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Sample records for 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase 15-pgdh

  1. Experimental cancer therapy using restoration of NAD+ -linked 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase expression.

    PubMed

    Kaliberova, Lyudmila N; Kusmartsev, Sergei A; Krendelchtchikova, Valentina; Stockard, Cecil R; Grizzle, William E; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Kaliberov, Sergey A

    2009-11-01

    Preclinical and clinical evidence shows that cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2)-mediated prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) overexpression plays an important role in tumor growth, metastasis, and immunosuppression. It has been shown that expression of NAD(+)-linked 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), a key enzyme responsible for PGE(2) inactivation, is suppressed in the majority of cancers, including breast and colon carcinoma. We have developed adenoviral vectors (Ad) encoding the 15-PGDH gene under control of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1/flt-1; Adflt-PGDH) and the Cox-2 (Adcox-PGDH) promoters. The purpose of this study was to investigate cytotoxicity in vitro and therapeutic efficacy in vivo of 15-PGDH-mediated cancer therapy. The levels of PGE(2) and VEGF expression were correlated with PGE(2) receptor and Cox-2 and flt-1 expression in cancer cells. The in vitro study showed that Ad-mediated 15-PGDH expression significantly decreased proliferation and migration of cancer cells. Animal breast and colon tumor therapy studies showed that 15-PGDH gene therapy produced a significant delay in 2LMP and LS174T tumor growth. Combined therapy using 15-PGDH and anti-VEGF antibody (bevacizumab) significantly increased inhibition of growth of LS174T tumor xenografts in comparison with agents alone. These results suggest that 15-PGDH-mediated regulation of PGE(2) catabolism in the tumor microenvironment represents a novel approach for therapy of human breast and colon cancer.

  2. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase Generation of Electrophilic Lipid Signaling Mediators from Hydroxy Ω-3 Fatty Acids*

    PubMed Central

    Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Wenzel, Sally; Sobol, Robert W.; Holguin, Fernando; Freeman, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15PGDH) is the primary enzyme catalyzing the conversion of hydroxylated arachidonic acid species to their corresponding oxidized metabolites. The oxidation of hydroxylated fatty acids, such as the conversion of prostaglandin (PG) E2 to 15-ketoPGE2, by 15PGDH is viewed to inactivate signaling responses. In contrast, the typically electrophilic products can also induce anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative responses. This study determined that hydroxylated docosahexaenoic acid metabolites (HDoHEs) are substrates for 15PGDH. Examination of 15PGDH substrate specificity was conducted in cell culture (A549 and primary human airway epithelia and alveolar macrophages) using chemical inhibition and shRNA knockdown of 15PGDH. Substrate specificity is broad and relies on the carbon position of the acyl chain hydroxyl group. 14-HDoHE was determined to be the optimal DHA substrate for 15PGDH, resulting in the formation of its electrophilic metabolite, 14-oxoDHA. Consistent with this, 14-HDoHE was detected in bronchoalveolar lavage cells of mild to moderate asthmatics, and the exogenous addition of 14-oxoDHA to primary alveolar macrophages inhibited LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression. These data reveal that 15PGDH-derived DHA metabolites are biologically active and can contribute to the salutary signaling actions of Ω-3 fatty acids. PMID:25586183

  3. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase, a COX-2 oncogene antagonist, is a TGF-β-induced suppressor of human gastrointestinal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Min; Rerko, Ronald M.; Platzer, Petra; Dawson, Dawn; Willis, Joseph; Tong, Min; Lawrence, Earl; Lutterbaugh, James; Lu, Shilong; Willson, James K. V.; Luo, Guangbin; Hensold, Jack; Tai, Hsin-Hsiung; Wilson, Keith; Markowitz, Sanford D.

    2004-01-01

    Marked increased expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), a prostaglandin-synthesizing enzyme that is pharmacologically inhibited by nonsteroid anti-inflammatory-type drugs, is a major early oncogenic event in the genesis of human colon neoplasia. We report that, in addition to inducing expression of COX-2, colon cancers further target the prostaglandin biogenesis pathway by ubiquitously abrogating expression of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), a prostaglandin-degrading enzyme that physiologically antagonizes COX-2. We find that 15-PGDH transcript and protein are both highly expressed by normal colonic epithelia but are nearly undetectable in colon cancers. Using gene transfection to restore 15-PGDH expression in colon cancer cells strongly inhibits the ability of these cells to form tumors in immune-deficient mice and demonstrates 15-PGDH to have functional colon cancer tumor suppressor activity. In interrogating the mechanism for 15-PGDH expression loss in colon cancer, we determined that colonic 15-PGDH expression is directly controlled and strongly induced by activation of the TGF-β tumor suppressor pathway. These findings thus delineate an enzymatic pathway that induces colon cancer suppression, a pathway that is activated by TGF-β and mediated by 15-PGDH. PMID:15574495

  4. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase as a marker in colon carcinogenesis: analysis of the prostaglandin pathway in human colonic tissue

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dong-Hoon; Ryu, Yeon-Mi; Lee, Sun-Mi; Jeong, Jin-Yong; Yoon, Soon Man; Ye, Byong Duk; Byeon, Jeong-Sik; Yang, Suk-Kyun

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGEs-1) regulate prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) expression and are involved in colon carcinogenesis. We investigated the expression of PGE2 and its regulating genes in sporadic human colon tumors and matched normal tissues. Methods Twenty colonic adenomas and 27 colonic adenocarcinomas were evaluated. COX-2 and 15-PGDH expression was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The expression of PGE2 and mPGEs-1 was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting, respectively. Results The expression of COX-2, mPGEs-1, and PGE2 did not differ between the adenomas and matched distant normal tissues. 15-PGDH expression was lower in adenomas than in the matched normal colonic tissues (P<0.001). In adenocarcinomas, mPGEs-1 and PGE2 expression was significantly higher (P<0.001 and P=0.020, respectively), and COX-2 expression did not differ from that in normal tissues (P=0.207). 15-PGDH expression was significantly lower in the normal colonic mucosa from adenocarcinoma patients than in the normal mucosa from adenoma patients (P=0.018). Conclusions Early inactivation of 15-PGDH, followed by activation of COX-2 and mPGEs-1, contributes to PGE2 production, leading to colon carcinogenesis. 15-PGDH might be a novel candidate marker for early detection of field defects in colon carcinogenesis. PMID:28239316

  5. 15-Oxoeicosatetraenoic acid is a 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase-derived electrophilic mediator of inflammatory signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Nathaniel W; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Gao, Yang; Blair, Ian A; Freeman, Bruce A; Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus

    2015-06-05

    Bioactive lipids govern cellular homeostasis and pathogenic inflammatory processes. Current dogma holds that bioactive lipids, such as prostaglandins and lipoxins, are inactivated by 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15PGDH). In contrast, the present results reveal that catabolic "inactivation" of hydroxylated polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) yields electrophilic α,β-unsaturated ketone derivatives. These endogenously produced species are chemically reactive signaling mediators that induce tissue protective events. Electrophilic fatty acids diversify the proteome through post-translational alkylation of nucleophilic cysteines in key transcriptional regulatory proteins and enzymes that govern cellular metabolic and inflammatory homeostasis. 15PGDH regulates these processes as it is responsible for the formation of numerous electrophilic fatty acids including the arachidonic acid metabolite, 15-oxoeicosatetraenoic acid (15-oxoETE). Herein, the role of 15-oxoETE in regulating signaling responses is reported. In cell cultures, 15-oxoETE activates Nrf2-regulated antioxidant responses (AR) and inhibits NF-κB-mediated pro-inflammatory responses via IKKβ inhibition. Inhibition of glutathione S-transferases using ethacrynic acid incrementally increased the signaling capacity of 15-oxoETE by decreasing 15-oxoETE-GSH adduct formation. This work demonstrates that 15PGDH plays a role in the regulation of cell and tissue homeostasis via the production of electrophilic fatty acid signaling mediators.

  6. High-Affinity Inhibitors of Human NAD+-Dependent 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase: Mechanisms of Inhibition and Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Niesen, Frank H.; Schultz, Lena; Jadhav, Ajit; Bhatia, Chitra; Guo, Kunde; Maloney, David J.; Pilka, Ewa S.; Wang, Minghua; Oppermann, Udo; Heightman, Tom D.; Simeonov, Anton

    2010-01-01

    Background 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH, EC 1.1.1.141) is the key enzyme for the inactivation of prostaglandins, regulating processes such as inflammation or proliferation. The anabolic pathways of prostaglandins, especially with respect to regulation of the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes have been studied in detail; however, little is known about downstream events including functional interaction of prostaglandin-processing and -metabolizing enzymes. High-affinity probes for 15-PGDH will, therefore, represent important tools for further studies. Principal Findings To identify novel high-affinity inhibitors of 15-PGDH we performed a quantitative high-throughput screen (qHTS) by testing >160 thousand compounds in a concentration-response format and identified compounds that act as noncompetitive inhibitors as well as a competitive inhibitor, with nanomolar affinity. Both types of inhibitors caused strong thermal stabilization of the enzyme, with cofactor dependencies correlating with their mechanism of action. We solved the structure of human 15-PGDH and explored the binding modes of the inhibitors to the enzyme in silico. We found binding modes that are consistent with the observed mechanisms of action. Conclusions Low cross-reactivity in screens of over 320 targets, including three other human dehydrogenases/reductases, suggest selectivity of the present inhibitors for 15-PGDH. The high potencies and different mechanisms of action of these chemotypes make them a useful set of complementary chemical probes for functional studies of prostaglandin-signaling pathways. Enhanced version This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the installation and use of the web plugin are available in Text S2. PMID:21072165

  7. Altered expression of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase in tumor-infiltrated CD11b myeloid cells: a mechanism for immune evasion in cancer.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Kaliberov, Sergei; Daurkin, Irina; Kaliberova, Lyudmila; Buchsbaum, Donald; Vieweg, Johannes; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2009-06-15

    Many cancers are known to produce high amounts of PGE(2), which is involved in both tumor progression and tumor-induced immune dysfunction. The key enzyme responsible for the biological inactivation of PGE(2) in tissue is NAD(+)-dependent 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH). It is well established that cancer cells frequently show down-regulated expression of 15-PGDH, which plays a major role in catabolism of the PGE(2). Here we demonstrate that tumor-infiltrated CD11b cells are also deficient for the 15-PGDH gene. Targeted adenovirus-mediated delivery of 15-PGDH gene resulted in substantial inhibition of tumor growth in mice with implanted CT-26 colon carcinomas. PGDH-mediated antitumor effect was associated with attenuated tumor-induced immune suppression and substantially reduced secretion of immunosuppressive mediators and cytokines such as PGE(2), IL-10, IL-13, and IL-6 by intratumoral CD11b cells. We show also that introduction of 15-PGDH gene in tumor tissue is sufficient to redirect the differentiation of intratumoral CD11b cells from immunosuppressive M2-oriented F4/80(+) tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) into M1-oriented CD11c(+) MHC class II-positive myeloid APCs. Notably, the administration of the 15-PGDH gene alone demonstrated a significant therapeutic effect promoting tumor eradication and long-term survival in 70% of mice with preestablished tumors. Surviving mice acquired antitumor T cell-mediated immune response. This study for the first time demonstrates an important role of the 15-PGDH in regulation of local antitumor immune response and highlights the potential to be implemented to enhance the efficacy of cancer therapy and immunotherapy.

  8. Effect of ginger root on cyclooxygenase-1 and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase expression in colonic mucosa of humans at normal and increased risk for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Turgeon, Danielle K; Wright, Benjamin D; Sidahmed, Elkhansa; Ruffin, Mack T; Brenner, Dean E; Sen, Ananda; Zick, Suzanna M

    2013-09-01

    Elevated tissue levels of prostaglandin E2, produced by cyclooxygenase (COX), are an early event in colorectal cancer (CRC). Data suggest the efficacy of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as cancer preventives, in the inhibition of COX activity; however, side effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory pose unacceptable limitations. Ginger has been reported to have anti-inflammatory activities with significant CRC preventive potential. We investigated whether consumption of 2.0 g ginger daily regulated the level of two key enzymes that control prostaglandin E2 production, COX-1 and NAD(+)-dependent 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH). Thirty participants at normal and 20 participants at increased risk for CRC were randomized and given 2.0 g/day ginger or placebo for 28 days. Flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to obtain colon biopsies at baseline and the end of the study. Tissue levels of COX-1 and 15-PGDH were assessed using western blotting. After ginger consumption, participants at increased risk for CRC had a significantly reduced colonic COX-1 protein level (23.8±41%) compared with the placebo group (18.9±52%; P=0.03). Protein levels of 15-PGDH in the colon were unchanged. In participants who were at normal risk for CRC, neither protein levels of COX-1 nor 15-PGDH in the colon were altered by ginger consumption. Ginger significantly lowered COX-1 protein expression in participants at increased risk for CRC but not in those at normal risk for CRC. Ginger did not alter 15-PGDH protein expression in either increased or normal-risk participants. Further investigation, in larger studies with a longer ginger intervention, is needed to examine the ability of ginger to impact tissue levels of prostaglandin.

  9. 15-Deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 induces expression of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase through Elk-1 activation in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Rim; Lee, Ha-Na; Lim, Kyu; Surh, Young-Joon; Na, Hye-Kyung

    2014-10-01

    Overproduction of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been reported to be implicated in carcinogenesis. The intracellular level of PGE2 is maintained not only by its biosynthesis, but also by inactivation/degradation. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) is the key enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of oncogenic PGE2 to a biologically inactive keto metabolite. In the present study, we demonstrate that 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 (15 d-PGJ2), one of the terminal products of cyclooxygenase-2, updregulates the expression and the activity of 15-PGDH in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. By using deletion constructs of the 15-PGDH promoter, we have found that E-twenty six (Ets) is the most essential determinant for 15-PGDH induction. 15 d-PGJ2 induced phosphorylation of Elk-1, one of Ets transcription factor family members, in the nucleus. Knockdown of Elk-1 abolished the ability of 15 d-PGJ2 to upregulate 15-PGDH expression. Furthermore, 15 d-PGJ2-mediated activation of Elk-1 was found to be dependent on activation of extracellular-signal related kinase (ERK) 1/2. Treatment of U0126, a pharmacological inhibitor of MEK1/2-ERK, abolished phosphorylation and DNA binding of Elk-1 as well as 15-PGDH induction in 15 d-PGJ2-treated MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, 15 d-PGJ2 generated reactive oxygen species (ROS), which contribute to the expression of 15-PGDH as well as phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Elk-1. 15 d-PGJ2 inhibited the migration of MDA-MB-231 cells, which was attenuated by transient transfection with 15-PGDH siRNA. Taken together, these findings suggest that 15 d-PGJ2 induces the expression of 15-PGDH through ROS-mediated activation of ERK1/2 and subsequently Elk-1 in the MDA-MB-231 cells, which may contribute to tumor suppressive activity of this cyclopentenone prostaglandin.

  10. TISSUE REGENERATION. Inhibition of the prostaglandin-degrading enzyme 15-PGDH potentiates tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongyou; Desai, Amar; Yang, Sung Yeun; Bae, Ki Beom; Antczak, Monika I; Fink, Stephen P; Tiwari, Shruti; Willis, Joseph E; Williams, Noelle S; Dawson, Dawn M; Wald, David; Chen, Wei-Dong; Wang, Zhenghe; Kasturi, Lakshmi; Larusch, Gretchen A; He, Lucy; Cominelli, Fabio; Di Martino, Luca; Djuric, Zora; Milne, Ginger L; Chance, Mark; Sanabria, Juan; Dealwis, Chris; Mikkola, Debra; Naidoo, Jacinth; Wei, Shuguang; Tai, Hsin-Hsiung; Gerson, Stanton L; Ready, Joseph M; Posner, Bruce; Willson, James K V; Markowitz, Sanford D

    2015-06-12

    Agents that promote tissue regeneration could be beneficial in a variety of clinical settings, such as stimulating recovery of the hematopoietic system after bone marrow transplantation. Prostaglandin PGE2, a lipid signaling molecule that supports expansion of several types of tissue stem cells, is a candidate therapeutic target for promoting tissue regeneration in vivo. Here, we show that inhibition of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), a prostaglandin-degrading enzyme, potentiates tissue regeneration in multiple organs in mice. In a chemical screen, we identify a small-molecule inhibitor of 15-PGDH (SW033291) that increases prostaglandin PGE2 levels in bone marrow and other tissues. SW033291 accelerates hematopoietic recovery in mice receiving a bone marrow transplant. The same compound also promotes tissue regeneration in mouse models of colon and liver injury. Tissues from 15-PGDH knockout mice demonstrate similar increased regenerative capacity. Thus, 15-PGDH inhibition may be a valuable therapeutic strategy for tissue regeneration in diverse clinical contexts.

  11. Concerted actions of ameliorated colitis, aberrant crypt foci inhibition and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase induction by sonic hedgehog inhibitor led to prevention of colitis-associated cancer.

    PubMed

    Kangwan, Napapan; Kim, Yoon-Jae; Han, Young-Min; Jeong, Migyeong; Park, Jong-Min; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2016-03-15

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling has been known to contribute to carcinogenesis in organ, where hedgehog exerted organogenesis and in cancers, which are developed based on mutagenic inflammation. Therefore, colitis-associated cancer (CAC) can be a good model to prove whether Shh inhibitors can be applied to prevent, as the efforts to discover potent anti-inflammatory agent are active to prevent CAC. Here, under the hypothesis that Shh inhibitors can prevent CAC, mouse model was generated to develop CAC by azoxymethane (AOM)-initiated, dextran sodium sulfate-promoted carcinogenesis. Shh inhibitors, cerulenin and itraconazole were treated by oral gavage and the mice were sacrificed at early phase of 3 weeks and late phase of 16 weeks. Compared to control group, the number of aberrant crypt foci at 3 weeks and tumor incidence at 16 weeks were all significantly decreased with Shh inhibitor. Significant attenuations of macrophage infiltration accompanied with significant decreases of IL-6, COX-2, STAT3 and NF-κB as well as significant ameliorations of β-catenin nuclear translocation, cyclin D1 and CDK4 were imposed with Shh inhibitors. Especially, CAC was accompanied with significant cancellation of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), but their levels were significantly preserved with Shh inhibitors. Among inflammatory mediators, significantly decreased levels of IL-6 and TNF-α, regulated with repressed NF-κb and STAT3, were prominent with Shh inhibitor, whereas significant inductions of apoptosis were noted with Shh inhibitors. In conclusion, Shh inhibitors significantly prevented CAC covering either ameliorating oncogenic inflammation or suppressing tumor proliferation, especially supported with significant inhibition of IL-6 and STAT3 signaling, 15-PGDH preservation and apoptosis induction.

  12. 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase is upregulated by hydroxychloroquine in rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Jae; Lee, Sora; Lee, Haw-Yong; Won, Hansol; Chang, Sung-Hae; Nah, Seong-Su

    2015-09-01

    15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD) is the key enzyme responsible for the metabolic inactivation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) catabolism. PGE2 is one of the predominant catabolic factors involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the expression and regulation of HPGD in RA fibroblast‑like synoviocyte (FLS) remain to be elucidated. Disease‑modifying anti‑rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are the most important anti‑arthritic drugs, which reduce the effect of joint injury. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of HPGD in RA tissues and cells, and normal synovial tissues and cells. The effect of the most popular DMARDs, hydroxychloroquine, on the expression of HPGD in RA‑FLS was also investigated. Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the expression levels of HPGD in human synovium were lower in RA synovium compared with the normal and OA synovium. In RA‑FLS, the expression of HPGD was increased following treatment with several DMARDs, including sulfasalazine, methotrexate, and hydroxychloroquine. Hydroxychloroquine (10 µM) treatment induced the phosphorylation of ERK, SAPK/JNK and p38. Hydroxychloroquine induced a decrease in the release of PGE2, which was restored by mitogen‑activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway inhibitors. Hydroxychloroquine may therefore, affect the pathogenesis of RA through the MAP kinase pathway by regulating the expression of HPGD.

  13. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase is upregulated by hydroxychloroquine in rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes

    PubMed Central

    KIM, HAK-JAE; LEE, SORA; LEE, HAW-YONG; WON, HANSOL; CHANG, SUNG-HAE; NAH, SEONG-SU

    2015-01-01

    15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD) is the key enzyme responsible for the metabolic inactivation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) catabolism. PGE2 is one of the predominant catabolic factors involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the expression and regulation of HPGD in RA fibroblast-like synoviocyte (FLS) remain to be elucidated. Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are the most important anti-arthritic drugs, which reduce the effect of joint injury. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of HPGD in RA tissues and cells, and normal synovial tissues and cells. The effect of the most popular DMARDs, hydroxychloroquine, on the expression of HPGD in RA-FLS was also investigated. Western blotting and immuno-histochemical analysis demonstrated that the expression levels of HPGD in human synovium were lower in RA synovium compared with the normal and OA synovium. In RA-FLS, the expression of HPGD was increased following treatment with several DMARDs, including sulfasalazine, methotrexate, and hydroxychloroquine. Hydroxychloroquine (10 µM) treatment induced the phosphorylation of ERK, SAPK/JNK and p38. Hydroxychloroquine induced a decrease in the release of PGE2, which was restored by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway inhibitors. Hydroxychloroquine may therefore, affect the pathogenesis of RA through the MAP kinase pathway by regulating the expression of HPGD. PMID:26082314

  14. miR-620 promotes tumor radioresistance by targeting 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoyong; Taeb, Samira; Jahangiri, Sahar; Korpela, Elina; Cadonic, Ivan; Yu, Nancy; Krylov, Sergey N.; Fokas, Emmanouil; Boutros, Paul C.; Liu, Stanley K.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA contribute to tumor radiation resistance, which is an important clinical problem, and thus we are interested in identifying and characterizing their function. We demonstrate that miR-620 contributes to radiation resistance in cancer cells by increasing proliferation, and decreasing the G2/M block. We identify the hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase 15-(nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) (HPGD/15-PGDH) tumor suppressor gene as a direct miR-620 target, which results in increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels. Furthermore, we show that siRNA targeting of HPGD or administration of exogenous PGE2 recapitulates radioresistance. Targeting of the EP2 receptor that responds to PGE2 using pharmacological or genetic approaches, abrogates radioresistance. Tumor xenograft experiments confirm that miR-620 increases proliferation and tumor radioresistance in vivo. Regulation of PGE2 levels via targeting of HPGD by miR-620 is an innovative manner by which a microRNA can induce radiation resistance. PMID:26068950

  15. Fetal guinea pig brain 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase: Ontogeny and effect of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Treissman, D.; Brien, J.F. )

    1991-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the ontogeny of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-OH-PGDH) activity in the brain of the fetal guinea pig and to test the hypothesis that acute in vitro ethanol exposure produces concentration-dependent inhibition of fetal brain 15-OH-PGDH activity. Enzyme activity was determined in vitro by measuring the rate of oxidation of PGE2 to 15-keto-PGE2 using an optimized radiometric procedure. The study was conducted utilizing the whole brain of the fetal guinea pig at mean gestational ages of 34, 43 and 62 days (term, about 66 days) and the brain stem (pons and medulla) of the fetal guinea pig at mean gestational ages of 43 and 62 days. The direct effect of acute in vitro exposure to ethanol was assessed by incubating 15-OH-PGDH with ethanol in the concentration range of 10 to 80 mM. 15-OH-PGDH was measurable in the whole brain and brain stem, and the enzyme activity was similar for the gestational ages examined. There was no significant ethanol-induced inhibition of 15-OH-PGDH activity in the whole brain or brain stem. The data demonstrate that the whole brain and brain stem of the fetal guinea pig have the capacity to metabolize PGE2 to 15-keto-PGE2, an inactive metabolite, during the second half of gestation. The data apparently are not consistent with the hypothesis that acute in vitro exposure to ethanol directly inhibits 15-OH-PGDH activity in fetal brain.

  16. Inhibition of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase activity in rabbit gastric antral mucosa by panaxynol isolated from oriental medicines.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Y; Sakuma, S; Komatsu, S; Sato, D; Nishida, H; Xiao, Y Q; Baba, K; Fujita, T

    1998-09-01

    Panaxynol is a polyacetylene compound with anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet-aggregatory effects isolated from commonly used oriental medicines. The effects of panaxynol on the activity of prostaglandin-synthesizing and catabolizing enzymes in the rabbit gastric antral mucosa have been examined. At concentrations ranging from 25 to 200 microM panaxynol had no effect on the synthesis of prostaglandins E2, F2alpha and D2 from exogenous arachidonic acid in the microsomal fraction of the gastric mucosa whereas at 25-200 microM it dose-dependently inhibited the activity of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (PGDH), which catalyses the initial step of prostaglandin catabolism, in the cytosolic fraction. The concentration required for 50% inhibition (IC50) was approximately 25 microM. Inhibition of PGDH by panaxynol was non-competitive with regard to NAD+ and prostaglandin E2. These results suggest that panaxynol has the potential to inhibit PGDH activity in gastric mucosa, possibly as a result of pharmacological activity.

  17. Non-canonical WNT5A signaling up-regulates the expression of the tumor suppressor 15-PGDH and induces differentiation of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mehdawi, Lubna M; Prasad, Chandra Prakash; Ehrnström, Roy; Andersson, Tommy; Sjölander, Anita

    2016-11-01

    The tumor suppressor 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) is the key enzyme in prostaglandin E2 catabolism and is down-regulated in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue. Canonical Wnt signaling is frequently elevated in colon cancers and has been shown to down-regulate 15-PGDH expression. Therefore, we have in the current study investigated if the non-canonical ligand WNT5A relates to increased expression of 15-PGDH in colon cancer cells. In the same cohort of patients, we demonstrated a parallel and significant loss of 15-PGDH and WNT5A protein expression in CRC tissues compared with matched normal colon tissues. Furthermore, patients with low 15-PGDH/WNT5A expression in their tumors showed reduced survival compared with patients with high 15-PGDH/WNT5A expression. To investigate if WNT5A signaling directly affects 15-PGDH expression, we performed in vitro analyses of colon cancer cells (HT-29 and Caco-2). Both cell lines, when treated with recombinant WNT5A (rWNT5A) or Foxy-5, a WNT5A-mimicking peptide, responded by increasing their expression of 15-PGDH mRNA and protein. Our investigations showed that rWNT5A and Foxy-5 induced this increased expression of 15-PGDH through reduced β-catenin signaling as well as increased JNK/AP-1 signaling in colon cancer cells. WNT5A signaling also induced increased 15-PGDH expression in a breast cancer cell line both in vitro and in vivo. In agreement, WNT5A signaling also increased the expression of the differentiation markers sucrose-isomaltase and mucin-2 in colon cancer cells. Our results show that WNT5A signaling regulates 15-PGDH expression, thus uncovering a novel mechanism by which WNT5A acts as a tumor suppressor and suggests that increased 15-PGDH expression could be used as an indicator of a positive response to Foxy-5 in patients treated with this WNT5A agonist.

  18. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Upregulate 15-PGDH Expression in Cholangiocarcinoma Cells by Inhibiting miR-26a/b Expression.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lu; Han, Chang; Song, Kyoungsub; Zhang, Jinqiang; Lim, Kyu; Wu, Tong

    2015-04-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a proinflammatory lipid mediator that promotes cancer growth. The 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) catalyzes oxidation of the 15(S)-hydroxyl group of PGE2, leading to its inactivation. Therefore, 15-PGDH induction may offer a strategy to treat cancers that are driven by PGE2, such as human cholangiocarcinoma. Here, we report that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) upregulate 15-PGDH expression by inhibiting miR-26a and miR-26b, thereby contributing to ω-3 PUFA-induced inhibition of human cholangiocarcinoma cell growth. Treatment of human cholangiocarcinoma cells (CCLP1 and TFK-1) with ω-3 PUFA (DHA) or transfection of these cells with the Fat-1 gene (encoding Caenorhabditis elegans desaturase, which converts ω-6 PUFA to ω-3 PUFA) significantly increased 15-PGDH enzymes levels, but with little effect on the activity of the 15-PGDH gene promoter. Mechanistic investigations revealed that this increase in 15-PGDH levels in cells was mediated by a reduction in the expression of miR-26a and miR-26b, which target 15-PGDH mRNA and inhibit 15-PGDH translation. These findings were extended by the demonstration that overexpressing miR-26a or miR-26b decreased 15-PGDH protein levels, reversed ω-3 PUFA-induced accumulation of 15-PGDH protein, and prevented ω-3 PUFA-induced inhibition of cholangiocarcinoma cell growth. We further observed that ω-3 PUFA suppressed miR-26a and miR-26b by inhibiting c-myc, a transcription factor that regulates miR-26a/b. Accordingly, c-myc overexpression enhanced expression of miR-26a/b and ablated the ability of ω-3 PUFA to inhibit cell growth. Taken together, our results reveal a novel mechanism for ω-3 PUFA-induced expression of 15-PGDH in human cholangiocarcinoma and provide a preclinical rationale for the evaluation of ω-3 PUFA in treatment of this malignancy.

  19. Regulation of synthesis and activity of NAD(+)-dependent 15-hydroxy-prostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) by dexamethasone and phorbol ester in human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xun, C.Q.; Ensor, C.M.; Tai, H.H. )

    1991-06-28

    Dexamethasone stimulated 15-PGDH activity in HEL cells in a time and concentration dependent manner. Increase in 15-PGDH activity by dexamethasone was found to be accompanied by an increase in enzyme synthesis as revealed by Western blot and (35S)methionine labeling studies. In addition to dexamethasone, other anti-inflammatory steroids also increased 15-PGDH activity in the order of their glucocorticoid activity. Among sex steroids only progesterone increased significantly 15-PGDH activity. 12-0-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) also induced the synthesis of 15-PGDH but inhibited the enzyme activity. It appears that TPA caused a time dependent inactivation of 15-PGDH by a protein kinase C mediated mechanism.

  20. Hypoxia activates 15-PGDH and its metabolite 15-KETE to promote pulmonary artery endothelial cells proliferation via ERK1/2 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cui; Liu, Yun; Wang, Yanyan; Zhang, Chen; Yao, Hongmin; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Dandan; Shen, Tingting; Zhu, Daling

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Dysfunction and injury of endothelial cells in the pulmonary artery play critical roles in the hypertension induced by chronic hypoxia. One consequence of hypoxia is increased activity of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (PGDH). Here, we have explored, in detail, the effects of hypoxia on the proliferation of pulmonary artery endothelial cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, cell-cycle analysis, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis to study the effects of hypoxia, induced 15-PGDH) activity and its product, 15-keto-6Z, 8Z, 11Z, 13E-eicosatetraenoic acid (15-KETE), on endothelial cell proliferation. Scratch-wound and tube formation assays were also used to study migration of endothelial cells. KEY RESULTS 15-KETE increased DNA synthesis and enhanced the transition from the G0/G1 phase to the S phase in hypoxia. Inhibition of 15-PGDH or siRNA for 15-PGDH reversed these effects. 15-KETE also activated the ERK1/2 signalling pathway. 15-KETE-induced cell migration and tube formation were reversed by blocking ERK1/2, but not the p38 MAPK pathway. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Hypoxia-induced endothelial proliferation and migration, an important underlying mechanism contributing to hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodelling, appears to be mediated by 15-PGDH and 15-KETE, via the ERK1/2 signalling pathway. PMID:24467360

  1. The ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids prevented colitis-associated carcinogenesis through blocking dissociation of β-catenin complex, inhibiting COX-2 through repressing NF-κB, and inducing 15-prostaglandin dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Han, Young-Min; Jeong, Migyeung; Park, Jong-Min; Kim, Mi-Young; Go, Eun-Jin; Cha, Ji Young; Kim, Kyung Jo; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that diets containing an increased ratio of ω-6 : ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are a risk factor for colon cancer and might affect tumorigenesis. Therefore, dietary ω-3 PUFA administration may be a preventive strategy against colon cancer. Until now, the exact molecular mechanisms and required dietary doses of ω-3 PUFAs for cancer prevention were unknown. In this study, we explored the anti-tumorigenic mechanisms of ω-3 PUFAs against a colitis-associated cancer (CAC) model. Through in vitro cell models involving docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) administration, down-regulation of survivin and Bcl-2, and up-regulation of Bax, accompanied by blockage of β-catenin complex dissociation, the main mechanisms responsible for DHA-induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells were determined. Results included significant reduction in azoxymethane-initiated, dextran sodium sulfate-promoted CACs, as well as significant preservation of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) and significant inhibition of Cyclooxyganase-2 (COX-2) and Prostaglandin E2(P < 0.01). Additional mechanisms and significant induction of apoptosis in both tumor and non-tumor tissues were also noted in fat-1 transgenic (TG) mice. The lipid profiles of colon tissues measured in all specimens revealed that intake greater than 3 g ω-3 PUFA/60 kg of body weight showed tissue levels similar to those seen in fat-1 TG mice, preventing cancer. Our study concluded that COX-2 inhibition, 15-PGDH preservation, apoptosis induction, and blockage of β-catenin complex dissociation contributed to the anti-tumorigenesis effect of ω-3 PUFAs, and an intake higher than 3g ω-3 PUFAs/60 kg of body weight can assist in CAC prevention. PMID:27566583

  2. The ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids prevented colitis-associated carcinogenesis through blocking dissociation of β-catenin complex, inhibiting COX-2 through repressing NF-κB, and inducing 15-prostaglandin dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Han, Young-Min; Jeong, Migyeung; Park, Jong-Min; Kim, Mi-Young; Go, Eun-Jin; Cha, Ji Young; Kim, Kyung Jo; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-09-27

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that diets containing an increased ratio of ω-6 : ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are a risk factor for colon cancer and might affect tumorigenesis. Therefore, dietary ω-3 PUFA administration may be a preventive strategy against colon cancer. Until now, the exact molecular mechanisms and required dietary doses of ω-3 PUFAs for cancer prevention were unknown. In this study, we explored the anti-tumorigenic mechanisms of ω-3 PUFAs against a colitis-associated cancer (CAC) model. Through in vitro cell models involving docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) administration, down-regulation of survivin and Bcl-2, and up-regulation of Bax, accompanied by blockage of β-catenin complex dissociation, the main mechanisms responsible for DHA-induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells were determined. Results included significant reduction in azoxymethane-initiated, dextran sodium sulfate-promoted CACs, as well as significant preservation of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) and significant inhibition of Cyclooxyganase-2 (COX-2) and Prostaglandin E2(P < 0.01). Additional mechanisms and significant induction of apoptosis in both tumor and non-tumor tissues were also noted in fat-1 transgenic (TG) mice. The lipid profiles of colon tissues measured in all specimens revealed that intake greater than 3 g ω-3 PUFA/60 kg of body weight showed tissue levels similar to those seen in fat-1 TG mice, preventing cancer. Our study concluded that COX-2 inhibition, 15-PGDH preservation, apoptosis induction, and blockage of β-catenin complex dissociation contributed to the anti-tumorigenesis effect of ω-3 PUFAs, and an intake higher than 3g ω-3 PUFAs/60 kg of body weight can assist in CAC prevention.

  3. Endogenous conversion of ω-6 to ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in fat-1 mice attenuated intestinal polyposis by either inhibiting COX-2/β-catenin signaling or activating 15-PGDH/IL-18.

    PubMed

    Han, Young-Min; Park, Jong-Min; Cha, Ji-Young; Jeong, Migyeong; Go, Eun-Jin; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-05-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3PUFAs) have inhibitory effects in various preclinical cancer models, but their effects in intestinal polyposis have never been examined. As attempts have been made to use nutritional intervention to counteract colon cancer development, in this study we evaluated the effects of ω-3 PUFAs on intestinal polyposis in the Apc(Min/+) mouse model. The experimental groups included wild-type C56BL/6 mice, Apc(Min/+) mice, fat-1 transgenic mice expressing an n-3 desaturase to enable ω-3 PUFA synthesis, and Apc(Min/+) × fat-1 double-transgenic mice; all mice were 20 weeks of age. Small intestines were collected for gross and pathologic evaluation, including assessment of polyp number and size, followed by immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting. After administration of various concentrations of ω-3 PUFAs, PUFA levels were measured in small intestine tissue by GC/MS/MS analysis to compare with PUFA synthesis of between C57BL6 and fat-1mice. As a result, ω-3 PUFAs significantly attenuated Apc mutation-induced intestinal polyposis accompanied with significant inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, COX-2 and PGE2, but induced significant levels of 15-PGDH. In addition, significant induction of the inflammasome-related substrates as IL-1β and IL-18 and activation of caspase-1 was observed in Apc(Min/+) × fat-1 mice. Administration of at least 3 g/60 kg ω-3 PUFAs was equivalent to ω-3 PUFAs produced in fat-1 mice and resulted in significant increase in the expression of IL-1β, caspase-3 and IL-18, as seen in Apc(Min/+) × fat-1 mice. We conclude that ω-3PUFAs can prevent intestinal polyp formation by inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, but increased levels of 15-PGDH and IL-18.

  4. The effect of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin 1β (IL1β) and interleukin 6 (IL6) on endometrial PGF2α synthesis, metabolism and release in early-pregnant pigs.

    PubMed

    Franczak, A; Zmijewska, A; Kurowicka, B; Wojciechowicz, B; Petroff, B K; Kotwica, G

    2012-01-01

    Cytokines produced by the porcine uterus and embryos may be involved in the regulation of endometrial prostaglandin synthesis, metabolism, and release. We studied the effect of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin 1β (IL1β) and interleukin 6 (IL6) on: 1) endometrial release of prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), 2) expression of the terminal enzyme of PGF2α synthesis--PGF synthase mRNA (PGFS mRNA), 3) secretion of PGF(2)α metabolite--13,14-dihydro-15-keto PGF2α (PGFM) by the endometrium and 4) presence and activity of endometrial NAD-dependent 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH). The effects of cytokines were determined on days 10-11 and days 12-13, e.g., before and during maternal recognition of pregnancy, and on days 15-16, e.g., during the peri-implantation period and compared with its effect in cyclic gilts on corresponding days of the estrous cycle. TNFα did not affect endometrial release of PGF2α in pregnant and cyclic pigs. IL1β enhanced endometrial PGF2α release on days 12-13 and 15-16 in pregnant and cyclic pigs, respectively. IL6 increased PGF2α release mainly on days 15-16 of pregnancy. Expression of PGFS mRNA was decreased by IL1β on days 12-13 of pregnancy (P<0.05) and increased in response to IL1β, TNFα and IL6 on 12-13 (P<0.05) and 15-16 (P<0.01) of the estrous cycle. IL1β increased release of PGFM in gravid pigs on days 12-13, 15-16 and in non-gravid pigs 10-11 and 15-16 of the cycle. On days 15-16 of pregnancy TNFα and IL6 increased endometrial secretion of PGFM. We determined that in porcine endometrium NAD-dependent 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) is present. In gravid pigs, the highest expression of endometrial 15-PGDH occurred during days 12-13 of pregnancy, while in non-gravid pigs during days 10-11 of the estrous cycle. These data provide new evidence that TNFα, IL1β, IL6 are involved in the regulation of endometrial synthesis, release and metabolism of PGF2α to protect CL during early pregnancy

  5. Sex hormones induce a gender-related difference in renal expression of a novel prostaglandin transporter, OAT-PG, influencing basal PGE2 concentration.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Ryo; Onoe, Kimitaka; Obara, Masaya; Matsubara, Mitsunobu; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Muto, Shigeaki; Asano, Shinji

    2012-02-01

    Based on the nucleotide sequence of a mouse prostaglandin-specific transporter (mOAT-PG), we identified a rat homolog (rOAT-PG) which shares 80% identity with mOAT-PG in a deduced amino acid sequence. rOAT-PG transports PGE(2) and colocalizes with 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), a metabolic enzyme for PGs, in proximal tubules, suggesting that rOAT-PG is involved in PGE(2) clearance to regulate its physiological function in the renal cortex. We found that the expression level of rOAT-PG in the renal cortex was much higher in male rats than in female rats whereas there was no gender difference in the expression level of cyclooxygenase-2, a key enzyme producing PGE(2), and 15-PGDH in the renal cortex. Tissue PGE(2) concentration in the renal cortex was lower in male rats than in female rats, suggesting that renocortical PGE(2) concentration is primarily determined by the expression level of OAT-PG, which is regulated differently between male and female rats. Castration of male rat led to a remarkable reduction in OAT-PG expression and a significant increase in renocortical PGE(2) concentration. These alterations were recovered by testosterone supplementation. These results suggest that OAT-PG is involved in local PGE(2) clearance in the renal cortex. Although the physiological importance of the gender difference in local PGE(2) clearance is still unclear, these findings might be a key to clarifying the physiological roles of PGE(2) in the kidney.

  6. Macrophages programmed by apoptotic cells promote angiogenesis via prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    Brecht, Kerstin; Weigert, Andreas; Hu, Jiong; Popp, Rüdiger; Fisslthaler, Beate; Korff, Thomas; Fleming, Ingrid; Geisslinger, Gerd; Brüne, Bernhard

    2011-07-01

    Macrophages contribute to tissue homeostasis in the developing as well as the adult organism. They promote tissue regeneration and remodeling after injury, which requires efficient neoangiogenesis. Signaling pathways activating an angiogenic program in macrophages are still poorly defined. We report that apoptotic cells (ACs), which originate from stressed or damaged tissues, can induce angiogenic properties in primary human macrophages. The signal originating from ACs is the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), which activates S1P1/3 on macrophages to up-regulate cyclooxygenase-2. The formation and liberation of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) then stimulates migration of endothelial cells. This is demonstrated by using PGE(2) receptor antagonists or a neutralizing PGE(2) antibody in vitro, thereby attenuating endothelial cell migration using a Boyden chamber assay. In vivo, neutralization of PGE(2) from proangiogenic macrophage supernatants blocked vessel formation into Matrigel plugs. In particular, apoptotic cancer cells shifted prostanoid formation in macrophages selectively toward PGE(2) by up-regulating cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES1), while down-regulating the PGE(2)-degrading enzyme 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) or prostaglandin-D synthase (PGDS). Angiogenic programming of macrophages by ACs, therefore, may control responses to tissue stress such as in tumors, where macrophages support cancer progression.

  7. COX2/mPGES1/PGE2 pathway regulates PD-L1 expression in tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Prima, Victor; Kaliberova, Lyudmila N; Kaliberov, Sergey; Curiel, David T; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2017-01-31

    In recent years, it has been established that programmed cell death protein ligand 1 (PD-L1)-mediated inhibition of activated PD-1(+) T lymphocytes plays a major role in tumor escape from immune system during cancer progression. Lately, the anti-PD-L1 and -PD-1 immune therapies have become an important tool for treatment of advanced human cancers, including bladder cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms of PD-L1 expression in cancer are not fully understood. We found that coculture of murine bone marrow cells with bladder tumor cells promoted strong expression of PD-L1 in bone marrow-derived myeloid cells. Tumor-induced expression of PD-L1 was limited to F4/80(+) macrophages and Ly-6C(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells. These PD-L1-expressing cells were immunosuppressive and were capable of eliminating CD8 T cells in vitro. Tumor-infiltrating PD-L1(+) cells isolated from tumor-bearing mice also exerted morphology of tumor-associated macrophages and expressed high levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-forming enzymes microsomal PGE2 synthase 1 (mPGES1) and COX2. Inhibition of PGE2 formation, using pharmacologic mPGES1 and COX2 inhibitors or genetic overexpression of PGE2-degrading enzyme 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), resulted in reduced PD-L1 expression. Together, our study demonstrates that the COX2/mPGES1/PGE2 pathway involved in the regulation of PD-L1 expression in tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells and, therefore, reprogramming of PGE2 metabolism in tumor microenvironment provides an opportunity to reduce immune suppression in tumor host.

  8. Lactate dehydrogenase test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003471.htm Lactate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a protein that helps produce energy ...

  9. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  10. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 42. Read More Enzyme Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Hemoglobin Review Date 2/11/2016 Updated by: ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics G6PD Deficiency Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  11. Sonic hedgehog inhibitors prevent colitis-associated cancer via orchestrated mechanisms of IL-6/gp130 inhibition, 15-PGDH induction, Bcl-2 abrogation, and tumorsphere inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kangwan, Napapan; Kim, Yoon-Jae; Han, Young Min; Jeong, Migyeong; Park, Jong-Min; Go, Eun-Jin; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2016-02-16

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling is essential in normal development of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, whereas aberrantly activated SHH is implicated in GI cancers because it facilitates carcinogenesis by redirecting stem cells. Since colitis-associated cancer (CAC) is associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, in which SHH and IL-6 signaling, inflammation propagation, and cancer stem cell (CSC) activation have been implicated, we hypothesized that SHH inhibitors may prevent CAC by blocking the above SHH-related carcinogenic pathways. In the intestinal epithelial cells IEC-6 and colon cancer cells HCT-116, IL-6 expression and its signaling were assessed with SHH inhibitors and levels of other inflammatory mediators, proliferation, apoptosis, tumorsphere formation, and tumorigenesis were also measured. CAC was induced in C57BL/6 mice by administration of azoxymethane followed by dextran sodium sulfate administration. SHH inhibitors were administered by oral gavage and the mice were sacrificed at 16 weeks. TNF-α-stimulated IEC-6 cells exhibited increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and enzymes, whereas SHH inhibitors suppressed TNF-α-induced inflammatory signaling, especially IL-6/IL-6R/gp130 signaling. SHH inhibitors significantly induced apoptosis, inhibited cell proliferation, suppressed tumorsphere formation, and reduced stemness factors. In the mouse model, SHH inhibitors significantly reduced tumor incidence and multiplicity, decreased the expression of IL-6, TNF-α, COX-2, STAT3, and NF-κB, and significantly induced apoptosis. In colosphere xenografts, SHH inhibitor significantly suppressed tumorigenesis by inhibiting tumorsphere formation. Taken together, our data suggest that administration of SHH inhibitors could be an effective strategy to prevent colitis-induced colorectal carcinogenesis, mainly by targeting IL-6 signaling, ablating CSCs, and suppressing oncogenic inflammation, achieving chemoquiescence ultimately.

  12. LACTIC DEHYDROGENASES OF PSEUDOMONAS NATRIEGENS.

    PubMed

    WALKER, H; EAGON, R G

    1964-07-01

    Walker, Hazel (University of Georgia, Athens), and R. G. Eagon. Lactic dehydrogenases of Pseudomonas natriegens. J. Bacteriol. 88:25-30. 1964.-Lactic dehydrogenases specific for d- and l-lactate were demonstrated in Pseudomonas natriegens. The l-lactic dehydrogenase showed considerable heat stability, and 40% of the activity remained in extracts after heating at 60 C for 10 min. An essential thiol group for enzyme activity was noted. The results of these experiments were consistent with the view that lactate was dehydrogenated initially by a flavin cofactor and that electrons were transported through a complete terminal oxidase system to oxygen. The intracellular site of these lactic dehydrogenases was shown to be the cell membrane. It was suggested that the main physiological role of these lactic dehydrogenases is that of lactate utilization.

  13. Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biologic...

  14. Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, H. J.; Hanson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum, a facultative methane-oxidizing bacterium, has been purified to homogeneity as indicated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. It has several properties in common with the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The active enzyme is a dimeric protein, both subunits having molecular weights of about 62,000. The enzyme exhibits broad substrate specificity for primary alcohols and catalyzes the two-step oxidation of methanol to formate. The apparent Michaelis constants of the enzyme are 2.9 × 10−5 M for methanol and 8.2 × 10−5 M for formaldehyde. Activity of the purified enzyme is dependent on phenazine methosulfate. Certain characteristics of this enzyme distinguish it from the other alcohol dehydrogenases of other methylotrophic bacteria. Ammonia is not required for, but stimulates the activity of newly purified enzyme. An absolute dependence on ammonia develops after storage of the purified enzyme. Activity is not inhibited by phosphate. The fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme indicates that it and the cofactor associated with it may be chemically different from the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The alcohol dehydrogenases of Hyphomicrobium WC-65, Pseudomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and several facultative methylotrophs are serologically related to the enzyme purified in this study. The enzymes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and of organisms of the Methylococcus group did not cross-react with the antiserum prepared against the alcohol dehydrogenase of M. organophilum. Images PMID:80974

  15. Michael hydratase alcohol dehydrogenase or just alcohol dehydrogenase?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Michael hydratase – alcohol dehydrogenase (MhyADH) from Alicycliphilus denitrificans was previously identified as a bi-functional enzyme performing a hydration of α,β-unsaturated ketones and subsequent oxidation of the formed alcohols. The investigations of the bi-functionality were based on a spectrophotometric assay and an activity staining in a native gel of the dehydrogenase. New insights in the recently discovered organocatalytic Michael addition of water led to the conclusion that the previously performed experiments to identify MhyADH as a bi-functional enzyme and their results need to be reconsidered and the reliability of the methodology used needs to be critically evaluated. PMID:24949265

  16. Genetics Home Reference: lactate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... dehydrogenase-B pieces (subunits) of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme. This enzyme is found throughout the body and is important ... cells. There are five different forms of this enzyme, each made up of four protein subunits. Various ...

  17. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Revisited

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Jerome T.; Henderson, Alfred R.

    1984-01-01

    Hemolytic diseases associated with drugs have been recognized since antiquity. Many of these anemias have been associated with oxidizing agents and deficiencies in the intraerythrocytic enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. This paper outlines the discovery, prevalence, and variants of this enzyme. Methods of diagnosis of associated anemias are offered. PMID:6502728

  18. Characterization of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 3

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Caroline E.; Brocklehurst, Keith; Pickersgill, Richard W.; Warren, Martin J.

    2005-01-01

    RALDH3 (retinal dehydrogenase 3) was characterized by kinetic and binding studies, protein engineering, homology modelling, ligand docking and electrostatic-potential calculations. The major recognition determinant of an RALDH3 substrate was shown to be an eight-carbon chain bonded to the aldehyde group whose kinetic influence (kcat/Km at pH 8.5) decreases when shortened or lengthened. Surprisingly, the β-ionone ring of all-trans-retinal is not a major recognition site. The dissociation constants (Kd) of the complexes of RALDH3 with octanal, NAD+ and NADH were determined by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. The similarity of the Kd values for the complexes with NAD+ and with octanal suggests a random kinetic mechanism for RALDH3, in contrast with the ordered sequential mechanism often associated with aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes. Inhibition of RALDH3 by tri-iodothyronine binding in competition with NAD+, predicted by the modelling, was established kinetically and by immunoprecipitation. Mechanistic implications of the kinetically influential ionizations with macroscopic pKa values of 5.0 and 7.5 revealed by the pH-dependence of kcat are discussed. Analogies with data for non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus mutans, together with the present modelled structure of the thioacyl RALDH3, suggest (a) that kcat characterizes deacylation of this intermediate for specific substrates and (b) the assignment of the pKa of the major ionization (approximating to 7.5) to the perturbed carboxy group of Glu280 whose conjugate base is envisaged as supplying general base catalysis to attack of a water molecule. The macroscopic pKa of the minor ionization (5.0) is considered to approximate to that of the carboxy group of Glu488. PMID:16241904

  19. Cellobiose dehydrogenase in cellulose degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, L.; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro

    1996-10-01

    Cellobiose dehydrogenase is produced by a variety of fungi. Although it was already discovered during the 70`s, it`s role in cellulose and lignin degradation is yet ambiguous. The enzyme contains both heme and FAD as prosthetic groups, and seems to have a domain specifically designed to bind the enzyme to cellulose. It`s affinity to amorphous cellulose is higher than to crystalline cellulose. We will report on the binding behavior of the enzyme, its usefulness in elucidation of cellulose structures and also, possibilities for applications such as its use in measuring individual and synergistic mechanisms for cellulose degradation by endo- and exo-glucanases.

  20. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  4. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Luzzatto, Lucio; Nannelli, Caterina; Notaro, Rosario

    2016-04-01

    G6PD is a housekeeping gene expressed in all cells. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is part of the pentose phosphate pathway, and its main physiologic role is to provide NADPH. G6PD deficiency, one of the commonest inherited enzyme abnormalities in humans, arises through one of many possible mutations, most of which reduce the stability of the enzyme and its level as red cells age. G6PD-deficient persons are mostly asymptomatic, but they can develop severe jaundice during the neonatal period and acute hemolytic anemia when they ingest fava beans or when they are exposed to certain infections or drugs. G6PD deficiency is a global health issue.

  5. Opine dehydrogenases in marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Harcet, Matija; Perina, Drago; Pleše, Bruna

    2013-10-01

    It is well known today that opine production anaerobic pathways are analogs to the classical glycolytic pathway (lactate production pathway). These pathways, catalyzed by a group of enzymes called opine dehydrogenases (OpDHs), ensure continuous flux of glycolysis and a constant supply of ATP by maintaining the NADH/NAD(+) ratio during exercise and hypoxia, thus regulating the cytosolic redox balance in glycolysis under anoxia. OpDHs are distributed in a wide range of marine invertebrate phyla, including sponges (Porifera). Phylogenetic analyses supported with enzymatic assays strongly indicate that sponge OpDHs constitute an enzyme class unrelated to other OpDHs. Therefore, OpDHs in marine invertebrates are divided into two groups, a mollusk/annelid type and a sponge type, which belongs to the OCD/mu-crystallin family.

  6. Molecular characterization of benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed Central

    Gillooly, D J; Robertson, A G; Fewson, C A

    1998-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of xylB and xylC from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, the genes encoding benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II, were determined. The complete nucleotide sequence indicates that these two genes form part of an operon and this was supported by heterologous expression and physiological studies. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II is a 51654 Da protein with 484 amino acids per subunit and it is typical of other prokaryotic and eukaryotic aldehyde dehydrogenases. Benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase has a subunit Mr of 38923 consisting of 370 amino acids, it stereospecifically transfers the proR hydride of NADH, and it is a member of the family of zinc-dependent long-chain alcohol dehydrogenases. The enzyme appears to be more similar to animal and higher-plant alcohol dehydrogenases than it is to most other microbial alcohol dehydrogenases. Residue His-51 of zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases is thought to be necessary as a general base for catalysis in this category of alcohol dehydrogenases. However, this residue was found to be replaced in benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase from A. calcoaceticus by an isoleucine, and the introduction of a histidine residue in this position did not alter the kinetic coefficients, pH optimum or substrate specificity of the enzyme. Other workers have shown that His-51 is also absent from the TOL-plasmid-encoded benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase of Pseudomonas putida and so these two closely related enzymes presumably have a catalytic mechanism that differs from that of the archetypal zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases. PMID:9494109

  7. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... conversion is essential to begin the series of chemical reactions that produce energy for cells. The pyruvate dehydrogenase ... E3, each of which performs part of the chemical reaction that converts pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. In addition, ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skin on the palms and soles (hand-foot syndrome); shortness of breath; and hair loss may also ... dehydrogenase deficiency , with its early-onset neurological symptoms, is a rare disorder. Its prevalence is ...

  9. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Waitkus, Matthew S.; Diplas, Bill H.; Yan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, extraordinary progress has been made in elucidating the underlying genetic causes of gliomas. In 2008, our understanding of glioma genetics was revolutionized when mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) were identified in the vast majority of progressive gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs). IDH enzymes normally catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to generate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), but recurrent mutations at Arg132 of IDH1 and Arg172 of IDH2 confer a neomorphic enzyme activity that catalyzes reduction of αKG into the putative oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutate (D2HG). D2HG inhibits αKG-dependent dioxygenases and is thought to create a cellular state permissive to malignant transformation by altering cellular epigenetics and blocking normal differentiation processes. Herein, we discuss the relevant literature on mechanistic studies of IDH1/2 mutations in gliomas, and we review the potential impact of IDH1/2 mutations on molecular classification and glioma therapy. PMID:26188014

  10. Regulation of heart muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ronald H.; Randle, Philip J.; Denton, Richard M.

    1974-01-01

    1. The activity of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase was assayed by the incorporation of [32P]phosphate from [γ-32P]ATP into the dehydrogenase complex. There was a very close correlation between this incorporation and the loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity with all preparations studied. 2. Nucleoside triphosphates other than ATP (at 100μm) and cyclic 3′:5′-nucleotides (at 10μm) had no significant effect on kinase activity. 3. The Km for thiamin pyrophosphate in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was 0.76μm. Sodium pyrophosphate, adenylyl imidodiphosphate, ADP and GTP were competitive inhibitors against thiamin pyrophosphate in the dehydrogenase reaction. 4. The Km for ATP of the intrinsic kinase assayed in three preparations of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase was in the range 13.9–25.4μm. Inhibition by ADP and adenylyl imidodiphosphate was predominantly competitive, but there was nevertheless a definite non-competitive element. Thiamin pyrophosphate and sodium pyrophosphate were uncompetitive inhibitors against ATP. It is suggested that ADP and adenylyl imidodiphosphate inhibit the kinase mainly by binding to the ATP site and that the adenosine moiety may be involved in this binding. It is suggested that thiamin pyrophosphate, sodium pyrophosphate, adenylyl imidodiphosphate and ADP may inhibit the kinase by binding through pyrophosphate or imidodiphosphate moieties at some site other than the ATP site. It is not known whether this is the coenzyme-binding site in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction. 5. The Km for pyruvate in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was 35.5μm. 2-Oxobutyrate and 3-hydroxypyruvate but not glyoxylate were also substrates; all three compounds inhibited pyruvate oxidation. 6. In preparations of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase free of thiamin pyrophosphate, pyruvate inhibited the kinase reaction at all concentrations in the range 25–500μm. The inhibition was uncompetitive. In the presence of thiamin pyrophosphate

  11. Characterization of succinate dehydrogenase and alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Lenzen, S; Panten, U

    1983-12-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase activities in homogenates of rat and ob/ob mouse pancreatic islets were only 13% of the activities in homogenates of liver and were also several times lower than in homogenates of pancreatic acinar tissue. This indicates that the content of mitochondria in pancreatic islet cells is very low. The very low activity of succinate dehydrogenase is in agreement with the low mitochondrial volume in the cytoplasmic ground substance of pancreatic islet cells as observed in morphometric studies. This may represent the poor equipment of pancreatic islet cells with electron transport chains and thus provide a regulatory role for the generation of reducing equivalents and chemical energy for the regulation of insulin secretion. The activities of succinate dehydrogenase in tissue homogenates of pancreatic islets, pancreatic acinar tissue, and liver were significantly inhibited by malonate and diazoxide but not by glucose, mannoheptulose, streptozotocin, or verapamil. Tolbutamide inhibited only pancreatic islet succinate dehydrogenase significantly, providing evidence for a different behavior of pancreatic islet cell mitochondria. Therefore diazoxide and tolbutamide may affect pancreatic islet function through their effects on succinate dehydrogenase activity. The activities of alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase in homogenates of pancreatic islets and liver from rats and ob/ob mice were in the same range, while activities in homogenates of pancreatic acinar tissue were lower. None of the test agents affected alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase activity. Thus the results provide no support for the recent contention that alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase activity may be critical for the regulation of insulin secretion.

  12. Benzene toxicity: emphasis on cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Bolcsak, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Blood dyscrasias such as leukopenia and anemia have been clearly identified as consequences of chronic benzene exposure. The metabolites, phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone produced inhibition of /sup 59/Fe uptake in mice which followed the same time course as that produced by benzene. The inhibitor of benzene oxidation, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, mitigated the inhibitory effects of benzene and phenol only. These data support the contention that benzene toxicity is mediated by a metabolite and suggest that the toxicity of phenol is a consequence of its metabolism to hydroquinone and that the route of metabolism to catechol may also contribute to the production of toxic metabolite(s). The properties of mouse liver cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases were examined. These enzymes catalyze the NADP/sup +/-dependent oxidation of trans-1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzene (BDD) to catechol, a possible toxic metabolite of benzene produced via this metabolic route. Four distinct dihydrodiol dehydrogenases (DD1, DD2, DD3, and DD4) were purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. DD1 appeared to be identical to the major ketone reductase and 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the liver. DD2 exhibited aldehyde reductase activity. DD3 and DD4 oxidized 17..beta..-hydroxysteroids, but no carbonyl reductase activity was detected. These relationships between BDD dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase and/or 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were supported by several lines of evidence.

  13. Sorbitol dehydrogenase: structure, function and ligand design.

    PubMed

    El-Kabbani, O; Darmanin, C; Chung, R P-T

    2004-02-01

    Sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), a member of the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase protein family and the second enzyme of the polyol pathway of glucose metabolism, converts sorbitol to fructose strictly using NAD(+) as coenzyme. SDH is expressed almost ubiquitously in all mammalian tissues. The enzyme has attracted considerable interest due to its implication in the development of diabetic complications and thus its tertiary structure may facilitate the development of drugs for the treatment of diabetes sufferers. Modelling studies suggest that SDH is structurally homologous to mammalian alcohol dehydrogenase with respect to conserved zinc binding motif and a hydrophobic substrate-binding pocket. Recently, the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of a mammalian SDH was solved, and it was found that while the overall 3-D structures of SDH and alcohol dehydrogenase are similar, the zinc coordination in the active sites of the two enzymes is different. The available structural and biochemical information of SDH are currently being utilized in a structure-based approach to develop drugs for the treatment or prevention of the complications of diabetes. This review provides an overview of the recent advances in the structure, function and drug development fields of sorbitol dehydrogenase.

  14. Fundamental molecular differences between alcohol dehydrogenase classes.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, O; Atrian, S; Luque, T; Hjelmqvist, L; Gonzàlez-Duarte, R; Jörnvall, H

    1994-01-01

    Two types of alcohol dehydrogenase in separate protein families are the "medium-chain" zinc enzymes (including the classical liver and yeast forms) and the "short-chain" enzymes (including the insect form). Although the medium-chain family has been characterized in prokaryotes and many eukaryotes (fungi, plants, cephalopods, and vertebrates), insects have seemed to possess only the short-chain enzyme. We have now also characterized a medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase in Drosophila. The enzyme is identical to insect octanol dehydrogenase. It is a typical class III alcohol dehydrogenase, similar to the corresponding human form (70% residue identity), with mostly the same residues involved in substrate and coenzyme interactions. Changes that do occur are conservative, but Phe-51 is of functional interest in relation to decreased coenzyme binding and increased overall activity. Extra residues versus the human enzyme near position 250 affect the coenzyme-binding domain. Enzymatic properties are similar--i.e., very low activity toward ethanol (Km beyond measurement) and high selectivity for formaldehyde/glutathione (S-hydroxymethylglutathione; kcat/Km = 160,000 min-1.mM-1). Between the present class III and the ethanol-active class I enzymes, however, patterns of variability differ greatly, highlighting fundamentally separate molecular properties of these two alcohol dehydrogenases, with class III resembling enzymes in general and class I showing high variation. The gene coding for the Drosophila class III enzyme produces an mRNA of about 1.36 kb that is present at all developmental stages of the fly, compatible with the constitutive nature of the vertebrate enzyme. Taken together, the results bridge a previously apparent gap in the distribution of medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenases and establish a strictly conserved class III enzyme, consistent with an important role for this enzyme in cellular metabolism. Images PMID:8197167

  15. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    PubMed

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems.

  16. 21 CFR 862.1565 - 6-Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6 PGD) in serum and erythrocytes. Measurements of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase are used in the diagnosis and treatment of certain liver diseases (such as hepatitis) and anemias....

  17. [Interaction of succinate dehydrogenase and oxaloacetate].

    PubMed

    Kotliar, A B; Vinogradov, A D

    1984-04-01

    The equilibrium and rate constants for interaction of the reduced and oxidized membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.99.1) with oxaloacetate were determined. The 10-fold decrease in the oxaloacetate affinity for the reduced enzyme was shown to be due to the 10-fold increase of the enzyme-inhibitor complex dissociation rate, which occurs upon its reduction. The rate of dissociation induced by succinate is 10 times higher than that induced by malonate in the submitochondrial particles, being equal in the soluble enzyme preparations. The rates of dissociation induced by malonate excess, or by the enzyme irreversibly utilizing oxaloacetate (transaminase in the presence of glutamate) are also equal. The data obtained suggest that succinate dehydrogenase interaction with succinate and oxaloacetate results from the competition for a single dicarboxylate-specific site. In submitochondrial particles all succinate dehydrogenase molecules are in redox equilibrium provided for by endogenous ubiquinone. No electronic equilibrium between the individual enzyme molecules exists, when succinate dehydrogenase is solubilized.

  18. Development of an amine dehydrogenase for synthesis of chiral amines.

    PubMed

    Abrahamson, Michael J; Vázquez-Figueroa, Eduardo; Woodall, Nicholas B; Moore, Jeffrey C; Bommarius, Andreas S

    2012-04-16

    A leucine dehydrogenase has been successfully altered through several rounds of protein engineering to an enantioselective amine dehydrogenase. Instead of the wild-type α-keto acid, the new amine dehydrogenase now accepts the analogous ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), which corresponds to exchange of the carboxy group by a methyl group to produce chiral (R)-1,3-dimethylbutylamine.

  19. [Thermal stability of lactate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase incorporated into highly concentrated gels].

    PubMed

    Kulis, Iu Iu

    1979-03-01

    The rate constants for inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase in solution at 65 degrees C (pH 7,5) are 0,72 and 0,013 min-1, respectively. The enzyme incorporation into acrylamide gels results in immobilized enzymes, whose residual activity is 18--25% of the original one. In 6,7% gels the rate of thermal inactivation for lactate dehydrogenase is decreased nearly 10-fold, whereas the inactivation rate for alcohol dehydrogenase is increased 4,6-fold as compared to the soluble enzymes. In 14% and 40% gels the inactivation constants for lactate dehydrogenase are 6,3.10(-3) and 5,9.10(-4) min-1, respectively. In 60% gels the thermal inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase is decelerated 3600-fold as compared to the native enzyme. The enthalpy and enthropy for the inactivation of the native enzyme are equal to 62,8 kcal/mole and 116,9 cal/(mole.grad.) for the native enzyme and those of gel-incorporated (6,7%) enzyme -- 38,7 kcal/mole and 42 cal/(mole.grad.), respectively. The thermal stability of alcohol dehydrogenase in 60% gels is increased 12-fold. To prevent gel swelling, methacrylic acid and allylamine were added to the matrix, with subsequent treatment by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. The enzyme activity of the modified gels is 2,7--3% of that for the 6,7% gels. The stability of lactate dehydrogenase in such gels is significantly increased. A mechanism of stabilization of the subunit enzymes in highly concentrated gels is discussed.

  20. Dehydrogenase and Oxoreductase Activities of Porcine Placental 11Beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    dehydrogenase (IIB-HSD) were measured in tissue fragment cultures on day 75 of gestation. Dehydrogenase activity was over fivefold greater than oxoreductase...oxoreductase activities in porcine placentae under physiological conditions using placental explant culture and endogenous concentrations of coenzymes and...f!M range). In human placental tissue fragments at midterm and late pregnancy ( 12, 18) and in trophoblast cell cultures from term placentae ( 41

  1. Characterization of xylitol dehydrogenase from Debaryomyces hansenii

    SciTech Connect

    Girio, F.M.; Amaral-Collaco, M.T.; Pelica, F.

    1996-01-01

    The xylitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.9) from xylose-grown cells of Debaryomyces hansenii was partially purified in two chromatographic steps, and characterization studies were carried out in order to investigate the role of the xylitol dehydrogenase-catalyzed step in the regulation of D-xylose metabolism. The enzyme was most active at pH 9.0-9.5, and exhibited a broad polyol specificity. The Michaelis constants for xylitol and NAD{sup +} were 16.5 and 0.55 mM, respectively. Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} did not affect the enzyme activity. Conversely, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Co{sup 2+} strongly inhibited the enzyme activity. It was concluded that NAD{sup +}-xylitol dehydrogenase from D. hansenii has similarities with other xylose-fermenting yeasts in respect to optimal pH, substrate specificity, and K{sub m} value for xylitol, and therefore should be named L-iditol:NAD{sup +}-5-oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.14). The reason D. hansenii is a good xylitol producer is not because of its value of K for xylitol, which is low enough to assure its fast oxidation by NAD{sup +}-xylitol dehydrogenase. However, a higher K{sub m} value of xylitol dehydrogenase for NAD{sup +} compared to the K{sub m} values of other xylose-fermenting yeasts may be responsible for the higher xylitol yields. 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Properties of formate dehydrogenase in Methanobacterium formicicum

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, N.L.; Ferry, J.G.

    1982-04-01

    Soluble formate dehydrogenase from Methanobacterium formicicum was purified 71-fold with a yield of 35%. Purification was performed anaerobically in the presence of 10 mM sodium azide which stabilized the enzyme. The purified enzyme reduced, with formate, 50..mu..mol of methyl viologen per min per mg of protein and 8.2 ..mu..mol of coenzyme F/sub 420/ per min per mg of protein. The apparent K/sub m/ for 7,8-didemethyl-8-hydroxy-5-deazariboflavin, a hydrolytic derivative of coenzyme F/sub 420/, was 10-fold greater (63 ..mu..M) than for coenzyme F/sub 420/ (6 ..mu..M). The purified enzyme also reduced flavin mononucleotide (K/sub m/ = 13 ..mu..M) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (K/sub m/ = 25 ..mu..M) with formate, but did not reduce NAD/sup +/ or NADP/sup +/. The reduction of NADP/sup +/ with formate required formate dehydrogenase, coenzyme F/sub 420/, and coenzyme F/sub 420/:NADP/sup +/ oxidoreductase. The formate dehydrogenase had an optimal pH of 7.9 when assayed with the physiological electron acceptor coenzyme F/sub 420/. The optimal reaction rate occurred at 55/sup 0/C. The molecular weight was 288,000 as determined by gel filtration. The purified formate dehydrogenase was strongly inhibited by cyanide (K/sub i/ = 6 ..mu..M), azide (K/sub i/ = 39 ..mu..M),..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..-dipyridyl, and 1,10-phenanthroline. Denaturation of the purified formate dehydrogenase with sodium dodecyl sulfate under aerobic conditions revealed a fluorescent compound. Maximal excitation occurred at 385 nm, with minor peaks at 277 and 302 nm. Maximal fluorescence emission occurred at 455 nm.

