncology Biomarkers. The study aim was to determine the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for evaluation of TIL by different pathologists. A total of 120 slides were evaluated by a large group of pathologists with a web-based system in ring study 1 and a more advanced software-system in ring study 2 that included an integrated feedback with standardized reference images. The predefined aim for successful ring studies 1 and 2 was an ICC above 0.7 (lower limit of 95% confidence interval (CI)). In ring study 1 the prespecified endpoint was not reached (ICC: 0.70; 95% CI: 0.62-0.78). On the basis of an analysis of sources of variation, we developed a more advanced digital image evaluation system for ring study 2, which improved the ICC to 0.89 (95% CI: 0.85-0.92). The Fleiss' kappa value for <60 vs ≥60% TIL improved from 0.45 (ring study 1) to 0.63 in RS2 and the mean concordance improved from 88 to 92%. This large international standardization project shows that reproducible evaluation of TIL is feasible in breast cancer. This opens the way for standardized reporting of tumor immunological parameters in clinical studies and diagnostic practice. The software-guided image evaluation approach used in ring study 2 may be of value as a tool for evaluation of TIL in clinical trials and diagnostic practice. The experience gained from this approach might be applicable to the standardization of other diagnostic parameters in histopathology.

  16. Female sex work and international sport events - no major changes in demand or supply of paid sex during the 2010 Soccer World Cup: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Important unanswered questions remain on the impact of international sporting events on the sex industry. Speculation about increased demand and supply of sex work often generates significant attention, but also additional funding for HIV programmes. This study assessed whether changes occurred in the demand and supply of paid sex during the 2010 Soccer World Cup in South Africa. Methods Trained sex worker interviewers conducted face-to-face semi-structured interviews among consenting female sex workers during May-September 2010. Using bivariate analyses we compared supply, demand, sexual risk-taking, and police and health services contact pre-World Cup, to levels during the World Cup and after the event. Results No increases were detected in indicators of sex work supply, including the proportion of sex workers newly arrived in the city (< 2.5% in each phase) or those recently entering the trade (≤ 1.5%). Similarly, demand for sex work, indicated by median number of clients (around 12 per week) and amount charged per transaction ($13) remained similar in the three study periods. Only a third of participants reported observing any change in the sex industry ascribed to the World Cup. Self-reported condom-use with clients remained high across all samples (> 92.4% in all phases). Health-care utilisation decreased non-significantly from the pre- to during World Cup period (62.4% to 57.0%; P = 0.075). Across all periods, about thirty percent of participants had interacted with police in the preceding month, two thirds of whom had negative interactions. Conclusions Contrary to public opinion, no major increases were detected in the demand or supply of paid sex during the World Cup. Although the study design employed was unable to select population-based samples, these findings do not support the public concern and media speculation prior to the event, but rather signal a missed opportunity for public health action. Given the media attention on sex work

  17. Evidence-based decision-making for vaccine introductions: Overview of the ProVac International Working Group’s experience

    PubMed Central

    Jauregui, Barbara; Garcia, Ana Gabriela Felix; Janusz, Cara Bess; Blau, Julia; Munier, Aline; Atherly, Deborah; Mvundura, Mercy; Hajjeh, Rana; Lopman, Benjamin; Clark, Andrew David; Baxter, Louise; Hutubessy, Raymond; de Quadros, Ciro; Andrus, Jon Kim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pan American Health Organization’s (PAHO) ProVac Initiative aims to strengthen countries’ technical capacity to make evidence-based immunization policy. With financial support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, PAHO established the ProVac International Working Group (IWG), a platform created for two years to transfer the ProVac Initiative’s tools and methods to support decisions in non-PAHO regions. Methods In 2011, WHO Regional Offices and partner agencies established the IWG to transfer the ProVac framework for new vaccine decision support, including tools and trainings to other regions of the world. During the two year period, PAHO served as the coordinating secretariat and partner agencies played implementing or advisory roles. Results Fifty nine national professionals from 17 countries received training on the use of economic evaluations to aid vaccine policy making through regional workshops. The IWG provided direct technical support to nine countries to develop cost-effectiveness analyses to inform decisions. All nine countries introduced the new vaccine evaluated or their NITAGs have made a recommendation to the Ministry of Health to introduce the new vaccine. Discussion Developing countries around the world are increasingly interested in weighing the potential health impact due to new vaccine introduction against the investments required. During the two years, the ProVac approach proved valuable and timely to aid the national decision making processes, even despite the different challenges and idiosyncrasies encountered in each region. The results of this work suggest that: (1) there is great need and demand for technical support and for capacity building around economic evaluations; and (2) the ProVac method of supporting country-owned analyses is as effective in other regions as it has been in the PAHO region. Conclusion Decision support for new vaccine introduction in low- and middle-income countries is critical to guiding

  18. 22nd International Conference on Ion Beam Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radović, Iva Bogdanović; Jakšić, Milko; Fazinić, Stjepko

    2016-03-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B contains the proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Ion Beam Analysis (IBA 2015). The conference was held in Grand Hotel 4 Opatijska Cvijeta in Opatija, Croatia, between 14th and 19th June 2015. Opatija, one of the Croatia's most famous touristic destinations, often called the pearl of the Adriatic, is celebrating this year 170 years of tourism. During the past, kings and emperors, writers, philosophers, poets and composers, but also scientists, used to stay in the town mainly built at the turn of the 20th century.

  19. Subtrochanteric fractures after long-term treatment with bisphosphonates: a European Society on Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis, and International Osteoporosis Foundation Working Group Report

    PubMed Central

    Åkesson, K.; Bouxsein, M.; Kanis, J. A.; Napoli, N.; Papapoulos, S.; Reginster, J.-Y.; Cooper, C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary This paper reviews the evidence for an association between atypical subtrochanteric fractures and long-term bisphosphonate use. Clinical case reports/reviews and case–control studies report this association, but retrospective phase III trial analyses show no increased risk. Bisphosphonate use may be associated with atypical subtrochanteric fractures, but the case is yet unproven. Introduction A Working Group of the European Society on Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis and the International Osteoporosis Foundation has reviewed the evidence for a causal association between subtrochanteric fractures and long-term treatment with bisphosphonates, with the aim of identifying areas for further research and providing recommendations for physicians. Methods A PubMed search of literature from 1994 to May 2010 was performed using key search terms, and articles pertinent to subtrochanteric fractures following bisphosphonate use were analysed. Results Several clinical case reports and case reviews report a possible association between atypical fractures at the subtrochanteric region of the femur in bisphosphonate-treated patients. Common features of these ‘atypical’ fractures include prodromal pain, occurrence with minimal/no trauma, a thickened diaphyseal cortex and transverse fracture pattern. Some small case–control studies report the same association, but a large register-based study and retrospective analyses of phase III trials of bisphosphonates do not show an increased risk of subtrochanteric fractures with bisphosphonate use. The number of atypical subtrochanteric fractures in association with bisphosphonates is an estimated one per 1,000 per year. It is recommended that physicians remain vigilant in assessing their patients treated with bisphosphonates for the treatment or prevention of osteoporosis and advise patients of the potential risks. Conclusions Bisphosphonate use may be associated with atypical subtrochanteric

  20. Health hazards and medical treatment of volunteers aged 18-30 years working in international social projects of non-governmental organizations (NGO).

    PubMed

    Küpper, T; Rieke, B; Neppach, K; Morrison, A; Martin, J

    2014-01-01

    The specific health risk profile and diversity of treatments sought by young volunteers participating in international social projects should differ from those of their older colleagues. In the absence of any data to identify whether this was correct, a retrospective analysis was performed using a standardized questionnaire. Questions included what diseases occurred, and details of the frequency and types of treatment sought during their stay - (e.g. self-treatment, medical/dental intervention, or local healer). The 153 participants were aged 18-30 years and worked in a non-governmental organization for >6 months. The participants were: 53% female, mean age 20 years, and mean duration of stay was 11.2 months. Their NGO placement abroad was in Latin America 65.4%, 14.4% in Africa, and 9.8% in Asia. 83% of the young volunteers had received some advice regarding travel medicine before their departure. However, they suffered from more injuries compared to private travellers, and febrile infections were more common when compared to older studies. 21.2% suffered from dental problems and 50% of them sought medical treatment. This study highlights a previously unreported higher risk profile of specific health problems occurring in young NGO volunteers, including some potentially life-threatening diagnoses that differed from their older colleagues and normal travellers. It is recommended that young volunteers should receive age specific, comprehensive pre-departure training in health and safety, first aid, and management of common health problems. A medical check-up upon returning home should be mandatory. The provision of a basic first aid kit to each volunteer before departure is also recommended.

  1. ISBD(S), International Standard Bibliographic Description for Serials; Recommended by the Joint Working Group on the International Standard Bibliographic Description for Serials set up by the IFLA Committee on Cataloguing and the IFLA Committee on Serial Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, London (England). Committee on Cataloguing.

    The International Standard Bibliographic Description for Serials--ISBD(S)--provides a format for the international communication of bibliographic information so that records may be interchanged between sources, interpreted across language barriers, and converted to machine readable form. The ISBD(S) standards are limited to the descriptive…

  2. The Value of Smarter Teachers: International Evidence on Teacher Cognitive Skills and Student Performance. Program on Education Policy and Governance Working Papers Series. PEPG 14-06

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanushek, Eric A.; Piopiunik, Marc; Wiederhold, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Differences in teacher quality are commonly cited as a key determinant of the huge international student performance gaps. However, convincing evidence on this relationship is still lacking, in part because it is unclear how to measure teacher quality consistently across countries. We use unique international assessment data to investigate the…

  3. Working Together to Make Sense of the Past: Mothers' and Children's Use of Internal States Language in Conversations about Traumatic and Nontraumatic Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Patricia J.; Stark, Emily N.; Lukowski, Angela F.; Rademacher, Jennifer; Van Abbema, Dana L.; Ackil, Jennifer K.

    2005-01-01

    Mother-child conversations about a devastating tornado and about 2 nontraumatic events were examined to determine whether there were (a) differences in use of internal states language when talking about traumatic and nontraumatic events and (b) similarities in mothers' and children's use of internal states language. At Session 1, which took place…

  4. What Works to Prevent or Reduce Internalizing Problems or Socio-Emotional Difficulties in Adolescents: Lessons from Experimental Evaluations of Social Interventions. Fact Sheet. Publication #2011-34

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzian, Mary; Hamilton, Katie; Ericson, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Left untreated, internalizing problems, such as a depressive or anxious mood, negative self-perceptions, and emotional distress, can undermine one's ability to succeed in school, live a healthy lifestyle, form and maintain close relationships with others, and, in general, accomplish life goals. When internalizing problems are experienced daily for…

  5. School Competition and Students' Entrepreneurial Intentions: International Evidence Using Historical Catholic Roots of Private Schooling. Working Papers Series. PEPG 10-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falck, Oliver; Woessmann, Ludger

    2010-01-01

    School choice research mostly focuses on academic outcomes. Policymakers increasingly view entrepreneurial traits as a non-cognitive outcome important for economic growth. We use international PISA-2006 (Programme for International Student Assessment -2006) student-level data to estimate the effect of private-school competition on students'…

  6. Poverty Alleviation, Work and Adult Learning. Report of the UIE Round Table Held during the International Congress on Vocational Education and Training (2nd, Seoul, Korea, April 26-30, 1999). UIE Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Madhu, Ed.

    This document contains six papers about and from a roundtable discussion of poverty alleviation, work, and adult learning. The "Introduction" (Madhu Singh) presents an overview of the roundtable. "Work-Related Adult Education: Challenges and Possibilities in Poverty Areas" (Enrique Pieck) describes work-related adult education strategies and…

  7. The International System of Units (SI) in Oceanography. Report of IAPSO Working Group on Symbols, Units and Nomenclature in Physical Oceanography (SUN). Unesco Technical Papers in Marine Science 45. IAPSO Publication Scientifique No. 32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Marine Sciences.

    This report introduces oceanographers to the International System of Units (SI) in physical oceanography. The SI constitutes a universal language, designed to be understood by all scientists. It facilitates their mutual comprehension and exchange of views and results of their work. The first part of the report is devoted to physical quantities,…

  8. Genotoxicity testing on the international space station: Preparatory work on the SOS-LUX test as part of the space experiment TRIPLE-LUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojicic, Nevena; Walrafen, David; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Weisshaar, Maria-Paz; Horneck, Gerda

    Harmful environmental factors - namely ionizing radiation - will continue to influence future manned space missions. The Radiation Biology Unit at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) develops cellular monitoring systems, which include bacterial and mammalian cell systems capable of recognizing DNA damage as a consequence of the presence of genotoxic conditions. Such a bioassay is the SOS-LUX test, which represents the radiobiological part of the German space experiment "Gene, immune and cellular responses to single and combined space flight conditions (TRIPLE-LUX)" which has been selected by the IDI/USRA Peer Review Panel for NASA/ESA to be performed on the International Space Station (ISS). It will supply basic information on the genotoxic response to radiation applied in microgravity. The biological end-point under investigation will depend on the bacterial SOS response brought about by genetically modified bacteria that are transformed with the pSWITCH plasmid (constructed from the plasmids pPLS-1 and pGFPuv). The luminescent/fluorescent bioassay SWITCH (SWITCH: Salmonella Weighting of Induced Toxicity Cyto/GenoTox for Human Health) as successor of the SOS-LUX test for rapid toxicity (genotoxicity and cytotoxicity) testing, makes use of two sensing and reporting systems for the two biological endpoints under investigation: the SOS-LUX test and the LAC- Fluoro test. The SWITCH plasmid carries the promoterless lux operon of Photobacterium leiognathi as reporter element under the control of the DNA-damage-dependent SOS promoter of ColD as sensor element (for genotoxicity testing) and the sequences for a hybrid protein consisting of β-galactosidase and GFPuv of Aequorea victoria as reporter element under the control of the (in Salmonella constitutively active) LAC promoter of Escherichia coli as sensor element (for cytotoxicity testing). The system has worked properly for terrestrial applications during the first experiments. Experiments using X-rays and UV radiation

  9. Adoptive parenting and attachment: association of the internal working models between adoptive mothers and their late-adopted children during adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Cecilia S.; Di Folco, Simona; Guerriero, Viviana; Santona, Alessandra; Terrone, Grazia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Recent literature has shown that the good outcome of adoption would mostly depend on the quality of adoptive parenting, which is strongly associated with the security of parental internal working models (IWMs) of attachment. Specifically, attachment states-of-mind of adoptive mothers classified as free and autonomous and without lack of resolution of loss or trauma could represent a good protective factor for adopted children, previously maltreated and neglected. While most research on adoptive families focused on pre-school and school-aged children, the aim of this study was to assess the concordance of IWMs of attachment in adoptive dyads during adolescence. Method: Our pilot-study involved 76 participants: 30 adoptive mothers (mean age = 51.5 ± 4.3), and their 46 late-adopted adolescents (mean age = 13.9 ± 1.6), who were all aged 4–9 years old at time of adoption (mean age = 6.3 ± 1.5). Attachment representations of adopted adolescents were assessed by the Friend and Family Interview (FFI), while adoptive mothers’ state-of-mind with respect to attachment was classified by the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI). Adolescents’ verbal intelligence was controlled for. Results: Late-adopted adolescents were classified as follows: 67% secure, 26% dismissing, and 7% preoccupied in the FFI, while their adoptive mothers’ AAI classifications were 70% free-autonomous, 7% dismissing, and 23% unresolved. We found a significant concordance of 70% (32 dyads) between the secure–insecure FFI and AAI classifications. Specifically adoptive mothers with high coherence of transcript and low unresolved loss tend to have late-adopted children with high secure attachment, even if the adolescents’ verbal intelligence made a significant contribution to this prediction. Discussion: Our results provides an empirical contribution to the literature concerning the concordance of attachment in adoptive dyads, highlighting the beneficial impact of highly coherent

