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Sample records for 1577b bovine liver

  1. Ultrasound assisted-deep eutectic solvent extraction of iron from sheep, bovine and chicken liver samples.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Erkan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2015-05-01

    A green, novel and effective ultrasound assisted-deep eutectic solvent (DES) extraction (UA-DES-E) procedure was developed for extraction of iron from sheep, bovine and chicken liver samples. The analytical parameters including type and composition DES, volume of DES, ultrasonication time and ratio of sample to DES were optimized by using 50mg of the NIST SRM 1577b bovine liver certified reference material. The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) were found as 0.026µg mL(-1) and 0.085µg mL(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) as a result of 7 replicates of 50mg of certified reference material was 1.4%. The accuracy of proposed method was checked by the addition/recovery tests to NIST SRM 1577b bovine liver and a sheep liver. The extraction method was applied to extraction of iron from bovine, sheep and chicken liver samples retail from markets at Kayseri, Turkey with satisfactory results (recoveries higher than 95%).

  2. Ultrasound assisted-deep eutectic solvent extraction of iron from sheep, bovine and chicken liver samples.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Erkan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2015-05-01

    A green, novel and effective ultrasound assisted-deep eutectic solvent (DES) extraction (UA-DES-E) procedure was developed for extraction of iron from sheep, bovine and chicken liver samples. The analytical parameters including type and composition DES, volume of DES, ultrasonication time and ratio of sample to DES were optimized by using 50mg of the NIST SRM 1577b bovine liver certified reference material. The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) were found as 0.026µg mL(-1) and 0.085µg mL(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) as a result of 7 replicates of 50mg of certified reference material was 1.4%. The accuracy of proposed method was checked by the addition/recovery tests to NIST SRM 1577b bovine liver and a sheep liver. The extraction method was applied to extraction of iron from bovine, sheep and chicken liver samples retail from markets at Kayseri, Turkey with satisfactory results (recoveries higher than 95%). PMID:25702999

  3. Recombinant bovine rhodanese: purification and comparison with bovine liver rhodanese.

    PubMed

    Miller, D M; Kurzban, G P; Mendoza, J A; Chirgwin, J M; Hardies, S C; Horowitz, P M

    1992-06-24

    Recombinant bovine rhodanese (thiosulfate: cyanide sulfurtransferase, EC 2.8.1.1) has been purified to homogeneity from Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) by cation-exchange chromatography. Recombinant and bovine liver rhodanese coelectrophorese under denaturing conditions, with an apparent subunit molecular weight of 33,000. The amino terminal seven residues of the recombinant protein are identical to those of the bovine enzyme, indicating that E. coli also removes the N-terminal methionine. The Km for thiosulfate is the same for the two proteins. The specific activity of the recombinant enzyme is 12% higher (816 IU/mg) than that of the bovine enzyme (730 IU/mg). The two proteins are indistinguishable as to their ultraviolet absorbance and their intrinsic fluorescence. The ability of the two proteins to refold from 8 M urea to enzymatically active species was similar both for unassisted refolding, and when folding was assisted either by the detergent, lauryl maltoside or by the E. coli chaperonin system composed of cpn60 and cpn10. Bovine rhodanese is known to have multiple electrophoretic forms under native conditions. In contrast, the recombinant protein has only one form, which comigrates with the least negatively charged of the bovine liver isoforms. This is consistent with the retention of the carboxy terminal residues in the recombinant protein that are frequently removed from the bovine liver protein.

  4. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... 110, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catalase (bovine liver). 184.1034 Section 184.1034... GRAS § 184.1034 Catalase (bovine liver). (a) Catalase (bovine liver) (CAS Reg. No. 81457-95-6) is...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catalase (bovine liver). 184.1034 Section 184.1034... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1034 Catalase (bovine liver). (a) Catalase...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catalase (bovine liver). 184.1034 Section 184.1034... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1034 Catalase (bovine liver). (a) Catalase...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catalase (bovine liver). 184.1034 Section 184.1034... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1034 Catalase (bovine liver). (a) Catalase...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Catalase (bovine liver). 184.1034 Section 184.1034... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1034 Catalase (bovine liver). (a) Catalase...

  9. Unique oligomeric intermediates of bovine liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Koodathingal; Prajapati, Shashi; Ahmad, Atta; Jain, S K; Bhakuni, Vinod

    2002-01-01

    Catalases, although synthesized from single genes and built up from only one type of subunit, exist in heterogeneous form with respect to their conformations and association states in biological systems. This heterogeneity is not of genetic origin, but rather reflects the instability of this oligomeric heme enzyme. To understand better the factors that stabilize the various association states of catalase, we performed studies on the multimeric intermediates that are stabilized during guanidine-hydrochloride- and urea-induced unfolding of bovine liver catalase (BLC). For the first time, we have observed an enzymatically active, folded dimer of native BLC. This dimer has slightly higher enzymatic activity and altered structural properties compared to the native tetramer. Comparative studies of the effect of NaCl, GdmCl, and urea on BLC show that cation binding to negatively charged groups present in amino acid side chains of the enzyme leads to stabilization of an enzymatically active, folded dimer of BLC. Besides the folded dimer, an enzymatically active expanded tetramer and a partially unfolded, enzymatically inactive dimer of BLC were also observed. A complete recovery of native enzyme was observed on refolding of expanded tetramers and folded dimers; however, a very low recovery (maximum of approximately 5%) of native enzyme was observed on refolding of partially unfolded dimers and fully unfolded monomers. PMID:11742121

  10. Establishment and characterization of feeder-cell-dependent bovine fetal liver cell lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The establishment and initial characterization of bovine fetal liver cell lines is described. Bovine fetal hepatocytes were cultured from the liver of a 34-day bovine fetus by physical disruption of the liver tissue. Released liver cells and clumps of cells were plated on STO feeder layers and wer...

  11. Insulin receptor gene expression in normal and diseased bovine liver.

    PubMed

    Liu, G W; Zhang, Z G; Wang, J G; Wang, Z; Xu, C; Zhu, X L

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare insulin receptor (IR) gene expression in normal bovine liver (n=7) with samples of liver from cows in the perinatal period with ketosis (n=7) and cows with fatty liver (n=7). Gene expression was determined by internally controlled reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expression of IR mRNA in the liver of ketotic dairy cows was higher than in cows with fatty liver, but in both disease groups the expression was substantially lower than that in normal liver. Reduced expression of IR mRNA in fatty liver indicates that responses to insulin are markedly decreased, which might be due to insulin resistance. The relatively lower IR mRNA expression in the liver tissue of dairy cows with ketosis might enhance gluconeogenesis and lipid mobilization to relieve energy negative balance.

  12. Production and characterization of a bovine liver candidate reference material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, S. R.; Peixoto, A. M. J.; Souza, G. B.; Tullio, R. R.; Nogueira, A. R. A.

    2016-07-01

    The preparation of a bovine liver candidate reference material and the steps are taken to confirm its homogeneity, long and short term stabilities, and consensus values are described. Details of the sample preparation and the final collaborative exercise are presented. The material elemental composition was characterized by 17 elements (As, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mo, Mn, Na, P, Pb, Se, Sr, V, and Zn) of nutritional and toxicological significance.

  13. Effect of storage on tensile material properties of bovine liver.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan-Chiao; Kemper, Andrew R; Untaroiu, Costin D

    2014-01-01

    Cadaveric tissue models play an important role in the assessment and optimization of novel restraint systems for reducing abdominal injuries. However, the effect of tissue preservation by means of freezing on the material properties of abdominal tissues remains unknown. The goal of this study was to investigate the influence of frozen storage time on the material responses of the liver parenchyma in tensile loading. Specimens from ten bovine livers were equally divided into three groups: fresh, 30-day frozen storage, and 60-day frozen storage. All preserved specimens were stored at -12°C. Dog-bone specimens from each preservation group were randomly assigned to one of three strain rates (0.01s(-1), 0.1s(-1), and 1.0s(-1)) and tested to failure in tensile loading. The local material response recorded at the tear location and the global material response of the whole specimen of the liver parenchyma specimens were investigated based on the experimental data and optimized analytical material models. The local and global failure strains decreased significantly between fresh specimens and specimens preserved for 30 days (p<0.05), and between fresh specimens and specimens preserved for 60 days (p<0.05) for all three loading rates. Changes on the material model parameters were also observed between fresh and preserved specimens. Preservation by means of frozen storage was found to affect both the material and failure response of bovine liver parenchyma in tensile loading. The stiffness of the tissue increased with increased preservation time and increased strain rate. In summary, significant changes (p<0.05) between the failure strain of previously frozen liver parenchyma samples and fresh samples were demonstrated at both global and local levels in this study. In addition, nonlinear and viscoelastic characteristics of the liver parenchyma were observed in tension for both fresh and preserved samples.

  14. Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA): Development of a Flow Model for Bovine Livers for Extensive Bench Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Lubienski, Andreas Bitsch, Rudi G.; Lubienski, Katrin; Kauffmann, Guenter; Duex, Markus

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. To develop a flow model for bovine livers for extensive bench testing of technical improvements or procedure-related developments of radiofrequency ablation excluding animal experiments. Methods. The perfusion of bovine livers directly from the slaughterhouse was simulated in a liver perfusion tank developed for the experimental work. The liver perfusion medium used was a Tyrode solution prepared in accordance with physiologic criteria (as for liver transplants) which was oxygenated by an oxygenator and heated to 36.5 deg. C. Portal vein circulation was regulated via a flow- and pressure-controlled pump and arterial circulation using a dialysis machine. Flow rate and pressure were adjusted as for the physiology of a human liver converted to bovine liver conditions. The fluid discharged from the liver was returned into the perfusion system through the vena cava. Extendable precision swivel arms with the radiofrequency probe attached were mounted on the liver perfusion tank. RFA was conducted with the RF3000 generator and a 2 cm LeVeen needle (Boston Scientific, Ratingen, Germany) in a three-dimensional grid for precise localization of the generated thermolesions. Results. Four bovine livers weighing 8.4 {+-} 0.4 kg each were prepared, connected to the perfusion system, and consecutively perfused for the experiments. Mean arterial flow was 569 {+-} 43 ml/min, arterial pressure 120 mmHg, portovenous flow 1440 {+-} 305 ml/min, and portal pressure 10 mmHg. Macroscopic evaluation after the experiments revealed no thrombi within the hepatic vessels. A total of 136 RF thermolesions were generated with an average number of 34 per liver. Mean RF duration was 2:59 {+-} 2:01 min:sec with an average baseline impedance of 28.2 {+-} 3.4 ohms. The mean diameter of the thermolesions along the puncture channel was 22.98 {+-} 4.34 mm and perpendicular to the channel was 23.27 {+-} 4.82 mm. Conclusion. Extracorporeal perfusion of bovine livers with consecutive standardized RF

  15. Opal suppressor serine tRNAs from bovine liver form phosphoseryl-tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hatfield, D; Diamond, A; Dudock, B

    1982-01-01

    An unusual minor species of bovine liver serine tRNA has previously been isolated, sequenced, and found to suppress the UGA termination codon in protein synthesis in vitro [Diamond, A., Dudock, B. & Hatfield, D. (1981) Cell 25, 497-506]. We have now found that this tRNA can be a substrate in a specific phosphorylation reaction in which phosphoseryl-tRNA is formed. Moreover, bovine liver contains a second UGA suppressor serine tRNA (tRNASerNCA; N is a modified nucleoside) which also forms phosphoseryl-tRNA. The nucleotide sequence and coding properties of tRNASerNCA are presented. Images PMID:6815648

  16. A dual validation approach to detect anthelmintic residues in bovine liver over an extended concentration range

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes a method for the detection and quantification of 38 of the most widely used anthelmintics (including benzimidazoles, macrocyclic lactones and flukicides) in bovine liver at MRL and non-MRL level. A dual validation approach was adapted to reliably detect anthelmintic residues ov...

  17. Diminishing of aggregation for bovine liver catalase through acidic residues modification.

    PubMed

    Hashemnia, S; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Ghourchian, H; Ahmad, F; Hakimelahi, G H; Saboury, A A

    2006-12-15

    The tendency of proteins to aggregate is an important problem in biotechnology and the pharmaceutical industry. Because proteins in the aggregated state generally do not have the same biological activity as proteins in the native state. In order to prevent aggregation, it is essential to know the effective parameters in anti-aggregation mechanism. Using a chemical protein modification approach, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies and circular dichroism spectropolarimetry, this study investigates the parameters involved in anti-aggregation mechanism of bovine liver catalase. Our findings clearly indicate that the modified bovine liver catalase provides better protection than the native enzyme against thermal aggregation. It seems that a decrease in hydrophobicity resulting in chemical modification plays an important role in preventing aggregation. PMID:16828155

  18. Interlaboratory comparison of methods for the determination of incurred tilmicosin residues in bovine liver.

    PubMed

    Clark, Susan B; O'Rangers, John J; Rowe, W Douglas; Madson, Mark R; Hurlbut, Jeffrey A; Sofos, John N; Fuerst, Brenda; James, Glenda; Griffith, Sydney; Readnour, Robin S

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare 2 methods for the determination of tilmicosin residues in bovine liver samples. Three laboratories participated in the comparison of the 2 methods. The first method was described in a New Animal Drug Application (NADA 140-929), and the second was a modification of that method in which hexane was substituted for carbon tetrachloride in one cleanup step. Each of the 3 laboratories analyzed subsamples of 10 bovine livers containing incurred tilmicosin. Residues ranged from 2.3 to 81 ppm tilmicosin in the 10 liver samples with an 11.8% relative standard deviation obtained by using both methods. In addition, fortified-control liver tissue samples were analyzed concurrently with tissues containing incurred residues by using the modified method in one of the laboratories. The fortification levels ranged from 0.3 to 112 ppm, with recoveries ranging from 76 to 92%. The results from the 3 laboratories were comparable, indicating that the modified method was not only as effective as the original NADA method, but also more desirable because of the change to a less hazardous solvent.

  19. Structural similarity between bovine conglutinin and bovine lung surfactant protein D and demonstration of liver as a site of synthesis of conglutinin.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, B L; Lu, J; Reid, K B

    1993-01-01

    Conglutinin is a Ca(2+)-dependent, carbohydrate-binding, serum protein which contains an N-terminal collagen-like region and a C-terminal, C-type lectin domain. To date, conglutinin, which appears to play an important role in defence mechanisms, has been fully described, by protein sequence analysis, only in the bovine system. To allow comparison of lung surfactant protein D (SP-D) with conglutinin, within one species, a full-length cDNA clone for SP-D has been isolated from a bovine lung library. The derived amino acid sequence for bovine SP-D shows a higher (78%) level of identity to the sequence of conglutinin than to the sequence of human or rat SP-D (67 and 65% respectively). However, SP-D and conglutinin are known to have different carbohydrate-binding specificities, therefore some of the 16 residues conserved in the C-type lectin domains of all three species of SP-D, but which are not conserved in conglutinin, appear likely to be involved in determination of specificity. The use of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-derived DNA probe for bovine SP-D in Northern blotting studies yielded a signal from bovine liver mRNA as well as the expected signal from bovine lung mRNA. Since SP-D appears to be a lung-specific protein, it seems probable that the liver is the primary site of synthesis of conglutinin. Images Figure 4 PMID:8436402

  20. Characterization of a membrane-associated receptor from bovine liver that binds phosphomannosyl residues of bovine testicular beta-galactosidase.

    PubMed Central

    Sahagian, G G; Distler, J; Jourdian, G W

    1981-01-01

    A receptor that binds the phosphomannosyl recognition marker of bovine testicular beta-galactosidase (beta-D-galactoside galactohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.23) was isolated from bovine liver membranes. The receptor was extracted from crude plasma membrane preparations with Triton X-100 and immunoprecipitated as a receptor--beta-galactosidase complex with anti-beta-galactosidase. The receptor was dissociated from the precipitate with mannose 6-phosphate, labeled with 125I, and purified on a beta-galactosidase-Sepharose 4B affinity matrix. A quantitative binding assay employing anti-beta-galactosidase and IgGsorb (formalin-fixed Staphylococcus aureus) was devised to study the binding of 125I-labeled receptor to beta-galactosidase. Maximal binding of receptor to enzyme occurred at pH values between 5.7 and 6.5. Divalent cations were not required for binding. The values of the dissociation constant obtained for beta-galactosidase varied between 200 nM observed with "lower uptake" forms and 20 nM for "higher uptake" forms of the enzyme. A number of phosphorylated monosaccharides were tested as inhibitors of binding of enzyme to receptor; mannose 6-phosphate and fructose 1-phosphate served as inhibitors and exhibited Ki values of 0.064 mM and 0.24 mM, respectively. The receptor has a subunit molecular weight of 215,000. Similar receptors were also demonstrated in Triton X-100 extracts of human skin fibroblasts, Chinese hamster ovary cells, and rat hepatocytes. These cell types are known to assimilate lysosomal enzymes containing covalently bound mannose 6-phosphate residues. Images PMID:6270668

  1. Effect of pH on bovine liver catalase as determined by electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Blum, H; Chance, B; Litchfield, W J

    1978-06-21

    Two major rhombic high-spin ferric heme signals are observed during the pH titration of bovine liver catalase. The less rhombic signal if dominant above pH 6.0 and the more rhombic signal below pH 6.0. Ethanol in high concentration enhances the relative intensity of the less rhombic signal. These data demonstrate the sensitivitiy of the ligand field to changes in catalase solvent and, furthermore, suggest that both rhombic configuration posses identical spectral and catalytic properties. PMID:27228

  2. A novel NADPH:(bound) NADP+ reductase and NADH:(bound) NADP+ transhydrogenase function in bovine liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Gaetani, Gian F; Ferraris, Anna M; Sanna, Paola; Kirkman, Henry N

    2005-02-01

    Many catalases have the shared property of containing bound NADPH and being susceptible to inactivation by their own substrate, H2O2. The presence of additional (unbound) NADPH effectively prevents bovine liver and human erythrocytic catalase from becoming compound II, the reversibly inactivated state of catalase, and NADP+ is known to be generated in the process. The function of the bound NADPH, which is tightly bound in bovine liver catalase, has been unknown. The present study with bovine liver catalase and [14C]NADPH and [14C]NADH revealed that unbound NADPH or NADH are substrates for an internal reductase and transhydrogenase reaction respectively; the unbound NADPH or NADH cause tightly bound NADP+ to become NADPH without becoming tightly bound themselves. This and other results provide insight into the function of tightly bound NADPH. PMID:15456401

  3. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method to determine boldenone in bovine liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Granja, Rodrigo H M M; Salerno, Alessandro G; de Lima, Andreia C; Montalvo, Cynthia; Reche, Karine V G; Giannotti, Fabio M; Wanschel, Amarylis C B A

    2014-01-01

    Boldenone, an androgenic steroid, is forbidden for use in meat production in most countries worldwide. Residues of this drug in food present a potential risk to consumers. A sensitive LC/MS/MS method for analysis of 17β-boldenone using boldenone-d3 as an internal standard was developed. An enzymatic hydrolysis and extraction using ethyl acetate, methanol, and hexane were performed in the sample preparation. Parameters such as decision limit (CCα), detection capability (CCβ), precision, recovery, and ruggedness were evaluated according to the Brazilian Regulation 24/2009 (equivalent to European Union Decision 2002/657/EC) and International Organization for Standardization/International Electrotechnical Commission 17025:2005. CCα and CCβ were determined to be 0.17 and 0.29 μg/kg, respectively. Average recoveries from bovine liver samples fortified with 1, 1.5, and 2 μg/kg were around 100%. A complete statistical analysis was performed on the results obtained, including an estimation of the method uncertainty. The method is considered robust after being subjected to day-to-day analytical variations and has been used as a standard method in Brazil to report boldenone levels in bovine liver. PMID:25903003

  4. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method to determine boldenone in bovine liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Granja, Rodrigo H M M; Salerno, Alessandro G; de Lima, Andreia C; Montalvo, Cynthia; Reche, Karine V G; Giannotti, Fabio M; Wanschel, Amarylis C B A

    2014-01-01

    Boldenone, an androgenic steroid, is forbidden for use in meat production in most countries worldwide. Residues of this drug in food present a potential risk to consumers. A sensitive LC/MS/MS method for analysis of 17β-boldenone using boldenone-d3 as an internal standard was developed. An enzymatic hydrolysis and extraction using ethyl acetate, methanol, and hexane were performed in the sample preparation. Parameters such as decision limit (CCα), detection capability (CCβ), precision, recovery, and ruggedness were evaluated according to the Brazilian Regulation 24/2009 (equivalent to European Union Decision 2002/657/EC) and International Organization for Standardization/International Electrotechnical Commission 17025:2005. CCα and CCβ were determined to be 0.17 and 0.29 μg/kg, respectively. Average recoveries from bovine liver samples fortified with 1, 1.5, and 2 μg/kg were around 100%. A complete statistical analysis was performed on the results obtained, including an estimation of the method uncertainty. The method is considered robust after being subjected to day-to-day analytical variations and has been used as a standard method in Brazil to report boldenone levels in bovine liver.

  5. Sixty years from discovery to solution: crystal structure of bovine liver catalase form III

    SciTech Connect

    Foroughi, Leila M.; Kang, You-Na; Matzger, Adam J.

    2012-03-27

    The crystallization and structural characterization of bovine liver catalase (BLC) has been intensively studied for decades. Forms I and II of BLC have previously been fully characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Form III has previously been analyzed by electron microscopy, but owing to the thinness of this crystal form an X-ray crystal structure had not been determined. Here, the crystal structure of form III of BLC is presented in space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.7, b = 173.7, c = 186.3 {angstrom}. The asymmetric unit is composed of the biological tetramer, which is packed in a tetrahedron motif with three other BLC tetramers. This higher resolution structure has allowed an assessment of the previously published electron-microscopy studies.

  6. Sixty years from discovery to solution: crystal structure of bovine liver catalase form III.

    PubMed

    Foroughi, Leila M; Kang, You Na; Matzger, Adam J

    2011-09-01

    The crystallization and structural characterization of bovine liver catalase (BLC) has been intensively studied for decades. Forms I and II of BLC have previously been fully characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Form III has previously been analyzed by electron microscopy, but owing to the thinness of this crystal form an X-ray crystal structure had not been determined. Here, the crystal structure of form III of BLC is presented in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 68.7, b = 173.7, c = 186.3 Å. The asymmetric unit is composed of the biological tetramer, which is packed in a tetrahedron motif with three other BLC tetramers. This higher resolution structure has allowed an assessment of the previously published electron-microscopy studies. PMID:21904028

  7. Nonlinear acoustic properties of ex vivo bovine liver and the effects of temperature and denaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, E. J.; Coussios, C.-C.; Cleveland, R. O.

    2014-06-01

    Thermal ablation by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has a great potential for the non-invasive treatment of solid tumours. Due to the high pressure amplitudes involved, nonlinear acoustic effects must be understood and the relevant medium property is the parameter of nonlinearity B/A. Here, B/A was measured in ex vivo bovine liver, over a heating/cooling cycle replicating temperatures reached during HIFU ablation, adapting a finite amplitude insertion technique, which also allowed for measurement of sound-speed and attenuation. The method measures the nonlinear progression of a plane wave through liver and B/A was chosen so that numerical simulations matched the measured waveforms. To create plane-wave conditions, sinusoidal bursts were transmitted by a 100 mm diameter 1.125 MHz unfocused transducer and measured using a 15 mm diameter 2.25 MHz broadband transducer in the near field. Attenuation and sound-speed were calculated using a reflected pulse from the smaller transducer using the larger transducer as the reflecting interface. Results showed that attenuation initially decreased with heating then increased after denaturation, the sound-speed initially increased with temperature and then decreased, and B/A showed an increase with temperature but no significant post-heating change. The B/A data disagree with other reports that show a significant change and we suggest that any nonlinear enhancement in the received ultrasound signal post-treatment is likely due to acoustic cavitation rather than changes in tissue nonlinearity.

  8. Sensitivity of mitochondria isolated from liver and kidney of rat and bovine to lipid peroxidation: a comparative study of light emission and fatty acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Gavazza, Mariana; Marmunti, Mónica; Catalá, Angel

    2005-12-01

    Much work has been carried out on non-enzymatic-induced lipid peroxidation of mitochondria obtained from different tissues of monogastric animals, but little information is available about this process in poligastric animals. Studies were carried out to determine the sensitivity of mitochondria isolated from liver and kidney of rat and bovine to lipid peroxidation (ascorbate-Fe2+ dependent) by comparison of light emission and fatty acid profiles. Mitochondria from both species were susceptible to lipid peroxidation. Measurements of chemiluminescence indicate that the lipid peroxidation process was more effective in mitochondria from rat liver than in the organelle obtained from bovine, whereas changes were not observed in mitochondria from rat and bovine kidney. The fatty acid composition of total lipids isolated from liver and kidney mitochondria of both species was substantially modified when subjected to non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation with a decrease of arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids. The polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition was higher in mitochondria obtained from rat liver (43.11+/- 4.16) than in bovine (15.78 +/- 0.76). As a consequence, the unsaturation index (UI), was higher in mitochondria of rat liver than in bovine. Nevertheless, the PUFA composition of kidney mitochondria from both species was similar; therefore, statistically significant differences in the UI were not observed. The results suggest that mainly the PUFAs present in hepatic and kidney mitochondria were sensitive to oxidative damage. The lipid peroxidation process was more effective in rat liver mitochondria than in bovine.

  9. Nonlinear acoustic properties of ex vivo bovine liver and the effects of temperature and denaturation.

    PubMed

    Jackson, E J; Coussios, C-C; Cleveland, R O

    2014-06-21

    Thermal ablation by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has a great potential for the non-invasive treatment of solid tumours. Due to the high pressure amplitudes involved, nonlinear acoustic effects must be understood and the relevant medium property is the parameter of nonlinearity B/A. Here, B/A was measured in ex vivo bovine liver, over a heating/cooling cycle replicating temperatures reached during HIFU ablation, adapting a finite amplitude insertion technique, which also allowed for measurement of sound-speed and attenuation. The method measures the nonlinear progression of a plane wave through liver and B/A was chosen so that numerical simulations matched the measured waveforms. To create plane-wave conditions, sinusoidal bursts were transmitted by a 100 mm diameter 1.125 MHz unfocused transducer and measured using a 15 mm diameter 2.25 MHz broadband transducer in the near field. Attenuation and sound-speed were calculated using a reflected pulse from the smaller transducer using the larger transducer as the reflecting interface. Results showed that attenuation initially decreased with heating then increased after denaturation, the sound-speed initially increased with temperature and then decreased, and B/A showed an increase with temperature but no significant post-heating change. The B/A data disagree with other reports that show a significant change and we suggest that any nonlinear enhancement in the received ultrasound signal post-treatment is likely due to acoustic cavitation rather than changes in tissue nonlinearity.

  10. Isolation, purification and characterization of antioxidant peptidic fractions from a bovine liver sarcoplasmic protein thermolysin hydrolyzate.

    PubMed

    Di Bernardini, Roberta; Rai, Dilip K; Bolton, Declan; Kerry, Joseph; O'Neill, Eileen; Mullen, Anne Maria; Harnedy, Pádraigín; Hayes, Maria

    2011-02-01

    Sarcoplasmic proteins isolated from bovine livers were hydrolyzed using the enzyme thermolysin at 37°C for 2h. The hydrolyzates were filtered through molecular weight cut off membranes (MWCO) and filtrates were obtained. The water activity (a(w)) of unhydrolysed sarcoplasmic protein, full hydrolyzates, 10-kDa and 3-kDa filtrates were below the limit necessary for microbial growth. The antioxidant activities of both filtrates and fractions were assessed using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity assay, the ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay and the Fe(2+) chelating ability assay. RP-HPLC was used for purification of the full hydrolyzates, the 10-kDa and the 3-kDa filtrates. The peptidic content of the full hydrolyzates, the 10-kDa and the 3-kDa filtrates were assessed using the Dumas method and peptide contents of each fraction were characterized using electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight (ESI-Q-TOF) mass spectrometry with the resultant spectrum analysed using the software programmes Protein Lynx Global Server 2.4. and TurboSEQUEST. Similarities between the amino acid composition of characterized peptides from each fraction and previously reported antioxidant peptides were found. This study demonstrates that meat by-product such as liver can be utilised as raw material for the generation of bioactive peptides with demonstrated antioxidant activities in vitro using the enzyme thermolysin. It is significant as it presents a potential opportunity for meat processors to use their waste streams for the generation of bioactive peptides for potential functional food use. PMID:21129427

  11. Kinetic studies to determine the mechanism of regulation of bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase by nucleotide effectors.

    PubMed

    Cook, P F

    1982-01-01

    A combination of kinetic and isotope effect studies in the presence and absence of the effectors ADP and GTP was used to elucidate the mechanism of regulation of bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase. ADP at low concentrations of glutamate competes with TPN for free enzyme. GTP exhibits a similar effect at high concentrations (100 microM and above). When ADP binds at its allosteric site, it increases the off rates of both alpha-ketoglutarate and TPNH from their product complexes. This results in a decrease in V/K for both substrates, an increase in V, and an increase in the deuterium isotope effects for all three parameters so that they are all about 1.3. The rate of release of glutamate from E-TPNH-glutamate is also apparently enhanced since no substrate inhibition by glutamate is observed in the presence of ADP. The effect of GTP is in opposition to that of ADP in that GTP decreases the off rates for both TPN and glutamate from E-TPN-glutamate as well as the off rates for alpha-ketoglutarate and TPNH. This results in an increase in the V/K's for both substrates, a decrease in V, and a decrease in the deuterium isotope effects for all three parameters to a value of 1. Substrate inhibition by glutamate is also eliminated by GTP probably by preventing any significant accumulation of E-TPNH to which glutamate binds as an inhibitor.

  12. The water effect on the kinetic of the bovine liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Seixas, Flavio Augusto Vicente; da Silva, Milene Ribeiro; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Tosqui, Priscilla; Colombo, Marcio Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Catalase is an enzyme that occurs in almost all aerobic organisms. Its main metabolic function is to prevent oxidative damage to tissues induced by hydrogen peroxide which is a strong oxidizing agent. Catalase is very effective in performing this task, since it has the highest turnover rate among all the enzymes. The properties of catalase have been investigated extensively for many years; however, the role of the solvent molecules in the catalytic reaction of this enzyme has not yet been investigated. Therefore, the objective of this work was to investigate the contribution of the solvent molecules on the catalytic reaction of bovine liver catalase with its substrate H2O2 by the osmotic stress method. As a probe for protein structural changes in solution, the differential number of water molecules released during the transition from free to bound form of the enzyme was measured. These assays were correlated with protein structural data provided by the SAXS technique and crystallographic structures of free and CN(-) bonded enzymes. The results showed that the difference in surface accessible area of the crystal structures does not reflect the variation that is observed in solution. Moreover, catalase is not influenced by the solvent during the catalytic reaction, which represents a lower energy barrier to be crossed in the overall energetics of the reaction, a fact that contributes to the high turnover rate of catalase. PMID:21529340

  13. Effect of sodium dodecyl fulfate on the dissociation of bovine liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Takeda, A; Hachimori, A; Murai, M; Sato, K; Samejima, T

    1975-11-01

    Native bovine liver catalase [EC 1.11.1.6] and catalase acetylated with N-acetylimidazole (AI) both combined with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to form catalase-SDS complexes. The differences between native and acetylated catalase bound to SDS were investigated as regards enzymatic activity, absorption spectra, ORD and CD, sedimentation velocity and fluorescence spectra. It was found that the binding of SDS with both catalases depended on incubation time and SDS concentration, and that the acetylation of catalase had some protective effect on the denaturation of the molecule by SDS, which may be ascribed to a reduction of ionic interaction between SDS and the protein on acetylation. The native catalase was found to split into three smaller components on incubation with 1% SDS for 96 hr, whereas the acetylated catalase split into two smaller components. These smaller components were isolated by gel filtration through Sephadex G-100. The isolated components has estimated molecular weights of 60,000, 30,000, aide. It seemed likely that the modification occurred stepwise. Approximately 26% of the carboxyl groups of fibrinogen was modified finally. The modified fibrinogen had no interaction with cationic detergent, and did not form any complex with the detergent. In dilute acid, fibrinogen was observed to show only a slight interaction with cationic detergent. It is probable that the exposed and ionized carboxyl groups are essential for the formation of a complex between fibrinogen and cationic detergent. PMID:1240102

  14. Effect of covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol on immunogenicity and circulating life of bovine liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Abuchowski, A; McCoy, J R; Palczuk, N C; van Es, T; Davis, F F

    1977-06-10

    Methoxypolyethylene glycols of 1900 daltons (PEG-1900) or 5000 daltons (PEG-5000) were covalently attached to bovine liver catalase using 2,4,6-trichloro-s-triazine as the coupling agent. Rabbits were immunized by the intravenous and intramuscular routes with catalase modified by covalent attachment of PEG-1900 to 43% of the amino groups (PEG-1900-catalase). The intravenous antiserum did not yield detectable antibodies against PEG-1900-catalase or native catalase, as determined by Ouchterlony and complement fixation methods, whereas the intramuscular antiserum contained antibodies to both PEG-1900-catalase and catalase. PEG-1900 did not react with either antiserum. Catalase was prepared in which PEG-5000 was attached to 40% of the amino groups (PEG-5000-catalase). This catalase preparation did not react with either antiserum. PEG-1900-catalase retained 93% of its enzymatic activity; PEG-5000-catalase retained 95%. PEG-5000-catalase resisted digestion by trypsin, chymotrypsin, and a protease from Streptomyces griseus. PEG-1900-catalase and PEG-5000-catalase exhibited enhanced circulating lives in the blood of acatalasemic mice during repetitive intravenous injections. No evidence was seen of an immune response to injections of the modified enzymes. Mice injected repetitively with PEG-5000-catalase remained immune competent for unmodieied catalase, and no evidence of tissue or organ damage was seen. PMID:16907

  15. Preparation of a stable biocatalyst of bovine liver catalase using immobilization and postimmobilization techniques.

    PubMed

    Betancor, Lorena; Hidalgo, Aurelio; Fernández-Lorente, Gloria; Mateo, Cesar; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisan, José M

    2003-01-01

    Bovine liver catalase was immobilized on different supports. The tetrameric nature of this enzyme was found to cause its rapid inactivation in diluted conditions due to subunit dissociation, a fact that may rule out its industrial use. Multi-subunit immobilization using highly activated glyoxyl agarose was not enough to involve all enzyme subunits. In fact, washing the derivative produced a strong decrease in the enzyme activity. Further cross-linking of previously immobilized enzyme with tailor-made dextran-aldehyde permitted the multimeric structure to be fully stabilized using either multisubunit preparations immobilized onto highly activated glyoxyl-agarose support or one subunit enzymes immobilized onto poorly activated glyoxyl-agarose. The highest stability of the final biocatalyst was observed using the multisubunit immobilized derivative cross-linked with dextran-aldehyde. The optimal derivative retained around 60% of the immobilized activity, did not release any enzyme subunits after boiling in the presence of SDS, and did not lose activity during washing, and its stability did not depend on the dilution. This derivative was used for 10 cycles in the destruction of 10 mM hydrogen peroxide without any decrease in the enzyme activity. PMID:12790636

  16. Effect of cyprodinil and fludioxonil pesticides on bovine liver catalase activity

    PubMed Central

    Karadag, Hasan; Ozhan, Fadil

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated if the use of the pesticides cyprodinil and fludioxonil produced an inhibitory effect on the bovine liver catalase (CAT) activity. It was documented that the activity of the enzyme decreased with increasing concentrations of cyprodinil and fludioxonil from 0 to 500 ppm. At pesticide concentrations of 250 and 500 ppm, the activity of CAT remained unchanged and passed to a steady state. The exposure to cyprodinil in concentrations of 10, 50, 100, 250 and 500 ppm, led to a decrease in the per cent of the CAT enzyme activity calculated as 45.4, 68.0, 73.0, 77.8 and 77.4, respectively. Similarly, the exposure to fludioxonil in concentrations of 10, 50, 100, 250 and 500 ppm, produced the following percentage decrease in the CAT enzyme activity: 20.0, 30.8, 42.8, 46.3 and 45.9, respectively. Cyprodinil inhibited CAT competitively, whereas the mechanism of fludioxonil inhibition over the enzyme was non-competitive. PMID:26740786

  17. Treatment with bovine gallstones exacerbates liver damage, but enhances hepatoprotection by bear gall powder in carbon tetrachloride-intoxicated rats.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, T; Matsumoto, N; Kashima, K

    1998-03-01

    The interactions between bovine gallstones (Goou) and bear gall powder (Yutan) in decreases in serum transaminase levels were investigated in rats intoxicated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). The p.o. administration of Goou significantly increased both serum transaminase levels and hepatic lipid peroxidation following i.p. administration of CCl4. Concomitant administration of both Goou and Yutan resulted in decreases of serum transaminase levels and hepatic lipid peroxidation, which were more remarkable than with administration of Yutan alone. Goou significantly increased the estimated hepatic blood flow in the indocyanine green clearance test and enhanced the delivery of CCl4 to the liver from the peritoneal cavity. These findings suggest that Goou exacerbates CCl4-induced hepatic damage because of the accelerated delivery of CCl4 to the liver and that Goou might have a hemodynamic drug interaction with Yutan in the liver, possibly enhancing the hepatoprotective effect of Yutan.

  18. Neither bovine somatotropin nor growth hormone-releasing factor alters expression of thyroid hormone receptors in liver and mammary tissues.

    PubMed

    Capuco, A V; Binelli, M; Tucker, H A

    2011-10-01

    Physiological effects of thyroid hormones are mediated primarily by binding of triiodothyronine to specific nuclear receptors. Organ-specific changes in production of triiodothyronine from its prohormone, thyroxine, have been hypothesized to target the action of thyroid hormones on the mammary gland and play a role in mediating or augmenting a galactopoietic response to bovine somatotropin (bST). Additionally, tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormones may be altered by changes in the number or affinity of nuclear receptors for thyroid hormones. In the present study, effects of bST and bovine growth hormone-releasing factor (bGRF) on thyroid hormone receptors in liver and mammary gland were studied. Lactating Holstein cows received continuous infusions of bST or bGRF for 63 d or served as uninfused controls. Nuclei were isolated from harvested mammary and liver tissues and incubated with [(125)I]-triiodothyronine. Treatments did not alter the capacity or affinity of specific binding sites for triiodothyronine in liver or mammary nuclei. Evaluation of transcript abundance for thyroid hormone receptors showed that isoforms of thyroid hormone receptor or retinoid receptor (which may influence thyroid receptor action) expressed in the mammary gland were not altered by bST or bGRF treatment. Data do not support the hypothesis that administration of bST or bGRF alters sensitivity of mammary tissue by changing expression of thyroid hormone receptors.

  19. Immobilized iminodiacetic acid (IDA)-type Cu2+ -chelating membrane affinity chromatography for purification of bovine liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Jia, L; Zou, H; Zhang, Y

    1999-05-01

    A metal ion chelating membrane medium based on iminodiacetate-substituted modified short cotton cellulose was examined for the purification of bovine liver catalase (BLC). The effect of buffer pH, chelator surface density, initial concentration of crude enzyme and flow rate on BLC binding efficiency to the copper ion chelating membrane adsorbent were examined. Under the chromatographic conditions chosen, 67.7% recovery of BLC was attained with an overall 4.2-fold increase in specific activity in a single step. After performance of BLC purification, the chelating membrane adsorbent can be easily regenerated by imidazole or EDTA buffer with higher reviving effectiveness with the latter. PMID:10375124

  20. Reactive oxygen species-mediated loss of bovine sperm motility in egg yolk Tris extender: protection by pyruvate, metal chelators and bovine liver or oviductal fluid catalase.

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Jean-François; Blanchette, Sophie; Cormier, Nathaly; Sirard, Marc-André

    2002-02-01

    Improvement of bovine semen cryopreservation requires a better understanding of the properties of the currently used extenders. At present, about half of the spermatozoa die or become immotile following cryopreservation. The implication of an oxidative stress during or following the process of cryopreservation has been suspected to alter sperm functions. However, insufficient information is available on the effect of oxidative stress on sperm functions in their surrounding environment, the extender, such as the one based on egg yolk, Tris and glycerol. In this study, we investigated the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide anion (O2*-) on bovine sperm motility in a widely used egg yolk Tris glycerol (EYTG) extender in comparison to a reference medium, the Tyrode's albumen lactate pyruvate (TALP). Bovine sperm were incubated for 6 h with or without concentrations of H2O2 ranging from 12.5 microM to 1.25 mM and with the hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase system (X/XOD) that generates O2*-. Sperm motility was established by computer assisted semen analysis (CASA) in four similar experiments using the same frozen pool of semen. We have found that sperm motility was reduced significantly by H2O2 concentrations 20-fold lower in EYTG than in TALP medium. The differential resistance of the two media was explained by pyruvate present in TALP that acts as an antioxidant and metals ions, chelated by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DETAPAC), found in egg yolk that might react with H2O2. Addition of only 5 U/ml of bovine liver catalase or oviductal fluid catalase (OFC) were sufficient to overcome the loss of sperm motility caused by 100 microM H2O2 in both EYTG and TALP. However, OFC was the most effective of the two catalases in EYTG. In addition to maintain sperm motility, catalase (5 U/ml) and pyruvate (5 mM) increased the intracellular sperm ATP level in comparison to sperm incubated alone for 6 h at 38.5 degrees C in

  1. Polymer-Induced Heteronucleation for Protein Single Crystal Growth: Structural Elucidation of Bovine Liver Catalase and Concanavalin A Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Foroughi, Leila M.; Kang, You-Na; Matzger, Adam J.

    2012-05-09

    Obtaining single crystals for X-ray diffraction remains a major bottleneck in structural biology; when existing crystal growth methods fail to yield suitable crystals, often the target rather than the crystallization approach is reconsidered. Here we demonstrate that polymer-induced heteronucleation, a powerful technique that has been used for small molecule crystallization form discovery, can be applied to protein crystallization by optimizing the heteronucleant composition and crystallization formats for crystallizing a wide range of protein targets. Applying these advances to two benchmark proteins resulted in dramatically increased crystal size, enabling structure determination, for a half century old form of bovine liver catalase (BLC) that had previously only been characterized by electron microscopy, and the discovery of two new forms of concanavalin A (conA) from the Jack bean and accompanying structural elucidation of one of these forms.

  2. Validation of radioimmunoassay screening methods for beta-agonists in bovine liver according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC.

    PubMed

    Granja, R H M M; Montes Niño, A M; Rabone, F; Montes Niño, R E; Cannavan, A; Salerno, A Gonzalez

    2008-12-01

    Validation studies were carried out on a multi-residue screening method for anilinic type beta-agonists (clenbuterol, mabuterol, brombuterol, cimaterol, cimbuterol, mapenterol, clenpenterol) and a method for the phenolic type beta-agonist, salbutamol, in bovine liver. The validation was performed according to the European Union Commission Decision 2002/657/EC (European Commission 2002), which establishes criteria and procedures for the determination of parameters such as the detection capability (CCbeta), specificity, stability of standard solutions and stability of the analyte in matrix. CCbeta values for the eight target compounds were between 0.25 and 0.5 microg kg(-1). The stability of standard solutions and analytes in matrix and the specificity of the antibody were characterized. The methods are applicable for qualitative screening of beta-agonists for regulatory programmes according to European Union performance requirements, or as a semi-quantitative research tool for known target compounds.

  3. Allelic gene expression imbalance of bovine IGF2, LEP and CCL2 genes in liver, kidney and pituitary.

    PubMed

    Olbromski, R; Siadkowska, E; Zelazowska, B; Zwierzchowski, L

    2013-02-01

    Allelic expression imbalance (AEI) is an important genetic factor being the cause of differences in phenotypic traits that can be heritable. Studying AEI can be useful in searching for factors that modulate gene expression and help to understand molecular mechanisms underlying phenotypic changes. Although it was commonly recognized in many species and we know many genes show allelic expression imbalance, this phenomena was not studied on a larger scale in cattle. Using the pyrosequencing method we analyzed a set of 29 bovine genes in order to find those that have preferential allelic expression. The study was conducted in three tissues: liver, pituitary and kindey. Out of the studied group of genes 3 of them-LEP (leptin), IGF2 (insulin-like growth factor 2), CCL2 (chemokine C-C motif ligand 2) showed allelic expression imbalance.

  4. Cadmium levels in bovine liver and kidney from agricultural regions on and off the Canadian Shield, 1985-1988

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, R.; Suda, P. ); Luyken, H. )

    1989-11-01

    Over the past decade studies have revealed the presence of high cadmium (Cd) levels in the kidneys of several wildlife species living on Precambrian geological formations typified by the Canadian Shield and similar terrain in the Scandinavian countries. Following a visit to Canada, Frank reported high Cd readings in kidney from moose on the Canadian Shield, and this was confirmed for Ontario and for Quebec. In this study liver and kidney were collected and analyzed from bovine animals slaughtered on the Canadian Shield and those coming from farms on the glacial deposits south of the shield. Although an earlier study was conducted between 1980 and 1983 no separation was made between the two regions.

  5. Epoxidation of plasmalogens: source for long-chain alpha-hydroxyaldehydes in subcellular fractions of bovine liver.

    PubMed Central

    Loidl-Stahlhofen, A; Hannemann, K; Felde, R; Spiteller, G

    1995-01-01

    1. Masked long-chain alpha-hydroxyaldehydes were trapped in all subcellular fractions of bovine liver by application of pentafluorbenzyloxime derivatization [van Kuijk, Thomas, Stephens and Dratz (1986) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 139, 144-149] and quantified via GLC/MS using characteristic ion traces. 2. The chain-length profile of long-chain 2-hydroxyalkanales clearly indicates their relationship to plasmalogens as precursor molecules. 3. The previously postulated existence of alpha-acyloxyplasmalogens as precursor molecules of masked long-chain alpha-hydroxyaldehydes in bovine tissue lipids [Lutz and Spiteller (1991) Liebigs Ann. Chem. 1991, 563-567] was excluded. 4. The constant oxidation rate of plasmalogens in all subcellular fractions provides conclusive evidence for a non-enzymic plasmalogen epoxidation process (probably via hydroperoxy radicals). 5. The high reactivity of alpha-hydroxyaldehydes sheds some doubt on the postulation that plasmalogens protect mammalian cells against oxidative stress as postulated previously [Morand, Zoeller and Raetz (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 11590-11596; Morand, Zoeller and Raetz (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 11597-11606]. Images Figure 4 PMID:7639697

  6. Long-term stability of RNA in post-mortem bovine skeletal muscle, liver and subcutaneous adipose tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Bojlul; Monahan, Frank J; Moloney, Aidan P; Schmidt, Olaf; MacHugh, David E; Sweeney, Torres

    2007-01-01

    Background Recovering high quality intact RNA from post-mortem tissue is of major concern for gene expression studies in animals and humans. Since the availability of post-mortem tissue is often associated with substantial delay, it is important that we understand the temporal variation in the stability of total RNA and of individual gene transcripts so as to be able to appropriately interpret the data generated from such studies. Hence, the objective of this experiment was to qualitatively and quantitatively assess the integrity of total and messenger RNA extracted from bovine skeletal muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver stored at 4°C at a range of time points up to 22 days post-mortem. These conditions were designed to mimic the environment prevailing during the transport of beef from the abattoir to retail outlets. Results The 28S and 18S rRNA molecules of total RNA were intact for up to 24 h post-mortem in liver and adipose tissues and up to 8 days post-mortem in skeletal muscle. The mRNA of housekeeping genes (GAPDH and ACTB) and two diet-related genes (RBP5 and SCD) were detectable up to 22 days post-mortem in skeletal muscle. While the mRNA stability of the two housekeeping genes was different in skeletal muscle and liver, they were similar to each other in adipose tissue. After 22 days post-mortem, the relative abundance of RBP5 gene was increased in skeletal muscle and in adipose tissue and decreased in liver. During this period, the relative abundance of SCD gene also increased in skeletal muscle whereas it decreased in both adipose tissue and liver. Conclusion Stability of RNA in three tissues (skeletal muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver) subjected to long-term post-mortem storage at refrigeration temperature indicated that skeletal muscle can be a suitable tissue for recovering biologically useful RNA for gene expression studies even if the tissue is subjected to post-mortem storage for weeks, whereas adipose tissue and liver

  7. Formation of complexes between 125I-labelled human or bovine somatotropins and binding proteins in vivo in rat liver and kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Bonifacino, J S; Roguin, L P; Paladini, A C

    1983-01-01

    At 5 min after intravenous injection, both 125I-labelled human somatotropin and 125I-labelled bovine somatotropin were concentrated in rat liver and kidney. When the labelled hormones were administered along with an excess of the corresponding unlabelled hormone, a significant decrease of the uptake was observed in the liver, but not in the kidney. Study of the subcellular distribution of radioiodinated somatotropins in liver revealed that most of the radioactivity was specifically concentrated in the microsomal fraction. In contrast, the kidney fraction that accounted for most of the radioactivity was the 100 000 g supernatant. After solubilization, with 1% (w/v) Triton X-100, of the microsomal fractions obtained from both organs, the radioactive material was analysed by gel filtration on Sepharose CL-6B. By using this approach, it was demonstrated that both 125I-labelled human somatotropin and 125I-labelled bovine somatotropin bind in vivo to proteins present in liver. A small proportion of 125I-labelled human somatotropin was also shown to form complexes with proteins present in kidney. The present results demonstrate that the liver uptake is mainly due to binding of somatotropins to specific proteins, in contrast with the kidney, in which binding to specific sites contributes minimally to the overall uptake. PMID:6615460

  8. Investigation on the interaction between isorhamnetin and bovine liver catalase by spectroscopic techniques under different pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yumin; Li, Daojin

    2016-08-01

    The binding of isorhamnetin to bovine liver catalase (BLC) was first investigated at 302, 310 and 318 K at pH 7.4 using spectroscopic methods including fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism (CD) and UV-vis absorption. Spectrophotometric observations are rationalized mainly in terms of a static quenching process. The binding constants and binding sites were evaluated by fluorescence quenching methods. Enzymatic activity of BLC in the absence and presence of isorhamnetin was measured using a UV/vis spectrophotometer. The result revealed that the binding of isorhamnetin to BLC led to a reduction in the activity of BLC. The positive entropy change and enthalpy change indicated that the interaction of isorhamnetin with BLC was mainly driven by hydrophobic forces. The distance r between the donor (BLC) and acceptor (isorhamnetin) was estimated to be 2.99 nm according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, and CD spectra showed no obvious change in the conformation of BLC upon the binding of isorhamnetin. In addition, the influence of pH on the binding of isorhamnetin to BLC was investigated and the binding ability of the drug to BLC deceased under other pH conditions (pH 9.0, 6.5, 5.0, 3.5, or 2.0) as compared with that at pH 7.4. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26748824

  9. Effect of compatible and noncompatible osmolytes on the enzymatic activity and thermal stability of bovine liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Sepasi Tehrani, H; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Ghourchian, H; Ahmad, F; Kiany, A; Atri, M S; Ariaeenejad, Sh; Kavousi, K; Saboury, A A

    2013-12-01

    Catalase is an important antioxidant enzyme that catalyzes the disproportionation of H2O2 into harmless water and molecular oxygen. Due to various applications of the enzyme in different sectors of industry as well as medicine, the enhancement of stability of the enzyme is important. Effect of various classes of compatible as well as noncompatible osmolytes on the enzymatic activity, disaggregation, and thermal stability of bovine liver catalase have been investigated. Compatible osmolytes, proline, xylitol, and valine destabilize the denatured form of the enzyme and, therefore, increase its disaggregation and thermal stability. The increase in the thermal stability is accompanied with a slight increase of activity in comparison to the native enzyme at 25 °C. On the other hand, histidine, a noncompatible osmolyte stabilizes the denatured form of the protein and hence causes an overall decrease in the thermal stability and enzymatic activity of the enzyme. Chemometric results have confirmed the experimental results and have provided insight into the distribution and number of mole fraction components for the intermediates. The increase in melting temperature (Tm) and enzymatic rate could be further amplified by the intrinsic effect of temperature enhancement on the enzymatic activity for the industrial purposes. PMID:23249140

  10. [Ultrasonic and thermal inactivation of catalases from the bovine liver, the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, and the fungus Penicillium piceum].

    PubMed

    Potapovich, M V; Eremin, A N; Metelitsa, D I

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics of inactivation of catalases from bovine liver (CAT), the fungus Penicillium piceum (CAT1), and the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris (CAT2) was studied in phosphate buffer (pH 5.5 or 7.4) at 45 and 50 degrees C or under the conditions of exposure to low-frequency ultrasound (LFUS; 27 kHz, 60 W/cm2). The processes were characterized by effective first-order rate constants (s(-1)): kin (total inactivation), k*in in (thermal inactivation), and k*in (us) (ultrasonic inactivation). The values of kin and k*in increased in the following order: CAT1 < CAT < CAT2. CD spectra of the enzyme solutions were recorded in the course of inactivation by high temperatures (45 and 50 degrees C) and LFUS, and the ratios of secondary structures were calculated. Processes of thermal and ultrasonic inactivation of catalases were associated with a decrease in the content of alpha helices and an increase in that of antiparallel beta structures and irregular regions (CAT1 < CAT < CAT2). We conclude that the enzymes exhibit the following rank order of resistance: CAT1 > CAT >CAT2. Judging from the characteristics of CAT1, it appears to be an optimum component for antioxidant enzyme complexes. PMID:16358747

  11. Investigation on the interaction between isorhamnetin and bovine liver catalase by spectroscopic techniques under different pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yumin; Li, Daojin

    2016-08-01

    The binding of isorhamnetin to bovine liver catalase (BLC) was first investigated at 302, 310 and 318 K at pH 7.4 using spectroscopic methods including fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism (CD) and UV-vis absorption. Spectrophotometric observations are rationalized mainly in terms of a static quenching process. The binding constants and binding sites were evaluated by fluorescence quenching methods. Enzymatic activity of BLC in the absence and presence of isorhamnetin was measured using a UV/vis spectrophotometer. The result revealed that the binding of isorhamnetin to BLC led to a reduction in the activity of BLC. The positive entropy change and enthalpy change indicated that the interaction of isorhamnetin with BLC was mainly driven by hydrophobic forces. The distance r between the donor (BLC) and acceptor (isorhamnetin) was estimated to be 2.99 nm according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, and CD spectra showed no obvious change in the conformation of BLC upon the binding of isorhamnetin. In addition, the influence of pH on the binding of isorhamnetin to BLC was investigated and the binding ability of the drug to BLC deceased under other pH conditions (pH 9.0, 6.5, 5.0, 3.5, or 2.0) as compared with that at pH 7.4. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Covalent conjugation of tetrameric bovine liver catalase to liposome membranes for stabilization of the enzyme tertiary and quaternary structures.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Makoto; Sakamoto, Hideyuki; Shirakami, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    Tetrameric bovine liver catalase (BLC) is unstable because of its dissociation into subunits at low enzyme concentrations and the conformational change of the subunits at high temperatures. In this work, for stabilization of BLC, the enzyme was covalently conjugated with liposome membranes composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), cholesterol and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-glutaryl (NGPE). The NGPE, which was responsible for the BLC/membrane coupling, was altered from 0.05 to 0.2 in its liposomal mole fraction f(G). The catalase-conjugated liposome (CCL) with f(G) of 0.15 showed the maximum number of the conjugated BLC molecules of 28 per liposome. The reactivity of CCLs to H(2)O(2) was as high as that of free BLC at 25 degrees C in Tris-HCl buffer of pH 7.4. Among the CCLs, the catalyst with f(G) of 0.15 was the most stable at 55 degrees C in its enzyme activity in the buffer because the appropriate number of BLC/liposome covalent bonding prevented the dissociation-induced enzyme deactivation. Furthermore, the CCL showed much higher stability at 55 degrees C than the free BLC/enzyme-free liposome mixture and free BLC at the low BLC concentration of 340ng/mL. This was because BLC in the CCL was located in the vicinity of the host membrane regardless of the catalyst concentration, which could induce the effective stabilization effect of the membrane on the enzyme tertiary structure as indicated by the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence analysis. The results obtained demonstrate the high structural stability of BLC in the CCL system, which was derived from the covalent bonding and interaction between BLC and liposomes. PMID:19131221

  13. Non-oxygen-forming pathways of hydrogen peroxide degradation by bovine liver catalase at low hydrogen peroxide fluxes.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Herbert; Auferkamp, Oliver; Bramey, Thorsten; de Groot, Klaus; Kirsch, Michael; Korth, Hans-Gert; Petrat, Frank; Sustmann, Reiner

    2006-01-01

    Heme catalases are considered to degrade two molecules of H(2)O(2) to two molecules of H(2)O and one molecule of O(2) employing the catalatic cycle. We here studied the catalytic behaviour of bovine liver catalase at low fluxes of H(2)O(2) (relative to catalase concentration), adjusted by H(2)O(2)-generating systems. At a ratio of a H(2)O(2) flux (given in microM/min(- 1)) to catalase concentration (given in microM) of 10 min(- 1) and above, H(2)O(2) degradation occurred via the catalatic cycle. At lower ratios, however, H(2)O(2) degradation proceeded with increasingly diminished production of O(2). At a ratio of 1 min(- 1), O(2) formation could no longer be observed, although the enzyme still degraded H(2)O(2). These results strongly suggest that at low physiological H(2)O(2) fluxes H(2)O(2) is preferentially metabolised reductively to H(2)O, without release of O(2). The pathways involved in the reductive metabolism of H(2)O(2) are presumably those previously reported as inactivation and reactivation pathways. They start from compound I and are operative at low and high H(2)O(2) fluxes but kinetically outcompete the reaction of compound I with H(2)O(2) at low H(2)O(2) production rates. In the absence of NADPH, the reducing equivalents for the reductive metabolism of H(2)O(2) are most likely provided by the protein moiety of the enzyme. In the presence of NADPH, they are at least in part provided by the coenzyme. PMID:16298761

  14. Bovine liver dihydropyrimidine amidohydrolase: purification, properties, and characterization as a zinc metalloenzyme.

    PubMed

    Brooks, K P; Jones, E A; Kim, B D; Sander, E G

    1983-10-15

    Beef liver dihydropyrimidine amidohydrolase has been purified to homogeneity using both an electrophoretic and a hydrophobic chromatographic method. The enzyme is a tetramer with a molecular weight of 226,000 g mol-1, a subunit molecular weight of 56,500 g mol-1, and contains 4 mol of tightly bound (Ks greater than or equal to 1.33 X 10(9) M-1) Zn2+ per mole of active enzyme. The enzyme appears to be a true Zn2+ metalloenzyme because there exists a direct proportionality between enrichment of Zn2+ and active enzyme during purification, there is an almost quantitative relationship between the loss of both enzyme activity and Zn2+ during 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid treatment to form apoenzyme, Zn2+ and Co2+ reactivate dipicolinic acid-inhibited enzyme, and saturating concentrations of a substrate, dihydrothymine, protect against 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid inhibition. EDTA does not inhibit the enzyme; however, 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid, o-phenanthroline, and 2,6-dipicolinic acid cause a time-dependent loss in activity which follows pseudo-first-order kinetics. Analysis of the resulting kinetic data for these three chelators indicates that the reaction pathway involves the formation of an enzyme-Zn2+-chelator ternary complex which then dissociates to form apoenzyme and a Zn2+-chelator complex. Like other Zn2+ metalloenzymes, the enzyme is inhibited by a number of substituted sulfonamides. In the case of p-nitrobenzenesulfonamide, this inhibition is competitive in nature. Using the purified enzyme, kinetic constants were determined for a variety of dihydropyrimidines, ureidocarboxylic acids, and hydantoin substrates. Normal hyperbolic kinetics were observed for the hydrolysis of the cyclic compounds, but the cyclization of the ureidoacids showed biphasic kinetics and different values of Km can be estimated at either high or low concentrations of these substrates.

