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Sample records for 14th national passive

  1. National Conference on Campus Safety (14th, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, June 26-28, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jack N. Ed.

    Presentations made at the fourteenth National Conference on Campus Safety. The topics dealt with include--(1) Provisions for Safety in Design of Campus Buildings, (2) Disposal of Chemical And Radioactive Waste, (3) Fire Prevention, (4) The Human Factor in Accidents, (5) Public Liability through Design, (6) A Professor's Views on Safety, (7)…

  2. NEWTON'S APPLE 14th Season Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichmann, Sue, Ed.

    This guide was developed to help teachers use the 14th season of NEWTON'S APPLE in their classrooms and contains lessons formatted to follow the National Science Education Standards. The "Overview,""Main Activity," and "Try-This" sections were created with inquiry-based learning in mind. Each lesson page begins with…

  3. Environmental Education, The Last Measure of Man. An Anthology of Papers for the Consideration of the 14th and 15th Conference of the U.S. National Commission for UNESCO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Raymond F.

    An anthology of papers for consideration by delegates to the 14th and 15th conferences of the United States National Commission for UNESCO are presented in this book. As a wide-ranging collection of ideas, it is intended to serve as background materials for the conference theme - our responsibility for preserving and defending a human environment…

  4. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (14th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 283 to 308

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the president, congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  5. The Philosophical and Sociological Bases of Reading; Yearbook of the Annual Meeting of the National Reading Conference (14th, Dallas, Texas, December 3-5, 1964).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurston, Eric L., Ed.; Hafner, Lawrence E., Ed.

    Focusing on the philosophical and sociological bases of reading, the papers in this volume were drawn from the fourteenth annual meeting of the National Reading Conference held in 1964. Among the topics covered in the 27 papers are the following: the philosophy and sociology of reading; reading reform; adult literacy; paperback books; factors in…

  6. Eighth national passive solar conference. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, A.; Zee, R.

    1983-12-01

    The Eighth National Passive Solar Conference was held near Santa Fe, New Mexico at the Glorieta Conference Center on September 5 to 11, 1983. Nearly 900 people from all across the nation and the world attended the conference. Close to 200 technical papers were presented, 50 solar product exhibits were available; 34 poster sessions were presented; 16 solar workshops were conducted; 10 renowned solar individuals participated in rendezvous sessions; 7 major addresses were delivered; 5 solar home tours were conducted; 2 emerging architecture sessions were held which included 21 separate presentations; and commercial product presentations were given for the first time ever at a national passive solar conference. Peter van Dresser of Santa Fe received the prestigious Passive Solar Pioneer Award, posthumously, from the American Solar Energy Society and Benjamin T. Buck Rogers of Embudo received the prestigious Peter van Dresser Award from the New Mexico Solar Energy Association. This report reviews conference organization, attendance, finances, conference evaluation form results, and includes press coverage samples, selected conference photos courtesy of Marshall Tyler, and a summary with recommendations for future conferences. The Appendices included conference press releases and a report by the New Mexico Solar Industry Development Corporation on exhibits management.

  7. Passive recirculation in the National Launch System's fuel feedlines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. R.; Holt, K. A.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains the passive recirculation tests on the fuel feedline of the National Launch System (NLS). The majority of testing was performed in February 1992, at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, CO. The primary objective was to characterize passive recirculation in the NLS fuel feedline. The objective was met by observing the passive recirculation in a one-fifth scale model of the feedline with clear glass sections. The testing was recorded on video tape and with photographs. A description of the testing apparatus and support equipment is included. The experiment indicates that passive recirculation was occurring; higher angles from the horizontal transfer more heat.

  8. Passive solar progress: a simplified guide to the 3rd national passive solar conference

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.; Howell, Y.; Richards, D.

    1980-10-01

    Some of the concepts and practices that have come to be known as passive solar heating and cooling are introduced, and a current picture of the field is presented. Much of the material presented is derived from papers given at the 3rd National Passive Solar Conference held in San Jose, California in January 1979 and sponsored by the US Department of Energy. Extracts and data from these papers have been integrated in the text with explanatory and descriptive material. In this way, it is attempted to present technical information in an introductory context. Topics include design considerations, passive and hybrid systems and applications, sizing methods and performance prediction, and implementation issues. A glossary is included. (WHK)

  9. The Unionized Professoriate: A Discriminating Appraisal. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions (14th, New York, New York, April 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Joel M., Ed.

    Collective bargaining in higher education and a few other fields is examined in 21 papers from a 1986 conference of the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions. After an introduction by Joel M. Douglas, the academic collective bargaining system is reexamined in four papers. Additional papers…

  10. PREFACE: 14th Gravitational Waves Data Analysis Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Fulvio

    2010-04-01

    The 14th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW-14) is the last of a long series of annual meetings dedicated to the GW data analysis. This time the workshop was held at the Department of Physics of the University of Rome "Sapienza" and its scientic focus was on strengthening the connection among the gravitational wave and other astrophysical communities. Thus, a significant fraction of the workshop was dedicated to explore the potentialities of the multimessanger astronomy and in particular on the emerging neutrino observatories in conjunction with the GW observations. Moreover, several contributions were devoted to technical details of the analysis of real data from interferometric detectors, aimed at the improvement of the data quality for increasing the confidence in the detection of the first GW event. On the base of these techniques new GW upper limits on the strength of continuous signals from neutron stars and on stochastic background as the event rates of burst and inspiral signals have been set. As chairman of this workshop, I would like to thank the members of the organizing and scientic committees and all the participants which have been the crucial actors of the workshop success. Some of the talks presented during the conference appear in the special issue of Classical and Quantum Gravity, while remaining talks from the symposium are published in this companion volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The ensemble of all these contributions represents the most up-to-date papers on the topics covered by the meeting and, it provides valuable details about current work. Finally , I would also like to thank the institutions and the sponsor that made this meeting possible: University of Rome La Sapienza Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics - INFN Italian National Institute of Astrophyiscs - INAF University of Rome Tor Vergata University of Sannio E4-Computing Engineering s.p.a. Fulvio Ricci University of La Sapienza and INFN

  11. The passive autocatalytic recombiner test program at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, T.K.; Malliakos, A.

    1997-10-01

    Passive autocatalytic recombiners (PARs) are being considered by the nuclear power industry as a combustible gas control system in operating plants and advanced light water reactor (ALWR) containments for design basis events. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed systems and methodologies to measure the amount of hydrogen that can be depleted in a containment by a PAR. Experiments were performed that determined the hydrogen depletion rate of a PAR in the presence of steam and also evaluated the effect of scale (number of cartridges) on the PAR performance at both low and high hydrogen concentrations.

  12. Restoring the Trust in Native Education. Annual NIEA Legislative Summit (14th, February 7-9, 2011). Briefing Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Education Association, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Several briefing papers were presented during the 14th Annual National Indian Education Association (NIEA) Legislative Summit. This briefing book contains the following papers presented during the summit: (1) Restoring the Trust in Native Education; (2) NIEA Legislative Priorities for 2011: "Talking Points"; (3) Reauthorization of the…

  13. Viruses in a 14th-century coprolite.

    PubMed

    Appelt, Sandra; Fancello, Laura; Le Bailly, Matthieu; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel; Desnues, Christelle

    2014-05-01

    Coprolites are fossilized fecal material that can reveal information about ancient intestinal and environmental microbiota. Viral metagenomics has allowed systematic characterization of viral diversity in environmental and human-associated specimens, but little is known about the viral diversity in fossil remains. Here, we analyzed the viral community of a 14th-century coprolite from a closed barrel in a Middle Ages site in Belgium using electron microscopy and metagenomics. Viruses that infect eukaryotes, bacteria, and archaea were detected, and we confirmed the presence of some of them by ad hoc suicide PCR. The coprolite DNA viral metagenome was dominated by sequences showing homologies to phages commonly found in modern stools and soil. Although their phylogenetic compositions differed, the metabolic functions of the viral communities have remained conserved across centuries. Antibiotic resistance was one of the reconstructed metabolic functions detected.

  14. The Moon in the 14th Century Frescoes in Padova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellinati, Claudio

    Padova, already in the 14th century a great cultural center of international reputation, struggled with the problems posed by the Moon with Pietro d'Abano, physician and astronomer. But it was with the great painters of that time, namely Giotto and Giusto de'Menabuoi, that its most intimate connections with the contemporary popular culture and theology were illustrated. Giotto depicts the Moon in the Giudizio Universale of the Scrovegni Chapel (1305). The Moon appears on the upper part of the painting, to the left of Christ the Judge, to crown together with the Sun, His presence. The Moon is a heavenly body similar to those appearing on Roman coins of emperors, to signify the Judge is an immortal creature. The color is pale, witeish, almost veiled. More important, the Moon has a face that by popular belief was that of Cain, condemned to amass `mucchi di rovi spinosi' for the fire of the damned (Dante Alighieri, Divina Commedia, Inferno XX, 126). Giusto de' Menabuoi on the other hand expounds, in the Crucifixion of the Duomo (1375 ca), a theological interpretation. The day of God's justice, following the death of the Savior, the Moon will burn and the Sun will pale (Isaiah, 24, 23). And indeed the Moon has a dark reddish colour. Therefore, while in Giotto the Moon is seen as in the popular beliefs, Giusto underlines the theological visions of his times with the words of the prophets.

  15. Spatial distribution of tropospheric ozone in national parks of California: interpretation of passive-sampler data.

    PubMed

    Ray, J D

    2001-09-28

    The National Park Service (NPS) has tested and used passive ozone samplers for several years to get baseline values for parks and to determine the spatial variability within parks. Experience has shown that the Ogawa passive samplers can provide +/-10% accuracy when used with a quality assurance program consisting of blanks, duplicates, collocated instrumentation, and a standard operating procedure that carefully guides site operators. Although the passive device does not meet EPA criteria as a certified method (mainly, that hourly values be measured), it does provide seasonal summed values of ozone. The seasonal ozone concentrations from the passive devices can be compared to other monitoring to determine baseline values, trends, and spatial variations. This point is illustrated with some kriged interpolation maps of ozone statistics. Passive ozone samplers were used to get elevational gradients and spatial distributions of ozone within a park. This was done in varying degrees at Mount Rainier, Olympic, Sequoia-Kings Canyon, Yosemite, Joshua Tree, Rocky Mountain, and Great Smoky Mountains national parks. The ozone has been found to vary by factors of 2 and 3 within a park when average ozone is compared between locations. Specific examples of the spatial distributions of ozone in three parks within California are given using interpolation maps. Positive aspects and limitations of the passive sampling approach are presented.

  16. Research on ambient temperature passive magnetic bearings at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.; Ryitov, D.D.` Smith, J.R.; Tung, L.S.

    1997-04-01

    Research performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on the equilibrium and stability of a new class of ambient-temperature passive bearing systems is described. The basic concepts involved are: (1) Stability of the rotating system is only achieved in the rotating state. That is, disengaging mechanical systems are used to insure stable levitation at rest (when Earnshaw`s theorem applies). (2) Stable levitation by passive magnetic elements can be achieved if the vector sum of the force derivatives of the several elements of the system is net negative (i.e. restoring) for axial, transverse, and tilt-type perturbations from equilibrium. To satisfy the requirements of (2) using only permanent magnet elements we have employed periodic ``Halbach arrays.`` These interact with passive inductive loaded circuits and act as stabilizers, with the primary forces arising from axially symmetric permanent-magnet elements. Stabilizers and other elements needed to create compact passive magnetic bearing systems have been constructed. Novel passive means for stabilizing classes of rotor-dynamic instabilities in such systems have also been investigated.

  17. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces (Met & Props 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wei-En

    2014-03-01

    Proceedings of the 14th International Conference, Taipei, Taiwan, 17th-21st June, 2013 Taiwan Organized by: Center for Measurement Standards/Industrial Technology Research Institute Mechanical and Systems Research Laboratories/Industrial Technology Research Institute National Taiwan University National Cheng Kung University National Taiwan University of Science and Technology National Tsing Hua University Greetings from Chairman of International Programme CommitteeTom Thomas When Professor Ken Stout and I founded this series of conferences in the United Kingdom more than thirty years ago, we did not anticipate its longevity or its success. Since that first meeting at Leicester, the conference has been often held in England, but also in several other European countries: France, Poland and Sweden, as well as in the United States. Ken, sadly no longer with us, would be proud of what it has achieved and has come to represent. Generations of researchers have presented their new ideas and innovations here which are now embodied in many textbooks and international standards. But this conference in 2013 marks a new departure and perhaps a new future. For the first time it is being held in Asia, reflecting the historic rise of the economies of the Pacific Rim, adding modern technology to their long-existing traditions of ordered insight and precise craftsmanship. Many of you have travelled far to attend this meeting, and we hope you will feel your trouble has been rewarded. We have an excellent selection of papers from all over the world from many of the world's experts, embodying the consolidation of tested ideas as well as the latest advances in the subject. These will be set in context by a glittering array of keynote and invited speakers. On behalf of the International Programme Committee, I am glad to acknowledge the hard work of the members of the Local Organising Committee in putting the programme together and making all the arrangements, and to accept their

  18. Passive soil venting at the Chemical Waste Landfill Site at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, J.M.; Reavis, B.; Cheng, W.C.

    1995-05-01

    Passive Soil Vapor Extraction was tested at the Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) site at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNLIW). Data collected included ambient pressures, differential pressures between soil gas and ambient air, gas flow rates into and out of the soil and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in vented soil gas. From the differential pressure and flow rate data, estimates of permeability were arrived at and compared with estimates from other studies. Flow, differential pressure, and ambient pressure data were collected for nearly 30 days. VOC data were collected for two six-hour periods during this time. Total VOC emissions were calculated and found to be under the limit set by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Although a complete process evaluation is not possible with the data gathered, some of the necessary information for designing a passive venting process was determined and the important parameters for designing the process were indicated. More study is required to evaluate long-term VOC removal using passive venting and to establish total remediation costs when passive venting is used as a polishing process following active soil vapor extraction.

  19. ISVEE 14 Yucatan 2015 14th Symposium of the International Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics.

    PubMed

    de Anda, Jorge Hernández

    2017-02-01

    The 14th Symposium of the International Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics (ISVEE 14) was held in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico during 3-7 November. 2015. The purpose of ISVEE 14 Yucatan 2015 was to provide a global forum for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, junior and senior investigators, as well as health policymakers to exchange information that can advance the fields of veterinary epidemiology and economics, and other disciplines in the health and social sciences. The main theme of ISVEE 14 was Planning Our Future. Human population growth is predicted to increase nearly 50% to 11 billion by 2050, and climate change and changing land use can have an impact on local and global food systems, interactions among humans, wildlife and domestic animals, as well as local, regional, and global public health alerts. How can we help our systems of education, research, and public policy adapt? Are new veterinary graduates and epidemiology practitioners prepared to become active protagonists in the solution of health issues that affect humans and animal populations in a changing environment? What innovative research is needed to understand and enhance the food systems of the future? What are the expected roles or contributions of veterinarians or epidemiology practitioners on future climate change, food systems, and health? Is our profession or discipline leading One Health initiatives? Are there current or new models that make national veterinary services more efficacious and efficient for disease control and eradication? To help us answer these questions, the organizing committee of ISVEE 14 invited five distinguished keynote speakers to share their vision and innovative ideas on education, technological developments, research, and public policy of our future with a concentration in the following five areas: (i) One Health (Jonna Mazet), (ii) climate change (Bernard Bett), (iii) animal health economics (Jonathan Rushton), (iv) national veterinary services

  20. PREFACE: 14th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, Liliana; Britton, David; Glover, Nigel; Heinrich, Gudrun; Lauret, Jérôme; Naumann, Axel; Speer, Thomas; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro

    2012-06-01

    ACAT2011 This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to scientific contributions presented at the 14th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2011) which took place on 5-7 September 2011 at Brunel University, UK. The workshop series, which began in 1990 in Lyon, France, brings together computer science researchers and practitioners, and researchers from particle physics and related fields in order to explore and confront the boundaries of computing and of automatic data analysis and theoretical calculation techniques. It is a forum for the exchange of ideas among the fields, exploring and promoting cutting-edge computing, data analysis and theoretical calculation techniques in fundamental physics research. This year's edition of the workshop brought together over 100 participants from all over the world. 14 invited speakers presented key topics on computing ecosystems, cloud computing, multivariate data analysis, symbolic and automatic theoretical calculations as well as computing and data analysis challenges in astrophysics, bioinformatics and musicology. Over 80 other talks and posters presented state-of-the art developments in the areas of the workshop's three tracks: Computing Technologies, Data Analysis Algorithms and Tools, and Computational Techniques in Theoretical Physics. Panel and round table discussions on data management and multivariate data analysis uncovered new ideas and collaboration opportunities in the respective areas. This edition of ACAT was generously sponsored by the Science and Technology Facility Council (STFC), the Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology (IPPP) at Durham University, Brookhaven National Laboratory in the USA and Dell. We would like to thank all the participants of the workshop for the high level of their scientific contributions and for the enthusiastic participation in all its activities which were, ultimately, the key factors in the

  1. 76 FR 81956 - National Infrastructure Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ..., Ballroom, 529 14th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20045. The meeting will be open to the public. DATES: The....gov . ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the National Press Club, Ballroom, 529 14th Street,...

  2. 14th International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission ("PIXE 2015")

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybyłowicz, Wojciech Józef; Pineda-Vargas, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B contains the proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission ("PIXE 2015") that was held in Somerset West (South Africa) from 25th February to 3rd March 2015.

  3. Medieval Armenian Costumes: A History of the Armenians from the 7th-14th Centuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soghikian, Juanita Will

    The booklet contains illustrations of 40 medieval Armenian costumes based upon statues and paintings of the 7th through the 14th centuries. Part of a series of seven instructional materials dealing with the history and culture of Armenian Americans, the booklet also provides a discussion of Armenian history and detailed descriptions of each…

  4. DC66812 AERIAL VIEW OF THE 14TH AND 15TH STREET CORRIDORS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DC-668-12 AERIAL VIEW OF THE 14TH AND 15TH STREET CORRIDORS, LOOKING NORTH FROM ABOVE EAST POTOMAC PARK TOWARD THE MALL AND BEYOND - L'Enfant-McMillan Plan of Washington, DC, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  5. The 14th Annual James L. Waters Symposium at Pittcon: Raman Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy was the main topic of the 14th Annual James L. Waters Symposium, which was held in March 2003 at Pittcon. The development of the enabling technologies that have made Raman spectroscopy a routine analysis tool in many laboratories worldwide is discussed.

  6. 75 FR 39266 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; National Infrastructure Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... 13, 2010, at the National Press Club's Ballroom, 529 14th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20045. DATES... Ballroom, 529 14th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20045. While we will be unable to accommodate oral...

  7. The National Adjustment of 2011: A refinement of the US National Spatial Reference System on passive GNSS control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The mission of NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) is to define, maintain, and provide access to the National Spatial Reference System (NSRS). The NSRS is the consistent reference system defining latitude, longitude, height, scale, gravity, and orientation throughout the United States and its territories. NGS maintains and provides access to the NSRS, the foundation for the nation's transportation, mapping, and charting infrastructure, as well as a multitude of other scientific and engineering applications. As part of the continuing efforts to improve the NSRS, in April 2011 NGS initiated the National Adjustment of 2011 (NA2011) Project to determine updated North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) coordinates (latitude, longitude, and ellipsoid height) on passive control stations with positions determined using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) technology. NA2011 is a simultaneous least-squares adjustment of approximately 80,000 passive control stations using a nationwide network of over 400,000 GNSS vectors performed using a Helmert blocking strategy. The GNSS vectors (and associated estimated errors and correlations) are stored in the NGS Integrated Data Base (NGSIDB) and represent over 4000 survey projects spanning from the mid 1980s to August 2011. The adjustment is being constrained to current NAD 83 coordinates of the NGS Continuously Operating Reference Station (CORS) network, which is a GNSS-based "active control" system that is the geometric foundation of the NSRS. The latest NAD 83 CORS coordinates used as NA2011 constraints were determined in August 2011 in the Multi-Year CORS Solution (MYCS) project. The MYCS yielded coordinates and velocities on CORS through a combined solution of all CORS GNSS data from 1994 to April 2011. Constraining NA2011 to the MYCS optimally aligns the GNSS passive control with the active control, providing a unified reference system. The resulting realization provides positions at an epoch date of January 1, 2010, and it

  8. Mitral valve endocarditis due to Abiotrophia defectiva in a 14th week pregnant woman.

    PubMed

    Botta, Luca; Merati, Roberto; Vignati, Gabriele; Orcese, Carlo Andrea; De Chiara, Benedetta; Cannata, Aldo; Bruschi, Giuseppe; Fratto, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis during pregnancy carries a high mortality risk, both for the mother and for the foetus and requires a multidisciplinary team in the management of complicated cases. We report our experience with a 39-year old patient, affected by an acute active mitral endocarditis due to Abiotrophia defectiva at the 14th gestational week, strongly motivated to continue the pregnancy. Our patient successfully underwent mitral valve replacement with a normothermic high-flow cardiopulmonary bypass under continuous intraoperative foetal monitoring. Caesarean section occurred at the 38th gestational week. The delivery was uneventful and both the mother and child are doing well at the 16-month follow-up.

  9. 14th Annual Meeting of the Psychoneuroimmunology Research Society 28 - 29 May 2007, Bordeaux, France.

    PubMed

    Braddock, Martin

    2007-10-01

    The Association for Neurophyschopharmacology hosted a satellite meeting as part of the 14th Annual Meeting of the Psychoneuroimmunology Research Society. The meeting was entitled 'Cytokines and Depression III: Identification and Treatment of Symptoms Associated with Inflammation in Diseases with Inflammation in Medically Ill Patients' and was held in Bordeaux, France on 28 - 29 May, 2007. The meeting comprised approximately 40 participants from many leading laboratories and hospitals from around the world looking to understand some of the clinical issues associated with depression and behavioural changes, with the aims of exploring better ways of clinical monitoring and marshalling drug discovery efforts from bespoke and alternate indications in providing new therapeutic approaches.

  10. Business of biosimilars - 14th annual conference (October 15-17, 2013 - Boston, Massachusetts, USA).

    PubMed

    Bourgoin, A

    2013-12-01

    Competition in the biological market offers a new set of opportunities and challenges within the healthcare industry. Biosimilars, like generic small-molecule drugs, can provide cost savings and increase patient access, while also promoting innovation. While large molecule manufacturers face many challenges unique to complex therapeutics, it is becoming clear that the commercialization of biosimilars shares many of the same hurdles as the generics market. The 14th Annual Business of Biosimilars Conference provided quality presentations from industry leaders regarding many commercial considerations for stakeholders interested in entering the biosimilars market. Opportunities to network with industry experts were offered, with over 120 attendees.

  11. EDITORIAL: The 14th International Symposium on Flow Visualization, ISFV14 The 14th International Symposium on Flow Visualization, ISFV14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Chun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2011-06-01

    The 14th International Symposium on Flow Visualization (ISFV14) was held in Daegu, Korea, on 21-24 June 2010. There were 304 participants from 17 countries. The state of the art in many aspects of flow visualization was presented and discussed, and a total of 243 papers from 19 countries were presented. Two special lectures and four invited lectures, 48 paper sessions and one poster session were held in five session rooms and in a lobby over four days. Among the paper sessions, those on 'biological flows', 'micro/nano fluidics', 'PIV/PTV' and 'compressible and sonic flows' received great attention from the participants of ISFV14. Special events included presentations of 'The Asanuma Award' and 'The Leonardo Da Vinci Award' to prominent contributors. Awards for photos and movies were given to three scientists for their excellence in flow visualizations. Sixteen papers were selected by the Scientific Committee of ISFV14. After the standard peer review process of this journal, six papers were finally accepted for publication. We wish to thank the editors of MST for making it possible to publish this special feature from ISFV14. We also thank the authors for their careful and insightful work and cooperation in the preparation of revised papers. It will be our pleasure if readers appreciate the hot topics in flow visualization research as a result of this special feature. We also hope that the progress in flow visualization will create new research fields. The 15th International Symposium on Flow Visualization will be held in Minsk, Belarus in 2012. We would like to express sincere thanks to the staff at IOP Publishing for their kind support.

  12. A nationwide adjustment of passive GNSS control for the U.S. National Spatial Reference System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, M. L.; Saleh, J.

    2012-12-01

    As part of continuing efforts to improve the National Spatial Reference System (NSRS), in June 2011 NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) completed a nationwide adjustment of "passive" control (i.e., physical survey monuments). The project was divided into five separate networks, each of which was performed as a simultaneous least-squares adjustment of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) vectors. To create the networks, 4267 individual survey projects were combined for a total of 80,872 unique stations connected by 424,711 GNSS vectors observed between April 1983 and December 2011. A Helmert blocking strategy was used to adjust the two large networks representing the coterminous U.S. The adjustment was constrained to current North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) coordinates of 1195 NGS Continuously Operating Reference Stations (CORS). The CORS network is a GNSS-based "active" control system and the geometric foundation of the NSRS. Constraining the adjustment to the CORS optimally aligned the GNSS passive control with the active control, providing a unified reference frame to serve the Nation's geometric positioning needs. The project yielded NAD 83 latitude, longitude, and ellipsoid heights at an epoch date of 2010.00 (January 1, 2010). The median station accuracy was 0.9 cm horizontal and 1.5 cm vertical (i.e., ellipsoid height) at the 95% confidence level. A number of technical issues were confronted in performing this project. One was that the networks were referenced to three different tectonic plates. Each of these tectonic plates is identified by a "datum tag" following the NAD 83 name: NAD 83(2011) is referenced to the North America plate; NAD 83(PA11) is referenced to the Pacific plate; and NAD 83(MA11) is referenced to the Mariana plate. In some cases, stations referenced to one plate were located on a different plate (e.g., stations in coastal California and the Caribbean were referenced to the North America plate). This was handled by modeling

  13. 14th Annual international meeting of wind turbine test stations: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    These proceedings are of the 14th Annual International Meeting of Test Stations. As the original charter states these meetings are intended to be an international forum for sharing wind turbine testing experiences. By sharing their experiences they can improve testing skills and techniques. As with all new industries the quality of the products is marked by how well they learn from their experiences and incorporate this learning into the next generation of products. The test station`s role in this process is to provide accurate information to the companies they serve. This information is used by designers to conform and improve their designs. It is also used by certification agencies for confirming the quality of these designs. By sharing of experiences they are able to accomplished these goals, serve these customers better and ultimately improve the international wind energy industry.

  14. [A medieval herbal from the 14th century, a new version of the Latin Macer?].

    PubMed

    Mauch, Ute

    2006-01-01

    A medical compendium of "Melleus liquorphysicae artis" has survived under the name Alexander Hispanus; it is in codex Ms. 8769 of the Biblioteca nacional in Madrid. Therein a herbal from the 14th century is integrated. However, today people must think that we have one herbal and two authors: Alexander Hispanus and Henrik Harpestraeng (died 1244), a physician from Scandinavia. First of all, the parts of the medical compendium are presented. We do not know which parts originally belong to the medical compendium. The examination of many handwritings suggested that the discourses about consumption and dropsy were not originally included in the compendium; that seems certain. Further it was shown that probably Alexander Hispanus did not live after all and we must see him as a fictional person. Nevertheless we should not automatically regard Henrik Harpestraeng as the author of the herbal although it contains typical plants of the North like Angelica. The oldest codex of the herbal was probably written in Bavaria or Austria because it contains old Bavarian words. This handwriting can be seen as a piece of evidence that the knowledge about Angelica was spreading from the South. We should explore the connection with handwritings of the Macer, too. The herbal could be a Latin version of the Macer, in which the original verses are abandoned. An analysis of the medical plants made it clear that the herbal is probably directed to a male readership. Especially the chapter on Galganum elucidates that. In the 14th century Galganum was thought to have a contraceptive effect, but this was kept secret from women! All in all the structure of the herbal suggests a use as a kind of reference book that was not used daily though.

  15. Passive and active soil gas sampling at the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area III, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    McVey, M.D.; Goering, T.J.; Peace, J.L.

    1996-02-01

    The Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is tasked with assessing and remediating the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area III. The Mixed Waste Landfill is a 2.6 acre, inactive radioactive and mixed waste disposal site. In 1993 and 1994, an extensive passive and active soil gas sampling program was undertaken to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds in the subsurface at the landfill. Passive soil gas surveys identified levels of PCE, TCE, 1,1, 1-TCA, toluene, 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane, dichloroethyne, and acetone above background. Verification by active soil gas sampling confirmed concentrations of PCE, TCE, 1,1,1-TCA, and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane at depths of 10 and 30 feet below ground surface. In addition, dichlorodifluoroethane and trichlorofluoromethane were detected during active soil gas sampling. All of the volatile organic compounds detected during the active soil gas survey were present in the low ppb range.

  16. [Medical research travel 100 years ago: the 14th German Medical Study Trip to North America and Canada in the year 1912].

    PubMed

    Neid, T; Helm, J

    2012-12-01

    Already before the First World War the North American medicine had developed within less years so far that it had an excellent reputation and that famous scientists and medicines from Europe came in the country for extensive study trips and congressional visits. Exactly 100 years ago the delegation biggest till then of German doctors visited in the course of the 14th German Medical Study Trip the United States of America. The very amicable relation between the doctors of both nations made easier the scientific exchange during this study trip and allowed a deep insight into the medicine of the USA to the participants. Even though the German doctors were very impressed with the developement in the USA and reported partly in their native country in detail about that, it didn't succeed in keeping pace with the rapid developement of the USA into the leading research nation in the following decades.

  17. "May the force be with you": 14th Samuel Haughton lecture.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, P J

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents the 14th Samuel Haughton lecture delivered on the 26th of January 2008. The lecture began by describing Haughton's research on animal mechanics. Haughton opposed Charles Darwin's theory of natural selection using the argument that the skeleton obeys the 'principle of least action' and therefore must have been designed with that principle in mind. In the course of his research he dissected many animals, including albatrosses, cassowaries, llamas, tigers, jackals and jaguars. He took anatomical measurements and did calculations to prove that muscle attachment sites were optimally located. The relationship between optimality and evolution continues to be studied. Computer simulations show optimality is difficult to achieve. This is because, even if optimality could be defined, the gene recombinations required to evolve an optimal phenotype may not exist. The drive towards optimality occurs under gravitational forces. Simulations to predict mechano-regulation of tissue differentiation and remodelling have been developed and tested. They have been used to design biomechanically optimized scaffolds for regenerative medicine and to identify the mechanoregularory mechanisms in osteoporosis. It is proposed that an important development in bioengineering will be the discovery of algorithms that can be used for the prediction of mechano-responsiveness in biological tissues.

  18. Multielemental analysis of tissues from Cangrande della Scala, Prince of Verona, in the 14th century.

    PubMed

    Apostoli, Pietro; De Palma, Giuseppe; Catalani, Simona; Bortolotti, Federica; Tagliaro, Franco

    2009-01-01

    Cangrande della Scala, Prince of Verona (Italy), died suddenly shortly after his triumph in the battle of Treviso (July 18, 1329). Thus, in the frame of a multidisciplinary paleo-pathological study, we carried out a multielemental analysis on the Prince's tissue specimens, including hair, liver, muscle, and bone, in order to characterize a multitissue profile of metallic elements in a nobleman of the 14th century. Biological specimens were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. We were able to rule out arsenic poisoning as the primary cause of death. High levels of gold and silver in both hair and liver samples were probably due to prolonged contact of the mummy with precious metals in the funeral garments. High lead concentrations in both liver and bone tissue can be traced back to the ingestion of contaminated food and alcoholic beverages. Most of the essential elements were in the normal range of values for contemporary living people. The low arsenic and chromium levels in the Prince's tissues as compared to modern people would be suggestive of raised concentrations of both the elements in the present era, which are likely due to industrial pollution.

  19. The solar flare of the 14th of July 2000 (L3+C detector results)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achard, P.; Adrian, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; van den Akker, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, V. P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Bähr, J.; Baldew, S. V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillère, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J. J.; Blyth, S. C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Böhm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J. G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chiarusi, T.; Chang, Y. H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; de Asmundis, R.; Déglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degré, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Ding, L. K.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Duran, I.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Extermann, P.; Faber, G.; Falagan, M. A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J. H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Ganguli, S. N.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z. F.; Grabosch, H. J.; Grenier, G.; Grimm, O.; Groenstege, H.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guida, M.; Guo, Y. N.; Gupta, S. K.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L. J.; Haas, D.; Haller, Ch.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, Y.; He, Z. X.; Hebbeker, T.; Hervé, A.; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, A.; Hou, S. R.; Huo, A. X.; Ito, N.; Jin, B. N.; Jindal, P.; Jing, C. L.; Jones, L. W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberría, I.; Kantserov, V.; Kaur, M.; Kawakami, S.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kim, J. K.; Kirkby, J.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Kok, E.; Korn, A.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kräber, M.; Kuang, H. H.; Kraemer, R. W.; Krüger, A.; Kuijpers, J.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J. M.; Lei, Y.; Leich, H.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, Z. C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lin, W. T.; Linde, F. L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z. A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y. S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W. G.; Ma, X. H.; Ma, Y. Q.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J. P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R. R.; Meng, X. W.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; Mihul, A.; van Mil, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G. B.; Monteleoni, B.; Muanza, G. S.; Muijs, A. J. M.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumov, V. A.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Nowak, H.; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Parriaud, J.-F.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pieri, M.; Pioppi, M.; Piroué, P. A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofiev, D.; Qing, C. R.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M. A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P. G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ravindran, K. C.; Razis, P.; Rembeczki, S.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Rewiersma, P.; Riemann, S.; Rojkov, A.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosemann, C.; Rosenbleck, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, S.; Rubio, J. A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schäfer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schoeneich, B.; Schotanus, D. J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shen, C. Q.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D. P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L. Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J. D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X. W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, C.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tonwar, S. C.; Tóth, J.; Trowitzsch, G.; Tully, C.; Tung, K. L.; Ulbricht, J.; Unger, M.; Valente, E.; Verkooijen, H.; Van de Walle, R. T.; Vasquez, R.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, X. W.; Wang, Z. M.; Weber, M.; van Wijk, R.; Wijnen, T. A. M.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Y. P.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yang, B. Z.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, M.; Yang, X. F.; Yao, Z. G.; Yeh, S. C.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, S. J.; Zhu, G. Y.; Zhu, R. Y; Zhu, Q. Q.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zöller, M.; Zwart, A. N. M.; L3 Collaboration

    2006-09-01

    Aims.Several experiments have reported observations on possible correlations between the flux of high energy muons and intense solar flares. If confirmed, these observations would have significant implications for acceleration processes in the heliosphere able to accelerate protons and other ions to energies of at least tens of GeV. Methods: The solar flare of the 14 of July 2000 offered a unique opportunity for the L3+C experiment to search for a correlated enhancement in the flux of muons using the L3 precision muon spectrometer. Its capabilities for observing a directional excess in the flux of muons above 15 GeV (corresponding to primary proton energies above 40 GeV) are presented along with observations made on the 14th of July 2000. Results: We report an excess which appeared at a time coincident with the peak increase of solar protons observed at lower energies. The probability that the excess is a background fluctuation is estimated to be 1%. No similar excess of the muon flux was observed up to 1.5 h after the solar flare time.

  20. 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies: task force report on antiphospholipid syndrome treatment trends.

    PubMed

    Erkan, Doruk; Aguiar, Cassyanne L; Andrade, Danieli; Cohen, Hannah; Cuadrado, Maria J; Danowski, Adriana; Levy, Roger A; Ortel, Thomas L; Rahman, Anisur; Salmon, Jane E; Tektonidou, Maria G; Willis, Rohan; Lockshin, Michael D

    2014-06-01

    Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) is characterized by vascular thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity occurring in patients with persistent antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). The primary objective of the APS Treatment Trends Task Force, created as part of the 14th International Congress on aPL, was to systematically review the potential future treatment strategies for aPL-positive patients. The task force chose as future clinical research directions: a) determining the necessity for controlled clinical trials in venous thromboembolism with the new oral direct thrombin or anti-factor Xa inhibitors pending the results of the ongoing rivaroxaban in APS (RAPS) trial, and designing controlled clinical trials in other forms of thrombotic APS; b) systematically analyzing the literature as well as aPL/APS registries, and creating specific registries for non-warfarin/heparin anticoagulants; c) increasing recruitment for an ongoing primary thrombosis prevention trial, and designing secondary thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity prevention trials with hydroxychloroquine; d) determining surrogate markers to select patients for statin trials; e) designing controlled studies with rituximab and other anti-B-cell agents; f) designing mechanistic and clinical studies with eculizumab and other complement inhibitors; and g) chemically modifying peptide therapy to improve the half-life and minimize immunogenicity. The report also includes recommendations for clinicians who consider using these agents in difficult-to-manage aPL-positive patients.

  1. The 14th Ile residue is essential for Leptin function in regulating energy homeostasis in rat

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuyang; Zhu, Xianmin; Li, Hong; Hu, Youtian; Zhou, Jinping; He, Di; Feng, Yun; Lu, Lina; Du, Guizhen; Hu, Youjin; Liu, Tiancheng; Wang, Zhen; Ding, Guohui; Chen, Jiayu; Gao, Shaorong; Wu, Fang; Xue, Zhigang; Li, Yixue; Fan, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    LEPTIN (LEP) is a circulating hormone released primarily from white adipocytes and is crucial for regulating satiety and energy homeostasis in humans and animals. Using the CRISPR technology, we created a set of Lep mutant rats that carry either null mutations or a deletion of the 14th Ile (LEP∆I14) in the mature LEP protein. We examined the potential off-target sites (OTS) by whole-genome high-throughput sequencing and/or Sanger-sequencing analysis and found no OTS in mutant rats. Mature LEP∆I14 is incessantly produced and released to blood at a much elevated level due to the feedback loop. Structure modeling of binding conformation between mutant LEP∆I14 and LEPTIN receptor (LEPR) suggests that the conformation of LEP∆I14 impairs its binding with LEPR, consistent with its inability to activate STAT3-binding element in the luciferase reporter assay. Phenotypic study demonstrated that Lep∆I14 rats recapitulate phenotypes of Lep-null mutant rats including obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hepatic steatosis, nephropathy, and infertility. Compared to the existing ob/ob mouse models, this Lep∆I14/∆I14 rat strain provides a robust tool for further dissecting the roles of LEP in the diabetes related kidney disease and reproduction problem, beyond its well established function in regulating energy homeostasis. PMID:27378381

  2. [A manuscript with illustrations and equipment of alchemy in the 14th century].

    PubMed

    Kurzmann, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Manuscript 1122 Trinity College Cambridge was written in Latin in England in the late 13th century. Page 120verso shows drawings with descriptions of alchemistic vessels and apparatus. These descriptions have been deciphered, translated into German and commented on. Unlike many comments in literature relating to these drawings they neither go back to Artefius or Alphidius nor are they part of the paper "clavis sapientiae". They were drawn up by an unknown hand in the late 14th century on the empty page 120verso of the older manuscript 1122. The drawings show a great variety of vessels and apparatus of highly sophisticated design. It is clear that they are based on older, professional sources. The descriptions in many cases go back to Arab designations, which were later lost. In many cases, archaeological finds confirm the actual existence of the vessels shown in the manuscript, so that we can assume that the drawings represent reality. Thus the drawings can help to interpret finds in storerooms of museums which up to now have not been identified, or recently excavated parts or fragments.

  3. Report of the 14th Genomic Standards Consortium Meeting, Oxford, UK, September 17-21, 2012.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Barker, Katharine; Bicak, Mesude; Bourlat, Sarah; Coddington, Jonathan; Deck, John; Drummond, Alexei; Gilbert, Jack A.; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Kottmann, Renzo; Meyer, Chris; Morrison, Norman; Obst, Matthias; Robbins, Robert; Schriml, Lynn; Sterk, Peter; Stones-Havas, Steven

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the 14th workshop of the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) held at the University of Oxford in September 2012. The primary goal of the workshop was to work towards the launch of the Genomic Observatories (GOs) Network under the GSC. For the first time, it brought together potential GOs sites, GSC members, and a range of interested partner organizations. It thus represented the first meeting of the GOs Network (GOs1). Key outcomes include the formation of a core group of “champions” ready to take the GOs Network forward, as well as the formation of working groups. The workshop also served as the first meeting of a wide range of participants in the Ocean Sampling Day (OSD) initiative, a first GOs action. Three projects with complementary interests – COST Action ES1103, MG4U and Micro B3 – organized joint sessions at the workshop. A two-day GSC Hackathon followed the main three days of meetings.

  4. Coping with Catastrophe: The Black Death of the 14th Century. A Unit of Study for Grades 7-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Anne

    This unit of study explains the causes, course, characteristics, and results of the Black Death during the 14th century. The Black Death, also known as the bubonic plague, left virtually no one untouched in Europe, Asia, and Northern Africa. Europe lost a third or more of its population. In a broader context, study of the unit alerts students to…

  5. 76 FR 68399 - Certain Pasta From Turkey: Notice of Final Results of the 14th Antidumping Duty Administrative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Pasta From Turkey: Notice of Final Results of the 14th Antidumping... Turkey (pasta).\\1\\ The review covers one exporter: Marsan Gida Sanayi ve Ticaret A.S. (Marsan). The period of review (POR) is July 1, 2009, through June 30, 2010. \\1\\ See Certain Pasta From Turkey:...

  6. Reading and Reality. Proceedings of the Annual Reading Conference (14th, Terre Haute, Indiana, June 14, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Vanita M., Comp.; Waterman, David C., Comp.

    Intended for reading teachers, this pamphlet contains the presentations of the 14th annual reading conference at Indiana State University, beginning with opening remarks by David C. Waterman and welcoming comments by J. Stephen Hazlett. In the opening address, "What Good is Comprehension without Composition?" by Sharon and David Moore, the role of…

  7. 76 FR 19373 - The 14th Annual Food and Drug Administration-Orange County Regulatory Affairs Educational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The 14th Annual Food and Drug Administration-Orange County Regulatory Affairs Educational Conference in Irvine, California: New Regulatory Challenges AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)...

  8. 14th St. Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference 2015: Evidence, Controversies, Consensus – Primary Therapy of Early Breast Cancer: Opinions Expressed by German Experts

    PubMed Central

    Jackisch, Christian; Harbeck, Nadia; Huober, Jens; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Gerber, Bernd; Kreipe, Hans-Heinrich; Liedtke, Cornelia; Marschner, Norbert; Möbus, Volker; Scheithauer, Heike; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Thomssen, Christoph; Loibl, Sibylle; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Blohmer, Jens-Uwe; Costa, Serban-Dan; Decker, Thomas; Diel, Ingo; Fasching, Peter A.; Fehm, Tanja; Janni, Wolfgang; Lück, Hans-Joachim; Maass, Nicolai; Scharl, Anton; Untch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary The key topics of this year's 14th St. Gallen Consensus Conference on the diagnosis and therapy of primary breast cancer were again questions about breast surgery and axillary surgery, radio-oncology and systemic therapy options in consideration of tumor biology, and the clinical application of multigene assays. This year, the consensus conference took place in Vienna. From a German perspective, it makes sense to substantiate the results of the vote of the international panel representing 19 countries in light of the updated national therapy recommendations of the AGO (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Gynäkologische Onkologie). Therefore, 14 German breast cancer experts, 3 of whom are members of the International St. Gallen Panel, have commented on the voting results of the St. Gallen Consensus Conference 2015 in relation to clinical routine in Germany. PMID:26557827

  9. PREFACE: 14th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao, Luis; Minotti, Fernando; Kelly, Hector

    2012-06-01

    These proceedings present the written contributions from participants of the Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP), which was held in Mar del Plata, Argentina, on 20-25 November 2011. This was the 14th session of the series of LAWPP biennial meetings, which started in 1982. The five-day scientific program of LAWPP 2011 consisted of 32 talks and various poster sessions, with the participation of 135 researchers from Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Puerto Rico, USA, Venezuela, as well as others from Europe and Asia. In addition, a School on Plasma Physics and a Workshop on Industrial Applications of Plasma Technology (AITP) were organized together with the main meeting. The five-day School held in the week previous to the meeting was intended for young scientists starting their research in Plasma Physics. On the other hand, the objective of the AITP Workshop was to enhance regional academic and industrial cooperation in the field of plasma assisted surface technology. Topics addressed at LAWPP 2011 included space plasmas, dusty plasmas, nuclear fusion, non-thermal plasmas, basic plasma processes, plasma simulation and industrial plasma applications. This variety of subjects is reflected in these proceedings, which the editors hope will result in enjoyable and fruitful reading for those interested in Plasma Physics. It is a pleasure to thank the Institutions that sponsored the meeting, as well as all the participants and collaborators for making this meeting possible. The Editors Luis Bilbao, Fernando Minotti and Hector Kelly LAWPP participants Participants of the 14th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics, 20-25 November 2011, Mar del Plata, Argentina International Scientific Committee Carlos Alejaldre, Spain María Virginia Alves, Brazil Ibere Caldas, Brazil Luis Felipe Delgado-Aparicio, Peru Mayo Villagrán, Mexico Kohnosuke Sato, Japan Héctor Kelly, Argentina Edberto Leal-Quirós, Puerto Rico George Morales, USA Julio Puerta

  10. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Transport in Interacting Disordered Systems (TIDS-14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frydman, Aviad

    2012-07-01

    The '14th Transport in interacting disordered systems - TIDS14' conference took place during 5-8 September 2011 in Acre Israel. The conference was a continuation of the biennial meeting traditionally called HRP (hopping and related phenomena) and later named TIDS (transport in interacting disordered systems). Previous conferences took place in Trieste (1985), Bratislava (1987), Chapel Hill (1989), Marburg (1991), Glasgow (1993), Jerusalem (1995), Rackeve (1997), Murcia (1999), Shefayim (2001), Trieste (2003), Egmond, aan Zee (2005), Marburg (2007) and Rackeve (2009). Central to these conferences are systems that are characterized by a large degree of disorder and hence they lack translational symmetry. In such systems interactions are usually very important. Dramatic differences in the behavior of crystalline solids and the 'disordered' systems are possible. Some examples of the latter are amorphous materials, polymer aggregates, materials whose properties are governed by impurities, granular systems and biological systems. This conference series is notable for the pleasant atmosphere and fruitful exchange of ideas between theoreticians and experimentalists in these areas. This tradition was also maintained in the conference in Israel. Specific topics of TIDS14 included: hopping, electron and Coulomb glasses, Anderson localization and many body localization, noise, magneto-transport, metal-insulator and superconductor-insulator transition, transport through low dimensional and nanostructures, quantum coherence, interference and dephasing and other related topics. Over sixty scientists from fourteen countries participated in the conference and presented papers either as oral presentations or as posters in two sessions that took place during the conference. Many of these papers are included in these proceedings. I would like to thank all the conference participants for the interesting presentations, debates and discussions that created a stimulating but pleasant

  11. Radio imaging of a type IVM radio burst on the 14th of August 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Bain, H. M.; Krucker, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Raftery, C. L.

    2014-02-10

    Propagating coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by burst signatures in radio spectrogram data. We present Nançay Radioheliograph observations of a moving source of broadband radio emission, commonly referred to as a type IV radio burst (type IVM), which occurred in association with a CME on the 14th of August 2010. The event was well observed at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths by SDO/AIA and PROBA2/SWAP, and by the STEREO SECCHI and SOHO LASCO white light (WL) coronagraphs. The EUV and WL observations show the type IVM source to be cospatial with the CME core. The observed spectra is well fitted by a power law with a negative slope, which is consistent with optically thin gyrosynchrotron emission. The spectrum shows no turn over at the lowest Nançay frequencies. By comparing simulated gyrosynchrotron spectra with Nançay Radioheliograph observations, and performing a rigorous parameter search we are able to constrain several key parameters of the underlying plasma. Simulated spectra found to fit the data suggest a nonthermal electron distribution with a low energy cutoff of several tens to 100 keV, with a nonthermal electron density in the range 10{sup 0}-10{sup 2} cm{sup –3}, in a magnetic field of a few Gauss. The nonthermal energy content of the source is found to contain 0.001%-0.1% of the sources thermal energy content. Furthermore, the energy loss timescale for this distribution equates to several hours, suggesting that the electrons could be accelerated during the CME initiation or early propagation phase and become trapped in the magnetic structure of the CME core without the need to be replenished.