  3. "Enzymogenesis": classical liver alcohol dehydrogenase origin from the glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase line.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, O; Jörnvall, H

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of the activity and structure of lower vertebrate alcohol dehydrogenases reveals that relationships between the classical liver and yeast enzymes need not be continuous. Both the ethanol activity of class I-type alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) and the glutathione-dependent formaldehyde activity of the class III-type enzyme [formaldehyde:NAD+ oxidoreductase (glutathione-formylating), EC 1.2.1.1] are present in liver down to at least the stage of bony fishes (cod liver: ethanol activity, 3.4 units/mg of protein in one enzyme; formaldehyde activity, 4.5 units/mg in the major form of another enzyme). Structural analysis of the latter protein reveals it to be a typical class III enzyme, with limited variation from the mammalian form and therefore with stable activity and structure throughout much of the vertebrate lineage. In contrast, the classical alcohol dehydrogenase (the class I enzyme) appears to be the emerging form, first in activity and later also in structure. The class I activity is present already in the piscine line, whereas the overall structural-type enzyme is not observed until amphibians and still more recent vertebrates. Consequently, the class I/III duplicatory origin appears to have arisen from a functional class III form, not a class I form. Therefore, ethanol dehydrogenases from organisms existing before this duplication have origins separate from those leading to the "classical" liver alcohol dehydrogenases. The latter now often occur in isozyme forms from further gene duplications and have a high rate of evolutionary change. The pattern is, however, not simple and we presently find in cod the first evidence for isozymes also within a class III alcohol dehydrogenase. Overall, the results indicate that both of these classes of vertebrate alcohol dehydrogenase are important and suggest a protective metabolic function for the whole enzyme system. Images PMID:1409630

  4. Purification of arogenate dehydrogenase from Phenylobacterium immobile.

    PubMed

    Mayer, E; Waldner-Sander, S; Keller, B; Keller, E; Lingens, F

    1985-01-07

    Phenylobacterium immobile, a bacterium which is able to degrade the herbicide chloridazon, utilizes for L-tyrosine synthesis arogenate as an obligatory intermediate which is converted in the final biosynthetic step by a dehydrogenase to tyrosine. This enzyme, the arogenate dehydrogenase, has been purified for the first time in a 5-step procedure to homogeneity as confirmed by electrophoresis. The Mr of the enzyme that consists of two identical subunits amounts to 69000 as established by gel electrophoresis after cross-linking the enzyme with dimethylsuberimidate. The Km values were 0.09 mM for arogenate and 0.02 mM for NAD+. The enzyme has a high specificity with respect to its substrate arogenate.

  5. Peafowl lactate dehydrogenase: problem of isoenzyme identification.

    PubMed

    Rose, R G; Wilson, A C

    1966-09-16

    Peafowl, like other vertebrates, contain multiple forms of lactate dehydrogenase. The electrophoretic properties of the peafowl isoenzymes are unusual in that the isoenzyme from heart tissue can be either more or less anodic than that of muscle, depending on the pH. This finding focuses attention on the problem of isoenzyme identification. It is suggested that isoenzymes be identified on the basis of properties that are chemically and biologically more significant than electrophoretic mobility.

  6. Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Smithgall, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    Carcinogenic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by microsomal monoxygenases proceeds through trans-dihydrodiol metabolites to diol-epoxide ultimate carcinogens. This thesis directly investigated the role of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, a cytosolic NAD(P)-linked oxidoreductase, in the detoxification of polycyclic aromatic trans-dihydrodiols. A wide variety of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols were synthesized and shown to be substrates for the homogeneous rat liver dehydrogenase, including several potent proximate carcinogens derived from 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, 5-methylchrysene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Since microsomal activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is highly stereospecific, the stereochemical course of enzymatic trans-dihydrodiol oxidation was monitored using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry. The major product formed from the dehydrogenase-catalyzed oxidation of the trans-1,2-dihydrodiol of naphthalene was characterized using UV, IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy, and appears to be 4-hydroxy-1,2-naphthoquinone. Mass spectral analysis suggests that an analogous hydroxylated o-quinone is formed as the major product of benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation of trans-dihydrodiols was shown to be potently inhibited by all of the major classes of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Enhancement of trans-dihydrodiol proximate carcinogen oxidation may protect against possible adverse effects of the aspirin-like drugs, and help maintain the balance between activation and detoxification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  7. Relationships within the aldehyde dehydrogenase extended family.

    PubMed Central

    Perozich, J.; Nicholas, H.; Wang, B. C.; Lindahl, R.; Hempel, J.

    1999-01-01

    One hundred-forty-five full-length aldehyde dehydrogenase-related sequences were aligned to determine relationships within the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) extended family. The alignment reveals only four invariant residues: two glycines, a phenylalanine involved in NAD binding, and a glutamic acid that coordinates the nicotinamide ribose in certain E-NAD binary complex crystal structures, but which may also serve as a general base for the catalytic reaction. The cysteine that provides the catalytic thiol and its closest neighbor in space, an asparagine residue, are conserved in all ALDHs with demonstrated dehydrogenase activity. Sixteen residues are conserved in at least 95% of the sequences; 12 of these cluster into seven sequence motifs conserved in almost all ALDHs. These motifs cluster around the active site of the enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis of these ALDHs indicates at least 13 ALDH families, most of which have previously been identified but not grouped separately by alignment. ALDHs cluster into two main trunks of the phylogenetic tree. The largest, the "Class 3" trunk, contains mostly substrate-specific ALDH families, as well as the class 3 ALDH family itself. The other trunk, the "Class 1/2" trunk, contains mostly variable substrate ALDH families, including the class 1 and 2 ALDH families. Divergence of the substrate-specific ALDHs occurred earlier than the division between ALDHs with broad substrate specificities. A site on the World Wide Web has also been devoted to this alignment project. PMID:10210192

  8. Xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida Fu1: two molybdenum-containing dehydrogenases of novel structural composition.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, K; Andreesen, J R

    1990-01-01

    The constitutive xanthine dehydrogenase and the inducible 2-furoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase could be labeled with [185W]tungstate. This labeling was used as a reporter to purify both labile proteins. The radioactivity cochromatographed predominantly with the residual enzymatic activity of both enzymes during the first purification steps. Both radioactive proteins were separated and purified to homogeneity. Antibodies raised against the larger protein also exhibited cross-reactivity toward the second smaller protein and removed xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity up to 80 and 60% from the supernatant of cell extracts, respectively. With use of cell extract, Western immunoblots showed only two bands which correlated exactly with the activity stains for both enzymes after native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Molybdate was absolutely required for incorporation of 185W, formation of cross-reacting material, and enzymatic activity. The latter parameters showed a perfect correlation. This evidence proves that the radioactive proteins were actually xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase. The apparent molecular weight of the native xanthine dehydrogenase was about 300,000, and that of 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase was 150,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of both enzymes revealed two protein bands corresponding to molecular weights of 55,000 and 25,000. The xanthine dehydrogenase contained at least 1.6 mol of molybdenum, 0.9 ml of cytochrome b, 5.8 mol of iron, and 2.4 mol of labile sulfur per mol of enzyme. The composition of the 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase seemed to be similar, although the stoichiometry was not determined. The oxidation of furfuryl alcohol to furfural and further to 2-furoic acid by Pseudomonas putida Fu1 was catalyzed by two different dehydrogenases. Images PMID:2170335

  9. Inhibitory effect of disulfiram (Antabuse) on alcohol dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Carper, W R; Dorey, R C; Beber, J H

    1987-10-01

    We investigated the effect of disulfiram (Antabuse) on the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1) in vitro. We observed a time-dependent inhibition of this dehydrogenase by disulfiram and diethyldithiocarbamate similar to that obtained for aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.3). These results suggest a possible explanation for various side effects observed in the clinical use of Antabuse.

  10. A lipoamide dehydrogenase from Neisseria meningitidis has a lipoyl domain.

    PubMed

    Bringas, R; Fernandez, J

    1995-04-01

    A protein of molecular weight of 64 kDa (p64k) found in the outer membrane of Neisseria meningitidis shows a high degree of homology with both the lipoyl domain of the acetyltransferase and the entire sequence of the lipoamide dehydrogenase, the E2 and E3 components of the dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes, respectively. The alignment of the p64k with lipoyl domains and lipoamide dehydrogenases from different species is presented. The possible implications of this protein in binding protein-dependent transport are discussed. This is the first lipoamide dehydrogenase reported to have a lipoyl domain.

  11. Inhibition of membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase by disulfiram.

    PubMed

    Jay, D

    1991-04-01

    The effect of disulfiram on succinate oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase activities of beef heart submitochondrial particles was studied. Results show that disulfiram inhibits both functions. Succinate and malonate suppress the inhibitory action of disulfiram when succinate dehydrogenase is stabilized in an active conformation. Disulfiram is not able to inhibit the enzyme when succinate dehydrogenase is inactivated by oxaloacetate. The inhibitory effect of disulfiram is reverted by the addition of dithiothreitol. From these results, it is proposed that disulfiram inhibits the utilization of succinate by a direct modification of an -SH group located in the catalytically active site of succinate dehydrogenase.

  12. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... plasma. Malic dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of muscle and liver diseases, myocardial infarctions, cancer, and blood disorders such as myelogenous (produced in the...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... plasma. Malic dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of muscle and liver diseases, myocardial infarctions, cancer, and blood disorders such as myelogenous (produced in the...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... plasma. Malic dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of muscle and liver diseases, myocardial infarctions, cancer, and blood disorders such as myelogenous (produced in the...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... plasma. Malic dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of muscle and liver diseases, myocardial infarctions, cancer, and blood disorders such as myelogenous (produced in the...

  16. Placental glucose dehydrogenase polymorphism in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y J; Paik, S G; Park, H Y

    1994-12-01

    The genetic polymorphism of placental glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) was investigated in 300 Korean placentae using horizontal starch gel electrophoresis. The allele frequencies for GDH1, GDH2 and GDH3 were 0.537, 0.440 and 0.005, respectively, which were similar to those in Japanese. We also observed an anodal allele which was similar to the GDH4 originally reported in Chinese populations at a low frequency of 0.015. An additional new cathodal allele (named GDH6) was observed in the present study with a very low frequency of 0.003.

  17. Kinetic mechanism of chicken liver xanthine dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Bruguera, P; Lopez-Cabrera, A; Canela, E I

    1988-01-01

    The kinetic behaviour of chicken-liver xanthine dehydrogenase (xanthine/NAD+ oxidoreductase; EC 1.2.1.37) has been studied. Steady-state results, obtained from a wide range of concentrations of substrates and products, were fitted by rational functions of degree 1:1, 1:2, 2:2 and 3:3 with respect to substrates, and 0:1, 1:1, 0:2 and 1:2 with regard to products, using a non-linear regression program which guarantees the fit. The goodness of fit was improved using a computer program that combines model discrimination, parameter refinement and sequential experimental design. The AIC and F tests were also used for model discrimination. For comparative purposes, the xanthine/oxygen oxidoreductase reaction was also studied. From the functions which give the maximum improvement, the complete rate equation was deduced. The significance of the terms was stated by the above methods. It was concluded that xanthine dehydrogenase requires a minimum mechanism of degree 1:1 for xanthine, 2:2 for NAD+, 1:1 for uric acid and 1:2 for NADH in the xanthine/NAD+ oxidoreductase reaction. These are the minimum degrees required but a rate equation of higher degree is not excluded. PMID:3422556

  18. Catecholamine regulation of lactate dehydrogenase in rat brain cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; McGinnis, J.F.; de Vellis, J.

    1980-03-25

    The mechanism of catecholamine induction of the soluble cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) was studied in the rat glial tumor cell line, C6. Lactate dehydrogenase was partially purified from extracts of (/sup 3/H)leucine-labeled cells by affinity gel chromatography and quantitatively immunoprecipitated with anti-lactate dehydrogenase-5 IgG and with antilactate dehydrogenase-1 IgG. The immunoprecipitates were dissociated and electrophoresed on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. Using this methodology, the increased enzyme activity of lactate dehydrogenase in norepinephrine-treated C6 cells was observed to be concomitant with the increased synthesis of enzyme molecules. Despite the continued presence of norepinephrine, the specific increase in the rate of synthesis of lactate dehydrogenase was transient. It was first detected at 4 h, was maximum at 9 h, and returned to basal levels by 24 h. The half-life of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activity was 36 h during the induction and 40 h during deinduction. The half-life for decay of /sup 3/H-labeled lactate dehydrogenase was 41 h. These observations suggest that the increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity in norepinephrine-treated cells does not involve any change in the rate of degradation. Norepinephrine increased the specific rate of synthesis of both lactate dehydrogenase-5 (a tetramer of four M subunits) and lactate dehydrogenase-1 (a tetramer of four H subunits), although to different extents. Since these subunits are coded for by two separate genes on separate chromosomes, it suggests that the regulatory mechanism involves at least two separate sites of action.

  19. A chemical proteomic probe for detecting dehydrogenases: catechol rhodanine.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xia; Sem, Daniel S

    2012-01-01

    Inherent complexity of the proteome often demands that it be studied as manageable subsets, termed subproteomes. A subproteome can be defined in a number of ways, although a pragmatic approach is to define it based on common features in an active site that lead to binding of a common small molecule ligand (e.g., a cofactor or a cross-reactive drug lead). The subproteome, so defined, can be purified using that common ligand tethered to a resin, with affinity chromatography. Affinity purification of a subproteome is described in the next chapter. That subproteome can then be analyzed using a common ligand probe, such as a fluorescent common ligand that can be used to stain members of the subproteome in a native gel. Here, we describe such a fluorescent probe, based on a catechol rhodanine acetic acid (CRAA) ligand that binds to dehydrogenases. The CRAA ligand is fluorescent and binds to dehydrogenases at pH > 7, and hence can be used effectively to stain dehydrogenases in native gels to identify what subset of proteins in a mixture are dehydrogenases. Furthermore, if one is designing inhibitors to target one or more of these dehydrogenases, the CRAA staining can be performed in a competitive assay format, with or without inhibitor, to assess the selectivity of the inhibitor for the targeted dehydrogenase. Finally, the CRAA probe is a privileged scaffold for dehydrogenases, and hence can easily be modified to increase affinity for a given dehydrogenase.

  20. Toxic Neuronal Death by Glyeraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase and Mitochondria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    Neuroreport, 10(5), 1149-1153. Sioud, M., & Jespersen, L. (1996). Enhancement of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis by glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase...1996) Enhancemen t of hammerhead r ibozyme cata lysis by glycera ldehyde-3- phospha te dehydrogenase. J Mol Biol 257:775–789. Sirover MA (1997) Role of

  1. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5560 Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system. (a) Identification. A lactic...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5560 Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system. (a) Identification. A lactic...

  3. Conformations of Diphosphopyridine Coenzymes upon Binding to Dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Yu; Eichner, Ronald D.; Kaplan, Nathan O.

    1973-01-01

    The binding of oxidized as well as reduced coenzyme to some dehydrogenases has been studied under different concentration ratios and temperatures by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A significant difference in the spectral behavior between DPN+ and DPNH upon binding is interpreted in terms of fast and slow on-off rates relative to the nuclear magnetic resonance time scale in the binding of these two coenzymes. Significant downfield shifts of DPN+ were observed upon binding, comparable in magnitude to those expected upon opening (destacking) of the coenzymes in the case of chicken-muscle and lobster-tail lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) and yeast alchol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1.). A preliminary survey of several other dehydrogenases is consistent with these findings. In the case of 3-phosphoglyceraldehyde dehydrogenase, there is a possibility that the coenzyme exists in the folded form. PMID:4351183

  4. Characterization of the developmentally regulated Bacillus subtilis glucose dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lampel, K A; Uratani, B; Chaudhry, G R; Ramaley, R F; Rudikoff, S

    1986-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the structural gene for glucose dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.47) of Bacillus subtilis was determined and comprises 780 base pairs. The subunit molecular weight of glucose dehydrogenase as deduced from the nucleotide sequence is 28,196, which agrees well with the subunit molecular weight of 31,500 as determined from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The sequence of the 49 amino acids at the NH2 terminus of glucose dehydrogenase purified from sporulating B. subtilis cells matched the amino acid sequence derived from the DNA sequence. Glucose dehydrogenase was purified from an Escherichia coli strain harboring pEF1, a plasmid that contains the B. subtilis gene encoding glucose dehydrogenase. This enzyme has the identical amino acid sequence at the NH2 terminus as the B. subtilis enzyme. A putative ribosome-binding site, 5'-AGGAGG-3', which is complementary to the 3' end of the 16S rRNA of B. subtilis, was found 6 base pairs preceding the translational start codon of the structural gene of glucose dehydrogenase. No known promoterlike DNA sequences that are recognized by B. subtilis RNA polymerases were present immediately preceding the translational start site of the glucose dehydrogenase structural gene. The glucose dehydrogenase gene was found to be under sporulation control at the trancriptional level. A transcript of 1.6 kilobases hybridized to a DNA fragment within the structural gene of glucose dehydrogenase. This transcript was synthesized 3 h after the cessation of vegetative growth concomitant to the appearance of glucose dehydrogenase. Images PMID:3082854

  5. GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE-S, A SPERM-SPECIFIC GLYCOLYTIC ENZYME, IS REQUIRED FOR SPERM MOTILITY AND MALE FERTILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While glycolysis is highly conserved, it is remarkable that several novel isozymes in this central metabolic pathway are found in mammalian sperm. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-S (GAPDS) is the product of a mouse gene expressed only during spermatogenesis and, like it...

  6. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana cytokinin dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Bitto, Eduard; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2008-08-13

    Since first discovered in Zea mays, cytokinin dehydrogenase (CKX) genes have been identified in many plants including rice and Arabidopsis thaliana, which possesses CKX homologues (AtCKX1-AtCKX7). So far, the three-dimensional structure of only Z. mays CKX (ZmCKX1) has been determined. The crystal structures of ZmCKX1 have been solved in the native state and in complex with reaction products and a slowly reacting substrate. The structures revealed four glycosylated asparagine residues and a histidine residue covalently linked to FAD. Combined with the structural information, recent biochemical analyses of ZmCKX1 concluded that the final products of the reaction, adenine and a side chain aldehyde, are formed by nonenzymatic hydrolytic cleavage of cytokinin imine products resulting directly from CKX catalysis. Here, we report the crystal structure of AtCKX7 (gene locus At5g21482.1, UniProt code Q9FUJ1).

  7. NADH electrochemical sensor coupled with dehydrogenase enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, Hideko; Mascini, Marco )

    1992-06-01

    A graphite electrode assembled in a flow cell has shown to be a good detector for NADH. Current is linearly dependent on concentration in the range 10{sup {minus}7}-10{sup {minus}3} M without any mediator at the potential applied of 300 mV vs Ag/AgCl. Lactate and alcohol dehydrogenases were immobilized near to the electrode surface or in a reactor to obtain an NADH-based biosensor for lactate or ethanol. With lactate the authors succeeded to obtain a response only if the reactor was used and for alcohol a current proportional to the concentration was obtained either if the enzyme was immobilized in a membrane and placed near the electrode surface or when the enzyme was immobilized in a reactor form. By FIA procedures fast responses and recoveries were obtained, but with a short linear range.

  8. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Monkenbusch, M.; Stadler, A. Biehl, R.; Richter, D.; Ollivier, J.; Zamponi, M.

    2015-08-21

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D{sub 2}O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains.

  9. [Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Japan].

    PubMed

    Kanno, Hitoshi; Ogura, Hiromi

    2015-07-01

    In the past 10 years, we have diagnosed congenital hemolytic anemia in 294 patients, approximately 33% of whom were found to have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. It is becoming more common for Japanese to marry people of other ethnic origins, such that G6PD deficiency is becoming more prevalent in Japan. Japanese G6PD deficiency tends to be diagnosed in the neonatal period due to severe jaundice, while G6PD-deficient patients with foreign ancestors tend to be diagnosed at the onset of an acute hemolytic crisis before the age of six. It is difficult to predict the clinical course of each patient by G6PD activity, reduced glutathione content, or the presence/absence of severe neonatal jaundice. We propose that both neonatal G6PD screening and systematic analyses of G6PD gene mutations may be useful for personalized management of patients with G6PD-deficient hemolytic anemia.

  10. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.D.; Weretilnyk, E.A.; Weigel, P.

    1986-04-01

    Betaine is synthesized in spinach chloroplasts via the pathway Choline ..-->.. Betaine Aldehyde ..-->.. Betaine; the second step is catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). The subcellular distribution of BADH was determined in leaf protoplast lysates; BADH isozymes were separated by 6-9% native PAGE. The chloroplast stromal fraction contains a single BADH isozyme (number1) that accounts for > 80% of the total protoplast activity; the extrachloroplastic fraction has a minor isozyme (number2) which migrates more slowly than number1. Both isozymes appear specific for betaine aldehyde, are more active with NAD than NADP, and show a ca. 3-fold activity increase in salinized leaves. The phenotype of a natural variant of isozyme number1 suggests that the enzyme is a dimer.

  11. Multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase causing excessive acetaldehyde production from ethanol by oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Sylvia I; Jin, Ling; Gasparovich, Stephen R; Tao, Lin

    2013-07-01

    Ethanol consumption and poor oral hygiene are risk factors for oral and oesophageal cancers. Although oral streptococci have been found to produce excessive acetaldehyde from ethanol, little is known about the mechanism by which this carcinogen is produced. By screening 52 strains of diverse oral streptococcal species, we identified Streptococcus gordonii V2016 that produced the most acetaldehyde from ethanol. We then constructed gene deletion mutants in this strain and analysed them for alcohol and acetaldehyde dehydrogenases by zymograms. The results showed that S. gordonii V2016 expressed three primary alcohol dehydrogenases, AdhA, AdhB and AdhE, which all oxidize ethanol to acetaldehyde, but their preferred substrates were 1-propanol, 1-butanol and ethanol, respectively. Two additional dehydrogenases, S-AdhA and TdhA, were identified with specificities to the secondary alcohol 2-propanol and threonine, respectively, but not to ethanol. S. gordonii V2016 did not show a detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase even though its adhE gene encodes a putative bifunctional acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase. Mutants with adhE deletion showed greater tolerance to ethanol in comparison with the wild-type and mutant with adhA or adhB deletion, indicating that AdhE is the major alcohol dehydrogenase in S. gordonii. Analysis of 19 additional strains of S. gordonii, S. mitis, S. oralis, S. salivarius and S. sanguinis showed expressions of up to three alcohol dehydrogenases, but none showed detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, except one strain that showed a novel ALDH. Therefore, expression of multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase may contribute to excessive production of acetaldehyde from ethanol by certain oral streptococci.

  12. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum Lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Hernandez, Agustin; Speed, Haley; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-03-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum causes waterborne diseases worldwide. There is no effective therapy for C. parvum infection. The parasite depends mainly on glycolysis for energy production. Lactate dehydrogenase is a major regulator of glycolysis. This paper describes the biochemical characterization of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase and high resolution crystal structures of the apo-enzyme and four ternary complexes. The ternary complexes capture the enzyme bound to NAD/NADH or its 3-acetylpyridine analog in the cofactor binding pocket, while the substrate binding site is occupied by one of the following ligands: lactate, pyruvate or oxamate. The results reveal distinctive features of the parasitic enzyme. For example, C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase prefers the acetylpyridine analog of NADH as a cofactor. Moreover, it is slightly less sensitive to gossypol inhibition compared with mammalian lactate dehydrogenases and not inhibited by excess pyruvate. The active site loop and the antigenic loop in C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are considerably different from those in the human counterpart. Structural features and enzymatic properties of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are similar to enzymes from related parasites. Structural comparison with malate dehydrogenase supports a common ancestry for the two genes.

  13. Priapism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: An underestimated correlation?

    PubMed

    De Rose, Aldo Franco; Mantica, Guglielmo; Tosi, Mattia; Bovio, Giulio; Terrone, Carlo

    2016-10-05

    Priapism is a rare clinical condition characterized by a persistent erection unrelated to sexual excitement. Often the etiology is idiopathic. Three cases of priapism in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency patients have been described in literature. We present the case of a 39-year-old man with glucose- 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, who reached out to our department for the arising of a non-ischemic priapism without arteriolacunar fistula. We suggest that the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency could be an underestimated risk factor for priapism.

  14. Protein engineering reveals ancient adaptive replacements in isocitrate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Antony M.; Golding, G. Brian

    1997-01-01

    Evolutionary analysis indicates that eubacterial NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases (EC 1.1.1.42) first evolved from an NAD-dependent precursor about 3.5 billion years ago. Selection in favor of utilizing NADP was probably a result of niche expansion during growth on acetate, where isocitrate dehydrogenase provides 90% of the NADPH necessary for biosynthesis. Amino acids responsible for differing coenzyme specificities were identified from x-ray crystallographic structures of Escherichia coli isocitrate dehydrogenase and the distantly related Thermus thermophilus NAD-dependent isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. Site-directed mutagenesis at sites lining the coenzyme binding pockets has been used to invert the coenzyme specificities of both enzymes. Reconstructed ancestral sequences indicate that these replacements are ancestral. Hence the adaptive history of molecular evolution is amenable to experimental investigation. PMID:9096353

  15. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases, such as viral hepatitis,...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... is a device that is intended to measure the activity of the enzyme malic dehydrogenase in serum and... diseases, myocardial infarctions, cancer, and blood disorders such as myelogenous (produced in the...

  17. ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASES EXPRESSION DURING POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT: LIVER VS. LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules present in the environment, and can be produced during biotransformation of xenobiotics. Although the lung can be a major target for aldehyde toxicity, development of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), which detoxify aldehydes, in lung has be...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  8. Mammalian class IV alcohol dehydrogenase (stomach alcohol dehydrogenase): structure, origin, and correlation with enzymology.

    PubMed Central

    Parés, X; Cederlund, E; Moreno, A; Hjelmqvist, L; Farrés, J; Jörnvall, H

    1994-01-01

    The structure of a mammalian class IV alcohol dehydrogenase has been determined by peptide analysis of the protein isolated from rat stomach. The structure indicates that the enzyme constitutes a separate alcohol dehydrogenase class, in agreement with the distinct enzymatic properties; the class IV enzyme is somewhat closer to class I (the "classical" liver alcohol dehydrogenase; approximately 68% residue identities) than to the other classes (II, III, and V; approximately 60% residue identities), suggesting that class IV might have originated through duplication of an early vertebrate class I gene. The activity of the class IV protein toward ethanol is even higher than that of the classical liver enzyme. Both Km and kcat values are high, the latter being the highest of any class characterized so far. Structurally, these properties are correlated with replacements at the active site, affecting both substrate and coenzyme binding. In particular, Ala-294 (instead of valine) results in increased space in the middle section of the substrate cleft, Gly-47 (instead of a basic residue) results in decreased charge interactions with the coenzyme pyrophosphate, and Tyr-363 (instead of a basic residue) may also affect coenzyme binding. In combination, these exchanges are compatible with a promotion of the off dissociation and an increased turnover rate. In contrast, residues at the inner part of the substrate cleft are bulky, accounting for low activity toward secondary alcohols and cyclohexanol. Exchanges at positions 259-261 involve minor shifts in glycine residues at a reverse turn in the coenzyme-binding fold. Clearly, class IV is distinct in structure, ethanol turnover, stomach expression, and possible emergence from class I. PMID:8127901

  9. Enzymic and structural studies on Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase and other short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases.

    PubMed

    Smilda, T; Kamminga, A H; Reinders, P; Baron, W; van Hylckama Vlieg, J E; Beintema, J J

    2001-05-01

    Enzymic and structural studies on Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenases and other short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) are presented. Like alcohol dehydrogenases from other Drosophila species, the enzyme from D. simulans is more active on secondary than on primary alcohols, although ethanol is its only known physiological substrate. Several secondary alcohols were used to determine the kinetic parameters kcat and Km. The results of these experiments indicate that the substrate-binding region of the enzyme allows optimal binding of a short ethyl side-chain in a small binding pocket, and of a propyl or butyl side-chain in large binding pocket, with stereospecificity for R(-) alcohols. At a high concentration of R(-) alcohols substrate activation occurs. The kcat and Km values determined under these conditions are about two-fold, and two orders of magnitude, respectively, higher than those at low substrate concentrations. Sequence alignment of several SDRs of known, and unknown three-dimensional structures, indicate the presence of several conserved residues in addition to those involved in the catalyzed reactions. Structural roles of these conserved residues could be derived from observations made on superpositioned structures of several SDRs with known structures. Several residues are conserved in tetrameric SDRs, but not in dimeric ones. Two halohydrin-halide-lyases show significant homology with SDRs in the catalytic domains of these enzymes, but they do not have the structural features required for binding NAD+. Probably these lyases descend from an SDR, which has lost the capability to bind NAD+, but the enzyme reaction mechanisms may still be similar.

  10. Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Activity in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Lorite, María J.; Tachil, Jörg; Sanjuán, Juán; Meyer, Ortwin; Bedmar, Eulogio J.

    2000-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 110spc4 was capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth with carbon monoxide (CO) as a sole energy and carbon source under aerobic conditions. The enzyme carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH; EC 1.2.99.2) has been purified 21-fold, with a yield of 16% and a specific activity of 58 nmol of CO oxidized/min/mg of protein, by a procedure that involved differential ultracentrifugation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration. The purified enzyme gave a single protein and activity band on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had a molecular mass of 230,000 Da. The 230-kDa enzyme was composed of large (L; 75-kDa), medium (M; 28.4-kDa), and small (S; 17.2-kDa) subunits occurring in heterohexameric (LMS)2 subunit composition. The 75-kDa polypeptide exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with the large subunit of the CODH of Oligotropha carboxidovorans. The B. japonicum enzyme contained, per mole, 2.29 atoms of Mo, 7.96 atoms of Fe, 7.60 atoms of labile S, and 1.99 mol of flavin. Treatment of the enzyme with iodoacetamide yielded di(carboxamidomethyl)molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide, identifying molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as the organic portion of the B. japonicum CODH molybdenum cofactor. The absorption spectrum of the purified enzyme was characteristic of a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein. PMID:10788353

  11. Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Lorite, M J; Tachil, J; Sanjuán, J; Meyer, O; Bedmar, E J

    2000-05-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 110spc4 was capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth with carbon monoxide (CO) as a sole energy and carbon source under aerobic conditions. The enzyme carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH; EC 1.2.99.2) has been purified 21-fold, with a yield of 16% and a specific activity of 58 nmol of CO oxidized/min/mg of protein, by a procedure that involved differential ultracentrifugation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration. The purified enzyme gave a single protein and activity band on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had a molecular mass of 230,000 Da. The 230-kDa enzyme was composed of large (L; 75-kDa), medium (M; 28.4-kDa), and small (S; 17.2-kDa) subunits occurring in heterohexameric (LMS)(2) subunit composition. The 75-kDa polypeptide exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with the large subunit of the CODH of Oligotropha carboxidovorans. The B. japonicum enzyme contained, per mole, 2.29 atoms of Mo, 7.96 atoms of Fe, 7.60 atoms of labile S, and 1.99 mol of flavin. Treatment of the enzyme with iodoacetamide yielded di(carboxamidomethyl)molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide, identifying molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as the organic portion of the B. japonicum CODH molybdenum cofactor. The absorption spectrum of the purified enzyme was characteristic of a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein.

  12. Targeting Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2: New Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Che-Hong; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Gross, Eric R.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2014-01-01

    A family of detoxifying enzymes called aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) has been a subject of recent interest, as its role in detoxifying aldehydes that accumulate through metabolism and to which we are exposed from the environment has been elucidated. Although the human genome has 19 ALDH genes, one ALDH emerges as a particularly important enzyme in a variety of human pathologies. This ALDH, ALDH2, is located in the mitochondrial matrix with much known about its role in ethanol metabolism. Less known is a new body of research to be discussed in this review, suggesting that ALDH2 dysfunction may contribute to a variety of human diseases including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, and cancer. Recent studies suggest that ALDH2 dysfunction is also associated with Fanconi anemia, pain, osteoporosis, and the process of aging. Furthermore, an ALDH2 inactivating mutation (termed ALDH2*2) is the most common single point mutation in humans, and epidemiological studies suggest a correlation between this inactivating mutation and increased propensity for common human pathologies. These data together with studies in animal models and the use of new pharmacological tools that activate ALDH2 depict a new picture related to ALDH2 as a critical health-promoting enzyme. PMID:24382882

  13. Targeting isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) in cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takeo; Khawaja, Muhammad Rizwan; DiNardo, Courtney D; Atkins, Johnique T; Janku, Filip

    2016-05-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is an essential enzyme for cellular respiration in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Recurrent mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 are prevalent in several cancers including glioma, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), cholangiocarcinoma and chondrosarcoma. The mutated IDH1 and IDH2 proteins have a gain-of-function, neomorphic activity, catalyzing the reduction of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) by NADPH. Cancer-associated IDH mutations block normal cellular differentiation and promote tumorigenesis via the abnormal production of the oncometabolite 2-HG. High levels of 2-HG have been shown to inhibit α-KG dependent dioxygenases, including histone and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) demethylases, which play a key role in regulating the epigenetic state of cells. Current targeted inhibitors of IDH1 (AG120, IDH305), IDH2 (AG221), and pan-IDH1/2 (AG881) selectively inhibit mutant IDH protein and induce cell differentiation in in vitro and in vivo models. Preliminary results from phase I clinical trials with IDH inhibitors in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies have demonstrated an objective response rate ranging from 31% to 40% with durable responses (>1 year) observed. Furthermore, the IDH inhibitors have demonstrated early signals of activity in solid tumors with IDH mutations, including cholangiocarcinomas and low grade gliomas.

  14. Herbicidal Activity of an Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase Inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Wittenbach, V. A.; Teaney, P. W.; Hanna, W. S.; Rayner, D. R.; Schloss, J. V.

    1994-01-01

    Isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) is the third enzyme specific to leucine biosynthesis. It catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of 3-isopropylmalate (3-IPM) to 2-ketoisocaproic acid. The partially purified enzyme from pea (Pisum sativum L.) shows a broad pH optimum of 7.8 to 9.1 and has Km values for 3-IPM and NAD of 18 and 40 [mu]M, respectively. O-Isobutenyl oxalylhydroxamate (O-IbOHA) has been discovered to be an excellent inhibitor of the pea IPMDH, with an apparent inhibitor constant of 5 nM. As an herbicide, O-IbOHA showed only moderate activity on a variety of broadleaf and grass species. We characterized the herbicidal activity of O-IbOHA on corn (Zea mays L.), a sensitive species; giant foxtail (Setaria faberi) and morning glory (Ipomoea purpurea [L.] Roth), moderately tolerant species; and soybean [Glycine max L. Merr.), a tolerant species. Differences in tolerance among the species were not due to differences in the sensitivity of IPMDH. Studies with [14C]O-IbOHA suggested that uptake and translocation were not major limitations for herbicidal activity, nor were they determinants of tolerance. Moreover, metabolism could not account for the difference in tolerance of corn, foxtail, and morning glory, although it might account for the tolerance of soybean. Herbicidal activity on all four species was correlated with the accumulation of 3-IPM in the plants. PMID:12232331

  15. Iodination of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jean O.; Harris, J. Ieuan

    1970-01-01

    1. A high degree of homology in the positions of tyrosine residues in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase from lobster and pig muscle, and from yeast, prompted an examination of the reactivity of tyrosine residues in the enzyme. 2. Iodination of the enzyme from lobster muscle with low concentrations of potassium tri-[125I]-iodide led to the identification of tyrosine residues of differing reactivity. Tyrosine-46 appeared to be the most reactive in the native enzyme. 3. When the monocarboxymethylated enzyme was briefly treated with small amounts of iodine, iodination could be confined almost entirely to tyrosine-46 in the lobster enzyme; tyrosine-39 or tyrosine-42, or both, were also beginning to react. 4. These three tyrosine residues were also those that reacted most readily in the carboxymethylated pig and yeast enzymes. 5. The difficulties in attaining specific reaction of the native enzyme are considered. 6. The differences between our results and those of other workers are discussed. ImagesPLATE 1PLATE 2 PMID:5530750

  16. Human liver aldehyde dehydrogenase: coenzyme binding

    SciTech Connect

    Kosley, L.L.; Pietruszko, R.

    1987-05-01

    The binding of (U-/sup 14/C) NAD to mitochondrial (E2) and cytoplasmin(E1) aldehyde dehydrogenase was measured by gel filtration and sedimentation techniques. The binding data for NAD and (E1) yielded linear Scatchard plots giving a dissociation constant of 25 (+/- 8) uM and the stoichiometry of 2 mol of NAD bound per mol of E1. The binding data for NAD and (E2) gave nonlinear Scatchard plots. The binding of NADH to E2 was measured via fluorescence enhancement; this could not be done with E1 because there was no signal. The dissociation constant for E2 by this technique was 0.7 (+/- 0.4) uM and stoichiometry of 1.0 was obtained. The binding of (U-/sup 14/C) NADH to (E1) and (E2) was also measured by the sedimentation technique. The binding data for (E1) and NADH gave linear Scatchard plots giving a dissociation constant of 13 (+/- 6) uM and the stoichiometry of 2.0. The binding data for NADH to (E2) gave nonlinear Scatchard plots. With (E1), the dissociation constants for both NAD and NADH are similar to those determined kinetically, but the stoichiometry is only half of that found by stopped flow technique. With (E2) the dissociation constant by fluorometric procedure was 2 orders of magnitude less than that from catalytic reaction.

  17. Succinate Dehydrogenase Loss in Familial Paraganglioma: Biochemistry, Genetics, and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Her, Yeng F.; Maher, L. James

    2015-01-01

    It is counterintuitive that metabolic defects reducing ATP production can cause, rather than protect from, cancer. Yet this is precisely the case for familial paraganglioma, a form of neuroendocrine malignancy caused by loss of succinate dehydrogenase in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Here we review biochemical, genetic, and epigenetic considerations in succinate dehydrogenase loss and present leading models and mysteries associated with this fascinating and important tumor. PMID:26294907

  18. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of methylated liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C S

    1978-01-01

    Reductive methylation of lysine residues activates liver alcohol dehydrogenase in the oxidation of primary alcohols, but decreases the activity of the enzyme towards secondary alcohols. The modification also desensitizes the dehydrogenase to substrate inhibition at high alcohol concentrations. Steady-state kinetic studies of methylated liver alcohol dehydrogenase over a wide range of alcohol concentrations suggest that alcohol oxidation proceeds via a random addition of coenzyme and substrate with a pathway for the formation of the productive enzyme-NADH-alcohol complex. To facilitate the analyses of the effects of methylation on liver alcohol dehydrogenase and factors affecting them, new operational kinetic parameters to describe the results at high substrate concentration were introduced. The changes in the dehydrogenase activity on alkylation were found to be associated with changes in the maximum velocities that are affected by the hydrophobicity of alkyl groups introduced at lysine residues. The desensitization of alkylated liver alcohol dehydrogenase to substrate inhibition is identified with a decrease in inhibitory Michaelis constants for alcohols and this is favoured by the steric effects of substituents at the lysine residues. PMID:697732

  19. Effect of fermented sea tangle on the alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jae-Young; Jeong, Jae-Jun; Yang, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Bae-Jin; Cho, Young-Su

    2011-08-01

    Sea tangle, a kind of brown seaweed, was fermented with Lactobacillus brevis BJ-20. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content in fermented sea tangle (FST) was 5.56% (w/w) and GABA in total free amino acid of FST was 49.5%. The effect of FST on the enzyme activities and mRNA protein expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) involved in alcohol metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. Yeast was cultured in YPD medium supplemented with different concentrations of FST powder [0, 0.4, 0.8, and 1.0% (w/v)] for 18 h. FST had no cytotoxic effect on the yeast growth. The highest activities and protein expressions of ADH and ALDH from the cell-free extracts of S. cerevisiae were evident with the 0.4% and 0.8% (w/v) FST-supplemented concentrations, respectively. The highest concentrations of GABA as well as minerals (Zn, Ca, and Mg) were found in the cell-free extracts of S. cerevisiae cultured in medium supplemented with 0.4% (w/v) FST. The levels of GABA, Zn, Ca, and Mg in S. cerevisiae were strongly correlated with the enzyme activities of ADH and ALDH in yeast. These results indicate that FST can enhance the enzyme activities and protein expression of ADH and ALDH in S. cerevisiae.

  20. Stringency of substrate specificity of Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase.

    SciTech Connect

    Boernke, W. E.; Millard, C. S.; Stevens, P. W.; Kakar, S. N.; Stevens, F. J.; Donnelly, M. I.; Nebraska Wesleyan Univ.

    1995-09-10

    Malate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase are members of the structurally and functionally homologous family of 2-ketoacid dehydrogenases. Both enzymes display high specificity for their respective keto substrates, oxaloacetate and pyruvate. Closer analysis of their specificity, however, reveals that the specificity of malate dehydrogenase is much stricter and less malleable than that of lactate dehydrogenase. Site-specific mutagenesis of the two enzymes in an attempt to reverse their specificity has met with contrary results. Conversion of a specific active-site glutamine to arginine in lactate dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus generated an enzyme that displayed activity toward oxaloacetate equal to that of the native enzyme toward pyruvate (H. M. Wilks et al. (1988) Science 242, 1541-1544). We have constructed a series of mutants in the mobile, active site loop of the Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase that incorporate the complementary change, conversion of arginine 81 to glutamine, to evaluate the role of charge distribution and conformational flexibility within this loop in defining the substrate specificity of these enzymes. Mutants incorporating the change R81Q all had reversed specificity, displaying much higher activity toward pyruvate than to the natural substrate, oxaloacetate. In contrast to the mutated lactate dehydrogenase, these reversed-specificity mutants were much less active than the native enzyme. Secondary mutations within the loop of the E. coli enzyme (A80N, A80P, A80P/M85E/D86T) had either no or only moderately beneficial effects on the activity of the mutant enzyme toward pyruvate. The mutation A80P, which can be expected to reduce the overall flexibility of the loop, modestly improved activity toward pyruvate. The possible physiological relevance of the stringent specificity of malate dehydrogenase was investigated. In normal strains of E. coli, fermentative metabolism was not affected by expression of the mutant

  1. The Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Hadj-Saïd, Jessica; Pandelia, Maria-Eirini; Léger, Christophe; Fourmond, Vincent; Dementin, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Ni-containing Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenases (CODHs) catalyze the reversible conversion between CO and CO₂and are involved in energy conservation and carbon fixation. These homodimeric enzymes house two NiFeS active sites (C-clusters) and three accessory [4Fe-4S] clusters. The Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Dv) genome contains a two-gene CODH operon coding for a CODH (cooS) and a maturation protein (cooC) involved in nickel insertion in the active site. According to the literature, the question of the precise function of CooC as a chaperone folding the C-cluster in a form which accommodates free nickel or as a mere nickel donor is not resolved. Here, we report the biochemical and spectroscopic characterization of two recombinant forms of the CODH, produced in the absence and in the presence of CooC, designated CooS and CooS(C), respectively. CooS contains no nickel and cannot be activated, supporting the idea that the role of CooC is to fold the C-cluster so that it can bind nickel. As expected, CooS(C) is Ni-loaded, reversibly converts CO and CO₂, displays the typical Cred1 and Cred2 EPR signatures of the C-cluster and activates in the presence of methyl viologen and CO in an autocatalytic process. However, Ni-loaded CooS(C) reaches maximum activity only upon reductive treatment in the presence of exogenous nickel, a phenomenon that had not been observed before. Surprisingly, the enzyme displays the Cred1 and Cred2 signatures whether it has been activated or not, showing that this activation process of the Ni-loaded Dv CODH is not associated with structural changes at the active site.

  2. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, B C; Fathi, A T; DiNardo, C D; Pollyea, D A; Chan, S M; Swords, R

    2017-01-01

    Alterations to genes involved in cellular metabolism and epigenetic regulation are implicated in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies. Recurring mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes are detected in approximately 20% of adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 5% of adults with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). IDH proteins are homodimeric enzymes involved in diverse cellular processes, including adaptation to hypoxia, histone demethylation and DNA modification. The IDH2 protein is localized in the mitochondria and is a critical component of the tricarboxylic acid (also called the ‘citric acid' or Krebs) cycle. Both IDH2 and IDH1 (localized in the cytoplasm) proteins catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). Mutant IDH enzymes have neomorphic activity and catalyze reduction of α-KG to the (R) enantiomer of 2-hydroxyglutarate, which is associated with DNA and histone hypermethylation, altered gene expression and blocked differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. The prognostic significance of mutant IDH (mIDH) is controversial but appears to be influenced by co-mutational status and the specific location of the mutation (IDH1-R132, IDH2-R140, IDH2-R172). Treatments specifically or indirectly targeted to mIDH are currently under clinical investigation; these therapies have been generally well tolerated and, when used as single agents, have shown promise for inducing responses in some mIDH patients when used as first-line treatment or in relapsed or refractory AML or MDS. Use of mIDH inhibitors in combination with drugs with non-overlapping mechanisms of action is especially promising, as such regimens may address the clonal heterogeneity and the multifactorial pathogenic processes involved in mIDH myeloid malignancies. Advances in mutational analysis have made testing more rapid and convenient, and less expensive; such testing should become part of routine diagnostic workup and repeated at

  3. Succinate Dehydrogenase Gene Mutations in Cardiac Paragangliomas

    PubMed Central

    Martucci, Victoria L.; Emaminia, Abbas; del Rivero, Jaydira; Lechan, Ronald M.; Magoon, Bindiya T.; Galia, Analyza; Fojo, Tito; Leung, Steve; Lorusso, Roberto; Jimenez, Camilo; Shulkin, Barry L.; Audibert, Jennifer L.; Adams, Karen T.; Rosing, Douglas R.; Vaidya, Anand; Dluhy, Robert G.; Horvath, Keith A.; Pacak, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are chromaffin cell tumors arising from neuroendocrine cells. At least one third of paragangliomas are related to germline mutations in one of 17 genes. While these tumors can occur throughout the body, cardiac paragangliomas are very rare, accounting for less than 0.3% of mediastinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of patients with cardiac paragangliomas, particularly focusing on their genetic backgrounds. A retrospective chart analysis of fifteen patients with cardiac paraganglioma was performed to determine clinical presentation, genetic background, diagnostic work-up, and outcomes. The average age at diagnosis was 41.9 years. Typical symptoms of paraganglioma (e.g., hypertension, sweating, palpitations, headache) were reported at initial presentation in 13 patients (86.7%); the remaining 2, as well as 4 symptomatic patients, initially presented with cardiac-specific symptoms (e.g., chest pain, dyspnea). Genetic testing was done in 13 cases (86.7%); 10 (76.9%) were positive for mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) subunits B, C, or D. Thirteen cases (86.7%) underwent surgery to remove the paraganglioma with no intraoperative morbidity or mortality; one additional patient underwent surgical resection but experienced intraoperative complications after removal of the tumor due to comorbities and did not survive. SDHx mutations are known to be associated with mediastinal locations and malignant behavior of paragangliomas. In this report, we extend the locations of predominantly SDHx-related paragangliomas to cardiac tumors. In conclusion, cardiac paragangliomas are frequently associated with underlying SDHx germline mutations, suggesting a need for genetic testing of all patients with this rare tumor. PMID:25896150

  4. Structural Studies of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvate in the presence of Mg(2+) and thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) followed by the rate-limiting reductive acetylation of the lipoyl moiety linked to dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The three-dimensional structure of human E1 is elucidated using the methods of macromolecular X-ray crystallography. The structure is an alpha, alpha', beta and beta' tetramer with the protein units being in the tetrahedral arrangement. Each 361-residue alpha-subunit and 329-residue beta-subunit is composed of a beta-sheet core surrounded by alpha-helical domains. Each subunit is in extensive contact with all the three subunits involving TPP and magnesium cofactors, and potassium ions. The two binding sites for TPP are at the alpha-beta' and alpha'-beta interfaces, each involving a magnesium ion and Phe6l, His63, Tyr89, and Met200 from the alpha-subunit (or alpha'-subunit), and Met81 Phe85, His128 from the beta-subunit (or beta'-subunit). K+ ions are nestled between two beta-sheets and the end of an alpha-helix in each beta-subunit, where they are coordinated by four carbonyl oxygen groups from Ile12, Ala160, Asp163, and Asnl65, and a water molecule. The catalytic C2 carbon of thiazolium ring in this structure forms a 3.2 A contact with a water molecule involved in a series of H-bonds with other water molecules, and indirectly with amino acids including those involved in the catalysis and regulation of the enzyme.

  5. Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase Structure and Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) alcohol dehydrogenase I (ADH1) is the constitutive enzyme that reduces acetaldehyde to ethanol during the fermentation of glucose. ADH1 is a homotetramer of subunits with 347 amino acid residues. A structure for ADH1 was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.4 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains four different subunits, arranged as similar dimers named AB and CD. The unit cell contains two different tetramers made up of “back-to-back” dimers, AB:AB and CD:CD. The A and C subunits in each dimer are structurally similar, with a closed conformation, bound coenzyme, and the oxygen of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol ligated to the catalytic zinc in the classical tetrahedral coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, and His-66. In contrast, the B and D subunits have an open conformation with no bound coenzyme, and the catalytic zinc has an alternative, inverted coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, His-66, and the carboxylate of Glu-67. The asymmetry in the dimeric subunits of the tetramer provides two structures that appear to be relevant for the catalytic mechanism. The alternative coordination of the zinc may represent an intermediate in the mechanism of displacement of the zinc-bound water with alcohol or aldehyde substrates. Substitution of Glu-67 with Gln-67 decreases the catalytic efficiency by 100-fold. Previous studies of structural modeling, evolutionary relationships, substrate specificity, chemical modification, and site-directed mutagenesis are interpreted more fully with the three-dimensional structure. PMID:25157460

  6. Properties and subunit structure of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hamada, M; Hiraoka, T; Koike, K; Ogasahara, K; Kanzaki, T

    1976-06-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase [EC 1.2.4.1] was separated from the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and its molecular weight was estimated to be about 150,000 by sedimentation equilibrium methods. The enzyme was dissociated into two subunits (alpha and beta), with estimated molecular weights of 41,000 (alpha) and 36,000 (beta), respectively, by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. The subunits were separated by phosphocellulose column chromatography and their chemical properties were examined. The subunit structure of the pyruvate dehydrogenase was assigned as alpha2beta2. The content of right-handed alpha-helix in the enzyme molecule was estimated to be about 29 and 28% by optical rotatory dispersion and by circular dichroism, respectively. The enzyme contained no thiamine-PP, and its dehydrogenase activity was completely dependent on added thiamine-PP and partially dependent on added Mg2+ and Ca2+. The Km value of pyruvate dehydrogenase for thiamine diphosphate was estimated to be 6.5 X 10(-5) M in the presence of Mg2+ or Ca2+. The enzyme showed highly specific activity for thiamine-PP dependent oxidation of both pyruvate and alpha-ketobutyrate, but it also showed some activity with alpha-ketovalerate, alpha-ketoisocaproate, and alpha-ketoisovalerate. The pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was strongly inhibited by bivalent heavy metal ions and by sulfhydryl inhibitors; and the enzyme molecule contained 27 moles of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-reactive sulfhydryl groups and a total of 36 moles of sulfhydryl groups. The inhibitory effect of p-chloromercuribenzoate was prevented by preincubating the enzyme with thiamine-PP plus pyruvate. The structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase necessary for formation of the complex is also reported.

  7. Direct transfer of NADH between alpha-glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase: fact or misinterpretation?

    PubMed

    Srivastava, D K; Smolen, P; Betts, G F; Fukushima, T; Spivey, H O; Bernhard, S A

    1989-09-01

    Following the criticism by Chock and Gutfreund [Chock, P.B. & Gutfreund, H. (1988) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85, 8870-8874], that our proposal of direct transfer of NADH between glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (alpha-glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase, alpha-GDH; EC 1.1.1.8) and L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27) was based on a misinterpretation of the kinetic data, we have reinvestigated the transfer mechanism between this enzyme pair. By using the "enzyme buffering" steady-state kinetic technique [Srivastava, D.K. & Bernhard, S.A. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 4538-4545], we examined the mechanism (random diffusion vs. direct transfer) of transfer of NADH between rabbit muscle alpha-GDH and pig heart LDH. The steady-state data reveal that the LDH-NADH complex and the alpha-GDH-NADH complex can serve as substrate for the alpha-GDH-catalyzed reaction and the LDH-catalyzed reaction, respectively. This is consistent with the direct-transfer mechanism and inconsistent with a mechanism in which free NADH is the only competent substrate for either enzyme-catalyzed reaction. The discrepancy between this conclusion and that of Chock and Gutfreund comes from (i) their incorrect measurement of the Km for NADH in the alpha-GDH-catalyzed reaction, (ii) inadequate design and range of the steady-state kinetic experiments, and (iii) their qualitative assessment of the prediction of the direct-transfer mechanism. Our transient kinetic measurements for the transfer of NADH from alpha-GDH to LDH and from LDH to alpha-GDH show that both are slower than predicted on the basis of free equilibration of NADH through the aqueous environment. The decrease in the rate of equilibration of NADH between alpha-GDH and LDH provides no support for the random-diffusion mechanism; rather, it suggests a direct interaction between enzymes that modulates the transfer rate of NADH. Thus, contrary to Chock and Gutfreund's conclusion, all our experimental data compel us to propose, once again, that

  8. Rearrangement of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase protein–protein interactions by the MDM2 ligand nutlin‐3

    PubMed Central

    Way, Luke; Faktor, Jakub; Dvorakova, Petra; Nicholson, Judith; Vojtesek, Borek; Graham, Duncan; Ball, Kathryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Drugs targeting MDM2's hydrophobic pocket activate p53. However, these agents act allosterically and have agonist effects on MDM2's protein interaction landscape. Dominant p53‐independent MDM2‐drug responsive‐binding proteins have not been stratified. We used as a variable the differential expression of MDM2 protein as a function of cell density to identify Nutlin‐3 responsive MDM2‐binding proteins that are perturbed independent of cell density using SWATH‐MS. Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, the E3 subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, was one of two Nutlin‐3 perturbed proteins identified fours hour posttreatment at two cell densities. Immunoblotting confirmed that dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase was induced by Nutlin‐3. Depletion of MDM2 using siRNA also elevated dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase in Nutlin‐3 treated cells. Mitotracker confirmed that Nutlin‐3 inhibits mitochondrial activity. Enrichment of mitochondria using TOM22+ immunobeads and TMT labeling defined key changes in the mitochondrial proteome after Nutlin‐3 treatment. Proximity ligation identified rearrangements of cellular protein–protein complexes in situ. In response to Nutlin‐3, a reduction of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase/dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase protein complexes highlighted a disruption of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. This coincides with an increase in MDM2/dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase complexes in the nucleus that was further enhanced by the nuclear export inhibitor Leptomycin B. The data suggest one therapeutic impact of MDM2 drugs might be on the early perturbation of specific protein–protein interactions within the mitochondria. This methodology forms a blueprint for biomarker discovery that can identify rearrangements of MDM2 protein–protein complexes in drug‐treated cells. PMID:27273042

  9. Purification and characterization of limonoate dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus fascians.

    PubMed

    Humanes, L; López-Ruiz, A; Merino, M T; Roldán, J M; Diez, J

    1997-09-01

    Limonoate dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus fascians has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by a procedure that consists of ion-exchange, hydrophobic, and affinity chromatography. The native enzyme has a molecular mass of around 128,000 Da and appears to be composed of four similar subunits (30,000 Da each). The isoelectric point is 4.9 as determined by isoelectric focusing. The homogeneous enzyme was used to determine the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence. The enzyme was purified from cells grown in either fructose or limonoate as a carbon source. Limonoate dehydrogenase activity was higher in limonoate-grown cultures. Additionally, the enzyme preparations differed in their affinity for limonoids but not for NAD+. In all cases limonoate dehydrogenase exhibited a higher catalytic rate and stronger affinity for limonoate A-ring lactone than for disodium limonoate, the limonoid traditionally used for in vitro activity assays. Our data confirm previous reports proposing that limonoate A-ring lactone is the physiological substrate for limonoate dehydrogenase. The increase in limonoate dehydrogenase activity observed in limonoate-grown cultures appears to be caused by a rise in protein levels, since chloramphenicol prevented such an effect.

  10. Characterization of interactions of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase with its binding protein in the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yun-Hee; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2010-05-07

    Unlike pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes (PDCs) from prokaryotes, PDCs from higher eukaryotes have an additional structural component, E3-binding protein (BP), for binding of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) in the complex. Based on the 3D structure of the subcomplex of human (h) E3 with the di-domain (L3S1) of hBP, the amino acid residues (H348, D413, Y438, and R447) of hE3 for binding to hBP were substituted singly by alanine or other residues. These substitutions did not have large effects on hE3 activity when measured in its free form. However, when these hE3 mutants were reconstituted in the complex, the PDC activity was significantly reduced to 9% for Y438A, 20% for Y438H, and 18% for D413A. The binding of hE3 mutants with L3S1 determined by isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the binding affinities of the Y438A, Y438H, and D413A mutants to L3S1 were severely reduced (1019-, 607-, and 402-fold, respectively). Unlike wild-type hE3 the binding of the Y438A mutant to L3S1 was accompanied by an unfavorable enthalpy change and a large positive entropy change. These results indicate that hE3-Y438 and hE3-D413 play important roles in binding of hE3 to hBP.

  11. Radial immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis compared for identifying autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase in human serum.

    PubMed

    Harff, G A; Backer, E T

    1990-12-14

    Variant electrophoretic patterns of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes were studied. By radial immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis, immunoglobulin and light chain class of autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase were identified in nine sera: seven of these sera demonstrated IgG (5 lambda, 2 kappa) autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase, the other two demonstrated IgA (both kappa) autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase, the other two demonstrated IgA (both kappa) autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase. We conclude that radial immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis are equally effective for identifying auto-antibodies to lactate dehydrogenase in serum. Radial immunodiffusion, however, is easier to perform than immunoelectrophoresis.

  12. Crystal structure of homoisocitrate dehydrogenase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Bulfer, Stacie L.; Hendershot, Jenna M.; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2013-09-18

    Lysine biosynthesis in fungi, euglena, and certain archaebacteria occurs through the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway. Enzymes in the first steps of this pathway have been proposed as potential targets for the development of antifungal therapies, as they are absent in animals but are conserved in several pathogenic fungi species, including Candida, Cryptococcus, and Aspergillus. One potential antifungal target in the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway is the third enzyme in the pathway, homoisocitrate dehydrogenase (HICDH), which catalyzes the divalent metal-dependent conversion of homoisocitrate to 2-oxoadipate (2-OA) using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) as a cofactor. HICDH belogns to a family of {beta}-hydroxyacid oxidative decarboxylases that includes malate dehydrogenase, tartrate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), and 3-isopropylmalte dehydrogenase (IPMDH). ICDH and IPMDH are well-characterized enzymes that catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to yield 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) in the citric acid cycle and the conversion of 3-isopropylmalate to 2-oxoisovalerate in the leucine biosynthetic pathway, respectively. Recent structural and biochemical studies of HICDH reveal that this enzyme shares sequence, structural, and mechanistic homology with ICDH and IPMDH. To date, the only published structures of HICDH are from the archaebacteria Thermus thermophilus (TtHICDH). Fungal HICDHs diverge from TtHICDH in several aspects, including their thermal stability, oligomerization state, and substrate specificity, thus warranting further characterization. To gain insights into these differences, they determined crystal structures of a fungal Schizosaccharomyces pombe HICDH (SpHICDH) as an apoenzyme and as a binary complex with additive tripeptide glycyl-glycyl-glycine (GGG) to 1.55 {angstrom} and 1.85 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Finally, a comparison of the SpHICDH and TtHICDH structures reveal differences in

  13. Reversible inactivation of CO dehydrogenase with thiol compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kreß, Oliver; Gnida, Manuel; Pelzmann, Astrid M.; Marx, Christian; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Meyer, Ortwin

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Rather large thiols (e.g. coenzyme A) can reach the active site of CO dehydrogenase. • CO- and H{sub 2}-oxidizing activity of CO dehydrogenase is inhibited by thiols. • Inhibition by thiols was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. • Thiols coordinate the Cu ion in the [CuSMo(=O)OH] active site as a third ligand. - Abstract: Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CO dehydrogenase) from Oligotropha carboxidovorans is a structurally characterized member of the molybdenum hydroxylase enzyme family. It catalyzes the oxidation of CO (CO + H{sub 2}O → CO{sub 2} + 2e{sup −} + 2H{sup +}) which proceeds at a unique [CuSMo(=O)OH] metal cluster. Because of changing activities of CO dehydrogenase, particularly in subcellular fractions, we speculated whether the enzyme would be subject to regulation by thiols (RSH). Here we establish inhibition of CO dehydrogenase by thiols and report the corresponding K{sub i}-values (mM): L-cysteine (5.2), D-cysteine (9.7), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (8.2), D,L-homocysteine (25.8), L-cysteine–glycine (2.0), dithiothreitol (4.1), coenzyme A (8.3), and 2-mercaptoethanol (9.3). Inhibition of the enzyme was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of thiol-inhibited CO dehydrogenase revealed a bimetallic site in which the RSH coordinates to the Cu-ion as a third ligand ([Mo{sup VI}(=O)OH{sub (2)}SCu{sup I}(SR)S-Cys]) leaving the redox state of the Cu(I) and the Mo(VI) unchanged. Collectively, our findings establish a regulation of CO dehydrogenase activity by thiols in vitro. They also corroborate the hypothesis that CO interacts with the Cu-ion first. The result that thiol compounds much larger than CO can freely travel through the substrate channel leading to the bimetallic cluster challenges previous concepts involving chaperone function and is of importance for an understanding how the sulfuration step in

  14. The Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complexes: Structure-based Function and Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mulchand S.; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes (PDCs) from all known living organisms comprise three principal catalytic components for their mission: E1 and E2 generate acetyl-coenzyme A, whereas the FAD/NAD+-dependent E3 performs redox recycling. Here we compare bacterial (Escherichia coli) and human PDCs, as they represent the two major classes of the superfamily of 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes with different assembly of, and interactions among components. The human PDC is subject to inactivation at E1 by serine phosphorylation by four kinases, an inactivation reversed by the action of two phosphatases. Progress in our understanding of these complexes important in metabolism is reviewed. PMID:24798336

  15. Purification of xanthine dehydrogenase and sulfite oxidase from chicken liver.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, K; Brody, M S; Hille, R

    1996-05-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase and sulfite oxidase from chicken liver are oxomolybdenum enzymes which catalyze the oxidation of xanthine to uric acid and sulfite to sulfate, respectively. Independent purification protocols have been previously described for both enzymes. Here we describe a procedure by which xanthine dehydrogenase and sulfite oxidase are purified simultaneously from the same batch of fresh chicken liver. Also, unlike the protocols described earlier, this procedure avoids the use of acetone extraction as well as a heat step, thus minimizing damage to the molybdenum centers of the enzymes.

  16. The α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex in cancer metabolic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Vatrinet, Renaud; Leone, Giulia; De Luise, Monica; Girolimetti, Giulia; Vidone, Michele; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Porcelli, Anna Maria

    2017-01-01

    Deregulated metabolism is a well-established hallmark of cancer. At the hub of various metabolic pathways deeply integrated within mitochondrial functions, the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex represents a major modulator of electron transport chain activity and tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) flux, and is a pivotal enzyme in the metabolic reprogramming following a cancer cell's change in bioenergetic requirements. By contributing to the control of α-ketoglutarate levels, dynamics, and oxidation state, the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase is also essential in modulating the epigenetic landscape of cancer cells. In this review, we will discuss the manifold roles that this TCA enzyme and its substrate play in cancer.

  17. Differential energetic metabolism during Trypanosoma cruzi differentiation. I. Citrate synthase, NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Adroher, F J; Osuna, A; Lupiañez, J A

    1988-11-15

    The activities of the mitochondrial enzymes citrate synthase (citrate oxaloacetatelyase, EC 4.1.3.7), NADP-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase (threo-Ds-isocitrate:NADP+ oxidoreductase (decarboxylating), EC 1.1.1.42), and succinate dehydrogenase (succinate: FAD oxidoreductase, EC 1.3.99.1) as well as their kinetic behavior in the two developmental forms of Trypanosoma cruzi at insect vector stage, epimastigotes and infective metacyclic trypomastigotes, were studied. The results presented in this work clearly demonstrate a higher mitochondrial metabolism in the metacyclic forms as is shown by the extraordinary enhanced activities of metacyclic citrate synthase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase. In epimastigotes, the specific activities of citrate synthase at variable concentrations of oxalacetate and acetyl-CoA were 24.6 and 26.6 mU/mg of protein, respectively, and the Michaelis constants were 7.88 and 6.84 microM for both substrates. The metacyclic enzyme exhibited the following kinetic parameters: a specific activity of 228.4 mU/mg and Km of 3.18 microM for oxalacetate and 248.5 mU/mg and 2.75 microM, respectively, for acetyl-CoA. NADP-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase specific activities for epimastigotes and metacyclics were 110.2 and 210.3 mU/mg, whereas the apparent Km's were 47.9 and 12.5 microM, respectively. No activity for the NAD-dependent isozyme was found in any form of T. cruzi differentiation. The particulated succinate dehydrogenase showed specific activities of 8.2 and 39.1 mU/mg for epimastigotes and metacyclic trypomastigotes, respectively, although no significant changes in the Km (0.46 and 0.48 mM) were found. The cellular role and the molecular mechanism that probably take place during this significant shift in the mitochondrial metabolism during the T. cruzi differentiation have been discussed.

  18. Phanerochaete chrysosporium Cellobiohydrolase and Cellobiose Dehydrogenase Transcripts in Wood

    PubMed Central

    Vallim, Marcelo A.; Janse, Bernard J. H.; Gaskell, Jill; Pizzirani-Kleiner, Aline A.; Cullen, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    The transcripts of structurally related cellobiohydrolase genes in Phanerochaete chrysosporium-colonized wood chips were quantified. The transcript patterns obtained were dramatically different from the transcript patterns obtained previously in defined media. Cellobiose dehydrogenase transcripts were also detected, which is consistent with the hypothesis that such transcripts play an important role in cellulose degradation. PMID:9572973

  19. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system. 866.5560 Section 866.5560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... blood cells), myocardial infarction (heart disease), and some forms of leukemia (cancer of the...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system. 866.5560 Section 866.5560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... blood cells), myocardial infarction (heart disease), and some forms of leukemia (cancer of the...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... step that metabolizes groups of fats called medium-chain fatty acids and short-chain fatty acids. Mutations in the HADH gene lead ... a shortage of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Medium-chain and short-chain fatty acids cannot be metabolized ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: 2-methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... down proteins from food into smaller parts called amino acids. Amino acids can be further processed to provide energy for ... methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency cannot process a particular amino acid called isoleucine. Most cases of 2-methylbutyryl-CoA ...

  3. Distribution of the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex in Developing Soybean Cotyledons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The somewhat surprising report that storage proteins and oil are non-uniformly distributed in the cotyledons of developing soybeans prompted us to determine the spatial distribution of the mitochondrial and plastidial forms of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). It has been proposed that pla...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1420 - Isocitric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... test system is a device intended to measure the activity of the enzyme isocitric dehydrogenase in serum... disease such as viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, or acute inflammation of the biliary tract; pulmonary disease...), and diseases associated with pregnancy. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device...

  5. Efficiency of superoxide anions in the inactivation of selected dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2010-09-01

    The most ubiquitous of the primary reactive oxygen species, formed in all aerobes, is the superoxide free radical. It is believed that the superoxide anion radical shows low reactivity and in oxidative stress it is regarded mainly as an initiator of more reactive species such as rad OH and ONOO -. In this paper, the effectiveness of inactivation of selected enzymes by radiation-generated superoxide radicals in comparison with the effectiveness of the other products of water radiolysis is examined. We investigate three enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We show that the direct contribution of the superoxide anion radical to GAPDH and ADH inactivation is significant. The effectiveness of the superoxide anion in the inactivation of GAPDH and ADG was only 2.4 and 2.8 times smaller, respectively, in comparison with hydroxyl radical. LDH was practically not inactivated by the superoxide anion. Despite the fact that the studied dehydrogenases belong to the same class of enzymes (oxidoreductases), all have a similar molecular weight and are tetramers, their susceptibility to free-radical damage varies. The differences in the radiosensitivity of the enzymes are not determined by the basic structural parameters analyzed. A significant role in inactivation susceptibility is played by the type of amino acid residues and their localization within enzyme molecules.

