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Sample records for 15d-pgj2 stimulates ho-1

  1. Elimination of the biphasic pharmacodynamics of 15d-PGJ2 by controlling its release from a nanoemulsion

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Saed; Kajimoto, Kazuaki; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2016-01-01

    15-Deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) has a dual action of stimulating anti-inflammation and anti-proliferation when exogenously administered at high doses. However, at lower doses, it can be toxic inducing opposite actions, ie, stimulation of both inflammation and cell proliferation. This biphasic phenomenon of 15d-PGJ2 is believed to be due to its multitarget behavior. In this study, we provide a strategy for controlling such biphasic pharmacodynamics by separating its dual actions while retaining the beneficial one by using a nanoemulsion (NE). The 15d-PGJ2 was encapsulated in the NE composed of triolein/distearoyl phosphatidylcholine/Tween 80 at a high encapsulation ratio (>83%). Furthermore, NE enhanced drug retention by slowing down its release rate, which was, unconventionally, inversely dependent on the total surface area of the NE system. Next, focusing on the biphasic effect on cell proliferation, we found that the 15d-PGJ2-loaded slow-release NE showed only a dose-dependent inhibition of the viability of a mouse macrophage cell line, RAW264.7, although a fast-release NE as well as free 15d-PGJ2 exerted a biphasic effect. The observed slow-release kinetics are believed to be responsible for elimination of the biphasic pharmacodynamics of 15d-PGJ2 mainly for two reasons: 1) a high proportion of 15d-PGJ2 that is retained in the NE was delivered to the cytosol, where proapoptotic targets are located and 2) 15d-PGJ2 was able to bypass cell membrane-associated targets that lead to the induction of cellular proliferation. Collectively, our strategy of eliminating the 15d-PGJ2-induced biphasic pharmacodynamics was based on the delivery of 15d-PGJ2 to its desired site of action, excluding undesired sites, on a subcellular level. PMID:27354798

  2. Mitochondrial remodeling following fission inhibition by 15d-PGJ2 involves molecular changes in mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Rekha; Mishra, Nandita; Singha, Prajjal K.; Venkatachalam, Manjeri A.; Saikumar, Pothana

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Chemical inhibition of fission protein Drp1 leads to mitochondrial fusion. {yields} Increased fusion stimulates molecular changes in mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1. {yields} Proteolysis of larger isoforms, new synthesis and ubiquitination of OPA1 occur. {yields} Loss of mitochondrial tubular rigidity and disorganization of cristae. {yields} Generation of large swollen dysfunctional mitochondria. -- Abstract: We showed earlier that 15 deoxy {Delta}{sup 12,14} prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) inactivates Drp1 and induces mitochondrial fusion . However, prolonged incubation of cells with 15d-PGJ2 resulted in remodeling of fused mitochondria into large swollen mitochondria with irregular cristae structure. While initial fusion of mitochondria by 15d-PGJ2 required the presence of both outer (Mfn1 and Mfn2) and inner (OPA1) mitochondrial membrane fusion proteins, later mitochondrial changes involved increased degradation of the fusion protein OPA1 and ubiquitination of newly synthesized OPA1 along with decreased expression of Mfn1 and Mfn2, which likely contributed to the loss of tubular rigidity, disorganization of cristae, and formation of large swollen degenerated dysfunctional mitochondria. Similar to inhibition of Drp1 by 15d-PGJ2, decreased expression of fission protein Drp1 by siRNA also resulted in the loss of fusion proteins. Prevention of 15d-PGJ2 induced mitochondrial elongation by thiol antioxidants prevented not only loss of OPA1 isoforms but also its ubiquitination. These findings provide novel insights into unforeseen complexity of molecular events that modulate mitochondrial plasticity.

  3. The cyclopentenone prostaglandin 15d-PGJ2 inhibits the NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasomes.

    PubMed

    Maier, Nolan K; Leppla, Stephen H; Moayeri, Mahtab

    2015-03-15

    Inflammasomes are cytosolic protein complexes that respond to diverse danger signals by activating caspase-1. The sensor components of the inflammasome, often proteins of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR) family, detect stress, danger stimuli, and pathogen-associated molecular patterns. We report that the eicosanoid 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2) and related cyclopentenone PGs inhibit caspase-1 activation by the NLR family leucine-rich repeat protein (NLRP)1 and NLRP3 inflammasomes. This inhibition was independent of the well-characterized role of 15d-PGJ2 as a peroxisome proliferator receptor-γ agonist, its activation of NF erythroid 2-related factor 2, or its anti-inflammatory function as an inhibitor of NF-κB. Instead, 15d-PGJ2 prevents the autoproteolytic activation of caspase-1 and the maturation of IL-1β through induction of a cellular state inhibitory to caspase-1 proteolytic function. The eicosanoid does not directly modify or inactivate the caspase-1 enzyme. Rather, inhibition is dependent on de novo protein synthesis. In a mouse peritonitis model of gout, using monosodium urate crystals to activate NLRP3, 15d-PGJ2 caused a significant inhibition of cell recruitment and associated IL-1β release. Furthermore, in a murine anthrax infection model, 15d-PGJ2 reversed anthrax lethal toxin-mediated NLRP1-dependent resistance. The findings reported in this study suggest a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory properties of the cyclopentenone PGs through inhibition of caspase-1 and the inflammasome.

  4. 15d-PGJ2-Loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticles: Physicochemical Characterization and Evaluation of Pharmacological Effects on Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Camila Morais Gonçalves; Pasquoto, Tatiane; de Lima, Renata; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2), a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) agonist, has physiological properties including pronounced anti-inflammatory activity, though it binds strongly to serum albumin. The use of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) can improve therapeutic properties increasing drug efficiency and availability. 15d-PGJ2-SLN was therefore developed and investigated in terms of its immunomodulatory potential. 15d-PGJ2-SLN and unloaded SLN were physicochemically characterized and experiments in vivo were performed. Animals were pretreated with 15d-PGJ2-SLN at concentrations of 3, 10 or 30 μg·kg-1 before inflammatory stimulus with carrageenan (Cg), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or mBSA (immune response). Interleukins (IL-1β, IL-10 and IL-17) levels were also evaluated in exudates. The 15d-PGJ2-SLN system showed good colloidal parameters and encapsulation efficiency of 96%. The results showed that the formulation was stable for up to 120 days with low hemolytic effects. The 15d-PGJ2-SLN formulation was able to reduce neutrophil migration in three inflammation models tested using low concentrations of 15d-PGJ2. Additionally, 15d-PGJ2-SLN increased IL-10 levels and reduced IL-1β as well as IL-17 in peritoneal fluid. The new 15d-PGJ2-SLN formulation highlights perspectives of a potent anti-inflammatory system using low concentrations of 15d-PGJ2. PMID:27575486

  5. Autocrine secretion of 15d-PGJ2 mediates simvastatin-induced apoptotic burst in human metastatic melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wasinger, Christine; Künzl, Martin; Minichsdorfer, Christoph; Höller, Christoph; Zellner, Maria; Hohenegger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Despite new therapeutic approaches, metastatic melanomas still have a poor prognosis. Statins reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and exert anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative actions. We have recently shown that simvastatin triggers an apoptotic burst in human metastatic melanoma cells by the synthesis of an autocrine factor. Experimental Approach The current in vitro study was performed in human metastatic melanoma cell lines (A375, 518a2) and primary human melanocytes and melanoma cells. The secretome of simvastatin-stressed cells was analysed with two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and MS. The signalling pathways involved were analysed at the protein and mRNA level using pharmacological approaches and siRNA technology. Key Results Simvastatin was shown to activate a stress cascade, leading to the synthesis of 15-deoxy-12,14-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2), in a p38- and COX-2-dependent manner. Significant concentrations of 15d-PGJ2 were reached in the medium of melanoma cells, which were sufficient to activate caspase 8 and the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Inhibition of lipocalin-type PGD synthase, a key enzyme for 15d-PGJ2 synthesis, abolished the apoptotic effect of simvastatin. Moreover, 15d-PGJ2 was shown to bind to the fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5), which was up-regulated and predominantly detected in the secretome of simvastatin-stressed cells. Knockdown of FABP5 abolished simvastatin-induced activation of PPAR-γ and amplified the apoptotic response. Conclusions and Implications We characterized simvastatin-induced activation of the 15d-PGJ2/FABP5 signalling cascades, which triggered an apoptotic burst in melanoma cells but did not affect primary human melanocytes. These data support the rationale for the pharmacological targeting of 15d-PGJ2 in metastatic melanoma. PMID:25091578

  6. 15d-PGJ2 Reduced Microglia Activation and Alleviated Neurological Deficit of Ischemic Reperfusion in Diabetic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lihong; Li, Gang; Feng, Xiaofang; Wang, Luojun

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of PPARγ agonist 15d-PGJ2 treatment on the microglia activation and neurological deficit of ischemia reperfusion in diabetic rat model, adult Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed for the research. The rats were randomly categorized into four groups: (1) sham-operated group; (2) standard ischemia group; (3) diabetic ischemia group; (4) diabetic ischemia group with diabetes and treated with 15d-PGJ2. Compared to the sham-operated group, all the ischemic groups have significantly severer neurological deficits, more TNF-α and IL-1 expression, increased labeling of apoptotic cells, increased CD68 positive staining of brain lesion, and increased volume of infarct and cerebral edema in both 24 hours and 7 days after reperfusion. Interestingly, reduced neurological deficits, decreased TNF-α and IL-1 expression, less apoptotic cells and CD68 positive staining, and alleviated infarct and cerebral edema volume were observed when 15d-PGJ2 was intraperitoneally injected after reperfusion in diabetic ischemia group, suggesting its neuroprotective role in regulating microglia activation, which may have a therapeutic application in the future. PMID:26844229

  7. Therapeutic Treatment of Arthritic Mice with 15-Deoxy Δ12,14-Prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) Ameliorates Disease through the Suppression of Th17 Cells and the Induction of CD4+CD25−FOXP3+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Benevides, Luciana; Pinto, Larissa G.; Cunha, Thiago M.

    2016-01-01

    The prostaglandin, 15-deoxy Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2), is a lipid mediator that plays an important role in the control of chronic inflammatory disease. However, the role of prostanoid in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is not well determined. We demonstrated the therapeutic effect of 15d-PGJ2 in an experimental model of arthritis. Daily administration of 15d-PGJ2 attenuated the severity of CIA, reducing the clinical score, pain, and edema. 15d-PGJ2 treatment was associated with a marked reduction in joint levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Although the mRNA expression of ROR-γt was profoundly reduced, FOXP3 was enhanced in draining lymph node cells from 15d-PGJ2-treated arthritic mice. The specific and polyclonal CD4+ Th17 cell responses were limited during the addition of prostaglandin to cell culture. Moreover, in vitro 15d-PGJ2 increased the expression of FOXP3, GITR, and CTLA-4 in the CD4+CD25− population, suggesting the induction of Tregs on conventional T cells. Prostanoid addition to CD4+CD25− cells selectively suppressed Th17 differentiation and promoted the enhancement of FOXP3 under polarization conditions. Thus, 15d-PGJ2 ameliorated symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis by regulating Th17 differentiation, concomitant with the induction of Tregs, and, consequently, protected mice from diseases aggravation. Altogether, these results indicate that 15d-PGJ2 may represent a potential therapeutic strategy in RA. PMID:27872515

  8. Electroacupuncture Ameliorates Acute Renal Injury in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Rabbits via Induction of HO-1 through the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Li-rong; Dong, Shu-an; Cao, Xin-shun; Wu, Li-li; Wu, Li-na

    2015-01-01

    Electroacupuncture at select acupoints have been verified to protect against organ dysfunctions during endotoxic shock. And, heme oxygenase (HO)-1 as a phase II enzyme and antioxidant contributed to the protection of kidney in septic shock rats. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt pathway mediated the activation of NF-E2 related factor-2 (Nrf2), which was involved in HO-1 induction. To understand the efficacy of electroacupuncture stimulation in ameliorating acute kidney injury (AKI) through the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 pathway and subsequent HO-1 upregulation, a dose of LPS 5mg/kg was administered intravenously to replicate the rabbit model of AKI induced by endotoxic shock. Electroacupuncture pretreatment was handled bilaterally at Zusanli and Neiguan acupoints for five consecutive days while sham electroacupuncture at non-acupoints as control. Results displayed that electroacupuncture stimulation significantly alleviated the morphologic renal damage, attenuated renal tubular apoptosis, suppressed the elevated biochemical indicators of AKI caused by LPS, enhanced the expressions of phospho-Akt, HO-1protein, Nrf2 total and nucleoprotein, and highlighted the proportions of Nrf2 nucleoprotein as a parallel. Furthermore, partial protective effects of elecroacupuncture were counteracted by preconditioning with wortmannin (the selective PI3K inhibitor), indicating a direct involvement of PI3K/Akt pathway. Inconsistently, wortmannin pretreatment made little difference to the expressions of HO-1, Nrf2 nucleoprotein and total protein, which indicated that PI3K/Akt may be not the only pathway responsible for electroacupuncture-afforded protection against LPS-induced AKI. These findings provide new insights into the potential future clinical applications of electroacupuncture for AKI induced by endotoxic shock instead of traditional remedies. PMID:26524181

  9. The Anti-inflammatory Activities of Two Major Withanolides from Physalis minima Via Acting on NF-κB, STAT3, and HO-1 in LPS-Stimulated RAW264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui-Jun; Gao, Cai-Yun; Guo, Chao; Zhou, Miao-Miao; Luo, Jun; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2016-12-02

    Physalis minima has been traditionally used as a folk herbal medicine in China for the treatment of many inflammatory diseases. However, little is known about its anti-inflammatory constituents and associated molecular mechanisms. In our study, withaphysalin A (WA) and 2, 3-dihydro-withaphysalin C (WC), two major withanolide-type compounds, were obtained from the anti-inflammatory fraction of P. minima. Both WA and WC significantly inhibited the production of nitrite oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and several pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW264.7 macrophages. Further research indicated that they downregulated the LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) at the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, they also suppressed nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65, phosphorylation of STAT3, and upregulated HO-1 expression. Intriguingly, the activation of MAPKs was suppressed by WA but was not altered by WC. Taken together, these data provide scientific evidence for elucidating the major bioactive constituents and related molecular mechanisms for the traditional use of P. minima and suggest that WA and WC can be attractive therapeutic candidates for various inflammatory diseases.

  10. Heme oxygenase-1 expression is down-regulated by angiotensin II and under hypertension in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Alba, Gonzalo; El Bekay, Rajaa; Chacón, Pedro; Reyes, M Edith; Ramos, Eladio; Oliván, Josefina; Jiménez, Juan; López, José M; Martín-Nieto, José; Pintado, Elízabeth; Sobrino, Francisco

    2008-08-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a peptide hormone able to elicit a strong production of reactive oxygen species by human neutrophils. In this work, we have addressed whether expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an antioxidant enzyme, becomes altered in these cells upon Ang II treatment or under hypertension conditions. In neutrophils from healthy and hypertensive subjects, induction of HO-1 mRNA and protein expression with a parallel increase in enzyme activity took place upon treatment with 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-PGJ2 (15dPGJ2). However, Ang II prevented HO-1 synthesis by normal neutrophils in vitro, and HO-1 expression was depressed in neutrophils from hypertensive patients in comparison with cells from healthy subjects. In addition, Ang II treatment led to a reduced HO-1 enzyme activity to levels similar to those found in neutrophils from hypertensive patients. NO donors reversed the inhibition of 15dPGJ2-dependent HO-1 expression in neutrophils from hypertensive patients, and conversely, inhibition of inducible NO synthase (NOS2) activity counteracted the stimulatory effect of 15dPGJ2 on HO-1 expression in normal human neutrophils. Moreover, Ang II canceled 15dPGJ2-dependent induction of NOS2 mRNA synthesis. Present findings indicate that down-regulation of HO-1 expression in neutrophils from hypertensive subjects is likely exerted through the inhibition of NOS2 expression. Additionally, they underscore the potential usefulness of NO donors as new, therapeutic agents against hypertension.

  11. The cyclopentenone 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 binds to and activates H-Ras

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, José Luis; Pérez-Sala, Dolores; Castrillo, Antonio; Martínez, Natalia; Cañada, F. Javier; Boscá, Lisardo; Rojas, José M.

    2003-01-01

    The cyclopentenone 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) induces cell proliferation and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. Here, we describe that these effects are mediated by 15d-PGJ2-elicited H-Ras activation. We demonstrate that this pathway is specific for H-Ras through the formation of a covalent adduct of 15d-PGJ2 with Cys-184 of H-Ras, but not with N-Ras or K-Ras. Mutation of C184 inhibited H-Ras modification and activation by 15d-PGJ2, whereas serum-elicited stimulation was not affected. These results describe a mechanism for the activation of the Ras signaling pathway, which results from the chemical modification of H-Ras by formation of a covalent adduct with cyclopentenone prostaglandins. PMID:12684535

  12. EGR-1 regulates Ho-1 expression induced by cigarette smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huaqun; Wang, Lijuan; Gong, Tao; Yu, Yang; Zhu, Chunhua; Li, Fen; Wang, Li; Li, Chaojun

    2010-05-28

    As an anti-oxidant molecule, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been implicated in the protection of lung injury by cigarette smoke (CS). The mechanisms regulating its expression have not been defined. In this report, the role of early growth response 1 (EGR-1) in the regulation of Ho-1 expression was investigated. In C57BL/6 mice with CS exposure, HO-1 was greatly increased in bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar inflammatory cells. In primary cultured mouse lung fibroblasts and RAW264.7 cells exposed to cigarette smoke water extract (CSE), an increase in HO-1 protein level was detected. In addition, CSE induced HO-1 expression was decreased in Egr-1 deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (Egr-1{sup -/-} MEFs). Nuclear localization of EGR-1 was examined in mouse lung fibroblasts after exposure to CSE. Luciferase reporter activity assays showed that the enhancer region of the Ho-1 gene containing a proposed EGR-1 binding site was responsible for the induction of HO-1. A higher increase of alveolar mean linear intercept (Lm) was observed in lung tissues, and a larger increase in the number of total cells and monocytes/macrophages from bronchial alveolar lavage fluid was found in CS-exposed mice by loss of function of EGR-1 treatment. In summary, the present data demonstrate that EGR-1 plays a critical role in HO-1 production induced by CS.

  13. Aprotinin Inhibits Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Inflammation and Proliferation via Induction of HO-1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hyup; Choi, Hyoung Chul; Lee, Kwang Youn

    2009-01-01

    Aprotinin is used clinically in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to reduce transfusion requirements and the inflammatory response. The mechanism of action for the anti-inflammatory effects of aprotinin is still unclear. We examined our hypothesis whether inhibitory effects of aprotinin on cytokine-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression (IL-1β plus TNF-α), reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation were due to HO-1 induction in rat VSMCs. Aprotinin induced HO-1 protein expression in a dose-dependent manner, which was potentiated during inflammatory condition. Aprotinin reduced cytokine mixture (CM)-induced iNOS expression in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, aprotinin reduced CM-induced ROS generation, cell proliferation, and phosphorylation of JNK but not of P38 and ERK1/2 kinases. Aprotinin effects were reversed by pre-treatment with the HO-1 inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPPIX). HO-1 is therefore closely involved in inflammatory-stimulated VSMC proliferation through the regulation of ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation. Our results suggest a new molecular basis for aprotinin anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:19885007

  14. Substance P Induces HO-1 Expression in RAW 264.7 Cells Promoting Switch towards M2-Like Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Montana, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Substance P (SP) is a neuropeptide that mediates many physiological as well as inflammatory responses. Recently, SP has been implicated in the resolution of inflammation through induction of M2 macrophages phenotype. The shift between M1-like and M2-like, allowing the resolution of inflammatory processes, also takes place by means of hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1). HO-1 is induced in response to oxidative stress and inflammatory stimuli and modulates the immune response through macrophages polarisation. SP induces HO-1 expression in human periodontal ligament (PDL), the latter potentially plays a role in cytoprotection. We demonstrated that SP promotes M2-like phenotype from resting as well as from M1 macrophages. Indeed, SP triggers the production of interleukine-10 (IL-10), interleukine-4 (IL-4) and arginase-1 (Arg1) without nitric oxide (NO) generation. In addition, SP increases HO-1 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Here we report that SP, without affecting cell viability, significantly reduces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and enzymes, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukine-6 (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and ameliorates migration and phagocytic properties in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. M2-like conversion required retention of NF-κB p65 into the cytoplasm and HO-1 induced expression. Silencing of the HO-1 mRNA expression reversed the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines in RAW 264.7 stimulated by LPS and down-regulated anti-inflammatory hallmarks of M2 phenotype. In conclusion, our data show that SP treatment might be associated with anti-inflammatory effects in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells by suppressing NF-κB activation and inducing HO-1 expression. PMID:27907187

  15. Activation of the complement cascade enhances motility of leukemic cells by downregulating expression of HO-1

    PubMed Central

    Abdelbaset-Ismail, A; Borkowska-Rzeszotek, S; Kubis, E; Bujko, K; Brzeźniakiewicz-Janus, K; Bolkun, L; Kloczko, J; Moniuszko, M; Basak, G W; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W; Ratajczak, M Z

    2017-01-01

    As a crucial arm of innate immunity, the complement cascade (ComC) is involved both in mobilization of normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) from bone marrow (BM) into peripheral blood and in their homing to BM. Despite the fact that ComC cleavage fragments alone do not chemoattract normal HSPCs, we found that leukemia cell lines as well as clonogenic blasts from chronic myeloid leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia patients respond robustly to C3 and C5 cleavage fragments by chemotaxis and increased adhesion. This finding was supported by the detection of C3a and C5a receptors in cells from human malignant hematopoietic cell lines and patient blasts at the mRNA (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) and protein level (fluorescence-activated cell sorting), and by the demonstration that these receptors respond to stimulation by C3a and C5a by phosphorylation of p42/44 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), and protein kinase B (PKB/AKT). We also found that inducible heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is a negative regulator of ComC-mediated trafficking of leukemic cells, and that stimulation of leukemic cells by C3 or C5 cleavage fragments activates p38 MAPK, which downregulates HO-1 expression, rendering cells more mobile. We conclude that activation of the ComC in leukemia/lymphoma patients (for example, as a result of accompanying infections) enhances the motility of malignant cells and contributes to their spread in a p38 MAPK–HO-1-dependent manner. Therefore, inhibition of p38 MAPK or upregulation of HO-1 by small-molecule modulators would have a beneficial effect on ameliorating cell migration-mediated expansion of leukemia/lymphoma cells when the ComC becomes activated. PMID:27451975

  16. NRF2 activation is involved in ozonated human serum upregulation of HO-1 in endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pecorelli, Alessandra; Bocci, Velio; Acquaviva, Alessandra; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Gardi, Concetta; Virgili, Fabio; Ciccoli, Lucia; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2013-02-15

    During the last decade, it has been shown that the activation of NRF2 and the binding to electrophile-responsive element (EpREs), stimulates the expression of a great number of genes responsible for the synthesis of phase I and phase II proteins, including antioxidants enzymes and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). This critical cell response occurs in cardiovascular, degenerative and chronic infective diseases aggravated by a chronic oxidative stress. In our previous reports we have shown that ozonated plasma is able to up-regulate HO-1 expression in endothelial cells. In the present work we investigated a candidate mechanism involved in this process. After treatment with increasing doses of ozonated serum (20, 40 and 80 μg/mL O{sub 3} per mL of serum), a clear dose dependent activation of NRF2 and the subsequent induction of HO-1 and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1(NQO1) was observed. This effect was also present when cells were treated with serum and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) or serum and 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE). Moreover, the treatment with ozonated serum was associated with a dose-dependent activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) and p38 MAP kinases (p38), not directly involved in NRF2 activation. These data, provide a new insight on the mechanism responsible for the induction of HO-1 expression by ozonated serum in the endothelium, and have a practical importance as an expedient approach to the treatment of patients with both effective orthodox drugs and ozonated autohemotherapy, targeted to the restoration of redox homeostasis. - Highlights: ► Endothelial HO1 is upregulated by ozonated plasma ► This activation is induced by NRF2 and it is ERK independent. ► 4HNE and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} are the main molecules involved in this process. ► Ozonated plasma induced a hormetic effect ► Combination of orthodox medicine and ozonated plasma can be a useful treatment.

  17. Molecular hydrogen protects mice against polymicrobial sepsis by ameliorating endothelial dysfunction via an Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongguang; Xie, Keliang; Han, Huanzhi; Li, Yuan; Liu, Lingling; Yang, Tao; Yu, Yonghao

    2015-09-01

    Endothelial injury is a primary cause of sepsis and sepsis-induced organ damage. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an essential role in endothelial cellular defenses against inflammation by activating nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2). We found that molecular hydrogen (H2) exerts an anti-inflammatory effect. Here, we hypothesized that H2 attenuates endothelial injury and inflammation via an Nrf2-mediated HO-1 pathway during sepsis. First, we detected the effects of H2 on cell viability and cell apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) stimulated by LPS. Then, we measured cell adhesion molecules and inflammatory factors in HUVECs stimulated by LPS and in a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis mouse model. Next, the role of Nrf2/HO-1 was investigated in activated HUVECs, as well as in wild-type and Nrf(-/-) mice with sepsis. We found that both 0.3 mmol/L and 0.6 mmol/L (i.e., saturated) H2-rich media improved cell viability and cell apoptosis in LPS-activated HUVECs and that 0.6mmol/L (i.e., saturated) H2-rich medium exerted an optimal effect. H2 could suppress the release of cell adhesion molecules, such as vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1). Furthermore, H2 could elevate anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 levels in LPS-stimulated HUVECs and in lung tissue from CLP mice. H2 enhanced HO-1 expression and activity in vitro and in vivo. HO-1 inhibition reversed the regulatory effects of H2 on cell adhesion molecules and inflammatory factors. H2 regulated endothelial injury and the inflammatory response via Nrf2-mediated HO-1 levels. These results suggest that H2 could suppress excessive inflammatory responses and endothelial injury via an Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

  18. 15-deoxy prostaglandin J2, the nonenzymatic metabolite of prostaglandin D2, induces apoptosis in keratinocytes of human hair follicles: a possible explanation for prostaglandin D2-mediated inhibition of hair growth.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hyun Woo; Kang, Yoo Ri; Kwack, Mi Hee; Sung, Young Kwan

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) and its nonenzymatic metabolite, 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 (15-dPGJ2), inhibit in vitro growth of explanted human hair follicles and inhibit hair growth in mice through the GPR44 (DP2). However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we first investigated the expression of DP2 in human hair follicles and in cultured follicular cells. We found that DP2 is strongly expressed in the outer root sheath (ORS) cells and weakly expressed in the dermal papilla (DP) cells. We observed slight growth stimulation when ORS and DP cells were treated with PGD2. We also observed slight growth stimulation when DP and ORS cells were treated with low concentrations (0.5 and 1 μM) of 15-dPGJ2. However, 5 μM 15-dPGJ2 inhibited the viability and caused apoptosis of both cell types. Exposure of cultured human hair follicles to 15-dPGJ2 resulted in significant apoptosis in follicular keratinocytes. Altogether, our data provide an evidence that 15-dPGJ2 promotes apoptosis in follicular keratinocytes and provide rationale for developing remedies for the prevention and treatment of hair loss based on DP2 antagonism.

  19. Effect of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)gamma agonists on prostaglandins cascade in joint cells.

    PubMed

    Moulin, David; Poleni, Paul-Emile; Kirchmeyer, Mélanie; Sebillaud, Sylvie; Koufany, Meriem; Netter, Patrick; Terlain, Bernard; Bianchi, Arnaud; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves

    2006-01-01

    In response to inflammatory cytokines, chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts produce high amounts of prostaglandins (PG) which self-perpetuate locally the inflammatory reaction. Prostaglandins act primarily through membrane receptors coupled to G proteins but also bind to nuclear Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs). Amongst fatty acids, the cyclopentenone metabolite of PGD2, 15-deoxy-Delta12,14PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2), was shown to be a potent ligand of the PPARgamma isotype prone to inhibit the production of inflammatory mediators. As the stimulated synthesis of PGE2 originates from the preferential coupling of inducible enzymes, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and membrane PGE synthase-1 (mPGES-1), we investigated the potency of 15d-PGJ2 to regulate prostaglandins synthesis in rat chondrocytes stimulated with interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). We demonstrated that 15d-PGJ2, but not the high-affinity PPARgamma ligand rosiglitazone, decreased almost completely PGE2 synthesis and mPGES-1 expression. The inhibitory potency of 15d-PGJ2 was unaffected by changes in PPARgamma expression and resulted from inhibition of NF-kappaB nuclear binding and IkappaBalpha sparing, secondary to reduced phosphorylation of IKKbeta. Consistently with 15d-PGJ2 being a putative endogenous regulator of the inflammatory reaction if synthesized in sufficient amounts, the present data confirm the variable PPARgamma-dependency of its effects in joint cells while underlining possible species and cell types specificities.

  20. The HO-1/CO system regulates mitochondrial-capillary density relationships in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Pecorella, Shelly R H; Potter, Jennifer V F; Cherry, Anne D; Peacher, Dionne F; Welty-Wolf, Karen E; Moon, Richard E; Piantadosi, Claude A; Suliman, Hagir B

    2015-10-15

    The heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)/carbon monoxide (CO) system induces mitochondrial biogenesis, but its biological impact in human skeletal muscle is uncertain. The enzyme system generates CO, which stimulates mitochondrial proliferation in normal muscle. Here we examined whether CO breathing can be used to produce a coordinated metabolic and vascular response in human skeletal muscle. In 19 healthy subjects, we performed vastus lateralis muscle biopsies and tested one-legged maximal O2 uptake (V̇o2max) before and after breathing air or CO (200 ppm) for 1 h daily for 5 days. In response to CO, there was robust HO-1 induction along with increased mRNA levels for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), cytochrome c, cytochrome oxidase subunit IV (COX IV), and mitochondrial-encoded COX I and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (NDI). CO breathing did not increase V̇o2max (1.96 ± 0.51 pre-CO, 1.87 ± 0.50 post-CO l/min; P = not significant) but did increase muscle citrate synthase, mitochondrial density (139.0 ± 34.9 pre-CO, 219.0 ± 36.2 post-CO; no. of mitochondrial profiles/field), myoglobin content and glucose transporter (GLUT4) protein level and led to GLUT4 localization to the myocyte membrane, all consistent with expansion of the tissue O2 transport system. These responses were attended by increased cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31)-positive muscle capillaries (1.78 ± 0.16 pre-CO, 2.37 ± 0.59 post-CO; capillaries/muscle fiber), implying the enrichment of microvascular O2 reserve. The findings support that induction of the HO-1/CO system by CO not only improves muscle mitochondrial density, but regulates myoglobin content, GLUT4 localization, and capillarity in accordance with current concepts of skeletal muscle plasticity.

  1. The HO-1/CO system regulates mitochondrial-capillary density relationships in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Pecorella, Shelly R. H.; Potter, Jennifer V. F.; Cherry, Anne D.; Peacher, Dionne F.; Welty-Wolf, Karen E.; Moon, Richard E.; Suliman, Hagir B.

