Science.gov

Sample records for 15-minute commercial-free news

  1. Ral-GTPases: approaching their 15 minutes of fame.

    PubMed

    Feig, Larry A

    2003-08-01

    Andy Warhol, the famous pop artist, once claimed that "in the future everyone will be famous for 15 minutes". The same, it seems, can be said of proteins, because at any given time some proteins become more "fashionable" to study than others. But most proteins have been highly conserved throughout millions of years of evolution, which implies that they all have essential roles in cell biology. Thus, each one will no doubt enter the limelight if the right experiment in the right cell type is done. A good example of this is the Ras-like GTPases (Ral-GTPases), which until recently existed in the shadow of their close cousins--the Ras proto-oncogenes. Recent studies have yielded insights into previously unappreciated roles for Ral-GTPases in intensively investigated disciplines such as vesicle trafficking, cell morphology, transcription and possibly even human oncogenesis. PMID:12888294

  2. 25. FOLSOM, CALIFORNIA, 15 MINUTE QUADRANGLE. 1941. Scale 1:62,500. United ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. FOLSOM, CALIFORNIA, 15 MINUTE QUADRANGLE. 1941. Scale 1:62,500. United States Geological Survey. - Natomas Ditch System, Rhodes Ditch, West of Bidwell Street, north of U.S. Highway 50, Folsom, Sacramento County, CA

  3. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    Belfast: On the next level above Galileo Wales: 2nd All Wales Physics Teachers Meeting England: Good afternoon Natural Philosphers... Communication: Posters win prizes Careers: Physics On Course 2004 Visits: Refreshing Physics Sport: Cheating at baseball Physics on Stage: Polish performance Space: Forces that affect GPS satellites New Zealand: It’s not All Black News these days New Initiatives: NOISE Physics on Stage 3: Lively stars heading for ESA

  4. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Italy’s Physics Olympiad creates greater interest and motivation House of Experiments: 'humour helps in the teaching of science' Science takes stage in Germany PPARC news: guide and awards Schools newspaper competition focuses on Venus Website offers practical advice SHAP workshop will sharpen up teachers' skills Students will soon use Faulkes Telescope North to see the stars Talk takes a tour of the universe ASE 2004 Welsh physicists share secrets Switch students on to physics Teachers Awards 2004 recognize quality of teaching AAPT spends winter in Miami sun Schools Physics Group meeting will take place at Rugby School

  5. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-07-01

    AWARDS Presentations to top students; PHYSICS IN PRIMARY SCIENCE Amaze and inspire; WEB RESOURCES PhysicsClub goes live; EVENTS GIREP develops thinking; RESEARCH FRONTIERS Carbon dating may not run to time; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Vocational qualifications; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Flanders gears up for curriculum change; EXHIBITIONS Building the Universe; EVENTS Physics Discipline Network VII; SPECIAL NEWS FEATURE Progress in UK post-16 courses; Teaching Advancing Physics... the story so far; An outside observer's view of Advancing Physics; Student views of SHAP; Results from the SHAP pilot: successful and girl-friendly; AWARDS Royal visit to publisher;

  6. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    EPS AWARD WINNERS Award for outreach to Physics Education authors; TEACHER TRAINING Helping teachers specialize in physics; AAPT SUMMER MEETING The science of light; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Do you believe in skepticism?; E-LEARNING Massive investment in Swedish online learning; UK SCIENCE YEAR News from Science Year; 11-16 CURRICULUM Naming the energy parts; TEACHER TRAINING Electronic Discussion Group for Trainee Teachers; PUBLICATIONS Physics on Course 2002; WALES Physics in Powys; HIGHER EDUCATION HE solutions to the physics teacher shortage; SCOTLAND The 27th Scottish Stirling Meeting; NORTHERN IRELAND Belfast physics teachers' meeting; SCOTLAND Physics Summer School, Edinburgh 2001; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Physics education research: massive growth; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Just-In-Time Teaching;

  7. Geochemical characterization of the Mt. Harvard 15-minute quadrangle, Colorado, using NURE data

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlam, J.R.

    1984-09-01

    The geochemical characteristics of the Mt. Harvard 15-minute quadrangle, Colorado, were identified using data from National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) detailed and reconnaissance geochemical and geophysical surveys. Statistical and cartographic techniques developed during the NURE program were applied to the data, and the results were compared with published geologic mapping, geologic studies, and mineral-occurrence information. Interpretations based on these comparisons resulted in the identification of distinct geochemical environments which represent differing rock types, geologic structures, and mineral-occurrence or -deposit areas. Fifteen areas that have geochemical characteristics indicative of mineral deposits were delineated in this study. Nine of the areas contain elemental data that indicate known and potential base- and precious-metal deposits; four of the areas contain elemental data indicative of uranium deposits; and two of the areas contain data indicative of pegmatite deposits.

  8. A typical pointed observation in IRAS designed to fit into a 15 minute window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G.; Gregorich, D.

    1993-01-01

    A typical pointed observation in the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) was designed to fit into a 15 minute window. Observing constraints, however, did not always permit targets from the scientific program to be observed on exactly 15 minute centers and a few months into the mission it was realized that the automatic scheduling program left times when no observations were being made. In order to use this potentially wasted observing time, a mode of pointed observations, the 'filler' mode, with shorter observation duration was initiated. Locations were picked on an arbitrary grid, spaced relatively uniformly in ecliptic coordinates, and the telescope was pointed to one of these sites whenever a gap potentially occurred. One of us (GXN) was the coordinator of this effort (the FL sub-group). There are a total of 22 FL fields, 13 of which have more than 50 component observations. These 13 fields cover about 30 square degrees. It was proposed to concentrate on one filler field, FL29, a field with 53 coverages which thus had among the deepest coverage of those observed in this mode. This field was also observed extensively at various non-infrared wavelengths by a variety of techniques. Because the IRAS observations of FL29 were made at the limits of the survey sensitivity and at different twist angles it was necessary to make significant technical advances in the methods used in the processing and analyzing the data. In particular, if normal IRAS coaddition procedures were used, the noise resulting from coaddition of the multiple frames did not decrease in the manner expected once significantly different twist angles were included in the coaddition. The technical effort needed to reduce the observations of FL29 was completed and now the noise behavior is understood and well behaved. The reduction of the field FL29 observations is done.

  9. Detection of Bacillus spores within 15 minutes by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shende, Chetan; Inscore, Frank; Huang, Hermes; Farquharson, Stuart; Sengupta, Atanu

    2012-06-01

    Since the distribution of Bacillus anthracis causing spores through the US Postal System, there has been a persistent fear that biological warfare agents (BWAs) will be used by terrorists against our military abroad and our civilians at home. Despite the substantial effort to develop BWA analyzers, they remain either too slow, produce high falsealarm rates, lack sensitivity, or cannot be fielded. Consequently there remains a need for a portable analyzer that can overcome these limitations as expressed at the 2011 Biological Weapons Convention. To meet this need we have been developing a sample system that selectively binds BWAs and produce surface-enhanced Raman (SER) spectra using portable Raman spectrometers. Here we describe the use of a short peptide ligand functionalized on silver nanoparticles to selectively capture Bacillus cereus spores (a surrogate of B. anthracis) and their subsequent detection by SER spectroscopy. This technique was used to specifically detect B. cereus spores over closely related species like B. subtilis belonging to the same genus within 15 minutes. Sensitivity of the method was demonstrated by detecting 104 B. cereus spores/mL of water. The technology, once developed should prove invaluable for rapid monitoring of BWAs, which will immensely help first responders and emergency personnel in implementing appropriate counter measures.

  10. "15 Minutes Of Fame": exploring the temporal dimension of middle pleistocene lithic technology.

    PubMed

    Hallos, J

    2005-08-01

    This paper addresses the spatial and temporal dimensions of knapping routines through analysis of refit data. Many reconstructions of lithic tool production utilising refit data concentrate upon 'how' a piece of stone is taken apart, and less often consider the 'when' and 'where'. Lower Palaeolithic artefacts are frequently viewed as belonging to simplistic technical systems in which tools were made and used as and when required, showing little temporal depth. Modern knappers can replicate the components of the Acheulean toolkit, such as a biface, in around 15 minutes. The predominant use of local raw materials and the relatively simple reduction sequences observed on many Middle Pleistocene sites has given rise to the view that Acheulean hominins possessed an immediate approach to technology, and that artefacts did not stay in the technological system very long. In contrast, other researchers have stressed the increased planning abilities of hominins in relation to their stone tool-making and using routines. Increased planning abilities are often cited as a diagnostic feature of modern human cognition. As such, tracing the emergence of these abilities is an important avenue of research in human evolution. The aim of this paper is to investigate how the process of lithic production was organised on several Middle Pleistocene sites in northwest Europe. By comparing refitting sequences from several primary context sites, the different stages of reduction present at these locations can be reconstructed. Since refit sets record the work carried out in one place and time by an individual, they can be used to reconstruct the spatial and temporal dimension of these past technological activities. The analysis shows fragmentation of reduction sequences was a common occurrence, suggesting a more dynamic approach to tool-making and using activities than has previously been recognised. The analysis provides a description of these artefact dynamics, and discusses the underlying

  11. "15 Minutes Of Fame": exploring the temporal dimension of middle pleistocene lithic technology.

    PubMed

    Hallos, J

    2005-08-01

    This paper addresses the spatial and temporal dimensions of knapping routines through analysis of refit data. Many reconstructions of lithic tool production utilising refit data concentrate upon 'how' a piece of stone is taken apart, and less often consider the 'when' and 'where'. Lower Palaeolithic artefacts are frequently viewed as belonging to simplistic technical systems in which tools were made and used as and when required, showing little temporal depth. Modern knappers can replicate the components of the Acheulean toolkit, such as a biface, in around 15 minutes. The predominant use of local raw materials and the relatively simple reduction sequences observed on many Middle Pleistocene sites has given rise to the view that Acheulean hominins possessed an immediate approach to technology, and that artefacts did not stay in the technological system very long. In contrast, other researchers have stressed the increased planning abilities of hominins in relation to their stone tool-making and using routines. Increased planning abilities are often cited as a diagnostic feature of modern human cognition. As such, tracing the emergence of these abilities is an important avenue of research in human evolution. The aim of this paper is to investigate how the process of lithic production was organised on several Middle Pleistocene sites in northwest Europe. By comparing refitting sequences from several primary context sites, the different stages of reduction present at these locations can be reconstructed. Since refit sets record the work carried out in one place and time by an individual, they can be used to reconstruct the spatial and temporal dimension of these past technological activities. The analysis shows fragmentation of reduction sequences was a common occurrence, suggesting a more dynamic approach to tool-making and using activities than has previously been recognised. The analysis provides a description of these artefact dynamics, and discusses the underlying

  12. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the range use and behaviour of laying hens in commercial free-range flocks was explored. Six flocks were each visited on four separate days and data collected from their outdoor area (divided into zones based on distance from shed and available resources). These were: apron (0-10 m from shed normally without cover or other enrichments); enriched belt (10-50 m from shed where resources such as manmade cover, saplings and dust baths were provided); and outer range (beyond 50 m from shed with no cover and mainly grass pasture). Data collection consisted of counting the number of hens in each zone and recording behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distance (NND) of 20 birds per zone on each visit day. In addition, we used techniques derived from ecological surveys to establish four transects perpendicular to the shed, running through the apron, enriched belt and outer range. Number of hens in each 10 m × 10 m quadrat was recorded four times per day as was the temperature and relative humidity of the outer range. On average, 12.5% of hens were found outside. Of these, 5.4% were found in the apron; 4.3% in the enriched zone; and 2.8% were in the outer range. This pattern was supported by data from quadrats, where the density of hens sharply dropped with increasing distance from shed. Consequently, NND was greatest in the outer range, least in the apron and intermediate in the enriched belt. Hens sampled in outer range and enriched belts had better feather condition than those from the apron. Standing, ground pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded activities with standing and pecking most likely to occur in the apron, and walking and foraging more common in the outer range. Use of the outer range declined with lower temperatures and increasing relative humidity, though use of apron and enriched belt was not affected by variation in these measures. These data support previous findings that outer range areas tend to be

  13. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Commercial free-range production has become a significant sector of the fresh egg market due to legislation banning conventional cages and consumer preference for products perceived as welfare friendly, as access to outdoor range can lead to welfare benefits such as greater freedom of movement and enhanced behavioural opportunities. This study investigated dispersal patterns, feather condition and activity of laying hens in three distinct zones of the range area; the apron area near shed; enriched zone 10–50 m from shed; and outer range beyond 50 m, in six flocks of laying hens under commercial free-range conditions varying in size between 4000 and 24,000 hens. Each flock was visited for four days to record number of hens in each zone, their behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distances (NND), as well as record temperature and relative humidity during the visit. Temperature and relative humidity varied across the study period in line with seasonal variations and influenced the use of range with fewer hens out of shed as temperature fell or relative humidity rose. On average, 12.5% of the hens were observed on the range and most of these hens were recorded in the apron zone as hen density decreased rapidly with increasing distance from the shed. Larger flocks appeared to have a lower proportion of hens on range. The hens used the range more in the early morning followed by a progressive decrease through to early afternoon. The NND was greatest in the outer range and decreased towards the shed. Feather condition was generally good and hens observed in the outer range had the best overall feather condition. Standing, pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded behaviours and of these, standing occurred most in the apron whereas walking and foraging behaviours were recorded most in the outer range. This study supported the findings of previous studies that reported few hens in the range and greater use of areas closer

  14. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Commercial free-range production has become a significant sector of the fresh egg market due to legislation banning conventional cages and consumer preference for products perceived as welfare friendly, as access to outdoor range can lead to welfare benefits such as greater freedom of movement and enhanced behavioural opportunities. This study investigated dispersal patterns, feather condition and activity of laying hens in three distinct zones of the range area; the apron area near shed; enriched zone 10–50 m from shed; and outer range beyond 50 m, in six flocks of laying hens under commercial free-range conditions varying in size between 4000 and 24,000 hens. Each flock was visited for four days to record number of hens in each zone, their behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distances (NND), as well as record temperature and relative humidity during the visit. Temperature and relative humidity varied across the study period in line with seasonal variations and influenced the use of range with fewer hens out of shed as temperature fell or relative humidity rose. On average, 12.5% of the hens were observed on the range and most of these hens were recorded in the apron zone as hen density decreased rapidly with increasing distance from the shed. Larger flocks appeared to have a lower proportion of hens on range. The hens used the range more in the early morning followed by a progressive decrease through to early afternoon. The NND was greatest in the outer range and decreased towards the shed. Feather condition was generally good and hens observed in the outer range had the best overall feather condition. Standing, pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded behaviours and of these, standing occurred most in the apron whereas walking and foraging behaviours were recorded most in the outer range. This study supported the findings of previous studies that reported few hens in the range and greater use of areas closer

  15. SO MUCH TO DO, SO LITTLE TIME: CARE FOR THE SOCIALLY DISADVANTAGED AND THE 15-MINUTE VISIT

    PubMed Central

    Fiscella, Kevin; Epstein, Ronald M

    2008-01-01

    There is much to do in primary care and little time to do it. Currently, primary care delivery is organized around visits, often 15 minutes or less, during which much is expected of clinicians. This includes establishing partnerships with patient and families; addressing acute and chronic biomedical and psychosocial problems; prevention, care coordination; and ensuring informed decision-making that respects patients’ needs and preferences. Visit-based care discriminates against socially disadvantaged patients, who often require more time due to complex health care needs and the challenge of establishing partnerships and communicating across chasms of race, ethnicity, education, language, and culture. Rushed visits exacerbate disparities in health car due to competing demands, miscommunications and activation of unconscious physician stereotypes. Addressing health care disparities requires radical transformation in the structure and financing of primary care and the roles of the health care team members and patients. One such innovation, the patient-centered medical home, organizes care around patients’ needs, not visits. Thus, face-to-face visits and physician-centered care are supplanted by team-based care that relies on multiple communication modalities, expanded health information technology, population management, culturally-sensitive outreach and follow-up, and coaching patients to assume more active roles in care. Implementation requires payment reform that allocates resources based on the true costs of providing high quality care to socially disadvantaged patients. Ensuring success will require physician leadership and training in new care models, transformation in primary care culture, and redesign of care around the needs of patients, particularly those needing care the most. PMID:18809810

  16. Research News

    MedlinePlus

    Research News - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis ... Email Home Research Research News & Progress Research News Research News Share Smaller Text Larger Text Print Read ...

  17. Core temperature changes and sprint performance of elite female soccer players after a 15-minute warm-up in a hot-humid environment.

    PubMed

    Somboonwong, Juraiporn; Chutimakul, Ladawan; Sanguanrungsirikul, Sompol

    2015-01-01

    Warm-up session should be modified according to the environmental conditions. However, there is limited evidence regarding the proper soccer warm-up time for female players in the heat. The purpose of this study was to examine the rise in core body temperature and the sprint performance after a 15-minute warm-up in a hot-humid environment using female soccer players during the different phases of their menstrual cycle. Thirteen eumenorrheic national female soccer players (aged 18.8 ± 1.3 years, (Equation is included in full-text article.)53.05 ± 6.66 ml·kg·min) performed a 15-minute warm-up protocol at an ambient temperature of 32.5 ± 1.6° C with a relative humidity of 53.6 ± 10.2% during their early follicular and midluteal phases of their cycle. The warm-up protocol is composed of jogging, skipping by moving the legs in various directions, and sprinting alternated with jogging, followed by a 45-minute recovery period. Rectal temperatures were recorded during the rest period and every 5 minutes throughout the warm-up and recovery phases of the study. Heart rate was monitored at rest and every 5 minutes during the warm-up. Forty-yard sprint time was assessed immediately after the completion of warm-up, which was later compared with the time at baseline. The value for the baseline was obtained at least 2 days before the experiment. During the early follicular and midluteal phases, the rectal temperatures obtained at the end of the warm-up period were significantly (p < 0.05) higher by 1.26° C (95% confidence interval [CI] = +0.46 to +2.06° C) and 1.18° C (95% CI = +0.53 to +1.83° C), whereas the heart rates increased to 153.67 ± 20.34 and 158.38 ± 15.19 b·min, respectively. After 20 minutes of the recovery period, the rectal temperature decreased by approximately 50%. The sprint times were significantly (p < 0.05) faster post-warm-up during both the early follicular (5.52 seconds; 95% CI = 5.43-5.60 seconds) and midluteal phases (5.51 seconds; 95% CI

  18. Evaluation of alcaftadine 0.25% ophthalmic solution in acute allergic conjunctivitis at 15 minutes and 16 hours after instillation versus placebo and olopatadine 0.1%

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Jack V; Edwards-Swanson, Kimberly; Ingerman, Avner

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of alcaftadine 0.05%, 0.1%, and 0.25% ophthalmic solutions in treating the signs and symptoms of allergic conjunctivitis when compared with olopatadine hydrochloride 0.1% and placebo using the conjunctival allergen challenge (CAC) model. Methods One hundred and seventy subjects were randomized and 164 subjects completed all visits. CAC was performed to determine and confirm subjects’ eligibility at visits 1 and 2, respectively. The CAC was repeated at visit 3 (day 0 ± 3), 16 hours after study medication instillation, and at visit 4 (day 14 ± 3), 15 minutes after instillation. Ocular itching and conjunctival redness were evaluated after an allergen challenge, along with several secondary endpoints. Results Alcaftadine 0.25% and olopatadine 0.1% treatments exhibited significantly lower mean scores compared with placebo for ocular itching and conjunctival redness at visits 3 and 4. Most adverse events were self-limiting and mild in severity. No serious treatment-related adverse events occurred. Conclusion Treatment with alcaftadine 0.25% ophthalmic solution resulted in mean differences of >1 unit (ocular itching) and approximately >1 unit (conjunctival redness), which was significant (P < 0.001) compared with placebo treatment. All doses of alcaftadine were safe and well tolerated in the population studied. PMID:21339800

  19. Spatio-temporal distribution of Saharan dust source activations inferred from 15-minute MSG-SEVIRI observations and its links to meteorological processes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepanski, K.; Tegen, I.

    2009-12-01

    Mineral dust aerosol emitted from arid and semi-arid areas impacts on the weather and climate system by affecting e.g. radiation fluxes and nutrient cycles. The emission of dust particles depend strongly on surface wind velocity and turbulent fluxes as well as on surface characteristics like surface texture and vegetation cover. To estimate the effect of dust aerosol, detailed knowledge on the spatio-temporal distribution of active dust sources is necessary. As dust sources are mostly located over remote areas satellite observations are suitable for localizing active dust sources. Thereby the accuracy of determining dust sources from such an indirect method is limited by the temporal resolution and the ambiguities of the retrieval. A 1°x1° map on the spatial and temporal (3-hourly) distribution of dust source activations (DSA) over North Africa is compiled starting in March 2006. For dust source identification 15-minute Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) infra-red (IR) dust index images are used based on brightness temperature measurements by the Spinning enhanced Visible and Infra-Red Imager (SEVIRI) at 8.7 µm, 10.8 µm and 12.0 µm. This data set has been used (1) to identify most active dust source areas, and (2) to investigate on the temporal distribution of occurring dust source activations. Over the Sahara Desert 65% of dust sources becomes active during 06-09 UTC pointing towards an important role of the break-down of the nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) for dust mobilization besides other meteorological features like density currents, haboobs, and cyclones. Furthermore the role of the nocturnal LLJ for dust mobilization over the Sahara is investigated by weather observations and a modelling study. DSA observations of the last 3.5 years indicate an interannual variability in frequencies of local dust source activations. The causes of this variability will be analyzed with respect to corresponding atmospheric conditions.

  20. Data-based mechanistic modeling of dissolved organic carbon load through storms using continuous 15-minute resolution observations within UK upland watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T.; Chappell, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    Few watershed modeling studies have addressed DOC dynamics through storm hydrographs (notable exceptions include Boyer et al., 1997 Hydrol Process; Jutras et al., 2011 Ecol Model; Xu et al., 2012 Water Resour Res). In part this has been a consequence of an incomplete understanding of the biogeochemical processes leading to DOC export to streams (Neff & Asner, 2001, Ecosystems) & an insufficient frequency of DOC monitoring to capture sometimes complex time-varying relationships between DOC & storm hydrographs (Kirchner et al., 2004, Hydrol Process). We present the results of a new & ongoing UK study that integrates two components - 1/ New observations of DOC concentrations (& derived load) continuously monitored at 15 minute intervals through multiple seasons for replicated watersheds; & 2/ A dynamic modeling technique that is able to quantify storage-decay effects, plus hysteretic, nonlinear, lagged & non-stationary relationships between DOC & controlling variables (including rainfall, streamflow, temperature & specific biogeochemical variables e.g., pH, nitrate). DOC concentration is being monitored continuously using the latest generation of UV spectrophotometers (i.e. S::CAN spectro::lysers) with in situ calibrations to laboratory analyzed DOC. The controlling variables are recorded simultaneously at the same stream stations. The watersheds selected for study are among the most intensively studied basins in the UK uplands, namely the Plynlimon & Llyn Brianne experimental basins. All contain areas of organic soils, with three having improved grasslands & three conifer afforested. The dynamic response characteristics (DRCs) that describe detailed DOC behaviour through sequences of storms are simulated using the latest identification routines for continuous time transfer function (CT-TF) models within the Matlab-based CAPTAIN toolbox (some incorporating nonlinear components). To our knowledge this is the first application of CT-TFs to modelling DOC processes

  1. NEWS: Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leeds. Physics at Work Exhibition: 12-14 September, University of Cambridge The year 2000 Exhibition will be the 16th organized by Brenda Jennison. The exhibition will be held at the Cavendish Laboratory and further details can be obtained from Brenda at the University (tel: 01223 332888, fax: 01223 332894 or e-mail: bmj10@cam.ac.uk). News on GNVQ science The Institute of Physics and the Royal Society of Chemistry are currently financing the compilation of a directory of resources to assist teachers in identifying and selecting suitable materials for teaching the new GNVQ science specifications. Work on the first part of the directory will soon be completed and it is hoped to publish the material in both print and electronic forms before the end of the summer term. This first part covers resources - all evaluated by practising GNVQ teachers - supporting the teaching of the compulsory units for Advanced GNVQ Science. A small team comprising a physics teacher, a chemistry teacher and a biology teacher, all involved with GNVQ programmes and led by Dr Ken Gadd, has carried out the work. They have established a network of teachers around the country to help with the evaluation of curriculum materials. The next part of the project will be to examine the feasibility of providing a similar listing for the optional units at this level. Future development, depending on the availability of funds, will extend the project to Intermediate level programmes in science, including the Part One, once its structure has been agreed at QCA. Further information about the Directory and the next phase of development will be available in the autumn. Activities Physics on Stage The future of science, technology and the ensuing wealth creation potential for Britain will depend on the quality of science education in schools today. Yet the numbers studying physics, which underpins science and engineering, are falling. This problem is currently

  2. Computer News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities: Classroom Projects and Curriculum Ideas, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents several news stories about computers and technology. (1) Applied Science Associates of Narragansett, Rhode Island is providing computer modeling technology to help locate the remains to the USS Bonhomme Richard, which sank in 1779 after claiming a Revolutionary War victory. (2) Whyville, the leading edu-tainment virtual world…

  3. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. March 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. These daily classroom guides present top stories, headlines, environmental news, and other current events, along with suggested class discussion topics and activities to accompany the broadcasts for one…

  4. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. June 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. These daily classroom guides present top stories, headlines, environmental news, and other current events, along with suggested class discussion topics and activities to accompany the broadcasts for one…

  5. Measuring News Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  6. National Cancer Institute News

    MedlinePlus

    ... Workshop NCI Annual Fact Book NCI Visuals Online Social Media @NCIMedia NCI YouTube Subscribe to NCI News Releases ... posts Subscribe Events Scientific Meetings and Lectures Conferences Social Media Events News Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 ...

  7. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    News from Journal House

    National Chemistry Week (NCW)

    National Chemistry Week Celebrating Chemistry and Art is the theme of NCW 2001, to be held November 4-10, 2001. As you make plans for participating in the celebrations in your area, keep in mind that JCE is developing special materials on this theme, which will appear in our October issue: Classroom Activities, a comprehensive Illustrated Resource Paper, Report from Online, specially written brief articles illustrated in color, articles related to the theme, and CLIPs (Chemical Laboratory Information Profiles).

    Awards Announced

    Passer Award

    Passer Award recipients from the April 1 closing date are:
    • George Bennett, Millikin University, Decatur, IL
    • Daniel Berger, Bluffton College, Bluffton, OH
    • Karen Dunlap, Sierra College, Rocklin, CA
    • Myung-Hoon Kim, Georgia Perimeter College, Dunwoody, GA
    • Cheryl Longfellow, Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA
    • Jerry Maas, Oakton Community College, Des Plaines, IL
    • Tim Royappa, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL

    Visiting Scientist Award, Western Connecticut Section

    Diane Bunce, The Catholic University of America, has been selected as the 2001 Visiting Scientist of the Western Connecticut Section of the ACS. The award, presented annually since 1967, brings an outstanding chemical educator to visit high schools in Fairfield County, CT. In May, Bunce visited three high schools, Christian Heritage School, Fairfield High School, and Greenwich High School, where she interacted with teachers and students and presented lectures and demonstrations to several chemistry classes. She was also keynote speaker at the ACS local section's Education Night. The awardee is selected by a committee of university and high school teachers, industrial chemists, and the previous Visiting Scientist

  8. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    News from Journal House

    National Chemistry Week (NCW)

    National Chemistry Week Celebrating Chemistry and Art is the theme of NCW 2001, to be held November 4-10, 2001. As you make plans for participating in the celebrations in your area, keep in mind that JCE is developing special materials on this theme, which will appear in our October issue: Classroom Activities, a comprehensive Illustrated Resource Paper, Report from Online, specially written brief articles illustrated in color, articles related to the theme, and CLIPs (Chemical Laboratory Information Profiles).

