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Sample records for 15-prostaglandin dehydrogenase expression

  1. The ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids prevented colitis-associated carcinogenesis through blocking dissociation of β-catenin complex, inhibiting COX-2 through repressing NF-κB, and inducing 15-prostaglandin dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Han, Young-Min; Jeong, Migyeung; Park, Jong-Min; Kim, Mi-Young; Go, Eun-Jin; Cha, Ji Young; Kim, Kyung Jo; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that diets containing an increased ratio of ω-6 : ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are a risk factor for colon cancer and might affect tumorigenesis. Therefore, dietary ω-3 PUFA administration may be a preventive strategy against colon cancer. Until now, the exact molecular mechanisms and required dietary doses of ω-3 PUFAs for cancer prevention were unknown. In this study, we explored the anti-tumorigenic mechanisms of ω-3 PUFAs against a colitis-associated cancer (CAC) model. Through in vitro cell models involving docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) administration, down-regulation of survivin and Bcl-2, and up-regulation of Bax, accompanied by blockage of β-catenin complex dissociation, the main mechanisms responsible for DHA-induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells were determined. Results included significant reduction in azoxymethane-initiated, dextran sodium sulfate-promoted CACs, as well as significant preservation of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) and significant inhibition of Cyclooxyganase-2 (COX-2) and Prostaglandin E2(P < 0.01). Additional mechanisms and significant induction of apoptosis in both tumor and non-tumor tissues were also noted in fat-1 transgenic (TG) mice. The lipid profiles of colon tissues measured in all specimens revealed that intake greater than 3 g ω-3 PUFA/60 kg of body weight showed tissue levels similar to those seen in fat-1 TG mice, preventing cancer. Our study concluded that COX-2 inhibition, 15-PGDH preservation, apoptosis induction, and blockage of β-catenin complex dissociation contributed to the anti-tumorigenesis effect of ω-3 PUFAs, and an intake higher than 3g ω-3 PUFAs/60 kg of body weight can assist in CAC prevention. PMID:27566583

  2. The ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids prevented colitis-associated carcinogenesis through blocking dissociation of β-catenin complex, inhibiting COX-2 through repressing NF-κB, and inducing 15-prostaglandin dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Han, Young-Min; Jeong, Migyeung; Park, Jong-Min; Kim, Mi-Young; Go, Eun-Jin; Cha, Ji Young; Kim, Kyung Jo; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-09-27

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that diets containing an increased ratio of ω-6 : ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are a risk factor for colon cancer and might affect tumorigenesis. Therefore, dietary ω-3 PUFA administration may be a preventive strategy against colon cancer. Until now, the exact molecular mechanisms and required dietary doses of ω-3 PUFAs for cancer prevention were unknown. In this study, we explored the anti-tumorigenic mechanisms of ω-3 PUFAs against a colitis-associated cancer (CAC) model. Through in vitro cell models involving docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) administration, down-regulation of survivin and Bcl-2, and up-regulation of Bax, accompanied by blockage of β-catenin complex dissociation, the main mechanisms responsible for DHA-induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells were determined. Results included significant reduction in azoxymethane-initiated, dextran sodium sulfate-promoted CACs, as well as significant preservation of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) and significant inhibition of Cyclooxyganase-2 (COX-2) and Prostaglandin E2(P < 0.01). Additional mechanisms and significant induction of apoptosis in both tumor and non-tumor tissues were also noted in fat-1 transgenic (TG) mice. The lipid profiles of colon tissues measured in all specimens revealed that intake greater than 3 g ω-3 PUFA/60 kg of body weight showed tissue levels similar to those seen in fat-1 TG mice, preventing cancer. Our study concluded that COX-2 inhibition, 15-PGDH preservation, apoptosis induction, and blockage of β-catenin complex dissociation contributed to the anti-tumorigenesis effect of ω-3 PUFAs, and an intake higher than 3g ω-3 PUFAs/60 kg of body weight can assist in CAC prevention.

  3. Buformin suppresses the expression of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Yano, Akiko; Kubota, Masafumi; Iguchi, Kazuhiro; Usui, Shigeyuki; Hirano, Kazuyuki

    2006-05-01

    The biguanides metformin and buformin, which are clinically used for diabetes mellitus, are known to improve resistance to insulin in patients. Biguanides were reported to cause lactic acidosis as a side effect. Since the mechanism of the side effect still remains obscure, we have examined genes whose expression changes by treating HepG2 cells with buformin in order to elucidate the mechanisms of the side effect. A subtraction cDNA library was constructed by the method of suppressive subtractive hybridization and the screening of the library was performed with cDNA probes prepared from HepG2 cells treated with or without buformin for 12 h. The expression of the gene and the protein obtained by the screening was monitored by real-time RT-PCR with specific primers and Western blotting with specific antibody. The amounts of ATP and NAD+ were determined with luciferase and alcohol dehydrogenase, respectively. We found that expression of the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPD) gene was suppressed by treating HepG2 cells with 0.25 mM buformin for 12 h as a result of the library screening. The decrease in the expression depended on the treatment period. The amount of GAPD protein also decreased simultaneously with the suppression of the gene expression by the treatment with buformin. The amount of ATP and NAD+ in the HepG2 cells treated with buformin decreased to 10 and 20% of the control, respectively. These observations imply that the biguanide causes deactivation of the glycolytic pathway and subsequently the accumulation of pyruvate and NADH and a decrease in NAD+. Therefore, the reaction equilibrium catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase leans towards lactate production and this may result in lactic acidosis.

  4. Expression of lactate dehydrogenase C correlates with poor prognosis in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yibo; Liang, Chao; Zhu, Jundong; Miao, Chenkui; Yu, Yajie; Xu, Aimin; Zhang, Jianzhong; Li, Pu; Li, Shuang; Bao, Meiling; Yang, Jie; Qin, Chao; Wang, Zengjun

    2017-03-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase C is an isoenzyme of lactate dehydrogenase and a member of the cancer-testis antigens family. In this study, we aimed to investigate the expression and functional role of lactate dehydrogenase C and its basic mechanisms in renal cell carcinoma. First, a total of 133 cases of renal cell carcinoma samples were analysed in a tissue microarray, and Kaplan-Meier survival curve analyses were performed to investigate the correlation between lactate dehydrogenase C expression and renal cell carcinoma progression. Lactate dehydrogenase C protein levels and messenger RNA levels were significantly upregulated in renal cell carcinoma tissues, and the patients with positive lactate dehydrogenase C expression had a shorter progression-free survival, indicating the oncogenic role of lactate dehydrogenase C in renal cell carcinoma. In addition, further cytological experiments demonstrated that lactate dehydrogenase C could prompt renal cell carcinoma cells to produce lactate, and increase metastatic and invasive potential of renal cell carcinoma cells. Furthermore, lactate dehydrogenase C could induce the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process and matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression. In summary, these findings showed lactate dehydrogenase C was associated with poor prognosis in renal cell carcinoma and played a pivotal role in the migration and invasion of renal cell carcinoma cells. Lactate dehydrogenase C may act as a novel biomarker for renal cell carcinoma progression and a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma.

  5. Over-Expression, Purification and Crystallization of Human Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Y. S.; Ciszak, Ewa; Patel, Mulchand

    2000-01-01

    Dehydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3; dihydrolipoan-tide:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.8.1.4) is a common catalytic component found in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, and branched-chain cc-keto acid dehydrogenase complex. E3 is also a component (referred to as L protein) of the glycine cleavage system in bacterial metabolism (2). Active E3 forms a homodimer with four distinctive subdomain structures (FAD binding, NAD+ binding, central and interface domains) with non-covalently but tightly bound FAD in the holoenzyme. Deduced amino acids from cloned full-length human E3 gene showed a total of 509 amino acids with a leader sequence (N-terminal 35 amino acids) that is excised (mature form) during transportation of expressed E3 into mitochondria membrane. So far, three-dimensional structure of human E3 has not been reported. Our effort to achieve the elucidation of the X-ray crystal structure of human E3 will be presented. Recombinant pPROEX-1 expression vector (from GIBCO BRL Life Technologies) having the human E3 gene without leader sequence was constructed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and subsequent ligation, and cloned in E.coli XL1-Blue by transformation. Since pPROEX-1 vector has an internal His-tag (six histidine peptide) located at the upstream region of a multicloning site, one-step affinity purification of E3 using nickelnitriloacetic acid (Ni-NTA) agarose resin, which has a strong affinity to His-tag, was feasible. Also a seven-amino-acid spacer peptide and a recombinant tobacco etch virus protease recognition site (seven amino acids peptide) found between His-tag and first amino acid of expressed E3 facilitated the cleavage of His-tag from E3 after the affinity purification. By IPTG induction, ca. 15 mg of human E3 (mature form) was obtained from 1L LB culture with overnight incubation at 25C. Over 98% of purity of E3 from one-step Ni-NTA agarose affinity purification was confirmed by SDS-PAGE analysis. For

  6. The expression of succinate dehydrogenase in breast phyllodes tumor.

    PubMed

    Choi, Junjeong; Kim, Do Hee; Jung, WooHee; Koo, Ja Seung

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the expression of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)A, SDHB, and HIF-1α in phyllodes tumors and the association with clinic-pathologic factors. Using tissue microarray (TMA) for 206 phyllodes tumor cases, we performed immunohistochemical stains for SDHA, SDHB, and HIF-1α and analyzed their expression in regard to clinicopathologic parameters of each case. The cases were comprised of 156 benign, 34 borderline, and 16 malignant phyllodes tumors. The expression of stromal SDHA and epithelial- and stromal- SDHB increased as the tumor progressed from benign to malignant (P⟨0.001). There were five stromal SDHA-negative cases and 31 stromal SDHB-negative cases. SDHB negativity was associated with a lower histologic grade (P=0.054) and lower stromal atypia (P=0.048). Univariate analysis revealed that a shorter disease free survival (DFS) was associated with stromal SDHB high-positivity (P=0.013) and a shorter overall survival (OS) was associated with high-positivity of stromal SDHA and SDHB (P⟨0.001 and P⟨0.001, respectively). The multivariate Cox analysis with the variables stromal cellularity, stromal atypia, stromal mitosis, stromal overgrowth, tumor margin, stromal SDHA expression, and stromal SDHB expression revealed that stromal overgrowth was associated with a shorter DFS (hazard ratio: 24.78, 95% CI: 3.126-196.5, P=0.002) and a shorter OS (hazard ratio: 176.7, 95% CI: 8.466-3691, P=0.001). In conclusion, Tumor grade is positively correlated with SDHA and SDHB expression in the tumor stroma in phyllodes tumors of the breast. This result may be attributed to the increased metabolic demand in high grade tumors.

  7. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression in solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Collart, F.R.; Chubb, C.B.; Mirkin, B.L.; Huberman, E.

    1992-07-10

    IMP dehydrogenase, a regulatory enzyme of guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, may play a role in cell proliferation and malignancy. To assess this possibility, we examined IMP dehydrogenase expression in a series of human solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines in comparison with their normal counterparts. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression was observed in brain tumors relative to normal brain tissue and in sarcoma cells relative to normal fibroblasts. Similarly, in several B- and T-lymphoid leukemia cell lines, elevated levels of IMP dehydrogenase mRNA and cellular enzyme were observed in comparison with the levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes. These results are consistent with an association between increased IMP dehydrogenase expression and either enhanced cell proliferation or malignant transformation.

  8. Not only students can express alcohol dehydrogenase: goldfish can too!

    PubMed

    Chamberland, Valérie; Rioux, Pierre

    2010-12-01

    This article describes a novel approach to study the metabolic regulation of the respiratory system in vertebrates that suits physiology lessons for undergraduate students. It consists of an experimental demonstration of the goldfish's (Carassius auratus) adaptations to anoxia. The goldfish is one of the few vertebrates showing strong enzymatic plasticity for the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), which allows it to survive long periods of severe anoxia. Therefore, we propose two simple laboratory exercises in which students are first asked to characterize the distribution of ADH isozymes in the goldfish by performing cellulose acetate electrophoresis. The second part of this laboratory lesson is the determination of liver glycogen. To further student comprehension, an interspecies comparative component is integrated, in which the same subjects are studied in an anoxia-sensitive species, the brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis). ADH in goldfish is restricted to skeletal muscles, where it catalyzes alcoholic fermentation, permitting ethanol excretion through the gills and therefore preventing lactate acidosis caused by sustained glycolysis during anoxia. Electrophoresis also reveals the occurrence of a liver isozyme in the brook charr, which ADH catalyzes in the opposite pathway, allowing the usual ethanol degradation. As for the liver glycogen assay, it shows largely superior content in the goldfish liver compared with the brook charr, providing goldfish with a sustained energy supply during anoxia. The results of this laboratory exercise clearly demonstrate several physiological strategies developed by goldfish to cope with such a crucial environmental challenge as oxygen depletion.

  9. ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASES EXPRESSION DURING POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT: LIVER VS. LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules present in the environment, and can be produced during biotransformation of xenobiotics. Although the lung can be a major target for aldehyde toxicity, development of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), which detoxify aldehydes, in lung has be...

  10. Sequences and expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase genes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Rae, J L; Cutfield, J F; Lamont, I L

    1997-01-01

    A mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, OT2100, which appeared to be defective in the production of the fluorescent yellow-green siderophore pyoverdine had been isolated previously following transposon mutagenesis (T. R. Merriman and I. L. Lamont, Gene 126:17-23, 1993). DNA from either side of the transposon insertion site was cloned, and the sequence was determined. The mutated gene had strong identity with the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (E2) components of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) from other bacterial species. Enzyme assays revealed that the mutant was defective in the E2 subunit of PDH, preventing assembly of a functional complex. PDH activity in OT2100 cell extracts was restored when extract from an E1 mutant was added. On the basis of this evidence, OT2100 was identified as an aceB or E2 mutant. A second gene, aceA, which is likely to encode the E1 component of PDH, was identified upstream from aceB. Transcriptional analysis revealed that aceA and aceB are expressed as a 5-kb polycistronic transcript from a promoter upstream of aceA. An intergenic region of 146 bp was located between aceA and aceB, and a 2-kb aceB transcript that originated from a promoter in the intergenic region was identified. DNA fragments upstream of aceA and aceB were shown to have promoter activities in P. aeruginosa, although only the aceA promoter was active in Escherichia coli. It is likely that the apparent pyoverdine-deficient phenotype of mutant OT2100 is a consequence of acidification of the growth medium due to accumulation of pyruvic acid in the absence of functional PDH. PMID:9171401

  11. Heterogeneous expression of protein and mRNA in pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, I D; Kerr, D S; Ho, L; Lusk, M M; Pepin, R A; Javed, A A; Mole, J E; Jesse, B W; Thekkumkara, T J; Pons, G

    1988-01-01

    Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase [pyruvate:lipoamide 2-oxidoreductase (decarboxylating and acceptor-acetylating), EC 1.2.4.1], the first component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, is associated with lactic acidosis and central nervous system dysfunction. Using both specific antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase and cDNAs coding for its two alpha and beta subunits, we characterized pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency in 11 patients. Three different patterns were found on immunologic and RNA blot analyses. (i) Seven patients had immunologically detectable crossreactive material for the alpha and beta proteins of pyruvate dehydrogenase. (ii) Two patients had no detectable crossreactive protein for either the alpha or beta subunit but had normal amounts of mRNA for both alpha and beta subunits. (iii) The remaining two patients also had no detectable crossreactive protein but had diminished amounts of mRNA for the alpha subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase only. These results indicate that loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity may be associated with either absent or catalytically inactive proteins, and in those cases in which this enzyme is absent, mRNA for one of the subunits may also be missing. When mRNA for one of the subunits is lacking, both protein subunits are absent, suggesting that a mutation affecting the expression of one of the subunit proteins causes the remaining uncomplexed subunit to be unstable. The results show that several different mutations account for the molecular heterogeneity of pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency. Images PMID:3140238

  12. Reduced aldehyde dehydrogenase expression in preeclamptic decidual mesenchymal stem/stromal cells is restored by aldehyde dehydrogenase agonists

    PubMed Central

    Kusuma, Gina D.; Abumaree, Mohamed H.; Perkins, Anthony V.; Brennecke, Shaun P.; Kalionis, Bill

    2017-01-01

    High resistance to oxidative stress is a common feature of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) and is associated with higher cell survival and ability to respond to oxidative damage. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity is a candidate “universal” marker for stem cells. ALDH expression was significantly lower in decidual MSC (DMSC) isolated from preeclamptic (PE) patients. ALDH gene knockdown by siRNA transfection was performed to create a cell culture model of the reduced ALDH expression detected in PE-DMSC. We showed that ALDH activity in DMSC is associated with resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced toxicity. Our data provide evidence that ALDH expression in DMSC is required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress. Furthermore, candidate ALDH activators were screened and two of the compounds were effective in upregulating ALDH expression. This study provides a proof-of-principle that the restoration of ALDH activity in diseased MSC is a rational basis for a therapeutic strategy to improve MSC resistance to cytotoxic damage. PMID:28205523

  13. Tandem orientation of duplicated xanthine dehydrogenase genes from Arabidopsis thaliana: differential gene expression and enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Hesberg, Christine; Hänsch, Robert; Mendel, Ralf R; Bittner, Florian

    2004-04-02

    Xanthine dehydrogenase from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana was analyzed on molecular and biochemical levels. Whereas most other organisms appear to own only one gene for xanthine dehydrogenase A. thaliana possesses two genes in tandem orientation spaced by 704 base pairs. The cDNAs as well as the proteins AtXDH1 and AtXDH2 share an overall identity of 93% and show high homologies to xanthine dehydrogenases from other organisms. Whereas AtXDH2 mRNA is expressed constitutively, alterations of AtXDH1 transcript levels were observed at various stresses like drought, salinity, cold, and natural senescence, but also after abscisic acid treatment. Transcript alteration did not mandatorily result in changes of xanthine dehydrogenase activities. Whereas salt treatment had no effect on xanthine dehydrogenase activities, cold stress caused a decrease, but desiccation and senescence caused a strong increase of activities in leaves. Because AtXDH1 presumably is the more important isoenzyme in A. thaliana it was expressed in Pichia pastoris, purified, and used for biochemical studies. AtXDH1 protein is a homodimer of about 300 kDa consisting of identical subunits of 150 kDa. Like xanthine dehydrogenases from other organisms AtXDH1 uses hypoxanthine and xanthine as main substrates and is strongly inhibited by allopurinol. AtXDH1 could be activated by the purified molybdenum cofactor sulfurase ABA3 that converts inactive desulfo-into active sulfoenzymes. Finally it was found that AtXDH1 is a strict dehydrogenase and not an oxidase, but is able to produce superoxide radicals indicating that besides purine catabolism it might also be involved in response to various stresses that require reactive oxygen species.

  14. Expression of Cellobiose Dehydrogenase from Neurospora crassa in Pichia pastoris and its purification and characterization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A gene encoding cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) from Neurospora crassa strain FGSC 2489 has been cloned and expressed in the heterologous host Pichia pastoris, under the control of the AOX1 methanol inducible promoter. Recombinant CDH without the native signal sequence and fused with a his6-tag (rNC-...

  15. EXPRESSION OF THE SPERMATOGENIC CELL-SPECIFIC GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE (GAPDS) IN RAT TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The spermatogenic cell-specific variant of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDS) has been cloned from a rat testis cDNA library and its pattern of expression determined. A 1417 nucleotide cDNA has been found to encode an enzyme with substantial homology to mouse GAPDS...

  16. Monoterpene metabolism. Cloning, expression, and characterization of (-)-isopiperitenol/(-)-carveol dehydrogenase of peppermint and spearmint.

    PubMed

    Ringer, Kerry L; Davis, Edward M; Croteau, Rodney

    2005-03-01

    The essential oils of peppermint (Mentha x piperita) and spearmint (Mentha spicata) are distinguished by the oxygenation position on the p-menthane ring of the constitutive monoterpenes that is conferred by two regiospecific cytochrome P450 limonene-3- and limonene-6-hydroxylases. Following hydroxylation of limonene, an apparently similar dehydrogenase oxidizes (-)-trans-isopiperitenol to (-)-isopiperitenone in peppermint and (-)-trans-carveol to (-)-carvone in spearmint. Random sequencing of a peppermint oil gland secretory cell cDNA library revealed a large number of clones that specified redox-type enzymes, including dehydrogenases. Full-length dehydrogenase clones were screened by functional expression in Escherichia coli using a recently developed in situ assay. A single full-length acquisition encoding (-)-trans-isopiperitenol dehydrogenase (ISPD) was isolated. The (-)-ISPD cDNA has an open reading frame of 795 bp that encodes a 265-residue enzyme with a calculated molecular mass of 27,191. Nondegenerate primers were designed based on the (-)-trans-ISPD cDNA sequence and employed to screen a spearmint oil gland secretory cell cDNA library from which a 5'-truncated cDNA encoding the spearmint homolog, (-)-trans-carveol-dehydrogenase, was isolated. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification and RACE were used to acquire the remaining 5'-sequence from RNA isolated from oil gland secretory cells of spearmint leaf. The full-length spearmint dehydrogenase shares >99% amino acid identity with its peppermint homolog and both dehydrogenases are capable of utilizing (-)-trans-isopiperitenol and (-)-trans-carveol. These isopiperitenol/carveol dehydrogenases are members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily and are related to other plant short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases involved in secondary metabolism (lignan biosynthesis), stress responses, and phytosteroid biosynthesis, but they are quite dissimilar (approximately 13% identity) to the monoterpene

  17. Expression of Aeromonas caviae ST pyruvate dehydrogenase complex components mediate tellurite resistance in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Miguel E.; Molina, Roberto C.; Diaz, Waldo A.; Pradenas, Gonzalo A.; Vasquez, Claudio C.

    2009-02-27

    Potassium tellurite (K{sub 2}TeO{sub 3}) is harmful to most organisms and specific mechanisms explaining its toxicity are not well known to date. We previously reported that the lpdA gene product of the tellurite-resistant environmental isolate Aeromonas caviae ST is involved in the reduction of tellurite to elemental tellurium. In this work, we show that expression of A. caviae ST aceE, aceF, and lpdA genes, encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase, dihydrolipoamide transacetylase, and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, respectively, results in tellurite resistance and decreased levels of tellurite-induced superoxide in Escherichia coli. In addition to oxidative damage resulting from tellurite exposure, a metabolic disorder would be simultaneously established in which the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex would represent an intracellular tellurite target. These results allow us to widen our vision regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in bacterial tellurite resistance by correlating tellurite toxicity and key enzymes of aerobic metabolism.

  18. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 4 (PDK4) gene expression by glucocorticoids and insulin.

    PubMed

    Connaughton, Sara; Chowdhury, Farhana; Attia, Ramy R; Song, Shulan; Zhang, Yi; Elam, Marshall B; Cook, George A; Park, Edwards A

    2010-02-05

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in mitochondria and is a key regulatory enzyme in the oxidation of glucose to acetyl-CoA. Phosphorylation of PDC by the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK) inhibits its activity. The expression of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) gene is increased in fasting and other conditions associated with the switch from the utilization of glucose to fatty acids as an energy source. Transcription of the PDK4 gene is elevated by glucocorticoids and inhibited by insulin. In this study, we have investigated the factors involved in the regulation of the PDK4 gene by these hormones. Glucocorticoids stimulate PDK4 through two glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding sites located more than 6000 base pairs upstream of the transcriptional start site. Insulin inhibits the glucocorticoid induction in part by causing dissociation of the GR from the promoter. Previously, we found that the estrogen related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) stimulates the expression of PDK4. Here, we determined that one of the ERRalpha binding sites contributes to the insulin inhibition of PDK4. A binding site for the forkhead transcription factor (FoxO1) is adjacent to the ERRalpha binding sites. FoxO1 participates in the glucocorticoid induction of PDK4 and the regulation of this gene by insulin. Our data demonstrate that glucocorticoids and insulin each modulate PDK4 gene expression through complex hormone response units that contain multiple factors.

  19. Ethanol production by the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus by expression of bacterial bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Keller, Matthew W; Lipscomb, Gina L; Nguyen, Diep M; Crowley, Alexander T; Schut, Gerrit J; Scott, Israel; Kelly, Robert M; Adams, Michael W W

    2017-02-14

    Ethanol is an important target for the renewable production of liquid transportation fuels. It can be produced biologically from pyruvate, via pyruvate decarboxylase, or from acetyl-CoA, by alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE). Thermophilic bacteria utilize AdhE, which is a bifunctional enzyme that contains both acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase activities. Many of these organisms also contain a separate alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) that generates ethanol from acetaldehyde, although the role of AdhA in ethanol production is typically not clear. As acetyl-CoA is a key central metabolite that can be generated from a wide range of substrates, AdhE can serve as a single gene fuel module to produce ethanol through primary metabolic pathways. The focus here is on the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows by fermenting sugar to acetate, CO2 and H2 . Previously, by the heterologous expression of adhA from a thermophilic bacterium, P. furiosus was shown to produce ethanol by a novel mechanism from acetate, mediated by AdhA and the native enzyme aldehyde oxidoreductase (AOR). In this study, the AOR gene was deleted from P. furiosus to evaluate ethanol production directly from acetyl-CoA by heterologous expression of the adhE gene from eight thermophilic bacteria. Only AdhEs from two Thermoanaerobacter strains showed significant activity in cell-free extracts of recombinant P. furiosus and supported ethanol production in vivo. In the AOR deletion background, the highest amount of ethanol (estimated 61% theoretical yield) was produced when adhE and adhA from Thermoanaerobacter were co-expressed.

  20. Characterization of a novel flooding stress-responsive alcohol dehydrogenase expressed in soybean roots.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Deschamps, Thibaut; Thibaut, Deschamps; Hiraga, Susumu; Kato, Mikio; Chiba, Mitsuru; Hashiguchi, Akiko; Tougou, Makoto; Shimamura, Satoshi; Yasue, Hiroshi

    2011-10-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) is the key enzyme in alcohol fermentation. We analyzed Adh expression in order to clarify the role of Adh of soybeans (Glycine max) to flooding stress. Proteome analysis confirmed that expression of Adh is significantly upregulated in 4-day-old soybean seedlings subjected to 2 days of flooding. Southern hybridization analysis and soybean genome database search revealed that soybean has at least 6 Adh genes. The GmAdh2 gene that responded to flooding was isolated from soybean cultivar Enrei. Adh2 expression was markedly increased 6 h after flooding and decreased 24 h after floodwater drainage. In situ hybridization and Western blot indicated that flooding strongly induces Adh2 expression in RNA and protein levels in the root apical meristem. Osmotic, cold, or drought stress did not induce expression of Adh2. These results indicate that Adh2 is a flooding-response specific soybean gene expressed in root tissue.

  1. Expression, Purification, Crystallization And Preliminary X-Ray Studies of Histamine Dehydrogenase From Nocardioides Simplex

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, T.M.; Hirakawa, H.; Mure, M.; Scott, E.E.; Limburg, J.

    2009-05-21

    Histamine dehydrogenase (HADH) from Nocardioides simplex catalyzes the oxidative deamination of histamine to produce imidazole acetaldehyde and an ammonium ion. HADH is functionally related to trimethylamine dehydrogenase (TMADH), but HADH has strict substrate specificity towards histamine. HADH is a homodimer, with each 76 kDa subunit containing two redox cofactors: a [4Fe-4S] cluster and an unusual covalently bound flavin mononucleotide, 6-S-cysteinyl-FMN. In order to understand the substrate specificity of HADH, it was sought to determine its structure by X-ray crystallography. This enzyme has been expressed recombinantly in Escherichia coli and successfully crystallized in two forms. Diffraction data were collected to 2.7 {angstrom} resolution at the SSRL synchrotron with 99.7% completeness. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 101.14, b = 107.03, c = 153.35 {angstrom}.

  2. Expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase isoforms in canine adrenal glands treated with trilostane.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Hirotaka; Kumagai, Takayuki; Kurano, Mai; Koyama, Hidekazu

    2014-06-01

    Trilostane, a competitive inhibitor of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, is often used to treat canine hyperadrenocorticism. In some species, trilostane has been shown to have additional effects on steroid biosynthesis, and it has been postulated that trilostane might have effects on 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) in dogs. To investigate the effect of trilostane on 11β-HSD in canine adrenal glands, healthy Beagle dogs were treated with trilostane for 8 weeks. Trilostane treatment resulted in a significant decrease of the cortisol/cortisone ratio in the serum. The adrenal gland mRNA and protein expression levels of 11β-HSD type 1 and 11β-HSD type 2 were significantly higher and significantly lower respectively in dogs treated with trilostane compared to those in control healthy Beagle dogs. These findings suggest that trilostane may have an effect on 11β-HSD activity in canine adrenal glands.

  3. 11-Beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 expression in white adipose tissue is strongly correlated with adiposity.

    PubMed

    Milagro, Fermin I; Campión, Javier; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2007-04-01

    Glucocorticoid action within the cells is regulated by the levels of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression and two enzymes, 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11betaHSD1), which converts inactive to active glucocorticoids, and 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11betaHSD2), which regulates the access of active glucocorticoids to the receptor by converting cortisol/corticosterone to the glucocorticoid-inactive form cortisone/dehydrocorticosterone. Male Wistar rats developed obesity by being fed a high-fat diet for 56 days, and GR, 11betaHSD1 and 11betaHSD2 gene expression were compared with control-diet fed animals. Gene expression analysis of 11betaHSD1, 11betaHSD2 and GR were performed by RT-PCR in subcutaneous and retroperitoneal adipose tissue. High-fat fed animals overexpressed 11betaHSD2 in subcutaneous but not in retroperitoneal fat. Interestingly, mRNA levels strongly correlated in both tissues with different parameters related to obesity, such as body weight, adiposity and insulin resistance, suggesting that this gene is a reliable marker of adiposity in this rat model of obesity. Thus, 11betaHSD2 is expressed in adipose tissue by both adipocytes and stromal-vascular cells, which suggests that this enzyme may play an important role in preventing fat accumulation in adipose tissue.

  4. Correct developmental expression of a cloned alcohol dehydrogenase gene transduced into the Drosophila germ line.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, D A; Posakony, J W; Maniatis, T

    1983-08-01

    We have used P-element-mediated transformation to introduce a cloned Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene into the germ line of ADH null flies. Six independent transformants expressing ADH were identified by their acquired resistance to ethanol. Each transformant carries a single copy of the cloned Adh gene in a different chromosomal location. Four of the six transformant lines exhibit normal Adh expression by the following criteria: quantitative levels of ADH enzyme activity in larvae and adults; qualitative tissue specificity; the size of stable Adh mRNA; and the characteristic developmental switch in utilization of two different Adh promoters. The remaining two transformants express ADH enzyme activity with the correct tissue specificity, but at a lower level than wild type. These results demonstrate that an 11.8 kb chromosomal fragment containing the Adh gene includes the cis-acting sequences necessary for its correct developmental expression, and that a variety of chromosomal sites permit proper Adh gene function.

  5. Expression and Characterization of a Novel 1,3-Propanediol Dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xianghui; Yun, Junhua; Qi, Yilin; Zhang, Huanhuan; Wang, Fei; Guo, Qi; Cao, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    1,3-Propanediol dehydrogenase (PDOR) is important in the biosynthesis of 1,3-propanediol. In the present study, the dhaT gene encoding PDOR was cloned from Lactobacillus brevis 6239 and expressed in Escherichia coli for the first time. Sequence analysis revealed that PDOR containing two Fe(2+)-binding motifs and a cofactor motif belongs to the type III alcohol dehydrogenase. The purified recombinant PDOR exhibited a single band of 42 kDa according to SDS-PAGE. Optimal temperatures and pH values of this dehydrogenase are 37 °C, 7.5 for reduction and 25 °C, 9.5 for oxidation, respectively. We found that PDOR was more stable in acid buffer than in alkaline condition, and 60 % of its relative activity still remained after a 2-h incubation at 37 °C. The activity of PDOR can be enhanced in the presence of Mn(2+) or Fe(2+) iron and inhibited by EDTA or PMSF by different degrees. The K m and V max of this dehydrogenase are 1.25 mM, 64.02 μM min(-1) mg(-1) for propionaldehyde and 2.26 mM, 35.05 μM min(-1) mg(-1) for 1,3-PD, respectively. Substrate specificity analysis showed that PDOR has a broad range of substrate specificities. The modeling superposition indicated that the structural differences may account for the diversity of PDORs' properties. Thus, our PDOR is a potential candidate for facilitating the 1,3-PD biosynthesis.

  6. Cloning, characterization and functional expression of Taenia solium 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Aceves-Ramos, A; de la Torre, P; Hinojosa, L; Ponce, A; García-Villegas, R; Laclette, J P; Bobes, R J; Romano, M C

    2014-07-01

    The 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17β-HSD) are key enzymes involved in the formation (reduction) and inactivation (oxidation) of sex steroids. Several types have been found in vertebrates including fish, as well as in invertebrates like Caenorhabditis elegans, Ciona intestinalis and Haliotis diversicolor supertexta. To date limited information is available about this enzyme in parasites. We showed previously that Taenia solium cysticerci are able to synthesize sex steroid hormones in vitro when precursors are provided in the culture medium. Here, we identified a T. solium 17β-HSD through in silico blast searches in the T. solium genome database. This coding sequence was amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into the pcDNA 3.1(+) expression vector. The full length cDNA contains 957bp, corresponding to an open reading frame coding for 319 aa. The highest identity (84%) at the protein level was found with the Echinococcus multilocularis 17β-HSD although significant similarities were also found with other invertebrate and vertebrate 17β-HSD sequences. The T. solium Tsol-17βHSD belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) protein superfamily. HEK293T cells transiently transfected with Tsol17β-HSD induced expression of Tsol17β-HSD that transformed 3H-androstenedione into testosterone. In contrast, 3H-estrone was not significantly transformed into estradiol. In conclusion, T. solium cysticerci express a 17β-HSD that catalyzes the androgen reduction. The enzyme belongs to the short chain dehydrogenases/reductase family and shares motifs and activity with the type 3 enzyme of some other species.

  7. 20 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase expression in a murine virus-induced myeloproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marcovistz, R; Le Bousse-Kerdiles, M C; Maillere, B; Smadja-Joffe, F; Poirrier, V; Jasmin, C

    1991-11-01

    The myeloproliferative sarcoma virus (MPSV) infection in DBA/2 mice leads to important quantitative and qualitative changes in their hemopoiesis. These findings suggest a disturbance in the production and action of a certain hemopoietic factor similar to IL3. Here, we show that the level of the 20 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20 alpha-SDH) expression, which can be induced by IL3, is dramatically increased in spleen and thymus of MPSV-infected mice. Our results suggest that quantification of 20 alpha-SDH activity can be used to indicate abnormal production of a growth factor similar to IL3 in hemopoietic system diseases.

  8. Arabidopsis alcohol dehydrogenase expression in both shoots and roots is conditioned by root growth environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, H. J.; Ferl, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the Arabidopsis Adh (alcohol dehydrogenase) gene is constitutively expressed at low levels in the roots of young plants grown on agar media, and that the expression level is greatly induced by anoxic or hypoxic stresses. We questioned whether the agar medium itself created an anaerobic environment for the roots upon their growing into the gel. beta-Glucuronidase (GUS) expression driven by the Adh promoter was examined by growing transgenic Arabidopsis plants in different growing systems. Whereas roots grown on horizontal-positioned plates showed high Adh/GUS expression levels, roots from vertical-positioned plates had no Adh/GUS expression. Additional results indicate that growth on vertical plates closely mimics the Adh/GUS expression observed for soil-grown seedlings, and that growth on horizontal plates results in induction of high Adh/GUS expression that is consistent with hypoxic or anoxic conditions within the agar of the root zone. Adh/GUS expression in the shoot apex is also highly induced by root penetration of the agar medium. This induction of Adh/GUS in shoot apex and roots is due, at least in part, to mechanisms involving Ca2+ signal transduction.

  9. Expression of Lactate Dehydrogenase in Aspergillus niger for L-Lactic Acid Production.

    PubMed

    Dave, Khyati K; Punekar, Narayan S

    2015-01-01

    Different engineered organisms have been used to produce L-lactate. Poor yields of lactate at low pH and expensive downstream processing remain as bottlenecks. Aspergillus niger is a prolific citrate producer and a remarkably acid tolerant fungus. Neither a functional lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from nor lactate production by A. niger is reported. Its genome was also investigated for the presence of a functional ldh. The endogenous A. niger citrate synthase promoter relevant to A. niger acidogenic metabolism was employed to drive constitutive expression of mouse lactate dehydrogenase (mldhA). An appraisal of different branches of the A. niger pyruvate node guided the choice of mldhA for heterologous expression. A high copy number transformant C12 strain, displaying highest LDH specific activity, was analyzed under different growth conditions. The C12 strain produced 7.7 g/l of extracellular L-lactate from 60 g/l of glucose, in non-neutralizing minimal media. Significantly, lactate and citrate accumulated under two different growth conditions. Already an established acidogenic platform, A. niger now promises to be a valuable host for lactate production.

  10. Genomic organization and expression of the human fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase gene (FALDH)

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, G.R.; Markova, N.G.; Compton, J.G.

    1997-01-15

    Mutations in the fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH) gene cause Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) - a disease characterized by mental retardation, spasticity, and congenital ichthyosis. To facilitate mutation analysis in SLS and to study the pathogenesis of FALDH deficiency, we have determined the structural organization and characterized expression of the FALDH (proposed designation ALDH10) gene. The gene consists of 10 exons spanning about 30.5 kb. A TATA-less promoter is associated with the major transcription initiation site found to be 258 hp upstream of the ATG codon. The G4C-rich sequences surrounding the transcription initiation site encompassed regulatory elements that interacted with proteins in HeLa nuclear extracts and were able to promote transcription in vitro. FALDH is widely expressed as three transcripts of 2, 3.8, and 4.0 kb, which originate from multiple polyadenylation signals in the 3{prime} UTR. An alternatively spliced mRNA was detected that contains an extra exon and encodes an enzyme that is likely to have altered membrane-binding properties. The FALDH gene lies only 50-85 kb from ALDH3, an aldehyde dehydrogenase gene that has homologous sequence and intron/exon structure. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Daily Variations in the Glycerol-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Isoforms Expression in Triatoma infestans Flight Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Stroppa, María M.; Carriazo, Carlota S.; Gerez de Burgos, Nelia M.; Garcia, Beatríz A.

    2014-01-01

    Triatoma infestans, the main vector of Chagas disease, is a blood-sucking insect. Flight dispersal of adults is the most important mechanism for reinfestation of houses after insecticide spraying. Flight muscles have two glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) isoforms: GPDH-1 is involved in flight metabolism and GPDH-2 provides lipid precursors. In this study, we explored the profile of GPDH expression in females and males adult flight muscles under light/dark cycle, constant light, and constant dark conditions. Under constant dark conditions, GPDH-1 flight muscles of T. infestans showed a rhythmic pattern of transcription synchronous with a rhythmic profile of activity suggesting regulation by the endogenous circadian clock. Otherwise, the GPDH-2 expression analysis showed no regulation by the endogenous clock, but showed that an external factor, such as the dark/light period, was necessary for synchronization of GPDH-2 transcription and activity. PMID:24914000

  12. Functional expression of Phanerochaete chrysosporium cellobiose dehydrogenase flavin domain in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Desriani; Ferri, Stefano; Sode, Koji

    2010-06-01

    Cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH; EC 1.1.99.18) is an extracellular glycosylated protein composed of two distinct domains, a C-terminal catalytic flavin domain and an N-terminal cytochrome-b-type heme domain, which transfers electrons from the flavin domain to external electron acceptors. The soluble flavin domain of the Phanerochaete chrysosporium CDH was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme showed dye-mediated CDH activity higher than that of the complete CDH, composed of flavin domain and heme domain, prepared using Pichia pastoris as the host microorganism. The ability to conveniently express the recombinant CDH flavin domain in E. coli provides great opportunities for the molecular engineering of the catalytic properties of CDH.

  13. Enantioselective bioconversion using Escherichia coli cells expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae reductase and Bacillus subtilis glucose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Joo; Jung, Jihye; Choi, Hyejeong; Uhm, Ki-Nam; Kim, Hyung Kwoun

    2010-09-01

    Ethyl (R, S)-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate (ECHB) is a useful chiral building block for the synthesis of L-carnitine and hypercholesterolemia drugs. The yeast reductase, YOL151W (GenBank locus tag), exhibits an enantioselective reduction activity, converting ethyl-4-chlorooxobutanoate (ECOB) exclusively into (R)-ECHB. YOL151W was generated in Escherichia coli cells and purified via Ni- NTA and desalting column chromatography. It evidenced an optimum temperature of 45 degrees C and an optimum pH of 6.5-7.5. Bacillus subtilis glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) was also expressed in Escherichia coli, and was used for the recycling of NADPH, required for the reduction reaction. Thereafter, Escherichia coli cells co-expressing YOL151W and GDH were constructed. After permeablization treatment, the Escherichia coli whole cells were utilized for ECHB synthesis. Through the use of this system, the 30 mM ECOB substrate could be converted to (R)-ECHB.

  14. Gene cloning, expression, and characterization of a novel acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Issatchenkia terricola strain XJ-2.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhengying; Zhang, Chong; Lu, Fengxia; Bie, Xiaomei; Lu, Zhaoxin

    2012-03-01

    Acetaldehyde is a known mutagen and carcinogen. Active aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) represents an important mechanism for acetaldehyde detoxification. A yeast strain XJ-2 isolated from grape samples was found to produce acetaldehyde dehydrogenase with a high activity of 2.28 U/mg and identified as Issatchenkia terricola. The enzyme activity was validated by oxidizing acetaldehyde to acetate with NAD(+) as coenzyme based on the headspace gas chromatography analysis. A novel acetaldehyde dehydrogenase gene (ist-ALD) was cloned by combining SiteFinding-PCR and self-formed adaptor PCR. The ist-ALD gene comprised an open reading frame of 1,578 bp and encoded a protein of 525 amino acids. The predicted protein of ist-ALD showed the highest identity (73%) to ALDH from Pichia angusta. The ist-ALD gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product (ist-ALDH) presented a productivity of 442.3 U/mL cells. The purified ist-ALDH was a homotetramer of 232 kDa consisting of 57 kDa-subunit according to the SDS-PAGE and native PAGE analysis. Ist-ALDH exhibited the optimal activity at pH 9.0 and 40°C, respectively. The activity of ist-ALDH was enhanced by K(+), NH4(+), dithiothreitol, and 2-mercaptoethanol but strongly inhibited by Ag(+), Hg(2+), Cu(2+), and phenylmethyl sulfonylfluoride. In the presence of NAD(+), ist-ALDH could oxidize many aliphatic, aromatic, and heterocyclic aldehydes, preferably acetaldehyde. Kinetic study revealed that ist-ALDH had a k (cat) value of 27.71/s and a k (cat)/K (m) value of 26.80 × 10(3)/(mol s) on acetaldehyde, demonstrating ist-ALDH, a catalytically active enzyme by comparing with other ALDHs. These studies indicated that ist-ALDH was a potential enzymatic product for acetaldehyde detoxification.

  15. Cloning, expression, functional validation and modeling of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase isolated from xylem of Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Brijesh; Pandey, Veda Prakash; Dwivedi, Upendra Nath

    2011-10-01

    A cDNA encoding cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), catalyzing conversion of cinnamyl aldehydes to corresponding cinnamyl alcohols, was cloned from secondary xylem of Leucaena leucocephala. The cloned cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS cells. Temperature and Zn(2+) ion played crucial role in expression and activity of enzyme, such that, at 18°C and at 2 mM Zn(2+) the CAD was maximally expressed as active enzyme in soluble fraction. The expressed protein was purified 14.78-folds to homogeneity on Ni-NTA agarose column with specific activity of 346 nkat/mg protein. The purified enzyme exhibited lowest Km with cinnamyl alcohol (12.2 μM) followed by coniferyl (18.1 μM) and sinapyl alcohol (23.8 μM). Enzyme exhibited high substrate inhibition with cinnamyl (beyond 20 μM) and coniferyl (beyond 100 μM) alcohols. The in silico analysis of CAD protein exhibited four characteristic consensus sequences, GHEXXGXXXXXGXXV; C(100), C(103), C(106), C(114); GXGXXG and C(47), S(49), H(69), L(95), C(163), I(300) involved in catalytic Zn(2+) binding, structural Zn(2+) binding, NADP(+) binding and substrate binding, respectively. Tertiary structure, generated using Modeller 9v5, exhibited a trilobed structure with bulged out structural Zn(2+) binding domain. The catalytic Zn(2+) binding, substrate binding and NADP(+) binding domains formed a pocket protected by two major lobes. The enzyme catalysis, sequence homology and 3-D model, all supported that the cloned CAD belongs to alcohol dehydrogenase family of plants.

  16. Expression of a gene encoding mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase in rice increases under submerged conditions.

    PubMed

    Nakazono, M; Tsuji, H; Li, Y; Saisho, D; Arimura, S; Tsutsumi, N; Hirai, A

    2000-10-01

    It is known that alcoholic fermentation is important for survival of plants under anaerobic conditions. Acetaldehyde, one of the intermediates of alcoholic fermentation, is not only reduced by alcohol dehydrogenase but also can be oxidized by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). To determine whether ALDH plays a role in anaerobic metabolism in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Nipponbare), we characterized a cDNA clone encoding mitochondrial ALDH from rice (Aldh2a). Analysis of sub-cellular localization of ALDH2a protein using green fluorescent protein and an in vitro ALDH assay using protein extracts from Escherichia coli cells that overexpressed ALDH2a indicated that ALDH2a functions in the oxidation of acetaldehyde in mitochondria. A Southern-blot analysis indicated that mitochondrial ALDH is encoded by at least two genes in rice. We found that the Aldh2a mRNA was present at high levels in leaves of dark-grown seedlings, mature leaf sheaths, and panicles. It is interesting that expression of the rice Aldh2a gene, unlike the expression of the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Aldh2a gene, was induced in rice seedlings by submergence. Experiments with ruthenium red, which is a blocker of Ca(2+) fluxes in rice as well as maize (Zea mays), suggest that the induction of expression of Adh1 and Pdc1 by low oxygen stress is regulated by elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) level. However, the induction of Aldh2a gene expression may not be controlled by the cytosolic Ca(2+) level elevation. A possible involvement of ALDH2a in the submergence tolerance of rice is discussed.

  17. Expression, purification and crystallization of Trypanosoma cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase complexed with orotate

    SciTech Connect

    Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Takashima, Eizo; Osanai, Arihiro; Shimizu, Hironari; Nara, Takeshi; Aoki, Takashi; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2005-10-01

    The Trypanosoma cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme in pyrimidine de novo biosynthesis and redox homeostasis, was crystallized in complex with its first reaction product, orotate. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHOD) catalyzes the oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate, the fourth step and the only redox reaction in the de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidine. DHOD from Trypanosoma cruzi (TcDHOD) has been expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Crystals of the TcDHOD–orotate complex were grown at 277 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique using polyethylene glycol 3350 as a precipitant. The crystals diffract to better than 1.8 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation (λ = 0.900 Å). X-ray diffraction data were collected at 100 K and processed to 1.9 Å resolution with 98.2% completeness and an overall R{sub merge} of 7.8%. The TcDHOD crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 67.87, b = 71.89, c = 123.27 Å. The presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit (2 × 34 kDa) gives a crystal volume per protein weight (V{sub M}) of 2.2 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 44%.

  18. Testis-specific lactate dehydrogenase is expressed in somatic tissues of plateau pikas☆

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Duowei; Wei, Lian; Wei, Dengbang; Rao, Xinfeng; Qi, Xinzhang; Wang, Xiaojun; Ma, Benyuan

    2013-01-01

    LDH-C4 is a lactate dehydrogenase that catalyzes the interconversion of pyruvate with lactate. In mammals the, Ldh-c gene was originally thought to be expressed only in testis and spermatozoa. Plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae), belonging to the genus Ochotona of the Ochotonidea family, is a hypoxia tolerant mammal living at 3000–5000 m above sea levelon the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. We found that the expression pattern of six LDH isoenzymes in the somatic tissues of female and male plateau pikas to be the same as those in testis and sperm, suggesting that LDH-C4 was expressed in somatic tissues of plateau pika. Here we report the detection of LDHC in the somatic tissues of plateau pika using RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Our results indicate that Ldh-c mRNA is transcribed in the heart, liver, lung, kidney, brain, skeletal muscle and testis. In somatic tissues LDHC was translated in the cytoplasm, while in testis it was expressed in both cytoplasm and mitochondria. The third band from cathode to anode in LDH isoenzymes was identified as LDH-C4. The finding that Ldh-c is expressed in both somatic tissues and testis of plateau pika provides important implications for more in-depth research into the Ldh-c function in mammals. PMID:23772382

  19. Roles of histamine on the expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 in endometrioid adenocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Jiang, Yang; Ikeda, Jun-Ichiro; Tian, Tian; Sato, Atsushi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Morii, Eiichi

    2014-10-01

    Cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are a limited number of cells that are essential for maintenance, recurrence, and metastasis of tumors. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) has been recognized as a marker of CICs. We previously reported that ALDH1-high cases of uterine endometrioid adenocarcinoma showed poor prognosis, and that ALDH1 high population was more tumorigenic, invasive, and resistant to apoptosis than ALDH1 low population. Histamine plays a critical role in cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Here, we examined the effect of histamine on ALDH1 expression in endometrioid adenocarcinoma cell line. The addition of histamine increased ALDH1 high population, which was consistent with the result that histamine enhanced the invasive ability and the resistance to anticancer drug. Among 4 types of histamine receptors, histamine H1 and H2 receptor (H1R and H2R) were expressed in endometrioid adenocarcinoma cell line. The addition of H1R agonist but not H2R agonist increased ALDH1. The antagonist H1R but not H2R inhibited the effect of histamine on ALDH1 expression. These results indicated that histamine increased the expression of ALDH1 via H1R but not H2R. These findings may provide the evidence for exploring a new strategy to suppress CICs by inhibiting ALDH1 expression with histamine.

  20. Potato tuber cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase genes: biochemical properties, activity, and expression during tuber dormancy progression.

    PubMed

    Suttle, Jeffrey C; Huckle, Linda L; Lu, Shunwen; Knauber, Donna C

    2014-03-15

    The enzymatic and biochemical properties of the proteins encoded by five potato cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CKX)-like genes functionally expressed in yeast and the effects of tuber dormancy progression on StCKX expression and cytokinin metabolism were examined in lateral buds isolated from field-grown tubers. All five putative StCKX genes encoded proteins with in vitro CKX activity. All five enzymes were maximally active at neutral to slightly alkaline pH with 2,6-dichloro-indophenol as the electron acceptor. In silico analyses indicated that four proteins were likely secreted. Substrate dependence of two of the most active enzymes varied; one exhibiting greater activity with isopentenyl-type cytokinins while the other was maximally active with cis-zeatin as a substrate. [(3)H]-isopentenyl-adenosine was readily metabolized by excised tuber buds to adenine/adenosine demonstrating that CKX was active in planta. There was no change in apparent in planta CKX activity during either natural or chemically forced dormancy progression. Similarly although expression of individual StCKX genes varied modestly during tuber dormancy, there was no clear correlation between StCKX gene expression and tuber dormancy status. Thus although CKX gene expression and enzyme activity are present in potato tuber buds throughout dormancy, they do not appear to play a significant role in the regulation of cytokinin content during tuber dormancy progression.

  1. Cerium Regulates Expression of Alternative Methanol Dehydrogenases in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b

    PubMed Central

    Farhan Ul Haque, Muhammad; Kalidass, Bhagyalakshmi; Bandow, Nathan; Turpin, Erick A.; DiSpirito, Alan A.

    2015-01-01

    Methanotrophs have multiple methane monooxygenases that are well known to be regulated by copper, i.e., a “copper switch.” At low copper/biomass ratios the soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) is expressed while expression and activity of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) increases with increasing availability of copper. In many methanotrophs there are also multiple methanol dehydrogenases (MeDHs), one based on Mxa and another based on Xox. Mxa-MeDH is known to have calcium in its active site, while Xox-MeDHs have been shown to have rare earth elements in their active site. We show here that the expression levels of Mxa-MeDH and Xox-MeDH in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b significantly decreased and increased, respectively, when grown in the presence of cerium but the absence of copper compared to the absence of both metals. Expression of sMMO and pMMO was not affected. In the presence of copper, the effect of cerium on gene expression was less significant, i.e., expression of Mxa-MeDH in the presence of copper and cerium was slightly lower than in the presence of copper alone, but Xox-MeDH was again found to increase significantly. As expected, the addition of copper caused sMMO and pMMO expression levels to significantly decrease and increase, respectively, but the simultaneous addition of cerium had no discernible effect on MMO expression. As a result, it appears Mxa-MeDH can be uncoupled from methane oxidation by sMMO in M. trichosporium OB3b but not from pMMO. PMID:26296730

  2. Cerium regulates expression of alternative methanol dehydrogenases in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    PubMed

    Farhan Ul Haque, Muhammad; Kalidass, Bhagyalakshmi; Bandow, Nathan; Turpin, Erick A; DiSpirito, Alan A; Semrau, Jeremy D

    2015-11-01

    Methanotrophs have multiple methane monooxygenases that are well known to be regulated by copper, i.e., a "copper switch." At low copper/biomass ratios the soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) is expressed while expression and activity of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) increases with increasing availability of copper. In many methanotrophs there are also multiple methanol dehydrogenases (MeDHs), one based on Mxa and another based on Xox. Mxa-MeDH is known to have calcium in its active site, while Xox-MeDHs have been shown to have rare earth elements in their active site. We show here that the expression levels of Mxa-MeDH and Xox-MeDH in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b significantly decreased and increased, respectively, when grown in the presence of cerium but the absence of copper compared to the absence of both metals. Expression of sMMO and pMMO was not affected. In the presence of copper, the effect of cerium on gene expression was less significant, i.e., expression of Mxa-MeDH in the presence of copper and cerium was slightly lower than in the presence of copper alone, but Xox-MeDH was again found to increase significantly. As expected, the addition of copper caused sMMO and pMMO expression levels to significantly decrease and increase, respectively, but the simultaneous addition of cerium had no discernible effect on MMO expression. As a result, it appears Mxa-MeDH can be uncoupled from methane oxidation by sMMO in M. trichosporium OB3b but not from pMMO.

  3. In vitro expression of Candida albicans alcohol dehydrogenase genes involved in acetaldehyde metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bakri, M M; Rich, A M; Cannon, R D; Holmes, A R

    2015-02-01

    Alcohol consumption is a risk factor for oral cancer, possibly via its conversion to acetaldehyde, a known carcinogen. The oral commensal yeast Candida albicans may be one of the agents responsible for this conversion intra-orally. The alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) family of enzymes are involved in acetaldehyde metabolism in yeast but, for C. albicans it is not known which family member is responsible for the conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde. In this study we determined the expression of mRNAs from three C. albicans Adh genes (CaADH1, CaADH2 and CaCDH3) for cells grown in different culture media at different growth phases by Northern blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. CaADH1 was constitutively expressed under all growth conditions but there was differential expression of CaADH2. CaADH3 expression was not detected. To investigate whether CaAdh1p or CaAdh2p can contribute to alcohol catabolism in C. albicans, each gene from the reference strain C. albicans SC5314 was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cell extracts from an CaAdh1p-expressing S. cerevisiae recombinant, but not an CaAdh2p-expressing recombinant, or an empty vector control strain, possessed ethanol-utilizing Adh activity above endogenous S. cerevisiae activity. Furthermore, expression of C. albicans Adh1p in a recombinant S. cerevisiae strain in which the endogenous ScADH2 gene (known to convert ethanol to acetaldehyde in this yeast) had been deleted, conferred an NAD-dependent ethanol-utilizing, and so acetaldehyde-producing, Adh activity. We conclude that CaAdh1p is the enzyme responsible for ethanol use under in vitro growth conditions, and may contribute to the intra-oral production of acetaldehyde.

  4. LDHk, an unusual oxygen-sensitive lactate dehydrogenase expressed in human cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, G R; Kovacik, W P

    1981-01-01

    An unusual isozyme of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; L-lactate:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.27), LDHk, has been described in cells transformed by the Kirsten murine sarcoma virus (KiMSV). This isozyme appears to contain one or more subunits encoded by the transforming gene of KiMSV and is readily distinguished from other isozymes of LDH. Specifically, it is more basic than other LDH isozymes, has an apparent subunit structure of (35,000)4(22,000)1, is essentially inactive if assayed under a normal atmosphere, and is strongly inhibited by GTP and various related compounds. We have examined human cancer and normal tissue controls for expression of an activity like LDHk. In 11 out of 16 human carcinomas, LDHk activity was increased 10- to 500-fold over the level seen in adjoining nontumor tissue. In contrast, other LDH isozymes were increased by only 2- to 5-fold. Images PMID:6942426

  5. Experimental cancer therapy using restoration of NAD+ -linked 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase expression.

    PubMed

    Kaliberova, Lyudmila N; Kusmartsev, Sergei A; Krendelchtchikova, Valentina; Stockard, Cecil R; Grizzle, William E; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Kaliberov, Sergey A

    2009-11-01

    Preclinical and clinical evidence shows that cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2)-mediated prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) overexpression plays an important role in tumor growth, metastasis, and immunosuppression. It has been shown that expression of NAD(+)-linked 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), a key enzyme responsible for PGE(2) inactivation, is suppressed in the majority of cancers, including breast and colon carcinoma. We have developed adenoviral vectors (Ad) encoding the 15-PGDH gene under control of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1/flt-1; Adflt-PGDH) and the Cox-2 (Adcox-PGDH) promoters. The purpose of this study was to investigate cytotoxicity in vitro and therapeutic efficacy in vivo of 15-PGDH-mediated cancer therapy. The levels of PGE(2) and VEGF expression were correlated with PGE(2) receptor and Cox-2 and flt-1 expression in cancer cells. The in vitro study showed that Ad-mediated 15-PGDH expression significantly decreased proliferation and migration of cancer cells. Animal breast and colon tumor therapy studies showed that 15-PGDH gene therapy produced a significant delay in 2LMP and LS174T tumor growth. Combined therapy using 15-PGDH and anti-VEGF antibody (bevacizumab) significantly increased inhibition of growth of LS174T tumor xenografts in comparison with agents alone. These results suggest that 15-PGDH-mediated regulation of PGE(2) catabolism in the tumor microenvironment represents a novel approach for therapy of human breast and colon cancer.

  6. Characterization of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase isoenzyme expression in benign and malignant human prostate.

    PubMed

    Elo, J P; Akinola, L A; Poutanen, M; Vihko, P; Kyllönen, A P; Lukkarinen, O; Vihko, R

    1996-03-28

    In the present study, expressions of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) types 1, 2, and 3, 5alpha-reductase type 2 and human androgen receptor mRNAs were determined in 12 benign prostatic hyperplasia and 17 prostatic carcinoma specimens. 17HSD type 2 was found to be the principle isoenzyme expressed in the prostate. Significantly higher expressions of 17HSD type 2 and 5alpha-reductase type 2 were detected in benign prostatic hyperplasia compared with the carcinoma specimens. Expression of the androgen receptor in the 2 groups was not significantly different. 17HSD type 3 mRNA was not detected in any of the specimens investigated. Only low constructive expression of the 2.3 kb mRNA of 17HSD type 1 was seen. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that this did not lead to significant enzyme expression, only faint staining for the enzyme protein being detected, mainly in uroepithelial cells. No significant correlation was found between any of the mRNAs analysed, but the data on 5alpha-reductase type 2 mRNA support the presence of an increased proportion of 5alpha-dihydrotesterone in the hyperplastic prostate. In cultured PC-3 prostatic cancer cells and in the transiently transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells, 17HSD type 2 was found exclusively to convert 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone and testosterone into the less potent 17-keto compounds 5alpha-androstanedione and 4-androstenedione, respectively. We suggest that the 17HSD type 2 isoenzyme plays a part in the metabolic pathway, resulting in the inactivation of testosterone and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone locally in the prostate. The enzyme expressed in the prostate could, therefore, protect cells from excessive androgen action.

  7. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 3A1 expression by the human keratocyte and its repair phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Pei, Ying; Reins, Rose Y; McDermott, Alison M

    2006-11-01

    Transparency is essential for normal corneal function. Recent studies suggest that corneal cells express high levels of so-called corneal crystallins, such as aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and transketolase (TKT) that contribute to maintaining cellular transparency. Stromal injury leads to the appearance of repair phenotype keratocytes, the corneal fibroblast and myofibroblast. Previous studies on keratocytes from species such as bovine and rabbit indicate that the transformation from the normal to repair phenotype is accompanied by a loss of corneal crystallin expression, which may be associated with loss of cellular transparency. Here we investigated if a similar loss occurs with human keratocyte repair phenotypes. Human corneal epithelial cells were collected by scraping and keratocytes were isolated by collagenase digestion from cadaveric corneas. The cells were either processed immediately (freshly isolated keratocytes) or were cultured in the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum or transforming growth factor-beta to induce transformation to the corneal fibroblast and myofibroblast phenotypes, respectively. RT-PCR, western blotting and immunolabeling were used to detect mRNA and protein expression of ALDH isozymes and TKT. ALDH enzyme activity was also quantitated and immunolabeling was performed to determine the expression of ALDH3A1 in human corneal tissue sections from normal and diseased corneas. Human corneal keratocytes isolated from three donors expressed ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 mRNA, and one donor also expressed ALDH2 and TKT. Corneal epithelial cells expressed ALDH1A1, ALDH2, ALDH3A1 and TKT. Compared to normal keratocytes, corneal fibroblast expression of ALDH3A1 mRNA was reduced by 27% (n=5). ALDH3A1 protein expression as detected by western blotting was markedly reduced in passage zero fibroblasts and undetectable in higher passages (n=3). TKT protein expression was reduced in fibroblasts compared to keratocytes (n=2). ALDH3A1 enzyme activity was not

  8. Decreased expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase A1 predicts an unfavorable prognosis in ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaqing; Huang, Ruixia; Li, Xiaoli; Li, Xiaoran; Yu, Dandan; Zhang, Mingzhi; Wen, Jianguo; Goscinski, Mariusz Adam; Trope, Claes G; Nesland, Jahn M; Suo, Zhenhe

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase A1 (PDHA1) serves as a gate-keeper enzyme link between glycolysis and the mitochondrial citric acid cycle. The inhibition of PDHA1 in cancer cells can result in an increased Warburg effect and a more aggressive phenotype in cancer cells. This study was conducted to investigate the expression of PDHA1 in ovarian cancer and the correlation between PDHA1 expression and the prognosis of patients. The PDHA1 protein expression in 3 ovarian cancer cell lines (OVCAR-3, SKOV-3 and ES-2) and 248 surgically removed ovarian carcinoma samples was immunocytochemically examined. Statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the correlations between PDHA1 expression and the clinicopathological characteristics of the patients as well as the predictive value of PDHA1. The results showed the presence of variable expression of PDHA1 in the three ovarian cancer cell lines. Of the 248 ovarian cancer tissue specimens, 45 cases (18.1%) were negative in tumor cells for PDHA1, 162 cases (65.3%) displayed a low expression level, and 41 cases (16.5%) had a relatively high PDHA1 staining. The expression of PDHA1 was associated with the histological subtype (P=0.004) and FIGO stage (P=0.002). The median OS time in the PDHA1 negative group, low expression group and high expression group were 0.939 years, 1.443 years and 9.900 years, respectively. The median PFS time in the above three groups were 0.287 years, 0.586 years and 9.900 years, respectively. Furthermore, the high expression of PDHA1 in ovarian carcinoma cells was significantly associated with better OS and PFS by statistical analyses. Multivariate analyses showed that PDHA1 expression was also an independent prognostic factor for higher OS in ovarian cancer patients (HR=0.705, 95% CI 0.541-0.918, P=0.01). Our study indicated that the decreased expression of PDHA1 might be an independent prognostic factor in unfavorable outcomes. PMID:27725912

  9. Gene expression of type 2 17 beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in scalp hairs of hirsute women.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Isabel O; Lhullier, Cintia; Brum, Ilma S; Spritzer, Poli Mara

    2003-09-01

    Androgens are the main hormonal regulators of human hair growth and they are related to clinical conditions such as hirsutism. The aim of this study was to analyze the gene expression of androgen receptor (AR) and type 2 17 beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17 beta-HSD) in keratinocytes of plucked scalp hairs from hirsute patients and normal subjects. We studied 58 women with hirsutism (31 with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), 27 with idiopathic hirsutism (IH)); 15 control women; and 10 control men. Hirsutism was assessed by a modified Ferriman-Gallwey method. Hormonal status was assessed between days 2 and 10 of the menstrual cycle or on any day when the patients were amenorrheic. AR and type 2 17 beta-HSD mRNA levels were estimated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). AR expression was similar in all groups. Type 2 17 beta-HSD gene expression in untreated hirsute patients was lower (2.1+/-0.10) than in normal women (3.1+/-0.17), and similar to men (1.8+/-0.22). Comparing hirsute patients, type 2 17 beta-HSD expression was higher in treated PCOS (3.0+/-0.34 versus 2.2+/-0.13) and IH patients (2.5+/-0.19 versus 2.0+/-0.15); hirsutism score was lower (P=0.003, PCOS; P=0.003, IH); and SHBG levels were higher (P=0.001, PCOS; P=0.024, IH) in treated patients. The free androgen index was lower in treated women (P=0.024 for the IH group). In conclusion, the lower expression of type 2 17 beta-HSD mRNA in scalp hairs of untreated hirsute patients suggests androgen metabolism disturbances with predominance of more potent androgens, as occurs in men. The enzyme's higher gene expression in treated hirsute patients could be an indirect evidence of restored enzyme activity and intracellular androgen metabolism.

  10. The Alcohol Dehydrogenase Gene Family in Melon (Cucumis melo L.): Bioinformatic Analysis and Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yazhong; Zhang, Chong; Liu, Wei; Tang, Yufan; Qi, Hongyan; Chen, Hao; Cao, Songxiao

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH), encoded by multigene family in plants, play a critical role in plant growth, development, adaptation, fruit ripening and aroma production. Thirteen ADH genes were identified in melon genome, including 12 ADHs and one formaldehyde dehydrogenease (FDH), designated CmADH1-12 and CmFDH1, in which CmADH1 and CmADH2 have been isolated in Cantaloupe. ADH genes shared a lower identity with each other at the protein level and had different intron-exon structure at nucleotide level. No typical signal peptides were found in all CmADHs, and CmADH proteins might locate in the cytoplasm. The phylogenetic tree revealed that 13 ADH genes were divided into three groups respectively, namely long-, medium-, and short-chain ADH subfamily, and CmADH1,3-11, which belongs to the medium-chain ADH subfamily, fell into six medium-chain ADH subgroups. CmADH12 may belong to the long-chain ADH subfamily, while CmFDH1 may be a Class III ADH and serve as an ancestral ADH in melon. Expression profiling revealed that CmADH1, CmADH2, CmADH10 and CmFDH1 were moderately or strongly expressed in different vegetative tissues and fruit at medium and late developmental stages, while CmADH8 and CmADH12 were highly expressed in fruit after 20 days. CmADH3 showed preferential expression in young tissues. CmADH4 only had slight expression in root. Promoter analysis revealed several motifs of CmADH genes involved in the gene expression modulated by various hormones, and the response pattern of CmADH genes to ABA, IAA and ethylene were different. These CmADHs were divided into ethylene-sensitive and –insensitive groups, and the functions of CmADHs were discussed. PMID:27242871

  11. Regulation of IMP dehydrogenase gene expression by its end products, guanine nucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Glesne, D A; Collart, F R; Huberman, E

    1991-01-01

    To study the regulation of IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH), the rate-limiting enzyme of guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, we examined the effects of nucleosides, nucleotides, nucleotide analogs, or the IMPDH inhibitor mycophenolic acid (MPA) on the steady-state levels of IMPDH mRNA. The results indicated that IMPDH gene expression is regulated inversely by the intracellular level of guanine ribonucleotides. We have shown that treatment with guanosine increased the level of cellular guanine ribonucleotides and subsequently reduced IMPDH steady-state mRNA levels in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Conversely, MPA treatment diminished the level of guanine ribonucleotides and increased IMPDH mRNA levels. Both of these effects on the steady-state level of IMPDH mRNA could be negated by cotreatment with guanosine and MPA. The down regulation of IMPDH gene expression by guanosine or its up regulation by MPA was not due to major changes in transcriptional initiation and elongation or mRNA stability in the cytoplasm but rather was due to alterations in the levels of the IMPDH mRNA in the nucleus. These results suggest that IMPDH gene expression is regulated by a posttranscriptional, nuclear event in response to fluctuations in the intracellular level of guanine ribonucleotides. Images PMID:1717828

  12. Testis-specific expression of a functional retroposon encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Hendriksen, P.J.M. |; Hoogerbrugge, J.W.; Baarends, W.M.

    1997-05-01

    The X-chromosomal gene glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6pd) is known to be expressed in most cell types of mammalian species. In the mouse, we have detected a novel gene, designated G6pd-2, encoding a G6PD isoenzyme. G6pd-2 does not contain introns and appears to represent a retroposed gene. This gene is uniquely transcribed in postmeiotic spermatogenic cells in which the X-encoded G6pd gene is not transcribed. Expression of the G6pd-2 sequence in a bacterial system showed that the encoded product is an active enzyme. Zymogramic analysis demonstrated that recombinant G6PD-2, but not recombinant G6PD-1 (the X-chromosome-encoded G6PD), formed tetramers under reducing conditions. Under the same conditions, G6PD tetramers were also found in extracts of spermatids and spermatozoa, indicating the presence of G6pd-2-encoded isoenzyme in these cell types. G6pd-2 is one of the very few known expressed retroposons encoding a functional protein, and the presence of this gene is probably related to X chromosome inactivation during spermatogenesis. 62 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Cellular prion protein directly interacts with and enhances lactate dehydrogenase expression under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ramljak, Sanja; Schmitz, Matthias; Zafar, Saima; Wrede, Arne; Schenkel, Sara; Asif, Abdul R; Carimalo, Julie; Doeppner, Thorsten R; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Weise, Jens; Zerr, Inga

    2015-09-01

    Although a physiological function of the cellular prion protein (PrP(c)) is still not fully clarified, a PrP(c)-mediated neuroprotection against hypoxic/ischemic insult is intriguing. After ischemic stroke prion protein knockout mice (Prnp(0/0)) display significantly greater lesions as compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Earlier reports suggested an interaction between the glycolytic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and PrP(c). Since hypoxic environment enhances LDH expression levels and compels neurons to rely on lactate as an additional oxidative substrate for energy metabolism, we examined possible differences in LDH protein expression in WT and Prnp(0/0) knockout models under normoxic/hypoxic conditions in vitro and in vivo, as well as in a HEK293 cell line. While no differences are observed under normoxic conditions, LDH expression is markedly increased after 60-min and 90-min of hypoxia in WT vs. Prnp(0/0) primary cortical neurons with concurrent less hypoxia-induced damage in the former group. Likewise, cerebral ischemia significantly increases LDH levels in WT vs. Prnp(0/0) mice with accompanying smaller lesions in the WT group. HEK293 cells overexpressing PrP(c) show significantly higher LDH expression/activity following 90-min of hypoxia as compared to control cells. Moreover, a cytoplasmic co-localization of LDH and PrP(c) was recorded under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Interestingly, an expression of monocarboxylate transporter 1, responsible for cellular lactate uptake, increases with PrP(c)-overexpression under normoxic conditions. Our data suggest LDH as a direct PrP(c) interactor with possible physiological relevance under low oxygen conditions.