    2015-01-01

    The heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)/carbon monoxide (CO) system induces mitochondrial biogenesis, but its biological impact in human skeletal muscle is uncertain. The enzyme system generates CO, which stimulates mitochondrial proliferation in normal muscle. Here we examined whether CO breathing can be used to produce a coordinated metabolic and vascular response in human skeletal muscle. In 19 healthy subjects, we performed vastus lateralis muscle biopsies and tested one-legged maximal O2 uptake (V̇o2max) before and after breathing air or CO (200 ppm) for 1 h daily for 5 days. In response to CO, there was robust HO-1 induction along with increased mRNA levels for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), cytochrome c, cytochrome oxidase subunit IV (COX IV), and mitochondrial-encoded COX I and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (NDI). CO breathing did not increase V̇o2max (1.96 ± 0.51 pre-CO, 1.87 ± 0.50 post-CO l/min; P = not significant) but did increase muscle citrate synthase, mitochondrial density (139.0 ± 34.9 pre-CO, 219.0 ± 36.2 post-CO; no. of mitochondrial profiles/field), myoglobin content and glucose transporter (GLUT4) protein level and led to GLUT4 localization to the myocyte membrane, all consistent with expansion of the tissue O2 transport system. These responses were attended by increased cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31)-positive muscle capillaries (1.78 ± 0.16 pre-CO, 2.37 ± 0.59 post-CO; capillaries/muscle fiber), implying the enrichment of microvascular O2 reserve. The findings support that induction of the HO-1/CO system by CO not only improves muscle mitochondrial density, but regulates myoglobin content, GLUT4 localization, and capillarity in accordance with current concepts of skeletal muscle plasticity. PMID:26186946

  2. AN ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR THE HO-1 ISOFORM OF HEME OXYGENASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    AN ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR THE HO-1 ISOFORM OF HEME OXYGENASE

    Heme oxygenase (HO) occurs in biological tissues as two major isoforms HO-1 and HO-2. HO-1 is inducible by many treatments, particularly oxidative stress-related conditions such as depletion of gl...

  3. Involvement of PKA and HO-1 signaling in anti-inflammatory effects of surfactin in BV-2 microglial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sun Young; Kim, Ji-Hee; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, YoungHee

    2013-04-01

    Surfactin, one of the most powerful biosurfactants, is a bacterial cyclic lipopeptide. Here, we investigated the anti-neuroinflammatory properties of surfactin in lipoteichoic acid (LTA)-stimulated BV-2 microglial cells. Surfactin significantly inhibited excessive production of the pro-inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and suppressed the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Subsequent mechanistic studies revealed that surfactin inhibited LTA-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT-1) activation. However, surfactin increases the phosphorylation of the STAT-3, a component of the homeostatic mechanism causing anti-inflammatory events. We also demonstrated that surfactin induces heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and nuclear factor-regulated factor-2 (Nrf-2) activation, and that the anti-inflammatory effects of surfactin are abrogated by small interfering RNA-mediated knock-down of HO-1 or Nrf-2. Interestingly, we found that surfactin increased the level of cAMP and induced phosphorylation of cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) in microglial cells. Furthermore, treatment with the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H-89, blocked HO-1 induction by surfactin and abolished surfactin's suppressive effects on ROS and NO production. These results indicate that HO-1 and its upstream effector, PKA, play a pivotal role in the anti-neuroinflammatory response of surfactin in LTA-stimulated microglia. Therefore, surfactin might have therapeutic potential for neuroprotective agents to treat inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. - Highlights: ► Surfactin inhibits proinflammatory mediator synthesis in LTA-activated BV-2 cells. ► Surfactin suppresses NF-κB and STAT-1, but potentiates

  4. Fasting-Mimicking Diet Reduces HO-1 to Promote T Cell-Mediated Tumor Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Di Biase, Stefano; Lee, Changhan; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Manes, Brianna; Buono, Roberta; Cheng, Chia-Wei; Cacciottolo, Mafalda; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; de Cabo, Rafael; Wei, Min; Morgan, Todd E; Longo, Valter D

    2016-07-11

    Immune-based interventions are promising strategies to achieve long-term cancer-free survival. Fasting was previously shown to differentially sensitize tumors to chemotherapy while protecting normal cells, including hematopoietic stem and immune cells, from its toxic side effects. Here, we show that the combination of chemotherapy and a fasting-mimicking diet (FMD) increases the levels of bone marrow common lymphoid progenitor cells and cytotoxic CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), leading to a major delay in breast cancer and melanoma progression. In breast tumors, this effect is partially mediated by the downregulation of the stress-responsive enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). These data indicate that FMD cycles combined with chemotherapy can enhance T cell-dependent targeted killing of cancer cells both by stimulating the hematopoietic system and by enhancing CD8(+)-dependent tumor cytotoxicity.

  5. Statins inhibit pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation by upregulation of HO-1 and p21WAF1.

    PubMed

    Li, Manxiang; Liu, Yuan; Shi, Hongyang; Zhang, Yonghong; Wang, Guizuo; Xu, Jing; Lu, Jiamei; Zhang, Dexin; Xie, Xinming; Han, Dong; Wu, Yuanyuan; Li, Shaojun

    2012-10-01

    Simvastatin is a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor, which has been shown to ameliorate the development of pulmonary hypertension in animal model by suppression of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) proliferation, yet its underlying molecular mechanisms are not completely understood. In this study, we show that simvastatin dose-dependently inhibited serotonin-stimulated PASMCs proliferation. This was accompanied with the parallel induction of heme oxyganase-1 (HO-1) and upregulation of p21(WAF1). More importantly, we found that Tin-protoporphyrin (SnPP), a selective inhibitor of HO-1, could block the effect of simvastatin on inhibition of cell proliferation in response to serotonin and abolish simvastatin-induced p21(WAF1) expression. The inhibitive effect of simvastatin on cell proliferation was also significantly suppressed by silencing p21(WAF1) with siRNA transfection. The extent of effect of SnPP on inhibition of cell proliferation was similar to that of lack of p21(WAF1) by siRNA transfection. Taken together, our study suggests that simvastatin inhibits PASMCs proliferation by sequential upregulation of HO-1 and p21(WAF1) to benefit pulmonary hypertension.

  6. Sex-Dependent Effects of HO-1 Deletion from Adipocytes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hosick, Peter A.; Weeks, Mary Frances; Hankins, Michael W.; Moore, Kyle H.; Stec, David E.

    2017-01-01

    Induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been demonstrated to decrease body weight and improve insulin sensitivity in several models of obesity in rodents. To further study the role of HO-1 in adipose tissue, we created an adipose-specific HO-1 knockout mouse model. Male and female mice were fed either a control or a high-fat diet for 30 weeks. Body weights were measured weekly and body composition, fasting blood glucose and insulin levels were determined every six weeks. Adipocyte-specific knockout of HO-1 had no significant effect on body weight in mice fed a high-fat diet but increased body weight in female mice fed a normal-fat diet. Although body weights were not different in females fed a high fat diet, loss of HO-1 in adipocytes resulted in significant alterations in body composition. Adipose-specific HO-1 knockout resulted in increased fasting hyperglycemia and insulinemia in female but not male mice on both diets. Adipose-specific knockout of HO-1 resulted in a significant loss of HO activity and a decrease in the protein levels of adiponectin in adipose tissue. These results demonstrate that loss of HO-1 in adipocytes has greater effects on body fat and fasting hyperglycemia in a sex-dependent fashion and that expression of HO-1 in adipose tissue may have a greater protective role in females as compared to males. PMID:28287466

  7. Relationships between NOS2 and HO-1 in liver of rats with chronic bile duct ligation.

    PubMed

    Flores, Olga; Criado, Manuela; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Angel; Hidalgo, Froilán; Collía, Francisco; López-Novoa, José Miguel; Esteller, Alejandro

    2005-05-01

    An increased expression and activity of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the liver has been observed in models of hepatic damage. Nitric oxide (NO) seems to be involved in HO-1 regulation. The aim of this work is to assess HO-1 induction and heme oxygenase (HO) activity in rats with bile duct ligation (BDL). We have assessed the effect of chronic inhibition of the NO synthesis by N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) on HO-1 induction and HO activity. In the BDL animals, compared with sham-operated ones, we found an increased plasma nitrite and bilirubin concentration, and a marked liver expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and HO-1, assessed by both Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Chronic l-NAME treatment prevented plasma nitrite increase in animals subjected to BDL. BDL animals treated with l-NAME, compared with untreated BDL rats, showed an important decrease in HO-1 expression and in HO activity (assessed as a decreased plasma bilirubin and bilirubin excretion). In conclusion, our experiments show parallel changes in expression and activity of HO-1 and NOS2 activity in the BDL model of liver damage and suggest that increased NO production is involved in HO-1 overexpression.

  8. The Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. Bark. Involves NF-κB Suppression and Nrf2-Dependent HO-1 Induction in BV-2 Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Seung-Hwan; Ma, Shi-Xun; Hwang, Ji-Young; Ko, Yong-Hyun; Seo, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Bo-Ram; Lee, Seok-Yong; Jang, Choon-Gon

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory properties of Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. Bark. (EUE) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated microglial BV-2 cells and found that EUE inhibited LPS-mediated up-regulation of pro-inflammatory response factors. In addition, EUE inhibited the elevated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, mediators, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in LPS-stimulated BV-2 microglial cells. Subsequent mechanistic studies revealed that EUE suppressed LPS-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), and their downstream transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). EUE also blocked the nuclear translocation of NF-κB and inhibited its binding to DNA. We next demonstrated that EUE induced the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and upregulated heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. We determined that the significant up-regulation of HO-1 expression by EUE was a consequence of Nrf2 nuclear translocation; furthermore, EUE increased the DNA binding of Nrf2. In contrast, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a specific HO-1 inhibitor, blocked the ability of EUE to inhibit NO and PGE2 production, indicating the vital role of HO-1. Overall, our results indicate that EUE inhibits pro-inflammatory responses by modulating MAPKs, PI3K/Akt, and GSK-3β, consequently suppressing NF-κB activation and inducing Nrf2-dependent HO-1 activation. PMID:27068259

  9. ATF3-mediated NRF2/HO-1 signaling regulates TLR4 innate immune responses in mouse liver ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Rao, J; Qian, X; Li, G; Pan, X; Zhang, C; Zhang, F; Zhai, Y; Wang, X; Lu, L

    2015-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is a stress-induced transcription factor that has been shown to repress inflammatory gene expression in multiple cell types and diseases. However, little is known about the roles and mechanisms of ATF3 in liver ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). In warm and cold liver IRI models, we showed that ATF3 deficiency significantly increased ischemia/reperfusion (IR)-stressed liver injury, as evidenced by increased serum alanine aminotransferase levels, histological liver damage, and hepatocellular apoptosis. These may correlate with inhibition of the intrahepatic nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2/heme oxygenase-1 (NRF2/HO-1) signaling pathway leading to enhancing Toll-like receptor 4/nuclear factor kappa beta (TLR4/NF-κB) activation, pro-inflammatory programs and macrophage/neutrophil trafficking, while simultaneously repressing anti-apoptotic molecules in ischemic liver. Interestingly, activation of NRF2/HO-1 signaling using an NRF2 activator, oltipraz (M2), during hepatic IRI-rescued ATF3 anti-inflammatory functions in ATF3-deficient mice. For in vitro studies, ATF3 ablation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) depressed levels of NRF2/HO-1 and PI3K/AKT, resulting in enhanced TLR4/NF-κB activation. Pretreatment of LPS-stimulated BMMs with M2 increased NRF2/HO-1 expression, promoted PI3K/AKT, which in turn suppressed TLR4/NF-κB-mediated proinflammatory mediators. Thus, our results first demonstrate ATF3-mediated NRF2/HO-1 signaling in the regulation of TLR4-driven inflammatory responses in IR-stressed livers. Our findings provide a rationale for a novel therapeutic strategy for managing IR-induced liver injury.

  10. Micro-RNA-155-mediated control of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is required for restoring adaptively tolerant CD4+ T-cell function in rodents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinyu; Vandevenne, Patricia; Hamdi, Haifa; Van Puyvelde, Merry; Zucchi, Alessandro; Bettonville, Marie; Weatherly, Kathleen; Braun, Michel Y

    2015-03-01

    T cells chronically stimulated by a persistent antigen often become dysfunctional and lose effector functions and proliferative capacity. To identify the importance of micro-RNA-155 (miR-155) in this phenomenon, we analyzed mouse miR-155-deficient CD4(+) T cells in a model where the chronic exposure to a systemic antigen led to T-cell functional unresponsiveness. We found that miR-155 was required for restoring function of T cells after programmed death receptor 1 blockade. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) was identified as a specific target of miR-155 and inhibition of HO-1 activity restored the expansion and tissue migration capacity of miR-155(-/-) CD4(+) T cells. Moreover, miR-155-mediated control of HO-1 expression in CD4(+) T cells was shown to sustain in vivo antigen-specific expansion and IL-2 production. Thus, our data identify HO-1 regulation as a mechanism by which miR-155 promotes T-cell-driven inflammation.

  11. Mechanical Stress Changes the Complex Interplay Between HO-1, Inflammation and Fibrosis, During Excisional Wound Repair.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Niels A J; Suttorp, Maarten; Gerritsen, Marlous M; Wong, Ronald J; van Run-van Breda, Coby; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Brouwer, Katrien M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Carels, Carine E L; Lundvig, Ditte M S; Wagener, Frank A D T G

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stress following surgery or injury can promote pathological wound healing and fibrosis, and lead to functional loss and esthetic problems. Splinted excisional wounds can be used as a model for inducing mechanical stress. The cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is thought to orchestrate the defense against inflammatory and oxidative insults that drive fibrosis. Here, we investigated the activation of the HO-1 system in a splinted and non-splinted full-thickness excisional wound model using HO-1-luc transgenic mice. Effects of splinting on wound closure, HO-1 promoter activity, and markers of inflammation and fibrosis were assessed. After seven days, splinted wounds were more than three times larger than non-splinted wounds, demonstrating a delay in wound closure. HO-1 promoter activity rapidly decreased following removal of the (epi)dermis, but was induced in both splinted and non-splinted wounds during skin repair. Splinting induced more HO-1 gene expression in 7-day wounds; however, HO-1 protein expression remained lower in the epidermis, likely due to lower numbers of keratinocytes in the re-epithelialization tissue. Higher numbers of F4/80-positive macrophages, αSMA-positive myofibroblasts, and increased levels of the inflammatory genes IL-1β, TNF-α, and COX-2 were present in 7-day splinted wounds. Surprisingly, mRNA expression of newly formed collagen (type III) was lower in 7-day wounds after splinting, whereas, VEGF and MMP-9 were increased. In summary, these data demonstrate that splinting delays cutaneous wound closure and HO-1 protein induction. The pro-inflammatory environment following splinting may facilitate higher myofibroblast numbers and increase the risk of fibrosis and scar formation. Therefore, inducing HO-1 activity against mechanical stress-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be an interesting strategy to prevent negative effects of surgery on growth and function in patients with orofacial clefts or in patients with

  12. Mechanical Stress Changes the Complex Interplay Between HO-1, Inflammation and Fibrosis, During Excisional Wound Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Niels A. J.; Suttorp, Maarten; Gerritsen, Marlous M.; Wong, Ronald J.; van Run-van Breda, Coby; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Brouwer, Katrien M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Carels, Carine E. L.; Lundvig, Ditte M. S.; Wagener, Frank A. D. T. G.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stress following surgery or injury can promote pathological wound healing and fibrosis, and lead to functional loss and esthetic problems. Splinted excisional wounds can be used as a model for inducing mechanical stress. The cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is thought to orchestrate the defense against inflammatory and oxidative insults that drive fibrosis. Here, we investigated the activation of the HO-1 system in a splinted and non-splinted full-thickness excisional wound model using HO-1-luc transgenic mice. Effects of splinting on wound closure, HO-1 promoter activity, and markers of inflammation and fibrosis were assessed. After seven days, splinted wounds were more than three times larger than non-splinted wounds, demonstrating a delay in wound closure. HO-1 promoter activity rapidly decreased following removal of the (epi)dermis, but was induced in both splinted and non-splinted wounds during skin repair. Splinting induced more HO-1 gene expression in 7-day wounds; however, HO-1 protein expression remained lower in the epidermis, likely due to lower numbers of keratinocytes in the re-epithelialization tissue. Higher numbers of F4/80-positive macrophages, αSMA-positive myofibroblasts, and increased levels of the inflammatory genes IL-1β, TNF-α, and COX-2 were present in 7-day splinted wounds. Surprisingly, mRNA expression of newly formed collagen (type III) was lower in 7-day wounds after splinting, whereas, VEGF and MMP-9 were increased. In summary, these data demonstrate that splinting delays cutaneous wound closure and HO-1 protein induction. The pro-inflammatory environment following splinting may facilitate higher myofibroblast numbers and increase the risk of fibrosis and scar formation. Therefore, inducing HO-1 activity against mechanical stress-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be an interesting strategy to prevent negative effects of surgery on growth and function in patients with orofacial clefts or in patients with

  13. Prunella vulgaris suppresses HG-induced vascular inflammation via Nrf2/HO-1/eNOS activation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sun Mi; Lee, Yun Jung; Yoon, Jung Joo; Lee, So Min; Kim, Jin Sook; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2012-01-01

    Vascular inflammation is an important factor which can promote diabetic complications. In this study, the inhibitory effects of aqueous extract from Prunella vulgaris (APV) on high glucose (HG)-induced expression of cell adhesion molecules in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) are reported. APV decreased HG-induced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and E-selectin. APV also dose-dependently inhibited HG-induced adhesion of HL-60 monocytic cells. APV suppressed p65 NF-κB activation in HG-treated cells. APV significantly inhibited the formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). HG-stimulated HUVEC secreted gelatinases, however, APV inhibited it. APV induced Akt phosphorylation as well as activation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), eNOS, and nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which may protect vascular inflammation caused by HG. In conclusion, APV exerts anti-inflammatory effect via inhibition of ROS/NF-κB pathway by inducing HO-1 and eNOS expression mediated by Nrf2, thereby suggesting that Prunella vulgaris may be a possible therapeutic approach to the inhibition of diabetic vascular diseases.

  14. Role of HO-1 in protective effect of electro-acupuncture against endotoxin shock-induced acute lung injury in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Bo; Jianbo, Yu; Dong, Shu-An; Shuan, Dong; Luo, Xiao-Qing; Xiaoqing, Luo; Gong, Li-Rong; Lirong, Gong; Zhang, Yuan; Yuan, Zhang; Wang, Man; Man, Wang; Cao, Xin-Shun; Xinshun, Cao; Liu, Da-Quan; Daquan, Liu

    2013-06-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 has been reported to play a great role in attenuating lung injury during endotoxic shock in our previous research. Although electro-acupuncture has been explored to reduce oxidative stress and decrease inflammatory reaction in animals with endotoxic shock, the mechanism of this effect is still unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether HO-1 is involved in the effect of electro-acupuncture on the injured lung during endotoxic shock in rabbits. Sixty New England white rabbits were randomly divided into groups C, Z, ES, EA, AP, and EAZ. Before inducing endotoxic shock, group ES received no electro-acupuncture, while group EA received electro-acupuncture at ST36 (zusanli) and BL13 (feishu) acupoints on both sides for five days and group AP received electro-acupuncture (EA) stimulation at a non-acupoint. Groups ES, AP, EA, and EAZ received LPS to replicate the experimental model of injured lung induced by endotoxic shock, and electro-acupuncture was performed throughout the procedure with the same parameter. Groups EAZ and Z received the HO-1 inhibitor, ZnPP-IX, intraperitoneally. The animals were sacrificed by blood-letting at 6 h after LPS administration. The blood samples were collected for serum examination, and the lungs were removed for pathology examination, detection of alveolaer epithelial cell apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling assay (TUNEL assay), determination of wet to dry ratio, measurement of Evans blue (EB) contents, and determination of HO-1protein and mRNA expression. According to the results, EA at ST36 and BL13 could increase the expression of HO-1. At the same time, index of quantitative assessment (IQA) score and the number of TUNEL-positive cells decreased, while electro-acupuncture at the other points did not exert this effect, and pretreatment with ZnPP-IX in group EAZ suppressed the efficacy of electro-acupuncture preconditioning. In summary, electro

  15. Nrf2-Mediated HO-1 Induction Coupled with the ERK Signaling Pathway Contributes to Indirect Antioxidant Capacity of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Jang, Hae-Dong

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the contributing effect of the nuclear transcription factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated signaling pathway on the indirect antioxidant capacity of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) against oxidative stress in HepG2 cells. The result of an antioxidant response element (ARE)-luciferase assay showed that CAPE stimulated ARE promoter activity resulting in increased transcriptional and translational activities of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). In addition, CAPE treatment enhanced Nrf2 accumulation in the nucleus and the post-translational phosphorylation level of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) among several protein kinases tested. Treatment with ERK inhibitor U126 completely suppressed CAPE-induced ERK phosphorylation and HO-1 expression, but it only partly inhibited CAPE-induced Nrf2 accumulation and ARE promoter. Using the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) method, the cellular antioxidant capacity of CAPE against 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH)- or H2O2-induced oxidative stress also was shown to be partially suppressed by the ERK inhibitor. From the overall results it is proposed that the indirect antioxidant activity of CAPE against oxidative stress in HepG2 cells is partially attributed to induction of HO-1, which is regulated by Kelch-like erythroid-cell-derived protein with CNC homology (ECH)-associated protein 1 (Keap1)-independent Nrf2 activation relying on post-translational phosphorylation of ERK. PMID:25007817

  16. Higenamine promotes M2 macrophage activation and reduces Hmgb1 production through HO-1 induction in a murine model of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Li, Mingchao; Wang, Yan; Wu, Jian; Li, Jiaping

    2014-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is considered to be primarily associated with loss of motor function and leads to the activation of diverse cellular mechanisms in the central nervous system to attempt to repair the damaged spinal cord tissue. Higenamine (HG) (1-[(4-hydroxyphenyl) methyl]-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-6,7-diol), an active ingredient of Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata, has been traditionally used as a heart stimulant and anti-inflammatory agent in oriental countries. However, the function and related mechanism of HG on SCI have never been investigated. In our current study, HG treatment displayed increased myelin sparring and enhanced spinal cord repair process. The numbers of CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, Ly6G(+) neutrophils and CD11b(+) macrophages were all significantly lower in the HG-treated group than that in the control group after SCI. HG administration increased the expression of IL-4 and IL-10 and promoted M2 macrophage activation. Significantly reduced Hmgb1 expression was also observed in HG-treated mice with SCI. Furthermore, HG treatment promoted HO-1 production. The increased number of M2 macrophages, decreased expression of Hmgb1 and promoted locomotor recovery induced by HG were all reversed with additional HO-1 inhibitor treatment. In conclusion, HG promotes M2 macrophage activation and reduces Hmgb1 expression dependent on HO-1 induction and then promotes locomotor function after SCI.

  17. NO counterbalances HO-1 overexpression-induced acceleration of hepatocyte proliferation in mice.

    PubMed

    Schuett, Harald; Eipel, Christian; Maletzki, Claudia; Menger, Michael D; Vollmar, Brigitte

    2007-06-01

    The trigger for liver regeneration, including shear stress, has been the subject of ongoing debate. Blood vessel-derived gaseous molecules carbon monoxide (CO) and nitric oxide (NO) regulate vascular tone and play an important role in liver regeneration. In heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) transgenic mice, it has been shown that CO-mediated impairment of vasorelaxation is an NO-dependent event. We therefore studied liver regeneration in HO-1 overexpressing animals in dependency of NO availability. Mice were subjected to (2/3) hepatectomy and were treated with either cobalt protoporphyrin-IX for induction of CO-liberating HO-1, N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) for blockade of NO synthase (NOS) or both. Application of molsidomine in L-NAME treated animals served for resubstitution of NO. Vehicle-treated animals served as respective control animals. We examined 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression as well as HO-1 and NOS-2 protein levels. Intrahepatic red blood cell velocity and volumetric blood flow were evaluated by in vivo fluorescence microscopy as indicators for microvascular shear stress. Hepatic regeneration remained unaffected by L-NAME application for NOS blockade. However, NOS blockade in HO-1 induced animals caused increased 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine and proliferating cell nuclear antigen measures of liver regeneration. In parallel, these animals revealed increased velocities and volumetric blood flow in the terminal afferent vessels and postsinusoidal venules. These local hemodynamic changes including enhanced hepatocyte proliferation could be reversed by NO liberation via molsidomine. The present findings stress the role of NO to counterbalance vascular tone in HO-1 overexpressing animals for maintenance of adequate perfusion and salutary shear force within the hepatic microvasculature upon liver resection.

  18. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Angelica gigas via Heme Oxygenase (HO)-1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Cho, Joon Hyeong; Kwon, Jung Eun; Cho, Youngmi; Kim, Inhye; Kang, Se Chan

    2015-06-15

    Angelica gigas (AG) is effective against various medical conditions such as bacterial infection, inflammation, and cancer. It contains a number of coumarin compounds and the group of interest is the pyranocoumarin, which comprises decursin and decursinol angelate. This group has an effect on controlling inflammation, which is caused by excessive nitric oxide (NO) production. Heme oxygenases (HOs), particularly HO-1, play a role in regulating the production of NO. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of AG by measuring HO-1 expression. Treatments with CH2Cl2 layer and Angelica gigas extract (AGE) showed the highest NO inhibition effects. Decursin, decursinol angelate, and nodakenin were isolated from the CH2Cl2 layer of AGE. Decursin also demonstrated the highest anti-oxidative effect among the coumarins. Although decursin had the best NO inhibition and anti-oxidative effects, the effects of AGE treatment far surpassed that of decursin. This is owing to the combination effect of the coumarins present within AGE, which is a solvent extract of AG. The expression of HO-1 is an effective indicator of the anti-inflammatory effects of AG. Based on the results of the coumarin compounds, HO-1 expression was found to be dose dependent and specific to decursin.

  19. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Angelica gigas via Heme Oxygenase (HO)-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Joon Hyeong; Kwon, Jung Eun; Cho, Youngmi; Kim, Inhye; Kang, Se Chan

    2015-01-01

    Angelica gigas (AG) is effective against various medical conditions such as bacterial infection, inflammation, and cancer. It contains a number of coumarin compounds and the group of interest is the pyranocoumarin, which comprises decursin and decursinol angelate. This group has an effect on controlling inflammation, which is caused by excessive nitric oxide (NO) production. Heme oxygenases (HOs), particularly HO-1, play a role in regulating the production of NO. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of AG by measuring HO-1 expression. Treatments with CH2Cl2 layer and Angelica gigas extract (AGE) showed the highest NO inhibition effects. Decursin, decursinol angelate, and nodakenin were isolated from the CH2Cl2 layer of AGE. Decursin also demonstrated the highest anti-oxidative effect among the coumarins. Although decursin had the best NO inhibition and anti-oxidative effects, the effects of AGE treatment far surpassed that of decursin. This is owing to the combination effect of the coumarins present within AGE, which is a solvent extract of AG. The expression of HO-1 is an effective indicator of the anti-inflammatory effects of AG. Based on the results of the coumarin compounds, HO-1 expression was found to be dose dependent and specific to decursin. PMID:26083119

  20. Catalase prevents maternal diabetes-induced perinatal programming via the Nrf2-HO-1 defense system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shiao-Ying; Chen, Yun-Wen; Zhao, Xin-Ping; Chenier, Isabelle; Tran, Stella; Sauvé, Alexandre; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Zhang, Shao-Ling

    2012-10-01

    We investigated whether overexpression of catalase (CAT) in renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs) could prevent the programming of hypertension and kidney disease in the offspring of dams with maternal diabetes. Male offspring of nondiabetic and diabetic dams from two transgenic (Tg) lines (Hoxb7-green fluorescent protein [GFP]-Tg [controls] and Hoxb7/CAT-GFP-Tg, which overexpress CAT in RPTCs) were studied from the prenatal period into adulthood. Nephrogenesis, systolic blood pressure, renal hyperfiltration, kidney injury, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were assessed. Gene expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), nuclear factor erythroid 2p45-related factor-2 (Nrf2), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was tested in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Renal dysmorphogenesis was observed in offspring of Hoxb7-GFP-Tg dams with severe maternal diabetes; the affected male offspring displayed higher renal ROS generation and developed hypertension and renal hyperfiltration as well as renal injury with heightened TGF-β1 expression in adulthood. These changes were ameliorated in male offspring of diabetic Hoxb7/CAT-GFP-Tg dams via the Nrf2-HO-1 defense system. CAT promoted Nrf2 nuclear translocation and HO-1 gene expression, seen in both in vitro and in vivo studies. In conclusion, CAT overexpression in the RPTCs ameliorated maternal diabetes-induced perinatal programming, mediated, at least in part, by triggering the Nrf2-HO-1 defense system.

  1. Exogenous induction of HO-1 alleviates vincristine-induced neuropathic pain by reducing spinal glial activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Zhu, Ming-Di; Jiang, Bao-Chun; Yang, Tian; Gao, Yong-Jing

    2015-07-01

    Chemotherapy drugs such as vincristine can produce painful peripheral neuropathy for which is still lack of effective treatment. Recent studies have demonstrated that neuroinflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) was shown to mediate the resolution of inflammation. In this study, we investigated the contribution of HO-1 in the modulation of vincristine-induced pain and the mechanisms implicated. Injection of vincristine induced persistent mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in mice. The expression of HO-1 mRNA and protein was increased in 2 weeks in the spinal cord. Immunostaining showed that HO-1 was mainly expressed in neurons of spinal cord dorsal horn in naïve animals, but induced in astrocytes and microglia after vincristine injection. Intraperitoneal injection of HO-1 inducer increased HO-1 expression in the spinal cord and attenuated vincristine-induced pain. Persistent induction of HO-1 by intraspinal injection of HO-1-expressing lentivirus alleviated vincristine-induced pain for more than 2 weeks. Furthermore, vincristine induced activation of glial cells (astrocytes and microglia), phosphorylation of MAPKs (JNK, ERK, and p38), and production of TNF-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the spinal cord, which were all reduced by intrathecal injection of HO-1 inducer. Taken together, our data provide the first evidence that induction of HO-1 attenuates vincristine-induced neuropathic pain via inhibition of glia-mediated neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. This suggests that exogenously induced HO-1 may have potential as therapy in chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain.

  2. Dual protective role of HO-1 in transplanted liver grafts: A review of experimental and clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Feng; Wang, Zhen-Yu; Li, Ji-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Liver transplantation is considered as the most effective treatment for end-stage liver disease. However, serious complications still exist, particularly in two aspects: ischemia and subsequent reperfusion of the liver, causing postoperative hepatic dysfunction and even failure; and acute and chronic graft rejections, affecting the allograft survival. Heme oxygenase (HO), a stress-response protein, is believed to exert a protective function on both the development of ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) and graft rejection. In this review of current researches on allograft protection, we focused on the HO-1. We conjecture that HO-1 may link these two main factors affecting the prognosis of liver transplantations. In this review, the following aspects were emphasized: the basic biological functions of HO-1, its roles in IRI and allograft rejection, as well as methods to induce HO-1 and the prospects of a therapeutic application of HO-1 in liver transplantation. PMID:21912452

  3. Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) Expression in Prostate Cancer Cells Modulates the Oxidative Response in Bone Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando, Mercedes; Wan, Xinhai; Meiss, Roberto; Yang, Jun; De Siervi, Adriana; Navone, Nora; Vazquez, Elba

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a leading cause of death among males. It is currently estimated that inflammatory responses are linked to 15-20% of all deaths from cancer worldwide. PCa is dominated by complications arising from metastasis to the bone where the tumor cells interact with the bone microenvironment impairing the balance between bone formation and degradation. However, the molecular nature of this interaction is not completely understood. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) counteracts oxidative damage and inflammation. Previous studies from our laboratory showed that HO-1 is implicated in PCa, demonstrating that endogenous HO-1 inhibits bone derived-prostate cancer cells proliferation, invasion and migration and decreases tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo. The aim of this work was to analyze the impact of HO-1 modulated PCa cells on osteoblasts proliferation in vitro and on bone remodeling in vivo. Using a co-culture system of PC3 cells with primary mice osteoblasts (PMOs), we demonstrated that HO-1 pharmacological induction (hemin treatment) abrogated the diminution of PMOs proliferation induced by PCa cells and decreased the expression of osteoclast-modulating factors in osteoblasts. No changes were detected in the expression of genes involved in osteoblasts differentiation. However, co-culture of hemin pre-treated PC3 cells (PC3 Hem) with PMOs provoked an oxidative status and activated FoxO signaling in osteoblasts. The percentage of active osteoblasts positive for HO-1 increased in calvarias explants co-cultured with PC3 Hem cells. Nuclear HO-1 expression was detected in tumors generated by in vivo bone injection of HO-1 stable transfected PC3 (PC3HO-1) cells in the femur of SCID mice. These results suggest that HO-1 has the potential to modify the bone microenvironment impacting on PCa bone metastasis. PMID:24224047

  4. Hirsutenone reduces deterioration of tight junction proteins through EGFR/Akt and ERK1/2 pathway both converging to HO-1 induction.