  12. 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies Task Force report on obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Guilherme R; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Andrade, Carlos A; Andreoli, Laura; Chighizola, Cecilia B; Porter, T Flint; Salmon, Jane; Silver, Robert M; Tincani, Angela; Branch, D Ware

    2014-08-01

    Pregnancy morbidity is one of the clinical manifestations used for classification criteria of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). During the 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (aPL), a Task Force with internationally-known experts was created to carry out a critical appraisal of the literature available regarding the association of aPL with obstetric manifestations present in actual classification criteria (recurrent early miscarriage, fetal death, preeclampsia and placental insufficiency) and the quality of the evidence that treatment(s) provide benefit in terms of avoiding recurrent adverse obstetric outcomes. The association of infertility with aPL and the effectiveness of the treatment of patients with infertility and positive aPL was also investigated. This report presents current knowledge and limitations of published studies regarding pregnancy morbidity, infertility and aPL, identifying areas that need better investigative efforts and proposing how critical flaws could be avoided in future studies, as suggested by participants of the Task Force. Except for fetal death, there are limitations in the quality of the data supporting the association of aPL with obstetric complications included in the current APS classification criteria. Recommended treatments for all pregnancy morbidity associated to APS also lack well-designed studies to confirm its efficacy. APL does not seem to be associated with infertility and treatment does not improve the outcomes in infertile patients with aPL. In another section of the Task Force, Dr. Jane Salmon reviewed complement-mediated inflammation in reproductive failure in APS, considering new therapeutic targets to obstetric APS (Ob APS).

  13. 4th Rare Disease South Eastern Europe (See) Meeting Skopje, Macedonia (November 14th, 2015).

    PubMed

    Gucev, Zoran; Tasic, Velibor; Polenakovic, Momir

    2015-01-01

    The 4th meeting on rare diseases in South Eastern Europe (SEE) was held in Skopje, at the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts (MASA) on the 14(th) of November 2015. The focuses were metabolic, rare brain diseases as well as the rare dysmorphic syndrome. The authors of the report are particularly keen on stating that one of the main goals of the meeting, namely to help the treatment of patients with rare disease has begun to bear fruits. The talk on an iminosugar-based pharmacological chaperone compound as a drug candidate for the treatment of GM1-gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis IVB (Morquio disease type B) was enlightening. To date, there is no treatment available to be offered to patients, but chaperones lead mutated proteins to adopt a native-like conformation and to successfully traffic to their normal cellular destination. DORPHAN is developing an iminosugar-based pharmacological chaperone compound for the treatment of GM1-gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis IVB. A talk on recent developments in the laboratory diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) was particularly interesting, covering the laboratory diagnosis of the MPS diseases by a strategy of clinical examination, biochemical analysis of urine samples, enzyme tests and genetic characterization of underlying mutations. New techniques were developed, including analysis of urinary glycosaminoglycans with tandem mass spectrometry, miniaturized enzyme tests or novel synthetic substrates for enzyme assays using mass spectrometry detection of products using dried blood spots. Feasibility and cost-effectiveness of these methods in newborn screening programs have been demonstrated. Neuromuscular RDs, and especially familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) were a topic of the Bulgarian colleagues. Diagnosis, screening and the role of microglia were also topics of particular interest. In summary, this year RD meeting was exciting and productive on a wide range of diseases and on a novel insights on

  14. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions (HCI 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Chikashi

    2009-07-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions (HCI2008), held at the University of Electro-Communications, Chofu, Tokyo, Japan from 1-5 September 2008. This series of conferences began in Stockholm, Sweden in 1982 and has since been held every other year; in Oxford, UK (1984), Groningen, the Netherlands (1986), Grenoble, France (1988), Giessen, Germany (1990), Manhattan, Kansas, USA (1992), Vienna, Austria (1994), Omiya, Japan (1996), Bensheim, Germany (1998), Berkeley, USA (2000), Caen, France (2002), Vilnius, Lithuania (2004) and Belfast, UK (2006). Highly charged ions (HCI), which are defined as highly ionized (i.e. positively charged atomic) ions here, mainly exist in hot plasmas such as the solar corona and fusion plasmas. It is true that its importance in plasma physics has driven researchers to the spectroscopic studies of HCIs, but the spectroscopy of few-electron ions is not only important for plasmas but also interesting for fundamental atomic physics. Electrons moving fast near a heavy nucleus give a suitable system to test the fundamental atomic theory involving relativistic and quantum electro-dynamic effects in a strong field. Also, the huge potential energy of a HCI induces drastic reaction in the interaction with matter. This unique property of HCIs, coupled with the recent development of efficient ion sources, is opening the possibility to utilize them in new technologies in the field such as nano-fabrication, surface analysis, medical physics, and so on. Hence, this conference is recognized as a valuable gathering place for established practitioners and also for newcomers; we exchange information, we are introduced to the subject itself, and to unexpected interfaces with other fields. On 31 August, the day before the opening of HCI2008, we welcomed the delegates at the university's restaurant—and we were greeted with an unusually heavy summer shower! The conference then opened on

  15. Update on the diabetic foot 2012: the 14th biennial Malvern Diabetic Foot Conference, May 9-11, 2012.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Peter; Franklyn, Kerryn; Rayman, Gerry; Boulton, Andrew J M

    2013-03-01

    The 14th biennial Malvern Diabetic Foot Conference was held in May 2012. Physicians, podiatrists, nurses, orthotists, surgeons, radiologists, and other professionals attended to reflect on the diabetic foot. The conference comprised interactive workshops, oral presentations of new research findings, and lectures from leading figures in the world of the diabetic foot. Over the 3 days, topics such as epidemiology, neuropathy, screening, vascular disease, prevention, and management among others were discussed. The conference has been an excellent platform from which to share new and ongoing research and it will without a doubt improve the treatment of the diabetic foot across the world.

  16. Real-world vehicle emissions: a summary of the 14th coordinating research council on-road Vehicle Emissions Workshop.

    PubMed

    Cadle, Steven H; Belian, Timothy C; Black, Kevin N; Minassian, Fred; Natarajan, Mani; Tierney, Eugene J; Lawson, Douglas R

    2005-02-01

    The Coordinating Research Council held its 14th Vehicle Emissions Workshop in March 2004, where results of the most recent on-road vehicle emissions research were presented. We summarize ongoing work from researchers who are engaged in improving our understanding of the contribution of mobile sources to ambient air quality and emission inventories. Participants in the workshop discussed efforts to improve mobile source emission models, light- and heavy-duty vehicle emissions measurements, on- and off-road emissions measurements, effects of fuels and lubricating oils on emissions, as well as topics for future research.

  17. [The Sarqī medical school (11th-14th centuries): society and medicine in al-Andalus Levante].

    PubMed

    Franco Sanchez, F

    2001-01-01

    Most of the information about medical science in al-Andalus is associated with its leading figures and their work in the capital cities of the time: Cordoba, Seville, Granada, and the Taifal cities. This study presents the medicine of the Levantine or Sarqī al-Andalus region (10th-14th centuries). To this end, we have gathered reports on physicians that worked in the different Levantine capitals and have investigated key data in the biographical dictionaries, sources that have been little-used to study medical practice. We especially studied the Takmila by Ibn al-Abbār from Valencia.

  18. 14th Annual P3 Awards: A National Student Design Competition for Sustainability Focusing on People, Prosperity and the Planet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA as part of its People, Prosperity and the Planet (P3) Award Program – is seeking applications proposing to research, develop, and design solutions to real world challenges involving sustainability.

  19. [The life and works of the Prague professor and rector Wikbold Stutte of Osnabrück (14th century)].

    PubMed

    Berger, Harald

    2009-01-01

    Wicbold Stutte of Osnabrueck, Master of Arts and of Medicine at the 14th century University of Prague and Rector there in 1375, has been known until recently only through some documents. An examination of the codex Mainz, Stadtbibliothek, Hs I 613, uncovered for the first time a literary work of Wicbold's, viz. a voluminous commentary on (part of) Aristotle's 'Parva naturalia'. A first reading of this work and further special research yielded finally a list of twelve writings done or projected by Wicbold, three of which are known at present to be extant, viz. the just mentioned philosophical work and two medicinal ones. This contribution describes Wicbold's quite impressive career, both academical and clerical (section I), gives a list of his extant and testified works together with their manuscript traditions, incipits, and explicits as far as available (section II) and gives finally a list of the known documents regarding Wicbold's life and career (section III).

  20. The 14th International Conference on Alzheimer's Drug Discovery, 9 - 10 September 2013, in Jersey City, New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Glicksman, Marcie A

    2014-02-01

    The following conference was the 14th International Conference on Alzheimer's Drug Discovery held 9 - 10 September 2013, in Jersey City, NJ. The conference attracted about 140 attendees with 49% from academia, 36% from industry and private practice, 10% from nonprofit organizations and 2% from the government. The meeting had two plenary speakers that kicked off each morning of the conference and then two sessions each day to cover different aspects of Alzheimer's disease drug discovery. There were sessions on neuroprotection, mitochondrial function, biomarkers, ApoE, tau and protein clearance. The conference was organized by the Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation (ADDF) with all of the presenters supported by grants awarded by the ADDF. The conference had financial support from the pharmaceutical companies Merck & Co., Eli Lilly & Co. and Pfizer, Inc. Friends, exhibitors and media partners also helped financially support the conference.

  1. 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies Task Force. Report on antiphospholipid syndrome laboratory diagnostics and trends.

    PubMed

    Bertolaccini, Maria Laura; Amengual, Olga; Andreoli, Laura; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Chighizola, Cecilia B; Forastiero, Ricardo; de Groot, Philip; Lakos, Gabriella; Lambert, Marc; Meroni, Pierluigi; Ortel, Thomas L; Petri, Michelle; Rahman, Anisur; Roubey, Robert; Sciascia, Savino; Snyder, Melissa; Tebo, Anne E; Tincani, Angela; Willis, Rohan

    2014-09-01

    Current classification criteria for definite Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) require the use of three laboratory assays to detect antiphospholipid antibodies (aCL, anti-β2GPI and LA) in the presence of at least one of the two major clinical manifestations (i.e. thrombosis or pregnancy morbidity) of the syndrome. However, several other autoantibodies shown to be directed to other proteins or their complex with phospholipids have been proposed to be relevant to APS but their clinical utility and their diagnostic value remains elusive. This report summarizes the findings, conclusions and recommendations of the "APS Task Force 3-Laboratory Diagnostics and Trends" meeting that took place during the 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (APLA 2013, September 18-21, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil).

  2. Radio imaging spectroscopy of synchrotron emission associated with a CME on the 14th of August 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Hazel; Krucker, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Raftery, C.

    2013-07-01

    We present Nancay Radioheliograph observations of a moving type IV solar radio burst which occurred in association with a CME on the 14th of August 2010. The event was well observed at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, the SWAP instrument onboard Proba2 and by the LASCO white light coronograph. The burst emission was found to be cospatial with the core of the CME. Using radio imaging spectroscopy we are able to characterize the underlying electron distribution and plasma parameters within the source. Fitted spectra reveal a clear power law component consistent with optically thin synchrotron emission from accelerated electrons trapped in the erupting flux rope. As is often observed in type IV bursts, polarization measurements show the source to be moderately polarized during the peak of the burst, before steadily increasing to around 70% as the brightness temperature of the burst decays.

  3. The 14th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and related retroviruses (July 1–4, 2009; Salvador, Brazil)

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Luc

    2009-01-01

    The "14th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and Related Retroviruses" was held in Salvador, Bahia, from July 1st to July 4th 2009. The aim of this biennial meeting is to promote discussion and share new findings between researchers and clinicians for the benefit of patients infected by human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV). HTLV infects approximately 15–20 million individuals worldwide and causes a broad spectrum of diseases including neurodegeneration and leukemia. The scientific program included a breadth of HTLV research topics: epidemiology, host immune response, basic mechanisms of protein function, virology, pathogenesis, clinical aspects and treatment. Exciting new findings were presented in these different fields, and the new advances have led to novel clinical trials. Here, highlights from this conference are summarized. PMID:19686596

  4. Archaeological Zelliges of Meknes (14th-century): Physical measurements of the colour and identification of colouring agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Amara, A.; Azzou, A.; Haddad, M.; Schvoerer, M.; Ney, C.; Lyazidi, S. Ait; Molinié, P.

    2005-03-01

    Two series of Zelliges belonging to the Filalia and Bou-Inaniya Medersas (14th-century) in Meknes city have been studied in order to describe precisely the colour of the glazes and to identify the chromogen agents responsible for these colours. The glaze colours are physically studied by the determination of their chromatic coordinates using chromametry method. These coordinates are represented in the conventional Yxy and L*a*b* spaces. Furthermore the chromogen ions, responsible for the different colour shades, are identified by optical absorption spectrometry (OAS) and by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) methods. These ions are the classical ones: copper (Cu2+) for the green, cobalt (Co2+) for the blue, iron (Fe3+) for the honey colour and iron (Fe3+) in association with manganese (Mn3+) for the black.

  5. 14th congress of combustion by-products and their health effects-origin, fate, and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources.

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Eva; Andersson, Patrik L; Bidleman, Terry; Boman, Christoffer; Carlin, Danielle J; Collina, Elena; Cormier, Stephania A; Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra C; Gullett, Brian K; Johansson, Christer; Lucas, Donald; Lundin, Lisa; Lundstedt, Staffan; Marklund, Stellan; Nording, Malin L; Ortuño, Nuria; Sallam, Asmaa A; Schmidt, Florian M; Jansson, Stina

    2016-04-01

    The 14th International Congress on Combustion By-Products and Their Health Effects was held in Umeå, Sweden from June 14th to 17th, 2015. The Congress, mainly sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program and the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, focused on the "Origin, fate and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources". The international delegates included academic and government researchers, engineers, scientists, policymakers and representatives of industrial partners. The Congress provided a unique forum for the discussion of scientific advances in this research area since it addressed in combination the health-related issues and the environmental implications of combustion by-products. The scientific outcomes of the Congress included the consensus opinions that: (a) there is a correlation between human exposure to particulate matter and increased cardiac and respiratory morbidity and mortality; (b) because currently available data does not support the assessment of differences in health outcomes between biomass smoke and other particulates in outdoor air, the potential human health and environmental impacts of emerging air-pollution sources must be addressed. Assessment will require the development of new approaches to characterize combustion emissions through advanced sampling and analytical methods. The Congress also concluded the need for better and more sustainable e-waste management and improved policies, usage and disposal methods for materials containing flame retardants.

  6. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in the National Park ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in the National Park Service, U.S.S. Arizona Memorial, 14th Naval District Photograph Collection), 14th ND PHOG No. 15233. U.S. Navy photograph, 1942. VIEW SHOWS CONSTRUCTION OF DRYDOCK NO. 3 (FACILITY S781). - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Waterfront Facilities, Various locations throughout base, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Passive smoking and stroke in men and women: a national population-based case-control study in China.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lei; Han, Wei; Jiang, Jingmei; Liu, Boqi; Wu, Yanping; Zou, Xiaonong; Xue, Fang; Chen, Yuanli; Zhang, Biao; Pang, Haiyu; Wang, Yuyan; Wang, Zixing; Hu, Yaoda; Li, Junyao

    2017-03-31

    An association between passive smoking and stroke is unclear in China, particularly the association with hemorrhagic stroke. This study included 16205 deaths due to stroke aged ≥30 years and 16205 non-stroke controls randomly selected and frequency-matched to cases on gender and age. Smoking of spouses, defined as ≥1 cigarette per day for up to 1 year, was taken as a measure of exposure to passive smoking of subjects that was retrospectively ascertained by interviewing surviving spouses. After adjustment for variables, passive smoking increased the risk of death by 10% (odds ratio (OR), 1.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.05-1.16) for all strokes, by 10% (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.04-1.16) for hemorrhagic stroke, and by 12% (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.03-1.23) for ischemic stroke, compared with non-exposure. This finding was highly consistent in men or women and in smokers or non-smokers, and was generally consistent among zones of China despite geographic diversity. The risk significantly increased with exposure-years and quantity of cigarettes smoked daily by spouses. This study indicated that passive smoking is associated with deaths from all-type strokes. It is highly advisable for the government to promote strong tobacco prevention and cessation programs and smoke-free environments.

  8. Passive smoking and stroke in men and women: a national population-based case-control study in China

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Lei; Han, Wei; Jiang, Jingmei; Liu, Boqi; Wu, Yanping; Zou, Xiaonong; Xue, Fang; Chen, Yuanli; Zhang, Biao; Pang, Haiyu; Wang, Yuyan; Wang, Zixing; Hu, Yaoda; Li, Junyao

    2017-01-01

    An association between passive smoking and stroke is unclear in China, particularly the association with hemorrhagic stroke. This study included 16205 deaths due to stroke aged ≥30 years and 16205 non-stroke controls randomly selected and frequency-matched to cases on gender and age. Smoking of spouses, defined as ≥1 cigarette per day for up to 1 year, was taken as a measure of exposure to passive smoking of subjects that was retrospectively ascertained by interviewing surviving spouses. After adjustment for variables, passive smoking increased the risk of death by 10% (odds ratio (OR), 1.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.05–1.16) for all strokes, by 10% (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.04–1.16) for hemorrhagic stroke, and by 12% (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.03–1.23) for ischemic stroke, compared with non-exposure. This finding was highly consistent in men or women and in smokers or non-smokers, and was generally consistent among zones of China despite geographic diversity. The risk significantly increased with exposure-years and quantity of cigarettes smoked daily by spouses. This study indicated that passive smoking is associated with deaths from all-type strokes. It is highly advisable for the government to promote strong tobacco prevention and cessation programs and smoke-free environments. PMID:28361935

  9. Yeasts for Global Happiness: report of the 14th International Congress on Yeasts (ICY14) held in Awaji Island.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    The 14th International Congress on Yeasts (ICY14) was held at Awaji Yumebutai International Conference Center (Awaji, Hyogo) in Japan from 11 to 15 September 2016. The main slogan of ICY14 was 'Yeasts for Global Happiness', which enabled us to acknowledge the high-potential usefulness of yeasts contributing to the global happiness in terms of food/beverage, health/medicine and energy/environment industries, as well as to basic biosciences. In addition, two more concepts were introduced: 'from Japan to the world' and 'from senior to junior'. As it was the first ICY meeting held in Japan or other Asian countries, ICY14 provided a good opportunity to widely spread the great achievements by Japanese and Asian yeast researchers, such as those by the 2016 Nobel Laureate Dr. Yoshinori Ohsumi, and also, to convey the fun and importance of yeasts to the next generation of researchers from Asia and all over the world. As a result, a total of 426 yeast lovers from 42 countries (225 overseas and 201 domestic participants) with different generations attended ICY14 to share the latest knowledge of a wide range of yeast research fields and to join active and constructive scientific discussions.

  10. Food on foot: long-distance trade in slaughter oxen between Denmark and the Netherlands (14th-18th century).

    PubMed

    Gijsbers, W; Koolmees, P

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a short review of the long-distance trade in slaughter oxen in Northwest Europe. The long-term development of the trade is described against the social-economic background of the production and consumption areas. In the 14th century, the Danes obtained the right to sell cattle in certain Dutch cities. From 1500 onwards, the export of oxen from Denmark and the adjacent duchy of Schleswig-Holstein increased considerably. The export reached its peak in the first quarter of the 17th century; registered export in 1612 amounted to more than 52.000 oxen over land and, in 1624, about 10.000 oxen over sea. Part of that export was destined for the Dutch market. Protectionist tax measures taken by the Dutch government and the outbreaks of rinderpest put an end to the regular ox trade in the first half of the 18th century. By decree, local authorities tried to prevent the spread of contagious animal diseases. The history of international cattle trade and hauling, however, indicates that economic motives largely outweighed animal welfare issues. Thus, in addition to addressing the logistics of the trade, this paper also addresses veterinary aspects and animal welfare issues related to the transport of cattle.

  11. Proceedings of the Annual International Conference on Outdoor Recreation and Education (ICORE) (14th, Oxford, Ohio, November 7-12, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freidline, Mark, Ed.; Phipps, Maurice, Ed.; Moore, Tim, Ed.; Versteeg, Julie, Ed.

    This proceedings contains 15 conference papers and presentation summaries from the 14th annual International Conference on Outdoor Recreation and Education (ICORE). Titles are: "The Hidden Costs of Outdoor Education/Recreation Academic Training" (Christian Bisson); "The Service Learning Concept: Service Learning in the National…

  12. ED-MEDIA 2002 World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications. Proceedings (14th, Denver, Colorado, June 24-29, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Philip, Ed.; Rebelsky, Samuel, Ed.

    This 14th annual ED-MEDIA conference serves as a multi-disciplinary forum for the discussion and exchange of information on the research, development, and applications on all topics related to multimedia, hypermedia and telecommunications/distance education. ED-MEDIA, the premiere international conference in the field, spans all disciplines and…

  13. Dealing with Diversity: A Key Issue for Educational Management. Proceedings of the ENIRDEM Conference (14th, Brno and Telc, the Czech Republic, September 22-25, 2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pol, Milan, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    An anthology of speeches of the 14th conference of the European Network for Improving Research and Development in Educational Management (ENIRDEM), held on 22 to 25 September 2005 in Brno and Telc, the Czech Republic, this book contains 13 contributions by 19 speakers and co-authors, covering various questions related to the topic of diversity in…

  14. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council of Graduate Schools in the United States (14th, Phoenix, Arizona, December 4-6, 1974).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, John W., Ed.

    The report of the 14th annual meeting of the Council of Graduate Schools presents a seminar on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Board by Lorene I. Rogers, Lincoln E. Moses, Warren W. Willingham, and Herman A. Witkin. The task force on Biomedical Sciences report is presented by Jerold Roschwalb, Lyle V. Jones, Robert H. Grant, and Penny D.…

  15. 14th EuCheMS International Conference on Chemistry and the Environment ICCE 2013: IEC-WTC, Barcelona, Spain, 25-28 June 2013.

    PubMed

    Luis, Santiago V; Jover, Eric

    2014-10-01

    The 14th European Association of Chemical and Molecular Sciences (EuCheMS) International Conference on Chemistry and the Environment (ICCE 2013) took place on 25-28 June 2013 at the IEC and the WTC in Barcelona, Spain. The ICCE is a well-established biannual conference organized by the Division of Chemistry and the EuCheMS.

  16. Mobility, mortality, and the middle ages: identification of migrant individuals in a 14th century black death cemetery population.

    PubMed

    Kendall, E J; Montgomery, J; Evans, J A; Stantis, C; Mueller, V

    2013-02-01

    Mobility and migration patterns of groups and individuals have long been a topic of interest to archaeologists, used for broad explanatory models of cultural change as well as illustrations of historical particularism. The 14th century AD was a tumultuous period of history in Britain, with severely erratic weather patterns, the Great Famine of 1315-1322, the Scottish Wars of Independence, and the Hundred Years' War providing additional migration pressures to the ordinary economic issues drawing individuals to their capital under more stable conditions. East Smithfield Black Death Cemetery (Royal Mint) had a documented use period of only 2 years (AD 1348-1350), providing a precise historical context (∼50 years) for data. Adults (n = 30) from the East Smithfield site were sampled for strontium and oxygen stable isotope analyses of tooth enamel. Five individuals were demonstrated to be statistical outliers through the combined strontium and oxygen isotope data. Potential origins for migrants ranged from London's surrounding hinterlands to distant portions of northern and western Britain. Historic food sourcing practices for London were found to be an important factor for consideration in a broader than expected (87) Sr/(86) Sr range reflected in a comparison of enamel samples from three London datasets. The pooled dataset demonstrated a high level of consistency between site data, divergent from the geologically predicted range. We argue that this supports the premise that isotope data in human populations must be approached as a complex interaction between behavior and environment and thus should be interpreted cautiously with the aid of alternate lines of evidence.

  17. PREFACE: 14th Annual International Astrophysics Conference: Linear and Nonlinear Particle Energization throughout the Heliosphere and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.

    2015-09-01

    The 14th Annual International Astrophysics Conference was held at the Sheraton Tampa Riverwalk Hotel, Tampa, Florida, USA, during the week of 19-24 April 2015. The meeting drew some 75 participants from all over the world, representing a wide range of interests and expertise in the energization of particles from the perspectives of theory, modelling and simulations, and observations. The theme of the meeting was "Linear and Nonlinear Particle Energization throughout the Heliosphere and Beyond." Energetic particles are ubiquitous to plasma environments, whether collisionless such as the supersonic solar wind, the magnetospheres of planets, the exospheres of nonmagnetized planets and comets, the heliospheric-local interstellar boundary regions, interstellar space and supernova remnant shocks, and stellar wind boundaries. Energetic particles are found too in more collisional regions such as in the solar corona, dense regions of the interstellar medium, accretion flows around stellar objects, to name a few. Particle acceleration occurs wherever plasma boundaries, magnetic and electric fields, and turbulence are present. The meeting addressed the linear and nonlinear physical processes underlying the variety of particle acceleration mechanisms, the role of particle acceleration in shaping different environments, and acceleration processes common to different regions. Both theory and observations were addressed with a view to encouraging crossdisciplinary fertilization of ideas, concepts, and techniques. The meeting addressed all aspects of particle acceleration in regions ranging from the Sun to the interplanetary medium to magnetospheres, exospheres, and comets, the boundaries of the heliosphere, and beyond to supernova remnant shocks, galactic jets, stellar winds, accretion flows, and more. The format of the meeting included 25-minute presentations punctuated by two 40-minute talks, one by Len Fisk that provided an historical overview of particle acceleration in the

  18. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    It is our great pleasure to welcome you to the 14th International Conference on Micro- and Nano-Technology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications, or PowerMEMS 2014, in Awaji Island, Japan. The aim of PowerMEM is to present the latest research results in the field of miniature, micro- and nano-scale technologies for power generation and energy conversion. The conference will also- give us the opportunity to exchange informations and new ideas in the field of Power MEMS/NEMS. The current status of the field of PowerMEMS spans the full spectrum from basic research to practical applications. We will enjoy valuable discussions not only from the viewpoint of academia but from commercial and industrial perspectives. In the conference, three invited speakers lead the technical program. We received 172 abstracts and after a careful reviewing process by the Technical Program Committee a total of 133 papers were selected for presentation. These have been organized into 16 Oral sessions in two parallel streams and two poster sessions including some late-news papers. The oral and regular poster papers are published by the Institute of Physics (IOP). We have also organized a PowerMEMS School in Kobe-Sannomiya contiguous to the main conference. This two-day school will cover various topics of energy harvesting. World leading experts will give invited lectures on their main topics. This is a new experiment to broaden the technology remit of our conference by organizing mini symposiums that aim to gather the latest research on the following topics by the organizers: Microscale Combustion, Wideband Vibration Energy Harvesting, RF Energy Transfer and Industrial Application. We hope this, and other activities will make PowerMEMS2014 a memorable success. One of the important programs in an international conference is the social program, and we prepare the PowerMEMS2014 banquet in the banquet room at the Westin Awaji Island Hotel. This will provide an opportunity to

  19. Mariculture associated with oil and gas structures: A compendium. Information transfer meeting (14th), mariculture sessions. Held in New Orleans, Louisiana on November 17, 1994. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reggio, V.C.

    1996-09-01

    Increased interest in the use of offshore oil and gas platforms for growing coastal and pelagic fish and shellfish for commercial markets led to MMS to sponsor a forum on this topic. This report encompasses the views, opinions, constraints, limitations, possibilities, and proposals from representative of the public and private sectors with interest and concern for fishery development in the Gulf of Mexico. This report provides summaries of the presentations given at the mariculture session during the 14th Annual Information transfer Meeting held in New Orleans in November 1994.

  20. An estimation of the primary proton spectrum between 10 to the 12th and 10 to the 14th eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaisser, T. K.; Siohan, F.; Yodh, G. B.

    1978-01-01

    Based on measurements of unaccompanied charged hadron flux from 10 to the 11th to 10 to the 14th eV at mountain altitudes, the primary proton flux is estimated using recently determined proton-proton total cross sections from new measurements of the real part of the forward scattering amplitude at ISR, and Glauber theory to calculate proton-air inelastic cross section. The derived spectrum agrees well with extrapolation of the direct measurements below 2 times 10 to the 12th eV without change of slope.

  1. Primary proton and helium spectra in the energy range 10 to the 12th to 10 to the 14th eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.; Ogata, T.; Saito, T.; Holynski, R.; Jurak, A.; Wolter, W.; Wosiek, B.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Parnell, T. A.; Jones, W. V.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of proton and helium spectra have been made in the energy range 10 to the 12th to 10 to the 14th eV. Large area thin emulsion calorimeters were used in the Japanese American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment balloon flight series. Power indices of the integral spectra for both nuclei are consistent with published data at lower energies. Absolute intensities are also consistent for helium and proton fluxes with extrapolations of previous data. No steepening of the proton spectrum is indicated.

  2. Microscopic analysis of "iron spot" on blue-and-white porcelain from Jingdezhen imperial kiln in early Ming dynasty (14th-15th century).

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenxuan; Zhu, Jian; Jiang, Jianxin; Xu, Changqing; Wu, Shurong; Guan, Li; Zhang, Zhaoxia; Wu, Menglei; Du, Jingnan

    2016-11-01

    "Sumali," as an imported cobalt ore from overseas, was a sort of precious and valuable pigment used for imperial kilns only, which produces characteristic "iron spot" to blue-and-white porcelain in early Ming Dynasty (A.D. 14th-15th century). Although there were some old studies on it, the morphology and formation of iron spot has not been fully investigated and understood. Therefore, five selected samples with typical spot from Jingdezhen imperial kiln in Ming Yongle periods (A.D. 1403-1424) were analyzed by various microscopic analysis including 3D digital microscope, SEM-EDS and EPMA. According to SEM images, samples can be divided into three groups: un-reflected "iron spot" without crystals, un-reflected "iron spot" with crystals and reflected "iron spot" with crystals. Furthermore, 3D micro-images revealed that "iron spots" separate out dendritic or snow-shaped crystals of iron only on and parallel to the surface of glaze for which "iron spot" show strong metallic luster. Combining with microscopic observation and microanalysis on crystallization and non-crystallization areas, it indicates that firing oxygen concentration is the ultimate causation of forming reflective iron spot which has a shallower distribution below the surface and limits crystals growing down. More details about characters of "iron spot" used "Sumali" were found and provided new clues to coloration, formation mechanism and porcelain producing technology of imperial kiln from 14th to 15th centuries of China.

  3. Primary Therapy of Patients with Early Breast Cancer: Evidence, Controversies, Consensus: Opinions of German Specialists to the 14th St. Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference 2015 (Vienna 2015).

    PubMed

    Untch, M; Harbeck, N; Huober, J; von Minckwitz, G; Gerber, B; Kreipe, H-H; Liedtke, C; Marschner, N; Möbus, V; Scheithauer, H; Schneeweiss, A; Thomssen, C; Jackisch, C; Beckmann, M W; Blohmer, J-U; Costa, S-D; Decker, T; Diel, I; Fasching, P A; Fehm, T; Janni, W; Lück, H-J; Maass, N; Scharl, A; Loibl, S

    2015-06-01

    For the first time, this year's St. Gallen International Consensus Conference on the treatment of patients with primary breast cancer, which takes place every two years, was held not in St. Gallen (Switzerland) but - for logistical reasons - in Vienna (Austria) under its usual name. The 2015 St. Gallen International Consensus Conference was the 14th of its kind. As the international panel of the St. Gallen conference consists of experts from different countries, the consensus mirrors an international cross-section of opinions. From a German perspective, it was considered useful to translate the results of the votes of the St. Gallen conference into practical suggestions, particularly in light of the recently updated treatment guideline of the Gynecologic Oncology Group (AGO-Mamma 2015) in Germany. A German group consisting of 14 breast cancer experts, three of whom are members of the international St. Gallen panel, has therefore provided comments on the results of this year's votes at the 2015 St. Gallen Consensus Conference and their impact on clinical care in Germany. The 14th St. Gallen conference once again focused on surgery of the breast and the axilla, radio-oncologic and systemic treatment options for primary breast cancer depending on tumor biology, and the clinical use of multigene assays. The conference also considered targeted therapies for older and for younger patients, including the diagnosis/treatment of breast cancer during and after pregnancy and the preservation of fertility.

  4. The influence of sandstone caprock material on bedrock channel steepness within a tectonically passive setting: Buffalo National River Basin, Arkansas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaler, E. A.; Covington, M. D.

    2016-09-01

    Bedrock channel profile analysis typically assumes that channels evolve toward a condition of topographic steady state where channel morphology is adjusted to rock erodibility, uplift rates, and stream power. Here we use the integral method of channel profile analysis to quantify channel steepness within a large set of tributary channels that incise through layered rocks in the Buffalo National River Basin in northern Arkansas. Statistical analysis of these channels demonstrates that normalized channel steepness is not a function of local bedrock lithology but is influenced by coarse sediment supply. Specifically, normalized steepness is greatest in reaches of the basin where an interval of Pennsylvanian sandstone forms a caprock on the ridges. Block detachment of the sandstone causes large boulders to be stranded in the upper tributaries where stream power is too low to mobilize or effectively erode the boulders. Within these channels, normalized steepness is correlated with sandstone boulder size and percent boulder coverage rather than local lithology, despite strong contrasts in the mechanical strength of the lithologies incised. This analysis suggests that removal of caprock material is rate limiting within the landscape and may be responsible for the long-term persistence of topography within this tectonically passive setting.

  5. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in National Park Service, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in National Park Service, U.S.S. Arizona Memorial, 14th Naval District Photograph Collection), 14th ND PHOG no. PH 00-46. U.S. Navy photograph, 1946. FACILITY 250 AT MAKALAPA WITH ADDED WOOD-FRAMED STORIES. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Headquarters, Commander-in-Chief of the Pacific Fleet, Intersection of Halawa & Makalapa Drives, Makalapa Administration Area, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in the National Park ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in the National Park Service, U.S.S. Arizona Memorial, 14th Naval District Photograph Collection), 14th ND Temp. No. 890. U.S. Navy photograph, circa 1935. CONSTRUCTION OF THE REPAIR BASIN (FACILITIES B12 THROUGH B21) PROCEEDED QUICKLY AS DID THE ERECTION OF THE 200-TON HAMMERHEAD CRANE (BASE VISIBLE ON LEFT). - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Waterfront Facilities, Various locations throughout base, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in the National Park ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in the National Park Service, U.S.S. Arizona Memorial, 14th Naval District Photograph Collection), 14th ND PHOG No. 2984. U.S. Navy photograph, August 1919. VIEW OF COALING STATION FROM RADIO TOWER NO. 1. REMNANTS OF THE COAL STATION WALLS AND PIER (FACILITY O1) REMAIN. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Waterfront Facilities, Various locations throughout base, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in the National Park ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in the National Park Service, U.S.S. Arizona Memorial, 14th Naval District Photograph Collection), 14th ND PHOG No. P.H. 4175-42. U.S. Navy photograph, 1942. THE NAVAL SUPPLY DEPOT’S HUGE FUELING PIER (FACILITY H1-H4) HELPED KEEP THE FLEET MOVING DURING WORLD WAR II. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Waterfront Facilities, Various locations throughout base, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in the National Park ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in the National Park Service, U.S.S. Arizona Memorial, 14th Naval District Photograph Collection), 14th ND Temp. No. 722. U.S. Navy photograph, early 1930s. BERTHING AT THE SUBMARINE BASE INCLUDED THE FOUR PIERS (NOW GONE) AND SOME OF THE QUAYWALL (FACILITIES S10 TO S12) ALONG MAGAZINE LOCK. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Waterfront Facilities, Various locations throughout base, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. 75 FR 25878 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ... Register of Historic Places/National Historic Landmarks Program. ALABAMA Calhoun County Downtown Anniston Historic District (Boundary Increase), Bounded by Wilmer & Walnut Aves., W. 9th & 14th Sts.,...

  11. Better vaccines for healthier life. Part II. Conference report of the DCVMN International 14th Annual General Meeting Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Tippoo, Patrick; Sivaramakrishnan, Venkatraman; Nguyen, Thuvan

    2014-11-12

    New vaccines are required to meet the public health challenges of the next generation and many unmet global health needs can be addressed by developing countries vaccine manufacturers such as lower-cost vaccines based on single-dose, thermostable formulations, efficacious in children with compromised gastrointestinal tracts. GMP compliance is also a challenge, as sometimes innovation and clinical development focus is not accompanied by command of scale-up and quality assurance for large volume manufacturing and supply. Identifying and addressing such challenges, beyond cost and cold-chain space, including safety considerations and health worker behavior, regulatory alliances and harmonization to foster access to vaccines, will help countries to ensure sustainable immunization. There needs to be continuous and close management of the global vaccine supply both at national and international levels, requiring careful risk management, coordination and cooperation with manufacturers. Successful partnership models based on sharing a common goal, mutual respect and good communication were discussed among stakeholders.

  12. [Learning to read Pierre Lombard's Books of Sentences at the University of Paris in the 13(th) and 14 (th) centuries].

    PubMed

    Angotti, Claire

    2012-01-01

    In the middle ages, the ability to offer an oral commentary on Pierre Lombard's Books of Sentences was seen as an essential step in the training of masters of theology (maîtres régents). This was an exercise done by bachelors. While the first university statutes say little about this exercise, later statutes, particularly in the 14(th) century, suggest that it was carried out by following very strict guidelines. This article posits that students actually followed a number of « model commentaries » because the masters applied the methodology of exegesis. Looking at the manuscripts and their critical apparatus, this article offers a better understanding of the lectio of the Books of Sentences.

  13. Calibration of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Passive-Active Neutron Drum Shuffler for Measurement of Highly Enriched Uranium in Mixed Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, M; O'Connell, W; Cochran, C; Rinard, P; Dearborn, D; Endres, E

    2002-05-23

    As a follow-on to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) effort to calibrate the LLNL passive-active neutron drum (PAN) shuffler for measurement of highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide, a method has been developed to extend the use of the PAN shuffler to the measurement of HEU in mixed uranium-plutonium (U-Pu) oxide. This method uses the current LLNL HEU oxide calibration algorithms, appropriately corrected for the mixed U-Pu oxide assay time, and recently developed PuO{sub 2} calibration algorithms to yield the mass of {sup 235}U present via differences between the expected count rate for the PuO{sub 2} and the measured count rate of the mixed U-Pu oxide. This paper describes the LLNL effort to use PAN shuffler measurements of units of certified reference material (CRM) 149 [uranium (93% Enriched) Oxide - U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Standard for Neutron Counting Measurements] and CRM 146 [Uranium Isotopic Standard for Gamma Spectrometry Measurements] and a selected set of LLNL PuO{sub 2}-bearing containers in consort with Monte Carlo simulations of the PAN shuffler response to each to (1) establish and validate a correction to the HEU calibration algorithm for the mixed U-Pu oxide assay time, (2) develop a PuO{sub 2} calibration algorithm that includes the effect of PuO{sub 2} density (2.4 g/cm{sup 3} to 4.8 g/cm{sup 3}) and container size (8.57 cm to 9.88 cm inside diameter and 9.60 cm to 13.29 cm inside height) on the PAN shuffler response, and (3) develop and validate the method for establishing the mass of {sup 235}U present in an unknown of mixed U-Pu oxide.

  14. Update on Calibration of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Passive-Active Neutron Drum Shuffler for Measurement of Highly Enriched Uranium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, M; O'Connell, W; Cochran, C; Rinard, P; Dearborn, D; Endres, E

    2002-05-17

    In October of 1999, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began an effort to calibrate the LLNL passive-active neutron (PAN) drum shuffler for measurement of highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide. A single unit of certified reference material (CRM) 149 [Uranium (93% Enriched) Oxide - U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Standard for Neutron Counting Measurements] was used to (1) develop a mass calibration curve for HEU oxide in the nominal range of 393 g to 3144 g {sup 235}U, and (2) perform a detailed axial and radial mapping of the detector response over a wide region of the PAN shuffler counting chamber. Results from these efforts were reported at the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management 41st Annual Meeting in July 2000. This paper describes subsequent efforts by LLNL to use a unit of CRM 146 [Uranium Isotopic Standard for Gamma Spectrometry Measurements] in consort with Monte Carlo simulations of the PAN shuffler response to CRM 149 and CRM 146 units and a selected set of containers with CRM 149-equivalent U{sub 3}O{sub 8} to (1) extend the low range of the reported mass calibration curve to 10 g {sup 235}U, (2) evaluate the effect of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} density (2.4 g/cm{sup 3} to 4.8 g/cm{sup 3}) and container size (5.24 cm to 12.17 cm inside diameter and 6.35 cm to 17.72 cm inside height) on the PAN shuffler response, and (3) develop mass calibration curves for U{sub 3}O{sub 8} enriched to 20.1 wt% {sup 235}U and 52.5 wt% {sup 235}U.

  15. Forging Connections in Adult Higher Education. National Conference on Alternative and External Degree Programs for Adults (14th, San Francisco, California, October 6-8, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC.

    This document contains the following 25 papers from a conference on adult higher educational practices: "Learning and Workplace Linkages via Applied Research Projects" (Elaine Cahalan Hollensbe, Linda Hauber); "Practical Action Research in Non-Traditional Students' Senior Projects" (Elliott Lauderdale); "Obtaining the Elusive: An Innovative Degree…

  16. Attaining Excellence in the 80's. Research in Agricultural Education. Proceedings of the Annual National Agricultural Education Research Meeting (14th, Las Vegas, Nevada, December 4, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannebach, Alfred J., Comp.

    Among the 36 research papers and critiques are "A Comparison of 1972 and 1980 Secondary Agricultural Education Students" (Navaratnam, Oliver); "A Day Late and a Dollar Short" (Moore); "Assessment of Preservice Preparation by Recent Graduates of Agricultural Education Programs" (Yahya, Burnett); "Characteristics and Activities of Vocational…

  17. The Magic of Technology. NECC 1993: Proceedings of the Annual National Educational Computing Conference (14th, Orlando, Florida, June 27-30, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brubaker, Thomas, A., Ed.; And Others

    These conference proceedings address the capabilities of technology in education. Papers and summaries of presentations are provided on the following topics: programs for special needs students; virtual realities; funding opportunities; videodiscs; future programs and perspectives; telecomputing; computer networks in the classroom; human…

  18. 76 FR 67669 - National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... Forest Service National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council will meet..., Executive Staff to the National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council, 201 14th Street, SW.,...

  19. Image Understanding, 14th Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, L. S.

    1983-06-01

    Technical and annual progress reports of principal investigators of image understanding are presented. Topics covered include: surface constraint from linear entents; computing visual correspondance; smoothing optical flow fields; viewframes; a connectionist model of form perception; use of difference fields in processing sensor motion; a facet approach to optic flow; special purpose automatic programming for 3-d model-based vision; MAPS: organization of a spatial data base system using imagery, terrain, and map data; segment-based stereo matching; software metrics for performance analysis of parallel hardware; scene analysis algorithms; and robot vehicles.

  20. Genotyping Yersinia pestis in Historical Plague: Evidence for Long-Term Persistence of Y. pestis in Europe from the 14th to the 17th Century.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Lisa; Wiechmann, Ingrid; Harbeck, Michaela; Thomas, Astrid; Grupe, Gisela; Projahn, Michaela; Scholz, Holger C; Riehm, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) recovered from plague victims of the second plague pandemic (14th to 17th century), excavated from two different burial sites in Germany, and spanning a time period of more than 300 years, was characterized using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. Of 30 tested skeletons 8 were positive for Yersinia pestis-specific nucleic acid, as determined by qPCR targeting the pla gene. In one individual (MP-19-II), the pla copy number in DNA extracted from tooth pulp was as high as 700 gene copies/μl, indicating severe generalized infection. All positive individuals were identical in all 16 SNP positions, separating phylogenetic branches within nodes N07_N10 (14 SNPs), N07_N08 (SNP s19) and N06_N07 (s545), and were highly similar to previously investigated plague victims from other European countries. Thus, beside the assumed continuous reintroduction of Y. pestis from central Asia in multiple waves during the second pandemic, long-term persistence of Y. pestis in Europe in a yet unknown reservoir host has also to be considered.

  1. Passive solar technology

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D

    1981-04-01

    The present status of passive solar technology is summarized, including passive solar heating, cooling and daylighting. The key roles of the passive solar system designer and of innovation in the building industry are described. After definitions of passive design and a summary of passive design principles are given, performance and costs of passive solar technology are discussed. Passive energy design concepts or methods are then considered in the context of the overall process by which building decisions are made to achieve the integration of new techniques into conventional design. (LEW).

  2. Effects of prenatal X-irradiation on the 14th-18th days of gestation on postnatal growth and development in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jensh, R.P.; Brent, R.L.

    1988-11-01

    Thirty-nine pregnant adult Wistar strain rats were randomly assigned to one of three exposure groups: 0, 0.75, or 1.50 Gy X-radiation total exposure. Animals were exposed from the 14th to the 18th days of gestation at 0, 0.15, or 0.30 Gy per day. At term, 15 rats were killed and morphologic analyses were completed. Twenty-four rats were allowed to deliver their offspring. On the first day of postnatal life, litters were reduced to a maximum of eight pups per litter, with equal numbers of male and female offspring wherever possible. A total of 187 pups were observed for the age of acquisition of five reflexes (air righting, surface righting, visual placing, negative geotaxis, auditory startle) and the appearance of four physiologic markers (pinna detachment, eye opening, vaginal opening, testes descent). There was significant dose-related weight reduction in term fetuses and offspring throughout the 86-day postnatal period. Postnatal growth rate (g gained/day) was unaffected. Adult offspring brain and gonadal weight and organ weight:body weight ratios were reduced. Using the PAC50 methodology, dose-related alterations occurred in the acquisition of several reflexes. All physiologic markers exhibited a dose-related delay in appearance. These results indicate that fractionated exposure to X-radiation during the fetal period in the rat results in dose-dependent alterations in postnatal growth and physiologic development. These studies are important for our understanding of the long-range effects of prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation late in gestation.

  3. 77 FR 59888 - National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... Forest Service National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council will meet... Forestry Advisory Council, 201 14th Street SW., Yates Building (1 Central) MS-1151, Washington, DC...

  4. Floodplain deposits, channel changes and riverbank stratigraphy of the Mekong River area at the 14th-Century city of Chiang Saen, Northern Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Spencer H.; Ziegler, Alan D.; Bundarnsin, Tharaporn

    2008-10-01

    edges as arcuate cuts of similar curvature into the saprolite-mantled bedrock hills These features indicate channel avulsion occurred by meander loop cutoff in the past. Brick Buddhist monuments of the 14th-16th Century were built upon the floodplain with meander features on the Thai and Laos side of the river, indicating that these meandering channel features and the broader floodplain are mostly older than 600 years.

  5. PREFACE: European Microbeam Analysis Society's 14th European Workshop on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis (EMAS 2015), Portorož, Slovenia, 3-7 May 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovet, Xavier; Matthews, Michael B.; Čeh, Miran; Langer, Enrico; Žagar, Kristina

    2016-02-01

    This volume of the IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering contains papers from the 14th Workshop of the European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis which took place from the 3rd to the 7th of May 2015 in the Grand Hotel Bernardin, Portorož, Slovenia. The primary aim of this series of workshops is to assess the state-of-the-art and reliability of microbeam analysis techniques. The workshops also provide a forum where students and young scientists starting out on a career in microbeam analysis can meet and discuss with the established experts. The workshops have a unique format comprising invited plenary lectures by internationally recognized experts, poster presentations by the participants and round table discussions on the key topics led by specialists in the field.This workshop was organized in collaboration with the Jožef Stefan Institute and SDM - Slovene Society for Microscopy. The technical programme included the following topics: electron probe microanalysis, STEM and EELS, materials applications, cathodoluminescence and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and their applications. As at previous workshops there was also a special oral session for young scientists. The best presentation by a young scientist was awarded with an invitation to attend the 2016 Microscopy and Microanalysis meeting at Columbus, Ohio. The prize went to Shirin Kaboli, of the Department of Metals and Materials Engineering of McGill University (Montréal, Canada), for her talk entitled "Electron channelling contrast reconstruction with electron backscattered diffraction". The continuing relevance of the EMAS workshops and the high regard in which they are held internationally can be seen from the fact that 71 posters from 16 countries were on display at the meeting and that the participants came from as far away as Japan, Canada, USA, and Australia. A selection of participants with posters was invited

  6. Tropospheric Passive Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The long term role of airborne/spaceborne passive remote sensing systems for tropospheric air quality research and the identification of technology advances required to improve the performance of passive remote sensing systems were discussed.