  10. Working the System”—British American Tobacco's Influence on the European Union Treaty and Its Implications for Policy: An Analysis of Internal Tobacco Industry Documents

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Katherine E.; Fooks, Gary; Collin, Jeff; Weishaar, Heide; Mandal, Sema; Gilmore, Anna B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Impact assessment (IA) of all major European Union (EU) policies is now mandatory. The form of IA used has been criticised for favouring corporate interests by overemphasising economic impacts and failing to adequately assess health impacts. Our study sought to assess how, why, and in what ways corporations, and particularly the tobacco industry, influenced the EU's approach to IA. Methods and Findings In order to identify whether industry played a role in promoting this system of IA within the EU, we analysed internal documents from British American Tobacco (BAT) that were disclosed following a series of litigation cases in the United States. We combined this analysis with one of related literature and interviews with key informants. Our analysis demonstrates that from 1995 onwards BAT actively worked with other corporate actors to successfully promote a business-oriented form of IA that favoured large corporations. It appears that BAT favoured this form of IA because it could advance the company's European interests by establishing ground rules for policymaking that would: (i) provide an economic framework for evaluating all policy decisions, implicitly prioritising costs to businesses; (ii) secure early corporate involvement in policy discussions; (iii) bestow the corporate sector with a long-term advantage over other actors by increasing policymakers' dependence on information they supplied; and (iv) provide businesses with a persuasive means of challenging potential and existing legislation. The data reveal that an ensuing lobbying campaign, largely driven by BAT, helped secure binding changes to the EU Treaty via the Treaty of Amsterdam that required EU policymakers to minimise legislative burdens on businesses. Efforts subsequently focused on ensuring that these Treaty changes were translated into the application of a business orientated form of IA (cost–benefit analysis [CBA]) within EU policymaking procedures. Both the tobacco and chemical

  11. Education, Work and Social Capital: Towards a New Conception of Vocational Education. Routledge International Studies in the Philosophy of Education, Number 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winch, Christopher

    This book examines the relationship among education, work, and social capital at the beginning of the 21st century. The following are among the topics discussed in the book's 15 chapters: (1) necessity, work, effort, and leisure; (2) the economic and work-related aims of education, including liberal, vocational, and civic education; (3) the…

  12. The International Society of Hypertension and World Hypertension League call on governments, nongovernmental organizations and the food industry to work to reduce dietary sodium.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Norman R C; Lackland, Daniel T; Chockalingam, Arun; Lisheng, Liu; Harrap, Stephen B; Touyz, Rhian M; Burrell, Louise M; Ramírez, Agustín J; Schmieder, Roland E; Schutte, Aletta E; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2014-02-01

    The International Society of Hypertension and the World Hypertension League have developed a policy statement calling for reducing dietary salt. The policy supports the WHO and the United Nations recommendations, which are based on a comprehensive and up-to-date review of relevant research. The policy statement calls for broad societal action to reduce dietary salt, thus reducing blood pressure and preventing hypertension and its related burden of cardiovascular disease. The hypertension organizations and experts need to become more engaged in the efforts to prevent hypertension and to advocate strongly to have dietary salt reduction policies implemented. The statement is being circulated to national hypertension organizations and to international nongovernmental health organizations for consideration of endorsement. Member organizations of the International Society of Hypertension and the World Hypertension League are urged to support this effort.

  13. The International Society of Hypertension and World Hypertension League call on governments, nongovernmental organizations and the food industry to work to reduce dietary sodium.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Norman R C; Lackland, Daniel T; Chockalingam, Arun; Lisheng, Liu; Harrap, Stephen B; Touyz, Rhian M; Burrell, Louise M; Ramírez, Agustín J; Schmieder, Roland E; Schutte, Aletta E; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2014-02-01

    The International Society of Hypertension and the World Hypertension League have developed a policy statement calling for reducing dietary salt. The policy supports the WHO and the United Nations recommendations, which are based on a comprehensive and up-to-date review of relevant research. The policy statement calls for broad societal action to reduce dietary salt, thus reducing blood pressure and preventing hypertension and its related burden of cardiovascular disease. The hypertension organizations and experts need to become more engaged in the efforts to prevent hypertension and to advocate strongly to have dietary salt reduction policies implemented. The statement is being circulated to national hypertension organizations and to international nongovernmental health organizations for consideration of endorsement. Member organizations of the International Society of Hypertension and the World Hypertension League are urged to support this effort. PMID:24430121

  14. Work-Related Adult Learning in a Changing World. Adult Learning and the Changing World of Work. A Series of 29 Booklets Documenting Workshops Held at the Fifth International Conference on Adult Education (Hamburg, Germany, July 14-18, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. for Education.

    This booklet reflects on how, in this period of change and transition, work-related adult learning should respect the unity of human beings as citizens, individuals, and workers. Section 1 deals with the most significant changes taking place in the world of work, including globalization; technological innovations; changing employment patterns; and…

  15. NAWeb 99: What Works and Why. International Conference on Web-Based Learning (5th, New Brunswick, Canada, October 2-5, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Richard, Ed.

    This proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Web-Based Learning, NAWeb 99, includes the following papers: "Coordinating Different Masters and Customers: Dalhousie's Diploma in Disability Management Program"; "The Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Graduate Level Course for Teaching Web-Based Instruction";…

  16. The Policy Impact of PISA: An Exploration of the Normative Effects of International Benchmarking in School System Performance. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 71

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breakspear, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Little research has been done into how the results of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) affect national educational reform and policy-making. This paper examines the normative impact of PISA by investigating how, and the extent to which , national policy actors use PISA in policies and practices, to evaluate and improve…

  17. Labour Market Characteristics and International Mobility of Doctorate Holders: Results for Seven Countries. OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers, 2007/2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auriol, Laudeline

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the first results of a project initiated in 2004 by the OECD in collaboration with Eurostat and the UNESCO Institute for Statistics, and aimed at developing a regular and internationally comparable production system of indicators on the careers and mobility of doctorate holders. A first data collection was launched in September…

  18. Support for International Space University?s (ISU) 2003 Summer Session Program and the Theme Day on ?Living and Working in Space?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finarelli, Margaret G.

    2004-01-01

    The 2003 Summer Session Program of the International Space University (ISU) was conducted at the ISU Central Campus in Strasbourg, France, July 5-September 6, 2003. Attending the Summer Session were 114 students from 27 countries including the US. The International Space University (ISU) offers its students a unique and comprehensive educational package covering all disciplines related to space programs and enterprises - space science, space engineering, systems engineering, space policy and law, business and management, and space and society. By providing international graduate students and young space professionals both an intensive interdisciplinary curriculum and also the opportunity to solve complex problems together in an intercultural environment, ISU is preparing the future leaders of the emerging global space community. Since its founding in 1988, ISU has graduated more than 2200 students from 87 countries. Together with hundreds of ISU faculty and lecturers from around the world, ISU alumni comprise an extremely effective network of space professionals and leaders that actively facilitates individual career growth, professional activities and international space cooperation. ISU's interdisciplinary Student Theme Days and Student Workshops are intended to have great educational value for the participants. Along with the interdisciplinary Core Lectures, they apprise the students of state-of-the-art activities, programs and policies in spacefaring nations. They also provide ISU students the opportunity to meet world experts in space-related subjects.

  19. The Private Internal Rates of Return to Tertiary Education: New Estimates for 21 OECD Countries. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 591

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boarini, Romina; Strauss, Hubert

    2007-01-01

    This study provides estimates of the private Internal Rates of Return (IRR) to tertiary education for women and men in 21 OECD countries, for the years between 1991 and 2005. IRR are computed by estimating labour market premia on cross-country comparable individual-level data. Labour market premia are then adjusted for fiscal factors and education…

  20. Measurements of Quality in Higher Education. International Working Conference Proceedings (1st, Washington, D.C., May 23-24, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Postsecondary Teaching, Learning, and Assessment, University Park, PA.

    This volume contains 14 papers from international sources that outline fundamental concepts and research interests connected to the measurement of quality in postsecondary education. Some of the papers consist of concept papers and others are more extensive reports of research underway or findings from recently concluded studies. The papers are as…

  1. School Accountability, Autonomy, Choice, and the Level of Student Achievement: International Evidence from PISA 2003. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wobmann, Ludger; Ludemann, Elke; Schutz, Gabriela; West, Martin R.

    2007-01-01

    Accountability, autonomy, and choice play a leading role in recent school reforms in many countries. This report provides new evidence on whether students perform better in school systems that have such institutional measures in place. We implement an internationally comparative approach within a rigorous micro-econometric framework that accounts…

  2. Proceedings of the International Working Conference on the Measurements of Quality in Postsecondary Education (2nd, Edinburgh, Scotland, September 5, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park. Center for the Study of Higher Education.

    This report presents the outcomes from two international 1991 conferences, one held in Washington, D.C., and the other in Scotland, which addressed developing a framework for cooperative research in the area of measuring quality in postsecondary education. The first meeting established the foundations for collaborative research and the second…

  3. A Critical Appraisal of the Impact of International Agencies on Educational Reforms and Teachers' Lives and Work: The Case of Ireland?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugrue, Ciaran

    2006-01-01

    Against a general backdrop of an international discourse on educational reform that has focused on accountability, this article provides a detailed and critical analysis of the evolution of accountability policy and practice in Irish primary and post-primary education during the past 20 years. The analysis indicates clearly that national policy…

  4. Resuscitation of the newly born infant: an advisory statement from the Pediatric Working Group of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Kattwinkel, J; Niermeyer, S; Nadkarni, V; Tibballs, J; Phillips, B; Zideman, D; Van Reempts, P; Osmond, M

    1999-04-01

    The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR), with representation from North America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Africa, and South America, was formed in 1992 to provide a forum for liaison between resuscitation organizations in the developed world. This consensus document on resuscitation extends previously published ILCOR advisory statements on resuscitation to address the unique and changing physiology of the newly born infant within the first few hours following birth and the techniques for providing advanced life support. PMID:10206142

  5. Impacts of Culture on International Negotiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodin, James Ronald

    2010-09-01

    This paper provides practical suggestions for developing a healthy and complete working relationship between the system safety practitioner and international business partners, international vendors and international customers.

  6. From sixty-two interviews on 'the worst and the best episode of your life'. Relationships between internal working models and a grammatical scale of subject-object affective connections.

    PubMed

    Seganti, A; Carnevale, G; Mucelli, R; Solano, L; Target, M

    2000-06-01

    The authors address the issue of inferring unconscious internal working models of interaction through language. After reviewing Main's seminal work of linguistic assessment through the 'adult attachment interview', they stress the idea of adults' internal working models (IWMs) as information-processing devices, which give moment-to-moment sensory orientation in the face of any past or present, animate or inanimate object. They propose that a selective perception of the objects could match expected with actual influence of objects on the subject's self, through very simple 'parallel-processed' categories of internal objects. They further hypothesise that the isomorphism between internal working models of interaction and grammatical connections between subjects and objects within a clause could be a key to tracking positive and negative images of self and other during discourse. An experiment is reported applying the authors' 'scale of subject/object affective connection' to the narratives of sixty-two subjects asked to write about the 'worst' and 'best' episodes of their lives. Participants had previously been classified using Hazan & Shaver's self-reported 'attachment types' (avoidant, anxious and secure) categorising individuals' general expectations in relation to others. The findings were that the subject/object distribution of positive and negative experience, through verbs defined for this purpose as either performative or state verbs, did significantly differ between groups. In addition, different groups tended, during the best episodes, significantly to invert the trend of positive/negative subject/object distribution shown during the worst episode. Results are discussed in terms of a psychoanalytic theory of improvement through co-operative elaboration of negative relational issues.

  7. Mixing and turbulent mixing in fluids, plasma and materials: summary of works presented at the 3rd International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Serge; Keane, Christopher J.; Niemela, Joseph J.; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.

    2013-07-01

    Mixing and turbulent mixing are non-equilibrium processes that occur in a broad variety of processes in fluids, plasmas and materials. The processes can be natural or artificial, their characteristic scales can be astrophysical or atomistic, and energy densities can be low or high. Understanding the fundamental aspects of turbulent mixing is necessary to comprehend the dynamics of supernovae and accretion discs, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, mantle-lithosphere tectonics and volcanic eruptions, atmospheric and oceanographic flows in geophysics, and premixed and non-premixed combustion. It is crucial for the development of the methods of control in technological applications, including mixing mitigation in inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, and mixing enhancement in reactive flows, as well as material transformation under the action of high strain rates. It can improve our knowledge of realistic turbulent processes at low energy density involving walls, unsteady transport, interfaces and vortices, as well as high energy density hydrodynamics including strong shocks, explosions, blast waves and supersonic flows. A deep understanding of mixing and turbulent mixing requires one to go above and beyond canonical approaches and demands further enhancements in the quality and information capacity of experimental and numerical data sets, and in the methods of theoretical analysis of continuous dynamics and kinetics. This has the added potential then of bringing the experiment, numerical modelling, theoretical analysis and data processing to a new level of standards. At the same time, mixing and turbulent mixing being one of the most formidable and multi-faceted problems of modern physics and mathematics, is well open for a curious mind. In this article we briefly review various aspects of turbulent mixing, and present a summary of over 70 papers that were discussed at the third International Conference on 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2011, that

  8. Diabetes mellitus in older people: position statement on behalf of the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics (IAGG), the European Diabetes Working Party for Older People (EDWPOP), and the International Task Force of Experts in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Alan; Morley, John E; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leo; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Bayer, Tony; Zeyfang, Andrej; Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Vischer, Ulrich; Woo, Jean; Chapman, Ian; Dunning, Trisha; Meneilly, Graydon; Rodriguez-Saldana, Joel; Gutierrez Robledo, Luis Miguel; Cukierman-Yaffe, Tali; Gadsby, Roger; Schernthaner, Guntram; Lorig, Kate

    2012-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent metabolic condition in ageing societies associated with high levels of morbidity, multiple therapies, and functional deterioration that challenges even the best of health care systems to deliver high-quality, individualized care. Most international clinical guidelines have ignored the often-unique issues of frailty, functional limitation, changes in mental health, and increasing dependency that characterize many aged patients with diabetes. A collaborative Expert Group of the IAGG and EDWPOP and an International Task Force have explored the key issues that affect diabetes in older people using a robust method comprising a Delphi process and an evidence-based review of the literature. Eight domains of interest were initially agreed and discussed: hypoglycemia, therapy, care home diabetes, influence of comorbidities, glucose targets, family/carer perspectives, diabetes education, and patient safety. A set of "consensus" statements was produced in each domain of interest. These form a foundation for future policy development in this area and should influence the clinical behavior and approach of all health professionals engaged in delivering diabetes care to older people.