    PubMed

    Seo, Geom Seog; Jiang, Wen-Yi; Park, Pil-Hoon; Sohn, Dong Hwan; Cheon, Jae Hee; Lee, Sung Hee

    2014-07-15

    Oxidative stress-induced disruption of epithelial tight junctions (TJ) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of intestinal disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The current study investigated the protective effect of hirsutenone against disruption of the intestinal barrier in vitro and in a mouse model of colitis. Caco-2 cells were stimulated with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BH). Hirsutenone prevented the t-BH-induced increase in permeability by inhibiting the reduction in zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) expression, and rapidly stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Hirsutenone-mediated protection against the loss of ZO-1 depends on the activation of both ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways. Interestingly, hirsutenone-mediated activation of Akt, but not ERK1/2, signaling was EGFR-dependent. Hirsutenone increased heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression through both EGFR/Akt- and ERK1/2-dependent pathways, contributing to the protective effects against TJ dysfunction. Colitis was induced in mice by intrarectal administration of 2,4,6,-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Hirsutenone administration improved the clinical parameters and tissue histological appearance, increased HO-1 expression, attenuated reduction of ZO-1 and occludin mRNA, and promoted BrdU incorporation in the colonic epithelium of TNBS-treated mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate that hirsutenone reverse disordered intestinal permeability by activating EGFR/Akt and ERK1/2 pathways, which are involved in the regulation of HO-1 expression. These findings highlight the potential of hirsutenone for clinical applications in the treatment of IBD.

  5. Iron Supplementation Alters Heme and Heme Oxygenase 1 (HO-1) Levels In Pregnant Women in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Salifu, Hassana; Wilson, Nana O.; Liu, Mingli; Dickinson-Copeland, Carmen; Yatich, Nelly; Keenan, John; Turpin, Cornelius; Jolly, Pauline; Gyasi, Richard; Adjei, Andrew A.; Stiles, Jonathan K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Iron supplementation is recommended for pregnant women to meet their iron requirement for a healthy pregnancy. The benefits and risks of universal iron supplementation during pregnancy in malaria endemic countries are currently being debated. As part of a broader study that focused on the effect of heme/HO-1 on pregnancy outcomes in malaria in pregnancy, we determined the association between iron supplementation and free heme levels in blood of pregnant women with and without malaria in Ghana. We hypothesized that pregnant women with malaria who took iron supplements will have higher levels of Heme/HO-1 than those who did not take iron supplements. Methods A total of 337 women were recruited for this study. Blood samples were collected for malaria diagnosis and heme/HO-1 measurement. Quantification of heme was done using a heme colorimetric assay kit and HO-1 levels were performed using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) on plasma samples. Results Malaria positive iron supplemented women, in their third trimester, had significantly higher median levels of heme 59.3(43.1 – 60.4) than non-malaria iron supplemented women 35.7(33.0 – 62.2), p = 0.026. Also, malaria positive iron supplemented women had significant higher median levels of HO-16.2(IQR 4.9 – 8.1) than pregnant women who did not take iron supplements 2.9 (IQR 2.1 – 3.8), p = <0.001 Conclusion Although iron supplementation may be highly beneficial and improve pregnancy outcomes for iron deficient or anemic mothers, it is also likely that iron supplementation for pregnant women who are not iron deficient may put this group of women at risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes. Findings from this study sheds light on the effect of iron supplementation on malaria derived heme in pregnancy, which may inform how iron supplementation is recommended for pregnant women who are not iron deficient. PMID:28124024

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Rhapontici Radix Ethanol Extract via Inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK and Induction of HO-1 in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Oh, You-Chang; Cho, Won-Kyung; Yim, Nam-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Rhapontici Radix (RR) has been used in traditional medicine in East Asia and has been shown to have various beneficial effects. However, its biological properties or mechanism on inflammation-related diseases is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine the anti-inflammatory activity and underlying molecular mechanisms of Rhapontici Radix ethanol extract (RRE). The inhibitory effect of RRE on the production of NO, cytokines, inflammatory-related proteins, and mRNAs in LPS-stimulated macrophages was determined by the Griess assay, ELISA, Western blot analysis, and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. Our results indicate that treatment with RRE significantly inhibited the secretion of NO and inflammatory cytokines in RAW 264.7 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages without cytotoxicity. We also found that RRE strongly suppressed the expression of iNOS and COX-2 and induced HO-1 expression. It also prevented nuclear translocation of NF-κB by inhibiting the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of MAPKs in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells was significantly inhibited by RRE. These findings suggest that RRE may operate as an effective anti-inflammatory agent by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways and inducing HO-1 expression in macrophages. Our results suggest that RRE has potential value as candidate to inflammatory therapeutic phytomedicine. PMID:27524868

  7. Long-term effect of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 induction in glomerular immune injury.

    PubMed

    Datta, Prasun K; Duann, Pu; Lianos, Elias A

    2006-03-01

    In a rat model of macrophage-dependent glomerular immune injury induced by administration of antibody against the glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM), the authors assessed the anti-proteinuric effect of Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction. Rats received anti-GBM antibody alone, anti-GBM antibody and treatment with the HO-1 inducer, hemin, or non-immune serum (controls). Urine protein, creatinine, and nitrite/nitrate excretion were measured on days 5, 7, and 14 after administration of the anti-GBM antibody. In hemin-treated animals with anti-GBM antibody-induced immune injury, HO-1 immunolocalized in macrophages infiltrating glomeruli and in tubular epithelial cells. In these animals, proteinuria was decreased. There was also a decrease in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels without a change in serum creatinine or systemic blood pressure. The observations establish the anti-proteinuric effect of hemin induction. This effect could be mechanistically linked to blunting of the ability of infiltrating macrophages to cause injury or to changes in tubular handling of filtered protein.

  8. Nadroparin sodium activates Nrf2/HO-1 pathway in acetic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yalniz, Mehmet; Demirel, Ulvi; Orhan, Cemal; Bahcecioglu, Ibrahim Halil; Ozercan, Ibrahim Hanefi; Aygun, Cem; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Kazim

    2012-06-01

    Effects of nadroparin sodium, a low molecular weight heparin, in colitis was investigated by analyzing proteins implicated in nuclear factor E2-related factor-2/heme oxygenase-1 (Nrf2/HO-1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathways. Twenty-eight rats were used. Colitis was induced by acetic acid (AA). Nadroparin sodium was given to prevention and treatment groups in addition to AA. Colitis was assessed histologically and levels of proteins were analyzed with Western blot. Nadroparin not only prevented and ameliorated the AA-induced colitis histopathologically but also decreased expression of colon NF-κB, activator protein-1, cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and IL-6, which were significantly increased in group AA compared to control. The accumulation of Nrf2 in nuclear fraction and HO-1 found low in group AA was increased with nadroparin (p < 0.05). The mean malondialdehyde level increased with AA and was decreased significantly with nadroparin prevention and treatment (p < 0.001). Nadroparin sodium has both protective and therapeutic effects against colonic inflammation via exerting anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects by modulating Nrf2/HO-1 and NF-κB pathways.

  9. Mitochondrial quality-control dysregulation in conditional HO-1–/– mice

    PubMed Central

    Suliman, Hagir B.; Keenan, Jeffrey E.; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2017-01-01

    The heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox1; HO-1) pathway was tested for defense of mitochondrial quality control in cardiomyocyte-specific Hmox1 KO mice (HO-1[CM]–/–) exposed to oxidative stress (100% O2). After 48 hours of exposure, these mice showed persistent cardiac inflammation and oxidative tissue damage that caused sarcomeric disruption, cardiomyocyte death, left ventricular dysfunction, and cardiomyopathy, while control hearts showed minimal damage. After hyperoxia, HO-1(CM)–/– hearts showed suppression of the Pgc-1α/nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) axis, swelling, low electron density mitochondria by electron microscopy (EM), increased cell death, and extensive collagen deposition. The damage mechanism involves structurally deficient autophagy/mitophagy, impaired LC3II processing, and failure to upregulate Pink1- and Park2-mediated mitophagy. The mitophagy pathway was suppressed through loss of NRF-1 binding to proximal promoter sites on both genes. These results indicate that cardiac Hmox1 induction not only prevents heme toxicity, but also regulates the timing and registration of genetic programs for mitochondrial quality control that limit cell death, pathological remodeling, and cardiac fibrosis. PMID:28194437

  10. Transport properties of Ho1- x Lu x B12 solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabáni, S.; Bat'ko, I.; Bat'ková, M.; Flachbart, K.; Gaz̆o, E.; Pristás̆, G.; Takác̆ová, I.; Bogach, A. V.; Sluchanko, N. E.; Shitsevalova, N. Yu.

    2013-05-01

    Our studies of Ho1- x Lu x B12 solid solutions have shown that the temperature of antiferromagnetic (AF) order in geometrically frustrated system of HoB12 ( T N = 7.4 K) is linearly suppressed to zero temperature, i.e. T N → 0, as lutetium concentration increases to x→ x c ≈ 0.9. In this contribution, we present original results of electrical resistivity measurements on Ho1- x Lu x B12 single crystalline samples with x = 0, 0.2, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9, 1 in the temperature range 0.06-300 K and in magnetic fields ( B) up to 8 T. Complex B vs T N phase diagrams were received from precise temperature ρ( T) and field ρ( B) dependences of resistivity with several AF phases for x ≤ 0.5 pointing to a possibility of quantum critical point at x c ≈ 0.9. The scattering of conduction electrons in the AF phase and in the paramagnetic phase as well as Hall effect results are analyzed and discussed for various concentrations x, when magnetic dilution increases with the increasing content of nonmagnetic Lu ions in the Ho1- x Lu x B12 system.

  11. Nutritional control of IL-23/Th17-mediated autoimmune disease through HO-1/STAT3 activation

    PubMed Central

    Brück, Jürgen; Holstein, Julia; Glocova, Ivana; Seidel, Ursula; Geisel, Julia; Kanno, Toshio; Kumagai, Jin; Mato, Naoko; Sudowe, Stephan; Widmaier, Katja; Sinnberg, Tobias; Yazdi, Amir S.; Eberle, Franziska C.; Hirahara, Kiyoshi; Nakayama, Toshinori; Röcken, Martin; Ghoreschi, Kamran

    2017-01-01

    The nutritional curcumin (CUR) is beneficial in cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. The molecular mechanisms underlying this food-mediated silencing of inflammatory immune responses are poorly understood. By investigating antigen-specific immune responses we found that dietary CUR impairs the differentiation of Th1/Th17 cells in vivo during encephalomyelitis and instead promoted Th2 cells. In contrast, feeding CUR had no inhibitory effect on ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation. Mechanistically, we found that CUR induces an anti-inflammatory phenotype in dendritic cells (DC) with enhanced STAT3 phosphorylation and suppressed expression of Il12b and Il23a. On the molecular level CUR readily induced NRF2-sensitive heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) mRNA and protein in LPS-activated DC. HO-1 enhanced STAT3 phosphorylation, which enriched to Il12b and Il23a loci and negatively regulated their transcription. These findings demonstrate the underlying mechanism through which a nutritional can interfere with the immune response. CUR silences IL-23/Th17-mediated pathology by enhancing HO-1/STAT3 interaction in DC. PMID:28290522

  12. t-BHQ Provides Protection against Lead Neurotoxicity via Nrf2/HO-1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fang; Li, Xiaoyi; Li, Lili; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The neurotoxicity of lead has been well established, and oxidative stress is strongly associated with lead-induced neurotoxicity. Nrf2 is important for protection against oxidative stress in many disease models. We applied t-BHQ, which is an Nrf2 activator, to investigate the possible role of Nrf2 in the protection against lead neurotoxicity. t-BHQ significantly attenuated the oxidative stress in developmental rats by decreasing MDA level, as well as by increasing SOD activity and GSH content, in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Furthermore, neuronal apoptosis was detected by Nissl staining, and Bax expression was inhibited in the t-BHQ-treated group. Results showed that t-BHQ suppressed ROS production and caspase 3/7 activity but increased intracellular GSH content, in SH-SY5Y cells under lead exposure. Moreover, in vivo and in vitro, t-BHQ enhanced the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and binding to ARE areas but did not induce Nrf2 transcription. These phenomena were confirmed using RT-PCR, EMSA, Western blot, and immunofluorescence analyses. Subsequent upregulation of the expression of HO-1, NQO1, and GCLC was observed. However, knockdown of Nrf2 or HO-1 adversely affected the protective effects of t-BHQ against lead toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Thus, t-BHQ can protect against lead neurotoxicity, depending on the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. PMID:26798413

  13. Unveiling the Association of STAT3 and HO-1 in Prostate Cancer: Role beyond Heme Degradation1

    PubMed Central

    Elguero, Belen; Gueron, Geraldine; Giudice, Jimena; Toscani, Martin A; De Luca, Paola; Zalazar, Florencia; Coluccio-Leskow, Federico; Meiss, Roberto; Navone, Nora; De Siervi, Adriana; Vazquez, Elba

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the androgen receptor (AR) is a key step in the development of prostate cancer (PCa). Several mechanisms have been identified in AR activation, among them signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling. Disruption of STAT3 activity has been associated to cancer progression. Recent studies suggest that heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) may play a key role in PCa that may be independent of its catalytic function. We sought to explore whether HO-1 operates on AR transcriptional activity through the STAT3 axis. Our results display that HO-1 induction in PCa cells represses AR activation by decreasing the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) promoter activity and mRNA levels. Strikingly, this is the first report to show by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis that HO-1 associates to gene promoters, revealing a novel function for HO-1 in the nucleus. Furthermore, HO-1 and STAT3 directly interact as determined by co-immunoprecipitation studies. Forced expression of HO-1 increases STAT3 cytoplasmic retention. When PCa cells were transfected with a constitutively active STAT3 mutant, PSA and STAT3 downstream target genes were abrogated under hemin treatment. Additionally, a significant decrease in pSTAT3 protein levels was detected in the nuclear fraction of these cells. Confocal microscopy images exhibit a decreased rate of AR/STAT3 nuclear co-localization under hemin treatment. In vivo studies confirmed that STAT3 nuclear delimitation was significantly decreased in PC3 tumors overexpressing HO-1 grown as xenografts in nude mice. These results provide a novel function for HO-1 down-modulating AR transcriptional activity in PCa, interfering with STAT3 signaling, evidencing its role beyond heme degradation. PMID:23226098

  14. HO-1 inhibits preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation at the onset of obesity via ROS dependent activation of Akt2

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Gabriel; Lindroos-Christensen, Josefine; Einwallner, Elisa; Husa, Julia; Zapf, Thea-Christin; Lipp, Katharina; Rauscher, Sabine; Gröger, Marion; Spittler, Andreas; Loewe, Robert; Gruber, Florian; Duvigneau, J. Catharina; Mohr, Thomas; Sutterlüty-Fall, Hedwig; Klinglmüller, Florian; Prager, Gerhard; Huppertz, Berthold; Yun, Jeanho; Wagner, Oswald; Esterbauer, Harald; Bilban, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of white adipose tissue (WAT) is a hallmark of obesity. The expansion of WAT in obesity involves proliferation and differentiation of adipose precursors, however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we used an unbiased transcriptomics approach to identify the earliest molecular underpinnings occuring in adipose precursors following a brief HFD in mice. Our analysis identifies Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) as strongly and selectively being upregulated in the adipose precursor fraction of WAT, upon high-fat diet (HFD) feeding. Specific deletion of HO-1 in adipose precursors of Hmox1fl/flPdgfraCre mice enhanced HFD-dependent visceral adipose precursor proliferation and differentiation. Mechanistically, HO-1 reduces HFD-induced AKT2 phosphorylation via ROS thresholding in mitochondria to reduce visceral adipose precursor proliferation. HO-1 influences adipogenesis in a cell-autonomous way by regulating events early in adipogenesis, during the process of mitotic clonal expansion, upstream of Cebpα and PPARγ. Similar effects on human preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation in vitro were observed upon modulation of HO-1 expression. This collectively renders HO-1 as an essential factor linking extrinsic factors (HFD) with inhibition of specific downstream molecular mediators (ROS & AKT2), resulting in diminished adipogenesis that may contribute to hyperplastic adipose tissue expansion. PMID:28102348

  15. Agrimonolide and Desmethylagrimonolide Induced HO-1 Expression in HepG2 Cells through Nrf2-Transduction and p38 Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Teng, Hui; Zhang, Kalin Yanbo; Skalicka-Woźniak, Krystyna; Georgiev, Milen I.; Xiao, Jianbo

    2017-01-01

    Agrimonolide and desmethylagrimonolide are the main bioactive polyphenols in agrimony with well-documented antioxidant, anti-diabetic, and anti-inflammatory potential. We report here for the first time that agrimonolide and desmethylagrimonolide stimulate the expression of phase II detoxifying enzymes through the Nrf2-dependent signaling pathway. Agrimonolide and desmethylagrimonolide also possess considerable protective activity from oxidative DNA damage. In order to explore the cytoprotective potential of agrimonolide and desmethylagrimonolide on oxidative stress in liver, we developed an oxidative stress model in HepG2 cells, and check the hypothesis whether Nrf2 pathway is involved. Western blotting and luciferase assay revealed that exposure of HepG2 cells to agrimonolide or desmethylagrimonolide leads to increased heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression by activating ARE through induction of Nrf2 and suppression of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1). Moreover, agrimonolide and desmethylagrimonolide also activated ERK signaling pathways and significantly attenuated individual p38 MAPK expression, subsequently leading to Nrf2 nuclear translocation. In conclusion, our results indicated that transcriptional activation of Nrf2/ARE is critical in agrimonolide and desmethylagrimonolide-mediated HO-1 induction, which can be regulated partially by the blockade of p38 MAPK signaling pathway and inhibiting nuclear translocation of Nrf2. PMID:28119605

  16. AmeriFlux US-Ho1 Howland Forest (main tower)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hollinger, David [USDA Forest Service; Hollinger, David [USDA Forest Service

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ho1 Howland Forest (main tower). Site Description - Closed conifer forest, minimal disturbance. References: Fernandez et al. (1993), Canadian Journal of Soil Science 73 317-328. Hollinger et al. (1999), Global Change Biology 5: 891-902. Savage KE, Davidson EA (2001), Global Biogeochemical Cycles 15 337-350. Scott et al. (2004), Environmental Management, Vol. 33, Supplement 1, pp. S9-S22. Hollinger et al. (2004), Global Change Biology 10: 1689-1706.

  17. HO-1, RET and PML as possible markers for risk stratification of acute myelocytic leukemia and prognostic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Meisheng; Wang, Jishi; Ma, Dan; Chen, Shuya; Lin, Xiaojing; Fang, Qin; Zhe, Nana

    2015-11-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible isoform of HO that is activated in response to oxidative stress and has anti-apoptotic and pro-proliferative effects on leukemia cells. RET, a tyrosine kinase receptor; its expression levels are associated with the differentiation degree of acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) cells. The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) gene inhibits cell proliferation and tumor growth, participates in the differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells and induces cell apoptosis. However, the association between the expression levels of HO-1, RET and PML genes and the risk stratification of AML and prognosis have not previously been reported. In the present study, HO-1 was expressed in the human AML Kasumi-1, HL-60 and THP-1 cell lines, and HO-1 expression was regulated by Hemin (20 µmol/l) and ZnPPIX (10 µmol/l). Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis demonstrated that expression of RET and PML were positively and negatively correlated with HO-1 expression, respectively. Bone marrow samples (18 favorable, 55 intermediate, 15 adverse and 2 unknown karyotype AML cases and 20 healthy donors) were collected from 90 randomly selected AML patients upon their first visit. The mRNA and protein expression of HO-1, RET and PML in samples was detected by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis. At the mRNA level, the adverse group expressed significantly higher levels of HO-1 and RET compared with the levels in the favorable and normal groups. The PML mRNA expression levels in adverse patient samples was lower compared with those of the intermediate group and favorable group. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression levels of HO-1, RET and PML proteins in all risk groups exhibited the same pattern of expression as was observed for the mRNA levels. The overall survival and relapse-free survival rates were shortest in AML patients with high HO-1 expression (Kaplan-Meier; log-rank, P<0.01). The results of the

  18. Molecular cloning and expression of a cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) heme oxygenase-1 gene, CsHO1, which is involved in adventitious root formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Yue; Cao, Ze-Yu; Shen, Wen-Biao; Cui, Jin

    2011-10-15

    Our previous work showed that in cucumber (Cucumis sativus), auxin rapidly induces heme oxygenase (HO) activity and the product of HO action, carbon monoxide (CO), then triggers the signal transduction events leading to adventitious root formation. In this study, the cucumber HO-1 gene (named as CsHO1) was isolated and sequenced. It contains four exons and three introns and encodes a polypeptide of 291 amino acids. Further results show that CsHO1 shares a high homology with plant HO-1 proteins and codes a 33.3 kDa protein with a 65-amino transit peptide, predicting a mature protein of 26.1 kDa. The mature CsHO1 was expressed in Escherichia coli to produce a fusion protein, which exhibits HO activity. The CsHO1:GFP fusion protein was localized in the chloroplast. Related biochemical analyses of mature CsHO1, including Vmax, Km, Topt and pHopt, were also investigated. CsHO1 mRNA was found in germinating seeds, roots, stem, and especially in leaf tissues. Several well-known adventitious root inducers, including auxin, ABA, hemin, nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP), CaCl(2), and sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), differentially up-regulate CsHO1 transcripts and corresponding protein levels. These results suggest that CsHO1 may be involved in cucumber adventitious rooting.

  19. Molecular cloning, characterization, and expression of an alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) heme oxygenase-1 gene, MsHO1, which is pro-oxidants-regulated.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guang-Qing; Xu, Sheng; Xie, Yan-Jie; Han, Bin; Nie, Li; Shen, Wen-Biao; Wang, Ren

    2011-07-01

    It has been documented that plant heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1; EC 1.14.99.3) is both development- and stress-regulated, thus it plays a vital role in light signalling and stress responses. In this study, an alfalfa (Medica sativa L.) HO-1 gene MsHO1 was isolated and sequenced. It contains four exons and three introns within genomic DNA sequence and encodes a polypeptide with 283 amino acids. MsHO1 had a conserved HO signature sequence and showed high similarity to other HOs in plants, especially HO-1 isoform. The MsHO1:GFP fusion protein was localized in the chloroplast. Further biochemical activity analysis of mature MsHO1, which was expressed in Escherichia coli, showed that the Vmax was 48.78 nmol biliverdin-IXα (BV) h⁻¹ nmol⁻¹ protein with an apparent Km value for hemin of 2.33 μM, and the optimum Tm and pH were 37 °C and 7.2, respectively. Results of semi-quantitative RT-PCR and western blot showed that the expressions of MsHO1 were higher in alfalfa stems and leaves than those in germinating seeds and roots. Importantly, MsHO1 gene expression and protein level were induced significantly by some pro-oxidant compounds, including hemin and nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP). In conclusion, MsHO1 may play an important role in oxidative responses.

  20. Activated AMPK boosts the Nrf2/HO-1 signaling axis—A role for the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Kristin; Baldinger, Johannes; Mayerhofer, Barbara; Atanasov, Atanas G.; Dirsch, Verena M.; Heiss, Elke H.

    2015-01-01

    In light of the emerging interplay between redox and metabolic signaling pathways we investigated the potential cross talk between nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), central regulators of the cellular redox and energy balance, respectively. Making use of xanthohumol (XN) as an activator of both the AMPK and the Nrf2 signaling pathway we show that AMPK exerts a positive influence on Nrf2/heme oxygenase (HO)-1 signaling in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Genetic ablation and pharmacological inhibition of AMPK blunts Nrf2-dependent HO-1 expression by XN already at the mRNA level. XN leads to AMPK activation via interference with mitochondrial function and activation of liver kinase B1 as upstream AMPK kinase. The subsequent AMPK-mediated enhancement of the Nrf2/HO-1 response does not depend on inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin, inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β, or altered abundance of Nrf2 (total and nuclear). However, reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress was identified and elaborated as a step in the AMPK-augmented Nrf2/HO-1 response. Overall, we shed more light on the hitherto incompletely understood cross talk between the LKB1/AMPK and the Nrf2/HO-1 axis revealing for the first time involvement of the unfolded protein response as an additional player and suggesting tight cooperation between signaling pathways controlling cellular redox, energy, or protein homeostasis. PMID:25843659

  1. Fatty aldehyde dehydrogenases in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: role in hexadecanol metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, M E; Finnerty, W R

    1985-01-01

    The role of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenases (FALDHs) in hexadecane and hexadecanol metabolism was studied in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N. Two distinct FALDHs were demonstrated in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: a membrane-bound, NADP-dependent FALDH activity induced 5-, 15-, and 9-fold by growth on hexadecanol, dodecyl aldehyde, and hexadecane, respectively, and a constitutive, NAD-dependent, membrane-localized FALDH. The NADP-dependent FALDH exhibited apparent Km and Vmax values for decyl aldehyde of 5.0, 13.0, 18.0, and 18.3 microM and 537.0, 500.0, 25.0, and 38.0 nmol/min in hexadecane-, hexadecanol-, ethanol-, palmitate-grown cells, respectively. FALDH isozymes ald-a, ald-b, and ald-c were demonstrated by gel electrophoresis in extracts of hexadecane- and hexadecanol-grown cells. ald-a, ald-b, and ald-d were present in dodecyl aldehyde-grown cells, while palmitate-grown control cells contained ald-b and ald-d. Dodecyl aldehyde-negative mutants were isolated and grouped into two phenotypic classes based on growth: class 1 mutants were hexadecane and hexadecanol negative and class 2 mutants were hexadecane and hexadecanol positive. Specific activity of NADP-dependent FALDH in Ald21 (class 1 mutant) was 85% lower than that of wild-type FALDH, while the specific activity of Ald24 (class 2 mutant) was 55% greater than that of wild-type FALDH. Ald21R, a dodecyl aldehyde-positive revertant able to grow on hexadecane, hexadecanol, and dodecyl aldehyde, exhibited a 100% increase in the specific activity of the NADP-dependent FALDH. The oxidation of [3H]hexadecane byAld21 yielded the accumulation of 61% more fatty aldehyde than the wild type, while Ald24 accumulated 27% more fatty aldehyde, 95% more fatty alcohol, and 65% more wax ester than the wild type. This study provides genetic and physiological evidence for the role of fatty aldehyde as an essential metabolic intermediate and NADP-dependent FALDH as a key enzyme in the dissimilation of hexadecane, hexadecanol

  2. Magnetic properties of Ho1- x Lu x B12 solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabáni, S.; Gaz̆o, E.; Pristás̆, G.; Takác̆ová, I.; Flachbart, K.; Shitsevalova, N.; Siemensmeyer, K.; Sluchanko, N.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic properties of the geometrically frustrated antiferromagnet HoB12 (with T N = 7.4 K) modified by substitution of magnetic Ho atoms through non-magnetic Lu ones are presented and discussed. In this case, in Ho1- x Lu x B12 solid solutions, both chemical pressure resulting from different Lu3+ and Ho3+ radii and magnetic dilution take place with increasing Lu content ( x) that change properties of the system. The received results show strong indication for the existence of a quantum critical point near x = 0.9, which separates the region of magnetic order (starting with HoB12 for x = 0) and the nonmagnetic region (ending with superconducting LuB12 for x = 1).

  3. Modification of Caffeic Acid with Pyrrolidine Enhances Antioxidant Ability by Activating AKT/HO-1 Pathway in Heart

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Hui-Chun; Lee, Shih-Yi; Yang, Kai-Chien; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Su, Ming-Jai

    2016-01-01

    Overproduction of free radicals during ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury leads to an interest in using antioxidant therapy. Activating an endogenous antioxidant signaling pathway is more important due to the fact that the free radical scavenging behavior in vitro does not always correlate with a cytoprotection effect in vivo. Caffeic acid (CA), an antioxidant, is a major phenolic constituent in nature. Pyrrolidinyl caffeamide (PLCA), a derivative of CA, was compared with CA for their antioxidant and cytoprotective effects. Our results indicate that CA and PLCA exert the same ability to scavenge DPPH in vitro. In response to myocardial I/R stress, PLCA was shown to attenuate lipid peroxydation and troponin release more than CA. These responses were accompanied with a prominent elevation in AKT and HO-1 expression and a preservation of mnSOD expression and catalase activity. PLCA also improved cell viability and alleviated the intracellular ROS level more than CA in cardiomyocytes exposed to H2O2. When inhibiting the AKT or HO-1 pathways, PLCA lost its ability to recover mnSOD expression and catalase activity to counteract with oxidative stress, suggesting AKT/HO-1 pathway activation by PLCA plays an important role. In addition, inhibition of AKT signaling further abolished HO-1 activity, while inhibition of HO-1 signaling attenuated AKT expression, indicating cross-talk between the AKT and HO-1 pathways. These protective effects may contribute to the cardiac function improvement by PLCA. These findings provide new insight into therapeutic approaches using a modified natural compound against oxidative stress from myocardial injuries. PMID:26845693

  4. Luteolin protects mice from severe acute pancreatitis by exerting HO-1-mediated anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Wang, Kezhou; Yuan, Chunxiao; Xing, Rong; Ni, Jianbo; Hu, Guoyong; Chen, Fengling; Wang, Xingpeng

    2017-01-01

    Reseda odorata L. has long been used in traditional Asian medicine for the treatment of diseases associated with oxidative injury and acute inflammation, such as endotoxemia, acute lung injury, acute myocardial infarction and hepatitis. Luteolin, the main component of Reseda odorata L., which is also widely found in many natural herbs and vege tables, has been shown to induce heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression to exert anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. In this study, we aimed to examine the effects of luteolin on mice with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Cerulein and lipopolysaccharide were used to induce SAP in male Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice in the SAP group. The SAP group was divided into 4 subgroups, as follows: the vehicle, luteolin, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) only, and luteolin (Lut) + ZnPP (luteolin plus zinc protoporphyrin treatment) groups. The wet/dry weight ratios, hematoxylin and eosin staining and pathological scores of pancreatic tissues were assessed and compared to those of the control mice. Amylase, lipase, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and myeloperoxidase activities, and malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10 and HO-1 levels, as well as the expression of HO-1 were determined in serum and/or pancreatic tissue samples. SAP was successfully induced in male mice compared to normal control mice. The wet/dry weight ratios, pathological scores, and amylase and lipase activity, as well as the levels of TNFα and IL-6 were significantly reduced in the pancreatic tissues of the mice in the Lut group compared with those of the mice in the vehicle group. The Lut group exhibited a significant increase in HO-1 expression in the pancreas and enhanced serum HO-1 and IL-10 levels compared with the vehicle group. The suppression of HO-1 activity in the ZnPP group significantly abolished the protective effects of luteolin. NF-κB expression in the pancreatic tissues

  5. Knockout of ho-1 protects the striatum from ferrous iron-induced injury in a male-specific manner in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Fang; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.; Lin, Chih-Lung; Chen, Tzu-Yin; Hsiao, Hsiu-Wen; Chiang, Pei-Chi; Hsu, Chin

    2016-01-01

    Men have worse survival than premenopausal women after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). After ICH, overproduction of iron associated with induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in brain was observed. Rodent ICH model using ferrous citrate (FC)-infusion into the striatum to simulate iron overload, showed a higher degree of injury severity in males than in females. However, the participation of HO-1 in sex-differences of iron-induced brain injury remains unknown. The present results showed a higher level of HO-1 expression associated with more severe injury in males compared with females after FC-infusion. Estradiol (E2) contributed to lower levels of FC-induced HO-1 expression in females compared with males. Heterozygote ho-1 KO decreased the levels of FC-induced injury severity, histological lesions, behavioral deficits, autophagy and autophagic cell death in the striatum of males but not in females. Moreover, ho-1 deficiency enhanced the neuroprotection by E2 only in males. These results suggested that over induction of HO-1 plays a harmful role in FC-induced brain injury in a male-specific manner. Suppression of HO-1 combined with E2 exhibits a synergistic effect on neuroprotection against FC-induced striatal injury in males. These findings open up the prospect for male-specific neuroprotection targeting HO-1 suppression for patients suffering from striatal iron overload. PMID:27198537

  6. Nuclear Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) Modulates Subcellular Distribution and Activation of Nrf2, Impacting Metabolic and Anti-oxidant Defenses*

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Chhanda; Shah, Nidhi; Muthu, Manasa; La, Ping; Fernando, Amal P.; Sengupta, Shaon; Yang, Guang; Dennery, Phyllis A.