  7. Passive storage technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, P.

    1984-01-01

    Advances in storage technology and how passive techniques could be applied to the storage of propellants at the space station are described. The devices considered are passive orbital disconnect struts, cooled shield optimization, liftweight shields and catalytic converters.

  8. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and European Space Agency (ESA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. It is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The primary objective of this effort is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys.

  9. Historical flood data series of Eastern Spanish Coast (14th-20th centuries). Improving identification of climatic patterns and human factors of flood events from primary documentary sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberola, Armando; Barriendos, Mariano; Gil-Guirado, Salvador; Pérez-Morales, Alfredo; Balasch, Carles; Castelltort, Xavier; Mazón, Jordi; Pino, David; Lluís Ruiz-Bellet, Josep; Tuset, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Historical flood data series of Eastern Spanish Coast (14th-20th centuries). Improving identification of climatic patterns and human factors of flood events from primary documentary sources Armando Alberola, Barriendos, M., Gil-Guirado, S., Pérez Morales, A., Balasch, C., Castelltort, X., Mazón, J., Pino, D., Ruiz-Bellet, J.L., Tuset, J. Historical flood events in eastern spanish coast have been studied by different research groups and projects. Complexity of flood processes, involving atmospheric, surface and human factors, is not easily understandable when long time series are required. Present analysis from PREDIFLOOD Project Consortium defines a new step of flood event databases: Improved access to primary (documentary) and secondary (bibliographical) sources, data collection for all possible locations where floods are detected, and improved system of classification (Barriendos et al., 2014). A first analysis is applied to 8 selected flood series. Long chronologies from PREDIFLOOD Project for Catalonia region (Girona, Barcelona, Tarragona, Lleida, Tortosa). In addition, to cover all sector of spanish mediterranean coast, we introduce Valencia city in Turia River basin. South Eastern sector is cover with Murcia and Caravaca cities, Segura River basin. Extension of area under study required contributions of research teams experienced in work of documentary primary sources (Alberola, 2006; Gil-Guirado, 2013). Flood frequency analysis for long scale periods show natural climatic oscillations into so-called Little Ice Age. There are general patterns, affecting most of basins, but also some local anomalies or singularities. To explain these differences and analogies it is not enough to use purely climatic factors. In this way, we analyze human factors that have been able to influence the variability of floods along last 6 centuries (demography, hydraulic infrastructures, urban development...). This approach improves strongly understanding of mechanisms producing

  10. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in the National Park ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in the National Park Service, U.S.S. Arizona Memorial, 14th Naval District Photograph Collection), 14th ND C.W. No. P88-7864. U.S. Navy photograph, September 1933. VIEW OF THE MAIN SHIPYARD BERTHING. BY THIS DATE THE ORIGINAL 1010 DOCK (FACILITY B2) HAD BEEN EXTENDED AT EITHER END (FACILITIES B1 AND B3). THE SMALL BOAT LANDING (FACILITY N2) IS IN THE FOREGROUND. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Waterfront Facilities, Various locations throughout base, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. Toward A Research Framework to Bridge Cross-platform Error Characterization of Spaceborne Passive/Active Sensors using NOAA/NSSL Ground Radar-based National Mosaic QPE Products over CONUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstetter, P.; Hong, Y.; Gourley, J. J.; Cao, Q.; Schwaller, M.; Petersen, W. A.; Zhang, J.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Maggioni, V.; Seyyedi, H.; Chen, S.

    2012-12-01

    A characterization of the error associated to satellite rainfall estimates arises as major information for applications in evolving from deterministic to probabilistic frameworks. We focus here on the error structure of TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) and Microwave Imager (TMI) quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) at ground, a major issue for applications of derived products in rainfall estimation from space, water budget studies and hydrological modeling. Due to the variety of sources of error in spaceborne QPE the problem is addressed by comparison of satellite QPEs with reference values derived from ground-based measurements using NOAA/NSSL Ground Radar-based National Mosaic QPE (NMQ). Investigations have been carried out at fine scale (e.g. instantaneous and 5 km for PR) on the basis of several month data samples that explore the effects of regional climatology of the southern part of US. A significant effort has been carried out to derive a trustworthy reference rainfall from bias-corrected NMQ at fine spatial and temporal scales. A comparison framework has been developed to examine the consistency of the ground and space-based sensors in term of precipitation detection, characterization (e.g. convective, stratiform) and quantification. Specific error factors for passive (e.g. surface conditions for TMI) and active (e.g. attenuation of the radar signal, non uniform beam filling for PR) sensors are investigated. Systematic biases and random errors quantified at the satellite estimation scale are useful for satellite-based rainfall products. This cross-platform error characterization will ultimately act as a bridge to intercalibrate active and passive microwave measurements from the GPM core satellite to the constellation satellites.

  12. 75 FR 56502 - National Advisory Committee on Meat and Poultry Inspection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ... Food Safety and Inspection Service National Advisory Committee on Meat and Poultry Inspection AGENCY.... App. 2, that the National Advisory Committee on Meat and Poultry Inspection (NACMPI) will hold a... Committee on Meat and Poultry Inspection, USDA, FSIS, 14th & Independence Avenue, SW., Room 1180,...

  13. Immunizations: Active vs. Passive

    MedlinePlus

    ... a certain type of wild animal bites a child. Passive immunizations for hepatitis A (gamma globulin) may be helpful ... A is common. They are typically given before children or adults leave on their ... active vaccination is preferable. Keep in mind that passive immunizations ...

  14. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F [Walnut Creek, CA

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  15. LASL passive program

    SciTech Connect

    Neeper, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    Recent accomplishments are outlined on the following tasks: (1) solar load ratio for sunspaces; (2) thermal performance of components and buildings; (3) convective loop test; (4) similarity study of interzone convection; (5) evaluation of phase-change thermal storage; (6) off-peak electrical auxiliary heating; (7) passive solar design handbook; (8) program support to DOE; and (9) passive cooling for residences. (WHK)

  16. Passive solar construction handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

    1981-08-01

    Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. The unique design constraints presented in passive homes are introduced and many of the salient issues influencing design decisions are described briefly. Passive solar construction is described for each passive system type: direct gain, thermal storage wall, attached sunspace, thermal storage roof, and convective loop. For each system type, important design and construction issues are discussed and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type are presented. Construction details are given and construction and thermal performance information is given for the materials used in collector components, storage components, and control components. Included are glazing materials, framing systems, caulking and sealants, concrete masonry, concrete, brick, shading, reflectors, and insulators. The Load Collector Ratio method for estimating passive system performance is appended, and other analysis methods are briefly summarized. (LEW)

  17. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  18. Techniques for active passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Roscioli, Joseph R.; Herndon, Scott C.; Nelson, Jr., David D.

    2016-12-20

    In one embodiment, active (continuous or intermittent) passivation may be employed to prevent interaction of sticky molecules with interfaces inside of an instrument (e.g., an infrared absorption spectrometer) and thereby improve response time. A passivation species may be continuously or intermittently applied to an inlet of the instrument while a sample gas stream is being applied. The passivation species may have a highly polar functional group that strongly binds to either water or polar groups of the interfaces, and once bound presents a non-polar group to the gas phase in order to prevent further binding of polar molecules. The instrument may be actively used to detect the sticky molecules while the passivation species is being applied.

  19. Forecasting the impact of storm waves and sea-level rise on Midway Atoll and Laysan Island within the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument—a comparison of passive versus dynamic inundation models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Berkowitz, Paul; Reynolds, Michelle H.; Logan, Joshua B.

    2013-01-01

    Two inundation events in 2011 underscored the potential for elevated water levels to damage infrastructure and affect terrestrial ecosystems on the low-lying Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. The goal of this study was to compare passive "bathtub" inundation models based on geographic information systems (GIS) to those that include dynamic water levels caused by wave-induced set-up and run-up for two end-member island morphologies: Midway, a classic atoll with islands on the shallow (2-8 m) atoll rim and a deep, central lagoon; and Laysan, which is characterized by a deep (20-30 m) atoll rim and an island at the center of the atoll. Vulnerability to elevated water levels was assessed using hindcast wind and wave data to drive coupled physics-based numerical wave, current, and water-level models for the atolls. The resulting model data were then used to compute run-up elevations using a parametric run-up equation under both present conditions and future sea-level-rise scenarios. In both geomorphologies, wave heights and wavelengths adjacent to the island shorelines increased more than three times and four times, respectively, with increasing values of sea-level rise, as more deep-water wave energy could propagate over the atoll rim and larger wind-driven waves could develop on the atoll. Although these increases in water depth resulted in decreased set-up along the islands’ shorelines, the larger wave heights and longer wavelengths due to sea-level rise increased the resulting wave-induced run-up. Run-up values were spatially heterogeneous and dependent on the direction of incident wave direction, bathymetry, and island configuration. Island inundation was modeled to increase substantially when wave-driven effects were included, suggesting that inundation and impacts to infrastructure and terrestrial habitats will occur at lower values of predicted sea-level rise, and thus sooner in the 21st century, than suggested

  20. AIAA International Communication Satellite Systems Conference and Exhibit, 14th, Washington, DC, Mar. 22-26, 1992, Technical Papers. Pts. 1-3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The present conference on international communication satellite systems discusses GEO launch vehicle development, military Satcom systems, GEO mobile Satcom systems, advanced transponder technology, and digital network architecture. Attention is given to digital network architecture, the optical Satcom system, emerging launch alternatives, military and government Satcom systems, satellite communications developments in newly industrialized nations, launch options to nongeostationary orbits, and data relay satellite technology. Topics addressed include LEO satellite systems, earth terminal technology, personal communications, high data rate links via satellite, Italsat, antenna systems, Intelsat system and service development, new spacecraft system concepts, orbit/spectrum allocation and use, and ACTS technology. Also discussed are array antenna technology, VSAT and other small terminal systems, orbits, propagation, onboard satellite switching, reflector antenna technology, and panel small communication satellite systems.

  1. Decay of Bk246* formed in similar entrance channel reactions of B11+U235 and N14+Th232 at low energies using the dynamical cluster-decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Birbikram; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2008-05-01

    The decay of the Bk246* nucleus, formed in entrance channel reactions B11+U235 and N14+Th232 at different incident energies, is studied by using the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) extended to include the deformations and orientations of nuclei. The main decay mode here is fission. The other (weaker) decay channels are the light particles evaporation (A⩽4) and intermediate mass fragments (5⩽A⩽20). All decay products are calculated as emissions of preformed clusters through the interaction barriers. The calculated fission cross sections σfiss, taken as a sum of the energetically favored symmetric and near symmetric fragments (ACN/2±7 and A=106-110 plus complementary fragments) show an excellent agreement with experimental data at all experimental incident c.m. energies for both reactions, except for the top three energies in the case of the B11+U235 reaction. The disagreement between the DCM calculations and data at higher incident c.m. energies for the B11+U235 entrance channel is associated with the presence of additional effects of noncompound, quasifission (qf) components, in contradiction with the measured anisotropy effects which indicate the other entrance channel N14+Th232 to contain the noncompound nucleus contribution. The prediction of two fission windows, the symmetric fission (SF) and near symmetric or heavy mass fragments (HMFs), suggests the presence of a fine structure of fission fragments, which also need an experimental verification. The only parameter of the model is the neck length parameter ▵R whose value is shown to depend strongly on limiting angular momentum, which in turn depends on the use of sticking or nonsticking moment of inertia for angular momentum effects.

  2. Measure Guideline: Passive Vents

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, David; Neri, Robin

    2016-02-05

    This document addresses the use of passive vents as a source of outdoor air in multifamily buildings. The challenges associated with implementing passive vents and the factors affecting performance are outlined. A comprehensive design methodology and quantified performance metrics are provided. Two hypothetical design examples are provided to illustrate the process. This document is intended to be useful to designers, decision-makers, and contractors implementing passive ventilation strategies. It is also intended to be a resource for those responsible for setting high-performance building program requirements, especially pertaining to ventilation and outdoor air. To ensure good indoor air quality, a dedicated source of outdoor air is an integral part of high-performance buildings. Presently, there is a lack of guidance pertaining to the design and installation of passive vents, resulting in poor system performance. This report details the criteria necessary for designing, constructing, and testing passive vent systems to enable them to provide consistent and reliable levels of ventilation air from outdoors.

  3. Passive Wake Vortex Control

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J M

    2001-10-18

    The collapse of the Soviet Union and ending of the Cold War brought about many significant changes in military submarine operations. The enemies that the US Navy faces today and in the future will not likely be superpowers armed with nuclear submarines, but rather smaller, rogue nations employing cheaper diesel/electric submarines with advanced air-independent propulsion systems. Unlike Cold War submarine operations, which occurred in deep-water environments, future submarine conflicts are anticipated to occur in shallow, littoral regions that are complex and noisy. Consequently, non-acoustic signatures will become increasingly important and the submarine stealth technology designed for deep-water operations may not be effective in these environments. One such non-acoustic signature is the surface detection of a submarine's trailing vortex wake. If a submarine runs in a slightly buoyant condition, its diving planes must be inclined at a negative angle of attack to generate sufficient downforce, which keeps the submarine from rising to the surface. As a result, the diving planes produce a pair of counter-rotating trailing vortices that propagate to the water surface. In previous deep-water operations, this was not an issue since the submarines could dive deep enough so that the vortex pair became incoherent before it reached the water surface. However, in shallow, littoral environments, submarines do not have the option of diving deep and, hence, the vortex pair can rise to the surface and leave a distinct signature that might be detectable by synthetic aperture radar. Such detection would jeopardize not only the mission of the submarine, but also the lives of military personnel on board. There has been another attempt to solve this problem and reduce the intensity of trailing vortices in the wakes of military submarines. The research of Quackenbush et al. over the past few years has been directed towards an idea called ''vortex leveraging.'' This active concept

  4. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  5. Ethnicity, Race, and Nationality in Education: A Global Perspective. The Rutgers Invitational Symposium on Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimahara, N. Ken, Ed.; Holowinsky, Ivan Z., Ed.; Tomlinson-Clarke, Saundra, Ed.

    This volume contains 12 papers originally presented at the 14th Rutgers Invitational Symposium on Education in 1999. The symposium explored contemporary issues of ethnic, cultural, and national identities and their influence on the social construction of identity. Papers include: (1) "Reconceptualizing Ethnicity and Educational…

  6. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A method is described for passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  7. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1990-01-01

    A method of passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  8. Passive hydrogel fuel generator

    SciTech Connect

    Neefe, Ch. W.

    1985-04-16

    A passive hydrogen oxygen generator in which the long wavelength infrared portion of the sun's spectrum heats water to provide circulation of the water within the generator. The shorter wavelength portion of the spectrum to which water is transparent is used in splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen by photoelectrolysis.

  9. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, David

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  10. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  11. Passive MIMO Radar Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Hypothesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 3.3.3 Dependence on SNR...71 4.3.3 Dependence on SNR and DNR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 4.4 Interpretations...described as a passive radar network. The topology of such networks is described as bistatic, multistatic, or multiple-input multiple-output, depending on

  12. Special 14 juillet (July 14th Special).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubreuilh, Jean-Luc; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A series of articles on France's Bastille Day and its significance to the French over the two centuries of its celebration presents the viewpoints of the historian, writer, painter, film industry, and singer and provides materials and instructional ideas for classroom use. (MSE)

  13. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation & dynamics; and surfaces.

  14. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation dynamics; and surfaces.

  15. Passivated niobium cavities

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  16. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  17. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Hall, Earl T. (Inventor); Baker, Donald A. (Inventor); Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  18. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Hall, Earl T.; Baker, Donald A.; Bryant, Timothy D.

    1992-08-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  19. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-07-01

    The invention is an ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system. The invention incorporates piezoelectric polymer film combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted from a fetus inside an expectant mother and to provide means for filtering out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  20. Passively actuated valve

    SciTech Connect

    Modro, S. Michael; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2005-09-20

    A passively actuated valve for isolating a high pressure zone from a low pressure zone and discontinuing the isolation when the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below a preset threshold. If the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below the preset threshold, the valve opens and allows flow from the high pressure zone to the low pressure zone. The valve remains open allowing pressure equalization and back-flow should a pressure inversion between the two pressure zone occur.

  1. Results of a Demonstration Assessment of Passive System Reliability Utilizing the Reliability Method for Passive Systems (RMPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Bucknor, Matthew; Grabaskas, David; Brunett, Acacia; Grelle, Austin

    2015-04-26

    Advanced small modular reactor designs include many advantageous design features such as passively driven safety systems that are arguably more reliable and cost effective relative to conventional active systems. Despite their attractiveness, a reliability assessment of passive systems can be difficult using conventional reliability methods due to the nature of passive systems. Simple deviations in boundary conditions can induce functional failures in a passive system, and intermediate or unexpected operating modes can also occur. As part of an ongoing project, Argonne National Laboratory is investigating various methodologies to address passive system reliability. The Reliability Method for Passive Systems (RMPS), a systematic approach for examining reliability, is one technique chosen for this analysis. This methodology is combined with the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) approach to assess the reliability of a passive system and the impact of its associated uncertainties. For this demonstration problem, an integrated plant model of an advanced small modular pool-type sodium fast reactor with a passive reactor cavity cooling system is subjected to a station blackout using RELAP5-3D. This paper discusses important aspects of the reliability assessment, including deployment of the methodology, the uncertainty identification and quantification process, and identification of key risk metrics.

  2. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in National Park Service, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in National Park Service, U.S.S. Arizona Memorial, 14th Naval District Photograph Collection), PHOG No. P.H. 3309-42. U.S. Navy photograph, 1942. BEGINNING CONSTRUCTION ON THE BOMBPROOF POWER PLANT (FACILITY 177) AT HOSPITAL POINT. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Bombproof Facilities, Various locations throughout base, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in National Park Service, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in National Park Service, U.S.S. Arizona Memorial, 14th Naval District Photograph Collection), PHOG No. P.H. 3470-42. U.S. Navy photograph, August 1942. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE HOSPITAL POINT POWER PLANT (FACILITY 177). - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Bombproof Facilities, Various locations throughout base, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. Passive millimeter wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pergande, Al; Dean, Donald D.; O'Donnell, Daniel J.

    1996-05-01

    Passive millimeter wave (MMW) imaging provides a breakthrough capability for driver vision enhancement to counter the blinding effects of inclement weather. This type of sensor images in a manner analogous to an infrared or visible camera, but receives its energy from the MMW portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Technology has progressed to the point where MMW radiometric systems offer advantages to a number of vision applications. We report on our developmental 94 GHz radiometric testbed, and the eventual technological evolutions that will help MMW radiometers and radars meet military and commercial market needs.

  5. Optimizing passive quantum clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullan, Michael; Knill, Emanuel

    2014-10-01

    We describe protocols for passive atomic clocks based on quantum interrogation of the atoms. Unlike previous techniques, our protocols are adaptive and take advantage of prior information about the clock's state. To reduce deviations from an ideal clock, each interrogation is optimized by means of a semidefinite program for atomic state preparation and measurement whose objective function depends on the prior information. Our knowledge of the clock's state is maintained according to a Bayesian model that accounts for noise and measurement results. We implement a full simulation of a running clock with power-law noise models and find significant improvements by applying our techniques.

  6. Passive load control for large wind turbines.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwill, Thomas D.

    2010-05-01

    Wind energy research activities at Sandia National Laboratories focus on developing large rotors that are lighter and more cost-effective than those designed with current technologies. Because gravity scales as the cube of the blade length, gravity loads become a constraining design factor for very large blades. Efforts to passively reduce turbulent loading has shown significant potential to reduce blade weight and capture more energy. Research in passive load reduction for wind turbines began at Sandia in the late 1990's and has moved from analytical studies to blade applications. This paper discusses the test results of two Sandia prototype research blades that incorporate load reduction techniques. The TX-100 is a 9-m long blade that induces bend-twist coupling with the use of off-axis carbon in the skin. The STAR blade is a 27-m long blade that induces bend-twist coupling by sweeping the blade in a geometric fashion.

  7. Photometric Passive Range Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argueta-Diaz, Victor; García-Valenzuela, Augusto

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we present a passive optical ranging method that consists of taking several photometric measurements from the light radiated by an object and deriving the range from these measurements. This passive ranging device uses an iris of radius a, a lens of radius larger than a, and a photodetector of radius p

  8. Fly ash carbon passivation

    DOEpatents

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  9. Passive bistatic radar analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hagan, Daniel W.; Kuschel, H.; Schiller, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    Passive Bistatic Radar (PBR) research is at its zenith with several notable PBR systems currently operational, or available for deployment. Such PBRs include the Manastash Ridge Radar (MRR) developed for and by academia; Silent Sentry developed as a commercial concern by Lockheed Martin; and Homeland Alerter (HA100) also a commercial system developed by Thales. However at present, despite the existence of numerous PBR prototypes, take up of commercial passive radar technology remains slow. This is due in part to technology immaturity, in part to politics, and particularly due to the fact that monostatic radars perform so well. If PBRs are to enjoy longevity as a viable technology then it is imperative that they address certain niche application areas, with the aforementioned MRR being one prime example of this. The focus of this paper will be an analysis of a PBR system that utilised FM radio signals of opportunity to detect aircraft targets with an RCS generally not lower than 20 m2. The paper will demonstrate the theoretical detection coverage of an FM based PBR operating in a severe interference environment.

  10. Passive-solar construction handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

    1981-02-01

    Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. Passive solar construction is covered according to system type, each system type discussion including a general discussion of the important design and construction issues which apply to the particular system and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type. The three basic types of passive solar systems discussed are direct gain, thermal storage wall, and attached sunspace. Thermal performance and construction information is presented for typical materials used in passive solar collector components, storage components, and control components. Appended are an overview of analysis methods and a technique for estimating performance. (LEW)

  11. Surface passivation optimization using DIRECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Peter A.; Kim, Kwiseon; Jones, Wesley B.; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2007-06-01

    We describe a systematic and efficient method of determining pseudo-atom positions and potentials for use in nanostructure calculations based on bulk empirical pseudopotentials (EPMs). Given a bulk EPM for binary semiconductor X, we produce parameters for pseudo-atoms necessary to passivate a nanostructure of X in preparation for quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations. These passivants are based on the quality of the wave functions of a set of small test structures that include the passivants. Our method is based on the global optimization method DIRECT. It enables and/or streamlines surface passivation for empirical pseudopotential calculations.

  12. End-of-Mission Passivation: Successes and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas; Matney, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The passivation of spacecraft and launch vehicle orbital stages at end-of-mission has been a principal space debris mitigation measure world-wide since the 1980 s. Space vehicle passivation includes the removal of stored energies, especially those associated with propulsion and electrical power systems. Prior to 2007 the breakup of non-functioning, non-passivated space vehicles was the major source of hazardous debris in Earth orbit. The United Nations and the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee have both included passivation in their formal space debris mitigation guidelines. This often simple countermeasure has been adopted by many spacefaring countries and organizations and has undoubtedly prevented numerous major satellite breakups. For some existing space vehicle designs, passivation requires changes in hardware, software, and/or operational procedures. Questions about the permissible degree of passivation for both current and future space vehicles have arisen and are addressed herein. An important element to be considered is the potentially long period in which the space vehicle will remain in orbit, i.e., up to 25 years after mission termination in LEO and for centuries in orbits above LEO. Finally, the issue of passivation of space vehicles which have failed prematurely is addressed.

  13. Passive detection of vehicle loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Troy R.; Salvaggio, Carl; Faulring, Jason W.; Salvaggio, Philip S.; McKeown, Donald M.; Garrett, Alfred J.; Coleman, David H.; Koffman, Larry D.

    2012-01-01

    The Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Laboratory (DIRS) at the Rochester Institute of Technology, along with the Savannah River National Laboratory is investigating passive methods to quantify vehicle loading. The research described in this paper investigates multiple vehicle indicators including brake temperature, tire temperature, engine temperature, acceleration and deceleration rates, engine acoustics, suspension response, tire deformation and vibrational response. Our investigation into these variables includes building and implementing a sensing system for data collection as well as multiple full-scale vehicle tests. The sensing system includes; infrared video cameras, triaxial accelerometers, microphones, video cameras and thermocouples. The full scale testing includes both a medium size dump truck and a tractor-trailer truck on closed courses with loads spanning the full range of the vehicle's capacity. Statistical analysis of the collected data is used to determine the effectiveness of each of the indicators for characterizing the weight of a vehicle. The final sensing system will monitor multiple load indicators and combine the results to achieve a more accurate measurement than any of the indicators could provide alone.

  14. PASSIVE DETECTION OF VEHICLE LOADING

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, A.

    2012-01-03

    The Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Laboratory (DIRS) at the Rochester Institute of Technology, along with the Savannah River National Laboratory is investigating passive methods to quantify vehicle loading. The research described in this paper investigates multiple vehicle indicators including brake temperature, tire temperature, engine temperature, acceleration and deceleration rates, engine acoustics, suspension response, tire deformation and vibrational response. Our investigation into these variables includes building and implementing a sensing system for data collection as well as multiple full-scale vehicle tests. The sensing system includes; infrared video cameras, triaxial accelerometers, microphones, video cameras and thermocouples. The full scale testing includes both a medium size dump truck and a tractor-trailer truck on closed courses with loads spanning the full range of the vehicle's capacity. Statistical analysis of the collected data is used to determine the effectiveness of each of the indicators for characterizing the weight of a vehicle. The final sensing system will monitor multiple load indicators and combine the results to achieve a more accurate measurement than any of the indicators could provide alone.

  15. Commentary on "Capturing the Evasive Passive"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillo-Martin, Diane; Snyder, William

    2009-01-01

    Passives has been the focus of much research in language acquisition since the 1970s. It has been clear from this research that young children seldom produce passives spontaneously, particularly "long" or "full" passives with a by-phrase; and they usually perform poorly on experimental tests of the comprehension of passives, especially passives of…

  16. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, Paul F.; Cooke, Franklin E.; Fitch, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

  17. Adaptive passive fathometer processing.

    PubMed

    Siderius, Martin; Song, Heechun; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S; Hursky, Paul; Harrison, Chris

    2010-04-01

    Recently, a technique has been developed to image seabed layers using the ocean ambient noise field as the sound source. This so called passive fathometer technique exploits the naturally occurring acoustic sounds generated on the sea-surface, primarily from breaking waves. The method is based on the cross-correlation of noise from the ocean surface with its echo from the seabed, which recovers travel times to significant seabed reflectors. To limit averaging time and make this practical, beamforming is used with a vertical array of hydrophones to reduce interference from horizontally propagating noise. The initial development used conventional beamforming, but significant improvements have been realized using adaptive techniques. In this paper, adaptive methods for this process are described and applied to several data sets to demonstrate improvements possible as compared to conventional processing.

  18. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

    1994-01-25

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

  19. Passive magnetic bearing system

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2014-09-02

    An axial stabilizer for the rotor of a magnetic bearing provides external control of stiffness through switching in external inductances. External control also allows the stabilizer to become a part of a passive/active magnetic bearing system that requires no external source of power and no position sensor. Stabilizers for displacements transverse to the axis of rotation are provided that require only a single cylindrical Halbach array in its operation, and thus are especially suited for use in high rotation speed applications, such as flywheel energy storage systems. The elimination of the need of an inner cylindrical array solves the difficult mechanical problem of supplying support against centrifugal forces for the magnets of that array. Compensation is provided for the temperature variation of the strength of the magnetic fields of the permanent magnets in the levitating magnet arrays.

  20. Subject, Topic and Sesotho Passive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demuth, Katherine

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of Sesotho-speaking children's spontaneous language showed that the acquisition of passives was closely linked to the fact that Sesotho subjects must be discourse topics. It is suggested that a detailed analysis of how passive constructions interact with other components of a given linguistic system is critical for developing coherent and…

  1. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1994-01-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

  2. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

  3. Passive retrofits for Navy housing

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbert, R.; Miles, C.; Jones, R.; Peck, C.; Anderson, J.; Jacobson, V.; Dale, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    A project to assess and initiate passive solar energy retrofits to US Navy family housing is described. The current data base for Navy housing (ECOP), and its enhancement for passive solar purposes options proposed for Navy housing are explained. The analysis goals and methods to evaluate the retrofits are discussed. An educational package to explain the retrofits is described.

  4. Passive sensor systems for nuclear material monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M.L.; Boatner, L.A.; Holcomb, D.E.; McElhaney, S.A.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Muhs, J.D.; Roberts, M.R.; Hill, N.W.

    1993-09-01

    Passive fiber optic sensor systems capable of confirming the presence of special nuclear materials in storage or process facilities are being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These sensors provide completely passive, remote measurement capability. No power supplies, amplifiers, or other active components that could degrade system reliability are required at the sensor location. ORNL, through its research programs in scintillator materials, has developed a variety of materials for use in alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and neutron-sensitive scintillator detectors. In addition to sensors for measuring radiation flux, new sensor materials have been developed which are capable of measuring weight, temperature, and source location. An example of a passive sensor for temperature measurement is the combination of a thermophosphor (e.g., rare-earth activated Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) with {sup 6}LiF (95% {sup 6}Li). This combination results in a new class of scintillators for thermal neutrons that absorb energy from the radiation particles and remit the energy as a light pulse, the decay rate of which, over a specified temperature range, is temperature dependent. Other passive sensors being developed include pressure-sensitive triboluminescent materials, weight-sensitive silicone rubber fibers, scintillating fibers, and other materials for gamma and neutron detection. The light from the scintillator materials of each sensor would be sent through optical fibers to a monitoring station, where the attribute quantity could be measured and compared with previously recorded emission levels. Confirmatory measurement applications of these technologies are being evaluated to reduce the effort, costs, and employee exposures associated with inventorying stockpiles of highly enriched uranium at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant.

  5. Passive Acoustic Vessel Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwal, Pasang Sherpa

    This thesis investigates the development of a low-cost passive acoustic system for localizing moving vessels to monitor areas where human activities such as fishing, snorkeling and poaching are restricted. The system uses several off-the-shelf sensors with unsynchronized clocks where the Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA) or time delay is extracted by cross-correlation of the signal between paired sensors. The cross-correlation function uses phase correlation or Phase Transform (PHAT) which whitens the cross-spectrum in order to de-emphasize dominant frequency components. Using the locations of pairs of sensors as foci, hyperbolic equations can be defined using the time delay between them. With three or more sensors, multiple hyperbolic functions can be calculated which intersect at a unique point: the boat's location. It is also found that increasing separation distances between sensors decreased the correlation between the signals. However larger separation distances have better localization capability than with small distances. Experimental results from the Columbia and Willamette Rivers are presented to demonstrate performance.

  6. Passive-solar greenhouse

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Our project objective was to design, construct, and operate a commercialized (16' x 50') passive, solar greenhouse. The structure was originally intended as a vegetable forcing facility to produce vegetable crops in the off-season. Building and size constraints and economic considerations convinced us to use the greenhouse for producing bedding plants and vegetable starts in the spring, high value vegetables (tomatoes, cucumbers) in the fall and forced bulbs in the winter. This crop sequence allows us to use the greenhouse all year without additional heat as the crops are adopted to the temperature regime of the greenhouse during each particular season. In our first season, the greenhouse performed beautifully. The lowest temperature recorded was 38/sup 0/F after 4 cold, cloudy days in February. The production of bedding plants has allowed us to diversify our products and the early transplants we produced were a great asset to our vegetable farming operation. Although construction cost (4.57 sq. ft.) is higher than that of a conventional polyethylene-covered, quonset-type greenhouse (approx. $1.92 sq. ft.), our annual operating cost is cheaper than that of a conventional greenhouse (0.49 cents sq. ft. versus 0.67 cents sq. ft.) due to a longer usable lifetime of the structure and the elimination of heating costs. Our structure has been toured by interested individuals, school and farm groups. We plan to publicize the structure and its advantages by promoting more visits to the site.

  7. Passive blast pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

    2013-03-19

    A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

  8. The soil moisture active passive (SMAP) mission and validation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite will be launched by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in October 2014. This satellite is the culmination of basic research and applications development over the past thirty years. During most of this period, research and development o...

  9. The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Mission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council’s Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of the moisture present at Earth's land surface and will distinguish frozen f...

  10. Development of a portable passive-acoustic bedload monitoring system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A hydrophone-based passive acoustic bedload-monitoring system was designed, tested and deployed by researchers at the University of Mississippi and the National Sedimentation Laboratory in Oxford, MS. The hydrophone system was designed to be easily deployed and operated by non-experts. In addition, ...

  11. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) applications activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first-tier satellite missions recommended by the U.S. National Research Council Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space. The SMAP mission 1 is under development by NASA and is scheduled for launch late in 2014. The SMAP mea...

  12. [Damage from passive tobacco smoking].

    PubMed

    Bartkowiak, Z

    1995-01-01

    The author presents data on the biological casualties and consequences of tobacco-smoking. Smoking is the most dangerous addiction in the scale of the world and in Poland. It causes numerous premature decrease and tobacco-dependent sickness. The author characterises the spread of this addiction in Poland concentrating on the problem of the passive smoking harmfulness. Non-smokers, children and youth, embryo and foetus during the pregnancy are exposed to the passive smoking. The experimental examinations of animals and the analysis of the lateral stream of the tobacco smoke confirm not the least, but rather the greater damage of the passive smoking than the active one. The mechanisms of acting of the tobacco smoke on the passive smokers' body and the health consequences are discussed. The manners, means and activities that are useful for the health protection of non-smokers against the tobacco smoke and the ways of the smoking prevention are described.

  13. Orion Passive Thermal: Control Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez-Hermandez, Angel; Miller, Stephen W.

    2009-01-01

    A general overview of the NASA Orion Passive Thermal Control System (PTCS) is presented. The topics include: 1) Orion in CxP Hierarchy; 2) General Orion Description/Orientation; and 3) Orion PTCS Overview.

  14. Solar passive systems for buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-03-01

    A survey is provided of what is known about the design of solar passive buildings. A systematic presentation is given of proven concepts with suitable illustrations. It is intended as a general guide for architects, designers and other building practitioners. Topics include the various concepts of solar passive heating and cooling, design factors such as location, climate, microclimate, form; building metabolism, thermal and visual comfort; location and form of illumination; and natural cooling via wind towers and cisterns.

  15. Passive vapor extraction feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Rohay, V.J.

    1994-06-30

    Demonstration of a passive vapor extraction remediation system is planned for sites in the 200 West Area used in the past for the disposal of waste liquids containing carbon tetrachloride. The passive vapor extraction units will consist of a 4-in.-diameter pipe, a check valve, a canister filled with granular activated carbon, and a wind turbine. The check valve will prevent inflow of air that otherwise would dilute the soil gas and make its subsequent extraction less efficient. The granular activated carbon is used to adsorb the carbon tetrachloride from the air. The wind turbine enhances extraction rates on windy days. Passive vapor extraction units will be designed and operated to meet all applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. Based on a cost analysis, passive vapor extraction was found to be a cost-effective method for remediation of soils containing lower concentrations of volatile contaminants. Passive vapor extraction used on wells that average 10-stdft{sup 3}/min air flow rates was found to be more cost effective than active vapor extraction for concentrations below 500 parts per million by volume (ppm) of carbon tetrachloride. For wells that average 5-stdft{sup 3}/min air flow rates, passive vapor extraction is more cost effective below 100 ppm.

  16. Microgravity Passive Phase Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paragano, Matthew; Indoe, William; Darmetko, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    A new invention disclosure discusses a structure and process for separating gas from liquids in microgravity. The Microgravity Passive Phase Separator consists of two concentric, pleated, woven stainless- steel screens (25-micrometer nominal pore) with an axial inlet, and an annular outlet between both screens (see figure). Water enters at one end of the center screen at high velocity, eventually passing through the inner screen and out through the annular exit. As gas is introduced into the flow stream, the drag force exerted on the bubble pushes it downstream until flow stagnation or until it reaches an equilibrium point between the surface tension holding bubble to the screen and the drag force. Gas bubbles of a given size will form a front that is moved further down the length of the inner screen with increasing velocity. As more bubbles are added, the front location will remain fixed, but additional bubbles will move to the end of the unit, eventually coming to rest in the large cavity between the unit housing and the outer screen (storage area). Owing to the small size of the pores and the hydrophilic nature of the screen material, gas does not pass through the screen and is retained within the unit for emptying during ground processing. If debris is picked up on the screen, the area closest to the inlet will become clogged, so high-velocity flow will persist farther down the length of the center screen, pushing the bubble front further from the inlet of the inner screen. It is desired to keep the velocity high enough so that, for any bubble size, an area of clean screen exists between the bubbles and the debris. The primary benefits of this innovation are the lack of any need for additional power, strip gas, or location for venting the separated gas. As the unit contains no membrane, the transport fluid will not be lost due to evaporation in the process of gas separation. Separation is performed with relatively low pressure drop based on the large surface

  17. Photocopy of photograph (Source: National Park Service, U.S.S. Arizona Memorial, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (Source: National Park Service, U.S.S. Arizona Memorial, from 14th Naval District Photograph Collection, PHOG No. P.H. 4464-45) Official USN Photo, 1945. REMOVAL OF SPLINTERPROOF SHELTER (FORMER FACILITY S 1122), LOCATED BETWEEN FACILITIES 1 AND 3 IN NAVAL SHIPYARD. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Splinterproof Air Raid Shelters, Various locations throughout base, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. Passive solar design: final evaluation, the Passive Studio

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, Duncan S.; Rose, Stuart

    1980-08-01

    The further evaluation of the workshops in passive design for practicing architects and engineers through delayed interviews with a sample of the participants is reported with particular emphasis on the extent to which the participants have practiced passive design in the three-four months since attending. Also discussed is an unsuccessful attempt to conduct a lower-cost version of the program outside of normal office hours. Finally, the follow-on programs and improvements that the interviews indicated are needed are identified. (MHR)

  19. Passivation of fluorinated activated charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Del Cul, G.D.; Trowbridge, L.D.; Simmons, D.W.; Williams, D.F.; Toth, L.M.

    1997-10-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE), at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since 1969 when the fuel salt was drained from the core into two Hastelloy N tanks at the reactor site. In 1995, a multiyear project was launched to remediate the potentially hazardous conditions generated by the movement of fissile material and reactive gases from the storage tanks into the piping system and an auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB). The top 12 in. of the ACB is known by gamma scan and thermal analysis to contain about 2.6 kg U-233. According to the laboratory tests, a few feet of fluorinated charcoal are believed to extend beyond the uranium front. The remainder of the ACB should consist of unreacted charcoal. Fluorinated charcoal, when subjected to rapid heating, can decompose generating gaseous products. Under confined conditions, the sudden exothermic decomposition can produce high temperatures and pressures of near-explosive characteristics. Since it will be necessary to drill and tap the ACB to allow installation of piping and instrumentation for remediation and recovery activities, it is necessary to chemically convert the reactive fluorinated charcoal into a more stable material. Ammonia can be administered to the ACB as a volatile denaturing agent that results in the conversion of the C{sub x}F to carbon and ammonium fluoride, NH{sub 4}F. The charcoal laden with NH{sub 4}F can then be heated without risking any sudden decomposition. The only consequence of heating the treated material will be the volatilization of NH{sub 4}F as a mixture of NH{sub 3} and HF, which would primarily recombine as NH{sub 4}F on surfaces below 200 C. The planned scheme for the ACB denaturing is to flow diluted ammonia gas in steps of increasing NH{sub 3} concentration, 2% to 50%, followed by the injection of pure ammonia. This report summarizes the planned passivation treatment scheme to stabilize the ACB and remove the potential hazards. It also includes basic information

  20. A Passive System Reliability Analysis for a Station Blackout

    SciTech Connect

    Brunett, Acacia; Bucknor, Matthew; Grabaskas, David; Sofu, Tanju; Grelle, Austin

    2015-05-03

    The latest iterations of advanced reactor designs have included increased reliance on passive safety systems to maintain plant integrity during unplanned sequences. While these systems are advantageous in reducing the reliance on human intervention and availability of power, the phenomenological foundations on which these systems are built require a novel approach to a reliability assessment. Passive systems possess the unique ability to fail functionally without failing physically, a result of their explicit dependency on existing boundary conditions that drive their operating mode and capacity. Argonne National Laboratory is performing ongoing analyses that demonstrate various methodologies for the characterization of passive system reliability within a probabilistic framework. Two reliability analysis techniques are utilized in this work. The first approach, the Reliability Method for Passive Systems, provides a mechanistic technique employing deterministic models and conventional static event trees. The second approach, a simulation-based technique, utilizes discrete dynamic event trees to treat time- dependent phenomena during scenario evolution. For this demonstration analysis, both reliability assessment techniques are used to analyze an extended station blackout in a pool-type sodium fast reactor (SFR) coupled with a reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS). This work demonstrates the entire process of a passive system reliability analysis, including identification of important parameters and failure metrics, treatment of uncertainties and analysis of results.

  1. The Development of a Demonstration Passive System Reliability Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Bucknor, Matthew; Grabaskas, David; Brunett, Acacia

    2014-06-22

    In this paper, the details of the development of a demonstration problem to assess the reliability of a passive safety system are presented. An advanced small modular reactor (advSMR) design, which is a pool-type sodium fast reactor (SFR) coupled with a passive reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) is described. The RELAP5-3D models of the advSMR and RCCS that will be used to simulate a long-term station blackout (SBO) accident scenario are presented. Proposed benchmarking techniques for both the reactor and the RCCS are discussed, which includes utilization of experimental results from the Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF) at the Argonne National Laboratory. Details of how mechanistic methods, specifically the Reliability Method for Passive Systems (RMPS) approach, will be utilized to determine passive system reliability are presented. The results of this mechanistic analysis will ultimately be compared to results from dynamic methods in future work. This work is part of an ongoing project at Argonne to demonstrate methodologies for assessing passive system reliability.

  2. Surface passivation optimization using DIRECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwiseon; Graf, Peter A.; Jones, Wesley B.; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2006-03-01

    The calculation of the electronic structure of a nanostructure must take into account surface effects. In experiments, the dangling bonds at the surface of a semiconductor nanostructure are passivated by other semiconductors or by organic ligands. In either case, photoluminescence measurements reveal that the emission comes from bulk-like, dot-interior states. These observations suggest that an approach to passivating a simulated nanostructure would be to attach “pseudo-atoms” to each dangling bond. Here we present an automated methodology for generating surface passivating pseudo potentials for bulk empirical pseudo potentials. Our method is based on the global optimization method DIRECT. We apply it to two materials, CdSe and InP. Incorporated into a larger computational nanoscience infrastructure, our work represents a much needed improvement in the usability of the empirical pseudo potential method.

  3. The anodic passivation of lithium

    SciTech Connect

    James, S.D.

    1983-10-01

    The anodic passivation of Li has been characterized at room temperature in a variety of electrolytes (propylene carbonate, thionyl chloride, sulfur dioxide), as a function of convection and current density and in the presence of water and other impurities. In thionyl chloride the effect of salt concentration (0.5-4.5M, LiA1C1/sub 4/) and acidity (0.5-3M, A1C1/sub 3/) has been studied. The evidence accumulated suggests that anodic passivation is caused by anodic enrichment and eventual precipitation of electrolyte salt in superficial anolyte.

  4. Passivation of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The surface of high temperature superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O(7-x) are passivated by reacting the native Y, Ba and Cu metal ions with an anion such as sulfate or oxalate to form a surface film that is impervious to water and has a solubility in water of no more than 10(exp -3) M. The passivating treatment is preferably conducted by immersing the surface in dilute aqueous acid solution since more soluble species dissolve into the solution. The treatment does not degrade the superconducting properties of the bulk material.

  5. Indoor localization using passive RFID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vastianos, George E.; Kyriazanos, Dimitris M.; Segou, Olga E.; Mitilineos, Stelios A.; Thomopoulos, Stelios C. A.

    2011-06-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) systems based on passive tags are used successfully in a wide range of object identification applications. However, the increasing needs to meet new demands on applications of localization and tracking create a new field for evolution of the RFID technology. This paper presents the design, implementation, and evaluation of a cost-effective localization system for in-building usage that is able to localize objects that carry passive RFID tags. The RFID reading is performed by a single Reader and an array of directional antennas through multiplexing. Evaluation and experimental results from three localization algorithms based on RSSI are presented.

  6. Mission 119 passive microwave results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollinger, J. P.; Mennella, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Passive microwave measurements of the sea surface were made for determining surface wind speeds from the NP3A aircraft (NASA-927). Observations were made at frequencies of 1.4, 10.6, and 31.4 GHz during NASA mission 119, undertaken off Bermuda in the vicinity of Argus Island sea tower during January 1970. Passive microwave observations from Argus Island ocean showed that the surface roughness effect, dependent on wind speed, is also dependent on observational frequency, increasing with increasing frequency. The roughness effect appears to be dominant for wind speeds less than 30 to 40 knots (2).

  7. International Workshop on Detection, Classification and Localization of Marine Mammals Using Passive Acoustics (4th). International Workshop on Density Estimation of Marine Mammals Using Passive Acoustics (1st)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-13

    Mars 55 Characterisation of sound subunits for humpback whale song analysis. F. Pace, P.R. White, O. Adam 56 Passive acoustic detection of Minke...International Monitoring System. Samaran Flore, Adam Olivier, Guinet Christophe 58 Detection of Minke whale sounds in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine...September 8.40 Characterisation of sound subunits for humpback whale song analysis. F. Pace, P.R. White, O. Adam 9.00 Passive acoustic detection of

  8. Passive and hybrid solar technologies program summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-05-01

    The goal of the national energy policy is to foster an adequate supply of energy at reasonable prices. This policy recognizes that adequate supply requires flexibility, with no undue reliance on any single source of supply. The goal of reasonable prices suggests economic efficiency so that consumers, individuals, commercial and industrial users alike, are not penalized by government regulation or subside. The strategies for achieving this energy policy goal are: (1) to minimize federal regulation in energy pricing while maintaining public health and safety and environmental quality, and (2) to promote a balanced and mixed energy resource system through research and development. One of the keys to energy sufficiently is the scientific application of passive solar energy techniques.

  9. Passive Fiber Optic Gyro Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    34. FORWORD The report summarizes the principles of operation of the passive fiber optic gyro. It starts with a discussion of the Sagnac effect and...polarization and the angle of the " fast " axis varied nonlinearly and that the two effects are partially independent. Based on tests with a 200 meter length of

  10. Orion Passive Thermal Control Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    An viewgraph presentation of Orion's passive thermal control system is shown. The topics include: 1) Orion in CxP Hierarchy; 2) General Orion Description/Orientation; 3) Module Descriptions and Images; 4) Orion PTCS Overview; 5) Requirements/Interfaces; 6) Design Reference Missions; 7) Natural Environments; 8) Thermal Models; 9) Challenges/Issues; and 10) Testing

  11. Solar Array Passive LDEF Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A Marshall researcher examines a sample from the Solar Array Passive Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). LDEF, which flew in space, measured the number, severity, and effects of micrometeroid hits on various materials. The data will lead to improved spacecraft design in the future.