  9. Effect of internal heating during hot compression testing on the stress-strain behavior and hot working characteristics of Alloy 304L

    SciTech Connect

    Mataya, M.C.; Sackschewsky, V.E.

    1993-05-01

    Temperature change from conversion of deformation to internal heat, and its effect on stress-strain behavior of alloy 304L was investigated by initially isothermal (temperature of specimen, compression dies, environment equilibrated at initiation of test) uniaxial compression. Strain rate was varied 0.01 s{sup {minus}1} to 1 s{sup {minus}1} (thermal state of specimen varied from nearly isothermal to nearly adiabatic). Specimens were deformed at 750 to 1150 to a strain of 1. Change in temperature with strain was calculated via finite element analysis from measured stress-strain data and predictions were confirmed with thermocouples to verify the model. Temperature increased nearly linearly at the highest strain rate, consistent with temperature rise being a linear function of strain (adiabatic). As strain rate was lowered, heat transfer from superheated specimen to cooler dies caused sample temperature to increase and then decrease with strain as the sample thinned and specimen-die contact area increased. As-measured stress was corrected. Resulting isothermal flow curves were compared to predictions of a simplified method suggested by Thomas and Shrinivasan and differences are discussed. Strain rate sensitivity, activation energy for deformation, and flow curve peak associated with onset of dynamic recrystallization were determined from both as-measured and isothermal stress-strain data and found to vary widely. The impact of utilizing as-measured stress-strain data, not corrected for internal heating, on results of a number of published investigations is discussed.

  10. Education and Work. Proceedings of the International Conference Linking Research and Practice (Toronto, Ontario, March 4-6, 1993). Volumes 1-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corson, David, Ed.; Lawton, Stephen B., Ed.

    These two volumes comprise the proceedings of a conference on links between education and work and the power relationships in the wider culture and in its social order. Each volume begins with a "Foreword" (Ronald C. Morrison), "Preface" (Arthur Kruger), "Introduction" (David Corson), and author notes. Volume I contains seven papers: "Beyond…

  11. U.S.-GERMAN BILATERAL WORKING GROUP: International Research Cooperation to Develop and Evaluate Tools and Techniques for Revitalization of Potentially Contaminated Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. German Bilateral Working Group originated in 1990 in order to share and transfer information, ideas, tools and techniques regarding environmental research. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)/Office of Research and Development (ORD) and the German Federal Mini...

  12. Towards Effective International Work-Integrated Learning Practica in Development Studies: Reflections on the Australian Consortium for "In-Country" Indonesian Studies' Development Studies Professional Practicum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosser, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, overseas work-integrated learning practica have become an increasingly important part of development studies curricula in "Northern" universities. This paper examines the factors that shape pedagogical effectiveness in the provision of such programmes, focusing on the case of the Australian Consortium for "In-Country" Indonesian…

  13. [Diagnosis and treatment of imported malaria in Spain: Recommendations from the Malaria Working Group of the Spanish Society of Tropical Medicine and International Health (SEMTSI)].

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Jose; Rojo-Marcos, Gerardo; Ramírez-Olivencia, Germán; Salas-Coronas, Joaquín; Treviño, Begoña; Perez Arellano, José Luis; Torrús, Diego; Muñoz Vilches, Maria Jose; Ramos, Jose Manuel; Alegría, Iñaki; López-Vélez, Rogelio; Aldasoro, Edelweiss; Perez-Molina, Jose Antonio; Rubio, Jose Miguel; Bassat, Quique

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a common parasitic disease diagnosed in the returned traveler. Mortality in travelers with imported malaria is around 2-3%, and one of the main factors associated with poor prognosis is the delay in the diagnosis and treatment. Imported malaria cases usually present with fever, headache and myalgia, but other symptoms may appear. The diagnosis should be performed as soon as possible, using thick smear or rapid diagnostic tests, and a blood smear. Treatment should be initiated urgently. In cases of severe malaria, the use of intravenous artemisinins has proved to be superior to intravenous quinine. This document reviews the recommendations of the expert group of the Spanish Society of Tropical Medicine and International Health (SEMTSI) for the diagnosis and treatment of imported malaria in Spain.

  14. International Myeloma Working Group Consensus Statement for the Management, Treatment, and Supportive Care of Patients With Myeloma Not Eligible for Standard Autologous Stem-Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Antonio; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; San Miguel, Jesus F.; Larocca, Alessandra; Niesvizky, Ruben; Morgan, Gareth; Landgren, Ola; Hajek, Roman; Einsele, Hermann; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Richardson, Paul G.; Cavo, Michele; Spencer, Andrew; Stewart, A. Keith; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Lonial, Sagar; Sonneveld, Pieter; Durie, Brian G.M.; Moreau, Philippe; Orlowski, Robert Z.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To provide an update on recent advances in the management of patients with multiple myeloma who are not eligible for autologous stem-cell transplantation. Methods A comprehensive review of the literature on diagnostic criteria is provided, and treatment options and management of adverse events are summarized. Results Patients with symptomatic disease and organ damage (ie, hypercalcemia, renal failure, anemia, or bone lesions) require immediate treatment. The International Staging System and chromosomal abnormalities identify high- and standard-risk patients. Proteasome inhibitors, immunomodulatory drugs, corticosteroids, and alkylating agents are the most active agents. The presence of concomitant diseases, frailty, or disability should be assessed and, if present, treated with reduced-dose approaches. Bone disease, renal damage, hematologic toxicities, infections, thromboembolism, and peripheral neuropathy are the most frequent disabling events requiring prompt and active supportive care. Conclusion These recommendations will help clinicians ensure the most appropriate care for patients with myeloma in everyday clinical practice. PMID:24419113

  15. IGSN at Work in the Land Down Under: Exploiting an International Sample Identifier System to Enhance Reproducibility of Australian Geochemcial and Geochronological Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastrakova, I.; Klump, J. F.; McInnes, B.; Wyborn, L. A.; Brown, A.

    2015-12-01

    The International Geo-Sample Number (IGSN) provides a globally unique identifier for physical samples used to generate analytical data. This unique identifier provides the ability to link each physical sample to any analytical data undertaken on that sample, as well as to any publications derived from any data derived on the sample. IGSN is particularly important for geochemical and geochronological data, where numerous analytical techniques can be undertaken at multiple analytical facilities not only on the parent rock sample itself, but also on derived sample splits and mineral separates. Australia now has three agencies implementing IGSN: Geoscience Australia, CSIRO and Curtin University. All three have now combined into a single project, funded by the Australian Research Data Services program, to better coordinate the implementation of IGSN in Australia, in particular how these agencies allocate IGSN identifiers. The project will register samples from pilot applications in each agency including the CSIRO National Collection of Mineral Spectra database, the Geoscience Australia sample collection, and the Digital Mineral Library of the John De Laeter Centre for Isotope Research at Curtin University. These local agency catalogues will then be aggregated into an Australian portal, which will ultimately be expanded for all geoscience specimens. The development of this portal will also involve developing a common core metadata schema for the description of Australian geoscience specimens, as well as formulating agreed governance models for registering Australian samples. These developments aim to enable a common approach across Australian academic, research organisations and government agencies for the unique identification of geoscience specimens and any analytical data and/or publications derived from them. The emerging pattern of governance and technical collaboration established in Australia may also serve as a blueprint for similar collaborations internationally.

  16. Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Ion Beam Modification of Materials (IBMM 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantomme, André; Temst, Kristiaan

    2015-12-01

    It is our pleasure to present the proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Ion Beam Modification of Materials, which took place from September 14th until September 19th, 2014. The conference was held in the historic center of Leuven, a medieval city in the heart of Europe, a city where centuries-old culture meets frontier science and technology. Among other places, the conference brought us to the University Hall, which has been in use by the university since its foundation in 1425, to the Infirmerie of the Grand Beguinage and to the medieval city of Bruges, the latter two being Unesco World Heritage sites.

  17. Critical issues with the in vivo comet assay: A report of the comet assay working group in the 6th International Workshop on Genotoxicity Testing (IWGT).

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Kojima, Hajime; Burlinson, Brian; Collins, Andrew R; Kasper, Peter; Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Uno, Yoshifumi; Vasquez, Marie; Beevers, Carol; De Boeck, Marlies; Escobar, Patricia A; Kitamoto, Sachiko; Pant, Kamala; Pfuhler, Stefan; Tanaka, Jin; Levy, Dan D

    2015-05-01

    As a part of the 6th IWGT, an expert working group on the comet assay evaluated critical topics related to the use of the in vivo comet assay in regulatory genotoxicity testing. The areas covered were: identification of the domain of applicability and regulatory acceptance, identification of critical parameters of the protocol and attempts to standardize the assay, experience with combination and integration with other in vivo studies, demonstration of laboratory proficiency, sensitivity and power of the protocol used, use of different tissues, freezing of samples, and choice of appropriate measures of cytotoxicity. The standard protocol detects various types of DNA lesions but it does not detect all types of DNA damage. Modifications of the standard protocol may be used to detect additional types of specific DNA damage (e.g., cross-links, bulky adducts, oxidized bases). In addition, the working group identified critical parameters that should be carefully controlled and described in detail in every published study protocol. In vivo comet assay results are more reliable if they were obtained in laboratories that have demonstrated proficiency. This includes demonstration of adequate response to vehicle controls and an adequate response to a positive control for each tissue being examined. There was a general agreement that freezing of samples is an option but more data are needed in order to establish generally accepted protocols. With regard to tissue toxicity, the working group concluded that cytotoxicity could be a confounder of comet results. It is recommended to look at multiple parameters such as histopathological observations, organ-specific clinical chemistry as well as indicators of tissue inflammation to decide whether compound-specific toxicity might influence the result. The expert working group concluded that the alkaline in vivo comet assay is a mature test for the evaluation of genotoxicity and can be recommended to regulatory agencies for use. PMID

  18. Critical issues with the in vivo comet assay: A report of the comet assay working group in the 6th International Workshop on Genotoxicity Testing (IWGT).

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Kojima, Hajime; Burlinson, Brian; Collins, Andrew R; Kasper, Peter; Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Uno, Yoshifumi; Vasquez, Marie; Beevers, Carol; De Boeck, Marlies; Escobar, Patricia A; Kitamoto, Sachiko; Pant, Kamala; Pfuhler, Stefan; Tanaka, Jin; Levy, Dan D

    2015-05-01

    As a part of the 6th IWGT, an expert working group on the comet assay evaluated critical topics related to the use of the in vivo comet assay in regulatory genotoxicity testing. The areas covered were: identification of the domain of applicability and regulatory acceptance, identification of critical parameters of the protocol and attempts to standardize the assay, experience with combination and integration with other in vivo studies, demonstration of laboratory proficiency, sensitivity and power of the protocol used, use of different tissues, freezing of samples, and choice of appropriate measures of cytotoxicity. The standard protocol detects various types of DNA lesions but it does not detect all types of DNA damage. Modifications of the standard protocol may be used to detect additional types of specific DNA damage (e.g., cross-links, bulky adducts, oxidized bases). In addition, the working group identified critical parameters that should be carefully controlled and described in detail in every published study protocol. In vivo comet assay results are more reliable if they were obtained in laboratories that have demonstrated proficiency. This includes demonstration of adequate response to vehicle controls and an adequate response to a positive control for each tissue being examined. There was a general agreement that freezing of samples is an option but more data are needed in order to establish generally accepted protocols. With regard to tissue toxicity, the working group concluded that cytotoxicity could be a confounder of comet results. It is recommended to look at multiple parameters such as histopathological observations, organ-specific clinical chemistry as well as indicators of tissue inflammation to decide whether compound-specific toxicity might influence the result. The expert working group concluded that the alkaline in vivo comet assay is a mature test for the evaluation of genotoxicity and can be recommended to regulatory agencies for use.

  19. Validation of WHO classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS) for myelodysplastic syndromes and comparison with the revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R). A study of the International Working Group for Prognosis in Myelodysplasia (IWG-PM).

    PubMed

    Della Porta, M G; Tuechler, H; Malcovati, L; Schanz, J; Sanz, G; Garcia-Manero, G; Solé, F; Bennett, J M; Bowen, D; Fenaux, P; Dreyfus, F; Kantarjian, H; Kuendgen, A; Levis, A; Cermak, J; Fonatsch, C; Le Beau, M M; Slovak, M L; Krieger, O; Luebbert, M; Maciejewski, J; Magalhaes, S M M; Miyazaki, Y; Pfeilstöcker, M; Sekeres, M A; Sperr, W R; Stauder, R; Tauro, S; Valent, P; Vallespi, T; van de Loosdrecht, A A; Germing, U; Haase, D; Greenberg, P L; Cazzola, M

    2015-07-01

    A risk-adapted treatment strategy is mandatory for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We refined the World Health Organization (WHO)-classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS) by determining the impact of the newer clinical and cytogenetic features, and we compared its prognostic power to that of the revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R). A population of 5326 untreated MDS was considered. We analyzed single WPSS parameters and confirmed that the WHO classification and severe anemia provide important prognostic information in MDS. A strong correlation was found between the WPSS including the new cytogenetic risk stratification and WPSS adopting original criteria. We then compared WPSS with the IPSS-R prognostic system. A highly significant correlation was found between the WPSS and IPSS-R risk classifications. Discrepancies did occur among lower-risk patients in whom the number of dysplastic hematopoietic lineages as assessed by morphology did not reflect the severity of peripheral blood cytopenias and/or increased marrow blast count. Moreover, severe anemia has higher prognostic weight in the WPSS versus IPSS-R model. Overall, both systems well represent the prognostic risk of MDS patients defined by WHO morphologic criteria. This study provides relevant in formation for the implementation of risk-adapted strategies in MDS. PMID:25721895

  20. Improving Internal Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonus, Thaddeus, Ed.

    Guidelines for developing the internal communications of colleges and universities, researching internal communication needs, and increasing information flow through traditional and nontraditional media are provided in 11 articles. Titles and authors include the following: "Work for an Open Internal Communication Policy" (Thaddeus Bonus); "Five…

  1. International cooperation.

    PubMed

    1999-04-01

    As the most densely populated country in the world, China actively conducts international exchanges and cooperation. It takes every opportunity to publicize its family planning policies and practices during international forums. Moreover, the country's State Family Planning Commission has been collaborating with the United Nations Population Fund in implementing health and family planning programs. This program covers public awareness campaigns, technical services, sex education for the youth, and social marketing. For years, China has also been cooperating with WHO in the area of family planning and reproductive health, and has established partnership with the Japanese Organization for International Cooperation in Family Planning. In addition, the State Family Planning Commission has worked with the Public Media Center of the US as well as with the Rockefeller Foundation and Ford Foundation in introducing "contraceptive methods by informed choice" and "male participation in family planning" in the rural areas of the country. China has also worked closely with many other developing countries on population issues. In October 1998, China collaborated with the Partners in Population and Development for a reporting mission that was attended by journalists from 11 countries.