    2014-01-01

    With oxidative injury as well as in some solid tumors and myeloid leukemia cells, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic microsomal stress protein, migrates to the nucleus in a truncated and enzymatically inactive form. However, the function of HO-1 in the nucleus is not completely clear. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor and master regulator of numerous antioxidants and anti-apoptotic proteins, including HO-1, also accumulates in the nucleus with oxidative injury and in various types of cancer. Here we demonstrate that in oxidative stress, nuclear HO-1 interacts with Nrf2 and stabilizes it from glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β)-mediated phosphorylation coupled with ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation, thereby prolonging its accumulation in the nucleus. This regulation of Nrf2 post-induction by nuclear HO-1 is important for the preferential transcription of phase II detoxification enzymes such as NQO1 as well as glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), a regulator of the pentose phosphate pathway. Using Nrf2 knock-out cells, we further demonstrate that nuclear HO-1-associated cytoprotection against oxidative stress depends on an HO-1/Nrf2 interaction. Although it is well known that Nrf2 induces HO-1 leading to mitigation of oxidant stress, we propose a novel mechanism by which HO-1, by modulating the activation of Nrf2, sets an adaptive reprogramming that enhances antioxidant defenses. PMID:25107906

  7. Cerium oxide nanoparticles alleviate oxidative stress and decreases Nrf-2/HO-1 in D-GALN/LPS induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Reem M; Rashd, Laila A; Hashem, Khalid S; Soliman, Hatem M

    2015-07-01

    Translocation of the master regulator of antioxidant-response element-driven antioxidant gene, nuclear factor erythroid 2 (Nrf-2) from the cytoplasm into the nucleus and triggering the transcription of hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1) to counteract the oxidative stress is a key feature in D-galactoseamine and lipopolysaccharide (D-GALN/LPS) induced hepatotoxicity. We mainly aimed to study the effect of cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles on Nrf-2/HO-1 pathway whereas; it has previously shown to have an antioxidant effect in liver models. Administration of CeO2 nanoparticles significantly decreased the translocation of the cytoplasmic Nrf-2 with a concomitant decrement in the gene expression of HO-1 as it reveals a powerful antioxidative effect as indicated by the significant increase in the levels of glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPX1), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. In synchronization, a substantial decrement in the levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), TBARS and percentage of DNA fragmentation was established. These results were confirmed by histopathology examination which showed a severe degeneration, haemorrhages, widened sinusoids and focal leukocyte infiltration in D-GALN/LPS treatment and these features were alleviated with CeO2 administration. In conclusion, CeO2 is a potential antioxidant that can effectively decrease the translocation of the cytoplasmic Nrf-2 into the nucleus and decrease HO-1 in D-GALN/LPS induced hepatotoxicity.

  8. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) protects skin cells from ionizing radiation via heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) overexpression.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Xu, Jing; Ge, Yangyang; Cao, Han; Ge, Xin; Luo, Judong; Xue, Jiao; Yang, Hongying; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping

    2014-11-01

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenolic constituent of green tea, is a potent antioxidant and free radical scavenger that may have therapeutic applications for the treatment of many disorders. Radiation therapy is widely used for the treatment of various types of cancers; however, radiation-induced skin injury remains a serious concern. EGCG has not yet been reported as protecting skin cells against ionizing radiation. In the present study, we investigated whether EGCG confers cytoprotection against ionizing radiation. We found that, compared with the control, pretreatment with EGCG significantly enhanced the viability of human skin cells that were irradiated with X-rays, and decreased apoptosis induced by X-ray irradiation. Mito-Tracker assay showed that EGCG suppressed the damage to mitochondria induced by ionizing radiation via upregulation of SOD2. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HaCaT cells were significantly reduced when pretreated with EGCG before irradiation. Radiation-induced γH2AX foci, which are representative of DNA double-strand breaks, were decreased by pretreatment with EGCG. Furthermore, EGCG induced the expression of the cytoprotective molecule heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in a dose-dependent manner via transcriptional activation. HO-1 knockdown or treatment with the HO-1 inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPPIX) reversed the protective role of EGCG, indicating an important role for HO-1. These results suggest that EGCG offers a new strategy for protecting skin against ionizing radiation.

  9. Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 induction prevents Endoplasmic Reticulum stress-mediated endothelial cell death and impaired angiogenic capacity.

    PubMed

    Maamoun, Hatem; Zachariah, Matshediso; McVey, John H; Green, Fiona R; Agouni, Abdelali

    2017-03-01

    Most of diabetic cardiovascular complications are attributed to endothelial dysfunction and impaired angiogenesis. Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and oxidative stresses were shown to play a pivotal role in the development of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. Hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) was shown to protect against oxidative stress in diabetes; however, its role in alleviating ER stress-induced endothelial dysfunction remains not fully elucidated. We aim here to test the protective role of HO-1 against high glucose-mediated ER stress and endothelial dysfunction and understand the underlying mechanisms with special emphasis on oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death. Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) were grown in either physiological or intermittent high concentrations of glucose for 5days in the presence or absence of Cobalt (III) Protoporphyrin IX chloride (CoPP, HO-1 inducer) or 4-Phenyl Butyric Acid (PBA, ER stress inhibitor). Using an integrated cellular and molecular approach, we then assessed ER stress and inflammatory responses, in addition to apoptosis and angiogenic capacity in these cells. Our results show that HO-1 induction prevented high glucose-mediated increase of mRNA and protein expression of key ER stress markers. Cells incubated with high glucose exhibited high levels of oxidative stress, activation of major inflammatory and apoptotic responses [nuclear factor (NF)-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)] and increased rate of apoptosis; however, cells pre-treated with CoPP or PBA were fully protected. In addition, high glucose enhanced caspases 3 and 7 cleavage and activity and augmented cleaved poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) expression whereas HO-1 induction prevented these effects. Finally, HO-1 induction and ER stress inhibition prevented high glucose-induced reduction in NO release and impaired the angiogenic capacity of HUVECs, and enhanced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A expression. Altogether, we show here the

  10. Protocatechualdehyde Protects Against Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion-Induced Oxidative Injury Via Protein Kinase Cε/Nrf2/HO-1 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chao; Wang, Shiquan; Duan, Jialin; Jia, Na; Zhu, Yanrong; Ding, Yi; Guan, Yue; Wei, Guo; Yin, Ying; Xi, Miaomaio; Wen, Aidong

    2017-03-01

    Oxidative stress is closely related to the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) is a phenolic acid compound that has the putative antioxidant activities. The present study was aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in the antioxidative effect of PCA against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The experiment stroke model was produced in Sprague-Dawley rats via middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). To model ischemia-like conditions in vitro, differentiated SH-SY5Y cells were exposed to transient oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Treatment with PCA significantly improved neurologic score, reduced infarct volume and necrotic neurons, and also decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) contents at 24 h after reperfusion. Meanwhile, PCA significantly increased the transcription nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expressions in the ischemic cerebral cortex as shown by immunofluorescence staining and Western blot analysis. In vitro experiment showed that PCA protected differentiated SH-SY5Y cells against OGD-induced injury. Likewise, PCA also increased markedly the Nrf2 and HO-1 expressions in a dose-dependent manner. The neuroprotection effect of PCA was abolished by knockdown of Nrf2 and HO-1. Moreover, knockdown of protein kinase Cε (PKCε) also blocked PCA-induced Nfr2 nuclear translocation, HO-1 expression, and neuroprotection. Taken together, these results provide evidences that PCA can protect against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion-induced oxidative injury, and the neuroprotective effect involves the PKCε/Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

  11. Garcinia vilersiana bark extract activates the Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway in RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Yamanaka, Ichiro; Duong, Ho Huynh Thuy; Quynh, Nguyen Thi; Kanaho, Yasunori; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2013-01-01

    Garcinia vilersiana is a traditional medicinal plant in Vietnam. The petroleum ether extract of stem bark of Garcinia vilersiana (GVE) was prepared to evaluate its potential to activate Nrf2, a transcription factor of antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes. Exposure of mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells to GVE (0.625-2.5 µg/ml) resulted in a significant activation of Nrf2, as evaluated by nuclear accumulation of this transcription factor, and increased antioxidant response element (ARE) binding activity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. As a result, GVE caused ARE-dependent up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the cells. These results suggest that GVE contains components that have the ability to activate the Nrf2/ARE/HO-1 signaling pathway, leading to cellular protection.

  12. (GT)n Repeat Polymorphism in Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) Correlates with Clinical Outcome after Myeloablative or Nonmyeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Køllgaard, Tania; Kornblit, Brian; Petersen, Jesper; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Mortensen, Bo Kok; Brændstrup, Peter; Sengeløv, Henrik; Høgdall, Estrid; Müller, Klaus; Vindeløv, Lars; Andersen, Mads Hald; thor Straten, Per

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a treatment for various hematologic diseases where efficacy of treatment is in part based on the graft versus tumour (GVT) activity of cells in the transplant. The cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation and it has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory functions. In humans a (GT)n repeat polymorphism regulates the expression of HO-1. We conducted fragment length analyses of the (GT)n repeat in the promotor region of the gene for HO-1 in DNA from donors and recipients receiving allogeneic myeloablative- (MA) (n = 110) or nonmyeloablative- (NMA-) (n = 250) HCT. Subsequently, we compared the length of the (GT)n repeat with clinical outcome after HCT. We demonstrated that transplants from a HO-1high donor after MA-conditioning (n = 13) is associated with higher relapse incidence at 3 years (p = 0.01, n = 110). In the NMA-conditioning setting transplantation of HO-1low donor cells into HO-1low recipients correlated significantly with decreased relapse related mortality (RRM) and longer progression free survival (PFS) (p = 0.03 and p = 0.008, respectively). Overall, our findings suggest that HO-1 may play a role for the induction of GVT effect after allogeneic HCT. PMID:27997582

  13. Nitric oxide sets off an antioxidant response in adrenal cells: involvement of sGC and Nrf2 in HO-1 induction.

    PubMed

    Astort, F; Mercau, M; Giordanino, E; Degese, M S; Caldareri, L; Coso, O; Cymeryng, C B

    2014-02-15

    Induction of microsomal heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) activity is considered a cytoprotective mechanism in different cell types. In adrenal cells, HO-1 induction by ACTH exerts a modulatory effect on steroid production as well. As nitric oxide (NO) has been also regarded as an autocrine/paracrine modulator of adrenal steroidogenesis we sought to study the effects of NO on the induction of HO-1 and the mechanism involved. We hereby analyzed the time and dose-dependent effect of a NO-donor (DETA/NO) on HO-1 induction in a murine adrenocortical cell line. We showed that this effect is mainly exerted at a transcriptional level as it is inhibited by actinomycin D and HO-1 mRNA degradation rates were not affected by DETA/NO treatment. HO-1 induction by NO does not appear to involve the generation of oxidative stress as it was not affected by antioxidant treatment. We also demonstrated that NO-treatment results in the nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2), an effect that is attenuated by transfecting the cells with a dominant negative isoform of Nrf2. We finally show that the effects of the NO-donor are reproduced by a permeable analog of cGMP and that a soluble guanylate cyclase specific inhibitor blocked both the induction of HO-1 by NO and the nuclear translocation of Nrf2.

  14. HO-1 attenuates hippocampal neurons injury via the activation of BDNF-TrkB-PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in stroke.

    PubMed

    Qi, Dashi; Ouyang, Changjie; Wang, Yulan; Zhang, Shichun; Ma, Xijuan; Song, YuanJian; Yu, HongLi; Tang, Jiali; Fu, Wei; Sheng, Lei; Yang, Lihua; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Weihao; Miao, Lei; Li, Tengteng; Huang, Xiaojing; Dong, Hongyan

    2014-08-19

    Although recent studies have found that HO-1 plays an important role in neuronal survival, little is known about the precise mechanisms occurring during cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective mechanisms of HO-1 against ischemic brain injury induced by cerebral I/R and to explore whether the BDNF-TrkB-PI3K/Akt signaling pathway contributed to the protection provided by HO-1. Over-expressed HO-1 plasmids were employed to induce the overexpression of HO-1 through hippocampi CA1 injection 5 days before the cerebral I/R animal model was induced by four-vessel occlusion for 15 min transient ischemia and followed by reperfusion in Sprague-Dawley rats. Immunoblotting was carried out to examine the expression of the related proteins, and HE-staining was used to detect the percentage of living neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region. The results showed that over-expressed HO-1 could significantly protect neurons against cerebral I/R. Furthermore, the protein expression of BDNF, TrkB and p-Akt also increased in the rats treated with over-expressed HO-1 plasmids. However, treatment with tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) receptor antagonist (K252a) reversed the HO-1-induced increase in BDNF and p-Akt protein levels and decreased the level of cleaved caspase-3 protein in I/R rats. In summary, our results imply that HO-1 can decrease cell apoptosis in the I/R rat brain and that the mechanism may be related to the activation of the BDNF-TrkB-PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  15. Targeting HO-1 by Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Reduces Contrast-Induced Renal Injury via Anti-Oxidative Stress and Anti-Inflammation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yunhui; Wu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yongbin; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Fu, Jinjuan; Zou, Xue; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Xiongwen; Jose, Pedro A.; Lu, Xi; Zeng, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Both oxidative stress and inflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a purified catechin from green tea, has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, it is unknown whether or not EGCG is effective in treating CIN. Our present study found that intravenous administration of EGCG, either before or just after the establishment of CIN, had a protective effect, determined by normalization of serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels, improvement in renal histopathological scoring and alleviation of apoptosis, accompanied by decreased oxidative stress and inflammation. Because EGCG is a potent inducer of the antioxidant heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), we studied HO-1 signaling in CIN. HO-1 levels were increased in CIN; treatment with EGCG further increased HO-1 levels, accompanied by an increase in Nrf2, a regulator of antioxidant proteins. Interestingly, blockade of HO-1 with protoporphyrin IX zinc(II) (ZnPP) prevented the protective effect of EGCG on CIN. ZnPP also blocked the ability of EGCG to increase the activity of an antioxidant (superoxide dismutase), and decrease markers of oxidative stress (myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde) and inflammation (myeloperoxidase and IL-1β), indicating that HO-1 is the upstream molecule that regulates the EGCG-mediated protection. To determine further the role of HO-1 on the EGCG-mediated inhibition of inflammation, we studied the effect of EGCG on the NLRP3 inflammasome, an upstream signaling of IL-1β. EGCG down-regulated NLRP3 expression, which was blocked by ZnPP, indicating that HO-1 links EGCG with NLRP3. Therefore, EGCG, via up-regulation of HO-1, protects against CIN by amelioration of oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:26866373

  16. Beneficial effects of the transgenic expression of human sTNF-αR-Fc and HO-1 on pig-to-mouse islet xenograft survival.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ji-Jing; Yeom, Hye-Jeong; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Lee, Jae-Ghi; Lee, Eun Won; Cho, Bumrae; Lee, Han Sin; Kim, Su Jin; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Kim, Sung Joo; Lee, Byeong-Chun; Ahn, Curie; Yang, Jaeseok

    2016-02-01

    Both human soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor-Fc (sTNF-αR-Fc) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) transgenic pigs have been generated previously for xenotransplantation. Here, we investigated whether overexpression of sTNF-αR-Fc or HO-1 in pig islets prolongs islet xenograft survival. Adult porcine islets were isolated from human sTNF-αR-Fc or HO-1 transgenic and wild type pigs, and were transplanted into diabetic nude mice. Effects of the expression of both genes on islet apoptosis, chemokine expression, cellular infiltration, antibody production, and islet xenograft survival were analyzed. Human sTNF-αR-Fc transgenic pigs successfully expressed sTNF-αR-Fc in the islets; human HO-1 transgenic pigs expressed significant levels of HO-1 in the islets. Pig-to-mouse islet xenograft survival was significantly prolonged in both the sTNF-αR-Fc and HO-1 groups compared with that in the wild type group. Both the sTNF-αR-Fc and HO-1 groups exhibited suppressed intragraft expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and decreased perigraft infiltration of immune cells. However, there was no difference in the anti-pig antibody levels between the groups. Apoptosis of islet cells during the early engraftment was suppressed only in the HO-1 group. Porcine islets from both sTNF-αR-Fc and HO-1 transgenic pigs prolonged xenograft survival by suppressing islet cell apoptosis or secondary inflammatory responses following islet death, indicating that these transgenic pigs might have applications in successful islet xenotransplantation.

  17. Ethanol Extract of Ganoderma lucidum Augments Cellular Anti-oxidant Defense through Activation of Nrf2/HO-1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoo-hwan; Kim, Jung-hee; Song, Choon-ho; Jang, Kyung-jeon; kim, Cheol-hong; Kang, Ji- Sook; Choi, Yung-hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The mushroom Ganoderma lucidum has been widely used as a traditional herbal medicine for many years. Although several studies have focused on the anti-oxidative activity of this mushroom, the molecular mechanisms underlying its activity have not yet been clearly established. The present study investigated the cytoprotective effect of ethanol extract of Ganoderma lucidum (EGL) against oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide, H2O2) and elucidated the underlying mechanisms in a C2C12 myoblast cell line. Methods: Oxidative stress markers were determined by using the comet assay to measure reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage. Cell viability and Western blotting analyses were employed to evaluate the cellular response to EGL and H2O2 in C2C12 cells. Transfection with nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-specific small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) was conducted to understand the relationship between Nrf2 expression and H2O2-induced growth inhibition. Results: The results showed that EGL effectively inhibited H2O2-induced growth and the generation of ROS. EGL markedly suppressed H2O2-induced comet-like DNA formation and phosphorylation of histone H2AX at serine 139 (p-γH2AX), a widely used marker of DNA damage, suggesting that EGL prevented H2O2-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, the EGL treatment effectively induced the expression of Nrf2, as well as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), with parallel phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in the C2C12 myoblasts. However, zinc protoporphyrin IX, a HO-1 inhibitor, significantly abolished the protective effects of EGL against H2O2-induced accumulation of ROS and reduced cell growth. Notably, transient transfection with Nrf2-specific siRNA attenuated the cytoprotective effects and HO-1 induction by EGL, indicating that EGL induced the expression of HO-1 in an Nrf2-dependent manner. Conclusion: Collectively, these results demonstrate that EGL augments the

  18. Sulforaphane Protects Rodent Retinas against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury through the Activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 Antioxidant Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruixing; Brecha, Nicholas C.; Yu, Albert Cheung Hoi; Pu, Mingliang

    2014-01-01

    Retinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury induces oxidative stress, leukocyte infiltration, and neuronal cell death. Sulforaphane (SF), which can be obtained in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, exerts protective effects in response to oxidative stress in various tissues. These effects can be initiated through nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). This investigation was designed to elucidate the neural protective mechanisms of SF in the retinal I/R rat model. Animals were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with SF (12.5 mg/kg) or vehicle (corn oil) once a day for 7 consecutive days. Then, retinal I/R was made by elevating the intraocular pressure (IOP) to 130 mmHg for 1 h. To determine if HO-1 was involved in the Nrf2 antioxidant pathway, rats were subjected to protoporphyrin IX zinc (II) (ZnPP, 30 mg/kg, i.p.) treatments at 24 h before retinal ischemia. The neuroprotective effects of SF were assessed by determining the morphology of the retina, counting the infiltrating inflammatory cells and the surviving retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and amacrine cells, and measuring apoptosis in the retinal layers. The expression of Nrf2 and HO-1 was studied by immunofluorescence analysis and western blotting. I/R induced a marked increase of ROS generation, caused pronounced inflammation, increased the apoptosis of RGCs and amacrine cells and caused the thinning of the inner retinal layer (IRL), and these effects were diminished or abolished by SF pretreatment. Meanwhile, SF pretreatment significantly elevated the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and the level of HO-1 expression in the I/R retinas; however, ZnPP reversed the protective effects of SF on I/R retinas. Together, we offer direct evidence that SF had protective effects on I/R retinas, which could be attributed, at least in part, to the activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant pathway. PMID:25470382

  19. Sulforaphane exerts its anti-inflammatory effect against amyloid-β peptide via STAT-1 dephosphorylation and activation of Nrf2/HO-1 cascade in human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    An, Ye Won; Jhang, Kyoung A; Woo, So-Youn; Kang, Jihee Lee; Chong, Young Hae

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder worldwide, accounting for most cases of dementia in elderly individuals, and effective therapies are still lacking. This study was designed to investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of sulforaphane against Aβ1-42 monomers in human THP-1 microglia-like cells. The results showed that sulforaphane preferentially inhibited cathepsin B- and caspase-1-dependent NLRP3 inflammasome activation induced by mostly Aβ1-42 monomers, an effect that potently reduced excessive secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Subsequent mechanistic studies revealed that sulforaphane mitigated the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 induced by Aβ1-42 monomers. Sulforaphane also increased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation, which was followed by upregulation of heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1). The anti-inflammatory effect of sulforaphane on Aβ1-42-induced IL-1β production was diminished by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Nrf2 or HO-1. Moreover, sulforaphane significantly attenuated the levels of microRNA-146a, which is selectively upregulated in the temporal cortex and hippocampus of AD brains. The aforementioned effects of sulforaphane were replicated by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, herbimycin A, and Nrf2 activator. These results indicate that signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 dephosphorylation, HO-1 and its upstream effector, Nrf2, play a pivotal role in triggering an anti-inflammatory signaling cascade of sulforaphane that results in decreases of IL-1β release and microRNA-146a production in Aβ1-42-stimulated human microglia-like cells. These findings suggest that the phytochemical sulforaphane has a potential application in AD therapeutics.

  20. Butein induction of HO-1 by p38 MAPK/Nrf2 pathway in adipocytes attenuates high-fat diet induced adipose hypertrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Ka, Sun-O; Lee, Youngyi; Park, Byung-Hyun; Bae, Eun Ju

    2017-03-15

    Adipose tissue inflammation and oxidative stress are key components in the development of obesity and insulin resistance. Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in adipocytes protects against obesity and adipose dysfunction. In this study, we report the identification of butein, a flavonoid chalcone, as a novel inducer of HO-1 expression in adipocytes in vitro and in vivo. Butein upregulated HO-1 mRNA and protein expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, accompanied by Kelch-Like ECH-Associated Protein (Keap) 1 degradation and increase in the nuclear level of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Butein modulation of Keap1 and Nrf2 as well as HO-1 upregulation was reversed by pretreatment with p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580, indicating the involvement of p38 MAPK in butein activation of Nrf2 in adipocytes. In addition, HO-1 activation by butein led to the inhibitions of reactive oxygen species and adipocyte differentiation, as evidenced by the fact that butein repression of reactive oxygen species and adipogenesis was reversed by pretreatment with HO-1 inhibitor SnPP. Induction of HO-1 expression by butein was also demonstrated in the adipose tissue of C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat diet administered along with butein for three weeks, and correlated with the inhibitions of adiposity and adipose tissue inflammation, which were reversed by co-administration of SnPP. Altogether, our results demonstrate that butein activates the p38 MAPK/Nrf2/HO-1 pathway to act as a potent inhibitor of adipose hypertrophy and inflammation in a diet-induced obesity model and thus has potential for suppressing obesity-linked metabolic syndrome.

  1. MP4CO, a pegylated hemoglobin saturated with carbon monoxide, is a modulator of HO-1, inflammation, and vaso-occlusion in transgenic sickle mice.

    PubMed

    Belcher, John D; Young, Mark; Chen, Chunsheng; Nguyen, Julia; Burhop, Kenneth; Tran, Phuc; Vercellotti, Gregory M

    2013-10-10

    Transgenic sickle mice expressing β(S) hemoglobin have activated vascular endothelium in multiple organs that exhibits enhanced expression of NF-ĸB and adhesion molecules and promotes microvascular stasis in sickle, but not normal, mice in response to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R), or heme. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) or administration of its products, carbon monoxide (CO) or biliverdin, inhibits microvascular stasis in sickle mice. Infusion of human hemoglobin conjugated with polyethylene glycol and saturated with CO (MP4CO) markedly induced hepatic HO-1 activity and inhibited NF-ĸB activation and H/R-induced microvascular stasis in sickle mice. These effects were mediated by CO; saline or MP4 saturated with O2 (MP4OX) had little to no effect on H/R-induced stasis, though unmodified oxyhemoglobin exacerbated stasis. The HO-1 inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin, blocked MP4CO protection, consistent with HO-1 involvement in the protection afforded by MP4CO. MP4CO also induced nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2), an important transcriptional regulator of HO-1 and other antioxidant genes. In a heterozygous (hemoglobin-AS) sickle mouse model, intravenous hemin induced cardiovascular collapse and mortality within 120 minutes, which was significantly reduced by MP4CO, but not MP4OX. These data demonstrate that MP4CO induces cytoprotective Nrf2 and HO-1 and decreases NF-ĸB activation, microvascular stasis, and mortality in transgenic sickle mouse models.

  2. Sulforaphane Ameliorates Okadaic Acid-Induced Memory Impairment in Rats by Activating the Nrf2/HO-1 Antioxidant Pathway.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Subhash; Rajasekar, N; Hanif, Kashif; Nath, Chandishwar; Shukla, Rakesh

    2016-10-01

    Okadaic acid (OKA) causes memory impairment and attenuates nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) along with oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in rats. Sulforaphane (dietary isothiocyanate compound), an activator of Nrf2 signaling, exhibits neuroprotective effects. However, the protective effect of sulforaphane in OKA-induced neurotoxicity remains uninvestigated. Therefore, in the present study, the role of sulforaphane in OKA-induced memory impairment in rats was explored. A significant increased Nrf2 expression in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex was observed in trained (Morris water maze) rats, and a significant decreased Nrf2 expression in memory-impaired (OKA, 200 ng icv) rats indicated its involvement in memory function. Sulforaphane administration (5 and 10 mg/kg, ip, days 1 and 2) ameliorates OKA-induced memory impairment in rats. The treatment also restored Nrf2 and its downstream antioxidant protein expression (GCLC, HO-1) and attenuated oxidative stress (ROS, nitrite, GSH), neuroinflammation (NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-10), and neuronal apoptosis in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of OKA-treated rats. Further, to determine whether modulation of Nrf2 signaling is responsible for the protective effect of sulforaphane, in vitro, Nrf2 siRNA and its downstream HO-1 inhibition studies were carried out in a rat astrocytoma cell line (C6). The protective effects of sulforaphane were abolished with Nrf2 siRNA and HO-1 inhibition in astrocytes. The results suggest that Nrf2-dependent activation of cellular antioxidant machinery results in sulforaphane-mediated protection against OKA-induced memory impairment in rats. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. Protective action of nipradilol mediated through S-nitrosylation of Keap1 and HO-1 induction in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Koriyama, Yoshiki; Kamiya, Marie; Takadera, Tsuneo; Arai, Kunizo; Sugitani, Kayo; Ogai, Kazuhiro; Kato, Satoru

    2012-12-01

    Nipradilol (Nip), which has α1- and β-adrenoceptor antagonist and nitric oxide (NO)-donating properties, has clinically been used as an anti-glaucomatous agent in Japan. NO mediates cellular signaling pathways that regulate physiological functions. The major signaling mechanisms mediated by NO are cGMP-dependent signaling and protein S-nitrosylation-dependent signalings. Nip has been described as having neuroprotective effects through cGMP-dependent pathway in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). However, the effect seems to be partial. On the other hand, whether Nip can prevent cell death through S-nitrosylation is not yet clarified. In this study, we therefore focused on the neuroprotective mechanism of Nip through S-nitrosylation. Nip showed a dramatic neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress-induced death of RGC-5 cells. However, denitro-nipradilol, which does not have NO-donating properties, was not protective against oxidative stress. Furthermore, an NO scavenger significantly reversed the protective action of Nip against oxidative stress. In addition, we demonstrated that α1- or β-adrenoceptor antagonists (prazosin or timolol) did not show any neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress in RGC-5 cells. We also demonstrated that Nip induced the expression of the NO-dependent antioxidant enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). S-nitrosylation of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein by Nip was shown to contribute to the translocation of NF-E2-related factor 2 to the nucleus, and triggered transcriptional activation of HO-1. Furthermore, RGC death and levels of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE) were increased after optic nerve injury in vivo. Pretreatment with Nip significantly suppressed RGC death and accumulation of 4HNE after injury through an HO-1 activity-dependent mechanism. These data demonstrate a novel neuroprotective action of Nip against oxidative stress-induced RGC death in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Melatonin prevents hemorrhagic shock-induced liver injury in rats through an Akt-dependent HO-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jun-Te; Kuo, Chia-Jung; Chen, Tsung-Hsing; Wang, Frank; Lin, Chun-Jun; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Hwang, Tsann-Long; Jan, Yi-Yin

    2012-11-01

    Although melatonin treatment following trauma-hemorrhage or ischemic reperfusion prevents organs from dysfunction and injury, the precise mechanism remains unknown. This study tested whether melatonin prevents liver injury following trauma-hemorrhage involved the protein kinase B (Akt)-dependent heme oxygenase (HO)-1 pathway. After a 5-cm midline laparotomy, male rats underwent hemorrhagic shock (mean blood pressure approximately 40 mmHg for 90 min) followed by fluid resuscitation. At the onset of resuscitation, rats were treated with vehicle, melatonin (2 mg/kg), or melatonin plus phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor wortmannin (1 mg/kg). At 2 hr after trauma-hemorrhage, the liver tissue myeloperoxidase activity, malondialdehyde, adenosine triphosphate, serum alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase levels were significantly increased compared with sham-operated control. Trauma-hemorrhage resulted in a significant decrease in the Akt activation in comparison with the shams (relative density, 0.526 ± 0.031 versus 1.012 ± 0.066). Administration of melatonin following trauma-hemorrhage normalized liver Akt phosphorylation (0.993 ± 0.061), further increased mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation (5.263 ± 0.338 versus 2.556 ± 0.225) and HO-1 expression (5.285 ± 0.325 versus 2.546 ± 0.262), and reduced cleaved caspase-3 levels (2.155 ± 0.297 versus 5.166 ± 0.309). Coadministration of wortmannin abolished the melatonin-mediated attenuation of the shock-induced liver injury markers. Our results collectively suggest that melatonin prevents hemorrhagic shock-induced liver injury in rats through an Akt-dependent HO-1 pathway.

  5. Potent Anti-inflammatory and Analgesic Actions of the Chloroform Extract of Dendropanax morbifera Mediated by the Nrf2/HO-1 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Akram, Muhammad; Kim, Kyeong-A; Kim, Eun-Sun; Syed, Ahmed Shah; Kim, Chul Young; Lee, Jong Soo; Bae, Ok-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Dendropanax morbifera LEVEILLE (DP) has been used in traditional Korean medicines to treat a variety of inflammatory diseases. Although the in vitro anti-inflammatory potential of this plant is understood, its in vivo efficacy and underlying molecular mechanism of anti-inflammatory effects are largely unknown. We elucidated the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities and the underlying molecular mechanisms of DP using in vitro and in vivo models. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophages were used to analyze the in vitro anti-inflammatory potential of DP extract and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. In vivo animal models of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA)-induced ear edema and acetic acid-induced writhing response tests were used to analyze the in vivo anti-inflammatory effects and anti-nociceptive effects of DP extract, respectively. Methanolic extract of DP (DPME) significantly inhibited the release of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in LPS-activated macrophages. Among the five sub-fractions, the chloroform fraction (DP-C) showed the most potent suppressive effects against pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines in LPS-stimulated macrophages. These effects were attributed to inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) nuclear translocation and c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2 phosphorylation and to activation of NF-E2-related factor 2/heme oxygenase-1 (Nrf2/HO-1) signaling. DP-C exhibited strong protective in vivo effects in TPA-induced ear edema mouse model and acetic acid-induced writhing response test. Our data suggest that DP-C has potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities and may be a promising treatment against a variety of inflammatory diseases.

