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Sample records for 158a gev lead

  1. Antihelium-3 production in lead-lead collisions at 158 A GeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenescu, R.; Baglin, C.; Beck, H. P.; Borer, K.; Bussière, A.; Elsener, K.; Gorodetzky, Ph; Guillaud, J. P.; Kabana, S.; Klingenberg, R.; Lehmann, G.; Lindén, T.; Lohmann, K. D.; Mommsen, R.; Moser, U.; Pretzl, K.; Schacher, J.; Spiwoks, R.; Tuominiemi, J.; Weber, M.

    2003-01-01

    The NA52 experiment measured particle and antiparticle yields at 0° production angle over a wide range in rapidity in lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions at 158 A GeV/c with a minimum bias trigger. Besides Script O(106) antiprotons (bar-p) and Script O(103) antideuterons (bar-d) a total of five antihelium-3 (overline-3He) were found. The resulting invariant differential overline-3He production cross sections at ptsimeq0 GeV/c turn out to be E (d3sigma)/(dp3) = (2.5 ± 1.8) × 10-7 bc3 GeV-2 at a rapidity of y = 3.4 in the laboratory system and (5.9 ± 3.4) × 10-8 bc3 GeV-2 at y = 4.0. The results are discussed in the framework of a simple coalescence model.

  2. Multifractal moments in heavy ion Pb-Pb collisions at 158 A GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Sunil

    2016-05-01

    In present work, we use the method of scaled factorial moments to search for intermittent behavior in Pb-Pb interactions at 158 A GeV. The analysis is done on photon distributions obtained using preshower photon multiplicity detector. Scaled factorial moments are used to study short range fluctuations in pseudorapidity distributions of photons. Scaled factorial moments are calculated using horizontal corrected and vertical analysis. The results are compared with simulation analysis using VENUS event generator.

  3. Impact parameter dependence of π ±, K±, p, overlinep, d and overlined production in Pb+Pb collisions at 158 A GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabana, Sonja; Ambrosini, G.; Arsenescu, R.; Baglin, C.; Beringer, J.; Borer, K.; Bussière, A.; Dittus, F.; Elsener, K.; Gorodetzky, Ph.; Guillaud, J. P.; Hess, P.; Klingenberg, R.; Lindén, T.; Lohmann, K. D.; Mommsen, R.; Moser, U.; Pretzl, K.; Schacher, J.; Stoffel, F.; Tuominiemi, J.; Weber, M.; NA52 Collaboration

    1999-12-01

    The impact parameter dependence of π ±, K±, p, overlinep, d and overlined yields produced in fixed target lead+lead collisions at 158 A GeV incident energy is presented. The particle yields are measured near zero transverse momentum and in the forward rapidity region.

  4. An investigation of the antinuclei and nuclei production mechanism in Pb + Pb collisions at 158 A GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenescu, R.; Baglin, C.; Beck, H. P.; Borer, K.; Bussière, A.; Elsener, K.; Gorodetzky, Ph; Guillaud, J. P.; Kabana, S.; Klingenberg, R.; Lehmann, G.; Lindén, T.; Lohmann, K. D.; Mommsen, R.; Moser, U.; Pretzl, K.; Schacher, J.; Spiwoks, R.; Tuominiemi, J.; Weber, M.

    2003-11-01

    We investigate the production mechanisms of p, d, t, 3He, 4He, 6Li, \\overline {\\mathrm {p}} , \\overline {\\mathrm {d}} and \\overline {^3{\\mathrm {He}}} in Pb+Pb collisions at 158 A GeV measured near zero transverse momentum with the NA52 experiment at the CERN SPS. We find evidence that nuclei and antinuclei in Pb+Pb collisions are mainly produced via the coalescence mechanism out of a thermalized source of hadrons, at a time close to the thermal freeze-out of hadrons corresponding to a temperature of ~120 MeV.

  5. Antinuclei production in Pb + Pb collisions at 158 A GeV/ c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelquist, G.; Baglin, C.; Beringer, J.; Bohm, C.; Borer, K.; Bussière, A.; Dittus, F.; Elsener, K.; Frei, D.; Gorodetzky, Ph.; Guillaud, J. P.; Hugentobler, E.; Klingenberg, R.; Linden, T.; Lohmann, K. D.; Moser, U.; Pal, T.; Pretzl, K.; Schacher, J.; Selldén, B.; Stoffel, F.; Tuominiemi, J.; Zhang, Q. P.; Newmass (NA52) Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    We investigate antinuclei production in Pb + Pb interactions at 158 GeV/ c per nucleon at zero degree production angle. We quote invariant differential production cross sections for antiprotons and antideuterons. The corresponding antideuteron to antiproton ratio at midrapidity is 4.2 · 10 -4. One antihelium-3 nucleus was observed. The results are discussed in the framework of a simple coalescence model.

  6. Event-by-Event Charged-Neutral Fluctuations in Pb + Pb Collisions at 158 A GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Plasil, F; Silvermyr, David O; Stankus, Paul W; WA98, Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Charged particles and photons have been measured in central Pb + Pb collisions at 158 A GeV in a common ( )-phase space region in the WA98 experiment at the CERN SPS. The measured distributions have been analyzed to quantify the frequency with which phase space regions of varying sizes have either small or large neutral pion fraction. The measured results are compared with VENUS model simulated events and with mixed events. Events with both large and small charged neutral fluctuations are observed to occur more frequently than expected statistically, as deduced from mixed events, or as predicted by model simulations, with the difference becoming more prominent with decreasing size of the region.

  7. Baryon and antibaryon production in lead-lead collisions at 158 A GeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newmass (NA52) Collaboration; Ambrosini, G.; Arsenescu, R.; Baglin, C.; Beringer, J.; Bohm, C.; Borer, K.; Bussière, A.; Dittus, F.; Elsener, K.; Frei, D.; Gorodetzky, Ph.; Guillaud, J. P.; Hess, P.; Hugentobler, E.; Kabana, S.; Klingenberg, R.; Lindén, T.; Lohmann, K. D.; Mommsen, R.; Moser, U.; Pal, T.; Pretzl, K.; Schacher, J.; Selldén, B.; Stoffel, F.; Tuominiemi, J.; Weber, M.; Zhang, Q. P.

    1998-01-01

    We report on baryon and antibaryon as well as K+ and K- production cross sections measured in lead-lead collisions at 158 GeV/c per nucleon. The presented data were taken at zero degree production angle with a minimum bias trigger. The measurements covered a wide range of rapidity 1.4

  8. Calculation of the Coulomb Fission Cross Sections for Pb-Pb and Bi-Pb Interactions at 158 A GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poyser, William J.; Ahern, Sean C.; Norbury, John W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    The Weizsacker-Williams (WW) method of virtual quanta is used to make approximate cross section calculations for peripheral relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We calculated the Coulomb fission cross sections for projectile ions of Pb-208 and Bi-209 with energies of 158 A GeV interacting with a Pb-208 target. We also calculated the electromagnetic absorption cross section for Pb-208 ion interacting as described. For comparison we use both the full WW method and a standard approximate WW method. The approximate WW method in larger cross sections compared to the more accurate full WW method.

  9. Energy dependence of transverse momentum fluctuations in Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at 20A to 158A GeV

    SciTech Connect

    NA49 Collaboration; Anticic, T.

    2009-04-15

    Results are presented on event-by-event fluctuations of transverse momenta p{sub T} in central Pb+Pb interactions at 20A, 30A, 40A, 80A, and 158A GeV. The analysis was performed for charged particles at forward center-of-mass rapidity (1.1 < y*{sub {pi}} < 2.6). Three fluctuation measures were studied: the distribution of average transverse momentum M(p{sub T}) in the event, the {phi}{sub p{sub T}} fluctuation measure, and two-particle transverse momentum correlations. Fluctuations of p{sub T} are small and show no significant energy dependence in the energy range of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. Results are compared with QCD-inspired predictions for the critical point, and with the UrQMD model. Transverse momentum fluctuations, similar to multiplicity fluctuations, do not show the increase expected for freeze-out near the critical point of QCD.

  10. K*(892)⁰ and K̄*(892)⁰ production in central Pb + Pb, Si + Si, C + C, and inelastic p + p collisions at 158A GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Anticic, T.; Baatar, B.; Barna, D.; Bartke, J.; Beck, H.; Betev, L.; Białkowska, H.; Blume, C.; Bogusz, M.; Boimska, B.; Book, J.; Botje, M.; Bunčić, P.; Cetner, T.; Christakoglou, P.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cramer, J. G.; Eckardt, V.; Fodor, Z.; Foka, P.; Friese, V.; Gaździcki, M.; Grebieszkow, K.; Höhne, C.; Kadija, K.; Karev, A.; Kolesnikov, V. I.; Kowalski, M.; Kresan, D.; Laszlo, A.; Lacey, R.; van Leeuwen, M.; Mackowiak, M.; Makariev, M.; Malakhov, A. I.; Mateev, M.; Melkumov, G. L.; Mitrovski, M.; Mrówczyński, S.; Nicolic, V.; Pálla, G.; Panagiotou, A. D.; Peryt, W.; Pluta, J.; Prindle, D.; Pühlhofer, F.; Renfordt, R.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rybczyński, M.; Rybicki, A.; Sandoval, A.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T.; Seyboth, P.; Siklér, F.; Skrzypczak, E.; Słodkowski, M.; Stefanek, G.; Stock, R.; Ströbele, H.; Susa, T.; Szuba, M.; Utvić, M.; Varga, D.; Vassiliou, M.; Veres, G. I.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vranić, D.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A.

    2011-12-13

    Production of the K*(892)0 and K̄*(892)⁰ resonances was studied via their K⁺π⁻ and K⁻π⁺ decay modes in central Pb+Pb, Si+Si, C+C, and inelastic p+p collisions at 158A GeV(√(sNN)=17.3 GeV) with the NA49 detector at the CERN SPS. Transverse momentum and rapidity distributions were measured and total yields were estimated. The yield of K* exceeds that of K̄* by about a factor of two in nucleus-nucleus reactions. The total yield ratios ⟨K*⟩/⟨K+⟩ and ⟨K̄*⟩/⟨K-⟩ are strongly suppressed in central Pb+Pb compared to p+p, C+C, and Si+Si collisions, in agreement with the expected attenuation of these short-lived resonance states in the hadronic phase of the expanding fireball. The UrQMD model, although incorporating such a scenario, does not provide a quantitative description of the experimental results. The statistical hadron gas model assuming the same freeze-out parameters for stable hadrons and resonances overestimates the ⟨K*⟩/⟨K⟩ ratios in central Pb+Pb collisions by about a factor of 2.5.

  11. K*(892)⁰ and K̄*(892)⁰ production in central Pb + Pb, Si + Si, C + C, and inelastic p + p collisions at 158A GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Anticic, T.; Baatar, B.; Barna, D.; Bartke, J.; Beck, H.; Betev, L.; Białkowska, H.; Blume, C.; Bogusz, M.; Boimska, B.; et al

    2011-12-13

    Production of the K*(892)0 and K̄*(892)⁰ resonances was studied via their K⁺π⁻ and K⁻π⁺ decay modes in central Pb+Pb, Si+Si, C+C, and inelastic p+p collisions at 158A GeV(√(sNN)=17.3 GeV) with the NA49 detector at the CERN SPS. Transverse momentum and rapidity distributions were measured and total yields were estimated. The yield of K* exceeds that of K̄* by about a factor of two in nucleus-nucleus reactions. The total yield ratios ⟨K*⟩/⟨K+⟩ and ⟨K̄*⟩/⟨K-⟩ are strongly suppressed in central Pb+Pb compared to p+p, C+C, and Si+Si collisions, in agreement with the expected attenuation of these short-lived resonance states in the hadronicmore » phase of the expanding fireball. The UrQMD model, although incorporating such a scenario, does not provide a quantitative description of the experimental results. The statistical hadron gas model assuming the same freeze-out parameters for stable hadrons and resonances overestimates the ⟨K*⟩/⟨K⟩ ratios in central Pb+Pb collisions by about a factor of 2.5.« less

  12. Centrality and system size dependence of (multi-strange) hyperons at 40A and 158A GeV: A comparison between a binary collision model and a Boltzmann + hydrodynamic hybrid model

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Hannah; Mitrovski, Michael; Schuster, Tim; Bleicher, Marcus

    2009-11-15

    We present results on the centrality and system size dependence of (multi-strange) hyperons in Pb+Pb collisions at 40A and 158A GeV from the Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD-v2.3) model and a coupled Boltzmann + hydrodynamics calculation. The second approach is realized in a hybrid fashion based on UrQMD, with an intermediate hydrodynamical evolution for the hot and dense stage of the collision. This implementation allows a comparison of microscopic transport calculations with hydrodynamic simulations to explore the transition from a system that is not fully equilibrated, such as C+C or Si+Si collisions, to a supposedly fully equilibrated system, such as that created in Pb+Pb reactions. The results of our calculations are compared to measurements of the (anti-)hyperon yields at midrapidity (|y|{<=}0.5) and total multiplicities performed by the NA49 and NA57 Collaborations at 40A and 158A GeV. Furthermore, we compare our predictions to the centrality dependence of {lambda},{lambda}, and {xi}{sup -} rapidity spectra and total multiplicities at 40A and 158A GeV, where possible.

  13. Baryon stopping and charged particle production from lead-lead collisions at 158 GeV per nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Toy, Milton Y.

    1999-07-01

    Net proton (proton minus antiproton) and negative charge hadron spectra (h-) from central Pb+Pb collisions at 158 GeV per nucleon at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron were measured and compared to spectra from central collisions of the lighter S+S system. Net baryon distributions were derived from those of net protons and net lambdas. Stopping, or rapidity shift with respect to the beam, of net protons and net baryons increase with system size. The mean transverse momentum &60;pT&62; of net protons also increase with system size. The h- rapidity density scales with the number of participant nucleons for nuclear collisions, where their &60;pT&62; is independent of system size. The &60;pT&62; dependence upon particle mass and system size is consistent with larger transverse flow velocity at midrapidity for central collisions of Pb+Pb compared to that of S+S.

  14. Three-pion interferometry results from central Pb+Pb collisions at 158A GeV/c.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, M M; Agnihotri, A; Ahammed, Z; Angelis, A L; Antonenko, V; Arefiev, V; Astakhov, V; Avdeitchikov, V; Awes, T C; Baba, P V; Badyal, S K; Barlag, C; Bathe, S; Batiounia, B; Bernier, T; Bhalla, K B; Bhatia, V S; Blume, C; Bock, R; Bohne, E M; Böröcz, Z; Bucher, D; Buijs, A; Büsching, H; Carlen, L; Chalyshev, V; Chattopadhyay, S; Cherbatchev, R; Chujo, T; Claussen, A; Das, A C; Decowski, M P; Delagrange, H; Djordjadze, V; Donni, P; Doubovik, I; Dutt, S; Dutta Majumdar, M R; El Chenawi, K; Eliseev, S; Enosawa, K; Foka, P; Fokin, S; Ganti, M S; Garpman, S; Gavrishchuk, O; Geurts, F J; Ghosh, T K; Glasow, R; Gupta, S K; Guskov, B; Gustafsson, H A; Gutbrod, H H; Higuchi, R; Hrivnacova, I; Ippolitov, M; Kalechofsky, H; Kamermans, R; Kampert, K H; Karadjev, K; Karpio, K; Kato, S; Kees, S; Klein-Bösing, C; Knoche, S; Kolb, B W; Kosarev, I; Koutcheryaev, I; Krümpel, T; Kugler, A; Kulinich, P; Kurata, M; Kurita, K; Kuzmin, N; Langbein, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, Y Y; Löhner, H; Luquin, L; Mahapatra, D P; Manko, V; Martin, M; Martínez, G; Maximov, A; Mgebrichvili, G; Miake, Y; Mir, M F; Mishra, G C; Miyamoto, Y; Mohanty, B; Mora, M J; Morrison, D; Mukhopadhyay, D S; Naef, H; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Neumaier, S; Nianine, A; Nikitine, V; Nikolaev, S; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nomokonov, P; Nystrand, J; Obenshain, F E; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Pachr, M; Pavliouk, S; Peitzmann, T; Petracek, V; Pinganaud, W; Plasil, F; von Poblotzki, U; Purschke, M L; Rak, J; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ramamurthy, V S; Rao, N K; Retiere, F; Reygers, K; Roland, G; Rosselet, L; Roufanov, I; Roy, C; Rubio, J M; Sako, H; Sambyal, S S; Santo, R; Sato, S; Schlagheck, H; Schmidt, H R; Schutz, Y; Shabratova, G; Shah, T H; Sibiriak, I; Siemiarczuk, T; Silvermyr, D; Sinha, B C; Slavine, N; Söderström, K; Solomey, N; Sørensen, S P; Stankus, P; Stefanek, G; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Stüken, D; Sumbera, M; Svensson, T; Trivedi, M D; Tsvetkov, A; Tykarski, L; Urbahn, J; Pijll, E C; Eijndhoven, N; Nieuwenhuizen, G J; Vinogradov, A; Viyogi, Y P; Vodopianov, A; Vörös, S; Wysłouch, B; Yagi, K; Yokota, Y; Young, G R

    2000-10-01

    Three-particle correlations have been measured for identified pi(-) from central 158A GeV Pb+Pb collisions by the WA98 experiment at CERN. A substantial contribution of the genuine three-body correlation has been found as expected for a mainly chaotic and symmetric source. PMID:11005962

  15. Di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV Au + Au and d + Au collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, W.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, R.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Wu; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The STAR Collaboration presents for the first time two-dimensional di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV central Au + Au and minimum-bias d + Au collisions to explore hadronization mechanisms in the quark gluon plasma. The enhancement of the jet-like yield for leading pions in Au + Au data with respect to the d + Au reference and the absence of such an enhancement for leading non-pions (protons and kaons) are discussed within the context of a quark recombination scenario. The correlated yield at large angles, specifically in the ridge region, is found to be significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. The consistencies of the constituent quark scaling, azimuthal harmonic model and a mini-jet modification model description of the data are tested, providing further constraints on hadronization.

  16. The role of Ile87 of CYP158A2 in oxidative coupling reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Bin; Bellamine, Aouatef; Lei, Li; Waterman, Michael R.

    2012-05-15

    Both CYP158A1 and CYP158A2 are able to catalyze an oxidative C-C coupling reaction producing biflaviolin or triflaviolin in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). The substrate-bound crystal structures of CYP158A2 and CYP158A1 reveal that the side chain of Ile87 in CYP158A2 points to the active site contacting the distal flaviolin molecule, however, the bulkier side chain of Lys90 in CYP158A1 (corresponding to Ile87 in CYP158A2) is toward the distal surface of the protein. These results suggest that these residues could be important in determining product regiospecificity. In order to explore the role of the two residues in catalysis, the reciprocal mutants, Ile87Lys and Lys90Ile, of CYP158A2 and CYP158A1, respectively, were generated and characterized. The mutant Ile87Lys enzyme forms two isomers of biflaviolin instead of three isomers of biflaviolin in wild-type CYP158A2. CYP158A1 containing the substitution of lysine with isoleucine has the same catalytic activity compared with the wild-type CYP158A1. The crystal structure of Ile87Lys showed that the BC loop in the mutant is in a very different orientation compared with the BC loop in both CYP158A1/A2 structures. These results shed light on the mechanism of the oxidative coupling reaction catalyzed by cytochrome P450.

  17. Search for strangelets in Pb + Pb collisions at 158 A GeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenescu, R.; Baglin, C.; Beck, H. P.; Borer, K.; Bussière, A.; Elsener, K.; Gorodetzky, Ph; Guillaud, J. P.; Kabana, S.; Klingenberg, R.; Lehmann, G.; Lindén, T.; Lohmann, K. D.; Mommsen, R.; Moser, U.; Pretzl, K.; Schacher, J.; Spiwoks, R.; Tuominiemi, J.; Weber, M.

    2002-11-01

    The NA52 experiment at CERN has investigated lead-lead collisions at 158 A GeV/c and searched for long-lived strange quark matter droplets, so-called strangelets, with a unique signature of a high mass-to-charge ratio. This ratio was measured in a focusing spectrometer equipped with a time-of-flight system. A total of 3×1011 Pb + Pb interactions at positive and 1013 at negative spectrometer polarities have been recorded. No strangelet has been observed, which sets experimental upper limits (90% CL) for the strangelet production at 3×10-9 per interaction for positively charged and at 2×10-10 per interaction for negatively charged strangelets.

  18. New results from NA52 on particle production in Pb-Pb collisions at 158 A GeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenescu, R.; NA52 Collaboration; Ambrosini, G.; Arsenescu, R.; Baglin, C.; Beringer, J.; Bohm, C.; Borer, K.; Bussière, A.; Dittus, F.; Elsener, K.; Gorodetsky, Ph.; Guillaud, J. P.; Hess, P.; Kabana, S.; Klingenberg, R.; Lindén, T.; Lohmann, K. D.; Mommsen, R.; Moser, U.; Pretzl, K.; Schacher, J.; Selldén, B.; Stoffel, F.; Tuominiemi, J.; Weber, M.; Zhang, Q. P.

    1999-02-01

    We are presenting new results on and production in minimum bias lead-lead collisions at 158 A GeV/c. The measurements were performed at zero degree production angle and for a wide rapidity range. The analysis method used the full particle identification capabilities (time of flight, Cerenkov counters and hadronic calorimeter) of the spectrometer. We show K/ and ratios as a function of rapidity, as well as invariant particle production cross sections. As a particularity we observe near projectile rapidity an enhancement in the number of with respect to .

  19. Respiratory phenotypes are distinctly affected in mice with common Rett syndrome mutations MeCP2 T158A and R168X.

    PubMed

    Bissonnette, J M; Schaevitz, L R; Knopp, S J; Zhou, Z

    2014-05-16

    Respiratory disturbances are a primary phenotype of the neurological disorder, Rett syndrome (RTT), caused by mutations in the X-linked gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Mouse models generated with null mutations in Mecp2 mimic respiratory abnormalities in RTT girls. Large deletions, however, are seen in only ∼10% of affected human individuals. Here we characterized respiration in heterozygous females from two mouse models that genetically mimic common RTT point mutations, a missense mutation T158A (Mecp2(T158A/)(+)) or a nonsense mutation R168X (Mecp2(R168X/+)). MeCP2 T158A shows decreased binding to methylated DNA, while MeCP2 R168X retains the capacity to bind methylated DNA but lacks the ability to recruit complexes required for transcriptional repression. We found that both Mecp2(T158A/+) and Mecp2(R168X/+) heterozygotes display augmented hypoxic ventilatory responses and depressed hypercapnic responses, compared to wild-type controls. Interestingly, the incidence of apnea was much greater in Mecp2(R168X/+) heterozygotes, 189 per hour, than Mecp2(T158A/+) heterozygotes, 41 per hour. These results demonstrate that different RTT mutations lead to distinct respiratory phenotypes, suggesting that characterization of the respiratory phenotype may reveal functional differences between MeCP2 mutations and provide insights into the pathophysiology of RTT.

  20. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lead Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Lead Poisoning is Preventable If your home was built before ... of the RRP rule. Read more . Learn about Lead Poisoning Prevention Week . Report Uncertified Contractors and Environmental Violations ...

  1. Centrality dependence of ?, baryon and antibaryon production in Pb + Pb collisions at 158 A GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabana, Sonia; NA52 Collaboration; Ambrosini, G.; Arsenescu, R.; Baglin, C.; Beringer, J.; Borer, K.; Bussière, A.; Dittus, F.; Elsener, K.; Gorodetzky, Ph; Guillaud, J. P.; Hess, P.; Kabana, S.; Klingenberg, R.; Lindén, T.; Lohmann, K. D.; Mommsen, R.; Moser, U.; Pretzl, K.; Schacher, J.; Stoffel, F.; Tuominiemi, J.; Weber, M.

    1999-02-01

    We present new results of the CERN experiment NA52 on the centrality dependence of img23.gif, img24.gif, p, d, p and d production yields near zero transverse momentum and at several rapidities, from 64 img25.gif to 4 img25.gif of the total Pb + Pb cross section. Baryon yields increase nearly linearly and img24.gif yields faster than linearly with the number of participating nucleons img28.gif. The antibaryon yields increase less than linearly with img28.gif, indicating absorption. The centrality and rapidity dependence of the img30.gif ratio indicates Coulomb interaction of the pions with the projectile spectator protons. Within the framework of a coalescence model the radius of the particle source has been estimated from the ratios img31.gif and d /¯ img32.gif. The source radii are similar for matter and antimatter and are found to increase with img33.gif.

  2. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... obvious symptoms, it frequently goes unrecognized. CDC’s Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program is committed to the Healthy People ... Lead Levels Information for Parents Tips for preventing lead poisoning About Us Overview of CDC’s Childhood Lead Poisoning ...

  3. Next-to-Leading-Order QCD Correction to e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}+{eta}{sub c} at {radical}(s)=10.6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yujie; Gao Yingjia; Chao, K.-T.

    2006-03-10

    One of the most challenging open problems in heavy quarkonium physics is the double charm production in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at B factories. The measured cross section of e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}+{eta}{sub c} is much larger than leading order (LO) theoretical predictions. With the nonrelativistic QCD factorization formalism, we calculate the next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD correction to this process. Taking all one-loop self-energy, triangle, box, and pentagon diagrams into account, and factoring the Coulomb-singular term into the cc bound state wave function, we get an ultraviolet and infrared finite correction to the cross section of e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}+{eta}{sub c} at {radical}(s)=10.6 GeV. We find that the NLO QCD correction can substantially enhance the cross section with a K factor (the ratio of NLO to LO) of about 1.8-2.1; hence, it greatly reduces the large discrepancy between theory and experiment.

  4. Study of 232Th(n, γ) and 232Th(n,f) reaction rates in a graphite moderated spallation neutron field produced by 1.6 GeV deuterons on lead target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asquith, N. L.; Hashemi-Nezhad, S. R.; Westmeier, W.; Zhuk, I.; Tyutyunnikov, S.; Adam, J.

    2015-02-01

    The Gamma-3 assembly of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna, Russia is designed to emulate the neutron spectrum of a thermal Accelerator Driven System (ADS). It consists of a lead spallation target surrounded by reactor grade graphite. The target was irradiated with 1.6 GeV deuterons from the Nuclotron accelerator and the neutron capture and fission rate of 232Th in several locations within the assembly were experimentally measured. 232Th is a proposed fuel for envisaged Accelerator Driven Systems and these two reactions are fundamental to the performance and feasibility of 232Th in an ADS. The irradiation of the Gamma-3 assembly was also simulated using MCNPX 2.7 with the INCL4 intra-nuclear cascade and ABLA fission/evaporation models. Good agreement between the experimentally measured and calculated reaction rates was found. This serves as a good validation for the computational models and cross section data used to simulate neutron production and transport of spallation neutrons within a thermal ADS.

  5. The NA52 strangelet and particle search in Pb+Pb collisions at 158 A GeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M.; NA52 Collaboration; Arsenescu, R.; Baglin, C.; Beck, H. P.; Borer, K.; Bussière, A.; Elsener, K.; Gorodetzky, Ph; Guillaud, J. P.; Kabana, S.; Klingenberg, R.; Lehmann, G.; Lindén, T.; Lohmann, K. D.; Mommsen, R.; Moser, U.; Pretzl, K.; Schacher, J.; Spiwoks, R.; Tuominiemi, J.; Weber, M.

    2002-07-01

    The NA52 experiment searched for long-lived charged strangelets in 158 A GeV/c Pb+Pb collisions at CERN SPS. We collected 1013 Pb+Pb interactions looking for negatively charged strangelets and 3 × 1011 Pb+Pb interactions for positively charged ones. No evidence for the production of strangelets has been observed. The upper strangelet production limits are discussed. Besides the strangelet searches NA52 was able to identify particles and anti-particles over a wide range in rapidity. Results of the invariant differential particle production cross sections including fragments up to carbon and 5 0954-3899/28/7/347/hebar_1 are presented.

  6. Characterising the 750 GeV diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernon, Jérémy; Goudelis, Andreas; Kraml, Sabine; Mawatari, Kentarou; Sengupta, Dipan

    2016-05-01

    We study kinematic distributions that may help characterise the recently observed excess in diphoton events at 750 GeV at the LHC Run 2. Several scenarios are considered, including spin-0 and spin-2 750 GeV resonances that decay directly into photon pairs as well as heavier parent resonances that undergo three-body or cascade decays. We find that combinations of the distributions of the diphoton system and the leading photon can distinguish the topology and mass spectra of the different scenarios, while patterns of QCD radiation can help differentiate the production mechanisms. Moreover, missing energy is a powerful discriminator for the heavy parent scenarios if they involve (effectively) invisible particles. While our study concentrates on the current excess at 750 GeV, the analysis is general and can also be useful for characterising other potential diphoton signals in the future.

  7. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO 250 GEV

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) as the first high energy polarized proton collider was designed t o provide polarized proton collisions a t a maximum beam energy of 250 GeV. I t has been providing collisions a t a beam energy of 100 Gel' since 2001. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, polarization is preserved during the acceleration from injection to 100 GeV with careful control of the betatron tunes and the vertical orbit distortions. However, the intrinsic spin resonances beyond 100 GeV are about a factor of two stronger than those below 100 GeV? making it important t o examine the impact of these strong intrinsic spin resonances on polarization survival and the tolerance for vertical orbit distortions. Polarized protons were accelerated t o the record energy of 250 GeV in RHIC with a polarization of 46% measured a t top energy in 2006. The polarization measurement as a function of beam energy also shows some polarization loss around 136 GeV, the first strong intrinsic resonance above 100 GeV. This paper presents the results and discusses the sensitivity of the polarization survival t o orbit distortions.

  8. Beyond the MSSM Higgs bosons at 125 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjema, F.; Drieu La Rochelle, G.

    2012-07-01

    Beyond the MSSM framework is an effective theory approach that encapsulates a variety of extensions beyond the MSSM with which it shares the same field content. The lightest Higgs mass can be much heavier than in the MSSM without creating a tension with naturalness or requiring superheavy stops. The phenomenology of the Higgs sector is at the same time much richer. We critically review the properties of a Higgs with mass around 125 GeV in this model. In particular, we investigate how the rates in the important inclusive 2γ channel, the 2γ+2 jets and the ZZ→4l (and/or WW) can be enhanced or reduced compared to the standard model and what kind of correlations between these rates are possible. We consider both a vanilla model where stops have moderate masses with no trilinear stop mixing term and a model having a large stop mixing with a light stop. We show that in both cases there are scenarios that lead to enhancements in these rates at a mass of 125 GeV corresponding to either the lightest Higgs or the heaviest CP-even Higgs of the model. In all of these scenarios we study the prospects of finding other signatures of either the 125 GeV Higgs or those of the heavier Higgses. In most cases the τ¯τ channels are the most promising. Exclusion limits from the recent LHC Higgs searches are folded in our analyses while the tantalizing hints for a Higgs signal at 125 GeV are used as an example of how to constrain beyond the MSSM and/or direct future searches.

  9. Strangelet Search in Pb-Pb Interactions at 158 GeV /c per Nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelquist, G.; Baglin, C.; Beringer, J.; Bohm, C.; Borer, K.; Bussière, A.; Dittus, F.; Elsener, K.; Frei, D.; Gorodetzky, Ph.; Guillaud, J. P.; Hugentobler, E.; Klingenberg, R.; Lindén, T.; Lohmann, K. D.; Moser, U.; Pal, T.; Pretzl, K.; Schacher, J.; Selldén, B.; Stoffel, F.; Tuominiemi, J.; Zhang, Q. P.

    1996-05-01

    The NA52 experiment searches for long-lived massive strange quark matter particles, so-called strangelets, produced in Pb-Pb collisions at a beam momentum of plab = 158 A GeV/c. Upper limits for the production of strangelets at zero degree production angle covering a mass to charge ratio up to 120 GeV/c2 and lifetimes tlab>~1.2 μs are given. The data presented here were taken during the 1994 lead beam running period at CERN.

  10. Evaluation of dynamically downscaled extreme temperature using a spatially-aggregated generalized extreme value (GEV) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiali; Han, Yuefeng; Stein, Michael L.; Kotamarthi, Veerabhadra R.; Huang, Whitney K.

    2016-02-01

    The weather research and forecast (WRF) model downscaling skill in extreme maximum daily temperature is evaluated by using the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution. While the GEV distribution has been used extensively in climatology and meteorology for estimating probabilities of extreme events, accurately estimating GEV parameters based on data from a single pixel can be difficult, even with fairly long data records. This work proposes a simple method assuming that the shape parameter, the most difficult of the three parameters to estimate, does not vary over a relatively large region. This approach is applied to evaluate 31-year WRF-downscaled extreme maximum temperature through comparison with North American regional reanalysis (NARR) data. Uncertainty in GEV parameter estimates and the statistical significance in the differences of estimates between WRF and NARR are accounted for by conducting a novel bootstrap procedure that makes no assumption of temporal or spatial independence within a year, which is especially important for climate data. Despite certain biases over parts of the United States, overall, WRF shows good agreement with NARR in the spatial pattern and magnitudes of GEV parameter estimates. Both WRF and NARR show a significant increase in extreme maximum temperature over the southern Great Plains and southeastern United States in January and over the western United States in July. The GEV model shows clear benefits from the regionally constant shape parameter assumption, for example, leading to estimates of the location and scale parameters of the model that show coherent spatial patterns.

  11. Determination of the b-quark production cross section in p{anti p} collisions at 630 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.

    1997-10-01

    We present a preliminary measurement of the b-quark production cross section in p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 630 GeV. The analysis is based on 340 nb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We determine the ratio of the b-quark production cross sections at 630 GeV to 1800 GeV and compare our results with the CDF and UA1 measurements, and with the next-to- leading order QCD predictions.

  12. GeV electron microtron design report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, H. E.

    1982-05-01

    Rising interest in the nuclear physics community in a GeV CW electron accelerator reflects the growing importance of high resolution short-range nuclear physics to future advances in the field. Major current problems are reviewed and the details of prospective measurements which could be made with a GeV CW electron facility are discussed, together with their impact on an understanding of nuclear forces and the structure of nuclear matter. The microtron accelerator was chosen as the technology to generate the electron beams required for the research discussed because of the advantages of superior beam quality, low capital and operating cost and capability of furnishing beams of several energies and intensities simultaneously. A complete technical description of the conceptual design for a 2 GeV double-sided CW electron microtron is presented. The accelerator can furnish three beams with independently controlled energy and intensity.

  13. 750 GeV diphotons from a D3-brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckman, Jonathan J.

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by the recently reported diphoton excess at 750 GeV observed by both CMS and ATLAS, we study string-based particle physics models which can accommodate this signal. Quite remarkably, although Grand Unified Theories in F-theory tend to impose tight restrictions on candidate extra sectors, the case of a probe D3-brane near an E-type Yukawa point naturally leads to a class of strongly coupled models capable of accommodating the observed signature. In these models, the visible sector is realized by intersecting 7-branes, and the 750 GeV resonance is a scalar modulus associated with motion of the D3-brane in the direction transverse to the Standard Model 7-branes. Integrating out heavy 3-7 string messenger states leads to dimension five operators for gluon fusion production and diphoton decays. Due to the unified structure of interactions, these models also predict that there should be additional decay channels to ZZ and Zγ. We also comment on models with distorted unification, where both the production mechanism and decay channels can differ.

  14. A regional GEV scale-invariant framework for Intensity-Duration-Frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, J.; Ceresetti, D.; Molinié, G.; Creutin, J.-D.

    2016-09-01

    We propose in this paper a regional formulation of Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves of point-rainfall maxima in a scale-invariant Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) framework. The two assumptions we make is that extreme daily rainfall is GEV-distributed - which is justified by Extreme Value Theory (EVT) - and that extremes of aggregated daily rainfall follow simple-scaling relationships. Following these assumptions, we develop in a unified way a GEV simple-scaling model for extremes of aggregated daily rainfall over the range of durations where scaling applies. Then we propose a way of correcting this model for measurement frequency, giving a new GEV-scaling model for extremes of aggregated hourly rainfall. This model deviates from the simple-scaling assumption. This framework is applied to the Mediterranean region of Cévennes-Vivarais, France. A network of about 300 daily raingage stations covering the last 50 years and accumulated to span the range 1 day-1 week is used to fit the scale invariant GEV-model locally. By means of spatial interpolation of the model parameters, and correction for measurement frequency, we are able to build a regional model with good performances down to 1 h duration, even though only one hourly station is used to build the model. Finally we produce mean and return level maps within the region in the range 1 h-1 week and comment on the potential rain storms leading to these maps.

  15. Where Will LEAD Lead?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Louis

    After setting forth eight assumptions concerning the education of educational administrators, findings about the Leadership in Educational Administration Development (LEAD) program are discussed. The analysis is based on the first-year applications, telephone conversations with staff at a majority of the project sites, and additional material…

  16. TARGET FRAGMENT ENERGIES AND MOMENTA IN THE REACTION OF 4.8 GeV {sup 12}C AND 5.0 GeV {sup 20}Ne WITH {sup 238}U

    SciTech Connect

    Loveland, W.; Luo, Cheng; McGaughey, P. L.; Morrissey, D. J.; Seaborg, G. T.

    1980-10-01

    Target fragment recoil properties were measured using the thick target-thick catcher technique for the interaction of 4.8 GeV {sup 12}C and 5.0 GeV {sup 20}Ne with {sup 238}U. The target fragment energies and momenta are very similar for the reaction of 4.8 GeV (400 MeV/A) {sup 12}C and 5.0 GeV (250 MeV/A) {sup 20}Ne with {sup 238}U. In the complex variation of fragment momenta with their N/Z ratio, one finds evidence suggesting the existence of several mechanisms leading to the formation of the target fragments. Comparison of these results with the predictions of the intranuclear cascade model of Yariv and Fraenkel and the firestreak model shows that both model predictions grossly overestimate the target fragment momenta.

  17. LEADING WITH LEADING INDICATORS

    SciTech Connect

    PREVETTE, S.S.

    2005-01-27

    This paper documents Fluor Hanford's use of Leading Indicators, management leadership, and statistical methodology in order to improve safe performance of work. By applying these methods, Fluor Hanford achieved a significant reduction in injury rates in 2003 and 2004, and the improvement continues today. The integration of data, leadership, and teamwork pays off with improved safety performance and credibility with the customer. The use of Statistical Process Control, Pareto Charts, and Systems Thinking and their effect on management decisions and employee involvement are discussed. Included are practical examples of choosing leading indicators. A statistically based color coded dashboard presentation system methodology is provided. These tools, management theories and methods, coupled with involved leadership and employee efforts, directly led to significant improvements in worker safety and health, and environmental protection and restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites.

  18. Meson Spectroscopy At Jlab At 12 Gev

    SciTech Connect

    Fegan, Stuart

    2014-12-01

    The 12 GeV upgrade to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab will enable a new generation of experiments in hadronic nuclear physics, seeking to address fundamental questions in our understanding of QCD. The existence of exotic states, suggested by both quark models and lattice calculations, would allow gluonic degrees of freedom to be explored, and may help explain the role played by gluons in the QCD interaction. This article will review the meson spectroscopy program being planned at the lab following the 12 GeV upgrade, utilising real and quasi-real photon beams in two of the lab's four experimental halls, whose distinct capabilities will enable an extensive set of spectroscopy experiments to be performed at the same facility.

  19. Booster 6-GeV study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Pellico, William A.; Lackey, James; Padilla, Rene; Norem, James; /Argonne

    2005-05-01

    A wider aperture, which has been obtained along the Booster beam line recently, brings the opportunity to run beams with the intensity higher than ever before. Sooner or later, the available RF accelerating voltage will become a new limit for the beam intensity. Extra accelerating voltages can be achieved either by increasing the RFSUM or by reducing the accelerating rate via a slower acceleration, and this motivates the 6-GeV study.

  20. Booster 6-GeV study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Pellico, William A.; Lackey, James; Padilla, Rene; Norem, J.; /Argonne

    2004-12-01

    Since a wider aperture has been obtained along the Booster beam line, this opens the opportunity for Booster running a higher intensity beam than ever before. Sooner or later, the available RF accelerating voltage will become a new limit for the beam intensity. Either by increasing the RFSUM or by reducing the accelerating rate can achieve the similar goal. The motivation for the 6-GeV study is to gain the relative accelerating voltage via a slower acceleration.

  1. Measurement of D0, D+, Ds + and D*+ production in fixed target 920 GeV proton nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Adams, M.; Agari, M.; Albrecht, H.; Aleksandrov, A.; Amaral, V.; Amorim, A.; Aplin, S. J.; Aushev, V.; Bagaturia, Y.; Balagura, V.; Bargiotti, M.; Barsukova, O.; Bastos, J.; Batista, J.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, T. S.; Belkov, A.; Belkov, A.; Belotelov, I.; Bertin, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Böcker, M.; Bogatyrev, A.; Bohm, G.; Bräuer, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Bruschi, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buran, T.; Carvalho, J.; Conde, P.; Cruse, C.; Dam, M.; Danielsen, K. M.; Danilov, M.; de Castro, S.; Deppe, H.; Dong, X.; Dreis, H. B.; Egorytchev, V.; Ehret, K.; Eisele, F.; Emeliyanov, D.; Essenov, S.; Fabbri, L.; Faccioli, P.; Feuerstack-Raible, M.; Flammer, J.; Fominykh, B.; Funcke, M.; Garrido, L.; Gellrich, A.; Giacobbe, B.; Gläß, J.; Goloubkov, D.; Golubkov, Y.; Golutvin, A.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, I.; Gorišek, A.; Gouchtchine, O.; Goulart, D. C.; Gradl, S.; Gradl, W.; Grimaldi, F.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Guilitsky, Y.; Hansen, J. D.; Hernández, J. M.; Hofmann, W.; Hohlmann, M.; Hott, T.; Hulsbergen, W.; Husemann, U.; Igonkina, O.; Ispiryan, M.; Jagla, T.; Jiang, C.; Kapitza, H.; Karabekyan, S.; Karpenko, N.; Keller, S.; Kessler, J.; Khasanov, F.; Kiryushin, Y.; Kisel, I.; Klinkby, E.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kolanoski, H.; Korpar, S.; Krauss, C.; Kreuzer, P.; Križan, P.; Krücker, D.; Kupper, S.; Kvaratskheliia, T.; Lanyov, A.; Lau, K.; Lewendel, B.; Lohse, T.; Lomonosov, B.; Männer, R.; Mankel, R.; Masciocchi, S.; Massa, I.; Matchikhilian, I.; Medin, G.; Medinnis, M.; Mevius, M.; Michetti, A.; Mikhailov, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Muresan, R.; Zur Nedden, M.; Negodaev, M.; Nörenberg, M.; Nowak, S.; Núñez Pardo de Vera, M. T.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Padilla, C.; Peralta, D.; Pernack, R.; Pestotnik, R.; Petersen, B. A. A.; Piccinini, M.; Pleier, M. A.; Poli, M.; Popov, V.; Pose, D.; Prystupa, S.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Pyrlik, J.; Reeves, K.; Reßing, D.; Rick, H.; Riu, I.; Robmann, P.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rybnikov, V.; Sánchez, F.; Sbrizzi, A.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schreiner, A.; Schröder, H.; Schwanke, U.; Schwartz, A. J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Schwenninger, B.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sciacca, F.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Shuvalov, S.; Silva, L.; Škrk, D.; Sözüer, L.; Solunin, S.; Somov, A.; Somov, S.; Spengler, J.; Spighi, R.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanovnik, A.; Starič, M.; Stegmann, C.; Subramania, H. S.; Symalla, M.; Tikhomirov, I.; Titov, M.; Tsakov, I.; Uwer, U.; van Eldik, C.; Vassiliev, Y.; Villa, M.; Vitale, A.; Vukotic, I.; Wahlberg, H.; Walenta, A. H.; Walter, M.; Wang, J. J.; Wegener, D.; Werthenbach, U.; Wolters, H.; Wurth, R.; Wurz, A.; Xella-Hansen, S.; Zaitsev, Y.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zeuner, T.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Z.; Zimmermann, R.; Živko, T.; Zoccoli, A.

    2007-11-01

    The inclusive production cross sections of the charmed mesons D0,D+,Ds + and D*+ have been measured in interactions of 920 GeV protons on C, Ti, and W targets with the HERA-B detector at the HERA storage ring. Differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and Feynman’s x variable are given for the central rapidity region and for transverse momenta up to pT=3.5 GeV/ c. The atomic mass number dependence and the leading to non-leading particle production asymmetries are presented as well.

  2. Walking from 750 GeV to 950 GeV in the technipion zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Shinya; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    If the 750-GeV diphoton excess is identified with the color-singlet isosinglet technipion P0 (750) in the one-family walking technicolor model, as in our previous paper, then there should exist another color-singlet technipion-isotriplet one, P±,3, predicted at around 950 GeV independently of the dynamical details. The P±,3(950 ) are produced at the LHC via vector-boson and photon-fusion processes, predominantly decaying to W γ and γ γ , respectively. Those walking technicolor signals can be explored at run 2 or 3, which would further open the door for a plethora of other (colored) technipions.

  3. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Experiments Stories Lessons Topics Games Activities Lessons MENU Lead Poisoning Kids Homepage Topics Pollution Lead Poisoning What is ... you can avoid contact with it! Sources of Lead Poisoning HOUSE PAINTS: Before1950, lead-based paint was used ...

  4. Lead Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine lead sources, educating family members about lead poisoning , and instituting follow-up testing to monitor the ... high levels of lead, see the article on Lead Poisoning . The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has ...

  5. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Lead Poisoning What is it and who is affected? Lead is a highly toxic substance, exposure to which ... and children can suffer from the effects of lead poisoning, but childhood lead poisoning is much more frequent. ...

  6. LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATION BEYOND 1 GeV USING IONIZATION INDUCED INJECTION*

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, K A; Clayton, C E; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Mori, W B; Pak, A; silva, L O; Lemos, N; Fonseca, R A; de Freitas, S; Albert, F; Doeppner, T; Filip, C; Froula, D; Glenzer, S H; Price, D; Ralph, J; Pollock, B B

    2011-03-22

    A series of laser wake field accelerator experiments leading to electron energy exceeding 1 GeV are described. Theoretical concepts and experimental methods developed while conducting experiments using the 10 TW Ti:Sapphire laser at UCLA were implemented and transferred successfully to the 100 TW Callisto Laser System at the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL. To reach electron energies greater than 1 GeV with current laser systems, it is necessary to inject and trap electrons into the wake and to guide the laser for more than 1 cm of plasma. Using the 10 TW laser, the physics of self-guiding and the limitations in regards to pump depletion over cm-scale plasmas were demonstrated. Furthermore, a novel injection mechanism was explored which allows injection by ionization at conditions necessary for generating electron energies greater than a GeV. The 10 TW results were followed by self-guiding at the 100 TW scale over cm plasma lengths. The energy of the self-injected electrons, at 3 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} plasma density, was limited by dephasing to 720 MeV. Implementation of ionization injection allowed extending the acceleration well beyond a centimeter and 1.4 GeV electrons were measured.

  7. Commissioning and Operation of 12 GeV CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Freyberger, Arne P.

    2015-09-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) located at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) has been recently upgraded to deliver continuous electron beams to the experimental users at a maximum energy of 12 GeV, three times the original design energy of 4 GeV. This paper will present an overview of the upgrade, referred to as the 12GeV upgrade, and highlights from recent beam commissioning results.

  8. 100 GeV SLAC Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, Z. D.

    2002-03-01

    The SLAC beam energy can be increased from the current 50 GeV to 100 GeV, if we change the operating frequency from the present 2856 MHz to 11424 MHz, using technology developed for the NLC. We replace the power distribution system with a proposed NLC distribution system as shown in Fig. 1. The four 3 meter s-band 820 nS .ll time accelerator sections are replaced by six 2 meter x-band 120 nS .ll time sections. Thus the accelerator length per klystron retains the same length, 12 meters. The 4050 65MW- 3.5microS klystrons are replaced by 75MW-1.5microS permanent magnet klystrons developed here and in Japan. The present input to the klystrons would be multiplied by a factor of 4 and possibly ampli.ed. The SLED cavities have to be replaced. The increase in beam voltage is due to the higher elastance to group velocity ratio, higher compression ratio and higher unloaded to external Q ratio of the new SLED cavities. The average power input is reduced because of the narrower klystron pulse width and because the klystron electro-magnets are replaced by permanent magnets.

  9. A 100 GeV SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Zoltan D

    2002-03-07

    The SLAC beam energy can be increased from the current 50 GeV to 100 GeV, if we change the operating frequency from the present 2856 MHz to 11424 MHz, using technology developed for the NLC. We replace the power distribution system with a proposed NLC distribution system as shown in Fig. 1. The four 3 meter s-band 820 nS fill time accelerator sections are replaced by six 2 meter x-band 120 nS fill time sections. Thus the accelerator length per klystron retains the same length, 12 meters. The 4050 65MW-3.5 {micro}S klystrons are replaced by 75MW-1.5 {micro}S permanent magnet klystrons developed here and in Japan. The present input to the klystrons would be multiplied by a factor of 4 and possibly amplified. The SLED [1] cavities have to be replaced. The increase in beam voltage is due to the higher elastance to group velocity ratio, higher compression ratio and higher unloaded to external Q ratio of the new SLED cavities. The average power input is reduced because of the narrower klystron pulse width and because the klystron electro-magnets are replaced by permanent magnets.

  10. Lead Toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... homes. • Most people, especially children, who suffer from lead poisoning are exposed through lead-contaminated household dust or ... and six if they are at risk of lead poisoning (see: ). Who can I call to get more ...

  11. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be found in all parts of our environment. Much of it comes from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may still have lead paint. You could be exposed to lead by Eating food or drinking water that contains lead. Water pipes in older homes ...

  12. Lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Rekus, J.F.

    1992-08-01

    Construction workers who weld, cut or blast structural steel coated with lead-based paint are at significant risk of lead poisoning. Although technology to control these exposures may not have existed when the lead standard was promulgated, it is available today. Employers who do not take steps to protect their employees from lead exposure may be cited and fined severely for their failure.

  13. 3 GeV Injector Design Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-12-16

    This Design Handbook is intended to be the main reference book for the specifications of the 3 GeV SPEAR booster synchrotron project. It is intended to be a consistent description of the project including design criteria, key technical specifications as well as current design approaches. Since a project is not complete till it's complete changes and modifications of early conceptual designs must be expected during the duration of the construction. Therefore, this Design Handbook is issued as a loose leaf binder so that individual sections can be replaced as needed. Each page will be dated to ease identification with respect to latest revisions. At the end of the project this Design Handbook will have become the 'as built' reference book of the injector for operations and maintenance personnel.

  14. Predicted CALET measurements of electron and positron spectra from 3 to 20 GeV using the geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, B. F.

    2014-05-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is an imaging calorimeter under construction for launch to the ISS in 2014 for a planned 5 year mission. CALET consists of a charge detection module (CHD) with two segmented planes of 1 cm thick plastic scintillator, an imaging calorimeter (IMC) with a total of 3 radiation lengths (X∘) of tungsten plates read out with 8 planes of interleaved scintillating fibers, and a total absorption calorimeter (TASC) with 27 X∘ of lead tungstate (PWO) logs. The primary objectives of the experiment are to measure the electron e+e energy spectra from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, to detect gamma-rays above 10 GeV, and to measure the energy spectra of nuclei from protons through iron up to 1000 TeV. In this paper we describe how the geomagnetic field at the 51.6° inclination orbit of the ISS can be used to allow CALET to measure the distinct electron and positron fluxes. The positron fraction has been seen to rise above ˜10 GeV by previous experiments (HEAT, AMS-01), and more recently to continue to increase to higher energies (˜80 GeV for PAMELA, ˜200 GeV for Fermi and ˜350 GeV with the best statistics for AMS-02). Utilizing the geomagnetic cutoff, CALET will be able to distinguish electrons and positrons in the ˜3-20 GeV energy range where the positron fraction turns upward to complement existing high statistics measurements.

  15. ON THE ORIGIN OF > 10 GeV PHOTONS IN GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiangyu; Liu Ruoyu; Lemoine, Martin

    2013-07-10

    Fermi/LAT has detected long-lasting high-energy photons (>100 MeV) from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), with the highest energy photons reaching about 100 GeV. One proposed scenario is that they are produced by high-energy electrons accelerated in GRB forward shocks via synchrotron radiation. We study the maximum synchrotron photon energy in this scenario, considering the properties of the microturbulence magnetic fields behind the shock, as revealed by recent particle-in-cell simulations and theoretical analyses of relativistic collisionless shocks. Due to the small-scale nature of the microturbulent magnetic field, the Bohm acceleration approximation, in which the scattering mean free path is equal to the particle Larmor radius, breaks down at such high energies. This effect leads to a typical maximum synchrotron photon of a few GeV at 100 s after the burst and this maximum synchrotron photon energy decreases quickly with time. We show that the fast decrease of the maximum synchrotron photon energy leads to a fast decay of the synchrotron flux. The 10-100 GeV photons detected after the prompt phase cannot be produced by the synchrotron mechanism. They could originate from the synchrotron self-Compton emission of the early afterglow if the circumburst density is sufficiently large, or from the external inverse Compton process in the presence of central X-ray emission, such as X-ray flares and prompt high-latitude X-ray emission.

  16. 750 GeV diphoton excess from E6 in F-theory GUTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karozas, Athanasios; King, Stephen F.; Leontaris, George K.; Meadowcroft, Andrew K.

    2016-06-01

    We interpret the 750-760 GeV diphoton resonance as one or more of the spinless components of a singlet superfield arising from the three 27-dimensional representations of E6 in F-theory, which also contain three copies of colour-triplet charge ∓ 1 / 3 vector-like fermions Di ,Dbari and inert Higgs doublets to which the singlets may couple. For definiteness we consider (without change) a model that was proposed some time ago which contains such states, as well as bulk exotics, leading to gauge coupling unification. The smoking gun prediction of the model is the existence of other similar spinless resonances, possibly close in mass to 750-760 GeV, decaying into diphotons, as well as the three families of vector-like fermions Di ,Dbari.

  17. Diffractive dijet production at sqrt[s] = 630 and 1800 GeV at the Fermilab Tevatron.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Albrow, M G; Amaral, P; Ambrose, D; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berge, J P; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bonushkin, Y; Borras, K; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; van den Brink, S; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Buckley-Geer, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byon-Wagner, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Colijn, A P; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Cropp, R; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Done, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Elias, J E; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Fan, Q; Fang, H-C; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Giannetti, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldstein, J; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Grim, G; Gris, P; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Hao, W; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Ivanov, A; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Karr, K; Kartal, S; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, A M; Lee, K; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N S; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, A; Matthews, J A J; Mayer, J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Moore, C; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Popovic, M; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Renton, P; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Robinson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sato, H; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Sedov, A; Segler, S; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Singh, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, C; Snider, F D; Solodsky, A; Spalding, J; Speer, T; Sphicas, P; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Spiegel, L; Steele, J; Stefanini, A; Strologas, J; Strumia, F; Stuart, D; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, T; Takano, T; Takashima, R; Takikawa, K; Tamburello, P; Tanaka, M; Tannenbaum, B; Tecchio, M; Tesarek, R J; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thurman-Keup, R; Tipton, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tollestrup, A; Tonelli, D; Toyoda, H; Trischuk, W; de Troconiz, J F; Tseng, J; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vaiciulis, T; Valls, J; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Vucinic, D; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wallace, N B; Wan, Z; Wang, C; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Watanabe, T; Waters, D; Watts, T; Webb, R; Wenzel, H; Wester, W C; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilkes, T; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Winn, D; Wolbers, S; Wolinski, D; Wolinski, J; Wolinski, S; Worm, S; Wu, X; Wyss, J; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yeh, P; Yoh, J; Yosef, C; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Zanetti, A; Zetti, F; Zucchelli, S

    2002-04-15

    We report a measurement of the diffractive structure function F(D)(jj) of the antiproton obtained from a study of dijet events produced in association with a leading antiproton in pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 630 GeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The ratio of F(D)(jj) at sqrt[s] = 630 GeV to F(D)(jj) obtained from a similar measurement at sqrt[s] = 1800 GeV is compared with expectations from QCD factorization and other theoretical predictions. We also report a measurement of the xi ( x-Pomeron) and beta ( x of parton in Pomeron) dependence of F(D)(jj) at sqrt[s] = 1800 GeV. In the region 0.035GeV2, and beta<0.5, F(D)(jj)(beta,xi) is found to be of the form beta(-1.0+/-0.1)xi(-0.9+/-0.1), which obeys beta-xi factorization.