  15. Single-laboratory validation of a modified liquid chromatographic method with UV detection for determination of trenbolone residues in bovine liver and muscle.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, James D; Reid, JoAnn; Neiser, Constance D; Fesser, Adrian C E

    2003-01-01

    Trenbolone acetate is a synthetic testosterone analog registered for use in a number of countries as a growth-promoting hormone, applied as an implant in the ears of feedlot cattle. The method is intended for the detection and quantitation of trace amounts of alpha- and beta-trenbolone in bovine tissues (muscle, liver) by liquid chromatography (LC) with UV detection and eliminates the use of the structural analog, 19-nortestosterone, as an internal standard. Trenbolone residues are extracted from tissues that have been homogenized in sodium acetate with a 3-phase liquid-liquid extraction by adding a mixture of water-acetonitrile-dichloromethanehexane, with trenbolone residues preferentially partitioned into the middle acetonitrile layer. The extract is passed through solid-phase extraction cartridges (both C18 and silica gel) using, respectively, methanol-water and acetone-toluene as eluents. Reversed-phase high-performance LC separation is performed, an octadecyl-bonded column with methanol-acetonitrile-water used as mobile phase for sample analysis. The limit of detection is 0.2 ng/g in muscle tissue and 0.6 ng/g in liver tissue, with coefficients of variation of 3.5-12.1% for alpha- and beta-trenbolone at concentrations from 0.2 to 4.0 ng/g fortified in muscle and 3.3-26.0% from liver fortified at 0.6-10.0 ng/g. Absolute recoveries of 40-130% were observed, but the use of fortified matrix curves eliminated recovery correction. Critical control points were identified in a pH adjustment step and an evaporation step during method validation, which included ruggedness testing. Analysis of incurred tissues (bovine liver and muscle) stored at -20 degrees C for over 25 weeks did not identify any significant loss of residues. PMID:14632391

  16. Inhibitory effects of deferasirox on the structure and function of bovine liver catalase: a spectroscopic and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Moradi, M; Divsalar, A; Saboury, A A; Ghalandari, B; Harifi, A R

    2015-01-01

    Deferasirox (DFX), as an oral chelator, is used for treatment of transfusional iron overload. In this study, we have investigated the effects of DFX as an iron chelator, on the function and structure of bovine liver catalase (BLC) by different spectroscopic methods of UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) at two temperatures of 25 and 37 °C. In vitro kinetic studies showed that DFX can inhibit the enzymatic activity in a competitive manner. KI value was calculated 39 nM according to the Lineweaver-Burk plot indicating a high rate of inhibition of the enzyme. Intrinsic fluorescence data showed that increasing the drug concentrations leads to a significant decrease in the intrinsic emission of the enzyme indicating a significant change in the three-dimensional environment around the chromophores of the enzyme structure. By analyzing the fluorescence quenching data, it was found that the BLC has two binding sites for DFX and the values of binding constant at 25 and 37 °C were calculated 1.7 × 10(7) and 3 × 10(7) M(-1), respectively. The static type of quenching mechanism is involved in the quenching of intrinsic emission of enzyme. The thermodynamic data suggest that hydrophobic interactions play a major role in the binding reaction. UV-vis spectroscopy results represented the changes in tryptophan (Trp) absorption and Soret band spectra, which indicated changes in Trp and heme group position caused by the drug binding. Also, CD data represented that high concentrations of DFX lead to a significant decreasing in the content of β-sheet and random coil accompanied an increasing in α-helical content of the protein. The molecular docking results indicate that docking may be an appropriate method for prediction and confirmation of experimental results and also useful for determining the binding mechanism of proteins and drugs. According to above results, it can be concluded that the DFX can chelate the Fe(III) on the enzyme active site leading

  17. Inhibitory effects of deferasirox on the structure and function of bovine liver catalase: a spectroscopic and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Moradi, M; Divsalar, A; Saboury, A A; Ghalandari, B; Harifi, A R

    2015-01-01

    Deferasirox (DFX), as an oral chelator, is used for treatment of transfusional iron overload. In this study, we have investigated the effects of DFX as an iron chelator, on the function and structure of bovine liver catalase (BLC) by different spectroscopic methods of UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) at two temperatures of 25 and 37 °C. In vitro kinetic studies showed that DFX can inhibit the enzymatic activity in a competitive manner. KI value was calculated 39 nM according to the Lineweaver-Burk plot indicating a high rate of inhibition of the enzyme. Intrinsic fluorescence data showed that increasing the drug concentrations leads to a significant decrease in the intrinsic emission of the enzyme indicating a significant change in the three-dimensional environment around the chromophores of the enzyme structure. By analyzing the fluorescence quenching data, it was found that the BLC has two binding sites for DFX and the values of binding constant at 25 and 37 °C were calculated 1.7 × 10(7) and 3 × 10(7) M(-1), respectively. The static type of quenching mechanism is involved in the quenching of intrinsic emission of enzyme. The thermodynamic data suggest that hydrophobic interactions play a major role in the binding reaction. UV-vis spectroscopy results represented the changes in tryptophan (Trp) absorption and Soret band spectra, which indicated changes in Trp and heme group position caused by the drug binding. Also, CD data represented that high concentrations of DFX lead to a significant decreasing in the content of β-sheet and random coil accompanied an increasing in α-helical content of the protein. The molecular docking results indicate that docking may be an appropriate method for prediction and confirmation of experimental results and also useful for determining the binding mechanism of proteins and drugs. According to above results, it can be concluded that the DFX can chelate the Fe(III) on the enzyme active site leading

  18. Herbal adaptogens combined with protein fractions from bovine colostrum and hen egg yolk reduce liver TNF-α expression and protein carbonylation in Western diet feeding in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We examined if a purported anti-inflammatory supplement (AF) abrogated Western-diet (WD)-induced liver pathology in rats. AF contained: 1) protein concentrates from bovine colostrum and avian egg yolk; 2) herbal adaptogens and antioxidants; and 3) acetyl-L-carnitine. Methods Nine month-old male Brown Norway rats were allowed ad libitum access to WD for 41–43 days and randomly assigned to WD + AF feeding twice daily for the last 31–33 days (n = 8), or WD and water-placebo feeding twice daily for the last 31–33 days (n = 8). Rats fed a low-fat/low-sucrose diet (CTL, n = 6) for 41–43 days and administered a water-placebo twice daily for the last 31–33 days were also studied. Twenty-four hours following the last gavage-feed, liver samples were analyzed for: a) select mRNAs (via RT-PCR) as well as genome-wide mRNA expression patterns (via RNA-seq); b) lipid deposition; and, c) protein carbonyl and total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Serum was also examined for TAC, 8-isoprostane and clinical chemistry markers. Results WD + AF rats experienced a reduction in liver Tnf-α mRNA (-2.8-fold, p < 0.01). Serum and liver TAC was lower in WD + AF versus WD and CTL rats (p < 0.05), likely due to exogenous antioxidant ingredients provided through AF as evidenced by a tendency for mitochondrial SOD2 mRNA to increase in WD + AF versus CTL rats (p = 0.07). Liver fat deposition nor liver protein carbonyl content differed between WD + AF versus WD rats, although liver protein carbonyls tended to be lower in WD + AF versus CTL rats (p = 0.08). RNA-seq revealed that 19 liver mRNAs differed between WD + AF versus WD when both groups were compared with CTL rats (+/- 1.5-fold, p < 0.01). Bioinformatics suggest that AF prevented WD-induced alterations in select genes related to the transport and metabolism of carbohydrates in favor of select genes related to lipid transport and metabolism. Finally, serum clinical

  19. Kinetics of the inhibition of bovine liver dihydrofolate reductase by tea catechins: origin of slow-binding inhibition and pH studies.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Perán, Enma; Cabezas-Herrera, Juan; Hiner, Alexander N P; Sadunishvili, Tinatin; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno

    2005-05-24

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is the subject of intensive investigation since it appears to be the primary target enzyme for "antifolate" drugs, such as methotrexate and trimethoprim. Fluorescence quenching and stopped-flow fluorimetry show that the ester bond-containing tea polyphenols (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG) are potent and specific inhibitors of DHFR with inhibition constants (K(I)) of 120 and 82 nM, respectively. Both tea compounds showed the characteristics of slow-binding inhibitors of bovine liver DHFR. In this work, we have determined a complete kinetic scheme to explain the slow-binding inhibition and the pH effects observed during the inhibition of bovine liver DHFR by these tea polyphenols. Experimental data, based on fluorimetric titrations, and transient phase and steady-state kinetic studies confirm that EGCG and ECG are competitive inhibitors with respect to 7,8-dihydrofolate, which bind preferentially to the free form of the enzyme. The origin of their slow-binding inhibition is proposed to be the formation of a slow dissociation ternary complex by the reaction of NADPH with the enzyme-inhibitor complex. The pH controls both the ionization of critical catalytic residues of the enzyme and the protonation state of the inhibitors. At acidic pH, EGCG and ECG are mainly present as protonated species, whereas near neutrality, they evolve toward deprotonated species due to ionization of the ester-bonded gallate moiety (pK = 7.8). Although DHFR exhibits different affinities for the protonated and deprotonated forms of EGCG and ECG, it appears that the ionization state of Glu-30 in DHFR is critical for its inhibition. The physiological implications of these pH dependencies are also discussed. PMID:15895994

  20. Development and validation of a method for Cd, Pb and As analysis in bovine, equine and poultry liver by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lara, P C P; Fabrino, H J F; Germano, A; Silva, J B B Da

    2012-01-01

    A method for the determination of As, Cd and Pb in bovine, equine and poultry liver by ICP-MS was developed and validated. Samples were digested in a microwave oven using a 10% HNO(3) solution. A set of experiments was made according to a central composite design (CCD) for optimisation of the plasma argon flow, nebuliser argon flow and radiofrequency power applied to the plasma. During the validation, Rh and Ru were evaluated as internal standards and, after validation, the best was Rh for Pb and Cd analysis, but for As better results were obtained without an internal standard. The method allowed As, Cd and Pb determination with a 3.3% HNO(3) solution for the calibration curves ranging from 0 to 40 µg l(-1) for As and from 0 to 20 µg l(-1) for Cd and Pb. The recovery values obtained showed averages of 100%, 106% and 96% for As, Cd and Pb, respectively. Limits of quantification obtained were 85 µg kg(-1) for As, 6.5 µg kg(-1) for Cd and 12.5 µg kg(-1) for Pb. Repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility were evaluated through the indicators HORRAT(r) and HORRAT(R), and the results were less than 0.30. The method is simple, fast and showed adequate precision and accuracy for the determination of As, Cd and Pb in bovine, equine and poultry liver. The precision, recovery, uncertainties, and limits of detection and quantification for each analyte were in accordance to European Union Commission Regulation 2007/333/EC.

  1. Comparative oxidation of 2-propyn-1-ol with other low molecular weight unsaturated and saturated primary alcohols by bovine liver catalase in vitro.

    PubMed

    DeMaster, E G; Dahlseid, T; Redfern, B

    1994-01-01

    The oxidative metabolism of low molecular weight, saturated and unsaturated, primary alcohols, which include ethanol, allyl alcohol (2-propen-1-ol), and propargyl alcohol (2-propyn-1-ol), is generally accepted to occur via alcohol dehydrogenase; however, compared to other short-chain alcohols, 2-propyn-1-ol is a poor substrate for this enzyme. Accordingly, we have examined liver catalase as an alternative pathway for the oxidation or bioactivation of 2-propyn-1-ol to 2-propyn-1-al, a highly reactive alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde. The rates of oxidation for a series of low molecular weight, saturated, primary alcohols and selected unsaturated alcohols were determined for the bovine liver catalase-catalyzed reaction by measuring aldehyde production over time employing a GC procedure. A negative correlation was found for log rates of oxidation versus molecular size (volume) of the substrates (p < 0.01); however, the rate of oxidation for 2-propyn-1-ol was higher than predicted by this relation and was 30% greater than the oxidation rate determined for ethanol. In addition, 2-propyn-1-ol-derived 2-propyn-1-al inhibited the peroxidatic and catalytic activities of catalase, whereas 2-propen-1-ol-derived 2-propen-1-al had no effect on these activities of catalase. Inhibition was blocked by GSH; and the activity was not restored to the inhibited enzyme by GSH treatment or dialysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8075374

  2. Radiofrequency Ablation with a New Perfused-Cooled Electrode Using a Single Pump: An Experimental Study in Ex Vivo Bovine Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seung Kwon Seo, Jung Wook

    2005-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of a new perfused-cooled electrode that uses a single pump for creating a large ablation zone in explanted bovine liver. This was done by comparing with the radiofrequency (RF) ablation zones that were created with a monopolar cooled electrode to the RF ablation zones that were created by the new perfused-cooled electrode. We developed a new perfused-cooled electrode that uses a single pump by modifying a 17-gauge cooled electrode (Radionics) with a 2.5-cm outer metallic sheath (15-gauge) in order to allow use of the internal cooling water (5.85 % hypertonic saline) for the infused saline. Thirty ablation zones were created in explanted bovine livers (12-min ablation cycle; pulsed technique; 2000 mA, maximum) with three different regimens: group A, RF ablation with the 17-gauge cooled electrode; group B, RF ablation with the 15-gauge cooled electrode; group C, RF ablation with the perfused-cooled electrode. T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was obtained immediately after RF ablation for calculating volumes of the ablation zone. Following MR imaging, the ablation zones were excised and measured for transverse diameters and vertical diameters. The transverse diameter, vertical diameter, and the calculated volumes of the ablation zones on MR imaging were compared among the groups. Ablation zones created with the perfused-cooled electrode (group C) were significantly larger than those created with the 17-gauge cooled electrode (group A) and the 15-gauge cooled electrode (group B) according to the transverse diameter and vertical diameter on the gross specimens (p < 0.05): 3.6 {+-} 0.38 cm and 4.4 {+-} 0.20 cm in group A, 3.7 {+-} 0.08 cm and 4.6 {+-} 0.16 cm in group B, and 5.4 {+-} 0.65 cm and 6.0 {+-} 0.56 cm in group C, respectively. On the MR imaging, the calculated volumes of the ablation zones in group C were significantly larger than those in groups A and B (p < 0.05): 23.1 {+-} 8.7 cm{sup 3} in

  3. Liver.

    PubMed

    Kim, W R; Lake, J R; Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Schladt, D P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Wainright, J L; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    The median waiting time for patients with MELD ≥ 35 decreased from 18 days in 2012 to 9 days in 2014, after implementation of the Share 35 policy in June 2013. Similarly, mortality among candidates listed with MELD ≥ 35 decreased from 366 per 100 waitlist years in 2012 to 315 in 2014. The number of new active candidates added to the pediatric liver transplant waiting list in 2014 was 655, down from a peak of 826 in 2005. The number of prevalent candidates (on the list on December 31 of the given year) continued to decline, 401 active and 173 inactive. The number of deceased donor pediatric liver transplants peaked at 542 in 2008 and was 478 in 2014. The number of living donor liver pediatric transplants was 52 in 2014; most were from donors closely related to the recipients. Graft survival continued to improve among pediatric recipients of deceased donor and living donor livers. PMID:26755264

  4. Confirmatory analysis of sulfonamide antibacterials in bovine liver and kidney: extraction with hot water and liquid chromatography coupled to a single- or triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Bogialli, Sara; Curini, Roberta; Di Corcia, Antonio; Nazzari, Manuela; Sergi, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    A simple, specific, and rapid confirmatory method for determining 12 sulfonamide (SAs) antibacterials in bovine liver and kidney is presented. This method is based on the matrix solid-phase dispersion technique with hot water as extractant followed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) with an electrospray ion source. The method was tailored for use with both single-quadrupole MS (I) and triple-quadrupole MS (II) instruments. After acidification and filtration of the aqueous extract, a 250-microL aliquot was injected into instrument I while only 25 microL was analyzed by instrument II. With instrument I MS data acquisition was performed in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode, selecting at least three ions for each target compound. With instrument II the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode with three fragmentation reactions for each compound was chosen. With the exception of sulfaquinoxaline (SQX), recovery of the analytes at the 50 ppb level in both liver and kidney was 72-96% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranging between 3 and 11%. The very poor recovery of SQX was due to its rapid enzymatic oxidation when in contact with the two tissues. With instrument I, limits of quantification (LOQs, S/N = 10) were 5-14 ppb of SAs. Even lower LOQs (1-8 ppb) were estimated by using instrument II, even though the extract volume analyzed was ten times lower than that with instrument I. With both matrices and using instrument I, severe ion signal suppression was experienced for the early-eluted SAs when trying to fractionate analytes by using a short chromatographic run time. This effect was traced to polar endogenous co-extractives eluted in the first part of the chromatographic run that interfered with gas-phase ion formation for SAs. Adopting more selective chromatographic conditions minimized this effect. PMID:12772270

  5. Confirmatory analysis of sulfonamide antibacterials in bovine liver and kidney: extraction with hot water and liquid chromatography coupled to a single- or triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Bogialli, Sara; Curini, Roberta; Di Corcia, Antonio; Nazzari, Manuela; Sergi, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    A simple, specific, and rapid confirmatory method for determining 12 sulfonamide (SAs) antibacterials in bovine liver and kidney is presented. This method is based on the matrix solid-phase dispersion technique with hot water as extractant followed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) with an electrospray ion source. The method was tailored for use with both single-quadrupole MS (I) and triple-quadrupole MS (II) instruments. After acidification and filtration of the aqueous extract, a 250-microL aliquot was injected into instrument I while only 25 microL was analyzed by instrument II. With instrument I MS data acquisition was performed in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode, selecting at least three ions for each target compound. With instrument II the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode with three fragmentation reactions for each compound was chosen. With the exception of sulfaquinoxaline (SQX), recovery of the analytes at the 50 ppb level in both liver and kidney was 72-96% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranging between 3 and 11%. The very poor recovery of SQX was due to its rapid enzymatic oxidation when in contact with the two tissues. With instrument I, limits of quantification (LOQs, S/N = 10) were 5-14 ppb of SAs. Even lower LOQs (1-8 ppb) were estimated by using instrument II, even though the extract volume analyzed was ten times lower than that with instrument I. With both matrices and using instrument I, severe ion signal suppression was experienced for the early-eluted SAs when trying to fractionate analytes by using a short chromatographic run time. This effect was traced to polar endogenous co-extractives eluted in the first part of the chromatographic run that interfered with gas-phase ion formation for SAs. Adopting more selective chromatographic conditions minimized this effect.

  6. Spatial specificity and sensitivity of passive cavitation imaging for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound thermal ablation in ex vivo bovine liver

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Kevin; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Corregan, Nicholas M.; Holland, Christy K.; Mast, T. D.

    2014-01-01

    Passive cavitation images (PCIs) generated from scattered acoustic waves are a potential technique for monitoring lesion formation during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) thermal ablation. HIFU lesion prediction by PCIs was assessed in ex vivo bovine liver samples (N=14) during 30-s sonications with 1.1-MHz continuous-wave ultrasound (1989 W/cm^2 estimated spatial-peak intensity). Treated samples were sectioned, optically scanned, and the HIFU lesions segmented based on tissue discoloration. During each insonation, a 192-element, 7-MHz linear array (L7/Iris 2, Ardent Sound) passively recorded emissions from a plane containing the HIFU propagation axis oriented parallel to the image azimuth direction. PCIs were formed from beamformed A-lines filtered into fundamental, harmonic, ultraharmonic, and inharmonic frequency bands. Lesion prediction was tested using binary classification of local tissue ablation based on thresholded PCIs, with spatial specificity and sensitivity of lesion prediction quantified by the area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC). Tadpole-shaped lesions were best predicted by harmonic emissions (AUROC=0.76), prefocal lesions were best predicted by harmonic or ultraharmonic emissions (AUROC=0.86), and cigar-type focal lesions were best predicted by fundamental and harmonic emissions (AUROC=0.65). These results demonstrate spatial specificity and sensitivity when predicting HIFU lesions with PCIs. PMID:24817990

  7. Microwave ablation at 10.0 GHz achieves comparable ablation zones to 1.9 GHz in ex vivo bovine liver.

    PubMed

    Luyen, Hung; Gao, Fuqiang; Hagness, Susan C; Behdad, Nader

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of using high-frequency microwaves for tissue ablation by comparing the performance of a 10 GHz microwave ablation system with that of a 1.9 GHz system. Two sets of floating sleeve dipole antennas operating at these frequencies were designed and fabricated for use in ex vivo experiments with bovine livers. Combined electromagnetic and transient thermal simulations were conducted to analyze the performance of these antennas. Subsequently, a total of 16 ablation experiments (eight at 1.9 GHz and eight at 10.0 GHz) were conducted at a power level of 42 W for either 5 or 10 min. In all cases, the 1.9 and 10 GHz experiments resulted in comparable ablation zone dimensions. Temperature monitoring probes revealed faster heating rates in the immediate vicinity of the 10.0 GHz antenna compared to the 1.9 GHz antenna, along with a slightly delayed onset of heating farther from the 10 GHz antenna, suggesting that heat conduction plays a greater role at higher microwave frequencies in achieving a comparably sized ablation zone. The results obtained from these experiments agree very well with the combined electromagnetic/thermal simulation results. These simulations and experiments show that using lower frequency microwaves does not offer any significant advantages, in terms of the achievable ablation zones, over using higher frequency microwaves. Indeed, it is demonstrated that high-frequency microwave antennas may be used to create reasonably large ablation zones. Higher frequencies offer the advantage of smaller antenna size, which is expected to lead to less invasive interstitial devices and may possibly lead to the development of more compact multielement arrays with heating properties not available from single-element antennas.

  8. Improved bleeding scores using Gelfoam(®) Powder with incremental concentrations of bovine thrombin in a swine liver lesion model.

    PubMed

    Morse, Dennis C; Silva, Elif; Bartrom, Jolee; Young, Kelli; Bass, Eric J; Potter, David; Bieber, Trevor

    2016-10-01

    Topical hemostatic agents are used intra-operatively to prevent uncontrolled bleeding. Gelfoam(®) Powder contains a hemostatic agent prepared from purified pork skin gelatin, the efficacy of which is increased when combined with thrombin. However, the effect of increasing concentrations of thrombin on resultant hemostasis is not known. This study sought to evaluate the ability of various concentrations of thrombin in combination with Gelfoam Powder to control bleeding using a swine liver lesion model. Ten pigs underwent a midline laparotomy. Circular lesions were created in the left medial, right medial, and left lateral lobes; six lesions per lobe. Gelfoam Powder was hydrated with Thrombin-JMI(®) diluted to 250, 375, and 770 IU/mL. Each concentration was applied to two lesion sites per lobe. Bleeding scores were measured at 3, 6, 9, and 12 min using a 6-point system; comparison of bleeding scores was performed using ANOVA with the post hoc Tukey test. The bleeding scores with thrombin concentrations at 770 IU/mL were significantly lower than at 250 and 375 IU/mL at all four time points. The percentage of biopsies with a clinically acceptable bleeding score rose from 37.9, 46.6, and 71.2 % at 3 min to 55.2, 69.0, and 88.1 % at 12 min in the 250, 375, and 770 IU/mL thrombin groups, respectively. The study showed that the hemostatic response to thrombin was dose-related: using higher concentrations of thrombin with Gelfoam Powder yielded improved hemostasis, as determined by lower bleeding scores. PMID:27334382

  9. New Method for the Analysis of Flukicide and Other Anthelmintic Residues in Bovine Milk and Liver using LC-MS/MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) multi-residue method for the simultaneous quantification and identification of 38 residues of the most widely used anthelmintic veterinary drugs (including benzimidazoles, macrocyclic lactones, and flukicides) in milk and liver has been d...

  10. Subunit structure of the dihydrolipoyl transacylase component of branched-chain. cap alpha. -keto acid dehydrogenase complex from bovine liver: mapping of the lipoyl-bearing domain by limited proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-05

    To characterize the lipoyl-bearing domain of the dihydrolipoyl transacylase (E/sub 2/) component, purified branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase complex from bovine liver was reductively acylated with (U-/sup 14/C)..cap alpha..-ketoisovalerate in the presence of thiamin pyrophosphate and N-ethylmaleimide. Digestion of the modified complex with increasing concentrations of trypsin sequentially cleaved the E/sub 2/ polypeptide chain (M/sub r/ = 52,000) into five radiolabeled lipoyl-containing fragments, L/sub 1/-L/sub 5/. In addition, a lipoate-free inner E/sub 2/ core consisting of fragment A and fragment B was produced. Fragment A contains the active site for transacylation reaction and fragment B is the subunit-binding domain. Fragment L/sub 5/ and fragment B were stable and resistant to further tryptic digestion. Mouse antiserium against E/sub 2/ reacted only with fragments L/sub 1/, L/sub 2/, and L/sub 3/, and did not bind fragments L/sub 4/, L/sub 5/, A, and B as judged by immunoblotting analysis. The anti-E/sub 2/ serum-strongly inhibited the overall reaction catalyzed by the complex, but was without effect on the transacylation activity of E/sub 2/. Measurement of incorporation of (1-/sup 14/C)isobutyryl groups into the E/sub 2/ subunit indicated the presence of 1 lipoyl residue/E/sub 2/ chain.

  11. [Determination of five avermectins in bovine liver by on-line solid-phase extraction with hydrophobic monolithic column coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Yaoqin; Ai, Lianfeng; Wang, Xuesheng; Wang, Manman; Xu, Houjun; Hao, Yulan

    2015-06-01

    A method based on on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) with hydrophobic monolithic column coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed for the simultaneous determination of five avermectins in bovine liver. A poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic column was used as the sorbent. The parameters influenced on on-line SPE and separation process such as the loading mobile phase, the eluting flow rate and the solvent for the separation were investigated in detail. Blank samples, spiked samples, matrix effect and recovery experiments were investigated to evaluate the extraction efficiency and potential interfering compounds originating from the matrix. Under the optimized conditions, the method showed a linear range of 1-100 µg/L and the quantification limit of 5 µg/kg for each analyte. The presented method gave recoveries of 77.4%-98.4%. The relative standard deviations of intra-day and inter-day were 4.46%-8.03% and 4.79%-8.68%, respectively. Moreover, no significant changes were found in the extraction performance after more than 400 usages on one monolithic column, and even on the monoliths with various batches. The feasibility of the developed poly (butyl methacrylate-coethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic column based on the on-line SPE method for the determination of avermectins was further demonstrated by the analysis of real samples.

  12. Liver metastases

    MedlinePlus

    Metastases to the liver; Metastatic liver cancer; Liver cancer - metastatic; Colorectal cancer - liver metastases; Colon cancer - liver metastases; Esophageal cancer - liver metastases; Lung cancer - liver metastases; Melanoma - liver metastases

  13. Coordination modes of tyrosinate-ligated catalase-type heme enzymes: magnetic circular dichroism studies of Plexaura homomalla allene oxide synthase, Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis protein-2744c, and bovine liver catalase in their ferric and ferrous states.

    PubMed

    Bandara, D M Indika; Sono, Masanori; Bruce, Grant S; Brash, Alan R; Dawson, John H

    2011-12-01

    Bovine liver catalase (BLC), catalase-related allene oxide synthase (cAOS) from Plexaura homomalla, and a recently isolated protein from the cattle pathogen Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP-2744c (MAP)) are all tyrosinate-ligated heme enzymes whose crystal structures have been reported. cAOS and MAP have low (<20%) sequence similarity to, and significantly different catalytic functions from, BLC. cAOS transforms 8R-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid to an allene epoxide, whereas the MAP protein is a putative organic peroxide-dependent peroxidase. To elucidate factors influencing the functions of these and related heme proteins, we have investigated the heme iron coordination properties of these tyrosinate-ligated heme enzymes in their ferric and ferrous states using magnetic circular dichroism and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The MAP protein shows remarkable spectral similarities to cAOS and BLC in its native Fe(III) state, but clear differences from ferric proximal heme ligand His93Tyr Mb (myoglobin) mutant, which may be attributed to the presence of an Arg(+)-N(ω)-H···¯O-Tyr (proximal heme axial ligand) hydrogen bond in the first three heme proteins. Furthermore, the spectra of Fe(III)-CN¯, Fe(III)-NO, Fe(II)-NO (except for five-coordinate MAP), Fe(II)-CO, and Fe(II)-O(2) states of cAOS and MAP, but not H93Y Mb, are also similar to the corresponding six-coordinate complexes of BLC, suggesting that a tyrosinate (Tyr-O¯) is the heme axial ligand trans to the bound ligands in these complexes. The Arg(+)-N(ω)-H to ¯O-Tyr hydrogen bond would be expected to modulate the donor properties of the proximal tyrosinate oxyanion and, combined with the subtle differences in the catalytic site structures, affect the activities of cAOS, MAP and BLC. PMID:22104301

  14. [Liver and artificial liver].

    PubMed

    Chamuleau, R A

    1998-06-01

    Despite good results of orthotopic liver transplantation in patients with fulminant hepatic failure the need still exists for an effective and safe artificial liver, able to temporarily take over the complex liver function so as to bridge the gap with transplantation or regeneration. Attempts to develop non-biological artificial livers have failed, mostly when controlled clinical trials were performed. In the last decade several different types of bioartificial livers have been devised, in which the biocomponent consists of freshly isolated porcine hepatocytes or a human hepatoblastoma cell line. The majority use semipermeable hollow fibers known from artificial kidney devices. The liver cells may lie either inside or outside the lumen of these fibers. In vitro analysis of liver function and animal experimental work showing that the bioartificial liver increases survival justify clinical application. Bioartificial livers are connected to patients extracorporeally by means of plasmapheresis circuit for periods of about 6 hours. In different trials about 40 patients with severe liver failure have been treated. No important adverse effects have not been reported in these phase I trials. Results of controlled studies are urgently needed. As long as no satisfactory immortalised human liver cell line with good function is available, porcine hepatocytes will remain the first choice, provided transmission of porcine pathogens to man is prevented. PMID:9752034

  15. Molecular definition of bovine argininosuccinate synthetase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, J A; Healy, P J; Beaudet, A L; O'Brien, W E

    1989-01-01

    Citrullinemia is an inborn error of metabolism due to deficiency of the urea cycle enzyme, argininosuccinate synthetase [L-citrulline:L-aspartate ligase (AMP-forming), EC 6.3.4.5]. The disease was first described in humans but was recently reported in dairy cattle in Australia. Here we report the nucleotide sequence of the normal bovine cDNA for argininosuccinate synthetase and the mutation present in animals with citrullinemia. Analysis of DNA from affected animals by Southern blotting did not readily identify the mutation in the bovine gene. RNA (Northern) blotting revealed a major reduction in the steady-state amount of mRNA in the liver of affected animals to less than 5% of controls. The bovine cDNA was cloned and sequenced and revealed 96% identity with the deduced human sequence at the amino acid level. Starting with mutant bovine liver, the mRNA was reverse-transcribed; the cDNA product was amplified with the polymerase chain reaction, cloned, and sequenced. The sequence revealed a C----T transition converting arginine-86 (CGA) to a nonsense codon (TGA). A second C----T transition represented a polymorphism in proline-175 (CCC----CCT). The mutation and the polymorphism were confirmed by amplification of genomic DNA and demonstration with restriction endonuclease enzymes of both the loss of an Ava II site in DNA from mutant animals at codon 86 and the presence or absence of a Dde I site at codon 175. The loss of the Ava II site can be used for rapid, economical, nonradioactive detection of heterozygotes for bovine citrullinemia. Images PMID:2813370

  16. 77 FR 20319 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 93 RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products Correction In proposed rule...

  17. 78 FR 73993 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, and 98 RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products Corrections In rule document 2013-28228 appearing...

  18. Liver Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home / Before The Transplant / Organ Facts / Liver Organ Facts Heart Lung Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver ... Receiving "the call" About the Operation Heart Lung Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Liver Facts How the Liver Works The liver is one ...

  19. Liver Wellness

    MedlinePlus

    ... to liver wellness. • There are more than 100 liver diseases. • Liver disease is one of the top 10 causes of ... out of every 10 Americans is affected by liver disease. • Some liver diseases such as hepatitis A, hepatitis ...

  20. Rapid analysis of aminoglycoside antibiotics in bovine tissues using disposable pipette extraction and ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A high-throughput qualitative screening and identification method for 9 aminoglycosides of regulatory interest has been developed, validated, and implemented for bovine kidney, liver, and muscle tissues. The method involves extraction at previously validated conditions, cleanup using disposable pip...

  1. Liver biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - liver; Percutaneous biopsy ... the biopsy needle to be inserted into the liver. This is often done by using ultrasound. The ... the chance of damage to the lung or liver. The needle is removed quickly. Pressure will be ...

  2. Liver Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases. Viruses cause some of them, like hepatitis A, ... the skin, can be one sign of liver disease. Cancer can affect the liver. You could also ...

  3. Liver Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... You Can Use April May Calendar Liver Lowdown Mar 2014 Calendar of Events In The News Academic ... 2016 Calendar Jan Feb 2016 recipe Liver Lowdown Mar/Apr 2016 Liver Lowdown August 2016 Know Your ...

  4. Liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000205.htm Liver disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The term "liver disease" applies to many conditions that stop the liver ...

  5. Liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shennen A; Glorioso, Jaime M; Nyberg, Scott L

    2014-04-01

    The liver is unique in its ability to regenerate in response to injury. A number of evolutionary safeguards have allowed the liver to continue to perform its complex functions despite significant injury. Increased understanding of the regenerative process has significant benefit in the treatment of liver failure. Furthermore, understanding of liver regeneration may shed light on the development of cancer within the cirrhotic liver. This review provides an overview of the models of study currently used in liver regeneration, the molecular basis of liver regeneration, and the role of liver progenitor cells in regeneration of the liver. Specific focus is placed on clinical applications of current knowledge in liver regeneration, including small-for-size liver transplant. Furthermore, cutting-edge topics in liver regeneration, including in vivo animal models for xenogeneic human hepatocyte expansion and the use of decellularized liver matrices as a 3-dimensional scaffold for liver repopulation, are proposed. Unfortunately, despite 50 years of intense study, many gaps remain in the scientific understanding of liver regeneration.

  6. Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shennen A; Glorioso, Jaime M; Nyberg, Scott L

    2014-01-01

    The liver is unique in its ability to regenerate in response to injury. A number of evolutionary safeguards have allowed the liver to continue to perform its complex functions despite significant injury. Increased understanding of the regenerative process has significant benefit in the treatment of liver failure. Furthermore, understanding of liver regeneration may shed light on the development of cancer within the cirrhotic liver. This review will provide an overview of the models of study currently utilized in liver regeneration, the molecular basis of liver regeneration, and the role of liver progenitor cells in regeneration of the liver. Specific focus will be placed on clinical applications of current knowledge in liver regeneration including small for size liver transplant. Furthermore, cutting edge topics in liver regeneration including in vivo animal models for xenogeneic human hepatocyte expansion and the use of decellularized liver matrices as a three dimensional scaffold for liver repopulation will be proposed. Unfortunately, despite 50 years of intense study, many gaps remain in the scientific understanding of liver regeneration. PMID:24495569

  7. Phantom and animal tissues for modelling the electrical properties of human liver.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, P R; Rossetto, F; Prakash, M; Neuman, D G; Lee, T

    2003-01-01

    The dielectric properties of human liver were characterized over the frequency range of 0.3-3 GHz for freshly excised tissue samples of primary hepatocellular carcinoma, metastatic colorectal carcinoma, and normal liver tissues resected from the tumour margin. On average, the dielectric constant (epsilon(r)) of freshly excised human liver tumour was 12% higher than that of surrounding normal liver, and the electrical conductivity (sigma) of tumour was 24% higher. In order to establish suitable tissue models for human liver, the electrical properties were compared to measurements of homogenous phantom mixtures, in vitro bovine liver, and in vivo canine and porcine liver tissues. The data demonstrate that there are several animal tissues that can be used to model the average dielectric properties of human liver reasonably accurately, and use of the most readily available bovine liver appears well-justified, even when stored for up to 10 days in a refrigerator. Additionally, the dielectric properties of in vitro liver remained stable over a large temperature range, with sigma rising only 1.1%/ degrees C in porcine liver (15-37 degrees C) and 2.0%/ degrees C in bovine liver (10-90 degrees C), and epsilon(r) decreasing < or =0.2%/ degrees C in both tissues. This effort identifies homogeneous solid and liquid phantom models and several heterogeneous in vitro tissues that adequately model the dielectric properties of human liver tumours for use in quantitative studies of microwave power deposition in liver.

  8. Protein Crystal Bovine Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Bovine Insulin space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). Facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  9. Bovine milk exosome proteome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exosomes are 40-100 nm membrane vesicles of endocytic origin and are found in blood, urine, amniotic fluid, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, as well as human and bovine milk. Exosomes are extracellular organelles important in intracellular communication/signaling, immune function, and biomarkers ...

  10. [Bovine spongiform encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Suárez Fernández, G

    2001-01-01

    An histórical and conceptual review is made about Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy or mad cows disease and an epidemiological analysis as a present and future health problem. This analysis of BSE should not be negative, considering the truths that we know today. PMID:11783042

  11. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also referred to as “mad cow disease” is a chronic, non-febrile, neuro-degenerative disease affecting the central nervous system. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of domestic animals, of which BSE is a member includes scrapie of sheep...

  12. Genotyping bovine coronaviruses.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine coronaviruses (BoCV) are enveloped, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses of the Coronaviridae family. Infection is associated with enteritis and pneumonia in calves and Winter Dysentery in adult cattle. Strains, isolated more than 50 years ago, are used in vaccines and as laboratory ...

  13. American Liver Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... LALD) Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy (ICP) Liver Biopsy Liver Cancer Liver Cysts Liver Function Tests Liver Transplant Newborn ... community. It's Liver Awareness Month- and it's also Liver Cancer Awareness Month, so we've teamed with Bayer ...

  14. Discovery and Genomic Characterization of a Novel Ovine Partetravirus and a New Genotype of Bovine Partetravirus

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Herman; Tsoi, Hoi-Wah; Teng, Jade L. L.; Chen, Xin-Chun; Liu, Haiying; Zhou, Boping; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2011-01-01

    Partetravirus is a recently described group of animal parvoviruses which include the human partetravirus, bovine partetravirus and porcine partetravirus (previously known as human parvovirus 4, bovine hokovirus and porcine hokovirus respectively). In this report, we describe the discovery and genomic characterization of partetraviruses in bovine and ovine samples from China. These partetraviruses were detected by PCR in 1.8% of bovine liver samples, 66.7% of ovine liver samples and 71.4% of ovine spleen samples. One of the bovine partetraviruses detected in the present samples is phylogenetically distinct from previously reported bovine partetraviruses and likely represents a novel genotype. The ovine partetravirus is a novel partetravirus and phylogenetically most related to the bovine partetraviruses. The genome organization is conserved amongst these viruses, including the presence of a putative transmembrane protein encoded by an overlapping reading frame in ORF2. Results from the present study provide further support to the classification of partetraviruses as a separate genus in Parvovirinae. PMID:21980506

  15. Liver Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF, 341 KB)​​​​. Alternate Language URL Español Liver Biopsy Page Content On this page: What is a ... to Remember Clinical Trials What is a liver biopsy? A liver biopsy is a procedure that involves ...

  16. Fatty acid profiles in relation to triglyceride level in the liver of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi; Mohamed, Tharwat; Goto, Akiko; Oikawa, Shin; Kurosawa, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    To elucidate possible relationships between triglyceride (TG) levels and fatty acid composition in bovine liver, hepatic TG and seven individual fatty acids were measured in 23 Holstein dairy cows, of them 6 are healthy. Liver TG level was greater than 3 % in 12 cows which were ruled fatty liver. Palmitic and oleic acid proportions were significantly higher in fatty liver cows than in the healthy cows, while stearic acid was lower in fatty liver cows. With increased liver TG, stearic acid proportions decreased dramatically. Results indicate that hepatic lipidosis markedly alters the proportions of the various fatty acids in the liver of dairy cows.

  17. Liver transplantation☆

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, M.; Mennini, G.; Lai, Q.; Ginanni Corradini, S.; Drudi, F.M.; Pugliese, F.; Berloco, P.B.

    2007-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) involves the substitution of a diseased native liver with a normal liver (or part of one) taken from a deceased or living donor. Considered an experimental procedure through the 1980s, OLT is now regarded as the treatment of choice for a number of otherwise irreversible forms of acute and chronic liver disease. The first human liver transplantation was performed in the United States in 1963 by Prof. T.E. Starzl of the University of Colorado. The first OLT to be performed in Italy was done in 1982 by Prof. R. Cortesini. The procedure was successfully performed at the Policlinico Umberto I of the University of Rome (La Sapienza). The paper reports the indications for liver transplantation, donor selection and organ allocation in our experience, surgical technique, immunosuppression, complications and results of liver transplantation in our center. PMID:23396075

  18. Diagnostic imaging in bovine orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Johann; Geissbühler, Urs; Steiner, Adrian

    2014-03-01

    Although a radiographic unit is not standard equipment for bovine practitioners in hospital or field situations, ultrasound machines with 7.5-MHz linear transducers have been used in bovine reproduction for many years, and are eminently suitable for evaluation of orthopedic disorders. The goal of this article is to encourage veterinarians to use radiology and ultrasonography for the evaluation of bovine orthopedic disorders. These diagnostic imaging techniques improve the likelihood of a definitive diagnosis in every bovine patient but especially in highly valuable cattle, whose owners demand increasingly more diagnostic and surgical interventions that require high-level specialized techniques.

  19. In utero infection of swine fetuses with infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (bovine herpesvirus-1).

    PubMed

    Joo, H S; Dee, S A; Molitor, T W; Thacker, B J

    1984-10-01

    The pathogenesis of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) virus (bovine herpesvirus-1) was studied in porcine fetuses after in utero inoculation. Laparotomies were performed on 8 seronegative pregnant sows at 34 to 86 days of gestation, and all fetuses in 1 uterine horn of each sow were exposed to IBR virus via inoculation into the amniotic sacs. Fetuses in the other horn served as controls. Clinical signs of infection were not observed in the sows, except for 2 sows that aborted at postinoculation days (PID) 11 and 15. Fetuses of the remaining 6 sows were collected at slaughter on PID 15 to 28. Fetuses were examined for gross abnormalities, presence of IBR virus in tissues, and the formation of neutralizing antibodies to IBR virus. Of 33 inoculated fetuses from 6 sows, 10 were mummified, 11 were hemorrhagic and/or edematous, and 12 were alive. Necrotic lesions were observed on the skin and in the liver of dead and live fetuses. Virus was recovered from 29 of 33 inoculated fetuses. Infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus was isolated from fetal skin, liver, lungs, kidney, spleen, stomach contents, brain, amniotic fluid, and placenta. Virus was isolated from 4 of 11 fetuses recovered from 1 aborting sow. Antibodies to IBR virus were not detected in sera from the sows. However, antibodies were detected in 6 of 15 fetuses inoculated at 63 to 86 days of gestation and collected at slaughter at 86 to 112 days of gestation. The youngest fetus with detectable IBR antibody was estimated to be 74 days of gestation by measuring crown-rump length of the fetus.

  20. Contribution of mitochondria and peroxisomes to palmitate oxidation in rat and bovine tissues.

    PubMed

    Piot, C; Veerkamp, J H; Bauchart, D; Hocquette, J F

    1998-10-01

    Total and peroxisomal palmitate oxidation capacities and mitochondrial enzyme activities were compared in tissues from growing rats, preruminant calves and 15-month-old bulls. Total palmitate oxidation rates were 1.9-5.2-fold higher in rat than in bovine tissues and 1.7-fold higher in the heart and muscles from calves than from growing bulls. The peroxisomal contribution to palmitate oxidation was similar between rats and bovines (i.e. calves and bulls) in liver (35-51%), heart (26%) but not in muscles (14 +/- 3% in rats vs 33 +/- 4.5% in bovines, P < 0.05). Mitochondrial enzyme activities were 1.8-4.8-fold higher in rat than in bovine tissues but the citrate synthase to cytochrome-c oxidase ratio was the highest in the liver (17-38), intermediate in the heart and muscles from calves and rats (6-10) and the lowest in heart and muscles from bulls (2-3, P < 0.05). In all tissues and animal groups, palmitate oxidation rates were similar per unit cytochrome-c oxidase activity, but not always per unit citrate synthase activity. Therefore, differences in mitochondrial contents (as between rats and bovines) or in mitochondrial characteristics (as between liver and muscles) relate to the differences in palmitate oxidation capacity.

  1. Bovine myocardial epithelial inclusions.

    PubMed

    Baker, D C; Schmidt, S P; Langheinrich, K A; Cannon, L; Smart, R A

    1993-01-01

    Light microscopic, histochemical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural methods were used to examine myocardial epithelial masses in the hearts of ten cattle. The tissues consisted of paraffin-embedded or formalin-fixed samples from eight hearts that were being inspected in slaughter houses and from two hearts from calves that died of septicemia. The ages of the cattle ranged from 4 days to 12 years; the breeds were unspecified for all but one Hereford female and the two Holstein calves; and there were three males, four females, and three steers. The masses in these cases were compared with similar appearing lesions found in other animal species. The lesions in the bovine hearts were single to multiple, well circumscribed, found in the left ventricle wall, and composed of squamous to cuboidal epithelial cells that formed tubular, ductular, and acinar structures with lumens that were void or filled with amorphous protein globules. Electron microscopic examination revealed epithelial cells that had sparse apical microvilli, tight apical intercellular junctions, perinuclear bundles of filaments, and rare cilia. Almost half of the bovine epithelial masses (4/9) had occasional diastase-resistant periodic acid-Schiff-positive granules in their cytoplasm, and few had hyaluronidase-resistant alcian blue-positive granules (2/9) or colloidal iron-positive granules (1/9). All myocardial masses had abundant collagen surrounding the tubular and acinar structures, and 2/9 had elastin fibers as well. None of the myocardial masses had Churukian-Schenk or Fontana Masson's silver staining granules in epithelial cells. Immunohistochemically, all bovine myocardial tumors stained positively for cytokeratin (8/8), and occasional masses stained positively for vimentin (3/8) or carcinoembryonic antigen (3/8). None of the masses stained positively for desmin. The myocardial epithelial tumors most likely represent endodermal rests of tissue misplaced during organogenesis.

  2. Bovine Genital Mycoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Doig, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    Infection, lesions and clinical significance of Acheloplasmas, Mycoplasma bovis and Mycoplasma bovigenitalium in genital disease of cattle are described. A more detailed account is given of ureaplasma infections. Acute and chronic forms of granular vulvitis in both field and experimental disease are described as well as the role of the organism in abortion. Recovery rates of ureaplasma and mycoplasma from semen and preputial washings in bulls are outlined and their significance in disease is discussed. There are problems in differentiating pathogenic from nonpathogenic isolates. Methods are being developed to treat semen for these organisms. This paper provides a concise summary of clinical and microbiological aspects of bovine genital mycoplasmosis. PMID:7337908

  3. Bovine coronavirus hemagglutinin protein.

    PubMed

    King, B; Potts, B J; Brian, D A

    1985-02-01

    Treatment of purified bovine coronavirus (Mebus strain) with pronase destroyed the integrity of virion surface glycoproteins gp140, gp120, gp100, reduced the amount of gp26 and destroyed the hemagglutinating activity of the virus. Bromelain, on the other hand, destroyed the integrity of gp120, gp100 and gp26 but failed to remove gp140 and failed to destroy viral hemagglutinating activity. These experiments suggest that gp140 is the virion hemagglutinin. Immunoblotting studies using monospecific antiserum demonstrate that gp140 is a disulfide-linked dimeric structure reducible to monomers of 65 kDa.

  4. Preparation of bovine serum albumin nanospheres as drug targeting carriers.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Y; Takayama, K; Ueda, H; Machida, Y; Nagai, T

    1987-12-01

    Bovine serum albumin nanospheres (BSA-NS) of mean diameter about 170 nm were prepared by means of the tanning method with glutaraldehyde, and their efficacy as drug targeting carriers was evaluated. To gain insight of biodegradability, BSA microspheres (BSA-MS) were first administered to rats and their distributions in the lungs and liver were observed by a scanning electron microscope. A large amount of BSA-MS was found in the lungs and their surface was slightly degraded at 1 week after the administration. For investigating biocompatibility, the weight increase of the spleen and liver was measured after the administration of the BSA-NS to mice. The spleen weight of the group receiving BSA-NS was equivalent to that of the control group, though the liver weight was significantly increased. It was observed that conjugates of BSA-NS with antibody selectively concentrated on the surface of Sepharose beads which were coated with antigen.

  5. Liver spots

    MedlinePlus

    Sun-induced skin changes - liver spots; Senile or solar lentigines; Skin spots - aging; Age spots ... Liver spots are changes in skin color that occur in older skin. The coloring may be due to aging, exposure to the sun or other sources of ...

  6. Systemic kappaAL amyloidosis associated with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, H; Yamamoto, S; Sako, T; Hirayama, K; Higuchi, H; Nagahata, H

    2000-01-01

    Histopathologic and immunohistochemical examinations were conducted on a 5-year-old Holstein-Friesian cow with systemic kappaAL amyloidosis associated with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency. Amyloid deposits were present in the perivascular and intercellular spaces of the visceral organs, such as the liver, kidneys, pancreas, adrenal glands, and upper alimentary tract. Amyloid was stained positively with Congo red with or without 5% potassium permanganate pretreatment and had green birefringence observed under polarized light. Immunohistochemically, amyloid reacted strongly against anti-bovine IgG (H+L) and anti-bovine kappa-light chain and reacted weakly against bovine X-light chain antibodies but was negative for anti-human amyloid AA antibody. This is the first description of AL amyloidosis immunohistochemically related to immunoglobulin kappa-light chains of precursor protein in cattle. PMID:10643989

  7. The bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor: A receptor with low affinity for benzodiazepines

    SciTech Connect

    Parola, A.L.; Laird, H.E. II )

    1991-01-01

    The density of bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) in four tissues was highest in adrenal cortex. The adrenal cortex PBR cofractionated with a mitochondrial membrane marker enzyme and could be solubilized with intact ligand binding properties using digitonin. The membrane bound and soluble mitochondrial receptors were pharmacologically characterized and showed the rank order of potency to inhibit ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding was PK 11195 > protoporphyrin IX > benzodiazepines. ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding to bovine adrenal mitochondria was unaffected by diethylpyrocarbonate, a histidine residue modifying reagent that decreased binding to rat liver mitochondria by 70%. ({sup 3}H)PK 14105 photolabeled the bovine PBR and the Mr was estimated under nondenaturing and denaturing conditions. These results demonstrate the bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor is pharmacologically and biochemically distinct from the rat receptor, but the receptor component photolabeled by an isoquinoline ligand has a similar molecular weight.

  8. Identification of bovine hibernation-specific protein complex and evidence of its regulation in fasting and aging.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Satoshi; Okamoto, Ryuji; Taniguchi, Masaya; Ban-Tokuda, Tomomi; Konishi, Katsuhisa; Goto, Itaru; Yamamoto, Yasunari; Sugimoto, Kazushi; Takamatsu, Nobuhiko; Nakamura, Mashio; Shiraki, Katsuya; Buechler, Christa; Ito, Masaaki

    2013-05-01

    Hibernation-specific protein (HP) is a plasma protein that regulates hibernation in chipmunks. The HP complex (HP20c) consists of three homologous proteins, HP20, HP25 and HP27, all produced by liver and belonging to the C1q family. To date, HP20c has not been identified in any mammalian species except chipmunk and ground squirrel hibernators. Here, we report a bovine HP20 gene isolated from liver tissue and aortic endothelial cells. Total homology between bovine and chipmunk variants was 63% at the amino acid level. Gene expression was highest in the liver. Western blot revealed HP20 protein in foetal, newborn, calf and adult serum, with highest concentrations in the adult. Similar proteins were detected in sera of other ruminants but not in humans, bears, mice or rats. Bovine HP20 protein was found mainly in ovaries, stomach, heart, kidneys, lungs, testes and prostate, but not in the skeletal muscle. Native HP20 was purified from bovine adult serum as a complex containing 25 and 27 kDa proteins. Mass spectrometry revealed that these proteins are orthologues of chipmunk HP25 and HP27, respectively. Interestingly, bovine HP20 was highly expressed in cattle serum after fasting. Native bovine HP20c may be a useful tool for investigating HP function.

  9. Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Michalopoulos, George K.

    2009-01-01

    Liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy is a very complex and well-orchestrated phenomenon. It is carried out by the participation of all mature liver cell types. The process is associated with signaling cascades involving growth factors, cytokines, matrix remodeling, and several feedbacks of stimulation and inhibition of growth related signals. Liver manages to restore any lost mass and adjust its size to that of the organism, while at the same time providing full support for body homeostasis during the entire regenerative process. In situations when hepatocytes or biliary cells are blocked from regeneration, these cell types can function as facultative stem cells for each other. PMID:17559071

  10. What Is Liver Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Key statistics about liver cancer What is liver cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body ... structure and function of the liver. About the liver The liver is the largest internal organ. It ...

  11. Benign Liver Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search: Your Liver Liver Health and Wellness Recipes Liver Disease Information Patients & Families Caregiver's FAQ Become an Organ ... 2013 Liver Awareness Month Personal Story - David Roncori Liver Disease - The Big Picture 13 Ways to a Healthy ...

  12. Thioltransferase activity of bovine lens glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed Central

    Dal Monte, M; Cecconi, I; Buono, F; Vilardo, P G; Del Corso, A; Mura, U

    1998-01-01

    A Mu-class glutathione S-transferase purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from bovine lens displayed thioltransferase activity, catalysing the transthiolation reaction between GSH and hydroxyethyldisulphide. The thiol-transfer reaction is composed of two steps, the formation of GSSG occurring through the generation of an intermediate mixed disulphide between GSH and the target disulphide. Unlike glutaredoxin, which is only able to catalyse the second step of the transthiolation process, glutathioneS-transferase catalyses both steps of the reaction. Data are presented showing that bovine lens glutathione S-transferase and rat liver glutaredoxin, which was used as a thioltransferase enzyme model, can operate in synergy to catalyse the GSH-dependent reduction of hydroxyethyldisulphide. PMID:9693102

  13. Pathogenesis of bovine neosporosis.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Buxton, D; Wouda, W

    2006-05-01

    The protozoan parasite Neospora caninum is a major pathogen of cattle and dogs, being a significant cause of abortion in cattle in many countries. It is one of the most efficiently transmitted parasites, with up to 90% of cattle infected in some herds. The pathogenesis of abortion due to Neospora is complex and only partially understood. Losses occur after a primary infection during pregnancy but more commonly as the result of recrudescence of a persistent infection during pregnancy. Parasitaemia is followed by invasion of the placenta and fetus. It is suggested that abortion occurs when primary parasite-induced placental damage jeopardises fetal survival directly or causes release of maternal prostaglandins that in turn cause luteolysis and abortion. Fetal damage may also occur due to primary tissue damage caused by the multiplication of N. caninum in the fetus or due to insufficient oxygen/nutrition, secondary to placental damage. In addition, maternal immune expulsion of the fetus may occur associated with maternal placental inflammation and the release of maternal pro-inflammatory cytokines in the placenta. Thus N. caninum is a primary pathogen capable of causing abortion either through maternal placental inflammation, maternal and fetal placental necrosis, fetal damage, or a combination of all three. The question of how N. caninum kills the fetus exposes the complex and finely balanced biological processes that have evolved to permit bovine and other mammalian pregnancies to occur. Defining these immunological mechanisms will shed light on potential methods of control of bovine neosporosis and enrich our understanding of the continuity of mammalian and protozoal survival. PMID:16712863

  14. Liver Panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver; the best test for detecting hepatitis Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) – an enzyme related to the bile ducts ... only moderately elevated or close to normal. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) ALP may be significantly increased with obstructed ...

  15. Liver transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... toxins in the blood Storing sugars, fats, iron, copper, and vitamins The most common reason for a ... cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis Metabolic disorders of copper or iron ( Wilson's disease and hemochromatosis ) Liver transplant ...

  16. Liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, E. J.; Iredale, J. P.

    1998-01-01

    Liver fibrosis and its related complications continue to represent a significant worldwide healthcare burden. Over the past decade there has been considerable improvement in our understanding of the cellular mechanisms and pathophysiology underlying hepatic fibrosis. This greater insight into the relevant basic sciences may lead to the development of novel treatment strategies designed to block the fibrogenic cascade or even enhance matrix degradation. In addition, there have been significant advances in the management of the complications of cirrhosis, with specific treatments now available for some conditions. Perhaps most notably, liver transplantation is now a highly successful treatment for end-stage liver disease and should be considered in all patients with chronic liver disease. PMID:9683971

  17. Building trust on bovine TB.

    PubMed

    Woodroffe, Rosie

    2014-03-01

    Opinion on how best to control bovine TB remains divided, particularly with regard to badgers. Rosie Woodroffe believes that vets have a constructive role to play in the debate and helping farmers locally. PMID:24736823

  18. Pathology of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Domingo, M; Vidal, E; Marco, A

    2014-10-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a chronic granulomatous caseous-necrotising inflammatory process that mainly affects the lungs and their draining lymph nodes (Ln.). The pathological changes associated with bTB infection reflect the interplay between the host defence mechanisms and the mycobacterial virulence factors and the balance between the immunologic protective responses and the damaging inflammatory processes. Inhalation is the most common infection route and causes lesions of the nasopharynx and lower respiratory tract, including its associated lymph nodes. The initial infection (primary complex) may be followed by chronic (post-primary) tuberculosis or may be generalised. Goat tuberculosis often produces liquefactive necrosis and caverns, similarly to human TB. The assessment of the severity of TB lesions is crucial for vaccine trials. Semi-quantitative gross lesion scoring systems have been developed for cattle, but imaging technology has allowed the development of more standardised, objective, and quantitative methods, such as multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), which provides quantitative measures of lesion volume. PMID:24731532

  19. Bovine respiratory disease model based on dual infections with infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine corona virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the leading cause of economic loss in the U.S. cattle industry. BRDC likely results from simultaneous or sequential infections with multiple pathogens including both viruses and bacteria. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine corona virus (BoCV...

  20. Corset liver

    SciTech Connect

    Philips, D.M.; LaBrecque, D.R.; Shirazi, S.S.

    1985-08-01

    The authors describe four patients with a benign hepatic malformation most consistent with the rarely described anomaly known as corset liver. Three of these patients were extensively evaluated to rule out a malignancy because of an abdominal mass. These patients illustrate several features which may help in making the diagnosis and avoiding unnecessary surgery.

  1. Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Primary liver cell carcinoma; Tumor - liver; Cancer - liver; Hepatoma ... Hepatocellular carcinoma accounts for most liver cancers. This type of cancer occurs more often in men than women. It is usually diagnosed in people age 50 or older. Hepatocellular ...

  2. Liver disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - liver disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on liver disease : American Liver Foundation -- www.liverfoundation.org Children's Liver Association for Support Services -- www.classkids.org Hepatitis ...

  3. Tests for Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer Next Topic Liver cancer stages Tests for liver cancer If you have some of the signs ... cancer has come back (recurred). Other blood tests Liver function tests (LFTs): Because liver cancer often develops ...

  4. Bovine Parathyroid Hormone: Amino Acid Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, H. Bryan; Ronan, Rosemary

    1970-01-01

    Bovine parathyroid hormone has been isolated in homogeneous form, and its complete amino acid sequence determined. The bovine hormone is a single chain, 84 amino acids long. It contains amino-terminal alanine, and carboxyl-terminal glutamine. The bovine parathyroid hormone is approximately three times the length of the newly discovered hormone, thyrocalcitonin, whose action is reciprocal to parathyroid hormone. Images PMID:5275384

  5. Material Properties of Inorganic Bovine Cancellous Bovine: Nukbone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piña, Cristina; Palma, Benito; Munguía, Nadia

    2006-09-01

    In this work, inorganic cancellous bovine bone implants prepared in the Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales — UNAM were characterized. Elementary chemical analysis was made, toxic elements concentration were measured and the content of organic matter also. These implants fulfill all the requirements of the ASTM standards, and therefore it is possible their use in medical applications.