  12. Passivated ambipolar black phosphorus transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Dewu; Lee, Daeyeong; Jang, Young Dae; Choi, Min Sup; Nam, Hye Jin; Jung, Duk-Young; Yoo, Won Jong

    2016-06-01

    We report the first air-passivated ambipolar BP transistor formed by applying benzyl viologen, which serves as a surface charge transfer donor for BP flakes. The passivated BP devices exhibit excellent stability under both an ambient atmosphere and vacuum; their transistor performance is maintained semi-permanently. Unlike their intrinsic p-type properties, passivated BP devices present advantageous ambipolar properties with much higher electron mobility up to ~83 cm2 V-1 s-1 from 2-terminal measurement at 300 K, compared to other reported studies on n-type BP transistors. On the basis of the n-type doping effect that originated from benzyl viologen, we also systematically investigated the BP thickness dependence of our devices on electrical properties, in which we found the best electron transport performance to be attained when an ~10 nm thick BP flake was used.We report the first air-passivated ambipolar BP transistor formed by applying benzyl viologen, which serves as a surface charge transfer donor for BP flakes. The passivated BP devices exhibit excellent stability under both an ambient atmosphere and vacuum; their transistor performance is maintained semi-permanently. Unlike their intrinsic p-type properties, passivated BP devices present advantageous ambipolar properties with much higher electron mobility up to ~83 cm2 V-1 s-1 from 2-terminal measurement at 300 K, compared to other reported studies on n-type BP transistors. On the basis of the n-type doping effect that originated from benzyl viologen, we also systematically investigated the BP thickness dependence of our devices on electrical properties, in which we found the best electron transport performance to be attained when an ~10 nm thick BP flake was used. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Transfer characteristics of BP field effect transistors (BV1-BV4) (Fig. S1 and S2 and Table S1); output characteristics of BP field effect transistors in different directions (Fig. S3

  13. National Toxicology Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... Initiative Public Health Public Health Impact Report on Carcinogens Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods Health Assessment and ... 04/2016 HHS Releases the 14th Report on Carcinogens 11/03/2016 Board of Scientific Counselors Meeting ...

  14. Building on Family Strengths: Research and Services in Support of Children and Their Families. Proceedings of the Building on Family Strengths Annual Conference (14th, Portland, Oregon, May 31-June 2, 2007) and State of the Science Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swart, Sandra, Ed.; Friesen, Barbara, Ed.; Holman, Ariel, Ed.; Aue, Nicole, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The State of the Science conference was held in May, 2007 as part of the ongoing series of national conferences, "Building on Family Strengths," conducted by the Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health at Portland State University. The theme of this State-of-the Science conference was "Effective…

  15. Passive solar design handbook. Volume 3: Passive solar design analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. W.; Bascomb, J. D.; Kosiewicz, C. E.; Lazarus, G. S.; McFarland, R. D.; Wray, W. O.

    1982-07-01

    Simple analytical methods concerning the design of passive solar heating systems are presented with an emphasis on the average annual heating energy consumption. Key terminology and methods are reviewed. The solar load ratio (SLR) is defined, and its relationship to analysis methods is reviewed. The annual calculation, or Load Collector Ratio (LCR) method, is outlined. Sensitivity data are discussed. Information is presented on balancing conservation and passive solar strategies in building design. Detailed analysis data are presented for direct gain and sunspace systems, and details of the systems are described. Key design parameters are discussed in terms of their impact on annual heating performance of the building. These are the sensitivity data. The SLR correlations for the respective system types are described. The monthly calculation, or SLR method, based on the SLR correlations, is reviewed. Performance data are given for 9 direct gain systems and 15 water wall and 42 Trombe wall systems.

  16. Development of Verbal Passive in Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perovic, Alexandra; Wexler, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To experimentally investigate knowledge of passives of actional ("hold") and psychological ("love") verbs in children with Williams syndrome (WS). Passives are usually reported to be in line with mental age in WS. However, studies usually focus on passives of actional verbs only. Method: Twenty-six children with WS, ages 6-16, and 3…

  17. User evaluation study of passive solar residences

    SciTech Connect

    Towle, S.

    1980-03-01

    Speculation exists regarding the readiness of various passive techniques for commercialization and the market potential for residential applications. This paper discusses the preliminary findings of a market assessment study designed to document user experiences with passive solar energy. Owners and builders of passive solar homes were interviewed and asked to comment on personal experiences with their homes.

  18. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown. Final report, [September 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.

    1994-02-21

    Purpose is to understand the mechanisms for growth and breakdown of passive films on metal and alloy surfaces in aqueous medium; a secondary goal is to devise methods for predicting localized corrosion damage in industrial systems. Tasks currently being studied are: formation of bilayer structures in passive films on metals and alloys; passivity breakdown on solid vs. liquid gallium; roles of alloying elements in passivity breakdown; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of passive films; electronic structure of passive oxide films; photoelectrochemical impedance spectroscopy of passive films; and kinetics of localized attack.

  19. New England style passive solar

    SciTech Connect

    Kriescher, P.

    2000-06-01

    There are homeowners throughout New England who planned for and built homes that allow them to avoid the sting of winter's high heating bills. These climate-responsive homes rely on passive solar heating, cooling and lighting. An example of such a climate-responsive/passive solar house is the home that Arthur and Terry Becker build on 6 beautiful acres (2.4 hectares) of rolling farm and woodland southeast of Andover, Connecticut, in 1981. They worked very closely with their designer, Al Eggan of K.T. Lear and Associates, to ensure that they would never have to pay for home heating oil, and that they would enjoy a level of year-round comfort that they had not experienced in conventionally built homes.

  20. Passive cryocooler for microsatellite payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, Mayes; Thomas, Paul J.; Harron, John W.; Duggan, Philip; Sinclair, Peter M.; Khanna, Shyam M.

    1998-11-01

    A passive cryocooler has been developed for the cooling of small payloads to temperatures as low as 145 K. Although designed for a specific electronics experiment on the STRV-1d microsatellite, the device is suitable for a wide range of applications. The cryocooler uses coated surfaces for tailored radiative cooling. Mechanical support between components is provided by fiberglass struts. The measured end temperature reached is 151 K in a liquid nitrogen dewar which extrapolates to an end temperature of lower than 145 K in space. Thermal vacuum testing and random vibration testing at levels consistent with an Ariane 5 launch have been performed as part of formal qualification for the STRV mission. In this paper, details of the design, analysis, fabrication and testing of the passive cryocooler are presented.

  1. All-passive nonreciprocal metastructure

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Davoyan, Arthur R.; Engheta, Nader

    2015-01-01

    One-way propagation of light, analogous to the directional flow of electrons in the presence of electric potential difference, has been an important goal in the wave–matter interaction. Breaking time-reversal symmetry in photonic flows is faced with challenges different from those for electron flows. In recent years several approaches and methods have been offered towards achieving this goal. Here we investigate another systematic approach to design all-passive relatively high-throughput metastructures that exhibit nonreciprocal properties and achieve wave-flow isolation. Moreover, we build on those findings and propose a paradigm for a quasi-two-dimensional metastructure that mimics the nonreciprocal property of Faraday rotation without using any magnetic or electric biasing. We envision that the proposed approaches may serve as a building block for all-passive time-reversal symmetry breaking with potential applications for future nonreciprocal systems and devices PMID:26414528

  2. FOSTERING APPLICATIONS OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE NASA SOIL MOISTURE ACTIVE PASSIVE (SMAP) MISSION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond. SMAP will ma...

  3. Active and Passive Hybrid Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carswell, James R.

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid ocean wind sensor (HOWS) can map ocean vector wind in low to hurricane-level winds, and non-precipitating and precipitating conditions. It can acquire active and passive measurements through a single aperture at two wavelengths, two polarizations, and multiple incidence angles. Its low profile, compact geometry, and low power consumption permits installation on air craft platforms, including high-altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

  4. Design Document for Passive Bioventing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    Unfortunately, most of the airflow measurement techniques such as Pitot tubes or orifice plates are not suitable for such low airflows. While there...available, including mechanical (rotary vane ) and thermal (hot wire) anemometers, which are suitable for measuring the flows induced during passive...Hill Air Force Base, UT. Blond, A. N., and P. M. Downing, 1997. Rotating vanes vs. thermal anemometry technology. Technical Topic I003: Airflow

  5. Interior design for passive solar homes

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, J. C.

    1981-07-01

    The increasing emphasis on refinement of passive solar systems has brought recognition to interior design as an integral part of passive solar architecture. Interior design can be used as a finetuning tool minimizing many of the problems associated with passive solar energy use in residential buildings. In addition, treatment of interior space in solar model homes may be a prime factor in determining sales success. A new style of interior design is evolving in response to changes in building form incorporating passive solar design features. The psychology behind passive solar architecture is reflected in interiors, and selection of interior components increasingly depends on the functional suitability of various interior elements.

  6. Evaluation of Alternate Surface Passivation Methods (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E

    2005-05-31

    Stainless steel containers were assembled from parts passivated by four commercial vendors using three passivation methods. The performance of these containers in storing hydrogen isotope mixtures was evaluated by monitoring the composition of initially 50% H{sub 2} 50% D{sub 2} gas with time using mass spectroscopy. Commercial passivation by electropolishing appears to result in surfaces that do not catalyze hydrogen isotope exchange. This method of surface passivation shows promise for tritium service, and should be studied further and considered for use. On the other hand, nitric acid passivation and citric acid passivation may not result in surfaces that do not catalyze the isotope exchange reaction H{sub 2} + D{sub 2} {yields} 2HD. These methods should not be considered to replace the proprietary passivation processes of the two current vendors used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility.

  7. Alternative to Nitric Acid for Passivation of Stainless Steel Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L.; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. Consequently, it is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The DoD and NASA have numerous structures and equipment that are fabricated from stainless steel. The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits including increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational cost. DoD and NASA agreed to collaborate to validate citric acid as an acceptable passivating agent for stainless steel. This paper details our investigation of prior work developing the citric acid passivation process, development of the test plan, optimization of the process for specific stainless steel alloys, ongoing and planned testing to elucidate the process' resistance to corrosion in comparison to nitric acid, and preliminary results.

  8. Will Passive Protection Save Congo Forests?

    PubMed Central

    Galford, Gillian L.; Soares-Filho, Britaldo S.; Sonter, Laura J.; Laporte, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    Central Africa’s tropical forests are among the world’s largest carbon reserves. Historically, they have experienced low rates of deforestation. Pressures to clear land are increasing due to development of infrastructure and livelihoods, foreign investment in agriculture, and shifting land use management, particularly in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The DRC contains the greatest area of intact African forests. These store approximately 22 billion tons of carbon in aboveground live biomass, yet only 10% are protected. Can the status quo of passive protection — forest management that is low or nonexistent — ensure the preservation of this forest and its carbon? We have developed the SimCongo model to simulate changes in land cover and land use based on theorized policy scenarios from 2010 to 2050. Three scenarios were examined: the first (Historical Trends) assumes passive forest protection; the next (Conservation) posits active protection of forests and activation of the national REDD+ action plan, and the last (Agricultural Development) assumes increased agricultural activities in forested land with concomitant increased deforestation. SimCongo is a cellular automata model based on Bayesian statistical methods tailored for the DRC, built with the Dinamica-EGO platform. The model is parameterized and validated with deforestation observations from the past and runs the scenarios from 2010 through 2050 with a yearly time step. We estimate the Historical Trends trajectory will result in average emissions of 139 million t CO2 year-1 by the 2040s, a 15% increase over current emissions. The Conservation scenario would result in 58% less clearing than Historical Trends and would conserve carbon-dense forest and woodland savanna areas. The Agricultural Development scenario leads to emissions of 212 million t CO2 year-1 by the 2040s. These scenarios are heuristic examples of policy’s influence on forest conservation and carbon storage. Our results

  9. Will Passive Protection Save Congo Forests?

    PubMed

    Galford, Gillian L; Soares-Filho, Britaldo S; Sonter, Laura J; Laporte, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    Central Africa's tropical forests are among the world's largest carbon reserves. Historically, they have experienced low rates of deforestation. Pressures to clear land are increasing due to development of infrastructure and livelihoods, foreign investment in agriculture, and shifting land use management, particularly in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The DRC contains the greatest area of intact African forests. These store approximately 22 billion tons of carbon in aboveground live biomass, yet only 10% are protected. Can the status quo of passive protection - forest management that is low or nonexistent - ensure the preservation of this forest and its carbon? We have developed the SimCongo model to simulate changes in land cover and land use based on theorized policy scenarios from 2010 to 2050. Three scenarios were examined: the first (Historical Trends) assumes passive forest protection; the next (Conservation) posits active protection of forests and activation of the national REDD+ action plan, and the last (Agricultural Development) assumes increased agricultural activities in forested land with concomitant increased deforestation. SimCongo is a cellular automata model based on Bayesian statistical methods tailored for the DRC, built with the Dinamica-EGO platform. The model is parameterized and validated with deforestation observations from the past and runs the scenarios from 2010 through 2050 with a yearly time step. We estimate the Historical Trends trajectory will result in average emissions of 139 million t CO2 year-1 by the 2040s, a 15% increase over current emissions. The Conservation scenario would result in 58% less clearing than Historical Trends and would conserve carbon-dense forest and woodland savanna areas. The Agricultural Development scenario leads to emissions of 212 million t CO2 year-1 by the 2040s. These scenarios are heuristic examples of policy's influence on forest conservation and carbon storage. Our results suggest that 1

  10. Gibbs free energy assisted passivation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salihoglu, Omer; Tansel, T.; Hostut, M.; Ergun, Y.; Aydinli, A.

    2016-05-01

    Reduction of surface leakage is a major challenge in most photodetectors that requires the elimination of surface oxides on etched mesas during passivation. Engineering the passivation requires close attention to chemical reactions that take place at the interface during the process. In particular, removal of surface oxides may be controlled via Gibbs reactivity. We have compared electrical performance of type-II superlattice photodetectors, designed for MWIR operation, passivated by different passivation techniques. We have used ALD deposited Al2O3, HfO2, TiO2, ZnO, PECVD deposited SiO2, Si3N4 and sulphur containing octadecanethiol (ODT) selfassembled monolayers (SAM) passivation layers on InAs/GaSb p-i-n superlattice photodetectors with cutoff wavelength at 5.1 μm. In this work, we have compared the result of different passivation techniques which are done under same conditions, same epitaxial structure and same fabrication processes. We have found that ALD deposited passivation is directly related to the Gibbs free energy of the passivation material. Gibbs free energies of the passivation layer can directly be compared with native surface oxides to check the effectiveness of the passivation layer before the experimental study.

  11. Passive microwave soil moisture research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Oneill, P. E.; Wang, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The AgRISTARS Soil Moisture Project has made significant progress in the quantification of microwave sensor capabilities for soil moisture remote sensing. The 21-cm wavelength has been verified to be the best single channel for radiometric observations of soil moisture. It has also been found that other remote sensing approaches used in conjunction with L-band passive data are more successful than multiple wavelength microwave radiometry in this application. AgRISTARS studies have also improved current understanding of noise factors affecting the interpretability of microwave emission data. The absorption of soil emission by vegetation has been quantified, although this effect is less important than absorption effects for microwave radiometry.

  12. Passive solar reflector satellite revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, C.; Daly, J. C.

    1980-07-01

    Passive light weight reflectors in space which direct the incident solar energy to a specified location on the Earth surface are proposed as an alternative system for the solar power satellite to overcome conversion losses and to avoid the need for photovoltaic cells. On Earth, either photovoltaic cells or a steam turbine alternator on a solar tower, or a similar conventional, relatively high efficiency cycle are used for electricity generation. The constraints which apply to the design of the optical system if a single satellite is placed in geostationary orbit are outlined. A single lens and a two lens system are discussed.

  13. Passive solar reflector satellite revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, C.; Daly, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Passive light weight reflectors in space which direct the incident solar energy to a specified location on the Earth surface are proposed as an alternative system for the solar power satellite to overcome conversion losses and to avoid the need for photovoltaic cells. On Earth, either photovoltaic cells or a steam turbine alternator on a solar tower, or a similar conventional, relatively high efficiency cycle are used for electricity generation. The constraints which apply to the design of the optical system if a single satellite is placed in geostationary orbit are outlined. A single lens and a two lens system are discussed.

  14. Modular passive solar heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, B.D.

    1985-03-19

    A modular passive solar energy storage system comprises a plurality of heat tubes which are arranged to form a flat plate solar collector and are releasably connected to a water reservoir by, and are part of, double-walled heat exchangers which penetrate to the water reservoir and enhance the heat transfer characteristics between the collector and the reservoir. The flat plate collector-heat exchanger disassembly, the collector housing, and the reservoir are integrated into a relatively light weight, unitary structural system in which the reservoir is a primary structural element. In addition to light weight, the system features high efficiency and ease of assembly and maintenance.

  15. Intercomparison of passive dosimetry technology at EDF facilities in France.

    PubMed

    Garcier, Y; Cordier, G; Pauron, C; Fazileabasse, J

    2007-01-01

    Since the spring of 1999, new French radiation protection legislation has allowed the use of passive dosemeters, other than the silver emulsion film badge, for the measurement of H(p)(10). Faced with the eventual obsolescence of its dosimetry system, Electricité de France (EDF, the French electricity provider) initiated a comparative study of passive dosemeters, based on different technologies, that had received accreditation by national laboratories and regulatory bodies, namely: TLD, RPL and OSL. An extended field study in nuclear power stations and medical X-ray departments has shown that all technologies provide compatible dosimetric estimates. It also showed that the selected dosemeters based on RPL and OSL technologies gave better results due to their energy responses and to a lower detection threshold compliant with the new regulation. A final suggestion to implement a new OSL based dosimetric system is made due to its overall performance and to its lower cost of implementation.

  16. The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Peggy; Entekhabi, Dara; Njoku, Eni; Kellogg, Kent

    2011-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council?s Decadal Survey [1]. Its mission design consists of L-band radiometer and radar instruments sharing a rotating 6-m mesh reflector antenna to provide high-resolution and high-accuracy global maps of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state every 2-3 days. The combined active/passive microwave soil moisture product will have a spatial resolution of 10 km and a mean latency of 24 hours. In addition, the SMAP surface observations will be combined with advanced modeling and data assimilation to provide deeper root zone soil moisture and net ecosystem exchange of carbon. SMAP is expected to launch in the late 2014 - early 2015 time frame.

  17. Gap between active and passive solar heating

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The gap between active and passive solar could hardly be wider. The reasons for this are discussed and advantages to narrowing the gap are analyzed. Ten years of experience in both active and passive systems are reviewed, including costs, frequent problems, performance prediction, performance modeling, monitoring, and cooling concerns. Trends are analyzed, both for solar space heating and for service water heating. A tendency for the active and passive technologies to be converging is observed. Several recommendations for narrowing the gap are presented.

  18. Overview of Passive Solar Design Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    the "market acceptance" of the passive solar designs. In mast cases, a passive system is integrated into the architecture of a building, which...increases discomfort by decreasing the rate of moisture evaporation from the skin. The Bioclimatic Chart developed by V. Olgyay provides a convenient way...outdoors and, therefore, not previously cir- culated through the system. passive solar system: An assembly of natural and architectural components

  19. Performance Assessment of Passive Hearing Protection Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-24

    AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2014-0148 Performance Assessment of Passive Hearing Protection Devices Hilary L. Gallagher Richard L. McKinley...Assessment of Passive Hearing Protection Devices 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-14-D-6501 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62202F 6. AUTHOR(S...is essential. Passive hearing protectors, capable of attenuating both continuous and impulsive noise, have been designed to reduce the risk of

  20. Cellular automaton formulation of passive scalar dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Hudong; Matthaeus, William H.

    1987-01-01

    Cellular automata modeling of the advection of a passive scalar in a two-dimensional flow is examined in the context of discrete lattice kinetic theory. It is shown that if the passive scalar is represented by tagging or 'coloring' automation particles a passive advection-diffusion equation emerges without use of perturbation expansions. For the specific case of the hydrodynamic lattice gas model of Frisch et al. (1986), the diffusion coefficient is calculated by perturbation.

  1. Columbia County Habitat for Humanity Passive Townhomes

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2016-03-01

    Columbia County Habitat for Humanity (CCHH) (New York, Climate Zone 5A) built a pair of townhomes to Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS+ 2015) criteria to explore approaches for achieving Passive House performance (specifically with respect to exterior wall, space-conditioning, and ventilation strategies) within the labor and budget context inherent in a Habitat for Humanity project. CCHH’s goal is to eventually develop a cost-justified Passive House prototype design for future projects.

  2. Passive locomotion in unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaemi Oskouei, Babak; Kanso, Eva

    2010-11-01

    The passive locomotion of a submerged body in unsteady flow is studied. This work is motivated by recent experimental evidence that live and dead trout exploit vortices in the wake of an oscillating cylinder to swim upstream. We consider a simple model of a rigid body interacting dynamically with idealized wake models. The wake models consist of point vortices periodically introduced into the fluid domain to emulate shedding of vortices from an external un-modeled fixed or moving obstacle producing a "drag" or "thrust" wake, respectively. Both symmetric and staggered vortex configurations are considered. The submerged body is free to move in the plane, that is to say, it is not pinned at a given point. We do not prescribe a background flow, we rather consider the two-way coupled dynamics between the body's motion and the advection of ambient vortices. We show that both circular and elliptical bodies could "swim" passively against the flow by extracting energy from the ambient vortices. We obtain periodic trajectories for the body-vortex system and analyze their linear stability. We propose active feedback control strategies to overcome the instabilities.

  3. Passive electroreception in aquatic mammals.

    PubMed

    Czech-Damal, Nicole U; Dehnhardt, Guido; Manger, Paul; Hanke, Wolf

    2013-06-01

    Passive electroreception is a sensory modality in many aquatic vertebrates, predominantly fishes. Using passive electroreception, the animal can detect and analyze electric fields in its environment. Most electric fields in the environment are of biogenic origin, often produced by prey items. These electric fields can be relatively strong and can be a highly valuable source of information for a predator, as underlined by the fact that electroreception has evolved multiple times independently. The only mammals that possess electroreception are the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and the echidnas (Tachyglossidae) from the monotreme order, and, recently discovered, the Guiana dolphin (Sotalia guianensis) from the cetacean order. Here we review the morphology, function and origin of the electroreceptors in the two aquatic species, the platypus and the Guiana dolphin. The morphology shows certain similarities, also similar to ampullary electroreceptors in fishes, that provide cues for the search for electroreceptors in more vertebrate and invertebrate species. The function of these organs appears to be very similar. Both species search for prey animals in low-visibility conditions or while digging in the substrate, and sensory thresholds are within one order of magnitude. The electroreceptors in both species are innervated by the trigeminal nerve. The origin of the accessory structures, however, is completely different; electroreceptors in the platypus have developed from skin glands, in the Guiana dolphin, from the vibrissal system.

  4. Rocket launchers as passive controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, J. E., Jr.; Gunnels, R. T.; McCutchen, R. K., Jr.

    1981-12-01

    A concept is advanced for using the motion of launchers of a free-flight launcher/rocket system which is caused by random imperfections of the rockets launched from it to reduce the total error caused by the imperfections. This concept is called 'passive launcher control' because no feedback is generated by an active energy source after an error is sensed; only the feedback inherent in the launcher/rocket interaction is used. Relatively simple launcher models with two degrees of freedom, pitch and yaw, were used in conjunction with a more detailed, variable-mass model in a digital simulation code to obtain rocket trajectories with and without thrust misalignment and dynamic imbalance. Angular deviations of rocket velocities and linear deviations of the positions of rocket centers of mass at burnout were computed for cases in which the launcher was allowed to move ('flexible' launcher) and was constrained so that it did not rotate ('rigid' launcher) and ratios of flexible to rigid deviations were determined. Curves of these error ratios versus launcher frequency are presented. These show that a launcher which has a transverse moment of inertia about its pivot point of the same magnitude as that of the centroidal transverse moments of inertia of the rockets launched from it can be tuned to passively reduce the errors caused by rocket imperfections.

  5. Passive cavitation imaging with ultrasound arrays.

    PubMed

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A; Datta, Saurabh; Holland, Christy K; Mast, T Douglas

    2009-12-01

    A method is presented for passive imaging of cavitational acoustic emissions using an ultrasound array, with potential application in real-time monitoring of ultrasound ablation. To create such images, microbubble emissions were passively sensed by an imaging array and dynamically focused at multiple depths. In this paper, an analytic expression for a passive image is obtained by solving the Rayleigh-Sommerfield integral, under the Fresnel approximation, and passive images were simulated. A 192-element array was used to create passive images, in real time, from 520-kHz ultrasound scattered by a 1-mm steel wire. Azimuthal positions of this target were accurately estimated from the passive images. Next, stable and inertial cavitation was passively imaged in saline solution sonicated at 520 kHz. Bubble clusters formed in the saline samples were consistently located on both passive images and B-scans. Passive images were also created using broadband emissions from bovine liver sonicated at 2.2 MHz. Agreement was found between the images and source beam shape, indicating an ability to map therapeutic ultrasound beams in situ. The relation between these broadband emissions, sonication amplitude, and exposure conditions are discussed.

  6. Passive transfer of colostral immunoglobulins in calves.

    PubMed

    Weaver, D M; Tyler, J W; VanMetre, D C; Hostetler, D E; Barrington, G M

    2000-01-01

    Passive transfer of colostral immunoglobulins has long been accepted as imperative to optimal calf health. Many factors, including timing of colostrum ingestion, the method and volume of colostrum administration, the immunoglobulin concentration of the colostrum ingested, and the age of the dam have been implicated in affecting the optimization of absorption. The practice of colostrum pooling, the breed and presence of the dam, and the presence of respiratory acidosis in the calf also may affect passive transfer. Various tests have been reported to accurately measure passive transfer status in neonatal calves. The radial immunodiffusion and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) are the only tests that directly measure serum IgG concentration. All other available tests including serum total solids by refractometry, sodium sulfite turbidity test, zinc sulfate turbidity test, serum gamma-glutamyl transferase activity, and whole blood glutaraldehyde gelation estimate serum IgG concentration based on concentration of total globulins or other proteins whose passive transfer is statistically associated with that of IgG. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the literature of passive transfer in calves including factors that affect passive transfer status, testing modalities, effects of failure of passive transfer on baseline mortality, consequences of failure of passive transfer, and some treatment options. Many previously accepted truisms regarding passive transfer in calves should be rejected based on the results of recent research.

  7. Modeling Chemical Detection Sensitivities of Active and Passive Remote Sensing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Scharlemann, E T

    2003-07-28

    During nearly a decade of remote sensing programs under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), LLNL has developed a set of performance modeling codes--called APRS--for both Active and Passive Remote Sensing systems. These codes emphasize chemical detection sensitivity in the form of minimum detectable quantities with and without background spectral clutter and in the possible presence of other interfering chemicals. The codes have been benchmarked against data acquired in both active and passive remote sensing programs at LLNL and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The codes include, as an integral part of the performance modeling, many of the data analysis techniques developed in the DOE's active and passive remote sensing programs (e.g., ''band normalization'' for an active system, principal component analysis for a passive system).

  8. Photodiode-Based, Passive Ultraviolet Dosimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Gray, Perry

    2004-01-01

    Simple, passive instruments have been developed for measuring the exposure of material specimens to vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation from the Sun. Each instrument contains a silicon photodiode and a coulometer. The photocharge generated in the photodiode is stored in the coulometer. The accumulated electric charge measured by use of the coulometer is assumed to be proportional to the cumulative dose of VUV radiation expressed in such convenient units as equivalent Sun hours (ESH) [defined as the number of hours of exposure to sunlight at normal incidence]. Intended originally for use aboard spacecraft, these instruments could also be adapted to such terrestrial uses as monitoring the curing of ultraviolet-curable epoxies. Each instrument includes a photodiode and a coulometer assembly mounted on an interface plate (see figure). The photodiode assembly includes an aluminum housing that holds the photodiode, a poly(tetrafluoroehylene) cosine receptor, and a narrow-band optical filter. The cosine receptor ensures that the angular response of the instrument approximates the ideal angular response (proportional to the cosine of the angle of incidence). The filter is chosen to pass the ultraviolet wavelength of interest in a specific experiment. The photodiode is electrically connected to the coulometer. The factor of proportionality between the charge stored in the coulometer and ultraviolet dosage (in units of ESH) is established, prior to use, in calibration experiments that involve the use of lamps and current sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  9. The University's Role in National Life--Passive or Active?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, G. T.

    1980-01-01

    Some kind of coalition of universities, corporations, and other private organizations, it is argued, will be necessary to gain sufficient credibility to influence public policy. The complexities of modern mass media communication and of public policy issues have reached levels that justify a review of university and corporate roles. (MLW)

  10. NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Barron; Moran, M. Susan; Escobar, Vanessa; Brown, Molly E.

    2014-05-01

    The launch of the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission in 2014 will provide global soil moisture and freeze-thaw measurements at moderate resolution (9 km) with latency as short as 24 hours. The resolution, latency and global coverage of SMAP products will enable new applications in the fields of weather, climate, drought, flood, agricultural production, human health and national security. To prepare for launch, the SMAP mission has engaged more than 25 Early Adopters. Early Adopters are users who have a need for SMAP-like soil moisture or freeze-thaw data, and who agreed to apply their own resources to demonstrate the utility of SMAP data for their particular system or model. In turn, the SMAP mission agreed to provide Early Adopters with simulated SMAP data products and pre-launch calibration and validation data from SMAP field campaigns, modeling, and synergistic studies. The applied research underway by Early Adopters has provided fundamental knowledge of how SMAP data products can be scaled and integrated into users' policy, business and management activities to improve decision-making efforts. This presentation will cover SMAP applications including weather and climate forecasting, vehicle mobility estimation, quantification of greenhouse gas emissions, management of urban potable water supply, and prediction of crop yield. The presentation will end with a discussion of potential international applications with focus on the ESA/CEOS TIGER Initiative entitled "looking for water in Africa", the United Nations (UN) Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) which carries a specific mandate focused on Africa, the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) which lists soil moisture as an Essential Climate Variable (ECV), and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which reported a food and nutrition crisis in the Sahel.

  11. Passive adaptive imaging through turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofsted, David

    2016-05-01

    Standard methods for improved imaging system performance under degrading optical turbulence conditions typically involve active adaptive techniques or post-capture image processing. Here, passive adaptive methods are considered where active sources are disallowed, a priori. Theoretical analyses of short-exposure turbulence impacts indicate that varying aperture sizes experience different degrees of turbulence impacts. Smaller apertures often outperform larger aperture systems as turbulence strength increases. This suggests a controllable aperture system is advantageous. In addition, sub-aperture sampling of a set of training images permits the system to sense tilts in different sub-aperture regions through image acquisition and image cross-correlation calculations. A four sub-aperture pattern supports corrections involving five realizable operating modes (beyond tip and tilt) for removing aberrations over an annular pattern. Progress to date will be discussed regarding development and field trials of a prototype system.

  12. Cardiopulmonary readjustments in passive tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matalon, S. V.; Farhi, L. E.

    1979-01-01

    The readjustment of cardiopulmonary variables in human volunteers at various tilt angles on a tilt board is studied. Five healthy subjects (18-31 yr) with thorough knowledge of the experimental protocol are tested, passively tilted from the supine to the upright position in 15-deg increments in random sequence. The parameters measured are cardiac output (Q), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), minute and alveolar ventilation /V(E) and V(A)/, functional residual capacity (FRC), and arterial-end-tidal P(CO2) pressure difference. It is found that changes in Q and FRC are linearly related to the sine of the tilt angle, indicating that either reflexes are absent or their net effect is proportional to the effects of gravity. This is clearly not the case for other variables /HR, SV, V(E), V(A)/, where it is possible to demonstrate threshold values for the appearance of secondary changes.

  13. A Passive Magnetic Bearing Flywheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siebert, Mark; Ebihara, Ben; Jansen, Ralph; Fusaro, Robert L.; Morales, Wilfredo; Kascak, Albert; Kenny, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    A 100 percent passive magnetic bearing flywheel rig employing no active control components was designed, constructed, and tested. The suspension clothe rotor was provided by two sets of radial permanent magnetic bearings operating in the repulsive mode. The axial support was provided by jewel bearings on both ends of the rotor. The rig was successfully operated to speeds of 5500 rpm, which is 65 percent above the first critical speed of 3336 rpm. Operation was not continued beyond this point because of the excessive noise generated by the air impeller and because of inadequate containment in case of failure. Radial and axial stiffnesses of the permanent magnetic bearings were experimentally measured and then compared to finite element results. The natural damping of the rotor was measured and a damping coefficient was calculated.

  14. Passive Optical Sample Assembly (POSA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, R. C.; Miller, E. R.; Susko, M.

    1981-01-01

    A Passive Optical Sample Assembly (POSA) unit was mounted and flown in the cargo bay of the space shuttle Columbia during the first Orbital Flight Test (OFT-1). A similar unit was mounted in a different location in the cargo bay during the postflight operations. The samples in both POSA arrays were subjected to a series of optical and analytical measurements prior to delivery for installation in the cargo bay and after retrieval of the flight hardware. The final results of a comparison of the two series of measurements are presented. These STS-1 results are based on data obtained from only a portion of one of the ten Induced Environment Contamination Monitor instruments to be flown on several shuttle flights beginning with STS-2. These limited results do not indicate shuttle contamination levels in excess of those anticipated.

  15. Passive Tracking System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor); Chen, Henry A. (Inventor); Phan, Chau T. (Inventor); Bourgeois, Brian A. (Inventor); Dusl, Jon (Inventor); Hill, Brent W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Systems and methods are disclosed for passively determining the location of a moveable transmitter utilizing a pair of phase shifts at a receiver for extracting a direction vector from a receiver to the transmitter. In a preferred embodiment, a phase difference between the transmitter and receiver is extracted utilizing a noncoherent demodulator in the receiver. The receiver includes an antenna array with three antenna elements, which preferably are patch antenna elements spaced apart by one-half wavelength. Three receiver channels are preferably utilized for simultaneously processing the received signal from each of the three antenna elements. Multipath transmission paths for each of the three receiver channels are indexed so that comparisons of the same multipath component are made for each of the three receiver channels. The phase difference for each received signal is determined by comparing only the magnitudes of received and stored modulation signals to determine a winning modulation symbol.

  16. Passive Tracking System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor); Chen, Henry A. (Inventor); Phan, Chau T. (Inventor); Bourgeois, Brian A. (Inventor); Dusl, John (Inventor); Hill, Brent W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    System and methods are disclosed for passively determining the location of a moveable transmitter utilizing a pair of phase shifts at a receiver for extracting a direction vector from a receiver to the transmitter. In a preferred embodiment, a phase difference between the transmitter and receiver is extracted utilizing a noncoherent demodulator in the receiver. The receiver includes antenna array with three antenna elements, which preferably are patch antenna elements placed apart by one-half wavelength. Three receiver channels are preferably utilized for simultaneously processing the received signal from each of the three antenna elements. Multipath transmission paths for each of the three receiver channels are indexed so that comparisons of the same multipath component are made for each of the three receiver channels. The phase difference for each received signal is determined by comparing only the magnitudes of received and stored modulation signals to determine a winning modulation symbol.

  17. Passive solar-heated courthouse

    SciTech Connect

    Coupland, J.

    1997-12-01

    The Santa Fe Municipal Court Building is the first passive solar-heated courthouse in the United States. Taking advantage of the mild climate and using the sun to heat buildings are ancient traditions in northern New Mexico. One of the design team`s initial goals was to develop a project that was both environmentally responsive and responsible. The project was planned to be energy efficient and to demonstrate the use of integrated natural energy systems. The building is unique because occupants are responsible for manually operating equipment to maintain comfort levels in their individual work areas. Solar gain and light levels are modulated by adjusting mini-blinds, and temperature and ventilation are controlled by windows. This approach has proven successful, and the court employees are enthusiastic about their ability to control their environment. The paper describes the operation of the heating systems, ventilation cooling systems, and lighting. The paper also discusses energy consumption and modeling.

  18. Passive Thermal Management of Foil Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for passive thermal management of foil bearing systems are disclosed herein. The flow of the hydrodynamic film across the surface of bearing compliant foils may be disrupted to provide passive cooling and to improve the performance and reliability of the foil bearing system.

  19. Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Ice.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    This is a report on the progress that has been made in the study of active and passive remote sensing of ice during the period of August 1, 1984...active and passive microwave remote sensing , (2) used the strong fluctuation theory and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to calculate the brightness

  20. Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Ice.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    This is a report on the progress that has been made in the study of active and passive remote sensing of ice during the period of February 1, 1984...the emissivities as functions of viewing angles and polarizations. They are used to interpret the passive microwave remote sensing data from

  1. Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Gorski, Anthony J.; Schertz, William W.

    1982-01-01

    A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

  2. Passive Solar Construction--Design and Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Inquiry and Referral Service (DOE), Silver Spring, MD.

    Presented is a list of books and reports intended to serve as technical sources of information for the building professional interested in energy conservation. These publications are grouped under these headings: (1) energy-conserving building design; (2) passive systems/design; (3) passive systems/performance; and (4) proceedings (of the American…

  3. Aerodynamic control with passively pitching wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravish, Nick; Wood, Robert

    Flapping wings may pitch passively under aerodynamic and inertial loads. Such passive pitching is observed in flapping wing insect and robot flight. The effect of passive wing pitch on the control dynamics of flapping wing flight are unexplored. Here we demonstrate in simulation and experiment the critical role wing pitching plays in yaw control of a flapping wing robot. We study yaw torque generation by a flapping wing allowed to passively rotate in the pitch axis through a rotational spring. Yaw torque is generated through alternating fast and slow upstroke and and downstroke. Yaw torque sensitively depends on both the rotational spring force law and spring stiffness, and at a critical spring stiffness a bifurcation in the yaw torque control relationship occurs. Simulation and experiment reveal the dynamics of this bifurcation and demonstrate that anomalous yaw torque from passively pitching wings is the result of aerodynamic and inertial coupling between the pitching and stroke-plane dynamics.

  4. CMR Shuffler System: Passive Mode Calibration and Certification Report

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, Katherine C.; Gomez, Cipriano D.; Salazar, William R.; Mayo, Douglas R.; Vigil, Georgiana M.; Crooks, William J.; Stange, Sy

    2012-07-20

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels (CVs) remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1 to 2 inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the vessels. As debris is removed from the vessels, material will be placed in waste drums. Far-field gamma ray assay will be used to determine when a drum is nearing a {sup 239}Pu equivalent mass of less than 200 g. The drum will then be assayed using a waste drum shuffler operated in passive mode using a neutron coincidence counting method for accountability. This report focuses on the testing and calibration of the CMR waste drum shuffler in passive mode operation. Initial testing was performed to confirm previously accepted measurement parameters. The system was then calibrated using a set of weapons grade Pu (WGPu, {sup 239}Pu > 93%) oxide standards placed inside a 55 gallon drum. The calibration data ranges from Pu mass of 0.5 g to 188.9 g. The CMR waste drum shuffler has been tested and calibrated in passive mode in preparation for safeguards accountability measurements of waste drums containing material removed from CVs for the CVD project.

  5. Prognostics Health Management for Advanced Small Modular Reactor Passive Components

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coble, Jamie B.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Wootan, David W.; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-10-18

    In the United States, sustainable nuclear power to promote energy security is a key national energy priority. Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMR), which are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts using non-light-water reactor (LWR) coolants such as liquid metal, helium, or liquid salt may provide a longer-term alternative to more conventional LWR-based concepts. The economics of AdvSMRs will be impacted by the reduced economy-of-scale savings when compared to traditional LWRs and the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs are expected to be dominated by operations and maintenance costs. Therefore, achieving the full benefits of AdvSMR deployment requires a new paradigm for plant design and management. In this context, prognostic health management of passive components in AdvSMRs can play a key role in enabling the economic deployment of AdvSMRs. In this paper, the background of AdvSMRs is discussed from which requirements for PHM systems are derived. The particle filter technique is proposed as a prognostics framework for AdvSMR passive components and the suitability of the particle filter technique is illustrated by using it to forecast thermal creep degradation using a physics-of-failure model and based on a combination of types of measurements conceived for passive AdvSMR components.

  6. Active and passive computed tomography for nondestructive assay

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardi, R T; Camp, D E; Clard, D; Jackson, J A; Martz, H E, Decman, D J; Roberson, G P

    1998-10-28

    Traditional gamma-ray methods used to characterize nuclear waste introduce errors that are related to non-uniform measurement responses associated with unknown radioactive source and matrix material distributions. These errors can be reduced by applying an active and passive tomographic technique (A&PCT) developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The technique uses an external radioactive source and active tomography to map the attenuation within a waste barrel as a function of mono-energetic gamma-ray energy. Passive tomography is used to localize and identify specific radioactive waste within the same container. Reconstruction of the passive data using the attenuation maps at specific energies allows internal waste radioactivity to be corrected for any overlying heterogeneous materials, thus yielding an absolute assay of the waste activity. LLNL and Bio-Imaging Research, Inc. have collaborated in a technology transfer effort to integrate an A&PCT assay system into a mobile waste characterization trailer. This mobile system has participated in and passed several formal DOE-sponsored performance demonstrations, tests and evaluations. The system is currently being upgraded with multiple detectors to improve throughput, automated gamma-ray analysis code to simplify the assay, and a new emission reconstruction code to improve accuracy

  7. Evaluating the Relationship between Equilibrium Passive ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This review evaluates passive sampler uptake of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in water column and interstitial water exposures as a surrogate for organism bioaccumulation. Fifty-four studies were found where both passive sampler uptake and organism bioaccumulation were measured and 19 of these investigations provided direct comparisons relating passive sampler uptake and organism bioaccumulation. Polymers compared included low density polyethylene (LDPE), polyoxymethylene (POM), and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and organisms ranged from polychaetes and oligochaetes to bivalves, aquatic insects, and gastropods. Regression equations correlating bioaccumulation (CL) and passive sampler uptake (CPS) were used to assess the strength of observed relationships. Passive sampling based concentrations resulted in logarithmic predictive relationships, most of which were within one to two orders of magnitude of measured bioaccumulation. Mean coefficients of determination (r2) for LDPE, PDMS and POM were 0.68, 0.76 and 0.58, respectively. For the available raw data, the mean ratio of CL and CPS was 10.8 ± 18.4 (n = 609). This review concludes that in many applications passive sampling may serve as a reliable surrogate for biomonitoring organisms when biomonitoring organisms are not available. When applied properly, passive sampling based estimates of bioaccumulation provide useful information for making informed decisions about the bioavailability of HOCs

  8. Evaluating the Relationship between Equilibrium Passive ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Objectives. This review evaluates passive sampler uptake of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in water column and interstitial water exposures as a surrogate for organism bioaccumulation. Approach/Activities. Fifty-five studies were found where both passive sampler uptake and organism bioaccumulation were measured and 19 of these investigations provided direct comparisons relating passive sampler uptake and organism bioaccumulation. Polymers compared included low density polyethylene (LDPE), polyoxymethylene (POM), and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and organisms ranged from polychaetes and oligochaetes to bivalves, aquatic insects, and gastropods. Regression equations correlating bioaccumulation (CL) and passive sampler uptake (CPS) were used to assess the strength of observed relationships. Results/Lessons Learned. Passive sampling based concentrations resulted in strong logarithmic regression relationships, most of which were within one to two orders of magnitude of measured bioaccumulation. Mean coefficients of determination (r2) for LDPE, PDMS and POM were 0.68, 0.76 and 0.58, respectively. For the available raw data, the mean ratio of CL and CPS was 10.8 ± 18.4 (n = 609). Passive sampler uptake and bioaccumulation were not found to be identical (i.e., CPS ≠ CL) but the logarithmic-based relationships between these values were consistently linear and predictive. This review concludes that in many applications passive sampling may serve as a

  9. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  10. Passive states for essential observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strich, Robert

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this note is to present a unified approach to the results given by Borchers and Buchholz ["Global properties of vacuum states in de Sitter space," Ann. Inst. Henri Poincare, Sect. A. 70, 23-40 (1999)] and by Buchholz and Summers ["Stable quantum systems in anti-de Sitter space: Causality, independence and spectral properties," J. Math. Phys. 45, 4810-4831 (2004)] which also covers examples of models not presented in these two papers (e.g., d-dimensional Minkowski space-time for d ⩾3). Assuming that a state is passive for an observer traveling along certain (essential) worldlines, we show that this state is invariant under the isometry group, is a temperature equilibrium state for the observer at a temperature uniquely determined by the structure constants of the Lie algebra involved, and fulfills (a variant of) the Reeh-Schlieder property. Also, the modular objects associated with such a state and the observable algebra of an observer are computed and a version of weak locality is examined.

  11. Passive states for essential observers

    SciTech Connect

    Strich, Robert

    2008-02-15

    The aim of this note is to present a unified approach to the results given by Borchers and Buchholz ['Global properties of vacuum states in de Sitter space', Ann. Inst. Henri Poincare, Sect. A. 70, 23-40 (1999)] and by Buchholz and Summers ['Stable quantum systems in anti-de Sitter space: Causality, independence and spectral properties', J. Math. Phys. 45, 4810-4831 (2004)] which also covers examples of models not presented in these two papers (e.g., d-dimensional Minkowski space-time for d{>=}3). Assuming that a state is passive for an observer traveling along certain (essential) worldlines, we show that this state is invariant under the isometry group, is a temperature equilibrium state for the observer at a temperature uniquely determined by the structure constants of the Lie algebra involved, and fulfills (a variant of) the Reeh-Schlieder property. Also, the modular objects associated with such a state and the observable algebra of an observer are computed and a version of weak locality is examined.

  12. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOEpatents

    Evans, D.J.; Cha, Y.S.

    1999-04-06

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment. 6 figs.

  13. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Daniel J.; Cha, Yung S.

    1999-01-01

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment.

  14. Passive Cooling of Body Armor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtz, Ronald; Matic, Peter; Mott, David

    2013-03-01

    Warfighter performance can be adversely affected by heat load and weight of equipment. Current tactical vest designs are good insulators and lack ventilation, thus do not provide effective management of metabolic heat generated. NRL has undertaken a systematic study of tactical vest thermal management, leading to physics-based strategies that provide improved cooling without undesirable consequences such as added weight, added electrical power requirements, or compromised protection. The approach is based on evaporative cooling of sweat produced by the wearer of the vest, in an air flow provided by ambient wind or ambulatory motion of the wearer. Using an approach including thermodynamic analysis, computational fluid dynamics modeling, air flow measurements of model ventilated vest architectures, and studies of the influence of fabric aerodynamic drag characteristics, materials and geometry were identified that optimize passive cooling of tactical vests. Specific architectural features of the vest design allow for optimal ventilation patterns, and selection of fabrics for vest construction optimize evaporation rates while reducing air flow resistance. Cooling rates consistent with the theoretical and modeling predictions were verified experimentally for 3D mockups.

  15. Passive environmental temperature control system

    DOEpatents

    Corliss, John M.; Stickford, George H.

    1981-01-01

    Passive environmental heating and cooling systems are described, which utilize heat pipes to transmit heat to or from a thermal reservoir. In a solar heating system, a heat pipe is utilized to carry heat from a solar heat absorber plate that receives sunlight, through a thermal insulation barrier, to a heat storage wall, with the outer end of the pipe which is in contact with the solar absorber being lower than the inner end. The inclining of the heat pipe assures that the portion of working fluid, such as Freon, which is in a liquid phase will fall by gravity to the outer end of the pipe, thereby assuring diode action that prevents the reverse transfer of heat from the reservoir to the outside on cool nights. In a cooling system, the outer end of the pipe which connects to a heat dissipator, is higher than the inner end that is coupled to a cold reservoir, to allow heat transfer only out of the reservoir to the heat dissipator, and not in the reverse direction.

  16. Passive autonomous infrared sensor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, Firooz

    1987-10-01

    This study was conducted in response to the DoD's need for establishing understanding of algorithm's modules for passive infrared sensors and seekers and establishing a standardized systematic procedure for applying this understanding to DoD applications. We quantified the performances of Honeywell's Background Adaptive Convexity Operator Region Extractor (BACORE) detection and segmentation modules, as functions of a set of image metrics for both single-frame and multiframe processing. We established an understanding of the behavior of the BACORE's internal parameters. We characterized several sets of stationary and sequential imagery and extracted TIR squared, TBIR squared, ESR, and range for each target. We generated a set of performance models for multi-frame processing BACORE that could be used to predict the behavior of BACORE in image metric space. A similar study was conducted for another of Honeywell's segmentors, namely Texture Boundary Locator (TBL), and its performances were quantified. Finally, a comparison of TBL and BACORE on the same data base and same number of frames was made.