  2. Mixing and turbulent mixing in fluids, plasma and materials: summary of works presented at the 3rd International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Serge; Keane, Christopher J.; Niemela, Joseph J.; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.

    2013-07-01

    Mixing and turbulent mixing are non-equilibrium processes that occur in a broad variety of processes in fluids, plasmas and materials. The processes can be natural or artificial, their characteristic scales can be astrophysical or atomistic, and energy densities can be low or high. Understanding the fundamental aspects of turbulent mixing is necessary to comprehend the dynamics of supernovae and accretion discs, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, mantle-lithosphere tectonics and volcanic eruptions, atmospheric and oceanographic flows in geophysics, and premixed and non-premixed combustion. It is crucial for the development of the methods of control in technological applications, including mixing mitigation in inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, and mixing enhancement in reactive flows, as well as material transformation under the action of high strain rates. It can improve our knowledge of realistic turbulent processes at low energy density involving walls, unsteady transport, interfaces and vortices, as well as high energy density hydrodynamics including strong shocks, explosions, blast waves and supersonic flows. A deep understanding of mixing and turbulent mixing requires one to go above and beyond canonical approaches and demands further enhancements in the quality and information capacity of experimental and numerical data sets, and in the methods of theoretical analysis of continuous dynamics and kinetics. This has the added potential then of bringing the experiment, numerical modelling, theoretical analysis and data processing to a new level of standards. At the same time, mixing and turbulent mixing being one of the most formidable and multi-faceted problems of modern physics and mathematics, is well open for a curious mind. In this article we briefly review various aspects of turbulent mixing, and present a summary of over 70 papers that were discussed at the third International Conference on 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2011, that

  3. The effect of an ergonomic intervention on musculoskeletal, psychosocial, and visual strain of VDT data entry work: the Polish part of the international study.

    PubMed

    Konarska, Maria; Wolska, Agnieszka; Widerszal-Bazyl, Maria; Bugajska, Joanna; Roman-Liu, Danuta; Aarås, Arne

    2005-01-01

    A group of routine data entry operators (female) was included in the Polish MEPS (musculoskeletal--eyestrain--psychosocial--stress) study. Before the intervention, ergonomic assessment revealed improper working conditions such as inadequate lighting, uncomfortable chairs, and lack of forearm and wrist support while medical examination revealed that trapezius muscle load along with upper arm, head and back angles were higher than advisable. Subjects complained about neck and shoulder pain, visual problems, and psychosocial conditions. The ergonomic intervention included installation of new luminaires and Venetian blinds, new chairs, repair of ventilators, and optometric corrections. The results after the intervention showed mainly improvement in chair comfort, lighting conditions, visual strain, and sitting posture. However, financial limitations did not allow satisfactory completion of the intervention leading to a mixed interpretation of the results.

  4. Methods and strategies for assessing uncontrolled drug-drug interactions in population pharmacokinetic analyses: results from the International Society of Pharmacometrics (ISOP) Working Group.

    PubMed

    Bonate, Peter L; Ahamadi, Malidi; Budha, Nageshwar; de la Peña, Amparo; Earp, Justin C; Hong, Ying; Karlsson, Mats O; Ravva, Patanjali; Ruiz-Garcia, Ana; Struemper, Herbert; Wade, Janet R

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to present a consolidated set of guidelines for the analysis of uncontrolled concomitant medications (ConMed) as a covariate and potential perpetrator in population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) analyses. This white paper is the result of an industry-academia-regulatory collaboration. It is the recommendation of the working group that greater focus be given to the analysis of uncontrolled ConMeds as part of a PopPK analysis of Phase 2/3 data to ensure that the resulting outcome in the PopPK analysis can be viewed as reliable. Other recommendations include: (1) collection of start and stop date and clock time, as well as dose and frequency, in Case Report Forms regarding ConMed administration schedule; (2) prespecification of goals and the methods of analysis, (3) consideration of alternate models, other than the binary covariate model, that might more fully characterize the interaction between perpetrator and victim drug, (4) analysts should consider whether the sample size, not the percent of subjects taking a ConMed, is sufficient to detect a ConMed effect if one is present and to consider the correlation with other covariates when the analysis is conducted, (5) grouping of ConMeds should be based on mechanism (e.g., PGP-inhibitor) and not drug class (e.g., beta-blocker), and (6) when reporting the results in a publication, all details related to the ConMed analysis should be presented allowing the reader to understand the methods and be able to appropriately interpret the results. PMID:26837775

  5. Proceedings of the 14th Annual Software Engineering Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Several software related topics are presented. Topics covered include studies and experiment at the Software Engineering Laboratory at the Goddard Space Flight Center, predicting project success from the Software Project Management Process, software environments, testing in a reuse environment, domain directed reuse, and classification tree analysis using the Amadeus measurement and empirical analysis.

  6. Seven Substances Added to 14th Report on Carcinogens

    MedlinePlus

    ... through soil to make its way into underground drinking water sources. Because of its widespread use as a ... safeguard the public by identifying substances in the environment that may affect human health. For more information ...

  7. Proceedings of the 14th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Technological areas covered include aviation propulsion, aerodynamic devices, and crew safety; space vehicle propulsion, guidance and control; spacecraft deployment, positioning, and pointing; spacecraft bearings, gimbals, and lubricants; and large space structures. Devices for payload deployment, payload retention, and crew extravehicular activity on the space shuttle orbiter are also described.

  8. 18th International Conference on Antiviral Research.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, William M

    2005-08-01

    The 18th International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR) was held at the Princess Sofia Hotel in Barcelona, Spain, from 11th-14th April, 2005. This is a yearly international meeting sponsored by the International Society for Antiviral Research (ISAR). The current president of ISAR is John A Secrest 3rd of the Southern Research Institute. The scientific programme committee was chaired by John C Drach from the University of Michigan. ISAR was founded in 1987 to exchange prepublication basic, applied and clinical information on the development of antiviral, chemical and biological agents as well as to promote collaborative research. The ISAR has had a major role in the significant advances of the past decade in the reduction of the societal burdens of viral diseases by the focus of ICAR on the discovery and clinical application of antiviral agents. The 18th ICAR was organised as a series of focus presentations on specific viral groups consisting of oral and poster presentations of original research findings. In addition, the conference included plenary speakers, award presentations, a minisymposium on bioterrorism, and a satellite symposium on clinical antiviral drug developments. The size of the conference (> 50 oral and 250 poster presentations) necessitates limitation to the most noteworthy in the judgment of this reviewer. The current membership of the ISAR is approximately 700 with approximately 50% the membership in attendance. PMID:16086663

  9. International Commission for Protection against Environmental Mutagens and Carcinogens. ICPEMC Working Paper 5/6. Perspectives in mutation epidemiology, 6. A 1983 view of sentinel phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Mulvihill, J J; Czeizel, A

    1983-12-01

    A sentinel phenotype is a clinical disorder or syndrome that (1) occurs sporadically as a consequence of a single, highly penetrant mutant gene, (2) is a dominant or X-linked trait of considerable frequency and low fitness, and (3) is uniformly expressed and accurately diagnosable with minimal effort at or near birth. Although 1828 autosomal dominant traits are known in human beings, 36 can be considered as candidate sentinel phenotypes, along with 5 X-linked disorders. Based on surveys of malformations in infants and children, 16 additional traits are proposed beyond previous lists. In Hungary, the 24 syndromes or defects with reliable manifestations in newborn infants occur with a frequency of 2.5-3.3 per 10 000 live births. As markers of human mutations, sentinel phenotypes have the advantage of representing germinal mutations that result in significant health problems. There are severe disadvantages that have, to date, prevented the launching of a field demonstration of the value of these phenotypes in mutation epidemiology. Agreement on a list of phenotypes has been delayed by continued recognition of two or more distinct genetic diseases within what was once thought to be a single disorder. For the same reason, most of the candidate sentinel phenotypes have not been assigned unique codes in the International Classification of Diseases. Each of the disorders is so rare and has features that overlap with so many other syndromes that highly trained clinical dysmorphologist and pediatric ophthalmologists would have to be engaged in any study. The sentinel phenotype approach, like other strategies in mutation epidemiology, would encounter problems with linkage among files of data, privacy, and access to sufficiently large populations. In contrast with the approach using multiple protein variants (as in the study of blood from offspring of survivors of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki), the sentinel phenotype approach would likely be much less expensive

  10. International Commission for Protection against Environmental Mutagens and Carcinogens. ICPEMC Working Paper 5/6. Perspectives in mutation epidemiology, 6. A 1983 view of sentinel phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Mulvihill, J J; Czeizel, A

    1983-12-01

    A sentinel phenotype is a clinical disorder or syndrome that (1) occurs sporadically as a consequence of a single, highly penetrant mutant gene, (2) is a dominant or X-linked trait of considerable frequency and low fitness, and (3) is uniformly expressed and accurately diagnosable with minimal effort at or near birth. Although 1828 autosomal dominant traits are known in human beings, 36 can be considered as candidate sentinel phenotypes, along with 5 X-linked disorders. Based on surveys of malformations in infants and children, 16 additional traits are proposed beyond previous lists. In Hungary, the 24 syndromes or defects with reliable manifestations in newborn infants occur with a frequency of 2.5-3.3 per 10 000 live births. As markers of human mutations, sentinel phenotypes have the advantage of representing germinal mutations that result in significant health problems. There are severe disadvantages that have, to date, prevented the launching of a field demonstration of the value of these phenotypes in mutation epidemiology. Agreement on a list of phenotypes has been delayed by continued recognition of two or more distinct genetic diseases within what was once thought to be a single disorder. For the same reason, most of the candidate sentinel phenotypes have not been assigned unique codes in the International Classification of Diseases. Each of the disorders is so rare and has features that overlap with so many other syndromes that highly trained clinical dysmorphologist and pediatric ophthalmologists would have to be engaged in any study. The sentinel phenotype approach, like other strategies in mutation epidemiology, would encounter problems with linkage among files of data, privacy, and access to sufficiently large populations. In contrast with the approach using multiple protein variants (as in the study of blood from offspring of survivors of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki), the sentinel phenotype approach would likely be much less expensive

  11. Tick-borne encephalitis as a notifiable disease--Status quo and the way forward. Report of the 17th annual meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE).

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2015-07-01

    The 17th meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE), a group of neurologists, general practicioners, clinicians, travel physicians, virologists, pediatricians, and epidemiologists, was held under the title "Tick-borne encephalitis as a notifiable disease--status quo and the way forward". The conference agenda was divided into three parts on the first day: "Epidemiology & Risk areas", "Poster Walk: Epidemiological Update in Europe", and "News in TBE Research". On the second day, a World Café Working Session took place where the participants could choose three tables out of six to join for discussion. Key topics on current epidemiological developments and investigations, risk areas, cases, travel and mobility, TBE in children, vaccination rates, and latest news on vaccination were presented and extensively discussed.

  12. Advances in Work Organisation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    A 1973 international management seminar, sponsored by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, provided an opportunity for representatives from various countries to share innovations in work organization. It appears that attitudes toward work and working life are changing throughout the industrialized world; part of the dilemma…

  13. PREFACE: 2013 Joint IMEKO (International Measurement Confederation) TC1-TC7-TC13 Symposium: Measurement Across Physical and Behavioural Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista Rossi, Giovanni; Crenna, Francesco; Belotti, Vittorio

    2013-09-01

    The 2013 Joint IMEKO (International Measurement Confederation) TC1-C7-TC13 was organised by the University of Genova - DIME/MEC, Measurement Laboratory, Italy, on 4-6 September 2013. The work of this symposium is reported in this volume. The scope of the symposium includes the main topics covered by the above Technical Committees: TC1 Education and Training in Measurement and Instrumentation TC7 Measurement Science TC13 Measurements in Biology and Medicine This is in keeping with the tradition set by the previous events of this well established series. There has been a special focus on measurement across physical and behavioural sciences, with the aim of highlighting the interdisciplinary character of measurement science and of promoting constructive interactions with scientists in other disciplines. The discussion was introduced by keynote lectures on measurement challenges in psychophysics, psychometrics and quantum physics. The symposium was attended by experts working in these areas from 18 countries, including USA, Australia and Japan, and provided a useful forum for them to share and exchange their work and ideas. In total over sixty papers are included in the volume, organised according to the presentation sessions. Each paper was independently peer-reviewed by two reviewers from a distinguished international panel. The Symposium was held in Genova, which was the European Capital of Culture in 2004, and took place in Palazzo Ducale, an important historical building whose construction started in the 13th century, and that has been the house of the Duke of Genova from the 14th century. Genova, whose name comes from the Latin word 'Janua' (meaning 'door', as January is the door month of the year), has been regarded over the centuries as a door connecting Europe with the different countries and cultures of the Mediterranean basin and thus was an appropriate site for an international symposium involving different and new scientific visions and approaches to

  14. STS-111 Onboard Photo of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Backdropped against the blackness of space is the International Space Station (ISS), as viewed from the approching Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour, STS-111 mission, in June 2002. Expedition Five replaced Expedition Four crew after remaining a record-setting 196 days in space. Three spacewalks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish the delivery and installation of the Mobile Remote Servicer Base System (MBS), an important part of the Station's Mobile Servicing System that allows the robotic arm to travel the length of the Station, which is necessary for future construction tasks; the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the Station's robotic arm, and the task of unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the ISS, was launched on June 5, 2002 and landed June 19, 2002.

  15. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries Report of the Patient-Reported Outcome Measures Working Group of the International Society of Arthroplasty Registries Part II. Recommendations for selection, administration, and analysis.