  14. Characterization of Cardiac-Resident Progenitor Cells Expressing High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Roehrich, Marc-Estienne; Spicher, Albert; Milano, Giuseppina; Vassalli, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    High aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity has been associated with stem and progenitor cells in various tissues. Human cord blood and bone marrow ALDH-bright (ALDHbr) cells have displayed angiogenic activity in preclinical studies and have been shown to be safe in clinical trials in patients with ischemic cardiovascular disease. The presence of ALDHbr cells in the heart has not been evaluated so far. We have characterized ALDHbr cells isolated from mouse hearts. One percent of nonmyocytic cells from neonatal and adult hearts were ALDHbr. ALDHvery-br cells were more frequent in neonatal hearts than adult. ALDHbr cells were more frequent in atria than ventricles. Expression of ALDH1A1 isozyme transcripts was highest in ALDHvery-br cells, intermediate in ALDHbr cells, and lowest in ALDHdim cells. ALDH1A2 expression was highest in ALDHvery-br cells, intermediate in ALDHdim cells, and lowest in ALDHbr cells. ALDH1A3 and ALDH2 expression was detectable in ALDHvery-br and ALDHbr cells, unlike ALDHdim cells, albeit at lower levels compared with ALDH1A1 and ALDH1A2. Freshly isolated ALDHbr cells were enriched for cells expressing stem cell antigen-1, CD34, CD90, CD44, and CD106. ALDHbr cells, unlike ALDHdim cells, could be grown in culture for more than 40 passages. They expressed sarcomeric α-actinin and could be differentiated along multiple mesenchymal lineages. However, the proportion of ALDHbr cells declined with cell passage. In conclusion, the cardiac-derived ALDHbr population is enriched for progenitor cells that exhibit mesenchymal progenitor-like characteristics and can be expanded in culture. The regenerative potential of cardiac-derived ALDHbr cells remains to be evaluated. PMID:23484127

  15. Organ-specific expression of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) subunits in yellow lupine.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Teresa; Dabert, Mirosława; Nowak, Witold

    2011-07-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, EC 1.4.2-4) is present in yellow lupine (Lupinus luteus cv. Juno) in many isoforms. The number and banding pattern of isoenzymes varies with respect to plant organ and developmental stage. To better understand the complex nature of GDH regulation in plants, the levels of GDH transcripts, enzyme activity and isoenzyme patterns in germinating seeds and roots of yellow lupine were examined. The analysis of GDH cDNA sequences in lupine revealed three mRNA types, of which two encoded the β-GDH subunit and one encoded the α-GDH subunit (corresponding to the GDH1(GDH3) and GDH2 genes, respectively). The relative expression of GDH1 and GDH2 genes was analyzed in various lupine organs by using quantitative real-time PCR. Our results indicate that different mRNA types were differently regulated depending on organ type. Although both genes appeared to be ubiquitously expressed in all lupine tissues, the GDH1 transcripts evidently predominated over those of GDH2. Immunochemical analyses confirmed that, during embryo development, varied expression of two GDH subunits takes place. The α-GDH subunit (43kDa) predominated in the early stages of germinating seeds, while the β-GDH subunit (44kDa) was the only GDH polypeptide present in lupine roots. These results firmly support the hypothesis that isoenzyme variability of GDH in yellow lupine is associated with the varied expression of α and β subunits into the complexes of hexameric GDH forms. The presence of several isogenes of GDH in yellow lupine may explain the high number (over 20) of its molecular forms in germinating lupine.

  16. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng-Xia; Zang, Jian-Lei; Wang, Tan; Xie, Yu-Li; Zhang, Jin; Hu, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) constitute a superfamily of NAD(P)+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants.

  17. Cloning and mRNA Expression of NADH Dehydrogenase during Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus Development and Pesticide Response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NADH dehydrogenase, the largest of the respiratory complexes, is the first enzyme of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have cloned and sequenced cDNA of NADH dehydrogenase gene from Ochlerotatus (Ochlerotatus) taeniorhynchus (Wiedemann) adult (GeneBank Accession number: FJ458415). The ...

  18. The cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase gene family in melon (Cucumis melo L.): bioinformatic analysis and expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yazhong; Zhang, Chong; Liu, Wei; Qi, Hongyan; Chen, Hao; Cao, Songxiao

    2014-01-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) is a key enzyme in lignin biosynthesis. However, little was known about CADs in melon. Five CAD-like genes were identified in the genome of melons, namely CmCAD1 to CmCAD5. The signal peptides analysis and CAD proteins prediction showed no typical signal peptides were found in all CmCADs and CmCAD proteins may locate in the cytoplasm. Multiple alignments implied that some motifs may be responsible for the high specificity of these CAD proteins, and may be one of the key residues in the catalytic mechanism. The phylogenetic tree revealed seven groups of CAD and melon CAD genes fell into four main groups. CmCAD1 and CmCAD2 belonged to the bona fide CAD group, in which these CAD genes, as representative from angiosperms, were involved in lignin synthesis. Other CmCADs were distributed in group II, V and VII, respectively. Semi-quantitative PCR and real time qPCR revealed differential expression of CmCADs, and CmCAD5 was expressed in different vegetative tissues except mature leaves, with the highest expression in flower, while CmCAD2 and CmCAD5 were strongly expressed in flesh during development. Promoter analysis revealed several motifs of CAD genes involved in the gene expression modulated by various hormones. Treatment of abscisic acid (ABA) elevated the expression of CmCADs in flesh, whereas the transcript levels of CmCAD1 and CmCAD5 were induced by auxin (IAA); Ethylene induced the expression of CmCADs, while 1-MCP repressed the effect, apart from CmCAD4. Taken together, these data suggested that CmCAD4 may be a pseudogene and that all other CmCADs may be involved in the lignin biosynthesis induced by both abiotic and biotic stresses and in tissue-specific developmental lignification through a CAD genes family network, and CmCAD2 may be the main CAD enzymes for lignification of melon flesh and CmCAD5 may also function in flower development.

  19. The Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase Gene Family in Melon (Cucumis melo L.): Bioinformatic Analysis and Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yazhong; Zhang, Chong; Liu, Wei; Qi, Hongyan; Chen, Hao; Cao, Songxiao

    2014-01-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) is a key enzyme in lignin biosynthesis. However, little was known about CADs in melon. Five CAD-like genes were identified in the genome of melons, namely CmCAD1 to CmCAD5. The signal peptides analysis and CAD proteins prediction showed no typical signal peptides were found in all CmCADs and CmCAD proteins may locate in the cytoplasm. Multiple alignments implied that some motifs may be responsible for the high specificity of these CAD proteins, and may be one of the key residues in the catalytic mechanism. The phylogenetic tree revealed seven groups of CAD and melon CAD genes fell into four main groups. CmCAD1 and CmCAD2 belonged to the bona fide CAD group, in which these CAD genes, as representative from angiosperms, were involved in lignin synthesis. Other CmCADs were distributed in group II, V and VII, respectively. Semi-quantitative PCR and real time qPCR revealed differential expression of CmCADs, and CmCAD5 was expressed in different vegetative tissues except mature leaves, with the highest expression in flower, while CmCAD2 and CmCAD5 were strongly expressed in flesh during development. Promoter analysis revealed several motifs of CAD genes involved in the gene expression modulated by various hormones. Treatment of abscisic acid (ABA) elevated the expression of CmCADs in flesh, whereas the transcript levels of CmCAD1 and CmCAD5 were induced by auxin (IAA); Ethylene induced the expression of CmCADs, while 1-MCP repressed the effect, apart from CmCAD4. Taken together, these data suggested that CmCAD4 may be a pseudogene and that all other CmCADs may be involved in the lignin biosynthesis induced by both abiotic and biotic stresses and in tissue-specific developmental lignification through a CAD genes family network, and CmCAD2 may be the main CAD enzymes for lignification of melon flesh and CmCAD5 may also function in flower development. PMID:25019207

  20. Human GLUD2 glutamate dehydrogenase is expressed in neural and testicular supporting cells.

    PubMed

    Spanaki, Cleanthe; Zaganas, Ioannis; Kleopa, Kleopas A; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2010-05-28

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is an allosterically regulated enzyme that is expressed widely. Its activity is potently inhibited by GTP and thought to be controlled by the need of the cell for ATP. In addition to this housekeeping human (h) GDH1, humans have acquired (via a duplication event) a highly homologous isoenzyme (hGDH2) that is resistant to GTP. Although transcripts of GLUD2, the gene encoding hGDH2, have been detected in human neural and testicular tissues, data on the endogenous protein are lacking. Here, we developed an antibody specific for hGDH2 and used it to study human tissues. Western blot analyses revealed, to our surprise, that endogenous hGDH2 is more densely expressed in testis than in brain. At the subcellular level, hGDH2 localized to mitochondria. Study of testicular tissue using immunocytochemical and immunofluorescence methods revealed that the Sertoli cells were strongly labeled by our anti-hGDH2 antibody. In human cerebral cortex, a robust labeling of astrocytes was detected, with neurons showing faint hGDH2 immunoreactivity. Astrocytes and Sertoli cells are known to support neurons and germ cells, respectively, providing them with lactate that largely derives from the tricarboxylic acid cycle via conversion of glutamate to alpha-ketoglutarate (GDH reaction). As hGDH2 is not subject to GTP control, the enzyme is able to metabolize glutamate even when the tricarboxylic acid cycle generates GTP amounts sufficient to inactivate the housekeeping hGDH1 protein. Hence, the selective expression of hGDH2 by astrocytes and Sertoli cells may provide a significant biological advantage by facilitating metabolic recycling processes essential to the supportive role of these cells.

  1. Identification of Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Sequence and Expression Profiles in Tree Shrew (Tupaia belangeri)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yu; Wang, Yingjun; Smith, Wanli W.; Leng, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri) diverged from the primate order (Primates) and are classified as Scandentia, a separate taxonomic group of mammals. The tree shrew has been suggested to use an animal model to study human disease but the genomic sequences of tree shrew is largely unidentified. Here we identified the full-length cDNA sequence of a housekeeping gene, Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH), in tree shrew. We further constructed a phylogenetic family tree base on GAPDH molecules of various organisms and compared GAPDH sequences with human and other small experimental animals. These study revealed that tree shrew was closer to human than mouse, rat, rabbit and guinea pig. The Quantitative Reverse Transcription PCR and western blot analysis further demonstrated that GAPDH expressed in various tissues in tree shrew as a general conservative housekeeping proteins as in human. Our findings provide the novel genetic knowledge of the tree shrew and strong evidences that tree shrew can be an experimental model system to study human disorders. PMID:24887411

  2. Two mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogenase activities of Kluyveromyces lactis are differently expressed during respiration and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Saliola, M; Falcone, C

    1995-12-20

    The lactose-utilizing yeast Kluyveromyces lactis is an essentially aerobic organism in which both respiration and fermentation can coexist depending on the sugar concentration. Despite a low fermentative capacity as compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, four structural genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activities are present in this yeast. Two of these activities, namely K1ADH III and K1ADH IV, are located within mitochondria and their presence is dependent on the carbon sources in the medium. In this paper we demonstrate by transcription and activity analysis that KlADH3 is expressed in the presence of low glucose concentrations and in the presence of respiratory carbon sources other than ethanol. Indeed ethanol acts as a strong repressor of this gene. On the other hand, KlADH4 is induced by the presence of ethanol and not by other respiratory carbon sources. We also demonstrate that the presence of KLADH III and KLADH IV in K. lactis cells is dependent on glucose concentration, glucose uptake and the amount of ethanol produced. As a consequence, these activities can be used as markers for the onset of respiratory and fermentative metabolism in this yeast.

  3. Enhanced expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in human cells sustaining oxidative stress.

    PubMed Central

    Ursini, M V; Parrella, A; Rosa, G; Salzano, S; Martini, G

    1997-01-01

    Recent reports have demonstrated that glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity in mammalian cells is necessary in order to ensure cell survival when damage is produced by reactive oxygen intermediates. In this paper we demonstrate that oxidative stress, caused by agents acting at different steps in the biochemical pathway controlling the intracellular redox status, determines the increase in G6PD-specific activity in human cell lines of different tissue origins. The intracellular level of G6PD-specific mRNA also increases, with kinetics compatible with the induction of new enzyme synthesis. We carried out experiments in which cells were exposed to oxidative stress in the presence of inhibitors of protein or RNA synthesis. These demonstrated that increased G6PD expression is mainly due to an increased rate of transcription, with a minor but significant contribution of regulatory mechanisms acting at post-transcriptional levels. These results provide new information on the defence systems that eukaryotic cells possess in order to prevent damage caused by potentially harmful oxygen derivatives. PMID:9169615

  4. Selective n-butanol production by Clostridium sp. MTButOH1365 during continuous synthesis gas fermentation due to expression of synthetic thiolase, 3-hydroxy butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, crotonase, butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, butyraldehyde dehydrogenase, and NAD-dependent butanol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Berzin, Vel; Tyurin, Michael; Kiriukhin, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Acetogen Clostridum sp. MT1962 produced 287 mM acetate (p < 0.005) and 293 mM ethanol (p < 0.005) fermenting synthesis gas blend 60% CO and 40% H₂ in single-stage continuous fermentation. This strain was metabolically engineered to the biocatalyst Clostridium sp. MTButOH1365. The engineered biocatalyst lost production of ethanol and acetate while initiated the production of 297 mM of n-butanol (p < 0.005). The metabolic engineering comprised Cre-lox66/lox71-based elimination of phosphotransacetylase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase along with integration to chromosome synthetic thiolase, 3-hydroxy butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, crotonase, butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, butyraldehyde dehydrogenase, and NAD-dependent butanol dehydrogenase. This is the first report on elimination of acetate and ethanol production genes and expression of synthetic gene cluster encoding n-butanol biosynthesis pathway in acetogen biocatalyst for selective fuel n-butanol production with no antibiotic support for the introduced genes.

  5. Diversity in expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in females.

    PubMed

    Abdulrazzaq, Y M; Micallef, R; Qureshi, M; Dawodu, A; Ahmed, I; Khidr, A; Bastaki, S M; Al-Khayat, A; Bayoumi, R A

    1999-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), to describe the different mutations in the population, to determine its prevalence, and to study inheritance patterns in families of G6PD-deficient individuals. All infants born at Tawam Hospital, Al-Ain, UAE from January 1994 to September 1996 were screened at birth for their G6PD status. In addition, those attending well-baby clinics during the period were also screened for the disorder. Families of 40 known G6PD-deficient individuals, selected randomly from the records of three hospitals in the country, were assessed for G6PD deficiency. Where appropriate, this was followed by definition of G6PD mutations. Of 8198 infants, 746 (9.1%), comprising 15% of males and 5% of females tested, were found to be G6PD deficient. A total of 27 families were further assessed: of these, all but one family had the nt563 Mediterranean mutation. In one family, two individuals had the nt202 African mutation. The high manifestation of G6PD deficiency in women may be due to the preferential expression of the G6PD-deficient gene and X-inactivation of the normal gene, and/or to the presence of an 'enhancer' gene that makes the expression of the G6PD deficiency more likely. The high level of consanguinity which, theoretically, should result in a high proportion of homozygotes and consequently a higher proportion of females with the deficiency, was not found to be a significant factor.

  6. Molecular cloning, co-expression, and characterization of glycerol dehydratase and 1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase from Citrobacter freundii.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xianghui; Deng, Wenying; Wang, Fei; Guo, Qi; Chen, Huayou; Wang, Liang; He, Xiang; Huang, Ribo

    2013-06-01

    1,3-Propanediol (1,3-PD), an important material for chemical industry, is biologically synthesized by glycerol dehydratase (GDHt) and 1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase (PDOR). In present study, the dhaBCE and dhaT genes encoding glycerol dehydratase and 1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase respectively were cloned from Citrobacter freundii and co-expressed in E. coli. Sequence analysis revealed that the cloned genes were 85 and 77 % identical to corresponding gene of C. freundii DSM 30040 (GenBank No. U09771), respectively. The over-expressed recombinant enzymes were purified by nickel-chelate chromatography combined with gel filtration, and recombinant GDHt and PDOR were characterized by activity assay, kinetic analysis, pH, and temperature optimization. This research may form a basis for the future work on biological synthesis of 1,3-PD.

  7. DEVELOPMENTAL EXPRESSION OF ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE IN RAT: A COMPARISON OF LIVER AND LUNG DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolism is one of the major determinants for age-related susceptibility changes to chemicals. Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules present in the environment and can be produced during biotransformation of xenobiotics. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) are important in aldehyd...

  8. Expression of NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase in Enterobacter aerogenes and its involvement in anaerobic metabolism and H2 production.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan; Zhao, Hongxin; Zhang, Chong; Lai, Qiheng; Wu, Xi; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2009-10-01

    An expression system for NAD(+)-dependent formate dehydrogenase gene (fdh1), from Candida boidinii, was constructed and cloned into Enterobacter aerogenes IAM1183. With the fdh1 expression, the total H(2) yield was attributed to a decrease in activity of the lactate pathway and an increase of the formate pathway flux due to the NADH regeneration. Analysis of the redox state balance and ethanol-to-acetate ratio in the fdhl-expressed strain showed that increased reducing power arose from the reconstruction of NADH regeneration pathway from formate thereby contributing to the improved H(2) production.

  9. Expression and characterization of Pantoea CO dehydrogenase to utilize CO-containing industrial waste gas for expanding the versatility of CO dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun Sil; Min, Kyoungseon; Kim, Geun-Joong; Kwon, Inchan; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Although aerobic CO dehydrogenases (CODHs) might be applicable in various fields, their practical applications have been hampered by low activity and no heterologous expression. We, for the first time, could functionally express recombinant PsCODH in E. coli and obtained a highly concentrated recombinant enzyme using an easy and convenient method. Its electron acceptor spectra, optimum conditions (pH 6.5 and 30 °C), and kinetic parameters (kcat of 12.97 s−1, Km of 0.065 mM, and specific activity of 0.86 Umg−1) were examined. Blast furnace gas (BFG) containing 20% CO, which is a waste gas from the steel-making process, was tested as a substrate for PsCODH. Even with BFG, the recombinant PsCODH retained 88.2% and 108.4% activity compared with those of pure CO and 20% CO, respectively. The results provide not only a promising strategy to utilize CO-containing industrial waste gases as cheap, abundant, and renewable resources but also significant information for further studies about cascade reactions producing value-added chemicals via CO2 as an intermediate produced by a CODH-based CO-utilization system, which would ultimately expand the versatility of CODH. PMID:28290544

  10. Expression and characterization of Pantoea CO dehydrogenase to utilize CO-containing industrial waste gas for expanding the versatility of CO dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Sil; Min, Kyoungseon; Kim, Geun-Joong; Kwon, Inchan; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2017-03-14

    Although aerobic CO dehydrogenases (CODHs) might be applicable in various fields, their practical applications have been hampered by low activity and no heterologous expression. We, for the first time, could functionally express recombinant PsCODH in E. coli and obtained a highly concentrated recombinant enzyme using an easy and convenient method. Its electron acceptor spectra, optimum conditions (pH 6.5 and 30 °C), and kinetic parameters (kcat of 12.97 s(-1), Km of 0.065 mM, and specific activity of 0.86 Umg(-1)) were examined. Blast furnace gas (BFG) containing 20% CO, which is a waste gas from the steel-making process, was tested as a substrate for PsCODH. Even with BFG, the recombinant PsCODH retained 88.2% and 108.4% activity compared with those of pure CO and 20% CO, respectively. The results provide not only a promising strategy to utilize CO-containing industrial waste gases as cheap, abundant, and renewable resources but also significant information for further studies about cascade reactions producing value-added chemicals via CO2 as an intermediate produced by a CODH-based CO-utilization system, which would ultimately expand the versatility of CODH.

  11. Expression and characterization of Pantoea CO dehydrogenase to utilize CO-containing industrial waste gas for expanding the versatility of CO dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eun Sil; Min, Kyoungseon; Kim, Geun-Joong; Kwon, Inchan; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2017-03-01

    Although aerobic CO dehydrogenases (CODHs) might be applicable in various fields, their practical applications have been hampered by low activity and no heterologous expression. We, for the first time, could functionally express recombinant PsCODH in E. coli and obtained a highly concentrated recombinant enzyme using an easy and convenient method. Its electron acceptor spectra, optimum conditions (pH 6.5 and 30 °C), and kinetic parameters (kcat of 12.97 s‑1, Km of 0.065 mM, and specific activity of 0.86 Umg‑1) were examined. Blast furnace gas (BFG) containing 20% CO, which is a waste gas from the steel-making process, was tested as a substrate for PsCODH. Even with BFG, the recombinant PsCODH retained 88.2% and 108.4% activity compared with those of pure CO and 20% CO, respectively. The results provide not only a promising strategy to utilize CO-containing industrial waste gases as cheap, abundant, and renewable resources but also significant information for further studies about cascade reactions producing value-added chemicals via CO2 as an intermediate produced by a CODH-based CO-utilization system, which would ultimately expand the versatility of CODH.

  12. Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) expression is negatively regulated by certain microRNAs in human lung tissues.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Takeshi; Date, Yuko; Nishibatake, Yu; Takane, Hiroshi; Fukuoka, Yasushi; Taniguchi, Yuuji; Burioka, Naoto; Shimizu, Eiji; Nakamura, Hiroshige; Otsubo, Kenji; Ieiri, Ichiro

    2012-07-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is important to the antitumor effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). DPD gene (DPYD) expression in tumors is correlated with sensitivity to 5-FU. Because the 5-FU accumulated in cancer cells is also rapidly converted into inactivated metabolites through catabolic pathways mediated by DPD, high DPD activity in cancer cells is an important determinant of the response to 5-FU. DPD activity is highly variable and reduced activity causes a high risk of 5-FU toxicity. Genetic variation in DPYD has been proposed as the main factor responsible for the variation in DPD activity. However, only a small proportion of the activity of DPD can be explained by DPYD mutations. In this study, we found that DPYD is a target of the following microRNAs (miRNA): miR-27a, miR-27b, miR-134, and miR-582-5p. In luciferase assays with HepG2 cells, the overexpression of these miRNAs was associated with significantly decreased reporter activity in a plasmid containing the 3'-UTR of DYPD mRNA. The level of DPD protein in MIAPaca-2 cells was also significantly decreased by the overexpression of these four miRNAs. The results suggest that miR-27a, miR-27b, miR-134, and miR-582-5p post-transcriptionally regulate DPD protein expression. The levels of miRNAs in normal lung tissue and lung tumors were compared; miR-27b and miR-134 levels were significantly lower in the tumors than normal tissue (3.64 ± 4.02 versus 9.75 ± 6.58 and 0.64 ± 0.75 versus 1.48 ± 1.39). DPD protein levels were significantly higher in the tumors. Thus, the decreased expression of miR-27b would be responsible for the high levels of DPD protein. This study is the first to show that miRNAs regulate the DPD protein, and provides new insight into 5-FU-based chemotherapy.

  13. The tissue-specific expression and developmental regulation of two nuclear genes encoding rat mitochondrial proteins. Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kelly, D P; Gordon, J I; Alpers, R; Strauss, A W

    1989-11-15

    To study the regulation of nuclear genes which encode mitochondrial enzymes involved in oxidative metabolism, absolute levels of mRNA encoding rat medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) and rat mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) were determined in developing and adult male rat tissues. MCAD mRNA is expressed in a variety of adult male tissues with highest steady state levels in heart, adrenal, and skeletal muscle and lowest levels in brain, lung, and testes. In comparison, steady state levels of mMDH mRNA in adult male rat tissues were similar to those of MCAD mRNA in heart, small intestine, adrenal, and skeletal muscle but markedly different in brain, stomach, and testes. Thus, the steady-state levels of MCAD and mMDH mRNA are highest in adult tissues with high energy requirements. Dot blot analysis of RNA prepared from late fetal, suckling, and weaning rat heart, liver, and brain demonstrated the presence of MCAD and mMDH mRNA during the fetal period in all three tissues. Both MCAD and mMDH mRNA levels increased 2-2.5-fold at birth followed by a decline during the first postnatal week in heart and liver. The patterns of accumulation of these mRNAs in heart and liver during the weaning and early adult periods were also similar, although the absolute levels were significantly different. Brain MCAD mRNA levels were consistently low (less than 0.1 pg/micrograms total cellular RNA) throughout the developmental stages. However, brain mMDH mRNA levels exhibited a marked increase during the weaning period, reaching a peak concentration which is higher than the level of mMDH mRNA in heart and liver at any point during development. These results indicate that the level of expression of the nuclear genes encoding MCAD and mMDH is tissue-specific and developmentally regulated. The patterns of MCAD and mMDH mRNA accumulation parallel the changes in energy metabolism which occur during development and among adult tissues.

  14. Expression, purification and characterization of human glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) allosteric regulatory mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jie; Hsu, Betty Y L; MacMullen, Courtney M; Poncz, Mortimer; Smith, Thomas J; Stanley, Charles A

    2002-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyses the reversible oxidative deamination of l-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate in the mitochondrial matrix. In mammals, this enzyme is highly regulated by allosteric effectors. The major allosteric activator and inhibitor are ADP and GTP, respectively; allosteric activation by leucine may play an important role in amino acid-stimulated insulin secretion. The physiological significance of this regulation has been highlighted by the identification of children with an unusual hyperinsulinism/hyperammonaemia syndrome associated with dominant mutations in GDH that cause a loss in GTP inhibition. In order to determine the effects of these mutations on the function of the human GDH homohexamer, we studied the expression, purification and characterization of two of these regulatory mutations (H454Y, which affects the putative GTP-binding site, and S448P, which affects the antenna region) and a mutation designed to alter the putative binding site for ADP (R463A). The sensitivity to GTP inhibition was impaired markedly in the purified H454Y (ED(50), 210 microM) and S448P (ED(50), 3.1 microM) human GDH mutants compared with the wild-type human GDH (ED(50), 42 nM) or GDH isolated from heterozygous patient cells (ED(50), 290 and 280 nM, respectively). Sensitivity to ADP or leucine stimulation was unaffected by these mutations, confirming that they interfere specifically with the inhibitory GTP-binding site. Conversely, the R463A mutation completely eliminated ADP activation of human GDH, but had little effect on either GTP inhibition or leucine activation. The effects of these three mutations on ATP regulation indicated that this nucleotide inhibits human GDH through binding of its triphosphate tail to the GTP site and, at higher concentrations, activates the enzyme through binding of the nucleotide to the ADP site. These data confirm the assignment of the GTP and ADP allosteric regulatory sites on GDH based on X-ray crystallography and provide

  15. Regulated Expression of Three Alcohol Dehydrogenase Genes in Barley Aleurone Layers 1

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Andrew D.; Jacobsen, John V.; Zwar, John A.

    1984-01-01

    Three genes specify alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1.; ADH) enzymes in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) (Adh 1, Adh 2, and Adh 3). Their polypeptide products (ADH 1, ADH 2, ADH 3) dimerize to give a total of six ADH isozymes which can be resolved by native gel electrophoresis and stained for enzyme activity. Under fully aerobic conditions, aleurone layers of cv Himalaya had a high titer of a single isozyme, the homodimer containing ADH 1 monomers. This isozyme was accumulated by the aleurone tissue during the later part of seed development, and survived seed drying and rehydration. The five other possible ADH isozymes were induced by O2 deficit. The staining of these five isozymes on electrophoretic gels increased progressively in intensity as O2 levels were reduced below 5%, and were most intense at 0% O2. In vivo35S labeling and specific immunoprecipitation of ADH peptides, followed by isoelectric focusing of the ADH peptides in the presence of 8 molar urea (urea-IEF) demonstrated the following. (a) Aleurone layers incubated in air synthesized ADH 1 and a trace of ADH 2; immature layers from developing seeds behaved similarly. (b) At 5% O2, synthesis of ADH 2 increased and ADH 3 appeared. (c) At 2% and 0% O2, the synthesis of all three ADH peptides increased markedly. Cell-free translation of RNA isolated from aleurone layers, followed by immunoprecipitation and urea-IEF of in vitro synthesized ADH peptides, showed that levels of mRNA for all three ADH peptides rose sharply during 1 day of O2 deprivation. Northern hybridizations with a maize Adh 2 cDNA clone established that the clone hybridized with barley mRNA comparable in size to maize Adh 2 mRNA, and that the level of this barley mRNA increased 15- to 20-fold after 1 day at 5% or 2% O2, and about 100-fold after 1 day at 0% O2. We conclude that in aleurone layers, expression of the three barley Adh genes is maximal in the absence of O2, that regulation of mRNA level is likely to be a major controlling factor, and

  16. The E1 beta-subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase is surface-expressed in Lactobacillus plantarum and binds fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Vastano, Valeria; Salzillo, Marzia; Siciliano, Rosa A; Muscariello, Lidia; Sacco, Margherita; Marasco, Rosangela

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is among the species with a probiotic activity. Adhesion of probiotic bacteria to host tissues is an important principle for strain selection, because it represents a crucial step in the colonization process of either pathogens or commensals. Most bacterial adhesins are proteins, and a major target for them is fibronectin, an extracellular matrix glycoprotein. In this study we demonstrate that PDHB, a component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, is a factor contributing to fibronectin-binding in L. plantarum LM3. By means of fibronectin overlay immunoblotting assay, we identified a L. plantarum LM3 surface protein with apparent molecular mass of 35 kDa. Mass spectrometric analysis shows that this protein is the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 beta-subunit (PDHB). The corresponding pdhB gene is located in a 4-gene cluster encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase. In LM3-B1, carrying a null mutation in pdhB, the 35 kDa adhesin was not anymore detectable by immunoblotting assay. Nevertheless, the pdhB null mutation did not abolish pdhA, pdhC, and pdhD transcription in LM3-B1. By adhesion assays, we show that LM3-B1 cells bind to immobilized fibronectin less efficiently than wild type cells. Moreover, we show that pdhB expression is negatively regulated by the CcpA protein and is induced by bile.

  17. Cloning and expression of the gene encoding catalytic subunit of thermostable glucose dehydrogenase from Burkholderia cepacia in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Inose, Ken; Fujikawa, Masako; Yamazaki, Tomohiko; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Sode, Koji

    2003-02-21

    We have cloned a 1620-nucleotide gene encoding the catalytic subunit (alpha subunit) of a thermostable glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) from Burkholderia cepacia. The FAD binding motif was found in the N-terminal region of the alpha subunit. The deduced primary structure of the alpha subunit showed about 48% identity to the catalytic subunits of sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) from Gluconobacter oxydans and 2-keto-D-gluconate dehydrogenases (2KGDH) from Erwinia herbicola and Pantoea citrea. The alpha subunit of B. cepacia was expressed in Escherichia coli in its active water-soluble form, showing maximum dye-mediated GDH activity at 70 degrees C, retaining high thermal stability. A putative open reading frame (ORF) of 507 nucleotides was also found upstream of the alpha subunit encoding an 18-kDa peptide, designated as gamma subunit. The deduced primary structure of gamma subunit showed about 30% identity to the small subunits of the SDH from G. oxydans and 2KGDHs from E. herbicola and P. citrea.

  18. Highly selective anti-Prelog synthesis of optically active aryl alcohols by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Nie, Yao; Mu, Xiao Qing; Zhang, Rongzhen; Xu, Yan

    2016-07-03

    Biocatalytic asymmetric synthesis has been widely used for preparation of optically active chiral alcohols as the important intermediates and precursors of active pharmaceutical ingredients. However, the available whole-cell system involving anti-Prelog specific alcohol dehydrogenase is yet limited. A recombinant Escherichia coli system expressing anti-Prelog stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase from Candida parapsilosis was established as a whole-cell system for catalyzing asymmetric reduction of aryl ketones to anti-Prelog configured alcohols. Using 2-hydroxyacetophenone as the substrate, reaction factors including pH, cell status, and substrate concentration had obvious impacts on the outcome of whole-cell biocatalysis, and xylose was found to be an available auxiliary substrate for intracellular cofactor regeneration, by which (S)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol was achieved with an optical purity of 97%e.e. and yield of 89% under the substrate concentration of 5 g/L. Additionally, the feasibility of the recombinant cells toward different aryl ketones was investigated, and most of the corresponding chiral alcohol products were obtained with an optical purity over 95%e.e. Therefore, the whole-cell system involving recombinant stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase was constructed as an efficient biocatalyst for highly enantioselective anti-Prelog synthesis of optically active aryl alcohols and would be promising in the pharmaceutical industry.

  19. Impaired expression of NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 and PPARgamma coactivator-1 in skeletal muscle of ZDF rats: restoration by troglitazone.

    PubMed

    Jové, Mireia; Salla, Joel; Planavila, Anna; Cabrero, Agatha; Michalik, Liliane; Wahli, Walter; Laguna, Juan C; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes has been related to a decrease of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content. In this study, we show increased expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) and its target genes involved in fatty acid metabolism in skeletal muscle of Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) (fa/fa) rats. In contrast, the mRNA levels of genes involved in glucose transport and utilization (GLUT4 and phosphofructokinase) were decreased, whereas the expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK-4), which suppresses glucose oxidation, was increased. The shift from glucose to fatty acids as the source of energy in skeletal muscle of ZDF rats was accompanied by a reduction of subunit 1 of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1, ND1) and subunit II of complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase II, COII), two genes of the electronic transport chain encoded by mtDNA. The transcript levels of PPARgamma Coactivator 1 (PGC-1) showed a significant reduction. Treatment with troglitazone (30 mg/kg/day) for 15 days reduced insulin values and reversed the increase in PDK-4 mRNA levels, suggesting improved insulin sensitivity. In addition, troglitazone treatment restored ND1 and PGC-1 expression in skeletal muscle. These results suggest that troglitazone may avoid mitochondrial metabolic derangement during the development of diabetes mellitus 2 in skeletal muscle.

  20. Tungsten and molybdenum regulation of formate dehydrogenase expression in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Sofia M; Pimentel, Catarina; Valente, Filipa M A; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina; Pereira, Inês A C

    2011-06-01

    Formate is an important energy substrate for sulfate-reducing bacteria in natural environments, and both molybdenum- and tungsten-containing formate dehydrogenases have been reported in these organisms. In this work, we studied the effect of both metals on the levels of the three formate dehydrogenases encoded in the genome of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, with lactate, formate, or hydrogen as electron donors. Using Western blot analysis, quantitative real-time PCR, activity-stained gels, and protein purification, we show that a metal-dependent regulatory mechanism is present, resulting in the dimeric FdhAB protein being the main enzyme present in cells grown in the presence of tungsten and the trimeric FdhABC₃ protein being the main enzyme in cells grown in the presence of molybdenum. The putatively membrane-associated formate dehydrogenase is detected only at low levels after growth with tungsten. Purification of the three enzymes and metal analysis shows that FdhABC₃ specifically incorporates Mo, whereas FdhAB can incorporate both metals. The FdhAB enzyme has a much higher catalytic efficiency than the other two. Since sulfate reducers are likely to experience high sulfide concentrations that may result in low Mo bioavailability, the ability to use W is likely to constitute a selective advantage.

  1. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex: mRNA and protein expression patterns of E1α subunit genes in human spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Ana; Silva, Maria João; Graça, Inês; Silva, Joaquina; Sá, Rosália; Sousa, Mário; Barros, Alberto; Tavares de Almeida, Isabel; Rivera, Isabel

    2012-09-10

    During spermatogenesis, germ cells undergo a complex process of cell differentiation and morphological restructuring, which depends on the coordinated expression of different genes. Some vital examples are those involved in cell energy metabolism, namely the genes encoding the E1α subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex: the somatic PDHA1 (X-linked) and the testis-specific PDHA2 (autosomal). There are no data related to the study at the RNA and protein levels of PDHA genes during human spermatogenesis. The present study aimed to describe the mRNA and protein expression patterns of the human PDHA genes during spermatogenesis. Expression profiles of the PDHA1 and PDHA2 genes were characterized using different human tissues and cells. Diploid and haploid germ cells fractions were obtained from testis tissues. The mRNA profiles were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR, whereas the protein profiles were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, western blotting and two-dimensional electrophoresis. Expression of the PDHA1 gene was found in all somatic cells, whereas expression of PDHA2 gene was restricted to germ cells. The switch from X-linked to autosomic gene expression occurred in spermatocytes. Data suggest the activation of PDHA2 gene expression is most probably a mechanism to ensure the continued expression of the protein, thus allowing germ cell viability and functionality.

  2. Transcription analysis of pyranose dehydrogenase from the basidiomycete Agaricus bisporus and characterization of the recombinantly expressed enzyme.

    PubMed

    Gonaus, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Sygmund, Christoph; Haltrich, Dietmar; Peterbauer, Clemens

    2016-03-01

    Agaricus bisporus is a litter degrading basidiomycete commonly found in humic-rich environments. It is used as model organism and cultivated in large scale for food industry. Due to its ecological niche it produces a variety of enzymes for detoxification and degradation of humified plant litter. One of these, pyranose dehydrogenase, is thought to play a role in detoxification and lignocellulose degradation. It is a member of the glucose-methanol-choline family of flavin-dependent enzymes and oxidizes a wide range of sugars with concomitant reduction of electron acceptors like quinones. In this work, transcription of pdh in A. bisporus was investigated with real-time PCR revealing influence of the carbon source on pdh expression levels. The gene was isolated and heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris. Characterization of the recombinant enzyme showed a higher affinity towards disaccharides compared to other tested pyranose dehydrogenases from related Agariceae. Homology modeling and sequence alignments indicated that two loops of high sequence variability at substrate access site could play an important role in modulating these substrate specificities.

  3. Expression of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases and their putative homologues during Arabidopsis thaliana growth and development: lessons for database annotations?

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Kim, Kye-Won; Cho, Man-Ho; Franceschi, Vincent R; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2007-07-01

    A major goal currently in Arabidopsis research is determination of the (biochemical) function of each of its approximately 27,000 genes. To date, however, 12% of its genes actually have known biochemical roles. In this study, we considered it instructive to identify the gene expression patterns of nine (so-called AtCAD1-9) of 17 genes originally annotated by The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR) as cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD, EC 1.1.1.195) homologues [see Costa, M.A., Collins, R.E., Anterola, A.M., Cochrane, F.C., Davin, L.B., Lewis N.G., 2003. An in silico assessment of gene function and organization of the phenylpropanoid pathway metabolic networks in Arabidopsis thaliana and limitations thereof. Phytochemistry 64, 1097-1112.]. In agreement with our biochemical studies in vitro [Kim, S.-J., Kim, M.-R., Bedgar, D.L., Moinuddin, S.G.A., Cardenas, C.L., Davin, L.B., Kang, C.-H., Lewis, N.G., 2004. Functional reclassification of the putative cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase multigene family in Arabidopsis. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101, 1455-1460.], and analysis of a double mutant [Sibout, R., Eudes, A., Mouille, G., Pollet, B., Lapierre, C., Jouanin, L., Séguin A., 2005. Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase-C and -D are the primary genes involved in lignin biosynthesis in the floral stem of Arabidopsis. Plant Cell 17, 2059-2076.], both AtCAD5 (At4g34230) and AtCAD4 (At3g19450) were found to have expression patterns consistent with development/formation of different forms of the lignified vascular apparatus, e.g. lignifying stem tissues, bases of trichomes, hydathodes, abscission zones of siliques, etc. Expression was also observed in various non-lignifying zones (e.g. root caps) indicative of, perhaps, a role in plant defense. In addition, expression patterns of the four CAD-like homologues were investigated, i.e. AtCAD2 (At2g21730), AtCAD3 (At2g21890), AtCAD7 (At4g37980) and AtCAD8 (At4g37990), each of which previously had been demonstrated to have low CAD

  4. Teneligliptin Decreases Uric Acid Levels by Reducing Xanthine Dehydrogenase Expression in White Adipose Tissue of Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of teneligliptin on uric acid metabolism in male Wistar rats and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The rats were fed with a normal chow diet (NCD) or a 60% high-fat diet (HFD) with or without teneligliptin for 4 weeks. The plasma uric acid level was not significantly different between the control and teneligliptin groups under the NCD condition. However, the plasma uric acid level was significantly decreased in the HFD-fed teneligliptin treated rats compared to the HFD-fed control rats. The expression levels of xanthine dehydrogenase (Xdh) mRNA in liver and epididymal adipose tissue of NCD-fed rats were not altered by teneligliptin treatment. On the other hand, Xdh expression was reduced significantly in the epididymal adipose tissue of the HFD-fed teneligliptin treated rats compared with that of HFD-fed control rats, whereas Xdh expression in liver did not change significantly in either group. Furthermore, teneligliptin significantly decreased Xdh expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. DPP-4 treatment significantly increased Xdh expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. With DPP-4 pretreatment, teneligliptin significantly decreased Xdh mRNA expression compared to the DPP-4-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In conclusion, our studies suggest that teneligliptin reduces uric acid levels by suppressing Xdh expression in epididymal adipose tissue of obese subjects. PMID:27652270

  5. Expression Pattern of Two Paralogs Encoding Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenases in Arabidopsis. Isolation and Characterization of the Corresponding Mutants1

    PubMed Central

    Sibout, Richard; Eudes, Aymerick; Pollet, Brigitte; Goujon, Thomas; Mila, Isabelle; Granier, Fabienne; Séguin, Armand; Lapierre, Catherine; Jouanin, Lise

    2003-01-01

    Studying Arabidopsis mutants of the phenylpropanoid pathway has unraveled several biosynthetic steps of monolignol synthesis. Most of the genes leading to monolignol synthesis have been characterized recently in this herbaceous plant, except those encoding cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD). We have used the complete sequencing of the Arabidopsis genome to highlight a new view of the complete CAD gene family. Among nine AtCAD genes, we have identified the two distinct paralogs AtCAD-C and AtCAD-D, which share 75% identity and are likely to be involved in lignin biosynthesis in other plants. Northern, semiquantitative restriction fragment-length polymorphism-reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and western analysis revealed that AtCAD-C and AtCAD-D mRNA and protein ratios were organ dependent. Promoter activities of both genes are high in fibers and in xylem bundles. However, AtCAD-C displayed a larger range of sites of expression than AtCAD-D. Arabidopsis null mutants (Atcad-D and Atcad-C) corresponding to both genes were isolated. CAD activities were drastically reduced in both mutants, with a higher impact on sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity (6% and 38% of residual sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activities for Atcad-D and Atcad-C, respectively). Only Atcad-D showed a slight reduction in Klason lignin content and displayed modifications of lignin structure with a significant reduced proportion of conventional S lignin units in both stems and roots, together with the incorporation of sinapaldehyde structures ether linked at Cβ. These results argue for a substantial role of AtCAD-D in lignification, and more specifically in the biosynthesis of sinapyl alcohol, the precursor of S lignin units. PMID:12805615

  6. Expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes in human osteosarcoma: potential role in pathogenesis and as targets for treatments.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pushpa; Hardy, Rowan; Sumathi, Vaiyapuri; Bartle, Gillian; Kindblom, Lars-Gunnar; Grimer, Robert; Bujalska, Iwona; Stewart, Paul M; Rabbitt, Elizabeth; Gittoes, Neil J L; Cooper, Mark S

    2012-08-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a primary malignant tumour of bone occurring predominantly in children and young adults. Despite chemotherapy, relapse is common and mortality remains high. Non-transformed osteoblasts are highly sensitive to glucocorticoids, which reduce proliferation and induce apoptosis. Previously, we observed that OS cells, but not normal osteoblasts, express 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2). This enzyme inactivates cortisol (active) to cortisone (inactive) and expression of 11β-HSD2 renders OS cells resistant to glucocorticoids. By contrast, the related enzyme 11β-HSD1 converts cortisone to cortisol and reduces OS cell proliferation in vitro. Some synthetic glucocorticoids (e.g. dehydrodexamethasone (DHD), inactive counterpart of dexamethasone (DEX)) have been reported to be activated by 11β-HSD2. We therefore investigated expression and enzymatic activity of 11β-HSD isozymes in human OS tissue, determined whether 11β-HSD expression has prognostic value in the response to therapy, and evaluated the potential use of synthetic glucocorticoids to selectively target OS cells. OS samples expressed both 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2. 11β-HSD1 expression in pretreatment biopsy specimens positively correlated with primary tumour size. Expression and activity of 11β-HSD1 in post-treatment biopsies were unrelated to the degree of tumour necrosis following chemotherapy. However, high 11β-HSD2 expression in post-treatment biopsies correlated with a poor response to therapy. OS cells that expressed 11β-HSD2 inactivated endogenous glucocorticoids; but these cells were also able to generate DEX from DHD. These results suggest that OS treatment response is related to 11β-HSD2 enzyme expression. Furthermore, OS cells expressing this enzyme could be targeted by treatment with synthetic glucocorticoids that are selectively reactivated by the enzyme.

  7. Class-Specific Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Promote 11-Beta Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 2 Expression in JEG-3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Togher, Katie L.; Kenny, Louise C.

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to maternal cortisol plays a crucial role in fetal organogenesis. However, fetal overexposure to cortisol has been linked to a range of short- and long-term adverse outcomes. Normally, this is prevented by the expression of an enzyme in the placenta called 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2) which converts active cortisol to its inactive metabolite cortisone. Placental 11β-HSD2 is known to be reduced in a number of adverse pregnancy complications, possibly through an epigenetic mechanism. As a result, a number of pan-HDAC inhibitors have been examined for their ability to promote 11β-HSD2 expression. However, it is not known if the effects of pan-HDAC inhibition are a general phenomenon or if the effects are dependent upon a specific class of HDACs. Here, we examined the ability of pan- and class-specific HDAC inhibitors to regulate 11β-HSD2 expression in JEG3 cells. We find that pan-, class I, or class IIa HDAC inhibition promoted 11β-HSD2 expression and prevented cortisol or interleukin-1β-induced decrease in its expression. These results demonstrate that targeting a specific class of HDACs can promote 11β-HSD2 expression in JEG3 cells. This adds to the growing body of evidence suggesting that HDACs may be crucial in maintaining normal fetal development. PMID:28321257

  8. Reduced expression of 15-hydroxy prostaglandin dehydrogenase in chorion during labor is associated with decreased PRB and increased PRA and GR expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; He, Ping; Sun, Qianqian; Liu, Jie; Gao, Lu; You, Xingji; Gu, Hang; Ni, Xin

    2013-05-01

    The chorion laeve controls the levels of active prostaglandins within the uterus by NAD-dependent 15-hydroxy prostaglandin dehydrogenase (PGDH). The expression of PGDH in chorion is modulated by glucocorticoids and progesterone. In this study, we investigated glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and progesterone receptor A and B (PRA and PRB) in the regulation of PGDH expression in chorion, and we determined whether reduced PGDH expression in chorion during labor is associated with the changes in GR and PR expression by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Dexamethasone (DEX) inhibited PGDH expression whereas progesterone stimulated PGDH expression in chorionic trophoblasts. DEX suppressed PGDH expression in GR overexpression and PR knockdown cells. The inhibitory effect of DEX did not occur in GR knockdown cells. Progesterone inhibited PGDH in GR overexpression and PR knockdown cells and it stimulated PGDH in PRB overexpression cells whereas it suppressed PGDH in PRA overexpression cells. Knockdown of c-Jun resulted in a loss of progesterone- and DEX-induced effects. PGDH was down-regulated in chorion tissues during labor. PRB was decreased whereas PRA and GR were increased in chorion during labor. Glucocorticoids inhibit PGDH expression via GR in chorionic trophoblasts. Progesterone enhances PGDH expression through PRB, whereas it inhibits PGDH expression via GR and PRA. Decreased PGDH expression is associated with increased GR and PRA, although decreased PRB, in chorion during labor.

  9. Cloning and heterologous expression of two aryl-aldehyde dehydrogenases from the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tomofumi; Ichinose, Hirofumi; Wariishi, Hiroyuki

    2010-04-09

    We identified two aryl-aldehyde dehydrogenase proteins (PcALDH1 and PcALDH2) from the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Both PcALDHs were translationally up-regulated in response to exogenous addition of vanillin, one of the key aromatic compounds in the pathway of lignin degradation by basidiomycetes. To clarify the catalytic functions of PcALDHs, we isolated full-length cDNAs encoding these proteins and heterologously expressed the recombinant enzymes using a pET/Escherichia coli system. The open reading frames of both PcALDH1 and PcALDH2 consisted of 1503 nucleotides. The deduced amino acid sequences of both proteins showed high homologies with aryl-aldehyde dehydrogenases from other organisms and contained ten conserved domains of ALDHs. Moreover, a novel glycine-rich motif 'GxGxxxG' was located at the NAD{sup +}-binding site. The recombinant PcALDHs catalyzed dehydrogenation reactions of several aryl-aldehyde compounds, including vanillin, to their corresponding aromatic acids. These results strongly suggested that PcALDHs metabolize aryl-aldehyde compounds generated during fungal degradation of lignin and various aromatic xenobiotics.

  10. [Tumoral dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase expression and efficacy of 5-fluorouracil plus leucovorin plus UFT therapy in patients with colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hideyuki; Ohsawa, Tomonori; Nakada, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Masaru; Inokuma, Shigehisa; Shirakawa, Kazuo; Yamada, Hirofumi; Hashimoto, Daijo

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between tumoral expression of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), the rate limiting enzyme of the degradation pathway 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and the efficacy of 5-FU based chemotherapy for colorectal cancer. Twenty-eight colorectal cancer patients who had underwent noncurative resection (n = 16) or had developed recurrence (n = 12) were enrolled. All patients were given 5-FU plus leucovorin intravenously and UFT (1 M Tegafur, 4 M Uracil) perorally. The expression levels of the DPD in the primary lesions were determined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Group A (n = 10) consisted of one patient with complete response, 4 with partial response, and 5 with no change (time to disease progression (TTP) > = 90 days). Group B (n = 18) consisted of 14 patients with progressive disease and 4 with NC (time to progression, < 90 days). The tumoral DPD levels did not differ between the groups (p = 0.58). There were no effective cases (n = 6) whose tumoral DPD levels were equal to or more than 83.2 U/mg protein (high DPD expression). There were marked overlaps in the DPD levels between the two groups whose DPD levels were less than 83.0 U/mg protein (moderate or low expression). These results suggest that high expression of tumoral DPD would be predictive to failure of fluoropyrimidine-based treatment. However, it is unlikely to set the optimal cutoff value for predicting the efficacy of this type of chemotherapy.

  11. Genome-Wide Analysis of Sorbitol Dehydrogenase (SDH) Genes and Their Differential Expression in Two Sand Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) Fruits.

    PubMed

    Dai, Meisong; Shi, Zebin; Xu, Changjie

    2015-06-09

    Through RNA-seq of a mixed fruit sample, fourteen expressed sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) genes have been identified from sand pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai). Comparative phylogenetic analysis of these PpySDHs with those from other plants supported the closest relationship of sand pear with Chinese white pear (P. bretschneideri). The expression levels varied greatly among members, and the strongest six (PpySDH2, PpySDH4, PpySDH8, PpySDH12, PpySDH13 and PpySDH14) accounted for 96% of total transcript abundance of PpySDHs. Tissue-specific expression of these six members was observed in nine tissues or organs of sand pear, with the greatest abundance found in functional leaf petioles, followed by the flesh of young fruit. Expression patterns of these six PpySDH genes during fruit development were analyzed in two sand pear cultivars, "Cuiguan" and "Cuiyu". Overall, expression of PpySDHs peaked twice, first at the fruitlet stage and again at or near harvest. The transcript abundance of PpySDHs was higher in "Cuiguan" than in "Cuiyu", accompanied by a higher content of sugars and higher ratio of fructose to sorbitol maintained in the former cultivar at harvest. In conclusion, it was suggested that multiple members of the SDH gene family are possibly involved in sand pear fruit development and sugar accumulation and may affect both the sugar amount and sugar composition.

  12. Genome-Wide Analysis of Sorbitol Dehydrogenase (SDH) Genes and Their Differential Expression in Two Sand Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) Fruits

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Meisong; Shi, Zebin; Xu, Changjie

    2015-01-01

    Through RNA-seq of a mixed fruit sample, fourteen expressed sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) genes have been identified from sand pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai). Comparative phylogenetic analysis of these PpySDHs with those from other plants supported the closest relationship of sand pear with Chinese white pear (P. bretschneideri). The expression levels varied greatly among members, and the strongest six (PpySDH2, PpySDH4, PpySDH8, PpySDH12, PpySDH13 and PpySDH14) accounted for 96% of total transcript abundance of PpySDHs. Tissue-specific expression of these six members was observed in nine tissues or organs of sand pear, with the greatest abundance found in functional leaf petioles, followed by the flesh of young fruit. Expression patterns of these six PpySDH genes during fruit development were analyzed in two sand pear cultivars, “Cuiguan” and “Cuiyu”. Overall, expression of PpySDHs peaked twice, first at the fruitlet stage and again at or near harvest. The transcript abundance of PpySDHs was higher in “Cuiguan” than in “Cuiyu”, accompanied by a higher content of sugars and higher ratio of fructose to sorbitol maintained in the former cultivar at harvest. In conclusion, it was suggested that multiple members of the SDH gene family are possibly involved in sand pear fruit development and sugar accumulation and may affect both the sugar amount and sugar composition. PMID:26068235

  13. Co-expression of two heterologous lactate dehydrogenases genes in Kluyveromyces marxianus for l-lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Won; In, Jung Hoon; Park, Joon-Bum; Shin, Jonghyeok; Park, Jin Hwan; Sung, Bong Hyun; Sohn, Jung-Hoon; Seo, Jin-Ho; Park, Jin-Byoung; Kim, Soo Rin; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2017-01-10

    Lactic acid (LA) is a versatile compound used in the food, pharmaceutical, textile, leather, and chemical industries. Biological production of LA is possible by yeast strains expressing a bacterial gene encoding l-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Kluyveromyces marxianus is an emerging non-conventional yeast with various phenotypes of industrial interest. However, it has not been extensively studied for LA production. In this study, K. marxianus was engineered to express and co-express various heterologous LDH enzymes that were reported to have different pH optimums. Specifically, three LDH enzymes originating from Staphylococcus epidermidis (SeLDH; optimal at pH 5.6), Lactobacillus acidophilus (LaLDH; optimal at pH 5.3), and Bos taurus (BtLDH; optimal at pH 9.8) were functionally expressed individually and in combination in K. marxianus, and the resulting strains were compared in terms of LA production. A strain co-expressing SeLDH and LaLDH (KM5 La+SeLDH) produced 16.0g/L LA, whereas the strains expressing those enzymes individually produced only 8.4 and 6.8g/L, respectively. This co-expressing strain produced 24.0g/L LA with a yield of 0.48g/g glucose in the presence of CaCO3. Our results suggest that co-expression of LDH enzymes with different pH optimums provides sufficient LDH activity under dynamic intracellular pH conditions, leading to enhanced production of LA compared to individual expression of the LDH enzymes.

  14. Expression, purification, crystallization, and preliminary X-Ray analysis of the human UDP-glucose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jae Wan; Robinson, Robert Charles; Lee, Han Sam; Lee, Jae Il; Heo, Yong Seok; Kim, Hyun Tae; Lee, Hyun Ju; Cho, Sung Woo; Choe, Han

    2006-01-01

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH) catalyzes the synthesis of UDP-glucuronic acid from UDP-glucose resulting in the formation of proteoglycans that are involved in promoting normal cellular growth and migration. Overproduction of proteoglycans has been implicated in the progression of certain epithelial cancers. Here, human UGDH (hUGDH) was purified and crystallized from a solution of 0.2 M ammonium sulfate, 0.1 M Na cacodylate, pH 6.5, and 21% PEG 8000. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.8 A. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with unit-cell parameters a = 173.25, b = 191.16, c = 225.94 A, and alpha = beta = gamma = 90.0 degrees. Based on preliminary analysis of the diffraction data, we propose that the biological unit of hUGDH is a tetramer.

  15. Isoform expression in the multiple soluble malate dehydrogenase of Hoplias malabaricus (Erythrinidae, Characiformes).

    PubMed

    Aquino-Silva, M R; Schwantes, M L; Schwantes, A R

    2003-02-01

    Kinetic properties and thermal stabilities of Hoplias malabaricus liver and skeletal muscle unfractionated malate dehydrogenase (MDH, EC 1.1.1.37) and its isolated isoforms were analyzed to further study the possible sMDH-A* locus duplication evolved from a recent tandem duplication. Both A (A1 and A2) and B isoforms had similar optima pH (7.5-8.0). While Hoplias A isoform could not be characterized as thermostable, B could as thermolabile. A isoforms differed from B isoform in having higher Km values for oxaloacetate. The possibly duplicated A2 isoform showed higher substrate affinity than the A1. Hoplias duplicated A isoforms may influence the direction of carbon flow between glycolisis and gluconeogenesis.

  16. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Paul R.; Evans, Daniel; Greenwood, Jacqueline A.; Moody, Peter C. E.

    2008-08-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase A has been cloned, expressed and purified. Apoprotein crystals have been grown which diffracted to 1.75 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}; holo crystals were grown in the presence of NADP, diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution and belonged to space group P3{sub 2}. The classical glycolytic pathway contains an NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, with NADP-dependent forms reserved for photosynthetic organisms and archaea. Here, the cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Helicobacter pylori is reported; crystals of the protein were grown both in the presence and the absence of NADP.

  17. Over-expression of PsGPD, a mushroom glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, enhances salt tolerance in rice plants.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung-Il; Lim, Hye-Min; Siddiqui, Zamin Shaheed; Park, Sung-Han; Kim, A-Ram; Kwon, Taek-Ryoun; Lee, Seong-Kon; Park, Soo-Chul; Jeong, Mi-Jeong; Lee, Gang-Seob

    2014-08-01

    Transgenic potatoes expressing glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD), isolated from the oyster mushroom, Pleurotus sajor-caju, had increased tolerance to salt stress (Jeong et al. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 278:192-196, 2000). To examine the physiological mechanisms enhancing salt tolerance in GPD-transgenic rice plants, the salt tolerance of five GPD transgenic rice lines (T1-T5) derived from Dongjin rice cultivar were evaluated in a fixed 150 mM saline environment in comparison to two known wild-type rice cultivars, Dongjin (salt sensitive) and Pokali (salt tolerant). Transgenic lines, T2, T3, and T5, had a substantial increase in biomass and relative water content compared to Dongjin. Stomatal conductance and osmotic potential were higher in the GPD transgenic lines and were similar to those in Pokali. The results are discussed based on the comparative physiological response of GPD transgenic lines with those of the salt-sensitive and salt-tolerant rice cultivars.

  18. Engineering acetyl coenzyme A supply: functional expression of a bacterial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the cytosol of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Barbara U; van Rossum, Harmen M; Luttik, Marijke A H; Akeroyd, Michiel; Benjamin, Kirsten R; Wu, Liang; de Vries, Simon; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2014-10-21

    The energetic (ATP) cost of biochemical pathways critically determines the maximum yield of metabolites of vital or commercial relevance. Cytosolic acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is a key precursor for biosynthesis in eukaryotes and for many industrially relevant product pathways that have been introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae, such as isoprenoids or lipids. In this yeast, synthesis of cytosolic acetyl-CoA via acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) involves hydrolysis of ATP to AMP and pyrophosphate. Here, we demonstrate that expression and assembly in the yeast cytosol of an ATP-independent pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) from Enterococcus faecalis can fully replace the ACS-dependent pathway for cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthesis. In vivo activity of E. faecalis PDH required simultaneous expression of E. faecalis genes encoding its E1α, E1β, E2, and E3 subunits, as well as genes involved in lipoylation of E2, and addition of lipoate to growth media. A strain lacking ACS that expressed these E. faecalis genes grew at near-wild-type rates on glucose synthetic medium supplemented with lipoate, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. A physiological comparison of the engineered strain and an isogenic Acs(+) reference strain showed small differences in biomass yields and metabolic fluxes. Cellular fractionation and gel filtration studies revealed that the E. faecalis PDH subunits were assembled in the yeast cytosol, with a subunit ratio and enzyme activity similar to values reported for PDH purified from E. faecalis. This study indicates that cytosolic expression and assembly of PDH in eukaryotic industrial microorganisms is a promising option for minimizing the energy costs of precursor supply in acetyl-CoA-dependent product pathways. Importance: Genetically engineered microorganisms are intensively investigated and applied for production of biofuels and chemicals from renewable sugars. To make such processes economically and environmentally sustainable, the energy

  19. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  20. Expression and characterization of a cytosolic glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase isoform from barley (Hordeum vulgare) roots.

    PubMed

    Castiglia, Daniela; Cardi, Manuela; Landi, Simone; Cafasso, Donata; Esposito, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    In plant cells, glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH-EC 1.1.1.49) regulates the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP), a metabolic route involved in the production of NADPH for various biosynthetic processes and stress response. In this study, we report the overexpression of a cytosolic G6PDH isoform from barley (Hordeum vulgare) roots in bacteria, and the biochemical characterization of the purified recombinant enzyme (HvCy-G6PDH). A full-length cDNA coding for a cytosolic isoform of G6PDH was isolated, and the sequence was cloned into pET3d vector; the protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified by anion exchange and affinity chromatography. The kinetic properties were calculated: the recombinant HvCy-G6PDH showed KMs and KINADPH comparable to those observed for the enzyme purified from barley roots; moreover, the analysis of NADPH inhibition suggested a competitive mechanism. Therefore, this enzyme could be utilised for the structural and regulatory characterization of this isoform in higher plants.

  1. Cloning, sequencing and expression of the Schwanniomyces occidentalis NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    De Zoysa, P A; Connerton, I F; Watson, D C; Johnston, J R

    1991-08-01

    The cloned NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) genes of Aspergillus nidulans (gdhA) and Neurospora crassa (am) have been shown to hybridize under reduced stringency conditions to genomic sequences of the yeast Schwanniomyces occidentalis. Using 5' and 3' gene-specific probes, a unique 5.1 kb BclI restriction fragment that encompasses the entire Schwanniomyces sequence has been identified. A recombinant clone bearing the unique BclI fragment has been isolated from a pool of enriched clones in the yeast/E. coli shuttle vector pWH5 by colony hybridization. The identity of the plasmid clone was confirmed by functional complementation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gdh-1 mutation. The nucleotide sequence of the Schw. occidentalis GDH gene, which consists of 1380 nucleotides in a continuous reading frame of 459 amino acids, has been determined. The predicted amino acid sequence shows considerable homology with GDH proteins from other fungi and significant homology with all other available GDH sequences.

  2. Characterization and expression of NAD(H)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Turano, F J; Thakkar, S S; Fang, T; Weisemann, J M

    1997-04-01

    Two distinct cDNA clones encoding NAD(H)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD[H]-GDH) in Arabidopsis thaliana were identified and sequenced. The genes corresponding to these cDNA clones were designated GDH1 and GDH2. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences suggest that both gene products contain putative mitochondrial transit polypeptides and NAD(H)- and alpha-ketoglutarate-binding domains. Subcellular fractionation confirmed the mitochondrial location of the NAD(H)-GDH isoenzymes. In addition, a putative EF-hand loop, shown to be associated with Ca2+ binding, was identified in the GDH2 gene product but not in the GDH1 gene product. GDH1 encodes a 43.0-kD polypeptide, designated alpha, and GDH2 encodes a 42.5-kD polypeptide, designated beta. The two subunits combine in different ratios to form seven NAD(H)-GDH isoenzymes. The slowest-migrating isoenzyme in a native gel, GDH1, is a homohexamer composed of alpha subunits, and the fastest-migrating isoenzyme, GDH7, is a homohexamer composed of beta subunits. GDH isoenzymes 2 through 6 are heterohexamers composed of different ratios of alpha and beta subunits. NAD(H)-GDH isoenzyme patterns varied among different plant organs and in leaves of plants irrigated with different nitrogen sources or subjected to darkness for 4 d. Conversely, there were little or no measurable changes in isoenzyme patterns in roots of plants treated with different nitrogen sources. In most instances, changes in isoenzyme patterns were correlated with relative differences in the level of alpha and beta subunits. Likewise, the relative difference in the level of alpha or beta subunits was correlated with changes in the level of GDH1 or GDH2 transcript detected in each sample, suggesting that NAD(H)-GDH activity is controlled at least in part at the transcriptional level.

  3. Enhanced drought and heat stress tolerance of tobacco plants with ectopically enhanced cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Macková, Hana; Hronková, Marie; Dobrá, Jana; Turečková, Veronika; Novák, Ondřej; Lubovská, Zuzana; Motyka, Václav; Haisel, Daniel; Hájek, Tomáš; Prášil, Ilja Tom; Gaudinová, Alena; Štorchová, Helena; Ge, Eva; Werner, Tomáš; Schmülling, Thomas; Vanková, Radomíra

    2013-07-01

    Responses to drought, heat, and combined stress were compared in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants ectopically expressing the cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase CKX1 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana L. under the control of either the predominantly root-expressed WRKY6 promoter or the constitutive 35S promoter, and in the wild type. WRKY6:CKX1 plants exhibited high CKX activity in the roots under control conditions. Under stress, the activity of the WRKY6 promoter was down-regulated and the concomitantly reduced cytokinin degradation coincided with raised bioactive cytokinin levels during the early phase of the stress response, which might contribute to enhanced stress tolerance of this genotype. Constitutive expression of CKX1 resulted in an enlarged root system, a stunted, dwarf shoot phenotype, and a low basal level of expression of the dehydration marker gene ERD10B. The high drought tolerance of this genotype was associated with a relatively moderate drop in leaf water potential and a significant decrease in leaf osmotic potential. Basal expression of the proline biosynthetic gene P5CSA was raised. Both wild-type and WRKY6:CKX1 plants responded to heat stress by transient elevation of stomatal conductance, which correlated with an enhanced abscisic acid catabolism. 35S:CKX1 transgenic plants exhibited a small and delayed stomatal response. Nevertheless, they maintained a lower leaf temperature than the other genotypes. Heat shock applied to drought-stressed plants exaggerated the negative stress effects, probably due to the additional water loss caused by a transient stimulation of transpiration. The results indicate that modulation of cytokinin levels may positively affect plant responses to abiotic stress through a variety of physiological mechanisms.

  4. Regulation of cell growth and apoptosis through lactate dehydrogenase C over-expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tuo; Zhang, Cunchao; Jing, Yu; Jiang, Cheng; Li, Zhenhua; Wang, Shengyu; Ma, Kai; Zhang, Dapeng; Hou, Sheng; Dai, Jianxin; Kou, Geng; Wang, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Lactate has long been credited as a by-product, which jeopardizes cell growth and productivity when accumulated over a certain concentration during the manufacturing process of therapeutic recombinant proteins by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. A number of efforts to decrease the lactate concentration have been developed; however, the accumulation of lactate is still a critical issue by the late stage of fed-batch culture. Therefore, a lactate-tolerant cell line was developed through over-expression of lactate dehydrogenase C (LDH-C). In fed-batch culture, sodium lactate or sodium pyruvate was supplemented into the culture medium to simulate the environment of lactate accumulation, and LDH-C over-expression increased the highest viable cell density by over 30 and 50 %, respectively, on day 5, meanwhile the viability was also improved significantly since day 5 compared with that of the control. The percentages of cells suffering early and late apoptosis decreased by 3.2 to 12.5 and 2.0 to 4.3 %, respectively, from day 6 onwards in the fed-batch culture when 40 mM sodium pyruvate was added compared to the control. The results were confirmed by mitochondrial membrane potential assay. In addition, the expression of cleaved caspases 3 and 7 decreased in cells over-expressing LDH-C, suggesting the mitochondrial pathway was involved in the LDH-C regulated anti-apoptosis. In conclusion, a novel cell line with higher lactate tolerance, lowered lactate production, and alleviated apoptosis response was developed by over-expression of LDH-C, which may potentially represent an efficient and labor-saving approach in generating recombinant proteins.

  5. Expression of the betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase gene in barley in response to osmotic stress and abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Ishitani, M; Nakamura, T; Han, S Y; Takabe, T

    1995-01-01

    When subjected to salt stress or drought, some vascular plants such as barley respond with an increased accumulation of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine (betaine), being the last step of betaine synthesis catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). We report here cloning and characterization of BADH cDNA from barley, a monocot, and the expression pattern of a BADH transcript. An open reading frame of 1515 bp encoded a protein which showed high homology to BADH enzymes present in other plants (spinach and sugar-beet) and in Escherichia coli. Transgenic tobacco plants harboring the clone expressed high levels of both BADH protein and its enzymatic activity. Northern blot analyses indicated that BADH mRNA levels increased almost 8-fold and 2-fold, respectively, in leaves and roots of barley plants grown in high-salt conditions, and that these levels decreased upon release of the stress, whereas they did not decrease under continuous salt stress. BADH transcripts also accumulate in response to water stress or drought, indicating a common response of the plant to osmotic changes that affect its water status. The addition of abscisic acid (ABA) to plants during growth also increased the levels of BADH transcripts dramatically, although the response was delayed when compared to that found for salt-stressed plants. Removal of plant roots before transferring the plants to high-salt conditions reduced only slightly the accumulation of BADH transcripts in the leaves.

  6. The expression of a recombinant glycolate dehydrogenase polyprotein in potato (Solanum tuberosum) plastids strongly enhances photosynthesis and tuber yield.

    PubMed

    Nölke, Greta; Houdelet, Marcel; Kreuzaler, Fritz; Peterhänsel, Christoph; Schillberg, Stefan

    2014-08-01

    We have increased the productivity and yield of potato (Solanum tuberosum) by developing a novel method to enhance photosynthetic carbon fixation based on expression of a polyprotein (DEFp) comprising all three subunits (D, E and F) of Escherichia coli glycolate dehydrogenase (GlcDH). The engineered polyprotein retained the functionality of the native GlcDH complex when expressed in E. coli and was able to complement mutants deficient for the D, E and F subunits. Transgenic plants accumulated DEFp in the plastids, and the recombinant protein was active in planta, reducing photorespiration and improving CO2 uptake with a significant impact on carbon metabolism. Transgenic lines with the highest DEFp levels and GlcDH activity produced significantly higher levels of glucose (5.8-fold), fructose (3.8-fold), sucrose (1.6-fold) and transitory starch (threefold), resulting in a substantial increase in shoot and leaf biomass. The higher carbohydrate levels produced in potato leaves were utilized by the sink capacity of the tubers, increasing the tuber yield by 2.3-fold. This novel approach therefore has the potential to increase the biomass and yield of diverse crops.

  7. Cloning, expression, purification and characterization of his-tagged human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase: a simplified method for protein yield.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Terrón-Hernández, Jessica; de la Mora-de la Mora, Ignacio; García-Torres, Itzhel; López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Oria-Hernández, Jesús

    2013-10-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first step of the pentose phosphate pathway. In erythrocytes, the functionality of the pathway is crucial to protect these cells against oxidative damage. G6PD deficiency is the most frequent enzymopathy in humans with a global prevalence of 4.9 %. The clinical picture is characterized by chronic or acute hemolysis in response to oxidative stress, which is related to the low cellular activity of G6PD in red blood cells. The disease is heterogeneous at genetic level with around 160 mutations described, mostly point mutations causing single amino acid substitutions. The biochemical studies aimed to describe the detrimental effects of mutations on the functional and structural properties of human G6PD are indispensable to understand the molecular physiopathology of this disease. Therefore, reliable systems for efficient expression and purification of the protein are highly desirable. In this work, human G6PD was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography in a single chromatographic step. The structural and functional characterization indicates that His-tagged G6PD resembles previous preparations of recombinant G6PD. In contrast with previous protein yield systems, our method is based on commonly available resources and fully accessible laboratory equipment; therefore, it can be readily implemented.

  8. Feeding hydroalcoholic extract powder of Lepidium meyenii (maca) enhances testicular gene expression of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in rats.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Y; Kawate, N; Inaba, T; Morii, H; Takahashi, K; Tamada, H

    2017-03-06

    Although feeding diets containing the extract powder of Lepidium meyenii (maca), a plant growing in Peru's Central Andes, increases serum testosterone concentration associated with enhanced ability of testosterone production by Leydig cells in male rats, changes in testicular steroidogenesis-related factors by the maca treatment are not known. This study examined the effects of maca on testicular gene expressions for luteinizing hormone receptor, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and steroidogenic enzymes. Eight-week-old male rats were given the diets with or without (control) the maca extract powder (2%) for 6 weeks, and mRNA levels were determined by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that the testicular mRNA level of HSD3B1 (3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase; 3β-HSD) increased by the treatment, whereas the levels of the other factors examined did not change. These results suggest that increased expression of 3β-HSD gene may be involved in the enhanced steroidogenic ability by the maca treatment in rat testes.