  17. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of NASA and the GSDO Program, the objective of this project is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys. This project is a direct follow-on to United Space Alliance (USA) work at KSC to optimize the parameters for the use of citric acid and verify effectiveness. This project will build off of the USA study to further evaluate citric acids effectiveness and suitability for corrosion protection of a number of stainless steels alloys used by NASA, the Department of Defense (DoD), and the European Space Agency (ESA).

  18. Soil moisture active passive (SMAP) satellite status and cal/val activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite will be launched by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in November 2014. This satellite is the culmination of basic research and applications development over the past thirty years. During most of this period, research and development ...

  19. NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission and opportunities for applications users

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of four first-tier missions recommended by the National Research Council's Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space. Set to launch in 2014, SMAP soil moisture and freeze/thaw measurements will have an accuracy, resolution, and glob...

  20. Advanced Reactor Passive System Reliability Demonstration Analysis for an External Event

    SciTech Connect

    Bucknor, Matthew D.; Grabaskas, David; Brunett, Acacia J.; Grelle, Austin

    2016-01-01

    Many advanced reactor designs rely on passive systems to fulfill safety functions during accident sequences. These systems depend heavily on boundary conditions to induce a motive force, meaning the system can fail to operate as intended due to deviations in boundary conditions, rather than as the result of physical failures. Furthermore, passive systems may operate in intermediate or degraded modes. These factors make passive system operation difficult to characterize within a traditional probabilistic framework that only recognizes discrete operating modes and does not allow for the explicit consideration of time-dependent boundary conditions. Argonne National Laboratory has been examining various methodologies for assessing passive system reliability within a probabilistic risk assessment for a station blackout event at an advanced small modular reactor. This paper provides an overview of a passive system reliability demonstration analysis for an external event. Centering on an earthquake with the possibility of site flooding, the analysis focuses on the behavior of the passive reactor cavity cooling system following potential physical damage and system flooding. The assessment approach seeks to combine mechanistic and simulation-based methods to leverage the benefits of the simulation-based approach without the need to substantially deviate from conventional probabilistic risk assessment techniques. While this study is presented as only an example analysis, the results appear to demonstrate a high level of reliability for the reactor cavity cooling system (and the reactor system in general) to the postulated transient event.

  1. Passive decoy-state quantum key distribution using weak coherent pulses with modulator attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Bao, Wan-Su; Li, Hong-Wei; Zhou, Chun; Wang, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Passive decoy-state quantum key distribution is more desirable than the active one in some scenarios. It is also affected by the imperfections of the devices. In this paper, the influence of modulator attenuation on the passive decoy-state method is considered. We introduce and analyze the unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer, briefly, and combining with the virtual source and imaginary unitary transformation, we characterize the passive decoy-state method using a weak coherent photon source with modulator attenuation. According to the attenuation parameter δ, the pass efficiencies are given. Then, the key generation rate can be acquired. From numerical simulations, it can be seen that modulator attenuation has a nonnegligible influence on the performance of passive-state QKD protocol. Based on the research, the analysis method of virtual source and imaginary unitary transformation are preferred in analyzing passive decoy state protocol, and the passive decoy-state method is better than the active one and is close to the active vacuum + weak decoy state under the condition of having the same modulator attenuation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11304397).

  2. 14TH Annual International Performance Management Association Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Being more responsive to all internal & external customers 6 Evolution of Business Planning & Execution Systems Functional View Mainframe Value Chain...integrating EVM to core business Planning , Budgeting, and Acquisition Under GPRA David Muzio Office of Federal Procurement Policy 202-395-6805 Largest

  3. History of On-orbit Satellite Fragmentations (14th Edition)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.; Stansbery, Eugene; Whitlock, David O.; Abercromby, Kira J.; Shoots, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Since the first serious satellite fragmentation occurred in June 1961 (which instantaneously increased the total Earth satellite population by more than 400%) the issue of space operations within the finite region of space around the Earth has been the subject of increasing interest and concern. The prolific satellite fragmentations of the 1970s and the marked increase in the number of fragmentations in the 1980s served to widen international research into the characteristics and consequences of such events. Continued events in all orbits in later years make definition and historical accounting of those events crucial to future research. Large, manned space stations and the growing number of operational robotic satellites demand a better understanding of the hazards of the dynamic Earth satellite population.

  4. Optoelectronic Workshops (14th). Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal IR chopper.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-21

    and Development Authority, Ontario Hydro , and the University of Rochester. Such support does not imply endorsement of the content by any of the above...shorter helix pitch length in G-1456 adds an additional elastic restoring torque not present in the long-pitch ZLI-4003, resulting in reduced decay...cell was a Wilks Model VR-6 variable path cell with KBr substrates. The path length of the cell was adjusted to 10 pm and the calibration checked by

  5. Proceedings of the 14th Annual Software Engineering Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Several software related topics are presented. Topics covered include studies and experiment at the Software Engineering Laboratory at the Goddard Space Flight Center, predicting project success from the Software Project Management Process, software environments, testing in a reuse environment, domain directed reuse, and classification tree analysis using the Amadeus measurement and empirical analysis.

  6. Proceedings of the 14th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Technological areas covered include aviation propulsion, aerodynamic devices, and crew safety; space vehicle propulsion, guidance and control; spacecraft deployment, positioning, and pointing; spacecraft bearings, gimbals, and lubricants; and large space structures. Devices for payload deployment, payload retention, and crew extravehicular activity on the space shuttle orbiter are also described.

  7. Assessment of the SMAP Passive Soil Moisture Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Steven K.; Bindlish, Rajat; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Njoku, Eni; Jackson, Tom; Colliander, Andreas; Chen, Fan; Burgin, Mariko; Dunbar, Scott; Piepmeier, Jeffrey; Yueh, Simon; Entekhabi, Dara; Cosh, Michael H.; Caldwell, Todd; Walker, Jeffrey; Wu, Xiaoling; Berg, Aaron; Rowlandson, Tracy; Pacheco, Anna; McNairn, Heather; Thibeault, Marc; Martinez-Fernandez, Jose; Gonzalez-Zamora, Angel; Seyfried, Mark; Bosch, David; Starks, Patrick; Goodrich, David; Prueger, John; Palecki, Michael; Small, Eric E.; Zreda, Marek; Calvet, Jean-Christophe; Crow, Wade T.; Kerr, Yann

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite mission was launched on January 31, 2015. The observatory was developed to provide global mapping of high-resolution soil moisture and freeze-thaw state every two to three days using an L-band (active) radar and an L-band (passive) radiometer. After an irrecoverable hardware failure of the radar on July 7, 2015, the radiometer-only soil moisture product became the only operational Level 2 soil moisture product for SMAP. The product provides soil moisture estimates posted on a 36 kilometer Earth-fixed grid produced using brightness temperature observations from descending passes. Within months after the commissioning of the SMAP radiometer, the product was assessed to have attained preliminary (beta) science quality, and data were released to the public for evaluation in September 2015. The product is available from the NASA Distributed Active Archive Center at the National Snow and Ice Data Center. This paper provides a summary of the Level 2 Passive Soil Moisture Product (L2_SM_P) and its validation against in situ ground measurements collected from different data sources. Initial in situ comparisons conducted between March 31, 2015 and October 26, 2015, at a limited number of core validation sites (CVSs) and several hundred sparse network points, indicate that the V-pol Single Channel Algorithm (SCA-V) currently delivers the best performance among algorithms considered for L2_SM_P, based on several metrics. The accuracy of the soil moisture retrievals averaged over the CVSs was 0.038 cubic meter per cubic meter unbiased root-mean-square difference (ubRMSD), which approaches the SMAP mission requirement of 0.040 cubic meter per cubic meter.

  8. Passive film growth on carbon steel and its nanoscale features at various passivating potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Cheng, Y. Frank

    2017-02-01

    In this work, the passivation and topographic sub-structure of passive films on a carbon steel in a carbonate/bicarbonate solution was characterized by electrochemical measurements, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. When passivating at a potential near the active-passive transition, the film contains the mixture of Fe3O4, Fe2O3 and FeOOH, with numerous nanoscale features. As the film-forming potential shifts positively, the passive film becomes more compact and the nanoscale features disappear. When the film is formed at a passive potential where the oxygen evolution is enabled, the content of FeOOH in the film increases, resulting in an amorphous topography and reduced corrosion resistance.

  9. Method and structure for passivating semiconductor material

    DOEpatents

    Pankove, Jacques I.

    1981-01-01

    A structure for passivating semiconductor material comprises a substrate of crystalline semiconductor material, a relatively thin film of carbon disposed on a surface of the crystalline material, and a layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited on the carbon film.

  10. Climate-Specific Passive Building Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Graham S.; Klingenberg, Katrin

    2015-07-29

    In 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognized the value of performance-based passive building standards when it joined with Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) to promote DOE’s Challenge Home program in tandem with the PHIUS+ Certification program. Since then, the number of passive building projects that have been certified under the partnership has grown exponentially because of some synergy. Passive building represents a well-developed approach to arrive at the envelope basis for zero energy and energy-positive projects by employing performance-based criteria and maximizing cost-effective savings from conservation before implementing renewable energy technologies. The Challenge Home program evolved into the Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program in a move toward 1) attaining zero energy and 2) including active renewable energy generation such as photovoltaics (PV)—toward the zero energy goal.

  11. Lipid-Based Passivation in Nanofluidics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Stretching DNA in nanochannels is a useful tool for direct, visual studies of genomic DNA at the single molecule level. To facilitate the study of the interaction of linear DNA with proteins in nanochannels, we have implemented a highly effective passivation scheme based on lipid bilayers. We demonstrate virtually complete long-term passivation of nanochannel surfaces to a range of relevant reagents, including streptavidin-coated quantum dots, RecA proteins, and RecA–DNA complexes. We show that the performance of the lipid bilayer is significantly better than that of standard bovine serum albumin-based passivation. Finally, we show how the passivated devices allow us to monitor single DNA cleavage events during enzymatic degradation by DNase I. We expect that our approach will open up for detailed, systematic studies of a wide range of protein–DNA interactions with high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:22432814

  12. Expansion-based passive ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1993-01-01

    A new technique of passive ranging which is based on utilizing the image-plane expansion experienced by every object as its distance from the sensor decreases is described. This technique belongs in the feature/object-based family. The motion and shape of a small window, assumed to be fully contained inside the boundaries of some object, is approximated by an affine transformation. The parameters of the transformation matrix are derived by initially comparing successive images, and progressively increasing the image time separation so as to achieve much larger triangulation baseline than currently possible. Depth is directly derived from the expansion part of the transformation. To a first approximation, image-plane expansion is independent of image-plane location with respect to the focus of expansion (FOE) and of platform maneuvers. Thus, an expansion-based method has the potential of providing a reliable range in the difficult image area around the FOE. In areas far from the FOE the shift parameters of the affine transformation can provide more accurate depth information than the expansion alone, and can thus be used similarly to the way they were used in conjunction with the Inertial Navigation Unit (INU) and Kalman filtering. However, the performance of a shift-based algorithm, when the shifts are derived from the affine transformation, would be much improved compared to current algorithms because the shifts - as well as the other parameters - can be obtained between widely separated images. Thus, the main advantage of this new approach is that, allowing the tracked window to expand and rotate, in addition to moving laterally, enables one to correlate images over a very long time span which, in turn, translates into a large spatial baseline - resulting in a proportionately higher depth accuracy.

  13. Expansion-based passive ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique of passive ranging which is based on utilizing the image-plane expansion experienced by every object as its distance from the sensor decreases. This technique belongs in the feature/object-based family. The motion and shape of a small window, assumed to be fully contained inside the boundaries of some object, is approximated by an affine transformation. The parameters of the transformation matrix are derived by initially comparing successive images, and progressively increasing the image time separation so as to achieve much larger triangulation baseline than currently possible. Depth is directly derived from the expansion part of the transformation. To a first approximation, image-plane expansion is independent of image-plane location with respect to the focus of expansion (FOE) and of platform maneuvers. Thus, an expansion-based method has the potential of providing a reliable range in the difficult image area around the FOE. In areas far from the FOE the shift parameters of the affine transformation can provide more accurate depth information than the expansion alone, and can thus be used similarly to the way they have been used in conjunction with the Inertial Navigation Unit (INU) and Kalman filtering. However, the performance of a shift-based algorithm, when the shifts are derived from the affine transformation, would be much improved compared to current algorithms because the shifts--as well as the other parameters--can be obtained between widely separated images. Thus, the main advantage of this new approach is that, allowing the tracked window to expand and rotate, in addition to moving laterally, enables one to correlate images over a very long time span which, in turn, translates into a large spatial baseline resulting in a proportionately higher depth accuracy.

  14. Energy savings obtainable through passive solar techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    A passive solar energy system is one in which the thermal energy flow is by natural means, that is by radiation, conduction, or natural convection. The purpose of the paper is to provide a survey of passive solar heating experience, especially in the US. Design approaches are reviewed and examples shown. Misconceptions are discussed. Advantages are listed. The Los Alamos program of performance simulation and evaluation is described and a simplified method of performance estimation is outlined.

  15. Statistical theory of passive location systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrieri, D. J.

    1984-03-01

    A derivation of the principal algorithms and an analysis of the performance of the two most important passive location systems for stationary transmitters, hyperbolic location systems and direction-finding location systems, are presented. The concentration ellipse, the circular error probability, and the geometric dilution of precision are defined and related to the location-system and received-signal characteristics. Doppler and other passive location systems are briefly discussed.

  16. Hydrogen passivation of silicon nanowire structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouida, S.; Benabderrahmane Zaghouani, R.; Bachtouli, N.; Bessais, B.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we focus on hydrogen passivation of silicon nanowire structures (SiNWs) obtained by metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) intended to be used in silicon-based solar cells. SiNWs present high surface defects density causing the minority carrier lifetime reduction. Our results show that hydrogen passivation of SiNWs ameliorates minority carrier lifetime by reducing the dangling bonds and then the surface recombination velocity. This enhancement is limited by SiNWs distribution.

  17. Brookfield Homes Passive House Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    A. Herk; Poerschke, A.; Beach, R.

    2016-02-01

    In 2012-2013, IBACOS worked with a builder, Brookfield Homes in Denver, Colorado, to design and construct a Passive House certified model home. IBACOS used several modeling programs and calculation methods to complete the final design package along with Brookfield's architect KGA Studio. This design package included upgrades to the thermal enclosure, basement insulation, windows, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Short-term performance testing in the Passive House was done during construction and after construction.

  18. Status of the Z Refurbishment project (ZR) at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Weinbrecht, Edward A.; Bloomquist, Douglas D.; Warner, Peggy Jean; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Faturos, Thomas V.; Tabor, Debra Ann; McKee, G. Randall; Weed, John Woodruff

    2005-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories Z Refurbishment (ZR) Project formally began in August 2002 to increase the Z Accelerator's utilization by providing the capability to perform more shots, improve precision and pulse shape variability, increase delivered current, and accomplish the improvements with minimal disruption to Z's ongoing programs. A project overview was provided at the 14th International Pulsed Power Conference in 2003. This paper provides an update of the project including architectural changes over the past two years, timeframe for completion, and overall design and fabrication status.

  19. Passive Safety Features for Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, Daniel T

    2010-01-01

    The rapid growth in the size and complexity of commercial nuclear power plants in the 1970s spawned an interest in smaller, simpler designs that are inherently or intrinsically safe through the use of passive design features. Several designs were developed, but none were ever built, although some of their passive safety features were incorporated into large commercial plant designs that are being planned or built today. In recent years, several reactor vendors are actively redeveloping small modular reactor (SMR) designs with even greater use of passive features. Several designs incorporate the ultimate in passive safety they completely eliminate specific accident initiators from the design. Other design features help to reduce the likelihood of an accident or help to mitigate the accident s consequences, should one occur. While some passive safety features are common to most SMR designs, irrespective of the coolant technology, other features are specific to water, gas, or liquid-metal cooled SMR designs. The extensive use of passive safety features in SMRs promise to make these plants highly robust, protecting both the general public and the owner/investor. Once demonstrated, these plants should allow nuclear power to be used confidently for a broader range of customers and applications than will be possible with large plants alone.

  20. AMISS - Active and passive MIcrowaves for Security and Subsurface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Slob, Evert; Turk, Ahmet Serdar; Crocco, Lorenzo; Catapano, Ilaria; Di Matteo, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    The FP7-IRSES project AMISS - Active and passive MIcrowaves for Security and Subsurface imaging is based on a well-combined network among research institutions of EU, Associate and Third Countries (National Research Council of Italy - Italy, Technische Universiteit Delft - The Netherlands, Yildiz Technical University - Turkey, Bauman Moscow State Technical University - Russia, Usikov Institute for Radio-physics and Electronics and State Research Centre of Superconductive Radioelectronics "Iceberg" - Ukraine and University of Sao Paulo - Brazil) with the aims of achieving scientific advances in the framework of microwave and millimeter imaging systems and techniques for security and safety social issues. In particular, the involved partners are leaders in the scientific areas of passive and active imaging and are sharing their complementary knowledge to address two main research lines. The first one regards the design, characterization and performance evaluation of new passive and active microwave devices, sensors and measurement set-ups able to mitigate clutter and increase information content. The second line faces the requirements to make State-of-the-Art processing tools compliant with the instrumentations developed in the first line, suitable to work in electromagnetically complex scenarios and able to exploit the unexplored possibilities offered by new instrumentations. The main goals of the project are: 1) Development/improvement and characterization of new sensors and systems for active and passive microwave imaging; 2) Set up, analysis and validation of state of art/novel data processing approach for GPR in critical infrastructure and subsurface imaging; 3) Integration of state of art and novel imaging hardware and characterization approaches to tackle realistic situations in security, safety and subsurface prospecting applications; 4) Development and feasibility study of bio-radar technology (system and data processing) for vital signs detection and

  1. Passive and Hybrid PFC Rectifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Yasuyuki

    The diode rectifier offers several desirable features such as a unity displacement-factor and a high efficiency with low complexity and high reliability, but the utility line-current is significantly distorted. The traditional multi-pulse (e.g., 12-pulse, 18-pulse and so on) PAM concept by means of multiple rectifier units and phase-shifting isolation-transformers is a well-known scheme to improve the input line-current waveform and reduce dc-current/voltage ripple. Though, the necessity of the isolation-transformer is a great weak point especially for applications in low to medium power range. To mitigate the problem, several investigations have been done. The PWM rectifier is a modern and effective alternative, although it results in a higher initial cost, lower efficiency and EMI noise problems due to high frequency switching. To solve the problem, we have two alternatives without PWM and are so called “Passive” schemes. One is the multi-pulse/multi-phase scheme without the isolation transformer but with an autotransformer. This scheme results in a simplified multi-pulse PAM rectifier. The other is the Third-Harmonic-Current Injection and the expanded schemes. Although these two schemes have been studied independently in most cases, new types of diode PFC rectifier obtained by combining the two schemes have been studied recently. Additionally, further new topologies, so called “Hybrid” type, have been proposed very recently. The rectifiers with the new concept consist of an autotransformer-connected double 3-phase bridge 12-pulse rectifier and a PWM dc-dc converter on the dc-side to perform the current injection. The Hybrid rectifiers offer output voltage controllability and sinusoidal input currents similarly to the PWM rectifiers. To show the current trends and remaining possibilities of the Passive and Hybrid rectifiers, this paper gives a survey and historical review of the rectifiers. Then, some new topologies in the category are investigated

  2. Discreet passive explosive detection through 2-sided wave guided fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Harper, Ross James; la Grone, Marcus; Fisher, Mark

    2012-10-16

    The current invention provides a passive sampling device suitable for collecting and detecting the presence of target analytes. In particular, the passive sampling device is suitable for detecting nitro-aromatic compounds. The current invention further provides a passive sampling device reader suitable for determining the collection of target analytes. Additionally, the current invention provides methods for detecting target analytes using the passive sampling device and the passive sampling device reader.

  3. Discreet passive explosive detection through 2-sided waveguided fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Harper, Ross James; la Grone, Marcus; Fisher, Mark

    2011-10-18

    The current invention provides a passive sampling device suitable for collecting and detecting the presence of target analytes. In particular, the passive sampling device is suitable for detecting nitro-aromatic compounds. The current invention further provides a passive sampling device reader suitable for determining the collection of target analytes. Additionally, the current invention provides methods for detecting target analytes using the passive sampling device and the passive sampling device reader.

  4. Contribution of passive smoking to respiratory cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Kuller, L H; Garfinkel, L; Correa, P; Haley, N; Hoffmann, D; Preston-Martin, S; Sandler, D

    1986-01-01

    This article reviews data from experimental and epidemiologic studies on passive smoking and makes 12 recommendations for further study. The physicochemical nature of passive smoke, the smoke inhaled by nonsmokers, differs significantly from the mainstream smoke inhaled by the active smoker. At present, measurement of urinary cotinine appears to be the best method of assessing exposures to passive smoking. Data indicate that the greater number of lung cancers in nonsmoking women is probably related to environmental tobacco smoke. Exposures in utero and very early in life to passive smoking may be important in relationship to the subsequent development of cancer and need further consideration. The short-term effects of environmental tobacco smoke on the cardiovascular system, especially among high-risk individuals, may be of greater concern than that of cancer and requires further study. Further study of increased risks of lung cancers in relation to environmental tobacco smoke exposure requires larger collaborative studies to identify lung cancer cases among nonsmokers, better delineation of pathology, and more careful selection of controls. In addition, studies of epithelial cells or specific cytology should be undertaken to determine evidence of cellular changes in relation to environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Animal inhalation studies with passive smoke should be initiated with respect to transplacental carcinogenesis, the relationship of sidestream smoke exposure with lung cancer, the induction of tumors in the respiratory tract and other organs, and the differences in the physicochemical natures of sidestream and mainstream smoke. PMID:3830114

  5. Passive terahertz imaging for security application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lan-tao; Deng, Chao; Zhao, Yuan-meng; Zhang, Cun-lin

    2013-08-01

    The passive detection is safe for passengers and operators as no radiation. Therefore, passive terahertz (THz) imaging can be applied to human body security check. Imaging in the THz band offers the unique property of being able to identify object through a range of materials. Therefore passive THz imaging is meaningful for security applications. This attribute has always been of interest to both the civil and military marks with applications. We took advantage of a single THz detector and a trihedral scanning mirror to propose another passive THz beam scanning imaging method. This method overcame the deficiencies of the serious decline in image quality due to the movement of the focused mirror. We exploited a THz scanning mirror with a trihedral scanning mirror and an ellipsoidal mirror to streamline the structure of the system and increase the scanning speed. Then the passive THz beam scanning imaging system was developed based on this method. The parameters were set as follows: the best imaging distance was 1.7m, the image height was 2m, the image width was 1m, the minimum imaging time of per frame was 8s, and the minimum resolution was 4cm. We imaged humans with different objects hidden under their clothes, such as fruit knife, belt buckle, mobile phone, screwdriver, bus cards, keys and other items. All the tested stuffs could be detected and recognized from the image.

  6. Passive MMW algorithm performance characterization using MACET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Bradford D.; Watson, John S.; Amphay, Sengvieng A.

    1997-06-01

    As passive millimeter wave sensor technology matures, algorithms which are tailored to exploit the benefits of this technology are being developed. The expedient development of such algorithms requires an understanding of not only the gross phenomenology, but also specific quirks and limitations inherent in sensors and the data gathering methodology specific to this regime. This level of understanding is approached as the technology matures and increasing amounts of data become available for analysis. The Armament Directorate of Wright Laboratory, WL/MN, has spearheaded the advancement of passive millimeter-wave technology in algorithm development tools and modeling capability as well as sensor development. A passive MMW channel is available within WL/MNs popular multi-channel modeling program Irma, and a sample passive MMW algorithm is incorporated into the Modular Algorithm Concept Evaluation Tool, an algorithm development and evaluation system. The Millimeter Wave Analysis of Passive Signatures system provides excellent data collection capability in the 35, 60, and 95 GHz MMW bands. This paper exploits these assets for the study of the PMMW signature of a High Mobility Multi- Purpose Wheeled Vehicle in the three bands mentioned, and the effect of camouflage upon this signature and autonomous target recognition algorithm performance.

  7. Nondestructive assay using active and passive computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, G. P. ,LLNL

    1998-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has over 600,000 transuranic (TRU) waste drums temporarily stored at nearly 40 sites within the United States. Contents of these drums must be characterized before they are transported for permanent disposal. Traditional gamma-ray methods used to characterize nuclear waste introduce errors that are related to nonuniform measurement responses associated with unknown radioactive source and matrix material distributions. These errors can be reduced by application of tomographic techniques, that measure these distributions. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed two tomographic-based waste assay systems. They use external radioactive sources and tomography-protocol to map the attenuation within a waste drum as a function of mono-energetic gamma-ray energy in waste containers. Passive tomography is used to localize and identify specific radioactive waste contents within the same waste containers. Reconstruction of the passive data via the active images allows internal waste radioactivities in a drum to be corrected for any overlying heterogeneous materials, thus yielding an absolute assay of the waste radioactivities. Calibration of both systems requires only point source measurements and are independent of matrix materials. The first system is housed at LLNL and was developed to study and validate research concepts. The second system is being developed with Bioimaging Research, Inc. (BIR) and is housed within a mobile waste characterization trailer. This system has traveled to three DOE facilities to demonstrate the active and passive computed tomography capability. Both systems have participated in and successfully passed the requirements of formal DOE-sponsored intercomparison studies. The systems have measured approximately 1 to 100 grains of plutonium within a variety of waste matrix materials. Laboratory and field results from these two systems over the past several years show that both systems

  8. Climate-Specific Passive Building Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Graham S.; Klingenberg, Katrin

    2015-07-01

    Passive design principles (super insulation, airtight envelopes, elimination of thermal bridges, etc.) - pioneered in North America in the 70s and 80s and refined in Europe in the 90s have proven to be universally effective to significantly reduce heating and cooling loads. However, a single, rigid performance metric developed in Germany has led to limited uptake of passive building principles in many regions of the United States. It has also, in many cases, promoted some design decisions that had negative effects on economic feasibility and thermal comfort. This study's main objective is to validate (in a theoretical sense) verifiable, climate-specific passive standards and space conditioning criteria that retain ambitious, environmentally-necessary energy reduction targets and are economically feasible, such standards provide designers an ambitious but achievable performance target on the path to zero.

  9. Active colloids that slosh through passive matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Granick, Steve

    Studies of natural and artificial active matter have focused on systems with a large mismatch of the time and length scales for active and passive elements, but in a variety of non-equilibrium condensed matter systems, including numerous biological processes, actively driven elements have a crowded environment of surrounding passive ``solvent'' elements of comparable size. Here we study self-propelled colloidal particles in a passive matrix of comparable size. Particles with high activity take straight lines and sharp turns through the soft 2-D crystal matrix to ensure rapid healing of the crystal structure. Effective attraction between active particles arises when the concentration of active particles or the hardness of the matrix increases; active particles tend to segregate in the grain boundaries of the crystal matrix.

  10. Complete corrosion inhibition through graphene defect passivation.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ya-Ping; Hofmann, Mario; Chang, Kai-Wen; Jhu, Jian Gang; Li, Yuan-Yao; Chen, Kuang Yao; Yang, Chang Chung; Chang, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2014-01-28

    Graphene is expected to enable superior corrosion protection due to its impermeability and chemical inertness. Previous reports, however, demonstrate limited corrosion inhibition and even corrosion enhancement of graphene on metal surfaces. To enable the reliable and complete passivation, the origin of the low inhibition efficiency of graphene was investigated. Combining electrochemical and morphological characterization techniques, nanometer-sized structural defects in chemical vapor deposition grown graphene were found to be the cause for the limited passivation effect. Extremely fast mass transport on the order of meters per second both across and parallel to graphene layers results in an inhibition efficiency of only ∼50% for Cu covered with up to three graphene layers. Through selective passivation of the defects by atomic layer deposition (ALD) an enhanced corrosion protection of more than 99% was achieved, which compares favorably with commercial corrosion protection methods.

  11. Passive Cooling System for a Vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, T. J.; Thoensen, T.

    2005-11-15

    A passive cooling system for a vehicle (114) transfers heat from an overheated internal component, for example, an instrument panel (100), to an external portion (116) of the vehicle (114), for example, a side body panel (126). The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section (118) embedded in the overheated internal component and a condenser section (120) at the external portion (116) of the vehicle (114). The evaporator (118) and condenser (120) sections are in fluid communication. The passive cooling system may also include a thermally conductive film (140) for thermally connecting the evaporator sections (118) of the heat pipes (112) to each other and to the instrument panel (100).

  12. Passive cooling system for a vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Thoensen, Thomas

    2005-11-15

    A passive cooling system for a vehicle (114) transfers heat from an overheated internal component, for example, an instrument panel (100), to an external portion (116) of the vehicle (114), for example, a side body panel (126). The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section (118) embedded in the overheated internal component and a condenser section (120) at the external portion (116) of the vehicle (114). The evaporator (118) and condenser (120) sections are in fluid communication. The passive cooling system may also include a thermally conductive film (140) for thermally connecting the evaporator sections (118) of the heat pipes (112) to each other and to the instrument panel (100).

  13. A passive sampler for atmospheric ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D.; Hisham, M.W.M. )

    1992-02-01

    A simple, cost-effective passive sampler has been developed for the determination of atmospheric ozone. This passive sampler is based on a colorant which fades upon reaction with ozone, whose concentration can be determined by reflectance measurement of the color change. Direct, on-site measurements are possible, and no chemical analyses are needed. Sampler design and validation studies have been carried out and included quantitative determination of color change vs exposure time (1-8 days), color change vs. ozone concentration (30-350 ppb), and response to changes in sampler configuration that modify the passive sampling rate. With indigo carmine as the colorant, the detection limits are 30 ppb. day and 120 ppb. day using a plastic grid and Teflon filter, respectively, as diffusion barriers. Interferences from nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde and peroxyacetyl nitrate are 15, 4 and 16%, respectively, thus resulting in a negligible bias when measuring ozone in ambient air.

  14. Load attenuating passively adaptive wind turbine blade

    DOEpatents

    Veers, Paul S.; Lobitz, Donald W.

    2003-01-07

    A method and apparatus for improving wind turbine performance by alleviating loads and controlling the rotor. The invention employs the use of a passively adaptive blade that senses the wind velocity or rotational speed, and accordingly modifies its aerodynamic configuration. The invention exploits the load mitigation prospects of a blade that twists toward feather as it bends. The invention includes passively adaptive wind turbine rotors or blades with currently preferred power control features. The apparatus is a composite fiber horizontal axis wind-turbine blade, in which a substantial majority of fibers in the blade skin are inclined at angles of between 15 and 30 degrees to the axis of the blade, to produces passive adaptive aeroelastic tailoring (bend-twist coupling) to alleviate loading without unduly jeopardizing performance.

  15. Load attenuating passively adaptive wind turbine blade

    DOEpatents

    Veers, Paul S.; Lobitz, Donald W.

    2003-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving wind turbine performance by alleviating loads and controlling the rotor. The invention employs the use of a passively adaptive blade that senses the wind velocity or rotational speed, and accordingly modifies its aerodynamic configuration. The invention exploits the load mitigation prospects of a blade that twists toward feather as it bends. The invention includes passively adaptive wind turbine rotors or blades with currently preferred power control features. The apparatus is a composite fiber horizontal axis wind-turbine blade, in which a substantial majority of fibers in the blade skin are inclined at angles of between 15 and 30 degrees to the axis of the blade, to produces passive adaptive aeroelastic tailoring (bend-twist coupling) to alleviate loading without unduly jeopardizing performance.

  16. Passive infrared bullet detection and tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, T.J.

    1994-12-31

    An apparatus and method for passively detecting a projectile such as, for example, a bullet using a passive infrared detector. A passive infrared detector is focused onto a region in which a projectile is expected to be located. Successive images of infrared radiation in the region are recorded. Background infrared radiation present in the region is suppressed such that second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile as the projectile passes through the region are produced. A projectile path calculator determines the path and other aspects of the projectile by using the second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile. The present invention, in certain embodiments, also determines the origin of the path of the projectile and takes a photograph of the area surrounding the origin and/or fires at least one projectile at the area surrounding the origin of the path of the projectile.

  17. Passive infrared bullet detection and tracking

    DOEpatents

    Karr, T.J.

    1997-01-21

    An apparatus and method for passively detecting a projectile such as, for example, a bullet using a passive infrared detector. A passive infrared detector is focused onto a region in which a projectile is expected to be located. Successive images of infrared radiation in the region are recorded. Background infrared radiation present in the region is suppressed such that second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile as the projectile passes through the region are produced. A projectile path calculator determines the path and other aspects of the projectile by using the second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile. The present invention, in certain embodiments, also determines the origin of the path of the projectile and takes a photograph of the area surrounding the origin and/or fires at least one projectile at the area surrounding the origin of the path of the projectile. 9 figs.

  18. Passive infrared bullet detection and tracking

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for passively detecting a projectile such as, for example, a bullet using a passive infrared detector. A passive infrared detector is focused onto a region in which a projectile is expected to be located. Successive images of infrared radiation in the region are recorded. Background infrared radiation present in the region is suppressed such that second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile as the projectile passes through the region are produced. A projectile path calculator determines the path and other aspects of the projectile by using the second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile. The present invention, in certain embodiments, also determines the origin of the path of the projectile and takes a photograph of the area surrounding the origin and/or fires at least one projectile at the area surrounding the origin of the path of the projectile.

  19. Passive absolute age and temperature history sensor

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex; Vianco, Paul T.

    2015-11-10

    A passive sensor for historic age and temperature sensing, including a first member formed of a first material, the first material being either a metal or a semiconductor material and a second member formed of a second material, the second material being either a metal or a semiconductor material. A surface of the second member is in contact with a surface of the first member such that, over time, the second material of the second member diffuses into the first material of the first member. The rate of diffusion for the second material to diffuse into the first material depends on a temperature of the passive sensor. One of the electrical conductance, the electrical capacitance, the electrical inductance, the optical transmission, the optical reflectance, or the crystalline structure of the passive sensor depends on the amount of the second material that has diffused into the first member.

  20. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Payer, J H

    2006-01-10

    Alloy 22 (N06022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nanometers per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids.

  1. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. Rebak; J.H. Payer

    2006-01-20

    Alloy 22 (NO6022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nano-meters per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids.

  2. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L.

    2013-01-01

    The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. This procedure results in the formation of a metal oxide layer to prevent corrosion. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid which exhibits excellent corrosion performance; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. The longtime military specification for the passivation of stainless steel was cancelled in favor of newer specifications which allow for the use of citric acid in place of nitric acid. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits that include increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational costs. There have been few studies, however, to determine whether citric acid is an acceptable alternative for NASA and DoD. This paper details activities to date including development of the joint test plan, on-going and planned testing, and preliminary results.

  3. Pesticide monitoring in surface water and groundwater using passive samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodes, V.; Grabic, R.

    2009-04-01

    Passive samplers as screening devices have been used within a czech national water quality monitoring network since 2002 (SPMD and DGT samplers for non polar substances and metals). The passive sampler monitoring of surface water was extended to polar substances, in 2005. Pesticide and pharmaceutical POCIS samplers have been exposed in surface water at 21 locations and analysed for polar pesticides, perfluorinated compounds, personal care products and pharmaceuticals. Pesticide POCIS samplers in groundwater were exposed at 5 locations and analysed for polar pesticides. The following active substances of plant protection products were analyzed in surface water and groundwater using LC/MS/MS: 2,4,5-T, 2,4-D, Acetochlor, Alachlor, Atrazine, Atrazine_desethyl, Azoxystrobin, Bentazone, Bromacil, Bromoxynil, Carbofuran, Clopyralid, Cyanazin, Desmetryn, Diazinon, Dicamba, Dichlobenil, Dichlorprop, Dimethoat, Diuron, Ethofumesate, Fenarimol, Fenhexamid, Fipronil, Fluazifop-p-butyl, Hexazinone, Chlorbromuron, Chlorotoluron, Imazethapyr, Isoproturon, Kresoxim-methyl, Linuron, MCPA, MCPP, Metalaxyl, Metamitron, Methabenzthiazuron, Methamidophos, Methidathion, Metobromuron, Metolachlor, Metoxuron, Metribuzin, Monolinuron, Nicosulfuron, Phorate, Phosalone, Phosphamidon, Prometryn, Propiconazole, Propyzamide, Pyridate, Rimsulfuron, Simazine, Tebuconazole, Terbuthylazine, Terbutryn, Thifensulfuron-methyl, Thiophanate-methyl and Tri-allate. The POCIS samplers performed very well being able to provide better picture than grab samples. The results show that polar pesticides and also perfluorinated compounds, personal care products and pharmaceuticals as well occur in hydrosphere of the Czech republic. Acknowledgment: Authors acknowledge the financial support of grant No. 2B06095 by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports.

  4. Ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearings: Theory and design equations

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1997-12-30

    Research has been underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to build a theoretical and experimental base for the design of ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearings for a variety of possible applications. in the approach taken the limitations imposed by Earnshaw`s theorem with respect to the stability of passive magnetic bearing systems employing axially symmetric permanent-magnet elements are overcome by employing special combinations of elements, as follows: Levitating and restoring forces are provided by combinations of permanent-magnet-excited elements chosen to provide positive stiffnesses (negative force derivatives) for selected displacements (i.e., those involving translations or angular displacement of the axis of rotation). As dictated by Eamshaw`s theorem, any bearing system thus constructed will be statically unstable for at least one of the remaining possible displacements. Stabilization against this displacement is accomplished by using periodic arrays (`Halbach arrays`) of permanent magnets to induce currents in close-packed inductively loaded circuits, thereby producing negative force derivatives stabilizing the system while in rotation. Disengaging mechanical elements stabilize the system when at rest and when below a low critical speed. The paper discusses theory and equations needed for the design of such systems.

  5. Detection of chemical pollutants by passive LWIR hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, Hugo; Thériault, Jean-Marc; Bouffard, François; Puckrin, Eldon; Dubé, Denis

    2012-09-01

    Toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) represent a major threat to public health and security. Their detection constitutes a real challenge to security and first responder's communities. One promising detection method is based on the passive standoff identification of chemical vapors emanating from the laboratory under surveillance. To investigate this method, the Department of National Defense and Public Safety Canada have mandated Defense Research and Development Canada (DRDC) - Valcartier to develop and test passive Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensors for standoff detection. The initial effort was focused to address the standoff detection and identification of toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) and precursors. Sensors such as the Multi-option Differential Detection and Imaging Fourier Spectrometer (MoDDIFS) and the Improved Compact ATmospheric Sounding Interferometer (iCATSI) were developed for this application. This paper describes the sensor developments and presents initial results of standoff detection and identification of TICs and precursors. The standoff sensors are based on the differential Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) radiometric technology and are able to detect, spectrally resolve and identify small leak plumes at ranges in excess of 1 km. Results from a series of trials in asymmetric threat type scenarios will be presented. These results will serve to establish the potential of the method for standoff detection of TICs precursors and surrogates.

  6. Implementation of CPFD to Control Active and Passive Airfoil Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jay; Asselin, Daniel; Williamson, Charles

    2016-11-01

    The fluid dynamics of biologically-inspired flapping propulsion provides a fertile testing ground for the field of unsteady aerodynamics, serving as important groundwork for the design and development of fast, mobile underwater vehicles and flapping-wing micro air vehicles (MAVs). There has been a recent surge of interest in these technologies as they provide low cost, compact, and maneuverable means for terrain mapping, search and rescue operations, and reconnaissance. Propulsion by unsteady motions has been fundamentally modeled with an airfoil that heaves and pitches, and previous work has been done to show that actively controlling these motions can generate high thrust and efficiency (Read, Hover & Triantafyllou 2003). In this study, we examine the performance of an airfoil with an actuated heave motion coupled with a passively controlled pitch motion created by simulating the presence of a torsional spring using our cyber-physical fluid dynamics (CPFD) approach (Mackowski & Williamson 2011, 2015, 2016). By using passively controlled pitch, we have effectively eliminated an actuator, decreasing cost and mass, an important step for developing efficient vehicles. In many cases, we have achieved comparable or superior thrust and efficiency values to those obtained using two actively controlled degrees of freedom. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0243, monitored by Dr. Douglas Smith.

  7. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1994-05-31

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer. 1 fig.

  8. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer.

  9. Inherently safe passive gas monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Cordaro, Joseph V.; Bellamy, John Stephen; Shuler, James M.; Shull, Davis J.; Leduc, Daniel R.

    2016-09-06

    Generally, the present disclosure is directed to gas monitoring systems that use inductive power transfer to safely power an electrically passive device included within a nuclear material storage container. In particular, the electrically passive device can include an inductive power receiver for receiving inductive power transfer through a wall of the nuclear material storage container. The power received by the inductive power receiver can be used to power one or more sensors included in the device. Thus, the device is not required to include active power generation components such as, for example, a battery, that increase the risk of a spark igniting flammable gases within the container.

  10. Technical Assessment: WRAP 1 HVAC Passive Shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, D.E.; Nash, C.R.; Stroup, J.L.

    1993-08-12

    As the result of careful interpretation of DOE Order 6430.lA and other DOE Orders, the HVAC system for WRAP 1 has been greatly simplified. The HVAC system is now designed to safely shut down to Passive State if power fails for any reason. The fans cease functioning, allowing the Zone 1 and Zone 2 HVAC Confinement Systems to breathe with respect to atmospheric pressure changes. Simplifying the HVAC system avoided overdesign. Construction costs were reduced by eliminating unnecessary equipment. This report summarizes work that was done to define the criteria, physical concepts, and operational experiences that lead to the passive shutdown design for WRAP 1 confinement HVAC systems.

  11. Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Ice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-26

    92 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Ice NO0014-89-J-l 107 6. AUTHOR(S) 425f023-08 Prof. J.A. Kong 7... REMOTE SENSING OF ICE Sponsored by: Department of the Navy Office of Naval Research Contract number: N00014-89-J-1107 Research Organization: Center for...J. A. Kong Period covered: October 1, 1988 - November 30, 1992 St ACTIVE AND PASSIVE REMOTE SENSING OF ICE FINAL REPORT This annual report covers

  12. An all-silicon passive optical diode.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Wang, Jian; Varghese, Leo T; Shen, Hao; Niu, Ben; Xuan, Yi; Weiner, Andrew M; Qi, Minghao

    2012-01-27

    A passive optical diode effect would be useful for on-chip optical information processing but has been difficult to achieve. Using a method based on optical nonlinearity, we demonstrate a forward-backward transmission ratio of up to 28 decibels within telecommunication wavelengths. Our device, which uses two silicon rings 5 micrometers in radius, is passive yet maintains optical nonreciprocity for a broad range of input power levels, and it performs equally well even if the backward input power is higher than the forward input. The silicon optical diode is ultracompact and is compatible with current complementary metal-oxide semiconductor processing.

  13. Passive obstacle location for rotorcraft guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, P. K. A.; Chatterji, G. B.; Sridhar, B.

    1991-01-01

    Nap-of-the-earth flight mode is extremely demanding on the rotorcraft pilots. This fact has motivated the research in automating various components of low altitude rotorcraft flight operations. Concurrent with the development of guidance laws, efforts are under way to develop systems for locating the terrain and the obstacles using inputs from passive electrooptical sensors such as TV cameras and infrared imagers. A passive obstable location algorithm that uses image sequences from cameras undergoing translational and rotational motion is developed. The algorithm is in a general form and can operate in multicamera imaging environments. Performance results using an image sequence from an airborne camera are given.

  14. Superacid Passivation of Crystalline Silicon Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bullock, James; Kiriya, Daisuke; Grant, Nicholas; Azcatl, Angelica; Hettick, Mark; Kho, Teng; Phang, Pheng; Sio, Hang C; Yan, Di; Macdonald, Daniel; Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel A; Wallace, Robert M; Cuevas, Andres; Javey, Ali

    2016-09-14

    The reduction of parasitic recombination processes commonly occurring within the silicon crystal and at its surfaces is of primary importance in crystalline silicon devices, particularly in photovoltaics. Here we explore a simple, room temperature treatment, involving a nonaqueous solution of the superacid bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide, to temporarily deactivate recombination centers at the surface. We show that this treatment leads to a significant enhancement in optoelectronic properties of the silicon wafer, attaining a level of surface passivation in line with state-of-the-art dielectric passivation films. Finally, we demonstrate its advantage as a bulk lifetime and process cleanliness monitor, establishing its compatibility with large area photoluminescence imaging in the process.

  15. High-performance passive viscous isolator element for active/passive (hybrid) isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Torey; Davis, L. Porter; Sullivan, Jeanne M.; Hoffman, Terry; Das, Alok

    1996-05-01

    A high performance passive isolator has been developed for a multiaxis isolation system for vibration isolation of an optical payload. This passive isolator will be used along with an active element to provide improved vibration isolation performance over previous isolators. The isolator has been designed using ideas developed previously for 'tuned' three parameter passive isolators. The isolator has also been developed offering the lowest system passive break frequencies structurally feasible for the lightweight optical payload. The implementations of these passive isolator design considerations complement the active portion of the system, and also provide the best passive isolation at the higher frequencies long after the active system has 'rolled off.' The mathematics used to design the isolator as well as the isolator's physical attributes are discussed. The unique design challenges of incorporating the passive element with the active, forming one 'hybrid' D-strut$TM, also are discussed. Finally, actual test data from isolator testing are compared to predicted performance, verifying the isolator's exceptional performance and predictability.

  16. Comparison of Lichen, Conifer Needles, Passive Air Sampling Devices, and Snowpack as Passive Sampling Media to Measure Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds in Remote Atmospheres

    PubMed Central

    SCHRLAU, JILL E.; GEISER, LINDA; HAGEMAN, KIMBERLY J.; LANDERS, DIXON H.

    2011-01-01

    A wide range of semi-volatile organic compounds (SOCs), including pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were measured in lichen, conifer needles, snowpack and XAD-based passive air sampling devices (PASDs) collected from 19 different U.S. national parks in order to compare the magnitude and mechanism of SOC accumulation in the different passive sampling media. Lichen accumulated the highest SOC concentrations, in part because of its long (and unknown) exposure period, while PASDs accumulated the lowest concentrations. However, only the PASD SOC concentrations can be used to calculate an average atmospheric gas-phase SOC concentration because the sampling rates are known and the media is uniform. Only the lichen and snowpack SOC accumulation profiles were statistically significantly correlated (r = 0.552, p-value <0.0001) because they both accumulate SOCs present in the atmospheric particle-phase. This suggests that needles and PASDs represent a different composition of the atmosphere than lichen and snowpack and that the interpretation of atmospheric SOC composition is dependent on the type of passive sampling media used. All four passive sampling media preferentially accumulated SOCs with relatively low air-water partition coefficients, while snowpack accumulated SOCs with higher log KOA values compared to the other media. Lichen accumulated more SOCs with log KOA > 10 relative to needles and showed a greater accumulation of particle-phase PAHs. PMID:22087860

  17. Comparison of lichen, conifer needles, passive air sampling devices, and snowpack as passive sampling media to measure semi-volatile organic compounds in remote atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Schrlau, Jill E; Geiser, Linda; Hageman, Kimberly J; Landers, Dixon H; Simonich, Staci Massey

    2011-12-15

    A wide range of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs), including pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were measured in lichen, conifer needles, snowpack and XAD-based passive air sampling devices (PASDs) collected from 19 different U.S. national parks in order to compare the magnitude and mechanism of SOC accumulation in the different passive sampling media. Lichen accumulated the highest SOC concentrations, in part because of its long (and unknown) exposure period, whereas PASDs accumulated the lowest concentrations. However, only the PASD SOC concentrations can be used to calculate an average atmospheric gas-phase SOC concentration because the sampling rates are known and the media is uniform. Only the lichen and snowpack SOC accumulation profiles were statistically significantly correlated (r = 0.552, p-value <0.0001) because they both accumulate SOCs present in the atmospheric particle-phase. This suggests that needles and PASDs represent a different composition of the atmosphere than lichen and snowpack and that the interpretation of atmospheric SOC composition is dependent on the type of passive sampling media used. All four passive sampling media preferentially accumulated SOCs with relatively low air-water partition coefficients, while snowpack accumulated SOCs with higher log K(OA) values compared to the other media. Lichen accumulated more SOCs with log K(OA) > 10 relative to needles and showed a greater accumulation of particle-phase PAHs.