    Awards Announced

    Passer Award

    Passer Award recipients from the April 1 closing date are:
    • George Bennett, Millikin University, Decatur, IL
    • Daniel Berger, Bluffton College, Bluffton, OH
    • Karen Dunlap, Sierra College, Rocklin, CA
    • Myung-Hoon Kim, Georgia Perimeter College, Dunwoody, GA
    • Cheryl Longfellow, Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA
    • Jerry Maas, Oakton Community College, Des Plaines, IL
    • Tim Royappa, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL

    Visiting Scientist Award, Western Connecticut Section

    Diane Bunce, The Catholic University of America, has been selected as the 2001 Visiting Scientist of the Western Connecticut Section of the ACS. The award, presented annually since 1967, brings an outstanding chemical educator to visit high schools in Fairfield County, CT. In May, Bunce visited three high schools, Christian Heritage School, Fairfield High School, and Greenwich High School, where she interacted with teachers and students and presented lectures and demonstrations to several chemistry classes. She was also keynote speaker at the ACS local section's Education Night. The awardee is selected by a committee of university and high school teachers, industrial chemists, and the previous Visiting Scientist

  9. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    News from Journal House

    Guidelines for Submission The Journal's current Guide to Submissions can be found on pages 29-30 of this issue. They have been streamlined a bit and also include a handy check list. This information is also available on JCE Online at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Authors/. Wanted: Demo Checkers The Tested Demonstrations column needs people who like to try out demos. Column editor Ed Vitz is looking for additional volunteers to serve as "checkers" for manuscripts that have been submitted to the Journal for possible publication as Tested Demonstrations. A checker is expected to perform two functions: to review the manuscript for accuracy and novelty, and to attempt to perform the demonstration according to the procedure supplied by the author. Checkers may suggest important improvements in demonstration procedures, and for their efforts they are cited in the byline when the manuscript is published. For instance, the demo showing the yellow cascading precipitates (lead iodide) made from potassium iodide and lead nitrate was submitted by Wobbe de Vos and checked by Kim Kostka. The (yellow) cascading precipitates are from "Using Large Glass Cylinders To Demonstrate Chemical Reactions" that appeared in the April 1999 issue of JCE. We prefer that checkers begin the review process (which may in some cases involve procuring supplies) very soon after being contacted so that their review can be completed in the timely manner that authors deserve. Checkers are usually teachers who routinely present lecture demonstrations in their classes in either high school or colleges. We try not to call on checkers more often than once a year, which is one of the reasons for this request. Another is that we lose many highly valued, experienced checkers to retirement or other endeavors. Prospective checkers may want to look at a copy of the JCE Tested Demonstration Evaluation Form. It can be found on the Web at http://www.kutztown.edu/ vitz

  10. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    News from Journal House

    Guidelines for Submission The Journal's current Guide to Submissions can be found on pages 29-30 of this issue. They have been streamlined a bit and also include a handy check list. This information is also available on JCE Online at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Authors/. Wanted: Demo Checkers The Tested Demonstrations column needs people who like to try out demos. Column editor Ed Vitz is looking for additional volunteers to serve as "checkers" for manuscripts that have been submitted to the Journal for possible publication as Tested Demonstrations. A checker is expected to perform two functions: to review the manuscript for accuracy and novelty, and to attempt to perform the demonstration according to the procedure supplied by the author. Checkers may suggest important improvements in demonstration procedures, and for their efforts they are cited in the byline when the manuscript is published. For instance, the demo showing the yellow cascading precipitates (lead iodide) made from potassium iodide and lead nitrate was submitted by Wobbe de Vos and checked by Kim Kostka. The (yellow) cascading precipitates are from "Using Large Glass Cylinders To Demonstrate Chemical Reactions" that appeared in the April 1999 issue of JCE. We prefer that checkers begin the review process (which may in some cases involve procuring supplies) very soon after being contacted so that their review can be completed in the timely manner that authors deserve. Checkers are usually teachers who routinely present lecture demonstrations in their classes in either high school or colleges. We try not to call on checkers more often than once a year, which is one of the reasons for this request. Another is that we lose many highly valued, experienced checkers to retirement or other endeavors. Prospective checkers may want to look at a copy of the JCE Tested Demonstration Evaluation Form. It can be found on the Web at http://www.kutztown.edu/ vitz

  11. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-08-01

    News from Journal House Perspective on JCE Online Recently a reader asked us for a perspective on JCE Onlinehow the chemical education community is receiving it and how the Journal staff itself views it. We share our responses below. Subscriber Numbers How many people subscribe to JCE Online+? As of June 1, 1999, our records show that 13% of individual JCE subscriptions in the USA include JCE Online+. This percentage has increased significantly during the past year- in June 1998 it was approximately 4% and December 1998 about 7%. Almost all subscribers to JCE Online subscribe to print as well. Since JCE Online has only very recently been made available to institutional subscribers, there are no numbers to report. There has been considerable interest in online from libraries. Given that JCE Online+ is a fairly recent subscriber option and that many subscribers have a wait-and-see approach to any new option, we feel that the numbers above are quite high. The steady growth is encouraging. Online Usage How many people visit our Web site? Statistics for the period January 1, 1999, through May 31, 1999, that may be of interest include:

    Total Pages Served 361,115

    Total Visits 138,377

    Total Unique Visitors 51,744

    Total Repeat Visitors 11,536

    Average Visit Length 03:05

    Average Requests/Visit 10.8

    Average Pages/Visit 2.6

    Average Daily Visits 916 Online Rationale and Expectations JCE Online is a very important part of the whole Journal, but we do not expect it to supplant print: online and print are very different media. Usage of JCE Online is growing steadily; our subscribers are realizing what we have learned: it is not possible to deliver the Journal in the print medium alone- print is no longer adequate to accomplish our mission. Examples of things not possible in print include:

    ·JCE Index to all 76

  12. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    News from Journal House

    Journal Ambassadors, 1999 What do the people listed below have in common? A search of our records indicates that each has been a participant in our Journal Ambassador program during 1999.
    • Guy Anderson
    • Jim Becvar
    • Jerry Bell
    • Jim Birk
    • Diane Bunce
    • Ann Cartwright
    • Thomas Clark
    • Jane Crosby
    • Maria Dean
    • Art Ellis
    • Donald Elswick
    • Tommy Franklin
    • Babu George
    • Paul Heath
    • Angela Hoffman
    • Lynn Hogue
    • J. J. Lagowski
    • Frank Lambert
    • Dorothy Lehmkuhl
    • George Lelevre
    • Scott Luaders
    • Jane McMullen
    • Marci Merritt
    • Carl Minnier
    • Richard Narske
    • Ron Perkins
    • Gabriel Pinto
    • Dick Potts
    • Herb Retcofsky
    • Jerry Sarquis
    • Elke Schoffers
    • Sara Selfe
    • Uni Susskind
    • J. Mark Tolman
    • John Varine
    • Dawn Wakeley
    • Marla White
    Those who are a part of this program take materials about the Journal to workshops, outreach programs, seminars, regional meetings, award nights, short courses, and other events at home and abroad, places where people who are interested in chemical education gather. Given about three weeks notice, we can outfit you with a variety of materials that will help others get tuned in to the good things that are happening in chemical education. We can send you an assortment of Journal issues, subscription forms, our Publications/Software Catalog, reprints from the Viewpoints series, copies of Classroom Activities, or JCE Gift Award Certificates, assuming that supplies are available. Of course we can arrange for the group to have temporary access to JCE Online. We can send you a brochure about the Ambassador program or answer any questions - just ask: email to jce@chem.wisc.edu; phone 1-800-991-5534 (U.S.) or 608-262-5153 (non-U.S.); fax 608-265-8094. If by chance you were a Journal Ambassador in 1999 but your name was not included, just let us know so that you can be recognized in a future column. Gift

  13. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. July 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. The daily CNN Newsroom broadcast is supported by a Daily Classroom Guide, written by professional educators. These classroom guides are designed to accompany CNN Newsroom broadcasts for a given month,…

  14. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. July, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free of charge to participating schools. This guide is designed to accompany the program for July 1997. Top stories include the following: Britain's hand over of Hong Kong to the People's Republic of China; regulating business on the…

  15. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. January 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. These Daily Classroom Guides support broadcasts of CNN Newsroom for January 1999. Each guide contains program rundowns for that day's broadcast, discussion activities, and links to external Web sites.…

  16. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. April 1-30, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. These daily Classroom Guides are designed to accompany the broadcast, and contain activities for discussing top stories, headlines, and other current events topics; each guide also includes World Wide…

  17. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. May 1-29, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. These guides are designed to accompany the program broadcasts for May 1-29, 1998. Top stories include: effects of a labor strike on Denmark's economy (May 1); the new currency of the European Union, the…

  18. "Good News" Tune Makes Discussion of "Bad News" Sing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sneed, Don

    1984-01-01

    Recommends playing Anne Murray's recording of "A Little Good News" to promote discussion about the nature of news and Bobbie Gentry's "Ode to Billy Joe" for discussion on writing news stories about suicides. (CRH)

  19. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-08-01

    News from Journal House Perspective on JCE Online Recently a reader asked us for a perspective on JCE Onlinehow the chemical education community is receiving it and how the Journal staff itself views it. We share our responses below. Subscriber Numbers How many people subscribe to JCE Online+? As of June 1, 1999, our records show that 13% of individual JCE subscriptions in the USA include JCE Online+. This percentage has increased significantly during the past year- in June 1998 it was approximately 4% and December 1998 about 7%. Almost all subscribers to JCE Online subscribe to print as well. Since JCE Online has only very recently been made available to institutional subscribers, there are no numbers to report. There has been considerable interest in online from libraries. Given that JCE Online+ is a fairly recent subscriber option and that many subscribers have a wait-and-see approach to any new option, we feel that the numbers above are quite high. The steady growth is encouraging. Online Usage How many people visit our Web site? Statistics for the period January 1, 1999, through May 31, 1999, that may be of interest include:

    Total Pages Served 361,115

    Total Visits 138,377

    Total Unique Visitors 51,744

    Total Repeat Visitors 11,536

    Average Visit Length 03:05

    Average Requests/Visit 10.8

    Average Pages/Visit 2.6

    Average Daily Visits 916 Online Rationale and Expectations JCE Online is a very important part of the whole Journal, but we do not expect it to supplant print: online and print are very different media. Usage of JCE Online is growing steadily; our subscribers are realizing what we have learned: it is not possible to deliver the Journal in the print medium alone- print is no longer adequate to accomplish our mission. Examples of things not possible in print include:

    ·JCE Index to all 76

  20. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    News from Journal House

    Journal Ambassadors, 1999 What do the people listed below have in common? A search of our records indicates that each has been a participant in our Journal Ambassador program during 1999.
    • Guy Anderson
    • Jim Becvar
    • Jerry Bell
    • Jim Birk
    • Diane Bunce
    • Ann Cartwright
    • Thomas Clark
    • Jane Crosby
    • Maria Dean
    • Art Ellis
    • Donald Elswick
    • Tommy Franklin
    • Babu George
    • Paul Heath
    • Angela Hoffman
    • Lynn Hogue
    • J. J. Lagowski
    • Frank Lambert
    • Dorothy Lehmkuhl
    • George Lelevre
    • Scott Luaders
    • Jane McMullen
    • Marci Merritt
    • Carl Minnier
    • Richard Narske
    • Ron Perkins
    • Gabriel Pinto
    • Dick Potts
    • Herb Retcofsky
    • Jerry Sarquis
    • Elke Schoffers
    • Sara Selfe
    • Uni Susskind
    • J. Mark Tolman
    • John Varine
    • Dawn Wakeley
    • Marla White
    Those who are a part of this program take materials about the Journal to workshops, outreach programs, seminars, regional meetings, award nights, short courses, and other events at home and abroad, places where people who are interested in chemical education gather. Given about three weeks notice, we can outfit you with a variety of materials that will help others get tuned in to the good things that are happening in chemical education. We can send you an assortment of Journal issues, subscription forms, our Publications/Software Catalog, reprints from the Viewpoints series, copies of Classroom Activities, or JCE Gift Award Certificates, assuming that supplies are available. Of course we can arrange for the group to have temporary access to JCE Online. We can send you a brochure about the Ambassador program or answer any questions - just ask: email to jce@chem.wisc.edu; phone 1-800-991-5534 (U.S.) or 608-262-5153 (non-U.S.); fax 608-265-8094. If by chance you were a Journal Ambassador in 1999 but your name was not included, just let us know so that you can be recognized in a future column. Gift

  1. With News Search Engines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, Holly

    2005-01-01

    Although there are many news search engines on the Web, finding the news items one wants can be challenging. Choosing appropriate search terms is one of the biggest challenges. Unless one has seen the article that one is seeking, it is often difficult to select words that were used in the headline or text of the article. The limited archives of…

  2. Working with News Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosenbaugh, Dick

    To work effectively with personnel in the news media, one needs to assist them in doing their job by getting accurate information to them (in plenty of time for their deadline) and in providing information about meetings (when they do not have a reporter to cover the event). Familiarity aids in communication with news media personnel so one should…

  3. National PKU News

    MedlinePlus

    ... and History Staff & Board How Much Phe Guthrie-Koch Scholarship Books Resources Support Us Contact Us Donors ... new Amino Acid Analysis Results This Year’s Guthrie-Koch PKU Scholarship Winners © 2016 National PKU News

  4. Water Power Program News

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-19

    News stories about conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies from the U.S. Department of Energy, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the Wind and Water Power Program, and other federal agencies.

  5. Turning News into Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otten, Nick; Stelmach, Majorie

    1987-01-01

    Suggests young people can respond to news stories and political issues they feel strongly about through poetry, and presents one student's effective use of satire which lets his emotions "leak through" to the reader. (NH)

  6. CCG - News & Events

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's Center for Cancer Genomics (CCG) has been widely recognized for its research efforts to facilitiate advances in cancer genomic research and improve patient outcomes. Find the latest news about and events featuring CCG.

  7. In the News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reece, Lauren

    2000-01-01

    A board member in an Iowa district explains the importance of presenting 4-minute summaries of educational news and trends at board meetings. In choosing items for presentation, she considers relevance, context, perspective, terminology, awareness, and national political developments. (MLH)

  8. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Highlights major science news stories of 1982 reported in "Science News." Categories include space/astronomy, biology, chemistry, medicine, energy, physics, anthropology/paleontology, earth sciences, technology, behavior, science/society, and the environment. (JN)

  9. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Highlights important 1983 news stories reported in Science News. Stories are categorized under: anthropology/paleontology; behavior; biology; chemistry; earth sciences; energy; environment; medicine; physics; science and society; space sciences and astronomy; and technology and computers. (JN)

  10. News | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    News about scientific advances in cancer prevention, program activities, and new projects are included here in NCI press releases and fact sheets, articles from the NCI Cancer Bulletin, and Clinical Trial News from the NCI website.

  11. Science News of the Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presented is a review of important science news stories reported in Science News during 1976. Most items include a volume and page number reference to the issue of Science News in which the article appeared. Items are grouped under general major headings such as: space, astronomy, medicine, chemistry, etc. (SL)

  12. Political News and Political Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schertges, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with mass media in modern democratic societies, using the example of Israeli news reports in German television (TV) news. Central to this interest are processes of mediating politics: political socialisation and education; that is to say, empowering citizens via TV news to participate in democratic processes. The article…

  13. The Structure of Foreign News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Robert L.; Thompson, Kirstin D.

    To examine the ways in which aspects of foreign news content are linked together, an analysis was performed on the data collected during a content analysis of foreign news in major national daily newspapers and broadcast news programs over 12 days. The analysis included the identification of (1) up to four topics from an all-inclusive descriptive…

  14. Delivering bad news to patients.

    PubMed

    Monden, Kimberley R; Gentry, Lonnie; Cox, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    When physicians lack proper training, breaking bad news can lead to negative consequences for patients, families, and physicians. A questionnaire was used to determine whether a didactic program on delivering bad news was needed at our institution. Results revealed that 91% of respondents perceived delivering bad news as a very important skill, but only 40% felt they had the training to effectively deliver such news. We provide a brief review of different approaches to delivering bad news and advocate for training physicians in a comprehensive, structured model.

  15. News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Lifer, Evan; Olson, Renee; Milliot, Jim; Bing, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    Reviews library news for 1997. Highlights public library budgets, examined by number of patrons served; Internet filters and censorship; librarians and the media; private and government funding sources; outsourcing; expectations for growth in the publishing industry, emphasizing the Asian economic crisis; and new ideas from the next generation of…

  16. Inexpensive News Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Ellen D.; Wall, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    Describes consumer or business-oriented online services that provide access to current news information and offers a less expensive alternative to standard online databases. Online clipping services are discussed, their costs are examined, and profiles of five services are compared: CompuServe, CompuServe as a gateway to IQuest, DELPHI, DIALCOM,…

  17. Antarctic news clips, 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-08-01

    Published stories are presented that sample a year's news coverage of Antarctica. The intent is to provide the U.S. Antarctic Program participants with a digest of current issues as presented by a variety of writers and popular publications. The subject areas covered include the following: earth science; ice studies; stratospheric ozone; astrophysics; life science; operations; education; antarctic treaty issues; and tourism

  18. News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Lifer, Evan; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This section includes three articles that review library news from the past year. Highlights include public library budgets, examined by geographic regions; government programs; flood damage; library school closings; school library media programs; publishing industry concerns, including mergers, broadening markets, and on-demand printing; and…

  19. News Editing. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westley, Bruce H.

    A revision of the first edition of "News Editing," this is a textbook for the newspaper editor. The duties of the editor are detailed, as are those of other newspaper employees. Among the basic editing skills the author includes suggestions for sentence structure, word usage, and vocabulary. Examples are given of editing for objectivity, handling…

  20. Parent News Offline, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Anne S., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This document is comprised of the two issues in volume 5 of "Parent News Offline," a publication of the National Parent Information Network (NPIN) designed to introduced those without Internet Access to the activities and information available through NPIN. The Spring 2003 issue contains the following articles: (1) "Summer Academic Programs" (Anne…

  1. E News: Report highlights

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    Three technologies are highlighted in this issue: a rooftop ice storage system for small commercial loads; chlorofluorocarbon-free electric chillers and their expected market; and the FlashBake oven, a commercial-sized oven that uses high intensity quartz lamps to cook food quickly. Regular columns on Member News and Work in Progress are included.

  2. The News, Fall 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Ray, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This fall 2002 newsletter from the Community College League of California contains several articles, news stories, and the brochure from the 2002 Annual Convention, "Celebrating the Way California LEARNS." Articles include: (1) "Nursing Shortage Poses Dilemma for Colleges: Access vs. Efficiency," a discussion of the debate over how to increase the…

  3. NewsWire, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrom, Elizabeth, Ed.; Bingham, Margaret, Ed.; Bowman, Gloria, Ed.; Shoemaker, Dan, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the 3 2002 issues of the newsletter "NewsWire," (volume 5). Issue Number One focuses on collaborative Web projects. This issue begins with descriptions of four individual projects: "iEARN"; "Operation RubyThroat"; "Follow the Polar Huskies!"; and "Log in Your Animal Roadkill!" Features that follow include: "Bringing the…

  4. NO news is no new news

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fotheringham, C.J.; Keeley, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    In the paper 'NO News', Preston et al. (2004) make a number of erroneous assumptions regarding nitrogen oxide chemistry. These authors also present some very significant misinterpretations of previous research into the effects of various nitrogen oxides on germination of post-fire followers. Methodological differences between the study by Preston et al. (2004) and previous work are also problematic, such as using NO-donors in solution versus the use of direct application of various nitrogen oxides in the gaseous phase. A closer review of these studies, with the proper understanding of nitrogen oxide chemistry, and interpretations of the available literature, would lead to the conclusion that, contrary to the authors' assertions, the Preston et al. (2004) study supports, rather than refutes, earlier findings by Keeley and Fotheringham (1997, 1998a, b, 2000). ?? CAB International 2005.

  5. A Comparison of Bad News on Radio and Television Using the News Morbidity Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, Jack B.

    A reliable "news morbidity" scale was developed to measure the prevalence of bad and good news on radio and television; the scale was then used in a pilot study of one city's news output. The news morbidity scale is a seven-step scale ranging from "extremely bad" to "extremely good" news. A sample of 945 television and 1,105 radio news stories…

  6. ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS NEWS.

    PubMed

    Stremmel, Neil; Struck, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    American National Standards (ANSI Standards) developed by Accredited Standards Committees S1, S2, S3, S3/SC 1, and S12 in the areas of acoustics, mechanical vibration and shock, bioacoustics, animal bioacoustics, and noise, respectively, are published by the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). In addition to these standards, ASA publishes a catalog of Acoustical American National Standards. To receive a copy of the latest Standards catalog, please contact Neil Stremmel.Comments are welcomed on all material in Acoustical Standards News.This Acoustical Standards News section in JASA, as well as the National Catalog of Acoustical Standards and other information on the Standards Program of the Acoustical Society of America, are available via the ASA home page: http://acousticalsociety.org. PMID:27475185

  7. Contact: Releasing the news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  8. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Reviews major science news stories of 1988 as reported in the pages of Science News. Covers the areas of anthropology, astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, earth sciences, environment, food science, mathematics and computers, paleobiology, physics, science and society, space sciences, and technology. (YP)

  9. What Turns Events into News?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tukachinsky, Riva

    2013-01-01

    "The New York Times" is known for its slogan ''All the News That's Fit to Print.'' But how do gatekeepers decide which events meet this criterion? Although some individuals might believe that the news constitutes an undistorted reflection of the social reality, students in communication courses have the…

  10. News Flow between the Americas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Robert L.; And Others

    As part of an international study of world news flow undertaken by the International Association for Mass Communication Research, a content analysis was conducted of foreign news stories in the largest circulation newspapers in Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina, as well as in six papers in the United States, and of material from the files of "Agence…

  11. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Reviews important science news stories reported during 1984 in "Science News" magazine. These stories are in the categories of: anthropology and paleontology; behavior; biology; chemistry; computers; mathematics; earth science; the environment; medicine; physics; science and society; space sciences and astronomy; and technology. (JN)

  12. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides a review of science news stories reported in "Science News" during 1987. References each item to the volume and page number in which the subject was addressed. Contains references on astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, earth sciences, environment, mathematics and computers, paleontology and anthropology, physics, science…

  13. Television News Exchanges in Asia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flournoy, Don M.

    In 1984, a project was initiated in Asia under the sponsorship of the Asia Pacific Broadcasting Union that represents a major break-through in achieving a better balance in the collection, editing, and distribution of the world's news. This break-through was the Asiavision Satellite News Exchange, which has made it possible for many Asian…

  14. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Presented is a review of important science news stories of 1989 as reported in the pages of "Science News." Topics include anthropology, astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, environment, food science, math and computers, paleobiology, physics, science and society, space sciences, and technology. (CW)

  15. NEWS: Web's wonders!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    Introducing this month's collection of useful websites for physics teachers. If you have any suggestions for this column then please send them to us at ped@ioppublishing.co.uk Dave Pickersgill has drawn our attention to the following: www.sheffcol.ac.uk/links/ which has annotated, classified and searchable links to over 1700 educational sites. Included are around 500 science links. Members of the American Association of Physics Teachers were recently informed of a website for those hoping to arouse interest and knowledge of astronomy in their students. Space.com, a comprehensive space news website, had launched `spaceKids', a new channel specifically targeted at children complete with a gallery of space images, space and science news, stories, a space question and answer section hosted by a team of science teachers, interactive games, weekly polls and competitions. The website can be found at www.spacekids.com Those fascinated by all aspects of nuclear fusion should take a look at the General Atomics educational site: FusionEd.gat.com as well as the national site fusion.gat.com/PlasmaOutreach

  16. News Photos in "Time" and "Newsweek."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Kuo-jen

    1984-01-01

    Investigates how news pictures in two national news magazines have portrayed the world and the United States to their readers. Concludes that both magazines used far more news pictures about the United States than about foreign countries and that international news pictures were more violent-oriented than United States pictures. (FL)

  17. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers...

  18. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers...

  19. Scientific Sources' Perception of Network News Accuracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Barbara; Singletary, Michael

    Recent polls seem to indicate that many Americans rely on television as a credible and primary source of news. To test the accuracy of this news, a study examined three networks' newscasts of science news, the attitudes of the science sources toward reporting in their field, and the factors related to accuracy. The Vanderbilt News Archives Index…

  20. MedlinePlus FAQ: News Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/faq/news.html Question: I saw a news article on MedlinePlus but now I can't ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Answer: The health news page displays the most recent news. MedlinePlus displays ...

  1. LATIN--Latin American Regional News Agency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, John Spicer

    The establishment of a regional news agency for Latin America to improve the balance of news flow and increase the transmission of news more applicable to regional problems has often been proposed. Despite wide acceptance of the concept, the birth of the Third World's first regional news agency, Agencia Latinoamericana de Informacion (LATIN), has…

  2. Index to NASA News Releases 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This issue of the index to NASA News Releases contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, during 1995. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject index, Personal name index, News release number index, Accession number index, Speeches, and News releases.

  3. What makes gambling news?

    PubMed

    McMullan, J L; Mullen, J

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines print media coverage of casino and electronic gambling in one Canadian province from 1992 to 1997. It provides a theme analysis of content of 234 gambling stories printed in the top two daily newspapers in Nova Scotia. The findings of our content analysis indicate that pro-gambling corporate and political newspaper sources waged a successful media campaign and constructed a powerful public rhetoric in support of new gambling products, services, and institutions. The media, for their part, gave visibility and form to these structured messages. They helped create expectations about gambling and economics and gambling and government. Law and order, and moral and medical discourses about gambling, we discovered, were minor representations in the news coverage, although moral narratives were a pervasive secondary theme in much of the reporting. At bottom, the press produced a "politics of truth" about gambling that was both an external exercise of power and an internal organizational production. PMID:11842527

  4. Microbial Control News - November 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the first of a column in the Society for Invertebrate Pathology Newsletter. Entitled "Microbial Control News" this article summarizes regulatory actions in the U.S. and Canada regarding microbial insect pest control agents....

  5. Increasing Learning from TV News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perloff, Richard M.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes an experiment that manipulated two variables, repetition and pausing for viewer "digestion" of information in a news telecast. Concludes that the use of repetition increased viewers' retention of information, but that pauses did not. (FL)

  6. Video segmentation techniques for news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Michael; Wolf, Wayne H.

    1996-11-01

    This paper describes our experiences in video analysis for a video library on the World Wide Web. News and documentary programs, though seemingly simple, have some characteristics which can cause problems in simple shot segmentation algorithms. We have developed a methodology, based on our experience with the analysis of several hours of news/documentary footage, which improve the results of shot segmentation on this type of material and which in turn allows for higher-quality storyboards for our video library.

  7. In the News: Current Events Websites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byerly, Greg; Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews Web sites for current events news that are appropriate for students of various ages. Discusses the possibilities for second language learning and curriculum connections and lists television sites, news magazines, classroom magazines, newspapers, and lesson plans. (LRW)

  8. Biodegradation of news inks

    SciTech Connect

    Erhan, S.Z.; Bagby, M.O.

    1995-12-01

    Printing ink vehicles that require no petroleum components were prepared by modifying vegetable oil. Physical properties of inks formulated with these vehicles meet or exceed the industry standards for lithographic and letterpress newsprint applications. Elimination of petroleum-based resin and reduced pigment requirements, due to the light vehicle color, provide a competitively priced alternative to petroleum-based inks of equal quality. These ink vehicles, made exclusively from soybean oil, were subjected to biodegradation, and the results were compared with those obtained with commercial vehicles. Results show that they degrade faster and more completely than commercial hybrid (partial) soy or mineral oil based vehicles. Fermentations were allowed to proceed for 5, 12, and 25 days. Both mono-and mixed cultures of microorganisms commonly found in soil were used. In 25 days, commercial mineral oil based vehicles degraded 17-27%, while commercial hybrid soy oil based vehicles degraded 58-68% and our 100% soy oil based vehicles degrade 82-92%. Similar studies were conducted with commercial news inks consisting of soy or mineral oil with petroleum resins along with the four colored pigments and USDA`s 100% soy oil based ink consisting of modified soybean oil and pigment. Results show that pigment slowed the degradation of ink vehicles; however, neither time nor type of pigment played a significant role. Also these inks were degraded by using {open_quotes}Modified Sturm Test{close_quotes} (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). In this method, test organisms were obtained from activated sludge, and the extent of degradation was determined by measuring carbon dioxide evolution. In all cases USDA`s ink degraded faster and more completely (for all four colors) than either hybrid soy oil based or petroleum based inks.

  9. Optical Long Baseline Interferometry News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, P. R.; Malbet, F.

    2005-12-01

    The Optical Long Baseline Interferometry News is a website and forum for scientists, engineers, and students who share an interest in long baseline stellar interferometry. It was established in 1995 and is the focus of activity of the IAU Working Group on Optical/Infrared Interferometry. Here you will find links to projects devoted to stellar interferometry, news items, recent papers and preprints, and resources for further research. The email news forum was established in 2001 to complement the website and to facilitate exchanges and collaborations. The forum includes an email exploder and an archived list of discussions. You are invited to explore the forum and website at http://olbin.jpl.nasa.gov. Work by PRL was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  10. "...And Now A Story about Today's News."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornstein, Harvey A.

    The news media plays an important role in shaping opinions about the character of American society. Through the news, people learn about the prevalence of human benevolence or malevolence. The author conducted several tests to evaluate the effects of news on individuals of various ages and backgrounds. Experimental groups were told that they would…

  11. Technology: News Readers and Other Handy Utilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how there are advantages and disadvantages to using an Internet News Reader instead of a Web browser. The major advantage is that one can read the headlines and short summaries of news articles from dozens of sources quickly. Another advantage the author points out to news readers is that one gets a short…

  12. Muffled Drums: The News Media in Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hachten, William A.

    This book examines the news media of modern Africa--newspapers, radio, television, news agencies, and magazines. The first half of the book presents a general overview of African news media, including the following topics: the context of Africa as related to the media, the background of each form of media, government involvement, the patterns of…

  13. A Reconsideration of Bias in the News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Robert L.; Greene, Mark T.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses conceptual problems with the traditional approach to the study of news bias; reports on a study conducted with 73 college students, which yielded data supporting the thesis that what news consumers see as biased news is often material that is discrepant with what they already believe. (GT)

  14. Network Evening News Coverage of Environmental Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Michael R.; And Others

    Focusing on ABC, NBC, and CBS's evening news broadcasts from January 1984 through February 1986, a study examined network news coverage of environmental risk--defined as manmade chemical, biological, and physical agents that create risk in the indoor, outdoor, and occupational environments. Using the Vanderbilt University "Television News Index…

  15. Making the News: Jobs in TV Journalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csorny, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    What do TV news workers do each day? For many of them, contributing to daily news broadcasts has changed greatly over the years. This evolution will likely continue for years to come. And more changes to news production are expected, according to Tom Weir, an associate professor at the University of South Carolina's School of Journalism and Mass…

  16. Perceptions of Advertising Influence on Broadcast News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Hubert W.; Barnes, Beth E.

    2001-01-01

    Finds that while students (studying broadcast journalism or advertising) and practitioners (station news directors and agency media directors) were in agreement on the majority of opinion statements discussing advertising's influence on broadcast news content, except students were less bothered by advertising's influence on news content than were…

  17. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This is a review of important science news stories of 1990 as reported in the pages of this journal. Areas covered include anthropology, astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, computers and math, earth sciences, environment, food science, materials science, paleobiology, physics, science and society, and space sciences. (CW)

  18. NABE News, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosa, Alicia, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document contains the 2000-2001 issues of the "NABE News," a magazine about bilingual education. The theme of each issue is: (1) "Back to School: Anti-Bilingual Ballot Initiatives To Affect Thousands of LEP Students"; (2) "Serving Emerging Populations: School Districts Re-Tool To Respond to New Students' Needs"; (3) "NABE Celebrates 25 Years…

  19. Global Awareness through Video News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Errol

    At Tokai University (Japan), an English-as-a-Second-Language course in global issues through video uses the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's monthly video magazine "News in Review", published eight months a year for use in Canadian English-medium schools. Of the four segments in each magazine, usually two are about Canada or international…

  20. Customized News in Your Mailbox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudich, Joe

    1996-01-01

    Customized Internet services deliver news and selected research via e-mail, fax, Web browser, or their own software. Some are clipping services while others are full-fledged online newspapers. Most charge a monthly subscription fee, but a few are free to registered users. Provides the addresses, cost, scope, and evaluation of eight services. (PEN)

  1. How to Tell Bad News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    Therapists, physicians, police officers, and emergency staff often are the messengers of bad news. They have to tell a patient, a parent, or a loved one about a death, an accident, a school shooting, a life-threatening diagnosis, a terrorist attack, or a suicide. Usually the messenger bears a heavy responsibility but has little training and seeks…

  2. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Highlights important 1985 science stories appearing in "Science News" under these headings: anthropology and paleontology, astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, computers and mathematics, earth sciences, environment, physics, science and society, space sciences, and technology. Each entry includes the volume and page number in…

  3. Science News of the Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Presents a review of important science articles of 1974 as reported in the pages of "Science News." References are given relating to the volume and page number in which the main article appeared. Life-sciences, physical sciences, earth science, environmental science, humanities and technology research are reviewed. (EB)

  4. Campus Child Care News, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Marion F., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document is comprised of the three 1998 issues of a newsletter disseminating information on the National Coalition for Campus Child Care Centers (NCCCC) and providing a forum for news, research, and information concerning campus child care centers. The February issue contains stories on the White House Conference on Child Care, registration…

  5. The Aesthetics of News. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasser, Theodore L.

    That every community needs its own distinctive newspaper is the conclusion drawn in this review of the literature on journalism and communication. Following a summary of John Dewey's definition of democracy in the introduction, the first section of the paper points out the conflict that newspapers experience in trying to be a news source…

  6. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-05-01

    and faithful supporter of this Journal, died February 25, 1999, at his home in Lafayette, California, at the age of 86. At the Fall 1998 ACS Meeting in Boston he suffered a serious fall following a stroke, from which he never recovered. One of his last photographs, taken the previous day at a Journal luncheon, appears on page 1360 of the November 1998 issue. His commentary on his long career in chemistry and education appears on page 1520 of the December 1998 issue. Seaborg was a Nobel laureate, discoverer of elements, scientific advisor to presidents, former chancellor of the University of California, former chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission, chairman of the steering committee of the CHEM Study project, founder of Lawrence Hall of Science, , the list goes on and on. He was at the same time a passionate supporter of education. Seaborg published fourteen articles in the Journal between 1951 and 1998. He was interviewed in 1975 by David Ridgway as part of the Impact series (JCE 1975, 52, 70), and that interview is highly recommended reading (see supplement to this article). He received the 1994 ACS George C. Pimentel Award in Chemical Education; his award address was published in the ACS Division of Chemical Education's CHED Newsletter, Fall 1995. Memorial articles with details of his life and his scientific contributions have appeared in The New York Times (Saturday, February 27, 1999, page 1) and Chemical & Engineering News (March 8, 1999, page 29). But there is also the spirit of the man, what he believed in, what he tried to do, what he hoped he had accomplished. A sense of that can be gained from the excerpts that are reprinted below, taken first from the Impact interview and then from the award address. Ridgway: On reflection, now, out of your many contributions to chemistry, is there one that you feel has had more of an impact than others? Seaborg: The discovery of plutonium would answer that question. The impact th

  7. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-02-01

    News from Journal House Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Many readers are trying to modify the way they teach and in so doing are trying to write new types of questions and problems. The Journal has a new online resource, the JCE Internet Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Web site, http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCEWWW/Resources/CQandChP/index.html . The site is a source of questions and problems that can be used in teaching and assessing conceptual understanding and problem solving in chemistry. Here you can find a library of free-response and multiple-choice conceptual questions and challenge problems, tips for writing these questions and problems, and a discussion of types of concept questions. This site is intended to be a means of sharing conceptual questions and challenge problems among chemical educators. It will be as inclusive as possible, and to achieve this readers need to share their questions and alert the authors to references or Web sites. The screen captures shown below should provide a feeling for what you will find when you visit the site. The authors, William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, welcome additions to the library of conceptual questions or other comments or suggestions. Contact them by email, fax, or regular mail. William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1393. Bill: phone: 765/494-5453; fax: 765/494-0239; email: wrrobin@purdue.edu. Sue: phone: 765/494-0823; fax: 765/494-0239; email: nurrenbe@purdue.edu. fax: 765/494-0239. 1998 Ford Foundation Fellowships The National Research Council has announced the recipients of the 1998 fellowships for minority scholars. Three categories of fellowships were awarded: 50 to beginning graduate students, 33 to students writing their dissertations, and 28 to recent Ph.D. recipients. There were about 1,000 applicants. For information about the next competition contact the Fellowship Office of the National

  8. To Kill a Messenger; Television News and the Real World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, William

    From his vantage point as News Director of CBS News in Washington, the author examines the role of television news in our society and gives an insider's view of the day-to-day process of selecting and presenting news. Highlighting the book are in-depth discussions of past and recent news events. The Nixon "Checkers" speech, John Kennedy's fight to…

  9. How to Write News for Broadcast and Print Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dary, David

    This book is a primer on the techniques of news writing and the application of those principles to print and broadcast journalism. Chapters include: "The News Media," which presents a brief history of journalism and the foundations on which it is based; "What Is News?"; "Gathering News," which discusses news beats, reporters' qualifications, and…

  10. Using the News: An Examination of the Value and Use of News Sources in CMC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Steve

    1997-01-01

    Investigates how members of a Usenet newsgroup value and use news sources. Finds that electronic news sources predominated and that media use was not tied to the user's geographic locale. Raises several questions for future research. (RS)

  11. Communicating Bad News to Patients

    PubMed Central

    Premi, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on doctor/patient communication, emphasizing the communication of bad news. Available information supports the view that patients want more information than they generally receive and that, contrary to popular belief, patients who are better informed benefit from the information they receive. Physicians are seen as taking a less professional approach to communication activities than to clinical problem solving. Some strategies for approaching the problems identified are outlined. PMID:11650449

  12. News clippings for introductory astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrowsky, Matthew

    1999-09-01

    Most students entering our introductory astronomy course for nonscience majors arrive not merely lacking scientific facts-they also have misconceptions about the nature of science, and many have a handicapping ``science anxiety'' (in addition to math anxiety). So I have added a ``current science'' requirement to our introductory course. Each student must compile a file of five astronomy news articles taken from readily available sources.