    PubMed

    Rolfson, Ola; Bohm, Eric; Franklin, Patricia; Lyman, Stephen; Denissen, Geke; Dawson, Jill; Dunn, Jennifer; Eresian Chenok, Kate; Dunbar, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Garellick, Göran; Lübbeke, Anne

    2016-07-01

    - The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group have evaluated and recommended best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty registries. The 2 generic PROMs in common use are the Short Form health surveys (SF-36 or SF-12) and EuroQol 5-dimension (EQ-5D). The Working Group recommends that registries should choose specific PROMs that have been appropriately developed with good measurement properties for arthroplasty patients. The Working Group recommend the use of a 1-item pain question ("During the past 4 weeks, how would you describe the pain you usually have in your [right/left] [hip/knee]?"; response: none, very mild, mild, moderate, or severe) and a single-item satisfaction outcome ("How satisfied are you with your [right/left] [hip/knee] replacement?"; response: very unsatisfied, dissatisfied, neutral, satisfied, or very satisfied). Survey logistics include patient instructions, paper- and electronic-based data collection, reminders for follow-up, centralized as opposed to hospital-based follow-up, sample size, patient- or joint-specific evaluation, collection intervals, frequency of response, missing values, and factors in establishing a PROMs registry program. The Working Group recommends including age, sex, diagnosis at joint, general health status preoperatively, and joint pain and function score in case-mix adjustment models. Interpretation and statistical analysis should consider the absolute level of pain, function, and general health status as well as improvement, missing data, approaches to analysis and case-mix adjustment, minimal clinically important difference, and minimal detectable change. The Working Group recommends data collection immediately before and 1 year after surgery, a threshold of 60% for acceptable frequency of response, documentation of non-responders, and documentation of incomplete or missing data. PMID

  16. PREFACE: MCWASP XIV: International Conference on Modelling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, H.

    2015-06-01

    The current volume represents contributed papers of the proceedings of the 14th international conference on ''Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP XIV)'', Yumebutai International Conference Center, Awaji island, Hyogo, Japan on 21 - 26 June, 2016. The first conference of the series 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP)' was started up in 1980, and this is the 14th conference. The participants are more than 100 scientists from industry and academia, coming from 19 countries. In the conference, we have 5 invited, 70 oral and 31 poster presentations on different aspects of the modeling. The conference deals with various casting processes (Ingot / shape casting, continuous casting, direct chill casting and welding), fundamental phenomena (nucleation and growth, dendritic growth, eutectic growth, micro-, meso- and macrostructure formation and defect formation), coupling problems (electromagnetic interactions, application of ultrasonic wave), development of experimental / computational methods and so on. This volume presents the cutting-edge research in the modeling of casting, welding and solidification processes. I would like to thank MAGMA Giessereitechnologie GmbH, Germany and SCSK Corporation, Japan for supporting the publication of contributed papers. Hideyuki Yasuda Conference Chairman Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University Japan

  17. Tick-borne encephalitis-still on the map: Report of the 18th annual meeting of the international scientific working group on tick-borne encephalitis (ISW-TBE).

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2016-07-01

    The 18th meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE)-a group of neurologists, general practitioners, clinicians, travel physicians, virologists, pediatricians and epidemiologists-was held under the title 'Tick-borne encephalitis-still on the map'. The conference agenda was divided into six sessions: 'National Implementation of EU notifiable disease status', 'Virology', 'Epidemiology and Risk areas & Poster Walk Epidemiological Update', 'Clinic', 'Environmental Factors' and 'New Findings and Diagnosis'. Key topics such as 'TBE as a notifiable disease-results of the third European survey', 'TBE vaccines over the years', 'Overview of flaviviruses', 'TBE virus phylogenetics', 'Current epidemiological developments and investigations', 'Clinical aspects', 'TBE in veterinary medicine', 'Laboratory diagnostic', 'Occupational risk', 'Allergy, obesity, and vaccination' were presented and extensively discussed.

  18. Information Work in Distance Education: International Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harry, Keith; Ismail, Nazira

    This paper outlines the range and types of distance education on which information is potentially available. Different types of institutions involved in distance education are identified, and the major concerns of distance teaching institutions worldwide are briefly examined. Information users and their information needs are identified, and types…

  19. Establishing Internal Communication Channels That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Julie

    1999-01-01

    Uses a case study to examine the trends in current and preferred methods of communication within an institution of higher education, the Manukau Institute of Technology, New Zealand. Interviews and questionnaires identified ways in which leaders and staff received information, the communication methods they considered most effective, and…

  20. Assessment of International Work on Organizational Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Ian

    2002-06-01

    This report describes the concept of organizational factors and includes a consensus definition. It summarizes existing methods for assessing organizations from a safety culture perspective, for analyzing past incidents at plants to assess the role of safety culture, and for using such incident analysis to provide a database supporting organizational factors models. It describes existing methods that potentially could be extended to quantify organizational factors in a Probabilistic Safety Analysis. It concludes that no method is clearly superior for this purpose and recommends the organization of a workshop to clarify important issues prior to selecting a method.

  1. International Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valauskas, Edward J.; Crosby, John, IV; Haycock, Ken; Oh, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Includes the following international reports: International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions; Special Libraries Association; and Trends and Issues in Library and Information Services in Canada, 1998. (AEF)

  2. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  3. International Cooperation at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawney, Timothy; Feldstein, Karen

    International cooperation is a cornerstone principle of NASA’s activities, especially within the activities of the Science Mission Directorate. Nearly two thirds of the flight missions in which NASA leads or participates involve international cooperation. Numerous ground based activities also rely on international cooperation, whether because of unique expertise, unique geography, or the need for a global response. Going forward, in an era of tighter budgets and a more integrated global perspective, NASA and the rest of the space agencies around the world will be forced to work more closely together, in a broader array of activities than ever before, in order to be able to afford to push the boundaries of space exploration. The goal of this presentation is to provide an overview of NASA’s current international science cooperative activities. It will include a discussion of why NASA conducts international cooperation and look at the mechanisms through which international cooperation can occur at NASA, including peer-to-peer development of relationships. It will also discuss some of the limiting factors of international cooperation, such as export control, and ways in which to manage those constraints. Finally, the presentation would look at some of the present examples where NASA is working to increase international cooperation and improve coordination. Case studies will be used to demonstrate these mechanisms and concepts. For example, NASA continues to participate in international coordination groups such as the International Mars Exploration Working Group (IMEWG) and International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG), but is expanding into new areas as well. NASA is one of the leaders in expanding and improving international coordination in the area of Near-Earth Object detection, characterization, and mitigation. Having participated in the first meetings of such groups as the International Asteroid Warning Network (IAWN) and Space Missions Planning

  4. Proceedings of the consensus meetings from the International Retinoblastoma Staging Working Group on the pathology guidelines for the examination of enucleated eyes and evaluation of prognostic risk factors in retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Xavier; Chantada, Guillermo L; Doz, François; Wilson, Matthew W; de Davila, Maria T G; Rodríguez-Galindo, Carlos; Chintagumpala, Murali; Chévez-Barrios, Patricia

    2009-08-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular malignant childhood tumor in need of prospective clinical trials to address important unanswered questions about biology, treatment, and prognostic factors. Currently, there is controversy about the definitions for choroidal invasion and an inconsistency in the handling of eyes with retinoblastoma. The International Retinoblastoma Staging Working Group (IRSWG) composed of 58 participants from 24 countries on 4 continents had a series of Internet meetings to discuss the staging and tissue handling guidelines to reach consensus for adequate processing, establishing definitions of histopathologic risk factors, and reporting of enucleated eyes with retinoblastoma to serve as the basis for clinical trials and studies to validate the proposed criteria. The meetings were facilitated by the International Outreach Program of the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital through Cure4Kids. The retinoblastoma guidelines from the Children's Oncology Group, the French Society for Pediatric Cancers, the Association of Directors of Anatomic and Surgical Pathology, and some published data were the basis for this consensus document. Discussions of the feasibility, practicality, and efficacy of the guidelines and criteria resulted in this report. The consensus definitions reached included definition of massive choroidal invasion stated as a maximum diameter of invasive tumor focus of 3 mm or more that may reach the scleral tissue. Focal choroidal invasion is defined as a tumor focus of less than 3 mm and not reaching the sclera. Optic nerve invasion is classified as prelaminar, laminar, retrolaminar, or tumor at surgical margin, and the measurement of the depth of invasion should also be recorded. These guidelines also address handling of the enucleated eye with retinoblastoma in an efficient, practical, and feasible manner for a meaningful diagnosis. The consensus criteria reached by the IRSWG should be validated through prospective

  5. 15. international conference on plant growth substances: Program -- Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Since the 14th Conference in Amsterdam in 1991, progress in plant hormone research and developmental plant biology has been truly astonishing. The five ``classical`` plant hormones, auxin, gibberellin, cytokinin, ethylene, and abscisic acid, have been joined by a number of new signal molecules, e.g., systemin, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, whose biosynthesis and functions are being understood in ever greater detail. Molecular genetics has opened new vistas in an understanding of transduction pathways that regulate developmental processes in response to hormonal and environmental signals. The program of the 15th Conference includes accounts of this progress and brings together scientists whose work focuses on physiological, biochemical, and chemical aspects of plant growth regulation. This volume contains the abstracts of papers presented at this conference.

  6. PREFACE: International Scientific and Technical Conference ''Innovative Mechanical Engineering Technologies, Equipment and Materials-2014''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nail, K.

    2015-06-01

    In the period from 3 to 5 December 2014 the city of Kazan hosted the International Scientific Conference ''Innovative mechanical engineering technologies, equipment and materials - 2014'' (ISC ''vIMETEM - 2014''). The event was followed by the 14th International specialized exhibition ''Engineering. Metalworking. Kazan'' The main objective of the annual conference was for participants to discuss scientific and technical achievements in the design and manufacture of engineering products, the expansion of cooperation between scientific organizations and enterprises of machine-building complex and the definition of perspective ways of creation and development of new techniques, technologies and materials. The conference ''IMETEM'' was devoted to the 90th anniversary of Fayzrahman Salahovich Yunusov, who made a great contribution in the field of aviation technology. Kashapov Nail, D.Sc., professor (Kazan Federal University)

  7. International Heliophysical Year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, J. M.; Harrison, R.; Poland, A.; St.Cyr, O. C.; Thompson, B. J.; Rabin, Douglas (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In 1957 a program of international research, inspired by the International Polar Years of 1882-83 and 1932-33, was organized as the International Geophysical Year (IGY) to study global phenomena of the Earth and geospace. The IGY involved about 60,000 scientists from 66 nations, working at thousands of stations, from pole to pole to obtain simultaneous, global observations on Earth and in space. There had never been anything like it before. The fiftieth anniversary of the International Geophysical Year will occur in 2007. We propose to organize an international program of scientific collaboration for this time period called the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). Like it predecessors, the IHY will focus on fundamental global questions of Earth science.

  8. [Human resource capacity building on TB laboratory work for TB control program--through the experience of international TB laboratory training course for TB control at the Research Institute of Tuberculosis, JATA, Japan].

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Akiko; Kato, Seiya

    2008-06-01

    The international training course on TB laboratory work for national tuberculosis program (NTP) has been conducted at the Research Institute of Tuberculosis since 1975 funded by Japan International Cooperation Agency in collaboration with WHO Western Pacific Regional Office. The aim of the course is to train key personnel in TB laboratory field for NTP in resource-limited countries. The course has trained 265 national key personnel in TB laboratory service from 57 resource-limited countries in the last 33 years. The number of participants trained may sound too small in the fight against the large TB problem in resource-limited countries. However, every participant is playing an important role as a core and catalyst for the TB control program in his/her own country when they were back home. The curriculum is composed of technical aspects on TB examination, mainly sputum microscopy in addition since microscopy service is provided at many centers that are deployed in a widely spread area, the managerial aspect of maintaining quality TB laboratory work at the field laboratory is another component of the curriculum. Effective teaching methods using materials such as artificial sputum, which is useful for panel slide preparation, and technical manuals with illustrations and pictures of training procedure have been developed through the experience of the course. These manuals are highly appreciated and widely used by the front line TB workers. The course has also contributed to the expansion of EQA (External Quality Assessment) system on AFB microscopy for the improvement of the quality of TB laboratory service of NTP. The course is well-known for not only having a long history, but also for its unique learning method emphasizing "Participatory Training", particularly for practicum sessions to master the skills on AFB microscopy. The method in learning AFB microscopy, which was developed by the course, was published as a training manual by IUATLD, RIT and USAID. As it is

  9. Working towards accreditation by the International Standards Organization 15189 Standard: how to validate an in-house developed method an example of lead determination in whole blood by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Garcia Hejl, Carine; Ramirez, Jose Manuel; Vest, Philippe; Chianea, Denis; Renard, Christophe

    2014-09-01

    Laboratories working towards accreditation by the International Standards Organization (ISO) 15189 standard are required to demonstrate the validity of their analytical methods. The different guidelines set by various accreditation organizations make it difficult to provide objective evidence that an in-house method is fit for the intended purpose. Besides, the required performance characteristics tests and acceptance criteria are not always detailed. The laboratory must choose the most suitable validation protocol and set the acceptance criteria. Therefore, we propose a validation protocol to evaluate the performance of an in-house method. As an example, we validated the process for the detection and quantification of lead in whole blood by electrothermal absorption spectrometry. The fundamental parameters tested were, selectivity, calibration model, precision, accuracy (and uncertainty of measurement), contamination, stability of the sample, reference interval, and analytical interference. We have developed a protocol that has been applied successfully to quantify lead in whole blood by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). In particular, our method is selective, linear, accurate, and precise, making it suitable for use in routine diagnostics.

  10. One-year test-retest reliability of a Japanese web-based version of the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) for major depression in a working population.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Haruki; Inoue, Akiomi; Tsuno, Kanami; Kawakami, Norito

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the one-year test-retest reliability and the demographic correlates of a self-administered web-based depression section of the World Health Organization-Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WHO-CIDI) in a working population. Overall, 1060 out of all employees (N = 1279) from a manufacturing company in Japan responded to two web-based surveys of depression of the WHO-CIDI within a one-year interval in 2009 and 2010. The concordance between lifetime diagnoses of major depressive disorder on two occasions was calculated as percent agreement (%), Gwet's AC1 , and Yule's Q indicators were compared by gender, age, education, and marital status. For the total sample, percent agreement was 94%, AC1 was 0.93, and Yule's Q was 0.82. The concordance rate was low (0.15) among those who were diagnosed at either time or both times. The concordance differed significantly across education and marital status. While the agreement indicators were relatively high, consistent with previous reports based on face-to-face interviews conducted within a shorter interval, the low stability of positive cases may challenge the accuracy of lifetime diagnosis of major depressive disorder using a web version of the WHO-CIDI. Education and marital status might affect the test-retest reliability. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24677699

  11. Optimization of therapy for severe aplastic anemia based on clinical, biologic, and treatment response parameters: conclusions of an international working group on severe aplastic anemia convened by the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, March 2010.