  18. Diffractive dijet production at sqrt[s] = 630 and 1800 GeV at the Fermilab Tevatron.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Albrow, M G; Amaral, P; Ambrose, D; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berge, J P; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bonushkin, Y; Borras, K; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; van den Brink, S; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Buckley-Geer, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byon-Wagner, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Colijn, A P; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Cropp, R; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Done, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Elias, J E; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Fan, Q; Fang, H-C; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Giannetti, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldstein, J; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Grim, G; Gris, P; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Hao, W; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Ivanov, A; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Karr, K; Kartal, S; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, A M; Lee, K; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N S; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, A; Matthews, J A J; Mayer, J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Moore, C; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Popovic, M; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Renton, P; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Robinson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sato, H; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Sedov, A; Segler, S; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Singh, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, C; Snider, F D; Solodsky, A; Spalding, J; Speer, T; Sphicas, P

    2002-04-15

    We report a measurement of the diffractive structure function F(D)(jj) of the antiproton obtained from a study of dijet events produced in association with a leading antiproton in pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 630 GeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The ratio of F(D)(jj) at sqrt[s] = 630 GeV to F(D)(jj) obtained from a similar measurement at sqrt[s] = 1800 GeV is compared with expectations from QCD factorization and other theoretical predictions. We also report a measurement of the xi ( x-Pomeron) and beta ( x of parton in Pomeron) dependence of F(D)(jj) at sqrt[s] = 1800 GeV. In the region 0.035GeV2, and beta<0.5, F(D)(jj)(beta,xi) is found to be of the form beta(-1.0+/-0.1)xi(-0.9+/-0.1), which obeys beta-xi factorization. PMID:11955190

  19. Lead poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Landrigan, P J; Todd, A C

    1994-01-01

    Lead poisoning is the most common disease of environmental origin in the United States today. Adult lead poisoning results primarily from exposure by inhalation in the workplace. Pediatric lead poisoning results principally from the ingestion of lead from environmental media, including paint chips, dust, soil, drinking water, ceramics, and medications. Lead is toxic to many organ systems, among them developing erythrocytes, the kidneys, and the nervous system. Lead-induced toxicity to the central nervous system causes delayed development, diminished intelligence, and altered behavior. In young children, this effect has been demonstrated convincingly to occur at blood lead levels between 10 and 20 micrograms per dl. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended that a blood lead level of 10 micrograms per dl or higher be considered evidence of increased lead absorption, and the National Academy of Sciences has concurred in that recommendation. Unresolved issues in need of further study include the frequency of screening young children for lead, the question of whether women should be offered screening for lead before conceiving a pregnancy, the role of x-ray fluorescence analysis in assessing lead in bone, and the appropriate legislative response of the United States government to lead-based paint abatement. PMID:7941534

  20. Lead poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... lead is still found in some modern faucets. Soil contaminated by decades of car exhaust or years ... house paint scrapings. Lead is more common in soil near highways and houses. Hobbies involving soldering, stained ...

  1. The lead-glass electromagnetic calorimeter for the SELEX experiment

    SciTech Connect

    M. Y. Balatz et al.

    2004-07-19

    A large-acceptance, highly segmented electromagnetic lead glass calorimeter for Experiment E781 (SELEX) at Fermi National Acceleration Laboratory was designed and built. This detector has been used to reconstruct photons and electrons with energies ranging from few GeV up to 500 GeV in the collisions of the 650 GeV {Sigma}{sup -} hyperons and {pi}{sup -} mesons with the target nucleons. The design, calibration and performance of the calorimeter are described. Energy resolution and position resolution are assessed using both calibration electron beams and {pi}{sup 0} mesons reconstructed in 650 GeV hadron-hadron interactions. The performance of the calorimeter in selecting resonant states that involve photons is demonstrated.

  2. Interpreting 750 GeV diphoton excess in plain NMSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badziak, Marcin; Olechowski, Marek; Pokorski, Stefan; Sakurai, Kazuki

    2016-09-01

    NMSSM has enough ingredients to explain the diphoton excess at 750 GeV: singlet-like (pseudo) scalar (a) s and higgsinos as heavy vector-like fermions. We consider the production of the 750 GeV singlet-like pseudo scalar a from a decay of the doublet-like pseudo scalar A, and the subsequent decay of a into two photons via higgsino loop. We demonstrate that this cascade decay of the NMSSM Higgs bosons can explain the diphoton excess at 750 GeV.

  3. Evidence for the 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying to a pair of $\\tau$ leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-01-20

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson decaying into a pair of tau leptons is performed using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2011 and 2012. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse femtobarns at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 19.7 inverse femtobarns at 8 TeV. Each tau lepton decays hadronically or leptonically to an electron or a muon, leading to six different final states for the tau-lepton pair, all considered in this analysis. An excess of events is observed over the expected background contributions, with a local significance larger than 3 standard deviations for m[H] values between 115 and 130 GeV. The best fit of the observed H to tau tau signal cross section for m[H] = 125 GeV is 0.78 +- 0.27 times the standard model expectation. These observations constitute evidence for the 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying to a pair of tau leptons.

  4. Evidence for the 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying to a pair of $$\\tau$$ leptons

    DOE PAGES

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-01-20

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson decaying into a pair of tau leptons is performed using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2011 and 2012. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse femtobarns at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 19.7 inverse femtobarns at 8 TeV. Each tau lepton decays hadronically or leptonically to an electron or a muon, leading to six different final states for the tau-lepton pair, all considered in this analysis. An excess of events is observed over the expected background contributions, with a local significance largermore » than 3 standard deviations for m[H] values between 115 and 130 GeV. The best fit of the observed H to tau tau signal cross section for m[H] = 125 GeV is 0.78 +- 0.27 times the standard model expectation. These observations constitute evidence for the 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying to a pair of tau leptons.« less

  5. X-Ray Counterparts of Puzzling Gev-Tev Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargaltsev, Oleg

    2014-09-01

    We propose to look for X-ray counterparts of the extended TeV source HESS J1616-508 that may also have been detected with Fermi at GeV energies. The nature of the source and the connection between the TeV source and the nearby GeV sources are unknown. It has been suggested that it may be a relic plerion powered by the offset PSR J1617-5055, but a deep Chandra observation of this pulsar and its wind nebula has not confirmed this hypothesis. To understand the nature of this long-standing "dark accelerator", we propose to observe the GeV sources (which could be young pulsars) and another nearby young pulsar (J1614-5048) to check whether or not they could supply relativistic particles and power the TeV source. We will also explore the nature of the GeV sources.

  6. Leading Democratically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookfield, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Democracy is the most venerated of American ideas, the one for which wars are fought and people die. So most people would probably agree that leaders should be able to lead well in a democratic society. Yet, genuinely democratic leadership is a relative rarity. Leading democratically means viewing leadership as a function or process, rather than…

  7. 3 GeV RCS at the JKJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Fumiaki

    2002-12-01

    3GeV RCS at the JAERI-KEK joint project (JKJ) is a rapid cycling synchrotron designed for high intensity proton beam. The designed output power is 1MW with a repetition rate of 25 Hz. In this paper, the outline of 3GeV RCS, key issues to achieve the goal, R&D status and time schedule of construction are reported.

  8. Mass of the lightest supersymmetric Higgs boson beyond the leading logarithm approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kodaira, J.; Yasui, Y. ); Sasaki, K. )

    1994-12-01

    We examine the radiative corrections to the mass of the lightest Higgs boson in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model. We use the renormalization-group-improved effective potential which includes the next-to-leading-order contributions. We find that the higher-order corrections to the lightest Higgs boson mass are non-negligible, adding 3--11 GeV (3--9 GeV) to the result in the leading logarithm approximation for the range of top quark mass 100 GeV [lt][ital m][sub [ital t

  9. LEAD STUDIES

    PubMed Central

    Aub, Joseph C.; Reznikoff, Paul; Smith, Dorothea E.

    1924-01-01

    It appears, from the investigations in other laboratories, that the anemia observed in cases of lead poisoning is due to destruction of blood rather than to diminished production of blood. The method of poisoning cells in vitro with lead was adopted in order to study this phenomenon, and distinct effects were thereby obtained, even when only 0.001 mg. of lead is added to approximately 5 billion washed red corpuscles. In order to obtain optimum results the usual dosage employed was ten times this or 0.01 mg. per 5 billion cells. The following changes were observed in cells so treated. 1. Such a marked increase in the resistance to hypotonic salt solution develops that complete hemolysis does not occur until the cells are exposed to a saline solution of 0.05 per cent. Untreated cells are completely hemolyzed in 0.25 or 0.225 per cent saline. 2. This reaction is quantitative and varies with the concentration of lead used. Under the conditions of our experiments this phenomenon seems to be unique. The effects of arsenic are very slight in comparison. 3. While from this reaction it may be concluded that lead increases cellular resistance, it also appears that it shortens the life of blood cells. This may be demonstrated by the much more rapid appearance of hemolysis than normal when the cells are merely allowed to stand in Ringer solution of any dilution. 4. In rabbits with acute lead poisoning these same phenomena may be noted in vivo. 5. Both phenomena may be changed in vitro by varying the time and temperature of the reaction and the concentration of lead, as Fici has already pointed out. 6. If normal cells stand in Ringer solution for 6 hours something diffuses into the solution which largely reduces the action of lead. After repeated washing these cells react with lead in the usual manner. 7. Small amounts of serum react with lead and eliminate its effects. Red blood cells, treated with a mixture of lead and blood serum, show normal hemolysis in hypotonic salt

  10. The weak bound state with the non-zero charge density as the LHC 126.5 GeV state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syska, J.

    2016-09-01

    The self-consistent model of classical field interactions formulated as the counterpart of the quantum electroweak model leads to homogeneous boson ground state solutions in presence of non-zero extended fermionic charge density fluctuations. Two different types of electroweak configurations of fields are analyzed. The first one has non-zero electric and weak charge fluctuations. The second one is electrically uncharged but weakly charged. Both types of configurations have two physically interesting solutions which possess masses equal to 126.67 GeV at the value of the scalar fluctuation potential parameter λ equal to ~0.0652. The spin zero electrically uncharged droplet formed as a result of the decay of the charged one is interpreted as the ~126.5 GeV state found in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiment. (The other two configurations correspond to solutions with masses equal to 123.7 GeV and λ equal to ~0.0498 and thus the algebraic mean of the masses of two central solutions, i.e., 126.67 GeV and 123.7 GeV, is equal to 125.185 GeV.) The problem of a mass of this kind of droplets will be considered on the basis of the phenomenon of the screening of the fluctuation of charges. Their masses are found in the thin wall approximation.

  11. SPIN Effects, QCD, and Jefferson Laboratory with 12 GeV electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexey

    2013-11-01

    QCD and Spin physics are playing important role in our understanding of hadron structure. I will give a short overview of origin of hadron structure in QCD and highlight modern understanding of the subject. Jefferson Laboratory is undergoing an upgrade that will increase the energy of electron beam up to 12 GeV. JLab is one of the leading facilities in nuclear physics studies and once operational in 2015 JLab 12 will be crucial for future of nuclear physics. I will briefly discuss future studies in four experimental halls of Jefferson Lab.

  12. Ecotoxicology: Lead

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheuhammer, A.M.; Beyer, W.N.; Schmitt, C.J.; Jorgensen, Sven Erik; Fath, Brian D.

    2008-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a naturally occurring metallic element; trace concentrations are found in all environmental media and in all living things. However, certain human activities, especially base metal mining and smelting; combustion of leaded gasoline; the use of Pb in hunting, target shooting, and recreational angling; the use of Pb-based paints; and the uncontrolled disposal of Pb-containing products such as old vehicle batteries and electronic devices have resulted in increased environmental levels of Pb, and have created risks for Pb exposure and toxicity in invertebrates, fish, and wildlife in some ecosystems.

  13. Tetraethyl lead

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Tetraethyl lead ; CASRN 78 - 00 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  14. Characterization of Lead Tungstate for Neutral Particle Spectrometer at 12 GeV JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runyon, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Precision measurements of the deeply-virtual Compton scattering cross section at different beam energies to extract the real part of the Compton form factor, measurements to push the energy scale of real Compton scattering, and measurements of the basic semi-inclusive neutral-pion cross section in a kinematical region where the QCD factorization scheme is expected to hold all have something in common: the need for detecting neutral particles with high precision and high luminosity. The Neutral Particle Spectrometer (NPS) is a crystal electromagnetic calorimeter preceded by a sweeping magnet to sweep away charged particles. In this presentation I will show the results of PbWO4 crystal quality studies for the NPS. PbWO4 is optimal for the NPS due to its small Moliere radius and radiation hardness. The critical aspect for crystal quality, and thus resolution/precision, is the combination of high light output and radiation hardness, which depend strongly on the manufacturing process. We have tested the performance of PbWO4 crystals, and in particular, measured their light yield, optical transmission, and uniformity and radiation hardness. The homogeneity of the crystal was investigated based on the variation of the transverse optical transmission. Supported in part by NSF-PHY-1306227.

  15. Centrality dependence of direct photon production in (square root)S(NN) = 200 GeV Au + Au collisions.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2005-06-17

    The first measurement of direct photons in Au + Au collisions at (square root)S(NN) = 200 GeV is presented. The direct photon signal is extracted as a function of the Au + Au collision centrality and compared to next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. The direct photon yield is shown to scale with the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions for all centralities.

  16. RHIC 100 GeV Polarized Proton Luminosity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-01-17

    A big problem in RHIC 100 GeV proton run 2009 was the significantly lower luminosity lifetime than all previous runs. It is shown in this note that the beam intensity decay in run 2009 is caused by the RF voltage ramping in store. It is also shown that the beam decay is not clearly related to the beam momentum spread, therefore, not directly due to the 0.7m. β* Furthermore, the most important factor regarding the low luminosity lifetime is the faster transverse emittance growth in store, which is also much worse than the previous runs, and is also related to the RF ramping. In 100 GeV proton run 2012a, the RF ramping was abandoned, but the β* was increased to 0.85m, with more than 20% loss of luminosity, which is not necessary. It is strongly suggested to use smaller β* in 100 GeV polarized proton run 2015/2016

  17. CEBAF SRF Performance during Initial 12 GeV Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna; Allison, Trent; Daly, Edward; Drury, Michael; Hovater, J; Lahti, George; Mounts, Clyde; Nelson, Richard; Plawski, Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV includes the installation of eleven new 100 MV cryomodules (88 cavities). The superconducting RF cavities are designed to operate CW at an accelerating gradient of 19.3 MV/m with a QL of 3×107. Not all the cavities were operated at the minimum gradient of 19.3 MV/m with the beam. Though the initial 12 GeV milestones were achieved during the initial commissioning of CEBAF, there are still some issues to be addressed for long term reliable operation of these modules. This paper reports the operational experiences during the initial commissioning and the path forward to improve the performance of C100 (100 MV) modules.

  18. The 6 GeV TMD Program at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Puckett, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs) of the nucleon in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has emerged as one of the major physics motivations driving the experimental program using the upgraded 11 GeV electron beam at Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). The accelerator construction phase of the CEBAF upgrade is essentially complete and commissioning of the accelerator has begun as of April, 2014. As the new era of CEBAF operations begins, it is appropriate to review the body of published and forthcoming results on TMDs from the 6 GeV era of CEBAF operations, discuss what has been learned, and discuss the key challenges and opportunities for the 11 GeV SIDIS program of CEBAF.

  19. The Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    R.D. McKeown

    2010-09-01

    Construction of the 12 GeV upgrade to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is presently underway. This upgrade includes doubling the energy of the electron beam to 12 GeV, the addition of a new fourth experimental hall, and the construction of upgraded detector hardware. An overview of this upgrade project is presented, along with highlights of the anticipated experimental program. The 12 GeV upgrade project at Jefferson Lab will enable a powerful new experimental program that will advance our understanding of the quark/gluon structure of hadronic matter, the nature of Quantum Chromodynamics, and the properties of a new extended standard model of particle interactions. Commissioning of the upgraded beam will be begin in 2013, and the full complement of upgraded experimental equipment will be completed in 2015. This unique facility will provide many opportunities for exploration and discovery for a large international community of nuclear scientists.

  20. The 6 GeV TMD Program at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The study of the transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs) of the nucleon in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has emerged as one of the major physics motivations driving the experimental program using the upgraded 11 GeV electron beam at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). The accelerator construction phase of the CEBAF upgrade is essentially complete and commissioning of the accelerator has begun as of April, 2014. As the new era of CEBAF operations begins, it is appropriate to review the body of published and forthcoming results on TMDs from the 6 GeV era of CEBAF operations, discuss what has been learned, and discuss the key challenges and opportunities for the 11 GeV SIDIS program of CEBAF.

  1. The ETFDH c.158A>G variation disrupts the balanced interplay of ESE- and ESS-binding proteins thereby causing missplicing and multiple Acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Rikke K J; Brøner, Sabrina; Sabaratnam, Rugivan; Doktor, Thomas K; Andersen, Henriette S; Bruun, Gitte H; Gahrn, Birthe; Stenbroen, Vibeke; Olpin, Simon E; Dobbie, Angus; Gregersen, Niels; Andresen, Brage S

    2014-01-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency is a disorder of fatty acid and amino acid oxidation caused by defects of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or its dehydrogenase (ETFDH). A clear relationship between genotype and phenotype makes genotyping of patients important not only diagnostically but also for prognosis and for assessment of treatment. In the present study, we show that a predicted benign ETFDH missense variation (c.158A>G/p.Lys53Arg) in exon 2 causes exon skipping and degradation of ETFDH protein in patient samples. Using splicing reporter minigenes and RNA pull-down of nuclear proteins, we show that the c.158A>G variation increases the strength of a preexisting exonic splicing silencer (ESS) motif UAGGGA. This ESS motif binds splice inhibitory hnRNP A1, hnRNP A2/B1, and hnRNP H proteins. Binding of these inhibitory proteins prevents binding of the positive splicing regulatory SRSF1 and SRSF5 proteins to nearby and overlapping exonic splicing enhancer elements and this causes exon skipping. We further suggest that binding of hnRNP proteins to UAGGGA is increased by triggering synergistic hnRNP H binding to GGG triplets located upstream and downsteam of the UAGGGA motif. A number of disease-causing exonic elements that induce exon skipping in other genes have a similar architecture as the one in ETFDH exon 2. PMID:24123825

  2. Estimating changes in temperature extremes from millennial-scale climate simulations using generalized extreme value (GEV) distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Whitney K.; Stein, Michael L.; McInerney, David J.; Sun, Shanshan; Moyer, Elisabeth J.

    2016-07-01

    Changes in extreme weather may produce some of the largest societal impacts of anthropogenic climate change. However, it is intrinsically difficult to estimate changes in extreme events from the short observational record. In this work we use millennial runs from the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) in equilibrated pre-industrial and possible future (700 and 1400 ppm CO2) conditions to examine both how extremes change in this model and how well these changes can be estimated as a function of run length. We estimate changes to distributions of future temperature extremes (annual minima and annual maxima) in the contiguous United States by fitting generalized extreme value (GEV) distributions. Using 1000-year pre-industrial and future time series, we show that warm extremes largely change in accordance with mean shifts in the distribution of summertime temperatures. Cold extremes warm more than mean shifts in the distribution of wintertime temperatures, but changes in GEV location parameters are generally well explained by the combination of mean shifts and reduced wintertime temperature variability. For cold extremes at inland locations, return levels at long recurrence intervals show additional effects related to changes in the spread and shape of GEV distributions. We then examine uncertainties that result from using shorter model runs. In theory, the GEV distribution can allow prediction of infrequent events using time series shorter than the recurrence interval of those events. To investigate how well this approach works in practice, we estimate 20-, 50-, and 100-year extreme events using segments of varying lengths. We find that even using GEV distributions, time series of comparable or shorter length than the return period of interest can lead to very poor estimates. These results suggest caution when attempting to use short observational time series or model runs to infer infrequent extremes.

  3. Shielding Design Aspects of SR Beamlines for 3-GeV And 8-GeV Class Synchrotron Radiation Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Yoshihiro; Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed; /SLAC

    2007-09-24

    Differences in synchrotron radiation beamline shielding design between the facilities of 3 GeV class and 8 GeV class are discussed with regard to SLAC SSRL and SPring-8 beamlines. Requirements of beamline shielding as well as the accelerator shielding depend on the stored electron energy, and here some factors in beamline shielding depending on the stored energy in particular, are clarified, namely the effect of build up, the effect of double scattering of photons at branch beamlines, and the spread of gas bremsstrahlung.

  4. E6 inspired SUSY benchmarks, dark matter relic density and a 125 GeV Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athron, Peter; Harries, Dylan; Nevzorov, Roman; Williams, Anthony G.

    2016-09-01

    We explore the relic density of dark matter and the particle spectrum within a constrained version of an E6 inspired SUSY model with an extra U(1)N gauge symmetry. In this model a single exact custodial symmetry forbids tree-level flavor-changing transitions and the most dangerous baryon and lepton number violating operators. We present a set of benchmark points showing scenarios that have a SM-like Higgs mass of 125 GeV and sparticle masses above the LHC limits. They lead to striking new physics signatures which may be observed during run II of the LHC and can distinguish this model from the simplest SUSY extensions of the SM. At the same time these benchmark scenarios are consistent with the measured dark matter abundance and necessarily lead to large dark matter direct detection cross sections close to current limits and observable soon at the XENON1T experiment.

  5. The JLAB 12 GeV Energy Upgrade of CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, Leigh H.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation should describe the progress of the 12GeV Upgrade of CEBAF at Jefferson Lab. The status of the upgrade should be presented as well as details on the construction, procurement, installation and commissioning of the magnet and SRF components of the upgrade.

  6. 12 GeV detector technology at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Leckey, John P.; Collaboration: GlueX Collaboration

    2013-04-19

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) is presently in the middle of an upgrade to increase the energy of its CW electron beam from 6 GeV to 12 GeV along with the addition of a fourth experimental hall. Driven both by necessity and availability, novel detectors and electronics modules have been used in the upgrade. One such sensor is the Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM), specifically a Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC), which is an array of avalanche photodiode pixels operating in Geiger mode that are used to sense photons. The SiPMs replace conventional photomultiplier tubes and have several distinct advantages including the safe operation in a magnetic field and the lack of need for high voltage. Another key to 12 GeV success is advanced fast electronics. Jlab will use custom 250 MHz and 125 MHz 12-bit analog to digital converters (ADCs) and time to digital converters (TDCs) all of which take advantage of VME Switched Serial (VXS) bus with its GB/s high bandwidth readout capability. These new technologies will be used to readout drift chambers, calorimeters, spectrometers and other particle detectors at Jlab once the 12 GeV upgrade is complete. The largest experiment at Jlab utilizing these components is GlueX - an experiment in the newly constructed Hall D that will study the photoproduction of light mesons in the search for hybrid mesons. The performance of these components and their respective detectors will be presented.

  7. 12 GeV detector technology at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Leckey, John P.

    2013-04-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) is presently in the middle of an upgrade to increase the energy of its CW electron beam from 6 GeV to 12 GeV along with the addition of a fourth experimental hall. Driven both by necessity and availability, novel detectors and electronics modules have been used in the upgrade. One such sensor is the Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM), specifically a Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC), which is an array of avalanche photodiode pixels operating in Geiger mode that are used to sense photons. The SiPMs replace conventional photomultiplier tubes and have several distinct advantages including the safe operation in a magnetic field and the lack of need for high voltage. Another key to 12 GeV success is advanced fast electronics. Jlab will use custom 250 MHz and 125 MHz 12-bit analog to digital converters (ADCs) and time to digital converters (TDCs) all of which take advantage of VME Switched Serial (VXS) bus with its GB/s high bandwidth readout capability. These new technologies will be used to readout drift chambers, calorimeters, spectrometers and other particle detectors at Jlab once the 12 GeV upgrade is complete. The largest experiment at Jlab utilizing these components is GlueX - an experiment in the newly constructed Hall D that will study the photoproduction of light mesons in the search for hybrid mesons. The performance of these components and their respective detectors will be presented.

  8. 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    During the past decade, synchrotron radiation emitted by circulating electron beams has come into wide use as a powerful, versatile source of x-rays for probing the structure of matter and for studying various physical processes. Several synchrotron radiation facilities with different designs and characteristics are now in regular operation throughout the world, with recent additions in this country being the 0.8-GeV and 2.5-GeV rings of NSLS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. However, none of the operating facilities has been designed to use a low-emittance, high-energy stored beam, together with modern undulator devices, to produce a large number of hard x-ray beams of extremely high brilliance. This document is a proposal to the Department of Energy to construct and operate high-energy synchrotron radiation facility at Argonne National Laboratory. We have now chosen to set the design energy of this facility at 7.0 GeV, with the capability to operate at up to 7.5 GeV.

  9. JLab's Hall A after the 12 GeV upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    John Lerose

    2004-11-14

    An overview is presented of the planned physics program for JLab's Hall A following the 12 GeV upgrade with emphasis on the equipment needed to achieve the desired experimental goals. Results of simulations of sample experiments with anticipated uncertainties are presented.

  10. Nucleon Form Factors experiments with 12 GeV CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtsekhowski, B.

    2008-10-13

    A number of precision form factor experiments at high momentum transfer will be performed with the 11 GeV electron beam of CEBAF. We review the approved proposals and the conceptual schemes of several new suggestions. Form factor data will serve as a major input for the construction of a tomographic image of the nucleon.

  11. 750 GeV diphoton resonance and electric dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kiwoon; Im, Sang Hui; Kim, Hyungjin; Mo, Doh Young

    2016-09-01

    We examine the implication of the recently observed 750 GeV diphoton excess for the electric dipole moments of the neutron and electron. If the excess is due to a spin zero resonance which couples to photons and gluons through the loops of massive vector-like fermions, the resulting neutron electric dipole moment can be comparable to the present experimental bound if the CP-violating angle α in the underlying new physics is of O (10-1). An electron EDM comparable to the present bound can be achieved through a mixing between the 750 GeV resonance and the Standard Model Higgs boson, if the mixing angle itself for an approximately pseudoscalar resonance, or the mixing angle times the CP-violating angle α for an approximately scalar resonance, is of O (10-3). For the case that the 750 GeV resonance corresponds to a composite pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson formed by a QCD-like hypercolor dynamics confining at ΛHC, the resulting neutron EDM can be estimated with α ∼(750 GeV /ΛHC) 2θHC, where θHC is the hypercolor vacuum angle.

  12. Jet fragmentation functions for identified particles in p+p collisions at 200 GeV in the STAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruna, Elena

    2008-10-01

    According to theoretical predictions, jet quenching in heavy-ion collisions modifies the jet energy and multiplicity distributions, as well as the jet hadrochemical composition. The measurement of jet fragmentation functions in p+p collisions at 200 GeV provides a baseline to study jet modifications in Au+Au collisions at RHIC. A cone algorithm is used to reconstruct jets in the STAR Time Projection Chamber and Electromagnetic Calorimeter; a study of the jet energy resolution based on PYTHIA+GEANT simulations is reported. We present the results on distributions of jet fragments in p+p collisions at 200 GeV in STAR for charged hadrons and identified particles at different jet energies and cone radii. The results are compared to MLLA (modified leading logarithmic approximation) calculations which provide a good description of the data at higher jet energies.

  13. Performance of the VENUS lead-glass calorimeter at TRISTAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumiyoshi, T.; Hayashi, K.; Ogawa, K.; Takasaki, F.; Haba, J.; Kamitani, T.; Kanematsu, N.; Osabe, H.; Sugimoto, S.; Yamashita, T.; Sakano, M.; Yoshida, H.; Shino, K.

    1988-09-01

    The initial performance of the VENUS barrel electromagnetic calorimeter at TRISTAN is described. The calorimeter is composed of 5160 lead-glass counters in a semi-tower arrangement. An energy resolution of 3.8% was obtained for 26 GeV Bhabha events. The neutral pions in the hadronic events were reconstructed with a mass resolution of σ = 16 MeV. The gain of the lead-glass counters was stable within 2% during a four months operation at TRISTAN.

  14. Why is GeV physics relevant in the age of the LHC?

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, Michael R.

    2014-02-01

    The contribution that Jefferson Lab has made, with its 6 GeV electron beam, and will make, with its 12 GeV upgrade, to our understanding of the way the fundamental interactions work, particularly strong coupling QCD, is outlined. The physics at the GeV scale is essential even in TeV collisions.

  15. Study of the inclusive reaction K -p→p+X at 32 GeV/ c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, E.; Babintsev, V.; Borovikov, A.; Chekulaev, S.; Moiseev, A.; Sarycheva, L.; Denegri, D.; Givernaud, A.; Lewin, C.; Prevost, J.; Turluer, M. L.; Gensch, U.; Klugow, J.; Walter, M.; Grässler, H.; Triantis, F. A.; Buschbeck, B.; MacNaughton, J.; France-USSR; CERN-USSR Collaboration

    1981-05-01

    In a K -p experiment at 32 GeV/ c with a sensitivity of 6 ev/≈b the inclusive reaction K -p → p + X was studied in the kinematical region x < -0.3. Most of the protons in this region were identified by ionization. Correcting for losses of the very slow as well as of the fast protons in this region we obtained σp( x < -0.3) = 5.9 ± 0.2 mb. The double invariant differential cross sections of protons were analysed in terms of the variables x, pT2, and M2/ s, t, and the contributions from separate peripheral mechanisms were analysed. A triple-Regge analysis was performed on the inclusive proton d 2σ/d td( M2/ s) distribution with | t| < 1.1 GeV 2. The fit with an RRP term resulted in an effective trajectory for the exchanged reggeon lying somewhat lower than that for the leading meson trajectory. Inclusion in the fit of an additional ππp term showed that pion exchange is important in the triple-Regge region at small | t|.

  16. Inferring the nature of the boson at 125-126Â GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Arjun; Modak, Tanmoy; Sahoo, Dibyakrupa; Sinha, Rahul; Cheng, Hai-Yang

    2014-05-01

    The presence of a bosonic resonance near 125 GeV has been firmly established at the Large Hadron Collider. Understanding the exact nature of this boson is a priority. The task now is to verify whether the boson is indeed the scalar Higgs as proposed in the Standard Model of particle physics, or something more esoteric as proposed in the plethora of extensions to the Standard Model. This requires a verification that the boson is a JPC=0++ state with couplings precisely as predicted by the Standard Model. Since a non-Standard Model boson can in some cases mimic the Standard Model Higgs in its couplings to gauge bosons, it is essential to rule out any anomalous behavior in its gauge couplings. We present a step by step methodology to determine the properties of this resonance without making any assumptions about its couplings. We present the analysis in terms of uniangular distributions which lead to angular asymmetries that allow for the extraction of the couplings of the 125-126 GeV resonance to Z bosons. We show analytically and numerically, that these asymmetries can unambiguously confirm whether the new boson is indeed the Standard Model Higgs boson.

  17. Multiwavelength Observations of GRB 110731A: GeV Emission from Onset to Afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Greiner, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Mészáros, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Romoli, C.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sanchez, D. A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sonbas, E.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Gruber, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M.; Connaughton, V.; Foley, S.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pelassa, V.; Preece, R.; Rau, A.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; Kann, D. A.; Filgas, R.; Klose, S.; Krühler, T.; Fukui, A.; Sako, T.; Tristram, P. J.; Oates, S. R.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Littlejohns, O.

    2013-02-01

    We report on the multiwavelength observations of the bright, long gamma-ray burst GRB 110731A, by the Fermi and Swift observatories, and by the MOA and GROND optical telescopes. The analysis of the prompt phase reveals that GRB 110731A shares many features with bright Large Area Telescope bursts observed by Fermi during the first three years on-orbit: a light curve with short time variability across the whole energy range during the prompt phase, delayed onset of the emission above 100 MeV, extra power-law component and temporally extended high-energy emission. In addition, this is the first GRB for which simultaneous GeV, X-ray, and optical data are available over multiple epochs beginning just after the trigger time and extending for more than 800 s, allowing temporal and spectral analysis in different epochs that favor emission from the forward shock in a wind-type medium. The observed temporally extended GeV emission is most likely part of the high-energy end of the afterglow emission. Both the single-zone pair transparency constraint for the prompt signal and the spectral and temporal analysis of the forward-shock afterglow emission independently lead to an estimate of the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet Γ ~ 500-550.

  18. Scaled simulations of a 10 GeV accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Paul, K.; Cowan, B.

    2009-01-22

    Laser plasma accelerators are able to produce high quality electron beams from 1 MeV to 1 GeV. The next generation of plasma accelerator experiments will likely use a multi-stage approach where a high quality electron bunch is first produced and then injected into an accelerating structure. In this paper we present scaled particle-in-cell simulations of a 10 GeV stage in the quasi-linear regime. We show that physical parameters can be scaled to be able to perform these simulations at reasonable computational cost. Beam loading properties and electron bunch energy gain are calculated. A range of parameter regimes are studied to optimize the quality of the electron bunch at the output of the stage.

  19. The 12 GeV Energy Upgrade at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Fulvia C.

    2012-09-01

    Two new cryomodules and an extensive upgrade of the bending magnets at Jefferson Lab has been recently completed in preparation for the full energy upgrade in about one year. Jefferson Laboratory has undertaken a major upgrade of its flagship facility, the CW re-circulating CEBAF linac, with the goal of doubling the linac energy to 12 GeV. I will discuss here the main scope and timeline of the upgrade and report on recent accomplishments and the present status. I will then discuss in more detail the core of the upgrade, the new additional C100 cryomodules, their production, tests and recent successful performance. I will then conclude by looking at the future plans of Jefferson Laboratory, from the commissioning and operations of the 12 GeV CEBAF to the design of the MEIC electron ion collider.

  20. THE LASER EMITTANCE SCANNER FOR 1 GEV H- BEAM

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Dong-O; Pogge, James R; Menshov, Alexander A; Nesterenko, Igor N; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Webster, Anthony W; Grice, Warren P

    2009-01-01

    A transverse phase space laser emittance scanner is proposed [1] and under development for the 1-GeV H- SNS linac, using a laser beam as a slit. For a 1-GeV H- beam, it is difficult to build a slit because the stopping distance is more than 50 cm in copper. We propose a Laser Emittance Scanner (LES) to use a laser beam as an effective slit by stripping off the outer electron of the H- (making it neutral) upstream of a bend magnet and measuring the stripped component downstream of the bend magnet. The design and modeling of the system will be discussed. We are expecting to make a preliminary measurement in 2009.

  1. Scaled simulations of a 10 GeV accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Geddes, C.G.R; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Paul, K.; Cowan, B.; Leemans, W.P.

    2008-09-08

    Laser plasma accelerators are able to produce high quality electron beams from 1 MeV to 1 GeV. The next generation of plasma accelerator experiments will likely use a multi-stage approach where a high quality electron bunch is first produced and then injected into an accelerating structure. In this paper we present scaled particle-in-cell simulations of a 10 GeV stage in the quasi-linear regime. We show that physical parameters can be scaled to be able to perform these simulations at reasonable computational cost. Beam loading properties and electron bunch energy gain are calculated. A range of parameter regimes are studied to optimize the quality of the electron bunch at the output of the stage.

  2. Meson Spectroscopy at JLab@12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Celentano, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    Meson, being the simplest hadronic bound system, is the ideal "laboratory" to study the interaction between quarks, to understand the role of the gluons inside hadrons and to investigate the origin of color confinement. To perform such studies it is important to measure the meson spectrum, with precise determination of resonance masses and properties, looking for rare qbar q states and for unconventional mesons with exotic quantum numbers (i.e. mesons with quantum numbers that are not compatible with a qbar q structure). With the imminent advent of the 12 GeV upgrade of Jefferson Lab a new generation of meson spectroscopy experiments will start: "Meson-Ex" in Hall B and "GLUEX" in Hall D. Both will use photo-production to explore the spectrum of mesons in the light-quark sector, in the energy range of few GeVs.

  3. Dihadron Electroproduction in DIS with Transversely Polarized 3He Target at 12 GeV Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jixie; SoLID Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The transversity distribution function is one of the important and least known parton distribution functions (PDFs) of the nucleon. It can be studied via both single-hadron and double-hadron electro-production from a transversely polarized target in the deep inelastic scattering (DIS) region. Due to the low cross section, the data for the transversity distribution functions are very scarce. After 12 GeV upgrade, the high intensity 12 GeV electron accelerator at Jefferson Lab (JLab), togather with tThe large acceptance of the proposed Solenoidal Large Intensity Device (SoLID) in Hall A, will provide very good opportunities to study the transversity distribution functions in high precision. In this talk, we will present the dihadron program with SoLID. We plan to measure the single target spin asymmetries (SSA) of dihadron production in DIS region using 11 and 8.8 GeV electron beam on a transversely polarized 3He target. We will map the SSA in a 4-D space of x, Q2, zh and Mh. Assuming leading twist dominance, the transversity distribution, h1, can be extracted by combine with the world data on dihadron fragmentation functions (DiFF). These data will provide crucial inputs to the flavor separation of the transversity, especially the d quark distribution.

  4. Jet production in deep-inelastic muon scattering at 490 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Melanson, H.L.; E665 Collaboration

    1993-06-01

    Measurements of jet rates in deep-inelastic muon scattering are presented. The JADE algorithm is used to define jets in the kinematic region 9 < W < 33 GeV. Data taken on a proton target are analyzed within the QCD framework, with the goal of extracting {alpha}{sub s}. Results on the Q{sup 2} dependence of the average transverse momentum of jets are used to demonstrate the running of the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}. In addition, first measurements of the production of jets from heavy nuclei in the region x{sub B{sub j}} > 0.001 are discussed. Initial results indicate a suppression in the rate of two forward jets in carbon, calcium and lead as compared to deuterium. All results presented are preliminary.

  5. A procedure for benchmarking laboratory exposures with 1 A GeV iron ions.

    PubMed

    Wilson, John W; Tweed, John; Walker, Steve A; Cucinotta, Francis A; Tripathi, Ram K; Blattnig, Steve; Mertens, Christopher J

    2005-01-01

    A new version of the HZETRN code capable of simulating HZE ions with either laboratory or space boundary conditions is under development. The computational model consists of combinations of physical perturbation expansions based on the scales of atomic interaction, multiple scattering, and nuclear reactive processes with use of asymptotic/Neumann expansions with non-perturbative corrections. The code contains energy loss with straggling, nuclear attenuation, nuclear fragmentation with energy dispersion and downshifts, and off-axis dispersion with multiple scattering under preparation. The present benchmark is for a broad directed beam for 1 A GeV iron ion beams with 2 A MeV width and four targets of polyethylene, polymethyl metachrylate, aluminum, and lead of varying thickness from 5 to 30 g/cm2. The benchmark quantities will be dose, track averaged LET, dose averaged LET, fraction of iron ion remaining, and fragment energy spectra after 23 g/cm2 of polymethyl metachrylate. PMID:15934193

  6. The multiplicity and the spectra of secondaries correlated with the leading particle energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruglov, N. A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Sarycheva, L. I.; Smirnova, L. N.

    1985-01-01

    The spectra of leading particles of different nature in pp-collisions at E sub 0 = 33 GeV are obtained. The multiplicities and the spectra of secondaries, mesons, gamma-quanta, lambda and lambda-hyperons and protons for different leading particle energy ranges are determined.

  7. Pion-Kaon correlations in central Au+Au collisions at square root [sNN] = 130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gutierrez, T D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2003-12-31

    Pion-kaon correlation functions are constructed from central Au+Au STAR data taken at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The results suggest that pions and kaons are not emitted at the same average space-time point. Space-momentum correlations, i.e., transverse flow, lead to a space-time emission asymmetry of pions and kaons that is consistent with the data. This result provides new independent evidence that the system created at RHIC undergoes a collective transverse expansion. PMID:14754044

  8. Charmed Meson Production in 800 GEV Proton-Proton Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senko, Mark Frederick

    The purpose of this dissertation is to present the results of a study concerning the energy dependence of charmed meson production properties as a test of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This experiment was performed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, using a rapid cycling bubble chamber (LEBC) as a hydrogen target and high resolution vertex detector, in combination with the Fermilab Multiparticle Spectrometer (FMPS). The multiplicity trigger was unbiased, and spectrometer acceptance was good at x_ {F} >=q 0. A comparison of the results from previous experiments at center of mass energies sqrt{s} <=q 27 GeV and sqrt {s} >=q 53 GeV implies a total charm particle production cross section which rises rapidly as a function of sqrt{s} . The result of our experiment, sigma (D/| D) = 42.7 +/- 7.8 mub at sqrt{s} = 38 GeV, indicates a slower rise, in agreement with QCD predictions. A maximum likelihood fit to the parameterization of the differential cross section as d^2sigma/dx_{F}dp _sp{|}{2} ~ (1 - | x_{F }|)^{n}e^{-bp _sp{|}{2}} gives the results n = 8.4_sp {-1.9}{+2.2}, b = 0.78_sp{-0.16}{+0.19} (GeV/c)^{-2}, and < pbot > = 1.1_sp{-0.1}{+0.2} GeV/c. When compared with results from the lower energy experiments, these values indicate charm production becoming more central and < pbot > being consistent with the charmed quark mass. These results are once again consistent with QCD predictions. Lastly, analysis has shown that sigma(D ^*^+/-)/sigma(D^0) is governed primarily by spin statistics, displaying no energy dependence. The resulting cross section for D^*^+/- production is sigma(D^*^+/-) = 13.31 +/- 5.74 mub.

  9. Background model systematics for the Fermi GeV excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calore, Francesca; Cholis, Ilias; Weniger, Christoph

    2015-03-01

    The possible gamma-ray excess in the inner Galaxy and the Galactic center (GC) suggested by Fermi-LAT observations has triggered a large number of studies. It has been interpreted as a variety of different phenomena such as a signal from WIMP dark matter annihilation, gamma-ray emission from a population of millisecond pulsars, or emission from cosmic rays injected in a sequence of burst-like events or continuously at the GC. We present the first comprehensive study of model systematics coming from the Galactic diffuse emission in the inner part of our Galaxy and their impact on the inferred properties of the excess emission at Galactic latitudes 2° < |b| < 20° and 300 MeV to 500 GeV. We study both theoretical and empirical model systematics, which we deduce from a large range of Galactic diffuse emission models and a principal component analysis of residuals in numerous test regions along the Galactic plane. We show that the hypothesis of an extended spherical excess emission with a uniform energy spectrum is compatible with the Fermi-LAT data in our region of interest at 95% CL. Assuming that this excess is the extended counterpart of the one seen in the inner few degrees of the Galaxy, we derive a lower limit of 10.0° (95% CL) on its extension away from the GC. We show that, in light of the large correlated uncertainties that affect the subtraction of the Galactic diffuse emission in the relevant regions, the energy spectrum of the excess is equally compatible with both a simple broken power-law of break energy Ebreak = 2.1 ± 0.2 GeV, and with spectra predicted by the self-annihilation of dark matter, implying in the case of bar bb final states a dark matter mass of mχ=49+6.4-5.4 GeV.

  10. 8 GeV H- ions: Transport and injection

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Bryant, H.; Drozhdin, A.; Hill, C.; Kostin, M.; Macek, R.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Rees, G.H.; Tang, Z.; Yoon, P.; /Fermilab /New Mexico U. /Los Alamos /Rutherford /Rochester U.

    2005-05-01

    Fermilab is working on the design of an 8 GeV superconducting RF H{sup -} linac called the Proton Driver. The energy of H{sup -} beam will be an order of magnitude higher than the existing ones. This brings up a number of technical challenges to transport and injection of H{sup -} ions. This paper will focus on the subjects of stripping losses (including stripping by blackbody radiation, field and residual gas) and carbon foil stripping efficiency, along with a brief discussion on other issues such as Stark states lifetime of hydrogen atoms, single and multiple Coulomb scattering, foil heating and stress, radiation activation, collimation and jitter correction, etc.

  11. The 12 GeV JLab Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Elton

    2009-01-01

    The upgrade of the CEBAF Accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV will deliver high luminosity and high quality beams, which will open unique opportunities for studies of the quark and gluon structure of hadrons in the valence region. Such physics will be made accessible by substantial additions to the experimental equipment in combination with the increased energy reach of the upgraded machine. The emphasis of the talk will be on the program in a new experimental Hall D designed to search for gluonic excitations.

  12. Optimization of the 8 GeV AP3-P1 Lattice for Antiproton Transfers

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, Dave; /Fermilab

    2001-01-22

    During 8 GeV antiproton transfers between the Accumulator to the Main Injector, the antiprotons must travel through four separate beam lines, AP3, AP1, P2, and P1. This note describes the optimization of a single lattice that describes these beam lines for 8 GeV antiproton transfers from the Accumulator to the Main Injector and 8 GeV proton transfers from the Main Injector to the Accumulator.

  13. Commissioning of the 123 MeV injector for 12 GeV CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yan; Hofler, Alicia S.; Kazimi, Reza

    2015-09-01

    The upgrade of CEBAF to 12GeV included modifications to the injector portion of the accelerator. These changes included the doubling of the injection energy and relocation of the final transport elements to accommodate changes in the CEBAF recirculation arcs. This paper will describe the design changes and the modelling of the new 12GeV CEBAF injector. Stray magnetic fields have been a known issue for the 6 GeV CEBAF injector, the results of modelling the new 12GeV injector and the resulting changes implemented to mitigate this issue are described in this paper. The results of beam commissioning of the injector are also presented.

  14. First polarized proton collision at a beam energy of 250 GeV in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bai,M.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I. G.; Alessi, J.; et al.

    2009-05-04

    After providing collisions of polarized protons at a beam energy of 100 GeV since 2001, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL had its first opportunity to collide polarized protons at its maximum beam energy of 250 GeV in the 2009 polarized proton operations. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes [1] in each ring, RHIC preserves polarization during acceleration from injection to 100 GeV with precise control of the betatron tunes and vertical orbit distortions. However, the strong intrinsic spin resonances beyond 100 GeV are more than two times stronger than those below 100 GeV, requiring much tighter tolerances on vertical orbit distortions and betatron tunes. With the currently achieved orbit correction and tune control, average polarizations of {approx_equal} 42% at top energy and average polarizations of {approx_equal} 55% at injection energy were achieved. Polarization measurements as a function of beam energy also indicated aU polarization losses occurred around three strong intrinsic resonances at 136 GeV, 199.3 GeV and 220.8 GeV Peak luminosity of 122 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} was also demonstrated. This paper presents the performance of the first RHIC 250 GeV operation and discusses the depolarization issues encountered during the run.

  15. The Jefferson Lab program: From 6 GeV operations to the 12 GeV upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Marco Battaglieri

    2012-04-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory and the CEBAF accelerator operated for more than a decade, running a comprehensive scientific program that improved our understanding of the strong interaction. The facility is now moving toward an upgrade of the machine, from 6 to 12 GeV; a new experimental hall will be added and the equipment of the three existing halls will be enhanced. In this contribution some selected results from the rich physics program run at JLab, as well as the prospects for the near future, will be presented.

  16. 750 GeV diphotons from supersymmetry with Dirac gauginos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Timothy; Kribs, Graham D.; Nelson, Ann E.; Ostdiek, Bryan

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the recent excess in the diphoton invariant mass near 750 GeV, we explore a supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model that includes the minimal set of superpartners as well as additional Dirac partner chiral superfields in the adjoint representation for each gauge group. The bino partner pseudoscalar is identified as the 750 GeV resonance, while superpotential interactions between it and the gluino (wino) partners yield production via gluon fusion (decay to photon pairs) at one-loop. The gauginos and these additional adjoint superpartners are married by a Dirac mass and must also have Majorana masses. While a large wino partner Majorana mass is necessary to explain the excess, the gluino can be approximately Dirac-like, providing benefits consistent with being both "supersoft" (loop corrections to the scalar masses from Dirac gauginos are free of logarithmic enhancements) and "supersafe" (the experimental limits on the squark/gluino masses can be relaxed due to the reduced production rate). Consistency with the measured Standard Model-like Higgs boson mass is imposed, and a numerical exploration of the parameter space is provided. Models that can account for the diphoton excess are additionally characterized by having couplings that can remain perturbative up to very high scales, while remaining consistent with experimental constraints, the Higgs boson mass, and an electroweak scale which is not excessively fine-tuned.

  17. STANDARDIZATION OF CEBAF 12 GEV UPGRADE CAVITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Tiffany Bass, G. Davis, Christiana Wilson, Mircea Stirbet

    2012-07-01

    CEBAF 12GeV upgrade project includes 80 new 7-cell cavities to form 10 cryomodules. Each cavity underwent RF qualification at 2.07K using a high power accelerating gradient test and an HOM survey in Jefferson Lab's Vertical Testing Area (VTA) before cavity string assembly. In order to ensure consistently high quality data, updated cavity testing procedures and analysis were implemented and used by a group of VTA operators. For high power tests, a cavity testing procedure was developed and used in conjunction with a LabVIEW program to collect the test data. Additionally while the cavity was at 2.07K, an HOM survey was performed using a network analyzer and a combination of Excel and Mathematica programs. Data analysis was standardized and an online logbook, Pansophy, was used for data storage and mining. The Pansophy system allowed test results to be easily summarized and searchable across all cavity tests. In this presentation, the CEBAF 12GeV upgrade cavity testing procedure, method for data analysis, and results reporting results will be discussed.

  18. 12 GeV Upgrade Project - Cryomodule Production

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hogan, A. Burrill, G.K. Davis, M.A. Drury, M. Wiseman

    2012-07-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) is producing ten 100+MV SRF cryomodules (C100) as part of the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade Project. Once installed, these cryomodules will become part of an integrated accelerator system upgrade that will result in doubling the energy of the CEBAF machine from 6 to 12 GeV. This paper will present a complete overview of the C100 cryomodule production process. The C100 cryomodule was designed to have the major components procured from private industry and assembled together at Jefferson Lab. In addition to measuring the integrated component performance, the performance of the individual components is verified prior to being released for production and assembly into a cryomodule. Following a comprehensive cold acceptance test of all subsystems, the completed C100 cryomodules are installed and commissioned in the CEBAF machine in preparation of accelerator operations. This overview of the cryomodule production process will include all principal performance measurements, acceptance criterion and up to date status of current activities.

  19. Search for GeV GRBs at Chacaltaya

    SciTech Connect

    Castellina, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Morello, C.; Trinchero, G.; Vallania, P.; Vernetto, S.; Navarra, G.; Saavedra, O.; Yoshii, H.; Kaneko, T.; Kakimoto, K.; Nishi, K.; Cabrera, R.; Urzagasti, D.; Velarde, A.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Butterworth, P.; Cline, T. L.; Gehrels, N.; Fishman, G. J.

    1998-05-16

    In this paper we present the results of a search for GeV Gamma Ray Bursts made by the INCA experiment during the first 9 months of operation. INCA, an air shower array located at Mount Chacaltaya (Bolivia) at 5200 m a.s.l., has been searching for GRBs since December 1996. Up to August, 1997, 34 GRBs detected by BATSE occurred in the field of view of the experiment. For any burst, the counting rate of the array in the 2 hours interval around the burst trigger time has been studied. No significant excess has been observed. Assuming for the bursts a power low energy spectrum extending up to 1 TeV with a slope {alpha}=-2 and a duration of 10 s, the obtained 1 GeV-1 TeV energy fluence upper limits range from 7.9 10{sup -5} erg cm{sup -2} to 3.5 10{sup -3} erg cm{sup -2} depending on the event zenith angles.

  20. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12 GeV Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers, the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.

  1. Galactic Diffuse Gamma Ray Emission Is Greater than 10 Gev

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    AGILE and Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST) are the next high-energy gamma-ray telescopes to be flown in space. These instruments will have angular resolution about 5 times better than Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) above 10 GeV and much larger field of view. The on-axis effective area of AGILE will be about half that of EGRET, whereas GLAST will have about 6 times greater effective area than EGRET. The capabilities of ground based very high-energy telescopes are also improving, e.g. Whipple, and new telescopes, e.g. Solar Tower Atmospheric Cerenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE), Cerenkov Low Energy Sampling and Timing Experiment (CELESTE), and Mars Advanced Greenhouse Integrated Complex (MAGIC) are expected to have low-energy thresholds and sensitivities that will overlap the GLAST sensitivity above approximately 10 GeV. In anticipation of the results from these new telescopes, our current understanding of the galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, including the matter and cosmic ray distributions is reviewed. The outstanding questions are discussed and the potential of future observations with these new instruments to resolve these questions is examined.

  2. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers, the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.

  3. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12GeV Upgrade

    DOE PAGES

    Qiang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers,more » the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.« less

  4. Radiation microscope for SEE testing using GeV ions.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Knapp, James Arthur; Rossi, Paolo; Hattar, Khalid M.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Brice, David Kenneth; Branson, Janelle V.

    2009-09-01

    Radiation Effects Microscopy is an extremely useful technique in failure analysis of electronic parts used in radiation environment. It also provides much needed support for development of radiation hard components used in spacecraft and nuclear weapons. As the IC manufacturing technology progresses, more and more overlayers are used; therefore, the sensitive region of the part is getting farther and farther from the surface. The thickness of these overlayers is so large today that the traditional microbeams, which are used for REM are unable to reach the sensitive regions. As a result, higher ion beam energies have to be used (> GeV), which are available only at cyclotrons. Since it is extremely complicated to focus these GeV ion beams, a new method has to be developed to perform REM at cyclotrons. We developed a new technique, Ion Photon Emission Microscopy, where instead of focusing the ion beam we use secondary photons emitted from a fluorescence layer on top of the devices being tested to determine the position of the ion hit. By recording this position information in coincidence with an SEE signal we will be able to indentify radiation sensitive regions of modern electronic parts, which will increase the efficiency of radiation hard circuits.

  5. Lead Poisoning Prevention Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC.gov . Lead Home Calendar of Events National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week Archived Materials CDC's Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program Advisory Committee (ACCLPP) Current Activities Blood ...

  6. Lead - nutritional considerations

    MedlinePlus

    Lead poisoning - nutritional considerations; Toxic metal - nutritional considerations ... utensils . Old paint poses the greatest danger for lead poisoning , especially in young children. Tap water from lead ...

  7. Shower development of particles with momenta from 15 GeV to 150 GeV in the CALICE scintillator-tungsten hadronic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chefdeville, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Eigen, G.; Marshall, J. S.; Thomson, M. A.; Ward, D. R.; Alipour Tehrani, N.; Apostolakis, J.; Dannheim, D.; Elsener, K.; Folger, G.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Killenberg, M.; Klempt, W.; van der Kraaij, E.; Linssen, L.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Münnich, A.; Poss, S.; Ribon, A.; Roloff, P.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Sicking, E.; Strube, J.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Chang, S.; Khan, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kong, D. J.; Oh, Y. D.; Blazey, G. C.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Zutshi, V.; Giraud, J.; Grondin, D.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Brianne, E.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Falley, G.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Karstensen, S.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morozov, S.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Terwort, M.; Tran, H. L.; Vargas-Trevino, A.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schröder, S.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Harion, T.; Munwes, Y.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Bilki, B.; Onel, Y.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Wing, M.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kirikova, N.; Kozlov, V.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Weuste, L.; Amjad, M. S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Richard, F.; Pöschl, R.; Rouëné, J.; Thiebault, A.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Cizel, J.-B.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Haddad, Y.; Magniette, F.; Nanni, J.; Pavy, S.; Rubio-Roy, M.; Shpak, K.; Tran, T. H.; Videau, H.; Yu, D.; Callier, S.; Conforti di Lorenzo, S.; Dulucq, F.; Fleury, J.; Martin-Chassard, G.; de la Taille, Ch.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kovalcuk, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Chen, S.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Kozakai, C.; Nakanishi, H.; Götze, M.; Sauer, J.; Weber, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

    2015-12-01

    We present a study of showers initiated by electrons, pions, kaons, and protons with momenta from 15 GeV to 150 GeV in the highly granular CALICE scintillator-tungsten analogue hadronic calorimeter. The data were recorded at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron in 2011. The analysis includes measurements of the calorimeter response to each particle type as well as measurements of the energy resolution and studies of the longitudinal and radial shower development for selected particles. The results are compared to Geant4 simulations (version 9.6.p02). In the study of the energy resolution we include previously published data with beam momenta from 1 GeV to 10 GeV recorded at the CERN Proton Synchrotron in 2010.

  8. 750 GeV diphoton resonance, 125 GeV Higgs and muon g - 2 anomaly in deflected anomaly mediation SUSY breaking scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Wu, Lei; Yang, Jin Min; Zhang, Mengchao

    2016-08-01

    We propose to interpret the 750 GeV diphoton excess in deflected anomaly mediation supersymmetry breaking scenarios, which can naturally predict couplings between a singlet field and vector-like messengers. The CP-even scalar component (S) of the singlet field can serve as the 750 GeV resonance. The messenger scale, which is of order the gravitino scale, can be as light as Fϕ ∼ O (10) TeV when the messenger species NF and the deflection parameter d are moderately large. Such messengers can induce the large loop decay process S → γγ. Our results show that such a scenario can successfully accommodate the 125 GeV Higgs boson, the 750 GeV diphoton excess and the muon g - 2 without conflicting with the LHC constraints. We also comment on the possible explanations in the gauge mediation supersymmetry breaking scenario.