  18. Marketing passive solar energy to the building industry

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, P.

    1981-01-01

    The first national marketing effort of the passive solar design concept which was conducted in 1980-1981 is examined. The prime audiences for this program were builders, remodelers, building material distributors and dealers, architects and the home buying public. To effectively implement this publicity campaign, four steps were necessary: 1. catch the audience's attention; 2. convey a direct and clear message; 3. reinforce the message; and 4. motivate the audience to action. While there are many different avenues to approach any target audience, SRA chose its proven methods of reaching the building community. Trade press, direct mail, industry events, conferences, editorial supplements and newspaper services were used to implement this highly successful program. How each strategy was chosen and implemented will be discussed. The results of the program will be displayed and examined.

  19. Experimental and analytical studies of passive shutdown heat removal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, D.; Tessier, J.; Heineman, J.; Stewart, R.; Anderson, T.; August, C.; Chawla, T.; Cheung, F.B.; Despe, O.; Haupt, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    Using a naturally circulating air stream to remove shutdown decay heat from a nuclear reactor vessel is a key feature of advanced liquid metal reactor (LMR) concepts developed by potential vendors selected by the Department of Energy. General Electric and Rockwell International continue to develop innovative design concepts aimed at improving safety, lowering plant costs, simplifying plant operation, reducing construction times, and most of all, enhancing plant licensability. The reactor program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) provides technical support to both organizations. The method of shutdown heat removal proposed employs a totally passive cooling system that rejects heat from the reactor by radiation and natural convection to air. The system is inherently reliable since it is not subject failure modes associated with active decay cooling systems. The system is designed to assure adequate cooling of the reactor under abnormal operating conditions associated with loss of heat removal through other heat transport paths.

  20. Passive smoking and respiratory conditions in primary school children.

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, S M; Rona, R J; Chinn, S

    1988-01-01

    The effect of passive smoking on respiratory symptoms of children aged 5 to 11 years was investigated in over 4000 English children and nearly 800 Scottish children participating in the National Study of Health and Growth in 1982. After adjusting for associations of respiratory symptoms with age, sex, and a number of potentially confounding variables, significant associations were found of wheeze, both occasional and persistent, day or night cough, and bronchitis attacks with number of cigarettes smoked by parents at home for English children and for occasional wheeze in Scottish children. Asthma attacks and cough first thing in the morning showed positive but not statistically significant associations in English children. The presence of at least one condition was statistically significant in both English and Scottish children. The largest relative risk for exposure to 20 cigarettes a day compared to no exposure was 1.60 for persistent wheeze in English children (95% confidence interval 1.17-2.18). PMID:3221159

  1. South Philadelphia Passive Sampler and Sensor Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    From June 2013 to March 2015, a total of 41 two-week duration passive sampler deployments were conducted at 17 sites in South Philadelphia, with results for benzene discussed here. Complementary time-resolved measurements with lower cost prototype fenceline sensors and an open-pa...

  2. Passive Polarimetric Microwave Signatures Observed Over Antarctica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    WindSat satellite-based fully polarimetric passive microwave observations, expressed in the form of the Stokes vector, were analyzed over the Antarctic ice sheet. The vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures (first two Stokes components) from WindSat are shown to be consistent w...

  3. Hydrogen passivation of polycrystalline silicon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheller, L.-P.; Weizman, M.; Simon, P.; Fehr, M.; Nickel, N. H.

    2012-09-01

    The influence of post-hydrogenation on the electrical and optical properties of solid phase crystallized polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) was examined. The passivation of grain-boundary defects was measured as a function of the passivation time. The silicon dangling-bond concentration decreases with increasing passivation time due to the formation of Si-H complexes. In addition, large H-stabilized platelet-like clusters are generated. The influence of H on the electrical properties was investigated using temperature dependent conductivity and Hall-effect measurements. For poly-Si on Corning glass, the dark conductivity decreases upon hydrogenation, while it increases when the samples are fabricated on silicon-nitride covered Borofloat glass. Hall-effect measurements reveal that for poly-Si on Corning glass the hole concentration and the mobility decrease upon post-hydrogenation, while a pronounced increase is observed for poly-Si on silicon-nitride covered Borofloat glass. This indicates the formation of localized states in the band gap, which is supported by sub band-gap absorption measurments. The results are discussed in terms of hydrogen-induced defect passivation and generation mechanisms.

  4. Four questions for passive frame theory.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, David A

    2016-01-01

    Four questions are raised about the passive frame theory of Morsella et al.: (1) What is the relation of the theory to the response-selection-bottleneck view of attention? (2) Does the theory accommodate the contents of consciousness? (3) What about animals without skeletal muscles? (4) How do the contents of consciousness change with the development of automaticity?

  5. Passive mechanics in jellyfish-like locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Megan; Eldredge, Jeff

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this work is to identify possible benefits of passive flexibility in biologically-inspired locomotion. Substantial energy savings are likely achieved in natural locomotion by allowing a mix of actively controlled and passively responsive deformation. The jellyfish is a useful target of study, due to its relatively simple structure and the availability of recent kinematics and flow-field measurements. In this investigation, the jellyfish consists of a two-dimensional articulated system of rigid bodies linked by hinges. The kinematics -- expressed via the hinge angles -- are adapted from experimentally measured motion. The free swimming system is explored via high-fidelity numerical simulation with a viscous vortex particle method with coupled body dynamics. The computational tool allows the arbitrary designation of individual hinges as ``active'' or ``passive,'' to introduce a mix of flexibility into the system. In some cases, replacing an active hinge with a passive spring can enhance the mean swimming speed, thus reducing the power requirements of the system. Varying the stiffness and damping coefficients of the spring yield different locomotive results. The numerical solution is used to compute the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) throughout the field. The FTLE fields reveal manifolds in the flow that act as transport barriers, uncovering otherwise unseen geometric characteristics of the flow field that add new insight into the locomotion mechanics.

  6. USE OF PASSIVE SAMPLERS IN THE DEARS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) employs a number of passive diffusion-based samplers for the collection of select gaseous air pollutants. These pollutants include criteria gases such as ozone, carbonyls such as acrolein, and volatile organics such as 1-3, ...

  7. Sunspot Time Series: Passive and Active Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zięba, S.; Nieckarz, Z.

    2014-07-01

    Solar activity slowly and irregularly decreases from the first spotless day (FSD) in the declining phase of the old sunspot cycle and systematically, but also in an irregular way, increases to the new cycle maximum after the last spotless day (LSD). The time interval between the first and the last spotless day can be called the passive interval (PI), while the time interval from the last spotless day to the first one after the new cycle maximum is the related active interval (AI). Minima of solar cycles are inside PIs, while maxima are inside AIs. In this article, we study the properties of passive and active intervals to determine the relation between them. We have found that some properties of PIs, and related AIs, differ significantly between two group of solar cycles; this has allowed us to classify Cycles 8 - 15 as passive cycles, and Cycles 17 - 23 as active ones. We conclude that the solar activity in the PI declining phase (a descending phase of the previous cycle) determines the strength of the approaching maximum in the case of active cycles, while the activity of the PI rising phase (a phase of the ongoing cycle early growth) determines the strength of passive cycles. This can have implications for solar dynamo models. Our approach indicates the important role of solar activity during the declining and the rising phases of the solar-cycle minimum.

  8. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J.S.

    1991-12-31

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process.

  9. Passive Smoking in the Workplace: Selected Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report provides information about the health effects of passive smoking, the types of policies that are in force in the public and private sectors to control workplace smoking, and the costs and effects of those policies. The executive summary briefly highlights the three major areas of the report: (1) a review of the studies of health…

  10. Mennonite Nursing Home passive solar demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    A long-term nursing care facility and retirement center was designed for passive solar heating. The system comprises thermal mass, thermal insulation, Trombe walls, and direct gain clerestories. Included here is a topical report, analysis of building performance, owner's perspective, designer's perspective, and summary of information dissemination activities. (MHR)

  11. PCM Passive Cooling System Containing Active Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanding, David E.; Bass, David I.

    2005-01-01

    A multistage system has been proposed for cooling a circulating fluid that is subject to intermittent intense heating. The system would be both flexible and redundant in that it could operate in a basic passive mode, either sequentially or simultaneously with operation of a first, active cooling subsystem, and either sequentially or simultaneously with a second cooling subsystem that could be active, passive, or a combination of both. This flexibility and redundancy, in combination with the passive nature of at least one of the modes of operation, would make the system more reliable, relative to a conventional cooling system. The system would include a tube-in-shell heat exchanger, within which the space between the tubes would be filled with a phase-change material (PCM). The circulating hot fluid would flow along the tubes in the heat exchanger. In the basic passive mode of operation, heat would be conducted from the hot fluid into the PCM, wherein the heat would be stored temporarily by virtue of the phase change.

  12. Passive stability of a spinning Skylab.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    The results of an analytical investigation of the rotational dynamics of a spinning Skylab space station are presented. The passive stability of motion of a simplified model consisting of a rigid core body with two attached flexible appendages is investigated. The parameter plane stability technique is applied to the specific Skylab case to determine its transient response to external disturbances.

  13. Passive stability of a spinning Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    The results of an analytical investigation of the rotational dynamics of a spinning Skylab space station are presented. The passive stability of motion of a simplified model consisting of a rigid core body with two attached flexible appendages is investigated. The parameter plane stability technique is applied to the specific Skylab case to determine its transient response to external disturbances.

  14. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    DOEpatents

    Herring, J. Stephen

    1993-01-01

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process.

  15. Propulsion by active and passive airfoil oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackowski, A. W.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2013-11-01

    Oscillating airfoils have been the subject of much research both as a mechanism of propulsion in engineering devices as well as a model of understanding how fish, birds, and insects produce thrust and maneuvering forces. Additionally, the jet or wake generated by an oscillating airfoil exhibits a multitude of vortex patterns, which are an interesting study in their own right. We present PIV measurements of the vortex flow behind an airfoil undergoing controlled pitching oscillations at moderate Reynolds number. As a method of propulsion, oscillating foils have been found to be capable performers when undergoing both pitching and heaving motions [Anderson et al. 1998]. While an airfoil undergoing only pitching motion is a relatively inefficient propulsor, we examine the effect of adding passive dynamics to the system: for example, actuated pitching with a passive spring in the heave direction. Practically speaking, a mechanical system with such an arrangement has the potential to reduce the cost and complexity of an oscillating airfoil propulsor. To study an airfoil undergoing both active and passive motion, we employ our ``cyber-physical fluid dynamics'' technique [Mackowski & Williamson, 2011] to simulate the effects of passive dynamics in a physical experiment.

  16. Passive safety injection system using borated water

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1993-01-01

    A passive safety injection system relies on differences in water density to induce natural circulatory flow patterns which help maintain prescribed concentrations of boric acid in borated water, and prevents boron from accumulating in the reactor vessel and possibly preventing heat transfer.

  17. Passive Microwave Remote Sensing for Land Applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land applications, in particular soil moisture retrieval, have been hampered by the lack of low frequency passive microwave observations and the coarse spatial resolution of existing sensors. The next decade could see several improved operational and exploratory missions using new technologies as w...

  18. Polymer optics for the passive infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claytor, Richard N.

    2016-10-01

    An important, but largely invisible, area of polymer optics involves sensing the motion of warm objects. It can be further subdivided into optics for security, for energy conservation, and for convenience; the area has become known as optics for the passive infrared. The passive infrared is generally known as the 8 to 14 μm region of the optical spectrum. The region's roots are in the traditional infrared technology of many decades ago; there is a coincident atmospheric window, although that has little relevance to many short-range applications relevant to polymer optics. Regrettably, there is no polymer material ideally suited to the passive infrared, but one material is generally superior to other candidates. The inadequacy of this material makes the Fresnel lens important. Polymer optics for the passive infrared were first introduced in the 1970s. Patents from that period will be shown, as well as early examples. The unfamiliar names of the pioneering companies and their technical leaders will be mentioned. The 1980s and 90s brought a new and improved lens type, and rapid growth. Pigments for visible-light appearance and other reasons were introduced; one was a spectacular failure. Recent advances include faster lenses, a new groove structure, additional pigments, and lens-mirror combinations. New sensor types are also being introduced. Finally, some unique and inventive applications will be discussed.

  19. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    DOEpatents

    Herring, J.S.

    1993-09-21

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process. 8 figures.

  20. Design tools for passive solar applications

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J D

    1986-04-01

    Examples of passive solar design tools are given, categorized as either evaluation tools or guidance tools. A trend toward microcomputer-based tools is noted; however, these are usually developed for use by engineers rather than architects. The need for more instructive tools targeted specifically to designers is emphasized.

  1. South Philadelphia Passive Sampler and Sensor Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Starting in June 2013, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) and the City of Philadelphia Air Measurements Services began collaborative research on the use of passive samplers (PSs) and stand-alone air measurement (SAM) systems to improve information on the...

  2. Comprehension of Passives in Broca's Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastiaanse, Roelien; van Zonneveld, Ron

    2006-01-01

    Drai and Grodzinsky have statistically analyzed a large corpus of data on the comprehension of passives by patients with Broca's aphasia. The data come, according to Drai and Grodzinsky, from binary choice tasks. Among the languages that are analyzed are Dutch and German. Drai and Grodzinsky argue that Dutch and German speaking Broca patients…

  3. Passive SiC irradiation temperature monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, G.E.

    1996-04-01

    A new, improved passive irradiation temperature monitoring method was examined after an irradiation test at 627{degrees}C. The method is based on the analysis of thermal diffusivity changes during postirradiation annealing of polycrystalline SiC. Based on results from this test, several advantages for using this new method rather than a method based on length or lattice parameter changes are given.

  4. Passive baited sequential filth fly trap

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Filth fly control measures may be optimized with a better understanding of fly population dynamics measured throughout the day. We describe the modification of a commercial motorized sequential mosquito trap to accept liquid odorous bait and leverage a classic inverted cone design to passively confi...

  5. Photodetectors with passive thermal radiation control

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Dodson, Brian W.

    2001-10-02

    A new class of photodetectors which include means for passive shielding against undesired thermal radiation is disclosed. Such devices can substitute in applications currently requiring cooled optical sensors, such as IR detection and imaging. This description is included for purposes of searching, and is not intended to limit or otherwise influence the interpretation of the present invention.

  6. Passive compact molten salt reactor (PCMSR), modular thermal breeder reactor with totally passive safety system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harto, Andang Widi

    2012-06-01

    Design Study Passive Compact Molten Salt Reactor (PCMSR) with totally passive safety system has been performed. The term of Compact in the PCMSR name means that the reactor system is designed to have relatively small volume per unit power output by using modular and integral concept. In term of modular, the reactor system consists of three modules, i.e. reactor module, turbine module and fuel management module. The reactor module is an integral design that consists of reactor, primary and intermediate heat exchangers and passive post shutdown cooling system. The turbine module is an integral design of a multi heating, multi cooling, regenerative gas turbine. The fuel management module consists of all equipments related to fuel preparation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive handling. The preliminary calculations show that the PCMSR has negative temperature and void reactivity coefficient, passive shutdown characteristic related to fuel pump failure and possibility of using natural circulation for post shutdown cooling system.

  7. Passive compact molten salt reactor (PCMSR), modular thermal breeder reactor with totally passive safety system

    SciTech Connect

    Harto, Andang Widi

    2012-06-06

    Design Study Passive Compact Molten Salt Reactor (PCMSR) with totally passive safety system has been performed. The term of Compact in the PCMSR name means that the reactor system is designed to have relatively small volume per unit power output by using modular and integral concept. In term of modular, the reactor system consists of three modules, i.e. reactor module, turbine module and fuel management module. The reactor module is an integral design that consists of reactor, primary and intermediate heat exchangers and passive post shutdown cooling system. The turbine module is an integral design of a multi heating, multi cooling, regenerative gas turbine. The fuel management module consists of all equipments related to fuel preparation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive handling. The preliminary calculations show that the PCMSR has negative temperature and void reactivity coefficient, passive shutdown characteristic related to fuel pump failure and possibility of using natural circulation for post shutdown cooling system.

  8. A resolution congratulating the students, parents, teachers, and administrators of charter schools across the United States for their ongoing contributions to education, and supporting the ideals and goals of the 14th annual National Charter Schools Week, to be celebrated the week of May 5 through May 11, 2013.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Landrieu, Mary L. [D-LA

    2013-05-09

    05/09/2013 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S3352; text as passed Senate: CR S3344) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Prototype designs for passive-solar apartments and townhouses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, D.

    1981-09-01

    Seven designs of passive solar apartments and townhouses are briefly described. Descriptions of the layouts, thermal insulation, thermal mass, source of passive solar gain, and thermal integrity factor for auxiliary heating are presented.

  10. Surface passivation process of compound semiconductor material using UV photosulfidation

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.

    1995-01-01

    A method for passivating compound semiconductor surfaces by photolytically disrupting molecular sulfur vapor with ultraviolet radiation to form reactive sulfur which then reacts with and passivates the surface of compound semiconductors.

  11. Airborne Active and Passive L-Band Observations in Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colliander, A.; Yueh, S. H.; Chazanoff, S.; Jackson, T. J.; McNairn, H.; Bullock, P.; Wiseman, G.; Berg, A. A.; Magagi, R.; Njoku, E. G.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission is scheduled for launch in October 2014. The objective of the mission is global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state. Merging of active and passive L-band observations of the mission will enable unprecedented combination of accuracy, resolution, coverage and revisit-time for soil moisture and freeze/thaw state retrieval. For pre-launch algorithm development and validation the SMAP project and NASA coordinated a field campaign named as SMAPVEX12 (Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012) together with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in the vicinity of Winnipeg, Canada in June-July, 2012. The main objective of SMAPVEX12 was acquisition of data record that features long-time series with varying soil moisture and vegetation conditions (for testing the application of time-series approach) over aerial domain of multiple parallel lines (for spatial disaggregation studies). The coincident active and passive L-band data were acquired using the Passive Active L-band System (PALS), which is an airborne radiometer and radar developed for testing L-band retrieval algorithms. For SMAPVEX12 PALS was installed on a Twin Otter aircraft. The flight plan included flights at two altitudes. The higher altitude was used to map the whole experiment domain and the lower altitude was used to obtain measurements over a specific set of field sites. The spatial resolution (and swath) of the radar and radiometer from low altitude was about 600 m and from high altitude about 1500 m. The PALS acquisitions were complemented with high resolution (~10 m) L-band SAR measurements carried out by UAVSAR instrument on-board G-III aircraft. The campaign ran from June 7 until July 19. The PALS instrument conducted 17 brightness temperature and backscatter measurement flights and the UAVSAR conducted 14 backscatter measurement flights. The airborne data acquisition was supported by

  12. Study of thermosiphon and radiant panel passive heating systems for metal buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Biehl, F.A.; Schnurr, N.M.; Wray, W.O.

    1983-01-01

    A study of passive-heating systems appropriate for use on metal buildings is being conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory, Port Hueneme, California. The systems selected for study were chosen on the basis of their appropriateness for retrofit applications, although they are also suitable for new construction: simple radiant panels that communicate directly with the building interior and a backflow thermosiphon that provides heat indirectly.

  13. Detection of septic transfusion reactions to platelet transfusions by active and passive surveillance.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hong; Xiao, Wenbin; Lazarus, Hillard M; Good, Caryn E; Maitta, Robert W; Jacobs, Michael R

    2016-01-28

    Septic transfusion reactions (STRs) resulting from transfusion of bacterially contaminated platelets are a major hazard of platelet transfusion despite recent interventions. Active and passive surveillance for bacterially contaminated platelets was performed over 7 years (2007-2013) by culture of platelet aliquots at time of transfusion and review of reported transfusion reactions. All platelet units had been cultured 24 hours after collection and released as negative. Five sets of STR criteria were evaluated, including recent AABB criteria; sensitivity and specificity of these criteria, as well as detection by active and passive surveillance, were determined. Twenty of 51,440 platelet units transfused (0.004%; 389 per million) were bacterially contaminated by active surveillance and resulted in 5 STRs occurring 9 to 24 hours posttransfusion; none of these STRs had been reported by passive surveillance. STR occurred only in neutropenic patients transfused with high bacterial loads. A total of 284 transfusion reactions (0.55%) were reported by passive surveillance. None of these patients had received contaminated platelets. However, 6 to 93 (2.1%-32.7%) of these 284 reactions met 1 or more STR criteria, and sensitivity of STR criteria varied from 5.1% to 45.5%. These results document the continued occurrence of bacterial contamination of platelets resulting in STR in neutropenic patients, failure of passive surveillance to detect STR, and lack of specificity of STR criteria. These findings highlight the limitations of reported national STR data based on passive surveillance and the need to implement further measures to address this problem such as secondary testing or use of pathogen reduction technologies.

  14. Patientive Absolutive Verbal Morphology and Passive in Samoan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Kenneth William

    A study of the Samoan "-cia" suffix is presented. It argues that, contrary to prevailing theory, Samoan does have an active/passive contrast but that it is indicated by a difference in word order rather than by verbal morphology. It is shown, however, that "-cia" is similar to a passive suffix in that passive involves the…

  15. 48 CFR 252.211-7006 - Passive Radio Frequency Identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Passive Radio Frequency... of Provisions And Clauses 252.211-7006 Passive Radio Frequency Identification. As prescribed in 211.275-3, use the following clause: Passive Radio Frequency Identification (SEP 2011) (a) Definitions....

  16. 48 CFR 252.211-7006 - Passive Radio Frequency Identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Passive Radio Frequency... of Provisions And Clauses 252.211-7006 Passive Radio Frequency Identification. As prescribed in 211.275-3, use the following clause: Passive Radio Frequency Identification (SEP 2011) (a) Definitions....

  17. 48 CFR 252.211-7006 - Passive Radio Frequency Identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Passive Radio Frequency... of Provisions And Clauses 252.211-7006 Passive Radio Frequency Identification. As prescribed in 211.275-3, use the following clause: Passive Radio Frequency Identification (SEP 2011) (a) Definitions....

  18. 48 CFR 252.211-7006 - Passive Radio Frequency Identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Passive Radio Frequency... of Provisions And Clauses 252.211-7006 Passive Radio Frequency Identification. As prescribed in 211.275-3, use the following clause: Passive Radio Frequency Identification (SEP 2011) (a) Definitions....

  19. The Passive Voice in Computer Manuals: A New Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelis, Louise H.

    1995-01-01

    Finds debate and confusion about the use of passive voice in texts in general, and in computer manuals in particular. Aims to provide clarity by presenting the "alternation principle" for the use of the passive voice in computer manuals, in which active voice is used for user actions and passive voice for automatic computer actions. (PA)

  20. The soil moisture active/passive (SMAP) mission: How we got here and what it will provide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite will be launched by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in October 2014. This satellite is the culmination of basic research and applications development over the past thirty years. During most of this period, research and development o...

  1. The soil moisture active passive validation experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12): pre-launch calibration and validation of the SMAP satellite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite is scheduled for launch in November 2014. In order to develop robust soil moisture retrieval algorithms that fully exploit the unique capabilities of SMAP, algorithm developers had identified a nee...

  2. Identification and characterization of passive safety system and inherent safety feature building blocks for advanced light-water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating passive and inherent safety options for Advanced Light-Water Reactors (ALWRs). A major activity in 1989 includes identification and characterization of passive safety system and inherent safety feature building blocks, both existing and proposed, for ALWRs. Preliminary results of this work are reported herein. This activity is part of a larger effort by the US Department of Energy, reactor vendors, utilities, and others in the United States to develop improved LWRs. The Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) program and the Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (APWR) program have as goals improved, commercially available LWRs in the early 1990s. The Advanced Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ASBWR) program and the AP-600 program are developing more advanced reactors with increased use of passive safety systems. It is planned that these reactors will become commercially available in the mid 1990s. The ORNL program is an exploratory research program for LWRs beyond the year 2000. Desired long-term goals for such reactors include: (1) use of only passive and inherent safety, (2) foolproof against operator errors, (3) malevolence resistance against internal sabotage and external assault and (4) walkaway safety. The acronym ''PRIME'' (Passive safety, Resilient operation, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended (walkaway) safety) is used to summarize these desired characteristics. Existing passive and inherent safety options are discussed in this document.

  3. Linear and passive silicon optical isolator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Zhong, Xiao-Lan; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    On-chip optical isolation plays a key role in optical communications and computing based on silicon integrated photonic structures and has attracted great attentions for long years. Recently there have appeared hot controversies upon whether isolation of light can be realized via linear and passive photonic structures. Here we demonstrate optical isolation of infrared light in purely linear and passive silicon photonic structures. Both numerical simulations and experimental measurements show that the round-trip transmissivity of in-plane infrared light across a silicon photonic crystal slab heterojunction diode could be two orders of magnitudes smaller than the forward transmissivity at around 1,550 nm with a bandwidth of about 50 nm, indicating good performance of optical isolation. The occurrence of in-plane light isolation is attributed to the information dissipation due to off-plane and side-way scattering and selective modal conversion in the multiple-channel structure and has no conflict with the reciprocal principle.

  4. Passive deformation analysis of human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Dong, C; Skalak, R; Sung, K L; Schmid-Schönbein, G W; Chien, S

    1988-02-01

    The following analysis presents an experimental and theoretical study of the passive viscoelastic behavior of human leukocytes. Individual neutrophils in EDTA were observed both during their partial aspiration into a small micropipette and after expulsion from a large micropipette where the cell had been totally aspirated and deformed into a sausage shape. To analyze the data, a passive model of leukocyte rheology has been developed consisting of a cortical shell containing a Maxwell fluid which describes the average properties of the cell cytoplasm. The cortical shell represents a crosslinked actin layer near the surface of the cell and is assumed to be under pre-stressed tension. This model can reproduce the results of experiments using micropipette for both short-time small deformation and slow recovery data after large deformation. In addition, a finite element scheme has been established for the same model which shows close agreement with the analytical solution.

  5. Wide bandgap passivation layers on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, C.; Landis, G.; Beaulieu, R.; Loferski, J.; Vernon, S. M.; Spitzer, M. B.; Sekula, P.; Keavney, C. J.; Haven, V.

    The research problem that has been addressed in this work is the deposition of ZnS, ZnS sub 0.9Se sub 0.1, and GaP, which are candidate lattice-matched wide bandgap materials intended to replace SiO2 passivation on silicon solar cells. Ideally, these films would reflect minority carriers but not impede majority carrier transport to the surface and would passivate beneath contacts. The thin films were deposited by MOCVD, resistance evaporation or sputtering. Epitaxial GaP and ZnS films cause increases of internal quantum efficiency at short wavelengths. Reductions in J sub o comparable to that generated by SiO2, and increases in V sub oc were also observed. Film growth morphology was found to be a function of substrate temperature, orientation and the success of in situ removal of the native oxide.

  6. Wide bandgap passivation layers on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, C.; Landis, G.; Beaulieu, R.; Loferski, J.; Sekula, P.

    The research problem addressed is the deposition of ZnS, ZnS0.9Se0.1, and GaP, which are candidate lattice-matched wide-bandgap materials intended to replace SiO2 passivation on silicon solar cells. Ideally, these films would reflect minority carriers but not impede majority carrier transport to the surface and would passivate beneath contacts. The thin films were deposited by MOCVD, resistance evaporation or sputtering. Epitaxial GaP and ZnS films were found to cause increases of internal quantum efficiency at short wavelengths. Reductions in J0 comparable to that generated by SiO2 and increases in Voc were also observed. Film growth morphology was found to be a function of substrate temperature, orientation and the success of in situ removal of the native oxide.

  7. Integration of Passive Components for Spacecraft Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, E. J.; Wesseling, E.; White, V.; Lieneweg, U.; Mojarradi, M.; Ulrich, R.; Wasef, M.; Mantooth, A.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA roadmap outlining future deep space missions to Europa and other outer planetary destinations calls for continued reductions in the mass and volume of the spacecraft avionics. Spacecraft power electronics, including the power switches and converters, remain difficult to miniaturize due to the need for large numbers of discrete passive components such as resistors, capacitors, inductors and transformers. As part of the System-on-a-chip program at the Center for Integrated Space Microsystems and at the University of Arkansas, we are working to develop integrated or embedded passive components geared specifically for use in power management and distribution (PMAD) in future avionics over the next five to ten years. This will not only enable a scaling down of the power subsystems, but will make possible new architectures such as "distributed" PMAD. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Nonspherical atomic effective pseudopotentials for surface passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpulevich, Anastasia; Bui, Hanh; Antonov, Denis; Han, Peng; Bester, Gabriel

    2016-11-01

    We present a method to extract accurate pseudopotentials for surface passivants, within the framework of the atomic effective pseudopotential method. We retain the imaginary part of the pseudopotential in the construction procedure. This imaginary component in reciprocal space translates into a nonspherical component in real space. This asphericity allows to model surface dipoles and their ensuing band offsets. We show that these surface effects need to be taken into account to model electronic properties of quantum dots accurately—which requires to go beyond the spherical potential approximation for the passivant/surface atoms. The good level of transferability, without additional computational costs, is demonstrated for Si, CdSe, and InP nanostructures. The results are directly compared to large-scale density functional theory calculations.

  9. Performance of passive terahertz imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia; Zhao, Guozhong

    2016-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation has the higher penetration to clothing, cardboard boxes, plastic packaging materials and other similar dielectrics. Its lower photon energy compared with X-rays make the detected material and the human being to be not destroyed. THz application in field of security are developed by many countries. In this research, we present a multiband of passive terahertz imaging by the thermal radiation measurement. The Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference(NETD) is obtained. The result shows that NETD of the passive imaging system is 0.8K at 94 GHz, and 1.5K at 250GHz. We found that the main source of noise is the noise from detection circuit. Finally, the improvement methods of detecting sensitivity are analyzed and discussed.

  10. Structural Damage Detection Using Virtual Passive Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lew, Jiann-Shiun; Juang, Jer-Nan

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents novel approaches for structural damage detection which uses the virtual passive controllers attached to structures, where passive controllers are energy dissipative devices and thus guarantee the closed-loop stability. The use of the identified parameters of various closed-loop systems can solve the problem that reliable identified parameters, such as natural frequencies of the open-loop system may not provide enough information for damage detection. Only a small number of sensors are required for the proposed approaches. The identified natural frequencies, which are generally much less sensitive to noise and more reliable than the identified natural frequencies, are used for damage detection. Two damage detection techniques are presented. One technique is based on the structures with direct output feedback controllers while the other technique uses the second-order dynamic feedback controllers. A least-squares technique, which is based on the sensitivity of natural frequencies to damage variables, is used for accurately identifying the damage variables.

  11. Passively damped vibration welding system and method

    DOEpatents

    Tan, Chin-An; Kang, Bongsu; Cai, Wayne W.; Wu, Tao

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an anvil, and a passive damping mechanism (PDM). The controller generates an input signal having a calibrated frequency. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction at the calibrated frequency in response to the input signal to form a weld in a work piece. The PDM is positioned with respect to the system, and substantially damps or attenuates vibration in an undesirable second direction. A method includes connecting the PDM having calibrated properties and a natural frequency to an anvil of an ultrasonic welding system. Then, an input signal is generated using a weld controller. The method includes vibrating a welding horn in a desirable direction in response to the input signal, and passively damping vibration in an undesirable direction using the PDM.

  12. Germanium detector passivated with hydrogenated amorphous germanium

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, William L.; Haller, Eugene E.

    1986-01-01

    Passivation of predominantly crystalline semiconductor devices (12) is provided for by a surface coating (21) of sputtered hydrogenated amorphous semiconductor material. Passivation of a radiation detector germanium diode, for example, is realized by sputtering a coating (21) of amorphous germanium onto the etched and quenched diode surface (11) in a low pressure atmosphere of hydrogen and argon. Unlike prior germanium diode semiconductor devices (12), which must be maintained in vacuum at cryogenic temperatures to avoid deterioration, a diode processed in the described manner may be stored in air at room temperature or otherwise exposed to a variety of environmental conditions. The coating (21) compensates for pre-existing undesirable surface states as well as protecting the semiconductor device (12) against future impregnation with impurities.

  13. Passive control of unsteady condensation shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Matsuo, Shigeru; Shimamoto, Katsumi; Yasugi, Shinichi; Yu, Shen

    2000-12-01

    A rapid expansion of moist air or steam in a supersonic nozzle gives rise to nonequilibrium condensation phenomena. Thereby, if the heat released by condensation of water vapour exceeds a certain quantity, the flow will become unstable and periodic flow oscillations of the unsteady condensation shock wave will occur. For the passive control of shock-boundary layer interaction using the porous wall with a plenum underneath, many papers have been presented on the application of the technique to transonic airfoil flows. In this paper, the passive technique is applied to three types of oscillations of the unsteady condensation shock wave generated in a supersonic nozzle in order to suppress the unsteady behavior. As a result, the effects of number of slits and length of cavity on the aspect of flow field have been clarified numerically using a 3rd-order MUSCL type TVD finite-difference scheme with a second-order fractional-step for time integration.

  14. Passive optical element with selective angular reflection.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, C; Rheault, F; Boulay, R; Tremblay, R

    1987-02-01

    This work is related to the development of passive selective transmission materials that will contribute to regularize the solar thermal gain. We propose an original solution to the problem of seasonal control of energetic input into buildings through windows. A passive optical element with selective angular reflection is used to solve this problem. This optical element allows sunlight to enter windows during the fall and winter, whereas, owing to the different astronomical path of the sun, it stops and rejects direct sunlight by means of the optical effect called total internal reflection (TIR) during the central spring-summer period. The purpose of this paper is to describe the optical element in some detail, to develop the principal design equations, and give the results of the optimization of optical and geometrical parameters.

  15. Passive appendages generate drift through symmetry breaking

    PubMed Central

    Lācis, U.; Brosse, N.; Ingremeau, F.; Mazzino, A.; Lundell, F.; Kellay, H.; Bagheri, S.

    2014-01-01

    Plants and animals use plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs and fins to aid locomotion. Many of these appendages are not actively controlled, instead they have to interact passively with the surrounding fluid to generate motion. Here, we use theory, experiments and numerical simulations to show that an object with a protrusion in a separated flow drifts sideways by exploiting a symmetry-breaking instability similar to the instability of an inverted pendulum. Our model explains why the straight position of an appendage in a fluid flow is unstable and how it stabilizes either to the left or right of the incoming flow direction. It is plausible that organisms with appendages in a separated flow use this newly discovered mechanism for locomotion; examples include the drift of plumed seeds without wind and the passive reorientation of motile animals. PMID:25354545

  16. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  17. Tierra Nueva -- A passive solar cohousing project

    SciTech Connect

    Haggard, K.; Cooper, P.

    1999-10-01

    California architects take on the formidable challenges of designing a cohousing project, and discover that the end result is well worth the effort. The Tierra Nueva Cohousing Project consists of living units, a common house, community orchard, community gardens, community play space, space for a future shop and at the periphery of the site, parking, carports and garages. The units use thermal mass, solar heating, passive solar cooling, perimeter insulation on slabs. Design was agreed to by the community as a whole.

  18. Pan abode naturally passive solar homes

    SciTech Connect

    Steel, G.B.

    1981-03-01

    Currently Pan Abode markets 30 stock models of solid timber homes. In these homes the interior and exterior walls are of solid timber construction. Wall timbers, made from Western Red Cedar, are precut at the factory in Renton, Washington and then shipped to the site for assembly. Once at the site, the wall timbers are stacked according to the approved plans with timbers laid up throughout the house one course at a time. Ceilings in the Pan Abode homes are exposed beam with 2'' x 6'' sheathing. The large amount of exposed wood in the Pan Abode homes naturally provides the thermal mass necessary for a high performance passive solar home. The best selling stock model for Pan Abode is the Standard Cavalier. Because this home is the best selling model, it is selected as the base case for the development of a passive solar product line. The design objective is to modify the Standard Cavalier making use of its natural thermal mass to provide significantly improved thermal performance while minimizing any increases in the first costs attributed to passive solar design. Two generic passive solar systems are considered in the design process. The first system is ''direct gain.'' In this system the south windows are used to collect winter sun and the natural thermal mass inside the home is used to moderate the interior temperatures, storing and releasing solar heat, as necessary. The second system provides for a room addition to the basic house of an Energy Wing Solarium. The Energy Wing provides improved thermal performance to the Cavalier and provides a sun room, as well. In this system south facing windows on the Energy Wing collect sunlight in the winter. The design options, thermal performance, market and cost are discussed.

  19. Passive Endwall Treatments for Enhancing Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    These lecture notes were presented at the von Karman Institutes lecture series on Advances in Axial Compressor Aerodynamics, May 2006. They provide a fairly extensive overview of what's been learned from numerous investigations of various passive casing endwall technologies that have been proposed for alleviating the stall limiting physics associated with the compressor endwall flow field. The lecture notes are organized to give an appreciation for the inventiveness and understanding of the earliest compressor technologists and to provide a coherent thread of understanding that has arisen out of the early investigations. As such the lecture notes begin with a historical overview of casing treatments from their infancy through the earliest proposed concepts involving blowing, suction and flow recirculation. A summary of lessons learned from these early investigations is provided at the end of this section. The lecture notes then provide a somewhat more in-depth overview of recent advancements in the development of passive casing treatments from the late 1990's through 2006, including advancements in understanding the flow mechanism of circumferential groove casing treatments, and the development of discrete tip injection and self-recirculating casing treatments. At the conclusion of the lecture notes a final summary of lessons learned throughout the history of the development of passive casing treatments is provided. Finally, a list of future needs is given. It is hoped that these lecture notes will be a useful reference for future research endeavors to improve our understanding of the fluid physics of passive casing treatments and how they act to enhance compressor stability, and that they will perhaps provide a springboard for future research activities in this area of interest

  20. Comprehensive Planning for Passive Solar Architectural Retrofit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    IBID. p.2 3. IBID. p.56-60 (See Appendix B) 4. Victor Olgyay, Design with Climate- Bioclimatic Approach to Architectural Regionalism, Princeton...4. Ibid. p. 51 5. Victor 0lgyay. Design with Climate- Bioclimatic Approach to Architectural ~x~i Re ionaiism. Princeton University Press 1962. pp 110...COMPREHENSIVE PLANNING FOR PASSIVE SOLAIA ARCHITECTURAL RETROFIT DTICSELE-CT Ef B SMAST’ER ipf ARCHITECTURE THESIS MIAMI UNIVERSITY e OXFOROsOH 0

  1. Passive magnetic bearings for vehicular electromechanical batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R

    1996-03-01

    This report describes the design of a passive magnetic bearing system to be used in electromechanical batteries (flywheel energy storage modules) suitable for vehicular use. One or two such EMB modules might, for example, be employed in a hybrid-electric automobile, providing efficient means for power peaking, i.e., for handling acceleration and regenerative braking power demands at high power levels. The bearing design described herein will be based on a ''dual-mode'' operating regime.

  2. High spatial resolution passive microwave sounding systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Rosenkranz, P. W.; Bonanni, P. G.; Gasiewski, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    Two extensive series of flights aboard the ER-2 aircraft were conducted with the MIT 118 GHz imaging spectrometer together with a 53.6 GHz nadir channel and a TV camera record of the mission. Other microwave sensors, including a 183 GHz imaging spectrometer were flown simultaneously by other research groups. Work also continued on evaluating the impact of high-resolution passive microwave soundings upon numerical weather prediction models.

  3. Passively cooled direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Costin, Daniel P.

    2008-03-18

    A wind turbine is provided that passively cools an electrical generator. The wind turbine includes a plurality of fins arranged peripherally around a generator house. Each of the fins being oriented at an angle greater than zero degrees to allow parallel flow of air over the fin. The fin is further tapered to allow a constant portion of the fin to extend beyond the air stream boundary layer. Turbulence initiators on the nose cone further enhance heat transfer at the fins.

  4. Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, Eni G.; Entekhabi, Dara

    1996-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing provides a unique capability for direct observation of soil moisture. Remote measurements from space afford the possibility of obtaining frequent, global sampling of soil moisture over a large fraction of the Earth's land surface. Microwave measurements have the benefit of being largely unaffected by cloud cover and variable surface solar illumination, but accurate soil moisture estimates are limited to regions that have either bare soil or low to moderate amounts of vegetation cover. A particular advantage of passive microwave sensors is that in the absence of significant vegetation cover soil moisture is the dominant effect on the received signal. The spatial resolutions of passive Microwave soil moisture sensors currently considered for space operation are in the range 10-20 km. The most useful frequency range for soil moisture sensing is 1-5 GHz. System design considerations include optimum choice of frequencies, polarizations, and scanning configurations, based on trade-offs between requirements for high vegetation penetration capability, freedom from electromagnetic interference, manageable antenna size and complexity, and the requirement that a sufficient number of information channels be available to correct for perturbing geophysical effects. This paper outlines the basic principles of the passive microwave technique for soil moisture sensing, and reviews briefly the status of current retrieval methods. Particularly promising are methods for optimally assimilating passive microwave data into hydrologic models. Further studies are needed to investigate the effects on microwave observations of within-footprint spatial heterogeneity of vegetation cover and subsurface soil characteristics, and to assess the limitations imposed by heterogeneity on the retrievability of large-scale soil moisture information from remote observations.

  5. The Acquisition of Passives in Serbian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perovic, Alexandra; Vuksanovic, Jasmina; Petrovic, Boban; Avramovic-Ilic, Irena

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the comprehension of actional and psychological verbs in both their active and passive (short and long) forms by 99 Serbian-speaking children. The children, whose age ranged between 3 years, 6 months (3;6) and 7 years, 6 months (7;6), were divided into three groups: 3;6-5 ("M" = 4.3), 5;1-6;1 ("M" = 5.6),…

  6. Passive energy dump for superconducting coil protection

    DOEpatents

    Luton, J.N. Jr.

    1973-01-16

    The patent describes a passive resistance type energy dump for the protection of the coils of a superconducting magnet. Insertion heaters are immersed in a rigid container filled with a fusible alloy. The energy dump is connected across the coils of the superconducting magnet wherein individual heater elements are connected singly to the windings or otherwise according to the energy dumping requirements upon transition of the magnet to a normal state.

  7. Passive solar manufactured buildings development and analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekieffer, R.

    1983-11-01

    Manufactured buildings which are cost effective residential and light commercial buildings are discussed. The solar energy research institute (SERI) and the Department of Energy (DOE) worked with building manufacturers design, develop, and build passive solar manufactured buildings. This development process lead to valuable information in design development and design options, cost analysis, and estimated and monitored thermal performance on all types of manufactured buildings. The scope and content are described.

  8. Passive Hearing Protection Systems and Their Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    However, these coustic energy. Additionally, earcups and earcushions offer a t often is not flat in the region in which the earcup contacts the he...to provide personnel with personal hearing protection. This protection may be in the form of either an earplug that occludes the ear canal or a ...circumaural protector that inserts a barrier between the ambient noise and the ear. For both devices the level of passive protection provided changes

  9. Natural fracture characterization using passive seismic illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.

    2003-01-08

    The presence of natural fractures in reservoir rock can significantly enhance gas production, especially in tight gas formations. Any general knowledge of the existence, location, orientation, spatial density, and connectivity of natural fractures, as well as general reservoir structure, that can be obtained prior to active seismic acquisition and drilling can be exploited to identify key areas for subsequent higher resolution active seismic imaging. Current practices for estimating fracture properties before the acquisition of surface seismic data are usually based on the assumed geology and tectonics of the region, and empirical or fracture mechanics-based relationships between stratigraphic curvature and fracturing. The objective of this research is to investigate the potential of multicomponent surface sensor arrays, and passive seismic sources in the form of local earthquakes to identify and characterize potential fractured gas reservoirs located near seismically active regions. To assess the feasibility of passive seismic fracture detection and characterization, we have developed numerical codes for modeling elastic wave propagation in reservoir structures containing multiple, finite-length fractures. This article describes our efforts to determine the conditions for favorable excitation of fracture converted waves, and to develop an imaging method that can be used to locate and characterize fractures using multicomponent, passive seismic data recorded on a surface array.

  10. Passive dynamic controllers for nonlinear mechanical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Wu, Shih-Chin; Phan, Minh; Longman, Richard W.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology for model-independant controller design for controlling large angular motion of multi-body dynamic systems is outlined. The controlled system may consist of rigid and flexible components that undergo large rigid body motion and small elastic deformations. Control forces/torques are applied to drive the system and at the same time suppress the vibration due to flexibility of the components. The proposed controller consists of passive second-order systems which may be designed with little knowledge of the system parameter, even if the controlled system is nonlinear. Under rather general assumptions, the passive design assures that the closed loop system has guaranteed stability properties. Unlike positive real controller design, stabilization can be accomplished without direct velocity feedback. In addition, the second-order passive design allows dynamic feedback controllers with considerable freedom to tune for desired system response, and to avoid actuator saturation. After developing the basic mathematical formulation of the design methodology, simulation results are presented to illustrate the proposed approach to a flexible six-degree-of-freedom manipulator.

  11. Passive swimming in viscous oscillatory flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Ikhee; Huang, Yangyang; Zimmermann, Walter; Kanso, Eva

    2016-12-01

    Fluid-based locomotion at low Reynolds number is subject to the constraints of Purcell's scallop theorem: reciprocal shape kinematics identical under a time-reversal symmetry cannot cause locomotion. In particular, a single degree-of-freedom scallop undergoing opening and closing motions cannot swim. Most strategies for symmetry breaking and locomotion rely on direct control of the swimmer's shape kinematics. Less is known about indirect control via actuation of the fluid medium. To address how such indirect actuation strategies can lead to locomotion, we analyze a Λ -shaped model system analogous to Purcell's scallop but able to deform passively in oscillatory flows. Neutrally buoyant scallops undergo no net locomotion. We show that dense, elastic scallops can exhibit passive locomotion in zero-mean oscillatory flows. We examine the efficiency of swimming parallel to the background flow and analyze the stability of these motions. We observe transitions from stable to unstable swimming, including ordered transitions from fluttering to chaoticlike motions and tumbling. Our results demonstrate that flow oscillations can be used to passively actuate and control the motion of microswimmers, which may be relevant to applications such as surgical robots and cell sorting and manipulation in microfluidic devices.

  12. Complementary resistive switches for passive nanocrossbar memories.

    PubMed

    Linn, Eike; Rosezin, Roland; Kügeler, Carsten; Waser, Rainer

    2010-05-01

    On the road towards higher memory density and computer performance, a significant improvement in energy efficiency constitutes the dominant goal in future information technology. Passive crossbar arrays of memristive elements were suggested a decade ago as non-volatile random access memories (RAM) and can also be used for reconfigurable logic circuits. As such they represent an interesting alternative to the conventional von Neumann based computer chip architectures. Crossbar architectures hold the promise of a significant reduction in energy consumption because of their ultimate scaling potential and because they allow for a local fusion of logic and memory, thus avoiding energy consumption by data transfer on the chip. However, the expected paradigm change has not yet taken place because the general problem of selecting a designated cell within a passive crossbar array without interference from sneak-path currents through neighbouring cells has not yet been solved satisfactorily. Here we introduce a complementary resistive switch. It consists of two antiserial memristive elements and allows for the construction of large passive crossbar arrays by solving the sneak path problem in combination with a drastic reduction of the power consumption.