    PubMed

    Pulsipher, Michael A; Young, Neal S; Tolar, Jakub; Risitano, Antonio M; Deeg, H Joachim; Anderlini, Paolo; Calado, Rodrigo; Kojima, Seiji; Eapen, Mary; Harris, Richard; Scheinberg, Phillip; Savage, Sharon; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Tiu, Ramon V; DiFronzo, Nancy; Horowitz, Mary M; Antin, Joseph H

    2011-03-01

    Although recent advances in therapy offer the promise for improving survival in patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA), the small size of the patient population, lack of a mechanism in North America for longitudinal follow-up of patients, and inadequate cooperation among hematologists, scientists, and transplant physicians remain obstacles to conducting large studies that would advance the field. To address this issue, the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network (BMT CTN) convened a group of international experts in March 2010 to define the most important questions in the basic science, immunosuppressive therapy (IST), and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) of SAA and propose initiatives to facilitate clinical and biologic research. Key conclusions of the working group were: (1) new patients should obtain accurate, expert diagnosis and early identification of biologic risk; (2) a population-based SAA outcomes registry should be established in North America to collect data on patients longitudinally from diagnosis through and after treatment; (3) a repository of biologic samples linked to the clinical data in the outcomes registry should be developed; (4) innovative approaches to unrelated donor BMT that decrease graft-versus-host disease are needed; and (5) alternative donor transplantation approaches for patients lacking HLA-matched unrelated donors must be improved. A partnership of BMT, IST, and basic science researchers will develop initiatives and partner with advocacy and funding organizations to address these challenges. Collaboration with similar study groups in Europe and Asia will be pursued. PMID:21034841

  12. Diagnosis and classification of myelodysplastic syndrome: International Working Group on Morphology of myelodysplastic syndrome (IWGM-MDS) consensus proposals for the definition and enumeration of myeloblasts and ring sideroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mufti, Ghulam J; Bennett, John M; Goasguen, Jean; Bain, Barbara J; Baumann, Irith; Brunning, Richard; Cazzola, Mario; Fenaux, Pierre; Germing, Ulrich; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Jinnai, Itsuro; Manabe, Atsushi; Matsuda, Akira; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Sanz, Guillermo; Tomonaga, Masao; Vallespi, Teresa; Yoshimi, Ayami

    2008-11-01

    The classification of myelodysplastic syndromes is based on the morphological criteria proposed by the French-American-British (FAB) and World Health Organization (WHO) groups. Accurate enumeration of blast cells, although essential for diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome and for assignment to prognostic groups, is often difficult, due to imprecise criteria for the morphological definition of blasts and promyelocytes. An International Working Group on Morphology of Myelodysplastic Syndrome (IWGM-MDS) of hematopathologists and hematologists expert in the field of myelodysplastic syndrome reviewed the morphological features of bone marrows from all subtypes of myelodysplastic syndrome and agreed on a set of recommendations, including recommendations for the definition and enumeration of blast cells and ring sideroblasts. It is recommended that (1) agranular or granular blast cells be defined (replacing the previous type I, II and III blasts), (2) dysplastic promyelocytes be distinguished from cytologically normal promyelocytes and from granular blast cells, (3) sufficient cells be counted to give a precise blast percentage, particularly at thresholds that are important for diagnosis or prognosis and (4) ring sideroblasts be defined as erythroblasts in which there are a minimum of 5 siderotic granules covering at least a third of the nuclear circumference. Clear definitions and a differential count of a sufficient number of cells is likely to improve precision in the diagnosis and classification of myelodysplastic syndrome. Recommendations should be applied in the context of the WHO classification. PMID:18838480

  13. All about work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallinckrodt, A. John; Leff, Harvey S.

    1992-04-01

    A comprehensive ``taxonomy of work'' is developed to clarify the confusing potpourri of worklike quantities that exists in the literature. Seven types of work that can be done on a system of particles interacting internally and/or with its environment are identified and reviewed. Each work is defined in terms of relevant forces and displacements; mathematical connections between the works are delineated; work-energy relationships are derived; and the Galilean transformation properties of the works and corresponding energy changes are obtained. The results are applied to several examples, illustrating subtle distinctions between the various works and showing how they can be used to bridge the conceptual gap between the ``pure'' mechanics of point particles and the thermodynamics of macroscopic matter.

  14. NASA International Environmental Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie; Valek, Susan

    2010-01-01

    For nearly five decades, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been preeminent in space exploration. NASA has landed Americans on the moon, robotic rovers on Mars, and led cooperative scientific endeavors among nations aboard the International Space Station. But as Earth's population increases, the environment is subject to increasing challenges and requires more efficient use of resources. International partnerships give NASA the opportunity to share its scientific and engineering expertise. They also enable NASA to stay aware of continually changing international environmental regulations and global markets for materials that NASA uses to accomplish its mission. Through international partnerships, NASA and this nation have taken the opportunity to look globally for solutions to challenges we face here on Earth. Working with other nations provides NASA with collaborative opportunities with the global science/engineering community to explore ways in which to protect our natural resources, conserve energy, reduce the use of hazardous materials in space and earthly applications, and reduce greenhouse gases that potentially affect all of Earth's inhabitants. NASA is working with an ever-expanding list of international partners including the European Union, the European Space Agency and, especially, the nation of Portugal. Our common goal is to foster a sustainable future in which partners continue to explore the universe while protecting our home planet's resources for future generations. This brochure highlights past, current, and future initiatives in several important areas of international collaboration that can bring environmental, economic, and other benefits to NASA and the wider international space community.

  15. Internal tide oceanic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhongxiang

    2016-09-01

    A concept of internal tide oceanic tomography (ITOT) is proposed to monitor ocean warming on a global scale. ITOT is similar to acoustic tomography, but that work waves are internal tides. ITOT detects ocean temperature changes by precisely measuring travel time changes of long-range propagating internal tides. The underlying principle is that upper ocean warming strengthens ocean stratification and thus increases the propagation speed of internal tides. This concept is inspired by recent advances in observing internal tides by satellite altimetry. In particular, a plane wave fit method can separately resolve multiple internal tidal waves and thus accurately determines the phase of each wave. Two examples are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and usefulness of ITOT. In the eastern tropical Pacific, the yearly time series of travel time changes of the M2 internal tide is closely correlated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation index. In the North Atlantic, significant interannual variations and bidecadal trends are observed and consistent with the changes in ocean heat content measured by Argo floats. ITOT offers a long-term, cost-effective, environmentally friendly technique for monitoring global ocean warming. Future work is needed to quantify the accuracy of this technique.

  16. International Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Kenn; Habermann, Ulla; Chowdhury, Omar Faruque; Guerra, Iraida Manzanilla

    1998-01-01

    Includes "Introduction to International Perspectives" (Allen); "Volunteerism in the Welfare State: The Case of Denmark" (Habermann); "Grassroots Organizing in Bangladesh" (Chowdhury); and "Volunteerism in Latin America" (Guerra). (SK)

  17. Working Mothers

    MedlinePlus

    ... for their child when child care arrangements have broken down, or to take their child to necessary appointments. When to Return to Work A woman’s decision to return to work must take into account her own needs as well as those of her family. If you are considering returning to work, try ...

  18. International Curriculums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Larry L.

    This workshop presentation on international curriculums in the field of parks, recreation, leisure, cultural services, and travel/tourism comments that the literature is replete with articles addressing what the field is about, but not about curriculum issues, models, and structure. It reports an international survey of 12 college educators…

  19. The 1998-1999 collaborative exercises and proficiency testing program on DNA typing of the Spanish and Portuguese Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (GEP-ISFG).

    PubMed

    Gómez, J; Carracedo, A

    2000-10-01

    A total of 28 laboratories (labs) submitted results for the 1998 collaborative exercise and the proficiency testing program of the Spanish and Portuguese Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (GEP-ISFG) group. This number increased to 46 labs in 1999. Six bloodstains were submitted, each one with 200 microl soaked in cotton except the sample no. 6 submitted for DNA quantification which had 2 microl. One of the samples was a mixed stain. A paternity testing case and a criminal case in the 1998 trial (GEP'98) and two paternity testing cases in 1999 (GEP'99) were included and the statistical evaluation of the evidence was requested in both cases. In the GEP'99 trial, a theoretical paternity testing case was included. A total of 52 DNA genetic markers were used by the participants in the GEP'98 trial, which increased to 101 in GEP'99. Despite this increasing number of participating labs, results remained quite satisfactory. All the labs used PCR-based DNA polymorphisms with an increasing number of markers, obtaining good results. SLPs were used by a decreasing number of labs but the results indicated a good level of expertise despite the different protocols used. Good results were also obtained for mtDNA despite the difficulties presented by the samples due to the presence of length heteroplasmy in some samples in both trials. The detection of heteroplasmy should, however, be improved. Similar conclusions were reached for both, the paternity and the criminal case by all the labs. Common methodologies for the statistical evaluation of the paternity case were used and the paternity index and the probability of paternity (with an a priori value of 0.5) reported by most of the labs. Also, a great uniformity was found in the evaluation of the criminal case despite the lack of a specific hypothesis in the design of the exercise. Some errors in statistical programs or in calculations were detected in a theoretical paternity case included in the GEP

  20. Prognostic Value of FDG-PET, Based on the Revised Response Criteria, in Patients with Malignant Lymphoma: A Comparison with CT/MRI Evaluations, Based on the International Working Group/Cotswolds Meeting Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Isohashi, Kayako; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Kato, Hiroki; Fukushima, Kentaro; Maeda, Tetsuo; Watabe, Tadashi; Shimosegawa, Eku; Kanakura, Yuzuru; Hatazawa, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Post-treatment evaluations by CT/MRI (based on the International Working Group/Cotswolds meeting guidelines) and PET (based on Revised Response Criteria), were examined in terms of progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with malignant lymphoma (ML). Methods: 79 patients, undergoing CT/MRI for the examination of suspected lesions and whole-body PET/CT before and after therapy, were included in the study during April 2007-January 2013. The relationship between post-treatment evaluations (CT/MRI and PET) and PFS during the follow-up period was examined, using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. The patients were grouped according to the histological type into Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and other histological types. The association between post-treatment evaluations (PET or PET combined with CT/MRI) and PFS was examined separately. Moreover, the relationship between disease recurrence and serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor, lactic dehydrogenase, and C-reactive protein levels was evaluated before and after the treatment. Results: Patients with incomplete remission on both CT/MRI and PET had a significantly shorter PFS, compared to patients with complete remission on both CT/MRI and PET and those exhibiting incomplete remission on CT/MRI and complete remission on PET (P<0.001). Post-treatment PET evaluations were strongly correlated with patient outcomes in cases with HL or DLBCL (P<0.01) and other histological types (P<0.001). In patients with HL or DLBCL, incomplete remission on both CT/MRI and PET was associated with a significantly shorter PFS, compared to patients with complete remission on both CT/MRI and PET (P<0.05) and those showing incomplete remission on CT/MRI and complete remission on PET (P<0.01). In patients with other histological types, incomplete remission on both CT/MRI and PET was associated with a significantly shorter PFS, compared to cases with complete remission on both CT/MRI and PET (P<0

  1. ILO's Work in Vocational Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Documentation and Information, 1971

    1971-01-01

    The work of the Vocational Training Branch of the Human Relations Department, International Labour Office (Unesco), is described. The essential purpose is to develop improved practices in vocational training, with a view to progressive establishment of standards at the international level. (JB)

  2. Globalisation of international health.

    PubMed

    Walt, G

    1998-02-01

    40 years ago, activities in international health were the domain of WHO, governments (based on bilateral agreements), and non-governmental organisations. This has changed. Today, new players (such as the World Bank and, increasingly, the World Trade Organisation) have an influence on international health. As globalisation of trade and markets takes hold, new coalitions and alliances are forming to examine and deal with the direct and indirect consequences on health. This paper examines the changing context of cooperation in international health, and voices concerns about rising potential inequalities in health, both within and between countries. The question of how such changes will affect the actions of organisations working in international health is also addressed.

  3. Simulation in International Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Social scientists have long worked to replicate real-world phenomena in their research and teaching environments. Unlike our biophysical science colleagues, we are faced with an area of study that is not governed by the laws of physics and other more predictable relationships. As a result, social scientists, and international studies scholars more…

  4. ETV International Brief

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. ETV Program has been active internationally for more than 10 years. Initially these efforts focused on sharing information about the U.S. program. Over the last four years, ETV has formalized working relationships with other countries with the objective of developing a...

  5. FFA International Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Future Farmers of America, Washington, DC.

    The document provides a list of 10 of the international agriculture activities available for the Future Farmers of America (FFA) chapters' participation: Work Experience Abroad (WEA); Development Projects; FFA Study Seminars; Care, Inc.; Walk for Development; Agriculutural Seminars; Heifer Project; CROP; World Neighbors; and Meals for Millions.…

  6. Internalism, Externalism and Coding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Philip

    2007-01-01

    I examine some of the issues connected with the internalist/externalist distinction in work on the ontology of language. I note that Chomskyan radical internalism necessarily leads to a passive conception of child language acquisition. I reject that passive conception, and support current versions of constructivism [Tomasello, M., 2001. "The…

  7. PREFACE: 3rd International Congress on Mechanical Metrology (CIMMEC2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-10-01

    From October 14th to 16th 2014, The Brazilian National Institute of Metrology, Quality, and Technology (Inmetro) and the Brazilian Society of Metrology (SBM) organized the 3rd International Congress on Mechanical Metrology (3rd CIMMEC). The 3rd CIMMEC was held in the city of Gramado, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Anticipating the interest and enthusiasm of the technical-scientific community, the Organizing Institutions invite people and organizations to participate in this important congress, reiterating the commitment to organize an event according to highest international standards. This event has been conceived to integrate people and organizations from Brazil and abroad in the discussion of advanced themes in metrology. Manufacturers and dealers of measuring equipment and standards, as well as of auxiliary accessories and bibliographic material, had the chance to promote their products and services in stands at the Fair, which has taken place alongside the Congress. The 3rd CIMMEC consisted of five Keynote Speeches and 116 regular papers. Among the regular papers, the 25 most outstanding ones, comprising a high quality content on Mechanical Metrology, were selected to be published in this issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. It is our great pleasure to present this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series to the scientific community to promote further research in Mechanical Metrology and related areas. We believe that this volume will be both an excellent source of scientific material in the fast evolving fields that were covered by CIMMEC 2014.

  8. International Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valauskas, Edward J.; Stowe, Jennifer L.; Haycock, Ken; Dodd, Frances

    1998-01-01

    Presents three reports: International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions; Special Libraries Association; and Canadian library trends, focusing on information technology and access to information and rights and examining provincial libraries and library education. (PEN)

  9. International Geology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Linn

    1977-01-01

    Briefly discusses recent international programs in various areas of geology, including land-use problems, coping with geological hazards, and conserving the environment while searching for energy and mineral resources. (MLH)

  10. Working Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckett, David

    The resurgence of "lifelong learning" has renewed consideration of the nature of "working knowledge." Lifelong learning has many aspects, including construction and distribution of individuals' very self-hood, educational institutions' role in capturing informal experiences, and the juggling required between family and work-based responsibilities.…

  11. Projects Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Textor, Martin R.

    2005-01-01

    The great educational value of projects is emphasized by contrasting negative aspects of the life of today's children with the goals of project work. This is illustrated by a project "Shopping." It is shown what children are learning in such projects and what the advantages of project work are. Relevant topic areas, criteria for selecting a…

  12. Towards a Policy Framework for Decent Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egger, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    International Labour Organization (ILO) standards for decent work promote social justice and humane working conditions. These standards can contribute to sustainable development, macroeconomic security, and fairer distribution of benefits from growth. The ILO is working for policy integration and promotion of international labor standards as a…

  13. [Wet work].

    PubMed

    Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta; Chomiczewska, Dorota; Krecisz, Beata

    2010-01-01

    Wet work is one of the most important risk factors of occupational skin diseases. Exposure of hands to the wet environment for more than 2 hours daily, wearing moisture-proof protective gloves for a corresponding period of time or necessity to wash hands frequently lead to the disruption of epidermal stratum corneum, damage to skin barrier function and induction of irritant contact dermatitis. It may also promote penetration of allergens into the skin and increase the risk of sensitization to occupational allergens. Exposure to wet work plays a significant role in occupations, such as hairdressers and barbers, nurses and other health care workers, cleaning staff, food handlers and metalworkers. It is more common among women because many occupations involving wet work are female-dominated. The incidence of wet-work-induced occupational skin diseases can be reduced by taking appropriate preventive measures. These include identification of high-risk groups, education of workers, organization of work enabling to minimize the exposure to wet work, use of personal protective equipment and skin care after work.