  9. Demonstration of self-truncated ionization injection for GeV electron beams

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaie, M.; Li, S.; Zeng, M.; Hafz, N. A. M.; Chen, M.; Li, G. Y.; Zhu, Q. J.; Liao, H.; Sokollik, T.; Liu, F.; Ma, Y. Y.; Chen, L.M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2015-01-01

    Ionization-induced injection mechanism was introduced in 2010 to reduce the laser intensity threshold for controllable electron trapping in laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA). However, usually it generates electron beams with continuous energy spectra. Subsequently, a dual-stage target separating the injection and acceleration processes was regarded as essential to achieve narrow energy-spread electron beams by ionization injection. Recently, we numerically proposed a self-truncation scenario of the ionization injection process based upon overshooting of the laser-focusing in plasma which can reduce the electron injection length down to a few hundred micrometers, leading to accelerated beams with extremely low energy-spread in a single-stage. Here, using 100 TW-class laser pulses we report experimental observations of this injection scenario in centimeter-long plasma leading to the generation of narrow energy-spread GeV electron beams, demonstrating its robustness and scalability. Compared with the self-injection and dual-stage schemes, the self-truncated ionization injection generates higher-quality electron beams at lower intensities and densities, and is therefore promising for practical applications. PMID:26423136

  10. Exploring the jet multiplicity in the 750 GeV diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dutta, Bhaskar; Gao, Yu; Ghosh, Tathagata; Kamon, Teruki

    2016-10-01

    The recent diphoton excess at the LHC has been explained tentatively by a Standard Model (SM) singlet scalar of 750 GeV in mass, in the association of heavy particles with SM gauge charges. These new particles with various SM gauge charges induce loop-level couplings of the new scalar to WW, ZZ, Zγ, γγ, and gg. We show that the strength of the couplings to the gauge bosons also determines the production mechanism of the scalar particle via WW , ZZ , Zγ , γγ , gg fusion which leads to individually distinguishable jet distributions in the final state where the statistics will be improved in the ongoing run. The number of jets and the leading jet's transverse momentum distribution in the excess region of the diphoton signal can be used to determine the coupling of the scalar to the gauge bosons arising from the protons which subsequently determine the charges of the heavy particles that arise from various well-motivated models.

  11. Strange Particle Production in $p+p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 200GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta,N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2006-07-31

    We present strange particle spectra and yields measured atmid-rapidity in sqrt text s=200 GeV proton-proton (p+p) collisions atRHIC. We find that the previously observed universal transverse mass(mathrm mT \\equiv\\sqrt mathrm p_T 2+\\mathrm m2) scaling of hadronproduction in p+p collisions seems to break down at higher \\mt and thatthere is a difference in the shape of the \\mt spectrum between baryonsand mesons. We observe mid-rapidity anti-baryon to baryon ratios nearunity for Lambda and Xi baryons and no dependence of the ratio ontransverse momentum, indicating that our data do not yet reach thequark-jet dominated region. We show the dependence of the mean transversemomentum (\\mpt) on measured charged particle multiplicity and on particlemass and infer that these trends are consistent with gluon-jet dominatedparticle production. The data are compared to previous measurements fromCERN-SPS, ISR and FNAL experiments and to Leading Order (LO) and Next toLeading order (NLO) string fragmentation model predictions. We infer fromthese comparisons that the spectral shapes and particle yields from $p+p$collisions at RHIC energies have large contributions from gluon jetsrather than quark jets.

  12. Lead levels - blood

    MedlinePlus

    Blood lead levels ... is used to screen people at risk for lead poisoning. This may include industrial workers and children ... also used to measure how well treatment for lead poisoning is working. Lead is common in the ...

  13. Higgs stability and the 750 GeV diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvio, Alberto; Mazumdar, Anupam

    2016-04-01

    We study the implications of a possible unstable particle with mass MX GeV, suggested by recent results of ATLAS and CMS on diphoton final states, and work within the minimal model: we add to the Standard Model field content a pseudoscalar and a vector-like fermion carrying both color and electric charge. This can stabilize the electroweak vacuum without invoking new physics at very high energies, which would give an unnaturally large contribution to the Higgs mass. We also show that inflation can be obtained via a UV modification of General Relativity.

  14. Nucleon Form Factors above 6 GeV

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Taylor, R. E.

    1967-09-01

    This report describes the results from a preliminary analysis of an elastic electron-proton scattering experiment... . We have measured cross sections for e-p scattering in the range of q{sup 2} from 0.7 to 25.0 (GeV/c){sup 2}, providing a large region of overlap with previous measurements. In this experiment we measure the cross section by observing electrons scattered from a beam passing through a liquid hydrogen target. The scattered particles are momentum analyzed by a magnetic spectrometer and identified as electrons in a total absorption shower counter. Data have been obtained with primary electron energies from 4.0 to 17.9 GeV and at scattering angles from 12.5 to 35.0 degrees. In general, only one measurement of a cross section has been made at each momentum transfer.

  15. LHC future prospects of the 750 GeV resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ryosuke; Tobioka, Kohsaku

    2016-09-01

    A quantitative discussion on the future prospects of the 750 GeV resonance at the LHC experiment is given using a simple effective field theory analysis. The relative size of two effective operators relevant to diphoton decays can be probed by ratios of diboson signals in a robust way. We obtain the future sensitivities of Zγ, ZZ and WW resonance searches at the high luminosity LHC, rescaling from the current sensitivities at √{ s} = 13 TeV. Then, we show that a large fraction of parameter space in the effective field theory will be covered with 300 fb-1 and almost the whole parameter space will be tested with 3000 fb-1. This discussion is independent of production processes, other decay modes and total decay width.

  16. Laser Guiding for GeV Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Csaba

    2005-06-06

    Guiding of relativistically intense laser beams in preformed plasma channels is discussed for development of GeV-class laser accelerators. Experiments using a channel guided laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) at LBNL have demonstrated that near mono-energetic 100 MeV-class electron beams can be produced with a 10 TW laser system. Analysis, aided by particle-in-cell simulations, as well as experiments with various plasma lengths and densities, indicate that tailoring the length of the accelerator, together with loading of the accelerating structure with beam, is the key to production of mono-energetic electron beams. Increasing the energy towards a GeV and beyond will require reducing the plasma density and design criteria are discussed for an optimized accelerator module. The current progress and future directions are summarized through comparison with conventional accelerators, highlighting the unique short term prospects for intense radiation sources based on laser-driven plasma accelerators.

  17. Pressure Safety of JLAB 12GeV Upgrade Cryomodule

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Gary; Wiseman, Mark A.; Daly, Ed

    2009-11-01

    This paper reviews pressure safety considerations, per the US Department of Energy (DOE) 10CFR851 Final Rule [1], which are being implemented during construction of the 100 Megavolt Cryomodule (C100 CM) for Jefferson Lab’s 12 GeV Upgrade Project. The C100 CM contains several essential subsystems that require pressure safety measures: piping in the supply and return end cans, piping in the thermal shield and the helium headers, the helium vessel assembly which includes high RRR niobium cavities, the end cans, and the vacuum vessel. Due to the vessel sizes and pressure ranges, applicable national consensus code rules are applied. When national consensus codes are not applicable, equivalent design and fabrication approaches are identified and implemented. Considerations for design, material qualification, fabrication, inspection and examination are summarized. In addition, JLAB’s methodologies for implementation of the 10 CFR 851 requirements are described.

  18. The Upgrade of CEBAF to 12 GeV: Physics Motivations and Technical Aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard Mecking; Larry Cardman

    2002-08-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, CEBAF, makes use of electron and photon beams with an energy up to 6 GeV to investigate the electromagnetic structure of mesons, nucleons, and nuclei. We discuss the physics motivation for upgrading the facility to a maximum energy of 12 GeV and some of the key technological aspects of the upgrade.

  19. Inclusive particle spectra at (56 and 130)A GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, D. E.; Kahana, S. H.

    2001-03-01

    A simulation is performed of the recently reported data from PHOBOS at energies of s=56,130A GeV using the relativistic heavy ion cascade LUCIFER which had previously given a good description of the NA49 inclusive spectra at s=17.2A GeV. The results compare well with these early measurements at RHIC.

  20. 750 GeV messenger of dark conformal symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Zhang, Cen

    2016-03-01

    The tentative hints for a diphoton resonance at a mass of ˜750 GeV from the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC may be interpreted as first contact with a "dark" sector with a spontaneously broken conformal symmetry. The implied TeV scale of the dark sector may be motivated by the interaction strength required to accommodate a viable thermal relic dark matter (DM) candidate. We model the conformal dynamics using a Randall-Sundrum-type five-dimensional geometry whose IR boundary is identified with the dynamics of the composite dark sector, while the Standard Model (SM) matter content resides on the UV boundary, corresponding to "elementary" fields. We allow the gauge fields to reside in the five-dimensional bulk, which can be minimally chosen to be S U (3 )c×U (1 )Y. The "dark" radion is identified as the putative 750 GeV resonance. Heavy vectorlike fermions, often invoked to explain the diphoton excess, are not explicitly present in our model and are not predicted to appear in the spectrum of TeV scale states. Our minimal setup favors scalar DM of O (TeV ) mass. A generic expectation in this scenario, suggested by DM considerations, is the appearance of vector bosons at ˜ few TeV, corresponding to the gluon and hypercharge Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes that couple to UV boundary states with strengths that are suppressed uniformly compared to their SM values. Our analysis suggests that these KK modes could be within the reach of the LHC in the coming years.

  1. Studies of beam halo formation in the 12GeV CEBAF design

    SciTech Connect

    Yves Roblin; Arne Freyberger

    2007-06-01

    Beam halo formation in the beam transport design for the Jefferson Lab 12GeV upgrade was investigated using 12GeV beam transport models as well as data from 6GeV CEBAF operations. Various halo sources were considered; these covered both nuclear interactions with beam gas as well as optics-related effects such as non linearities in the magnetic fields of the transport elements. Halo due to beam gas scattering was found to be less of a problem at 12GeV compared to the 6GeV machine. Halo due to non linear effects of magnetic elements was characterized as a function of beam orbit and functional forms of the distribution were derived. These functional forms were used as inputs in subsequent detector optimizations studies.

  2. Where Will LEAD Lead? An Update on My LEAD Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Louis

    Issues in the future of a federal collaborative program, Leadership in Educational Administration Development (LEAD), are discussed in this paper. Problems attributed to LEAD are its antagonistic posture to educational administration programs in higher education and political conflicts of interest. Methodology involved analysis of successful LEAD…

  3. Potential lead exposures from lead crystal decanters.

    PubMed Central

    Appel, B R; Kahlon, J K; Ferguson, J; Quattrone, A J; Book, S A

    1992-01-01

    We measured the concentrations of lead leached into 4% acetic acid, white port, and a synthetic alcoholic beverage that were stored in lead crystal decanters for 1-, 2-, and 10-day periods at room temperature. In decanters from 14 different manufacturers, measured lead concentrations ranged from 100 to 1800 micrograms/L. The pH of the leaching medium is probably the dominant factor determining the extent of lead leached, with greater leaching occurring at lower pH values. The consumption of alcoholic beverages stored in lead crystal decanters is judged to pose a hazard. PMID:1456345

  4. Lead in petrol. The isotopic lead experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Facchetti, S. )

    1989-10-01

    Many studies were dedicated to the evaluation of the impact of automotive lead on the environment and to the assessment of its absorption in the human population. They can be subdivided into two groups, those based on changes of air and blood lead concentrations and those based on changes of air and blood lead isotopic compositions. According to various authors, 50-66% of the lead added to petrol is mobilized in the atmosphere, while most of the remainder adheres to the walls of the exhaust system from which it is expelled by mechanical and thermal shocks in the forms of easily sedimented particles. The fraction directly emitted by engine exhaust fumes is found in the form of fine particles, which can be transferred a long way from the emitting sources. However important the contribution of petrol lead to the total airborne lead may be, our knowledge does not permit a straightforward calculation of the percentage of petrol lead in total blood lead, which of course can also originate from other sources (e.g., industrial, natural). To evaluate this percentage in 1973, the idea of the Isotopic Lead Experiment (ILE project) was conceived to label, on a regional scale, petrol with a nonradioactive lead of an isotopic composition sufficiently different from that of background lead and sufficiently stable in time. This Account summarizes the main results obtained by the ILE project.

  5. Bone lead, hypertension, and lead nephropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Wedeen, R.P.

    1988-06-01

    There is considerable clinical evidence that excessive lead absorption causes renal failure with hypertension and predisposes individuals to hypertension even in the absence of detectable renal failure. Recent analyses of transiliac bone biopsies indicate that unsuspected elevated bone leads may reflect the cause (or contributing cause) of end-stage renal disease in 5% of the European dialysis population. In these patients, bone lead levels were four times higher than in unexposed cadavers (6 micrograms/g wet weight) and approximated levels found in lead workers (30 micrograms/g). At present, the most reliable index of the body lead burden is the CaNa2 EDTA lead mobilization test. In vivo tibial X-ray-induced X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a more practical noninvasive technique for assessing bone lead, which should find widespread application as a diagnostic tool and for epidemiologic studies.

  6. Experimental investigation of photon multiplicity and radiation cooling for 150 GeV electrons/positrons traversing diamond and Si crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsebom, K.; Medenwaldt, R.; Mikkelsen, U.; Møller, S. P.; Paludan, K.; Uggerhøj, E.; Worm, T.; Elsener, K.; Ballestrero, S.; Sona, P.; Romano, J.; Connell, S. H.; Sellschop, J. P. F.; Avakian, R. O.; Avetisian, A. E.; Taroian, S. P.

    1996-10-01

    Detailed experimental investigations of photon multiplicities for 150 GeV electrons/positrons traversing thin diamond and Si crystals have been performed. Along axial directions up to 10 photons are emitted in 1.5 mm diamond for a radiative energy loss larger than 4 GeV. This corresponds to a mean free path for photon emission of about two orders of magnitude shorter than in an amorphous target. This is in agreement with an enhanced radiative energy loss of ˜ 30 times that in amorphous targets. The strongly enhanced photon emission leads to radiation cooling which can result in particles exiting the crystal with a reduced angle to the axis. For incidences along planar directions the average multiplicity is still above one, even for the thinnest crystals used in the present experiment, so a single-photon spectrum can only be obtained for thicknesses ≤50 μm, which, on the other hand, is comparable to the coherence lengths for GeV photons, leading to destruction of the coherent effects.

  7. Parity Violation Inelastic Scattering Experiments at 6 GeV and 12 GeV Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkosky, Vincent A.; et. al.,

    2015-03-01

    We report on the measurement of parity-violating asymmetries in the deep inelastic scattering and nucleon resonance regions using inclusive scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from an unpolarized deuterium target. The effective weak couplings C$_{2q}$ are accessible through the deep-inelastic scattering measurements. Here we report a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry, which yields a determination of 2C$_{2u}$ - C$_{2d}$ with an improved precision of a factor of five relative to the previous result. This result indicates evidence with 95% confidence that the 2C$_{2u}$ - C$_{2d}$ is non-zero. This experiment also provides the first parity-violation data covering the whole resonance region, which provide constraints on nucleon resonance models. Finally, the program to extend these measurements at Jefferson Lab in the 12 GeV era using the Solenoidal Large Intensity Device was also discussed.

  8. Cross sections and transverse single-spin asymmetries in forward neutral-pion production from proton collisions at sqrt[s]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Jiang, H; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, D A; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2004-04-30

    Measurements of the production of forward high-energy pi(0) mesons from transversely polarized proton collisions at sqrt[s]=200 GeV are reported. The cross section is generally consistent with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations. The analyzing power is small at x(F) below about 0.3, and becomes positive and large at higher x(F), similar to the trend in data at sqrt[s]< or =20 GeV. The analyzing power is in qualitative agreement with perturbative QCD model expectations. This is the first significant spin result seen for particles produced with p(T)>1 GeV/c at a polarized proton collider. PMID:15169138

  9. Estimation of (41)Ar production in 0.1-1.1.0-GeV proton accelerator vaults using FLUKA Monte Carlo code.

    PubMed

    Biju, K; Sunil, C; Sarkar, P K

    2013-12-01

    The FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations are carried out to estimate the (41)Ar concentration inside accelerator vaults of various sizes when proton beams of energy 0.1-1.0 GeV are incident on thick copper and lead targets. Generally (41)Ar concentration is estimated using an empirical formula suggested in the NCRP 144, which assumes the activation is caused only by thermal neutrons alone. It is found that while the analytical and Monte Carlo techniques give similar results for the thermal neutron fluence inside the vault, the (41)Ar concentration is under-predicted by the empirical formula. It is also found that the thermal neutrons contribute ∼41 % to the total (41)Ar production while 56 % production is caused by neutrons between 0.025 and 1 eV. A modified factor is suggested for the use in the empirical expression to estimate the (41)Ar activity 0.1-1.0-GeV proton accelerator enclosures.

  10. Lead poisoning in children.

    PubMed

    Dapul, Heda; Laraque, Danielle

    2014-08-01

    There is no safe lead level in children. Primary prevention is the most effective way to bring about the complete removal of lead from the environment and eliminate lead poisoning as a public health concern. The National Lead Information Center can be reached via the Internet at www.epa.gov/lead and www.hud.gov/lead, or via phone at 1-800-424-LEAD (5323).

  11. Lead and the Romans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Aravind; Braun, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Lead poisoning has been a problem since early history and continues into modern times. An appealing characteristic of lead is that many lead salts are sweet. In the absence of cane and beet sugars, early Romans used "sugar of lead" (lead acetate) to sweeten desserts, fruits, and sour wine. People most at risk would have been those who consumed the…

  12. Conceptual design of the Project-X 1.3 GHz 3-8 GeV pulsed linac

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Eidelman, Y.; Nagaitsev, S.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Vostrikov, A.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Project-X, a multi-MW proton source, is under development at Fermilab. It enables a Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment via a new beam line pointed to DUSEL in Lead, South Dakota, and a broad suite of rare decay experiments. The initial acceleration is provided by a 3-GeV 1-mA CW superconducting linac. In a second stage, about 5% of the H{sup -} beam is accelerated up to 8 GeV in a 1.3 GHz SRF pulsed linac and injected into the Recycler/Main Injector complex. In order to mitigate problems with stripping foil heating during injection, higher current pulses are accelerated in the CW linac in conjunction with the 1 mA beam which is separated and further accelerated in the pulsed linac. The optimal current in the pulsed linac is discussed as well as the constraints that led to its selection. A conceptual design which covers optics and RF stability analysis is presented. Finally, the need for HOM damping is discussed.

  13. Observation of Z production in proton-lead collisions at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, RF; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Romero, D. A. Roa; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-09-01

    The first observation of Z boson production in proton-lead collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per proton-nucleon pair of = 5 TeV is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 1 .6 nb-1 collected with the LHCb detector. The Z candidates are reconstructed from pairs of oppositely charged muons with pseudorapidities between 2.0 and 4.5 and transverse momenta above 20 GeV /c. The invariant dimuon mass is restricted to the range 60 - 120 GeV /c. The Z production cross-section is measured to be

  14. Background model systematics for the Fermi GeV excess

    SciTech Connect

    Calore, Francesca; Cholis, Ilias; Weniger, Christoph

    2015-03-01

    The possible gamma-ray excess in the inner Galaxy and the Galactic center (GC) suggested by Fermi-LAT observations has triggered a large number of studies. It has been interpreted as a variety of different phenomena such as a signal from WIMP dark matter annihilation, gamma-ray emission from a population of millisecond pulsars, or emission from cosmic rays injected in a sequence of burst-like events or continuously at the GC. We present the first comprehensive study of model systematics coming from the Galactic diffuse emission in the inner part of our Galaxy and their impact on the inferred properties of the excess emission at Galactic latitudes 2° < |b| < 20° and 300 MeV to 500 GeV. We study both theoretical and empirical model systematics, which we deduce from a large range of Galactic diffuse emission models and a principal component analysis of residuals in numerous test regions along the Galactic plane. We show that the hypothesis of an extended spherical excess emission with a uniform energy spectrum is compatible with the Fermi-LAT data in our region of interest at 95% CL. Assuming that this excess is the extended counterpart of the one seen in the inner few degrees of the Galaxy, we derive a lower limit of 10.0° (95% CL) on its extension away from the GC. We show that, in light of the large correlated uncertainties that affect the subtraction of the Galactic diffuse emission in the relevant regions, the energy spectrum of the excess is equally compatible with both a simple broken power-law of break energy E(break) = 2.1 ± 0.2 GeV, and with spectra predicted by the self-annihilation of dark matter, implying in the case of bar bb final states a dark matter mass of m(χ)=49(+6.4)(-)(5.4)  GeV.

  15. Higgs-like boson at 750 GeV and genesis of baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Giardino, Pier Paolo; Zhang, Cen

    2016-07-01

    We propose that the diphoton excess at 750 GeV reported by ATLAS and CMS is due to the decay of an exo-Higgs scalar η associated with the breaking of a new S U (2 )e symmetry, dubbed exo-spin. New fermions, exo-quarks and exo-leptons, get TeV-scale masses through Yukawa couplings with η and generate its couplings to gluons and photons at one loop. The matter content of our model yields a B -L anomaly under S U (2 )e, whose breaking we assume entails a first-order phase transition. A nontrivial B -L asymmetry may therefore be generated in the early Universe, potentially providing a baryogenesis mechanism through the Standard Model (SM) sphaleron processes. The spontaneous breaking of S U (2 )e can, in principle, directly lead to electroweak symmetry breaking, thereby accounting for the proximity of the mass scales of the SM Higgs and the exo-Higgs. Our model can be distinguished from those comprising a singlet scalar and vector fermions by the discovery of TeV scale exo-vector bosons, corresponding to the broken S U (2 )e generators, at the LHC.

  16. Research Perspectives At Jefferson Lab: 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2004-07-01

    The plans for upgrading the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV are presented. The research program supporting that upgrade is illustrated with a few selected examples. The instrumentation under design to carry out that research program is discussed. Finally, a conceptual design of a future upgrade which combines a 25 GeV fixed-target facility and an electron-ion collider facility at a luminosity of up to 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and a CM energy of up to 65 GeV.

  17. Research Perspectives at Jefferson Lab: 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelis De Jager

    2003-05-01

    The plans for upgrading the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV are presented. The research program supporting that upgrade are illustrated with a few selected examples. The instrumentation under design to carry out that research program is discussed. Finally, a conceptual design of a future upgrade which combines a 25 GeV fixed-target facility and an electron-ion collider facility at a luminosity of up to 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and a CM energy of over 40 GeV.

  18. Research Perspectives at Jefferson Lab: 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2003-05-01

    The plans for upgrading the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV are presented. The research program supporting that upgrade is illustrated with a few selected examples. The instrumentation under design to carry out that research program is discussed. Finally, a conceptual design of a future upgrade which combines an electron-ion collider facility at a luminosity of up to 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and a CM energy of up to 65 GeV with a 25 GeV fixed-target facility.

  19. Research Perspectives at Jefferson Lab: 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2002-09-01

    The plans for upgrading the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV are presented. The research program supporting that upgrade are illustrated with a few selected examples. The instrumentation under design to carry out that research program is discussed. Finally, a conceptual design of a future upgrade which combines a 25 GeV fixed-target facility and an electron-ion collider facility at a luminosity of up to 10{sup 35}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and a CM energy of over 40 GeV.

  20. Inclusive charm cross sections in 800 GeV/ c p-p interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammar, R.; Banerjee, S.; Baland, J. F.; Ball, S.; Ball, R. C.; Bhat, P. C.; Bromberg, C.; Brun, R.; Canough, G. E.; Coffin, T.; Commichau, V.; Davis, R.; Dershem, T. O.; Dixon, R. L.; Fenker, H. C.; Ganguli, S. N.; Gensch, U.; Giokaris, N.; Girtler, P.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gress, J.; Gurtu, A.; Henri, V. P.; Hernandez, J. J.; Hrubec, J.; Iori, M.; Jones, L. W.; Knauss, D.; Kuhn, D.; Kwak, N.; Leedom, I. D.; Legros, P.; Lemonne, J.; Leutz, H.; Liu, X.; Malhotra, P. K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Mendez, G. E.; Mikocki, S.; Miller, R.; Naumann, T.; Neuhofer, G.; Nguyen, A.; Nikolic, M.; Nowak, H.; Pilette, P.; Poppleton, A.; Poirier, J.; Raghavan, R.; Rasner, K.; Reucroft, S.; Robertson, W. J.; Roe, B. P.; Roos, C. E.; Roth, A.; Senko, M.; Struczinski, W.; Subramanian, A.; Touboul, M. C.; Vonck, B.; Voyvodic, L.; Walker, W. D.; Waters, J. W.; Weber, M. F.; Webster, M. S.; Wickens, J.; Wild, C. F.; Youtsey, S.; LEBC-MPS Collaboration

    1987-01-01

    We report a measurement of the inclusive D/D¯ production cross section in 800 GeV/ c proton-proton interactions. The experiment used the high resolution bubble chamber LEBC exposed to an 800 GeV/ c proton beam at the Fermilab MPS. We obtain σ( D/ D¯)=59 -15+22μ b (statistical errors), having analysed 25% of the total data sample. Comparison with 400 GeV/ c pp dat a obtained with LEBC at CERN shows a D/D¯ cross section increase by a factor of 1.7 -0.5+0.7. This is in good agreement with fusion model calculations.

  1. Measurements of Compton Scattering on the Proton at 2 - 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Danagoulian, Areg

    2006-01-01

    Similar to elastic electron scattering, Compton Scattering on the proton at high momentum transfers(and high p⊥) can be an effective method to study its short-distance structure. An experiment has been carried out to measure the cross sections for Real Compton Scattering (RCS) on the proton for 2.3-5.7 GeV electron beam energies and a wide distribution of large scattering angles. The 25 kinematic settings sampled a domain of s = 5-11(GeV/c)2,-t = -7(GeV/c)2 and -u = 0.5-6.5(GeV/c)2. In addition, a measurement of longitudinal and transverse polarization transfer asymmetries was made at a 3.48 GeV beam energy and a scattering angle of θcm = 120°. These measurements were performed to test the existing theoretical mechanisms for this process as well as to determine RCS form factors. At the heart of the scientific motivation is the desire to understand the manner in which a nucleon interacts with external excitations at the above listed energies, by comparing and contrasting the two existing models – Leading Twist Mechanism and Soft Overlap “Handbag” Mechanism – and identify the dominant mechanism. Furthermore, the Handbag Mechanism allows one to calculate reaction observables in the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPD), which have the function of bridging the wide gap between the exclusive(form factors) and inclusive(parton distribution functions) description of the proton. The experiment was conducted in Hall A of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility(Jefferson Lab). It used a polarized and unpolarized electron beam, a 6% copper radiator with the thickness of 6.1% radiation lengths (to produce a bremsstrahlung photon beam), the Hall A liquid hydrogen target, a high resolution spectrometer with a focal plane polarimeter, and a photon hodoscope calorimeter. Results of the differential cross sections are presented, and discussed in the general context of the scientific motivation.

  2. Gev Gamma-ray Astronomy in the Era of GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is a high energy astronomy mission planned for launch in 2005. GLAST features two instruments; the Large Area Telescope (LAT) operating from 20 MeV - 300 GeV and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) operating from 10 keV - 25 MeV. GLAST observations will contribute to our understanding of active galactic nuclei and their jets, gamma-ray bursts, extragalactic and galactic diffuse emissions, dark matter, supernova remnants, pulsars, and the unidentified high energy gamma-ray sources. The LAT sensitivity is 4 x 10(exp -9) photons per square centimeter per second (greater than 100 MeV) for a one year all-sky survey, which is a factor of greater than 20 better than CGRO/EGRET. GLAST spectral observations of gamma-ray bursts cover over 6 orders of magnitude in energy thanks to the context observations of the GBM. The upper end of the LAT energy range merges with the low energy end of ground-based observatories to provide a remarkable new perspective on particle acceleration in the Universe.

  3. Hydrodynamical assessment of 200[ital A] GeV collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schnedermann, E.; Heinz, U. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg )

    1994-09-01

    We are analyzing the hydrodynamics of 200[ital A] GeV S+S collisions using a new approach which tries to quantify the uncertainties arising from the specific implementation of the hydrodynamical model. Based on a previous phenomenological analysis we use the global hydrodynamics model to show that the amount of initial flow, or initial energy density, cannot be determined from the hadronic momentum spectra. We additionally find that almost always a sizable transverse flow develops, which causes the system to freeze out, thereby limiting the flow velocity in itself. This freeze-out dominance in turn makes a distinction between a plasma and a hadron resonance gas equation of state very difficult, whereas a pure pion gas can easily be ruled out from present data. To complete the picture we also analyze particle multiplicity data, which suggest that chemical equilibrium is not reached with respect to the strange particles. However, the overpopulation of pions seems to be at most moderate, with a pion chemical potential far away from the Bose divergence.

  4. Variable gamma-ray sky at 1 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Pshirkov, M. S.; Rubtsov, G. I.

    2013-01-15

    We search for the long-term variability of the gamma-ray sky in the energy range E > 1 GeV with 168 weeks of the gamma-ray telescope Fermi-LAT data. We perform a full sky blind search for regions with variable flux looking for deviations from uniformity. We bin the sky into 12288 pixels using the HEALPix package and use the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test to compare weekly photon counts in each pixel with the constant flux hypothesis. The weekly exposure of Fermi-LAT for each pixel is calculated with the Fermi-LAT tools. We consider flux variations in a pixel significant if the statistical probability of uniformity is less than 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}, which corresponds to 0.05 false detections in the whole set. We identified 117 variable sources, 27 of which have not been reported variable before. The sources with previously unidentified variability contain 25 active galactic nuclei (AGN) belonging to the blazar class (11 BL Lacs and 14 FSRQs), one AGN of an uncertain type, and one pulsar PSR J0633+1746 (Geminga).

  5. Symmetries behind the 750 GeV diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Wei

    2016-06-01

    A 750 GeV resonance has been observed at the run 2 LHC in the diphoton channel. In this paper, we explain this resonance as a C P -even scalar S that triggers the spontaneous breaking of local U (1 )B or U (1 )B+L gauge symmetries. S couples to gluon and photon pairs at the one-loop level, where particles running in the loop are introduced to cancel anomalies, and the gluon fusion is the dominate production channel of S at the LHC. The model contains a scalar dark matter candidate stabilized by the new gauge symmetry. Our study shows that both the observed production cross section at the LHC and the best fit decay width of S can be explained in this model without conflicting with any other experimental data. Constraints on couplings associated with S are studied, which show that S has a negligible mixing with the standard model Higgs boson but sizable coupling with the dark matter.

  6. Exclusive processes at JLab at 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    Deeply virtual exclusive reactions provide a unique opportunity to probe the complex internal structure of the nucleon. They allow to access information about the correlations between parton transverse spatial and longitudinal momentum distributions from experimental observables. Dedicated experiments to study Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Deeply Virtual Meson Production (DVMP) have been carried out at Jefferson Lab using continuous electron beam with energies up to 6 GeV. Unpolarized cross sections, beam, target and double spin asymmetries have been measured for DVCS as well as for π0 exclusive electroproduction. The data from Hall B provide a wide kinematic coverage with Q2=1-4.5 GeV2, xB=0.1-0.5, and -t up to 2 GeV2. Hall A data have limited kinematic range partially overlapping with Hall B kinematics but provide a high accuracy measurements. Scaling tests of the DVCS cross sections provide solid evidence of twist-2 dominance, which makes chiral-even GPDs accessible even at modest Q2. We will discuss the interpretation of these data in terms of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) model. Successful description of the recent CLAS π0 exclusive production data within the framework of the GPD-based model provides a unique opportunity to access the chiral-odd GPDs.

  7. Nuclear interactions of 340-GeV pions in emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Tufail, A.; Ahmad, S.; Khan, A.R.; Zafar, M.; Shafi, M. )

    1990-10-01

    Some results on heavy- and shower-particle multiplicities produced in interactions of 340-GeV pions in nuclear emulsion are presented and compared with similar results in proton-nucleus interactions at different energies. Values of {l angle}{ital N}{sub {ital g}}{r angle} in {pi}{sup {minus}}{ital A} interactions are found to be less than its value in {ital pA} interactions at similar energies. This is understood in terms of additive quark model. The result on mean normalized multiplicity reveals that the values of {ital R}{sub {ital A}1} are almost constant in the forward direction for all values of {l angle}{nu}({ital N}{sub {ital g}}){r angle} and {ital R}{sub {ital A}1} increases with {l angle}{nu}({ital N}{sub {ital g}}){r angle} in the intervals 1.2{lt}{eta}{le}2.0 and {eta}{le}1.2.

  8. 750 GeV Diphoton Excess from the Goldstino Superpartner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, Christoffer; Torre, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    We interpret the diphoton excess recently reported by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations as a new resonance arising from the sgoldstino scalar, which is the superpartner of the Goldstone mode of spontaneous supersymmetry breaking, the goldstino. The sgoldstino is produced at the LHC via gluon fusion and decays to photons, with interaction strengths proportional to the corresponding gaugino masses over the supersymmetry breaking scale. Fitting the excess, while evading bounds from searches in the dijet, Z γ , Z Z , and W W final states, selects the supersymmetry breaking scale to be a few TeV and particular ranges for the gaugino masses. The two real scalars, corresponding to the C P -even and C P -odd parts of the complex sgoldstino, both have narrow widths, but their masses can be split of the order of 10-30 GeV by electroweak mixing corrections, which could account for the preference of a wider resonance width in the current low-statistics data. In the parameter space under consideration, tree level F -term contributions to the Higgs mass arise, in addition to the standard D -term contribution proportional to the Z -boson mass, which can significantly enhance the tree level Higgs mass.

  9. Early Commissioning Experience and Future Plans for the 12 GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Spata, Michael F.

    2014-12-01

    Jefferson Lab has recently completed the accelerator portion of the 12 GeV Upgrade for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. All 52 SRF cryomodules have been commissioned and operated with beam. The initial beam transport goals of demonstrating 2.2 GeV per pass, greater than 6 GeV in 3 passes to an existing experimental facility and greater than 10 GeV in 5-1/2 passes have all been accomplished. These results along with future plans to commission the remaining beamlines and to increase the performance of the accelerator to achieve reliable, robust and efficient operations at 12 GeV are presented.

  10. Lead Surveillance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on lead exposure is presented including forms of lead, sources, hematologic effects, neurologic effects, endocrine effects, renal effects, and reproductive and developmental effects. The purpose of the Lead Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Lead Exposure at LeRC are discussed.

  11. The Science and Experimental Equipment for the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Arrington, John; Bernstein, Aron; Brooks, William; Burker, Volker; Cardman, Lawrence; Carlson, Carl; Cates, Gordon; Chen, Jian-Ping; Dzierba, Alex; Ent, Rolf; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Fenker, Howard; Gao, Haiyan; Gasparian, Ashot; Goity, Jose; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holt, Roy; Hyde, Charles; De Jager, Cornelis; Jeschonnek, Sabine; Ji, Xiangdong; Jiang, Xiangdong; Jones, Mark; Keppel, Cynthia; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kumar, Krishna; Laget, Jean; Mack, David; Meyer, Curtis; Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Radyushkin, Anatoly; Ramsey-Musolf, Mike; Reimer, Paul; Richards, David; Rondon-Aramayo, Oscar; Salgado, Carlos; Smith, Elton; Schiavilla, Rocco; Souder, Paul; Stoler, Paul; Thomas, Anthony; Ulmer, Paul; Weinstein, Lawrence; Weiss, Christian

    2005-01-10

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) presents the compelling scientific case for upgrading the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV. Such a facility will make profound contributions to the study of hadronic matter.

  12. Reconciling the muon g -2 , a 125 GeV Higgs boson, and dark matter in gauge mediation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoladze, Ilia; Shafi, Qaisar; Ün, Cem Salih

    2015-12-01

    We present a class of models in the framework of gauge mediation supersymmetry breaking where the standard model is supplemented by additional U (1 ) symmetry which acts only on the third generation fermions. The messenger fields carry a nontrivial U (1 ) charge and are vectorlike particles under this symmetry. This leads to additional contributions to the soft supersymmetry breaking mass terms for the third-generation squarks and sleptons. In this framework we show that the muon g -2 anomaly, the observed 125 GeV Higgs boson mass and the detected relic dark matter abundance (gravitino in our case) can be simultaneously accommodated. The resolution of the muon g -2 anomaly, in particular, yields the result that masses of squarks in the first two families, as well the gluino mass, should be ≲2.5 TeV , which will be tested at LHC14.

  13. RESULTS FROM PP AT 62.4 AND 200 GeV WITH THE BRAHMS EXPERIMENTATION.

    SciTech Connect

    VIDEBAEK,F.

    2007-02-11

    Measurements of elementary pp collisions are essential for understanding heavy ion collisions. R.esu1ts for pp collisions at 200 and 62.4 GeV are presented. At both energies NLO pQCD describes pion production well. The measured pion transverse single spin asymmetries are very large at 62.4 GeV and are reasonably well described by models relying on pQCD at transverse momenta larger than 1 GeV/c.

  14. The First Fermi-LAT Catalog of Sources Above 10 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Moiseev, Alexander A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a catalog of gamma-ray sources at energies above 10 GeV based on data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) accumulated during the first 3 yr of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of >10 GeV sources (1FHL) has 514 sources. For each source we present location, spectrum, a measure of variability, and associations with cataloged sources at other wavelengths. We found that 449 (87%) could be associated with known sources, of which 393 (76% of the 1FHL sources) are active galactic nuclei. Of the 27 sources associated with known pulsars, we find 20 (12) to have significant pulsations in the range >10 GeV (>25 GeV). In this work we also report that, at energies above 10 GeV, unresolved sources account for 27% +/- 8% of the isotropic ? -ray background, while the unresolved Galactic population contributes only at the few percent level to the Galactic diffuse background. We also highlight the subset of the 1FHL sources that are best candidates for detection at energies above 50-100 GeV with current and future ground-based ? -ray observatories.

  15. Energies of GRB blast waves and prompt efficiencies as implied by modelling of X-ray and GeV afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniamini, Paz; Nava, Lara; Duran, Rodolfo Barniol; Piran, Tsvi

    2015-11-01

    We consider a sample of 10 gamma-ray bursts with long-lasting ( ≳ 102 s) emission detected by Fermi/Large Area Telescope and for which X-ray data around 1 d are also available. We assume that both the X-rays and the GeV emission are produced by electrons accelerated at the external forward shock, and show that the X-ray and the GeV fluxes lead to very different estimates of the initial kinetic energy of the blast wave. The energy estimated from GeV is on average ˜50 times larger than the one estimated from X-rays. We model the data (accounting also for optical detections around 1 d, if available) to unveil the reason for this discrepancy and find that good modelling within the forward shock model is always possible and leads to two possibilities: (i) either the X-ray emitting electrons (unlike the GeV emitting electrons) are in the slow-cooling regime or (ii) the X-ray synchrotron flux is strongly suppressed by Compton cooling, whereas, due to the Klein-Nishina suppression, this effect is much smaller at GeV energies. In both cases the X-ray flux is no longer a robust proxy for the blast wave kinetic energy. On average, both cases require weak magnetic fields (10-6 ≲ ɛB ≲ 10-3) and relatively large isotropic kinetic blast wave energies 10^{53} erg<{E}_{0,kin}<10^{55} erg corresponding to large lower limits on the collimated energies, in the range 10^{52} erg<{E}_{θ ,kin}<5× 10^{52} erg for an ISM (interstellar medium) environment with n ˜ 1 cm-3 and 10^{52} erg<{E}_{θ ,kin}<10^{53} erg for a wind environment with A* ˜ 1. These energies are larger than those estimated from the X-ray flux alone, and imply smaller inferred values of the prompt efficiency mechanism, reducing the efficiency requirements on the still uncertain mechanism responsible for prompt emission.

  16. Photoproduction of 7pi0 on hydrogen with CLAS from 1.1 GeV - 5.45 GeV using e+e --gamma decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunkel, Michael C.

    Photoproduction of the pi0 meson was studied using the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility using tagged incident photon energies spanning the range Egamma = 1.1 GeV - 5.45 GeV. The measurement is performed on a liquid hydrogen target in the reaction gammap → pe +e--(gamma). The final state of the reaction is the sum of two subprocesses for pi0 decay, the Dalitz decay mode of gamma0 → e +e--gamma and conversion mode where one photon from pi0 → gammagamma decay is converted into a e+e -- pair. This specific final state reaction avoided limitations caused by single prompt track triggering, while the span of incident photon energies allowed for measurements of gamma0 photoproduction to a domain never systematically measured before. We report the measurement of the gamma0 differential cross sections dsigma/dO and dsigma/dt. The angular distributions agree well with the SAID parametrization for incident beam energies below 3 GeV. As a result with this new data, the chi2/p.d.f. of the global fit in the SAID parametrization improved to 3.1 from 3.7. For incident beam energies greater than 3 GeV a comparison of a model based on Generalized Parton Distributions (GPD) with experimental data shows significant discrepancy, requiring further model developments to describe the data.

  17. Lead and tap water

    MedlinePlus

    Water contaminated with lead ... The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) monitors drinking water in the United States. It requires water suppliers to produce annual water quality reports. These reports include information about lead amounts, and they ...

  18. VOLUMETRIC LEAD ASSAY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.; S.K. Dua; David Roelant; Sachin Kumar

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a system for handling and radioassay of lead, consisting of a robot, a conveyor, and a gamma spectrometer. The report also presents a cost-benefit analysis of options: radioassay and recycling lead vs. disposal as waste.

  19. Exposures to lead.

    PubMed

    Callan, Anna C; Hinwood, Andrea L

    2011-01-01

    The Pacific Basin Consortium for Environment and Health hosted a workshop on Exposures to Lead. Speakers from Australia and the United States of America addressed current research knowledge on lead exposures and health effects in children, risk assessment and communication issues in dealing with lead exposure sources, different methods for assessing exposure, and the variety of scenarios where lead still remains a pollutant of concern. Mining continues to be a source of lead for many communities, and approaches to reducing exposures in these settings present particular challenges. A Perth Declaration for the Global Reduction of Childhood Lead Exposure was signed by participants of the meeting and is aimed at increasing attention to the need to continue to assess lead in the environment and to develop strategies to reduce lead in the environment and exposure by communities. PMID:21714377

  20. Exposures to lead.

    PubMed

    Callan, Anna C; Hinwood, Andrea L

    2011-01-01

    The Pacific Basin Consortium for Environment and Health hosted a workshop on Exposures to Lead. Speakers from Australia and the United States of America addressed current research knowledge on lead exposures and health effects in children, risk assessment and communication issues in dealing with lead exposure sources, different methods for assessing exposure, and the variety of scenarios where lead still remains a pollutant of concern. Mining continues to be a source of lead for many communities, and approaches to reducing exposures in these settings present particular challenges. A Perth Declaration for the Global Reduction of Childhood Lead Exposure was signed by participants of the meeting and is aimed at increasing attention to the need to continue to assess lead in the environment and to develop strategies to reduce lead in the environment and exposure by communities.

  1. PHOTOEMISSION PROPERTIES OF LEAD.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY,J.; RAO,T.; WARREN,J.; SEKUTOWICZ,J.; LEFFERTS,R.; LIPSKI,A.

    2004-07-05

    In this paper we present a study of the photoemission properties of lead at several UV wavelengths, including a study of the damage threshold of electroplated lead under laser cleaning. A quantum efficiency in excess of 0.1% has been achieved for a laser cleaned, electroplated lead sample with a laser wavelength of 193 nm. Niobium cathodes have been measured for comparison, and lead is found to be a superior photoemitter for all measured wavelengths.

  2. Transplacental transport of lead

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Neurotoxicity is the major health effect from exposure to lead for infants and young children, and there is current concern regarding possible toxic effects of lead on the child while in utero. there is no placental-fetal barrier to lead transport. Maternal and fetal blood lead levels are nearly identical, so lead passes through the placenta unencumbered. Lead has been measured in the fetal brain as early as the end of the first trimester (13 weeks). There is a similar rate of increase in brain size and lead content throughout pregnancy in the fetus of mothers in the general population, so concentration of lead probably does not differ greatly during gestation unless exposure of the mother changes. Cell-specific sensitivity to the toxic effects of lead, however, may be greater the younger the fetus. Lead toxicity to the nervous system is characterized by edema or swelling of the brain due to altered permeability of capillary endothelial cells. Experimental studies suggest that immature endothelial cells forming the capillaries of the developing brain are less resistant to the effects of lead, permitting fluid and cations including lead to reach newly formed components of the brain, particularly astrocytes and neurons. Also, the ability of astrocytes and neurons to sequester lead in the form of lead protein complexes occurs only in the later stages of fetal development, permitting lead in maturing brain cells to interact with vital subcellular organelles, particularly mitochondria, which are the major cellular energy source. Intracellular lead also affects binding sites for calcium which, in turn, may affect numerous cell functions including neurotransmitter release.

  3. Revisiting the pion leading-twist distribution amplitude within the QCD background field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Tao; Wu, Xing-Gang; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Huang, Tao; Fu, Hai-Bing; Han, Hua-Yong

    2014-07-01

    We study the pion leading-twist distribution amplitude (DA) within the framework of Shifman-Vainshtein-Zakharov sum rules under the background field theory. To improve the accuracy of the sum rules, we expand both the quark propagator and the vertex (z.D↔)n of the correlator up to dimension-six operators in the background field theory. The sum rules for the pion DA moments are obtained, in which all condensates up to dimension-six have been taken into consideration. Using the sum rules, we obtain ⟨ξ2⟩|1 GeV=0.338±0.032, ⟨ξ4⟩|1GeV=0.211±0.030 and ⟨ξ6⟩|1GeV=0.163±0.030. It is shown that the dimension-six condensates shall provide sizable contributions to the pion DA moments. We show that the first Gegenbauer moment of the pion leading-twist DA is a2π|1 GeV=0.403±0.093, which is consistent with those obtained in the literature within errors but prefers a larger central value as indicated by lattice QCD predictions.

  4. Lead Poisoning in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guyaux, Susan

    1990-01-01

    Overexposure to lead can permanently impair a child's mental and physical development. This article discusses sources of lead paint, survey and testing methods, management and abatement plans, drinking water contamination, and associated federal standards. Although lead is present in soil and in art, theater, and vocational programs, no federal…

  5. Lead Poisoning (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Lead Poisoning KidsHealth > For Parents > Lead Poisoning Print A A ... Family en español La intoxicación por plomo About Lead Poisoning If you have young kids, it's important to ...

  6. Learn about Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... Determine if your family is at risk for lead poisoning with the Lead Poisoning Home Checklist (PDF) . Top of page What do I do if I think my child or I have been exposed to lead? Talk to your pediatrician, general physician, or local ...

  7. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeckx, Roger L.

    1986-01-01

    Urban children are exposed to lead through the air they breathe, the water they drink, and the food and nonfood substances they ingest. The history, diagnosis, and treatment of lead poisoning in these children are discussed. Includes information on the toxicology of lead and the various risk classes. (JN)

  8. Lead Poisoning in Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M., Ed.; Linakis, James G., Ed.; Anderson, Angela C., Ed.

    The magnitude of childhood lead poisoning has been inexplicably neglected by modern medicine and by legislators. However, since the 1970s, increased attention has been focused on lead poisoning, and advances have been made in several areas, including understanding of the neurodevelopmental and behavioral ramifications of lead poisoning, and…

  9. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, A. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Early symptoms of lead poisoning in children are often overlooked. Lead poisoning has its greatest effects on the brain and nervous system. The obvious long-term solution to the lead poisoning problem is removal of harmful forms of the metal from the environment. (JN)

  10. Lead and children

    PubMed Central

    Abelsohn, Alan R.; Sanborn, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To provide family physicians with a practical, evidence-based approach to screening for and preventing children’s exposure to lead. SOURCES OF INFORMATION MEDLINE was searched using terms relevant to lead exposure and poisoning. We reviewed English-language articles published in 2003 to 2008. Most cited studies provide level 2 or 3 evidence. MAIN MESSAGE Lead is a developmental neurotoxin. Children are most commonly exposed and they are most vulnerable. Lead exposure has been associated with many cognitive and motor deficits, as well as distractibility and other characteristics of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Although children’s blood lead levels have declined considerably over the past 3 decades with removal of lead from gasoline and paint, children can still be exposed to lead from lead paint in older homes, toys, and other sources. Because post-exposure treatment cannot reverse the cognitive effects of lead exposure, preventing lead exposure is essential. CONCLUSION Family physicians have an important role in screening for children at high risk of lead exposure, and in educating families to prevent the exposure of children to lead. PMID:20547517

  11. Lead poisoning: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendel, Neil

    1993-01-01

    A problem that should be of great concern to all of us is the lead poisoning of children. First, I would like to present a short overview concerning the reasons everyone should care about lead poisoning, then discuss the history of lead poisoning, what is happening today across the country, and the future.

  12. Lead in Christmas lights.

    PubMed

    Laquatra, Joseph; Coyne, Lelia M; Pierce, Mark R

    2008-12-01

    A recent California proposition led to awareness that lead is a stabilizer in the Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) jacketing that covers conductors in Christmas lights. The objective of this study is to examine the level of accessible lead in Christmas lights. Following U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) Lead Inspectors' procedures, researchers at Cornell University and in Nebraska conducted wipe samples and total lead content samples of newly purchased and older Christmas light sets. Samples were analyzed for lead content. Lead was present in varying amounts on all samples. The amount of lead from the Nebraska samples, normalized to length of strings, was independent of analyzing laboratory, analysis method, age of string, and repeat sampling, both immediately and after extended storage. A later analysis of these same strings by the Cornell team showed diminished quantities. Amounts of surface lead normalized to crude estimates of the area of light string indicated surface concentrations in excess of U.S. EPA clearance level for lead on window sills. Whether exposure to lead in Christmas lights affects blood lead levels in humans is unknown. No standards exist for lead content in this product, and no protocols exist for conducting tests on it. Therefore, consumers may wish to exercise caution to reduce possible exposure.

  13. Precision measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at √s = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-26

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, ALL, in polarized pp collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 200 GeV. The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC pp data. Lastly, the measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x > 0.05 .

  14. Precision measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at √s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-26

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, ALL, in polarized pp collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 200 GeV. The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC pp data. Lastly, the measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x > 0.05 .

  15. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry and cross section for inclusivejet production in polarized proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2006-08-10

    We report a measurement of the longitudinal double-spinasymmetry A_LL and the differential cross section for inclusivemidrapidity jet production in polarized proton collisions at sqrt(s)=200GeV. The cross section data cover transverse momenta 5leading order perturbative QCD evaluations.The A_LL data cover 5

  16. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry and cross section for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at square root of s = 200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Mazumdar, M R Dutta; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; LaPointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Buren, G Van; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Molen, A M Vander; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2006-12-22

    We report a measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A(LL) and the differential cross section for inclusive midrapidity jet production in polarized proton collisions at square root of s = 200 GeV. The cross section data cover transverse momenta 5 < pT < 50 GeV/c and agree with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD evaluations. The A(LL) data cover 5 < pT < 17 GeV/c and disfavor at 98% C.L. maximal positive gluon polarization in the polarized nucleon. PMID:17280342

  17. Determination of alpha/sub s/ from energy-energy correlations in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation at 29 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.R.

    1987-10-01

    We have studied the energy-energy correlation in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation into hadrons at ..sqrt..s = 29 GeV using the Mark II detector at PEP. We find to O(..cap alpha../sub s//sup 2/) that ..cap alpha../sub s/ = 0.158 +- .003 +- .008 if hadronization is described by string fragmentation. Independent fragmentation schemes give ..cap alpha../sub s/ = .10 - .14, and give poor agreement with the data. A leading-log shower fragmentation model is found to describe the data well.

  18. Personal Dose Equivalent Conversion Coefficients For Photons To 1 GEV

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.; Hertel, N. E.

    2010-09-27

    The personal dose equivalent, H{sub p}(d), is the quantity recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) to be used as an approximation of the protection quantity Effective Dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations. The personal dose equivalent can be defined for any location and depth within the body. Typically, the location of interest is the trunk where personal dosemeters are usually worn and in this instance a suitable approximation is a 30 cm X 30 cm X 15 cm slab-type phantom. For this condition the personal dose equivalent is denoted as H{sub p,slab}(d) and the depths, d, are taken to be 0.007 cm for non-penetrating and 1 cm for penetrating radiation. In operational radiation protection a third depth, 0.3 cm, is used to approximate the dose to the lens of the eye. A number of conversion coefficients for photons are available for incident energies up to several MeV, however, data to higher energies are limited. In this work conversion coefficients up to 1 GeV have been calculated for H{sub p,slab}(10) and H{sub p,slab}(3) using both the kerma approximation and by tracking secondary charged particles. For H{sub p}(0.07) the conversion coefficients were calculated, but only to 10 MeV due to computational limitations. Additionally, conversions from air kerma to H{sub p,slab}(d) have been determined and are reported. The conversion coefficients were determined for discrete incident energies, but analytical fits of the coefficients over the energy range are provided. Since the inclusion of air can influence the production of secondary charged particles incident on the face of the phantom conversion coefficients have been determined both in vacuo and with the source and slab immersed within a sphere in air. The conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent are compared to the appropriate protection quantity, calculated according to the recommendations of the latest International Commission on

  19. Polarization of prompt J/{psi} in pp{yields}J/{psi}+X at {radical}(s)=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hee Sok; Lee, Jungil; Kim, Seyong; Yu, Chaehyun

    2011-02-01

    Within the framework of the nonrelativistic QCD factorization approach, we compute the cross section and polarization of prompt J/{psi} produced from proton-proton collisions at the center-of-momentum energy {radical}(s)=200 GeV. We present the transverse-momentum distribution in the forward-rapidity region 1.2<|y|<2.2 and the rapidity distribution over the transverse-momentum range 2 GeVGeV. The perturbative contributions are computed at leading order in the strong coupling constant. We predict slight transverse polarization of J/{psi} in the forward-rapidity region, while that for the midrapidity region is slightly longitudinal. The transverse-momentum distribution agrees well with the PHENIX preliminary data and the color-singlet-model prediction at next-to-leading order in {alpha}{sub s}, but disagrees with the result from the leading-order color-singlet model or the s-channel-cut method.

  20. Law: toxic lead aftermath

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, E.A.

    1983-03-01

    The paper describes the events which began with an EPA proposal to weaken the lead-in-gas regulations. Because of the outcry from environmentalists and expert testimony from the medical community, the EPA reversed its policy and issued new standards which would reduce lead emissions between 1983 and 1990 by 34 percent (128,000 tons). Scientific evidence presented showed a clear reduction in blood lead levels from 1976-1980 which paralleled decreases of lead in gasoline. Results from lead poisoning clinics which linked chronic low lead exposures to decreased classroom performance and other learning disabilities were presented. Lawyers from several environmental groups took the agency to court on the related issue of attaining national ambient air quality standards for lead. (JMT)

  1. Lead in the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pattee, O.H.; Pain, D.J.; Hoffman, David J.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Burton, G. Allen; Cairns, John=

    2003-01-01

    Anthropogenic uses of lead have probably altered its availability and environmental distribution more than any other toxic element. Consequently, lead concentrations in many living organisms may be approaching thresholds of toxicity for the adverse effects of lead. Such thresholds are difficult to define, as they vary with the chemical and physical form of lead, exposure regime, other elements present and also vary both within and between species. The technological capability to accurately quantify low lead concentrations has increased over the last decade, and physiological and behavioral effects have been measured in wildlife with tissue lead concentrations below those previously considered safe for humans.s.236 Consequently. lead criteria for the protection of wildlife and human health are frequently under review, and 'thresholds' of lead toxicity are being reconsidered. Proposed lead criteria for the protection of natural resources have been reviewed by Eisler. Uptake of lead by plants is limited by its generally low availability in soils and sediments, and toxicity may be limited by storage mechanisms and its apparently limited translocation within most plants. Lead does not generally accumulate within the foliar parts of plants, which limits its transfer to higher trophic levels. Although lead may concentrate in plant and animal tissues, no evidence of biomagnification exists. Acid deposition onto surface waters and soils with low buffering capacity may influence the availability of lead for uptake by plants and animals, and this may merit investigation at susceptible sites. The biological significance of chronic low-level lead exposure to wildlife is sometimes difficult to quantify. Animals living in urban environments or near point sources of lead emission are inevitably subject to greater exposure to lead and enhanced risk of lead poisoning. Increasingly strict controls on lead emissions in many countries have reduced exposure to lead from some sources

  2. Doubly-tagged Ds decays at 4.03 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, Ernest N.

    1995-11-01

    The [...] is a pseudoscalar meson composed of two second generation quarks, the heavy charm and the light strange. The bulk of our knowledge of the [...] comes from secondary production via B decays. These experiments have high statistics but are poorly suited to absolute branching fraction or production cross-section measurements. The best way to perform those is to use double-tagging of threshold pair production. Unfortunately, there is no strong resonance near [...] threshold, making it difficult to obtain sufficient statistics. This thesis makes use of the [...] integrated luminosity collected by the Beijing Spectrometer from the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider at 4.03 GeV. This energy was chosen because the coupled-channel model of Eichten et al. predicts an enhancement there of the [...] cross section to somewhat below 1 nb. We attempt to fully reconstruct hadronic and semileptonic [...] pairs from six-prong events not containing any photons. We combine the [...] from kinematic fitting and particle identification to form a single value, the joint confidence level, for each event. Using this in the analysis yields five hadronic events, with multiple combinations per event. Since the [...] principally decays to resonant moves, we preferentially select those combinations which lead to resonant two-body masses. This gives us a signal containing 7 resonant decays and 3 non-resonant [...] decays. We use Monte Carlo efficiencies and knowledge of the ratio [...] to estimate the production rates represented by these tags. We perform a likelihood analysis using those numbers, together with the absolute branching fractions, to obtain a value of [...] one sigma below the coupled channel model. Using only relative [...] branching fractions, we fit to a value for the ratio [...] This is within one sigma of the current world average, and differs [...] noticeably from the model of Bauer, Stech, and Wirbel value of [...