  13. The Changing Landscape of Science News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riordon, James

    2011-03-01

    Social media are revolutionizing the ways that people communicate and the ways they get their news. Traditional news outlets are in decline, and no subject area is declining faster than science news. Every day there are fewer professional science journalists working in traditional media. On the other hand, ever greater numbers of scientists, science enthusiasts, and online journalists are turning to blogs, podcasts, eBooks, twitter feeds, and social media sites like Facebook and Tumbler to spread news about science. I will present an overview of the state of science journalism and speculate on the likely directions it seems to be heading. I will also offer some general guidelines to help scientists understand what makes a good science news story, as well as suggesting ways that they can get their work in the news.

  14. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-05-01

    and faithful supporter of this Journal, died February 25, 1999, at his home in Lafayette, California, at the age of 86. At the Fall 1998 ACS Meeting in Boston he suffered a serious fall following a stroke, from which he never recovered. One of his last photographs, taken the previous day at a Journal luncheon, appears on page 1360 of the November 1998 issue. His commentary on his long career in chemistry and education appears on page 1520 of the December 1998 issue. Seaborg was a Nobel laureate, discoverer of elements, scientific advisor to presidents, former chancellor of the University of California, former chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission, chairman of the steering committee of the CHEM Study project, founder of Lawrence Hall of Science, , the list goes on and on. He was at the same time a passionate supporter of education. Seaborg published fourteen articles in the Journal between 1951 and 1998. He was interviewed in 1975 by David Ridgway as part of the Impact series (JCE 1975, 52, 70), and that interview is highly recommended reading (see supplement to this article). He received the 1994 ACS George C. Pimentel Award in Chemical Education; his award address was published in the ACS Division of Chemical Education's CHED Newsletter, Fall 1995. Memorial articles with details of his life and his scientific contributions have appeared in The New York Times (Saturday, February 27, 1999, page 1) and Chemical & Engineering News (March 8, 1999, page 29). But there is also the spirit of the man, what he believed in, what he tried to do, what he hoped he had accomplished. A sense of that can be gained from the excerpts that are reprinted below, taken first from the Impact interview and then from the award address. Ridgway: On reflection, now, out of your many contributions to chemistry, is there one that you feel has had more of an impact than others? Seaborg: The discovery of plutonium would answer that question. The impact there is probably nearly as great as any

  15. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-02-01

    News from Journal House Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Many readers are trying to modify the way they teach and in so doing are trying to write new types of questions and problems. The Journal has a new online resource, the JCE Internet Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Web site, http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCEWWW/Resources/CQandChP/index.html . The site is a source of questions and problems that can be used in teaching and assessing conceptual understanding and problem solving in chemistry. Here you can find a library of free-response and multiple-choice conceptual questions and challenge problems, tips for writing these questions and problems, and a discussion of types of concept questions. This site is intended to be a means of sharing conceptual questions and challenge problems among chemical educators. It will be as inclusive as possible, and to achieve this readers need to share their questions and alert the authors to references or Web sites. The screen captures shown below should provide a feeling for what you will find when you visit the site. The authors, William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, welcome additions to the library of conceptual questions or other comments or suggestions. Contact them by email, fax, or regular mail. William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1393. Bill: phone: 765/494-5453; fax: 765/494-0239; email: wrrobin@purdue.edu. Sue: phone: 765/494-0823; fax: 765/494-0239; email: nurrenbe@purdue.edu. fax: 765/494-0239. 1998 Ford Foundation Fellowships The National Research Council has announced the recipients of the 1998 fellowships for minority scholars. Three categories of fellowships were awarded: 50 to beginning graduate students, 33 to students writing their dissertations, and 28 to recent Ph.D. recipients. There were about 1,000 applicants. For information about the next competition contact the Fellowship Office of the National

  16. Hard News/Soft News Content of the National Broadcast Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, David K.; Gobetz, Robert H.

    A study investigated whether the amount of "soft news" coverage for the three major American broadcast television networks increased during the period from 1972 to 1987. A total of 558 broadcasts were analyzed. Each news story was coded and placed into one of four categories concerning its timeliness and whether it was "hard" or "soft" news.…

  17. Television News Sources and News Channels: A Study in Agenda-Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkowitz, Dan

    Noting that media agenda-setting research has seldom examined how the initial media agenda develops, a study examined the connection between news sources and agenda setting by means of a content analysis of sources and channels appearing in network television news and local television news. The findings were compared to similar studies of…

  18. TV News Sources and News Channels: A Study in Agenda-Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkowitz, Dan

    1987-01-01

    Examines news sources and news channels appearing in local and national television newscasts, focusing on how media agenda-setting develops. Notes a high reliance on routine news by television journalists, as well as a high reliance on experts and officials. Suggests that officials and executives dominate the agenda-building process in television…

  19. Teaching Students to Report and Write the News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Gail Cohen

    1978-01-01

    Draws on resources in the ERIC system to discuss the following aspects of student journalism: recognizing and gathering the news; interviewing news sources; writing clear, concise, and accurate news stories; and understanding journalism law and ethics. (KS)

  20. Breaking bad news and discussing death.

    PubMed

    Ambuel, B; Mazzone, M F

    2001-06-01

    The ability to discuss bad news with a patient and family is one clinical skill that is essential to providing effective end-of-life care. Patients and families value direct, nontechnical explanations that are given by a physician with compassion and kindness. Patients and families also value time to talk, express their feelings and ask questions. The authors review research on delivering bad news, then describe a six step process to guide physicians in discussing bad news with patients: (1) create an appropriate environment; (2) open the meeting; (3) discuss the news; (4) develop a follow-up plan; (5) document the conference; and (6) engage in self-reflection.

  1. News: Good chemical manufacturing process criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    This news column covers topics relating to manufacturing criteria, machine to machine technology, novel process windows, green chemistry indices, business resilience, immobilized enzymes, and Bt crops.

  2. Media Literacy, News Literacy, or News Appreciation? A Case Study of the News Literacy Program at Stony Brook University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This case study provides practical and theoretical insights into the Stony Brook news literacy program, which is one of the most ambitious and well-funded curricular experiments in modern journalism education and media literacy. Analysis of document, interview, and observation data indicates that news literacy educators sought to teach students…

  3. Computational Methods for Analyzing Health News Coverage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarlane, Delano J.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers that investigate the media's coverage of health have historically relied on keyword searches to retrieve relevant health news coverage, and manual content analysis methods to categorize and score health news text. These methods are problematic. Manual content analysis methods are labor intensive, time consuming, and inherently…

  4. Science News and the Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Using "Science News" as a teaching tool promotes writing about science, talking about science, and broadening students' views about what science is. This article describes an ongoing assignment in which students choose one article from "Science News" each week and write a brief summary and explanation of why they picked that article. (Contains 1…

  5. Scandal Clouds News Corporation's Move into Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quillen, Ian

    2011-01-01

    When News Corporation announced last fall its entry into the education technology market, some observers said the media conglomerate led by Rupert Murdoch was a bad fit for education. Between the ownership of conservative-leaning outlets like Fox News and a reputation for identifying opportunities to generate lots of revenue very quickly, News…

  6. Program Management Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Program Management Collection, which covers the topics of Assessment, Learning Disabilities, and Program Improvement. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic Skills, Program Management,…

  7. Workforce Competitiveness Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Workforce Competitiveness Collection, covering the topics of workforce education, English language acquisition, and technology. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic Skills, Program…

  8. International Flow of News: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowlana, Hamid, Ed.

    Noting the unprecedented expansion of research in the field of international communications, much of it conducted by scholars from developing countries, this bibliography contains citations of studies on the international flow of news. The bibliography begins with an introduction to the field of research on international news flow, noting those…

  9. Developing a News Media Literacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Seth; Maksl, Adam; Craft, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Using a framework previously applied to other areas of media literacy, this study developed and assessed a measurement scale focused specifically on critical news media literacy. Our scale appears to successfully measure news media literacy as we have conceptualized it based on previous research, demonstrated through assessments of content,…

  10. A Reconsideration of Bias in the News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Robert L.; Greene, Mark T.

    This paper discusses three conceptual problems--point of view, unit of bias, and behavioral response--with using content analysis to study news bias. The paper shows that the point of view of the content analyst is not appropriate if one wants to see how news consumers define and react to bias, that the unit of bias should be the specific instance…

  11. Predicting Political News Coverage by Newspaper Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Gilbert Len, Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Concludes that the only significant factors explaining the amount of political news published by the Arkansas daily press during the 1972 senatorial primary election campaign were the size of the daily news hole and the number of wire services a newspaper used. (GT)

  12. Listening to Monotony: All-News Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woal, Michael

    A study analyzed statistically the monotony of all-news radio listening and identified stylistic figures that elicit attention in listeners. Subjects were 30 graduate students whose experience with radio news ranged from occasional listening over several months to regular listening five or seven days per week for several years. Respondents were…

  13. News Values and the Vividness of Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennamer, J. David

    Most journalism textbooks begin with lists of what have been called "news values." These are criteria to be used to judge the newsworthiness of issues, events, and persons. The list of news values that most journalists have memorized can be replaced with a single concept--vividness. Vividness is a characteristic of the information produced by…

  14. Kids, Crime, and Local Television News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanich, Danilo

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority of crime reporting occurs on local television news and in newspapers. Although crimes are extraordinary events, they assume an ordinariness that only daily reporting can give them. The obvious question is what does the news tell us about crime. This article compares the coverage of adult crime and the coverage of what the author…

  15. News Research for Better Newspapers, Volume Five.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Chilton R., Comp.

    The findings of research studies that come from a variety of sources and concern newspapers, some aspects of television news, and news media audiences are summarized briefly. Among the topics are audience characteristics, content of stories, readership, headlines and makeup, editorial policy, and editorial administration and personnel. Most of the…

  16. Broadcast Journalism; An Introduction to News Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Mark W.

    The important features of writing news for radio and television are covered in this book. Ways to write colorful, accurate, and timely stories are explained with the emphasis on the differences between broadcast and newspaper stories. Other subjects treated are sources of news (including explanations of how the Associated Press copy works and how…

  17. NIH News in Health: September 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wein, Harrison, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    News in Health, is a monthly newsletter that provides practical health news and information. As college students arrive on campus this fall, it is a time of new experiences, new friendships and making memories that will last a lifetime. Unfortunately for many, it can also be a time of excessive drinking and dealing with its aftermath--vandalism,…

  18. Satellite News Feeds: Protecting a Transient Interest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwater, Tony; And Others

    Satellite news gathering (SNG) has been widely adopted in broadcast journalism in recent years, and appears likely to grow in importance as local television news operations increase their reliance on it. However, because the technology for SNG is so new, information transmitted through SNG systems is not adequately protected under current laws.…

  19. Foreign Affairs News and the Broadcast Journalist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batscha, Robert M.

    Discussion of the role of the broadcast journalist in foreign affairs news is divided into four parts in this volume: (1) "The Correspondent" deals with the group characteristics of foreign correspondents and their role conceptions, (2) "Gathering the News" examines the correspondent;s view of the mechanical constraints and structural…

  20. The NEWS Water Cycle Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Beaudoing, Hiroko Kato; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; William, Olson

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) program fosters collaborative research towards improved quantification and prediction of water and energy cycle consequences of climate change. In order to measure change, it is first necessary to describe current conditions. The goal of the first phase of the NEWS Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project was to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. The project was a multi-institutional collaboration with more than 20 active contributors. This presentation will describe the results of the water cycle component of the first phase of the project, which include seasonal (monthly) climatologies of water fluxes over land, ocean, and atmosphere at continental and ocean basin scales. The requirement of closure of the water budget (i.e., mass conservation) at various scales was exploited to constrain the flux estimates via an optimization approach that will also be described. Further, error assessments were included with the input datasets, and we examine these in relation to inferred uncertainty in the optimized flux estimates in order to gauge our current ability to close the water budget within an expected uncertainty range.

  1. The NEWS Water Cycle Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodell, M.; Beaudoing, H. K.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Olson, W. S.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) program fosters collaborative research towards improved quantification and prediction of water and energy cycle consequences of climate change. In order to measure change, it is first necessary to describe current conditions. The goal of the first phase of the NEWS Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project was to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. The project was a multi-institutional collaboration with more than 20 active contributors. This presentation will describe the results of the water cycle component of the first phase of the project, which include seasonal (monthly) climatologies of water fluxes over land, ocean, and atmosphere at continental and ocean basin scales. The requirement of closure of the water budget (i.e., mass conservation) at various scales was exploited to constrain the flux estimates via an optimization approach that will also be described. Further, error assessments were included with the input datasets, and we examine these in relation to inferred uncertainty in the optimized flux estimates in order to gauge our current ability to close the water budget within an expected uncertainty range.

  2. Space Shuttle Status News Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Richard Gilbech, External Tank "Tiger Team" Lead, begins this space shuttle news conference with detailing the two major objectives of the team. The objectives include: 1) Finding the root cause of the foam loss on STS-114; and 2) Near and long term improvements for the external tank. Wayne Hale, Space Shuttle Program Manager, presents a chart to explain the external tank foam loss during STS-114. He gives a possible launch date for STS-121 after there has been a repair to the foam on the External Tank. He further discusses the changes that need to be made to the surrounding areas of the plant in New Orleans, due to Hurricane Katrina. Bill Gerstemaier, NASA Associate Administrator for Space Operations, elaborates on the testing of the external tank foam loss. The discussion ends with questions from the news media about a fix for the foam, replacement of the tiles, foam loss avoidance, the root cause of foam loss and a possible date for a new external tank to be shipped to NASA Kennedy Space Center.

  3. Making It "Real": Words and Pictures in Television News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Sharon; Manners, Paul

    1997-01-01

    Examines features of television news, drawing on a series of interviews conducted during the production of an Open University television program. Examines the visual and verbal conventions of news and attempts to highlight how and why news can appear convincing. Those interviewed included British Broadcasting Corporation news practitioners,…

  4. Engagement with News Content in Online Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oeldorf-Hirsch, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Reports indicate that as the Internet is displacing traditional news sources, younger users continue to be disconnected from the news. Fortunately, the Internet provides new ways of sharing and discussing news stories with others through social networking sites such as Facebook, which may be important for engaging users in the news they read…

  5. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

  6. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

  7. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

  8. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

  9. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

  10. Uses and Values for News on Cable Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Thomas F.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Discusses cable television subscribers' perceptions and consumption patterns of television news and describes a survey that compared broadcast and cable television news viewing habits. Media dependency and media consumption are considered, attitudes toward news sources and the perceived monetary value of the Cable News Network (CNN) are studied,…

  11. The Role of Audiovisual Mass Media News in Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahrani, Taher; Sim, Tam Shu

    2011-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the role of audio/visual mass media news in language learning. In this regard, the two important issues regarding the selection and preparation of TV news for language learning are the content of the news and the linguistic difficulty. Content is described as whether the news is specialized or universal. Universal…

  12. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This issue of the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1993. The index is arranged in six sections: subject index, personal names index, news release number index, accession number index, speeches, and news releases.

  13. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This issue of the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1992. The index is arranged in six sections: subject index, personal names index, news release number index, accession number index, speeches, and news releases.

  14. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-05-01

    Schools lecture: Institute of Physics roadshow is a lecture series with a difference Rugby Meeting: 17th Annual Meeting for Teachers of Physics boasts an impressive schedule Courses: Year-12 pupils go to Open University Camera Competition: Enter now to win a new camera! Conference: Teachers invited to CERN in September New Zealand: Royal Society of New Zealand tackles fear of physics Bulgaria: Fairies, witches and extraterrestrials: how to teach science using theatre Schools lecture: Institute seeks speaker for its annual lecture series Competition: Critical thinking is encouraged by global warming competition Scotland: Two good reasons to visit Scotland this summer Competition: Test your knowledge Free Event: June IOP conference Conference: Also in Liverpool…

  15. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-11-01

    IRELAND New courses for high-tech Ireland; SCIENCE YEAR Science Year launched with a jump; THE NETHERLANDS School science teachers face uncertainty; KOREA Embedding physics in a cultural context; TEACHING RESOURCES Teacher, get your hook; ICT RESOURCES Stock-take of ICT progress; INTERNET Teachers to test-drive new physics gateway; NEW ZEALAND Physics is valued in New Zealand; JAPAN Advancing Physics in Japan; HIGHER EDUCATION Networking works in Cologne; INSTITUTE MATTERS IoP demands a better deal for physics teachers; AUSTRALIA Physics numbers decline: educators blame the low impact curriculum; SCIENCE FOR THE PUBLIC More than sixty seconds in Glasgow; INTERNET A gift selection of papers from IoP; TEACHING STYLES I know what you did last summer;

  16. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-01-01

    MASTERCLASSES Researchers help motivate school students; HIGHER EDUCATION Undergraduate physics inquiry launched Sir Peter; PUBLIC UNDERSTANDING OF SCIENCE Chemists take the lead to get science groups pulling together; RESEARCH FRONTIERS Spintronic Chips; LOWER SECONDARY CURRICULUM Why do we teach physics? TEACHING COMMUNITY e-Teachers; AWARDS Nobel Prize; HIGHER EDUCATION Project Phoenics; PARTICLE PHYSICS LEP Closure; TEACHER TRAINING Training salary fails to attract recruits; EVENTS Physics moves into the spotlight

  17. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-05-01

    LINKS WITH PRIMARY SCIENCE SAD Physics; PHYSICS RESEARCH In a hurry...; PHYSICS COMMUNITY Scottish Stirling Meeting; PHYSICS AT CONGRESS Global warming forecasts rise in skin cancer; EVENTS 2001 SET week; E-MAIL DISCUSSIONS Learning in science; STUDENT ACTIVITY Paperclip Physics; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Perspectives on Science; AWARDS Award for causing chaos; PHYSICS AT CONGRESS Physics and public heath: Do electrical power lines cause cancer? HIGHER EDUCATION First-year course development; INTERSCHOOL COLLABORATION Monitoring geomagnetic storms; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT UK course goes international; PHYSICS IN SCIENCE YEAR Website launched

  18. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-03-01

    PHYSICS AT ASE Warm welcome for new-look Physics Education; TEACHING COMMUNITY Conference in the Netherlands; RESEARCH Evidence based practice; PHYSICS AT ASE Teacher of Physics Awards; PHYSICS AT ASE Festival encourages science teachers; AWARDS Bragg Medal; PHYSICS AT ASE Meteorites are cool! PUBLIC UNDERSTANDING March 2001 - a science odyssey; WEB RESOURCES New website launched to support the gifted and talented; PHYSICS TEACHING A Fun lesson; RESEARCH FRONTIERS Are cell phones safe? OBITUARY Roy Schofield 1924-2000

  19. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    Einstein year: Einstein is brought back to life for a year of educational events Workshop: Students reach out for the Moon Event: Masterclasses go with a bang Workshop: Students search for asteroids on Einstein's birthday Scotland: Curriculum for Excellence takes holistic approach Conference: Reporting from a mattress in Nachod Conference: 'Change' is key objective at ICPE conference 2005 Lecture: Institute of Physics Schools Lecture series Conference: Experience showcase science in Warwick National network: Science Learning Centre opens Meeting: 30th Stirling Physics Meeting breaks records Competition: Win a digital camera! Forthcoming Events

  20. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    Physics on Stage: Physics on the political stage Women in Physics: Allez les girls! Curriculum: Students want ethics debate in school science Physics on Stage: Buzzing around the tulips Events: GIREP 2002 Competition: Schumacher in the shower! Higher Education: Universities consider conceptual physics courses Resources: Evaluation of Advancing Physics Research Frontiers: Physics Teachers @ CERN 2002 UK Curriculum: Preparing useful citizens China: Changing the approach NSTA Annual Convention: Innovations and simplicity Europe: European Community Science and Society Action Plan Citizenship: ASE-Wellcome Trust citizenship education initiative

  1. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    Meetings: Physics Teachers@CERN 2003 Education Group Annual Conference: Observations by a first-time participant... Summer Workshop: Making Music Competition: Physics in the fast lane Bristol Festival of Physics: Ice cream ice-breakers Online Resources: Old favourites go online UK Curriculum: What does society want? UK Curriculum: Assessment of Science Learning 14-19 Forthcoming Events

  2. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-07-01

    Einstein Year: Argentina remembers Einstein’s visit Health and Beauty: The sweet smell of fragrant molecules Austria: Physics and society top the bill Canada: Innovative teaching strategies pave the way for modern physics Publications: New online journal lets young scientists speak for themselves Forthcoming Events

  3. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenhall, Clive

    2012-06-01

    Herschel papers catalogued and accessible; Maskelyne papers accepted for the nation; centenary of the Hamburg Observatory; oldest astrologer's board found; Groupe Flammarion sold; ancient sundial found; keeping time (modern folk song about John Harrison).

  4. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenhall, Clive

    2011-09-01

    Townsend Observatory destroyed; BAA Lunar Section archives; Astro-Cymru; Royal star identified; Formation of Johannes Kepler Working Group; Tycho Brahe exhumed; Ancient observatory discovered in Iran...; ... and in Mexico; Calling all ex-occupants of interplanetary craft.

  5. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-11-01

    Astronomy: Trust founder receives heavenly honour Africa: UK teaching methods make the difference in Rwandan schools Spaced Out: UK-based scale model places Jodrell Bank at the centre of our solar system Teaching Support: Teacher Network makes its mark in the classroom Correction Art on Stage: Galileo lacks momentum Meeting: Teachers are inspired by US gathering Online Study: PPLATO Foundation promotes new avenue to university study Conference: GIREP '04 creates atmosphere of 'curiosity and enthusiasm' Meeting: SonSD meeting allows exchange of teaching ideas Competition: Win a digital camera! Physics in Perspective: Events highlight how rewarding physics can be Meeting: ASE conference to deliver the best of Physics Education

  6. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    Resources: First Faulkes Telescope on its way! Events: Everything under the Sun - GIREP 2002 Experiments: The most beautiful experiment, your favourite demonstration Science year: Planet Science takes off Resources: New CD packages Lecture: Fantastic Plastic Summer workshop: The Wright Stuff Resources: Amazing Space 14-16 curriculum: 21st century science ASE conference: ASE 2003 South Africa: Sasol SciFest Earth sciences: JESEI: the answer to all your Earthly problems

  7. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    Resources: Online schools video library GIREP Seminar: A seminar not a conference New Teaching Resource: Free living for teachers Space: NASA proposes MEER - Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic-Reboost Electronic Teaching Materials: Superconductivity motivates need for upper secondary curriculum subjects Gifted and Talented: Seminars seek challenges Space: Comet chasing Particle Physics: Playing with single electrons Physics on Stage: Teachers explore the meaning of life Physics on Stage: Greek national event Physics on Stage: Physics on the Slovak stage Physics on Stage: Clubbing in Germany Physics on Stage: The Sun's star performance Higher Education: Physics: so refreshing USA: Broadening the Base AAPT Summer Meeting: US teachers in good form Astronomy: High school astronomy in the Czech Republic Space: Express to Mars Particle Physics: Journey to the centre of the Earth? ASE 2004: Flight from the ASE Physics Songs: A powerful melody Teacher Training: European training looks for ideal model

  8. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-01-01

    Wales: Dataloggers network teachers 11-16 Science: Educational magazines with the fun bits left in! Institute of Physics: Public Awareness of Physics Awards Events: TeachSpace 2001 Australia: Chemistry and Physics in Tasmanian Agriculture Resources: From out of this world, into your lab Nobel Prize: Nobel Prize in Physics, 2001 China: Physics education for the 21st century: avoiding a crisis Resources: The Royal Astronomical Society Forthcoming Events

  9. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-05-01

    Cyber Workshop: The Teacher Network visits Second Life Festival: Alarm clock rings for European science Grant Project: The reality of university science Student Physics: Young physicists' tournament in Korea Environment: Climate change documentary to be shown in every secondary school in England and Wales Centenary: Glasgow celebrates life of Kelvin

  10. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-04-01

    Nearly Complete Set: I have an almost complete set of J. Chem. Educ., lacking only 3-4 volumes from the early 1930's. It is in pristine condition, bound each year (except the last five years), and used gently only by myself. I am retired and willing to part with this collection for a reasonable offer - I cannot afford to donate them. Any library or individual who might have a serious interest should contact Robert Goldenberg, P. O. Box 412, Westside Station, Buffalo, NY 14213; phone: 905/871-1098; email: goldenbe@vaxxine.com.

  11. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-07-01

    Croatia: Rijeka’s 2005 science festival attracts an enthusiastic crowd The Middle East: METSMaC conference reaches out to teachers around the Gulf and beyond Spain: Física en Acción 5: a Spanish festival that will have you cycling the tightrope Czech Republic: Astronomy lessons for everyone Sussex Planetarium: Planetarium sets its sights high TV series: Einstein gets animated for C4 cartoon series Memorial: Honouring the great: memorial to Robert Hooke is unveiled at Westminster Abbey Awards: SHAP awards prizes for exceptional student work Group meeting: IOP’s Education Group to meet in September Forthcoming Events

  12. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-07-01

    Radioactivity: Olympic Games: dirty and decaying? Awards: SciCast rewards the best in scientific short films Conference: Teachers conference is big in Boston Workshop: Experts and teachers mingle in Mexico Awards: Olympiad holds lavish ceremony Cinema: Indiana Jones has a skull full of physics Conference: ESERA announces Turkish delight for 2009 Forthcoming Events

  13. Cancer News Coverage and Information Seeking

    PubMed Central

    NIEDERDEPPE, JEFF; FROSCH, DOMINICK L.; HORNIK, ROBERT C.

    2010-01-01

    The shift toward viewing patients as active consumers of health information raises questions about whether individuals respond to health news by seeking additional information. This study examines the relationship between cancer news coverage and information seeking using a national survey of adults aged 18 years and older. A Lexis-Nexis database search term was used to identify Associated Press (AP) news articles about cancer released between October 21, 2002, and April 13, 2003. We merged these data to the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS), a telephone survey of 6,369 adults, by date of interview. Logistic regression models assessed the relationship between cancer news coverage and information seeking. Overall, we observed a marginally significant positive relationship between cancer news coverage and information seeking (p < 0.07). Interaction terms revealed that the relationship was apparent only among respondents who paid close attention to health news (p < 0.01) and among those with a family history of cancer (p < 0.05). Results suggest that a notable segment of the population actively responds to periods of elevated cancer news coverage by seeking additional information, but they raise concerns about the potential for widened gaps in cancer knowledge and behavior between large segments of the population in the future. PMID:18300068

  14. A content-based news video retrieval system: NVRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huayong; He, Tingting

    2009-10-01

    This paper focus on TV news programs and design a content-based news video browsing and retrieval system, NVRS, which is convenient for users to fast browsing and retrieving news video by different categories such as political, finance, amusement, etc. Combining audiovisual features and caption text information, the system automatically segments a complete news program into separate news stories. NVRS supports keyword-based news story retrieval, category-based news story browsing and generates key-frame-based video abstract for each story. Experiments show that the method of story segmentation is effective and the retrieval is also efficient.

  15. Healthy depictions? Depicting adoption and adoption news events on broadcast news.

    PubMed

    Kline, Susan L; Chatterjee, Karishma; Karel, Amanda I

    2009-01-01

    Given that the public uses the media to learn about adoption as a family form, this study analyzes U.S. television news coverage of adoption between 2001 and 2005 (N = 309 stories), to identify the types of news events covered about adoption. A majority of news stories covered fraud, crime, legal disputes, and negative international adoption cases. Adoptees as defective or unhealthy were depicted more in negative news event stories, birth parents appeared less overall, and adoptive parents were most likely to have healthy depictions in positively oriented adoption experience, big family, and reunion stories. Although three quarters of the stories used primary adoption participants as news sources, one-third of the negative event stories did not contain healthy depictions of adoption participants. The authors discuss ways journalists and researchers might improve adoption news coverage.

  16. Legal vs Ethical News-Gathering Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vahl, Rod

    1990-01-01

    Discusses legal and ethical issues surrounding methods of news-gathering, including undercover reporting, misrepresentation of the reporter's identity, fabrication, and plagiarism. Maintains that high school reporters should search out and follow guidelines for their information-seeking methods. (SR)

  17. New York Times Current News Physics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cise, John

    2010-03-01

    Since 2007 I have been using NYTimes current News articles rich in graphics and physics variables for developing edited one page web (http://CisePhysics.homestead.com/files/NYT.htm) physics questions based on current events in the news. The NYTimes home page listed above contains currently ten pages with about 40 one page current edited News related physics articles per page containing: rich graphics, graphic editions by the author, edited articles, introduction to a question, questions, and answers. I use these web pages to introduce new physics concepts to students with current applications of concepts in the news. I also use these one page physics applications as pop quizzes and extra credit for students. As news happens(e.g. the 2010 Vancouver Olympics) I find the physics applications in the NYTimes articles and generate applications and questions. These new one page applications with questions are added to the home page: http://CisePhysics.homestead.com/files/NYT.htm The newest pages start with page 10 and work back in time to 9, 8, etc. The ten web pages with about 40 news articles per page are arranged in the traditional manner: vectors, kinematics, projectiles, Newton, Work & Energy, properties of matter, fluids, temperature, heat, waves, and sound. This site is listed as a resource in AAPT's Compadre site.

  18. The Virtuous All-News Radio Journalist: Perceptions of News Directors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfemeyer, K. Tim; McFadden, Lori L.

    To date, most of the scholarly research and critical articles about ethics in journalism have dealt with newspapers and television rather than with radio. To help fill this gap, a study surveyed a segment of the radio news community to determine some of the attitudes, values, and beliefs of news directors concerning ethics in their workplace.…

  19. Teachable Moments in the News - an Online Resource Solar System Science News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhala, H. A. T.; Miller, E. A.; Goldstein, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    Teachable Moments in the News (www.challenger.org/tmn/) is an online resource developed at Challenger Center for Space Science Education that takes recent news stories related to Solar System science and places them in a context relevant to the grades K-12 science curriculum. Using stories such as the launch of the MESSENGER spacecraft to Mercury, Teachable Moments in the News is meant to provide a seamless pathway from the news desk to the classroom. For each news item, an overview of the story is provided, along with high-quality inquiry-based, standards-driven lessons and links to more in-depth articles. Teachable Moments in the News is also a great tool for scientists who wish to stay informed of the recent events in Solar System exploration. The archived back issues of the quarterly published Web digest allow for a quick refresher on the most important news stories over the past several months. The very accessible nature of the stories makes the resource valuable for college students, and even the general public, as a means to keep up-to-date about current developments in planetary astronomy. Furthermore, college and university teachers can easily adapt many of the lessons to fit into the curriculum of an undergraduate astronomy course. During the poster session, we welcome suggestions from the scientific community on ways to enhance the usefulness of Teachable Moments in the News. For example, researchers could form partnerships with Teachable Moments in the News to provide news stories on their current research to be featured on the Web site. We invite researchers interested in this education and public outreach tool to visit the poster and provide suggestions on how to make the resource work as effectively as possible.