  14. Lifelong Learning and Training: A Bridge to the Future. International Congress on Technical and Vocational Education (2nd, Seoul, South Korea, April 26-30, 1999). Main Working Document.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This document expands on the six themes of the Second International Congress on Technical and Vocational Education, providing a background for the expected discussions in a series of 40 viewpoints for delegates to discuss. The document is synthesized from a series of essays under the themes written by experts drawn from technical and vocational…

  15. Does "Social Work Abstracts" Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Gary; Barker, Kathleen; Covert-Vail, Lucinda; Rosenberg, Gary; Cohen, Stephanie A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The current study seeks to provide estimates of the adequacy of journal coverage in the Social Work Abstracts (SWA) database. Method: A total of 23 journals listed in the Journal Citation Reports social work category during the 1997 to 2005 period were selected for study. Issue-level coverage estimates were obtained for SWA and…

  16. Does Work Experience Actually Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John

    2012-01-01

    As unemployment levels rise, so education and training move into the policy spotlight. For the government, this is a very uncomfortable place to be right now. A number of large companies have withdrawn from the flagship Work Programme--under which jobseekers are invited to take up unpaid work placements of between two and eight weeks--amid…

  17. Is New Work Good Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westwood, Andy

    Some new work is good work. Quality is ultimately defined by the individual. However, these perceptions are inevitably colored by the circumstances in which people find themselves, by the time, place, and wide range of motivations for having to do a particular job in the first place. One person's quality may be another's purgatory and vice versa.…

  18. Team Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, David

    1999-01-01

    Explains how a team cleaning approach can be cost-effective and efficient means of school maintenance. Assigning staffing responsibilities and work schedules are addressed and the advantages of using a team system are explained. (GR)

  19. Working Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... as the family's values, fathers may assume more responsibility for child care and housework than has traditionally ... and fatigue as they try to juggle their responsibilities at home and at work. If you are ...

  20. Capacity Building for IT in Education in Developing Countries. IFIP (International Federation for Information Processing) TC3 WG 3.1, 3.4 & 3.5 Working Conference (Harare, Zimbabwe, August 19-25, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Gail, Ed.; Ruohonen, Mikko, Ed.

    CapBIT 97, Capacity Building for Information Technologies in Education in Developing Countries, from which this publication derives, was an invited IFIP working conference sponsored by Working Groups in secondary (WG 3.1), elementary (WG 3.5), and vocational and professional (WG 3.4) education under the auspices of IFIP Technical Committee for…

  1. Goddard Summer Interns: Alejandro Arambula

    NASA Video Gallery

    Alejandro Arambula is an aerospace engineering student at M.I.T. and a 2011 summer intern in Goddard's Propulsion Lab. This summer he is working with his mentor Khary Parker in building a test asse...

  2. Safety Training in Reed International

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridley, J.

    1974-01-01

    The safety training provided within Reed International Limited and its relationship to production operations are outlined, demonstrating that safety works when management is committed to it on both humanitarian and economic grounds. (MW)

  3. Educating Engineers for International Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Russel C.

    1995-01-01

    The era for international practice for engineers has arrived, and each engineering education system must revise its programs to prepare graduates for practice in the global marketplace. This includes foreign-language instruction, education in cultural awareness, opportunities for international work experience, and greater emphasis on history,…

  4. [Core competencies in internal medicine].

    PubMed

    Porcel, J M; Casademont, J; Conthe, P; Pinilla, B; Pujol, R; García-Alegría, J

    2011-06-01

    The working group of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) on "Competencies of the Internist" has defined the basic medical knowledge, skills and attitudes that all internists in Spain should have. This list of competencies represents the Internal Medicine core curriculum within the context of the future educational framework of medical specialties in Health Sciences.

  5. Internal shim

    DOEpatents

    Barth, Clyde H.; Blizinski, Theodore W.

    2003-05-13

    An internal shim used to accurately measure spaces in conjunction with a standard small probe has a shim top and a chassis. The internal shim is adjustably fixed within the space to be measured using grippers that emerge from the chassis and which are controlled by an arm pivotably attached to the shim top. A standard small probe passes through the shim along guides on the chassis and measures the distance between the exterior of the chassis and the boundary. By summing the measurements on each side of the chassis and the width of the chassis, the dimension of the space can be determined to within 0.001 inches.

  6. Age-specific models for evaluating dose and risk from internal exposures to radionuclides: Report of current work of the Metabolism and Dosimetry Research Group, July 1, 1985-June 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, R.W.; Warren, B.P.

    1987-09-01

    A projection of the health risk to a population internally exposed to a radionuclide requires explicit or implicit use of demographic, biokinetic, dosimetric, and dose-response models. Exposure guidelines have been based on models for a reference adult with a fixed life span. In this report, we describe recent efforts to develop a comprehensive methodology for estimation of radiogenic risk to individuals and to heterogeneous populations. Emphasis is on age-dependent biokinetics and dosimetry for internal emitters, but consideration also is given to conversion of age-specific doses to estimates of risk using realistic, site-specific demographic models and best available age-specific dose-response functions. We discuss how the methods described here may also improve estimates for the reference adult usually considered in radiation protection. 159 refs.

  7. Ethical Issues in Family Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, David M.

    For more than half a decade, the author edited a quarterly ethics column focusing on family work, first in the "International Association of Marriage and Family Counselors Newsletter" and later in "The Family Journal: Counseling and Therapy for Couples and Families." These columns responded to ethical dilemmas in family work submitted by…

  8. International Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Nancy D.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Three reports discuss the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions; the Frankfurt Book Fair, focusing on electronics; and Canadian library trends, including resource sharing, technology projects, information policy, censorship, services for persons with disabilities, construction projects, and library education and…

  9. International Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Donald A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This issue begins with a conceptual introduction to economic specialization, exports and imports, and the importance of international trade. Four instructional units follow this introduction, beginning with a preschool and kindergarten unit called "Traders and Travelers," which involves young students in five activities that illustrate our…

  10. Working Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Students need space to gather, share ideas, talk, develop common understanding and work to create greater knowledge. This focus on collaboration has put a strain on group study spaces. Students need to collaborate spontaneously, and scheduling time in a study room is not conducive to spur-of-the-moment collaboration. At many education…

  11. Working Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Annemaree; Somerville, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to explore the contribution that an information literacy approach to the empirical study of workplace learning can make to how people understand and conceptualise workplace learning. Design/methodology/approach: Three cohorts of fire-fighters working in two regional locations in NSW, Australia were…

  12. Wetlands Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messina, Linda; Blanchard, Pamela Borne

    2004-01-01

    This article describes how a biology teacher's search for a cross-curricular project in science, math, history, and environmental science, that would help her students connect what they were learning in the classroom to their everyday life, resulted in an ongoing stewardship project. Working together with the Louisiana Sea Grant College Program…

  13. Biotechnology Works!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Libby G.; Spenciner, Loraine

    There have been few initiatives addressing the improvement of science education for students with disabilities. Funded by the National Science Foundation, Biotechnology Works is a summer institute in immunology and genetics for students with disabilities, high school science teachers, and high school counselors. During the 1998 summer session,…

  14. Work organization is significantly associated with upper extremities musculoskeletal disorders among employees engaged in interactive computer-telephone tasks of an international bank subsidiary in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira Júnior, M; Conceição, G M; Saldiva, P H

    1997-04-01

    This study was designed to verify the risk factors for developing upper extremities musculoskeletal disorders (UEMD) among workers engaged in customer service tasks performed by telephone at a private banking corporation in São Paulo, Brazil. The monthly incidence of UEMD in hands and/or wrists in this group was studied retrospectively from January 1993 to June 1995. The statistical analysis was done by using multiple linear regression with the monthly incidence of UEMD considered as dependent variable in models controlled for age, seniority, mean daily regular worktime and overtime per operator, time pressure at work, rest/work schedule, management status, personnel training on postural and muscle stretching, and ergonomic hazards. The variables associated with UEMD were the following: time pressure at work (coefficient = 0.049; p = 0.008) and rest/work schedule (coefficient = -0.047; p = 0.02). The results indicate that working conditions are significantly associated with UEMD, and changes in the working schedule may decrease the incidence of this problem in workers assigned to tasks related to the interactive use of computer-accessible databases during telephone contacts. PMID:9093663

  15. Teaching International Law: Concepts in International Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starbird, Caroline; Pettit, Jenny; Singleton, Laurel

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to introduce students to public international law. Topics covered include international public organizations, such as the United Nations and World Trade Organization, international courts, international human rights law, international trade law, and international environmental law. The goal of each study is to examine how…

  16. Healthcare international.

    PubMed

    Hensley, S; Jaklevic, M C; Rauber, C; Weissenstein, E; Moore, J D; Shinkman, R; Pallarito, K; Katzman, C N; Hallam, K; Morrissey, J

    1998-11-01

    How people are treated when they need medical care depends on where in the world they are. In deciding which tools of the medical trade are used to treat disease and when they're used, location is paramount. A country's social policy, healthcare payment systems and cultural factors bear heavily on the utilization of medical technology. The cover story kicks off the magazine's third international healthcare section. PMID:10186352

  17. Rotary International.

    PubMed

    Young, Janis

    2008-01-01

    Rotary International is the oldest United States service organization and one of the largest volunteer groups in the world. There are hundreds of educational, health, and humanitarian activities, almost all of which are conducted locally in order to ensure that Rotary clubs meet the needs of the communities they serve. Club membership requires regular active participation and offers Rotarians multiple opportunities for involvement. PMID:18551844

  18. [Internal migration].

    PubMed

    Borisovna, L

    1991-06-01

    Very few studies have been conducted that truly permit explanation of internal migration and it repercussions on social and economic structure. It is clear however that a profound knowledge of the determinants and consequences of internal migration will be required as a basis for economic policy decisions that advance the goal of improving the level of living of the population. the basic supposition of most studies of the relationship of population and development is that socioeconomic development conditions demographic dynamics. The process of development in Mexico, which can be characterized by great heterogeneity, consequently produces great regional disparities. At the national level various studies have estimated the volume of internal migration in Mexico, but they have usually been limited to interstate migration because the main source of data, the census, is classified by states. But given the great heterogeneity within states in all the elements related to internal migration, it is clear that studies of internal migration within states are also needed. Such studies are almost nonexistent because of their technical difficulty. National level studies show that interstate migration increased significantly between 1940-80. The proportion of Mexicans living outside their states of birth increased by 558% in those years, compared to the 342% increase in the total Mexican population. Although Puebla has a high rate of increase, migration has kept it below Mexico's national growth rate. Migration between Puebla and other states and within Puebla has led to an increasing unevenness of spatial distribution. Between 1970-80, 57 of Puebla's municipios had growth rates above the state average of 2.8%/year, 6 had growth rates equal to the average, and 129 had growth rates that were below the average but not negative. 25 states with negative growth rates that were considered strongly expulsive. In 1980, 51.7% of the population was concentrated in the 57 municipios

  19. International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System Overview of Events: 2010-2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Gregory J.; Cover, John

    2015-01-01

    Nov 2, 2014 marked the completion of the 14th year of continuous human presence in space on board the International Space Station (ISS). After 42 expedition crews, over 115 assembly & utilization flights, over 180 combined Shuttle/Station, US & Russian Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), the post-Assembly-Complete ISS continues to fly and the engineering teams continue to learn from operating its systems, particularly the life support equipment. Problems with initial launch, assembly and activation of ISS elements have given way to more long term system operating trends. New issues have emerged, some with gestation periods measured in years. Major events and challenges for each U.S. Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) subsystem occurring during calendar years 2010 through 2014 are summarily discussed in this paper, along with look-aheads for what might be coming in the future for each U.S. ECLS subsystem.

  20. Assessment of Proficiency in Japanese as a Foreign Language. Conference Proceedings of an International Working Group Sponsored by the Asian Studies Council (Canberra, Australia, June 12-14, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wylie, Elaine, Ed.

    The proceedings of a working group conference on proficiency testing of Japanese as a second language contain a brief background paper distributed to conference invitees, a list of items included in the pre-conference portfolio, an advance organizer of potential discussion topics, a 77-item annotated list of bibliographies on second language…

  1. Adventures in International Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bersch, Gretchen T.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her grandmother and parents inspired in her a lifelong interest in international work throughout many parts of the world. As a consequence, the author built a figurative bridge from Alaska over the Bering Strait to Magadan, Russia (in far Eastern Siberia). She poignantly describes the work she has done…

  2. Croatian Meteor Network: Ongoing work 2015 - 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šegon, D.; Vida, D.; Korlević, K.; Andreić, Ž.

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing work of the Croatian Meteor Network (CMN) between the 2015 and 2016 International Meteor Conferences is presented. The current sky coverage is considered, software updates and updates of orbit catalogues are described. Furthermore, the work done on meteor shower searches, international collaborations as well as new fields of research are discussed. Finally, the educational efforts made by the CMN are described.

  3. The "working" of working memory.

    PubMed

    Miller, Earl K

    2013-12-01

    This review examines the evidence for a neurobiological explanation of executive functions of working memory. We suggest that executive control stems from information about task rules acquired by mixed selective, adaptive coding, multifunctional neurons in the prefrontal cortex. The output of these neurons dynamically links the cortex-wide networks needed to complete the task. The linking may occur via synchronizing of neural rhythms, which may explain why we have a limited capacity for simultaneous thought.

  4. Decent Work and Its Implications for Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Athanasou, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The principle of decent work was first espoused in the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Since 1999 the International Labour Organisation has operated according to a Decent Work Agenda and in recent times the movement towards the provision of decent work as a means of improving the quality of life has gathered momentum. Decent work is…

  5. Changing work systems.

    PubMed

    Clegg, C; Axtell, C; Older, M; Waterson, P

    1997-12-01

    This paper is concerned with finding practical ways of incorporating human and organizational concerns during the development and use of new information technologies (IT). It is structured in four parts. First, we outline the work of the Institute of Work Psychology at the University of Sheffield. One major interest is with the human and organizational aspects of the new information technologies. We are especially interested in work organization and job design, the allocation of tasks between and among humans and computers, the roles of users, the roles of senior managers, the management of change, and the performance of new investments in information technology (IT). Second, we review the evidence from survey work and from detailed case studies concerning the performance of IT. This reveals that most IT investments do not meet their performance objectives, and that the reasons for this are rarely purely technical in origin. Change is too often technology-led, and too little attention is paid to human and organizational factors. Most companies fail to consider how work should be organized and how jobs should be designed to make the new technologies more effective. Usually, users have no substantial influence on system development. Senior managers are criticized for their lack of understanding and action in these areas. Third, we consider the potential in the United Kingdom for changing work systems incorporating new technology. One way forward is through the development and use of sets of theoretically derived tools that can be used by managers and others. To this end we are working with several collaborators on a portfolio of tools in the following areas: organizational design job design allocation of tasks between and among humans and computers. We then review our approach and offer views of the areas and ways in which this work could develop, including opportunities for international collaboration.

  6. Operating internationally

    SciTech Connect

    Seeley, R.S.