  6. A catalogue of novel bovine long noncoding RNA across 18 tissues.

    PubMed

    Koufariotis, Lambros T; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe; Chamberlain, Amanda; Vander Jagt, Christy; Hayes, Ben J

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) have been implicated in diverse biological roles including gene regulation and genomic imprinting. Identifying lncRNA in bovine across many differing tissue would contribute to the current repertoire of bovine lncRNA, and help further improve our understanding of the evolutionary importance and constraints of these transcripts. Additionally, it could aid in identifying sites in the genome outside of protein coding genes where mutations could contribute to variation in complex traits. This is particularly important in bovine as genomic predictions are increasingly used in genetic improvement for milk and meat production. Our aim was to identify and annotate novel long non coding RNA transcripts in the bovine genome captured from RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) data across 18 tissues, sampled in triplicate from a single cow. To address the main challenge in identifying lncRNA, namely distinguishing lncRNA transcripts from unannotated genes and protein coding genes, a lncRNA identification pipeline with a number of filtering steps was developed. A total of 9,778 transcripts passed the filtering pipeline. The bovine lncRNA catalogue includes MALAT1 and HOTAIR, both of which have been well described in human and mouse genomes. We attempted to validate the lncRNA in libraries from three additional cows. 726 (87.47%) liver and 1,668 (55.27%) blood class 3 lncRNA were validated with stranded liver and blood libraries respectively. Additionally, this study identified a large number of novel unknown transcripts in the bovine genome with high protein coding potential, illustrating a clear need for better annotations of protein coding genes.

  7. Cartilage (Bovine and Shark) (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and use of cartilage as a complementary or alternative treatment for cancer? Cartilage from cows (bovine cartilage) and sharks has ... of CAM therapies originally considered to be purely alternative approaches are finding a place in cancer treatment—not as cures, but as complementary therapies that ...

  8. 78 FR 72979 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ... of the proposed rule would be applicable to domesticated water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis). The... disagrees with the commenter that the domesticated water buffalo should be included in the definition of bovines. Current trade in water buffalo products is primarily in semen and embryos and in dairy...

  9. Analysis of Heparins Derived From Bovine Tissues and Comparison to Porcine Intestinal Heparins.

    PubMed

    St Ange, Kalib; Onishi, Akihiro; Fu, Li; Sun, Xiaojun; Lin, Lei; Mori, Daisuke; Zhang, Fuming; Dordick, Jonathan S; Fareed, Jawed; Hoppensteadt, Debra; Jeske, Walter; Linhardt, Robert J

    2016-09-01

    Heparin is a widely used clinical anticoagulant. It is also a linear glycosaminoglycan with an average mass between 10 and 20 kDa and is primarily made up of trisulfated disaccharides comprised of 1,4-linked iduronic acid and glucosamine residues containing some glucuronic acid residues. Heparin is biosynthesized in the Golgi of mast cells commonly found in the liver, intestines, and lungs. Pharmaceutical heparin currently used in the United States is primarily extracted from porcine intestines. Other sources of heparin including bovine intestine and bovine lung are being examined as potential substitutes for porcine intestinal heparin. These additional sources are intended to serve to diversify the heparin supply, making this lifesaving drug more secure. The current study examines bovine heparins prepared from both intestines and lung and compares these to porcine intestinal heparin. The structural properties of these heparins are examined using nuclear magnetic resonance, gel permeation chromatography, and disaccharide analysis of heparinase-catalyzed depolymerized heparin. The in vitro functional activities of these heparins have also been determined. The goal of this study is to establish the structural and functional similarities and potential differences between bovine and porcine heparins. Porcine and bovine heparins have structural and compositional similarities and differences. PMID:27084870

  10. Locus Characterization and Gene Expression of Bovine FNDC5: Is the Myokine Irisin Relevant in Cattle?

    PubMed Central

    Komolka, Katrin; Albrecht, Elke; Schering, Lisa; Brenmoehl, Julia; Hoeflich, Andreas; Maak, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane protein FNDC5 was recently characterized as precursor of an exercise induced myokine named irisin. Previous studies found a relationship between circulating irisin levels and muscle mass in humans. Consequently, we tested the hypothesis whether FNDC5/irisin is involved in the modulation of body composition in cattle. Since information on the bovine FNDC5 locus was scarce, we characterized the gene experimentally as prerequisite for these investigations. We provide here a revised and extended gene model for bovine FNDC5. Although similarly organized like the human and murine loci, a higher variability was observed at transcript level in the bovine locus. FNDC5 mRNA was abundant in bovine skeletal muscle and was detected at lower levels in adipose tissue and liver. There were no expression differences between two groups of bulls highly different in muscularity and adiposity. Full-length FNDC5 protein (25 kDa) was present in bovine skeletal muscle independent of muscularity. Neither FNDC5 nor its putatively secreted peptide irisin were found in circulation of bulls. In contrast, we demonstrated that FNDC5 (25 kDa) and irisin (12 kDa) were present in murine skeletal muscle and that irisin was circulating in murine serum. This indicates fundamental differences in the regulation of FNDC5 and irisin between rodents and cattle. PMID:24498244

  11. Liver Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... food, store energy, and remove poisons. Liver function tests are blood tests that check to see how well your liver ... hepatitis and cirrhosis. You may have liver function tests as part of a regular checkup. Or you ...

  12. Liver Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... herbal supplements you are taking. What are normal ranges for liver function tests? Normal ranges for liver function tests can vary by age, ... other factors. Laboratory test results usually provide normal ranges for each liver function test with your results. ...

  13. Progression of Liver Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... You Can Use April May Calendar Liver Lowdown Mar 2014 Calendar of Events In The News Academic ... 2016 Calendar Jan Feb 2016 recipe Liver Lowdown Mar/Apr 2016 Liver Lowdown August 2016 Know Your ...

  14. Pyogenic liver abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Liver abscess; Bacterial liver abscess ... There are many potential causes of liver abscesses, including: Abdominal infection, such as appendicitis , diverticulitis , or a perforated bowel Infection in the blood Infection of the bile draining tubes ...

  15. Diet and Your Liver

    MedlinePlus

    ... scarring of your liver (cirrhosis). For people with liver disease, even a small amount of alcohol can make ... time. Eating an unhealthy diet can lead to liver disease. For example, a person who eats a lot ...

  16. Asymmetrical hypersensitivity to bovine collagen.

    PubMed

    Somerville, P; Wray, R C

    1993-05-01

    We report a unique patient with true asymmetrical hypersensitivity to bovine collagen. Hypersensitivity is the development of an inflammatory response at a treatment site after a negative skin test. She developed an inflammatory response in only one of two simultaneously injected sites. About 1.5% of patients with a negative skin test have a hypersensitivity reaction consisting of firmness, erythema, and swelling. The signs and symptoms generally resolve spontaneously in a few months.

  17. LIVER MICROSOMES

    PubMed Central

    Palade, G. E.; Siekevitz, P.

    1956-01-01

    Rat liver, liver homogenates, and microsome fractions separated therefrom were examined systematically in the electron microscope in sections of OsO4-fixed, methacrylate-embedded tissue and pellets. It was found that most microsomes are morphologically identical with the rough surfaced elements of the endoplasmic reticula of hepatic cells. They appear as isolated, membrane-bound vesicles, tubules, and cisternae which contain an apparently homogeneous material of noticeable density, and bear small, dense particles (100 to 150 A) attached to their outer aspect. In solutions of various osmolar concentrations they behave like osmometers. The findings suggest that they derive from the endoplasmic reticulum by a generalized pinching-off process rather than by mechanical fragmentation. The microsome fractions contain in addition relatively few vesicles free of attached particles, probably derived from the smooth surfaced parts of the endoplasmic reticula. Dense, peribiliary bodies represent a minor component of the same fractions. The microsomes derived from 1 gm. wet weight liver pulp contained (averages of 10 experiments) 3.09 mg. protein N, 3.46 mg. RNA (RNA/protein N = 1.12), and 487 µg. phospholipide P. They displayed DPNH-cytochrome c reductase activity and contained an alcohol-soluble hemochromogen. The microsome preparations proved resistant to washing and "aging." Treatment with versene and incubation with ribonuclease (30 minutes at 37°C.) resulted in appreciable losses of RNA and in partial or total disappearance of attached particles. Treatment with deoxycholate (0.3 to 0.5 per cent, pH = 7.5) induced a partial clarification of the microsome suspensions which, upon centrifugation, yielded a small pellet of conglomerated small, dense particles (100 to 150 A) with only occasionally interspersed vesicles. The pellet contained ∼80 to 90 per cent of the RNA and ∼20 per cent of the protein N of the original microsomes. The supernatant accounted satisfactorily

  18. Identification of an outer membrane protein of Fusobacterium necrophorum subsp. necrophorum that binds with high affinity to bovine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Menon, Sailesh; Nagaraja, T G; Narayanan, Sanjeev

    2015-03-23

    Fusobacterium necrophorum, a Gram-negative anaerobe, is the primary etiologic agent of liver abscesses in cattle. There are two subspecies; subsp. necrophorum and subsp. funduliforme, which differ in morphological, biochemical, molecular characteristics, and virulence. The subsp. necrophorum, which is more virulent, occurs more frequently in liver abscesses than the subsp. funduliforme. Bacterial adhesion to the host cell surface is critical to the pathogenesis of several bacterial infections, and in F. necrophorum, outer membrane proteins (OMP) have been shown to mediate adhesion to bovine endothelial cells. The objective of this study was to identify potential adhesins that are involved in adhesion of F. necrophorum subsp. necrophorum to the host cells. An OMP of 42.4 kDa, which binds with high affinity to the bovine endothelial cells and is recognized by the sera from cattle with liver abscesses, was identified. N-terminal sequencing of the protein showed 96% homology to the FomA protein of F. nucleatum. The PCR analysis showed that this fomA gene was present in several strains of subsp. necrophorum, subsp. funduliforme of bovine and subsp. funduliforme of human origin. The purified native and recombinantly expressed protein when preincubated with the endothelial cells, prevented the attachment of subsp. necrophorum significantly. In addition, the polyclonal antibody produced against the protein prevented the binding of subsp. necrophorum to bovine endothelial cells.

  19. Genetic relationship between the Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto cysts located in lung and liver of hosts.

    PubMed

    Oudni-M'rad, Myriam; Cabaret, Jacques; M'rad, Selim; Chaâbane-Banaoues, Raja; Mekki, Mongi; Zmantar, Sofien; Nouri, Abdellatif; Mezhoud, Habib; Babba, Hamouda

    2016-10-01

    G1 genotype of Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto is the major cause of hydatidosis in Northern Africa, Tunisia included. The genetic relationship between lung and liver localization were studied in ovine, bovine and human hydatid cysts in Tunisia. Allozyme variation and single strand conformation polymorphism were used for genetic differentiation. The first cause of genetic differentiation was the host species and the second was the localization (lung or liver). The reticulated genetic relationship between the liver or the lung human isolates and isolates from bovine lung, is indicative of recombination (sexual reproduction) or lateral genetic transfer. The idea of two specialized populations (one for the lung one for the liver) that are more or less successful according to host susceptibility is thus proposed.

  20. Genetic relationship between the Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto cysts located in lung and liver of hosts.

    PubMed

    Oudni-M'rad, Myriam; Cabaret, Jacques; M'rad, Selim; Chaâbane-Banaoues, Raja; Mekki, Mongi; Zmantar, Sofien; Nouri, Abdellatif; Mezhoud, Habib; Babba, Hamouda

    2016-10-01

    G1 genotype of Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto is the major cause of hydatidosis in Northern Africa, Tunisia included. The genetic relationship between lung and liver localization were studied in ovine, bovine and human hydatid cysts in Tunisia. Allozyme variation and single strand conformation polymorphism were used for genetic differentiation. The first cause of genetic differentiation was the host species and the second was the localization (lung or liver). The reticulated genetic relationship between the liver or the lung human isolates and isolates from bovine lung, is indicative of recombination (sexual reproduction) or lateral genetic transfer. The idea of two specialized populations (one for the lung one for the liver) that are more or less successful according to host susceptibility is thus proposed. PMID:27456279

  1. Amebic liver abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver in response to an intestinal parasite called Entamoeba histolytica . ... Amebic liver abscess is caused by Entamoeba histolytica. This ... dysentery. After an infection has occurred, the parasite may ...

  2. Alcohol-Related Liver Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... to run events. Please support us. Donate | Volunteer Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Discussion on Inspire Support Community ... Liver > Liver Disease Information > Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Explore this section to learn ...

  3. Secretion of active bovine somatotropin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Klein, B K; Hill, S R; Devine, C S; Rowold, E; Smith, C E; Galosy, S; Olins, P O

    1991-09-01

    We have expressed a chimeric protein, comprising the LamB secretion signal sequence fused to mature bovine somatotropin (bST), in Escherichia coli. Plasmid constructs with the recA promoter showed significant protein accumulation prior to induction and cell lysis occurred after induction. In contrast, the lacUV5 promoter was tightly regulated. With the lacUV5 promoter, temperature and inducer concentration had significant effects on the total amount of recombinant protein produced and the fraction processed to mature bST. Quantitation of bST from shake flask cultures showed that 1-2 micrograms/ml/OD550 could be released from the periplasm by osmotic shock. N-terminal sequence analysis of the purified protein indicated that the majority of the secreted bST was correctly processed. The bST present in the osmotic shock fraction was judged to be correctly folded by comigration with oxidized methionyl-bST standard on a non-reducing polyacrylamide gel and activity in a bovine liver radioreceptor assay. These results provide a rapid method to produce bST for use in structure-function studies.

  4. Liver xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Marino, I R; Tzakis, A G; Fung, J J; Todo, S; Doyle, H R; Manez, R; Starzl, T E

    1993-10-01

    During the past 30 years orthotopic liver transplantation has become a highly successful form of surgical treatments. The significant advances achieved in this field have led to an increased demand for organs and created a wide gap between organ availability and organ supply. A wider availability of organs for transplantation would allow an expansions rather than a contraction of the indications for transplantation, and, at the same time a relaxation of the patient selection criteria. All these facts clearly justify the renewed interest observed in the last decade in xenotransplantation. The original concept of xenografting, meaning the transplantation of cells, tissues, or organs between different species, is so ancient that it is easily recognizable in Greek and Roman mythology. The centaur Chiron, the teacher of Esculapius, and the Chimera are legendary examples of discordant xenogeneic creatures. However, it is only during this century that scientists have been able to bring this idea into the clinical arena. The early efforts were prompted by the shortage of humans organs at a time when there were few alternatives for treating end-stage organ failure.

  5. Engineering Liver

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Linda G.; Wells, Alan; Stolz, Donna Beer

    2014-01-01

    Interest in “engineering liver” arises from multiple communities: therapeutic replacement; mechanistic models of human processes; and drug safety and efficacy studies. An explosion of micro- and nano-fabrication, biomaterials, microfluidic, and other technologies potentially afford unprecedented opportunity to create microphysiological models of human liver, but engineering design principles for how to deploy these tools effectively towards specific applications, including how to define the essential constraints of any given application (including available sources of cells, acceptable cost, and user-friendliness) are still emerging. Arguably less appreciated is the parallel growth in computational systems biology approaches towards these same problems – particularly, in parsing complex disease processes from clinical material, building models of response networks, and in how to interpret the growing compendium of data on drug efficacy and toxicology in patient populations. Here, we provide insight into how the complementary paths of “engineering liver” – experimental and computational – are beginning to interplay towards greater illumination of human disease states and technologies for drug development. PMID:24668880

  6. Liver xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Marino, I R; Tzakis, A G; Fung, J J; Todo, S; Doyle, H R; Manez, R; Starzl, T E

    1993-10-01

    During the past 30 years orthotopic liver transplantation has become a highly successful form of surgical treatments. The significant advances achieved in this field have led to an increased demand for organs and created a wide gap between organ availability and organ supply. A wider availability of organs for transplantation would allow an expansions rather than a contraction of the indications for transplantation, and, at the same time a relaxation of the patient selection criteria. All these facts clearly justify the renewed interest observed in the last decade in xenotransplantation. The original concept of xenografting, meaning the transplantation of cells, tissues, or organs between different species, is so ancient that it is easily recognizable in Greek and Roman mythology. The centaur Chiron, the teacher of Esculapius, and the Chimera are legendary examples of discordant xenogeneic creatures. However, it is only during this century that scientists have been able to bring this idea into the clinical arena. The early efforts were prompted by the shortage of humans organs at a time when there were few alternatives for treating end-stage organ failure. PMID:25951555

  7. Sialyltransferase activity in regenerating rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Serafini-Cessi, Franca

    1977-01-01

    Liver microsomal fractions catalyse the transfer of sialic acid from CMP-N-acetyl-neuraminic acid to various exogenous acceptors such as desialylated fetuin, desialylated human Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein and desialylated bovine submaxillary-gland mucin. An increase in the rate of incorporation of sialic acid into desialylated glycoproteins was found after a lag period (7h) in regenerating liver. The increase was maximum 24h after partial hepatectomy for all acceptors tested. At later times after operation the sialyltransferase activity remained high only for desialylated fetuin. No soluble factors from liver or serum of partially hepatectomized animals influenced the activity of the sialyltransferases bound to the microsomal fraction. The sensitivity of sialyltransferases to activation by Triton X-100, added to the incubation medium, was unchanged in the microsomal preparation from animals 24h after sham operation or partial hepatectomy. The full activity of sialyltransferases towards the various desialylated acceptors showed some differences. Human Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein was a good acceptor of sialic acid only when desialylated by mild acid hydrolysis. After this treatment, but not after enzymic hydrolysis, a decrease in molecular weight of human Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein was observed. Further, the sialyltransferase activity as a function of incubation temperature gave different curves according to the acceptor used. The relationship between the biosynthesis of glycoproteins by regenerating liver and the sialyltransferase activity of microsomal fraction after partial hepatectomy is discussed. PMID:597233

  8. Models of bovine babesiosis including juvenile cattle.

    PubMed

    Saad-Roy, C M; Shuai, Zhisheng; van den Driessche, P

    2015-03-01

    Bovine Babesiosis in cattle is caused by the transmission of protozoa of Babesia spp. by ticks as vectors. Juvenile cattle (<9 months of age) have resistance to Bovine Babesiosis, rarely show symptoms, and acquire immunity upon recovery. Susceptibility to the disease varies between breeds of cattle. Models of the dynamics of Bovine Babesiosis transmitted by the cattle tick that include these factors are formulated as systems of ordinary differential equations. Basic reproduction numbers are calculated, and it is proved that if these numbers are below the threshold value of one, then Bovine Babesiosis dies out. However, above the threshold number of one, the disease may approach an endemic state. In this case, control measures are suggested by determining target reproduction numbers. The percentage of a particular population (for example, the adult bovine population) needed to be controlled to eradicate the disease is evaluated numerically using Columbia data from the literature. PMID:25715822

  9. Liver fibrosis markers in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Chrostek, Lech; Panasiuk, Anatol

    2014-07-01

    Alcohol is one of the main factors of liver damage. The evaluation of the degree of liver fibrosis is of great value for therapeutic decision making in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Staging of liver fibrosis is essential to define prognosis and management of the disease. Liver biopsy is a gold standard as it has high sensitivity and specificity in fibrosis diagnostics. Taking into account the limitations of liver biopsy, there is an exigency to introduce non-invasive serum markers for fibrosis that would be able to replace liver biopsy. Ideal serum markers should be specific for the liver, easy to perform and independent to inflammation and fibrosis in other organs. Serum markers of hepatic fibrosis are divided into direct and indirect. Indirect markers reflect alterations in hepatic function, direct markers reflect extracellular matrix turnover. These markers should correlate with dynamic changes in fibrogenesis and fibrosis resolution. The assessment of the degree of liver fibrosis in alcoholic liver disease has diagnostic and prognostic implications, therefore noninvasive assessment of fibrosis remains important. There are only a few studies evaluating the diagnostic and prognostic values of noninvasive biomarkers of fibrosis in patients with ALD. Several noninvasive laboratory tests have been used to assess liver fibrosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease, including the hyaluronic acid, FibroTest, FibrometerA, Hepascore, Forns and APRI indexes, FIB4, an algorithm combining Prothrombin index (PI), α-2 macroglobulin and hyaluronic acid. Among these tests, Fibrotest, FibrometerA and Hepascore demonstrated excellent diagnostic accuracy in identifying advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis, and additionally, Fibrotest was independently associated with survival. Therefore, the use of biomarkers may reduce the need for liver biopsy and permit an earlier treatment of alcoholic patients. PMID:25009372

  10. Adipogenesis of bovine perimuscular preadipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Masaaki; Le Luo Guan; Zhang Bing; Dodson, Michael V.; Okine, Erasmus; Moore, Stephen S.

    2008-02-01

    In this study, non-transformed progeny adipofibroblasts, derived from mature adipocyte dedifferentiation, was used as a novel in vitro model to study adipogenic gene expression in cattle. Adipofibroblasts from dedifferentiated mature perimuscular fat (PMF) tissue were cultured with differentiation stimulants until the cells exhibited morphological differentiation. Treated cells were harvested from day 2 to 16 for RNA extraction, whereas control cells were cultured without addition of stimulants. Results from time course gene expression assays by quantitative real-time PCR revealed that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-{gamma}), sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1) and their six down-stream genes were co-expressed at day 2 post-differentiation induction. When compared to other adipogenesis culture systems, the adipogenic gene expression of bovine PMF adipofibroblasts culture was different, especially to the rodent model. Collectively, these results demonstrated PPAR-{gamma} and SREBP-1 cooperatively play a key role to regulate the re-differentiation of bovine adipofibroblasts, during early conversion stages in vitro.

  11. Bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ross, Pablo J; Cibelli, Jose B

    2010-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a technique by which the nucleus of a differentiated cell is introduced into an oocyte from which its genetic material has been removed by a process called enucleation. In mammals, the reconstructed embryo is artificially induced to initiate embryonic development (activation). The oocyte turns the somatic cell nucleus into an embryonic nucleus. This process is called nuclear reprogramming and involves an important change of cell fate, by which the somatic cell nucleus becomes capable of generating all the cell types required for the formation of a new individual, including extraembryonic tissues. Therefore, after transfer of a cloned embryo to a surrogate mother, an offspring genetically identical to the animal from which the somatic cells where isolated, is born. Cloning by nuclear transfer has potential applications in agriculture and biomedicine, but is limited by low efficiency. Cattle were the second mammalian species to be cloned after Dolly the sheep, and it is probably the most widely used species for SCNT experiments. This is, in part due to the high availability of bovine oocytes and the relatively higher efficiency levels usually obtained in cattle. Given the wide utilization of this species for cloning, several alternatives to this basic protocol can be found in the literature. Here we describe a basic protocol for bovine SCNT currently being used in our laboratory, which is amenable for the use of the nuclear transplantation technique for research or commercial purposes. PMID:20336522

  12. Protection of newborn calves against fatal multisystemic infectious bovine rhinotracheitis by feeding colostrum from vaccinated cows.

    PubMed Central

    Mechor, G D; Rousseaux, C G; Radostits, O M; Babiuk, L A; Petrie, L

    1987-01-01

    To determine whether consumption of colostrum with high levels of serum neutralizing antibody to bovine herpesvirus 1 would protect neonatal calves from the frequently fatal multisystemic form of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, Holstein calves were fed for 48 h after birth with either pooled colostrum from seropositive vaccinated cows or colostrum from seronegative unvaccinated cows. The serum neutralizing antibody achieved in the former calves was between 64 and 256 and the titer in the latter calves was below 8. At 48 h of age the calves were challenged by aerosolization with bovine herpesvirus 1. All five seronegative calves died or were euthanized in a moribund state between days 5 and 7 of the trial, whereas all five seropositive animals remained healthy throughout the study. Twice daily clinical examination revealed significantly lower scores in the seronegative group from 60 h postinfection. Relative lung weights were greater in the seronegative group, associated with a severe acute necrotizing bronchiolitis with fibrin exudation. The seronegative group of calves also demonstrated an acute necrotizing rumenitis, pharyngitis, glossitis, esophagitis, laryngitis and tracheitis. The seropositive animals had only small areas of subacute necrotizing fibrinopurulent rhinitis. Bovine herpesvirus 1 virus was isolated from all nasal passages of all calves but isolation of virus in the seronegative calves was made from the trachea (5/5), lung (4/5), bronchial lymph nodes (4/5), spleen (4/5), thymus (3/5), liver (2/5), rumen (2/5) and brain (1/5).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2839276

  13. Characterization of Bovine Interferon α1: Expression in Yeast Pichia pastoris, Biological Activities, and Physicochemical Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jianwei; Cao, Chong; Bao, Jun; Liu, Hongtao; Peng, Tongquan

    2015-01-01

    A bovine interferon α (BoIFNα) gene that included signal sequence was amplified from bovine liver genomic DNA. The gene was named BoIFN-α1 according to the position at which the encoded gene of the bovine IFN was located in the bovine genome. The sequence included a 23-amino-acid signal peptide and a 166-amino-acid mature peptide. The structural characteristics and phylogenetic relationships of the BoIFN-α1 gene were analyzed. A recombinant mature BoIFN-α1 (rBoIFN-α1) was expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Physicochemical characteristics and antiviral activity were determined in vitro. Recombinant BoIFN-α1 was found to be highly sensitive to trypsin and stable at pH 2.0 or 65°C. It also exhibited antiviral activity, which was neutralized by a rabbit anti-rBoIFNα polyclonal antibody. This study revealed that rBoIFN-α1 has the typical characteristics of IFNα and can be used for both research and industrial application. PMID:25343404

  14. Biomarkers for liver fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin M.; Smith, Richard D.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Orton, Daniel

    2015-09-15

    Methods and systems for diagnosing or prognosing liver fibrosis in a subject are provided. In some examples, such methods and systems can include detecting liver fibrosis-related molecules in a sample obtained from the subject, comparing expression of the molecules in the sample to controls representing expression values expected in a subject who does not have liver fibrosis or who has non-progressing fibrosis, and diagnosing or prognosing liver fibrosis in the subject when differential expression of the molecules between the sample and the controls is detected. Kits for the diagnosis or prognosis of liver fibrosis in a subject are also provided which include reagents for detecting liver fibrosis related molecules.

  15. Muscarine binding sites in bovine adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Barron, B A; Murrin, L C; Hexum, T D

    1986-03-18

    The presence of muscarinic binding sites in the bovine adrenal medulla was investigated using [3H]QNB and the bovine adrenal medulla. Scatchard analysis combined with computer analysis yielded data consistent with a two binding site configuration. KDs of 0.15 and 14 nM and Bmax s of 29 and 210 fmol/mg protein, respectively, were observed. Displacement of [3H]QNB by various cholinergic agents is, in order of decreasing potency: QNB, dexetimide, atropine, scopolamine, imipramine, desipramine, oxotremorine, pilocarpine, acetylcholine, methacholine and carbachol. These results demonstrate the presence of more than one muscarine binding site in the bovine adrenal gland. PMID:3709656

  16. Bioartificial liver: current status.

    PubMed

    Pless, G; Sauer, I M

    2005-11-01

    Liver failure remains a life-threatening syndrome. With the growing disparity between the number of suitable donor organs and the number of patients awaiting transplantation, efforts have been made to optimize the allocation of organs, to find alternatives to cadaveric liver transplantation, and to develop extracorporeal methods to support or replace the function of the failing organ. An extracorporeal liver support system has to provide the main functions of the liver: detoxification, synthesis, and regulation. The understanding that the critical issue of the clinical syndrome in liver failure is the accumulation of toxins not cleared by the failing liver led to the development of artificial filtration and adsorption devices (artificial liver support). Based on this hypothesis, the removal of lipophilic, albumin-bound substances, such as bilirubin, bile acids, metabolites of aromatic amino acids, medium-chain fatty acids, and cytokines, should be beneficial to the clinical course of a patient in liver failure. Artificial detoxification devices currently under clinical evaluation include the Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS), Single-Pass Albumin Dialysis (SPAD), and the Prometheus system. The complex tasks of regulation and synthesis remain to be addressed by the use of liver cells (bioartificial liver support). The Extracorporeal Liver Assist Device (ELAD), HepatAssist, Modular Extracorporeal Liver Support system (MELS), and the Amsterdam Medical Center Bioartificial Liver (AMC-BAL) are bioartificial systems. This article gives a brief overview on these artificial and bioartificial devices and discusses remaining obstacles.

  17. Fatigue of bovine trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Moore, Tara L; Gibson, Lorna J

    2003-12-01

    Fatigue loading of bone, from the activities of daily living in the elderly, or from prolonged exercise in the young, can lead to increased risk of fracture. Elderly patients with osteoporosis are particularly prone to fragility fractures of the vertebrae, where load is carried primarily by trabecular bone. In this study, specimens of bovine trabecular bone were loaded in compressive fatigue at four different normalized stresses to one of six maximum strains. The resulting change in modulus and residual strain accumulation were measured over the life of the fatigue test. The number of cycles to reach a given maximum compressive strain increased with decreasing normalized stress. Modulus reduction and specimen residual strain increased with increasing maximum compressive strain, but few differences were observed between specimens loaded to the same maximum strain at different normalized stresses.

  18. Elastomechanical properties of bovine veins.

    PubMed

    Rossmann, Jenn Stroud

    2010-02-01

    Veins have historically been discussed in qualitative, relative terms: "more compliant" than arteries, subject to "lower pressures". The structural and compositional differences between arteries and veins are directly related to the different functions of these vessels. Veins are often used as grafts to reroute flow from atherosclerotic arteries, and venous elasticity plays a role in the development of conditions such as varicose veins and valvular insufficiency. It is therefore of clinical interest to determine the elastomechanical properties of veins. In the current study, both tensile and vibration testing are used to obtain elastic moduli of bovine veins. Representative stress-strain data are shown, and the mechanical and failure properties reported. Nonlinear and viscoelastic behavior is observed, though most properties show little strain rate dependence. These data suggest parameters for constitutive modeling of veins and may inform the design and testing of prosthetic venous valves as well as vein grafts. PMID:20129420

  19. Bovine Mastitis: Frontiers in Immunogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson-Crispi, Kathleen; Atalla, Heba; Miglior, Filippo; Mallard, Bonnie A.

    2014-01-01

    Mastitis is one of the most prevalent and costly diseases in the dairy industry with losses attributable to reduced milk production, discarded milk, early culling, veterinary services, and labor costs. Typically, mastitis is an inflammation of the mammary gland most often, but not limited to, bacterial infection, and is characterized by the movement of leukocytes and serum proteins from the blood to the site of infection. It contributes to compromised milk quality and the potential spread of antimicrobial resistance if antibiotic treatment is not astutely applied. Despite the implementation of management practises and genetic selection approaches, bovine mastitis control continues to be inadequate. However, some novel genetic strategies have recently been demonstrated to reduce mastitis incidence by taking advantage of a cow’s natural ability to make appropriate immune responses against invading pathogens. Specifically, dairy cattle with enhanced and balanced immune responses have a lower occurrence of disease, including mastitis, and they can be identified and selected for using the high immune response (HIR) technology. Enhanced immune responsiveness is also associated with improved response to vaccination, increased milk, and colostrum quality. Since immunity is an important fitness trait, beneficial associations with longevity and reproduction are also often noted. This review highlights the genetic regulation of the bovine immune system and its vital contributions to disease resistance. Genetic selection approaches currently used in the dairy industry to reduce the incidence of disease are reviewed, including the HIR technology, genomics to improve disease resistance or immune response, as well as the Immunity+™ sire line. Improving the overall immune responsiveness of cattle is expected to provide superior disease resistance, increasing animal welfare and food quality while maintaining favorable production levels to feed a growing population. PMID

  20. Bovine mastitis: frontiers in immunogenetics.

    PubMed

    Thompson-Crispi, Kathleen; Atalla, Heba; Miglior, Filippo; Mallard, Bonnie A

    2014-01-01

    Mastitis is one of the most prevalent and costly diseases in the dairy industry with losses attributable to reduced milk production, discarded milk, early culling, veterinary services, and labor costs. Typically, mastitis is an inflammation of the mammary gland most often, but not limited to, bacterial infection, and is characterized by the movement of leukocytes and serum proteins from the blood to the site of infection. It contributes to compromised milk quality and the potential spread of antimicrobial resistance if antibiotic treatment is not astutely applied. Despite the implementation of management practises and genetic selection approaches, bovine mastitis control continues to be inadequate. However, some novel genetic strategies have recently been demonstrated to reduce mastitis incidence by taking advantage of a cow's natural ability to make appropriate immune responses against invading pathogens. Specifically, dairy cattle with enhanced and balanced immune responses have a lower occurrence of disease, including mastitis, and they can be identified and selected for using the high immune response (HIR) technology. Enhanced immune responsiveness is also associated with improved response to vaccination, increased milk, and colostrum quality. Since immunity is an important fitness trait, beneficial associations with longevity and reproduction are also often noted. This review highlights the genetic regulation of the bovine immune system and its vital contributions to disease resistance. Genetic selection approaches currently used in the dairy industry to reduce the incidence of disease are reviewed, including the HIR technology, genomics to improve disease resistance or immune response, as well as the Immunity(+)™ sire line. Improving the overall immune responsiveness of cattle is expected to provide superior disease resistance, increasing animal welfare and food quality while maintaining favorable production levels to feed a growing population.

  1. Expressional and Bioinformatic Analysis of Bovine Filia/Ecat1/Khdc3l Gene: A Comparison with Ovine Species.

    PubMed

    Zahmatkesh, Azadeh; Ansari Mahyari, Saeid; Daliri Joupari, Morteza; Rahmani, Hamidreza; Shirazi, Abolfazl; Amiri Roudbar, Mahmood; Ansari Majd, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Maternal effect genes have highly impressive effects on pre-implantation development. Filia/Ecat1/Khdc3l is a maternal effect gene found in mouse oocytes and embryos, loss of which causes a 50% decrease in fertility. In the present study, we investigated Filia mRNA expression in bovine oviduct, 30- to 40-day fetus, liver, heart, lung, and oocytes (as a positive control), by RT-PCR and detected it only in oocytes. A 443 bp fragment was amplified only in oocytes and was sequenced as a part of bovine predicted Filia mRNA. We analyzed bovine and ovine Filia N-terminal peptide sequence in PHYRE2, and a KH domain was predicted. Protein alignment using ClustalW indicated a highly identical N-terminal extention between the 2 species. Immunohistochemical analysis using anti-bovine Filia antibody showed the expression of Filia protein in the zone surrounding the nuclear membrane, and in the subcortex of ovine oocytes of primary and antral follicles. However, in the bovine, Filia has been found through the oocyte cytoplasm of antral follicles, and here it is further confirmed in the primary follicles. Our data suggests a difference in Filia expression pattern between cow and sheep, although the sequence is highly conserved. PMID:27070240

  2. Antioxidants in liver health

    PubMed Central

    Casas-Grajales, Sael; Muriel, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Liver diseases are a worldwide medical problem because the liver is the principal detoxifying organ and maintains metabolic homeostasis. The liver metabolizes various compounds that produce free radicals (FR). However, antioxidants scavenge FR and maintain the oxidative/antioxidative balance in the liver. When the liver oxidative/antioxidative balance is disrupted, the state is termed oxidative stress. Oxidative stress leads to deleterious processes in the liver and produces liver diseases. Therefore, restoring antioxidants is essential to maintain homeostasis. One method of restoring antioxidants is to consume natural compounds with antioxidant capacity. The objective of this review is to provide information pertaining to various antioxidants found in food that have demonstrated utility in improving liver diseases. PMID:26261734

  3. Liver transplant - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Liver failure causes many problems, including malnutrition, problems with blood clotting, bleeding form the gastrointestinal tract, and jaundice. Frequently, patients who undergo liver transplantation are quite ill, and require ...

  4. Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver cancer is not common in the United States. Liver cancer is the fourth most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death in the world. In the United States, men, especially Chinese American men, have an increased ...

  5. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    MedlinePlus

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider ...

  6. Acute nontraumatic liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Caremani, Marcello; Tacconi, Danilo; Lapini, Laura

    2013-11-26

    The principal conditions requiring emergency/urgent intervention in patients with nontraumatic liver lesions are hemorrhage (with or without tumor rupture), rupture of hydatid cysts (with or without infection), complications arising from liver abscesses or congenital liver cysts, rupture related to peliosis hepatis, and in rare cases spontaneous hemorrhage. This article examines each of these conditions, its appearance on ultrasound (the first-line imaging method of choice for assessing any urgent nontraumatic liver lesion) and indications for additional imaging studies.

  7. Percutaneous liver biopsy.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Newton, Eric; Kar, Premashish

    2010-01-01

    Percutaneous liver biopsy has been performed for more than 120 years, and remains an important diagnostic procedure for the management of hepatobiliary disorders. Modern biochemical, immunologic, and radiographic techniques have facilitated the diagnosis and management of liver diseases but have not made liver biopsy obsolete. This comprehensive review article will discuss the history of development of percutaneous liver biopsy, its indications, contraindications, complications and the various aspects of the biopsy procedure in detail.

  8. Imaging in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Settimo; Miraglia, Roberto; Maruzzelli, Luigi; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to illustrate the role of non-invasive imaging tools such as ultrasonography, multi-detector row computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of pediatric and adult liver recipients and potential liver donors, and in the detection of potential complications arising from liver transplantation. PMID:19222090

  9. Immune mediated liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaojing; Ning, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Liver failure is a clinical syndrome of various etiologies, manifesting as jaundice, encephalopathy, coagulopathy and circulatory dysfunction, which result in subsequent multiorgan failure. Clinically, liver failure is classified into four categories: acute, subacute, acute-on-chronic and chronic liver failure. Massive hepatocyte death is considered to be the core event in the development of liver failure, which occurs when the extent of hepatocyte death is beyond the liver regenerative capacity. Direct damage and immune-mediated liver injury are two major factors involved in this process. Increasing evidence has suggested the essential role of immune-mediated liver injury in the pathogenesis of liver failure. Here, we review the evolved concepts concerning the mechanisms of immune-mediated liver injury in liver failure from human and animal studies. Both innate and adaptive immunity, especially the interaction of various immune cells and molecules as well as death receptor signaling system are discussed. In addition, we highlight the concept of “immune coagulation”, which has been shown to be related to the disease progression and liver injury exacerbation in HBV related acute-on-chronic liver failure. PMID:26417328

  10. Global assessment of imprinted gene expression in the bovine conceptus by next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Hagen, Darren E.; Wang, Juanbin; Elsik, Christine G.; Ji, Tieming; Siqueira, Luiz G.; Hansen, Peter J.; Rivera, Rocío M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism that leads to parental-allele-specific gene expression. Approximately 150 imprinted genes have been identified in humans and mice but less than 30 have been described as imprinted in cattle. For the purpose of de novo identification of imprinted genes in bovine, we determined global monoallelic gene expression in brain, skeletal muscle, liver, kidney and placenta of day ∼105 Bos taurus indicus × Bos taurus taurus F1 conceptuses using RNA sequencing. To accomplish this, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline to identify parent-specific single nucleotide polymorphism alleles after filtering adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing sites. We identified 53 genes subject to monoallelic expression. Twenty three are genes known to be imprinted in the cow and an additional 7 have previously been characterized as imprinted in human and/or mouse that have not been reported as imprinted in cattle. Of the remaining 23 genes, we found that 10 are uncharacterized or unannotated transcripts located in known imprinted clusters, whereas the other 13 genes are distributed throughout the bovine genome and are not close to any known imprinted clusters. To exclude potential cis-eQTL effects on allele expression, we corroborated the parental specificity of monoallelic expression in day 86 Bos taurus taurus × Bos taurus taurus conceptuses and identified 8 novel bovine imprinted genes. Further, we identified 671 candidate A-to-I RNA editing sites and describe random X-inactivation in day 15 bovine extraembryonic membranes. Our results expand the imprinted gene list in bovine and demonstrate that monoallelic gene expression can be the result of cis-eQTL effects. PMID:27245094

  11. Removal of transferrin from fetal bovine serum.

    PubMed

    Huebers, E; Nelson, N J; Huebers, H A; Rasey, J S

    1987-12-01

    An antiserum against purified fetal bovine serum (FBS) transferrin was produced in rabbits. The isolation of anti-bovine transferrin IgG fraction was achieved by ammonium sulfate precipitation of rabbit hyperimmune plasma followed by ion exchange chromatography on diethylaminoethanol (DEAE) cellulose, at both an acidic and basic pH. The various antibody fractions were analyzed by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on a high-resolution mono-Q column. The specificity and efficiency of the antibody fractions obtained were tested by titration of a constant amount of fetal bovine serum with increasing amounts of antibody. The completeness of removal of the fetal bovine serum transferrin resulting from the formation of the highly stable antibody antigen complex was monitored by immunologic and radioisotope methods. The removal of FBS transferrin by this antibody precipitation technique did not interfere with the ability of added iron 59-tagged human transferrin to deliver iron to rat reticulocytes, as shown in an in vivo incubation model. The method proved to be effective for the fast and complete removal of bovine transferrin from fetal bovine serum in vitro and will be a prerequisite for more detailed studies of the interaction of transferrin of different species with tissue receptors on cell lines in culture without resorting to completely defined culture media. PMID:3681114

  12. Acute liver failure and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2013-08-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is defined by the presence of coagulopathy (International Normalized Ratio ≥ 1.5) and hepatic encephalopathy due to severe liver damage in patients without pre-existing liver disease. Although the mortality due to ALF without liver transplantation is over 80%, the survival rates of patients have considerably improved with the advent of liver transplantation, up to 60% to 90% in the last two decades. Recent large studies in Western countries reported 1, 5, and 10-year patient survival rates after liver transplantation for ALF of approximately 80%, 70%, and 65%, respectively. Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), which has mainly evolved in Asian countries where organ availability from deceased donors is extremely scarce, has also improved the survival rate of ALF patients in these regions. According to recent reports, the overall survival rate of adult ALF patients who underwent LDLT ranges from 60% to 90%. Although there is still controversy regarding the graft type, optimal graft volume, and ethical issues, LDLT has become an established treatment option for ALF in areas where the use of deceased donor organs is severely restricted. PMID:25343108

  13. Coffee and Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Wadhawan, Manav; Anand, Anil C

    2016-03-01

    Coffee is the most popular beverage in the world. Consumption of coffee has been shown to benefit health in general, and liver health in particular. This article reviews the effects of coffee intake on development and progression of liver disease due to various causes. We also describe the putative mechanisms by which coffee exerts the protective effect. The clinical evidence of benefit of coffee consumption in Hepatitis B and C, as well as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease, has also been presented. Coffee consumption is associated with improvement in liver enzymes (ALT, AST, and GGTP), especially in individuals with risk for liver disease. Coffee intake more than 2 cups per day in patients with preexisting liver disease has been shown to be associated with lower incidence of fibrosis and cirrhosis, lower hepatocellular carcinoma rates, as well as decreased mortality. PMID:27194895

  14. FXR and liver carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiong-fei; Zhao, Wei-yu; Huang, Wen-dong

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor family and a ligand-modulated transcription factor. In the liver, FXR has been considered a multi-functional cell protector and a tumor suppressor. FXR can suppress liver carcinogenesis via different mechanisms: 1) FXR maintains the normal liver metabolism of bile acids, glucose and lipids; 2) FXR promotes liver regeneration and repair after injury; 3) FXR protects liver cells from death and enhances cell survival; 4) FXR suppresses hepatic inflammation, thereby preventing inflammatory damage; and 5) FXR can directly increase the expression of some tumor-suppressor genes and repress the transcription of several oncogenes. However, inflammation and epigenetic silencing are known to decrease FXR expression during tumorigenesis. The reactivation of FXR function in the liver may be a potential therapeutic approach for patients with liver cancer. PMID:25500874

  15. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: involvement in bovine respiratory disease and diagnostic challenges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reviews the contribution of bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) to the development of Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD). Veterinarians and producers generally consider BRD as one of the most significant diseases affecting production in the cattle industry. BRD can affect the performance (...

  16. The effect of initial and dynamic liver conditions on RF ablation size: a study in perfused and non-perfused animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belous, Anna; Podhajsky, Ronald J.

    2009-02-01

    Investigators reporting RF ablation (RFA) studies often use different initial and dynamic conditions, often in porcine or bovine liver models. This study examines the effects of initial temperature, prior freezing, and perfusion in these models. Understanding how these variables affect RFA size provides some basis for comparing data from different studies. We obtained porcine and bovine livers from a slaughterhouse and divided them into experimental groups each with discrete initial temperatures set in the range of 12 to 37°C. The livers were used either the day of harvest or frozen within 1-3 days prior to RFA treatment. A perfused liver model was developed to simulate human blood flow rates and allowed accurate control of the temperature and flow rate. Saline (0.9%) was substituted for blood. The non-perfused liver model group included bovine and porcine tissue; whereas the perfused liver model group included only porcine tissue. One experiment included porcine livers that were perfused at different flow rates and with different saline concentrations. Harvested tissue from this group was examined under a light microscope and the level of edema was assessed using image processing software. The results demonstrate no significant difference in RF lesion sizes between porcine and bovine livers. Freezing the tissue prior to treatment has no significant effect but the initial temperature does significantly affect the size of ablation. The ablation size in perfused liver is similar to in vivo results (earlier study) but is significantly smaller then non-perfused liver. Morphological analysis indicates that perfusion, freezing, and saline concentration cause significant tissue edema.

  17. Search for the genome of bovine herpesvirus types 1, 4 and 5 in bovine semen

    PubMed Central

    Morán, P.E.; Favier, P.A.; Lomónaco, M.; Catena, M.C.; Chiapparrone, M.L.; Odeón, A.C.; Verna, A.E.; Pérez, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) causes respiratory and reproductive disorders in cattle. Recently, bovine herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5) and bovine herpesvirus type 4 (BoHV-4) have been identified to be associated with genital disease. In this study, the presence of the genome of BoHV-1, BoHV-4 and BoHV-5 in bovine semen of Argentinean and international origin was analyzed by PCR assays. The most important finding of this study is the detection of the genome of BoHV-1 and BoHV-4 in semen of bulls maintained at artificial insemination centers. It is particularly relevant that BoHV-1 DNA was also identified in one sample of international origin suggesting the need for extensive quality control measures on international transport of bovine semen. PMID:26623325

  18. Bovine colostrum: an emerging nutraceutical.

    PubMed

    Bagwe, Siddhi; Tharappel, Leo J P; Kaur, Ginpreet; Buttar, Harpal S

    2015-09-01

    Nutraceutical, a term combining the words "nutrition" and "pharmaceuticals", is a food or food product that provides health benefits as an adjuvant or alternative therapy, including the treatment and prevention of infectious diseases in children and adults. There is emerging evidence that bovine colostrum (BC) may be one of the promising nutraceuticals which can prevent or mitigate various diseases in newborns and adults. Immunity-related disorders are one of the leading causes of mortality in the world. BC is rich in immunity, growth and antimicrobial factors, which promote tissue growth and the maturation of digestive tract and immune function in neonatal animals and humans. The immunoglobulins and lactoferrin present in colostrum are known to build natural immunity in newborns which helps to reduce the mortality rate in this population. Also, the side-effect profile of colostrum proteins and possible lactose intolerance is relatively less in comparison with milk. In general, BC is considered safe and well tolerated. Since colostrum has several important nutritional constituents, well-designed, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies with colostrum products should be conducted to widen its therapeutic use. The objectives of this review are to create awareness about the nutraceutical properties of colostrum and to discuss the various ongoing alternative treatments of colostrum and its active ingredients as well as to address colostrum's future nutraceutical and therapeutic implications in humans. PMID:25781716

  19. Ultrastructure of bovine sperm chromatin.

    PubMed

    Filho, Romualdo Morandi; Beletti, Marcelo Emilio; de Oliveira, Fabio

    2015-12-01

    Mammalian semen chromatin comprises DNA, protamine, and, at lower levels, other proteins. This constitution confers intense compaction to the chromatin, helping to protect the DNA and causing the head of the sperm to be very small, facilitating the safe transport of its genetic contents. It is known that changes in the sperm chromatin compaction lead to fertility problems in bulls, justifying studies of this structure. Although there are theoretical models of sperm chromatin because of its high compaction, there is no morphological evidence of such models. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the ultrastructure of bovine sperm chromatin in an attempt to corroborate the theoretical chromatin models existing today. The isolated bull sperm heads had their chromatin partially unpacked by chemical treatment using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dithiothreitol (DTT) and were then embedded in Epon resin. Using an ultramicrotome, ultrathin sections were obtained, which were contrasted with uranyl acetate and lead citrate, and then viewed under transmission electron microscopy. The methodology used allowed the visualization of toroidal structures interconnected by a filamentous nuclear matrix, which is entirely consistent with the most current theoretical models. PMID:26515508

  20. Growing a whole porcine liver organ ex situ for six hours without red blood cells or hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jing; Xia, Lingling; Shen, Hefang; Bian, Congwen; Bao, Sujin; Zhang, Min; Du, Yiqi; Dai, Yan; Zhao, Lijuan; Xu, Yuanhong; Xiong, Qiru; Xu, Jianjian; Xu, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation is an effective approach to end-stage liver disease. Shortage of donor liver and increased waiting time for liver transplantation necessitate the development of an organ culture system by which livers can be cultured and maintained ex situ for a prolonged period of time. The aim of this work is to test whether cell culture condition in vitro could be used to culture whole livers ex situ without the use of erythrocytes. Twelve castrated male land race/farm young porcine livers were exposed to 30 min warm ischemia and 30 min cold perfusion. Livers were isolated and connected to an Ex situ liver culture system using a standard culture medium RPMI1640 supplied with 10% of fetal bovine serum and sufficient dissolved oxygen under a normothermic condition for 6 hours. Metabolic biomarkers, bile and urea production, hepatic cell viability and histology analysis of biopsies were examined and newly proliferated hepatic cells labeled by BrdU were analyzed after 6 hours ex situ culture. The results from biochemical assays and histology analysis indicate that livers after the organ culture still maintain the full function. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate that the liver culture system established in this work can be used to culture whole livers ex situ in the absence of erythrocytes. PMID:27398140

  1. Aging and liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee; Kisseleva, Tatiana; Brenner, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Aging is a condition in which a person gradually loses the ability to maintain homeostasis, due to structural alteration or dysfunction. Aging is a major risk factor for most chronic diseases. As the liver has a remarkable ability to regenerate, this review assessed the effect of aging on clinical liver disease with references to preclinical models when relevant to pathogenesis. Recent findings Aging has been shown to not only enhance vulnerability to acute liver injury but also increase susceptibility of the fibrotic response. Aging is associated with the severity and poor prognosis of various liver diseases including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic liver disease, hepatitis C, and liver transplantation. Summary Treatment of older patients with liver disease may require different or longer interventions. Transplantation of an older liver will be less tolerant of subsequent injury. Future studies are needed to understand more about the molecular mechanism of aging and contribute to the development of a noble treatment strategy that can block the progression of aging-induced liver diseases. PMID:25850346

  2. Liver transplantatation- an overview.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rakesh

    2013-06-01

    Liver transplantation is a therapeutic option of choice for acute and chronic end-stage liver disease. Indications, contraindications, and surgical procedures for the liver transplantation have become well established. In most part of the world, the main source of liver for transplantation remains the donation after brain death (DBD), but in view of increasing death on the waiting list due to shortage of brain dead organs other options such as split liver transplantation, living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), and donation after cardiac death (DCD) have been used. In the pretransplantation era, liver failure was nearly universally fatal, with mortality from fulminant hepatic failure of 80-90 %, and 1-year mortality in decompensated cirrhosis of more than 50 %. In contrast, liver transplantation patient survival is presently more than 85 % at 1 year and more than 70 % at 5 years, emphasizing the clinical benefit of liver transplantation for either acute or chronic liver failure. PMID:24426424

  3. Recent Progress in Cryopreservation of Bovine Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hochi, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Principle of oocyte cryoinjury is first overviewed and then research history of cryopreservation using bovine oocytes is summarized for the last two decades with a few special references to recent progresses. Various types of cryodevices have been developed to accelerate the cooling rate and applied to the oocytes from large domestic species enriched with cytoplasmic lipid droplets. Two recent approaches include the qualitative improvement of IVM oocytes prior to the vitrification and the short-term recovery culture of vitrified-warmed oocytes prior to the subsequent IVF. Supplementation of L-carnitine to IVM medium of bovine oocytes has been reported to reduce the amount of cytoplasmic lipid droplets and improve the cryotolerance of the oocytes, but it is still controversial whether the positive effect of L-carnitine is reproducible. Incidence of multiple aster formation, a possible cause for low developmental potential of vitrified-warmed bovine oocytes, was inhibited by a short-term culture of the postwarm oocytes in the presence of Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (ROCK) inhibitor. Use of an antioxidant α-tocopherol, instead of the ROCK inhibitor, also supported the revivability of the postwarm bovine oocytes. Further improvements of the vitrification procedure, combined with pre- and postvitrification chemical treatment, would overcome the high sensitivity of bovine oocytes to cryopreservation. PMID:24738063

  4. [Liver and sport].

    PubMed

    Watelet, J

    2008-11-01

    The liver is a vital organ and plays a central role in energy exchange, protein synthesis as well as the elimination of waste products from the body. Acute and chronic injury may disturb a variety of liver functions to different degrees. Over the last three decades, the effects of physical activity and competitive sport on the liver have been described by various investigators. These include viral hepatitis and drug-induced liver disorders. Herein, we review acute and chronic liver diseases potentially caused by sport. Team physicians, trainers and others, responsible for the health of athletes, should be familiar with the risk factors, clinical features, and consequences of liver diseases that occur in sports.

  5. Tolerance Induction in Liver.

    PubMed

    Karimi, M H; Geramizadeh, B; Malek-Hosseini, S A

    2015-01-01

    Liver is an exclusive anatomical and immunological organ that displays a considerable tolerance effect. Liver allograft acceptance is shown to occur spontaneously within different species. Although in human transplant patients tolerance is rarely seen, the severity level and cellular mechanisms of transplant rejection vary. Non-paranchymal liver cells, including Kupffer cells, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, hepatic stellate cells, and resident dendritic cells may participate in liver tolerogenicity. The mentioned cells secret anti-inflammatory cytokines such as TGF-β and IL-10 and express negative co-stimulatory molecules like PD-L1 to mediate immunosuppression. Other mechanisms such as microchimerism, soluble major histocompatibility complex and regulatory T cells may take part in tolerance induction. Understanding the mechanisms involved in liver transplant rejection/tolerance helps us to improve therapeutic options to induce hepatic tolerance. PMID:26082828

  6. Expression of albumin in nonhepatic tissues and its synthesis by the bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Shamay, A; Homans, R; Fuerman, Y; Levin, I; Barash, H; Silanikove, N; Mabjeesh, S J

    2005-02-01

    Albumin is a well-characterized product of the liver. In the present study, objectives were to determine if the albumin gene is also expressed in various nonhepatic tissues in the bovine; whether mammary gland epithelial cells synthesize albumin; and how its synthesis is affected by bovine mastitis. Albumin expression was monitored using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Tissues examined were: liver, mammary gland, tongue, intestine, lymph gland, testicle, ovary, and uterus. All tissues except the ovary expressed the albumin gene, albeit less so than the liver. The highest level of expression (other than liver) was found in the lymph nodes but expression was also found in the mammary gland. Incubation of mammary gland explants with the labeled amino acid L-[(35)S] methionine resulted in formation of labeled immunoprecipitable albumin, newly synthesized in the explant. Immunoprecipitable albumin in the medium verified that newly synthesized albumin was also secreted into the medium. This shows that the gland itself is a source of milk albumin. Albumin mRNA expression was approximately 4 times higher in mammary gland tissue from 6 mastitic cows compared with expression in mammary tissue from 6 healthy glands. Further, secretion of albumin was increased 3.5-fold from explants of mastitic mammary glands compared with secretion from explants of healthy mammary glands. Addition of lipopolysaccharide increased the synthesis and secretion of albumin in mammary gland cells in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure to lipopolysaccharide accelerated albumin synthesis in a time-dependent manner up to 48 h. These results lead us to suggest that the secretion of albumin by the mammary gland is part of the innate nonspecific defense system. PMID:15653522

  7. Acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Slack, Andy; Wendon, Julia

    2011-06-01

    ALF is a multisystem disorder necessitating both predictive and reactive management strategies to support and protect organs from the initial and subsequent insults encountered. Early referral to a specialist liver centre with the option of liver transplantation is recommended. Furthermore, a good understanding of the poor prognostic variables is necessary to determine those most at risk of developing ALF in order to facilitate timely, safe transfer and listing for liver transplantation. PMID:21902079

  8. Robotic liver surgery

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Universe

    2014-01-01

    Robotic surgery is an evolving technology that has been successfully applied to a number of surgical specialties, but its use in liver surgery has so far been limited. In this review article we discuss the challenges of minimally invasive liver surgery, the pros and cons of robotics, the evolution of medical robots, and the potentials in applying this technology to liver surgery. The current data in the literature are also presented. PMID:25392840

  9. Robotic liver surgery.

    PubMed

    Leung, Universe; Fong, Yuman

    2014-10-01

    Robotic surgery is an evolving technology that has been successfully applied to a number of surgical specialties, but its use in liver surgery has so far been limited. In this review article we discuss the challenges of minimally invasive liver surgery, the pros and cons of robotics, the evolution of medical robots, and the potentials in applying this technology to liver surgery. The current data in the literature are also presented. PMID:25392840

  10. Bovine serum albumin: survival and osmolarity effect in bovine spermatozoa stored above freezing point.

    PubMed

    Nang, C F; Osman, K; Budin, S B; Ismail, M I; Jaffar, F H F; Mohamad, S F S; Ibrahim, S F

    2012-05-01

    Liquid nitrogen preservation in remote farms is a limitation. The goal of this study was to determine optimum temperature above freezing point for bovine spermatozoa preservation using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a supplementation. Pooled semen sample from three ejaculates was subjected to various BSA concentration (1, 4, 8 and 12 mg ml(-1)), before incubation in different above freezing point temperatures (4, 25 and 37 °C). Viability assessment was carried out against time from day 0 (fresh sample) until all spermatozoa become nonviable. Optimal condition for bovine spermatozoa storage was at 4 °C with 1 mg ml(-1) BSA for almost 7 days. BSA improved bovine spermatozoa viability declining rate to 44.28% at day 4 and 57.59% at day 7 compared to control, with 80.54% and 98.57% at day 4 and 7 respectively. Increase in BSA concentration did not improve sperm viability. Our results also confirmed that there was a strong negative correlation between media osmolarity and bovine spermatozoa survival rate with r = 0.885, P < 0.0001. Bovine serum albumin helps to improve survival rate of bovine spermatozoa stored above freezing point.

  11. Insulin-sensitive glucose transporter transcript levels in calf muscles assessed with a bovine GLUT4 cDNA fragment.

    PubMed

    Hocquette, J F; Graulet, B; Castiglia-Delavaud, C; Bornes, F; Lepetit, N; Ferre, P

    1996-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that the expression of the insulin-sensitive glucose transporter (GLUT4) is lower in oxidative muscles than in glycolytic muscles in bovines and goats in contrast to observations in rats. Additional experiments in this work provide very strong arguments that the immunoreactive band detected does represent GLUT4 protein, which further validates our previous results. Therefore, to determine the level of regulation, the main objective of the present study was to measure GLUT4 mRNA amounts in various bovine muscles. A 241-bp fragment of the bovine GLUT4 cDNA was cloned by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). It shares 80-90% sequence identity with related sequences in other species. This PCR-amplified bovine GLUT4 probe was used to determine the distribution of GLUT4 mRNA in bovine tissues in comparison with that of GLUT1 mRNA. Moreover, GLUT4 mRNA amounts were quantified by Northern-blot analysis in heart and seven skeletal muscles with various oxidative and glycolytic activities from seven ruminant calves. GLUT4 mRNA was detected by Northern-blot analysis only in calf insulin-sensitive tissues. In contrast, GLUT1 mRNA was detected in all tissues studied except liver. GLUT4 mRNA amount was the highest in masseter and heart, which are oxidative muscles (1.67 +/- 0.16 and 1.53 +/- 0.19 units/g wet tissue weight, respectively) and the lowest in glycolytic or oxido-glycolytic muscles (0.31 +/- 0.04 to 1.00 +/- 0.09 units/g wet tissue weight; SEM, n = 7). These data and our previous results provide evidence for translational and/or post-translational control mechanisms of bovine GLUT4 protein expression in a muscle type-specific manner.