  20. Media Credibility Reconsidered: Synergy between On-Air and Online News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucy, Erik P.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the combined effects of on-air and online network news exposure, placing student and adult news consumers in broadcast news, online news, and telewebbing conditions. Indicates that perceptions of network news credibility are affected by channel used. Offers evidence for the existence of a synergy effect between on-air and online news. (PM)

  1. Measuring the Interestingness of News Articles

    SciTech Connect

    Pon, R K; Cardenas, A F; Buttler, D J

    2007-09-24

    An explosive growth of online news has taken place. Users are inundated with thousands of news articles, only some of which are interesting. A system to filter out uninteresting articles would aid users that need to read and analyze many articles daily, such as financial analysts and government officials. The most obvious approach for reducing the amount of information overload is to learn keywords of interest for a user (Carreira et al., 2004). Although filtering articles based on keywords removes many irrelevant articles, there are still many uninteresting articles that are highly relevant to keyword searches. A relevant article may not be interesting for various reasons, such as the article's age or if it discusses an event that the user has already read about in other articles. Although it has been shown that collaborative filtering can aid in personalized recommendation systems (Wang et al., 2006), a large number of users is needed. In a limited user environment, such as a small group of analysts monitoring news events, collaborative filtering would be ineffective. The definition of what makes an article interesting--or its 'interestingness'--varies from user to user and is continually evolving, calling for adaptable user personalization. Furthermore, due to the nature of news, most articles are uninteresting since many are similar or report events outside the scope of an individual's concerns. There has been much work in news recommendation systems, but none have yet addressed the question of what makes an article interesting.

  2. Television News Uses: A Cross-National Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Mark R.

    1978-01-01

    Reports that a classification of television news uses and gratifications based on research in Leeds, England, did not adequately encompass the functions of television news for a United States audience. (GW)

  3. Mixed News on Drug Abuse Among Lesbian, Gay Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... News on: Drug Abuse Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Health Mental Disorders Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Drug Abuse Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Health Mental Disorders About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs ...

  4. [Influence of the news media].

    PubMed

    Camarena Luna, R

    1991-01-01

    Newspapers, in addition to news, also cover topics of permanent interest to their readers. One such topic is sexuality. The appearance of the incurable sexually transmitted disease AIDS obliges a reconsideration of the complex and contradictory concept of sexuality. Sexuality is not often spoken of openly; rather, it is secret, hidden, and referred to obliquely. Sexuality is the manifestation and satisfaction of the sexual impulses common to all individuals. Sexuality is determined by anatomic and physiologic aspects and also by the knowledge, experiences, values, and norms internalized by the individual living in a social group. Messages about sexual conduct are constantly being received. This social part of sexuality supported by customs and morals is the part that is directly influenced by communications media. An important objective of the media is to create awareness and mold opinions. Mexico's large national circulation newspapers present different points of view about sexuality. Newspapers that continually critique homosexual practices and those that demonstrate implicit approval of pornographic videos by advertising them both present attitudes without providing opportunities to reason, compare, or support opinions. Sexuality is usually referred to indirectly and superficially in the press. Sex education may be mentioned but not the erotic implications of sexuality, and acceptance or opposition to use of condoms may be discussed without mention of psychological barriers to their use. The national press is not prepared to propose new attitudes toward sexuality in the age of AIDS. Only 1 national newspaper in Mexico regularly provides information on AIDS including aspects related to sexual pleasure and responsibility and safer sex. The majority continue with their pre-AIDS coverage of sexuality, using it to arouse interest but providing little depth. Newspapers should provide more extensive coverage on sexuality and its modifications due to AIDS, a reality

  5. [Influence of the news media].

    PubMed

    Camarena Luna, R

    1991-01-01

    Newspapers, in addition to news, also cover topics of permanent interest to their readers. One such topic is sexuality. The appearance of the incurable sexually transmitted disease AIDS obliges a reconsideration of the complex and contradictory concept of sexuality. Sexuality is not often spoken of openly; rather, it is secret, hidden, and referred to obliquely. Sexuality is the manifestation and satisfaction of the sexual impulses common to all individuals. Sexuality is determined by anatomic and physiologic aspects and also by the knowledge, experiences, values, and norms internalized by the individual living in a social group. Messages about sexual conduct are constantly being received. This social part of sexuality supported by customs and morals is the part that is directly influenced by communications media. An important objective of the media is to create awareness and mold opinions. Mexico's large national circulation newspapers present different points of view about sexuality. Newspapers that continually critique homosexual practices and those that demonstrate implicit approval of pornographic videos by advertising them both present attitudes without providing opportunities to reason, compare, or support opinions. Sexuality is usually referred to indirectly and superficially in the press. Sex education may be mentioned but not the erotic implications of sexuality, and acceptance or opposition to use of condoms may be discussed without mention of psychological barriers to their use. The national press is not prepared to propose new attitudes toward sexuality in the age of AIDS. Only 1 national newspaper in Mexico regularly provides information on AIDS including aspects related to sexual pleasure and responsibility and safer sex. The majority continue with their pre-AIDS coverage of sexuality, using it to arouse interest but providing little depth. Newspapers should provide more extensive coverage on sexuality and its modifications due to AIDS, a reality

  6. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This issue of the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1987. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject Index, Personal Names Index, News Release Number Index, Accession Number Index, and Speeches and News Releases.

  7. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This issue of the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1989. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject Index, Personal Names Index, News Release Number Index, Accession Number Index, and Speeches and News Releases.

  8. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This issue of the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1986. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject Index, Personal Names Index, News Release Number Index, Accession Number Index, and Speeches and News Releases.

  9. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This issue of the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1988. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject Index, Personal Names Index, News Release Number Index, Accession Number Index, and Speeches and News Releases.

  10. Astronomy, New Instrumentation, and the News Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maran, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    Reporting of astronomical discoveries and events in the news media continues to expand to satisfy a seemingly voracious public interest. New telescopes, instruments, and facilities both up in space and on the ground, provide unique opportunities for media outreach on what scientists are accomplishing. And, new media such as website news providers, high-definition television, and video news walls help to fuel the growing activity. Ever since Tycho Brahe operated his own printing press, astronomers have striven to document their accomplishments for the wider world. In recent years, astronomers' media outreach has been successful in reaching the mass television audience through successful efforts at animation and scientific visualization, and through dramatic images acquired by some facilities, such as the solar physics satellites and ground observatories.

  11. Aerial perches and free-range laying hens: the effect of access to aerial perches and of individual bird parameters on keel bone injuries in commercial free-range laying hens.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, C J; Ball, M E E; O'Connell, N E

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this trial was to determine the effect of aerial perches on keel bone injuries and tibia bone characteristics in free-range laying hens. The relationship between keel bone injuries and individual bird parameters, such as weight, girth, wing:girth ratio, feather coverage, and tibia bone characteristics, was also assessed. Five commercial free-range houses, each containing between 7,000 and 8,000 birds, were used. The houses and range areas were divided in half; in half of the house, birds had access to aerial perches (P) and in the other half, they did not (NP). On 13 occasions between 17 and 70 wk of age, 20 birds per treatment were randomly selected from the slatted area and palpated for keel bone injury. At 72 wk of age, 30 birds per treatment in each of 4 houses were selected at random, weighed, and then euthanized. Girth and wing area and feather coverage were measured. The keel and left tibia bones were removed and keel bones were scored for injury. Tibia bones were weighed and diameter, length, breaking strength, and ash content recorded. Results indicated that access to aerial perches did not affect tibia bone measures (P > 0.05). Average palpated keel bone score increased with age of the hens (P < 0.001) but was not significantly affected by perch treatment (P > 0.05). There was a significant interaction between treatment and farm on keel bone injuries measured at dissection (P < 0.05), with the probability of birds having high keel-damage scores increasing in the perched treatment in some farms but not others. In general, as the keel bone injury score measured at dissection increased, the breaking strength (P < 0.001) and ash content (P < 0.05) of the tibia bone decreased. It is suggested that individual variation in bone strength contributes to differences in susceptibility to keel injury. No relationship existed between keel-injury score measured at dissection and individual parameters, such as weight, girth, or wing:girth ratio (P > 0

  12. Tipping news in information accumulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, J. K.

    2010-05-01

    As a continuous opinion dynamics model, the information accumulation system (IAS) includes three basic mechanisms of the news, the inheritance and the diffusion as contributing to the information accumulation process of a system. A system is composed of agents who diffuse information through internal interaction, while each of them has incomplete memory or inheritance rate. The news comes from external sources of information, such as mass media. Previously the model IAS was studied only for the small news problems. In this study, a tipping news problem is considered. A key question of the problem is: what is the minimum strength of advertisement that can tip the minority opinion to a majority one? Dynamics of the IAS is briefly revisited with a special interest on nonlinear behavior of the model. In particular, it is shown that a discrete map of the IAS for a single color problem can be transformed into a logistic map, from which the dynamics of the IAS can be better understood. To show the applicability of the IAS model, the result is applied to explain the concept of the critical population size, which claims that there is a minimum population size for a social knowledge system to be continuously inherited without being lost. And critical size of the tipping news is found analytically in terms of IAS parameters. Some of the key results from the present study are compared in detail with the results from the Brownian particle model, which is believed to be the most similar model to the IAS. The concept of tipping news is used to show that a traditional society can tip at an exceptionally low inter-community exposure. Finally, the result was applied to the language competition problem.

  13. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international... Headquarters offices of External Relations and Public Affairs. (b) NASA Centers and Headquarters offices will report all visits proposed by representatives of foreign news media to the Public Affairs Officer of...

  14. 32 CFR 516.53 - News media and other inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true News media and other inquiries. 516.53 Section 516.53 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL... Litigation in Which the United States Has An Interest § 516.53 News media and other inquiries. News...

  15. 32 CFR 516.53 - News media and other inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false News media and other inquiries. 516.53 Section 516.53 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL... Litigation in Which the United States Has An Interest § 516.53 News media and other inquiries. News...

  16. 32 CFR 516.53 - News media and other inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false News media and other inquiries. 516.53 Section 516.53 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL... Litigation in Which the United States Has An Interest § 516.53 News media and other inquiries. News...

  17. 32 CFR 516.53 - News media and other inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true News media and other inquiries. 516.53 Section 516.53 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL... Litigation in Which the United States Has An Interest § 516.53 News media and other inquiries. News...

  18. 32 CFR 516.53 - News media and other inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true News media and other inquiries. 516.53 Section 516.53 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL... Litigation in Which the United States Has An Interest § 516.53 News media and other inquiries. News...

  19. Perceptions and Use of News Media by College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henke, Lucy L.

    1985-01-01

    This study investigated college students' use of and attitudes toward traditional and nontraditional news media, and the role of cable news network (CNN) and its integration into evolving news consumption patterns. Results indicate later college years are associated with heavier consumption. CNN viewers are heavier users of traditional media.…

  20. Learning from Television News: How Important Are Story Attributes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dennis K.; Robinson, John P.

    Two news audience surveys were conducted--one in Great Britain with 489 subjects and one in the United States with 447 subjects--to assess the ability of various types of television news stories to induce learning. The central objective of the research was to identify attributes of specific news stories that had been well or poorly comprehended.…

  1. A Predictive Framework for Determining How Journalists Determine News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudino, James L.

    To determine how to articulate a concrete definition of the substance of the journalist's occupation, this paper offers a propositional framework of news value based on Kurt Lewin's gatekeeper model. First, the paper follows the established suggestion that news decisions are best studied from a gatekeeping perspective or that "news is whatever…

  2. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international activities. (a) Releases of information involving NASA activities, views, programs, or projects...

  3. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international activities. (a) Releases of information involving NASA activities, views, programs, or projects...

  4. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international activities. (a) Releases of information involving NASA activities, views, programs, or projects...

  5. Network Television Evening News Coverage of Infectious Disease Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Michael; Wartenberg, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Examines coverage of several infectious diseases and teenage suicide to see whether television news favors covering illness where it clusters or when it occurs near major news centers where it is easier to cover. Finds that television news did go to where the illness broke out but tended to favor reporting urban over rural suicides. (RS)

  6. Dow Jones News/Retrieval--An IndepthBxook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Tim

    1984-01-01

    This introduction to the nonbibliographic databases offered by the Dow Jones News/Retrieval Service describes file content and search strategies in four groups: Dow Jones Business and Economic News; Dow Jones Quotes (market prices for stocks and other securities); Financial and Investment Services; General News and Information Services. Examples…

  7. Foreign News Agency Influences on a Developing Country Press (Egypt).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisenborn, Ray E.

    To analyze the patterns of newspaper news sources in a developing nation and the geographic focus of news and news subject matter categories, an analysis was conducted of the English-language "Egyptian Gazette," the official organ of the Arab Socialist Union. Primary data for the study were the front pages selected at random from the newspaper…

  8. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This issue of the annual Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of headquarters staff during 1990. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject Index, Personal Names Index, News Release Number Index, Accession Number, Speeches, and New Releases Indices.

  9. News for the '90s: A Question of Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Rosalind, Ed.; Thoman, Elizabeth, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This special issue of "Media & Values" gives a perspective on how news is changing, what is missing in the news, and how to spot bias and misinformation in news coverage, both print and electronic. Articles examine the impact of computer imaging on the credibility of photographs and the issue of privacy--just how far should journalists go to get a…

  10. The Flow of Foreign News into Six Arab Gulf Newspapers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Habib, Abdulrahman Ibrahim

    In order to determine the nature of foreign news coverage in the Arab Gulf states, a study examined six newspapers in these states (one in each country) in regard to the volume, news sources, and kinds of news (both subject categories and regions covered). Data were selected from 12 issues (one from each month) in 1986 from the following…

  11. College Students' News Gratifications, Media Use, and Current Events Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Richard C.; Basil, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    Results of testing uses and gratifications theory with college students show students' media use and surveillance needs increase college year. Demographic differences and gratifications sought drive news media use. Surveillance needs result in increased use of all news media, whereas entertainment needs result in television news and CNN viewing.…

  12. 31 CFR 515.573 - Transactions by news organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transactions by news organizations... Licenses, Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.573 Transactions by news organizations... Cuban organizations whose primary purpose is the gathering and dissemination of news to the...

  13. 31 CFR 515.573 - Transactions by news organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transactions by news organizations... Licenses, Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.573 Transactions by news organizations... Cuban organizations whose primary purpose is the gathering and dissemination of news to the...

  14. News Icons and the Mainstreaming of Social Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, W. Lance; Lawrence, Regina G.

    1995-01-01

    Defines news icons, and discusses life cycle of a news icon. Offers a case study of coverage patterns of a garbage barge that for three months in 1987 was rejected at every port. Finds that the incident provided an occasion for journalists and their sources to refigure cultural scripts about garbage and recycling to produce news as cultural forum.…

  15. 26 CFR 49.4253-2 - Exemption for news services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exemption for news services. 49.4253-2 Section...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Communications § 49.4253-2 Exemption for news services. (a) In general. The exemption for news services provided by section 4253(b) is applicable...

  16. Firefox Extension Framework for News Article Tagging

    2006-08-08

    FEFNAT is a Firefox extension that is used to collect information about user interests when viewing new articles. When a user is reading a news article on a web-page, he can vote whether the article was interesting or not interesting by clicking the appropriate button on the extension's tool-bar. The purpose of this extension is to collet user interests and behavior while viewing new articles so that it can be used in my research formore » predicting how interesting future news article may be for the user.« less

  17. 33 CFR 165.504 - Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Shipyard, James River, Newport News, Va.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Shipyard, James River, Newport News, Va. 165.504 Section 165.504 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.504 Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Shipyard, James...

  18. Covering Adoption: General Depictions in Broadcast News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Susan L.; Karel, Amanda I.; Chatterjee, Karishma

    2006-01-01

    Using theories of stigma (Goffman, 1963) and media frames (Iyengar, 1991), 292 news stories pertaining to adoption that appeared on major broadcast networks between 2001 and 2004 were analyzed. Media coverage of adoptees contained more problematic than positive depictions. Although birth parents were not always depicted, adoptive parent and…

  19. Children's Television News as Political Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourne, Carole

    This document presents the results of a two-year study of a British Broadcasting Company children's news program which examined the goals and routines of the programmers, the program content, and audience response. Observations were made of program routines, the content was analyzed, and responses to the programs were obtained during informal,…

  20. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  1. The News, Summer 1999-Summer 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Trische, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document contains five quarterly issues of The News, published Summer 1999 through Summer 2000 by the Community College League of California. The following items are contained in this document: "Grant Writing Success Depends on Resources, Information and Staff,""College Theaters Perform Balancing Act with Community, Instruction,…

  2. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  3. News Diffusion after the Reagan Shooting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bantz, Charles R.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Provides additional evidence on the role interpersonal communication plays in the diffusion of news about crisis events. Adds information about the rapidity of such diffusion, daily routine and first source, demographic differences and communicative behavior/personal reactions, and possible effects of research methods. (PD)

  4. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  5. The News: July 1996-Spring 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The News, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This document consists of 14 consecutive issues of "The News," a newsletter of the Community College League of California. The lead articles of these issues are as follows: (1) Silicon Valley Executives Urge Colleges to Innovate, Network; (2) Policy Center Calls on Higher Education Leaders to Plan for Huge Wave of Students; (3) Enrollment Up…

  6. Alabama Education News. Volume 27, Number 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  7. Alabama Education News. Volume 32, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  8. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  9. Society for the History of Psychology news.

    PubMed

    Rodkey, Elissa

    2015-02-01

    Presents two brief news items. The first item discusses the archives of Roger Sperry, 1981 Nobel Prize Laureate. The note provides information as to the materials archived, their location, and contact archivist. The second item discusses the passing of José Luis Pinillos Díaz (1919-2013), a founder of Spanish psychology. PMID:25664887

  10. Teaching Strategy: Human Rights in the News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Offers a lesson in which the students investigate the media, in particular news stories, announcements, and advertisements, for evidence of attitudes on human rights. Assists students in developing an awareness of human-rights issues in everyday life and enables them to cite examples of human-rights protections and violations. (CMK)

  11. Parent News: A Compilation of 1998 Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Anne S., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document consists of the 12 issues of "Parent News" (an electronic Internet magazine for parents, prepared for the National Parent Information Network) published during 1998. Each monthly issue contains feature articles describing the activities of the National Parent Information Network, summarizing research useful to parents, announcing…

  12. The News Media and Their Critics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Robert Oliver

    To investigate the nature, content, and validity of criticisms of the news media and to determine whether these criticisms are made objectively, a study surveyed 550 members of the Mass Media and Society Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC). Response rate was 41%. Questions examined statements…

  13. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  14. The Art of Editing the News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGiffert, Robert C.

    This textbook provides the journalism student with a practical demonstration of copyreading. Reporters' copy is shown first untouched and then as it undergoes improvements in clarity, effectiveness, and news style. Using many examples of copy from student newspapers and stories written by students for reporting and editing courses, as well as copy…

  15. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  16. Implication for Media Convergence on News Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gumus, Agah; Ozad, Bahire

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, comparisons of the effects of the traditional news media and the Internet have been made in relation to comprehension and remembering. This study aims at assessing the effects of single and compound presentational elements, and making predictions for the future. One of the two main aims of this study is to measure…

  17. The Best of Chem 13 News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorsen, Kathy

    1999-07-01

    This column is designed to give JCE readers a few highlights from Chem 13 News, a monthly publication for chemistry educators from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, and provides annotations describing a particular activity or a variety of sources from which new and creative ideas can be extracted.

  18. Alabama Education News. Volume 27, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  19. Parent News: A Compilation of 1997 Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Anne S., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This document consists of the 12 issues of "Parent News" (an electronic Internet magazine for parents, prepared for the National Parent Information Network) published during 1997. Each monthly issue contains feature articles describing the activities of the National Parent Information Network, summarizing research useful to parents, announcing…

  20. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  1. News Values and the Vividness of Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennamer, J. David

    1988-01-01

    Claims that the long list of traditionally accepted news values can be replaced with a single concept, vividness, and that vivid information may not be the best information. Blames much of the alleged deficiencies associated with journalistic practice such as sensationalism and preoccupation with conflict on the journalistic practice of writing to…

  2. Direct Instruction News: Effective School Practices, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarver, Sara G., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    The mission of the Association for Direct Instruction is to promote the improvement of effective educational methods. This journal, "Direct Instruction News," is their publication. The Spring 2003 (Volume 3, Number 1) contains the following articles: "Implementing DI Successfully" (Sara G. Tarver); "Textbooks: What?" (Bob Dixon); "Introduction to…

  3. Is Education News Falling off Front Pages?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2009-01-01

    Billions in federal economic-stimulus dollars are slated to be spent to help improve public education, but Americans relying on traditional news outlets are likely to find out little, if anything, about what that effort might mean for the schools in their communities, a new report suggests. That's because education coverage of any type barely…

  4. News Note: New newsletter from SKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-08-01

    The SKA is now publishing three newsletters, one for the general public, one for the stakeholders in the Northern Cape and the latest one SKA SA Tech News. This new one is at a more sophisticated level than the others and is aimed at those interested in the technology and astronomy of the SKA and MeerKAT.

  5. Television News and International Earthquake Relief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Adam F.

    1997-01-01

    Develops an instrument based on earthquake-related deaths to provide an exogenous measure of media coverage. Finds that more U.S. network news coverage increased aggregate donations by private citizens; but that the amount of such coverage was not associated with government assistance or international aid, although these forms of aid were highly…

  6. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  7. Society for the History of Psychology news.

    PubMed

    Rodkey, Elissa

    2015-02-01

    Presents two brief news items. The first item discusses the archives of Roger Sperry, 1981 Nobel Prize Laureate. The note provides information as to the materials archived, their location, and contact archivist. The second item discusses the passing of José Luis Pinillos Díaz (1919-2013), a founder of Spanish psychology.

  8. Soviet Cybernetics: Recent News Items, Number Thirteen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Wade B.

    An issue of "Soviet Cybernetics: Recent News Items" consists of English translations of the leading recent Soviet contributions to the study of cybernetics. Articles deal with cybernetics in the 21st Century; the Soviet State Committee on Science and Technology; economic reforms in Rudnev's ministry; an interview with Rudnev; Dnepr-2; Dnepr-2…

  9. Alabama Education News. Volume 33, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  10. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  11. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  12. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  13. Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  14. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  15. News "Speed Dating" for Scientists and Journalists: Conveying geoscience news in haiku-short form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybas, C. L.

    2006-12-01

    As Rachel Carson wrote in her 1956 book, The Sense of Wonder, it's important for everyone to develop an appreciation of "land, sea and sky." One of the best ways of getting the word out to the public about these realms is through the media. How do scientists capture the interest of the press in a society with a seemingly shorter and shorter attention span? Studies show that as the amount of scientific jargon and number of complex concepts in a news story increase, "filter-feeding" by the public of that news declines. When scientific jargon/complex concepts are few, the public "consumes" much more news. These results also apply to news story headlines: shorter headlines get the most interest. Based on these findings, one organization has started an experiment in "scientific speed dating": giving presenters three minutes to discuss results. They may have discovered something: news coverage of the research has been excellent. In today's world, conveying news about the geosciences in haiku-short form may be the best way of relating the wonders of land, sea and sky.

  16. Automatic indexing of news video for content-based retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Myung-Sup; Yoo, Cheol-Jung; Chang, Ok-Bae

    1998-06-01

    Since it is impossible to automatically parse a general video, we investigated an integrated solution for the content-based news video indexing and the retrieval. Thus, a specific structural video such as news video is parsed, because it is included both temporal and spatial characteristics that the news event with an anchor-person is iteratively appeared, a news icon and a caption are involved in some frame, respectively. To extract automatically the key frames by using the structured knowledge of news, the model used in this paper is consisted of the news event segmentation, caption recognition and search browser module. The following are three main modules represented in this paper: (1) The news event segmentation module (NESM) for both the recognition and the division of an anchor-person shot. (2) The caption recognition module (CRM) for the detection of the caption-frames in a news event, the extraction of their caption region in the frame by using split-merge method, and the recognition of the region as a text with OCR software. 3) The search browser module (SBM) for the display of the list of news events and news captions, which are included in selected news event. However, the SBM can be caused various searching mechanisms.

  17. Cohesiveness in financial news and its relation to market volatility.

    PubMed

    Piškorec, Matija; Antulov-Fantulin, Nino; Novak, Petra Kralj; Mozetič, Igor; Grčar, Miha; Vodenska, Irena; Smuc, Tomislav

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by recent financial crises, significant research efforts have been put into studying contagion effects and herding behaviour in financial markets. Much less has been said regarding the influence of financial news on financial markets. We propose a novel measure of collective behaviour based on financial news on the Web, the News Cohesiveness Index (NCI), and we demonstrate that the index can be used as a financial market volatility indicator. We evaluate the NCI using financial documents from large Web news sources on a daily basis from October 2011 to July 2013 and analyse the interplay between financial markets and finance-related news. We hypothesise that strong cohesion in financial news reflects movements in the financial markets. Our results indicate that cohesiveness in financial news is highly correlated with and driven by volatility in financial markets.

  18. Cohesiveness in Financial News and its Relation to Market Volatility

    PubMed Central

    Piškorec, Matija; Antulov-Fantulin, Nino; Novak, Petra Kralj; Mozetič, Igor; Grčar, Miha; Vodenska, Irena; Šmuc, Tomislav

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by recent financial crises, significant research efforts have been put into studying contagion effects and herding behaviour in financial markets. Much less has been said regarding the influence of financial news on financial markets. We propose a novel measure of collective behaviour based on financial news on the Web, the News Cohesiveness Index (NCI), and we demonstrate that the index can be used as a financial market volatility indicator. We evaluate the NCI using financial documents from large Web news sources on a daily basis from October 2011 to July 2013 and analyse the interplay between financial markets and finance-related news. We hypothesise that strong cohesion in financial news reflects movements in the financial markets. Our results indicate that cohesiveness in financial news is highly correlated with and driven by volatility in financial markets. PMID:24849598

  19. Counseling patients for lifestyle change: making a 15-minute office visit work.

    PubMed

    Berra, Kathy; Hughes, Suzanne

    2015-04-01

    Lifestyle counseling is an intervention that can improve chronic disease management as well as patient and provider satisfaction. Patients and providers are often frustrated with difficulties faced in the implementation and maintenance of lifestyle change. Can we change this paradigm? Are there new strategies that work and can be implemented in a typical office visit? The medical literature confirms the effectiveness of lifestyle interventions and recommends that lifestyle counseling be considered as a cornerstone of care. Here we present a case study of a midlife woman to show how motivational interviewing can be used to help her identify and meet her health goals.

  20. Geology of the Aspen 15-minute quadrangle, Pitkin and Gunnison counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bryant, Bruce

    1979-01-01

    The Aspen area, located 170 km southwest of Denver, Colo., lies at the intersection of the northeast-trending Colorado mineral belt and the west margin of the north-trending Sawatch uplift of Laramide age; it is within the southwest part of the northwest-trending late Paleozoic Eagle basin. Precambrian shales and graywackes, perhaps as old as 2 billion years (b.y.), were converted to sillimanite-bearing gneiss and muscovite-biotite schist 1.65-1.70 b.y. ago. They were deformed into northeast-plunging folds and were migmatized, and they were intruded by quartz diorite, porphyritic quartz monzonite, and granite. Muscovite-biotite quartz monzonite intruded this older Precambrian terrane about 1.45 b.y. ago and is the predominant Precambrian rock near Aspen. Uplift, some faulting, and much erosion occurred during the 900-million year (m.y.) interval between emplacement of the plutonic rocks and deposition of Upper Cambrian sediments. From Late Cambrian through Mississippian the region was part of a broad area alternately covered by shallow seas or occupied by low-lying land. Quartzite, dolomite, and limestone 200-320 m thick, comprising the Sawatch Quartzite and Peerless Formation (Cambrian), Manitou Dolomite (Ordovician), Chaffee Group (Mississippian(?) and Devonian), and Leadville Limestone (Mississippian) were deposited during this interval. After an hiatus during which soil formation and solution of the Leadville Limestone took place in the Late Mississippian, a thick sequence of marine and nonmarine clastic rocks was deposited in the newly developing Eagle basin during the late Paleozoic and early Mesozoic. Deposition of about 300 m of carbonaceous shale, limestone, dolomite, and minor siltstone and evaporite of the Belden Formation began in a shallow sea in Early and Middle Pennsylvanian time. Facies relations indicate that the northwest-trending Uncompahgre uplift southwest of Aspen, if present at that time, had very low relief. The overlying Middle Pennsylvanian Gothic Formation of Langenheim (1952) contains calcareous sandstone, siltstone, shale, limestone, and evaporite. Its clastic debris, significantly coarser than that in the Belden, signals the initial rise of the Uncompahgre uplift bordering the Eagle basin on the southwest; the Gothic here lacks the conglomerates and fossiliferous marine limestones found closer to the uplift. Red terrigenous clastic rocks and minor limestone and evaporite of the Maroon Formation as much as 3,200 m thick, deposited mainly in a fluvial flood-plain environment during the rest of the Pennsylvanian and the Early Permian, indicate withdrawal of the sea caused by further uplift of the Uncompahgre highland. Following an hiatus accompanied by local folding, the red conglomerate, sandstone, and siltstone of the State Bridge Formation (Late Permian and Early Triassic) was deposited in a fluvial-lacustrine environment adjacent to a much-expanded Uncompahgre uplift; a significant part of the State Bridge is material recycled from the Maroon Formation exposed to erosion on the flank of the uplift. The State Bridge, absent towards the south, becomes thicker and finer grained towards the north. The Chinle Formation (Late Triassic) rests with angular unconformity on the State Bridge Formation. The Chinle contains a basal discontinuous quartz-pebble conglomerate (Gartra Member) and is chiefly calcareous siltstone and limestone, with some beds of sandstone and conglomerate composed of fragments derived from the limestone beds. The Chinle was deposited on flood plains and in lakes by streams. Storms may have disrupted the sediments in the lakes producing the limestone pebble conglomerates. The lack of feldspar in the Chinle indicates that the nearby part of the Uncompahgre uplift was not a sediment source, or was covered by a deeply weathered feldspar-free mantle. The formation, absent towards the south, thickens toward the north. Thicknesses of the Maroon, State Bridge, and Ch

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF 15-MINUTE AVERAGE INDOOR AND OUTDOOR PM 2.5 CONCENTRATIONS. (R825241)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. 15-minute consultation: a structured approach to the assessment of chest pain in a child.

    PubMed

    Collins, Samuel A; Griksaitis, Michael J; Legg, Julian P

    2014-08-01

    This article aims to provide a concise, structured approach to the child with chest pain. Chest pain is a common presenting symptom in children but, unlike in adults, the cause is rarely cardiac. We review the main causes of chest pain in children and discuss the important features that may alert those assessing paediatric chest pain to serious underlying pathology. In the vast majority of cases, reassurance is all that is required and a thorough initial consultation can exclude rare, serious disease and provide vital reassurance to children and families.

  3. A website for astronomical news in Spanish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Gil, A.

    2008-06-01

    Noticias del Cosmos is a collection of web pages within the Astronomical Observatory of the University of Valencia's website where we publish short daily summaries of astronomical press releases. Most, if not all of, the releases are originally written in English, and often Spanish readers may find them difficult to understand because not many people are familiar with the scientific language employed in these releases. Noticias del Cosmos has two principal aims. First, we want to communicate the latest astronomical news on a daily basis to a wide Spanish-speaking public who would otherwise not be able to read them because of the language barrier. Second, daily news can be used as a tool to introduce the astronomical topics of the school curriculum in a more immediate and relevant way. Most of the students at school have not yet reached a good enough level in their knowledge of English to fully understand a press release, and Noticias del Cosmos offers them and their teachers this news in their mother tongue. During the regular programme of school visits at the Observatory we use the news as a means of showing that there is still a lot to be discovered. So far the visits to the website have been growing steadily. Between June 2003 and June 2007 we had more than 30,000 visits (excluding 2006). More than 50% of the visits come from Spain, followed by visitors from South and Central America. The feedback we have received from teachers so far has been very positive, showing the usefulness of news items in the classroom when teaching astronomy.

  4. Science versus News: On the Cutting Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, A. L.; French, V.; Villard, R.; Maran, S. P.