  6. Molecular cloning of gluconobacter oxydans DSM 2003 xylitol dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, H Mir Mohammad; Ahmadi, R; Aghaabdollahian, S; Mofid, M R; Ghaemi, Y; Abedi, D

    2011-01-01

    Due to the widespread applications of xylitol dehydrogenase, an enzyme used for the production of xylitol, the present study was designed for the cloning of xylitol dehydrogenase gene from Glcunobacter oxydans DSM 2003. After extraction of genomic DNA from this bacterium, xylitol dehydrogenase gene was replicated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The amplified product was entered into pTZ57R cloning vector by T/A cloning method and transformation was performed by heat shocking of the E. coli XL1-blue competent cells. Following plasmid preparation, the cloned gene was digested out and ligated into the expression vector pET-22b(+). Electrophoresis of PCR product showed a 789 bp band. Recombinant plasmid (rpTZ57R) was then constructed. This plasmid was double digested with XhoI and EcoRI resulting in 800 bp and 2900 bp bands. The obtained insert was ligated into pET-22b(+) vector and its orientation was confirmed with XhoI and BamHI restriction enzymes. In conclusion, in the present study the recombinant expression vector containing xylitol dehydrogenase gene has been constructed and can be used for the production of this enzyme in high quantities.

  7. NADP+-Preferring d-Lactate Dehydrogenase from Sporolactobacillus inulinus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lingfeng; Xu, Xiaoling; Wang, Limin; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxy acid dehydrogenases, including l- and d-lactate dehydrogenases (L-LDH and D-LDH), are responsible for the stereospecific conversion of 2-keto acids to 2-hydroxyacids and extensively used in a wide range of biotechnological applications. A common feature of LDHs is their high specificity for NAD+ as a cofactor. An LDH that could effectively use NADPH as a coenzyme could be an alternative enzymatic system for regeneration of the oxidized, phosphorylated cofactor. In this study, a d-lactate dehydrogenase from a Sporolactobacillus inulinus strain was found to use both NADH and NADPH with high efficiencies and with a preference for NADPH as its coenzyme, which is different from the coenzyme utilization of all previously reported LDHs. The biochemical properties of the D-LDH enzyme were determined by X-ray crystal structural characterization and in vivo and in vitro enzymatic activity analyses. The residue Asn174 was demonstrated to be critical for NADPH utilization. Characterization of the biochemical properties of this enzyme will contribute to understanding of the catalytic mechanism and provide referential information for shifting the coenzyme utilization specificity of 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases. PMID:26150461

  8. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme...

  9. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme...

  10. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme...

  11. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme...

  12. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... hemolytic anemia associated with a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. This generic device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An...

  13. Glutamate dehydrogenases: the why and how of coenzyme specificity.

    PubMed

    Engel, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    NAD(+) and NADP(+), chemically similar and with almost identical standard oxidation-reduction potentials, nevertheless have distinct roles, NAD(+) serving catabolism and ATP generation whereas NADPH is the biosynthetic reductant. Separating these roles requires strict specificity for one or the other coenzyme for most dehydrogenases. In many organisms this holds also for glutamate dehydrogenases (GDH), NAD(+)-dependent for glutamate oxidation, NADP(+)-dependent for fixing ammonia. In higher animals, however, GDH has dual specificity. It has been suggested that GDH in mitochondria reacts only with NADP(H), the NAD(+) reaction being an in vitro artefact. However, contrary evidence suggests mitochondrial GDH not only reacts with NAD(+) but maintains equilibrium using the same pool as accessed by β-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase. Another complication is the presence of an energy-linked dehydrogenase driving NADP(+) reduction by NADH, maintaining the coenzyme pools at different oxidation-reduction potentials. Its coexistence with GDH makes possible a futile cycle, control of which is not yet properly explained. Structural studies show NAD(+)-dependent, NADP(+)-dependent and dual-specificity GDHs are closely related and a few site-directed mutations can reverse specificity. Specificity for NAD(+) or for NADP(+) has probably emerged repeatedly during evolution, using different structural solutions on different occasions. In various GDHs the P7 position in the coenzyme-binding domain plays a key role. However, whereas in other dehydrogenases an acidic P7 residue usually hydrogen bonds to the 2'- and 3'-hydroxyls, dictating NAD(+) specificity, among GDHs, depending on detailed conformation of surrounding residues, an acidic P7 may permit binding of NAD(+) only, NADP(+) only, or in higher animals both.

  14. Spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity in forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błońska, Ewa; Lasota, Jarosław

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity (DH) in forest soils using geostatistics. We have studied variability soil dehydrogenase and their relationship with variability of some physic-chemical properties. Two study areas (A and B) were set up in southern Poland in the Zlotoryja Forest District. Study areas were covered by different types of vegetation (A- broadleaf forest with beech, ash and sycamore), B- coniferous forest with Norway spruce). The soils were classified as Dystric Cambisols (WRB 2006). The samples for laboratory testing were collected from 49 places on each areas. 15 cm of surface horizon of soil were taken (with previously removed litter). Dehydrogenase activity was marked with Lenhard's method according to the Casida procedure. Soil pH, nitrogen (N) and soil organic carbon (C) content (by LECO CNS 2000 carbon analyzer) was marked. C/N ratio was calculated. Particle size composition was determined using laser diffraction. Statistical analysis were performed using STATISTICA 10 software. Geostatistical analysis and mapping were done by application of GS 9+ (Gamma Design) and Surfer 11 (Golden Software). The activity of DH ranged between 5,02 and 71,20 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1 on the A area and between 0,94 and 16,47 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1. Differences in spatial variability of the analised features were noted. The variability of dehydrogenase activity on the A study area was described by an exponential model, whereas on the B study area the spatial correlation has not been noted. The relationship of dehydrogenase activity with the remaining parameters of soil was noted only in the case of A study area. The variability of organic carbon content on the A and B study areas were described by an exponential model. The variability of nitrogen content on both areas were described by an spherical model.

  15. Short Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase Rdhe2 Is a Novel Retinol Dehydrogenase Essential for Frog Embryonic Development*

    PubMed Central

    Belyaeva, Olga V.; Lee, Seung-Ah; Adams, Mark K.; Chang, Chenbei; Kedishvili, Natalia Y.

    2012-01-01

    The enzymes responsible for the rate-limiting step in retinoic acid biosynthesis, the oxidation of retinol to retinaldehyde, during embryogenesis and in adulthood have not been fully defined. Here, we report that a novel member of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily, frog sdr16c5, acts as a highly active retinol dehydrogenase (rdhe2) that promotes retinoic acid biosynthesis when expressed in mammalian cells. In vivo assays of rdhe2 function show that overexpression of rdhe2 in frog embryos leads to posteriorization and induction of defects resembling those caused by retinoic acid toxicity. Conversely, antisense morpholino-mediated knockdown of endogenous rdhe2 results in phenotypes consistent with retinoic acid deficiency, such as defects in anterior neural tube closure, microcephaly with small eye formation, disruption of somitogenesis, and curved body axis with bent tail. Higher doses of morpholino induce embryonic lethality. Analyses of retinoic acid levels using either endogenous retinoic acid-sensitive gene hoxd4 or retinoic acid reporter cell line both show that the levels of retinoic acid are significantly decreased in rdhe2 morphants. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that Xenopus rdhe2 functions as a retinol dehydrogenase essential for frog embryonic development in vivo. Importantly, the retinol oxidizing activity of frog rdhe2 is conserved in its mouse homologs, suggesting that rdhe2-related enzymes may represent the previously unrecognized physiologically relevant retinol dehydrogenases that contribute to retinoic acid biosynthesis in higher vertebrates. PMID:22291023

  16. Inducible UDP-glucose dehydrogenase from French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) locates to vascular tissue and has alcohol dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Robertson, D; Smith, C; Bolwell, G P

    1996-01-01

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase is responsible for channelling UDP-glucose into the pool of UDP-sugars utilized in the synthesis of wall matrix polysaccharides and glycoproteins. It has been purified to homogeneity from suspension-cultured cells of French bean by a combination of hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, gel filtration and dye-ligand chromatography. The enzyme had a subunit of Mr 40,000. Km values were measured for UDP-glucose as 5.5 +/- 1.4 mM and for NAD+ as 20 +/- 3 microM. It was subject to inhibition by UDP-xylose. UDP-glucose dehydrogenase activity co-purified with alcohol dehydrogenase activity from suspension-cultured cells, elicitor-treated cells and elongating hypocotyls, even when many additional chromatographic steps were employed subsequently. The protein from each source was resolved into virtually identical patterns of isoforms on two-dimensional isoelectric focusing/PAGE. However, a combination of peptide mapping and sequence analysis, gel analysis using activity staining and kinetic analysis suggests that both activities are a function of the same protein. An antibody was raised and used to immunolocalize UDP-glucose dehydrogenase to developing xylem and phloem of French bean hypocotyl. Together with data published previously, these results are consistent with an important role in the regulation of carbon flux into wall matrix polysaccharides.

  17. Crystal structure of quinone-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Pseudogluconobacter saccharoketogenes. A versatile dehydrogenase oxidizing alcohols and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Rozeboom, Henriëtte J; Yu, Shukun; Mikkelsen, Rene; Nikolaev, Igor; Mulder, Harm J; Dijkstra, Bauke W

    2015-12-01

    The quinone-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (PQQ-ADH, E.C. 1.1.5.2) from the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudogluconobacter saccharoketogenes IFO 14464 oxidizes primary alcohols (e.g. ethanol, butanol), secondary alcohols (monosaccharides), as well as aldehydes, polysaccharides, and cyclodextrins. The recombinant protein, expressed in Pichia pastoris, was crystallized, and three-dimensional (3D) structures of the native form, with PQQ and a Ca(2+) ion, and of the enzyme in complex with a Zn(2+) ion and a bound substrate mimic were determined at 1.72 Å and 1.84 Å resolution, respectively. PQQ-ADH displays an eight-bladed β-propeller fold, characteristic of Type I quinone-dependent methanol dehydrogenases. However, three of the four ligands of the Ca(2+) ion differ from those of related dehydrogenases and they come from different parts of the polypeptide chain. These differences result in a more open, easily accessible active site, which explains why PQQ-ADH can oxidize a broad range of substrates. The bound substrate mimic suggests Asp333 as the catalytic base. Remarkably, no vicinal disulfide bridge is present near the PQQ, which in other PQQ-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases has been proposed to be necessary for electron transfer. Instead an associated cytochrome c can approach the PQQ for direct electron transfer.

  18. Molecular determinants of the cofactor specificity of ribitol dehydrogenase, a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hee-Jung; Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Singh, Ranjitha; Kang, Yun Chan; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2012-05-01

    Ribitol dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis (ZmRDH) catalyzes the conversion of ribitol to d-ribulose and concomitantly reduces NAD(P)(+) to NAD(P)H. A systematic approach involving an initial sequence alignment-based residue screening, followed by a homology model-based screening and site-directed mutagenesis of the screened residues, was used to study the molecular determinants of the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH. A homologous conserved amino acid, Ser156, in the substrate-binding pocket of the wild-type ZmRDH was identified as an important residue affecting the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH. Further insights into the function of the Ser156 residue were obtained by substituting it with other hydrophobic nonpolar or polar amino acids. Substituting Ser156 with the negatively charged amino acids (Asp and Glu) altered the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH toward NAD(+) (S156D, [k(cat)/K(m)(,NAD)]/[k(cat)/K(m)(,NADP)] = 10.9, where K(m)(,NAD) is the K(m) for NAD(+) and K(m)(,NADP) is the K(m) for NADP(+)). In contrast, the mutants containing positively charged amino acids (His, Lys, or Arg) at position 156 showed a higher efficiency with NADP(+) as the cofactor (S156H, [k(cat)/K(m)(,NAD)]/[k(cat)/K(m)(,NADP)] = 0.11). These data, in addition to those of molecular dynamics and isothermal titration calorimetry studies, suggest that the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH can be modulated by manipulating the amino acid residue at position 156.

  19. Expression of lactate dehydrogenase C correlates with poor prognosis in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yibo; Liang, Chao; Zhu, Jundong; Miao, Chenkui; Yu, Yajie; Xu, Aimin; Zhang, Jianzhong; Li, Pu; Li, Shuang; Bao, Meiling; Yang, Jie; Qin, Chao; Wang, Zengjun

    2017-03-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase C is an isoenzyme of lactate dehydrogenase and a member of the cancer-testis antigens family. In this study, we aimed to investigate the expression and functional role of lactate dehydrogenase C and its basic mechanisms in renal cell carcinoma. First, a total of 133 cases of renal cell carcinoma samples were analysed in a tissue microarray, and Kaplan-Meier survival curve analyses were performed to investigate the correlation between lactate dehydrogenase C expression and renal cell carcinoma progression. Lactate dehydrogenase C protein levels and messenger RNA levels were significantly upregulated in renal cell carcinoma tissues, and the patients with positive lactate dehydrogenase C expression had a shorter progression-free survival, indicating the oncogenic role of lactate dehydrogenase C in renal cell carcinoma. In addition, further cytological experiments demonstrated that lactate dehydrogenase C could prompt renal cell carcinoma cells to produce lactate, and increase metastatic and invasive potential of renal cell carcinoma cells. Furthermore, lactate dehydrogenase C could induce the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process and matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression. In summary, these findings showed lactate dehydrogenase C was associated with poor prognosis in renal cell carcinoma and played a pivotal role in the migration and invasion of renal cell carcinoma cells. Lactate dehydrogenase C may act as a novel biomarker for renal cell carcinoma progression and a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma.

  20. A specific radiochemical assay for pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Small, C; Jones, M E

    1987-03-01

    Previous studies of pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase have been conducted using a spectrophotometric method to monitor substrate-dependent NAD(P)H production. For the assay of the mammalian enzyme, the spectrophotometric assay was found to be unacceptable for kinetic studies as the production of NAD(P)H was nonlinear with time and protein concentration. An assay which measures radiolabeled glutamate production by this enzyme in the presence of NAD+ from radiolabeled pyrroline-5-carboxylate has been developed. Separation of substrate from product is achieved by column chromatography using Dowex 50 cation-exchange resin. The product isolated by this procedure was identified as glutamate. This new assay is linear with time and protein concentration and gives reproducible results. The assay is not influenced by competing enzyme activities, such as glutamate dehydrogenase, in a liver homogenate so that quantitative conversion of pyrroline-5-carboxylate to glutamate is observed.

  1. Regional development of glutamate dehydrogenase in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Leong, S F; Clark, J B

    1984-07-01

    The development of glutamate dehydrogenase enzyme activity in rat brain regions has been followed from the late foetal stage to the adult and through to the aged (greater than 2 years) adult. In the adult brain the enzyme activity was greatest in the medulla oblongata and pons greater than midbrain = hypothalamus greater than cerebellum = striatum = cortex. In the aged adult brain, glutamate dehydrogenase activity was significantly lower in the medulla oblongata and pons when compared to the 90-day-old adult value, but not in other regions. The enzyme-specific activity of nonsynaptic (free) mitochondria purified from the medulla oblongata and pons of 90-day-old animals was about twice that of mitochondria purified from the striatum and the cortex. The specific activity of the enzyme in synaptic mitochondria purified from the above three brain regions, however, remained almost constant.

  2. Parasite Lactate Dehydrogenase for Diagnosis of Plasmodium Falciparum. Phase II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-04-01

    Diagnosis of Plasmodium Falciparum PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert C. Piper, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Flow, Incorporated Portland, Oregon 97201...Phase 11 (24 Mar 95 - 23 Mar 97) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Parasite Lactate Dehydrogenase for Diagnosis of Plasmodium Falciparum DAMD...that infected patients become ill. Four species of Plasmodium infect humans. P. falciparum accounts for -85 % of the world’s malaria. P. falciparum is

  3. Reappraisal of the Regulation of Lactococcal l-Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    van Niel, Ed W. J.; Palmfeldt, Johan; Martin, Rani; Paese, Marco; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel

    2004-01-01

    Lactococcal lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs) are coregulated at the substrate level by at least two mechanisms: the fructose-1,6-biphosphate/phosphate ratio and the NADH/NAD ratio. Among the Lactococcus lactis species, there are strains that are predominantly regulated by the first mechanism (e.g., strain 65.1) or by the second mechanism (e.g., strain NCDO 2118). A more complete model of the kinetics of the regulation of lactococcal LDH is discussed. PMID:15006814

  4. Inhibition of membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase by fluorescamine.

    PubMed

    Jay, D; Jay, E G; Garcia, C

    1993-12-01

    Fluorescamine rapidly inactivated membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase. The inhibition of the enzyme by this reagent was prevented by succinate and malonate, suggesting that the group modified by fluorescamine was located at the active site. The modification of the active site sulfhydryl group by 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) did not alter the inhibitory action of fluorescamine. However, the protective effect of malonate against fluorescamine inhibition was abolished in the enzyme modified at the thiol.

  5. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) in bacteria: a bioinformatic perspective.

    PubMed

    Kisiela, Michael; Skarka, Adam; Ebert, Bettina; Maser, Edmund

    2012-03-01

    Steroidal compounds including cholesterol, bile acids and steroid hormones play a central role in various physiological processes such as cell signaling, growth, reproduction, and energy homeostasis. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs), which belong to the superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR) or aldo-keto reductases (AKR), are important enzymes involved in the steroid hormone metabolism. HSDs function as an enzymatic switch that controls the access of receptor-active steroids to nuclear hormone receptors and thereby mediate a fine-tuning of the steroid response. The aim of this study was the identification of classified functional HSDs and the bioinformatic annotation of these proteins in all complete sequenced bacterial genomes followed by a phylogenetic analysis. For the bioinformatic annotation we constructed specific hidden Markov models in an iterative approach to provide a reliable identification for the specific catalytic groups of HSDs. Here, we show a detailed phylogenetic analysis of 3α-, 7α-, 12α-HSDs and two further functional related enzymes (3-ketosteroid-Δ(1)-dehydrogenase, 3-ketosteroid-Δ(4)(5α)-dehydrogenase) from the superfamily of SDRs. For some bacteria that have been previously reported to posses a specific HSD activity, we could annotate the corresponding HSD protein. The dominating phyla that were identified to express HSDs were that of Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Moreover, some evolutionarily more ancient microorganisms (e.g., Cyanobacteria and Euryachaeota) were found as well. A large number of HSD-expressing bacteria constitute the normal human gastro-intestinal flora. Another group of bacteria were originally isolated from natural habitats like seawater, soil, marine and permafrost sediments. These bacteria include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-degrading species such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Rhodococcus. In conclusion, HSDs are found in a wide variety of microorganisms including

  6. Recent advances in biotechnological applications of alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu-Guo; Yin, Huan-Huan; Yu, Dao-Fu; Chen, Xiang; Tang, Xiao-Ling; Zhang, Xiao-Jian; Xue, Ya-Ping; Wang, Ya-Jun; Liu, Zhi-Qiang

    2017-02-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs), which belong to the oxidoreductase superfamily, catalyze the interconversion between alcohols and aldehydes or ketones with high stereoselectivity under mild conditions. ADHs are widely employed as biocatalysts for the dynamic kinetic resolution of racemic substrates and for the preparation of enantiomerically pure chemicals. This review provides an overview of biotechnological applications for ADHs in the production of chiral pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals.

  7. Purification and characterization of dimeric dihydrodiol dehydrogenase from dog liver.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Nakanishi, M; Deyashiki, Y; Hara, A; Matsuura, K; Ohya, I

    1994-09-01

    High NADP(+)-linked dihydrodiol dehydrogenase activity was detected in dog liver cytosol, from which a dimeric enzyme composed of M(r) 39,000 subunits was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme oxidized trans-cyclohexanediol, and trans-dihydrodiols of benzene and naphthalene, the [1R,2R]-isomers of which were selectively oxidized. In the reverse reaction in the presence of NADPH as a coenzyme, the enzyme reduced alpha-dicarbonyl compounds, such as methylglyoxal, 3-deoxyglucosone, and diacetyl, and some compounds with a carbonyl group, such as glyceraldehyde, lactaldehyde, and acetoin. 4-Hydroxyphenylketones and ascorbates inhibited the enzyme. The results of steady-state kinetic analyses indicated that the reaction proceeds through an ordered bi bi mechanism with the coenzyme binding to the free enzyme, and suggested that the inhibitors bind to the enzyme-NADP+ binary complex. The dimeric enzyme was detected in liver and kidney of dog, and was immunochemically similar to the dimeric enzymes from monkey kidney, rabbit lens, and pig liver. The sequences (total 127 amino acid residues) of eight peptides derived on enzymatic digestion of the dog liver enzyme did not show significant similarity with the primary structures of members of the aldo-keto reductase and short chain dehydrogenase superfamilies, which include monomeric dihydrodiol dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase, respectively.

  8. Daidzin: a potent, selective inhibitor of human mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Keung, W M; Vallee, B L

    1993-02-15

    Human mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-I) is potently, reversibly, and selectively inhibited by an isoflavone isolated from Radix puerariae and identified as daidzin, the 7-glucoside of 4',7-dihydroxyisoflavone. Kinetic analysis with formaldehyde as substrate reveals that daidzin inhibits ALDH-I competitively with respect to formaldehyde with a Ki of 40 nM, and uncompetitively with respect to the coenzyme NAD+. The human cytosolic aldehyde dehydrogenase isozyme (ALDH-II) is nearly 3 orders of magnitude less sensitive to daidzin inhibition. Daidzin does not inhibit human class I, II, or III alcohol dehydrogenases, nor does it have any significant effect on biological systems that are known to be affected by other isoflavones. Among more than 40 structurally related compounds surveyed, 12 inhibit ALDH-I, but only prunetin and 5-hydroxydaidzin (genistin) combine high selectivity and potency, although they are 7- to 15-fold less potent than daidzin. Structure-function relationships have established a basis for the design and synthesis of additional ALDH inhibitors that could both be yet more potent and specific.

  9. Functional Analysis of a Mosquito Short Chain Dehydrogenase Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Mayoral, Jaime G.; Leonard, Kate T.; Defelipe, Lucas A.; Turjansksi, Adrian G.; Nouzova, Marcela; Noriegal, Fernando G.

    2013-01-01

    The short chain dehydrogenases (SDR) constitute one the oldest and largest families of enzymes with over 46,000 members in sequence databases. About 25% of all known dehydrogenases belong to the SDR family. SDR enzymes have critical roles in lipid, amino acid, carbohydrate, hormone and xenobiotic metabolism as well as in redox sensor mechanisms. This family is present in archaea, bacteria, and eukaryota, emphasizing their versatility and fundamental importance for metabolic processes. We identified a cluster of eight SDRs in the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AaSDRs). Members of the cluster differ in tissue specificity and developmental expression. Heterologous expression produced recombinant proteins that had diverse substrate specificities, but distinct from the conventional insect alcohol (ethanol) dehydrogenases. They are all NADP+-dependent and they have S-enantioselectivity and preference for secondary alcohols with 8–15 carbons. Homology modeling was used to build the structure of AaSDR1 and two additional cluster members. The computational study helped explain the selectivity towards the (10S)-isomers as well as the reduced activity of AaSDR4 and AaSDR9 for longer isoprenoid substrates. Similar clusters of SDRs are present in other species of insects, suggesting similar selection mechanisms causing duplication and diversification of this family of enzymes. PMID:23238893

  10. Mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex generates reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Starkov, Anatoly A; Fiskum, Gary; Chinopoulos, Christos; Lorenzo, Beverly J; Browne, Susan E; Patel, Mulchand S; Beal, M Flint

    2004-09-08

    Mitochondria-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) are thought to contribute to cell death caused by a multitude of pathological conditions. The molecular sites of mitochondrial ROS production are not well established but are generally thought to be located in complex I and complex III of the electron transport chain. We measured H(2)O(2) production, respiration, and NADPH reduction level in rat brain mitochondria oxidizing a variety of respiratory substrates. Under conditions of maximum respiration induced with either ADP or carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone,alpha-ketoglutarate supported the highest rate of H(2)O(2) production. In the absence of ADP or in the presence of rotenone, H(2)O(2) production rates correlated with the reduction level of mitochondrial NADPH with various substrates, with the exception of alpha-ketoglutarate. Isolated mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDHC) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDHC) complexes produced superoxide and H(2)O(2). NAD(+) inhibited ROS production by the isolated enzymes and by permeabilized mitochondria. We also measured H(2)O(2) production by brain mitochondria isolated from heterozygous knock-out mice deficient in dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Dld). Although this enzyme is a part of both KGDHC and PDHC, there was greater impairment of KGDHC activity in Dld-deficient mitochondria. These mitochondria also produced significantly less H(2)O(2) than mitochondria isolated from their littermate wild-type mice. The data strongly indicate that KGDHC is a primary site of ROS production in normally functioning mitochondria.

  11. Cloning, purification and crystallization of Thermus thermophilus proline dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    White, Tommi A.; Tanner, John J.

    2005-08-01

    Cloning, purification and crystallization of T. thermophilus proline dehydrogenase is reported. The detergent n-octyl β-d-glucopyranoside was used to reduce polydispersity, which enabled crystallization. Nature recycles l-proline by converting it to l-glutamate. This four-electron oxidation process is catalyzed by the two enzymes: proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ{sup 1}-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase. This note reports the cloning, purification and crystallization of Thermus thermophilus PRODH, which is the prototype of a newly discovered superfamily of bacterial monofunctional PRODHs. The results presented here include production of a monodisperse protein solution through use of the detergent n-octyl β-d-glucopyranoside and the growth of native crystals that diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution at Advanced Light Source beamline 4.2.2. The space group is P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 82.2, b = 89.6, c = 94.3 Å. The asymmetric unit is predicted to contain two protein molecules and 46% solvent. Molecular-replacement trials using a fragment of the PRODH domain of the multifunctional Escherichia coli PutA protein as the search model (24% amino-acid sequence identity) did not produce a satisfactory solution. Therefore, the structure of T. thermophilus PRODH will be determined by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  12. Metformin suppresses gluconeogenesis by inhibiting mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Madiraju, Anila K; Erion, Derek M; Rahimi, Yasmeen; Zhang, Xian-Man; Braddock, Demetrios T; Albright, Ronald A; Prigaro, Brett J; Wood, John L; Bhanot, Sanjay; MacDonald, Michael J; Jurczak, Michael J; Camporez, Joao-Paulo; Lee, Hui-Young; Cline, Gary W; Samuel, Varman T; Kibbey, Richard G; Shulman, Gerald I

    2014-06-26

    Metformin is considered to be one of the most effective therapeutics for treating type 2 diabetes because it specifically reduces hepatic gluconeogenesis without increasing insulin secretion, inducing weight gain or posing a risk of hypoglycaemia. For over half a century, this agent has been prescribed to patients with type 2 diabetes worldwide, yet the underlying mechanism by which metformin inhibits hepatic gluconeogenesis remains unknown. Here we show that metformin non-competitively inhibits the redox shuttle enzyme mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, resulting in an altered hepatocellular redox state, reduced conversion of lactate and glycerol to glucose, and decreased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Acute and chronic low-dose metformin treatment effectively reduced endogenous glucose production, while increasing cytosolic redox and decreasing mitochondrial redox states. Antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of hepatic mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase in rats resulted in a phenotype akin to chronic metformin treatment, and abrogated metformin-mediated increases in cytosolic redox state, decreases in plasma glucose concentrations, and inhibition of endogenous glucose production. These findings were replicated in whole-body mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase knockout mice. These results have significant implications for understanding the mechanism of metformin's blood glucose lowering effects and provide a new therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes.

  13. Characterization of two β-decarboxylating dehydrogenases from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kento; Nakanishi, Fumika; Tomita, Takeo; Akiyama, Nagisa; Lassak, Kerstin; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Nishiyama, Makoto

    2016-11-01

    Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, a hyperthermoacidophilic archaeon, possesses two β-decarboxylating dehydrogenase genes, saci_0600 and saci_2375, in its genome, which suggests that it uses these enzymes for three similar reactions in lysine biosynthesis through 2-aminoadipate, leucine biosynthesis, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. To elucidate their roles, these two genes were expressed in Escherichia coli in the present study and their gene products were characterized. Saci_0600 recognized 3-isopropylmalate as a substrate, but exhibited slight and no activity for homoisocitrate and isocitrate, respectively. Saci_2375 exhibited distinct and similar activities for isocitrate and homoisocitrate, but no detectable activity for 3-isopropylmalate. These results suggest that Saci_0600 is a 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase for leucine biosynthesis and Saci_2375 is a dual function enzyme serving as isocitrate-homoisocitrate dehydrogenase. The crystal structure of Saci_0600 was determined as a closed-form complex that binds 3-isopropylmalate and Mg(2+), thereby revealing the structural basis for the extreme thermostability and novel-type recognition of the 3-isopropyl moiety of the substrate.

  14. An efficient ribitol-specific dehydrogenase from Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranjitha; Singh, Raushan; Kim, In-Won; Sigdel, Sujan; Kalia, Vipin C; Kang, Yun Chan; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2015-05-01

    An NAD(+)-dependent ribitol dehydrogenase from Enterobacter aerogenes KCTC 2190 (EaRDH) was cloned and successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. The complete 729-bp gene was amplified, cloned, expressed, and subsequently purified in an active soluble form using nickel affinity chromatography. The enzyme had an optimal pH and temperature of 11.0 and 45°C, respectively. Among various polyols, EaRDH exhibited activity only toward ribitol, with Km, Vmax, and kcat/Km values of 10.3mM, 185Umg(-1), and 30.9s(-1)mM(-1), respectively. The enzyme showed strong preference for NAD(+) and displayed no detectable activity with NADP(+). Homology modeling and sequence analysis of EaRDH, along with its biochemical properties, confirmed that EaRDH belongs to the family of NAD(+)-dependent ribitol dehydrogenases, a member of short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SCOR) family. EaRDH showed the highest activity and unique substrate specificity among all known RDHs. Homology modeling and docking analysis shed light on the molecular basis of its unusually high activity and substrate specificity.

  15. Asp295 stabilizes the active-site loop structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase, facilitating phosphorylation of Ser292 by pyruvate dehydrogenase-kinase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have developed an invitro system for detailed analysis of reversible phosphorylation of the plant mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, comprising recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana a2b2-hetero tetrameric pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) plus A.thaliana E1-kinase (AtPDK). Upon addition of MgATP...

  16. Levels of Alpha-Glycerophosphate Dehydrogenase, Triosephosphate Isomerase and Lactic Acid Dehydrogenase in Muscles of the Cockroach, ’Periplaneta americana’ L.,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The level of alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase is slightly higher in leg muscle than in thoracic muscle of the American cockroach, Periplaneta ... americana . Triosephosphate isomerase in leg muscle is about twice that of thoracic muscle. There is little lactic acid dehydrogenase in both muscles. (Author)

  17. X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and autosomal 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) polymorphisms in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    VandeBerg, J.L.; Aivaliotis, M.J.; Samollow, P.B. )

    1992-12-01

    Electrophoretic polymorphisms of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) were examined in captive colonies of five subspecies of baboons (Papio hamadryas). Phenotype frequencies and family data verified the X-linked inheritance of the G6PD polymorphism. Insufficient family data were available to confirm autosomal inheritance of the 6PGD polymorphism, but the electrophoretic patterns of variant types (putative heterozygotes) suggested the codominant expression of alleles at an autosomal locus. Implications of the G6PD polymorphism are discussed with regard to its utility as a marker system for research on X-chromosome inactivation during baboon development and for studies of clonal cell proliferation and/or cell selection during the development of atherosclerotic lesions in the baboon model. 61 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  18. Cloning, sequencing and mutagenesis of the genes for aromatic amine dehydrogenase from Alcaligenes faecalis and evolution of amine dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Chistoserdov, A Y

    2001-08-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the aromatic amine utilization (aau) gene region from Alcaligenes faecalis contained nine genes (orf-1, aauBEDA, orf-2, orf-3, orf-4 and hemE) transcribed in the same direction. The aauB and aauA genes encode the periplasmic aromatic amine dehydrogenase (AADH) large and small subunit polypeptides, respectively, and were homologous to mauB and mauA, the genes for the large and small subunits of methylamine dehydrogenase (MADH). aauE and aauD are homologous to mauE and mauD and apparently carry out the same function of transport and folding of the small subunit polypeptide in the periplasm. No analogues of the mauF, mauG, mauL, mauM and mauN genes responsible for biosynthesis of tryptophan tryptophylquinone (the prosthetic group of amine dehydrogenases) were found in the aau cluster. orf-2 was predicted to encode a small periplasmic monohaem c-type cytochrome. No biological function can be assigned to polypeptides encoded by orf-1, orf-3 and orf-4 and mutations in these genes appeared to be lethal. Mutants generated by insertions into mauD were not able to use phenylethylamine, tyramine and tryptamine as a source of carbon and phenylethylamine, 3'-hydroxytyramine (dopamine) and tyramine as a source of nitrogen, indicating that AADH is the only enzyme involved in utilization of primary amines in A. faecalis. AADH genes are present in Alcaligenes xylosoxydans subsp. xylosoxydans, but not in other beta- and gamma-proteobacteria. Phylogenetic analysis of amine dehydrogenases (MADH and AADH) indicated that AADH and MADH evolutionarily diverged before separation of proteobacteria into existing subclasses.

  19. Methodological problems in the histochemical demonstration of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Bernocchi, G; Barni, S

    1983-12-01

    Methodological aspects of the histochemical technique for the demonstration of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity (EC 1.2.1.24) (indicative of the degradative step of gamma-aminobutyric acid catabolism) have been analysed in rat Purkinje neurons, where gamma-aminobutyric acid has been shown to be a neurotransmitter, and in hepatocytes, where it is metabolized. During a histochemical incubation for the enzyme, artefacts of succinate dehydrogenase activity and the 'nothing dehydrogenase' reaction are produced. Inhibition of these artefacts by the addition of two inhibitors, malonate and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, revealed specific reaction products. Formazan granules, which can be ascribed only to specific succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity, are obtained by adding malonate to the incubation medium in order to inhibit both succinate dehydrogenase activity and nothing dehydrogenase. The formation of these granules is completely inhibited by p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, an inhibitor of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity. Different levels of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity were noted in Purkinje neurons. This activity was also found in hepatocytes, mostly in the portal area, but with a lesser degree of intensity and specificity. Indeed, non-specific formazan granules were still produced, because of the 'nothing dehydrogenase' reaction, even in the presence of malonate. Thus, a malonate-insensitive 'nothing dehydrogenase' reaction seems to be present in neural and hepatic tissues.

  20. Human dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 11 is a novel type of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Miyagi, Namiki; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Hara, Akira; Ikari, Akira

    2016-03-25

    We report characterization of a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily encoded in a human gene, DHRS11. The recombinant protein (DHRS11) efficiently catalyzed the conversion of the 17-keto group of estrone, 4- and 5-androstenes and 5α-androstanes into their 17β-hydroxyl metabolites with NADPH as a coenzyme. In contrast, it exhibited reductive 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity toward 5β-androstanes, 5β-pregnanes, 4-pregnenes and bile acids. Additionally, DHRS11 reduced α-dicarbonyls (such as diacetyl and methylglyoxal) and alicyclic ketones (such as 1-indanone and loxoprofen). The enzyme activity was inhibited in a mixed-type manner by flavonoids, and competitively by carbenoxolone, glycyrrhetinic acid, zearalenone, curcumin and flufenamic acid. The expression of DHRS11 mRNA was observed widely in human tissues, most abundantly in testis, small intestine, colon, kidney and cancer cell lines. Thus, DHRS11 represents a novel type of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase with unique catalytic properties and tissue distribution.

  1. Structural Insights into the Drosophila melanogaster Retinol Dehydrogenase, a Member of the Short-Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase Family

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Lukas; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Alexander, Nathan S.; Babino, Darwin; Leung, Nicole Y.; Montell, Craig; Banerjee, Surajit; von Lintig, Johannes; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The 11-cis-retinylidene chromophore of visual pigments isomerizes upon interaction with a photon, initiating a downstream cascade of signaling events that ultimately lead to visual perception. 11-cis-Retinylidene is regenerated through enzymatic transformations collectively called the visual cycle. The first and rate-limiting enzymatic reaction within this cycle, i.e., the reduction of all-trans-retinal to all-trans-retinol, is catalyzed by retinol dehydrogenases. Here, we determined the structure of Drosophila melanogaster photoreceptor retinol dehydrogenase (PDH) isoform C that belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family. This is the first reported structure of a SDR that possesses this biologically important activity. Two crystal structures of the same enzyme grown under different conditions revealed a novel conformational change of the NAD+ cofactor, likely representing a change during catalysis. Amide hydrogen–deuterium exchange of PDH demonstrated changes in the structure of the enzyme upon dinucleotide binding. In D. melanogaster, loss of PDH activity leads to photoreceptor degeneration that can be partially rescued by transgenic expression of human RDH12. Based on the structure of PDH, we analyzed mutations causing Leber congenital amaurosis 13 in a homology model of human RDH12 to obtain insights into the molecular basis of RDH12 disease-causing mutations. PMID:27809489

  2. High substrate specificity of ipsdienol dehydrogenase (IDOLDH), a short-chain dehydrogenase from Ips pini bark beetles.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Teran, Rubi; Pak, Heidi; Blomquist, Gary J; Tittiger, Claus

    2016-09-01

    Ips spp. bark beetles use ipsdienol, ipsenol, ipsdienone and ipsenone as aggregation pheromone components and pheromone precursors. For Ips pini, the short-chain oxidoreductase ipsdienol dehydrogenase (IDOLDH) converts (-)-ipsdienol to ipsdienone, and thus likely plays a role in determining pheromone composition. In order to further understand the role of IDOLDH in pheromone biosynthesis, we compared IDOLDH to its nearest functionally characterized ortholog with a solved structure: human L-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase type II/ amyloid-β binding alcohol dehydrogenase (hHADH II/ABAD), and conducted functional assays of recombinant IDOLDH to determine substrate and product ranges and structural characteristics. Although IDOLDH and hHADH II/ABAD had only 35% sequence identity, their predicted tertiary structures had high identity. We found IDOLDH is a functional homo-tetramer. In addition to oxidizing (-)-ipsdienol, IDOLDH readily converted racemic ipsenol to ipsenone, and stereo-specifically reduced both ketones to their corresponding (-)-alcohols. The (+)-enantiomers were never observed as products. Assays with various substrate analogs showed IDOLDH had high substrate specificity for (-)-ipsdienol, ipsenol, ipsenone and ipsdienone, supporting that IDOLDH functions as a pheromone-biosynthetic enzyme. These results suggest that different IDOLDH orthologs and or activity levels contribute to differences in Ips spp. pheromone composition.

  3. Evidence for distinct dehydrogenase and isomerase sites within a single 3. beta. -hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/5-ene-4-ene isomerase protein

    SciTech Connect

    Luu-The, V.; Takahashi, Masakazu; de Launoit, Y.; Dumont, M.; Lachance, Y.; Labrie, F. )

    1991-09-10

    Complementary DNA encoding human 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/5-ene-4-ene isomerase (3-{beta}-HSD) has been expressed in transfected GH{sub 4}C{sub 1} with use of the cytomegalovirus promoter. The activity of the expressed protein clearly shows that both dehydrogenase and isomerase enzymatic activities are present within a single protein. However, such findings do not indicate whether the two activities reside within one or two closely related catalytic sites. With use of ({sup 3}H)-5-androstenedione, the intermediate compound in dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) transformation into 4-androstenedione by 3{beta}-HSD, the present study shows that 4MA (N,N-diethyl-4-methyl-3-oxo-4-aza-5{alpha}-androstane-17{beta}-carboxamide) and its analogues of 5-androstenedione to 4-androstenedione with an approximately 1,000-fold higher K{sub i} value. The present results thus strongly suggest that dehydrogenase and isomerase activities are present at separate sites on the 3-{beta}-HSD protein. Such data suggest that the irreversible step in the transformation of DHEA to 4-androstenedione is due to a separate site possessing isomerase activity that converts the 5-ene-3-keto to a much more stable 4-ene-3-keto configuration.

  4. Chirality of the hydrogen transfer to the coenzyme catalyzed by ribitol dehydrogenase from Klebsiella pneumoniae and D-mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Alizade, M A; Gaede, K; Brendel, K

    1976-08-01

    The stereochemistry of the hydrogen transfer to NAD catalyzed by ribitol dehydrogenase (ribitol:NAD 2-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.56) from Klebsiella pneumoniae and D-mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-mannitol-1-phosphate:NAD 2-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.17) from Escherichia coli was investigated. [4-3H]NAD was enzymatically reduced with nonlabelled ribitol in the presence of ribitol dehydrogenase and with nonlabelled D-mannitol 1-phosphate and D-mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase, respectively. In both cases the [4-3H]-NADH produced was isolated and the chirality at the C-4 position determined. It was found that after the transfer of hydride, the label was in both reactions exclusively confined to the (4R) position of the newly formed [4-3H]NADH. In order to explain these results, the hydrogen transferred from the nonlabelled substrates to [4-3H]NAD must have entered the (4S) position of the nicotinamide ring. These data indicate for both investigated inducible dehydrogenases a classification as B or (S) type enzymes. Ribitol also can be dehydrogenated by the constitutive A-type L-iditol dehydrogenase (L-iditol:NAD 5-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.14) from sheep liver. When L-iditol dehydrogenase utilizes ribitol as hydrogen donor, the same A-type classification for this oxidoreductase, as expected, holds true. For the first time, opposite chirality of hydrogen transfer to NAD in one organic reaction--ribitol + NAD = D-ribu + NADH + H--is observed when two different dehydrogenases, the inducible ribitol dehydrogenase from K. pneumoniae and the constitutive L-iditol dehydrogenase from sheep liver, are used as enzymes. This result contradicts the previous generalization that the chirality of hydrogen transfer to the coenzyme for the same reaction is independent of the source of the catalyzing enzyme.

  5. [Class III alcohol dehydrogenase and its role in the human body].

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Sani, Tufik Alizade; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2006-01-01

    Class III alcohol dehydrogenase is composed of two chi subunits, encoded by the ADH5 gene and existing in all tissues examined. It possesses a great ability to metabolize long-chain alcohols, while its capacity to oxidize ethanol is very limited. The amino-acid sequence homology and identical structural and kinetic properties indicate that class III alcohol dehydrogenase and formaldehyde dehydrogenase are identical enzymes. ADH III plays a significant role in the metabolism of formaldehyde in the human body.

  6. [Dihydropirymidine dehydrogenase (DPD)--a toxicity marker for 5-fluorouracil?].

    PubMed

    Jedrzychowska, Adriana; Dołegowska, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    In proceedings relating to patients suffering from cancer, an important step is predicting response and toxicity to treatment. Depending on the type of cancer, physicians use the generally accepted schema of treatment, for example pharmacotherapy. 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is the most widely used anticancer drug in chemotherapy for colon, breast, and head and neck cancer. Patients with dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) deficiency, which is responsible for the metabolism of 5-FU, may experience severe side effects during treatment, and even death. In many publications the need for determining the activity of DPD is discussed, which would protect the patient from the numerous side effects of treatment. However, in practice these assays are not done routinely, despite the high demand. In most cases, a genetic test is used to detect changes in the gene encoding DPD (such as in the USA), but because of the large number of mutations the genetic test cannot be used as a screening test. Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activity has been shown to have high variability among the general population, with an estimated proportion of at least 3-5% of individuals showing low or deficient DPD activity. In this publication we presents data about average dihydropirymidine dehydrogenase activity in various populations of the world (e.g. Japan, Ghana, Great Britain) including gender differences and collected information about the possibility of determination of DPD activity in different countries. Detection of reduced DPD activity in patients with planned chemotherapy will allow a lower dosage of 5-FU or alternative treatment without exposing them to adverse reactions.

  7. Cancer-associated isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations induce mitochondrial DNA instability.

    PubMed

    Kingsbury, Joanne M; Shamaprasad, Nachiketha; Billmyre, R Blake; Heitman, Joseph; Cardenas, Maria E

    2016-08-15

    A major advance in understanding the progression and prognostic outcome of certain cancers, such as low-grade gliomas, acute myeloid leukaemia, and chondrosarcomas, has been the identification of early-occurring mutations in the NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase genes IDH1 and IDH2 These mutations result in the production of the onco-metabolite D-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), thought to contribute to disease progression. To better understand the mechanisms of 2HG pathophysiology, we introduced the analogous glioma-associated mutations into the NADP(+ )isocitrate dehydrogenase genes (IDP1, IDP2, IDP3) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Intriguingly, expression of the mitochondrial IDP1(R148H) mutant allele results in high levels of 2HG production as well as extensive mtDNA loss and respiration defects. We find no evidence for a reactive oxygen-mediated mechanism mediating this mtDNA loss. Instead, we show that 2HG production perturbs the iron sensing mechanisms as indicated by upregulation of the Aft1-controlled iron regulon and a concomitant increase in iron levels. Accordingly, iron chelation, or overexpression of a truncated AFT1 allele that dampens transcription of the iron regulon, suppresses the loss of respirative capacity. Additional suppressing factors include overexpression of the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase gene ALD5 or disruption of the retrograde response transcription factor RTG1 Furthermore, elevated α-ketoglutarate levels also suppress 2HG-mediated respiration loss; consistent with a mechanism by which 2HG contributes to mtDNA loss by acting as a toxic α-ketoglutarate analog. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms that may contribute to 2HG oncogenicity in glioma and acute myeloid leukaemia progression, with the promise for innovative diagnostic and prognostic strategies and novel therapeutic modalities.

  8. Purification of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenases from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E and characterization of the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) as a bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenase--acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase.

    PubMed

    Burdette, D; Zeikus, J G

    1994-08-15

    The purification and characterization of three enzymes involved in ethanol formation from acetyl-CoA in Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E (formerly Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum 39E) is described. The secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 40 kDa subunits (SDS/PAGE) with a molecular mass of 160 kDa. The 2 degrees Adh had a lower catalytic efficiency for the oxidation of 1 degree alcohols, including ethanol, than for the oxidation of secondary (2 degrees) alcohols or the reduction of ketones or aldehydes. This enzyme possesses a significant acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase activity as determined by NADPH oxidation, thiol formation and ethanol production. The primary-alcohol dehydrogenase (1 degree Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 41.5 kDa (SDS/PAGE) subunits with a molecular mass of 170 kDa. The 1 degree Adh used both NAD(H) and NADP(H) and displayed higher catalytic efficiencies for NADP(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation and NADH-dependent acetaldehyde (identical to ethanal) reduction than for NADPH-dependent acetaldehyde reduction or NAD(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation. The NAD(H)-linked acetaldehyde dehydrogenase was a homotetramer (360 kDa) of identical subunits (100 kDa) that readily catalysed thioester cleavage and condensation. The 1 degree Adh was expressed at 5-20% of the level of the 2 degrees Adh throughout the growth cycle on glucose. The results suggest that the 2 degrees Adh primarily functions in ethanol production from acetyl-CoA and acetaldehyde, whereas the 1 degree Adh functions in ethanol consumption for nicotinamide-cofactor recycling.

  9. Purification of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenases from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E and characterization of the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) as a bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenase--acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, D; Zeikus, J G

    1994-01-01

    The purification and characterization of three enzymes involved in ethanol formation from acetyl-CoA in Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E (formerly Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum 39E) is described. The secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 40 kDa subunits (SDS/PAGE) with a molecular mass of 160 kDa. The 2 degrees Adh had a lower catalytic efficiency for the oxidation of 1 degree alcohols, including ethanol, than for the oxidation of secondary (2 degrees) alcohols or the reduction of ketones or aldehydes. This enzyme possesses a significant acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase activity as determined by NADPH oxidation, thiol formation and ethanol production. The primary-alcohol dehydrogenase (1 degree Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 41.5 kDa (SDS/PAGE) subunits with a molecular mass of 170 kDa. The 1 degree Adh used both NAD(H) and NADP(H) and displayed higher catalytic efficiencies for NADP(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation and NADH-dependent acetaldehyde (identical to ethanal) reduction than for NADPH-dependent acetaldehyde reduction or NAD(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation. The NAD(H)-linked acetaldehyde dehydrogenase was a homotetramer (360 kDa) of identical subunits (100 kDa) that readily catalysed thioester cleavage and condensation. The 1 degree Adh was expressed at 5-20% of the level of the 2 degrees Adh throughout the growth cycle on glucose. The results suggest that the 2 degrees Adh primarily functions in ethanol production from acetyl-CoA and acetaldehyde, whereas the 1 degree Adh functions in ethanol consumption for nicotinamide-cofactor recycling. Images Figure 1 PMID:8068002

  10. Buformin suppresses the expression of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Yano, Akiko; Kubota, Masafumi; Iguchi, Kazuhiro; Usui, Shigeyuki; Hirano, Kazuyuki

    2006-05-01

    The biguanides metformin and buformin, which are clinically used for diabetes mellitus, are known to improve resistance to insulin in patients. Biguanides were reported to cause lactic acidosis as a side effect. Since the mechanism of the side effect still remains obscure, we have examined genes whose expression changes by treating HepG2 cells with buformin in order to elucidate the mechanisms of the side effect. A subtraction cDNA library was constructed by the method of suppressive subtractive hybridization and the screening of the library was performed with cDNA probes prepared from HepG2 cells treated with or without buformin for 12 h. The expression of the gene and the protein obtained by the screening was monitored by real-time RT-PCR with specific primers and Western blotting with specific antibody. The amounts of ATP and NAD+ were determined with luciferase and alcohol dehydrogenase, respectively. We found that expression of the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPD) gene was suppressed by treating HepG2 cells with 0.25 mM buformin for 12 h as a result of the library screening. The decrease in the expression depended on the treatment period. The amount of GAPD protein also decreased simultaneously with the suppression of the gene expression by the treatment with buformin. The amount of ATP and NAD+ in the HepG2 cells treated with buformin decreased to 10 and 20% of the control, respectively. These observations imply that the biguanide causes deactivation of the glycolytic pathway and subsequently the accumulation of pyruvate and NADH and a decrease in NAD+. Therefore, the reaction equilibrium catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase leans towards lactate production and this may result in lactic acidosis.

  11. Identification, Cloning, and Characterization of l-Phenylserine Dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas syringae NK-15

    PubMed Central

    Ueshima, Sakuko; Muramatsu, Hisashi; Nakajima, Takanori; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Kato, Shin-ichiro; Misono, Haruo; Nagata, Shinji

    2010-01-01

    The gene encoding d-phenylserine dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas syringae NK-15 was identified, and a 9,246-bp nucleotide sequence containing the gene was sequenced. Six ORFs were confirmed in the sequenced region, four of which were predicted to form an operon. A homology search of each ORF predicted that orf3 encoded l-phenylserine dehydrogenase. Hence, orf3 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells and recombinant ORF3 was purified to homogeneity and characterized. The purified ORF3 enzyme showed l-phenylserine dehydrogenase activity. The enzymological properties and primary structure of l-phenylserine dehydrogenase (ORF3) were quite different from those of d-phenylserine dehydrogenase previously reported. l-Phenylserine dehydrogenase catalyzed the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the β-hydroxyl group of l-β-phenylserine. l-Phenylserine and l-threo-(2-thienyl)serine were good substrates for l-phenylserine dehydrogenase. The genes encoding l-phenylserine dehydrogenase and d-phenylserine dehydrogenase, which is induced by phenylserine, are located in a single operon. The reaction products of both enzymatic reactions were 2-aminoacetophenone and CO2. PMID:21048868

  12. [The role of hepatic and erythrocyte aldehyde dehydrogenase in the development of burn toxemia in rats].

    PubMed

    Solov'eva, A G

    2009-01-01

    The study was designed to examine catalytic properties of non-specific aldehyde dehydrogenase from rat liver and erythrocyte as the main markers of endogenous intoxication after burn. Enzymatic activity was assayed from changes in the rate of NADH synthesis during acetaldehyde oxidation. Burn was shown to decrease it both in the liver and in erythrocytes which resulted in the accumulation of toxic aldehydes and the development of intoxication. Simultaneous fall in alcohol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase activities is supposed to contribute to the decrease of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity as a result of thermal injury.

  13. Ribitol dehydrogenase of Klebsiella aerogenes. Sequence and properties of wild-type and mutant strains.

    PubMed Central

    Dothie, J M; Giglio, J R; Moore, C B; Taylor, S S; Hartley, B S

    1985-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the sequence of 249 amino acids in ribitol dehydrogenase-A from Klebsiella aerogenes. Continuous culture on xylitol yields strains that superproduce 'wild-type' enzyme but mutations appear to have arisen in this process. Other strains selected by such continuous culture produce enzymes with increased specific activity for xylitol but without loss of ribitol activity. One such enzyme, ribitol dehydrogenase-D, has Pro-196 for Gly-196. Another, ribitol dehydrogenase-B, has a different mutation. PMID:3904726

  14. In vitro hydrogen production by glucose dehydrogenase and hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.

    1996-10-01

    A new in vitro enzymatic pathway for the generation of molecular hydrogen from glucose has been demonstrated. The reaction is based upon the oxidation of glucose by Thermoplasma acidophilum glucose dehydrogenase with the concomitant oxidation of NADPH by Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase. Stoichiometric yields of hydrogen were produced from glucose with continuous cofactor recycle. This simple system may provide a method for the biological production of hydrogen from renewable sources. In addition, the other product of this reaction, gluconic acid, is a high-value commodity chemical.

  15. [Effects of H2-blockers on alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity].

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Orywal, Karolina; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2008-12-01

    First-pass metabolism (FPM) of alcohol is demonstrated by lower blood alcohol concentrations after oral than intravenous administration of the same dose. FPM occurs predominantly in the stomach and has been attributed to class IV of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzyme localizated in the gastric mucosa. A number of factors that influence on gastric ADH activity and thereby modulate FPM have been identified. These include age, sex, ethnicity, concentrations and amounts of alcohol consumed and drugs. Several H2-receptor antagonists, including cimetidine and ranitidine, inhibit gastric ADH activity and reduce FPM, resulting in higher blood alcohol concentrations after H2-blockers administration.

  16. Selective inhibition of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma brucei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelli, Massimo; El-Bastawissy, Eman; Knaggs, Michael H.; Barrett, Michael P.; Hanau, Stefania; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2001-05-01

    A number of triphenylmethane derivatives have been screened against 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma brucei and sheep liver. Some of these compounds show good inhibition of the enzymes and also selectivity towards the parasite enzyme. Modelling was undertaken to dock the compounds into the active sites of both enzymes. Using a combination of DOCK 3.5 and FLEXIDOCK a correlation was obtained between docking score and both activity for the enzymes and selectivity. Visualisation of the docked structures of the inhibitors in the active sites of the enzymes yielded a possible explanation of the selectivity for the parasite enzyme.

  17. Drug-induced haemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, T K; Todd, D; Tso, S C

    1976-01-01

    People with the variants of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) deficiency common in the southern Chinese (Canton, B(-)Chinese, and Hong Kong-Pokfulam) have a moderate shortening of red-cell survival but no anaemia when they are in the steady state. With a cross-transfusion technique, primaquine, nitrofurantoin, and large doses of aspirin were found to aggravate the haemolysis while sulphamethoxazole did so only in some people. Individual differences in drug metabolism may be the reason for this. Many commonly used drugs reported to accentuate haemolysis in GPD deficiency did not shorten red-cell survival. PMID:990860

  18. Evolution of D-lactate dehydrogenase activity from glycerol dehydrogenase and its utility for D-lactate production from lignocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid, an attractive, renewable chemical for production of biobased plastics (polylactic acid, PLA), is currently commercially produced from food-based sources of sugar. Pure optical isomers of lactate needed for PLA are typically produced by microbial fermentation of sugars at temperatures below 40 °C. Bacillus coagulans produces L(+)-lactate as a primary fermentation product and grows optimally at 50 °C and pH 5, conditions that are optimal for activity of commercial fungal cellulases. This strain was engineered to produce D(−)-lactate by deleting the native ldh (L-lactate dehydrogenase) and alsS (acetolactate synthase) genes to impede anaerobic growth, followed by growth-based selection to isolate suppressor mutants that restored growth. One of these, strain QZ19, produced about 90 g L-1 of optically pure D(−)-lactic acid from glucose in < 48 h. The new source of D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) activity was identified as a mutated form of glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH; D121N and F245S) that was produced at high levels as a result of a third mutation (insertion sequence). Although the native GlyDH had no detectable activity with pyruvate, the mutated GlyDH had a D-LDH specific activity of 0.8 μmoles min-1 (mg protein)-1. By using QZ19 for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to D-lactate (50 °C and pH 5.0), the cellulase usage could be reduced to 1/3 that required for equivalent fermentations by mesophilic lactic acid bacteria. Together, the native B. coagulans and the QZ19 derivative can be used to produce either L(+) or D(−) optical isomers of lactic acid (respectively) at high titers and yields from nonfood carbohydrates. PMID:22065761

  19. Evolution of D-lactate dehydrogenase activity from glycerol dehydrogenase and its utility for D-lactate production from lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2011-11-22

    Lactic acid, an attractive, renewable chemical for production of biobased plastics (polylactic acid, PLA), is currently commercially produced from food-based sources of sugar. Pure optical isomers of lactate needed for PLA are typically produced by microbial fermentation of sugars at temperatures below 40 °C. Bacillus coagulans produces L(+)-lactate as a primary fermentation product and grows optimally at 50 °C and pH 5, conditions that are optimal for activity of commercial fungal cellulases. This strain was engineered to produce D(-)-lactate by deleting the native ldh (L-lactate dehydrogenase) and alsS (acetolactate synthase) genes to impede anaerobic growth, followed by growth-based selection to isolate suppressor mutants that restored growth. One of these, strain QZ19, produced about 90 g L(-1) of optically pure D(-)-lactic acid from glucose in < 48 h. The new source of D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) activity was identified as a mutated form of glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH; D121N and F245S) that was produced at high levels as a result of a third mutation (insertion sequence). Although the native GlyDH had no detectable activity with pyruvate, the mutated GlyDH had a D-LDH specific activity of 0.8 μmoles min(-1) (mg protein)(-1). By using QZ19 for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to D-lactate (50 °C and pH 5.0), the cellulase usage could be reduced to 1/3 that required for equivalent fermentations by mesophilic lactic acid bacteria. Together, the native B. coagulans and the QZ19 derivative can be used to produce either L(+) or D(-) optical isomers of lactic acid (respectively) at high titers and yields from nonfood carbohydrates.

  20. Amino acid substitutions at glutamate-354 in dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli lower the sensitivity of pyruvate dehydrogenase to NADH.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhentao; Do, Phi Minh; Rhee, Mun Su; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2012-05-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) of Escherichia coli is inhibited by NADH. This inhibition is partially reversed by mutational alteration of the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LPD) component of the PDH complex (E354K or H322Y). Such a mutation in lpd led to a PDH complex that was functional in an anaerobic culture as seen by restoration of anaerobic growth of a pflB, ldhA double mutant of E. coli utilizing a PDH- and alcohol dehydrogenase-dependent homoethanol fermentation pathway. The glutamate at position 354 in LPD was systematically changed to all of the other natural amino acids to evaluate the physiological consequences. These amino acid replacements did not affect the PDH-dependent aerobic growth. With the exception of E354M, all changes also restored PDH-dependent anaerobic growth of and fermentation by an ldhA, pflB double mutant. The PDH complex with an LPD alteration E354G, E354P or E354W had an approximately 20-fold increase in the apparent K(i) for NADH compared with the native complex. The apparent K(m) for pyruvate or NAD(+) for the mutated forms of PDH was not significantly different from that of the native enzyme. A structural model of LPD suggests that the amino acid at position 354 could influence movement of NADH from its binding site to the surface. These results indicate that glutamate at position 354 plays a structural role in establishing the NADH sensitivity of LPD and the PDH complex by restricting movement of the product/substrate NADH, although this amino acid is not directly associated with NAD(H) binding.

  1. Proline dehydrogenase 2 (PRODH2) is a hydroxyproline dehydrogenase (HYPDH) and molecular target for treating primary hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Summitt, Candice B.; Johnson, Lynnette C.; Jönsson, Thomas J.; Parsonage, Derek; Holmes, Ross P.; Lowther, W. Todd

    2015-01-01

    The primary hyperoxalurias (PH), types 1–3, are disorders of glyoxylate metabolism that result in increased oxalate production and calcium oxalate stone formation. The breakdown of trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline (Hyp) from endogenous and dietary sources of collagen makes a significant contribution to the cellular glyoxylate pool. Proline dehydrogenase 2 (PRODH2), historically known as hydroxyproline oxidase, is the first step in the hydroxyproline catabolic pathway and represents a drug target to reduce the glyoxylate and oxalate burden of PH patients. This study is the first report of the expression, purification, and biochemical characterization of human PRODH2. Evaluation of a panel of N-terminal and C-terminal truncation variants indicated that residues 157–515 contain the catalytic core with one FAD molecule. The 12-fold higher kcat/Km value of 0.93 M−1·s−1 for Hyp over Pro demonstrates the preference for Hyp as substrate. Moreover, an anaerobic titration determined a Kd value of 125 μM for Hyp, a value ~1600-fold lower than the Km value. A survey of ubiquinone analogues revealed that menadione, duroquinone, and CoQ1 reacted more efficiently than oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor during catalysis. Taken together, these data and the slow reactivity with sodium sulfite support that PRODH2 functions as a dehydrogenase and most likely utilizes CoQ10 as the terminal electron acceptor in vivo. Thus, we propose that the name of PRODH2 be changed to hydroxyproline dehydrogenase (HYPDH). Three Hyp analogues were also identified to inhibit the activity of HYPDH, representing the first steps toward the development of a novel approach to treat all forms of PH. PMID:25697095

  2. Structural organization of the human sorbitol dehydrogenase gene (SORD)

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, T.; Carper, D.; Popescu, N.C.

    1995-03-01

    The primary structure of human sorbitol dehydrogenase (SORD) was determined by cDNA and genomic cloning. The nucleotide sequence of the mRNA covers 2471 bp including an open reading frame that yields a protein of 356 amino acid residues. The gene structure of SORD spans approximatley 30 kb divided into 9 exons and 8 introns. The gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.1 by in situ hybridization. Two transcription initiation sites were detected. Three Sp1 sites and a repetitive sequence (CAAA){sub 5} were observed in the 5{prime} noncoding region; no classical TATAA or CCAAT elements were found. The related alcohol dehydrogenases and {zeta}-crystallin have the same gene organization split by 8 introns, but no splice points coincide between SORD and these gene types. The deduced amino acid sequence of the SORD structure differs at a few positions from the directly determined protein sequence, suggesting allelic forms of the enzyme. High levels of SORD transcripts were observed in lens and kidney, as judged from Northern blot analysis. 42 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Interaction of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase monomer with phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, K A; Patel, H V; Freeman, K B; Papahadjopoulos, D

    1979-01-01

    The association between bovine and porcine mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37) and phospholipid vesicles was investigated. At concentrations at which malate dehydrogenase exists as a dimer, entrapment within the aqueous compartment but not binding of the 14C-labelled enzyme was observed. The dissociated enzyme was labile to moderate heat and to p-chloromercuribenzoate, but in both cases inactivation was decreased by incubation with suspensions of charged phospholipid vesicles. This suggested an interaction between enzyme subunits and phospholipid, and this was confirmed by direct binding measurements and by studies that followed changes in the fluorescein-labelled enzyme. The circular-dichroism spectra of the enzyme indicated a high alpha-helix content, and suggested that a small conformational change occurred when the enzyme dissociated. Fluorescence data also suggested less-rigid molecules after dissociation. A possible mechanism, based on the flexibility of enzyme monomer and its interaction with phospholipids, by which mitochondrial matrix enzymes are specifically localized in cells, is discussed. PMID:435273

  4. Structural basis for cellobiose dehydrogenase action during oxidative cellulose degradation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tien-Chye; Kracher, Daniel; Gandini, Rosaria; Sygmund, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Haltrich, Dietmar; Hällberg, B. Martin; Ludwig, Roland; Divne, Christina

    2015-01-01

    A new paradigm for cellulose depolymerization by fungi focuses on an oxidative mechanism involving cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDH) and copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO); however, mechanistic studies have been hampered by the lack of structural information regarding CDH. CDH contains a haem-binding cytochrome (CYT) connected via a flexible linker to a flavin-dependent dehydrogenase (DH). Electrons are generated from cellobiose oxidation catalysed by DH and shuttled via CYT to LPMO. Here we present structural analyses that provide a comprehensive picture of CDH conformers, which govern the electron transfer between redox centres. Using structure-based site-directed mutagenesis, rapid kinetics analysis and molecular docking, we demonstrate that flavin-to-haem interdomain electron transfer (IET) is enabled by a haem propionate group and that rapid IET requires a closed CDH state in which the propionate is tightly enfolded by DH. Following haem reduction, CYT reduces LPMO to initiate oxygen activation at the copper centre and subsequent cellulose depolymerization. PMID:26151670

  5. Phytoestrogens as inhibitors of fungal 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kristan, Katja; Krajnc, Katja; Konc, Janez; Gobec, Stanislav; Stojan, Jure; Rizner, Tea Lanisnik

    2005-09-01

    Different phytoestrogens were tested as inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17beta-HSDcl), a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. Phytoestrogens inhibited the oxidation of 100 microM 17beta-hydroxyestra-4-en-3-one and the reduction of 100 microM estra-4-en-3,17-dione, the best substrate pair known. The best inhibitors of oxidation, with IC(50) below 1 microM, were flavones hydroxylated at positions 3, 5 and 7: 3-hydroxyflavone, 3,7-dihydroxyflavone, 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin) and 5-hydroxyflavone, together with 5-methoxyflavone. The best inhibitors of reduction were less potent; 3-hydroxyflavone, 5-methoxyflavone, coumestrol, 3,5,7,4'-tetrahydroxyflavone (kaempferol) and 5-hydroxyflavone all had IC(50) values between 1 and 5 microM. Docking the representative inhibitors chrysin and kaempferol into the active site of 17beta-HSDcl revealed the possible binding mode, in which they are sandwiched between the nicotinamide moiety and Tyr212. The structural features of phytoestrogens, inhibitors of both oxidation and reduction catalyzed by the fungal 17beta-HSD, are similar to the reported structural features of phytoestrogen inhibitors of human 17beta-HSD types 1 and 2.

  6. Phytoestrogens as inhibitors of fungal 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kristan, Katja; Krajnc, Katja; Konc, Janez; Gobec, Stanislav; Stojan, Jure; Lanisnik Rizner, Tea

    2005-08-01

    Different phytoestrogens were tested as inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17beta-HSDcl), a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. Phytoestrogens inhibited the oxidation of 100microM 17beta-hydroxyestra-4-en-3-one and the reduction of 100microM estra-4-en-3,17-dione, the best substrate pair known. The best inhibitors of oxidation, with IC(50) below 1microM, were flavones hydroxylated at positions 3, 5 and 7: 3-hydroxyflavone, 3,7-dihydroxyflavone, 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin) and 5-hydroxyflavone, together with 5-methoxyflavone. The best inhibitors of reduction were less potent; 3-hydroxyflavone, 5-methoxyflavone, coumestrol, 3,5,7,4'-tetrahydroxyflavone (kaempferol) and 5-hydroxyflavone, all had IC(50) values between 1 and 5microM. Docking the representative inhibitors chrysin and kaempferol into the active site of 17beta-HSDcl revealed the possible binding mode, in which they are sandwiched between the nicotinamide moiety and Tyr212. The structural features of phytoestrogens, inhibitors of both oxidation and reduction catalyzed by the fungal 17beta-HSD, are similar to the reported structural features of phytoestrogen inhibitors of human 17beta-HSD types 1 and 2.

  7. Phenylbutyrate Therapy for Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Deficiency and Lactic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferriero, Rosa; Manco, Giuseppe; Lamantea, Eleonora; Nusco, Edoardo; Ferrante, Mariella I.; Sordino, Paolo; Stacpoole, Peter W.; Lee, Brendan; Zeviani, Massimo; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is a build-up of lactic acid in the blood and tissues, which can be due to several inborn errors of metabolism as well as nongenetic conditions. Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is the most common genetic disorder leading to lactic acidosis. Phosphorylation of specific serine residues of the E1α subunit of PDHC by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) inactivates the enzyme, whereas dephosphorylation restores PDHC activity. We found that phenylbutyrate enhances PDHC enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo by increasing the proportion of unphosphorylated enzyme through inhibition of PDK. Phenylbutyrate given to C57B6/L wild-type mice results in a significant increase in PDHC enzyme activity and a reduction of phosphorylated E1α in brain, muscle, and liver compared to saline-treated mice. By means of recombinant enzymes, we showed that phenylbutyrate prevents phosphorylation of E1α through binding and inhibition of PDK, providing a molecular explanation for the effect of phenylbutyrate on PDHC activity. Phenylbutyrate increases PDHC activity in fibroblasts from PDHC-deficient patients harboring various molecular defects and corrects the morphological, locomotor, and biochemical abnormalities in the noam631 zebrafish model of PDHC deficiency. In mice, phenylbutyrate prevents systemic lactic acidosis induced by partial hepatectomy. Because phenylbutyrate is already approved for human use in other diseases, the findings of this study have the potential to be rapidly translated for treatment of patients with PDHC deficiency and other forms of primary and secondary lactic acidosis. PMID:23467562

  8. CYTOCHEMICAL LOCALIZATION OF TWO GLYCOLYTIC DEHYDROGENASES IN WHITE SKELETAL MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Fahimi, H. Dariush; Karnovsky, Morris J.