  12. Bovine dopamine beta-hydroxylase cDNA. Complete coding sequence and expression in mammalian cells with vaccinia virus vector.

    PubMed

    Lewis, E J; Allison, S; Fader, D; Claflin, V; Baizer, L

    1990-01-15

    We have isolated cDNA clones for bovine dopamine beta-hydroxylase from an adrenal medulla cDNA library and have determined the complete coding sequence. The largest cDNA clone isolated from the library is 2.4 kilobase pairs (kb) and contains an open reading frame of 1788 bases, coding for a protein of 597 amino acids and Mr = 66,803. The predicted amino acid sequence of the bovine cDNA contains 85% identity with human dopamine beta-hydroxylase (Lamouroux, A., Vingny, A., Faucon Biquet, N., Darmon, M. C., Franck, R., Henry, J.P., and Mallet, J. (1987) EMBO J. 6, 3931-3937; Kobayashi, K., Kurosawa, Y., Fujita, K., and Nagatsu, T. (1989) Nucleic Acids Res. 17, 1089-1102). Northern blot analysis reveals that the cDNA hybridizes to an mRNA of 2.4 kb present in bovine adrenal medulla, but not in kidney, heart, or liver. In addition, the cDNA hybridizes to a second RNA species of 5.5 kb, which is 4-fold less abundant than the 2.4-kb RNA. In vitro translation of a synthetic RNA transcribed from the 2.4-kb cDNA produces a 68-kDa protein, which is specifically immunoprecipitated by antiserum to bovine dopamine beta-hydroxylase. The 2.4-kb cDNA was cloned into a vaccinia virus vector, and the recombinant virus was used to infect the rat pheochromocytoma PC12 and monkey BSC-40 fibroblast cell lines. In both cell lines, infection with recombinant virus produces a protein of Mr = 75,000, which reacts with antiserum to bovine dopamine beta-hydroxylase. These results indicate that the 2.4-kb cDNA contains the genetic information necessary to code for the bovine dopamine beta-hydroxylase subunit.

  13. Development of a radioimmunoassay for quantitation of calregulin in bovine tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna, N.C.; Waisman, D.M.

    1986-03-11

    Experimental conditions are described for a convenient and simple one-step method for radioimmunoassay (RIA) of the calcium binding protein calregulin. The radioimmunoassay utilizes /sup 125/I-labeled calregulin and pansorbin cells (Staphylococcus aureus) coated with rabbit anti-calregulin antibody. Binding equilibrium is attained in 30 min, and the total time of the assay is 1 h. The assay is sensitive to about 30 fmol of calregulin. Calregulin was quantitated in various bovine tissue extracts and was detected in all tissues except erythrocytes. It was present in particularly high amounts in pancreas (540 micrograms/g of tissue), liver (375 micrograms/g of tissue), and testis (256 micrograms/g of tissue). While about 80% of the total tissue calregulin is soluble, about 20% of this protein was found to be associated with particulate fractions. Unmasking of particulate calregulin required the presence of nonionic detergent. Gel permeation chromatography of bovine brain 100 000 g supernatant in the presence or absence of calcium has resolved a single peak of calregulin by RIA. In addition, the distribution of calregulin in the soluble or particulate fraction of bovine brain was unaffected by the presence or absence of calcium during homogenization, suggesting that calregulin does not form either calcium-dependent or calcium-independent association with soluble or particulate proteins. These results identify calregulin as a major tissue Ca2+ binding protein.

  14. Binding and Endocytosis of Bovine Hololactoferrin by the Parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Ortíz-Estrada, Guillermo; Calderón-Salinas, Víctor; Shibayama-Salas, Mineko; León-Sicairos, Nidia; de la Garza, Mireya

    2015-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a human parasite that requires iron (Fe) for its metabolic function and virulence. Bovine lactoferrin (B-Lf) and its peptides can be found in the digestive tract after dairy products are ingested. The aim of this study was to compare virulent trophozoites recently isolated from hamster liver abscesses with nonvirulent trophozoites maintained for more than 30 years in cultures in vitro regarding their interaction with iron-charged B-Lf (B-holo-Lf). We performed growth kinetics analyses of trophozoites in B-holo-Lf and throughout several consecutive transfers. The virulent parasites showed higher growth and tolerance to iron than nonvirulent parasites. Both amoeba variants specifically bound B-holo-Lf with a similar K d . However, averages of 9.45 × 10(5) and 6.65 × 10(6) binding sites/cell were found for B-holo-Lf in nonvirulent and virulent amoebae, respectively. Virulent amoebae bound more efficiently to human and bovine holo-Lf, human holo-transferrin, and human and bovine hemoglobin than nonvirulent amoebae. Virulent amoebae showed two types of B-holo-Lf binding proteins. Although both amoebae endocytosed this glycoprotein through clathrin-coated vesicles, the virulent amoebae also endocytosed B-holo-Lf through a cholesterol-dependent mechanism. Both amoeba variants secreted cysteine proteases cleaving B-holo-Lf. These data demonstrate that the B-Lf endocytosis is more efficient in virulent amoebae. PMID:26090404

  15. Binding and Endocytosis of Bovine Hololactoferrin by the Parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Ortíz-Estrada, Guillermo; Calderón-Salinas, Víctor; Shibayama-Salas, Mineko; León-Sicairos, Nidia; de la Garza, Mireya

    2015-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a human parasite that requires iron (Fe) for its metabolic function and virulence. Bovine lactoferrin (B-Lf) and its peptides can be found in the digestive tract after dairy products are ingested. The aim of this study was to compare virulent trophozoites recently isolated from hamster liver abscesses with nonvirulent trophozoites maintained for more than 30 years in cultures in vitro regarding their interaction with iron-charged B-Lf (B-holo-Lf). We performed growth kinetics analyses of trophozoites in B-holo-Lf and throughout several consecutive transfers. The virulent parasites showed higher growth and tolerance to iron than nonvirulent parasites. Both amoeba variants specifically bound B-holo-Lf with a similar Kd. However, averages of 9.45 × 105 and 6.65 × 106 binding sites/cell were found for B-holo-Lf in nonvirulent and virulent amoebae, respectively. Virulent amoebae bound more efficiently to human and bovine holo-Lf, human holo-transferrin, and human and bovine hemoglobin than nonvirulent amoebae. Virulent amoebae showed two types of B-holo-Lf binding proteins. Although both amoebae endocytosed this glycoprotein through clathrin-coated vesicles, the virulent amoebae also endocytosed B-holo-Lf through a cholesterol-dependent mechanism. Both amoeba variants secreted cysteine proteases cleaving B-holo-Lf. These data demonstrate that the B-Lf endocytosis is more efficient in virulent amoebae. PMID:26090404

  16. Binding and Endocytosis of Bovine Hololactoferrin by the Parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Ortíz-Estrada, Guillermo; Calderón-Salinas, Víctor; Shibayama-Salas, Mineko; León-Sicairos, Nidia; de la Garza, Mireya

    2015-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a human parasite that requires iron (Fe) for its metabolic function and virulence. Bovine lactoferrin (B-Lf) and its peptides can be found in the digestive tract after dairy products are ingested. The aim of this study was to compare virulent trophozoites recently isolated from hamster liver abscesses with nonvirulent trophozoites maintained for more than 30 years in cultures in vitro regarding their interaction with iron-charged B-Lf (B-holo-Lf). We performed growth kinetics analyses of trophozoites in B-holo-Lf and throughout several consecutive transfers. The virulent parasites showed higher growth and tolerance to iron than nonvirulent parasites. Both amoeba variants specifically bound B-holo-Lf with a similar K d . However, averages of 9.45 × 10(5) and 6.65 × 10(6) binding sites/cell were found for B-holo-Lf in nonvirulent and virulent amoebae, respectively. Virulent amoebae bound more efficiently to human and bovine holo-Lf, human holo-transferrin, and human and bovine hemoglobin than nonvirulent amoebae. Virulent amoebae showed two types of B-holo-Lf binding proteins. Although both amoebae endocytosed this glycoprotein through clathrin-coated vesicles, the virulent amoebae also endocytosed B-holo-Lf through a cholesterol-dependent mechanism. Both amoeba variants secreted cysteine proteases cleaving B-holo-Lf. These data demonstrate that the B-Lf endocytosis is more efficient in virulent amoebae.

  17. Bovine ephemeral fever in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, F I; Hsu, A M; Huang, K J

    2001-11-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) is a vector-borne disease of cattle, spanning tropical and subtropical zones of Asia, Australia, and Africa, caused by Ephemerovirus of the Rhabdoviridae. Taiwan has had 3 BEF epizootics, occurring in 1989, 1996, and 1999, since the vaccination regimen was initiated in 1984, given once a year in the spring with a single-dose formaldehyde-inactivated vaccine using the 1983 isolate as the seed virus. This study evaluated the 1999 population immunity against BEF virus in Taiwanese dairy cows with a neutralization test and whether the recent BEF virus isolates have mutated significantly from the vaccine virus. In March 1999, before vaccination, 94% of the animals studied were already seropositive, suggestive of an endemic or persistent infection from the previous year. By June 1999, when 51% of herds had been vaccinated, the antibody level rose, and by September 1999, the serum-neutralizing antibody (SNA) level fell to a minimum, preceding the outbreak of BEF in October 1999, during which the antibody levels of vaccinated cows continued to decline while those of unvaccinated cows rose sharply. The results suggest that, in 1999, vaccine-induced immunity was partially protective against BEE Because the current single-dose vaccination regimen resulted in minimal population immunity by September, a booster vaccination given in late summer may be advisable for future disease control. Analysis of the glycoprotein gene of Taiwanese isolates between 1983 and 1999 showed a 97.4-99.6% homology, with an alteration of 4 amino acids in antigenic sites G1, G3b, and G3c. Phylogenetic analysis of Taiwanese isolates revealed at least 2 distinct clusters: the 1983-1989 isolates and the 1996-1999 isolates. Both were distinct from 2 Japanese strains and the Australian BB7721 strain. Thus, at least 2 distinct BEF viruses, which had diverged before 1983, existed in Taiwanese dairy cows. PMID:11724135

  18. Arachidonate metabolism in bovine gallbladder muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, M.; Hidaka, T.; Ueta, T.; Ogura, R.

    1983-04-01

    Incubation of (1-/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid (AA) with homogenates of bovine gallbladder muscle generated a large amount of radioactive material having the chromatographic mobility of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (stable product of PGI2) and smaller amounts of products that comigrated with PGF2 alpha PGE2. Formation of these products was inhibited by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. The major radioactive product identified by thin-layer chromatographic mobility and by gas chromatography - mass spectrometric analysis was found to be 6-keto-PGF1 alpha. The quantitative metabolic pattern of (1-/sup 14/C)PGH2 was virtually identical to that of (1-/sup 14/C)AA. Incubation of arachidonic acid with slices of bovine gallbladder muscle released labile anti-aggregatory material in the medium, which was inhibited by aspirin or 15-hydroperoxy-AA. These results indicate that bovine gallbladder muscle has a considerable enzymatic capacity to produce PGI2 from arachidonic acid.

  19. 76 FR 26239 - Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis... framework being developed for the bovine tuberculosis and brucellosis programs in the United States. The... tuberculosis (TB) and bovine brucellosis in the United States. In keeping with its commitment to...

  20. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's...

  1. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's...

  2. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's...

  3. 9 CFR 113.216 - Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.216 Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master...

  4. 9 CFR 113.216 - Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.216 Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master...

  5. 9 CFR 113.216 - Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.216 Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master...

  6. 9 CFR 113.216 - Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.216 Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master...

  7. Characterization of the bovine C alpha gene.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, W R; Rabbani, H; Butler, J E; Hammarström, L

    1997-01-01

    The complete genomic sequence of a bovine C alpha gene is reported here. The genomic sequence was obtained from a C alpha phage clone that had been cloned from a genomic EMBL4 phage vector library. The C alpha sequence had previously been expressed as a chimeric antibody and identified as IgA using IgA-specific antibodies. Intron/exon boundaries were determined by comparison of the genomic sequence with an expressed bovine C alpha sequence obtained from spleen by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Analysis of 50 Swedish bovine genomic DNA samples using genomic blots and five different restriction enzymes failed to detect evidence of polymorphism. However, PstI digests of Brown Swiss DNA showed a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), suggesting that at least two allelic variants of bovine IgA exist. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of bovine IgA with sequences available for other species indicated that the highest homology was with that of swine, another artiodactyl. This was the highest homology observed for all mammalian IgA compared except for that between IgA1 and IgA2 in humans. Bovine IgA shares with rabbit IgA3 and IgA4, an additional N-linked glycosylation site at position 282. However, the collective data indicate that cattle are like swine and rodents and unlike rabbits in having a single locus of the gene encoding IgA of this species. Images Figure 4 PMID:9203958

  8. Bovine T lymphocyte responses to Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, John H

    2002-12-20

    The long-held paradigm of T lymphocyte-mediated activation of mononuclear phagocytes (Mø) as the major mechanism of protection against facultative intracellular pathogens such as Brucella has been modified to include killing of infected Mø by various subsets of T lymphocytes. Remnants of killed infected cells are phagocytosed by immunologically-activated Mø, which are much more efficient at killing such pathogens. Most of the detailed information regarding immunity in general and that of brucellosis specifically has been obtained using murine infection models rather than in cattle. However, there has been considerable definition of cellular phenotypes, cytokines and functional characteristics of T lymphocytes in cattle over the last decade. This was mainly due to development of monoclonal antibodies against cell surface markers and application of molecular cloning and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for isolation, characterization and detection of genes encoding bovine cytokines. This review discusses cellular and molecular immunity in bovine brucellosis as pertains to T lymphocyte interactions with the Mø. Although current knowledge directly obtained from brucellosis immunity studies in the bovine host is limited and incomplete, the many parallels between the bovine and murine immune systems allow for some extrapolation in the description of bovine host defense mechanisms. Direct information from studies with immunized cattle supports the concepts of coordinate activation of uninfected Mø and killing of Brucella-infected Mø by antigen-specific T lymphocytes as major mechanisms of host defense in bovine brucellosis. There also appears to be a bias in the T lymphocyte compartment towards recognition of particular bacterial stress proteins following immunization with live Brucella vaccines.

  9. Bovine beta-mannosidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bryan, L; Schmutz, S; Hodges, S D; Snyder, F F

    1990-12-14

    A fatal inherited glycoprotein storage disorder is described in Salers cattle which affects both sexes. Affected calves are unable to stand at birth, have a marked intention tremor, markedly enlarged kidneys, decreased white matter in all areas of the brain, and cytoplasmic vacuolation in multiple cell types of multiple tissues with nervous, renal, lymphoid and thyroid tissues most severely affected. Affected calves were grossly deficient in lymphocyte and brain beta-mannosidase activity and had markedly reduced but not deficient activity in liver and kidney. A test mating of obligate carriers produced three genotypes: affected, carrier, non-carrier in essentially the expected ratio of 1:2:1, consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. PMID:2260963

  10. Suppression of intralysosomal proteolysis aggravates structural damage and functional impairment of liver lysosomes in rats with toxic hepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Korolenko, T.A.; Gavrilova, N.I.; Kurysheva, N.G.; Malygin, A.E.; Pupyshev, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper estimates the effect of lowering protein catabolism in the lysosomes on structural and functional properties of the latter during liver damage. For comparison, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which is inert relative to intralysosomal proteolysis, and which also accumulates largely in lysosomes of the kupffer cells of the liver, was used. The uptake of labeled bovine serum albuman (C 14-BSA) by the liver is shown and the rate of intralysosomal proteolysis is given 24 hours after administration of suramin an CCl/sub 4/ to rats. It is suggested that it is risky to use drugs which inhibit intralysosomal proteolysis in the treatment of patients with acute hepatitis.

  11. Demecolcine-assisted enucleation for bovine cloning.

    PubMed

    Tani, Tetsuya; Shimada, Hiroaki; Kato, Yoko; Tsunoda, Yukio

    2006-01-01

    The present study demonstrated that demecolcine treatment for at least 30 min produces a membrane protrusion in metaphase II-stage bovine oocytes. The maternal chromosome mass is condensed within the protrusion, which makes it easy to remove the maternal chromosomes for nuclear transfer (NT). Maturation promoting factor activity, but not mitogen-activated protein kinase activity, increased up to 30% in oocytes during demecolcine treatment. One normal healthy calf was obtained after transfer of four NT blastocysts produced following demecolcine treatment. Demecolcine treatment did not increase the potential of NT oocytes to develop into blastocysts. The present study demonstrated that chemically-assisted removal of chromosomes is effective for bovine cloning.

  12. [Investigation on bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency].

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin-Zhu; Cui, Yu-Dong; Zhu, Zhan-Bo; Cao, Hong-Wei; Piao, Fan-Ze

    2006-10-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) is autosomal recessive disease. The pathogeny of BLAD is genic mutation of CD18-integrins on the leukocyte. In order to know the carrier and occurrence of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) among cows age from one to six years old in China, 1,000 cows were investigated by means of amplifying a CD18 gene fragment via reverse transcriptase-PCR followed by restriction digestion with Taq I. Results showed that 19 cows were BLAD carriers, indicating that the BLAD carrier rate was 1.9 percent. In addition, one cow was found to have BLAD. PMID:17035180

  13. Bovine rotavirus pentavalent vaccine development in India.

    PubMed

    Zade, Jagdish K; Kulkarni, Prasad S; Desai, Sajjad A; Sabale, Rajendra N; Naik, Sameer P; Dhere, Rajeev M

    2014-08-11

    A bovine rotavirus pentavalent vaccine (BRV-PV) containing rotavirus human-bovine (UK) reassortant strains of serotype G1, G2, G3, G4 and G9 has been developed by the Serum Institute of India Ltd, in collaboration with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), USA. The vaccine underwent animal toxicity studies and Phase I and II studies in adults, toddlers and infants. It has been found safe and immunogenic and will undergo a large Phase III study to assess efficacy against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis.

  14. Expression of bovine vitamin K-dependent carboxylase activity in baculovirus-infected insect cells.

    PubMed

    Roth, D A; Rehemtulla, A; Kaufman, R J; Walsh, C T; Furie, B; Furie, B C

    1993-09-15

    A vitamin K-dependent carboxylase has recently been purified from bovine liver microsomes and candidate cDNA clones have been isolated. Definitive identification of the carboxylase remains circumstantial since expression of candidate carboxylase cDNAs in mammalian cells is confounded by the presence of endogenous carboxylase activity. To overcome this problem, a recombinant strain of baculovirus (Autographa california nuclear polyhedrosis virus, AcMNPV) encoding a putative carboxylase (vbCbx/AcMNPV) was used to infect Sf9 insect cells, which we demonstrate have no endogenous carboxylase activity. Infection with vbCbx/AcMNPV conferred vitamin K-dependent carboxylase activity to Sf9 insect cells. Carboxylase activity was demonstrated to peak 2-3 days after infection with vbCbx/AcMNPV. Metabolic radiolabeling with L-[35S]methionine revealed that the 90-kDa recombinant protein is the major protein synthesized at the time of peak activity after infection. An anti-peptide antibody directed against residues 86-99 reacted with bovine liver carboxylase on Western blot analysis and immunoprecipitated recombinant carboxylase from infected Sf9 microsomal protein preparations. Since Sf9 insect cells lack endogenous vitamin K-dependent carboxylase activity, expression of carboxylase activity in Sf9 insect cells with recombinant baculovirus demonstrates that the protein encoded by this cDNA is a vitamin K-dependent gamma-glutamyl carboxylase. PMID:8378308

  15. Isolation of a human anti-haemophilic factor IX cDNA clone using a unique 52-base synthetic oligonucleotide probe deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine factor IX.

    PubMed

    Jaye, M; de la Salle, H; Schamber, F; Balland, A; Kohli, V; Findeli, A; Tolstoshev, P; Lecocq, J P

    1983-04-25

    A unique 52mer oligonucleotide deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine Factor IX was synthesized and used as a probe to screen a human liver cDNA bank. The Factor IX clone isolated shows 5 differences in nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence as compared to a previously isolated clone. In addition, precisely one codon has been deleted.Images

  16. Enteric, hepatic and muscle tissue development of goat kids fed with lyophilized bovine colostrum.

    PubMed

    Moretti, D B; Nordi, W M; Lima, A L; Pauletti, P; Machado-Neto, R

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the development of the enteric, hepatic and muscle tissues in goat kids fed with lyophilized bovine colostrum in the transition period of passive immunity to early active immunity. At 0, 7 and 14 h of life, 15 male newborns received 5% of their body weight of lyophilized bovine colostrum and 14 male newborns received goat colostrum, both with 55 mg/ml of IgG. Samples of the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, liver and muscle were collected at 18, 36 and 96 h of life to quantify total protein, DNA and RNA contents. In the jejunum and ileum, the highest levels of total protein and higher protein/RNA ratio were observed at 18 h (p < 0.05). There were no differences in DNA contents in any intestinal segment (p > 0.05). At 96 h, maximum levels of RNA were observed in the jejunum and ileum (p < 0.05) and higher RNA/DNA ratio in the three intestinal segments (p < 0.05), showing increased ability to synthesize intracellular RNA and proteins. The LBC group showed higher protein content and higher protein/DNA and protein/RNA ratios in the jejunum, a higher DNA content in the liver (p < 0.05) and a higher protein/RNA ratio in the muscle tissue (p < 0.05). In the muscle, higher protein and DNA levels were also found at 96 h (p < 0.05). Indicators of cellular activity suggest greater absorption of proteins from lyophilized bovine colostrum and increased cell maturity in the enteric and muscle tissues in the first hours of goat kids' life. PMID:23432513

  17. Oleic acid enhances G protein coupled receptor 43 expression in bovine intramuscular adipocytes but not in subcutaneous adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Chung, K Y; Smith, S B; Choi, S H; Johnson, B J

    2016-05-01

    We hypothesized that fatty acids would differentially affect G protein coupled receptor (GPR) 43 mRNA expression and GPR43 protein concentrations in bovine intramuscular (IM) and subcutaneous (SC) adipocytes. The GPR43 protein was detected in bovine liver, pancreas, and semimembranosus (MUS) muscle in samples taken at slaughter. Similarly, GPR43 protein levels were similar in IM adipose tissue and SM muscle but was barely detectable in SC adipose tissue. Primary cultures of IM and SC stromal vascular cells were isolated from bovine adipose tissues. Oleic acid (100 μ) stimulated PPARγ gene expression and decreased stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) gene expression but had no effect on GPR43 gene expression, which was readily detectable in both IM and SC adipocytes. Differentiation cocktail (Diff; 10 μ insulin, 4 μ dexamethasone, and 10 μ ciglitizone) stimulated CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and PPARγ gene expression in SC but not IM adipocytes, but Diff increased SCD gene expression in both cell types. Linoleic acid (10 µ) increased PPARγ gene expression relative to Diff cocktail in SC adipocytes, whereas linoleic acid and α-linolenic decreased SCD gene expression relative to control adipocytes and adipocytes incubated with Diff ( < 0.05). Increasing concentrations of oleic acid (1, 10, 100, and 500 μM) increased GPR43 protein and mRNA expression in IM but not SC adipocytes. These data indicated that oleic acid alters mRNA and protein concentrations of GPR43 in bovine IM adipocytes. PMID:27285685

  18. Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) interleukin-12: analysis of expression profiles and functional cross-reactivity with bovine system.

    PubMed

    Premraj, Avinash; Sreekumar, E; Jain, Mamta; Rasool, T J

    2006-03-01

    Interleukin-12, a heterodimeric pro-inflammatory cytokine, from water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) was analyzed for its for its tissue specific expression and functionality. Concanavalin A stimulated splenocytes displayed an up-regulation of the IL-12 p40 subunit 8-24h post-stimulation, whereas the p35 subunit did not show any quantitative variation at different time intervals. Basal level expressions of both the subunits were observed by RT-PCR in spleen. In addition p40 transcripts could be detected in liver and p35 in brain and muscle tissues as well in very low levels. Functional recombinant buffalo IL-12 was expressed in HEK 293T cells as a heterodimer using foot-and-mouth disease virus 2A polypeptide as a linker. Culture supernatants from transfected cells contained a hetero-dimeric p70 subunit as revealed in western blot of the proteins separated by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) using a monoclonal antibody against bovine IL-12 p40. IL-12 containing culture supernatant induced production of nitric oxide in cultured splenocytes of both buffalo and bovine origin. Our study reveals that buffalo IL-12, which shares a high-level sequence identity with bovine IL-12, also has functional cross-reactivity with the bovine immune cells.

  19. About the Operation: Liver Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Liver Transplant There are two very different surgical approaches to liver transplantation: the orthotopic and the heterotopic approach, both ...

  20. Nutrition and liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Teran, J C

    1999-08-01

    Malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies are common in patients with liver diseases. The pathogenesis of protein-energy malnutrition in cirrhosis involves many factors, including poor oral intake, malabsorption, and metabolic abnormalities similar to stress. Encephalopathy may complicate cirrhosis but is usually not caused by diet. Protein restriction is only necessary in rare patients with refractory encephalopathy. The use of branched-chain amino-acid solutions is not supported by the literature. Chronic liver diseases without cirrhosis are not usually associated with protein-energy malnutrition, but vitamin and mineral deficiencies are common, especially with significant cholestasis. Fatty liver may result from excessive triglyceride uptake and production by the liver or by a secretory defect. Therapy for fatty liver depends on its cause. Chronic total parenteral nutrition may induce fatty liver and inflammation especially in patients with short-bowel syndrome. Deficiency of choline in parenteral nutrition has been proposed as the mechanism for liver disease. Acute liver diseases such as fulminant hepatic failure or alcoholic hepatitis are considered hypercatabolic diseases and thus require prompt nutritional intervention with a high-calorie enteral or parenteral formula. In fulminant hepatic failure, low-protein, fluid-restricted formulas are recommended. PMID:10980970

  1. Hepatitis C: liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Metts, Julius; Carmichael, Lesley; Kokor, Winfred; Scharffenberg, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma account for approximately 40% of the 6,000 adult liver transplantations performed each year in the United States. Survival rates are 76% to 83% at 2 years and 69% to 72% at 5 years. If eligible for surgery and in the absence of contraindications, any patient with HCV infection who develops decompensated liver disease or hepatocellular carcinoma is a candidate for liver transplantation. Most transplantation programs require that a patient with a history of alcohol or drug abuse be abstinent for at least 6 months and active in a substance abuse rehabilitation program. Prioritization for transplantation is based primarily on a patient's model for end-stage liver disease score, though other factors are considered. Complications after liver transplantation include recurrence of HCV infection, rejection of the transplanted liver, and an increased rate of infection because of immunosuppression. Various drugs are used to prevent infection and organ rejection. Liver transplant recipients also develop diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, renal dysfunction, osteopenia, and cancers at high rates, likely because of the effects of immunosuppressive drugs, particularly steroids and calcineurin inhibitors. The family physician's role in caring for liver transplant recipients often involves detection and management of these conditions. PMID:25478647

  2. Hypoxia and fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomohiro; Shinjo, Satoko; Arai, Takatomo; Kanai, Mai; Goda, Nobuhito

    2014-11-01

    The liver is a central organ that metabolizes excessive nutrients for storage in the form of glycogen and lipids and supplies energy-producing substrates to the peripheral tissues to maintain their function, even under starved conditions. These processes require a considerable amount of oxygen, which causes a steep oxygen gradient throughout the hepatic lobules. Alcohol consumption and/or excessive food intake can alter the hepatic metabolic balance drastically, which can precipitate fatty liver disease, a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide, ranging from simple steatosis, through steatohepatitis and hepatic fibrosis, to liver cirrhosis. Altered hepatic metabolism and tissue remodeling in fatty liver disease further disrupt hepatic oxygen homeostasis, resulting in severe liver hypoxia. As master regulators of adaptive responses to hypoxic stress, hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) modulate various cellular and organ functions, including erythropoiesis, angiogenesis, metabolic demand, and cell survival, by activating their target genes during fetal development and also in many disease conditions such as cancer, heart failure, and diabetes. In the past decade, it has become clear that HIFs serve as key factors in the regulation of lipid metabolism and fatty liver formation. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms by which hypoxia and HIFs regulate lipid metabolism in the development and progression of fatty liver disease. PMID:25386057

  3. [Treatment of liver fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Marlene; Colmenero, Jordi; Bataller, Ramón

    2009-11-01

    Liver fibrosis is the progressive deposition of extracellular matrix in the liver parenchyma that precedes the development of cirrhosis. In the last few years, knowledge of the cellular and molecular bases of liver fibrosis has increased considerably. Environmental and genetic factors have been described that influence the progression of liver fibrosis, while non-invasive methods have been developed that allow the grade of fibrosis to be estimated without the need for liver biopsy. Currently, the only clearly effective treatment to attenuate or reverse liver fibrosis is elimination of the causative agent. When this is not feasible, fibrogenic factors (such as insulin resistance, obesity, alcohol intake, cannabis consumption, etc.) should be identified and treated. However, several agents are able to reduce liver fibrosis in experimental models of chronic liver damage. Few controlled clinical trials have been performed that evaluate the efficacy and safety of these agents and consequently the level of evidence supporting their use as anti-fibrogenic therapy is still low. The efficacy of the anti- fibrogenic drugs, renin-angiotensin system inhibitors, is currently being evaluated.

  4. Liver Cell Culture Devices

    PubMed Central

    Andria, B.; Bracco, A.; Cirino, G.; Chamuleau, R. A. F. M.

    2010-01-01

    In the last 15 years many different liver cell culture devices, consisting of functional liver cells and artificial materials, have been developed. They have been devised for numerous different applications, such as temporary organ replacement (a bridge to liver transplantation or native liver regeneration) and as in vitro screening systems in the early stages of the drug development process, like assessing hepatotoxicity, hepatic drug metabolism, and induction/inhibition studies. Relevant literature is summarized about artificial human liver cell culture systems by scrutinizing PubMed from 2003 to 2009. Existing devices are divided in 2D configurations (e.g., static monolayer, sandwich, perfused cells, and flat plate) and 3D configurations (e.g., liver slices, spheroids, and different types of bioreactors). The essential features of an ideal liver cell culture system are discussed: different types of scaffolds, oxygenation systems, extracellular matrixes (natural and artificial), cocultures with nonparenchymal cells, and the role of shear stress problems. Finally, miniaturization and high-throughput systems are discussed. All these factors contribute in their own way to the viability and functionality of liver cells in culture. Depending on the aim for which they are designed, several good systems are available for predicting hepatotoxicity and hepatic metabolism within the general population. To predict hepatotoxicity in individual cases genomic analysis might be essential as well. PMID:26998397

  5. Molecular differentiation of bovine sarcocysts.

    PubMed

    Akhlaghi, Majedeh; Razavi, Mostafa; Hosseini, Arsalan

    2016-07-01

    Cattle are common intermediate hosts of Sarcocystis, and the prevalence in adult bovine muscle is close to 100 % in most regions of the world. Three Sarcocystis spp. are known to infect cattle as intermediate hosts, namely, S. cruzi, S. hirsuta, and S. hominis. The aim of the present study was the molecular identification and differentiation of these three species, Neospora caninum and Besnoitia by PCR and RFLP methods. Tissue samples were obtained from diaphragmatic muscle of 101 cattle slaughtered in Shiraz, Fars Province, Iran, for both smear preparation and DNA extraction. The samples were digested by Pepsin, washed three times with PBS solution before taking smears, fixed in absolute methanol and stained with 10 % Giemsa. The slides were examined microscopically for Sarcocystis bradyzoites and DNA was extracted from 100 mg of Sarcocystis-infected meat samples. Since the primers also bind to 18S rRNA gene of some tissue cyst-forming coccidian protozoa, DNA was also extracted from 100 μl of tachyzoite-containing suspension of N. caninum and Besnoitia isolated from goat to compare RFLP pattern. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed on DNA of samples which were microscopically positive for Sarcocystis. Five restriction enzymes Dra1, EcoRV, RsaI, AvaI, and SspI were used for RFLP and DNA of one sample from protozoa was sequenced. Based on the RFLP results, 87 (98.9 %) DNA samples were cut with DraI, indicating infection by S. cruzi. One sample (1.1 %) of PCR products of infected samples was cut only with EcoRV which showed S. hominis infection. Forty-eight samples (53.3 %) of PCR products were cut with both DraI, EcoRV, or with DraI, EcoRV, and RsaI while none of them was cut with SspI, which shows the mixed infection of both S. cruzi and S. hominis and no infection with S. hirsuta. It seems by utilizing these restriction enzymes, RLFP could be a suitable method not only for identification of Sarcocystis species but also for differentiating them

  6. Genetic diversity analysis of buffalo fatty acid synthase (FASN) gene and its differential expression among bovines.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, S K; Goyal, S; Dubey, P K; Kumari, N; Mishra, S K; Mukesh, M; Kataria, R S

    2016-01-10

    Fatty Acid Synthase (FASN) gene seems to be structurally and functionally different in bovines in view of their distinctive fatty acid synthesis process. Structural variation and differential expression of FASN gene is reported in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), a bovine species close to cattle, in this study. Amino acid sequence and phylogenetic analysis of functionally important thioesterase (TE) domain of FASN revealed its conserved nature across mammals. Amino acid residues at TE domain, responsible for substrate binding and processing, were found to be invariant in all the mammalian species. A total of seven polymorphic nucleotide sites, including two in coding region of TE domain were identified across the 10 buffalo populations of riverine and swamp types. G and C alleles were found almost fixed at g18996 and g19056 loci, respectively in riverine buffaloes. Principal component analysis of three SNPs (g18433, g18996 and g19056) revealed distinct classification of riverine and swamp buffalo populations. Reverse Transcription-PCR amplification of mRNA corresponding to exon 8-10 region of buffalo FASN helped in identification of two transcript variants; one transcript of 565 nucleotides and another alternate transcript of 207 nucleotides, seems to have arisen through alternative splicing. Both the transcripts were found to be expressed in most of the vital tissues of buffalo with the highest expression in mammary gland. Semi-quantitative and real-time expression analysis across 13 different buffalo tissues revealed its highest expression in lactating mammary gland. When compared, expression of FASN was also found to be higher in liver, adipose and skeletal muscle of buffalo tissues, than cattle. However, the FASN expression was highest in adipose among the three tissues in both the species. Results indicate structural and functional distinctiveness of bovine FASN. Presence of alternate splicing in buffalo FASN also seems to be a unique phenomenon to the bovines

  7. Development of bovine embryos derived from reproductive techniques.

    PubMed

    Alberto, Míryan L V; Meirelles, Flavio V; Perecin, Felipe; Ambrósio, Carlos E; Favaron, Phelipe O; Franciolli, André L R; Mess, Andrea M; Dos Santos, José M; Rici, Rose E G; Bertolini, Marcelo; Miglino, Maria A

    2013-01-01

    Assisted reproduction techniques have improved agricultural breeding in the bovine. However, important development steps may differ from the situation in vivo and there is a high mortality rate during the first trimester of gestation. To better understand these events, we investigated the development of embryos and fetal membranes following fixed-time AI (FTAI), IVF and nuclear transfer (NT). The onset of yolk-sac development was not normal in cloned embryos. Later steps differed from conditions in vivo in all three groups; the yolk-sac was yellowish and juxtaposed with the amniotic membrane. Vascularisation of the chorioallantoic membrane was relatively late and low in NT gestations, but normal in the others. The overall development of the embryos was normal, as indicated by morphology and regression analysis of growth rate. However, NT conceptuses were significantly smaller, with the livers in some embryos occupying the abdominal cavity and others exhibiting heart abnormalities. In conclusion, the yolk-sac and the cardiovascular system seem to be vulnerable to morphogenetic alterations. Future studies will focus on gene expression and early vascularisation processes to investigate whether these changes may be responsible for the high incidence of intrauterine mortality, especially in clones.

  8. [Liver diseases in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Bruguera, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Liver diseases in the elderly have aroused less interest than diseases of other organs, since the liver plays a limited role in aging. There are no specific liver diseases of old age, but age-related anatomical and functional modifications of the liver cause changes in the frequency and clinical behavior of some liver diseases compared with those in younger patients. This review discusses the most important features of liver function in the healthy elderly population, as well as the features of the most prevalent liver diseases in this age group, especially the diagnostic approach to the most common liver problems in the elderly: asymptomatic elevation of serum transaminases and jaundice. PMID:24951302

  9. [Liver diseases in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Bruguera, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Liver diseases in the elderly have aroused less interest than diseases of other organs, since the liver plays a limited role in aging. There are no specific liver diseases of old age, but age-related anatomical and functional modifications of the liver cause changes in the frequency and clinical behavior of some liver diseases compared with those in younger patients. This review discusses the most important features of liver function in the healthy elderly population, as well as the features of the most prevalent liver diseases in this age group, especially the diagnostic approach to the most common liver problems in the elderly: asymptomatic elevation of serum transaminases and jaundice.

  10. Epidemiology and control of bovine ephemeral fever.

    PubMed

    Walker, Peter J; Klement, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever (or 3-day sickness) is an acute febrile illness of cattle and water buffaloes. Caused by an arthropod-borne rhabdovirus, bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV), the disease occurs seasonally over a vast expanse of the globe encompassing much of Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Australia. Although mortality rates are typically low, infection prevalence and morbidity rates during outbreaks are often very high, causing serious economic impacts through loss of milk production, poor cattle condition at sale and loss of traction power at harvest. There are also significant impacts on trade to regions in which the disease does not occur, including the Americas and most of Europe. In recent years, unusually severe outbreaks of bovine ephemeral fever have been reported from several regions in Asia and the Middle East, with mortality rates through disease or culling in excess of 10-20%. There are also concerns that, like other vector-borne diseases of livestock, the geographic distribution of bovine ephemeral fever could expand into regions that have historically been free of the disease. Here, we review current knowledge of the virus, including its molecular and antigenic structure, and the epidemiology of the disease across its entire geographic range. We also discuss the effectiveness of vaccination and other strategies to prevent or control infection. PMID:26511615

  11. Studying bovine early embryo transcriptome by microarray.

    PubMed

    Dufort, Isabelle; Robert, Claude; Sirard, Marc-André

    2015-01-01

    Microarrays represent a significant advantage when studying gene expression in early embryo because they allow for a speedy study of a large number of genes even if the sample of interest contains small quantities of genetic material. Here we describe the protocols developed by the EmbryoGENE Network to study the bovine transcriptome in early embryo using a microarray experimental design.

  12. Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding in Bovine Cerebral Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Reinhard, John F.; Synder, Solomon H.

    1980-05-01

    Purified preparations of microvessels from bovine cerebral cortex contain substantial levels of alpha-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, and histamine 1 receptor binding sites but only negligible serotonin, muscarinic cholinergic, opiate, and benzodiazepine receptor binding. Norepinephrine and histamine may be endogenous regulators of the cerebral microcirculation at the observed receptors.

  13. NUTRIENTS AND EPIGENETICS IN BOVINE CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a chapter for a book titled “Livestock Epigenetics” edited by Dr. Hasan Khatib and published by Wiley-Blackwell. This chapter is focused on the research development in our laboratory in the area of interaction of nutrients and genomic phonotype in bovine cells. Briefly, the Research on nutri...

  14. A physical map of the bovine genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Cattle are important agriculturally and relevant as a model organism. Previously described genetic and radiation hybrid (RH) maps of the bovine genome have been used to identify genomic regions and genes affecting specific traits. Application of these maps to identify influential geneti...

  15. Bovine respiratory disease research (1983-2009).

    PubMed

    Fulton, Robert W

    2009-12-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) research has provided significant understanding of the disease over the past 26 years. Modern research tools that have been used include monoclonal antibodies, genomics, polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry (IHC), DNA vaccines and viral vectors coding for immunogens. Emerging/reemerging viruses and new antigenic strains of viruses and bacteria have been identified. Methods of detection and the role for cattle persistently infected bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) were identified; viral subunits, cellular components and bacterial products have been characterized. Product advances have included vaccines for bovine respiratory syncytial virus, Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida; the addition of BVDV2 to the existing vaccines and new antibiotics. The role of Mycoplasma spp., particularly Mycoplasma bovis in BRD, has been more extensively studied. Bovine immunology research has provided more specific information on immune responses, T cell subsets and cytokines. The molecular and genetic basis for viral-bacterial synergy in BRD has been described. Attempts have been made to document how prevention of BRD by proper vaccination and management prior to exposure to infectious agents can minimize disease and serve as economic incentives for certified health programs. PMID:20003649

  16. Recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone Criticism Grows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaard, Greta

    1995-01-01

    Discusses concerns related to the use of recombinant bovine growth hormone in the United States and other countries. Analyses the issue from the perspectives of animal rights, human health, world hunger, concerns of small and organic farmers, costs to the taxpayer, and environmental questions. A sidebar discusses Canadian review of the hormone.…

  17. Characterization of the bovine ampkgamma1 gene.

    PubMed

    Benkel, Bernhard; Kollers, Sonja; Fries, Ruedi; Sazanov, Alexei; Yoshida, Erin; Valle, Edith; Davoren, Jon; Hickey, Donal

    2005-03-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) represents the mammalian form of the core component of a kinase cascade that is conserved between fungi, plants, and animals. AMPK plays a major role in protecting mammalian cells from metabolic stress by switching off biosynthetic pathways that require ATP and switching on ATP-regenerating pathways. In this report, we describe the isolation and characterization of the gene for the noncatalytic bovine gamma1 subunit of AMPK. The bovine ampkgamma1 (PRKAG1) gene spans in excess of 14 kb and is located at BTA 5q21-q22. It consists of 12 exons ranging in size from 38 b to 166 b, interspersed with 11 introns that range between 97 b and 6753 b in length. The coding region of the bovine gene shares 93% and 90% nucleotide sequence similarity with its human and rat counterparts, and the bovine AMPKgamma1 protein is 98% and 95% identical to its human and rat homologs, respectively, in amino acid sequence. SNP discovery using a cattle DNA panel revealed a number of polymorphisms that may be useful for the evaluation of ampkgamma1 as a candidate gene for energy metabolism-related production traits.

  18. Epidemiology and control of bovine ephemeral fever.

    PubMed

    Walker, Peter J; Klement, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever (or 3-day sickness) is an acute febrile illness of cattle and water buffaloes. Caused by an arthropod-borne rhabdovirus, bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV), the disease occurs seasonally over a vast expanse of the globe encompassing much of Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Australia. Although mortality rates are typically low, infection prevalence and morbidity rates during outbreaks are often very high, causing serious economic impacts through loss of milk production, poor cattle condition at sale and loss of traction power at harvest. There are also significant impacts on trade to regions in which the disease does not occur, including the Americas and most of Europe. In recent years, unusually severe outbreaks of bovine ephemeral fever have been reported from several regions in Asia and the Middle East, with mortality rates through disease or culling in excess of 10-20%. There are also concerns that, like other vector-borne diseases of livestock, the geographic distribution of bovine ephemeral fever could expand into regions that have historically been free of the disease. Here, we review current knowledge of the virus, including its molecular and antigenic structure, and the epidemiology of the disease across its entire geographic range. We also discuss the effectiveness of vaccination and other strategies to prevent or control infection.

  19. Identification of bovine-specific DNA in feedstuffs.

    PubMed

    Krcmár, P; Rencová, E

    2001-01-01

    Considering the menace of transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, feed components intended for cattle nutrition must be checked for the presence of bovine-derived materials. We have been using a method based on polymerase chain reaction for the identification of bovine-specific mitochondrial DNA sequences for this purpose. The specificity of the primers for polymerase chain reaction has been tested using samples of DNA of other vertebrate species, which may also be present in rendering plant products. The method allows the detection in concentrate mixtures of 0.125% of bovine-derived material. Bovine DNA at concentrations corresponding to less than 0.5% of bovine-derived material was detected in 3 of the 30 samples of concentrate mixtures collected from distributors' stores all over the Czech Republic. All 44 samples of fish meal collected from the same sources were free of bovine-derived material. PMID:11198432

  20. Linkage mapping bovine EST-based SNP

    PubMed Central

    Snelling, Warren M; Casas, Eduardo; Stone, Roger T; Keele, John W; Harhay, Gregory P; Bennett, Gary L; Smith, Timothy PL

    2005-01-01

    Background Existing linkage maps of the bovine genome primarily contain anonymous microsatellite markers. These maps have proved valuable for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) to broad regions of the genome, but more closely spaced markers are needed to fine-map QTL, and markers associated with genes and annotated sequence are needed to identify genes and sequence variation that may explain QTL. Results Bovine expressed sequence tag (EST) and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)sequence data were used to develop 918 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers to map genes on the bovine linkage map. DNA of sires from the MARC reference population was used to detect SNPs, and progeny and mates of heterozygous sires were genotyped. Chromosome assignments for 861 SNPs were determined by twopoint analysis, and positions for 735 SNPs were established by multipoint analyses. Linkage maps of bovine autosomes with these SNPs represent 4585 markers in 2475 positions spanning 3058 cM . Markers include 3612 microsatellites, 913 SNPs and 60 other markers. Mean separation between marker positions is 1.2 cM. New SNP markers appear in 511 positions, with mean separation of 4.7 cM. Multi-allelic markers, mostly microsatellites, had a mean (maximum) of 216 (366) informative meioses, and a mean 3-lod confidence interval of 3.6 cM Bi-allelic markers, including SNP and other marker types, had a mean (maximum) of 55 (191) informative meioses, and were placed within a mean 8.5 cM 3-lod confidence interval. Homologous human sequences were identified for 1159 markers, including 582 newly developed and mapped SNP. Conclusion Addition of these EST- and BAC-based SNPs to the bovine linkage map not only increases marker density, but provides connections to gene-rich physical maps, including annotated human sequence. The map provides a resource for fine-mapping quantitative trait loci and identification of positional candidate genes, and can be integrated with other data to guide and

  1. Molecular analysis of the bovine anaphylatoxin C5a receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nemali, Sailasree; Siemsen, Daniel W.; Nelson, Laura K.; Bunger, Peggy L.; Faulkner, Craig L.; Rainard, Pascal; Gauss, Katherine A.; Jutila, Mark A.; Quinn, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    Recruitment of phagocytes to inflammatory sites involves the coordinated action of several chemoattractants, including the anaphylatoxin C5a. While the C5a receptor (C5aR) has been well characterized in humans and rodents, little is known about the bovine C5aR. Here, we report cloning of bovine C5R1, the gene encoding bovine C5aR. We also analyzed genomic sequence upstream of the C5R1 translation start site. Although the bovine C5aR amino acid sequence was well conserved among species, significant differences in conserved features were found, including major differences in the N terminus, intracellular loop 3, and transmembrane domain VII. Analysis of C5aR expression by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy demonstrated high levels of C5aR on all bovine neutrophils and a subset of bovine monocytes. C5aR was not expressed on resting or activated bovine lymphocytes, although C5aR message was present in these cells. C5aR was also expressed on a small subset of bovine mammary epithelial cells. Pharmacological analysis of bovine C5aR-mediated responses showed that bovine C5a and C5adesArg both induced dose-dependent calcium fluxes and chemotaxis in bovine neutrophils, with similar efficacy for both agonists. Treatment of bovine neutrophils with C5a or C5adesArg resulted in homologous desensitization of bovine C5aR and cross-desensitization to interleukin 8 (IL-8) and platelet-activating factor (PAF); whereas, treatment with IL-8 or PAF did not cross-desensitize the cells to C5a or C5adesArg. Overall, these studies provide important information regarding distinct structural and functional features that may contribute to the unique pharmacological properties of bovine C5aR. PMID:18480166

  2. Pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Ce; Zhang, Quan-Bao; Qiao, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is the final pathological result of various chronic liver diseases, and fibrosis is the precursor of cirrhosis. Many types of cells, cytokines and miRNAs are involved in the initiation and progression of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a pivotal event in fibrosis. Defenestration and capillarization of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are major contributing factors to hepatic dysfunction in liver cirrhosis. Activated Kupffer cells destroy hepatocytes and stimulate the activation of HSCs. Repeated cycles of apoptosis and regeneration of hepatocytes contribute to pathogenesis of cirrhosis. At the molecular level, many cytokines are involved in mediation of signaling pathways that regulate activation of HSCs and fibrogenesis. Recently, miRNAs as a post-transcriptional regulator have been found to play a key role in fibrosis and cirrhosis. Robust animal models of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, as well as the recently identified critical cellular and molecular factors involved in the development of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis will facilitate the development of more effective therapeutic approaches for these conditions. PMID:24966602

  3. Pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen-Ce; Zhang, Quan-Bao; Qiao, Liang

    2014-06-21

    Liver cirrhosis is the final pathological result of various chronic liver diseases, and fibrosis is the precursor of cirrhosis. Many types of cells, cytokines and miRNAs are involved in the initiation and progression of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a pivotal event in fibrosis. Defenestration and capillarization of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are major contributing factors to hepatic dysfunction in liver cirrhosis. Activated Kupffer cells destroy hepatocytes and stimulate the activation of HSCs. Repeated cycles of apoptosis and regeneration of hepatocytes contribute to pathogenesis of cirrhosis. At the molecular level, many cytokines are involved in mediation of signaling pathways that regulate activation of HSCs and fibrogenesis. Recently, miRNAs as a post-transcriptional regulator have been found to play a key role in fibrosis and cirrhosis. Robust animal models of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, as well as the recently identified critical cellular and molecular factors involved in the development of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis will facilitate the development of more effective therapeutic approaches for these conditions.

  4. Proteoglycans in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baghy, Kornélia; Tátrai, Péter; Regős, Eszter; Kovalszky, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    Proteoglycans are a group of molecules that contain at least one glycosaminoglycan chain, such as a heparan, dermatan, chondroitin, or keratan sulfate, covalently attached to the protein core. These molecules are categorized based on their structure, localization, and function, and can be found in the extracellular matrix, on the cell surface, and in the cytoplasm. Cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, such as syndecans, are the primary type present in healthy liver tissue. However, deterioration of the liver results in overproduction of other proteoglycan types. The purpose of this article is to provide a current summary of the most relevant data implicating proteoglycans in the development and progression of human and experimental liver cancer. A review of our work and other studies in the literature indicate that deterioration of liver function is accompanied by an increase in the amount of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. The alteration of proteoglycan composition interferes with the physiologic function of the liver on several levels. This article details and discusses the roles of syndecan-1, glypicans, agrin, perlecan, collagen XVIII/endostatin, endocan, serglycin, decorin, biglycan, asporin, fibromodulin, lumican, and versican in liver function. Specifically, glypicans, agrin, and versican play significant roles in the development of liver cancer. Conversely, the presence of decorin could potentially provide protective effects. PMID:26755884

  5. Arsenic and liver disease.

    PubMed

    Guha Mazumder, D N

    2001-06-01

    The hepatotoxic action of arsenic, when used as a therapeutic agent, has long been recognised. Data on liver involvement following chronic exposure to arsenic-contaminated water are scanty. The nature and degree of liver involvement are reported on the basis of hospital based studies in patients who consumed arsenic contaminated drinking water for one to 15 years. Two hundred forty-eight patients with evidence of chronic arsenic toxicity underwent clinical and laboratory examination including liver function tests and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) status. Liver biopsy was done in 69 cases; in 29 patients, liver arsenic content was estimated by neutron activation analysis. Hepatomegaly was present in 190 of 248 patients (76.6%). Non-cirrhotic portal fibrosis was the predominant lesion (91.3%) in liver histology. The maximum arsenic content in liver was 6 mg/kg (mean 1.46 [0.42], control value 0.16 [0.04]; p <0.001); it was undetected in 6 of 29 samples studied. The largest number of patients with liver disease due to chronic arsenicosis from drinking arsenic contaminated water are reported. Non-cirrhotic portal fibrosis is the predominant lesion in this population. Hepatic fibrosis has also been demonstrated due to long term arsenic toxicity in an animal model. Initial biochemical evidence of hepatic membrane damage, probably due to reduction of glutathione and antioxidant enzymes, may be seen by 6 months. Continued arsenic feeding resulted in fatty liver with serum aminotransferases elevated at 12 months and hepatic fibrosis at 15 months.

  6. Liver support systems.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Antonio; Mancini, Elena; Ferramosca, Emiliana; Faenza, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    Liver insufficiency is a dramatic syndrome with multiple organ involvement. A multiplicity of toxic substances (hydrophilic like ammonia and lipophilic like bilirubin or bile acids or mercaptans) are released into the systemic circulation, thus altering many enzymatic cellular processes. Patients frequently die while on the transplantation waiting list because of organ scarcity. Systems supporting liver function may be useful to avoid further complications due to the typical toxic state, 'bridging' the patients to the transplantation, or, in the event of an acute decompensation of a chronic liver disease, sustain liver function long enough to permit the organ's regeneration and functional recovery. An ideal liver support system should substitute the main functions of the liver (detoxification, synthesis and regulation). Extracorporeal systems now available may be totally artificial or bioartificial. While the first are only able to perform detoxification, the second may add the functions of synthesis (plasma proteins, coagulation factors) and regulation (neurotransmitters). Bioartificial liver working with isolated hepatocytes and a synthetic membrane in an extracorporeal system are however still far from being ready for clinical use. At present, liver insufficiency may be treated with an extracorporeal support technology aimed either at detoxification alone or at a real purification. Charcoal hemoperfusion or exchange/absorption resins may be used for blood detoxification. Blood or plasma exchange, from a theoretical point of view, could be suitable for a polyvalent intoxication, such as liver failure; however, the multicompartmental distribution of some solutes largely endangers the efficacy of these procedures. Selective plasmapheresis techniques are now available for some solutes (e.g. styrene for bilirubin) and may progressively reduce the plasma levels and presumably the deposits of the solute. Novel treatments introduced to improve detoxification, mainly of

  7. Robotic liver resection technique.

    PubMed

    Hart, Marquis E; Precht, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The robotic approach to hepatic resection has evolved because of advances in laparoscopy and digital technology and based on the modern understanding of hepatic anatomy. Robotic technology has allowed for the development of a minimally invasive approach, which is conceptually similar to the open approach. The major differences are improved visualization and smaller incisions without a haptic interface. As a result, the operative strategy is reliant on visual cues and knowledge of hepatic surgical anatomy. Development of a robotic liver resection program ideally occurs in the setting of a comprehensive liver program with significant experience in all aspects of surgical liver care.

  8. Pasteurella multocida liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Cortez, J C; Shapiro, M; Awe, R J

    1986-08-01

    A previously healthy 61-year-old woman was seen with an abnormal chest roentgenogram and a 3-week history of fever, chills, malaise, and right upper quadrant pain. Blood cultures revealed Pasteurella multocida sensitive to penicillin. Liver spleen radioisotope scan and CT scan revealed space occupying lesions in the right lobe of the liver. The patient was a gardener with no pets or animal exposure. This case illustrates P. multocida septicemia and a liver abscess in a patient without animal exposure. In addition, the possibility of soil as another reservoir of infection is raised. PMID:3487981

  9. Bovine rhinitis viruses are common in U.S. cattle with bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Hause, Ben M; Collin, Emily A; Anderson, Joe; Hesse, Richard A; Anderson, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Bovine rhinitis viruses (BRV) are established etiological agents of bovine respiratory disease complex however little research into their epidemiology and ecology has been published for several decades. In the U.S., only bovine rhinitis A virus 1 (BRAV1) has been identified while bovine rhinitis A virus 2 (BRAV2) and bovine rhinitis B virus (BRBV) were previously only identified in England and Japan, respectively. Metagenomic sequencing of a nasal swab from a bovine respiratory disease (BRD) diagnostic submission from Kansas identified contigs with approximately 90% nucleotide similarity to BRAV2 and BRBV. A combination of de novo and templated assemblies using reference genomes yielded near complete BRAV2 and BRBV genomes. The near complete genome of bovine rhinitis A virus 1 (BRAV1) was also determined from a historical isolate to enable further molecular epidemiological studies. A 5'-nuclease reverse transcription PCR assay targeting the 3D polymerase gene was designed and used to screen 204 archived BRD clinical specimens. Thirteen (6.4%) were positive. Metagenomic sequencing of six positive samples identified mixed BRAV1/BRAV2, BRAV1/BRBV and BRAV2/BRBV infections for five samples. One sample showed infection only with BRAV1. Seroprevalence studies using a cell culture adapted BRBV found immunofluorescence assay-reactive antibodies were common in the herds analyzed. Altogether, these results demonstrate that BRV infections are common in cattle with respiratory disease and that BRAV1, BRAV2 and BRBV co-circulate in U.S. cattle and have high similarity to viruses isolated more than 30 years ago from diverse locations.

  10. Research Areas: Liver Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 900 drugs and supplements.​​ Recent discoveries from NIDDK research include: New medication shows promise against liver fibrosis ... linked to biliary atresia in newborn animals Support Research NIDDK invests in basic, clinical and translational research ...

  11. Fatty liver - nonalcoholic

    MedlinePlus

    ... may have the following tests to measure liver function: Complete blood count Prothrombin time Blood albumin level Your health care provider may ask for certain imaging tests, including: Ultrasound is often ...

  12. Liver function tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... laboratory results. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ... liver function. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ...

  13. Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States than in other parts of the world. Liver cancer is uncommon in the United States, ... is the fourth most common cancer in the world. In the United States, men, especially Chinese American ...

  14. Liver Transplant: Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... VHA Forms & Publications Quality & Safety Quality of Care Ethics VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guidelines Hospital Quality Data ... decreases the strain on your liver and other organs, and will make your recovery from surgery easier. ...

  15. Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... AST). This enzyme, which plays a role in processing proteins, is found in the liver, heart, muscles, ... doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, ...

  16. Alcoholic liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... weight loss Nausea or belly pain Small, red spider-like blood vessels on the skin As liver ... result of too much fluid Reddened palms Red spider-like blood vessels on the skin Small testicles ...

  17. Liver transplantation: current concepts.

    PubMed Central

    Wall, W J

    1988-01-01

    In this decade liver transplantation has been established as the preferred treatment for children and adults with irreversible end-stage liver disease. Biliary atresia in children and nonalcoholic cirrhosis in adults are the most common indications for the procedure. Transplantation currently plays only a minor role in the treatment of hepatic malignant disease. Blood group compatibility between donor and recipient is preferred, but histocompatibility matching (tissue typing) currently has no significant role in the selection of recipients. Approximately 70% of recipients survive for 1 year, and these patients have an excellent prospect of long-term survival. The emerging evidence indicates that the quality of life and rehabilitation of most liver recipients are good. The current success of liver transplantation can be attributed to critical selection of recipients, modern anesthetic and surgical techniques, improved perioperative care, accurate diagnosis of rejection and superior immunosuppression with cyclosporine. PMID:3289710

  18. [Diabetes in liver cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    García-Compeán, Diego; Jáquez-Quintana, Joel O; González-González, José A; Lavalle-González, Fernando J; Villarreal-Pérez, Jesús Z; Maldonado-Garza, Hector J

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of overt diabetes mellitus (DM) in liver cirrhosis is about 30%. However, DM or impaired glucose tolerance can be observed in 90% after an oral glucose tolerance test in patients with normal fasting plasma glucose. Type 2 DM may produce cirrhosis, whereas DM may be a complication of cirrhosis. The latter is known as «hepatogenous diabetes». Overt and subclinical DM is associated with liver complications and death in cirrhotic patients. Treating diabetes is difficult in cirrhotic patients because of the metabolic impairments due to liver disease and because the most appropriate pharmacologic treatment has not been defined. It is also unknown if glycemic control with hypoglycemic agents has any impact on the course of the liver disease. PMID:23628170

  19. [Diabetes in liver cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    García-Compeán, Diego; Jáquez-Quintana, Joel O; González-González, José A; Lavalle-González, Fernando J; Villarreal-Pérez, Jesús Z; Maldonado-Garza, Hector J

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of overt diabetes mellitus (DM) in liver cirrhosis is about 30%. However, DM or impaired glucose tolerance can be observed in 90% after an oral glucose tolerance test in patients with normal fasting plasma glucose. Type 2 DM may produce cirrhosis, whereas DM may be a complication of cirrhosis. The latter is known as «hepatogenous diabetes». Overt and subclinical DM is associated with liver complications and death in cirrhotic patients. Treating diabetes is difficult in cirrhotic patients because of the metabolic impairments due to liver disease and because the most appropriate pharmacologic treatment has not been defined. It is also unknown if glycemic control with hypoglycemic agents has any impact on the course of the liver disease.