  3. Regge approach to charged-pion photoproduction at invariant energies above 2 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sibirtsev, A; Haidenbauer, J; Krewald, S; Lee, T S.H.; Meissner, U -G; Thomas, A W

    2007-10-01

    A Regge model with absorptive corrections is employed in a global analysis of the world data on positive and negative pion photoproduction for photon energies from 3 to 8~GeV. In this region resonance contributions are expected to be negligible so that the available experimental information on differential cross sections and single polarization observables at $-t{\\leq}2$ GeV$^2$ allows us to determine the non-resonant part of the reaction amplitude reliably. The model amplitude is then used to predict observables for photon energies below $3$ GeV. Differences between our predictions and data in this energy region are systematically examined as possible signals for the presence of excited baryons. We find that the data available for the polarized photon asymmetry show promising resonance signatures at invariant energies around 2~GeV. With regard to differential cross sections the analysis of negative pion photoproduction data, obtained recently at JLab, indicates likewise the presence of resonance structures around 2~GeV.

  4. Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Positrons, A Proposal for the 50-GeV Beam in the FFTB

    SciTech Connect

    G. Alexander; P. Anthony; V. Bharadwaj; Yu.K. Batygin; T. Behnke; S. Berridge; G.R. Bower; W. Bugg; R. Carr; E. Chudakov; J.E. Clendenin; F.J. Decker; Yu. Efremenko; T. Fieguth; K. Flottmann; M. Fukuda; V. Gharibyan; T. Handler; T. Hirose; R.H. Iverson; Yu. Kamyshkov; H. Kolanoski; T. Lohse; Chang-guo Lu; K.T. McDonald; N. Meyners; R. Michaels; A.A. Mikhailichenko; K. Monig; G. Moortgat-Pick; M. Olson; T. Omori; D. Onoprienko; N. Pavel; R. Pitthan; M. Purohit; L. Rinolfi; K.P. Schuler; J.C. Sheppard; S. Spanier; A. Stahl; Z.M. Szalata; J. Turner; D. Walz; A. Weidemann; J. Weisend

    2003-06-01

    The full exploitation of the physics potential of future linear colliders such as the JLC, NLC, and TESLA will require the development of polarized positron beams. In the proposed scheme of Balakin and Mikhailichenko [1] a helical undulator is employed to generate photons of several MeV with circular polarization which are then converted in a relatively thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons. This experiment, E-166, proposes to test this scheme to determine whether such a technique can produce polarized positron beams of sufficient quality for use in future linear colliders. The experiment will install a meter-long, short-period, pulsed helical undulator in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at SLAC. A low-emittance 50-GeV electron beam passing through this undulator will generate circularly polarized photons with energies up to 10 MeV. These polarized photons are then converted to polarized positrons via pair production in thin targets. Titanium and tungsten targets, which are both candidates for use in linear colliders, will be tested. The experiment will measure the flux and polarization of the undulator photons, and the spectrum and polarization of the positrons produced in the conversion target, and compare the measurement results to simulations. Thus the proposed experiment directly tests for the first time the validity of the simulation programs used for the physics of polarized pair production in finite matter, in particular the effects of multiple scattering on polarization. Successful comparison of the experimental results to the simulations will lead to greater confidence in the proposed designs of polarized positrons sources for the next generation of linear colliders. This experiment requests six-weeks of time in the FFTB beam line: three weeks for installation and setup and three weeks of beam for data taking. A 50-GeV beam with about twice the SLC emittance at a repetition rate of 30 Hz is required.

  5. Lead Poison Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    With NASA contracts, Whittaker Corporations Space Science division has developed an electro-optical instrument to mass screen for lead poisoning. Device is portable and detects protoporphyrin in whole blood. Free corpuscular porphyrins occur as an early effect of lead ingestion. Also detects lead in urine used to confirm blood tests. Test is inexpensive and can be applied by relatively unskilled personnel. Similar Whittaker fluorometry device called "drug screen" can measure morphine and quinine in urine much faster and cheaper than other methods.

  6. Lead and growth.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Masayuki; Nishi, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-01

    Lead is highly toxic to the human body and children are much more vulnerable to lead toxicity than adults. Many studies have revealed that relatively low levels of blood lead can adversely affect human health, especially childhood growth and development. Blood lead levels (BLL) of children and adults have been decreasing recently almost all over the world, but a safety level for blood lead does not exist, and lead exposure is still a serious health problem especially for fetuses and children. Maternal lead burden causes fetal lead exposure and increases the risk of abortions, prematurity, low birth weight, and some minor anomalies. Infant BLL are inversely associated with weight gain. A negative relationship between somatic growth and BLL in children has been revealed. It has been suggested that lead exposure causes decrease of gonadotropin secretion of adolescents and delay of pubertal development. Several studies have revealed that children who are exposed to cigarette smoke have higher BLL than children who are not. Children should be protected from cigarette smoke for the purpose of avoiding the risk of increased BLL which might adversely affect their intellectual development and physical growth.

  7. Toxicological properties of lead.

    PubMed Central

    Damstra, T

    1977-01-01

    The pathological effects of lead on the renal, nervous, reproductive, endocrine, and immune systems have been reviewed. Emphasis is placed on reported subclinical effects due to chronic, low-level lead exposure. The crucial issue of whether subtle behavioral, intellectual, and developmental impairment occurs in young children, as a result of lead-induced CNS damage is discussed in detail. This issue remains unresolved. Further studies are needed in order to determine the long-term health effects of continuous, low-level lead exposure. PMID:198205

  8. Acute lead arsenate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Tallis, G A

    1989-12-01

    Three cases of acute lead arsenate poisoning which occurred in South Australia during a 12 month interval are described. The case reports demonstrate a number of features of the characteristic clinical syndrome which may follow ingestion of lead arsenate. The recommended management is immediate gastric lavage and subsequent chelation therapy with calcium EDTA and dimercaprol. Early gastric lavage may prevent significant lead absorption. However, arsenic acid (produced in the stomach when lead arsenate reacts with hydrochloric acid) is relatively water soluble and prompt gastric lavage is unlikely to prevent extensive arsenic absorption. It remains controversial as to whether chelation with dimercaprol prevents arsenical neuropathy.

  9. Lead poisoning: case studies

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, J N; Taylor, A; Bennett, P N

    2002-01-01

    Early clinical features of lead toxicity are non-specific and an occupational history is particularly valuable. Lead in the body comprises 2% in the blood (t1/2 35 days) and 95% in bone and dentine (t1/2 20–30 years). Blood lead may remain elevated for years after cessation from long exposure, due to redistribution from bone. Blood lead concentration is the most widely used marker for inorganic lead exposure. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) concentration in blood usefully reflects lead exposure over the prior 3 months. Symptomatic patients with blood lead concentration >2.4 µmol l−1 (50 µg dl−1) or in any event >3.8 µmol l−1 (80 µg dl−1) should receive sodium calciumedetate i.v., followed by succimer by mouth for 19 days. Asymptomatic patients with blood lead concentration >2.4 µmol l−1 (50 µg dl−1) may be treated with succimer alone. Sodium calciumedetate should be given with dimercaprol to treat lead encephalopathy. PMID:11994050

  10. Detection of Pulsed Gamma Rays Above 100 GeV from the Crab Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VERITAS Collaboration; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bouvier, A.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Christiansen, J. L.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gibbs, K.; Gillanders, G. H.; Godambe, S.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Huan, H.; Hughes, G.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Imran, A.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Lyutikov, M.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; Majumdar, P.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; McCutcheon, M.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nuñez, P.; Ong, R. A.; Orr, M.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pizlo, F.; Pohl, M.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Ruppel, J.; Saxon, D. B.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Şentürk, G. D.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Tešić, G.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Tsurusaki, K.; Tyler, J.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Vivier, M.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.

    2011-10-01

    We report the detection of pulsed gamma rays from the Crab pulsar at energies above 100 giga-electron volts (GeV) with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) array of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The detection cannot be explained on the basis of current pulsar models. The photon spectrum of pulsed emission between 100 mega-electron volts and 400 GeV is described by a broken power law that is statistically preferred over a power law with an exponential cutoff. It is unlikely that the observation can be explained by invoking curvature radiation as the origin of the observed gamma rays above 100 GeV. Our findings require that these gamma rays be produced more than 10 stellar radii from the neutron star.

  11. 750 GeV dark pion: Cousin of a dark G -parity odd WIMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yang; Berger, Joshua; Lu, Ran

    2016-04-01

    We point out a potential common origin of the recently observed 750 GeV diphoton resonance and a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) candidate. In a dark QCD sector with an unbroken dark G parity, the diphoton resonance could be a dark G -even pion, while the WIMP could be the lightest dark G -odd pion. Both particles are Standard Model gauge singlets and have the same decay constant. For the dark pion decay constant of around 500 GeV, both the diphoton excess at the LHC and the dark matter thermal abundance can be accommodated in our model. Our model predicts additional dark G -even and dark G -odd color-octet pions within reach of the 13 TeV LHC runs. For the 5 +5 ¯ model, compatible with the grand unified theories, the WIMP mass is predicted to be within (613,750) GeV.

  12. Detection of pulsed gamma rays above 100 GeV from the Crab pulsar.

    PubMed

    Aliu, E; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bouvier, A; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Christiansen, J L; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Gibbs, K; Gillanders, G H; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Huan, H; Hughes, G; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Lyutikov, M; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; McCann, A; McCutcheon, M; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nuñez, P; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pizlo, F; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Ruppel, J; Saxon, D B; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Sentürk, G D; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Tešić, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Tsurusaki, K; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B

    2011-10-01

    We report the detection of pulsed gamma rays from the Crab pulsar at energies above 100 giga-electron volts (GeV) with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) array of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The detection cannot be explained on the basis of current pulsar models. The photon spectrum of pulsed emission between 100 mega-electron volts and 400 GeV is described by a broken power law that is statistically preferred over a power law with an exponential cutoff. It is unlikely that the observation can be explained by invoking curvature radiation as the origin of the observed gamma rays above 100 GeV. Our findings require that these gamma rays be produced more than 10 stellar radii from the neutron star.

  13. The JLAB 3D program at 12 GeV (TMDs + GPDs)

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The Jefferson Lab CEBAF accelerator is undergoing an upgrade that will increase the beam energy up to 12 GeV. The three experimental Halls operating in the 6-GeV era are upgrading their detectors to adapt their performances to the new available kinematics, and a new Hall (D) is being built. The investigation of the three-dimensional nucleon structure both in the coordinate and in the momentum space represents an essential part of the 12-GeV physics program, and several proposals aiming at the extraction of related observables have been already approved in Hall A, B and C. In this proceedings, the focus of the JLab 3D program will be described, and a selection of proposals will be discussed.

  14. Fermi LAT Search for Photon Lines from 30 to 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T.H.; Buson, S.; /Padua U. /Barcelona, IEEC /Stanford U. /SLAC /IASF, Milan /Padua U. /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /NASA, Goddard /JAXA, Sagamihara /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U., Baltimore County /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /Stanford U. /SLAC /Perugia U. /Stanford U. /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U. /SLAC /CENBG, Gradignan /Stanford U. /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U. /SLAC /Ecole Polytechnique /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U. /SLAC /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /ASDC, Frascati /NASA, Goddard /Penn State U. /Maryland U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U. /SLAC /DAPNIA, Saclay /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Bonn, Max Planck Inst., Radioastron. /Alabama U., Huntsville /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /ICREA, Barcelona /NASA, Goddard /Ecole Polytechnique /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stanford U. /SLAC /UC, Santa Cruz /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U. /SLAC /Hiroshima U. /Waseda U. /Tokyo Inst. Tech. /Wako, RIKEN /Washington U., Seattle /Toulouse, CESR /INFN, Pisa /Stanford U. /SLAC /INFN, Pisa /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /CENBG, Gradignan /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /INFN, Bari /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Stanford U. /SLAC /Hiroshima U. /JAXA, Sagamihara /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U. /SLAC /Rome U.,Tor Vergata /Stanford U. /SLAC /Denver U. /Montpellier U. /Hiroshima U. /INFN, Pisa /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Denver U. /JAXA, Sagamihara /Stanford U. /SLAC /CENBG, Gradignan /Montpellier U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Pisa /Innsbruck U. /Stanford U. /SLAC /CENBG, Gradignan /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /UC, Santa Cruz /Barcelona, IEEC /Washington U., Seattle /UC, Santa Cruz /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U. /UC, Santa Cruz /NASA, Ames /UC, Santa Cruz /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /INFN, Pisa /Unlisted /CENBG, Gradignan /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U. /INFN, Pisa /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /DAPNIA, Saclay /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Purdue U. /Stanford U. /SLAC /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U. /SLAC /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /DAPNIA, Saclay /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IEEC /Stanford U. /SLAC /JAXA, Sagamihara /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U., Baltimore County /Toulouse, CESR /Rome U.,Tor Vergata /Banca di Roma /Stanford U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Tsukuba U., GSPAS /Kalmar U. /Stockholm U., OKC /UC, Santa Cruz

    2010-05-26

    Dark matter (DM) particle annihilation or decay can produce monochromatic {gamma}-rays readily distinguishable from astrophysical sources. {gamma}-ray line limits from 30 GeV to 200 GeV obtained from 11 months of Fermi Large Area Space Telescope data from 20-300 GeV are presented using a selection based on requirements for a {gamma}-ray line analysis, and integrated over most of the sky. We obtain {gamma}-ray line flux upper limits in the range 0.6-4.5 x 10{sup -9} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, and give corresponding DM annihilation cross-section and decay lifetime limits. Theoretical implications are briefly discussed.

  15. Recovering lead from batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David Prengaman, R.

    1995-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, a significant number of processes have been developed to recover lead from scrap batteries. These processes recover lead via hydrometallurgical processing of the paste component of the battery followed by electrowinning. A number of pilot plant operations have been conducted, but thus far none of the processes have become operational.

  16. Leadership, Leaders, and Leading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    Arguably, the most important need in society today is to create individuals who will take action positively and progressively to lead in the private organization, in the the public institution, or in the governmental agency. Leadership action should not be held hostage by the notion that only those in formal positions of leadership can lead.…

  17. Rapid Lead Screening Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... and treated earlier before the damaging effects of lead poisoning occur. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ... exceed 10μg/dL, the threshold used to indicate lead poisoning. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) estimates one ...

  18. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin-Fu, Jane S.

    This publication is a guide to help social and health workers plan a preventive campaign against lead poisoning, a cause of mental retardation other neurological handicaps, and death among children. The main victims are 1- to 6-year-olds living in areas where deteriorating housing prevails. Among the causes of lead poisoning are: ingestion of…

  19. Supersonic Leading Edge Receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslov, Anatoly A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes experimental studies of leading edge boundary layer receptivity for imposed stream disturbances. Studies were conducted in the supersonic T-325 facility at ITAM and include data for both sharp and blunt leading edges. The data are in agreement with existing theory and should provide guidance for the development of more complete theories and numerical computations of this phenomena.

  20. Lead toxicity: a review

    PubMed Central

    Ara, Anjum; Usmani, Jawed Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Lead toxicity is an important environmental disease and its effects on the human body are devastating. There is almost no function in the human body which is not affected by lead toxicity. Though in countries like US and Canada the use of lead has been controlled up to a certain extent, it is still used vehemently in the developing countries. This is primarily because lead bears unique physical and chemical properties that make it suitable for a large number of applications for which humans have exploited its benefits from historical times and thus it has become a common environmental pollutant. Lead is highly persistent in the environment and because of its continuous use its levels rise in almost every country, posing serious threats. This article reviews the works listed in the literature with recent updates regarding the toxicity of lead. Focus is also on toxic effects of lead on the renal, reproductive and nervous system. Finally the techniques available for treating lead toxicity are presented with some recent updates. PMID:27486361

  1. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

  2. LEAD IN CANDLE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The candle-using public should be made aware that the core of candle wicks may contain lead. Used as a stiffening agent to keep the wick out of the molten wax, lead can be emitted as particulate to the air and then deposited on indoor surfaces. To define the problem, 100 sets of ...

  3. Higgs precision study of the 750 GeV diphoton resonance and the 125 GeV standard model Higgs boson with Higgs-singlet mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Kingman; Ko, P.; Lee, Jae Sik; Park, Jubin; Tseng, Po-Yan

    2016-08-01

    We interpret the potential observation of the 750 GeV diphoton resonance at the LHC in models, in which an S U (2 ) isospin-singlet scalar boson mixes with the standard model (SM) Higgs boson through an angle α . Allowing the singlet scalar boson to have renormalizable couplings to vectorlike leptons and quarks and introducing sizable decay width of the 750 GeV diphoton resonance into non-SM particles such as dark matters, we can explain the large production cross section σ (H2)×B (H2→γ γ ) as well as the apparent large total width of the boson without conflicts from the results obtained by previous global fits to the SM Higgs boson data.

  4. Lead polluters get punished

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-09

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Justice last week cracked down on 36 US companies for polluting the environment with lead. EPA slapped fines totaling more than $10 million on 12 of the offending companies, and Justice filed 24 civil complaints. Hank Habicht, deputy administrator of the EPA, said that his agency's initiative comes after 8 months of intense - and presumably successful - efforts at locating and documenting lead pollution in the soil, air, and water supply. Most feared has been lead's ability to damage the intellectual development of children. This caused the agency, Habicht said, to look beyond the usual suspect - lead in the water supply - to lead-laced dirt in residential areas. Meanwhile, the Department of Justice is using the EPA contamination data as well. Twenty US attorneys have been assigned to pore over the federal environmental statutes, including the Clean Water Act and the Superfund Law, in order to file civil complaints.

  5. Systematic study of diphoton resonance at 750 GeV from sgoldstino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ran; Fan, Yizhou; Huang, Li; Li, Chuang; Li, Tianjun; Raza, Shabbar; Zhu, Bin

    2016-09-01

    The ATLAS and CMS Collaborations of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have reported an excess of events in diphoton channel with invariant mass of about 750 GeV. With low energy supersymmetry breaking, we systematically consider the sgoldstino scalar S as the new resonance, which is a linear combination of the CP-even scalar s and CP-odd pseudoscalar a. Because we show that s and a can be degenerated or have large mass splitting, we consider two cases for all the following three scenarios: (1) Single resonance, s is the 750 GeV resonance decays to a pair of 1 GeV pseudoscalar a with suitable decay length, these two a decay into collimated pair of photons which cannot be distinguished at the LHC and may appear as diphotons instead of four photons. (2) Twin resonances, ms ≃ ma with a mass difference of about 40 GeV and both s and a decay into diphoton pairs. For productions, we consider three scenarios: (I) vector-boson fusion; (II) gluon-gluon fusion; (III) qq¯ pair production. In all these scenarios with two kinds of resonances, we find the parameter space that satisfies the diphoton production cross-section from 3 to 13 fb and all the other experimental constraints. And we address the decay width as well. In particular, in the third scenario, we observe that the production cross-section is small but the decay width of s or a can be from 40 to 60 GeV. Even if the 750 GeV diphoton excesses were not confirmed by the ATLAS and CMS experiments, we point out that our proposal can be used to explain the current and future diphoton excesses.

  6. Lead toxicity: current concerns.

    PubMed Central

    Goyer, R A

    1993-01-01

    Over the 20-year period since the first issue of Environmental Health Perspectives was published, there has been considerable progress in the understanding of the potential toxicity of exposure to lead. Many of these advances have been reviewed in published symposia, conferences, and review papers in EHP. This brief review identifies major advances as well as a number of current concerns that present opportunities for prevention and intervention strategies. The major scientific advance has been the demonstration that blood lead (PbB) levels of 10-15 micrograms/dL in newborn and very young infants result in cognitive and behavioral deficits. Further support for this observation is being obtained by prospective or longitudinal studies presently in progress. The mechanism(s) for the central nervous system effects of lead is unclear but involve lead interactions within calcium-mediated intracellular messenger systems and neurotransmission. Effects of low-level lead exposure on blood pressure, particularly in adult men, may be related to the effect of lead on calcium-mediated control of vascular smooth muscle contraction and on the renin-angiotensin system. Reproductive effects of lead have long been suspected, but low-level effects have not been well studied. Whether lead is a carcinogen or its association with renal adenocarcinoma is a consequence of cystic nephropathy is uncertain. Major risk factors for lead toxicity in children in the United States include nutrition, particularly deficiencies of essential metals, calcium, iron, and zinc, and housing and socioeconomic status. A goal for the year 2000 is to reduce prevalence of blood lead levels exceeding 15 micrograms/dL. Images FIGURE 2. PMID:8354166

  7. Lead toxicity: Current concerns

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A. )

    1993-04-01

    Over the 20-year period since the first issue of Environmental Health Perspectives was published, there has been considerable progress in the understanding of the potential toxicity of exposure to lead. Many of these advances have been reviewed in published symposia, conferences, and review papers in EHP. This brief review identifies major advances as well as a number of current concerns that present opportunities for prevention and intervention strategies. The major scientific advance has been the demonstration that blood lead (PbB) levels of 10-15 micrograms/dL in newborn and very young infants result in cognitive and behavioral deficits. Further support for this observation is being obtained by prospective or longitudinal studies presently in progress. The mechanism(s) for the central nervous system effects of lead is unclear but involve lead interactions within calcium-mediated intracellular messenger systems and neurotransmission. Effects of low-level lead exposure on blood pressure, particularly in adult men, may be related to the effect of lead on calcium-mediated control of vascular smooth muscle contraction and on the renin-angiotensin system. Reproductive effects of lead have long been suspected, but low-level effects have not been well studied. Whether lead is a carcinogen or its association with renal adenocarcinoma is a consequence of cystic nephropathy is uncertain. Major risk factors for lead toxicity in children in the United States include nutrition, particularly deficiencies of essential metals, calcium, iron, and zinc, and housing and socioeconomic status. A goal for the year 2000 is to reduce prevalence of blood lead levels exceeding 15 micrograms/dL. 97 refs.

  8. Supersoft SUSY models and the 750 GeV diphoton excess, beyond effective operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Linda M.; Colburn, Russell; Goodman, Jessica

    2016-07-01

    We propose that the sbino, the scalar partner of a Dirac bino, can explain the 750 GeV diphoton excess observed by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations. We first argue for the existence of couplings between sbino to pairs of Standard Model gauge bosons using effective operator analysis. We then analyze the minimal completion of the effective operator model in which the sbino couples to pairs of gauge bosons through loops of heavy sfermions, with the sfermion-bino coupling originating from scalar potential D-terms. We find that the sbino model may be fit the 750 GeV excess by considering gluon fusion processes with decay to diphotons.

  9. Determination of cluster size in particle-nucleus interactions at 50 and 400 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Irfan, M.; Khushnood, H.; Shakeel, A.; Zafar, M.; Shafi, M.

    1984-07-01

    We have investigated the formation of clusters and their sizes in 50-GeV ..pi../sup -/-nucleus and 400-GeV proton-nucleus interactions. The maximum multiplicity of charged shower particles constituting the clusters at the two incident energies is observed to be four. Furthermore, the cluster size has been found to be independent of the gray-particle multiplicity and hence the target mass. The cluster size has also been observed to be independent of the energy and identity of the impinging hadrons.

  10. D*-PRODUCTION and F2c for Q2 > 1 GEV2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrdieck, S.

    2002-10-01

    Results of the H1 experiment on the visible ep cross section for inclusive D*(2010) meson production in deep-inelastic scattering are presented in a kinematic range of 1 < Q2 < 100 GeV2 and 0.05 < y < 0.7 and in the visible region pt(D*) > 1.5 GeV and |η(D*)| < 1.5. The data is compared to predictions based on perturbative QCD calculations in the CCFM and NLO DGLAP scheme. The charm contribution to the proton structure function, F2c, is extracted by extrapolating the visible cross section to the full phase space.

  11. Straw man 900-1000 GeV crystal extraction test beam for Fermilab collider operation

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    A design for a 900-1000 GeV, 100 khz parasitic test beam for use during collider operations has been developed. The beam makes use of two bent crystals, one for extraction and the other one for redirecting the beam in to the present Switchyard beam system. The beam requires only a few modifications in the A0 area and largely uses existing devices. It should be straight-forward to modify one or two beam lines in the fixed target experimental areas to work above 800 GeV. Possibilities for improvements to the design,to operate at higher fluxes are discussed.

  12. Lead-free piezoceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yasuyoshi; Takao, Hisaaki; Tani, Toshihiko; Nonoyama, Tatsuhiko; Takatori, Kazumasa; Homma, Takahiko; Nagaya, Toshiatsu; Nakamura, Masaya

    2004-11-01

    Lead has recently been expelled from many commercial applications and materials (for example, from solder, glass and pottery glaze) owing to concerns regarding its toxicity. Lead zirconium titanate (PZT) ceramics are high-performance piezoelectric materials, which are widely used in sensors, actuators and other electronic devices; they contain more than 60 weight per cent lead. Although there has been a concerted effort to develop lead-free piezoelectric ceramics, no effective alternative to PZT has yet been found. Here we report a lead-free piezoelectric ceramic with an electric-field-induced strain comparable to typical actuator-grade PZT. We achieved this through the combination of the discovery of a morphotropic phase boundary in an alkaline niobate-based perovskite solid solution, and the development of a processing route leading to highly <001> textured polycrystals. The ceramic exhibits a piezoelectric constant d33 (the induced charge per unit force applied in the same direction) of above 300picocoulombs per newton (pCN-1), and texturing the material leads to a peak d33 of 416pCN-1. The textured material also exhibits temperature-independent field-induced strain characteristics.

  13. Measurement of inelastic cross sections in relativistic deuteron-on-lead reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zamani, M.; Stoulos, S.; Fragopoulou, M.; Krivopustov, M.

    2010-10-15

    The inelastic cross section of deuterons hitting a lead target has been determined by the beam attenuation technique. A spallation neutron source based on a lead target was irradiated with 1.6- and 2.5-GeV deuterons. Solid-state nuclear track detectors as well as the activation method were used to obtain the neutron and proton distribution along the surface of the source. The attenuation coefficient was estimated by fitting the experimental data and taking into account the buildup effect and the beam attenuation. Using the attenuation coefficient, the interaction length and then the inelastic cross section of deuterons on lead reaction were determined.

  14. Determination of shower central position in laterally segmented lead-fluoride electromagnetic calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazouz, M.; Ghedira, L.; Voutier, E.

    2016-07-01

    The spatial resolution of laterally segmented electromagnetic calorimeters, built of lead fluoride material, is studied on the basis of Monte-Carlo simulations. Parametrization of the relative resolution on the shower position is proposed and optimized in terms of the energy of incoming particles and the elementary size of the calorimeter blocks. A new fit algorithm method is proposed that improves spatial resolution at high energies (> 5 GeV), and provides guidance for the design optimization of electromagnetic calorimeters.

  15. Leading Causes of Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature: Vision Leading Causes of Blindness Past Issues / Summer 2008 ... of the lenses in your eyes. They affect vision and are very common in older people. More ...

  16. Human lead absorption -- Texas.

    PubMed

    1997-09-19

    In December 1971, the City-County Health Department in El Paso, Texas, discovered that an ore smelter in El Paso was discharging large quantities of lead and other metallic wastes into the air. Between 1969 and 1971, this smelter had released 1,116 tons of lead, 560 tons of zinc, 12 tons of cadmium, and 1.2 tons of arsenic into the atmosphere through its stacks.

  17. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

  18. Naturalness, Dark Matter, and Unification with a 125 GeV Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinner, David

    remaining parameter space. Our results are broadly applicable, and account for a variety of thermal and non-thermal cosmological histories, including scenarios in which neutralinos are just a component of the observed dark matter today. Because this analysis is indifferent to the fine-tuning of electroweak symmetry breaking, our findings also hold for many models of neutralino dark matter in the MSSM, NMSSM, and Split Supersymmetry. We have identified parameter regions at low tan beta which sit in a double blind spot for both spin-independent and spin-dependent scattering. Interestingly, these low tan beta regions are independently favored in the NMSSM and models of Split Supersymmetry which accommodate a Higgs mass near 125 GeV. Finally, we consider precision b--tau Yukawa unification as an alternate motivation for supersymmetry near the weak scale. We show that for an LSP that is a bino-Higgsino admixture, this requirement leads to an upper-bound on the stop and sbottom masses in the several TeV regime because the threshold correction to the bottom mass at the superpartner scale is required to have a particular size. For tan beta ≈ 50, which is needed for t--b--tau unification, the stops must be lighter than 2.8 TeV when At has the opposite sign of the gluino mass, as is favored by renormalization group scaling. For lower values of tan beta, the top and bottom squarks must be even lighter. Yukawa unification plus dark matter implies that superpartners are likely in reach of the LHC, after the upgrade to 14 (or 13) TeV, independent of any considerations of naturalness. We present a model-independent, bottom-up analysis of the SUSY parameter space that is simultaneously consistent with Yukawa unification and the Higgs mass. We study the flavor and dark matter phenomenology that accompanies this Yukawa unification. A large portion of the parameter space predicts that the branching fraction for Bs → mu + mu-- will be observed to be significantly lower than the SM value.

  19. Extension of the Integrated Tiger Series (ITS) of electron-photon Monte Carlo codes to 100 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.G.

    1988-08-01

    Version 2.1 of the Integrated Tiger Series (ITS) of electron-photon Monte Carlo codes was modified to extend their ability to model interactions up to 100 GeV. Benchmarks against experimental results conducted at 10 and 15 GeV confirm the accuracy of the extended codes. 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. QCD corrections to J/ψ plus ηc production in e+e- annihilation at s=10.6GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Bin; Wang, Jian-Xiong

    2008-03-01

    Next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to J/ψ plus ηc production in e+e- annihilation at s=10.6GeV are calculated in this paper, and an analytic result is obtained. By choosing proper physical parameters, a K factor (ratio of next-to-leading order to LO) of about 2, which is in agreement with the result in Y.-J. Zhang, Y.-j. Gao, and K.-T. Chao, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 092001 (2006)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.96.092001, is obtained. The plot of the K factor vs the center-of-mass energy s shows that it is more difficult to obtain a convergent result from the perturbative QCD without resummation of ln⁡(s/mc2) terms as the s becomes larger.

  1. Magnesium Diboride Current Leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, John

    2010-01-01

    A recently discovered superconductor, magnesium diboride (MgB2), can be used to fabricate conducting leads used in cryogenic applications. Dis covered to be superconducting in 2001, MgB2 has the advantage of remaining superconducting at higher temperatures than the previously used material, NbTi. The purpose of these leads is to provide 2 A of electricity to motors located in a 1.3 K environment. The providing environment is a relatively warm 17 K. Requirements for these leads are to survive temperature fluctuations in the 5 K and 11 K heat sinks, and not conduct excessive heat into the 1.3 K environment. Test data showed that each lead in the assembly could conduct 5 A at 4 K, which, when scaled to 17 K, still provided more than the required 2 A. The lead assembly consists of 12 steelclad MgB2 wires, a tensioned Kevlar support, a thermal heat sink interface at 4 K, and base plates. The wires are soldered to heavy copper leads at the 17 K end, and to thin copper-clad NbTi leads at the 1.3 K end. The leads were designed, fabricated, and tested at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe - Institut foer Technische Physik before inclusion in Goddard's XRS (X-Ray Spectrometer) instrument onboard the Astro-E2 spacecraft. A key factor is that MgB2 remains superconducting up to 30 K, which means that it does not introduce joule heating as a resistive wire would. Because the required temperature ranges are 1.3-17 K, this provides a large margin of safety. Previous designs lost superconductivity at around 8 K. The disadvantage to MgB2 is that it is a brittle ceramic, and making thin wires from it is challenging. The solution was to encase the leads in thin steel tubes for strength. Previous designs were so brittle as to risk instrument survival. MgB2 leads can be used in any cryogenic application where small currents need to be conducted at below 30 K. Because previous designs would superconduct only at up to 8 K, this new design would be ideal for the 8-30 K range.

  2. Saturation of azimuthal anisotropy in Au + Au collisions at (square root)s(NN) = 62-200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Jamel, A; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Campbell, S; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; d'Enterria, D; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fukao, Y; Fung, S-Y; Gadrat, S; Garpman, S; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Horaguchi, T; Hur, H M; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kawagishi, T; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kim, Y-S; Kinney, E; Kinnison, W W; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Le Bornec, Y; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McCain, M C; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nilsson, P; Norman, B; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, H; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shimomura, M; Shohjoh, T; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Skutnik, S; Smith, W C; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sullivan, J P; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vertesi, R; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Willis, N; Winter, D; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudkte, O; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2005-06-17

    New measurements are presented for charged hadron azimuthal correlations at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at (square root)s(NN) = 62.4 and 200 GeV. They are compared to earlier measurements obtained at (square root)s(NN) = 130 GeV and in Pb + Pb collisions at (square root)s(NN) = 17.2 GeV. Sizeable anisotropies are observed with centrality and transverse momentum (pT) dependence characteristic of elliptic flow (upsilon2). For a broad range of centralities, the observed magnitudes and trends of the differential anisotropy, upsilon2(pT), change very little over the collision energy range (square root)s(NN) = 62-200 GeV, indicating saturation of the excitation function for upsilon2 at these energies. Such a saturation may be indicative of the dominance of a very soft equation of state for (square root)s(NN) approximately 60-200 GeV.

  3. GeV Blazar flares several parsecs from the central engine. Who pays the seed photon bill?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiding, Peter; Georganopoulos, Markos; Meyer, Eileen

    2016-04-01

    In Blazars, multi-wavelength observations suggest that some GeV flares take place at the location of the mm VLBI core, several pc from the black hole. This location for the GeV emission requires a yet un-identified source of seed photons to be Inverse Compton scattered to GeV energies. Our model for these flares involves a fast spine and slow sheath configuration for the relativistic jet, where the mildly beamed sheath emission will illuminate with a large opening angle the outer regions of the Molecular Torus. The heated clouds will then radiate and their emission will be relativistically boosted in the spine frame where it can they be up-scattered to GeV energies. We argue, through analytical work and simulations, that this can be the seed photon source that produces the GeV flares.

  4. Performance of First C100 Cryomodules for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, Michael A.; Burrill, Andrew B.; Davis, G. Kirk; Hogan, John P.; King, Lawrence; Marhauser, Frank; Park, HyeKyoung; Preble, Joseph; Reece, Charles E.; Reilly, Anthony V.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng; Wiseman, Mark A.

    2012-09-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is currently engaged in the 12 GeV Upgrade Project. The goal of the project is a doubling of the available beam energy of CEBAF from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. This increase in beam energy will be due primarily to the construction and installation of ten "C100" cryomodules in the CEBAF linacs. The C100 cryomodules are designed to deliver an average 108 MV each from a string of eight seven-cell, electropolished superconducting RF cavities operating at an average accelerating gradient of 19.2 MV/m. The new cryomodules fit in the same available linac space as the original CEBAF 20 MV cryomodules. Cryomodule production started in September 2010. Initial acceptance testing started in June 2011. The first two C100 cryomodules were installed and tested from August 2011 through October 2011, and successfully operated during the last period of the CEBAF 6 GeV era, which ended in May 2012. This paper will present the results of acceptance testing and commissioning of the C100 style cryomodules to date.

  5. Measurement of the nuclear electromagnetic cascade development in glass at energies above 200 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, C. R.; Huggett, R. W.; Humphreys, D. R.; Jones, W. V.; Levit, L. B.

    1971-01-01

    The longitudinal development of nuclear-electromagnetic cascades with energies greater than 200 GeV was measured in a low-Z (glass) absorber. This was done in the course of operating an ionization spectrometer at mountain altitude in an experiment to study the properties of gamma rays emitted from individual interactions at energies around 10,000 GeV. The ionization produced by a cascade is sampled by 20 sheets of plastic scintillator spaced uniformly in depth every 2.2 radiation lengths. Adjacent pairs of scintillators are viewed by photomultipliers which measure the mean ionization produced by an individual cascade in 10 layers each 1.1 interaction length (4.4 radiation lengths) thick. The longitudinal development of the cascades was measured for about 250 cascades having energies ranging from 200 GeV to 2500 GeV. The observations are compared with the predictions of calculations made for this specific spectrometer using a three-dimensional Monte Carlo model of the nuclear-electromagnetic cascade.

  6. HIGH POWER TEST OF RF SEPARATOR FOR 12 GEV UPGRADE OF CEBAF AT JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, M. Wissmann, J. Mammosser, C. Hovater, M. Spata, G. Krafft, J. Delayen

    2012-07-01

    CEBAF at JLab is in the process of an energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. The existing setup of the RF separator cavities in the 5th pass will not be adequate to extract the highest energy (11 GeV) beam to any two existing halls (A, B or C) while simultaneously delivering to the new hall D in the case of the proposed 12 GeV upgrade of the machine. To restore this capability, we are exploring the possibility of extension of existing normal conducting 499 MHz TEM-type rf separator cavities. Detailed numerical studies suggest that six 2-cell normal conducting structures meet the requirements; each 2-cell structure will require up to 4 kW RF input power in contrast with the current nominal operating power of 1.0 to 2.0 kW. A high power test of 4 kW confirms that the cavity meet the requirement.

  7. Recent developments in neutrino-nucleus interactions in 1 GeV energy region

    SciTech Connect

    Sobczyk, Jan T.

    2015-07-15

    Neutrino interactions in 1 GeV energy region are discussed. A role of nucleon-nucleon correlations in understanding recent quasi-elastic cross section measurements on nuclear target is explained. An importance of a correct treatment of two-body current contribution to the neutrino inclusive cross section is addressed.

  8. Pion-nucleon charge exchange amplitudes above 2 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Sibirtsev, A.; Krewald, S.; Hanhart, C.; Haidenbauer, J.; Meißner, U.-G.

    2009-04-01

    The amplitudes for the pion-nucleon charge exchange reaction of the Karlsruhe-Helsinki and the George-Washington-University partial-wave analyses are compared with those of a Regge-cut model with the aim to explore the possibility to provide high-energy constraints for theoretical baryon resonance analyses in the energy region above 2GeV.

  9. Fabrication and Testing Status of CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Marhauser, F; Davis, G K; Forehand, D; Grenoble, C; Hogan, J; Overton, R B; Reilly, A V; Rimmer, R A; Stirbet, M

    2011-09-01

    The 12 GeV upgrade of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) is under way. All cavities have been built by industry and are presently undergoing post-processing and final low and high power qualification before cryomodule assembly. The status is reported including fabrication-related experiences, observations and issues throughout production, post-processing and qualification.

  10. Pulsars above 10 GeV: Fermi LAT Observations and Questions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Dave

    2012-01-01

    The success of the Fermi Large Area Telescope in studying gamma-ray pulsars offers hints about future work above 10 GeV. The infrastructure for discovering pulsars will be similar between LAT and any future telescope. Some of the Fermi LAT results suggest intriguing questions about the future of high-energy pulsar studies.

  11. GeV electron beams from a laser-plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Nagler, B.; Gonsalves, A.J.; Nakamura, K.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Esarey, E.; Hooker, S.M.; Leemans, W.P.

    2006-10-01

    High-quality electron beams with up to 1 GeV energy havebeen generated by a laser-driven plasma-based accelerator by guiding a 40TW peak power laser pulse in a 3.3 cm long gas-filled capillary dischargewaveguide.

  12. The NMSSM lives: with the 750 GeV diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingo, Florian; Heinemeyer, Sven; Kim, Jong Soo; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof

    2016-05-01

    We propose an NMSSM scenario that can explain the excess in the diphoton spectrum at 750 GeV recently observed by ATLAS and CMS. We show that in a certain limit with a very light pseudoscalar one can reproduce the experimental results without invoking exotic matter. The 750 GeV excess is produced by two resonant heavy Higgs bosons with masses {˜ }750 GeV, which subsequently decay to two light pseudoscalars. Each of these decays to collimated photon pairs that appear as a single photon in the electromagnetic calorimeter. A mass gap between heavy Higgses mimics a large width of the 750 GeV peak. The production mechanism, containing a strong component via initial b quarks, ameliorates a possible tension with 8 TeV data compared to other production modes. We also discuss other constraints, in particular from low-energy experiments. Finally, we discuss possible methods that could distinguish our proposal from other physics models describing the diphoton excess in the Run-II of the LHC.

  13. Two-Body Photodisintegration of the Deuteron up to 2. 8 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Belz, J.E.; Potterveld, D.H.; Anthony, P.; Arnold, R.G.; Arrington, J.; Beck, D.; Beise, E.J.; Bosted, P.E.; Bulten, H.; Chapman, M.S.; Coulter, K.P.; Dietrich, F.; Ent, R.; Epstein, M.; Filippone, B.W.; Gao, H.; Gearhart, R.A.; Geesaman, D.F.; Hansen, J.; Holt, R.J.; Jackson, H.E.; Jones, C.E.; Keppel, C.E.; Kinney, E.R.; Kuhn, S.; Lee, K.; Lorenzon, W.; Lung, A.; Makins, N.C.R.; Margaziotis, D.J.; McKeown, R.D.; Meziani, Z.E.; Milner, R.G.; Mueller, B.; Napolitano, J.; Nelson, J.; O'Neill, T.G.; Papavassiliou, V.; Petratos, G.G.; Rock, S.E.; Segel, R.E.; Spengos, M.; Szalata, Z.M.; Tao, L.H.; van Bibber, K.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; White, J.L.; Zeidman, B. Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 Department of Physics, The American University, Washington, D.C. 20016 Depa

    1995-01-30

    Measurements were performed for the photodisintegration cross section of the deuteron for photon energies from 1.6 to 2.8 GeV and center-of-mass angles from 37[degree] to 90[degree]. The measured energy dependence of the cross section at [theta][sub c.m.]=90[degree] is in agreement with the constituent counting rules.

  14. Details and justifications for the MAP concept specification for acceleration above 63 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J. Scott

    2014-02-28

    The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) requires a concept specification for each of the accelerator systems. The Muon accelerators will bring the beam energy from a total energy of 63 GeV to the maximum energy that will fit on the Fermilab site. Justifications and supporting references are included, providing more detail than will appear in the concept specification itself.

  15. Vector leptoquarks and the 750 GeV diphoton resonance at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Christopher W.

    2016-06-01

    The ATLAS and CMS Collaborations recently presented evidence of a resonance decaying to pairs of photons around 750 GeV. In addition, the BaBar, Belle, and LHCb Collaborations have evidence of lepton non-universality in the semileptonic decays of B mesons. In this work, we make a first step towards a unified explanation of these anomalies. Specifically, we extend the Standard Model by including vector leptoquarks and a scalar singlet that couples linearly to pairs of the leptoquarks. We find there is parameter space that gives the correct cross section for a putative 750 GeV resonance decaying to photons that is consistent with unitarity, measurements of the properties of the 125 GeV Higgs boson, and direct searches for resonances in other channels. In addition, we also show that constraints can be derived on any Beyond the Standard Model explanation of the 750 GeV resonance where the only new particles are scalars, which are strong enough to rule out certain types of models entirely.

  16. Environmental lead in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, L.A.; Badillo, F. )

    1991-01-01

    From the data presented here, it can be concluded that environmental exposure to lead is a particularly severe problem in Mexico. As has been shown, there are very important sources of exposure to this metal: (a) for rural populations who manufacture and/or utilize lead-glazed pottery, (b) for urban populations who are exposed to high air lead concentrations due to the continued use of lead fuel additives, (c) for workers of several industries, mainly those of batteries and pigments, (d) for consumers who routinely eat canned foods such as hot peppers and fruit products, and (e) for the general population living in the vicinity of smelters, refineries and other industries that emit lead. Therefore, in Mexico only those native populations living in very primitive communities, far away from all civilized life, could be expected to be free from this exposure. At the same time, and despite the relatively few data available, it can be stated that the exposure to lead of populations in Mexico could be approaching levels that might be highly hazardous, in particular for the neuropsychological health of children. Regarding the presence of lead in the environment, despite the fact that the available studies are not enough, it is evident that pollution by this metal is widespread and that there is a serious lack of studies for most regions of the country, including several that might be expected to be highly polluted. At the same time, it is evident that the official attention paid to the problem, either in regulations, support of further studies, or implementation of effective control measures has been far from the level needed according to the available data.

  17. PROMPT GeV EMISSION FROM RESIDUAL COLLISIONS IN GAMMA-RAY BURST OUTFLOWS: EVIDENCE FROM FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 080916c

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhuo

    2010-01-20

    The gamma-rays from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are believed to be produced by internal shocks driven by small timescale, approx1 ms, variation in the GRB outflows, and a pair-production spectral cutoff is generally expected around the GeV range. However, the observed optical flashes accompanying GRBs suggest that the delayed residual collisions due to large timescale variation continue to accelerate electrons. We show here that the inverse-Compton (IC) scattering of the prompt gamma-rays by these residual internal shock electrons leads to a high-energy emission beyond the previously thought spectral cutoff, in agreement with the previous detections of GeV photons by EGRET in several GRBs in conjunction with MeV emission. We expect a spectral break due to the transition from the primary to residual internal shock emission at the previously thought spectral cutoff and expect systematic time delays of high-energy photons relative to MeV emission, the discovery of which would provide stringent constraint on the outflow properties, but requires large enough collection of high-energy photons by, e.g., Fermi and AGILE satellites. The recent Fermi-detected bright GRB 080916c unambiguously shows the shifting of the prompt emission toward later times as the photon energy increases. The second-scale shifting at >100 MeV is much longer than the MeV variability time, as predicted in the residual collision model. The observations imply that there should be emission above 70 GeV in the source frame, which may not be produced by primary internal shocks but by IC emission in residual collisions. With the method involving time delays of high-energy emission, the bulk Lorentz factor of GRB 080916c is determined to be GAMMA approx 300.

  18. Neutron yields for reactions induced by 120 GeV protons on thick copper target

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Sanami, Toshiya; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Saitoh, Kiwamu; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Ishibashi, Kenji; Lee, Hee-Seock; Ramberg, Eric; Coleman, Richard; /Fermilab

    2011-02-01

    We developed an experimental method to measure neutron energy spectrum for 120-GeV protons on a thick copper target at Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF). The spectrum in the energy range from 16 to 1600 MeV was obtained for 60-cm long copper target by time-of-flight technique with an NE213 scintillator and 5.5-m flight path. Energy spectra of neutrons generated from an interaction with beam and materials are important to design shielding structure of high energy accelerators. Until now, the energy spectra for the incident energy up to 3 GeV have been measured by several groups, Ishibashi et al., Amian et al., and Leray et al. In the energy region above 3 GeV, few experimental data are available because of small number of facilities for neutron experiment. On the other hand, concerning simulation codes, theoretical models for particle generation and transportation are switched from intermediate to high energy one around this energy. The spectra calculated by the codes have not been examined using experimental data. In shielding experiments using 120 GeV hadron beam, experimental data shows systematic differences from calculations. Hagiwara et al. have measured leakage neutron spectra behind iron and concrete shield from 120 GeV proton on target at anti-proton target station in Fermilab by using Bonner Spheres with unfolding technique. In CERN, Nakao et al reported experimental results of neutron spectra behind iron and concrete wall from 120 GeV/c proton and pion mixed beam on copper by using NE213 liquid scintillators with unfolding technique. Both of the results reported systematic discrepancies between experimental and calculation results. Therefore, experimental data are highly required to verify neutron production part of calculations. In this study, we developed an experimental method to measure neutron energy spectrum for 120 GeV proton on target. The neutron energy was determined using time-of-flight technique. We used the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF

  19. Diphoton excess at 750 GeV and LHC constraints in models with vectorlike particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Junichiro; Omura, Yuji

    2016-06-01

    Recently, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations report excesses around 750 GeV in the diphoton channels. This might be the evidence which reveals new physics beyond the Standard Model. In this paper, we consider models with a 750 GeV scalar and vectorlike particles, which couple each other through Yukawa couplings. The decay of the scalar to diphoton is given by the loop diagrams involving the extra colored particles. We investigate not only the setup required by the excesses, but also the LHC constraints, especially concerned with the vectorlike particles. In our scenario, the extra colored particles decay to quarks and a dark matter (DM) via Yukawa couplings. Then, the signals from the vectorlike particles are dijet, b b ¯ and/or t t ¯ with large missing energy. We discuss two possibilities for the setups: One is a model with vectorlike fermions and a scalar DM, and the other is a model with vectorlike scalars and a fermionic DM. We suggest the parameter region favored by the excess in each case, and study the constraints based on the latest LHC results at √{s }=8 TeV and 13 TeV. We conclude that the favored region is almost excluded by the LHC bounds, especially when the 750 GeV scalar dominantly decays to DMs. The mass differences between the vectorlike particles and the DM should be less than O (100 ) GeV [O (10 ) GeV ] to realize the large diphoton signal and the large decay width, if the extra colored particle only decays to a top (bottom) quark and a dark matter. Otherwise, these scenarios are already excluded by the latest LHC results.

  20. Spectra and solar energetic protons over 20 GeV in Bastille Day event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruiguang; Wang, Jinxiu

    2006-02-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) from large solar flares give important information about the physical process in the solar corona and the heliosphere. Several observations have indicated that solar protons could sometimes be accelerated to at least tens of GeV, even hundreds of GeV, in intense solar energetic process. We studied the solar proton differential energy spectra with energy range of 1 500 MeV at several time intervals during Bastille Day event. It was shown that the spectra could be fitted by a power law function before flare and after flare the power law spectra still existed above 30 MeV although spectra became softer with time. There was a spectral “knee” occurring at ˜30 MeV. We constructed a solar proton differential spectrum from 30 MeV to 3 GeV at peak flux time 10:30 UT and fitted it in the same manner. On the basis of a supposition of having the same power law spectrum in higher energy, we calculated the solar proton integrated fluxes in energy range of from 500 MeV to 20 GeV and compared them with other results obtained from experimental, modelling and theoretical calculations in other big historic SEP events. A Monte Carlo simulation was carried out for a primary proton beam at the top of the atmosphere producing secondary muons on the ground. Based on the simulation, possibility of registering the solar energetic proton beams with energies over 20 GeV was discussed.

  1. Lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, B.E. Jr.

    1986-12-02

    This patent describes a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoelectric ceramic composition which, based on total composition weight, consists essentially of a solid solution of lead zirconate and lead titanate in a PbZrO/sub 3/:PbTiO/sub 3/ ratio from about 0.505:0.495 to about 0.54:0.46; a halide salt selected from the group consisting of fluorides and chlorides of alkali metal and alkaline earth elements and mixtures thereof except for francium and radium in an amount from about 0.5 to 2 weight percent; and an oxide selected from the group consisting of magnesium, barium, scandium, aluminum, lanthanum, praesodynium, neodymium, samarium, and mixtures thereof in an amount from about 0.5 to about 6 weight percent, the relative amount of oxide being from about 1 to about 4 times that of the halide.

  2. Leading healthcare in complexity.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Healthcare institutions and providers are in complexity. Networks of interconnections from relationships and technology create conditions in which interdependencies and non-linear dynamics lead to surprising, unpredictable outcomes. Previous effective approaches to leadership, focusing on top-down bureaucratic methods, are no longer effective. Leading in complexity requires leaders to accept the complexity, create an adaptive space in which innovation and creativity can flourish and then integrate the successful practices that emerge into the formal organizational structure. Several methods for doing adaptive space work will be discussed. Readers will be able to contrast traditional leadership approaches with leading in complexity. They will learn new behaviours that are required of complexity leaders, along with challenges they will face, often from other leaders within the organization. PMID:25815410

  3. Leading healthcare in complexity.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Healthcare institutions and providers are in complexity. Networks of interconnections from relationships and technology create conditions in which interdependencies and non-linear dynamics lead to surprising, unpredictable outcomes. Previous effective approaches to leadership, focusing on top-down bureaucratic methods, are no longer effective. Leading in complexity requires leaders to accept the complexity, create an adaptive space in which innovation and creativity can flourish and then integrate the successful practices that emerge into the formal organizational structure. Several methods for doing adaptive space work will be discussed. Readers will be able to contrast traditional leadership approaches with leading in complexity. They will learn new behaviours that are required of complexity leaders, along with challenges they will face, often from other leaders within the organization.

  4. Differential cross sections, charge production asymmetry, and spin-density matrix elements for D ∗±(2010) produced in 500 GeV/ cπ--nucleon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Devmal, S.; Fernandez, A.; Fox, G. F.; Gagnon, P.; Gobel, C.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lundberg, B.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; MayTal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Mihalcea, D.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; d'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sanders, D. A.; Santha, A. K. S.; Santoro, A. F. S.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Stanton, N. R.; Stefanski, R. J.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yang, S. M.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.; Fermilab E791 Collaboration

    2002-07-01

    We report differential cross sections for the production of D ∗±(2010) produced in 500 GeV/ cπ--nucleon interactions from experiment E791 at Fermilab, as functions of Feynman- x ( xF) and transverse momentum squared ( pT2). We also report the D ∗± charge asymmetry and spin-density matrix elements as functions of these variables. Investigation of the spin-density matrix elements shows no evidence of polarization. The average values of the spin alignment are < η>=0.01±0.02 and -0.01±0.02 for leading and non-leading particles, respectively.

  5. Lead and compounds (inorganic)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Lead and compounds ( inorganic ) ; CASRN 7439 - 92 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  6. Girls Leading Outward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamed, Heather; Reyes, Jazmin; Moceri, Dominic C.; Morana, Laura; Elias, Maurice J.

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a program implemented in Red Bank Middle School in New Jersey to help at-risk, minority middle school girls realize their leadership potential. The GLO (Girls Leading Outward) program was developed by the Developing Safe and Civil Schools Project at Rutgers University and is facilitated by university students. Selected middle…

  7. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin-Fu, Jane S.

    Designed as a public information pamphlet, the text discusses the problem of lead poisoning in children. The preventable nature of the problem is stressed as well as needed action on the part of the public, physicians and other health workers, and the legislators. The pamphlet emphasizes that each of these areas is essential in preventing death or…

  8. Change, Lead, Succeed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munger, Linda; von Frank, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Redefine leadership in your school, and create capacity through school leadership teams that successfully coordinate professional learning. "Change, Lead, Succeed" shows school leaders and teachers in leadership roles what they need to know to effectively create a culture for change. Find out what distinguishes a school leadership team from other…

  9. Leading through Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerzon, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This article talks about leading significant learning opportunities through conflict of ideas in a school system. Catalyzing school change can turn emotional differences of opinion into learning opportunities. Leaders who want to deal effectively with these challenging, often tense situations need to be more than good managers. They need to be…

  10. Leading for Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazzie-Mintz, Ethan

    2010-01-01

    As the dropout problem has grown--and as increasing numbers of students have started to see dropping out as a viable option for expressing their disaffection with school--practitioners, policymakers, and researchers have looked more closely at the factors that lead students to disengage from school and have attempted to find ways to create…

  11. Lead Thickness Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1998-02-16

    The preshower lead thickness applied to the outside of D-Zero's superconducting solenoid vacuum shell was measured at the time of application. This engineering documents those thickness measurements. The lead was ordered in sheets 0.09375-inch and 0.0625-inch thick. The tolerance on thickness was specified to be +/- 0.003-inch. The sheets all were within that thickness tolerance. The nomenclature for each sheet was designated 1T, 1B, 2T, 2B where the numeral designates it's location in the wrap and 'T' or 'B' is short for 'top' or 'bottom' half of the solenoid. Micrometer measurements were taken at six locations around the perimeter of each sheet. The width,length, and weight of each piece was then measured. Using an assumed pure lead density of 0.40974 lb/in{sup 3}, an average sheet thickness was calculated and compared to the perimeter thickness measurements. In every case, the calculated average thickness was a few mils thinner than the perimeter measurements. The ratio was constant, 0.98. This discrepancy is likely due to the assumed pure lead density. It is not felt that the perimeter is thicker than the center regions. The data suggests that the physical thickness of the sheets is uniform to +/- 0.0015-inch.