    1966-01-01

    The cytochemical localization, by conventional methods, of lactate and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases is limited, firstly, by the solubility of these enzymes in aqueous media and, secondly, by the dependence of the final electron flow from reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH) to the tetrazolium on tissue diaphorase activity: localization is therefore that of the diaphorase, which in rabbit adductor magnus is mitochondrial. NADH has been found to have great affinity to bind in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and, therefore, if it is generated freely in the incubation media containing 2,2',5,5'-tetra-p-nitrophenyl-3,3'-(3,3'-dimethoxy-4,4'-phenylene)-ditetrazolium chloride (TNBT) and N-methyl phenazonium methyl sulfate (PMS), it can bind there and cause a false staining. Since such a production of NADH can readily occur in the incubation media for glycolytic dehydrogenases due to diffusion of these soluble enzymes from tissue sections, the prevention of enzyme solubilization is extremely important. Fixation in formaldehyde prevented such enzyme diffusion, while at the same time sufficient activity persisted to allow for adequate staining. The incubation media contained PMS, so that the staining system was largely independent of tissue diaphorase activity. Application of these methods to adductor magnus of rabbit revealed by light microscopy, for both enzymes, a fine network which was shown by electron microscopy to represent staining of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Mitochondria also reacted. These findings add further support for the notion that the sarcoplasmic reticulum is probably involved in glycolytic activity. PMID:4288329

  9. Lactate Dehydrogenase Catalysis: Roles of Keto, Hydrated, and Enol Pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meany, J. E.

    2007-09-01

    Many carbonyl substrates of oxidoreductase enzymes undergo hydration and enolization so that these substrate systems are partitioned between keto, hydrated (gem-diol), and enol forms in aqueous solution. Some oxidoreductase enzymes are subject to inhibition by high concentrations of substrate. For such enzymes, two questions arise pertaining to enzyme "substrate" interactions: (i) which form of the substrate system serves as the preferential substrate and (ii) which form acts to inhibit the enzyme? Thus the relative concentrations of the forms of these substrate systems (keto, hydrated, enol) may provide a form of metabolic control. In this light, the present article considers the reduction of pyruvate by lactate dehydrogenase in the presence of NADH. This reaction is inhibited by relatively high concentrations of pyruvate and the physiological significance of this inhibition has been a subject of controversy for many years. Summarized in this article are data from the literature pertaining to the interactions of keto, hydrated, and enol pyruvate with lactate dehydrogenase. Biochemistry instructors and their students are invited to review such pertinent articles so that they also may evaluate the possibility that the "substrate" inhibition of the isoenzymes in the heart muscle may be, under certain conditions, relevant as a form of metabolic control.

  10. Structural analysis of fungus-derived FAD glucose dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Hiromi; Sakai, Genki; Mori, Kazushige; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Kamitori, Shigehiro; Sode, Koji

    2015-01-01

    We report the first three-dimensional structure of fungus-derived glucose dehydrogenase using flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as the cofactor. This is currently the most advanced and popular enzyme used in glucose sensor strips manufactured for glycemic control by diabetic patients. We prepared recombinant nonglycosylated FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (FADGDH) derived from Aspergillus flavus (AfGDH) and obtained the X-ray structures of the binary complex of enzyme and reduced FAD at a resolution of 1.78 Å and the ternary complex with reduced FAD and D-glucono-1,5-lactone (LGC) at a resolution of 1.57 Å. The overall structure is similar to that of fungal glucose oxidases (GOxs) reported till date. The ternary complex with reduced FAD and LGC revealed the residues recognizing the substrate. His505 and His548 were subjected for site-directed mutagenesis studies, and these two residues were revealed to form the catalytic pair, as those conserved in GOxs. The absence of residues that recognize the sixth hydroxyl group of the glucose of AfGDH, and the presence of significant cavity around the active site may account for this enzyme activity toward xylose. The structural information will contribute to the further engineering of FADGDH for use in more reliable and economical biosensing technology for diabetes management. PMID:26311535

  11. New model for polymerization of oligomeric alcohol dehydrogenases into nanoaggregates.

    PubMed

    Barzegar, Abolfazl; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali A; Kyani, Anahita; Goliaei, Bahram; Ahmadian, Shahin; Sheibani, Nader

    2010-02-01

    Polymerization and self-assembly of proteins into nanoaggregates of different sizes and morphologies (nanoensembles or nanofilaments) is a phenomenon that involved problems in various neurodegenerative diseases (medicine) and enzyme instability/inactivity (biotechnology). Thermal polymerization of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (dimeric) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (tetrameric), as biotechnological ADH representative enzymes, was evaluated for the development of a rational strategy to control aggregation. Constructed ADH nuclei, which grew to larger amorphous nanoaggregates, were prevented via high repulsion strain of the net charge values. Good correlation between the variation in scattering and lambda(-2) was related to the amorphousness of the nanoaggregated ADHs, shown by electron microscopic images. Scattering corrections revealed that ADH polymerization was related to the quaternary structural changes, including delocalization of subunits without unfolding, i.e. lacking the 3D conformational and/or secondary-ordered structural changes. The results demonstrated that electrostatic repulsion was not only responsible for disaggregation but also caused a delay in the onset of aggregation temperature, decreasing maximum values of aggregation and amounts of precipitation. Together, our results demonstrate and propose a new model of self-assembly for ADH enzymes based on the construction of nuclei, which grow to formless nanoaggregates with minimal changes in the tertiary and secondary conformations.

  12. Crystal structure of a chimaeric bacterial glutamate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Tânia; Sharkey, Michael A.; Engel, Paul C.; Khan, Amir R.

    2016-05-23

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (EC 1.4.1.2–4) catalyse the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to α-ketoglutarate using NAD(P)+as a cofactor. The bacterial enzymes are hexameric, arranged with 32 symmetry, and each polypeptide consists of an N-terminal substrate-binding segment (domain I) followed by a C-terminal cofactor-binding segment (domain II). The catalytic reaction takes place in the cleft formed at the junction of the two domains. Distinct signature sequences in the nucleotide-binding domain have been linked to the binding of NAD+versusNADP+, but they are not unambiguous predictors of cofactor preference. In the absence of substrate, the two domains move apart as rigid bodies, as shown by the apo structure of glutamate dehydrogenase fromClostridium symbiosum. Here, the crystal structure of a chimaeric clostridial/Escherichia colienzyme has been determined in the apo state. The enzyme is fully functional and reveals possible determinants of interdomain flexibility at a hinge region following the pivot helix. The enzyme retains the preference for NADP+cofactor from the parentE. colidomain II, although there are subtle differences in catalytic activity.

  13. alpha-Ketoglutarate dehydrogenase mutant of Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, M J; Fraenkel, D G

    1979-01-01

    A mutant of Rhizobium meliloti selected as unable to grow on L-arabinose also failed to grow on acetate or pyruvate. It grew, but slower than the parental strain, on many other carbon sources. Assay showed it to lack alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (kgd) activity, and revertants of normal growth phenotype contained the activity again. Other enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and of the glyoxylate cycle were present in both mutant and parent strains. Enzymes of pyruvate metabolism were also assayed. L-Arabinose degradation in R. meliloti was found to differ from the known pathway in R. japonicum, since the former strain lacked 2-keto-o-deoxy-L-arabonate aldolase but contained alpha-ketoglutarate semialdehyde dehydrogenase; thus, it is likely that R. meliloti has the L-arabinose pathway leading to alpha-ketoglutarate rather than the one to glycolaldehyde and pyruvate. This finding accounts for the L-arabinose negativity of the mutant. Resting cells of the mutant were able to metabolize the three substrates which did not allow growth. PMID:762018

  14. Differing roles of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases during mouse oocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiaojing; Zhang, Liang; Han, Longsen; Ge, Juan; Ma, Rujun; Zhang, Xuesen; Moley, Kelle; Schedl, Tim; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs) modulate energy homeostasis in multiple tissues and cell types, under various nutrient conditions, through phosphorylation of the α subunit (PDHE1α, also known as PDHA1) of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. However, the roles of PDKs in meiotic maturation are currently unknown. Here, by undertaking knockdown and overexpression analysis of PDK paralogs (PDK1–PDK4) in mouse oocytes, we established the site-specificity of PDKs towards the phosphorylation of three serine residues (Ser232, Ser293 and Ser300) on PDHE1α. We found that PDK3-mediated phosphorylation of Ser293-PDHE1α results in disruption of meiotic spindle morphology and chromosome alignment and decreased total ATP levels, probably through inhibition of PDH activity. Unexpectedly, we discovered that PDK1 and PDK2 promote meiotic maturation, as their knockdown disturbs the assembly of the meiotic apparatus, without significantly altering ATP content. Moreover, phosphorylation of Ser232-PDHE1α was demonstrated to mediate PDK1 and PDK2 action in meiotic maturation, possibly through a mechanism that is distinct from PDH inactivation. These findings reveal that there are divergent roles of PDKs during oocyte maturation and indicate a new mechanism controlling meiotic structure. PMID:25991547

  15. The Development of Leucine Dehydrogenase and Formate Dehydrogenase Bifunctional Enzyme Cascade Improves the Biosynthsis of L-tert-Leucine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jixue; Zhang, Yonghui; Sun, Dongfang; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Shizhen; Fang, Baishan

    2016-11-01

    Leucine dehydrogenase (LDH) and formate dehydrogenase (FDH) were assembled together based on a high-affinity interaction between two different cohesins in a miniscaffoldin and corresponding dockerins in LDH and FDH. The miniscaffoldin with two enzymes was further absorbed by regenerated amorphous cellulose (RAC) to form a bifunctional enzyme complex (miniscaffoldin with LDH and FDH adsorbed by RAC, RSLF) in vitro. The enzymatic characteristics of the bifunctional enzyme complex and free enzymes mixture were systematically compared. The synthesis of L-tert-leucine by the RSLF and free enzyme mixture were compared under different concentrations of enzymes, coenzyme, and substrates. The initial L-tert-leucine production rate by RSLF was enhanced by 2-fold compared with that of the free enzyme mixture. Ninety-one grams per liter of L-tert-leucine with an enantiomeric purity of 99 % e.e. was obtained by RSLF multienzyme catalysis. The results indicated that the bifuntional enzyme complex based on cohesin-dockerin interaction has great potential in the synthesis of L-tert-leucine.

  16. Evaluation of alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes as bi-enzymatic anodes in a membraneless ethanol microfluidic fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-de-la-Rosa, J.; Arjona, N.; Arriaga, L. G.; Ledesma-García, J.; Guerra-Balcázar, M.

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (AldH) enzymes were immobilized by covalent binding and used as the anode in a bi-enzymatic membraneless ethanol hybrid microfluidic fuel cell. The purpose of using both enzymes was to optimize the ethanol electro-oxidation reaction (EOR) by using ADH toward its direct oxidation and AldH for the oxidation of aldehydes as by-products of the EOR. For this reason, three enzymatic bioanode configurations were evaluated according with the location of enzymes: combined, vertical and horizontally separated. In the combined configuration, a current density of 16.3 mA cm-2, a voltage of 1.14 V and a power density of 7.02 mW cm-2 were obtained. When enzymes were separately placed in a horizontal and vertical position the ocp drops to 0.94 V and to 0.68 V, respectively. The current density also falls to values of 13.63 and 5.05 mA cm-2. The decrease of cell performance of bioanodes with separated enzymes compared with the combined bioanode was of 31.7% and 86.87% for the horizontal and the vertical array.

  17. A 'random steady-state' model for the pyruvate dehydrogenase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase enzyme complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najdi, T. S.; Hatfield, G. W.; Mjolsness, E. D.

    2010-03-01

    The multienzyme complexes, pyruvate dehydrogenase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, involved in the central metabolism of Escherichia coli consist of multiple copies of three different enzymes, E1, E2 and E3, that cooperate to channel substrate intermediates between their active sites. The E2 components form the core of the complex, while a mixture of E1 and E3 components binds to the core. We present a random steady-state model to describe catalysis by such multienzyme complexes. At a fast time scale, the model describes the enzyme catalytic mechanisms of substrate channeling at a steady state, by polynomially approximating the analytic solution of a biochemical master equation. At a slower time scale, the structural organization of the different enzymes in the complex and their random binding/unbinding to the core is modeled using methods from equilibrium statistical mechanics. Biologically, the model describes the optimization of catalytic activity by substrate sharing over the entire enzyme complex. The resulting enzymatic models illustrate the random steady state (RSS) for modeling multienzyme complexes in metabolic pathways.

  18. In vivo regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase in Rhizopus oryzae to improve L-lactic acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Thitiprasert, Sitanan; Sooksai, Sarintip; Thongchul, Nuttha

    2011-08-01

    Rhizopus oryzae is becoming more important due to its ability to produce an optically pure L: -lactic acid. However, fermentation by Rhizopus usually suffers from low yield because of production of ethanol as a byproduct. Limiting ethanol production in living immobilized R. oryzae by inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was observed in shake flask fermentation. The effects of ADH inhibitors added into the medium on the regulation of ADH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as well as the production of cell biomass, lactic acid, and ethanol were elucidated. 1,2-diazole and 2,2,2-trifluroethanol were found to be the effective inhibitors used in this study. The highest lactic acid yield of 0.47 g/g glucose was obtained when 0.01 mM 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol was present during the production phase of the pregrown R. oryzae. This represents about 38% increase in yield as compared with that from the simple glucose fermentation. Fungal metabolism was suppressed when iodoacetic acid, N-ethylmaleimide, 4,4'-dithiodipyridine, or 4-hydroxymercury benzoic acid were present. Dramatic increase in ADH and LDH activities but slight change in product yields might be explained by the inhibitors controlling enzyme activities at the pyruvate branch point. This showed that in living R. oryzae, the inhibitors regulated the flux through the related pathways.

  19. The diagnostic value of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) measurement in the sera of gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Orywal, Karolina; Laniewska, Magdalena; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2010-12-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are present in gastric cancer cells (GC). Moreover, the activity of total ADH and class IV isoenzymes is significantly higher in cancer tissue than in healthy mucosa. The activity of these enzymes in cancer cells is probably reflected in the sera and could thus be helpful for diagnostics of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate a potential role of ADH and ALDH as tumor markers for gastric cancer. We defined diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, predictive value for positive and negative results, and receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve for tested enzymes. Serum samples were taken from 168 patients with gastric cancer before treatment and from 168 control subjects. Total ADH activity and class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by photometric but ALDH activity and ADH I and II by the fluorometric method, with class-specific fluorogenic substrates. There was significant increase in the activity of ADH IV isoenzyme and ADH total in the sera of gastric cancer patients compared to the control. The diagnostic sensitivity for ADH IV was 73%, specificity 79%, positive and negative predictive values were 81 and 72% respectively. Area under ROC curve for ADH IV was 0.67. The results suggest a potential role for ADH IV as marker of gastric cancer.

  20. Acute and chronic ethanol exposure differentially alters alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in the zebrafish liver.

    PubMed

    Tran, Steven; Nowicki, Magda; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2015-01-02

    Chronic ethanol exposure paradigms have been successfully used in the past to induce behavioral and central nervous system related changes in zebrafish. However, it is currently unknown whether chronic ethanol exposure alters ethanol metabolism in adult zebrafish. In the current study we examine the effect of acute ethanol exposure on adult zebrafish behavioral responses, as well as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in the liver. We then examine how two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms (continuous and repeated ethanol exposure) alter behavioral responses and liver enzyme activity during a subsequent acute ethanol challenge. Acute ethanol exposure increased locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner. ADH activity was shown to exhibit an inverted U-shaped curve and ALDH activity was decreased by ethanol exposure at all doses. During the acute ethanol challenge, animals that were continuously housed in ethanol exhibited a significantly reduced locomotor response and increased ADH activity, however, ALDH activity did not change. Zebrafish that were repeatedly exposed to ethanol demonstrated a small but significant attenuation of the locomotor response during the acute ethanol challenge but ADH and ALDH activity was similar to controls. Overall, we identified two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms that differentially alter behavioral and physiological responses in zebrafish. We speculate that these two paradigms may allow dissociation of central nervous system-related and liver enzyme-dependent ethanol induced changes in zebrafish.

  1. The influence of oxygen on radiation-induced structural and functional changes in glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Bubinski, Michal; Krokosz, Anita; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2012-07-01

    Proteins are major targets for oxidative damage due to their abundance in cells and high reactivity with free radicals. In the present study we examined the influence of oxygen on radiation-induced inactivation and structural changes of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We chose these two enzymes because they occur at high concentrations and participate in the most important processes in organisms; furthermore, they show considerable similarity in their structure. Protein solutions were irradiated with X-rays in doses ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 kGy, in air and N2O. The much higher radiation inactivation of GAPDH as compared to LDH is correlated with substantially greater structural changes in this protein, mainly involving the loss of free thiol groups (-SH). Of lesser importance in the differentiation of the radiosensitivity of the studied enzymes are tryptophan residues. Molecular oxygen, present during irradiation, increased to a significantly greater extent the inactivation and structural changes of GAPDH than that of LDH. The results suggest that the greater effect of oxygen on GAPDH is due to the higher efficiency of the superoxide radical, the higher amount of hydroperoxides generated, and the higher degree of unfolding of this protein.

  2. Molecular characterization of an aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase gene from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    PubMed Central

    Nair, R V; Bennett, G N; Papoutsakis, E T

    1994-01-01

    A gene (aad) coding for an aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) was identified immediately upstream of the previously cloned ctfA (J. W. Cary, D. J. Petersen, E. T. Papoutsakis, and G. N. Bennett, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 56:1576-1583, 1990) of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and sequenced. The 2,619-bp aad codes for a 96,517-Da protein. Primer extension analysis identified two transcriptional start sites 83 and 243 bp upstream of the aad start codon. The N-terminal section of AAD shows homology to aldehyde dehydrogenases of bacterial, fungal, mammalian, and plant origin, while the C-terminal section shows homology to alcohol dehydrogenases of bacterial (which includes three clostridial alcohol dehydrogenases) and yeast origin. AAD exhibits considerable amino acid homology (56% identity) over its entire sequence to the trifunctional protein encoded by adhE from Escherichia coli. Expression of aad from a plasmid in C. acetobutylicum showed that AAD, which appears as a approximately 96-kDa band in denaturing protein gels, provides elevated activities of NADH-dependent butanol dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and butyraldehyde dehydrogenase, and a small increase in NADH-dependent ethanol dehydrogenase. A 957-bp open reading frame that could potentially encode a 36,704-Da protein was identified upstream of aad. Images PMID:8300540

  3. The crystal structure of SDR-type pyridoxal 4-dehydrogenase of Mesorhizobium loti.

    PubMed

    Chu, Huy Nhat; Kobayashi, Jun; Mikami, Bunzo; Yagi, Toshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Pyridoxal 4-dehydrogenase catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of pyridoxal to 4-pyridoxolactone and is involved in degradation pathway I of pyridoxine, a vitamin B(6) compound. Its crystal structure was elucidated for the first time. Molecular replacement with (S)-1-phenylthanol dehydrogenase (PDB code 2EW8) was adopted to determine the tertiary structure of the NAD(+)-bound enzyme.

  4. Cloning and mRNA Expression of NADH Dehydrogenase during Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus Development and Pesticide Response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NADH dehydrogenase, the largest of the respiratory complexes, is the first enzyme of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have cloned and sequenced cDNA of NADH dehydrogenase gene from Ochlerotatus (Ochlerotatus) taeniorhynchus (Wiedemann) adult (GeneBank Accession number: FJ458415). The ...

  5. AROMATIC METABOLISM IN PLANTS. I. A STUDY OF THE PREPHENATE DEHYDROGENASE FROM BEAN PLANTS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Prephenate dehydrogenase (prephenate: NADP(+) oxidoreductase (decarboxylating)) was isolated from cotyledons of wax bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L. var...mung bean ( Phaseolus aureus Roxb.). A study was made of the variation in the amount of prephenate dehydrogenase and aromatic amino acid transaminase in

  6. Activity of select dehydrogenases with Sepharose-immobilized N6-carboxymethyl-NAD

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Justin; Vieille, Claire

    2015-01-01

    N6-carboxymethyl-NAD (N6-CM-NAD) can be used to immobilize NAD onto a substrate containing terminal primary amines. We previously immobilized N6-CM-NAD onto sepharose beads and showed that Thermotoga maritima glycerol dehydrogenase could use the immobilized cofactor with cofactor recycling. We now show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase, rabbit muscle L-lactate dehydrogenase (type XI), bovine liver L-glutamic dehydrogenase (type III), Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose-6-phosphate dehydro-genase, and Thermotoga maritima mannitol dehydrogenase are active with soluble N6-CM-NAD. The products of all enzymes but 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone were formed when sepharose-immobilized N6-CM-NAD was recycled by T. maritima glycerol dehydrogenase, indicating that N6-immobilized NAD is suitable for use by a variety of different dehydrogenases. Observations of the enzyme active sites suggest that steric hindrance plays a greater role in limiting or allowing activity with the modified cofactor than do polarity and charge of the residues surrounding the N6-amine group on NAD. PMID:25611453

  7. Heterogeneous expression of protein and mRNA in pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, I D; Kerr, D S; Ho, L; Lusk, M M; Pepin, R A; Javed, A A; Mole, J E; Jesse, B W; Thekkumkara, T J; Pons, G

    1988-01-01

    Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase [pyruvate:lipoamide 2-oxidoreductase (decarboxylating and acceptor-acetylating), EC 1.2.4.1], the first component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, is associated with lactic acidosis and central nervous system dysfunction. Using both specific antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase and cDNAs coding for its two alpha and beta subunits, we characterized pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency in 11 patients. Three different patterns were found on immunologic and RNA blot analyses. (i) Seven patients had immunologically detectable crossreactive material for the alpha and beta proteins of pyruvate dehydrogenase. (ii) Two patients had no detectable crossreactive protein for either the alpha or beta subunit but had normal amounts of mRNA for both alpha and beta subunits. (iii) The remaining two patients also had no detectable crossreactive protein but had diminished amounts of mRNA for the alpha subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase only. These results indicate that loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity may be associated with either absent or catalytically inactive proteins, and in those cases in which this enzyme is absent, mRNA for one of the subunits may also be missing. When mRNA for one of the subunits is lacking, both protein subunits are absent, suggesting that a mutation affecting the expression of one of the subunit proteins causes the remaining uncomplexed subunit to be unstable. The results show that several different mutations account for the molecular heterogeneity of pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency. Images PMID:3140238

  8. Activity of select dehydrogenases with sepharose-immobilized N(6)-carboxymethyl-NAD.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Justin; Vieille, Claire

    2015-01-01

    N(6)-carboxymethyl-NAD (N(6)-CM-NAD) can be used to immobilize NAD onto a substrate containing terminal primary amines. We previously immobilized N(6)-CM-NAD onto sepharose beads and showed that Thermotoga maritima glycerol dehydrogenase could use the immobilized cofactor with cofactor recycling. We now show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase, rabbit muscle L-lactate dehydrogenase (type XI), bovine liver L-glutamic dehydrogenase (type III), Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose-6-phosphate dehydro-genase, and Thermotoga maritima mannitol dehydrogenase are active with soluble N(6)-CM-NAD. The products of all enzymes but 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone were formed when sepharose-immobilized N(6)-CM-NAD was recycled by T. maritima glycerol dehydrogenase, indicating that N(6)-immobilized NAD is suitable for use by a variety of different dehydrogenases. Observations of the enzyme active sites suggest that steric hindrance plays a greater role in limiting or allowing activity with the modified cofactor than do polarity and charge of the residues surrounding the N(6)-amine group on NAD.

  9. Structural and functional properties of a yeast xylitol dehydrogenase, a Zn2+-containing metalloenzyme similar to medium-chain sorbitol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed Central

    Lunzer, R; Mamnun, Y; Haltrich, D; Kulbe, K D; Nidetzky, B

    1998-01-01

    The NAD+-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase from the xylose-assimilating yeast Galactocandida mastotermitis has been purified in high yield (80%) and characterized. Xylitol dehydrogenase is a heteronuclear multimetal protein that forms homotetramers and contains 1 mol of Zn2+ ions and 6 mol of Mg2+ ions per mol of 37.4 kDa protomer. Treatment with chelating agents such as EDTA results in the removal of the Zn2+ ions with a concomitant loss of enzyme activity. The Mg2+ ions are not essential for activity and are removed by chelation or extensive dialysis without affecting the stability of the enzyme. Results of initial velocity studies at steady state for d-sorbitol oxidation and d-fructose reduction together with the characteristic patterns of product inhibition point to a compulsorily ordered Theorell-Chance mechanism of xylitol dehydrogenase in which coenzyme binds first and leaves last. At pH 7.5, the binding of NADH (Ki approximately 10 microM) is approx. 80-fold tighter than that of NAD+. Polyhydroxyalcohols require at least five carbon atoms to be good substrates of xylitol dehydrogenase, and the C-2 (S), C-3 (R) and C-4 (R) configuration is preferred. Therefore xylitol dehydrogenase shares structural and functional properties with medium-chain sorbitol dehydrogenases. PMID:9806889

  10. Amphibian alcohol dehydrogenase, the major frog liver enzyme. Relationships to other forms and assessment of an early gene duplication separating vertebrate class I and class III alcohol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Cederlund, E.; Joernvall, H. ); Peralba, J.M.; Pares, X. )

    1991-03-19

    Submammalian alcohol dehydrogenase structures can be used to evaluate the origins and functions of different types of the mammalian enzyme. Two avian forms were recently reported, and the authors now define the major amphibian alcohol dehydrogenase. The enzyme from the liver of the Green frog Rana perezi was purified, carboxymethylated, and submitted to amino acid sequence determination by peptide analysis of six different digest. The protein has a 375-residue subunit and is a class I alcohol dehydrogenase, bridging the gap toward the original separation of the classes that are observable in the human alcohol dehydrogenase system. In relation to the human class I enzyme, the amphibian protein has residue identities exactly halfway (68%) between those for the corresponding avian enzyme (74%) and the human class III enzyme (62%), suggesting an origin of the alcohol dehnydrogenase classes very early in or close to the evolution of the vertebrate line. This conclusion suggests that these enzyme classes are more universal among animals than previously realized and constitutes the first real assessment of the origin of the duplications leading to the alcohol dehydrogenase classes. In conclusion, the amphibian enzyme allows a rough positioning of the divergence of the alcohol dehydrogenase classes, shows that the class I type is widesprread in vertebrates, and functionally conforms with greater variations at the substrate-binding than the coenzyme-binding site.

  11. Mutation of Arg-115 of human class III alcohol dehydrogenase: a binding site required for formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity and fatty acid activation.

    PubMed Central

    Engeland, K; Höög, J O; Holmquist, B; Estonius, M; Jörnvall, H; Vallee, B L

    1993-01-01

    The origin of the fatty acid activation and formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that distinguishes human class III alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) from all other alcohol dehydrogenases has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis of its Arg-115 residue. The Ala- and Asp-115 mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The activities of the recombinant native and mutant enzymes toward ethanol are essentially identical, but mutagenesis greatly decreases the kcat/Km values for glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation. The catalytic efficiency for the Asp variant is < 0.1% that of the unmutated enzyme, due to both a higher Km and a lower kcat value. As with the native enzyme, neither mutant can oxidize methanol, be saturated by ethanol, or be inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole; i.e., they retain these class III characteristics. In contrast, however, their activation by fatty acids, another characteristic unique to class III alcohol dehydrogenase, is markedly attenuated. The Ala mutant is activated only slightly, but the Asp mutant is not activated at all. The results strongly indicate that Arg-115 in class III alcohol dehydrogenase is a component of the binding site for activating fatty acids and is critical for the binding of S-hydroxymethylglutathione in glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. PMID:8460164

  12. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression in solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Collart, F.R.; Chubb, C.B.; Mirkin, B.L.; Huberman, E.

    1992-07-10

    IMP dehydrogenase, a regulatory enzyme of guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, may play a role in cell proliferation and malignancy. To assess this possibility, we examined IMP dehydrogenase expression in a series of human solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines in comparison with their normal counterparts. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression was observed in brain tumors relative to normal brain tissue and in sarcoma cells relative to normal fibroblasts. Similarly, in several B- and T-lymphoid leukemia cell lines, elevated levels of IMP dehydrogenase mRNA and cellular enzyme were observed in comparison with the levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes. These results are consistent with an association between increased IMP dehydrogenase expression and either enhanced cell proliferation or malignant transformation.

  13. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Activity in Normal and Deficient Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Kwan-Fu Rex; Hu, Chii-Whei C.; Utter, Merton F.

    1981-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity in human skin fibroblasts appears to be regulated by a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation mechanism, as is the case with other animal cells. The enzyme can be activated by pretreating the cells with dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, before they are disrupted for measurement of PDC activity. With such treatment, the activity reaches 5-6 nmol/min per mg of protein at 37°C with fibroblasts from infants. Such values represent an activation of about 5-20-fold over those observed with untreated cells. That this assay, based on [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation, represents a valid measurement of the overall PDC reaction is shown by the dependence of 14CO2 production on the presence of thiamin-PP, coenzyme A (CoA), Mg++, and NAD+. Also, it has been shown that acetyl-CoA and 14CO2 are formed in a 1:1 ratio. A similar degree of activation of PDC can also be achieved by adding purified pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase and high concentrations of Mg++ and Ca++, or in some cases by adding the metal ions alone to the cell homogenate after disruption. These results strongly suggest that activation is due to dephosphorylation. Addition of NaF, which inhibits dephosphorylation, leads to almost complete loss of PDC activity. Assays of completely activated PDC were performed on two cell lines originating from patients reported to be deficient in this enzyme (Blass, J. P., J. Avigan, and B. W. Ublendorf. 1970. J. Clin. Invest. 49: 423-432; Blass, J. P., J. D. Schuman, D. S. Young, and E. Ham. 1972. J. Clin. Invest. 51: 1545-1551). Even after activation with DCA, fibroblasts from the patients showed values of only 0.1 and 0.3 nmol/min per mg of protein. A familial study of one of these patients showed that both parents exhibited activity in fully activated cells about half that of normal values, whereas cells from a sibling appeared normal. These results demonstrate the inheritance nature of PDC deficiency

  14. 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in canine pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza-Hernandez, G.; Lopez-Solache, I.; Rendon, J.L.; Diaz-Sanchez, V.; Diaz-Zagoya, J.C.

    1988-04-15

    The mitochondrial fraction of the dog pancreas showed NAD(H)-dependent enzyme activity of 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. The enzyme catalyzes oxidoreduction between androstenedione and testosterone. The apparent Km value of the enzyme for androstenedione was 9.5 +/- 0.9 microM, the apparent Vmax was determined as 0.4 nmol mg-1 min-1, and the optimal pH was 6.5. In phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, maximal rate of androstenedione reduction was observed at 37 degrees C. The oxidation of testosterone by the enzyme proceeded at the same rate as the reduction of the androstenedione at a pH of 6.8-7.0. The apparent Km value and the optimal pH of the enzyme for testosterone were 3.5 +/- 0.5 microM and 7.5, respectively.

  15. Conjugated bilirubin in neonates with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, M; Rubaltelli, F F; Hammerman, C; Vilei, M T; Leiter, C; Abramov, A; Muraca, M

    1996-05-01

    We used a system capable of measuring conjugated bilirubin and its monoconjugated and diconjugated fractions in serum to assess bilirubin conjugation in 29 glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient, term, male newborn infants and 35 control subjects; all had serum bilirubin levels > or = 256 mumol/L (15 mg/dI). The median value for diconjugated bilirubin was lower in the G6PD-deficient neonates than in control subjects (0.06 (range 0.00 to 1.84) vs 0.21 (range 0.00 to 1.02) mumol/L, p = 0.006). Diglucuronide was undetectable in 11 (38.9%) of the G6PD-deficient infants versus 3 (8.6%) of the control subjects (p = 0.015). These findings imply a partial defect of bilirubin conjugation not previously demonstrated in G6PD-deficient newborn infants.

  16. Mechanistic enzymology of CO dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    SciTech Connect

    Ragsdale, S.W.

    1992-01-01

    The final steps in acetyl-CoA biosynthesis by anaerobic bacteria are performed by carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH), a nickel/iron-sulfur protein. An important achievement was to establish conditions under which acetyl-CoA synthesis by purified enzymes equals the in vivo rate of acetate synthesis. Under these optimized conditions we established that the rate limiting step in the synthesis of acetyl-CoA from methyl-H[sub 4]folate, CO and CoA is likely to be the methylation of CODH by the methylated corrinoid/iron-sulfur protein. We then focused on stopped flow studies of this rate limiting transmethylation reaction and established its mechanism. We have studied the carbonylation of CODH by infrared and resonance Raman spectroscopy and determined that the [Ni-Fe[sup 3-4]S[sub 4

  17. Separation of turkey lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes using isoelectric focusing technique.

    PubMed

    Heinová, Dagmar; Kostecká, Zuzana; Csank, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at pH 8.8 did not allow to separate lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzymes of turkey origin. Five electrophoretically distinguishable forms of the enzyme were detected in serum and tissues of turkey using IEF technique in a pH range of 3-9. Generally, three different groups were seen: (i) those having an anodic domination (heart, kidney, pancreas, and erythrocytes) with mainly LDH-1 fraction, (ii) those having a cathodic domination (breast muscle and serum) with prevalence of LDH-5, and (iii) those with a more uniform distribution (liver, spleen, lung, and brain). The specific enzyme activity was the highest in the breast muscle, followed by heart muscle, and brain. Low activities were detected in serum, kidney, and liver.

  18. Microbial metabolic activity in soil as measured by dehydrogenase determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The dehydrogenase technique for measuring the metabolic activity of microorganisms in soil was modified to use a 6-h, 37 C incubation with either glucose or yeast extract as the electron-donating substrate. The rate of formazan production remained constant during this time interval, and cellular multiplication apparently did not occur. The technique was used to follow changes in the overall metabolic activities of microorganisms in soil undergoing incubation with a limiting concentration of added nutrient. The sequence of events was similar to that obtained by using the Warburg respirometer to measure O2 consumption. However, the major peaks of activity occurred earlier with the respirometer. This possibly is due to the lack of atmospheric CO2 during the O2 consumption measurements.

  19. [Effect Of Polyelectrolytes on Catalytic Activity of Alcohol Dehydrogenase].

    PubMed

    Dubrovsky, A V; Musina, E V; Kim, A L; Tikhonenko, S A

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent and optical spectroscopy were used to study the interaction of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) with negatively charged polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) and dextran sulfate (DS), as well as positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium) (PDADMA). As found, DS and PDADMA did not affect the structural and catalytic enzyme properties. In contrast, PSS slightly decreased the protein self-fluorescence over 1 h of incubation, which is associated with partial destruction of its quaternary (globular) structure. Investigation of the ADH activity with and without PSS showed its dependency on the incubation time and the PSS presence. Sodium chloride (2.0 M and 0.2 M) or ammonium sulfate (0.1 M) added to the reaction mixture did not completely protect the enzyme quaternary structure from the PSS action. However ammonium sulfate or 0.2 M sodium chloride stabilized the enzyme and partially inhibited the negative PSS effect.

  20. Aldehyde dehydrogenase is used by cancer cells for energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joon Hee; Lee, Seon-Hyeong; Hong, Dongwan; Lee, Jae-Seon; Ahn, Hee-Sung; Ahn, Ju-Hyun; Seong, Tae Wha; Lee, Chang-Hun; Jang, Hyonchol; Hong, Kyeong Man; Lee, Cheolju; Lee, Jae-Ho; Kim, Soo-Youl

    2016-01-01

    We found that non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells express high levels of multiple aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) isoforms via an informatics analysis of metabolic enzymes in NSCLC and immunohistochemical staining of NSCLC clinical tumor samples. Using a multiple reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry analysis, we found that multiple ALDH isozymes were generally abundant in NSCLC cells compared with their levels in normal IMR-90 human lung cells. As a result of the catalytic reaction mediated by ALDH, NADH is produced as a by-product from the conversion of aldehyde to carboxylic acid. We hypothesized that the NADH produced by ALDH may be a reliable energy source for ATP production in NSCLC. This study revealed that NADH production by ALDH contributes significantly to ATP production in NSCLC. Furthermore, gossypol, a pan-ALDH inhibitor, markedly reduced the level of ATP. Gossypol combined with phenformin synergistically reduced the ATP levels, which efficiently induced cell death following cell cycle arrest. PMID:27885254

  1. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, hormones, and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Markey, Keira A; Uldall, Maria; Botfield, Hannah; Cato, Liam D; Miah, Mohammed A L; Hassan-Smith, Ghaniah; Jensen, Rigmor H; Gonzalez, Ana M; Sinclair, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) results in raised intracranial pressure (ICP) leading to papilledema, visual dysfunction, and headaches. Obese females of reproductive age are predominantly affected, but the underlying pathological mechanisms behind IIH remain unknown. This review provides an overview of pathogenic factors that could result in IIH with particular focus on hormones and the impact of obesity, including its role in neuroendocrine signaling and driving inflammation. Despite occurring almost exclusively in obese women, there have been a few studies evaluating the mechanisms by which hormones and adipokines exert their effects on ICP regulation in IIH. Research involving 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, a modulator of glucocorticoids, suggests a potential role in IIH. Improved understanding of the complex interplay between adipose signaling factors such as adipokines, steroid hormones, and ICP regulation may be key to the understanding and future management of IIH. PMID:27186074

  2. Environmental inhibition of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Reidenberg, M M

    2000-04-03

    Gossypol, a polyphenolic compound from cotton seed, caused hypokalemia in some men receiving it in a trial of its contraceptive activity. Searching for the mechanism for its hypokalemic action led to the observation that it inhibited 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. This would enhance mineralocorticoid effect in the kidney. Many other polyphenols also inhibit this enzyme including those in grapefruit juice. Ingesting 1-2 l of grapefruit juice inhibited this enzyme in two men in a clinical experiment. Tea polyphenols inhibit this enzyme and add to the inhibition caused by gossypol. Men in China have lower serum potassium values than men elsewhere and this is due to the environment, presumably the diet, in China. The importance of dietary and other exogenous inhibitors of this enzyme in electrolyte metabolism remains to be determined.

  3. The reaction of choline dehydrogenase with some electron acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, M C; Dawson, A P

    1975-01-01

    1. The choline dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.1) WAS SOLUBILIZED FROM ACETONE-DRIED POWDERS OF RAT LIVER MITOCHONDRIA BY TREATMENT WITH Naja naja venom. 2. The kinetics of the reaction of enzyme with phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as electron acceptors were investigated. 3. With both electron acceptors the reaction mechanism appears to involve a free, modified-enzyme intermediate. 4. With some electron acceptors the maximum velocity of the reaction is independent of the nature of the acceptor. With phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as acceptors the Km value for choline is also independent of the nature of the acceptor molecule. 5. The mechanism of the Triton X-100-solubilized enzyme is apparently the smae as that for the snake venom solubilized enzyme. PMID:1218095

  4. The reaction of choline dehydrogenase with some electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Barrett, M C; Dawson, A P

    1975-12-01

    1. The choline dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.1) WAS SOLUBILIZED FROM ACETONE-DRIED POWDERS OF RAT LIVER MITOCHONDRIA BY TREATMENT WITH Naja naja venom. 2. The kinetics of the reaction of enzyme with phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as electron acceptors were investigated. 3. With both electron acceptors the reaction mechanism appears to involve a free, modified-enzyme intermediate. 4. With some electron acceptors the maximum velocity of the reaction is independent of the nature of the acceptor. With phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as acceptors the Km value for choline is also independent of the nature of the acceptor molecule. 5. The mechanism of the Triton X-100-solubilized enzyme is apparently the smae as that for the snake venom solubilized enzyme.

  5. Suicidal dephosphorylation of thiamine pyrophosphate coupled with pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Strumilo, Slawomir; Dobrzyn, Pawel; Czerniecki, Jan; Tylicki, Adam

    2004-12-01

    Earlier it was noted that purified pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) produced by "Sigma" usually contains almost saturating amounts of thiamine pyrophosphate (ThPP). In this communication we present the observation that the endogenous ThPP coupled to PDC is dephosphorylated while staying at -10 degrees C, because in the enzyme preparation thiamine monophosphate and un-phosphorylated thiamine appear (HPLC determination). Under the same conditions exogenous ThPP is not dephosphorylated despite contact with the PDC preparation. This may suggest that interactions of some active groups of the enzyme with molecules of endogenous ThPP leads to break-up of the phosphoesters bonds, and destruction of the coenzyme. Decrease of PDC activity during storage is not in proportion with the degree of ThPP dephosphorylation. However the observed instability of PDC activity may be a consequence of the spontaneous process of its coenzyme autodestruction.

  6. Fabricating polystyrene fiber-dehydrogenase assemble as a functional biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    An, Hongjie; Jin, Bo; Dai, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Immobilization of the enzymes on nano-structured materials is a promising approach to enhance enzyme stabilization, activation and reusability. This study aimed to develop polystyrene fiber-enzyme assembles to catalyze model formaldehyde to methanol dehydrogenation reaction, which is an essential step for bioconversion of CO2 to a renewable bioenergy. We fabricated and modified electrospun polystyrene fibers, which showed high capability to immobilize dehydrogenase for the fiber-enzyme assembles. Results from evaluation of biochemical activities of the fiber-enzyme assemble showed that nitriation with the nitric/sulfuric acid ratio (v/v, 10:1) and silanization treatment delivered desirable enzyme activity and long-term storage stability, showing great promising toward future large-scale applications.

  7. Encapsulation of alcohol dehydrogenase in mannitol by spray drying.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Hirokazu; Joreau, Hiromi; Neoh, Tze Loon; Furuta, Takeshi; Yoshii, Hidefumi

    2014-03-24

    The retention of the enzyme activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) has been studied in various drying processes such as spray drying. The aim of this study is to encapsulate ADH in mannitol, either with or without additive in order to limit the thermal denaturation of the enzyme during the drying process. The retention of ADH activity was investigated at different drying temperatures. When mannitol was used, the encapsulated ADH was found inactive in all the dried powders. This is presumably due to the quick crystallization of mannitol during spray drying that resulted in the impairment of enzyme protection ability in comparison to its amorphous form. Maltodextin (dextrose equivalent = 11) was used to reduce the crystallization of mannitol. The addition of maltodextrin increased ADH activity and drastically changed the powder X-ray diffractogram of the spray-dried powders.

  8. Hemolytic anemia caused by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Olivares, N; Medina, C; Sánchez-Corona, J; Rivas, F; Rivera, H; Hernández, A; Delgado, J L; Ibarra, B; Cantú, J M; Vaca, G; Martínez, C

    1979-01-01

    Results are reported concerning quantitation of glucose -6- phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzyme activity where in one of the members of a family a clinical diagnosis of acute hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency had been established. In the propositus, G6PD levels were found to be less than 10 per cent thus confirming diagnosis; the same enzymatic deficiency was identified in one of the siblings without a history of hematologic pathology and in a maternal cousin with a history of neonatal jaundice as well as two obliged carriers. Electrophoretical enzyme phenotype was similar to A variant in three affected males. Advantages of prevention and medical care possible with early diagnosis of G6PD deficiency are discussed.

  9. IMP Dehydrogenase: Structural Schizophrenia and an Unusual Base

    SciTech Connect

    Hedstrom,L.; Gan, L.

    2006-01-01

    Textbooks describe enzymes as relatively rigid templates for the transition state of a chemical reaction, and indeed an enzyme such as chymotrypsin, which catalyzes a relatively simple hydrolysis reaction, is reasonably well described by this model. Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) undergoes a remarkable array of conformational transitions in the course of a complicated catalytic cycle, offering a dramatic counterexample to this view. IMPDH displays several other unusual mechanistic features, including an Arg residue that may act as a general base catalyst and a dynamic monovalent cation site. Further, IMPDH appears to be involved in 'moon-lighting' functions that may require additional conformational states. How the balance between conformational states is maintained and how the various conformational states interconvert is only beginning to be understood.

  10. Sequential injection analysis of ethanol using immobilized alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hedenfalk, M.; Mattiasson, B.

    1996-05-01

    A Sequential Injection (SI) system was used to analyze the ethanol concentration in fermentation broth. The method is based on the use of immobilized NAD{sup +} dependent alcohol dehydrogenase. A non-linear standard curve for ethanol (range 0.25-100 mM) was used to determine the concentration in fermentation broth and the results correlated well with HPLC measurements. The assay time was 140 s, 0.5 {mu}mol of cofactor was used for each determination, and the relative standard deviation was less than 6% when analyzing fermentation samples. The assay system is very stable and makes it possible to reduce the cofactor consumption while keeping the system set up simple.

  11. Alcohol dehydrogenase polymorphism in barrel cactus populations of Drosophila mojavensis.

    PubMed

    Cleland, S; Hocutt, G D; Breitmeyer, C M; Markow, T A; Pfeiler, E

    1996-07-01

    Starch gel electrophoresis revealed that the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-2) locus was polymorphic in two populations (from Agua Caliente, California and the Grand Canyon, Arizona) of cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis that utilize barrel cactus (Ferocactus acanthodes) as a host plant. Electromorphs representing products of a slow (S) and a fast (F) allele were found in adult flies. The frequency of the slow allele was 0.448 in flies from Agua Caliente and 0.659 in flies from the Grand Canyon. These frequencies were intermediate to those of the low (Baja California peninsula, Mexico) and high (Sonora, Mexico and southern Arizona) frequency Adh-2S populations of D. mojavensis that utilize different species of host cacti.

  12. Method To Identify Specific Inhibiutors Of Imp Dehydrogenase

    DOEpatents

    Collart, Frank R.; Huberman, Eliezer

    2000-11-28

    This invention relates to methods to identify specific inhibitors of the purine nucleotide synthesis enzyme, IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH). IMPDH is an essential enzyme found in all free-living organisms from humans to bacteria and is an important therapeutic target. The invention allows the identification of specific inhibitors of any IMPDH enzyme which can be expressed in a functional form in a recombinant host cell. A variety of eukaryotic or prokaryotic host systems commonly used for the expression of recombinant proteins are suitable for the practice of the invention. The methods are amenable to high throughput systems for the screening of inhibitors generated by combinatorial chemistry or other methods such as antisense molecule production. Utilization of exogenous guanosine as a control component of the methods allows for the identification of inhibitors specific for IMPDH rather than other causes of decreased cell proliferation.

  13. Over-Expression, Purification and Crystallization of Human Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Y. S.; Ciszak, Ewa; Patel, Mulchand

    2000-01-01

    Dehydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3; dihydrolipoan-tide:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.8.1.4) is a common catalytic component found in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, and branched-chain cc-keto acid dehydrogenase complex. E3 is also a component (referred to as L protein) of the glycine cleavage system in bacterial metabolism (2). Active E3 forms a homodimer with four distinctive subdomain structures (FAD binding, NAD+ binding, central and interface domains) with non-covalently but tightly bound FAD in the holoenzyme. Deduced amino acids from cloned full-length human E3 gene showed a total of 509 amino acids with a leader sequence (N-terminal 35 amino acids) that is excised (mature form) during transportation of expressed E3 into mitochondria membrane. So far, three-dimensional structure of human E3 has not been reported. Our effort to achieve the elucidation of the X-ray crystal structure of human E3 will be presented. Recombinant pPROEX-1 expression vector (from GIBCO BRL Life Technologies) having the human E3 gene without leader sequence was constructed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and subsequent ligation, and cloned in E.coli XL1-Blue by transformation. Since pPROEX-1 vector has an internal His-tag (six histidine peptide) located at the upstream region of a multicloning site, one-step affinity purification of E3 using nickelnitriloacetic acid (Ni-NTA) agarose resin, which has a strong affinity to His-tag, was feasible. Also a seven-amino-acid spacer peptide and a recombinant tobacco etch virus protease recognition site (seven amino acids peptide) found between His-tag and first amino acid of expressed E3 facilitated the cleavage of His-tag from E3 after the affinity purification. By IPTG induction, ca. 15 mg of human E3 (mature form) was obtained from 1L LB culture with overnight incubation at 25C. Over 98% of purity of E3 from one-step Ni-NTA agarose affinity purification was confirmed by SDS-PAGE analysis. For

  14. Expanding the clinical spectrum of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaie, L.; Klomp, L. W. J.; Rubio-Gozalbo, M. E.; Spaapen, L. J. M.; Haagen, A. A. M.; Dorland, L.

    2010-01-01

    3-Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency is considered to be a rare cause of congenital microcephaly, infantile onset of intractable seizures and severe psychomotor retardation. Here, we report for the first time a very mild form of genetically confirmed 3-PGDH deficiency in two siblings with juvenile onset of absence seizures and mild developmental delay. Amino acid analysis showed serine values in CSF and plasma identical to what is observed in the severe infantile form. Both patients responded favourably to relatively low dosages of serine supplementation with cessation of seizures, normalisation of their EEG abnormalities and improvement of well-being and behaviour. These cases illustrate that 3-PGDH deficiency can present with mild symptoms and should be considered as a treatable disorder in the differential diagnosis of mild developmental delay and seizures. Synopsis: we present a novel mild phenotype in patients with 3-PGDH deficiency. PMID:21113737

  15. [Sorbitol-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Gene Polymorhism in Malus Mill. (Rosaceae)].

    PubMed

    Boris, K V; Kudryavtsev, A M; Kochieva, E Z

    2015-11-01

    The sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (S6PDH) sequences of six representatives of the genus Malus, which belong to five different taxonomic sections, were examined for the first time. The exon-intron structure and polymorphism of the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of these genes was characterized. The intraspecific polymorphism of the S6PDH gene was assessed for the first time in 40 Russian and foreign apple (Malus domestica) cultivars. It was demonstrated that the interspecific polymorphism level of the S6PDH coding sequences in the studied. representatives of the genus Malus was 4%, and the intraspecific polymorphism level of M. domestica cultivars was very low, constituting 0.96%.

  16. Biofuel cell anode: NAD +/glucose dehydrogenase-coimmobilized ketjenblack electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, T.; Oike, M.; Yoshino, S.; Yatagawa, Y.; Haneda, K.; Kaji, H.; Nishizawa, M.

    2009-09-01

    We have studied the coimmobilization of glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and its cofactor, oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD +), on a ketjenblack (KB) electrode as a step toward a biofuel cell anode that works without mediators. A KB electrode was first treated with a sulfuric acid/nitric acid/water mixture to lower the overvoltage for NADH oxidation, and was next chemically modified with NAD + and GDH. The improved GDH/NAD +/KB electrode is found to oxidize glucose around 0 V vs. Ag/AgCl. A biofuel cell constructed with a bilirubin oxidase-immobilized KB cathode showed a maximum power density of 52 μW/cm 2 at 0.3 V.

  17. Ketonic diet in the management of pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Falk, R E; Cederbaum, S D; Blass, J P; Gibson, G E; Kark, R A; Carrel, R E

    1976-11-01

    Two brothers, aged 11 years 6 months and 2 years 3 months, with psychomotor and growth retardation, episodes of weakness, ataxia, ophthalmoplegia, and elevated levels of blood pyruvate were shown to have a deficiency in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH). When they ate a diet high enough in fats to cause ketonemia but not acidosis, there was a fall in blood pyruvate levels, a decrease in the frequency and severity of the episodes of neurological deterioration, an increased rate of growth and development in the younger brother, and increased strength and endurance in the older one. The possibility of dietary treatment makes the early diagnosis of PDH deficiency more important. Determination of blood pyruvate and lactate levels following a standard glucose meal (glucose-pyruvate test) appears to be the most reliable screening test for this condition.

  18. Lactate dehydrogenase A silencing in IDH mutant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Chesnelong, Charles; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Blough, Michael D.; Al-Najjar, Mohammad; Stechishin, Owen D.; Chan, Jennifer A.; Pieper, Russell O.; Ronen, Sabrina M.; Weiss, Samuel; Luchman, H. Artee; Cairncross, J. Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Background Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 gene (IDH1/2) were initially thought to enhance cancer cell survival and proliferation by promoting the Warburg effect. However, recent experimental data have shown that production of 2-hydroxyglutarate by IDH mutant cells promotes hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α degradation and, by doing so, may have unexpected metabolic effects. Methods We used human glioma tissues and derived brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) to study the expression of HIF1α target genes in IDH mutant (mt) and IDH wild-type (wt) tumors. Focusing thereafter on the major glycolytic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), we used standard molecular methods and pyrosequencing-based DNA methylation analysis to identify mechanisms by which LDHA expression was regulated in human gliomas. Results We found that HIF1α-responsive genes, including many essential for glycolysis (SLC2A1, PDK1, LDHA, SLC16A3), were underexpressed in IDHmt gliomas and/or derived BTSCs. We then demonstrated that LDHA was silenced in IDHmt derived BTSCs, including those that did not retain the mutant IDH1 allele (mIDHwt), matched BTSC xenografts, and parental glioma tissues. Silencing of LDHA was associated with increased methylation of the LDHA promoter, as was ectopic expression of mutant IDH1 in immortalized human astrocytes. Furthermore, in a search of The Cancer Genome Atlas, we found low expression and high methylation of LDHA in IDHmt glioblastomas. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of downregulation of LDHA in cancer. Although unexpected findings, silencing of LDHA and downregulation of several other glycolysis essential genes raise the intriguing possibility that IDHmt gliomas have limited glycolytic capacity, which may contribute to their slow growth and better prognosis. PMID:24366912

  19. Biochemical and structural characterization of Plasmodium falciparum glutamate dehydrogenase 2.

    PubMed

    Zocher, Kathleen; Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Kehr, Sebastian; Fischer, Marina; Rahlfs, Stefan; Becker, Katja

    2012-05-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (GDHs) play key roles in cellular redox, amino acid, and energy metabolism, thus representing potential targets for pharmacological interventions. Here we studied the functional network provided by the three known glutamate dehydrogenases of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The recombinant production of the previously described PfGDH1 as hexahistidyl-tagged proteins was optimized. Additionally, PfGDH2 was cloned, recombinantly produced, and characterized. Like PfGDH1, PfGDH2 is an NADP(H)-dependent enzyme with a specific activity comparable to PfGDH1 but with slightly higher K(m) values for its substrates. The three-dimensional structure of hexameric PfGDH2 was solved to 3.1 Å resolution. The overall structure shows high similarity with PfGDH1 but with significant differences occurring at the subunit interface. As in mammalian GDH1, in PfGDH2 the subunit-subunit interactions are mainly assisted by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions, whereas in PfGDH1 these contacts are mediated by networks of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds. In accordance with this, the known bovine GDH inhibitors hexachlorophene, GW5074, and bithionol were more effective on PfGDH2 than on PfGDH1. Subcellular localization was determined for all three plasmodial GDHs by fusion with the green fluorescent protein. Based on our data, PfGDH1 and PfGDH3 are cytosolic proteins whereas PfGDH2 clearly localizes to the apicoplast, a plastid-like organelle specific for apicomplexan parasites. This study provides new insights into the structure and function of GDH isoenzymes of P. falciparum, which represent potential targets for the development of novel antimalarial drugs.

  20. Human liver class I alcohol dehydrogenase gammagamma isozyme: the sole cytosolic 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase of iso bile acids.

    PubMed

    Marschall, H U; Oppermann, U C; Svensson, S; Nordling, E; Persson, B; Höög, J O; Jörnvall, H

    2000-04-01

    3beta-Hydroxy (iso) bile acids are formed during enterohepatic circulation from 3alpha-hydroxy bile acids and constitute normal compounds in plasma but are virtually absent in bile. Isoursodeoxycholic acid (isoUDCA) is a major metabolite of UDCA. In a recent study it was found that after administration of isoUDCA, UDCA became the major acid in bile. Thus, epimerization of the 3beta-hydroxy to a 3alpha-hydroxy group, catalyzed by 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSD) and 3-oxo-reductases must occur. The present study aims to characterize the human liver bile acid 3beta-HSD. Human liver cytosol and recombinant alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) betabeta and gammagamma isozymes were subjected to native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and isoelectric focusing. Activity staining with oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) or oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)) as cofactors and various iso bile acids as substrates was used to screen for 3beta-HSD activity. Reaction products were identified and quantified by gas chromotography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Computer-assisted substrate docking of isoUDCA to the active site of a 3-dimensional model of human class I gammagamma ADH was performed. ADH gammagamma isozyme was identified as the iso bile acid 3beta-HSD present in human liver cytosol, with NAD(+) as a cofactor. Values for k(cat)/K(m) were in the rank order isodeoxycholic acid (isoDCA), isochenodeoxycholic acid (isoCDCA), isoUDCA, and isolithocholic acid (isoLCA) (0.10, 0.09, 0.08, and 0. 05 min(-1) x micromol/L(-1), respectively). IsoUDCA fits as substrate to the 3-dimensional model of the active-site of ADH gammagamma. ADH gammagamma isozyme was defined as the only bile acid 3beta-HSD in human liver cytosol. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases are candidates for the binding and transport of 3alpha-hydroxy bile acids. We assume that ADH gammagamma isozyme is involved in cytosolic bile acid binding and transport processes as well.

  1. Microbial Oxidation of Methane and Methanol: Crystallization of Methanol Dehydrogenase and Properties of Holo- and Apo-Methanol Dehydrogenase from Methylomonas methanica

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ramesh N.; Hou, Ching T.; Felix, Andre

    1978-01-01

    Procedures are described for the purification and crystallization of methanol dehydrogenase from the soluble fraction of the type I obligate methylotroph Methylomonas methanica strain S1. The crystallized enzyme is homogeneous as judged by acrylamide gel electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation. The enzyme had a high pH optimum (9.5) and required ammonium salt as an activator. In the presence of phenazine methosulfate as an electron acceptor, the enzyme catalyzed the oxidation of primary alcohols and formaldehyde. Secondary, tertiary, and aromatic alcohols were not oxidized. The molecular weight as well as subunit size of methanol dehydrogenase was 60,000, indicating that it is monomeric. The sedimentation constant (s20,w) was 3.1S. The amino acid composition of the crystallized enzyme is also presented. Antisera prepared against the crystalline enzyme were nonspecific; they cross-reacted with and inhibited the isofunctional enzyme from other obligate methylotrophic bacteria. The crystalline methanol dehydrogenase had an absorption peak at 350 nm in the visible region and weak fluorescence peaks at 440 and 470 nm due to the presence of a pteridine derivative as the prosthetic group. A procedure was developed for the preparation of apo-methanol dehydrogenase. The molecular weights, sedimentation constants, electrophoretic mobilities, and immunological properties of apo- and holo-methanol dehydrogenases are identical. Apo-methanol dehydrogenase lacked the absorption peak at 350 nm and the fluorescence peaks at 440 and 470 nm and was catalytically inactive. All attempts to reconstitute an active enzyme from apo-methanol dehydrogenase, using various pteridine derivatives, were unsuccessful. Images PMID:415046

  2. The molybdenum formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase operon and the tungsten formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase operon from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. Structures and transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Hochheimer, A; Linder, D; Thauer, R K; Hedderich, R

    1996-11-15

    Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum contains a tungsten formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (FwdABCD) and a molybdenum formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (FmdABC). The fwdHFGDACB operon encoding the tungsten enzyme has recently been characterized. We report here on the structure and expression of the gene cluster encoding the molybdenum enzyme. This gene cluster is composed of three open reading frames (fmdECB). The fmdB gene was found to encode the molybdopterin-dinucleotide-binding subunit harboring the enzyme's active site; FmdB is thus functionally equivalent to FwdB. fmdC encodes a protein with sequence similarity to FwdC in its N-terminal part and with sequence similarity to FwdD in its C-terminal part; FmdC is thus functionally equivalent to FwdC and FwdD. Interestingly, the fmd operon lacks a gene fmdA encoding the subunit FmdA of the molybdenum enzyme. FmdA has the same apparent molecular mass and the same N-terminal amino acid sequence as FwdA and only one DNA sequence encoding for this N-terminal amino acid sequence was found in the M. thermoautotrophicum genome. It is therefore proposed that FmdA and FwdA are encoded by the same gene namely fwdA in the fwd operon. In agreement with this proposal is the finding that fwdA is expressed constitutively: northern-blot analysis of RNA from tungstate- and molybdate-grown cells of M. thermo-autotrophicum revealed that the fwdHFGDACB gene cluster is transcribed in the presence of either molybdate or tungstate in the growth medium whereas the fmdECB gene cluster was only transcribed when molybdate was present.

  3. Dimerization and enzymatic activity of fungal 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kristan, Katja; Deluca, Dominga; Adamski, Jerzy; Stojan, Jure; Rižner, Tea Lanišnik

    2005-01-01

    Background 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17β-HSDcl) is a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. SDR proteins usually function as dimers or tetramers and 17β-HSDcl is also a homodimer under native conditions. Results We have investigated here which secondary structure elements are involved in the dimerization of 17β-HSDcl and examined the importance of dimerization for the enzyme activity. Sequence similarity with trihydroxynaphthalene reductase from Magnaporthe grisea indicated that Arg129 and His111 from the αE-helices interact with the Asp121, Glu117 and Asp187 residues from the αE and αF-helices of the neighbouring subunit. The Arg129Asp and His111Leu mutations both rendered 17β-HSDcl monomeric, while the mutant 17β-HSDcl-His111Ala was dimeric. Circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis confirmed the conservation of the secondary structure in both monomers. The three mutant proteins all bound coenzyme, as shown by fluorescence quenching in the presence of NADP+, but both monomers showed no enzymatic activity. Conclusion We have shown by site-directed mutagenesis and structure/function analysis that 17β-HSDcl dimerization involves the αE and αF helices of both subunits. Neighbouring subunits are connected through hydrophobic interactions, H-bonds and salt bridges involving amino acid residues His111 and Arg129. Since the substitutions of these two amino acid residues lead to inactive monomers with conserved secondary structure, we suggest dimerization is a prerequisite for catalysis. A detailed understanding of this dimerization could lead to the development of compounds that will specifically prevent dimerization, thereby serving as a new type of inhibitor. PMID:16359545

  4. Improved Production of Propionic Acid in Propionibacterium jensenii via Combinational Overexpression of Glycerol Dehydrogenase and Malate Dehydrogenase from Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Zhuge, Xin; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Li, Jianghua

    2015-01-01

    Microbial production of propionic acid (PA), an important chemical building block used as a preservative and chemical intermediate, has gained increasing attention for its environmental friendliness over traditional petrochemical processes. In previous studies, we constructed a shuttle vector as a useful tool for engineering Propionibacterium jensenii, a potential candidate for efficient PA synthesis. In this study, we identified the key metabolites for PA synthesis in P. jensenii by examining the influence of metabolic intermediate addition on PA synthesis with glycerol as a carbon source under anaerobic conditions. We also further improved PA production via the overexpression of the identified corresponding enzymes, namely, glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), and fumarate hydratase (FUM). Compared to those in wild-type P. jensenii, the activities of these enzymes in the engineered strains were 2.91- ± 0.17- to 8.12- ± 0.37-fold higher. The transcription levels of the corresponding enzymes in the engineered strains were 2.85- ± 0.19- to 8.07- ± 0.63-fold higher than those in the wild type. The coexpression of GDH and MDH increased the PA titer from 26.95 ± 1.21 g/liter in wild-type P. jensenii to 39.43 ± 1.90 g/liter in the engineered strains. This study identified the key metabolic nodes limiting PA overproduction in P. jensenii and further improved PA titers via the coexpression of GDH and MDH, making the engineered P. jensenii strain a potential industrial producer of PA. PMID:25595755

  5. Biorhythms of activities of liver and blood dehydrogenases and changes in body weight of the rats feeding normal diet or excess of sugar substitutes.

    PubMed

    Petrovich, Yu A; Volozhin, A I; Zubtsov, V A; Kichenko, S M

    2007-12-01

    Biorhythms with higher levels of activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase in blood plasma, specific activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase in the liver, and body weight of rats were more pronounced in the spring-summer period than in the autumn-winter period. These specific features were revealed in animals feeding a normal diet or food with 54 and 27% sugar substitute sorbitol. However, specific activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the liver was higher in the autumn-winter period. Activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase in blood plasma increased by tens of times due to induction of sorbitol synthesis (substrate) in the liver. Sugar substitute xylitol is structurally similar to sorbitol, but is not the substrate for sorbitol dehydrogenase. However, the effect of xylitol on activities of lactate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the spring-summer period was similar to that of sorbitol.

  6. Control of glycolytic flux in Zymomonas mobilis by glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Snoep, J.L. |; Arfman, N.; Yomano, L.P.; Ingram, L.O.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Conway, T.

    1996-07-20

    Alycolytic genes in Zymomonas mobilis are highly expressed and constitute half of the cytoplasmic protein. The first four genes (glf, zwf, edd, glk) in this pathway form an operon encoding a glucose permease, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6-P dehydrogenase), 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase, and glucokinase, respectively. Each gene was overexpressed from a tac promoter to investigate the control of glycolysis during the early stages of batch fermentation when flux (qCO{sub 2}) is highest. Almost half of flux control appears to reside with G6-P dehydrogenase (C{sub G6-P dehydrogenase}{sup J} = 0.4). Although Z. mobilis exhibits one of the highest rates of glycolysis known, recombinants with elevated G6-P dehydrogenase had a 10% to 13% higher glycolytic flux than the native organism. A small increase in flux was also observed for recombinants expressing glf. Results obtained did not allow a critical evaluation of glucokinase and this enzyme may also represent an important control point. 6-Phosphogluconate dehydratase appears to be saturating at native levels. With constructs containing the full operon, growth rate and flux were both reduced, complicating interpretations. However, results obtained were also consistent with G6-P dehydrogenase as a primary site of control. Flux was 17% higher in operon constructs which exhibited a 17% increase in G6-P dehydrogenase specific activity, relative to the average of other operon constructs which contain a frameshift mutation in zwf.

  7. Peripartal changes in serum alkaline phosphatase activity and lactate dehydrogenase activity in dairy cows.

    PubMed Central

    Peter, A T; Bosu, W T; MacWilliams, P; Gallagher, S

    1987-01-01

    Peripartal serum alkaline phosphatase activity and lactate dehydrogenase activity were measured in 30 dairy cows in order to examine the association between retained fetal membranes and enzyme activity. Daily blood samples were obtained from pregnant cows, starting 15 days before the expected day of calving until eight days after parturition. Sera from 15 cows which retained fetal membranes longer than 24 hours and 15 cows which shed fetal membranes within six hours after parturition were analyzed for alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities. Mean alkaline phosphatase enzyme activities ranged from 15.93 to 32.6 U/L in retained and nonretained placenta cows. There was a trend towards higher serum alkaline phosphatase activities in retained placenta cows but the differences were not significant among the groups (P greater than 0.05). Mean lactate dehydrogenase activities ranged from 307.2 to 438.86 U/L in nonretained and retained placenta cows. Lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities in nonretained and retained placenta cows were similar (P greater than 0.05). The alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities peaked at the time of parturition in both groups. However, the differences in alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase activities on different days within non-retained and retained placenta cows were significant (P less than 0.05). Results indicate that prepartal changes in alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities are not predictive of placental retention postpartum. PMID:3453274

  8. On the role of microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase in metabolism of aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Antonenkov, V D; Pirozhkov, S V; Panchenko, L F

    1987-11-30

    To elucidate a possible role of membrane-bound aldehyde dehydrogenase in the detoxication of aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation, the substrate specificity of the highly purified microsomal enzyme was investigated. The aldehyde dehydrogenase was active with different aliphatic aldehydes including 4-hydroxyalkenals, but did not react with malonic dialdehyde. When Fe/ADP-ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation of arachidonic acid was carried out in an in vitro system, the formation of products which react with microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase was observed parallel with malonic dialdehyde accumulation.

  9. Binding region of alanopine dehydrogenase predicted by unbiased molecular dynamics simulations of ligand diffusion.

    PubMed

    Gohlke, Holger; Hergert, Ulrike; Meyer, Tatu; Mulnaes, Daniel; Grieshaber, Manfred K; Smits, Sander H J; Schmitt, Lutz

    2013-10-28

    Opine dehydrogenases catalyze the reductive condensation of pyruvate with L-amino acids. Biochemical characterization of alanopine dehydrogenase from Arenicola marina revealed that this enzyme is highly specific for L-alanine. Unbiased molecular dynamics simulations with a homology model of alanopine dehydrogenase captured the binding of L-alanine diffusing from solvent to a putative binding region near a distinct helix-kink-helix motif. These results and sequence comparisons reveal how mutations and insertions within this motif dictate the L-amino acid specificity.

  10. AB104. Glucose-6 phospate dehydrogenase deficiency among mongolian neonates

    PubMed Central

    Batjargal, Khishigjargal; Nansal, Gerelmaa; Zagd, Gerelmaa; Ganbaatar, Erdenetuya

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzyme deficiency in humans, affecting 400 million people worldwide and a high prevalence in persons of African, Middle Asian countries. The most common clinical manifestations are neonatal jaundice and acute hemolytic anemia, which is caused by the impairment of erythrocyte’s ability to remove harmful oxidative stress triggered by exogenous agents such as drugs, infection, or fava bean ingestion. Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia caused by G6PD is strongly associated with mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment. The study aims to determine a level of G6PD in healthy neonates. Methods We obtained blood spot samples from 268 infants around 24-72 hours in their age who has unsuspected intranatal and neonatal disorders. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase “Perkin Elmer, Finland” level is determined by Victor 2D Fluorometer assay, developing of neonatal jaundice is examined by recall. Results The76.5% of all participants (n=205) was assessed 4.36±1.15 Ug/Hb in normal reference range of G6PD, other 23.5% (n=63) was 0.96±0.51 Ug/Hb with G6PD deficiency. In the both sex, 51.5% of male 0.88±0.46 Ug/Hb (n=33) and 47.6% of female (n=30) 0.97±0.55 Ug/Hb was assessed with G6PD deficiency. Developing Jaundice period in number of 63 neonates with G6PD deficiency, 86% of neonates (n=54) was in 1-4 days, 4% of neonates (n=3) was in 5-7 days and there is no sign of jaundice in 9% (n=6). Therefore neonates with G6PD deficiency, 53.9% (n=34) continued jaundice more than two weeks. Conclusions G6PD deficiency was determined in male neonates (51.5%) more than female (47.6%). The 76.5% of all participants (n=205) was assessed 4.36±1.15 Ug/Hb in normal reference range of G6PDH other 23.5% (n=63) of all participants was 0.96±0.51 Ug/Hb with G6PD deficiency. It shows that G6PD might be one potential risk of neonatal jaundice and hyperbilirubinemia in neonates in Mongolia.