  20. Pediatric liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Spada, Marco; Riva, Silvia; Maggiore, Giuseppe; Cintorino, Davide; Gridelli, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    In previous decades, pediatric liver transplantation has become a state-of-the-art operation with excellent success and limited mortality. Graft and patient survival have continued to improve as a result of improvements in medical, surgical and anesthetic management, organ availability, immunosuppression, and identification and treatment of postoperative complications. The utilization of split-liver grafts and living-related donors has provided more organs for pediatric patients. Newer immunosuppression regimens, including induction therapy, have had a significant impact on graft and patient survival. Future developments of pediatric liver transplantation will deal with long-term follow-up, with prevention of immunosuppression-related complications and promotion of as normal growth as possible. This review describes the state-of-the-art in pediatric liver transplantation. PMID:19222089

  1. Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Karen Kristine; Simon-Santamaria, Jaione; McCuskey, Robert S; Smedsrød, Bård

    2015-10-01

    The liver sinusoidal endothelial cell (LSEC) forms the fenestrated wall of the hepatic sinusoid and functions as a control post regulating and surveying the trafficking of molecules and cells between the liver parenchyma and the blood. The cell acts as a scavenger cell responsible for removal of potential dangerous macromolecules from blood, and is increasingly acknowledged as an important player in liver immunity. This review provides an update of the major functions of the LSEC, including its role in plasma ultrafiltration and regulation of the hepatic microcirculation, scavenger functions, immune functions, and role in liver aging, as well as issues that are either undercommunicated or confusingly dealt with in the literature. These include metabolic functions, including energy metabolic interplay between the LSEC and the hepatocyte, and adequate ways of identifying and distinguishing the cells.

  2. Cod Liver Oil

    MedlinePlus

    ... cod liver oil on their skin to speed wound healing. When taken in appropriate doses by mouth, cod ... young children. Heart disease. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Wound healing. Glaucoma. Other conditions. More evidence is needed to ...

  3. Isobaric (gasless) laparoscopic liver and kidney biopsy in standing steers

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa, O. Alberto; von Bredow, Jurgen; Li, Hui; Smith, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the suitability of an isobaric laparoscopic procedure, using a single port, for obtaining serial kidney and liver biopsy samples from standing steers. The samples were used in support of a pharmacokinetic tissue–fluid correlation study. Laparoscopic access was performed 3 times in each of 8 healthy Holstein steers, alternating from the right side to the left side and then to the right side again. The surgery was performed in standing stocks after the animals were given 3 doses of sulfadimethoxine sulfate intravenously and fasted for at least 18 h. Sedation and analgesia were achieved with acepromazine and xylazine. Lidocaine 2% was injected at the center of the paralumbar fossa (left or right), and an incision was made for introduction of a trocar–cannula assembly. Room air was allowed to enter the abdomen through the cannula at the time of insertion. Once the peritoneal cavity was reached, an operating endoscope was inserted. No pressurized insufflation was performed. A biopsy forceps was introduced into the operating channel of the endoscope to obtain a 100-mg kidney or liver sample. No complications were encountered. The 24 laparoscopic procedures provided 24 kidney and 16 liver samples. The results suggest that the isobaric (gasless) single-port laparoscopic technique is feasible for kidney and liver biopsy on standing steers. The procedure can be performed in a reliable and efficient manner in the sedated standing bovine. PMID:19337395

  4. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Liver Cancer Who Have Undergone a Liver Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-25

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer

  5. A direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry method for the determination of silicon in biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M. D.; Krivan, V.

    2007-03-01

    A solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry method for direct determination of trace silicon in biological materials was developed and applied to analysis of pork liver, bovine liver SRM 1577b and pure cellulose. The organic matrix was destroyed and expelled from the furnace in the pyrolysis stage involving a step-wise increasing the temperature from 160 °C to 1200 °C. The mixed Pd/Mg(NO 3) 2 modifier has proved to be the optimum one with respect to the achievement of maximum sensitivity, elimination of the effect of the remaining inorganic substances and the possibility of using calibration curves measured with aqueous standard solutions for quantification. For the maximum applicable sample amount of 6 mg, the limit of detection was found to be 30 ng g - 1 . The results were compared with those obtained by different spectrometric methods involving sample digestion, by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using slurry sampling, by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and by radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The method seems to be a promising one for analysis of biological materials containing no significant fraction of silicon in form of not naturally occurring volatile organosilicon compounds. The still incessant serious limitations and uncertainties in the determination of trace silicon in solid biological materials are discussed.

  6. Analgesia after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Milan, Zoka

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses postoperative analgesia in patients with end-stage liver disease who have undergone liver transplantation (LT). Postoperative analgesia determines how patients perceive LT. Although important, this topic is underrepresented in the current literature. With an increased frequency of fast tracking in LT, efficient intra- and postoperative analgesia are undergoing changes. We herein review the current literature, compare the benefits and disadvantages of the therapeutic options, and make recommendations based on the current literature and clinical experience. PMID:26413222

  7. Acute liver failure in children.

    PubMed

    Devictor, Denis; Tissieres, Pierre; Afanetti, Mickael; Debray, Dominique

    2011-06-01

    The management of children with acute liver failure mandates a multidisciplinary approach and intense monitoring. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in developing specific and supportive medical measures, but clinical studies have mainly concerned adult patients. There are no specific medical therapies, except for a few metabolic diseases presenting with acute liver failure. Liver transplantation still remains the only definitive therapy in most instances. Recent clinical studies suggest that hepatocyte transplantation may be useful for bridging patients to liver transplantation, for providing metabolic support during liver failure and for replacing liver transplantation in certain metabolic liver diseases.

  8. Liver disease and malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Purnak, Tugrul; Yilmaz, Yusuf

    2013-08-01

    Patients with hepatic disorders are exceptionally vulnerable to developing malnutrition because of the key role played by the liver in regulating the nutritional state and the energy balance. Moreover, the presence of chronic liver disorders could reduce the appetite and thus influence the nutrient intake. Poor nutritional status has been shown in various patient groups with hepatic disorders, and particularly in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis who are at high nutritional risk. It is well established that malnourished patients with liver diseases generally have a higher risk of developing adverse clinical outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Nutrition screening with the Subjective Global Assessment and anthropometric measurements are an important first step in the early identification of malnutrition and initiates the whole nutrition care process. It is therefore important for appropriate nutrition policies and protocols to be implemented so that all patients with chronic liver diseases are monitored closely from a nutritional standpoint. Early and evidence-based nutritional interventions are eagerly needed to minimize the nutritional decline associated with chronic liver disorders and ultimately improve the prognosis of such patients. This review includes a comprehensive analysis of methods to identify malnutrition in patients with chronic liver diseases as well as the extent and impact of the malnutrition problem in selected patient populations.

  9. Split liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yersiz, H; Cameron, A M; Carmody, I; Zimmerman, M A; Kelly, B S; Ghobrial, R M; Farmer, D G; Busuttil, R W

    2006-03-01

    Seventy-five thousand Americans develop organ failure each year. Fifteen percent of those on the list for transplantation die while waiting. Several possible mechanisms to expand the organ pool are being pursued including the use of extended criteria donors, living donation, and split deceased donor transplants. Cadaveric organ splitting results from improved understanding of the surgical anatomy of the liver derived from Couinaud. Early efforts focused on reduced-liver transplantation (RLT) reported by both Bismuth and Broelsch in the mid-1980s. These techniques were soon modified to create both a left lateral segment graft appropriate for a pediatric recipient and a right trisegment for an appropriately sized adult. Techniques of split liver transplantation (SLT) were also modified to create living donor liver transplantation. Pichlmayr and Bismuth reported successful split liver transplantation in 1989 and Emond reported a larger series of nine split procedures in 1990. Broelsch and Busuttil described a technical modification in which the split was performed in situ at the donor institution with surgical division completed in the heart beating cadaveric donor. In situ splitting reduces cold ischemia, simplifies identification of biliary and vascular structures, and reduces reperfusion hemorrhage. However, in situ splits require specialized skills, prolonged operating room time, and increased logistical coordination at the donor institution. At UCLA over 120 in situ splits have been performed and this technique is the default when an optimal donor is available. Split liver transplantation now accounts for 10% of adult transplantations at UCLA and 40% of pediatric transplantations.

  10. The Liver in Critical Illness.

    PubMed

    Damm, Tessa W; Kramer, David J

    2016-07-01

    Caring for critically ill patients with acute and/or chronic liver dysfunction poses a unique challenge. Proper resuscitation and early consideration for transfer to liver transplant centers have resulted in improved outcomes. Liver support devices and cellular models have not yet shown mortality benefit, but they hold promise in the critical care of patients with liver disease. This article reviews pertinent anatomic and physiologic considerations of the liver in critical illness, followed by a selective review of associated organ dysfunction. PMID:27339681

  11. Carbonic Anhydrase Protects Fatty Liver Grafts against Ischemic Reperfusion Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bejaoui, Mohamed; Pantazi, Eirini; De Luca, Viviana; Panisello, Arnau; Folch-Puy, Emma; Hotter, Georgina; Capasso, Clemente; T. Supuran, Claudiu; Rosselló-Catafau, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are ubiquitous metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and a proton. CAs are involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes, including acid-base homeostasis, electrolyte balance, oxygen delivery to tissues and nitric oxide generation. Given that these processes are found to be dysregulated during ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI), and taking into account the high vulnerability of steatotic livers to preservation injury, we hypothesized a new role for CA as a pharmacological agent able to protect against ischemic damage. Two different aspects of the role of CA II in fatty liver grafts preservation were evaluated: 1) the effect of its addition to Institut Georges Lopez (IGL-1) storage solution after cold ischemia; 2) and after 24h of cold storage followed by two hours of normothermic ex-vivo perfusion. In all cases, liver injury, CA II protein concentration, CA II mRNA levels and CA II activity were determined. In case of the ex-vivo perfusion, we further assessed liver function (bile production, bromosulfophthalein clearance) and Western blot analysis of phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK), mitogen activated protein kinases family (MAPKs) and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) parameters (GRP78, PERK, IRE, eIF2α and ATF6). We found that CA II was downregulated after cold ischemia. The addition of bovine CA II to IGL-1 preservation solution efficiently protected steatotic liver against cold IRI. In the case of reperfusion, CA II protection was associated with better function, AMPK activation and the prevention of ERS and MAPKs activation. Interestingly, CA II supplementation was not associated with enhanced CO2 hydration. The results suggest that CA II modulation may be a promising target for fatty liver graft preservation. PMID:26225852

  12. Evidence of bovine viral diarrhea, but absence of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis and bovine brucellosis in the endangered huemul deer (Hippocamelus bisulcus) in Chilean Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Corti, Paulo; Saucedo, Cristián; Herrera, Paula

    2013-07-01

    We screened 18 endangered Chilean huemul (Hippocamelus bisulcus) for antibodies to infectious agents. We detected no antibody to bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) or Brucella abortus (BA); two huemul had antibody to bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Cattle (n=35) had antibody to BVDV and BHV-1 but not BA.

  13. Dental fluorosis in bovine temporary teeth

    SciTech Connect

    Suttie, J.W.; Clay, A.B.; Shearer, T.R.

    1985-02-01

    Deciduous incisors from calves born to dams fed an average of 40 mg of fluoride/kg of forage ration (40 ppm) were compared with incisors from calves born to dams fed a normal dairy ration. Skeletal fluoride concentration in the calves born to fluoride-fed dams was increased 5 to 8 fold, but enamel mottling and hypoplasia, typical of permanent bovine incisor dental fluorosis were not seen by gross, histologic, or radiologic examination. Decreases in the amount of enamel on the tooth or hardness of the enamel were not observed. These data do not support recent reports of widespread dental fluorosis of deciduous bovine teeth as a clinical sign of fluoride toxicity.

  14. Aetiology of bovine abortion in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Campero, C M; Moore, D P; Odeón, A C; Cipolla, A L; Odriozola, E

    2003-07-01

    Necropsies were performed on 354 fetuses from dairy and beef herds submitted from 1994 to 2000 to the diagnostic laboratories at Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria, Balcarce, Argentina. Samples from the fetuses were examined for pathogenic organisms and processed for microscopic examination. An aetiological diagnosis was made for 161 (45.5%) of the fetuses. No diagnosis was made for 193 (54.5%) fetuses. Infectious agents were isolated from 122 (34.4%) of the fetuses, bacterial agents being involved in 80 (22.6%) of these. The most common bacterial agents isolated from the fetuses were Brucella abortus in 28 fetuses, Campylobacter fetus in 26 cases, and Escherichia coli in 9 cases. Bovine herpesvirus and bovine viral diarrhoea virus were found in 9 and 6 cases, respectively. Neospora caninum was detected by an immunohistochemical technique in 26 cases (7.3%). Congenital abnormalities, dystocia and mummifications were found in 8, 19 and 11 cases, respectively.

  15. Evolution and recombination of bovine DNA repeats.

    PubMed

    Jobse, C; Buntjer, J B; Haagsma, N; Breukelman, H J; Beintema, J J; Lenstra, J A

    1995-09-01

    The history of the abundant repeat elements in the bovine genome has been studied by comparative hybridization and PCR. The Bov-A and Bov-B SINE elements both emerged just after the divergence of the Camelidae and the true ruminants. A 31-bp subrepeat motif in satellites of the Bovidae species cattle, sheep, and goat is also present in Cervidae (deer) and apparently predates the Bovidae. However, the other components of the bovine satellites were amplified after the divergence of the cattle and the Caprinae (sheep and goat). A 23-bp motif, which as subrepeat of two major satellites occupies 5% of the cattle genome, emerged only after the split of the water buffalo and other cattle species. During the evolution of the Bovidae the satellite repeat units were shaped by recombination events involving subrepeats, other satellite components, and SINE elements. Differences in restriction sites of homologous satellites indicate a continuing rapid horizontal spread of new sequence variants.

  16. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy: "mad cow disease".

    PubMed

    1996-07-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also known as "mad cow disease," is a fatal brain disease of cattle first recognized in the United Kingdom. In humans, the most common transmissible spongiform encephalopathy is Creutzfeldt-Jacob Disease (CJD). Although no cases of CJD have been directly linked to beef consumption, an advisory committee has reported that 10 recent cases of a CJD variant may be associated with BSE. This announcement has alarmed consumers well beyond the borders of the United Kingdom.

  17. [Alpha 2-antiplasmin in bovine plasma].

    PubMed

    Piliavskaia, A S; Panchenko, N E

    1985-01-01

    Bovine and human blood plasma contains alpha 2-antiplasmin which possesses affinity to lysin-binding sites in plasmin and inhibits the human plasmin. Its isolation was conducted for two stages: separation of plasminogen on lysin-cellulose, fractionation by ammonium sulphate, desalination on molselector G-25, chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-50 and affinity chromatography on plasmin-sepharose with the blocked active site.

  18. Dynamics of collagen from bovine connective tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renou, J.-P.; Foucat, L.; Corsaro, C.; Ollivier, J.; Zanotti, J.-M.; Middendorf, H. D.

    2004-07-01

    We present first results from neutron studies of ns to ps relaxations in bovine collagen, comparing data for a minimally cross-linked sample (young calf) with those for a highly cross-linked one (old cow). Proton displacements derived from quasielastic scans (30

  19. Killing of Brucella abortus by bovine serum.

    PubMed

    Corbeil, L B; Blau, K; Inzana, T J; Nielsen, K H; Jacobson, R H; Corbeil, R R; Winter, A J

    1988-12-01

    Studies of the serum bactericidal system in bovine brucellosis were undertaken to investigate the role of the humoral immune response in protection of cattle against the facultative intracellular parasite Brucella abortus. Fresh sera from normal control cattle, infected cattle, and cattle immunized with B. abortus cell envelopes were collected before treatment and during the course of immunization or infection. Normal fresh bovine serum or fresh agammaglobulinemic serum from colostrum-deprived calves was effective in killing smooth virulent B. abortus 2308, but rough strains RB51 (a rough mutant of strain 2308) and 45/20 were much more sensitive to serum. The difference in susceptibility to serum was shown to be correlated with differences in lipopolysaccharide chemotype, with the more resistant strain 2308 having O polysaccharide and the more susceptible strains 45/20 and RB51 lacking O side chains. By treatment of fresh serum with MgCl2 and EGTA [ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid] killing was shown to occur via the classical pathway of complement activation. When antibody to B. abortus was present, killing of strain RB51 increased but killing of smooth strain 2308 decreased. The earliest antibody response in serum from infected animals did not interfere with killing. When affinity-purified bovine immunoglobulins specific for B. abortus smooth lipopolysaccharide were added to fresh normal bovine serum, immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) and IgG2 isotypes blocked killing but IgM and IgA isotypes did not. Thus, it appears that serum from previously unexposed animals or animals early during infection can kill smooth B. abortus, an appropriate defense mechanism before the organism becomes intracellular. At later stages of infection, blocking antibodies predominate.

  20. Relationships between thyroid status, tissue oxidative metabolism, and muscle differentiation in bovine fetuses.

    PubMed

    Cassar-Malek, I; Picard, B; Kahl, S; Hocquette, J F

    2007-07-01

    The temporal relationships between thyroid status and differentiation of liver, heart and different skeletal muscles were examined in 42 bovine fetuses from day 110 to day 260 of development using principal component analysis of the data. Plasma concentrations of reverse-triiodothyronine (rT(3)) and thyroxine (T(4)) increased during development from day 110 to day 210 or 260, respectively, whereas concentration of triiodothyronine (T(3)) and hepatic type-1 5'-deiodinase activity (5'D1) increased from day 180 onwards. On day 260, high T(4) and rT(3) and low T(3) concentrations were observed together with a mature 5'D1 activity. Cytochrome-c oxidase (COX) activity expressed per mg protein increased at day 180 in masseter and near birth in masseter, rectus abdominis and cutaneus trunci muscles (P<0.05). Significant changes in citrate synthase (CS) activity per mg protein were observed between day 110 and day 180 in the liver and between day 210 and day 260 in the liver, the heart and the longissimus thoracis muscle (P<0.05). Muscle contractile differentiation was shown by the disappearance of the fetal myosin heavy chain from day 180 onwards. A positive correlation (r>0.47, P<0.01) was shown between thyroid status parameters (5'D1, concentrations of T(4) and T(3)) and COX activity in muscles known to be oxidative after birth (masseter, rectus abdominis) but not in liver and heart, nor in muscles known to be glycolytic after birth (cutaneus trunci, longissimus thoracis). A similar correlation was found between thyroid parameters and CS activity in liver and masseter. Results indicate that elevation of plasma T(3) concentrations in the last gestational trimester could be involved in the differentiation of oxidative skeletal muscles.

  1. Bovine colostrum and immune function after exercise.

    PubMed

    Davison, Glen

    2012-01-01

    Strenuous and/or prolonged exercise causes transient perturbations in immune function. It is well accepted that this is one mechanism contributing to the higher occurrence of infection (e.g. upper respiratory tract infection (URTI)) in athletes, especially endurance athletes. URTI or upper respiratory tract (URT) symptoms can negatively affect training and competition performance but athletes must train intensively to be successful. Therefore, interventions that can legitimately enhance immune function and reduce URTI risk can be of benefit to athletes. Bovine colostrum supplementation has been investigated as a possible nutritional countermeasure to enhance (or maintain) immune function, and reduce URTI risk, following strenuous or prolonged exercise and during intensive training periods. There is convincing evidence that daily supplementation with bovine colostrum, for a number of weeks (and preliminary evidence for acute effects after a single dose), can maintain intestinal barrier integrity, immune function and reduce the chances of suffering URTI or URT symptoms in athletes or those undertaking heavy training. The mechanisms are not fully understood at present but there is preliminary evidence suggesting that the effects on immune function are attributable, at least in part, to small bioactive components that survive digestion and are biologically available after consumption, but further work is required. In summary, the balance of existing evidence does support the notion that bovine colostrum is beneficial for certain groups of athletes, such as those involved in strenuous training (e.g. endurance athletes), in terms of immunity and resistance to infection. PMID:23075556

  2. Oxytocin binding sites in bovine mammary tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin.

    1989-01-01

    Oxytocin binding sites were identified and characterized in bovine mammary tissue. ({sup 3}H)-oxytocin binding reached equilibrium by 50 min at 20{degree}C and by 8 hr at 4{degree}C. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. Thyrotropin releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, pentagastrin, bradykinin, xenopsin and L-valyl-histidyl-L-leucyl-L-threonyl-L-prolyl-L-valyl-L-glutamyl-L-lysine were not competitive. In the presence of 10 nM LiCl, addition of oxytocin to dispersed bovine mammary cells, in which phosphatidylinositol was pre-labelled, caused a time and dose-dependent increase in radioactive inositiol monophosphate incorporation. The possibility that there are distinct vasopressin receptors in bovine mammary tissue was investigated. ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding reached equilibrium by 40 min at 20{degree}. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. The ability of the peptides to inhibit ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding was: (Thr{sup 4},Gly{sup 7})-oxytocin > Arg{sup 8}-vasopressin > (lys{sup 8})-vasopressin > (Deamino{sup 1},D-arg{sup 8})-vasopressin > oxytocin > d (CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP.

  3. PHYSICOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF LYOPHILIZED BOVINE BONE GRAFTS

    PubMed Central

    Galia, Carlos Roberto; Lourenço, André Luis; Rosito, Ricardo; Souza Macedo, Carlos Alberto; Camargo, Lourdes Maria Araujo Quaresma

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the physicochemical characteristics of lyophilized bovine grafts manufactured on a semi-industrial scale (Orthogen; Baumer S/A*) in accordance with a protocol previously developed by the authors. Methods: The lyophilized bovine bone grafts were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, differential exploratory scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Results: Ca was the main component (60%) found in the samples, followed by P (28%) and O (5%). The mean (sd) pore size was 316 μm (146.7), ranging from 91.2 to 497.8 μm, and 333.5 μm (304.8), ranging from 87.2 to 963.9 μm, at 50x and 150x magnification, respectively. The hydroxyapatite peaks were at 26°C and 32°C, and mass losses were observed between 250°C and 640°C, corresponding to organic material and water. Two temperature transitions (45.67°C and 91.89°C) showed denaturation of type 1 collagen and dehydration of hydroxyapatite. Conclusion: The physicochemical assessment of lyophilized bovine bone grafts in accordance with the protocol developed at semi-industrial scale confirmed that this product presents excellent biocompatibility, with characteristics similar to natural bone. PMID:27027036

  4. THEMES OF LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Starzl, Thomas E.; Fung, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Liver transplantation was the product of 5 interlocking themes. These began in 1958-59 with canine studies of then theoretical hepatotrophic molecules in portal venous blood (Theme I) and with the contemporaneous parallel development of liver and multivisceral transplant models (Theme II). Further Theme I investigations showed that insulin was the principal, although not the only, portal hepatotrophic factor. In addition to resolving long-standing controversies about the pathophysiology of portacaval shunt, the hepatotrophic studies blazed new trails in the regulation of liver size, function, and regeneration. They also targeted inborn metabolic errors (e.g. familial hyperlipoproteinemia) whose palliation by portal diversion presaged definitive correction with liver replacement. Clinical use of the Theme II transplant models depended on multiple drug immunosuppression (Theme III, Immunology), guided by an empirical algorithm of pattern recognition and therapeutic response. Successful liver replacement was first accomplished in 1967 with azathioprine, prednisone, and ALG. With this regimen, the world’s longest surviving liver recipient is now 40 years postoperative. Incremental improvements in survival outcome occurred (Theme IV) when azathioprine was replaced by cyclosporine (1979) which was replaced in turn by tacrolimus (1989). However, the biologic meaning of alloengraftment remained enigmatic until multilineage donor leukocyte microchimerism was discovered in 1992 in long surviving organ recipients. Seminal mechanisms were then identified (clonal exhaustion-deletion and immune ignorance) that linked organ engraftment and the acquired tolerance of bone marrow transplantation and eventually clarified the relationship of transplantation immunology to the immunology of infections, neoplasms, and autoimmune disorders. With this insight, better strategies of immunosuppression have evolved. As liver and other kinds of organ transplantation became accepted as

  5. Bovine HEXIM1 inhibits bovine immunodeficiency virus replication through regulating BTat-mediated transactivation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) transactivator (BTat) recruits the bovine cyclin T1 (B-cyclin T1) to the LTR to facilitate the transcription of BIV. Here, we demonstrate that bovine hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA)-induced protein 1 (BHEXIM1) inhibits BTat-mediated BIV LTR transcription. The results of in vivo and in vitro assays show direct binding of BHEXIM1 to the B-cyclin T1. These results suggest that the repression arises from BHEXIM1-BTat competition for B-cyclin T1, which allows BHEXIM1 to displace BTat from B-cyclin T1. Furthermore, we found that the C-terminal region and the centrally located region of BHEXIM1 are required for BHEXIM1 to associate with B-cyclin T1. Knockdown of BHEXIM1 enhances BIV replication. Taken together, our study provides the first clear evidence that BHEXIM1 is involved in BIV replication through regulating BTat-mediated transactivation. PMID:23537346

  6. Bovine HEXIM1 inhibits bovine immunodeficiency virus replication through regulating BTat-mediated transactivation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong-yan; Ma, Yong-gang; Gai, Yuan-ming; Liang, Zhi-bin; Ma, Jing; Su, Yang; Zhang, Qi-cheng; Chen, Qi-min; Tan, Juan

    2013-03-27

    The bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) transactivator (BTat) recruits the bovine cyclin T1 (B-cyclin T1) to the LTR to facilitate the transcription of BIV. Here, we demonstrate that bovine hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA)-induced protein 1 (BHEXIM1) inhibits BTat-mediated BIV LTR transcription. The results of in vivo and in vitro assays show direct binding of BHEXIM1 to the B-cyclin T1. These results suggest that the repression arises from BHEXIM1-BTat competition for B-cyclin T1, which allows BHEXIM1 to displace BTat from B-cyclin T1. Furthermore, we found that the C-terminal region and the centrally located region of BHEXIM1 are required for BHEXIM1 to associate with B-cyclin T1. Knockdown of BHEXIM1 enhances BIV replication. Taken together, our study provides the first clear evidence that BHEXIM1 is involved in BIV replication through regulating BTat-mediated transactivation.

  7. Effect of bovine lactoferrin in a therapeutic hamster model of hepatic amoebiasis.

    PubMed

    Ordaz-Pichardo, Cynthia; León-Sicairos, Nidia; Hernández-Ramírez, Verónica Ivonne; Talamás-Rohana, Patricia; de la Garza, Mireya

    2012-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of amoebiasis, a disease that produces dysentery as a result of the perforation of the large intestine. This parasite often invades other organs, primarily the liver, leading to an amoebic liver abscess (ALA), which can cause death. Metronidazole is the drug of choice for the treatment of ALA; however, it produces toxic side effects in patients. Lactoferrin (Lf) is a glycoprotein of the innate immune response that sequesters iron in the mucosae. Lf possesses immune-regulatory properties, such as antiinflammatory and antioxidant activities. Moreover, the microbicidal activity of apoLf, which lacks bound iron, has been shown. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of bovine Lf (bLf) against ALA in a model of hepatic amoebiasis in hamsters. Interestingly, hamsters treated intragastrically with Lf (2.5 mg/100 g mass) over a period of 8 days showed no clinical signs of disease and ALA was effectively decreased, with only 0.63% detectable lesion, compared with 63% in untreated animals. Furthermore, liver function and blood cells approached normal levels among those receiving bLf treatment. These results suggest that bLf may aid in the therapy of amoebiasis, likely without producing undesirable effects in patients. PMID:22332957

  8. Effect of bovine lactoferrin in a therapeutic hamster model of hepatic amoebiasis.

    PubMed

    Ordaz-Pichardo, Cynthia; León-Sicairos, Nidia; Hernández-Ramírez, Verónica Ivonne; Talamás-Rohana, Patricia; de la Garza, Mireya

    2012-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of amoebiasis, a disease that produces dysentery as a result of the perforation of the large intestine. This parasite often invades other organs, primarily the liver, leading to an amoebic liver abscess (ALA), which can cause death. Metronidazole is the drug of choice for the treatment of ALA; however, it produces toxic side effects in patients. Lactoferrin (Lf) is a glycoprotein of the innate immune response that sequesters iron in the mucosae. Lf possesses immune-regulatory properties, such as antiinflammatory and antioxidant activities. Moreover, the microbicidal activity of apoLf, which lacks bound iron, has been shown. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of bovine Lf (bLf) against ALA in a model of hepatic amoebiasis in hamsters. Interestingly, hamsters treated intragastrically with Lf (2.5 mg/100 g mass) over a period of 8 days showed no clinical signs of disease and ALA was effectively decreased, with only 0.63% detectable lesion, compared with 63% in untreated animals. Furthermore, liver function and blood cells approached normal levels among those receiving bLf treatment. These results suggest that bLf may aid in the therapy of amoebiasis, likely without producing undesirable effects in patients.

  9. Liver copper concentrations in cull cattle in the UK: are cattle being copper loaded?

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, N. R.; Holmes-Pavord, H. R.; Bone, P. A.; Ander, E. L.; Young, S. D.

    2015-01-01

    With the release of the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs/Advisory Committee on Animal Feed Guidance Note for Supplementing Copper to Bovines it was noted that the current copper status of the national herd was not known. Liver samples were recovered from 510 cull cattle at a single abattoir across a period of three days. The samples were wet-ashed and liver copper concentrations determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis. Breed, age and previous location information were obtained from the British Cattle Movement Service. Dairy breeds had higher liver copper concentrations than beef breeds. Holstein-Friesian and ‘other’ dairy breeds had 38.3 per cent and 40 per cent of cattle above the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency (AHVLA) reference range (8000 µmol/kg dry matter), respectively, whereas only 16.9 per cent of animals in the combined beef breeds exceeded this value. It was found that underlying topsoil copper concentration was not related to liver copper content and that age of the animal also had little effect on liver concentration. In conclusion, over 50 per cent of the liver samples tested had greater-than-normal concentrations of copper with almost 40 per cent of the female dairy cattle having liver copper concentrations above the AHVLA reference range, indicating that a significant proportion of the UK herd is at risk of chronic copper toxicity. PMID:26489996

  10. Liver copper concentrations in cull cattle in the UK: are cattle being copper loaded?

    PubMed

    Kendall, N R; Holmes-Pavord, H R; Bone, P A; Ander, E L; Young, S D

    2015-11-14

    With the release of the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs/Advisory Committee on Animal Feed Guidance Note for Supplementing Copper to Bovines it was noted that the current copper status of the national herd was not known. Liver samples were recovered from 510 cull cattle at a single abattoir across a period of three days. The samples were wet-ashed and liver copper concentrations determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis. Breed, age and previous location information were obtained from the British Cattle Movement Service. Dairy breeds had higher liver copper concentrations than beef breeds. Holstein-Friesian and 'other' dairy breeds had 38.3 per cent and 40 per cent of cattle above the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency (AHVLA) reference range (8000 µmol/kg dry matter), respectively, whereas only 16.9 per cent of animals in the combined beef breeds exceeded this value. It was found that underlying topsoil copper concentration was not related to liver copper content and that age of the animal also had little effect on liver concentration. In conclusion, over 50 per cent of the liver samples tested had greater-than-normal concentrations of copper with almost 40 per cent of the female dairy cattle having liver copper concentrations above the AHVLA reference range, indicating that a significant proportion of the UK herd is at risk of chronic copper toxicity.

  11. Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Bovine Mammary Microbiota: Potential Allies against Bovine Mastitis.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Damien S; Seridan, Bianca; Saraoui, Taous; Rault, Lucie; Germon, Pierre; Gonzalez-Moreno, Candelaria; Nader-Macias, Fatima M E; Baud, Damien; François, Patrice; Chuat, Victoria; Chain, Florian; Langella, Philippe; Nicoli, Jacques; Le Loir, Yves; Even, Sergine

    2015-01-01

    Bovine mastitis is a costly disease in dairy cattle worldwide. As of yet, the control of bovine mastitis is mostly based on prevention by thorough hygienic procedures during milking. Additional strategies include vaccination and utilization of antibiotics. Despite these measures, mastitis is not fully under control, thus prompting the need for alternative strategies. The goal of this study was to isolate autochthonous lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from bovine mammary microbiota that exhibit beneficial properties that could be used for mastitis prevention and/or treatment. Sampling of the teat canal led to the isolation of 165 isolates, among which a selection of ten non-redundant LAB strains belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Lactococcus were further characterized with regard to several properties: surface properties (hydrophobicity, autoaggregation); inhibition potential of three main mastitis pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Streptococcus uberis; colonization capacities of bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEC); and immunomodulation properties. Three strains, Lactobacillus brevis 1595 and 1597 and Lactobacillus plantarum 1610, showed high colonization capacities and a medium surface hydrophobicity. These strains are good candidates to compete with pathogens for mammary gland colonization. Moreover, nine strains exhibited anti-inflammatory properties, as illustrated by the lower IL-8 secretion by E. coli-stimulated bMEC in the presence of these LAB. Full genome sequencing of five candidate strains allowed to check for undesirable genetic elements such as antibiotic resistance genes and to identify potential bacterial determinants involved in the beneficial properties. This large screening of beneficial properties while checking for undesirable genetic markers allowed the selection of promising candidate LAB strains from bovine mammary microbiota for the prevention and/or treatment of bovine mastitis.

  12. Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Bovine Mammary Microbiota: Potential Allies against Bovine Mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Saraoui, Taous; Rault, Lucie; Germon, Pierre; Gonzalez-Moreno, Candelaria; Nader-Macias, Fatima M. E.; Baud, Damien; François, Patrice; Chuat, Victoria; Chain, Florian; Langella, Philippe; Nicoli, Jacques; Le Loir, Yves; Even, Sergine

    2015-01-01

    Bovine mastitis is a costly disease in dairy cattle worldwide. As of yet, the control of bovine mastitis is mostly based on prevention by thorough hygienic procedures during milking. Additional strategies include vaccination and utilization of antibiotics. Despite these measures, mastitis is not fully under control, thus prompting the need for alternative strategies. The goal of this study was to isolate autochthonous lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from bovine mammary microbiota that exhibit beneficial properties that could be used for mastitis prevention and/or treatment. Sampling of the teat canal led to the isolation of 165 isolates, among which a selection of ten non-redundant LAB strains belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Lactococcus were further characterized with regard to several properties: surface properties (hydrophobicity, autoaggregation); inhibition potential of three main mastitis pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Streptococcus uberis; colonization capacities of bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEC); and immunomodulation properties. Three strains, Lactobacillus brevis 1595 and 1597 and Lactobacillus plantarum 1610, showed high colonization capacities and a medium surface hydrophobicity. These strains are good candidates to compete with pathogens for mammary gland colonization. Moreover, nine strains exhibited anti-inflammatory properties, as illustrated by the lower IL-8 secretion by E. coli-stimulated bMEC in the presence of these LAB. Full genome sequencing of five candidate strains allowed to check for undesirable genetic elements such as antibiotic resistance genes and to identify potential bacterial determinants involved in the beneficial properties. This large screening of beneficial properties while checking for undesirable genetic markers allowed the selection of promising candidate LAB strains from bovine mammary microbiota for the prevention and/or treatment of bovine mastitis. PMID:26713450

  13. Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Bovine Mammary Microbiota: Potential Allies against Bovine Mastitis.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Damien S; Seridan, Bianca; Saraoui, Taous; Rault, Lucie; Germon, Pierre; Gonzalez-Moreno, Candelaria; Nader-Macias, Fatima M E; Baud, Damien; François, Patrice; Chuat, Victoria; Chain, Florian; Langella, Philippe; Nicoli, Jacques; Le Loir, Yves; Even, Sergine

    2015-01-01

    Bovine mastitis is a costly disease in dairy cattle worldwide. As of yet, the control of bovine mastitis is mostly based on prevention by thorough hygienic procedures during milking. Additional strategies include vaccination and utilization of antibiotics. Despite these measures, mastitis is not fully under control, thus prompting the need for alternative strategies. The goal of this study was to isolate autochthonous lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from bovine mammary microbiota that exhibit beneficial properties that could be used for mastitis prevention and/or treatment. Sampling of the teat canal led to the isolation of 165 isolates, among which a selection of ten non-redundant LAB strains belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Lactococcus were further characterized with regard to several properties: surface properties (hydrophobicity, autoaggregation); inhibition potential of three main mastitis pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Streptococcus uberis; colonization capacities of bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEC); and immunomodulation properties. Three strains, Lactobacillus brevis 1595 and 1597 and Lactobacillus plantarum 1610, showed high colonization capacities and a medium surface hydrophobicity. These strains are good candidates to compete with pathogens for mammary gland colonization. Moreover, nine strains exhibited anti-inflammatory properties, as illustrated by the lower IL-8 secretion by E. coli-stimulated bMEC in the presence of these LAB. Full genome sequencing of five candidate strains allowed to check for undesirable genetic elements such as antibiotic resistance genes and to identify potential bacterial determinants involved in the beneficial properties. This large screening of beneficial properties while checking for undesirable genetic markers allowed the selection of promising candidate LAB strains from bovine mammary microbiota for the prevention and/or treatment of bovine mastitis. PMID:26713450

  14. In vitro protective effect of bacteria-derived bovine alpha interferon I1 against selected bovine viruses.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, J H; Robson, D S; Scott, F W; Schiff, E I

    1985-12-01

    We used bacteria-derived bovine alpha-interferon I1 (Bo IFN-alpha I1) to study its antiviral effect in a bovine turbinate cell line on bovine diarrhea virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, parainfluenza 3 virus, and pseudorabies virus. We based our study upon replicate tests for each strain by using a block titration system with various concentrations of Bo IFN-alpha I1 against various concentrations of virus. The data were compiled in two-axis tables (replicate X concentration) and were statistically analyzed by the Spearman-Kärber method. An increase in the concentration of Bo IFN-alpha I1 enhanced its protective effect against every test virus strain. Bo IFN-alpha I1 had a marked in vitro effect on the bovine diarrhea viral strains. It demonstrated less protection against the pseudorabies and parainfluenza 3 viruses. Its effectiveness against the two infectious bovine rhinotracheitis viral strains was lesser and of a low order.

  15. Liver transplantation in acute-on-chronic liver failure: lessons learnt from acute liver failure setting.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Mettu Srinivas; Rajalingam, Rajesh; Rela, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure is a clinical entity with high risk of mortality. These patients can have severe liver dysfunction complicated with multiple organ failure. Liver transplantation is the definitive treatment for these patients. Literature regarding management of acute liver failure with special emphasis on liver transplantation was reviewed. Lessons learnt from the management of patients with acute liver failure which could be extrapolated to the management of patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure are discussed. Significant improvement in outcomes of acute liver failure has been reported across the world. Several aspects in transplantation for acute liver failure were found to be relevant to the management of acute-on-chronic liver failure. These include defining criteria to identify patients needing early liver transplantation, prioritizing patients with acute liver failure on the waiting list, defining when to abandon transplantation in acute liver failure, emphasis on graft quality and the need for a multi-disciplinary approach to manage multiple organ dysfunction. Useful lessons can be learnt from the progress made in the management of acute liver failure and these can be extrapolated to the management of patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure. PMID:25788191

  16. Gut microbiota and liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Minemura, Masami; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    Several studies revealed that gut microbiota are associated with various human diseases, e.g., metabolic diseases, allergies, gastroenterological diseases, and liver diseases. The liver can be greatly affected by changes in gut microbiota due to the entry of gut bacteria or their metabolites into the liver through the portal vein, and the liver-gut axis is important to understand the pathophysiology of several liver diseases, especially non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy. Moreover, gut microbiota play a significant role in the development of alcoholic liver disease and hepatocarcinogenesis. Based on these previous findings, trials using probiotics have been performed for the prevention or treatment of liver diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the changes in gut microbiota associated with various liver diseases, and we describe the therapeutic trials of probiotics for those diseases. PMID:25684933

  17. Kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum sporozoite neutralization by monoclonal antibodies, immune bovine serum, and immune bovine colostrum.

    PubMed Central

    Perryman, L E; Riggs, M W; Mason, P H; Fayer, R

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies, immune bovine serum, and immune bovine colostral whey neutralized infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum sporozoites for mice in a time-dependent manner. Immune colostral whey neutralized sporozoites more rapidly and completely than immune serum, monoclonal antibody (MAb) 18.44, or a combination of MAb 18.44 and MAb 17.41. Mice were partially protected against oral challenge with C. parvum oocytes when treated with immune colostral whey, MAb 17.41, or a combination of MAb 17.41 and MAb 18.44. PMID:2294054

  18. Inhibition of lactogenic activities of bovine mammary gland explants by the whey fraction of bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Shamay, A; Shinder, D A; Bruckental, I; Silanikove, N

    1997-09-01

    The regulation of milk constituents, synthesis and secretion in tissue cultures of the bovine mammary gland was altered by a whey fraction of bovine milk. alpha-Casein gene expression, casein secretion and fatty acid synthesis were inhibited by the whey fraction in a dose-dependent manner. The whey fraction inhibited the enhancement activity of prolactin on alpha-casein gene expression and fatty acid synthesis, and also inhibited casein secretion to the medium, in explants cultured in a medium with or without prolactin. No effect on the expression of the beta-lactoglobulin gene was found. PMID:9570895

  19. Imaging in pediatric liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Monti, L; Soglia, G; Tomà, P

    2016-05-01

    Liver transplantation has become an established curative treatment in adult patients with acute or chronic end-stage liver diseases. In pediatric cases the number of cadaveric donor livers is not sufficient and to overcome the shortage of appropriate-sized whole liver grafts, technical variants of liver transplantation have been practiced. Reduced-size cadaveric and split cadaveric allografts have become an important therapeutic option, expanding the availability of size-appropriate organs for pediatric recipients with terminal liver disease. The number of pediatric deaths awaiting liver transplantation has been reduced by the introduction of living-related liver transplantation, developed to overcome the shortage of suitable grafts for children. It is important for radiologists to know that children have distinct imaging of liver transplantation that distinguish them from adults. A multidisciplinary pediatric liver transplantation team should be skilled in pediatric conditions and in associated processes, risks and complications. Radiologists should know the common pediatric liver diseases that lead to liver transplantation, the anastomotic techniques and the expected postoperative imaging findings. The aim of this study is to illustrate the role of non-invasive imaging such us ultrasonography, color Doppler ultrasonography, multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of pediatric liver transplantation and in potential liver donors. PMID:26909515

  20. Stereoscopic liver surface reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Karwan, Adam; Rudnicki, Jerzy; Wróblewski, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a practical approach to measuring liver motion, both respiratory and laparoscopic, with a tool guided in the operating room. The presented method is based on standard operating room equipment, i.e. rigid laparoscopic cameras and a single incision laparoscopic surgery trocar. The triangulation algorithm is used and stereo correspondence points are marked manually by two independent experts. To calibrate the cameras two perpendicular chessboards, a pinhole camera model and a Tsai algorithm are used. The data set consists of twelve real liver surgery video sequences: ten open surgery and two laparoscopic, gathered from different patients. The setup equipment and methodology are presented. The proposed evaluation method based on both calibration points of the chessboard reconstruction and measurements made by the Polaris Vicra tracking system are used as a reference system. In the analysis stage we focused on two specific goals, measuring respiration and laparoscopic tool guided liver motions. We have presented separate examples for left and right liver lobes. It is possible to reconstruct liver motion using the SILS trocar. Our approach was made without additional position or movement sensors. Diffusion of cameras and laser for distance measurement seems to be less practical for in vivo laparoscopic data, but we do not exclude exploring such sensors in further research. PMID:23256023

  1. Liver dysfunction in haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Steven, M M; Small, M; Pettigrew, A; Lowe, G D; Sturrock, R D; Follett, E A; Forbes, C D

    1986-04-01

    Liver function was studied in 139 of 291 haemophiliacs known to a single Regional Haemophilia Centre including patients with classical haemophilia, Christmas disease and von Willebrand's disease. In 57 patients, six-monthly liver function tests over a five year period were also available. Thirty-nine of the 139 patients had had jaundice or hepatitis and 56 had a positive test for HBsAb in the blood although few of these had had an identifiable clinical illness. Fifty-eight haemophiliacs had elevated serum aminotransferases at the time of study, but the five year review revealed only six patients who had had persistently abnormal results, although none had clinically evident liver disease. Liver dysfunction was unrelated to a history of hepatitis, to a positive HBsAb test, or to age, type of haemophilia, factor level or frequency of factor replacement treatment. Abnormalities of liver function in haemophilia appear to be unrelated to past or present hepatitis B infection in most cases and may not be related to any single transmitted infectious agent.

  2. Coagulation in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Maureane

    2015-07-01

    The liver plays a key role in hemostasis as the site of synthesis of many of the proteins involved in the coagulation, antithrombotic and fibrinolytic systems that interact to both establish hemostasis, and preventing thrombosis. The common laboratory tests, prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), evolved from studies of plasma clotting in test tubes. Such studies laid the basis for the coagulation cascade model of hemostasis. However, thought has evolved to place a greater emphasis on the active roles of cells in localizing and regulating hemostasis. The PT and aPTT do not reflect the roles of cellular elements in hemostasis, nor do they reflect the crucial roles of antithrombotic and fibrinolytic systems. Thus, though the PT may indeed reflect the synthetic capacity of the liver, it does not accurately reflect the risk of bleeding or thrombosis in patients with liver failure.

  3. Mice with human livers.

    PubMed

    Grompe, Markus; Strom, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Animal models are used to study many aspects of human disease and to test therapeutic interventions. However, some very important features of human biology cannot be replicated in animals, even in nonhuman primates or transgenic rodents engineered with human genes. Most human microbial pathogens do not infect animals and the metabolism of many xenobiotics is different between human beings and animals. The advent of transgenic immune-deficient mice has made it possible to generate chimeric animals harboring human tissues and cells, including hepatocytes. The liver plays a central role in many human-specific biological processes and mice with humanized livers can be used to model human metabolism, liver injury, gene regulation, drug toxicity, and hepatotropic infections.

  4. Immunobiology of liver xenotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ekser, Burcin; Burlak, Christopher; Waldman, Joshua P; Lutz, Andrew J; Paris, Leela L; Veroux, Massimiliano; Robson, Simon C; Rees, Michael A; Ayares, David; Gridelli, Bruno; Tector, A Joseph; Cooper, David KC

    2013-01-01

    Pigs are currently the preferred species for future organ xenotransplantation. With advances in the development of genetically modified pigs, clinical xenotransplantation is becoming closer to reality. In preclinical studies (pig-to-nonhuman primate), the xenotransplantation of livers from pigs transgenic for human CD55 or from α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout pigs+/− transgenic for human CD46, is associated with survival of approximately 7–9 days. Although hepatic function, including coagulation, has proved to be satisfactory, the immediate development of thrombocytopenia is very limiting for pig liver xenotransplantation even as a ‘bridge’ to allotransplantation. Current studies are directed to understand the immunobiology of platelet activation, aggregation and phagocytosis, in particular the interaction between platelets and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, hepatocytes and Kupffer cells, toward identifying interventions that may enable clinical application. PMID:23078060

  5. [Probiotics in liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Soriano, Germán; Sánchez, Elisabet; Guarner, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in intestinal microbiota and inflammatory response play a key role in disease progression and development of complications in liver diseases, mainly in cirrhosis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Probiotics can be useful to delay disease progression and to prevent development of complications due to their ability to modulate intestinal flora, intestinal permeability and inflammatory response. Several studies have shown the efficacy of probiotics in the treatment of minimal hepatic encephalopathy and the prevention of episodes of overt hepatic encephalopathy. Probiotics have also been observed to prevent postoperative bacterial infections and to improve liver damage in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. However, more studies are needed in order to confirm the efficacy and safety of probiotics in patients with liver diseases, and to better understanding of the mechanisms implicated in their effects.

  6. Alcoholic liver disease: Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Ki Tae; Kim, Moon Young; Baik, Soon Koo

    2014-01-01

    The excess consumption of alcohol is associated with alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). ALD is a major healthcare problem, personal and social burden, and significant reason for economic loss worldwide. The ALD spectrum includes alcoholic fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. The diagnosis of ALD is based on a combination of clinical features, including a history of significant alcohol intake, evidence of liver disease, and laboratory findings. Abstinence is the most important treatment for ALD and the treatment plan varies according to the stage of the disease. Various treatments including abstinence, nutritional therapy, pharmacological therapy, psychotherapy, and surgery are currently available. For severe alcoholic hepatitis, corticosteroid or pentoxifylline are recommended based on the guidelines. In addition, new therapeutic targets are being under investigation. PMID:25278689

  7. Liver transplantation in Germany.

    PubMed

    Tacke, Frank; Kroy, Daniela C; Barreiros, Ana Paula; Neumann, Ulf P

    2016-08-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a well-accepted procedure for end-stage liver disease in Germany. In 2015, 1489 patients were admitted to the waiting list (including 1308 new admissions), with the leading etiologies being fibrosis and cirrhosis (n = 349), alcoholic liver disease (n = 302), and hepatobiliary malignancies (n = 220). Organ allocation in Germany is regulated within the Eurotransplant system based on urgency as expressed by the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. In 2015, only 894 LTs (n = 48 from living donors) were performed at 23 German transplant centers, reflecting a shortage of organs. Several factors may contribute to the low number of organ donations. The German transplant legislation only accepts donation after brain death (not cardiac death), whereas advances in neurosurgery and a more frequently requested "palliative care" approach render fewer patients suitable as potential donors. The legislation further requires the active consent of the donor or first-degree relatives before donation. Ongoing debates within the German transplant field address the optimal management of patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and cholangiocarcinoma and measures to increase living donor transplantations. As a result of irregularities at mainly 4 German transplant centers that were exposed in 2012, guiding principles updated by the German authorities have since implemented strict rules (including internal and external auditing, the 8-eyes principle, mandatory repeated testing for alcohol consumption) to prohibit any manipulations in organ allocation. In conclusion, we will summarize important aspects on the management of LT in Germany, discuss legal and organizational aspects, and highlight challenges mainly related to the relative lack of organ donations, increasing numbers of extended criteria donors, and the peculiarities of the recipient patients. Liver Transplantation 22 1136-1142 2016 AASLD.

  8. Liver transplantation in Germany.

    PubMed

    Tacke, Frank; Kroy, Daniela C; Barreiros, Ana Paula; Neumann, Ulf P

    2016-08-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a well-accepted procedure for end-stage liver disease in Germany. In 2015, 1489 patients were admitted to the waiting list (including 1308 new admissions), with the leading etiologies being fibrosis and cirrhosis (n = 349), alcoholic liver disease (n = 302), and hepatobiliary malignancies (n = 220). Organ allocation in Germany is regulated within the Eurotransplant system based on urgency as expressed by the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. In 2015, only 894 LTs (n = 48 from living donors) were performed at 23 German transplant centers, reflecting a shortage of organs. Several factors may contribute to the low number of organ donations. The German transplant legislation only accepts donation after brain death (not cardiac death), whereas advances in neurosurgery and a more frequently requested "palliative care" approach render fewer patients suitable as potential donors. The legislation further requires the active consent of the donor or first-degree relatives before donation. Ongoing debates within the German transplant field address the optimal management of patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and cholangiocarcinoma and measures to increase living donor transplantations. As a result of irregularities at mainly 4 German transplant centers that were exposed in 2012, guiding principles updated by the German authorities have since implemented strict rules (including internal and external auditing, the 8-eyes principle, mandatory repeated testing for alcohol consumption) to prohibit any manipulations in organ allocation. In conclusion, we will summarize important aspects on the management of LT in Germany, discuss legal and organizational aspects, and highlight challenges mainly related to the relative lack of organ donations, increasing numbers of extended criteria donors, and the peculiarities of the recipient patients. Liver Transplantation 22 1136-1142 2016 AASLD. PMID:27082951

  9. Living related liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Makuuchi, M; Kawarazaki, H; Iwanaka, T; Kamada, N; Takayama, T; Kumon, M

    1992-01-01

    Liver transplantation from a brain death donor has not yet been accepted in Japan. The only alternative method at present is transplantation from a living donor. After the first successful living related liver transplantation was performed by Strong in Brisbane, Australia, Japanese hepatic and transplant surgeons also began to perform such operations. As of February 1991, 16 living related liver transplantations had already been performed in Japan, mainly for children with biliary atresia. Five of these patients subsequently died, however, our patient has survived more than 1 year, and she is presently leading a normal school life. The most important issue regarding living related liver transplantation is to ensure the donor's safety. For this purpose, we conducted a preoperative banking of the donor's own blood and plasma. In addition, a selective vascular occlusion was carried out to reduce blood loss during the resection of the liver. Intraoperative color Doppler ultrasonography was introduced for evaluating the circulation of the graft. By using this modality, the following three points were able to be accurately estimated in order to obtain optimal graft perfusion: 1) The most suitable position for the graft to be fixed to the abdominal wall, 2) whether or not the abdominal wall could be closed and 3) the indication for a ligation of the collateral veins to form a porto-systemic shunt. Thanks to these procedures, living related liver transplantations have now become an acceptable transplant method, however, a transplantation from a cadaver that is brain dead but still has a beating heart is still absolutely necessary for adult recipients. Therefore, in the future, both methods should be performed.

  10. Comparative Ultrasonographic Imaging of Spleen and Liver in Healthy Crossbred Cows

    PubMed Central

    Imran, Sheikh; Tyagi, S. P.; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Adarsh; Sharma, Shivali

    2011-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to conduct a comparative ultrasonographic study of the normal bovine spleen and liver. This study was carried out in two phases using 3.5 MHz curvilinear transducer. In first phase of water bath study, bovine spleens and livers were obtained from 3 healthy cadavers and subjected to repeated ultrasonography to study the echotexture. The splenic parenchyma was isoechogenic with greater echogenicity as compared to the liver. Water bath study provided a good learning experience for the comparative analysis of echotexture of the spleen and liver. In second phase, 10 healthy Jersey/Red Sindhi adult nonpregnant cows were subjected to detailed abdominal ultrasonography a number of times to develop the baseline topographical data of the spleen and liver. The dorsal end of the spleen in the cranial intercostal spaces could be clearly seen at the peak of inspiration when the lungs retracted to uncover the parietal surface of the spleen. The ventral end of the spleen, portion of the left lung, and the reticular wall could be scanned in the left 7th to 6th ICS in all the cows, and in the left 5th ICS in 5 cows. The liver was imaged from just behind the 12th to 6th ICS in all the cows easily. The gallbladder was imaged as a tear drop or pear shaped anechogenic structure with a hyperechogenic wall. The location of the gallbladder varied from the 12th to 9th ICS. It was most consistently observed in the 11th ICS (in 7 cows) at a mean distance of 46.3 cm from the dorsal midline. In 3 cows, the gallbladder was also seen ventral to the costal arch. The caudal vena cava was imaged as a triangular anechogenic structure on the dorsal border of the liver in the last 2 intercostal spaces in all the cows. The portal vein was imaged characteristically as a star shaped anechogenic structure with a hyperechogenic wall, ventral to the caudal vena cava, in the last 2 intercostal spaces in all the cows and in the 10th ICS in only 8 cows. It was concluded that

  11. Eosinophilic Liver Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa Rivera, Ivonne; Toro, Doris H.; Gutierrez, Jose; Acosta, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic liver infiltration is a commonly encountered focal eosinophil-related inflammation with or without necrosis, which can be seen on computed tomography (CT) in the presence of peripheral eosinophilia. Although this entity has a relatively benign course, it is related to numerable conditions for which diagnosis may be challenging and requires substantial diagnostic work-up for proper management and care of the underlying disease. We report a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with a 1-week history of right upper quadrant abdominal pain with multiple ill-defined liver hypodensities associated with significant eosinophilia. PMID:26504883

  12. Obesity and liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ayloo, Subhashini; Armstrong, John; Hurton, Scott; Molinari, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The percentage of overweight and obese patients (OPs) waiting for a liver transplant continues to increase. Despite the significant advances occurred in bariatric medicine, obesity is still considered a relative contraindication to liver transplantation (LT). The main aim of this review is to appraise the literature on the outcomes of OPs undergoing LT, treatments that might reduce their weight before, during or after surgery, and discuss some of the controversies and limitations of the current knowledge with the intent of highlighting areas where future research is needed. PMID:26421262

  13. Neoplasms of the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, K.; Ishak, K.G.

    1987-01-01

    Primary Liver Cancer is perhaps the most prevalent malignancy in the world, particularly in South East Asia and Africa. After the discovery of hepatitis B virus as a cause of chronic liver disease often terminating cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and, more recently, the integration of viral DNA into host chromosomal DNA, the progress made in this field has been remarkable. This book contains 35 chapters and covers all topical aspects, such as oncogenes, epidemiology, carcinogenic role of hepatitis viruses, histopathology, new imaging techniques and new treatment modalities that include ultrasound-guided intratumor injections of ethanol and targeting chemotherapy.

  14. IL-4 gene expression in adventitial layer (fibrous layer) of hepatic ovine and bovine hydatid cysts.

    PubMed

    Dorosti, Zahra; Tolouei, Sepideh; Khanahmad, Hossein; Jafari, Rasool; Jafaee, Fereshteh; Sharafi, Seyedeh Marayam; Darani, Hossein Yousofi

    2016-09-01

    Cystic Echinococcosis is a parasitic disease with cosmopolitan distribution caused by the tape worm Echinococcus granulosus. Fibrous layer is developed around the cyst as a host immune response reaction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the rate of IL-4 gene expression in fibrous layer of bovine and ovine hepatic hydatid cysts using quantitative technique of Real-Time PCR. In this descriptive study the samples of hydatid cyst fibrous layer were taken from 6 bovine and 6 ovine hepatic hydatid cysts. Samples of normal liver tissue close to the cyst were also taken as controls. Total RNA from each sample was extracted and then converted to cDNA. Afterward, the rate of IL-4 gene expression for each sample was evaluated using real-time PCR technique. Data were analyzed by REST software (version 2.0.13, 2009). In sheep the rate of IL-4 gene expression in the fibrous layer of hepatic hydatid cysts was 1.98 times more than the rate of IL4 gene expression in control samples, but the difference was not significant (P = 0.561). In cattle the rate of IL-4 gene expression in the fibrous layer of hepatic hydatid cysts was 9.84 times more than that of control samples which was statistically significant (P < 0.001). With high rate of IL4 expression especially in fibrous layer of bovine hydatid cyst, it can be concluded that this interleukin may play an important role in host parasite relationship. PMID:27605798

  15. Identification and characterization of microRNA sequences from bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bu, D P; Nan, X M; Wang, F; Loor, J J; Wang, J Q

    2015-03-01

    The bovine mammary gland is composed of various cell types including bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMEC). The use of BMEC to uncover the microRNA (miRNA) profile would allow us to obtain a more specific profile of miRNA sequences that could be associated with lactation and avoid interference from other cell types. The objective of this study was to characterize the miRNA sequences expressed in isolated BMEC. The miRNA were identified by Solexa sequencing technology (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA). Furthermore, novel miRNA were uncovered by stem-loop reverse transcription-PCR and sequencing of PCR products. To detect tissue specificity, expression of novel miRNA sequences was measured by stem-loop RT-PCR and sequencing of PCR products in mammary gland, liver, adipose, ileum, spleen and kidney tissue from 3 lactating Holstein cows (50±10 d postpartum). After bioinformatics analysis, 12,323,451 reads were obtained by Solexa sequencing, of which 11,979,706 were clean reads, matching the bovine genome. Among clean reads, 9,428,122 belonged to miRNA sequences. Further analysis revealed that the miRNA bta-mir-184 had the most abundant expression, and 388 loci possessed the typical stem-loop structures matching known miRNA hairpins. In total, 38 loci with novel hairpins were identified as novel miRNA and were numbered from bta-U1 to bta-U38. One novel miRNA (bta-U21) was specific to mammary gland. Seven novel miRNA, including bta-U21, had tissue-restricted distribution. Uncovering the specific roles of these novel miRNA during lactation appears warranted.