    1998-12-01

    This session is to aid communication between scientists and journalists, to motivate astronomers to be active in communicating their science to the public via the press, and to help both astronomers and journalists to understand the constraints under which the other group is operating. The session consists of two talks of about 20 minutes, followed by a panel discussion. The first talk is "What Makes a Topic News?" This segment, by Miles O'Brien of CNN News, takes the AAS audiences behind the scenes in the world of producing science news stories. --- What drives selection of assignments? How does the science reporter convince their editor to cover a story? What factors about television producing help and also hurt getting science subjects across to the public? The second talk is "Public Knowledge on Science: The Growing Gap Between Scientists and the Taxpayer." This presentation by Jon Miller, a public opinion expert will emphasize the problems scientists and society, face in communicating to the public. --- What does the public know about science and scientific method? How much translation is required to communicate with the public to engage their interest without unacceptable compromise of scientific accuracy? The final segment is a panel of both science journalists and astronomers moderated by Steve Maran. Together they will tackle a question that gets to the heart of the Science-Vs-News controversies, "When Should Results Go Public?" Published too soon, science is called "hype"; Published too late, it is no longer "news." Should all results be peer reviewed first, and is that a satisfactory prerequisite? Do scientists take self-serving advantage of the public interest by making announcements before results appear in journals? How do we address the public desire to experience science unfolding and to see real-time data such as planetary science missions? The panelists are Dr. David Helfand, from Columbia University, Dr. Bruce Margon, from the University of

  5. Stem Cells News Update: A Personal Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wong, SC

    2013-01-01

    This article is a follow-up to a previous Commentary published in 2011. It updates some of the events mentioned in that Commentary and continues with more interesting and exciting news on stem cell research and the emerging field of Regenerative Medicine. Some of the news includes: 1) the 2012 Nobel Prize for Medicine awarded to John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka; 2) the cloning of human embryonic stem cells; 3) the continued search for truly pluripotent adult stem cells via in vitro and in vivo protocols; 4) the breakthrough in organ replacements; 5) the global stem cell race; 6) the global stem cell cryo-preservation business; 7) the worldwide stem cell donor registries, and 8) the issue of government regulation on stem cell therapy. PMID:24778557

  6. Stem cells news update: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sc

    2013-12-01

    This article is a follow-up to a previous Commentary published in 2011. It updates some of the events mentioned in that Commentary and continues with more interesting and exciting news on stem cell research and the emerging field of Regenerative Medicine. Some of the news includes: 1) the 2012 Nobel Prize for Medicine awarded to John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka; 2) the cloning of human embryonic stem cells; 3) the continued search for truly pluripotent adult stem cells via in vitro and in vivo protocols; 4) the breakthrough in organ replacements; 5) the global stem cell race; 6) the global stem cell cryo-preservation business; 7) the worldwide stem cell donor registries, and 8) the issue of government regulation on stem cell therapy.

  7. Breaking Bad News to Togolese Patients.

    PubMed

    Kpanake, Lonzozou; Sorum, Paul Clay; Mullet, Etienne

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to map Togolese people's positions regarding the breaking of bad news to elderly patients. Two hundred eleven participants who had in the past received bad medical news were presented with 72 vignettes depicting communication of bad news to elderly female patients and asked to indicate the acceptability of the physician's conduct in each case. The vignettes were all combinations of five factors: (a) the severity of the disease, (b) the patient's wishes about disclosure, (c) the level of social support during hospitalization, (d) the patient's psychological robustness, and (e) the physician's decision about how to communicate the bad news. Five qualitatively different positions were found. Two percent of the participants preferred that the physician always tell the full truth to both the patient and her relatives, 8% preferred that the truth be told depending on the physician's perception of the situation, 15% preferred that the physician tell the truth but understood that in some cases nondisclosure to the patient was not inappropriate, 33% preferred that the physician tell the full truth to the relatives but not as much information to the patient, and 42% preferred that the physician tell the full truth to the relatives only. These findings present a challenge to European physicians taking care of African patients living in Europe or working in African hospitals, and to African physicians trained in Europe and now working in their home countries. If these physicians respect the imperative of always telling the truth directly to their patients, their behavior may trigger anger and considerable misunderstanding among African patients and their families.

  8. Live Blogging Science News: The Rosetta Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S.

    2016-03-01

    When one of the world's most popular online news websites decides to cover a space science event live, you know that something big is brewing. Stuart Clark reports on how live blogging can be used for science reporting and how an idea that was triggered by his observations during the Rosetta flyby of the asteroid Lutetia and the landing of the Curiosity rover on Mars led to him live blogging two of Rosetta's most memorable occasions for The Guardian newspaper.

  9. Arctic Warming as News - Perils and Possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revkin, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    A science journalist in his 30th year covering human-driven climate change, including on three Arctic reporting trips, reflects on successes and setbacks as news media, environmentalists and Arctic communities have tried to convey the significance of polar change to a public for which the ends of the Earth will always largely be a place of the imagination.Novel challenges are arising in the 24/7 online media environment, as when a paper by a veteran climate scientist proposing a mechanism for abrupt sea-level rise became a big news story before it was accepted by the open-review journal to which it had been submitted. New science is digging in on possible connections between changing Arctic sea ice and snow conditions and disruptive winter weather in more temperate northern latitudes, offering a potential link between this distant region and the lives of ordinary citizens. As cutting-edge research, such work gets substantial media attention. But, as with all new areas of inquiry, uncertainty dominates - creating the potential for distracting the public and policymakers from the many aspects of anthropogenic climate change that are firmly established - but, in a way, boring because of that.With the challenges, there are unprecedented opportunities for conveying Arctic science. In some cases, researchers on expeditions are partnering with media, offering both scientists and news outlets fresh ways to convey the story of Arctic change in an era of resource constraints.Innovative uses of crittercams, webcams, and satellite observations offer educators and interested citizens a way to track and appreciate Arctic change. But more can be done to engage the public directly without the news media as an intermediary, particularly if polar scientists or their institutions test some of the established practices honed by more experienced communicators at NASA.

  10. Bad news: delivery, dialogue, and dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Quill, T E; Townsend, P

    1991-03-01

    The narrative from a real patient encounter is used to illustrate the powerful effect that delivering bad news can have on both patient and physician. The meaning of bad news to the patient may be quite different than the medical or the personal meaning to the physician. Differences in perception must be explored and understood before the common ground necessary for joint decision making is established. Initial patient responses can be divided into three categories: (1) basic psychophysiologic (fight-flight or conservation-withdrawal), (2) cognitive, and (3) affective. Responses vary considerably depending on the meaning of the diagnosis to the patient, the degree of immediate threat, and the patient's previous experience with illness. Desired outcomes of the initial meeting include (1) minimizing aloneness and isolation for both patient and physician; (2) achieving a common perception of the problem; (3) giving information tailored to the immediate needs of the patient; (4) addressing immediate medical needs, including the risk of suicide; (5) responding to immediate discomforts; and (6) ensuring a basic plan for follow-up. Though all clinicians deliver bad news, few have had formal training or open exploration of the profound potential impact of the experience. PMID:2001128

  11. A Functional Conceptualization of Understanding Science in the News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Megan M.

    The idea that the public should have the capacity for understanding science in the news has been embraced by scientists, educators, and policymakers alike. An oft-cited goal of contemporary science education, in fact, is to enhance students' understanding of science in the news. But what exactly does it mean to understand science in the news? Surprisingly few have asked this question, or considered the significance of its answer. This dissertation steps away from issues of science teaching and learning to examine the nature of understanding science in the news itself. My work consolidates past scholarship from the multiple fields concerned with the relationship between science and society to produce a theoretical model of understanding science in the news as a complex, multidimensional process that involves an understanding of science as well as journalism. This thesis begins by exploring the relationship between the understanding implicit in understanding science in the news and understanding science. Many assume these two ways of knowing are one in the same. To rebut this assumption, I examine the types of knowledge necessary for understanding science and understanding science in the news. I then use the literature devoted to scientific literacy to show how past research has imagined the knowledge necessary to understand science in the news. Next, I argue that one of the principle difficulties with these conceptualizations is that they define science in the news in essentially the same terms as science. They also, I suggest, oversimplify how and why public interacts with science in the news. This dissertation concludes with a proposal for one way we might think about understanding science in the news on its own terms rather than those of understanding science. This dissertation attempts to connect two fields of research that rarely intersect, despite their multiple common interests: science education and mass communication. It considers the notion of

  12. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This issue of the annual index to NASA Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1991. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject Index, Personal Name Index, News Release Number Index, Accession Number Index, and Speeches and News Releases Indices.

  13. An Effective News Recommendation Method for Microblog User

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wanrong; Dong, Shoubin; Zeng, Zhizhao; He, Jinchao

    2014-01-01

    Recommending news stories to users, based on their preferences, has long been a favourite domain for recommender systems research. Traditional systems strive to satisfy their user by tracing users' reading history and choosing the proper candidate news articles to recommend. However, most of news websites hardly require any user to register before reading news. Besides, the latent relations between news and microblog, the popularity of particular news, and the news organization are not addressed or solved efficiently in previous approaches. In order to solve these issues, we propose an effective personalized news recommendation method based on microblog user profile building and sub class popularity prediction, in which we propose a news organization method using hybrid classification and clustering, implement a sub class popularity prediction method, and construct user profile according to our actual situation. We had designed several experiments compared to the state-of-the-art approaches on a real world dataset, and the experimental results demonstrate that our system significantly improves the accuracy and diversity in mass text data. PMID:24983011

  14. Online resources for news about toxicology and other environmental topics.

    PubMed

    South, J C

    2001-01-12

    Technology has revolutionized researchers' ability to find and retrieve news stories and press releases. Thanks to electronic library systems and telecommunications--notably the Internet--computer users in seconds can sift through millions of articles to locate mainstream articles about toxicology and other environmental topics. But that does not mean it is easy to find what one is looking for. There is a confusing array of databases and services that archive news articles and press releases: (1) some are free; others cost thousands of dollars a year to access, (2) some include hundreds of newspaper and magazine titles; others cover only one publication, (3) some contain archives going back decades; others have just the latest news, (4) some offer only journalistically balanced reports from mainstream news sources; others mix news with opinions and advocacy and include reports from obscure or biased sources. This article explores ways to find news online - particularly news about toxicology, hazardous chemicals, environmental health and the environment in general. The article covers web sites devoted to environmental news; sites and search engines for general-interest news; newspaper archives; commercial information services; press release distribution services and archives; and other resources and strategies for finding articles in the popular press about toxicology and the environment. PMID:11164981

  15. An effective news recommendation method for microblog user.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wanrong; Dong, Shoubin; Zeng, Zhizhao; He, Jinchao

    2014-01-01

    Recommending news stories to users, based on their preferences, has long been a favourite domain for recommender systems research. Traditional systems strive to satisfy their user by tracing users' reading history and choosing the proper candidate news articles to recommend. However, most of news websites hardly require any user to register before reading news. Besides, the latent relations between news and microblog, the popularity of particular news, and the news organization are not addressed or solved efficiently in previous approaches. In order to solve these issues, we propose an effective personalized news recommendation method based on microblog user profile building and sub class popularity prediction, in which we propose a news organization method using hybrid classification and clustering, implement a sub class popularity prediction method, and construct user profile according to our actual situation. We had designed several experiments compared to the state-of-the-art approaches on a real world dataset, and the experimental results demonstrate that our system significantly improves the accuracy and diversity in mass text data.

  16. Language use depending on news frame and immigrant origin.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Itziar; Igartua, Juan-José; Moral, Félix; Palacios, Elena; Acosta, Tania; Muñoz, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of the media on individuals' specific language use in relation to a news story on immigration: the influence of the news frame and group cue. Abstraction, complexity of language use, and negative affective language were evaluated. The 523 participants were randomly distributed to each of the four experimental conditions: news frame (crime versus economic contribution) by group cue (geographical origin of the immigrants involved: Moroccans versus Latin Americans). Through content analysis of the ideas and reflections that arose after the participants read the different news stories, using the Linguistic Category Model (LCM; Semin & Fiedler, 1991) to measure abstract language and the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC; Pennebaker, Booth, & Francis, 2007) to analyze complex language and negative affective language, it emerged that abstract language and negative affective language were more frequent in the participants assigned to the news frame on crime. Complex language was more commonly used when the news frame referred to the economic contribution of immigrants. Regression analyses showed the mediating role of attitude to immigration in the effects of news frame on negative affective language. The bootstrap method was used to assess the magnitude of the indirect effect. A significant mediator effect was also found through structural equation modeling. Analyses of covariance showed one interaction between news frame and group cue: Among those who read the news story in a frame linking immigration to crime and Moroccan origin, abstract language was more characteristic. The results are discussed from the theoretical perspective of framing.

  17. Analysis of News Agencies' Descriptive Features of People and Organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Shin; Ma, Qiang; Yoshikawa, Masatoshi

    News agencies report news from different viewpoints and with different writing styles. We propose a method to extract characteristic descriptions of a news agency written about people and organizations. To extract the characteristic descriptions of a given person or organization, we analyze words which appear in the same sentence on the basis of their SVO roles. We then extract a description that is often used by the news agency but not commonly used by the others. The experimental results show that our method can elucidate the different features of each agency’s writing style.

  18. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  19. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  20. Cloaked Attribution--What Does It Mean to News Readers? ANPA News Research Bulletin. No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbertson, Hugh M.; Somerick, Nancy

    A study was conducted to determine how people react to unnamed or veiled news sources in newspaper articles. A group of 283 persons, chosen at random from three contrasting communities, was asked to read two articles dealing with different topics, one with sources quoted by name and one with euphemisms ("a White House spokesman,""a city official")…

  1. NewsMarket 2.0: Analysis of News for Stock Price Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazzetti, Alessandro; Mastronardi, Rosangela

    Most of the existing financial research tools use a stock's historical price and technical indicators to predict future price trends without taking into account the impact of web news. The recent explosion of demand for information on financial investment management is driving the search for alternative methods of quantitative data analysis.

  2. Work Roles, News Gathering Equipment, and Newscasts in Current U.S. Television News Departments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harless, James D.; Collins, Erik L.

    In the Spring of 1973, American television news editors were surveyed for data on staff size, operating budgets, work roles, camera equipment, portable VTR equipment, wire services, mobile equipment, and number of newscasts. The data obtained are reported in five levels of operating budgets with a summary of the statistics for each area of news…

  3. News-Letter/Faits Nouveaux. Council of Europe News-Letter 2/74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France). Documentation Center for Education in Europe.

    This newsletter contains articles in French and English on events relating to educational policy in various European countries. Part 1 contains an essay on the essential aims of education and a suggestion for incorporating work and study in university education. Part 2 includes the following news items: Austria's school education act; Belgium's…

  4. Displaying fairness while delivering bad news: Testing the effectiveness of organizational bad news training in the layoff context.

    PubMed

    Richter, Manuela; König, Cornelius J; Koppermann, Christopher; Schilling, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Although giving bad news at work is a stressful experience, managers are often underprepared for this challenging task. As a solution, we introduce organizational bad news training that integrates (a) principles of delivering bad news from the context of health care (i.e., bad news delivery component), and (b) principles of organizational justice theory (i.e., fairness component). We argue that both the formal and fair delivery of bad news at work can be enhanced with the help of training to mitigate distress both for the messenger and the recipient. We tested the effectiveness of training for the delivery of a layoff as a typical bad news event at work. In 2 studies, we compared the performance of a training group (receiving both components of training) with that of a control group (Study 1, Study 2) and a basics group (receiving the bad news delivery component only; Study 2) during a simulated dismissal notification meeting. In general, the results supported our hypotheses: Training improved the formal delivery of bad news and predicted indicators of procedural fairness during the conversation in both studies. In Study 2, we also considered layoff victims' negativity after the layoff and found that training significantly reduced negative responses. This relationship was fully mediated by layoff victims' fairness perceptions. Despite preparation, however, giving bad news remained a challenging task in both studies. In summary, we recommend that organizations provide managers with organizational bad news training in order to promote professional and fair bad news conversations at work. (PsycINFO Database Record

  5. New News for the New World Information Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Robert L.

    Noting that recent emphasis in the New World Information Order debate has focused on the development of new structures for the production and exchange of news among Third World countries, this paper provides a qualitative and quantitative examination of three types of alternative news agencies. They include the second-tier Western agencies…

  6. Investigating the News Seeking Behavior of Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qayyum, M. Asim; Williamson, Kirsty; Liu, Ying-Hsang; Hider, Philip

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the news-seeking and browsing behaviours of young adults, partly in the context of everyday life information seeking (ELIS), in order to explore their perceptions of and attitudes towards print and online news media. The study is significant because traditional print newspapers face a steady decline in their readership with…

  7. Handling News Media: Johnson and Dorman's Bag of Tricks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ralph H.; Dorman, William A.

    What passes for considered judgment in public discourse today is often little more than "unearned opinion"--the received opinion offered by others who have the power to shape the news. So students must develop consistent intellectual standards for routinely evaluating the news media which so frequently provide the empirical stuff about which they…

  8. 17 CFR 242.505 - Exclusion for news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exclusion for news media. 242.505 Section 242.505 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED...-Analyst Certification § 242.505 Exclusion for news media. No provision of this Regulation AC shall...

  9. 17 CFR 242.505 - Exclusion for news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exclusion for news media. 242.505 Section 242.505 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED...-Analyst Certification § 242.505 Exclusion for news media. No provision of this Regulation AC shall...

  10. 17 CFR 242.505 - Exclusion for news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exclusion for news media. 242.505 Section 242.505 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED...-Analyst Certification § 242.505 Exclusion for news media. No provision of this Regulation AC shall...

  11. 17 CFR 242.505 - Exclusion for news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exclusion for news media. 242.505 Section 242.505 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED...-Analyst Certification § 242.505 Exclusion for news media. No provision of this Regulation AC shall...

  12. A Multi-Dimensional Approach to Measuring News Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vraga, Emily; Tully, Melissa; Kotcher, John E.; Smithson, Anne-Bennett; Broeckelman-Post, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Measuring news media literacy is important in order for it to thrive in a variety of educational and civic contexts. This research builds on existing measures of news media literacy and two new scales are presented that measure self-perceived media literacy (SPML) and perceptions of the value of media literacy (VML). Research with a larger sample…

  13. 17 CFR 242.505 - Exclusion for news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusion for news media. 242.505 Section 242.505 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED...-Analyst Certification § 242.505 Exclusion for news media. No provision of this Regulation AC shall...

  14. Real and Ideal Television News Images: A Q-Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Jeffrey Neil

    This investigation demonstrates the applicability of Stephenson's Q-Methodology, a psychological instrument, for gathering qualitative data concerning television news audiences. A questionnaire consisting of statements describing a possible news format was distributed to the viewers of three commercial television stations in Baton Rouge,…

  15. Flow of News in the Gulf. New Communication Order 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Phil; And Others

    One of a series of publications dealing with the New Information Order, this paper contains reports of two studies concerning news flow in the Arabian Gulf region. The first study describes the content and volume of news exchanged between the Arab States of the Gulf region and Europe. Various sections of this report provide (1) information on the…

  16. A School News Bureau: PR Training at High School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Dolores P.

    1978-01-01

    Describes how a high school journalism teacher established a student news bureau to channel information about schools in the school system to the local media; lists advantages of the news bureau to its staff members and to the school system. (GW)

  17. Teaching the Scientific Method Using Current News Articles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Laura K.; Mahan, Carolyn G.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a short (less than 50 minutes) activity using news articles from sources such as "Science Daily" to teach students the steps of the scientific method and the difference between primary and secondary literature sources. The flexibility in choosing news articles to examine allowed us to tailor the activity to the specific interests of…

  18. DEA News, Number 2, Spring and Summer 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, John G., Ed.

    Published periodically, the DEA News, from the Division of Educational Affairs of the American Political Science Association, concentrates on issues and policies in education of special concern to political scientists and on specific information about course materials. Also the News reports on education issues, on questions about public awareness…

  19. Children's Expectations for Television Entertainment vs. Television News Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reitzes, Katherine A.; White, Mary Alice

    1982-01-01

    Found that sixth- and eighth-grade children (1) predicted a greater proportion of positive outcomes for television entertainment events than for television news events and (2) rated news events as more likely to happen in everyday life than entertainment events. Concluded that children can discriminate between the two facets of television reality.…

  20. Positive Organizational Behavior: A Buffer for Bad News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Sandra L.; Holden, Tracey Quigley

    2012-01-01

    Most communication research on bad news messages focuses on crisis communication, where attention is often limited to image repair strategies. The authors argue that a key indicator of an organization's effectiveness in communicating "bad news" messages is its organizational culture. Developing an organizational culture that values positive…

  1. Communicating bad news: a model for emergency mental health helpers.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Thomas J; Keefe-Cooperman, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses the concerns of the messenger/helper who must convey tragic news to individuals and families. It offers a model to be used as a guide to ease the stress on both the deliverer and receiver of bad news. The model uses the mnemonic, PEWTER (Prepare, Evaluate, Warn, Tell, Emotional Response, Regroup), to represent the six components of the communication process.

  2. The Real and Perceived Influence of the "US News" Ranking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    How influential has the "US News" Best Colleges ranking been over the last twenty-five years since it was first started in 1983? In what ways does this influence manifest itself? There is strong evidence of the impact of the US News rankings among consumers, prospective students and their parents, and the higher education establishment in the…

  3. A Functional Conceptualization of Understanding Science in the News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Megan M.

    2012-01-01

    The idea that the public should have the capacity for understanding science in the news has been embraced by scientists, educators, and policymakers alike. An oft-cited goal of contemporary science education, in fact, is to enhance students' understanding of science in the news. But what exactly does it "mean" to understand science…

  4. The Audience Experience with Television News. Journalism Monographs No. 55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Mark R.

    "Audience experience" is a term used to denote the subjective meaning of news watching for the average American. This study examines audience experience in the following ways: the extent to which the television audience chooses, through self-defined goals, the television news broadcast they will watch, the uses and gratification associated with…

  5. 31 CFR 560.519 - Policy governing news organization offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Policy governing news organization offices. 560.519 Section 560.519 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... Licenses, Authorizations and Statements of Licensing Policy § 560.519 Policy governing news...

  6. 31 CFR 560.519 - Policy governing news organization offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Policy governing news organization offices. 560.519 Section 560.519 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... Licenses, Authorizations and Statements of Licensing Policy § 560.519 Policy governing news...

  7. 31 CFR 560.519 - Policy governing news organization offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Policy governing news organization offices. 560.519 Section 560.519 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... Licenses, Authorizations and Statements of Licensing Policy § 560.519 Policy governing news...

  8. News for a Teen Market: The Lessons of Channel One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoynes, William

    1998-01-01

    Describes the types of stories that Channel One covers and the characteristics and configuration of its news sources. Focusing mostly on anchor personalities and politicians, Channel One news serves as a promotional vehicle for itself and youth culture, providing a friendly environment for controversial product advertisements. Such dramatic and…

  9. International News Communication Research: A Meta-Analytic Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Kuo-jen

    A survey of "Journalism Quarterly,""Gazette,""Public Opinion Quarterly,""Journal of Broadcasting," and "Journal of Communication" reveals that the early research on international news flow or coverage emphasized two aspects of news: (1) how the United States was portrayed in the media of other nations, and (2) what the effect of American society…

  10. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches (1984) contains selected speeches and news releases issued by NASA Headquarters during the year 1984. The index was prepared by the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Facility operated for the National Aeronautical and Space Administration by PRC Government Information Systems.

  11. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A listing is presented of 271 news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters and 72 selected speeches given by Headquarters staff in 1983. Subject and personal name indexes are arranged alphabetically. Indexes to titles, news release numbers, and accession numbers are arranged numerically.

  12. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A listing is provided of 201 news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters and 10 selected speeches presented by Headquarters staff in 1980. Subject and name indexes are arranged alphabetically. Indexes to titles, news release numbers and accession numbers are arranged numerically.

  13. Segmenting Broadcast News Audiences in the New Media Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wicks, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    Examines the "benefit segmentation model," a marketing strategy for local news media which is capable of sorting consumers into discrete segments interested in similar salient product attributes or benefits. Concludes that benefit segmentation may provide a means by which news programmers may respond to their audience. (RS)

  14. Do Children Really Take Note of Science in the News?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarman, Ruth; McClune, Billy

    2007-01-01

    For ten days in August 2006, Pluto was rarely out of the news as members of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) deliberated on its planetary status. For the members of the "News in Science Education" group, based at Queen's University, Belfast, this offered a great opportunity for educators to explore a number of interesting and important…

  15. The Effects of Market Structure on Television News Pricing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, Michael O.; Wollert, James A.

    Multiple regression techniques were used to examine the business side of local television news operations for November 1978. Research questions examined the effect of several variables on local television news prices (advertising rates), including type of ownership, network affiliation/signal type, market size, cable network penetration, market…

  16. Problem Areas in Science News Reporting, Writing, and Editing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Michael; Tankard, James W., Jr.

    Several potential "problem areas" in the science news coverage process were identified through analysis of comments written by 193 scientists who were asked to assess the accuracy of science news stories in which they were cited as the major source. The analysis led to a number of recommendations for improving the objective reporting of science…

  17. 31 CFR 515.573 - Transactions by news organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transactions by news organizations. 515.573 Section 515.573 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... Licenses, Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.573 Transactions by news...

  18. Some Uses-and-Gratifications of Television News Audiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towers, Wayne M.

    Fourteen statements relating to the surveillance, diversion, and social interaction uses of media were drawn from a review of uses and gratification research and applied to the viewing of local and national early evening news and nighttime local news television programs. A telephone survey of 543 adults elicited information concerning demographics…

  19. 31 CFR 515.573 - Transactions by news organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... operation of news bureaus in Cuba whose primary purpose is the gathering and dissemination of news to the...) Paying fees related to the operation of the office in Cuba. (b) Specific licenses may be issued... imported from Cuba and the interruption of the financial transactions with Cuba....

  20. What the Rankings Do for "U.S. News"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selingo, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    The annual "America's Best Colleges" issue of "U.S. News & World Report" has long been referred to as the magazine's swimsuit issue. While the comparison is made in jest, in terms of newsstand sales the association with the popular "Sports Illustrated" cover is not far off. Last year the "U.S. News" college issue was among 17 perennial…

  1. APOLLO 13: A News Bulletin from ABC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 13: ABC breaks the news of a mishap aboard the spacecraft From the film documentary 'APOLLO 13: 'Houston, We've got a problem'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLO 13 : Third manned lunar landing attempt with James A. Lovell, Jr., John L. Swigert, Jr., and Fred W. Haise, Jr. Pressure lost in SM oxygen system; mission aborted; LM used for life support. Mission Duration 142hrs 54mins 41sec

  2. A guide to reading health care news stories.

    PubMed

    Schwitzer, Gary

    2014-07-01

    From April 16, 2006, through May 30, 2013, a team of reviewers from HealthNewsReview.org, many of whom were physicians, evaluated the reporting by US news organizations on new medical treatments, tests, products, and procedures. After reviewing 1889 stories (approximately 43% newspaper articles, 30% wire or news services stories, 15% online pieces [including those by broadcast and magazine companies], and 12% network television stories), the reviewers graded most stories unsatisfactory on 5 of 10 review criteria: costs, benefits, harms, quality of the evidence, and comparison of the new approach with alternatives. Drugs, medical devices, and other interventions were usually portrayed positively; potential harms were minimized, and costs were ignored. Our findings can help journalists improve their news stories and help physicians and the public better understand the strengths and weaknesses of news media coverage of medical and health topics. PMID:24796314

  3. [Breaking bad news in oncology: the Belgian experience].

    PubMed

    Delevallez, F; Lienard, A; Gibon, A-S; Razavi, D

    2014-10-01

    Breaking bad news is a complex and frequent clinical task for physicians working in oncology. It can have a negative impact on patients and their relatives who are often present during breaking bad news consultations. Many factors influence how the delivery of bad news will be experienced especially the communication skills used by physicians. A three-phase process (post-delivery phase, delivery phase, pre-delivery phase) has been developed to help physician to handle this task more effectively. Communication skills and specific breaking bad news training programs are both necessary and effective. A recent study conducted in Belgium has shown their impact on the time allocated to each of the three phases of this process, on the communication skills used, on the inclusion of the relative in the consultation and on physicians' physiological arousal. These results underscore the importance of promoting intensive communication skills and breaking bad news training programs for health care professionals.

  4. Coverage of Alzheimer's disease from 1984 to 2008 in television news and information talk shows in the United States: an analysis of news framing.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok; Gearhart, Sherice; Bae, Hyuhn-Suhck

    2010-12-01

    This study examined 1371 TV news transcripts on Alzheimer's disease (AD) from 6 TV news networks during a 25-year period (1984-2008) employing the news framing perspective. Issues, sources, and episodic-thematic news about AD derived from the news framing perspective were analyzed. Results revealed that AD issues, such as treatments, personal stories, celebrities, and policy increased over time, whereas other issues including facts, causes, signs, and diagnosis received relatively limited news attention. Correlation analyses among episodic-thematic frames, issues, and sources found that episodic-thematic frames were positively linked with such issues as personal stories and policy and sources, including patients and politicians. The results suggest that although TV news covers episodic frames more than thematic ones, both frames can interact with each other to influence personal and social news about AD. Particularly, the role of celebrity affecting AD news at both individual and social levels is salient.

  5. Network television news coverage of environmental risks

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, M.R.; Sandman, P.M.; Sachsman, D.V.; Salomone, K.L.

    1989-03-01

    Despite the criticisms that surround television coverage of environmental risk, there have been relatively few attempts to measure what and whom television shows. Most research has focused analysis on a few weeks of coverage of major stories like the gas leak at Bhopal, the Three Mile Island nuclear accident, or the Mount St. Helen's eruption. To advance the research into television coverage of environmental risk, an analysis has been made of all environmental risk coverage by the network nightly news broadcasts for a period of more than two years. Researchers have analyzed all environmental risk coverage-564 stories in 26 months-presented on ABC, CBS, and NBC's evening news broadcasts from January 1984 through February 1986. The quantitative information from the 564 stories was balanced by a more qualitative analysis of the television coverage of two case studies-the dioxin contamination in Times Beach, Missouri, and the suspected methyl isocyanate emissions from the Union Carbide plant in Institute, West Virginia. Both qualitative and quantitative data contributed to the analysis of the role played by experts and environmental advocacy sources in coverage of environmental risk and to the suggestions for increasing that role.

  6. There is no news like bad news: women are more remembering and stress reactive after reading real negative news than men.

    PubMed

    Marin, Marie-France; Morin-Major, Julie-Katia; Schramek, Tania E; Beaupré, Annick; Perna, Andrea; Juster, Robert-Paul; Lupien, Sonia J

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of specialized television channels offering 24-hour coverage, Internet and smart phones, the possibility to be constantly in contact with the media has increased dramatically in the last decades. Despite this higher access to knowledge, the impact media exposure has on healthy individuals remains poorly studied. Given that most information conveyed in the media is negative and that upon perception of threat, the brain activates the stress system, which leads to cortisol secretion, we decided to determine how healthy individuals react to media information. Accordingly, we investigated whether reading real negative news (1) is physiologically stressful, (2) modulates one's propensity to be stress reactive to a subsequent stressor and (3) modulates remembrance for these news. Sixty participants (30 women, 30 men) were randomly assigned to either twenty-four real neutral news excerpts or to twenty-four real negative excerpts for 10 minutes. They were then all exposed to a well-validated psychosocial stressor, the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), which consists of an anticipation phase of 10 minutes and a test phase of 10 minutes. A total of eight salivary cortisol samples were collected, at 10-minutes intervals, throughout the experimental procedure. One day later, a free recall of the news was performed. Results showed that although reading negative news did not lead to change in cortisol levels (p>0.05), it led to a significant increase in cortisol to a subsequent stressor in women only (p<0.001). Also, women in the negative news condition experienced better memory for these news excerpts compared to men (p<0.01). These results suggest a potential mechanism by which media exposure could increase stress reactivity and memory for negative news in women.