  9. Codon-Optimized NADH Oxidase Gene Expression and Gene Fusion with Glycerol Dehydrogenase for Bienzyme System with Cofactor Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qiang; Wang, Shizhen

    2015-01-01

    NADH oxidases (NOXs) play an important role in maintaining balance of NAD+/NADH by catalyzing cofactors regeneration. The expression of nox gene from Lactobacillus brevis in Escherichia coli BL21 (BL21 (DE3)) was studied. Two strategies, the high AT-content in the region adjacent to the initiation codon and codon usage of the whole gene sequence consistent with the host, obtained the NOX activity of 59.9 U/mg and 73.3 U/mg (crude enzyme), with enhanced expression level of 2.0 and 2.5-folds, respectively. Purified NOX activity was 213.8 U/mg. Gene fusion of glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) and NOX formed bifuctional multi-enzymes for bioconversion of glycerol coupled with coenzyme regeneration. Kinetic parameters of the GDH-NOX for each substrate, glycerol and NADH, were calculated as Vmax(Glycerol) 20 μM/min, Km(Glycerol) 19.4 mM, Vmax (NADH) 12.5 μM/min and Km (NADH) 51.3 μM, respectively, which indicated the potential application of GDH-NOX for quick glycerol analysis and dioxyacetone biosynthesis. PMID:26115038

  10. Expression of protein engineered NADP+-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase increases ethanol production from xylose in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Matsushika, Akinori; Watanabe, Seiya; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Makino, Keisuke; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Katsuji; Takimura, Osamu; Sawayama, Shigeki

    2008-11-01

    A recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain transformed with xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) genes from Pichia stipitis has the ability to convert xylose to ethanol together with the unfavorable excretion of xylitol, which may be due to cofactor imbalance between NADPH-preferring XR and NAD(+)-dependent XDH. To reduce xylitol formation, we have already generated several XDH mutants with a reversal of coenzyme specificity toward NADP(+). In this study, we constructed a set of recombinant S. cerevisiae strains with xylose-fermenting ability, including protein-engineered NADP(+)-dependent XDH-expressing strains. The most positive effect on xylose-to-ethanol fermentation was found by using a strain named MA-N5, constructed by chromosomal integration of the gene for NADP(+)-dependent XDH along with XR and endogenous xylulokinase genes. The MA-N5 strain had an increase in ethanol production and decrease in xylitol excretion compared with the reference strain expressing wild-type XDH when fermenting not only xylose but also mixed sugars containing glucose and xylose. Furthermore, the MA-N5 strain produced ethanol with a high yield of 0.49 g of ethanol/g of total consumed sugars in the nonsulfuric acid hydrolysate of wood chips. The results demonstrate that glucose and xylose present in the lignocellulosic hydrolysate can be efficiently fermented by this redox-engineered strain.

  11. Manipulating cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) expression in flax affects fibre composition and properties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent decades cultivation of flax and its application have dramatically decreased. One of the reasons for this is unpredictable quality and properties of flax fibre, because they depend on environmental factors, retting duration and growing conditions. These factors have contribution to the fibre composition, which consists of cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin and pectin. By far, it is largely established that in flax, lignin reduces an accessibility of enzymes either to pectin, hemicelluloses or cellulose (during retting or in biofuel synthesis and paper production). Therefore, in this study we evaluated composition and properties of flax fibre from plants with silenced CAD (cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase) gene, which is key in the lignin biosynthesis. There is evidence that CAD is a useful tool to improve lignin digestibility and/or to lower the lignin levels in plants. Results Two studied lines responded differentially to the introduced modification due to the efficiency of the CAD silencing. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that flax CAD belongs to the “bona-fide” CAD family. CAD down-regulation had an effect in the reduced lignin amount in the flax fibre cell wall and as FT-IR results suggests, disturbed lignin composition and structure. Moreover introduced modification activated a compensatory mechanism which was manifested in the accumulation of cellulose and/or pectin. These changes had putative correlation with observed improved fiber’s tensile strength. Moreover, CAD down-regulation did not disturb at all or has only slight effect on flax plants’ development in vivo, however, the resistance against flax major pathogen Fusarium oxysporum decreased slightly. The modification positively affected fibre possessing; it resulted in more uniform retting. Conclusion The major finding of our paper is that the modification targeted directly to block lignin synthesis caused not only reduced lignin level in fibre, but also affected amount and

  12. Engineering Acetyl Coenzyme A Supply: Functional Expression of a Bacterial Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex in the Cytosol of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Barbara U.; van Rossum, Harmen M.; Luttik, Marijke A. H.; Akeroyd, Michiel; Benjamin, Kirsten R.; Wu, Liang; de Vries, Simon; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The energetic (ATP) cost of biochemical pathways critically determines the maximum yield of metabolites of vital or commercial relevance. Cytosolic acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is a key precursor for biosynthesis in eukaryotes and for many industrially relevant product pathways that have been introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae, such as isoprenoids or lipids. In this yeast, synthesis of cytosolic acetyl-CoA via acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) involves hydrolysis of ATP to AMP and pyrophosphate. Here, we demonstrate that expression and assembly in the yeast cytosol of an ATP-independent pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) from Enterococcus faecalis can fully replace the ACS-dependent pathway for cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthesis. In vivo activity of E. faecalis PDH required simultaneous expression of E. faecalis genes encoding its E1α, E1β, E2, and E3 subunits, as well as genes involved in lipoylation of E2, and addition of lipoate to growth media. A strain lacking ACS that expressed these E. faecalis genes grew at near-wild-type rates on glucose synthetic medium supplemented with lipoate, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. A physiological comparison of the engineered strain and an isogenic Acs+ reference strain showed small differences in biomass yields and metabolic fluxes. Cellular fractionation and gel filtration studies revealed that the E. faecalis PDH subunits were assembled in the yeast cytosol, with a subunit ratio and enzyme activity similar to values reported for PDH purified from E. faecalis. This study indicates that cytosolic expression and assembly of PDH in eukaryotic industrial microorganisms is a promising option for minimizing the energy costs of precursor supply in acetyl-CoA-dependent product pathways. PMID:25336454

  13. Energy balance-dependent regulation of ovine glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase protein isoform expression.

    PubMed

    Triantaphyllopoulos, Kostas A; Laliotis, George P; Bizelis, Iosif A

    2014-01-01

    G6PDH is the rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway and one of the principal source of NADPH, a major cellular reductant. Importantly, in ruminant's metabolism the aforementioned NADPH provided, is utilized for de novo fatty acid synthesis. Previous work of cloning the ovine (Ovis aries) og6pdh gene has revealed the presence of two cDNA transcripts (og6pda and og6pdb), og6pdb being a product of alternative splicing not similar to any other previously reported.(1) In the current study the effect of energy balance in the ovine G6PDH protein expression was investigated, shedding light on the biochemical features and potential physiological role of the oG6PDB isoform. Changes in energy balance leads to protein expression changes in both transcripts, to the opposite direction and not in a proportional way. Negative energy balance was not in favor of the presence of any particular isoform, while both protein expression levels were not significantly different (P > 0.05). In contrast, at the transition point from negative to positive and on the positive energy balance, there is a significant increase of oG6PDA compared with oG6PDB protein expression (P < 0.001). Both oG6PDH protein isoforms changed significantly toward the positive energy balance. oG6PDA is escalating, while oG6PDB is falling, under the same stimulus (positive energy balance alteration). This change is also positively associated with increasing levels in enzyme activity, 4 weeks post-weaning in ewes' adipose tissue. Furthermore, regression analysis clearly demonstrated the linear correlation of both proteins in response to the WPW, while energy balance, enzyme activity, and oG6PDA relative protein expression follow the same escalating trend; in contrast, oG6PDB relative protein expression falls in time, similar to both transcripts accumulation pattern, as reported previously.(2.)

  14. Impact of probiotic-supplemented diet on the expression level of lactate dehydrogenase in the leukocytes of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, Magdy A E; Moselhy, Said S

    2014-04-01

    Probiotics are known as living, nonpathogenic microorganisms that colonize the intestine and provide benefit to the host. The present study aims to measure one important energy metabolism-related enzyme activity in blood of rabbits fed on probiotics of recommended concentration. In addition, it also aims for the evaluation of the expression level of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. Two groups of rabbits are used: control group receiving normal standardized diet and the other probiotic-supplemented group receiving the same diet containing probiotic, namely, Mega acidophilus (200 million cfu/kg body weight/day) for 4 weeks. The obtained results revealed that the rabbits supplemented with probiotics showed a significant decrease in the levels of serum total cholesterol (TC), triacylglycerol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) when compared with control group. Risk factors detected by measuring TC/HDL-c and LDL-c/HDL-c ratios showed statistically significant decrease in probiotic-supplemented rabbits when compared with control group. In addition, blood glucose and total LDH activity were elevated in probiotic-supplemented rabbits when compared with control group. RT-PCR products of LDH-M gene produced two specific amplicons. One amplicon has the expected size of 243 bp from all samples of rabbits as revealed by GelPro software. The level of LDH-M expression was found to be increased in the probiotic-supplemented group. However, unexpected amplicons are produced at 586 bp in all the samples, which may be a dimeric form of the amplified region. It was concluded that this probiotic blend is beneficiary for the metabolic reactions of lipids in the body. Moreover, LDH expression level can be considered as a biomarker for the effect of probiotic and hence monitoring the metabolic changes as reflected from its administration.

  15. Feeding dried chicory root to pigs decrease androstenone accumulation in fat by increasing hepatic 3β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase expression.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Martin Krøyer; Brunius, Carl; Zamaratskaia, Galia; Ekstrand, Bo

    2012-05-01

    The present study investigated the in vivo effect of chicory root on testicular steroid concentrations and androstenone metabolizing enzymes in entire male pigs. Furthermore, the effect on skatole and indole concentrations in plasma and adipose tissue was investigated. The pigs were divided into two groups; one receiving experimental feed containing 10% dried chicory root for 16 days before slaughter, the control group was fed a standard diet. Plasma, adipose and liver tissue samples were collected at slaughter. Plasma was analyzed for the concentration of testosterone, estradiol, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), skatole and indole. Adipose tissue was analyzed for the concentration of androstenone, skatole and indole, while the liver tissue was analyzed for mRNA and protein expressions of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), sulfotransferase 2A1 and heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70). The results showed that the androstenone concentrations in the adipose tissue of chicory fed pigs were significantly (p<0.05) lower and indole concentrations were higher (p<0.05) compared to control fed pigs. Moreover the chicory root fed pigs had increased mRNA and protein expression of 3β-HSD and decreased HSP70 expression (p<0.05). Testosterone and IGF-1 concentrations in plasma as well as skatole concentrations in adipose tissue were not altered by dietary intake of chicory root. It is concluded that chicory root in the diet reduces the concentration of androstenone in adipose tissue via induction of 3β-HSD, and that these changes were not due to increased cellular stress.

  16. Deficient Expression of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1A1 is Consistent With Increased Sensitivity of Gorlin Syndrome Patients to Radiation Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Aaron T.; Magnaldo, Thierry; Sontag, Ryan L.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Sadler, Natalie C.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Gache, Yannick; Weber, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Human phenotypes that are highly susceptible to radiation carcinogenesis have been identified. Sensitive phenotypes often display robust regulation of molecular features that modify biological response, which can facilitate identification of the pathways/networks that contribute to pathophysiological outcomes. Here we interrogate primary dermal fibroblasts isolated from Gorlin syndrome patients (GDFs), who display a pronounced inducible tumorigenic response to radiation, in comparison to normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). Our approach exploits newly developed thiol reactive probes to define changes in protein thiol profiles in live cell studies, which minimizes artifacts associated with cell lysis. Redox probes revealed deficient expression of an apparent 55 kDa protein thiol in GDFs from independent Gorlin syndrome patients, compared with NHDFs. Proteomics tentatively identified this protein as aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), a key enzyme regulating retinoic acid synthesis, and ALDH1A1 protein deficiency in GDFs was confirmed by Western blot. A number of additional protein thiol differences in GDFs were identified, including radiation responsive annexin family members and lamin A/C. Collectively, candidates identified in our study have plausible implications for radiation health effects and cancer susceptibility. PMID:24285572

  17. Expression of a betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase gene in rice, a glycinebetaine nonaccumulator, and possible localization of its protein in peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Yokota, S; Muramoto, Y; Tsutsui, K; Oguri, Y; Fukui, K; Takabe, T

    1997-05-01

    Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) catalyzes the last step in the plant biosynthetic pathway that leads to glycinebetaine. Rice plants (Oryza sativa L.), albeit considered a typical non-glycinebetaine accumulating species, have been found to express this enzyme at low levels. This observation evokes an interest in phylogenic evolution of the enzyme in the plant kingdom. It is reported here that rice plants possess the ability to take up exogenously added betaine aldehyde through the roots and convert it to glycinebetaine, resulting in an enhanced salt-tolerance of the plants. A gene encoding a putative BADH from the rice genome was also cloned and sequenced. The gene was found to contain 14 introns, and the overall nucleotide sequence of the coding region is c. 78% identical to that of the barley BADH cDNA. Cloning of a partial BADH cDNA from rice was accomplished by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The nucleotide sequence of the cloned fragment was found to be identical to the corresponding exon regions of the rice genomic BADH gene. The deduced amino acid sequences of rice and barley BADH both contain a C-terminal tripeptide SKL, a signal known to target preproteins to microbodies. This localization was confirmed by an immuno-gold labeling study of transgenic tobacco harboring barley cDNA, which showed BADH protein inside peroxisomes. Northern blot analysis revealed that the level of BADH mRNA is salt-inducible.

  18. Analysis of xanthine dehydrogenase mRNA levels in mutants affecting the expression of the rosy locus.

    PubMed Central

    Covington, M; Fleenor, D; Devlin, R B

    1984-01-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) mRNA levels were measured in a number of mutants and natural variants affecting XDH gene expression. Two variants, ry+4 and ry+10, contain cis-acting elements which map to a region flanking the 5' end of the XDH gene. Ry+4, which has 2-3 times more XDH protein than a wild type strain, has 3.2 times more XDH mRNA. Ry+10 has 50% of the wild type XDH level and 54% of the wild type XDH mRNA level. Three rosy mutants which map within the structural gene were also examined. Two of these had little if any XDH mRNA, but the third mutant had 1.3 times more XDH mRNA than wild type flies. Another mutant, ry2 , which contains no XDH protein and has a 9KB transposable element inserted into the XDH gene, has normal levels of XDH mRNA transcripts which are also the same size as those found in the wild type strain. Changes in XDH mRNA levels were measured during Drosophila development and found to parallel changes in the amount of XDH protein. In addition, there were no large changes in the size of XDH mRNA during development. Images PMID:6588363

  19. Deficient expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 is consistent with increased sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome patients to radiation carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wright, Aaron T; Magnaldo, Thierry; Sontag, Ryan L; Anderson, Lindsey N; Sadler, Natalie C; Piehowski, Paul D; Gache, Yannick; Weber, Thomas J

    2015-06-01

    Human phenotypes that are highly susceptible to radiation carcinogenesis have been identified. Sensitive phenotypes often display robust regulation of molecular features that modify biological response, which can facilitate identification of the pathways/networks that contribute to pathophysiological outcomes. Here we interrogate primary dermal fibroblasts isolated from Gorlin syndrome patients (GDFs), who display a pronounced inducible tumorigenic response to radiation, in comparison to normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). Our approach exploits newly developed thiol reactive probes to define changes in protein thiol profiles in live cell studies, which minimizes artifacts associated with cell lysis. Redox probes revealed deficient expression of an apparent 55 kDa protein thiol in GDFs from independent Gorlin syndrome patients, compared with NHDFs. Proteomics tentatively identified this protein as aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), a key enzyme regulating retinoic acid synthesis, and ALDH1A1 protein deficiency in GDFs was confirmed by Western blot. A number of additional protein thiol differences in GDFs were identified, including radiation responsive annexin family members and lamin A/C. Collectively, candidates identified in our study have plausible implications for radiation health effects and cancer susceptibility.

  20. Deficient expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 is consistent with increased sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome patients to radiation carcinogenesis

    DOE PAGES

    Wright, Aaron T.; Magnaldo, Thierry; Sontag, Ryan L.; ...

    2013-11-27

    Human phenotypes that are highly susceptible to radiation carcinogenesis have been identified. Sensitive phenotypes often display robust regulation of molecular features that modify biological response, which can facilitate identification of relevant pathways/networks. Here we interrogate primary dermal fibroblasts isolated from Gorlin syndrome patients (GDFs), who display a pronounced tumorigenic response to radiation, in comparison to normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). Our approach exploits newly developed thiol-reactive probes with a flexible click chemistry functional group to define changes in protein thiol profiles in live cell studies, which minimizes artifacts associated with cell lysis. We observe qualitative differences in protein thiol profilesmore » by SDS-PAGE analysis when detection by iodoacetamide vs maleimide probe chemistries are compared, and pretreatment of cells with hydrogen peroxide eliminates detection of the majority of SDS-PAGE bands. Redox probes revealed deficient expression of an apparent 55 kDa protein thiol in GDFs from independent donors, compared with NHDFs. Proteomics tentatively identified this protein as aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), a key enzyme regulating retinoic acid synthesis, and this deficiency was confirmed by Western blot. Redox probes revealed additional protein thiol differences between GDFs and NHDFs, including radiation responsive annexin family members. Our results indicate a multifactorial basis for the unusual sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome to radiation carcinogenesis, and the pathways identified have plausible implications for radiation health effects.« less

  1. Deficient expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 is consistent with increased sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome patients to radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Aaron T.; Magnaldo, Thierry; Sontag, Ryan L.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Sadler, Natalie C.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Gache, Yannick; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-11-27

    Human phenotypes that are highly susceptible to radiation carcinogenesis have been identified. Sensitive phenotypes often display robust regulation of molecular features that modify biological response, which can facilitate identification of relevant pathways/networks. Here we interrogate primary dermal fibroblasts isolated from Gorlin syndrome patients (GDFs), who display a pronounced tumorigenic response to radiation, in comparison to normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). Our approach exploits newly developed thiol-reactive probes with a flexible click chemistry functional group to define changes in protein thiol profiles in live cell studies, which minimizes artifacts associated with cell lysis. We observe qualitative differences in protein thiol profiles by SDS-PAGE analysis when detection by iodoacetamide vs maleimide probe chemistries are compared, and pretreatment of cells with hydrogen peroxide eliminates detection of the majority of SDS-PAGE bands. Redox probes revealed deficient expression of an apparent 55 kDa protein thiol in GDFs from independent donors, compared with NHDFs. Proteomics tentatively identified this protein as aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), a key enzyme regulating retinoic acid synthesis, and this deficiency was confirmed by Western blot. Redox probes revealed additional protein thiol differences between GDFs and NHDFs, including radiation responsive annexin family members. Our results indicate a multifactorial basis for the unusual sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome to radiation carcinogenesis, and the pathways identified have plausible implications for radiation health effects.

  2. Targeted therapy for a subset of acute myeloid leukemias that lack expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1.

    PubMed

    Gasparetto, Maura; Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Khan, Nabilah; Pollyea, Daniel A; Myers, Jason R; Ashton, John M; Becker, Michael W; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Humphries, Keith R; Jordan, Craig T; Smith, Clayton A

    2017-03-09

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1) activity is high in hematopoietic stem cells and functions in part to protect stem cells from reactive aldehydes and other toxic compounds. In contrast, we found that ~25% of all acute myeloid leukemias expressed low or undetectable levels of ALDH1A1 and that this ALDH1A1- subset of leukemias correlates with good prognosis cytogenetics. ALDH1A1- cell lines as well as primary leukemia cells were found to be sensitive to treatment with compounds that directly and indirectly generate toxic ALDH substrates including 4-hydroxynonenal and the clinically relevant compounds arsenic trioxide and 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide. In contrast, normal hematopoietic stem cells were relatively resistant to these compounds. Using a murine xenotransplant model to emulate a clinical treatment strategy, established ALDH1A1- leukemias were also sensitive to in vivo treatment with cyclophosphamide combined with arsenic trioxide. These results demonstrate that targeting ALDH1A1- leukemic cells with toxic ALDH1A1 substrates such as arsenic and cyclophosphamide may be a novel targeted therapeutic strategy for this subset of acute myeloid leukemias.

  3. Rapid purification of the over-expressed membrane 3 β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in the presence of detergents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ming; Breton, Rock; Azzi, Arezki; Lin, Sheng-Xiang

    1996-10-01

    Three-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase / Δ 5-Δ 4 isomerase catalyses a key step in the transformation of all 5-prognen-3β-ol and 5-androsten-3β-ol steroids into the corresponding Δ 4-3-keto-steroids. Human type I 3β-HSD can be found in the subcellular fractions of mitochondria and microsome. A 1.5 kbp cDNA encoding human type I 3β-HSD was inserted into the transfer vector pBlueBac to form plasmid pBB / 3β-HSD. The recombinant baculovirus was obtained by co-transfection of wild type AcNPV genomic DNA and PBB / 3β-HSD in Sf9 cells, then used to infect Sf9 cells to over-express human 3β-HSD protein. The 3β-HSD sample was purified to homogeneity by a rapid procedure, consisting of an anion-exchange and an adsorbance chromatographies, based on FPLC and some detergents application. The whole process was successful with a purification rate of 90 fold and a high recovery (70%). The kinetic study showed a Vmax of 500 nmol/min · mg and a Km of 2.8 μM, being much more active than those reported.

  4. Component co-expression and purification of recombinant human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from baculovirus infected SF9 cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yong; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Guofeng; Oza, Khyati; Myers, Linda; Holbert, Marc A; Sweitzer, Sharon

    2014-05-01

    The mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is a multi-component mitochondrial enzyme that plays a key role in the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA connecting glycolysis to the citric acid cycle. Recent studies indicate that targeting the regulation of PDC enzymatic activity might offer therapeutic opportunities by inhibiting cancer cell metabolism. To facilitate drug discovery in this area, a well defined PDC sample is needed. Here, we report a new method of producing functional, recombinant, high quality human PDC complex. All five components were co-expressed in the cytoplasm of baculovirus-infected SF9 cells by deletion of the mitochondrial localization signal sequences of all the components and E1a was FLAG-tagged to facilitate purification. The protein FLAG tagged E1a complex was purified using FLAG-M2 affinity resin, followed by Superdex 200 sizing chromatography. The E2 and E3BP components were then Lipoylated using an enzyme based in vitro process. The resulting PDC is over 90% pure and homogenous. This non-phosphorylated, lipoylated human PDC was demonstrated to produce a robust detection window when used to develop an enzyme coupled assay of PDHK.

  5. Cloning, expression and characterization of glycerol dehydrogenase involved in 2,3-butanediol formation in Serratia marcescens H30.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liaoyuan; Xu, Quanming; Peng, Xiaoqian; Xu, Boheng; Wu, Yuehao; Yang, Yulong; Sun, Shujing; Hu, Kaihui; Shen, Yaling

    2014-09-01

    The meso-2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase (meso-BDH) from S. marcescens H30 is responsible for converting acetoin into 2,3-butanediol during sugar fermentation. Inactivation of the meso-BDH encoded by budC gene does not completely abolish 2,3-butanediol production, which suggests that another similar enzyme involved in 2,3-butanediol formation exists in S. marcescens H30. In the present study, a glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) encoded by gldA gene from S. marcescens H30 was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3), purified and characterized for its properties. In vitro conversion indicated that the purified GDH could catalyze the interconversion of (3S)-acetoin/meso-2,3-butanediol and (3R)-acetoin/(2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol. (2S,3S)-2,3-Butanediol was not a substrate for the GDH at all. Kinetic parameters of the GDH enzyme showed lower K m value and higher catalytic efficiency for (3S/3R)-acetoin in comparison to those for (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol and meso-2,3-butanediol, implying its physiological role in favor of 2,3-butanediol formation. Maximum activity for reduction of (3S/3R)-acetoin and oxidations of meso-2,3-butanediol and glycerol was observed at pH 8.0, while it was pH 7.0 for diacetyl reduction. The enzyme exhibited relative high thermotolerance with optimum temperature of 60 °C in the oxidation-reduction reactions. Over 60 % of maximum activity was retained at 70 °C. Additionally, the GDH activity was significantly enhanced for meso-2,3-BD oxidation in the presence of Fe(2+) and for (3S/3R)-acetoin reduction in the presence of Mn(2+), while several cations inhibited its activity, particularly Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) for (3S/3R)-acetoin reduction. The properties provided potential application for single configuration production of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol .

  6. Increased Expression of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Reduces Renal Cell Apoptosis During Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury After Hypothermic Machine Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zibiao; Hu, Qianchao; Fu, Zhen; Wang, Ren; Xiong, Yan; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Zhongzhong; Wang, Yanfeng; Ye, Qifa

    2016-06-01

    Hypothermic machine perfusion (MP) can reduce graft's injury after kidney transplantation; however, the mechanism has not been elucidated. In the past decade, many studies showed that aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a protease which can inhibit cell apoptosis. Therefore, this study aims to explore whether ALDH2 takes part in reducing organ damage after MP. Eighteen healthy male New Zealand rabbits (12 weeks old, weight 3.0 ± 0.3 kg) were randomly divided into three groups: normal group, MP group, and cold storage (CS) group (n = 6). The left kidney of rabbits underwent warm ischemia for 35 min through clamping the left renal pedicle and then reperfusion for 1 h. Left kidneys were preserved by MP or CS (4°C for 4 h) in vivo followed by the right nephrectomy and 24-h reperfusion, and then the specimens and blood were collected. Finally, concentration of urine creatinine (Cr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and 4-HNE were tested. Renal apoptosis was detected by TUNEL staining, and the expression of ALDH2, cleaved-caspase 3, bcl-2/ bax, MAPK in renal tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry or Western blot; 24 h after surgery, the concentration of Cr in MP group was 355 ± 71μmol/L, in CS group was 511 ± 44 μmol/L (P < 0.05), while the BUN was 15.02 ± 2.34 mmol/L in MP group, 22.64 ± 3.58 mmol/L in CS group (P < 0.05). The rate of apoptosis and expression of cleaved caspase-3, p-P38, p-ERK, and p-JNK in MP group was significantly lower than that in CS group (P < 0.05), while expression of ALDH2 and bcl-2/bax in MP group was significantly higher than that in CS group (P < 0.05); expression of cleaved caspase-3 in both MP and CS group significantly increased as compared with that in normal group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, increased expression of ALDH2 can reduce the renal cell apoptosis through inhibiting MAPK pathway during ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) after hypothermic MP.

  7. Heterologous expression of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase gene from Ammopiptanthus nanus confers high salt and heat tolerance to Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao-Qiang; Wang, Ying-Ge; Yong, Tai-Ming; She, Yue-Hui; Fu, Feng-Ling; Li, Wan-Chen

    2014-10-01

    Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) catalyzes the synthesis of glycine betaine, a regulator of osmosis, and therefore BADH is considered to play a significant role in response of plants to abiotic stresses. Here, based on the conserved residues of the deduced amino acid sequences of the homologous BADH genes, we cloned the AnBADH gene from the xerophytic leguminous plant Ammopiptanthus nanus by using reverse transcription PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The full-length cDNA is 1,868 bp long without intron, and contains an open reading frame of 1512 bp, and 3'- and 5'-untranslated regions of 294 and 62 bp. It encodes a 54.71 kDa protein of 503 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence shares high homology, conserved amino acid residues and sequence motifs crucial for the function with the BADHs in other leguminous species. The sequence of the open reading frame was used to construct a prokaryotic expression vector pET32a-AnBADH, and transform Escherichia coli. The transformants expressed the heterologous AnBADH gene under the induction of isopropyl β-D-thiogalactopyranoside, and demonstrated significant enhancement of salt and heat tolerance under the stress conditions of 700 mmol L(-1) NaCl and 55°C high temperature. This result suggests that the AnBADH gene might play a crucial role in adaption of A. nanus to the abiotic stresses, and have the potential to be applied to transgenic operations of commercially important crops for improvement of abiotic tolerance.

  8. Cadmium reduces 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 activity and expression in human placental trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kaiping; Julan, Laura; Rubio, Fran; Sharma, Anju; Guan, Haiyan

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium, a common environmental pollutant and a major constituent of tobacco smoke, has been identified as a new class of endocrine disruptors with a wide range of detrimental effects on mammalian reproduction. During human pregnancy, maternal cadmium exposure, via the environment and/or cigarette smoking, leads to fetal growth restriction (FGR), but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Although a substantial amount of evidence suggests that cadmium may affect fetal growth indirectly via the placenta, the molecular targets remain to be identified. Given that reduced placental 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11 beta-HSD2, encoded by HSD11B2 gene) is causally linked to FGR, the present study was undertaken to examine the hypothesis that cadmium induces FGR in part by targeting placental HSD11B2. Using cultured human trophoblast cells as a model system, we showed that cadmium exposure resulted in a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in 11 beta-HSD2 activity, such that an 80% reduction was observed after 24-h treatment at 1 microM. It also led to a similar decrease in levels of 11 beta-HSD2 protein and mRNA, suggesting that cadmium reduced 11 beta-HSD2 expression. Furthermore, cadmium diminished HSD11B2 promoter activity, indicative of repression of HSD11B2 gene transcription. In addition, the effect of cadmium was highly specific, in that other divalent metals (Zn(2+), Mg(2+), and Mn(2+)) as well as nicotine and cotinine (a major metabolite of nicotine) did not alter 11 beta-HSD2 activity. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that cadmium reduces human placental 11 beta-HSD2 expression and activity by suppressing HSD11B2 gene transcription. Thus the present study identifies placental 11 beta-HSD2 as a novel molecular target of cadmium. It also reveals a molecular mechanism by which this endocrine disruptor may affect human placental function and, consequently, fetal growth and development.

  9. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Paul R.; Mohammad, Shabaz; Melrose, Helen J.; Moody, Peter C. E.

    2008-08-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase B from H. pylori has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized in the presence of NAD. Crystals of GAPDHB diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution and belonged to space group P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 166.1, c = 253.1 Å. Helicobacter pylori is a dangerous human pathogen that resides in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Little is known about its metabolism and with the onset of antibiotic resistance new treatments are required. In this study, the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction of an NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from H. pylori are reported.

  10. Widening Spectrum of Cellular and Subcellular Expression of Human GLUD1 and GLUD2 Glutamate Dehydrogenases Suggests Novel Functions.

    PubMed

    Spanaki, Cleanthe; Kotzamani, Dimitra; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase1 (GDH1) (E.C. 1.4.1.3) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia while reducing NAD+ and/or NADP+ to NADH and/or NADPH. It links amino acid with carbohydrate metabolism, contributing to Krebs cycle anaplerosis, energy production, ammonia handling and redox homeostasis. Although GDH1 was one of the first major metabolic enzymes to be studied decades ago, its role in cell biology is still incompletely understood. There is however growing interest in a novel GDH2 isoenzyme that emerged via duplication in primates and underwent rapid evolutionary selection concomitant with prefrontal human cortex expansion. Also, the anaplerotic function of GDH1 and GDH2 is currently under sharp focus as this relates to the biology of glial tumors and other neoplasias. Here we used antibodies specific for human GDH1 (hGDH1) and human GDH2 (hGDH2) to study the expression of these isoenzymes in human tissues. Results revealed that both hGDH1 and hGDH2 are expressed in human brain, kidney, testis and steroidogenic organs. However, distinct hGDH1 and hGDH2 expression patterns emerged. Thus, while the Sertoli cells of human testis were strongly positive for hGDH2, they were negative for hGDH1. Conversely, hGDH1 showed very high levels of expression in human liver, but hepatocytes were virtually devoid of hGDH2. In human adrenals, both hGDHs were densely expressed in steroid-producing cells, with hGDH2 expression pattern matching that of the cholesterol side chain cleavage system involved in steroid synthesis. Similarly in human ovaries and placenta, both hGDH1 and hGDH2 were densely expressed in estrogen producing cells. In addition, hGDH1, being a housekeeping enzyme, was also expressed in cells that lack endocrine function. Regarding human brain, study of cortical sections using immunofluorescence (IF) with confocal microscopy revealed that hGDH1 and hGDH2 were both expressed

  11. Isoepoxydon dehydrogenase (idh) gene expression in relation to patulin production by Penicillium expansum under different temperature and atmosphere.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, N; Vlaemynck, G; Van Pamel, E; Van Weyenberg, S; Herman, L; Devlieghere, F; De Meulenaer, B; Van Coillie, E

    2016-03-02

    Penicillium expansum growth and patulin production occur mainly at post-harvest stage during the long-term storage of apples. Low temperature in combination with reduced oxygen concentrations is commonly applied as a control strategy to extend apple shelf life and supply the market throughout the year. Our in vitro study investigated the effect of temperature and atmosphere on expression of the idh gene in relation to the patulin production by P. expansum. The idh gene encodes the isoepoxydon dehydrogenase enzyme, a key enzyme in the patulin biosynthesis pathway. First, a reverse transcription real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) method was optimized to measure accurately the P. expansum idh mRNA levels relative to the mRNA levels of three reference genes (18S, β-tubulin, calmodulin), taking into account important parameters such as PCR inhibition and multiple reference gene stability. Subsequently, two P. expansum field isolates and one reference strain were grown on apple puree agar medium (APAM) under three conditions of temperature and atmosphere: 20 °C - air, 4 °C - air and 4 °C - controlled atmosphere (CA; 3% O2). When P. expansum strains reached a 0.5 and 2.0 cm colony diameter, idh expression and patulin concentrations were determined by means of the developed RT-qPCR and an HPLC-UV method, respectively. The in vitro study showed a clear reduction in patulin production and down-regulation of the idh gene expression when P. expansum was grown under 4 °C - CA. The results suggest that stress (low temperature and oxygen level) caused a delay of the fungal metabolism rather than a complete inhibition of toxin biosynthesis. A good correlation was found between the idh expression and patulin production, corroborating that temperature and atmosphere affected patulin production by acting at the transcriptional level of the idh gene. Finally, a reliable RT-qPCR can be considered as an alternative tool to investigate the effect of control strategies on the toxin formation in

  12. Regulation of adenine nucleotide translocase and glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase expression by thyroid hormones in different rat tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Dümmler, K; Müller, S; Seitz, H J

    1996-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3)-dependent gene expression of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) and the FAD-linked glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPDH) was investigated in several rat tissues. Both proteins provide an important link between cytosolic and mitochondrial metabolic pathways and seem to be involved in the stimulation of mitochondrial oxygen consumption in response to T3. Here we show that two ANT isoforms are expressed in rat, the muscle-specific ANT1 form and the ubiquitous ANT2 form. The expression of ANT1 mRNA is not sensitive to T3 whereas the amount of ANT2 mRNA is increased 7-9-fold in liver and heart within 12-48 h after T3 application. Little or no effect of T3 on ANT2 mRNA was observed in kidney and brain. The mRNA changes are paralleled by an increase in ANT protein, thus explaining the accelerated ADP/ATP exchange observed in mitochondria isolated from hyperthyroid rats. The key role of ANT2 in the control of hyperthyroid metabolism is evident because the expression of the mersalyl-sensitive phosphate carrier and the mitochondrial creatine kinase mRNA, which are functionally linked to ANT, did not respond to T3. Similarly to the ADP/ATP exchange, the transfer of cytosolic NADH to the respiratory chain via the glycerophosphate shuttle is very sensitive to T3. Recently we demonstrated the 10-15-fold induction of mGPDH mRNA in rat liver after administration of T3 [Müller and Seitz (1994) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 91, 10581-10585]. Here we show that, in contrast with ANT2, the time course of induction is fast (4-6 h). Furthermore, mGPDH mRNA is induced 6-fold by T3 in heart and 4-fold in kidney. From these results we conclude that the T3-mediated transcriptional induction leading to increased activity of ANT2 and mGPDH contributes considerably to the increase in mitochondrial oxygen consumption in rat tissues. PMID:8760382

  13. A novel flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) containing d-lactate dehydrogenase from the thermoacidophilic crenarchaeota Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7: purification, characterization and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Takenori; Kawakami, Ryushi; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2008-07-01

    Dye-linked D-lactate dehydrogenase activity was found in the crude extract of a continental thermoacidophilic crenarchaeota, Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7, and was purified 375-fold through four sequential chromatography steps. With a molecular mass of about 93 kDa, this enzyme was a homodimer comprised of identical subunits with molecular masses of about 48 kDa. The enzyme retained its full activity after incubation at 80 degrees C for 10 min and after incubation at pHs ranging from 6.5 to 10.0 for 30 min at 50 degrees C. The preferred substrate for this enzyme was D-lactate, with 2,6-dichloroindophenol serving as the electron acceptor. Using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the enzyme's prosthetic group was determined to be flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was MLEGIEYSQGEEREDFVGFKIKPKI. Using that sequence and previously reported genome information, the gene encoding the enzyme (ST0649) was identified. It was subsequently cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and found to encode a polypeptide of 440 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 49,715. The amino acid sequence of this dye-linked D-lactate dehydrogenase showed higher homology (39% identity) with that of a glycolate oxidase subunit homologue from Archaeoglobus fulgidus, but less similarity (32% identity) to D-lactate dehydrogenase from A. fulgidus. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dye-linked D-lactate dehydrogenase from S. tokodaii is a novel type of FAD containing D-lactate dehydrogenase.

  14. Thermal adaptation of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenases of eastern Pacific barracuda (Sphyraena spp): the role of differential isoenzyme expression

    PubMed

    Lin; Somero

    1995-01-01

    Kinetic properties, electrophoretic patterns and thermal stabilities of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenases (cMDHs) were compared in Eastern Pacific barracuda (Sphyraena spp) from different latitudes. All tissues of the tropical species S. ensis contained only a single, thermostable form of cMDH. Subtropical (S. lucasana) as well as north (S. argentea) and south (S. idiastes) temperate barracuda contained both thermostable and thermolabile cMDHs, the pattern characteristic of most teleosts. Kinetic studies using unfractioned cMDHs showed that the apparent Michaelis­Menten constant (Km) of cofactor (NADH) increased with temperature, but at the physiological temperatures of the four species, Km of NADH was conserved within a narrow range (20­23 µmol l-1). Thermostable and thermolabile cMDHs were chromatographically separated and compared. Thermolabile cMDHs had higher Km values for NADH at all measurement temperatures than did thermostable cMDHs. Thermolabile cMDHs isolated from congeneric barracuda exhibited similar kinetic properties (Km versus temperature, optimal pH, optimal substrate and cofactor concentrations). Thermostable cMDHs, likewise, were similar among the barracuda. Conservation of Km in the differently thermally adapted barracudas is, therefore, apparently due to adjustments in the ratio of expression of the thermostable and thermolabile isoforms, rather than to temperature-adaptive differences among orthologous homologues, as is commonly found for enzymes encoded by a single gene locus. The effects of temperature on the Km of NADH for isolated thermostable and thermolabile cMDHs of a eurythermal goby, Gillichthys mirabilis, however, were consistent with adaptive change in orthologous homologues of cMDH. The selective basis for the absence of thermolabile cMDH in warm-adapted ectotherms, mammals and birds is discussed.

  15. Expression of mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase and α-keto-acid dehydrogenase in rat brain: implications for neurotransmitter metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Jeffrey T.; Sweatt, Andrew J.; Hutson, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    In the brain, metabolism of the essential branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) leucine, isoleucine, and valine, is regulated in part by protein synthesis requirements. Excess BCAAs are catabolized or excreted. The first step in BCAA catabolism is catalyzed by the branched chain aminotransferase (BCAT) isozymes, mitochondrial BCATm and cytosolic BCATc. A product of this reaction, glutamate, is the major excitatory neurotransmitter and precursor of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The BCATs are thought to participate in a α-keto-acid nitrogen shuttle that provides nitrogen for synthesis of glutamate from α-ketoglutarate. The branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC) catalyzes the second, irreversible step in BCAA metabolism, which is oxidative decarboxylation of the branched-chain α-keto acid (BCKA) products of the BCAT reaction. Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD) results from genetic defects in BCKDC, which leads to accumulation of toxic levels of BCAAs and BCKAs that result in brain swelling. Immunolocalization of BCATm and BCKDC in rats revealed that BCATm is present in astrocytes in white matter and in neuropil, while BCKDC is expressed only in neurons. BCATm appears uniformly distributed in astrocyte cell bodies throughout the brain. The segregation of BCATm to astrocytes and BCKDC to neurons provides further support for the existence of a BCAA-dependent glial-neuronal nitrogen shuttle since the data show that BCKAs produced by glial BCATm must be exported to neurons. Additionally, the neuronal localization of BCKDC suggests that MSUD is a neuronal defect involving insufficient oxidation of BCKAs, with secondary effects extending beyond the neuron. PMID:22654736

  16. Biliary epithelial expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in primary biliary cirrhosis: an immunohistochemical and immunoelectron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Nakanuma, Y; Tsuneyama, K; Kono, N; Hoso, M; Van de Water, J; Gershwin, M E

    1995-01-01

    It has been reported recently that there is a unique distribution of the E2 subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC-E2) on biliary epithelial cells in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) but not primary sclerosing cholangitis. This distribution has been demonstrated using a mouse monoclonal antibody, coined C355.1. The epitope recognized by C355.1 is near the lipoic acid binding site of PDC-E2. C355.1 inhibits PDC-E2 activity in vitro and, unlike a panel of other monoclonal antibodies against different regions of PDC-E2, appears to bind not only to mitochondria but also to a unique antigen expressed predominantly on the luminal side of biliary epithelial cells in PBC. We have extended these observations by studying the subcellular reactivity of C355.1 using postembedding immunoelectron microscopy on the intrahepatic small bile ducts of PBC livers, extrahepatic biliary obstruction (EBO) livers, and normal livers. We report that the reactivity of C355.1 can be classified into two categories. The first category is characterized by small foci of reaction products that were randomly dispersed in cytoplasm, particularly in supranuclear areas; the ultrastructural characterization of these foci was impossible to define but was similar in PBC and EBO. However, of particular interest was the second category of reactivity, which was characterized by deposition of reaction products around the biliary lumen, including microvilli and adjacent subluminal ectoplasm and secretory substances in the biliary lumen. This staining pattern was frequent in PBC livers, only occasionally evident in EBO livers, and not found in normal livers. These data further define and highlight the unique subcellular distribution of PDC-E2 around the biliary lumen in PBC livers and suggest that this abnormality is related to the pathogenesis of bile duct lesions.

  17. Species-specific differences in tissue-specific expression of alcohol dehydrogenase are under the control of complex cis-acting loci: Evidence from Drosophila hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Ranganayakulu, G.; Reddy, A.R. ); Kirkpatrick, R.B.; Martin, P.F. )

    1991-12-01

    Differences in the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase in the hindgut and testis of adult Drosophila virilis, D. texana, D. novamexicana and D. borealis flies were observed. These heritable differences do not arise due to chromosomal rearrangements, since the polytene chromosome banding patterns did not reveal any such gross chromosomal rearrangements near the Adh locus in any of the tested species. Analysis of the interspecific hybrids revealed that these differences are controlled by complex cis-acting genetic loci. Further, the cis-acting locus controlling the expression of ADH in testis was found to be separable by crossing-over.

  18. Gene cloning and expression of Leifsonia alcohol dehydrogenase (LSADH) involved in asymmetric hydrogen-transfer bioreduction to produce (R)-form chiral alcohols.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kousuke; Makino, Yoshihide; Dairi, Tohru; Itoh, Nobuya

    2006-02-01

    The gene encoding Leifsonia alcohol dehydrogenase (LSADH), a useful biocatalyst for producing (R)-chiral alcohols, was cloned from the genomic DNA of Leifsonia sp. S749. The gene contained an opening reading frame consisting of 756 nucleotides corresponding to 251 amino acid residues. The subunit molecular weight was calculated to be 24,999, which was consistent with that determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzyme was expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli cells and purified to homogeneity by three column chromatographies. The predicted amino acid sequence displayed 30-50% homology to known short chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductases (SDRs); moreover, the NADH-binding site and the three catalytic residues in SDRs were conserved. The recombinant E. coli cells which overexpressed lsadh produced (R)-form chiral alcohols from ketones using 2-propanol as a hydrogen donor with the highest level of productivity ever reported and enantiomeric excess (e.e.).

  19. Cloning and high-level expression of the glutathione-independent formaldehyde dehydrogenase gene from Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, K; Takahashi, M; Yoshimoto, T; Tsuru, D

    1994-01-01

    A DNA fragment of 485 bp was specifically amplified by PCR with primers based on the N-terminal sequence of the purified formaldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.46) from Pseudomonas putida and on that of a cyanogen bromide-derived peptide. With this product as a probe, a gene coding for formaldehyde dehydrogenase (fdhA) in P. putida chromosomal DNA was cloned in Escherichia coli DH5 alpha. Sequencing analysis revealed that the fdhA gene contained 1,197-bp open reading frame, encoding a protein composed of 399 amino acid residues whose calculated molecular weight was 42,082. The transformant of E. coli DH5 alpha harboring the hybrid plasmid, pFDHK3DN71, showed about 50-fold-higher formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity than P. putida. The predicted amino acid sequence contained several features characteristic of the zinc-containing medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) family. Most of the glycine residues strictly conserved within the family, including a Gly-Xaa-Gly-Xaa-Xaa-Gly pattern in the coenzyme binding domain, were well conserved in this enzyme. Regions around both the catalytic and the structural zinc atoms were also conserved. Analyses of structural and enzymatic characteristics indicated that P. putida FDH belongs to the medium-chain ADH family, with mixed properties of mammalian class I and III ADHs. Images PMID:8169197

  20. Expression of the murine retinol dehydrogenase 10 (Rdh10) gene correlates with many sites of retinoid signalling during embryogenesis and organ differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cammas, Laura; Romand, Raymond; Fraulob, Valérie; Mura, Carole; Dollé, Pascal

    2007-10-01

    Retinoic acid acts as a signalling molecule regulating many developmental events in vertebrates. As this molecule directly influences gene expression by activating nuclear receptors, its patterns of synthesis have to be tightly regulated, and it is well established that at least three retinaldehyde dehydrogenases (RALDHs) are involved in such tissue-specific synthesis. Whereas embryos from oviparous species can obtain retinaldehyde by metabolizing carotenoids stored in the yolk, placental embryos rely on retinol transferred from the maternal circulation. Here, we show that the gene encoding one of the murine retinol dehydrogenases, Rdh10, is expressed according to complex profiles both during early embryogenesis and organ differentiation. Many of its expression sites correlate with regions of active retinoid signalling and Raldh gene expression, especially with Raldh2 in the early presomitic and somitic mesoderm, retrocardiac and posterior branchial arch region, or later in the pleural mesothelium and kidney cortical region. Rdh10 also shows cell-type and/or regional specificity during development of the palate, teeth, and olfactory system. During limb bud development, it may participate in retinoic acid production in proximal/posterior cells, and eventually in interdigital mesenchyme. These data implicate the retinol to retinaldehyde conversion as the first step in the tissue-specific regulation of retinoic acid synthesis, at least in mammalian embryos.

  1. In situ nucleic acid hybridization of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2 in primary biliary cirrhosis: pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2 messenger RNA is expressed in hepatocytes but not in biliary epithelium.

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Van de Water, J; Leung, P S; Coppel, R L; Nakanuma, Y; Gershwin, M E

    1997-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase-E2, or a cross-reactive molecule, has been shown by a variety of immunohistochemical methods to be present in increased amounts in biliary epithelial cells (BEC) in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). In this study, to further understand the nature of the immunoreactive molecule in BEC, we examined the expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2 (PDC-E2) messenger RNA (mRNA) and PDC-E2 protein in sections of livers from patients and controls to help identify the molecule found in BEC. We performed in situ hybridization using an antisense probe against the major epitope of PDC-E2. The data were very striking and suggested that there was no increased production of PDC-E2 in BEC. For example, in livers from patients with PBC, PDC-E2 mRNA was found in periportal hepatocytes in 16 of 17 cases (94%). In contrast, interlobular bile ducts and septal bile ducts had detectable levels of PDC-E2 mRNA in only 1 of 17 (6%) and 3 of 8 (38%) cases, respectively. Interestingly, proliferating bile ductules contained detectable levels of mRNA in 12 of 15 cases (80%). In control liver, periportal hepatocytes were positive in 15 of 17 cases (88%). Interlobular bile ducts, septal bile ducts, and proliferating bile ductules expressed mRNA signals in 4 of 17 (24%), 2 of 10 (20%), and 14 of 16 (88%), respectively. When formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections were examined by immunohistochemical staining with anti-PDC-E2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) C355.1, the interlobular bile ducts showed typical aberrant apical staining in all 10 PBC cases, but 0 of 9 liver controls. Periportal hepatocytes, proliferating bile ductules and infiltrating mononuclear cells stained with C355.1 but in a characteristic mitochondrial staining pattern. The presence of a PDC-E2-like molecule recognized by C355.1 is not reflected by the expression levels of PDC-E2 mRNA in the BEC of patients with PBC.

  2. Efficient production of acetoin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by disruption of 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase and expression of NADH oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sang-Jeong; Kim, Sujin; Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Acetoin is widely used in food and cosmetic industry as taste and fragrance enhancer. For acetoin production in this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae JHY605 was used as a host strain, where the production of ethanol and glycerol was largely eliminated by deleting five alcohol dehydrogenase genes (ADH1, ADH2, ADH3, ADH4, and ADH5) and two glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes (GPD1 and GPD2). To improve acetoin production, acetoin biosynthetic genes from Bacillus subtilis encoding α-acetolactate synthase (AlsS) and α-acetolactate decarboxylase (AlsD) were overexpressed, and BDH1 encoding butanediol dehydrogenase, which converts acetoin to 2,3-butanediol, was deleted. Furthermore, by NAD+ regeneration through overexpression of water-forming NADH oxidase (NoxE) from Lactococcus lactis, the cofactor imbalance generated during the acetoin production from glucose was successfully relieved. As a result, in fed-batch fermentation, the engineered strain JHY617-SDN produced 100.1 g/L acetoin with a yield of 0.44 g/g glucose. PMID:27279026

  3. Efficient production of acetoin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by disruption of 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase and expression of NADH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sang-Jeong; Kim, Sujin; Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2016-06-09

    Acetoin is widely used in food and cosmetic industry as taste and fragrance enhancer. For acetoin production in this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae JHY605 was used as a host strain, where the production of ethanol and glycerol was largely eliminated by deleting five alcohol dehydrogenase genes (ADH1, ADH2, ADH3, ADH4, and ADH5) and two glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes (GPD1 and GPD2). To improve acetoin production, acetoin biosynthetic genes from Bacillus subtilis encoding α-acetolactate synthase (AlsS) and α-acetolactate decarboxylase (AlsD) were overexpressed, and BDH1 encoding butanediol dehydrogenase, which converts acetoin to 2,3-butanediol, was deleted. Furthermore, by NAD(+) regeneration through overexpression of water-forming NADH oxidase (NoxE) from Lactococcus lactis, the cofactor imbalance generated during the acetoin production from glucose was successfully relieved. As a result, in fed-batch fermentation, the engineered strain JHY617-SDN produced 100.1 g/L acetoin with a yield of 0.44 g/g glucose.

  4. Prognostic significance of thymidylate synthase, thymidine phosphorylase and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase expression in biliary tract cancer patients receiving adjuvant 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    KIM, KWAN WOO; KWON, HYUK-CHAN; KIM, SUNG-HYUN; OH, SUNG YONG; LEE, SUEE; LEE, JI HYUN; ROH, MYUNG HWAN; KIM, MIN CHAN; KIM, KI HAN; KIM, YOUNG HOON; ROH, YOUNG HOON; JEONG, JIN SOOK; KIM, HYO-JIN

    2013-01-01

    Biliary tract cancer (BTC) is a relatively uncommon type of cancer, accounting for ∼4% of the malignant neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to determine whether the expression of thymidylate synthase (TS), thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) predict clinical outcome in BTC patients treated with adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. TS and TP expression were found to be significantly correlated with cancer location (P=0.044 and 0.031, respectively). The multivariate analysis revealed that age [hazard ratio (HR)=2.157, P=0.008], stage (HR=2.234, P<0.001), resection margin status (HR=2.748, P=0.004) and TP expression (HR=2.014, P=0.039) were independently associated with overall survival (OS). PMID:24649282

  5. Seasonal freeze resistance of rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) is generated by differential expression of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and antifreeze protein genes.

    PubMed

    Liebscher, Ryan S; Richards, Robert C; Lewis, Johanne M; Short, Connie E; Muise, Denise M; Driedzic, William R; Ewart, K Vanya

    2006-01-01

    In winter, rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) accumulate glycerol and produce an antifreeze protein (AFP), which both contribute to freeze resistance. The role of differential gene expression in the seasonal pattern of these adaptations was investigated. First, cDNAs encoding smelt and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and smelt glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were cloned so that all sequences required for expression analysis would be available. Using quantitative PCR, expression of beta actin in rainbow smelt liver was compared with that of GAPDH in order to determine its validity as a reference gene. Then, levels of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH), PEPCK, and AFP relative to beta actin were measured in smelt liver over a fall-winter-spring interval. Levels of GPDH mRNA increased in the fall just before plasma glycerol accumulation, implying a driving role in glycerol synthesis. GPDH mRNA levels then declined during winter, well in advance of serum glycerol, suggesting the possibility of GPDH enzyme or glycerol conservation in smelt during the winter months. PEPCK mRNA levels rose in parallel with serum glycerol in the fall, consistent with an increasing requirement for amino acids as metabolic precursors, remained elevated for much of the winter, and then declined in advance of the decline in plasma glycerol. AFP mRNA was elevated at the onset of fall sampling in October and remained elevated until April, implying separate regulation from GPDH and PEPCK. Thus, winter freezing point depression in smelt appears to result from a seasonal cycle of GPDH gene expression, with an ensuing increase in the expression of PEPCK, and a similar but independent cycle of AFP gene expression.

  6. Cloning and Expression of ntnD, Encoding a Novel NAD(P)+-Independent 4-Nitrobenzyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas sp. Strain TW3

    PubMed Central

    James, Keith D.; Hughes, Michelle A.; Williams, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain TW3 is able to metabolize 4-nitrotoluene to 4-nitrobenzoate and toluene to benzoate aerobically via a route analogous to the upper pathway of the TOL plasmids. We report the cloning and characterization of a benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ntnD) which encodes the enzyme for the catabolism of 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol and benzyl alcohol to 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and benzaldehyde, respectively. The gene is located downstream of the previously reported ntn gene cluster. NtnD bears no similarity to the analogous TOL plasmid XylB (benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase) protein either in its biochemistry, being NAD(P)+ independent and requiring assay via dye-linked electron transfer, or in its deduced amino acid sequence. It does, however, have significant similarity in its amino acid sequence to other NAD(P)+-independent alcohol dehydrogenases and contains signature patterns characteristic of type III flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent alcohol oxidases. Reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that ntnD is transcribed during growth on 4-nitrotoluene, although apparently not as part of the same transcript as the other ntn genes. The substrate specificity of the enzyme expressed from the cloned and overexpressed gene was similar to the activity expressed from strain TW3 grown on 4-nitrotoluene, providing evidence that ntnD is the previously unidentified gene in the pathway of 4-nitrotoluene catabolism. Examination of the 14.8-kb region around the ntn genes suggests that one or more recombination events have been involved in the formation of their current organization. PMID:10809692

  7. Functional characterization and expression analysis of rice δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase provide new insight into the regulation of proline and arginine catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; Funck, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    While intracellular proline accumulation in response to various stress conditions has been investigated in great detail, the biochemistry and physiological relevance of proline degradation in plants is much less understood. Moreover, the second and last step in proline catabolism, the oxidation of δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid (P5C) to glutamate, is shared with arginine catabolism. Little information is available to date concerning the regulatory mechanisms coordinating these two pathways. Expression of the gene coding for P5C dehydrogenase was analyzed in rice by real-time PCR either following the exogenous supply of amino acids of the glutamate family, or under hyperosmotic stress conditions. The rice enzyme was heterologously expressed in E. coli, and the affinity-purified protein was thoroughly characterized with respect to structural and functional properties. A tetrameric oligomerization state was observed in size exclusion chromatography, which suggests a structure of the plant enzyme different from that shown for the bacterial P5C dehydrogenases structurally characterized to date. Kinetic analysis accounted for a preferential use of NAD+ as the electron acceptor. Cations were found to modulate enzyme activity, whereas anion effects were negligible. Several metal ions were inhibitory in the micromolar range. Interestingly, arginine also inhibited the enzyme at higher concentrations, with a mechanism of uncompetitive type with respect to P5C. This implies that millimolar levels of arginine would increase the affinity of P5C dehydrogenase toward its specific substrate. Results are discussed in view of the involvement of the enzyme in either proline or arginine catabolism. PMID:26300893

  8. Cloning, expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the short-chain dehydrogenase enzymes WbmF, WbmG and WbmH from Bordetella bronchiseptica

    SciTech Connect

    Harmer, Nicholas J.; King, Jerry D.; Palmer, Colin M.; Preston, Andrew; Maskell, Duncan J.; Blundell, Tom L.

    2007-08-01

    The expression, purification, and crystallisation of the short-chain dehydrogenases WbmF, WbmG and WbmH from B. bronchiseptica are described. Native diffraction data to 1.5, 2.0, and 2.2 Å were obtained for the three proteins, together with complexes with nucleotides. The short-chain dehydrogenase enzymes WbmF, WbmG and WbmH from Bordetella bronchiseptica were cloned into Escherichia coli expression vectors, overexpressed and purified to homogeneity. Crystals of all three wild-type enzymes were obtained using vapour-diffusion crystallization with high-molecular-weight PEGs as a primary precipitant at alkaline pH. Some of the crystallization conditions permitted the soaking of crystals with cofactors and nucleotides or nucleotide sugars, which are possible substrate compounds, and further conditions provided co-complexes of two of the proteins with these compounds. The crystals diffracted to resolutions of between 1.50 and 2.40 Å at synchrotron X-ray sources. The synchrotron data obtained were sufficient to determine eight structures of the three enzymes in complex with a variety of cofactors and substrate molecules.

  9. Abiotic Stress Generates ROS That Signal Expression of Anionic Glutamate Dehydrogenases to Form Glutamate for Proline Synthesis in Tobacco and Grapevine[W

    PubMed Central

    Skopelitis, Damianos S.; Paranychianakis, Nikolaos V.; Paschalidis, Konstantinos A.; Pliakonis, Eleni D.; Delis, Ioannis D.; Yakoumakis, Dimitris I.; Kouvarakis, Antonios; Papadakis, Anastasia K.; Stephanou, Euripides G.; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A.

    2006-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) may be a stress-responsive enzyme, as GDH exhibits considerable thermal stability, and de novo synthesis of the α-GDH subunit is induced by exogenous ammonium and senescence. NaCl treatment induces reactive oxygen species (ROS), intracellular ammonia, expression of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi) gdh-NAD;A1 encoding the α-subunit of GDH, increase in immunoreactive α-polypeptide, assembly of the anionic isoenzymes, and in vitro GDH aminating activity in tissues from hypergeous plant organs. In vivo aminating GDH activity was confirmed by gas chromatorgraphy–mass spectrometry monitoring of 15N-Glu, 15N-Gln, and 15N-Pro in the presence of methionine sulfoximine and amino oxyacetic acid, inhibitors of Gln synthetase and transaminases, respectively. Along with upregulation of α-GDH by NaCl, isocitrate dehydrogenase genes, which provide 2-oxoglutarate, are also induced. Treatment with menadione also elicits a severalfold increase in ROS and immunoreactive α-polypeptide and GDH activity. This suggests that ROS participate in the signaling pathway for GDH expression and protease activation, which contribute to intracellular hyperammonia. Ammonium ions also mimic the effects of salinity in induction of gdh-NAD;A1 expression. These results, confirmed in tobacco and grape (Vitis vinifera cv Sultanina) tissues, support the hypothesis that the salinity-generated ROS signal induces α-GDH subunit expression, and the anionic iso-GDHs assimilate ammonia, acting as antistress enzymes in ammonia detoxification and production of Glu for Pro synthesis. PMID:17041150

  10. Immunocytochemical expression of 3beta- and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in bitch ovaries exposed to low doses of zearalenone.

    PubMed

    Gajecka, M; Otrocka-Domagała, I

    2013-01-01

    Companion animals, including bitches, are exposed to intoxication with zearalenone (ZEN) present in feed, and the above may lead to reproductive disorders which are pften noted in veterinary practice. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of long-term and low-dose ZEN intoxication on the immunoexpression (optical density) of 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD) and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-HSD) in the ovaries of pre-pubertal bitches. The experiment involved 30 clinically healthy, immature Beagle bitches aged approximately 70 days with initial average body weight of 8 kg. The animals were randomly divided into two experimental groups (EI and EII) and a control group (C; n = 10 in all groups). Group EI was administered 50 microg ZEN/kg BW per os over a period of 42 days, group EII received 75 microg ZEN/kg BW per os for 42 days, and group C was administered placebo per os over a period of 42 days. Weighed amounts of the analyzed mycotoxin were administered every morning in gel capsules before feeding. The animals were subjected to ovariohysterectomy at the end of the experiment. Immunocytochemical analyses were performed to localize 3beta-HSD and 17beta-HSD enzymes and determine their optical density. The results revealed that changes in the immunoexpression of the above enzymes were inversely proportional to the applied dose of ZEN substrate.

  11. The Impact of the Expression Level of Intratumoral Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase on Chemotherapy Sensitivity and Survival of Patients in Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cong; Liu, Hongpeng; Ma, Bin; Song, Yongxi; Gao, Peng; Xu, Yingying; Yu, Dehao

    2017-01-01

    The potential impact that the intratumoral expression level of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) has on chemotherapy sensitivity and long-term survival for gastric cancer (GC) patients remains controversial; therefore, this study seeks to clarify this issue. Our meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager (RevMan) 5.3 software. In vitro drug sensitivity tests, correlation coefficients between sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and expression levels of intratumoral DPD were used as effective indexes to analyse. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were used as endpoints for patient outcome, and hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were noted as measures of effect. There were 15 eligible studies including 1805 patients for the final analysis. The analysis revealed a statistically significant difference between the expression level of intratumoral DPD activity, DPD mRNA levels, and sensitivity to 5-FU in GC patients, with high expression levels of intratumoral DPD resulting in low sensitivity to 5-FU. However, no matter what therapeutic regimens were used, there was no significant difference for patient outcomes between high and low DPD expression groups, either in OS or in PFS. In conclusion, high levels of intratumoral DPD expression have a negative impact on sensitivity to 5-FU in GC patients, but no prognostic value for long-term survival was uncovered. PMID:28255193

  12. Stereoselective synthesis of (R)-phenylephrine using recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing a novel short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase gene from Serratia marcescens BCRC 10948.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guan-Jhih; Kuan, Yi-Chia; Chou, Hsiao-Yi; Fu, Tze-Kai; Lin, Jia-Shin; Hsu, Wen-Hwei; Yang, Ming-Te

    2014-01-20

    (R)-Phenylephrine [(R)-PE] is an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist and is widely used as a nasal decongestant to treat the common cold without the side effects of other ephedrine adrenergic drugs. We identified a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SM_SDR) from Serratia marcescens BCRC 10948 that was able to convert 1-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(methylamino) ethanone (HPMAE) into (R)-PE. The SM_SDR used NADPH and NADH as cofactors with specific activities of 17.35±0.71 and 5.57±0.07mU/mg protein, respectively, at 30°C and pH 7.0, thereby indicating that this enzyme could be categorized as an NADPH-preferring short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase. Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) expressing SM_SDR could convert HPMAE into (R)-PE with more than 99% enantiomeric excess. The productivity and conversion yield were 0.57mmolPE/lh and 51.06%, respectively, using 10mM HPMAE. Fructose was the most effective carbon source for the conversion of HPMAE to (R)-PE.

  13. Expression of the human isoform of glutamate dehydrogenase, hGDH2, augments TCA cycle capacity and oxidative metabolism of glutamate during glucose deprivation in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Jakob D; Lykke, Kasper; Bryk, Jaroslaw; Stridh, Malin H; Zaganas, Ioannis; Skytt, Dorte M; Schousboe, Arne; Bak, Lasse K; Enard, Wolfgang; Pääbo, Svante; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-03-01

    A key enzyme in brain glutamate homeostasis is glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) which links carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism mediating glutamate degradation to CO2 and expanding tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle capacity with intermediates, i.e. anaplerosis. Humans express two GDH isoforms, GDH1 and 2, whereas most other mammals express only GDH1. hGDH1 is widely expressed in human brain while hGDH2 is confined to astrocytes. The two isoforms display different enzymatic properties and the nature of these supports that hGDH2 expression in astrocytes potentially increases glutamate oxidation and supports the TCA cycle during energy-demanding processes such as high intensity glutamatergic signaling. However, little is known about how expression of hGDH2 affects the handling of glutamate and TCA cycle metabolism in astrocytes. Therefore, we cultured astrocytes from cerebral cortical tissue of hGDH2-expressing transgenic mice. We measured glutamate uptake and metabolism using [(3) H]glutamate, while the effect on metabolic pathways of glutamate and glucose was evaluated by use of (13) C and (14) C substrates and analysis by mass spectrometry and determination of radioactively labeled metabolites including CO2 , respectively. We conclude that hGDH2 expression increases capacity for uptake and oxidative metabolism of glutamate, particularly during increased workload and aglycemia. Additionally, hGDH2 expression increased utilization of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) during aglycemia and caused a general decrease in oxidative glucose metabolism. We speculate, that expression of hGDH2 allows astrocytes to spare glucose and utilize BCAAs during substrate shortages. These findings support the proposed role of hGDH2 in astrocytes as an important fail-safe during situations of intense glutamatergic activity. GLIA 2017;65:474-488.

  14. Expression of the succinate dehydrogenase genes (sdhCAB) from the facultatively anaerobic paenibacillus macerans during aerobic growth

    PubMed

    Schirawski; Hankeln; Unden

    1998-10-01

    Paenibacillus (formerly Bacillus) macerans is capable of succinate oxidation under oxic conditions and fumarate reduction under anoxic conditions. The reactions are catalyzed by different enzymes, succinate dehydrogenase (Sdh) and fumarate reductase (Frd). The genes encoding Sdh (sdhCAB) were analyzed. The gene products of sdhA and sdhB were similar to the subunits of known Sdh and Frd enzymes. The hydrophobic subunit SdhC showed close sequence similarity to the class of Sdh/Frd enzymes containing diheme cytochrome b. From the sdhCAB gene cluster two transcripts were produced, one comprising sdhCAB, the other sdhAB. The transcripts were found only during aerobic growth, and the amount was directly proportional to Sdh activity, but inversely proportional to Frd activity.

  15. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of budC Gene Encoding meso-2,3-Butanediol Dehydrogenase from Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guo-Chao; Bian, Ya-Qian; Han, Rui-Zhi; Dong, Jin-Jun; Ni, Ye

    2016-02-01

    The budC gene encoding a meso-2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase (BlBDH) from Bacillus licheniformis was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). Sequence analysis reveals that this BlBDH belongs to short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. In the presence of NADH, BlBDH catalyzes the reduction of diacetyl to (3S)-acetoin (97.3% ee), and further to (2S,3S)-2,3-butanediol (97.3% ee and 96.5% de). Similar to other meso-2,3-BDHs, it shows oxidative activity to racemic 2,3-butanediol whereas no activity toward racemic acetoin in the presence of NAD(+). For diacetyl reduction and 2,3-butanediol oxidation, the pH optimum of BlBDH is 5.0 and 10.0, respectively. Unusually, it shows relatively high activity over a wide pH range from 5.0 to 8.0 for racemic acetoin reduction. BlBDH shows lower K m and higher catalytic efficiency toward racemic acetoin (K m = 0.47 mM, k cat /K m = 432 s(-1)·mM(-1)) when compared with 2,3-butanediol (K m = 7.25 mM, k cat /K m = 81.5 s(-1)·mM(-1)), indicating its physiological role in favor of reducing racemic acetoin into 2,3-butanediol. The enzymatic characterization of BlBDH provides evidence for the directed engineering of B. licheniformis for producing enantiopure 2,3-butanediol.

  16. Pro-inflammatory Macrophages Sustain Pyruvate Oxidation through Pyruvate Dehydrogenase for the Synthesis of Itaconate and to Enable Cytokine Expression.

    PubMed

    Meiser, Johannes; Krämer, Lisa; Sapcariu, Sean C; Battello, Nadia; Ghelfi, Jenny; D'Herouel, Aymeric Fouquier; Skupin, Alexander; Hiller, Karsten

    2016-02-19

    Upon stimulation with Th1 cytokines or bacterial lipopolysaccharides, resting macrophages shift their phenotype toward a pro-inflammatory state as part of the innate immune response. LPS-activated macrophages undergo profound metabolic changes to adapt to these new physiological requirements. One key step to mediate this metabolic adaptation is the stabilization of HIF1α, which leads to increased glycolysis and lactate release, as well as decreased oxygen consumption. HIF1 abundance can result in the induction of the gene encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), which inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) via phosphorylation. Therefore, it has been speculated that pyruvate oxidation through PDH is decreased in pro-inflammatory macrophages. However, to answer this open question, an in-depth analysis of this metabolic branching point was so far lacking. In this work, we applied stable isotope-assisted metabolomics techniques and demonstrate that pyruvate oxidation is maintained in mature pro-inflammatory macrophages. Glucose-derived pyruvate is oxidized via PDH to generate citrate in the mitochondria. Citrate is used for the synthesis of the antimicrobial metabolite itaconate and for lipogenesis. An increased demand for these metabolites decreases citrate oxidation through the tricarboxylic acid cycle, whereas increased glutamine uptake serves to replenish the TCA cycle. Furthermore, we found that the PDH flux is maintained by unchanged PDK1 abundance, despite the presence of HIF1. By pharmacological intervention, we demonstrate that the PDH flux is an important node for M(LPS) macrophage activation. Therefore, PDH represents a metabolic intervention point that might become a research target for translational medicine to treat chronic inflammatory diseases.

  17. Pro-inflammatory Macrophages Sustain Pyruvate Oxidation through Pyruvate Dehydrogenase for the Synthesis of Itaconate and to Enable Cytokine Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Meiser, Johannes; Krämer, Lisa; Sapcariu, Sean C.; Battello, Nadia; Ghelfi, Jenny; D'Herouel, Aymeric Fouquier; Skupin, Alexander; Hiller, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Upon stimulation with Th1 cytokines or bacterial lipopolysaccharides, resting macrophages shift their phenotype toward a pro-inflammatory state as part of the innate immune response. LPS-activated macrophages undergo profound metabolic changes to adapt to these new physiological requirements. One key step to mediate this metabolic adaptation is the stabilization of HIF1α, which leads to increased glycolysis and lactate release, as well as decreased oxygen consumption. HIF1 abundance can result in the induction of the gene encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), which inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) via phosphorylation. Therefore, it has been speculated that pyruvate oxidation through PDH is decreased in pro-inflammatory macrophages. However, to answer this open question, an in-depth analysis of this metabolic branching point was so far lacking. In this work, we applied stable isotope-assisted metabolomics techniques and demonstrate that pyruvate oxidation is maintained in mature pro-inflammatory macrophages. Glucose-derived pyruvate is oxidized via PDH to generate citrate in the mitochondria. Citrate is used for the synthesis of the antimicrobial metabolite itaconate and for lipogenesis. An increased demand for these metabolites decreases citrate oxidation through the tricarboxylic acid cycle, whereas increased glutamine uptake serves to replenish the TCA cycle. Furthermore, we found that the PDH flux is maintained by unchanged PDK1 abundance, despite the presence of HIF1. By pharmacological intervention, we demonstrate that the PDH flux is an important node for M(LPS) macrophage activation. Therefore, PDH represents a metabolic intervention point that might become a research target for translational medicine to treat chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26679997

  18. Expression profiles of cortisol-inactivating enzyme, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2, in human epidermal tumors and its role in keratinocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Terao, Mika; Itoi, Saori; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2013-02-01

    The enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) catalyzes the interconversion between hormonally active cortisol and inactive cortisone within cells. There are two isozymes: 11β-HSD1 activates cortisol from cortisone and 11β-HSD2 inactivates cortisol to cortisone. 11β-HSD1 was recently discovered in skin, and we subsequently found that the enzyme negatively regulates keratinocyte proliferation. We verified 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 expression in benign and malignant skin tumors and investigated the role of 11β-HSD in skin tumor pathogenesis. Randomly selected formalin-fixed sections of skin lesions of seborrheic keratosis (SK), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) were stained with 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 antibodies, and 11β-HSD expression was also evaluated in murine epidermis in which hyperproliferation was induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13 acetate (TPA). We observed that 11β-HSD1 expression was decreased in all SK, SCC, and BCC lesions compared with unaffected skin. Conversely, 11β-HSD2 expression was increased in SK and BCC but not in SCC. Overexpression of 11β-HSD2 in keratinocytes increased cell proliferation. In the murine model, 11β-HSD1 expression was decreased in TPA-treated hyperproliferative skin. Our findings suggest that 11β-HSD1 expression is decreased in keratinocyte proliferative conditions, and 11β-HSD2 expression is increased in basal cell proliferating conditions, such as BCC and SK. Assessing 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 expression could be a useful tool for diagnosing and characterizing skin tumors.