  16. Stem Cells and Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    DUNCAN, ANDREW W.; DORRELL, CRAIG; GROMPE, MARKUS

    2011-01-01

    One of the defining features of the liver is the capacity to maintain a constant size despite injury. Although the precise molecular signals involved in the maintenance of liver size are not completely known, it is clear that the liver delicately balances regeneration with overgrowth. Mammals, for example, can survive surgical removal of up to 75% of the total liver mass. Within 1 week after liver resection, the total number of liver cells is restored. Moreover, liver overgrowth can be induced by a variety of signals, including hepatocyte growth factor or peroxisome proliferators; the liver quickly returns to its normal size when the proliferative signal is removed. The extent to which liver stem cells mediate liver regeneration has been hotly debated. One of the primary reasons for this controversy is the use of multiple definitions for the hepatic stem cell. Definitions for the liver stem cell include the following: (1) cells responsible for normal tissue turnover, (2) cells that give rise to regeneration after partial hepatectomy, (3) cells responsible for progenitor-dependent regeneration, (4) cells that produce hepatocyte and bile duct epithelial phenotypes in vitro, and (5) transplantable liver-repopulating cells. This review will consider liver stem cells in the context of each definition. PMID:19470389

  17. Specific regulation of male rat liver cytosolic estrogen receptor by the modulator of the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Celiker, M Y; Haas, A; Saunders, D; Litwack, G

    1993-08-31

    Modulator is a novel low-molecular-weight organic compound that regulates activities of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors as well as protein kinase C. In this study we show that male rat liver cytosolic estrogen receptor activation is inhibited by modulator in a dose-dependent manner. Fifty percent inhibition is obtained with 1 unit/ml modulator purified from bovine liver which is within the physiological concentration for modulator. However, sheep uterine cytosolic estrogen and androgen receptors are insensitive to regulation by modulator. Exogenous sodium molybdate treatment inhibits activation of all of these receptors of liver or uterus origin in an identical manner, further differentiating the effects of modulator and the molybdate anion. PMID:8363596

  18. The Virtual Liver: Modeling Chemical-Induced Liver Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA Virtual Liver (v-Liver) project is aimed at modeling chemical-induced processes in hepatotoxicity and simulating their dose-dependent perturbations. The v-Liver embodies an emerging field of research in computational tissue modeling that integrates molecular and cellul...

  19. Chromatin-like structures obtained after alkaline disruption of bovine and human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Favre, M; Breitburd, F; Croissant, O; Orth, G

    1977-01-01

    Four low-molecular-weight polypeptides migrating like H2a, H2b, H3, and H4 calf liver histones were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-acrylamide gel electrophoresis of highly purified preparations of bovine papillomavirus (BPV) and human papillomavirus (HPV). Complexes of these polypeptides and viral DNA were isolated by agarose-gel filtration of the alkaline disruption products of both viruses. When observed under the electron microscope, these complexes appeared as circular structures composed of nucleosomes with a diameter of about 8.0 nm interconnected by a naked DNA filament. The maximal frequency of nucleosomes per molecule was 30 for both viruses, corresponding to a condensation ratio of the viral DNA of 2.5. Images PMID:191643

  20. Perspectives on the History of Bovine TB and the Role of Tuberculin in Bovine TB Eradication

    PubMed Central

    Good, Margaret; Duignan, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a significant disease of animals and humans worldwide. Bovine tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacteria with an extremely wide host range and serious, although currently probably underdiagnosed, zoonotic potential. Where bovine tuberculosis controls are effective, human zoonotic TB, due to Mycobacterium bovis or M. caprae, is uncommon and clinical cases are infrequent in cattle. Therefore, the control and ultimate eradication of bovine tuberculosis is desirable. Tuberculin tests are the primary screening tool used in bovine eradication. The choice of tuberculin test is dependent on the environment in which it is to be used. Tuberculin potency is critical to test performance, and the accurate determination of potency is therefore particularly important. The design of a control or eradication programme should take into consideration the fundamental scientific knowledge, the epidemiological profile of disease, the experience of other eradication programmes, and the presence, in the same ecosystem, of maintenance hosts, in which infection is self-sustaining and which are capable of transmitting infection. A control or eradication programme will necessarily require modification as it progresses and must be under constant review to identify the optimal desirable goals, the efficacy of policy, and constraints to progress. PMID:21547209

  1. Susceptibility of bovine umbilical cord endothelial cells to bovine herpesviruses and pseudocowpox virus.

    PubMed

    Wellenberg, G J; Verstraten, E R A M; Jongejan, F; Van Oirschot, J T

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the susceptibility of bovine umbilical cord endothelial (BUE) cells to bovine herpesvirus (BHV) 1, BHV2, BHV4 and BHV5, and to pseudocowpox virus. The detection limits and growth curves of these viruses in BUE cells were compared with those in Vero, Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK). or bovine fetal diploid lung (BFDL) cells. Detection limits were determined by inoculating cell cultures with serial 10-fold dilutions of these viruses, and growth curves by titration of virus, harvested at various times after infecting cells at a multiplicity of infection of 0.1. The detection limits of BHV2 and BHV4 were lower in BUE cells than in Vero or MDBK cells, and cytopathic effects were observed earlier in BUE cells. In addition, BHV2 and BHV4 grew to higher titres in BUE cells than in Vero or MDBK cells. BUE cells appeared to be equally susceptible to BHV5, but less susceptible to BHV1.1 and BHVI.2 than MDBK cells. The study showed that BUE cells are highly susceptible to BHV2 and BHV4. and that the use of BUE cells can improve the laboratory diagnosis of these viruses. The use of BUE cells could also improve the isolation and growth of pseudocowpox virus.

  2. Bovine central memory T cells are highly proliferative in response to bovine tuberculosis infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term (i.e., 14 days) cultured IFN-gamma responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells are used as a correlate of T cell central memory (Tcm) responses in both humans and cattle. With bovine tuberculosis, vaccine-elicited long-term IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays are a correlate of protection. Recent...

  3. Bovine central memory T cells are highly proliferative in response to bovine tuberculosis infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term (i.e., 14 days) cultured IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays measure central memory T cell (Tcm) responses in both humans and cattle. With bovine tuberculosis, vaccine-elicited long-term IFN-gamma ELISPOT responses correlate with protection. In other species, Tcm’s pose low activation threshold and a...

  4. Fasciola hepatica IN BOVINES IN BRAZIL: DATA AVAILABILITY AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION

    PubMed Central

    Bennema, Sita C.; Scholte, Ronaldo Guilherme Carvalho; Molento, Marcelo Beltrão; Medeiros, Camilla; Carvalho, Omar dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Fasciolosis is a disease of importance for both veterinary and public health. For the first time, georeferenced prevalence data of Fasciola hepatica in bovines were collected and mapped for the Brazilian territory and data availability was discussed. Bovine fasciolosis in Brazil is monitored on a Federal, State and Municipal level, and to improve monitoring it is essential to combine the data collected on these three levels into one dataset. Data were collected for 1032 municipalities where livers were condemned by the Federal Inspection Service (MAPA/SIF) because of the presence of F. hepatica. The information was distributed over 11 states: Espírito Santo, Goiás, Minas Gerais, Mato Grosso do Sul, Mato Grosso, Pará, Paraná, Rio de Janeiro, Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina and São Paulo. The highest prevalence of fasciolosis was observed in the southern states, with disease clusters along the coast of Paraná and Santa Catarina and in Rio Grande do Sul. Also, temporal variation of the prevalence was observed. The observed prevalence and the kriged prevalence maps presented in this paper can assist both animal and human health workers in estimating the risk of infection in their state or municipality. PMID:24553606

  5. Adhesion of Fusobacterium necrophorum to bovine endothelial cells is mediated by outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Gart, Elena; Nagaraja, T G; Narayanan, Sanjeev

    2013-03-23

    Fusobacterium necrophorum, a Gram-negative anaerobe, is frequently associated with suppurative and necrotic infections of animals and humans. The organism is a major bovine pathogen, and in cattle, the common fusobacterial infections are hepatic abscesses, foot rot, and necrotic laryngitis. The species comprises two subspecies: F. necrophorum subsp. necrophorum and F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme. Bacterial adhesion to the host cell surface is a critical initial step in the pathogenesis, and outer membrane proteins (OMP) play an important role in adhesion and establishment of certain Gram-negative bacterial infections. The means by which F. necrophorum attaches to epithelial or endothelial cells has not been determined. We evaluated whether OMP of F. necrophorum, isolated from a liver abscess, mediated adhesion to bovine endothelial cells (adrenal gland capillary endothelial cell line). The extent of binding of subsp. necrophorum to the endothelial cells was higher than that of F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme. Trypsin treatment of bacterial cells decreased their binding to endothelial cells indicating the protein nature of adhesins. Preincubation of endothelial cells with OMP extracted from F. necrophorum decreased the binding of bacterial cells. In addition, binding of each subspecies to endothelial cells was inhibited by polyclonal antibodies raised against respective OMP and the antibody-mediated inhibition was subspecies specific. The western blot analysis of OMP bound to endothelial cells with anti-OMP antibodies showed four OMP of 17, 24, 40 and 74 kDa. We conclude that OMP of F. necrophorum play a role in adhesion of bacterial cells to the endothelial cells.

  6. Pathogenesis of neurological signs associated with bovine enteric coccidiosis: a prospective study and review.

    PubMed Central

    Isler, C M; Bellamy, J E; Wobeser, G A

    1987-01-01

    Various hypotheses have been proposed for the pathogenesis of the neurological signs associated with bovine enteric coccidiosis. We undertook a prospective study of cases of bovine enteric coccidiosis with and without nervous signs to test the validity of these hypotheses and explore other possible pathophysiological mechanisms. Clinical, pathological and toxicological data from 12 calves with, and 15 calves without, neurological signs were compared. Calves with neurological signs had a lower liver Cu concentration (p less than 0.01) and a higher plasma glucose concentration (p less than 0.05) than did calves without neurological signs. Hyperglycemia and Cu deficiency may increase the susceptibility to central nervous system damage, but are not likely to account for the onset of neurological signs in calves with enteric coccidiosis. The results of the study suggest that the following are not involved in the pathogenesis of "nervous coccidiosis": disturbance of serum Na, K, Ca, P, or Mg concentration, vitamin A deficiency, thiamine deficiency, anemia, lead intoxication, uremia, Haemophilus somnus meningoencephalitis, severity of coccidial infection, gross alterations in intestinal bacterial flora and hepatopathy. PMID:3607655

  7. Plants Consumption and Liver Health

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yong-Song; He, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The liver is a very important organ with a lot of functions for the host to survive. Dietary components are essential for and can be beneficial or detrimental to the healthy or diseased liver. Plants food is an essential part of the human diet and comprises various compounds which are closely related to liver health. Selected food plants can provide nutritional and medicinal support for liver disease. At the present, the knowledge of the effects of plants on the liver is still incomplete. The most urgent task at the present time is to find the best dietary and medicinal plants for liver health in an endless list of candidates. This review article updates the knowledge about the effects of plants consumption on the health of the liver, putting particular emphasis on the potential beneficial and harmful impact of dietary and medicinal plants on liver function. PMID:26221179

  8. Interventional Treatments for Liver Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Patient information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Interventional Treatments for Liver Disease There are a ... liver that can be treated with nonsurgical, interventional radiology techniques. Portal Hypertension Seen most frequently in patients ...

  9. Bovine Genetic Diversity Revealed By mtDNA Sequence Variation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mitochondrial DNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data were used to determine genetic distance, nucleotide diversity, construction of haplotypes, estimation of information contents, and phylogenic relationships in bovine HapMap breeds. The Bovine International HapMap panel consists of 720 anima...

  10. Bovine Papillomavirus Type 13 DNA in Equine Sarcoids

    PubMed Central

    Lunardi, Michele; de Alcântara, Brígida Kussumoto; Otonel, Rodrigo Alejandro Arellano; Rodrigues, Wagner Borges; Alfieri, Alice Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Equine sarcoids are locally aggressive fibroblastic neoplasms considered to be the most common skin tumors of horses worldwide. Bovine papillomavirus types 1 and 2 have typically been associated with sarcoids in equids. Investigations aiming to identify papillomavirus strains, aside from bovine papillomaviruses 1 and 2, which might be associated with sarcoid lesions, have been lacking. The aim of this article is to report the identification of a third bovine papillomavirus type, bovine papillomavirus 13, associated with equine sarcoids. Six sarcoid lesions were collected from diverse anatomical sites on two horses from southern Brazil. To detect a broad spectrum of papillomavirus strains, eight degenerate primer pairs designed to detect conserved regions on the L1 and E1 genes were tested on the DNA samples. Direct sequencing was then performed on the obtained amplicons, and sequence identities were compared with sequences from all bovine papillomavirus types. The FAP59/FAP64, MY09/MY11, and AR-E1F2/AR-E1R4 sequences generated from the sarcoids were shown to present 99 to 100% identity with bovine papillomavirus 13, a new bovine papillomavirus type previously described in cattle. The results from this study suggest that there is a need to identify bovine papillomavirus type 13 and other papillomavirus strains that might be associated with sarcoids in diverse geographical areas; such investigations might establish the frequency of occurrence of this viral type in these common tumors of equids. PMID:23637294

  11. Prevalence, transmission and impact of bovine leukosis in Michigan dairies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine leukosis, caused by infection with the retrovirus bovine leukemia virus (BLV), has been characterized as a contagious, but practically benign disease of the immune system. National Animal Health Monitoring Surveys in 1996 and 2007 indicate complacency has resulted in high prevalence of infect...

  12. Diagnosis of enzootic bovine leucosis in single and pooled samples.

    PubMed

    Hoff-Jørgensen, R

    1990-12-01

    Diagnosis of enzootic bovine leucosis is based on detection of antibodies against bovine leukemia virus, BLV. Some ELISA modifications have proved sensitive enough for use in the examination of pooled blood samples from slaughterhouses, milk and pooled milk samples. Suggestions for the standardisation of different ELISA modifications using a common reference serum are presented. PMID:1966753

  13. Identification of highly active flocculant proteins in bovine blood

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine blood is an excellent flocculating agent, faster acting and as effective on a mass basis as polyacrylamide, the most widely utilized polymeric flocculant. To determine the molecular basis of flocculation activity, whole bovine blood (BB) and BB plasma were fractionated by size exclusion chro...

  14. Discovery of a bovine enterovirus in alpaca.

    PubMed

    McClenahan, Shasta D; Scherba, Gail; Borst, Luke; Fredrickson, Richard L; Krause, Philip R; Uhlenhaut, Christine

    2013-01-01

    A cytopathic virus was isolated using Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells from lung tissue of alpaca that died of a severe respiratory infection. To identify the virus, the infected cell culture supernatant was enriched for virus particles and a generic, PCR-based method was used to amplify potential viral sequences. Genomic sequence data of the alpaca isolate was obtained and compared with sequences of known viruses. The new alpaca virus sequence was most similar to recently designated Enterovirus species F, previously bovine enterovirus (BEVs), viruses that are globally prevalent in cattle, although they appear not to cause significant disease. Because bovine enteroviruses have not been previously reported in U.S. alpaca, we suspect that this type of infection is fairly rare, and in this case appeared not to spread beyond the original outbreak. The capsid sequence of the detected virus had greatest homology to Enterovirus F type 1 (indicating that the virus should be considered a member of serotype 1), but the virus had greater homology in 2A protease sequence to type 3, suggesting that it may have been a recombinant. Identifying pathogens that infect a new host species for the first time can be challenging. As the disease in a new host species may be quite different from that in the original or natural host, the pathogen may not be suspected based on the clinical presentation, delaying diagnosis. Although this virus replicated in MDBK cells, existing standard culture and molecular methods could not identify it. In this case, a highly sensitive generic PCR-based pathogen-detection method was used to identify this pathogen.

  15. Endocannabinoids in Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Joseph; Liu, Jie; Mukhopadhyay, Bani; Cinar, Resat; Godlewski, Grzegorz; Kunos, George

    2010-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are lipid mediators of the same cannabinoid (CB) receptors that mediate the effects of marijuana. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) consists of CB receptors, endocannabinoids, and the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis and degradation, and is present both in brain and peripheral tissues, including the liver. The hepatic ECS is activated in various liver diseases, which contributes to the underlying pathologies. In cirrhosis of various etiologies, activation of vascular and cardiac CB1 receptors by macrophage- and platelet-derived endocannabinoids contribute to the vasodilated state and cardiomyopathy, which can be reversed by CB1 blockade. In mouse models of liver fibrosis, activation of CB1 receptors on hepatic stellate cells is fibrogenic, and CB1 blockade slows the progression of fibrosis. Fatty liver induced by high-fat diets or chronic alcohol feeding depend on activation of peripheral, including hepatic CB1 receptors, which also contribute to insulin resistance and dyslipidemias. Although the documented therapeutic potential of CB1 blockade is limited by neuropsychiatric side effects, these may be mitigated by using novel, peripherally restricted CB1 antagonists. PMID:21254182

  16. Glycosylation and Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anand; Herrera, Harmin; Block, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Liver cancer is the 5th most common cancer, but the 2nd leading cause of cancer death, in the world, with more than 700,000 fatalities annually. The major etiology of liver cancer is infection with an hepatotropic virus such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus infection (HCV). While chronic viral infection remains the main cause of liver disease and risk of HCC, rates of non –viral associated HCC are occurring at an alarmingly increasing rate. Like many cancers, survival rates are closely associated with time of detection. If HCC is caught early, survival rates can be as high as 50%. Regrettably, most cases of HCC are caught late where survival rates can be as low as 2–7%. Thus, there has been great interest in discovering serum biomarkers that could be used to identify those with HCC. To this end, many groups have examined the N-linked glycans to identify changes that occur with HCC. As the liver secretes the vast majority of proteins into the serum, this has often been a starting point for study. In serum, alterations in core fucosylation, outer-arm fucosylation, increased sialylation and glycan branching have been observed in patients with HCC. Similar findings have been found directly in HCC tissue suggesting that these glycan changes may play a role in tumor formation and development. PMID:25727150

  17. The EPA Liver Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    The v-Liver is part of a broader EPA effort on Virtual Tissues (VT) aimed at reducing the magnitude and spectrum of animal testing by integrative in silico and in vitro models, which recapitulate the properties of intact organs. The other VT projects include the Virtual Embryo (...

  18. Ton That Tung's livers.

    PubMed

    Helling, Thomas S; Azoulay, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Born in the early 20th century, the Vietnamese surgeon Ton That Tung received his medical education in French colonial Indochina at the fledgling l'Ecole de Médecine de Hanoi, the first indigenous medical school in Southeast Asia. The benefactor of a postgraduate position at the medical school, Ton That Tung subsequently obtained his surgical training at the Phù Doãn Hospital in Hanoi and concurrently developed a passion for the study of liver anatomy, pathology, and surgery. His contributions to an understanding of liver anatomy based on meticulous dissection of autopsy specimens antedated and rivaled later work by the famous Western anatomists Couinaud, Healey, Schroy, and others. Ton That Tung's contributions, however, were overshadowed by the intense national struggles of the Vietnamese to establish independent rule and self-governance from the French and by eventual alignment with eastern bloc Communist countries, thus isolating much of his work behind the "Iron Curtain" until well after the end of the Cold War. Nevertheless, Ton That Tung remains a pioneer in liver anatomy and liver surgery. His commitment to surgical science and, more importantly, to the Vietnamese people stands as a tribute to the tireless pursuit of his ideals. PMID:24335785

  19. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Minemura, Masami; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases. PMID:19554648

  20. Metabolism of the carcinogen alpha-asarone in liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Cartus, Alexander T; Schrenk, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-asarone (1) is a naturally occurring phenylpropene found in several plants, e.g. Acorus calamus. 1-containing plant materials and essential oils thereof are used for flavoring foods and in many phytopharmaceuticals. 1 has been claimed to have positive pharmacological effects, however, it is carcinogenic in male mice (liver) and probably genotoxic. Since the metabolic pathways of 1 have not been investigated and its carcinogenic mode of action is unknown, we investigated the metabolism of 1 in liver microsomes of rat, bovine, porcine, and human origin using HPLC-DAD and LC-ESI-MS/MS and derived kinetic data on the metabolite formation. The main metabolic pathway was the side-chain hydroxylation leading to (E)-3'-hydroxyasarone (2). Epoxidation of 1 presumably led to (E)-asarone-1',2'-epoxide (4) which instantly hydrolyzed to form erythro- and threo-configured diols (5b+5a). As a minor reaction O-demethylation of 1 was observed. The metabolite formation showed little species-specific differences with the exception of porcine liver microsomes for which the formation of diols 5b+5a exceeded the formation of alcohol 2. The kinetic parameters imply a dependence of the pattern of metabolite formation from substrate concentration. On the basis of our results and earlier findings we hypothesize the genotoxic epoxide 4 being the ultimate carcinogen metabolically formed from 1.

  1. The liver in haemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Ulvik, Rune J

    2015-01-01

    The review deals with genetic, regulatory and clinical aspects of iron homeostasis and hereditary haemochromatosis. Haemochromatosis was first described in the second half of the 19th century as a clinical entity characterized by excessive iron overload in the liver. Later, increased absorption of iron from the diet was identified as the pathophysiological hallmark. In the 1970s genetic evidence emerged supporting the apparent inheritable feature of the disease. And finally in 1996 a new "haemochromatosis gene" called HFE was described which was mutated in about 85% of the patients. From the year 2000 onward remarkable progress was made in revealing the complex molecular regulation of iron trafficking in the human body and its disturbance in haemochromatosis. The discovery of hepcidin and ferroportin and their interaction in regulating the release of iron from enterocytes and macrophages to plasma were important milestones. The discovery of new, rare variants of non-HFE-haemochromatosis was explained by mutations in the multicomponent signal transduction pathway controlling hepcidin transcription. Inhibited transcription induced by the altered function of mutated gene products, results in low plasma levels of hepcidin which facilitate entry of iron from enterocytes into plasma. In time this leads to progressive accumulation of iron and subsequently development of disease in the liver and other parenchymatous organs. Being the major site of excess iron storage and hepcidin synthesis the liver is a cornerstone in maintaining normal systemic iron homeostasis. Its central pathophysiological role in HFE-haemochromatosis with downgraded hepcidin synthesis, was recently shown by the finding that liver transplantation normalized the hepcidin levels in plasma and there was no sign of iron accumulation in the new liver.

  2. Liver transplantation in Spain.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, Gloria; Fondevila, Constantino; Navasa, Miquel

    2016-09-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) activity started in Spain in 1984 and has exceeded 23,700 interventions, with more than 1000 transplants performed yearly. Every hospital needs official authorization to perform a LT, which implies the obligation to register all patients on the national waiting list. The Spanish National Transplant Organization (ONT) provides essential support for organ procurement, allocation, and management of the waiting list at a national level. Liver allocation is center-oriented as all available organs are referred to the ONT for the whole country. The allocation rules for LT are made according to disease severity after consensus among professionals from every transplant center and ratified by representatives of the regional health authorities. Authorization and location/distribution of transplant centers are regulated by the country (Spain) and by the different regions according to the Real Decreto 1723/2012. For a total population of 47,850,795 inhabitants, there are 24 centers for LT for adults (1 team/2 million people) and 5 for LT for children (1 team/9.5 million people). Nonbiliary cirrhosis, particularly alcohol- and hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis (60%), and tumors, mainly hepatocellular carcinoma (19%), are the most common indications for LT in Spain. Unusual causes of LT include metabolic diseases like Wilson's disease, familial amyloid polyneuropathy and hyperoxaluria type I, polycystic kidney and liver disease, and some tumors (epithelioid hemangioendothelioma and neuroendocrine tumors). Important efforts are now being undertaken to improve the quality and transplantability of extended criteria livers, in particular those arising from DCD, which represent the greatest opportunity to expand the donor pool. These efforts have to be addressed to adapt the organ preservation procedures, be it through the application of regional perfusion in situ or the use of machine perfusion preservation ex situ. Liver Transplantation 22 1259-1264 2016

  3. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of bovine testicular hyaluronidase and vinblastine in mice: an attempt to optimize the mode of adjuvant hyaluronidase administration in cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Muckenschnabel, I; Bernhardt, G; Spruss, T; Buschauer, A

    1998-09-11

    The influence of the route of administration (i.v., i.p. and s.c.) on pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of bovine testicular hyaluronidase and vinblastine was studied in mice (plasma, skeletal muscle, liver, kidney and human melanoma). After i.v. injection, hyaluronidase was accumulated in liver and kidney, whereas i.p. and s.c. administration led to almost equal distribution in plasma, muscle, liver and kidney. In melanoma, the highest levels of hyaluronidase were found after s.c. injection of the enzyme close to the tumor. Hyaluronidase s.c. increased the intratumoral concentration of s.c. co-administered vinblastine most efficiently, making local simultaneous application as in interstitial chemotherapy most promising.

  4. Markers on Bovine Chromosome 20 Associated with Carcass Quality and Composition Traits and Incidence of Contracting Infectious Bovine Keratoconjunctivitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) on bovine chromosome 20 to fine map a previously identified QTL associated with the incidence of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK). Crossbred steers (GPE7; n = 539) derived from sires of 7 Bos taurus breeds...

  5. Markers on bovine chromosome 20 associated with carcass quality and composition traits and incidence of contracting infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to use single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) on bovine chromosome 20 to fine map a previously identified QTL associated with the incidence of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK). Crossbred steers (GPE7; n = 539) derived from sires of 7 Bos Taurus breeds and h...

  6. Affinity purification of aprotinin from bovine lung.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu; Liu, Lanhua; Chen, Beizhan; Zhang, Ling; Tong, Yanjun

    2015-05-01

    An affinity protocol for the purification of aprotinin from bovine lung was developed. To simulate the structure of sucrose octasulfate, a natural specific probe for aprotinin, the affinity ligand was composed of an acidic head and a hydrophobic stick, and was then linked with Sepharose. The sorbent was then subjected to adsorption analysis with pure aprotinin. The purification process consisted of one step of affinity chromatography and another step of ultrafiltration. Then purified aprotinin was subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, trypsin inhibitor activity, gel-filtration, and thin-layer chromatography analysis. As calculated, the theoretical maximum adsorption (Qmax ) of the affinity sorbent was 25,476.0 ± 184.8 kallikrein inactivator unit/g wet gel; the dissociation constant of the complex "immobilized ligand-aprotinin" (Kd ) was 4.6 ± 0.1 kallikrein inactivator unit/mL. After the affinity separation of bovine lung aprotinin, reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and gel-filtration chromatography revealed that the protein was a single polypeptide, and the purities were ∼ 97 and 100%, respectively; the purified peptide was also confirmed with aprotinin standard by gel-filtration chromatography and thin-layer chromatography. After the whole purification process, protein, and bioactivity recoveries were 2.2 and 92.6%, respectively; and the specific activity was up to 15,907.1 ± 10.2 kallikrein inactivator unit/mg. PMID:25677462

  7. Identification of Prototheca zopfii from Bovine Mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Zaini, F; Kanani, A; Falahati, M; Fateh, R; Salimi-Asl, M; Saemi, N; Farahyar, Sh; Kheirabad, A Kargar; Nazeri, M

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was identification of the epidemiology of Prototheca zopfii species from the milk samples of dairy cattle in Isfahan, central Iran. Methods: Milk samples were obtained from 230 dairy cattle, 130 with and 100 without mastitis, in Isfahan. The samples were cultured in Prototheca Isolation Medium (PIM) and Sabouraud’s dextrose agar. All P. zopfii isolates were identified by morphological and biochemical methods. Then, as a confirmatory test they were examined by genotype-specific PCR. Results: Four P. zopfii strains (3.07%) were isolated from the 130 samples of dairy cattle with clinical mastitis and there was no isolation from totally 100 samples of healthy bovines without mastitis. Specific PCR product (about 946 bp) was detected in four isolates. Conclusion: It seems that P. zopfii genotype II plays a key role in affecting bovine mastitis that confirmed other previous studies. Our study was the first, which identified the Prototheca species by traditional and molecular methods in Iran and Middle East as well. PMID:23113230

  8. [Running through the liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Grecu, F

    2003-01-01

    An overview of the organization, timing and developing of the liver transplantation is difficult to be made in terms of multiple sequences and a great variety of activities during the developing of such activity. A well-trained transplant team must carry out the potential donor, the liver grafts manipulation and the graft receptor, in the condition of a competitive medical system. A summary presentation, showing the essentials of the proceedings in liver transplantation could be assimilated as a guide of multidisciplinary sequences that leads to the completion of the liver grafting. The common feature of all that means the liver transplantation and generally in organ transplantation is the performance and exactingness.

  9. Measurement of Intrahepatic Pressure during Microwave Ablation in an Ex Vivo Bovine Liver Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hae Jin; Rhim, Hyunchul; Lee, Min Woo; Jeong, Woo Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims We experimented with different ablation methods and two types of microwave antennas to determine whether microwave ablation (MWA) increases intrahepatic pressure and to identify an MWA protocol that avoids increasing intrahepatic pressure. Methods MWA was performed using either a single-step standard ablation or a stepwise increment ablation paired with either a 16-gauge (G) 2-cm antenna or a 14G 4-cm antenna. We compared the maximum pressures and total ablation volumes. Results The mean maximum intrahepatic pressures and ablation volumes were as follows: 16G single-step: 37±33.4 mm Hg and 4.63 cm3; 16G multistep: 31±18.7 mm Hg and 3.75 cm3; 14G single-step: 114±45.4 mm Hg and 15.33 cm3; and 14G multistep: 106±43.8 mm Hg and 10.98 cm3. The intrahepatic pressure rose during MWA, but there were no statistically significant differences between the single and multistep methods when the same gauge antennae were used. The total ablation volume was different only in the 14G groups (p<0.05). Conclusions We demonstrated an increase in intrahepatic pressure during MWA. The multistep method may be used to prevent increased intrahepatic pressure after applying the proper power. PMID:25963083

  10. Effects of zinc and cadmium on apoptotic DNA fragmentation in isolated bovine liver nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Lohmann, R D; Beyersmann, D

    1994-01-01

    Isolated nuclei from mammalian cells contain a calcium-dependent endonuclease. The produced DNA fragmentation is a necessary step in the sequence of events resulting in apoptosis (programmed cell death). We report here that zinc and cadmium inhibit the calcium-dependent endonuclease. The essential metal ion zinc may counterbalance the calcium-mediated apoptosis. In contrast to zinc, cadmium alone stimulates the endonuclease by replacing calcium. Thus cadmium exerts a dual effect: micromolar concentrations inhibit the apoptotic endonuclease in the presence but activate the enzyme in the absence of calcium. Images Figure 2. PMID:7843111

  11. 78 FR 72859 - Concurrence With OIE Risk Designations for Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ... spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) risk designations for 14 regions. The OIE recognizes these regions as being... ``Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products,'' Docket No. APHIS-2008... regions for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) risk. Section 92.5 of the regulations provides that...

  12. Lipids changes in liver cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jing-ting; Xu, Ning; Zhang, Xiao-ying; Wu, Chang-ping

    2007-01-01

    Liver is one of the most important organs in energy metabolism. Most plasma apolipoproteins and endogenous lipids and lipoproteins are synthesized in the liver. It depends on the integrity of liver cellular function, which ensures homeostasis of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. When liver cancer occurs, these processes are impaired and the plasma lipid and lipoprotein patterns may be changed. Liver cancer is the fifth common malignant tumor worldwide, and is closely related to the infections of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). HBV and HCV infections are quite common in China and other Southeast Asian countries. In addition, liver cancer is often followed by a procession of chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis, so that hepatic function is damaged obviously on these bases, which may significantly influence lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in vivo. In this review we summarize the clinical significance of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism under liver cancer. PMID:17565510

  13. Endoderm specification and liver development.

    PubMed

    Goessling, W; Stainier, D Y

    2016-01-01

    The endoderm is the innermost embryonic germ layer, and in zebrafish, it gives rise to the lining of the gut, the gills, liver, pancreas, gallbladder, and derivatives of the pharyngeal pouch. These organs form the gastrointestinal tract and are involved with the absorption, delivery, and metabolism of nutrients. The liver has a central role in regulating these processes because it controls carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, protein synthesis, and breakdown of endogenous and xenobiotic products. Liver dysfunction frequently leads to significant morbidity and mortality; however, in most settings of organ injury, the liver exhibits remarkable regenerative capacity. In this chapter, we review the principal mechanisms of endoderm and liver formation and provide protocols to assess liver formation and liver regeneration. PMID:27312502

  14. [Iron and liver disease].

    PubMed

    Miyanishi, Koji; Kato, Junji

    2016-07-01

    Free iron in the liver is believed to facilitate the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including hydroxyl radicals (*OH), which cause oxidative damage of numerous cellular components such as lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, and also upregulate collagen synthesis. The *OH radical is known to generate promutagenic bases such as 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). In cases with chronic hepatitis C, long-term iron reduction therapy reduced the activity of hepatitis, suppressed fibrosis, and prevented hepatocarcinogenesis. In nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) livers, hepatic iron accumulation as well as oxidative DNA damage significantly increased. Humoral factor(s) in NASH serum may upregulate DMT1 expression in small intestine. Iron reduction therapy for NASH patients has a potential to reduce disease activity as well as hepatic oxidative damage. PMID:27455806

  15. Liver scintigraphy in ponies

    SciTech Connect

    Theodorakis, M.C.; Bermudez, A.J.; Manning, J.P.; Koritz, G.D.; Hillidge, C.J.

    1982-09-01

    Six derivatives of ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis (alpha-2-hydroxy phenyl) acetic acid labeled with /sup 99m/Tc were prepared and their imaging qualities evaluated in ponies. The 6 agents produced good scintigraphic images of certain structures of the liver in the pony. For each agent, 13 different scans were taken. Dorsal views of the left lateral, right lateral, and quadrate lobe were obtained with dorsal scans. Left lateral and left lateral oblique (45 degrees) scans provided a left lateral view of the left lobe and a medial view of the right lateral lobe. Right lateral scans revealed the right lateral and quadrate lobes. Administration of /sup 99m/Tc-labeled colloids which are commonly used in other species for liver scintigraphy resulted in extensive lung uptake in the pony.

  16. Iron and the liver.

    PubMed

    Pietrangelo, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Humans have evolved to retain iron in the body and are exposed to a high risk of iron overload and iron-related toxicity. Excess iron in the blood, in the absence of increased erythropoietic needs, can saturate the buffering capacity of serum transferrin and result in non-transferrin-bound highly reactive forms of iron that can cause damage, as well as promote fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis in the parenchymatous organs. A number of hereditary or acquired diseases are associated with systemic or local iron deposition or iron misdistribution in organs or cells. Two of these, the HFE- and non-HFE hemochromatosis syndromes represent the paradigms of genetic iron overload. They share common clinical features and the same pathogenic basis, in particular, a lack of synthesis or activity of hepcidin, the iron hormone. Before hepcidin was discovered, the liver was simply regarded as the main site of iron storage and, as such, the main target of iron toxicity. Now, as the main source of hepcidin, it appears that the loss of the hepcidin-producing liver mass or genetic and acquired factors that repress hepcidin synthesis in the liver may also lead to iron overload. Usually, there is low-grade excess iron which, through oxidative stress, is sufficient to worsen the course of the underlying liver disease or other chronic diseases that are apparently unrelated to iron, such as chronic metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. In the future, modulation of hepcidin synthesis and activity or hepcidin hormone-replacing strategies may become therapeutic options to cure iron-related disorders.

  17. [Cytokines and the liver].

    PubMed

    Kershenobich, D; Borovoy, J; Guevara, L; Male, R; Alcocer, J

    1990-07-01

    The cytokines are proteins synthetized by lymphoid and monocyte/macrophage system cells in response to a wide variety of infectious stimulus, featuring bacterial endotoxins. These proteins have immunoregulatory effects and have been implicated in inflammation and fibrosis. In this review we refer to the interleukin-1, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor because of their elevated basal levels in acute and chronic hepatopaties and in response to lipopolisacharide mainly in alcoholic liver disease. PMID:19256129

  18. Inhibition of listeriolysin O-induced hemolysis by bovine lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    Moriishi, K; Inoue, S; Koura, M; Amano, F

    1999-11-01

    Lactoferrin (LFR) plays an important role in the anti-microbial defense through iron binding, lipopolysaccharide binding and immunomodulation. In this study, we demonstrate that bovine LFR specifically inhibits the hemolytic activity of listeriolysin O (LLO) produced by Listeria monocytogenes. The hemolytic activity of LLO was completely inhibited in the presence of bovine LFR that was highly purified on two cation-exchange columns, whereas that of streptolysin O or perfringolysin O was not inhibited at all. A rabbit anti-LFR antibody canceled this inhibitory activity of bovine LFR. Although human transferrin exhibits 62% amino acid identity with bovine LFR, human apo-transferrin could not inhibit LLO-induced hemolysis. An increase in the concentration of FeCl3 or the Fe3+-saturation of bovine LFR, however, slightly reduced its inhibition of the hemolysis. The inhibitory activity of bovine LFR was dependent on pH, since it was observed under neutral and alkali conditions, but not under acidic conditions. These results suggest that the inhibition of LLO-induced hemolysis by bovine LFR is influenced by pH and iron ions, both of which may lead to conformational changes of LFR.

  19. Liver transplantation for malignancies.

    PubMed

    Eghtesad, Bijan; Aucejo, Federico

    2014-09-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) has become an acceptable and effective treatment for selected patients with hepatocellular carcinoma with excellent outcomes. More recently, LT has been tried in different primary and secondary malignancies of the liver. The outcomes of LT for very selected group of patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) have been promising. Excellent results have been reported in LT for patients with unresectable hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HEHE). In contrast to excellent results after LT for HEHE, results of LT for angiosarcoma have been disappointing with no long-term survivors. Hepatoblastoma (HB) is the most common primary liver cancer in pediatric age group. Long-term outcomes after LT in patients with unresectable tumor and good response to chemotherapy have been promising. Indication for LT for hepatic metastasis from neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) is mainly for patients with unresectable tumors and for palliation of medically uncontrollable symptoms. Posttransplant survival in those patients with low tumor activity index is excellent, despite recurrence of the tumor. More recent limited outcomes data on LT for unresectable hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer have claimed some survival benefit compared to the previous reports. However, due to the high rate of tumor recurrence in a very short time after LT, especially in the era of organ shortage, this indication has not been favored by the transplant community. PMID:24604263

  20. Survey on vertical infection of bovine viral diarrhea virus from fetal bovine sera in the field.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Kumiko; Oguma, Keisuke; Sentsui, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) isolation and antibody survey were performed using 2,758 fetal bovine sera (FBS) collected from slaughterhouses in New Zealand, Australia and the Dominican Republic, and then sent to Japan to manufacture commercial serum for cell culture use. FBS in the Dominican Republic were pooled for each several individuals, and those collected in other countries were separated according to each individual and subjected to the tests. BVDV was isolated from 25 (0.91%) FBS, and the BVDV antibody was detected in 44 (1.60%) FBS. The survey on 139 sets of paired sera of a dam and her fetus revealed that neither the BVDV antibody nor BVDV was detected in all FBS from BVDV antibody-positive dams.

  1. Scavenger receptors on sinusoidal liver endothelial cells are involved in the uptake of aldehyde-modified proteins.

    PubMed

    Duryee, Michael J; Freeman, Thomas L; Willis, Monte S; Hunter, Carlos D; Hamilton, Bartlett C; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Tuma, Dean J; Klassen, Lynell W; Thiele, Geoffrey M

    2005-11-01

    Scavenger receptors on sinusoidal liver endothelial cells (SECs) eliminate potentially harmful modified proteins circulating through the liver. It was shown recently that aldehyde-modified proteins bind to scavenger receptors and are associated with the development/progression of alcoholic liver diseases. For these studies, rat livers were perfused in situ with 125I-formaldehyde-bovine serum albumin (f-Alb) or 125I-malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde-bovine serum albumin (MAA-Alb) in the presence of known scavenger receptor ligands as inhibitors. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis and scavenger receptor Type A (SRA) knock-out mice were used to assess the role of these receptors in mediating immune responses. The degradation of 125I-f-Alb or 125I-MAA-Alb in whole livers and isolated SECs can be inhibited by known scavenger receptor ligands, including f-Alb, maleylated bovine albumin, and fucoidan. 125I-f-Alb could not be completely inhibited by MAA-Alb. In contrast, 125I-MAA-Alb was only partially inhibited with advanced glycosylated endproduct albumin. RT-PCR data show the presence of a number of scavenger receptors on SECs that may be responsible for the binding of MAA-modified proteins. SRA seems to be one of these receptors involved in the effects mediated by MAA-modified proteins. In a study using SRA knockout mice, it was shown that a decreased antibody response to MAA-Alb resulted. By RT-PCR, CD36, LOX-1, and SR-AI are the scavenger receptors most likely involved in the degradation of MAA-Alb.

  2. Scavenger receptors on sinusoidal liver endothelial cells are involved in the uptake of aldehyde-modified proteins.

    PubMed

    Duryee, Michael J; Freeman, Thomas L; Willis, Monte S; Hunter, Carlos D; Hamilton, Bartlett C; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Tuma, Dean J; Klassen, Lynell W; Thiele, Geoffrey M

    2005-11-01

    Scavenger receptors on sinusoidal liver endothelial cells (SECs) eliminate potentially harmful modified proteins circulating through the liver. It was shown recently that aldehyde-modified proteins bind to scavenger receptors and are associated with the development/progression of alcoholic liver diseases. For these studies, rat livers were perfused in situ with 125I-formaldehyde-bovine serum albumin (f-Alb) or 125I-malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde-bovine serum albumin (MAA-Alb) in the presence of known scavenger receptor ligands as inhibitors. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis and scavenger receptor Type A (SRA) knock-out mice were used to assess the role of these receptors in mediating immune responses. The degradation of 125I-f-Alb or 125I-MAA-Alb in whole livers and isolated SECs can be inhibited by known scavenger receptor ligands, including f-Alb, maleylated bovine albumin, and fucoidan. 125I-f-Alb could not be completely inhibited by MAA-Alb. In contrast, 125I-MAA-Alb was only partially inhibited with advanced glycosylated endproduct albumin. RT-PCR data show the presence of a number of scavenger receptors on SECs that may be responsible for the binding of MAA-modified proteins. SRA seems to be one of these receptors involved in the effects mediated by MAA-modified proteins. In a study using SRA knockout mice, it was shown that a decreased antibody response to MAA-Alb resulted. By RT-PCR, CD36, LOX-1, and SR-AI are the scavenger receptors most likely involved in the degradation of MAA-Alb. PMID:16105988

  3. Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 in naturally occurring bovine cutaneous fibropapillomas.

    PubMed

    Bocaneti, F; Altamura, G; Corteggio, A; Solcan, C; Velescu, E; Borzacchiello, G

    2015-01-01

    Bovine cutaneous fibropapillomas are benign skin tumours characterized by epithelial and dermal proliferation and induced by Bovine papillomaviruses (BPVs). Cyclooxygenase (COX) 1 and 2 are enzymes involved in pathological conditions, such as inflammation and epithelial carcinogenesis. Here we investigated biochemically and immunohistochemically COX-2 expression in bovine cutaneous fibropapillomas. Eight of twelve fibropapillomas (67%) showed COX-2 positive immunosignal mostly in the cytoplasm of the basal cell layer, while the normal skin did not stain. Biochemical analysis confirmed the expression of COX-2 in tumour samples. This study shows COX-2 expression in cutaneous fibropapillomas, suggesting a contribution in epithelial tumour development. PMID:26618600

  4. Transplantable liver production plan: "Yamaton"--liver project, Japan.

    PubMed

    Hata, Toshiyuki; Uemoto, Shinji; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2013-10-01

    Organ grafts developed in the xenogeneic pig scaffold are expected to resolve most issues of donor safety and ethical concerns about living-donor liver transplantation in Japan. We have been working on so-called "Yamaton" projects to develop transplantable organs using genetically engineered pigs. Our goal is to produce chimeric livers with human parenchyma in such pigs. The Yamaton-Liver project demonstrated the proof of concept by showing that rat-mouse chimeric livers could develop in mice and be successfully transplanted into syngeneic or allogeneic rats. Under conventional immunosuppression, the transplanted livers showed long-term function and protection against rejection. Because chimeric liver grafts have xenogeneic components, additional strategies, such as humanization of pig genes, induction of hematopoietic chimeras in donors, and replacement of pig endothelial cells with human ones, might be required in clinical use. Our projects still need to overcome various hurdles but can bring huge benefits to patients in the future. PMID:23896578

  5. Serological evidences of bovine herpesvirus-1 infection in bovines of organized farms in India.

    PubMed

    Nandi, S; Kumar, M; Yadav, V; Chander, V

    2011-04-01

    Bovine herpesvirus type-1 (BHV-1) is an important pathogen of cattle causing a variety of clinical signs, including the upper respiratory tract infection, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR). Infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, a highly infectious disease of cattle and buffaloes, occurs throughout the world including India. The present study based on micro-serum neutralization test reports the sero-epidemiology of BHV-1 infection in cattle and buffaloes from different parts of India. Serum samples from cattle, bulls, buffalo bulls and yaks were screened for BHV-1 antibodies. A total of 1115 serum samples were screened, and a total of 437 (39.2%) serum samples were found positive and 678 (60.8%) serum samples were found negative. Overall 168 (38.0%) cattle, 17 (85.0%) buffalo, 212 (38.6%) bulls, 8 (13.5%) buffalo bulls and 32 (71.1%) yaks were found positive for BHV-1 antibodies. State wise, Assam had highest seropositivity of 71.1% for yaks, Madhya Pradesh had 68.9% for cattle and Meghalaya was negative for the presence of antibodies to BHV-1 in cattle. PMID:21156033

  6. Seroprevalence of bovine immunodeficiency virus and bovine leukemia virus in draught animals in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Meas, S; Ohashi, K; Tum, S; Chhin, M; Te, K; Miura, K; Sugimoto, C; Onuma, M

    2000-07-01

    Since bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV), known as bovine lentivirus, has been detected in dairy and beef cattle in various countries around the world, a prevalence study of antibodies to BIV and bovine leukemia virus (BLV) was conducted in draught animals in five provinces in Cambodia, where protozoan parasite infections were suspected in some animals. To clarify the status of draught animals including Haryana, Brahman, mixed-breed, local breed cattle and muscle water buffaloes, a total of 544 cattle and 42 buffaloes were tested, and 26.3 and 16.7%, respectively, were found positive for anti-BIV p26 antibodies determined by Western blotting. There were 5.3% positive for anti-BLV antibodies detected by immunodiffusion test among the cattle, but no reactors among buffaloes and no dual infection for both BIV and BLV was determined in this study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from BIV-seropositive cattle were found to have BIV-provirus DNA, as detected by polymerase chain reaction and subsequent Southern blot hybridization. This is the first evidence for the presence of BIV and BLV infections in draught animals in tropical countries such as Cambodia. This wide distribution of BIV suggests its association with problems in animal health as reported worldwide, and that a primary BIV infection can predispose death of affected animals by other aggressive pathogens or stresses.

  7. [Liver damage caused by drugs].

    PubMed

    Strohmeyer, G; Weik, C

    1999-05-01

    The liver has a central role in the metabolism of many drugs, since this organ is the main site of biotransformation of endo- and xenobiotics. Water-soluble drugs have a small volume of distribution and can be eliminated unchanged in the urine. By contrast, lipid-soluble drugs have a larger volume of distribution and require conversion to water-soluble metabolites for their elimination in urine or bile. The liver with its specific receptors, transporters and enzymes is responsible for the uptake, transformation and excretion of the lipophilic drugs. While most of the drugs are transformed into stable metabolites, other drugs form reactive, potentially toxic, metabolites producing liver cell damage. Liver injury caused by drugs may mimic almost any kind of liver disease. Clinical findings are gastrointestinal symptoms with nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain, cholestatic liver injury with jaundice and pruritus of severe inflammatory and cirrhotic liver damage with signs of liver failure, encephalopathy and cerebral edema. The morphological changes vary from hepatitis, cholestasis, fatty liver, granulomatous hepatitis, peri-/portal inflammation, to fibrosis with cirrhotic alterations and vascular lesions and tumors. The most commonly used drugs causing severe liver injury are discussed in detail. These are anabolics, oral contraceptives, antituberculous and antifungal agents, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, ring substituted amphetamins ("designer drugs"), antiarrhythmics and antibiotics.

  8. Cross-reactivity of human and bovine antibodies in striped dolphin paraffin wax-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Jaber, J R; Fernández, A; Herráez, P; Espinosa de los Monteros, A; Ramírez, G A; García, P M; Fernández, T; Arbelo, M; Pérez, J

    2003-11-15

    This study evaluates the cross-reactivity of seven anti-human and one anti-bovine antibodies in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples of liver and mesenteric lymph nodes of 13 striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba). Four antibodies (CD3, IgG, lysozyme and S100 protein) reacted with striped dolphin lymph nodes in a similar pattern to that observed in the species of origin. The anti-human MHC class II mAb reacted strongly with macrophages and dendritic-like cells of striped dolphins, whereas a small number of lymphocytes were labelled with this antibody. These antibodies were used to study the immunophenotype of the inflammatory infiltrated in non-specific chronic reactive hepatitis (eight cases) and chronic parasite cholangitis (two cases) and normal liver (three cases) of striped dolphins. Non-specific chronic reactive hepatitis was composed of inflammatory infiltration of CD3+ T lymphocytes and IgG+ plasma cells in portal spaces and hepatic sinusoids. Lymphonodular aggregates observed in chronic parasitic cholangitis showed a cellular distribution similar to that found in lymph node cortex, including the presence of S100+ and MHC class II+ dendritic-like cells in lymphoid follicles and interfollicular areas. This result suggests that those inflammatory infiltrates are highly organised to enhance antigen presentation to B and T cells.

  9. A retrospective study of the prevalence of bovine fasciolosis at major abattoirs in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Mochankana, M Ernest; Robertson, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    A retrospective study covering a period of ten years (2001-2010) was conducted using postmortem meat inspection records of the Department of Veterinary Services in Gaborone to determine the prevalence of bovine fasciolosis in Botswana. Meat inspection records of monthly and annual returns from the two main export abattoirs in the country were examined, as well as the data collected on the total number of cattle slaughtered and the number of livers condemned due to Fasciola gigantica infection. Only 1250 of the approximately 1.4 million cattle slaughtered were infected with F. gigantica (0.09%, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.0% - 0.3%). No distinct seasonal pattern was observed in condemnation rates of livers. However, the pattern of distribution of fasciolosis was higher (but not significant) in cattle that originated from areas with high rainfall and more permanent water bodies than those from relatively low rainfall areas with a transitory water system. It is recommended that a longitudinal survey should be carried out at the abattoirs and farms to determine the prevalence of the disease in cattle of different ages, sex and breed as well as the place of origin in the country. The present study indicated that the prevalence of fasciolosis in cattle is low and the disease is therefore of less significance in Botswana than other African countries for which information is available. PMID:27380655

  10. Tear and decohesion of bovine pericardial tissue.

    PubMed

    Tobaruela, Almudena; Elices, Manuel; Bourges, Jean Yves; Rojo, Francisco Javier; Atienza, José Miguel; Guinea, Gustavo

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the fracture-by tear and delamination-of bovine pericardium tissues which are usually employed for the manufacture of bioprosthetic valves. A large number of samples (77) were tested in root-to-apex and circumferential directions, according to a standardised tear test (ASTM D 1938). Before performing the tear test, some samples were subjected to 1000 cycles of fatigue to a maximum stress of 3MPa. Fracture toughness of tearing and delamination were computed by following a simple fracture model. The study showed significantly lower values of delamination toughness compared with tear delamination. Moreover, tear forces were different in each test direction, revealing a clear orthotropic behaviour. All these results, as well as the testing procedure, could be of value for future research in the physiological function of pericardium tissues and clinical applications. PMID:27337412

  11. Diagnosis and Control of Bovine Neosporosis.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Milton M

    2016-07-01

    Neosporosis is one of the most common and widespread causes of bovine abortion. The causative parasite is transmitted in at least two ways, horizontally from canids, and by endogenous transmission within maternal lines of infected cattle. The prevalence of neosporosis is higher in the dairy industry than in the beef industry because of risk factors associated with intensive feeding. There are no vaccines, but logical management options are discussed that can lower the risk of abortion outbreaks and gradually reduce the prevalence of infection within herds. Steps should be taken to prevent total mixed rations from becoming contaminated by canine feces. If a herd has a high rate of infection that is associated with abortions in heifers, then the rate of reduction of infection prevalence can be speeded by only selecting seronegative replacement heifers to enter the breeding herd. Elimination of all infected cattle is not a recommended goal. PMID:27161392

  12. Presence of osteoinductive factors in bovine colostrum.

    PubMed

    Mussano, Federico; Bartorelli Cusani, Alberto; Brossa, Alessia; Carossa, Stefano; Bussolati, Gianni; Bussolati, Benedetta

    2014-01-01

    New approaches in the treatment of skeletal defects may benefit from the use of soluble biological factors. We previously standardized a derivative of bovine colostrum (SBCD), deprived of casein and fat and rich in cytokines. In the present study, we tested its possible use as an adjuvant in bone healing. SBCD contained factors involved in stromal cell stimulation and differentiation and induced cytokine production from stimulated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In vitro, SBCD promoted proliferation, migration and, in association with osteogenic factors, osteogenic differentiation of osteoblastic and MSCs. In in vivo experiments of subcutaneous Matrigel injection in mice, SBCD plus hydroxyapatite, but not hydroxyapatite nor SBCD alone, induced recruitment of macrophages and stromal cells. After 60 days, plugs containing SBCD and hydroxyapatite were densely calcified and diffusely positive for osteocalcin, supporting the occurrence of an early osteogenic process. These results indicate that SBCD is a rich source of factors with osteoinductive properties. PMID:25036965

  13. Fatty acids in bovine milk fat

    PubMed Central

    Månsson, Helena Lindmark

    2008-01-01

    Milk fat contains approximately 400 different fatty acid, which make it the most complex of all natural fats. The milk fatty acids are derived almost equally from two sources, the feed and the microbial activity in the rumen of the cow and the lipids in bovine milk are mainly present in globules as an oil-in-water emulsion. Almost 70% of the fat in Swedish milk is saturated of which around 11% comprises short-chain fatty acids, almost half of which is butyric acid. Approximately 25% of the fatty acids in milk are mono-unsaturated and 2.3% are poly-unsaturated with omega-6/omega-3 ratio around 2.3. Approximately 2.7% are trans fatty acids. PMID:19109654

  14. Stroma-free hemoglobin from bovine blood.

    PubMed

    Lima, Maria Celiana P; Andrade, Cristina T

    2007-01-01

    Isolation and purification of bovine hemoglobin (HbBv) was carried out after reaction of whole blood with carbon monoxide. Washing/centrifugation steps were used to eliminate leukocytes, platelets, and plasma proteins. Hypotonic media and ultrasound radiation were used to lyse red blood cells. Lyse by ultrasound was shown to lead to solutions at the highest concentrations in HbBv, and the least concentrations in major phospholipids contaminants. Additional purification procedures were performed to remove membrane proteins and phospholipids. In the first case, proteins were denatured by thermal treatment, and filtered. To eliminate phospholipids, liquid chromatography was used with strong anion exchangers. Purity of HbBv was evaluated by normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), electrophoresis, and size-exclusion HPLC. PMID:17701489

  15. Bovine achondrogenesis: evidence for defective chondrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Horton, W A; Jayo, M J; Leipold, H W; Machado, M A; Campbell, D; Ahmed, S

    1987-01-01

    A survey study of growth cartilage abnormalities in bovine bone dysplasias revealed that a disorder in Holstein cattle called bulldog calf closely resembles human achondrogenesis Type II. Substantial amounts of Type I collagen and other non Type II collagens were detected in the bulldog cartilage which was comprised primarily of extensive vascular canals and cells having the characteristics of hypertrophic and degenerative chondrocytes normally found in the growth plate. It is proposed that chondrocytes throughout the bulldog growth cartilage prematurely differentiate into hypertrophic cells that degenerate and predispose the cartilage to vascular invasion and the formation of cartilage canals. The presence of these canals probably accounts for most of the observed collagen abnormalities. PMID:3606909

  16. Tear and decohesion of bovine pericardial tissue.

    PubMed

    Tobaruela, Almudena; Elices, Manuel; Bourges, Jean Yves; Rojo, Francisco Javier; Atienza, José Miguel; Guinea, Gustavo

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the fracture-by tear and delamination-of bovine pericardium tissues which are usually employed for the manufacture of bioprosthetic valves. A large number of samples (77) were tested in root-to-apex and circumferential directions, according to a standardised tear test (ASTM D 1938). Before performing the tear test, some samples were subjected to 1000 cycles of fatigue to a maximum stress of 3MPa. Fracture toughness of tearing and delamination were computed by following a simple fracture model. The study showed significantly lower values of delamination toughness compared with tear delamination. Moreover, tear forces were different in each test direction, revealing a clear orthotropic behaviour. All these results, as well as the testing procedure, could be of value for future research in the physiological function of pericardium tissues and clinical applications.

  17. Bovine and human papillomaviruses: a comparative review.

    PubMed

    Munday, J S

    2014-11-01

    Fifty years ago, inoculation with bovine papillomavirus (BPV) was found to cause mesenchymal tumors of the skin in cattle and horses, as well as tumors of the bladder in cattle. Subsequent to these studies of BPVs, human papillomaviruses (HPVs) were found to cause cervical cancer resulting in intense research into papillomaviruses. During the past 50 years, the ways that HPVs and BPVs cause disease have been investigated, and both HPVs and BPVs have been associated with an increasingly diverse range of diseases. Herein, the biology, oncogenic mechanisms, and diseases associated with BPVs are compared with those of HPVs. As reviewed, there are currently significant differences between BPVs and HPVs. However, research 50 years ago into BPVs formed a prologue for the recognition that papillomaviruses have a significant role in human disease, and it is possible that future research may similarly reveal that BPVs are less different from HPVs than is currently recognized.