  7. Interpretation of Results of Studies Evaluating an Intervention Highlighted in Google Health News: A Cross-Sectional Study of News

    PubMed Central

    Haneef, Romana; Lazarus, Clement; Ravaud, Philippe; Yavchitz, Amélie; Boutron, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Background Mass media through the Internet is a powerful means of disseminating medical research. We aimed to determine whether and how the interpretation of research results is misrepresented by the use of “spin” in the health section of Google News. Spin was defined as specific way of reporting, from whatever motive (intentional or unintentional), to emphasize that the beneficial effect of the intervention is greater than that shown by the results. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of news highlighted in the health section of US, UK and Canada editions of Google News between July 2013 and January 2014. We searched for news items for 3 days a week (i.e., Monday, Wednesday, and Friday) during 6 months and selected a sample of 130 news items reporting a scientific article evaluating the effect of an intervention on human health. Results In total, 78% of the news did not provide a full reference or electronic link to the scientific article. We found at least one spin in 114 (88%) news items and 18 different types of spin in news. These spin were mainly related to misleading reporting (59%) such as not reporting adverse events that were reported in the scientific article (25%), misleading interpretation (69%) such as claiming a causal effect despite non-randomized study design (49%) and overgeneralization/misleading extrapolation (41%) of the results such as extrapolating a beneficial effect from an animal study to humans (21%). We also identified some new types of spin such as highlighting a single patient experience for the success of a new treatment instead of focusing on the group results. Conclusions Interpretation of research results was frequently misrepresented in the health section of Google News. However, we do not know whether these spin were from the scientific articles themselves or added in the news. PMID:26473725

  8. A Comparison of Career Attitudes of News-Editorial and Ad-PR Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ron F.

    1987-01-01

    Assesses the attitudes that news-editorial students have toward careers in public relations and advertising and the attitudes that public relations-advertising students have toward news careers. Finds that news-ed students saw careers in public relations as being less useful to society and having less prestige in the community than their careers.…

  9. News Bias in the 1972 Campaign: A Cross-Media Comparison. Journalism Monographs No. 58.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstetter, C. Richard

    The television networks nightly news coverage of the 1972 Presidential campaign was examined between July 10 and November 6, 1972 to assess the nature and impact of political bias in news coverage. The campaign news coverage of two newspapers and one wire service was also compared with respect to the content and length of each medium's news about…

  10. 46 CFR 386.17 - Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial... § 386.17 Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial purposes. Such photographs for news... Court Order or rule prohibits, photographs for news purposes may be taken in entrances, lobbies,...

  11. Hot news recommendation system from heterogeneous websites based on bayesian model.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhengyou; Xu, Shengwu; Liu, Ningzhong; Zhao, Zhengkang

    2014-01-01

    The most current news recommendations are suitable for news which comes from a single news website, not for news from different heterogeneous news websites. Previous researches about news recommender systems based on different strategies have been proposed to provide news personalization services for online news readers. However, little research work has been reported on utilizing hundreds of heterogeneous news websites to provide top hot news services for group customers (e.g., government staffs). In this paper, we propose a hot news recommendation model based on Bayesian model, which is from hundreds of different news websites. In the model, we determine whether the news is hot news by calculating the joint probability of the news. We evaluate and compare our proposed recommendation model with the results of human experts on the real data sets. Experimental results demonstrate the reliability and effectiveness of our method. We also implement this model in hot news recommendation system of Hangzhou city government in year 2013, which achieves very good results.

  12. Predicting Attention to Local Television News: Need for Cognition and Motives for Viewing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perse, Elizabeth M.

    1992-01-01

    Examines associations between local news viewing motives and attention to government reports or to sports reports. Identifies significant connections between need for cognition, utilitarian local news viewing motives, and attention to government news reports. Finds attention to sports news explained only by respondent sex. Discusses implications…

  13. 46 CFR 386.17 - Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial... § 386.17 Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial purposes. Such photographs for news... Court Order or rule prohibits, photographs for news purposes may be taken in entrances, lobbies,...

  14. Using Multimedia to Bring Science News to the Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Riordan, C.; Stein, B.; Lorditch, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Creative partnerships between scientists and journalists open new opportunities to bring the excitement of scientific discoveries to wider audiences. Research tells us that the majority of the general public now gets more science and technology news from the Internet than from TV sources (2014 NSF Science and Engineering Indicators). In order to reach these audiences news organizations must embrace multiple forms of multimedia. We will review recent research on how the new multimedia landscape is changing the way that science news is consumed and how news organizations are changing the way they deliver news. News programs like Inside Science, and other examples of new partnerships that deliver research news to journalists, teachers, students, and the general public will be examined. We will describe examples of successful collaborations including an article by a former Newsweek science reporter entitled "My 1975 'Cooling World' Story Doesn't Make Today's Climate Scientists Wrong," which got reprinted in Slate, RealClearScience, and mentioned in Factcheck.org and USA Today.

  15. Breaking bad news: issues relating to nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Clare

    2014-07-15

    The breaking of bad news was traditionally regarded to be the time when a doctor and nurse sat down with a patient and family members to provide information about, for example, a life-limiting diagnosis or a poor prognosis. However, breaking bad news is now generally accepted as a process, not a one-off event, and is considered to refer to any bad, sad or difficult information that alters patients' perceptions of their present and future. Nurses have an important role in the process of providing information and helping patients prepare for, receive, understand and cope with the bad news they have been given. This article aims to help nurses understand the process of breaking bad news and discuss the challenges and difficulties that nurses can face when they are involved with patients who have been given bad news. It also provides guidance with regard to preparing for breaking bad news, giving difficult information, responding to possible reactions, and supporting patients and their relatives after they have received bad news.

  16. NEWS: Nuclear Emulsions for WIMP Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Marco, Natalia; NEWS Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    In the field of direct Dark Matter search a different and promising approach is the directionality: the observation of the incoming apparent direction of WIMPs would in fact provide a new and unambiguous signature. The NEWS project is a very innovative approach for a high sensitivity experiment aiming at the directional detection of WIMPs: the detector is based on a novel emulsion technology called NIT (Nano Imaging Trackers) acting both as target and tracking device. In this paper we illustrate the features of a NIT-based detector and the newly developed read-out systems allowing to reach a spatial resolution of the order of 10 nm. We present the background studies and the experimental design. Finally we report about the time schedule of the experiment and the expected sensitivity for DM searches.

  17. STS-79 John Blaha address news media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-79 Mission Specialist John E. Blaha addresses news media gathered for the flight crew's late night arrival at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. A veteran space traveler who served as either commander or pilot on his four previous Shuttle flights, Blaha is taking a mission specialist's slot on STS-79 because he will be transferring to the Russian Space Station Mir for an extended stay. American astronaut Shannon Lucid will take his place aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis for the return trip home. Final preparations are under way for launch of Atlantis on Mission STS-79, with liftoff scheduled to occur during an approximately seven-minute window opening at 4:54 a.m. EDT, Sept.16.

  18. Databases toward Disseminated Use - Nikkei News Telecom -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasiwagi, Akira

    The need for “searchers” - adept hands in the art of information retrieval - is increasing nowadays. Searchers have become necessary as the result of the upbeat online database market. The number of database users is rising steeply. There is the urgent need to develop potential users of general information, such as newspaper articles. Simple commands, easy operation, and low prices hold the key to general popularization of databases, and the issue lies in how the industry will get about achieving this task. Nihon Keizai Shimbun has been undertaking a wide range of possibilities with Nikkei News Telecom. Although only two years have passed since its start, results of Nikkei’s efforts are summarized below.

  19. When good news leads to bad choices.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, Margaret A; Dunn, Roger M; Spetch, Marcia L; Ludvig, Elliot A

    2016-01-01

    Pigeons and other animals sometimes deviate from optimal choice behavior when given informative signals for delayed outcomes. For example, when pigeons are given a choice between an alternative that always leads to food after a delay and an alternative that leads to food only half of the time after a delay, preference changes dramatically depending on whether the stimuli during the delays are correlated with (signal) the outcomes or not. With signaled outcomes, pigeons show a much greater preference for the suboptimal alternative than with unsignaled outcomes. Key variables and research findings related to this phenomenon are reviewed, including the effects of durations of the choice and delay periods, probability of reinforcement, and gaps in the signal. We interpret the available evidence as reflecting a preference induced by signals for good news in a context of uncertainty. Other explanations are briefly summarized and compared. PMID:26781050

  20. Quantifying the Relationship Between Financial News and the Stock Market

    PubMed Central

    Alanyali, Merve; Moat, Helen Susannah; Preis, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    The complex behavior of financial markets emerges from decisions made by many traders. Here, we exploit a large corpus of daily print issues of the Financial Times from 2nd January 2007 until 31st December 2012 to quantify the relationship between decisions taken in financial markets and developments in financial news. We find a positive correlation between the daily number of mentions of a company in the Financial Times and the daily transaction volume of a company's stock both on the day before the news is released, and on the same day as the news is released. Our results provide quantitative support for the suggestion that movements in financial markets and movements in financial news are intrinsically interlinked. PMID:24356666

  1. 2008 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2008 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  2. STS-135 and Expedition 28 Joint Crew News Conference

    NASA Video Gallery

    Atlantis crew members and their six station colleagues gathered in the Japanese Kibo Laboratory to take questions from news media. Reporters at four NASA centers, NASA headquarters and in Japan par...

  3. 2010 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2010 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  4. 2012 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2012 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  5. Accredited, Non-Accredited News Curricula Are Similar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Bob A.

    1977-01-01

    Found that in news-editorial programs, the greatest differences between accredited and non-accredited programs occur in the social and behavioral sciences and the journalism theory and history subdivisions. (KS)

  6. Dynamic analysis of news streams: institutional versus environmental effects.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Kevin; Corman, Steven

    2004-07-01

    Many societal phenomena are studied through analysis of their representation in media-related texts, such as news articles. The dynamics of such data reflect the phenomenon's underlying generative mechanism. Media artifacts are assumed to mirror the social activity occurring in the environment, thus observed dynamics are assumed to reflect environmental dynamics. The institutional mechanics of media production also affect the observed dynamics however. In this study we examine the extent to which institutional versus environmental effects explain the observed dynamics of media content, in particular focusing on semi-continuous "news streams". We examine the dynamics of news streams produced by the electronic news organization Reuters, immediately following the events of September 11, 2001. We find that many of the observed dynamics appear institutionally generated. We conclude with methodological suggestions concerning the dynamic analysis of media content.

  7. Learning from Television News: A Critique of the Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Colin

    1983-01-01

    This critical review of some approaches to research on the effectiveness of television newscasts considers viewer characteristics, news item characteristics, presentation variables, and the confounding of these variables. The importance of behavioral science issues to such research is stressed. (MBR)

  8. 2013 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    An archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  9. Public Affairs and Sensationalism in Local TV News Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryu, Jung S.

    1982-01-01

    Analyzes the content of local news presented on three television stations in Cincinnati, Ohio, in three different years. Concludes that the stations used sensationalism and human interest stories as reserves to maintain high ratings. (FL)

  10. 2014 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    An archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  11. Quantifying the relationship between financial news and the stock market.

    PubMed

    Alanyali, Merve; Moat, Helen Susannah; Preis, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    The complex behavior of financial markets emerges from decisions made by many traders. Here, we exploit a large corpus of daily print issues of the Financial Times from 2(nd) January 2007 until 31(st) December 2012 to quantify the relationship between decisions taken in financial markets and developments in financial news. We find a positive correlation between the daily number of mentions of a company in the Financial Times and the daily transaction volume of a company's stock both on the day before the news is released, and on the same day as the news is released. Our results provide quantitative support for the suggestion that movements in financial markets and movements in financial news are intrinsically interlinked.

  12. Index to NASA news releases and speeches 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This index contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1994.

  13. Research News: Are VLSI Microcircuits Too Hard to Design?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    1980-01-01

    This research news article on microelectronics discusses the scientific challenge the integrated circuit industry will have in the next decade, for designing the complicated microcircuits made possible by advancing miniaturization technology. (HM)

  14. How Uses and Gratifications Affect Recall of Television News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gantz, Walter

    1978-01-01

    Reports on a study that suggested that those who watch television news primarily to gain information recall more than others, and that casual viewers recall more than those seeking diversion or both diversion and information. (GT)

  15. Use of Satellite Technology in Local Television News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacy, Stephen; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Assesses the state of satellite news gathering (SNG) among commercial broadcast, nonsatellite stations in the United States. Finds that 75 percent of the stations set SNG feeds but that only 50 percent have their own SNG equipment. (RS)

  16. 31 CFR 500.583 - News organization offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... North Korean nationals to serve as support staff; (3) Purchasing North Korean-origin goods for use in... operation of news bureaus in the United States by North Korean organizations whose primary purpose is...

  17. 2011 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2011 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  18. 2009 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2009 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  19. Loneliness, Parasocial Interaction, and Local Television News Viewing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Alan M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Investigating the nature of parasocial interaction (relationship of friendship or intimacy of the television viewer with a remote media personality). Developed a model to measure parasocial interaction and tested news-viewing motives and patterns. (PD)

  20. Communicating bad news: a model for emergency mental health helpers.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Thomas J; Keefe-Cooperman, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses the concerns of the messenger/helper who must convey tragic news to individuals and families. It offers a model to be used as a guide to ease the stress on both the deliverer and receiver of bad news. The model uses the mnemonic, PEWTER (Prepare, Evaluate, Warn, Tell, Emotional Response, Regroup), to represent the six components of the communication process. PMID:16944793

  1. News for the '90s: How To Analyze the News Media. Leader's Guide and Handout Masters. A Media Literacy Workshop Kit. [Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Barbara; Davis, Jay F.

    This guide contains three workshop modules to manage group discussion on the topic of the influence of the news media in the '90s. Module 1 instructs "How To Evaluate a News Story." Module 2 suggests "The Camera Never Lies - Or Does It?" Module 3 examines "What's Missing in the News: Democracy and the Media." Handouts accompanying module 3…

  2. Analyzing the Appropriateness of Internet-Based School News Programs for Social Studies Classrooms: "CNN Student News" as a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journell, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a research study on the appropriateness for social studies classrooms of "CNN Student News," a free online news program specifically aimed at middle and high school students. The author conducted a content analysis of "CNN Student News" during October 2012 and evaluated the program's content for…

  3. Delivering Current Hubble Space Telescope (HST) News to the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villard, R.; Eisenhamer, B.; Weaver, D.

    2004-05-01

    Today's classrooms are significantly influenced by current news events, delivered instantly into the classroom via the Internet. Educators are challenged daily to transform these events into student learning opportunities. In the case of space science, current news events may be the only chance for educators and students to explore the marvels of the universe. Inspired by these circumstances, the Formal Education and News Divisions at STScI's Office of Public Outreach joined forces to deliver current Hubble Space Telescope (HST) news events that have an educational backbone. Starting with the momentum of HST scientific discoveries, the team blends their skill for producing timely news pieces with educational expertise to maximize the potential learning impact of an HST news event. The partnership also allows the Office of Public Outreach to maximize cost effectiveness and efficiency of staff resources for a stellar product that brings the universe a little closer into view for the classroom. This poster will demonstrate how the two divisions draw on their talents to create their unique educational material as well as the various types of educational material produced by the partnership.

  4. News from Online: Industrial Chemicals and Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney Judd, Carolyn

    1999-02-01

    of the American Chemical Society Divisions of Polymer Chemistry and Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering and General Electric Corporation. The POLYED site, http:/ /chemdept.uwsp.edu/polyed/index.htm, is hosted by the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point. This National Center for Polymer Education is another good place to go for information. More education is available at the Ziegler Research Group Home Page at http://www.chem.ucalgary.ca/groups/ziegler/index.html . Go to Metallocene as Olefin Polymerization Catalysis: An Introduction ( http://www.chem.ucalgary.ca/groups/ziegler/met_intro.html ) for historical accounts of metallocene and Ziegler-Natta catalysts. Movies are available here too. This Canadian site is well-documented and educational. Back at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, The Why Files site at http://whyfiles.news.wisc.edu helps bring important chemical and technology news to the public. Go to the archived files of October 1997 ( http://whyfiles.news.wisc.edu/shorties/catalyst.html ) to find information about the importance of low-temperature metallocene catalysts. The Why Files received funding from the National Science Foundation. Go here for science information in an easy-to-read format. One of the driving forces toward better catalysis is the attempt to reach 100% product, combining efficiency with lowered pollution. Companies can look to the Environmental Protection Agency for information: Environsense at http://es.epa.gov/ is pledged to offer "Common Sense Solutions to Environmental Problems". So where can we get these polymers? The American Chemical Society can help. Go to Chemcylopedia at http://pubs.acs.org/chemcy99/ for great information. Both purchasers and users of chemicals can benefit from this site. Searches can be made on the chemical or on the supplier. Information provided includes CAS Registry Numbers and special shipping requirements as well as potential applications. Do you remember that we started with paper? Let

  5. Attracting Views and Going Viral: How Message Features and News-Sharing Channels Affect Health News Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Suk

    2015-01-01

    This study examined how intrinsic as well as perceived message features affect the extent to which online health news stories prompt audience selections and social retransmissions, and how news-sharing channels (e-mail vs. social media) shape what goes viral. The study analyzed actual behavioral data on audience viewing and sharing of New York Times health news articles, and associated article content and context data. News articles with high informational utility and positive sentiment invited more frequent selections and retransmissions. Articles were also more frequently selected when they presented controversial, emotionally evocative, and familiar content. Informational utility and novelty had stronger positive associations with e-mail-specific virality, while emotional evocativeness, content familiarity, and exemplification played a larger role in triggering social media-based retransmissions. PMID:26441472

  6. Geoscience in the news - sharing stories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfern, Simon

    2015-04-01

    Schemes such as the British Science Association media fellowships and the AGU mass media fellowships offer an opportunity for active researchers to sit side by side with journalists at the news desk. Each can learn from the other, and the mutual benefits are often unexpected. Here, I reflect on my own experiences as a media fellow at the BBC, and consider how this opportunity has altered my own views on communicated my, and others', science. Geosciences have a particular advantage in such translation to a general audience. Interest in the natural environment, the origins of life, the planetary science of the Solar System as a whole, as well as topics in resource, energy, climate and geohazards is high among the public. There are advantages in being willing to act as a "translator" of discovery and an "interpreter" of natural events that, it could be argued, should be grasped to keep the relevance of our science high in the perceptions of tax payers and policy makers. By exercising these types of communications skills, new perspectives on one's own research may be attained.

  7. Genetic optimism: framing genes and mental illness in the news.

    PubMed

    Conrad, P

    2001-06-01

    Over the past two decades the pace and specificity of discoveries associating genetics with mental illness has accelerated, which is reflected in an increase in news coverage about the genetics of mental disorder. The news media is a major source of public understanding of genetics and a strong influence on public discourse. This paper examines the news coverage of genetics and mental illness (i.e., bipolar illness and schizophrenia) over a 25 year period, emphasizing the peak period of 1987-1994. Using a sample of 110 news stories from 5 major American newspapers and 3 news magazines, we identify the frame of "genetic optimism" which dominated the reporting of genetics and mental illness beginning in the mid- 1980s. The structure of the frame is comprised of 3 elements: a gene for the disorder exists; it will be found; and it will be good. New discoveries of genes were announced with great fanfare, but the most promising claims could not be replicated or were retracted in short order. Despite these disconfirmations, genetic optimism persisted in subsequent news stories. While the scientific accuracy of the gene stories is high, the genetic optimism frame distorts some of the findings, misrepresents and reifies the impact of genes on mental disorder, and leaves no space for critics or an examination of potential negative impacts. The stances of reporters, scientists and editors may all in different ways contribute to the perpetuation of genetic optimism. Genetic optimism presents an overly sanguine picture of the state of genetics; as we enter the genetic age it is important to balance the extraneous "hype and hope" contained in news stories of genetics and mental illness.

  8. Advancing cancer control research in an emerging news media environment.

    PubMed

    Smith, Katherine C; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Blake, Kelly D; Cappella, Joseph N

    2013-12-01

    Cancer is both highly feared and highly newsworthy, and there is a robust body of research documenting the content and effects of cancer news coverage on health behaviors and policy. Recent years have witnessed ongoing, transformative shifts in American journalism alongside rapid advances in communication technology and the public information environment. These changes create a pressing need to consider a new set of research questions, sampling strategies, measurement techniques, and theories of media effects to ensure continued relevance and adaptation of communication research to address critical cancer control concerns. This paper begins by briefly reviewing what we know about the role of cancer news in shaping cancer-related beliefs, attitudes, behaviors, and policies. We then outline challenges and opportunities, both theoretical and methodological, posed by the rapidly changing news media environment and the nature of audience engagement. We organize our discussion around three major shifts associated with the emerging news media environment as it relates to health communication: 1) speed and dynamism of news diffusion, 2) increased narrowcasting of media content for specialized audiences, and 3) broadened participation in shaping media content. In so doing, we articulate a set of questions for future theory and research, in an effort to catalyze innovative communication scholarship to improve cancer prevention and control. PMID:24395988

  9. Climate sensitivity uncertainty: when is good news bad?

    PubMed

    Freeman, Mark C; Wagner, Gernot; Zeckhauser, Richard J

    2015-11-28

    Climate change is real and dangerous. Exactly how bad it will get, however, is uncertain. Uncertainty is particularly relevant for estimates of one of the key parameters: equilibrium climate sensitivity--how eventual temperatures will react as atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations double. Despite significant advances in climate science and increased confidence in the accuracy of the range itself, the 'likely' range has been 1.5-4.5°C for over three decades. In 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) narrowed it to 2-4.5°C, only to reverse its decision in 2013, reinstating the prior range. In addition, the 2013 IPCC report removed prior mention of 3°C as the 'best estimate'. We interpret the implications of the 2013 IPCC decision to lower the bottom of the range and excise a best estimate. Intuitively, it might seem that a lower bottom would be good news. Here we ask: when might apparently good news about climate sensitivity in fact be bad news in the sense that it lowers societal well-being? The lowered bottom value also implies higher uncertainty about the temperature increase, definitely bad news. Under reasonable assumptions, both the lowering of the lower bound and the removal of the 'best estimate' may well be bad news.

  10. From Reader to Writer: Citizen Journalism as News Produsage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, Axel

    Today, participatory or citizen journalism - journalism which enables readers to become writers - exists online and offline in a variety of forms and formats, operates under a number of editorial schemes, and focuses on a wide range of topics from the specialist to the generic and the micro-local to the global. Key models in this phenomenon include veteran sites Slashdot and Indymedia, as well as news-related weblogs; more recent additions into the mix have been the South Korean OhmyNews, which in 2003 was “the most influential online news site in that country, attracting an estimated 2 million readers a day” (Gillmor, 2003a, p. 7), with its new Japanese and international offshoots, as well as the Wikipedia with its highly up-to-date news and current events section and its more recent offshoot Wikinews, and even citizen-produced video news as it is found in sites such as YouTube and Current.tv.

  11. Youth and violence on local television news in California.

    PubMed Central

    Dorfman, L; Woodruff, K; Chavez, V; Wallack, L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study explores how local television news structures the public and policy debate on youth violence. METHODS: A content analysis was performed on 214 hours of local television news from California. Each of the 1791 stories concerning youth, violence, or both was coded and analyzed for whether it included a public health perspective. RESULTS: There were five key findings. First, violence dominated local television news coverage. Second, the specifics of particular crimes dominated coverage of violence. Third, over half of the stories on youth involved violence, while more than two thirds of the violence stories concerned youth. Fourth, episodic coverage of violence was more than five times more frequent than thematic coverage, which included links to broader social factors. Finally, only one story had an explicit public health frame. CONCLUSIONS: Local television news provides extremely limited coverage of contributing etiological factors in stories on violence. If our nation's most popular source of news continues to report on violence primarily through crime stories isolated from their social context, the chance for widespread support for public health solutions to violence will be diminished. PMID:9279266

  12. Climate sensitivity uncertainty: when is good news bad?

    PubMed

    Freeman, Mark C; Wagner, Gernot; Zeckhauser, Richard J

    2015-11-28

    Climate change is real and dangerous. Exactly how bad it will get, however, is uncertain. Uncertainty is particularly relevant for estimates of one of the key parameters: equilibrium climate sensitivity--how eventual temperatures will react as atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations double. Despite significant advances in climate science and increased confidence in the accuracy of the range itself, the 'likely' range has been 1.5-4.5°C for over three decades. In 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) narrowed it to 2-4.5°C, only to reverse its decision in 2013, reinstating the prior range. In addition, the 2013 IPCC report removed prior mention of 3°C as the 'best estimate'. We interpret the implications of the 2013 IPCC decision to lower the bottom of the range and excise a best estimate. Intuitively, it might seem that a lower bottom would be good news. Here we ask: when might apparently good news about climate sensitivity in fact be bad news in the sense that it lowers societal well-being? The lowered bottom value also implies higher uncertainty about the temperature increase, definitely bad news. Under reasonable assumptions, both the lowering of the lower bound and the removal of the 'best estimate' may well be bad news. PMID:26460117

  13. Incremental visual text analytics of news story development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstajic, Milos; Najm-Araghi, Mohammad; Mansmann, Florian; Keim, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Online news sources produce thousands of news articles every day, reporting on local and global real-world events. New information quickly replaces the old, making it difficult for readers to put current events in the context of the past. Additionally, the stories have very complex relationships and characteristics that are difficult to model: they can be weakly or strongly connected, or they can merge or split over time. In this paper, we present a visual analytics system for exploration of news topics in dynamic information streams, which combines interactive visualization and text mining techniques to facilitate the analysis of similar topics that split and merge over time. We employ text clustering techniques to automatically extract stories from online news streams and present a visualization that: 1) shows temporal characteristics of stories in different time frames with different level of detail; 2) allows incremental updates of the display without recalculating the visual features of the past data; 3) sorts the stories by minimizing clutter and overlap from edge crossings. By using interaction, stories can be filtered based on their duration and characteristics in order to be explored in full detail with details on demand. To demonstrate the usefulness of our system, case studies with real news data are presented and show the capabilities for detailed dynamic text stream exploration.

  14. Overlaid caption extraction in news video based on SVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Manman; Su, Yuting; Ji, Zhong

    2007-11-01

    Overlaid caption in news video often carries condensed semantic information which is key cues for content-based video indexing and retrieval. However, it is still a challenging work to extract caption from video because of its complex background and low resolution. In this paper, we propose an effective overlaid caption extraction approach for news video. We first scan the video key frames using a small window, and then classify the blocks into the text and non-text ones via support vector machine (SVM), with statistical features extracted from the gray level co-occurrence matrices, the LH and HL sub-bands wavelet coefficients and the orientated edge intensity ratios. Finally morphological filtering and projection profile analysis are employed to localize and refine the candidate caption regions. Experiments show its high performance on four 30-minute news video programs.

  15. Changing news: re-adjusting science studies to online newspapers.

    PubMed

    Riesch, Hauke

    2011-11-01

    With the newspapers' recent move to online reporting, traditional norms and practices of news reporting have changed to accommodate the new realities of online news writing. In particular, online news is much more fluid and prone to change in content than the traditional hard-copy newspapers--online newspaper articles often change over the course of the following days or even weeks as they respond to criticisms and new information becoming available. This poses a problem for social scientists who analyse newspaper coverage of science, health and risk topics, because it is no longer clear who has read and written what version, and what impact they potentially had on the national debates on these topics. In this note I want to briefly flag up this problem through two recent examples of U.K. national science stories and discuss the potential implications for PUS media research.

  16. Philosophy as news: bioethics, journalism and public policy.

    PubMed

    Goodman, K W

    1999-04-01

    News media accounts of issues in bioethics gain significance to the extent that the media influence public policy and inform personal decision making. The increasingly frequent appearance of bioethics in the news thus imposes responsibilities on journalists and their sources. These responsibilities are identified and discussed, as is (i) the concept of "news-worthiness" as applied to bioethics, (ii) the variable quality of bioethics reportage and (iii) journalists' reliance on ethicists to pass judgment. Because of the potential social and other benefits of high quality reporting on ethical issues, it is argued that journalists and their bioethics sources should explore and accommodate more productive relationships. An optimal journalism-ethics relationship will be one characterized by "para-ethics," in which journalistic constraints are noted but also in which issues and arguments are presented without oversimplification and credible disagreement is given appropriate attention.

  17. Education for a Culture of Peace: The Culture of Peace News Network as a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, David

    2013-01-01

    The Culture of Peace News Network, an internet news service, is analyzed in the framework of a general approach to education for a culture of peace. Its format reflects the eight program areas for a culture of peace as adopted by the UN General Assembly. Among its other operating principles are universality of news with all cultures and regions of…

  18. The Effects of Chronological Presentation of Information on Processing and Memory for Broadcast News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Annie; And Others

    To test the hypothesis that news stories written in chronological order are remembered better than news stories written in typical broadcast format, a study used a mixed model factorial design to examine factors of style (traditional or chronological), subject (content of news story), and order (placement of the story within the newscast). Two…

  19. 75 FR 21163 - Inmate Communication With News Media: Removal of Byline Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... of Prisons 28 CFR Part 540 RIN 1120-AB49 Inmate Communication With News Media: Removal of Byline... value for correspondence with the news media. The inmate may not act as reporter or publish under a... correspondence with representatives of the news media. * * * * * (b) The inmate may not receive compensation...

  20. 28 CFR 540.20 - Inmate correspondence with representatives of the news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... representatives of the news media. 540.20 Section 540.20 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF... correspondence with representatives of the news media. (a) An inmate may write through “special mail” to representatives of the news media specified by name or title (see § 540.2(b)). (b) The inmate may not...

  1. 28 CFR 540.20 - Inmate correspondence with representatives of the news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... representatives of the news media. 540.20 Section 540.20 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF... correspondence with representatives of the news media. (a) An inmate may write through “special mail” to representatives of the news media specified by name or title (see § 540.2(b)). (b) The inmate may not...

  2. 28 CFR 540.20 - Inmate correspondence with representatives of the news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... representatives of the news media. 540.20 Section 540.20 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF... correspondence with representatives of the news media. (a) An inmate may write through “special mail” to representatives of the news media specified by name or title (see § 540.2(b)). (b) The inmate may not...

  3. 28 CFR 540.20 - Inmate correspondence with representatives of the news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... representatives of the news media. 540.20 Section 540.20 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF... correspondence with representatives of the news media. (a) An inmate may write through “special mail” to representatives of the news media specified by name or title (see § 540.2(b)). (b) The inmate may not...

  4. 28 CFR 540.20 - Inmate correspondence with representatives of the news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... representatives of the news media. 540.20 Section 540.20 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF... correspondence with representatives of the news media. (a) An inmate may write through “special mail” to representatives of the news media specified by name or title (see § 540.2(b)). (b) The inmate may not...

  5. Teleology and News: The Religious Roots of American Journalism, 1630-1730.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nord, David Paul

    The nature and function of news in the public life of seventeenth-century New England and the legacy this conception of news left for the development of American newspaper journalism in the eighteenth century are explored in this paper. The paper argues that the origin of American news--its subject matter, style, and method of reporting--is deeply…

  6. 76 FR 28726 - Grain Market News Reports; Request for Extension of a Currently Approved Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service Grain Market News Reports; Request for Extension of... collection used to compile and generate grain market news reports. DATES: Comments must be received by July... . Comments may also be submitted to Mike Lynch, Chief, Livestock and Grain Market News Branch, Livestock...

  7. Biased News in the 1972 Campaign: A Multi-Media Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstetter, C. Richard

    The purpose of this study is to present systematic findings concerning bias in TV news coverage of the 1972 presidential campaign and to describe the kinds of coverage that the candidates and parties received during the campaign. News about the election was analyzed from weekday network evening news programs, AP day and night wire coverage, a…

  8. Religious Penalty in the U.S. News & World Report College Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, Robert W.; Chu, David K. W.; Anderton, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    Since its debut in 1983, the "U.S. News & World Report College Guide" has become the premier "consumer report" of higher education. We find that peer assessment, which is the largest component of the "U.S. News & World Report" ranking function, contains a penalty for religiously affiliated schools that is independent of the other "U.S. News &…

  9. Effects of Prompting Critical Reading of Science News on Seventh Graders' Cognitive Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Pei-Ying; Chen, Sufen; Chang, Huey-Por; Chang, Wen-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Science teachers frequently select science news articles as supplementary teaching materials; however, the literature indicates that students encounter difficulties in examining and evaluating the news content and textual elements. This paper reports an instructional strategy of utilizing science news articles and investigates its effectiveness in…

  10. 14 CFR § 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false News releases concerning international... ADMINISTRATION RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international activities. (a) Releases of information involving NASA activities, views, programs, or...

  11. 78 FR 32226 - Poultry Market News Reports; Request for Extension and Revision of the Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service Poultry Market News Reports; Request for Extension... Livestock, Poultry, Meat, Grain, and Their Related Products Used as Market News Information AGENCY... collection. AMS recently merged its Livestock and Grain Market News Division with the Poultry Market...