  12. ALL AGES LEAD MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) Model for Lead in Children (version 0.99d) was released in March 1994, and has been widely accepted in the risk assessment community as a tool for implementing the site specific risk assessment process when the issue is childhood...

  13. Leading by Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.; Moss, Connie M.

    2013-01-01

    A lot has changed in the principalship since the principal was the head teacher in a school. Current principals are building administrators and that is likely to continue, the authors posit. Nonetheless, they report their study focusing on leadership's role in formative assessment concluded that in order to lead learning the principal must…

  14. Neutral pion cross section and spin asymmetries at intermediate pseudorapidity in polarized proton collisions at √s =200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Barber, B.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Dion, A.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; He, W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jena, C.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Nord, P. M.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Pochron, W.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schaub, J.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The differential cross section and spin asymmetries for neutral pions produced within the intermediate pseudorapidity range 0.8<η<2.0 in polarized proton-proton collisions at √s =200 GeV are presented. Neutral pions were detected using the end cap electromagnetic calorimeter in the STAR detector at RHIC. The cross section was measured over a transverse momentum range of 5GeV /c and is found to agree with a next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculation. The longitudinal double-spin asymmetry ALL is measured in the same pseudorapidity range and spans a range of Bjorken-x down to x ≈0.01. The measured ALL is consistent with model predictions for varying degrees of gluon polarization. The parity-violating asymmetry AL is also measured and found to be consistent with zero. The transverse single-spin asymmetry AN is measured over a previously unexplored kinematic range in Feynman-x and pT. Such measurements may aid our understanding of the onset and kinematic dependence of the large asymmetries observed at more forward pseudorapidity (η ≈3) and their underlying mechanisms. The AN results presented are consistent with a twist-3 model prediction of a small asymmetry over the present kinematic range.

  15. The Variable Crab Nebula: Evidence for a Connection Between GeV Flares and Hard X-ray Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E. A.; Cherry, M. L.; Case, G. L.; Finger, M. H.; Jenke, P.; Zhang, X.

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, hard X-ray variations (Wilson-Hodge et al. 2011) and GeV flares (Tavani et al 2011, Abdo et al. 2011) from the Crab Nebula were discovered. Connections between these two phenomena were unclear, in part because the timescales were quite different, with yearly variations in hard X-rays and hourly to daily variations in the GeV flares. The hard X-ray flux from the Crab Nebula has again declined since 2014, much like it did in 2008-2010. During both hard X-ray decline periods, the Fermi LAT detected no GeV flares, suggesting that injection of particles from the GeV flares produces the much slower and weaker hard X-ray variations. The timescale for the particles emitting the GeV flares to lose enough energy to emit synchrotron photons in hard X-rays is consistent with the yearly variations observed in hard X-rays and with the expectation that the timescale for variations slowly increases with decreasing energy. This hypothesis also predicts even slower and weaker variations below 10 keV, consistent with the non-detection of counterparts to the GeV flares by Chandra (Weisskopf et al 2013). We will present a comparison of the observed hard X-ray variations and a simple model of the decay of particles from the GeV flares to test our hypothesis.

  16. The Variable Crab Nebula: Evidence for a Connection between GeV flares and Hard X-ray Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Kust Harding, Alice; Hays, Elizabeth A.; Cherry, Michael L.; Case, Gary L.; Finger, Mark H.; Jenke, Peter; Zhang, Xiao-Ling

    2016-04-01

    In 2010, hard X-ray variations (Wilson-Hodge et al. 2011) and GeV flares (Tavani et al 2011, Abdo et al. 2011) from the Crab Nebula were discovered. Connections between these two phenomena were unclear, in part because the timescales were quite different, with yearly variations in hard X-rays and hourly to daily variations in the GeV flares. The hard X-ray flux from the Crab Nebula has again declined since 2014, much like it did in 2008-2010. During both hard X-ray decline periods, the Fermi LAT detected no GeV flares, suggesting that injection of particles from the GeV flares produces the much slower and weaker hard X-ray variations. The timescale for the particles emitting the GeV flares to lose enough energy to emit synchrotron photons in hard X-rays is consistent with the yearly variations observed in hard X-rays and with the expectation that the timescale for variations slowly increases with decreasing energy. This hypothesis also predicts even slower and weaker variations below 10 keV, consistent with the non-detection of counterparts to the GeV flares by Chandra (Weisskopf et al 2013). We will present a comparison of the observed hard X-ray variations and a simple model of the decay of particles from the GeV flares to test our hypothesis.

  17. 130 GeV fingerprint of right-handed neutrino dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, Lars

    2012-11-01

    Recently, an interesting indication for a dark matter signal in the form of a narrow line, or maybe two lines and/or an internal bremsstrahlung feature, has been found in analyses of public data from the Fermi-LAT satellite detector. As recent analyses have also shown that there is little sign of extra contributions to continuum photons, it is natural to investigate leptophilic interacting massive particle models. We show that a model of radiatively generated neutrino masses may have the properties needed to explain the Fermi-LAT structure around 130 GeV. This model was proposed some 10 years ago, and predicted a clearly observable γ-ray signal in the Fermi-LAT (then GLAST) detector. Here, we update and improve that analysis, and show as an example that a right-handed neutrino of mass 135 GeV should give rise to three conspicuous effects: a broad internal bremsstrahlung bump with maximum around 120 GeV, a 2γ line around 135 GeV, and a Zγ line at 119.6 GeV (neglected in the previous work). These features together give a good fit to the 130 GeV structure, given the present energy resolution of the Fermi-LAT data. An attractive feature of the model is that the particle physics properties are essentially fixed, once the relic density and the mass of the right-handed neutrino dark matter particle have been set. Puzzling features of the data at present are a slight displacement of the signal from the galactic center, and a needed boost factor of order 5-15. This presents interesting challenges for numerical simulations including both baryons and dark matter on scales of 100 pc, and perhaps a need to go beyond the simplest halo models. With upcoming experiments having better energy resolution, or with future Fermi-LAT data, the double-peak structure with a definite predicted ratio of the strengths of the two lines and the internal bremsstrahlung feature should be seen, if this model is correct. With the planned satellite GAMMA-400, a striking fingerprint of this dark

  18. Precise measurement of Bhabha scattering at a center-of-mass energy of 57.77 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    VENUS Collaboration

    1997-01-01

    Bhabha scattering at a center-of-mass energy of 57.77 GeV has been measured using the VENUS detector at KEK TRISTAN. The precision is better than 1{percent} in scattering angle regions of {vert_bar}cos{theta}{vert_bar}{le}0.743 and 0.822{le}cos{theta}{le}0.968. A model-independent scattering-angle distribution is extracted from the measurement. The distribution is in good agreement with the prediction of the standard electroweak theory. The sensitivity to underlying theories is examined, after unfolding the photon-radiation effect. The q{sup 2} dependence of the photon vacuum polarization, frequently interpreted as a running of the QED fine-structure constant, is directly observed with a significance of three standard deviations. The Z{sup 0} exchange effect is clearly seen when the distribution is compared with the prediction from QED (photon exchanges only). The agreement with the standard theory leads us to constraints on extensions of the standard theory. In all quantitative discussions, correlations in the systematic error between angular bins are taken into account by employing an error matrix technique. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Long-range pseudo-rapidity correlations in 200 GeV Au +Au collisions with STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codrington, Martin; STAR Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Two interesting correlation analyses that may be useful in describing the matter created in heavy-ion collisions are γ-hadron correlations and di-hadron long-range pseudorapidity correlations (the ``ridge''). γ-hadron correlations are interesting because photons do not strongly interact with partonic matter: They provide a momentum tag for the recoil hadron(s) which may provide a better understanding of the matter produced. Additional measurements of the ridge using π0s at high pT may lead to a better understanding of ridge formation. Previously published STAR data has shown 2-D charged di-hadron correlations, and 1-D π0 triggered correlations. Wewill show results of 2-D correlations of likely γ & π0 triggers with charged hadrons from Au +Au collisions taken during Runs 7, 10, & 11 with the STAR detector; using the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and the Barrel ElectroMagnetic Calorimeter (BEMC). The TPC is used to measure the trajectory and momentum of charged hadrons and the BEMC is used to calculate the energy of electromagnetic particles. π0s were reconstructed from their decay photons in the Barrel Shower-Maximum Detector which sits ~ 5.6 X0 in the BEMC. The combination of the 3 datasets should provide adequate statistics to examine the ridge at high pt above 10 GeV. Supported in part by the U.S. Dept. of Energy.

  20. Measurements of the performance of a beam condition monitor prototype in a 5 GeV electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempel, M.; Afanaciev, K.; Burtowy, P.; Dabrowski, A.; Henschel, H.; Idzik, M.; Karacheban, O.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Levy, I.; Lohmann, W.; Pollak, B.; Przyborowski, D.; Ryjov, V.; Schuwalow, S.; Stickland, D.; Walsh, R.; Zagozdzinska, A.

    2016-08-01

    The Fast Beam Conditions Monitor, BCM1F, in the Compact Muon Solenoid, CMS, experiment was operated since 2008 and delivered invaluable information on the machine induced background in the inner part of the CMS detector supporting a safe operation of the inner tracker and high quality data. Due to the shortening of the time between two bunch crossings from 50 ns to 25 ns and higher expected luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider, LHC, in 2015, BCM1F needed an upgrade to higher bandwidth. In addition, BCM1F is used as an on-line luminometer operated independently of CMS. To match these requirements, the number of single crystal diamond sensors was enhanced from 8 to 24. Each sensor is subdivided into two pads, leading to 48 readout channels. Dedicated fast front-end ASICs were developed in 130 nm technology, and the back-end electronics is completely upgraded. An assembled prototype BCM1F detector comprising sensors, a fast front-end ASIC and optical analog readout was studied in a 5 GeV electron beam at the DESY-II accelerator. Results on the performance are given.

  1. IDENTIFIED PARTICLE TRANSVERSE MOMENTUM SPECTRA IN P+P AND D+AU COLLISIONS AT SNN=200 GEV.

    SciTech Connect

    NETRAKANTI, P.K.

    2005-10-24

    The transverse momentum (pT) spectra for identified charged pions, protons and anti-protons from p+p and d+Au collisions are measured around midrapidity (|y| < 0.5) over the range of 0.3 < p{sub T} < 10 GeV/c at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. The charged pion and proton+anti-proton spectra at high p{sub T} in p+p collisions have been compared with the next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamic (NLO pQCD) calculations with a specific fragmentation scheme. The p/{pi}{sup +} and {bar p}/{pi}{sup -} has been studied at high p{sub T}. The nuclear modification factor (R{sub dAu}) shows that the identified particle Cronin effects around midrapidity are significantly non-zero for charged pions and to be even larger for protons at intermediate p{sub T} (2 < p{sub T} < 5 GeV/c).

  2. Study of particle production fluctuations in Au + Au at sqrt(s_NN) = 130 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruneau, Claude A.

    2001-04-01

    The presence of two or more event classes in relativistic heavy ion collisions (e.g. at RHIC) can, in principle, be identified on the basis of a study of the impact parameter dependence of the variance (and covariance) of event-by-event observables such as the production multiplicity of specific species (kaons, anti-protons, etc), or the HBT radius if the production of the two event classes, e.g. a QGP and a purely hadronic gas, lead to finite differences in collision volume or particle production. (Gavin and Pruneau, Phys. Rev. C61, 044901 (2000). We will report on a first measurement of the production fluctuations of pi+-, kaons+-, protons, and anti-protons as a function of the collision impact parameter in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 130 GeV measured with the STAR TPC for pt>100 MeV/c and |eta|<0.5. The emphasis of the presentation will be in establishing whether observed particle productions are purely Poissonian or show manifestations of two or more classes of events.

  3. Forward-rapidity azimuthal and radial flow of identified particles for s=200 GeV Au+Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahms Collaboration; Sanders, S. J.; BRAHMS Collaboration

    2009-11-01

    A strong azimuthal flow signature at RHIC suggests rapid system equilibration leading to an almost perfect fluid state. The longitudinal extent of the flow behavior depends on how this state is formed and can be studied by measuring the pseudorapidity and transverse momentum dependence of the second Fourier component (ν(p)) of the azimuthal angular distribution. We report on a measurement of identified-particle ν as a function of p(0.5-2.0 GeV/c), centrality (0-25%, 25-50%), and pseudorapidity (0⩽η<3.2) for s=200 GeV Au+Au collisions. The BRAHMS spectrometers are used for particle identification (π, K, p) and momentum determination and the BRAHMS global detectors are used to determine the corresponding reaction-plane angles. The results are discussed in terms of the pseudorapidity dependence of constituent quark scaling and in terms of models that develop the complete (azimuthal and radial) hydrodynamic aspects of the forward dynamics at RHIC.

  4. LEAD SEVERING CONTRIVANCE

    DOEpatents

    Widmaier, W.

    1958-04-01

    A means for breaking an electrical circuit within an electronic tube during the process of manufacture is described. Frequently such circuits must be employed for gettering or vapor coating purposes, however, since an external pair of corector pins having no use after manufacture, is undesirable, this invention permits the use of existing leads to form a temporary circuit during manufacture, and severing it thereafter. One portion of the temporary circuit, made from a springy material such as tungsten, is spot welded to a fusable member. To cut the circuit an external radiant heat source melts the fusable member, allowing the tensed tungsten spring to contract and break the circuit. This inexpensive arrangement is particularly useful when the tube has a great many external leads crowded into the tube base.

  5. High sensitive X-ray films to detect electron showers in 100 GeV region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taira, T.; Shirai, T.; Tateyama, N.; Torii, S.; Nishimura, J.; Fujii, M.; Yoshida, A.; Aizu, H.; Nomura, Y.; Kazuno, M.

    1985-01-01

    Nonscreen type X-ray films were used in emulsion chamber experiments to detect high energy showers in cosmic rays. Ranges of the detection threshold is from about 1 to 2 TeV depending on the exposure conditions. Different types of X-ray films and sheets i.e. high sensitive screen type X-ray films and luminescence sheets were tested. The threshold of the shower detection is found to be about 200 GeV, which is much lower than that of nonscreen type X-ray films. These films are useful to detect showers in the medium energy range, a few hundred GeV, of the cosmic ray electrons.

  6. GeV excess electrons upscattering the CMB: a possible resolution to the "Photon Underproduction Crisis"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daylan, Tansu; Portillo, Stephen K. N.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2015-01-01

    Recently a gamma-ray excess has been identified in the inner Milky Way, which may be associated with the final state photon shower following DM annihilation to standard model final states. In this scenario ~ GeV electrons are also produced and, given their long energy loss timescale (~ Gyr), they can diffuse and escape the galaxy before losing too much energy. If such an electron population exists in the IGM, one observable consequence would be inverse Compton scattering on the CMB, which would produce UV photons that can efficiently ionize the IGM. This may be a possible resolution to the "Photon Underproduction Crisis", recently pointed out by Kollmeier et al. (2014). Regardless of the relevance to this crisis, the existence of a ~ GeV electron population in the IGM can put constraints on DM annihilation parameters considering the known X-ray backgrounds.

  7. Balloon measurements of the energy spectrum of cosmic electrons between 1 and 25 GeV.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earl, J. A.; Neely, D. E.; Rygg, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    During three balloon flights made in 1966 and 1967, cosmic electrons were investigated with the aid of a hodoscope detector that provided extensive and detailed information on each cosmic-ray event triggering the apparatus. Similar information obtained during calibration exposures to protons and pions as well as to electrons was used to provide identification of cosmic electrons and to determine their energies. Differential primary electron intensities measured in the range from 1 to 25 GeV were substantially larger than some earlier measurements. In conjunction with existing measurements at energies above 100 GeV, this finding indicates that the energy spectrum of cosmic electrons is steeper than that of cosmic-ray nuclei and consequently suggests that Compton/synchrotron energy loss plays a significant role in shaping the electron spectrum.

  8. A CONCEPTUAL 3-GEV LANSCE LINAC UPGRADE FOR ENHANCED PROTON RADIOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, Robert W; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Merrill, Frank E.; O'Hara, James F.; Rees, Daniel E.; Walstrom, Peter L.

    2012-05-14

    A conceptual design of a 3-GeV linac upgrade that would enable enhanced proton radiography at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is presented. The upgrade is based on the use of superconducting accelerating cavities to increase the present LANSCE linac output energy from 800 MeV to 3 GeV. The LANSCE linac currently provides negative hydrogen ion (H{sup -}) and proton (H{sup +}) beams to several user facilities that support Isotope Production, NNSA Stockpile Stewardship, and Basic Energy Science programs. Required changes to the front-end, the accelerating structures, and to the RF systems to meet the new performance goals, and changes to the existing beam switchyard to maintain operations for a robust user program are also described.

  9. Commissioning and operational results of the 12 GeV helium compression system at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Peter N.; Ganni, Venkatarao; Dixon, Kelly D.; Norton, Robert O.; Creel, Jonathan D.

    2015-12-01

    The new compressor system at Jefferson Lab (JLab) for the 12 GeV upgrade was commissioned in the spring of 2013 and incorporates many design changes, discussed in previous publications, to improve the operational range, efficiency, reliability and maintainability as compared to previous compressor skids used for this application. The 12 GeV helium compression system has five compressors configured with four pressure levels supporting three pressure levels in the new cold box. During compressor commissioning the compressors were operated independent of the cold box over a wide range of process conditions to verify proper performance including adequate cooling and oil removal. Isothermal and volumetric efficiencies over these process conditions for several built-involume ratios were obtained. This paper will discuss the operational envelope results and the modifications/improvements incorporated into the skids.

  10. Identification of Climate Change with Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) Distribution Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahayu, Anita

    2013-04-01

    Some events are difficult to avoid and gives considerable influence to humans and the environment is extreme weather and climate change. Many of the problems that require knowledge about the behavior of extreme values and one of the methods used are the Extreme Value Theory (EVT). EVT used to draw up reliable systems in a variety of conditions, so as to minimize the risk of a major disaster. There are two methods for identifying extreme value, Block Maxima with Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution approach and Peaks over Threshold (POT) with Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) approach. This research in Indramayu with January 1961-December 2003 period, the method used is Block Maxima with GEV distribution approach. The result showed that there is no climate change in Indramayu with January 1961-December 2003 period.

  11. GeV gamma-ray astronomy telescopes with high angular resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbreen, B.

    1985-01-01

    Gamma-ray telescopes flown on satellites have poor angular resolution with typical point source error circles of a few square degrees. It is shown that a major improvement in angular resolution for the detection of gamma-rays in the GeV region can be obtained with a single crystal as converter. The electron produced by a gamma ray incident at a small angle to a major crystal axis or plane is captured into channeling and radiates gamma rays. The channeling radiation and the electron-positron pair can be detected and yield point source locations with a precision of 5 arcseconds at 10 GeV. This is an improvement of three orders of magnitude on the angular precision of telescopes sensitive to gamma-rays above 50 MeV flown on Satellites.

  12. Superconducting Magnets for the 12 GeV Upgrade at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, Ruben J.; Young, Glenn R.

    2015-06-01

    Jefferson Laboratory is embarked on an energy upgrade to its flagship continuous electron beam accelerator in order to expand the scope of its research capabilities and probe further into the structure of nuclear particles. The 12 GeV upgrade includes the design, manufacture, integration, installation and commissioning of eight different superconducting magnets in three separate experimental halls. The effort involves other national laboratories, universities and industry spanning three countries. This paper will summarize the key characteristics of these magnets, ranging in size from 0.2 to 23 MJ in stored energy, and featuring many different types and configurations. The paper will also give an overview of the specific technical challenges for each magnet, and a status report on magnet manufacture and expected delivery dates. The 12GeV upgrade at J-Lab represents the largest superconducting magnet fabrication and installation program currently ongoing in the United States and this paper will present the breadth of collaborations supporting it.

  13. Coalescing at 8 GeV in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, D.J.; Capista, D.; Chase, B.; Dye, J.; Kourbanis, I.; Seiya, K.; Yang, M.-J.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    For Project X, it is planned to inject a beam of 3 10{sup 11} particles per bunch into the Main Injector. To prepare for this by studying the effects of higher intensity bunches in the Main Injector it is necessary to perform coalescing at 8 GeV. The results of a series of experiments and simulations of 8 GeV coalescing are presented. To increase the coalescing efficiency adiabatic reduction of the 53 MHz RF is required. This results in {approx}70% coalescing efficiency of 5 initial bunches. Data using wall current monitors has been taken to compare previous work and new simulations for 53 MHz RF reduction, bunch rotations and coalescing, good agreement between experiment and simulation was found. By increasing the number of bunches to 7 and compressing the bunch energy spread a scheme generating approximately 3 10{sup 11} particles in a bunch has been achieved. These bunches will then be used in further investigations.

  14. The shape of the primary cosmic ray electron spectrum above 10 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, R. F.; Ormes, J. F.; Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.

    1974-01-01

    A balloon borne measurement of the cosmic ray electron spectrum above 10 GeV is reported in which two new techniques have been used to remove proton background contamination. First, the depth of the spectrometer on one of the flights was more than 40 radiation lengths, enabling hadronically and electromagnetically induced cascades to be differentiated for a subset of the data. Second, electromagnetic cascade starting points were determined to within about 0.1 radiation lengths based upon a calibration with electrons from 5.4 to 18 GeV at the Stanford Linear Accelerator. The resulting spectrum, when fitted with a power law, is steep, but the fit is marginal. A significantly better fit is achieved by assuming a model in which the spectrum is steepening in the measured region.

  15. SRF CAVITY PERFORMANCE OVERVIEW FOR THE 12 GeV UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect

    A. Burrill, G.K. Davis, C.E. Reece, A.V. Reilly, M. Stirbet

    2012-07-01

    The CEBAF accelerator, a recirculating CW electron accelerator that is currently operating at Jefferson Laboratory, is in the process of having 10 new cryomodules installed to allow for the maximum beam energy to be increased from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. This upgrade required the fabrication, processing and RF qualification of 80, seven cell elliptical SRF cavities, a process that was completed in February 2012. The RF performance achieve in the vertical testing dewars has exceeded the design specification by {approx}25% and is a testament to the cavity design and processing cycle that has been implemented. This paper will provide a summary of the cavity RF performance in the vertical tests, as well as review the overall cavity processing cycle and duration for the project.

  16. Scalar Resonance at 750 GeV as Composite of Heavy Vector-Like Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wei; Zheng, Han-Qing

    2016-08-01

    We study a model of scalars which includes both the SM Higgs and a scalar singlet as composites of heavy vector-like fermions. The vector-like fermions are bounded by the super-strong four-fermion interactions. The scalar singlet decays to SM vector bosons through loop of heavy vector-like fermions. We show that the surprisingly large production cross section of di-photon events at 750 GeV resonance and the odd decay properties can all be explained. This model serves as a good model for both SM Higgs and a scalar resonance at 750 GeV. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) under Grant Nos. 11135009, 11375065 and 10925522

  17. An improved 8 GeV beam transport system for the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.

    1987-06-01

    A new 8 GeV beam transport system between the Booster and Main Ring synchrotrons at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is presented. The system was developed in an effort to improve the transverse phase space area occupied by the proton beam upon injection into the Main Ring accelerator. Problems with the original system are described and general methods of beamline design are formulated. Errors in the transverse properties of a beamline at the injection point of the second synchrotron and their effects on the region in transverse phase space occupied by a beam of particles are discussed. Results from the commissioning phase of the project are presented as well as measurements of the degree of phase space dilution generated by the transfer of 8 GeV protons from the Booster synchrotron to the Main Ring synchrotron.

  18. RF System Modelling for the JLab 12 GeV Upgrade and RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Alicia Hofler; Jean Delayen; J. Hovater; Stefan Simrock

    2003-10-01

    Jefferson Lab is using the MATLAB/Simulink library for RF systems developed for TTF as a tool to develop a model of its 12 GeV upgrade and the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) to study the behavior and performance of the RF control system. The library includes elements describing a superconducting cavity with mechanical modes excited by Lorentz Force effects and a klystron including saturation characteristics. It can be applied to gradient and phase or in-phase and quadrature control for cavities operating in either a self-excited loop or generator driven mode. We will provide an overview of the theory behind the library components and present initial modeling results for Jefferson Lab's 12 GeV Upgrade and the RIA systems.

  19. Commissioning and operational results of the 12 GeV helium compression system at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, P.; Ganni, V.; Dixon, K.; Norton, R.; Creel, J.

    2015-12-01

    The new compressor system at Jefferson Lab (JLab) for the 12 GeV upgrade was commissioned in the spring of 2013 and incorporates many design changes, discussed in previous publications, to improve the operational range, efficiency, reliability and maintainability as compared to previous compressor skids used for this application. The 12 GeV helium compression system has five compressors configured with four pressure levels supporting three pressure levels in the new cold box. During compressor commissioning the compressors were operated independent of the cold box over a wide range of process conditions to verify proper performance including adequate cooling and oil removal. Isothermal and volumetric efficiencies over these process conditions for several built-involume ratios were obtained. This paper will discuss the operational envelope results and the modifications/improvements incorporated into the skids.

  20. Study of kaonic final states in {pi}{sup -} p at 190 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, Tobias

    2010-08-05

    We discuss the status of analyses of data recorded in the 2008 and 2009 runs of the COMPASS experiment at CERN with sepcific focus on final states with K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0{pi}}- and K{sup +}K{sup -{pi}-} produced in {pi}{sup -}(190 GeV)p scattering. The interest in such final states is motivated by a summary of some of the relevant literature. We also show first results from the analysis of diffractively produced KK-bar{pi} states. Two prominent three-body structures, one around 1.8 GeV, the other at 2.2 GeV decaying via known KK-bar and K{pi} states are seen.

  1. Dirac gauginos, R symmetry and the 125 GeV Higgs

    SciTech Connect

    Bertuzzo, Enrico; Frugiuele, Claudia; Gregoire, Thomas; Ponton, Eduardo

    2015-04-20

    We study a supersymmetric scenario with a quasi exact R-symmetry in light of the discovery of a Higgs resonance with a mass of 125 GeV. In such a framework, the additional adjoint superfields, needed to give Dirac masses to the gauginos, contribute both to the Higgs mass and to electroweak precision observables. We then analyze the interplay between the two aspects, finding regions in parameter space in which the contributions to the precision observables are under control and a 125 GeV Higgs boson can be accommodated. Furthermore, we estimate the fine-tuning of the model finding regions of the parameter space still unexplored by the LHC with a fine-tuning considerably improved with respect to the minimal supersymmetric scenario. In particular, sizable non-holomorphic (non-supersoft) adjoints masses are required to reduce the fine-tuning.

  2. Interpretations of the possible 42.7 GeV γ -ray line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lei; Liang, Yun-Feng; Dong, Tie-Kuang; Fan, Yi-Zhong

    2016-08-01

    Recently Liang et al. [Phys. Rev. D 93, 103525 (2016)] found a tentative line signal at about 43 GeV in the directions of 16 nearby galaxy clusters. If arising from dark matter annihilation, the mass of the dark matter particles should be mχ˜43 GeV and the annihilation cross section ⟨σ v ⟩˜5 ×10-28(BF ¯ /1 03)-1 cm3 s-1 is needed, where BF ¯ is the averaged boost factor of the annihilation signal of these galaxy clusters. In this work we discuss several models which could interpret these features and estimate the model parameters. Usually a sizeable coupling parameter is needed. The 2 σ upper limits on the cross section of the dark matter annihilation into various final states such as b b ¯, μ+μ- and so on are also presented.

  3. Detection of Gamma Rays with E greater than 300 GeV From Markarian 501

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, J.; Connaughton, V.; Akerlof, C. W.; Biller, S.; Buckley, J.; Carter-Lewis, D. A.; Catanese, M.; Cawley, M. F.; Fegan, D. J.; Finley, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    The detection of gamma rays of energy greater than 300 GeV from the BL Lacertae object Mrk 501 demonstrates that extragalactic TeV emission is not unique to Mrk 421. During 66 hr of observations between 1995 March and July we measured an average flux of 8.1 +/- 1.4 x 10(exp -12) cm(exp -2)/s above 300 GeV, a flux that is only 20 percent of the average Mrk 421 flux. The new gamma-ray source has not been reported by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory as an emitter of gamma rays at lower energies. There is evidence for variability on timescales of days.

  4. J / ψ polarization in p + p collisions at √{ s} = 200 GeV in STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-12-01

    We report on a polarization measurement of inclusive J / ψ mesons in the di-electron decay channel at mid-rapidity at 2 GeV / c in p + p collisions at √{ s} = 200 GeV. Data were taken with the STAR detector at RHIC. The J / ψ polarization measurement should help to distinguish between different models of the J / ψ production mechanism since they predict different pT dependences of the J / ψ polarization. In this analysis, J / ψ polarization is studied in the helicity frame. The polarization parameter λθ measured at RHIC becomes smaller towards high pT, indicating more longitudinal J / ψ polarization as pT increases. The result is compared with predictions of presently available models.

  5. An overview of the planned Jefferson Lab 12-GeV helium refrigerator upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Arenius, Dana; Creel, Jonathan; Dixon, Kelly; Ganni, Venkatarao; Knudsen, Peter; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Wright, Mathew

    2008-03-01

    In February 2006, Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, VA, received â Critical Decision 1â (CD-1) approval to proceed with the engineering and design of the long anticipated upgrade to increase the beam energy of CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. This will require the installation of 10 new cryomodules, and additional 2.1-K refrigeration beyond the available 4600 W to handle the increased heat loads. Additionally, a new experimental hall, Hall D, is planned that will require the installation of a small, available refrigerator. This paper will present an overview of the integration of the new proposed refrigeration system into CEBAF, the installation of the available refrigerator for Hall D, and includes planned work scope, current schedule plans and project status.

  6. Brilliant GeV electron beam with narrow energy spread generated by a laser plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ronghao; Lu, Haiyang; Shou, Yinren; Lin, Chen; Zhuo, Hongbin; Chen, Chia-erh; Yan, Xueqing

    2016-09-01

    The production of GeV electron beam with narrow energy spread and high brightness is investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. A controlled electron injection scheme and a method for phase-space manipulation in a laser plasma accelerator are found to be essential. The injection is triggered by the evolution of two copropagating laser pulses near a sharp vacuum-plasma transition. The collection volume is well confined and the injected bunch is isolated in phase space. By tuning the parameters of the laser pulses, the parameters of the injected electron bunch, such as the bunch length, energy spread, emittance and charge, can be adjusted. Manipulating the phase-space rotation with the rephasing technique, the injected electron bunch can be accelerated to GeV level while keeping relative energy spread below 0.5% and transverse emittance below 1.0 μ m . The results present a very promising way to drive coherent x-ray sources.

  7. Dirac gauginos, R symmetry and the 125 GeV Higgs

    DOE PAGES

    Bertuzzo, Enrico; Frugiuele, Claudia; Gregoire, Thomas; Ponton, Eduardo

    2015-04-20

    We study a supersymmetric scenario with a quasi exact R-symmetry in light of the discovery of a Higgs resonance with a mass of 125 GeV. In such a framework, the additional adjoint superfields, needed to give Dirac masses to the gauginos, contribute both to the Higgs mass and to electroweak precision observables. We then analyze the interplay between the two aspects, finding regions in parameter space in which the contributions to the precision observables are under control and a 125 GeV Higgs boson can be accommodated. Furthermore, we estimate the fine-tuning of the model finding regions of the parameter spacemore » still unexplored by the LHC with a fine-tuning considerably improved with respect to the minimal supersymmetric scenario. In particular, sizable non-holomorphic (non-supersoft) adjoints masses are required to reduce the fine-tuning.« less

  8. Production of charged hadrons by positive muons on deuterium and xenon at 490 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aderholz, M.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Caroll, T. J.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H. G. E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J. J.; Salgado, C. W.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Seyerlein, H. J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H.-J.; Venkataramania, H.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Wilson, R.; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.

    1994-06-01

    Results on the production of charged hadrons in muon-deuteron and muon-xenon interactions are presented. The data were taken with the E665 spectrometer, which was exposed to the 490 GeV muon beam of the Tevatron at Fermilab. The use of a streamer chamber as vertex detector provides nearly 4π acceptance for charged particles. The μD data are compared with the μXe data in terms of multiplicity distributions, average multiplicities, forward-backward multiplicity correlations, rapidity and transverse momentum distributions and of two-particle rapidity correlations of charged hadrons. The data cover a range of invariant hadronic masses W from 8 to 30 GeV.

  9. Pseudoscalar Decaying Only via Loops as an Explanation for the 750 GeV Diphoton Excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Mao, Ying-nan; Tang, Yi-Lei; Zhang, Chen; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Shou-hua

    2016-04-01

    We construct a weakly coupled renormalizable model to explain the 750 GeV diphoton excess. The 750 GeV resonance [denoted as X (750 )] is interpreted as a pseudoscalar coming from a complex singlet. The model also naturally provides a dark matter candidate. One of the most attractive feature of the model is that decays of X (750 ) are all loop induced, so the diphoton rate is not diluted by unwanted tree level branching fractions. Relevant Yukawa interactions need not be tuned to the near-nonperturbative region to explain the rate. The model is highly predictive, including the pseudoscalar nature of X (750 ) and two nearly mass-degenerate exotic quarks carrying electric charge 5 /3 and 2 /3 , respectively. Rich phenomenology is expectedf with respect to collider searches, flavor physics, and dark matter detection, if X (750 ) can be pinned down by future LHC experiments.

  10. Coherent [pi][sup 0] photoproduction on the deuteron up to 4 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Meekins, D.G.; Armstrong, C.S. ); Meekins, D.G.; Abbott, D.J.; Baker, O.K.; Cardman, L.; Carlini, R.D.; Dunne, J.A.; Ent, R.; Keppel, C.E.; Mack, D.J.; Mitchell, J.H.; Tang, L.; Vulcan, W.F.; Wood, S.A.; Yan, C. ); Ahmidouch, A.; Madey, R.; Suleiman, R. ); Arrington, J.; Filippone, B.W.; McKeown, R.D. ); Assamagan, K.A.; Baker, O.K.; Cha, J.; Eden, T.; Gueye, P.L.; Harvey, M.; Hinton, W.; Keppel, C.E.; Madey, R.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Savage, G.; Tang, L. ); Barrow, S.P.; Beatty, D.P.; Fortune, H.T.; Koltenuk,

    1999-11-01

    The differential cross section for [sup 2]H([gamma],d)[pi][sup 0] has been measured at deuteron center-of-mass angles of 90[degree] and 136[degree]. This work reports the first data for this reaction above a photon energy of 1 GeV, and permits a test of the apparent constituent counting rule and reduced nuclear amplitude behavior as observed in elastic [ital ed] scattering. Measurements were performed up to a photon energy of 4.0 GeV, and are in good agreement with previous lower energy measurements. Overall, the data are inconsistent with both constituent-counting rule and reduced nuclear amplitude predictions. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

  11. Coherent {pi}{sup 0} photoproduction on the deuteron up to 4 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Meekins, D.G.; Armstrong, C.S.; Meekins, D.G.; Abbott, D.J.; Baker, O.K.; Cardman, L.; Carlini, R.D.; Dunne, J.A.; Ent, R.; Keppel, C.E.; Mack, D.J.; Mitchell, J.H.; Tang, L.; Vulcan, W.F.; Wood, S.A.; Yan, C.; Ahmidouch, A.; Madey, R.; Suleiman, R.; Arrington, J.; Filippone, B.W.; McKeown, R.D.; Assamagan, K.A.; Baker, O.K.; Cha, J.; Eden, T.; Gueye, P.L.; Harvey, M.; Hinton, W.; Keppel, C.E.; Madey, R.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Savage, G.; Tang, L.; Barrow, S.P.; Beatty, D.P.; Fortune, H.T.; Koltenuk, D.M.; Beck, D.H.; Bochna, C.; Cadman, R.V.; Forest, T.A.; Gao, H.; Holt, R.J.; Miller, M.A.; Nathan, A.M.; Owen, B.R.; Simicevic, N.; Terburg, B.P.; Williamson, S.E.; Beedoe, S.Y.; Danagoulian, S.; Beise, E.J.; Breuer, H.; Chant, N.S.; Collins, G.; Duncan, F.A.; Gustafsson, K.K.; Lung, A.F.; Mohring, R.M.; Belz, J.E.; Bosted, P.E.; Brash, E.J.; and others

    1999-11-01

    The differential cross section for {sup 2}H({gamma},d){pi}{sup 0} has been measured at deuteron center-of-mass angles of 90{degree} and 136{degree}. This work reports the first data for this reaction above a photon energy of 1 GeV, and permits a test of the apparent constituent counting rule and reduced nuclear amplitude behavior as observed in elastic {ital ed} scattering. Measurements were performed up to a photon energy of 4.0 GeV, and are in good agreement with previous lower energy measurements. Overall, the data are inconsistent with both constituent-counting rule and reduced nuclear amplitude predictions. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Proton-antiproton suppression in 200A GeV Au-Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renk, Thorsten; Eskola, Kari J.

    2007-08-01

    We discuss the measured nuclear suppression of p+p¯ production in 200A GeV Au-Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) within radiative energy loss. For the Albino-Kniehl-Kramer (AKK) set of fragmentation functions, proton production is dominated by gluons, giving rise to the expectation that the nuclear suppression for p+p¯ should be stronger than for pions due to the stronger coupling of gluons to the quenching medium. Using a hydrodynamical description for the soft matter evolution, we show that this is indeed seen in the calculation. However, the expected suppression factors for pions and protons are sufficiently similar that a discrimination with present data is not possible. In the high pT region above 6 GeV where the contributions of hydrodynamics and recombination to hadron production are negligible, the model calculation is in good agreement with the data on p+p¯ suppression.

  13. Proton-antiproton suppression in 200A GeV Au-Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Thorsten; Eskola, Kari J.

    2007-08-15

    We discuss the measured nuclear suppression of p+p production in 200A GeV Au-Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) within radiative energy loss. For the Albino-Kniehl-Kramer (AKK) set of fragmentation functions, proton production is dominated by gluons, giving rise to the expectation that the nuclear suppression for p+p should be stronger than for pions due to the stronger coupling of gluons to the quenching medium. Using a hydrodynamical description for the soft matter evolution, we show that this is indeed seen in the calculation. However, the expected suppression factors for pions and protons are sufficiently similar that a discrimination with present data is not possible. In the high p{sub T} region above 6 GeV where the contributions of hydrodynamics and recombination to hadron production are negligible, the model calculation is in good agreement with the data on p+p suppression.

  14. PILAC: A pion linac facility for 1-GeV pion physics at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    A design study or a Pion Linac (PILAC) at LAMPF is underway at Los Alamos. We present here a reference design for a system of pion sources, linac, and high-resolution beam line and spectrometer that will provide 10{sup 9} pions per second on target and 200-keV resolution for the ({pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}) reaction at 0.92 GeV. A general-purpose beam line that delivers both positive and negative pions in the energy range 0.4--1.1 GeV is included, thus opening up the possibility of a broad experimental program as is discussed in this report. A kicker-based beam sharing system allows delivery of beam to both beamlines simultaneously with independent sign and energy control. Because the pionlinac acts like an rf particle separator, all beams produced by PILAC will be free of electron (or positron) and proton contamination. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  15. GeV Electron Beams from a Capillary Discharge Guided Laser Plasma Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2010-07-08

    Laser plasma acceleration (LPA) up to 1 GeV has been realized at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory by using a capillary discharge waveguide. In this paper, the capillary discharge guided LPA system including a broadband single-shot electron spectrometer is described. The spectrometer was designed specifically for LPA experiments and has amomentumacceptance of 0.01 - 1.1 GeV/c with a percent level resolution. Experiments using a 33 mm long, 300 mu m diameter capillary demonstrated the generation of high energy electron beams up to 1 GeV. By de-tuning discharge delay from optimum guiding performance, selftrapping and acceleration were found to be stabilized producing 460 MeV electron beams.

  16. Research in atomic and applied physics using a 6-GeV synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.

    1985-12-01

    The Division of Atomic and Applied Physics in the Department of Applied Science at Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts a broad program of research using ion beams and synchrotron radiation for experiments in atomic physics and nuclear analytical techniques and applications. Many of the experiments would benefit greatly from the use of high energy, high intensity photon beams from a 6-GeV synchrotron source. A survey of some of the specific scientific possibilities is presented.

  17. eDT and Model-based Configuration of 12GeV CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Dennison L.

    2015-09-01

    This poster will discuss model-driven setup of CEBAF for the 12GeV era, focusing on the elegant Download Tool (eDT). eDT is a new operator tool that generates magnet design setpoints for various machine energies and pass configurations. eDT was developed in the effort towards a process for reducing machine configuration time and reproducibility by way of an accurate accelerator model.

  18. Future Research Program at JLab: 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2007-09-06

    The project to upgrade the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV is presented. Most of the research program supporting that upgrade, will require a highly polarized beam, as will be illustrated by a few selected examples. To carry out that research program will require an extensively upgraded instrumentation in two of the existing experimental halls and the addition of a fourth hall. The plans for a high-luminosity electron-ion collider are briefly discussed.

  19. Future Spin Physics at JLab: 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2006-10-02

    The project to upgrade the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV is presented. Most of the research program supporting that upgrade, will require a highly polarized beam, as will be illustrated by a few selected examples. To carry out that research program will require an extensively upgraded instrumentation in two of the existing experimental halls and the addition of a fourth hall. The plans for a high-luminosity electron-ion collider are briefly discussed.

  20. Physics with CLAS at Energies up to 12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Volker D. Burkert

    1998-06-01

    An energy increase of CEBAF into the 8-12 GeV range will benefit the physics program with CLAS in at least three areas: first, it increases the accessible range in four-momentum transfer for the study of exclusive reactions and form factor measurements to Q{sup 2} = 6 -10 GeV{sup 2}. Second, it extends the phase space available for the production of heavy mesons with masses greater than 1.5 GeV, and for total hadronic masses W < 4 GeV. Third, it will allow to fully reach the deep inelastic regime, with momentum and energy transfers needed for the study of transitions into the regime where pQCD may be applicable for inclusive as well as specific exclusive processes. The boundaries of the physics program are defined by the capabilities of the CLAS detector. These include: large acceptance (but not 4{pi}); high luminosity at large acceptance; detection of several (but not many) hadrons in the final state; hadron detection out-of-plane; and operation of polarized solid state targets for electrons (NH2, ND3) and photons (HD). For the following discussion we assumed that CLAS will be upgraded in several important aspects: full coverage for the charged particle tracking (without magnetic analysis) and the detection of high energy photons; extension of scattering angle coverage down to angles of about 5 degrees; extend particle identification, especially kaon/pion separation from 2 to 5 GeV/c; and implement photon tagging capabilities at high energies, which one currently limited to 6 GeV electron beam energies.

  1. Elastic antiproton-proton photoproduction between threshold and 4.8 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, D. P.; Dainton, J. B.; Lee, L. C. Y.; Marshall, R.; Thompson, J. C.; Williams, D. T.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Frost, G.; Newton, D.; Patrick, G. N.; Pearce, G. F.; Sloan, T.; Brookes, G. R.; Haynes, W. J.; Wilkes, P. B.

    1980-03-01

    The cross section for the process γ p → overlineppp has been measured from threshold up to 4.8 GeV using a tagged photon beam and a multiparticle spectrometer which detected all final state particles. The production cross section rises rapidly from threshold to a constant value of 35 nb. No evidence is found in the mass spectra for the production of narrow meson resonances decaying into overlinepp.

  2. Net charge fluctuations in Au + Au interactions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adcox, K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Y; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Klinksiek, S; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiriak, I G; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sorensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2002-08-19

    Data from Au + Au interactions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV, obtained with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, are used to investigate local net charge fluctuations among particles produced near midrapidity. According to recent suggestions, such fluctuations may carry information from the quark-gluon plasma. This analysis shows that the fluctuations are dominated by a stochastic distribution of particles, but are also sensitive to other effects, like global charge conservation and resonance decays.

  3. GeV electron beams from a centimeter-scale laser-driven plasmaaccelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, A.; Nakamura, K.; Panasenko, D.; Toth, Cs.; Esarey,E.; Schroeder; Hooker, S.M.; and Leemans, W.P.; Hooker, S.M.

    2007-06-25

    esults are presented on the generation ofquasi-monoenergeticelectron beams with energy up to 1GeV using a 40TWlaser and a 3.3 cm-long hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide.Electron beams were not observed without a plasma channel, indicatingthat self-focusing alone could not be relied upon for effective guidingofthe laser pulse. Results are presented of the electronbeam spectra, andthe dependence of the reliability of producingelectron beams as afunction of laser and plasma parameters.

  4. GeV electron beams from a cm-scale accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W.P.; Nagler, B.; Gonsalves, A.J.; Toth, C.; Nakamura,K.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Esarey, E.B.; Schroeder, C.; Hooker, S.M.

    2006-05-04

    GeV electron accelerators are essential to synchrotron radiation facilities and free electron lasers, and as modules for high-energy particle physics. Radio frequency based accelerators are limited to relatively low accelerating fields (10-50 MV/m) and hence require tens to hundreds of meters to reach the multi-GeV beam energies needed to drive radiation sources, and many kilometers to generate particle energies of interest to the frontiers of high-energy physics.Laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA) in which particles are accelerated by the field of a plasma wave driven by an intense laser pulse produce electric fields several orders of magnitude stronger (10-100 GV/m) and so offer the potential of very compact devices. However, until now it has not been possible to maintain the required laser intensity, and hence acceleration, over the several centimeters needed to reach GeV energies.For this reason laser-driven accelerators have to date been limited to the 100 MeV scale. Contrary to predictions that PW-class lasers would be needed to reach GeV energies, here we demonstrate production of a high-quality electron beam with 1 GeV energy by channeling a 40 TW peak power laser pulse in a 3.3 cm long gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide. We anticipate that laser-plasma accelerators based on capillary discharge waveguides will have a major impact on the development of future femtosecond radiation sources such as x-ray free electron lasers and become a standard building block for next generation high-energy accelerators.

  5. Observation of D - π production correlations in 500 GeV π- - N interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Costa, I.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Fernandez, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gerzon, S.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lundberg, B.; Maytal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B. T.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; D'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Santha, A. K. S.; Santoro, A. F. S.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Stanton, N. R.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.

    1997-02-01

    We study the charge correlations between charm mesons produced in 500 GeV π- - N interactions and the charged pions produced closest to them in phase space. With 110,000 fully reconstructed D mesons from experiment E791 at Fermilab, the correlations are studied as functions of the Dπ - D mass difference and of Feynman x. We observe significant correlations which appear to originate from a combination of sources including fragmentation dynamics, resonant decays, and charge of the beam.

  6. On the origin of GeV emission in gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Hascoët, Romain; Vurm, Indrek

    2014-06-10

    The most common progenitors of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are massive stars with strong stellar winds. We show that the GRB blast wave in the wind should emit a bright GeV flash. It is produced by inverse-Compton cooling of the thermal plasma behind the forward shock. The main part of the flash is shaped by scattering of the prompt MeV radiation (emitted at smaller radii) which streams through the external blast wave. The inverse-Compton flash is bright due to the huge e {sup ±} enrichment of the external medium by the prompt radiation ahead of the blast wave. At late times, the blast wave switches to normal synchrotron-self-Compton cooling. The mechanism is demonstrated by a detailed transfer simulation. The observed prompt MeV radiation is taken as an input of the simulation; we use GRB 080916C as an example. The result reproduces the GeV flash observed by the Fermi telescope. It explains the delayed onset, the steep rise, the peak flux, the time of the peak, the long smooth decline, and the spectral slope of GeV emission. The wind density required to reproduce all these features is typical of Wolf-Rayet stars. Our simulation predicts strong TeV emission 1 minute after the burst trigger; then a cutoff in the observed high-energy spectrum is expected from absorption by extragalactic background light. In addition, a bright optical counterpart of the GeV flash is predicted for plausible values of the magnetic field; such a double (optical+GeV) flash has been observed in GRB 130427A.

  7. Optics solutions for pp operation with electron lenses at 100 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.

    2014-07-12

    Electron lenses for head-on compensation are currently under commissioning and foreseen to be operational for the 2015 polarized proton run. These devices will provide a partial compensation of head-on beam-beam effects and allow to double the RHIC proton luminosity. This note reviews the optics constraints related to beam-beam compensation and summarizes the current lattice options for proton operation at 100 GeV.

  8. Some issues on the RF system in the 3 GeV Fermilab pre-booster

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K. Y.

    1998-06-01

    Some issues are presented on the rf system in the future Fermilab prebooster, which accelerates 4 bunches each containing 0.25 x 10{sub 14} protons from 1 to 3 GeV kinetic energy. The problem of beam loading is discussed. The proposal of having a non-tunable fixed-frequency rf system is investigated. Robinson's criteria for phase stability are checked and possible Robinson instability growth is computed.

  9. 750 GeV composite axion as the LHC diphoton resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrie, Neil D.; Kobakhidze, Archil; Talia, Matthew; Wu, Lei

    2016-04-01

    We propose that the 750 GeV resonance, presumably observed in the early LHC Run 2 data, could be a heavy composite axion that results from condensation of a hypothetical quark in a high-colour representation of conventional QCD. The model, motivated by a recently proposed solution to the strong CP problem, is very economical and is essentially defined by the properties of the additional quark - its colour charge, hypercharge and mass. The axion mass and its coupling to two photons (via axial anomaly) can be computed in terms of these parameters. The axion is predominantly produced via photon fusion (γγ → A) which is followed by Z vector boson fusion and associated production at the LHC. We find that the total diphoton cross section of the axion can be fitted with the observed excess. Combining the requirement on the cross-section, such that it reproduces the diphoton excess events, with the bounds on the total width (Γtot ⩽ 45 GeV), we obtain the effective coupling in the range 1.6 ×10-4 GeV-1 ≳CA ≳ 6.5 ×10-5 GeV-1. Within this window of allowed couplings the model favours a narrow width resonance and yQ2 ∼ O (10). In addition, we observe that the associated production q q bar → Aγ → γγγ can potentially produce a sizeable number of three photon events at future LHC. However, the rare decay Z →A* γ → γγγ is found to be too small to be probed at the LHC and e+e- colliders.

  10. Shadowing in the muon-xenon inelastic scattering cross section at 490 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Carroll, T. J.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, G.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H. G. E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J. J.; Salgado, C.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Seyerlein, H. J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H.-J.; Venkataramania, H.; Vidal, M.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Wilson, Richard; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.; Fermilab E665 Collaboration

    1992-08-01

    Inelastic scattering of 490 GeV μ + from deuterium and xenon nuclei has been studied for xBj> s.001. The ratio of the xenon/deuterium cross section per nucleon is observed to vary with xBj, with a depletion in the kinematic range 0.001 < xBj < 0.025 which exhibits no significant Q2 dependence. An electromagnetic calorimeter was used to verify the radiative corrections.

  11. Coherent (pi)0 Photoproduction on the Deuteron up to 4 GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Meekins, David; Abbott, David; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Armstrong, Christopher; Arrington, John; Assamagan, Ketevi; Baker, O.; Barrow, Steve; Beatty, David; Beck, Douglas; Beedoe, Shelton; Beise, Elizabeth; Belz, John; Bochna, Christopher; Bosted, Peter; Brash, Edward; Breuer, Herbert; Cadman, Robert; Cardman, Lawrence; Carlini, Roger; Cha, Jinseok; Chant, Nicholas; Collins, Glenn; Cothran, Christopher; Cummings, William; Danagoulian, Samuel; Duncan, Fraser; Dunne, James; Dutta, Dipangkar; Eden, Thomas; Ent, R.; Filippone, Bradley; Forest, Tony; Fortune, Harry; Frolov, Valera; Gao, Haiyan; Gilman, Ronald; Gueye, Paul; Gustafsson, Kenneth; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Harvey, Mark; Hinton, Wendy; Holt, Roy; Jackson, Harold; Keppel, Cynthia; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kinney, Edward; Klein, Andreas; Koltenuk, Douglas; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; Lung, Allison; Mack, David; Madey, Richard; Markowitz, Pete; McFarlane, Kenneth; McKeown, Robert; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Miller, M.A.; Mitchell, Joseph; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Mohring, Richard; Napolitano, James; Nathan, Alan; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; O'neill, Thomas; Owen, Brynnen; Pate, Stephen; Potterveld, David; Price, John; Rakness, Gregory; Ransome, Ronald; Reinhold, Joerg; Rutt, Paul; Salgado, Carlos; Savage, Geoff; Segel, Ralph; Simicevic, Neven; Stoler, Paul; Suleiman, Riad; Tang, Liguang; Terburg, Bart; Westrum, D.van; Vulcan, William; Williamson, Steven; Witkowski, Michael; Wood, Stephen; Yan, Chen; Zeidman, Benjamin

    1999-11-01

    The differential cross section for D( gamma,d)(pi)0 has been measured at deuteron center-of-mass angles of 90z and 136z. This work reports the first data for this reaction above a photon energy of 1 GeV, and permits a test of the apparent constituent counting rule and reduced nuclear amplitude behavior as observed in elastic ed scattering.

  12. Improved Prototype Cryomodule for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Reece; Danny Machie; Edward Daly; Isidoro Campisi; Jacek Sekutowicz; John Hogan; Karl Smith; Katherine Wilson; Mark Wiseman; Peter Kneisel; Timothy Whitlatch; William Hicks; Timothy Rothgeb

    2003-05-12

    In order to provide a higher performance building block cryomodule for the CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade, modifications have been made to the design of the Upgrade Cryomodule. The prototype cryomodule will be completed in 2004 and be installed for operation in CEBAF. Design changes enable the use of higher gradient cavities to achieve greater than 100 MV per cryomodule while not exceeding the budgeted cryogenic load of 300 W during steady-state operation.

  13. Shielding and radiation protection at the SSRL 3 GeV injector

    SciTech Connect

    Ipe, N.E.; Liu, J.C.

    1991-12-01

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) Injector is comprised of a linear accelerator (linac) capable of energies {le} 150 MeV, a 3 GeV booster synchrotron, and a beam line to transport the electrons into the storage ring SPEAR. The injector is shielded so that under normal operating conditions, the annual dose equivalent at the shield surface does not exceed 10 mSv. This paper describes the shielding and radiation protection at the injector.

  14. Leading change: 2--planning.

    PubMed

    Kerridge, Joanna

    National initiatives have outlined the importance of involving frontline staff in service improvement, and the ability to influence and manage change has been identified as an essential skill for delivering new models of care. Nurses often have to take the lead in managing change in clinical practice. The second in a three-part series is designed to help nurses at all levels develop the knowledge and skills to function as change agents within their organisations. This article focuses on planning the change and dealing with resistance. PMID:22439509

  15. Leading Change, Adding Value.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nick

    2016-09-12

    Essential facts Leading Change, Adding Value is NHS England's new nursing and midwifery framework. It is designed to build on Compassion in Practice (CiP), which was published 3 years ago and set out the 6Cs: compassion, care, commitment, courage, competence and communication. CiP established the values at the heart of nursing and midwifery, while the new framework sets out how staff can help transform the health and care sectors to meet the aims of the NHS England's Five Year Forward View. PMID:27615573

  16. A Search for Pulsations from Geminga above 100 GeV with VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Aune, T.; Barnacka, A.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickinson, H. J.; Dumm, J.; Eisch, J. D.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Griffiths, S. T.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Håkansson, N.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krennrich, F.; Kumar, S.; Lang, M. J.; Lyutikov, M.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Prokoph, H.; Pueschel, E.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Varlotta, A.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weinstein, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zajczyk, A.; Zitzer, B.

    2015-02-01

    We present the results of 71.6 hr of observations of the Geminga pulsar (PSR J0633+1746) with the VERITAS very-high-energy gamma-ray telescope array. Data taken with VERITAS between 2007 November and 2013 February were phase-folded using a Geminga pulsar timing solution derived from data recorded by the XMM- Newton and Fermi-LAT space telescopes. No significant pulsed emission above 100 GeV is observed, and we report upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the integral flux above 135 GeV (spectral analysis threshold) of 4.0 × 10-13 s-1 cm-2 and 1.7 × 10-13 s-1 cm-2 for the two principal peaks in the emission profile. These upper limits, placed in context with phase-resolved spectral energy distributions determined from 5 yr of data from the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT), constrain possible hardening of the Geminga pulsar emission spectra above ~50 GeV.