  18. Role of liver progenitors in acute liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Best, Jan; Dollé, Laurent; Manka, Paul; Coombes, Jason; van Grunsven, Leo A.; Syn, Wing-Kin

    2013-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) results from the acute and rapid loss of hepatocyte function and frequently exhibits a fulminant course, characterized by high mortality in the absence of immediate state-of-the-art intensive care and/or emergency liver transplantation (ELT). The role of hepatocyte-mediated liver regeneration during acute and chronic liver injury has been extensively investigated, and recent studies suggest that hepatocytes are not exclusively responsible for the regeneration of the injured liver during fulminant liver injury. Liver progenitor cells (LPC) (or resident liver stem cells) are quiescent in the healthy liver, but may be activated under conditions where the regenerative capacity of mature hepatocytes is severely impaired. This review aims to provide an overview of the role of the LPC population during ALF, and the role of putative cytokines, growth factors, mitogens, and hormones in the LPC response. We will highlight the potential interaction among cellular compartments during ALF, and discuss the possible prognostic value of the LPC response on ALF outcomes. PMID:24133449

  19. Liver transplantation in acute liver failure: A challenging scenario

    PubMed Central

    Mendizabal, Manuel; Silva, Marcelo Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a critical medical condition defined as rapid development of hepatic dysfunction associated with encephalopathy. The prognosis in these patients is highly variable and depends on the etiology, interval between jaundice and encephalopathy, age, and the degree of coagulopathy. Determining the prognosis for this population is vital. Unfortunately, prognostic models with both high sensitivity and specificity for prediction of death have not been developed. Liver transplantation has dramatically improved survival in patients with acute liver failure. Still, 25% to 45% of patients will survive with medical treatment. The identification of patients who will eventually require liver transplantation should be carefully addressed through the combination of current prognostic models and continuous medical assessment. The concerns of inaccurate selection for transplantation are significant, exposing the recipient to a complex surgery and lifelong immunosuppression. In this challenging scenario, where organ shortage remains one of the main problems, alternatives to conventional orthotopic liver transplantation, such as living-donor liver transplantation, auxiliary liver transplant, and ABO-incompatible grafts, should be explored. Although overall outcomes after liver transplantation for acute liver failure are improving, they are not yet comparable to elective transplantation. PMID:26819519

  20. Lipidome signatures in early bovine embryo development.

    PubMed

    Sudano, Mateus J; Rascado, Tatiana D S; Tata, Alessandra; Belaz, Katia R A; Santos, Vanessa G; Valente, Roniele S; Mesquita, Fernando S; Ferreira, Christina R; Araújo, João P; Eberlin, Marcos N; Landim-Alvarenga, Fernanda D C

    2016-07-15

    Mammalian preimplantation embryonic development is a complex, conserved, and well-orchestrated process involving dynamic molecular and structural changes. Understanding membrane lipid profile fluctuation during this crucial period is fundamental to address mechanisms governing embryogenesis. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to perform a comprehensive assessment of stage-specific lipid profiles during early bovine embryonic development and associate with the mRNA abundance of lipid metabolism-related genes (ACSL3, ELOVL5, and ELOVL6) and with the amount of cytoplasmic lipid droplets. Immature oocytes were recovered from slaughterhouse-derived ovaries, two-cell embryos, and eight- to 16-cell embryos, morula, and blastocysts that were in vitro produced under different environmental conditions. Lipid droplets content and mRNA transcript levels for ACSL3, ELOVL5, and ELOVL6, monitored by lipid staining and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively, increased at morula followed by a decrease at blastocyst stage. Relative mRNA abundance changes of ACSL3 were closely related to cytoplasmic lipid droplet accumulation. Characteristic dynamic changes of phospholipid profiles were observed during early embryo development and related to unsaturation level, acyl chain length, and class composition. ELOVL5 and ELOVL6 mRNA levels were suggestive of overexpression of membrane phospholipids containing elongated fatty acids with 16, 18, and 20 carbons. In addition, putative biomarkers of key events of embryogenesis, embryo lipid accumulation, and elongation were identified. This study provides a comprehensive description of stage-specific lipidome signatures and proposes a mechanism to explain its potential relationship with the fluctuation of both cytoplasmic lipid droplets content and mRNA levels of lipid metabolism-related genes during early bovine embryo development. PMID:27107972

  1. Bovine heart fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase: complete amino acid sequence and localization of phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, J; Uyeda, K

    1990-01-01

    We have shown previously that bovine heart fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (EC 2.7.1.105/3.1.3.46) is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C; phosphorylation results in activation of kinase. This activation of heart enzyme is in contrast to results with the liver isozyme, in which phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits the kinase activity. As an initial step toward understanding this difference between the isozymes we have determined the DNA sequence of the heart enzyme and analyzed the amino acid sequence with special emphasis on the location of the phosphorylation site. We isolated and sequenced two overlapping cDNA fragments, which together could encode the complete amino acid sequence of bovine heart fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase, a protein of 530 amino acids, with a calculated molecular weight of 60,679. Since the deduced protein contained amino acid sequences identical to the sequences of four known tryptic peptides from this enzyme we concluded that the deduced protein sequence did represent bovine heart enzyme. In addition, a cDNA fragment hybridized to a 4-kilobase mRNA from bovine heart. The phosphorylation sites of the heart enzyme were located near the C terminus, whereas the phosphorylation site of the liver isozyme is known to be located near the N terminus. These opposite locations of the phosphorylation sites may explain the contrasting effect of the covalent modification on the enzymes' activities. Images PMID:2164212

  2. Liver transplantation for Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Schilsky, Michael L

    2014-05-01

    Although Wilsons's disease (WD) may be treated with copper chelation (to remove copper) or zinc salts (to prevent absorption) to alleviate or prevent symptom development in most patients, there are WD patients for whom medical therapy is inadequate and survival would be unlikely without liver transplantation. Liver transplantation is indicated for the ∼5% of WD patients with acute liver failure as the first presentation of disease, most commonly in the second decade of life, or those who present with end-stage liver disease and severe hepatic insufficiency, most commonly in the third and fourth decades. Liver transplantation restores normal biliary copper excretion (thereby preventing disease recurrence) and promotes removal of copper from extrahepatic sites. Outcomes of liver transplantation for WD are excellent, including both cadaveric and living donors.

  3. Intestinal microbiota in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Haque, Tanvir R; Barritt, A Sidney

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal microbiota have emerged as a topic of intense interest in gastroenterology and hepatology. The liver is on the front line as the first filter of nutrients, toxins and bacterial metabolites from the intestines and we are becoming increasingly aware of interactions among the gut, liver and immune system as important mediators of liver health and disease. Manipulating the microbiota with therapeutic intent is a rapidly expanding field. In this review, we will describe what is known about the contribution of intestinal microbiota to liver homeostasis; the role of dysbiosis in the pathogenesis of liver disease including alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma; and the therapeutic manifestations of altering intestinal microbiota via antibiotics, prebiotics, probiotics and fecal microbiota transplantation.

  4. Pregnancy-related liver disorders.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ashish; Jamwal, Kapil D; Ramachandran, Anup; Balasubramanian, Kunissery A; Eapen, Chundamannil E

    2014-06-01

    Pregnancy-related liver disorders accounted for 8% of all maternal deaths at our center from 1999 to 2011. Of the three pregnancy-related liver disorders (acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP), HELLP (Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets) syndrome and pre-eclamptic liver dysfunction, which can lead to adverse maternal and fetal outcome, AFLP is most typically under - diagnosed. Risk of maternal death can be minimised by timely recognition and early/aggressive multi-specialty management of these conditions. Urgent termination of pregnancy remains the cornerstone of therapy for some of these life threatening disorders, but recent advancements in our understanding help us in better overall management of these patients. This review focuses on various aspects of pregnancy-related liver disorders. PMID:25755551

  5. Folate, Alcohol, and Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Medici, Valentina; Halsted, Charles H.

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is typically associated with folate deficiency, which is the result of reduced dietary folate intake, intestinal malabsorption, reduced liver uptake and storage, and increased urinary folate excretion. Folate deficiency favors the progression of liver disease through mechanisms that include its effects on methionine metabolism with consequences for DNA synthesis and stability and the epigenetic regulation of gene expression involved in pathways of liver injury. This paper reviews the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease with particular focus on ethanol-induced alterations in methionine metabolism which may act in synergy with folate deficiency to decrease antioxidant defense as well as DNA stability while regulating epigenetic mechanisms of relevant gene expressions. We also review the current evidence available on potential treatments of alcoholic liver disease based on correcting abnormalities in methionine metabolism and the methylation regulation of relevant gene expressions. PMID:23136133

  6. Experimental models of liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Willebrords, Joost; Maes, Michaël; Colle, Isabelle; van den Bossche, Bert; de Oliveira, Claudia Pinto Marques Souza; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini Ferreira; Leclercq, Isabelle; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a wound healing response to insults and as such affects the entire world population. In industrialized countries, the main causes of liver fibrosis include alcohol abuse, chronic hepatitis virus infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. A central event in liver fibrosis is the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which is triggered by a plethora of signaling pathways. Liver fibrosis can progress into more severe stages, known as cirrhosis, when liver acini are substituted by nodules, and further to hepatocellular carcinoma. Considerable efforts are currently devoted to liver fibrosis research, not only with the goal of further elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive this disease, but equally in view of establishing effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The present paper provides a state-of-the-art overview of in vivo and in vitro models used in the field of experimental liver fibrosis research. PMID:26047667

  7. Obesity, inflammation, and liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Beicheng; Karin, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Obesity has become a universal and major public health problem with increasing prevalence in both adults and children in the 21st century, even in developing countries. Extensive epidemiological studies reveal a strong link between obesity and development and progression of various types of cancers. The connection between obesity and liver cancer is particularly strong and obesity often results in liver diseases such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the more severe non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH is characterized by fatty liver inflammation and is believed to cause fibrosis and cirrhosis. The latter is a known liver cancer risk factor. In fact due to its much higher prevalence obesity may be a more substantial contributor to overall hepatocellular carcinoma burden than infection with hepatitis viruses. Here we review and discuss recent advances in elucidation of cellular and molecular alterations and signaling pathways associated with obesity and liver inflammation and their contribution to hepatocarcinogenesis.

  8. Detection and characterization of viruses as field and vaccine strains in feedlot cattle with bovine respiratory disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated viruses in bovine respiratory disease (BRD) cases in feedlots, including bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine coronaviruses (BoCV) and parainfluenza-3 virus (PI3V). Nasal swabs were collected fro...

  9. Radiation-Associated Liver Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Charlie C.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Dawson, Laura A.; Li, X. Allen; Das, Shiva K.; Miften, Moyed; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2010-03-01

    The liver is a critically important organ that has numerous functions including the production of bile, metabolism of ingested nutrients, elimination of many waste products, glycogen storage, and plasma protein synthesis. The liver is often incidentally irradiated during radiation therapy (RT) for tumors in the upper- abdomen, right lower lung, distal esophagus, or during whole abdomen or whole body RT. This article describes the endpoints, time-course, and dose-volume effect of radiation on the liver.

  10. Conservation of molecular interactions stabilizing bovine and mouse rhodopsin †

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Shiho; Colozo, Alejandro T.; Müller, Daniel J.; Park, Paul S.-H.

    2010-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the light receptor that initiates phototransduction in rod photoreceptor cells. The structure and function of rhodopsin is tightly linked to molecular interactions that stabilize and determine the receptor's functional state. Single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) was used to localize and quantify molecular interactions that structurally stabilize bovine and mouse rhodopsin from native disc membranes of rod photoreceptor cells. The mechanical unfolding of bovine and mouse rhodopsin revealed nine major unfolding intermediates, each intermediate defining a structurally stable segment in the receptor. These stable structural segments had similar localization and occurrence in both bovine and mouse samples. For each structural segment, parameters describing their unfolding energy barrier were determined by dynamic SMFS. No major differences were observed between bovine and mouse rhodopsin thereby implying that the structures of both rhodopsins are largely stabilized by similar molecular interactions. PMID:21038881

  11. Molecular and biological aspects of the bovine immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Corredor, Andrea G; St-Louis, Marie-Claude; Archambault, Denis

    2010-01-01

    The bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) was isolated in 1969 from a cow, R-29, with a wasting syndrome suggesting bovine leucosis. The virus, first designated bovine visna-like virus, remained unstudied until HIV was discovered in 1983. Then, it was demonstrated in 1987 that the bovine R-29 isolate was a lentivirus with striking similarity to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Moreover, BIV has the most complex genomic structure among all identified lentiviruses shown by several regulatory/accessory genes encoding proteins, some of which are involved in the regulation of virus gene expression. This manuscript aims to review biological and molecular aspects of BIV, with emphasis on regulatory/accessory viral genes/proteins which are involved in virus expression. PMID:20210777

  12. Cartilage (Bovine and Shark) (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the use of bovine and shark cartilage as a treatment for people with cancer. Note: The information in this summary is no longer being updated and is provided for reference purposes only.

  13. Cartilage (Bovine and Shark) (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the use of bovine and shark cartilage as a treatment for people with cancer. Note: The information in this summary is no longer being updated and is provided for reference purposes only.

  14. Immune suppression in calves with bovine immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S; Wood, C; Xue, W; Krukenberg, S M; Chen, Q; Minocha, H C

    1997-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) infection on immune functions and possible interactions between BIV and other bovine viruses in calves. Ten calves were inoculated intravenously with BIV, and five served as controls. An increased lymphocyte proliferation to BIV gag protein was demonstrated 2 to 6 weeks after BIV inoculation (P < 0.05). Lymphocyte subset differentiation revealed a decreased CD4/CD8 ratio (P < 0.05) during weeks 2 to 7, suggesting a possible immune dysfunction in BIV-infected calves. When the calves were inoculated with bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1), the antibody response to BHV-1 in BIV-infected calves was delayed and the antibody titers were significantly lower (P < 0.05). Injection of bovine viral diarrhea virus vaccine also elicited a lower neutralizing antibody response in BIV-infected calves. The results indicated that immune suppression occurred in BIV-infected calves. PMID:9067663

  15. HBV and liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Leung, Nancy

    2005-07-01

    The association of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and liver cancer is well documented in epidemiological study. Patients with chronic hepatitis B have increased risk of hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC), in particular those with active liver disease and cirrhosis. The incidence of HCC increases with age and is more common among male patients. The introduction of universal HBV vaccination program for the newborn in endemic regions has started to show beneficial impact. Taiwan introduced this program two decades ago and the incidence of liver cancer among infants and young children have declined significantly. The carcinogenic events leading to HCC are under intense research. A number of hypotheses have been proposed. HBV is not directly hepatotoxic but its interaction with the host immune system creates opportunity for HBV DNA integration into the host genome. One of the main foci of research is the HBX-encoded X protein. Its integration and protein expression impose alteration in cell proliferation cycle and apoptosis process. Many other factors may be involved including viral-induced alterations in p53 and telemerase, HBV genotypes, co-infection with HCV or delta agents, patient's lifestyle such as smoking, alcohol excesses, and genetic factors of the host patient. The processes of necroinflammation, cell proliferation and fibrosis facilitate the initial carcinogenic development. HCC surveillance with tumor markers such as alpha-foetal protein, decarboxylated prothrombin, in conjunction with imaging techniques has identified early small HCC that is amenable to curative therapy. Viral load has been correlated with increase risk of HCC. The available anti-viral agents have demonstrated clinical benefit among those with maintained and sustained response. Interferon and lamivudine therapy have demonstrated reduction of HCC among responders. However, they only constitute a minority proportion of treated patients. The mainstay of prevention should lie in prevention of

  16. Heavy smoking and liver.

    PubMed

    El-Zayadi, Abdel-Rahman

    2006-10-14

    Smoking causes a variety of adverse effects on organs that have no direct contact with the smoke itself such as the liver. It induces three major adverse effects on the liver: direct or indirect toxic effects, immunological effects and oncogenic effects. Smoking yields chemical substances with cytotoxic potential which increase necro-inflammation and fibrosis. In addition, smoking increases the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6 and TNF- alpha) that would be involved in liver cell injury. It contributes to the development of secondary polycythemia and in turn to increased red cell mass and turnover which might be a contributing factor to secondary iron overload disease promoting oxidative stress of hepatocytes. Increased red cell mass and turnover are associated with increased purine catabolism which promotes excessive production of uric acid. Smoking affects both cell-mediated and humoral immune responses by blocking lymphocyte proliferation and inducing apoptosis of lymphocytes. Smoking also increases serum and hepatic iron which induce oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation that lead to activation of stellate cells and development of fibrosis. Smoking yields chemicals with oncogenic potential that increase the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with viral hepatitis and are independent of viral infection as well. Tobacco smoking has been associated with suppression of p53 (tumour suppressor gene). In addition, smoking causes suppression of T-cell responses and is associated with decreased surveillance for tumour cells. Moreover, it has been reported that heavy smoking affects the sustained virological response to interferon (IFN) therapy in hepatitis C patients which can be improved by repeated phlebotomy. Smoker's syndrome is a clinico-pathological condition where patients complain of episodes of facial flushing, warmth of the palms and soles of feet, throbbing headache, fullness in the head, dizziness, lethargy, prickling

  17. Trout-liver histones

    PubMed Central

    Palau, J.; Butler, J. A. V.

    1966-01-01

    1. The histones of trout liver were examined and four main fractions (f1, f2b, f2a and f3) were isolated and characterized. 2. The amino acid analyses, N-terminal group analyses and starch-gel electrophoresis patterns are remarkably similar to the corresponding fractions of calf thymus. 3. The group f2a was also separated into two subfractions, f2al and f2a2, which are similar to those of calf thymus. ImagesFig. 1. PMID:5969291

  18. On-Farm Use of Ultrasonography for Bovine Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Ollivett, Theresa L; Buczinski, Sébastien

    2016-03-01

    Thoracic ultrasonography (TUS) in young cattle has recently gained momentum as an accurate and practical tool for identifying the lung lesions associated with bovine respiratory disease. As cattle producers increasingly seek input from their veterinarians on respiratory health issues, bovine practitioners should consider adding TUS to their practice models. This article discusses the relevant literature regarding TUS in young cattle, current acceptable techniques, and practical on-farm applications. PMID:26922110

  19. Isolation and Transfection of Primary Culture Bovine Retinal Pericytes.

    PubMed

    Primo, Vincent A; Arboleda-Velasquez, Joseph F

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes an enzymatic approach for isolating homogeneous cultures of pericytes from retinas of bovine source. In summary, retinas are dissected, washed, digested, filtered, cultured in specific media to select for pericytes, and finally expanded for a low passage culture of about 14 million bovine retinal pericytes (BRP) within 4-6 weeks. This protocol also describes a liposomal-based technique for transfection of BRPs. PMID:27172949

  20. An inhibitor to erythrocyte agglutination in bovine albumin preparations.

    PubMed

    Gunson, H H; Phillips, P K

    1975-01-01

    Three out of 28 commercial preparations of bovine serum albumin have been encountered which have an inhibitory effect on the assay of anti-Rh-o(D) using the Technicon AutoAnalyser. The inhibitory property, which can also be demonstrated by standard manual serological techniques, appears to be directed towards the second stage of the agglutination reaction. An automated screening procedure for bovine serum albumin preparations and some properties of the inhibitor are described.

  1. Control of asparagine-linked oligosaccharide chain processing: studies on bovine pancreatic ribonuclease B. An in vitro system for the processing of exogenous glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Williams, D B; Lennarz, W J

    1984-04-25

    To gain an understanding of why the polymannose-type oligosaccharide chain of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease B is not processed to a complex-type chain in vivo, the processing of this glycoprotein was studied in two cell-free systems. Addition of native 125I-ribonuclease B to rat liver Golgi membranes in the presence of UDP-GlcNAc resulted in the conversion of the high mannose chain to a complex type as evidenced by the acquisition of resistance to digestion with endoglucosaminidase H. Processing was linearly dependent on time and on the amount of Golgi membranes. Omission of UDP-GlcNAc from the reaction mixtures completely abolished processing of the glycoprotein. Product identification studies confirmed that the formation of ribonuclease that was resistant to digestion with endoglucosaminidase H was accompanied by the appearance of a complex-type oligosaccharide that contained one or more terminal beta-GlcNAc residues. In vitro processing of 125I-ribonuclease B that had been denatured by reduction and alkylation revealed that the rate of complex chain formation was only slightly greater than that observed with the native enzyme. In contrast to the results obtained with the heterologous rat liver system, Golgi membranes from bovine pancreas failed to process native ribonuclease B to the complex form. However, bovine pancreas Golgi membranes did readily process the denatured form of the enzyme. The presence of a factor in bovine pancreas that binds only to native ribonuclease B and thereby prevents its oligosaccharide chain from being processed was considered to be unlikely on the basis of gel filtration studies and mixing experiments. These findings indicate that some aspect of the conformation of native ribonuclease B prevents one or more of the processing enzymes of bovine pancreas from acting on the oligosaccharide chain. In addition, the substrate specificity of this processing enzyme(s) differs markedly from its counterpart in rat liver. These two factors

  2. Potential applications for antiviral therapy and prophylaxis in bovine medicine.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Walz, Paul H; Givens, M Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Viral disease is one of the major causes of financial loss and animal suffering in today's cattle industry. Increases in global commerce and average herd size, urbanization, vertical integration within the industry and alterations in global climate patterns have allowed the spread of pathogenic viruses, or the introduction of new viral species, into regions previously free of such pathogens, creating the potential for widespread morbidity and mortality in naïve cattle populations. Despite this, no antiviral products are currently commercially licensed for use in bovine medicine, although significant progress has been made in the development of antivirals for use against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) and bovine herpesvirus (BHV). BVDV is extensively studied as a model virus for human antiviral studies. Consequently, many compounds with efficacy have been identified and a few have been successfully used to prevent infection in vivo although commercial development is still lacking. FMDV is also the subject of extensive antiviral testing due to the importance of outbreak containment for maintenance of export markets. Thirdly, BHV presents an attractive target for antiviral development due to its worldwide presence. Antiviral studies for other bovine viral pathogens are largely limited to preliminary studies. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of antiviral compounds against several key bovine pathogens and the potential for commercial antiviral applications in the prevention and control of several selected bovine diseases. PMID:24810855

  3. Interactions between Euphorbia esula toxins and bovine ruminal microbes.

    PubMed

    Kronberg, Scott L; Halaweish, Fathi T; Hubert, Mindy B; Weimer, Paul J

    2006-01-01

    Cattle generally avoid grazing leafy spurge (LS; Euphorbia esula), whereas sheep and goats will often eat it. Understanding metabolism of toxic phytochemicals in LS by bovine rumen microflora may help explain why cattle often develop aversions to LS after initially eating it. Toxicity of LS compounds after in vitro fermentation with normal vs. antibiotic-modified bovine rumen digesta was evaluated at different lengths of fermentation. Levels of toxic and aversion-inducing ingenols were determined for fermented and nonfermented mixtures of LS and bovine rumen digesta, and the toxicity of an aversion-inducing extract of LS to rumen microbial species that are common in cattle, sheep, and goats was evaluated. Fermentation of LS with bovine digesta increased the toxicity of extracted compounds. Introduction of neomycin (an antibiotic that preferentially inhibits gram-negative bacteria) into the LS and bovine rumen digesta mixtures did not appear to affect toxicities regardless of fermentation length. Levels of ingenol were observed in LS and bovine digesta mixtures (both fermented and nonfermented) that were consistent with levels of ingenols reported for LS. Finally, a toxic extract of LS had little or no negative effect on the growth of several common species of rumen bacteria. The results indicate that LS is not generally toxic to the ruminal bacteria, but that microbial activity in the rumen may be responsible for enhancing LS toxicity to cattle.

  4. Potential applications for antiviral therapy and prophylaxis in bovine medicine.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Walz, Paul H; Givens, M Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Viral disease is one of the major causes of financial loss and animal suffering in today's cattle industry. Increases in global commerce and average herd size, urbanization, vertical integration within the industry and alterations in global climate patterns have allowed the spread of pathogenic viruses, or the introduction of new viral species, into regions previously free of such pathogens, creating the potential for widespread morbidity and mortality in naïve cattle populations. Despite this, no antiviral products are currently commercially licensed for use in bovine medicine, although significant progress has been made in the development of antivirals for use against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) and bovine herpesvirus (BHV). BVDV is extensively studied as a model virus for human antiviral studies. Consequently, many compounds with efficacy have been identified and a few have been successfully used to prevent infection in vivo although commercial development is still lacking. FMDV is also the subject of extensive antiviral testing due to the importance of outbreak containment for maintenance of export markets. Thirdly, BHV presents an attractive target for antiviral development due to its worldwide presence. Antiviral studies for other bovine viral pathogens are largely limited to preliminary studies. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of antiviral compounds against several key bovine pathogens and the potential for commercial antiviral applications in the prevention and control of several selected bovine diseases.

  5. Homologous recombination in bovine pestiviruses. Phylogenetic and statistic evidence.

    PubMed

    Jones, Leandro Roberto; Weber, E Laura

    2004-12-01

    Bovine pestiviruses (Bovine Viral Diarrea Virus 1 (BVDV 1) and Bovine Viral Diarrea Virus 2 (BVDV 2)) belong to the genus Pestivirus (Flaviviridae), which is composed of positive stranded RNA viruses causing significant economic losses world-wide. We used phylogenetic and bootstrap analyses to systematically scan alignments of previously sequenced genomes in order to explore further the evolutionary mechanisms responsible for variation in the virus. Previously published data suggested that homologous crossover might be one of the mechanisms responsible for the genomic rearrangements observed in cytopathic (cp) strains of bovine pestiviruses. Nevertheless, homologous recombination involves not just homologous crossovers, but also replacement of a homologous region of the acceptor RNA. Furthermore, cytopathic strains represent dead paths in evolution, since they are isolated exclusively from the fatal cases of mucosal disease. Herein, we report evidence of homologous inter-genotype recombination in the genome of a non-cytopathic (ncp) strain of Bovine Viral Diarrea Virus 1, the type species of the genus Pestivirus. We also show that intra-genotype homologous recombination might be a common phenomenon in both species of Pestivirus. This evidence demonstrates that homologous recombination contribute to the diversification of bovine pestiviruses in nature. Implications for virus evolution, taxonomy and phylogenetics are discussed.

  6. Remodeling of bovine endometrium throughout the estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Arai, Miki; Yoshioka, Shin; Tasaki, Yukari; Okuda, Kiyoshi

    2013-11-01

    The mammalian endometrium changes morphologically and functionally throughout the estrous cycle. In some species, endometrial cells also undergo periodic proliferation and degeneration. However, the remodeling of bovine endometrium throughout the estrous cycle remains unclear. In the present study, we examined how the remodeling of bovine endometrium varied through the estrous cycle by measuring the relative rates of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cells positive for both KI-67 (a proliferation marker) and cleaved caspase-3 (CCP3: an apoptotic cell marker) were immunohistochemically evaluated throughout the estrous cycle in the luminal and glandular epithelia, and the stroma of bovine endometrium. Percentages of KI-67-positive cells tended to be higher at the early luteal and follicular stages than at the mid and late luteal stages in all cell types. Similarly, percentages of CCP3-positive cells were higher at the early luteal stage than at the mid and late luteal stages in the luminal epithelium and stroma. Furthermore, CCP3 expression levels by Western blot analysis agreed with these immunohistological observations. On the other hand, DNA fragmentation was detected in the bovine endometrium without significant differences during the estrous cycle by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. Together, these results show that cell proliferation and apoptosis undergo cyclic patterns in the bovine endometrium, and suggest that the bovine endometrium is remodeled in each estrous cycle. PMID:24051170

  7. Getting a New Liver: Facts about Liver Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver does several things: • It helps digest your food. • It clears wastes from your blood. • It makes proteins that help your blood to clot. • It stores the sugars (glycogen) that are used for ... liver also controls the way your body uses food and the way it works with your immune ...

  8. Bovine coronavirus antibody titers at weaning negatively correlate with incidence of bovine respiratory disease in the feed yard

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is a multifactorial disease caused by complex interactions among viral and bacterial pathogens, stressful management practices and host genetic variability. Although vaccines and antibiotic treatments are readily available to prevent and treat infection caus...

  9. [Liver gunshot wounds].

    PubMed

    Botoi, G; Blăjan, I; Nemeş, S

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the 6 cases of liver shot wounds that were in supervision of the general surgery unit, County Hospital of Baia Mare, between the years 1990-1997. The patients were males, most of them being 20 to 30 years old. In 3 situations hunting rifles were involved, all followed by retention of metal foreign body. The wounds were plurivisceral in 5 of the 6 cases, the most frequently wounded was the right liver lobe. All the patients presented serious traumatic shock and haemorrhagic shock. Livertectomy was used in 40% of the cases being imposed by the dilacerant and transfixiant character of the wounds and also by the retention of foreign bodies in parenchime. We registered 2 demises, both in the first postoperatory hours. The paper proposes a few criteria that allow the application of a conservatory treatment:rapid favourable answer at deshocking therapy; hemodynamic stability; minimal hemoperitoneus (echographical and tomographical); absence of associated visceral wounds or, when they exist, of serious physiopathological consequences; access to performant means of imagistics.

  10. Recurrence of autoimmune liver diseases after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Nabiha; Renner, Eberhard L

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the most effective treatment modality for end stage liver disease caused by many etiologies including autoimmune processes. That said, the need for transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), but not for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), has decreased over the years due to the availability of effective medical treatment. Autoimmune liver diseases have superior transplant outcomes than those of other etiologies. While AIH and PBC can recur after LT, recurrence is of limited clinical significance in most, but not all cases. Recurrent PSC, however, often progresses over years to a stage requiring re-transplantation. The exact incidence and the predisposing factors of disease recurrence remain debated. Better understanding of the pathogenesis and the risk factors of recurrent autoimmune liver diseases is required to develop preventive measures. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of incidence, diagnosis, risk factors, clinical course, and treatment of recurrent autoimmune liver disease (AIH, PBC, PSC) following LT. PMID:26689244

  11. Five cases of ectopic liver and a case of accessory lobe of the liver.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Matsura, T; Takatori, Y; Ueki, K; Kobatake, T; Hidaka, M; Hirakawa, H; Fukukmoto, S; Shimada, Y

    1989-01-01

    Five cases of ectopic liver, two of retro-peritoneal cavity and three of gallbladder, and a case of accessory lobe of the liver, are reported. One of these cases with ectopic liver was accompanied by multiple cysts of the liver and kidney, and biliary microhamartoma, which was observed laparoscopically on the surface of the main liver and histologically proven in the ectopic liver.

  12. Molecular cloning of bovine lymphocyte activation gene-3 and its expression characteristics in bovine leukemia virus-infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Tatsuya; Konnai, Satoru; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Saori; Sunden, Yuji; Onuma, Misao; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2011-12-15

    Lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3), a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II binding CD4 homologue has recently been shown as one of the mechanisms for down-regulating immune responses during chronic disease progression. For the first time, we cloned LAG-3 from two breeds of cattle (Holstein and Japanese Black), and analyzed its expression levels in cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a chronic viral infection that leads to immuno-suppression. The cloned cDNA of bovine LAG-3 have an open reading frame of 1551 nucleotides, encoding a polypeptide of 515 amino acids in length. Similar to the swine LAG-3, the bovine LAG-3 protein sequence consisted of four extracellular domains, a transmembrane domain and an inhibitory motif, KTGELE. We found that the bovine LAG-3 mRNA transcripts were expressed predominantly on T-cells such as CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells, among peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In subsequent expression analysis, LAG-3 mRNA expression on CD4(+) T-cells from BLV-infected cattle was upregulated compared to that in normal cattle. Comparable results were obtained with CD8(+) T-cells from cattle infected with BLV. We further observed strong upregualtion of MHC class II molecule, the ligand for LAG-3 in BLV-infected cattle. These findings indicate an important role for inhibitory receptor molecules such as LAG-3 in chronic bovine infections and future studies will elucidate the specific role of LAG-3 in bovine diseases.

  13. Increased bovine Tim-3 and its ligand expressions during bovine leukemia virus infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The immunoinhibitory receptor T cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain-3 (Tim-3) and its ligand, galectin-9 (Gal-9), are involved in the immune evasion mechanisms for several pathogens causing chronic infections. However, there is no report concerning the role of Tim-3 in diseases of domestic animals. In this study, cDNA encoding for bovine Tim-3 and Gal-9 were cloned and sequenced, and their expression and role in immune reactivation were analyzed in bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-infected cattle. Predicted amino acid sequences of Tim-3 and Gal-9 shared high homologies with human and mouse homologues. Functional domains, including tyrosine kinase phosphorylation motif in the intracellular domain of Tim-3 were highly conserved among cattle and other species. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that bovine Tim-3 mRNA is mainly expressed in T cells such as CD4+ and CD8+ cells, while Gal-9 mRNA is mainly expressed in monocyte and T cells. Tim-3 mRNA expression in CD4+ and CD8+ cells was upregulated during disease progression of BLV infection. Interestingly, expression levels for Tim-3 and Gal-9 correlated positively with viral load in infected cattle. Furthermore, Tim-3 expression level closely correlated with up-regulation of IL-10 in infected cattle. The expression of IFN-γ and IL-2 mRNA was upregulated when PBMC from BLV-infected cattle were cultured with Cos-7 cells expressing Tim-3 to inhibit the Tim-3/Gal-9 pathway. Moreover, combined blockade of the Tim-3/Gal-9 and PD-1/PD-L1 pathways significantly promoted IFN-γ mRNA expression compared with blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway alone. These results suggest that Tim-3 is involved in the suppression of T cell function during BLV infection. PMID:22621175

  14. 25 Ways to Love Your Liver

    MedlinePlus

    ... You Can Use April May Calendar Liver Lowdown Mar 2014 Calendar of Events In The News Academic ... 2016 Calendar Jan Feb 2016 recipe Liver Lowdown Mar/Apr 2016 Liver Lowdown August 2016 Know Your ...

  15. Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans Among the Hispanic/Latino population, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While the ...

  16. Vascular emergencies in liver trauma.

    PubMed

    Taourel, P; Vernhet, H; Suau, A; Granier, C; Lopez, F M; Aufort, S

    2007-10-01

    The use of CT in the diagnosis and management of liver trauma is responsible for the shift from routine surgical versus non-surgical treatment in the management of traumatic liver injuries, even when they are of high grade. The main cause of complication and of death in liver trauma is related to vascular injury. The goal of this review focussed on the vascular complications of liver trauma is to describe the elementary lesions shown by CT in liver trauma including laceration, parenchymal hematoma and contusions, partial devascularisation, subcapsular hematomas, hemoperitoneum, active bleeding, pseudoaneurysm of the hepatic artery, bile leak, and periportal oedema, to illustrate the possible pitfalls in CT diagnosis of liver trauma and to underline the key-points which may absolutely be present in a CT report of liver trauma. Then we will remind the grading system based on the CT features and we will analyze the interest and limitations of such grading systems. Last we will discuss the diagnostic strategy at the early phase in patients with suspected liver trauma according to their clinical conditions and underline the conditions of arterial embolization, and then we will discuss the diagnosis strategy at the delayed phase according to the suspected complications. PMID:17851012

  17. Current Issues in Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The state of liver transplantation continues to evolve. This article focuses on 3 separate yet important issues within this field. First, there is a proposal to change the allocation of donor livers in the United States. The fundamental premise of this proposal is to equalize access to donor livers across the country. To accomplish this goal, the proposal is to increase the geographic area of liver allocation. As might be expected, there is a great deal of controversy surrounding the possibility of a major change in liver allocation and distribution. A second area of interest, and perhaps the most important therapeutic breakthrough in the field of hepatology, is the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. With cure rates up to 100%, an increasing proportion of liver transplant candidates and recipients are being cured of HCV infection with therapies that have minimal side effects. Consequently, the impact of HCV infection on patient and graft survival will likely improve substantially over the next few years. Finally, this article reviews the role of donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) in antibody-mediated rejection. Long recognized as an important factor in graft survival in renal transplantation, DSAs have recently been shown to be a strong predictor of graft and patient survival in liver transplantation. However, the importance of DSAs in liver transplantation is uncertain, in large part due to the absence of proven therapies. PMID:27231452

  18. The Liver, Regulator of Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this theme issue is to review the basic physiological, nutritional, and pathological facts pertaining to the liver. It is an educational tool through which university teachers and people in charge of training may enhance their teaching programs. The main liver diseases seen in young children and pregnant women in tropical regions is…

  19. Biliary Complications After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jagannath, Sanjay; Kalloo, Anthony N.

    2002-04-01

    The incidence of biliary complications after liver transplant is estimated to be 8% to 20%. Post-liver transplant biliary complications may lead to acute and chronic liver injury. The early recognition and prompt treatment of such complications improves the long-term survival of the patient and graft. An understanding of the type of biliary reconstruction, the rationale for creating a particular anastomosis, and the technical difficulties in reconstructing the biliary tract are important in assessing and managing complications after liver transplant. Because the clinical presentation of these patients may be subtle, the physician must be aggressive and thoughtful in ordering and interpreting the diagnostic tests. Important points to remember are 1) that noninvasive examinations may fail to detect small obstructions or leaks, 2) a liver biopsy often is performed prior to cholangiography to exclude rejection and ischemia, and 3) the liver biopsy can miss an extrahepatic obstruction by misinterpreting portal inflammation as rejection. Biliary leaks and strictures are the most common biliary complications following liver transplant. Less common complications include ampullary dysfunction and stone/sludge formation. The effective management of biliary complications following a liver transplant depends on understanding the natural history, the prognosis, and the available therapeutic options for each type of complication.

  20. The biosynthesis of glycerides by mitochondria from rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Margaret E.; Hübscher, G.

    1966-01-01

    1. The synthesis of glycerides from l-3-glycerophosphate and palmitic acid by mitochondrial preparations from rat liver was shown to be stimulated markedly by a soluble factor from the supernatant fraction of the liver. 2. That the soluble factor was a protein was indicated by its inactivation after treatment with papain and after boiling for 3min. at 100°, its precipitation by ammonium sulphate and its behaviour on Sephadex G-200. The soluble factor was purified by ammonium sulphate fractionation and gel filtration. 3. Bovine serum albumin and lipoprotein fractions from rat and human serum also stimulated glyceride biosynthesis but the stimulations were one-twentieth to one-third of that obtained with the soluble factor. 4. The function of the soluble factor could not be explained by assuming a leakage of acyl-CoA synthetase, phosphatidate phosphatase or diglyceride acyltransferase from the mitochondria into the supernatant during preparation of the mitochondrial fraction. 5. Palmitic acid, in the presence of the soluble factor and optimum amounts of ATP and CoA, was a more effective substrate than palmitoyl-CoA or palmitoylcarnitine for the biosynthesis of glycerides by mitochondria. PMID:4290720

  1. Cerebral Candidal Abscess and Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus Infection in an Aborted Bovine Fetus.

    PubMed

    Vilander, A C; Niles, G A; Frank, C B

    2016-01-01

    Candida species are opportunistic fungi associated with immunosuppression and are the most commonly isolated fungal pathogens from the human central nervous system. Invasive candidiasis is reported uncommonly in animals and there have only been two reports of candidal infection of the brain. This report presents a case of a cerebral candidal abscess in an aborted late-term calf co-infected with bovine viral diarrhoea virus. Candida etchellsii, a species not previously identified as pathogenic, was identified as the causative agent by polymerase chain reaction. PMID:26895887

  2. Nitric oxide in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Yasuko; Kim, Moon Young

    2015-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and its derivatives play important roles in the physiology and pathophysiology of the liver. Despite its diverse and complicated roles, certain patterns of the effect of NO on the pathogenesis and progression of liver diseases are observed. In general, NO derived from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) is protective against disease development, while inducible NOS (iNOS)-derived NO contributes to pathological processes. This review addresses the roles of NO in the development of various liver diseases with a focus on recently published articles. We present here two recent advances in understanding NO-mediated signaling - nitrated fatty acids (NO2-FAs) and S-guanylation - and conclude with suggestions for future directions in NO-related studies on the liver. PMID:26027855

  3. NITRIC OXIDE IN LIVER DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Iwakiri, Yasuko; Kim, Moon Young

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and its derivatives play important roles in the physiology and pathophysiology of the liver. Despite its diverse and complicated roles, certain patterns of the effect of NO on the pathogenesis and progression of liver diseases are observed. In general, NO derived from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) is protective against disease development, while inducible NOS (iNOS)-derived NO contributes to pathological processes. This review addresses the roles of NO in the development of various liver diseases with a focus on recently published articles. We present here two recent advances in understanding NO-mediated signaling, nitrated fatty acids and S-guanylation, and conclude with suggestions on future directions of NO-related studies on the liver. PMID:26027855

  4. Artificial and Bioartificial Liver Support

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The fact that liver failure constitutes a life-threatening condition and can, in most cases, only be overcome by orthotopic liver transplantation, lead to the development of various artificial and bioartificial liver support devices. While artificial systems are based on the principles of adsorption and filtration, the more complex concept of bioartificial devices includes the provision of liver cells. Instead of solely focussing on detoxification, these concepts also support the failing organ concerning synthetic and regulative functions. The systems were evaluated in a variety of clinical studies, demonstrating their safety and investigating the impact on the patient's clinical condition. This review gives an overview over the most common artificial and bioartificial liver support devices and summarizes the results of the clinical studies. PMID:19279696

  5. [Organ replacement therapy - extracorporeal liver assist devices].

    PubMed

    Sinner, Barbara; Kirchner, Gabriele I

    2016-09-01

    Liver failure is a disease with a high mortality rate. Often liver transplantation is the sole therapeutic option. On the one hand, liver support systems probably support the liver to allow regeneration, on the other hand they are an option to bridge for transplantation. This article gives an overview on the clinically used liver assist devices (molecular adsorbent recirculating system [MARS], Prometheus system, single-pass albumin dialysis [SPAD], plasmapheresis) and discusses the applications in liver failure. PMID:27631450

  6. Sequence and structural implications of a bovine corneal keratan sulfate proteoglycan core protein. Protein 37B represents bovine lumican and proteins 37A and 25 are unique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funderburgh, J. L.; Funderburgh, M. L.; Brown, S. J.; Vergnes, J. P.; Hassell, J. R.; Mann, M. M.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Amino acid sequence from tryptic peptides of three different bovine corneal keratan sulfate proteoglycan (KSPG) core proteins (designated 37A, 37B, and 25) showed similarities to the sequence of a chicken KSPG core protein lumican. Bovine lumican cDNA was isolated from a bovine corneal expression library by screening with chicken lumican cDNA. The bovine cDNA codes for a 342-amino acid protein, M(r) 38,712, containing amino acid sequences identified in the 37B KSPG core protein. The bovine lumican is 68% identical to chicken lumican, with an 83% identity excluding the N-terminal 40 amino acids. Location of 6 cysteine and 4 consensus N-glycosylation sites in the bovine sequence were identical to those in chicken lumican. Bovine lumican had about 50% identity to bovine fibromodulin and 20% identity to bovine decorin and biglycan. About two-thirds of the lumican protein consists of a series of 10 amino acid leucine-rich repeats that occur in regions of calculated high beta-hydrophobic moment, suggesting that the leucine-rich repeats contribute to beta-sheet formation in these proteins. Sequences obtained from 37A and 25 core proteins were absent in bovine lumican, thus predicting a unique primary structure and separate mRNA for each of the three bovine KSPG core proteins.

  7. Orthotopic liver transplantation for giant liver haemangioma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Lange, Undine G; Bucher, Julian N; Schoenberg, Markus B; Benzing, Christian; Schmelzle, Moritz; Gradistanac, Tanja; Strocka, Steffen; Hau, Hans-Michael; Bartels, Michael

    2015-12-24

    In liver haemangiomas, the risk of complication rises with increasing size, and treatment can be obligatory. Here we present a case of a 46-year-old female who suffered from a giant haemangioma causing severe portal hypertension and vena cava compression, leading to therapy refractory ascites, hyponatremia and venostasis-associated thrombosis with pulmonary embolism. The patients did not experience tumour rupture or consumptive coagulopathy. Surgical resection was impossible because of steatosis of the non-affected liver. Orthotopic liver transplantation was identified as the only treatment option. The patient's renal function remained stable even though progressive morbidity and organ allocation were improbable according to the patient's lab model for end-stage liver disease (labMELD) score. Therefore, non-standard exception status was approved by the European organ allocation network "Eurotransplant". The patient underwent successful orthotopic liver transplantation 16 mo after admission to our centre. Our case report indicates the underrepresentation of morbidity associated with refractory ascites in the labMELD-based transplant allocation system, and it indicates the necessity of promptly applying for non-standard exception status to enable transplantation in patients with a severe clinical condition but low labMELD score. Our case highlights the fact that liver transplantation should be considered early in patients with non-resectable, symptomatic benign liver tumours. PMID:26722664

  8. When Your Child Needs a Liver Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Child for Surgery Hepatitis Hereditary Hemochromatosis Digestive System Blood Test: Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel What Happens in the Operating Room? Hepatitis Your Liver Your Digestive System Anesthesia - ...

  9. Bioelectrical impedance analysis of bovine milk fat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiga, E. A.; Bertemes-Filho, P.

    2012-12-01

    Three samples of 250ml at home temperature of 20°C were obtained from whole, low fat and fat free bovine UHT milk. They were analysed by measuring both impedance spectra and dc conductivity in order to establish the relationship between samples related to fat content. An impedance measuring system was developed, which is based on digital oscilloscope, a current source and a FPGA. Data was measured by the oscilloscope in the frequency 1 kHz to 100 kHz. It was showed that there is approximately 7.9% difference in the conductivity between whole and low fat milk whereas 15.9% between low fat and free fat one. The change of fatness in the milk can be significantly sensed by both impedance spectra measurements and dc conductivity. This result might be useful for detecting fat content of milk in a very simple way and also may help the development of sensors for measuring milk quality, as for example the detection of mastitis.

  10. Immunogens of bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Bolin, S R

    1993-11-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a ubiquitous pathogen of cattle that induces economically important diseases affecting multiple organ systems. In the United States, over 150 biological products are licensed for control of BVDV. These products contain live or killed BVDV, and many products contain other viruses or bacteria. Potency tests for these vaccines are based on animal inoculation and serology. For live virus vaccines, titration of viral infectivity in cell culture is an accepted alternative to animal inoculation. The immunogens in a killed virus vaccine may be measured by enzyme linked immunoabsorbent assay. Immunogens of BVDV that stimulate a protective immune response have not been conclusively identified. Epitopes on a putative viral envelope glycoprotein, gp53, are involved in viral neutralization. Other viral glycoproteins, gp48 and gp25, are immunogenic but epitopes on these proteins do not stimulate production of antibodies that efficiently neutralize virus. Progress in developing meaningful in vitro assays for quantitation of BVDV immunogens awaits identification of viral proteins that stimulate a protective immunity.

  11. [Forensic problems in bovine obstetrics and gynecology].

    PubMed

    Ahlers, D

    1992-02-01

    In the published statistical reports of liability insurance companies for veterinarians a high percentage of damage claims falls into the field of obstetrics and gynaecology, particularly in the bovine species. Veterinarians are held responsible for the consequences of insufficient clinical examinations of female animals or, after a correct diagnosis, initiation of therapeutic measures that ar not indicated. An increasing number of damage claims is due to the fact that the veterinarian has not informed the owner of an animal in advance about the possible medical or economic risks of a particular treatment. From the expert opinions requested of our clinic by insurance companies and law courts, it can be concluded that in veterinary obstetrics, lesions and damages occurring during vaginal deliveries are still the most frequent cause of compensation claims. Veterinarians are blamed for the use of too much traction force (number of persons assisting in an extraction, use of mechanical calf-pullers) and for incorrect procedures during the manual or instrumental correction of postural or positional abnormalities or a uterine torsion. Also, in case of complications after obstetrical surgery owners suspect failure of the veterinarian. Many losses in the puerperal period are due to the fact that the clinical examination after an obstetrical intervention has not been performed with the necessary accuracy or has been completely omitted. Compensation claims after gynaecological procedures are mostly based on a falsely positive or negative pregnancy diagnosis and complications after surgery involving the ovaries.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Membrane associated phospholipase C from bovine brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Ryu, S.H.; Suh, P.; Choi, W.C.; Rhee, S.G.

    1987-05-01

    Cytosolic fractions of bovine brain contain 2 immunologically distinct phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase (PLC), PLC-I and PLC-II, whose MW are 150,000 and 145,000 respectively, under a denaturing condition. Monoclonal antibodies were derived against each form and specific radioimmunoassays were developed. Distribution of PLC-I and PLC-II in cytosolic and particulate fractions was measured using the radioimmunoassay. More than 90% of PLC-II was found in the cytosolic fraction, while the anti-PLC-I antibody cross-reacting protein was distributed nearly equally between the soluble fraction and the 2 M KCl extract of particulate fraction. The PLC enzyme in the particulate fraction was purified to homogeneity, yielding 2 proteins of 140 KDa and 150 KDa when analyzed on SDS-PAGE. Neither of the 2 enzymes cross-reacted with anti-PLC-II antibodies, but both could be immunoblotted by all 4 different anti-PLC-I antibodies. This suggests that the 140 KDa PLC was derived from the 150 KDa form. The 150 Kda form from particulate fraction was indistinguishable from the cytosolic PLC-I when their mixture was analyzed on SDS-PAGE. In addition, the elution profile of tryptic peptides derived from the 150 KDa particulate form was identical to that of cytosolic PLC-I. This result indicates that PLC-I is reversibly associated to membranes.

  13. Transmission studies with bovine malignant catarrhal fever.

    PubMed

    Selman, I E; Wiseman, A; Wright, N G; Murray, M

    1978-03-25

    The intravenous administration of whole blood from a pathologically confirmed field case of bovine malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) resulted in the appearance of the disease in three of five experimental calves 18 to 28 days later. Infection was maintained by serial calf transmissions, and produced clinical and pathological changes identical to those of the field disease for a total of 10 passages. The sixth passage involved the simultaneous infection of 10 calves from a single donor animal; six of the 10 recipients developed the typical disease after incubation periods ranging from 20 to 36 days and in each of these MCF was confirmed by pathological examination. In addition, clinical and pathological changes in the four other calves which were slaughtered either seven or 14 days post-infection suggested that they too would have developed typical clinical signs had they been allowed to survive for the necessary length of time. The results of a detailed study of the onset, progress and duration of the clinical signs of experimentally induced MCF are presented and the opportunity has been taken to discuss the available information regarding the transmission of MCF under experimental conditions and in the field. PMID:644823

  14. Recombinant viral vaccines for enzootic bovine leucosis.

    PubMed

    Daniel, R C; Gatei, M H; Good, M F; Boyle, D B; Lavin, M F

    1993-10-01

    Recently published studies on the development and use of recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) vaccines incorporating either the complete envelope (env) gene or only a fragment of the env gene consisting of the coding sequence for the env glycoprotein 51 (gp51) and part of gp30 of the bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) are described. It has been reported that vaccination of sheep with recombinant VV vaccines containing the complete env gene appears to protect sheep against challenge infection with BLV. The evidence for this protection is based on the lack of persistence of high titres of anti-gp51 antibodies compared with unvaccinated BLV infected controls, on the enhanced CD4 proliferative responses to specific BLV gp51 synthetic peptides in the vaccinated sheep, and on the inability to detect BLV pro-virus by polymerase chain reaction in the vaccinated sheep after 4 months following challenge infection compared with continual detection in unvaccinated sheep over a 16 month trial period. It has been suggested that cell-mediated immune responses may be an important aspect of protective immunity against BLV infection and it has been reported that large tracts of amino acid sequences within the env and pol genes are highly conserved in different isolates from different countries which is of importance in designing peptide derived vaccines. PMID:8270269

  15. [Enzootic bovine leukosis--a retrovirus disease].

    PubMed

    Straub, O C

    1988-01-01

    After a short historical introduction and a description of some of the properties of the bovine leucosis (leukemia) virus (BLV) the natural pathways of transmission, for which most likely intact infected cells are a prerequisite, are described and the role of possible vectors mentioned. The iatrogenic transmission by needles, dehorning and perhaps even rectal examinations is discussed. Semen, embryo transfer, saliva, urine, faeces and breath do obviously not play any role in contrast to nasal secretions containing viable cells. It is pointed out that it is not inevitable to eliminate all seropositive cattle from the premises during an eradication programme provided some additional tests are carried out: determination of the white blood picture, the p 24 status and perhaps even proof of antigen production in short-term buffy coat cultures. Offspring of seropositive cattle requires some special attention and careful testing at certain intervals. The report according to which BVD/MD virus-infected cattle are superinfected with BLV leading to rather difficult situations is cited. PMID:2851883

  16. Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD): a review.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, Hajime

    2004-12-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) in Holstein cattle is an autosomal recessive congenital disease characterized by recurrent bacterial infections, delayed wound healing and stunted growth, and is also associated with persistent marked neutrophilia. The molecular basis of BLAD is a single point mutation (adenine to guanine) at position 383 of the CD18 gene, which caused an aspartic acid to glycine substitution at amino acid 128 (D128G) in the adhesion molecule CD18. Neutrophils from BLAD cattle have impaired expression of the beta2 integrin (CD11a,b,c/CD18) of the leukocyte adhesion molecule. Abnormalities in a wide spectrum of adherence dependent functions of leukocytes have been fully characterized. Cattle affected with BLAD have severe ulcers on oral mucous membranes, severe periodontitis, loss of teeth, chronic pneumonia and recurrent or chronic diarrhea. Affected cattle die at an early age due to the infectious complications. Holstein bulls, including carrier sires that had a mutant BLAD gene in heterozygote were controlled from dairy cattle for a decade. The control of BLAD in Holstein cattle by publishing the genotypes and avoiding the mating between BLAD carriers was found to be successful. This paper provides an overview of the genetic disease BLAD with reference to the disease in Holstein cattle. PMID:15644595

  17. Insights into the bovine rumen plasmidome.

    PubMed

    Brown Kav, Aya; Sasson, Goor; Jami, Elie; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Benhar, Itai; Mizrahi, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Plasmids are self-replicating genetic elements capable of mobilization between different hosts. Plasmids often serve as mediators of lateral gene transfer, a process considered to be a strong and sculpting evolutionary force in microbial environments. Our aim was to characterize the overall plasmid population in the environment of the bovine rumen, which houses a complex and dense microbiota that holds enormous significance for humans. We developed a procedure for the isolation of total rumen plasmid DNA, termed rumen plasmidome, and subjected it to deep sequencing using the Illumina paired-end protocol and analysis using public and custom-made bioinformatics tools. A large number of plasmidome contigs aligned with plasmids of rumen bacteria isolated from different locations and at various time points, suggesting that not only the bacterial taxa, but also their plasmids, are defined by the ecological niche. The bacterial phylum distribution of the plasmidome was different from that of the rumen bacterial taxa. Nevertheless, both shared a dominance of the phyla Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria. Evidently, the rumen plasmidome is of a highly mosaic nature that can cross phyla. Interestingly, when we compared the functional profile of the rumen plasmidome to two plasmid databases and two recently published rumen metagenomes, it became apparent that the rumen plasmidome codes for functions, which are enriched in the rumen ecological niche and could confer advantages to their hosts, suggesting that the functional profiles of mobile genetic elements are associated with their environment, as has been previously implied for viruses. PMID:22431592

  18. Radiation effects on bovine taste bud membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shatzman, A.R.; Mossman, K.L.

    1982-11-01

    In order to investigate the mechanisms of radiation-induced taste loss, the effects of radiation on preparations of enriched bovine taste bud membranes were studied. Taste buds containing circumvallate papilae, and surrounding control epithelial tissues devoid of taste buds, were obtained from steers and given radiation doses of 0-7000 cGy (rad). Tissue fractions were isolated into membrane-enriched and heterogeneous components using differential and sucrose gradient centrifugation of tissue homogenates. The yield of membranes, as measured by protein content in the buoyant membrane-enriched fractions, was reduced in quantity with increasing radiation dose. The relation between radiation dose and membrane quantity in membrane-enriched fractions could be fit by a simple exponential model with taste bud-derived membranes twice as radiosensitive as membranes from control epithelial tissue. Binding of sucrose, sodium, and acetate and fluoride stimulation of adenylate cyclase were nearly identical in both irradiated and nonirradiated intact membranes. Radiation had no effect on fractions of heterogeneous components. While it is not clear what changes are occurring in enriched taste cell membranes, damage to membranes may play an important role in the taste loss observed in patients following radiotherapy.

  19. Spatial epidemiology of bovine tuberculosis in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Horacio Zendejas; Suazo, Feliciano Milián; Cuador Gil, José Quintín; Bello, Gustavo Cruz; Anaya Escalera, Ana María; Márquez, Gabriel Huitrón; Casanova, Leticia García

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use geographic information systems (GIS) and geo-statistical methods of ordinary kriging to predict the prevalence and distribution of bovine tuberculosis (TB) in Jalisco, Mexico. A random sample of 2 287 herds selected from a set of 48 766 was used for the analysis. Spatial location of herds was obtained by either a personal global positioning system (GPS), a database from the Instituto Nacional de Estadìstica Geografìa e Informàtica (INEGI) or Google Earth. Information on TB prevalence was provided by the Jalisco Commission for the Control and Eradication of Tuberculosis (COEETB). Prediction of TB was obtained using ordinary kriging in the geostatistical analyst module in ArcView8. A predicted high prevalence area of TB matching the distribution of dairy cattle was observed. This prediction was in agreement with the prevalence calculated on the total 48 766 herds. Validation was performed taking estimated values of TB prevalence at each municipality, extracted from the kriging surface and then compared with the real prevalence values using a correlation test, giving a value of 0.78, indicating that GIS and kriging are reliable tools for the estimation of TB distribution based on a random sample. This resulted in a significant savings of resources.

  20. Preparation of Monoclonal Antibodies Against Bovine Haptoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caihong; Gu, Cheng; Guo, Donghua; Gao, Jing; Li, Chunqiu; Liu, Na; Geng, Yufei; Su, Mingjun; Wang, Xinyu

    2014-01-01

    Female, 8-week-old BALB/c mice were immunized with purified recombinant proteins of the predicted immunodominant region of bovine haptoglobin (pirBoHp). Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), named 1B3 and 6D6, were prepared by conventional B lymphocyte hybridoma technique. Titers of ascitic fluid and cell culture supernatant of MAb 1B3 were 1:9.6×108 and 1:8.2×104, respectively, and that of MAb 6D6 were 1:4.4×105 and 1:1.0×104, respectively. The subtype of MAbs 1B3 and 6D6 was IgG1κ. In Western blot analysis, MAbs 1B3 and 6D6 could recognize the α-chain of native BoHp from plasma of dairy cows. These data indicated that MAbs 1B3 and 6D6 have a potential use for developing diagnostic reagents of BoHp. PMID:25358005

  1. Proteomic analysis of bovine skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Bouley, Julien; Meunier, Bruno; Chambon, Christophe; De Smet, Stefaan; Hocquette, Jean François; Picard, Brigitte

    2005-02-01

    Myostatin plays a major role in muscle growth and development and animals with disruption of this gene display marked increases in muscle mass. Little is known about muscle physiological adaptations in relation to this muscle hypertrophy. To provide a more comprehensive view, we analyzed bovine muscles from control, heterozygote and homozygote young Belgian blue bulls for myostatin deletion, which results in a normal level of inactive myostatin. Heterozygote and homozygote animals were characterized by a higher proportion of fast-twitch glycolytic fibers in Semitendinosus muscle. Differential proteomic analysis of this muscle was performed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry. Thirteen proteins, corresponding to 28 protein spots, were significantly altered in response to the myostatin deletion. The observed changes in protein expression are consistent with an increased fast muscle phenotype, suggesting that myostatin negatively controls mainly fast-twitch glycolytic fiber number. Finally, we demonstrated that differential mRNA splicing of fast troponin T is altered by the loss of myostatin function. The structure of mutually exclusive exon 16 appears predominantly expressed in muscles from heterozygote and homozygote animals. This suggests a role for exon 16 of fast troponin T in the physiological adaptation of the fast muscle phenotype.