  11. Heterozygosity of the sheep: Polymorphism of 'malic enzyme', isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP+), catalase and esterase.

    PubMed

    Baker, C M; Manwell, C

    1977-04-01

    In contrast to other reports, it is found that the sheep has approximately as much enzyme variation as man. Most of the genetically interpretable enzyme variation in heart, liver, kidney and muscle from 52 sheep (Merinos or Merino crosses) is in the NADP-dependent dehydrogenases [two 'malic enzymes' and the supernatant isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP+)] and in the esterases. Ten different loci for NAD-dependent dehydrogenases are electrophoretically monomorphic, as are five different NADH diaphorases from heart muscle and 15 different major proteins from skeletal muscle. It is highly statistically significant that NADP-dependent dehydrogenases and esterases are polymorphic but representatives of several other major classes of enzymes are not. The physiological significance of this polymorphism may be related to the role of these enzymes in growth and detoxication, sheep having been selected by man for faster growth, of wool or of carcass, and for grazing a wide variety of plants.

  12. Mitochondrial type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases in fungal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, A. Pedro; Videira, Arnaldo

    2015-01-01

    During aerobic respiration, cells produce energy through oxidative phosphorylation, which includes a specialized group of multi-subunit complexes in the inner mitochondrial membrane known as the electron transport chain. However, this canonical pathway is branched into single polypeptide alternative routes in some fungi, plants, protists and bacteria. They confer metabolic plasticity, allowing cells to adapt to different environmental conditions and stresses. Type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases (also called alternative NAD(P)H dehydrogenases) are non-proton pumping enzymes that bypass complex I. Recent evidence points to the involvement of fungal alternative NAD(P)H dehydrogenases in the process of programmed cell death, in addition to their action as overflow systems upon oxidative stress. Consistent with this, alternative NAD(P)H dehydrogenases are phylogenetically related to cell death - promoting proteins of the apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF)-family. PMID:28357279

  13. Identification and Characterization of an Inducible NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase from Red Beetroot Mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Menz, R. I.; Day, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    Exogenous NADH oxidation of mitochondria isolated from red beetroots (Beta vulgaris L.) increased dramatically upon slicing and aging the tissue. Anion-exchange chromatography of soluble fractions derived by sonication from fresh and aged beetroot mitochondria yielded three NADH dehydrogenase activity peaks. The third peak from aged beetroot mitochondria was separated into two activities by blue-affinity chromatography. One of these (the unbound peak) readily oxidized dihydrolipoamide, whereas the other (the bound peak) did not. The latter was an NAD(P)H dehydrogenase with high quinone and ferricyanide reductase activity and was absent from fresh beet mitochondria. Further affinity chromatography of the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase indicated enrichment of a 58-kD polypeptide on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We propose that this 58-kD protein is the inducible, external NADH dehydrogenase. PMID:12226415

  14. Identification and Characterization of an Inducible NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase from Red Beetroot Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Menz, R. I.; Day, D. A.

    1996-10-01

    Exogenous NADH oxidation of mitochondria isolated from red beetroots (Beta vulgaris L.) increased dramatically upon slicing and aging the tissue. Anion-exchange chromatography of soluble fractions derived by sonication from fresh and aged beetroot mitochondria yielded three NADH dehydrogenase activity peaks. The third peak from aged beetroot mitochondria was separated into two activities by blue-affinity chromatography. One of these (the unbound peak) readily oxidized dihydrolipoamide, whereas the other (the bound peak) did not. The latter was an NAD(P)H dehydrogenase with high quinone and ferricyanide reductase activity and was absent from fresh beet mitochondria. Further affinity chromatography of the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase indicated enrichment of a 58-kD polypeptide on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We propose that this 58-kD protein is the inducible, external NADH dehydrogenase.

  15. Structural Biology of Proteins of the Multi-enzyme Assembly Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Objectives and research challenges of this effort include: 1. Need to establish Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 2. Need to test value of microgravity for improving crystal quality of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 3. Need to improve flight hardware in order to control and understand the effects of microgravity on crystallization of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex proteins; 4. Need to integrate sets of national collaborations with the restricted and specific requirements of flight experiments; 5. Need to establish a highly controlled experiment in microgravity with a rigor not yet obtained; 6. Need to communicate both the rigor of microgravity experiments and the scientific value of results obtained from microgravity experiments to the national community; and 7. Need to advance the understanding of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex structures so that scientific and commercial advance is identified for these proteins.

  16. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency presented with convulsion: a rare case.

    PubMed

    Merdin, Alparslan; Avci, Fatma; Guzelay, Nihal

    2014-01-29

    Red blood cells carry oxygen in the body and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase protects these cells from oxidative chemicals. If there is a lack of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase, red blood cells can go acute hemolysis. Convulsion is a rare presentation for acute hemolysis due to Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency. Herein, we report a case report of a Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency diagnosed patient after presentation with convulsion. A 70 year-old woman patient had been hospitalized because of convulsion and fatigue. She has not had similar symptoms before. She had ingested fava beans in the last two days. Her hypophyseal and brain magnetic resonance imaging were normal. Blood transfusion was performed and the patient recovered.

  17. DEVELOPMENTAL EXPRESSION OF ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE IN RAT: A COMPARISON OF LIVER AND LUNG DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolism is one of the major determinants for age-related susceptibility changes to chemicals. Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules present in the environment and can be produced during biotransformation of xenobiotics. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) are important in aldehyd...

  18. Cloning and sequencing of the alcohol dehydrogenase II gene from Zymomonas mobilis

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Conway, Tyrrell

    1992-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase II gene from Zymomonas mobilis has been cloned and sequenced. This gene can be expressed at high levels in other organisms to produce acetaldehyde or to convert acetaldehyde to ethanol.

  19. The Effect of Salinity on the Malic Dehydrogenase of Pea Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Hason-Porath, Edna; Poljakoff-Mayber, Alexandra

    1969-01-01

    Effect of salinity on malate dehydrogenase activity was studied. Pea root tips contain 2 different malate dehydrogenases. One is located in the particulate, mitochondrial fraction, the other in the soluble, cytoplasmic fraction. Both can act when coupled with either NAD or NADP. Growing plants in Na2SO4 salinated medium did not affect the pattern of the malate dehydrogenases in the root tips. Growing plants in NaCl salinated media resulted in the appearance of a new, third isoenzyme. This new isoenzyme was located in the cytoplasmic fraction. Salinity of both types, when present in growth medium, induced increases in the NADP coupled activity of the mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase. The NAD coupled activity, however, was depressed except in the cytoplasmic fraction of plants grown in media salinated with NaCl to 1 atmosphere. Addition of either of the salts to assay media of enzymes, isolated from plants grown in non salinated substrate, did not have any significant effect. PMID:16657152

  20. Crystallographic and spectroscopic snapshots reveal a dehydrogenase in action

    DOE PAGES

    Huo, Lu; Davis, Ian; Liu, Fange; ...

    2015-01-07

    Aldehydes are ubiquitous intermediates in metabolic pathways and their innate reactivity can often make them quite unstable. There are several aldehydic intermediates in the metabolic pathway for tryptophan degradation that can decay into neuroactive compounds that have been associated with numerous neurological diseases. An enzyme of this pathway, 2-aminomuconate-6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, is responsible for ‘disarming’ the final aldehydic intermediate. Here we show the crystal structures of a bacterial analogue enzyme in five catalytically relevant forms: resting state, one binary and two ternary complexes, and a covalent, thioacyl intermediate. We also report the crystal structures of a tetrahedral, thiohemiacetal intermediate, a thioacylmore » intermediate and an NAD+-bound complex from an active site mutant. These covalent intermediates are characterized by single-crystal and solution-state electronic absorption spectroscopy. The crystal structures reveal that the substrate undergoes an E/Z isomerization at the enzyme active site before an sp3-to-sp2 transition during enzyme-mediated oxidation.« less

  1. Crystal structure of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Artur T; Feliciano, Patricia R; Pinheiro, Matheus P; Nonato, M Cristina

    2012-08-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) is the fourth enzyme in the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway and has been exploited as the target for therapy against proliferative and parasitic diseases. In this study, we report the crystal structures of DHODH from Leishmania major, the species of Leishmania associated with zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis, in its apo form and in complex with orotate and fumarate molecules. Both orotate and fumarate were found to bind to the same active site and exploit similar interactions, consistent with a ping-pong mechanism described for class 1A DHODHs. Analysis of LmDHODH structures reveals that rearrangements in the conformation of the catalytic loop have direct influence on the dimeric interface. This is the first structural evidence of a relationship between the dimeric form and the catalytic mechanism. According to our analysis, the high sequence and structural similarity observed among trypanosomatid DHODH suggest that a single strategy of structure-based inhibitor design can be used to validate DHODH as a druggable target against multiple neglected tropical diseases such as Leishmaniasis, Sleeping sickness and Chagas' diseases.

  2. Leucaena sp. recombinant cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase: purification and physicochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Patel, Parth; Gupta, Neha; Gaikwad, Sushama; Agrawal, Dinesh C; Khan, Bashir M

    2014-02-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase is a broad substrate specificity enzyme catalyzing the final step in monolignol biosynthesis, leading to lignin formation in plants. Here, we report characterization of a recombinant CAD homologue (LlCAD2) isolated from Leucaena leucocephala. LlCAD2 is 80 kDa homo-dimer associated with non-covalent interactions, having substrate preference toward sinapaldehyde with Kcat/Km of 11.6×10(6) (M(-1) s(-1)), and a possible involvement of histidine at the active site. The enzyme remains stable up to 40 °C, with the deactivation rate constant (Kd(*)) and half-life (t1/2) of 0.002 and 5h, respectively. LlCAD2 showed optimal activity at pH 6.5 and 9 for reduction and oxidation reactions, respectively, and was stable between pH 7 and 9, with the deactivation rate constant (Kd(*)) and half-life (t1/2) of 7.5×10(-4) and 15 h, respectively. It is a Zn-metalloenzyme with 4 Zn(2+) per dimer, however, was inhibited in presence of externally supplemented Zn(2+) ions. The enzyme was resistant to osmolytes, reducing agents and non-ionic detergents.

  3. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 in stem cells and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kaori; Tanaka, Takuji; Hara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The human genome contains 19 putatively functional aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes, which encode enzymes critical for detoxification of endogenous and exogenous aldehyde substrates through NAD(P)+-dependent oxidation. ALDH1 has three main isotypes, ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, and ALDH1A3, and is a marker of normal tissue stem cells (SC) and cancer stem cells (CSC), where it is involved in self-renewal, differentiation and self-protection. Experiments with murine and human cells indicate that ALDH1 activity, predominantly attributed to isotype ALDH1A1, is tissue- and cancer-specific. High ALDH1 activity and ALDH1A1 overexpression are associated with poor cancer prognosis, though high ALDH1 and ALDH1A1 levels do not always correlate with highly malignant phenotypes and poor clinical outcome. In cancer therapy, ALDH1A1 provides a useful therapeutic CSC target in tissue types that normally do not express high levels of ALDH1A1, including breast, lung, esophagus, colon and stomach. Here we review the functions and mechanisms of ALDH1A1, the key ALDH isozyme linked to SC populations and an important contributor to CSC function in cancers, and we outline its potential in future anticancer strategies. PMID:26783961

  4. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase regulates hepatitis C virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Gwon-Soo; Jeon, Jae-Han; Choi, Yeon-Kyung; Jang, Se Young; Park, Soo Young; Kim, Sung-Woo; Byun, Jun-Kyu; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Sungwoo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Lee, In-Kyu; Kang, Yu Na; Park, Keun-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    During replication, hepatitis C virus (HCV) utilizes macromolecules produced by its host cell. This process requires host cellular metabolic reprogramming to favor elevated levels of aerobic glycolysis. Therefore, we evaluated whether pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), a mitochondrial enzyme that promotes aerobic glycolysis, can regulate HCV replication. Levels of c-Myc, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), PDK1, PDK3, glucokinase, and serine biosynthetic enzymes were compared between HCV-infected and uninfected human liver and Huh-7.5 cells infected with or without HCV. Protein and mRNA expression of c-Myc, HIF-1α, and glycolytic enzymes were significantly higher in HCV-infected human liver and hepatocytes than in uninfected controls. This increase was accompanied by upregulation of serine biosynthetic enzymes, suggesting cellular metabolism was altered toward facilitated nucleotide synthesis essential for HCV replication. JQ1, a c-Myc inhibitor, and dichloroacetate (DCA), a PDK inhibitor, decreased the expression of glycolytic and serine synthetic enzymes in HCV-infected hepatocytes, resulting in suppressed viral replication. Furthermore, when co-administered with IFN-α or ribavirin, DCA further inhibited viral replication. In summary, HCV reprograms host cell metabolism to favor glycolysis and serine biosynthesis; this is mediated, at least in part, by increased PDK activity, which provides a surplus of nucleotide precursors. Therefore, blocking PDK activity might have therapeutic benefits against HCV replication. PMID:27471054

  5. Metabolism of the novel IMP dehydrogenase inhibitor benzamide riboside.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Walter; Salamon, Alexandra; Szekeres, Thomas

    2002-04-01

    Benzamide riboside (BR) is a novel anticancer agent exhibiting pronounced activity against several human tumor cell lines via the inhibition of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) that catalyzes the formation of xanthine 5'-monophosphate from inosine 5'-monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, thereby restricting the biosynthesis of guanylates. Phosphorylation of BR to its 5'-monophosphate derivative appears to be ubiquitous in most cells catalyzed by the enzymes, adenosine kinase, nicotinamide nucleoside kinase and 5' nucleotidase. BR 5'-monophosphate is then converted to the active metabolite benzamide adenine dinucleotide (BAD) by NMN adenylyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of NAD. As BAD is more potent in the inhibition of IMPDH than BR and BR 5'-monophosphate, cytotoxicity of BR is closely connected with intercellular metabolism to BAD. However, intracellular BAD level is also affected by BADase activity, a phosphodiesterase which hydrolyzes BAD to BR-5'-monophosphate and AMP. A recent study demonstrates enzymatic deamination of BR to non-cytotoxic benzene carboxylic acid (BR-COOH) as the main hepatic BR biotransformation product in rat liver. As the IMPDH inhibitors tiazofurin and ribavirin exhibit predominant accumulation and biotransformation in liver, hepatic metabolism may be an important factor also for BR activation and inactivation and should be considered in human liver during cancer therapy when BR is used as a single drug or in combination with other anticancer agents.

  6. Function, kinetic properties, crystallization, and regulation of microbial malate dehydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi-Íñiguez, Tóshiko; Aburto-Rodríguez, Nelly; Vilchis-González, Ana Laura; Flores, María Elena

    2016-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) is an enzyme widely distributed among living organisms and is a key protein in the central oxidative pathway. It catalyzes the interconversion between malate and oxaloacetate using NAD+ or NADP+ as a cofactor. Surprisingly, this enzyme has been extensively studied in eukaryotes but there are few reports about this enzyme in prokaryotes. It is necessary to review the relevant information to gain a better understanding of the function of this enzyme. Our review of the data generated from studies in bacteria shows much diversity in their molecular properties, including weight, oligomeric states, cofactor and substrate binding affinities, as well as differences in the direction of the enzymatic reaction. Furthermore, due to the importance of its function, the transcription and activity of this enzyme are rigorously regulated. Crystal structures of MDH from different bacterial sources led to the identification of the regions involved in substrate and cofactor binding and the residues important for the dimer-dimer interface. This structural information allows one to make direct modifications to improve the enzyme catalysis by increasing its activity, cofactor binding capacity, substrate specificity, and thermostability. A comparative analysis of the phylogenetic reconstruction of MDH reveals interesting facts about its evolutionary history, dividing this superfamily of proteins into two principle clades and establishing relationships between MDHs from different cellular compartments from archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes.

  7. Retinol Dehydrogenases Regulate Vitamin A Metabolism for Visual Function

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Bhubanananda; Maeda, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    The visual system produces visual chromophore, 11-cis-retinal from dietary vitamin A, all-trans-retinol making this vitamin essential for retinal health and function. These metabolic events are mediated by a sequential biochemical process called the visual cycle. Retinol dehydrogenases (RDHs) are responsible for two reactions in the visual cycle performed in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells, photoreceptor cells and Müller cells in the retina. RDHs in the RPE function as 11-cis-RDHs, which oxidize 11-cis-retinol to 11-cis-retinal in vivo. RDHs in rod photoreceptor cells in the retina work as all-trans-RDHs, which reduce all-trans-retinal to all-trans-retinol. Dysfunction of RDHs can cause inherited retinal diseases in humans. To facilitate further understanding of human diseases, mouse models of RDHs-related diseases have been carefully examined and have revealed the physiological contribution of specific RDHs to visual cycle function and overall retinal health. Herein we describe the function of RDHs in the RPE and the retina, particularly in rod photoreceptor cells, their regulatory properties for retinoid homeostasis and future therapeutic strategy for treatment of retinal diseases. PMID:27879662

  8. Aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibition as a pathogenic mechanism in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Fitzmaurice, Arthur G; Rhodes, Shannon L; Lulla, Aaron; Murphy, Niall P; Lam, Hoa A; O'Donnell, Kelley C; Barnhill, Lisa; Casida, John E; Cockburn, Myles; Sagasti, Alvaro; Stahl, Mark C; Maidment, Nigel T; Ritz, Beate; Bronstein, Jeff M

    2013-01-08

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder particularly characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Pesticide exposure has been associated with PD occurrence, and we previously reported that the fungicide benomyl interferes with several cellular processes potentially relevant to PD pathogenesis. Here we propose that benomyl, via its bioactivated thiocarbamate sulfoxide metabolite, inhibits aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), leading to accumulation of the reactive dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), preferential degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, and development of PD. This hypothesis is supported by multiple lines of evidence. (i) We previously showed in mice the metabolism of benomyl to S-methyl N-butylthiocarbamate sulfoxide, which inhibits ALDH at nanomolar levels. We report here that benomyl exposure in primary mesencephalic neurons (ii) inhibits ALDH and (iii) alters dopamine homeostasis. It induces selective dopaminergic neuronal damage (iv) in vitro in primary mesencephalic cultures and (v) in vivo in a zebrafish system. (vi) In vitro cell loss was attenuated by reducing DOPAL formation. (vii) In our epidemiology study, higher exposure to benomyl was associated with increased PD risk. This ALDH model for PD etiology may help explain the selective vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons in PD and provide a potential mechanism through which environmental toxicants contribute to PD pathogenesis.

  9. Computational design of glutamate dehydrogenase in Bacillus subtilis natto.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Li; Wang, Jia-Le; Hu, Yu; Qian, Bing-Jun; Yao, Xiao-Min; Wang, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Jian-Hua

    2013-04-01

    Bacillus subtilis natto is widely used in industry to produce natto, a traditional and popular Japanese soybean food. However, during its secondary fermentation, high amounts of ammonia are released to give a negative influence on the flavor of natto. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a key enzyme for the ammonia produced and released, because it catalyzes the oxidative deamination of glutamate to alpha-ketoglutarate using NAD(+) or NADP(+) as co-factor during carbon and nitrogen metabolism processes. To solve this problem, we employed multiple computational methods model and re-design GDH from Bacillus subtilis natto. Firstly, a structure model of GDH with cofactor NADP(+) was constructed by threading and ab initio modeling. Then the substrate glutamate were flexibly docked into the structure model to form the substrate-binding mode. According to the structural analysis of the substrate-binding mode, Lys80, Lys116, Arg196, Thr200, and Ser351 in the active site were found could form a significant hydrogen bonding network with the substrate, which was thought to play a crucial role in the substrate recognition and position. Thus, these residues were then mutated into other amino acids, and the substrate binding affinities for each mutant were calculated. Finally, three single mutants (K80A, K116Q, and S351A) were found to have significant decrease in the substrate binding affinities, which was further supported by our biochemical experiments.

  10. Crystallographic and spectroscopic snapshots reveal a dehydrogenase in action

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, Lu; Davis, Ian; Liu, Fange; Andi, Babak; Esaki, Shingo; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Orville, Allen M.; Liu, Aimin

    2015-01-07

    Aldehydes are ubiquitous intermediates in metabolic pathways and their innate reactivity can often make them quite unstable. There are several aldehydic intermediates in the metabolic pathway for tryptophan degradation that can decay into neuroactive compounds that have been associated with numerous neurological diseases. An enzyme of this pathway, 2-aminomuconate-6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, is responsible for ‘disarming’ the final aldehydic intermediate. Here we show the crystal structures of a bacterial analogue enzyme in five catalytically relevant forms: resting state, one binary and two ternary complexes, and a covalent, thioacyl intermediate. We also report the crystal structures of a tetrahedral, thiohemiacetal intermediate, a thioacyl intermediate and an NAD+-bound complex from an active site mutant. These covalent intermediates are characterized by single-crystal and solution-state electronic absorption spectroscopy. The crystal structures reveal that the substrate undergoes an E/Z isomerization at the enzyme active site before an sp3-to-sp2 transition during enzyme-mediated oxidation.

  11. Immobilization and enzymatic properties of Bacillus megaterium glucose dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, M.; Fontana, J.D.; Guimaraes, M.F.; Woodward, J.

    1996-12-31

    The enzymatic production of hydrogen gas from renewable sources of energy; e.g., cellulose, starch, lactose, can be obtained by coupling the reactions catalyzed by glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and hydrogenase. In order to enhance the thermostability of GDH from Bacillus megaterium, the enzyme was immobilized by ionic adsorption using the polycationic polymer DEAE-(dextran)Sephadex. The effect of enzyme concentration on immobilization showed a tendency to increase the activity of the immobilized enzyme with the increase of the amount of added GDH. When the enzyme: support ratio was 15.97 U: 100 mg, the immobilization yield was 84.76%. The enzymatic profiles for the immobilized GDH were a little different when compared to those for free enzyme with respect to the effects of pH and temperature. Concerning the effect of incubation time carried at pH 7.5 and at 40{degrees}C, the maximum production of reduced coenzyme by the immobilized enzyme was reached within 4 h and it was maintained up to 16 h without loss of enzymatic activity. The coupling of the immobilized GDH activity with that for free alkaline cellulose (Novozym. 342) demonstrated the possibility for obtaining reduced coenzyme from the cellulose hydrolysis and the immobilized GDH could be reassayed 10 times maintaining its enzyme activity.

  12. Stabilization and reutilization of Bacillus megaterium glucose dehydrogenase by immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, M. |; Fontana, J.D.; Guimaraes, M.F.; Woodward, J.

    1997-12-31

    Glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) from Bacillus megaterium was immobilized using aminopropyl controlled-pore silica (CPS, average pore sizes of 170 and 500 {angstrom}) as a support and glutaraldehyde as a bifunctional crosslinking agent. The CPS-immobilized enzyme could be reused 12 times and the best results were obtained using aminopropyl CPS-500 and bovine serum albumin as a feeder for stabilizing the protein layer on the support. DEAE-Sephadex (A-25 and A-50) was also used as a support for immobilizing GDH, with yields of around 42% for A-25 and 25-30% for A-50. The effect of pH on the immobilization procedure showed pH 6.5 to be better than pH 7.5 with respect to the recovery of enzyme activity. Both preparations of DEAE-Sephadex immobilized GDH could be reused several times and were thermostable at 400{degrees}C for 7 h. The kinetic parameters as Michaelis constant and maximum rate were determined for the immobilized enzyme and compared with those for the freeform. 9 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Xanthine dehydrogenase to xanthine oxidase conversion in ischemic rat intestine

    SciTech Connect

    McKelvey, T.G.; Engerson, T.D.; Elmore, C.R.; Jones, H.P. )

    1990-02-26

    The ischemic conversion of the NADH-producing xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) to an oxidase form, that produces both superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide, has been proposed as an important step in initiating oxygen radical-mediated ischemia-reperfusion injury. It has also been reported that two forms of converted oxidase are produced in ischemic rat liver; a reversible xanthine oxidase produced through sulfhydryl oxidation, that can be reconverted to XDH by incubation with 10mM dithiothreitol (Dtt) at 37{degrees}C, and a Dtt-irreversible oxidase produced via proteolysis. The authors report that increased oxidase in the ischemic rat intestine results from significant increases in both the Dtt-reversible and Dtt-irreversible forms of xanthine oxidase. Total oxidase activity (Irreversible + Dtt-reversible) was 19% of the total enzyme activity (XDH + XO) in control ileum and distal jejunum, increased to 26% after 1 hour of ischemia at 37{degrees}C, and significantly to 36% after 1.5 hours. After 3 hours 73% of the activity was in the oxidase form. Irreversible oxidase comprised 15% of the total activity in control intestine, significantly increased to 25% after 2 hours, and further to 42% after 3 hours. Dtt-reversible oxidase was 3% of the total activity in controls, increased to 13% after 1.5 hours, and significantly to 29% after 2 hours.

  14. The gene encoding proline dehydrogenase modulates sensorimotor gating in mice.

    PubMed

    Gogos, J A; Santha, M; Takacs, Z; Beck, K D; Luine, V; Lucas, L R; Nadler, J V; Karayiorgou, M

    1999-04-01

    Hemizygous cryptic deletions of the q11 band of human chromosome 22 have been associated with a number of psychiatric and behavioural phenotypes, including schizophrenia. Here we report the isolation and characterization of PRODH, a human homologue of Drosophila melanogaster sluggish-A (slgA), which encodes proline dehydrogenase responsible for the behavioural phenotype of the slgA mutant. PRODH is localized at chromosome 22q11 in a region deleted in some psychiatric patients. We also isolated the mouse homologue of slgA (Prodh), identified a mutation in this gene in the Pro/Re hyperprolinaemic mouse strain and found that these mice have a deficit in sensorimotor gating accompanied by regional neurochemical alterations in the brain. Sensorimotor gating is a neural filtering process that allows attention to be focused on a given stimulus, and is affected in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. Furthermore, several lines of evidence suggest that proline may serve as a modulator of synaptic transmission in the mammalian brain. Our observations, in conjunction with the chromosomal location of PRODH, suggest a potential involvement of this gene in the 22q11-associated psychiatric and behavioural phenotypes.

  15. Inactivation of Bakers' yeast glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Sungwoo; Joshi, J.G. )

    1989-04-18

    Preincubation of yeast glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) with Al(III) produced an inactive enzyme containing 1 mol of Al(III)/mol of enzyme subunit. None of the enzyme-bound Al(III) was dissociated by dialysis against 10 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.0, containing 0.2 mM EDTA at 4{degree}C for 24 h. Citrate, NADP{sup +}, EDTA, or NaF protected the enzyme against the Al(III) inactivation. The Al(III)-inactivated enzyme, however, was completely reactivated only by citrate and NaF. The dissociation constant for the enzyme-aluminum complex was calculated to be 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M with NaF, a known reversible chelator for aluminum. Modification of histidine and lysine residues of the enzyme with diethyl pyrocarbonate and acetylsalicylic acid, respectively, inactivated the enzyme. However, the modified enzyme still bound 1 mol of Al(III)/mol of enzyme subunit. Circular dichroism studies showed that the binding of Al(III) to the enzyme induced a decrease in {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet and an increase in random coil. Therefore, it is suggested that inactivation of G6PD by Al(III) is due to the conformational change induced by Al(III) binding.

  16. Regulation of L-threonine dehydrogenase in somatic cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Han, Chuanchun; Gu, Hao; Wang, Jiaxu; Lu, Weiguang; Mei, Yide; Wu, Mian

    2013-05-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that metabolic remodeling plays an important role in the regulation of somatic cell reprogramming. Threonine catabolism mediated by L-threonine dehydrogenase (TDH) has been recognized as a specific metabolic trait of mouse embryonic stem cells. However, it remains unknown whether TDH-mediated threonine catabolism could regulate reprogramming. Here, we report TDH as a novel regulator of somatic cell reprogramming. Knockdown of TDH inhibits, whereas induction of TDH enhances reprogramming efficiency. Moreover, microRNA-9 post-transcriptionally regulates the expression of TDH and thereby inhibits reprogramming efficiency. Furthermore, protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT5) interacts with TDH and mediates its post-translational arginine methylation. PRMT5 appears to regulate TDH enzyme activity through both methyltransferase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Functionally, TDH-facilitated reprogramming efficiency is further enhanced by PRMT5. These results suggest that TDH-mediated threonine catabolism controls somatic cell reprogramming and indicate the importance of post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation of TDH.

  17. Incidence and Geographic Distribution of Succinic Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase (SSADH) Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Attri, Savita Verma; Singhi, Pratibha; Wiwattanadittakul, Natrujee; Goswami, Jyotindra N; Sankhyan, Naveen; Salomons, Gajja S; Roullett, Jean-Baptiste; Hodgeman, Ryan; Parviz, Mahsa; Gibson, K Michael; Pearl, Phillip L

    2016-11-05

    The incidence of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency, an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of GABA degradation, is unknown. Upon a recent diagnosis of a new family of affected fraternal twins from the Punjabi ethnic group of India, case ascertainment from the literature and our database was done to determine the number of confirmed cases along with their geographic distribution. The probands presented with global developmental delay, infantile onset epilepsy, and a persistent neurodevelopmental disorder upon diagnosis at 10 years of age with intellectual disability, expressive aphasia, and behavioral problems most prominent for hyperactivity. Gamma-hydroxybutyric aciduria and homozygous ALDH5A1 c.608C>T; p.Pro203Leu mutations were confirmed. Identification of all available individual cases with clinical details available including geographic or ethnic origin revealed 182 patients from 40 countries, with the largest number of patients reported from the USA (24%), Turkey (10%), China (7%), Saudi Arabia (6%), and Germany (5%). This study provides an accounting of all published cases of confirmed SSADH deficiency and provides data useful in planning further studies of this rare inborn error of metabolism.

  18. Natural history of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency through adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Evan Cole; De Meulemeester, Christine; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Gibson, K. Michael; Torres, Carlos; Guberman, Alan; Salomons, Gajja S.; Jakobs, Cornelis; Ali-Ridha, Andre; Parviz, Mahsa; Pearl, Phillip L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The natural history of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency in adulthood is unknown; we elucidate the clinical manifestations of the disease later in life. Methods: A 63-year-old man with long-standing intellectual disability was diagnosed with SSADH deficiency following hospitalization for progressive decline, escalating seizures, and prolonged periods of altered consciousness. We present a detailed review of his clinical course and reviewed our SSADH deficiency database adult cohort to derive natural history information. Results: Of 95 patients in the database for whom age at diagnosis is recorded, there are 40 individuals currently aged 18 years or older. Only 3 patients were diagnosed after age 18 years. Of 25 adults for whom data are available after age 18, 60% have a history of epilepsy. Predominant seizure types are generalized tonic-clonic, absence, and myoclonic. EEGs showed background slowing or generalized epileptiform discharges in two-thirds of adults for whom EEG data were collected. History of psychiatric symptoms was prominent, with frequent anxiety, sleep disturbances, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Conclusions: We identified patients older than 18 years with SSADH deficiency in our database following identification and review of a patient diagnosed in the seventh decade of life. The illness had a progressive course with escalating seizures in the index case, with fatality at age 63. Diagnosis in adulthood is rare. Epilepsy is more common in the adult than the pediatric SSADH deficiency cohort; neuropsychiatric morbidity remains prominent. PMID:26268900

  19. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 inhibits inflammatory response and regulates atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shu-jian; Zhang, Ming-xiang; Wang, Xu-ping; Yuan, Qiu-huan; Xue, Li; Wang, Jia-li; Cui, Zhao-qiang; Zhang, Yun; Xu, Feng; Chen, Yu-guo

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) rs671 polymorphism, which eliminates ALDH2 activity down to 1%-6%, is a susceptibility gene for coronary disease. Here we investigated the underlying mechanisms based on our prior clinical and experimental studies. Male apoE−/− mice were transfected with GFP, ALDH2-overexpression and ALDH2-RNAi lentivirus respectively (n=20 each) after constrictive collars were placed around the right common carotid arteries. Consequently, ALDH2 gene silencing led to an increased en face plaque area, more unstable plaque with heavier accumulation of lipids, more macrophages, less smooth muscle cells and collagen, which were associated with aggravated inflammation. However, ALDH2 overexpression displayed opposing effects. We also found that ALDH2 activity decreased in atherosclerotic plaques of human and aged apoE−/− mice. Moreover, in vitro experiments with human umbilical vein endothelial cells further illustrated that, inhibition of ALDH2 activity resulted in elevating inflammatory molecules, an increase of nuclear translocation of NF-κB, and enhanced phosphorylation of NF-κB p65, AP-1 c-Jun, Jun-N terminal kinase and p38 MAPK, while ALDH2 activation could trigger contrary effects. These findings suggested that ALDH2 can influence plaque development and vulnerability, and inflammation via MAPK, NF-κB and AP-1 signaling pathways. PMID:27191745

  20. Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR): the 2002 update.

    PubMed

    Oppermann, Udo; Filling, Charlotta; Hult, Malin; Shafqat, Naeem; Wu, Xiaoqiu; Lindh, Monica; Shafqat, Jawed; Nordling, Erik; Kallberg, Yvonne; Persson, Bengt; Jörnvall, Hans

    2003-02-01

    Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR) form a large, functionally heterogeneous protein family presently with about 3000 primary and about 30 3D structures deposited in databases. Despite low sequence identities between different forms (about 15-30%), the 3D structures display highly similar alpha/beta folding patterns with a central beta-sheet, typical of the Rossmann-fold. Based on distinct sequence motifs functional assignments and classifications are possible, making it possible to build a general nomenclature system. Recent mutagenetic and structural studies considerably extend the knowledge on the general reaction mechanism, thereby establishing a catalytic tetrad of Asn-Ser-Tyr-Lys residues, which presumably form the framework for a proton relay system including the 2'-OH of the nicotinamide ribose, similar to the mechanism found in horse liver ADH. Based on their cellular functions, several SDR enzymes appear as possible and promising pharmacological targets with application areas spanning hormone-dependent cancer forms or metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes, and infectious diseases.

  1. Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency: lessons from mice and men.

    PubMed

    Pearl, P L; Gibson, K M; Cortez, M A; Wu, Y; Carter Snead, O; Knerr, I; Forester, K; Pettiford, J M; Jakobs, C; Theodore, W H

    2009-06-01

    Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency, a disorder of GABA degradation with subsequent elevations in brain GABA and GHB, is a neurometabolic disorder with intellectual disability, epilepsy, hypotonia, ataxia, sleep disorders, and psychiatric disturbances. Neuroimaging reveals increased T2-weighted MRI signal usually affecting the globus pallidus, cerebellar dentate nucleus, and subthalamic nucleus, and often cerebral and cerebellar atrophy. EEG abnormalities are usually generalized spike-wave, consistent with a predilection for generalized epilepsy. The murine phenotype is characterized by failure-to-thrive, progressive ataxia, and a transition from generalized absence to tonic-clonic to ultimately fatal convulsive status epilepticus. Binding and electrophysiological studies demonstrate use-dependent downregulation of GABA(A) and (B) receptors in the mutant mouse. Translational human studies similarly reveal downregulation of GABAergic activity in patients, utilizing flumazenil-PET and transcranial magnetic stimulation for GABA(A) and (B) activity, respectively. Sleep studies reveal decreased stage REM with prolonged REM latencies and diminished percentage of stage REM. An ad libitum ketogenic diet was reported as effective in the mouse model, with unclear applicability to the human condition. Acute application of SGS-742, a GABA(B) antagonist, leads to improvement in epileptiform activity on electrocorticography. Promising mouse data using compounds available for clinical use, including taurine and SGS-742, form the framework for human trials.

  2. Aldehyde dehydrogenases in cancer stem cells: potential as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Clark, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to current chemotherapeutic or radiation-based cancer treatment strategies is a serious concern. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are typically able to evade treatment and establish a recurrent tumor or metastasis, and it is these that lead to the majority of cancer deaths. Therefore, a major current goal is to develop treatment strategies that eliminate the resistant CSCs as well as the bulk tumor cells in order to achieve complete disease clearance. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) are important for maintenance and differentiation of stem cells as well as normal development. There is expanding evidence that ALDH expression increases in response to therapy and promotes chemoresistance and survival mechanisms in CSCs. This perspective will discuss a paper by Cojoc and colleagues recently published in Cancer Research, that indicates ALDHs play a key role in resistance to radiation therapy and tumor recurrence in prostate cancer. The authors suggest that ALDHs are a potential therapeutic target for treatment prostate cancer patients to limit radiation resistance and disease recurrence. The findings are consistent with work from other cancers showing ALDHs are major contributors of CSC signaling and resistance to anti-cancer treatments. This perspective will address representative work concerning the validity of ALDH and the associated retinoic acid signaling pathway as chemotherapeutic targets for prostate as well as other cancers. PMID:28149880

  3. Crystallographic and spectroscopic snapshots reveal a dehydrogenase in action

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Lu; Davis, Ian; Liu, Fange; Andi, Babak; Esaki, Shingo; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Orville, Allen M.; Liu, Aimin

    2015-01-01

    Aldehydes are ubiquitous intermediates in metabolic pathways and their innate reactivity can often make them quite unstable. There are several aldehydic intermediates in the metabolic pathway for tryptophan degradation that can decay into neuroactive compounds that have been associated with numerous neurological diseases. An enzyme of this pathway, 2-aminomuconate-6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, is responsible for ‘disarming’ the final aldehydic intermediate. Here we show the crystal structures of a bacterial analogue enzyme in five catalytically relevant forms: resting state, one binary and two ternary complexes, and a covalent, thioacyl intermediate. We also report the crystal structures of a tetrahedral, thiohemiacetal intermediate, a thioacyl intermediate and an NAD+-bound complex from an active site mutant. These covalent intermediates are characterized by single-crystal and solution-state electronic absorption spectroscopy. The crystal structures reveal that the substrate undergoes an E/Z isomerization at the enzyme active site before an sp3-to-sp2 transition during enzyme-mediated oxidation. PMID:25565451

  4. Functional characterization of a vanillin dehydrogenase in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Si, Meiru; Zhang, Weipeng; Zhang, Yaoling; Chen, Can; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Shaolin; Shen, Xihui

    2015-01-27

    Vanillin dehydrogenase (VDH) is a crucial enzyme involved in the degradation of lignin-derived aromatic compounds. Herein, the VDH from Corynebacterium glutamicum was characterized. The relative molecular mass (Mr) determined by SDS-PAGE was ~51 kDa, whereas the apparent native Mr values revealed by gel filtration chromatography were 49.5, 92.3, 159.0 and 199.2 kDa, indicating the presence of dimeric, trimeric and tetrameric forms. Moreover, the enzyme showed its highest level of activity toward vanillin at pH 7.0 and 30°C, and interestingly, it could utilize NAD(+) and NADP(+) as coenzymes with similar efficiency and showed no obvious difference toward NAD(+) and NADP(+). In addition to vanillin, this enzyme exhibited catalytic activity toward a broad range of substrates, including p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, o-phthaldialdehyde, cinnamaldehyde, syringaldehyde and benzaldehyde. Conserved catalytic residues or putative cofactor interactive sites were identified based on sequence alignment and comparison with previous studies, and the function of selected residues were verified by site-directed mutagenesis analysis. Finally, the vdh deletion mutant partially lost its ability to grow on vanillin, indicating the presence of alternative VDH(s) in Corynebacterium glutamicum. Taken together, this study contributes to understanding the VDH diversity from bacteria and the aromatic metabolism pathways in C. glutamicum.

  5. Human choline dehydrogenase: medical promises and biochemical challenges.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Francesca; Gadda, Giovanni

    2013-09-15

    Human choline dehydrogenase (CHD) is located in the inner membrane of mitochondria primarily in liver and kidney and catalyzes the oxidation of choline to glycine betaine. Its physiological role is to regulate the concentrations of choline and glycine betaine in the blood and cells. Choline is important for regulation of gene expression, the biosynthesis of lipoproteins and membrane phospholipids and for the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine; glycine betaine plays important roles as a primary intracellular osmoprotectant and as methyl donor for the biosynthesis of methionine from homocysteine, a required step for the synthesis of the ubiquitous methyl donor S-adenosyl methionine. Recently, CHD has generated considerable medical attention due to its association with various human pathologies, including male infertility, homocysteinuria, breast cancer and metabolic syndrome. Despite the renewed interest, the biochemical characterization of the enzyme has lagged behind due to difficulties in the obtainment of purified, active and stable enzyme. This review article summarizes the medical relevance and the physiological roles of human CHD, highlights the biochemical knowledge on the enzyme, and provides an analysis based on the comparison of the protein sequence with that of bacterial choline oxidase, for which structural and biochemical information is available.

  6. Not only students can express alcohol dehydrogenase: goldfish can too!

    PubMed

    Chamberland, Valérie; Rioux, Pierre

    2010-12-01

    This article describes a novel approach to study the metabolic regulation of the respiratory system in vertebrates that suits physiology lessons for undergraduate students. It consists of an experimental demonstration of the goldfish's (Carassius auratus) adaptations to anoxia. The goldfish is one of the few vertebrates showing strong enzymatic plasticity for the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), which allows it to survive long periods of severe anoxia. Therefore, we propose two simple laboratory exercises in which students are first asked to characterize the distribution of ADH isozymes in the goldfish by performing cellulose acetate electrophoresis. The second part of this laboratory lesson is the determination of liver glycogen. To further student comprehension, an interspecies comparative component is integrated, in which the same subjects are studied in an anoxia-sensitive species, the brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis). ADH in goldfish is restricted to skeletal muscles, where it catalyzes alcoholic fermentation, permitting ethanol excretion through the gills and therefore preventing lactate acidosis caused by sustained glycolysis during anoxia. Electrophoresis also reveals the occurrence of a liver isozyme in the brook charr, which ADH catalyzes in the opposite pathway, allowing the usual ethanol degradation. As for the liver glycogen assay, it shows largely superior content in the goldfish liver compared with the brook charr, providing goldfish with a sustained energy supply during anoxia. The results of this laboratory exercise clearly demonstrate several physiological strategies developed by goldfish to cope with such a crucial environmental challenge as oxygen depletion.

  7. Isolation and partial characterization of the Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, D A

    1980-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH; alcohol: NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) gene (Adh) of Drosophila melanogaster was isolated by utilizing a mutant strain in which the Adh locus is deleted. Adult RNA from wild-type flies was enriched in ADH sequences by gel electrophoresis and then used to prepare labeled cDNA for screening a bacteriophage lambda library of genomic Drosophila DNA. Of the clones that hybridized in the initial screen, one clone was identified that hybridized with labeled cDNA prepared from a wild-type Drosophila strain but did not hybridize with cDNA prepared from an Adh deletion strain. This clone was shown to contain ADH structural gene sequences by three criteria: in situ hybridization, in vitro translation of mRNA selected by hybridization to the cloned DNA, and comparison of the ADH protein sequence with a nucleotide sequence derived from the cloned DNA. Comparison of the restriction site maps from clones of three different wild-type Drosophila strains revealed the presence of a 200-nucleotide sequence in one strain that was absent from the other two strains. The ADH mRNA sequences were located within the cloned DNA by hybridization mapping experiments. Two intervening sequences were identified within Adh by S1 nuclease mapping experiments. Images PMID:6777776

  8. Sirtuin 4 is a lipoamidase regulating pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Rommel A.; Greco, Todd M.; Oberstein, Adam; Budayeva, Hanna G.; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Rowland, Elizabeth A.; Kang, Yibin; Shenk, Thomas; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sirtuins (SIRTs) are critical enzymes that govern genome regulation, metabolism, and aging. Despite conserved deacetylase domains, mitochondrial SIRT4 and SIRT5 have little to no deacetylase activity, and a robust catalytic activity for SIRT4 has been elusive. Here, we establish SIRT4 as a cellular lipoamidase that regulates the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH). Importantly, SIRT4 catalytic efficiency for lipoyl- and biotinyl-lysine modifications is superior to its deacetylation activity. PDH, which converts pyruvate to acetyl-CoA, has been known to be primarily regulated by phosphorylation of its E1 component. We determine that SIRT4 enzymatically hydrolyzes the lipoamide cofactors from the E2 component dihydrolipoyllysine acetyltransferase (DLAT), diminishing PDH activity. We demonstrate SIRT4-mediated regulation of DLAT lipoyl levels and PDH activity in cells and in vivo, in mouse liver. Furthermore, metabolic flux switching via glutamine stimulation induces SIRT4 lipoamidase activity to inhibit PDH, highlighting SIRT4 as a guardian of cellular metabolism. PMID:25525879

  9. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 in cardiac protection: a new therapeutic target?

    PubMed Central

    Budas, Grant R; Disatnik, Marie- Hélène; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is emerging as a key enzyme involved in cytoprotection in the heart. ALDH2 mediates both the detoxification of reactive aldehydes such as acetaldehyde and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) and the bioactivation of nitroglycerin (GTN) to nitric oxide (NO). In addition, chronic nitrate treatment results in ALDH2 inhibition and contributes to nitrate tolerance. Our lab recently identified ALDH2 to be a key mediator of endogenous cytoprotection. We reported that ALDH2 is phosphorylated and activated by the survival kinase protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε) and found a strong inverse correlation between ALDH2 activity and infarct size. We also identified a small molecule ALDH2 activator (Alda-1) which reduces myocardial infarct size induced by ischemia/reperfusion in vivo. In this review, we discuss evidence that ALDH2 is a key mediator of endogenous survival signaling in the heart, suggest possible cardioprotective mechanisms mediated by ALDH2, and discuss potential clinical implications of these findings. PMID:20005475

  10. Accelerated Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity Potentiates Osteoclastogenesis via NFATc1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Man; Kwon, So Hyun; Lee, Seoung Hoon; Lee, Soo Young; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts seem to be metabolic active during their differentiation and bone-resorptive activation. However, the functional role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a tetrameric enzyme consisting of an A and/or B subunit that catalyzes interconversion of pyruvate to lactate, in RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is not known. In this study, RANKL treatment induced gradual gene expression and activation of the LDH A2B2 isotype during osteoclast differentiation as well as the LDH A1B3 and B4 isotypes during osteoclast maturation after pre-osteoclast formation. Glucose consumption and lactate production in growth media were accelerated during osteoclast differentiation, together with enhanced expression of H+-lactate co-transporter and increased extracellular acidification, demonstrating that glycolytic metabolism was stimulated during differentiation. Further, oxygen consumption via mitochondria was stimulated during osteoclast differentiation. On the contrary, depletion of LDH-A or LDH-B subunit suppressed both glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism, resulting in reduced mature osteoclast formation via decreased osteoclast precursor fusion and down-regulation of the osteoclastogenic critical transcription factor NFATc1 and its target genes. Collectively, our findings suggest that RANKL-induced LDH activation stimulates glycolytic and mitochondrial respiratory metabolism, facilitating mature osteoclast formation via osteoclast precursor fusion and NFATc1 signaling. PMID:27077737

  11. Green tea polyphenols modulate insulin secretion by inhibiting glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Changhong; Allen, Aron; Kwagh, Jae; Doliba, Nicolai M; Qin, Wei; Najafi, Habiba; Collins, Heather W; Matschinsky, Franz M; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2006-04-14

    Insulin secretion by pancreatic beta-cells is stimulated by glucose, amino acids, and other metabolic fuels. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) has been shown to play a regulatory role in this process. The importance of GDH was underscored by features of hyperinsulinemia/hyperammonemia syndrome, where a dominant mutation causes the loss of inhibition by GTP and ATP. Here we report the effects of green tea polyphenols on GDH and insulin secretion. Of the four compounds tested, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate were found to inhibit GDH with nanomolar ED(50) values and were therefore found to be as potent as the physiologically important inhibitor GTP. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that EGCG inhibits BCH-stimulated insulin secretion, a process that is mediated by GDH, under conditions where GDH is no longer inhibited by high energy metabolites. EGCG does not affect glucose-stimulated insulin secretion under high energy conditions where GDH is probably fully inhibited. We have further shown that these compounds act in an allosteric manner independent of their antioxidant activity and that the beta-cell stimulatory effects are directly correlated with glutamine oxidation. These results demonstrate that EGCG, much like the activator of GDH (BCH), can facilitate dissecting the complex regulation of insulin secretion by pharmacologically modulating the effects of GDH.

  12. Aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibition as a pathogenic mechanism in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmaurice, Arthur G.; Rhodes, Shannon L.; Lulla, Aaron; Murphy, Niall P.; Lam, Hoa A.; O’Donnell, Kelley C.; Barnhill, Lisa; Casida, John E.; Cockburn, Myles; Sagasti, Alvaro; Stahl, Mark C.; Maidment, Nigel T.; Ritz, Beate; Bronstein, Jeff M.

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder particularly characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Pesticide exposure has been associated with PD occurrence, and we previously reported that the fungicide benomyl interferes with several cellular processes potentially relevant to PD pathogenesis. Here we propose that benomyl, via its bioactivated thiocarbamate sulfoxide metabolite, inhibits aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), leading to accumulation of the reactive dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), preferential degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, and development of PD. This hypothesis is supported by multiple lines of evidence. (i) We previously showed in mice the metabolism of benomyl to S-methyl N-butylthiocarbamate sulfoxide, which inhibits ALDH at nanomolar levels. We report here that benomyl exposure in primary mesencephalic neurons (ii) inhibits ALDH and (iii) alters dopamine homeostasis. It induces selective dopaminergic neuronal damage (iv) in vitro in primary mesencephalic cultures and (v) in vivo in a zebrafish system. (vi) In vitro cell loss was attenuated by reducing DOPAL formation. (vii) In our epidemiology study, higher exposure to benomyl was associated with increased PD risk. This ALDH model for PD etiology may help explain the selective vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons in PD and provide a potential mechanism through which environmental toxicants contribute to PD pathogenesis. PMID:23267077

  13. Modulation of lactate dehydrogenase isozymes by modified base queuine.

    PubMed

    Pathak, C; Vinayak, Manjula

    2005-09-01

    The modified base queuine is a nutrient factor for lower and higher eukaryotes except yeast. It is synthesized in eubacteria and inserted into the wobble position of specific tRNAs (tRNA(GUN)) in exchange of guanine at position 34. The tRNAs of Q family are completely modified in terminally differentiated somatic cells. However, mainly free queuine is present in embryonic and fast proliferating cells, tRNA remains Q deficient. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) A mRNA and LDH A protein is known to increase when cells are grown in hypoxic conditions. In the present study, the level of LDH isozymes is analyzed in different tissues of normal and cancerous (DLA) mice and the effect of queuine treatment on LDH isozyme is observed. LDH A isozyme is shown to increase in serum and liver of DLA mice. The level and activity of LDH A decreases on queuine treatment. In skeletal muscle and heart, LDH A isozyme decreases while LDH B increases in DLA mice. Queuine administration leads to change back towards normal. In case of brain, LDH A increases but LDH B decreases in DLA mice. Queuine treatment leads to decrease in A4 anaerobic isozymes of LDH. The results suggest that queuine suppresses anaerobic glycolytic pathway, which leads to tumor suppression of DLA mice.

  14. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: the added value of cytology.

    PubMed

    Roelens, Marie; Dossier, Claire; Fenneteau, Odile; Couque, Nathalie; Da Costa, Lydie

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 2 year-old boy hospitalized into the emergency room for influenza pneumonia infection. The evolution was marked by a respiratory distress syndrome, a severe hemolytic anemia, associated with thrombocytopenia and kidney failure. First, a diagnosis of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) has been judiciously suggested due to the classical triad: kidney failure, hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. But, strikingly, blood smears do not exhibit schizocytes, but instead ghosts and hemighosts, some characteristic features of a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Our hypothesis has been confirmed by enzymatic dosage and molecular biology. The unusual initial aplastic feature of this anemia could be the result of a transient erythroblastopenia due to the viral agent, at the origin of the G6PD crisis on a background of a major erythrocyte anti-oxydant enzyme defect. This case of G6PD defect points out the continuously importance of the cytology, which was able to redirect the diagnosis by the hemighost and ghost detection.

  15. Lactate Dehydrogenase in Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Something Old, Something New.

    PubMed

    Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Memeo, Riccardo; Casadei Gardini, Andrea; Giampieri, Riccardo; Bittoni, Alessandro; Andrikou, Kalliopi; Del Prete, Michela; Cascinu, Stefano; Scartozzi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver tumour (80-90%) and represents more than 5.7% of all cancers. Although in recent years the therapeutic options for these patients have increased, clinical results are yet unsatisfactory and the prognosis remains dismal. Clinical or molecular criteria allowing a more accurate selection of patients are in fact largely lacking. Lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) is a glycolytic key enzyme in the conversion of pyruvate to lactate under anaerobic conditions. In preclinical models, upregulation of LDH has been suggested to ensure both an efficient anaerobic/glycolytic metabolism and a reduced dependence on oxygen under hypoxic conditions in tumour cells. Data from several analyses on different tumour types seem to suggest that LDH levels may be a significant prognostic factor. The role of LDH in HCC has been investigated by different authors in heterogeneous populations of patients. It has been tested as a potential biomarker in retrospective, small, and nonfocused studies in patients undergoing surgery, transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), and systemic therapy. In the major part of these studies, high LDH serum levels seem to predict a poorer outcome. We have reviewed literature in this setting trying to resume basis for future studies validating the role of LDH in this disease.

  16. Phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from Ascaris suum

    SciTech Connect

    Thissen, J.; Komuniecki, R.

    1987-05-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) from body wall muscle of the porcine nematode, Ascaris suum, plays a pivotal role in anaerobic mitochondrial metabolism. As in mammalian mitochondria, PDC activity is inhibited by the phosphorylation of the ..cap alpha..PDH subunit, catalyzed by an associated PDH/sub a/ kinase. However, in contrast to PDC's isolated from all other eukaryotic sources, phosphorylation decreases the mobility of the ..cap alpha..PDH subunit on SDS-PAGE and permits the separation of the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH's. Phosphorylation and the inactivation of the Ascaris PDC correspond directly, and the additional phosphorylation that occurs after complete inactivation in mammalian PDC's is not observed. The purified ascarid PDC incorporates 10 nmoles /sup 32/P/mg P. Autoradiography of the radiolabeled PDC separated by SDS-PAGE yields a band which corresponds to the phosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH and a second, faint band which is present only during the first three minutes of PDC inactivation, intermediate between the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH subunit. Tryptic digests of the /sup 32/P-PDC yields one major phosphopeptide, when separated by HPLC, and its amino acid sequence currently is being determined.

  17. RECIPIENT PRETRANSPLANT INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN NONMYELOABLATIVE HCT

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Meagan J.; Risler, Linda J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S.; Boeckh, Michael J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5’- monophosphate (IMP) to xanthosine 5’-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T-cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation, but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, non-relapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient’s pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient’s sensitivity to MMF, but confirmatory studies are needed. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:24923537

  18. An animal model of human aldehyde dehydrogenase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Mann, J.; Yoshida, A.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic deficiency of ALDH2, a major mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, is intimately related to alcohol sensitivity and the degree of predisposition to alcoholic diseases in humans. The ultimate biological role of ALDH2 can be exposed by knocking out the ALDH2 gene in an animal model. As the first step for this line of studies, we cloned and characterized the ALDH2 gene from mouse C57/6J strain which is associated with a high alcohol preference. The gene spans 26 kbp and is composed of 13 exons. Embryonic stem cells were transfected with a replacement vector which contains a partially deleted exon3, a positive selection cassette (pPgk Neo), exon 4 with an artificial stop codon, exons 5, 6, 7, and a negative selection cassette (pMCI-Tk). Genomic DNAs prepared from drug resistant clones were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and by Southern blot analysis to distinguish random integration from homologous recombination. Out of 132 clones examined, 8 had undergone homologous recombination at one of the ALDH2 alleles. The cloned transformed embryonic stem cells with a disrupted ALDH2 allele were injected into blastocysts. Transplantation of the blastocysts into surrogate mother mice yielded chimeric mice. The role of ALDH2 in alcohol preference, alcohol sensitivity and other biological and behavioral characteristics can be elucidated by examining the heterozygous and homozygous mutant strains produced by breeding of chimeric mice.

  19. Determinants of performance in the isocitrate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, A. M.; Shiau, A. K.; Koshland, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    The substrate specificity of the NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli was investigated by combining site-directed mutagenesis and utilization of alternative substrates. A comparison of the kinetics of the wild-type enzyme with 2R-malate reveals that the gamma-carboxylate of 2R,3S-isocitrate contributes a factor of 12,000,000 to enzyme performance. Analysis of kinetic data compiled for 10 enzymes and nine different substrates reveals that a factor of 1,650 can be ascribed to the hydrogen bond formed between S113 and the gamma-carboxylate of bound isocitrate, a factor of 150 to the negative charge of the gamma-carboxylate, and a factor of 50 for the gamma-methyl. These results are entirely consistent with X-ray structures of Michaelis complexes that show a hydrogen bond positions the gamma-carboxylate of isocitrate so that a salt bridge can form to the nicotinamide ring of NADP. PMID:8745412

  20. Reactivity of the sulfhydryl groups of soluble succinate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, A D; Gavrikova, E V; Zuevsky, V V

    1976-04-01

    Soluble succinate dehydrogenase prepared by butanol extraction reacts with N-ethylmaleimide according to first-order kinetics with respect to both remaining active enzyme and the inhibitor concentration. Binding of the sulfhydryl groups of the enzyme prevents its alkylation by N-ethylmaleimide and inhibition by oxaloacetate. A kinetic analysis of the inactivation of alkylating reagent in the presence of succinate or malonate suggests that N-ethylmaleimide acts as a site-directed inhibitor. The apparent first-order rate constant of alkylation increases between pH 5.8 and 7.8 indicating a pKa value for the enzyme sulfhydryl group equal to 7.0 at 22 degrees C in 50 mM Tris-sufate buffer. Certain anions (phosphate, citrate, maleate and acetate) decrease the reactivity of the enzyme towards the alkylating reagent. Succinate/phenazine methosulfate reductase activity measured in the presence of a saturating concentration of succinate shows the same pH-dependence as the alkylation rate by N-ethylmaleimide. The mechanism of the first step of succinate oxidation, including a nucleophilic attack of substrate by the active-site sulfhydryl group, is discussed.

  1. Nuclear lactate dehydrogenase modulates histone modification in human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Castonguay, Zachary; Auger, Christopher; Thomas, Sean C.; Chahma, M’hamed; Appanna, Vasu D.

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Nuclear LDH is up-regulated under oxidative stress. • SIRT1 is co-immunoprecipitated bound to nuclear LDH. • Nuclear LDH is involved in histone deacetylation and epigenetics. - Abstract: It is becoming increasingly apparent that the nucleus harbors metabolic enzymes that affect genetic transforming events. Here, we describe a nuclear isoform of lactate dehydrogenase (nLDH) and its ability to orchestrate histone deacetylation by controlling the availability of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}), a key ingredient of the sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) deacetylase system. There was an increase in the expression of nLDH concomitant with the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in the culture medium. Under oxidative stress, the NAD{sup +} generated by nLDH resulted in the enhanced deacetylation of histones compared to the control hepatocytes despite no discernable change in the levels of SIRT1. There appeared to be an intimate association between nLDH and SIRT1 as these two enzymes co-immunoprecipitated. The ability of nLDH to regulate epigenetic modifications by manipulating NAD{sup +} reveals an intricate link between metabolism and the processing of genetic information.

  2. Sequence variation of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) paralogs in cactophilic Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Matzkin, Luciano M; Eanes, Walter F

    2003-01-01

    This study focuses on the population genetics of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) in cactophilic Drosophila. Drosophila mojavensis and D. arizonae utilize cactus hosts, and each host contains a characteristic mixture of alcohol compounds. In these Drosophila species there are two functional Adh loci, an adult form (Adh-2) and a larval and ovarian form (Adh-1). Overall, the greater level of variation segregating in D. arizonae than in D. mojavensis suggests a larger population size for D. arizonae. There are markedly different patterns of variation between the paralogs across both species. A 16-bp intron haplotype segregates in both species at Adh-2, apparently the product of an ancient gene conversion event between the paralogs, which suggests that there is selection for the maintenance of the intron structure possibly for the maintenance of pre-mRNA structure. We observe a pattern of variation consistent with adaptive protein evolution in the D. mojavensis lineage at Adh-1, suggesting that the cactus host shift that occurred in the divergence of D. mojavensis from D. arizonae had an effect on the evolution of the larval expressed paralog. Contrary to previous work we estimate a recent time for both the divergence of D. mojavensis and D. arizonae (2.4 +/- 0.7 MY) and the age of the gene duplication (3.95 +/- 0.45 MY). PMID:12586706

  3. Yeast cell-based analysis of human lactate dehydrogenase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Lulu Ahmed; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Nakanishi, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    Human lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) has attracted attention as a potential target for cancer therapy and contraception. In this study, we reconstituted human lactic acid fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with the goal of constructing a yeast cell-based LDH assay system. pdc null mutant yeast (mutated in the endogenous pyruvate decarboxylase genes) are unable to perform alcoholic fermentation; when grown in the presence of an electron transport chain inhibitor, pdc null strains exhibit a growth defect. We found that introduction of the human gene encoding LDHA complemented the pdc growth defect; this complementation depended on LDHA catalytic activity. Similarly, introduction of the human LDHC complemented the pdc growth defect, even though LDHC did not generate lactate at the levels seen with LDHA. In contrast, the human LDHB did not complement the yeast pdc null mutant, although LDHB did generate lactate in yeast cells. Expression of LDHB as a red fluorescent protein (RFP) fusion yielded blebs in yeast, whereas LDHA-RFP and LDHC-RFP fusion proteins exhibited cytosolic distribution. Thus, LDHB exhibits several unique features when expressed in yeast cells. Because yeast cells are amenable to genetic analysis and cell-based high-throughput screening, our pdc/LDH strains are expected to be of use for versatile analyses of human LDH.

  4. Single amino acid polymorphism in aldehyde dehydrogenase gene superfamily.

    PubMed

    Priyadharshini Christy, J; George Priya Doss, C

    2015-01-01

    The aldehyde dehydrogenase gene superfamily comprises of 19 genes and 3 pseudogenes. These superfamily genes play a vital role in the formation of molecules that are involved in life processes, and detoxification of endogenous and exogenous aldehydes. ALDH superfamily genes associated mutations are implicated in various diseases, such as pyridoxine-dependent seizures, gamma-hydroxybutyric aciduria, type II Hyperprolinemia, Sjogren-Larsson syndrome including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. Accumulation of large DNA variations data especially Single Amino acid Polymorphisms (SAPs) in public databases related to ALDH superfamily genes insisted us to conduct a survey on the disease associated mutations and predict their function impact on protein structure and function. Overall this study provides an update and highlights the importance of pathogenic mutations in associated diseases. Using KD4v and Project HOPE a computational based platform, we summarized all the deleterious properties of SAPs in ALDH superfamily genes by the providing valuable insight into structural alteration rendered due to mutation. We hope this review might provide a way to define the deleteriousness of a SAP and helps to understand the molecular basis of the associated disease and also permits precise diagnosis and treatment in the near future.

  5. Triazaspirodimethoxybenzoyls as Selective Inhibitors of Mycobacterial Lipoamide Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bryk, Ruslana; Arango, Nancy; Venugopal, Aditya; Warren, J. David; Park, Yun-Hee; Patel, Mulchand S.; Lima, Christopher D.; Nathan, Carl

    2010-06-25

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) remains the leading single cause of death from bacterial infection. Here we explored the possibility of species-selective inhibition of lipoamide dehydrogenase (Lpd), an enzyme central to Mtb's intermediary metabolism and antioxidant defense. High-throughput screening of combinatorial chemical libraries identified triazaspirodimethoxybenzoyls as high-nanomolar inhibitors of Mtb's Lpd that were noncompetitive versus NADH, NAD{sup +}, and lipoamide and >100-fold selective compared to human Lpd. Efficacy required the dimethoxy and dichlorophenyl groups. The structure of an Lpd-inhibitor complex was resolved to 2.42 {angstrom} by X-ray crystallography, revealing that the inhibitor occupied a pocket adjacent to the Lpd NADH/NAD{sup +} binding site. The inhibitor did not overlap with the adenosine moiety of NADH/NAD{sup +} but did overlap with positions predicted to bind the nicotinamide rings in NADH and NAD{sup +} complexes. The dimethoxy ring occupied a deep pocket adjacent to the FAD flavin ring where it would block coordination of the NADH nicotinamide ring, while the dichlorophenyl group occupied a more exposed pocket predicted to coordinate the NAD{sup +} nicotinamide. Several residues that are not conserved between the bacterial enzyme and its human homologue were predicted to contribute both to inhibitor binding and to species selectivity, as confirmed for three residues by analysis of the corresponding mutant Mtb Lpd proteins. Thus, nonconservation of residues lining the electron-transfer tunnel in Mtb Lpd can be exploited for development of species-selective Lpd inhibitors.

  6. Structural and Kinetic Studies of Formate Dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qi; Gakhar, Lokesh; Wickersham, Kyle; Francis, Kevin; Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Major, Dan T; Cheatum, Christopher M; Kohen, Amnon

    2016-05-17

    The structure of formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii (CbFDH) is of both academic and practical interests. First, this enzyme represents a unique model system for studies on the role of protein dynamics in catalysis, but so far these studies have been limited by the availability of structural information. Second, CbFDH and its mutants can be used in various industrial applications (e.g., CO2 fixation or nicotinamide recycling systems), and the lack of structural information has been a limiting factor in commercial development. Here, we report the crystallization and structural determination of both holo- and apo-CbFDH. The free-energy barrier for the catalyzed reaction was computed and indicates that this structure indeed represents a catalytically competent form of the enzyme. Complementing kinetic examinations demonstrate that the recombinant CbFDH has a well-organized reactive state. Finally, a fortuitous observation has been made: the apoenzyme crystal was obtained under cocrystallization conditions with a saturating concentration of both the cofactor (NAD(+)) and inhibitor (azide), which has a nanomolar dissociation constant. It was found that the fraction of the apoenzyme present in the solution is less than 1.7 × 10(-7) (i.e., the solution is 99.9999% holoenzyme). This is an extreme case where the crystal structure represents an insignificant fraction of the enzyme in solution, and a mechanism rationalizing this phenomenon is presented.

  7. Nitrated carbon nanoblisters for high-performance glucose dehydrogenase bioanodes.

    PubMed

    de Souza, João C P; Iost, Rodrigo M; Crespilho, Frank N

    2016-03-15

    Recently, many strategies are being explored for efficiently wiring glucose dehydrogenase (GDh) enzymes capable of glucose (fuel) oxidation. For instance, the use of GDh NAD(+)-dependent for glucose oxidation is of great interest in biofuel cell technology because the enzyme are unaffected by the presence of molecular oxygen commonly present in electrolyte. Here we present the fabrication of flexible carbon fibers modified with nitrated carbon nanoblisters and their application as high-performance GDh bioanodes. These bioelectrodes could electro-oxidize glucose at -360 mV (vs. Ag/AgClsat) in the presence of a molecular oxygen saturated electrolyte with current densities higher than 1.0 mAcm(-2) at 0.0 V. It is corroborated by open circuit potential, where a potential stabilization occurs at -150 mV in a long term stability current-transient experiment. This value is in agreement with the quasi-steady current obtained at very low scan rate (0.1 mVs(-1)), where the onset potential for glucose oxidation is -180 mV. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy revealed that the nitrated blisters and edge-like carbon structures, enabling highly efficient enzyme immobilization and low overpotential for electron transfer, allowing for glucose oxidation with potential values close to the thermodynamic cofactor.

  8. Glutamate dehydrogenase 1 and SIRT4 regulate glial development.

    PubMed

    Komlos, Daniel; Mann, Kara D; Zhuo, Yue; Ricupero, Christopher L; Hart, Ronald P; Liu, Alice Y-C; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2013-03-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia (HI/HA) syndrome is caused by an activation mutation of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1), a mitochondrial enzyme responsible for the reversible interconversion between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate. The syndrome presents clinically with hyperammonemia, significant episodic hypoglycemia, seizures, and frequent incidences of developmental and learning defects. Clinical research has implicated that although some of the developmental and neurological defects may be attributed to hypoglycemia, some characteristics cannot be ascribed to low glucose and as hyperammonemia is generally mild and asymptomatic, there exists the possibility that altered GDH1 activity within the brain leads to some clinical changes. GDH1 is allosterically regulated by many factors, and has been shown to be inhibited by the ADP-ribosyltransferase sirtuin 4 (SIRT4), a mitochondrially localized sirtuin. Here we show that SIRT4 is localized to mitochondria within the brain. SIRT4 is highly expressed in glial cells, specifically astrocytes, in the postnatal brain and in radial glia during embryogenesis. Furthermore, SIRT4 protein decreases in expression during development. We show that factors known to allosterically regulate GDH1 alter gliogenesis in CTX8 cells, a novel radial glial cell line. We find that SIRT4 and GDH1 overexpression play antagonistic roles in regulating gliogenesis and that a mutant variant of GDH1 found in HI/HA patients accelerates the development of glia from cultured radial glia cells.