  6. Protective Effect of Decursin Extracted from Angelica gigas in Male Infertility via Nrf2/HO-1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Bae, Woong Jin; Ha, U Syn; Choi, Jin Bong; Kim, Kang Sup; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Wang, Zhiping; Hwang, Sung Yeoun; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Higher testicular temperature results in altered spermatogenesis due to heat-related oxidative stress. We examined the effects of decursin extracted from Angelica gigas Nakai on antioxidant activity in vitro and in a cryptorchidism-induced infertility rat model. TM3 Leydig cell viability was measured based on oxidative stress according to treatment. Either distilled water or AG 400 mg/kg of A. gigas extract was administered orally for 4 weeks after unilateral cryptorchidism was induced. After 1, 2, and 4 weeks, six rats from the control group and six rats from treatment group were sacrificed. Testicular weight, semen quality, antioxidant activities, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein, and mRNA expression of Nrf2-regulated genes were analyzed. Treatment with A. gigas extract (1) protected TM3 cells against oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner, (2) improved the mean weight of the cryptorchid testis, (3) maintained sperm counts, motility, and spermatogenic cell density, (4) decreased levels of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and increased levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), (5) significantly increased Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and (6) significantly decreased apoptosis. This study suggests that decursin extracted from A. gigas is a supplemental agent that can reduce oxidative stress by Nrf2-mediated upregulation of HO-1 in rat experimentally induced unilateral cryptorchidism and may improve cryptorchidism-induced infertility.

  7. Protective effect of zerumbone reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury via antioxidative enzymes and Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Leung, Wai-Shing; Yang, Ming-Ling; Lee, Shiuan-Shinn; Kuo, Chi-Wen; Ho, Yung-Chyuan; Huang-Liu, Rosa; Lin, Hui-Wen; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang

    2017-05-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a serious disease with high morbidity and mortality rate. Although there are effective strategies for treatment of ALI; a widely accepted specific pharmacotherapy has not yet established. Zerumbone, the major active phytochemical compound from Zingiber zerumbet Smith, exhibits various beneficial biological and pharmacological activities, such as antioxidation, anti-inflammation, immunomodulation, and anti-cancer. We aimed to study the potential protective effects and mechanisms of zerumbone in mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Pretreatment with zerumbone inhibited the histopatholgical changes such as neutrophils infiltration, increased in alveolar barrier thickness, hemorrhage, and hyaline membrane formation occurred in lungs in LPS-induced ALI. In addition, not only LPS-induced activation of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and metallopeptidase-9 (MMP-9) was suppressed by zerumbone, but also lipid peroxidation in lungs was inhibited as well. Moreover, pretreatment with zerumbone reversed the antioxidative enzymes activities, including superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, decreased by LPS and enhanced the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase (HO-1) induced by LPS. These results from present study suggested that the protective mechanisms of zerumbone on LPS-induced ALI were via up-regulation of antioxidative enzymes and Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

  8. Isorhamnetin Attenuates Atherosclerosis by Inhibiting Macrophage Apoptosis via PI3K/AKT Activation and HO-1 Induction

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yun; Sun, Guibo; Dong, Xi; Wang, Min; Qin, Meng; Yu, Yingli; Sun, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Isorhamnetin (Iso) is a flavonoid compound extracted from the Chinese herb Hippophae rhamnoides L. Previous studies have revealed its anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant activities. This study investigated the ability of Iso to inhibit oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced cell apoptosis in THP-1-derived macrophages. The effects of Iso on atherosclerosis in vivo were also evaluated in apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) mice fed a high fat diet. Methods and Results Iso showed significant inhibitory effects on ox-LDL-induced THP-1-derived macrophage injuries via decreasing reactive oxygen species levels, lipid deposition, and caspase-3 activation, restoring mitochondrial membrane potential, reducing the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells, and regulating apoptosis-related proteins. We also determined the protective effects of Iso by PI3K/AKT activation and HO-1 induction. Iso reduced the atherosclerotic plaque size in vivo in ApoE-/- mice as assessed by oil red O, Sudan IV staining, and CD68-positive cells, and reduced macrophage apoptosis as assessed by caspase-3 and TUNEL assays in lesions. Conclusion In conclusion, our results show that Iso inhibited atherosclerotic plaque development in ApoE-/- mice by PI3K/AKT activation and HO-1 induction. PMID:25799286

  9. Mechanism of phytoestrogen puerarin-mediated cytoprotection following oxidative injury: Estrogen receptor-dependent up-regulation of PI3K/Akt and HO-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2008-12-15

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenolic non-steroidal plant compounds with estrogen-like biological activity. The phytoestrogen puerarin, the main isoflavone glycoside found in the root of Pueraria lobata, has been used for various medicinal purposes in traditional Chinese medicines for thousands of years. Recent studies have indicated that the estrogen receptor (ER), through interaction with p85, regulates phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity, revealing a physiologic, non-nuclear function of ER that may be relevant in cytoprotection. In this study, we demonstrate that the phytoestrogen puerarin inhibits tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced oxidative injury via an ER-dependent G{beta}1/PI3K/Akt and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway. Pretreatment of Hepa1c1c7 and HepG2 cells with puerarin significantly reduced t-BHP-induced caspase-3 activation and subsequent cell death. Also, puerarin up-regulated HO-1 expression and this expression conferred cytoprotection against oxidative injury induced by t-BHP. Moreover, puerarin induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which is upstream of puerarin-induced HO-1 expression, and PI3K activation, a pathway that is involved in induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, HO-1 expression and cytoprotection. Puerarin-induced up-regulation of HO-1 and cytoprotection against t-BHP were abolished by silencing Nrf2 expression with specific siRNA. Also, puerarin-mediated increases in PI3K activation and HO-1 induction were reversed by co-treatment with ICI 182,780 and pertussis toxin. Taken together, these results suggest that puerarin augments cellular antioxidant defense capacity through ER-dependent HO-1 induction via the G{beta}1/PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling pathway, thereby protecting cells from oxidative stress.

  10. Activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 Antioxidant Pathway Contributes to the Protective Effects of Lycium Barbarum Polysaccharides in the Rodent Retina after Ischemia-Reperfusion-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; So, Kwok-Fai; Brecha, Nicholas C.; Pu, Mingliang

    2014-01-01

    Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP), extracts from the wolfberries, are protective to retina after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). The antioxidant response element (ARE)–mediated antioxidant pathway plays an important role in maintaining the redox status of the retina. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), combined with potent AREs in its promoter, is a highly effective therapeutic target for the protection against neurodegenerative diseases, including I/R-induced retinal damage. The aim of our present study was to investigate whether the protective effect of LBP after I/R damage was mediated via activation of the Nrf2/HO-1-antioxidant pathway in the retina. Retinal I/R was induced by an increase in intraocular pressure to 130 mm Hg for 60 minutes. Prior to the induction of ischemia, rats were orally treated with either vehicle (PBS) or LBP (1 mg/kg) once a day for 1 week. For specific experiments, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP, 20 mg/kg), an HO-1 inhibitor, was intraperitoneally administered at 24 h prior to ischemia. The protective effects of LBP were evaluated by quantifying ganglion cell and amacrine cell survival, and by measuring cell apoptosis in the retinal layers. In addition, HO-1 expression was examined using Western blotting and immunofluorescence analyses. Cytosolic and nuclear Nrf2 was measured using immunofluorescent staining. LBP treatment significantly increased Nrf2 nuclear accumulation and HO-1 expression in the retina after I/R injury. Increased apoptosis and a decrease in the number of viable cells were observed in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and inner nuclear layer (INL) in the I/R retina, which were reversed by LBP treatment. The HO-1 inhibitor, ZnPP, diminished the LBP treatment-induced protective effects in the retina after I/R. Taken together, these results suggested that LBP partially exerted its beneficial neuroprotective effects via the activation of Nrf2 and an increase in HO-1 protein expression. PMID:24400114

  11. BnHO1, a haem oxygenase-1 gene from Brassica napus, is required for salinity and osmotic stress-induced lateral root formation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zeyu; Geng, Beibei; Xu, Sheng; Xuan, Wei; Nie, Li; Shen, Wenbiao; Liang, Yongchao; Guan, Rongzhan

    2011-08-01

    In this report, a rapeseed (Brassica napus) haem oxygenase-1 gene BnHO1 was cloned and sequenced. It shared high homology with Arabidopsis HY1 proteins, and encodes a 32.6 kDa protein with a 54-amino-acid transit peptide, predicting the mature protein of 25.1 kDa. The mature BnHO1 expressed in Escherichia coli exhibits haem oxygenase (HO) activity. Furthermore, the application of lower doses of NaCl (10 mM) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) (2%) mimicked the inducible effects of naphthylacetic acid and the HO-1 inducer haemin on the up-regulation of BnHO1 and subsequent lateral root (LR) formation. Contrasting effects were observed when a higher dose of NaCl or PEG was applied. The above inducible and inhibitory responses were blocked significantly when the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX) or haemin was applied, both of which were reversed by the application of carbon monoxide or ZnPPIX, respectively. Moreover, the addition of ZnPPIX at different time points during LR formation indicated that BnHO1 might be involved in the early stages of LR formation. The auxin response factor transcripts and the auxin content in seedling roots were clearly induced by lower doses of salinity or osmotic stress. However, treatment with the inhibitor of polar auxin transport N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid prevented the above inducible responses conferred by lower doses of NaCl and PEG, which were further rescued when the treatments were combined with haemin. Taken together, these results suggested a novel role of the rapeseed HO-1 gene in salinity and osmotic stress-induced LR formation, with a possible interaction with auxin signalling.

  12. NS-398, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, inhibits proliferation of IL-1{beta}-stimulated vascular smooth muscle cells by induction of {eta}{omicron}-1

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyoung Chul; Kim, Hee Sun; Lee, Kwang Youn; Chang, Ki Churl Kang, Young Jin

    2008-11-28

    We investigated whether NS-398, a selective inhibitor of COX-2, induces HO-1 in IL-1{beta}-stimulated vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). NS-398 reduced the production of PGE{sub 2} without modulation of expression of COX-2 in IL-1{beta}-stimulated VSMC. NS-398 increased HO-1 mRNA and protein in a dose-dependent manner, but inhibited proliferation of IL-1{beta}-stimulated VSMC. Furthermore, SnPPIX, a HO-1 inhibitor, reversed the effects of NS-398 on PGE{sub 2} production, suggesting that COX-2 activity can be affected by HO-1. Hemin, a HO-1 inducer, also reduced the production of PGE{sub 2} and proliferation of IL-1{beta}-stimulated VSMC. CORM-2, a CO-releasing molecule, but not bilirubin inhibited proliferation of IL-1{beta}-stimulated VSMC. NS-398 inhibited proliferation of IL-1{beta}-stimulated VSMC in a HbO{sub 2}-sensitive manner. In conclusion, NS-398 inhibits proliferation of IL-1{beta}-stimulated VSMC by HO-1-derived CO. Thus, NS-398 may facilitate the healing process of vessels in vascular inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis.

  13. Lycopene attenuates colistin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice via activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chongshan; Tang, Shusheng; Deng, Sijun; Zhang, Shen; Zhou, Yan; Velkov, Tony; Li, Jian; Xiao, Xilong

    2015-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is the major dose-limiting factor for the clinical use of colistin against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of lycopene on colistin-induced nephrotoxicity in a mouse model. Fifty mice were randomly divided into 5 groups: the control group (saline solution), the lycopene group (20 mg/kg of body weight/day administered orally), the colistin group (15 mg/kg/day administered intravenously), the colistin (15 mg/kg/day) plus lycopene (5 mg/kg/day) group, and the colistin (15 mg/kg/day) plus lycopene (20 mg/kg/day) group; all mice were treated for 7 days. At 12 h after the last dose, blood was collected for measurements of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine levels. The kidney tissue samples were obtained for examination of biomarkers of oxidative stress and apoptosis, histopathological assessment, and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis. Colistin treatment significantly increased concentrations of BUN and serum creatinine, tubular apoptosis/necrosis, lipid peroxidation, and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) activity, while the treatment decreased the levels of endogenous antioxidant biomarkers glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Notably, the changes in the levels of all biomarkers were attenuated in the kidneys of mice treated with colistin by lycopene (5 or 20 mg/kg). Lycopene treatment, especially in the colistin plus lycopene (20 mg/kg) group, significantly downregulated the expression of NF-κB mRNA (P < 0.01) but upregulated the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and HO-1 mRNA (both P < 0.01) in the kidney compared with the results seen with the colistin group. Our data demonstrated that coadministration of 20 mg/kg/day lycopene can protect against colistin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice. This effect may be attributed to the antioxidative property of lycopene and its ability to activate the Nrf2/HO

  14. Anti-oxidizing effect of the dichloromethane and hexane fractions from Orostachys japonicus in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells via upregulation of Nrf2 expression and activation of MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong-Seon; Lee, Gyeong-Seon; Kim, Seon-Hee; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Suk, Dong-Hee; Lee, Dong-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Orostachys japonicus shows various biological activities. However, the molecular mechanisms remain unknown in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Here, we investigated the anti-oxidizing effect of the dichloromethane (DCM) and hexane fractions from O. japonicus (OJD and OJH) against oxidative stress in RAW 264.7 cells stimulated by LPS. OJD and OJH significantly increased the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Additionally, it was found that the expression of HO-1 was stimulated by Nrf2 activated via degradation of Keap1. ERK and p38 inhibitors repressed HO-1 induced by OJD and OJH in LPS-stimulated cells, respectively. In conclusion, these results suggest that OJD and OJH may block oxidative damage stimulated by LPS, via increasing the expression of HO-1 and Nrf2, and MAPK signaling pathway. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(2): 98-103] PMID:24219867

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 induction alters chemokine regulation and ameliorates human immunodeficiency virus-type-1 infection in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhao-Hua; Kumari, Namita; Nekhai, Sergei; Clouse, Kathleen A.; Wahl, Larry M.; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) ameliorated HIV-1 infection of primary human macrophages. •The partial protection by HO-1 against HIV infection was associated with induction of chemokines such as MIP1α and MIP1β. •This mechanism explains lipopolysaccharide-stimulated HO-1-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infection of macrophages. -- Abstract: We have elucidated a putative mechanism for the host resistance against HIV-1 infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We show that LPS-activated MDM both inhibited HIV-1 entry into the cells and were refractory to post-entry productive viral replication. LPS-treated cells were virtually negative for mature virions as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. LPS activation of MDM markedly enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a potent inducible cytoprotective enzyme. Increased HO-1 expression was accompanied by elevated production of macrophage inflammatory chemokines (MIP1α and MIP1β) by LPS-activated MDM, significantly decreased surface chemokine receptor-5 (CCR-5) expression, and substantially reduced virus replication. Treatment of cells with HO-1 inhibitor SnPP IX (tin protoporphyrin IX) attenuated the LPS-mediated responses, HIV-1 replication and secretion of MIP1α, MIP1β, and LD78β chemokines with little change in surface CCR-5 expression. These results identify a novel role for HO-1 in the modulation of host immune response against HIV infection of MDM.

  16. Hawthorn Fruit Extract Elevates Expression of Nrf2/HO-1 and Improves Lipid Profiles in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jeong-Hyun; Liu, Yanan; Kim, Hyun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hawthorn (Crataegus pinnatifida Bunge) extract on the lipid profiles and antioxidant properties in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. After ovariectomy, the rats were randomly divided into four groups: the non-OVX control (Sham), the OVX-control (OVX), the OVX + 100 mg/kg b.w. of hawthorn extract (OL), and the OVX + 200 mg/kg b.w. of hawthorn extract (OH). The final body weights of the OVX group were significantly increased, but the increment was significantly decreased in hawthorn groups (p < 0.05). The serum total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels were significantly elevated in the OVX group, whereas the hawthorn groups showed a significant decrease in these levels (p < 0.05). The hepatic triglyceride (TG) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly reduced in the hawthorn groups compared with the OVX group (p < 0.05). The mRNA expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor (Nrf2), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were significantly decreased in the OVX group, whereas the hawthorn groups exhibited a significant increase in expression (p < 0.05). The protein expressions of Nrf2, HO-1, and GPx were lower in the OVX group than the Sham group (p < 0.05). The oral administration of hawthorn extract reversed the suppression of protein levels. These results suggest that hawthorn extract could have protective effects in OVX rats by improving lipid profiles, decreasing oxidative stress, and improving the antioxidant defense system. PMID:27187458

  17. Resolvin D1 reduces deterioration of tight junction proteins by upregulating HO-1 in LPS-induced mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wanli; Wang, Huiqing; Wang, Lei; Yao, Chengye; Yuan, Ruixia; Wu, Qingping

    2013-09-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by increased pulmonary permeability with high mortality. Resolvin D1 (RvD1), which has potent anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving activity, can attenuate pulmonary edema in the animal model of ALI. However, the mechanism underlying the protection of RvD1 on pulmonary edema is still unknown. Here we explore the effects and mechanism of RvD1 on the disruption of tight junction protein that results in the permeability edema in a model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. The severity of pulmonary edema was assessed by wet-to-dry rate and Evans blue infiltration; expressions of tight junction (TJ) proteins occludin and zona occludin-1 (ZO-1) were examined by immunofluorescence staining and western blot; mRNA in lung tissue was studied by real time-PCR; the TUNEL kit was performed for the detection of apoptosis of pulmonary barrier. Twenty-four hours after LPS inhalation by mice, wet-to-dry rate and Evans blue infiltration indicated that pretreatment with RvD1 relieved the pulmonary edema and pulmonary capillary permeability. Moreover, RvD1 attenuated the LPS-induced deterioration of TJ protein ZO-1 and occludin significantly. And we found that RvD1 increased heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression contributed to the protection on the deterioration of TJs. In addition, we found that RvD1 could reduce pulmonary cellular apoptosis in LPS-induced mice. In conclusion, RvD1 possesses the ability that relieves the pulmonary edema and restores pulmonary capillary permeability and reduces disruption of TJs in LPS-induced ALI of mice, at least in part, by upregulating HO-1 expression.

  18. Hawthorn Fruit Extract Elevates Expression of Nrf2/HO-1 and Improves Lipid Profiles in Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jeong-Hyun; Liu, Yanan; Kim, Hyun-Sook

    2016-05-13

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hawthorn (Crataegus pinnatifida Bunge) extract on the lipid profiles and antioxidant properties in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. After ovariectomy, the rats were randomly divided into four groups: the non-OVX control (Sham), the OVX-control (OVX), the OVX + 100 mg/kg b.w. of hawthorn extract (OL), and the OVX + 200 mg/kg b.w. of hawthorn extract (OH). The final body weights of the OVX group were significantly increased, but the increment was significantly decreased in hawthorn groups (p < 0.05). The serum total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels were significantly elevated in the OVX group, whereas the hawthorn groups showed a significant decrease in these levels (p < 0.05). The hepatic triglyceride (TG) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly reduced in the hawthorn groups compared with the OVX group (p < 0.05). The mRNA expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were significantly decreased in the OVX group, whereas the hawthorn groups exhibited a significant increase in expression (p < 0.05). The protein expressions of Nrf2, HO-1, and GPx were lower in the OVX group than the Sham group (p < 0.05). The oral administration of hawthorn extract reversed the suppression of protein levels. These results suggest that hawthorn extract could have protective effects in OVX rats by improving lipid profiles, decreasing oxidative stress, and improving the antioxidant defense system.

  19. Mechanism of estrogen-mediated attenuation of hepatic injury following trauma-hemorrhage: Akt-dependent HO-1 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jun-Te; Kan, Wen-Hong; Hsieh, Chi-Hsun; Choudhry, Mashkoor A; Schwacha, Martin G; Bland, Kirby I; Chaudry, Irshad H

    2007-10-01

    Protein kinase B (Akt) is known to be involved in proinflammatory and chemotactic events in response to injury. Akt activation also leads to the induction of heme oxygenase (HO)-1. Up-regulation of HO-1 mediates potent, anti-inflammatory effects and attenuates organ injury. Although studies have shown that 17beta-estradiol (E2) prevents organ damage following trauma-hemorrhage, it remains unknown whether Akt/HO-1 plays any role in E2-mediated attenuation of hepatic injury following trauma-hemorrhage. To study this, male rats underwent trauma-hemorrhage (mean blood pressure, approximately 40 mmHg for 90 min), followed by fluid resuscitation. At the onset of resuscitation, rats were treated with vehicle, E2 (1 mg/kg body weight), E2 plus the PI-3K inhibitor (Wortmannin), or the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist (ICI 182,780). At 2 h after sham operation or trauma-hemorrhage, plasma alpha-GST and hepatic tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, IL-6, TNF-alpha, ICAM-1, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1, and MIP-2 levels were measured. Hepatic Akt and HO-1 protein levels were also determined. Trauma-hemorrhage increased hepatic injury markers (alpha-GST and MPO activity), cytokines, ICAM-1, and chemokine levels. These parameters were markedly improved in the E2-treated rats following trauma-hemorrhage. E2 treatment also increased hepatic Akt activation and HO-1 expression compared with vehicle-treated, trauma-hemorrhage rats, which were abolished by coadministration of Wortmannin or ICI 182,780. These results suggest that the salutary effects of E2 on hepatic injury following trauma-hemorrhage are in part mediated via an ER-related, Akt-dependent up-regulation of HO-1.

  20. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid has an anti-oxidant effect via the Nrf-2/HO-1 pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kusunoki, Chisato; Yang, Liu; Yoshizaki, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Fumiyuki; Ishikado, Atsushi; Kondo, Motoyuki; Morino, Katsutaro; Sekine, Osamu; Ugi, Satoshi; Nishio, Yoshihiko; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omega-3 PUFA has a direct anti-oxidant effect in adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPA and DHA induce HO-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omega-3 PUFA and its end-product, 4-HHE, activates the Nrf-2/HO-1 pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omega-3 PUFA protects against oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity. -- Abstract: Oxidative stress is produced in adipose tissue of obese subjects and has been associated with obesity-related disorders. Recent studies have shown that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid ({omega}3-PUFA) has beneficial effects in preventing atherosclerotic diseases and insulin resistance in adipose tissue. However, the role of {omega}3-PUFA on adipocytes has not been elucidated. In this study, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with {omega}3-PUFA and its metabolites, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), or 4-hydroxy hexenal (4-HHE). {omega}3-PUFA and its metabolites dose-dependently increased mRNA and protein levels of the anti-oxidative enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1); whereas no changes in the well-known anti-oxidant molecules, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, were observed. Knockdown of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) significantly reduced EPA, DHA or 4-HHE-induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. Also, pretreatment with {omega}3-PUFA prevented H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cytotoxicity in a HO-1 dependent manner. In conclusion, treatment with EPA and DHA induced HO-1 through the activation of Nrf-2 and prevented oxidative stress in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. This anti-oxidant defense may be of high therapeutic value for clinical conditions associated with systemic oxidative stress.

  1. Nrf2-Mediated HO-1 Induction Contributes to Antioxidant Capacity of a Schisandrae Fructus Ethanol Extract in C2C12 Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji Sook; Han, Min Ho; Kim, Gi-Young; Kim, Cheol Min; Kim, Byung Woo; Hwang, Hye Jin; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to confirm the protective effect of Schisandrae Fructus, which are the dried fruits of Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill, against oxidative stress-induced cellular damage and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms in C2C12 myoblasts. Preincubating C2C12 cells with a Schisandrae Fructus ethanol extract (SFEE) significantly attenuated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced inhibition of growth and induced scavenging activity against intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by H2O2. SFEE also inhibited comet tail formation and phospho-histone γH2A.X expression, suggesting that it prevents H2O2-induced cellular DNA damage. Furthermore, treating C2C12 cells with SFEE significantly induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and phosphorylation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2). However, zinc protoporphyrin IX, a potent inhibitor of HO-1 activity, significantly reversed the protective effects of SFEE against H2O2-induced growth inhibition and ROS generation in C2C12 cells. Additional experiments revealed that the potential of the SFEE to induce HO-1 expression and protect against H2O2-mediated cellular damage was abrogated by transient transfection with Nrf2-specific small interfering RNA, suggesting that the SFEE protected C2C12 cells against oxidative stress-induced injury through the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. PMID:25493944

  2. Protection of chlorophyllin against oxidative damage by inducing HO-1 and NQO1 expression mediated by PI3K/Akt and Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanlin; Guan, Li; Wang, Xifu; Wen, Tao; Xing, Junjie; Zhao, Jinyuan

    2008-04-01

    Green vegetables are thought to have a chemoprotective effect on the basis of epidemiologic evidence. This study investigated whether chlorophyllin (CHL) could induce antioxidant enzymes and confer protection against oxidative damage. The results showed that CHL could induce HO-1 and NQO1 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) in a time- and dose-dependent manner and protect them against hydrogen peroxide caused oxidative damage. The induction of HO-1 and NQO1 by CHL was accompanied with the accumulation of transcription factor Nrf2 in nucleus and the activation of PI3K/Akt signalling pathway. Additionally, the specific inhibitor of PI3K/Akt could obviously decrease not only the induced expression of HO-1 and NQO1 but also the antioxidant effect of CHL. In conclusion, this study proved that CHL exerts antioxidant effect by inducing HO-1 and NQO1 expression mediated by PI3K/Akt and Nrf2. One thinks CHL may have promise to be prophylactic pharmaceuticals without adverse effects.

  3. Preconditioning with low concentration NO attenuates subsequent NO-induced apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells via HO-1-dependent mitochondrial death pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Hyun-Jeong; Park, Kyoung-Mi; Lee, Seahyoung; Lim, Hyun-Joung; Go, Sang-Hee; Eom, Sang-Mi; Park, Hyun-Young . E-mail: hypark65@nih.go.kr

    2006-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathways are important in both the maintenance of vascular homeostasis and disease progression. Overproduction of NO has been associated with ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Growing evidences suggest that NO preconditioning has cytoprotective effects against I/R injury. However, the mechanism with which NO mediates these effects remains to be elucidated. The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanism of how NO preconditioning inhibits subsequent NO-induced apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), specifically focusing on heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). According to our data, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) increased HO-1 expression in a concentration dependent manner. Preconditioning with low concentration SNP (0.3 mM) inhibited subsequent high concentration SNP (1.5 mM)-induced apoptosis, and this effect was reversed by the HO-1 inhibitor SnPP. Low concentration SNP-mediated protection involved p38 kinase inactivation and increased Bcl-2 expression. Furthermore, mitochondrial membrane potential was concomitantly increased with decreased expressions of Bax, Apaf-1, and activity of caspase-3, which was reversed by SnPP treatment. Our results show that low concentration SNP preconditioning suppresses subsequent high concentration SNP-induced apoptosis by inhibiting p38 kinase and mitochondrial death pathway via HO-1-dependent mechanisms in VSMC.

  4. The antioxidant effects of isorhamnetin contribute to inhibit COX-2 expression in response to inflammation: a potential role of HO-1.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kyuhwa; Yang, Ji Hye; Kim, Sang Chan; Ku, Sae Kwang; Ki, Sung Hwan; Shin, Sang Mi

    2014-06-01

    Previously, we reported that isorhamnentin, a 3'-O-methylated metabolite of quercetin, reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and NO production. The present study further investigated the underlying mechanism of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of isorhamnentin. Administration of isorhamnetin decreased the number of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) positive cells in rats with carrageenan-induced paw edema. Isorhamnetin also suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of COX-2 in cells. It is well known that LPS-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production leads to COX-2 induction. Isorhamnetin decreased LPS-induced ROS production and apoptosis. In addition, the basal expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was increased by isorhamnetin treatment in agreement with the increase in nuclear translocation of NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2), an essential transcription factor for the regulation of HO-1 expression. Moreover, pretreatment of tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP), a chemical inhibitor of HO-1, reversed the ability of isothamnetin to inhibit COX-2 expression. These results demonstrate that induction of HO-1 by isorhamnetin leads to a reduction in ROS production and its antioxidant property might contribute to the inhibition of COX-2 expression in response to inflammation.

  5. Delayed treatment with oleanolic acid attenuates tubulointerstitial fibrosis in chronic cyclosporine nephropathy through Nrf2/HO-1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) is known to protect against tissue injury by orchestrating antioxidant and detoxification responses to oxidative stress. This study investigated whether upregulation of Nrf2-dependent signaling by oleanolic acid (OA), which is known to activate Nrf2, could attenuate renal inflammation and fibrosis in cyclosporine (CsA)-induced kidney injury. Methods Male ICR mice were divided into four treatment groups: Vehicle (VH, n = 6), VH + OA (n = 6), CsA (n = 8), and CsA + OA (n = 8). For the OA-treated groups, OA (25 mg/kg/day) was administered by intraperitoneal injection for the final week of the 4-week experimental period. Renal function, morphologies and signaling were evaluated at the end of the study. Results Treatment with CsA resulted in decreased kidney function and urine osmolality and increased urine volume and urinary albumin levels. The CsA-induced changes were improved by OA treatment. Specifically, administration of OA decreased tubulointerstitial fibrosis and inflammation scores that were increased in CsA-treated mice. Furthermore, OA treatment decreased urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 8-epi-prostaglandin F2α (8-iso-PGF2α) levels. The beneficial effects of OA were attributed to an increased ratio of nuclear/total Nrf2 and subsequently enhanced expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1, as well as a stable level of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) expression, indicating that OA enhanced nuclear translocation of Nrf2. Increased apoptotic cell death and a high ratio of B cell leukaemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein (Bax) to Bcl-2 in CsA-treated mice were also significantly ameliorated by OA treatment. Conclusion Our results suggest that OA activates Nrf2/HO-1 signaling in chronic CsA nephropathy, which may have beneficial effects on inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:24559268

  6. Agmatine Reduces Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Oxidant Response via Activating PI3K/Akt Pathway and Up-Regulating Nrf2 and HO-1 Expression in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jianshen; Luo, Li; Hou, Fengyan; Fan, Xia; Yu, Jing; Ma, Wei; Tang, Wangqi; Yang, Xue; Zhu, Junyu; Kang, Wenyuan; Yan, Jun; Liang, Huaping

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are key responders of inflammation and are closely related with oxidative stress. Activated macrophages can enhance oxygen depletion, which causes an overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and leads to further excessive inflammatory response and tissue damage. Agmatine, an endogenous metabolite of L-arginine, has recently been shown to have neuroprotective effects based on its antioxidant properties. However, the antioxidant effects of agmatine in peripheral tissues and cells, especially macrophages, remain unclear. In this study we explored the role of agmatine in mediating antioxidant effects in RAW 264.7 cells and studied its antioxidant mechanism. Our data demonstrate that agmatine is an activator of Nrf2 signaling that markedly enhances Nrf2 nuclear translocation, increases nuclear Nrf2 protein level, up-regulates the expression of the Nrf2 downstream effector HO-1, and attenuates ROS generation induced by Lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We further demonstrated that the agmatine-induced activation of Nrf2 is likely through the PI3K/Akt pathway. LY294002, a specific PI3K/Akt inhibitor, abolished agmatine-induced HO-1 up-regulation and ROS suppression significantly. Inhibiting HO-1 pathway significantly attenuated the antioxidant effect of agmatine which the products of HO-1 enzymatic activity contributed to. Furthermore, the common membrane receptors of agmatine were evaluated, revealing that α2-adrenoceptor, I1-imidazoline receptor or I2-imidazoline receptor are not required by the antioxidant properties of agmatine. Taken together, our findings revealed that agmatine has antioxidant activity against LPS-induced ROS accumulation in RAW 264.7 cells involving HO-1 expression induced by Nrf2 via PI3K/Akt pathway activation. PMID:27685463

  7. The Successive Component-separated Magnetic-Transitions on Pseudoternary Compounds Ho1-xGdxRh2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigeoka, Toru; Morita, Tetsuhiro; Fujiwara, Tetsuya; Matsubayashi, Kazuyuki; Uwatoko, Yoshiya

    Magnetic measurements on pseudoternary compounds Ho1-xGdxRh2Si2, which substitute Gd having no quadrupole for Ho, were performed. They exhibit a successive component-separated magnetic transition; the c- and ab-components of magnetic moments independently order at different temperatures TN1 and TN2, respectively. The partial ordered state, a frustration appears for TN1 >T >TN2: for the phase II in the magnetic phase diagrams. In the ordered phase, step-like metamagnetic processes appear for TN2 >T; two-step ones appear along the [001] and [100] directions, and a one-step one appears along the [110] direction. The B-T magnetic phase diagrams were constructed. There are six, four and three ordered phases in the B001-T, B100-T and B110-T phase diagram, respectively. Two diagrams of the basal plane directions, B100-T and B110-T, resemble each other. Some interesting or peculiar phase boundaries appear. The Gd composition x dependence of transition temperatures is determined. The transition temperatures TN1 and TN2 increase with increasing x. The x-dependency of TN1 is well scaled by the de Gennes factor: (g-1)2J(J+1) whereas the transition of TN2 is not scaled. Some magnetic features declare that quadrupole interactions play an important role in this compound system.