  13. Passive acoustic threat detection in estuarine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowski, Brian; Sutin, Alexander; Roh, Heui-Seol; Bunin, Barry

    2008-04-01

    The Maritime Security Laboratory (MSL) at Stevens Institute of Technology supports research in a range of areas relevant to harbor security, including passive acoustic detection of underwater threats. The difficulties in using passive detection in an urban estuarine environment include intensive and highly irregular ambient noise and the complexity of sound propagation in shallow water. MSL conducted a set of tests in the Hudson River near Manhattan in order to measure the main parameters defining the detection distance of a threat: source level of a scuba diver, transmission loss of acoustic signals, and ambient noise. The source level of the diver was measured by comparing the diver's sound with a reference signal from a calibrated emitter placed on his path. Transmission loss was measured by comparing noise levels of passing ships at various points along their routes, where their distance from the hydrophone was calculated with the help of cameras and custom software. The ambient noise in the Hudson River was recorded under varying environmental conditions and amounts of water traffic. The passive sonar equation was then applied to estimate the range of detection. Estimations were done for a subset of the recorded noise levels, and we demonstrated how variations in the noise level, attenuation, and the diver's source level influence the effective range of detection. Finally, we provided analytic estimates of how an array improves upon the detection distance calculated by a single hydrophone.

  14. Columbia County Habitat for Humanity Passive Townhomes

    SciTech Connect

    Dentz, Jordan; Alaigh, Kunal; Dadia, Devanshi

    2016-03-18

    Columbia County (New York) Habitat for Humanity built a pair of townhomes to Passive House criteria with the purpose of exploring approaches for achieving Passive House performance and to eventually develop a prototype design for future projects. The project utilized a 2x6 frame wall with a structural insulated panel curtain wall and a ventilated attic over a sealed OSB ceiling air barrier. Mechanical systems include a single head, wall mounted ductless mini-split heat pump in each unit and a heat recovery ventilator. Costs were $26,000 per unit higher for Passive House construction compared with the same home built to ENERGY STAR version 3 specifications, representing about 18% of total construction cost. This report discusses the cost components, energy modeling results and lessons from construction. Two alternative ventilation systems are analyzed: a central system; and, a point-source system with small through-wall units distributed throughout the house. The report includes a design and cost analysis of these two approaches.

  15. Brookfield Homes Passive House Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Herk, A.; Poerschke, A.; Beach, R.

    2016-02-04

    In 2012-2013, IBACOS worked with a builder, Brookfield Homes in Denver, Colorado, to design and construct a Passive House certified model home. IBACOS used several modeling programs and calculation methods to complete the final design package along with Brookfield's architect KGA Studio. This design package included upgrades to the thermal enclosure, basement insulation, windows, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Short-term performance testing in the Passive House was done during construction and after construction. Testing with a blower door indicated that whole-building air leakage to the outside was 324 CFM and 0.60 ACH50. The other two test homes had little short-term testing done post-construction by the local energy rater. IBACOS then monitored the energy consumption and whole-house comfort conditions of that occupied Passive House after one year of operation and compared the monitoring results to those for two other occupied test houses in the same area with similar square footage but slightly different floor plans. IBACOS also assisted the builder, Brookfield Homes, in researching design scenarios for Zero Energy Ready Home and ENERGY STAR acceptance levels. IBACOS also assisted Brookfield in conceptualizing product for Denver's Brighton Heights area. Brookfield was considering building to Zero Energy Ready Home standards in that location. IBACOS provided strategies that Brookfield may draw from in the event the builder chooses to pursue a Zero Energy Ready Home plan for that market.

  16. Stable surface passivation process for compound semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.

    2001-01-01

    A passivation process for a previously sulfided, selenided or tellurated III-V compound semiconductor surface. The concentration of undesired mid-gap surface states on a compound semiconductor surface is reduced by the formation of a near-monolayer of metal-(sulfur and/or selenium and/or tellurium)-semiconductor that is effective for long term passivation of the underlying semiconductor surface. Starting with the III-V compound semiconductor surface, any oxidation present thereon is substantially removed and the surface is then treated with sulfur, selenium or tellurium to form a near-monolayer of chalcogen-semiconductor of the surface in an oxygen-free atmosphere. This chalcogenated surface is then contacted with a solution of a metal that will form a low solubility chalcogenide to form a near-monolayer of metal-chalcogen-semiconductor. The resulting passivating layer provides long term protection for the underlying surface at or above the level achieved by a freshly chalcogenated compound semiconductor surface in an oxygen free atmosphere.

  17. Passive bioventing driven by natural air exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Foor, D.C.; Zwick, T.C.; Hinchee, R.E.; Hoeppel, R.E.; Kyburg, C.; Bowling, L.

    1995-12-31

    Bioventing wells installed in the vadose zone of petroleum-contaminated sites at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC) in Twentynine Palms, California, naturally inhale and exhale air. This natural air exchange appears to be driven primarily by barometric pressure changes. The natural air exchange was utilized to engineer a passive bioventing system in which a valve allows only air injection and prevents soil gas extraction. The system is effective in aerating petroleum-contaminated, oxygen-limited subsurface soils. This aeration resulted in enhanced biological activity and site remediation. The bioventing wells (vent wells) were fitted with a passive valve mechanism that opens when the atmospheric pressure overcomes the internal vent well pressure. When the valve is open it permits atmospheric air to enter the vent well and infiltrate into the soil, thereby stimulating bioremediation. When the vent well pressure overcomes atmospheric pressure, the valve is closed and inhibits soil gas extraction. The vent wells are installed in a coarse sand where the depth to groundwater is approximately 220 ft (67 m). Generally, deeper vent wells produce greater flowrates. Passive airflow rates of up to 7 cfm (12 m{sup 3}/h) have been achieved at the bioventing wells.

  18. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Star formation history of passive red galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siudek, M.; Małek, K.; Scodeggio, M.; Garilli, B.; Pollo, A.; Haines, C. P.; Fritz, A.; Bolzonella, M.; de la Torre, S.; Granett, B. R.; Guzzo, L.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; De Lucia, G.; Davidzon, I.; Franzetti, P.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Marchetti, A.; Marulli, F.; Polletta, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Ilbert, O.; Gargiulo, A.; Moscardini, L.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Zamorani, G.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We trace the evolution and the star formation history of passive red galaxies, using a subset of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). The detailed spectral analysis of stellar populations of intermediate-redshift passive red galaxies allows the build up of their stellar content to be followed over the last 8 billion years. Methods: We extracted a sample of passive red galaxies in the redshift range 0.4 passive red galaxies were stacked in narrow bins of stellar mass and redshift. We use the stacked spectra to measure the 4000 Å break (D4000) and the Hδ Lick index (HδA) with high precision. These spectral features are used as indicators of the star formation history of passive red galaxies. We compare the results with a grid of synthetic spectra to constrain the star formation epochs of these galaxies. We characterize the formation redshift-stellar mass relation for intermediate-redshift passive red galaxies. Results: We find that at z 1 stellar populations in low-mass passive red galaxies are younger than in high-mass passive red galaxies, similar to what is observed at the present epoch. Over the full analyzed redshift range 0.4 < z < 1.0 and stellar mass range 10 < log (Mstar/M⊙) < 12, the D4000 index increases with redshift, while HδA gets lower. This implies that the stellar populations are getting older with increasing stellar mass. Comparison to the spectra of passive red galaxies in the SDSS survey (z 0.2) shows that the shape of the relations of D4000 and HδA with stellar mass has not changed significantly with redshift. Assuming a single burst formation, this implies that high-mass passive red galaxies formed their stars at zform 1.7, while low-mass galaxies formed their main stellar populations

  19. Evaluation of Alternate Stainless Steel Surface Passivation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Elliot A.

    2005-05-31

    Stainless steel containers were assembled from parts passivated by four commercial vendors using three passivation methods. The performance of these containers in storing hydrogen isotope mixtures was evaluated by monitoring the composition of initially 50% H{sub 2} 50% D{sub 2} gas with time using mass spectroscopy. Commercial passivation by electropolishing appears to result in surfaces that do not catalyze hydrogen isotope exchange. This method of surface passivation shows promise for tritium service, and should be studied further and considered for use. On the other hand, nitric acid passivation and citric acid passivation may not result in surfaces that do not catalyze the isotope exchange reaction H{sub 2} + D{sub 2} {yields} 2HD. These methods should not be considered to replace the proprietary passivation processes of the two current vendors used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility.

  20. Active and passive computed tomography algorithm with a constrained conjugate gradient solution

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.; Jackson, J. A.; Martz, H. E.; Roberson, G. P.

    1998-10-01

    An active and passive computed tomographic technique (A&PCT) has been developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The technique uses an external radioactive source and active tomography to map the attenuation within a waste drum as a function of mono-energetic gamma-ray energy. Passive tomography is used to localize and identify specific radioactive waste within the same container. The passive data is corrected for attenuation using the active data and this yields a quantitative assay of drum activity. A&PCT involves the development of a detailed system model that combines the data from the active scans with the geometry of the imaging system. Using the system model, iterative optimization techniques are used to reconstruct the image from the passive data. Requirements for high throughput yield measured emission levels in waste barrels that are too low to apply optimization techniques involving the usual Gaussian statistics. In this situation a Poisson distribution, typically used for cases with low counting statistics, is used to create an effective maximum likelihood estimation function. An optimization algorithm, Constrained Conjugate Gradient (CCG), is used to determine a solution for A&PCT quantitative assay. CCG, which was developed at LLNL, has proven to be an efficient and effective optimization method to solve limited-data problems. A detailed explanation of the algorithms used in developing the model and optimization codes is given.

  1. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Applications Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Molly E.; Moran, Susan; Escobar, Vanessa; Entekhabi, Dara; O'Neill, Peggy; Njoku, Eni

    2011-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first-tier satellite missions recommended by the U.S. National Research Council Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space. The SMAP mission 1 is under development by NASA and is scheduled for launch late in 2014. The SMAP measurements will allow global and high-resolution mapping of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state at resolutions from 3-40 km. These measurements will have high value for a wide range of environmental applications that underpin many weather-related decisions including drought and flood guidance, agricultural productivity estimation, weather forecasting, climate predictions, and human health risk. In 2007, NASA was tasked by The National Academies to ensure that emerging scientific knowledge is actively applied to obtain societal benefits by broadening community participation and improving means for use of information. SMAP is one of the first missions to come out of this new charge, and its Applications Plan forms the basis for ensuring its commitment to its users. The purpose of this paper is to outline the methods and approaches of the SMAP applications activity, which is designed to increase and sustain the interaction between users and scientists involved in mission development.

  2. Tracking marine mammals using passive acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosal, Eva-Marie

    2007-12-01

    It is difficult to study the behavior and physiology of marine mammals or to understand and mitigate human impact on them because much of their lives are spent underwater. Since sound propagates for long distances in the ocean and since many cetaceans are vocal, passive acoustics is a valuable tool for studying and monitoring their behavior. After a brief introduction to and review of passive acoustic tracking methods, this dissertation develops and applies two new methods. Both methods use widely-spaced (tens of kilometers) bottom-mounted hydrophone arrays, as well as propagation models that account for depth-dependent sound speed profiles. The first passive acoustic tracking method relies on arrival times of direct and surface-reflected paths. It is used to track a sperm whale using 5 at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) and gives position estimates that are accurate to within 10 meters. With such accuracy, the whale's pitch and yaw are estimated by assuming that its main axis (which points from the tail to the rostrum) is parallel to its velocity. Roll is found by fitting the details of the pulses within each sperm whale click to the so-called bent horn model of sperm whale sound production. Finally, given the position and orientation of the whale, its beam pattern is reconstructed and found to be highly directional with an intense forward directed component. Pair-wise spectrogram (PWS) processing is the second passive acoustic tracking method developed in this dissertation. Although it is computationally more intensive, PWS has several advantages over arrival-time tracking methods, especially in shallow water environments, for long duration calls, and for multiple-animal datasets, as is the case for humpback whales on Hawaiian breeding grounds. Results of simulations with realistic noise conditions and environmental mismatch are given and compared to other passive localization techniques. When applied to the AUTEC sperm whale dataset, PWS

  3. Stability Issues in Ambient-Temperature Passive Magnetic Bearing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    2000-02-17

    The ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory achieves rotor-dynamic stability by employing special combinations of levitating and stabilizing elements. These elements, energized by permanent magnet material, create the magnetic and electrodynamic forces that are required for the stable levitation of rotating systems, such as energy-storage flywheels. Stability criteria, derived from theory, describe the bearing element parameters, i.e., stiffnesses and damping coefficients, that are required both to assure stable levitation (''Earnshaw-stability''), and stability against whirl-type rotor-dynamic instabilities. The work described in this report concerns experimental measurements and computer simulations that address some critical aspects of this overall stability problem. Experimentally, a test device was built to measure the damping coefficient of dampers that employ eddy currents induced in a metallic disc. Another test device was constructed for the purpose of measuring the displacement-dependent drag coefficient of annular permanent magnet bearing elements. In the theoretical developments a computer code was written for the purpose of simulating the rotor-dynamics of our passive bearing systems. This code is capable of investigating rotor-dynamic stability effects for both small-amplitude transient displacements (i.e., those within the linear regime), and for large-amplitude displacements, where non-linear effects can become dominant. Under the latter conditions a bearing system that is stable for small-amplitude displacements may undergo a rapidly growing rotor-dynamic instability once a critical displacement is exceeded. A new result of the study was to demonstrate that stiffness anisotropy of the bearing elements (which can be designed into our bearing system) is strongly stabilizing, not only in the linear regime, but also in the non-linear regime.

  4. Transport of Passive Tracers in Baroclinic Wave Life Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Elizabeth M.; Randel, William J.; Stanford, John L.

    1999-01-01

    The transport of passive tracers in idealized baroclinic wave life cycles is studied using output from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model (CCM2). Two life cycles, LCn and LCs, are simulated, starting with baroclinically unstable initial conditions similar to those used by Thorncroft et al. in their study of two life cycle paradigms. The two life cycles LCn and LCs have different initial horizontal wind shear structures that result in distinctive nonlinear development. In terms of potential vorticity-potential temperature (PV-theta) diagnostics, the LCn case is characterized by thinning troughs that are advected anti-cyclonically and equatorward, while the LCs case has broadening troughs that wrap up cyclonically and poleward. Four idealized passive tracers are included in the model to be advected by the semi-Lagrangian transport scheme of the CCM2, and their evolutions are investigated throughout the life cycles. Tracer budgets are analyzed in terms of the transformed Eulerian mean constituent transport formalism in pressure coordinates and also in isentropic coordinates. Results for both LCn and LCs show transport that is downgradient with respect to the background structure of the tracer field, but with a characteristic spatial structure that maximizes in the middle to high latitudes. For the idealized tropospheric tracers in this study, this represents a net upward and poleward transport that enhances concentrations at high latitudes. These results vary little with the initial distribution of the constituent field. The time tendency of the tracer is influenced most strongly by the eddy flux term. with the largest transport occurring during the nonlinear growth stage of the life cycle. The authors also study the transport of a lower-stratospheric tracer, to examine stratosphere-troposphere exchange for baroclinic waves.

  5. Fluctuation driven active molecular transport in passive channel proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosztin, Ioan

    2006-03-01

    Living cells interact with their extracellular environment through the cell membrane, which acts as a protective permeability barrier for preserving the internal integrity of the cell. However, cell metabolism requires controlled molecular transport across the cell membrane, a function that is fulfilled by a wide variety of transmembrane proteins, acting as either passive or active transporters. In this talk it is argued that, contrary to the general belief, in active cell membranes passive and spatially asymmetric channel proteins can act as active transporters by consuming energy from nonequilibrium fluctuations fueled by cell metabolism. This assertion is demonstrated in the case of the E. coli aquaglyceroporin GlpF channel protein, whose high resolution crystal structure is manifestly asymmetric. By calculating the glycerol flux through GlpF within the framework of a stochastic model, it is found that, as a result of channel asymmetry, glycerol uptake driven by a concentration gradient is enhanced significantly in the presence of non-equilibrium fluctuations. Furthermore, the enhancement caused by a ratchet-like mechanism is larger for the outward, i.e., from the cytoplasm to the periplasm, flux than for the inward one, suggesting that the same non-equilibrium fluctuations also play an important role in protecting the interior of the cell against poisoning by excess uptake of glycerol. Preliminary data on water and sugar transport through aquaporin and maltoporin channels, respectively, are indicative of the universality of the proposed nonequilibrium-fluctuation-driven active transport mechanism. This work was supported by grants from the Univ. of Missouri Research Board, the Institute for Theoretical Sciences and the Department of Energy (DOE Contract W-7405-ENG-36), and the National Science Foundation (FIBR-0526854).

  6. Electrochemical characterization of anode passivation mechanisms in copper electrorefining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moats, Michael Scott

    Anode passivation can decrease productivity and quality while increasing costs in modern copper electrorefineries. This investigation utilized electrochemical techniques to characterize the passivation behavior of anode samples from ten different operating companies. It is believed that this collection of anodes is the most diverse set ever to be assembled to study the effect of anode composition on passivation. Chronopotentiometry was the main electrochemical technique, employing a current density of 3820 A m-2. From statistical analysis of the passivation characteristics, increasing selenium, tellurium, silver, lead and nickel were shown to accelerate passivation. Arsenic was the only anode impurity that inhibited passivation. Oxygen was shown to accelerate passivation when increased from 500 to 1500 ppm, but further increases did not adversely affect passivation. Nine electrolyte variables were also examined. Increasing the copper, sulfuric acid or sulfate concentration of the electrolyte accelerated passivation. Arsenic in the electrolyte had no effect on passivation. Chloride and optimal concentrations of thiourea and glue delayed passivation. Linear sweep voltammetry, cyclic voltammetry, and impedance spectroscopy provided complementary information. Analysis of the electrochemical results led to the development of a unified passivation mechanism. Anode passivation results from the formation of inhibiting films. Careful examination of the potential details, especially those found in the oscillations just prior to passivation, demonstrated the importance of slimes, copper sulfate and copper oxide. Slimes confine dissolution to their pores and inhibit diffusion. This can lead to copper sulfate precipitation, which blocks more of the surface area. Copper oxide forms because of the resulting increase in potential at the interface between the copper sulfate and anode. Ultimate passivation occurs when the anode potential is high enough to stabilize the oxide film in

  7. Cooperative passive-solar commercial retrofit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. T.

    1982-12-01

    The primary objectives of this project were: the conversion of an existing south-facing storefront into a trombe'-wall passive solar collector, the sharing of information on simple low-cost energy alternatives with the local community, and the reduction of the store building's dependence on non-renewable fossil fuel for space heating. Six 6' wide pre-assembled collector glazing panels were mounted on a 12' high by 36' long portion of the south-facing masonry wall. Vent-holes were cut through the wall at each panel to provide air inlets and outlets for the collector and monitoring equipment was installed to record performance. A series of hands-on construction workshops were attended by Co-op and community members. During these sessions, collector components were assembled. The panels were installed on April 22, 1981 in celebration of Earth Day. Additional sessions were held to complete the project, make necessary modifications and install sensors. Project personnel participated in several energy-education activities, including workshops, seminars and alternative energy home tours. A community-based energy resource council was founded with the assistance of several key Co-op project members and a fully-illustrated How-To manual, entitled Passive Solar Collector: A Trombe'-Wall Retrofit Guide was published. Finally, a variety of energy conservation measures were undertaken. These included a new airlock store entry, insulated store ceiling, destratification ceiling fans and wood-burning furnaces have combined with the passive solar collector to substantially reduce the use of fuel oil for heat.

  8. Pressure passivation of mild pyrolysis char

    SciTech Connect

    Ochs, T.; Summers, C.; Schroeder, K.; Sands, W.

    1999-07-01

    Low-rank coals that have been thermally dried in the mild pyrolysis process have a tendency to spontaneously combust. The spontaneous combustion of coals and chars has been linked to their affinity for oxygen. The USDOE has developed a method for the passivation of mild pyrolysis char derived from a low-rank coal using pressure differentials to control the oxidation of the active sites in the char rapidly and safely. Initial experiments performed by the USDOE show that the affinity of the coal for oxygen uptake (residual oxygen demand, ROD) is reduced by exposure of the coal-char to high-pressure gas mixtures including air or oxygen-enriched air. Laboratory-scale tests have shown that the ROD can be rapidly reduced by cycling the active coals between low-pressure (atmospheric pressure or less) and high-pressure (500 psi to 1,500 psi) regimes. Cycling the pressure of the treatment gas provides rapid passivation resulting from two effects: The high-pressure cycle forces fresh oxygen into the pores which have been purged of adsorbed gases and reaction products. The pores of coal are small enough to prohibit free convection and force oxygen exchange to take place by way of diffusion under ambient conditions. The forced introduction of fresh process gas under high pressure overcomes the restrictions due to diffusion limits while the removal of adsorbed products clears the way to active surface sites. The high pressure increases the number of oxygen molecules with sufficient energy to overcome the activation barrier of the passivation reaction, due to the increased number of molecules per unit volume of the high-pressure gas. Combined, the two effects rapidly produce a coal with a significantly reduced ROD.

  9. A Comprehensive Approach to Bi-National Regional Energy Planning in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect

    Matt Morrison

    2007-12-31

    The Pacific NorthWest Economic Region, a statutory organization chartered by the Northwest states of Alaska, Washington, Idaho, Montana, and Oregon, and the western Canadian provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, and the Yukon through its Energy Working Group launched a bi-national energy planning initiative designed to create a Pacific Northwest energy planning council of regional public/private stakeholders from both Canada and the US. There is an urgent need to deal with the comprehensive energy picture now before our hoped for economic recovery results in energy price spikes which are likely to happen because the current supply will not meet predicted demand. Also recent events of August 14th have shown that our bi-national energy grid system is intricately interdependent, and additional planning for future capacity is desperately needed.

  10. Passive long range acousto-optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Dan

    2006-08-01

    Alexander Graham Bell's photophone of 1880 was a simple free space optical communication device that used the sun to illuminate a reflective acoustic diaphragm. A selenium photocell located 213 m (700 ft) away converted the acoustically modulated light beam back into sound. A variation of the photophone is presented here that uses naturally formed free space acousto-optic communications links to provide passive multichannel long range acoustic sensing. This system, called RAS (remote acoustic sensor), functions as a long range microphone with a demonstrated range in excess of 40 km (25 miles).

  11. Passive stacks in a multifamily housing project

    SciTech Connect

    Saum, D.

    1995-12-31

    The Summerfield multi-family, 1242 unit housing project that has been under construction since 1993 in Prince Georges County Maryland near Washington, DC suggests that passive stacks provides significant radon mitigation in multi-family construction. Random radon tests in these buildings indicate an average indoor ground floor concentration of 0.3 pCi/L with the stacks open, and 1.3 pCi/L with the stacks sealed. These buildings were built with post-tension slabs which should be more airtight than conventional floating slabs, and measurements show that the pressure field extension in these slabs in very good.

  12. Passivation-free solid state battery

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, K.M.; Peramunage, D.

    1998-06-16

    This invention pertains to passivation-free solid-state rechargeable batteries composed of Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} anode, a solid polymer electrolyte and a high voltage cathode. The solid polymer electrolyte comprises a polymer host, such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(vinyl chloride), poly(vinyl sulfone), and poly(vinylidene fluoride), plasticized by a solution of a Li salt in an organic solvent. The high voltage cathode includes LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, LiCoO{sub 2}, LiNiO{sub 2} and LiV{sub 2}O{sub 5} and their derivatives. 5 figs.

  13. A passive vibration-cancelling isolation mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sykes, Alan O.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of an idealized passive vibration-cancelling two-terminal mount with one degree of freedom at each mechanical terminal isolating a nonrigid machine from a nonrigid foundation is presented. To evaluate a vibration-cancelling (VC) mount, its effectiveness as a function of frequency is compared with the effectiveness of both conventional and compound mounts isolating a rigid machine from a nonrigid foundation. The comparisons indicate that a carefully designed and manufactured VC mount should provide substantially greater vibration reduction at its cancellation frequency than either a conventional or compound mount having the same low frequency stiffness, i.e., stiffness at the natural frequency of the machine mount system.

  14. Passive Noise Filtering by Cellular Compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Stoeger, Thomas; Battich, Nico; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2016-03-10

    Chemical reactions contain an inherent element of randomness, which presents itself as noise that interferes with cellular processes and communication. Here we discuss the ability of the spatial partitioning of molecular systems to filter and, thus, remove noise, while preserving regulated and predictable differences between single living cells. In contrast to active noise filtering by network motifs, cellular compartmentalization is highly effective and easily scales to numerous systems without requiring a substantial usage of cellular energy. We will use passive noise filtering by the eukaryotic cell nucleus as an example of how this increases predictability of transcriptional output, with possible implications for the evolution of complex multicellularity.

  15. Bathymetric mapping with passive multispectral imagery.

    PubMed

    Philpot, W D

    1989-04-15

    Bathymetric mapping will be most straightforward where water quality and atmospheric conditions are invariant over the scene. Under these conditions, both depth and an effective attenuation coefficient of the water over several different bottom types may be retrieved from passive, multispectral imagery. As scenes become more complex-with changing water type and variable atmospheric conditions-it is probable that a strictly spectral analysis will no longer be sufficient to extract depth from multispectral imagery. In these cases an independent source of information will be required. The most likely sources for such information are spatial and temporal variations in image data.

  16. Passive Millimeter Wave Camera (PMMWC) at TRW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Engineers at TRW, Redondo Beach, California, inspect the Passive Millimeter Wave Camera, a weather-piercing camera designed to see through fog, clouds, smoke and dust. Operating in the millimeter wave portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, the camera creates visual-like video images of objects, people, runways, obstacles and the horizon. A demonstration camera (shown in photo) has been completed and is scheduled for checkout tests and flight demonstration. Engineer (left) holds a compact, lightweight circuit board containing 40 complete radiometers, including antenna, monolithic millimeter wave integrated circuit (MMIC) receivers and signal processing and readout electronics that forms the basis for the camera's 1040-element focal plane array.

  17. Passive Millimeter Wave Camera (PMMWC) at TRW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Engineers at TRW, Redondo Beach, California, inspect the Passive Millimeter Wave Camera, a weather-piercing camera designed to 'see' through fog, clouds, smoke and dust. Operating in the millimeter wave portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, the camera creates visual-like video images of objects, people, runways, obstacles and the horizon. A demonstration camera (shown in photo) has been completed and is scheduled for checkout tests and flight demonstration. Engineer (left) holds a compact, lightweight circuit board containing 40 complete radiometers, including antenna, monolithic millimeter wave integrated circuit (MMIC) receivers and signal processing and readout electronics that forms the basis for the camera's 1040-element focal plane array.

  18. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Pemberton, Bradley E.; May, Christopher P.; Rossabi, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus is provided which passively removes contaminated gases from a subsurface. The apparatus includes a riser pipe extending into a subsurface which has an exterior end in fluid communication with a valve. When well pressure is greater than atmospheric pressure, the valve opens to release contaminants into the atmosphere, and when well pressure is less than atmospheric pressure, the valve closes to prevent flow of air into the well. The valve assembly of the invention comprises a lightweight ball which is lifted from its valve seat with a slight pressure drop between the well and the atmosphere.

  19. Development of passive superconducting bearings. Phase 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Dantam K.

    1993-05-01

    This report documents the development of a passive superconducting bearing that is used to levitate relatively heavy rotors. This bearing was used to levitate a 7 lb rotor and spin at speeds of up to 12,000 rpm. The success of this effort indicates that the superconducting bearings have the potential for transition from a mere laboratory curiosity to a functional bearing component in a wider range of practical applications such as cryoturbopumps, miniature cryocoolers, and magnetic refrigerators. In addition, several configurations using superconductors to support loads along a single axis were investigated. The effort was directed to identify a specific configuration that offers a very high stiffness.

  20. Passive Accelerometer System Measurements on MIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1997-01-01

    The Passive Accelerometer System (PAS) is a simple moving ball accelerometer capable of measuring the small magnitude steady relative acceleration that occurs in a low earth orbit spacecraft due to atmospheric drag and the earth's gravity gradient. The acceleration is measured by recording the average velocity of the spherical ball over a suitable time increment. A modified form of Stokes law is used to convert the average velocity into an acceleration. PAS was used to measure acceleration on the MIR space station and on the first United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-1). The PAS measurement on MIR revealed remarkably low acceleration levels in the SPEKTR module.

  1. Estimating animal population density using passive acoustics.

    PubMed

    Marques, Tiago A; Thomas, Len; Martin, Stephen W; Mellinger, David K; Ward, Jessica A; Moretti, David J; Harris, Danielle; Tyack, Peter L

    2013-05-01

    Reliable estimation of the size or density of wild animal populations is very important for effective wildlife management, conservation and ecology. Currently, the most widely used methods for obtaining such estimates involve either sighting animals from transect lines or some form of capture-recapture on marked or uniquely identifiable individuals. However, many species are difficult to sight, and cannot be easily marked or recaptured. Some of these species produce readily identifiable sounds, providing an opportunity to use passive acoustic data to estimate animal density. In addition, even for species for which other visually based methods are feasible, passive acoustic methods offer the potential for greater detection ranges in some environments (e.g. underwater or in dense forest), and hence potentially better precision. Automated data collection means that surveys can take place at times and in places where it would be too expensive or dangerous to send human observers. Here, we present an overview of animal density estimation using passive acoustic data, a relatively new and fast-developing field. We review the types of data and methodological approaches currently available to researchers and we provide a framework for acoustics-based density estimation, illustrated with examples from real-world case studies. We mention moving sensor platforms (e.g. towed acoustics), but then focus on methods involving sensors at fixed locations, particularly hydrophones to survey marine mammals, as acoustic-based density estimation research to date has been concentrated in this area. Primary among these are methods based on distance sampling and spatially explicit capture-recapture. The methods are also applicable to other aquatic and terrestrial sound-producing taxa. We conclude that, despite being in its infancy, density estimation based on passive acoustic data likely will become an important method for surveying a number of diverse taxa, such as sea mammals, fish, birds

  2. Passivation-free solid state battery

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M.; Peramunage, Dharmasena

    1998-01-01

    This invention pertains to passivation-free solid-state rechargeable batteries composed of Li.sub.4 Ti.sub.5 O.sub.12 anode, a solid polymer electrolyte and a high voltage cathode. The solid polymer electrolyte comprises a polymer host, such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(vinyl chloride), poly(vinyl sulfone), and poly(vinylidene fluoride), plasticized by a solution of a Li salt in an organic solvent. The high voltage cathode includes LiMn.sub.2 O.sub.4, LiCoO.sub.2, LiNiO.sub.2 and LiV.sub.2 O.sub.5 and their derivatives.

  3. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Pemberton, B.E.; May, C.P.; Rossabi, J.

    1997-06-24

    An apparatus is provided which passively removes contaminated gases from a subsurface. The apparatus includes a riser pipe extending into a subsurface which has an exterior end in fluid communication with a valve. When well pressure is greater than atmospheric pressure, the valve opens to release contaminants into the atmosphere, and when well pressure is less than atmospheric pressure, the valve closes to prevent flow of air into the well. The valve assembly of the invention comprises a lightweight ball which is lifted from its valve seat with a slight pressure drop between the well and the atmosphere. 7 figs.

  4. Passive integral solar heat collector system

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman Jr., K. T.

    1985-04-30

    The present invention relates to an improved apparatus for collecting, absorbing, transferring, and storing solar heat energy, economically and passively, without pumps or electric power. The apparatus comprises a solar collector with a flat finned heat pipe absorber and an attached integral insulated storage tank with a double wall heat exchanger. The absorber, made of one or more slightly tilted gravity assisted heat pipes with flat absorber fins, absorbs and transfers solar heat by evaporation, vapor transport, and condensation to the slightly elevated heat storage tank. The one or more heat pipes turn on when the sun is shining and turn off automatically when the sun is not shining.

  5. Passive injection control for microfluidic systems

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Arnold, Don W.; Neyer, David W.

    2004-12-21

    Apparatus for eliminating siphoning, "dead" regions, and fluid concentration gradients in microscale analytical devices. In its most basic embodiment, the present invention affords passive injection control for both electric field-driven and pressure-driven systems by providing additional fluid flow channels or auxiliary channels disposed on either side of a sample separation column. The auxiliary channels are sized such that volumetric fluid flow rate through these channels, while sufficient to move the sample away from the sample injection region in a timely fashion, is less than that through the sample separation channel or chromatograph.

  6. Passive Wireless SAW Sensors for IVHM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Perey, Daniel F.; Atkinson, Gary M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    2008-01-01

    NASA aeronautical programs require integrated vehicle health monitoring (IVHM) to ensure the safety of the crew and the vehicles. Future IVHM sensors need to be small, light weight, inexpensive, and wireless. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology meets all of these constraints. In addition it operates in harsh environments and over wide temperature ranges, and it is inherently radiation hardened. This paper presents a survey of research opportunities for universities and industry to develop new sensors that address anticipated IVHM needs for aerospace vehicles. Potential applications of passive wireless SAW sensors from ground testing to high altitude aircraft operations are presented, along with some of the challenges and issues of the technology.

  7. Estimating animal population density using passive acoustics

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Tiago A; Thomas, Len; Martin, Stephen W; Mellinger, David K; Ward, Jessica A; Moretti, David J; Harris, Danielle; Tyack, Peter L

    2013-01-01

    Reliable estimation of the size or density of wild animal populations is very important for effective wildlife management, conservation and ecology. Currently, the most widely used methods for obtaining such estimates involve either sighting animals from transect lines or some form of capture-recapture on marked or uniquely identifiable individuals. However, many species are difficult to sight, and cannot be easily marked or recaptured. Some of these species produce readily identifiable sounds, providing an opportunity to use passive acoustic data to estimate animal density. In addition, even for species for which other visually based methods are feasible, passive acoustic methods offer the potential for greater detection ranges in some environments (e.g. underwater or in dense forest), and hence potentially better precision. Automated data collection means that surveys can take place at times and in places where it would be too expensive or dangerous to send human observers. Here, we present an overview of animal density estimation using passive acoustic data, a relatively new and fast-developing field. We review the types of data and methodological approaches currently available to researchers and we provide a framework for acoustics-based density estimation, illustrated with examples from real-world case studies. We mention moving sensor platforms (e.g. towed acoustics), but then focus on methods involving sensors at fixed locations, particularly hydrophones to survey marine mammals, as acoustic-based density estimation research to date has been concentrated in this area. Primary among these are methods based on distance sampling and spatially explicit capture-recapture. The methods are also applicable to other aquatic and terrestrial sound-producing taxa. We conclude that, despite being in its infancy, density estimation based on passive acoustic data likely will become an important method for surveying a number of diverse taxa, such as sea mammals, fish, birds

  8. Passive containment cooling water distribution device

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Fanto, Susan V.

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using a series of radial guide elements and cascading weir boxes to collect and then distribute the cooling water into a series of distribution areas through a plurality of cascading weirs. The cooling water is then uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weir notches in the face plate of the weir box.

  9. Passive sampler for measurements of atmospheric nitric acid vapor (HNO3) concentrations.

    PubMed

    Bytnerowicz, A; Padgett, P E; Arbaugh, M J; Parker, D R; Jones, D P

    2001-12-05

    Nitric acid (HNO3) vapor is an important nitrogenous air pollutant responsible for increasing saturation of forests with nitrogen and direct injury to plants. The USDA Forest Service and University of California researchers have developed a simple and inexpensive passive sampler for monitoring air concentrations of HNO3. Nitric acid is selectively absorbed on 47-mm Nylasorb nylon filters with no interference from particulate NO3-. Concentrations determined with the passive samplers closely corresponded with those measured with the co-located honeycomb annular denuder systems. The PVC protective caps of standardized dimensions protect nylon filters from rain and wind and allow for reliable measurements of ambient HNO3 concentrations. The described samplers have been successfully used in Sequoia National Park, the San Bernardino Mountains, and on Mammoth Mountain in California.

  10. Passive and inherent safety technologies for light-water nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1990-07-01

    Passive/inherent safety implies a technical revolution in our approach to nuclear power safety. This direction is discussed herein for light-water reactors (LWRs) -- the predominant type of power reactor used in the world today. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) the approach to the development of passive/inherent safety for LWRs consists of four steps: identify and quantify safety requirements and goals; identify and quantify the technical functional requirements needed for safety; identify, invent, develop, and quantify technical options that meet both of the above requirements; and integrate safety systems into designs of economic and reliable nuclear power plants. Significant progress has been achieved in the first three steps of this program. The last step involves primarily the reactor vendors. These activities, as well as related activities worldwide, are described here. 27 refs., 7 tabs.

  11. Wood dust exposure in the Danish furniture industry using conventional and passive monitors.

    PubMed

    Schlünssen, V; Vinzents, P S; Mikkelsen, A B; Schaumburg, I

    2001-03-01

    A study of wood dust exposure at furniture factories in one county in Denmark was performed as a cross sectional study. Dust exposure was measured with personal passive dust monitors and calibrated against active sampling on filters. Measurements of 1685 workers were included in the exposure assessment. The passive dust monitor conversion models for equivalent concentrations of inhalable dust and total dust based on data from the present study were not significantly different from the original models. Therefore models based on all available data were used. The parameters of the distribution of equivalent concentration of inhalable dust were 0.94 mg/m3 (geometric mean) and 2.10 (geometric standard deviation). Compared with a national cross sectional study from 1988 the exposure level (geometric mean) was reduced by a factor 2.0. Inhalable dust exposure was about 50% higher than exposure measured by the Danish 'total' dust method.

  12. Active-passive airborne ocean color measurement. II - Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.; Yungel, J. K.

    1986-01-01

    Reported here for the first time is the use of a single airborne instrument to make concurrent measurements of oceanic chlorophyll concentration by (1) laser-induced fluorescence, (2) passive upwelling radiance, and (3) solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence. Results from field experiments conducted with the NASA airborne oceanographic lidar (AOL) in the New York Bight demonstrate the capability of a single active-passive instrument to perform new and potentially important ocean color studies related to (1) active lidar validation of passive ocean color in-water algorithms, (2) chlorophyll a in vivo fluorescence yield variability, (3) calibration of active multichannel lidar systems, (4) effect of sea state on passive and active ocean color measurements, (5) laser/solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence investigations, and (6) subsequent improvement of satellite-borne ocean color scanners. For validation and comparison purposes a separate passive ocean color sensor was also flown along with the new active-passive sensor during these initial field trials.

  13. Enlightened Use of Passive Voice in Technical Writing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trammell, M. K.

    1981-01-01

    The passive voice as a normal, acceptable, and established syntactic form in technical writing is defended. Passive/active verb ratios, taken from sources including 'antipassivist' text books, are considered. The suitability of the passive voice in technical writing which involves unknown or irrelevant agents is explored. Three 'myths' that the passive (1) utilizes an abnormal and artificial word order, (2) is lifeless, and (3) is indirect are considered. Awkward and abnormal sounding examples encountered in text books are addressed in terms of original context. Unattractive or incoherent passive sentences are explained in terms of inappropriate conversion from active sentences having (1) short nominal or pronominal subjects or (2) verbs with restrictions on their passive use.

  14. Asymptotic Stability of Interconnected Passive Non-Linear Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isidori, A.; Joshi, S. M.; Kelkar, A. G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of stabilization of a class of internally passive non-linear time-invariant dynamic systems. A class of non-linear marginally strictly passive (MSP) systems is defined, which is less restrictive than input-strictly passive systems. It is shown that the interconnection of a non-linear passive system and a non-linear MSP system is globally asymptotically stable. The result generalizes and weakens the conditions of the passivity theorem, which requires one of the systems to be input-strictly passive. In the case of linear time-invariant systems, it is shown that the MSP property is equivalent to the marginally strictly positive real (MSPR) property, which is much simpler to check.

  15. Methodology for the passive control of orbital inclination and mean local time to meet sun-synchronous orbit requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Kraft, Lauri

    1992-01-01

    The mean local time (MLT) of equatorial crossing of a sun-synchronous Earth-observing spacecraft orbit drifts with inclination; therefore, in order to maintain the MLT, the inclination must be controlled. Inclination may be maintained actively by costly out-of-plane maneuvers or passively by using the perturbing forces due to the sun and moon. This paper examines the passive control approach using the Earth Observing System (EOS) as a basis for the discussion. Applications to Landsat and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) spacecraft are presented for comparison. This technique is especially beneficial to spacecraft lacking propulsion systems. The results indicate that passive inclination control appears to be the preferable maintenance method when spacecraft weight restrictions, operational considerations, and scientific requirements apply.

  16. Demonstration and Validation of a Fractured Rock Passive Flux Meter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    objective of this project was to demonstrate and validate a new closed- hole passive sensing technology for fractured media: the Fractured Rock Passive...OTV logs. ......................... 104 Figure 44. Test K: (A) black and white image of visual features from a portion of the FRPFM sock. (B...Passive flux Meter (FRPFM) Figure 45. Test K: (A) Black and white image of visual features from a portion of the FRPFM sock. (B) Visual features with

  17. Improvements to Passive Acoustic Tracking Methods for Marine Mammal Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Improvements to Passive Acoustic Tracking Methods for...www.soest.hawaii.edu/ore/faculty/nosal LONG-TERM GOALS The long-term goal of this project is to improve model-based passive acoustic methods for...and applicability of model-based passive acoustic tracking methods for marine mammals: 1) Invert for sound speed profiles, hydrophone position and

  18. Multi-family update to the passive solar construction handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, B. D.; Callahan, K. D.

    1983-11-01

    Builders and developers will accept passive solar construction and designs for integration with their existing practice if accurate and detailed plans of actual, proven passive solar subsystems and assemblies are made available to them. A Passive Solar Construction Handbook was developed. It focuses primarily upon single family homes. The multifamily update of the Handbook, is described and examples of the valuable builder information are shown. It represents a new breakthrough in DOE sponsored projects, performing a Technology Transfer on a most useful level.

  19. Approach to interior design for passive direct gain solar homes

    SciTech Connect

    Kachadorian, C.C.

    1980-01-01

    In response to requests from buyers and builders of direct gain passive solar homes interior design criteria either specific to, or emphasized by, passive solar buildings are investigated. Problems of high sunlight penetration, secondary illumination, material selection, sound control and psychology are approached. Material deterioration, fading, glare, noise, and a sense of spacial confinement can be minimized, contributing to the appeal and saleability of passive solar homes.

  20. Human sperm rheotaxis: a passive physical process

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuoran; Liu, Jun; Meriano, Jim; Ru, Changhai; Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing question in natural reproduction is how mammalian sperm navigate inside female reproductive tract and finally reach the egg cell, or oocyte. Recently, fluid flow was proposed as a long–range guidance cue for sperm navigation. Coitus induces fluid flow from oviduct to uterus, and sperm align themselves against the flow direction and swim upstream, a phenomenon termed rheotaxis. Whether sperm rheotaxis is a passive process dominated by fluid mechanics, or sperm actively sense and adapt to fluid flow remains controversial. Here we report the first quantitative study of sperm flagellar motion during human sperm rheotaxis and provide direct evidence indicating that sperm rheotaxis is a passive process. Experimental results show that there is no significant difference in flagellar beating amplitude and asymmetry between rheotaxis-turning sperm and those sperm swimming freely in the absence of fluid flow. Additionally, fluorescence image tracking shows no Ca2+ influx during sperm rheotaxis turning, further suggesting there is no active signal transduction during human sperm rheotaxis. PMID:27005727

  1. Passive solar energy information user study

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1980-11-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on passive solar heating and cooling are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. The overall study provides baseline data about information needs in the solar community. An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from seven passive groups respondents are analyzed in this report: Federally Funded Researchers, Manufacturer Representatives, Architects, Builders, Educators, Cooperative Extension Service County Agents, and Homeowners. The data will be used as input to the determination of information products and services the Solar Energy Research Institute, the Solar Energy Information Data Bank Network, and the entire information outreach community should be preparing and disseminating.

  2. Passive and active middle ear implants

    PubMed Central

    Beutner, Dirk; Hüttenbrink, Karl-Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Besides eradication of chronic middle ear disease, the reconstruction of the sound conduction apparatus is a major goal of modern ear microsurgery. The material of choice in cases of partial ossicular replacement prosthesis is the autogenous ossicle. In the event of more extensive destruction of the ossicular chain diverse alloplastic materials, e.g. metals, ceramics, plastics or composits are used for total reconstruction. Their specialised role in conducting sound energy within a half-open implant bed sets high demands on the biocompatibility as well as the acoustic-mechanic properties of the prosthesis. Recently, sophisticated titanium middle ear implants allowing individual adaptation to anatomical variations are widely used for this procedure. However, despite modern developments, hearing restoration with passive implants often faces its limitations due to tubal-middle-ear dysfunction. Here, implantable hearing aids, successfully used in cases of sensorineural hearing loss, offer a promising alternative. This article reviews the actual state of affairs of passive and active middle ear implants. PMID:22073102

  3. Optical passive athermalization for infrared zoom system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shenghui; Yang, Changcheng; Zheng, Jia; Lan, Ning; Xiong, Tao; Li, Yong

    2007-12-01

    In an infrared zoom system, it is difficult to obtain the best thermal compensation for all effective focal length (EFL) simultaneously by moving a single lens group. According to the principle of optical passive athermalization, the equations of focal length, achromatization and athermalization of both long and short EFL are established respectively. By analyzing the thermal aberration value relations between long EFL and short EFL, the thermal aberration values of the switching groups for short EFL athermalization are calculated. Firstly, the athermalization of long EFL is designed. Then through reasonable optical materials matching of the switching groups, the short EFL achieves athermalization as well. In this paper, a re-imaging switching zoom system is designed. It has a relative aperture of f/4.0, 100% cold shield efficiency, the EFL of 180mm/30mm at 3.7-4.8μm. The long EFL includes four refractive elements and one hybrid refractive/diffractive element. The switching groups of short EFL have two types, one is composed of four refractive elements, and the other is composed of two refractive elements and one hybrid refractive/diffractive element. Both of the short EFL achieve athermalization. With the aluminum materials of system structures, the zoom system achieves optical passive athermalization. It has the diffraction limited image quality and stable image plane from -30°C to 70°C.

  4. Silicone Wristbands as Personal Passive Samplers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Active-sampling approaches are commonly used for personal monitoring, but are limited by energy usage and data that may not represent an individual’s exposure or bioavailable concentrations. Current passive techniques often involve extensive preparation, or are developed for only a small number of targeted compounds. In this work, we present a novel application for measuring bioavailable exposure with silicone wristbands as personal passive samplers. Laboratory methodology affecting precleaning, infusion, and extraction were developed from commercially available silicone, and chromatographic background interference was reduced after solvent cleanup with good extraction efficiency (>96%). After finalizing laboratory methods, 49 compounds were sequestered during an ambient deployment which encompassed a diverse set of compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), consumer products, personal care products, pesticides, phthalates, and other industrial compounds ranging in log Kow from −0.07 (caffeine) to 9.49 (tris(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate). In two hot asphalt occupational settings, silicone personal samplers sequestered 25 PAHs during 8- and 40-h exposures, as well as 2 oxygenated-PAHs (benzofluorenone and fluorenone) suggesting temporal sensitivity over a single work day or week (p < 0.05, power =0.85). Additionally, the amount of PAH sequestered differed between worksites (p < 0.05, power = 0.99), suggesting spatial sensitivity using this novel application. PMID:24548134

  5. Passive vibration tuning with neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiDomenico, Eric D.

    1994-05-01

    Neural network control of flexible structures demonstrates better settling time and energy dissipation than linear design methods. Optimal tuning of passive vibration absorbers for reduced order control is examined using linear and non-linear cases. Quasi-Newton (BFGS) and simplex optimization methods improved the Den Hartog parameters where unsupervised LMS or backpropagation techniques were unstable. Lessons on unsupervised training for dynamic system control are illustrated by examining convergence to the solution in `error space' (parameters vs. cost). Spring stiffness and passive damping of a reaction mass actuator (RMA) are `tuned' for best disturbance rejection using total energy as a cost function. A single neuron using two weights (one for damping and the other for the spring coefficient) improved beam energy over the Den Hartog parameters for the linear bi-modal case. The non-linear case demonstrates even better performance. A multiple layer network is then demonstrated for both the linear and non-linear cases. Optimization techniques improved linear system parameters when initiated at the linear solutions. Lab data for the linear single neuron case validates model fidelity.