  9. Asparaginyl deamidation in two glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    DeLuna, Alexander; Quezada, Héctor; Gómez-Puyou, Armando; González, Alicia

    2005-03-25

    The non-enzymatic deamidation of asparaginyl residues is a major source of spontaneous damage of several proteins under physiological conditions. In many cases, deamidation and isoaspartyl formation alters the biological activity or stability of the native polypeptide. Rates of deamidation of particular residues depend on many factors including protein structure and solvent exposure. Here, we investigated the spontaneous deamidation of the two NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which have different kinetic properties and are differentially expressed in this yeast. Our results show that Asn54, present in Gdh3p but missing in the GDH1-encoded homologue, is readily deamidated in vitro under alkaline conditions. Relative to the native enzyme, deamidated Gdh3p shows reduced protein stability. The different deamidation rates of the two isoenzymes could explain to some extent, the relative in vivo instability of the allosteric Gdh3p enzyme, compared to that of Gdh1p. It is thus possible that spontaneous asparaginyl modification could play a role in the metabolic regulation of ammonium assimilation and glutamate biosynthesis.

  10. Regulation by ammonium of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bogonez, E; Satrústegui, J; Machado, A

    1985-06-01

    The activity of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) (EC 1.4.1.4; NADP-GDH) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is decreased under conditions in which intracellular ammonia concentrations increases. A high internal ammonia concentration can be obtained (a) by increasing the ammonium sulphate concentration in the culture medium, and (b) by growing the yeast either in acetate + ammonia media, where the pH of the medium rises during growth, or in heavily buffered glucose + ammonia media at pH 7.5. Under these conditions cellular oxoglutarate concentrations do not vary and changes in NADP-GDH activity appear to provide a constant rate of oxoglutarate utilization. The following results suggest that the decrease in NADP-GDH activity in ammonia-accumulating yeast cells is brought about by repression of synthesis: (i) after a shift to high ammonium sulphate concentrations, the number of units of activity per cell decreased as the inverse of cell doubling; and (ii) the rate of degradation of labelled NADP-GDH was essentially the same in ammonia-accumulating yeast cells and in controls, whereas the synthesis constant was much lower in the ammonia-accumulating cells than in the controls.

  11. The role of glutamate dehydrogenase in mammalian ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Spanaki, Cleanthe; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the reversible inter-conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia. High levels of GDH activity is found in mammalian liver, kidney, brain, and pancreas. In the liver, GDH reaction appears to be close-to-equilibrium, providing the appropriate ratio of ammonia and amino acids for urea synthesis in periportal hepatocytes. In addition, GDH produces glutamate for glutamine synthesis in a small rim of pericentral hepatocytes. Hence, hepatic GDH can be either a source for ammonia or an ammonia scavenger. In the kidney, GDH function produces ammonia from glutamate to control acidosis. In the human, the presence of two differentially regulated isoforms (hGDH1 and hGDH2) suggests a complex role for GDH in ammonia homeostasis. Whereas hGDH1 is sensitive to GTP inhibition, hGDH2 has dissociated its function from GTP control. Furthermore, hGDH2 shows a lower optimal pH than hGDH1. The hGDH2 enzyme is selectively expressed in human astrocytes and Sertoli cells, probably facilitating metabolic recycling processes essential for their supportive role. Here, we report that hGDH2 is also expressed in the epithelial cells lining the convoluted tubules of the renal cortex. As hGDH2 functions more efficiently under acidotic conditions without the operation of the GTP energy switch, its presence in the kidney may increase the efficacy of the organ to maintain acid base equilibrium.

  12. Alcohol dehydrogenase and an inactivator from rice seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Shimomura, S.; Beevers, H.

    1983-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was measured in the various organs of rice seedlings (Oryza sativa) growing in air. In extracts from ungerminated seeds, the ADH is stable, but in extracts from seedlings more than 2 days old the enzyme initially present loses activity in a time- and temperature-dependent fashion, due to the presence of an inactivating component which increases with age in roots and shoots. The inactivation can be prevented completely by dithiothreitol, and when this is included in the extraction medium the apparent loss of total ADH in roots and shoots with age is not observed. In seedlings grown in N/sub 2/, ADA levels in coleoptile extracts are higher than those in air, the enzyme is stable, and no inactivator can be detected. When seedlings grown for 5 days in air were transferred to N/sub 2/ for 3 days, ADA levels increased and there was a decline in inactivator activity. Transfer back to air after 1 day in N/sub 2/ led to loss of the accumulated ADH and increase in inactivator. These reciprocal changes and the fact that the inactivator is absent from coleoptiles of seedlings grown in N/sub 2/ appear to suggest a regulator role for the inactivator in vivo. However, it is clear that high levels of inactivator and ADH can exist in cells of seedlings grown in air for long periods without loss of enzyme activity, and it is argued that they must normally be separately compartmented.

  13. Psychotic mania in glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase-deficient subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bocchetta, Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency has been associated with acute psychosis, catatonic schizophrenia, and bipolar disorders by previous inconclusive reports. A particularly disproportionate rate of enzyme deficiency was found in manic schizoaffective patients from 662 lithium patients surveyed in Sardinia. The purpose of this study was to describe clinical characteristics which may be potentially associated with G6PD deficiency. Methods Characteristics of episodes, course of illness, family pattern of illness, laboratory tests, and treatment response of 29 G6PD-deficient subjects with a Research Diagnostic Criteria diagnosis of manic schizoaffective disorder were abstracted from available records. Results The most peculiar pattern was that of acute recurrent psychotic manic episodes, mostly characterized by loosening of associations, agitation, catatonic symptoms, and/or transient confusion, concurrent hyperbilirubinemia, positive psychiatric family history, and partial response to long-term lithium treatment. Conclusions A relationship between psychiatric disorder and G6PD deficiency is to be searched in the bipolar spectrum, particularly among patients with a history of acute episodes with psychotic and/or catatonic symptoms or with transient confusion. PMID:12844366

  14. SERUM VALUES OF ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE AND LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE IN OSTEOSARCOMA

    PubMed Central

    ZUMÁRRAGA, JUAN PABLO; BAPTISTA, ANDRÉ MATHIAS; ROSA, LUIS PABLO DE LA; CAIERO, MARCELO TADEU; CAMARGO, OLAVO PIRES DE

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To study the relationship between the pre and post chemotherapy (CT) serum levels of alkaline phosphatase (AP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and the percentage of tumor necrosis (TN) found in specimens after the pre surgical CT in patients with osteosarcoma. Methods: Series of cases with retrospective evaluation of patients diagnosed with osteosarcoma. Participants were divided into two groups according to serum values of both enzymes. The values of AP and LDH were obtained before and after preoperative CT. The percentage of tumor necrosis (TN) of surgical specimens of each patient was also included. Results: One hundred and thirty seven medical records were included from 1990 to 2013. Both the AP as LDH decreased in the patients studied, being the higher in pre CT than post CT. The average LHD decrease was 795.12U/L and AP decrease was 437.40 U/L. The average TN was 34.10 %. There was no statistically significant correlation between the serums values and the percentage of tumoral necrosis. Conclusion: The serum levels values of AP and LDH are not good predictors for the chemotherapy-induced necrosis in patients with osteosarcoma. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:27217815

  15. Triazaspirodimethoxybenzoyls as selective inhibitors of mycobacterial lipoamide dehydrogenase .

    PubMed

    Bryk, Ruslana; Arango, Nancy; Venugopal, Aditya; Warren, J David; Park, Yun-Hee; Patel, Mulchand S; Lima, Christopher D; Nathan, Carl

    2010-03-02

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) remains the leading single cause of death from bacterial infection. Here we explored the possibility of species-selective inhibition of lipoamide dehydrogenase (Lpd), an enzyme central to Mtb's intermediary metabolism and antioxidant defense. High-throughput screening of combinatorial chemical libraries identified triazaspirodimethoxybenzoyls as high-nanomolar inhibitors of Mtb's Lpd that were noncompetitive versus NADH, NAD(+), and lipoamide and >100-fold selective compared to human Lpd. Efficacy required the dimethoxy and dichlorophenyl groups. The structure of an Lpd-inhibitor complex was resolved to 2.42 A by X-ray crystallography, revealing that the inhibitor occupied a pocket adjacent to the Lpd NADH/NAD(+) binding site. The inhibitor did not overlap with the adenosine moiety of NADH/NAD(+) but did overlap with positions predicted to bind the nicotinamide rings in NADH and NAD(+) complexes. The dimethoxy ring occupied a deep pocket adjacent to the FAD flavin ring where it would block coordination of the NADH nicotinamide ring, while the dichlorophenyl group occupied a more exposed pocket predicted to coordinate the NAD(+) nicotinamide. Several residues that are not conserved between the bacterial enzyme and its human homologue were predicted to contribute both to inhibitor binding and to species selectivity, as confirmed for three residues by analysis of the corresponding mutant Mtb Lpd proteins. Thus, nonconservation of residues lining the electron-transfer tunnel in Mtb Lpd can be exploited for development of species-selective Lpd inhibitors.

  16. Site Saturation Mutagenesis Applications on Candida methylica Formate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Özgün, Gülşah P.; Ordu, Emel B.; Tütüncü, H. Esra; Yelboğa, Emrah; Sessions, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    In NADH regeneration, Candida methylica formate dehydrogenase (cmFDH) is a highly significant enzyme in pharmaceutical industry. In this work, site saturation mutagenesis (SSM) which is a combination of both rational design and directed evolution approaches is applied to alter the coenzyme specificity of NAD+-dependent cmFDH from NAD+ to NADP+ and increase its thermostability. For this aim, two separate libraries are constructed for screening a change in coenzyme specificity and an increase in thermostability. To alter the coenzyme specificity, in the coenzyme binding domain, positions at 195, 196, and 197 are subjected to two rounds of SSM and screening which enabled the identification of two double mutants D195S/Q197T and D195S/Y196L. These mutants increase the overall catalytic efficiency of NAD+ to 5.6 × 104-fold and 5 × 104-fold value, respectively. To increase the thermostability of cmFDH, the conserved residue at position 1 in the catalytic domain of cmFDH is subjected to SSM. The thermodynamic and kinetic results suggest that 8 mutations on the first residue can be tolerated. Among all mutants, M1L has the best residual activity after incubation at 60°C with 17%. These studies emphasize that SSM is an efficient method for creating “smarter libraries” for improving the properties of cmFDH. PMID:27847673

  17. Genetic control of alcohol dehydrogenase levels in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Maroni, G

    1978-06-01

    Among the progeny of Drosophila flies heterozygous for two noncomplementing Adh-negative alleles, two individuals were found that had recovered appreciable alcohol dehydrogenase activity, thereby surviving the ethanol medium used as a screen. The most likely explanation is that these Adh-positive flies are the product of intracistronic recombination within the Adh locus. Judging by the distribution of outside markers, one of the crossovers would have been a conventional reciprocal exchange while the other appears to have been an instance of nonreciprocal recombination. The enzymes produced in strains derived from the original survivors can be easily distinguished from wild-type enzymes ADH-S and ADH-F on the basis of their sensitivity to denaturing agents. None of various physical and catalytic properties tested revealed differences between the enzymes of the survivor strains except that in one of them the level of activity is 55--65% of the other. Quantitative immunological determinations of ADH gave estimates of enzyme protein which are proportional to the measured activity levels. These results are interpreted to indicate that different amounts of ADH protein are being accumulated in the two strains.

  18. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase with a bound inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Darrell E; Widom, Joanne; Clardy, Jon

    2006-03-01

    Membrane-associated dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) is an antimalarial therapeutic target without an effective inhibitor. Studies on human DHODH (HsDHODH) led to a structural mechanistic model in which respiratory quinones bind in a tunnel formed by the highly variable N-terminus that leads to the flavin mononucleotide-binding site. The therapeutic agents leflunomide (Arava) and brequinar sodium inhibit HsDHODH by binding in this tunnel. Plasmodium falciparum DHODH (PfDHODH) and HsDHODH have markedly different sensitivities to the two drugs. To understand the structural basis of this differential sensitivity and begin a structure-based drug-design cycle for PfDHODH inhibitors, the three-dimensional structure (2.4 Angstroms, R = 20.1%) of PfDHODH bound to the active metabolite of leflunomide was determined by X-ray crystallography. Comparison of the structures of HsDHODH and PfDHODH reveals a completely different binding mode for the same inhibitor in these two catalytically identical enzymes and explains the previously observed species-specific preferential binding. Because no effective inhibitors have been described for PfDHODH, this structure provides critical insight for the design of potential antimalarials.

  19. New isozyme systems for maize (Zea mays L.): aconitate hydratase, adenylate kinase, NADH dehydrogenase, and shikimate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Wendel, J F; Goodman, M M; Stuber, C W; Beckett, J B

    1988-06-01

    Electrophoretic variation and inheritance of four novel enzyme systems were studied in maize (Zea mays L.). A minimum of 10 genetic loci collectively encodes isozymes of aconitate hydratase (ACO; EC 4.2.1.3.), adenylate kinase (ADK; EC 2.7.4.3), NADH dehydrogenase (DIA; EC 1.6.99.-), and shikimate dehydrogenase (SAD; EC 1.1.1.25). At least four loci are responsible for the genetic control of ACO. Genetic data for two of the encoding loci, Aco1 and Aco4, demonstrated that at least two maize ACOs are active as monomers. Analysis of organellar preparations suggests that ACO1 and ACO4 are localized in the cytosolic and mitochondrial subcellular fractions, respectively. Maize ADK is encoded by a single nuclear locus, Adk1, governing monomeric enzymes that are located in the chloroplasts. Two cytosolic and two mitochondrial forms of DIA were electrophoretically resolved. Segregation analyses demonstrated that the two cytosolic isozymes are controlled by separate loci, Dia1 and Dia2, coding for products that are functional as monomers (DIA1) and dimers (DIA2). The major isozyme of SAD is apparently cytosolic, although an additional faintly staining plastid form may be present. Alleles at Sad1 are each associated with two bands that cosegregate in controlled crosses. Linkage analyses and crosses with B-A translocation stocks were effective in determining the map locations of six loci, including the previously described but unmapped locus Acp4. Several of these loci were localized to sparsely mapped regions of the genome. Dia2 and Acp4 were placed on the distal portion of the long arm of chromosome 1, 12.6 map units apart. Dia1 was localized to chromosome 2, 22.2 centimorgans (cM) from B1. Aco1 was mapped to chromosome 4, 6.2 cM from su1. Adk1 was placed on the poorly marked short arm of chromosome 6, 8.1 map units from rgd1. Less than 1% recombination was observed between Glu1 (on chromosome 10) and Sad1. In contrast to many other maize isozyme systems, there was little

  20. [Glutamate dehydrogenase activity of Bradyrhizobium japonicum in the presence of phytoregulators].

    PubMed

    Leonova, N O; Tytova, L V; Tantsiurenko, O V; Antypchuk, A F

    2006-01-01

    Influence of plant growth regulators ivin and emistim C, and flavonoids daidzein and quercetin on the glutamate dehydrogenase activity of soybean nodule bacteria, with contrasting symbiotic properties, were studied. It was shown that all used phytoregulators stimulated glutamate dehydrogenase activity of Bradyrhizobium japonicum 71t (the strain with highly efficient symbiotic properties) 1.2-4.9 times. Bradyrhizobium japonicum 21110 (the strain with inefficient symbiotic properties) diminished the enzyme activity in the presence of all phythoregulators except for ivin.

  1. Gene silencing in phlebotomine sand flies: Xanthine dehydrogenase knock down by dsRNA microinjections.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Mauricio R; Alexander, Bruce; Bates, Paul A; Dillon, Rod J

    2008-06-01

    Lutzomyia longipalpis are vectors of medically important visceral leishmaniasis in South America. Blood-fed adult females digest large amounts of protein, and xanthine dehydrogenase is thought to be a key enzyme involved in protein catabolism through the production of urate. Large amounts of heme are also released during digestion with potentially damaging consequences, as heme can generate oxygen radicals that damage lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. However, urate is an antioxidant that may prevent such oxidative damage produced by heme. We investigated xanthine dehydrogenase by developing the RNAi technique for sand flies and used this technique to knock down the Lu. longipalpis xanthine dehydrogenase gene to evaluate its role in survival of adult females after blood feeding. The gene sequence of Lu. longipalpis xanthine dehydrogenase is described together with expression in different life cycle stages and RNAi knock down. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR of xanthine dehydrogenase expression showed a significant increase in expression after bloodmeal ingestion. Microinjection of dsRNA via the thorax of 1-day-old adult female sand flies resulted in approximately 40% reduction of xanthine dehydrogenase gene expression in comparison to flies injected with a control dsRNA. A significant reduction of urate in the whole body and excretions of Lu. longipalpis was observed after dsRNA xanthine dehydrogenase microinjection and feeding 96h later on rabbit blood. Sand flies injected with XDH dsRNA also exhibit significantly reduced life span in comparison with the mock-injected group when fed on sucrose or when rabbit blood fed, showing that urate could be indeed an important free radical scavenger in Lu. longipalpis. The demonstration of xanthine dehydrogenase knock down by dsRNA microinjection, low mortality of microinjected insects and the successful bloodfeeding of injected insects demonstrated the utility of RNAi as a tool for functional analysis of genes in phlebotomine

  2. Structural Basis for "Flip-Flop" Action of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand

    2003-01-01

    The derivative of vitamin B1, thiamin pyrophosphate is a cofactor of pyruvate dehydrogenase, a component enzyme of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex that plays a major role in directing energy metabolism in the cell. This cofactor is used to cleave the C(sup alpha)-C(=O) bond of pyruvate followed by reductive acetyl transfer to lipoyl-dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. In alpha(sub 2)beta(sub 2)-tetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase, there are two cofactor binding sites, each of them being a center of independently conducted, although highly coordinated enzymatic reactions. The dynamic nonequivalence of two, otherwise chemically equivalent, catalytic sites can now be understood based on the recently determined crystal structure of the holo-form of human pyruvate dehydrogenase at 1.95A resolution. The structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase was determined using a combination of MAD phasing and molecular replacement followed by rounds of torsion-angles molecular-dynamics simulated-annealing refinement. The final pyruvate dehydrogenase structure included coordinates for all protein amino acids two cofactor molecules, two magnesium and two potassium ions, and 742 water molecules. The structure was refined to R = 0.202 and R(sub free) = 0.244. Our structural analysis of the enzyme folding and domain assembly identified a simple mechanism of this protein motion required for the conduct of catalytic action.

  3. Characteristics of external and internal NAD(P)H dehydrogenases in Hoya carnosa mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hoang Thi Kim; Nose, Akihiro

    2012-12-01

    This study aims at characterizing NAD(P)H dehydrogenases on the inside and outside of the inner membrane of mitochondria of one phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-crassulacean acid metabolism plant, Hoya carnosa. In crassulacean acid metabolism plants, NADH is produced by malate decarboxylation inside and outside mitochondria. The relative importance of mitochondrial alternative NADH dehydrogenases and their association was determined in intact-and alamethicin-permeabilized mitochondria of H. carnosa to discriminate between internal and external activities. The major findings in H. carnosa mitochondria are: (i) external NADPH oxidation is totally inhibited by DPI and totally dependent on Ca(2+), (ii) external NADH oxidation is partially inhibited by DPI and mainly dependent on Ca(2+), (iii) total NADH oxidation measured in permeabilized mitochondria is partially inhibited by rotenone and also by DPI, (iv) total NADPH oxidation measured in permeabilized mitochondria is partially dependent on Ca(2+) and totally inhibited by DPI. The results suggest that complex I, external NAD(P)H dehydrogenases, and internal NAD(P)H dehydrogenases are all linked to the electron transport chain. Also, the total measurable NAD(P)H dehydrogenases activity was less than the total measurable complex I activity, and both of these enzymes could donate their electrons not only to the cytochrome pathway but also to the alternative pathway. The finding indicated that the H. carnosa mitochondrial electron transport chain is operating in a classical way, partitioning to both Complex I and alternative Alt. NAD(P)H dehydrogenases.

  4. Decrease in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase is related to skin pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Nakama, Mitsuo; Murakami, Yuhko; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Nakata, Satoru

    2012-03-01

    Skin pigmentation is caused by various physical and chemical factors. It might also be influenced by changes in the physiological function of skin with aging. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) dehydrogenase is an enzyme related to the mitochondrial electron transport system and plays a key role in cellular energy production. It has been reported that the functional decrease in this system causes Parkinson's disease. Another study reports that the amount of NADH dehydrogenase in heart and skeletal muscle decreases with aging. A similar decrease in the skin would probably affect its physiological function. However, no reports have examined the age-related change in levels of NADH dehydrogenase in human skin. In this study, we investigated this change and its effect on skin pigmentation using cultured human epidermal keratinocytes. The mRNA expression of NDUFA1, NDUFB7, and NDUFS2, subunits of NADH dehydrogenase, and its activity were significantly decreased in late passage keratinocytes compared to early passage cells. Conversely, the mRNA expression of melanocyte-stimulating cytokines, interleukin-1 alpha and endothelin 1, was increased in late passage cells. On the other hand, the inhibition of NADH dehydrogenase upregulated the mRNA expression of melanocyte-stimulating cytokines. Moreover, the level of NDUFB7 mRNA was lower in pigmented than in nonpigmented regions of skin in vivo. These results suggest the decrease in NADH dehydrogenase with aging to be involved in skin pigmentation.

  5. Hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase activity in alcoholic subjects with and without liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, F; Perez, J; Morancho, J; Pinto, B; Richart, C

    1990-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase activity was measured in samples of liver tissue from a group of alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects to determine whether decreased liver alcohol dehydrogenase activity is a consequence of ethanol consumption or liver damage. The alcoholic patients were classified further into the following groups: control subjects with no liver disease (group 1), subjects with non-cirrhotic liver disease (group 2), and subjects with cirrhotic liver disease (group 3). The non-alcoholic subjects were also divided, using the same criteria, into groups 4, 5, and 6, respectively. The analysis of the results showed no significant differences when mean alcohol dehydrogenase activities of alcoholic and non-alcoholic patients with similar degrees of liver pathology were compared (groups 1 v 4, 2 v 5, and 3 v 6. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity was, however, severely reduced in patients with liver disease compared with control subjects. Our findings suggest that alcohol consumption does not modify hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase activity. The reduction in specific alcohol dehydrogenase activity in alcoholic liver disease is a consequence of liver damage. PMID:2379876

  6. The Crystal Structure of Aquifex aeolicus Prephenate Dehydrogenase Reveals the Mode of Tyrosine Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Warren; Shahinas, Dea; Bonvin, Julie; Hou, Wenjuan; Kimber, Matthew S.; Turnbull, Joanne; Christendat, Dinesh

    2009-08-14

    TyrA proteins belong to a family of dehydrogenases that are dedicated to l-tyrosine biosynthesis. The three TyrA subclasses are distinguished by their substrate specificities, namely the prephenate dehydrogenases, the arogenate dehydrogenases, and the cyclohexadienyl dehydrogenases, which utilize prephenate, l-arogenate, or both substrates, respectively. The molecular mechanism responsible for TyrA substrate selectivity and regulation is unknown. To further our understanding of TyrA-catalyzed reactions, we have determined the crystal structures of Aquifex aeolicus prephenate dehydrogenase bound with NAD(+) plus either 4-hydroxyphenylpyuvate, 4-hydroxyphenylpropionate, or l-tyrosine and have used these structures as guides to target active site residues for site-directed mutagenesis. From a combination of mutational and structural analyses, we have demonstrated that His-147 and Arg-250 are key catalytic and binding groups, respectively, and Ser-126 participates in both catalysis and substrate binding through the ligand 4-hydroxyl group. The crystal structure revealed that tyrosine, a known inhibitor, binds directly to the active site of the enzyme and not to an allosteric site. The most interesting finding though, is that mutating His-217 relieved the inhibitory effect of tyrosine on A. aeolicus prephenate dehydrogenase. The identification of a tyrosine-insensitive mutant provides a novel avenue for designing an unregulated enzyme for application in metabolic engineering.

  7. Crystal structure of novel NADP-dependent 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase from Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    PubMed

    Lokanath, Neratur K; Ohshima, Noriyasu; Takio, Koji; Shiromizu, Ikuya; Kuroishi, Chizu; Okazaki, Nobuo; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Miyano, Masashi; Kunishima, Naoki

    2005-09-30

    3-Hydroxyisobutyrate, a central metabolite in the valine catabolic pathway, is reversibly oxidized to methylmalonate semialdehyde by a specific dehydrogenase belonging to the 3-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase family. To gain insight into the function of this enzyme at the atomic level, we have determined the first crystal structures of the 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase from Thermus thermophilus HB8: holo enzyme and sulfate ion complex. The crystal structures reveal a unique tetrameric oligomerization and a bound cofactor NADP+. This bacterial enzyme may adopt a novel cofactor-dependence on NADP, whereas NAD is preferred in eukaryotic enzymes. The protomer folds into two distinct domains with open/closed interdomain conformations. The cofactor NADP+ with syn nicotinamide and the sulfate ion are bound to distinct sites located at the interdomain cleft of the protomer through an induced-fit domain closure upon cofactor binding. From the structural comparison with the crystal structure of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, another member of the 3-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase family, it is suggested that the observed sulfate ion and the substrate 3-hydroxyisobutyrate share the same binding pocket. The observed oligomeric state might be important for the catalytic function through forming the active site involving two adjacent subunits, which seems to be conserved in the 3-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases. A kinetic study confirms that this enzyme has strict substrate specificity for 3-hydroxyisobutyrate and serine, but it cannot distinguish the chirality of the substrates. Lys165 is likely the catalytic residue of the enzyme.

  8. Reduced aldehyde dehydrogenase expression in preeclamptic decidual mesenchymal stem/stromal cells is restored by aldehyde dehydrogenase agonists

    PubMed Central

    Kusuma, Gina D.; Abumaree, Mohamed H.; Perkins, Anthony V.; Brennecke, Shaun P.; Kalionis, Bill

    2017-01-01

    High resistance to oxidative stress is a common feature of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) and is associated with higher cell survival and ability to respond to oxidative damage. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity is a candidate “universal” marker for stem cells. ALDH expression was significantly lower in decidual MSC (DMSC) isolated from preeclamptic (PE) patients. ALDH gene knockdown by siRNA transfection was performed to create a cell culture model of the reduced ALDH expression detected in PE-DMSC. We showed that ALDH activity in DMSC is associated with resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced toxicity. Our data provide evidence that ALDH expression in DMSC is required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress. Furthermore, candidate ALDH activators were screened and two of the compounds were effective in upregulating ALDH expression. This study provides a proof-of-principle that the restoration of ALDH activity in diseased MSC is a rational basis for a therapeutic strategy to improve MSC resistance to cytotoxic damage. PMID:28205523

  9. Mechanism of activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase by dichloroacetate and other halogenated carboxylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Sue; Cooper, Ronald H.; Randle, Philip J.

    1974-01-01

    1. Monochloroacetate, dichloroacetate, trichloroacetate, difluoroacetate, 2-chloropropionate, 2,2′-dichloropropionate and 3-chloropropionate were inhibitors of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase. Dichloroacetate was also shown to inhibit rat heart pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase. The inhibition was mainly non-competitive with respect to ATP. The concentration required for 50% inhibition was approx. 100μm for the three chloroacetates, difluoroacetate and 2-chloropropionate and 2,2′-dichloropropionate. Dichloroacetamide was not inhibitory. 2. Dichloroacetate had no significant effect on the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate phosphatase when this was maximally activated by Ca2+ and Mg2+. 3. Dichloroacetate did not increase the catalytic activity of purified pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase. 4. Dichloroacetate, difluoroacetate, 2-chloropropionate and 2,2′-dichloropropionate increased the proportion of the active (dephosphorylated) form of pyruvate dehydrogenase in rat heart mitochondria with 2-oxoglutarate and malate as respiratory substrates. Similar effects of dichloroacetate were shown with kidney and fat-cell mitochondria. Glyoxylate, monochloroacetate and dichloroacetamide were inactive. 5. Dichloroacetate increased the proportion of active pyruvate dehydrogenase in the perfused rat heart, isolated rat diaphragm and rat epididymal fat-pads. Difluoroacetate and dichloroacetamide were also active in the perfused heart, but glyoxylate, monochloroacetate and trichloroacetate were inactive. 6. Injection of dichloroacetate into rats starved overnight led within 60 min to activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase in extracts from heart, psoas muscle, adipose tissue, kidney and liver. The blood concentration of lactate fell within 15 min to reach a minimum after 60 min. The blood concentration of glucose fell after 90 min and reached a minimum after 120 min. There was no significant change in plasma glycerol concentration. 7. In epididymal fatpads

  10. Monoterpene metabolism. Cloning, expression, and characterization of (-)-isopiperitenol/(-)-carveol dehydrogenase of peppermint and spearmint.

    PubMed

    Ringer, Kerry L; Davis, Edward M; Croteau, Rodney

    2005-03-01

    The essential oils of peppermint (Mentha x piperita) and spearmint (Mentha spicata) are distinguished by the oxygenation position on the p-menthane ring of the constitutive monoterpenes that is conferred by two regiospecific cytochrome P450 limonene-3- and limonene-6-hydroxylases. Following hydroxylation of limonene, an apparently similar dehydrogenase oxidizes (-)-trans-isopiperitenol to (-)-isopiperitenone in peppermint and (-)-trans-carveol to (-)-carvone in spearmint. Random sequencing of a peppermint oil gland secretory cell cDNA library revealed a large number of clones that specified redox-type enzymes, including dehydrogenases. Full-length dehydrogenase clones were screened by functional expression in Escherichia coli using a recently developed in situ assay. A single full-length acquisition encoding (-)-trans-isopiperitenol dehydrogenase (ISPD) was isolated. The (-)-ISPD cDNA has an open reading frame of 795 bp that encodes a 265-residue enzyme with a calculated molecular mass of 27,191. Nondegenerate primers were designed based on the (-)-trans-ISPD cDNA sequence and employed to screen a spearmint oil gland secretory cell cDNA library from which a 5'-truncated cDNA encoding the spearmint homolog, (-)-trans-carveol-dehydrogenase, was isolated. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification and RACE were used to acquire the remaining 5'-sequence from RNA isolated from oil gland secretory cells of spearmint leaf. The full-length spearmint dehydrogenase shares >99% amino acid identity with its peppermint homolog and both dehydrogenases are capable of utilizing (-)-trans-isopiperitenol and (-)-trans-carveol. These isopiperitenol/carveol dehydrogenases are members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily and are related to other plant short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases involved in secondary metabolism (lignan biosynthesis), stress responses, and phytosteroid biosynthesis, but they are quite dissimilar (approximately 13% identity) to the monoterpene

  11. Aldehyde Dehydrogenases in Cellular Responses to Oxidative/electrophilic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surendra; Brocker, Chad; Koppaka, Vindhya; Ying, Chen; Jackson, Brian; Matsumoto, Akiko; Thompson, David C.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated within living systems and the inability to manage ROS load leads to elevated oxidative stress and cell damage. Oxidative stress is coupled to the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. This process generates over 200 types of aldehydes, many of which are highly reactive and toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize endogenous and exogenous aldehydes and thereby mitigate oxidative/electrophilic stress in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. ALDHs are found throughout the evolutionary gamut, from single celled organisms to complex multicellular species. Not surprisingly, many ALDHs in evolutionarily distant, and seemingly unrelated, species perform similar functions, including protection against a variety of environmental stressors like dehydration and ultraviolet radiation. The ability to act as an ‘aldehyde scavenger’ during lipid peroxidation is another ostensibly universal ALDH function found across species. Up-regulation of ALDHs is a stress response in bacteria (environmental and chemical stress), plants (dehydration, salinity and oxidative stress), yeast (ethanol exposure and oxidative stress), Caenorhabditis elegans (lipid peroxidation) and mammals (oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation). Recent studies have also identified ALDH activity as an important feature of cancer stem cells. In these cells, ALDH expression helps abrogate oxidative stress and imparts resistance against chemotherapeutic agents such as oxazaphosphorine, taxane and platinum drugs. The ALDH superfamily represents a fundamentally important class of enzymes that significantly contributes to the management of electrophilic/oxidative stress within living systems. Mutations in various ALDHs are associated with a variety of pathological conditions in humans, underscoring the fundamental importance of these enzymes in physiological and pathological processes. PMID:23195683

  12. Function of formate dehydrogenases in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Sofia M; Voordouw, Johanna; Leitão, Cristina; Martins, Mónica; Voordouw, Gerrit; Pereira, Inês A C

    2013-08-01

    The genome of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough encodes three formate dehydrogenases (FDHs), two of which are soluble periplasmic enzymes (FdhAB and FdhABC3) and one that is periplasmic but membrane-associated (FdhM). FdhAB and FdhABC3 were recently shown to be the main enzymes present during growth with lactate, formate or hydrogen. To address the role of these two enzymes, ΔfdhAB and ΔfdhABC3, mutants were generated and studied. Different phenotypes were observed in the presence of either molybdenum or tungsten, since both enzymes were important for growth on formate in the presence of Mo, whereas in the presence of W only FdhAB played a role. Both ΔfdhAB and ΔfdhABC3 mutants displayed defects in growth with lactate and sulfate providing the first direct evidence for the involvement of formate cycling under these conditions. In support of this mechanism, incubation of concentrated cell suspensions of the mutant strains with lactate and limiting sulfate also gave elevated formate concentrations, as compared to the wild-type strain. In contrast, both mutants grew similarly to the wild-type with H2 and sulfate. In the absence of sulfate, the wild-type D. vulgaris cells produced formate when supplied with H2 and CO2, which resulted from CO2 reduction by the periplasmic FDHs. The conversion of H2 and CO2 to formate allows the reversible storage of reducing power in a much more soluble molecule. Furthermore, we propose this may be an expression of the ability of some sulfate-reducing bacteria to grow by hydrogen oxidation, in syntrophy with organisms that consume formate, but are less efficient in H2 utilization.

  13. Residues that influence coenzyme preference in the aldehyde dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    González-Segura, Lilian; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Julián-Sánchez, Adriana; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A

    2015-06-05

    To find out the residues that influence the coenzyme preference of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), we reviewed, analyzed and correlated data from their known crystal structures and amino-acid sequences with their published kinetic parameters for NAD(P)(+). We found that the conformation of the Rossmann-fold loops participating in binding the adenosine ribose is very conserved among ALDHs, so that coenzyme specificity is mainly determined by the nature of the residue at position 195 (human ALDH2 numbering). Enzymes with glutamate or proline at 195 prefer NAD(+) because the side-chains of these residues electrostatically and/or sterically repel the 2'-phosphate group of NADP(+). But contrary to the conformational rigidity of proline, the conformational flexibility of glutamate may allow NADP(+)-binding in some enzymes by moving the carboxyl group away from the 2'-phosphate group, which is possible if a small neutral residue is located at position 224, and favored if the residue at position 53 interacts with Glu195 in a NADP(+)-compatible conformation. Of the residues found at position 195, only glutamate interacts with the NAD(+)-adenosine ribose; glutamine and histidine cannot since their side-chain points are opposite to the ribose, probably because the absence of the electrostatic attraction by the conserved nearby Lys192, or its electrostatic repulsion, respectively. The shorter side-chains of other residues-aspartate, serine, threonine, alanine, valine, leucine, or isoleucine-are distant from the ribose but leave room for binding the 2'-phosphate group. Generally, enzymes having a residue different from Glu bind NAD(+) with less affinity, but they can also bind NADP(+) even sometimes with higher affinity than NAD(+), as do enzymes containing Thr/Ser/Gln195. Coenzyme preference is a variable feature within many ALDH families, consistent with being mainly dependent on a single residue that apparently has no other structural or functional roles, and therefore can

  14. Prognostic value of preoperative serum lactate dehydrogenase in thymic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zu-Yang; Gao, Shu-Geng; Mu, Ju-Wei; Xue, Qi; Mao, You-Sheng; Wang, Da-Li; Zhao, Jun; Gao, Yu-Shun; Huang, Jin-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background The prognostic value of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) has been demonstrated in various solid tumors. We attempted to determine whether serum LDH was predictive of survival in thymic carcinoma after surgical resection. Methods Ninety-five patients with thymic carcinoma treated in our hospital between January 2005 and December 2015 were retrospectively enrolled. Serum LDH was measured before surgery and categorized as low or high relative to the upper limit of normal (ULN) (225 U/L). The relationships of serum LDH level and other clinical variables with survival were estimated by Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results Serum LDH levels were found to be significantly associated with overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) of these patients. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year PFS were 76%, 51%, and 38%, and the 1-, 3- and 5-year OS were 97%, 75%, and 46%, respectively. Univariate analysis found that high serum LDH (>225 U/L) was associated with both lower OS [hazard ratio (HR) =2.710; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.363–1.5.391; P=0.004] and PFS (HR =3.365; 95% CI: 1.776–6.374; P<0.001). Multivariate analysis found that high serum LDH was associated with lower PFS (HR =2.122; 95% CI: 1.056–4.267; P=0.035). Moreover, high LDH was significantly associated with advanced Masaoka stage (P=0.001). Conclusions High serum LDH (>225 U/L) was an independent predictor of decreased PFS in thymic carcinoma patients. It was also significantly associated with reduced OS, but was not an independent predictor of death in those patients. PMID:27746998

  15. Salivary lactate dehydrogenase and aminotransferases in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Malicka, Barbara; Skoskiewicz-Malinowska, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of metabolic diseases resulting from impaired insulin secretion and/or action. DM is characterized by hyperglycemia that can lead to the dysfunction or damage of organs, including the salivary glands. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of salivary lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in diabetic patients. The study was approved by the Bioethics Committee of Wroclaw Medical University (Poland). The study comprised 90 adults of both sexes, aged 21 to 57 years. The patients were divided into 3 groups: type 1 diabetics (D1), type 2 diabetics (D2), and a healthy control group (C). Each group consisted of 30 age- and sex-matched subjects. Total protein (P, by Lowry method), LDH, AST, ALT (with Alpha Diagnostics kits), and salivary flow rate were measured in unstimulated mixed saliva. The level of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was measured with DCA 2000 Reagent Kit. The obtained data were analyzed using the Mann–Whitney U test and the Spearman rank at a significance level of P < 0.05 with the use of STATISTICA 9.0 software. In comparison with C, D1 presented a significantly higher activity of LDH (P < 0.001), AST (P < 0.001), and ALT (P < 0.01), whereas D2 indicated higher levels of LDH (P < 0.001) and ALT (P < 0.05) compared with C. Comparing D1 to D2, approximately 3-fold higher activity of AST (P < 0.01) and approximately 4.5-fold higher activity of ALT (P < 0.01) was observed. Higher levels of salivary LDH, AST, and ALT in D1 compared with D2 and C confirm that salivary glands of D1 might be attributed to autoimmunological damage associated with the pathomechanism of DM. PMID:27893660

  16. The expression of succinate dehydrogenase in breast phyllodes tumor.

    PubMed

    Choi, Junjeong; Kim, Do Hee; Jung, WooHee; Koo, Ja Seung

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the expression of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)A, SDHB, and HIF-1α in phyllodes tumors and the association with clinic-pathologic factors. Using tissue microarray (TMA) for 206 phyllodes tumor cases, we performed immunohistochemical stains for SDHA, SDHB, and HIF-1α and analyzed their expression in regard to clinicopathologic parameters of each case. The cases were comprised of 156 benign, 34 borderline, and 16 malignant phyllodes tumors. The expression of stromal SDHA and epithelial- and stromal- SDHB increased as the tumor progressed from benign to malignant (P⟨0.001). There were five stromal SDHA-negative cases and 31 stromal SDHB-negative cases. SDHB negativity was associated with a lower histologic grade (P=0.054) and lower stromal atypia (P=0.048). Univariate analysis revealed that a shorter disease free survival (DFS) was associated with stromal SDHB high-positivity (P=0.013) and a shorter overall survival (OS) was associated with high-positivity of stromal SDHA and SDHB (P⟨0.001 and P⟨0.001, respectively). The multivariate Cox analysis with the variables stromal cellularity, stromal atypia, stromal mitosis, stromal overgrowth, tumor margin, stromal SDHA expression, and stromal SDHB expression revealed that stromal overgrowth was associated with a shorter DFS (hazard ratio: 24.78, 95% CI: 3.126-196.5, P=0.002) and a shorter OS (hazard ratio: 176.7, 95% CI: 8.466-3691, P=0.001). In conclusion, Tumor grade is positively correlated with SDHA and SDHB expression in the tumor stroma in phyllodes tumors of the breast. This result may be attributed to the increased metabolic demand in high grade tumors.

  17. Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kramm, Anneke; Kisiela, Michael; Schulz, Rüdiger; Maser, Edmund

    2012-03-01

    The short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) represent a large superfamily of enzymes, most of which are NAD(H)-dependent or NADP(H)-dependent oxidoreductases. They display a wide substrate spectrum, including steroids, alcohols, sugars, aromatic compounds, and xenobiotics. On the basis of characteristic sequence motifs, the SDRs are subdivided into two main (classical and extended) and three smaller (divergent, intermediate, and complex) families. Despite low residue identities in pairwise comparisons, the three-dimensional structure among the SDRs is conserved and shows a typical Rossmann fold. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach to determine whether and which SDRs are present in cyanobacteria, microorganisms that played an important role in our ecosystem as the first oxygen producers. Cyanobacterial SDRs could indeed be identified, and were clustered according to the SDR classification system. Furthermore, because of the early availability of its genome sequence and the easy application of transformation methods, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, one of the most important cyanobacterial strains, was chosen as the model organism for this phylum. Synechocystis sp. SDRs were further analysed with bioinformatics tools, such as hidden Markov models (HMMs). It became evident that several cyanobacterial SDRs show remarkable sequence identities with SDRs in other organisms. These so-called 'homologous' proteins exist in plants, model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis  elegans, and even in humans. As sequence identities of up to 60% were found between Synechocystis and humans, it was concluded that SDRs seemed to have been well conserved during evolution, even after dramatic terrestrial changes such as the conversion of the early reducing atmosphere to an oxidizing one by cyanobacteria.

  18. Dysfunctional TCA-Cycle Metabolism in Glutamate Dehydrogenase Deficient Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Jakob D; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H; Skytt, Dorte M; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytes take up glutamate in the synaptic area subsequent to glutamatergic transmission by the aid of high affinity glutamate transporters. Glutamate is converted to glutamine or metabolized to support intermediary metabolism and energy production. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) catalyze the reversible reaction between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate, which is the initial step for glutamate to enter TCA cycle metabolism. In contrast to GDH, AAT requires a concomitant interconversion of oxaloacetate and aspartate. We have investigated the role of GDH in astrocyte glutamate and glucose metabolism employing siRNA mediated knock down (KD) of GDH in cultured astrocytes using stable and radioactive isotopes for metabolic mapping. An increased level of aspartate was observed upon exposure to [U-(13) C]glutamate in astrocytes exhibiting reduced GDH activity. (13) C Labeling of aspartate and TCA cycle intermediates confirmed that the increased amount of aspartate is associated with elevated TCA cycle flux from α-ketoglutarate to oxaloacetate, i.e. truncated TCA cycle. (13) C Glucose metabolism was elevated in GDH deficient astrocytes as observed by increased de novo synthesis of aspartate via pyruvate carboxylation. In the absence of glucose, lactate production from glutamate via malic enzyme was lower in GDH deficient astrocytes. In conclusions, our studies reveal that metabolism via GDH serves an important anaplerotic role by adding net carbon to the TCA cycle. A reduction in GDH activity seems to cause the astrocytes to up-regulate activity in pathways involved in maintaining the amount of TCA cycle intermediates such as pyruvate carboxylation as well as utilization of alternate substrates such as branched chain amino acids.

  19. Metabolic control analysis of eucaryotic pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex.

    PubMed

    Modak, Jayant; Deckwer, Wolf-Dieter; Zeng, An-Ping

    2002-01-01

    Metabolic control analysis (MCA) of pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme (PDH) complex of eucaryotic cells has been carried out using both in vitro and in vivo mechanistic models. Flux control coefficients (FCC) for the sensitivity of pyruvate decarboxylation rate to activities of various PDH complex reactions are determined. FCCs are shown to be strong functions of both pyruvate levels and various components of PDH complex. With the in vitro model, FCCs are shown to be sensitive to only the E1 component of the PDH complex at low pyruvate concentrations. At high pyruvate concentrations, the control is shared by all of the components, with E1 having a negative influence while the other three components, E2, X, and K, exert a positive control over the pyruvate decarboxylation rate. An unusual behavior of deactivation of the E1 component leading to higher net PDH activity is shown to be linked to the combined effect of protein X acylation and E1 deactivation. The steady-state analysis of the in vivo model reveals multiple steady state behavior of pyruvate metabolism with two stable and one unstable steady-states branches. FCCs also display multiplicity, showing completely different control distribution exerted by pyruvate and PDH components on three branches. At low pyruvate concentrations, pyruvate supply dominates the decarboxylation rate and PDH components do not exert any significant control. Reverse control distribution is observed at high pyruvate concentration. The effect of dilution due to cell growth on pyruvate metabolism is investigated in detail. While pyruvate dilution effects are shown to be negligible under all conditions, significant PDH complex dilution effects are observed under certain conditions. Comparison of in vitro and in vivo models shows that PDH components exert different degrees of control outside and inside the cells. At high pyruvate levels, PDH components are shown to exert a higher degree of control when reactions are taking place inside

  20. Characteristics and crystal structure of bacterial inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.; Evans, G.; Rotella, F. J.; Westbrook, E. M.; Beno, D.; Huberman, E.; Joachimiak, A.; Collart, F. R.

    1999-01-01

    IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is an essential enzyme that catalyzes the first step unique to GTP synthesis. To provide a basis for the evaluation of IMPDH inhibitors as antimicrobial agents, we have expressed and characterized IMPDH from the pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes. Our results show that the biochemical and kinetic characteristics of S. pyogenes IMPDH are similar to other bacterial IMPDH enzymes. However, the lack of sensitivity to mycophenolic acid and the K{sub m} for NAD (1180 {mu}M) exemplify some of the differences between the bacterial and mammalian IMPDH enzymes, making it an attractive target for antimicrobial agents. To evaluate the basis for these differences, we determined the crystal structure of the bacterial enzyme at 1.9 {angstrom} with substrate bound in the catalytic site. The structure was determined using selenomethionine-substituted protein and multiwavelength anomalous (MAD) analysis of data obtained with synchrotron radiation from the undulator beamline (19ID) of the Structural Biology Center at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source. S. pyogenes IMPDH is a tetramer with its four subunits related by a crystallographic 4-fold axis. The protein is composed of two domains: a TIM barrel domain that embodies the catalytic framework and a cystathione {beta}-synthase (CBS) dimer domain of so far unknown function. Using information provided by sequence alignments and the crystal structure, we prepared several site-specific mutants to examine the role of various active site regions in catalysis. These variants implicate the active site flap as an essential catalytic element and indicate there are significant differences in the catalytic environment of bacterial and mammalian IMPDH enzymes. Comparison of the structure of bacterial IMPDH with the known partial structures from eukaryotic organisms will provide an explanation of their distinct properties and contribute to the design of specific bacterial IMPDH inhibitors.

  1. Sequences and expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase genes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Rae, J L; Cutfield, J F; Lamont, I L

    1997-01-01

    A mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, OT2100, which appeared to be defective in the production of the fluorescent yellow-green siderophore pyoverdine had been isolated previously following transposon mutagenesis (T. R. Merriman and I. L. Lamont, Gene 126:17-23, 1993). DNA from either side of the transposon insertion site was cloned, and the sequence was determined. The mutated gene had strong identity with the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (E2) components of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) from other bacterial species. Enzyme assays revealed that the mutant was defective in the E2 subunit of PDH, preventing assembly of a functional complex. PDH activity in OT2100 cell extracts was restored when extract from an E1 mutant was added. On the basis of this evidence, OT2100 was identified as an aceB or E2 mutant. A second gene, aceA, which is likely to encode the E1 component of PDH, was identified upstream from aceB. Transcriptional analysis revealed that aceA and aceB are expressed as a 5-kb polycistronic transcript from a promoter upstream of aceA. An intergenic region of 146 bp was located between aceA and aceB, and a 2-kb aceB transcript that originated from a promoter in the intergenic region was identified. DNA fragments upstream of aceA and aceB were shown to have promoter activities in P. aeruginosa, although only the aceA promoter was active in Escherichia coli. It is likely that the apparent pyoverdine-deficient phenotype of mutant OT2100 is a consequence of acidification of the growth medium due to accumulation of pyruvic acid in the absence of functional PDH. PMID:9171401

  2. Thiosulfate Dehydrogenase (TsdA) from Allochromatium vinosum

    PubMed Central

    Brito, José A.; Denkmann, Kevin; Pereira, Inês A. C.; Archer, Margarida; Dahl, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Although the oxidative condensation of two thiosulfate anions to tetrathionate constitutes a well documented and significant part of the natural sulfur cycle, little is known about the enzymes catalyzing this reaction. In the purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum, the reaction is catalyzed by the periplasmic diheme c-type cytochrome thiosulfate dehydrogenase (TsdA). Here, we report the crystal structure of the “as isolated” form of A. vinosum TsdA to 1.98 Å resolution and those of several redox states of the enzyme to different resolutions. The protein contains two typical class I c-type cytochrome domains wrapped around two hemes axially coordinated by His53/Cys96 and His164/Lys208. These domains are very similar, suggesting a gene duplication event during evolution. A ligand switch from Lys208 to Met209 is observed upon reduction of the enzyme. Cys96 is an essential residue for catalysis, with the specific activity of the enzyme being completely abolished in several TsdA-Cys96 variants. TsdA-K208N, K208G, and M209G variants were catalytically active in thiosulfate oxidation as well as in tetrathionate reduction, pointing to heme 2 as the electron exit point. In this study, we provide spectroscopic and structural evidence that the TsdA reaction cycle involves the transient presence of heme 1 in the high-spin state caused by movement of the Sγ atom of Cys96 out of the iron coordination sphere. Based on the presented data, we draw important conclusions about the enzyme and propose a possible reaction mechanism for TsdA. PMID:25673691

  3. IMP dehydrogenase from Pneumocystis carinii as a potential drug target.

    PubMed Central

    O'Gara, M J; Lee, C H; Weinberg, G A; Nott, J M; Queener, S F

    1997-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid, a specific inhibitor of IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH; EC 1.1.1.205), is a potent inhibitor of Pneumocystis carinii growth in culture, suggesting that IMPDH may be a sensitive target for chemotherapy in this organism. The IMPDH gene was cloned as a first step to characterizing the enzyme and developing selective inhibitors. A 1.3-kb fragment containing a portion of the P. carinii IMPDH gene was amplified by PCR with two degenerate oligonucleotides based on conserved sequences in IMPDH from humans and four different microorganisms. Northern hybridization analysis showed the P. carinii IMPDH mRNA to be approximately 1.6 kb. The entire cDNA encoding P. carinii IMPDH was isolated and cloned. The deduced amino acid sequence of P. carinii IMPDH shared homology with bacterial (31 to 38%), protozoal (48 to 59%), mammalian (60 to 62%), and fungal (62%) IMPDH enzymes. The IMPDH cDNA was expressed by using a T7 expression system in an IMPDH-deficient strain of Escherichia coli (strain S phi 1101). E. coli S phi 1101 cells containing the P. carinii IMPDH gene were able to grow on medium lacking guanine, implying that the protein expressed in vivo was functional. Extracts of these E. coli cells contained IMPDH activity that had an apparent Km for IMP of 21.7 +/- 0.3 microM and an apparent Km for NAD of 314 +/- 84 microM (mean +/- standard error of the mean; n = 3), and the activity was inhibited by mycophenolic acid (50% inhibitory concentration, 24 microM; n = 2). PMID:8980752

  4. Purification and characterization of Plasmodium falciparum succinate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Suraveratum, N; Krungkrai, S R; Leangaramgul, P; Prapunwattana, P; Krungkrai, J

    2000-02-05

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), a Krebs cycle enzyme and complex II of the mitochondrial electron transport system was purified to near homogeneity from the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum cultivated in vitro by FPLC on Mono Q, Mono S and Superose 6 gel filtration columns. The malarial SDH activity was found to be extremely labile. Based on Superose 6 FPLC, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and nondenaturing-PAGE analyses, it was demonstrated that the malarial enzyme had an apparent native molecular mass of 90 +/- 8 kDa and contained two major subunits with molecular masses of 55 +/- 6 and 35 +/- 4 kDa (n = 8). The enzymatic reaction required both succinate and coenzyme Q (CoQ) for its maximal catalysis with Km values of 3 and 0.2 microM, and k(cat) values of 0.11 and 0.06 min(-1), respectively. Catalytic efficiency of the malarial SDH for both substrates were found to be relatively low (approximately 600-5000 M(-1) s(-1)). Fumarate, malonate and oxaloacetate were found to inhibit the malarial enzyme with Ki values of 81, 13 and 12 microM, respectively. The malarial enzyme activity was also inhibited by substrate analog of CoQ, 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 5 microM. The quinone had antimalarial activity against the in vitro growth of P. falciparum with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 0.27 microM and was found to completely inhibit oxygen uptake of the parasite at a concentration of 0.88 microM. A known inhibitor of mammalian mitochondrial SDH, 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone. had no inhibitory effect on both the malarial SDH activity and the oxygen uptake of the parasite at a concentration of 50 microM. Many properties observed in the malarial SDH were found to be different from the host mammalian enzyme.

  5. Lactate dehydrogenase activity is inhibited by methylmalonate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Saad, Laura O; Mirandola, Sandra R; Maciel, Evelise N; Castilho, Roger F

    2006-04-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia (MMAemia) is an inherited metabolic disorder of branched amino acid and odd-chain fatty acid metabolism, involving a defect in the conversion of methylmalonyl-coenzyme A to succinyl-coenzyme A. Systemic and neurological manifestations in this disease are thought to be associated with the accumulation of methylmalonate (MMA) in tissues and biological fluids with consequent impairment of energy metabolism and oxidative stress. In the present work we studied the effect of MMA and two other inhibitors of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex II (malonate and 3-nitropropionate) on the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in tissue homogenates from adult rats. MMA potently inhibited LDH-catalyzed conversion of lactate to pyruvate in liver and brain homogenates as well as in a purified bovine heart LDH preparation. LDH was about one order of magnitude less sensitive to inhibition by MMA when catalyzing the conversion of pyruvate to lactate. Kinetic studies on the inhibition of brain LDH indicated that MMA inhibits this enzyme competitively with lactate as a substrate (K (i)=3.02+/-0.59 mM). Malonate and 3-nitropropionate also strongly inhibited LDH-catalyzed conversion of lactate to pyruvate in brain homogenates, while no inhibition was observed by succinate or propionate, when present in concentrations of up to 25 mM. We propose that inhibition of the lactate/pyruvate conversion by MMA contributes to lactate accumulation in blood, metabolic acidemia and inhibition of gluconeogenesis observed in patients with MMAemia. Moreover, the inhibition of LDH in the central nervous system may also impair the lactate shuttle between astrocytes and neurons, compromising neuronal energy metabolism.

  6. Mechanism of Thermal Adaptation in the Lactate Dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huo-Lei; Egawa, Tsuyoshi; Chang, Eric; Deng, Hua; Callender, Robert

    2015-12-10

    The mechanism of thermal adaptation of enzyme function at the molecular level is poorly understood but is thought to lie within the structure of the protein or its dynamics. Our previous work on pig heart lactate dehydrogenase (phLDH) has determined very high resolution structures of the active site, via isotope edited IR studies, and has characterized its dynamical nature, via laser-induced temperature jump (T-jump) relaxation spectroscopy on the Michaelis complex. These particular probes are quite powerful at getting at the interplay between structure and dynamics in adaptation. Hence, we extend these studies to the psychrophilic protein cgLDH (Champsocephalus gunnari; 0 °C) and the extreme thermophile tmLDH (Thermotoga maritima LDH; 80 °C) for comparison to the mesophile phLDH (38-39 °C). Instead of the native substrate pyruvate, we utilize oxamate as a nonreactive substrate mimic for experimental reasons. Using isotope edited IR spectroscopy, we find small differences in the substate composition that arise from the detailed bonding patterns of oxamate within the active site of the three proteins; however, we find these differences insufficient to explain the mechanism of thermal adaptation. On the other hand, T-jump studies of reduced β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) emission reveal that the most important parameter affecting thermal adaptation appears to be enzyme control of the specific kinetics and dynamics of protein motions that lie along the catalytic pathway. The relaxation rate of the motions scale as cgLDH > phLDH > tmLDH in a way that faithfully matches kcat of the three isozymes.

  7. Energy substrate metabolism in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stenlid, Maria Halldin; Ahlsson, Fredrik; Forslund, Anders; von Döbeln, Ulrika; Gustafsson, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) deficiency is an inherited disorder of carbohydrate metabolism, resulting in lactic acidosis and neurological dysfunction. In order to provide energy for the brain, a ketogenic diet has been tried. Both the disorder and the ketogenic therapy may influence energy production. The aim of the study was to assess hepatic glucose production, lipolysis and resting energy expenditure (REE) in an infant, given a ketogenic diet due to neonatal onset of the disease. Lipolysis and glucose production were determined for two consecutive time periods by constant-rate infusions of [1,1,2,3,3-²H₅]-glycerol and [6,6-²H²]-glucose. The boy had been fasting for 2.5 h at the start of the sampling periods. REE was estimated by indirect calorimetry. Rates of glucose production and lipolysis were increased compared with those of term neonates. REE corresponded to 60% of normal values. Respiratory quotient (RQ) was increased, indicating a predominance of glucose oxidation. Blood lactate was within the normal range. Several mechanisms may underlie the increased rates of glucose production and lipolysis. A ketogenic diet will result in a low insulin secretion and reduced peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity, leading to increased production of glucose and decreased peripheral glucose uptake. Surprisingly, RQ was high, indicating active glucose oxidation, which may reflect a residual enzyme activity, sufficient during rest. Considering this, a strict ketogenic diet might not be the optimal choice for patients with PDH deficiency. We propose an individualised diet for this group of patients aiming at the highest glucose intake that each patient will tolerate without elevated lactate levels.

  8. A ketogenic diet increases succinic dehydrogenase activity in aging cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Balietti, Marta; Fattoretti, Patrizia; Giorgetti, Belinda; Casoli, Tiziana; Di Stefano, Giuseppina; Solazzi, Moreno; Platano, Daniela; Aicardi, Giorgio; Bertoni-Freddari, Carlo

    2009-08-01

    Impairment of energy metabolism and an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production seem to play a major role in age-related apoptotic loss of cardiomyocytes. Succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) is an important marker of the mitochondrial capability to provide an adequate amount of ATP. Moreover, because of its unique redox properties, SDH activity contributes to maintain the reduced state of the ubiquinone pool. Recent reports have shown that ketone body intake improves cardiac metabolic efficiency and exerts a cardioprotective antioxidant action, we therefore performed a cytochemical investigation of SDH activity in cardiomyocytes of late-adult (19-month-old) rats fed for 8 weeks with a medium-chain triglycerides ketogenic diet (MCT-KD). Young, age-matched and old animals fed with a standard chow were used as controls. The overall area of the precipitates (PA) from SDH activity and the area of the SDH-positive mitochondria (MA) were measured. The percent ratios PA/MA and MA/total myocardial tissue area (MA/TA) were the parameters taken into account. We found that PA/MA was significantly higher in young control rats and in MCT-KD-fed rats versus late-adult and old control rats and in young control versus MCT-KD-fed rats. MA/TA of MCT-KD-fed rats was significantly higher versus age-matched and old control rats and tended to be higher versus young control rats; this parameter was significantly higher in young versus old control rats. Thus, MCT-KD intake partially recovers age-related decrease of SDH activity and increases the myocardial area occupied by metabolically active mitochondria. These effects might counteract metabolic alterations leading to apoptosis-induced myocardial atrophy and failure during aging.

  9. Targeting Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Cancer Stem Cells in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landen, Charles N.; Goodman, Blake; Katre, Ashwini A.; Steg, Adam D.; Nick, Alpa M.; Stone, Rebecca L.; Miller, Lance D.; Mejia, Pablo Vivas; Jennings, Nicolas B.; Gershenson, David M.; Bast, Robert C.; Coleman, Robert L.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K.

    2010-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1) expression characterizes a subpopulation of cells with tumor initiating or cancer stem cell properties in several malignancies. Our goal was to characterize the phenotype of ALDH1A1-positive ovarian cancer cells and examine the biological effects of ALDH1A1 gene silencing. In our analysis of multiple ovarian cancer cell lines, we found that ALDH1A1 expression and activity was significantly higher in taxane and platinum-resistant cell lines. In patient samples, 72.9% of ovarian cancers had ALDH1A1 expression, in whom the percent of ALDH1A1-positive cells correlated negatively with progression-free survival (6.05 v 13.81 months, p<0.035). Subpopulations of A2780cp20 cells with ALDH1A1 activity were isolated for orthotopic tumor initiating studies, where tumorigenicity was approximately 50-fold higher with ALDH1A1-positive cells. Interestingly, tumors derived from ALDH1A1-positive cells gave rise to both ALDH1A1-positive and ALDH1A1-negative populations, but ALDH1A1-negative cells could not generate ALDH1A1-positive cells. In an in vivo orthotopic mouse model of ovarian cancer, ALDH1A1 silencing using nanoliposomal siRNA sensitized both taxane- and platinum-resistant cell lines to chemotherapy, significantly reducing tumor growth in mice compared to chemotherapy alone (a 74–90% reduction, p<0.015). These data demonstrate that the ALDH1A1 subpopulation is associated with chemoresistance and outcome in ovarian cancer patients, and targeting ALDH1A1 sensitizes resistant cells to chemotherapy. ALDH1A1-positive cells have enhanced, but not absolute, tumorigenicity, but do have differentiation capacity lacking in ALDH1A1-negative cells. This enzyme may be important for identification and targeting of chemoresistant cell populations in ovarian cancer. PMID:20889728

  10. Biochemical analysis of the modular enzyme inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Nimmesgern, E; Black, J; Futer, O; Fulghum, J R; Chambers, S P; Brummel, C L; Raybuck, S A; Sintchak, M D

    1999-11-01

    Two prominent domains have been identified in the X-ray crystal structure of inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), a core domain consisting of an alpha/beta barrel which contains the active site and an inserted subdomain whose structure is less well defined. The core domain encompassing amino acids 1-108 and 244-514 of wild-type human IMPDH (II) connected by the tetrapeptide linker Ile-Arg-Thr-Gly was expressed. The subdomain including amino acids 99-244 of human wild-type IMPDH (II) was expressed as a His-tagged fusion protein, where the His-tag was removable by enterokinase cleavage. These two proteins as well as wild-type human IMPDH (II), all proteins expressed in Escherichia coli, have been purified to apparent homogeneity. Both the wild-type and core domain proteins are tetrameric and have very similar enzymatic activities. In contrast, the subdomain migrates as a monomer or dimer on a gel filtration column and lacks enzymatic activity. Circular dichroism spectropolarimetry indicates that the core domain retains secondary structure very similar to full-length IMPDH, with 30% alpha-helix and 30% beta-sheet vs 33% alpha-helix and 29% beta-sheet for wild-type protein. Again, the subdomain protein is distinguished from both wild-type and core domain proteins by its content of secondary structure, with only 15% each of alpha-helix and beta-sheet. These studies demonstrate that the core domain of IMPDH expressed separately is both structurally intact and enzymatically active. The availability of the modules of IMPDH will aid in dissecting the architecture of this enzyme of the de novo purine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway, which is an important target for immunosuppressive and antiviral drugs.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) multigene families.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Ju; Tsoi, Stephen C-M; Mannen, Hideyuka; Shoei-lung Li, Steven

    2002-05-01

    In this paper we analyzed 49 lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) sequences, mostly from vertebrates. The amino acid sequence differences were found to be larger for a human-killifish pair than a human-lamprey pair. This indicates that some protein sequence convergence may occur and reduce the sequence differences in distantly related species. We also examined transitions and transversions separately for several species pairs and found that the transitions tend to be saturated in the distantly related species pair, while transversions are increasing. We conclude that transversions maintain a conservative rate through the evolutionary time. Kimura's two-parameter model for multiple-hit correction on transversions only was used to derive a distance measure and then construct a neighbor-joining (NJ) tree. Three findings were revealed from the NJ tree: (i) the branching order of the tree is consistent with the common branch pattern of major vertebrates; (ii) Ldh-A and Ldh-B genes were duplicated near the origin of vertebrates; and (iii) Ldh-C and Ldh-A in mammals were produced by an independent gene duplication in early mammalian history. Furthermore, a relative rate test showed that mammalian Ldh-C evolved more rapidly than mammalian Ldh-A. Under a two-rate model, this duplication event was calibrated to be approximately 247 million years ago (mya), dating back to the Triassic period. Other gene duplication events were also discovered in Xenopus, the first duplication occurring approximately 60-70 mya in both Ldh-A and Ldh-B, followed by another recent gene duplication event, approximately 20 mya, in Ldh-B.

  12. Cloning, characterization, and engineering of fungal L-arabinitol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byoungjin; Sullivan, Ryan P; Zhao, Huimin

    2010-07-01

    L-Arabinitol 4-dehydrogenase (LAD) catalyzes the conversion of L-arabinitol to L-xylulose with concomitant NAD(+) reduction in fungal L-arabinose catabolism. It is an important enzyme in the development of recombinant organisms that convert L: -arabinose to fuels and chemicals. Here, we report the cloning, characterization, and engineering of four fungal LADs from Penicillium chrysogenum, Pichia guilliermondii, Aspergillus niger, and Trichoderma longibrachiatum, respectively. The LAD from P. guilliermondii was inactive, while the other three LADs were NAD(+)-dependent and showed high catalytic activities, with P. chrysogenum LAD being the most active. T. longibrachiatum LAD was the most thermally stable and showed the maximum activity in the temperature range of 55-65 degrees C with the other LADs showed the maximum activity in the temperature range of 40-50 degrees C. These LADs were active from pH 7 to 11 with an optimal pH of 9.4. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to alter the cofactor specificity of these LADs. In a T. longibrachiatum LAD mutant, the cofactor preference toward NADP(+) was increased by 2.5 x 10(4)-fold, whereas the cofactor preference toward NADP(+) of the P. chrysogenum and A. niger LAD mutants was also drastically improved, albeit at the expense of significantly reduced catalytic efficiencies. The wild-type LADs and their mutants with altered cofactor specificity could be used to investigate the functionality of the fungal L-arabinose pathways in the development of recombinant organisms for efficient microbial L-arabinose utilization.

  13. THE HEME BINDING PROPERTIES OF GLYCERALDEHYDE-3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE

    PubMed Central

    Hannibal, Luciana; Collins, Daniel; Brassard, Julie; Chakravarti, Ritu; Vempati, Rajesh; Dorlet, Pierre; Santolini, Jérôme; Dawson, John H.; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2012-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a glycolytic enzyme that also functions in transcriptional regulation, oxidative stress, vesicular trafficking, and apoptosis. Because GAPDH is required for cellular heme insertion into inducible nitric oxide synthase (Chakravarti et al, PNAS 2010, 107(42):18004-9), we extensively characterized the heme binding properties of GAPDH. Substoichiometric amounts of ferric heme bound to GAPDH (1 heme per GAPDH tetramer) to form a low-spin complex with UV-visible maxima at 362, 418 and 537 nm, and when reduced to ferrous gave maxima at 424, 527 and 559 nm. Ferric heme association and dissociation rate constants at 10 °C were kon =17,800 M−1s−1 and koff1 = 7.0 × 10−3 s−1; koff2 = 3.3 × 10−4 s−1 respectively, giving approximate affinities of 19–390 nM. Ferrous heme bound more poorly to GAPDH and dissociated with a koff = 4.2 × 10−3 s−1. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), resonance Raman (rR) and EPR spectroscopic data on the ferric, ferrous, and ferrous-CO complexes of GAPDH showed that the heme is bis-ligated with His as the proximal ligand. The distal ligand in ferric complex was not displaced by CN− or N3− but in ferrous complex was displaceable by CO at a rate of 1.75 s−1 (for [CO]>0.2 mM). Studies with heme analogs revealed selectivity toward the coordinating metal and porphyrin ring structure. GAPDH-heme was isolated from bacteria induced to express rabbit GAPDH in the presence of δ-amino levulinic acid. Our finding of heme binding to GAPDH expands the protein’s potential roles. The strength, selectivity, reversibility, and redox sensitivity of heme binding to GAPDH is consistent with it performing heme sensing or heme chaperone-like functions in cells. PMID:22957700

  14. Alteration in substrate specificity of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase by an acyclic nicotinamide analog of NAD(+).