  8. Magnetism of Ho1-xTbxAl₂ alloys: Critical dependence of a first-order transition on Tb concentration

    DOE PAGES

    Khan, Mahmud; Mudryk, Ya.; Gschneidner, K. A.; ...

    2011-12-27

    HoAl₂ exhibits a first-order spin reorientation transition at 20 K, which is manifested as a sharp peak in the heat capacity. When Ho is partially replaced by only 5% of Tb, the sharp heat-capacity peak in Ho1-xTbxAl₂ (x = 0.05) disappears, and then reappears again for x ≥ 0.07. For x = 0.05, the anomaly corresponding to the spin reorientation transition is barely seen in the heat capacity, but as x exceeds 0.07 the weak anomaly transforms to a sharp peak. The spin reorientation transition temperature increases to 29 K for x = 0.05, and as x increases further themore » transition shifts to lower temperature and returns to ~20 K for x = 0.25. The transition is no longer observed when x exceeds 0.60. Temperature-dependent x-ray powder-diffraction data confirm the first-order nature of the spin reorientation transition for the alloy with x = 0.40, and indicate that the compound retains the room-temperature cubic structure within the sensitivity of the technique. Experimental observations are discussed considering the easy magnetization directions of HoAl₂ and TbAl₂.« less

  9. α-Dihydroxychalcone-glycoside (α-DHC) isolated from the heartwood of Pterocarpus marsupium inhibits LPS induced MAPK activation and up regulates HO-1 expression in murine RAW 264.7 macrophage

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Prarthana; Saraswat, Ghungroo; Kabir, Syed N.

    2014-05-15

    Three phenolic glycosides isolated from the heartwood of Pterocarpus marsupium showed significant free radical and superoxide ion scavenging activity and antioxidant potential that were comparable to, or several folds higher than those of standard antioxidants, trolox and ascorbic acid. The effective concentrations of these compounds were far below their cytotoxic levels. Compound 3, which was characterized to be α-dihydroxychalcone-glycoside (α-DHC), was the most potent one. Subsequent studies demonstrated that α-DHC effectively reduced nitric oxide and cytokine production by the LPS stimulated RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage cell line. The compound effectively attenuated the expression of inflammation-mediating enzymes COX-2 and iNOS at the mRNA as well as protein levels in a concentration dependent manner. It prevented phosphorylation of all the three MAPKs (JNK, ERK, p38) and eventually blocked the activation of downstream elements contributing to inflammation. Phosphorylation of IκB-α and subsequent translocation of NF-κB into the nucleus were restricted, while the expression of stress responsive gene HO-1 was up-regulated. α-DHC targeted Keap-1 by modifying its cysteine thiols, dissociating it from Nrf-2 and facilitating nuclear entry of the latter; and this in turn induced HO-1 expression. Thus α-DHC exerts its anti-inflammatory activity in a dual manner: by down regulating MAPKs and restricting nuclear stabilization of NF-κB at one end, and by disrupting Nrf-2–Keap-1 complex on the other. In conclusion, the anti-inflammatory potential together with its high therapeutic index envisages α-DHC as a prospective candidate molecule for the development of therapeutic strategy against inflammatory disorders. - Highlights: • α-DHC isolated from Pterocarpus marsupium has significant antioxidant potential. • α-DHC inhibits NO, IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. • α-DHC down-regulates of COX-2, iNOS expression in LPS-stimulated

  10. Deciphering an underlying mechanism of differential cellular effects of nanoparticles: an example of Bach-1 dependent induction of HO-1 expression by gold nanorod.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhenlin; Yang, Xiao; Li, Yiye; Li, Suping; Niu, Shiwen; Wu, Xiaochun; Wei, Jingyan; Nie, Guangjun

    2012-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles are extensively investigated for their potential biomedical applications. Therefore, it is pertinent to thoroughly evaluate their biological effects at different levels and their underlying molecular mechanism. Frequently, there are discrepancies about the biological effects of various gold nanoparticles among the reports dealing with different models. Most of the studies focused on the different biological effects of various nano-properties of the nanomaterials. We hypothesize that the biological models with different metabolic processes would be taken into account to explain the observed discrepancies of biological effects of nanomaterials. Herein, by using mouse embryo fibroblast cell line (MEF-1) and human embryonal lung fibroblast cell line (MRC-5) as in vitro models, we studied the cellular effects of gold nanorods (AuNRs) coated with poly (diallyldimethyl ammonium chloride) (PDDAC), polyethylene glycol and polystyrene sulfonae (PSS). We found that all three AuNRs had no effects on cellular viability at the concentration of 1 nM; however, AuNRs that coated with PDDAC and PSS induced significant up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) which was believed to be involved in cellular defense activities in MEF-1 but not in MRC-5 cells. Further study showed that the low fundamental expression of transcription factor Bach-1, the major regulator of HO-1 expression, in MEF-1 was responsible for the up-regulation of HO-1 induced by the AuNRs. Our results indicate that although AuNRs we used are non-cytotoxic, they cell-specifically induce change of gene expression, such as HO-1. Our current study provides a good example to explain the molecular mechanisms of differential biological effects of nanomaterials in different cellular models. This finding raises a concern on evaluation of cellular effects of nanoparticles where the cell models should be critically considered.

  11. Salvianolic acid A ameliorates the integrity of blood-spinal cord barrier via miR-101/Cul3/Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, De-Shui; Wang, Yan-Song; Bi, Yun-Long; Guo, Zhan-Peng; Yuan, Ya-Jiang; Tong, Song-Ming; Su, Rui-Chao; Ge, Li-Hao; Wang, Jian; Pan, Ya-Li; Guan, Ting-Ting; Cao, Yang

    2017-02-15

    Salvianolic acid A (Sal A), a bioactive compound isolated from the Chinese medicinal herb Danshen, is used for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. However, the protective function of Sal A on preserving the role of blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) after spinal cord injury (SCI) is unclear. The present study investigated the effects and mechanisms of Sal A (2.5, 5, 10mg/kg, i.p.) on BSCB permeability at different time-points after compressive SCI in rats. Compared to the SCI group, treatment with Sal A decreased the content of the Evans blue in the spinal cord tissue at 24h post-SCI. The expression levels of tight junction proteins and HO-1 were remarkably increased, and that of p-caveolin-1 protein was greatly decreased after SCI Sal A. The effect of Sal A on the expression level of ZO-1, occluding, and p-caveolin-1 after SCI was blocked by the HO-1 inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP). Also, Sal A inhibited the level of apoptosis-related proteins and improved the motor function until 21days after SCI. In addition, Sal A significantly increased the expression of microRNA-101 (miR-101) in the RBMECs under hypoxia. AntagomiR-101 markedly increased the RBMECs permeability and the expression of the Cul3 protein by targeting with 3'-UTR of its mRNA. The expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and HO-1 was significantly increased after agomiR-101 treatment. Therefore, Sal A could improve the recovery of neurological function after SCI, which could be correlated with the repair of BSCB integrity by the miR-101/Cul3/Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway.

  12. Antioxidant efficacy and the upregulation of Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression by (+)-lariciresinol, a lignan isolated from Rubia philippinensis, through the activation of p38

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Vivek K.; Alam, Md Badrul; Quan, Khong Trong; Kwon, Kyoo-Ri; Ju, Mi-Kyoung; Choi, Hee-Jeong; Lee, Jong Sung; Yoon, Jung-In; Majumder, Rajib; Rather, Irfan A.; Kim, Kangmin; Lee, Sang-Han; Na, MinKyun

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the antioxidative activity of (+)-lariciresinol (LRSL), an optically active lignan isolated from Rubia philippinensis in several in vitro assays. LRSL was also subjected to evaluate its inhibitory effect against the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in murine macrophage (RAW 264.7) cells. The results showed that LRSL possessed very strong radical scavenging activity and reducing power, as well as inhibited ROS generation in a dose-dependent manner without showing any cytotoxicity. The transcriptional and translational levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT) were markedly higher in the sample treated group. LRSL treatment also increased the transcriptional and translational activities of NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf-2) with a corresponding increase in the transcriptional and translational activities of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). LRSL activated p38 and treatments with SB239063 (a p38 inhibitor) suppressed the LRSL-induced activation of Nrf2, resulting in a decrease in HO-1 expression. Collectively, the data demonstrated that LRSL has potent antioxidative activity, decreasing ROS generation in RAW 264.7 cells and increasing the transcriptional and translational levels of antioxidant enzymes by activating Nrf2-mediated HO-1 induction via p38 signaling. PMID:28378774

  13. Casein Glycomacropeptide Hydrolysates Exert Cytoprotective Effect against Cellular Oxidative Stress by Up-Regulating HO-1 Expression in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiange; Chen, Bin; Du, Min; Song, Jiajia; Cheng, Xue; Wang, Xu; Mao, Xueying

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered as an important mediator in the progression of metabolic disorders. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential hepatoprotective effects and mechanisms of bovine casein glycomacropeptide hydrolysates (GHP) on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative damage in HepG2 cells. Results showed that GHP significantly blocked H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and cell viability reduction in a dose-dependent manner. Further, GHP concentration-dependently induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and increased nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation. Moreover, pretreatment of GHP increased the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), which were shown to contribute to Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression. Taken together, GHP protected HepG2 cells from oxidative stress by activation of Nrf2 and HO-1 via p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. Our findings indicate that bovine casein glycomacropeptide hydrolysates might be a potential ingredient in the treatment of oxidative stress-related disorders and further studies are needed to investigate the protective effects in vivo. PMID:28098837

  14. Andrographolide Activates Keap1/Nrf2/ARE/HO-1 Pathway in HT22 Cells and Suppresses Microglial Activation by Aβ42 through Nrf2-Related Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ji Yeon; Pyo, Euisun; An, Jin-Pyo; Kim, Jinwoong; Sung, Sang Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic approach of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been gradually diversified. We examined the therapeutic and preventive potential of andrographolide, which is a lactone diterpenoid from Andrographis paniculata, and focused on the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1)/nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2)-mediated heme oxygenase (HO)-1-inducing effects and the inhibitory activity of amyloid beta (Aβ)42-induced microglial activation related to Nrf2 and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)-mediated inflammatory responses. Andrographolide induced the expression and translocation of Nrf2 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, thereby activating antioxidant response element (ARE) gene transcription and HO-1 expression in murine hippocampal HT22 cells. Andrographolide eliminated intracellular Aβ42 in BV-2 cells and decreased the production of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, prostaglandin (PG)E2, and nitric oxide (NO) because of artificial phagocytic Aβ42. It decreased pNF-κB accumulation in the nucleus and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (i-NOS) and cyclooxygenase II (COX-II) in the microglial BV-2 cell line. In summary, andrographolide activates Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression and inhibits Aβ42-overexpressed microglial BV-2 cell activation. These results suggested that andrographolide might have the potential for further examination of the therapeutics of AD. PMID:28373747

  15. Prevention of cold ischemia/rewarming-induced ERK 1/2, p38 kinase and HO-1 activation by trophic factor supplementation of UW solution.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Sam; Foley, John D; Russell, Paul; McAnulty, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christopher J

    2008-08-01

    We have previously shown that trophic factor supplementation (TFS) of University of Wisconsin (UW) solution reduced early apoptotic changes in vascular endothelial cells. Here, we examine the effect of TFS on cell signaling pathways related to cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis after cold ischemic storage. In this study, the effect of TFS on the phosphorylation of signaling molecules ERK (extracellular regulated-signaling kinase) 1/2 and p38 MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinases) and of HO-1 (hemeoxygenase-1), relative to changes seen in unmodified UW solution, were determined by Western blot in cells stored under cold ischemic conditions. Primary cultures of canine kidney proximal tubule cells (CKPTC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used in this study. There was a significant decrease, relative to UW solution, after 1 min rewarming in ERK 1 and 2 activity in CKPTCs. For p38 MAPK, a significant decrease after 5 min rewarming was seen in CKPTC (p<0.05) while significant reductions relative to UW solution were seen in HUVECs after both 1 and 5 min rewarming (p<0.05). Phosphorylated HO-1 was also decreased by 43% and 50% in HUVECs, relative to UW solution, after 1 and 5 min rewarming (p<0.05 at each time point). Collectively, TFS not only limits ERK 1/2 and p38 MAPK activity induced by cold ischemic injury and subsequent rewarming, but also substantially restricted increases in HO-1 phosphorylation.

  16. The role of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the regulation of inflammatory reaction, neuronal cell proliferation and apoptosis in rats after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xuezheng; Mu, Linshen

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the regulation of inflammatory reaction, neuronal cell proliferation and apoptosis in rats after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods Thirty-six adult Sprague Dawley (SD) male rats were randomly divided into sham operation, ICH and zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) group. Rats (except for the sham operation group) were given 50 μL stereotactic injection of autologous blood from the femoral artery into the caudate nucleus, to establish an ICH model. In addition, rats in the ZPP group were given 10 mg/kg intraperitoneal injection of ZPP. At day 3 postoperative, neurobehavioral changes and brain water content were evaluated, brain tissue HO-1 expression was detected with immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), brain tissue apoptosis was evaluated with TUNEL method, Caspase 3, Caspase 8 and Caspase 9 activity were detected with colorimetric method, level of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 were measured with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), while Bcl-2, Bax, p-NF-κB p65 and p-IκBα protein expression were detected with Western blot. Results ICH group compared to sham operation: HO-1 positive rate and mRNA expression were increased, neurological deficit score and cell apoptosis rate were increased, Caspase 3, Caspase 8 and Caspase 9 activity were increased, level of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 were increased, Bcl-2 expression was downregulated, Bax, p-NF-κB p65 and p-IκBα expression were upregulated. The differences were statistically significant (P<0.01). ZPP group compared to ICH: HO-1 positive rate and mRNA expression were decreased, neurological deficit score and cell apoptosis rate were decreased, Caspase 3, Caspase 8, Caspase 9 activity were decreased, level of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 were decreased, Bcl-2 expression was upregulated, Bax, p-NF-κB p65 and p-IκBα expression were downregulated, and the differences were statistically

  17. Novel roles of c-Met in the survival of renal cancer cells through the regulation of HO-1 and PD-L1 expression.

    PubMed

    Balan, Murugabaskar; Mier y Teran, Eduardo; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Gasser, Martin; Choueiri, Toni K; Freeman, Gordon; Pal, Soumitro

    2015-03-27

    The receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met is overexpressed in renal cancer cells and can play major role in the growth and survival of tumor. We investigated how the c-Met-mediated signaling through binding to its ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) can modulate the apoptosis and immune escape mechanism(s) of renal cancer cells by the regulations of novel molecules heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and programmed death-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1). We found that HGF/c-Met-mediated signaling activated the Ras/Raf pathway and down-regulated cancer cell apoptosis; and it was associated with the overexpression of cytoprotective HO-1 and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2/Bcl-xL. c-Met-induced HO-1 overexpression was regulated at the transcriptional level. Next, we observed that c-Met induction markedly up-regulated the expression of the negative co-stimulatory molecule PD-L1, and this can be prevented following treatment of the cells with pharmacological inhibitors of c-Met. Interestingly, HGF/c-Met-mediated signaling could not induce PD-L1 at the optimum level when either Ras or HO-1 was knocked down. To study the functional significance of c-Met-induced PD-L1 expression, we performed a co-culture assay using mouse splenocytes (expressing PD-L1 receptor PD-1) and murine renal cancer cells (RENCA, expressing high PD-L1). We observed that the splenocyte-mediated apoptosis of cancer cells during co-culture was markedly increased in the presence of either c-Met inhibitor or PD-L1 neutralizing antibody. Finally, we found that both c-Met and PD-L1 are significantly up-regulated and co-localized in human renal cancer tissues. Together, our study suggests a novel mechanism(s) by which c-Met can promote increased survival of renal cancer cells through the regulation of HO-1 and PD-L1.

  18. Novel Roles of c-Met in the Survival of Renal Cancer Cells through the Regulation of HO-1 and PD-L1 Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Balan, Murugabaskar; Mier y Teran, Eduardo; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Gasser, Martin; Choueiri, Toni K.; Freeman, Gordon; Pal, Soumitro

    2015-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met is overexpressed in renal cancer cells and can play major role in the growth and survival of tumor. We investigated how the c-Met-mediated signaling through binding to its ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) can modulate the apoptosis and immune escape mechanism(s) of renal cancer cells by the regulations of novel molecules heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and programmed death-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1). We found that HGF/c-Met-mediated signaling activated the Ras/Raf pathway and down-regulated cancer cell apoptosis; and it was associated with the overexpression of cytoprotective HO-1 and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2/Bcl-xL. c-Met-induced HO-1 overexpression was regulated at the transcriptional level. Next, we observed that c-Met induction markedly up-regulated the expression of the negative co-stimulatory molecule PD-L1, and this can be prevented following treatment of the cells with pharmacological inhibitors of c-Met. Interestingly, HGF/c-Met-mediated signaling could not induce PD-L1 at the optimum level when either Ras or HO-1 was knocked down. To study the functional significance of c-Met-induced PD-L1 expression, we performed a co-culture assay using mouse splenocytes (expressing PD-L1 receptor PD-1) and murine renal cancer cells (RENCA, expressing high PD-L1). We observed that the splenocyte-mediated apoptosis of cancer cells during co-culture was markedly increased in the presence of either c-Met inhibitor or PD-L1 neutralizing antibody. Finally, we found that both c-Met and PD-L1 are significantly up-regulated and co-localized in human renal cancer tissues. Together, our study suggests a novel mechanism(s) by which c-Met can promote increased survival of renal cancer cells through the regulation of HO-1 and PD-L1. PMID:25645920

  19. PPARγ-induced upregulation of CD36 enhances hematoma resolution and attenuates long-term neurological deficits after germinal matrix hemorrhage in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Flores, Jerry J; Klebe, Damon; Rolland, William B; Lekic, Tim; Krafft, Paul R; Zhang, John H

    2016-03-01

    Germinal matrix hemorrhage remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants in the United States with little progress made in its clinical management. Survivors are often afflicted with long-term neurological sequelae, including cerebral palsy, mental retardation, hydrocephalus, and psychiatric disorders. Blood clots disrupting normal cerebrospinal fluid circulation and absorption after germinal matrix hemorrhage are thought to be important contributors towards post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus development. We evaluated if upregulating CD36 scavenger receptor expression in microglia and macrophages through PPARγ stimulation, which was effective in experimental adult cerebral hemorrhage models and is being evaluated clinically, will enhance hematoma resolution and ameliorate long-term brain sequelae using a neonatal rat germinal matrix hemorrhage model. PPARγ stimulation (15d-PGJ2) increased short-term PPARγ and CD36 expression levels as well as enhanced hematoma resolution, which was reversed by a PPARγ antagonist (GW9662) and CD36 siRNA. PPARγ stimulation (15d-PGJ2) also reduced long-term white matter loss and post-hemorrhagic ventricular dilation as well as improved neurofunctional outcomes, which were reversed by a PPARγ antagonist (GW9662). PPARγ-induced upregulation of CD36 in macrophages and microglia is, therefore, critical for enhancing hematoma resolution and ameliorating long-term brain sequelae.

  20. PPARγ-induced Upregulation of CD36 Enhances Hematoma Resolution and Attenuates Long-term Neurological Deficits after Germinal Matrix Hemorrhage in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Jerry J.; Klebe, Damon; Rolland, William B.; Lekic, Tim; Krafft, Paul R.; Zhang, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Germinal matrix hemorrhage remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants in the United States with little progress made in its clinical management. Survivors are often afflicted with long-term neurological sequelae, including cerebral palsy, mental retardation, hydrocephalus, and psychiatric disorders. Blood clots disrupting normal cerebrospinal fluid circulation and absorption after germinal matrix hemorrhage are thought to be important contributors towards post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus development. We evaluated if upregulating CD36 scavenger receptor expression in microglia and macrophages through PPARγ stimulation, which was effective in experimental adult cerebral hemorrhage models and is being evaluated clinically, will enhance hematoma resolution and ameliorate long-term brain sequelae using a neonatal rat germinal matrix hemorrhage model. PPARγ stimulation (15d-PGJ2) increased short-term PPARγ and CD36 expression levels as well as enhanced hematoma resolution, which was reversed by a PPARγ antagonist (GW9662) and CD36 siRNA. PPARγ stimulation (15d-PGJ2) also reduced long-term white matter loss and post-hemorrhagic ventricular dilation as well as improved neurofunctional outcomes, which were reversed by a PPARγ antagonist (GW9662). PPARγ-induced upregulation of CD36 in macrophages and microglia is, therefore, critical for enhancing hematoma resolution and ameliorating long-term brain sequelae. PMID:26739391

  1. Pinocembrin Suppresses H2O2-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction by a Mechanism Dependent on the Nrf2/HO-1 Axis in SH-SY5Y Cells.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto; da Costa Ferreira, Gustavo; Brasil, Flávia Bittencourt; Peres, Alessandra

    2017-01-13

    Mitochondria are susceptible to redox impairment, which has been associated with neurodegeneration. These organelles are both a source and target of reactive species. In that context, there is increasing interest in finding natural compounds that modulate mitochondrial function and mitochondria-related signaling in order to prevent or to treat diseases involving mitochondrial impairment. Herein, we investigated whether and how pinocembrin (PB) would prevent mitochondrial dysfunction elicited by the exposure of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). PB (25 μM) was administrated for 4 h before H2O2 treatment (300 μM for 24 h). PB prevented H2O2-induced loss of cell viability mitochondrial depolarization in SH-SY5Y cells. PB also attenuated redox impairment in mitochondrial membranes. The production of superoxide anion radical (O2(-•)) and nitric oxide (NO(•)) was alleviated by PB in cells exposed to H2O2. PB suppressed the H2O2-induced inhibition of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes aconitase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase. Furthermore, PB induced anti-inflammatory effects by abolishing the H2O2-dependent activation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and upregulation of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The PB-induced antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects are dependent on the heme oxygenate-1 (HO-1) enzyme and on the activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), since HO-1 inhibition (with 0.5 μM ZnPP IX) or Nrf2 silencing (with small interfering RNA (siRNA)) abolished the effects of PB. Overall, PB afforded cytoprotection by the Nrf2/HO-1 axis in H2O2-treated SH-SY5Y cells.

  2. Heat shock proteins in the brain: role of Hsp70, Hsp 27, and HO-1 (Hsp32) and their therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Frank R; Zhan, Xinhua; Liu, Da-Zhi

    2013-12-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are induced by heat shock via heat shock factor proteins binding to heat shock elements in their promoters. Hsp70 is massively induced in response to misfolded proteins following cerebral ischemia in all cell types but is induced mainly in neurons in the ischemic penumbra. Overexpression of Hsp70 via transgenes and viruses or systemic administration of Hsp70 fusion proteins that allow it to cross the blood brain barrier protects the brain against ischemia in most reported studies. Hsp27 can exist as unphosphorylated large oligomers that prevent misfolded protein aggregates and improve cell survival. P-Hsp27 small oligomers bind specific protein targets to improve survival. In the brain, protein kinase D phosphorylates Hsp27 following ischemia which then binds apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 to prevent MKK4/7, c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase, and Jun-induced apoptosis, and decrease infarct volumes following focal cerebral ischemia. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) metabolizes heme to carbon monoxide, ferrous ion, and biliverdin. CO activates cGMP to promote vasodilation, and biliverdin is converted to bilirubin which can serve as an anti-oxidant, both of which may contribute to the reported protective role of HO-1 in cerebral ischemia and subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, ferrous ion can react with hydrogen peroxide to produce pro-oxidant hydroxyl radicals which may explain the harmful role of HO-1 in intracerebral hemorrhage. Heat shock proteins as a class have great potential as treatments for cerebrovascular disease and have yet to be tested in the clinic.

  3. Antrodia camphorata Potentiates Neuroprotection against Cerebral Ischemia in Rats via Downregulation of iNOS/HO-1/Bax and Activated Caspase-3 and Inhibition of Hydroxyl Radical Formation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Po-Sheng; Lin, Po-Yen; Chang, Chao-Chien; Yu, Meng-Che; Yen, Ting-Lin; Lan, Chang-Chou; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Yang, Chih-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Antrodia camphorata (A. camphorata) is a fungus generally used in Chinese folk medicine for treatment of viral hepatitis and cancer. Our previous study found A. camphorata has neuroprotective properties and could reduce stroke injury in cerebral ischemia animal models. In this study, we sought to investigate the molecular mechanisms of neuroprotective effects of A. camphorata in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rats. A selective occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) with whole blood clots was used to induce ischemic stroke in rats and they were orally treated with A. camphorata (0.25 and 0.75 g/kg/day) alone or combined with aspirin (5 mg/kg/day). To provide insight into the functions of A. camphorata mediated neuroprotection, the expression of Bax, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and activated caspase-3 was determined by Western blot assay. Treatment of aspirin alone significantly reduced the expressions of HO-1 (P < 0.001), iNOS (P < 0.001), and Bax (P < 0.01) in ischemic regions. The reduction of these expressions was more potentiated when rats treated by aspirin combined with A. camphorata (0.75 g/kg/day). Combination treatment also reduced apoptosis as measured by a significant reduction in active caspase-3 expression in the ischemic brain compared to MCAO group (P < 0.01). Moreover, treatment of A. camphorata significantly (P < 0.05) reduced fenton reaction-induced hydroxyl radical (OH•) formation at a dose of 40 mg/mL. Taken together, A. camphorata has shown neuroprotective effects in embolic rats, and the molecular mechanisms may correlate with the downregulation of Bax, iNOS, HO-1, and activated caspase-3 and the inhibition of OH• signals. PMID:26379739

  4. Antrodia camphorata Potentiates Neuroprotection against Cerebral Ischemia in Rats via Downregulation of iNOS/HO-1/Bax and Activated Caspase-3 and Inhibition of Hydroxyl Radical Formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Po-Sheng; Lin, Po-Yen; Chang, Chao-Chien; Yu, Meng-Che; Yen, Ting-Lin; Lan, Chang-Chou; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Yang, Chih-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Antrodia camphorata (A. camphorata) is a fungus generally used in Chinese folk medicine for treatment of viral hepatitis and cancer. Our previous study found A. camphorata has neuroprotective properties and could reduce stroke injury in cerebral ischemia animal models. In this study, we sought to investigate the molecular mechanisms of neuroprotective effects of A. camphorata in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rats. A selective occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) with whole blood clots was used to induce ischemic stroke in rats and they were orally treated with A. camphorata (0.25 and 0.75 g/kg/day) alone or combined with aspirin (5 mg/kg/day). To provide insight into the functions of A. camphorata mediated neuroprotection, the expression of Bax, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and activated caspase-3 was determined by Western blot assay. Treatment of aspirin alone significantly reduced the expressions of HO-1 (P < 0.001), iNOS (P < 0.001), and Bax (P < 0.01) in ischemic regions. The reduction of these expressions was more potentiated when rats treated by aspirin combined with A. camphorata (0.75 g/kg/day). Combination treatment also reduced apoptosis as measured by a significant reduction in active caspase-3 expression in the ischemic brain compared to MCAO group (P < 0.01). Moreover, treatment of A. camphorata significantly (P < 0.05) reduced fenton reaction-induced hydroxyl radical (OH(•)) formation at a dose of 40 mg/mL. Taken together, A. camphorata has shown neuroprotective effects in embolic rats, and the molecular mechanisms may correlate with the downregulation of Bax, iNOS, HO-1, and activated caspase-3 and the inhibition of OH(•) signals.

  5. Synergistic cardioprotective effects of Danshensu and hydroxysafflor yellow A against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury are mediated through the Akt/Nrf2/HO-1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    HU, TIANXIN; WEI, GUO; XI, MIAOMIAO; YAN, JIAJIA; WU, XIAOXIAO; WANG, YANHUA; ZHU, YANRONG; WANG, CHAO; WEN, AIDONG

    2016-01-01

    In clinical practice, the traditional Chinese medicinal herbs, Radix Salvia Miltiorrhiza and Carthamus tinctorius L., are usually prescribed in combination due to their significant cardioprotective effects. However, the mechanisms responsible for these combined effects remain unknown. Thus, in this study, we investigated the mechanisms responsible for the combined effects of Danshensu (DSS) and hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) by establishing a rat model of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R), as well as a model of hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) using H9c2 cells. The combination index (CI) was calculated using the median-effect method. DSS and HSYA in combination led to a CI value of <1 as regards infarct size in vivo and cell viability in vitro. The rats with MI/R injury that were treated with DSS and/or HSYA were found to have significantly lower levels of creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and malondialdehyde (MDA), and a lower expressoin of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and markedly enhanced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Our in vitro experiments revealed that the cells treated with DSS and/or HSYA had a reduced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and a decreased percentage of cell apoptosis (increased Bcl-2/Bax ratio, decreased expression of cleaved caspase-3). DSS and HSYA increased the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the phosphorylation of Akt and the trans-location of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Furthermore, the Akt inhibitor, LY294002, partially hampered the expression of Nrf2 and HO-1. The HO-1 inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP-IX), did not decrease the expression of p-Akt and Nrf2, although it abolished the anti-apoptotic and antioxidant effects of DSS and HSYA. The findings of our study thus demonstrate that DSS and HSYA confer synergistic cardioprotective effects through the Akt/Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway, to certain extent, by enhancing the antioxidant defense system and exerting

  6. Baicalein inhibition of oxidative-stress-induced apoptosis via modulation of ERKs activation and induction of HO-1 gene expression in rat glioma cells C6

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.-C. . E-mail: yc3270@tmu.edu.tw; Chow, J.-M.; Lin, C.-W.; Wu, C.-Y.; Shen, S.-C.