  2. Screening in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Paolo Del; Mazzoleni, Marzio

    2006-01-01

    A disease is suitable for screening if it is common, if the target population can be identified and reached and if both a good screening test and an effective therapy are available. Of the most common liver diseases only viral hepatitis and genetic hemochromatosis partially satisfy these conditions. Hepatitis C is common, the screening test is good and the therapy eliminates the virus in half of the cases, but problems arise in the definition of the target population. In fact generalized population screening is not endorsed by international guidelines, although some recommend screening immigrants from high prevalence countries. Opportunistic screening (case finding) of individuals with classic risk factors, such as transfusion before 1992 and drug addiction, is the most frequently used strategy, but there is disagreement whether prison inmates, individuals with a history of promiscuous or traumatic sex and health care workers should be screened. In a real practice setting the performance of opportunistic screening by general practitioners is low but can be ameliorated by training programs. Screening targeted to segments of the population or mass campaigns are expensive and therefore interventions should be aimed to improve opportunistic screening and the detection skills of general practitioners. Regarding genetic hemochromatosis there is insufficient evidence for population screening, but individual physicians can decide to screen racial groups with a high prevalence of the disease, such as people in early middle age and of northern European origin. In the other cases opportunistic screening of high risk individuals should be performed, with a high level of suspicion in case of unexplained liver disease, diabetes, juvenile artropathy, sexual dysfunction and skin pigmentation. PMID:16981254

  3. Screening in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Del Poggio, Paolo; Mazzoleni, Marzio

    2006-09-01

    A disease is suitable for screening if it is common, if the target population can be identified and reached and if both a good screening test and an effective therapy are available. Of the most common liver diseases only viral hepatitis and genetic hemochromatosis partially satisfy these conditions. Hepatitis C is common, the screening test is good and the therapy eliminates the virus in half of the cases, but problems arise in the definition of the target population. In fact generalized population screening is not endorsed by international guidelines, although some recommend screening immigrants from high prevalence countries. Opportunistic screening (case finding) of individuals with classic risk factors, such as transfusion before 1992 and drug addiction, is the most frequently used strategy, but there is disagreement whether prison inmates, individuals with a history of promiscuous or traumatic sex and health care workers should be screened. In a real practice setting the performance of opportunistic screening by general practitioners is low but can be ameliorated by training programs. Screening targeted to segments of the population or mass campaigns are expensive and therefore interventions should be aimed to improve opportunistic screening and the detection skills of general practitioners. Regarding genetic hemochromatosis there is insufficient evidence for population screening, but individual physicians can decide to screen racial groups with a high prevalence of the disease, such as people in early middle age and of northern European origin. In the other cases opportunistic screening of high risk individuals should be performed, with a high level of suspicion in case of unexplained liver disease, diabetes, juvenile artropathy, sexual dysfunction and skin pigmentation. PMID:16981254

  4. Liver Transplantation after Exertional Heatstroke-Induced Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Hafeez Ul Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Exertional heatstroke (EHS) is a life-threatening disease characterized clinically by central nervous system dysfunction and severe hyperthermia. It frequently occurs among athletes, soldiers, and laborers. While cardiopulmonary symptoms are common in patients undergoing EHS, irreversible acute liver failure is a rarely described phenomenon. When managing cases of EHS complicated by acute liver failure, it is crucial to act promptly with aggressive total body cooling in order to prevent progression of the clinical syndrome. However, an urgent liver transplantation can be a therapeutic strategy when patients fail to improve with supportive measures. PMID:27738568

  5. Enzymic characteristics of fat globule membranes from bovine colostrum and bovine milk

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Fat globule membranes have been isolated from bovine colostrum and bovine milk by the dispersion of the fat in sucrose solutions at 4 degrees C and fractionation by centrifugation through discontinuous sucrose gradients. The morphology and enzymic characteristics of the separated fractions were examined. Fractions comprising a large proportion of the total extracted membrane were thus obtained having high levels of the Golgi marker enzymes UDP-galactose N- acetylglucosamine beta-4-galactosyltransferase and thiamine pyrophosphatase. A membrane-derived form of the galactosyltransferase has been solubilized from fat and purified to homogeneity. This enzyme is larger in molecular weight than previously studied soluble galactosyltransferases, but resembles in size the galactosyltransferase of lactating mammary Golgi membranes. In contrast, when fat globule membranes were prepared by traditional procedures, which involved washing the fat at higher temperatures, before extraction, galactosyltransferase was not present in the membranes, having been released into supernatant fractions, When the enzyme released by this procedure was partially purified and examined by gel filtration, it was found to be of a degraded form resembling in size the soluble galactosyltransferase of milk. The release is therefore attributed to the action of proteolytic enzymes. Our observations contrast with previous biochemical studies which suggested that Golgi membranes do not contribute to the milk fat globule membrane. They are, however, consistent with electron microscope studies of the fat secretion process, which indicate that secretory vesicle membranes, derived from the Golgi apparatus, may provide a large proportion of the fat globule membrane. PMID:402369

  6. Immunological relationships between malignant catarrhal fever virus (alcelaphine herpesvirus 1) and bovine cytomegalovirus (bovine herpesvirus 3).

    PubMed

    Rossiter, P B; Gumm, I D; Mirangi, P K

    1988-03-01

    Strains of malignant catarrhal fever virus (alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AHV-1)) and bovine cytomegalovirus (bovine herpesvirus 3 (BHV-3)) were compared for serological relatedness by cross-titration in an indirect immunofluorescent (IIF) antibody assay. There was definite cross-reactivity between these 2 viruses, with heterologous sera staining intracellular and membrane antigens of infected cells. Heterologous antibody titres were approximately 50-fold lower than homologous titres and could be removed by absorption with either homologous or heterologous virus-infected cells, but not with uninfected cells. Regression analyses of IIF antibody titres to AHV-1 and BHV-3 virus in 3 groups of wild ungulate sera also indicated a serological relationship between these herpesviruses. In a cross-immunity trial, 2 of 3 cattle immunized with a BHV-3 virus and 2 of 3 cattle immunized with avirulent AHV-1 resisted challenge with virulent AHV-1-infected blood which killed 3 unimmunized controls. These results are discussed particularly with respect to the involvement of BHV-3 in malignant catarrhal fever.

  7. Bovine leucosis virus contamination of a vaccine produced in vivo against bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, R J; Dimmock, C K; de Vos, A J; Rodwell, B J

    1988-09-01

    Contamination of a batch of tick fever (babesiosis and anaplasmosis) vaccine with bovine leucosis virus (BLV) was detected when a herd, in the final stages of an enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL) accreditation program, developed a large number of seropositive cattle following use of tick fever vaccine. Investigations incriminated a single calf used to produce Anaplasma centrale vaccine from which 13,959 doses were distributed. The failure of this calf to give a positive agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test before use was not fully explained. A total of 22,627 cattle from 111 herds receiving contaminated vaccine was tested to validate claims for compensation. Results showed infection rates of 62% and 51.8% in vaccinated dairy and beef cattle, respectively, compared with 6.1% and 1.5% in non-vaccinated cattle in the same herds. The results also indicated that infection did not spread from vaccinated to non-vaccinated in-contact cattle. Heavy reliance is now placed on purchase of calves for vaccine production from EBL accredited-free herds and on transmission tests from the calves to sheep to prevent a recurrence of contamination. The need for a BLV antigen detection test, with the sensitivity of the sheep transmission test but simpler and faster to perform, is evident. PMID:2847702

  8. Fraction of bovine leukemia virus-infected dairy cattle developing enzootic bovine leukosis.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Sota; Hayama, Yoko; Yamamoto, Takehisa

    2016-02-01

    Enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL) is a transmissible disease caused by the bovine leukemia virus that is prevalent in cattle herds in many countries. Only a small fraction of infected animals develops clinical symptoms, such as malignant lymphosarcoma, after a long incubation period. In the present study, we aimed to determine the fraction of EBL-infected dairy cattle that develop lymphosarcoma and the length of the incubation period before clinical symptoms emerge. These parameters were determined by a mathematical modeling approach based on the maximum-likelihood estimation method, using the results of a nationwide serological survey of prevalence in cattle and passive surveillance records. The best-fit distribution to estimate the disease incubation period was determined to be the Weibull distribution, with a median and average incubation period of 7.0 years. The fraction of infected animals developing clinical disease was estimated to be 1.4% with a 95% confidence interval of 1.2-1.6%. The parameters estimated here contribute to an examination of efficient control strategies making quantitative evaluation available. PMID:26754928

  9. Fraction of bovine leukemia virus-infected dairy cattle developing enzootic bovine leukosis.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Sota; Hayama, Yoko; Yamamoto, Takehisa

    2016-02-01

    Enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL) is a transmissible disease caused by the bovine leukemia virus that is prevalent in cattle herds in many countries. Only a small fraction of infected animals develops clinical symptoms, such as malignant lymphosarcoma, after a long incubation period. In the present study, we aimed to determine the fraction of EBL-infected dairy cattle that develop lymphosarcoma and the length of the incubation period before clinical symptoms emerge. These parameters were determined by a mathematical modeling approach based on the maximum-likelihood estimation method, using the results of a nationwide serological survey of prevalence in cattle and passive surveillance records. The best-fit distribution to estimate the disease incubation period was determined to be the Weibull distribution, with a median and average incubation period of 7.0 years. The fraction of infected animals developing clinical disease was estimated to be 1.4% with a 95% confidence interval of 1.2-1.6%. The parameters estimated here contribute to an examination of efficient control strategies making quantitative evaluation available.

  10. Experimental transmission of h-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy to bovinized transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Okada, H; Masujin, K; Iwamaru, Y; Imamura, M; Matsuura, Y; Mohri, S; Czub, S; Yokoyama, T

    2011-09-01

    To characterize the biological and biochemical properties of H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a transmission study with a Canadian H-type isolate was performed with bovinized transgenic mice (TgBoPrP), which were inoculated intracerebrally with brain homogenate from cattle with H-type BSE. All mice exhibited characteristic neurologic signs, and the subsequent passage showed a shortened incubation period. The distribution of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) was determined by immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and paraffin-embedded tissue (PET) blot. Biochemical properties and higher molecular weight of the glycoform pattern were well conserved within mice. Immunolabeled granular PrP(Sc), aggregates, and/or plaque-like deposits were mainly detected in the following brain locations: septal nuclei, subcallosal regions, hypothalamus, paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus, interstitial nucleus of the stria terminalis, and the reticular formation of the midbrain. Weak reactivity was detected by immunohistochemistry and PET blot in the cerebral cortex, most thalamic nuclei, the hippocampus, medulla oblongata, and cerebellum. These findings indicate that the H-type BSE prion has biological and biochemical properties distinct from those of C-type and L-type BSE in TgBoPrP mice, which suggests that TgBoPrP mice constitute a useful animal model to distinguish isolates from BSE-infected cattle.

  11. Measurement of betacellulin levels in bovine serum, colostrum and milk.

    PubMed

    Bastian, S E; Dunbar, A J; Priebe, I K; Owens, P C; Goddard, C

    2001-01-01

    Betacellulin, a member of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family, was originally isolated and identified from the conditioned medium from a murine pancreatic beta-cell carcinoma cell line. Recently, we isolated bovine betacellulin from a growth factor enriched cheese whey extract, but there is no information on the presence of betacellulin in other biological fluids. We have cloned the cDNA for bovine betacellulin, produced recombinant betacellulin and shown that it has a similar potency to the purified native molecule in stimulating the proliferation of Balb/c3T3 fibroblasts. We have produced a polyclonal antiserum to bovine betacellulin which did not cross-react with EGF or transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha). The antibody was used in a homologous RIA that was able to detect betacellulin in pooled bovine colostrum sampled during the first 3 days after calving (2.30+/-0.11 ng/ml mean+/-s.e.m.; n=6), in bovine milk soluble fraction (1.93+/-0.64 ng/ml mean+/-s.e.m.; n=5) and in bovine cheese whey (2.59+/-0.16 ng/ml mean+/-s.e.m.; n=3). The betacellulin concentration in foetal bovine serum (FBS) (3.68+/-0.59 ng/ml mean+/-s.e.m.; n=6) greatly exceeded that of betacellulin in serum from male calves 1 and 5 weeks of age (0.53+/-0.15 ng/ml and 0.70+/- 0.09 ng/ml respectively; mean+/-s.e.m.; n=9). Betacellulin measured in the serum of these same animals when aged between 27 and 43 weeks was below the detection limits of the RIA. Sera from 10 out of 36 unmated heifers contained betacellulin levels within the detection limits of the assay (0.433+/-0.06 ng/ml mean+/-s.e.m.; n=10). The presence of betacellulin in bovine colostrum and milk suggests that it plays a role in the growth and development of the neonate and/or mammary gland function. The results also show that betacellulin is undetectable in the castrated adult male circulation. Additionally, although present in very low amounts, serum betacellulin could be under hormonal regulation in the female, since

  12. Extracellular Matrix and Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arriazu, Elena; Ruiz de Galarreta, Marina; Cubero, Francisco Javier; Varela-Rey, Marta; Pérez de Obanos, María Pilar; Leung, Tung Ming; Lopategi, Aritz; Benedicto, Aitor; Abraham-Enachescu, Ioana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic microenvironment that undergoes continuous remodeling, particularly during injury and wound healing. Chronic liver injury of many different etiologies such as viral hepatitis, alcohol abuse, drug-induced liver injury, obesity and insulin resistance, metabolic disorders, and autoimmune disease is characterized by excessive deposition of ECM proteins in response to persistent liver damage. Critical Issues: This review describes the main collagenous and noncollagenous components from the ECM that play a significant role in pathological matrix deposition during liver disease. We define how increased myofibroblasts (MF) from different origins are at the forefront of liver fibrosis and how liver cell-specific regulation of the complex scarring process occurs. Recent Advances: Particular attention is paid to the role of cytokines, growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and newly identified matricellular proteins in the regulation of fibrillar type I collagen, a field to which our laboratory has significantly contributed over the years. We compile data from recent literature on the potential mechanisms driving fibrosis resolution such as MF’ apoptosis, senescence, and reversal to quiescence. Future Directions: We conclude with a brief description of how epigenetics, an evolving field, can regulate the behavior of MF and of how new “omics” tools may advance our understanding of the mechanisms by which the fibrogenic response to liver injury occurs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1078–1097. PMID:24219114

  13. Size mismatch in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fukazawa, Kyota; Nishida, Seigo

    2016-08-01

    Size mismatch is an unique and inevitable but critical issue in live donor liver transplantation. Unmatched metabolic demand of recipient as well as physiologic mismatch aggravates the damage to liver graft, inevitably leading to graft failure on recipient. Also, an excessive resection of liver graft for better recipient outcome in live donor liver transplant may jeopardize the healthy donor well-being and even put donor life in danger. There is a fine balance between resected graft volume required to meet the recipient's metabolic demand and residual graft volume required for donor safety. The obvious clinical necessity of finding that balance has prompted a clinical need and promoted the improvement of knowledge and development of management strategies for size-mismatched transplants. The development of the size-matching methodology has significantly improved graft outcome and recipient survival in live donor liver transplants. On the other hand, the effect of size mismatch in cadaveric transplants has never been observed as being so pronounced. The importance of matching of the donor recipient size has been unrecognized in cadaveric liver transplant. In this review, we attempt to summarize the current most updated knowledge on the subject, particularly addressing the definition and complications of size-mismatched cadaveric liver transplant, as well as management strategies. PMID:27474079

  14. Structural similarity of bovine lung prostaglandin F synthase to lens epsilon-crystallin of the European common frog.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, K; Fujii, Y; Nakayama, K; Ohkubo, H; Kuramitsu, S; Kagamiyama, H; Nakanishi, S; Hayaishi, O

    1988-01-01

    Cloned cDNA sequences specific for prostaglandin F (PGF) synthase have been isolated from a cDNA library of bovine lung mRNA sequences. Nucleotide-sequence analyses of cloned cDNA inserts have revealed that PGF synthase consists of a 969-base pair open reading frame coding for a 323-amino acid polypeptide with a Mr of 36,666. The sequence analysis indicates that bovine lung PGF synthase shows 62% identical plus conservative substitutions compared with human liver aldehyde reductase [Wermuth, B., Omar, A., Forster, A., Francesco, C., Wolf, M., Wartburg, J.P., Bullock, B. & Gabbay, K.H. (1987) in Enzymology and Molecular Biology of Carbonyl Metabolism: Aldehyde Dehydrogenase, Aldo-Keto Reductase, and Alcohol Dehydrogenase, eds. Weiner, H. & Flynn, T.G. (Liss, New York), pp. 297-307], which is similar to PGF synthase in molecular weight and substrate specificity. However, comparison of the amino acid sequence of PGF synthase with the National Biomedical Research Foundation protein data base reveals that the sequences of 225 amino acids from C termini of epsilon-crystallin of the European common frog (Rana temporaria) [Tomarev, S.I., Zinovieva, R.D., Dolgilevich, S.M., Luchin, S.V., Krayev, A.S., Skryabin, K.G. & Gause, G.G. (1984) FEBS Lett. 171, 297-302] and of PGF synthase show 77% identical and conservative substitutions without deletions/additions. The result suggests that European common frog lens epsilon-crystallin is identical to bovine lung PGF synthase. Images PMID:2829166

  15. Clinical applications of bovine colostrum therapy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rathe, Mathias; Müller, Klaus; Sangild, Per Torp; Husby, Steffen

    2014-04-01

    Bovine colostrum, the first milk that cows produce after parturition, contains high levels of growth factors and immunomodulatory components. Some healthy and diseased individuals may gain health benefits by consuming bovine colostrum as a food supplement. This review provides a systematic, critical evaluation of the current state of knowledge in this area. Fifty-one eligible studies were identified from the following databases: Medline, Embase, Global Health, the Cochrane Library, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. Studies were heterogeneous with regard to populations, outcomes, and methodological quality, as judged by the Jadad assessment tool. Many studies used surrogate markers to study the effects of bovine colostrum. Studies suggesting clinical benefits of colostrum supplementation were generally of poor methodological quality, and results could not be confirmed by other investigators. Bovine colostrum may provide gastrointestinal and immunological benefits, but further studies are required before recommendations can be made for clinical application. Animal models may help researchers to better understand the mechanisms of bovine colostrum supplementation, the dosage regimens required to obtain clinical benefits, and the optimal methods for testing these effects in humans. PMID:24571383

  16. Food Safety: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (Mad Cow Disease).

    PubMed

    Acheson, David W. K.

    2002-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy is just one of a group of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Only recently has it become recognized that transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are likely due to proteins known as prions. Although it has been recognized that transmissible spongiform encephalopathies may readily spread within species, the recent observations that bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle may have originated from another transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in sheep, known as scrapie, is cause for concern. Further, bovine spongiform encephalopathy has now been strongly linked with a universally fatal human neurologic disease known as new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Currently the only approach to preventing bovine spongiform encephalopathy, and subsequent new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, from ingestion of bovine spongiform encephalopathy-infected material is to avoid consumption of contaminated food. Little can be done to treat food that will destroy prions and leave a palatable product. At this stage we are continuing to learn about transmissible spongiform encephalopathies and their implications on human health. This is an ever-changing situation and has an unpredictable element in terms of the extent of the current outbreaks in England and other parts of Europe. PMID:11984426

  17. Characterization of bovine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin.

    PubMed

    van Veen, H A; Geerts, M E J; Zoetemelk, R A A; Nuijens, J H; van Berkel, P H C

    2006-09-01

    A protein of relative molecular mass of approximately 25,000 was purified from bovine colostrum by cation-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. The N-terminus of the protein matched the sequence predicted by the National Center for Biotechnology Information for the bovine homolog of human neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, a glycoprotein of relative molecular mass 25,000 belonging to the family of lipocalins. The protein was further designated as bovine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (bNGAL). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE of enzymically deglycosylated bNGAL indicated that the intact protein bears one N-linked glycan. Monosaccharide and mass spectrometric analyses of released N-linked carbohydrates revealed the presences of complex- and hybrid-type glycans, with galactose substituted with N-acetylgalactosamine. This substitution is typical for glycoproteins expressed in the bovine mammary gland. A specific ELISA revealed bNGAL concentrations in plasma and mature milk of about 0.05 and 1 microg/mL, respectively, whereas values as high as 51 microg/mL were measured in colostrum. Thus, we have isolated and characterized a novel bovine (milk) protein that is a new member of the lipocalin family. PMID:16899672

  18. Epidemiology of Bovine Mastitis in Cows of Dharwad District

    PubMed Central

    Kurjogi, Mahantesh M.; Kaliwal, Basappa B.

    2014-01-01

    Bovine mastitis is very common in cows of both developed and developing countries. The prevalence of clinical and subclinical mastitis (SCM) varies from region to region. Hence, the present study was carried out to determine the prevalence of mastitis using three diagnostic tests by considering different risk factors like age, lactation, breed, season, quarters, and herd. The results showed that surf field mastitis test (SFMT) is the most sensitive test for diagnosis of bovine mastitis, the older age and cows with later part of lactation period were more prone to bovine mastitis, and exotic breeds like Holstein freshen (HF) were more susceptible to bovine mastitis. The highest incidence of mastitis was recorded in monsoon season. The prevalence of subclinical and clinical mastitis was more in single and two quarters, respectively, and the rate of bovine mastitis was more in unorganized herds. The study concluded that SCM is directly associated with age, lactation period, and environmental factors of the cow and clinical mastitis is more associated with breed of the cow and environmental conditions. PMID:27382623

  19. Nutritional Status and Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Merli, Manuela; Giusto, Michela; Giannelli, Valerio; Lucidi, Cristina; Riggio, Oliviero

    2012-01-01

    Chronic liver disease has a profound effect on nutritional status and undernourishment is almost universally present in patients with end-stage liver disease undergoing liver transplantation. In the last decades, due to epidemiological changes, a trend showing an increase in patients with end-stage liver disease and associated obesity has also been reported in developed countries. Nutrition abnormalities may influence the outcome after transplantation therefore, the importance to carefully assess the nutritional status in the work-up of patients candidates for liver transplantation is widely accepted. More attention has been given to malnourished patients as they represent the greater number. The subjective global nutritional assessment and anthropometric measurements are recognized in current guidelines to be adequate in identifying those patients at risk of malnutrition. Cirrhotic patients with a depletion in lean body mass and fat deposits have an increased surgical risk and malnutrition may impact on morbidity, mortality and costs in the post-transplantation setting. For this reason an adequate calorie and protein intake should always be ensured to malnourished cirrhotic patient either through the diet, or using oral nutritional supplements or by enteral or parenteral nutrition although studies supporting the efficacy of nutritional supplementation in improving the clinical outcomes after transplantation are still scarce. When liver function is restored, an amelioration in the nutritional status is expected. After liver transplantation in fact dietary intake rapidly normalizes and fat mass is progressively regained while the recovery of muscle mass can be slower. In some patients unregulated weight gain may lead to over-nutrition and may favor metabolic disorders (hypertension, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia). This condition, defined as ‘metabolic syndrome’, may play a negative role on the overall survival of liver transplant patients. In this report we

  20. Acute mammary and liver transcriptome responses after an intramammary Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide challenge in postpartal dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Minuti, Andrea; Zhou, Zheng; Graugnard, Daniel E; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Palladino, Alejandro R; Cardoso, Felipe C; Trevisi, Erminio; Loor, Juan J

    2015-04-01

    The study investigated the effect of an intramammary lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge on the bovine mammary and liver transcriptome and its consequences on metabolic biomarkers and liver tissue composition. At 7 days of lactation, 7 cows served as controls (CTR) and 7 cows (LPS) received an intramammary Escherichia coli LPS challenge. The mammary and liver tissues for transcriptomic profiling were biopsied at 2.5 h from challenge. Liver composition was evaluated at 2.5 h and 7 days after challenge, and blood biomarkers were analyzed at 2, 3, 7 and 14 days from challenge. In mammary tissue, the LPS challenge resulted in 189 differentially expressed genes (DEG), with 20 down-regulated and 169 up-regulated. In liver tissue, there were 107 DEG in LPS compared with CTR with 42 down-regulated and 65 up-regulated. In mammary, bioinformatics analysis highlighted that LPS led to activation of NOD-like receptor signaling, Toll-like receptor signaling, RIG-I-like receptor signaling and apoptosis pathways. In liver, LPS resulted in an overall inhibition of fatty acid elongation in mitochondria and activation of the p53 signaling pathway. The LPS challenge induced changes in liver lipid composition, a systemic inflammation (rise of blood ceruloplasmin and bilirubin), and an increase in body fat mobilization. The data suggest that cells within the inflamed mammary gland respond by activating mechanisms of pathogen recognition. However, in the liver the response likely depends on mediators originating from the udder that affect liver functionality and specifically fatty acid metabolism (β-oxidation, ketogenesis, and lipoprotein synthesis).

  1. Acute mammary and liver transcriptome responses after an intramammary Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide challenge in postpartal dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Minuti, Andrea; Zhou, Zheng; Graugnard, Daniel E; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Palladino, Alejandro R; Cardoso, Felipe C; Trevisi, Erminio; Loor, Juan J

    2015-04-01

    The study investigated the effect of an intramammary lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge on the bovine mammary and liver transcriptome and its consequences on metabolic biomarkers and liver tissue composition. At 7 days of lactation, 7 cows served as controls (CTR) and 7 cows (LPS) received an intramammary Escherichia coli LPS challenge. The mammary and liver tissues for transcriptomic profiling were biopsied at 2.5 h from challenge. Liver composition was evaluated at 2.5 h and 7 days after challenge, and blood biomarkers were analyzed at 2, 3, 7 and 14 days from challenge. In mammary tissue, the LPS challenge resulted in 189 differentially expressed genes (DEG), with 20 down-regulated and 169 up-regulated. In liver tissue, there were 107 DEG in LPS compared with CTR with 42 down-regulated and 65 up-regulated. In mammary, bioinformatics analysis highlighted that LPS led to activation of NOD-like receptor signaling, Toll-like receptor signaling, RIG-I-like receptor signaling and apoptosis pathways. In liver, LPS resulted in an overall inhibition of fatty acid elongation in mitochondria and activation of the p53 signaling pathway. The LPS challenge induced changes in liver lipid composition, a systemic inflammation (rise of blood ceruloplasmin and bilirubin), and an increase in body fat mobilization. The data suggest that cells within the inflamed mammary gland respond by activating mechanisms of pathogen recognition. However, in the liver the response likely depends on mediators originating from the udder that affect liver functionality and specifically fatty acid metabolism (β-oxidation, ketogenesis, and lipoprotein synthesis). PMID:25921778

  2. Acute mammary and liver transcriptome responses after an intramammary Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide challenge in postpartal dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Minuti, Andrea; Zhou, Zheng; Graugnard, Daniel E; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Palladino, Alejandro R; Cardoso, Felipe C; Trevisi, Erminio; Loor, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the effect of an intramammary lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge on the bovine mammary and liver transcriptome and its consequences on metabolic biomarkers and liver tissue composition. At 7 days of lactation, 7 cows served as controls (CTR) and 7 cows (LPS) received an intramammary Escherichia coli LPS challenge. The mammary and liver tissues for transcriptomic profiling were biopsied at 2.5 h from challenge. Liver composition was evaluated at 2.5 h and 7 days after challenge, and blood biomarkers were analyzed at 2, 3, 7 and 14 days from challenge. In mammary tissue, the LPS challenge resulted in 189 differentially expressed genes (DEG), with 20 down-regulated and 169 up-regulated. In liver tissue, there were 107 DEG in LPS compared with CTR with 42 down-regulated and 65 up-regulated. In mammary, bioinformatics analysis highlighted that LPS led to activation of NOD-like receptor signaling, Toll-like receptor signaling, RIG-I-like receptor signaling and apoptosis pathways. In liver, LPS resulted in an overall inhibition of fatty acid elongation in mitochondria and activation of the p53 signaling pathway. The LPS challenge induced changes in liver lipid composition, a systemic inflammation (rise of blood ceruloplasmin and bilirubin), and an increase in body fat mobilization. The data suggest that cells within the inflamed mammary gland respond by activating mechanisms of pathogen recognition. However, in the liver the response likely depends on mediators originating from the udder that affect liver functionality and specifically fatty acid metabolism (β-oxidation, ketogenesis, and lipoprotein synthesis). PMID:25921778

  3. [Occupational liver diseases: (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kuntz, H D; May, B

    1980-07-18

    A large number of exogenous substances with potential liver toxicity are to be found in work places and in the environment. Decisive importance is ascribed to regular supervision of exposed persons and adhering to the appropriate safety provisions without being able to ensure reliable prevention of toxic liver damage thereby. The prognosis of occupational toxic liver damage is good if recognition is timely and the causal noxae are eliminated. The aim of all diagnostic and prophylactic efforts must be rehabilitation, in addition to specific occupational medical and hygienic measures.

  4. Interventional Radiology in Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Karani, John B. Yu, Dominic F.Q.C.; Kane, Pauline A.

    2005-04-15

    Radiology is a key specialty within a liver transplant program. Interventional techniques not only contribute to graft and recipient survival but also allow appropriate patient selection and ensure that recipients with severe liver decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma or portal hypertension are transplanted with the best chance of prolonged survival. Equally inappropriate selection for these techniques may adversely affect survival. Liver transplantation is a dynamic field of innovative surgical techniques with a requirement for interventional radiology to parallel these developments. This paper reviews the current practice within a major European center for adult and pediatric transplantation.

  5. Post-hepatectomy liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Kauffmann, Rondi

    2014-01-01

    Hepatectomies are among some of the most complex operative interventions performed. Mortality rates after major hepatectomy are as high as 30%, with post-hepatic liver failure (PHLF) representing the major source of morbidity and mortality. We present a review of PHLF, including the current definition, predictive factors, pre-operative risk assessment, techniques to prevent PHLF, identification and management. Despite great improvements in morbidity and mortality, liver surgery continues to demand excellent clinical judgement in selecting patients for surgery. Appropriate choice of pre-operative techniques to improve the functional liver remnant (FLR), fastidious surgical technique, and excellent post-operative management are essential to optimize patient outcomes. PMID:25392835

  6. [Dissection techniques in liver surgery].

    PubMed

    Rau, H G; Schauer, R; Pickelmann, S; Beyer, B C; Angele, M K; Zimmermann, A; Meimarakis, G; Heizmann, O; Schildberg, F W

    2001-02-01

    The first liver resection was performed in 1888. Since then a wide variety of dissection techniques have been introduced. The blunt dissection was replaced by novel methods, i.e. the CUSA technique and the Jet Cutter for major liver resections. These methods represent selective dissection techniques; whereas non-selective methods include the scalpel, scissors, linear stapling cutter, high-frequency coagulation, and the laser technique. The aim of this review article is the comparison of the different resection techniques in liver surgery, focussing on blood loss and resection time. PMID:11253668

  7. Autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Sener, Asli Gamze

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic hepatitis of unknown etiology characterized by clinical, histological, and immunological features, generally including circulating autoantibodies and a high total serum and/or gamma globulin. Liver-related autoantibodies are very significant for the correct diagnosis and classification of autoimmune liver diseases (AILD), namely autoimmune hepatitis types 1 and 2 (AIH-1 and 2), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and the sclerosing cholangitis types in adults and children. This article intends to review recent studies that investigate autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases from a microbiological perspective.

  8. 3-Tesla MRI Response to TACE in HCC (Liver Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-22

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Stage A Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC); Stage B Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC)

  9. Cross-reactivity of anti-human, anti-porcine and anti-bovine cytokine antibodies with cetacean tissues.

    PubMed

    Jaber, J R; Pérez, J; Zafra, R; Herráez, P; Rodríguez, F; Arbelo, M; de los Monteros, A Espinosa; Fernández, A

    2010-07-01

    The cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies specific for human, porcine and bovine cytokines was evaluated for three cetacean species: Atlantic spotted dolphins (Stenella frontalis), striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) and fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus). Formalin-fixed and snap-frozen tissue sections of lung, spleen, liver and mesenteric lymph node were evaluated. T and B lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages were detected by use of anti-human CD3, IgG and lysozyme polyclonal antibodies (pAbs), respectively. These reagents were successfully applied to both fixed and frozen tissues. Anti-human interleukin (IL)-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-8, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and CD25, anti-porcine IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, and anti-bovine IL-4 and interferon (IFN)-gamma antibodies produced immunolabelling in cetacean snap-frozen lymph node sections similar to that obtained with tissue from the species of origin, but they did not react with formalin-fixed tissue sections. Anti-porcine IL-12 pAb did not react with snap-frozen cetacean tissue samples. Macrophages and lymphocytes were the most common cells immunolabelled with the anti-cytokine antibodies. This panel of anti-cytokine antibodies may be used to evaluate cytokine expression in snap-frozen tissue samples from the cetacean species tested. PMID:20163803

  10. Cross-reactivity of anti-human, anti-porcine and anti-bovine cytokine antibodies with cetacean tissues.

    PubMed

    Jaber, J R; Pérez, J; Zafra, R; Herráez, P; Rodríguez, F; Arbelo, M; de los Monteros, A Espinosa; Fernández, A

    2010-07-01

    The cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies specific for human, porcine and bovine cytokines was evaluated for three cetacean species: Atlantic spotted dolphins (Stenella frontalis), striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) and fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus). Formalin-fixed and snap-frozen tissue sections of lung, spleen, liver and mesenteric lymph node were evaluated. T and B lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages were detected by use of anti-human CD3, IgG and lysozyme polyclonal antibodies (pAbs), respectively. These reagents were successfully applied to both fixed and frozen tissues. Anti-human interleukin (IL)-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-8, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and CD25, anti-porcine IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, and anti-bovine IL-4 and interferon (IFN)-gamma antibodies produced immunolabelling in cetacean snap-frozen lymph node sections similar to that obtained with tissue from the species of origin, but they did not react with formalin-fixed tissue sections. Anti-porcine IL-12 pAb did not react with snap-frozen cetacean tissue samples. Macrophages and lymphocytes were the most common cells immunolabelled with the anti-cytokine antibodies. This panel of anti-cytokine antibodies may be used to evaluate cytokine expression in snap-frozen tissue samples from the cetacean species tested.

  11. Structure of an Enteric Pathogen, Bovine Parvovirus

    PubMed Central

    Kailasan, Shweta; Halder, Sujata; Gurda, Brittney; Bladek, Heather; Chipman, Paul R.; McKenna, Robert; Brown, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bovine parvovirus (BPV), the causative agent of respiratory and gastrointestinal disease in cows, is the type member of the Bocaparvovirus genus of the Parvoviridae family. Toward efforts to obtain a template for the development of vaccines and small-molecule inhibitors for this pathogen, the structure of the BPV capsid, assembled from the major capsid viral protein 2 (VP2), was determined using X-ray crystallography as well as cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction (cryo-reconstruction) to 3.2- and 8.8-Å resolutions, respectively. The VP2 region ordered in the crystal structure, from residues 39 to 536, conserves the parvoviral eight-stranded jellyroll motif and an αA helix. The BPV capsid displays common parvovirus features: a channel at and depressions surrounding the 5-fold axes and protrusions surrounding the 3-fold axes. However, rather than a depression centered at the 2-fold axes, a raised surface loop divides this feature in BPV. Additional observed density in the capsid interior in the cryo-reconstructed map, compared to the crystal structure, is interpreted as 10 additional N-terminal residues, residues 29 to 38, that radially extend the channel under the 5-fold axis, as observed for human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1). Surface loops of various lengths and conformations extend from the core jellyroll motif of VP2. These loops confer the unique surface topology of the BPV capsid, making it strikingly different from HBoV1 as well as the type members of other Parvovirinae genera for which structures have been determined. For the type members, regions structurally analogous to those decorating the BPV capsid surface serve as determinants of receptor recognition, tissue and host tropism, pathogenicity, and antigenicity. IMPORTANCE Bovine parvovirus (BPV), identified in the 1960s in diarrheic calves, is the type member of the Bocaparvovirus genus of the nonenveloped, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) Parvoviridae family. The recent

  12. Inhibition of pig liver and Zea mays L. polyamine oxidase: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Federico, R; Leone, L; Botta, M; Binda, C; Angelini, R; Venturini, G; Ascenzi, P

    2001-01-01

    Polyamine oxidase (PAO) is involved in polyamine metabolism and production of hydrogen peroxide in animal and plants, thus representing a key system in development and programmed cell death. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of amiloride, p-aminobenzamidine, clonidine, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenyl-indole (DAPI), gabexate mesylate, guazatine, and N,N'-bis(2,3-butadienyl)-1,4-butane-diamine (MDL72527) on the catalytic activity of pig liver and Zea mays L. PAO, Lens culinaris L. and Pisum sativum L. and swine kidney copper amine oxidase, bovine trypsin, as well as neuronal constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS-I) was investigated. Moreover, agmatine and N(3) -prenylagmatine (G3) were observed to inhibit pig liver and Zea mays L. PAO, bovine trypsin, and NOS-I action, but were substrates for Lens culinaris L., Pisum sativum L. and swine kidney copper amine oxidase. Guazatine and G3 inhibited selectively Zea mays L. PAO with K(i) values of 7.5 x 10(-9) M and 1.5 x 10(-8) M, respectively (at pH 6.5 and 25.0 degrees C). As a whole, the data reported here represent examples of enzyme cross-inhibition, and appear to be relevant in view of the use of cationic L-arginine-and imidazole-based compounds as drugs. PMID:11342283

  13. Gut-Liver Axis in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Gyongyi

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) has been amongst the leading causes of liver cirrhosis and liver-related death worldwide for decades. Early discoveries in alcoholic liver disease identified increased levels of bacterial endotoxin in the portal circulation suggesting a role for gut-derived “toxins” in ALD. Indeed, alcohol consumption can disrupt the intestinal epithelial barrier and result in increased gut permeability that is increasingly recognized as a major factor in ALD. Bacterial endotoxin, LPS, is a prototypic microbe-derived inflammatory signal that contributes to inflammation in ALD through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Recent studies also demonstrated that alcohol consumption is associated with alterations in the gut microbiome and the dysbalance of pathogenic and commensal organisms in the intestinal microbiome may contribute to the abnormal gut-liver axis in ALD. Indeed, bacterial decontamination improves ALD both in human and animal models. This short review summarizes recent findings and highlights emerging trends in the gut-liver axis relevant to ALD. PMID:25447847

  14. Bovine tuberculosis surveillance alternatives in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Welby, S; Govaerts, M; Vanholme, L; Hooyberghs, J; Mennens, K; Maes, L; Van Der Stede, Y

    2012-09-15

    Belgium obtained the bovine tuberculosis (bTB) officially free status in 2003 (EC Decision 2003/467/EC). This study was carried out to evaluate the components of the current bTB surveillance program in Belgium and to determine the sensitivity of this program. Secondly, alternatives to optimize the bTB surveillance in accordance with European legislation (Council Directive 64/432/EEC) were evaluated. Separate scenario trees were designed for each active surveillance component of the bTB surveillance program. Data from 2005 to 2009 regarding cattle population, movement and surveillance were collected to feed the stochastic scenario tree simulation model. A total of 7,403,826 cattle movement history records were obtained for the 2,678,020 cattle from 36,059 cattle herds still active in 2009. The current surveillance program sensitivity as well as the impact of alternative surveillance protocols was simulated in a stochastic model using 10,000 iterations per simulation. The median (50% percentile) of the component sensitivities across 10,000 iterations was 0.83, 0.85, 0.99, 0.99, respectively, for (i) testing the cattle only during the winter screening, (ii) testing only imported cattle, (iii) testing only purchased cattle and (iv) testing only all slaughtered cattle. The sensitivity analysis showed that the most influential input parameter explaining the variability around the output came from the uncertainty distribution around the sensitivity of the diagnostic tests used within the bTB surveillance. Providing all animals are inspected and post mortem inspection is highly sensitive, slaughterhouse surveillance was the most effective surveillance component. If these conditions were not met, the uncertainty around the mean sensitivity of this component was important. Using an antibody ELISA at purchase and an interferon gamma test during winter screening and at import would increase greatly the sensitivity and the confidence level of Belgium's freedom from b

  15. Cholesterol content in European bovine milk fats.

    PubMed

    Precht, D

    2001-02-01

    Data about the cholesterol content in edible fats like bovine milk fat are important for balancing the cholesterol intake with food. A comparison of 3 different cholesterol determination methods showed that with the direct analysis by a 25 m long TAP steel capillary column the same results could be obtained as with a time-consuming saponification standard method including thin-layer chromatographic cleaning and subsequent silylation. On the other hand with a rapid direct method using a short packed column 21% unsaponifiables as e.g. minor sterols or hydrocarbons could be found in the "cholesterol peak". The analysis of 1142 German milk fats led to a mean cholesterol content of 265.6 +/- 20.0 mg/100 g fat (range: 204.4 to 382.5). For 165 milk fats from other 12 EU-countries, a similar mean cholesterol content of 258.5 +/- 19.9 mg/100 g fat (range: 215.0 to 331.6) was detected. Compared with sufficiently fed cows, underfed cows demonstrated an approx. 10.1% lower mean cholesterol content (238.7 +/- 9.7 mg/100 g fat). On the other hand, during the first 7 days post partum, the colostrum showed a significantly higher mean cholesterol content of 327.2 +/- 99.0 mg/100 g fat (n = 15; range: 213.1 to 583.9). Further, with special conditions as feeding of rape-seed the cholesterol content can be significantly lowered by 8-13%. An extraordinary lowering up to 50% can be reached by dry fractionation of milk fat (stearin "hard" fraction).

  16. Prion biology relevant to bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Novakofski, J; Brewer, M S; Mateus-Pinilla, N; Killefer, J; McCusker, R H

    2005-06-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer and elk are a threat to agriculture and natural resources, as well as a human health concern. Both diseases are transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), or prion diseases, caused by autocatalytic conversion of endogenously encoded prion protein (PrP) to an abnormal, neurotoxic conformation designated PrPsc. Most mammalian species are susceptible to TSE, which, despite a range of species-linked names, is caused by a single highly conserved protein, with no apparent normal function. In the simplest sense, TSE transmission can occur because PrPsc is resistant to both endogenous and environmental proteinases, although many details remain unclear. Questions about the transmission of TSE are central to practical issues such as livestock testing, access to international livestock markets, and wildlife management strategies, as well as intangible issues such as consumer confidence in the safety of the meat supply. The majority of BSE cases seem to have been transmitted by feed containing meat and bone meal from infected animals. In the United Kingdom, there was a dramatic decrease in BSE cases after neural tissue and, later, all ruminant tissues were banned from ruminant feed. However, probably because of heightened awareness and widespread testing, there is growing evidence that new variants of BSE are arising "spontaneously," suggesting ongoing surveillance will continue to find infected animals. Interspecies transmission is inefficient and depends on exposure, sequence homology, TSE donor strain, genetic polymorphism of the host, and architecture of the visceral nerves if exposure is by an oral route. Considering the low probability of interspecies transmission, the low efficiency of oral transmission, and the low prion levels in nonnervous tissues, consumption of conventional animal products represents minimal risk. However, detection of rare events is challenging, and TSE

  17. Bovine viral diarrhoea: pathogenesis and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lanyon, Sasha R; Hill, Fraser I; Reichel, Michael P; Brownlie, Joe

    2014-02-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is the most prevalent infectious disease of cattle. It causes financial losses from a variety of clinical manifestations and is the subject of a number of mitigation and eradication schemes around the world. The pathogenesis of BVDV infection is complex, with infection pre- and post-gestation leading to different outcomes. Infection of the dam during gestation results in fetal infection, which may lead to embryonic death, teratogenic effects or the birth of persistently infected (PI) calves. PI animals shed BVDV in their excretions and secretions throughout life and are the primary route of transmission of the virus. These animals can usually be readily detected by virus or viral antigen detection assays (RT-PCR, ELISA), except in the immediate post-natal period where colostral antibodies may mask virus presence. PI calves in utero (the 'Trojan cow' scenario) currently defy detection with available diagnostic tests, although dams carrying PI calves have been shown to have higher antibody levels than seropositive cows carrying non-PI calves. Acute infection with BVDV results in transient viraemia prior to seroconversion and can lead to reproductive dysfunction and immunosuppression leading to an increased incidence of secondary disease. Antibody assays readily detect virus exposure at the individual level and can also be used in pooled samples (serum and milk) to determine herd exposure or immunity. Diagnostic tests can be used to diagnose clinical cases, establish disease prevalence in groups and detect apparently normal but persistently infected animals. This review outlines the pathogenesis and pathology of BVD viral infection and uses this knowledge to select the best diagnostic tests for clinical diagnosis, monitoring, control and eradication efforts. Test methods, types of samples and problems areas of BVDV diagnosis are discussed.

  18. Quantitative Risk Assessment of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Kasuga, Fumiko

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a progressive neurological disease of cattle affecting the central nervous system and was first diagnosed in the United Kingdom (UK) in 1986 (Wells et al., 1987). This disease is one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) which includes Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans and scrapie in sheep. The causative agent of TSE is considered to be an abnormal form of prion protein. However, the details of its pathogenic mechanism have not been fully identified. Scrapie, which causes neurological symptoms in sheep and goats, has existed in the UK for 200 years (Hoinville, 1996) and spread across the rest of the world in the 1900s (Detwiler & Baylis, 2003). There has been no report so far that scrapie can be transmitted to humans. Initially, BSE was also considered as a disease affecting only animals. However, a variant type of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) was first reported in the UK, and exposure to a BSE agent was suspected (Collinge, Sidle, Meads, Ironside, & Hill, 1996). vCJD is clinically and pathologically different from the sporadic type of CJD, and age at clinical onset of vCJD is younger than sporadic type (Will et al., 1996). Since the UK government announced the possible association between BSE and vCJD in 1996, BSE has become a huge public health concern all over the world. Of particular concern about vCJD, the fatal disease in younger age, distorted consumer confidence in beef safety, and as a result reduced beef consumption has been seen in many BSE-affected countries.

  19. Morphological classification of bovine ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, R J; Irving-Rodgers, H F

    2010-02-01

    Follicle classification is an important aid to the understanding of follicular development and atresia. Some bovine primordial follicles have the classical primordial shape, but ellipsoidal shaped follicles with some cuboidal granulosa cells at the poles are far more common. Preantral follicles have one of two basal lamina phenotypes, either a single aligned layer or one with additional layers. In antral follicles <5 mm diameter, half of the healthy follicles have columnar shaped basal granulosa cells and additional layers of basal lamina, which appear as loops in cross section ('loopy'). The remainder have aligned single-layered follicular basal laminas with rounded basal cells, and contain better quality oocytes than the loopy/columnar follicles. In sizes >5 mm, only aligned/rounded phenotypes are present. Dominant and subordinate follicles can be identified by ultrasound and/or histological examination of pairs of ovaries. Atretic follicles <5 mm are either basal atretic or antral atretic, named on the basis of the location in the membrana granulosa where cells die first. Basal atretic follicles have considerable biological differences to antral atretic follicles. In follicles >5 mm, only antral atresia is observed. The concentrations of follicular fluid steroid hormones can be used to classify atresia and distinguish some of the different types of atresia; however, this method is unlikely to identify follicles early in atresia, and hence misclassify them as healthy. Other biochemical and histological methods can be used, but since cell death is a part of normal homoeostatis, deciding when a follicle has entered atresia remains somewhat subjective. PMID:19786400

  20. A Major Gene for Bovine Ovulation Rate

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Brian W.; Morris, Chris A.

    2015-01-01

    Half-sib daughters sired by a bull believed to be a carrier of a major gene for high ovulation rate were evaluated for ovulation rate and genotyped in an effort to both test the hypothesis of segregation of a major gene and to map the gene’s location. A total of 131 daughters were produced over four consecutive years at a University of Wisconsin-Madison research farm. All were evaluated for ovulation rate over an average of four estrous cycles using transrectal ultrasonography. The sire and all daughters were genotyped using a 3K SNP chip and the genotype and phenotype data were used in a linkage analysis. Subsequently, daughters recombinant within the QTL region and the sire were genotyped successively with 50K and 777K SNP chips to refine the location of the causative polymorphism. Positional candidate genes within the fine-mapped region were examined for polymorphism by Sanger sequencing of PCR amplicons encompassing coding and 5’ and 3’ flanking regions of the genes. Sire DNA was used as template in the PCR reactions. Strong evidence of a major gene for ovulation rate was observed (p<1x10-28) with the gene localized to bovine chromosome 10. Fine-mapping subsequently reduced the location to a 1.2 Mb region between 13.6 and 14.8 Mb on chromosome 10. The location identified does not correspond to that for any previously identified major gene for ovulation rate. This region contains three candidate genes, SMAD3, SMAD6 and IQCH. While candidate gene screening failed to identify the causative polymorphism, three polymorphisms were identified that can be used as a haplotype to track inheritance of the high ovulation rate allele in descendants of the carrier sire. PMID:26046917

  1. Blockade of bovine PD-1 increases T cell function and inhibits bovine leukemia virus expression in B cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1) is a known immunoinhibitory receptor that contributes to immune evasion of various tumor cells and pathogens causing chronic infection, such as bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection. First, in this study, to establish a method for the expression and functional analysis of bovine PD-1, hybridomas producing monoclonal antibodies (mAb) specific for bovine PD-1 were established. Treatment with these anti-PD-1 mAb enhanced interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Next, to examine whether PD-1 blockade by anti-PD-1 mAb could upregulate the immune reaction during chronic infection, the expression and functional analysis of PD-1 in PBMC isolated from BLV-infected cattle with or without lymphoma were performed using anti-PD-1 mAb. The frequencies of both PD-1+ CD4+ T cells in blood and lymph node and PD-1+ CD8+ T cells in lymph node were higher in BLV-infected cattle with lymphoma than those without lymphoma or control uninfected cattle. PD-1 blockade enhanced IFN-γ production and proliferation and reduced BLV-gp51 expression and B-cell activation in PBMC from BLV-infected cattle in response to BLV-gp51 peptide mixture. These data show that anti-bovine PD-1 mAb could provide a new therapy to control BLV infection via upregulation of immune response. PMID:23876077

  2. Development of a rapid and sensitive polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of bovine herpesvirus type 1 in bovine semen.

    PubMed Central

    van Engelenburg, F A; Maes, R K; van Oirschot, J T; Rijsewijk, F A

    1993-01-01

    We developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to detect bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) in bovine semen. Since bovine semen contains components that inhibit PCR amplification, a protocol was developed to purify BHV-1 DNA from bovine semen. To identify failures of PCR amplification, we used an internal control template that was coamplified by the same PCR primers. When separated fractions of BHV-1-contaminated semen were analyzed by the PCR, we found that more than 90% of the BHV-1 DNA was present in a pooled fraction consisting of seminal fluid, nonsperm cells, and virus adsorbed to spermatozoa. By using this fraction, three to five molecules of BHV-1 DNA in 50 microliters of bovine semen could be detected. A pilot study to compare this PCR assay with the routinely used virus isolation method showed that this PCR assay is 2- to 100-fold more sensitive. In addition, the results of the PCR assay are available in 1 day, whereas the virus isolation method takes 7 days. Therefore, the PCR assay may be a good alternative to the virus isolation method. Images PMID:8308103

  3. Dynamic compressive properties of bovine knee layered tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Masahiro; Hino, Yuki; Todo, Mitsugu

    2015-09-01

    In Japan, the most common articular disease is knee osteoarthritis. Among many treatment methodologies, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have recently received a lot of attention. In this field, cells and scaffolds are important, both ex vivo and in vivo. From the viewpoint of effective treatment, in addition to histological features, the compatibility of mechanical properties is also important. In this study, the dynamic and static compressive properties of bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were measured using a universal testing machine and a split Hopkinson pressure bar method. The compressive behaviors of bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were examined. The effects of strain rate on the maximum stress and the slope of stress-strain curves of the bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were discussed.

  4. Immunogenicity of a modified-live virus vaccine against bovine viral diarrhea virus types 1 and 2, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, bovine parainfluenza-3 virus, and bovine respiratory syncytial virus when administered intranasally in young calves.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wenzhi; Ellis, John; Mattick, Debra; Smith, Linda; Brady, Ryan; Trigo, Emilio

    2010-05-14

    The immunogenicity of an intranasally-administered modified-live virus (MLV) vaccine in 3-8 day old calves was evaluated against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) types 1 and 2, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) virus, parainfluenza-3 (PI-3) virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). Calves were intranasally vaccinated with a single dose of a multivalent MLV vaccine and were challenged with one of the respective viruses three to four weeks post-vaccination in five separate studies. There was significant sparing of diseases in calves intranasally vaccinated with the MLV vaccine, as indicated by significantly fewer clinical signs, lower rectal temperatures, reduced viral shedding, greater white blood cell and platelet counts, and less severe pulmonary lesions than control animals. This was the first MLV combination vaccine to demonstrate efficacy against BVDV types 1 and 2, IBR, PI-3 and BRSV in calves 3-8 days of age.

  5. A novel glutamate dehydrogenase from bovine brain: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Kim, S W; Cho, S W

    1995-08-01

    A soluble form of novel glutamate dehydrogenase has been purified from bovine brain. The preparation was homogeneous on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and composed of six identical subunits having a subunit size of 57,500 Da. The biochemical properties of glutamate dehydrogenase such as N-terminal amino acids sequences, kinetic parameters, amino acids analysis, and optimum pH were examined in both reductive amination of alpha-ketoglutarate and oxidative deamination of glutamate. N-terminal amino acid sequences of the bovine brain enzyme showed the significant differences in the first 5 amino acids compared to other glutamate dehydrogenases from various sources. These results indicate that glutamate dehydrogenase isolated from bovine brain is a novel polypeptide.

  6. Splitting and biopsy for bovine embryo sexing under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Lopes, R F; Forell, F; Oliveira, A T; Rodrigues, J L

    2001-12-01

    Improvements on embryo micromanipulation techniques led to the use of embryo bisection technology in commercial embryo transfer programs, and made possible the direct genetic analysis of preimplantation bovine embryos by biopsy. For example, aspiration and microsection, allow bovine embryos sexing by detection of male-specific Y-chromosome in a sample of embryonic cells. We report on the application of the methodologies of splitting and biopsy of bovine embryos in field conditions, and on the results of embryo sex determination by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Pregnancy rates achieved with fresh bisected or biopsied embryos (50 to 60%) were similar to the fresh intact embryos (55 to 61%). The PCR protocol used for embryo sexing showed 92% to 94% of efficiency and 90 to 100% of accuracy. These results demonstrate these procedures are suitable for use in field conditions.

  7. Control of Bovine Mastitis: Old and Recent Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Fernanda; Henriques, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    Mastitis is defined as the inflammatory response resulting of the infection of the udder tissue and it is reported in numerous species, namely in domestic dairy animals. This pathology is the most frequent disease of dairy cattle and can be potentially fatal. Mastitis is an economically important pathology associated with reduced milk production, changes in milk composition and quality, being considered one of the most costly to dairy industry. Therefore, the majority of research in the field has focused on control of bovine mastitis and many efforts are being made for the development of new and effective anti-mastitis drugs. Antibiotic treatment is an established component of mastitis control programs; however, the continuous search for new therapeutic alternatives, effective in the control and treatment of bovine mastitis, is urgent. This review will provide an overview of some conventional and emerging approaches in the management of bovine mastitis' infections. PMID:26687332

  8. Control of Bovine Mastitis: Old and Recent Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Fernanda; Henriques, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    Mastitis is defined as the inflammatory response resulting of the infection of the udder tissue and it is reported in numerous species, namely in domestic dairy animals. This pathology is the most frequent disease of dairy cattle and can be potentially fatal. Mastitis is an economically important pathology associated with reduced milk production, changes in milk composition and quality, being considered one of the most costly to dairy industry. Therefore, the majority of research in the field has focused on control of bovine mastitis and many efforts are being made for the development of new and effective anti-mastitis drugs. Antibiotic treatment is an established component of mastitis control programs; however, the continuous search for new therapeutic alternatives, effective in the control and treatment of bovine mastitis, is urgent. This review will provide an overview of some conventional and emerging approaches in the management of bovine mastitis' infections.

  9. Processed bovine cartilage: an improved biosynthetic implant for contour defects

    SciTech Connect

    Ersek, R.A.; Hart, W.G. Jr.; Greer, D.; Beisang, A.A.; Flynn, P.J.; Denton, D.R.

    1984-05-01

    Irradiated human cartilage has been found to be a superior implant material for correction of contour defects; however, availability problems have prevented this material from gaining wide acceptance. Implantation of processed irradiated bovine cartilage in primates and rabbits, as described here, provides strong evidence that this material performs like irradiated allograft cartilage antigenically and has certain cosmetic advantages over allograft cartilage. Our studies in primates have shown that there is no systemically measurable antibody-antigen reaction, either cellular or noncellular, to irradiated processed bovine cartilage. Neither primary nor second-set provocative implantations produced any measurable rejection. In rabbits, composite grafts of two pieces of irradiated bovine cartilage adjacent to each other were also well tolerated, with no measurable absorption and with capsule formation typical of a foreign body reaction to an inert object.

  10. Identification of genetic variation and putative regulatory regions in bovine CARD15

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mutations in caspase recruitment domain 15 (CARD15) are associated with susceptibility to Crohn's disease and Blau Syndrome. We performed comparative analyses of the bovine, murine, and human CARD15 transcripts to elucidate functionality of bovine CARD15 and examine its potential role in bovine dise...

  11. 9 CFR 113.215 - Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.215 Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  12. 9 CFR 113.215 - Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.215 Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  13. 9 CFR 113.215 - Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.215 Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  14. 9 CFR 113.215 - Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.215 Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  15. Liver disease in vineyard sprayers.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, J C; Menezes, A P

    1977-02-01

    Liver disease with inclusions of copper was recognized among 30 rural workers with "vineyard sprayer's lung." The pathological findings were varied: focal or diffuse swelling and proliferation of Kupffer cells; histiocytic and sarcoid-like granulomata; fibrosis of variable degree in the perisinusoidal, portal, and subcapsular areas, accompanied by atypical proliferation of the sinusoidal lining cells; micronodular cirrhosis; angiosarcoma of the liver; idiopathic portal hypertension. Abundant deposits of copper were revealed by histochemical techniques within hepatic and pulmonary lesions in these patients. The observations on the human and experimental material suggest an etiological relationship between exposure to copper sulfate and the lesions described. A morphological resemblance was noted between the "liver disease of vineyard sprayers" and the hepatic lesions reported in workers exposed to inorganic arsenic and to vinyl chloride. The identification of the inhaled foreign material within the liver lesions raises important etiological considerations.

  16. Calcium Signaling in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Amaya, Maria Jimena; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) is a highly versatile second messenger that regulates a wide range of functions in every type of cell and tissue. To achieve this versatility, the Ca2+ signaling system operates in a variety of ways to regulate cellular processes that function over a wide dynamic range. This is particularly well exemplified for Ca2+ signals in the liver, which modulate diverse and specialized functions such as bile secretion, glucose metabolism, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. These Ca2+ signals are organized to control distinct cellular processes through tight spatial and temporal coordination of [Ca2+]i signals, both within and between cells. This article will review the machinery responsible for the formation of Ca2+ signals in the liver, the types of subcellular, cellular, and intercellular signals that occur, the physiological role of Ca2+ signaling in the liver, and the role of Ca2+ signaling in liver disease. PMID:23720295

  17. Epigenetic biomarkers in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Banaudha, Krishna K; Verma, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma or HCC) is a major cancer worldwide. Research in this field is needed to identify biomarkers that can be used for early detection of the disease as well as new approaches to its treatment. Epigenetic biomarkers provide an opportunity to understand liver cancer etiology and evaluate novel epigenetic inhibitors for treatment. Traditionally, liver cirrhosis, proteomic biomarkers, and the presence of hepatitis viruses have been used for the detection and diagnosis of liver cancer. Promising results from microRNA (miRNA) profiling and hypermethylation of selected genes have raised hopes of identifying new biomarkers. Some of these epigenetic biomarkers may be useful in risk assessment and for screening populations to identify who is likely to develop cancer. Challenges and opportunities in the field are discussed in this chapter.

  18. Biomarkers in Pediatric Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Kyrana, Eirini; Fitzpatrick, Emer; Dhawan, Anil

    2016-01-01

    The chronic nature of liver diseases in children and adults merits close follow-up for disease progression and/or treatment evaluation. Disease progression involves injury to liver cells resulting in cell death, varying degrees of inflammation, steatosis depending on the insult, oxidative stress, and eventually fibrosis and cirrhosis unless the process is modified with treatment or spontaneous recovery. Inflammation, cell death, and fibrosis are the three major processes that determine the outcome of liver disease irrespective of the etiology. Markers to measure the activity or status of these parameters in a dynamic way, particularly via noninvasive methods, are urgently required. In this chapter, we summarize recent advances in the identification of biomarkers of liver diseases: biomarkers corresponding to inflammation, cell death, fibrosis, and the development of malignancy.

  19. Folate, alcohol, and liver disease.

    PubMed

    Medici, Valentina; Halsted, Charles H

    2013-04-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is typically associated with folate deficiency, which is the result of reduced dietary folate intake, intestinal malabsorption, reduced liver uptake and storage, and increased urinary folate excretion. Folate deficiency favors the progression of liver disease through mechanisms that include its effects on methionine metabolism with consequences for DNA synthesis and stability and the epigenetic regulation of gene expression involved in pathways of liver injury. This paper reviews the pathogenesis of ALD with particular focus on ethanol-induced alterations in methionine metabolism, which may act in synergy with folate deficiency to decrease antioxidant defense as well as DNA stability while regulating epigenetic mechanisms of relevant gene expressions. We also review the current evidence available on potential treatments of ALD based on correcting abnormalities in methionine metabolism and the methylation regulation of relevant gene expressions. PMID:23136133

  20. Isolation of methylglyoxal from liver.

    PubMed Central

    Fodor, G; Mujumdar, R; Szent-Gyorgyi, A

    1978-01-01

    Acetaldehyde and methylglyoxal were shown to be present in liver bound to protein. They were isolated in the form of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones and osazones, respectively. The NMR spectrum of pure methylglyoxal was recorded. PMID:279916