  19. The Expression of Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Associated Cell Cycle (GACC) Genes Correlates with Cancer Stage and Poor Survival in Patients with Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dunrui; Moothart, Daniel R.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Qian, Xiaolan

    2013-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is often used as a stable housekeeping marker for constant gene expression. However, the transcriptional levels of GAPDH may be highly up-regulated in some cancers, including non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). Using a publically available microarray database, we identified a group of genes whose expression levels in some cancers are highly correlated with GAPDH up-regulation. The majority of the identified genes are cell cycle-dependent (GAPDH Associated Cell Cycle, or GACC). The up-regulation pattern of GAPDH positively associated genes in NSCLC is similar to that observed in cultured fibroblasts grown under conditions that induce anti-senescence. Data analysis demonstrated that up-regulated GAPDH levels are correlated with aberrant gene expression related to both glycolysis and gluconeogenesis pathways. Down-regulation of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP1) in gluconeogenesis in conjunction with up-regulation of most glycolytic genes is closely related to high expression of GAPDH in the tumors. The data presented demonstrate that up-regulation of GAPDH positively associated genes is proportional to the malignant stage of various tumors and is associated with an unfavourable prognosis. Thus, this work suggests that GACC genes represent a potential new signature for cancer stage identification and disease prognosis. PMID:23620736

  20. Increased Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β and Hexose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Expression in Adipose Tissue May Contribute to Glucocorticoid-Induced Mouse Visceral Adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chaoying; Yang, Huabing; Wang, Ying; Dong, Yunzhou; Yu, Fei; Wu, Yong; Wang, Wei; Ume, Adaku; Lutfy, Kabirullah; Friedman, Theodore C.; Tian, Shiliu; Liu, Yanjun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Increased adiposity in visceral depots is a crucial feature associated with glucocorticoid (GC) excess. The action of GCs in target tissue is regulated by GC receptor (GR) and 11ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11ß-HSD1) coupled with hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6pdh). Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) is known to be a crucial mediator of ligand-dependent gene transcription. We hypothesized that the major effects of corticosteroids on adipose fat accumulation are in part medicated by changes in GSK3β and H6pdh. METHODS We characterized the alterations of GSK3β and GC metabolic enzymes, and determined the impact of GR antagonist mifepristone on obesity-related genes and the expression of H6pdh and 11ß-HSD1 in adipose tissue of mice exposed to excess GC as well as in in vitro studies using 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with GCs. RESULTS Corticosterone (CORT) exposure increased abdominal fat mass and induced expression of lipid synthase ACC and ACL with activation of GSK3β phosphorylation in abdominal adipose tissue of C57BL/6J mice. Increased pSer9 GSK3β was correlated with induction of H6pdh and 11ß-HSD1. Additionally, mifepristone treatment reversed the production of H6pdh and attenuated CORT-mediated production of 11ß-HSD1 and lipogenic gene expression with reduction of pSer9 GSK3β, thereby leading to improvement of phenotype of adiposity within adipose tissue in mice treated with excess GCs. Suppression of pSer9 GSK3β by mifepristone was accompanied by activation of pThr308 Akt and blockade of CORT-induced adipogenic transcriptor C/EBPα and PPARγ. In addition, mifepristone also attenuated CORT-mediated activation of IRE1α/XBP1. Additionally, reduction of H6pdh by shRNA showed comparable effects to mifepristone on attenuating CORT-induced expression of GC metabolic enzymes and improved lipid accumulation in vitro in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. CONCLUSION These findings suggest that elevated adipose GSK3β and H6pdh expression contribute

  1. [Inheritance and phenotype expression of functional and null alleles of aromatic alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) in diploid wheats].

    PubMed

    Konovalov, A A; Shundrina, I K; Karpova, E V; Nefedov, A A; Goncharov, N P

    2014-11-01

    Functional F and null 0 alleles of the CAD1 (Aadh1) gene, which controls the biosynthesis of aromatic alcohol dehydrogenase, were studied in hybrids of the diploid wheat T. monococcum L. and Triticum sinskajae A.Filat. et Kurk. The gene CAD1 is located in chromosome 5A and is linked with the awnless gene awnS (La) with a recombination frequency of about 32%. Plants with genotypes FF, F0, and 00 were significantly different in the height and mechanical strength of the stalk (culm). The elastic limit of the culm tissues of plants FF was considerably higher than in 00 plants. F0 heterozygotes had intermediate values. The thickness of the wall of the sclerenchyma was thinner in plants with genotype 00. The chemical structure of lignin of plants with the functional CAD allele contained units of a phloroglucinol series missing in the mutant plants. The CAD genotypes had no effect on the relative content of cellulose and lignin in stalks ofdiploid wheat and insignificantly influenced the ratio of H :G : S units in the lignin structure, as well as some components of extractives.

  2. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase protein and mRNA are both differentially expressed in adult chickens but not chick embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Milner, R J; Brow, M D; Cleveland, D W; Shinnick, T M; Sutcliffe, J G

    1983-01-01

    We have determined the 679 nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone which, by hybridization-translation experiments, corresponds to a 36K chick brain protein. Our studies provide a partial amino acid sequence for this protein, identifying it as chicken glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Antisera raised against purified chicken GAPDH reacted with a 36K protein present in chick brain extracts and estimated to be the fourth most prevalent protein, as determined by either Coomassie Blue staining or by in vitro translation of chick brain mRNA. The amounts of GAPDH mRNA in chick brain, liver and muscle and adult chicken brain are similar, whereas the relative amount of adult chicken muscle GPDH mRNA is greatly elevated and that of adult liver lowered. The GAPDH protein levels showed a similar variation between tissues, suggesting that the levels of GAPDH protein are largely regulated by the amount of available GAPDH mRNA. The chicken GAPDH clone does not hybridize to rat mRNA, even though GAPDH is one of the most evolutionarily conserved proteins, indicating that selection pressures are heavier at the primary protein sequence level than at the nucleic acid sequence level for this gene, a situation contrasting to that of the tubulins. Images PMID:6687938

  3. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis of d-lactate dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus jensenii

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangwoo; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2014-01-01

    The thermostable d-lactate dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus jensenii (Lj d-LDH) is a key enzyme for the production of the d-form of lactic acid from pyruvate concomitant with the oxidation of NADH to NAD+. The polymers of lactic acid are used as biodegradable bioplastics. The Lj d-LDH protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of 28%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 400, 100 mM Tris–HCl pH 9, 200 mM magnesium sulfate at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 2.1 Å. The crystal belonged to space group P3121, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 90.5, c = 157.8 Å. With two molecules per asymmetric unit, the crystal volume per unit protein weight (V M) is 2.58 Å3 Da−1, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 52.3%. The structure was solved by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion using a selenomethionine derivative. PMID:25084378

  4. 17Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase Type 1 and Type 2: association between mRNA expression and activity in cell lines.

    PubMed

    Day, Joanna M; Tutill, Helena J; Newman, Simon P; Purohit, Atul; Lawrence, Harshani R; Vicker, Nigel; Potter, Barry V L; Reed, Michael J

    2006-03-27

    17Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17beta-HSDs) are a family of enzymes that regulate steroid availability within a tissue by catalysing the interconversion of active and inactive forms. Type 1 is up-regulated in many breast tumours, and is responsible for the reduction of oestrone to active oestradiol which stimulates cell proliferation within the tumour. Type 2 oxidises many active steroids to their inactive forms, including oestradiol to oestrone. In this study, we have compared the mRNA expression and enzyme activities of Type 1 and Type 2 in MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, T47D, JEG3 and 293-EBNA cell lines. Also studied were two cell lines stably expressing transfected Type 1 cDNA. RT-PCR indicated that little Type 1 mRNA is expressed in two of the breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and in 293-EBNA cells, but that expression is much higher in the T47D breast cancer cell line, and in the choriocarcinoma cell line, JEG3. However, a higher level of expression of Type 1 is seen in the transfected cell lines MCF-7.8H and 293-EBNA[His617beta-HSD1]. Activity assays show that there is high association between mRNA expression and enzyme activity. Assays indicate that, with the exception of MDA-MB-231 cells, Type 2 activity is low in these lines. The study of the basal activities of these enzymes will be used in future studies investigating the regulation of the enzymes by endogenous and exogenous factors. An understanding of their regulation in both healthy and malignant tissues may lead to future therapeutic intervention at the regulatory level.

  5. Lignin and lignans in plant defence: insight from expression profiling of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase genes during development and following fungal infection in Populus.

    PubMed

    Bagniewska-Zadworna, Agnieszka; Barakat, Abdelali; Lakomy, Piotr; Smoliński, Dariusz J; Zadworny, Marcin

    2014-12-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) catalyses the final step in the biosynthesis of monolignol, the main component of lignin. Lignins, deposited in the secondary cell wall, play a role in plant defence against pathogens. We re-analysed the phylogeny of CAD/CAD-like genes using sequences from recently sequenced genomes, and analysed the temporal and spatial expression profiles of CAD/CAD-like genes in Populus trichocarpa healthy and infected plants. Three fungal pathogens (Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium oxysporum, and Cytospora sp.), varying in lifestyle and pathogenicity, were used for plant infection. Phylogenetic analyses showed that CAD/CAD-like genes were distributed in classes represented by all members from angiosperm lineages including basal angiosperms and Selaginella. The analysed genes showed different expression profiles during development and demonstrated that three genes were involved in primary xylem maturation while five may function in secondary xylem formation. Expression analysis following inoculation with fungal pathogens, showed that five genes were induced in either stem or leaves. These results add further evidence that CAD/CAD-like genes have evolved specialised functions in plant development and defence against various pest and pathogens. Two genes (PoptrCAD11 and PoptrCAD15), which were induced under various stresses, could be treated as universal markers of plant defence using lignification or lignan biosynthesis.

  6. Delta 5-3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 beta HSD) from Digitalis lanata. Heterologous expression and characterisation of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Herl, Vanessa; Frankenstein, Jördis; Meitinger, Nadine; Müller-Uri, Frieder; Kreis, Wolfgang

    2007-06-01

    During the biosynthesis of cardiac glycosides, Delta (5)-3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 beta HSD, EC 1.1.1.51) converts pregnenolone (5-pregnen-3beta-ol-20-one) to isoprogesterone (5-pregnene-3,20-dione). A 3 beta HSD gene was isolated from leaves of Digitalis lanata. It consisted of 870 nucleotides containing a 90 nucleotide long intron. A full-length cDNA clone that encodes 3 beta HSD was isolated by RT-PCR from the same source. A SPH I /KPN I 3 beta HSD cDNA was cloned into the pQE30 vector and then transferred into E. COLI strain M15[pREP4]. 3 beta HSD cDNA was functionally expressed as a His-tagged fusion protein (pQ3 beta HSD) composed of 273 amino acids (calculated molecular mass 28,561 Da). pQ3 beta HSD was purified by metal chelate affinity chromatography on Ni-NTA. Pregnenolone and other 3beta-hydroxypregnanes but not cholesterol were 3beta-oxidised by pQ3 beta HSD when NAD was used as the co-substrate. Testosterone (4-androsten-17beta-ol-3-one) was converted to 4-androstene-3,17-dione indicating that the pQ3 beta HSD has also 17beta-dehydrogenase activity. pQ3 beta HSD was able to reduce 3-keto steroids to their corresponding 3beta-hydroxy derivatives when NADH was used as the co-substrate. For comparison, 3 beta HSD genes were isolated and sequenced from another 6 species of the genus DIGITALIS. Gene structure and the deduced 3 beta HSD proteins share a high degree of similarity.

  7. In Vivo Validation of In Silico Predicted Metabolic Engineering Strategies in Yeast: Disruption of α-Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase and Expression of ATP-Citrate Lyase for Terpenoid Production

    PubMed Central

    Gruchattka, Evamaria; Kayser, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Background Engineering of the central carbon metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to redirect metabolic flux towards cytosolic acetyl-CoA has become a central topic in yeast biotechnology. A cell factory with increased flux into acetyl-CoA can be used for heterologous production of terpenoids for pharmaceuticals, biofuels, fragrances, or other acetyl-CoA derived compounds. In a previous study, we identified promising metabolic engineering targets in S. cerevisiae using an in silico stoichiometric metabolic network analysis. Here, we validate selected in silico strategies in vivo. Results Patchoulol was produced by yeast via a heterologous patchoulol synthase of Pogostemon cablin. To increase the metabolic flux from acetyl-CoA towards patchoulol, a truncated HMG-CoA reductase was overexpressed and farnesyl diphosphate synthase was fused with patchoulol synthase. The highest increase in production could be achieved by modifying the carbon source; sesquiterpenoid titer increased from glucose to ethanol by a factor of 8.4. Two strategies predicted in silico were chosen for validation in this work. Disruption of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase gene (KGD1) was predicted to redirect the metabolic flux via the pyruvate dehydrogenase bypass towards acetyl-CoA. The metabolic flux was redirected as predicted, however, the effect was dependent on cultivation conditions and the flux was interrupted at the level of acetate. High amounts of acetate were produced. As an alternative pathway to synthesize cytosolic acetyl-CoA, ATP-citrate lyase was expressed as a polycistronic construct, however, in vivo performance of the enzyme needs to be optimized to increase terpenoid production. Conclusions Stoichiometric metabolic network analysis can be used successfully as a metabolic prediction tool. However, this study highlights that kinetics, regulation and cultivation conditions may interfere, resulting in poor in vivo performance. Main sites of regulation need to be released and

  8. Kinetic characterization of recombinant Bacillus coagulans FDP-activated l-lactate dehydrogenase expressed in Escherichia coli and its substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ting; Xu, Yanbing; Sun, Xiucheng; Zheng, Zhaojuan; Ouyang, Jia

    2014-03-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a homofermentative, acid-tolerant and thermophilic sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, which is capable of producing high yields of optically pure lactic acid. The l-(+)-lactate dehydrogenase (l-LDH) from B. coagulans is considered as an ideal biocatalyst for industrial production. In this study, the gene ldhL encoding a thermostable l-LDH was amplified from B. coagulans NL01 genomic DNA and successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant enzyme was partially purified and its enzymatic properties were characterized. Sequence analysis demonstrated that the l-LDH was a fructose 1,6-diphosphate-activated NAD-dependent lactate dehydrogenase (l-nLDH). Its molecular weight was approximately 34-36kDa. The Km and Vmax values of the purified l-nLDH for pyruvate were 1.91±0.28mM and 2613.57±6.43μmol(minmg)(-1), respectively. The biochemical properties of l-nLDH showed that the specific activity were up to 2323.29U/mg with optimum temperature of 55°C and pH of 6.5 in the pyruvate reduction and 351.01U/mg with temperature of 55°C and pH of 11.5 in the lactate oxidation. The enzyme also showed some activity in the absence of FDP, with a pH optimum of 4.0. Compared to other lactic acid bacterial l-nLDHs, the enzyme was found to be relatively stable at 50°C. Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) ions had activated effects on the enzyme activity, and the enzyme was greatly inhibited by Ni(2+) ion. Besides these, l-nLDH showed the higher specificity towards pyruvate esters, such as methyl pyruvate and ethyl pyruvate.

  9. Impact of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency on sickle cell anaemia expression in infancy and early childhood: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Benkerrou, Malika; Alberti, Corinne; Couque, Nathalie; Haouari, Zinedine; Ba, Aissatou; Missud, Florence; Boizeau, Priscilla; Holvoet, Laurent; Ithier, Ghislaine; Elion, Jacques; Baruchel, André; Ducrocq, Rolande

    2013-12-01

    In patients with sickle cell anaemia (SCA), concomitant glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is usually described as having no effect and only occasionally as increasing severity. We analysed sequential clinical and biological data for the first 42 months of life in SCA patients diagnosed by neonatal screening, including 27 G6PD-deficient patients, who were matched on sex, age and parents' geographic origin to 81 randomly selected patients with normal G6PD activity. In the G6PD-deficient group, steady-state haemoglobin was lower (-6·2 g/l, 95% confidence interval (CI), [-10·1; -2·3]) and reticulocyte count higher (247 × 10(9) /l, 95%CI, [97; 397]). The acute anaemic event rate was 3 times higher in the G6PD-deficient group (P < 10(-3) ). A higher proportion of G6PD-deficient patients required blood transfusion (20/27 [74%] vs. 37/81 [46%], P < 10(-3) ), for acute anaemic events, and also vaso-occlusive and infectious events. No significant between-group differences were found regarding the rates of vaso-occlusive, infectious, or cerebrovascular events. G6PD deficiency in babies with SCA worsens anaemia and increases blood transfusion requirements in the first years of life. These effects decrease after 2 years of age, presumably as the decline in fetal haemoglobin levels leads to increased sickle cell haemolysis and younger red blood cells with higher G6PD activity.

  10. Improved Tolerance to Various Abiotic Stresses in Transgenic Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas) Expressing Spinach Betaine Aldehyde Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Weijuan; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Hongxia; Zhang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Abiotic stresses are critical delimiters for the increased productivity and cultivation expansion of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), a root crop with worldwide importance. The increased production of glycine betaine (GB) improves plant tolerance to various abiotic stresses without strong phenotypic changes, providing a feasible approach to improve stable yield production under unfavorable conditions. The gene encoding betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) is involved in the biosynthesis of GB in plants, and the accumulation of GB by the heterologous overexpression of BADH improves abiotic stress tolerance in plants. This study is to improve sweet potato, a GB accumulator, resistant to multiple abiotic stresses by promoted GB biosynthesis. A chloroplastic BADH gene from Spinacia oleracea (SoBADH) was introduced into the sweet potato cultivar Sushu-2 via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The overexpression of SoBADH in the transgenic sweet potato improved tolerance to various abiotic stresses, including salt, oxidative stress, and low temperature. The increased BADH activity and GB accumulation in the transgenic plant lines under normal and multiple environmental stresses resulted in increased protection against cell damage through the maintenance of cell membrane integrity, stronger photosynthetic activity, reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and induction or activation of ROS scavenging by the increased activity of free radical-scavenging enzymes. The increased proline accumulation and systemic upregulation of many ROS-scavenging genes in stress-treated transgenic plants also indicated that GB accumulation might stimulate the ROS-scavenging system and proline biosynthesis via an integrative mechanism. This study demonstrates that the enhancement of GB biosynthesis in sweet potato is an effective and feasible approach to improve its tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses without causing phenotypic defects. This strategy for trait improvement in

  11. Caenorhabditis elegans expressing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae NADH alternative dehydrogenase Ndi1p, as a tool to identify new genes involved in complex I related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cossard, Raynald; Esposito, Michela; Sellem, Carole H.; Pitayu, Laras; Vasnier, Christelle; Delahodde, Agnès; Dassa, Emmanuel P.

    2015-01-01

    Isolated complex I deficiencies are one of the most commonly observed biochemical features in patients suffering from mitochondrial disorders. In the majority of these clinical cases the molecular bases of the diseases remain unknown suggesting the involvement of unidentified factors that are critical for complex I function. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae NDI1 gene, encoding the mitochondrial internal NADH dehydrogenase was previously shown to complement a complex I deficient strain in Caenorhabditis elegans with notable improvements in reproduction and whole organism respiration. These features indicate that Ndi1p can functionally integrate the respiratory chain, allowing complex I deficiency complementation. Taking into account the Ndi1p ability to bypass complex I, we evaluate the possibility to extend the range of defects/mutations causing complex I deficiencies that can be alleviated by NDI1 expression. We report here that NDI1 expressing animals unexpectedly exhibit a slightly shortened lifespan, a reduction in the progeny, and a depletion of the mitochondrial genome. However, Ndi1p is expressed and targeted to the mitochondria as a functional protein that confers rotenone resistance to those animals without affecting their respiration rate and ATP content. We show that the severe embryonic lethality level caused by the RNAi knockdowns of complex I structural subunit encoding genes (e.g., NDUFV1, NDUFS1, NDUFS6, NDUFS8, or GRIM-19 human orthologs) in wild type animals is significantly reduced in the Ndi1p expressing worm. All together these results open up the perspective to identify new genes involved in complex I function, assembly, or regulation by screening an RNAi library of genes leading to embryonic lethality that should be rescued by NDI1 expression. PMID:26124772

  12. 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase types 1 and 2 in postnatal development of rat testis: gene expression, localization and regulation by luteinizing hormone and androgens.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong-Yu; Chen, Xin-Xin; Lin, Han; Fei, Ai-Li; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2014-01-01

    11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) and type 2 (11β-HSD2) are expressed in rat testis, where they regulate the local concentrations of glucocorticoids. Here, we investigated the expression and localization of 11β-HSD in rat testis during postnatal development, and the regulation of these genes by luteinizing hormone (LH) and androgens. mRNA and protein levels were analyzed by quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively, in testes collected from rats at postnatal day (PND) 7, 14, 21, 35, and 90, and from rats treated with LH, 7α-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENT) and testosterone at PND 21 and PND 90. Immunohistochemical staining was used to identify the localization of the 11β-HSD in rat testis at PND 7, 14, and 90. We found that 11β-HSD1 expression was restricted to the interstitial areas, and that its levels increased during rat testis development. In contrast, whereas 11β-HSD2 was expressed in both the interstitial areas and seminiferous tubules at PND 7, it was present only in the interstitial areas at PND 90, and its levels declined during testicular development. Moreover, 11β-HSD1 mRNA was induced by LH in both the PND 21 and 90 testes and by MENT at PND 21, whereas 11β-HSD2 mRNA was induced by testosterone and MENT in the PND 21 testis and by LH in the PND 90 testis. In conclusion, our study indicates that the 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 genes have distinct patterns of spatiotemporal expression and hormonal regulation during postnatal development of the rat testis.

  13. Expression of P450 aromatase and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 at fetal-maternal interface during tubal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Qin, Li; Xiao, Zhi-Jie; Wang, Yan-Ling; Herva, Riitta; Leng, Jin-Hua; Lang, Jing-He; Isomaa, Veli; Piao, Yun-Shang

    2003-12-01

    Steroidogenesis in the placenta has been studied widely, but little is known about steroid metabolism in ectopic pregnancy. Previous studies have indicated that trophoblast invasion and placentation in the uterus and the fallopian tube may be controlled by similar mechanisms. As far as 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) production is concerned, it has been well demonstrated that its biosynthesis in the placenta involves the action of P450 aromatase (P450arom) and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (17HSD1). The purpose of this study was to characterize the expression pattern of P450arom and 17HSD1 at the fetal-maternal interface, particularly in various trophoblast cells, in tubal pregnancy. Using in situ hybridization, P450arom mRNA was localized in syncytiotrophoblast (ST) cells, which are mainly responsible for hormone production during pregnancy, whereas no signal was detected in villous cytotrophoblast (VCT), column CT and extravillous CT (EVCT) cells. Immunohistochemical assays revealed that 17HSD1 is present in ST cells, a large portion of EVCT cells and 20% of column CT cells. On the other hand, no expression of 17HSD1 was detected in VCT cells. In addition, 17HSD1 was found in epithelial cells of the fallopian tube. Interestingly, the expression level of 17HSD1 in fallopian tube epithelium during tubal pregnancy was significantly higher than that during normal cycle. Our data provide the first evidence that normal and tubal pregnancies possess identical expression of P450arom and 17HSD1 in ST cells and therefore, similar E(2) production in the placenta. Further, the association of 17HSD1 with EVCT cells indicates that 17HSD1 perhaps play a role in trophoblast invasion. Finally, increased expression of 17HSD1 in epithelial cells of fallopian tube may lead to a local E(2) supply sufficient for the maintenance of tubal pregnancy.

  14. Aberrant expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A (ALDH1A) subfamily genes in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia is a common feature of T-lineage tumours.

    PubMed

    Longville, Brooke A C; Anderson, Denise; Welch, Mathew D; Kees, Ursula R; Greene, Wayne K

    2015-01-01

    The class 1A aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH1A) subfamily of genes encode enzymes that function at the apex of the retinoic acid (RA) signalling pathway. We detected aberrant expression of ALDH1A genes, particularly ALDH1A2, in a majority (72%) of primary paediatric T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) specimens. ALDH1A expression was almost exclusive to T-lineage, but not B-lineage, ALL. To determine whether ALDH1A expression may have relevance to T-ALL cell growth and survival, the effect of inhibiting ALDH1A function was measured on a panel of human ALL cell lines. This revealed that T-ALL proliferation had a higher sensitivity to modulation of ALDH1A activity and RA signalling as compared to ALL cell lines of B-lineage. Consistent with these findings, the genes most highly correlated with ALDH1A2 expression were involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis. Evidence that such genes may be targets of regulation via RA signalling initiated by ALDH1A activity was provided by the TNFRSF10B gene, encoding the apoptotic death receptor TNFRSF10B (also termed TRAIL-R2), which negatively correlated with ALDH1A2 and showed elevated transcription following treatment of T-ALL cell lines with the ALDH1A inhibitor citral (3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienal). These data indicate that ALDH1A expression is a common event in T-ALL and supports a role for these enzymes in the pathobiology of this disease.

  15. Cloning and expression of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase during gonadal recrudescence and after hCG induction in the air-breathing catfish, Clarias gariepinus.

    PubMed

    Raghuveer, Kavarthapu; Senthilkumaran, Balasubramanian

    2012-09-01

    3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-hsd) plays an important role in biosynthesis of both androgens and estrogens during steroidogenesis. In this study, we report the cloning of a full-length cDNA of 3β-hsd from gonads of the air-breathing catfish, Clarias gariepinus a seasonally reproducing teleost fish. We studied the expression pattern of 3β-hsd during gonadal ontogeny and recrudescence (flanking two years of reproductive cycle) using real-time PCR. We also examined the influence of gonadotropin on 3β-hsd expression in gonads of catfish by human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) induction. The real-time PCR results revealed that 3β-hsd transcript was detectable much earlier in undifferentiated gonads i.e. before the sex differentiation and later on its expression was seen in both male and female gonads throughout the development. The expression analysis during subsequent seasonal reproductive cycle in catfish (older than one year) showed that in adult males, the transcripts were significantly high during prespawning phase (spermatogenesis) and declined during spermiation. In adult females, the transcripts were abundantly expressed in the ovarian follicles both at prespawning and spawning phases. Furthermore, the 3β-hsd mRNA levels in different follicular stages were markedly high in vitellogenic follicles (maturing oocytes; stage III) compared to other stages. Treatment of hCG in recrudescing female fish, in vivo as well as in testicular slices, in vitro resulted in the up-regulation of gonadal 3β-hsd mRNA indicating that it is under the regulation of gonadotropins. These results together suggest that 3β-hsd gene plays an important role during spermatogenesis and oogenesis as well as in the gonadal recrudescence of catfish.

  16. Expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 and glucocorticoid receptors in reproductive tissue of male horses at different stages of sexual maturity.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Luna, C V; Budik, S; Helmreich, M; Walter, I; Aurich, C

    2013-04-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) as mediators of the stress response may affect Leydig cell function by inhibiting either luteinizing hormone receptor expression or testosterone biosynthesis. The isozymes 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11βHSD) 1 and 11βHSD2 control the intracellular cortisol levels. Little is known about the effects of stress on fertility in the equine. The objective of the present study was to determine the presence and cellular localization of glucocorticoid receptors (GCR) and glucocorticoid-metabolizing enzymes (11βHSD1 and 11βHSD2) in equine epididymal and testicular tissue with special regard to sexual maturation. Testicular and epididymal tissue was collected from 21 healthy stallions, and four age groups were designed: pre-pubertal, young, mature and older horses. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) were used. Pre-pubertal horses showed higher testicular gene expression of 11βHSD1, 11βHSD2 and GCR than horses of all other groups (p < 0.05). A positive intranuclear immunoreaction for GCR was seen in epithelial cells of caput, corpus and cauda epididymidis and in Leydig cells. Significant differences (p < 0.05) between age groups occurred. The number of Leydig cells staining positive for GCR was highest in immature stallions (p < 0.05). The enzyme 11βHSD1 was localized in epithelial cells of the caput and corpus epididymidis and in Leydig cells. As determined by enzyme assay, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependant dehydrogenase (oxidation) activity was not detected in testicular tissue from immature stallions but in all other age groups (n = 3 per group). Results of this study suggest a contribution of GCs to maturation of male reproductive tissue in horses. In mature stallions, expression of 11βHSD enzymes and the oxidative 11βHSD activity in Leydig cells and epididymal basal and principal cells suggest a protective role on these tissues contributing to physiological intracellular

  17. Enhancement of 1,3-propanediol production by expression of pyruvate decarboxylase and aldehyde dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis in the acetolactate-synthase-deficient mutant of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Mok; Hong, Won-Kyung; Heo, Sun-Yeon; Park, Jang Min; Jung, You Ree; Oh, Baek-Rock; Joe, Min-Ho; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Chul Ho

    2014-08-01

    The acetolactate synthase (als)-deficient mutant of Klebsiella pneumoniae fails to produce 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) or 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD), and is defective in glycerol metabolism. In an effort to recover production of the industrially valuable 1,3-PD, we introduced the Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (aldB) genes into the als-deficient mutant to activate the conversion of pyruvate to ethanol. Heterologous expression of pdc and aldB efficiently recovered glycerol metabolism in the 2,3-BD synthesis-defective mutant, enhancing the production of 1,3-PD by preventing the accumulation of pyruvate. Production of 1,3-PD in the pdc- and aldB-expressing als-deficient mutant was further enhanced by increasing the aeration rate. This system uses metabolic engineering to produce 1,3-PD while minimizing the generation of 2,3-BD, offering a breakthrough for the industrial production of 1,3-PD from crude glycerol.

  18. Efficient expression of codon-adapted human acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 cDNA with 6xHis tag in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zhao, YuFeng; Lei, MingKe; Wu, YuanXin; Zhang, ZiSheng; Wang, CunWen

    2009-10-01

    Human mitochondrial acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) catalyzes the oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetic acid. Therefore, ALDH2 has therapeutic potential in detoxification of acetaldehyde. Furthermore, ALDH2 catalyzes nitroglycerin to nitrate and 1, 2-glyceryldinitrate during therapy for angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. Large quantities of ALDH2 will be needed for potential clinical practice. In this study, Pichia pastoris was used as a platform for expression of human ALDH2. Based on the ALDH2*1 cDNA sequence, we designed ALDH2 cDNA by choosing the P. pastoris preferred codons and by decreasing the G + C content level. The sequence was synthesized using the overlap extension PCR method. The cDNA and 6xHis tags were subcloned into the plasmid pPIC9K. The recombinant protein was expressed in P. pastoris GS115 and purified using Ni(2+)-Sepharose affinity chromatography. The amount of secreted protein in the culture was 80 mg/L in shake-flask cultivation and 260 mg/L in high-density bioreactor fermentation. Secreted ALDH2 was easily purified from the culture supernatant by using Ni(2+)-Sepharose affinity chromatography. After purification of the fermentation supernatant, the enzyme had a specific activity of 1.2 U/mg protein. The yield was about 16 mg/L in a shake flask culture of P. pastoris GS115 which contained the original human ALDH2*1 cDNA.

  19. Expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A1 and high mobility group box 1 in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in association with survival time

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xu; Coordes, Annekatrin; Kaufmann, Andreas M.; Albers, Andreas E.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of novel multimodal treatment combinations in advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), outcomes remain poor. The identification of specifically validated biomarkers is required to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms, to evaluate treatment efficiency and to develop novel therapeutic targets. The present study, therefore, examined the presence of aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A1 (ALDH1A1) and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) expression in primary OSCC and analyzed the impact on survival time. In 59 patients with OSCC, the expression of ALDH1A1, p16 and HMGB1, and their clinicopathological data were analyzed. HMGB1 positivity was significantly increased in patients with T1-2 stage disease compared with T3-4 stage disease (P<0.001), whereas ALDH1A1 positivity was not. ALDH1A1+ tumors showed significantly lower differentiation than ALDH1A1− tumors (P=0.018). Multivariate analysis showed that ALDH1A1 positivity (P=0.041) and nodal status (N2-3) (P=0.036) predicted a poor prognosis. In this patient cohort, ALDH1A1 and nodal status were identified as independent predictors of a shorter overall survival time. The study results, therefore, provide evidence of the prognostic value of ALDH1A1 as a marker for cancer stem cells and nodal status in OSCC patients. PMID:27900016

  20. Expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A1 and high mobility group box 1 in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in association with survival time.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xu; Coordes, Annekatrin; Kaufmann, Andreas M; Albers, Andreas E

    2016-11-01

    Despite the development of novel multimodal treatment combinations in advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), outcomes remain poor. The identification of specifically validated biomarkers is required to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms, to evaluate treatment efficiency and to develop novel therapeutic targets. The present study, therefore, examined the presence of aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A1 (ALDH1A1) and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) expression in primary OSCC and analyzed the impact on survival time. In 59 patients with OSCC, the expression of ALDH1A1, p16 and HMGB1, and their clinicopathological data were analyzed. HMGB1 positivity was significantly increased in patients with T1-2 stage disease compared with T3-4 stage disease (P<0.001), whereas ALDH1A1 positivity was not. ALDH1A1(+) tumors showed significantly lower differentiation than ALDH1A1(-) tumors (P=0.018). Multivariate analysis showed that ALDH1A1 positivity (P=0.041) and nodal status (N2-3) (P=0.036) predicted a poor prognosis. In this patient cohort, ALDH1A1 and nodal status were identified as independent predictors of a shorter overall survival time. The study results, therefore, provide evidence of the prognostic value of ALDH1A1 as a marker for cancer stem cells and nodal status in OSCC patients.

  1. Identification and mRNA expression of two 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase genes in the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis following exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Wang, Qing; Ji, Yinglu; Zhang, Qian; Wu, Huifeng; Xie, Jia; Zhao, Jianmin

    2014-05-01

    17β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17β-HSDs) are multifunctional enzymes involved in the metabolism of steroids, fatty acids, retinoids and bile acid. In this study, two novel types of 17β-HSDs (named as MgHsd17b10 and MgHsd17b12) were cloned from Mytilus galloprovincialis by using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) approaches. Sequence analysis showed that MgHsd17b10 and MgHsd17b12 encoded a polypeptide of 259 and 325 amino acids, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that MgHsd17b10 and MgHsd17b12 were evolutionarily clustered with other invertebrate 17β-HSD type 10 and 17β-HSD type 12 homologues. The MgHsd17b10 and MgHsd17b12 transcripts could be detected in all examined tissues with higher expression levels in digestive glands and gonad. After exposed to endocrine disrupting chemicals (Bisphenol A or 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether), the expression of MgHsd17b10 and MgHsd17b12 transcripts was both down-regulated in digestive glands. These findings suggest that MgHsd17b10 and MgHsd17b12 perhaps play an important role in the endocrine regulation of M. galloprovincialis.

  2. Insulin, CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Proteins and Lactate Regulate the Human 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 2 Gene Expression in Colon Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Alikhani-Koupaei, Rasoul; Ignatova, Irena D.; Guettinger, Andreas; Frey, Felix J.; Frey, Brigitte M.

    2014-01-01

    11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11beta-HSD) modulate mineralocorticoid receptor transactivation by glucocorticoids and regulate access to the glucocorticoid receptor. The isozyme 11beta-HSD2 is selectively expressed in mineralocorticoid target tissues and its activity is reduced in various disease states with abnormal sodium retention and hypertension, including the apparent mineralocorticoid excess. As 50% of patients with essential hypertension are insulin resistant and hyperinsulinemic, we hypothesized that insulin downregulates the 11beta-HSD2 activity. In the present study we show that insulin reduced the 11beta-HSD2 activity in cancer colon cell lines (HCT116, SW620 and HT-29) at the transcriptional level, in a time and dose dependent manner. The downregulation was reversible and required new protein synthesis. Pathway analysis using mRNA profiling revealed that insulin treatment modified the expression of the transcription factor family C/EBPs (CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins) but also of glycolysis related enzymes. Western blot and real time PCR confirmed an upregulation of C/EBP beta isoforms (LAP and LIP) with a more pronounced increase in the inhibitory isoform LIP. EMSA and reporter gene assays demonstrated the role of C/EBP beta isoforms in HSD11B2 gene expression regulation. In addition, secretion of lactate, a byproduct of glycolysis, was shown to mediate insulin-dependent HSD11B2 downregulation. In summary, we demonstrate that insulin downregulates HSD11B2 through increased LIP expression and augmented lactate secretion. Such mechanisms are of interest and potential significance for sodium reabsorption in the colon. PMID:25133511

  3. Expression and regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoforms in the developing rat heart and in adulthood: role of thyroid hormone status and lipid supply.

    PubMed Central

    Sugden, M C; Langdown, M L; Harris, R A; Holness, M J

    2000-01-01

    Activation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDHC) promotes glucose disposal, whereas inactivation conserves glucose. The PDH kinases (PDHKs) regulate glucose oxidation through inhibitory phosphorylation of PDHC. The adult rat heart contains three PDHK isoforms PDHK1, PDHK2 and PDHK4. Using Western-blot analysis, with specific antibodies raised against individual recombinant PDHK1, PDHK2 and PDHK4, the present study investigated PDHK isoform expression in the developing rat heart and adulthood. We identified clear differences in the patterns of protein expression of each of these PDHK isoforms during the first 3 weeks of post-natal development, with most marked up-regulation of isoforms PDHK1 and PDHK4. Distinctions between the three cardiac PDHK isoforms were also demonstrated with respect to post-neonatal maturational up-regulation; with greatest up-regulation of PDHK1 and least up-regulation of PDHK4 from the post-neonatal period until maturity. The study also examined the role of thyroid hormone status and lipid supply on PDHK isoform expression. We observed marked selective increases in the amount of PDHK4 protein present relative to total cardiac protein in both hyperthyroidism and high-fat feeding. Overall, our data identify PDHK isoform PDHK1 as being of more potential regulatory importance for glucose oxidation in the adult compared with the neonatal heart, and cardiac PDHK4 as a PDHK isoform whose expression is specifically responsive to changes in lipid supply, suggesting that its up-regulation during early post-natal life may be the perinatal switch to use fatty acids as the energy source. We also identify regulation of pyruvate sensitivity of cardiac PDHK as a physiological variable, a change in which requires factors in addition to a change in lipid supply. PMID:11104680

  4. Lactate dehydrogenase test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003471.htm Lactate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a protein that helps produce energy ...

  5. Glutamate dehydrogenase and Na+-K+ ATPase expression and growth response of Litopenaeus vannamei to different salinities and dietary protein levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Erchao; Arena, Leticia; Lizama, Gabriel; Gaxiola, Gabriela; Cuzon, Gerard; Rosas, Carlos; Chen, Liqiao; van Wormhoudt, Alain

    2011-03-01

    Improvement in the osmoregulation capacity via nutritional supplies is vitally important in shrimp aquaculture. The effects of dietary protein levels on the osmoregulation capacity of the Pacific white shrimp ( L. vannamei) were investigated. This involved an examination of growth performance, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and Na+-K+ ATPase mRNA expression,, and GDH activity in muscles and gills. Three experimental diets were formulated, containing 25%, 40%, and 50% dietary protein, and fed to the shrimp at a salinity of 25. After 20 days, no significant difference was observed in weight gain, though GDH and Na+-K+ ATPase gene expression and GDH activity increased with higher dietary protein levels. Subsequently, shrimp fed diets with 25% and 50% dietary protein were transferred into tanks with salinities of 38 and 5, respectively, and sampled at weeks 1 and 2. Shrimp fed with 40% protein at 25 in salinity (optimal conditions) were used as a control. Regardless of the salinities, shrimp fed with 50% dietary protein had significantly higher growth performance than other diets; no significant differences were found in comparison with the control. Shrimp fed with 25% dietary protein and maintained at salinities of 38 and 5 had significantly lower weight gain values after 2 weeks. Ambient salinity change also stimulated the hepatosomatic index, which increased in the first week and then recovered to a relatively normal level, as in the control, after 2 weeks. These findings indicate that in white shrimp, the specific protein nutrient and energy demands related to ambient salinity change are associated with protein metabolism. Increased dietary protein level could improve the osmoregulation capacity of L. vannamei with more energy resources allocated to GDH activity and expression.

  6. The interaction of the Arabidopsis response regulator ARR18 with bZIP63 mediates the regulation of PROLINE DEHYDROGENASE expression.

    PubMed

    Veerabagu, Manikandan; Kirchler, Tobias; Elgass, Kirstin; Stadelhofer, Bettina; Stahl, Mark; Harter, Klaus; Mira-Rodado, Virtudes; Chaban, Christina

    2014-10-01

    As the first and rate-limiting enzyme of proline degradation, PROLINE DEHYDROGENASE1 (PDH1) is tightly regulated during plant stress responses, including induction under hypoosmolarity and repression under water deficit. The plant receptor histidine kinases AHKs, elements of the two-component system (TCS) in Arabidopsis thaliana, are proposed to function in water stress responses by regulating different stress-responsive genes. However, little information is available concerning AHK phosphorelay-mediated downstream signaling. Here we show that the Arabidopsis type-B response regulator 18 (ARR18) functions as a positive osmotic stress response regulator in Arabidopsis seeds and affects the activity of the PDH1 promoter, known to be controlled by C-group bZIP transcription factors. Moreover, direct physical interaction of ARR18 with bZIP63 was identified and shown to be dependent on phosphorylation of the conserved aspartate residue in the ARR18 receiver domain. We further show that bZIP63 itself functions as a negative regulator of seed germination upon osmotic stress. Using reporter gene assays in protoplasts, we demonstrated that ARR18 interaction negatively interferes with the transcriptional activity of bZIP63 on the PDH1 promoter. Our findings provide new insight into the function of ARR18 and bZIP63 as antagonistic regulators of gene expression in Arabidopsis.

  7. Cloning, expression, and biochemical characterization of a novel NADP(+)-dependent 7α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from Clostridium difficile and its application for the oxidation of bile acids.

    PubMed

    Bakonyi, Daniel; Hummel, Werner

    2017-04-01

    A gene encoding a novel 7α-specific NADP(+)-dependent hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from Clostridium difficile was cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was purified using an N-terminal hexa-his-tag and biochemically characterized. The optimum temperature is at 60°C, but the enzyme is inactivated at this temperature with a half-life time of 5min. Contrary to other known 7α-HSDHs, for example from Clostridium sardiniense or E. coli, the enzyme from C. difficile does not display a substrate inhibition. In order to demonstrate the applicability of this enzyme, a small-scale biotransformation of the bile acid chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) into 7-ketolithocholic acid (7-KLCA) was carried out with simultaneous regeneration of NADP(+) using an NADPH oxidase that resulted in a complete conversion (<99%). Furthermore, by a structure-based site-directed mutagenesis, cofactor specificity of the 7α-HSDH from Clostridium difficile was altered to accept NAD(H). This mutant was biochemically characterized and compared to the wild-type.

  8. Molecular mimicry in primary biliary cirrhosis. Evidence for biliary epithelial expression of a molecule cross-reactive with pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Water, J; Turchany, J; Leung, P S; Lake, J; Munoz, S; Surh, C D; Coppel, R; Ansari, A; Nakanuma, Y; Gershwin, M E

    1993-01-01

    Sera from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) react with enzymes of the 2-oxo dehydrogenase pathways, particularly PDC-E2. These enzymes are present in all nucleated cells, yet autoimmune damage is confined to biliary epithelial cells. Using a panel of eight mouse monoclonal antibodies and a human combinatorial antibody specific for PDC-E2, we examined by indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy sections of liver from patients with PBC, progressive sclerosing cholangitis, and hepatocarcinoma. The monoclonal antibodies gave typical mitochondrial immunofluorescence on biliary epithelium and on hepatocytes from patients with either PBC, progressive sclerosing cholangitis, or hepatocarcinoma. However, one of eight mouse monoclonal antibodies (C355.1) and the human combinatorial antibody reacted with great intensity and specificity with the luminal region of biliary epithelial cells from patients with PBC. Simultaneous examination of these sections with an antiisotype reagent for human IgA revealed high IgA staining in the luminal region of biliary epithelial cells in patients with PBC. IgG and IgA antibodies to PDC-E2 were detected in the bile of patients with PBC but not normal controls. We believe that this data may be interpreted as indicating that a molecule cross-reactive with PDC-E2 is expressed at high levels in the luminal region of biliary epithelial cells in PBC. Images PMID:8514873

  9. Molecular mimicry in primary biliary cirrhosis. Evidence for biliary epithelial expression of a molecule cross-reactive with pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2.

    PubMed

    Van de Water, J; Turchany, J; Leung, P S; Lake, J; Munoz, S; Surh, C D; Coppel, R; Ansari, A; Nakanuma, Y; Gershwin, M E

    1993-06-01

    Sera from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) react with enzymes of the 2-oxo dehydrogenase pathways, particularly PDC-E2. These enzymes are present in all nucleated cells, yet autoimmune damage is confined to biliary epithelial cells. Using a panel of eight mouse monoclonal antibodies and a human combinatorial antibody specific for PDC-E2, we examined by indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy sections of liver from patients with PBC, progressive sclerosing cholangitis, and hepatocarcinoma. The monoclonal antibodies gave typical mitochondrial immunofluorescence on biliary epithelium and on hepatocytes from patients with either PBC, progressive sclerosing cholangitis, or hepatocarcinoma. However, one of eight mouse monoclonal antibodies (C355.1) and the human combinatorial antibody reacted with great intensity and specificity with the luminal region of biliary epithelial cells from patients with PBC. Simultaneous examination of these sections with an antiisotype reagent for human IgA revealed high IgA staining in the luminal region of biliary epithelial cells in patients with PBC. IgG and IgA antibodies to PDC-E2 were detected in the bile of patients with PBC but not normal controls. We believe that this data may be interpreted as indicating that a molecule cross-reactive with PDC-E2 is expressed at high levels in the luminal region of biliary epithelial cells in PBC.

  10. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of L-lactate dehydrogenase and its H171C mutant from Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Xiaoli

    2012-08-31

    L-Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is an important enzyme involved in the last step of glycolysis that catalyzes the reversible conversion of pyruvate to L-lactate with the simultaneous oxidation of NADH to NAD{sup +}. In this study, wild-type LDH from Bacillus subtilis (BsLDH-WT) and the H171C mutant (BsLDH-H171C) were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to near-homogeneity. BsLDH-WT was crystallized in the presence of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) and NAD{sup +} and the crystal diffracted to 2.38 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal belonged to space group P3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 171.04, c = 96.27 {angstrom}. BsLDH-H171C was also crystallized as the apoenzyme and in complex with NAD{sup +}, and data sets were collected to 2.20 and 2.49 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Both BsLDH-H171C crystals belonged to space group P3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 133.41, c = 99.34 {angstrom} and a = b = 133.43, c = 99.09 {angstrom}, respectively. Tetramers were observed in the asymmetric units of all three crystals.

  11. Molecular characterization of benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed Central

    Gillooly, D J; Robertson, A G; Fewson, C A

    1998-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of xylB and xylC from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, the genes encoding benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II, were determined. The complete nucleotide sequence indicates that these two genes form part of an operon and this was supported by heterologous expression and physiological studies. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II is a 51654 Da protein with 484 amino acids per subunit and it is typical of other prokaryotic and eukaryotic aldehyde dehydrogenases. Benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase has a subunit Mr of 38923 consisting of 370 amino acids, it stereospecifically transfers the proR hydride of NADH, and it is a member of the family of zinc-dependent long-chain alcohol dehydrogenases. The enzyme appears to be more similar to animal and higher-plant alcohol dehydrogenases than it is to most other microbial alcohol dehydrogenases. Residue His-51 of zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases is thought to be necessary as a general base for catalysis in this category of alcohol dehydrogenases. However, this residue was found to be replaced in benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase from A. calcoaceticus by an isoleucine, and the introduction of a histidine residue in this position did not alter the kinetic coefficients, pH optimum or substrate specificity of the enzyme. Other workers have shown that His-51 is also absent from the TOL-plasmid-encoded benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase of Pseudomonas putida and so these two closely related enzymes presumably have a catalytic mechanism that differs from that of the archetypal zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases. PMID:9494109

  12. Organelle-specific expression of subunit ND5 of human complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) alters cation homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Wojtek; Gemperli, Anja C; Cvetesic, Nevena; Steuber, Julia

    2010-09-01

    The ND5 component of the respiratory complex I is a large, hydrophobic subunit encoded by the mitochondrial genome. Its bacterial homologue, the NDH-1 subunit NuoL, acts as a cation transporter in the absence of other NDH-1 subunits. Mutations in human ND5 are frequently observed in neurodegenerative diseases. Wild type and mutant variants of ND5 fused to GFP or a FLAG peptide were targeted to the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) or the inner mitochondrial membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which lacks an endogenous complex I. The localization of ND5 fusion proteins was confirmed by microscopic analyses of S. cerevisiae cells, followed by cellular fractionation and immunostaining. The impact of the expression of ND5 fusion proteins on the growth of S. cerevisiae in the presence and absence of added salts was studied. ER-resident ND5 conferred Li(+) sensitivity to S. cerevisiae, which was lost when the E145V variant of ND5 was expressed. All variants of ND5 tested led to increased resistance of S. cerevisiae at high external concentrations of Na(+) or K(+). The data seem to indicate that ND5 influences the salt homeostasis of S. cerevisiae independent of other complex I subunits, and paves the way for functional studies of mutations found in mitochondrially encoded complex I genes.

  13. Expression of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in ovarian and uterine tissue during diestrus and open cervix cystic endometrial hyperplasia-pyometra in the bitch.

    PubMed

    Gultiken, Nilgun; Yarim, Murat; Yarim, Gul Fatma; Gacar, Ayhan; Mason, James Ian

    2016-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the expression of 3β-hydroxystreroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) in the uterus and ovary of healthy dogs and those with cystic endometrial hyperplasia and/or pyometra complex (CEH-pyometra). Eighteen female dogs were included in the study. Eleven bitches with open cervix CEH-pyometra were included in the CEH-pyometra group and seven diestrus bitches in the control group. For immunostaining a rabbit polyclonal, one raised against recombinant human type 2 (adrenal/gonadal) 3β-HSD was used. Progesterone (P4) concentrations were not statistically different between the groups. Strongly stained large interstitial cell groups in the ovarian medulla were observed particularly in CEH-pyometra group although these cells in the control group were weakly or moderately stained and existed singly or paired. The expressions of 3β-HSD in luminal epithelium (42.40 ± 22.40% vs. 18.42 ± 13.15%, P < 0.05) and glandular epithelium (32.80 ± 27.05% vs. 2.94 ± 7.79%, P < 0.01) of endometrium were significantly higher in CEH-pyometra group than those in the control group. The expression of 3β-HSD in CL was higher (29.38 ± 9.58% vs. 22.94 ± 4.97%) in CEH-pyometra group than that of control group although the differences were not significant (P > 0.05). Similarly, the significant increase in the expression of 3β-HSD in ovarian interstitial cells (33.86 ± 29.44 vs. 1.13 ± 2.97, P < 0.05) was found in CEH-pyometra group compared to the control group. The study revealed that 3β-HSD expression in the endometrium of canine CEH-pyometra was significantly high.

  14. Effect of ginger root on cyclooxygenase-1 and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase expression in colonic mucosa of humans at normal and increased risk for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Turgeon, Danielle K; Wright, Benjamin D; Sidahmed, Elkhansa; Ruffin, Mack T; Brenner, Dean E; Sen, Ananda; Zick, Suzanna M

    2013-09-01

    Elevated tissue levels of prostaglandin E2, produced by cyclooxygenase (COX), are an early event in colorectal cancer (CRC). Data suggest the efficacy of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as cancer preventives, in the inhibition of COX activity; however, side effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory pose unacceptable limitations. Ginger has been reported to have anti-inflammatory activities with significant CRC preventive potential. We investigated whether consumption of 2.0 g ginger daily regulated the level of two key enzymes that control prostaglandin E2 production, COX-1 and NAD(+)-dependent 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH). Thirty participants at normal and 20 participants at increased risk for CRC were randomized and given 2.0 g/day ginger or placebo for 28 days. Flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to obtain colon biopsies at baseline and the end of the study. Tissue levels of COX-1 and 15-PGDH were assessed using western blotting. After ginger consumption, participants at increased risk for CRC had a significantly reduced colonic COX-1 protein level (23.8±41%) compared with the placebo group (18.9±52%; P=0.03). Protein levels of 15-PGDH in the colon were unchanged. In participants who were at normal risk for CRC, neither protein levels of COX-1 nor 15-PGDH in the colon were altered by ginger consumption. Ginger significantly lowered COX-1 protein expression in participants at increased risk for CRC but not in those at normal risk for CRC. Ginger did not alter 15-PGDH protein expression in either increased or normal-risk participants. Further investigation, in larger studies with a longer ginger intervention, is needed to examine the ability of ginger to impact tissue levels of prostaglandin.

  15. Ovarian expression of inhibin-subunits, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and cytochrome P450 aromatase during the estrous cycle and pregnancy of shiba goats (Capra hircus).

    PubMed

    Kandiel, Mohamed M M; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    The cellular localization of the inhibin subunits (α, β(A), and β (B)), steroidogenic enzymes (3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3βHSD) and cytochrome P450 aromatase (P450arom) were evaluated in the ovaries of cyclic (n=6) and pregnant (n=2) Shiba goats (Capra Hircus). The immunointensity of inhibin α and β(A) subunits showed an increase in the granulosa cells (GC) of developing follicles. Inhibin β(B) subunit and P450arom showed high expression in GC of antral follicles. 3βHSD immunoreactivity was uniform in preantral and antral follicles. In follicular phase and late pregnancy, there was a strong expression of inhibin α subunit in GC of antral follicles. Although in mid pregnancy, antral follicles GC showed moderate immunostaining of inhibin β subunits, the immunoreactivity of inhibin β(A) and β(B) subunits was high during the follicular and luteal stages, respectively. While, immunoreactivity of GC to P450arom was moderate during all studied stages, and 3βHSD immunoreactivity was plentiful in antral follicles during the luteal phase. The immunoreactivity to inhibin α subunit and P450arom was abundant during mid pregnancy in the luteal tissues. Immunoreaction to inhibin β subunits was faint-to-moderate in cyclic and pregnancy corpora lutea. Immunoexpression of 3βHSD was maximal in late pregnancy corpora lutea. The present results suggest that, in goats, the GC of antral follicles are the main source of dimeric inhibins and that corpora lutea may partially participate in the secretion of inhibin. Changes in ovarian hormonal levels might depend on the synthesizing capacity of hormones in the follicles and corpora lutea to regulate the goat's reproductive stages.

  16. Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequencing, and expression of genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenases from the thermophile Thermoanaerobacter brockii and the mesophile Clostridium beijerinckii.

    PubMed

    Peretz, M; Bogin, O; Tel-Or, S; Cohen, A; Li, G; Chen, J S; Burstein, Y

    1997-08-01

    Proteins play a pivotal role in thermophily. Comparing the molecular properties of homologous proteins from thermophilic and mesophilic bacteria is important for understanding the mechanisms of microbial adaptation to extreme environments. The thermophile Thermoanaerobacter (Thermoanaerobium) brockii and the mesophile Clostridium beijerinckii contain an NADP(H)-linked, zinc-containing secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (TBADH and CBADH) showing a similarly broad substrate range. The structural genes encoding the TBADH and the CBADH were cloned, sequenced, and highly expressed in Escherichia coli. The coding sequences of the TB adh and the CB adh genes are, respectively, 1056 and 1053 nucleotides long. The TB adh gene encoded an amino acid sequence identical to that of the purified TBADH. Alignment of the deduced amino acid sequences of the TB and CB adh genes showed a 76% identity and a 86% similarity, and the two genes had a similar preference for codons with A or T in the third position. Multiple sequence alignment of ADHs from different sources revealed that two (Cys-46 and His-67) of the three ligands for the catalytic Zn atom of the horse-liver ADH are preserved in TBADH and CBADH. Both the TBADH and CBADH were homotetramers. The substrate specificities and thermostabilities of the TBADH and CBADH expressed inE. coli were identical to those of the enzymes isolated from T. brockii and C. beijerinckii, respectively. A comparison of the amino acid composition of the two ADHs suggests that the presence of eight additional proline residues in TBADH than in CBADH and the exchange of hydrophilic and large hydrophobic residues in CBADH for the small hydrophobic amino acids Pro, Ala, and Val in TBADH might contribute to the higher thermostability of the T. brockii enzyme.

  17. Elevated glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase expression in the cervical cancer cases is associated with the cancerigenic event of high-risk human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tao; Li, Ya-Shan; Chen, Bo; Chang, Ye-Fei; Liu, Guang-Cai; Hong, Ying; Chen, Hong-Lan

    2015-01-01

    The most important etiologic agent in the pathogenesis of cervical cancers (CCs) is human papillomavirus (HPV), while the mechanisms underlying are still not well known. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is reported to elevate in various tumor cells. However, no available references elucidated the correlation between the levels of G6PD and HPV-infected CC until now. In the present study, we explored the possible role of G6PD in the pathology of CC induced by HPV infection. Totally 48 patients with HPV + CC and another 63 healthy women enrolled in the clinical were employed in the present study. Overall, prevalence of cervical infection with high-risk-HPV (HR-HPV) type examined was HPV-16, followed by HPV-18. The expressions of G6PD in CC samples were also detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC), qRT-PCR, and Western blot. Regression analysis showed elevated G6PD level was positively correlated with the CC development in 30–40 aged patients with HR-HPV-16/18 infection. The HPV16 + Siha, HPV18 + Hela, and HPV-C33A cell lines were employed and transfected with G6PD deficient vectors developed in vitro. MTT and flow cytometry were also employed to determine the survival and apoptosis of CC cells after G6PD expressional inhibition. Our data revealed that G6PD down-regulation induced poor proliferation and more apoptosis of HPV18 + Hela cells, when compared with that of HPV16 + Siha and HPV-C33A cells. These findings suggest that G6PD expressions in the HR-HPV + human CC tissues and cell lines play an important role in tumor growth and proliferation. PMID:25616277

  18. Improved NADPH Regeneration for Fungal Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase by Co-Expressing Bacterial Glucose Dehydrogenase in Resting-Cell Biotransformation of Recombinant Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyunwoo; Durairaj, Pradeepraj; Lee, Dowoo; Ahsan, Md Murshidul; Yun, Hyungdon

    2016-12-28

    Fungal cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes catalyze versatile monooxygenase reactions and play a major role in fungal adaptations owing to their essential roles in the production avoid metabolites critical for pathogenesis, detoxification of xenobiotics, and exploitation avoid substrates. Although fungal CYP-dependent biotransformation for the selective oxidation avoid organic compounds in yeast system is advantageous, it often suffers from a shortage avoid intracellular NADPH. In this study, we aimed to investigate the use of bacterial glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) for the intracellular electron regeneration of fungal CYP monooxygenase in a yeast reconstituted system. The benzoate hydroxylase FoCYP53A19 and its homologous redox partner FoCPR from Fusarium oxysporum were co-expressed with the BsGDH from Bacillus subtilis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for heterologous expression and biotransformations. We attempted to optimize several bottlenecks concerning the efficiency of fungal CYP-mediated whole-cell-biotransformation to enhance the conversion. The catalytic performance of the intracellular NADPH regeneration system facilitated the hydroxylation of benzoic acid to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid with high conversion in the resting-cell reaction. The FoCYP53A19+FoCPR+BsGDH reconstituted system produced 0.47 mM 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (94% conversion) in the resting-cell biotransformations performed in 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 6.0) containing 0.5 mM benzoic acid and 0.25% glucose for 24 h at 30°C. The "coupled-enzyme" system can certainly improve the overall performance of NADPH-dependent whole-cell biotransformations in a yeast system.

  19. Expression, purification, enzymatic characterization and crystallization of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Naegleria gruberi, the first one from phylum Percolozoa.

    PubMed

    Machado, Agnes Thiane Pereira; Silva, Marcio; Iulek, Jorge

    2016-11-01

    Naegleria gruberi had its genome sequenced by Fritz-Laylin and collaborators in 2010. It is not pathogenic, but has characteristics similar to those of Naegleria fowleri, opportunistic pathogen that can cause fatal encephalitis in humans. N. gruberi genome has contributed to a better understanding of the primitive eukaryotic metabolism and revealed the complexity of several metabolic pathways. In this paper we describe the expression, purification, enzyme characterization and crystallization of N. gruberi GAPDH, the first one for an organism belonging to phylum Percolozoa. The results indicated that 10 mM, 8.0 and 25 °C are the optimum arsenate concentration, pH and temperature, respectively. The enzyme presents allosteric positive cooperativity for substrates NAD(+) and G3P as indicated by the Hill coefficients. The phylogenetic proximity between N. fowleri and N. gruberi suggests that contributions from the study of the latter might provide information to assist the search for treatments of Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis, especially, in this work, taking into account that GAPDH is identified as a therapeutic target.

  20. Altered expression of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase in tumor-infiltrated CD11b myeloid cells: a mechanism for immune evasion in cancer.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Kaliberov, Sergei; Daurkin, Irina; Kaliberova, Lyudmila; Buchsbaum, Donald; Vieweg, Johannes; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2009-06-15

    Many cancers are known to produce high amounts of PGE(2), which is involved in both tumor progression and tumor-induced immune dysfunction. The key enzyme responsible for the biological inactivation of PGE(2) in tissue is NAD(+)-dependent 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH). It is well established that cancer cells frequently show down-regulated expression of 15-PGDH, which plays a major role in catabolism of the PGE(2). Here we demonstrate that tumor-infiltrated CD11b cells are also deficient for the 15-PGDH gene. Targeted adenovirus-mediated delivery of 15-PGDH gene resulted in substantial inhibition of tumor growth in mice with implanted CT-26 colon carcinomas. PGDH-mediated antitumor effect was associated with attenuated tumor-induced immune suppression and substantially reduced secretion of immunosuppressive mediators and cytokines such as PGE(2), IL-10, IL-13, and IL-6 by intratumoral CD11b cells. We show also that introduction of 15-PGDH gene in tumor tissue is sufficient to redirect the differentiation of intratumoral CD11b cells from immunosuppressive M2-oriented F4/80(+) tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) into M1-oriented CD11c(+) MHC class II-positive myeloid APCs. Notably, the administration of the 15-PGDH gene alone demonstrated a significant therapeutic effect promoting tumor eradication and long-term survival in 70% of mice with preestablished tumors. Surviving mice acquired antitumor T cell-mediated immune response. This study for the first time demonstrates an important role of the 15-PGDH in regulation of local antitumor immune response and highlights the potential to be implemented to enhance the efficacy of cancer therapy and immunotherapy.

  1. Expression analyses of insulin-like peptide 3, RXFP2, LH receptor, and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in testes of normal and cryptorchid dogs.

    PubMed

    Hannan, M A; Kawate, N; Kubo, Y; Pathirana, I N; Büllesbach, E E; Hatoya, S; Inaba, T; Takahashi, M; Tamada, H

    2015-10-15

    Insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3) plays a key role in testicular descent in rodents, whereas in domestic animals, many aspects of the roles of INSL3 in reproductive organs after puberty are still unknown. This study was undertaken to (1) determine the quantitative changes of gene expression of testicular INSL3, its receptor (RXFP2), LH receptor, and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase during and after puberty in normal male dogs; (2) compare the expressions of these substances in normal and cryptorchid dogs; and (3) localize the cells expressing INSL3 in normal and retained canine testes. Testes were obtained from small-breed normal male dogs (n = 56) and cryptorchid dogs (n = 22). Normal scrotal testes from the normal dogs (normal testes), retained testes from both the unilateral and bilateral cryptorchid dogs (retained testes), and scrotal testes of the unilateral cryptorchid dogs (cryptorchid scrotal testes) were used. We measured the concentrations of these testicular messenger RNAs (mRNAs) by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and an enzyme immunoassay was used for measuring INSL3 peptide. Immunohistochemistry for INSL3 peptide was done in paraformaldehyde-fixed frozen testicular tissue. In the normal dogs, total amount of INSL3 mRNA per testis tended to decrease (P = 0.05) from pubertal (6-12 months) to postpubertal (1-5 years) and decreased (P < 0.01) to middle age (5-10 years), but total amount of INSL3 peptide per testis did not change among age groups. Concentrations of INSL3 mRNA were higher (P < 0.01) in retained testes than those in the normal testes and cryptorchid scrotal testes, and similar differences were observed for INSL3 peptide. Reversely, total amounts of INSL3 mRNA and peptide per retained testis were lower (P < 0.01) than those per normal testis because of smaller weight of retained testes. Concentrations and total amount of RXFP2 mRNA in the retained testes were almost nil and lower (P < 0.01) than those in

  2. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha upregulates 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 expression by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-beta in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Irena D; Kostadinova, Radina M; Goldring, Christopher E; Nawrocki, Andrea R; Frey, Felix J; Frey, Brigitte M

    2009-02-01

    The enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) catalyzes the conversion of inactive to active glucocorticoids. 11beta-HSD1 plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of obesity and controls glucocorticoid actions in inflammation. Several studies have demonstrated that TNF-alpha increases 11beta-HSD1 mRNA and activity in various cell models. Here, we demonstrate that mRNA and activity of 11beta-HSD1 is increased in liver tissue from transgenic mice overexpressing TNF-alpha, indicating that this effect also occurs in vivo. To dissect the molecular mechanism of this increase, we investigated basal and TNF-alpha-induced transcription of the 11beta-HSD1 gene (HSD11B1) in HepG2 cells. We found that TNF-alpha acts via p38 MAPK pathway. Transient transfections with variable lengths of human HSD11B1 promoter revealed highest activity with or without TNF-alpha in the proximal promoter region (-180 to +74). Cotransfection with human CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-alpha (C/EBPalpha) and C/EBPbeta-LAP expression vectors activated the HSD11B1 promoter with the strongest effect within the same region. Gel shift and RNA interference assays revealed the involvement of mainly C/EBPalpha, but also C/EBPbeta, in basal and only of C/EBPbeta in the TNF-alpha-induced HSD11B1 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay confirmed in vivo the increased abundance of C/EBPbeta on the proximal HSD11B1 promoter upon TNF-alpha treatment. In conclusion, C/EBPalpha and C/EBPbeta control basal transcription, and TNF-alpha upregulates 11beta-HSD1, most likely by p38 MAPK-mediated increased binding of C/EBPbeta to the human HSD11B1 promoter. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing involvement of p38 MAPK in the TNF-alpha-mediated 11beta-HSD1 regulation, and that TNF-alpha stimulates enzyme activity in vivo.

  3. Tryptophan tryptophylquinone cofactor biogenesis in the aromatic amine dehydrogenase of Alcaligenes faecalis. Cofactor assembly and catalytic properties of recombinant enzyme expressed in Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Hothi, Parvinder; Khadra, Khalid Abu; Combe, Jonathan P; Leys, David; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2005-11-01

    The heterologous expression of tryptophan trytophylquinone (TTQ)-dependent aromatic amine dehydrogenase (AADH) has been achieved in Paracoccus denitrificans. The aauBEDA genes and orf-2 from the aromatic amine utilization (aau) gene cluster of Alcaligenes faecalis were placed under the regulatory control of the mauF promoter from P. denitrificans and introduced into P. denitrificans using a broad-host-range vector. The physical, spectroscopic and kinetic properties of the recombinant AADH were indistinguishable from those of the native enzyme isolated from A. faecalis. TTQ biogenesis in recombinant AADH is functional despite the lack of analogues in the cloned aau gene cluster for mauF, mauG, mauL, mauM and mauN that are found in the methylamine utilization (mau) gene cluster of a number of methylotrophic organisms. Steady-state reaction profiles for recombinant AADH as a function of substrate concentration differed between 'fast' (tryptamine) and 'slow' (benzylamine) substrates, owing to a lack of inhibition by benzylamine at high substrate concentrations. A deflated and temperature-dependent kinetic isotope effect indicated that C-H/C-D bond breakage is only partially rate-limiting in steady-state reactions with benzylamine. Stopped-flow studies of the reductive half-reaction of recombinant AADH with benzylamine demonstrated that the KIE is elevated over the value observed in steady-state turnover and is independent of temperature, consistent with (a) previously reported studies with native AADH and (b) breakage of the substrate C-H bond by quantum mechanical tunnelling. The limiting rate constant (k(lim)) for TTQ reduction is controlled by a single ionization with pK(a) value of 6.0, with maximum activity realized in the alkaline region. Two kinetically influential ionizations were identified in plots of k(lim)/K(d) of pK(a) values 7.1 and 9.3, again with the maximum value realized in the alkaline region. The potential origin of these kinetically influential

  4. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for L-tyrosine production by expression of genes coding for the chorismate mutase domain of the native chorismate mutase-prephenate dehydratase and a cyclohexadienyl dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Béjar, María I; Lara, Alvaro R; López, Hezraí; Hernández-Chávez, Georgina; Martinez, Alfredo; Ramírez, Octavio T; Bolívar, Francisco; Gosset, Guillermo

    2008-05-01

    The expression of the feedback inhibition-insensitive enzyme cyclohexadienyl dehydrogenase (TyrC) from Zymomonas mobilis and the chorismate mutase domain from native chorismate mutase-prephenate dehydratase (PheA(CM)) from Escherichia coli was compared to the expression of native feedback inhibition-sensitive chorismate mutase-prephenate dehydrogenase (CM-TyrA(p)) with regard to the capacity to produce l-tyrosine in E. coli strains modified to increase the carbon flow to chorismate. Shake flask experiments showed that TyrC increased the yield of l-tyrosine from glucose (Y(l-Tyr/Glc)) by 6.8-fold compared to the yield obtained with CM-TyrA(p). In bioreactor experiments, a strain expressing both TyrC and PheA(CM) produced 3 g/liter of l-tyrosine with a Y(l-Tyr/Glc) of 66 mg/g. These values are 46 and 48% higher than the values for a strain expressing only TyrC. The results show that the feedback inhibition-insensitive enzymes can be employed for strain development as part of a metabolic engineering strategy for l-tyrosine production.

  5. Metabolic Engineering of Escherichia coli for l-Tyrosine Production by Expression of Genes Coding for the Chorismate Mutase Domain of the Native Chorismate Mutase-Prephenate Dehydratase and a Cyclohexadienyl Dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis▿

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Béjar, María I.; Lara, Alvaro R.; López, Hezraí; Hernández-Chávez, Georgina; Martinez, Alfredo; Ramírez, Octavio T.; Bolívar, Francisco; Gosset, Guillermo

    2008-01-01

    The expression of the feedback inhibition-insensitive enzyme cyclohexadienyl dehydrogenase (TyrC) from Zymomonas mobilis and the chorismate mutase domain from native chorismate mutase-prephenate dehydratase (PheACM) from Escherichia coli was compared to the expression of native feedback inhibition-sensitive chorismate mutase-prephenate dehydrogenase (CM-TyrAp) with regard to the capacity to produce l-tyrosine in E. coli strains modified to increase the carbon flow to chorismate. Shake flask experiments showed that TyrC increased the yield of l-tyrosine from glucose (Yl-Tyr/Glc) by 6.8-fold compared to the yield obtained with CM-TyrAp. In bioreactor experiments, a strain expressing both TyrC and PheACM produced 3 g/liter of l-tyrosine with a Yl-Tyr/Glc of 66 mg/g. These values are 46 and 48% higher than the values for a strain expressing only TyrC. The results show that the feedback inhibition-insensitive enzymes can be employed for strain development as part of a metabolic engineering strategy for l-tyrosine production. PMID:18344329

  6. Malate dehydrogenase from the mesophile Chlorobium vibrioforme and from the mild thermophile Chlorobium tepidum: molecular cloning, construction of a hybrid, and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Naterstad, K; Lauvrak, V; Sirevåg, R

    1996-12-01

    The genes (mdh) encoding malate dehydrogenase (MDH) from the mesophile Chlorobium vibrioforme and the moderate thermophile C. tepidum were cloned and sequenced, and the complete amino acid sequences were deduced. When the region upstream of mdh was analyzed, a sequence with high homology to an operon encoding ribosomal proteins from Escherichia coli was found. Each mdh gene consists of a 930-bp open reading frame and encodes 310 amino acid residues, corresponding to a subunit weight of 33,200 Da for the dimeric enzyme. The amino acid sequence identity of the two MDHs is 86%. Homology searches using the primary structures of the two MDHs revealed significant sequence similarity to lactate dehydrogenases. A hybrid mdh was constructed from the 3' part of mdh from C. tepidum and the 5' part of mdh from C. vibrioforme. The thermostabilities of the hybrid enzyme and of MDH from C. vibrioforme and C. tepidum were compared.