  6. Passive Broad-Spectrum Influenza Immunoprophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Cassandra M.; Penhale, William J.; Sangster, Mark Y.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza is a perennial problem affecting millions of people annually with the everpresent threat of devastating pandemics. Active prophylaxis by vaccination against influenza virus is currently the main countermeasure supplemented with antivirals. However, disadvantages of this strategy include the impact of antigenic drift, necessitating constant updating of vaccine strain composition, and emerging antiviral drug resistance. The development of other options for influenza prophylaxis, particularly with broad acting agents able to provide protection in the period between the onset of a pandemic and the development of a strain specific vaccine, is of great interest. Exploitation of broad-spectrum mediators could provide barricade protection in the early critical phase of influenza virus outbreaks. Passive immunity has the potential to provide immediate antiviral effects, inhibiting virus replication, reducing virus shedding, and thereby protecting vulnerable populations in the event of an impending influenza pandemic. Here, we review passive broad-spectrum influenza prophylaxis options with a focus on harnessing natural host defenses, including interferons and antibodies. PMID:25328697

  7. Passive versus active mitigation cost analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Parazin, R.J.; Galbraith, J.D.

    1995-04-01

    The scope of this task is to assess the impact of mitigation alternatives for Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103 on the Project W-236A Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. This assessment and other related tasks are part of an Action Plan Path Forward prepared by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Life Extension and Transition Program. Task 3.7 of the Action Plan for Project W-236A MWTF analyzed the comparative cost/risk of two hydrogen gas mitigation alternatives (active versus passive) to recommend the most appropriate course of action to resolve the hydrogen gas safety issue. The qualitative success of active mitigation has been demonstrated through Tank 241-SY-101 testing. Passive mitigation has not been demonstrated but will be validated by laboratory test work performed under Task 3.1 of the Action Plan. It is assumed for this assessment that the uncertainties associated with the performance of either alternative is comparable. Determining alternative specific performance measures beyond those noted are not in the scope of this effort.

  8. Improvement of passive THz camera images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Marcin; Piszczek, Marek; Palka, Norbert; Szustakowski, Mieczyslaw

    2012-10-01

    Terahertz technology is one of emerging technologies that has a potential to change our life. There are a lot of attractive applications in fields like security, astronomy, biology and medicine. Until recent years, terahertz (THz) waves were an undiscovered, or most importantly, an unexploited area of electromagnetic spectrum. The reasons of this fact were difficulties in generation and detection of THz waves. Recent advances in hardware technology have started to open up the field to new applications such as THz imaging. The THz waves can penetrate through various materials. However, automated processing of THz images can be challenging. The THz frequency band is specially suited for clothes penetration because this radiation does not point any harmful ionizing effects thus it is safe for human beings. Strong technology development in this band have sparked with few interesting devices. Even if the development of THz cameras is an emerging topic, commercially available passive cameras still offer images of poor quality mainly because of its low resolution and low detectors sensitivity. Therefore, THz image processing is very challenging and urgent topic. Digital THz image processing is a really promising and cost-effective way for demanding security and defense applications. In the article we demonstrate the results of image quality enhancement and image fusion of images captured by a commercially available passive THz camera by means of various combined methods. Our research is focused on dangerous objects detection - guns, knives and bombs hidden under some popular types of clothing.

  9. Passive heating of the ground surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyburczyk, Anna

    2016-03-01

    The phenomenon of phase change is one of the most important contemporary issues of thermal engineering. In particular, this applies to all kinds of heat exchanger systems, which should achieve the highest possible efficiency while reducing investment and operating costs. Some of these systems are heat pipes or thermosyphons, which, among others, are used for the heat transfer, temperature stabilization and the regulation of heat flux density. Additionally, they are passive systems, and therefore do not require an external power supply. Heat pipes can be used to stabilize the surface temperature of roads and driveways. Large heat tubes can be applied for heating the surface of bridges and overpasses, which become icy in unfavorable climatic conditions. The paper presents research on the test facility, whose main component is a long vertical copper fin. The temperature at the base of the fin was kept constant for a given series of measurements. Heat receiving fluid was ethanol at atmospheric pressure. The measurement methodology and the results of investigations were discussed. The surface temperature distribution was measured with the infrared camera, and on this basis the local values of heat flow and the heat transfer coefficient were determined. The results were presented as boiling curves for both the fin with the smooth surface and the one covered with a metal capillary-porous structure. The results obtained are useful in the design of heat exchangers, including passive heating of the ground.

  10. Passive droplet sorting using viscoelastic flow focusing.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Andrew C; Patel, Apurva; Beer, N Reginald; Lee, Abraham P

    2013-04-07

    We present a study of passive hydrodynamic droplet sorting in microfluidic channels based on intrinsic viscoelastic fluid properties. Sorting is achieved by tuning the droplets' intrinsic viscous and viscoelastic properties relative to the continuous oil phase to achieve a positive or negative lateral migration toward high or low shear gradients in the channel. In the presence of weakly viscoelastic fluid behavior, droplets with a viscosity ratio, κ, between 0.5-10 were found to migrate toward a high shear gradient near the channel walls. For all other κ-values, or Newtonian fluids, droplets would migrate toward a low shear gradient at the channel centerline. It was also found that for strongly viscoelastic fluids with low interfacial tension, droplets would migrate toward the edge even with κ-values lower than 0.5. The resulting bi-directional lateral droplet migration between different droplets allows size-independent sorting. Still, their sorting efficiencies are dependent on droplet size, intrinsic fluid elasticity, viscosity, droplet deformability, and overall fluid shear rates. Based on these findings, we demonstrate >200 Hz passive droplet sorting frequencies and achieve >100 fold enrichment factors without the need to actively sense and/or control active mechanisms. Using a low viscosity oil phase of 6.25 cPs, we demonstrate sorting discrimination of 1 cPs and 5 cPs aqueous droplets with κ-values of 0.2 and 0.8 respectively.

  11. Passivity analysis for flexible multilink space manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damaren, Christopher J.

    1995-03-01

    The important input-output property of passivity is explored for a general flexible space manipulator with chain topology. The manipulator is assumed to consist of rigid and/or flexible links interconnected via revolute joints, and a free rigid spacecraft and cantilevered payload are modeled at the base and tip, respectively. Actuation on the spacecraft and torques at the joints serve as control inputs and a suitably modified input variable is constructed. The notion of reflected tip position introduced by Wang and Vidyasagar for a single flexible link is extended to the multilink case and used to define a corresponding modified output variable. The dynamics governing the system are developed using a Lagrangian approach and both linearized and nonlinear forms of the mapping relating modified inputs to modified outputs are examined. Our major result shows that the transfer function in the linear case is positive real when the spacecraft and payload are much more massive than the manipulator links. The corresponding nonlinear analysis shows that the mapping is, in fact, passive and uncovers an approximate static relationship between the elastic coordinates and applied torques. A numerical example employing the Space Shuttle, remote manipulator system, and payload is used to demonstrate the validity of the theoretical results. Applications to control system design are indicated.

  12. Passive Remote Sensing of Cloud Ice Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Wang, James R.

    2004-01-01

    Hurricanes, blizzards and other weather events are important to understand not only for disaster preparation, but also to track the global energy balance and to improve weather and climate forecasts. For several decades, passive radiometers and active radars on aircraft and satellites have been employed to remotely sense rain rates and the properties of liquid particles. In the past few years the relationships between frozen particles and millimeter-wave observations have become understood well enough to estimate the properties of ice in clouds. A brief background of passive remote sensing of precipitation will be presented followed by a focused discussion of recent research at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center estimating the properties of frozen particles in clouds. The retrievals are for (1) ice that will eventually melt into rain, (2) for solid precipitation falling in northern climates, and (3) cirrus ice clouds. The electromagnetic absorption and scattering properties and differences of liquid rain versus frozen particles will be summarized for frequencies from 6 to 340+ GHz. Challenges of this work including surface emissivity variability, non-linear and under-constrained relationships, and frozen particle unknowns will be discussed. Retrieved cloud particle contents and size distributions for ice above the melting layer in hurricanes, retrieved snowfall rates for a blizzard, and cirrus ice estimates will be presented. Future directions of this work will also be described.

  13. Silicone wristbands as personal passive samplers.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Steven G; Kincl, Laurel D; Anderson, Kim A

    2014-03-18

    Active-sampling approaches are commonly used for personal monitoring, but are limited by energy usage and data that may not represent an individual's exposure or bioavailable concentrations. Current passive techniques often involve extensive preparation, or are developed for only a small number of targeted compounds. In this work, we present a novel application for measuring bioavailable exposure with silicone wristbands as personal passive samplers. Laboratory methodology affecting precleaning, infusion, and extraction were developed from commercially available silicone, and chromatographic background interference was reduced after solvent cleanup with good extraction efficiency (>96%). After finalizing laboratory methods, 49 compounds were sequestered during an ambient deployment which encompassed a diverse set of compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), consumer products, personal care products, pesticides, phthalates, and other industrial compounds ranging in log K(ow) from -0.07 (caffeine) to 9.49 (tris(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate). In two hot asphalt occupational settings, silicone personal samplers sequestered 25 PAHs during 8- and 40-h exposures, as well as 2 oxygenated-PAHs (benzofluorenone and fluorenone) suggesting temporal sensitivity over a single work day or week (p < 0.05, power =0.85). Additionally, the amount of PAH sequestered differed between worksites (p < 0.05, power = 0.99), suggesting spatial sensitivity using this novel application.

  14. Human sperm rheotaxis: a passive physical process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuoran; Liu, Jun; Meriano, Jim; Ru, Changhai; Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-03-01

    A long-standing question in natural reproduction is how mammalian sperm navigate inside female reproductive tract and finally reach the egg cell, or oocyte. Recently, fluid flow was proposed as a long–range guidance cue for sperm navigation. Coitus induces fluid flow from oviduct to uterus, and sperm align themselves against the flow direction and swim upstream, a phenomenon termed rheotaxis. Whether sperm rheotaxis is a passive process dominated by fluid mechanics, or sperm actively sense and adapt to fluid flow remains controversial. Here we report the first quantitative study of sperm flagellar motion during human sperm rheotaxis and provide direct evidence indicating that sperm rheotaxis is a passive process. Experimental results show that there is no significant difference in flagellar beating amplitude and asymmetry between rheotaxis-turning sperm and those sperm swimming freely in the absence of fluid flow. Additionally, fluorescence image tracking shows no Ca2+ influx during sperm rheotaxis turning, further suggesting there is no active signal transduction during human sperm rheotaxis.

  15. k Spectrum of Passive Scalars in Lagrangian Chaotic Fluid Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonsen, Thomas M., Jr.; Fan, Zhencan Frank; Ott, Edward

    1995-08-01

    An eikonal-type description for the evolution of k spectra of passive scalars convected in a Lagrangian chaotic fluid flow is shown to accurately reproduce results from orders of magnitude more time consuming computations based on the full passive scalar partial differential equation. Furthermore, the validity of the reduced description, combined with concepts from chaotic dynamics, allows new theoretical results on passive scalar k spectra to be obtained. Illustrative applications are presented to long-time passive scalar decay, and to Batchelor's law k spectrum and its diffusive cutoff.

  16. Demonstration of Passive Fuel Cell Thermal Management Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian; Colozza, Anthony; Wynne, Robert; Miller, Michael; Meyer, Al; Smith, William

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced passive thermal management technology to reduce the mass and improve the reliability of space fuel cell systems for the NASA Exploration program. The passive thermal management system relies on heat conduction within highly thermally conductive cooling plates to move the heat from the central portion of the cell stack out to the edges of the fuel cell stack. Using the passive approach eliminates the need for a coolant pump and other cooling loop components within the fuel cell system which reduces mass and improves overall system reliability. Previous development demonstrated the performance of suitable highly thermally conductive cooling plates and integrated heat exchanger technology to collect the heat from the cooling plates (Ref. 1). The next step in the development of this passive thermal approach was the demonstration of the control of the heat removal process and the demonstration of the passive thermal control technology in actual fuel cell stacks. Tests were run with a simulated fuel cell stack passive thermal management system outfitted with passive cooling plates, an integrated heat exchanger and two types of cooling flow control valves. The tests were run to demonstrate the controllability of the passive thermal control approach. Finally, successful demonstrations of passive thermal control technology were conducted with fuel cell stacks from two fuel cell stack vendors.

  17. An investigation of a passively controlled haptic interface

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.T.; Book, W.J.

    1997-03-01

    Haptic interfaces enhance cooperation between humans and robotic manipulators by providing force and tactile feedback to the human user during the execution of arbitrary tasks. The use of active actuators in haptic displays presents a certain amount of risk since they are capable of providing unacceptable levels of energy to the systems upon which they operate. An alternative to providing numerous safeguards is to remove the sources of risk altogether. This research investigates the feasibility of trajectory control using passive devices, that is, devices that cannot add energy to the system. Passive actuators are capable only of removing energy from the system or transferring energy within the system. It is proposed that the utility of passive devices is greatly enhanced by the use of redundant actuators. In a passive system, once motion is provided to the system, presumably by a human user, passive devices may be able to modify this motion to achieve a desired resultant trajectory. A mechanically passive, 2-Degree-of-Freedom (D.O.F.) manipulator has been designed and built. It is equipped with four passive actuators: two electromagnetic brakes and two electromagnetic clutches. This paper gives a review of the literature on passive and robotics and describes the experimental test bed used in this research. Several control algorithms are investigated, resulting in the formulation of a passive control law.

  18. Ionic transport in passivation layered on the lithium electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimon, Eugeny S.; Churikov, Alexei V.; Shirokov, Alexander V.; Lvov, Arlen L.; Chuvashkin, Anatoly N.

    1993-04-01

    The processes of ionic transport in passivating layers on the surface of the lithium electrode in solutions based on thionyl chloride, propylene carbonate and gamma -butyrolactone have been studied by means of pulse electrochemical methods. The data obtained are quantitatively described by a model which takes into account transport of both the intrinsic mobile lithium ions of the passivating layer and lithium ions injected into the passivating layer from the electrode or from the electrolyte solution under anodic or cathodic current directions, respectively. The values of mobility and concentration of mobile lithium ions in passivating layers formed on lithium in various solutions under open-circuit conditions have been determined.

  19. Atomic Scale Understanding of Poly-Si/SiO2/c-Si Passivated Contacts: Passivation Degradation Due to Metallization

    SciTech Connect

    Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Young, David; Lee, Benjamin; Nemeth, William; Harvey, Steve; Aoki, Toshihiro; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Stradins, Paul

    2016-11-21

    The key attributes for achieving high efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells include class leading developments in the ability to approach the theoretical limits of silicon solar technology (29.4% efficiency). The push for high efficiency devices is further compounded with the clear need for passivation to reduce recombination at the metal contacts. At the same time there is stringent requirement to retain the same material device quality, surface passivation, and performance characteristics following subsequent processing. The development of passivated silicon cell structures that retain active front and rear surface passivation and overall material cell quality is therefore a relevant and active area of development. To address the potential outcomes of metallization on passivated silicon stack, we report on some common microstructural features of degradation due to metallization for a series of silicon device stacks. A fundamental materials understanding of the metallization process on retaining high-efficiency passivated Si devices is therefore gained over these series of results.

  20. The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Entekhabi, Dara; Njoku, Eni; ONeill, Peggy; Kellogg, Kent; Entin, Jared

    2011-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first-tier projects recommended by the U.S. National Research Council Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space. The SMAP mission is in formulation phase and it is scheduled for launch in 2014. The SMAP mission is designed to produce high-resolution and accurate global mapping of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state using an instrument architecture that incorporates an L-band (1.26 GHz) radar and an L-band (1.41 GHz) radiometer. The simultaneous radar and radiometer measurements will be combined to derive global soil moisture mapping at 9 [km] resolution with a 2 to 3 days revisit and 0.04 [cm3 cm-3] (1 sigma) soil water content accuracy. The radar measurements also allow the binary detection of surface freeze/thaw state. The project science goals address in water, energy and carbon cycle science as well as provide improved capabilities in natural hazards applications.

  1. Global Wetland Monitoring with AMSR-E Passive Microwave Radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, R.; McDonald, K.; Podest, E.; Heimann, M.; Zimmermann, R.

    2006-12-01

    Methane is the most potent green house gas in Earth's atmosphere. Recent findings have raised wide concern as to whether living plants have a significant role in producing large amounts of methane. Although such findings may contradict the common understanding of many atmospheric scientists, laboratory studies have demonstrated that it is not clear how accurately natural methane production can be measured. Our study investigates the impact of natural wetlands on variations in methane out-gassing within a global modeling construct. At a first step, we utilize newly available passive microwave measurements from the AMSR-E radiometer to observe Earth's largest wetland regions and to monitor their seasonal behavior. A remote sensing technique is presented that exploits the temporal variability of daily AMSR-E brightness temperature observations to detect changes in water distribution that control inundation patterns for large wetlands in Siberia, North America, and the Amazon Basin susceptible to strong seasonal shifts in surface water retention or precipitation amounts. Initial results demonstrate that our method can be applied directly and without any tuning applied to the input remote sensing signal, though careful evaluation of our product with in-situ information remains to be carried out. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. Foundations for Improvements to Passive Detection Systems - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Labov, S E; Pleasance, L; Sokkappa, P; Craig, W; Chapline, G; Frank, M; Gronberg, J; Jernigan, J G; Johnson, S; Kammeraad, J; Lange, D; Meyer, A; Nelson, K; Pohl, B; Wright, D; Wurtz, R

    2004-10-07

    This project explores the scientific foundation and approach for improving passive detection systems for plutonium and highly enriched uranium in real applications. Sources of gamma-ray radiation of interest were chosen to represent a range of national security threats, naturally occurring radioactive materials, industrial and medical radiation sources, and natural background radiation. The gamma-ray flux emerging from these sources, which include unclassified criticality experiment configurations as surrogates for nuclear weapons, were modeled in detail. The performance of several types of gamma-ray imaging systems using Compton scattering were modeled and compared. A mechanism was created to model the combine sources and background emissions and have the simulated radiation ''scene'' impinge on a model of a detector. These modeling tools are now being used in various projects to optimize detector performance and model detector sensitivity in complex measuring environments. This study also developed several automated algorithms for isotope identification from gamma-ray spectra and compared these to each other and to algorithms already in use. Verification testing indicates that these alternative isotope identification algorithms produced less false positive and false negative results than the ''GADRAS'' algorithms currently in use. In addition to these algorithms that used binned spectra, a new approach to isotope identification using ''event mode'' analysis was developed. Finally, a technique using muons to detect nuclear material was explored.

  3. The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Entekhabi, Dara; Nijoku, Eni G.; ONeill, Peggy E.; Kellogg, Kent H.; Crow, Wade T.; Edelstein, Wendy N.; Entin, Jared K.; Goodman, Shawn D.; Jackson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Joel; Kimball, John; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Koster, Randal D.; McDonald, Kyle C.; Moghaddam, Mahta; Moran, Susan; Reichle, Rolf; Shi, J. C.; Spencer, Michael W.; Thurman, Samuel W.; Tsang, Leung; VanZyl, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council s Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of the moisture present at Earth's land surface and will distinguish frozen from thawed land surfaces. Direct observations of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state from space will allow significantly improved estimates of water, energy and carbon transfers between land and atmosphere. Soil moisture measurements are also of great importance in assessing flooding and monitoring drought. SMAP observations can help mitigate these natural hazards, resulting in potentially great economic and social benefits. SMAP soil moisture and freeze/thaw timing observations will also reduce a major uncertainty in quantifying the global carbon balance by helping to resolve an apparent missing carbon sink on land over the boreal latitudes. The SMAP mission concept would utilize an L-band radar and radiometer. These instruments will share a rotating 6-meter mesh reflector antenna to provide high-resolution and high-accuracy global maps of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state every two to three days. The SMAP instruments provide direct measurements of surface conditions. In addition, the SMAP project will use these observations with advanced modeling and data assimilation to provide deeper root-zone soil moisture and estimates of land surface-atmosphere exchanges of water, energy and carbon. SMAP is scheduled for a 2014 launch date

  4. Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results

    SciTech Connect

    Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

    2011-08-08

    The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan

  5. SNL evaluation of Gigabit Passive Optical Networks (GPON).

    SciTech Connect

    Heckart, David G.; Roybal, Glen B.; Walker, Betty R.; Pratt, Thomas Joseph; Gossage, Steven Allen; Trujillo, Sandra M.; Fischer, Bob; Brenkosh, Joseph Peter; Rudolfo, Gerald F.; Dirks, David H.; Schutt, James Alan

    2009-08-01

    Gigabit Passive Optical Networks (GPON) is a networking technology which offers the potential to provide significant cost savings to Sandia National Laboratories in the area of network operations. However, a large scale GPON deployment requires a significant investment in equipment and infrastructure. Before a large scale GPON system was acquired and built, a small GPON system manufactured by Motorola was acquired and tested. The testing performed was to determine the suitability of GPON for use at SNL. This report documents that testing. This report presents test results of GPON system consisting of Motorola and Juniper equipment. The GPON system was tested in areas of data throughput, video conferencing, VOIP, security, and operations and management. The GPON system performed well in almost all areas. GPON will not meet the needs of the low percentage of users requiring a true 1-10 Gbps network connection. GPON will also most likely not meet the need of some servers requiring dedicated throughput of 1-10 Gbps. Because of that, there will be some legacy network connections that must remain. If these legacy network connections can not be reduced to a bare minimum and possibly consolidated to a few locations, any cost savings gained by switching to GPON will be negated by maintaining two networks. A contract has been recently awarded for new GPON equipment with larger buffers. This equipment should improve performance and further reduce the need for legacy network connections. Because GPON has fewer components than a typical hierarchical network, it should be easier to manage. For the system tested, the management was performed by using the AXSVison client. Access to the client must be tightly controlled, because if client/server communications are compromised, security will be an issue. As with any network, the reliability of individual components will determine overall system reliability. There were no failures with the routers, OLT, or Sun Workstation Management

  6. All fiber passively Q-switched laser

    DOEpatents

    Soh, Daniel B. S.; Bisson, Scott E

    2015-05-12

    Embodiments relate to an all fiber passively Q-switched laser. The laser includes a large core doped gain fiber having a first end. The large core doped gain fiber has a first core diameter. The laser includes a doped single mode fiber (saturable absorber) having a second core diameter that is smaller than the first core diameter. The laser includes a mode transformer positioned between a second end of the large core doped gain fiber and a first end of the single mode fiber. The mode transformer has a core diameter that transitions from the first core diameter to the second core diameter and filters out light modes not supported by the doped single mode fiber. The laser includes a laser cavity formed between a first reflector positioned adjacent the large core doped gain fiber and a second reflector positioned adjacent the doped single mode fiber.

  7. Passive scalar mixing in vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sau, Rajes; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2006-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of passive scalar mixing in vortex rings are performed, with and without crossflow. The simulation results without crossflow agree well with experimental data for `formation number', total circulation, trajectory and entrainment fraction. Scalar profiles, mixedness and volume of scalar carrying fluid are used to quantify mixing, whose characteristics are quite different in the formation and propagation phases of the ring. These results are explained in terms of entrainment by the ring. The simulations with crossflow show that the ring tilts and deforms. When the stroke ratio is greater than formation number, the ring tilts in the direction of the crossflow. On the other hand, when the stroke ratio is less than formation number, the ring tilts in the opposite direction, such that its induced velocity opposes the crossflow. The Magnus effect may be used to provide a simple explanation. The impact of this behavior on mixing will be discussed.

  8. General Corrosion and Passive Film Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, S; Roberts, S; Evans, K; Wolery, T; Carroll, S

    2005-11-29

    We have studied Alloy 22 corrosion and passive film stability in nitrogen-purged Na-K-Cl-NO{sub 3} brines having NO{sub 3}:Cl ratios of 7.4 at 160 C and NO{sub 3}:Cl ratios of 0.5 and 7.4 at 220 C in autoclave experiments under a slight pressure. The experiments were done to show the effect of high nitrate brines on the durability of the Alloy 22 outer barrier of the waste canisters. Ratios of NO{sub 3}:Cl used in this study were lower than expected ratios for the repository environment at these temperatures and atmospheric pressures (NO{sub 3}:Cl > 25), however they were thought to be high enough to inhibit localized corrosion. Localized corrosion occurred on the liquid-immersed and vapor-exposed creviced specimens under all conditions studied. Crevice penetration depths were difficult to quantify due to the effects of deformation and surface deposits. Further characterization is needed to evaluate the extent of localized corrosion. The bulk of the surface precipitates were derived from the partial dissolution of ceramic crevice formers used in the study. At this time we do not know if the observed localized corrosion reflects the corrosiveness of Na-K-Cl-NO{sub 3} solutions at elevated temperature over nine months or if it was an artifact of the experimental protocol. Nor do we know if much more concentrated brines with higher NO{sub 3}:Cl ratios formed by dust deliquescence will initiate localized corrosion on Alloy 22 at 160 and 220 C. Our results are consistent with the conclusion that nitrate concentrations greater than 18.5 molal may be required to offset localized corrosion of Alloy 22 at 160 and 220 C. Stability of the passive film and general corrosion were evaluated on the liquid-immersed and vapor-exposed non-creviced specimens. Elemental depth profiles of the vapor-exposed specimens are consistent with the development of a protective Cr-rich oxide near the base metal. The combined passive film and alloy oxide of the immersed specimens was much thicker

  9. Passive millimeter-wave concealed weapon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Gordon N.; Anderton, Rupert N.; Appleby, Roger

    2001-02-01

    A method of detecting weapons concealed under clothing using passive millimeter wave imaging is described. The optical properties of clothing are discussed and examples given of the spectral reflectivity and transmission. The transmission tends to be constant from 60 to 150 GHz above which it decreases for some clothing materials. The transmission of a cotton T-shirt is typically 95% and of a leather jacket up to 85% at lower frequencies. A model is presented for calculating the contrast of a metallic concealed weapon when hidden under clothing and it indicates contrasts as large as 200 K can be realized outdoors. The advantages of real time over static frame imagery are discussed. It is concluded that real time imagery offers considerable advantages as weapons can be very varied in size, position and orientation and movement offers vital clues to the human observer which aid the recognition process.

  10. The measurement accuracy of passive radon instruments.

    PubMed

    Beck, T R; Foerster, E; Buchröder, H; Schmidt, V; Döring, J

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the data having been gathered from interlaboratory comparisons of passive radon instruments over 10 y with respect to the measurement accuracy. The measurement accuracy is discussed in terms of the systematic and the random measurement error. The analysis shows that the systematic measurement error of the most instruments issued by professional laboratory services can be within a range of ±10 % from the true value. A single radon measurement has an additional random measurement error, which is in the range of up to ±15 % for high exposures to radon (>2000 kBq h m(-3)). The random measurement error increases for lower exposures. The analysis especially applies to instruments with solid-state nuclear track detectors and results in proposing criteria for testing the measurement accuracy. Instruments with electrets and charcoal have also been considered, but the low stock of data enables only a qualitative discussion.

  11. Reciprocity, passivity and causality in Willis materials.

    PubMed

    Muhlestein, Michael B; Sieck, Caleb F; Alù, Andrea; Haberman, Michael R

    2016-10-01

    Materials that require coupling between the stress-strain and momentum-velocity constitutive relations were first proposed by Willis (Willis 1981 Wave Motion3, 1-11. (doi:10.1016/0165-2125(81)90008-1)) and are now known as elastic materials of the Willis type, or simply Willis materials. As coupling between these two constitutive equations is a generalization of standard elastodynamic theory, restrictions on the physically admissible material properties for Willis materials should be similarly generalized. This paper derives restrictions imposed on the material properties of Willis materials when they are assumed to be reciprocal, passive and causal. Considerations of causality and low-order dispersion suggest an alternative formulation of the standard Willis equations. The alternative formulation provides improved insight into the subwavelength physical behaviour leading to Willis material properties and is amenable to time-domain analyses. Finally, the results initially obtained for a generally elastic material are specialized to the acoustic limit.

  12. Passive chip-based droplet sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham P; Hatch, Andrew C; Fisher, Jeffrey S

    2015-11-05

    An apparatus for passive sorting of microdroplets including a main flow channel, a flow stream of microdroplets in the main flow channel wherein the microdroplets have substantially the same diameter and wherein the flow stream of microdroplets includes first microdroplets having a first degree of stiffness and second microdroplets having a second degree of stiffness wherein the second degree of stiffness is different than the first degree of stiffness. A second flow channel is connected to the main flow channel for the second microdroplets having a second degree of stiffness. A separator separates the second microdroplets having a second degree of stiffness from the first microdroplets and directs the second microdroplets having a second degree of stiffness into the second flow channel.

  13. Passive chip-based droplet sorting

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham P; Hatch, Andrew C; Fisher, Jeffrey S

    2015-03-03

    An apparatus for passive sorting of microdroplets including a main flow channel, a flow stream of microdroplets in the main flow channel wherein the microdroplets have substantially the same diameter and wherein the flow stream of microdroplets includes first microdroplets having a first degree of stiffness and second microdroplets having a second degree of stiffness wherein the second degree of stiffness is different than the first degree of stiffness. A second flow channel is connected to the main flow channel for the second microdroplets having a second degree of stiffness. A separator separates the second microdroplets having a second degree of stiffness from the first microdroplets and directs the second microdroplets having a second degree of stiffness into the second flow channel.

  14. Passive separation control by acoustic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. L.; Spedding, G. R.

    2013-10-01

    At transitional Reynolds numbers, the laminar boundary layer separation and possible reattachment on a smooth airfoil, or wing section, are notoriously sensitive to small variations in geometry or in the fluid environment. We report here on the results of a pilot study that adds to this list of sensitivities. The presence of small holes in the suction surface of an Eppler 387 wing has a transformative effect upon the aerodynamics, by changing the mean chordwise separation line location. These changes are not simply a consequence of the presence of the small cavities, which by themselves have no effect. Acoustic resonance in the backing cavities generates tones that interact with intrinsic flow instabilities. Possible consequences for passive flow control strategies are discussed together with potential problems in measurements through pressure taps in such flow regimes.

  15. Passive UHF RFID Tag for Multispectral Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Escobedo, Pablo; Carvajal, Miguel A.; Capitán-Vallvey, Luis F.; Fernández-Salmerón, José; Martínez-Olmos, Antonio; Palma, Alberto J.

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a passive printed radiofrequency identification tag in the ultra-high-frequency band with multiple optical sensing capabilities. This tag includes five photodiodes to cover a wide spectral range from near-infrared to visible and ultraviolet spectral regions. The tag antenna and circuit connections have been screen-printed on a flexible polymeric substrate. An ultra-low-power microcontroller-based switch has been included to measure the five magnitudes issuing from the optical sensors, providing a spectral fingerprint of the incident electromagnetic radiation from ultraviolet to infrared, without requiring energy from a battery. The normalization procedure has been designed applying illuminants, and the entire system was tested by measuring cards from a colour chart and sensing fruit ripening. PMID:27428973

  16. Passive microwave algorithm development and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petty, Grant W.

    1995-01-01

    The scientific objectives of this grant are: (1) thoroughly evaluate, both theoretically and empirically, all available Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) retrieval algorithms for column water vapor, column liquid water, and surface wind speed; (2) where both appropriate and feasible, develop, validate, and document satellite passive microwave retrieval algorithms that offer significantly improved performance compared with currently available algorithms; and (3) refine and validate a novel physical inversion scheme for retrieving rain rate over the ocean. This report summarizes work accomplished or in progress during the first year of a three year grant. The emphasis during the first year has been on the validation and refinement of the rain rate algorithm published by Petty and on the analysis of independent data sets that can be used to help evaluate the performance of rain rate algorithms over remote areas of the ocean. Two articles in the area of global oceanic precipitation are attached.

  17. The LaBarge Passive Seismic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, G. M.; Schmedes, J.; Saltzer, R. L.; Roth, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate large-scale seismic velocity models provide critical support for subsurface imaging, particularly for migration and inversion. However, conventional seismic sources typically do not provide significant information below 5-10Hz. Further, alternative methods to obtain a reference velocity model such as normal move-out analysis may be ambiguous or misleading in complicated tectonic settings like fold-and-thrust belts. To address these challenges, we investigated the potential of using naturally occurring earthquakes to obtain a seismic velocity model for shallow sediment structure (above 5 km). Passive seismic data were continuously recorded at 55 stations in LaBarge, Wy for six months in early 2009. We employed two widely used techniques, relative travel-time tomography and teleseismic receiver functions, more commonly used to image deep crustal and mantle structure. The resulting structural image and velocity model compares favorably with local well control, suggesting seismic models obtained by this method would provide viable support for imaging and inversions.

  18. Reciprocity, passivity and causality in Willis materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhlestein, Michael B.; Sieck, Caleb F.; Alù, Andrea; Haberman, Michael R.

    2016-10-01

    Materials that require coupling between the stress-strain and momentum-velocity constitutive relations were first proposed by Willis (Willis 1981 Wave Motion 3, 1-11. (doi:10.1016/0165-2125(81)90008-1)) and are now known as elastic materials of the Willis type, or simply Willis materials. As coupling between these two constitutive equations is a generalization of standard elastodynamic theory, restrictions on the physically admissible material properties for Willis materials should be similarly generalized. This paper derives restrictions imposed on the material properties of Willis materials when they are assumed to be reciprocal, passive and causal. Considerations of causality and low-order dispersion suggest an alternative formulation of the standard Willis equations. The alternative formulation provides improved insight into the subwavelength physical behaviour leading to Willis material properties and is amenable to time-domain analyses. Finally, the results initially obtained for a generally elastic material are specialized to the acoustic limit.

  19. Contrast optimization in broadband passive polarimetric imaging.

    PubMed

    Boffety, Matthieu; Hu, Haofeng; Goudail, François

    2014-12-01

    Polarimetric imaging is often performed using light with a narrow spectrum for the sake of polarization measurement accuracy. However, due to the use of narrowband filters, this reduces the amount of light entering the system and thus the signal-to-noise ratio. This may not be the best choice for target detection applications, where a high target contrast is required rather than polarimetric accuracy. We address contrast optimization for broadband passive polarimetric imaging. We show through simulation and experiments that polarimetric contrast can be significantly increased by broadening the spectrum of analyzed light. In addition, we show that the contrast can be optimized by taking into account the spectral dependence of the scene and of the polarization analysis devices.

  20. Piezoelectric radiofrequency transducers as passive buried sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rétornaz, T.; Friedt, J.-M.; Alzuaga, S.; Baron, T.; Lebrasseur, É.; Martin, G.; Laroche, T.; Ballandras, S.; Griselin, M.; Simonnet, J.-P.

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate that single-piezoelectric substrate-based acoustic transducers act as ideal sensors for probing with various RADAR strategies. Because these sensors are intrinsically passive devices working in the radiofrequency range, they exhibit improved interrogation range and robustness with respect to silicon-based radio frequency identification tags. Both wideband (acoustic delay lines) and narrowband (acoustic resonators) transducers are shown to be compatible with pulse-mode and frequency-modulated continuous-wave RADAR strategies, respectively. We particularly focus on the ground-penetrating RADAR (GPR) application in which the lack of local energy source makes these sensors suitable candidates for buried applications in roads, building or civil engineering monitoring. A novel acoustic sensor concept - high-overtone bulk acoustic resonator - is especially suited as sensor interrogated by a wide range of antenna set, as demonstrated with GPR units working in the 100 and 200 MHz range.

  1. Optical effects module and passive sample array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    The Optical Effects Module (OEM) has the objective to monitor the effects of the deposition and adhesion of both molecular species and particles on optical surfaces in the Shuttle cargo bay environment. The OEM performs inflight measurements of the ultraviolet (253.7 nm) transmittance and diffuse reflectance of five optical samples at regular intervals throughout the orbital mission. Most of the obtained results indicates or implies the absence of a significant accumulation of contamination other than particulates on the samples. The contaminant species (or particulates) adhering to the samples of the Passive Sample Array (PSA) were identified by means of Auger and X-ray energy dispersive analyses. The elements silicon, chlorine, and phosphorus were discovered.

  2. New passive solar cooking system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schlussler, L.

    1981-11-01

    The development of a solar cooking system which uses a phase change process to passively transfer heat from a collector to a cooker is presented. In the design of this cooking system steam is produced in the collector and then is used as the heat transfer fluid in the cooker. The most efficient use of the system is to heat food directly by condensing the steam onto the food, whereas a heat exchanger is necessary to heat an oven or a frying pan. A pressure cooker was successfully built and tested using the steam from the collector. Brief discussions on the collector design and performance, and heat storage phase change materials are provided. (BCS)

  3. Human Aorta Is a Passive Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlevan, Niema; Gharib, Morteza

    2012-11-01

    Impedance pump is a simple valveless pumping mechanism that operates based on the principles of wave propagation and reflection. It has been shown in a zebrafish that a similar mechanism is responsible for the pumping action in the embryonic heart during early stages before valve formation. Recent studies suggest that the cardiovascular system is designed to take advantage of wave propagation and reflection phenomena in the arterial network. Our aim in this study was to examine if the human aorta is a passive pump working like an impedance pump. A hydraulic model with different compliant models of artificial aorta was used for series of in-vitro experiments. The hydraulic model includes a piston pump that generates the waves. Our result indicates that wave propagation and reflection can create pumping mechanism in a compliant aorta. Similar to an impedance pump, the net flow and the flow direction depends on the frequency of the waves, compliance of the aorta, and the piston stroke.

  4. Passive immunization of pigeons against trichomoniasis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.M.

    1970-01-01

    Nonimmune homing pigeons Columba livia were infected with the Jones' Barn strain of Trichomonas gallinae and subsequently transfused with plasma from acute or chronically infected pigeons harboring one of 3 different strains of T. gallinae. The transfusions were either a single 2 mi dose given one day after inoculation or three 1 ml doses given 0, 5, and 10 days after inoculation. Plasma from pigeons harboring any of the 3 strains was capable of passively immunizing nonimmune birds. All birds which were immunized with plasma from infected pigeons survived until killed at the end of the test period and no visceral lesions were found on necropsy but trichomonads were present in the oropharynx. All controls (untreated or transfused with normal plasma) died of visceral trichomoniasis. Immune plasma produced some lysis of trichomonads in vitro, and inhibition of motility and vacuolization occurred in some of the non-lysed organisms. The overall lytic activity in vitro affected less than 10% of the suspended trichomonads.

  5. Passive Imaging in Nondiffuse Acoustic Wavefields

    SciTech Connect

    Mulargia, Francesco; Castellaro, Silvia

    2008-05-30

    A main property of diffuse acoustic wavefields is that, taken any two points, each of them can be seen as the source of waves and the other as the recording station. This property is shown to follow simply from array azimuthal selectivity and Huygens principle in a locally isotropic wavefield. Without time reversal, this property holds approximately also in anisotropic azimuthally uniform wavefields, implying much looser constraints for undistorted passive imaging than those required by a diffuse field. A notable example is the seismic noise field, which is generally nondiffuse, but is found to be compatible with a finite aperture anisotropic uniform wavefield. The theoretical predictions were confirmed by an experiment on seismic noise in the mainland of Venice, Italy.

  6. Focused fluid flow in passive continental margins.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Christian

    2005-12-15

    Passive continental margins such as the Atlantic seaboard of Europe are important for society as they contain large energy resources, and they sustain ecosystems that are the basis for the commercial fish stock. The margin sediments are very dynamic environments. Fluids are expelled from compacting sediments, bottom water temperature changes cause gas hydrate systems to change their locations and occasionally large magmatic intrusions boil the pore water within the sedimentary basins, which is then expelled to the surface. The fluids that seep through the seabed at the tops of focused fluid flow systems have a crucial role for seabed ecology, and study of such fluid flow systems can also help in predicting the distribution of hydrocarbons in the subsurface and deciphering the climate record. Therefore, the study of focused fluid flow will become one of the most important fields in marine geology in the future.

  7. Passive UHF RFID Tag for Multispectral Assessment.

    PubMed

    Escobedo, Pablo; Carvajal, Miguel A; Capitán-Vallvey, Luis F; Fernández-Salmerón, José; Martínez-Olmos, Antonio; Palma, Alberto J

    2016-07-14

    This work presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a passive printed radiofrequency identification tag in the ultra-high-frequency band with multiple optical sensing capabilities. This tag includes five photodiodes to cover a wide spectral range from near-infrared to visible and ultraviolet spectral regions. The tag antenna and circuit connections have been screen-printed on a flexible polymeric substrate. An ultra-low-power microcontroller-based switch has been included to measure the five magnitudes issuing from the optical sensors, providing a spectral fingerprint of the incident electromagnetic radiation from ultraviolet to infrared, without requiring energy from a battery. The normalization procedure has been designed applying illuminants, and the entire system was tested by measuring cards from a colour chart and sensing fruit ripening.

  8. Passive magnetic bearing for a horizontal shaft

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2003-12-02

    A passive magnetic bearing is composed of a levitation element and a restorative element. The levitation element is composed of a pair of stationary arcuate ferromagnetic segments located within an annular radial-field magnet array. The magnet array is attached to the inner circumference of a hollow shaft end. An attractive force between the arcuate segments and the magnet array acts vertically to levitate the shaft, and also in a horizontal transverse direction to center the shaft. The restorative element is comprised of an annular Halbach array of magnets and a stationary annular circuit array located within the Halbach array. The Halbach array is attached to the inner circumference of the hollow shaft end. A repulsive force between the Halbach array and the circuit array increases inversely to the radial space between them, and thus acts to restore the shaft to its equilibrium axis of rotation when it is displaced therefrom.

  9. Passive runaway electron suppression in tokamak disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H. M.; Helander, P.

    2013-07-15

    Runaway electrons created in disruptions pose a serious problem for tokamaks with large current. It would be desirable to have a runaway electron suppression method which is passive, i.e., a method that does not rely on an uncertain disruption prediction system. One option is to let the large electric field inherent in the disruption drive helical currents in the wall. This would create ergodic regions in the plasma and increase the runaway losses. Whether these regions appear at a suitable time and place to affect the formation of the runaway beam depends on disruption parameters, such as electron temperature and density. We find that it is difficult to ergodize the central plasma before a beam of runaway current has formed. However, the ergodic outer region will make the Ohmic current profile contract, which can lead to instabilities that yield large runaway electron losses.

  10. Earthquakes at North Atlantic passive margins

    SciTech Connect

    Gregersen, S. ); Basham, P.W. )

    1989-01-01

    The main focus of this volume is the earthquakes that occur at and near the continental margins on both sides of the North Atlantic. The book, which contains the proceedings of the NATO workshop on Causes and Effects of Earthquakes at Passive Margins and in Areas of Postglacial Rebound on Both Sides of the North Atlantic, draws together the fields of geophysics, geology and geodesy to address the stress and strain in the Earth's crust. The resulting earthquakes produced on ancient geological fault zones and the associated seismic hazards these pose to man are also addressed. Postglacial rebound in North America and Fennoscandia is a minor source of earthquakes today, during the interglacial period, but evidence is presented to suggest that the ice sheets suppressed earthquake strain while they were in place, and released this strain as a pulse of significant earthquakes after the ice melted about 9000 years ago.

  11. Passive Earth Entry Vehicle Landing Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris

    2017-01-01

    Two full-scale passive Earth Entry Vehicles (EEV) with realistic structure, surrogate sample container, and surrogate Thermal Protection System (TPS) were built at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and tested at the Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR). The main test objective was to demonstrate structural integrity and investigate possible impact response deviations of the realistic vehicle as compared to rigid penetrometer responses. With the exception of the surrogate TPS and minor structural differences in the back shell construction, the two test vehicles were identical in geometry and both utilized the Integrated Composite Stiffener Structure (ICoSS) structural concept in the forward shell. The ICoSS concept is a lightweight and highly adaptable composite concept developed at NASA LaRC specifically for entry vehicle TPS carrier structures. The instrumented test vehicles were released from a helicopter approximately 400 m above ground. The drop height was selected such that at least 98% of the vehicles terminal velocity would be achieved. While drop tests of spherical penetrometers and a low fidelity aerodynamic EEV model were conducted at UTTR in 1998 and 2000, this was the first time a passive EEV with flight-like structure, surrogate TPS, and sample container was tested at UTTR for the purpose of complete structural system validation. Test results showed that at a landing vertical speed of approximately 30 m/s, the test vehicle maintained structural integrity and enough rigidity to penetrate the sandy clay surface thus attenuating the landing load, as measured at the vehicle CG, to less than 600 g. This measured deceleration was found to be in family with rigid penetrometer test data from the 1998 and 2000 test campaigns. Design implications of vehicle structure/soil interaction with respect to sample container and sample survivability are briefly discussed.

  12. Synchronized passive imaging of single cavitation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gateau, Jérôme; Aubry, Jean-François; Pernot, Mathieu; Chauvet, Daurian; Boch, Anne-Laure; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickaël

    2011-09-01

    Passive cavitation detection techniques are usually of relatively low sensitivity to single cavitation events. Moreover, a single-element transducer is generally used, so that the spatial localization of these cavitation events is not possible, or is limited to the probing volume. To both detect and localize single cavitation events over an extended volume, the following experimental set-up has been used and validated: cavitation is induced with a focused single-element transducer (mean frequency 660 kHz, f♯ = 1) driven by a high power (up to 5 kW) electric burst of a few cycles, and the acoustic emission of the bubbles is recorded on a standard linear array (4-7 MHz), mounted on the side of the single element to probe its focal spot. Both the frequencies and the geometry used are appropriate to in vivo implementation. The recording of ultrasonic radio-frequency (RF) data was performed simultaneously on 64 channels of the array and was synchronized with the pulsed excitation. A single cavitation event results in a high frequency and coherent wave front on the RF data. Thanks to synchronization, these RF data are beam-formed to localize the event with a axial resolution of 0.3 mm. A small number of discrete events could also be separated with this method. Besides, B-mode images obtained with the linear array prior to passive detection allowed the positioning of the events within the tissue structure. This technique has been used first ex vivo on freshly harve pig and sheep thigh muscle: with a two cycle excitation, a 9 MPa cavitation threshold was found. Cavitation detection was also achieved in vivo with a five cycle burst excitation in sheep thigh muscle for a peak acoustic pressure of 11MPa. This technique could provide useful information in order to better understand, control and monitor the initiation phase of the histotripsy process.

  13. Simplified preliminary economic analysis for passive solar heating. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Baldetti, P.J.; Lockard, M.A.

    1983-09-01

    This report establishes economic feasibility criteria for considering the use of passive solar design. In light of the growing cost of supplying the energy demands of the Air Force, a method is needed to simplify the adaptation of passive solar heating and cooling in future building construction.

  14. Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Gorski, A.J.; Schertz, W.W.

    1980-09-29

    A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

  15. 77 FR 19531 - 7(a) Loan Program; Eligible Passive Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Part 120 RIN 3245-AG48 7(a) Loan Program; Eligible Passive Companies AGENCY: U.S. Small... received, SBA will publish a timely withdrawal of the rule in the Federal Register. ADDRESSES: You may... Operating Company to be a guarantor or a co-borrower (with the Eligible Passive Company) on the loan. In a...

  16. 48 CFR 211.275 - Passive radio frequency identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Passive radio frequency identification. 211.275 Section 211.275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Requirements Documents 211.275 Passive radio frequency identification....

  17. 48 CFR 211.275 - Passive radio frequency identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Passive radio frequency identification. 211.275 Section 211.275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Requirements Documents 211.275 Passive radio frequency identification....

  18. 48 CFR 211.275 - Passive radio frequency identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Passive radio frequency identification. 211.275 Section 211.275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Requirements Documents 211.275 Passive radio frequency identification....

  19. 48 CFR 211.275 - Passive radio frequency identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Passive radio frequency identification. 211.275 Section 211.275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Requirements Documents 211.275 Passive radio frequency identification....

  20. Passive Impact Damage Detection of Fiber Glass Composite Panels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-19

    PASSIVE IMPACT DAMAGE DETECTION OF FIBER GLASS COMPOSITE PANELS. By BRUNO ZAMORANO-SENDEROS A dissertation...COVERED 04-11-2012 to 10-12-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE PASSIVE IMPACT DAMAGE DETECTION OF FIBER GLASS COMPOSITE PANELS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...process. .................................... 31 Figure 3-8 Sensor attached to the fiber glass fabric