    2006-10-15

    In the present study, we examined the protective mechanism of baicalein (BE) and its glycoside, baicalin (BI), on hydrogen-peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2})-induced cell death in rat glioma C6 cells. Results of the MTT assay, LDH release assay, and morphological observation showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} addition reduced the viability of C6 cells, and this was prevented by the addition of BE but not BI. Incubation of C6 cells with BE significantly decreased the intracellular peroxide level induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} according to flow cytometric analysis using DCHF-DA as a fluorescent substrate. Suppression of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptotic events including DNA ladders, hypodiploid cells, and activation of caspases 3, 8, and, 9 by BE but not BI was identified in C6 cells. The cytotoxicity and phosphorylation of ERK proteins induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were blocked by the ERK inhibitor PD98059. Catalase addition prevented H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced ROS production, ERKs protein phosphorylation, and cell death, and BE dose-dependently inhibited H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced ERK protein phosphorylation in C6 cells. These data suggest that ROS-scavenging activity is involved in BE prevention of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death via blocking ERKs activation. Additionally, BE but not BI induced heat shock protein 32 (HSP32; HO-1) protein expression in both time- and dose-dependent manners, but not heme oxygenase 2 (HO-2), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), or heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) protein expression. In the absence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, BE induces ERKs protein phosphorylation, and HO-1 protein expression induced by BE was blocked by the addition of cycloheximide, actinomycin D, and the ERK inhibitor PD98059. The addition of the HO inhibitor ZnPP inhibited the protective effect of BE against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cytotoxicity in C6 cells according to the MTT assay and apoptotic morphology under microscopic observation, accompanied by blocking the ROS-scavenging activity of BE

  7. Novel imidazole derivatives as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2) inhibitors and their cytotoxic activity in human-derived cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Loredana; Pittalà, Valeria; Romeo, Giuseppe; Modica, Maria N; Marrazzo, Agostino; Siracusa, Maria A; Sorrenti, Valeria; Di Giacomo, Claudia; Vanella, Luca; Parayath, Neha N; Greish, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is a cytoprotective enzyme that can be overexpressed in some pathological conditions, including certain cancers. In this work, novel imidazole derivatives were designed and synthesized as inhibitors of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2). In these compounds the imidazole ring, crucial for the activity, is connected to a hydrophobic group, represented by aryloxy, benzothiazole, or benzoxazole moieties, by means of alkyl or thioalkyl chains of different length. Many of the tested compounds were potent and/or selective against one of the two isoforms of HO. Furthermore, most of the pentyl derivatives showed to be better inhibitors of HO-2 with respect to HO-1, revealing a critical role of the alkyl chain in discriminating between the two isoenzymes. Compounds which showed the better profile of HO inhibition were selected and tested to evaluate their cytotoxic properties in prostate and breast cancer cell lines (DU-145, PC3, LnCap, MDA-MB-231, and MCF-7). In these assays, aryloxyalkyl derivatives resulted more cytotoxic than benzothiazolethioalkyl ones; in particular compound 31 was active against all the cell lines tested, confirming the anti-proliferative properties of HO inhibitors and their potential use in the treatment of specific cancers.

  8. Ellagic acid exerts protective effect in intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease: Possible involvement of ERβ/Nrf2/HO-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Rabiee, Nafiseh; Zabihnejad, Sedigheh; Roghani, Mehrdad

    2017-02-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a prevalent movement disorder in the elderly with progressive loss of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons and incapacitating motor and non-motor complications. Ellagic acid is a natural phenolic compound with potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated its possible neuroprotective effect in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD. Intrastriatal 6-OHDA-lesioned rats were pretreated with ellagic acid at a dose of 50 mg/kg/day for 1 week. Results showed that ellagic acid attenuates apomorphine-induced rotational bias and lowers the latency to initiate and the total time in the narrow beam task and this beneficial effect was partially abrogated following intracerebroventricular microinjection of estrogen receptor β (ERβ) antagonist. Furthermore, ellagic acid reduced striatal malondialdehyde (MDA), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and DNA fragmentation, and improved monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). Meanwhile, ellagic acid prevented loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons within substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC). These findings indicate neuroprotective potential of ellagic acid in 6-OHDA rat model of PD via amelioration of apoptosis and oxidative stress, suppression of MAO-B, and its favorable influence is partly reliant on ERβ/Nrf2/HO-1 signaling cascade.

  9. Mechanistic study on the biological effects of silver and gold nanoparticles in Caco-2 cells--induction of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway by high concentrations of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Aueviriyavit, Sasitorn; Phummiratch, Duangkamol; Maniratanachote, Rawiwan

    2014-01-03

    The most commonly used metal nanoparticles (NPs) across diverse applications, including in agro-food applications, include silver (AgNPs) and gold (AuNPs). In the present study, we aimed to investigate the biological responses and possible toxicological effects of AgNPs and AuNPs in the Caco-2 cells as an in vitro human GI tract model. Both AgNPs and AuNPs were internalized into the cytoplasm of Caco-2 cells, but not within the nucleus and only exposure to high concentrations of AgNPs, but not AuNPs, caused acute cytotoxicity and depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, only AgNPs significantly depleted the total intracellular glutathione level, induced the activation of the stress-responsive gene, Nrf2, and dramatically increased the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Furthermore, siRNA silencing of Nrf2 transcripts significantly reduced the AgNP-induced HO-1 mRNA induction, suggesting a key role for Nrf2 in the control of HO-1 expression. Taken together, AgNPs but not AuNPs induced acute cytotoxicity and cellular responses via the oxidative stress-related activation of Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway in Caco-2 cells. The expression of HO-1 transcripts may be useful as a sensitive marker for safety evaluation of AgNPs in the GI tract of humans.

  10. The cytoprotective effect of isorhamnetin against oxidative stress is mediated by the upregulation of the Nrf2-dependent HO-1 expression in C2C12 myoblasts through scavenging reactive oxygen species and ERK inactivation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yung Hyun

    2016-04-01

    This study was designed to confirm the protective effects of isorhamnetin against oxidative stress-induced cellular damage. Our results indicated that isorhamnetin inhibited the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced growth inhibition and exhibited scavenging activity against the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mouse-derived C2C12 myoblasts. Isorhamnetin also significantly attenuated H2O2-induced DNA damage and apoptosis, and increased the levels of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its phosphorylation associated with the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). However, the protective effects of isorhamnetin on H2O2-induced ROS and growth inhibition were significantly abolished by an HO-1 competitive inhibitor. Moreover, the potential of isorhamnetin to mediate HO-1 induction and protect against H2O2-mediated growth inhibition was abrogated by transient transfection with Nrf2-specific small interfering RNA. Additionally, isorhamnetin induced the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), such as extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 MAPK. However, the specific inhibitor of ERK, but not JNK and p38 MAPK, was able to abolish the HO-1 upregulation and the Nrf2 phosphorylation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that isorhamnetin augments the cellular antioxidant defense capacity by activating the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway involving the activation of the ERK pathway, thus protecting the C2C12 cells from H2O2-induced cytotoxicity.

  11. Preconditioning with Gua Lou Gui Zhi decoction enhances H2O2-induced Nrf2/HO-1 activation in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jingjie; Li, Zuanfang; Lin, Ruhui; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Lin, Jiumao; Peng, Jun; Chen, Lidian

    2015-09-01

    Spasticity is common in various central neurological conditions, including after a stroke. Such spasticity may cause additional problems, and often becomes a primary concern for afflicted individuals. A number of studies have identified nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) as a key regulator in the adaptive survival response to oxidative stress. Elevated expression of Nrf2, combined with heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) resistance, in the central nervous system is known to elicit key internal and external oxidation protection. Gua Lou Gui Zhi decoction (GLGZD) is a popular traditional Chinese formula with a long history of clinical use in China for the treatment of muscular spasticity following a stroke, epilepsy or a spinal cord injury. However, the mechanism underlying the efficacy of the medicine remains unclear. In the present study, the antioxidative effects of GLGZD were evaluated and the underlying molecular mechanisms were investigated, using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12 cells) as an in vitro oxidative stress model of neural cells. Upon application of different concentrations of GLGZD, a 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and ATP measurement were conducted to assess the impact on PC12 cell proliferation. In addition, inverted microscopy observations, and the MTT and ATP assessments, revealed that GLGZD attenuated H2O2-induced oxidative damage and signaling repression in PC12 cells. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression levels of Nrf2 and HO-1, which are associated with oxidative stress, were analyzed using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and confocal microscopy. Confocal microscopy observations, as well as the quantitative PCR assay, revealed that GLGZD exerted a neuroprotective function against H2O2-induced oxidative damage in PC12 cells. Therefore, the results demonstrated that GLGZD protected PC12 cells injured by H2O2, which may be

  12. Long-term aerobic exercise protects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by modulating the expression of IL-6 and HO-1.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Mariana Yasue Saito; Seelaender, Marilia; Castoldi, Angela; de Almeida, Danilo Candido; Bacurau, Aline Villa Nova; Andrade-Oliveira, Vinicius; Enjiu, Lucas Maceratesi; Pisciottano, Marcus; Hayashida, Caroline Yuri; Hiyane, Meire Ioshie; Brum, Patricia Chakur; Camara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Amano, Mariane Tami

    2014-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is substantial side effect for 30% of patients undergoing cancer therapy with cisplatin and may force them to change or even abandon the treatment. Studies regarding aerobic exercise have shown its efficacy for the treatment of many types of diseases and its capacity to reduce tumors. However, little is known about the impact of physical exercise on cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). In the present study, our aim was to investigate the role of physical exercise in AKI induced by cisplatin. We submitted C57Bl6 male mice to seven weeks of chronic exercise on a training treadmill and treated them with single i.p. injection of cisplatin (20 mg/kg) in the last week. Exercise efficacy was confirmed by an increased capillary-to-fiber ratio in the gastrocnemius muscle of exercised groups (EX and CIS-EX). The group submitted to exercise before cisplatin administration (CIS-EX) exhibited less weight loss and decreased serum urea levels compared to the cisplatin group (CIS). Exercise also showed a protective role against cisplatin-induced cell death in the kidney. The CIS-EX group showed a lower inflammatory response, with less TNF and IL-10 expression in the kidney and serum. In the same group, we observed an increase of IL-6 and HO-1 expression in the kidney. Taken together, our results indicate that chronic aerobic exercise is able to attenuate AKI by inducing IL-6 and HO-1 production, which results in lower inflammatory and apoptotic profiles in the kidney.

  13. Lycopene ameliorates atrazine-induced oxidative damage in adrenal cortex of male rats by activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Abass, Marwa Ahmed; Elkhateeb, Shereen Ahmed; Abd El-Baset, Samia Adel; Kattaia, Asmaa Alhosiny; Mohamed, Eman Mosallam; Atteia, Hebatallah Husseini

    2016-08-01

    Atrazine (ATZ) is one of the most commonly used herbicides contaminating plants, soil and water resources. Several strategies have been used to counteract ATZ toxicity. Here, we tested the hypothesis that lycopene could ameliorate ATZ-induced toxicity in the adrenal cortex. For this purpose, 35 adult male albino rats were randomized into five equal groups: untreated control, vehicle control (received 0.5 mL corn oil/day), lycopene (treated with lycopene dissolved in 0.5 mL corn oil, 10 mg/kg b.w./day), ATZ (received ATZ dissolved in 0.5 mL corn oil 300 mg/kg b.w./day), and ATZ + lycopene (treated with ATZ and lycopene at the same previously mentioned doses). All treatments were given by oral gavage for 4 weeks. We found that ATZ exposure significantly increased relative adrenal weight, plasma ACTH levels, and adrenal oxidative stress as manifested by elevated malondialdehyde levels, decreased reduced glutathione content and depressed antioxidant enzyme activities in adrenal cortex tissues with respect to control groups. Furthermore, the transcription of adrenal cortex nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), nuclear factor kappa B, and caspase-3 genes was increased significantly compared with the control groups. This was accompanied with DNA fragmentation and structural and ultrastructural changes in zona glomerulosa and zona fasiculata of the adrenal cortex. Notably, all these changes were partially ameliorated in rats treated concomitantly with ATZ and lycopene. Our results showed that lycopene exerts protective effects against ATZ-induced toxicity in rat adrenal cortex. These effects may be attributed to the antioxidative property of lycopene and its ability to activate the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

  14. Carnosic Acid Induces Anti-Inflammatory Effects in Paraquat-Treated SH-SY5Y Cells Through a Mechanism Involving a Crosstalk Between the Nrf2/HO-1 Axis and NF-κB.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto; de Souza, Izabel Cristina Custódio; Fürstenau, Cristina Ribas

    2017-01-12

    Carnosic acid (CA) is a phenolic diterpene obtained from Rosmarinus officinalis L. and has demonstrated cytoprotective properties in several experimental models. CA exerts antioxidant effects by upregulating the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which controls the expression of antioxidant and phase II detoxification enzymes. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression is modulated by Nrf2 and has been demonstrated as part of the mechanism underlying the CA-induced cytoprotection. Nonetheless, it remains to be studied whether and how HO-1 would mediate CA-elicited anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, we have investigated here whether and how CA would prevent paraquat (PQ)-induced inflammation-related alterations in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. SH-SY5Y cells were pretreated for 12 h with CA at 1 μM before exposure to PQ for further 24 h. CA suppressed the PQ-induced alterations on the levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) through a mechanism involving the activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 axis. Furthermore, we observed a crosstalk between the Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway and the activation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factor, since administration of ZnPP IX (specific inhibitor of HO-1) or Nrf2 knockdown using small interfering RNA (siRNA) abolished the anti-inflammatory effects induced by CA. Moreover, administration of SN50 (specific inhibitor of NF-κB) inhibited the PQ-induced inflammation-related effects in SH-SY5Y cells. Therefore, CA exerted anti-inflammatory effects in SH-SY5Y cells through an Nrf2/HO-1 axis-dependent manner associated with downregulation of NF-κB.

  15. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits nitric oxide production and nuclear factor-kappaB via heme oxygenase-1 expression in RAW264.7 macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Oh, Gi-Su; Pae, Hyun-Ock; Lee, Bok-Soo; Kim, Byeong-Nam; Kim, Jong-Moon; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Jeon, Seon Bok; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Chae, Han-Jung; Chung, Hun-Taeg

    2006-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), a regulatory gaseous molecule that is endogenously synthesized by cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE) and/or cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) from L-cysteine (L-Cys) metabolism, is a putative vasodilator, and its role in nitric oxide (NO) production is unexplored. Here, we show that at noncytotoxic concentrations, H(2)S was able to inhibit NO production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression via heme oxygenase (HO-1) expression in RAW264.7 macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Both H(2)S solution prepared by bubbling pure H(2)S gas and NaSH, a H(2)S donor, dose dependently induced HO-1 expression through the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Pretreatment with H(2)S or NaHS significantly inhibited LPS-induced iNOS expression and NO production. Moreover, NO production in LPS-stimulated macrophages that are expressing CSE mRNA was significantly reduced by the addition of L-Cys, a substrate for H(2)S, but enhanced by the selective CSE inhibitor beta-cyano-L-alanine but not by the CBS inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid. While either blockage of HO activity by the HO inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin IX, or down-regulation of HO-1 expression by HO-1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) reversed the inhibitory effects of H(2)S on iNOS expression and NO production, HO-1 overexpression produced the same inhibitory effects of H(2)S. In addition, LPS-induced nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation was diminished in RAW264.7 macrophages preincubated with H(2)S. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect of H(2)S on NF-kappaB activation was reversed by the transient transfection with HO-1 siRNA, but was mimicked by either HO-1 gene transfection or treatment with carbon monoxide (CO), an end product of HO-1. CO treatment also inhibited LPS-induced NO production and iNOS expression via its inactivation of NF-kappaB. Collectively, our results suggest that H(2)S can inhibit NO production and NF-kappaB activation in LPS-stimulated

  16. Molecular basis for the direct inhibition of AP-1 DNA binding by 15-deoxy-Delta 12,14-prostaglandin J2.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sala, Dolores; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Cañada, F Javier

    2003-12-19

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins may interfere with cellular functions by multiple mechanisms. The cyclopentenone 15-deoxy-Delta 12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) has been reported to inhibit the activity of the transcription factor AP-1 in several experimental settings. We have explored the possibility of a direct interaction of 15d-PGJ2 with AP-1 proteins. Here we show that 15d-PGJ2 covalently modifies c-Jun and directly inhibits the DNA binding activity of AP-1. The modification of c-Jun occurs both in vitro and in intact cells as detected by labeling with biotinylated 15d-PGJ2 and mass spectrometry analysis. Attachment of the cyclopentenone prostaglandin occurs at cysteine 269, which is located in the c-Jun DNA binding domain. In addition, 15d-PGJ2 can promote the oligomerization of a fraction of c-Jun through the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds or 15d-PGJ2-bonded dimers. Our results identify a novel site of interaction of 15d-PGJ2 with the AP-1 activation pathway that may contribute to the complex effects of cyclopentenone prostaglandins on the cellular response to pro-inflammatory agents. They also show the first evidence for the induction of protein cross-linking by 15d-PGJ2.

  17. Contribution of covalent protein modification to the antiinflammatory effects of cyclopentenone prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sala, Dolores; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Pineda-Molina, Estela; Cañada, F Javier

    2002-11-01

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins, which are produced during inflammatory processes, may exert a negative feedback on inflammation. These reactive compounds may form covalent adducts with thiol groups in glutathione or in proteins. The transcription factor NF-kappaB is key for the expression of numerous proinflammatory genes. We have observed that treatment of mesangial cells with 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) inhibits the cytokine-elicited DNA binding activity of NF-kappaB, both in intact cells and in isolated nuclear extracts, thus suggesting a direct effect on DNA binding. By using a biotinylated 15d-PGJ(2) derivative, we have observed that 15d-PGJ(2) forms an adduct with the p50 subunit of NF-kappaB, as shown by Western blot and detection with horseradish peroxidase-conjugated streptavidin. In contrast, a p50 construct that bears a mutation in the cysteine residue involved in DNA binding (Cys62Ser) and is not susceptible to inhibition by 15d-PGJ(2) does not incorporate biotinylated 15d-PGJ(2). The labeling of several polypeptides after incubation of cells with biotinylated 15d-PGJ(2) suggests that there may be multiple targets for modification by 15d-PGJ(2). We propose that the covalent modification of NF-kappaB (and potentially other proteins) by 15d-PGJ(2) may contribute to the antiinflammatory effects of this prostaglandin.

  18. Arctigenin Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Pulmonary Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in a Mouse Model via Suppression of MAPK, HO-1, and iNOS Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-zhou; Jiang, Zheng-kui; He, Bao-xia; Liu, Xian-ben

    2015-08-01

    Arctigenin, a bioactive component of Arctium lappa (Nubang), has anti-inflammatory activity. Here, we investigated the effects of arctigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. Mice were divided into four groups: control, LPS, LPS + DMSO, and LPS + Arctigenin. Mice in the LPS + Arctigenin group were injected intraperitoneally with 50 mg/kg of arctigenin 1 h before an intratracheal administration of LPS (5 mg/kg). Lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) were collected. Histological changes of the lung were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Arctigenin decreased LPS-induced acute lung inflammation, infiltration of inflammatory cells into BALF, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, arctigenin pretreatment reduced the malondialdehyde level and increased superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and glutathione peroxidase/glutathione disulfide ratio in the lung. Mechanically, arctigenin significantly reduced the production of nitric oxygen and inducible nitric oxygen synthase (iNOS) expression, enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, and decreased the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Arctigenin has anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects on LPS-induced acute lung injury, which are associated with modulation of MAPK, HO-1, and iNOS signaling.

  19. Grape seed proanthocyanidins protects against cadmium induced oxidative pancreatitis in rats by attenuating oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis via Nrf-2/HO-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Nazima; Manoharan, Vaihundam; Miltonprabu, Selvaraj

    2016-06-01

    The present study has been designed and carried out to explore the role of grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSP) in the pancreas of cadmium (Cd)-induced cellular oxidative stress-mediated toxicity in rats. Four groups of healthy rats were given oral doses of Cd (5-mg/kg BW) and to identify the possible mechanism of action of GSP 100-mg/kg BW was selected and was given 90 min before Cd intoxication. The causative molecular and cellular mechanism of Cd was determined using various biochemical assays, histology, western blotting and ELISA. Cd intoxication revealed increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL1β and IFN-γ), reduced levels of cellular defense proteins (Nrf-2 and HO-1) and glucose transporter (GLUT-2 and GLUT-4) along with the enhanced levels of signaling molecules of apoptosis (cleaved Caspase-12/9/8/3) in the pancreas of Cd-intoxicated rats. Results suggested that the treatment with GSP reduced blood glucose level, increased plasma insulin and mitigated oxidative stress-related markers. GSP protects pancreatic tissue by attenuated inflammatory responses and inhibited apoptosis. This uniqueness and absence of any detectable adverse effect of GSP proposes the possibility of using it as an effective protector in the oxidative stress-mediated pancreatic dysfunction in rats.

  20. Paeonol and danshensu combination attenuates apoptosis in myocardial infarcted rats by inhibiting oxidative stress: Roles of Nrf2/HO-1 and PI3K/Akt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; Song, Fan; Duan, Lin-Rui; Sheng, Juan-Juan; Xie, Yan-Hua; Yang, Qian; Chen, Ying; Dong, Qian-Qian; Zhang, Bang-Le; Wang, Si-Wang

    2016-01-01

    Paeonol and danshensu is the representative active ingredient of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs Cortex Moutan and Radix Salviae Milthiorrhizae, respectively. Paeonol and danshensu combination (PDSS) has putative cardioprotective effects in treating ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, the evidence for the protective effect is scarce and the pharmacological mechanisms of the combination remain unclear. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effect of PDSS on isoproterenol (ISO)-induced myocardial infarction in rats and to elucidate the potential mechanism. Assays of creatine kinase-MB, cardiac troponin I and T and histopathological analysis revealed PDSS significantly prevented myocardial injury induced by ISO. The ISO-induced profound elevation of oxidative stress was also suppressed by PDSS. TUNEL and caspase-3 activity assay showed that PDSS significantly inhibited apoptosis in myocardia. In exploring the underlying mechanisms of PDSS, we found PDSS enhanced the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in myocardial injured rats. Furthermore, PDSS increased phosphorylated PI3K and Akt, which may in turn activate antioxidative and antiapoptotic signaling events in rat. These present findings demonstrated that PDSS exerts significant cardioprotective effects against ISO-induced myocardial infarction in rats. The protective effect is, at least partly, via activation of Nrf2/HO-1 signaling and involvement of the PI3K/Akt cell survival signaling pathway. PMID:27021411

  1. Tryptanthrin Suppresses the Activation of the LPS-Treated BV2 Microglial Cell Line via Nrf2/HO-1 Antioxidant Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Young-Won; Cheon, So Yeong; Park, Sung Yun; Song, Juhyun; Lee, Ju-Hee

    2017-01-01

    Microglia are the resident macrophages in the central nervous system (CNS) and play essential roles in neuronal homeostasis and neuroinflammatory pathologies. Recently, microglia have been shown to contribute decisively to neuropathologic processes after ischemic stroke. Furthermore, natural compounds have been reported to attenuate inflammation and pathologies associated with neuroinflammation. Tryptanthrin (indolo[2,1-b]quinazoline-6,12-dione) is a phytoalkaloid with known anti-inflammatory effects in cells. In present study, the authors confirmed middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) injury triggers the activation of microglia in brain tissue, and investigated whether tryptanthrin influences the function of mouse murine BV2 microglia under LPS-induced inflammatory conditions in vitro. It was found tryptanthrin protected BV2 microglia cells against LPS-induced inflammation and inhibited the induction of M1 phenotype microglia under inflammatory conditions. In addition, tryptanthrin reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in BV2 microglia cells via nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) signaling and NF-κB signaling. The authors suggest that tryptanthrin might alleviate the progress of neuropathologies by controlling microglial functions under neuroinflammatory conditions. PMID:28210215

  2. 15-Deoxy-Delta 12,14-prostaglandin J2 inhibition of NF-kappaB-DNA binding through covalent modification of the p50 subunit.

    PubMed

    Cernuda-Morollón, E; Pineda-Molina, E; Cañada, F J; Pérez-Sala, D

    2001-09-21

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins display anti-inflammatory activities and interfere with the signaling pathway that leads to activation of transcription factor NF-kappaB. Here we explore the possibility that the NF-kappaB subunit p50 may be a target for the cyclopentenone 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)). This prostaglandin inhibited the DNA binding ability of recombinant p50 in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition required the cyclopentenone moiety and could be prevented but not reverted by glutathione and dithiothreitol. Moreover, a p50 mutant with a C62S mutation was resistant to inhibition, indicating that the effect of 15d-PGJ(2) was probably due to its interaction with cysteine 62 in p50. The covalent modification of p50 by 15d-PGJ(2) was demonstrated by reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry analysis that showed an increase in retention time and in the molecular mass of 15d-PGJ(2)-treated p50, respectively. The interaction between p50 and 15d-PGJ(2) was relevant in intact cells. 15d-PGJ(2) effectively inhibited cytokine-elicited NF-kappaB activity in HeLa without reducing IkappaBalpha degradation or nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB subunits. 15d-PGJ(2) reduced NF-kappaB DNA binding activity in isolated nuclear extracts, suggesting a direct effect on NF-kappaB proteins. Finally, treatment of HeLa with biotinylated-15d-PGJ(2) resulted in the formation of a 15d-PGJ(2)-p50 adduct as demonstrated by neutravidin binding and immunoprecipitation. These results clearly show that p50 is a target for covalent modification by 15d-PGJ(2) that results in inhibition of DNA binding.

  3. Beneficial effects of Camellia Oil (Camellia oleifera Abel.) on ketoprofen-induced gastrointestinal mucosal damage through upregulation of HO-1 and VEGF.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Wu, Shu-Li; Ho, Cheng-Ying; Huang, Shang-Ming; Cheng, Chun-Lung; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2014-01-22

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ketoprofen, are generally used to treat pain and inflammation and as pyretic agents in clinical medicine. However, the usage of these drugs may lead to oxidative injury to the gastrointestinal mucosa. Camellia oil ( Camellia oleifera Abel.) is commonly used in Taiwan and China as cooking oil. Traditional remedies containing this oil exert beneficial health effects on the bowel, stomach, liver, and lungs. However, the effects of camellia oil on ketoprofen-induced oxidative gastrointestinal mucosal lesions remain unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of camellia oil on ketoprofen-induced acute gastrointestinal ulcers. The results showed that treatment of Int-407 cells with camellia oil (50-75 μg/mL) not only increased the levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) mRNA expression but also increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) protein secretion, which served as a mucosal barrier against gastrointestinal oxidative injury. Moreover, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats treated with camellia oil (2 mL/kg/day) prior to the administration of ketoprofen (50 mg/kg/day) successfully inhibited COX-2 protein expression, inhibited the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and nitrite oxide (NO), reversed the impairment of the antioxidant system, and decreased oxidative damage in the gastrointestinal mucosa. More importantly, pretreatment of SD rats with camellia oil strongly inhibited gastrointestinal mucosal injury induced by ketoprofen, which was proved by the histopathological staining of gastrointestinal tissues. Our data suggest that camellia oil exerts potent antiulcer effects against oxidative damage in the stomach and intestine induced by ketoprofen.

  4. Forsythiae Fructus Inhibits B16 Melanoma Growth Involving MAPKs/Nrf2/HO-1 Mediated Anti-Oxidation and Anti-Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jiaolin; Ding, Renbo; Zou, Lidi; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Kai; Liu, Fang; Li, Peng; Chen, Meiwan; Wan, Jian-Bo; Su, Huanxing; Wang, Yitao; He, Chengwei

    2016-01-01

    Forsythiae Fructus, the fruits of Forsythia suspensa (Thunb.) Vahl, Lianqiao in Chinese, is one of the most fundamental herbs in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). It is a typical heat-clearing and detoxicating herb, according to TCM theory. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of Forsythiae Fructus aqueous extract (FAE) on B16-F10 melanoma cells in vivo. The transplanted B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6 mice was established and used for the evaluation of the in vivo antitumor effect of FAE. FAE strongly inhibited the growth of B16-F10 cells in vitro and the tumor in vivo. The survival time of tumor-bearing mice was significantly prolonged by FAE. FAE inhibited cancer cell proliferation and angiogenesis in the tumor, as indicated by the decreased expressions of Ki67 and CD31. The levels of ROS, MDA, TNF-[Formula: see text] and IL-6 decreased, while GSH increased in the FAE treatment group, indicating FAE possesses strong anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activity. The expression of anti-oxidant proteins Nrf-2 and HO-1, tumor suppressors P53 and p-PTEN, and the MAPK pathways in tumor tissues were upregulated by FAE treatment. These data demonstrated that FAE exhibited strong antitumor activity against B16-F10 murine melanoma both in vitro and in vivo. The antitumor effect of FAE involved decreases in oxidative stress and inflammation in the tumor, which is closely related to the heat-clearing and detoxicating properties of FAE.

  5. 4-Ketopinoresinol, a novel naturally occurring ARE activator, induces the Nrf2/HO-1 axis and protects against oxidative stress-induced cell injury via activation of PI3K/AKT signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huang-Hui; Chen, Yu-Tsen; Huang, Yen-Wen; Tsai, Hui-Ju; Kuo, Ching-Chuan

    2012-03-15

    The Nrf2/ARE pathway plays an important role in inducing phase II detoxifying enzymes and antioxidant proteins and has been considered a potential target for cancer chemoprevention because it eliminates harmful reactive oxygen species or reactive intermediates generated from carcinogens. The objectives of this study were to identify novel Nrf2/ARE activators and to investigate the mechanistic signaling pathway involved in the activation of Nrf2-mediated cytoprotective effects against oxidative-induced cell injury. A stable ARE-driven luciferase reporter cell line was established to screen a potentially cytoprotective compound. 4-Ketopinoresinol (4-KPR), the (α-γ) double-cyclized type of lignan obtained from adlay (Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf), activates ARE-driven luciferase activity more effectively than the classical ARE activator tert-butylhydroquinone. 4-KPR treatment resulted in a transient increase in AKT phosphorylation and subsequent phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2, along with increased expression of ARE-dependent cytoprotective genes, such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), aldo-keto reductases, and glutathione synthetic enzyme. 4-KPR suppresses oxidative stress-induced DNA damage and cell death via upregulation of HO-1. Inhibition of PI3K/AKT signaling by chemical inhibitors or RNA interference not only suppressed 4-KPR-induced Nrf2/HO-1 activation, but also eliminated the cytoprotective effect against oxidative damage. These observations in an ARE-regulated gene system suggest that 4-KPR is a novel Nrf2/ARE-mediated transcription activator, activates the Nrf2/HO-1 axis, and protects against oxidative stress-induced cell injury via activation of PI3K/AKT signaling.