  17. Is radiative electroweak symmetry breaking consistent with a 125 GeV Higgs mass?

    PubMed

    Steele, T G; Wang, Zhi-Wei

    2013-04-12

    The mechanism of radiative electroweak symmetry breaking occurs through loop corrections, and unlike conventional symmetry breaking where the Higgs mass is a parameter, the radiatively generated Higgs mass is dynamically predicted. Padé approximations and an averaging method are developed to extend the Higgs mass predictions in radiative electroweak symmetry breaking from five- to nine-loop order in the scalar sector of the standard model, resulting in an upper bound on the Higgs mass of 141 GeV. The mass predictions are well described by a geometric series behavior, converging to an asymptotic Higgs mass of 124 GeV consistent with the recent ATLAS and CMS Collaborations observations. Similarly, we find that the Higgs self-coupling converges to λ=0.23, which is significantly larger than its conventional symmetry breaking counterpart for a 124 GeV Higgs mass. In addition to this significant enhancement of the Higgs self-coupling and HH→HH scattering, we find that Higgs decays to gauge bosons are unaltered and the scattering processes WL(+)WL(+)→HH, ZLZL→HH are also enhanced, providing signals to distinguish conventional and radiative electroweak symmetry breaking mechanisms.

  18. A SEARCH FOR PULSATIONS FROM GEMINGA ABOVE 100 GeV WITH VERITAS

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Aune, T.; Barnacka, A.; Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M.; Bird, R.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V.; Dickinson, H. J.; Eisch, J. D.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dumm, J. E-mail: gtrichards@gatech.edu; and others

    2015-02-10

    We present the results of 71.6 hr of observations of the Geminga pulsar (PSR J0633+1746) with the VERITAS very-high-energy gamma-ray telescope array. Data taken with VERITAS between 2007 November and 2013 February were phase-folded using a Geminga pulsar timing solution derived from data recorded by the XMM- Newton and Fermi-LAT space telescopes. No significant pulsed emission above 100 GeV is observed, and we report upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the integral flux above 135 GeV (spectral analysis threshold) of 4.0 × 10{sup –13} s{sup –1} cm{sup –2} and 1.7 × 10{sup –13} s{sup –1} cm{sup –2} for the two principal peaks in the emission profile. These upper limits, placed in context with phase-resolved spectral energy distributions determined from 5 yr of data from the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT), constrain possible hardening of the Geminga pulsar emission spectra above ∼50 GeV.

  19. The Time of Flight Upgrade for CLAS at 12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis Graham

    2007-10-01

    The Time of Flight (TOF) system is a detection system within the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. CLAS, being a magnetic toroidal multi-gap spectrometer, is used in the detection of particles and their varying properties. Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is providing an incoming electron beam of energy 6 GeV that is used to probe the structure and production of these particles. The CLAS detector is currently adapted to energies of up to 6 GeV, but with recent approval it will now upgrade to energies of 12 GeV. CLAS consists of drift chambers to determine the charged particle paths, gas Cherenkov counters for electron discrimination, TOF scintillators for particle identification, and an electromagnetic calorimeter for identifying showering electrons and photons. The TOF system, which is our focus, is composed of scintillation counters at the forward angle, and covers an area of 206 meters squared. Therefore, we look to upgrade and construct the TOF system of CLAS and outline strategies of current construction, purpose for design, and outlook for the TOF system upgrade

  20. The Time of Flight Upgrade for CLAS at 12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Lewis

    2007-10-26

    The Time of Flight (TOF) system is a detection system within the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. CLAS, being a magnetic toroidal multi-gap spectrometer, is used in the detection of particles and their varying properties. Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is providing an incoming electron beam of energy 6 GeV that is used to probe the structure and production of these particles. The CLAS detector is currently adapted to energies of up to 6 GeV, but with recent approval it will now upgrade to energies of 12 GeV. CLAS consists of drift chambers to determine the charged particle paths, gas Cherenkov counters for electron discrimination, TOF scintillators for particle identification, and an electromagnetic calorimeter for identifying showering electrons and photons. The TOF system, which is our focus, is composed of scintillation counters at the forward angle, and covers an area of 206 meters squared. Therefore, we look to upgrade and construct the TOF system of CLAS and outline strategies of current construction, purpose for design, and outlook for the TOF system upgrade.

  1. Discovery of GeV emission from the Circinus galaxy with the Fermi large area telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, Masaaki; Stawarz, Łukasz; Cheung, Chi C.; Bechtol, Keith; Madejski, Greg M.; Massaro, Francesco; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Tibaldo, Luigi; Strong, Andrew

    2013-12-20

    We report the discovery of γ-ray emission from the Circinus galaxy using the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Circinus is a nearby (∼4 Mpc) starburst with a heavily obscured Seyfert-type active nucleus, bipolar radio lobes perpendicular to the spiral disk, and kpc-scale jet-like structures. Our analysis of 0.1-100 GeV events collected during 4 yr of LAT observations reveals a significant (≅ 7.3σ) excess above the background. We find no indications of variability or spatial extension beyond the LAT point-spread function. A power-law model used to describe the 0.1-100 GeV γ-ray spectrum yields a flux of (18.8 ± 5.8) × 10{sup –9} photon cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} and photon index 2.19 ± 0.12, corresponding to an isotropic γ-ray luminosity of 3 × 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1}. This observed γ-ray luminosity exceeds the luminosity expected from cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium and inverse Compton radiation from the radio lobes. Thus, the origin of the GeV excess requires further investigation.

  2. 9 GeV energy gain in a beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litos, M.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Corde, S.; Clayton, C. E.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Schmeltz, M.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-03-01

    An electron beam has gained a maximum energy of 9 GeV per particle in a 1.3 m-long electron beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator. The amount of charge accelerated in the spectral peak was 28.3 pC, and the root-mean-square energy spread was 5.0%. The mean accelerated charge and energy gain per particle of the 215 shot data set was 115 pC and 5.3 GeV, respectively, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 4.0 GeV m-1at the spectral peak. The mean energy spread of the data set was 5.1%. These results are consistent with the extrapolation of the previously reported energy gain results using a shorter, 36 cm-long plasma source to within 10%, evincing a non-evolving wake structure that can propagate distances of over a meter in length. Wake-loading effects were evident in the data through strong dependencies observed between various spectral properties and the amount of accelerated charge.

  3. Interpreting 750 GeV diphoton excess in SU(5) grand unified theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ketan M.; Sharma, Pankaj

    2016-06-01

    The ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC have found significant excess in the diphoton invariant mass distribution near 750 GeV. We interpret this excess in a predictive nonsupersymmetric SU(5) grand unified framework with a singlet scalar and light adjoint fermions. The 750 GeV resonance is identified as a gauge singlet scalar. Both its production and decays are induced by 24 dimensional adjoint fermions predicted within SU(5). The adjoint fermions are assumed to be odd under Z2 symmetry which forbids their direct coupling to the standard model fermions. We show that the observed diphoton excess can be explained with sub-TeV adjoint fermions and with perturbative Yukawa coupling. A narrow width scenario is more preferred while a simultaneous explanation of observed cross section and large total decay width requires some of the adjoint fermions lighter than 375 GeV. The model also provides a singlet fermion as a candidate of cold dark matter. The gauge coupling unification is achieved in the framework by introducing color sextet scalars while being consistent with the proton decay constraint.

  4. 9 GeV energy gain in a beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    DOE PAGES

    Litos, M.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Corde, S.; Clayton, C. E.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Green, S. Z.; et al

    2016-02-15

    An electron beam has gained a maximum energy of 9 GeV per particle in a 1.3 m-long electron beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator. The amount of charge accelerated in the spectral peak was 28.3 pC, and the root-mean-square energy spread was 5.0%. The mean accelerated charge and energy gain per particle of the 215 shot data set was 115 pC and 5.3 GeV, respectively, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 4.0 GeV m-1 at the spectral peak. Moreover, the mean energy spread of the data set was 5.1%. Our results are consistent with the extrapolation of the previously reported energy gainmore » results using a shorter, 36 cm-long plasma source to within 10%, evincing a non-evolving wake structure that can propagate distances of over a meter in length. Wake-loading effects were evident in the data through strong dependencies observed between various spectral properties and the amount of accelerated charge.« less

  5. Conceptual design of the Argonne 6-GeV synchrotron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Crosbie, E.; Khoe, T.; Knott, M.; Kramer, S.; Kustom, R.; Lari, R.; Martin, R.; Mavrogenes, G.; Moenich, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory Synchrotron Light Source Storage Ring is designed to have a natural emittance of 6.5 x 10/sup -9/ m for circulating 6-GeV positrons. Thirty of the 32 long straight sections, each 6.5-m long, will be available for synchrotron light insertion devices. A circulating positron current of 300 mA can be injected in about 8 min. from a booster synchrotron operating with a repetition time of 1.2 sec. The booster synchrotron will contain two different rf systems. The lower frequency system (38.97 MHz) will accept positrons from a 360-MeV linac and will accelerate them to 2.25 GeV. The higher frequency system (350.76 MHz) will accelerate the positrons to 6 GeV. The positrons will be produced from a 300-MeV electron beam on a tungsten target. A conceptual layout is shown. 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. A GeV Source in the Direction of Supernova Remnant CTB 37B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu-Liang; Liang, Yun-Feng; Li, Xiang; Yuan, Qiang; Liu, Si-Ming; Wei, Da-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are the most attractive candidates for the acceleration sites of Galactic cosmic rays. We report the detection of GeV γ-ray emission with the Pass 8 events recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) in the vicinity of the shell-type SNR CTB 37B that is likely associated with the TeV γ-ray source HESS J1713–381. The photon spectrum of CTB 37B is consistent with a power law with an index of 1.89 ± 0.08 in the energy range of 0.5–500 GeV, and the measured flux connects smoothly with that of HESS J1713–381 at a few hundred GeV. No significant spatial extension and time variation are detected. The multi-wavelength data can be well fitted with either a leptonic model or a hadronic one. However, parameters of both models suggest more efficient particle acceleration than typical SNRs. Meanwhile, the X-ray and γ-ray spectral properties of CTB 37B show that it is an interesting source bridging young SNRs dominated by non-thermal emission and old SNRs interacting with molecular clouds.

  7. Bivariate Frequency Analysis with Nonstationary Gumbel/GEV Marginal Distributions for Rainfall Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Kyungwon; Kim, Sunghun; Kim, Hanbeen; Ahn, Hyunjun; Heo, Jun-Haeng

    2016-04-01

    Multivariate frequency analysis has been developing for hydrological data recently. Particularly, the copula model has been used as an effective method which has no limitation on deciding marginal distributions. The time-series rainfall data can be characterized to rainfall event by inter-event time definition and each rainfall event has rainfall depth and duration. In addition, changes in rainfall depth have been studied recently due to climate change. The nonstationary (time-varying) Gumbel and Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) have been developed and their performances have been investigated from many studies. In the current study, bivariate frequency analysis has performed for rainfall depth and duration using Archimedean copula on stationary and nonstationary hourly rainfall data to consider the effect of climate change. The parameter of copula model is estimated by inference function for margin (IFM) method and stationary/nonstationary Gumbel and GEV distributions are used for marginal distributions. As a result, level curve of copula model is obtained and goodness-of-fit test is performed to choose appropriate marginal distribution among the applied stationary and nonstationary Gumbel and GEV distributions.

  8. The BErkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA): A 10 GeV Laser Plasma Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W.P.; Duarte, R.; Esarey, E.; Fournier, S.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Lockhart, D.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, C.; Vay, J.-L.; Zimmermann, S.

    2010-06-01

    An overview is presented of the design of a 10 GeV laser plasma accelerator (LPA) that will be driven by a PW-class laser system and of the BELLA Project, which has as its primary goal to build and install the required Ti:sapphire laser system for the acceleration experiments. The basic design of the 10 GeV stage aims at operation in the quasi-linear regime, where the laser excited wakes are largely sinusoidal and offer the possibility of accelerating both electrons and positrons. Simulations show that a 10 GeV electron beam can be generated in a meter scale plasma channel guided LPA operating at a density of about 1017 cm-3 and powered by laser pulses containing 30-40 J of energy in a 50- 200 fs duration pulse, focused to a spotsize of 50-100 micron. The lay-out of the facility and laser system will be presented as well as the progress on building the facility.

  9. 750 GeV diphoton resonance in a top and bottom seesaw model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobakhidze, Archil; Wang, Fei; Wu, Lei; Yang, Jin Min; Zhang, Mengchao

    2016-06-01

    The top and bottom seesaw model, which extends the top seesaw in order to accommodate a 125 GeV Higgs boson, predicts vector-like top/bottom partners and these partners can be bounded to form several neutral and charged singlet composite scalars by some new strong dynamics. In this letter, we use such a singlet scalar to interpret the 750 GeV diphoton resonance. This singlet scalar is dominantly produced through the gluon fusion process induced by the partners and its diphoton decay is induced by both the partners and the charged singlet scalars. We show that this scenario can readily account for the observed 750 GeV diphoton signal under the current LHC constraints. Further, this scenario predicts some other phenomenology, such as a strong correlation between the decays to γγ, Zγ and ZZ, a three-photon signal from the associate production of a singlet scalar and a photon, as well as some signals from the partner cascade decays. These signals may jointly allow for a test of this framework in future 100 TeV hadron collider and ILC experiments.

  10. The gamma-ray pulsar population of globular clusters: Implications for the GeV excess

    DOE PAGES

    Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim

    2016-08-09

    In this study, it has been suggested that the GeV excess, observed from the region surrounding the Galactic Center, might originate from a population of millisecond pulsars that formed in globular clusters. With this in mind, we employ the publicly available Fermi data to study the gamma-ray emission from 157 globular clusters, identifying a statistically significant signal from 25 of these sources (ten of which are not found in existing gamma-ray catalogs). We combine these observations with the predicted pulsar formation rate based on the stellar encounter rate of each globular cluster to constrain the gamma-ray luminosity function of millisecondmore » pulsars in the Milky Way's globular cluster system. We find that this pulsar population exhibits a luminosity function that is quite similar to those millisecond pulsars observed in the field of the Milky Way (i.e. the thick disk). After pulsars are expelled from a globular cluster, however, they continue to lose rotational kinetic energy and become less luminous, causing their luminosity function to depart from the steady-state distribution. Using this luminosity function and a model for the globular cluster disruption rate, we show that millisecond pulsars born in globular clusters can account for only a few percent or less of the observed GeV excess. Among other challenges, scenarios in which the entire GeV excess is generated from such pulsars are in conflict with the observed mass of the Milky Way's Central Stellar Cluster.« less

  11. Production and knockout of nucleon isobars from helium by 5 GeV pions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, S.; Dahlgren, S.; Ekelöf, T.; Grafström, P.; Hagberg, E.; Hallgren, A.; Kullander, S.; Badełek, B.; Nassalski, J.; Berthot, J.; Cotte, P.; Doré, C.; Meritet, L.; Querrou, M.; Vazeille, F.; Burq, J. P.; Chemarin, M.; Chevallier, M.; Ille, B.; Lambert, M.; Fäldt, G.; Gugelot, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Using both recoil and fast-particle spectrometers, the reaction π-+4He-->π-+3H+x has been measured for triton momenta in the region 0.24-0.60 GeV/c. The experimental spectra are presented as functions of triton momentum and angle and of mass of the unmeasured object. In the theoretical analysis it is assumed that the final state can be reached via quasielastic scattering from N*3H states and via N* productions from the p3H state of helium. The most credible of three investigated p3H wave functions requires one percent of N*3H states in the mass range 1.08-1.80 GeV/c2. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 4He(π-,π-x)t, E=5 GeV, Et>10 MeV measured σ(θt,mx), σ(mx,Et), σ(mx,θt) deduced p-t wave-f, x-t prob. 1.1GeV. p(π-,π-)x, E=5 GeV, measured σ(mx).

  12. Diphoton rate in the inert doublet model with a 125 GeV Higgs boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świeżewska, Bogumiła; Krawczyk, Maria

    2013-08-01

    An improved analysis of the diphoton decay rate of the Higgs boson in the inert doublet model is presented together with a critical discussion of the results existing in the literature. For a Higgs boson mass Mh of 125 GeV and taking into account various constraints—vacuum stability, existence of the inert vacuum, perturbative unitarity, electroweak precision tests, and the LEP bounds—we find regions in the parameter space where the diphoton rate is enhanced. The resulting regions are confronted with the allowed values of the dark matter mass. We find that a significant enhancement in the two-photon decay of the Higgs boson is only possible for constrained values of the scalar couplings λ3˜hH+H-, λ345˜hHH and the masses of the charged scalar and the dark matter particle. The enhancement above 1.3 demands that the masses of H± and H be less than 135 GeV (and above 62.5 GeV) and -1.46<λ3, λ345<-0.24. In addition, we analyze the correlation of the diphoton and Zγ rates.

  13. Primary cosmic ray electrons above 10 GeV: Evidence for a spectral break

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, R. F.; Ormes, J. F.; Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.

    1973-01-01

    A balloon borne measurement of the cosmic ray electron spectrum from 10 to 200 GeV is reported in which two new techniques have been used to remove proton background contamination. First, the depth of the spectrometer was more than 25 radiation lengths, the equivalent of more than 2 mean free paths of material, enabling hadronically and electromagnetically induced cascades to be differentiated for a subset of the data. Second, electromagnetic cascade starting points were determined to within + or - 0.1 radiation lengths based upon a calibration with electrons from 5.4 to 18 GeV at the Stanford Linear Accelerator, greatly reducing the chances for a proton to simulate an electron. The resulting spectrum, when fitted with a power law, is quite steep, -3.2 + or - 0.1, but the chi-square fit is marginal. A significantly better fit is achieved assuming a transition region model in which the source spectral index is 2.7 with a break occurring at about 50 GeV.

  14. Non-thermal CMSSM with a 125 GeV Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, Luis; Cicoli, Michele; Dutta, Bhaskar; Krippendorf, Sven; Maharana, Anshuman; Muia, Francesco; Quevedo, Fernando

    2015-05-01

    We study the phenomenology of the CMSSM/mSUGRA with non-thermal neutralino dark matter. Besides the standard parameters of the CMSSM we include the reheating temperature as an extra parameter. Imposing radiative electroweak symmetry breaking with a Higgs mass around 125 GeV and no dark matter overproduction, we contrast the scenario with different experimental bounds from colliders (LEP, LHC), cosmic microwave background (Planck), direct (LUX, XENON100, CDMS, IceCube) and indirect (Fermi) dark matter searches. The allowed parameter space is characterised by a Higgsino-like LSP with a mass around 300 GeV. The observed dark matter abundance can be saturated for reheating temperatures around 2GeV while larger temperatures require extra non-neutralino dark matter candidates and extend the allowed parameter space. Sfermion and gluino masses are in the few TeV region. These scenarios can be achieved in string models of sequestered supersymmetry breaking which avoid cosmological moduli problems and are compatible with gauge coupling unification. Astrophysics and particle physics experiments will fully investigate this non-thermal scenario in the near future.

  15. Perturbative QCD effects observed in 490 GeV deep-inelastic muon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H. G.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J. J.; Salgado, C. W.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H.-J.; Venkataramania, H.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Wilson, Richard; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.

    1993-12-01

    Results on forward charged hadrons in 490 GeV deep-inelastic muon scattering are presented. The transverse momenta, azimuthal asymmetry, and energy flow of events with four or more forward charged hadrons are studied. The range of the invariant hadronic mass squared 300GeV2/c4 extends higher than previous deep-inelastic muon scattering experiments. Data are compared to the predictions of the Lund Monte Carlo model with perturbative QCD simulated by matrix elements, parton showers, and color dipole radiation. All of the QCD-based models are consistent with the data while a model without QCD processes is not. Correlations with the multiplicity-independent event variable Π~=J||pT|| are studied. The relationship between the azimuthal asymmetry and transverse momentum of forward hadrons is also presented. The data are most consistent with intrinsic parton transverse momentum squared k2T of 0.25 GeV2/c2.

  16. The gamma-ray pulsar population of globular clusters: implications for the GeV excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim

    2016-08-01

    It has been suggested that the GeV excess, observed from the region surrounding the Galactic Center, might originate from a population of millisecond pulsars that formed in globular clusters. With this in mind, we employ the publicly available Fermi data to study the gamma-ray emission from 157 globular clusters, identifying a statistically significant signal from 25 of these sources (ten of which are not found in existing gamma-ray catalogs). We combine these observations with the predicted pulsar formation rate based on the stellar encounter rate of each globular cluster to constrain the gamma-ray luminosity function of millisecond pulsars in the Milky Way's globular cluster system. We find that this pulsar population exhibits a luminosity function that is quite similar to those millisecond pulsars observed in the field of the Milky Way (i.e. the thick disk). After pulsars are expelled from a globular cluster, however, they continue to lose rotational kinetic energy and become less luminous, causing their luminosity function to depart from the steady-state distribution. Using this luminosity function and a model for the globular cluster disruption rate, we show that millisecond pulsars born in globular clusters can account for only a few percent or less of the observed GeV excess. Among other challenges, scenarios in which the entire GeV excess is generated from such pulsars are in conflict with the observed mass of the Milky Way's Central Stellar Cluster.

  17. The rapidity dependence of the proton-to-pion ratio in Au+Au and p+p collisions at s=62.4 GeV and 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahms Collaboration; Staszel, P.; BRAHMS Collaboration

    2009-11-01

    The BRAHMS measured proton-to-pion ratios in Au+Au and p+p collisions at s=62.4 GeV and s=200 GeV are presented as a function of transverse momentum and collision centrality within the pseudo-rapidity range 0⩽η⩽3.8. The results for Au+Au at s=200 GeV are compared with predictions from models which incorporate hydro-dynamics, hadron rescattering and jet production, in the η interval covered. In Au+Au collisions at s=200 GeV, η≈2.2, and at s=62.4 GeV, η=0, the bulk medium can be characterized by the common value of μ≈65 MeV. The p/π+(p) ratios measured for these two selections display a striking agreement in the p range covered (up to 2.2 GeV/c). At a collision energy of 62.4 GeV and at forward pseudo-rapidity we found a crossing point of p/π+ ratios measured in central and semi-peripheral Au+Au and in p+p reactions. The crossing occurs in the narrow η bin around value of 3.2, simultaneously in the whole covered p range (0.3 GeV/c

  18. Precision measurements of g1 of the proton and the deuteron with 6 GeV electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Prok, Yelena; Bosted, Peter; Kvaltine, Nicholas; Adhikari, Krishna; Adikaram-Mudiyanselage, Dasuni; Aghasyan, Mher; Amaryan, Moskov; Anderson, Mark; Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Battaglieri, Marco; Biselli, Angela; Bono, Jason; Briscoe, William; Brock, Joseph; Brooks, William; Bueltmann, Stephen; Burkert, Volker; Carlin, Christopher; Carman, Daniel; Celentano, Andrea; Chandavar, Shloka; Colaneri, Luca; Cole, Philip; Contalbrigo, Marco; Cortes, Olga; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; D'Angelo, Annalisa; Dashyan, Natalya; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Deur, Alexandre; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dupre, Raphael; El Alaoui, Ahmed; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Fedotov, Gleb; Fegan, Stuart; Fersch, Robert; Fleming, Jamie; Forest, Tony; Garcon, Michel; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Ghandilyan, Yeranuhi; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Girod-Gard, Francois-Xavier; Giovanetti, Kevin; Goetz, John; Gohn, Wesley; Gothe, Ralf; Griffioen, Keith; Guegan, Baptiste; Guler, Nevzat; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hanretty, Charles; Harrison, Nathan; Hattawy, Mohammad; Hicks, Kenneth; Ho, Dao; Holtrop, Maurik; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Jawalkar, Sucheta; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Joo, Kyungseon; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keith, Christopher; Keller, Daniel; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Andrey; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Koirala, Suman; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Lenisa, Paolo; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; MacGregor, Ian; Markov, Nikolai; Mayer, Michael; McKinnon, Bryan; Meekins, David; Mineeva, Taisiya; Mirazita, Marco; Mokeev, Viktor; Montgomery, Rachel; MOUTARDE, Herve; Movsisyan, Aram; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Pappalardo, Luciano; Paremuzyan, Rafayel; Park, K; Peng, Peng; Phillips, J J; Pierce, Joshua; Pisano, Silvia; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdniakov, Serguei; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Puckett, Andrew; Raue, Brian; Rimal, Dipak; Ripani, Marco; Rizzo, Alessandro; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Roy, Priyashree; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salgado, Carlos; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seder, Erin; Sharabian, Youri; Simonyan, Ani; Smith, Claude; Smith, Gregory; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stepanyan, Samuel; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Sytnik, Valeriy; Taiuti, Mauro; Tang, Wei; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vernarsky, Brian; Vlasov, Alexander; Voskanyan, Hakob; Voutier, Eric; Walford, Natalie; Watts, Daniel; Weinstein, Lawrence; Zachariou, Nicholas; Zana, Lorenzo; Zhang, Jixie; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Zhiwen; Zonta, Irene

    2014-08-01

    The inclusive polarized structure functions of the proton and deuteron, g1p and g1d, were measured with high statistical precision using polarized 6 GeV electrons incident on a polarized ammonia target in Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory. Electrons scattered at lab angles between 18 and 45 degrees were detected using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). For the usual DIS kinematics, Q^2>1 GeV^2 and the final-state invariant mass W>2 GeV, the ratio of polarized to unpolarized structure functions g1/F1 is found to be nearly independent of Q^2 at fixed x. Significant resonant structure is apparent at values of W up to 2.3 GeV. In the framework of perturbative QCD, the high-W results can be used to better constrain the polarization of quarks and gluons in the nucleon, as well as high-twist contributions.

  19. Performance of a lead radiator, gas tube calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, L.; Arenton, M.; Chen, T.Y.; Conetti, S.; Cox, B.; Delchamps, S.W.; Etemadi, B.; Fortney, L.; Guffey, K.; Haire, M.

    1989-03-13

    Design and performance of a 4.2 radiation length lead-sandwich, gas tube hodoscope are discussed. The device, measuring 1 /times/ 2 m/sup 2/ in area and 12 cm in depth, was employed in Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory experiment 705. Multiple samplings of anode wires situated within three-walled aluminum tubes were used to generate an X coordinate; similarly, capacitively coupled copper-clad strips were ganged together to yield a Y coordinate. The results reviewed are based on an analysis of electron calibration data taken during a recent six-month running period. In particular, position resolution (in millimeters) is seen to be 0.8 + 3.3/..sqrt..E + 31/E for the 9.92 mm spaced wires and 0.6 + 3.2/..sqrt..E + 32/E for the 12.5 mm strips, where E represents the electron beam energy in GeV. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Source breakup dynamics in Au + Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV via three-dimensional two-pion source imaging.

    PubMed

    Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Al-Jamel, A; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chai, J-S; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fukao, Y; Fung, S-Y; Gadrat, S; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hamagaki, H; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kawagishi, T; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khanzadeev, A; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, Y-S; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Le Bornec, Y; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Li, X H; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakamura, T; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, H; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shohjoh, T; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Smith, W C; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sullivan, J P; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Vertesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Willis, N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2008-06-13

    A three-dimensional correlation function obtained from midrapidity, low p(T), pion pairs in central Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV is studied. The extracted model-independent source function indicates a long range tail in the directions of the pion pair transverse momentum (out) and the beam (long). A proper breakup time tau(0) ~ 9 fm/c and a mean proper emission duration Delta tau ~ 2 fm/c, leading to sizable emission time differences ({|Delta t(LCM)|} approximately 12 fm/c), are required to allow models to be successfully matched to these tails. The model comparisons also suggest an outside-in "burning" of the emission source reminiscent of many hydrodynamical models. PMID:18643489

  1. Source breakup dynamics in Au + Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV via three-dimensional two-pion source imaging.

    PubMed

    Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Al-Jamel, A; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chai, J-S; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fukao, Y; Fung, S-Y; Gadrat, S; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hamagaki, H; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kawagishi, T; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khanzadeev, A; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, Y-S; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Le Bornec, Y; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Li, X H; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakamura, T; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, H; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shohjoh, T; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Smith, W C; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sullivan, J P; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Vertesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Willis, N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2008-06-13

    A three-dimensional correlation function obtained from midrapidity, low p(T), pion pairs in central Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV is studied. The extracted model-independent source function indicates a long range tail in the directions of the pion pair transverse momentum (out) and the beam (long). A proper breakup time tau(0) ~ 9 fm/c and a mean proper emission duration Delta tau ~ 2 fm/c, leading to sizable emission time differences ({|Delta t(LCM)|} approximately 12 fm/c), are required to allow models to be successfully matched to these tails. The model comparisons also suggest an outside-in "burning" of the emission source reminiscent of many hydrodynamical models.

  2. Forward neutral pion production in p + p and d + Au collisions at square root sNN=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bharadwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhatia, V S; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, H A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Mazumdar, M R Dutta; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fornazier, K S F; Fox, B D; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamb, R; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Q J; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J N; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Reinnarth, J; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Savin, I; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Buren, G Van; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Molen, A M Vander; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zborovsky, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2006-10-13

    Measurements of the production of forward pi0 mesons from p + p and d + Au collisions at square root sNN=200 GeV are reported. The p + p yield generally agrees with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations. The d + Au yield per binary collision is suppressed as eta increases, decreasing to approximately 30% of the p + p yield at eta =4.00, well below shadowing expectations. Exploratory measurements of azimuthal correlations of the forward pi0 with charged hadrons at eta approximately 0 show a recoil peak in p + p that is suppressed in d + Au at low pion energy. These observations are qualitatively consistent with a saturation picture of the low-x gluon structure of heavy nuclei. PMID:17155322

  3. QCD Corrections to Double J/{psi} Production in e{sup +}e{sup -} Annihilation at {radical}(s)=10.6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Bin; Wang Jianxiong

    2008-05-09

    Next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD corrections to double J/{psi} production in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at {radical}(s)=10.6 GeV are calculated. We find that they greatly decrease the cross section, with a K factor (NLO/LO) ranging from -0.31 to 0.25 depending on the renormalization scale. Although the renormalization scale dependence indicates a large uncertainty, when combined with the NLO QCD corrections to J/{psi}+{eta}{sub c} production, it can explain why the double J/{psi} production could not be found at B factories while the J/{psi}+{eta}{sub c} production could, despite the fact that cross section of the former is larger than that of the latter at LO by a factor of 1.8.

  4. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim

    2008-07-08

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  5. Investigation of quasielastic muon-neutrino scattering on nuclei at E{sub v} < 1 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Agababyan, N. M.; Ammosov, V. V.; Atayan, M.; Grigoryan, N.; Gulkanyan, H.; Ivanilov, A. A. Karamyan, Zh.; Korotkov, B. A.

    2007-10-15

    Quasielastic muon-neutrino scattering on nuclei of propane-Freon mixture at energies in the range E{sub v} < 1 GeV is studied. The multiplicity, momentum, and emission-angle distributions of final protons are measured along with the dependence of the mean values for these distributions on the neutrino energy in the range 0.2 < E{sub v} < 1 GeV.

  6. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Leemans, Wim [LOASIS Program, AFRD

    2016-07-12

    July 8, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  7. A study of the reaction π-p → φφn AT 16 GeV/ c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, T. A.; Baccari, B.; Booth, P. S. L.; Brun, R.; Campbell, P. T.; Carroll, L. J.; Costa, G.; Donald, R. A.; Edwards, D. N.; Evangelista, C.; Frame, D.; French, B. R.; Geer, S. H. P.; Ghidini, B.; Girtler, P.; Hughes, I. S.; Jackson, N. J.; Lynch, J. G.; Mandelli, L.; Mättig, P.; Minto, P. W.; Mitaroff, W. A.; Otter, G.; Palano, A.; Perini, L.; Pinfold, J.; Range, W. H.; Richardson, J. A.; Rudolph, G.; Saleemi, F.; Schlütter, H.; Schmitz, W.; Scott, L.; Stewart, D. T.; Tamborini, M.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Zito, G.

    1982-03-01

    The reaction π-p → φφn has been isolated at 16 GeV/ c and its cross section determined to be 40 ± 10 nb. The φφ mass spectrum shows a threshold enhancement between 2.1 and 2.5 GeV. A successful description of the angular content of the φφ system requires two interferingss JP = 2 + states.

  8. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Leemans, Wim [LOASIS Program, AFRD

    2016-07-12

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  9. Modeling astatine production in liquid lead-bismuth spallation targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, J. C.; Boudard, A.; Cugnon, J.; Ghali, S.; Leray, S.; Mancusi, D.; Zanini, L.

    2013-03-01

    Astatine isotopes can be produced in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic targets through proton-induced double charge exchange reactions on bismuth or in secondary helium-induced interactions. Models implemented into the most common high-energy transport codes generally have difficulties to correctly estimate their production yields as was shown recently by the ISOLDE Collaboration, which measured release rates from a lead-bismuth target irradiated by 1.4 and 1 GeV protons. In this paper, we first study the capability of the new version of the Liège intranuclear cascade model, INCL4.6, coupled to the deexcitation code ABLA07 to predict the different elementary reactions involved in the production of such isotopes through a detailed comparison of the model with the available experimental data from the literature. Although a few remaining deficiencies are identified, very satisfactory results are found, thanks in particular to improvements brought recently on the treatment of low-energy helium-induced reactions. The implementation of the models into MCNPX allows identifying the respective contributions of the different possible reaction channels in the ISOLDE case. Finally, the full simulation of the ISOLDE experiment is performed, taking into account the likely rather long diffusion time from the target, and compared with the measured diffusion rates for the different astatine isotopes, at the two studied energies, 1.4 and 1 GeV. The shape of the isotopic distribution is perfectly reproduced as well as the absolute release rates, assuming in the calculation a diffusion time between 5 and 10hours. This work finally shows that our model, thanks to the attention paid to the emission of high-energy clusters and to low-energy cluster induced reactions, can be safely used within MCNPX to predict isotopes with a charge larger than that of the target by two units in spallation targets, and, probably, more generally to isotopes created in secondary reactions induced by composite

  10. Blood Test: Lead (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and when based on a child's risk for lead poisoning. Those who are considered at risk — such as ... How Do I Get My Child Tested for Lead Poisoning? Lead Poisoning Pica Getting a Blood Test (Video) ...

  11. Lead (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    MedlinePlus

    ... have lead in them The good news about lead poisoning is that it’s 100% preventable. That means we ... damage the brain, and may even cause death. Lead poisoning can also cause: Anemia (when your blood doesn’ ...

  12. Leading from the boardroom.

    PubMed

    Lorsch, Jay W; Clark, Robert C

    2008-04-01

    These days, boards are working overtime to comply with Sarbanes-Oxley and other governance requirements meant to protect shareholders from executive wrongdoing. But as directors have become more hands-on with compliance, they've become more hands-off with long-range planning. That exposes corporations and their shareholders to another--perhaps even greater--risk, say professors Lorsch, of Harvard Business School, and Clark, of Harvard Law School. Boards are giving the long term short shrift for a number of reasons. Despite much heavier workloads, directors haven't rethought their patterns of operating - their meetings, committees, and other interactions. Compliance has changed their relationship with executives, however, turning directors into micromanagers who closely probe executives' actions instead of providing high-level guidance. Meanwhile, the pressure to meet quarterly expectations intensifies. Directors need to do a better job of balancing compliance with forward thinking. Boardroom effectiveness hinges most on the quality of directors and their interactions, the authors' research shows. Directors must apply their wisdom broadly, handling compliance work more efficiently and staying out of the weeds on strategic issues. Using their power with management to evangelize for long-term planning, they must take the lead on discussions about financial infrastructure, talent development, and strategy. Reserving sacrosanct time for such discussions, as Philips Electronics' board does at annual retreats, is an effective practice: After one recent retreat, Philips decided to exit the semiconductor business, where it was losing ground. Individual directors also must not shy away from asking tough questions and acting as catalysts on critical issues, such as grooming a successor to the CEO. In short, directors must learn to lead from the boardroom.

  13. Relationship between lead mining and blood lead levels in children.

    PubMed

    Murgueytio, A M; Evans, R G; Sterling, D A; Clardy, S A; Shadel, B N; Clements, B W

    1998-01-01

    The authors studied blood lead levels of 226 randomly selected children, aged 6-92 mo, who lived in either a lead-mining area or a nonmining area, and 69 controls. The authors sought to determine to what extent mining activities contributed to blood lead levels in the children. The mean blood lead levels in the study and control groups were 6.52 microg/dl and 3.43 microg/dl, respectively. The corresponding proportions of children with elevated blood lead levels were 17% and 3%. Soil and dust lead levels were up to 10 times higher in the study than the control group. Elevated blood lead levels appeared to result from exposure to both lead-mining waste and lead-based paint. Mining waste was the cause of the higher prevalence of elevated blood lead levels in these children. PMID:9886161

  14. Lead-acid battery

    SciTech Connect

    Rowlette, J.J.

    1983-09-20

    A light weight lead-acid battery is disclosed having a positive terminal and a negative terminal and including one or more cells or grid stacks having a plurality of vertically stacked conductive monoplates with positive active material and negative active material deposited on alternating plates in the cell or grid stack. Electrolyte layers positioned between each monoplate are included to provide a battery cell having four sides which is capable of being electrically charged and discharged. Two vertical positive bus bars are provided on opposite sides of the battery cell for connecting the monoplates with positive active material together in parallel current conducting relation. In addition, two negative bus bars on opposite sides of the battery cell each being adjacent the positive bus bars are provided for connecting the monoplates with negative active material together in parallel current conducting relation. The positive and negative bus bars not only provide a low resistance method for connecting the plurality of conductive monoplates of their respective battery terminals but also provides support and structural strength to the battery cell structure. In addition, horizontal orientation of monoplates is provided in a vertical stacking arrangement to reduce electrolyte stratification and short circuiting due to flaking of positive and negative active materials from the monoplates.

  15. Nurses: advocating, leading, caring!

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Stephanie L

    2013-01-01

    This speech was delivered on 27 October at the 2012 Conference and general meeting of the Italian Nurses Association CNAI (Consociazione nazionale delle Associazioni infermiere/i) held in Rome from 25 to 27 October 2012. The theme of the conference was "No Nurses No Future". The "No Nurses No Future" is a national campaign developed by the nurses of the Italian Nurses Association to fight for the rights of the profession to sustain not only the practice of the nurse, strong nursing education, research and regulation, but more importantly to ensure that in the future there will be enough nurses in the healthcare workforce to advocate, lead and care for the citizens of Italy.Italian nurses took advantage of the presence of prof. Ferguson and, before travelling to Rome, the Region Lombardy IPASVI Colleges (Coordinamento dei Collegi IPASVI della regione Lombardia) invited her to talk on the same topic during a jointed Conference with CNAI at Circolo della Stampa of Milan on 23rd October.

  16. Lead-acid battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A light weight lead-acid battery (30) having a positive terminal (36) and a negative terminal (34) and including one or more cells or grid stacks having a plurality of vertically stacked conductive monoplates (10, 20) with positive active material and negative active material deposited on alternating plates in the cell or grid stack. Electrolyte layers (26, 28) positioned between each monoplate are included to provide a battery cell having four sides which is capable of being electrically charged and discharged. Two vertical positive bus bars (42, 43) are provided on opposite sides of the battery cell for connecting the monoplates (10) with positive active material together in parallel current conducting relation. In addition, two negative bus bars (38, 39) on opposite sides of the battery cell each being adjacent the positive bus bars are provided for connecting the monoplates (20) with negative active material together in parallel current conducting relation. The positive (42, 43) and negative (38, 39) bus bars not only provide a low resistance method for connecting the plurality of conductive monoplates of their respective battery terminals (36, 34) but also provides support and structural strength to the battery cell structure. In addition, horizontal orientation of monoplates (10, 20) is provided in a vertical stacking arrangement to reduce electrolyte stratification and short circuiting due to flaking of positive and negative active materials from the monoplates.

  17. DETERMINANTS OF RESIDENTIAL LEAD EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The phase-out of leaded gasoline, and the accompanying decrease in lead emissions, resulted in a dramatic decline in mean blood lead levels from the late 1970s through the early 1990s. Nonetheless, lead exposures remain a public health concern. Long-term exposures to even low...

  18. Characterization of CALET prototype TASC lead tungstate calorimeter using CERN beam test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaid, Amir

    2013-04-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is a high-energy cosmic ray experiment that will be placed on the International Space Station in 2014. The primary goals of CALET are to measure the cosmic ray electron spectra from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, gamma rays from 10 GeV to 10 TeV, and protons and nuclei from 10 GeV up to 1000 TeV. The detector consists of three main components: a Charge Detector (CHD), Imaging Calorimeter (IMC), and Total Absorption Calorimeter (TASC). The TASC consists of 192 lead tungstate (PbWO4) logs arranged in 12 layers. An understanding of the major characteristics of the TASC is important for accurately determining the incident particle shower energy deposition. In September 2012, a prototype CALET detector was exposed to electron, muon, and proton beams from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN. Muon beams can be used to determine the detector response to minimum ionizing particles (MIP). In the present paper, we discuss the response of the TASC logs to muon beams as a function of position, and signal attenuation during propagation. Included is a discussion of parameterizations of position-dependent muon energy deposition and signal attenuation functions for the TASC logs based on the CERN beam test data.

  19. Leading Your Leaders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Wayne N.

    2008-01-01

    life is good. More often when an unbelievably difficult test fails, we are left with a very long discussion of why and what was wrong in the design or execution of the test. Make sure that the test is well defined. Even then, it is important to explain to your leaders what inherent accuracy (or error) the test conditions or equipment have and what the assumptions or initial conditions were for the test. Test results without a good understanding of the test's accuracy or the pedigree of the test assumptions are worth very little. Finally, there is flight test data. Always limited, never at the edge of the envelope, it still shows how the real hardware works in a combined environment. Flight experience is dangerous because it typically doesn't show how close to the edge of the cliff the equipment is operating, but it does demonstrate how the hardware really works. A flight test is the ultimate test, again taken with the knowledge that it is probably not the extreme but something more like the middle of the environmental and systems performance. Good understanding of a problem and its solution always relies on a combination of all these methods. Be sure to lead your leaders by using all the tools you have at your disposal. At the end of the day, decisions in space flight always come down to a risk trade. Our business is not remotely safe, not in the sense that the public, the media, or our legislators use the term. Everything we do has a risk, cost, schedule, or performance trade-off. For your leaders to make an appropriate decision, you need to educate them, lead them, talk with them, and engage them in the discussion until full understanding takes place. It's your job. *

  20. Control of Laser Plasma Based Accelerators up to 1 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kei

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation documents the development of a broadband electron spectrometer (ESM) for GeV class Laser Wakefield Accelerators (LWFA), the production of high quality GeV electron beams (e-beams) for the first time in a LWFA by using a capillary discharge guide (CDG), and a statistical analysis of CDG-LWFAs. An ESM specialized for CDG-LWFAs with an unprecedented wide momentum acceptance, from 0.01 to 1.1 GeV in a single shot, has been developed. Simultaneous measurement of e-beam spectra and output laser properties as well as a large angular acceptance (> ± 10 mrad) were realized by employing a slitless scheme. A scintillating screen (LANEX Fast back, LANEX-FB)--camera system allowed faster than 1 Hz operation and evaluation of the spatial properties of e-beams. The design provided sufficient resolution for the whole range of the ESM (below 5% for beams with 2 mrad divergence). The calibration between light yield from LANEX-FB and total charge, and a study on the electron energy dependence (0.071 to 1.23 GeV) of LANEX-FB were performed at the Advanced light source (ALS), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Using this calibration data, the developed ESM provided a charge measurement as well. The production of high quality electron beams up to 1 GeV from a centimeter-scale accelerator was demonstrated. The experiment used a 310 μm diameter gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide that channeled relativistically-intense laser pulses (42 TW, 4.5 x 1018 W/cm2) over 3.3 centimeters of sufficiently low density (≃ 4.3 x 1018/cm3) plasma. Also demonstrated was stable self-injection and acceleration at a beam energy of ≃ 0.5 GeV by using a 225 μm diameter capillary. Relativistically-intense laser pulses (12 TW, 1.3 x 1018W/cm2) were guided over 3.3 centimeters of low density (≃ 3.5 x 1018/cm3) plasma in this experiment. A statistical analysis of the CDG

  1. Current issues in human lead exposure and regulation of lead.

    PubMed

    Davis, J M; Elias, R W; Grant, L D

    1993-01-01

    Concern about lead as a significant public health problem has increased as epidemiological and experimental evidence has mounted regarding adverse health effects at successively lower levels of lead exposure. This concern has led to downward revision of criteria for acceptable blood lead concentrations to the 10 micrograms/dL mark now designated by EPA as a target level for regulatory development and enforcement/clean-up purposes. Much progress has been made in reducing lead exposures during the past 10-15 years, with marked declines evident both in air lead and blood lead concentrations in parallel to the phase-down of lead in gasoline and notable decreases in food lead exposure due to elimination of lead soldered cans by U.S. food processors. With the lessening of exposure from these sources, the importance of other components of multimedia exposure pathways has grown and stimulated increasing regulatory attention and abatement efforts to reduce health risks associated with lead exposure from drinking water, from lead-based paint, and from household dust and soil contaminated by deteriorating paint, smelter emissions, or various other sources. Increasing attention is also being accorded to reduction of occupational lead exposures (including those related to lead abatement activities), with particular concern for protection of men and women during their reproductive years.

  2. Channeling, Volume Reection and Gamma Emission Using 14GeV Electrons in Bent Silicon Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Brandon

    2015-08-14

    High energy electrons can be deflected with very tight bending radius using a bent silicon crystal. This produces gamma radiation. As these crystals can be thin, a series of bent silicon crystals with alternating direction has the potential to produce coherent gamma radiation with reasonable energy of the driving electron beam. Such an electron crystal undulator offers the prospect for higher energy radiation at lower cost than current methods. Permanent magnetic undulators like LCLS at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are expensive and very large (about 100 m in case of the LCLS undulator). Silicon crystals are inexpensive and compact when compared to the large magnetic undulators. Additionally, such a high energy coherent light source could be used for probing through materials currently impenetrable by x-rays. In this work we present the experimental data and analysis of experiment T523 conducted at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We collected the spectrum of gamma ray emission from 14 GeV electrons on a bent silicon crystal counting single photons. We also investigated the dynamics of electron motion in the crystal i.e. processes of channeling and volume reflection at 14 GeV, extending and building off previous work. Our single photon spectrum for the amorphous crystal orientation is consistent with bremsstrahlung radiation and the volume reflection crystal orientation shows a trend consistent with synchrotron radiation at a critical energy of 740 MeV. We observe that in these two cases the data are consistent, but we make no further claims because of statistical limitations. We also extended the known energy range of electron crystal dechanneling length and channeling efficiency to 14 GeV.

  3. Charmed-meson production in 800-GeV P-P interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Senko, M.F.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to present the results of a study concerning the energy dependence of charmed meson production properties as a test of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This experiment was performed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, using a rapid cycling bubble chamber (LEBC) as a hydrogen target and high resolution vertex detector, in combination with the Fermilab Multiparticle Spectrometer (FMPS). The multiplicity trigger was unbiased, and spectrometer acceptance was good at x{sub F} {ge} 0. A comparison of the results from previous experiments at center of mass energies {radical}s {le} 27 GeV and {radical}s {ge} 53 GeV implies a total charm particle production cross section which rises rapidly as a function of {radical}s. The result of the experiment, {sigma}(D/{bar D}) = 42.7 {plus minus} 7.8 {mu}b at {radical}s = 38 GeV, indicates a slower rise, in agreement with QCD predictions. A maximum likelihood fit to the parameterization of the differential cross section as d{sup 2}{sigma}/dx{sub F}dp{sub {perpendicular}}{sup 2} {approximately} (1 {minus} {vert bar}x{sub F}{vert bar}){sup n}e{sup {minus}bp{sub {perpendicular}}{sup 2}} gives the results n = 8.4{sub {minus}1.9}{sup +2.2}, b= 0.78{sub {minus}0.16}{sup +0.19} (GeV/c){sup {minus}2}, and {l angle}p{perpendicular}{r angle} = 1.1{sub {minus} 0.1}{sup +0.2} GeV/c. When compared with results from the lower energy experiments, these values indicate charm production becoming more central and {l angle}p{perpendicular}{r angle} being consistent with the charmed quark mass. These results are once again consistent with QCD predictions.

  4. Case for a 700+GeV WIMP: Cosmic ray spectra from PAMELA, Fermi, and ATIC

    SciTech Connect

    Cholis, Ilias; Goodenough, Lisa; Weiner, Neal; Dobler, Gregory; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2009-12-15

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate an anomalous injection of high-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} in the galactic halo. The recent e{sup +} fraction spectrum from the payload for antimatter matter exploration and light-nuclei astrophysics (PAMELA) shows a sharp rise up to 100 GeV. The Fermi gamma-ray space telescope has found a significant hardening of the e{sup +}e{sup -} cosmic-ray spectrum above 100 GeV, with a break, confirmed by HESS at around 1 TeV. The advanced thin ionization calorimeter (ATIC) has also detected a similar excess, falling back to the expected spectrum at 1 TeV and above. Excess microwaves towards the galactic center in the WMAP data are consistent with hard synchrotron radiation from a population of 10-100 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} (the WMAP 'Haze'). We argue that dark matter annihilations can provide a consistent explanation of all of these data, focusing on dominantly leptonic modes, either directly or through a new light boson. Normalizing the signal to the highest energy evidence (Fermi and HESS), we find that similar cross sections provide good fits to PAMELA and the Haze, and that both the required cross section and annihilation modes are achievable in models with Sommerfeld-enhanced annihilation. These models naturally predict significant production of gamma rays in the galactic center via a variety of mechanisms. Most notably, there is a robust inverse-Compton scattered (ICS) gamma-ray signal arising from the energetic electrons and positrons, detectable at Fermi/GLAST energies, which should provide smoking gun evidence for this production.

  5. The Spectrum of Isotropic Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission Between 100 Mev and 820 Gev

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Brandt, T. J.; Hays, E.; Perkins, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    The gamma-ray sky can be decomposed into individually detected sources, diffuse emission attributed to the interactions of Galactic cosmic rays with gas and radiation fields, and a residual all-sky emission component commonly called the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background (IGRB). The IGRB comprises all extragalactic emissions too faint or too diffuse to be resolved in a given survey, as well as any residual Galactic foregrounds that are approximately isotropic. The first IGRB measurement with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) used 10 months of sky-survey data and considered an energy range between 200 MeV and 100 GeV. Improvements in event selection and characterization of cosmic-ray backgrounds, better understanding of the diffuse Galactic emission, and a longer data accumulation of 50 months, allow for a refinement and extension of the IGRB measurement with the LAT, now covering the energy range from 100 MeV to 820 GeV. The IGRB spectrum shows a significant high-energy cutoff feature, and can be well described over nearly four decades in energy by a power law with exponential cutoff having a spectral index of 2.32 plus or minus 0.02 and a break energy of (279 plus or minus 52) GeV using our baseline diffuse Galactic emission model. The total intensity attributed to the IGRB is (7.2 plus or minus 0.6) x 10(exp -6) cm(exp -2) s(exp -1) sr(exp -1) above 100 MeV, with an additional +15%/-30% systematic uncertainty due to the Galactic diffuse foregrounds.

  6. The JLab 12 GeV Energy Upgrade of CEBAF for QCD and Hadronic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Cardman, Lawrence; Harwood, Leigh

    2007-06-25

    CEBAF at Jefferson Lab is a 5-pass, recirculating cw electron linac operating at ~6 GeV and devoted to basic research in nuclear physics. The 12 GeV Upgrade is a major project, sponsored by the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics, that will expand its research capabilities substantially by doubling the maximum energy and adding major new experimental apparatus. We anticipate that the project will receive Critical Decision 2 approval this year and begin construction in 2008. The research program motivating the Upgrade includes: the study of hybrid mesons, which involve excited states of the glue, to explore the nature of quark confinement; dramatic improvements in our understanding of the QCD structure of the hadrons through the extension of our knowledge of their parton distribution functions to high xBjorken, where they are dominated by underlying valence quark structure, and a program of nucleon “tomography” via measurements of the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), a broad program of experiments in the physics of nuclei that aims to understand the QCD basis for the nucleon-nucleon force and how nucleons and mesons arise as an approximation to the underlying quark-gluon structure; and precision tests of the Standard Model through parity violating deep inelastic and Møller scattering. The Upgrade includes: doubling the accelerating voltages of the linacs by adding 10 new high-performance cryomodules; the requisite expansion of the 2K cryogenics plant and rf power systems to support these cryomodules; upgrading the beam transport system from 6 to 12 GeV through extensive re-use and/or modification of existing hardware; and the addition of one recirculation arc, a new experimental area, and the beamline to it; and the construction of major new experimental equipment for the GPD, high-xBjorken, and hybrid meson programs. The presentation will describe the science briefly and provide some details about the accelerator plans.

  7. Resolution Performance of HERA-B Lead-Glass Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losada, Anthony; Brash, Edward; Thomas, Jordan; Ayerbe-Gayoso, Carlos; Burton, Matthew; Perdisat, Charles; Jones, Mark; Punjabi, Vina; Hast, Carsten; Szalata, Zenon

    2013-10-01

    In preparation of upcoming 12 GeV experiments at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility it is necessary to upgrade existing systems or install new detectors. As part of this effort, an array of lead-glass sampling calorimeters is need for use in the GEP-5 experiment. A sampling calorimeter can be used to determine the energy and spatial position of a high energy particle that enters it while simultaneously stopping the particle. To determine the appropriate construction to meet the needs of upcoming experiments, it was necessary to take an existing model and confirm its energy and position resolution. This model could then be confirmed as an option for the final construction, or used as a starting point to design a better detector. For our test we obtained ten lead-glass calorimeters used in HERA-B and tested them in End Station A at SLAC. I will report on our findings for the HERA-B lead-glass sampling calorimeters. I will cover the results of both the energy and position resolutions as well as the methods used to determine these quantities.

  8. Conceptual design of the vaccum system for the 6 GeV storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Be, S.H.; Morimoto, Y.; Sakamoto, H.; Yokouchi, S.

    1988-09-30

    Preliminary design results for the vacuum system of the 6 GeV storage ring which is being planned at RIKEN, are presented. The vacuum system is designed to maintain a beam-on operating pressure of 1 x 10/sup 10/ Torr. This report places special emphasis on the new vacuum chamber whose antechamber is with two isolated-pump chambers, and pumping system. The distribution of the synchrotron radiation depositions at the absorber or within the vacuum chambers is discussed. Finally the new type of a crotch absorber is briefly described.

  9. An 8 GeV H- multi-turn injection system for the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.E.; Yoon, P.; Liaw, C-J.; Raparia, D.; Bebee-Wang, J.; /Brookhaven

    2007-06-01

    An 8 GeV superconducting linear accelerator (SCL) has been proposed [1] as a single stage H{sup -} injector into the Main Injector (MI) synchrotron . This would be the highest energy H{sup -} multi-turn injection system in the world. The conceptual design of an injection system has been further refined by addressing transverse phase space painting issues, chicane dipole fields and foil location, foil temperature issues, and initial longitudinal phase space painting simulations. We present the current state of design.

  10. Recirculating Beam Breakup Study for the 12 GeV Upgrade at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Ilkyoung Shin, Todd Satogata, Shahid Ahmed, Slawomir Bogacz, Mircea Stirbet, Haipeng Wang, Yan Wang, Byung Yunn, Ryan Bodenstein

    2012-07-01

    Two new high gradient C100 cryomodules with a total of 16 new cavities were installed at the end of the CEBAF south linac during the 2011 summer shutdown as part of the 12-GeV upgrade project at Jefferson Lab. We surveyed the higher order modes (HOMs) of these cavities in the Jefferson Lab cryomodule test facility and CEBAF tunnel. We then studied recirculating beam breakup (BBU) in November 2011 to evaluate CEBAF low energy performance, measure transport optics, and evaluate BBU thresholds due to these HOMs. This paper discusses the experiment setup, cavity measurements, machine setup, optics measurements, and lower bounds on BBU thresholds by new cryomodules.

  11. Jet production in deep-inelastic muon scattering at 490 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Melanson, H.L.

    1993-06-01

    Measurements of jet rates in deep-inelastic muon scattering are presented. The JADE algorithm is used to define jets in the kinematic region 9 < W < 33 GeV. Data taken on a proton target are analyzed within the QCD framework, with the goal of extracting [alpha][sub s]. Results on the Q[sup 2] dependence of the average transverse momentum of jets are used to demonstrate the running of the strong coupling constant [alpha][sub s]. In addition, first measurements of the production of jets from heavy nuclei in the region x[sub B[sub j

  12. Late effects of 2.2 GeV protons on the central nervous system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lippincott, S. W.; Calvo, W.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of late pathological effects of high-energy (2.2 GeV) protons on the brain of rabbits, in a postirradiation period of up to 16 months following exposure at fluxes of 30, 100, and 1000 billion protons per sq cm. At the latter two irradiation-intensity levels, the kinds of brain lesions inflicted include large venous dilatation, thickening of vessel walls with deposit of amorphous PAS positive substance, thrombosis, perivascular infiltration of leukocytes and macrophages, mobilization of microglia cells, gliosis, demyelinization, and multiple small pseudocyst formation.