  12. Writing News Spots about Science: A Way to Promote Scientific Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Ralf; Otten, Juliane; Eilks, Ingo

    2010-01-01

    Use of the "Journalist Method" in science education is described, in which pupils are asked to create short news presentations (we call them news spots) for a fictitious television newscast about science-related issues. The writing of such news spots by cooperative teams of pupils is supported by collections of background information taken from…

  13. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793...)(9) OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Requirements for Exemption § 793.11 Combination announcer, news... as a news editor. In such cases, the primary employment test under the section 13(b)(9)...

  14. 78 FR 11094 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; James River, Between Isle of Wight and Newport News, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... and Newport News, VA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of deviation from drawbridge regulation... News, VA. This deviation is necessary to facilitate generator replacement on the James River Draw... operating schedule, the James River Bridge, mile 5.0, between Isle of Isle and Newport News, VA opens...

  15. 7 CFR 502.10 - Photographs by visitors or for news, advertising, or commercial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Photographs by visitors or for news, advertising, or... RESEARCH CENTER PROPERTY, BELTSVILLE, MARYLAND § 502.10 Photographs by visitors or for news, advertising, or commercial purposes. Photographs may be taken by visitors or for news purposes without...

  16. What's Ethical and What's Not in Electronic Journalism: Perceptions of News Directors. Radio-Television Journalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfemeyer, K. Tim

    A study examined the perceptions about what is and is not ethical behavior in electronic journalism. Subjects, 220 television news directors and 66 radio news directors, responded to a 117-item survey of ethics in electronic journalism. Results indicated that the news directors identified: (1) 10 "acceptable" behaviors, including working a second…

  17. The Art of Breaking Bad News: Lessons Learned at a Large Public University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, Joe F.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to reflect on how to break bad news. The style in which one breaks bad news at the collegiate level has implications both for the individual and for the institution. If not managed well by enrollment professionals, negative news can taint prospects, applicants, parents, and current students, blemishing the…

  18. Tuning In: Using the News for a Content-Based ESL Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moglen, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Vast amounts of daily news content are widely available and easily accessible, and they can be converted into materials for intermediate and advanced ESL classes. This article will describe the why and how for integrating news media sources into a multiskills ESL classroom. Through the news, students are immediately engaged with the material…

  19. 31 CFR 700.9 - Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial purposes. 700.9 Section 700.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial purposes. Photographs for news, advertising, or...

  20. 7 CFR 502.10 - Photographs by visitors or for news, advertising, or commercial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Photographs by visitors or for news, advertising, or... RESEARCH CENTER PROPERTY, BELTSVILLE, MARYLAND § 502.10 Photographs by visitors or for news, advertising, or commercial purposes. Photographs may be taken by visitors or for news purposes without...

  1. Television news coverage of nurse strikes: a resource management perspective.

    PubMed

    Kalisch, B J; Kalisch, P A; Young, R L

    1983-01-01

    The quality of television news coverage of nurses' strikes and other labor activities plays a crucial role in expanding such conflicts to the public with either prolabor or promanagement colorations. It was found that access to the medium was influenced by the magnitude of the disruption. Nurse unions are benefited by more positive television news coverage when they (1) project an image of solidarity, (2) maintain unity over time, and (3) receive the support of other types of health-care workers. As predicted, hospital administrators were the most negative in televised comments about striking nurses. PMID:6551779

  2. America Past. Teacher's Guide. Sixteen 15-Minute Programs on the Social History of the United States for High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleet, Jim; Patrick, John J.

    This teacher's guide was designed to accompany 16 short video programs that trace the social and cultural development of the United States and show that today's society is the result of diverse historical events, ideas, and people. The guide provides program summaries, ideas for discussion, review questions, and extra credit projects. Spanish,…

  3. CHARACTERIZING INDOOR AND OUTDOOR 15-MINUTE AVERAGE PM2.5 CONCENTRATIONS IN URBAN NEIGHBORHOODS. (R827928)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  4. COMPARISON OF SHORT-TERM VARIATIONS (15-MINUTE AVERAGES) IN OUTDOOR AND INDOOR PM 2.5 CONCENTRATIONS. (R825241)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  5. Measurement of 100 B. anthracis Ames spores within 15 minutes by SERS at the US Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Ctr.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Shende, Chetan; Smith, Wayne; Huang, Hermes; Sperry, Jay; Sickler, Todd; Prugh, Amber; Guicheteau, Jason

    2014-05-01

    Since the distribution of Bacillus anthracis-Ames spores through the US Postal System, there has been a persistent fear that biological warfare agents will be used by terrorists against our military abroad and our civilians at home. While there has been substantial effort since the anthrax attack of 2001 to develop analyzers to detect this and other biological warfare agents, the analyzers remain either too slow, lack sensitivity, produce high false-positive rates, or cannot be fielded. In an effort to overcome these limitations we have been developing a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy system. Here we describe the use of silver nanoparticles functionalized with a short peptide to selectively capture Bacillus anthracis spores and produce SER scattering. Specifically, measurements of 100 B. anthracis-Ames spores/mL in ~25 minutes performed at the US Army's Edgewood Chemical Biological Center are presented. The measurements provide a basis for the development of systems that can detect spores collected from the air or water supplies with the potential of saving lives during a biological warfare attack.

  6. A 15-minute light pulse during darkness prevents the antigonadotrophic action of afternoon melatonin injections in male hamsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, R. J.; Hurlbut, E. C.; King, T. S.; Richardson, B. A.; Vaughan, M. K.; Kosub, K. Y.

    1982-12-01

    When adult male Syrian hamsters were maintained under 14 h light and 10 h darkness daily (lights on from 0600-2000 h), peak pineal melatonin levels (705 pg/gland) were attained at 0500 h. When the dark phase of the light:dark cycle was interrupted with a 15 min pulse of light from 2300 2315 h (3 h after lights out), the highest melatonin levels achieved was roughly 400 pg/gland. Finally, if the 15 min pulse of light was given at 0200 0215 h (6 h after lights out) the nocturnal rise in pineal melatonin was completely abolished. Having made these observations, a second experiment was designed to determine the ability of afternoon melatonin injections to inhibit reproduction in hamsters kept under an uninterrupted 14∶10 cycle or under the same lighting regimen where the dark phase was interrupted with a 15 min pulse of light (0200 0215 h). In the uninterrupted light:dark schedule the daily afternoon injection of 25 μg melatonin caused the testes and the accessory sex organs to atrophy within 11 weeks. Conversely, if the dark phase was interrupted with light between 0200 0215 h, afternoon melatonin injections were incapable of inhibiting the growth of the reproductive organs. The findings suggest that exogenously administered melatonin normally synergizes with endogenously produced melatonin to cause gonadal involution in hamsters.

  7. Breaking the News or Fueling the Epidemic? Temporal Association between News Media Report Volume and Opioid-Related Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Nabarun; Mandl, Kenneth D.; Brownstein, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Historical studies of news media have suggested an association between reporting and increased drug abuse. Period effects for substance use have been documented for different classes of legal and illicit substances, with the suspicion that media publicity may have played major roles in their emergence. Previous analyses have drawn primarily from qualitative evidence; the temporal relationship between media reporting volume and adverse health consequences has not been quantified nationally. We set out to explore whether we could find a quantitative relationship between media reports about prescription opioid abuse and overdose mortality associated with these drugs. We assessed whether increases in news media reports occurred before or after increases in overdose deaths. Methodology/Principal Findings Our ecological study compared a monthly time series of unintentional poisoning deaths involving short-acting prescription opioid substances, from 1999 to 2005 using multiple cause-of-death data published by the National Center for Health Statistics, to monthly counts of English-language news articles mentioning generic and branded names of prescription opioids obtained from Google News Archives from 1999 to 2005. We estimated the association between media volume and mortality rates by time-lagged regression analyses. There were 24,272 articles and 30,916 deaths involving prescription opioids during the seven-year study period. Nationally, the number of articles mentioning prescription opioids increased dramatically starting in early 2001, following prominent coverage about the nonmedical use of OxyContin. We found a significant association between news reports and deaths, with media reporting preceding fatal opioid poisonings by two to six months and explaining 88% (p<0.0001, df 78) of the variation in mortality. Conclusions/Significance While availability, structural, and individual predispositions are key factors influencing substance use, news reporting

  8. Foreign Policy News in the 1980 Presidential Election Campaign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stovall, James Glen

    A survey was conducted to determine the extent and content of newspaper coverage of foreign policy issues in the 1980 United States presidential campaign. Fifty daily newspapers from every region of the country were selected randomly based on circulation. A list of 757 news events was divided into party and nonparty events, and the party events…

  9. War News Radio: Conflict Education through Student Journalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Emily

    2009-01-01

    In this essay Emily Hager presents an example of conflict education through student journalism. War News Radio is a student-organized and student-produced program developed at Swarthmore College in which participants produce for a global audience nonpartisan weekly radio shows and podcasts focused on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Hager shares…

  10. Good news from the bottom: US asphalt market 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-22

    For US refiners faced with numerous tough challenges in 1993, the US asphalt market recovery may have provided some welcome news for those watching the bottom line. Higher prices and increased sales made the asphalt market a summertime profit center for many US refiners and marketers -- for the first time in years.

  11. Science News Stories as Boundary Objects Affecting Engagement with Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polman, Joseph L.; Hope, Jennifer M. G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores how participating in a program spanning an informal science institution and multiple school sites engaged youth with science in a different way. In particular, teens in the program selected and researched science topics of personal interest, and then authored, revised, and published science news stories about those topics in an…

  12. New Directions in the Delivery of Business News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Martin

    After a period of slow growth, companies that provide business news to the manager's desktop PC are now among the most rapidly growing companies in the United States information industry. Well established companies such as Desktop Data and Individual, Inc. are now being joined by a number of new services and by enhanced versions of existing…

  13. Perception of News Bias in 1972 Presidential Campaign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstetter, C. Richard

    1979-01-01

    Interviews with 1,034 respondents shortly before the 1972 presidential election, and with 701 of these respondents shortly after the election, revealed that a small proportion perceived political bias in television news, a larger proportion perceived biases in newspaper reporting, and the vast majority saw no political bias in either medium. (GT)

  14. The "U.S. News" Rankings Roll On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric

    2007-01-01

    As usual, "U.S. News & World Report's" annual college rankings offered a heavy dose of deja vu when they arrived last August. In this article, the author discusses the response rate to the magazine's controversial reputational survey. The overall response rate plunged to its lowest level ever, a possible sign that organized criticism of the…

  15. Explicit News Writing Rules and the Intuitive "Good Ear."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Clifford; Slattery, Karen

    1990-01-01

    Argues that news-writing instruction that relies on explicit rules is inadequate because: (1) rule violations are common; (2) some rules work well only in particular situations; and (3) some rules overgeneralize. Identifies the difficulty of teaching students to develop a "good ear" for writing. Concludes that instruction must balance rule-based…

  16. 7 CFR 500.9 - Photographs for news or advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Photographs for news or advertising. 500.9 Section 500.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL ARBORETUM Conduct on U.S. National Arboreturm Property § 500.9...

  17. 7 CFR 500.9 - Photographs for news or advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Photographs for news or advertising. 500.9 Section 500.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL ARBORETUM Conduct on U.S. National Arboreturm Property § 500.9...

  18. The Changing Market Structure of Local Television News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Angela

    The growth in competition for revenues, along with the advent of cable, independent television and video cassette recorders (VCR), may signify a change in the market structure of local television news. To explain if and how this change may be occurring, an explanation of economic theory as well as evidence from "Broadcast and Cable Yearbook" and…

  19. News Values and Country Non-Daily Reporting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vines, Josie

    2001-01-01

    Suggests Australia's country, non-daily newspapers present journalism graduates with excellent opportunities to experience a wide range of journalistic responsibilities and compile an impressive portfolio. Argues the need for the news values of these newspapers to be integrated into pedagogical models. Documents the country non-daily's news…

  20. Television Economic News and the Social Construction of Economic Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adoni, Hanna; Cohen, Akiba A.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a study concerned with relating the understanding of the functioning of mass media, particulary television and newspapers, to the formation of public opinion regarding economic issues. Concludes that frequent exposure to news develops a false impression that the public understands more than they really do. (JMF)

  1. Brave New World: A Good News Scenario for Educational Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenaghan, D.

    A good news scenario about the future of education in the United States includes many things that are already being done and other things that can be dreamed of. One example is the "Awesome All-Stars Academy," a dream of a group of dedicated politicians, administrators, teachers, parents, community members, and students who took seriously their…

  2. Science in the News: An Evaluation of Students' Scientific Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murcia, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Understanding and evaluating reports of science in the media is frequently stated as an attribute of a scientifically literate person, with some researchers suggesting it should be fundamental to any study of scientific literacy. Constructive engagement with science news briefs requires individuals to understand the terms used, take a critical…

  3. KSC Tech Transfer News, Volume 5, No. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Kennedy Tech Transfer News is the semiannual magazine of the Innovative Partnerships Program Office at NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida. This magazine seeks to inform and educate cMI servant and Contractor personnel at Kennedy about actively participating in achieving NASA's technology transfer goals

  4. Constraints on Critical Thinking: An Analysis of News Narratives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunmire, Patricia

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that college students are unaware of the socially constructed nature of news reports. Students may accept uncritically what they view and read. A narrative analysis of front-page coverage from the "New York Times" and the "Washington Post" of the 1990 Persian Gulf situation reveals how the papers constructed and defined…

  5. Biofuels News, Vol. 2, Issue 3, Summer 99

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, S.

    1999-09-01

    The focus of this Biofuels News is biodiesel. Biodiesel is a domestically produced renewable fuel that is made by reacting alcohol (usually methanol or ethanol) with vegetable oils, animal fats, or recycled cooking greases. It can be used neat (pure) or in blends (the most popular is 20% biodiesel blend) with any type of diesel fuel.

  6. Liquid Subjects: News Media and Public Political Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piotrowski, Marcelina; Ruitenberg, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between news media and political education within consumer society. We argue that political education today needs to be understood as part of consumerism and media culture, in which individuals selectively expose themselves to and scrutinize various media representations not only of…

  7. Agricultural Market News Programming of Wisconsin Radio and Television Stations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroupa, Eugene A.; And Others

    This study was designed to determine what Wisconsin's 92 AM and 107 FM radio and 18 television stations were providing as agricultural market information programming. Data were collected via a two-phase survey. It was found that the number of stations giving farm and market news were 79% of AM, 56% of FM, and 1% of television stations based on a…

  8. Agenda Building Role of News Releases in Corporate Takeovers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohl, Coral M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines how particular characteristics of two companies' press releases, generated during a hostile takeover attempt, influenced the media's news decisions. Finds that press releases from Prime Computer were associated with newspaper articles that were longer, more favorable to its point of view, and contained the same lead message points as…

  9. The Language of Journalism in Treatments of Hormone Replacement News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Susan Peck

    2005-01-01

    Researchers studying science communication have criticized the sensationalism that often appears in journalistic accounts of science news. This article looks at the linguistic sources of that sensationalism by analyzing the journalistic coverage of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study of hormone replacement research, which was abruptly…

  10. Headline Bioethics: Engagement with Bioethics in the News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willmott, Chris

    2013-01-01

    An exercise is described in which second year undergraduate bioscientists write a reflective commentary on the ethical implications of a recent biological/biomedical news story of their own choosing. As well as being of more real-world relevance than writing in a traditional essay format, the commentaries also have potential utility in helping the…

  11. Biofuels News, Fall 1998, Vol. 1, No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    ICF Kaiser

    1998-12-08

    This issue of the Biofuels News focuses on a new industry in renewable transportation fuel. BC International (BCI) became the first company to dedicate a facility to produce ethanol from agricultural residues. Also, featured is an article on the potential of switchgrass as an energy crop.

  12. Portrayals of People with Cerebral Palsy in Homicide News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucardie, Richard; Sobsey, Dick

    2005-01-01

    Through content analysis, employing qualitative and quantitative methods, Canadian media representation of people with cerebral palsy (PWCP) in public life was examined. Canadian NewsDisc, an online biographic database service, was used to examine the use of stigmatizing language such as afflicted by, afflicted with, suffered from, suffers from,…

  13. The Informative Speech as a Television News Package

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorpe, Judith M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To expand an informative speech into a television news package. Type of speech: Informative. Point value: 5% of course grade (Note: The original informative speech is worth 10% of the course grade). Requirements: (a) References: 3; (b) Length: 30 seconds; (c) Visual aid: 3; (d) Outline: Yes; (e) Prerequisite reading: Chapter 14 (Whitman…

  14. Political Ads vs. News as Sources of Issue Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Xinshu; Chaffee, Steven H.

    A study reexamined survey data collected in late October 1984 in order to test the validity of the generalization that people are influenced more by television ads than they are by television news. Sampling was based on random digit dialing in Dane County, Wisconsin, and 416 interviews conducted by telephone. Data analysis indicated that the…

  15. Let's Tell the Good News about Reading and Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, William D.

    1989-01-01

    Since the media seldom feature good news about education, principals need to highlight elementary school children's reading and writing accomplishments. Principals can hear students read aloud in the hallway, send interesting compositions to the superintendent's office, and post creative writing efforts on the walls of local banks, pizza parlors,…

  16. International News in United States Media: Myths, Stereotypes and Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lent, John A.

    Research conducted during the past 20 years reveals that, except for the "New York Times,""Christian Science Monitor," and "Wall Street Journal," United States daily newspapers are not known for outstanding international news coverage; that European, English, Canadian, Latin American, and Asian newspapers use disproportionately larger amounts of…

  17. Dysgraphia Defined. NetNews. Volume 5, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LDA of Minnesota, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In this issue of "NetNews," the focus is on dysgraphia, a form of writing disability. Both dyslexia and dysgraphia fall under the category of specific learning disability. They may be related because significant language processing problems can impact both reading and spelling--although there is less incidence of dysgraphia. Dysgraphia…

  18. Dyscalculia Defined. NetNews. Volume 5, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LDA of Minnesota, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The focus of this issue of "NetNews" is dyscalculia, or math disability. Most of the attention over the years has been on reading and writing difficulties, thus leading to the belief that math difficulties are not very common or serious. However, it has been estimated that about 6% of school-age children experience significant math difficulties.…

  19. Intermediate Decoding Skills. NetNews. Volume 4, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LDA of Minnesota, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Intermediate decoding refers to word analysis skills that are beyond a beginning, one-syllable level as described in an earlier NetNews issue, yet are just as important for building adult level reading proficiency. Research from secondary settings indicates that struggling readers in middle school or high school programs often read between the…

  20. Summer Food Service Program. Nourishing News. Volume 3, Issue 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) is to provide nutritious meals to children in low-income areas when school is not in session. This issue of "Nourishing News" focuses on SFSPs. The articles contained in this issue are: (1) Is Your Summer Food Program Financially Fit? (Jean Zaske); (2) Keeping the "Bugs" Away: An Ounce of…

  1. Network News-Interview Programs and the "Television War".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Raymond L.; Lichty, Lawrence W.

    A study was made of the news-interview programs from the three major television networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC) to determine which aspects of the Vietnam War were discussed on the programs and whether participants were supporters of or detractors from the policies of the presidential administration at the time. The content analysis of 481 editions of…

  2. News Media and Diplomacy: Roles, Relationships and Communication Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullion, Stuart James

    Reflecting and influencing foreign policy, the mass media are important, if nontraditional, diplomatic channels. The role the news media assume, ranging from neutral to participant, depends largely on the society within which it operates. Journalists in authoritarian governments, for example, who rely on press releases and briefings of foreign…

  3. Making Your News Service More Effective. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Joel S., Ed.

    This handbook is intended as a reference tool for use in the college or university's public information office, news bureau, information services, or public relations office. An update of an earlier edition, it presents articles by a number of authors, some from CASE Currents, bulletin of the Council for Advancement and Support of Education. It…

  4. Through Anglo Eyes: Chicanos as Portrayed in the News Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Felix

    Coverage of Chicanos by the news media, almost nonexistent until the mid-1960s, still has not achieved full balance or objectivity. It is important for media personnel to develop greater competence in handling Chicano coverage since the Latino group, of which Chicanos are the largest segment, are the nation's fastest growing population group…

  5. The News as Environment. Journalism Monographs Number Eighty-Five.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Dean W.

    1983-01-01

    To expose a fundamental conflict in journalism between newsworthiness and objectivity (or novelty and authority) this monograph first examines the parallel between news environment and physical environment. Objectivity is defined here not as a description of the environment, but as symbols in the minds of significant publics, or…

  6. Educational Technology News. Fall 2005, Volume 5, Issue 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning Point Associates / North Central Regional Educational Laboratory (NCREL), 2005

    2005-01-01

    Educational Technology News is a biannual newsletter published by the Center for Technology at the North Central Regional Educational Laboratory (NCREL). The following topics are discussed in this issue: (1) TechPOINT: Measure Progress, Achieve Technology Proficiency; (2) New in the Center for Technology: Five-Year Research Project Identifies Key…

  7. Multiple Measures of Network TV News Bias in Campaign '72.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowry, Dennis T.

    Divided into two parts, this study includes an analysis of the verbal content of Nixon and McGovern news stories carried by the three networks and an analysis of selected types of nonverbal content. The universe for the study was the 53 days, Monday through Friday, between the end of the Republican national convention and election day, 1972. A…

  8. Early Telegraphic News Dispatches: The Forerunner of the AP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarzlose, Richard A.

    The origin of the Associated Press (AP) lies in the early cooperative news gathering efforts of the editors of several New York newspapers. As early as May 1846, these editors were "pooling" their energies in response to newly developed modes of communication--the wire and wireless telegraph and the trans-oceanic steamship mail services. The…

  9. The New (and Old) News about Cheating for Distance Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Scott L.; Sorensen, Don; Tippets, Holly Rose

    2009-01-01

    Those in distance education are faced with a formidable challenge to ensure the identity of test takers and integrity of exam results, especially since students are physically removed from the classroom and distributed across the globe. This news digest will provide distance educators not only with a better understanding and awareness of issues…

  10. Bringing the News Back Home: Strategies of Acculturation and Foreignisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassnett, Susan

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers the long-standing debate in the field of translation concerning whether texts should be fully acculturated into the target system or should retain traces of their foreign origin. The author suggests that these debates become redundant, if not counter-productive in the field of news translation, where the demands of the target…

  11. Religion Journalists' Perceptions of Religion News and Its Audience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buddenbaum, Judith M.

    A study surveyed newspapers that print religious news to determine the kinds of coverage their religion journalists provide and to determine the type of audience for which they write. Mail surveys were completed by 141 daily newspapers with circulations ranging from under 10,000 to over 100,000. All but 13 respondents provided a working definition…

  12. News Reading, Knowledge about, and Attitudes toward Foreign Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, David K.

    1990-01-01

    Finds that a sample of adults in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama, found that consumption of news about five countries generally leads to greater knowledge and more favorable attitudes toward those countries. Suggests that the mass media may have an important role in reducing ethnocentrism. (MG)

  13. A Summarization System for Chinese News from Multiple Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsin-Hsi; Kuo, June-Jei; Huang, Sheng-Jie; Lin, Chuan-Jie; Wung, Hung-Chia

    2003-01-01

    Proposes a summarization system for multiple documents that employs named entities and other signatures to cluster news from different sources, as well as punctuation marks, linking elements, and topic chains to identify the meaningful units (MUs). Using nouns and verbs to identify similar MUs, focusing and browsing models are applied to represent…

  14. The Public Policy Pedagogy of Corporate and Alternative News Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Deirdre M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper argues for seeing in-depth news coverage of political, social, and economic issues as "public policy pedagogy." To develop my argument, I draw on Nancy Fraser's democratic theory, which attends to social differences and does not assume that unity is a starting point or an end goal of public dialogue. Alongside the formation of…

  15. Computer Databases: A Survey; Part 1: General and News Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Mick

    1986-01-01

    Descriptions and evaluations of 13 databases devoted to computer information are presented by type under four headings: bibliographic databases; daily news services; online computer magazines; and specialized computer industry databases. Information on database producers, starting date of file, update frequency, vendors, and prices is summarized…

  16. News media framing of childhood obesity in the United States from 2000 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Barry, Colleen L; Jarlenski, Marian; Grob, Rachel; Schlesinger, Mark; Gollust, Sarah E

    2011-07-01

    The American public holds mixed views about the desirability of government action to combat childhood obesity. The framing of coverage by news media may affect citizens' views about the causes of childhood obesity and the most appropriate strategies for addressing the problem. We analyzed the content of a 20% random sample of news stories on childhood obesity published in 18 national and regional news sources in the United States over a 10-year period (2000-2009). News media coverage patterns indicated that by 2003, childhood obesity was firmly on the news media's agenda and remained so until 2007, after which coverage decreased. We identified changes in news media framing over time and significant differences according to news source. News coverage of causes of childhood obesity that were linked to the food and beverage industry increased in the early years of the study but then decreased markedly in later years. Similarly, mention of solutions to the problem of childhood obesity that involved restrictions on the food and beverage industry followed a reverse U-shaped pattern over the 10-year study period. News stories consistently mentioned individual behavioral changes most often as a solution to the problem of childhood obesity. Television news was more likely than other news sources to focus on behavior change as a solution, whereas newspapers were more likely to identify system-level solutions such as changes that would affect neighborhoods, schools, and the food and beverage industry. PMID:21690111

  17. News media framing of childhood obesity in the United States from 2000 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Barry, Colleen L; Jarlenski, Marian; Grob, Rachel; Schlesinger, Mark; Gollust, Sarah E

    2011-07-01

    The American public holds mixed views about the desirability of government action to combat childhood obesity. The framing of coverage by news media may affect citizens' views about the causes of childhood obesity and the most appropriate strategies for addressing the problem. We analyzed the content of a 20% random sample of news stories on childhood obesity published in 18 national and regional news sources in the United States over a 10-year period (2000-2009). News media coverage patterns indicated that by 2003, childhood obesity was firmly on the news media's agenda and remained so until 2007, after which coverage decreased. We identified changes in news media framing over time and significant differences according to news source. News coverage of causes of childhood obesity that were linked to the food and beverage industry increased in the early years of the study but then decreased markedly in later years. Similarly, mention of solutions to the problem of childhood obesity that involved restrictions on the food and beverage industry followed a reverse U-shaped pattern over the 10-year study period. News stories consistently mentioned individual behavioral changes most often as a solution to the problem of childhood obesity. Television news was more likely than other news sources to focus on behavior change as a solution, whereas newspapers were more likely to identify system-level solutions such as changes that would affect neighborhoods, schools, and the food and beverage industry.

  18. Public understanding of chemistry research in print news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hands, Michael D., Jr.

    Despite numerous calls for improving scientific literacy, many American adults show a lack of understanding of experiments, scientific study, and scientific inquiry. News media is one important avenue for science learning, but previous research investigating health and/or environmental science news has shown that it is inconsistent in the presentation of scientific research limitations, potentially impacting reader understanding. In the first phase of this dissertation, seventeen news articles reporting on a single chemistry research article, along with associated press releases and research articles, were analyzed using move analysis to determine the structure of each type of text. It was found that the overall structure of each text genre was similar, with the main difference being that research articles start by presenting background information, while the others lead with highlighting overall research outcomes. Analysis of the steps revealed that, as seen for health and environmental science news articles, descriptions of the study limitations and methods were generally omitted in the news articles. Using these findings, a pilot study was conducted where study limitations were added to a chemistry research news article and the effect of its presence on staff members employed at a large Midwestern university (n=12) and science faculty employed at the same institution (n=6) was explored. Interviews with the participants revealed that including limitations enhanced readers' ability to identify conclusions and evaluate claims, but decreased their trust in the information. In the final part of this study, the trends seen in the previous phase were explored to determine their generalizability. Members of the public (n=232) and science faculty (n=191) read a randomly assigned news article either presenting or omitting the study limitations and research methods. Participants reading articles presenting limitations were able to evaluate the reasonableness of claims

  19. The Spreading of Social Energy: How Exposure to Positive and Negative Social News Affects Behavior.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ziqing; Yu, Rongjun

    2016-01-01

    Social news, unlike video games or TV programs, conveys real-life interactions. Theoretically, social news in which people help or harm each other and violate rules should influence both prosocial and violation behaviors. In two experiments, we demonstrated the spreading effects of social news in a social interaction context emphasizing social conventions and a nonsocial interaction context emphasizing moral norms. Across the two studies, the results showed that positive social news increased cooperation (decreased defection) but had no effect on cheating, whereas negative social news increased cheating but with no change in cooperation (or defection). We conclude that there is a spreading impact of positive social news in the conventional norm domain and of negative social news in the moral norm domain. PMID:27253877

  20. The Spreading of Social Energy: How Exposure to Positive and Negative Social News Affects Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ziqing; Yu, Rongjun

    2016-01-01

    Social news, unlike video games or TV programs, conveys real-life interactions. Theoretically, social news in which people help or harm each other and violate rules should influence both prosocial and violation behaviors. In two experiments, we demonstrated the spreading effects of social news in a social interaction context emphasizing social conventions and a nonsocial interaction context emphasizing moral norms. Across the two studies, the results showed that positive social news increased cooperation (decreased defection) but had no effect on cheating, whereas negative social news increased cheating but with no change in cooperation (or defection). We conclude that there is a spreading impact of positive social news in the conventional norm domain and of negative social news in the moral norm domain. PMID:27253877

  1. The Spreading of Social Energy: How Exposure to Positive and Negative Social News Affects Behavior.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ziqing; Yu, Rongjun

    2016-01-01

    Social news, unlike video games or TV programs, conveys real-life interactions. Theoretically, social news in which people help or harm each other and violate rules should influence both prosocial and violation behaviors. In two experiments, we demonstrated the spreading effects of social news in a social interaction context emphasizing social conventions and a nonsocial interaction context emphasizing moral norms. Across the two studies, the results showed that positive social news increased cooperation (decreased defection) but had no effect on cheating, whereas negative social news increased cheating but with no change in cooperation (or defection). We conclude that there is a spreading impact of positive social news in the conventional norm domain and of negative social news in the moral norm domain.