  7. GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE-S, A SPERM-SPECIFIC GLYCOLYTIC ENZYME, IS REQUIRED FOR SPERM MOTILITY AND MALE FERTILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While glycolysis is highly conserved, it is remarkable that several novel isozymes in this central metabolic pathway are found in mammalian sperm. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-S (GAPDS) is the product of a mouse gene expressed only during spermatogenesis and, like it...

  8. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from the human pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi in complex with substrate

    PubMed Central

    Ortíz, Cecilia; Larrieux, Nicole; Medeiros, Andrea; Botti, Horacio; Comini, Marcelo; Buschiazzo, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    An N-terminally truncated version of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma cruzi lacking the first 37 residues was crystallized both in its apo form and in a binary complex with glucose 6-­phosphate. The crystals both belonged to space group P21 and diffracted to 2.85 and 3.35 Å resolution, respectively. Self-rotation function maps were consistent with point group 222. The structure was solved by molecular replacement, confirming a tetrameric quaternary structure. PMID:22102256

  9. Extranuclear expression of the bacterial xylose isomerase (xylA) and the UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (hasB) genes in yeast with Kluyveromyces lactis linear killer plasmids as vectors.

    PubMed

    Schründer, J; Gunge, N; Meinhardt, F

    1996-11-01

    On the basis of the linear killer plasmid pGKL1 from Kluyveromyces lactis, two new linear hybrid plasmids were constructed. One of these, pRSC126, carried the xylA gene from Streptomyces rubiginosus encoding the xylose isomerase. The other linear hybrid molecule, pRSC128, carried the hasB gene of Streptococcus pyogenes encoding the UDP glucose dehydrogenase. Construction was performed in a way that the putative cytoplasmic promoter element of ORF5 of pGKL2 was fused to the coding region of the heterologous genes. After transformation, in vivo recombination led to the establishment of linear hybrid vectors. Though efficiency of expression was low when compared with bacterial systems, cytoplasmic expression of both genes was clearly demonstrated.

  10. Sorbitol dehydrogenase: structure, function and ligand design.

    PubMed

    El-Kabbani, O; Darmanin, C; Chung, R P-T

    2004-02-01

    Sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), a member of the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase protein family and the second enzyme of the polyol pathway of glucose metabolism, converts sorbitol to fructose strictly using NAD(+) as coenzyme. SDH is expressed almost ubiquitously in all mammalian tissues. The enzyme has attracted considerable interest due to its implication in the development of diabetic complications and thus its tertiary structure may facilitate the development of drugs for the treatment of diabetes sufferers. Modelling studies suggest that SDH is structurally homologous to mammalian alcohol dehydrogenase with respect to conserved zinc binding motif and a hydrophobic substrate-binding pocket. Recently, the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of a mammalian SDH was solved, and it was found that while the overall 3-D structures of SDH and alcohol dehydrogenase are similar, the zinc coordination in the active sites of the two enzymes is different. The available structural and biochemical information of SDH are currently being utilized in a structure-based approach to develop drugs for the treatment or prevention of the complications of diabetes. This review provides an overview of the recent advances in the structure, function and drug development fields of sorbitol dehydrogenase.

  11. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 42. Read More Enzyme Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Hemoglobin Review Date 2/11/2016 Updated by: ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics G6PD Deficiency Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  12. Multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase causing excessive acetaldehyde production from ethanol by oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Sylvia I; Jin, Ling; Gasparovich, Stephen R; Tao, Lin

    2013-07-01

    Ethanol consumption and poor oral hygiene are risk factors for oral and oesophageal cancers. Although oral streptococci have been found to produce excessive acetaldehyde from ethanol, little is known about the mechanism by which this carcinogen is produced. By screening 52 strains of diverse oral streptococcal species, we identified Streptococcus gordonii V2016 that produced the most acetaldehyde from ethanol. We then constructed gene deletion mutants in this strain and analysed them for alcohol and acetaldehyde dehydrogenases by zymograms. The results showed that S. gordonii V2016 expressed three primary alcohol dehydrogenases, AdhA, AdhB and AdhE, which all oxidize ethanol to acetaldehyde, but their preferred substrates were 1-propanol, 1-butanol and ethanol, respectively. Two additional dehydrogenases, S-AdhA and TdhA, were identified with specificities to the secondary alcohol 2-propanol and threonine, respectively, but not to ethanol. S. gordonii V2016 did not show a detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase even though its adhE gene encodes a putative bifunctional acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase. Mutants with adhE deletion showed greater tolerance to ethanol in comparison with the wild-type and mutant with adhA or adhB deletion, indicating that AdhE is the major alcohol dehydrogenase in S. gordonii. Analysis of 19 additional strains of S. gordonii, S. mitis, S. oralis, S. salivarius and S. sanguinis showed expressions of up to three alcohol dehydrogenases, but none showed detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, except one strain that showed a novel ALDH. Therefore, expression of multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase may contribute to excessive production of acetaldehyde from ethanol by certain oral streptococci.

  13. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Luzzatto, Lucio; Nannelli, Caterina; Notaro, Rosario

    2016-04-01

    G6PD is a housekeeping gene expressed in all cells. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is part of the pentose phosphate pathway, and its main physiologic role is to provide NADPH. G6PD deficiency, one of the commonest inherited enzyme abnormalities in humans, arises through one of many possible mutations, most of which reduce the stability of the enzyme and its level as red cells age. G6PD-deficient persons are mostly asymptomatic, but they can develop severe jaundice during the neonatal period and acute hemolytic anemia when they ingest fava beans or when they are exposed to certain infections or drugs. G6PD deficiency is a global health issue.

  14. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus agalactiae NEM316

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Revathi; Ponnuraj, Karthe

    2014-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is an essential enzyme involved in glycolysis. Despite lacking the secretory signal sequence, this cytosolic enzyme has been found localized at the surface of several bacteria and fungi. As a surface protein, GAPDH exhibits various adhesive functions, thereby facilitating colonization and invasion of host tissues. Streptococcus agalactiae, also known as group B streptococcus (GBS), binds onto the host using its surface adhesins and causes sepsis and pneumonia in neonates. GAPDH is one of the surface adhesins of GBS binding to human plasminogen and is a virulent factor associated with host colonization. Although the surface-associated GAPDH has been shown to bind to a variety of host extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules in various bacteria, the molecular mechanism underlying their interaction is not fully understood. To investigate this, structural studies on GAPDH of S. agalactiae were initiated. The gapC gene of S. agalactiae NEM316 encoding GAPDH protein was cloned into pET-28a vector, overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The GAPDH crystals obtained in two different crystallization conditions diffracted to 2.8 and 2.6 Å resolution, belonging to two different space groups P21 and P212121, respectively. The structure was solved by molecular replacement and structure refinement is now in progress. PMID:25005093

  15. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis of the (S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase PaaH1 from Ralstonia eutropha H16

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jieun; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2014-01-01

    The (S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase PaaH1 from Ralstonia eutropha (RePaaH1) is an enzyme used in the biosynthesis of n-butanol from acetyl-CoA by the reduction of acetoacetyl-CoA to (S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA. The RePaaH1 protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of 1.4 M ammonium sulfate, 0.1 M sodium cacodylate pH 6.0, 0.2 M sodium chloride at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 2.6 Å on a synchrotron beamline. The crystal belonged to space group P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 135.4, c = 97.2 Å. With three molecules per asymmetric unit, the crystal volume per unit protein weight (V M) is 2.68 Å3 Da−1, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 54.1%. The structure was solved by the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion method and refinement of the structure is in progress. PMID:25005097

  16. Identification and characterization of the LysR-type transcriptional regulator HsdR for steroid-inducible expression of the 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/carbonyl reductase gene in Comamonas testosteroni.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenjie; Xiong, Guangming; Maser, Edmund

    2012-02-01

    3α-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/carbonyl reductase (3α-HSD/CR) from Comamonas testosteroni is a key enzyme in steroid degradation in soil and water. 3α-HSD/CR gene (hsdA) expression can be induced by steroids like testosterone and progesterone. Previously, we have shown that the induction of hsdA expression by steroids is a derepression where steroidal inducers bind to two repressors, RepA and RepB, thereby preventing the blocking of hsdA transcription and translation, respectively (G. Xiong and E. Maser, J. Biol. Chem. 276:9961-9970, 2001; G. Xiong, H. J. Martin, and E. Maser, J. Biol. Chem. 278:47400-47407, 2003). In the present study, a new LysR-type transcriptional factor, HsdR, for 3α-HSD/CR expression in C. testosteroni has been identified. The hsdR gene is located 2.58 kb downstream from hsdA on the C. testosteroni ATCC 11996 chromosome with an orientation opposite that of hsdA. The hsdR gene was cloned and recombinant HsdR protein was produced, as was anti-HsdR polyclonal antibodies. While heterologous transformation systems revealed that HsdR activates the expression of the hsdA gene, electrophoresis mobility shift assays showed that HsdR specifically binds to the hsdA promoter region. Interestingly, the activity of HsdR is dependent on decreased repression by RepA. Furthermore, in vitro binding assays indicated that HsdR can come into contact with RNA polymerase. As expected, an hsdR knockout mutant expressed low levels of 3α-HSD/CR compared to that of wild-type C. testosteroni after testosterone induction. In conclusion, HsdR is a positive transcription factor for the hsdA gene and promotes the induction of 3α-HSD/CR expression in C. testosteroni.

  17. Expression of 3beta-HSD and P5betaR, genes respectively coding for Delta5-3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and progesterone 5beta-reductase, in leaves and cell cultures of Digitalis lanata EHRH.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Mona; de Padua, Rodrigo Maia; Herl, Vanessa; Müller-Uri, Frieder; Kreis, Wolfgang

    2010-06-01

    Plants of the genus Digitalis produce 5 beta-cardenolides that are used in the therapy of cardiac insufficiency in humans. 3 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 beta-HSD) and progesterone 5 beta-reductase (P5 betaR) are both supposed to be important enzymes in the biosynthesis of these natural products. Activity and gene expression were demonstrated for both enzymes in cardenolide-accumulating leaves of Digitalis lanata but also in cardenolide-free permanent cell suspension cultures initiated from D. lanata leaf tissue. Enzyme activities were determined and quantified by HPLC and GC-MS methods. Expression of the respective genes, namely AY585867.1 (P5betaR gene) and DQ466890.1 (3beta-HSD gene), was made evident by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis. We demonstrate for the first time that the P5betaR gene, encoding an enzyme described as a key enzyme in cardenolide biosynthesis, is also expressed in cardenolide-free tissues of cardenolide-containing plants.

  18. Expression pattern, ethanol-metabolizing activities, and cellular localization of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases in human large bowel: association of the functional polymorphisms of ADH and ALDH genes with hemorrhoids and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chien-Ping; Jao, Shu-Wen; Lee, Shiao-Pieng; Chen, Pei-Chi; Chung, Chia-Chi; Lee, Shou-Lun; Nieh, Shin; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2012-02-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are principal enzymes responsible for metabolism of ethanol. Functional polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH2 genes occur among racial populations. The goal of this study was to systematically determine the functional expressions and cellular localization of ADHs and ALDHs in human rectal mucosa, the lesions of adenocarcinoma and hemorrhoid, and the genetic association of allelic variations of ADH and ALDH with large bowel disorders. Twenty-one surgical specimens of rectal adenocarcinoma and the adjacent normal mucosa, including 16 paired tissues of rectal tumor, normal mucosae of rectum and sigmoid colon from the same individuals, and 18 surgical mixed hemorrhoid specimens and leukocyte DNA samples from 103 colorectal cancer patients, 67 hemorrhoid patients, and 545 control subjects recruited in previous study, were investigated. The isozyme/allozyme expression patterns of ADH and ALDH were identified by isoelectric focusing and the activities were assayed spectrophotometrically. The protein contents of ADH/ALDH isozymes were determined by immunoblotting using the corresponding purified class-specific antibodies; the cellular activity and protein localizations were detected by immunohistochemistry and histochemistry, respectively. Genotypes of ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH2 were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms. At 33mM ethanol, pH 7.5, the activity of ADH1C*1/1 phenotypes exhibited 87% higher than that of the ADH1C*1/*2 phenotypes in normal rectal mucosa. The activity of ALDH2-active phenotypes of rectal mucosa was 33% greater than ALDH2-inactive phenotypes at 200μM acetaldehyde. The protein contents in normal rectal mucosa were in the following order: ADH1>ALDH2>ADH3≈ALDH1A1, whereas those of ADH2, ADH4, and ALDH3A1 were fairly low. Both activity and content of ADH1 were significantly decreased in rectal tumors, whereas the ALDH activity remained

  19. Plastidial Expression of Type II NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase Increases the Reducing State of Plastoquinones and Hydrogen Photoproduction Rate by the Indirect Pathway in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1.

    PubMed

    Baltz, Anthony; Dang, Kieu-Van; Beyly, Audrey; Auroy, Pascaline; Richaud, Pierre; Cournac, Laurent; Peltier, Gilles

    2014-07-01

    Biological conversion of solar energy into hydrogen is naturally realized by some microalgae species due to a coupling between the photosynthetic electron transport chain and a plastidial hydrogenase. While promising for the production of clean and sustainable hydrogen, this process requires improvement to be economically viable. Two pathways, called direct and indirect photoproduction, lead to sustained hydrogen production in sulfur-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cultures. The indirect pathway allows an efficient time-based separation of O2 and H2 production, thus overcoming the O2 sensitivity of the hydrogenase, but its activity is low. With the aim of identifying the limiting step of hydrogen production, we succeeded in overexpressing the plastidial type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDA2). We report that transplastomic strains overexpressing NDA2 show an increased activity of nonphotochemical reduction of plastoquinones (PQs). While hydrogen production by the direct pathway, involving the linear electron flow from photosystem II to photosystem I, was not affected by NDA2 overexpression, the rate of hydrogen production by the indirect pathway was increased in conditions, such as nutrient limitation, where soluble electron donors are not limiting. An increased intracellular starch was observed in response to nutrient deprivation in strains overexpressing NDA2. It is concluded that activity of the indirect pathway is limited by the nonphotochemical reduction of PQs, either by the pool size of soluble electron donors or by the PQ-reducing activity of NDA2 in nutrient-limited conditions. We discuss these data in relation to limitations and biotechnological improvement of hydrogen photoproduction in microalgae.

  20. Regulation of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and sulphotransferase 2A1 gene expression in primary porcine hepatocytes by selected sex-steroids and plant secondary metabolites from chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) and wormwood (Artemisia sp.).

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Martin Krøyer; Ekstrand, Bo

    2014-02-15

    In pigs the endogenously produced compound androstenone is metabolised in the liver in two steps by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) and sulphotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1). The present study investigated the effect of selected sex-steroids (0.01-1 μM androstenone, testosterone and estradiol), skatole (1-100 μM) and secondary plant metabolites (1-100 μM) on the expression of 3β-HSD and SULT2A1 mRNA. Additionally the effect of a global methanolic extract of dried chicory root was investigated and compared to previous obtained in vivo effects. Primary hepatocytes were isolated from the livers of piglets (crossbreed: Landrace×Yorkshire and Duroc) and cultured for 24h before treatment for an additionally 24h. RNA was isolated from the hepatocytes and specific gene expression determined by RT-PCR using TaqMan probes. The investigated sex-steroids had no effect on the mRNA expression of 3β-HSD and SULT2A1, while skatole decreased the content of SULT2A1 30% compared to control. Of the investigated secondary plant metabolites artemisinin and scoparone (found in Artemisia sp.) lowered the content of SULT2A1 by 20 and 30% compared to control, respectively. Moreover, we tested three secondary plant metabolites (lactucin, esculetin and esculin) found in chicory root. Lactucin increased the mRNA content of both 3β-HSD and SULT2A1 by 200% compared to control. An extract of chicory root was shown to decrease the expression of both 3β-HSD and SULT2A1. It is concluded that the gene expression of enzymes with importance for androstenone metabolism is regulated by secondary plant metabolites in a complex manner.

  1. Inhibition of 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type II Suppresses Lung Carcinogenesis by Blocking Tumor COX-2 Expression as Well as the ERK and mTOR Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shilin; Yao, Bing; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiaoping; Pozzi, Ambra; Zhang, Ming-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is by far the leading cause of cancer death. Early diagnosis and prevention remain the best approach to reduce the overall morbidity and mortality. Experimental and clinical evidence have shown that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) contributes to lung tumorigenesis. COX-2 inhibitors suppress the development and progression of lung cancer. However, increased cardiovascular risks of COX-2 inhibitors limit their use in chemoprevention of lung cancers. Glucocorticoids are endogenous and potent COX-2 inhibitors, and their local actions are down-regulated by 11β–hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II (11ßHSD2)-mediated metabolism. We found that 11βHSD2 expression was increased in human lung cancers and experimental lung tumors. Inhibition of 11βHSD2 activity enhanced glucocorticoid-mediated COX-2 inhibition in human lung carcinoma cells. Furthermore, 11βHSD2 inhibition suppressed lung tumor growth and invasion in association with increased tissue active glucocorticoid levels, decreased COX-2 expression, inhibition of ERK and mTOR signaling pathways, increased tumor endoplasmic reticulum stress as well as increased lifespan. Therefore, 11βHSD2 inhibition represents a novel approach for lung cancer chemoprevention and therapy by increasing tumor glucocorticoid activity, which in turn selectively blocks local COX-2 activity and/or inhibits the ERK and mTOR signaling pathways. PMID:26011146

  2. Expression of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (hsd3b), star and ad4bp/sf-1 during gonadal development in medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Masatoshi; Fukasawa, Motoaki; Tanaka, Satomi; Shimamori, Kazusuke; Suzuki, Aya; Matsuda, Masaru; Kobayashi, Tohru; Nagahama, Yoshitaka; Shibata, Naoki

    2012-04-01

    In most vertebrates, sex steroids play a critical role in gonadal development, maturation of germ cells, and development of secondary sexual characteristics. Sex steroids are synthesized in steroid-producing cells (SPCs) in the testis known as Leydig cells, as well as in thecal and granulosa cells in the ovary. In SPCs, cholesterol is sequentially catalyzed by a set of steroidogenic factors and enzymes in order to produce sex steroids. Therefore, integrated expression of the genes involved in steroidogenesis is critical for the proper production of sex steroids. In the present study, regulatory mechanisms of steroidogenic factors and enzymes were examined. We focused on hsd3b, star and ad4bp/sf-1 as well as the description of temporal and spatial expression of these genes during gonadal development in medaka (Oryzias latipes). During testicular development, hsd3b, star and ad4bp/sf-1 were co-expressed in the interstitial somatic cells subsequent to the formation of the seminiferous tubule precursor, suggesting that ad4bp/sf-1 regulated the transcription of both hsd3b and star. During ovarian development, the expression pattern of hsd3b coincided with that of cyp11a1, but not with that of aromatase. Although ad4bp/sf-1 was mainly expressed in presumptive follicular cells, it was also detected in hsd3b positive interstitial cells in the developing ovary. Contrary to our expectations, the onset of star expression occurred during a later stage of ovarian development than the expression of other steroidogenic enzymes. Thus, the regulation mechanism of star transcription appears to differ from that of the other steroidogenic enzymes in the developing ovary, but not in the developing testis.

  3. Role of glucocorticoid receptor and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha in the feed-forward induction of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 expression by cortisol in human amnion fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Guo, Chunming; Zhu, Ping; Li, Wenjiao; Myatt, Leslie; Sun, Kang

    2007-11-01

    The amount of cortisol available to its receptors is increased by the pre-receptor enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) which converts cortisone to cortisol. We examined the molecular mechanisms of the feedback effect of cortisol on 11beta-HSD1 mRNA expression in human amnion fibroblasts. Our data showed that cortisol-induced 11beta-HSD1 mRNA expression dose dependently in amnion fibroblasts, which could be completely blocked both by the mRNA transcription inhibitor 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole riboside and by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist RU486, and partially blocked by global inhibition of CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) with transfection of C/EBP-specific dominant-negative expression CMV500 plasmid (AC/EBP) into the cells. Likewise, the induction of the promoter activity by cortisol could also be completely blocked by RU486 and partially by AC/EBP transfection. Progressive 5' deletion of the 11beta-HSD1promoter located the region responsible for cortisol's induction within -204 bp upstream to the transcription start site. Specific nucleotide mutations of the putative glucocorticoid responsive element or CCAAT in this promoter region attenuated the induction by cortisol. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay and electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that GR and C/EBPalpha but not C/EBPbeta could bind this promoter region upon cortisol stimulation of amnion fibroblasts. In conclusion, we demonstrated that GR and C/EBPalpha were involved in cortisol-induced 11beta-HSD1 mRNA expression via binding to 11beta-HSD1 promoter in amnion fibroblasts, which may cast a feed-forward production of cortisol in the fetal membranes at the end of gestation.

  4. Recurrent 12q13-15 chromosomal aberrations, high frequency of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutations, and absence of high mobility group AT-hook 2 expression in periosteal chondromas.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila; Taksdal, Ingeborg; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; Heim, Sverre

    2015-07-01

    Periosteal chondroma is a benign cartilage tumor that accounts for <2% of chondromas. In the present study, four cases of periosteal chondromas were cytogenetically investigated and studied for the expression of high-mobility group AT-hook 2 (HMGA2), mutations in codons 132 of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)1 and 172 of IDH2; mutations -C228T and -C250T in the promoter region of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT); and for methylation in the promoter regions of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and cellular retinol binding protein 1 (CRBP1). Chromosome aberrations of 12q13-15 were found in two out of the four tumors, while two had a normal karyotype. Two periosteal chondromas carried the mutation IDH1R132C (CGT>TGT), and two carried the mutation IDH1R132L (CGT>CTT). However, none of the four tumors had methylated MGMT and CRBP1 promoters or mutations at codon 172 of IDH2. In addition, -C228T and -C250T mutations were not present in the promoter region of TERT, nor was HMGA2 demonstrated to be expressed. The present study indicated that in periosteal chondromas, the involvement of 12q13-15 in structural rearrangements may be recurrent but that HMGA2 is not expressed. Additionally, the periosteal chondromas investigated in the study carried a heterozygous IDH1R132 mutation, the MGMT and CRBP1 promoters were not methylated, and -C228T and -C250T mutations in the promoter region of TERT were absent.

  5. Regulation of 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/delta 5-delta 4 isomerase expression and activity in the hypophysectomized rat ovary: Interactions between the stimulatory effect of human chorionic gonadotropin and the luteolytic effect of prolactin

    SciTech Connect

    Martel, C.; Labrie, C.; Dupont, E.; Couet, J.; Trudel, C.; Rheaume, E.; Simard, J.; Luu-The, V.; Pelletier, G.; Labrie, F. )

    1990-12-01

    The enzyme 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/delta 5-delta 4 isomerase (3 beta-HSD) catalyzes an obligatory step in the conversion of pregnenolone and other 5-ene-3 beta-hydroxysteroids into progesterone as well as precursors of all androgens and estrogens in the ovary. Since 3 beta-HSD is likely to be an important target for regulation by pituitary hormones, we have studied the effect of chronic treatment with LH (hCG), FSH, and PRL on ovarian 3 beta-HSD expression and activity in hypophysectomized adult female rats. Human CG (hCG) (10 IU, twice a day (bid)), ovine FSH (0.5 microgram, bid), and ovine PRL (1 mg, bid) were administered, singly or in combination, for a period of 10 days starting 15 days after hypophysectomy. In hypophysectomized rats, PRL exerted a potent inhibitory effect on all the parameters studied. In fact, PRL caused a 81% decrease in ovarian 3 beta-HSD mRNA content accompanied by a similar decrease in 3 beta-HSD activity and protein levels. In addition, ovarian weight decreased by 40% whereas serum progesterone fell dramatically from 1.92 nmol/liter to undetectable levels after treatment with PRL. Whereas hCG alone had only slight stimulatory effects on 3 beta-HSD mRNA, protein content and activity levels, treatment with the gonadotropin partially or completely reversed the potent inhibitory effects of oPRL on all the parameters measured. FSH, on the other hand, had no significant effect on 3 beta-HSD expression and activity. In situ hybridization experiments using the 35S-labeled rat ovary 3 beta-HSD cDNA probe show that the inhibitory effect of PRL is exerted primarily on luteal cell 3 beta-HSD expression and activity. On the other hand, it can be seen that hCG stimulates 3 beta-HSD mRNA accumulation in interstitial cells.

  6. LACTIC DEHYDROGENASES OF PSEUDOMONAS NATRIEGENS.

    PubMed

    WALKER, H; EAGON, R G

    1964-07-01

    Walker, Hazel (University of Georgia, Athens), and R. G. Eagon. Lactic dehydrogenases of Pseudomonas natriegens. J. Bacteriol. 88:25-30. 1964.-Lactic dehydrogenases specific for d- and l-lactate were demonstrated in Pseudomonas natriegens. The l-lactic dehydrogenase showed considerable heat stability, and 40% of the activity remained in extracts after heating at 60 C for 10 min. An essential thiol group for enzyme activity was noted. The results of these experiments were consistent with the view that lactate was dehydrogenated initially by a flavin cofactor and that electrons were transported through a complete terminal oxidase system to oxygen. The intracellular site of these lactic dehydrogenases was shown to be the cell membrane. It was suggested that the main physiological role of these lactic dehydrogenases is that of lactate utilization.

  7. High performance enzyme fuel cells using a genetically expressed FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase α-subunit of Burkholderia cepacia immobilized in a carbon nanotube electrode for low glucose conditions.

    PubMed

    Fapyane, Deby; Lee, Soo-Jin; Kang, Seo-Hee; Lim, Du-Hyun; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Nam, Tae-hyun; Ahn, Jae-Pyoung; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Kim, Seon-Won; Chang, In Seop

    2013-06-28

    FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (FAD-GDH) of Burkholderia cepacia was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified in order to use it as an anode catalyst for enzyme fuel cells. The purified enzyme has a low Km value (high affinity) towards glucose, which is 463.8 μM, up to 2-fold exponential range lower compared to glucose oxidase. The heterogeneous electron transfer coefficient (Ks) of FAD-GDH-menadione on a glassy carbon electrode was 10.73 s(-1), which is 3-fold higher than that of GOX-menadione, 3.68 s(-1). FAD-GDH was able to maintain its native glucose affinity during immobilization in the carbon nanotube and operation of enzyme fuel cells. FAD-GDH-menadione showed 3-fold higher power density, 799.4 ± 51.44 μW cm(-2), than the GOX-menadione system, 308.03 ± 17.93 μW cm(-2), under low glucose concentration, 5 mM, which is the concentration in normal physiological fluid.

  8. Expression of 17?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and the effects of LH, FSH and prolactin on oestrone and 17?-oestradiol secretion in the endometrium of pigs during early pregnancy and the oestrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowicz, B; Kotwica, G; Zglejc, K; Waszkiewicz, E; Franczak, A

    2016-03-07

    The endometrium of pregnant and cyclic pigs is a source of oestrone (E1) and 17β-oestradiol (E2). However, the roles of LH, FSH and prolactin (PRL) as regulators of endometrial steroidogenesis, and the presence of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) in the porcine endometrium, remain unknown. Therefore, in the present study we examined 17β-HSD expression and the effects of LH, FSH and PRL on E1 and E2 release in vitro in endometrial explants harvested from gravid pigs on Days 10-11 (embryo migration within the uterus), 12-13 (maternal recognition of pregnancy) and 15-16 (beginning of implantation) and compared them with results obtained in non-gravid pigs. The results show that: (1) endometrial 17β-HSD activity was decreased on Days 15-16 in pregnant and cyclic pigs compared with the preceding days; (2) LH, FSH and PRL increased endometrial E1 secretion on Days 10-11 and 15-16 of pregnancy and on Days 12-13 and 15-16 of the oestrous cycle; and (3) LH, FSH and PRL increased endometrial E2 secretion on Days 15-16 of pregnancy and during the days studied in the oestrous cycle. In conclusion, data suggest that LH, FSH and PRL affect endometrial secretion of estrogens in pigs.

  9. Differential sensitivity of male and female mouse embryos to oxidative induced heat-stress is mediated by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Crespo, M; Ramírez, M A; Fernández-González, R; Rizos, D; Lonergan, P; Pintado, B; Gutiérrez-Adán, A

    2005-12-01

    During the preimplantation period, in vitro cultured males have a higher metabolic rate, different gene expression, and grow faster than females. It has been suggested that under some stress conditions male embryos are more vulnerable than females; however, the biological fragility of male embryos is little understood. Since many forms of stress result in the overproduction of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), we addressed the hypothesis that the connection between female advantage during early developmental stages and heat stress involves ROS and differential gene expression of G6PD, an X-linked gene related to oxidative stress. We have found that after compaction, female heat-stressed embryos have less relative amounts of H2O2 than males, and female embryos survive better than males under in vivo or in vitro heat stress situations. In addition, in vitro produced female embryos grow slower than male embryos, have differential mRNA transcription of G6PD and also of some genes situated on autosomal-chromosomes (Sox, Bax, and Oct-4). Moreover, by inhibiting G6PD, all differences generated by oxidative stress between male and female embryos disappear. For the first time, we provide an experimental demonstration of a mechanism that explains why following exposure to heat stress-induced ROS, female preimplantation embryos are more resistant than males.

  10. 15-Deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 induces expression of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase through Elk-1 activation in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Rim; Lee, Ha-Na; Lim, Kyu; Surh, Young-Joon; Na, Hye-Kyung

    2014-10-01

    Overproduction of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been reported to be implicated in carcinogenesis. The intracellular level of PGE2 is maintained not only by its biosynthesis, but also by inactivation/degradation. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) is the key enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of oncogenic PGE2 to a biologically inactive keto metabolite. In the present study, we demonstrate that 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 (15 d-PGJ2), one of the terminal products of cyclooxygenase-2, updregulates the expression and the activity of 15-PGDH in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. By using deletion constructs of the 15-PGDH promoter, we have found that E-twenty six (Ets) is the most essential determinant for 15-PGDH induction. 15 d-PGJ2 induced phosphorylation of Elk-1, one of Ets transcription factor family members, in the nucleus. Knockdown of Elk-1 abolished the ability of 15 d-PGJ2 to upregulate 15-PGDH expression. Furthermore, 15 d-PGJ2-mediated activation of Elk-1 was found to be dependent on activation of extracellular-signal related kinase (ERK) 1/2. Treatment of U0126, a pharmacological inhibitor of MEK1/2-ERK, abolished phosphorylation and DNA binding of Elk-1 as well as 15-PGDH induction in 15 d-PGJ2-treated MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, 15 d-PGJ2 generated reactive oxygen species (ROS), which contribute to the expression of 15-PGDH as well as phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Elk-1. 15 d-PGJ2 inhibited the migration of MDA-MB-231 cells, which was attenuated by transient transfection with 15-PGDH siRNA. Taken together, these findings suggest that 15 d-PGJ2 induces the expression of 15-PGDH through ROS-mediated activation of ERK1/2 and subsequently Elk-1 in the MDA-MB-231 cells, which may contribute to tumor suppressive activity of this cyclopentenone prostaglandin.

  11. Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biologic...

  12. Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, H. J.; Hanson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum, a facultative methane-oxidizing bacterium, has been purified to homogeneity as indicated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. It has several properties in common with the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The active enzyme is a dimeric protein, both subunits having molecular weights of about 62,000. The enzyme exhibits broad substrate specificity for primary alcohols and catalyzes the two-step oxidation of methanol to formate. The apparent Michaelis constants of the enzyme are 2.9 × 10−5 M for methanol and 8.2 × 10−5 M for formaldehyde. Activity of the purified enzyme is dependent on phenazine methosulfate. Certain characteristics of this enzyme distinguish it from the other alcohol dehydrogenases of other methylotrophic bacteria. Ammonia is not required for, but stimulates the activity of newly purified enzyme. An absolute dependence on ammonia develops after storage of the purified enzyme. Activity is not inhibited by phosphate. The fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme indicates that it and the cofactor associated with it may be chemically different from the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The alcohol dehydrogenases of Hyphomicrobium WC-65, Pseudomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and several facultative methylotrophs are serologically related to the enzyme purified in this study. The enzymes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and of organisms of the Methylococcus group did not cross-react with the antiserum prepared against the alcohol dehydrogenase of M. organophilum. Images PMID:80974

  13. Efficient whole-cell biocatalyst for acetoin production with NAD+ regeneration system through homologous co-expression of 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase and NADH oxidase in engineered Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Teng; Zhang, Xian; Rao, Zhiming; Zhao, Xiaojing; Zhang, Rongzhen; Yang, Taowei; Xu, Zhenghong; Yang, Shangtian

    2014-01-01

    Acetoin (3-hydroxy-2-butanone), an extensively-used food spice and bio-based platform chemical, is usually produced by chemical synthesis methods. With increasingly requirement of food security and environmental protection, bio-fermentation of acetoin by microorganisms has a great promising market. However, through metabolic engineering strategies, the mixed acid-butanediol fermentation metabolizes a certain portion of substrate to the by-products of organic acids such as lactic acid and acetic acid, which causes energy cost and increases the difficulty of product purification in downstream processes. In this work, due to the high efficiency of enzymatic reaction and excellent selectivity, a strategy for efficiently converting 2,3-butandiol to acetoin using whole-cell biocatalyst by engineered Bacillus subtilis is proposed. In this process, NAD+ plays a significant role on 2,3-butanediol and acetoin distribution, so the NADH oxidase and 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase both from B. subtilis are co-expressed in B. subtilis 168 to construct an NAD+ regeneration system, which forces dramatic decrease of the intracellular NADH concentration (1.6 fold) and NADH/NAD+ ratio (2.2 fold). By optimization of the enzymatic reaction and applying repeated batch conversion, the whole-cell biocatalyst efficiently produced 91.8 g/L acetoin with a productivity of 2.30 g/(L·h), which was the highest record ever reported by biocatalysis. This work indicated that manipulation of the intracellular cofactor levels was more effective than the strategy of enhancing enzyme activity, and the bioprocess for NAD+ regeneration may also be a useful way for improving the productivity of NAD+-dependent chemistry-based products.

  14. Stringency of substrate specificity of Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase.

    SciTech Connect

    Boernke, W. E.; Millard, C. S.; Stevens, P. W.; Kakar, S. N.; Stevens, F. J.; Donnelly, M. I.; Nebraska Wesleyan Univ.

    1995-09-10

    Malate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase are members of the structurally and functionally homologous family of 2-ketoacid dehydrogenases. Both enzymes display high specificity for their respective keto substrates, oxaloacetate and pyruvate. Closer analysis of their specificity, however, reveals that the specificity of malate dehydrogenase is much stricter and less malleable than that of lactate dehydrogenase. Site-specific mutagenesis of the two enzymes in an attempt to reverse their specificity has met with contrary results. Conversion of a specific active-site glutamine to arginine in lactate dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus generated an enzyme that displayed activity toward oxaloacetate equal to that of the native enzyme toward pyruvate (H. M. Wilks et al. (1988) Science 242, 1541-1544). We have constructed a series of mutants in the mobile, active site loop of the Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase that incorporate the complementary change, conversion of arginine 81 to glutamine, to evaluate the role of charge distribution and conformational flexibility within this loop in defining the substrate specificity of these enzymes. Mutants incorporating the change R81Q all had reversed specificity, displaying much higher activity toward pyruvate than to the natural substrate, oxaloacetate. In contrast to the mutated lactate dehydrogenase, these reversed-specificity mutants were much less active than the native enzyme. Secondary mutations within the loop of the E. coli enzyme (A80N, A80P, A80P/M85E/D86T) had either no or only moderately beneficial effects on the activity of the mutant enzyme toward pyruvate. The mutation A80P, which can be expected to reduce the overall flexibility of the loop, modestly improved activity toward pyruvate. The possible physiological relevance of the stringent specificity of malate dehydrogenase was investigated. In normal strains of E. coli, fermentative metabolism was not affected by expression of the mutant

  15. Michael hydratase alcohol dehydrogenase or just alcohol dehydrogenase?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Michael hydratase – alcohol dehydrogenase (MhyADH) from Alicycliphilus denitrificans was previously identified as a bi-functional enzyme performing a hydration of α,β-unsaturated ketones and subsequent oxidation of the formed alcohols. The investigations of the bi-functionality were based on a spectrophotometric assay and an activity staining in a native gel of the dehydrogenase. New insights in the recently discovered organocatalytic Michael addition of water led to the conclusion that the previously performed experiments to identify MhyADH as a bi-functional enzyme and their results need to be reconsidered and the reliability of the methodology used needs to be critically evaluated. PMID:24949265

  16. Rearrangement of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase protein–protein interactions by the MDM2 ligand nutlin‐3

    PubMed Central

    Way, Luke; Faktor, Jakub; Dvorakova, Petra; Nicholson, Judith; Vojtesek, Borek; Graham, Duncan; Ball, Kathryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Drugs targeting MDM2's hydrophobic pocket activate p53. However, these agents act allosterically and have agonist effects on MDM2's protein interaction landscape. Dominant p53‐independent MDM2‐drug responsive‐binding proteins have not been stratified. We used as a variable the differential expression of MDM2 protein as a function of cell density to identify Nutlin‐3 responsive MDM2‐binding proteins that are perturbed independent of cell density using SWATH‐MS. Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, the E3 subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, was one of two Nutlin‐3 perturbed proteins identified fours hour posttreatment at two cell densities. Immunoblotting confirmed that dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase was induced by Nutlin‐3. Depletion of MDM2 using siRNA also elevated dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase in Nutlin‐3 treated cells. Mitotracker confirmed that Nutlin‐3 inhibits mitochondrial activity. Enrichment of mitochondria using TOM22+ immunobeads and TMT labeling defined key changes in the mitochondrial proteome after Nutlin‐3 treatment. Proximity ligation identified rearrangements of cellular protein–protein complexes in situ. In response to Nutlin‐3, a reduction of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase/dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase protein complexes highlighted a disruption of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. This coincides with an increase in MDM2/dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase complexes in the nucleus that was further enhanced by the nuclear export inhibitor Leptomycin B. The data suggest one therapeutic impact of MDM2 drugs might be on the early perturbation of specific protein–protein interactions within the mitochondria. This methodology forms a blueprint for biomarker discovery that can identify rearrangements of MDM2 protein–protein complexes in drug‐treated cells. PMID:27273042

  17. Cloning and sequencing of the alcohol dehydrogenase II gene from Zymomonas mobilis

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Conway, Tyrrell

    1992-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase II gene from Zymomonas mobilis has been cloned and sequenced. This gene can be expressed at high levels in other organisms to produce acetaldehyde or to convert acetaldehyde to ethanol.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: lactate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... dehydrogenase-B pieces (subunits) of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme. This enzyme is found throughout the body and is important ... cells. There are five different forms of this enzyme, each made up of four protein subunits. Various ...

  19. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Revisited

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Jerome T.; Henderson, Alfred R.

    1984-01-01

    Hemolytic diseases associated with drugs have been recognized since antiquity. Many of these anemias have been associated with oxidizing agents and deficiencies in the intraerythrocytic enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. This paper outlines the discovery, prevalence, and variants of this enzyme. Methods of diagnosis of associated anemias are offered. PMID:6502728

  20. Effect of fermented sea tangle on the alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jae-Young; Jeong, Jae-Jun; Yang, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Bae-Jin; Cho, Young-Su

    2011-08-01

    Sea tangle, a kind of brown seaweed, was fermented with Lactobacillus brevis BJ-20. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content in fermented sea tangle (FST) was 5.56% (w/w) and GABA in total free amino acid of FST was 49.5%. The effect of FST on the enzyme activities and mRNA protein expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) involved in alcohol metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. Yeast was cultured in YPD medium supplemented with different concentrations of FST powder [0, 0.4, 0.8, and 1.0% (w/v)] for 18 h. FST had no cytotoxic effect on the yeast growth. The highest activities and protein expressions of ADH and ALDH from the cell-free extracts of S. cerevisiae were evident with the 0.4% and 0.8% (w/v) FST-supplemented concentrations, respectively. The highest concentrations of GABA as well as minerals (Zn, Ca, and Mg) were found in the cell-free extracts of S. cerevisiae cultured in medium supplemented with 0.4% (w/v) FST. The levels of GABA, Zn, Ca, and Mg in S. cerevisiae were strongly correlated with the enzyme activities of ADH and ALDH in yeast. These results indicate that FST can enhance the enzyme activities and protein expression of ADH and ALDH in S. cerevisiae.

  1. Molecular cloning of gluconobacter oxydans DSM 2003 xylitol dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, H Mir Mohammad; Ahmadi, R; Aghaabdollahian, S; Mofid, M R; Ghaemi, Y; Abedi, D

    2011-01-01

    Due to the widespread applications of xylitol dehydrogenase, an enzyme used for the production of xylitol, the present study was designed for the cloning of xylitol dehydrogenase gene from Glcunobacter oxydans DSM 2003. After extraction of genomic DNA from this bacterium, xylitol dehydrogenase gene was replicated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The amplified product was entered into pTZ57R cloning vector by T/A cloning method and transformation was performed by heat shocking of the E. coli XL1-blue competent cells. Following plasmid preparation, the cloned gene was digested out and ligated into the expression vector pET-22b(+). Electrophoresis of PCR product showed a 789 bp band. Recombinant plasmid (rpTZ57R) was then constructed. This plasmid was double digested with XhoI and EcoRI resulting in 800 bp and 2900 bp bands. The obtained insert was ligated into pET-22b(+) vector and its orientation was confirmed with XhoI and BamHI restriction enzymes. In conclusion, in the present study the recombinant expression vector containing xylitol dehydrogenase gene has been constructed and can be used for the production of this enzyme in high quantities.

  2. Molecular characterization of an aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase gene from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    PubMed Central

    Nair, R V; Bennett, G N; Papoutsakis, E T

    1994-01-01

    A gene (aad) coding for an aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) was identified immediately upstream of the previously cloned ctfA (J. W. Cary, D. J. Petersen, E. T. Papoutsakis, and G. N. Bennett, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 56:1576-1583, 1990) of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and sequenced. The 2,619-bp aad codes for a 96,517-Da protein. Primer extension analysis identified two transcriptional start sites 83 and 243 bp upstream of the aad start codon. The N-terminal section of AAD shows homology to aldehyde dehydrogenases of bacterial, fungal, mammalian, and plant origin, while the C-terminal section shows homology to alcohol dehydrogenases of bacterial (which includes three clostridial alcohol dehydrogenases) and yeast origin. AAD exhibits considerable amino acid homology (56% identity) over its entire sequence to the trifunctional protein encoded by adhE from Escherichia coli. Expression of aad from a plasmid in C. acetobutylicum showed that AAD, which appears as a approximately 96-kDa band in denaturing protein gels, provides elevated activities of NADH-dependent butanol dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and butyraldehyde dehydrogenase, and a small increase in NADH-dependent ethanol dehydrogenase. A 957-bp open reading frame that could potentially encode a 36,704-Da protein was identified upstream of aad. Images PMID:8300540

  3. Control of glycolytic flux in Zymomonas mobilis by glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Snoep, J.L. |; Arfman, N.; Yomano, L.P.; Ingram, L.O.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Conway, T.

    1996-07-20

    Alycolytic genes in Zymomonas mobilis are highly expressed and constitute half of the cytoplasmic protein. The first four genes (glf, zwf, edd, glk) in this pathway form an operon encoding a glucose permease, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6-P dehydrogenase), 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase, and glucokinase, respectively. Each gene was overexpressed from a tac promoter to investigate the control of glycolysis during the early stages of batch fermentation when flux (qCO{sub 2}) is highest. Almost half of flux control appears to reside with G6-P dehydrogenase (C{sub G6-P dehydrogenase}{sup J} = 0.4). Although Z. mobilis exhibits one of the highest rates of glycolysis known, recombinants with elevated G6-P dehydrogenase had a 10% to 13% higher glycolytic flux than the native organism. A small increase in flux was also observed for recombinants expressing glf. Results obtained did not allow a critical evaluation of glucokinase and this enzyme may also represent an important control point. 6-Phosphogluconate dehydratase appears to be saturating at native levels. With constructs containing the full operon, growth rate and flux were both reduced, complicating interpretations. However, results obtained were also consistent with G6-P dehydrogenase as a primary site of control. Flux was 17% higher in operon constructs which exhibited a 17% increase in G6-P dehydrogenase specific activity, relative to the average of other operon constructs which contain a frameshift mutation in zwf.

  4. Mammalian class IV alcohol dehydrogenase (stomach alcohol dehydrogenase): structure, origin, and correlation with enzymology.

    PubMed Central

    Parés, X; Cederlund, E; Moreno, A; Hjelmqvist, L; Farrés, J; Jörnvall, H

    1994-01-01

    The structure of a mammalian class IV alcohol dehydrogenase has been determined by peptide analysis of the protein isolated from rat stomach. The structure indicates that the enzyme constitutes a separate alcohol dehydrogenase class, in agreement with the distinct enzymatic properties; the class IV enzyme is somewhat closer to class I (the "classical" liver alcohol dehydrogenase; approximately 68% residue identities) than to the other classes (II, III, and V; approximately 60% residue identities), suggesting that class IV might have originated through duplication of an early vertebrate class I gene. The activity of the class IV protein toward ethanol is even higher than that of the classical liver enzyme. Both Km and kcat values are high, the latter being the highest of any class characterized so far. Structurally, these properties are correlated with replacements at the active site, affecting both substrate and coenzyme binding. In particular, Ala-294 (instead of valine) results in increased space in the middle section of the substrate cleft, Gly-47 (instead of a basic residue) results in decreased charge interactions with the coenzyme pyrophosphate, and Tyr-363 (instead of a basic residue) may also affect coenzyme binding. In combination, these exchanges are compatible with a promotion of the off dissociation and an increased turnover rate. In contrast, residues at the inner part of the substrate cleft are bulky, accounting for low activity toward secondary alcohols and cyclohexanol. Exchanges at positions 259-261 involve minor shifts in glycine residues at a reverse turn in the coenzyme-binding fold. Clearly, class IV is distinct in structure, ethanol turnover, stomach expression, and possible emergence from class I. PMID:8127901

  5. Short Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase Rdhe2 Is a Novel Retinol Dehydrogenase Essential for Frog Embryonic Development*

    PubMed Central

    Belyaeva, Olga V.; Lee, Seung-Ah; Adams, Mark K.; Chang, Chenbei; Kedishvili, Natalia Y.

    2012-01-01

    The enzymes responsible for the rate-limiting step in retinoic acid biosynthesis, the oxidation of retinol to retinaldehyde, during embryogenesis and in adulthood have not been fully defined. Here, we report that a novel member of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily, frog sdr16c5, acts as a highly active retinol dehydrogenase (rdhe2) that promotes retinoic acid biosynthesis when expressed in mammalian cells. In vivo assays of rdhe2 function show that overexpression of rdhe2 in frog embryos leads to posteriorization and induction of defects resembling those caused by retinoic acid toxicity. Conversely, antisense morpholino-mediated knockdown of endogenous rdhe2 results in phenotypes consistent with retinoic acid deficiency, such as defects in anterior neural tube closure, microcephaly with small eye formation, disruption of somitogenesis, and curved body axis with bent tail. Higher doses of morpholino induce embryonic lethality. Analyses of retinoic acid levels using either endogenous retinoic acid-sensitive gene hoxd4 or retinoic acid reporter cell line both show that the levels of retinoic acid are significantly decreased in rdhe2 morphants. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that Xenopus rdhe2 functions as a retinol dehydrogenase essential for frog embryonic development in vivo. Importantly, the retinol oxidizing activity of frog rdhe2 is conserved in its mouse homologs, suggesting that rdhe2-related enzymes may represent the previously unrecognized physiologically relevant retinol dehydrogenases that contribute to retinoic acid biosynthesis in higher vertebrates. PMID:22291023

  6. Crystal structure of quinone-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Pseudogluconobacter saccharoketogenes. A versatile dehydrogenase oxidizing alcohols and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Rozeboom, Henriëtte J; Yu, Shukun; Mikkelsen, Rene; Nikolaev, Igor; Mulder, Harm J; Dijkstra, Bauke W

    2015-12-01

    The quinone-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (PQQ-ADH, E.C. 1.1.5.2) from the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudogluconobacter saccharoketogenes IFO 14464 oxidizes primary alcohols (e.g. ethanol, butanol), secondary alcohols (monosaccharides), as well as aldehydes, polysaccharides, and cyclodextrins. The recombinant protein, expressed in Pichia pastoris, was crystallized, and three-dimensional (3D) structures of the native form, with PQQ and a Ca(2+) ion, and of the enzyme in complex with a Zn(2+) ion and a bound substrate mimic were determined at 1.72 Å and 1.84 Å resolution, respectively. PQQ-ADH displays an eight-bladed β-propeller fold, characteristic of Type I quinone-dependent methanol dehydrogenases. However, three of the four ligands of the Ca(2+) ion differ from those of related dehydrogenases and they come from different parts of the polypeptide chain. These differences result in a more open, easily accessible active site, which explains why PQQ-ADH can oxidize a broad range of substrates. The bound substrate mimic suggests Asp333 as the catalytic base. Remarkably, no vicinal disulfide bridge is present near the PQQ, which in other PQQ-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases has been proposed to be necessary for electron transfer. Instead an associated cytochrome c can approach the PQQ for direct electron transfer.

  7. Gene silencing in phlebotomine sand flies: Xanthine dehydrogenase knock down by dsRNA microinjections.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Mauricio R; Alexander, Bruce; Bates, Paul A; Dillon, Rod J

    2008-06-01

    Lutzomyia longipalpis are vectors of medically important visceral leishmaniasis in South America. Blood-fed adult females digest large amounts of protein, and xanthine dehydrogenase is thought to be a key enzyme involved in protein catabolism through the production of urate. Large amounts of heme are also released during digestion with potentially damaging consequences, as heme can generate oxygen radicals that damage lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. However, urate is an antioxidant that may prevent such oxidative damage produced by heme. We investigated xanthine dehydrogenase by developing the RNAi technique for sand flies and used this technique to knock down the Lu. longipalpis xanthine dehydrogenase gene to evaluate its role in survival of adult females after blood feeding. The gene sequence of Lu. longipalpis xanthine dehydrogenase is described together with expression in different life cycle stages and RNAi knock down. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR of xanthine dehydrogenase expression showed a significant increase in expression after bloodmeal ingestion. Microinjection of dsRNA via the thorax of 1-day-old adult female sand flies resulted in approximately 40% reduction of xanthine dehydrogenase gene expression in comparison to flies injected with a control dsRNA. A significant reduction of urate in the whole body and excretions of Lu. longipalpis was observed after dsRNA xanthine dehydrogenase microinjection and feeding 96h later on rabbit blood. Sand flies injected with XDH dsRNA also exhibit significantly reduced life span in comparison with the mock-injected group when fed on sucrose or when rabbit blood fed, showing that urate could be indeed an important free radical scavenger in Lu. longipalpis. The demonstration of xanthine dehydrogenase knock down by dsRNA microinjection, low mortality of microinjected insects and the successful bloodfeeding of injected insects demonstrated the utility of RNAi as a tool for functional analysis of genes in phlebotomine

  8. Characterization of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 3

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Caroline E.; Brocklehurst, Keith; Pickersgill, Richard W.; Warren, Martin J.

    2005-01-01

    RALDH3 (retinal dehydrogenase 3) was characterized by kinetic and binding studies, protein engineering, homology modelling, ligand docking and electrostatic-potential calculations. The major recognition determinant of an RALDH3 substrate was shown to be an eight-carbon chain bonded to the aldehyde group whose kinetic influence (kcat/Km at pH 8.5) decreases when shortened or lengthened. Surprisingly, the β-ionone ring of all-trans-retinal is not a major recognition site. The dissociation constants (Kd) of the complexes of RALDH3 with octanal, NAD+ and NADH were determined by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. The similarity of the Kd values for the complexes with NAD+ and with octanal suggests a random kinetic mechanism for RALDH3, in contrast with the ordered sequential mechanism often associated with aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes. Inhibition of RALDH3 by tri-iodothyronine binding in competition with NAD+, predicted by the modelling, was established kinetically and by immunoprecipitation. Mechanistic implications of the kinetically influential ionizations with macroscopic pKa values of 5.0 and 7.5 revealed by the pH-dependence of kcat are discussed. Analogies with data for non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus mutans, together with the present modelled structure of the thioacyl RALDH3, suggest (a) that kcat characterizes deacylation of this intermediate for specific substrates and (b) the assignment of the pKa of the major ionization (approximating to 7.5) to the perturbed carboxy group of Glu280 whose conjugate base is envisaged as supplying general base catalysis to attack of a water molecule. The macroscopic pKa of the minor ionization (5.0) is considered to approximate to that of the carboxy group of Glu488. PMID:16241904

  9. Cellobiose dehydrogenase in cellulose degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, L.; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro

    1996-10-01

    Cellobiose dehydrogenase is produced by a variety of fungi. Although it was already discovered during the 70`s, it`s role in cellulose and lignin degradation is yet ambiguous. The enzyme contains both heme and FAD as prosthetic groups, and seems to have a domain specifically designed to bind the enzyme to cellulose. It`s affinity to amorphous cellulose is higher than to crystalline cellulose. We will report on the binding behavior of the enzyme, its usefulness in elucidation of cellulose structures and also, possibilities for applications such as its use in measuring individual and synergistic mechanisms for cellulose degradation by endo- and exo-glucanases.

  10. Decrease in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase is related to skin pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Nakama, Mitsuo; Murakami, Yuhko; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Nakata, Satoru

    2012-03-01

    Skin pigmentation is caused by various physical and chemical factors. It might also be influenced by changes in the physiological function of skin with aging. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) dehydrogenase is an enzyme related to the mitochondrial electron transport system and plays a key role in cellular energy production. It has been reported that the functional decrease in this system causes Parkinson's disease. Another study reports that the amount of NADH dehydrogenase in heart and skeletal muscle decreases with aging. A similar decrease in the skin would probably affect its physiological function. However, no reports have examined the age-related change in levels of NADH dehydrogenase in human skin. In this study, we investigated this change and its effect on skin pigmentation using cultured human epidermal keratinocytes. The mRNA expression of NDUFA1, NDUFB7, and NDUFS2, subunits of NADH dehydrogenase, and its activity were significantly decreased in late passage keratinocytes compared to early passage cells. Conversely, the mRNA expression of melanocyte-stimulating cytokines, interleukin-1 alpha and endothelin 1, was increased in late passage cells. On the other hand, the inhibition of NADH dehydrogenase upregulated the mRNA expression of melanocyte-stimulating cytokines. Moreover, the level of NDUFB7 mRNA was lower in pigmented than in nonpigmented regions of skin in vivo. These results suggest the decrease in NADH dehydrogenase with aging to be involved in skin pigmentation.

  11. Mutation of Arg-115 of human class III alcohol dehydrogenase: a binding site required for formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity and fatty acid activation.

    PubMed Central

    Engeland, K; Höög, J O; Holmquist, B; Estonius, M; Jörnvall, H; Vallee, B L

    1993-01-01

    The origin of the fatty acid activation and formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that distinguishes human class III alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) from all other alcohol dehydrogenases has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis of its Arg-115 residue. The Ala- and Asp-115 mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The activities of the recombinant native and mutant enzymes toward ethanol are essentially identical, but mutagenesis greatly decreases the kcat/Km values for glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation. The catalytic efficiency for the Asp variant is < 0.1% that of the unmutated enzyme, due to both a higher Km and a lower kcat value. As with the native enzyme, neither mutant can oxidize methanol, be saturated by ethanol, or be inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole; i.e., they retain these class III characteristics. In contrast, however, their activation by fatty acids, another characteristic unique to class III alcohol dehydrogenase, is markedly attenuated. The Ala mutant is activated only slightly, but the Asp mutant is not activated at all. The results strongly indicate that Arg-115 in class III alcohol dehydrogenase is a component of the binding site for activating fatty acids and is critical for the binding of S-hydroxymethylglutathione in glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. PMID:8460164

  12. Functional Analysis of a Mosquito Short Chain Dehydrogenase Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Mayoral, Jaime G.; Leonard, Kate T.; Defelipe, Lucas A.; Turjansksi, Adrian G.; Nouzova, Marcela; Noriegal, Fernando G.

    2013-01-01

    The short chain dehydrogenases (SDR) constitute one the oldest and largest families of enzymes with over 46,000 members in sequence databases. About 25% of all known dehydrogenases belong to the SDR family. SDR enzymes have critical roles in lipid, amino acid, carbohydrate, hormone and xenobiotic metabolism as well as in redox sensor mechanisms. This family is present in archaea, bacteria, and eukaryota, emphasizing their versatility and fundamental importance for metabolic processes. We identified a cluster of eight SDRs in the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AaSDRs). Members of the cluster differ in tissue specificity and developmental expression. Heterologous expression produced recombinant proteins that had diverse substrate specificities, but distinct from the conventional insect alcohol (ethanol) dehydrogenases. They are all NADP+-dependent and they have S-enantioselectivity and preference for secondary alcohols with 8–15 carbons. Homology modeling was used to build the structure of AaSDR1 and two additional cluster members. The computational study helped explain the selectivity towards the (10S)-isomers as well as the reduced activity of AaSDR4 and AaSDR9 for longer isoprenoid substrates. Similar clusters of SDRs are present in other species of insects, suggesting similar selection mechanisms causing duplication and diversification of this family of enzymes. PMID:23238893

  13. An efficient ribitol-specific dehydrogenase from Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranjitha; Singh, Raushan; Kim, In-Won; Sigdel, Sujan; Kalia, Vipin C; Kang, Yun Chan; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2015-05-01

    An NAD(+)-dependent ribitol dehydrogenase from Enterobacter aerogenes KCTC 2190 (EaRDH) was cloned and successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. The complete 729-bp gene was amplified, cloned, expressed, and subsequently purified in an active soluble form using nickel affinity chromatography. The enzyme had an optimal pH and temperature of 11.0 and 45°C, respectively. Among various polyols, EaRDH exhibited activity only toward ribitol, with Km, Vmax, and kcat/Km values of 10.3mM, 185Umg(-1), and 30.9s(-1)mM(-1), respectively. The enzyme showed strong preference for NAD(+) and displayed no detectable activity with NADP(+). Homology modeling and sequence analysis of EaRDH, along with its biochemical properties, confirmed that EaRDH belongs to the family of NAD(+)-dependent ribitol dehydrogenases, a member of short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SCOR) family. EaRDH showed the highest activity and unique substrate specificity among all known RDHs. Homology modeling and docking analysis shed light on the molecular basis of its unusually high activity and substrate specificity.

  14. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) in bacteria: a bioinformatic perspective.

    PubMed

    Kisiela, Michael; Skarka, Adam; Ebert, Bettina; Maser, Edmund

    2012-03-01

    Steroidal compounds including cholesterol, bile acids and steroid hormones play a central role in various physiological processes such as cell signaling, growth, reproduction, and energy homeostasis. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs), which belong to the superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR) or aldo-keto reductases (AKR), are important enzymes involved in the steroid hormone metabolism. HSDs function as an enzymatic switch that controls the access of receptor-active steroids to nuclear hormone receptors and thereby mediate a fine-tuning of the steroid response. The aim of this study was the identification of classified functional HSDs and the bioinformatic annotation of these proteins in all complete sequenced bacterial genomes followed by a phylogenetic analysis. For the bioinformatic annotation we constructed specific hidden Markov models in an iterative approach to provide a reliable identification for the specific catalytic groups of HSDs. Here, we show a detailed phylogenetic analysis of 3α-, 7α-, 12α-HSDs and two further functional related enzymes (3-ketosteroid-Δ(1)-dehydrogenase, 3-ketosteroid-Δ(4)(5α)-dehydrogenase) from the superfamily of SDRs. For some bacteria that have been previously reported to posses a specific HSD activity, we could annotate the corresponding HSD protein. The dominating phyla that were identified to express HSDs were that of Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Moreover, some evolutionarily more ancient microorganisms (e.g., Cyanobacteria and Euryachaeota) were found as well. A large number of HSD-expressing bacteria constitute the normal human gastro-intestinal flora. Another group of bacteria were originally isolated from natural habitats like seawater, soil, marine and permafrost sediments. These bacteria include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-degrading species such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Rhodococcus. In conclusion, HSDs are found in a wide variety of microorganisms including

  15. Evidence for distinct dehydrogenase and isomerase sites within a single 3. beta. -hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/5-ene-4-ene isomerase protein

    SciTech Connect

    Luu-The, V.; Takahashi, Masakazu; de Launoit, Y.; Dumont, M.; Lachance, Y.; Labrie, F. )

    1991-09-10

    Complementary DNA encoding human 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/5-ene-4-ene isomerase (3-{beta}-HSD) has been expressed in transfected GH{sub 4}C{sub 1} with use of the cytomegalovirus promoter. The activity of the expressed protein clearly shows that both dehydrogenase and isomerase enzymatic activities are present within a single protein. However, such findings do not indicate whether the two activities reside within one or two closely related catalytic sites. With use of ({sup 3}H)-5-androstenedione, the intermediate compound in dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) transformation into 4-androstenedione by 3{beta}-HSD, the present study shows that 4MA (N,N-diethyl-4-methyl-3-oxo-4-aza-5{alpha}-androstane-17{beta}-carboxamide) and its analogues of 5-androstenedione to 4-androstenedione with an approximately 1,000-fold higher K{sub i} value. The present results thus strongly suggest that dehydrogenase and isomerase activities are present at separate sites on the 3-{beta}-HSD protein. Such data suggest that the irreversible step in the transformation of DHEA to 4-androstenedione is due to a separate site possessing isomerase activity that converts the 5-ene-3-keto to a much more stable 4-ene-3-keto configuration.

  16. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  20. Opine dehydrogenases in marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Harcet, Matija; Perina, Drago; Pleše, Bruna

    2013-10-01

    It is well known today that opine production anaerobic pathways are analogs to the classical glycolytic pathway (lactate production pathway). These pathways, catalyzed by a group of enzymes called opine dehydrogenases (OpDHs), ensure continuous flux of glycolysis and a constant supply of ATP by maintaining the NADH/NAD(+) ratio during exercise and hypoxia, thus regulating the cytosolic redox balance in glycolysis under anoxia. OpDHs are distributed in a wide range of marine invertebrate phyla, including sponges (Porifera). Phylogenetic analyses supported with enzymatic assays strongly indicate that sponge OpDHs constitute an enzyme class unrelated to other OpDHs. Therefore, OpDHs in marine invertebrates are divided into two groups, a mollusk/annelid type and a sponge type, which belongs to the OCD/mu-crystallin family.

  1. X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and autosomal 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) polymorphisms in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    VandeBerg, J.L.; Aivaliotis, M.J.; Samollow, P.B. )

    1992-12-01

    Electrophoretic polymorphisms of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) were examined in captive colonies of five subspecies of baboons (Papio hamadryas). Phenotype frequencies and family data verified the X-linked inheritance of the G6PD polymorphism. Insufficient family data were available to confirm autosomal inheritance of the 6PGD polymorphism, but the electrophoretic patterns of variant types (putative heterozygotes) suggested the codominant expression of alleles at an autosomal locus. Implications of the G6PD polymorphism are discussed with regard to its utility as a marker system for research on X-chromosome inactivation during baboon development and for studies of clonal cell proliferation and/or cell selection during the development of atherosclerotic lesions in the baboon model. 61 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  2. Change in ATP-binding cassette B1/19, glutamine synthetase and alcohol dehydrogenase gene expression during root elongation in Betula pendula Roth and Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn in response to leachate and leonardite humic substances.

    PubMed

    Tahiri, Abdelghani; Delporte, Fabienne; Muhovski, Yordan; Ongena, Marc; Thonart, Philippe; Druart, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) are complex and heterogeneous compounds of humified organic matter resulting from the chemical and microbiological decomposition of organic residues. HS have a positive effect on plant growth and development by improving soil structure and fertility. They have long been recognized as plant growth-promoting substances, particularly with regard to influencing nutrient uptake, root growth and architecture. The biochemical and molecular mechanisms through which HS influence plant physiology are not well understood. This study evaluated the bioactivity of landfill leachate and leonardite HS on alder (Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn) and birch (Betula pendula Roth) during root elongation in vitro. Changes in root development were studied in relation to auxin, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms, as well as to the stress adaptive response. The cDNA fragments of putative genes encoding two ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters (ABCB1 and ABCB19) belonging to the B subfamily of plant ABC auxin transporters were cloned and sequenced. Molecular data indicate that HS and their humic acid (HA) fractions induce root growth by influencing polar auxin transport (PAT), as illustrated by the modulation of the ABCB transporter transcript levels (ABCB1 and ABCB19). There were also changes in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) gene transcript levels in response to HS exposure. These findings confirmed that humic matter affects plant growth and development through various metabolic pathways, including hormonal, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms and stress response or signalization.

  3. Characterization of two β-decarboxylating dehydrogenases from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kento; Nakanishi, Fumika; Tomita, Takeo; Akiyama, Nagisa; Lassak, Kerstin; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Nishiyama, Makoto

    2016-11-01

    Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, a hyperthermoacidophilic archaeon, possesses two β-decarboxylating dehydrogenase genes, saci_0600 and saci_2375, in its genome, which suggests that it uses these enzymes for three similar reactions in lysine biosynthesis through 2-aminoadipate, leucine biosynthesis, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. To elucidate their roles, these two genes were expressed in Escherichia coli in the present study and their gene products were characterized. Saci_0600 recognized 3-isopropylmalate as a substrate, but exhibited slight and no activity for homoisocitrate and isocitrate, respectively. Saci_2375 exhibited distinct and similar activities for isocitrate and homoisocitrate, but no detectable activity for 3-isopropylmalate. These results suggest that Saci_0600 is a 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase for leucine biosynthesis and Saci_2375 is a dual function enzyme serving as isocitrate-homoisocitrate dehydrogenase. The crystal structure of Saci_0600 was determined as a closed-form complex that binds 3-isopropylmalate and Mg(2+), thereby revealing the structural basis for the extreme thermostability and novel-type recognition of the 3-isopropyl moiety of the substrate.

  4. Plastidial Expression of Type II NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase Increases the Reducing State of Plastoquinones and Hydrogen Photoproduction Rate by the Indirect Pathway in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Baltz, Anthony; Dang, Kieu-Van; Beyly, Audrey; Auroy, Pascaline; Richaud, Pierre; Cournac, Laurent; Peltier, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Biological conversion of solar energy into hydrogen is naturally realized by some microalgae species due to a coupling between the photosynthetic electron transport chain and a plastidial hydrogenase. While promising for the production of clean and sustainable hydrogen, this process requires improvement to be economically viable. Two pathways, called direct and indirect photoproduction, lead to sustained hydrogen production in sulfur-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cultures. The indirect pathway allows an efficient time-based separation of O2 and H2 production, thus overcoming the O2 sensitivity of the hydrogenase, but its activity is low. With the aim of identifying the limiting step of hydrogen production, we succeeded in overexpressing the plastidial type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDA2). We report that transplastomic strains overexpressing NDA2 show an increased activity of nonphotochemical reduction of plastoquinones (PQs). While hydrogen production by the direct pathway, involving the linear electron flow from photosystem II to photosystem I, was not affected by NDA2 overexpression, the rate of hydrogen production by the indirect pathway was increased in conditions, such as nutrient limitation, where soluble electron donors are not limiting. An increased intracellular starch was observed in response to nutrient deprivation in strains overexpressing NDA2. It is concluded that activity of the indirect pathway is limited by the nonphotochemical reduction of PQs, either by the pool size of soluble electron donors or by the PQ-reducing activity of NDA2 in nutrient-limited conditions. We discuss these data in relation to limitations and biotechnological improvement of hydrogen photoproduction in microalgae. PMID:24820024

  5. Human alcohol dehydrogenase: structural differences between the beta and gamma subunits suggest parallel duplications in isoenzyme evolution and predominant expression of separate gene descendants in livers of different mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Bühler, R; Hempel, J; Kaiser, R; von Wartburg, J P; Vallee, B L; Jörnvall, H

    1984-01-01

    Human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH; alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) occurs in multiple forms, which exhibit distinct electrophoretic mobilities and enzymatic properties. The homogeneous isoenzymes beta 1 beta 1 and gamma 1 gamma 1 were isolated from livers of Caucasians with "typical" ADH phenotype by double ternary complex affinity chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. The differences between the beta 1 and gamma 1 subunits were determined by structural analysis of all tryptic peptides from the carboxymethylated proteins. The human beta 1 and gamma 1 chains differ at 21 of the 373 positions (5.6%). Ten tryptic peptides account for the differences. All residue substitutions are compatible with one-base mutations and result in largely unaltered properties, but five lead to charge differences. Sixteen substitutions are at positions corresponding to the catalytic domain of the well-known horse enzyme; five correspond to the coenzyme-binding domain. Substitutions adjacent to important regions may correlate with differences in coenzyme binding, substrate specificities, and active-site relationships. The residue replacements between the beta 1 and gamma 1 subunits of human ADH are not identical to the known substitutions between ethanol-active (E) and steroid-active (S) subunits of horse ADH. Thus, the duplication leading to human beta 1 and gamma 1 subunits is separate and different from that leading to equine E and S subunits. Both duplications are likely to have occurred after the ancestral separation of human and equine ADH. Of the 21 residues that are different between beta 1/gamma 1, 13 in gamma 1 but only 6 in beta 1 are identical to those of the horse E chain. This suggests a closer relationship between gamma 1 and E, although beta 1 in man and E in the horse are the subunits recovered in highest yield from liver ADH preparations. Consequently, in these two mammalian species, relative activities of genes for an isoenzyme family appear to be

  6. Human dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 11 is a novel type of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Miyagi, Namiki; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Hara, Akira; Ikari, Akira

    2016-03-25

    We report characterization of a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily encoded in a human gene, DHRS11. The recombinant protein (DHRS11) efficiently catalyzed the conversion of the 17-keto group of estrone, 4- and 5-androstenes and 5α-androstanes into their 17β-hydroxyl metabolites with NADPH as a coenzyme. In contrast, it exhibited reductive 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity toward 5β-androstanes, 5β-pregnanes, 4-pregnenes and bile acids. Additionally, DHRS11 reduced α-dicarbonyls (such as diacetyl and methylglyoxal) and alicyclic ketones (such as 1-indanone and loxoprofen). The enzyme activity was inhibited in a mixed-type manner by flavonoids, and competitively by carbenoxolone, glycyrrhetinic acid, zearalenone, curcumin and flufenamic acid. The expression of DHRS11 mRNA was observed widely in human tissues, most abundantly in testis, small intestine, colon, kidney and cancer cell lines. Thus, DHRS11 represents a novel type of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase with unique catalytic properties and tissue distribution.

  7. Structural Insights into the Drosophila melanogaster Retinol Dehydrogenase, a Member of the Short-Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase Family

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Lukas; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Alexander, Nathan S.; Babino, Darwin; Leung, Nicole Y.; Montell, Craig; Banerjee, Surajit; von Lintig, Johannes; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The 11-cis-retinylidene chromophore of visual pigments isomerizes upon interaction with a photon, initiating a downstream cascade of signaling events that ultimately lead to visual perception. 11-cis-Retinylidene is regenerated through enzymatic transformations collectively called the visual cycle. The first and rate-limiting enzymatic reaction within this cycle, i.e., the reduction of all-trans-retinal to all-trans-retinol, is catalyzed by retinol dehydrogenases. Here, we determined the structure of Drosophila melanogaster photoreceptor retinol dehydrogenase (PDH) isoform C that belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family. This is the first reported structure of a SDR that possesses this biologically important activity. Two crystal structures of the same enzyme grown under different conditions revealed a novel conformational change of the NAD+ cofactor, likely representing a change during catalysis. Amide hydrogen–deuterium exchange of PDH demonstrated changes in the structure of the enzyme upon dinucleotide binding. In D. melanogaster, loss of PDH activity leads to photoreceptor degeneration that can be partially rescued by transgenic expression of human RDH12. Based on the structure of PDH, we analyzed mutations causing Leber congenital amaurosis 13 in a homology model of human RDH12 to obtain insights into the molecular basis of RDH12 disease-causing mutations. PMID:27809489

  8. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... conversion is essential to begin the series of chemical reactions that produce energy for cells. The pyruvate dehydrogenase ... E3, each of which performs part of the chemical reaction that converts pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. In addition, ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skin on the palms and soles (hand-foot syndrome); shortness of breath; and hair loss may also ... dehydrogenase deficiency , with its early-onset neurological symptoms, is a rare disorder. Its prevalence is ...