    PubMed

    Malver, Olaf; Sebastian, Mina J; Oppenheimer, Norman J

    2014-11-01

    A new, acyclic NAD-analog, acycloNAD(+) has been synthesized where the nicotinamide ribosyl moiety has been replaced by the nicotinamide (2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl moiety. The chemical properties of this analog are comparable to those of β-NAD(+) with a redox potential of -324mV and a 341nm λmax for the reduced form. Both yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH) catalyze the reduction of acycloNAD(+) by primary alcohols. With HLADH 1-butanol has the highest Vmax at 49% that of β-NAD(+). The primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect is greater than 3 indicating a significant contribution to the rate limiting step from cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bond. The stereochemistry of the hydride transfer in the oxidation of stereospecifically deuterium labeled n-butanol is identical to that for the reaction with β-NAD(+). In contrast to the activity toward primary alcohols there is no detectable reduction of acycloNAD(+) by secondary alcohols with HLADH although these alcohols serve as competitive inhibitors. The net effect is that acycloNAD(+) has converted horse liver ADH from a broad spectrum alcohol dehydrogenase, capable of utilizing either primary or secondary alcohols, into an exclusively primary alcohol dehydrogenase. This is the first example of an NAD analog that alters the substrate specificity of a dehydrogenase and, like site-directed mutagenesis of proteins, establishes that modifications of the coenzyme distance from the active site can be used to alter enzyme function and substrate specificity. These and other results, including the activity with α-NADH, clearly demonstrate the promiscuity of the binding interactions between dehydrogenases and the riboside phosphate of the nicotinamide moiety, thus greatly expanding the possibilities for the design of analogs and inhibitors of specific dehydrogenases.

  15. The conserved Lysine69 residue plays a catalytic role in Mycobacterium tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The shikimate pathway is an attractive target for the development of antitubercular agents because it is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, but absent in humans. M. tuberculosis aroE-encoded shikimate dehydrogenase catalyzes the forth reaction in the shikimate pathway. Structural and functional studies indicate that Lysine69 may be involved in catalysis and/or substrate binding in M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. Investigation of the kinetic properties of mutant enzymes can bring important insights about the role of amino acid residues for M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. Findings We have performed site-directed mutagenesis, steady-state kinetics, equilibrium binding measurements and molecular modeling for both the wild-type M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase and the K69A mutant enzymes. The apparent steady-state kinetic parameters for the M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase were determined; the catalytic constant value for the wild-type enzyme (50 s-1) is 68-fold larger than that for the mutant K69A (0.73 s-1). There was a modest increase in the Michaelis-Menten constant for DHS (K69A = 76 μM; wild-type = 29 μM) and NADPH (K69A = 30 μM; wild-type = 11 μM). The equilibrium dissociation constants for wild-type and K69A mutant enzymes are 32 (± 4) μM and 134 (± 21), respectively. Conclusion Our results show that the residue Lysine69 plays a catalytic role and is not involved in substrate binding for the M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. These efforts on M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase catalytic mechanism determination should help the rational design of specific inhibitors, aiming at the development of antitubercular drugs. PMID:19917104

  16. Orchestration of enzymatic processing by thiazole/oxazole-modified microcin dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Melby, Joel O; Li, Xiangpo; Mitchell, Douglas A

    2014-01-21

    Thiazole/oxazole-modified microcins (TOMMs) comprise a structurally diverse family of natural products with varied bioactivities linked by the presence of posttranslationally installed thiazol(in)e and oxazol(in)e heterocycles. The detailed investigation of the TOMM biosynthetic enzymes from Bacillus sp. Al Hakam (Balh) has provided significant insight into heterocycle biosynthesis. Thiazoles and oxazoles are installed by the successive action of an ATP-dependent cyclodehydratase (C- and D-protein) and a FMN-dependent dehydrogenase (B-protein), which are responsible for azoline formation and azoline oxidation, respectively. Although several studies have focused on the mechanism of azoline formation, many details regarding the role of the dehydrogenase (B-protein) in overall substrate processing remain unknown. In this work, we evaluated the involvement of the dehydrogenase in determining the order of ring formation as well as the promiscuity of the Balh and microcin B17 cyclodehydratases to accept a panel of noncognate dehydrogenases. In support of the observed promiscuity, a fluorescence polarization assay was utilized to measure binding of the dehydrogenase to the cyclodehydratase using the intrinsic fluorescence of the FMN cofactor. Ultimately, the noncognate dehydrogenases were shown to possess cyclodehydratase-independent activity. A previous study identified a conserved Lys-Tyr motif to be important for dehydrogenase activity. Using the tools developed in this study, the Lys-Tyr motif was shown neither to alter complex formation with the cyclodehydratase nor the reduction potential. Taken together with the known crystal structure of a homologue, our data suggest that the Lys-Tyr motif is of catalytic importance. Overall, this study provides a greater level of insight into the complex orchestration of enzymatic activity during TOMM biosynthesis.

  17. Orchestration of Enzymatic Processing by Thiazole/Oxazole-Modified Microcin Dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Melby, Joel O.; Li, Xiangpo; Mitchell, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Thiazole/oxazole-modified microcins (TOMMs) comprise a structurally diverse family of natural products with varied bioactivities linked by the presence of posttranslationally installed thiazol(in)e and oxazol(in)e heterocycles. The detailed investigation of the TOMM biosynthetic enzymes from Bacillus sp. Al Hakam (Balh) has provided significant insight into heterocycle biosynthesis. Thiazoles and oxazoles are installed by the successive action of an ATP-dependent cyclodehydratase (C- and D-protein) and a FMN-dependent dehydrogenase (B-protein), which are responsible for azoline formation and azoline oxidation, respectively. Although several studies have focused on the mechanism of azoline formation, many details regarding the role of the dehydrogenase (B-protein) in overall substrate processing remain unknown. In this work, we evaluated the involvement of the dehydrogenase in determining the order of ring formation, as well as the promiscuity of the Balh and microcin B17 cyclodehydratases to accept a panel of noncognate dehydrogenases. In support of the observed promiscuity, a fluorescence polarization assay was utilized to measure binding of the dehydrogenase to the cyclodehydratase using the intrinsic fluorescence of the FMN cofactor. Ultimately, the noncognate dehydrogenases were shown to possess cyclodehydratase-independent activity. A previous study identified a conserved Lys-Tyr motif to be important for dehydrogenase activity. Using the tools developed in this study, the Lys-Tyr motif was shown to not alter complex formation with the cyclodehydratase nor the reduction potential. Taken with the known crystal structure of a homolog, our data suggest that the Lys-Tyr motif is of catalytic importance. Overall, this study provides a greater level of insight into the complex orchestration of enzymatic activity during TOMM biosynthesis. PMID:24364559

  18. Production of superoxide/hydrogen peroxide by the mitochondrial 2-oxoadipate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Renata L S; Bunik, Victoria I; Brand, Martin D

    2016-02-01

    In humans, mutations in dehydrogenase E1 and transketolase domain containing 1 (DHTKD1) are associated with neurological abnormalities and accumulation of 2-oxoadipate, 2-aminoadipate, and reactive oxygen species. The protein encoded by DHTKD1 has sequence and structural similarities to 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, and the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex can produce superoxide/H2O2 at high rates. The DHTKD1 enzyme is hypothesized to catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of 2-oxoadipate, a shared intermediate of the degradative pathways for tryptophan, lysine and hydroxylysine. Here, we show that rat skeletal muscle mitochondria can produce superoxide/H2O2 at high rates when given 2-oxoadipate. We identify the putative mitochondrial 2-oxoadipate dehydrogenase complex as one of the sources and characterize the conditions that favor its superoxide/H2O2 production. Rates increased at higher NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratios and were higher at each NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratio when 2-oxoadipate was present, showing that superoxide/H2O2 was produced during the forward reaction from 2-oxoadipate, but not in the reverse reaction from NADH in the absence of 2-oxoadipate. The maximum capacity of the 2-oxoadipate dehydrogenase complex for production of superoxide/H2O2 is comparable to that of site IF of complex I, and seven, four and almost two-fold lower than the capacities of the 2-oxoglutarate, pyruvate and branched-chain 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes, respectively. Regulation by ADP and ATP of H2O2 production driven by 2-oxoadipate was very different from that driven by 2-oxoglutarate, suggesting that site AF of the 2-oxoadipate dehydrogenase complex is a new source of superoxide/H2O2 associated with the NADH isopotential pool in mitochondria.

  19. Tandem orientation of duplicated xanthine dehydrogenase genes from Arabidopsis thaliana: differential gene expression and enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Hesberg, Christine; Hänsch, Robert; Mendel, Ralf R; Bittner, Florian

    2004-04-02

    Xanthine dehydrogenase from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana was analyzed on molecular and biochemical levels. Whereas most other organisms appear to own only one gene for xanthine dehydrogenase A. thaliana possesses two genes in tandem orientation spaced by 704 base pairs. The cDNAs as well as the proteins AtXDH1 and AtXDH2 share an overall identity of 93% and show high homologies to xanthine dehydrogenases from other organisms. Whereas AtXDH2 mRNA is expressed constitutively, alterations of AtXDH1 transcript levels were observed at various stresses like drought, salinity, cold, and natural senescence, but also after abscisic acid treatment. Transcript alteration did not mandatorily result in changes of xanthine dehydrogenase activities. Whereas salt treatment had no effect on xanthine dehydrogenase activities, cold stress caused a decrease, but desiccation and senescence caused a strong increase of activities in leaves. Because AtXDH1 presumably is the more important isoenzyme in A. thaliana it was expressed in Pichia pastoris, purified, and used for biochemical studies. AtXDH1 protein is a homodimer of about 300 kDa consisting of identical subunits of 150 kDa. Like xanthine dehydrogenases from other organisms AtXDH1 uses hypoxanthine and xanthine as main substrates and is strongly inhibited by allopurinol. AtXDH1 could be activated by the purified molybdenum cofactor sulfurase ABA3 that converts inactive desulfo-into active sulfoenzymes. Finally it was found that AtXDH1 is a strict dehydrogenase and not an oxidase, but is able to produce superoxide radicals indicating that besides purine catabolism it might also be involved in response to various stresses that require reactive oxygen species.

  20. Xanthine oxidase and xanthine dehydrogenase from an estivating land snail.

    PubMed

    Hermes-Lima, M; Storey, K B

    1995-01-01

    During arousal from estivation in land snails, Otala lactea, active metabolic functions are restored within minutes and oxygen consumption increases dramatically. During the transition from the hypoxic conditions of estivation to normoxia it is possible that xanthine oxidase (XO) in hepatopancreas contributes to the observed lipid peroxidation. Using a fluorometric assay that is based on the oxidation of pterin, the activities and some properties of XO and XO+XDH (sum of XO and xanthine dehydrogenase activities) were measured in hepatopancreas extracts. Km values for pterin for XO and XO+XDH were 9 and 6 microM, respectively, and the Km of XDH for methylene blue was 5 microM. Both XO+XDH and XO activities were inhibited by allopurinol (I50 = 2 microM), pre-incubation at 40 degrees C, and by 5 min H2O2 pre-exposure. Inclusion of azide in the reaction promoted a rise of approximately 70-fold in the inactivation power of H2O2 due to inhibition of high endogenous catalase activity. The I50 for H2O2 of XO+XDH and XO activities in the presence of azide was 0.04 and 0.11 mM, respectively. Unlike the situation for mammalian XO, a previous reduction of O. lactea XO (by pterin) was not necessary to make the enzyme susceptible to H2O2 effects. Interestingly, methylene blue partially prevented both heat- and H2O2-induced inactivation of XO+XDH activity. These data indicate that the formation of an enzyme-methylene blue complex induces protection against heat and oxidative damage at the FAD-active site. Both XO and XO+XDH activites were significantly higher in snails after 35 days of estivation compared with active snails 24 h after arousal from dormancy. The ratio of XO/(XO+XDH) activities was also slightly increased in estivating O. lactea (from 0.07 to 0.09; P < 0.025). XO activity was 0.03 nmol.min-1.mg protein-1 in estivating snails. Compared with hepatopancreas catalase, XO activity is probably too low to contribute significantly to the net generation of oxyradicals, and

  1. Mechanism of pyruvate dehydrogenase activation by increased cardiac work.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Neely, J R

    1983-06-01

    The effects of increased cardiac work, pyruvate and insulin on the state of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activation and rate of pyruvate decarboxylation was studied in the isolated perfused rat heart. At low levels of cardiac work, 61% of PDH was present in the active form when glucose was the only substrate provided. The actual rate of pyruvate decarboxylation was only 5% of the available capacity calculated from the percent of active PDH. Under this condition, the rate of pyruvate decarboxylation was restricted by the slow rate of pyruvate production from glycolysis. Increasing cardiac work accelerated glycolysis, but production of pyruvate remained rate limiting for pyruvate oxidation and only 40% of the maximal active PDH capacity was used. Addition of insulin along with glucose reduced the percent of active PDH to 16% of the total at low cardiac work. This effect of insulin was associated with increased mitochondria NADH/NAD and acetyl CoA/CoA ratios. With both glucose and insulin the calculated maximum capacity of active PDH was about the same as measured rates of pyruvate oxidation indicating that pyruvate oxidation was limited by the activation state of PDH. In this case, raising the level of cardiac work increased the active PDH to 85% and although pyruvate oxidation was accelerated, measured flux through PDH was only 73% of the maximal activity of active PDH. With pyruvate as added exogenous substrate, PDH was 82% of active at low cardiac work probably due to pyruvate inhibition of PDH kinase. In this case, the measured rate of pyruvate oxidation was 64% of the capacity of active PDH. However, increased cardiac work still caused further activation of PDH to 96% active. Thus, actual rates of pyruvate oxidation in the intact tissue were determined by (1) the supply of pyruvate in hearts receiving glucose alone, (2) by the percent of active PDH in hearts receiving both glucose and insulin at low work and (3) by end-product inhibition in hearts receiving

  2. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Nigerian children.

    PubMed

    Williams, Olatundun; Gbadero, Daniel; Edowhorhu, Grace; Brearley, Ann; Slusher, Tina; Lund, Troy C

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzymopathy and in Sub-Saharan Africa, is a significant cause of infection- and drug-induced hemolysis and neonatal jaundice. Our goals were to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among Nigerian children of different ethnic backgrounds and to identify predictors of G6PD deficiency by analyzing vital signs and hematocrit and by asking screening questions about symptoms of hemolysis. We studied 1,122 children (561 males and 561 females) aged 1 month to 15 years. The mean age was 7.4 ± 3.2 years. Children of Yoruba ethnicity made up the largest group (77.5%) followed by those Igbo descent (10.6%) and those of Igede (10.2%) and Tiv (1.8%) ethnicity. G6PD status was determined using the fluorescent spot method. We found that the overall prevalence of G6PD deficiency was 15.3% (24.1% in males, 6.6% in females). Yoruba children had a higher prevalence (16.9%) than Igede (10.5%), Igbo (10.1%) and Tiv (5.0%) children. The odds of G6PD deficiency were 0.38 times as high in Igbo children compared to Yoruba children (p=0.0500). The odds for Igede and Tiv children were not significantly different from Yoruba children (p=0.7528 and 0.9789 respectively). Mean oxygen saturation, heart rate and hematocrit were not significantly different in G6PD deficient and G6PD sufficient children. The odds of being G6PD deficient were 2.1 times higher in children with scleral icterus than those without (p=0.0351). In conclusion, we determined the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Nigerian sub-populations. The odds of G6PD deficiency were decreased in Igbo children compared to Yoruba children. There was no association between vital parameters or hematocrit and G6PD deficiency. We found that a history of scleral icterus may increase the odds of G6PD deficiency, but we did not exclude other common causes of icterus such as sickle cell disease or malarial infection.

  3. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity from pig kidney cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Pawelczyk, T; Olson, M S

    1992-01-01

    The activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase in the purified PDH complex from pig kidney is sensitive to changes in ionic strength. The enzyme has optimum activity within a small range of ionic strength (0.03-0.05 M). An increase in ionic strength from 0.04 M to 0.2 M lowers the activity of PDH kinase by 32% and decreases the Km for ATP from 25 microM to 10 microM. At constant ionic strength (0.15 M) the enzyme has optimum activity over a broad pH range (7.2-8.0). The PDH kinase is stimulated 2.2-fold by 20 mM-K+, whereas Na+ even at high concentration (80 mM) has no effect on the enzyme activity. The stimulation of PDH kinase by K+ is not dependent on pH and ionic strength. PDH kinase is inhibited by HPO4(2-) in the presence of K+, whereas HPO4(2-) has no effect on the activity of this enzyme in the absence of K+. HPO4(2-) at concentrations of 2 and 10 mM inhibits PDH kinase by 28% and 55% respectively. The magnitude of this inhibition is not dependent on the ATP/ADP ratio. Inhibition by HPO4(2-) in the concentration range 0-10 mM is non-competitive with respect to ATP, and becomes mixed-type at concentrations over 10 mM. The Ki for HPO4(2-) is 10 mM. When HPO4(2-) is replaced by SO4(2-), the same effects on the activity of PDH kinase are observed. PDH kinase is also inhibited by Cl-. In the presence of 80 mM-Cl- the PDH kinase is inhibited by 40%. The inhibition by Cl- is not dependent on K+. In conclusion, we postulate that changes in phosphate concentrations may play a significant role in the regulation of PDH kinase activity in vivo. PMID:1463442

  4. Plasma Lactate Dehydrogenase Levels Predict Mortality in Acute Aortic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Fulvio; Ravetti, Anna; Nazerian, Peiman; Liedl, Giovanni; Veglio, Maria Grazia; Battista, Stefania; Vanni, Simone; Pivetta, Emanuele; Montrucchio, Giuseppe; Mengozzi, Giulio; Rinaldi, Mauro; Moiraghi, Corrado; Lupia, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In acute aortic syndromes (AAS), organ malperfusion represents a key event impacting both on diagnosis and outcome. Increased levels of plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a biomarker of malperfusion, have been reported in AAS, but the performance of LDH for the diagnosis of AAS and the relation of LDH with outcome in AAS have not been evaluated so far. This was a bi-centric prospective diagnostic accuracy study and a cohort outcome study. From 2008 to 2014, patients from 2 Emergency Departments suspected of having AAS underwent LDH assay at presentation. A final diagnosis was obtained by aortic imaging. Patients diagnosed with AAS were followed-up for in-hospital mortality. One thousand five hundred seventy-eight consecutive patients were clinically eligible, and 999 patients were included in the study. The final diagnosis was AAS in 201 (20.1%) patients. Median LDH was 424 U/L (interquartile range [IQR] 367–557) in patients with AAS and 383 U/L (IQR 331–460) in patients with alternative diagnoses (P < 0.001). Using a cutoff of 450 U/L, the sensitivity of LDH for AAS was 44% (95% confidence interval [CI] 37–51) and the specificity was 73% (95% CI 69–76). Overall in-hospital mortality for AAS was 23.8%. Mortality was 32.6% in patients with LDH ≥ 450 U/L and 16.8% in patients with LDH < 450 U/L (P = 0.006). Following stratification according to LDH quartiles, in-hospital mortality was 12% in the first (lowest) quartile, 18.4% in the second quartile, 23.5% in the third quartile, and 38% in the fourth (highest) quartile (P = 0.01). LDH ≥ 450 U/L was further identified as an independent predictor of death in AAS both in univariate and in stepwise logistic regression analyses (odds ratio 2.28, 95% CI 1.11–4.66; P = 0.025), in addition to well-established risk markers such as advanced age and hypotension. Subgroup analysis showed excess mortality in association with LDH ≥ 450 U/L in elderly, hemodynamically stable

  5. Alcoholism and alcohol drinking habits predicted from alcohol dehydrogenase genes.

    PubMed

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Rasmussen, Søren; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Grønbaek, Morten

    2008-06-01

    Alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism are partly genetically determined. Alcohol is degraded primarily by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) wherein genetic variation that affects the rate of alcohol degradation is found in ADH1B and ADH1C. It is biologically plausible that these variations may be associated with alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism. By genotyping 9080 white men and women from the general population, we found that men and women with ADH1B slow vs fast alcohol degradation drank more alcohol and had a higher risk of everyday drinking, heavy drinking, excessive drinking and of alcoholism. For example, the weekly alcohol intake was 9.8 drinks (95% confidence interval (CI): 9.1-11) among men with the ADH1B.1/1 genotype compared to 7.5 drinks (95% CI: 6.4-8.7) among men with the ADH1B.1/2 genotype, and the odds ratio (OR) for heavy drinking was 3.1 (95% CI: 1.7-5.7) among men with the ADH1B.1/1 genotype compared to men with the ADH1B.1/2 genotype. Furthermore, individuals with ADH1C slow vs fast alcohol degradation had a higher risk of heavy and excessive drinking. For example, the OR for heavy drinking was 1.4 (95% CI: 1.1-1.8) among men with the ADH1C.1/2 genotype and 1.4 (95% CI: 1.0-1.9) among men with the ADH1B.2/2 genotype, compared with men with the ADH1C.1/1 genotype. Results for ADH1B and ADH1C genotypes among men and women were similar. Finally, because slow ADH1B alcohol degradation is found in more than 90% of the white population compared to less than 10% of East Asians, the population attributable risk of heavy drinking and alcoholism by ADH1B.1/1 genotype was 67 and 62% among the white population compared with 9 and 24% among the East Asian population.

  6. Isolation and biochemical characterization of a glucose dehydrogenase from a hay infusion metagenome.

    PubMed

    Basner, Alexander; Antranikian, Garabed

    2014-01-01

    Glucose hydrolyzing enzymes are essential to determine blood glucose level. A high-throughput screening approach was established to identify NAD(P)-dependent glucose dehydrogenases for the application in test stripes and the respective blood glucose meters. In the current report a glucose hydrolyzing enzyme, derived from a metagenomic library by expressing recombinant DNA fragments isolated from hay infusion, was characterized. The recombinant clone showing activity on glucose as substrate exhibited an open reading frame of 987 bp encoding for a peptide of 328 amino acids. The isolated enzyme showed typical sequence motifs of short-chain-dehydrogenases using NAD(P) as a co-factor and had a sequence similarity between 33 and 35% to characterized glucose dehydrogenases from different Bacillus species. The identified glucose dehydrogenase gene was expressed in E. coli, purified and subsequently characterized. The enzyme, belonging to the superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases, shows a broad substrate range with a high affinity to glucose, xylose and glucose-6-phosphate. Due to its ability to be strongly associated with its cofactor NAD(P), the enzyme is able to directly transfer electrons from glucose oxidation to external electron acceptors by regenerating the cofactor while being still associated to the protein.

  7. Selective n-butanol production by Clostridium sp. MTButOH1365 during continuous synthesis gas fermentation due to expression of synthetic thiolase, 3-hydroxy butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, crotonase, butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, butyraldehyde dehydrogenase, and NAD-dependent butanol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Berzin, Vel; Tyurin, Michael; Kiriukhin, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Acetogen Clostridum sp. MT1962 produced 287 mM acetate (p < 0.005) and 293 mM ethanol (p < 0.005) fermenting synthesis gas blend 60% CO and 40% H₂ in single-stage continuous fermentation. This strain was metabolically engineered to the biocatalyst Clostridium sp. MTButOH1365. The engineered biocatalyst lost production of ethanol and acetate while initiated the production of 297 mM of n-butanol (p < 0.005). The metabolic engineering comprised Cre-lox66/lox71-based elimination of phosphotransacetylase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase along with integration to chromosome synthetic thiolase, 3-hydroxy butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, crotonase, butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, butyraldehyde dehydrogenase, and NAD-dependent butanol dehydrogenase. This is the first report on elimination of acetate and ethanol production genes and expression of synthetic gene cluster encoding n-butanol biosynthesis pathway in acetogen biocatalyst for selective fuel n-butanol production with no antibiotic support for the introduced genes.

  8. Inactivation of glycerol dehydrogenase of Klebsiella pneumoniae and the role of divalent cations.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E A; Levine, R L; Lin, E C

    1985-01-01

    Anaerobically induced NAD-linked glycerol dehydrogenase of Klebsiella pneumoniae for fermentative glycerol utilization was reported previously to be inactivated in the cell during oxidative metabolism. In vitro inactivation was observed in this study by incubating the purified enzyme in the presence of O2, Fe2+, and ascorbate or dihydroxyfumarate. It appears that O2 and the reducing agent formed H2O2 and that H2O2 reacted with Fe2+ to generate an activated species of oxygen which attacked the enzyme. The in vitro-oxidized enzyme, like the in vivo-inactivated enzyme, showed an increased Km for NAD (but not glycerol) and could no longer be activated by Mn2+ which increased the Vmax of the native enzyme but decreased its apparent affinity for NAD. Ethanol dehydrogenase and 1,3-propanediol oxidoreductase, two enzymes with anaerobic function, also lost activity when the cells were incubated aerobically with glucose. However, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (NADP-linked), isocitrate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase, expected to function both aerobically and anaerobically, were not inactivated. Thus, oxidative modification of proteins in vivo might provide a mechanism for regulating the activities of some anaerobic enzymes. PMID:3900046

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Anaerobic Ethylbenzene Dehydrogenase, a Novel Mo-Fe-S Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Hope A.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2001-01-01

    The first step in anaerobic ethylbenzene mineralization in denitrifying Azoarcus sp. strain EB1 is the oxidation of ethylbenzene to (S)-(−)-1-phenylethanol. Ethylbenzene dehydrogenase, which catalyzes this reaction, is a unique enzyme in that it mediates the stereoselective hydroxylation of an aromatic hydrocarbon in the absence of molecular oxygen. We purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase to apparent homogeneity and showed that the enzyme is a heterotrimer (αβγ) with subunit masses of 100 kDa (α), 35 kDa (β), and 25 kDa (γ). Purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase contains approximately 0.5 mol of molybdenum, 16 mol of iron, and 15 mol of acid-labile sulfur per mol of holoenzyme, as well as a molydopterin cofactor. In addition to ethylbenzene, purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase was found to oxidize 4-fluoro-ethylbenzene and the nonaromatic hydrocarbons 3-methyl-2-pentene and ethylidenecyclohexane. Sequencing of the encoding genes revealed that ebdA encodes the α subunit, a 974-amino-acid polypeptide containing a molybdopterin-binding domain. The ebdB gene encodes the β subunit, a 352-amino-acid polypeptide with several 4Fe-4S binding domains. The ebdC gene encodes the γ subunit, a 214-amino-acid polypeptide that is a potential membrane anchor subunit. Sequence analysis and biochemical data suggest that ethylbenzene dehydrogenase is a novel member of the dimethyl sulfoxide reductase family of molybdopterin-containing enzymes. PMID:11443088

  10. Isolation and Biochemical Characterization of a Glucose Dehydrogenase from a Hay Infusion Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Basner, Alexander; Antranikian, Garabed

    2014-01-01

    Glucose hydrolyzing enzymes are essential to determine blood glucose level. A high-throughput screening approach was established to identify NAD(P)-dependent glucose dehydrogenases for the application in test stripes and the respective blood glucose meters. In the current report a glucose hydrolyzing enzyme, derived from a metagenomic library by expressing recombinant DNA fragments isolated from hay infusion, was characterized. The recombinant clone showing activity on glucose as substrate exhibited an open reading frame of 987 bp encoding for a peptide of 328 amino acids. The isolated enzyme showed typical sequence motifs of short-chain-dehydrogenases using NAD(P) as a co-factor and had a sequence similarity between 33 and 35% to characterized glucose dehydrogenases from different Bacillus species. The identified glucose dehydrogenase gene was expressed in E. coli, purified and subsequently characterized. The enzyme, belonging to the superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases, shows a broad substrate range with a high affinity to glucose, xylose and glucose-6-phosphate. Due to its ability to be strongly associated with its cofactor NAD(P), the enzyme is able to directly transfer electrons from glucose oxidation to external electron acceptors by regenerating the cofactor while being still associated to the protein. PMID:24454935

  11. INFLUENCE OF MODERATE TEMPERATURE ON GROWTH AND MALIC DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY OF A MARINE PSYCHROPHILE.

    PubMed

    MORITA, R Y; BURTON, S D

    1963-11-01

    Morita, Richard Y. (Oregon State University, Corvallis), and Sheril D. Burton. Influence of moderate temperature on growth and malic dehydrogenase activity of a marine psychrophile. J. Bacteriol. 86:1025-1029. 1963.-The maximal and optimal growth temperatures for a marine psychrophilic vibrio (PS 207) were determined to be 30 and 24.5 C, respectively. Malic dehydrogenase was found to be functioning in whole cells at about 1/20 of its observed maximum. Incubation of the cells, prior to or during the assay, at temperatures above the maximal growth temperature permitted the malic dehydrogenase to operate nearer its maximum, but this also inactivated the intracellular enzyme. The heating of whole cells gave an apparent effect of increasing malic dehydrogenase activity. Lysis of the cells permitted the enzyme to function at its full potential but rendered the enzyme more sensitive to heat denaturation. Lysis of the cells also caused the enzyme to lose approximately one-half of its malic dehydrogenase activity with each 10 C drop in temperature, whereas whole cells only lose approximately 1/5 of their enzyme activity at low temperatures with each 10 C drop.

  12. Biochemical Characterization of Putative Adenylate Dimethylallyltransferase and Cytokinin Dehydrogenase from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Frébortová, Jitka; Greplová, Marta; Seidl, Michael F.; Heyl, Alexander; Frébort, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins, a class of phytohormones, are adenine derivatives common to many different organisms. In plants, these play a crucial role as regulators of plant development and the reaction to abiotic and biotic stress. Key enzymes in the cytokinin synthesis and degradation in modern land plants are the isopentyl transferases and the cytokinin dehydrogenases, respectively. Their encoding genes have been probably introduced into the plant lineage during the primary endosymbiosis. To shed light on the evolution of these proteins, the genes homologous to plant adenylate isopentenyl transferase and cytokinin dehydrogenase were amplified from the genomic DNA of cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The putative isopentenyl transferase was shown to be functional in a biochemical assay. In contrast, no enzymatic activity was detected for the putative cytokinin dehydrogenase, even though the principal domains necessary for its function are present. Several mutant variants, in which conserved amino acids in land plant cytokinin dehydrogenases had been restored, were inactive. A combination of experimental data with phylogenetic analysis indicates that adenylate-type isopentenyl transferases might have evolved several times independently. While the Nostoc genome contains a gene coding for protein with characteristics of cytokinin dehydrogenase, the organism is not able to break down cytokinins in the way shown for land plants. PMID:26376297

  13. Inhibition by ethanol, acetaldehyde and trifluoroethanol of reactions catalysed by yeast and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed Central

    Dickenson, C J; Dickinson, F M

    1978-01-01

    1. Produced inhibition by ethanol of the acetaldehyde-NADH reaction, catalysed by the alcohol dehydrogenases from yeast and horse liver, was studied at 25 degrees C and pH 6-9. 2. The results with yeast alcohol dehydrogenase are generally consistent with the preferred-pathway mechanism proposed previously [Dickenson & Dickinson (1975) Biochem. J. 147, 303-311]. The observed hyperbolic inhibition by ethanol of the maximum rate of acetaldehyde reduction confirms the existence of the alternative pathway involving an enzyme-ethanol complex. 3. The maximum rate of acetaldehyde reduction with horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase is also subject to hyperbolic inhibition by ethanol. 4. The measured inhibition constants for ethanol provide some of the information required in the determination of the dissociation constant for ethanol from the active ternary complex. 5. Product inhibition by acetaldehyde of the ethanol-NAD+ reaction with yeast alcohol dehydrogenase was examined briefly. The results are consistent with the proposed mechanism. However, the nature of the inhibition of the maximum rate cannot be determined within the accessible range of experimental conditions. 6. Inhibition of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase by trifluoroethanol was studied at 25 degrees C and pH 6-10. The inhibition was competitive with respect to ethanol in the ethanol-NAD+ reaction. Estimates were made of the dissociation constant for trifluoroethanol from the enzyme-NAD+-trifluoroethanol complex in the range pH6-10. PMID:208509

  14. The role of nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent malate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase in the supply of reduced nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide phosphate for steroidogenesis in the superovulated rat ovary

    PubMed Central

    Flint, A. P. F.; Denton, R. M.

    1970-01-01

    1. Superovulated rat ovary was found to contain high activities of NADP–malate dehydrogenase and NADP–isocitrate dehydrogenase. The activity of each enzyme was approximately four times that of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and equalled or exceeded the activities reported to be present in other mammalian tissues. Fractionation of a whole tissue homogenate of superovulated rat ovary indicated that both enzymes were exclusively cytoplasmic. The tissue was also found to contain pyruvate carboxylase (exclusively mitochondrial), NAD–malate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase (both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic) and ATP–citrate lyase (exclusively cytoplasmic). 2. The kinetic properties of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, NADP–malate dehydrogenase and NADP–isocitrate dehydrogenase were determined and compared with the whole-tissue concentrations of their substrates and NADPH; NADPH is a competitive inhibitor of all three enzymes. The concentrations of glucose 6-phosphate, malate and isocitrate in incubated tissue slices were raised at least tenfold by the addition of glucose to the incubation medium, from the values below to values above the respective Km values of the dehydrogenases. Glucose doubled the tissue concentration of NADPH. 3. Steroidogenesis from acetate is stimulated by glucose in slices of superovulated rat ovary incubated in vitro. It was found that this stimulatory effect of glucose can be mimicked by malate, isocitrate, lactate and pyruvate. 4. It is concluded that NADP–malate dehydrogenase or NADP–isocitrate dehydrogenase or both may play an important role in the formation of NADPH in the superovulated rat ovary. It is suggested that the stimulatory effect of glucose on steroidogenesis from acetate results from an increased rate of NADPH formation through one or both dehydrogenases, brought about by the increases in the concentrations of malate, isocitrate or both. Possible pathways involving the two enzymes are discussed

  15. Malate Dehydrogenases of Pisum sativum: Tissue Distribution and Properties of the Particulate Forms.

    PubMed

    Zschoche, W C; Ting, I P

    1973-06-01

    Mitochondria and leaf microbodies isolated from leaves of pea (Pisum sativum) by sucrose density gradient centrifugation were each shown to have a unique form (isoenzyme) of malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37) based on chromatographic and kinetic properties. Root organelle preparations were shown to contain only a mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase with physical and kinetic properties similar to the leaf form. The absence of a detectable root microbody malate dehydrogenase similar to the leaf enzyme, which is intermediate in electrophoretic and chromatographic properties between the mitochondrial and soluble isoenzymes, was confirmed by diethylaminoethyl cellulose column chromatography and starch-gel electrophoresis of total homogenates from leaf and root tissue. These findings tend to support the role of the leaf microbody isoenzyme in a pathway unique to photosynthetic tissue.

  16. Crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of human pyruvate dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, E.; Korotchkina, L. G.; Hong, Y. S.; Joachimiak, A.; Patel, M. S.

    2001-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) is a component enzyme of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. The enzyme catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvic acid and the rate-limiting reductive acetylation of the lipoyl moiety linked to the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. E1 is an alpha(2)beta(2) tetramer ( approximately 154 kDa). Crystals of this recombinant enzyme have been grown in polyethylene glycol 3350 using a vapor-diffusion method at 295 K. The crystals are characterized as orthorhombic, space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 64.2, b = 126.9, c = 190.2 A. Crystals diffracted to a minimum d spacing of 2.5 A. The asymmetric unit contains one alpha(2)beta(2) tetrameric E1 assembly; self-rotation function analysis showed a pseudo-twofold symmetry relating the two alphabeta dimers.

  17. Expression of Aeromonas caviae ST pyruvate dehydrogenase complex components mediate tellurite resistance in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Miguel E.; Molina, Roberto C.; Diaz, Waldo A.; Pradenas, Gonzalo A.; Vasquez, Claudio C.

    2009-02-27

    Potassium tellurite (K{sub 2}TeO{sub 3}) is harmful to most organisms and specific mechanisms explaining its toxicity are not well known to date. We previously reported that the lpdA gene product of the tellurite-resistant environmental isolate Aeromonas caviae ST is involved in the reduction of tellurite to elemental tellurium. In this work, we show that expression of A. caviae ST aceE, aceF, and lpdA genes, encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase, dihydrolipoamide transacetylase, and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, respectively, results in tellurite resistance and decreased levels of tellurite-induced superoxide in Escherichia coli. In addition to oxidative damage resulting from tellurite exposure, a metabolic disorder would be simultaneously established in which the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex would represent an intracellular tellurite target. These results allow us to widen our vision regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in bacterial tellurite resistance by correlating tellurite toxicity and key enzymes of aerobic metabolism.

  18. Selected dehydrogenases in Yarrowia lipolytica JMY 861: their role in the synthesis of flavor compounds.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Marya; St-Louis, Richard; Husson, Florence; Kermasha, Selim

    2016-09-01

    The presence of selected dehydrogenases, including alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-YL) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-YL), in Yarrowia lipolytica JMY 861, and their potential role in flavor synthesis were investigated. The experimental findings showed that using reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) as cofactor, the ADH-YL activity in vitro was 6-fold higher than that with reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH); however, under the experimental conditions used in this study, an ALDH-YL activity was not detected. The in situ hexanal reduction reaction was found to be instantaneous; however, when the yeast cells suspension was diluted 150 times, the initial relative hexanal concentration was increased by 84.1%. The chromatographic analyses indicated the conversion, in situ, of linoleic acid hydroperoxides (HPODs) into volatile C6-compounds after 60 min of HPODs addition to the yeast cells suspension.

  19. Role of NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase in nitrogen metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, S M; Magasanik, B

    1990-01-01

    We cloned GDH2, the gene that encodes the NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, by purifying the enzyme, making polyclonal antibodies to it, and using the antibodies to screen a lambda gt11 yeast genomic library. A yeast strain with a deletion-disruption allele of GDH2 which replaced the wild-type gene grew very poorly with glutamate as a nitrogen source, but growth improved significantly when the strain was also provided with adenine or other nitrogenous compounds whose biosynthesis requires glutamine. Our results indicate that the NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase catalyzes the major, but not sole, pathway for generation of ammonia from glutamate. We also isolated yeast mutants that lacked glutamate synthase activity and present evidence which shows that normally NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase is not involved in glutamate biosynthesis, but that if the enzyme is overexpressed, it may function reversibly in intact cells. PMID:1975578

  20. Structural Insights into l-Tryptophan Dehydrogenase from a Photoautotrophic Cyanobacterium, Nostoc punctiforme.

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, Taisuke; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Kitamura, Megumi; Hakumai, Yuichi; Fukui, Kenji; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Ashiuchi, Makoto; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2017-01-15

    l-Tryptophan dehydrogenase from Nostoc punctiforme NIES-2108 (NpTrpDH), despite exhibiting high amino acid sequence identity (>30%)/homology (>50%) with NAD(P)(+)-dependent l-Glu/l-Leu/l-Phe/l-Val dehydrogenases, exclusively catalyzes reversible oxidative deamination of l-Trp to 3-indolepyruvate in the presence of NAD(+) Here, we determined the crystal structure of the apo form of NpTrpDH. The structure of the NpTrpDH monomer, which exhibited high similarity to that of l-Glu/l-Leu/l-Phe dehydrogenases, consisted of a substrate-binding domain (domain I, residues 3 to 133 and 328 to 343) and an NAD(+)/NADH-binding domain (domain II, residues 142 to 327) separated by a deep cleft. The apo-NpTrpDH existed in an open conformation, where domains I and II were apart from each other. The subunits dimerized themselves mainly through interactions between amino acid residues around the β-1 strand of each subunit, as was observed in the case of l-Phe dehydrogenase. The binding site for the substrate l-Trp was predicted by a molecular docking simulation and validated by site-directed mutagenesis. Several hydrophobic residues, which were located in the active site of NpTrpDH and possibly interacted with the side chain of the substrate l-Trp, were arranged similarly to that found in l-Leu/l-Phe dehydrogenases but fairly different from that of an l-Glu dehydrogenase. Our crystal structure revealed that Met-40, Ala-69, Ile-74, Ile-110, Leu-288, Ile-289, and Tyr-292 formed a hydrophobic cluster around the active site. The results of the site-directed mutagenesis experiments suggested that the hydrophobic cluster plays critical roles in protein folding, l-Trp recognition, and catalysis. Our results provide critical information for further characterization and engineering of this enzyme.

  1. Increasing Anaerobic Acetate Consumption and Ethanol Yields in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with NADPH-Specific Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Henningsen, Brooks M.; Hon, Shuen; Covalla, Sean F.; Sonu, Carolina; Argyros, D. Aaron; Barrett, Trisha F.; Wiswall, Erin; Froehlich, Allan C.

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has recently been engineered to use acetate, a primary inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as a cosubstrate during anaerobic ethanolic fermentation. However, the original metabolic pathway devised to convert acetate to ethanol uses NADH-specific acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase and quickly becomes constrained by limited NADH availability, even when glycerol formation is abolished. We present alcohol dehydrogenase as a novel target for anaerobic redox engineering of S. cerevisiae. Introduction of an NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (NADPH-ADH) not only reduces the NADH demand of the acetate-to-ethanol pathway but also allows the cell to effectively exchange NADPH for NADH during sugar fermentation. Unlike NADH, NADPH can be freely generated under anoxic conditions, via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. We show that an industrial bioethanol strain engineered with the original pathway (expressing acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis and with deletions of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes GPD1 and GPD2) consumed 1.9 g liter−1 acetate during fermentation of 114 g liter−1 glucose. Combined with a decrease in glycerol production from 4.0 to 0.1 g liter−1, this increased the ethanol yield by 4% over that for the wild type. We provide evidence that acetate consumption in this strain is indeed limited by NADH availability. By introducing an NADPH-ADH from Entamoeba histolytica and with overexpression of ACS2 and ZWF1, we increased acetate consumption to 5.3 g liter−1 and raised the ethanol yield to 7% above the wild-type level. PMID:26386051

  2. Increasing anaerobic acetate consumption and ethanol yields in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Henningsen, Brooks M; Hon, Shuen; Covalla, Sean F; Sonu, Carolina; Argyros, D Aaron; Barrett, Trisha F; Wiswall, Erin; Froehlich, Allan C; Zelle, Rintze M

    2015-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has recently been engineered to use acetate, a primary inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as a cosubstrate during anaerobic ethanolic fermentation. However, the original metabolic pathway devised to convert acetate to ethanol uses NADH-specific acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase and quickly becomes constrained by limited NADH availability, even when glycerol formation is abolished. We present alcohol dehydrogenase as a novel target for anaerobic redox engineering of S. cerevisiae. Introduction of an NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (NADPH-ADH) not only reduces the NADH demand of the acetate-to-ethanol pathway but also allows the cell to effectively exchange NADPH for NADH during sugar fermentation. Unlike NADH, NADPH can be freely generated under anoxic conditions, via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. We show that an industrial bioethanol strain engineered with the original pathway (expressing acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis and with deletions of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes GPD1 and GPD2) consumed 1.9 g liter(-1) acetate during fermentation of 114 g liter(-1) glucose. Combined with a decrease in glycerol production from 4.0 to 0.1 g liter(-1), this increased the ethanol yield by 4% over that for the wild type. We provide evidence that acetate consumption in this strain is indeed limited by NADH availability. By introducing an NADPH-ADH from Entamoeba histolytica and with overexpression of ACS2 and ZWF1, we increased acetate consumption to 5.3 g liter(-1) and raised the ethanol yield to 7% above the wild-type level.

  3. Production of superoxide/H2O2 by dihydroorotate dehydrogenase in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Goncalves, Renata L S; Orr, Adam L; Brand, Martin D

    2014-07-01

    Dehydrogenases that use ubiquinone as an electron acceptor, including complex I of the respiratory chain, complex II, and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, are known to be direct generators of superoxide and/or H2O2. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase oxidizes dihydroorotate to orotate and reduces ubiquinone to ubiquinol during pyrimidine metabolism, but it is unclear whether it produces superoxide and/or H2O2 directly or does so only indirectly from other sites in the electron transport chain. Using mitochondria isolated from rat skeletal muscle we establish that dihydroorotate oxidation leads to superoxide/H2O2 production at a fairly high rate of about 300pmol H2O2·min(-1)·mg protein(-1) when oxidation of ubiquinol is prevented and complex II is uninhibited. This H2O2 production is abolished by brequinar or leflunomide, known inhibitors of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase. Eighty percent of this rate is indirect, originating from site IIF of complex II, because it can be prevented by malonate or atpenin A5, inhibitors of complex II. In the presence of inhibitors of all known sites of superoxide/H2O2 production (rotenone to inhibit sites in complex I (site IQ and, indirectly, site IF), myxothiazol to inhibit site IIIQo in complex III, and malonate plus atpenin A5 to inhibit site IIF in complex II), dihydroorotate dehydrogenase generates superoxide/H2O2, at a small but significant rate (23pmol H2O2·min(-1)·mg protein(-1)), from the ubiquinone-binding site. We conclude that dihydroorotate dehydrogenase can generate superoxide and/or H2O2 directly at low rates and is also capable of indirect production at higher rates from other sites through its ability to reduce the ubiquinone pool.

  4. NAD(+)-linked alcohol dehydrogenase 1 regulates methylglyoxal concentration in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Min-Kyu; Ku, MyungHee; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2014-04-02

    We purified a fraction that showed NAD(+)-linked methylglyoxal dehydrogenase activity, directly catalyzing methylglyoxal oxidation to pyruvate, which was significantly increased in glutathione-depleted Candida albicans. It also showed NADH-linked methylglyoxal-reducing activity. The fraction was identified as a NAD(+)-linked alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1) through mass spectrometric analyses. In ADH1-disruptants of both the wild type and glutathione-depleted cells, the intracellular methylglyoxal concentration increased significantly; defects in growth, differentiation, and virulence were observed; and G2-phase arrest was induced.

  5. Isolated tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase can synthesize acetoin which inhibits pyruvate oxidation as well as other aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Baggetto, L G; Lehninger, A L

    1987-05-29

    Oxidation of 1 mM pyruvate by Ehrlich and AS30-D tumor mitochondria is inhibited by acetoin, an unusual and important metabolite of pyruvate utilization by cancer cells, by acetaldehyde, methylglyoxal and excess pyruvate. The respiratory inhibition is reversed by other substrates added to pyruvate and also by 0.5 mM ATP. Kinetic properties of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from these tumor mitochondria have been studied. This complex appears to be able to synthesize acetoin from acetaldehyde plus pyruvate and is competitively inhibited by acetoin. The role of a new regulatory pattern for tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase is presented.

  6. Methylglyoxal and the polyol pathway. Three-carbon compounds are substrates for sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Lindstad, R I; McKinley-McKee, J S

    1993-09-06

    Methylglyoxal, 1,2-propanediol and glycerol are shown to be substrates for sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase. With 1,2-propanediol the enzyme-catalyzed reaction occurs specifically with the R(-)-enantiomer. The maximum velocities and the specificity constants obtained for the three-carbon substrates are considerably lower than those reported previously for sorbitol, and suggest that rate-determination is imposed by catalytic steps other than the enzyme-coenzyme product dissociation. The present findings are discussed in terms of substrate specificity and stereospecificity, and may indicate novel aspects of sorbitol dehydrogenase function in relation to glucose metabolism and diabetic pathogenesis.

  7. Affinity purifications of aldose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from the xylose-fermenting yeast Pachysolen tannophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Bolen, P.L.; Roth, K.A.; Freer, S.N.

    1986-10-01

    Although xylose is a major product of hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials, few yeasts are able to convert it to ethanol. In Pachysolen tannophilus, one of the few xylose-fermenting yeasts found, aldose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase were found to be key enzymes in the metabolic pathway for xylose fermentation. This paper presents a method for the rapid and simultaneous purification of both aldose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from P. tannophilus. Preliminary studies indicate that this method may be easily adapted to purify similar enzymes from other xylose-fermenting yeasts.

  8. Aromatase, estrone sulfatase, and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase: structure-function studies and inhibitor development.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yanyan; Chen, Shiuan

    2011-07-04

    Aromatase, estrone sulfatase, and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 are involved in the key steps of 17β-estradiol biosynthesis. Structure-function studies of aromatase, estrone sulfatase and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 are important to evaluate the molecular basis of the interaction between these enzymes and their inhibitors. Selective and potent inhibitors of the three enzymes have been developed as antiproliferative agents in hormone-dependent breast carcinoma. New treatment strategies for hormone-dependent breast cancer are discussed.

  9. Thermal stability of chimeric isopropylmalate dehydrogenase genes constructed from a thermophile and a mesophile.

    PubMed

    Numata, K; Muro, M; Akutsu, N; Nosoh, Y; Yamagishi, A; Oshima, T

    1995-01-01

    Chimeric isopropylmalate dehydrogenases were constructed by connecting the genes isolated from an extreme thermophile, Thermus thermophilus, and a mesophile, Bacillus subtilis. These genes were expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzymes were purified and analysed. Enzymes of T.thermophilus and B.subtilis and chimeric enzymes showed similar enzymological characteristics except for thermal stability. The stability of each enzyme was approximately proportional to the content of the amino acid sequence from the T.thermophilus enzyme. The results suggested that amino acid residues contributing the thermal stability distribute themselves, in general, evenly at least in the N-terminal half of the amino acid sequence of T.thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase.

  10. Mechanism of aldehyde oxidation catalyzed by horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Olson, L P; Luo, J; Almarsson, O; Bruice, T C

    1996-07-30

    The mechanism of oxidation of benzaldehyde to benzoic acid catalyzed by horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH) has been investigated using the HLADH structure at 2.1 A resolution with NAD+ and pentafluorobenzyl alcohol in the active site [Ramaswamy et al. (1994) Biochemistry 33,5230-5237]. Constructs for molecular dynamics (MD) investigations with HLADH were obtained by a best-fit superimposition of benzaldehyde or its hydrate on the pentafluorobenzyl alcohol bound to the active site Zn(II)ion. Equilibrium bond lengths, angles, and dihedral parameters for Zn(II) bonding residues His67, Cys46, and Cys174 were obtained from small-molecule X-ray crystal structures and an ab initio-derived parameterization of zinc in HLADH [Ryde, U. (1995) Proteins: Struct., Funct., Genet. 21,40-56]. Dynamic simulations in CHARMM were carried out on the following three constructs to 100 ps: (MD1) enzyme with NAD+, benzaldehyde, and zinc-ligated HO-in the active site; (MD2) enzyme with NAD+ and hydrated benzaldehyde monoanion bound to zinc via the pro-R oxygen, with a proton residing on the pro-S oxygen; and (MD3) enzyme with NAD+ and hydrated benzaldehyde monoanion bound to zinc via the pro-S oxygen, with a proton residing on the pro-R oxygen. Analyses were done of 800 sample conformations taken in the last 40 ps of dynamics. Structures from MD1 and MD3 were used to define the initial spatial arrangements of reactive functionalities for semiempirical PM3 calculations. Using PM3, model systems were calculated of ground states and some transition states for aldehyde hydration, hydride transfer, and subsequent proton shuttling. With benzaldehyde and zinc-bound hydroxide ion in the active site, the oxygen of Zn(II)-OH resided at a distance of 2.8-5.5 A from the aldehyde carbonyl carbon during the dynamics simulation. This may be compared to the PM3 transition state for attack of the Zn(II)-OH oxygen on the benzaldehyde carbonyl carbon, which has an O...C distance of 1.877 A. HLADH

  11. Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9 (ACAD 9) is the long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase in human embryonic and fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Oey, N A; Ruiter, J P N; Ijlst, L; Attie-Bitach, T; Vekemans, M; Wanders, R J A; Wijburg, F A

    2006-07-21

    We recently reported the expression and activity of several fatty acid oxidation enzymes in human embryonic and fetal tissues including brain and spinal cord. Liver and heart showed expression of both very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) mRNA. However, while mRNA expression of LCHAD could be clearly detected in the retina and spinal cord, expression of VLCAD mRNA was low to undetectable in these tissues. Nevertheless, abundant acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) activity was detected with palmitoyl-CoA as substrate in fetal central nervous tissue. These conflicting data suggested the presence of a different long-chain ACAD in human embryonic and fetal brain. In this study, using in situ hybridization as well as enzymatic studies, we identified acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9 (ACAD 9) as the long-chain ACAD in human embryonic and fetal central nervous tissue. Until now, no clinical signs and symptoms of central nervous system involvement have been reported in VLCAD deficiency. A novel long-chain FAO defect, i.e., ACAD 9 deficiency with only central nervous system involvement, could, if not lethal during intra uterine development, easily escape proper diagnosis, since probably no classical signs and symptoms of FAO deficiency will be observed. Screening for ACAD 9 deficiency in patients with undefined neurological symptoms and/or impairment in neurological development of unknown origin is necessary to establish if ACAD 9 deficiency exists as a separate disease entity.

  12. The diagnostic value of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) measurement in the sera of patients with brain tumor

    PubMed Central

    Laniewska-Dunaj, Magdalena; Orywal, Karolina; Kochanowicz, Jan; Rutkowski, Robert; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) exist in the brain. Alcohol dehydrogenase and ALDH are also present in brain tumor cells. Moreover, the activity of class I isoenzymes was significantly higher in cancer than healthy brain cells. The activity of these enzymes in tumor tissue is reflected in the serum and could thus be helpful for diagnostics of brain neoplasms. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of ADH and ALDH as markers for brain tumors. Material and methods Serum samples were taken for routine biochemical investigation from 115 patients suffering from brain tumors (65 glioblastomas, 50 meningiomas). For the measurement of the activity of class I and II ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activity, fluorometric methods were used. The total ADH activity and activity of class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by the photometric method. Results There was a significant increase in the activity of ADH I isoenzyme and ADH total in the sera of brain tumor patients compared to the controls. The diagnostic sensitivity for ADH I was 78%, specificity 85%, and positive and negative predictive values were 86% and 76% respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of ADH I increased with the stage of the carcinoma. Area under receiver-operating characteristic curve for ADH I was 0.71. Conclusions The results suggest a potential role for ADH I as a marker for brain tumor. PMID:28261287

  13. Enhancement of the activity of enzyme immobilized on polydopamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles by rational orientation of formate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Ni, Kefeng; Zhao, Chengcheng; Ren, Yuhong; Wei, Dongzhi

    2014-10-20

    Immobilization of enzymes onto nanoparticles and retention of their structure and activity, which may be related to the orientation of enzymes on nanoparticles, remain a challenge. Here, we developed a novel enzyme-orientation strategy to enhance the activity of formate dehydrogenase immobilized on polydopamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles via site-directed mutation. Seven mutants were constructed based on homology modeling of formate dehydrogenase and immobilized on polydopamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles to investigate the influence of these mutations on immobilization. The immobilized mutant C242A/C275V/C363V/K389C demonstrated the highest immobilization yield and retained 90% of its initial activity, which was about 3-fold higher than that of wild-type formate dehydrogenase. Moreover, co-immobilization of formate dehydrogenase and leucine dehydrogenase was performed for the synthesis of l-tert-leucine. The catalytic efficiency of the co-immobilized mutant C242A/C275V/C363V/K389C and leucine dehydrogenase increased by more than 4-fold compared to that of co-immobilized wild-type formate dehydrogenase and leucine dehydrogenase.

  14. A rapid procedure for the in situ assay of periplasmic, PQQ-dependent methanol dehydrogenase in intact single bacterial colonies.

    PubMed

    Vemuluri, Venkata Ramana; Shaw, Shreya; Autenrieth, Caroline; Ghosh, Robin

    2017-03-23

    Mechanistic details of methanol oxidation catalyzed by the periplasmically-located pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent methanol dehydrogenase of methylotrophs can be elucidated using site-directed mutants. Here, we present an in situ colony assay of methanol dehydrogenase, which allows robotic screening of large populations of intact small colonies, and regrowth of colonies for subsequent analysis.

  15. Analysis of Quaternary Structure of a [LDH-like] Malate Dehydrogenase of Plasmodium falciparum with Oligomeric Mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    L-Malate dehydrogenase (PfMDH) from Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent for the most severe form of malaria, has shown remarkable similarities to L-lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH). PfMDH is more closely related to [LDH-like] MDHs characterized in archea and other prokaryotes. Initial sequence a...

  16. Structure and Function of Plasmodium falciparum malate dehydrogenase: Role of Critical Amino Acids in C-substrate Binding Procket

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malaria parasite thrives on anaerobic fermentation of glucose for energy. Earlier studies from our lab have demonstrated that a cytosolic malate dehydrogenase (PfMDH) with striking similarity to lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) might complement PfLDH function in Plasmodium falciparum. The N-terminal g...

  17. Physiological Function of Alcohol Dehydrogenases and Long-Chain (C30) Fatty Acids in Alcohol Tolerance of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, D. S.; Jung, S.-H.; Shen, G.-J.; Hollingsworth, R. I.; Zeikus, J. G.

    2002-01-01

    A mutant strain (39E H8) of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus that displayed high (8% [vol/vol]) ethanol tolerance for growth was developed and characterized in comparison to the wild-type strain (39E), which lacks alcohol tolerance (<1.5% [vol/vol]). The mutant strain, unlike the wild type, lacked primary alcohol dehydrogenase and was able to increase the percentage of transmembrane fatty acids (i.e., long-chain C30 fatty acids) in response to increasing levels of ethanol. The data support the hypothesis that primary alcohol dehydrogenase functions primarily in ethanol consumption, whereas secondary alcohol dehydrogenase functions in ethanol production. These results suggest that improved thermophilic ethanol fermentations at high alcohol levels can be developed by altering both cell membrane composition (e.g., increasing transmembrane fatty acids) and the metabolic machinery (e.g., altering primary alcohol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase activities). PMID:11916712

  18. Membrane-bound sugar alcohol dehydrogenase in acetic acid bacteria catalyzes L-ribulose formation and NAD-dependent ribitol dehydrogenase is independent of the oxidative fermentation.

    PubMed

    Adachi, O; Fujii, Y; Ano, Y; Moonmangmee, D; Toyama, H; Shinagawa, E; Theeragool, G; Lotong, N; Matsushita, K

    2001-01-01

    To identify the enzyme responsible for pentitol oxidation by acetic acid bacteria, two different ribitol oxidizing enzymes, one in the cytosolic fraction of NAD(P)-dependent and the other in the membrane fraction of NAD(P)-independent enzymes, were examined with respect to oxidative fermentation. The cytoplasmic NAD-dependent ribitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.56) was crystallized from Gluconobacter suboxydans IFO 12528 and found to be an enzyme having 100 kDa of molecular mass and 5 s as the sedimentation constant, composed of four identical subunits of 25 kDa. The enzyme catalyzed a shuttle reversible oxidoreduction between ribitol and D-ribulose in the presence of NAD and NADH, respectively. Xylitol and L-arabitol were well oxidized by the enzyme with reaction rates comparable to ribitol oxidation. D-Ribulose, L-ribulose, and L-xylulose were well reduced by the enzyme in the presence of NADH as cosubstrates. The optimum pH of pentitol oxidation was found at alkaline pH such as 9.5-10.5 and ketopentose reduction was found at pH 6.0. NAD-Dependent ribitol dehydrogenase seemed to be specific to oxidoreduction between pentitols and ketopentoses and D-sorbitol and D-mannitol were not oxidized by this enzyme. However, no D-ribulose accumulation was observed outside the cells during the growth of the organism on ribitol. L-Ribulose was accumulated in the culture medium instead, as the direct oxidation product catalyzed by a membrane-bound NAD(P)-independent ribitol dehydrogenase. Thus, the physiological role of NAD-dependent ribitol dehydrogenase was accounted to catalyze ribitol oxidation to D-ribulose in cytoplasm, taking D-ribulose to the pentose phosphate pathway after being phosphorylated. L-Ribulose outside the cells would be incorporated into the cytoplasm in several ways when need for carbon and energy sources made it necessary to use L-ribulose for their survival. From a series of simple experiments, membrane-bound sugar alcohol dehydrogenase was concluded to be

  19. Effects of a 3β-hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Inhibitor, Trilostane, on the Fathead Minnow Reproductive Axis

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of environmental contaminants and plant flavonoid compounds have been shown to inhibit the activity of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ5-Δ4 isomerase (3β-HSD). Because 3β-HSD plays a critical role in steroid hormone synthesis, inhibition of 3β-HSD represents a potentia...

  20. Inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of human malignant cells by methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Ray, M; Basu, N; Ray, S

    1997-12-01

    The effect of methylglyoxal on the activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GA3PD) of several normal human tissues and benign and malignant tumors has been tested. Methylglyoxal inactivated GA3PD of all the malignant cells (47 samples) and the degree of inactivation was in the range of 25-90%, but it had no inhibitory effect on this enzyme from several normal cells (24 samples) and benign tumors (13 samples). When the effect of methylglyoxal on other two dehydrogenases namely glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and L-lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) of similar cells was tested as controls it has been observed that methylglyoxal has some inactivating effect on G6PD of all the normal, benign and malignant samples tested, whereas, LDH remained completely unaffected. These studies indicate that the inactivating effect of methylglyoxal on GA3PD specifically of the malignant cells may be a common feature of all the malignant cells, and this phenomenon can be used as a simple and rapid device for the detection of malignancy.

  1. PTEN Regulates Glutamine Flux to Pyrimidine Synthesis and Sensitivity to Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Deepti; Stratikopoulos, Elias; Ozturk, Sait; Steinbach, Nicole; Pegno, Sarah; Schoenfeld, Sarah; Yong, Raymund; Murty, Vundavalli V; Asara, John M; Cantley, Lewis C; Parsons, Ramon

    2017-04-01

    Metabolic changes induced by oncogenic drivers of cancer contribute to tumor growth and are attractive targets for cancer treatment. Here, we found that increased growth of PTEN-mutant cells was dependent on glutamine flux through the de novo pyrimidine synthesis pathway, which created sensitivity to the inhibition of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, a rate-limiting enzyme for pyrimidine ring synthesis. S-phase PTEN-mutant cells showed increased numbers of replication forks, and inhibitors of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase led to chromosome breaks and cell death due to inadequate ATR activation and DNA damage at replication forks. Our findings indicate that enhanced glutamine flux generates vulnerability to dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibition, which then causes synthetic lethality in PTEN-deficient cells due to inherent defects in ATR activation. Inhibition of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase could thus be a promising therapy for patients with PTEN-mutant cancers.Significance: We have found a prospective targeted therapy for PTEN-deficient tumors, with efficacy in vitro and in vivo in tumors derived from different tissues. This is based upon the changes in glutamine metabolism, DNA replication, and DNA damage response which are consequences of inactivation of PTENCancer Discov; 7(4); 380-90. ©2017 AACR.See related article by Brown et al., p. 391This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 339.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency is a condition that prevents the body from converting certain fats into energy, especially during periods without food (fasting). Signs and symptoms of SCAD deficiency may ...

  3. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and sulfadimidin acetylation phenotypes in Egyptian oases.

    PubMed

    Hussein, L; Yamamah, G; Saleh, A

    1992-04-01

    Screening of 1315 males from two Egyptian oases for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G-6PD) found an incidence of 5.9%. The rate of acetylation of sulfadimidin was also studied, and a bimodal distribution was found with 73% rapid acetylators. There is a correlation between high frequency of G-6PD deficiency and high frequency of slow acetylation rate.

  4. Increasing the Heme-Dependent Respiratory Efficiency of Lactococcus lactis by Inhibition of Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Arioli, Stefania; Zambelli, Daniele; Guglielmetti, Simone; De Noni, Ivano; Pedersen, Martin B.; Pedersen, Per Dedenroth; Dal Bello, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of heme-induced respiration in Lactococcus lactis has radically improved the industrial processes used for the biomass production of this species. Here, we show that inhibition of the lactate dehydrogenase activity of L. lactis during growth under respiration-permissive conditions can stimulate aerobic respiration, thereby increasing not only growth efficiency but also the robustness of this organism. PMID:23064338

  5. Functional characterization of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase in Brachypodium distachyon.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignin is a significant recalcitrant in the conversion of plant biomass to bioethanol. Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) catalyze key steps in the pathway of lignin monomer biosynthesis. Brown midrib mutants in Zea mays and Sorghum bicolor with impaired...

  6. Electrophoretic variation in muscle lactate dehydrogenase in Snake Valley cutthroat trout, Salmo clarki subsp.

    PubMed

    Klar, G T; Stalnaker, C B

    1979-01-01

    1. Electrophoretic variation observed in muscle A group lactate dehydrogenase in Snake Valley cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki subsp.) suggested the presence of two variant alleles at the A1 locus and a null allele at the A2 locus. 2. The taxonomic status of the Snake Valley cutthroat trout was reviewed.

  7. Reversible inactivation of the isocitrate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli ML308 during growth on acetate.

    PubMed

    Bennett, P M; Holms, W H

    1975-03-01

    During aerobic growth of Escherichia coli ML308 on acetate as sole carbon source, the apparent synthesis of isocitrate dehydrogenase was repressed relative to cultures on other carbon sources, such as glucose, which do not employ the glyoxylate bypass as an anaplerotic sequence. When cells were removed from an acetate medium, or when compounds were added which made the operation of the glyoxylate bypass unnecessary, the activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase rapidly increased 3- to 4-fold but fell again on restoration to an acetate medium. Changes in activity were rapid and, furthermore, could be demonstrated in the absence of protein synthesis. It is thus improbable that the mechanism involved degradation or de novo synthesis of the enzyme protein. Oxaloacetate and glyoxylate showed concerted inhibition of isocitrate dehydrogenase which could be relieved by dialysis. Because extracts of low enzyme activity, derived from acetate-metabolizing cells, could not be stimulated by dialysis or by addition of a wide range of metabolites, it is unlikely that low molecular weight, freely dissociable effectors were responsible for stimulation or inhibition of activity. Control of isocitrate dehydrogenase permitted the efficient utilization of acetate as sole source of carbon and energy but perserved the capacity of the cell to respond rapidly to an improvement in nutritional conditions. A limited survey showed that the mechanism is common but not universal among strains of E. coli and occurs in at least one strain each of Klebsiella aerogenes, Salmonella typhimurium and Serratia marcescens.

  8. Often Ignored Facts about the Control of the 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strumilo, Slawomir

    2005-01-01

    Information about the control of the activity of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC), a key enzyme in the citric acid cycle, is not well covered in the biochemical education literature, especially as it concerns the allosteric regulation of OGDHC by adenine nucleotide and ortophosphate. From experimental work published during the last…

  9. Alcohol dehydrogenase, SDR and MDR structural stages, present update and altered era.

    PubMed

    Jörnvall, Hans; Landreh, Michael; Östberg, Linus J

    2015-06-05

    It is now about half a century since molecular research on alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) and medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (MDR) started. During this time, at least four stages of research can be distinguished, which led to many ADH, SDR and MDR structures from which their origins could be traced. An introductory summary of these stages is given, followed by a current update on the now known structures, including the present pattern of mammalian MDR-ADH enzymes into six classes and their evolutionary relationships. In spite of the wide spread in evolutionary changes from the "constant" class III to the more "variable" other classes, the change in class V (only confirmed as a transcript in humans) and class VI (absent in humans) are also restricted. Such spread in variability is visible also in other dehydrogenases, but not always so restricted in other co-evolving proteins we have studied. Finally, the shift in era of present ADH research is highlighted, as well as levels of likely future continuation.

  10. [Isolation and fermentation conditions of strains producing 1-phenyl-2-amino-ethanol alcohol dehydrogenase].

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Wang, J; Yang, L; Wu, J; Sun, W

    2001-10-01

    A Arachnia sp. P163 producing alcohol dehydrogenase which is able to reduce aminoacetophenone to R-1-phenyl-2-aminoethanol was obtained from soil and cultures. The maximum activity of enzyme was produced by the LB medium containing 1% sodium citrate and peptone, 0.1% phenylaminoethanol as inducer at 30 degrees C for 48 hs.

  11. Threonine-Insensitive Homoserine Dehydrogenase From Soybean: Genomic Organization, Kinetic Mechanism, and In vivo Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspartate kinase (AK) and homoserine dehydrogenase (HSD) functions as key regulatory enzymes at branch points in the aspartate amino acid pathway and are feedback inhibited by threonine. In plants, the biochemical properties of AK and bifunctional AK-HSD enzymes have been characterized, but the mol...

  12. Interaction of the membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase with substrate and competitive inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kotlyar, A B; Vinogradov, A D

    1984-01-18

    The protective effect of dicarboxylates on the active-site-directed inhibition of the membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase by N-ethylmaleimide, steady-state kinetics methods for Ki and Ks determinations, and equilibrium studies were employed to quantitate the relative affinities of succinate, fumarate, malonate and oxaloacetate to the reduced and oxidized species of the enzyme. A more than 10-fold difference in the relative affinities of the reduced and oxidized succinate dehydrogenase to succinate, fumarate and oxaloacetate is found, whereas the reactivity of the active-site sulphydryl group does not depend on the redox state of the enzyme. The redox-state-dependent changes in the affinity of the membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase to oxaloacetate can be quantitatively accounted for by a 10-fold increase in the rate of dissociation of the enzyme-inhibitor complex which occurs upon reduction of the enzyme. The data obtained give no support for either the existence of a sulphydryl group other than the active-site one important for the catalysis or for the presence of a separate dicarboxylate-specific regulatory site in the succinate dehydrogenase molecule.

  13. Modification of Rhizopus lactate dehydrogenase for improved resistance to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizopus oryzae is frequently used for fermentative production of lactic acid. We determined that one of the key enzymes, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), involved in synthesis of lactic acid by R. oryzae was significantly inhibited by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) at physiological concentrations. Thi...

  14. Relationship of lactate dehydrogenase activity with body measeurements of Angus x Charolais cows and calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Angus x Charolais cows (n = 87) and their Angus-sired, spring-born calves (n = 86) were utilized to examine relationships between lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and body measurements of beef cows; and the relationship between maternal LDH activity in late gestation and subsequent calf birth we...

  15. The Alcohol Dehydrogenase Kinetics Laboratory: Enhanced Data Analysis and Student-Designed Mini-Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, Todd P.