    1994-02-01

    When Enron Power Corp. took over a 28 MW power facility at the former US Naval base in Subic Bay, the Philippines, the company was required to employ 139 people to run the plant. This large labor force was necessary not because of the plant's operational needs, but because of local labor practices and unemployment pressures. Independent power companies have become all too familiar with the high cost and complexity of developing projects in emerging international markets. Some of the most significant issues involve taxation, unfamiliar legal systems, changing regulations, and foreign investment restrictions. In addition, questions about currency exchange, national credit worthiness, and political stability add to the difficulty of international development. However, one of the most daunting challenges centers not on development, but on long-term operations and maintenance (O M). A key concern is finding qualified labor. Most developers and O M companies agree that local people should run the plant, with the top person, or persons, thoroughly trained in the developer's company philosophy.

  7. ILO - International Migration Programme.

    PubMed

    Boudraa, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    In a wide International Context characterised not only by the economical development but also by the social, cultural, political and individual development, we witness more and more to a exchange between the developed and the developing countries, which can be translated especially in the migration of the work force. In theory, all countries are either countries of origin either countries of transit or destination, and they are all responsible for the rights of migrant workers by promoting the rights, by monitoring and by preventing the abusive conditions. The process of migration of the workforce can be divided into three stages: the first coincides with the period prior to departure, the second is represented by the aftermath of the departure and the period of stay in the country of destination, the third stage corresponds to the return in the country of origin. The workers must be protected throughout this process by the international organizations that perform the catalytic role of communication and exchange between countries, for the only purpose of protecting the rights of immigrant and/or immigrants workers. The responsibility for the protection of workers is divided among the various players in the International Labour Organisation. Every country has to apply measures according to the international standards regarding workers' rights, standards that guide the various countries in the formulation and implementation of their policies and legislation. These standards are suggested by International Conventions, the ILO Conventions and other international instruments such as the human rights instrument. There has been a big step forward once the ILO Fundamental Conventions and Conventions on Migrant Workers where implemented and this implementation represented the use of the Guidelines "ILO Multilateral Framework on Labour Migration".

  8. ILO - International Migration Programme.

    PubMed

    Boudraa, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    In a wide International Context characterised not only by the economical development but also by the social, cultural, political and individual development, we witness more and more to a exchange between the developed and the developing countries, which can be translated especially in the migration of the work force. In theory, all countries are either countries of origin either countries of transit or destination, and they are all responsible for the rights of migrant workers by promoting the rights, by monitoring and by preventing the abusive conditions. The process of migration of the workforce can be divided into three stages: the first coincides with the period prior to departure, the second is represented by the aftermath of the departure and the period of stay in the country of destination, the third stage corresponds to the return in the country of origin. The workers must be protected throughout this process by the international organizations that perform the catalytic role of communication and exchange between countries, for the only purpose of protecting the rights of immigrant and/or immigrants workers. The responsibility for the protection of workers is divided among the various players in the International Labour Organisation. Every country has to apply measures according to the international standards regarding workers' rights, standards that guide the various countries in the formulation and implementation of their policies and legislation. These standards are suggested by International Conventions, the ILO Conventions and other international instruments such as the human rights instrument. There has been a big step forward once the ILO Fundamental Conventions and Conventions on Migrant Workers where implemented and this implementation represented the use of the Guidelines "ILO Multilateral Framework on Labour Migration". PMID:22073693

  9. Myeloma in patients younger than age 50 years presents with more favorable features and shows better survival: an analysis of 10 549 patients from the International Myeloma Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Durie, Brian G. M.; Bolejack, Vanessa; Turesson, Ingemar; Kyle, Robert A.; Blade, Joan; Fonseca, Rafael; Dimopoulos, Meletios; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; San Miguel, Jesus; Westin, Jan; Harousseau, Jean-Luc; Beksac, Meral; Boccadoro, Mario; Palumbo, Antonio; Barlogie, Bart; Shustik, Chaim; Cavo, Michele; Greipp, Philip R.; Joshua, Douglas; Attal, Michel; Sonneveld, Pieter; Crowley, John

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed the presenting features and survival in 1689 patients with multiple myeloma aged younger than 50 years compared with 8860 patients 50 years of age and older. Of the total 10 549 patients, 7765 received conventional therapy and 2784 received high-dose therapy. Young patients were more frequently male, had more favorable features such as low International Staging System (ISS) and Durie-Salmon stage as well as less frequently adverse prognostic factors including high C-reactive protein (CRP), low hemoglobin, increased serum creatinine, and poor performance status. Survival was significantly longer in young patients (median, 5.2 years vs 3.7 years; P < .001) both after conventional (median, 4.5 years vs 3.3 years; P < .001) or high-dose therapy (median, 7.5 years vs 5.7 years; P = .04). The 10-year survival rate was 19% after conventional therapy and 43% after high-dose therapy in young patients, and 8% and 29%, respectively, in older patients. Multivariate analysis revealed age as an independent risk factor during conventional therapy, but not after autologous transplantation. A total of 5 of the 10 independent risk factors identified for conventional therapy were also relevant for autologous transplantation. After adjusting for normal mortality, lower ISS stage and other favorable prognostic features seem to account for the significantly longer survival of young patients with multiple myeloma with age remaining a risk factor during conventional therapy. PMID:18268097

  10. A prognostic model to predict survival in 867 World Health Organization-defined essential thrombocythemia at diagnosis: a study by the International Working Group on Myelofibrosis Research and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Passamonti, Francesco; Thiele, Jürgen; Girodon, Francois; Rumi, Elisa; Carobbio, Alessandra; Gisslinger, Heinz; Kvasnicka, Hans Michael; Ruggeri, Marco; Randi, Maria Luigia; Gangat, Naseema; Vannucchi, Alessandro Maria; Gianatti, Andrea; Gisslinger, Bettina; Müllauer, Leonhard; Rodeghiero, Francesco; d'Amore, Emanuele S G; Bertozzi, Irene; Hanson, Curtis A; Boveri, Emanuela; Marino, Filippo; Maffioli, Margherita; Caramazza, Domenica; Antonioli, Elisabetta; Carrai, Valentina; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Pascutto, Cristiana; Cazzola, Mario; Barbui, Tiziano; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2012-08-01

    Diagnosis of essential thrombocythemia (ET) has been updated in the last World Health Organization (WHO) classification. We developed a prognostic model to predict survival at diagnosis, named IPSET (International Prognostic Score for ET), studying patients with WHO-defined ET. Age 60 years or older, leukocyte count ≥ 11 × 10(9)/L, and prior thrombosis significantly affected survival, by multivariable Cox regression. On the basis of the hazard ratio, we assigned 2 points to age and 1 each to leukocyte count and thrombosis. So, the IPSET model allocated 867 patients into 3 risk categories with significantly different survival: low (sum of points = 0; median survival not reached), intermediate (sum = 1-2; median survival 24.5 years), and high (sum = 3-4, median survival 13.8 years). The IPSET model was further validated in 2 independent cohorts including 132 WHO-defined ET and 234 Polycythemia Vera Study Group-defined ET patients. The IPSET model was able to predict the occurrence of thrombosis, and not to predict post-ET myelofibrosis. In conclusion, IPSET, based on age ≥ 60 years, leukocyte count ≥ 11 × 10(9)/L, and history of thrombosis allows prognostic assessment of WHO-defined ET and the validation process makes IPSET applicable in all patients phenotypically appearing as ET.

  11. Decent Work: A Psychological Perspective.

    PubMed

    Blustein, David L; Olle, Chad; Connors-Kellgren, Alice; Diamonti, A J

    2016-01-01

    This contribution, which serves as the lead article for the Research Topic entitled "From Meaning of Working to Meaningful Lives: The Challenges of Expanding Decent Work," explores current challenges in the development and operationalization of decent work. Based on an initiative from the International Labor Organization [ILO] (1999) decent work represents an aspirational statement about the quality of work that should be available to all people who seek to work around the globe. Within recent years, several critiques have been raised about decent work from various disciplines, highlighting concerns about a retreat from the social justice ethos that had initially defined the concept. In addition, other scholars have observed that decent work has not included a focus on the role of meaning and purpose at work. To address these concerns, we propose that a psychological perspective can help to revitalize the decent work agenda by infusing a more specific focus on individual experiences and by reconnecting decent work to its social justice origins. As an illustration of the advantages of a psychological perspective, we explore the rise of precarious work and also connect the decent work agenda to the Psychology-of-Working Framework and Theory (Blustein, 2006; Duffy et al., 2016). PMID:27047430

  12. Decent Work: A Psychological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Blustein, David L.; Olle, Chad; Connors-Kellgren, Alice; Diamonti, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    This contribution, which serves as the lead article for the Research Topic entitled “From Meaning of Working to Meaningful Lives: The Challenges of Expanding Decent Work,” explores current challenges in the development and operationalization of decent work. Based on an initiative from the International Labor Organization [ILO] (1999) decent work represents an aspirational statement about the quality of work that should be available to all people who seek to work around the globe. Within recent years, several critiques have been raised about decent work from various disciplines, highlighting concerns about a retreat from the social justice ethos that had initially defined the concept. In addition, other scholars have observed that decent work has not included a focus on the role of meaning and purpose at work. To address these concerns, we propose that a psychological perspective can help to revitalize the decent work agenda by infusing a more specific focus on individual experiences and by reconnecting decent work to its social justice origins. As an illustration of the advantages of a psychological perspective, we explore the rise of precarious work and also connect the decent work agenda to the Psychology-of-Working Framework and Theory (Blustein, 2006; Duffy et al., 2016). PMID:27047430

  13. Column internals

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    In the fields of distillation, absorption, stripping and extraction, theory and technology go hand in hand. The thermodynamic principles of phase equilibrium and the concepts of mass transfer and fluid flow are of primary importance in all of these operations. The engineer must understand these phenomena to select equipment effectively. This article discusses the latest in commercial technology in column internals for gas-liquid and liquid-liquid contacting. The principles of operation are explained vis-a-vis the characteristics of the applications in which they are used. The focus is on moderate-to-large columns for refining and chemical applications. Guidelines for selecting the most appropriate type of device are presented, and examples of typical applications are described.

  14. Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation Intern

    ScienceCinema

    Gertman, Vanessa

    2016-07-12

    Some interns just copy papers and seal envelopes. Not at INL! Check out how Vanessa Gertman, an INL intern working at the Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation, spent her summer working with some intense visualization software. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  15. Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation Intern

    SciTech Connect

    Gertman, Vanessa

    2010-01-01

    Some interns just copy papers and seal envelopes. Not at INL! Check out how Vanessa Gertman, an INL intern working at the Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation, spent her summer working with some intense visualization software. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  16. International Perspectives on Plagiarism and Considerations for Teaching International Trainees

    PubMed Central

    Heitman, Elizabeth; Litewka, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    In the increasingly global community of biomedical science and graduate science education, many US academic researchers work with international trainees whose views on scientific writing and plagiarism can be strikingly different from US norms. Although a growing number of countries and international professional organizations identify plagiarism as research misconduct, many international trainees come from research environments where plagiarism is ill-defined and even commonly practiced. Two research-ethics educators consider current perspectives on plagiarism around the world and contend that US research-training programs should focus on trainees’ scientific writing skills and acculturation, not simply on preventing plagiarism. PMID:21194646

  17. International perspectives on plagiarism and considerations for teaching international trainees.

    PubMed

    Heitman, Elizabeth; Litewka, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    In the increasingly global community of biomedical science and graduate science education, many US academic researchers work with international trainees whose views on scientific writing and plagiarism can be strikingly different from US norms. Although a growing number of countries and international professional organizations identify plagiarism as research misconduct, many international trainees come from research environments where plagiarism is ill-defined and even commonly practiced. Two research-ethics educators consider current perspectives on plagiarism around the world and contend that US research-training programs should focus on trainees' scientific writing skills and acculturation, not simply on preventing plagiarism.

  18. II. Vinzenz Czerny (1842-1915): grand seigneur of oncologic surgery--life, influence, and work of the Second Congress President of the ISS/SIC. International Society of Surgery/Société Internationale de Chirurgie.

    PubMed

    Liebermann-Meffert, D; Stein, H J; White, H

    2000-12-01

    Vinzenz Czerny, chairman and professor of surgery in Freiburg im Breisgau and in Heidelberg, Germany, is the typical example of a prominent surgeon with an elegant technique, who was also a keen observer and scientist at the turn of the nineteenth into the early twentieth century. Starting his career in Vienna, Austria, he can be looked upon as the most important disciple of Theodor Billroth. Whereas Billroth may be regarded as the father of modern gastrointestinal surgery, Czerny can be considered the father of modern surgery for intestinal malignancies and multimodal treatment. The early history of visceral cancer therapy is linked with his career. He became a surgeon of the highest rank, with great clinical skill, rare judgment, and vision who contributed essentially to the development of modern surgery. From his early education he maintained a lifelong affection for the natural sciences and was an excellent physiologist and pathologist. During his professional life he successfully built up a well deserved reputation for general and cancer surgery and for the introduction of radio- and chemotherapy into the treatment of tumors. Czerny founded and chaired the first experimental Institute for Cancer Research in Germany. Two years later, in 1908, he presided at the 2nd Congress of the International Society of Surgery/Société Internationale de Chirurgie (ISS/SIC) in Brussels, a congress that was almost entirely devoted to the etiology of visceral cancer and the progress and achievements of its treatment. Czerny left a clear legacy of opinion and methods on which the modern era of surgical cancer treatment is based.

  19. International occupational health.

    PubMed

    LaDou, Joseph

    2003-08-01

    Working conditions for the majority of the world's workers do not meet the minimum standards and guidelines set by international agencies. Occupational health and safety laws cover only about 10 percent of the population in developing countries, omitting many major hazardous industries and occupations. With rare exception, most countries defer to the United Nations the responsibility for international occupational health. The UN's international agencies have had limited success in bringing occupational health to the industrializing countries. The International Labor Organization (ILO) conventions are intended to guide all countries in the promotion of workplace safety and in managing occupational health and safety programs. ILO conventions and recommendations on occupational safety and health are international agreements that have legal force only if they are ratified by ILO member states. The most important ILO Convention on Occupational Safety and Health has been ratified by only 37 of the 175 ILO member states. Only 23 countries have ratified the ILO Employment Injury Benefits Convention that lists occupational diseases for which compensation should be paid. The World Health Organization (WHO) is responsible for the technical aspects of occupational health and safety, the promotion of medical services and hygienic standards. Limited WHO and ILO funding severely impedes the development of international occupational health. The U.S. reliance on international agencies to promote health and safety in the industrializing countries is not nearly adequate. This is particularly true if occupational health continues to be regarded primarily as an academic exercise by the developed countries, and a budgetary triviality by the international agencies. Occupational health is not a goal achievable in isolation. It should be part of a major institutional development that touches and reforms every level of government in an industrializing country. Occupational health and safety

  20. Study Abroad Ghana: An International Experiential Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boateng, Alice; Thompson, Abigail Mercy

    2013-01-01

    The global nature of social problems indicates how important it is for social workers to be involved in international issues. For example, overseas experience in social work programs is in consonance with the Council on Social Work Education's emphasis on global context of social work practice. In view of this, some schools of social work are…