  10. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Waitkus, Matthew S.; Diplas, Bill H.; Yan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, extraordinary progress has been made in elucidating the underlying genetic causes of gliomas. In 2008, our understanding of glioma genetics was revolutionized when mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) were identified in the vast majority of progressive gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs). IDH enzymes normally catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to generate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), but recurrent mutations at Arg132 of IDH1 and Arg172 of IDH2 confer a neomorphic enzyme activity that catalyzes reduction of αKG into the putative oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutate (D2HG). D2HG inhibits αKG-dependent dioxygenases and is thought to create a cellular state permissive to malignant transformation by altering cellular epigenetics and blocking normal differentiation processes. Herein, we discuss the relevant literature on mechanistic studies of IDH1/2 mutations in gliomas, and we review the potential impact of IDH1/2 mutations on molecular classification and glioma therapy. PMID:26188014

  11. Temporal expression of the human alcohol dehydrogenase gene family during liver development correlates with differential promoter activation by hepatocyte nuclear factor 1, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha, liver activator protein, and D-element-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    van Ooij, C; Snyder, R C; Paeper, B W; Duester, G

    1992-01-01

    The human class I alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene family consists of ADH1, ADH2, and ADH3, which are sequentially activated in early fetal, late fetal, and postnatal liver, respectively. Analysis of ADH promoters revealed differential activation by several factors previously shown to control liver transcription. In cotransfection assays, the ADH1 promoter, but not the ADH2 or ADH3 promoter, was shown to respond to hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF-1), which has previously been shown to regulate transcription in early liver development. The ADH2 promoter, but not the ADH1 or ADH3 promoter, was shown to respond to CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha), a transcription factor particularly active during late fetal liver and early postnatal liver development. The ADH1, ADH2, and ADH3 promoters all responded to the liver transcription factors liver activator protein (LAP) and D-element-binding protein (DBP), which are most active in postnatal liver. For all three promoters, the activation by LAP or DBP was higher than that seen by HNF-1 or C/EBP alpha, and a significant synergism between C/EBP alpha and LAP was noticed for the ADH2 and ADH3 promoters when both factors were simultaneously cotransfected. A hierarchy of ADH promoter responsiveness to C/EBP alpha and LAP homo- and heterodimers is suggested. In all three ADH genes, LAP bound to the same four sites previously reported for C/EBP alpha (i.e., -160, -120, -40, and -20 bp), but DBP bound strongly only to the site located at -40 bp relative to the transcriptional start. Mutational analysis of ADH2 indicated that the -40 bp element accounts for most of the promoter regulation by the bZIP factors analyzed. These studies suggest that HNF-1 and C/EBP alpha help establish ADH gene family transcription in fetal liver and that LAP and DBP help maintain high-level ADH gene family transcription in postnatal liver. Images PMID:1620113

  12. Isolation and biochemical characterization of a glucose dehydrogenase from a hay infusion metagenome.

    PubMed

    Basner, Alexander; Antranikian, Garabed

    2014-01-01

    Glucose hydrolyzing enzymes are essential to determine blood glucose level. A high-throughput screening approach was established to identify NAD(P)-dependent glucose dehydrogenases for the application in test stripes and the respective blood glucose meters. In the current report a glucose hydrolyzing enzyme, derived from a metagenomic library by expressing recombinant DNA fragments isolated from hay infusion, was characterized. The recombinant clone showing activity on glucose as substrate exhibited an open reading frame of 987 bp encoding for a peptide of 328 amino acids. The isolated enzyme showed typical sequence motifs of short-chain-dehydrogenases using NAD(P) as a co-factor and had a sequence similarity between 33 and 35% to characterized glucose dehydrogenases from different Bacillus species. The identified glucose dehydrogenase gene was expressed in E. coli, purified and subsequently characterized. The enzyme, belonging to the superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases, shows a broad substrate range with a high affinity to glucose, xylose and glucose-6-phosphate. Due to its ability to be strongly associated with its cofactor NAD(P), the enzyme is able to directly transfer electrons from glucose oxidation to external electron acceptors by regenerating the cofactor while being still associated to the protein.

  13. Isolation and Biochemical Characterization of a Glucose Dehydrogenase from a Hay Infusion Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Basner, Alexander; Antranikian, Garabed

    2014-01-01

    Glucose hydrolyzing enzymes are essential to determine blood glucose level. A high-throughput screening approach was established to identify NAD(P)-dependent glucose dehydrogenases for the application in test stripes and the respective blood glucose meters. In the current report a glucose hydrolyzing enzyme, derived from a metagenomic library by expressing recombinant DNA fragments isolated from hay infusion, was characterized. The recombinant clone showing activity on glucose as substrate exhibited an open reading frame of 987 bp encoding for a peptide of 328 amino acids. The isolated enzyme showed typical sequence motifs of short-chain-dehydrogenases using NAD(P) as a co-factor and had a sequence similarity between 33 and 35% to characterized glucose dehydrogenases from different Bacillus species. The identified glucose dehydrogenase gene was expressed in E. coli, purified and subsequently characterized. The enzyme, belonging to the superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases, shows a broad substrate range with a high affinity to glucose, xylose and glucose-6-phosphate. Due to its ability to be strongly associated with its cofactor NAD(P), the enzyme is able to directly transfer electrons from glucose oxidation to external electron acceptors by regenerating the cofactor while being still associated to the protein. PMID:24454935

  14. Regulation of heart muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ronald H.; Randle, Philip J.; Denton, Richard M.

    1974-01-01

    1. The activity of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase was assayed by the incorporation of [32P]phosphate from [γ-32P]ATP into the dehydrogenase complex. There was a very close correlation between this incorporation and the loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity with all preparations studied. 2. Nucleoside triphosphates other than ATP (at 100μm) and cyclic 3′:5′-nucleotides (at 10μm) had no significant effect on kinase activity. 3. The Km for thiamin pyrophosphate in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was 0.76μm. Sodium pyrophosphate, adenylyl imidodiphosphate, ADP and GTP were competitive inhibitors against thiamin pyrophosphate in the dehydrogenase reaction. 4. The Km for ATP of the intrinsic kinase assayed in three preparations of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase was in the range 13.9–25.4μm. Inhibition by ADP and adenylyl imidodiphosphate was predominantly competitive, but there was nevertheless a definite non-competitive element. Thiamin pyrophosphate and sodium pyrophosphate were uncompetitive inhibitors against ATP. It is suggested that ADP and adenylyl imidodiphosphate inhibit the kinase mainly by binding to the ATP site and that the adenosine moiety may be involved in this binding. It is suggested that thiamin pyrophosphate, sodium pyrophosphate, adenylyl imidodiphosphate and ADP may inhibit the kinase by binding through pyrophosphate or imidodiphosphate moieties at some site other than the ATP site. It is not known whether this is the coenzyme-binding site in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction. 5. The Km for pyruvate in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was 35.5μm. 2-Oxobutyrate and 3-hydroxypyruvate but not glyoxylate were also substrates; all three compounds inhibited pyruvate oxidation. 6. In preparations of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase free of thiamin pyrophosphate, pyruvate inhibited the kinase reaction at all concentrations in the range 25–500μm. The inhibition was uncompetitive. In the presence of thiamin pyrophosphate

  15. Characterization of succinate dehydrogenase and alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Lenzen, S; Panten, U

    1983-12-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase activities in homogenates of rat and ob/ob mouse pancreatic islets were only 13% of the activities in homogenates of liver and were also several times lower than in homogenates of pancreatic acinar tissue. This indicates that the content of mitochondria in pancreatic islet cells is very low. The very low activity of succinate dehydrogenase is in agreement with the low mitochondrial volume in the cytoplasmic ground substance of pancreatic islet cells as observed in morphometric studies. This may represent the poor equipment of pancreatic islet cells with electron transport chains and thus provide a regulatory role for the generation of reducing equivalents and chemical energy for the regulation of insulin secretion. The activities of succinate dehydrogenase in tissue homogenates of pancreatic islets, pancreatic acinar tissue, and liver were significantly inhibited by malonate and diazoxide but not by glucose, mannoheptulose, streptozotocin, or verapamil. Tolbutamide inhibited only pancreatic islet succinate dehydrogenase significantly, providing evidence for a different behavior of pancreatic islet cell mitochondria. Therefore diazoxide and tolbutamide may affect pancreatic islet function through their effects on succinate dehydrogenase activity. The activities of alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase in homogenates of pancreatic islets and liver from rats and ob/ob mice were in the same range, while activities in homogenates of pancreatic acinar tissue were lower. None of the test agents affected alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase activity. Thus the results provide no support for the recent contention that alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase activity may be critical for the regulation of insulin secretion.

  16. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, B C; Fathi, A T; DiNardo, C D; Pollyea, D A; Chan, S M; Swords, R

    2017-01-01

    Alterations to genes involved in cellular metabolism and epigenetic regulation are implicated in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies. Recurring mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes are detected in approximately 20% of adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 5% of adults with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). IDH proteins are homodimeric enzymes involved in diverse cellular processes, including adaptation to hypoxia, histone demethylation and DNA modification. The IDH2 protein is localized in the mitochondria and is a critical component of the tricarboxylic acid (also called the ‘citric acid' or Krebs) cycle. Both IDH2 and IDH1 (localized in the cytoplasm) proteins catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). Mutant IDH enzymes have neomorphic activity and catalyze reduction of α-KG to the (R) enantiomer of 2-hydroxyglutarate, which is associated with DNA and histone hypermethylation, altered gene expression and blocked differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. The prognostic significance of mutant IDH (mIDH) is controversial but appears to be influenced by co-mutational status and the specific location of the mutation (IDH1-R132, IDH2-R140, IDH2-R172). Treatments specifically or indirectly targeted to mIDH are currently under clinical investigation; these therapies have been generally well tolerated and, when used as single agents, have shown promise for inducing responses in some mIDH patients when used as first-line treatment or in relapsed or refractory AML or MDS. Use of mIDH inhibitors in combination with drugs with non-overlapping mechanisms of action is especially promising, as such regimens may address the clonal heterogeneity and the multifactorial pathogenic processes involved in mIDH myeloid malignancies. Advances in mutational analysis have made testing more rapid and convenient, and less expensive; such testing should become part of routine diagnostic workup and repeated at

  17. Benzene toxicity: emphasis on cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Bolcsak, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Blood dyscrasias such as leukopenia and anemia have been clearly identified as consequences of chronic benzene exposure. The metabolites, phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone produced inhibition of /sup 59/Fe uptake in mice which followed the same time course as that produced by benzene. The inhibitor of benzene oxidation, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, mitigated the inhibitory effects of benzene and phenol only. These data support the contention that benzene toxicity is mediated by a metabolite and suggest that the toxicity of phenol is a consequence of its metabolism to hydroquinone and that the route of metabolism to catechol may also contribute to the production of toxic metabolite(s). The properties of mouse liver cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases were examined. These enzymes catalyze the NADP/sup +/-dependent oxidation of trans-1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzene (BDD) to catechol, a possible toxic metabolite of benzene produced via this metabolic route. Four distinct dihydrodiol dehydrogenases (DD1, DD2, DD3, and DD4) were purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. DD1 appeared to be identical to the major ketone reductase and 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the liver. DD2 exhibited aldehyde reductase activity. DD3 and DD4 oxidized 17..beta..-hydroxysteroids, but no carbonyl reductase activity was detected. These relationships between BDD dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase and/or 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were supported by several lines of evidence.

  18. High expression Zymomonas promoters

    DOEpatents

    Viitanen, Paul V.; Tao, Luan; Zhang, Yuying; Caimi, Perry G.; McCole, Laura : Zhang, Min; Chou, Yat-Chen; McCutchen, Carol M.; Franden, Mary Ann

    2011-08-02

    Identified are mutants of the promoter of the Z. mobilis glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, which direct improved expression levels of operably linked heterologous nucleic acids. These are high expression promoters useful for expression of chimeric genes in Zymomonas, Zymobacter, and other related bacteria.

  19. Molecular cloning and functional expression in heterologous mammalian cells of the cDNAs encoding lactate dehydrogenase isozymes A (muscle), B (heart), and C (testis) from man and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, I.; Hou, E.W.; Sharief, F.S.; Hiraoka, B.Y.; Takano, T.; Li, S.S.L.

    1987-05-01

    The full-length cDNAs encoding human LHD-A (muscle), human and mouse LDH-B (heart), and mouse LDH-C (testis) isozymes have been isolated and their nucleotide sequences determined. The cDNAs for human LDH-A and mouse LDH-C isozymes were inserted into mammalian expression vectors and were shown to direct the synthesis of functional LDH isozymes in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The exogeneous LDH-A and LDH-C subunits were found to form hybrid LDH tetrameric isozymes with endogeneous LDH-A subunit of CHO cells. The genomic DNA containing LDH cDNA insert and the levels of mRNA expression are being characterized.

  20. Thermal stability of chimeric isopropylmalate dehydrogenase genes constructed from a thermophile and a mesophile.

    PubMed

    Numata, K; Muro, M; Akutsu, N; Nosoh, Y; Yamagishi, A; Oshima, T

    1995-01-01

    Chimeric isopropylmalate dehydrogenases were constructed by connecting the genes isolated from an extreme thermophile, Thermus thermophilus, and a mesophile, Bacillus subtilis. These genes were expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzymes were purified and analysed. Enzymes of T.thermophilus and B.subtilis and chimeric enzymes showed similar enzymological characteristics except for thermal stability. The stability of each enzyme was approximately proportional to the content of the amino acid sequence from the T.thermophilus enzyme. The results suggested that amino acid residues contributing the thermal stability distribute themselves, in general, evenly at least in the N-terminal half of the amino acid sequence of T.thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase.

  1. Fundamental molecular differences between alcohol dehydrogenase classes.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, O; Atrian, S; Luque, T; Hjelmqvist, L; Gonzàlez-Duarte, R; Jörnvall, H

    1994-01-01

    Two types of alcohol dehydrogenase in separate protein families are the "medium-chain" zinc enzymes (including the classical liver and yeast forms) and the "short-chain" enzymes (including the insect form). Although the medium-chain family has been characterized in prokaryotes and many eukaryotes (fungi, plants, cephalopods, and vertebrates), insects have seemed to possess only the short-chain enzyme. We have now also characterized a medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase in Drosophila. The enzyme is identical to insect octanol dehydrogenase. It is a typical class III alcohol dehydrogenase, similar to the corresponding human form (70% residue identity), with mostly the same residues involved in substrate and coenzyme interactions. Changes that do occur are conservative, but Phe-51 is of functional interest in relation to decreased coenzyme binding and increased overall activity. Extra residues versus the human enzyme near position 250 affect the coenzyme-binding domain. Enzymatic properties are similar--i.e., very low activity toward ethanol (Km beyond measurement) and high selectivity for formaldehyde/glutathione (S-hydroxymethylglutathione; kcat/Km = 160,000 min-1.mM-1). Between the present class III and the ethanol-active class I enzymes, however, patterns of variability differ greatly, highlighting fundamentally separate molecular properties of these two alcohol dehydrogenases, with class III resembling enzymes in general and class I showing high variation. The gene coding for the Drosophila class III enzyme produces an mRNA of about 1.36 kb that is present at all developmental stages of the fly, compatible with the constitutive nature of the vertebrate enzyme. Taken together, the results bridge a previously apparent gap in the distribution of medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenases and establish a strictly conserved class III enzyme, consistent with an important role for this enzyme in cellular metabolism. Images PMID:8197167

  2. Method To Identify Specific Inhibiutors Of Imp Dehydrogenase

    DOEpatents

    Collart, Frank R.; Huberman, Eliezer

    2000-11-28

    This invention relates to methods to identify specific inhibitors of the purine nucleotide synthesis enzyme, IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH). IMPDH is an essential enzyme found in all free-living organisms from humans to bacteria and is an important therapeutic target. The invention allows the identification of specific inhibitors of any IMPDH enzyme which can be expressed in a functional form in a recombinant host cell. A variety of eukaryotic or prokaryotic host systems commonly used for the expression of recombinant proteins are suitable for the practice of the invention. The methods are amenable to high throughput systems for the screening of inhibitors generated by combinatorial chemistry or other methods such as antisense molecule production. Utilization of exogenous guanosine as a control component of the methods allows for the identification of inhibitors specific for IMPDH rather than other causes of decreased cell proliferation.

  3. Biochemical Characterization of Putative Adenylate Dimethylallyltransferase and Cytokinin Dehydrogenase from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Frébortová, Jitka; Greplová, Marta; Seidl, Michael F.; Heyl, Alexander; Frébort, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins, a class of phytohormones, are adenine derivatives common to many different organisms. In plants, these play a crucial role as regulators of plant development and the reaction to abiotic and biotic stress. Key enzymes in the cytokinin synthesis and degradation in modern land plants are the isopentyl transferases and the cytokinin dehydrogenases, respectively. Their encoding genes have been probably introduced into the plant lineage during the primary endosymbiosis. To shed light on the evolution of these proteins, the genes homologous to plant adenylate isopentenyl transferase and cytokinin dehydrogenase were amplified from the genomic DNA of cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The putative isopentenyl transferase was shown to be functional in a biochemical assay. In contrast, no enzymatic activity was detected for the putative cytokinin dehydrogenase, even though the principal domains necessary for its function are present. Several mutant variants, in which conserved amino acids in land plant cytokinin dehydrogenases had been restored, were inactive. A combination of experimental data with phylogenetic analysis indicates that adenylate-type isopentenyl transferases might have evolved several times independently. While the Nostoc genome contains a gene coding for protein with characteristics of cytokinin dehydrogenase, the organism is not able to break down cytokinins in the way shown for land plants. PMID:26376297

  4. Role of Alanine Dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Recovery from Hypoxic Nonreplicating Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Giffin, Michelle M.; Shi, Lanbo; Gennaro, Maria L.; Sohaskey, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can maintain a nonreplicating persistent state in the host for decades, but must maintain the ability to efficiently reactivate and produce active disease to survive and spread in a population. Among the enzymes expressed during this dormancy is alanine dehydrogenase, which converts pyruvate to alanine, and glyoxylate to glycine concurrent with the oxidation of NADH to NAD. It is involved in the metabolic remodeling of M. tuberculosis through its possible interactions with both the glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycle. Both mRNA levels and enzymatic activities of isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, and alanine dehydrogenase increased during entry into nonreplicating persistence, while the gene and activity for the second enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, malate synthase were not. This could suggest a shift in carbon flow away from the glyoxylate cycle and instead through alanine dehydrogenase. Expression of ald was also induced in vitro by other persistence-inducing stresses such as nitric oxide, and was expressed at high levels in vivo during the initial lung infection in mice. Enzyme activity was maintained during extended hypoxia even after transcription levels decreased. An ald knockout mutant of M. tuberculosis showed no reduction in anaerobic survival in vitro, but resulted in a significant lag in the resumption of growth after reoxygenation. During reactivation the ald mutant had an altered NADH/NAD ratio, and alanine dehydrogenase is proposed to maintain the optimal NADH/NAD ratio during anaerobiosis in preparation of eventual regrowth, and during the initial response during reoxygenation. PMID:27203084

  5. Cancer-associated isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations induce mitochondrial DNA instability.

    PubMed

    Kingsbury, Joanne M; Shamaprasad, Nachiketha; Billmyre, R Blake; Heitman, Joseph; Cardenas, Maria E

    2016-08-15

    A major advance in understanding the progression and prognostic outcome of certain cancers, such as low-grade gliomas, acute myeloid leukaemia, and chondrosarcomas, has been the identification of early-occurring mutations in the NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase genes IDH1 and IDH2 These mutations result in the production of the onco-metabolite D-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), thought to contribute to disease progression. To better understand the mechanisms of 2HG pathophysiology, we introduced the analogous glioma-associated mutations into the NADP(+ )isocitrate dehydrogenase genes (IDP1, IDP2, IDP3) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Intriguingly, expression of the mitochondrial IDP1(R148H) mutant allele results in high levels of 2HG production as well as extensive mtDNA loss and respiration defects. We find no evidence for a reactive oxygen-mediated mechanism mediating this mtDNA loss. Instead, we show that 2HG production perturbs the iron sensing mechanisms as indicated by upregulation of the Aft1-controlled iron regulon and a concomitant increase in iron levels. Accordingly, iron chelation, or overexpression of a truncated AFT1 allele that dampens transcription of the iron regulon, suppresses the loss of respirative capacity. Additional suppressing factors include overexpression of the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase gene ALD5 or disruption of the retrograde response transcription factor RTG1 Furthermore, elevated α-ketoglutarate levels also suppress 2HG-mediated respiration loss; consistent with a mechanism by which 2HG contributes to mtDNA loss by acting as a toxic α-ketoglutarate analog. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms that may contribute to 2HG oncogenicity in glioma and acute myeloid leukaemia progression, with the promise for innovative diagnostic and prognostic strategies and novel therapeutic modalities.

  6. Purification of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenases from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E and characterization of the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) as a bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenase--acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase.

    PubMed

    Burdette, D; Zeikus, J G

    1994-08-15

    The purification and characterization of three enzymes involved in ethanol formation from acetyl-CoA in Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E (formerly Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum 39E) is described. The secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 40 kDa subunits (SDS/PAGE) with a molecular mass of 160 kDa. The 2 degrees Adh had a lower catalytic efficiency for the oxidation of 1 degree alcohols, including ethanol, than for the oxidation of secondary (2 degrees) alcohols or the reduction of ketones or aldehydes. This enzyme possesses a significant acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase activity as determined by NADPH oxidation, thiol formation and ethanol production. The primary-alcohol dehydrogenase (1 degree Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 41.5 kDa (SDS/PAGE) subunits with a molecular mass of 170 kDa. The 1 degree Adh used both NAD(H) and NADP(H) and displayed higher catalytic efficiencies for NADP(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation and NADH-dependent acetaldehyde (identical to ethanal) reduction than for NADPH-dependent acetaldehyde reduction or NAD(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation. The NAD(H)-linked acetaldehyde dehydrogenase was a homotetramer (360 kDa) of identical subunits (100 kDa) that readily catalysed thioester cleavage and condensation. The 1 degree Adh was expressed at 5-20% of the level of the 2 degrees Adh throughout the growth cycle on glucose. The results suggest that the 2 degrees Adh primarily functions in ethanol production from acetyl-CoA and acetaldehyde, whereas the 1 degree Adh functions in ethanol consumption for nicotinamide-cofactor recycling.

  7. Purification of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenases from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E and characterization of the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) as a bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenase--acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, D; Zeikus, J G

    1994-01-01

    The purification and characterization of three enzymes involved in ethanol formation from acetyl-CoA in Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E (formerly Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum 39E) is described. The secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 40 kDa subunits (SDS/PAGE) with a molecular mass of 160 kDa. The 2 degrees Adh had a lower catalytic efficiency for the oxidation of 1 degree alcohols, including ethanol, than for the oxidation of secondary (2 degrees) alcohols or the reduction of ketones or aldehydes. This enzyme possesses a significant acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase activity as determined by NADPH oxidation, thiol formation and ethanol production. The primary-alcohol dehydrogenase (1 degree Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 41.5 kDa (SDS/PAGE) subunits with a molecular mass of 170 kDa. The 1 degree Adh used both NAD(H) and NADP(H) and displayed higher catalytic efficiencies for NADP(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation and NADH-dependent acetaldehyde (identical to ethanal) reduction than for NADPH-dependent acetaldehyde reduction or NAD(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation. The NAD(H)-linked acetaldehyde dehydrogenase was a homotetramer (360 kDa) of identical subunits (100 kDa) that readily catalysed thioester cleavage and condensation. The 1 degree Adh was expressed at 5-20% of the level of the 2 degrees Adh throughout the growth cycle on glucose. The results suggest that the 2 degrees Adh primarily functions in ethanol production from acetyl-CoA and acetaldehyde, whereas the 1 degree Adh functions in ethanol consumption for nicotinamide-cofactor recycling. Images Figure 1 PMID:8068002

  8. Lactate dehydrogenase A silencing in IDH mutant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Chesnelong, Charles; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Blough, Michael D.; Al-Najjar, Mohammad; Stechishin, Owen D.; Chan, Jennifer A.; Pieper, Russell O.; Ronen, Sabrina M.; Weiss, Samuel; Luchman, H. Artee; Cairncross, J. Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Background Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 gene (IDH1/2) were initially thought to enhance cancer cell survival and proliferation by promoting the Warburg effect. However, recent experimental data have shown that production of 2-hydroxyglutarate by IDH mutant cells promotes hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α degradation and, by doing so, may have unexpected metabolic effects. Methods We used human glioma tissues and derived brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) to study the expression of HIF1α target genes in IDH mutant (mt) and IDH wild-type (wt) tumors. Focusing thereafter on the major glycolytic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), we used standard molecular methods and pyrosequencing-based DNA methylation analysis to identify mechanisms by which LDHA expression was regulated in human gliomas. Results We found that HIF1α-responsive genes, including many essential for glycolysis (SLC2A1, PDK1, LDHA, SLC16A3), were underexpressed in IDHmt gliomas and/or derived BTSCs. We then demonstrated that LDHA was silenced in IDHmt derived BTSCs, including those that did not retain the mutant IDH1 allele (mIDHwt), matched BTSC xenografts, and parental glioma tissues. Silencing of LDHA was associated with increased methylation of the LDHA promoter, as was ectopic expression of mutant IDH1 in immortalized human astrocytes. Furthermore, in a search of The Cancer Genome Atlas, we found low expression and high methylation of LDHA in IDHmt glioblastomas. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of downregulation of LDHA in cancer. Although unexpected findings, silencing of LDHA and downregulation of several other glycolysis essential genes raise the intriguing possibility that IDHmt gliomas have limited glycolytic capacity, which may contribute to their slow growth and better prognosis. PMID:24366912

  9. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    PubMed

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems.

  10. 21 CFR 862.1565 - 6-Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6 PGD) in serum and erythrocytes. Measurements of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase are used in the diagnosis and treatment of certain liver diseases (such as hepatitis) and anemias....

  11. Proline dehydrogenase 2 (PRODH2) is a hydroxyproline dehydrogenase (HYPDH) and molecular target for treating primary hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Summitt, Candice B.; Johnson, Lynnette C.; Jönsson, Thomas J.; Parsonage, Derek; Holmes, Ross P.; Lowther, W. Todd

    2015-01-01

    The primary hyperoxalurias (PH), types 1–3, are disorders of glyoxylate metabolism that result in increased oxalate production and calcium oxalate stone formation. The breakdown of trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline (Hyp) from endogenous and dietary sources of collagen makes a significant contribution to the cellular glyoxylate pool. Proline dehydrogenase 2 (PRODH2), historically known as hydroxyproline oxidase, is the first step in the hydroxyproline catabolic pathway and represents a drug target to reduce the glyoxylate and oxalate burden of PH patients. This study is the first report of the expression, purification, and biochemical characterization of human PRODH2. Evaluation of a panel of N-terminal and C-terminal truncation variants indicated that residues 157–515 contain the catalytic core with one FAD molecule. The 12-fold higher kcat/Km value of 0.93 M−1·s−1 for Hyp over Pro demonstrates the preference for Hyp as substrate. Moreover, an anaerobic titration determined a Kd value of 125 μM for Hyp, a value ~1600-fold lower than the Km value. A survey of ubiquinone analogues revealed that menadione, duroquinone, and CoQ1 reacted more efficiently than oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor during catalysis. Taken together, these data and the slow reactivity with sodium sulfite support that PRODH2 functions as a dehydrogenase and most likely utilizes CoQ10 as the terminal electron acceptor in vivo. Thus, we propose that the name of PRODH2 be changed to hydroxyproline dehydrogenase (HYPDH). Three Hyp analogues were also identified to inhibit the activity of HYPDH, representing the first steps toward the development of a novel approach to treat all forms of PH. PMID:25697095

  12. [Interaction of succinate dehydrogenase and oxaloacetate].

    PubMed

    Kotliar, A B; Vinogradov, A D

    1984-04-01

    The equilibrium and rate constants for interaction of the reduced and oxidized membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.99.1) with oxaloacetate were determined. The 10-fold decrease in the oxaloacetate affinity for the reduced enzyme was shown to be due to the 10-fold increase of the enzyme-inhibitor complex dissociation rate, which occurs upon its reduction. The rate of dissociation induced by succinate is 10 times higher than that induced by malonate in the submitochondrial particles, being equal in the soluble enzyme preparations. The rates of dissociation induced by malonate excess, or by the enzyme irreversibly utilizing oxaloacetate (transaminase in the presence of glutamate) are also equal. The data obtained suggest that succinate dehydrogenase interaction with succinate and oxaloacetate results from the competition for a single dicarboxylate-specific site. In submitochondrial particles all succinate dehydrogenase molecules are in redox equilibrium provided for by endogenous ubiquinone. No electronic equilibrium between the individual enzyme molecules exists, when succinate dehydrogenase is solubilized.

  13. Development of an amine dehydrogenase for synthesis of chiral amines.

    PubMed

    Abrahamson, Michael J; Vázquez-Figueroa, Eduardo; Woodall, Nicholas B; Moore, Jeffrey C; Bommarius, Andreas S

    2012-04-16

    A leucine dehydrogenase has been successfully altered through several rounds of protein engineering to an enantioselective amine dehydrogenase. Instead of the wild-type α-keto acid, the new amine dehydrogenase now accepts the analogous ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), which corresponds to exchange of the carboxy group by a methyl group to produce chiral (R)-1,3-dimethylbutylamine.

  14. [Thermal stability of lactate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase incorporated into highly concentrated gels].

    PubMed

    Kulis, Iu Iu

    1979-03-01

    The rate constants for inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase in solution at 65 degrees C (pH 7,5) are 0,72 and 0,013 min-1, respectively. The enzyme incorporation into acrylamide gels results in immobilized enzymes, whose residual activity is 18--25% of the original one. In 6,7% gels the rate of thermal inactivation for lactate dehydrogenase is decreased nearly 10-fold, whereas the inactivation rate for alcohol dehydrogenase is increased 4,6-fold as compared to the soluble enzymes. In 14% and 40% gels the inactivation constants for lactate dehydrogenase are 6,3.10(-3) and 5,9.10(-4) min-1, respectively. In 60% gels the thermal inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase is decelerated 3600-fold as compared to the native enzyme. The enthalpy and enthropy for the inactivation of the native enzyme are equal to 62,8 kcal/mole and 116,9 cal/(mole.grad.) for the native enzyme and those of gel-incorporated (6,7%) enzyme -- 38,7 kcal/mole and 42 cal/(mole.grad.), respectively. The thermal stability of alcohol dehydrogenase in 60% gels is increased 12-fold. To prevent gel swelling, methacrylic acid and allylamine were added to the matrix, with subsequent treatment by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. The enzyme activity of the modified gels is 2,7--3% of that for the 6,7% gels. The stability of lactate dehydrogenase in such gels is significantly increased. A mechanism of stabilization of the subunit enzymes in highly concentrated gels is discussed.

  15. Dehydrogenase and Oxoreductase Activities of Porcine Placental 11Beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    dehydrogenase (IIB-HSD) were measured in tissue fragment cultures on day 75 of gestation. Dehydrogenase activity was over fivefold greater than oxoreductase...oxoreductase activities in porcine placentae under physiological conditions using placental explant culture and endogenous concentrations of coenzymes and...f!M range). In human placental tissue fragments at midterm and late pregnancy ( 12, 18) and in trophoblast cell cultures from term placentae ( 41

  16. Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9 (ACAD 9) is the long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase in human embryonic and fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Oey, N A; Ruiter, J P N; Ijlst, L; Attie-Bitach, T; Vekemans, M; Wanders, R J A; Wijburg, F A

    2006-07-21

    We recently reported the expression and activity of several fatty acid oxidation enzymes in human embryonic and fetal tissues including brain and spinal cord. Liver and heart showed expression of both very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) mRNA. However, while mRNA expression of LCHAD could be clearly detected in the retina and spinal cord, expression of VLCAD mRNA was low to undetectable in these tissues. Nevertheless, abundant acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) activity was detected with palmitoyl-CoA as substrate in fetal central nervous tissue. These conflicting data suggested the presence of a different long-chain ACAD in human embryonic and fetal brain. In this study, using in situ hybridization as well as enzymatic studies, we identified acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9 (ACAD 9) as the long-chain ACAD in human embryonic and fetal central nervous tissue. Until now, no clinical signs and symptoms of central nervous system involvement have been reported in VLCAD deficiency. A novel long-chain FAO defect, i.e., ACAD 9 deficiency with only central nervous system involvement, could, if not lethal during intra uterine development, easily escape proper diagnosis, since probably no classical signs and symptoms of FAO deficiency will be observed. Screening for ACAD 9 deficiency in patients with undefined neurological symptoms and/or impairment in neurological development of unknown origin is necessary to establish if ACAD 9 deficiency exists as a separate disease entity.

  17. Characterization of xylitol dehydrogenase from Debaryomyces hansenii

    SciTech Connect

    Girio, F.M.; Amaral-Collaco, M.T.; Pelica, F.

    1996-01-01

    The xylitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.9) from xylose-grown cells of Debaryomyces hansenii was partially purified in two chromatographic steps, and characterization studies were carried out in order to investigate the role of the xylitol dehydrogenase-catalyzed step in the regulation of D-xylose metabolism. The enzyme was most active at pH 9.0-9.5, and exhibited a broad polyol specificity. The Michaelis constants for xylitol and NAD{sup +} were 16.5 and 0.55 mM, respectively. Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} did not affect the enzyme activity. Conversely, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Co{sup 2+} strongly inhibited the enzyme activity. It was concluded that NAD{sup +}-xylitol dehydrogenase from D. hansenii has similarities with other xylose-fermenting yeasts in respect to optimal pH, substrate specificity, and K{sub m} value for xylitol, and therefore should be named L-iditol:NAD{sup +}-5-oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.14). The reason D. hansenii is a good xylitol producer is not because of its value of K for xylitol, which is low enough to assure its fast oxidation by NAD{sup +}-xylitol dehydrogenase. However, a higher K{sub m} value of xylitol dehydrogenase for NAD{sup +} compared to the K{sub m} values of other xylose-fermenting yeasts may be responsible for the higher xylitol yields. 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Properties of formate dehydrogenase in Methanobacterium formicicum

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, N.L.; Ferry, J.G.

    1982-04-01

    Soluble formate dehydrogenase from Methanobacterium formicicum was purified 71-fold with a yield of 35%. Purification was performed anaerobically in the presence of 10 mM sodium azide which stabilized the enzyme. The purified enzyme reduced, with formate, 50..mu..mol of methyl viologen per min per mg of protein and 8.2 ..mu..mol of coenzyme F/sub 420/ per min per mg of protein. The apparent K/sub m/ for 7,8-didemethyl-8-hydroxy-5-deazariboflavin, a hydrolytic derivative of coenzyme F/sub 420/, was 10-fold greater (63 ..mu..M) than for coenzyme F/sub 420/ (6 ..mu..M). The purified enzyme also reduced flavin mononucleotide (K/sub m/ = 13 ..mu..M) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (K/sub m/ = 25 ..mu..M) with formate, but did not reduce NAD/sup +/ or NADP/sup +/. The reduction of NADP/sup +/ with formate required formate dehydrogenase, coenzyme F/sub 420/, and coenzyme F/sub 420/:NADP/sup +/ oxidoreductase. The formate dehydrogenase had an optimal pH of 7.9 when assayed with the physiological electron acceptor coenzyme F/sub 420/. The optimal reaction rate occurred at 55/sup 0/C. The molecular weight was 288,000 as determined by gel filtration. The purified formate dehydrogenase was strongly inhibited by cyanide (K/sub i/ = 6 ..mu..M), azide (K/sub i/ = 39 ..mu..M),..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..-dipyridyl, and 1,10-phenanthroline. Denaturation of the purified formate dehydrogenase with sodium dodecyl sulfate under aerobic conditions revealed a fluorescent compound. Maximal excitation occurred at 385 nm, with minor peaks at 277 and 302 nm. Maximal fluorescence emission occurred at 455 nm.

  19. Increasing Anaerobic Acetate Consumption and Ethanol Yields in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with NADPH-Specific Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Henningsen, Brooks M.; Hon, Shuen; Covalla, Sean F.; Sonu, Carolina; Argyros, D. Aaron; Barrett, Trisha F.; Wiswall, Erin; Froehlich, Allan C.

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has recently been engineered to use acetate, a primary inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as a cosubstrate during anaerobic ethanolic fermentation. However, the original metabolic pathway devised to convert acetate to ethanol uses NADH-specific acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase and quickly becomes constrained by limited NADH availability, even when glycerol formation is abolished. We present alcohol dehydrogenase as a novel target for anaerobic redox engineering of S. cerevisiae. Introduction of an NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (NADPH-ADH) not only reduces the NADH demand of the acetate-to-ethanol pathway but also allows the cell to effectively exchange NADPH for NADH during sugar fermentation. Unlike NADH, NADPH can be freely generated under anoxic conditions, via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. We show that an industrial bioethanol strain engineered with the original pathway (expressing acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis and with deletions of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes GPD1 and GPD2) consumed 1.9 g liter−1 acetate during fermentation of 114 g liter−1 glucose. Combined with a decrease in glycerol production from 4.0 to 0.1 g liter−1, this increased the ethanol yield by 4% over that for the wild type. We provide evidence that acetate consumption in this strain is indeed limited by NADH availability. By introducing an NADPH-ADH from Entamoeba histolytica and with overexpression of ACS2 and ZWF1, we increased acetate consumption to 5.3 g liter−1 and raised the ethanol yield to 7% above the wild-type level. PMID:26386051

  20. Increasing anaerobic acetate consumption and ethanol yields in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Henningsen, Brooks M; Hon, Shuen; Covalla, Sean F; Sonu, Carolina; Argyros, D Aaron; Barrett, Trisha F; Wiswall, Erin; Froehlich, Allan C; Zelle, Rintze M

    2015-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has recently been engineered to use acetate, a primary inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as a cosubstrate during anaerobic ethanolic fermentation. However, the original metabolic pathway devised to convert acetate to ethanol uses NADH-specific acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase and quickly becomes constrained by limited NADH availability, even when glycerol formation is abolished. We present alcohol dehydrogenase as a novel target for anaerobic redox engineering of S. cerevisiae. Introduction of an NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (NADPH-ADH) not only reduces the NADH demand of the acetate-to-ethanol pathway but also allows the cell to effectively exchange NADPH for NADH during sugar fermentation. Unlike NADH, NADPH can be freely generated under anoxic conditions, via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. We show that an industrial bioethanol strain engineered with the original pathway (expressing acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis and with deletions of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes GPD1 and GPD2) consumed 1.9 g liter(-1) acetate during fermentation of 114 g liter(-1) glucose. Combined with a decrease in glycerol production from 4.0 to 0.1 g liter(-1), this increased the ethanol yield by 4% over that for the wild type. We provide evidence that acetate consumption in this strain is indeed limited by NADH availability. By introducing an NADPH-ADH from Entamoeba histolytica and with overexpression of ACS2 and ZWF1, we increased acetate consumption to 5.3 g liter(-1) and raised the ethanol yield to 7% above the wild-type level.

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (Rv3708c) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Rajan; Panjikar, Santosh; Kishan, K. V. Radha; Tewari, Rupinder; Weiss, Manfred S.

    2008-03-01

    The enzyme aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase from M. tuberculosis has been expressed, purified and crystallized in two different crystal forms. Aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Asd, ASADH, Rv3708c), which is the second enzyme in the lysine/homoserine-biosynthetic pathways, has been expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was purified using affinity and gel-filtration chromatographic techniques and crystallized in two different crystal forms. Preliminary diffraction data analysis suggested the presence of up to four monomers in the asymmetric unit of the orthorhombic crystal form A and of one or two monomers in the cubic crystal form B.

  2. "Enzymogenesis": classical liver alcohol dehydrogenase origin from the glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase line.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, O; Jörnvall, H

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of the activity and structure of lower vertebrate alcohol dehydrogenases reveals that relationships between the classical liver and yeast enzymes need not be continuous. Both the ethanol activity of class I-type alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) and the glutathione-dependent formaldehyde activity of the class III-type enzyme [formaldehyde:NAD+ oxidoreductase (glutathione-formylating), EC 1.2.1.1] are present in liver down to at least the stage of bony fishes (cod liver: ethanol activity, 3.4 units/mg of protein in one enzyme; formaldehyde activity, 4.5 units/mg in the major form of another enzyme). Structural analysis of the latter protein reveals it to be a typical class III enzyme, with limited variation from the mammalian form and therefore with stable activity and structure throughout much of the vertebrate lineage. In contrast, the classical alcohol dehydrogenase (the class I enzyme) appears to be the emerging form, first in activity and later also in structure. The class I activity is present already in the piscine line, whereas the overall structural-type enzyme is not observed until amphibians and still more recent vertebrates. Consequently, the class I/III duplicatory origin appears to have arisen from a functional class III form, not a class I form. Therefore, ethanol dehydrogenases from organisms existing before this duplication have origins separate from those leading to the "classical" liver alcohol dehydrogenases. The latter now often occur in isozyme forms from further gene duplications and have a high rate of evolutionary change. The pattern is, however, not simple and we presently find in cod the first evidence for isozymes also within a class III alcohol dehydrogenase. Overall, the results indicate that both of these classes of vertebrate alcohol dehydrogenase are important and suggest a protective metabolic function for the whole enzyme system. Images PMID:1409630

  3. Aldehyde dehydrogenase is used by cancer cells for energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joon Hee; Lee, Seon-Hyeong; Hong, Dongwan; Lee, Jae-Seon; Ahn, Hee-Sung; Ahn, Ju-Hyun; Seong, Tae Wha; Lee, Chang-Hun; Jang, Hyonchol; Hong, Kyeong Man; Lee, Cheolju; Lee, Jae-Ho; Kim, Soo-Youl

    2016-01-01

    We found that non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells express high levels of multiple aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) isoforms via an informatics analysis of metabolic enzymes in NSCLC and immunohistochemical staining of NSCLC clinical tumor samples. Using a multiple reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry analysis, we found that multiple ALDH isozymes were generally abundant in NSCLC cells compared with their levels in normal IMR-90 human lung cells. As a result of the catalytic reaction mediated by ALDH, NADH is produced as a by-product from the conversion of aldehyde to carboxylic acid. We hypothesized that the NADH produced by ALDH may be a reliable energy source for ATP production in NSCLC. This study revealed that NADH production by ALDH contributes significantly to ATP production in NSCLC. Furthermore, gossypol, a pan-ALDH inhibitor, markedly reduced the level of ATP. Gossypol combined with phenformin synergistically reduced the ATP levels, which efficiently induced cell death following cell cycle arrest. PMID:27885254

  4. Purification of arogenate dehydrogenase from Phenylobacterium immobile.

    PubMed

    Mayer, E; Waldner-Sander, S; Keller, B; Keller, E; Lingens, F

    1985-01-07

    Phenylobacterium immobile, a bacterium which is able to degrade the herbicide chloridazon, utilizes for L-tyrosine synthesis arogenate as an obligatory intermediate which is converted in the final biosynthetic step by a dehydrogenase to tyrosine. This enzyme, the arogenate dehydrogenase, has been purified for the first time in a 5-step procedure to homogeneity as confirmed by electrophoresis. The Mr of the enzyme that consists of two identical subunits amounts to 69000 as established by gel electrophoresis after cross-linking the enzyme with dimethylsuberimidate. The Km values were 0.09 mM for arogenate and 0.02 mM for NAD+. The enzyme has a high specificity with respect to its substrate arogenate.

  5. Peafowl lactate dehydrogenase: problem of isoenzyme identification.

    PubMed

    Rose, R G; Wilson, A C

    1966-09-16

    Peafowl, like other vertebrates, contain multiple forms of lactate dehydrogenase. The electrophoretic properties of the peafowl isoenzymes are unusual in that the isoenzyme from heart tissue can be either more or less anodic than that of muscle, depending on the pH. This finding focuses attention on the problem of isoenzyme identification. It is suggested that isoenzymes be identified on the basis of properties that are chemically and biologically more significant than electrophoretic mobility.

  6. Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Smithgall, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    Carcinogenic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by microsomal monoxygenases proceeds through trans-dihydrodiol metabolites to diol-epoxide ultimate carcinogens. This thesis directly investigated the role of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, a cytosolic NAD(P)-linked oxidoreductase, in the detoxification of polycyclic aromatic trans-dihydrodiols. A wide variety of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols were synthesized and shown to be substrates for the homogeneous rat liver dehydrogenase, including several potent proximate carcinogens derived from 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, 5-methylchrysene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Since microsomal activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is highly stereospecific, the stereochemical course of enzymatic trans-dihydrodiol oxidation was monitored using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry. The major product formed from the dehydrogenase-catalyzed oxidation of the trans-1,2-dihydrodiol of naphthalene was characterized using UV, IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy, and appears to be 4-hydroxy-1,2-naphthoquinone. Mass spectral analysis suggests that an analogous hydroxylated o-quinone is formed as the major product of benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation of trans-dihydrodiols was shown to be potently inhibited by all of the major classes of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Enhancement of trans-dihydrodiol proximate carcinogen oxidation may protect against possible adverse effects of the aspirin-like drugs, and help maintain the balance between activation and detoxification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  7. Relationships within the aldehyde dehydrogenase extended family.

    PubMed Central

    Perozich, J.; Nicholas, H.; Wang, B. C.; Lindahl, R.; Hempel, J.

    1999-01-01

    One hundred-forty-five full-length aldehyde dehydrogenase-related sequences were aligned to determine relationships within the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) extended family. The alignment reveals only four invariant residues: two glycines, a phenylalanine involved in NAD binding, and a glutamic acid that coordinates the nicotinamide ribose in certain E-NAD binary complex crystal structures, but which may also serve as a general base for the catalytic reaction. The cysteine that provides the catalytic thiol and its closest neighbor in space, an asparagine residue, are conserved in all ALDHs with demonstrated dehydrogenase activity. Sixteen residues are conserved in at least 95% of the sequences; 12 of these cluster into seven sequence motifs conserved in almost all ALDHs. These motifs cluster around the active site of the enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis of these ALDHs indicates at least 13 ALDH families, most of which have previously been identified but not grouped separately by alignment. ALDHs cluster into two main trunks of the phylogenetic tree. The largest, the "Class 3" trunk, contains mostly substrate-specific ALDH families, as well as the class 3 ALDH family itself. The other trunk, the "Class 1/2" trunk, contains mostly variable substrate ALDH families, including the class 1 and 2 ALDH families. Divergence of the substrate-specific ALDHs occurred earlier than the division between ALDHs with broad substrate specificities. A site on the World Wide Web has also been devoted to this alignment project. PMID:10210192

  8. Xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida Fu1: two molybdenum-containing dehydrogenases of novel structural composition.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, K; Andreesen, J R

    1990-01-01

    The constitutive xanthine dehydrogenase and the inducible 2-furoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase could be labeled with [185W]tungstate. This labeling was used as a reporter to purify both labile proteins. The radioactivity cochromatographed predominantly with the residual enzymatic activity of both enzymes during the first purification steps. Both radioactive proteins were separated and purified to homogeneity. Antibodies raised against the larger protein also exhibited cross-reactivity toward the second smaller protein and removed xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity up to 80 and 60% from the supernatant of cell extracts, respectively. With use of cell extract, Western immunoblots showed only two bands which correlated exactly with the activity stains for both enzymes after native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Molybdate was absolutely required for incorporation of 185W, formation of cross-reacting material, and enzymatic activity. The latter parameters showed a perfect correlation. This evidence proves that the radioactive proteins were actually xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase. The apparent molecular weight of the native xanthine dehydrogenase was about 300,000, and that of 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase was 150,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of both enzymes revealed two protein bands corresponding to molecular weights of 55,000 and 25,000. The xanthine dehydrogenase contained at least 1.6 mol of molybdenum, 0.9 ml of cytochrome b, 5.8 mol of iron, and 2.4 mol of labile sulfur per mol of enzyme. The composition of the 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase seemed to be similar, although the stoichiometry was not determined. The oxidation of furfuryl alcohol to furfural and further to 2-furoic acid by Pseudomonas putida Fu1 was catalyzed by two different dehydrogenases. Images PMID:2170335

  9. Express

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Express ; CASRN 101200 - 48 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  10. Identification of a dehydrogenase required for lactose metabolism in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Arellano, Benjamin H; Ortiz, Janett D; Manzano, Janet; Chen, Joseph C

    2010-05-01

    Caulobacter crescentus, which thrives in freshwater environments with low nutrient levels, serves as a model system for studying bacterial cell cycle regulation and organelle development. We examined its ability to utilize lactose (i) to gain insight into the metabolic capacities of oligotrophic bacteria and (ii) to obtain an additional genetic tool for studying this model organism, aiming to eliminate the basal enzymatic activity that hydrolyzes the chromogenic substrate 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-d-galactopyranoside (X-gal). Using a previously isolated transposon mutant, we identified a gene, lacA, that is required for growth on lactose as the sole carbon source and for turning colonies blue in the presence of X-gal. LacA, which contains a glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductase domain, has homology to the flavin subunit of Pectobacterium cypripedii's gluconate dehydrogenase. Sequence comparisons indicated that two genes near lacA, lacB and lacC, encode the other subunits of the membrane-bound dehydrogenase. In addition to lactose, all three lac genes are involved in the catabolism of three other beta-galactosides (lactulose, lactitol, and methyl-beta-d-galactoside) and two glucosides (salicin and trehalose). Dehydrogenase assays confirmed that the lac gene products oxidize lactose, salicin, and trehalose. This enzymatic activity is inducible, and increased lac expression in the presence of lactose and salicin likely contributes to the induction. Expression of lacA also depends on the presence of the lac genes, implying that the dehydrogenase participates in induction. The involvement of a dehydrogenase suggests that degradation of lactose and other sugars in C. crescentus may resemble a proposed pathway in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

  11. The molybdenum formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase operon and the tungsten formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase operon from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. Structures and transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Hochheimer, A; Linder, D; Thauer, R K; Hedderich, R

    1996-11-15

    Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum contains a tungsten formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (FwdABCD) and a molybdenum formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (FmdABC). The fwdHFGDACB operon encoding the tungsten enzyme has recently been characterized. We report here on the structure and expression of the gene cluster encoding the molybdenum enzyme. This gene cluster is composed of three open reading frames (fmdECB). The fmdB gene was found to encode the molybdopterin-dinucleotide-binding subunit harboring the enzyme's active site; FmdB is thus functionally equivalent to FwdB. fmdC encodes a protein with sequence similarity to FwdC in its N-terminal part and with sequence similarity to FwdD in its C-terminal part; FmdC is thus functionally equivalent to FwdC and FwdD. Interestingly, the fmd operon lacks a gene fmdA encoding the subunit FmdA of the molybdenum enzyme. FmdA has the same apparent molecular mass and the same N-terminal amino acid sequence as FwdA and only one DNA sequence encoding for this N-terminal amino acid sequence was found in the M. thermoautotrophicum genome. It is therefore proposed that FmdA and FwdA are encoded by the same gene namely fwdA in the fwd operon. In agreement with this proposal is the finding that fwdA is expressed constitutively: northern-blot analysis of RNA from tungstate- and molybdate-grown cells of M. thermo-autotrophicum revealed that the fwdHFGDACB gene cluster is transcribed in the presence of either molybdate or tungstate in the growth medium whereas the fmdECB gene cluster was only transcribed when molybdate was present.

  12. SDR-O: an orphan short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase localized at mouse chromosome 10/human chromosome 12.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiguo; Song, Min-Sun; Napoli, Joseph L

    2002-07-10

    We report cloning a cDNA that encodes a novel short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase, SDR-O, conserved in mouse, human and rat. Human and mouse liver express SDR-O (short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase-orphan) mRNA intensely. The mouse embryo expresses SDR-O mRNA as early as day seven. Human SDR-O localizes on chromosome 12; mouse SDR-O localizes on chromosome 10 with CRAD1, CRAD2 and RDH4. SDR-O shares highest amino acid similarity with rat RoDH1 and mouse RDH1 (69-70%), but does not have the retinol and 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity of either, nor is it active as a 17beta- or 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Short-chain dehydrogenase/reductases catalyse the metabolism of ligands that bind with nuclear receptors: the occurrence of 'orphan' nuclear receptors may imply existence of 'orphan' SDR, suggesting that SDR-O may catalyse the metabolism of another class of nuclear receptor ligand. Alternatively, SDR-O may not have a catalytic function, but may regulate metabolism by binding substrates/products and/or by serving as a regulatory factor.

  13. Mapping and cloning of gldA, the structural gene of the Escherichia coli glycerol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Truniger, V; Boos, W

    1994-01-01

    gldA, the structural gene for the NAD(+)-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase, was mapped at 89.2 min on the Escherichia coli linkage map, cotransducible with, but not adjacent to, the glpFKX operon encoding the proteins for the uptake and phosphorylation of glycerol. gldA was cloned, and its position on the physical map of E. coli was determined. The expression of gldA was induced by hydroxyacetone under stationary-phase growth conditions. Images PMID:8132480

  14. RDH12, a retinol dehydrogenase causing Leber's congenital amaurosis, is also involved in steroid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Keller, Brigitte; Adamski, Jerzy

    2007-05-01

    Three retinol dehydrogenases (RDHs) were tested for steroid converting abilities: human and murine RDH 12 and human RDH13. RDH12 is involved in retinal degeneration in Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA). We show that murine Rdh12 and human RDH13 do not reveal activity towards the checked steroids, but that human type 12 RDH reduces dihydrotestosterone to androstanediol, and is thus also involved in steroid metabolism. Furthermore, we analyzed both expression and subcellular localization of these enzymes.

  15. Inhibitory effect of disulfiram (Antabuse) on alcohol dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Carper, W R; Dorey, R C; Beber, J H

    1987-10-01

    We investigated the effect of disulfiram (Antabuse) on the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1) in vitro. We observed a time-dependent inhibition of this dehydrogenase by disulfiram and diethyldithiocarbamate similar to that obtained for aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.3). These results suggest a possible explanation for various side effects observed in the clinical use of Antabuse.

  16. A lipoamide dehydrogenase from Neisseria meningitidis has a lipoyl domain.

    PubMed

    Bringas, R; Fernandez, J

    1995-04-01

    A protein of molecular weight of 64 kDa (p64k) found in the outer membrane of Neisseria meningitidis shows a high degree of homology with both the lipoyl domain of the acetyltransferase and the entire sequence of the lipoamide dehydrogenase, the E2 and E3 components of the dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes, respectively. The alignment of the p64k with lipoyl domains and lipoamide dehydrogenases from different species is presented. The possible implications of this protein in binding protein-dependent transport are discussed. This is the first lipoamide dehydrogenase reported to have a lipoyl domain.

  17. Inhibition of membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase by disulfiram.

    PubMed

    Jay, D

    1991-04-01

    The effect of disulfiram on succinate oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase activities of beef heart submitochondrial particles was studied. Results show that disulfiram inhibits both functions. Succinate and malonate suppress the inhibitory action of disulfiram when succinate dehydrogenase is stabilized in an active conformation. Disulfiram is not able to inhibit the enzyme when succinate dehydrogenase is inactivated by oxaloacetate. The inhibitory effect of disulfiram is reverted by the addition of dithiothreitol. From these results, it is proposed that disulfiram inhibits the utilization of succinate by a direct modification of an -SH group located in the catalytically active site of succinate dehydrogenase.

  18. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... plasma. Malic dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of muscle and liver diseases, myocardial infarctions, cancer, and blood disorders such as myelogenous (produced in the...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... plasma. Malic dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of muscle and liver diseases, myocardial infarctions, cancer, and blood disorders such as myelogenous (produced in the...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... plasma. Malic dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of muscle and liver diseases, myocardial infarctions, cancer, and blood disorders such as myelogenous (produced in the...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... plasma. Malic dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of muscle and liver diseases, myocardial infarctions, cancer, and blood disorders such as myelogenous (produced in the...

  2. Placental glucose dehydrogenase polymorphism in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y J; Paik, S G; Park, H Y

    1994-12-01

    The genetic polymorphism of placental glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) was investigated in 300 Korean placentae using horizontal starch gel electrophoresis. The allele frequencies for GDH1, GDH2 and GDH3 were 0.537, 0.440 and 0.005, respectively, which were similar to those in Japanese. We also observed an anodal allele which was similar to the GDH4 originally reported in Chinese populations at a low frequency of 0.015. An additional new cathodal allele (named GDH6) was observed in the present study with a very low frequency of 0.003.

  3. Kinetic mechanism of chicken liver xanthine dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Bruguera, P; Lopez-Cabrera, A; Canela, E I

    1988-01-01

    The kinetic behaviour of chicken-liver xanthine dehydrogenase (xanthine/NAD+ oxidoreductase; EC 1.2.1.37) has been studied. Steady-state results, obtained from a wide range of concentrations of substrates and products, were fitted by rational functions of degree 1:1, 1:2, 2:2 and 3:3 with respect to substrates, and 0:1, 1:1, 0:2 and 1:2 with regard to products, using a non-linear regression program which guarantees the fit. The goodness of fit was improved using a computer program that combines model discrimination, parameter refinement and sequential experimental design. The AIC and F tests were also used for model discrimination. For comparative purposes, the xanthine/oxygen oxidoreductase reaction was also studied. From the functions which give the maximum improvement, the complete rate equation was deduced. The significance of the terms was stated by the above methods. It was concluded that xanthine dehydrogenase requires a minimum mechanism of degree 1:1 for xanthine, 2:2 for NAD+, 1:1 for uric acid and 1:2 for NADH in the xanthine/NAD+ oxidoreductase reaction. These are the minimum degrees required but a rate equation of higher degree is not excluded. PMID:3422556

  4. Catecholamine regulation of lactate dehydrogenase in rat brain cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; McGinnis, J.F.; de Vellis, J.

    1980-03-25

    The mechanism of catecholamine induction of the soluble cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) was studied in the rat glial tumor cell line, C6. Lactate dehydrogenase was partially purified from extracts of (/sup 3/H)leucine-labeled cells by affinity gel chromatography and quantitatively immunoprecipitated with anti-lactate dehydrogenase-5 IgG and with antilactate dehydrogenase-1 IgG. The immunoprecipitates were dissociated and electrophoresed on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. Using this methodology, the increased enzyme activity of lactate dehydrogenase in norepinephrine-treated C6 cells was observed to be concomitant with the increased synthesis of enzyme molecules. Despite the continued presence of norepinephrine, the specific increase in the rate of synthesis of lactate dehydrogenase was transient. It was first detected at 4 h, was maximum at 9 h, and returned to basal levels by 24 h. The half-life of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activity was 36 h during the induction and 40 h during deinduction. The half-life for decay of /sup 3/H-labeled lactate dehydrogenase was 41 h. These observations suggest that the increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity in norepinephrine-treated cells does not involve any change in the rate of degradation. Norepinephrine increased the specific rate of synthesis of both lactate dehydrogenase-5 (a tetramer of four M subunits) and lactate dehydrogenase-1 (a tetramer of four H subunits), although to different extents. Since these subunits are coded for by two separate genes on separate chromosomes, it suggests that the regulatory mechanism involves at least two separate sites of action.

  5. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase regulates hepatitis C virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Gwon-Soo; Jeon, Jae-Han; Choi, Yeon-Kyung; Jang, Se Young; Park, Soo Young; Kim, Sung-Woo; Byun, Jun-Kyu; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Sungwoo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Lee, In-Kyu; Kang, Yu Na; Park, Keun-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    During replication, hepatitis C virus (HCV) utilizes macromolecules produced by its host cell. This process requires host cellular metabolic reprogramming to favor elevated levels of aerobic glycolysis. Therefore, we evaluated whether pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), a mitochondrial enzyme that promotes aerobic glycolysis, can regulate HCV replication. Levels of c-Myc, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), PDK1, PDK3, glucokinase, and serine biosynthetic enzymes were compared between HCV-infected and uninfected human liver and Huh-7.5 cells infected with or without HCV. Protein and mRNA expression of c-Myc, HIF-1α, and glycolytic enzymes were significantly higher in HCV-infected human liver and hepatocytes than in uninfected controls. This increase was accompanied by upregulation of serine biosynthetic enzymes, suggesting cellular metabolism was altered toward facilitated nucleotide synthesis essential for HCV replication. JQ1, a c-Myc inhibitor, and dichloroacetate (DCA), a PDK inhibitor, decreased the expression of glycolytic and serine synthetic enzymes in HCV-infected hepatocytes, resulting in suppressed viral replication. Furthermore, when co-administered with IFN-α or ribavirin, DCA further inhibited viral replication. In summary, HCV reprograms host cell metabolism to favor glycolysis and serine biosynthesis; this is mediated, at least in part, by increased PDK activity, which provides a surplus of nucleotide precursors. Therefore, blocking PDK activity might have therapeutic benefits against HCV replication. PMID:27471054

  6. Accelerated Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity Potentiates Osteoclastogenesis via NFATc1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Man; Kwon, So Hyun; Lee, Seoung Hoon; Lee, Soo Young; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts seem to be metabolic active during their differentiation and bone-resorptive activation. However, the functional role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a tetrameric enzyme consisting of an A and/or B subunit that catalyzes interconversion of pyruvate to lactate, in RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is not known. In this study, RANKL treatment induced gradual gene expression and activation of the LDH A2B2 isotype during osteoclast differentiation as well as the LDH A1B3 and B4 isotypes during osteoclast maturation after pre-osteoclast formation. Glucose consumption and lactate production in growth media were accelerated during osteoclast differentiation, together with enhanced expression of H+-lactate co-transporter and increased extracellular acidification, demonstrating that glycolytic metabolism was stimulated during differentiation. Further, oxygen consumption via mitochondria was stimulated during osteoclast differentiation. On the contrary, depletion of LDH-A or LDH-B subunit suppressed both glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism, resulting in reduced mature osteoclast formation via decreased osteoclast precursor fusion and down-regulation of the osteoclastogenic critical transcription factor NFATc1 and its target genes. Collectively, our findings suggest that RANKL-induced LDH activation stimulates glycolytic and mitochondrial respiratory metabolism, facilitating mature osteoclast formation via osteoclast precursor fusion and NFATc1 signaling. PMID:27077737

  7. Yeast cell-based analysis of human lactate dehydrogenase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Lulu Ahmed; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Nakanishi, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    Human lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) has attracted attention as a potential target for cancer therapy and contraception. In this study, we reconstituted human lactic acid fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with the goal of constructing a yeast cell-based LDH assay system. pdc null mutant yeast (mutated in the endogenous pyruvate decarboxylase genes) are unable to perform alcoholic fermentation; when grown in the presence of an electron transport chain inhibitor, pdc null strains exhibit a growth defect. We found that introduction of the human gene encoding LDHA complemented the pdc growth defect; this complementation depended on LDHA catalytic activity. Similarly, introduction of the human LDHC complemented the pdc growth defect, even though LDHC did not generate lactate at the levels seen with LDHA. In contrast, the human LDHB did not complement the yeast pdc null mutant, although LDHB did generate lactate in yeast cells. Expression of LDHB as a red fluorescent protein (RFP) fusion yielded blebs in yeast, whereas LDHA-RFP and LDHC-RFP fusion proteins exhibited cytosolic distribution. Thus, LDHB exhibits several unique features when expressed in yeast cells. Because yeast cells are amenable to genetic analysis and cell-based high-throughput screening, our pdc/LDH strains are expected to be of use for versatile analyses of human LDH.

  8. Glutamate dehydrogenase 1 and SIRT4 regulate glial development.

    PubMed

    Komlos, Daniel; Mann, Kara D; Zhuo, Yue; Ricupero, Christopher L; Hart, Ronald P; Liu, Alice Y-C; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2013-03-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia (HI/HA) syndrome is caused by an activation mutation of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1), a mitochondrial enzyme responsible for the reversible interconversion between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate. The syndrome presents clinically with hyperammonemia, significant episodic hypoglycemia, seizures, and frequent incidences of developmental and learning defects. Clinical research has implicated that although some of the developmental and neurological defects may be attributed to hypoglycemia, some characteristics cannot be ascribed to low glucose and as hyperammonemia is generally mild and asymptomatic, there exists the possibility that altered GDH1 activity within the brain leads to some clinical changes. GDH1 is allosterically regulated by many factors, and has been shown to be inhibited by the ADP-ribosyltransferase sirtuin 4 (SIRT4), a mitochondrially localized sirtuin. Here we show that SIRT4 is localized to mitochondria within the brain. SIRT4 is highly expressed in glial cells, specifically astrocytes, in the postnatal brain and in radial glia during embryogenesis. Furthermore, SIRT4 protein decreases in expression during development. We show that factors known to allosterically regulate GDH1 alter gliogenesis in CTX8 cells, a novel radial glial cell line. We find that SIRT4 and GDH1 overexpression play antagonistic roles in regulating gliogenesis and that a mutant variant of GDH1 found in HI/HA patients accelerates the development of glia from cultured radial glia cells.

  9. The role of glutamate dehydrogenase in mammalian ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Spanaki, Cleanthe; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the reversible inter-conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia. High levels of GDH activity is found in mammalian liver, kidney, brain, and pancreas. In the liver, GDH reaction appears to be close-to-equilibrium, providing the appropriate ratio of ammonia and amino acids for urea synthesis in periportal hepatocytes. In addition, GDH produces glutamate for glutamine synthesis in a small rim of pericentral hepatocytes. Hence, hepatic GDH can be either a source for ammonia or an ammonia scavenger. In the kidney, GDH function produces ammonia from glutamate to control acidosis. In the human, the presence of two differentially regulated isoforms (hGDH1 and hGDH2) suggests a complex role for GDH in ammonia homeostasis. Whereas hGDH1 is sensitive to GTP inhibition, hGDH2 has dissociated its function from GTP control. Furthermore, hGDH2 shows a lower optimal pH than hGDH1. The hGDH2 enzyme is selectively expressed in human astrocytes and Sertoli cells, probably facilitating metabolic recycling processes essential for their supportive role. Here, we report that hGDH2 is also expressed in the epithelial cells lining the convoluted tubules of the renal cortex. As hGDH2 functions more efficiently under acidotic conditions without the operation of the GTP energy switch, its presence in the kidney may increase the efficacy of the organ to maintain acid base equilibrium.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of L-threonine dehydrogenase (TDH) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, A; Mikolajek, H; Wright, J N; Coker, A; Erskine, P T; Cooper, J B; Bashir, Q; Rashid, N; Jamil, F; Akhtar, M

    2008-09-01

    The enzyme L-threonine dehydrogenase catalyses the NAD(+)-dependent conversion of L-threonine to 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate, which is the first reaction of a two-step biochemical pathway involved in the metabolism of threonine to glycine. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of L-threonine dehydrogenase (Tk-TDH) from the hyperthermophilic organism Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1 is reported. This threonine dehydrogenase consists of 350 amino acids, with a molecular weight of 38 kDa, and was prepared using an Escherichia coli expression system. The purified native protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and crystals grew in the tetragonal space group P4(3)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 124.5, c = 271.1 A. Diffraction data were collected to 2.6 A resolution and preliminary analysis indicates that there are four molecules in the asymmetric unit of the crystal.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel Dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 1 genea from human fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Wu, Q; Xu, M; Cheng, C; Zhou, Z; Huang, Y; Zhao, W; Zeng, L; Xu, J; Fu, X; Ying, K; Xie, Y; Mao, Y

    2001-01-01

    Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR) constitute a large protein family of NAD(P)(H)-dependent oxidoreductase. They are defined by distinct, common sequence motifs and show a wide range of substrate specialisms. By large-scale sequencing analysis of a human fetal brain cDNA library, we isolated a novel human SDR-type dehydrogenase/reductase gene named Dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 1 (DHRS1). The DHRS1 cDNA is 1411 base pair in length, encoding a 314-amino-acid polypeptide which has a SDR motif. Northern blot reveals two bands, of about 0.9 and 1.4 kb in size. These two forms are expressed in many tissues. The DHRS1 gene is localized on chromosome 14q21.3. It has 9 exons and spans 9.2 kb of the genomic DNA.

  12. Effects of pyruvate dehydrogenase subunits overexpression on the α-ketoglutarate production in Yarrowia lipolytica WSH-Z06.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongwei; Madzak, Catherine; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2014-08-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica WSH-Z06 harbours a promising capability to oversynthesize α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). Its wide utilization is hampered by the formation of high concentrations of pyruvate. In this study, a metabolic strategy for the overexpression of the α and β subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase E1, E2 and E3 components was designed to reduce the accumulation of pyruvate. Elevated expression level of α subunit of E1 component improved the α-KG production and reduced the pyruvate accumulation. Due to a reduction in the acetyl-CoA supply, neither the growth of cells nor the synthesis of α-KG was restrained by the overexpression of β subunit of E1, E2 and E3 components. Furthermore, via the overexpression of these thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP)-binding subunits, the dependency of pyruvate dehydrogenase on thiamine was diminished in strains T1 and T2, in which α and β subunits of E1 component were separately overexpressed. In these two recombinant strains, the accumulation of pyruvate was insensitive to variations in exogenous thiamine. The results suggest that α-KG production can be enhanced by altering the dependence on TPP of pyruvate dehydrogenase and that the competition for the cofactor can be switched to ketoglutarate dehydrogenase via separate overexpression of the TPP-binding subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase. The results presented here provided new clue to improve α-KG production.

  13. Characterization of an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant lacking a cytosolic non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Rius, Sebastián P; Casati, Paula; Iglesias, Alberto A; Gomez-Casati, Diego F

    2006-08-01

    Non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde- 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (NP-GAPDH) is a conserved cytosolic protein found in higher plants. In photosynthetic cells, the enzyme is involved in a shuttle transfer mechanism to export NADPH from the chloroplast to the cytosol. To investigate the role of this enzyme in plant tissues, we characterized a mutant from Arabidopsis thaliana having an insertion at the NP-GAPDH gene locus. The homozygous mutant was determined to be null respect to NP-GAPDH, as it exhibited undetectable levels of both transcription of NP-GAPDH mRNA, protein expression and enzyme activity. Transcriptome analysis demonstrated that the insertion mutant plant shows altered expression of several enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Significantly, cytosolic phosphorylating (NAD-dependent) glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA levels are induced in the mutant, which correlates with an increase in enzyme activity. mRNA levels and enzymatic activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were also elevated, correlating with an increase in NADPH concentration. Moreover, increased ROS levels were measured in the mutant plants. Down-regulation of several glycolytic and photosynthetic genes suggests that NP-GAPDH is important for the efficiency of both metabolic processes. The results presented demonstrate that NP-GAPDH has a relevant role in plant growth and development.

  14. Biochemical analysis of the modular enzyme inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Nimmesgern, E; Black, J; Futer, O; Fulghum, J R; Chambers, S P; Brummel, C L; Raybuck, S A; Sintchak, M D

    1999-11-01

    Two prominent domains have been identified in the X-ray crystal structure of inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), a core domain consisting of an alpha/beta barrel which contains the active site and an inserted subdomain whose structure is less well defined. The core domain encompassing amino acids 1-108 and 244-514 of wild-type human IMPDH (II) connected by the tetrapeptide linker Ile-Arg-Thr-Gly was expressed. The subdomain including amino acids 99-244 of human wild-type IMPDH (II) was expressed as a His-tagged fusion protein, where the His-tag was removable by enterokinase cleavage. These two proteins as well as wild-type human IMPDH (II), all proteins expressed in Escherichia coli, have been purified to apparent homogeneity. Both the wild-type and core domain proteins are tetrameric and have very similar enzymatic activities. In contrast, the subdomain migrates as a monomer or dimer on a gel filtration column and lacks enzymatic activity. Circular dichroism spectropolarimetry indicates that the core domain retains secondary structure very similar to full-length IMPDH, with 30% alpha-helix and 30% beta-sheet vs 33% alpha-helix and 29% beta-sheet for wild-type protein. Again, the subdomain protein is distinguished from both wild-type and core domain proteins by its content of secondary structure, with only 15% each of alpha-helix and beta-sheet. These studies demonstrate that the core domain of IMPDH expressed separately is both structurally intact and enzymatically active. The availability of the modules of IMPDH will aid in dissecting the architecture of this enzyme of the de novo purine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway, which is an important target for immunosuppressive and antiviral drugs.