    2016-01-01

    A highly instructive, wide-ranging laboratory project in which students study the effects of various parameters on the enzymatic activity of alcohol dehydrogenase has been adapted for the upper-division biochemistry and physical biochemistry laboratory. Our two main goals were to provide enhanced data analysis, featuring nonlinear regression, and…

  16. Biochemical characterization of uronate dehydrogenases from three Pseudomonads, Chromohalobacter salixigens, and Polaromonas naphthalenivorans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enzyme catalysts will be vital in the development of synthetic biology approaches for converting pectinic monosaccharides from citrus and beet processing waste streams to value-added materials. We describe here the biophysical and mechanistic characterization of uronate dehydrogenases from a wide va...

  17. Characterization of uronate dehydrogenases catalysing the initial step in an oxidative pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pick, André; Schmid, Jochen; Sieber, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Uronate dehydrogenases catalyse the oxidation of uronic acids to aldaric acids, which represent ‘top value-added chemicals’ that have the potential to substitute petroleum-derived chemicals. The identification and annotation of three uronate dehydrogenases derived from Fulvimarina pelagi HTCC2506, Streptomyces viridochromogenes DSM 40736 and Oceanicola granulosus DSM 15982 via sequence analysis is described. Characterization and comparison with two known uronate dehydrogenases in regard to substrate spectrum, catalytic activity and pH as well as temperature dependence was performed. The catalytic efficiency was investigated in two different buffer systems; potassium phosphate and Tris-HCl. In addition to the typical and well available substrates glucuronate and galacturonate also mannuronate as part of many structural polysaccharides were tested. The uronate dehydrogenase of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Pseudomonas syringae showed catalytic dependency on the buffer system resulting in an increased Km especially for glucuronate in potassium phosphate compared with Tris-HCl buffer. Enzyme stability at 37°C of the different Udhs was in the order: P. syringae < S. viridochromogens < A. tumefaciens < F. pelagi < O. granulosus. All enzymes showed activity within a broad pH range from 7.0 to 9.5, only O. granulosus had a very narrow range around 7.0. PMID:25884328

  18. Purification and in vitro complementation of mutant histidinol dehydrogenases. [Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Grubmeyer, C.T.

    1987-09-01

    The biochemistry of interallelic complementation within the Salmonella typhimurium hisD gene was investigated by in vitro protein complementation of mutant histidinol dehydrogenases (EC 1.1.1.23). Double-mutant strains were constructed containing the his01242 (constitutive overproducer) attenuator mutations and selected hisDa or hisDb mutations. Extracts from such hisDa986 and hisDb1799 mutant cells failed to show histidinol dehydrogenase activity but complemented to produce active enzyme. Inactive mutant histidinol dehydrogenases were purified from each of the two mutants by ion-exchange chromatography. Complementation by the purified mutant proteins required the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol and MnCl/sub 2/, and protein-protein titrations indicated that heterodimers were strongly preferred in mixtures of the complementary mutant enzymes. Both purified mutant proteins failed to catalyze NAD-NADH exchange reactions reflective of the first catalytic step of the two-step reaction. The inactive enzymes bound /sup 54/Mn/sup 2 +/ weakly or not at all in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol, in contrast to wild-type enzyme which bound /sup 54/Mn/sup 2 +/ to 0.6 sites per monomer under the same conditions. The mutant proteins, like wild-type histidinol dehydrogenase, behaved as dimers on analytical gel filtration chromatography, but dissociated to form monomers in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. This effect of 20-mercaptoethanol was prevented by low levels of MnCl/sub 2/.

  19. Expression of Cellobiose Dehydrogenase from Neurospora crassa in Pichia pastoris and its purification and characterization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A gene encoding cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) from Neurospora crassa strain FGSC 2489 has been cloned and expressed in the heterologous host Pichia pastoris, under the control of the AOX1 methanol inducible promoter. Recombinant CDH without the native signal sequence and fused with a his6-tag (rNC-...

  20. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-derived NADPH fuels superoxide production in the failing heart

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the failing heart, NADPH oxidase and uncoupled NO synthase utilize cytosolic NADPH to form superoxide. NADPH is supplied principally by the pentose phosphate pathway, whose rate-limiting enzyme is glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Therefore, we hypothesized that cardiac G6PD activation dr...

  1. Determination of the Subunit Molecular Mass and Composition of Alcohol Dehydrogenase by SDS-PAGE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Barbara T.

    2007-01-01

    SDS-PAGE is a simple, rapid technique that has many uses in biochemistry and is readily adaptable to the undergraduate laboratory. It is, however, a technique prone to several types of procedural pitfalls. This article describes the use of SDS-PAGE to determine the subunit molecular mass and composition of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase employing…

  2. Role of Alanine Dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Recovery from Hypoxic Nonreplicating Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Giffin, Michelle M.; Shi, Lanbo; Gennaro, Maria L.; Sohaskey, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can maintain a nonreplicating persistent state in the host for decades, but must maintain the ability to efficiently reactivate and produce active disease to survive and spread in a population. Among the enzymes expressed during this dormancy is alanine dehydrogenase, which converts pyruvate to alanine, and glyoxylate to glycine concurrent with the oxidation of NADH to NAD. It is involved in the metabolic remodeling of M. tuberculosis through its possible interactions with both the glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycle. Both mRNA levels and enzymatic activities of isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, and alanine dehydrogenase increased during entry into nonreplicating persistence, while the gene and activity for the second enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, malate synthase were not. This could suggest a shift in carbon flow away from the glyoxylate cycle and instead through alanine dehydrogenase. Expression of ald was also induced in vitro by other persistence-inducing stresses such as nitric oxide, and was expressed at high levels in vivo during the initial lung infection in mice. Enzyme activity was maintained during extended hypoxia even after transcription levels decreased. An ald knockout mutant of M. tuberculosis showed no reduction in anaerobic survival in vitro, but resulted in a significant lag in the resumption of growth after reoxygenation. During reactivation the ald mutant had an altered NADH/NAD ratio, and alanine dehydrogenase is proposed to maintain the optimal NADH/NAD ratio during anaerobiosis in preparation of eventual regrowth, and during the initial response during reoxygenation. PMID:27203084

  3. Rv0132c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Encodes a Coenzyme F420-Dependent Hydroxymycolic Acid Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Purwantini, Endang; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup

    2013-01-01

    The ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to manipulate and evade human immune system is in part due to its extraordinarily complex cell wall. One of the key components of this cell wall is a family of lipids called mycolic acids. Oxygenation of mycolic acids generating methoxy- and ketomycolic acids enhances the pathogenic attributes of M. tuberculosis. Thus, the respective enzymes are of interest in the research on mycobacteria. The generation of methoxy- and ketomycolic acids proceeds through intermediary formation of hydroxymycolic acids. While the methyl transferase that generates methoxymycolic acids from hydroxymycolic acids is known, hydroxymycolic acids dehydrogenase that oxidizes hydroxymycolic acids to ketomycolic acids has been elusive. We found that hydroxymycolic acid dehydrogenase is encoded by the rv0132c gene and the enzyme utilizes F420, a deazaflavin coenzyme, as electron carrier, and accordingly we called it F420-dependent hydroxymycolic acid dehydrogenase. This is the first report on the involvement of F420 in the synthesis of a mycobacterial cell envelope. Also, F420-dependent hydroxymycolic acid dehydrogenase was inhibited by PA-824, and therefore, it is a previously unknown target for this new tuberculosis drug. PMID:24349169

  4. EXPRESSION OF THE SPERMATOGENIC CELL-SPECIFIC GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE (GAPDS) IN RAT TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The spermatogenic cell-specific variant of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDS) has been cloned from a rat testis cDNA library and its pattern of expression determined. A 1417 nucleotide cDNA has been found to encode an enzyme with substantial homology to mouse GAPDS...

  5. Structural relationship between the hexameric and tetrameric family of glutamate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Britton, K L; Baker, P J; Rice, D W; Stillman, T J

    1992-11-01

    The family of glutamate dehydrogenases include a group of hexameric oligomers with a subunit M(r) of around 50,000, which are closely related in amino acid sequence and a smaller group of tetrameric oligomers based on a much larger subunit with M(r) 115,000. Sequence comparisons have indicated a low level of similarity between the C-terminal portion of the tetrameric enzymes and a substantial region of the polypeptide chain for the more widespread hexameric glutamate dehydrogenases. In the light of the solution of the three-dimensional structure of the hexameric NAD(+)-linked glutamate dehydrogenase from Clostridium symbiosum, we have undertaken a detailed examination of the alignment of the sequence for the C-terminal domain of the tetrameric Neurospora crassa glutamate dehydrogenase against the sequence and the molecular structure of that from C. symbiosum. This analysis reveals that the residues conserved between these two families are clustered in the three-dimensional structure and points to a remarkably similar layout of the glutamate-binding site and the active-site pocket, though with some differences in the mode of recognition of the nucleotide cofactor.

  6. Crystallization and Preliminary Structural Analysis of Dihydrolipoyl Transsuccinylase, the Core of the 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex

    PubMed Central

    Derosier, David J.; Oliver, Robert M.; Reed, Lester J.

    1971-01-01

    Dihydrolipoyl transsuccinylase, one of the three enzymes comprising the Escherichia coli 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.4.2) complex, has been crystallized. Studies by x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy establish that the transsuccinylase has octahedral (432) symmetry, i.e., it consists of 24 subunits that are structurally identical. Images PMID:4942179

  7. Purification and properties of rabbit muscle l-glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Philip; Dickinson, F. Mark; Jones, Ian G.

    1973-01-01

    A modified procedure has been developed for the purification of rabbit muscle l-glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The product of the preparation satisfies all criteria of homogeneity. Some physical properties of the enzyme have been re-investigated. The results suggest that previous preparations may have been contaminated with significant amounts of heavy-molecular-weight protein. PMID:4778280

  8. Direct Electrochemical Addressing of Immobilized Alcohol Dehydrogenase for the Heterogeneous Bioelectrocatalytic Reduction of Butyraldehyde to Butanol

    PubMed Central

    Schlager, S; Neugebauer, H; Haberbauer, M; Hinterberger, G; Sariciftci, N S

    2015-01-01

    Modified electrodes using immobilized alcohol dehydrogenase enzymes for the efficient electroreduction of butyraldehyde to butanol are presented as an important step for the utilization of CO2-reduction products. Alcohol dehydrogenase was immobilized, embedded in an alginate–silicate hybrid gel, on a carbon felt (CF) electrode. The application of this enzyme to the reduction of an aldehyde to an alcohol with the aid of the coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), in analogy to the final step in the natural reduction cascade of CO2 to alcohol, has been already reported. However, the use of such enzymatic reductions is limited because of the necessity of providing expensive NADH as a sacrificial electron and proton donor. Immobilization of such dehydrogenase enzymes on electrodes and direct pumping of electrons into the biocatalysts offers an easy and efficient way for the biochemical recycling of CO2 to valuable chemicals or alternative synthetic fuels. We report the direct electrochemical addressing of immobilized alcohol dehydrogenase for the reduction of butyraldehyde to butanol without consumption of NADH. The selective reduction of butyraldehyde to butanol occurs at room temperature, ambient pressure and neutral pH. Production of butanol was detected by using liquid-injection gas chromatography and was estimated to occur with Faradaic efficiencies of around 40 %. PMID:26113881

  9. ACTIVITY AND ISOZYME CONTENT OF LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE UNDER LONG-TERM ORAL TAURINE ADMINISTRATION TO RATS.

    PubMed

    Ostapiv, R D; Humenyuk, S L; Manko, V V

    2015-01-01

    The effect of long-term oral taurine administration to rats on activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), its isozyme content and activity in the whole blood, liver, thigh muscle, brain and testes tissues were studied in the present work. For this purpose male Wistar rats with body weight 190-220 g were randomly divided into three groups, they were orally administered drinking water (control group) or taurine solution 40 and 100 mg per kg of body weight ( groups I and II, respectively). The total lactate dehydrogenase activity was measured spectrophotometrically, the percentage content of isozymes was determined by electrophoresis in 7.5% poliacrylamide gel withfurther staining according to J. Garbus. It was found that the total lactate dehydrogenase activity increased in all studied tissues. In testes of animals of both groups and in brain of group I animals, the total percentage contents of isozymes that are responsible for lactate production (LDH4+LDH5) increased. In liver of animals of both groups and in whole blood of group II animals, the total percentage content of isozymes that produce pyruvate (LDH1+LDH2) increased. In thigh muscle of both groups and in brain of group II animals the balance between LDH1+LDH2 and LDH4+LDH5 content did not differ from control values, though total lactate dehydrogenase activity was significantly higher, than that in the control group. Thus, the increase in the lactate dehydrogenase activity under long-term oral taurine administration in different rat tissues was found to be tissue- and dose-dependent and was caused by the increase in the content of different isozymes. Such increase in group I animals might be explained by adaptive mechanisms to hypoxia caused by high doses of taurine. For group II animals high doses of taurine were toxic and directly affected metabolic processes in the animal bodies.

  10. Purification, Characterization, and Submitochondrial Localization of a 58-Kilodalton NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Luethy, M. H.; Thelen, J. J.; Knudten, A. F.; Elthon, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    An NADH dehydrogenase activity from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) root mitochondria was purified to a 58-kD protein doublet. An immunologically related dehydrogenase was partially purified from maize (Zea mays L. B73) mitochondria to a 58-kD protein doublet, a 45-kD protein, and a few other less prevalent proteins. Polyclonal antibodies prepared against the 58-kD protein of red beet roots were found to immunoprecipitate the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase activity. The antibodies cross-reacted to similar proteins in mitochondria from a number of plant species but not to rat liver mitochondrial proteins. The polyclonal antibodies were used in conjunction with maize mitochondrial fractionation to show that the 58-kD protein was likely part of a protein complex loosely associated with the membrane fraction. A membrane-impermeable protein cross-linking agent was used to further show that the majority of the 58-kD protein was located on the outer surface of the inner mitochondrial membrane or in the intermembrane space. Analysis of the cross-linked 58-kD NAD(P)H dehydrogenase indicated that specific proteins of 64, 48, and 45 kD were cross-linked to the 58-kD protein doublet. The NAD(P)H dehydrogenase activity was not affected by ethyleneglycol-bis([beta]-aminoethyl ether)-N,N[prime] -tetraacetic acid or CaCl2, was stimulated somewhat (21%) by flavin mononucleotide, was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (49%) and mersalyl (40%), and was inhibited by a bud scale extract of Platanus occidentalis L. containing platanetin (61%). PMID:12228370

  11. Production of racemic lactic acid in Pediococcus cerevisiae cultures by two lactate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Gordon, G L; Doelle, H W

    1975-02-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent d(minus)-and l(plus)-lactate dehydrogenases have been partially purified 89- and 70-fold simultaneously from cell-free extracts of Pediococcus cerevisiae. Native molecular weights, as estimated from molecular sieve chromatography and electrophoresis in nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels, are 71,000 to 73,000 for d(minus)-lactate dehydrogenase and 136,000 to 139,000 for l(plus)-lactate dehydrogenase. Electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate-containing gels reveals subunits with approximate molecular weights of 37,000 to 39,000 for both enzymes. By lowering the pyruvate concentration from 5.0 to 0.5 mM, the pH optimum for pyruvate reduction by d(minus)-lactate dehydrogenase decreases from pH 8.0 to 3.6. However, l(plus)-lactate dehydrogenase displays an optimum for pyruvate reduction between pH 4.5 and 6.0 regardless of the pyruvate concentration. The enzymes obey Michaelis-Menten kinetics for both pyruvate and reduced NAD at pH 5.4 and 7.4, with increased affinity for both substrates at the acid pH. alpha-Ketobutyrate can be used as a reducible substrate, whereas oxamate has no inhibitory effect on lactate oxidation by either enzyme. Adenosine triphosphate causes inhibition of both enzymes by competition with reduced NAD. Adenosine diphosphate is also inhibitory under the same conditions, whereas NAD acts as a product inhibitor. These results are discussed with relation to the lactate isomer production during the growth cycle of P. cerevisiae.

  12. Regulation of insulin release by factors that also modify glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Fahien, L A; MacDonald, M J; Kmiotek, E H; Mertz, R J; Fahien, C M

    1988-09-25

    Leucine and monomethyl succinate initiate insulin release, and glutamine potentiates leucine-induced insulin release. Alanine enhances and malate inhibits leucine plus glutamine-induced insulin release. The insulinotropic effect of leucine is at least in part secondary to its ability to activate glutamate oxidation by glutamate dehydrogenase (Sener, A., Malaisse-Lagae, F., and Malaisse, W. J. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 78, 5460-5464). The effect of these other amino acids or Krebs cycle intermediates on insulin release also correlates with their effects on glutamate dehydrogenase and their ability to regulate inhibition of this enzyme by alpha-ketoglutarate. For example, glutamine enhances insulin release and islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity only in the presence of leucine. This could be because leucine, especially in the presence of alpha-ketoglutarate, increases the Km of glutamate and converts alpha-ketoglutarate from a noncompetitive to a competitive inhibitor of glutamate. Thus, in the presence of leucine, this enzyme is more responsive to high levels of glutamate and less responsive to inhibition by alpha-ketoglutarate. Malate could decrease and alanine could increase insulin release because malate increases the generation of alpha-ketoglutarate in islet mitochondria via the combined malate dehydrogenase-aspartate aminotransferase reaction, and alanine could decrease the level of alpha-ketoglutarate via the alanine transaminase reaction. Monomethyl succinate alone is as stimulatory of insulin release as leucine alone, and glutamine enhances the action of both. Succinyl coenzyme A, leucine, and GTP are all bound in the same region on glutamate dehydrogenase, where GTP is a potent inhibitor and succinyl coenzyme A and leucine are comparable activators. Thus, the insulinotropic properties of monomethyl succinate could result from it increasing the level of succinyl coenzyme A and decreasing the level of GTP via the succinate thiokinase reaction.

  13. Physiological covalent regulation of rat liver branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.A.; Powell, S.M.; Paxton, R.; Gillim, S.E.; Nagae, H.

    1985-12-01

    A radiochemical assay was developed for measuring branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase activity of Triton X-100 extracts of freeze-clamped rat liver. The proportion of active (dephosphorylated) enzyme was determined by measuring enzyme activities before and after activation of the complex with a broad-specificity phosphoprotein phosphatase. Hepatic branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase activity in normal male Wistar rats was 97% active but decreased to 33% active after 2 days on low-protein (8%) diet and to 13% active after 4 days on the same diet. Restricting protein intake of lean and obese female Zucker rats also caused inactivation of hepatic branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex. Essentially all of the enzyme was in the active state in rats maintained for 14 days on either 30 or 50% protein diets. This was also the case for rats maintained on a commercial chow diet (minimum 23% protein). However, maintaining rats on 20, 8, and 0% protein diets decreased the percentage of the active form of the enzyme to 58, 10, and 7% of the total, respectively. Fasting of chow-fed rats for 48 h had no effect on the activity state of hepatic branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase, i.e., 93% of the enzyme remained in the active state compared to 97% for chow-fed rats. However, hepatic enzyme of rats maintained on 8% protein diet was 10% active before starvation and 83% active after 2 days of starvation. Thus, dietary protein deficiency results in inactivation of hepatic branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex, presumably as a consequence of low hepatic levels of branched-chain alpha-ketoacids.

  14. Identification of a dehydrogenase required for lactose metabolism in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Arellano, Benjamin H; Ortiz, Janett D; Manzano, Janet; Chen, Joseph C

    2010-05-01

    Caulobacter crescentus, which thrives in freshwater environments with low nutrient levels, serves as a model system for studying bacterial cell cycle regulation and organelle development. We examined its ability to utilize lactose (i) to gain insight into the metabolic capacities of oligotrophic bacteria and (ii) to obtain an additional genetic tool for studying this model organism, aiming to eliminate the basal enzymatic activity that hydrolyzes the chromogenic substrate 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-d-galactopyranoside (X-gal). Using a previously isolated transposon mutant, we identified a gene, lacA, that is required for growth on lactose as the sole carbon source and for turning colonies blue in the presence of X-gal. LacA, which contains a glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductase domain, has homology to the flavin subunit of Pectobacterium cypripedii's gluconate dehydrogenase. Sequence comparisons indicated that two genes near lacA, lacB and lacC, encode the other subunits of the membrane-bound dehydrogenase. In addition to lactose, all three lac genes are involved in the catabolism of three other beta-galactosides (lactulose, lactitol, and methyl-beta-d-galactoside) and two glucosides (salicin and trehalose). Dehydrogenase assays confirmed that the lac gene products oxidize lactose, salicin, and trehalose. This enzymatic activity is inducible, and increased lac expression in the presence of lactose and salicin likely contributes to the induction. Expression of lacA also depends on the presence of the lac genes, implying that the dehydrogenase participates in induction. The involvement of a dehydrogenase suggests that degradation of lactose and other sugars in C. crescentus may resemble a proposed pathway in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

  15. Mutational Analyses of Glucose Dehydrogenase and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens Reveal Their Effects on Growth and Alginate Production.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Susan; Mærk, Mali; Valla, Svein; Ertesvåg, Helga

    2015-05-15

    The biosynthesis of alginate has been studied extensively due to the importance of this polymer in medicine and industry. Alginate is synthesized from fructose-6-phosphate and thus competes with the central carbon metabolism for this metabolite. The alginate-producing bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens relies on the Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways for glucose metabolism, and these pathways are also important for the metabolism of fructose and glycerol. In the present study, the impact of key carbohydrate metabolism enzymes on growth and alginate synthesis was investigated in P. fluorescens. Mutants defective in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (Zwf-1 and Zwf-2) or glucose dehydrogenase (Gcd) were evaluated using media containing glucose, fructose, or glycerol. Zwf-1 was shown to be the most important glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase for catabolism. Both Zwf enzymes preferred NADP as a coenzyme, although NAD was also accepted. Only Zwf-2 was active in the presence of 3 mM ATP, and then only with NADP as a coenzyme, indicating an anabolic role for this isoenzyme. Disruption of zwf-1 resulted in increased alginate production when glycerol was used as the carbon source, possibly due to decreased flux through the Entner-Doudoroff pathway rendering more fructose-6-phosphate available for alginate biosynthesis. In alginate-producing cells grown on glucose, disruption of gcd increased both cell numbers and alginate production levels, while this mutation had no positive effect on growth in a non-alginate-producing strain. A possible explanation is that alginate synthesis might function as a sink for surplus hexose phosphates that could otherwise be detrimental to the cell.

  16. Cytophotometric analysis of reaction rates of succinate and lactate dehydrogenase activity in rat liver, heart muscle and tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Van Noorden, C J; Vogels, I M

    1989-01-01

    Reaction rates of succinate and lactate dehydrogenase activity in cryostat sections of rat liver, tracheal epithelium and heart muscle were monitored by continuous measurement of formazan formation by cytophotometry at room temperature. Incubation media contained polyvinyl alcohol as tissue protectant and Tetranitro BT as final electron acceptor. Control media lacked either substrate or substrate and coenzyme. Controls were also performed by adding malonate (a competitive inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase), pyruvate (a non-competitive inhibitor of lactate dehydrogenase), oxalate (a competitive inhibitor of lactate dehydrogenase) or N-ethylmaleimide (a blocker of SH groups). A specific malonate-sensitive linear test minus control response for succinate dehydrogenase activity was obtained in liver (1.6 mumol H2cm-3 min-1) and tracheal epithelium (0.8 mumol H2cm-3 min-1) but not in heart muscle. All variations in the incubation conditions tested did not result in a linear test minus control response in the latter tissue. Because the reaction was sensitive to malonate, it was concluded that the initial reaction rate was the specific rate of succinate dehydrogenase activity in heart muscle (9.1 mumol H2 cm-3 min-1). Test minus control reactions for lactate dehydrogenase activity were distinctly non-linear for all tissues tested. This appeared to be due to product inhibition by pyruvate generated during the reaction and therefore it was concluded that the appropriate control reaction was the test reaction in the presence of 20 mM pyruvate. The initial rate of the test minus this control was the true rate of lactate dehydrogenase activity. The lactate dehydrogenase activity thus found in liver parenchyma was 5.0 mumol of H2 generated per cm3 liver tissue per min.

  17. Structural and Thermodynamic Basis for Weak Interactions between Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase and Subunit-binding Domain of the Branched-chain α-Ketoacid Dehydrogenase Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Brautigam, Chad A.; Wynn, R. Max; Chuang, Jacinta L.; Naik, Mandar T.; Young, Brittany B.; Huang, Tai-huang; Chuang, David T.

    2011-01-01

    The purified mammalian branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC), which catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of branched-chain α-keto acids, is essentially devoid of the constituent dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase component (E3). The absence of E3 is associated with the low affinity of the subunit-binding domain of human BCKDC (hSBDb) for hE3. In this work, sequence alignments of hSBDb with the E3-binding domain (E3BD) of the mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex show that hSBDb has an arginine at position 118, where E3BD features an asparagine. Substitution of Arg-118 with an asparagine increases the binding affinity of the R118N hSBDb variant (designated hSBDb*) for hE3 by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. The enthalpy of the binding reaction changes from endothermic with the wild-type hSBDb to exothermic with the hSBDb* variant. This higher affinity interaction allowed the determination of the crystal structure of the hE3/hSBDb* complex to 2.4-Å resolution. The structure showed that the presence of Arg-118 poses a unique, possibly steric and/or electrostatic incompatibility that could impede E3 interactions with the wild-type hSBDb. Compared with the E3/E3BD structure, the hE3/hSBDb* structure has a smaller interfacial area. Solution NMR data corroborated the interactions of hE3 with Arg-118 and Asn-118 in wild-type hSBDb and mutant hSBDb*, respectively. The NMR results also showed that the interface between hSBDb and hE3 does not change significantly from hSBDb to hSBDb*. Taken together, our results represent a starting point for explaining the long standing enigma that the E2b core of the BCKDC binds E3 far more weakly relative to other α-ketoacid dehydrogenase complexes. PMID:21543315

  18. Structural and Thermodynamic Basis for Weak Interactions between Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase and Subunit-binding Domain of the Branched-chain [alpha]-Ketoacid Dehydrogenase Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Brautigam, Chad A.; Wynn, R. Max; Chuang, Jacinta L.; Naik, Mandar T.; Young, Brittany B.; Huang, Tai-huang; Chuang, David T.

    2012-02-27

    The purified mammalian branched-chain {alpha}-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC), which catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of branched-chain {alpha}-keto acids, is essentially devoid of the constituent dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase component (E3). The absence of E3 is associated with the low affinity of the subunit-binding domain of human BCKDC (hSBDb) for hE3. In this work, sequence alignments of hSBDb with the E3-binding domain (E3BD) of the mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex show that hSBDb has an arginine at position 118, where E3BD features an asparagine. Substitution of Arg-118 with an asparagine increases the binding affinity of the R118N hSBDb variant (designated hSBDb*) for hE3 by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. The enthalpy of the binding reaction changes from endothermic with the wild-type hSBDb to exothermic with the hSBDb* variant. This higher affinity interaction allowed the determination of the crystal structure of the hE3/hSBDb* complex to 2.4-{angstrom} resolution. The structure showed that the presence of Arg-118 poses a unique, possibly steric and/or electrostatic incompatibility that could impede E3 interactions with the wild-type hSBDb. Compared with the E3/E3BD structure, the hE3/hSBDb* structure has a smaller interfacial area. Solution NMR data corroborated the interactions of hE3 with Arg-118 and Asn-118 in wild-type hSBDb and mutant hSBDb*, respectively. The NMR results also showed that the interface between hSBDb and hE3 does not change significantly from hSBDb to hSBDb*. Taken together, our results represent a starting point for explaining the long standing enigma that the E2b core of the BCKDC binds E3 far more weakly relative to other {alpha}-ketoacid dehydrogenase complexes.

  19. The separate roles of PQQ and apo-enzyme syntheses in the regulation of glucose dehydrogenase activity in Klebsiella pneumoniae NCTC 418.

    PubMed

    Hommes, R W; Herman, P T; Postma, P W; Tempest, D W; Neijssel, O M

    1989-01-01

    No holoenzyme pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase and only very low apoenzyme levels could be detected in cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae, growing anaerobically, or carrying out a fumarate or nitrate respiration. Low glucose dehydrogenase activity in some aerobic glucose-excess cultures of K. pneumoniae (ammonia or sulphate limitation) was increased significantly by addition of PQQ, whereas in cells already possessing a high glucose dehydrogenase activity (phosphate or potassium limitation) extra PQQ had almost no effect. These observations indicate that the glucose dehydrogenase activity in K. pneumoniae is modulated by both PQQ synthesis and synthesis of the glucose dehydrogenase apo-enzyme.

  20. Purification and Characterization of a Novel NAD(P)+-Farnesol Dehydrogenase from Polygonum minus Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Seman-Kamarulzaman, Ahmad-Faris; Mohamed-Hussein, Zeti-Azura

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile hormones have attracted attention as safe and selective targets for the design and development of environmentally friendly and biorational insecticides. In the juvenile hormone III biosynthetic pathway, the enzyme farnesol dehydrogenase catalyzes the oxidation of farnesol to farnesal. In this study, farnesol dehydrogenase was extracted from Polygonum minus leaves and purified 204-fold to apparent homogeneity by ion-exchange chromatography using DEAE-Toyopearl, SP-Toyopearl, and Super-Q Toyopearl, followed by three successive purifications by gel filtration chromatography on a TSK-gel GS3000SW. The enzyme is a heterodimer comprised of subunits with molecular masses of 65 kDa and 70 kDa. The optimum temperature and pH were 35°C and pH 9.5, respectively. Activity was inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents, metal-chelating agents and heavy metal ions. The enzyme utilized both NAD+ and NADP+ as coenzymes with Km values of 0.74 mM and 40 mM, respectively. Trans, trans-farnesol was the preferred substrate for the P. minus farnesol dehydrogenase. Geometrical isomers of trans, trans-farnesol, cis, trans-farnesol and cis, cis-farnesol were also oxidized by the enzyme with lower activity. The Km values for trans, trans-farnesol, cis, trans-farnesol and cis, cis-farnesol appeared to be 0.17 mM, 0.33 mM and 0.42 mM, respectively. The amino acid sequences of 4 tryptic peptides of the enzyme were analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS spectrometry, and showed no significant similarity to those of previously reported farnesol dehydrogenases. These results suggest that the purified enzyme is a novel NAD(P)+-dependent farnesol dehydrogenase. The purification and characterization established in the current study will serve as a basis to provide new information for recombinant production of the enzyme. Therefore, recombinant farnesol dehydrogenase may provide a useful molecular tool in manipulating juvenile hormone biosynthesis to generate transgenic plants for pest control. PMID:26600471

  1. [Activity of liver mitochondrial NAD+-dependent dehydrogenases of the krebs cycle in rats with acetaminophen-induced hepatitis developed under conditions of alimentary protein deficiency].

    PubMed

    Voloshchuk, O N; Kopylchuk, G P

    2016-01-01

    Activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, and the NAD(+)/NADН ratio were studied in the liver mitochondrial fraction of rats with toxic hepatitis induced by acetaminophen under conditions of alimentary protein deprivation. Acetaminophen-induced hepatitis was characterized by a decrease of isocitrate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase activities, while the mitochondrial NAD(+)/NADН ratio remained at the control level. Modeling of acetaminophen-induced hepatitis in rats with alimentary protein caused a more pronounced decrease in the activity of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases studied and a 2.2-fold increase of the mitochondrial NAD(+)/NADН ratio. This suggests that alimentary protein deprivation potentiated drug-induced liver damage.

  2. Re-evaluation of the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase/L-lactate dehydrogenase enzyme system. Evidence against the direct transfer of NADH between active sites.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, S P; Storey, K B

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the direct transfer of metabolites from rabbit muscle L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, EC 1.1.1.27) to glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH, EC 1.1.1.8) revealed discrepancies between theoretical predictions and experimental results. Measurements of the GPDH reaction rate at a fixed NADH concentration and in the presence of increasing LDH concentrations gave experimental results similar to those previously obtained by Srivastava, Smolen, Betts, Fukushima, Spivey & Bernhard [(1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 6464-6468]. However, a mathematical solution of the direct-transfer-mechanism equations as described by Srivastava et al. (1989) showed that the direct-transfer model did not adequately describe the experimental behaviour of the reaction rate at increasing LDH concentrations. In addition, experiments designed to measure the formation of an LDH4.NADH.GPDH2 complex, predicted by the direct-transfer model, indicated that no significant formation of tertiary complex occurred. An examination of other kinetic models, developed to describe the LDH/GPDH/NADH system better, revealed that the experimental results may be best explained by assuming that free NADH, and not E1.NADH, is the sole substrate for GPDH. These results suggest that direct transfer of NADH between rabbit muscle LDH and GPDH does not occur in vitro. PMID:1898374

  3. In search for function of two human orphan SDR enzymes: hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase like 2 (HSDL2) and short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase-orphan (SDR-O).

    PubMed

    Kowalik, Dorota; Haller, Ferdinand; Adamski, Jerzy; Moeller, Gabriele

    2009-11-01

    The protein superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) today comprises over 20,000 members found in pro- and eukaryotes. Despite low amino acid sequence identity (only 15-30%), they share several similar characteristics in conformational structures, the N-terminal cofactor (NAD(P)/NAD(P)H) binding region being the most conserved. The enzymes catalyze oxido-reductive reactions and have a broad spectrum of substrates. Not all recently identified SDRs have been analyzed in detail yet, and we therefore characterized two rudimentarily annotated human SDR candidates: an orphan SDR (SDR-O) and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase like 2 (HSDL2). We analyzed the amino acid sequence for cofactor preference, performed subcellular localization studies, and a screening for substrates of the enzymes, including steroid hormones and retinoids. None of both tested proteins showed a significant conversion of steroid hormones. However, the peroxisomal localization of human HSDL2 may suggest an involvement in fatty acid metabolism. For SDR-O a weak conversion of retinal into retinol was detectable in the presence of the cofactor NADH.

  4. Increased activity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in purified cell suspensions and single cells from the uterine cervix in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, S. K.; Benedetto, C.; Flatman, A.; Hammond, R. H.; Micheletti, L.; Riley, C.; Riley, P. A.; Spargo, D. J.; Zonca, M.; Slater, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    The activities of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase have been measured in squamous epithelial cells of the uterine cervix from normal patients and cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). A biochemical cycling method, which uses only simple equipment and is suited to routine use and to automation, was applied to cells separated by gradient centrifugation. In addition, cells were examined cytochemically, and the intensity of staining in the cytoplasm of single whole cells was measured using computerised microcytospectrophotometry. Twenty per cent of cells in samples from normal patients (n=61) showed staining intensities above an extinction of 0.15 at 540 nm, compared to 71% of cases of CIN 1 (n=14), 91% of cases of CIN 2 (n=11) and 67% of cases of CIN 3 (n=15). The cytochemical data do not allow definitive distinctions to be made between different grades of CIN whereas the biochemical assay applied to cell lysates shows convincing differences between normal samples and cases of CIN. There are no false negatives for CIN 3 (n=14) and CIN 2 (n=10) and 11% false negatives for CIN 1 (n=9) and 14% of false positives for normal cases (n=21). The results of this preliminary study with reference to automation are discussed [corrected]. Images Figure 1 PMID:1637668

  5. Complete knockout of the lactate dehydrogenase A gene is lethal in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1, 2, 3 down-regulated CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Yip, Shirley S M; Zhou, Meixia; Joly, John; Snedecor, Bradley; Shen, Amy; Crawford, Yongping

    2014-09-01

    Accumulation of high level of lactate can negatively impact cell growth during fed-batch culture process. In this study, we attempted to knockout the lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) gene in CHO cells in order to attenuate the lactate level. To prevent the potential deleterious effect of pyruvate accumulation, consequent to LDHA knockout, on cell culture, we chose a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1, 2, and 3 (PDHK1, 2, and 3) knockdown cell line in which to knock out LDHA alleles. Around 3,000 clones were screened to obtain 152 mutants. Only heterozygous mutants were identified. An attempt to knockout the remaining wild-type allele from one such heterozygote yielded only two mutants after screening 567 clones. One had an extra valine. Another evidenced a duplication event, possessing at lease one wild-type and two different frameshifted alleles. Both mutants still retained LDH activity. Together, our data strongly suggest that a complete knockout of LDHA is lethal in CHO cells, despite simultaneous down-regulation of PDHK1, 2, and 3.

  6. Enhanced production of dihydroxyacetone from glycerol by overexpression of glycerol dehydrogenase in an alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient mutant of Gluconobacter oxydans.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-hua; Wu, Jian; Liu, Xu; Lin, Jin-ping; Wei, Dong-zhi; Chen, Hao

    2010-11-01

    Gluconobacter oxydans can rapidly and incompletely oxidize glycerol to dihydroxyacetone (DHA), a versatile product extensively used in cosmetic, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. To improve DHA production, the glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) responsible for DHA formation was overexpressed in G. oxydans M5AM, in which the gene coding for the membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was interrupted. Real-time PCR and enzyme activity assay revealed that the absence of ADH together with the overexpression of GDH gene resulted in an increased GDH activity in the resulting strain M5AM/GDH, which led to a substantially enhanced production of DHA in a resting cell system. In a batch biotransformation process, M5AM/GDH exhibited a 2.4-fold increased DHA productivity of 2.4g/g CDW/h from 1.0g/g CDW/h, yielding 96g/L DHA from 100g/L glycerol. When 140g/L glycerol was supplied, a final DHA concentration of 134g/L was accumulated within 14h. In four repeated batch runs, 385g DHA over a time period of 34h was achieved from 400g glycerol with an average productivity of 2.2g/g CDW/h. These results indicated that this newly developed strain G. oxydans M5AM/GDH with high productivity and increased tolerance against product inhibition has potential for DHA production in an industrial bioconversion process.

  7. Production of optically pure L-phenyllactic acid by using engineered Escherichia coli coexpressing L-lactate dehydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaojuan; Zhao, Mingyue; Zang, Ying; Zhou, Ying; Ouyang, Jia

    2015-08-10

    L-Phenyllactic acid (L-PLA) is a novel antiseptic agent with broad and effective antimicrobial activity. In addition, L-PLA has been used for synthesis of poly(phenyllactic acid)s, which exhibits better mechanical properties than poly(lactic acid)s. However, the concentration and optical purity of L-PLA produced by native microbes was rather low. An NAD-dependent L-lactate dehydrogenase (L-nLDH) from Bacillus coagulans NL01 was confirmed to have a good ability to produce L-PLA from phenylpyruvic acid (PPA). In the present study, l-nLDH gene and formate dehydrogenase gene were heterologously coexpressed in Escherichia coli. Through two coupled reactions, 79.6mM l-PLA was produced from 82.8mM PPA in 40min and the enantiomeric excess value of L-PLA was high (>99%). Therefore, this process suggested a promising alternative for the production of chiral l-PLA.

  8. Response surface methodology to optimize partition and purification of two recombinant oxidoreductase enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase and d-galactose dehydrogenase in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Shahbaz Mohammadi, Hamid; Mostafavi, Seyede Samaneh; Soleimani, Saeideh; Bozorgian, Sajad; Pooraskari, Maryam; Kianmehr, Anvarsadat

    2015-04-01

    Oxidoreductases are an important family of enzymes that are used in many biotechnological processes. An experimental design was applied to optimize partition and purification of two recombinant oxidoreductases, glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) from Bacillus subtilis and d-galactose dehydrogenase (GalDH) from Pseudomonas fluorescens AK92 in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). Response surface methodology (RSM) with a central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was performed to optimize critical factors like polyethylene glycol (PEG) concentration, concentration of salt and pH value. The best partitioning conditions was achieved in an ATPS composed of 12% PEG-6000, 15% K2HPO4 with pH 7.5 at 25°C, which ensured partition coefficient (KE) of 66.6 and 45.7 for GDH and GalDH, respectively. Under these experimental conditions, the activity of GDH and GalDH was 569.5U/ml and 673.7U/ml, respectively. It was found that these enzymes preferentially partitioned into the top PEG-rich phase and appeared as single bands on SDS-PAGE gel. Meanwhile the validity of the response model was confirmed by a good agreement between predicted and experimental results. Collectively, according to the obtained data it can be inferred that the ATPS optimization using RSM approach can be applied for recovery and purification of any enzyme from oxidoreductase family.

  9. Effects of deletion of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutamate dehydrogenase genes on glycerol and ethanol metabolism in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Chin, Young-Wook; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Bioethanol is currently used as an alternative fuel for gasoline worldwide. For economic production of bioethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, formation of a main by-product, glycerol, should be prevented or minimized in order to reduce a separation cost of ethanol from fermentation broth. In this study, S. cerevisiae was engineered to investigate the effects of the sole and double disruption of NADH-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 (GPD1) and NADPH-requiring glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) on the production of glycerol and ethanol from glucose. Even though sole deletion of GPD1 or GDH1 reduced glycerol production, double deletion of GPD1 and GDH1 resulted in the lowest glycerol concentration of 2.31 g/L, which was 46.4% lower than the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the recombinant S. cerevisiae ∆GPD1∆GDH1 strain showed a slight improvement in ethanol yield (0.414 g/g) compared with the wild-type strain (0.406 g/g). Genetic engineering of the glycerol and glutamate metabolic pathways modified NAD(P)H-requiring metabolic pathways and exerted a positive effect on glycerol reduction without affecting ethanol production.

  10. Localization of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in Mycobacterium sp. VKM Ac-1815D mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Egorova, O V; Nikolayeva, V M; Suzina, N E; Donova, M V

    2005-04-01

    The localization of mycobacterial 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-OH SDH) was studied using cell fractionation and cytochemical investigation. Mycobacterium sp. Et1 mutant strain derived from Mycobacterium sp. VKM Ac-1815D and characterized by increased 17beta-OH SDH activity was used as a model organism. Subcellular distribution study showed both soluble and membrane-bound forms of mycobacterial 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. The cytochemical method based on a copper ferrocyanide procedure followed by electron microscopic visualization was applied in order to investigate the intracellular localization of bacterial 17beta-OH SDH in more detail. The enzyme was found to be located in the peripheral cytoplasmic zone adjoining the cytoplasmic membrane (CM). 17beta-OH SDH was loosely membrane bound and easily released into the environment under the cell integrity failure.

  11. Primary structure and phylogenetic relationships of a malate dehydrogenase gene from Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Roger, A J; Morrison, H G; Sogin, M L

    1999-06-01

    The lactate and malate dehydrogenases comprise a complex protein superfamily with multiple enzyme homologues found in eubacteria, archaebacteria, and eukaryotes. In this study we describe the sequence and phylogenetic relationships of a malate dehydrogenase (MDH) gene from the amitochondriate diplomonad protist, Giardia lamblia. Parsimony, distance, and maximum-likelihood analyses of the MDH protein family solidly position G. lamblia MDH within a eukaryote cytosolic MDH clade, to the exclusion of chloroplast, mitochondrial, and peroxisomal homologues. Furthermore, G. lamblia MDH is specifically related to a homologue from Trichomonas vaginalis. This MDH topology, together with published phylogenetic analyses of beta-tubulin, chaperonin 60, valyl-tRNA synthetase, and EF-1alpha, suggests a sister-group relationship between diplomonads and parabasalids. Since these amitochondriate lineages contain genes encoding proteins which are characteristic of mitochondria and alpha-proteobacteria, their shared ancestry suggests that mitochondrial properties were lost in the common ancestor of both groups.

  12. Pro-haloacetate Nanoparticles for Efficient Cancer Therapy via Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Santosh K.; Ye, Mao; Ostadhossein, Fatemeh; Pan, Dipanjan

    2016-01-01

    Anticancer agents based on haloacetic acids are developed for inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), an enzyme responsible for reversing the suppression of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Through molecular docking studies mono- and dihaloacetates are identified as potent PDK2 binders and matched their efficiency with dichloroacetic acid. In silico screening directed their conversion to phospholipid prodrugs, which were subsequently self-assembled to pro-haloacetate nanoparticles. Following a thorough physico-chemical characterization, the functional activity of these novel agents was established in wide ranges of human cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo in rodents. Results indicated that the newly explored PDK modulators can act as efficient agent for cancer regression. A Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) assay mechanistically confirmed that these agents trigger their activity through the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. PMID:27323896

  13. Molecular Analysis of the Gene Encoding F420-Dependent Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Purwantini, Endang; Daniels, Lacy

    1998-01-01

    The gene fgd, which codes for F420-dependent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (FGD), was cloned from Mycobacterium smegmatis, and its sequence was determined and analyzed. A homolog of FGD which has a very high similarity to the M. smegmatis FGD-derived amino acid sequence was identified in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. FGD showed significant homology with F420-dependent N5,N10-methylene-tetrahydromethanopterin reductase (MER) from methanogenic archaea and with several hypothetical proteins from M. tuberculosis and Archaeoglobus fulgidus, but FGD showed no significant homology with NADP-dependent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases. Multiple alignment of FGD and MER proteins revealed four conserved consensus sequences. Multiple alignment of FGD with the hypothetical proteins also revealed portions of the same conserved sequences. Moderately high levels of FGD were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) carrying fgd in pBluescript. PMID:9555906

  14. Differential Role of Glutamate Dehydrogenase in Nitrogen Metabolism of Maize Tissues 1

    PubMed Central

    Loyola-Vargas, Victor Manuel; de Jimenez, Estela Sanchez

    1984-01-01

    Both calli and plantlets of maize (Zea mays L. var Tuxpeño 1) were exposed to specific nitrogen sources, and the aminative (NADH) and deaminative (NAD+) glutamate dehydrogenase activities were measured at various periods of time in homogenates of calli, roots, and leaves. A differential effect of the nitrogen sources on the tissues tested was observed. In callus tissue, glutamate, ammonium, and urea inhibited glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity. The amination and deamination reactions also showed different ratios of activity under different nitrogen sources. In roots, ammonium and glutamine produced an increase in GDH-NADH activity whereas the same metabolites were inhibitory of this activity in leaves. These data suggest the presence of isoenzymes or conformers of GDH, specific for each tissue, whose activities vary depending on the nutritional requirements of the tissue and the state of differentiation. PMID:16663876

  15. Human hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and pre-receptor regulation: Insights into inhibitor design and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Penning, Trevor M.

    2011-01-01

    Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) represent a major class of NAD(P)(H) dependent steroid hormone oxidoreductases involved in the pre-receptor regulation of hormone action. This is achieved by HSDs working in pairs so that they can interconvert ketosteroids with hydroxysteroids resulting in a change in ligand potency for nuclear receptors. HSDs belong to two protein superfamilies the aldo-keto reductases and the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductases. In humans, many of the important enzymes have been thoroughly characterized including the elucidation of their three-dimensional structures. Because these enzymes play fundamental roles in steroid hormone action they can be considered to be drug targets for a variety of steroid driven diseases: e.g. metabolic syndrome and obesity, inflammation, and hormone dependent malignancies of the endometrium, prostate and breast. This article will review how fundamental knowledge of these enzymes can be exploited in the development of isoform specific HSD inhibitors from both protein superfamilies. PMID:21272640

  16. Expression, Purification, Crystallization And Preliminary X-Ray Studies of Histamine Dehydrogenase From Nocardioides Simplex

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, T.M.; Hirakawa, H.; Mure, M.; Scott, E.E.; Limburg, J.

    2009-05-21

    Histamine dehydrogenase (HADH) from Nocardioides simplex catalyzes the oxidative deamination of histamine to produce imidazole acetaldehyde and an ammonium ion. HADH is functionally related to trimethylamine dehydrogenase (TMADH), but HADH has strict substrate specificity towards histamine. HADH is a homodimer, with each 76 kDa subunit containing two redox cofactors: a [4Fe-4S] cluster and an unusual covalently bound flavin mononucleotide, 6-S-cysteinyl-FMN. In order to understand the substrate specificity of HADH, it was sought to determine its structure by X-ray crystallography. This enzyme has been expressed recombinantly in Escherichia coli and successfully crystallized in two forms. Diffraction data were collected to 2.7 {angstrom} resolution at the SSRL synchrotron with 99.7% completeness. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 101.14, b = 107.03, c = 153.35 {angstrom}.

  17. Expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase isoforms in canine adrenal glands treated with trilostane.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Hirotaka; Kumagai, Takayuki; Kurano, Mai; Koyama, Hidekazu

    2014-06-01

    Trilostane, a competitive inhibitor of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, is often used to treat canine hyperadrenocorticism. In some species, trilostane has been shown to have additional effects on steroid biosynthesis, and it has been postulated that trilostane might have effects on 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) in dogs. To investigate the effect of trilostane on 11β-HSD in canine adrenal glands, healthy Beagle dogs were treated with trilostane for 8 weeks. Trilostane treatment resulted in a significant decrease of the cortisol/cortisone ratio in the serum. The adrenal gland mRNA and protein expression levels of 11β-HSD type 1 and 11β-HSD type 2 were significantly higher and significantly lower respectively in dogs treated with trilostane compared to those in control healthy Beagle dogs. These findings suggest that trilostane may have an effect on 11β-HSD activity in canine adrenal glands.

  18. Alpha-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase activity in sex-linked muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Johnston, H A; Wilkinson, J H; Withycombe, W A; Raymond, S

    1966-05-01

    In two families with severe sex-linked muscular dystrophy, high levels of alpha-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (HBD), lactate dehydrogenase (LD), aspartate transaminase (AspT), aldolase, and creatine phosphokinase (CPK) were found in the sera of three young affected males. In both families the mother had a raised level of HBD activity. Four sisters of the three affected boys had raised serum enzyme levels, and they are regarded as presumptive carriers of the disease. Biopsy specimens of dystrophic muscle had LD and HBD contents which were significantly lower than those of control specimens, while the HBD/LD ratios were markedly greater. Muscle from two unaffected members of the same family also exhibited high ratios, indicating the presence of the electrophoretically fast LD isoenzymes, and this was confirmed by acrylamide-gel electrophoresis.

  19. SDR-type human hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases involved in steroid hormone activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoqiu; Lukacik, Petra; Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Oppermann, Udo

    2007-02-01

    Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases catalyze the NAD(P)(H)-dependent oxidoreduction of hydroxyl and oxo-functions at distinct positions of steroid hormones. This reversible reaction constitutes an important pre-receptor control mechanism for nuclear receptor ligands of the androgen, estrogen and glucocorticoid classes, since the conversion "switches" between receptor ligands and their inactive metabolites. The major reversible activities found in mammals acting on steroid hormones comprise 3alpha-, 11beta- and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases, and for each group several distinct isozymes have been described. The enzymes differ in their expression pattern, nucleotide cofactor preference, steroid substrate specificity and subcellular localization, and thus constitute a complex system ensuring cell-specific adaptation and regulation of steroid hormone levels. Several isoforms constitute promising drug targets, of particular importance in cancer, metabolic diseases, neurodegeneration and immunity.

  20. Interaction of thiamin diphosphate with phosphorylated and dephosphorylated mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Bisswanger, Hans

    2005-01-01

    Kinetic and binding studies were carried out on substrate and cofactor interaction with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from bovine heart. Fluoropyruvate and pyruvamide, previously described as irreversible and allosteric inhibitors, respectively, are strong competitive inhibitors with respect to pyruvate. Binding of thiamin diphosphate was used to study differences between the active dephosphorylated and inactive phosphorylated enzyme states by spectroscopic methods. The change in both the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and the fluorescence of the 6-bromoacetyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene-labelled enzyme complex produced on addition of the cofactor showed similar binding behaviour for both enzyme forms, with slightly higher affinity for the phosphorylated form. Changes in the CD spectrum, especially the negative Cotton effect at 330 nm as a function of cofactor concentration, both in the absence and presence of pyruvate, also revealed no drastic differences between the two enzyme forms. Thus, inactivation of the enzyme activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is not caused by impeding the binding of substrate or cofactor.

  1. Thiamine pyrophosphate as an effector of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex from European bison heart.

    PubMed

    Strumilo, S; Markiewicz, J

    1995-09-01

    The purified 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDC) from the European bison heart was near saturated with endogenous bound thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). Exogenous TPP added to the full OGDC reaction medium decreased S0.5 for 2-oxoglutarate approximately 2.6-fold without any notable change in the maximum reaction rate. The TPP effect was observed in the presence of 1 mM ADP which alone is a strong positive allosteric effector of OGDC. At an unsaturating 2-oxoglutarate concentration the A50 value for TPP was approximately 0.05 mM. The ADP-like action of exogenous TPP was also found in the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (E1) reaction, determined in the presence of 2,6-dichlorophenoloindophenol as an electron acceptor.

  2. INT-dehydrogenase activity test for assessing anaerobic biodegradability of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Hongwei, Yang; Zhanpeng, Jiang; Shaoqi, Shi; Tang, W Z

    2002-11-01

    This study assessed anaerobic biodegradability of organic compounds from microorganism activity. Dehydrogenase activity can be a good parameter characterizing the microorganism activity. A modified method of 2-(p-iodophenyl-3-(p-nitrophenyl)-5-pheny tetrazolium chloride-dehydrogenase activity determination was proposed in anaerobic biodegradability assessment. Cubic spline curves were adopted to link the data points. This curve was integrated twice to calculate areas. The microorganism activity index in anaerobic biodegradability assessment was calculated by standardizing the integral. According to the results of the activity index, 14 kinds of organic compounds were classified into readily, partially, and poorly biodegradable under anaerobic conditions, respectively. As a result, some conclusions for anaerobic biodegradability of organic compounds were reached, based on the activity index value.

  3. Characterization of the Membrane-Bound Succinic Dehydrogenase of Micrococcus lysodeikticus

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Jerry J.; Linder, Regina; Salton, Milton R. J.

    1971-01-01

    The occurrence of succinic dehydrogenase [succinic:(acceptor) oxidoreductase, EC 1.3.99.1] in membrane fractions of Micrococcus lysodeikticus was investigated. The enzyme could be purified 10-fold, by deoxycholate treatment. Butanol extraction of membranes yielded an active fraction, nonsedimentable at 130,000 × g for 2 hr and altered in its phospholipid content relative to membranes. The activity of the enzyme in particulate preparations was decreased in the presence of competitive inhibitors and by compounds known to react with iron, sulfhydryl groups, and flavine. In this respect, the bacterial succinic dehydrogenase is similar to the enzyme derived from yeast and mammalian sources. In certain membrane fractions, Ca2+ and Mg2+ exhibited inhibitory effects whereas Triton X-100 caused activation. The enzyme could also be activated by substrate. In the phenazine reductase assay, incomplete reduction of electron acceptor was observed upon addition of divalent cations and iron binding agents. Images PMID:4327510

  4. Pro-haloacetate Nanoparticles for Efficient Cancer Therapy via Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Santosh K.; Ye, Mao; Ostadhossein, Fatemeh; Pan, Dipanjan

    2016-06-01

    Anticancer agents based on haloacetic acids are developed for inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), an enzyme responsible for reversing the suppression of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Through molecular docking studies mono- and dihaloacetates are identified as potent PDK2 binders and matched their efficiency with dichloroacetic acid. In silico screening directed their conversion to phospholipid prodrugs, which were subsequently self-assembled to pro-haloacetate nanoparticles. Following a thorough physico-chemical characterization, the functional activity of these novel agents was established in wide ranges of human cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo in rodents. Results indicated that the newly explored PDK modulators can act as efficient agent for cancer regression. A Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) assay mechanistically confirmed that these agents trigger their activity through the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

  5. [Hemoglobin Woodville associated with double point mutation in the gene of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase].

    PubMed

    Mansini, Adrián P; Fernández, Diego A; Aguirre, Fernando M; Pepe, Carolina; Milanesio, Berenice; Chaves, Alejandro; Eandi Eberle, Silvia; Feliú Torres, Aurora

    2015-01-01

    The co-inheritance of erythrocyte defects, hemoglobinopathies, enzymopathies, and membranopathies is not an unusual event. For the diagnosis, a laboratory strategy, including screening and confirmatory tests, additional to molecular characterization, was designed. As the result of this approach, a 24-year-old man carrying a hemoglobinopathy (Hemoglobin Woodville) and an enzymopathy (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency) was identified. In the heterozygous state hemoglobin Woodville, is asymptomatic, and homozygous or double heterozygous individuals have not been reported thus far. On the other hand, previously described double point mutation in the gene for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase c. [202G>A; 376A>G], p. [Val 68Met; Asn126Asp], causes hemolysis of varying severity after food or drug intake or infections. This case highlights the importance of the methodology carried out for the diagnosis, treatment, and proper genetic counseling.

  6. A Novel 3-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase That Regulates Reproductive Development and Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Wollam, Joshua; Magner, Daniel B.; Magomedova, Lilia; Rass, Elisabeth; Shen, Yidong; Rottiers, Veerle; Habermann, Bianca; Cummins, Carolyn L.; Antebi, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous small molecule metabolites that regulate animal longevity are emerging as a novel means to influence health and life span. In C. elegans, bile acid-like steroids called the dafachronic acids (DAs) regulate developmental timing and longevity through the conserved nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12, a homolog of mammalian sterol-regulated receptors LXR and FXR. Using metabolic genetics, mass spectrometry, and biochemical approaches, we identify new activities in DA biosynthesis and characterize an evolutionarily conserved short chain dehydrogenase, DHS-16, as a novel 3-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Through regulation of DA production, DHS-16 controls DAF-12 activity governing longevity in response to signals from the gonad. Our elucidation of C. elegans bile acid biosynthetic pathways reveals the possibility of novel ligands as well as striking biochemical conservation to other animals, which could illuminate new targets for manipulating longevity in metazoans. PMID:22505847

  7. DENATURATION AND RENATURATION OF MALIC DEHYDROGENASE IN A CELL-FREE EXTRACT FROM A MARINE PSYCHROPHILE.

    PubMed

    BURTON, S D; MORITA, R Y

    1963-11-01

    Burton, Sheril D. (Oregon State University, Corvallis), and Richard Y. Morita. Denaturation and renaturation of malic dehydrogenase in a cell-free extract from a marine psychrophile. J. Bacteriol. 86:1019-1024. 1963.-Malic dehydrogenase from a marine psychrophilic vibrio (PS 207) was found to be heat-sensitive at 30 C, the maximal growth temperature for the organism. Initial denaturation was reversible, with maximal renaturation occurring when the denatured enzyme was slowly cooled in the presence of mercaptoethanol, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and malate. No renaturation occurred when these compounds were added after slow cooling, or when the renaturation mixture was rapidly cooled. Mercaptoethylamine, cysteine, glutathione, or mercaptoacetic acid could not replace mercaptoethanol. The kinetics of denaturation and renaturation suggest the presence of several malic isozymes each with different heat labilities, or that these processes are occurring in several distinct steps.

  8. Kinetic studies of the regulation of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase by citrate.

    PubMed Central

    Gelpí, J L; Dordal, A; Montserrat, J; Mazo, A; Cortés, A

    1992-01-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase shows a complex regulation pattern in the presence of citrate. Previously published results indicate that this enzyme is activated by citrate in the NAD(+)----NADH direction and inhibited in the opposite direction. Moreover, high concentrations of L-malate or oxaloacetate produce deviations from the Michaelis-Menten behaviour. Results reported in this paper clearly show that citrate both activates and inhibits mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase in the same direction (NAD(+)----NADH), and in the same reaction medium, depending on substrate concentration. This surprising effect has made it necessary to propose a new kinetic mechanism that extends those previously suggested and allows us to explain both the citrate effect (activating or inhibitory) and the effect of high concentrations of L-malate and oxaloacetate. PMID:1567375

  9. Coenzyme Q releases the inhibitory effect of free fatty acids on mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Rauchová, Hana; Drahota, Zdenek; Rauch, Pavel; Fato, Romana; Lenaz, Giorgio

    2003-01-01

    Data presented in this paper show that the size of the endogenous coenzyme Q (CoQ) pool is not a limiting factor in the activation of mitochondrial glycerophosphate-dependent respiration by exogenous CoQ(3), since successive additions of succinate and NADH to brown adipose tissue mitochondria further increase the rate of oxygen uptake. Because the inhibition of glycerophosphate-dependent respiration by oleate was eliminated by added CoQ(3), our data indicate that the activating effect of CoQ(3) is related to the release of the inhibitory effect of endogenous free fatty acids (FFA). Both the inhibitory effect of FFA and the activating effect of CoQ(3) could be demonstrated only for glycerophosphate-dependent respiration, while succinate- or NADH-dependent respiration was not affected. The presented data suggest differences between mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase and succinate or NADH dehydrogenases in the transfer of reducing equivalents to the CoQ pool.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of rabbit l-gulonate 3-dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Asada, Yukuhiko; Kuroishi, Chizu; Ukita, Yoko; Sumii, Rie; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Hara, Akira; Kunishima, Naoki

    2008-03-01

    The preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of rabbit l-gulonate 3-dehydrogenase is described. Rabbit l-gulonate 3-dehydrogenase was crystallized using the oil-microbatch method at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.70 Å resolution from a crystal at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belongs to the C-centred monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 71.81, b = 69.08, c = 65.64 Å, β = 102.7°. Assuming the presence of a monomeric protomer in the asymmetric unit gives a V{sub M} value of 2.21 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 44.4%. A cocrystal with NADH, which was isomorphous to the apo form, was also prepared and diffraction data were collected to 1.85 Å resolution using Cu Kα radiation at 100 K.

  11. Nucleotide sequence of yeast GDH1 encoding nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Moye, W S; Amuro, N; Rao, J K; Zalkin, H

    1985-07-15

    The yeast GDH1 gene encodes NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase. This gene was isolated by complementation of an Escherichia coli glutamate auxotroph. NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase was overproduced 6-10-fold in Saccharomyces cerevisiae bearing GDH1 on a multicopy plasmid. The nucleotide sequence of the 1362-base pair coding region and 5' and 3' flanking sequences were determined. Transcription start sites were located by S1 nuclease mapping. Regulation of GDH1 was not maintained when the gene was present on a multicopy plasmid. Protein secondary structure predictions identified a region with potential to form the dinucleotide-binding domain. The amino acid sequences of the yeast and Neurospora crassa enzymes are 63% conserved. Unlike the N. crassa gene, yeast GDH1 has no introns.

  12. Identification of New Structural Fragments for the Design of Lactate Dehydrogenase A Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Nilov, D.K.; Kulikov, A.V.; Prokhorova, E.A.; Švedas, V.K.

    2016-01-01

    Human lactate dehydrogenase A plays an important role in the glucose metabolism of tumor cells and constitutes an attractive target for chemotherapy. Molecular fragments able to bind in the active site of this enzyme and form hydrogen bonds with the Arg168 guanidinium group, as well as additional interactions with the loop 96–111 in the closed conformation, have been identified by virtual screening of sulfonates and experimental testing of their inhibitory effect. The sulfo group can occupy a similar position as the carboxyl group of the substrate and its structural analogs, whereas the benzothiazole group attached via a linker can be located in the coenzyme (NADH) binding site. Thus, the value of merging individual structural elements of the inhibitor by a linker was demonstrated and ways of further structural modification for the design of more effective inhibitors of lactate dehydrogenase A were established. PMID:27795851

  13. Optical characterization of glutamate dehydrogenase monolayers chemisorbed on SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompa, P. P.; Blasi, L.; Longo, L.; Cingolani, R.; Ciccarella, G.; Vasapollo, G.; Rinaldi, R.; Rizzello, A.; Storelli, C.; Maffia, M.

    2003-04-01

    This paper describes the formation of glutamate dehydrogenase monolayers on silicon dioxide, and their characterization by means of physical techniques, i.e., fluorescence spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Detailed investigations of the intrinsic stability of native proteins in solution were carried out to elucidate the occurrence of conformational changes induced by the immobilization procedure. The enzyme monolayers were deposited on SiO2 after preexposing silicon surfaces to 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and reacting the silylated surfaces with glutaric dialdehyde. The optical characterization demonstrates that the immobilization does not interfere with the fold pattern of the native enzyme. In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy, thermal denaturation, and quenching studies performed on the enzyme in solution well describe the folding and unfolding properties of glutamate dehydrogenase. The photophysical studies reported here are relevant for nanobioelectronics applications requiring protein immobilization on a chip.

  14. Class 2 aldehyde dehydrogenase. Characterization of the hamster enzyme, sensitive to daidzin and conserved within the family of multiple forms.

    PubMed

    Hjelmqvist, L; Lundgren, R; Norin, A; Jörnvall, H; Vallee, B; Klyosov, A; Keung, W M

    1997-10-13

    Mitochondrial (class 2) hamster aldehyde dehydrogenase has been purified and characterized. Its primary structure has been determined and correlated with the tertiary structure recently established for this class from another species. The protein is found to represent a constant class within a complex family of multiple forms. Variable segments that occur in different species correlate with non-functional segments, in the same manner as in the case of the constant class of alcohol dehydrogenases (class III type) of another protein family, but distinct from the pattern of the corresponding variable enzymes. Hence, in both these protein families, overall variability and segment architectures behave similarly, with at least one 'constant' form in each case, class III in the case of alcohol dehydrogenases, and at least class 2 in the case of aldehyde dehydrogenases.

  15. Regulation of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and hydrogenase in Rhodospirillum rubrum: effects of CO and oxygen on synthesis and activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bonam, D; Lehman, L; Roberts, G P; Ludden, P W

    1989-01-01

    Exposure of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum to carbon monoxide led to increased carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and hydrogenase activities due to de novo protein synthesis of both enzymes. Two-dimensional gels of [35S]methionine-pulse-labeled cells showed that induction of CO dehydrogenase synthesis was rapidly initiated (less than 5 min upon exposure to CO) and was inhibited by oxygen. Both CO dehydrogenase and the CO-induced hydrogenase were inactivated by oxygen in vivo and in vitro. In contrast to CO dehydrogenase, the CO-induced hydrogenase was 95% inactivated by heating at 70 degrees C for 5 min. Unlike other hydrogenases, this CO-induced hydrogenase was inhibited only 60% by a 100% CO gas phase. Images PMID:2498285

  16. Geldanamycin Prevents Hemorrhage-Induced ATP Loss by Overexpressing Inducible HSP70 and Activating Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-24

    levels were determined using the ATP Bioluminescence Assay Kit HS II (Roche; Mannheim, Germany). Luminescence was measured with a TD-20/20...Geldanamycin prevents hemorrhage-induced ATP loss by overexpressing inducible HSP70 and activating pyruvate dehydrogenase Juliann G. Kiang,1,2,3...Geldanamycin prevents hemorrhage-induced ATP loss by overexpressing inducible HSP70 and activating pyruvate dehy- drogenase. Am J Physiol Gastrointest

  17. Mapping and cloning of gldA, the structural gene of the Escherichia coli glycerol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Truniger, V; Boos, W

    1994-01-01

    gldA, the structural gene for the NAD(+)-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase, was mapped at 89.2 min on the Escherichia coli linkage map, cotransducible with, but not adjacent to, the glpFKX operon encoding the proteins for the uptake and phosphorylation of glycerol. gldA was cloned, and its position on the physical map of E. coli was determined. The expression of gldA was induced by hydroxyacetone under stationary-phase growth conditions. Images PMID:8132480

  18. Marked and variable inhibition by chemical fixation of cytochrome oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase in single motoneurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chalmers, G. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of tissue fixation on succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase activity in single motoneurons of the rat was demonstrated using a computer image processing system. Inhibition of enzyme activity by chemical fixation was variable, with some motoneurons being affected more than others. It was concluded that quantification of enzymatic activity in chemically fixed tissue provides an imprecise estimate of enzyme activities found in fresh-frozen tissues.

  19. RDH12, a retinol dehydrogenase causing Leber's congenital amaurosis, is also involved in steroid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Keller, Brigitte; Adamski, Jerzy

    2007-05-01

    Three retinol dehydrogenases (RDHs) were tested for steroid converting abilities: human and murine RDH 12 and human RDH13. RDH12 is involved in retinal degeneration in Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA). We show that murine Rdh12 and human RDH13 do not reveal activity towards the checked steroids, but that human type 12 RDH reduces dihydrotestosterone to androstanediol, and is thus also involved in steroid metabolism. Furthermore, we analyzed both expression and subcellular localization of these enzymes.

  20. Partial Purification and Characterization of Three NAD(P)H Dehydrogenases from Beta vulgaris Mitochondria 1

    PubMed Central

    Luethy, Michael H.; Hayes, Marianne K.; Elthon, Thomas E.

    1991-01-01

    Mitochondria isolated from the taproot of beet (Beta vulgaris) were used in an effort to identify and partially purify the proteins constituting the exogenous NADH dehydrogenase. Three NAD(P)H dehydrogenases are released from these mitochondria by sonication, and these enzymes were partially purified using fast protein liquid chromatography. One of the enzymes, designated peak I, is capable of oxidizing NADPH and the β form of NADH. The other two activities, peaks II and III, oxidize only β-NADH. All three peaks are insensitive to divalent cation chelators and a complex I inhibitor, rotenone. The major component to peak I is a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of approximately 42 kilodaltons. Peak I activity was insensitive to platanetin, a specific inhibitor of the exogenous dehydrogenase, and insensitive to added Ca2+ or Mg2+. Peak I displayed a broad pH activity profile with an optimum between 7.5 and 8.0 for both NADPH and NADH. Purified peak II gave a single polypeptide of about 32 kilodaltons, had a pH optimum between 7.0 and 7.5, and was slightly stimulated by Ca2+ and Mg2+. As with peak I, platanetin had no effect on peak II activity. Peak III was not purified completely, but contained two major polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 55 and 40 kilodaltons. This enzyme was not affected by Ca2+ and Mg2+, but was inhibited by platanetin. The peak III enzyme had a rather sharp pH optimum of approximately 6.5 to 6.6. The above data indicate that peak III activity is likely the exogenous NADH dehydrogenase. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:16668549