  13. Two-Particle Interferometry of 200 GeV Au+Au Collisions at PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, M

    2004-04-19

    The PHENIX experiment has measured pion-pion, kaon-kaon, and proton-proton correlations in Au+Au collisions at {radical}S{sub NN} = 200GeV. The correlations are fit to extract radii using both the Bowler Coulomb correction and full calculation of the two-particle wave function. The resulting radii are similar for all three species and decrease with increasing k{sub t} as expected for collective flow. The R{sub out} and R{sub side} radii are approximately equal indicating a short emission duration.

  14. Deflection of 450 GeV protons by planar channeling in a bent silicon crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, B. N.; Møller, S. P.; Uggerhøj, E.; Worm, T.; Atherton, H. W.; Clément, M.; Doble, N.; Elsener, K.; Gatignon, L.; Grafström, P.; Jeanneret, J. B.; Hage-Ali, M.; Siffert, P.

    1992-08-01

    A 450 GeV proton beam has been bent by various angles from 4 to 14 mrad using planar channeling in a (111) silicon crystal. Detailed investigations of the deflected beam as well as the unbent and scattered particles have been performed. The incident beam had a divergence of about 35 μrad (FWHM). 20% of the protons hitting the crystal front face were found to be initially channeled. The measured bending efficiencies range from 5 to 2% (for increasing deflection angles) are compared to theoretical estimates including surface acceptance and dechanneling in bent silicon crystals.

  15. A Bunch Length Monitor for JLab 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Mohamad Ali; Freyberger, Arne P.; Gubeli, Joseph F.; Krafft, Geoffrey A.

    2013-12-01

    A continuous non-invasive bunch length monitor for the 12 GeV upgrade of Jefferson Lab will be used to determine the bunch length of the beam. The measurement will be done at the fourth dipole of the injector chicane at 123 MeV using the coherent synchrotron light emitted from the dipole. The estimated bunch length is 333 fs. A vacuum chamber will be fabricated and a Radiabeam real time interferometer will be used. In this paper, background, the estimated calculations and the construction of the chamber will be discussed.

  16. Prediction of Narrow N* and {Lambda}* Resonances with Hidden Charm above 4 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jiajun; Molina, R.; Oset, E.; Zou, B. S.

    2010-12-03

    The interaction between various charmed mesons and charmed baryons is studied within the framework of the coupled-channel unitary approach with the local hidden gauge formalism. Several meson-baryon dynamically generated narrow N{sup *} and {Lambda}{sup *} resonances with hidden charm are predicted with mass above 4 GeV and width smaller than 100 MeV. The predicted new resonances definitely cannot be accommodated by quark models with three constituent quarks and can be looked for in the forthcoming PANDA/FAIR experiments.

  17. 750 GeV diphoton excess confronted with a top-pion in the TTM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yu-Chen; Yue, Chong-Xing; Zhao, Zhen-Hua

    2016-05-01

    The latest LHC data suggest an intriguing excess at mγγ = 750GeV which apparently requires an explanation from the beyond standard model physics. In this paper, we explore the possibility for this signal to arise from a top-pion in the Top Triangle Moose model which can be viewed as a dimensional-deconstruction version of the top-color assisted technicolor model. We demonstrate that the observed excess can be accommodated by and has important implications for this interesting model.

  18. Design for ANL 7 GeV storage ring vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrle, R.B.; Nielsen, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    The 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) design includes a storage ring having a 1060-m circumference with the capability of accommodating 34 insertion devices (ID) and their associated photon beam lines. An additional 35 photon lines can be provided from bending magnets. The vacuum system for the storage ring is designed to maintain a beam-on operating pressure of 1n Torr or less to achieve a positron beam lifetime of approximately 20 hours. The vacuum system and it's current developmental status are described.

  19. Theory Support for the Excited Baryon Analysis Program at the JLAB 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Volker; Lee, Tsung-Shung; Mokeev, Viktor; Aznauryan, Inna; Braun, Vladimir; Capstick, Simon; Cloet, Ian; Edwards, Robert; Gianinni, M.; Lin, Huey-Wen; Roberts, C.D.; Stoler, Paul; Zhao, Qiang; Zou, Bing-Song

    2009-01-01

    This document summarizes the contributions of the Electromagnetic $\\gamma_vNN^*$ Transition Form Factors workshop participants that provide theoretical support of the excited baryon program at the 12 GeV energy upgrade at JLab. The main objectives of the workshop were (a) review the status of the $\\gamma_vNN^*$ transition form factors extracted from the meson electroproduction data, (b) call for the theoretical interpretations of the extracted $N$-$N^*$ transition form factors, that enable access to the mechanisms responsible for the N* formation and to their emergence from QCD.

  20. Single shot 3 GeV electron transverse emittance with a pepper-pot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Cyrille; Delerue, Nicolas; Bartolini, Riccardo

    2013-11-01

    We present the first measurement of the transverse emittance of an electron bunch at 3 GeV using the pepper-pot technique. The measurements presented in this paper demonstrate the possibility to use such a method for single shot emittance measurement of high energy particles. This measurement presents also the experimental verification of a previous theoretical study, which was predicting in which condition such a measurement can be done. The method may present some technical limitations which are discussed in view of the application to future very small emittance multi-GeV particle accelerators.

  1. Application of JLab 12GeV helium refrigeration system for the FRIB accelerator at MSU

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, Venkatarao; Knudsen, Peter N.; Arenius, Dana M.; Casagrande, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    The planned approach to have a turnkey helium refrigeration system for the MSU-FRIB accelerator system, encompassing the design, fabrication, installation and commissioning of the 4.5-K refrigerator cold box(es), cold compression system, warm compression system, gas management, oil removal and utility/ancillary systems, was found to be cost prohibitive. Following JLab’s suggestion, MSU-FRIB accelerator management made a formal request to evaluate the applicability of the recently designed 12GeV JLab cryogenic system for this application. The following paper will outline the findings and the planned approach for the FRIB helium refrigeration system.

  2. Application of JLab 12GeV helium refrigeration system for the FRIB accelerator at MSU

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.; Arenius, D.; Casagrande, F.

    2014-01-29

    The planned approach to have a turnkey helium refrigeration system for the MSU-FRIB accelerator system, encompassing the design, fabrication, installation and commissioning of the 4.5-K refrigerator cold box(es), cold compression system, warm compression system, gas management, oil removal and utility/ancillary systems, was found to be cost prohibitive. Following JLab’s suggestion, MSU-FRIB accelerator management made a formal request to evaluate the applicability of the recently designed 12GeV JLab cryogenic system for this application. The following paper will outline the findings and the planned approach for the FRIB helium refrigeration system.

  3. Vibration Response Testing of the CEBAF 12GeV Upgrade Cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G. Kirk; Matalevich, Joseph R.; Wiseman, Mark A.; Powers, Thomas J.

    2012-09-01

    The CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade project includes 80 new 7-cell cavities to form 10 cryomodules. These cryomodules were tested during production to characterize their microphonic response in situ. For several early cryomodules, detailed (vibration) modal studies of the cryomodule string were performed during the assembly process to identify the structural contributors to the measured cryomodule microphonic response. Structural modifications were then modelled, implemented, and verified by subsequent modal testing and in-situ microphonic response testing. Interim and latest results from this multi-stage process will be reviewed.

  4. Diphoton resonance at 750 GeV in the broken R -symmetric MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Sabyasachi; Chakraborty, Amit; Raychaudhuri, Sreerup

    2016-08-01

    Nonobservation of superpartners of the Standard Model particles at the early runs of the LHC provide strong motivation for introducing an R -symmetric minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. This model also comes with a pair of extra scalars which couple only to superpartners at the tree level. We demonstrate that in the case when the U (1 )R symmetry is mildly broken one of these scalars develops all the properties necessary to explain the 750 GeV diphoton resonance recently observed at the LHC, as well as the nonobservation of associated signals in other channels. Some confirmatory tests in the upcoming LHC runs are proposed.

  5. Characteristics of the 7-GeV advanced photon source: A guide for users

    SciTech Connect

    Shenoy, G.K.; Viccaro, P.J.; Mills, D.M.

    1988-02-01

    In this document we present the characteristics of the electromagnetic radiation from various types of sources on the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. The sources include bending magnets, undulators, and wigglers. The characteristics are compared with those of other synchrotron sources when operated at their design specifications. The influence of positron beam size on the on-axis brilliance is discussed, along with the power distribution from these sources. The goal of this document is to provide users with enough information on the characteristics of radiation from the APS storage ring so that experiments can be efficiently planned. 23 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Revisiting light stringy states in view of the 750 GeV diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasopoulos, Pascal; Bianchi, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    We investigate light massive string states that appear at brane intersections. They replicate the massless spectrum in a richer fashion and may be parametrically lighter than standard Regge excitations. We identify the first few physical states and determine their BRST invariant vertex operators. In the supersymmetric case we reconstruct the super-multiplet structure. We then compute some simple interactions, such as the decay rate of a massive scalar or vector into two massless fermions. Finally we suggest an alternative interpretation of the 750 GeV diphoton excess at LHC in terms of a light massive string state, a replica of the Standard Model Higgs.

  7. The Fermi GeV excess: challenges for the dark matter interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calore, Francesca; Bozorgnia, Nassim; Lovell, Mark; Bertone, Gianfranco; Schaller, Matthieu; Frenk, Carlos S.; Crain, Robert A.; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom; Trayford, James W.

    2016-05-01

    One of the most exciting recent results in the field of dark matter indirect searches has been the discovery of an excess emission in gamma rays from the Galactic centre above the standard astrophysical background. We show that current hydrodynamic simulations, namely simulated Milky Way-like galaxies within the “Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments” (EAGLE) project, challenge the possibility to interpret the GeV excess as due to annihilation of dark matter particles in the halo if the Milky Way.

  8. Anisotropic flow in the forward directions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Markus D.

    2004-03-09

    The addition of the two Forward TPCs to the STAR detector allows one to measure anisotropic flow at forward pseudorapidities. This made possible the first measurement of directed flow at collision energies of {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. PHOBOS' results on elliptic flow at forward rapidities were confirmed, and the sign of v{sub 2} was determined to be positive for the first time at RHIC energies. The higher harmonic, v{sub 4}, is consistent with the recently suggested v{sub 2}2 scaling behavior.

  9. Testing of the new tuner design for the CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade SRF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Daly; G. Davis; William Hicks

    2005-05-01

    The new tuner design for the 12 GeV Upgrade SRF cavities consists of a coarse mechanical tuner and a fine piezoelectric tuner. The mechanism provides a 30:1 mechanical advantage, is pre-loaded at room temperature and tunes the cavities in tension only. All of the components are located in the insulating vacuum space and attached to the helium vessel, including the motor, harmonic drive and piezoelectric actuators. The requirements and detailed design are presented. Measurements of range and resolution of the coarse tuner are presented and discussed.

  10. FMEA on the superconducting torus for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV accelerator upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoshal, Probir K.; Biallas, George H.; Fair, Ruben J.; Rajput-Ghoshal, Renuka; Schneider, William J.; Legg, Robert A.; Kashy, David H.; Hogan, John P.; Wiseman, Mark A.; Luongo, Cesar; Ballard, Joshua T.; Young, Glenn R.; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Rode, Claus H.

    2015-01-16

    As part of the Jefferson Lab 12GeV accelerator upgrade project, Hall B requires two conduction cooled superconducting magnets. One is a magnet system consisting of six superconducting trapezoidal racetrack-type coils assembled in a toroidal configuration and the second is an actively shielded solenoidal magnet system consisting of 5 coils. Both magnets are to be wound with Superconducting Super Collider-36 NbTi strand Rutherford cable soldered into a copper channel. This paper describes the various failure modes in torus magnet along with the failure modes that could be experienced by the torus and its interaction with the solenoid which is located in close proximity.

  11. The lead industry and lead water pipes "A Modest Campaign".

    PubMed

    Rabin, Richard

    2008-09-01

    Lead pipes for carrying drinking water were well recognized as a cause of lead poisoning by the late 1800s in the United States. By the 1920s, many cities and towns were prohibiting or restricting their use. To combat this trend, the lead industry carried out a prolonged and effective campaign to promote the use of lead pipes. Led by the Lead Industries Association (LIA), representatives were sent to speak with plumbers' organizations, local water authorities, architects, and federal officials. The LIA also published numerous articles and books that extolled the advantages of lead over other materials and gave practical advice on the installation and repair of lead pipes. The LIA's activities over several decades therefore contributed to the present-day public health and economic cost of lead water pipes.

  12. Get the lead out: The many faces of lead law

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, L.S.

    1996-10-01

    There are numerous laws and regulations which apply to lead and its compounds because lead is used in many different ways. There is some confusion regarding which laws apply and how they affect the corrosion field. This paper provides a brief overview of the various lead laws found at the federal level, their applicability, and requirements.

  13. Interpreting the 750 GeV diphoton excess in minimal extensions of Two-Higgs-Doublet models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badziak, Marcin

    2016-08-01

    It is shown that the 750 GeV diphoton excess can be explained in extensions of Two-Higgs-Doublet Models that do not involve large multiplicities of new electromagnetically charged states. The key observation is that at moderate and large tan ⁡ β the total decay width of the 750 GeV Higgs is strongly reduced as compared to the Standard Model. This allows for much more economical choices of new states that enhance the diphoton signal to fit the data. In particular, it is shown that one family of vector-like quarks and leptons with SM charges is enough to explain the 750 GeV diphoton excess. Moreover, such charge assignment can keep the 125 GeV Higgs signal rates exactly at the SM values. The scenario can interpret the diphoton excess provided that the total decay width of a hypothetical resonance that would be measured at the LHC turns out to not exceed few GeV.

  14. Inclusive Lambda_c Production in e+e- Annihilations at sqrt{s}=10.54 GeV and in Upsilon(4S) Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-09-07

    We present measurements of the total production rates and momentum distributions of the charmed baryon {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} in e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} hadrons at a center-of-mass energy of 10.54 GeV and in {Upsilon}(4S) decays. In hadronic events at 10.54 GeV, charmed hadrons are almost exclusively leading particles in e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} events, allowing direct studies of c-quark fragmentation. We measure a momentum distribution for {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryons that differs significantly from those measured previously for charmed mesons. Comparing with a number of models, we find none that can describe the distribution completely. We measure an average scaled momentum of (x{sub p}) = 0.574 {+-} 0.009 and a total rate of N{sub {Lambda}{sub c}}{sup q{bar q}} = 0.057 {+-} 0.002(exp.) {+-} 0.015(BF) {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} per hadronic event, where the experimental error is much smaller than that due to the branching fraction into the reconstructed decay mode, pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +}. In {Upsilon}(4S) decays we measure a total rate of N{sub {Lambda}{sub c}}{sup {Upsilon}} = 0.091 {+-} 0.006(exp.) {+-} 0.024(BF) per {Upsilon}(4S) decay, and find a much softer momentum distribution than expected from B decays into a {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} plus an antinucleon and one to three pions.

  15. Transverse single spin asymmetrics in heavy flavor production in polarized p+p collisions at center of mass energy = 200 GeV at PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albataineh, Hisham

    The spin structure of the proton has revealed itself to be extremely complex and is an area of ongoing research. In particular its transverse spin structure remains poorly understood. Large transverse single-spin asymmetries of up to 20%--40% were observed in forward pion production by the E704 collaboration at Fermi lab at large xF at s = 19.4 GeV [161, 162] and have been found by the STAR [113] and BRAHMS experiments [163] to persist at RHIC energies. Such large asymmetries were initially surprising because at leading order, perturbative quantum chromodynamics predicted only small effects. A number of pQCD based models have been developed to explain this phenomenon. Among them are the Sivers effect (transversely asymmetric kT quark and gluon distributions) [78], the Collins effect (transversity distribution in combination with spin-dependent fragmentation function) [180], and the higher twist effect (interference between quark and gluon fields in the initial or final state) [80, 181]. In addition, single-spin azimuthal asymmetries were observed recently in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) experiments i.e. HERMES experiment at DESY and BELLE experiment at KEKB. Measurement of single-spin asymmetries in SIDIS on a transversely polarized hydrogen target at HERMES [105], and the measurement of azimuthal asymmetries in inclusive production of hadron pairs in e+e- annihilation at BELLE [18], provided evidence that Sivers and Collins effect are real physical mechanisms. The transverse single spin asymmetry of high pT muons from open heavy avor production in polarized p+ p collisions at s = 200 GeV has been measured from Run 6 data. The corresponding luminosity used in this analysis is 2.7 pb-1 with average beam polarization about 52% +/- 4.7% for blue beam and 50% +/- 4.8% for yellow beam.

  16. Soil lead-blood lead relationship among Boston children

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, M.B.; Bellinger, D.C.

    1988-12-01

    Lead contaminated soil has been consistently been found to contribute significantly to children's risk of blood lead elevation. An association between soil lead and blood lead has been reported for children in Holland, Rochester, New York, Omaha, Nebraska, Christchurch, New Zealand, and Kellogg, Idaho. The authors report on the connection between soil and blood lead levels among a group of Boston children in order to document this pattern of association in a specific setting which may be analogous to other situations of interest. The base population consisted of 11,837 consecutive births at the Boston Hospital for Women between April 1979 and April 1981.

  17. Lead testing wipes contain measurable background levels of lead.

    PubMed

    Keenan, James J; Le, Matthew H; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Gaffney, Shannon H

    2010-03-01

    Lead is registered under the California Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Proposition 65) as both a carcinogen and a reproductive hazard. As part of the process to determine if consumer products satisfy Proposition 65 with respect to lead, various wipe sampling strategies have been utilized. Four commonly used wipe materials (cotton gauze, cotton balls, ashless filter paper, and Ghost Wipes) were tested for background lead levels. Ghost Wipe material was found to have 0.43 +/- 0.11 microg lead/sample (0.14 microg/wipe). Wipe testing for lead using Ghost Wipes may therefore result in measurable concentrations of lead, regardless of whether or not the consumer product actually contains leachable lead. PMID:20087726

  18. MEASUREMENT OF THE CROSS-SECTION FOR THE γ γ -> p/line{p} PROCESS AT √ {s} = 183 - 189\\ GeV AT LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barillari, T.

    2002-07-01

    The OPAL detector at LEP has been used to study the exclusive production of proton antiproton pairs in the collisions of two quasi-real photons using data taken at √ {s} = 183\\ GeV and 189 GeV. The results here presented are for γγ invariant masses, W, in the range 2.15 GeV < W < 3.95 GeV. The cross-section measurements are compared with previous data and with recent analytic calculations based on the quark-diquark model predictions.

  19. Lead toxicity in older adults.

    PubMed

    Vig, E K; Hu, H

    2000-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that lead, even at relatively low levels of exposure, has the potential to harm not only the young and the occupationally-exposed, but also older people. Because they have been alive for a longer period of time, older adults have had more potential exposures to lead. They may have been exposed to lead while working in unregulated occupations, or they may have encountered more lead in the environment on a daily basis. Several large epidemiological studies have found that older people have higher blood and bone lead levels than younger adults. Additionally, sporadic clusters of acute lead exposure among older adults as a result of activities such as ceramic glaze hobby work and consumption of moonshine whiskey continue to be reported. After lead enters the body, it circulates in the blood reaching the soft tissues and bone. Researchers have learned that lead can hibernate within bone for decades. Although lead within bone is of uncertain toxicity to bone tissue, conditions of bone resorption, such as osteoporosis, can cause bone lead to reenter the bloodstream where it can then re-expose the soft tissue, and, potentially, exert delayed deleterious effects. Evidence is emerging that blood and bone lead levels, reflecting relatively modest exposures, are associated with hypertension, renal insufficiency, and cognitive impairment. Medical treatments that now exist to slow the rate of bone resorption may maintain lead within bones. On-going studies evaluating the relationship between body lead stores and both cognitive and renal impairment, as well as the potential modifying effect of bone resorption, will help determine whether bone resorption should be retarded specifically to preserve organ function. Physicians should be aware of potential past and present lead exposures among their older patients. Ongoing lead exposure should be prevented. In the future, treatment of osteoporosis may be undertaken not only to improve bone health but also to

  20. Lead toxicity in older adults.

    PubMed

    Vig, E K; Hu, H

    2000-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that lead, even at relatively low levels of exposure, has the potential to harm not only the young and the occupationally-exposed, but also older people. Because they have been alive for a longer period of time, older adults have had more potential exposures to lead. They may have been exposed to lead while working in unregulated occupations, or they may have encountered more lead in the environment on a daily basis. Several large epidemiological studies have found that older people have higher blood and bone lead levels than younger adults. Additionally, sporadic clusters of acute lead exposure among older adults as a result of activities such as ceramic glaze hobby work and consumption of moonshine whiskey continue to be reported. After lead enters the body, it circulates in the blood reaching the soft tissues and bone. Researchers have learned that lead can hibernate within bone for decades. Although lead within bone is of uncertain toxicity to bone tissue, conditions of bone resorption, such as osteoporosis, can cause bone lead to reenter the bloodstream where it can then re-expose the soft tissue, and, potentially, exert delayed deleterious effects. Evidence is emerging that blood and bone lead levels, reflecting relatively modest exposures, are associated with hypertension, renal insufficiency, and cognitive impairment. Medical treatments that now exist to slow the rate of bone resorption may maintain lead within bones. On-going studies evaluating the relationship between body lead stores and both cognitive and renal impairment, as well as the potential modifying effect of bone resorption, will help determine whether bone resorption should be retarded specifically to preserve organ function. Physicians should be aware of potential past and present lead exposures among their older patients. Ongoing lead exposure should be prevented. In the future, treatment of osteoporosis may be undertaken not only to improve bone health but also to

  1. Electromagnetic production of mesons and nucleon resonances at GeV energies

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.H.; Pichowsky, M.; Sato, T.

    1995-08-01

    A coupled-channels model for investigating the electromagnetic excitation of nucleon resonances (N*) at energies accessible to CEBAF, was developed. Motivated by the existing QCD-based hadron models, we assume that the basic resonant interaction mechanisms of the model Hamiltonian are the absorption and emission of photons and mesons by a bare quark core. The matrix elements of nonresonant interactions are deduced from low-order Feynman diagrams of an effective Lagrangian with chiral symmetry. The standard projection operator technique was applied to obtain a set of unitary scattering equations for describing {pi}N and {gamma}N reactions up to the GeV energy region. By assuming that the nonresonant two-pion continuum can be approximated as a fictitious {sigma}N state, the scattering equations can then be cast into a set of coupled-channels equations involving only two-particle {gamma}N, {pi}N, {eta}N, {rho}N, {pi}{Delta}, {omega}N and {sigma}N channels, which can be solved by well-developed numerical methods. The bare coupling constants and the range parameters of the hadronic form factors are adjusted to reproduce {pi}N scattering phase shifts up to 2-GeV incident pion energy. We then explore the dependence of the {gamma}N {yields} {pi}N and N(e,e{prime}{pi}) observables on the {gamma}N {yields} N* excitation strengths predicted by various QCD-based models of hadrons.

  2. Design of a multi-bend achromat lattice for 3 GeV synchrotron light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-San

    2016-03-01

    We present a lattice design for a low-emittance and high-brilliance 3 GeV synchrotron light source that has been widely investigated in the world. We show the design results for a MBA (Multi-Bend Achromat) lattice with an emittance of 1.3 nm and 282.4 m circumference. Each cell has 5 bending magnets that consist of outer two with bending angle of 4.5° and inner three with bending angle of 7°. The lattice is designed to be flexible and consists of 12 straight sections in which one straight section has a length of 5.9 m. We have studied the dynamic aperture in the lattice with machine errors. It is shown that the designed low-emittance lattice provides sufficient dynamic aperture after COD correction. We present the results of variations of emittance, energy spread and dynamic aperture due to in-vacuum undulators in the straight sections. We performed particle tracking after the beam injection to investigate the efficiency of the injection scheme. We show the designed results of an injection scheme that shows the space allocation in injection section and the particle motions of injected beam. Our designed lattice provides a good optimization in terms of the emittance and brilliance as a light source for 3 GeV energy and circumference of 28 m.

  3. 750 GeV diphoton resonance from singlets in an exceptional supersymmetric standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen F.; Nevzorov, Roman

    2016-03-01

    The 750-760 GeV diphoton resonance may be identified as one or two scalars and/or one or two pseudoscalars contained in the two singlet superfields S 1,2 arising from the three 27-dimensional representations of E 6. The three 27s also contain three copies of colour-triplet charge ∓1 /3 vector-like fermions D, overline{D} and two copies of charged inert Higgsinos {tilde{H}}+ , {tilde{H}}- to which the singlets S 1,2 may couple. We propose a variant of the E6SSM where the third singlet S 3 breaks a gauged U(1) N above the TeV scale, predicting Z N ' , D, overline{D} , {tilde{H}}+ , {tilde{H}}- at LHC Run 2, leaving the two lighter singlets S 1,2 with masses around 750 GeV. We calculate the branching ratios and cross-sections for the two scalar and two pseudoscalar states associated with the S 1,2 singlets, including possible degeneracies and maximal mixing, subject to the constraint that their couplings remain perturbative up to the unification scale.

  4. From the 750 GeV diphoton resonance to multilepton excesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Kyu Jung; Chen, Chuan-Ren; Hamaguchi, Koichi; Low, Ian

    2016-07-01

    Weakly coupled models for the 750 GeV diphoton resonance often invoke new particles carrying both color and/or electric charges to mediate loop-induced couplings of the resonance to two gluons and two photons. The new colored particles may not be stable and could decay into final states containing standard model particles. We consider an electroweak doublet of vectorlike quarks (VLQs) carrying electric charges of 5 /3 and 2 /3 , respectively, which mediate the loop-induced couplings of the 750 GeV resonance. If the VLQ has a mass at around 1 TeV, it naturally gives rise to the observed diphoton signal strength while all couplings remain perturbative up to a high scale. At the same time, if the charge-5 /3 VLQ decays into final states containing top quark and W boson, it would contribute to the multilepton excesses observed in both run 1 and run 2 data. It is also possible to incorporate a dark matter candidate in the decay final states to explain the observed relic density.

  5. Environmental assessment of the proposed 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    The potential environmental impacts of construction and operation of a 6- to 7-GeV synchrotron radiation source known as the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory were evaluated. Key elements considered include on- and off-site radiological effects; socioeconomic effects; and impacts to aquatic and terrestrial flora and fauna, wetlands, water and air quality, cultural resources, and threatened or endangered species. Also incorporated are the effects of decisions made as a result of the preliminary design (Title I) being prepared. Mitigation plans to further reduce impacts are being developed. These plans include coordination with the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE) and other responsible agencies to mitigate potential impacts to wetlands. This mitigation includes providing habitat of comparable ecological value to assure no net loss of wetlands. These mitigation actions would be permitted and monitored by COE. A data recovery plan to protect cultural resources has been developed and approved, pursuant to a Programmatic Agreement among the US Department of Energy, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Illinois State Historic Preservation Office. Applications for National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) and air emissions permits have been submitted to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA), respectively. 71 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Right-handed neutrino production rate at T > 160 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ghisoiu, I.; Laine, M. E-mail: laine@itp.unibe.ch

    2014-12-01

    The production rate of right-handed neutrinos from a Standard Model plasma at a temperature above a hundred GeV has previously been evaluated up to NLO in Standard Model couplings (g ∼ 2/3) in relativistic (M ∼ πT) and non-relativistic regimes (M >> πT), and up to LO in an ultrarelativistic regime (M ∼< gT). The last result necessitates an all-orders resummation of the loop expansion, accounting for multiple soft scatterings of the nearly light-like particles participating in 1 ↔ 2 reactions. In this paper we suggest how the regimes can be interpolated into a result applicable for any right-handed neutrino mass and at all temperatures above 160GeV. The results can also be used for determining the lepton number washout rate in models containing right-handed neutrinos. Numerical results are given in a tabulated form permitting for their incorporation into leptogenesis codes. We note that due to effects from soft Higgs bosons there is a narrow intermediate regime around (M ∼ g{sup 1/2}T in which our interpolation is phenomenological and a more precise study would be welcome.

  7. Vector-like exotics in F-theory and 750 GeV diphotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palti, Eran

    2016-06-01

    The recent excess in diphoton events around 750 GeV seen by the ATLAS and CMS experiments could be hinting at the existence of new vector-like charged matter around the TeV scale which couples to a singlet. Such a spectrum of exotics arises inevitably in certain classes of F-theory GUTs with hypercharge flux when the GUT symmetry is extended by a U (1) symmetry under which the Higgs fields of the MSSM are not vector-like. The exotics are not vector-like under the U (1) symmetry and therefore their mass is naturally related to its breaking scale. Previously this scale was taken to be close to the GUT scale which led to tension with proton decay, the μ-term magnitude, and too large R-parity violation. The 750 GeV excess provides new motivation for considering breaking the U (1) around the TeV scale, which additionally alleviates the previous problems. We study the possible TeV-scale spectrum in such an SU (5) GUT scenario and show that it is constrained and predictive. Gauge coupling unification can be retained at the accuracy of the MSSM at one loop even though typically the spectrum does not form complete GUT representations. For example the exotics cannot form a complete 10 multiplet but nonetheless happen to behave as one in the beta functions. We present an initial analysis of the diphoton production rates for the exotics spectra and find them compatible with data.

  8. Cosmic Transients Test Einstein's Equivalence Principle out to GeV Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, He; Wu, Xue-Feng; Mészáros, Peter

    2015-09-01

    The Einstein Equivalence Principle (EEP) can be probed with astrophysical sources emitting simultaneously different types of neutral particles, or particles with varying energies, by testing their time of flight through the same gravitational field. Here we use the time delays between correlated photons from cosmological transients to constrain the accuracy of the EEP. We take data from two gamma-ray bursts as an example and, as a lower limit to the theoretical time delays between different energies, we use delays arising from only the gravitational field of our own galaxy. We then show that the parameterized post-Newtonian parameter γ is the same for photons over energy ranges between eV and MeV and between MeV and GeV to a part in 10-7, which is at least one order of magnitude better than previous limits. Combining this bound on the wavelength dependence of γ with the absolute bound | γ -1| \\lt 0.3% from light-deflection measurements at optical (eV) wavelengths, we thus extend this absolute bound on γ to GeV energies.

  9. Top-phobic heavy Higgs boson as the 750 GeV diphoton resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sin Kyu; Song, Jeonghyeon

    2016-06-01

    A hint of a new resonance at a mass of 750 GeV has been shown in the diphoton channel of the Run-2 LHC data. The observed signal rate is usually too large to interpret it as a new scalar boson in the context of weakly coupled renormalizable models. One way is to reduce its total decay rate, which is possible if the C P -even heavy Higgs boson H0 in the aligned two Higgs doublet model becomes top-phobic. To ensure sufficient gluon fusion production, we introduce vector-like quarks (VLQ). The Higgs precision data as well as the exclusion limits from no excesses in other resonance searches through Z γ , b b ¯, τ+τ-, and j j channels at the Run-1 LHC are comprehensively studied. In Type I, the top-phobic H0 cannot simultaneously explain the 750 GeV diphoton excess and the Higgs precision data since the same Yukawa couplings of the up-type and down-type VLQs to H0 always make more contribution to the diphoton signal rate of the standard model Higgs boson than that of H0. In Type II, small Yukawa coupling of the up-type VLQ but sizable Yukawa coupling of the down-type VLQ is shown to explain the signal while satisfying other LHC exclusion limits.

  10. The CMS barrel calorimeter response to particle beams from 2 to 350 GeV/ c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullin, S.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B.; Adam, N.; Adams, M.; Adzic, P.; Akchurin, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Almeida, N.; Anagnostou, G.; Andelin, D.; Anderson, E. W.; Anfreville, M.; Anicin, I.; Antchev, G.; Antunovic, Z.; Arcidiacono, R.; Arenton, M. W.; Auffray, E.; Argiro, S.; Askew, A.; Atramentov, O.; Ayan, S.; Arcidy, M.; Aydin, S.; Aziz, T.; Baarmand, M.; Babich, K.; Baccaro, S.; Baden, D.; Baffioni, S.; Bakirci, M. N.; Balazs, M.; Banerjee, Sud.; Banerjee, Sun.; Bard, R.; Barge, D.; Barnes, V.; Barney, D.; Barone, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Baty, C.; Bawa, H.; Baiatian, G.; Bandurin, D.; Beauceron, S.; Bell, K. W.; Bencze, G.; Benetta, R.; Bercher, M.; Beri, S.; Bernet, C.; Berntzon, L.; Berthon, U.; Besancon, M.; Betev, B.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Biino, C.; Blaha, J.; Bloch, P.; Blyth, S.; Bodek, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bose, S.; Bose, T.; Bourotte, J.; Brett, A. M.; Brown, R. M.; Britton, D.; Budd, H.; Buehler, M.; Burchesky, K.; Busson, P.; Camanzi, B.; Camporesi, T.; Cankoçak, K.; Carrell, K.; Carrera, E.; Cartiglia, N.; Cavallari, F.; Cerci, S.; Cerutti, M.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Charlot, C.; Chen, E. A.; Chen, W. T.; Chen, Z.; Chendvankar, S.; Chipaux, R.; Choudhary, B. C.; Choudhury, R. K.; Chung, Y.; Clarida, W.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Combaret, C.; Conetti, S.; Cossutti, F.; Cox, B.; Cremaldi, L.; Cushman, P.; Cussans, D. G.; Dafinei, I.; Damgov, J.; da Silva di Calafiori, D. R.; Daskalakis, G.; Davatz, G.; David, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Debbins, P.; Deiters, K.; Dejardin, M.; Djordjevic, M.; Deliomeroglu, M.; Della Negra, R.; Della Ricca, G.; Del Re, D.; Demianov, A.; de Min, A.; Denegri, D.; Depasse, P.; de Visser, T.; Descamps, J.; Deshpande, P. V.; Diaz, J.; Diemoz, M.; di Marco, E.; Dimitrov, L.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Djambazov, L.; Dobrzynski, L.; Drndarevic, S.; Duboscq, J. E.; Dugad, S.; Dumanoglu, I.; Duru, F.; Dutta, D.; Dzelalija, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Elias, J.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Elvira, D.; Emeliantchik, I.; Eno, S.; Ershov, A.; Erturk, S.; Esen, S.; Eskut, E.; Evangelou, I.; Evans, D. L.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Fay, J.; Fenyvesi, A.; Ferri, F.; Fisher, W.; Flower, P. S.; Franci, D.; Franzoni, G.; Freeman, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Funk, W.; Ganjour, S.; Gargiulo, C.; Gascon, S.; Gataullin, M.; Gaultney, V.; Gamsizkan, H.; Gavrilov, V.; Geerebaert, Y.; Genchev, V.; Gentit, F. X.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Ghezzi, A.; Ghodgaonkar, M. D.; Gilly, J.; Givernaud, A.; Gleyzer, S.; Gninenko, S.; Go, A.; Gobbo, B.; Godinovic, N.; Golubev, N.; Golutvin, I.; Goncharov, P.; Gong, D.; Govoni, P.; Grant, N.; Gras, P.; Grassi, T.; Green, D.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gribushin, A.; Grinev, B.; Guevara Riveros, L.; Guillaud, J. P.; Gurtu, A.; Murat Güler, A.; Gülmez, E.; Gümüş, K.; Haelen, T.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Haguenauer, M.; Halyo, V.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Hansen, M.; Hashemi, M.; Hauptman, J.; Hazen, E.; Heath, H. F.; Heering, A.; Heister, A.; Heltsley, B.; Hill, J. A.; Hintz, W.; Hirosky, R.; Hobson, P. R.; Honma, A.; Hou, G. W. S.; Hsiung, Y.; Hunt, A.; Husejko, M.; Ille, B.; Ilyina, N.; Imlay, R.; Ingram, D.; Ingram, Q.; Isiksal, E.; Jarry, P.; Jarvis, C.; Jeong, C.; Jessop, C.; Johnson, K.; Jones, J.; Jovanovic, D.; Kaadze, K.; Kachanov, V.; Kaftanov, V.; Kailas, S.; Kalagin, V.; Kalinin, A.; Kalmani, S.; Karmgard, D.; Kataria, S. K.; Kaur, M.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Kellogg, R.; Kennedy, B. W.; Khmelnikov, A.; Kim, H.; Kisselevich, I.; Kloukinas, K.; Kodolova, O.; Kohli, J.; Kokkas, P.; Kolberg, T.; Kolossov, V.; Korablev, A.; Korneev, Y.; Kosarev, I.; Kramer, L.; Krasnikov, N.; Krinitsyn, A.; Krokhotin, A.; Krpic, D.; Kryshkin, V.; Kubota, Y.; Kubrik, A.; Kuleshov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kunori, S.; Kuo, C. M.; Kurt, P.; Kyberd, P.; Kyriakis, A.; Laasanen, A.; Ladygin, V.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Laszlo, A.; Lawlor, C.; Lazic, D.; Lebeau, M.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lee, S.-W.; Leshev, G.; Lethuillier, M.; Levchuk, L.; Lin, S. W.; Lin, W.; Linn, S.; Lintern, A. L.; Litvine, V.; Litvintsev, D.; Litov, L.; Lobolo, L.; Locci, E.; Lodge, A. B.; Longo, E.; Loukas, D.; Los, S.; Lubinsky, V.; Luckey, P. D.; Lukanin, V.; Lustermann, W.; Lynch, C.; Ma, Y.; Machado, E.; Mahlke-Krueger, H.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Malberti, M.; Malclès, J.; Maletic, D.; Mandjavidze, I.; Mans, J.; Manthos, N.; Maravin, Y.; Marchica, C.; Marinelli, N.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Marlow, D.; Markowitz, P.; Marone, M.; Martinez, G.; Mathez, H.; Matveev, V.; Mavrommatis, C.; Maurelli, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Meridiani, P.; Merlo, J. P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mescheryakov, G.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Mikhailin, V.; Milenovic, P.; Miller, M.; Milleret, G.; Miné, P.; Moeller, A.; Mohammadi-Najafabadi, M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moissenz, P.

    2009-04-01

    The response of the CMS barrel calorimeter (electromagnetic plus hadronic) to hadrons, electrons and muons over a wide momentum range from 2 to 350 GeV/ c has been measured. To our knowledge, this is the widest range of momenta in which any calorimeter system has been studied. These tests, carried out at the H2 beam-line at CERN, provide a wealth of information, especially at low energies. The analysis of the differences in calorimeter response to charged pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons and a detailed discussion of the underlying phenomena are presented. We also show techniques that apply corrections to the signals from the considerably different electromagnetic (EB) and hadronic (HB) barrel calorimeters in reconstructing the energies of hadrons. Above 5 GeV/ c, these corrections improve the energy resolution of the combined system where the stochastic term equals 84.7±1.6% and the constant term is 7.4±0.8%. The corrected mean response remains constant within 1.3% rms.

  11. Interpreting the 750 GeV diphoton excess in the minimal dilaton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Junjie; Shang, Liangliang; Su, Wei; Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Jinya

    2016-05-01

    We try to interpret the 750 GeV diphoton excess in the minimal dilaton model, which extends the SM by adding one linearized dilaton field and vector-like fermions. We first show by analytic formulas in this framework that the production rates of the γ γ , gg, Zγ , ZZ, WW^*, tbar{t}, and hh signals at the 750 GeV resonance are only sensitive to the dilaton-Higgs mixing angle θ _S and the parameter η ≡ v N_X/f, where f is the dilaton decay constant and N_X denotes the number of the fermions. Then we scan the two parameters by considering various theoretical and experimental constraints to find the solutions to the diphoton excess. We conclude that the model can predict the central value of the diphoton rate without conflicting with any constraints. The signatures of our explanation at the LHC Run II and the vacuum stability at high energy scale are also discussed.

  12. Models of a 750 GeV quarkonium and the LHC excesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Koichi; Liew, Seng Pei

    2016-08-01

    We investigate models involving a vectorlike quark (X ), which forms a 750 GeV bound state and reproduces the observed diphoton signals at the LHC, in connection with other excesses in the LHC data. An exotic hypercharge of -4 /3 is required to fit the signal cross section, which indicates that there is an additional particle(s) that mediates the decay of X in the full theory. We find that introducing an SU(2) doublet vectorlike quark of mass around 600 GeV in our UV-complete framework can accommodate not only the diphoton but also the on-Z excess (and potentially a slight excess in the monojet events). Our models also include a dark matter candidate. The most useful way to probe the models at the LHC is via monojet searches. The relic dark matter density is largely determined by coannihilation effects, and indirect detection of dark matter annihilation signals is the alternative and complementary probe of our models.

  13. Right-handed neutrino production rate at T>160 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ghisoiu, I.; Laine, M.

    2014-12-16

    The production rate of right-handed neutrinos from a Standard Model plasma at a temperature above a hundred GeV has previously been evaluated up to NLO in Standard Model couplings (g∼2/3) in relativistic (M∼πT) and non-relativistic regimes (M≫πT), and up to LO in an ultrarelativistic regime (M≲gT). The last result necessitates an all-orders resummation of the loop expansion, accounting for multiple soft scatterings of the nearly light-like particles participating in 1↔2 reactions. In this paper we suggest how the regimes can be interpolated into a result applicable for any right-handed neutrino mass and at all temperatures above 160 GeV. The results can also be used for determining the lepton number washout rate in models containing right-handed neutrinos. Numerical results are given in a tabulated form permitting for their incorporation into leptogenesis codes. We note that due to effects from soft Higgs bosons there is a narrow intermediate regime around M∼g{sup 1/2}T in which our interpolation is phenomenological and a more precise study would be welcome.

  14. Dielectron Mass Spectra from Au +Au Collisions at √sNN =200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    We report the STAR measurements of dielectron (e+e-) production at midrapidity (|yee|<1) in Au +Au collisions at √sNN =200 GeV. The measurements are evaluated in different invariant mass regions with a focus on 0.30-0.76 (ρ-like), 0.76-0.80 (ω-like), and 0.98-1.05 (ϕ-like) GeV /c2. The spectrum in the ω-like and ϕ-like regions can be well described by the hadronic cocktail simulation. In the ρ-like region, however, the vacuum ρ spectral function cannot describe the shape of the dielectron excess. In this range, an enhancement of 1.77±0.11(stat)±0.24(syst)±0.33(cocktail) is determined with respect to the hadronic cocktail simulation that excludes the ρ meson. The excess yield in the ρ-like region increases with the number of collision participants faster than the ω and ϕ yields. Theoretical models with broadened ρ contributions through interactions with constituents in the hot QCD medium provide a consistent description of the dilepton mass spectra for the measurement presented here and the earlier data at the Super Proton Synchrotron energies.

  15. 750 GeV resonance in the gauged U(1)‧-extended MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yun; Li, Ying-Ying; Liu, Tao

    2016-08-01

    Recently the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations at the LHC announced their observation of a potential 750 GeV di-photon resonance, after analyzing the √{ s} = 13 TeV LHC data. This observation has significant implications for low-energy supersymmetry. Beyond the MSSM and the NMSSM, we study the MSSM-extensions with an extra U(1) ‧ gauge symmetry. The anomaly cancellation and the spontaneous breaking of the non-decoupled U(1) ‧ generally require introducing vector-like supermultiplets (both colored and color-neutral ones) and singlet supermultiplets, respectively. We illustrate that the potential 750 GeV resonance (Y) can be accommodated in various mechanisms, as a singlet-like scalar or pseudoscalar. Three benchmark scenarios are presented: (1) vector-like quarks (VLQ) mediated pp → Y → γγ; (2) scalar VLQ mediated pp → Y → γγ; (3) heavy scalar (pseudo-scalar) H / A associated production pp →H* /A* → YH / h. Additionally, we notice that the Z‧-mediated vector boson fusion production and Z‧-associated production pp → Yqq‧, if yielding a signal rate of the observed level, might have been excluded by the searches for Z‧ via Drell-Yan process at the LHC.

  16. Synchro-betatron resonances in the 8 GeV proton driver

    SciTech Connect

    Shoroku Ohnuma

    2002-12-02

    The major difference of these two versions is the size (circumference) and the maximum energy. In the first study, the circumference is chosen to be 711.3m, which is 1.5 times the present Booster, with the maximum energy of 16 GeV. In the second version, it is mandated to be the same as Booster together with the same maximum energy of 8 GeV. One of the major impacts of the reduced size of the ring is the inevitable reduction in the total length of available space for injection/collimation/extraction systems and for rf cavities, 14 slots of 7.43m each in the smaller ring compared with 24 slots of 6.15m each in the larger ring. Since each cavity occupies a slot of 2.35m and 22 cavities are desirable, seven or eight slots out of 14 in the smaller ring must be reserved for rf, only six or seven remaining for all other systems. The constraint in space is particularly troublesome for the extraction system since the beam loss at extraction (at the highest beam energy) is the major concern of any high intensity proton machines.

  17. 750 GeV diphoton resonance in a visible heavy QCD axion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Cheng-Wei; Fukuda, Hajime; Ibe, Masahiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we revisit a visible heavy QCD axion model in light of the recent reports on the 750 GeV diphoton resonance by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. In this model, the axion is made heavy with the help of the mirror copied sector of the Standard Model, while the successful Peccei-Quinn mechanism is kept intact. We identify the 750 GeV resonance as the scalar boson associated with spontaneous breaking of the Peccei-Quinn symmetry, which mainly decays into a pair of axions. We find that the mixing between the axion and η and η' plays important roles in its decays and the resultant branching ratio into two photons. The axion decay length can be suitable for explaining the diphoton excess by the di-axion production when its decay constant fa≃1 TeV . We also find that our model allows multiple sets of the extra fermions without causing the domain wall problem, which is advantageous to explain the diphoton signal.

  18. Electroproduction of the {phi}(1020) Vector Meson at 4 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantin Loukachine

    2000-02-01

    We studied the reaction ep {yields} e{prime}p{prime}{phi} with a 4.2 GeV incident electron beam in the region of the electroproduction variables Q{sup 2} from 0.7 to 2.2 GeV{sup 2} and W from 2.0 to 2.6 GeV. The data were taken and analyzed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. For the first time, we observe the expected t-slope dependence on Q{sup 2} and {Delta}{tau} in {phi} vector meson production. We find that the width of the forward {phi}-meson diffraction peak increases rapidly as the interaction time decreases below c{Delta}{tau} of 1 fm. Within a simple optical model framework, the data show that {phi} meson has a smaller size than the {rho}. The measured {phi} cross-section dependence on Q{sup 2} is in a good agreement with previous measurements and well-described by the phenomenological Pomeron exchange model. Our cross-section data do not favor the standard Vector Meson Dominance and s{bar s}-knockout model predictions. From the angular distribution of the decay {phi} {yields} K{sup +} K{sup -}, assuming the s-channel helicity conservation, we extracted the longitudinal-to-transverse cross-section ratio, R, and Vector Meson Dominance scaling parameter, {xi}{sup 2}, which are consistent with the previous measurements and the model expectations.

  19. Parameters for a 30 GeV Undulator Test Facility in the FFTB/LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Krejcik, Patrick

    2001-04-12

    The parameters for a 30 GeV test beam are outlined for use with an undulator in the FFTB tunnel where the LCLS will eventually be housed. It is proposed to use the SLAC linac and damping rings in their present mode of operation for PEP II injection, where 30 GeV beams are also delivered at 10 Hz to the FFTB. High peak currents are obtained with the addition of a second bunch compressor in the linac. In order to minimize the synchrotron radiation induced emittance growth in the bunch compressor it is necessary to locate the new bunch compressor at the low-energy end of the linac, just after the damping rings. The bunch compressor is a duplicate of the LCLS chicane-style bunch compressor. This test beam would provide an exciting possibility to test LCLS undulator sections and provide a unique high-brightness source of incoherent X-rays and begin developing the LCLS experimental station. The facility will also act as a much needed accelerator test bed for the production, diagnostics and tuning of very short bunches in preparation for the LCLS after the photo injector is commissioned.

  20. Lead in teeth from lead-dosed goats: Microdistribution and relationship to the cumulative lead dose

    SciTech Connect

    Bellis, David J.; Hetter, Katherine M.; Jones, Joseph; Amarasiriwardena, Dula; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2008-01-15

    Teeth are commonly used as a biomarker of long-term lead exposure. There appear to be few data, however, on the content or distribution of lead in teeth where data on specific lead intake (dose) are also available. This study describes the analysis of a convenience sample of teeth from animals that were dosed with lead for other purposes, i.e., a proficiency testing program for blood lead. Lead concentration of whole teeth obtained from 23 animals, as determined by atomic absorption spectrometry, varied from 0.6 to 80 {mu}g g{sup -1}. Linear regression of whole tooth lead ({mu}g g{sup -1}) on the cumulative lead dose received by the animal (g) yielded a slope of 1.2, with r{sup 2}=0.647 (p<0.0001). Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was employed to determine lead content at micrometer scale spatial resolution in the teeth of seven goats representing the dosing range. Highly localized concentrations of lead, ranging from about 10 to 2000 {mu}g g{sup -1}, were found in circumpulpal dentine. Linear regression of circumpulpal lead ({mu}g g{sup -1}) on cumulative lead dose (g) yielded a slope of 23 with r{sup 2}=0.961 (p=0.0001). The data indicated that whole tooth lead, and especially circumpulpal lead, of dosed goats increased linearly with cumulative lead exposure. These data suggest that circumpulpal dentine is a better biomarker of cumulative lead exposure than is whole tooth lead, at least for lead-dosed goats.

  1. International perspectives of lead exposure and lead toxicity.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, P

    1993-01-01

    Three approaches have been used to examine how human body burdens of lead depend on different environments: (1) In paleopathologic studies, lead concentrations have been determined in well-preserved human bones or teeth, and pre-pollution samples generally show lead concentrations of about 1% of current levels in industrialized countries. (2) Geographic comparisons of blood-lead concentrations show low levels in, Nepal, Faroe Islands, and Sweden, while high levels occur in Mexico and Malta; average blood-lead levels may vary by a factor of 10 or more. (3) In analytical epidemiology, major exposure sources have been related to lead levels in blood, by either prospective or cross-sectional design. Increased blood-lead concentrations are related to smoking, drinking alcoholic beverages, eating vegetables for dinner, urban residence, and exposure from lead-using industries; average blood-lead values of subgroups within well-defined populations may vary by a factor of 3 or more. The dose-relationships for lead-induced neurotoxicity will depend on the sensitivity of the parameters chosen as indicators of lead exposure and of neurotoxicity. The temporal relationship between lead exposures and the development of deficits must be ascertained. Individual susceptibility and interacting factors must also be taken into account. Differences in addressing these issues impede the comparison between studies. Recently neonatal jaundice has been found to be a risk factor for subsequent neurobehavioral dysfunction in children with a birth weight above 2500 g, but only in children with increased lead exposure. Lead exposure may act in combination with several other factors and result in additive, or synergistic effects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8247415

  2. The ecotoxicology of lead shot and lead fishing weights.

    PubMed

    Scheuhammer, A M; Norris, S L

    1996-10-01

    : Lead shot ingestion is the primary source of elevated lead exposure and poisoning in waterfowl and most other bird species. For some species (e.g. Common Loons, Gavia immer), lead sinker ingestion is a more frequent cause of lead poisoning. In freshwater environments where recreational angling activity and loon populations co-occur, lead poisoning from ingestion of small (<50 gram) lead sinkers or jigs accounts for 10-50% of recorded adult loon mortality, depending on the locations studied. Lead shot ingestion occurs in waterfowl, and in a wide variety of non-waterfowl species, including upland game birds, shorebirds, raptors, and scavengers. Where it has been explicitly studied in Canada and the US, lead poisoning mortality of bald (Haliacetus leucocephalus) and golden eagles (Aquila chrysactos) from eating prey animals with lead shot embedded in their tissues accounts for an estimated 10-15% of the recorded post-fledging mortality in these raptorial species. In addition to environments that experience hunting with lead shot, clay target shooting ranges, especially those in which the shotfall zones include ponds, marshes, lakes, rivers, beaches, or other aquatic-type environments, create a significant risk of shot ingestion and poisoning for waterbirds. Metallic lead pellets deposited onto soils and aquatic sediments are not chemically or environmentally inert, although tens or hundreds of years may be required for total breakdown and dissolution of pellets. Functional, affordable non-toxic alternatives to lead shot and sinkers are being currently produced, and additional such products are being developed. Several countries have successfully banned the use of small lead sinkers, and of lead shot for waterfowl and other hunting, also for clay target shooting, using a phasing-out process that gives manufactures, sellers, and users adequate time to adjust to the regulations. PMID:24193869

  3. Comparison of radiation damage in lead tungstate crystals under pion and gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Batarin, V.A.; Butler, J.; Davidenko, A.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Goncharenko, Y.M.; Grishin, V.N.; Kachanov, V.A.; Khodyrev, V.Y.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Kubota, Y.; Lukanin, V.S.; Matulenko, Y.A.; Melnick, Y.M.; Meschanin, A.P.; Mikhalin, N.E.; Minaev, N.G.; Mochalov, V.V.; Morozov, D.A.; Nogach, L.V.; Ryazantsev, A.V.; /Serpukhov, IHEP /Fermilab /Minnesota U. /Syracuse U. /Nanjing U.

    2003-12-01

    Studies of the radiation hardness of lead tungstate crystals produced by the Bogoroditsk Techno-Chemical Plant in Russia and the Shanghai Institute of Ceramics in China have been carried out at IHEP, Protvino. The crystals were irradiated by a 40 GeV pion beam. After full recovery, the same crystals were irradiated using a {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-ray source. The dose rate profiles along the crystal length were observed to be quite similar. We compare the effects of the two types of radiation on the crystals light output.

  4. A Monte Carlo investigation of lead-scintillator calorimeters for hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tymieniecka, Teresa

    1993-12-01

    The FLUKA Monte Carlo code has been used augmented by models of the low energy neutron cascade to study hadronic shower development in the multilayer structure of lead-scintillator calorimeters. Hadron detection is investigated for the range of thicknesses of scintillator plates from 0.1 to 0.5 cm and absorber plates from 0.1 to 2.5 cm, as well as for incident hadron energies in the range from 3 to 200 GeV and for 1 TeV. Good agreement is found with measurements, including the sampling fluctuations. The effects of lateral energy leakage on the calorimeter signal and its resolution are discussed.

  5. Sum and buffer amplifier for lead-glass barrel calorimeter in the TOPAZ detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ujiie, N.; Ikeda, M.; Inaba, S.

    1988-02-01

    Analog sum and buffer amplifiers have been developed to provide a fast trigger signal from the lead-glass electromagnetic calorimeter in the TOPAZ detector for TRISTAN e/sup +/e/sup -/ collider experiments at KEK. The total kick-back noise from the 4300 channel gate signals of the LeCroy FASTBUS ADC 1885N has been suppressed to less than 40 mV (equivalent to a 0.4 GeV electron signal). The performances of the analog sum and buffer amplifiers that have been developed are described.

  6. Lead in School Drinking Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    Lead levels in school drinking water merit special concern because children are more at risk than adults from exposure to lead. This manual provides ways in which school officials can minimize this risk. It assists administrators by providing: (1) general information on the significance of lead in school drinking water and its effects on children;…

  7. Breakthrough: Lead-free Solder

    ScienceCinema

    Anderson, Iver

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory senior metallurgist Iver Anderson explains the importance of lead-free solder in taking hazardous lead out of the environment by eliminating it from discarded computers and electronics that wind up in landfills. Anderson led a team that developed a tin-silver-copper replacement for traditional lead-tin solder that has been adopted by more than 50 companies worldwide.

  8. Breakthrough: Lead-free Solder

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iver

    2012-01-01

    Ames Laboratory senior metallurgist Iver Anderson explains the importance of lead-free solder in taking hazardous lead out of the environment by eliminating it from discarded computers and electronics that wind up in landfills. Anderson led a team that developed a tin-silver-copper replacement for traditional lead-tin solder that has been adopted by more than 50 companies worldwide.

  9. The Changing Way of Leading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sytsma, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    This conceptual article explores the changing way of leading. It proposes that in contrast to the primarily outer actions that characterize educational change, the inner and outer dimensions of leaders are necessary to change what constitutes leading, thereby making it more appropriate to our times. The unfolding of leading actions and the…

  10. Environmental Lead and Children's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Marie

    This paper discusses the threat to children's health posed by environmental exposure to lead, focusing on public policy issues surrounding lead exposure in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. In Australia, the current blood lead level at which there is a health concern is at or above 25 micrograms per deciliter (ug/dl) of blood for infants and…

  11. Coherent radiation from 70 GeV and 150 GeV electrons and positrons traversing diamond and Si crystals near axial and planar directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Møller, S. P.; Uggerhøj, E.; Worm, T.; Elsener, K.; Sona, P.; Connell, S. H.; Sellschop, J. P. F.; Avakian, R. O.; Avetisian, A. E.; Taroian, S. P.