  15. A chemical proteomic probe for detecting dehydrogenases: catechol rhodanine.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xia; Sem, Daniel S

    2012-01-01

    Inherent complexity of the proteome often demands that it be studied as manageable subsets, termed subproteomes. A subproteome can be defined in a number of ways, although a pragmatic approach is to define it based on common features in an active site that lead to binding of a common small molecule ligand (e.g., a cofactor or a cross-reactive drug lead). The subproteome, so defined, can be purified using that common ligand tethered to a resin, with affinity chromatography. Affinity purification of a subproteome is described in the next chapter. That subproteome can then be analyzed using a common ligand probe, such as a fluorescent common ligand that can be used to stain members of the subproteome in a native gel. Here, we describe such a fluorescent probe, based on a catechol rhodanine acetic acid (CRAA) ligand that binds to dehydrogenases. The CRAA ligand is fluorescent and binds to dehydrogenases at pH > 7, and hence can be used effectively to stain dehydrogenases in native gels to identify what subset of proteins in a mixture are dehydrogenases. Furthermore, if one is designing inhibitors to target one or more of these dehydrogenases, the CRAA staining can be performed in a competitive assay format, with or without inhibitor, to assess the selectivity of the inhibitor for the targeted dehydrogenase. Finally, the CRAA probe is a privileged scaffold for dehydrogenases, and hence can easily be modified to increase affinity for a given dehydrogenase.

  16. Toxic Neuronal Death by Glyeraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase and Mitochondria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    Neuroreport, 10(5), 1149-1153. Sioud, M., & Jespersen, L. (1996). Enhancement of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis by glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase...1996) Enhancemen t of hammerhead r ibozyme cata lysis by glycera ldehyde-3- phospha te dehydrogenase. J Mol Biol 257:775–789. Sirover MA (1997) Role of

  17. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5560 Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system. (a) Identification. A lactic...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5560 Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system. (a) Identification. A lactic...

  19. Molecular Analysis of the Gene Encoding F420-Dependent Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Purwantini, Endang; Daniels, Lacy

    1998-01-01

    The gene fgd, which codes for F420-dependent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (FGD), was cloned from Mycobacterium smegmatis, and its sequence was determined and analyzed. A homolog of FGD which has a very high similarity to the M. smegmatis FGD-derived amino acid sequence was identified in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. FGD showed significant homology with F420-dependent N5,N10-methylene-tetrahydromethanopterin reductase (MER) from methanogenic archaea and with several hypothetical proteins from M. tuberculosis and Archaeoglobus fulgidus, but FGD showed no significant homology with NADP-dependent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases. Multiple alignment of FGD and MER proteins revealed four conserved consensus sequences. Multiple alignment of FGD with the hypothetical proteins also revealed portions of the same conserved sequences. Moderately high levels of FGD were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) carrying fgd in pBluescript. PMID:9555906

  20. SDR-type human hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases involved in steroid hormone activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoqiu; Lukacik, Petra; Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Oppermann, Udo

    2007-02-01

    Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases catalyze the NAD(P)(H)-dependent oxidoreduction of hydroxyl and oxo-functions at distinct positions of steroid hormones. This reversible reaction constitutes an important pre-receptor control mechanism for nuclear receptor ligands of the androgen, estrogen and glucocorticoid classes, since the conversion "switches" between receptor ligands and their inactive metabolites. The major reversible activities found in mammals acting on steroid hormones comprise 3alpha-, 11beta- and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases, and for each group several distinct isozymes have been described. The enzymes differ in their expression pattern, nucleotide cofactor preference, steroid substrate specificity and subcellular localization, and thus constitute a complex system ensuring cell-specific adaptation and regulation of steroid hormone levels. Several isoforms constitute promising drug targets, of particular importance in cancer, metabolic diseases, neurodegeneration and immunity.

  1. Conformations of Diphosphopyridine Coenzymes upon Binding to Dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Yu; Eichner, Ronald D.; Kaplan, Nathan O.

    1973-01-01

    The binding of oxidized as well as reduced coenzyme to some dehydrogenases has been studied under different concentration ratios and temperatures by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A significant difference in the spectral behavior between DPN+ and DPNH upon binding is interpreted in terms of fast and slow on-off rates relative to the nuclear magnetic resonance time scale in the binding of these two coenzymes. Significant downfield shifts of DPN+ were observed upon binding, comparable in magnitude to those expected upon opening (destacking) of the coenzymes in the case of chicken-muscle and lobster-tail lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) and yeast alchol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1.). A preliminary survey of several other dehydrogenases is consistent with these findings. In the case of 3-phosphoglyceraldehyde dehydrogenase, there is a possibility that the coenzyme exists in the folded form. PMID:4351183

  2. Novel chiral tool, (R)-2-octanol dehydrogenase, from Pichia finlandica: purification, gene cloning, and application for optically active α-haloalcohols.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Kudoh, Masatake

    2013-09-01

    A novel enantioselective alcohol dehydrogenase, (R)-2-octanol dehydrogenase (PfODH), was discovered among methylotrophic microorganisms. The enzyme was purified from Pichia finlandica and characterized. The molecular mass of the enzyme was estimated to be 83,000 and 30,000 by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, respectively. The enzyme was an NAD(+)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase and showed a strict enantioselectivity, very broad substrate specificity, and high tolerance to SH reagents. A gene-encoding PfODH was cloned and sequenced. The gene consisted of 765 nucleotides, coding polypeptides of 254 amino acids. The gene was singly expressed and coexpressed together with a formate dehydrogenase as an NADH regenerator in an Escherichia coli. Ethyl (S)-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate and (S)-2-chloro-1-phenylethanol were synthesized using a whole-cell biocatalyst in more than 99 % optical purity.

  3. Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase lowers leaf respiration and alters photorespiration and plant growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tomaz, Tiago; Bagard, Matthieu; Pracharoenwattana, Itsara; Lindén, Pernilla; Lee, Chun Pong; Carroll, Adam J; Ströher, Elke; Smith, Steven M; Gardeström, Per; Millar, A Harvey

    2010-11-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) catalyzes a reversible NAD(+)-dependent-dehydrogenase reaction involved in central metabolism and redox homeostasis between organelle compartments. To explore the role of mitochondrial MDH (mMDH) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), knockout single and double mutants for the highly expressed mMDH1 and lower expressed mMDH2 isoforms were constructed and analyzed. A mmdh1mmdh2 mutant has no detectable mMDH activity but is viable, albeit small and slow growing. Quantitative proteome analysis of mitochondria shows changes in other mitochondrial NAD-linked dehydrogenases, indicating a reorganization of such enzymes in the mitochondrial matrix. The slow-growing mmdh1mmdh2 mutant has elevated leaf respiration rate in the dark and light, without loss of photosynthetic capacity, suggesting that mMDH normally uses NADH to reduce oxaloacetate to malate, which is then exported to the cytosol, rather than to drive mitochondrial respiration. Increased respiratory rate in leaves can account in part for the low net CO(2) assimilation and slow growth rate of mmdh1mmdh2. Loss of mMDH also affects photorespiration, as evidenced by a lower postillumination burst, alterations in CO(2) assimilation/intercellular CO(2) curves at low CO(2), and the light-dependent elevated concentration of photorespiratory metabolites. Complementation of mmdh1mmdh2 with an mMDH cDNA recovered mMDH activity, suppressed respiratory rate, ameliorated changes to photorespiration, and increased plant growth. A previously established inverse correlation between mMDH and ascorbate content in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) has been consolidated in Arabidopsis and may potentially be linked to decreased galactonolactone dehydrogenase content in mitochondria in the mutant. Overall, a central yet complex role for mMDH emerges in the partitioning of carbon and energy in leaves, providing new directions for bioengineering of plant growth rate and a new insight into the molecular mechanisms

  4. Characterization of the developmentally regulated Bacillus subtilis glucose dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lampel, K A; Uratani, B; Chaudhry, G R; Ramaley, R F; Rudikoff, S

    1986-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the structural gene for glucose dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.47) of Bacillus subtilis was determined and comprises 780 base pairs. The subunit molecular weight of glucose dehydrogenase as deduced from the nucleotide sequence is 28,196, which agrees well with the subunit molecular weight of 31,500 as determined from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The sequence of the 49 amino acids at the NH2 terminus of glucose dehydrogenase purified from sporulating B. subtilis cells matched the amino acid sequence derived from the DNA sequence. Glucose dehydrogenase was purified from an Escherichia coli strain harboring pEF1, a plasmid that contains the B. subtilis gene encoding glucose dehydrogenase. This enzyme has the identical amino acid sequence at the NH2 terminus as the B. subtilis enzyme. A putative ribosome-binding site, 5'-AGGAGG-3', which is complementary to the 3' end of the 16S rRNA of B. subtilis, was found 6 base pairs preceding the translational start codon of the structural gene of glucose dehydrogenase. No known promoterlike DNA sequences that are recognized by B. subtilis RNA polymerases were present immediately preceding the translational start site of the glucose dehydrogenase structural gene. The glucose dehydrogenase gene was found to be under sporulation control at the trancriptional level. A transcript of 1.6 kilobases hybridized to a DNA fragment within the structural gene of glucose dehydrogenase. This transcript was synthesized 3 h after the cessation of vegetative growth concomitant to the appearance of glucose dehydrogenase. Images PMID:3082854

  5. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana cytokinin dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Bitto, Eduard; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2008-08-13

    Since first discovered in Zea mays, cytokinin dehydrogenase (CKX) genes have been identified in many plants including rice and Arabidopsis thaliana, which possesses CKX homologues (AtCKX1-AtCKX7). So far, the three-dimensional structure of only Z. mays CKX (ZmCKX1) has been determined. The crystal structures of ZmCKX1 have been solved in the native state and in complex with reaction products and a slowly reacting substrate. The structures revealed four glycosylated asparagine residues and a histidine residue covalently linked to FAD. Combined with the structural information, recent biochemical analyses of ZmCKX1 concluded that the final products of the reaction, adenine and a side chain aldehyde, are formed by nonenzymatic hydrolytic cleavage of cytokinin imine products resulting directly from CKX catalysis. Here, we report the crystal structure of AtCKX7 (gene locus At5g21482.1, UniProt code Q9FUJ1).

  6. NADH electrochemical sensor coupled with dehydrogenase enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, Hideko; Mascini, Marco )

    1992-06-01

    A graphite electrode assembled in a flow cell has shown to be a good detector for NADH. Current is linearly dependent on concentration in the range 10{sup {minus}7}-10{sup {minus}3} M without any mediator at the potential applied of 300 mV vs Ag/AgCl. Lactate and alcohol dehydrogenases were immobilized near to the electrode surface or in a reactor to obtain an NADH-based biosensor for lactate or ethanol. With lactate the authors succeeded to obtain a response only if the reactor was used and for alcohol a current proportional to the concentration was obtained either if the enzyme was immobilized in a membrane and placed near the electrode surface or when the enzyme was immobilized in a reactor form. By FIA procedures fast responses and recoveries were obtained, but with a short linear range.

  7. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Monkenbusch, M.; Stadler, A. Biehl, R.; Richter, D.; Ollivier, J.; Zamponi, M.

    2015-08-21

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D{sub 2}O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains.

  8. [Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Japan].

    PubMed

    Kanno, Hitoshi; Ogura, Hiromi

    2015-07-01

    In the past 10 years, we have diagnosed congenital hemolytic anemia in 294 patients, approximately 33% of whom were found to have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. It is becoming more common for Japanese to marry people of other ethnic origins, such that G6PD deficiency is becoming more prevalent in Japan. Japanese G6PD deficiency tends to be diagnosed in the neonatal period due to severe jaundice, while G6PD-deficient patients with foreign ancestors tend to be diagnosed at the onset of an acute hemolytic crisis before the age of six. It is difficult to predict the clinical course of each patient by G6PD activity, reduced glutathione content, or the presence/absence of severe neonatal jaundice. We propose that both neonatal G6PD screening and systematic analyses of G6PD gene mutations may be useful for personalized management of patients with G6PD-deficient hemolytic anemia.

  9. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.D.; Weretilnyk, E.A.; Weigel, P.

    1986-04-01

    Betaine is synthesized in spinach chloroplasts via the pathway Choline ..-->.. Betaine Aldehyde ..-->.. Betaine; the second step is catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). The subcellular distribution of BADH was determined in leaf protoplast lysates; BADH isozymes were separated by 6-9% native PAGE. The chloroplast stromal fraction contains a single BADH isozyme (number1) that accounts for > 80% of the total protoplast activity; the extrachloroplastic fraction has a minor isozyme (number2) which migrates more slowly than number1. Both isozymes appear specific for betaine aldehyde, are more active with NAD than NADP, and show a ca. 3-fold activity increase in salinized leaves. The phenotype of a natural variant of isozyme number1 suggests that the enzyme is a dimer.

  10. Rapid inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase: an initiating event in high dietary fat-induced loss of metabolic flexibility in the heart.

    PubMed

    Crewe, Clair; Kinter, Michael; Szweda, Luke I

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac function depends on the ability to switch between fatty acid and glucose oxidation for energy production in response to changes in substrate availability and energetic stress. In obese and diabetic individuals, increased reliance on fatty acids and reduced metabolic flexibility are thought to contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease. Mechanisms by which cardiac mitochondria contribute to diet-induced metabolic inflexibility were investigated. Mice were fed a high fat or low fat diet for 1 d, 1 wk, and 20 wk. Cardiac mitochondria isolated from mice fed a high fat diet displayed a diminished ability to utilize the glycolytically derived substrate pyruvate. This response was rapid, occurring within the first day on the diet, and persisted for up to 20 wk. A selective increase in the expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 and inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase are responsible for the rapid suppression of pyruvate utilization. An important consequence is that pyruvate dehydrogenase is sensitized to inhibition when mitochondria respire in the presence of fatty acids. Additionally, increased expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 preceded any observed diet-induced reductions in the levels of glucose transporter type 4 and glycolytic enzymes and, as judged by Akt phosphorylation, insulin signaling. Importantly, diminished insulin signaling evident at 1 wk on the high fat diet did not occur in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 knockout mice. Dietary intervention leads to a rapid decline in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 levels and recovery of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity indicating an additional form of regulation. Finally, an overnight fast elicits a metabolic response similar to that induced by high dietary fat obscuring diet-induced metabolic changes. Thus, our data indicate that diet-induced inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase may be an initiating event in decreased oxidation of glucose and increased reliance of the heart on

  11. The role of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase in restoring growth on glucose of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoglucose isomerase mutant.

    PubMed

    Boles, E; Lehnert, W; Zimmermann, F K

    1993-10-01

    Phosphoglucose isomerase pgi1-deletion mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot grow on glucose as the sole carbon source and are even inhibited by glucose. These growth defects could be suppressed by an over-expression on a multi-copy plasmid of the structural gene GDH2 coding for the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase. GDH2 codes for a protein with 1092 amino acids which is located on chromosome XII and shows high sequence similarity to the Neurospora crassa NAD-glutamate dehydrogenase. Suppression of the pgi1 deletion by over-expression of GDH2 was abolished in strains with a deletion of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene ZWF1 or gene GDH1 coding for the NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase. Moreover, this suppression required functional mitochondria. It is proposed that the growth defect of pgi1 deletion mutants on glucose is due to a rapid depletion of NADP which is needed as a cofactor in the oxidative reactions of the pentose phosphate pathway. Over-expression of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase leads to a very efficient conversion of glutamate with NADH generation to 2-oxoglutarate which can be converted back to glutamate by the NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase with the consumption of NADPH. Consequently, over-expression of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase causes a substrate cycling between 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate which restores NADP from NADPH through the coupled conversion of NAD to NADH which can be oxidized in the mitochondria. Furthermore, the requirement for an increase in NADPH consumption for the suppression of the phosphoglucose isomerase defect could be met by addition of oxidizing agents which are known to reduce the level of NADPH.

  12. IMP dehydrogenase from Pneumocystis carinii as a potential drug target.

    PubMed Central

    O'Gara, M J; Lee, C H; Weinberg, G A; Nott, J M; Queener, S F

    1997-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid, a specific inhibitor of IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH; EC 1.1.1.205), is a potent inhibitor of Pneumocystis carinii growth in culture, suggesting that IMPDH may be a sensitive target for chemotherapy in this organism. The IMPDH gene was cloned as a first step to characterizing the enzyme and developing selective inhibitors. A 1.3-kb fragment containing a portion of the P. carinii IMPDH gene was amplified by PCR with two degenerate oligonucleotides based on conserved sequences in IMPDH from humans and four different microorganisms. Northern hybridization analysis showed the P. carinii IMPDH mRNA to be approximately 1.6 kb. The entire cDNA encoding P. carinii IMPDH was isolated and cloned. The deduced amino acid sequence of P. carinii IMPDH shared homology with bacterial (31 to 38%), protozoal (48 to 59%), mammalian (60 to 62%), and fungal (62%) IMPDH enzymes. The IMPDH cDNA was expressed by using a T7 expression system in an IMPDH-deficient strain of Escherichia coli (strain S phi 1101). E. coli S phi 1101 cells containing the P. carinii IMPDH gene were able to grow on medium lacking guanine, implying that the protein expressed in vivo was functional. Extracts of these E. coli cells contained IMPDH activity that had an apparent Km for IMP of 21.7 +/- 0.3 microM and an apparent Km for NAD of 314 +/- 84 microM (mean +/- standard error of the mean; n = 3), and the activity was inhibited by mycophenolic acid (50% inhibitory concentration, 24 microM; n = 2). PMID:8980752

  13. Targeting Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Cancer Stem Cells in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landen, Charles N.; Goodman, Blake; Katre, Ashwini A.; Steg, Adam D.; Nick, Alpa M.; Stone, Rebecca L.; Miller, Lance D.; Mejia, Pablo Vivas; Jennings, Nicolas B.; Gershenson, David M.; Bast, Robert C.; Coleman, Robert L.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K.

    2010-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1) expression characterizes a subpopulation of cells with tumor initiating or cancer stem cell properties in several malignancies. Our goal was to characterize the phenotype of ALDH1A1-positive ovarian cancer cells and examine the biological effects of ALDH1A1 gene silencing. In our analysis of multiple ovarian cancer cell lines, we found that ALDH1A1 expression and activity was significantly higher in taxane and platinum-resistant cell lines. In patient samples, 72.9% of ovarian cancers had ALDH1A1 expression, in whom the percent of ALDH1A1-positive cells correlated negatively with progression-free survival (6.05 v 13.81 months, p<0.035). Subpopulations of A2780cp20 cells with ALDH1A1 activity were isolated for orthotopic tumor initiating studies, where tumorigenicity was approximately 50-fold higher with ALDH1A1-positive cells. Interestingly, tumors derived from ALDH1A1-positive cells gave rise to both ALDH1A1-positive and ALDH1A1-negative populations, but ALDH1A1-negative cells could not generate ALDH1A1-positive cells. In an in vivo orthotopic mouse model of ovarian cancer, ALDH1A1 silencing using nanoliposomal siRNA sensitized both taxane- and platinum-resistant cell lines to chemotherapy, significantly reducing tumor growth in mice compared to chemotherapy alone (a 74–90% reduction, p<0.015). These data demonstrate that the ALDH1A1 subpopulation is associated with chemoresistance and outcome in ovarian cancer patients, and targeting ALDH1A1 sensitizes resistant cells to chemotherapy. ALDH1A1-positive cells have enhanced, but not absolute, tumorigenicity, but do have differentiation capacity lacking in ALDH1A1-negative cells. This enzyme may be important for identification and targeting of chemoresistant cell populations in ovarian cancer. PMID:20889728

  14. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum Lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Hernandez, Agustin; Speed, Haley; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-03-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum causes waterborne diseases worldwide. There is no effective therapy for C. parvum infection. The parasite depends mainly on glycolysis for energy production. Lactate dehydrogenase is a major regulator of glycolysis. This paper describes the biochemical characterization of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase and high resolution crystal structures of the apo-enzyme and four ternary complexes. The ternary complexes capture the enzyme bound to NAD/NADH or its 3-acetylpyridine analog in the cofactor binding pocket, while the substrate binding site is occupied by one of the following ligands: lactate, pyruvate or oxamate. The results reveal distinctive features of the parasitic enzyme. For example, C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase prefers the acetylpyridine analog of NADH as a cofactor. Moreover, it is slightly less sensitive to gossypol inhibition compared with mammalian lactate dehydrogenases and not inhibited by excess pyruvate. The active site loop and the antigenic loop in C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are considerably different from those in the human counterpart. Structural features and enzymatic properties of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are similar to enzymes from related parasites. Structural comparison with malate dehydrogenase supports a common ancestry for the two genes.

  15. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 in stem cells and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kaori; Tanaka, Takuji; Hara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The human genome contains 19 putatively functional aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes, which encode enzymes critical for detoxification of endogenous and exogenous aldehyde substrates through NAD(P)+-dependent oxidation. ALDH1 has three main isotypes, ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, and ALDH1A3, and is a marker of normal tissue stem cells (SC) and cancer stem cells (CSC), where it is involved in self-renewal, differentiation and self-protection. Experiments with murine and human cells indicate that ALDH1 activity, predominantly attributed to isotype ALDH1A1, is tissue- and cancer-specific. High ALDH1 activity and ALDH1A1 overexpression are associated with poor cancer prognosis, though high ALDH1 and ALDH1A1 levels do not always correlate with highly malignant phenotypes and poor clinical outcome. In cancer therapy, ALDH1A1 provides a useful therapeutic CSC target in tissue types that normally do not express high levels of ALDH1A1, including breast, lung, esophagus, colon and stomach. Here we review the functions and mechanisms of ALDH1A1, the key ALDH isozyme linked to SC populations and an important contributor to CSC function in cancers, and we outline its potential in future anticancer strategies. PMID:26783961

  16. Regulation of L-threonine dehydrogenase in somatic cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Han, Chuanchun; Gu, Hao; Wang, Jiaxu; Lu, Weiguang; Mei, Yide; Wu, Mian

    2013-05-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that metabolic remodeling plays an important role in the regulation of somatic cell reprogramming. Threonine catabolism mediated by L-threonine dehydrogenase (TDH) has been recognized as a specific metabolic trait of mouse embryonic stem cells. However, it remains unknown whether TDH-mediated threonine catabolism could regulate reprogramming. Here, we report TDH as a novel regulator of somatic cell reprogramming. Knockdown of TDH inhibits, whereas induction of TDH enhances reprogramming efficiency. Moreover, microRNA-9 post-transcriptionally regulates the expression of TDH and thereby inhibits reprogramming efficiency. Furthermore, protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT5) interacts with TDH and mediates its post-translational arginine methylation. PRMT5 appears to regulate TDH enzyme activity through both methyltransferase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Functionally, TDH-facilitated reprogramming efficiency is further enhanced by PRMT5. These results suggest that TDH-mediated threonine catabolism controls somatic cell reprogramming and indicate the importance of post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation of TDH.

  17. Incidence and Geographic Distribution of Succinic Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase (SSADH) Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Attri, Savita Verma; Singhi, Pratibha; Wiwattanadittakul, Natrujee; Goswami, Jyotindra N; Sankhyan, Naveen; Salomons, Gajja S; Roullett, Jean-Baptiste; Hodgeman, Ryan; Parviz, Mahsa; Gibson, K Michael; Pearl, Phillip L

    2016-11-05

    The incidence of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency, an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of GABA degradation, is unknown. Upon a recent diagnosis of a new family of affected fraternal twins from the Punjabi ethnic group of India, case ascertainment from the literature and our database was done to determine the number of confirmed cases along with their geographic distribution. The probands presented with global developmental delay, infantile onset epilepsy, and a persistent neurodevelopmental disorder upon diagnosis at 10 years of age with intellectual disability, expressive aphasia, and behavioral problems most prominent for hyperactivity. Gamma-hydroxybutyric aciduria and homozygous ALDH5A1 c.608C>T; p.Pro203Leu mutations were confirmed. Identification of all available individual cases with clinical details available including geographic or ethnic origin revealed 182 patients from 40 countries, with the largest number of patients reported from the USA (24%), Turkey (10%), China (7%), Saudi Arabia (6%), and Germany (5%). This study provides an accounting of all published cases of confirmed SSADH deficiency and provides data useful in planning further studies of this rare inborn error of metabolism.

  18. Aldehyde dehydrogenases in cancer stem cells: potential as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Clark, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to current chemotherapeutic or radiation-based cancer treatment strategies is a serious concern. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are typically able to evade treatment and establish a recurrent tumor or metastasis, and it is these that lead to the majority of cancer deaths. Therefore, a major current goal is to develop treatment strategies that eliminate the resistant CSCs as well as the bulk tumor cells in order to achieve complete disease clearance. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) are important for maintenance and differentiation of stem cells as well as normal development. There is expanding evidence that ALDH expression increases in response to therapy and promotes chemoresistance and survival mechanisms in CSCs. This perspective will discuss a paper by Cojoc and colleagues recently published in Cancer Research, that indicates ALDHs play a key role in resistance to radiation therapy and tumor recurrence in prostate cancer. The authors suggest that ALDHs are a potential therapeutic target for treatment prostate cancer patients to limit radiation resistance and disease recurrence. The findings are consistent with work from other cancers showing ALDHs are major contributors of CSC signaling and resistance to anti-cancer treatments. This perspective will address representative work concerning the validity of ALDH and the associated retinoic acid signaling pathway as chemotherapeutic targets for prostate as well as other cancers. PMID:28149880

  19. Human choline dehydrogenase: medical promises and biochemical challenges.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Francesca; Gadda, Giovanni

    2013-09-15

    Human choline dehydrogenase (CHD) is located in the inner membrane of mitochondria primarily in liver and kidney and catalyzes the oxidation of choline to glycine betaine. Its physiological role is to regulate the concentrations of choline and glycine betaine in the blood and cells. Choline is important for regulation of gene expression, the biosynthesis of lipoproteins and membrane phospholipids and for the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine; glycine betaine plays important roles as a primary intracellular osmoprotectant and as methyl donor for the biosynthesis of methionine from homocysteine, a required step for the synthesis of the ubiquitous methyl donor S-adenosyl methionine. Recently, CHD has generated considerable medical attention due to its association with various human pathologies, including male infertility, homocysteinuria, breast cancer and metabolic syndrome. Despite the renewed interest, the biochemical characterization of the enzyme has lagged behind due to difficulties in the obtainment of purified, active and stable enzyme. This review article summarizes the medical relevance and the physiological roles of human CHD, highlights the biochemical knowledge on the enzyme, and provides an analysis based on the comparison of the protein sequence with that of bacterial choline oxidase, for which structural and biochemical information is available.

  20. Nuclear lactate dehydrogenase modulates histone modification in human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Castonguay, Zachary; Auger, Christopher; Thomas, Sean C.; Chahma, M’hamed; Appanna, Vasu D.

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Nuclear LDH is up-regulated under oxidative stress. • SIRT1 is co-immunoprecipitated bound to nuclear LDH. • Nuclear LDH is involved in histone deacetylation and epigenetics. - Abstract: It is becoming increasingly apparent that the nucleus harbors metabolic enzymes that affect genetic transforming events. Here, we describe a nuclear isoform of lactate dehydrogenase (nLDH) and its ability to orchestrate histone deacetylation by controlling the availability of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}), a key ingredient of the sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) deacetylase system. There was an increase in the expression of nLDH concomitant with the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in the culture medium. Under oxidative stress, the NAD{sup +} generated by nLDH resulted in the enhanced deacetylation of histones compared to the control hepatocytes despite no discernable change in the levels of SIRT1. There appeared to be an intimate association between nLDH and SIRT1 as these two enzymes co-immunoprecipitated. The ability of nLDH to regulate epigenetic modifications by manipulating NAD{sup +} reveals an intricate link between metabolism and the processing of genetic information.

  1. Sequence variation of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) paralogs in cactophilic Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Matzkin, Luciano M; Eanes, Walter F

    2003-01-01

    This study focuses on the population genetics of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) in cactophilic Drosophila. Drosophila mojavensis and D. arizonae utilize cactus hosts, and each host contains a characteristic mixture of alcohol compounds. In these Drosophila species there are two functional Adh loci, an adult form (Adh-2) and a larval and ovarian form (Adh-1). Overall, the greater level of variation segregating in D. arizonae than in D. mojavensis suggests a larger population size for D. arizonae. There are markedly different patterns of variation between the paralogs across both species. A 16-bp intron haplotype segregates in both species at Adh-2, apparently the product of an ancient gene conversion event between the paralogs, which suggests that there is selection for the maintenance of the intron structure possibly for the maintenance of pre-mRNA structure. We observe a pattern of variation consistent with adaptive protein evolution in the D. mojavensis lineage at Adh-1, suggesting that the cactus host shift that occurred in the divergence of D. mojavensis from D. arizonae had an effect on the evolution of the larval expressed paralog. Contrary to previous work we estimate a recent time for both the divergence of D. mojavensis and D. arizonae (2.4 +/- 0.7 MY) and the age of the gene duplication (3.95 +/- 0.45 MY). PMID:12586706

  2. Asparaginyl deamidation in two glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    DeLuna, Alexander; Quezada, Héctor; Gómez-Puyou, Armando; González, Alicia

    2005-03-25

    The non-enzymatic deamidation of asparaginyl residues is a major source of spontaneous damage of several proteins under physiological conditions. In many cases, deamidation and isoaspartyl formation alters the biological activity or stability of the native polypeptide. Rates of deamidation of particular residues depend on many factors including protein structure and solvent exposure. Here, we investigated the spontaneous deamidation of the two NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which have different kinetic properties and are differentially expressed in this yeast. Our results show that Asn54, present in Gdh3p but missing in the GDH1-encoded homologue, is readily deamidated in vitro under alkaline conditions. Relative to the native enzyme, deamidated Gdh3p shows reduced protein stability. The different deamidation rates of the two isoenzymes could explain to some extent, the relative in vivo instability of the allosteric Gdh3p enzyme, compared to that of Gdh1p. It is thus possible that spontaneous asparaginyl modification could play a role in the metabolic regulation of ammonium assimilation and glutamate biosynthesis.

  3. Priapism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: An underestimated correlation?

    PubMed

    De Rose, Aldo Franco; Mantica, Guglielmo; Tosi, Mattia; Bovio, Giulio; Terrone, Carlo

    2016-10-05

    Priapism is a rare clinical condition characterized by a persistent erection unrelated to sexual excitement. Often the etiology is idiopathic. Three cases of priapism in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency patients have been described in literature. We present the case of a 39-year-old man with glucose- 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, who reached out to our department for the arising of a non-ischemic priapism without arteriolacunar fistula. We suggest that the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency could be an underestimated risk factor for priapism.

  4. Modulation of ethanol stress tolerance by aldehyde dehydrogenase in the mycorrhizal fungus Tricholoma vaccinum.

    PubMed

    Asiimwe, Theodore; Krause, Katrin; Schlunk, Ines; Kothe, Erika

    2012-08-01

    We report the first mycorrhizal fungal aldehyde dehydrogenase gene, ald1, which was isolated from the basidiomycete Tricholoma vaccinum. The gene, encoding a protein Ald1 of 502 amino acids, is up-regulated in ectomycorrhiza. Phylogenetic analyses using 53 specific fungal aldehyde dehydrogenases from all major phyla in the kingdom of fungi including Ald1 and two partial sequences of T. vaccinum were performed to get an insight in the evolution of the aldehyde dehydrogenase family. By using competitive and real-time RT-PCR, ald1 is up-regulated in response to alcohol and aldehyde-related stress. Furthermore, heterologous expression of ald1 in Escherichia coli and subsequent in vitro enzyme activity assay demonstrated the oxidation of propionaldehyde and butyraldehyde with different kinetics using either NAD(+) or NADP(+) as cofactors. In addition, overexpression of ald1 in T. vaccinum after Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation increased ethanol stress tolerance. These results demonstrate the ability of Ald1 to circumvent ethanol stress, a critical function in mycorrhizal habitats.

  5. Pharmacological Blockade of Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors in Diet-Induced Obesity Regulates Mitochondrial Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase in Muscle.

    PubMed

    Arrabal, Sergio; Lucena, Miguel Angel; Canduela, Miren Josune; Ramos-Uriarte, Almudena; Rivera, Patricia; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Decara, Juan; Vargas, Antonio; Baixeras, Elena; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes; Márquez, Javier; Fernández-Llébrez, Pedro; De Roos, Baukje; Grandes, Pedro; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptors peripherally modulate energy metabolism. Here, we investigated the role of CB1 receptors in the expression of glucose/pyruvate/tricarboxylic acid (TCA) metabolism in rat abdominal muscle. Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD), a flavoprotein component (E3) of α-ketoacid dehydrogenase complexes with diaphorase activity in mitochondria, was specifically analyzed. After assessing the effectiveness of the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (3 mg kg(-1), 14 days) on food intake and body weight, we could identified seven key enzymes from either glycolytic pathway or TCA cycle--regulated by both diet and CB1 receptor activity--through comprehensive proteomic approaches involving two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/LC-ESI trap mass spectrometry. These enzymes were glucose 6-phosphate isomerase (GPI), triosephosphate isomerase (TPI), enolase (Eno3), lactate dehydrogenase (LDHa), glyoxalase-1 (Glo1) and the mitochondrial DLD, whose expressions were modified by AM251 in hypercaloric diet-induced obesity. Specifically, AM251 blocked high-carbohydrate diet (HCD)-induced expression of GPI, TPI, Eno3 and LDHa, suggesting a down-regulation of glucose/pyruvate/lactate pathways under glucose availability. AM251 reversed the HCD-inhibited expression of Glo1 and DLD in the muscle, and the DLD and CB1 receptor expression in the mitochondrial fraction. Interestingly, we identified the presence of CB1 receptors at the membrane of striate muscle mitochondria. DLD over-expression was confirmed in muscle of CB1-/- mice. AM251 increased the pyruvate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase activity in C2C12 myotubes, and the diaphorase/oxidative activity in the mitochondria fraction. These results indicated an up-regulation of methylglyoxal and TCA cycle activity. Findings suggest that CB1 receptors in muscle modulate glucose/pyruvate/lactate pathways and mitochondrial oxidative activity by targeting DLD.

  6. Formate Dehydrogenase, an Enzyme of Anaerobic Metabolism, Is Induced by Iron Deficiency in Barley Roots1

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kazuya; Itai, Reiko; Suzuki, Koichiro; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko-Kishi; Yoshimura, Etsuro; Mori, Satoshi

    1998-01-01

    To identify the proteins induced by Fe deficiency, we have compared the proteins of Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) roots by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Peptide sequence analysis of induced proteins revealed that formate dehydrogenase (FDH), adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, and the Ids3 gene product (for Fe deficiency-specific) increased in Fe-deficient roots. FDH enzyme activity was detected in Fe-deficient roots but not in Fe-sufficient roots. A cDNA encoding FDH (Fdh) was cloned and sequenced. Fdh expression was induced by Fe deficiency. Fdh was also expressed under anaerobic stress and its expression was more rapid than that induced by Fe deficiency. Thus, the expression of Fdh observed in Fe-deficient barley roots appeared to be a secondary effect caused by oxygen deficiency in Fe-deficient plants. PMID:9489019

  7. Protein engineering reveals ancient adaptive replacements in isocitrate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Antony M.; Golding, G. Brian

    1997-01-01

    Evolutionary analysis indicates that eubacterial NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases (EC 1.1.1.42) first evolved from an NAD-dependent precursor about 3.5 billion years ago. Selection in favor of utilizing NADP was probably a result of niche expansion during growth on acetate, where isocitrate dehydrogenase provides 90% of the NADPH necessary for biosynthesis. Amino acids responsible for differing coenzyme specificities were identified from x-ray crystallographic structures of Escherichia coli isocitrate dehydrogenase and the distantly related Thermus thermophilus NAD-dependent isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. Site-directed mutagenesis at sites lining the coenzyme binding pockets has been used to invert the coenzyme specificities of both enzymes. Reconstructed ancestral sequences indicate that these replacements are ancestral. Hence the adaptive history of molecular evolution is amenable to experimental investigation. PMID:9096353

  8. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases, such as viral hepatitis,...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... is a device that is intended to measure the activity of the enzyme malic dehydrogenase in serum and... diseases, myocardial infarctions, cancer, and blood disorders such as myelogenous (produced in the...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  20. Enzymic and structural studies on Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase and other short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases.

    PubMed

    Smilda, T; Kamminga, A H; Reinders, P; Baron, W; van Hylckama Vlieg, J E; Beintema, J J

    2001-05-01

    Enzymic and structural studies on Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenases and other short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) are presented. Like alcohol dehydrogenases from other Drosophila species, the enzyme from D. simulans is more active on secondary than on primary alcohols, although ethanol is its only known physiological substrate. Several secondary alcohols were used to determine the kinetic parameters kcat and Km. The results of these experiments indicate that the substrate-binding region of the enzyme allows optimal binding of a short ethyl side-chain in a small binding pocket, and of a propyl or butyl side-chain in large binding pocket, with stereospecificity for R(-) alcohols. At a high concentration of R(-) alcohols substrate activation occurs. The kcat and Km values determined under these conditions are about two-fold, and two orders of magnitude, respectively, higher than those at low substrate concentrations. Sequence alignment of several SDRs of known, and unknown three-dimensional structures, indicate the presence of several conserved residues in addition to those involved in the catalyzed reactions. Structural roles of these conserved residues could be derived from observations made on superpositioned structures of several SDRs with known structures. Several residues are conserved in tetrameric SDRs, but not in dimeric ones. Two halohydrin-halide-lyases show significant homology with SDRs in the catalytic domains of these enzymes, but they do not have the structural features required for binding NAD+. Probably these lyases descend from an SDR, which has lost the capability to bind NAD+, but the enzyme reaction mechanisms may still be similar.

  1. Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Activity in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Lorite, María J.; Tachil, Jörg; Sanjuán, Juán; Meyer, Ortwin; Bedmar, Eulogio J.

    2000-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 110spc4 was capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth with carbon monoxide (CO) as a sole energy and carbon source under aerobic conditions. The enzyme carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH; EC 1.2.99.2) has been purified 21-fold, with a yield of 16% and a specific activity of 58 nmol of CO oxidized/min/mg of protein, by a procedure that involved differential ultracentrifugation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration. The purified enzyme gave a single protein and activity band on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had a molecular mass of 230,000 Da. The 230-kDa enzyme was composed of large (L; 75-kDa), medium (M; 28.4-kDa), and small (S; 17.2-kDa) subunits occurring in heterohexameric (LMS)2 subunit composition. The 75-kDa polypeptide exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with the large subunit of the CODH of Oligotropha carboxidovorans. The B. japonicum enzyme contained, per mole, 2.29 atoms of Mo, 7.96 atoms of Fe, 7.60 atoms of labile S, and 1.99 mol of flavin. Treatment of the enzyme with iodoacetamide yielded di(carboxamidomethyl)molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide, identifying molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as the organic portion of the B. japonicum CODH molybdenum cofactor. The absorption spectrum of the purified enzyme was characteristic of a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein. PMID:10788353

  2. Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Lorite, M J; Tachil, J; Sanjuán, J; Meyer, O; Bedmar, E J

    2000-05-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 110spc4 was capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth with carbon monoxide (CO) as a sole energy and carbon source under aerobic conditions. The enzyme carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH; EC 1.2.99.2) has been purified 21-fold, with a yield of 16% and a specific activity of 58 nmol of CO oxidized/min/mg of protein, by a procedure that involved differential ultracentrifugation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration. The purified enzyme gave a single protein and activity band on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had a molecular mass of 230,000 Da. The 230-kDa enzyme was composed of large (L; 75-kDa), medium (M; 28.4-kDa), and small (S; 17.2-kDa) subunits occurring in heterohexameric (LMS)(2) subunit composition. The 75-kDa polypeptide exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with the large subunit of the CODH of Oligotropha carboxidovorans. The B. japonicum enzyme contained, per mole, 2.29 atoms of Mo, 7.96 atoms of Fe, 7.60 atoms of labile S, and 1.99 mol of flavin. Treatment of the enzyme with iodoacetamide yielded di(carboxamidomethyl)molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide, identifying molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as the organic portion of the B. japonicum CODH molybdenum cofactor. The absorption spectrum of the purified enzyme was characteristic of a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein.

  3. Targeting Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2: New Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Che-Hong; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Gross, Eric R.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2014-01-01

    A family of detoxifying enzymes called aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) has been a subject of recent interest, as its role in detoxifying aldehydes that accumulate through metabolism and to which we are exposed from the environment has been elucidated. Although the human genome has 19 ALDH genes, one ALDH emerges as a particularly important enzyme in a variety of human pathologies. This ALDH, ALDH2, is located in the mitochondrial matrix with much known about its role in ethanol metabolism. Less known is a new body of research to be discussed in this review, suggesting that ALDH2 dysfunction may contribute to a variety of human diseases including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, and cancer. Recent studies suggest that ALDH2 dysfunction is also associated with Fanconi anemia, pain, osteoporosis, and the process of aging. Furthermore, an ALDH2 inactivating mutation (termed ALDH2*2) is the most common single point mutation in humans, and epidemiological studies suggest a correlation between this inactivating mutation and increased propensity for common human pathologies. These data together with studies in animal models and the use of new pharmacological tools that activate ALDH2 depict a new picture related to ALDH2 as a critical health-promoting enzyme. PMID:24382882

  4. Targeting isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) in cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takeo; Khawaja, Muhammad Rizwan; DiNardo, Courtney D; Atkins, Johnique T; Janku, Filip

    2016-05-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is an essential enzyme for cellular respiration in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Recurrent mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 are prevalent in several cancers including glioma, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), cholangiocarcinoma and chondrosarcoma. The mutated IDH1 and IDH2 proteins have a gain-of-function, neomorphic activity, catalyzing the reduction of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) by NADPH. Cancer-associated IDH mutations block normal cellular differentiation and promote tumorigenesis via the abnormal production of the oncometabolite 2-HG. High levels of 2-HG have been shown to inhibit α-KG dependent dioxygenases, including histone and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) demethylases, which play a key role in regulating the epigenetic state of cells. Current targeted inhibitors of IDH1 (AG120, IDH305), IDH2 (AG221), and pan-IDH1/2 (AG881) selectively inhibit mutant IDH protein and induce cell differentiation in in vitro and in vivo models. Preliminary results from phase I clinical trials with IDH inhibitors in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies have demonstrated an objective response rate ranging from 31% to 40% with durable responses (>1 year) observed. Furthermore, the IDH inhibitors have demonstrated early signals of activity in solid tumors with IDH mutations, including cholangiocarcinomas and low grade gliomas.

  5. Herbicidal Activity of an Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase Inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Wittenbach, V. A.; Teaney, P. W.; Hanna, W. S.; Rayner, D. R.; Schloss, J. V.

    1994-01-01

    Isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) is the third enzyme specific to leucine biosynthesis. It catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of 3-isopropylmalate (3-IPM) to 2-ketoisocaproic acid. The partially purified enzyme from pea (Pisum sativum L.) shows a broad pH optimum of 7.8 to 9.1 and has Km values for 3-IPM and NAD of 18 and 40 [mu]M, respectively. O-Isobutenyl oxalylhydroxamate (O-IbOHA) has been discovered to be an excellent inhibitor of the pea IPMDH, with an apparent inhibitor constant of 5 nM. As an herbicide, O-IbOHA showed only moderate activity on a variety of broadleaf and grass species. We characterized the herbicidal activity of O-IbOHA on corn (Zea mays L.), a sensitive species; giant foxtail (Setaria faberi) and morning glory (Ipomoea purpurea [L.] Roth), moderately tolerant species; and soybean [Glycine max L. Merr.), a tolerant species. Differences in tolerance among the species were not due to differences in the sensitivity of IPMDH. Studies with [14C]O-IbOHA suggested that uptake and translocation were not major limitations for herbicidal activity, nor were they determinants of tolerance. Moreover, metabolism could not account for the difference in tolerance of corn, foxtail, and morning glory, although it might account for the tolerance of soybean. Herbicidal activity on all four species was correlated with the accumulation of 3-IPM in the plants. PMID:12232331

  6. Iodination of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jean O.; Harris, J. Ieuan

    1970-01-01

    1. A high degree of homology in the positions of tyrosine residues in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase from lobster and pig muscle, and from yeast, prompted an examination of the reactivity of tyrosine residues in the enzyme. 2. Iodination of the enzyme from lobster muscle with low concentrations of potassium tri-[125I]-iodide led to the identification of tyrosine residues of differing reactivity. Tyrosine-46 appeared to be the most reactive in the native enzyme. 3. When the monocarboxymethylated enzyme was briefly treated with small amounts of iodine, iodination could be confined almost entirely to tyrosine-46 in the lobster enzyme; tyrosine-39 or tyrosine-42, or both, were also beginning to react. 4. These three tyrosine residues were also those that reacted most readily in the carboxymethylated pig and yeast enzymes. 5. The difficulties in attaining specific reaction of the native enzyme are considered. 6. The differences between our results and those of other workers are discussed. ImagesPLATE 1PLATE 2 PMID:5530750

  7. Human liver aldehyde dehydrogenase: coenzyme binding

    SciTech Connect

    Kosley, L.L.; Pietruszko, R.

    1987-05-01

    The binding of (U-/sup 14/C) NAD to mitochondrial (E2) and cytoplasmin(E1) aldehyde dehydrogenase was measured by gel filtration and sedimentation techniques. The binding data for NAD and (E1) yielded linear Scatchard plots giving a dissociation constant of 25 (+/- 8) uM and the stoichiometry of 2 mol of NAD bound per mol of E1. The binding data for NAD and (E2) gave nonlinear Scatchard plots. The binding of NADH to E2 was measured via fluorescence enhancement; this could not be done with E1 because there was no signal. The dissociation constant for E2 by this technique was 0.7 (+/- 0.4) uM and stoichiometry of 1.0 was obtained. The binding of (U-/sup 14/C) NADH to (E1) and (E2) was also measured by the sedimentation technique. The binding data for (E1) and NADH gave linear Scatchard plots giving a dissociation constant of 13 (+/- 6) uM and the stoichiometry of 2.0. The binding data for NADH to (E2) gave nonlinear Scatchard plots. With (E1), the dissociation constants for both NAD and NADH are similar to those determined kinetically, but the stoichiometry is only half of that found by stopped flow technique. With (E2) the dissociation constant by fluorometric procedure was 2 orders of magnitude less than that from catalytic reaction.

  8. Gene Expression in Adult Metafemales of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Birchler, J. A.; Hiebert, J. C.; Krietzman, M.

    1989-01-01

    The expression of selected X-linked and autosomal genes was examined in metafemales (3X:2A) compared to diploid sisters. Three enzyme activities (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phospho-gluconate dehydrogenase, β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase) encoded by X-linked genes are not significantly different in the two classes of flies. In contrast, three autosomally encoded enzyme activities (alcohol dehydrogenase, α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase) are reduced in metafemales. Protein and DNA comparisons between metafemales and diploid sisters show a lowered level of total protein whereas the total DNA measurements are similar. Thus, the total cell number in metafemales is basically unchanged but gene expression is reduced. Phenotypic analysis of three autosomal loci, glass (gl), purple (pr) and pink-peach (p(p)), show that all three have lowered expression in metafemales while the X-linked loci, white-apricot (w(a)) and Bar (B), are dosage compensated. Quantitative dot blot analysis of messenger RNA levels of the second chromosomal locus, alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh), and the X chromosomal locus, rudimentary (r), show that Adh has reduced expression and r is partially compensated per total RNA in metafemales. It is proposed that the increased dosage of the X chromosome inversely affects both the X and autosomal gene expression but the simultaneous increased dosage of the structural genes on the X results in dosage compensation. The reduced levels of expression of autosomal genes could contribute to the great inviability of metafemales. PMID:2503426

  9. Succinate Dehydrogenase Loss in Familial Paraganglioma: Biochemistry, Genetics, and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Her, Yeng F.; Maher, L. James

    2015-01-01

    It is counterintuitive that metabolic defects reducing ATP production can cause, rather than protect from, cancer. Yet this is precisely the case for familial paraganglioma, a form of neuroendocrine malignancy caused by loss of succinate dehydrogenase in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Here we review biochemical, genetic, and epigenetic considerations in succinate dehydrogenase loss and present leading models and mysteries associated with this fascinating and important tumor. PMID:26294907

  10. Identification of 3-Sulfinopropionyl Coenzyme A (CoA) Desulfinases within the Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Schürmann, Marc; Demming, Rebecca Michaela; Krewing, Marco; Rose, Judith; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study, the essential role of 3-sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acd) in Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7T (AcdDPN7) during degradation of 3,3′-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP) was elucidated. DTDP is a sulfur-containing precursor substrate for biosynthesis of polythioesters (PTEs). AcdDPN7 showed high amino acid sequence similarity to acyl-CoA dehydrogenases but was unable to catalyze a dehydrogenation reaction. Hence, it was investigated in the present study whether 3SP-CoA desulfinase activity is an uncommon or a widespread property within the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Therefore, proteins of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily from Advenella kashmirensis WT001, Bacillus cereus DSM31, Cupriavidus necator N-1, Escherichia coli BL21, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, Ralstonia eutropha H16, Variovorax paradoxus B4, Variovorax paradoxus S110, and Variovorax paradoxus TBEA6 were expressed in E. coli strains. All purified acyl-CoA dehydrogenases appeared as homotetramers, as revealed by size exclusion chromatography. AcdS110, AcdB4, AcdH16, and AcdKT2440 were able to dehydrogenate isobutyryl-CoA. AcdKT2440 additionally dehydrogenated butyryl-CoA and valeryl-CoA, whereas AcdDSM31 dehydrogenated only butyryl-CoA and valeryl-CoA. No dehydrogenation reactions were observed with propionyl-CoA, isovaleryl-CoA, succinyl-CoA, and glutaryl-CoA for any of the investigated acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. Only AcdTBEA6, AcdN-1, and AcdLB400 desulfinated 3SP-CoA and were thus identified as 3SP-CoA desulfinases within the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family, although none of these three Acds dehydrogenated any of the tested acyl-CoA thioesters. No appropriate substrates were identified for AcdBL21 and AcdWT001. Spectrophotometric assays provided apparent Km and Vmax values for active substrates and indicated the applicability of phylogenetic analyses to predict the substrate range of

  11. Identification of 3-sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (CoA) desulfinases within the Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, Marc; Demming, Rebecca Michaela; Krewing, Marco; Rose, Judith; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    In a previous study, the essential role of 3-sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acd) in Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7(T) (AcdDPN7) during degradation of 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP) was elucidated. DTDP is a sulfur-containing precursor substrate for biosynthesis of polythioesters (PTEs). AcdDPN7 showed high amino acid sequence similarity to acyl-CoA dehydrogenases but was unable to catalyze a dehydrogenation reaction. Hence, it was investigated in the present study whether 3SP-CoA desulfinase activity is an uncommon or a widespread property within the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Therefore, proteins of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily from Advenella kashmirensis WT001, Bacillus cereus DSM31, Cupriavidus necator N-1, Escherichia coli BL21, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, Ralstonia eutropha H16, Variovorax paradoxus B4, Variovorax paradoxus S110, and Variovorax paradoxus TBEA6 were expressed in E. coli strains. All purified acyl-CoA dehydrogenases appeared as homotetramers, as revealed by size exclusion chromatography. AcdS110, AcdB4, AcdH16, and AcdKT2440 were able to dehydrogenate isobutyryl-CoA. AcdKT2440 additionally dehydrogenated butyryl-CoA and valeryl-CoA, whereas AcdDSM31 dehydrogenated only butyryl-CoA and valeryl-CoA. No dehydrogenation reactions were observed with propionyl-CoA, isovaleryl-CoA, succinyl-CoA, and glutaryl-CoA for any of the investigated acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. Only AcdTBEA6, AcdN-1, and AcdLB400 desulfinated 3SP-CoA and were thus identified as 3SP-CoA desulfinases within the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family, although none of these three Acds dehydrogenated any of the tested acyl-CoA thioesters. No appropriate substrates were identified for AcdBL21 and AcdWT001. Spectrophotometric assays provided apparent Km and Vmax values for active substrates and indicated the applicability of phylogenetic analyses to predict the substrate range of

  12. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of methylated liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C S

    1978-01-01

    Reductive methylation of lysine residues activates liver alcohol dehydrogenase in the oxidation of primary alcohols, but decreases the activity of the enzyme towards secondary alcohols. The modification also desensitizes the dehydrogenase to substrate inhibition at high alcohol concentrations. Steady-state kinetic studies of methylated liver alcohol dehydrogenase over a wide range of alcohol concentrations suggest that alcohol oxidation proceeds via a random addition of coenzyme and substrate with a pathway for the formation of the productive enzyme-NADH-alcohol complex. To facilitate the analyses of the effects of methylation on liver alcohol dehydrogenase and factors affecting them, new operational kinetic parameters to describe the results at high substrate concentration were introduced. The changes in the dehydrogenase activity on alkylation were found to be associated with changes in the maximum velocities that are affected by the hydrophobicity of alkyl groups introduced at lysine residues. The desensitization of alkylated liver alcohol dehydrogenase to substrate inhibition is identified with a decrease in inhibitory Michaelis constants for alcohols and this is favoured by the steric effects of substituents at the lysine residues. PMID:697732

  13. X-ray crystal structure of a malonate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain AAC.

    PubMed

    Wilding, Matthew; Scott, Colin; Peat, Thomas S; Newman, Janet

    2017-01-01

    The NAD-dependent malonate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase KES23460 from Pseudomonas sp. strain AAC makes up half of a bicistronic operon responsible for β-alanine catabolism to produce acetyl-CoA. The KES23460 protein has been heterologously expressed, purified and used to generate crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction studies. The crystals belonged to space group P212121 and diffracted X-rays to beyond 3 Å resolution using the microfocus beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. The structure was solved using molecular replacement, with a monomer from PDB entry 4zz7 as the search model.

  14. Enzymatic Kinetic Properties of the Lactate Dehydrogenase Isoenzyme C₄ of the Plateau Pika (Ochotona curzoniae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Lian; Wei, Dengbang; Li, Xiao; Xu, Lina; Wei, Linna

    2016-01-07

    Testis-specific lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-C₄) is one of the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isozymes that catalyze the terminal reaction of pyruvate to lactate in the glycolytic pathway. LDH-C₄ in mammals was previously thought to be expressed only in spermatozoa and testis and not in other tissues. Plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae) belongs to the genus Ochotona of the Ochotonidea family. It is a hypoxia-tolerant species living in remote mountain areas at altitudes of 3000-5000 m above sea level on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Surprisingly, Ldh-c is expressed not only in its testis and sperm, but also in somatic tissues of plateau pika. To shed light on the function of LDH-C₄ in somatic cells, Ldh-a, Ldh-b, and Ldh-c of plateau pika were subcloned into bacterial expression vectors. The pure enzymes of Lactate Dehydrogenase A₄ (LDH-A₄), Lactate Dehydrogenase B₄ (LDH-B₄), and LDH-C₄ were prepared by a series of expression and purification processes, and the three enzymes were identified by the method of sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The enzymatic kinetics properties of these enzymes were studied by Lineweaver-Burk double-reciprocal plots. The results showed the Michaelis constant (Km) of LDH-C₄ for pyruvate and lactate was 0.052 and 4.934 mmol/L, respectively, with an approximate 90 times higher affinity of LDH-C₄ for pyruvate than for lactate. At relatively high concentrations of lactate, the inhibition constant (Ki) of the LDH isoenzymes varied: LDH-A₄ (Ki = 26.900 mmol/L), LDH-B₄ (Ki = 23.800 mmol/L), and LDH-C₄ (Ki = 65.500 mmol/L). These data suggest that inhibition of lactate by LDH-A₄ and LDH-B₄ were stronger than LDH-C₄. In light of the enzymatic kinetics properties, we suggest that the plateau pika can reduce reliance on oxygen supply and enhance its adaptation to the hypoxic environments due to increased anaerobic glycolysis by LDH-C₄.

  15. Structural and kinetic characterization of recombinant 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida G7.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Simara Semíramis de; Neves, Cíntia Mara Leal; Guimarães, Samuel Leite; Whitman, Christian P; Johnson, William H; Aparicio, Ricardo; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto

    2015-08-01

    The first enzyme in the oxalocrotonate branch of the naphthalene-degradation lower pathway in Pseudomonas putida G7 is NahI, a 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde dehydrogenase which converts 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde to 2-hydroxymuconate in the presence of NAD(+). NahI is in family 8 (ALDH8) of the NAD(P)(+)-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase superfamily. In this work, we report the cloning, expression, purification and preliminary structural and kinetic characterization of the recombinant NahI. The nahI gene was subcloned into a T7 expression vector and the enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli ArcticExpress as a hexa-histidine-tagged fusion protein. After purification by affinity and size-exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments were conducted to analyze the oligomeric state and the overall shape of the enzyme in solution. The protein is a tetramer in solution and has nearly perfect 222 point group symmetry. Protein stability and secondary structure content were evaluated by a circular dichroism spectroscopy assay under different thermal conditions. Furthermore, kinetic assays were conducted and, for the first time, KM (1.3±0.3μM) and kcat (0.9s(-1)) values were determined at presumed NAD(+) saturation. NahI is highly specific for its biological substrate and has no activity with salicylaldehyde, another intermediate in the naphthalene-degradation pathway.

  16. Inhibition of stress mediated cell death by human lactate dehydrogenase B in yeast.

    PubMed

    Sheibani, Sara; Jones, Natalie K; Eid, Rawan; Gharib, Nada; Arab, Nagla T T; Titorenko, Vladimir; Vali, Hojatollah; Young, Paul A; Greenwood, Michael T

    2015-08-01

    We report the identification of human L- lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB) as a novel Bax suppressor. Yeast heterologously expressing LDHB is also resistant to the lethal effects of copper indicating that it is a general suppressor of stress mediated cell death. To identify potential LDHB targets, LDHB was expressed in yeast mutants defective in apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. The absence of functional PCD regulators including MCA1, YBH3, cyclophilin (CPR3) and VMA3, as well as the absence of the pro-survival autophagic pathway (ATG1,7) did not interfere with the LDHB mediated protection against copper indicating that LDHB functions independently of known PCD regulators or by simply blocking or stimulating a common PCD promoting or inhibitory pathway. Measurements of lactate levels revealed that short-term copper stress (1.6 mM, 4 h), does not increase intracellular levels of lactate, instead a three-fold increase in extracellular lactate was observed. Thus, yeast cells resemble mammalian cells where different stresses are known to lead to increased lactate production leading to lactic acidosis. In agreement with this, we found that the addition of exogenous lactic acid to growth media was sufficient to induce cell death that could be inhibited by the expression of LDHB. Taken together our results suggest that lactate dehydrogenase is a general suppressor of PCD in yeast.

  17. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of borneol dehydrogenase from the glandular trichomes of Lavandula x intermedia.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Lukman S; Galata, Mariana; Demissie, Zerihun A; Mahmoud, Soheil S

    2012-12-15

    Several varieties of Lavandula x intermedia (lavandins) are cultivated for their essential oils (EOs) for use in cosmetic, hygiene and personal care products. These EOs are mainly constituted of monoterpenes including camphor, which contributes an off odor reducing the olfactory appeal of the oil. We have recently constructed a cDNA library from the glandular trichomes (the sites of EO synthesis) of L. x intermedia plants. Here, we describe the cloning of a borneol dehydrogenase cDNA (LiBDH) from this library. The 780 bp open reading frame of the cDNA encoded a 259 amino acid short chain alcohol dehydrogenase with a predicted molecular mass of ca. 27.5 kDa. The recombinant LiBDH was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified by Ni-NTA agarose affinity chromatography, and functionally characterized in vitro. The bacterially produced enzyme specifically converted borneol to camphor as the only product with K(m) and k(cat) values of 53 μM and 4.0 × 10(-4) s(-1), respectively. The LiBDH transcripts were specifically expressed in glandular trichomes of mature flowers indicating that like other Lavandula monoterpene synthases the expression of this gene is regulated in a tissue-specific manner. The cloning of LiBDH has far reaching implications in improving the quality of Lavandula EOs through metabolic engineering.

  18. A coniferyl aldehyde dehydrogenase gene from Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 enhances the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Adeboye, Peter Temitope; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The conversion of coniferyl aldehyde to cinnamic acids by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under aerobic growth conditions was previously observed. Bacteria such as Pseudomonas have been shown to harbor specialized enzymes for converting coniferyl aldehyde but no comparable enzymes have been identified in S. cerevisiae. CALDH from Pseudomonas was expressed in S. cerevisiae. An acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Ald5) was also hypothesized to be actively involved in the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic growth conditions in S. cerevisiae. In a second S. cerevisiae strain, the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD5) was deleted. A prototrophic control strain was also engineered. The engineered S. cerevisiae strains were cultivated in the presence of 1.1mM coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic condition in bioreactors. The results confirmed that expression of CALDH increased endogenous conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae and ALD5 is actively involved with the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae.

  19. The Arabidopsis thaliana REDUCED EPIDERMAL FLUORESCENCE1 Gene Encodes an Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Involved in Ferulic Acid and Sinapic Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Ramesh B.; Bastress, Kristen L.; Ruegger, Max O.; Denault, Jeff W.; Chapple, Clint

    2004-01-01

    Recent research has significantly advanced our understanding of the phenylpropanoid pathway but has left in doubt the pathway by which sinapic acid is synthesized in plants. The reduced epidermal fluorescence1 (ref1) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana accumulates only 10 to 30% of the sinapate esters found in wild-type plants. Positional cloning of the REF1 gene revealed that it encodes an aldehyde dehydrogenase, a member of a large class of NADP+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. Consistent with this finding, extracts of ref1 leaves exhibit low sinapaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. These data indicate that REF1 encodes a sinapaldehyde dehydrogenase required for sinapic acid and sinapate ester biosynthesis. When expressed in Escherichia coli, REF1 was found to exhibit both sinapaldehyde and coniferaldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and further phenotypic analysis of ref1 mutant plants showed that they contain less cell wall–esterified ferulic acid. These findings suggest that both ferulic acid and sinapic acid are derived, at least in part, through oxidation of coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde. This route is directly opposite to the traditional representation of phenylpropanoid metabolism in which hydroxycinnamic acids are instead precursors of their corresponding aldehydes. PMID:14729911

  20. The Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Hadj-Saïd, Jessica; Pandelia, Maria-Eirini; Léger, Christophe; Fourmond, Vincent; Dementin, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Ni-containing Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenases (CODHs) catalyze the reversible conversion between CO and CO₂and are involved in energy conservation and carbon fixation. These homodimeric enzymes house two NiFeS active sites (C-clusters) and three accessory [4Fe-4S] clusters. The Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Dv) genome contains a two-gene CODH operon coding for a CODH (cooS) and a maturation protein (cooC) involved in nickel insertion in the active site. According to the literature, the question of the precise function of CooC as a chaperone folding the C-cluster in a form which accommodates free nickel or as a mere nickel donor is not resolved. Here, we report the biochemical and spectroscopic characterization of two recombinant forms of the CODH, produced in the absence and in the presence of CooC, designated CooS and CooS(C), respectively. CooS contains no nickel and cannot be activated, supporting the idea that the role of CooC is to fold the C-cluster so that it can bind nickel. As expected, CooS(C) is Ni-loaded, reversibly converts CO and CO₂, displays the typical Cred1 and Cred2 EPR signatures of the C-cluster and activates in the presence of methyl viologen and CO in an autocatalytic process. However, Ni-loaded CooS(C) reaches maximum activity only upon reductive treatment in the presence of exogenous nickel, a phenomenon that had not been observed before. Surprisingly, the enzyme displays the Cred1 and Cred2 signatures whether it has been activated or not, showing that this activation process of the Ni-loaded Dv CODH is not associated with structural changes at the active site.

  1. Succinate Dehydrogenase Gene Mutations in Cardiac Paragangliomas

    PubMed Central

    Martucci, Victoria L.; Emaminia, Abbas; del Rivero, Jaydira; Lechan, Ronald M.; Magoon, Bindiya T.; Galia, Analyza; Fojo, Tito; Leung, Steve; Lorusso, Roberto; Jimenez, Camilo; Shulkin, Barry L.; Audibert, Jennifer L.; Adams, Karen T.; Rosing, Douglas R.; Vaidya, Anand; Dluhy, Robert G.; Horvath, Keith A.; Pacak, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are chromaffin cell tumors arising from neuroendocrine cells. At least one third of paragangliomas are related to germline mutations in one of 17 genes. While these tumors can occur throughout the body, cardiac paragangliomas are very rare, accounting for less than 0.3% of mediastinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of patients with cardiac paragangliomas, particularly focusing on their genetic backgrounds. A retrospective chart analysis of fifteen patients with cardiac paraganglioma was performed to determine clinical presentation, genetic background, diagnostic work-up, and outcomes. The average age at diagnosis was 41.9 years. Typical symptoms of paraganglioma (e.g., hypertension, sweating, palpitations, headache) were reported at initial presentation in 13 patients (86.7%); the remaining 2, as well as 4 symptomatic patients, initially presented with cardiac-specific symptoms (e.g., chest pain, dyspnea). Genetic testing was done in 13 cases (86.7%); 10 (76.9%) were positive for mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) subunits B, C, or D. Thirteen cases (86.7%) underwent surgery to remove the paraganglioma with no intraoperative morbidity or mortality; one additional patient underwent surgical resection but experienced intraoperative complications after removal of the tumor due to comorbities and did not survive. SDHx mutations are known to be associated with mediastinal locations and malignant behavior of paragangliomas. In this report, we extend the locations of predominantly SDHx-related paragangliomas to cardiac tumors. In conclusion, cardiac paragangliomas are frequently associated with underlying SDHx germline mutations, suggesting a need for genetic testing of all patients with this rare tumor. PMID:25896150

  2. Structural Studies of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvate in the presence of Mg(2+) and thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) followed by the rate-limiting reductive acetylation of the lipoyl moiety linked to dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The three-dimensional structure of human E1 is elucidated using the methods of macromolecular X-ray crystallography. The structure is an alpha, alpha', beta and beta' tetramer with the protein units being in the tetrahedral arrangement. Each 361-residue alpha-subunit and 329-residue beta-subunit is composed of a beta-sheet core surrounded by alpha-helical domains. Each subunit is in extensive contact with all the three subunits involving TPP and magnesium cofactors, and potassium ions. The two binding sites for TPP are at the alpha-beta' and alpha'-beta interfaces, each involving a magnesium ion and Phe6l, His63, Tyr89, and Met200 from the alpha-subunit (or alpha'-subunit), and Met81 Phe85, His128 from the beta-subunit (or beta'-subunit). K+ ions are nestled between two beta-sheets and the end of an alpha-helix in each beta-subunit, where they are coordinated by four carbonyl oxygen groups from Ile12, Ala160, Asp163, and Asnl65, and a water molecule. The catalytic C2 carbon of thiazolium ring in this structure forms a 3.2 A contact with a water molecule involved in a series of H-bonds with other water molecules, and indirectly with amino acids including those involved in the catalysis and regulation of the enzyme.

  3. Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase Structure and Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) alcohol dehydrogenase I (ADH1) is the constitutive enzyme that reduces acetaldehyde to ethanol during the fermentation of glucose. ADH1 is a homotetramer of subunits with 347 amino acid residues. A structure for ADH1 was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.4 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains four different subunits, arranged as similar dimers named AB and CD. The unit cell contains two different tetramers made up of “back-to-back” dimers, AB:AB and CD:CD. The A and C subunits in each dimer are structurally similar, with a closed conformation, bound coenzyme, and the oxygen of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol ligated to the catalytic zinc in the classical tetrahedral coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, and His-66. In contrast, the B and D subunits have an open conformation with no bound coenzyme, and the catalytic zinc has an alternative, inverted coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, His-66, and the carboxylate of Glu-67. The asymmetry in the dimeric subunits of the tetramer provides two structures that appear to be relevant for the catalytic mechanism. The alternative coordination of the zinc may represent an intermediate in the mechanism of displacement of the zinc-bound water with alcohol or aldehyde substrates. Substitution of Glu-67 with Gln-67 decreases the catalytic efficiency by 100-fold. Previous studies of structural modeling, evolutionary relationships, substrate specificity, chemical modification, and site-directed mutagenesis are interpreted more fully with the three-dimensional structure. PMID:25157460

  4. Rutin attenuates ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in hippocampal neuronal cells by increasing aldehyde dehydrogenase 2.

    PubMed

    Song, Kibbeum; Kim, Sokho; Na, Ji-Young; Park, Jong-Heum; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kwon, Jungkee

    2014-10-01

    Rutin is derived from buckwheat, apples, and black tea. It has been shown to have beneficial anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Ethanol is a central nervous system depressant and neurotoxin. Its metabolite, acetaldehyde, is critically toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) metabolizes acetaldehyde into nontoxic acetate. This study examined rutin's effects on ALDH2 activity in hippocampal neuronal cells (HT22 cells). Rutin's protective effects against acetaldehyde-based ethanol neurotoxicity were confirmed. Daidzin, an ALDH2 inhibitor, was used to clarify the mechanisms of rutin's protective effects. Cell viability was significantly increased after rutin treatment. Rutin significantly reversed ethanol-increased Bax, cytochrome c expression and caspase 3 activity, and decreased Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL protein expression in HT22 cells. Interestingly, rutin increased ALDH2 expression, while daidzin reversed this beneficial effect. Thus, this study demonstrates rutin protects HT22 cells against ethanol-induced neurotoxicity by increasing ALDH2 activity.

  5. Dehydrogenase GRD1 represents a novel component of the cellulase regulon in Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina).

    PubMed

    Schuster, André; Kubicek, Christian P; Schmoll, Monika

    2011-07-01

    Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) is nowadays the most important industrial producer of cellulase and hemicellulase enzymes, which are used for pretreatment of cellulosic biomass for biofuel production. In this study, we introduce a novel component, GRD1 (glucose-ribitol dehydrogenase 1), which shows enzymatic activity on cellobiose and positively influences cellulase gene transcription, expression, and extracellular endo-1,4-β-D-glucanase activity. grd1 is differentially transcribed upon growth on cellulose and the induction of cellulase gene expression by sophorose. The transcription of grd1 is coregulated with that of cel7a (cbh1) under inducing conditions. GRD1 is further involved in carbon source utilization on several carbon sources, such as those involved in lactose and D-galactose catabolism, in several cases in a light-dependent manner. We conclude that GRD1 represents a novel enhancer of cellulase gene expression, which by coregulation with the major cellulase may act via optimization of inducing mechanisms.

  6. Properties and subunit structure of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hamada, M; Hiraoka, T; Koike, K; Ogasahara, K; Kanzaki, T

    1976-06-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase [EC 1.2.4.1] was separated from the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and its molecular weight was estimated to be about 150,000 by sedimentation equilibrium methods. The enzyme was dissociated into two subunits (alpha and beta), with estimated molecular weights of 41,000 (alpha) and 36,000 (beta), respectively, by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. The subunits were separated by phosphocellulose column chromatography and their chemical properties were examined. The subunit structure of the pyruvate dehydrogenase was assigned as alpha2beta2. The content of right-handed alpha-helix in the enzyme molecule was estimated to be about 29 and 28% by optical rotatory dispersion and by circular dichroism, respectively. The enzyme contained no thiamine-PP, and its dehydrogenase activity was completely dependent on added thiamine-PP and partially dependent on added Mg2+ and Ca2+. The Km value of pyruvate dehydrogenase for thiamine diphosphate was estimated to be 6.5 X 10(-5) M in the presence of Mg2+ or Ca2+. The enzyme showed highly specific activity for thiamine-PP dependent oxidation of both pyruvate and alpha-ketobutyrate, but it also showed some activity with alpha-ketovalerate, alpha-ketoisocaproate, and alpha-ketoisovalerate. The pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was strongly inhibited by bivalent heavy metal ions and by sulfhydryl inhibitors; and the enzyme molecule contained 27 moles of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-reactive sulfhydryl groups and a total of 36 moles of sulfhydryl groups. The inhibitory effect of p-chloromercuribenzoate was prevented by preincubating the enzyme with thiamine-PP plus pyruvate. The structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase necessary for formation of the complex is also reported.