  2. Biofantasies: genetics and medicine in the print news media.

    PubMed

    Petersen, A

    2001-04-01

    The contemporary news media is an important site for exploring the diverse and complex cultural images of genetics and its medical possibilities, and of the mechanisms by which these images are (re) produced and sustained. This article investigates how the print news media 'frames' stories on genetics and medicine. It is based on a discourse analysis of articles appearing in three Australian newspapers in the late 1990s. Gene stories were found to be prominent in each of the newspapers, and to emphasise the medical benefits of genetic research. Stories frequently cite and quote scientists, who explain the nature and significance of the research and/or its implications for treatment or prevention. Many stories focus on new genetic discoveries, and portray genetic researchers as involved in a quest to unlock nature's secrets. Stories of hope, and depictions of geneticists as warriors or heroes, appear regularly. The positive vision of genetics is supported by the use of particular metaphors, accompanying illustrative material, 'human interest' stories, and reference to credible sources. There is rarely mention of the influence of non-genetic factors and 'multifactorial' interactions on disorders, or questioning of the goals, direction, methods, or value of genetic research. Scientists made extensive use of the media in their efforts to maintain a positive image of research in the face of public concerns about scientists 'going too far', following the announcement of the cloning of Dolly. Boundaries were drawn between 'therapeutic cloning'--implicitly defined as 'good', useful, and legitimate--and 'reproductive cloning'--seen as 'bad', dangerous, and illegitimate. By framing news stories as they do, the print news media are likely to exert a powerful influence on public responses to health problems. With new genetic technologies becoming more integrated in preventive medicine and public health, it is important to investigate how news stories help shape the agenda for

  3. Competing Discourses about Youth Sexual Exploitation in Canadian News Media

    PubMed Central

    Saewyc, Elizabeth M.; Miller, Bonnie B.; Rivers, Robert; Matthews, Jennifer; Hilario, Carla; Hirakata, Pam

    2015-01-01

    Media holds the power to create, maintain, or break down stigmatizing attitudes, which affect policies, funding, and services. To understand how Canadian news media depicts the commercial sexual exploitation of children and youth, we examined 835 Canadian newspaper articles from 1989–2008 using a mixed methods critical discourse analysis approach, comparing representations to existing research about sexually exploited youth. Despite research evidence that equal rates of boys and girls experience exploitation, Canadian news media depicted exploited youth predominantly as heterosexual girls, and described them alternately as victims or workers in a trade, often both in the same story. News media mentioned exploiters far less often than victims, and portrayed them almost exclusively as male, most often called ‘customers’ or ‘consumers,’ and occasionally ‘predators’; in contrast, research has documented the majority of sexually exploited boys report female exploiters. Few news stories over the past two decades portrayed the diversity of victims, perpetrators, and venues of exploitation reported in research. The focus on victims but not exploiters helps perpetuate stereotypes of sexual exploitation as business or a ‘victimless crime,’ maintains the status quo, and blurs responsibility for protecting youth under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Health care providers and researchers can be advocates for accuracy in media coverage about sexual exploitation; news reporters and editors should focus on exploiters more than victims, draw on existing research evidence to avoid perpetuating stereotypes, and use accurate terms, such as commercial sexual exploitation, rather than terms related to business or trade. PMID:26793015

  4. Biofantasies: genetics and medicine in the print news media.

    PubMed

    Petersen, A

    2001-04-01

    The contemporary news media is an important site for exploring the diverse and complex cultural images of genetics and its medical possibilities, and of the mechanisms by which these images are (re) produced and sustained. This article investigates how the print news media 'frames' stories on genetics and medicine. It is based on a discourse analysis of articles appearing in three Australian newspapers in the late 1990s. Gene stories were found to be prominent in each of the newspapers, and to emphasise the medical benefits of genetic research. Stories frequently cite and quote scientists, who explain the nature and significance of the research and/or its implications for treatment or prevention. Many stories focus on new genetic discoveries, and portray genetic researchers as involved in a quest to unlock nature's secrets. Stories of hope, and depictions of geneticists as warriors or heroes, appear regularly. The positive vision of genetics is supported by the use of particular metaphors, accompanying illustrative material, 'human interest' stories, and reference to credible sources. There is rarely mention of the influence of non-genetic factors and 'multifactorial' interactions on disorders, or questioning of the goals, direction, methods, or value of genetic research. Scientists made extensive use of the media in their efforts to maintain a positive image of research in the face of public concerns about scientists 'going too far', following the announcement of the cloning of Dolly. Boundaries were drawn between 'therapeutic cloning'--implicitly defined as 'good', useful, and legitimate--and 'reproductive cloning'--seen as 'bad', dangerous, and illegitimate. By framing news stories as they do, the print news media are likely to exert a powerful influence on public responses to health problems. With new genetic technologies becoming more integrated in preventive medicine and public health, it is important to investigate how news stories help shape the agenda for

  5. Maintaining a News Perspective Remotely through Online Information Retrieval: Task-Based Web Experiences of Foreign News Correspondents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Kuanyuh Tony

    2009-01-01

    A two-stage mixed methods approach was used to examine how foreign correspondents stationed in the United States use World Wide Web technology to maintain their news perspectives remotely. Despite emerging technology playing an increasingly significant role in the production of international journalism, the subject under investigation has been…

  6. Semiautomatic news analysis, indexing, and classification system based on topic preselection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanjalic, Alan; Lagendijk, Reginald L.; Biemond, Jan

    1998-12-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of an efficient semiautomatic system for analysis, classification and indexing of TV news program material, and show the feasibility of its practical realization. The only input into the system, other than the news program itself, are the spoken words, serving as keys for topic prespecification. The chosen topics express user's current professional or private interests and are used for filtering the news material correspondingly. After the basic analysis steps on a news program stream, including the processes of shot change detection and key frame extraction, the system automatically represents the news program as a series of longer higher-level segments. Each of them contains one or more video shots and belongs to one of the coarse categories, such as anchorperson (news reader) shots, news shot series, the starting and ending program sequence. The segmentation procedure is performed on the video component of the news program stream and the results are used to define the corresponding segments in the news audio stream. In the next step, the system uses the prespecified audio keys to index the segments and group them into reports, being the actual retrieval units. This step is performed on the segmented news audio stream by applying the wordspotting procedure to each segment. As a result, all the reports on prespecified topics are easily reachable for efficient retrieval.

  7. The Public and Local News [and] Why Some Editorial Endorsements are More Persuasive Than Others. American Newspaper Publishers Association (ANPA) News Research Report No. 37.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, James P.; And Others

    Two unrelated studies investigated issues in newspaper journalism. The first, a replication of an earlier study, examined whether the priority given by newspapers to reporting local news was warranted. Respondents in three areas of the country were asked to rate their interest in various types of news on a five-point scale. Results indicated that…

  8. Time perception: the bad news and the good.

    PubMed

    Matthews, William J; Meck, Warren H

    2014-07-01

    Time perception is fundamental and heavily researched, but the field faces a number of obstacles to theoretical progress. In this advanced review, we focus on three pieces of 'bad news' for time perception research: temporal perception is highly labile across changes in experimental context and task; there are pronounced individual differences not just in overall performance but in the use of different timing strategies and the effect of key variables; and laboratory studies typically bear little relation to timing in the 'real world'. We describe recent examples of these issues and in each case offer some 'good news' by showing how new research is addressing these challenges to provide rich insights into the neural and information-processing bases of timing and time perception.

  9. Mediating subpolitics in US and UK science news.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The development of therapeutic cloning research sparked a scientific controversy pitting patients' hopes for cures against religious and anti-abortion opposition. The present study investigates this controversy by examining the production and content of Anglo-American print media coverage of the branch of embryonic stem cell research known as "therapeutic cloning." Data collection included press articles about therapeutic cloning (n = 5,185) and qualitative interviews with journalists (n = 18). Patient activists and anti-abortion groups emerged as key news sources in this coverage. Significant qualitative differences in the mediation of these subpolitical groups and their arguments for and against therapeutic cloning are identified. Results suggest that the perceived human interest news value of narratives of patient suffering may give patient advocacy groups a privileged position in journalistic coverage. Finally, Ulrich Beck's theoretical arguments about subpolitics are critically applied to the results to elicit further insights.

  10. Identifying Event Impacts by Monitoring the News Media

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Robert M; Potok, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    Assessing the potential property and social impacts of an event, such as tornado or wildfire, continues to be a challenging research area. From financial markets to disaster management to epidemiology, the importance of understanding the impacts that events create cannot be understated. Our work describes an approach to fuse information from multiple sources, then to analyze the information cycles to identify prior temporal patterns related to the impact of an event. This approach is then applied to the analysis of news reports from multiple news sources pertaining to several different natural disasters. Results show that our approach can project the severity of the impacts of certain natural disasters, such as heat waves on droughts and wild fires. In addition, results show that specific types of disaster consistently produce similar impacts when each time they occur.

  11. Linking Financial Market Dynamics and the Impact of News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacher, J. C.; Ochiai, T.

    2011-09-01

    In financial markets, he behavior of investors determines the prices of financial products. However, these investors can also be influenced by good and bad news. Here, we present a mathematical model to reproduce the price dynamics in real financial markets affected by news. The model has both positive and negative feed-back mechanisms. Furthermore, the behavior of the model is examined by considering two different types of noise. Our results show that the dynamic balance of positive and negative feed-back mechanisms with the noise effect determines the asset price movement. For comparison with real market, we have used the Forex data corresponding to the time period of the recent Tohoku-Kanto earthquake in Japan.

  12. Medical scientists and health news reporting: a case of miscommunication.

    PubMed

    Shuchman, M; Wilkes, M S

    1997-06-15

    The public is poorly served by the coverage of medical science in the general press. Scientists and physicians blame the press, claiming that journalists are careless in their reporting, subject to competitive pressures, and ignorant of the scientific process. Journalists accuse the medical community of limiting access to information and erecting barriers to the public dissemination of medical research. In many areas of health news reporting, the underlying problem is an interactive dynamic that involves scientists and journalists. Both parties share the responsibility for accurate communication to the public. This report suggests ways to improve health news reporting, focusing on four problem areas: sensationalism, biases and conflicts of interest, lack of follow-up, and stories that are not covered. PMID:9182476

  13. Relative risk in the news media: a quantification of misrepresentation.

    PubMed Central

    Frost, K; Frank, E; Maibach, E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study quantifies the representativeness with which the print news media depict mortality. METHODS: The proportion of mortality-related copy in samples of national print media was compared with the proportion of actual deaths attributable to the leading causes of US mortality over a 1-year period. RESULTS: For every tested cause of death, a significant disproportion was found between amount of text devoted to the cause and the actual number of attributable deaths. Underrepresented causes included tobacco use (23% of expected copy) and heart disease (33%); overrepresented causes included illicit use of drugs (1740%), motor vehicles (1280%), and toxic agents (1070%). CONCLUSIONS: The news media significantly misrepresent the prevalence of leading causes of death and their risk factors. This misrepresentation may contribute to the public's distorted perceptions of health threats. PMID:9184517

  14. Thousands of News Reporters Watch Apollo 11 Lift Off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    At the press site, thousands of news reporters from the world over watched, taking many pictures, as the Saturn V launch vehicle (AS-506) lifted off to start Apollo 11 on its historic mission to land on the Moon. The total number of news people officially registered to cover the launch was 3,497. The craft lifted off from launch pad 39 at Kennedy Space Flight Center (KSC) on July 16, 1969. A three man crew included astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module(CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The mission finalized with splashdown into the Pacific Ocean on July 24, 1969. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished. The Saturn V was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Werher von Braun.

  15. Framing Obesity: How News Frames Shape Attributions and Behavioral Responses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ye; Krakow, Melinda; John, Kevin K; Liu, Miao; Weaver, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Based on a public health model of obesity, this study set out to examine whether a news article reporting the obesity issue in a societal versus individual frame would increase perceptions of societal responsibilities for the obesity problem and motivate responsibility-taking behaviors. Responsibility-taking behaviors were examined at 3 levels: personal, interpersonal, and societal. Data from a Web-based experiment revealed significant framing effects on behaviors via causal and treatment responsibility attributions. The societal frame increased societal causal and treatment attribution, which led to greater likelihoods of interpersonal and social responsibility-taking behaviors as well as personal behaviors. Our findings suggest that news framing can be an effective venue for raising awareness of obesity as a societal issue and mobilizing collective efforts. PMID:26375052

  16. Communicative competence in the delivery of bad news.

    PubMed

    Gillotti, Cathy; Thompson, Teresa; McNeilis, Kelly

    2002-04-01

    Grounded in the Cegala and Waldron (Communication Studies 43 (1992) 105) model of communicative competence, the present study applied the McNeilis (Health Communication 13 (2001) 5) provider-patient coding scheme to video tapes of 3rd year medical students delivering bad news to a standardized patient. The goal of the study was to understand the specific communicative moves that are associated with perceptions of competence during bad news delivery. The coding scheme assesses Content, Acknowledgment Tokens, Interruptions, Alignment, and Function of the message. Naïve observers also evaluated the tapes on several items, assessing empathy and communicative effectiveness. Nonmedical talk was the most common type of content, followed by discussion of the current health problem. Neither acknowledgment tokens nor interruptions were frequent. The most common function of a message was a closed question, followed by explanations, assertions, and open questions. Summing across the functions indicated that information giving was the nost common behavior. The perceivers' data showed fairly neutral assessments of the medical students--they were generally not evaluated very positively, although they were not disliked. Regression analyses indicated numerous specific communicative behaviors that were associated with judgments of competence. Statements falling into the Nonspecific Content category were associated with more positive perceptions, while relational statements, moderately closed questions, solicited answers, expansions, restatements, assertions, explanations, open questions, bracketing, and small talk as well as information verifying, seeking, and giving (summed functions) led to more negative perceptions. The results indicate that the delivery of bad news requires communicative moves that differ from other kinds of medical communication. Depending on the results of future analyses of this topic health are providers may be well advised to focus little of their

  17. New/Small News in the English Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    It has been argued that schools are trapped in a print-based past, while their students inhabit a nonprint-based age, and that this has accompanied a shift from traditional mass media to media driven by computer technology. This article draws on the work of Stuart Allan to examine some of the history of this shift in term of news and asks what…

  18. Discovering opinion leaders for medical topics using news articles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rapid identification of subject experts for medical topics helps in improving the implementation of discoveries by speeding the time to market drugs and aiding in clinical trial recruitment, etc. Identifying such people who influence opinion through social network analysis is gaining prominence. In this work, we explore how to combine named entity recognition from unstructured news articles with social network analysis to discover opinion leaders for a given medical topic. Methods We employed a Conditional Random Field algorithm to extract three categories of entities from health-related new articles: Person, Organization and Location. We used the latter two to disambiguate polysemy and synonymy for the person names, used simple rules to identify the subject experts, and then applied social network analysis techniques to discover the opinion leaders among them based on their media presence. A network was created by linking each pair of subject experts who are mentioned together in an article. The social network analysis metrics (including centrality metrics such as Betweenness, Closeness, Degree and Eigenvector) are used for ranking the subject experts based on their power in information flow. Results We extracted 734,204 person mentions from 147,528 news articles related to obesity from January 1, 2007 through July 22, 2010. Of these, 147,879 mentions have been marked as subject experts. The F-score of extracting person names is 88.5%. More than 80% of the subject experts who rank among top 20 in at least one of the metrics could be considered as opinion leaders in obesity. Conclusion The analysis of the network of subject experts with media presence revealed that an opinion leader might have fewer mentions in the news articles, but a high network centrality measure and vice-versa. Betweenness, Closeness and Degree centrality measures were shown to supplement frequency counts in the task of finding subject experts. Further, opinion leaders missed in

  19. Modeling foreign exchange market activity around macroeconomic news: Hawkes-process approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaldi, Marcello; Pennesi, Paris; Lillo, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    We present a Hawkes-model approach to the foreign exchange market in which the high-frequency price dynamics is affected by a self-exciting mechanism and an exogenous component, generated by the pre-announced arrival of macroeconomic news. By focusing on time windows around the news announcement, we find that the model is able to capture the increase of trading activity after the news, both when the news has a sizable effect on volatility and when this effect is negligible, either because the news in not important or because the announcement is in line with the forecast by analysts. We extend the model by considering noncausal effects, due to the fact that the existence of the news (but not its content) is known by the market before the announcement.

  20. Is Waiting the Hardest Part? Comparing the Emotional Experiences of Awaiting and Receiving Bad News.

    PubMed

    Sweeny, Kate; Falkenstein, Angelica

    2015-11-01

    Awaiting uncertain news is stressful, but is it more stressful than receiving bad news? We compared these emotional experiences in two studies. Participants in Study 1 reflected on a personal experience awaiting news that ultimately turned out badly, and participants in Study 2 were law graduates awaiting their results on the bar exam who ultimately failed the exam. In Study 1, participants were ambivalent as to whether awaiting or receiving bad news was more difficult, and emotion ratings in both studies confirmed this ambivalence. Anxiety was higher in anticipation of bad news (at least at the moment of truth) than in the face of it, whereas other negative emotions were more intense following the news than during the waiting period. Thus, whether waiting is "the hardest part" depends on whether one prefers to be racked with anxiety or afflicted with other negative emotions such as anger, disappointment, depression, and regret.

  1. The Role of Practical Advice in Bioterrorism News Coverage.

    PubMed

    Swain, Kristen Alley

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of crisis advice appearing in US news coverage of the 2001 anthrax attacks. Coverage of any crisis can spark public outrage, including fear, speculation, and contradictory or confusing evidence, especially when the stories do not contain practical advice. Five coders analyzed 833 news stories from 272 major US newspapers, the Associated Press, National Public Radio, and 4 major US television networks. Practical advice appeared in only a quarter of the stories, even though practical advice for self-protection was mentioned 3 times more often than the vague advice that simply advised people not to panic. Public health officials provided the most practical advice, while scientists provided the least practical advice. Stories containing practical advice also provided more elucidating information, explaining why the threat was low, reducible, treatable, and detectable. Over the 3 phases of the anthrax crisis, an inverse relationship appeared between the amount of news coverage containing practical advice compared to "outrage rhetoric." Stories mentioned practical advice more often during the post-impact phase than earlier in the crisis. Elucidating, explanatory advice emphasized actions, risk comparisons, and tradeoffs. The findings indicate that when journalists use credible sources to provide practical advice and avoid speculation, their coverage can prevent the spread of misinformation and confusion during a bioterror attack. Also, journalists should provide context and sourcing when discussing advice during the outbreak and impact phases of the crisis, because these explanations could counteract outrage and threat distortion.

  2. Science fiction/science fact: medical genetics in news stories.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Alan; Anderson, Alison; Allan, Stuart

    2005-12-01

    News media coverage of biotechnology issues offers a rich source of fictional portrayals, with stories drawing strongly on popular imagery and metaphors in descriptions of the powers and dangers of biotechnology. This article examines how science fiction metaphors, imagery and motifs surface in British newspaper (broadsheet and tabloid) coverage of medical genetic issues, focusing on press reporting of two recent highly publicised news media events; namely, the Hashmi and Whitaker families' plights to use stem cells from a 'perfectly matched sibling' for the treatment of their diseased children. It is concerned in particular with the extent to which journalists' use of certain literary devices encourages preferred formulations of medical genetics, and thereby potentially shapes public deliberation about scientific developments and their consequences for society. Understanding how science fiction sustains science fact, and vice versa, and how the former is portrayed in news media, it is argued, would thus seem to be crucial in the effort to understand why people respond so strongly to biotechnologies, and what they imagine their consequences to be.

  3. NEWS: Improving Water and Energy Prediction through Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belvedere, D. R.; Entin, J.; Houser, P.; Schiffer, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    The water and energy cycle is driven by a multiplicity of complex processes and interactions at all time and space scales, many of which are inadequately understood and poorly represented in model predictions. In addition, many of the components of the global water cycle prediction system are available, but not integrated; yet improved water and energy cycle process understanding and model prediction require inter-disciplinary integration of many traditional disciplines, including atmospheric, terrestrial and ocean scientists, observationalists, modelers and stakeholders, and weather, climate and geologic researchers. In 2003 NASA established the NASA Energy and Water cycle Study (NEWS), whose long-term grand challenge is to document and enable improved, observationally based, predictions of water and energy cycle consequences of Earth system variability and change. However, recognizing that, the broad objectives of energy and water cycling related climate research extend well beyond the purview of any single agency or program, and call for the support of many activities that are matched to each agency's respective roles and missions. This poster will highlight inter-disciplinary science results made possible through NEWS critical linkages (integration) by the four NEWS working groups listed below, NASA research programs and satellite missions, other agencies, and international efforts. Drought & Flood Extremes: including water and energy aspects of abrupt climate change Evaporation & Latent Heating: including both land and ocean Water and Energy Cycle Climatology: exploiting and influencing evolving observing systems Modeling & Water Cycle Prediction: fostering interaction with the global modeling community

  4. The effects of subtle misinformation in news headlines.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Ullrich K H; Lewandowsky, Stephan; Chang, Ee Pin; Pillai, Rekha

    2014-12-01

    Information presented in news articles can be misleading without being blatantly false. Experiment 1 examined the effects of misleading headlines that emphasize secondary content rather than the article's primary gist. We investigated how headlines affect readers' processing of factual news articles and opinion pieces, using both direct memory measures and more indirect reasoning measures. Experiment 2 examined an even more subtle type of misdirection. We presented articles featuring a facial image of one of the protagonists, and examined whether the headline and opening paragraph of an article affected the impressions formed of that face even when the person referred to in the headline was not the person portrayed. We demonstrate that misleading headlines affect readers' memory, their inferential reasoning and behavioral intentions, as well as the impressions people form of faces. On a theoretical level, we argue that these effects arise not only because headlines constrain further information processing, biasing readers toward a specific interpretation, but also because readers struggle to update their memory in order to correct initial misconceptions. Practical implications for news consumers and media literacy are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. The Role of Practical Advice in Bioterrorism News Coverage.

    PubMed

    Swain, Kristen Alley

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of crisis advice appearing in US news coverage of the 2001 anthrax attacks. Coverage of any crisis can spark public outrage, including fear, speculation, and contradictory or confusing evidence, especially when the stories do not contain practical advice. Five coders analyzed 833 news stories from 272 major US newspapers, the Associated Press, National Public Radio, and 4 major US television networks. Practical advice appeared in only a quarter of the stories, even though practical advice for self-protection was mentioned 3 times more often than the vague advice that simply advised people not to panic. Public health officials provided the most practical advice, while scientists provided the least practical advice. Stories containing practical advice also provided more elucidating information, explaining why the threat was low, reducible, treatable, and detectable. Over the 3 phases of the anthrax crisis, an inverse relationship appeared between the amount of news coverage containing practical advice compared to "outrage rhetoric." Stories mentioned practical advice more often during the post-impact phase than earlier in the crisis. Elucidating, explanatory advice emphasized actions, risk comparisons, and tradeoffs. The findings indicate that when journalists use credible sources to provide practical advice and avoid speculation, their coverage can prevent the spread of misinformation and confusion during a bioterror attack. Also, journalists should provide context and sourcing when discussing advice during the outbreak and impact phases of the crisis, because these explanations could counteract outrage and threat distortion. PMID:26381372

  6. Frequently cited sources in cancer news coverage: a content analysis examining the relationship between cancer news content and source citation.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, Cortney M; Jensen, Jakob D; Stryker, Jo Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The media are a frequent and sometimes sole source of cancer information for many people. News coverage of cancer can be influential to cancer-related practices such as prevention or detection behaviors, and sources cited by journalists may be influential in shaping this coverage. A content analysis (n = 3,656 stories) revealed that the most frequently cited sources in cancer news articles-research institutions and medical journals-receive disproportionately more attention compared to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the American Cancer Society (ACS), and pharmaceutical companies. Research institutions were cited twice as frequently as medical journals, and more than three times as frequently as pharmaceutical companies. Most clinical trial stories were optimistic or neutral in tone, and tone was significantly related to citations of pharmaceutical companies and medical journals. Implications for effects of cancer coverage on behaviors, and the influence of sources such as research institutions and pharmaceutical companies, are discussed.

  7. Frequently cited sources in cancer news coverage: a content analysis examining the relationship between cancer news content and source citation.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, Cortney M; Jensen, Jakob D; Stryker, Jo Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The media are a frequent and sometimes sole source of cancer information for many people. News coverage of cancer can be influential to cancer-related practices such as prevention or detection behaviors, and sources cited by journalists may be influential in shaping this coverage. A content analysis (n = 3,656 stories) revealed that the most frequently cited sources in cancer news articles-research institutions and medical journals-receive disproportionately more attention compared to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the American Cancer Society (ACS), and pharmaceutical companies. Research institutions were cited twice as frequently as medical journals, and more than three times as frequently as pharmaceutical companies. Most clinical trial stories were optimistic or neutral in tone, and tone was significantly related to citations of pharmaceutical companies and medical journals. Implications for effects of cancer coverage on behaviors, and the influence of sources such as research institutions and pharmaceutical companies, are discussed. PMID:19784789

  8. Decoding the codes: A content analysis of the news coverage of genetic cloning by three online news sites and three national daily newspapers, 1996 through 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Jon E.

    This study compared news coverage of genetic cloning research in three online news sites (CNN.com, ABC.com, and MSNBC.com) and three national daily newspapers (The New York Times, The Washington Post, and USA Today). The study involved the analysis of 230 online and print news articles concerning genetic cloning published from 1996 through 1998. Articles were examined with respect to formats, sources, focus, tone, and assessments about the impact of cloning research. Findings indicated that while print news formats remained relatively constant for the duration of this study, online news formats changed significantly with respect to the kinds of media used to represent the news, the layouts used to represent cloning news, and the emphasis placed on audio-visual content. Online stories were as much as 20 to 70% shorter than print stories. More than 50% of the articles appearing online were composed by outside sources (wire services, guest columnists, etc.). By comparison, nearly 90% of the articles published by print newspapers were written "in-house" by science reporters. Online news sites cited fewer sources and cited a smaller variety of sources than the newspapers examined here. In both news outlets, however, the sources most frequently cited were those with vested interests in furthering cloning research. Both online and print news coverage of cloning tends to focus principally on the technical procedures and on the future benefits of cloning. More than 60% of the articles focused on the techniques and technologies of cloning. Less than 25% of the articles focused on social, ethical, or legal issues associated with cloning. Similarly, articles from all six sources (75%) tended to be both positive and future-oriented. Less than 5% of the total articles examined here had a strongly negative or critical tone. Moreover, both online and print news sources increasingly conveyed a strong sense of acceptance about the possibility of human cloning. Data from this study

  9. 43 CFR 5.4 - When is a permit required for news-gathering activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... COMMERCIAL FILMING AND SIMILAR PROJECTS AND STILL PHOTOGRAPHY ON CERTAIN AREAS UNDER DEPARTMENT JURISDICTION.... News-gathering activities involving filming, videography, or still photography do not require a...

  10. 43 CFR 5.4 - When is a permit required for news-gathering activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... COMMERCIAL FILMING AND SIMILAR PROJECTS AND STILL PHOTOGRAPHY ON CERTAIN AREAS UNDER DEPARTMENT JURISDICTION.... News-gathering activities involving filming, videography, or still photography do not require a...

  11. Does emotional intelligence predict breaking bad news skills in pediatric interns? A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Suzanne; Kassis, Karyn; Nagel, Rollin; Verbeck, Nicole; Mahan, John D.; Shell, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background While both patients and physicians identify communication of bad news as an area of great challenge, the factors underlying this often complex task remain largely unknown. Emotional intelligence (EI) has been positively correlated with good general communication skills and successful leadership, but there is no literature relating EI to the delivery of bad news. Purpose Our objectives were to determine: 1) performance of first-year pediatric residents in the delivery of bad news in a standardized patient (SP) setting; and 2) the role of EI in these assessments. Our hypothesis was that pediatric trainees with higher EI would demonstrate more advanced skills in this communication task. Methods Forty first- year residents participated. Skill in bad news delivery was assessed via SP encounters using a previously published assessment tool (GRIEV_ING Death Notification Protocol). Residents completed the Emotional and Social Competency Inventory (ESCI) as a measure of EI. Results Residents scored poorly on bad news delivery skills but scored well on EI. Intraclass correlation coefficients indicated moderate to substantial inter-rater reliability among raters using the delivering bad news assessment tool. However, no correlation was found between bad news delivery performance and EI. Conclusions We concluded that first-year pediatric residents have inadequate skills in the delivery of bad news. In addition, our data suggest that higher EI alone is not sufficient to effectively deliver death news and more robust skill training is necessary for residents to gain competence and acquire mastery in this important communication domain. PMID:26286897

  12. Communicating Ebola through social media and electronic news media outlets: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Househ, Mowafa

    2016-09-01

    Social media and electronic news media activity are an important source of information for the general public. Yet, there is a dearth of research exploring the use of Twitter and electronic news outlets during significant worldly events such as the recent Ebola Virus scare. The purpose of this article is to investigate the use of Twitter and electronic news media outlets in communicating Ebola Virus information. A cross-sectional survey of Twitter data and Google News Trend data from 30 September till 29 October, 2014 was conducted. Between 30 September and 29 October, there were approximately 26 million tweets (25,925,152) that contained the word Ebola. The highest number of correlated activity for Twitter and electronic news outlets occurred on 16 October 2014. Other important peaks in Twitter data occurred on 1 October, 6 October, 8 October, and 12 October, 2014. The main influencers of the Twitter feeds were news media outlets. The study reveals a relationship between electronic news media publishing and Twitter activity around significant events such as Ebola. Healthcare organizations should take advantage of the relationship between electronic news media and trending events on social media sites such as Twitter and should work on developing social media campaigns in co-operation with leading electronic news media outlets (e.g. CNN, Yahoo, Reuters) that can have an influence on social media activity.

  13. The Evaluations of Swine Flu Magnitudes in TV News: A Comparative Analysis of Paired Influenza Pandemics.

    PubMed

    Pan, Po-Lin; Meng, Juan

    2015-01-01

    This study examined how major TV news networks covered two flu pandemics in 1976 and 2009 in terms of news frames, mortality exemplars, mortality subject attributes, vaccination, evaluation approaches, and news sources. Results showed that the first pandemic was frequently framed with the medical/scientific and political/legal issues, while the second pandemic was emphasized with the health risk issue in TV news. Both flu pandemics were regularly reported with mortality exemplars, but the focus in the first pandemic was on the flu virus threat and vaccination side effects, while the vaccination shortage was frequently revealed in the second outbreak.

  14. 78 FR 52129 - Cotton Classification and Market News Service: Notice of Request for an Extension and Revision of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service Cotton Classification and Market News Service: Notice of Request for an... the currently approved information collection Cotton Classification and Market News Service. DATES..., Research and Promotion Staff, Cotton and Tobacco Programs, AMS, USDA, 100 Riverside Parkway, Suite...

  15. 75 FR 28231 - Cotton Classification and Market News Service: Notice of Request for an Extension and Revision of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service Cotton Classification and Market News Service: Notice of Request for an... the currently approved information collection Cotton Classification and Market News Service. DATES... submit written comments concerning this proposal to Shethir Riva, Chief, Research and Promotion,...

  16. Climate Science News 2.0 at NSIDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitzell, K.; Meier, W.; Serreze, M. C.; Stroeve, J. C.; Scambos, T. A.

    2011-12-01

    How does a small science and data center step into new media? We do not have a lot of time to blog daily, maintain multiple social media accounts, monitor comments, or to constantly buff our image in the fast-changing world of social media. At the same time, the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC)'s news announcements and updates on Arctic sea ice reach a huge audience. We have answers to the questions about Arctic climate change that many people are asking, and we want to share that information with people who get their news from non-traditional sources. How can we take advantage of new technologies to help our information reach the largest number of people, without overwhelming our limited resources? So far our approach has been to continue offering innovative, insightful content that in some ways sells itself. We use social media as a tool to share this popular content, emphasizing quality over quantity (We do not tweet every day, but when we do, people listen). We also use social media as a research and "buzz-monitoring" tool to learn more about and to interact with our diverse audience. Even before NSIDC ventured onto Twitter and Facebook, people were using these tools to share our content. Social media allowed us to passively enjoy their benefits, as our regular readers shared updates with their friends and colleagues. The news, analysis, and data we provide were unique, and that made them attractive to a broad readership. By dipping a toe into social media, however, we found that we could start sharing our content with more control, and that a little effort goes a long way in spreading the word. In this presentation/poster we will show how NSIDC is using Twitter, Facebook, and the new Icelights Web site, to communicate with the public about changing sea ice and climate.

  17. Criteria Utilized by College-Educated Women to Select Newspaper Science News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunwoody, Sharon

    In an attempt to identify criteria used by readers to select science news, a homogeneous group of women in the Philadelphia area was asked to indicate which of 48 science-news statements they would be interested in reading in their newspapers. The statements were condensed from stories selected from Philadelphia newspapers over a…

  18. Breaking news dissemination in the media via propagation behavior based on complex network theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nairong; An, Haizhong; Gao, Xiangyun; Li, Huajiao; Hao, Xiaoqing

    2016-07-01

    The diffusion of breaking news largely relies on propagation behaviors in the media. The tremendous and intricate propagation relationships in the media form a complex network. An improved understanding of breaking news diffusion characteristics can be obtained through the complex network research. Drawing on the news data of Bohai Gulf oil spill event from June 2011 to May 2014, we constructed a weighted and directed complex network in which media are set as nodes, the propagation relationships as edges and the propagation times as the weight of the edges. The primary results show (1) the propagation network presents small world feature, which means relations among media are close and breaking news originating from any node can spread rapidly; (2) traditional media and official websites are the typical sources for news propagation, while business portals are news collectors and spreaders; (3) the propagation network is assortative and the group of core media facilities the spread of breaking news faster; (4) for online media, news originality factor become less important to propagation behaviors. This study offers a new insight to explore information dissemination from the perspective of statistical physics and is beneficial for utilizing the public opinion in a positive way.

  19. The Content Analysis of the News in the National Papers Concerning the Renewed Primary Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasdemir, Adem; Kus, Zafer

    2011-01-01

    The news in the national papers has an important role to inform the people about the content of new primary school curriculum. This study investigated the way of function with the comparison of the studies in the literature. The news concerning the renewed curriculum appearing in the national media in the period between 2004 and 2007 was obtained…

  20. The Caribbean Story on CNN World Report: Just What is Development News?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClean, Lisa A.; Stewart, Robert K.

    While Caribbean countries complained during the 1970s about negative coverage at the hands of Western journalists, scholars have observed that local Caribbean media were not providing adequate news coverage from the region either. A study examined 245 news stories sent by English-speaking Caribbean journalists to CNN World Report over a five-year…