    1995-10-01

    Channeling radiation and energy loss for 150 GeV electrons and positrons incident on a 0.5 mm thick <100> diamond and a 0.6 mm thick <110> Si crystal have been measured — near axial and planar directions. It is found that yields from well channeled electrons are enhanced by a factor of two, and those for positrons are reduced by a factor of five, as compared to yields outside the channeling region. The experimental critical angle for channeling agrees very well with the Lindhard angle ψ1. For incidence along planes and close to axial directions, the overall picture of the radiation spectra for electrons and positrons is the same for the high-energy photons, where a strongly enhanced peak is found, as was first discovered in an earlier electron experiment. In diamond, the standard coherent bremsstrahlung has been measured close to the 110 planes but for 10 mrad and 50 mrad from the axis. These experimental results agree well with calculations using the Born approximation.

  12. 6 GeV synchrotron x-ray source: Conceptual design report. Supplement B - conceptual design of proposed beam lines for the 6 GeV light source

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    In this document, preliminary conceptual designs are presented for ten sample beamlines for the 6 GeV Light Source. These beamlines will accommodate investigations in solid-state physics, materials science, materials technology, chemical technology, and biological and medical sciences. In future, the designs will be altered to include new developments in x-ray optics and hardware technologies. The research areas addressed by the samples beamlines are as follows: Topography and Radiography/Tomography (section 2); Inelastic Scattering with Ultrahigh Energy Resolution (Section 3); Surface and Bulk Studies Using High Momentum Resolution (Section 4); Inelastic Scattering from Charge and Spin (Section 5); Advanced X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies (Section 6); Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Studies (Section 7); General Purpose Scattering for Materials Studies (Section 8); Multiple-Energy Anomalous-Dispersion Studies of Proteins (Section 9); Protein Crystallography (Section 10); Time- and Space-resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy (Section 11); Medical Diagnostic Facility (Section 12); and Transuranium Research Facility (Section 13). The computer systems to be used on the beamlines are also discussed in Section 14 of this document.

  13. Prevalence of childhood lead poisoning in a lead mining area

    SciTech Connect

    Murgueytio, A.M.; Evans, R.G.; Roberts, D.; Moehr, T.

    1996-06-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of lead poisoning among children six to seventy-one months of age who live in a lead mining area, compared to children not living in an area exposed to lead mining waste. Children were selected from a sampling frame based on a census of the study and control areas. Participants were interviewed and blood and urine were collected for lead and cadmium analysis. Environmental measurements of soil, dust, and paint were also made. Mean blood lead levels were significantly higher in the study group compared to the control group, 6.25 {mu}g/dl and 3.59 {micro}g/dl, respectively. Also, 14% of the study group compared to 0% of the control group had blood lead levels greater than 10 {micro}g/dl, the level of concern established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Soil, dust, and paint lead levels were significantly higher in the study area. There were no significant differences between groups in urine cadmium levels although environmental dust and soil cadmium levels were significantly higher in the study group. This study suggested that the increased prevalence of elevated blood lead levels in the study group is highly correlated to a combination of exposure to soil contaminated with lead mining and smelting waste and exposure to household lead paint.

  14. Lead exposure among lead-acid battery workers in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Matte, T D; Figueroa, J P; Burr, G; Flesch, J P; Keenlyside, R A; Baker, E L

    1989-01-01

    To assess lead exposure in the Jamaican lead-acid battery industry, we surveyed three battery manufacturers (including 46 production workers) and 10 battery repair shops (including 23 battery repair workers). Engineering controls and respiratory protection were judged to be inadequate at battery manufacturers and battery repair shops. At manufacturers, 38 of 42 air samples for lead exceeded a work-shift time-weighted average concentration of 0.050 mg/m3 (range 0.030-5.3 mg/m3), and nine samples exceeded 0.50 mg/m3. Only one of seven air samples at repair shops exceeded 0.050 mg/m3 (range 0.003-0.066 mg/m3). Repair shop workers, however, had higher blood lead levels than manufacturing workers (65% vs. 28% with blood lead levels above 60 micrograms/dl, respectively). Manufacturing workers had a higher prevalence of safe hygienic practices and a recent interval of minimal production had occurred at one of the battery manufacturers. Workers with blood lead levels above 60 micrograms/dl tended to have higher prevalences of most symptoms of lead toxicity than did workers with lower blood lead levels, but this finding was not consistent or statistically significant. The relationship between zinc protoporphyrin concentrations and increasing blood lead concentrations was consistent with that described among workers in developed countries. The high risk of lead toxicity among Jamaican battery workers is consistent with studies of battery workers in other developing countries. PMID:2773946

  15. Lead exposure among lead-acid battery workers in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Matte, T D; Figueroa, J P; Burr, G; Flesch, J P; Keenlyside, R A; Baker, E L

    1989-01-01

    To assess lead exposure in the Jamaican lead-acid battery industry, we surveyed three battery manufacturers (including 46 production workers) and 10 battery repair shops (including 23 battery repair workers). Engineering controls and respiratory protection were judged to be inadequate at battery manufacturers and battery repair shops. At manufacturers, 38 of 42 air samples for lead exceeded a work-shift time-weighted average concentration of 0.050 mg/m3 (range 0.030-5.3 mg/m3), and nine samples exceeded 0.50 mg/m3. Only one of seven air samples at repair shops exceeded 0.050 mg/m3 (range 0.003-0.066 mg/m3). Repair shop workers, however, had higher blood lead levels than manufacturing workers (65% vs. 28% with blood lead levels above 60 micrograms/dl, respectively). Manufacturing workers had a higher prevalence of safe hygienic practices and a recent interval of minimal production had occurred at one of the battery manufacturers. Workers with blood lead levels above 60 micrograms/dl tended to have higher prevalences of most symptoms of lead toxicity than did workers with lower blood lead levels, but this finding was not consistent or statistically significant. The relationship between zinc protoporphyrin concentrations and increasing blood lead concentrations was consistent with that described among workers in developed countries. The high risk of lead toxicity among Jamaican battery workers is consistent with studies of battery workers in other developing countries.

  16. Contribution of lead in dust to children's blood lead.

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, M J

    1983-01-01

    The importance of urban dust as a source of lead for young children is still disputed. Although blood-lead data from various population surveys usually show a peak concentration in early childhood, there is evidence that such a peak is small or absent altogether in children without much access to the general environment. An examination of those studies where groups of people in regions of low and high lead contamination have been compared shows that the child/adult blood-lead ratio is almost always enhanced in the more exposed groups. This implies a route of lead uptake which is important for children but less so for adults, and it is likely that this route is the dust-hand-mouth one. There are sufficient data to suggest a quantitative relationship between raised levels of blood lead and lead in dust. There is a strong case for a lead-in-dust standard but some will probably remain unpersuaded unless or until there are reliable data for blood lead and environmental lead involving matched groups of young people from urban and rural areas. PMID:6873030

  17. Diphoton decay for a 750 GeV scalar boson in a SU(6)⊗U(1)X model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, S. F.; Martinez, R.; Ochoa, F.; Sierra, C. F.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a new SU (6) ⊗ U(1)X GUT model free from anomalies, with a 750 GeV scalar candidate which can decay into two photons, compatible with the recent diphoton signal reported by ATLAS and CMS collaborations. This model gives masses to all fermions and may explain the 750 GeV signal through one loop decays to γγ with charged vector and charged Higgs bosons, as well as up- and electron-like exotic particles that arise naturally from the condition of cancellation of anomalies of the SU (6) ⊗ U(1)X group. We obtain, for different width approximations, allowed mass regions from 900 GeV to 3 TeV for the exotic up-like quark, in agreement with ATLAS and CMS collaborations data.

  18. Events with a Rapidity Gap between Jets in {ovr p}p Collisions at {radical} (s) =630 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, R.E.; Byrum, K.L.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.E.; LeCompte, T.; Nodulman, L.; Breccia, L.; Brunetti, R.; Deninno, M.; Fiori, I.; Mazzanti, P.; Behrends, S.; Bensinger, J.; Blocker, C.; Kirsch, L.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Bonushkin, Y.; Hauser, J.; Lindgren, M.; Amadon, A.; Berryhill, J.; Contreras, M.; Culbertson, R.; Frisch, H.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Hohlmann, M.; Nakaya, T.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dittmann, J.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Khazins, D.; Kowald, W.; Oh, S.H.; Albrow, M.G.; Atac, M.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J.P.; Biery, K.; Binkley, M.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Byon-Wagner, A.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cooper, J.; DeJongh, F.; Demina, R.; Derwent, P.F.; Elias, J.E.; Erdmann, W.; Flaugher, B.; Foster, G.W.; Freeman, J.; Geer, S.; Hahn, S.R.; Harris, R.M.; Incandela, J.; Jensen, H.; Joshi, U.; Kennedy, R.D.; Kephart, R.; Lammel, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Lukens, P.; Maeshima, K.; Marriner, J.P.; Miao, T.; Mukherjee, A.; Nelson, C.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Klimenko, S.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Nomerotski, A.; Barone, M.; Bertolucci, S.; Cordelli, M.; DellAgnello, S.; Happacher, F.; Miscetti, S.; Clark, A.G.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Kambara, H.; Baumann, T.; Franklin, M.; Gordon, A.; Hamilton, R.; Huth, J.; Kestenbaum, D.; Maksimovic, P.; and others

    1998-12-01

    We report a measurement of the fraction of dijet events with a rapidity gap between jets produced by color-singlet exchange in {ovr p}p collisions at {radical} (s) =630 GeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. In events with two jets of transverse energy E{sup jet}{sub T}{gt}8 GeV , pseudorapidity in the range 1.8{lt}{vert_bar}{eta}{sup jet}{vert_bar}{lt}3.5 and {eta}{sub 1}{eta}{sub 2}{lt}0 , the color-singlet exchange fraction is found to be R=[2.7{plus_minus}0.7(stat){plus_minus}0 .6(syst)]{percent} . Comparisons are made with results obtained at {radical} (s) =1800 GeV and with theoretical expectations. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  19. Two component dark matter: a possible explanation of 130 GeV γ-ray line from the galactic centre

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Anirban; Majumdar, Debasish; Bhattacharjee, Pijushpani; Sil, Arunansu E-mail: debasish.majumdar@saha.ac.in E-mail: pijush.bhattacharjee@saha.ac.in

    2013-12-01

    Recently there has been a hint of a gamma-ray line at 130 GeV originated from the galactic centre after the analysis of the Fermi-LAT satellite data. Being monochromatic in nature, it rules out the possibility of having its astrophysical origin and there has been a speculation that this line could be originated from dark matter annihilation. In this work, we propose a two component dark matter scenario where an extension of the Standard Model by an inert Higgs doublet and a gauge singlet scalar concocted with Z{sub 2} × Z'{sub 2} symmetry, is considered. We find that our scenario can not only explain the 130 GeV gamma-ray line through dark matter annihilation but also produce the correct dark matter relic density. We have used the Standard Model Higgs mass around 125 GeV as intimated by the LHC data.

  20. Heavy Higgs decay to t t ¯ Z and constraints on a 750 GeV pseudoscalar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdom, Bob; Ratzlaff, Melissa

    2016-07-01

    In models with multiple nondegenerate Higgs bosons, the decay chain H /A →A /H Z →t t ¯ Z may have a partial width comparable to the t t ¯ decay mode. We recast the ATLAS standard model t t ¯Z measurement to put limits on the rate for this process. Limits are also set on the two Higgs doublet model at low tan β that are sensitive to a heavy Higgs mass as high as ˜750 GeV . We then discuss the 750 GeV diphoton excess in terms of a pseudoscalar that also has the decays A →H Z and A →H±W∓. These decays strongly constrain the partial widths for A →γ γ and A →g g when combined with the t t ¯ resonance search limits. In a benchmark model the mass of H should be close to 650 GeV.

  1. Cosmic-ray electron flux measured by the PAMELA experiment between 1 and 625 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adriani, O; Barbarino, G C; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Borisov, S; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; Consiglio, L; De Pascale, M P; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Galper, A M; Gillard, W; Grishantseva, L; Jerse, G; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Malvezzi, V; Marcelli, L; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Nikonov, N; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Pizzolotto, C; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Rossetto, L; Sarkar, R; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stochaj, S J; Stockton, J C; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G; Voronov, S A; Wu, J; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G

    2011-05-20

    Precision measurements of the electron component in the cosmic radiation provide important information about the origin and propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Here we present new results regarding negatively charged electrons between 1 and 625 GeV performed by the satellite-borne experiment PAMELA. This is the first time that cosmic-ray e⁻ have been identified above 50 GeV. The electron spectrum can be described with a single power-law energy dependence with spectral index -3.18 ± 0.05 above the energy region influenced by the solar wind (> 30 GeV). No significant spectral features are observed and the data can be interpreted in terms of conventional diffusive propagation models. However, the data are also consistent with models including new cosmic-ray sources that could explain the rise in the positron fraction.

  2. $\\pi^+$ photoproduction on the proton for photon energies from 0.725 to 2.875 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, Michael; Ritchie, Barry; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Collins, Patrick; Pasyuk, E.; Arndt, Richard; Briscoe, William; Strakovski, Igor; Workman, Ron

    2009-06-01

    Differential cross sections for the reaction $\\gamma p \\to n \\pi^+$ have been measured with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) and a tagged photon beam with energies from 0.725 to 2.875 GeV. Where available, the results obtained here compare well with previously published results for the reaction. Agreement with the SAID and MAID analyses is found below 1 GeV. The present set of cross sections has been incorporated into the SAID database, and exploratory fits have been made up to 2.7 GeV. Resonance couplings have been extracted and compared to previous determinations. With the addition of these cross sections to the world data set, significant changes have occurred in the high-energy behavior of the SAID cross-section predictions and amplitudes.

  3. pi0 photoproduction on the proton for photon energies from 0.675 to 2.875-GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Dugger; Barry Ritchie; Jacques Ball; Patrick Collins; Evgueni Pasyuk; Richard Arndt; William Briscoe; Igor Strakovski; Ron Workman; Gary Adams; Moscov Amaryan; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Eric Anciant; Marco Anghinolfi; Burin Asavapibhop; G. Asryan; Gerard Audit; Harutyun Avakian; H. Bagdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Nathan Baltzell; Steve Barrow; Marco Battaglieri; Kevin Beard; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Mehmet Bektasoglu; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Barry Berman; Nicola Bianchi; Angela Biselli; Billy Bonner; Sylvain Bouchigny; Sergey Boyarinov; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; Sharon Careccia; Daniel Carman; Bryan Carnahan; Shifeng Chen; Philip Cole; Alan Coleman; Philip Coltharp; Dieter Cords; Pietro Corvisiero; Donald Crabb; Hall Crannell; John Cummings; Enzo De Sanctis; Raffaella De Vita; Pavel Degtiarenko; Haluk Denizli; Lawrence Dennis; Alexandre Deur; Kahanawita Dharmawardane; Kalvir Dhuga; Richard Dickson; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; P. Dragovitsch; Steven Dytman; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; Latifa Elouadrhiri; A. Empl; Paul Eugenio; Renee Fatemi; Gleb Fedotov; Gerald Feldman; Robert Feuerbach; John Ficenec; Tony Forest; Herbert Funsten; Michel Garcon; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Ralf Gothe; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Matthieu Guillo; Nevzat Guler; Lei Guo; Vardan Gyurjyan; Cynthia Hadjidakis; Rafael Hakobyan; John Hardie; D. Heddle; F. Hersman; Kenneth Hicks; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; J. Hu; Marco Huertas; Charles Hyde; Charles Hyde-Wright; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; Narbe Kalantarians; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; Kui Kim; Kinney Kim; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Alexei Klimenko; Mike Klusman; Mikhail Kossov; Zebulun Krahn; Laird Kramer; Valery Kubarovsky; Joachim Kuhn; Sebastian Kuhn; Viacheslav Kuznetsov; Jeff Lachniet; Jean Laget; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Tsung-shung Lee; Ana Lima; Kenneth Livingston; K. Lukashin; Joseph Manak; Claude Marchand; Leonard Maximon; Simeon McAleer; Bryan McKinnon; John McNabb; Bernhard Mecking; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Ralph Minehart; Marco Mirazita; Rory Miskimen; Viktor Mokeev; Kei Moriya; Steven Morrow; Valeria Muccifora; James Mueller; Gordon Mutchler; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; James Napolitano; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Grant O'Rielly; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; K Park; Craig Paterson; Sasha Philips; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Dinko Pocanic; Oleg Pogorelko; S. Pozdniakov; Barry Preedom; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Liming Qin; Brian Raue; Gregory Riccardi; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; David Rowntree; Philip Rubin; Franck Sabatie; Julian Salamanca; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Aziz Shafi; Youri Sharabian; J. Shaw; Sebastio Simionatto; Alexander Skabelin; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; M. Spraker; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Paul Stoler; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; Simon Taylor; David Tedeschi; Ulrike Thoma; R. Thompson; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Luminita Todor; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Xue kai Wang; Lawrence Weinstein; Henry Weller; Dennis Weygand; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; M.H. Wood; A. Yegneswaran; Jae-Chul Yun; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang

    2007-07-23

    Differential cross sections for the reaction $\\gamma p \\to p \\pi^0$ have been measured with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) and a tagged photon beam with energies from 0.675 to 2.875 GeV. The results reported here possess greater accuracy in the absolute normalization than previous measurements. They disagree with recent CB-ELSA measurements for the process at forward scattering angles. Agreement with the SAID and MAID fits is found below 1 GeV. The present set of cross sections has been incorporated into the SAID database, and exploratory fits have been extended to 3 GeV. Resonance couplings have been extracted and compared to previous determinations.

  4. EPA lead program (Pb) update

    SciTech Connect

    Lanier, D.

    1994-12-31

    Lead is a cumulative poison that is especially hazardous to children. It affects the nervous and reproductive systems by causing neurological and physical development delays, as well as cognitive and behavioral changes. It can also cause hypertension in adults. Lead can be absorbed into the blood by ingestion or inhalation. The author discusses legislative efforts to control lead exposure to humans. They are: Title 10, which amends TSCA; and Title 4 -- Lead Exposure Reduction. The major tasks being performed by EPA to control the exposure of lead to man are included. Professional training is of major importance in this effort.

  5. Presence of lead in opium.

    PubMed

    Aghaee-Afshar, Mahmoud; Khazaeli, Payam; Behnam, Behzad; Rezazadehkermani, Mohammad; Ashraf-Ganjooei, Narges

    2008-09-01

    Opium addiction is a common form of addiction in Middle East countries such as Iran. Recently several reports suggested some kinds of pathologic findings such as abdominal pain, nephropathy, and anemia in opium addict patients. Such pathologic findings suggest lead poisoning in the patients. In this study, the concentration of lead in 10 opium samples was evaluated. The mean concentration of lead in the opium samples was 1.88 ppm. This may explain some of the pathologic findings found in addict patients. The authors would suggest further investigations to evaluate the lead concentration in opium addicts' sera and also routine screening for lead poisoning in opium addict patients.

  6. Relic gravity waves and 7 keV dark matter from a GeV scale inflaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukov, F. L.; Gorbunov, D. S.

    2014-09-01

    We study the mechanism of generation of 7 keV sterile neutrino Dark Matter (DM) in the model with light inflaton χ, which serves as a messenger of scale invariance breaking. In this model the inflaton, in addition to providing reheating to the Standard Model (SM) particles, decays directly into sterile neutrinos. The latter are responsible for the active neutrino oscillations via seesaw type I mechanism. While the two sterile neutrinos may also produce the lepton asymmetry in the primordial plasma and hence explain the baryon asymmetry of the Universe, the third one being the lightest may be of 7 keV and serve as DM. For this mechanism to work, the mass of the inflaton is bound to be light (0.1-1 GeV) and uniquely determines its properties, which allows to test the model. For particle physics experiments these are: inflaton lifetime (10-5-10-12 s), branching ratio of B-meson to kaon and inflaton (10-6-10-4) and inflaton branching ratios into light SM particles like it would be for the SM Higgs boson of the same mass. For cosmological experiments these are: spectral index of scalar perturbations (ns≃0.957-0.967), and amount of tensor perturbations produced at inflation (tensor-to-scalar ratio r≃0.15-0.005). β and ξ are related from the CMB normalization. mχ and β are related by the requirement of the generation of proper abundance of DM (given DM mass M1 or coupling f1 is known). ξ can be determined from the measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio r of the primordial perturbations. α is bound from below from the requirement of sufficient reheating, α is bound from above not to spoil the inflationary potential by radiative corrections, certain region in mχ and θ (or, equivalently β) is constrained from particle physics experiments. We show below that the first two are automatically satisfied with the parameters, leading to the proper DM generation, and the latter one leads to significant bound on the inflaton mass mχ (and hence effective upper bound

  7. Study of open charm production in proton+proton collisions at center of mass energies = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butsyk, Sergey

    2005-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with its unique electron identification system enables us to perform high precision measurements of electron yields. By measuring electron production at high transverse momentum, we can disentangle the contribution of electrons originating from semi-leptonic decays of heavy quarks (charm or bottom) from the less interesting "photonic" decay modes of light mesons. D/B mesons carry single heavy valence quarks and are usually referred to as "Open Charm" and "Open Bottom" particles, differentiating them from Closed Flavor particles such as J/psi, and Y mesons. Due to the large mass of the heavy quarks, their production mechanisms can be adequately explained by perturbative QCD (pQCD) theory. This dissertation presents the measurement of electrons from heavy flavor decays in proton + proton collisions at RHIC at collision energy s = 200 GeV over a wide range of transverse moment (0.4 < pT < 5 GeV/c). Two independent analysis techniques of signal extraction were performed. The "Cocktail" subtraction is based on the calculation and subtraction of the expected "photon-related" electron background based upon measured yields of light mesons. The "Converter" subtraction is based upon a direct measurement of photon yields achieved introducing additional material in the PHENIX acceptance and deducing the photon abundance by measuring the increase in electron yield. This is the first measurement of the Open Charm crossection at this collision energy and it is an important baseline measurement for comparison with nucleus + nucleus collisions. The modification of Open Charm production in heavy ion collisions compared to the presented p + p result can be used to study the final state interaction of the heavy quarks with hot dense matter inside the collisions. The results of the Open Charm measurements are compared to current pQCD predictions both in Leading Order (LO) O a2s and Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) O a3s

  8. Prevention of Childhood Lead Toxicity.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Blood lead concentrations have decreased dramatically in US children over the past 4 decades, but too many children still live in housing with deteriorated lead-based paint and are at risk for lead exposure with resulting lead-associated cognitive impairment and behavioral problems. Evidence continues to accrue that commonly encountered blood lead concentrations, even those below 5 µg/dL (50 ppb), impair cognition; there is no identified threshold or safe level of lead in blood. From 2007 to 2010, approximately 2.6% of preschool children in the United States had a blood lead concentration ≥5 µg/dL (≥50 ppb), which represents about 535 000 US children 1 to 5 years of age. Evidence-based guidance is available for managing increased lead exposure in children, and reducing sources of lead in the environment, including lead in housing, soil, water, and consumer products, has been shown to be cost-beneficial. Primary prevention should be the focus of policy on childhood lead toxicity. PMID:27325637

  9. Lead-based paint assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Lorie, C.; Cowdery, J.W.

    1994-12-31

    In 1977, The US consumer product safety commission banned the use of lead-based paint (LBP) in all industries, except the maritime industry which still has certain privileged uses. Unfortunately for property and building owners, the ban did not come soon enough. In response to this heightened awareness, several environmental market sectors addressing the issues have emerged. These include: residential; soil; commercial; water; and structures. The first and most important step in addressing the concerns posed by the existence of lead based contamination is to quantify the amount of lead-based product, to determine the location of the lead based product and the extent, if any, of lead based contamination, and to make recommendations for the remediation or abatement of the lead product and resultant contamination. In narrowing the focus of these issues, this paper discusses lead-based paint assessment; preparing and organizing the assessment, the regulatory considerations, assessment methodology, and presentation of results.

  10. Conceptual Design Report. Antiproton - Proton Collider Upgrade 20 GeV Rings. Technical Components and Civil Construction May, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    1988-05-01

    This report contains a description of the design and cost estimate of two new 20 GeV rings which will be required to support the upgrade of the Fermilab Collider with a luminosity goal of 5x10 31 cm-2s-1. The new rings include an antiproton post-accumulator, denoted the Antiproton Super Booster (ASB), and a proton post-booster, denoted the Proton Super Booster (PSB). The siting of the rings is shown in Figure I-1. Both rings are capable of operation at 20 GeV, eliminating the need for ever again injecting beam into the Main Ring below transition, and significantly enhancing Main Ring performance. The Antiproton Super Booster is designed to accept and accumulate up to 4x1012 antiprotons from the existing Antiproton Accumulator, and deliver them to the Main Ring at 20 GeV for acceleration and injection into the Collider. It is also designed to accept diluted antiprotons from the Main Ring at 20 GeV for recooling. The PSB accepts 8.9 GeV protons from the existing Booster and accelerates them to 20 GeV for injection into the Main Ring. The PSB is designed to operate at 5 Hz. The siting shown in Figure I-1 has the attractive feature that it removes all Main Ring injection hardware from the AO straight section, opening the possibility of installing a third proton-antiproton interaction region in the Tevatron Collider.

  11. Constraints on the leading-twist pion distribution amplitude from a QCD light-cone sum rule with chiral current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xing-Gang

    2008-10-01

    We present an improved analysis of the constraints on the first two Gegenbauer moments, a {2/ π } and a {4/ π }, of the pion’s leading-twist distribution amplitude from a QCD light-cone sum rule analysis of the B→ π weak transition form factor f +( q 2). A proper chiral current is adopted in QCD light-cone sum rules so as to eliminate the most uncertain twist-3 contributions to f +( q 2), and then we concentrate our attention on the properties of the leading-twist pionic DA. A nearly model-independent f +( q 2), based on the spectrum of B→ π l ν decays from BaBar, together with uncertainties, is adopted as the standard shape for f +( q 2) for our discussion. From a minimum χ 2-fit and by taking the theoretical uncertainties into account, we obtain a {2/ π }(1 GeV)=0.17{-0.17/+0.15} and a {4/ π }(1 GeV)=-0.06{-0.22/+0.20} at the 1 σ confidence level for m {b/*}∈[4.7,4,8] GeV.

  12. Spectral characteristics and power distribution from insertion devices on a 6 to 7 GeV storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Shenoy, G.K.; Viccaro, P.J.

    1986-06-01

    Two different types of insertion devices - undulators and wigglers - are described and compared. Each provides a periodic magnetic field that alters polarity, but whereas the spectral distribution from a wiggler is continuous and wide, the radiation of an undulator has spectrally narrow and discrete peaks. The distinction is determined by the deflection parameter. The energy spread in undulator peaks is calculated. Insertion device magnets and gap are discussed. Undulator tunability from gap variation is considered on a 6-GeV lattice and on a 7-GeV lattice. Also discussed is the angular distribution of power and the polarization from various sources. (LEW)

  13. Distributions of charged hadrons observed in deep-inelastic muon-deuterium scattering at 490 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H. G. E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J. J.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Seyerlein, H. J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H.-J.; Vidal, M.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Venkataramania, H.; Wilson, Richard; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.

    1991-11-01

    Longitudinal and transverse momentum spectra of final state hadrons produced in deep-inelastic muon-deuterium scattering at incident muon energy of 490 GeV have been measured up to a hadronic center of mass energy of 30 GeV. The longitudinal distributions agree well with data from earlier muon-nucleon scattering experiments; these distributions tend to increase in steepness as the center of mass energy increases. Comparisons with e+e- data at comparable center of mass energies indicate slight differences. The transverse momentum distributions show an increase in mean pT2 with an increase in the center of mass energy.

  14. Search for supersymmetric partners of top and bottom quarks at /sqrt(s)=189 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DELPHI Collaboration; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adye, T.; Adzic, P.; Ajinenko, I.; Albrecht, Z.; Alderweireld, T.; Alekseev, G. D.; Alemany, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anassontzis, E. G.; Andersson, P.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Åsman, B.; Augustin, J.-E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barker, G.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Benekos, N. C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Bigi, M.; Bilenky, M. S.; Bizouard, M.-A.; Bloch, D.; Blom, H. M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borgland, A. W.; Borisov, G.; Bosio, C.; Botner, O.; Boudinov, E.; Bouquet, B.; Bourdarios, C.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bozovic, I.; Bozzo, M.; Bracko, M.; Branchini, P.; Brenner, R. A.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.-M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Cabrera, S.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castillo Gimenez, M. V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chabaud, V.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chochula, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chudoba, J.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Crawley, H. B.; Crennell, D.; Crepe, S.; Crosetti, G.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; Davenport, M.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Min, A.; De Paula, L.; Dijkstra, H.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Dolbeau, J.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Duperrin, A.; Durand, J.-D.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Engel, J.-P.; Espirito Santo, M.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayot, J.; Feindt, M.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Ferro, F.; Fichet, S.; Firestone, A.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Franek, B.; Frodesen, A. G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Galloni, A.; Gamba, D.; Gamblin, S.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gaspar, C.; Gaspar, M.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E. N.; Gele, D.; Geralis, T.; Gerdyukov, L.; Ghodbane, N.; Gil, I.; Glege, F.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Gopal, G.; Gorn, L.; Gouz, Yu.; Gracco, V.; Grahl, J.; Graziani, E.; Gris, P.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Haider, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hansen, J.; Harris, F. J.; Hedberg, V.; Heising, S.; Hernandez, J. J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hessing, T. L.; Heuser, J.-M.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Hoorelbeke, S.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Huber, M.; Huet, K.; Hughes, G. J.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, J. N.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, P.; Janik, R.; Jarlskog, Ch.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Juillot, P.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Karafasoulis, K.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E. C.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Khokhlov, Yu.; Khomenko, B. A.; Khovanski, N. N.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.; Kinvig, A.; Kjaer, N. J.; Klapp, O.; Klein, H.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kostioukhine, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krammer, M.; Kriznic, E.; Krumstein, Z.; Kubinec, P.; Kurowska, J.; Kurvinen, K.; Lamsa, J. W.; Lane, D. W.; Lapin, V.; Laugier, J.-P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Lefebure, V.; Leinonen, L.; Leisos, A.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Libby, J.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Loerstad, B.; Loken, J. G.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Mahon, J. R.; Maio, A.; Malek, A.; Malmgren, T. G. M.; Maltezos, S.; Malychev, V.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Cubbin, M.; Mc Kay, R.; Mc Nulty, R.; Mc Pherson, G.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Migliore, E.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W. A.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moeller, R.; Moenig, K.; Monge, M. R.; Moraes, D.; Moreau, X.; Morettini, P.; Morton, G.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mulet-Marquis, C.; Muresan, R.; Murray, W. J.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Naraghi, F.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F. L.; Navas, S.; Nawrocki, K.; Negri, P.; Neufeld, N.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, B. S.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nomokonov, V.; Nygren, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A. G.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Orazi, G.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Pain, R.; Paiva, R.; Palacios, J.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Pavel, T.; Pegoraro, M.; Peralta, L.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Phillips, H. T.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Rames, J.; Ratoff, P. N.; Read, A. L.; Rebecchi, P.; Redaelli, N. G.; Regler, M.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P. B.; Resvanis, L. K.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rohne, O.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rosinsky, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Royon, Ch.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sadovsky, A.; Sajot, G.; Salt, J.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sannino, M.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Scuri, F.; Seager, P.; Sedykh, Y.; Segar, A. M.; Seibert, N.; Sekulin, R.; Shellard, R. C.; Siebel, M.; Simard, L.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A. N.; Smadja, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, G. R.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Stanescu, C.; Stanic, S.; Stanitzki, M.; Stevenson, K.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Thomas, J.; Timmermans, J.; Tinti, N.; Tkatchev, L. G.; Tobin, M.; Todorova, S.; Tomaradze, A.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Tortosa, P.; Transtromer, G.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Vander Velde, C.; Van Dam, P.; Van den Boeck, W.; Van Doninck, W. K.; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E.; Vodopyanov, A. S.; Voulgaris, G.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J. H.; Wilkinson, G. R.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Wolf, G.; Yi, J.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zoller, Ph.; Zucchelli, G. C.; Zumerle, G.

    2000-12-01

    Searches for supersymmetric partners of top and bottom quarks are presented using data taken by the DELPHI experiment at LEP in 1997 and 1998. No deviations from standard model expectations are observed in these data sets, which are taken at centre-of-mass energies of 183 GeV and 189 GeV and correspond to integrated luminosities of 54 pb-1 and 158 pb-1. These results are used in combination with those obtained by DELPHI at lower centre-of-mass energies to exclude regions in the squark-neutralino mass plane at 95% confidence level.

  15. Lead exposure, lead poisoning, and lead regulatory standards in China, 1990-2005.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xibiao; Wong, Otto

    2006-11-01

    This article presents a summary of lead exposure levels and lead poisoning at workplaces in China reported in the Chinese medical literature between 1990 and 2005. A comprehensive literature search identified 618 papers reporting lead exposure and lead poisoning data. The data were analyzed in terms of time period, type of industry, size of factory, and task or process. In 2002 the new Occupational Diseases Prevention and Control Act was passed in China, with new provisions specifically for regulatory enforcement. Therefore, a comparison of lead exposure levels and lead poisoning rates before and after the 2002 Act will shed some light on the effectiveness of the new regulation. The reported lead exposure levels covered a wide range; some measurements were in excess of 250 mg/m(3), which was orders-of-magnitude higher than the occupational exposure levels (OELs) for lead in China. The overall arithmetic mean, median, and geometric mean were 0.92, 0.25, and 0.24 mg/m(3), respectively. Approximately 53.7% of the averages reported in the papers were above the national OELs. The data demonstrated that many facilities in the lead industries reported in the literature were not in compliance with the OELs. Similarly, there appeared to be only a minor impact of the 2002 Act on the reduction of occupational lead poisoning in China. The lead poisoning rates reported in the literature were well above 30%. Judging by the lead exposure levels and the lead poisoning rates, the current overall occupational health monitoring system appears inadequate, lacking the necessary enforcement. The 2002 Act, without the necessary enforcement, did not appear to have a major impact on either lead exposures or lead poisoning in China. Much work in enforcing the 2002 Act remains to be done.

  16. Exclusive Photoproduction of Charged Pions in Hydrogen and Deuterium from 1 to 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lingyan Zhu

    2004-02-28

    The study of the transition region in the description of exclusive processes and hadron structure, from the nucleon-meson degrees of freedom in meson-exchange models at low energy to the quark-gluon degrees of freedom in pQCD at high energy, is essential for us to understand the strong interaction. The differential cross section measurements for exclusive reactions at fixed center-of-mass angles enable us to investigate the constituent counting rule, which explicitly connects the quark-gluon degrees of freedom to the energy dependence of differential cross sections. JLab Experiment E94-104 was carried out in Hall A with two high resolution spectrometers. It included the coincidence cross section measurement for the [gamma]n --> pi{sup -}[p] process with a deuterium target and the singles measurement for the [gamma]p --> pi{sup +}[n] process with a hydrogen target. The untagged real photons were generated by the electron beam impinging on a copper radiator. The photon energies ranged from 1.1 to 5.5 GeV, corresponding to the center-of-mass energies from 1.7 to 3.4 GeV. The pion center-of-mass angles were fixed at 50 deg, 70 deg, 90 deg, and also 100 deg, 110 deg at a few energies. The JLab E94-104 data presented in this thesis contain four interesting features. The data exhibit a global scaling behavior for both [pi]{sup -} and [pi]{sup +} photoproduction at high energies and high transverse momenta, consistent with the constituent counting rule and the existing [pi]{sup +} photoproduction data. This implies that the quark-gluon degrees of freedom start to play a role at this energy scale. The data suggests possible substructure of the scaling behavior, which might be oscillations around the scaling value. There are several possible mechanisms that can cause oscillations, for example the one associated with the generalized constituent counting rule involving quark orbital angular momentum. The data show an enhancement in the scaled cross section at center

  17. The likely cause of the EGRET GeV anomaly and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Hunter, S. D.; Kniffen, D. A.

    2008-02-01

    Analysis of data from the EGRET γ-ray detector on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory indicated an anomaly in the form of an excess diffuse galactic flux at GeV energies over that which was theoretically predicted. Various explanations for this anomaly have been put forth, including the invocation of supersymmetric dark matter annihilation. We reexamine these explanations here, including a new discussion of the possible systematic errors in the sensitivity determination of the EGRET detector. We conclude that the most likely explanation of the EGRET “GeV anomaly” was an error in the estimation of the EGRET sensitivity at energies above ˜1 GeV. We give reasons why such a situation could have occured. We find evidence from our new all-sky analysis which is inconsistent with the assumption that the anomaly can be a signal of supersymmetric dark matter annihilation. We also reconfirm the original results of the EGRET team on the extragalactic γ-ray background spectrum. There are important implications of our analysis for the upcoming gamma ray large area telescope (GLAST) mission.Keywordsγ-raysBackground radiationReferencesF.W.SteckerAstrophys. J.212197760S.D.HunterAstrophys. J.4811997205A.K.HardingF.W.SteckerNature2901981316M.PohlJ.A.EspositoAstrophys. J.5071998327A.W.StrongI.V.MoskalenkoO.ReimerAstrophys. J.6132004962W.De BoerAstron. Astrophys.444200551A.W.StrongI.V.MoskalenkoO.ReimerAstrophys. J.6132004956P.SreekumarAstrophys. J.4941998523F.W.SteckerAstrophys. Space Sci.61970377F.W.SteckerCosmic Gamma Rays1971Mono Pub.BaltimoreF.W.SteckerAstrophys. J.1851973499Y. Shikaze et al., e-print .V. de Ataíde Malafaia Lopos dos Santos, e-print .C.D.DermerAstron. Astrophys.1571986223F.W.SteckerM.M.ShapiroJ.P.WefelCosmic Gamma Rays, Neutrinos, and Related Astrophysicsvol. 451989KluwerDordrechtF.W.SteckerAstrophys. J.2281979919T.KamaeAstrophys. J.6472006692M.MoriAstrophys. J.4781997225P

  18. Walking on the ladder: 125 GeV technidilaton, or Conformal Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Shinya; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    The walking technicolor based on the ladder Schwinger-Dyson gap equation is studied, with the scale-invariant coupling being an idealization of the Caswell-Banks-Zaks infrared fixed point in the "anti-Veneziano limit", such that N C → ∞ with N C · α( μ 2) = fixed and N F / N C = fixed (≫1), of the SU( N C ) gauge theory with massless N F flavors near criticality. We show that the 125 GeV Higgs can be naturally identified with the technidilaton (TD) predicted in the walking technicolor, a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone (NG) boson of the spontaneous symmetry breaking of the approximate scale symmetry. Ladder calculations yield the TD mass M ϕ from the trace anomaly as {M}_{φ}^2{F}_{φ}^2=-4<{θ}_{μ}^{μ}> =-β (α ({μ}^2))/α ({μ^2)}< {G}_{λ ν}^2({μ}^2)> ˜eq {N}_C{N}_F16/π^4{m}_F^4 , independently of the renormalization point μ, where m F is the dynamical mass of the technifermion, and {F}_{φ }=O(√{N_F{N}_C}{m}_F) the TD decay constant. It reads {M}_{φ}^2˜eq {(\\upsilon_{EW}/2\\cdot 5{\\upsilon}_{EW}/F_{φ })}^2\\cdot [8/N_F4/N_C],({\\upsilon}_{EW}=246GeV) , which implies F ϕ ≃ 5 v EW for M ϕ ≃ 125 GeV ≃ 1/2 v EW in the one-family model ( N C = 4 , N F = 8), in good agreement with the current LHC Higgs data. The result reflects a generic scaling M ϕ 2 / υ EW 2 ˜ M ϕ 2 / F ϕ 2 ˜ m F 2 / F ϕ 2 ˜ 1/( N F N C ) → 0 as a vanishing trace anomaly, namely the TD has a mass vanishing in the anti-Veneziano limit, similarly to η' meson as a pseudo-NG boson of the ordinary QCD with vanishing U(1) A anomaly in the Veneziano limit ( N F / N C ≪ 1).

  19. Chemical speciation of lead dust associated with primary lead smelting.

    PubMed Central

    Spear, T M; Svee, W; Vincent, J H; Stanisich, N

    1998-01-01

    The research presented in this article assessed geochemical factors relating to dust produced during primary lead smelting. Bulk dust samples and size-selective airborne dust samples were collected from four areas of a primary lead smelter and analyzed by X-ray diffraction and sequential chemical extraction. X-ray diffraction showed that the smelter dusts were composed primarily of sulfides, oxides, sulfates, and silicates of metal ores, with galena being the primary dust component. Sequential extraction revealed the solubility of lead compounds at less than 7% in the exchangeable and mildly acidic steps for the bulk dusts collected from four smelter areas. The later steps of the extraction procedure were more effective in dissolving the lead compounds associated with the bulk dust samples, with 43%, 26%, and 8% of the total lead, in the ore storage, sinter, and blast/dross smelter areas, respectively, being extracted in the residual step. Sequential extraction of coarse airborne dust samples from the ore storage and sinter plant showed that 1.2% and 4.1% of the total lead, respectively, was exchangeable. The finer particle size fractions from these areas of the smelter showed higher percentages of exchangeable lead. Of the course airborne dust from the blast/dross furnace processes, 65% of the total lead was exchangeable. However, the largest percentage of lead from these areas was associated with the finer particle-size fractions. If lead bioavailability is related to its solubility as determined through sequential extraction, the health hazards associated with lead exposure may be appreciably enhanced in the blast and dross furnace processes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9721256

  20. Combined processing of lead concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubasov, V. L.; Paretskii, V. M.; Sidorin, G. N.; Travkin, V. F.

    2013-06-01

    A combined scheme of processing of lead concentrates with the production of pure metallic lead and the important components containing in these concentrates is considered. This scheme includes sulfating roasting of the lead concentrates and two-stage leaching of the formed cinder with the formation of a sulfate solution and lead sulfate. When transformed into a carbonate form, lead sulfate is used for the production of pure metallic lead. Silver, indium, copper, cadmium, nickel, cobalt, and other important components are separately extracted from a solution. At the last stage, zinc is extracted by either extraction followed by electrolytic extraction of a metal or the return of the forming solution of sulfuric acid to cinder leaching.

  1. Lead toxicity in battery workers.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Saeeda Fouzia; Baloch, Malka

    2014-11-01

    Lead poisoning is a medical condition caused by increased levels of lead in the body. Routes of exposure include contaminated air, water, soil, food and consumer products. Occupational exposure is the main cause of lead poisoning in the adults. Two cases of occupational lead poisoning in adult battery workers are hereby presented. Both male patients had initial non-specific symptoms of intermittent abdominal pain, fatigue and headache for 6 - 8 years. Later on, they developed psychosis, slurred speech, tremors of hands and initially underwent treatment for Parkinsonism and Wilson's disease because of clinical misdiagnosis. They were diagnosed with lead poisoning later and were treated successfully with lead chelator (CaNa2 EDTA).

  2. Lead toxicity in battery workers.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Saeeda Fouzia; Baloch, Malka

    2014-11-01

    Lead poisoning is a medical condition caused by increased levels of lead in the body. Routes of exposure include contaminated air, water, soil, food and consumer products. Occupational exposure is the main cause of lead poisoning in the adults. Two cases of occupational lead poisoning in adult battery workers are hereby presented. Both male patients had initial non-specific symptoms of intermittent abdominal pain, fatigue and headache for 6 - 8 years. Later on, they developed psychosis, slurred speech, tremors of hands and initially underwent treatment for Parkinsonism and Wilson's disease because of clinical misdiagnosis. They were diagnosed with lead poisoning later and were treated successfully with lead chelator (CaNa2 EDTA). PMID:25518804

  3. Secondary lead production in Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, J.S.S.; Lim, C.L.

    1988-04-01

    In the absence of a lead producers' association in Malaysia and the continued presence of illegal operators whose activities are confined to remelting of cable scraps and/or smelting of battery scraps using a shaft furnace, this paper relies heavily on the information obtained from Metal Reclamation Industries, Sdn. Bhd. -the only modern integrated lead smelter in the country. Consequently, the authors can only present a semiquantitative and general paper on secondary lead production in Malaysia covering the following areas: history; secondary lead smelting; raw material; products; quality control; pollution controls; and future of secondary lead production in Malaysia. They conclude that if Malaysia is to become a major secondary lead producer in the Asian region, the industry must: (1) import raw materials in the form of scrapped batteries; (2) develop or acquire new technology; (3) cope with changing pollution regulations, and (4) develop technical skills and efficient quality controls to meet new challenges. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  4. Lead Levels in Utah Eagles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Michelle

    2006-10-01

    Lead is a health hazard to most animals, causing adverse effects to the nervous and reproductive systems if in sufficient quantity. Found in most fishing jigs and sinkers, as well as some ammunition used in hunting, this metal can poison wildlife such as eagles. Eagles are raptors, or predatory birds, and their lead exposure would most likely comes from their food -- a fish which has swallowed a sinker or lead shot in carrion (dead animal matter). As part of an ongoing project to investigate the environment lead levels in Utah, the bone lead levels in the wing bones of eagles have been measured for eagle carcasses found throughout Utah. The noninvasive technique of x-ray fluorescence was used, consisting of a Cd-109 radioactive source to activate lead atoms and a HPGe detector with digital electronics to collect the gamma spectra. Preliminary results for the eagles measured to date will be presented.

  5. Undue Lead Absorption and Lead Poisoning in Children: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin-Fu, J. S.

    The toxic effects of lead, a useful metal ubiquitous in the human environment, have long been known. The occupational hazards of lead poisoning were well established by the early 19th century, but plumbism in children caused by paint ingestion was not reported until the turn of the century. Even in 1924, the child was said to live in a "lead…

  6. Primary lead/secondary lead same genus -- different species

    SciTech Connect

    McClain, G.

    1993-05-01

    An attempt is made to offer a basic primer on the refining of lead metal and some of the attendant economics in achieving specification compliance. The construction of metal requirements with this knowledge in hand should result in economic rewards for both the consumer and producer. The unit differences between lead smelting from ore and recycled sources are explained.

  7. Indices of potential lead hazard.

    PubMed Central

    Posner, H S

    1977-01-01

    This review is concerned with the concentrations of lead in human whole blood, erythrocytes, plasma, serum, soft tissues, bone, and urine. The extent to which redistribution of some of the bound lead occurs is outlines. The effects of lead on enzyme activities and on the accumulation of metabolic intermediates in the blood and urine are described. A brief section deals with the range of signs and symptoms that can occur and differences seen between symptomatic children and adults. PMID:332498

  8. Contribution of lead from calcium supplements to blood lead.

    PubMed Central

    Gulson, B L; Mizon, K J; Palmer, J M; Korsch, M J; Taylor, A J

    2001-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to determine the contribution of lead to blood from consumption of calcium supplements approximating the recommended daily intakes over a 6-month period. Subjects were males and females ages 21 to 47 years (geometric mean 32 years) with a geometric mean blood lead concentration of 2.5 microg/dL. They were subdivided into three groups. One treatment group (n = 8) was administered a complex calcium supplement (carbonate/phosphate/citrate) and the other treatment group (n = 7) calcium carbonate. The control group (n = 6) received no supplement. The lead isotopic compositions of the supplements were completely different from those of the blood of the subjects, allowing us easily to estimate contribution from the supplements. The daily lead dose from the supplements at 100% compliance was about 3 microg Pb. Three blood samples were taken at 2-month intervals before treatment to provide background values, and three were taken during treatment. Subjects in the treatment group were thus their own controls. Lead isotopic compositions for the complex supplement showed minimal change during treatment compared with pretreatment. Lead isotopic compositions in blood for the calcium carbonate supplement showed increases of up to 0.5% in the (206)Pb/(204)Pb ratio, and for all isotope ratios there was a statistically significant difference between baseline and treatment (p < 0.005). The change from baseline to treatment for the calcium carbonate supplement differed from that for both the control group and the group administered the complex supplement. Blood lead concentrations, however, showed minimal changes. Variations in blood lead levels over time did not differ significantly between groups. Our results are consistent with earlier investigations using radioactive and stable lead tracers, which showed minimal gastrointestinal absorption of lead in the presence of calcium (+/- phosphorus) in adults. Even though there is no discernible increase in

  9. Comment on "Evidence for narrow resonant structures at W ≈1.68 GeV and W ≈1.72 GeV in real Compton scattering off the proton"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werthmüller, D.; Witthauer, L.; Glazier, D. I.; Krusche, B.

    2015-12-01

    We comment on the statement by Kuznetsov et al. that the structure around W =1.72 GeV seen in the beam asymmetry in Compton scattering off the proton is not observed in the total cross section of η photoproduction on the neutron.

  10. Safe leads and lead changes in competitive team sports.

    PubMed

    Clauset, A; Kogan, M; Redner, S

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the time evolution of lead changes within individual games of competitive team sports. Exploiting ideas from the theory of random walks, the number of lead changes within a single game follows a Gaussian distribution. We show that the probability that the last lead change and the time of the largest lead size are governed by the same arcsine law, a bimodal distribution that diverges at the start and at the end of the game. We also determine the probability that a given lead is "safe" as a function of its size L and game time t. Our predictions generally agree with comprehensive data on more than 1.25 million scoring events in roughly 40,000 games across four professional or semiprofessional team sports, and are more accurate than popular heuristics currently used in sports analytics.

  11. Remnant Pacemaker Lead Tips after Lead Extractions in Pacemaker Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daehoon; Baek, Yong-Soo; Lee, Misol; Uhm, Jae-Sun; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    Complete hardware removal is recommended in the case of patients with cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infections. However, the complete extraction of chronically implanted leads is not always achieved. The outcomes and optimal management of CIED infections with retained material after lead extractions have not been elucidated. In this case report, we present five patients with CIED infections with remnant lead tips even after lead extractions. Two patients had localized pocket infections, and were managed with antibiotics for a period of more than two weeks. The other three patients had infective endocarditis, and were managed with antibiotics for a period of more than four weeks. In one patient, the lead tip migrated to the right pulmonary artery, but did not produce any symptoms or complications. Only one of five patients experienced a resurgence of an infection. PMID:27482268

  12. Safe leads and lead changes in competitive team sports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauset, A.; Kogan, M.; Redner, S.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the time evolution of lead changes within individual games of competitive team sports. Exploiting ideas from the theory of random walks, the number of lead changes within a single game follows a Gaussian distribution. We show that the probability that the last lead change and the time of the largest lead size are governed by the same arcsine law, a bimodal distribution that diverges at the start and at the end of the game. We also determine the probability that a given lead is "safe" as a function of its size L and game time t . Our predictions generally agree with comprehensive data on more than 1.25 million scoring events in roughly 40 000 games across four professional or semiprofessional team sports, and are more accurate than popular heuristics currently used in sports analytics.

  13. Lead Poisoning in Wild Birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lahner, Lesanna L.; Franson, J. Christian

    2009-01-01

    Lead in its various forms has been used for thousands of years, originally in cooking utensils and glazes and more recently in many industrial and commercial applications. However, lead is a potent, potentially deadly toxin that damages many organs in the body and can affect all animals, including humans. By the mid 1990s, lead had been removed from many products in the United States, such as paint and fuel, but it is still commonly used in ammunition for hunting upland game birds, small mammals, and large game animals, as well as in fishing tackle. Wild birds, such as mourning doves, bald eagles, California condors, and loons, can die from the ingestion of one lead shot, bullet fragment, or sinker. According to a recent study on loon mortality, nearly half of adult loons found sick or dead during the breeding season in New England were diagnosed with confirmed or suspected lead poisoning from ingestion of lead fishing weights. Recent regulations in some states have restricted the use of lead ammunition on certain upland game hunting areas, as well as lead fishing tackle in areas frequented by common loons and trumpeter swans. A variety of alternatives to lead are available for use in hunting, shooting sports, and fishing activities.

  14. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.; Poeppel, R.B.

    1995-06-20

    An electrical lead is disclosed having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths. 9 figs.

  15. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Poeppel, Roger B.

    1995-01-01

    An electrical lead having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths.

  16. Deep Inelastic Structure Functions from Electron Scattering on Hydrogen, Deuterium, and Iron at 0.6 GEV(2) <= Q('2) <= 30.0 GEV(2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, Larry W.

    1990-01-01

    We report the final results from experiment E140, a recent deep inelastic electron-deuterium and electron -iron scattering experiment at SLAC. In addition, we present the results of a combined global analysis of all SLAC deep inelastic electron-hydrogen and electron-deuterium cross section measurements between 1970 and 1983. Data from seven earlier experiments are re-radiatively corrected and normalized to experiment E140. We report extractions of R(x,Q^2) and F_2(x,Q ^2) for hydrogen and deuterium over the entire SLAC kinematic range:.06 <= x <=.90 and 0.6 <= Q^2 <= 30.0 (GeV^2). We find that R^{p} = R^{d}, as expected by QCD. Extracted values of R(x,Q^2) are significantly larger than predictions based on QCD and on QCD with the inclusion of kinematic target mass terms. This difference indicates that dynamical higher twist effects may be important in the SLAC kinematic range. A best fit empirical model of R(x,Q^2) is used to extract F_2 from each cross section measurement. These F_2 extractions are compared with F_2 data from EMC and BCDMS. Agreement is observed with EMC when the EMC data are multiplied by times 1.07. Agreement is observed with BCDMS over a limited range in x. The ratios of F_sp{2} {d}/F_sp{2}{p} are examined for Q^2 dependence. We observe a significant negative slope for x<= .6, and a significant positive slope above x>.7 , in excellent agreement with predictions based on QCD with the inclusion of kinematic target mass terms.

  17. Parameter choices for a muon recirculating linear accelerator from 5 to 63 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J. S.

    2014-06-19

    A recirculating linear accelerator (RLA) has been proposed to accelerate muons from 5 to 63 GeV for a muon collider. It should be usable both for a Higgs factory and as a stage for a higher energy collider. First, the constraints due to the beam loading are computed. Next, an expression for the longitudinal emittance growth to lowest order in the longitudinal emittance is worked out. After finding the longitudinal expression, a simplified model that describes the arcs and their approximate expression for the time of flight dependence on energy in those arcs is found. Finally, these results are used to estimate the parameters required for the RLA arcs and the linac phase.

  18. Study of a national 2-GeV continuous beam electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Holt, R.J.; Jackson, H.E.; Khoe, T.K.; Mavrogenes, G.S.

    1980-08-01

    Current trends in research in medium energy physics with electromagnetic probes are reviewed briefly and design objectives are proposed for a continuous beam 2 GeV electron accelerator. Various types of accelerator systems are discussed and exploratory designs developed for two concepts, the linac-stretcher ring and a double-sided microtron system. Preliminary cost estimates indicate that a linac-ring system which meets all the design objectives with the exception of beam quality and uses state-of-the-art technology can be built for approximately $29 million. However, the double-sided microtron shows promise for development into a substantially less expensive facility meeting all design objectives. Its technical feasibility remains to be established. Specific areas requiring additional engineering studies are discussed, and current efforts at Argonne and elsewhere are identified.

  19. Naturalness, the autonomy of scales, and the 125 GeV Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Porter

    2015-08-01

    The recent discovery of the Higgs at 125 GeV by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC has put significant pressure on a principle which has guided much theorizing in high energy physics over the last 40 years, the principle of naturalness. In this paper, I provide an explication of the conceptual foundations and physical significance of the naturalness principle. I argue that the naturalness principle is well-grounded both empirically and in the theoretical structure of effective field theories, and that it was reasonable for physicists to endorse it. Its possible failure to be realized in nature, as suggested by recent LHC data, thus represents an empirical challenge to certain foundational aspects of our understanding of QFT. In particular, I argue that its failure would undermine one class of recent proposals which claim that QFT provides us with a picture of the world as being structured into quasi-autonomous physical domains.

  20. Production and Testing Experience with the SRF Cavities for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    A. Burrill, G.K. Davis, F. Marhauser, C.E. Reece, A.V. Reilly, M. Stirbet

    2011-09-01

    The CEBAF recirculating CW electron linear accelerator at Jefferson Lab is presently undergoing a major upgrade to 12 GeV. This project includes the fabrication, preparation, and testing of 80 new 7-cell SRF cavities, followed by their incorporation into ten new cryomodules for subsequent testing and installation. In order to maximize the cavity Q over the full operable dynamic range in CEBAF (as high as 25 MV/m), the decision was taken to apply a streamlined preparation process that includes a final light temperature-controlled electropolish of the rf surface over the vendor-provided bulk BCP etch. Cavity processing work began at JLab in September 2010 and will continue through December 2011. The excellent performance results are exceeding project requirements and indicate a fabrication and preparation process that is stable and well controlled. The cavity production and performance experience to date will be summarized and lessons learned reported to the community.