  7. A Formate Dehydrogenase Confers Tolerance to Aluminum and Low pH1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yu Long; Fan, Wei; Xu, Jia Meng; Liu, Yu; Cao, Meng Jie; Wang, Ming-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) is involved in various higher plant abiotic stress responses. Here, we investigated the role of rice bean (Vigna umbellata) VuFDH in Al and low pH (H+) tolerance. Screening of various potential substrates for the VuFDH protein demonstrated that it functions as a formate dehydrogenase. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and histochemical analysis showed that the expression of VuFDH is induced in rice bean root tips by Al or H+ stresses. Fluorescence microscopic observation of VuFDH-GFP in transgenic Arabidopsis plants indicated that VuFDH is localized in the mitochondria. Accumulation of formate is induced by Al and H+ stress in rice bean root tips, and exogenous application of formate increases internal formate content that results in the inhibition of root elongation and induction of VuFDH expression, suggesting that formate accumulation is involved in both H+- and Al-induced root growth inhibition. Over-expression of VuFDH in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) results in decreased sensitivity to Al and H+ stress due to less production of formate in the transgenic tobacco lines under Al and H+ stresses. Moreover, NtMATE and NtALS3 expression showed no changes versus wild type in these over-expression lines, suggesting that herein known Al-resistant mechanisms are not involved. Thus, the increased Al tolerance of VuFDH over-expression lines is likely attributable to their decreased Al-induced formate production. Taken together, our findings advance understanding of higher plant Al toxicity mechanisms, and suggest a possible new route toward the improvement of plant performance in acidic soils, where Al toxicity and H+ stress coexist. PMID:27021188

  8. Aldehyde Dehydrogenases in Cellular Responses to Oxidative/electrophilic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surendra; Brocker, Chad; Koppaka, Vindhya; Ying, Chen; Jackson, Brian; Matsumoto, Akiko; Thompson, David C.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated within living systems and the inability to manage ROS load leads to elevated oxidative stress and cell damage. Oxidative stress is coupled to the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. This process generates over 200 types of aldehydes, many of which are highly reactive and toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize endogenous and exogenous aldehydes and thereby mitigate oxidative/electrophilic stress in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. ALDHs are found throughout the evolutionary gamut, from single celled organisms to complex multicellular species. Not surprisingly, many ALDHs in evolutionarily distant, and seemingly unrelated, species perform similar functions, including protection against a variety of environmental stressors like dehydration and ultraviolet radiation. The ability to act as an ‘aldehyde scavenger’ during lipid peroxidation is another ostensibly universal ALDH function found across species. Up-regulation of ALDHs is a stress response in bacteria (environmental and chemical stress), plants (dehydration, salinity and oxidative stress), yeast (ethanol exposure and oxidative stress), Caenorhabditis elegans (lipid peroxidation) and mammals (oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation). Recent studies have also identified ALDH activity as an important feature of cancer stem cells. In these cells, ALDH expression helps abrogate oxidative stress and imparts resistance against chemotherapeutic agents such as oxazaphosphorine, taxane and platinum drugs. The ALDH superfamily represents a fundamentally important class of enzymes that significantly contributes to the management of electrophilic/oxidative stress within living systems. Mutations in various ALDHs are associated with a variety of pathological conditions in humans, underscoring the fundamental importance of these enzymes in physiological and pathological processes. PMID:23195683

  9. Function of formate dehydrogenases in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Sofia M; Voordouw, Johanna; Leitão, Cristina; Martins, Mónica; Voordouw, Gerrit; Pereira, Inês A C

    2013-08-01

    The genome of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough encodes three formate dehydrogenases (FDHs), two of which are soluble periplasmic enzymes (FdhAB and FdhABC3) and one that is periplasmic but membrane-associated (FdhM). FdhAB and FdhABC3 were recently shown to be the main enzymes present during growth with lactate, formate or hydrogen. To address the role of these two enzymes, ΔfdhAB and ΔfdhABC3, mutants were generated and studied. Different phenotypes were observed in the presence of either molybdenum or tungsten, since both enzymes were important for growth on formate in the presence of Mo, whereas in the presence of W only FdhAB played a role. Both ΔfdhAB and ΔfdhABC3 mutants displayed defects in growth with lactate and sulfate providing the first direct evidence for the involvement of formate cycling under these conditions. In support of this mechanism, incubation of concentrated cell suspensions of the mutant strains with lactate and limiting sulfate also gave elevated formate concentrations, as compared to the wild-type strain. In contrast, both mutants grew similarly to the wild-type with H2 and sulfate. In the absence of sulfate, the wild-type D. vulgaris cells produced formate when supplied with H2 and CO2, which resulted from CO2 reduction by the periplasmic FDHs. The conversion of H2 and CO2 to formate allows the reversible storage of reducing power in a much more soluble molecule. Furthermore, we propose this may be an expression of the ability of some sulfate-reducing bacteria to grow by hydrogen oxidation, in syntrophy with organisms that consume formate, but are less efficient in H2 utilization.

  10. Characteristics and crystal structure of bacterial inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.; Evans, G.; Rotella, F. J.; Westbrook, E. M.; Beno, D.; Huberman, E.; Joachimiak, A.; Collart, F. R.

    1999-01-01

    IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is an essential enzyme that catalyzes the first step unique to GTP synthesis. To provide a basis for the evaluation of IMPDH inhibitors as antimicrobial agents, we have expressed and characterized IMPDH from the pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes. Our results show that the biochemical and kinetic characteristics of S. pyogenes IMPDH are similar to other bacterial IMPDH enzymes. However, the lack of sensitivity to mycophenolic acid and the K{sub m} for NAD (1180 {mu}M) exemplify some of the differences between the bacterial and mammalian IMPDH enzymes, making it an attractive target for antimicrobial agents. To evaluate the basis for these differences, we determined the crystal structure of the bacterial enzyme at 1.9 {angstrom} with substrate bound in the catalytic site. The structure was determined using selenomethionine-substituted protein and multiwavelength anomalous (MAD) analysis of data obtained with synchrotron radiation from the undulator beamline (19ID) of the Structural Biology Center at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source. S. pyogenes IMPDH is a tetramer with its four subunits related by a crystallographic 4-fold axis. The protein is composed of two domains: a TIM barrel domain that embodies the catalytic framework and a cystathione {beta}-synthase (CBS) dimer domain of so far unknown function. Using information provided by sequence alignments and the crystal structure, we prepared several site-specific mutants to examine the role of various active site regions in catalysis. These variants implicate the active site flap as an essential catalytic element and indicate there are significant differences in the catalytic environment of bacterial and mammalian IMPDH enzymes. Comparison of the structure of bacterial IMPDH with the known partial structures from eukaryotic organisms will provide an explanation of their distinct properties and contribute to the design of specific bacterial IMPDH inhibitors.

  11. THE HEME BINDING PROPERTIES OF GLYCERALDEHYDE-3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE

    PubMed Central

    Hannibal, Luciana; Collins, Daniel; Brassard, Julie; Chakravarti, Ritu; Vempati, Rajesh; Dorlet, Pierre; Santolini, Jérôme; Dawson, John H.; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2012-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a glycolytic enzyme that also functions in transcriptional regulation, oxidative stress, vesicular trafficking, and apoptosis. Because GAPDH is required for cellular heme insertion into inducible nitric oxide synthase (Chakravarti et al, PNAS 2010, 107(42):18004-9), we extensively characterized the heme binding properties of GAPDH. Substoichiometric amounts of ferric heme bound to GAPDH (1 heme per GAPDH tetramer) to form a low-spin complex with UV-visible maxima at 362, 418 and 537 nm, and when reduced to ferrous gave maxima at 424, 527 and 559 nm. Ferric heme association and dissociation rate constants at 10 °C were kon =17,800 M−1s−1 and koff1 = 7.0 × 10−3 s−1; koff2 = 3.3 × 10−4 s−1 respectively, giving approximate affinities of 19–390 nM. Ferrous heme bound more poorly to GAPDH and dissociated with a koff = 4.2 × 10−3 s−1. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), resonance Raman (rR) and EPR spectroscopic data on the ferric, ferrous, and ferrous-CO complexes of GAPDH showed that the heme is bis-ligated with His as the proximal ligand. The distal ligand in ferric complex was not displaced by CN− or N3− but in ferrous complex was displaceable by CO at a rate of 1.75 s−1 (for [CO]>0.2 mM). Studies with heme analogs revealed selectivity toward the coordinating metal and porphyrin ring structure. GAPDH-heme was isolated from bacteria induced to express rabbit GAPDH in the presence of δ-amino levulinic acid. Our finding of heme binding to GAPDH expands the protein’s potential roles. The strength, selectivity, reversibility, and redox sensitivity of heme binding to GAPDH is consistent with it performing heme sensing or heme chaperone-like functions in cells. PMID:22957700

  12. Phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex precedes HIF-1-mediated effects and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 upregulation during the first hours of hypoxic treatment in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Andreas David; Walbrecq, Geoffroy; Kozar, Ines; Behrmann, Iris; Haan, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is an important gatekeeper enzyme connecting glycolysis to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Thereby, it has a strong impact on the glycolytic flux as well as the metabolic phenotype of a cell. PDC activity is regulated via reversible phosphorylation of three serine residues on the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) E1α subunit. Phosphorylation of any of these residues by the PDH kinases (PDKs) leads to a strong decrease in PDC activity. Under hypoxia, the inactivation of the PDC has been described to be dependent on the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1)-induced PDK1 protein upregulation. In this study, we show in two hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (HepG2 and JHH-4) that, during the adaptation to hypoxia, PDH is already phosphorylated at time points preceding HIF-1-mediated transcriptional events and PDK1 protein upregulation. Using siRNAs and small molecule inhibitor approaches, we show that this inactivation of PDC is independent of HIF-1α expression but that the PDKs need to be expressed and active. Furthermore, we show that reactive oxygen species might be important for the induction of this PDH phosphorylation since it correlates with the appearance of an altered redox state in the mitochondria and is also inducible by H2O2 treatment under normoxic conditions. Overall, these results show that neither HIF-1 expression nor PDK1 upregulation is necessary for the phosphorylation of PDH during the first hours of the adaptation to hypoxia. PMID:27800515

  13. Direct transfer of NADH between alpha-glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase: fact or misinterpretation?

    PubMed

    Srivastava, D K; Smolen, P; Betts, G F; Fukushima, T; Spivey, H O; Bernhard, S A

    1989-09-01

    Following the criticism by Chock and Gutfreund [Chock, P.B. & Gutfreund, H. (1988) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85, 8870-8874], that our proposal of direct transfer of NADH between glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (alpha-glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase, alpha-GDH; EC 1.1.1.8) and L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27) was based on a misinterpretation of the kinetic data, we have reinvestigated the transfer mechanism between this enzyme pair. By using the "enzyme buffering" steady-state kinetic technique [Srivastava, D.K. & Bernhard, S.A. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 4538-4545], we examined the mechanism (random diffusion vs. direct transfer) of transfer of NADH between rabbit muscle alpha-GDH and pig heart LDH. The steady-state data reveal that the LDH-NADH complex and the alpha-GDH-NADH complex can serve as substrate for the alpha-GDH-catalyzed reaction and the LDH-catalyzed reaction, respectively. This is consistent with the direct-transfer mechanism and inconsistent with a mechanism in which free NADH is the only competent substrate for either enzyme-catalyzed reaction. The discrepancy between this conclusion and that of Chock and Gutfreund comes from (i) their incorrect measurement of the Km for NADH in the alpha-GDH-catalyzed reaction, (ii) inadequate design and range of the steady-state kinetic experiments, and (iii) their qualitative assessment of the prediction of the direct-transfer mechanism. Our transient kinetic measurements for the transfer of NADH from alpha-GDH to LDH and from LDH to alpha-GDH show that both are slower than predicted on the basis of free equilibration of NADH through the aqueous environment. The decrease in the rate of equilibration of NADH between alpha-GDH and LDH provides no support for the random-diffusion mechanism; rather, it suggests a direct interaction between enzymes that modulates the transfer rate of NADH. Thus, contrary to Chock and Gutfreund's conclusion, all our experimental data compel us to propose, once again, that

  14. Purification and characterization of limonoate dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus fascians.

    PubMed

    Humanes, L; López-Ruiz, A; Merino, M T; Roldán, J M; Diez, J

    1997-09-01

    Limonoate dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus fascians has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by a procedure that consists of ion-exchange, hydrophobic, and affinity chromatography. The native enzyme has a molecular mass of around 128,000 Da and appears to be composed of four similar subunits (30,000 Da each). The isoelectric point is 4.9 as determined by isoelectric focusing. The homogeneous enzyme was used to determine the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence. The enzyme was purified from cells grown in either fructose or limonoate as a carbon source. Limonoate dehydrogenase activity was higher in limonoate-grown cultures. Additionally, the enzyme preparations differed in their affinity for limonoids but not for NAD+. In all cases limonoate dehydrogenase exhibited a higher catalytic rate and stronger affinity for limonoate A-ring lactone than for disodium limonoate, the limonoid traditionally used for in vitro activity assays. Our data confirm previous reports proposing that limonoate A-ring lactone is the physiological substrate for limonoate dehydrogenase. The increase in limonoate dehydrogenase activity observed in limonoate-grown cultures appears to be caused by a rise in protein levels, since chloramphenicol prevented such an effect.

  15. Characterization of interactions of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase with its binding protein in the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yun-Hee; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2010-05-07

    Unlike pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes (PDCs) from prokaryotes, PDCs from higher eukaryotes have an additional structural component, E3-binding protein (BP), for binding of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) in the complex. Based on the 3D structure of the subcomplex of human (h) E3 with the di-domain (L3S1) of hBP, the amino acid residues (H348, D413, Y438, and R447) of hE3 for binding to hBP were substituted singly by alanine or other residues. These substitutions did not have large effects on hE3 activity when measured in its free form. However, when these hE3 mutants were reconstituted in the complex, the PDC activity was significantly reduced to 9% for Y438A, 20% for Y438H, and 18% for D413A. The binding of hE3 mutants with L3S1 determined by isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the binding affinities of the Y438A, Y438H, and D413A mutants to L3S1 were severely reduced (1019-, 607-, and 402-fold, respectively). Unlike wild-type hE3 the binding of the Y438A mutant to L3S1 was accompanied by an unfavorable enthalpy change and a large positive entropy change. These results indicate that hE3-Y438 and hE3-D413 play important roles in binding of hE3 to hBP.

  16. Involvement of Candida albicans pyruvate dehydrogenase complex protein X (Pdx1) in filamentation

    PubMed Central

    F.Vellucci, Vincent; Gygax, Scott; Hostetter, Margaret K.

    2007-01-01

    For 50 years, physiologic studies in Candida albicans have associated fermentation with filamentation and respiration with yeast morphology. Analysis of the mitochondrial proteome of a C. albicans NDH51 mutant, known to be defective in filamentation, identified increased expression of several proteins in the respiratory pathway. Most notable was a 15-fold increase in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex protein X (Pdx1), an essential component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. In basal salts medium with 100 mM glucose as carbon source, two independent pdx1 mutants displayed a filamentation defect identical to ndh51; reintegration of one PDX1 allele restored filamentation. Concentrations of glucose ≤100 mM did not correct the filamentation defect. Expanding on previous work, these studies suggest that increased expression of proteins extraneous to the electron transport chain compensates for defects in the respiratory pathway to maintain yeast morphology. Mitochondrial proteomics can aid in the identification of C. albicans genes not previously implicated in filamentation. PMID:17254815

  17. Cloning and characterization of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase encoding gene in Gracilaria/Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xueying, Ren; Zhenghong, Sui; Xuecheng, Zhang

    2006-04-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) plays important roles in various cellular processes. A cytosolic GAPDH encoding gene ( gpd) of Gracilaria/Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis was cloned and characterized. Deduced amino acid sequence of the enzyme of G. lemaneiformis had high homology with those of seven red algae. The 5'-untranslated regions of the GAPDHs encoding genes of these red algae varied greatly. GAPDHs of these red algae shared the highly conserved glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase active site ASCTTNCL. However, such active site of Cyanidium caldarium was different from those of the other six algae at the last two residues (CL to LF), thus the spatial structure of its GAPDH active center may be different from those of the other six. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that GAPDH of G. lemaneiformis might have undergone an evolution similar to those of Porphyra yezoensis, Chondrus crispus, and Gracilaria verrucosa. C. caldarium had a closer evolutionary relationship with Cyanidioschyzon merolae than with Cyanidium sp. Virtual Northern blot analysis revealed that gpd of G. lemaneiformis expressed constitutively, which suggested that it might be house-keeping and could be adapted as an inner control in gene expression analysis of G. lemaneiformis.

  18. Biochemical and structural characterization of the apicoplast dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Larissa M.; Biddau, Marco; Byron, Olwyn; Müller, Sylke

    2014-01-01

    PDC (pyruvate dehydrogenase complex) is a multi-enzyme complex comprising an E1 (pyruvate decarboxylase), an E2 (dihydrolipomide acetyltransferase) and an E3 (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase). PDC catalyses the decarboxylation of pyruvate and forms acetyl-CoA and NADH. In the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, the single PDC is located exclusively in the apicoplast. Plasmodium PDC is essential for parasite survival in the mosquito vector and for late liver stage development in the human host, suggesting its suitability as a target for intervention strategies against malaria. Here, PfaE3 (P. falciparum apicoplast E3) was recombinantly expressed and characterized. Biochemical parameters were comparable with those determined for E3 from other organisms. A homology model for PfaE3 reveals an extra anti-parallel β-strand at the position where human E3BP (E3-binding protein) interacts with E3; a parasite-specific feature that may be exploitable for drug discovery against PDC. To assess the biological role of Pfae3, it was deleted from P. falciparum and although the mutants are viable, they displayed a highly synchronous growth phenotype during intra-erythrocytic development. The mutants also showed changes in the expression of some mitochondrial and antioxidant proteins suggesting that deletion of Pfae3 impacts on the parasite's metabolic function with downstream effects on the parasite's redox homoeostasis and cell cycle. PMID:25387830

  19. 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and the brain: From zero to hero, a decade of progress

    PubMed Central

    Wyrwoll, Caitlin S.; Holmes, Megan C.; Seckl, Jonathan R.

    2011-01-01

    Glucocorticoids have profound effects on brain development and adult CNS function. Excess or insufficient glucocorticoids cause myriad abnormalities from development to ageing. The actions of glucocorticoids within cells are determined not only by blood steroid levels and target cell receptor density, but also by intracellular metabolism by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11β-HSD). 11β-HSD1 regenerates active glucocorticoids from their inactive 11-keto derivatives and is widely expressed throughout the adult CNS. Elevated hippocampal and neocortical 11β-HSD1 is observed with ageing and causes cognitive decline; its deficiency prevents the emergence of cognitive defects with age. Conversely, 11β-HSD2 is a dehydrogenase, inactivating glucocorticoids. The major central effects of 11β-HSD2 occur in development, as expression of 11β-HSD2 is high in fetal brain and placenta. Deficient feto-placental 11β-HSD2 results in a life-long phenotype of anxiety and cardiometabolic disorders, consistent with early life glucocorticoid programming. PMID:21144857

  20. Phosphorylation Status of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Distinguishes Metabolic Phenotypes of Cultured Rat Brain Astrocytes and Neurons

    PubMed Central

    HALIM, NADER D.; McFATE, THOMAS; MOHYELDIN, AHMED; OKAGAKI, PETER; KOROTCHKINA, LIOUBOV G; PATEL, MULCHAND S; JEOUNG, NAM HO; HARRIS, ROBERT A.; SCHELL, MICHAEL J.; VERMA, AJAY

    2010-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in nervous tissue has been proposed to occur in a compartmentalized manner with astrocytes contributing largely to glycolysis and neurons being the primary site of glucose oxidation. However, mammalian astrocytes and neurons both contain mitochondria and it remains unclear why in culture neurons oxidize glucose, lactate, and pyruvate to a much larger extent than astrocytes. The objective of this study was to determine whether pyruvate metabolism is differentially regulated in cultured neurons vs. astrocytes. Expression of all components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC), the rate-limiting step for pyruvate entry into the Krebs cycle, was determined in cultured astrocytes and neurons. In addition, regulation of PDC enzymatic activity in the two cell types via protein phosphorylation was examined. We show that all components of the PDC are expressed in both cell types in culture but that PDC activity is kept strongly inhibited in astrocytes through phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase alpha subunit (PDHα). In contrast, neuronal PDC operates close to maximal levels with much lower levels of phosphorlyated PDHα. Dephosphorylation of astrocytic PDHα restores PDC activity and lowers lactate production. Our findings suggest that the glucose metabolism of astrocytes and neurons may be far more flexible than previously believed. PMID:20544852

  1. Identification of a quinone dehydrogenase from a Bacillus sp. involved in the decolourization of the lignin-model dye, Azure B.

    PubMed

    Bandounas, Luaine; Pinkse, Martijn; de Winde, Johannes H; Ruijssenaars, Harald J

    2013-01-25

    In this study we have investigated the molecular background of the previously reported dye decolourization potential of Bacillus sp. LD003. Strain LD003 was previously isolated on Kraft lignin and was able to decolourize various lignin model dyes. Specifically Azure B (AB) was decolourized efficiently. Proteins possibly involved in AB decolourization were partially purified, fractionated by gel electrophoresis and identified via mass spectrometry. Five candidate enzymes were selected and expressed in Escherichia coli. Of these, only a quinone dehydrogenase was shown to decolourize AB. Thus, this quinone dehydrogenase was identified as an AB decolourizing enzyme of Bacillus sp. LD003.

  2. Radial immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis compared for identifying autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase in human serum.

    PubMed

    Harff, G A; Backer, E T

    1990-12-14

    Variant electrophoretic patterns of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes were studied. By radial immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis, immunoglobulin and light chain class of autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase were identified in nine sera: seven of these sera demonstrated IgG (5 lambda, 2 kappa) autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase, the other two demonstrated IgA (both kappa) autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase, the other two demonstrated IgA (both kappa) autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase. We conclude that radial immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis are equally effective for identifying auto-antibodies to lactate dehydrogenase in serum. Radial immunodiffusion, however, is easier to perform than immunoelectrophoresis.

  3. Crystal structure of homoisocitrate dehydrogenase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Bulfer, Stacie L.; Hendershot, Jenna M.; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2013-09-18

    Lysine biosynthesis in fungi, euglena, and certain archaebacteria occurs through the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway. Enzymes in the first steps of this pathway have been proposed as potential targets for the development of antifungal therapies, as they are absent in animals but are conserved in several pathogenic fungi species, including Candida, Cryptococcus, and Aspergillus. One potential antifungal target in the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway is the third enzyme in the pathway, homoisocitrate dehydrogenase (HICDH), which catalyzes the divalent metal-dependent conversion of homoisocitrate to 2-oxoadipate (2-OA) using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) as a cofactor. HICDH belogns to a family of {beta}-hydroxyacid oxidative decarboxylases that includes malate dehydrogenase, tartrate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), and 3-isopropylmalte dehydrogenase (IPMDH). ICDH and IPMDH are well-characterized enzymes that catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to yield 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) in the citric acid cycle and the conversion of 3-isopropylmalate to 2-oxoisovalerate in the leucine biosynthetic pathway, respectively. Recent structural and biochemical studies of HICDH reveal that this enzyme shares sequence, structural, and mechanistic homology with ICDH and IPMDH. To date, the only published structures of HICDH are from the archaebacteria Thermus thermophilus (TtHICDH). Fungal HICDHs diverge from TtHICDH in several aspects, including their thermal stability, oligomerization state, and substrate specificity, thus warranting further characterization. To gain insights into these differences, they determined crystal structures of a fungal Schizosaccharomyces pombe HICDH (SpHICDH) as an apoenzyme and as a binary complex with additive tripeptide glycyl-glycyl-glycine (GGG) to 1.55 {angstrom} and 1.85 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Finally, a comparison of the SpHICDH and TtHICDH structures reveal differences in

  4. Reversible inactivation of CO dehydrogenase with thiol compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kreß, Oliver; Gnida, Manuel; Pelzmann, Astrid M.; Marx, Christian; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Meyer, Ortwin

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Rather large thiols (e.g. coenzyme A) can reach the active site of CO dehydrogenase. • CO- and H{sub 2}-oxidizing activity of CO dehydrogenase is inhibited by thiols. • Inhibition by thiols was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. • Thiols coordinate the Cu ion in the [CuSMo(=O)OH] active site as a third ligand. - Abstract: Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CO dehydrogenase) from Oligotropha carboxidovorans is a structurally characterized member of the molybdenum hydroxylase enzyme family. It catalyzes the oxidation of CO (CO + H{sub 2}O → CO{sub 2} + 2e{sup −} + 2H{sup +}) which proceeds at a unique [CuSMo(=O)OH] metal cluster. Because of changing activities of CO dehydrogenase, particularly in subcellular fractions, we speculated whether the enzyme would be subject to regulation by thiols (RSH). Here we establish inhibition of CO dehydrogenase by thiols and report the corresponding K{sub i}-values (mM): L-cysteine (5.2), D-cysteine (9.7), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (8.2), D,L-homocysteine (25.8), L-cysteine–glycine (2.0), dithiothreitol (4.1), coenzyme A (8.3), and 2-mercaptoethanol (9.3). Inhibition of the enzyme was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of thiol-inhibited CO dehydrogenase revealed a bimetallic site in which the RSH coordinates to the Cu-ion as a third ligand ([Mo{sup VI}(=O)OH{sub (2)}SCu{sup I}(SR)S-Cys]) leaving the redox state of the Cu(I) and the Mo(VI) unchanged. Collectively, our findings establish a regulation of CO dehydrogenase activity by thiols in vitro. They also corroborate the hypothesis that CO interacts with the Cu-ion first. The result that thiol compounds much larger than CO can freely travel through the substrate channel leading to the bimetallic cluster challenges previous concepts involving chaperone function and is of importance for an understanding how the sulfuration step in

  5. The Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complexes: Structure-based Function and Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mulchand S.; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes (PDCs) from all known living organisms comprise three principal catalytic components for their mission: E1 and E2 generate acetyl-coenzyme A, whereas the FAD/NAD+-dependent E3 performs redox recycling. Here we compare bacterial (Escherichia coli) and human PDCs, as they represent the two major classes of the superfamily of 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes with different assembly of, and interactions among components. The human PDC is subject to inactivation at E1 by serine phosphorylation by four kinases, an inactivation reversed by the action of two phosphatases. Progress in our understanding of these complexes important in metabolism is reviewed. PMID:24798336

  6. Purification of xanthine dehydrogenase and sulfite oxidase from chicken liver.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, K; Brody, M S; Hille, R

    1996-05-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase and sulfite oxidase from chicken liver are oxomolybdenum enzymes which catalyze the oxidation of xanthine to uric acid and sulfite to sulfate, respectively. Independent purification protocols have been previously described for both enzymes. Here we describe a procedure by which xanthine dehydrogenase and sulfite oxidase are purified simultaneously from the same batch of fresh chicken liver. Also, unlike the protocols described earlier, this procedure avoids the use of acetone extraction as well as a heat step, thus minimizing damage to the molybdenum centers of the enzymes.

  7. The α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex in cancer metabolic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Vatrinet, Renaud; Leone, Giulia; De Luise, Monica; Girolimetti, Giulia; Vidone, Michele; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Porcelli, Anna Maria

    2017-01-01

    Deregulated metabolism is a well-established hallmark of cancer. At the hub of various metabolic pathways deeply integrated within mitochondrial functions, the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex represents a major modulator of electron transport chain activity and tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) flux, and is a pivotal enzyme in the metabolic reprogramming following a cancer cell's change in bioenergetic requirements. By contributing to the control of α-ketoglutarate levels, dynamics, and oxidation state, the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase is also essential in modulating the epigenetic landscape of cancer cells. In this review, we will discuss the manifold roles that this TCA enzyme and its substrate play in cancer.

  8. [Involvement of hydrogen peroxide in the regulation of coexpression of alternative oxidase and rotenone-insensitive NADH dehydrogenase in tomato leaves and calluses].

    PubMed

    Eprintsev, A T; Mal'tseva, E V; Shatskikh, A S; Popov, V N

    2011-01-01

    The involvement of active oxygen forms in the regulation of the expression of mitochondrial respiratory chain components, which are not related to energy storing, has been in vitro and in vivo studied in Lycopersicum esculentum L. The highest level of transcription of genes encoding alternative oxidase and NADH dehydrogenase has been observed in green tomato leaves. It has been shown that even low H2O2 concentrations activate both aoxlalpha and ndb1 genes, encoding alternative oxidase and external mitochondrial rotenone-insensitive NADH dehydrogenase, respectively. According to our results, in the case of an oxidative stress, alternative oxidase and NADH dehydrogenase are coexpressed in tomato plant tissues, and active oxygen forms serve as the secondary messengers of their coexpression.

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene from Penicillium expansum PE-12.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T; Qi, Z; Yu, Q S; Tang, K X

    2013-07-15

    Penicillium expansum produces large amounts of lipase, which is widely used in laundry detergent and leather industry. We isolated the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (PeGPD) from P. expansum PE-12 through reverse transcriptase PCR and 5'-3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE-PCR). The gene is 1266 bp long, including an ORF of 1014 bp, encoding a polypeptide chain of 337 amino acids. A phylogenetic tree based on GPD proteins showed that P. expansum is close to Aspergillus species, but comparatively distant from P. marneffei. Southern blot results revealed a single copy of PeGPD, and expression analysis gave evidence of high expression levels. PeGPD genes have potential for genetic engineering of P. expansum for industrial lipase production.

  10. Succinate Dehydrogenase Supports Metabolic Repurposing of Mitochondria to Drive Inflammatory Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mills, Evanna L; Kelly, Beth; Logan, Angela; Costa, Ana S H; Varma, Mukund; Bryant, Clare E; Tourlomousis, Panagiotis; Däbritz, J Henry M; Gottlieb, Eyal; Latorre, Isabel; Corr, Sinéad C; McManus, Gavin; Ryan, Dylan; Jacobs, Howard T; Szibor, Marten; Xavier, Ramnik J; Braun, Thomas; Frezza, Christian; Murphy, Michael P; O'Neill, Luke A

    2016-10-06

    Activated macrophages undergo metabolic reprogramming, which drives their pro-inflammatory phenotype, but the mechanistic basis for this remains obscure. Here, we demonstrate that upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, macrophages shift from producing ATP by oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis while also increasing succinate levels. We show that increased mitochondrial oxidation of succinate via succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and an elevation of mitochondrial membrane potential combine to drive mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. RNA sequencing reveals that this combination induces a pro-inflammatory gene expression profile, while an inhibitor of succinate oxidation, dimethyl malonate (DMM), promotes an anti-inflammatory outcome. Blocking ROS production with rotenone by uncoupling mitochondria or by expressing the alternative oxidase (AOX) inhibits this inflammatory phenotype, with AOX protecting mice from LPS lethality. The metabolic alterations that occur upon activation of macrophages therefore repurpose mitochondria from ATP synthesis to ROS production in order to promote a pro-inflammatory state.

  11. Characterization of an Arxula adeninivorans alcohol dehydrogenase involved in the metabolism of ethanol and 1-butanol.

    PubMed

    Kasprzak, Jakub; Rauter, Marion; Riechen, Jan; Worch, Sebastian; Baronian, Kim; Bode, Rüdiger; Schauer, Frieder; Kunze, Gotthard

    2016-05-01

    In this study, alcohol dehydrogenase 1 from Arxula adeninivorans (Aadh1p) was identified and characterized. Aadh1p showed activity with short and medium chain length primary alcohols in the forward reaction and their aldehydes in the reverse reaction. Aadh1p has 64% identity with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Adh1p, is localized in the cytoplasm and uses NAD(+) as cofactor. Gene expression analysis showed a low level increase in AADH1 gene expression with ethanol, pyruvate or xylose as the carbon source. Deletion of the AADH1 gene affects growth of the cells with 1-butanol, ethanol and glucose as the carbon source, and a strain which overexpressed the AADH1 gene metabolized 1-butanol more rapidly. An ADH activity assay indicated that Aadh1p is a major enzyme for the synthesis of ethanol and the degradation of 1-butanol in A. adeninivorans.

  12. Tyr-94 Phosphorylation Inhibits Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Phosphatase 1 and Promotes Tumor Growth*

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Changliang; Kang, Hee-Bum; Elf, Shannon; Xie, Jianxin; Gu, Ting-Lei; Aguiar, Mike; Lonning, Scott; Hitosugi, Taro; Chung, Tae-Wook; Arellano, Martha; Khoury, Hanna J.; Shin, Dong M.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Boggon, Titus J.; Fan, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Many cancer cells rely more on aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) than mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and catabolize glucose at a high rate. Such a metabolic switch is suggested to be due in part to functional attenuation of mitochondria in cancer cells. However, how oncogenic signals attenuate mitochondrial function and promote the switch to glycolysis remains unclear. We previously reported that tyrosine phosphorylation activates and inhibits mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) and phosphatase (PDP), respectively, leading to enhanced inhibitory serine phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and consequently inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) in cancer cells. In particular, Tyr-381 phosphorylation of PDP1 dissociates deacetylase SIRT3 and recruits acetyltransferase ACAT1 to PDC, resulting in increased inhibitory lysine acetylation of PDHA1 and PDP1. Here we report that phosphorylation at another tyrosine residue, Tyr-94, inhibits PDP1 by reducing the binding ability of PDP1 to lipoic acid, which is covalently attached to the L2 domain of dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase (E2) to recruit PDP1 to PDC. We found that multiple oncogenic tyrosine kinases directly phosphorylated PDP1 at Tyr-94, and Tyr-94 phosphorylation of PDP1 was common in diverse human cancer cells and primary leukemia cells from patients. Moreover, expression of a phosphorylation-deficient PDP1 Y94F mutant in cancer cells resulted in increased oxidative phosphorylation, decreased cell proliferation under hypoxia, and reduced tumor growth in mice. Together, our findings suggest that phosphorylation at different tyrosine residues inhibits PDP1 through independent mechanisms, which act in concert to regulate PDC activity and promote the Warburg effect. PMID:24962578

  13. A bacterial aromatic aldehyde dehydrogenase critical for the efficient catabolism of syringaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Naofumi; Goto, Takayuki; Takahashi, Kenji; Kasai, Daisuke; Otsuka, Yuichiro; Nakamura, Masaya; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao; Masai, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    Vanillin and syringaldehyde obtained from lignin are essential intermediates for the production of basic chemicals using microbial cell factories. However, in contrast to vanillin, the microbial conversion of syringaldehyde is poorly understood. Here, we identified an aromatic aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene responsible for syringaldehyde catabolism from 20 putative ALDH genes of Sphingobium sp. strain SYK-6. All these genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and nine gene products, including previously characterized BzaA, BzaB, and vanillin dehydrogenase (LigV), exhibited oxidation activities for syringaldehyde to produce syringate. Among these genes, SLG_28320 (desV) and ligV were most highly and constitutively transcribed in the SYK-6 cells. Disruption of desV in SYK-6 resulted in a significant reduction in growth on syringaldehyde and in syringaldehyde oxidation activity. Furthermore, a desV ligV double mutant almost completely lost its ability to grow on syringaldehyde. Purified DesV showed similar kcat/Km values for syringaldehyde (2100 s−1·mM−1) and vanillin (1700 s−1·mM−1), whereas LigV substantially preferred vanillin (8800 s−1·mM−1) over syringaldehyde (1.4 s−1·mM−1). These results clearly demonstrate that desV plays a major role in syringaldehyde catabolism. Phylogenetic analyses showed that DesV-like ALDHs formed a distinct phylogenetic cluster separated from the vanillin dehydrogenase cluster. PMID:28294121

  14. Physiological and fermentation properties of Bacillus coagulans and a mutant lacking fermentative lactate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Su, Yue; Rhee, Mun Su; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2011-03-01

    Bacillus coagulans, a sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, grows optimally at 50-55 °C and produces lactic acid as the primary fermentation product from both hexoses and pentoses. The amount of fungal cellulases required for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) at 55 °C was previously reported to be three to four times lower than for SSF at the optimum growth temperature for Saccharomyces cerevisiae of 35 °C. An ethanologenic B. coagulans is expected to lower the cellulase loading and production cost of cellulosic ethanol due to SSF at 55 °C. As a first step towards developing B. coagulans as an ethanologenic microbial biocatalyst, activity of the primary fermentation enzyme L-lactate dehydrogenase was removed by mutation (strain Suy27). Strain Suy27 produced ethanol as the main fermentation product from glucose during growth at pH 7.0 (0.33 g ethanol per g glucose fermented). Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) acting in series contributed to about 55% of the ethanol produced by this mutant while pyruvate formate lyase and ADH were responsible for the remainder. Due to the absence of PDH activity in B. coagulans during fermentative growth at pH 5.0, the l-ldh mutant failed to grow anaerobically at pH 5.0. Strain Suy27-13, a derivative of the l-ldh mutant strain Suy27, that produced PDH activity during anaerobic growth at pH 5.0 grew at this pH and also produced ethanol as the fermentation product (0.39 g per g glucose). These results show that construction of an ethanologenic B. coagulans requires optimal expression of PDH activity in addition to the removal of the LDH activity to support growth and ethanol production.

  15. A distinct type of alcohol dehydrogenase, adh4+, complements ethanol fermentation in an adh1-deficient strain of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Masao; Tohda, Hideki; Kumagai, Hiromichi; Giga-Hama, Yuko

    2004-03-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, only one alcohol dehydrogenase gene, adh1(+), has been identified. To elucidate the influence of adh1(+) on ethanol fermentation, we constructed the adh1 null strain (delta adh1). The delta adh1 cells still produced ethanol and grew fermentatively as the wild-type cells. Both DNA microarray and RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that this ethanol production is caused by the enhanced expression of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADH4-like gene product (SPAC5H10.06C named adh4(+)). Since the strain lacking both adh1 and adh4 genes (delta adh1 delta adh4) showed non-fermentative retarded growth, only these two ADHs produce ethanol for fermentative growth. This is the first observation that a S. cerevisiae ADH4-like alcohol dehydrogenase functions in yeast ethanol fermentation.

  16. Differential energetic metabolism during Trypanosoma cruzi differentiation. I. Citrate synthase, NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Adroher, F J; Osuna, A; Lupiañez, J A

    1988-11-15

    The activities of the mitochondrial enzymes citrate synthase (citrate oxaloacetatelyase, EC 4.1.3.7), NADP-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase (threo-Ds-isocitrate:NADP+ oxidoreductase (decarboxylating), EC 1.1.1.42), and succinate dehydrogenase (succinate: FAD oxidoreductase, EC 1.3.99.1) as well as their kinetic behavior in the two developmental forms of Trypanosoma cruzi at insect vector stage, epimastigotes and infective metacyclic trypomastigotes, were studied. The results presented in this work clearly demonstrate a higher mitochondrial metabolism in the metacyclic forms as is shown by the extraordinary enhanced activities of metacyclic citrate synthase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase. In epimastigotes, the specific activities of citrate synthase at variable concentrations of oxalacetate and acetyl-CoA were 24.6 and 26.6 mU/mg of protein, respectively, and the Michaelis constants were 7.88 and 6.84 microM for both substrates. The metacyclic enzyme exhibited the following kinetic parameters: a specific activity of 228.4 mU/mg and Km of 3.18 microM for oxalacetate and 248.5 mU/mg and 2.75 microM, respectively, for acetyl-CoA. NADP-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase specific activities for epimastigotes and metacyclics were 110.2 and 210.3 mU/mg, whereas the apparent Km's were 47.9 and 12.5 microM, respectively. No activity for the NAD-dependent isozyme was found in any form of T. cruzi differentiation. The particulated succinate dehydrogenase showed specific activities of 8.2 and 39.1 mU/mg for epimastigotes and metacyclic trypomastigotes, respectively, although no significant changes in the Km (0.46 and 0.48 mM) were found. The cellular role and the molecular mechanism that probably take place during this significant shift in the mitochondrial metabolism during the T. cruzi differentiation have been discussed.

  17. 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase is upregulated by hydroxychloroquine in rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Jae; Lee, Sora; Lee, Haw-Yong; Won, Hansol; Chang, Sung-Hae; Nah, Seong-Su

    2015-09-01

    15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD) is the key enzyme responsible for the metabolic inactivation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) catabolism. PGE2 is one of the predominant catabolic factors involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the expression and regulation of HPGD in RA fibroblast‑like synoviocyte (FLS) remain to be elucidated. Disease‑modifying anti‑rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are the most important anti‑arthritic drugs, which reduce the effect of joint injury. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of HPGD in RA tissues and cells, and normal synovial tissues and cells. The effect of the most popular DMARDs, hydroxychloroquine, on the expression of HPGD in RA‑FLS was also investigated. Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the expression levels of HPGD in human synovium were lower in RA synovium compared with the normal and OA synovium. In RA‑FLS, the expression of HPGD was increased following treatment with several DMARDs, including sulfasalazine, methotrexate, and hydroxychloroquine. Hydroxychloroquine (10 µM) treatment induced the phosphorylation of ERK, SAPK/JNK and p38. Hydroxychloroquine induced a decrease in the release of PGE2, which was restored by mitogen‑activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway inhibitors. Hydroxychloroquine may therefore, affect the pathogenesis of RA through the MAP kinase pathway by regulating the expression of HPGD.

  18. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase is upregulated by hydroxychloroquine in rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes

    PubMed Central

    KIM, HAK-JAE; LEE, SORA; LEE, HAW-YONG; WON, HANSOL; CHANG, SUNG-HAE; NAH, SEONG-SU

    2015-01-01

    15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD) is the key enzyme responsible for the metabolic inactivation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) catabolism. PGE2 is one of the predominant catabolic factors involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the expression and regulation of HPGD in RA fibroblast-like synoviocyte (FLS) remain to be elucidated. Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are the most important anti-arthritic drugs, which reduce the effect of joint injury. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of HPGD in RA tissues and cells, and normal synovial tissues and cells. The effect of the most popular DMARDs, hydroxychloroquine, on the expression of HPGD in RA-FLS was also investigated. Western blotting and immuno-histochemical analysis demonstrated that the expression levels of HPGD in human synovium were lower in RA synovium compared with the normal and OA synovium. In RA-FLS, the expression of HPGD was increased following treatment with several DMARDs, including sulfasalazine, methotrexate, and hydroxychloroquine. Hydroxychloroquine (10 µM) treatment induced the phosphorylation of ERK, SAPK/JNK and p38. Hydroxychloroquine induced a decrease in the release of PGE2, which was restored by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway inhibitors. Hydroxychloroquine may therefore, affect the pathogenesis of RA through the MAP kinase pathway by regulating the expression of HPGD. PMID:26082314

  19. Cloning and functional characterization of ACAD-9, a novel member of human acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Weiping; Zou, Dajin; Chen, Guoyou; Wan, Tao; Zhang, Minghui; Cao, Xuetao

    2002-10-04

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenases (ACADs) are a family of mitochondrial enzymes catalyzing the initial rate-limiting step in the beta-oxidation of fatty acyl-CoA. The reaction provides main source of energy for human heart and skeletal muscle. Eight human ACADs have been described. Deficiency of these enzymes, especially very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD), usually leads to severe human organic diseases, such as sudden death in infancy, infantile cardiomyopathy (CM), hypoketotic hypoglycemia, or hepatic dysfunction. By large-scale random sequencing, we identified a novel homolog of ACADs from human dendritic cell (DC) cDNA library. It contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 1866bp, which encodes a 621 amino acid protein. It shares approximately 47% amino acid identity and 65% similarity with human VLCAD. So, the novel molecule is named as acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-9 (ACAD-9), the ninth member of ACADs. The new gene consists of 18 exons and 17 introns, and is mapped to chromosome 3q26. It contains the two signatures shared by all members of the ACADs. ACAD-9 mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in most normal human tissues and cancer cell lines with high level of expression in heart, skeletal muscles, brain, kidney, and liver. Enzymatic assay proved that the recombinant ACAD-9 protein has the dehydrogenase activity on palmitoyl-coenzyme A (C16:0) and stearoyl-coenzyme A (C18:0). Our results indicate that ACAD-9 is a novel member of ACADs.

  20. Reconstruction of an Acetogenic 2,3-Butanediol Pathway Involving a Novel NADPH-Dependent Primary-Secondary Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Köpke, Michael; Gerth, Monica L.; Maddock, Danielle J.; Mueller, Alexander P.; Liew, FungMin

    2014-01-01

    Acetogenic bacteria use CO and/or CO2 plus H2 as their sole carbon and energy sources. Fermentation processes with these organisms hold promise for producing chemicals and biofuels from abundant waste gas feedstocks while simultaneously reducing industrial greenhouse gas emissions. The acetogen Clostridium autoethanogenum is known to synthesize the pyruvate-derived metabolites lactate and 2,3-butanediol during gas fermentation. Industrially, 2,3-butanediol is valuable for chemical production. Here we identify and characterize the C. autoethanogenum enzymes for lactate and 2,3-butanediol biosynthesis. The putative C. autoethanogenum lactate dehydrogenase was active when expressed in Escherichia coli. The 2,3-butanediol pathway was reconstituted in E. coli by cloning and expressing the candidate genes for acetolactate synthase, acetolactate decarboxylase, and 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase. Under anaerobic conditions, the resulting E. coli strain produced 1.1 ± 0.2 mM 2R,3R-butanediol (23 μM h−1 optical density unit−1), which is comparable to the level produced by C. autoethanogenum during growth on CO-containing waste gases. In addition to the 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase, we identified a strictly NADPH-dependent primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (CaADH) that could reduce acetoin to 2,3-butanediol. Detailed kinetic analysis revealed that CaADH accepts a range of 2-, 3-, and 4-carbon substrates, including the nonphysiological ketones acetone and butanone. The high activity of CaADH toward acetone led us to predict, and confirm experimentally, that C. autoethanogenum can act as a whole-cell biocatalyst for converting exogenous acetone to isopropanol. Together, our results functionally validate the 2,3-butanediol pathway from C. autoethanogenum, identify CaADH as a target for further engineering, and demonstrate the potential of C. autoethanogenum as a platform for sustainable chemical production. PMID:24657865

  1. Phanerochaete chrysosporium Cellobiohydrolase and Cellobiose Dehydrogenase Transcripts in Wood

    PubMed Central

    Vallim, Marcelo A.; Janse, Bernard J. H.; Gaskell, Jill; Pizzirani-Kleiner, Aline A.; Cullen, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    The transcripts of structurally related cellobiohydrolase genes in Phanerochaete chrysosporium-colonized wood chips were quantified. The transcript patterns obtained were dramatically different from the transcript patterns obtained previously in defined media. Cellobiose dehydrogenase transcripts were also detected, which is consistent with the hypothesis that such transcripts play an important role in cellulose degradation. PMID:9572973

  2. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system. 866.5560 Section 866.5560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... blood cells), myocardial infarction (heart disease), and some forms of leukemia (cancer of the...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system. 866.5560 Section 866.5560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... blood cells), myocardial infarction (heart disease), and some forms of leukemia (cancer of the...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... step that metabolizes groups of fats called medium-chain fatty acids and short-chain fatty acids. Mutations in the HADH gene lead ... a shortage of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Medium-chain and short-chain fatty acids cannot be metabolized ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: 2-methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... down proteins from food into smaller parts called amino acids. Amino acids can be further processed to provide energy for ... methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency cannot process a particular amino acid called isoleucine. Most cases of 2-methylbutyryl-CoA ...

  6. Distribution of the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex in Developing Soybean Cotyledons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The somewhat surprising report that storage proteins and oil are non-uniformly distributed in the cotyledons of developing soybeans prompted us to determine the spatial distribution of the mitochondrial and plastidial forms of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). It has been proposed that pla...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1420 - Isocitric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... test system is a device intended to measure the activity of the enzyme isocitric dehydrogenase in serum... disease such as viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, or acute inflammation of the biliary tract; pulmonary disease...), and diseases associated with pregnancy. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device...

  8. Efficiency of superoxide anions in the inactivation of selected dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2010-09-01

    The most ubiquitous of the primary reactive oxygen species, formed in all aerobes, is the superoxide free radical. It is believed that the superoxide anion radical shows low reactivity and in oxidative stress it is regarded mainly as an initiator of more reactive species such as rad OH and ONOO -. In this paper, the effectiveness of inactivation of selected enzymes by radiation-generated superoxide radicals in comparison with the effectiveness of the other products of water radiolysis is examined. We investigate three enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We show that the direct contribution of the superoxide anion radical to GAPDH and ADH inactivation is significant. The effectiveness of the superoxide anion in the inactivation of GAPDH and ADG was only 2.4 and 2.8 times smaller, respectively, in comparison with hydroxyl radical. LDH was practically not inactivated by the superoxide anion. Despite the fact that the studied dehydrogenases belong to the same class of enzymes (oxidoreductases), all have a similar molecular weight and are tetramers, their susceptibility to free-radical damage varies. The differences in the radiosensitivity of the enzymes are not determined by the basic structural parameters analyzed. A significant role in inactivation susceptibility is played by the type of amino acid residues and their localization within enzyme molecules.

  9. NADP+-Preferring d-Lactate Dehydrogenase from Sporolactobacillus inulinus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lingfeng; Xu, Xiaoling; Wang, Limin; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxy acid dehydrogenases, including l- and d-lactate dehydrogenases (L-LDH and D-LDH), are responsible for the stereospecific conversion of 2-keto acids to 2-hydroxyacids and extensively used in a wide range of biotechnological applications. A common feature of LDHs is their high specificity for NAD+ as a cofactor. An LDH that could effectively use NADPH as a coenzyme could be an alternative enzymatic system for regeneration of the oxidized, phosphorylated cofactor. In this study, a d-lactate dehydrogenase from a Sporolactobacillus inulinus strain was found to use both NADH and NADPH with high efficiencies and with a preference for NADPH as its coenzyme, which is different from the coenzyme utilization of all previously reported LDHs. The biochemical properties of the D-LDH enzyme were determined by X-ray crystal structural characterization and in vivo and in vitro enzymatic activity analyses. The residue Asn174 was demonstrated to be critical for NADPH utilization. Characterization of the biochemical properties of this enzyme will contribute to understanding of the catalytic mechanism and provide referential information for shifting the coenzyme utilization specificity of 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases. PMID:26150461

  10. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme...

  11. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme...

  12. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme...

  13. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme...

  14. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... hemolytic anemia associated with a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. This generic device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An...

  15. Glutamate dehydrogenases: the why and how of coenzyme specificity.

    PubMed

    Engel, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    NAD(+) and NADP(+), chemically similar and with almost identical standard oxidation-reduction potentials, nevertheless have distinct roles, NAD(+) serving catabolism and ATP generation whereas NADPH is the biosynthetic reductant. Separating these roles requires strict specificity for one or the other coenzyme for most dehydrogenases. In many organisms this holds also for glutamate dehydrogenases (GDH), NAD(+)-dependent for glutamate oxidation, NADP(+)-dependent for fixing ammonia. In higher animals, however, GDH has dual specificity. It has been suggested that GDH in mitochondria reacts only with NADP(H), the NAD(+) reaction being an in vitro artefact. However, contrary evidence suggests mitochondrial GDH not only reacts with NAD(+) but maintains equilibrium using the same pool as accessed by β-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase. Another complication is the presence of an energy-linked dehydrogenase driving NADP(+) reduction by NADH, maintaining the coenzyme pools at different oxidation-reduction potentials. Its coexistence with GDH makes possible a futile cycle, control of which is not yet properly explained. Structural studies show NAD(+)-dependent, NADP(+)-dependent and dual-specificity GDHs are closely related and a few site-directed mutations can reverse specificity. Specificity for NAD(+) or for NADP(+) has probably emerged repeatedly during evolution, using different structural solutions on different occasions. In various GDHs the P7 position in the coenzyme-binding domain plays a key role. However, whereas in other dehydrogenases an acidic P7 residue usually hydrogen bonds to the 2'- and 3'-hydroxyls, dictating NAD(+) specificity, among GDHs, depending on detailed conformation of surrounding residues, an acidic P7 may permit binding of NAD(+) only, NADP(+) only, or in higher animals both.

  16. Spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity in forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błońska, Ewa; Lasota, Jarosław

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity (DH) in forest soils using geostatistics. We have studied variability soil dehydrogenase and their relationship with variability of some physic-chemical properties. Two study areas (A and B) were set up in southern Poland in the Zlotoryja Forest District. Study areas were covered by different types of vegetation (A- broadleaf forest with beech, ash and sycamore), B- coniferous forest with Norway spruce). The soils were classified as Dystric Cambisols (WRB 2006). The samples for laboratory testing were collected from 49 places on each areas. 15 cm of surface horizon of soil were taken (with previously removed litter). Dehydrogenase activity was marked with Lenhard's method according to the Casida procedure. Soil pH, nitrogen (N) and soil organic carbon (C) content (by LECO CNS 2000 carbon analyzer) was marked. C/N ratio was calculated. Particle size composition was determined using laser diffraction. Statistical analysis were performed using STATISTICA 10 software. Geostatistical analysis and mapping were done by application of GS 9+ (Gamma Design) and Surfer 11 (Golden Software). The activity of DH ranged between 5,02 and 71,20 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1 on the A area and between 0,94 and 16,47 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1. Differences in spatial variability of the analised features were noted. The variability of dehydrogenase activity on the A study area was described by an exponential model, whereas on the B study area the spatial correlation has not been noted. The relationship of dehydrogenase activity with the remaining parameters of soil was noted only in the case of A study area. The variability of organic carbon content on the A and B study areas were described by an exponential model. The variability of nitrogen content on both areas were described by an spherical model.

  17. Molecular genetics and pathophysiology of 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, S.; Geissler, W.M.; Wu, L.

    1996-01-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in the 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 gene impair the formation of testosterone in the fetal testis and give rise to genetic males with female external genitalia. Such individuals are usually raised as females, but virilize at the time of expected puberty as the result of increases in serum testosterone. Here we describe mutations in 12 additional subjects/families with this disorder. The 14 mutations characterized to date include 10 missense mutations, 3 splice junction abnormalities, and 1 small deletion that results in a frame shift. Three of these mutations have occurred in more than 1 family. Complementary DNAs incorporating 9 of the 10 missense mutations have been constructed and expressed in reporter cells; 8 of the 9 missense mutations cause almost complete loss of enzymatic activity. In 2 subjects with loss of function, missense mutations testosterone levels in testicular venous blood were very low. Considered together, these findings strongly suggest that the common mechanism for testosterone formation in postpubertal subjects with this disorder is the conversion of circulating androstenedione to testosterone by one or more of the unaffected 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase isoenzymes. 29 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Transformation of Neurospora crassa with the cloned am (glutamate dehydrogenase) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kinsey, J A; Rambosek, J A

    1984-01-01

    We used DNA containing the am gene of Neurospora crassa, cloned in the lambda replacement vector lambdaL-47 (this clone is designated lambdaC-10), and plasmid vector subclones of this DNA to transform am deletion and point mutant strains. By means of subcloning, all sequences required for transformation to am prototrophy and expression of glutamate dehydrogenase have been shown to reside on a 2.5-kilobase BamHI fragment. We also characterized several am+ strains that were obtained after transformation with lambdaC-10. These strains showed Mendelian segregation of the am+ gene, although less than 50% of the transformed strains showed the normal linkage relationship of am with inl. In all cases tested, the strains had incorporated lambda DNA as well. The lambda DNA also showed a Mendelian segregation pattern. In one case, the incorporation of am DNA in a novel position was associated with a mutagenic event producing a strain with a very tight colonial morphology. In all cases in which the am+ gene had become the resident of a new chromosome, glutamate dehydrogenase was produced to only 10 to 20% of the wild-type levels. Images PMID:6230518

  19. p53 negatively regulates transcription of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase Pdk2.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Tanupriya; Harris, Chris R

    2012-01-15

    In cancer cells, the aberrant conversion of pyruvate into lactate instead of acetyl-CoA in the presence of oxygen is known as the Warburg effect. The consequences and mechanisms of this metabolic peculiarity are incompletely understood. Here we report that p53 status is a key determinant of the Warburg effect. Wild-type p53 expression decreased levels of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-2 (Pdk2) and the product of its activity, the inactive form of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (P-Pdc), both of which are key regulators of pyruvate metabolism. Decreased levels of Pdk2 and P-Pdc in turn promoted conversion of pyruvate into acetyl-CoA instead of lactate. Thus, wild-type p53 limited lactate production in cancer cells unless Pdk2 could be elevated. Together, our results established that wild-type p53 prevents manifestation of the Warburg effect by controlling Pdk2. These findings elucidate a new mechanism by which p53 suppresses tumorigenesis acting at the level of cancer cell metabolism.

  20. Identification of Small-Molecule Inhibitors against Meso-2, 6-Diaminopimelate Dehydrogenase from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Victoria N.; Parikh, Hardik I.; El-rami, Fadi; Ge, Xiuchun; Chen, Weihau; Zhang, Yan; Kellogg, Glen E.; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Species-specific antimicrobial therapy has the potential to combat the increasing threat of antibiotic resistance and alteration of the human microbiome. We therefore set out to demonstrate the beginning of a pathogen-selective drug discovery method using the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis as a model. Through our knowledge of metabolic networks and essential genes we identified a “druggable” essential target, meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase, which is found in a limited number of species. We adopted a high-throughput virtual screen method on the ZINC chemical library to select a group of potential small-molecule inhibitors. Meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase from P. gingivalis was first expressed and purified in Escherichia coli then characterized for enzymatic inhibitor screening studies. Several inhibitors with similar structural scaffolds containing a sulfonamide core and aromatic substituents showed dose-dependent inhibition. These compounds were further assayed showing reasonable whole-cell activity and the inhibition mechanism was determined. We conclude that the establishment of this target and screening strategy provides a model for the future development of new antimicrobials. PMID:26544875

  1. P450BM3 fused to phosphite dehydrogenase allows phosphite-driven selective oxidations.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Nina; Kulig, Justyna K; Bartsch, Anette; Hayes, Martin A; Janssen, Dick B; Fraaije, Marco W

    2017-03-01

    To facilitate the wider application of the NADPH-dependent P450BM3, we fused the monooxygenase with a phosphite dehydrogenase (PTDH). The resulting monooxygenase-dehydrogenase fusion enzyme acts as a self-sufficient bifunctional catalyst, accepting phosphite as a cheap electron donor for the regeneration of NADPH.The well-expressed fusion enzyme was purified and analyzed in comparison to the parent enzymes. Using lauric acid as substrate for P450BM3, it was found that the fusion enzyme had similar substrate affinity and hydroxylation selectivity while it displayed a significantly higher activity than the non-fused monooxygenase. Phosphite-driven conversions of lauric acid at restricted NADPH concentrations confirmed multiple turnovers of the cofactor. Interestingly, both the fusion enzyme and the native P450BM3 displayed enzyme concentration dependent activity and the fused enzyme reached optimal activity at a lower enzyme concentration. This suggests that the fusion enzyme has an improved tendency to form functional oligomers.To explore the constructed phosphite-driven P450BM3 as a biocatalyst, conversions of the drug compounds omeprazole and rosiglitazone were performed. PTDH-P450BM3 driven by phosphite was found to be more efficient in terms of total turnover when compared with P450BM3 driven by NADPH. The results suggest that PTDH-P450BM3 is an attractive system for use in biocatalytic and drug metabolism studies.

  2. Multiple Independent Fusions of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase with Enzymes in the Pentose Phosphate Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Nicholas A.; Dixon, Thomas A.; Cavalcanti, Andre R. O.

    2011-01-01

    Fusions of the first two enzymes in the pentose phosphate pathway, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconolactonase (6PGL), have been previously described in two distant clades, chordates and species of the malarial parasite Plasmodium. We have analyzed genome and expressed sequence data from a variety of organisms to identify the origins of these gene fusion events. Based on the orientation of the domains and range of species in which homologs can be found, the fusions appear to have occurred independently, near the base of the metazoan and apicomplexan lineages. Only one of the two metazoan paralogs of G6PD is fused, showing that the fusion occurred after a duplication event, which we have traced back to an ancestor of choanoflagellates and metazoans. The Plasmodium genes are known to contain a functionally important insertion that is not seen in the other apicomplexan fusions, highlighting this as a unique characteristic of this group. Surprisingly, our search revealed two additional fusion events, one that combined 6PGL and G6PD in an ancestor of the protozoan parasites Trichomonas and Giardia, and another fusing G6PD with phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) in a species of diatoms. This study extends the range of species known to contain fusions in the pentose phosphate pathway to many new medically and economically important organisms. PMID:21829610

  3. Tyr-301 Phosphorylation Inhibits Pyruvate Dehydrogenase by Blocking Substrate Binding and Promotes the Warburg Effect*

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jun; Kang, Hee-Bum; Shan, Changliang; Elf, Shannon; Lin, Ruiting; Xie, Jianxin; Gu, Ting-Lei; Aguiar, Mike; Lonning, Scott; Chung, Tae-Wook; Arellano, Martha; Khoury, Hanna J.; Shin, Dong M.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Boggon, Titus J.; Kang, Sumin; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) plays a crucial role in regulation of glucose homoeostasis in mammalian cells. PDC flux depends on catalytic activity of the most important enzyme component pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). PDH kinase inactivates PDC by phosphorylating PDH at specific serine residues, including Ser-293, whereas dephosphorylation of PDH by PDH phosphatase restores PDC activity. The current understanding suggests that Ser-293 phosphorylation of PDH impedes active site accessibility to its substrate pyruvate. Here, we report that phosphorylation of a tyrosine residue Tyr-301 also inhibits PDH α 1 (PDHA1) by blocking pyruvate binding through a novel mechanism in addition to Ser-293 phosphorylation. In addition, we found that multiple oncogenic tyrosine kinases directly phosphorylate PDHA1 at Tyr-301, and Tyr-301 phosphorylation of PDHA1 is common in EGF-stimulated cells as well as diverse human cancer cells and primary leukemia cells from human patients. Moreover, expression of a phosphorylation-deficient PDHA1 Y301F mutant in cancer cells resulted in increased oxidative phosphorylation, decreased cell proliferation under hypoxia, and reduced tumor growth in mice. Together, our findings suggest that phosphorylation at distinct serine and tyrosine residues inhibits PDHA1 through distinct mechanisms to impact active site accessibility, which act in concert to regulate PDC activity and promote the Warburg effect. PMID:25104357

  4. Tyr-301 phosphorylation inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase by blocking substrate binding and promotes the Warburg effect.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jun; Kang, Hee-Bum; Shan, Changliang; Elf, Shannon; Lin, Ruiting; Xie, Jianxin; Gu, Ting-Lei; Aguiar, Mike; Lonning, Scott; Chung, Tae-Wook; Arellano, Martha; Khoury, Hanna J; Shin, Dong M; Khuri, Fadlo R; Boggon, Titus J; Kang, Sumin; Chen, Jing

    2014-09-19

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) plays a crucial role in regulation of glucose homoeostasis in mammalian cells. PDC flux depends on catalytic activity of the most important enzyme component pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). PDH kinase inactivates PDC by phosphorylating PDH at specific serine residues, including Ser-293, whereas dephosphorylation of PDH by PDH phosphatase restores PDC activity. The current understanding suggests that Ser-293 phosphorylation of PDH impedes active site accessibility to its substrate pyruvate. Here, we report that phosphorylation of a tyrosine residue Tyr-301 also inhibits PDH α 1 (PDHA1) by blocking pyruvate binding through a novel mechanism in addition to Ser-293 phosphorylation. In addition, we found that multiple oncogenic tyrosine kinases directly phosphorylate PDHA1 at Tyr-301, and Tyr-301 phosphorylation of PDHA1 is common in EGF-stimulated cells as well as diverse human cancer cells and primary leukemia cells from human patients. Moreover, expression of a phosphorylation-deficient PDHA1 Y301F mutant in cancer cells resulted in increased oxidative phosphorylation, decreased cell proliferation under hypoxia, and reduced tumor growth in mice. Together, our findings suggest that phosphorylation at distinct serine and tyrosine residues inhibits PDHA1 through distinct mechanisms to impact active site accessibility, which act in concert to regulate PDC activity and promote the Warburg effect.

  5. Lactate dehydrogenase is the key enzyme for pneumococcal pyruvate metabolism and pneumococcal survival in blood.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Paula; Al-Bayati, Firas A Y; Andrew, Peter W; Neves, Ana Rute; Yesilkaya, Hasan

    2014-12-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a fermentative microorganism and causes serious diseases in humans, including otitis media, bacteremia, meningitis, and pneumonia. However, the mechanisms enabling pneumococcal survival in the host and causing disease in different tissues are incompletely understood. The available evidence indicates a strong link between the central metabolism and pneumococcal virulence. To further our knowledge on pneumococcal virulence, we investigated the role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), which converts pyruvate to lactate and is an essential enzyme for redox balance, in the pneumococcal central metabolism and virulence using an isogenic ldh mutant. Loss of LDH led to a dramatic reduction of the growth rate, pinpointing the key role of this enzyme in fermentative metabolism. The pattern of end products was altered, and lactate production was totally blocked. The fermentation profile was confirmed by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of glucose metabolism in nongrowing cell suspensions of the ldh mutant. In this strain, a bottleneck in the fermentative steps is evident from the accumulation of pyruvate, revealing LDH as the most efficient enzyme in pyruvate conversion. An increase in ethanol production was also observed, indicating that in the absence of LDH the redox balance is maintained through alcohol dehydrogenase activity. We also found that the absence of LDH renders the pneumococci avirulent after intravenous infection and leads to a significant reduction in virulence in a model of pneumonia that develops after intranasal infection, likely due to a decrease in energy generation and virulence gene expression.

  6. Inactivation of 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase 2 delays zebrafish erythroid maturation by conferring premature mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Davuluri, Gangarao; Song, Ping; Liu, Zhuoming; Wald, David; Sakaguchi, Takuya F.; Devireddy, L.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are the site of iron utilization, wherein imported iron is incorporated into heme or iron–sulfur clusters. Previously, we showed that a cytosolic siderophore, which resembles a bacterial siderophore, facilitates mitochondrial iron import in eukaryotes, including zebrafish. An evolutionarily conserved 3-hydroxy butyrate dehydrogenase, 3-hydroxy butyrate dehydrogenase 2 (Bdh2), catalyzes a rate-limiting step in the biogenesis of the eukaryotic siderophore. We found that inactivation of bdh2 in developing zebrafish embryo results in heme deficiency and delays erythroid maturation. The basis for this erythroid maturation defect is not known. Here we show that bdh2 inactivation results in mitochondrial dysfunction and triggers their degradation by mitophagy. Thus, mitochondria are prematurely lost in bdh2-inactivated erythrocytes. Interestingly, bdh2-inactivated erythroid cells also exhibit genomic alterations as indicated by transcriptome analysis. Reestablishment of bdh2 restores mitochondrial function, prevents premature mitochondrial degradation, promotes erythroid development, and reverses altered gene expression. Thus, mitochondrial communication with the nucleus is critical for erythroid development. PMID:26929344

  7. Retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 1 regulates a thermogenic program in white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Florian W; Vernochet, Cecile; O’Brien, Patrick; Spoerl, Steffen; Brown, Jonathan D; Nallamshetty, Shriram; Zeyda, Maximilian; Stulnig, Thomas M; Cohen, David E; Kahn, C Ronald; Plutzky, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Promoting brown adipose tissue (BAT) formation and function may reduce obesity. Recent data link retinoids to energy balance, but a specific role for retinoid metabolism in white versus brown fat is unknown. Retinaldehyde dehydrogenases (Aldhs), also known as aldehyde dehydrogenases, are rate-limiting enzymes that convert retinaldehyde (Rald) to retinoic acid. Here we show that Aldh1a1 is expressed predominately in white adipose tissue (WAT), including visceral depots in mice and humans. Deficiency of the Aldh1a1 gene induced a BAT-like transcriptional program in WAT that drove uncoupled respiration and adaptive thermogenesis. WAT-selective Aldh1a1 knockdown conferred this BAT program in obese mice, limiting weight gain and improving glucose homeostasis. Rald induced uncoupling protein-1 (Ucp1) mRNA and protein levels in white adipocytes by selectively activating the retinoic acid receptor (RAR), recruiting the coactivator PGC-1α and inducing Ucp1 promoter activity. These data establish Aldh1a1 and its substrate Rald as previously unrecognized determinants of adipocyte plasticity and adaptive thermogenesis, which may have potential therapeutic implications. PMID:22561685

  8. Properties and evolution of an alcohol dehydrogenase from the Crenarchaeota Pyrobaculum aerophilum.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Annalisa; Rosso, Francesco; Barbarisi, Alfonso; Labella, Tullio; D'Auria, Sabato

    2010-08-01

    The gene encoding a novel alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) that belongs to the medium chain dehydrogenase/reductase (MDR) superfamily was identified in the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrobaculum aerophilum. The P. aerophilum ADH gene (Pae2687) was over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and the protein (PyAeADHII) was purified to homogeneity and characterized. The PyAeADHII belongs to a medium chain class because its monomer size is 330 residues and even if it is structurally similar to other enzymes belonging to MDR superfamily, it lacks key residues involved in the coordination of the catalytic Zn ion and in the binding of alcoholic substrates typical of other ADHs. Consistently, PyAeADHII does not show activity on a large number of alcohols, aldheydes or ketones. It is active only when alpha-tetralone is used as a substrate. The enzyme has a strict requirement for NADP(H) as the coenzyme and has remarkable thermophilicity, displaying activity at temperatures up to 95 degrees C. The study of the metabolic pathways of P. aerophilum can provide information on the evolution of genes and enzymes and may be crucial for understanding the evolution of eukaryotic cells.

  9. Identification and characterization of inosine 5-monophosphate dehydrogenase in Streptococcus suis type 2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-han; He, Kong-wang; Duan, Zhi-tao; Zhou, Jun-ming; Yu, Zheng-yu; Ni, Yan-xiu; Lu, Cheng-ping

    2009-11-01

    Streptococcus suis type 2 is a swine pathogen responsible for diverse diseases. Although many virulent factors have been identified and studied, relatively little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms of type 2. The aim of the study was to identify and understand the characterization of Inosine 5-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). A 957-bp gene, impdh, was identified in the virulent S. suis serotype 2 (SS2), and analysis of the predicted IMPDH sequence revealed IMP dehydrogenase/GMP reductase domain. The gene encoding for the IMPDH of S. suis was cloned and sequenced. The DNA sequence contained an open reading frame encoding for a 318 amino acid polypeptide exhibiting 23% sequence identity with the IMPDH from Streptococcus pyogenes (YP281355) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (ZP00404150). Using the pET(32) expression plasmid, the impdh gene was inducibly overexpressed in Escherichia coli to produce IMPDH with a hexahistidyl N-terminus to permit its purification. The (His)6 IMPDH protein was found to possess functional IMPDH enzymatic activity after the purification. The impdh-knockout SS2 mutant ( Delta IMPDH) constructed in this study was slower in growth and one pH unit higher than SS2-H after 6 h of culturing, and found to be attenuated in mouse models of infection for 2.5 times and not be capable of causing death in porcine models of infection in contrast with the parent SS2-H.

  10. Sequence and structural aspects of the functional diversification of plant alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Claudia E; Salzano, Francisco M; de Souza, Osmar Norberto; Freitas, Loreta B

    2007-07-01

    The glycolytic proteins in plants are coded by small multigene families, which provide an interesting contrast to the high copy number of gene families studied to date. The alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) genes encode glycolytic enzymes that have been characterized in some plant families. Although the amino acid sequences of zinc-containing long-chain ADHs are highly conserved, the metabolic function of this enzyme is variable. They also have different patterns of expression and are submitted to differences in nonsynonymous substitution rates between gene copies. It is possible that the Adh copies have been retained as a consequence of adaptative amino acid replacements which have conferred subtle changes in function. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that there have been a number of separate duplication events within angiosperms, and that genes labeled Adh1, Adh2 and Adh3 in different groups may not be homologous. Nonsynonymous/synonymous ratios yielded no signs of positive selection. However, the coefficients of functional divergence (theta) estimated between the Adh1 and Adh2 gene groups indicate statistically significant site-specific shift of evolutionary rates between them, as well as between those of different botanical families, suggesting that altered functional constraints may have taken place at some amino acid residues after their diversification. The theoretical three-dimensional structure of the alcohol dehydrogenase from Arabis blepharophylla was constructed and verified to be stereochemically valid.

  11. Molecular and physiological aspects of alcohol dehydrogenases in the ethanol metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    de Smidt, Olga; du Preez, James C; Albertyn, Jacobus

    2012-02-01

    The physiological role and possible functional substitution of each of the five alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) isozymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated in five quadruple deletion mutants designated strains Q1-Q5, with the number indicating the sole intact ADH gene. Their growth in aerobic batch cultures was characterised in terms of kinetic and stoichiometric parameters. Cultivation with glucose or ethanol as carbon substrate revealed that Adh1 was the only alcohol dehydrogenase capable of efficiently catalysing the reduction of acetaldehyde to ethanol. The oxidation of produced or added ethanol could also be attributed to Adh1. Growth of strains lacking the ADH1 gene resulted in the production of glycerol as a major fermentation product, concomitant with the production of a significan