  6. 20C, a bibenzyl compound isolated from Gastrodia elata, protects PC12 cells against rotenone-induced apoptosis via activation of the Nrf2/ARE/HO-1 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ju-yang; Yuan, Yu-he; Yan, Jia-qing; Wang, Ya-nan; Chu, Shi-feng; Zhu, Cheng-gen; Guo, Qing-lan; Shi, Jian-gong; Chen, Nai-hong

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Our preliminary study shows that a bibenzyl compound isolated from Gastrodia elata, 2-[4-hydroxy-3-(4-hydroxybenzyl)benzyl]-4-(4-hydroxybenzyl)phenol (designated 20C), protects PC12 cells against H2O2-induced injury. In this study we investigated whether 20C exerted neuroprotective action in a cell model of Parkinson's disease. Methods: A cell model of Parkinson's disease was established in PC12 cells by exposure to rotenone (4 μmol/L) for 48 h. Cell viability and apoptosis were assessed, and intracellular ROS level and the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were detected. The expression of apoptosis-related proteins Bax, Bcl-2, cytochrome c, cleaved caspase-3, and oxidative stress-related proteins Nrf2, HO-1 and NQO1 were examined using Western blotting. The mRNA levels of HO-1 and NQO1 were determined with RT-PCR. The nuclear translocation of Nrf2 was observed with immunofluorescence staining. Results: Treatment with rotenone significantly increased the number of apoptotic cells, accompanied by marked increases in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. Rotenone also increased ROS accumulation, reduced MMP, and increased the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 as well as the mRNA and protein levels of the Nrf2 downstream target genes HO-1 and NQO1 in PC12 cells. Co-treatment with 20C (0.01–1 μmol/L) dose-dependently attenuated rotenone-induced apoptosis and oxidative stress in PC12 cells. Nrf2 knockdown by siRNA partially reversed the protective effects of 20C in rotenone-treated PC12 cells. Conclusion: The bibenzyl compound 20C protects PC12 cells from rotenone-induced apoptosis, at least in part, via activation of the Nrf2/ARE/HO-1 signaling pathway. PMID:27180985

  7. Protein thiol modification by 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J2 addition in mesangial cells: role in the inhibition of pro-inflammatory genes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Stamatakis, Konstantinos; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2004-11-01

    The cyclopentenone prostaglandin and PPARgamma agonist 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) displays anti-inflammatory effects in several experimental models. Direct modification of protein thiols is arising as an important mechanism of cyclopentenone prostaglandin action. However, little is known about the extent or specificity of this process. Mesangial cells (MC) play a key role in glomerulonephritis. In this work, we have studied the selectivity of protein modification by 15d-PGJ(2) in MC, and the correlation with the modulation of several proinflammatory genes. MC incubation with biotinylated 15d-PGJ(2) results in the labeling of a distinct set of proteins as evidenced by two-dimensional electrophoresis. 15d-PGJ(2) binds to nuclear and cytosolic targets as detected by fluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation. The pattern of biotinylated 15d-PGJ(2)-modified polypeptides is readily distinguishable from that of total protein staining or labeling with biotinylated iodoacetamide. 15d-PGJ(2) addition requires the double bond in the cyclopentane ring. 9,10-Dihydro-15d-PGJ(2), a 15d-PGJ(2) analog that shows the same potency as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonist in MC but lacks the cyclopentenone moiety, displays reduced ability to modify proteins and to block 15d-PGJ(2) binding. Micromolar concentrations of 15d-PGJ(2) inhibit cytokine-elicited levels of inducible nitricoxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in MC. In contrast, 9,10-dihydro-15d-PGJ(2) does not reproduce this inhibition. 15d-PGJ(2) effect is not blocked by the PPARgamma antagonist 2-chloro-5-nitro-N-phenylbenzamide (GW9662). Moreover, compounds possessing an alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl group, like 2-cyclopenten-1-one and 2-cyclohexen-1-one, reduce pro-inflammatory gene expression. These observations indicate that covalent modification of cellular thiols by 15d-PGJ(2) is a selective process that plays an important

  8. The effect of moderate-intensity exercise on the expression of HO-1 mRNA and activity of HO in cardiac and vascular smooth muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Cailing; Qi, Jie; Li, Wanwei; Zhang, Jun

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the effects of moderate-intensity training on the activity of heme oxygenase (HO) and expression of HO-1 mRNA in the aorta and the cardiac muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). After 9 weeks of swimming exercise, the activity of HO and expression of HO-1 mRNA in the SHRs were measured. The resting blood pressure in the exercise group was increased by 1.7% (P > 0.05), whereas it was significantly elevated by 10.3% (P < 0.01) in the SHR rats. Compared with animals in the control and sedentary groups, the expression level of HO-1 mRNA of aorta and cardiac muscle in the exercise group was significantly enhanced (P < 0.01). The HO activity and the content of plasma carbon monoxide (CO) in the sedentary group were dramatically decreased (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively) compared with the control group. HO activity and content of plasma CO in the exercise group were significantly higher compared with those in the sedentary group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). The HO/CO metabolic pathway might be involved in the regulation of blood pressure of the SHR models.

  9. Anti-Fibrotic Effect of Losartan, an Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker, Is Mediated through Inhibition of ER Stress via Up-Regulation of SIRT1, Followed by Induction of HO-1 and Thioredoxin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyosang; Baek, Chung Hee; Lee, Raymond Bok; Chang, Jai Won; Yang, Won Seok; Lee, Sang Koo

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is increasingly identified as modulator of fibrosis. Losartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker, has been widely used as the first choice of treatment in chronic renal diseases. We postulated that anti-fibrotic effect of losartan is mediated through inhibition of ER stress via SIRT1 (silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1) hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1)/thioredoxin pathway. Renal tubular cells, tunicamycin (TM)-induced ER stress, and unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) mouse model were used. Expression of ER stress was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical stain. ER stress was induced by chemical ER stress inducer, tunicamycin, and non-chemical inducers such as TGF-β, angiotensin II, high glucose, and albumin. Losartan suppressed the TM-induced ER stress, as shown by inhibition of TM-induced expression of GRP78 (glucose related protein 78) and p-eIF2α (phosphospecific-eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2α), through up-regulation of SIRT1 via HO-1 and thioredoxin. Losartan also suppressed the ER stress by non-chemical inducers. In both animal models, losartan reduced the tubular expression of GRP78, which were abolished by pretreatment with sirtinol (SIRT1 inhibitor). Sirtinol also blocked the inhibitory effect of losartan on the UUO-induced renal fibrosis. These findings provide new insights into renoprotective effects of losartan and suggest that SIRT1, HO-1, and thioredoxin may be potential pharmacological targets in kidney diseases under excessive ER stress condition. PMID:28146117

  10. Acute toxicity of a commercial glyphosate formulation on European sea bass juveniles (Dicentrarchus labrax L.): gene expressions of heme oxygenase-1 (ho-1), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and aromatases (cyp19a and cyp19b).

    PubMed

    Prevot-D'Alvise, N; Richard, S; Coupé, S; Bunet, R; Grillasca, J P

    2013-12-31

    Acute toxicity of Roundup, a commercial glyphosate--based herbicide, was evaluated in a teleost marine fish, the European sea bass, after 96 h of exposure. The LC50 96-h value of Roundup was 529 mg/L. Juveniles (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) were exposed to a sublethal concentration (35% of the LC50, i.e. 193 mg/L) of Roundup for 96-h. The study of heme oxygenase-1 (ho-1) gene expression was performed in four tissues (liver, gills, brain and gonads) and highlighted the disruption of antioxidant defence system. Results showed that ho-1 mRNA levels in liver and gills significantly decreased (p<0.001 and p<0.01 respectively) in fish exposed to 193 mg/L of Roundup, whereas in brain and gonads, ho-1 mRNA level was not altered. The analysis of acetylcholinesterase expression was used to evaluate the overall neurotoxicity of the herbicide and aromatase genes to assess the alteration of the endocrine system. Results showed that AChE and cyp19b gene transcriptions significantly increased (p<0.01) in brain of sea bass, whereas aromatase gene expression (cyp19a) in gonads was not significantly altered. Our results showed complex tissue-specific transcriptional responses after 96 h of exposure to a sublethal concentration. All these disruptions confirmed the deleterious effects of this glyphosate-based herbicide in a marine species.

  11. 15-Deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 Induces Apoptosis and Upregulates SOCS3 in Human Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trindade-da-Silva, Carlos Antônio; Reis, Carolina Fernandes; Vecchi, Lara; Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; Sperandio, Marcelo; Matias Colombo, Bruna França; Alves, Patrícia Terra; Ward, Laura Sterian; Ueira-Vieira, Carlos; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The cyclopentenone prostaglandin 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) is a natural ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) and a potential mediator of apoptosis in cancer cells. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of 15d-PGJ2 in human thyroid papillary carcinoma cells (TPC-1) using different doses of 15d-PGJ2 (0.6 to 20 μM) to determine IC50 (9.3 μM) via the MTT assay. The supernatant culture medium of the TPC-1 cells that was treated either with 15d-PGJ2 or with vehicle (control) for 24 hours was assessed for IL-6 secretion via CBA assay. RT-qPCR was used to evaluate mRNA expression of IL-6, SOCS1, SOCS3, and STAT3. TPC-1 cells treated with 15d-PGJ2 decreased the secretion and expression of IL-6 and STAT3, while it increased SOCS1 and SOCS3. Overall, we demonstrated that 15d-PGJ2 downregulated IL-6 signaling pathway and led TPC-1 cells into apoptosis. In conclusion, 15d-PGJ2 shows the potential to become a new therapeutic approach for thyroid tumors. PMID:27190500

  12. Biosynthesis of 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-PGJ2 and the ligation of PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Bell-Parikh, L. Chastine; Ide, Tomomi; Lawson, John A.; McNamara, Peter; Reilly, Muredach; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2003-01-01

    15-deoxy-Δ12,14-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2) has been identified as an endogenous ligand for PPARγ, inducing adipogenesis in vitro. Additional roles for this molecule in the propagation and resolution of inflammation, ligation of NF-κB, and mediation of apoptosis have been proposed. However, quantitative, physiochemical evidence for the formation of 15d-PGJ2 in vivo is lacking. We report that 15d-PGJ2 is detectable using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry–mass spectrometry at low picomolar concentrations in the medium of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. However, despite induction of COX-2, production of PGs, including 15d-PGJ2, does not increase during adipocyte differentiation, a process unaltered by COX inhibition. 15d-PGJ2 is detectable as a minor product of COX-2 in human urine. However, its biosynthesis is unaltered during or after COX activation in vivo by LPS. Furthermore, the biosynthesis of 15d-PGJ2 is not augmented in the joint fluid of patients with arthritis, nor is its urinary excretion increased in patients with diabetes or obesity. 15d-PGJ2 is not the endogenous mediator of PPARγ-dependent adipocyte activation and is unaltered in clinical settings in which PPARγ activation has been implicated. PMID:12975479

  13. Resveratrol pretreatment attenuates injury and promotes proliferation of neural stem cells following oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation by upregulating the expression of Nrf2, HO-1 and NQO1 in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Changbo; Cheng, Wei; Yu, Pingping; Wang, Li; Zhou, Lulin; Zeng, Li; Yang, Qin

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the use of drugs and other methods for protecting implanted neural stem cells (NSCs) from the adverse environment of injured tissue for successful cell therapy. Resveratrol can modify cardiac stem cells to enhance their survival and differentiation, however, its effect and the mechanism underlying its neuroprotective effect on NSCs following stroke remain to be fully elucidated. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) signaling is important in antioxidative stress, and the role of Nrf-2 signaling in the enhanced neuroprotection of NSCs by resveratrol following stroke also remains to be elucidated. In the present study, NSCs were pretreated with resveratrol prior to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R) in vitro. The survival, apoptosis and proliferation of the NSCs were assessed using an MTT assay, Hoechst 33258 staining of nuclei and flow cytometry, respectively. In addition, the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), level of malondiadehyde (MDA) and content of glutathione (GSH) were determined. The protein expressions levels of Nrf-2, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1), and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) were detected using western blot analysis. It was found that resveratrol markedly enhanced NSC survival and proliferation, decreased apoptosis and the levels of MDA, and increased the activity of SOD and content of GSH in a concentration-dependent manner following OGD/R injury in vitro. In addition, the protein expression levels of Nrf2, HO-1 and NQO1 were significantly upregulated. These findings suggested that resveratrol attenuated injury and promoted proliferation of the NSCs, at least in part, by upregulating the expression of Nrf2, HO-1 and NQO1 following OGD/R injury in vitro. PMID:27573874

  14. Increased generation of cyclopentenone prostaglandins after brain ischemia and their role in aggregation of ubiquitinated proteins in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hao; Li, Wenjin; Ahmad, Muzamil; Rose, Marie E.; Miller, Tricia M.; Yu, Mei; Chen, Jie; Pascoe, Jordan L.; Poloyac, Samuel M.; Hickey, Robert W.; Graham, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    The cyclopentenone prostaglandin (CyPG) J2 series, including prostaglandin J2 (PGJ2), Δ12-PGJ2 and 15-deoxy-Δ12, 14 -prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2), are active metabolites of PGD2, exerting multiple effects on neuronal function. However, the physiologic relevance of these effects remains uncertain as brain concentrations of CyPGs have not been precisely determined. In this study, we found that free PGD2 and the J2 series CyPGs (PGJ2, Δ12-PGJ2 and 15d-PGJ2) were increased in post-ischemic rat brain as detected by UPLC-MS/MS with 15d-PGJ2 being the most abundant CyPG. These increases were attenuated by pre-treating with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor piroxicam. Next, effects of chronic exposure to 15d-PGJ2 were examined by treating primary neurons with 15d-PGJ2, CAY10410 (a 15d-PGJ2 analog lacking the cyclopentenone ring structure), or vehicle for 24 h to 96 h. Because we found that the concentration of free 15d-PGJ2 decreased rapidly in cell culture medium, freshly prepared medium containing 15d-PGJ2, CAY10410 or vehicle was changed twice daily to maintain steady extracellular concentrations. Incubation with 2.5 μM 15d-PGJ2, but not CAY10410, increased neuronal cell death without induction of caspase-3 or PARP cleavage, consistent with a primarily necrotic mechanism for 15d-PGJ2-induced cell death which was further supported by TUNEL assay results. Ubiquitinated protein accumulation and aggregation was observed after 96 h 15d-PGJ2 incubation, accompanied by compromised 20S proteasome activity. Unlike another proteasome inhibitor, MG132, 15d-PGJ2 treatment did not activate autophagy or induce aggresome formation. Therefore, the cumulative cytotoxic effects of increased generation of CyPGs after stroke may contribute to delayed post-ischemic neuronal injury. PMID:23355003

  15. Comparative cytoprotective effects of carbocysteine and fluticasone propionate in cigarette smoke extract-stimulated bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pace, Elisabetta; Ferraro, Maria; Di Vincenzo, Serena; Cipollina, Chiara; Gerbino, Stefania; Cigna, Diego; Caputo, Valentina; Balsamo, Rossella; Lanata, Luigi; Gjomarkaj, Mark

    2013-11-01

    Cigarette smoke extracts (CSE) induce oxidative stress, an important feature in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and oxidative stress contributes to the poor clinical efficacy of corticosteroids in COPD patients. Carbocysteine, an antioxidant and mucolytic agent, is effective in reducing the severity and the rate of exacerbations in COPD patients. The effects of carbocysteine on CSE-induced oxidative stress in bronchial epithelial cells as well as the comparison of these antioxidant effects of carbocysteine with those of fluticasone propionate are unknown. The present study was aimed to assess the effects of carbocysteine (10(-4) M) in cell survival and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (by flow cytometry) as well as total glutathione (GSH), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), nuclear-related factor 2 (Nrf2) expression and histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC-2) expression/activation in CSE-stimulated bronchial epithelial cells (16-HBE) and to compare these effects with those of fluticasone propionate (10(-8) M). CSE, carbocysteine or fluticasone propionate did not induce cell necrosis (propidium positive cells) or cell apoptosis (annexin V-positive/propidium-negative cells) in 16-HBE. CSE increased ROS production, nuclear Nrf2 and HO-1 in 16-HBE. Fluticasone propionate did not modify intracellular ROS production, GSH and HDCA-2 but reduced Nrf2 and HO-1 in CSE-stimulated 16-HBE. Carbocysteine reduced ROS production and increased GSH, HO-1, Nrf2 and HDAC-2 nuclear expression/activity in CSE-stimulated cells and was more effective than fluticasone propionate in modulating the CSE-mediated effects. In conclusion, the present study provides compelling evidences that the use of carbocysteine may be considered a promising strategy in diseases associated with corticosteroid resistance.

  16. Inhibition of microRNA-153 protects neurons against ischemia/reperfusion injury in an oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation cellular model by regulating Nrf2/HO-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qiong; Gao, Jianbo; Zheng, Yan; Liu, Xueli; Zhou, Qiangqiang; Shi, Canxia; Yao, Meng; Chen, Xia

    2017-02-28

    MicroRNAs are emerging as critical regulators in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury; however, their exact roles remain poorly understood. miR-153 is reported to be a neuron-related miRNA involved in neuroprotection. In this study, we aimed to investigate the precise role of miR-153 in regulating neuron survival during cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury using an oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD/R) cellular model. We found that miR-153 was significantly upregulated in neurons subjected to OGD/R treatment. Inhibition of miR-153 significantly attenuated OGD/R-induced injury and oxidative stress in neurons. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was identified as a target gene of miR-153. Inhibition of miR-153 significantly promoted the expression of Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). However, silencing of Nrf2 significantly blocked the protective effects of miR-153 inhibition. Our study indicates that the inhibition of miR-153 protects neurons against OGD/R-induced injury by regulating Nrf2/HO-1 signaling and suggests a potential therapeutic target for cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  17. 4,7-Dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,3-benzodioxole from Antrodia camphorata inhibits LPS-induced inflammation via suppression of NF-κB and induction HO-1 in RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Shie, Pei-Hsin; Wang, Sheng-Yang; Lay, Horng-Liang; Huang, Guan-Jhong

    2016-02-01

    Several benzenoid compounds have been isolated from Antrodia camphorata are known to have excellent anti-inflammatory activity. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory potential of 4,7-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,3-benzodioxole (DMB), one of the major benzenoid compounds isolated from the mycelia of A. camphorata. DMB significantly decreased the LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory molecules, such as nitric oxide (NO), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in RAW264.7 cells. In addition, DMB suppressed the protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, DMB significantly suppressed LPS-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and this inhibition was found to be associated with decreases in the phosphorylation and degradation of its inhibitor, inhibitory κB-α (IκB-α). Moreover, we found that DMB markedly inhibited the protein expression level of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Furthermore, treatment with DMB significantly increased hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in RAW264.7 cells, which is further confirmed by hemin, a HO-1 enhancer, significantly attenuated the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory molecules and iNOS and TLR4 protein levels. Taken together, the present study suggests that DMB may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  18. 15-Deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 exerts pro- and anti-inflammatory effects in mesangial cells in a concentration-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Alma E; Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J; Díez-Dacal, Beatriz; Oeste, Clara L; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2012-02-01

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins play a modulatory role in inflammation, in part through their ability to covalently modify key proinflammatory proteins. Using mesangial cells as a cellular model of inflammation we have observed that 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) exerts a biphasic effect on cell activation by cytokines, with nanomolar concentrations eliciting an amplification of nitric oxide (NO) production and iNOS and COX-2 levels, and concentrations of 5 μM and higher inhibiting proinflammatory gene expression. An analog of 15d-PGJ(2) lacking the cyclopentenone structure (9,10-dihydro-15d-PGJ(2)) showed reduced ability to elicit both types of effects, suggesting that the electrophilic nature of 15d-PGJ(2) is important for its biphasic action. Interestingly, the switch from stimulatory to inhibitory actions occurred within a narrow concentration range and correlated with the ability of 15d-PGJ(2) to induce heme oxygenase 1 and γ-GCSm expression. These events are highly dependent on the triggering of the antioxidant response, which is considered as a sensor of thiol group modification. Indeed, the levels of the master regulator of the antioxidant response Nrf2 increased upon treatment with concentrations of 15d-PGJ(2) above 5 μM, an effect that could not be mimicked by 9,10-dihydro-15d-PGJ(2). Thus, an interplay of redox and electrophilic signalling mechanisms can be envisaged by which 15d-PGJ(2), as several other redox mediators, could contribute both to the onset and to the resolution of inflammation in a context or concentration-dependent manner.

  19. Extract of Ziziphus jujuba Fruit (Jujube) Stimulates Expression of Enzymes Responsible for Heme Recycle via Anti-oxidant Response Element in Cultured Murine Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianping; Lam, Candy T W; Li, Zhonggui; Yao, Ping; Lin, Huangquan; Dong, Tina T X; Tsim, Karl W K

    2016-02-01

    Jujube, the fruit of Ziziphus jujuba Mill., is a functional food and commonly used as a health supplement worldwide. To study the beneficial role of jujube in heme iron recycling during erythrophagocytosis, the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), biliverdin reductase A and B, and ferroportin were determined in jujube-treated cultured RAW 264.7 macrophages. Application of a chemically standardized jujube water extract in cultured RAW 264.7 cells for 24 h stimulated the expressions of HO-1, biliverdin reductase A, biliverdin reductase B, and ferroportin in a concentration-dependent manner, having the maximal responses from twofolds to threefolds. A plasmid containing anti-oxidant response element, a regulator for HO-1 transcription, was transfected into RAW 264.7 cells. Application of jujube water extract onto the transfected macrophages stimulated the anti-oxidant response element-mediated transcriptional activity by twofolds. These results supported the potential capacity of jujube by regulating expressions of heme iron recycling genes in cultured macrophages.

  20. Protective effect of Xuebijing injection on D-galactosamine- and lipopolysaccharide-induced acute liver injury in rats through the regulation of p38 MAPK, MMP-9 and HO-1 expression by increasing TIPE2 expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Wei; Liu, Rong; Wu, Hai-Yin; Zhang, Wei; Xia, Jing; Dong, Min-Na; Yu, Wen; Wang, Qiang; Xie, Feng-Mei; Wang, Rui; Huang, Yun-Qiao; Qian, Chuan-Yun

    2016-11-01

    Xuebijing injection (XBJ) has long been used to treat infectious diseases in China. The therapeutic effect of XBJ is probably associated with anti-inflammatory effects. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for the effects of XBJ remain unknown. The present study was conducted in order to evaluate the protective effects of XBJ in a rat model of D-galactosamine (D-Gal)- and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)‑induced acute liver injury. In the present study, the rats were injected with D-Gal and LPS intraperitoneally to induce acute liver injury. Two hours prior to D-Gal and LPS administration, the treatment group was administered XBJ by intravenous infusion. The effects of XBJ on D-Gal- and LPS-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑alpha‑induced protein 8-like 2 (TIPE2), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) as well as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling was examined using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), western blot analysis, immunofluorescence, as well as by analysing the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the transaminases, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels in the rat liver tissues were also measured. For histological analysis, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained liver samples were evaluated. The results showed that XBJ upregulated TIPE2 and HO-1 expression, reduced the expression of NF-κB65 and MMP-9, inhibited the LPS-induced gene expression of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK, decreased the generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-6, IL-13 and TNF-α], inhibited ALT and AST activity, and ameliorated D-Gal- and LPS-induced liver injury. The histological results also demonstrated that XBJ attenuated D-Gal- and LPS-induced liver inflammation. It was found that XBJ may

  1. Protective effect of Xuebijing injection on D-galactosamine- and lipopolysaccharide-induced acute liver injury in rats through the regulation of p38 MAPK, MMP-9 and HO-1 expression by increasing TIPE2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Wei; Liu, Rong; Wu, Hai-Yin; Zhang, Wei; Xia, Jing; Dong, Min-Na; Yu, Wen; Wang, Qiang; Xie, Feng-Mei; Wang, Rui; Huang, Yun-Qiao; Qian, Chuan-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Xuebijing injection (XBJ) has long been used to treat infectious diseases in China. The therapeutic effect of XBJ is probably associated with anti-inflammatory effects. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for the effects of XBJ remain unknown. The present study was conducted in order to evaluate the protective effects of XBJ in a rat model of D-galactosamine (D-Gal)- and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute liver injury. In the present study, the rats were injected with D-Gal and LPS intraperitoneally to induce acute liver injury. Two hours prior to D-Gal and LPS administration, the treatment group was administered XBJ by intravenous infusion. The effects of XBJ on D-Gal- and LPS-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced protein 8-like 2 (TIPE2), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) as well as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling was examined using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), western blot analysis, immunofluorescence, as well as by analysing the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the transaminases, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels in the rat liver tissues were also measured. For histological analysis, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained liver samples were evaluated. The results showed that XBJ upregulated TIPE2 and HO-1 expression, reduced the expression of NF-κB65 and MMP-9, inhibited the LPS-induced gene expression of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK, decreased the generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-6, IL-13 and TNF-α], inhibited ALT and AST activity, and ameliorated D-Gal- and LPS-induced liver injury. The histological results also demonstrated that XBJ attenuated D-Gal- and LPS-induced liver inflammation. It was found that XBJ may prevent LPS-induced pro

  2. Enhancement of the Effect of Methyl Pyropheophorbide-a-Mediated Photodynamic Therapy was Achieved by Increasing ROS via Inhibition of Nrf2-HO-1 or Nrf2-ABCG2 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tian, Si; Yong, Min; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Li; Pan, Li; Chen, Qing; Li, Kai-Ting; Kong, Yu-Han; Jiang, Yuan; Yu, Ting-He; Yu, Le-Hua; Bai, Ding-Qun

    2017-03-27

    Emerging evidence indicates that the transcription factor nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (-NRF2) plays an essential role in cellular defense against oxidative stress; its activation has been related to cytoprotection. Here, we investigated the role of Nrf2 in improving the efficacy of methyl pyropheophorbide-a-mediated photodynamic therapy (Mppa-PDT) via the downregulation of Nrf2 in human ovarian cancer A2780 cells and SKOV3 cells. We found that Nrf2 translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in vitro and in vivo, and the expression of Nrf2 and P-Nrf2 increased through a possible mechanism regulated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) after Mppa-PDT treatment. Furthermore, cytotoxicity and apoptosis induced by Mppa-PDT increased after Nrf2down-regulation. Nrf2 down -regulation increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels by attenuating antioxidants or pumping Mppa out of cells, which resulted from the inhibition of Nrf2-HO-1 or Nrf2-ABCG2 signaling. In addition, SKOV3 cells exhibited increased resistance to Mppa-PDT, and the expression levels of P-Nrf2 and ABCG2 were higher in SKOV3 cells than in A2780 cells, suggesting that Nrf2-ABCG2 signaling might be involved in the intrinsic resistanceto Mppa-PDT. Taken together, these results provided evidence that Nrf2 down-regulation can enhance the effect of Mppa-PDT.

  3. Tomato powder impedes the development of azoxymethane-induced colorectal cancer in rats through suppression of COX-2 expression via NF-κB and regulating Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Tuzcu, Mehmet; Aslan, Abdullah; Tuzcu, Zeynep; Yabas, Mehmet; Bahcecioglu, Ibrahim Halil; Ozercan, Ibrahim Hanifi; Kucuk, Omer; Sahin, Kazim

    2012-09-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Since dietary factors have been connected to a reduced risk of a diversity of human cancers, in this study we investigated the effects of tomato powder (TP) on the development of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colorectal cancer in Wistar rats, and possible mechanism(s) by which TP shows its chemopreventive activity. Here we show that TP added to feed at 5% rate decreases the rate of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and reduces the development of adenocarcinoma and growth of AOM-induced colorectal cancer in rats. In addition, we demonstrate that TP supplementation shows its chemopreventive activities through inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression via NF-κB pathway and promotion of apoptosis, as well as regulating Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway in colorectal tissue of AOM-treated rats. Our findings identify an intimate connection between dietary supplementation of TP and the decreased risk of colorectal cancer in rats, and suggest that consumption of TP would be a natural candidate for the prevention of colorectal cancer in men.

  4. Lithospermic acid B protects beta-cells from cytokine-induced apoptosis by alleviating apoptotic pathways and activating anti-apoptotic pathways of Nrf2-HO-1 and Sirt1

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byung-Wan; Chun, Sung Wan; Kim, Soo Hyun; Lee, Yongho; Kang, Eun Seok; Cha, Bong-Soo; Lee, Hyun Chul

    2011-04-01

    Lithospermic acid B (LAB) has been reported to protect OLETF rats, an established type 2 diabetic animal model, from the development of diabetes-related vascular complications. We investigated whether magnesium lithospermate B (LAB) has a protective role under cytokine-induced apoptosis in INS-1 cells in vitro and whether it slows the development of diabetes in OLETF rats in vivo. Pretreatment with 50 {mu}M LAB significantly reduced the 1000 U/mL INF-{gamma} and 100 U/mL IL-1{beta}-induced INS-1 cell death. LAB significantly alleviated cytokine-induced phosphorylations of p38 and JNK in accordance with a decrease in cleaved caspase-3 activity in beta-cells. LAB also protected against the cytokine-induced caspase-3 apoptotic pathway via significant activation of Nrf2-HO (heme-oxigenase)-1 and Sirt1 expression. OLETF rats treated with 40 mg/kg/day LAB showed a significant improvement in glucose tolerance compared to untreated OLETF control rats in vivo. Our results suggest that the cytoprotective effects of LAB on pancreatic {beta}-cells are related with both alleviating apoptotic pathways and activating anti-apoptotic pathways of Nrf2-HO-1 and Sirt1.

  5. Possible involvement of 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14) -prostaglandin J2 in the development of leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Toru; Matsuzaki, Syu; Miyahara, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Kaori; Hasegawa, Yuki; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is a worldwide health problem that urgently needs to be solved. Leptin is an anti-obesity hormone that activates satiety signals to the brain. Evidence to suggest that leptin resistance is involved in the development of obesity is increasing; however, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. We herein demonstrated that 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14) -prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2 ) was involved in the development of leptin resistance. A treatment with 15d-PGJ2 inhibited the leptin-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in neuronal cells (SH-SY5Y-Ob-Rb cells). Furthermore, the intracerebroventricular administration of 15d-PGJ2 reversed the inhibitory effects of leptin on food intake in rats. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) antagonist, GW9662, slightly reversed the inhibitory effects of 15d-PGJ2 on the leptin-induced activation of STAT3 in neuronal cells. The PPAR-γ agonist, rosiglitazone, also inhibited leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation. Therefore, the inhibitory effects of 15d-PGJ2 may be mediated through PPAR-γ. On the other hand, 15d-PGJ2 -induced leptin resistance may not be mediated by endoplasmic reticulum stress or suppressor of cytokine signaling 3. The results of the present study suggest that 15d-PGJ2 is a novel factor for the development of leptin resistance in obesity. Leptin resistance, an insensitivity to the actions of leptin, is involved in the development of obesity. Here, we found 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14) -prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2 ) may be involved in the development of leptin resistance. The present results suggest that the 15d-PGJ2 may be a novel factor for the development of leptin resistance in obesity. 15d-PGJ2 , 15-Deoxy-Δ(12,14) -prostaglandin J2; STAT3, signal tranducer and activator of transcription 3.

  6. Identification of novel protein targets for modification by 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J2 in mesangial cells reveals multiple interactions with the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Stamatakis, Konstantinos; Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2006-01-01

    The cyclopentenone prostaglandin 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2) has been shown to display protective effects against renal injury or inflammation. In cultured mesangial cells (MC), 15d-PGJ2 inhibits the expression of proinflammatory genes and modulates cell proliferation. Therefore, cyclopentenone prostaglandins (cyPG) have been envisaged as a promise in the treatment of renal disease. The effects of 15d-PGJ2 may be dependent on or independent from its role as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonist. It was shown recently that an important determinant for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-independent effects of 15d-PGJ2 is the capacity to modify proteins covalently and alter their function. However, a limited number of protein targets have been identified to date. Herein is shown that a biotinylated derivative of 15d-PGJ2 recapitulates the effects of 15d-PGJ2 on the stress response and inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase levels and forms stable adducts with proteins in intact MC. Biotinylated 15d-PGJ2 was then used to identify proteins that potentially are involved in cyPG biologic effects. Extracts from biotinylated 15d-PGJ2-treated MC were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis, and the spots of interest were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Identified targets include proteins that are regulated by oxidative stress, such as heat-shock protein 90 and nucleoside diphosphate kinase, as well as proteins that are involved in cytoskeletal organization, such as actin, tubulin, vimentin, and tropomyosin. Biotinylated 15d-PGJ2 binding to several targets was confirmed by avidin pull-down. Consistent with these findings, 15d-PGJ2 induced early reorganization of vimentin and tubulin in MC. The cyclopentenone moiety and the presence of cysteine were important for vimentin rearrangement. These studies may contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of action and therapeutic potential of cyPG.

  7. Zinc protoporphyrin inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-, lipoteichoic acid-, and peptidoglycan-induced nitric oxide production through stimulating iNOS protein ubiquitination

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, J.-M.; Lin, H.-Y.; Shen, S.-C.; Wu, M.-S.; Lin, C.-W.; Chiu, W.-T.; Lin, C.-H. Chen, Y.-C.

    2009-06-15

    In the present study, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), but not ferric protoporphyrin (FePP), tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), or zinc chloride (ZnCl{sub 2}), at the doses of 0.5, 1, and 2 {mu}M, dose-dependently inhibited lipopolysaccharide- (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and peptidoglycan (PGN)-induced inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) production with an increase in heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) protein in RAW264.7 macrophages in a serum-free condition. NO inhibition and HO-1 induction by ZnPP were blocked by the separate addition of fetal bovine serum (FBS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). A decrease in the iNOS/NO ratio and an increase in HO-1 protein by ZnPP were identified in three different conditions including ZnPP pretreatment, ZnPP co-treatment, and ZnPP post-treatment with LPS and LTA. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) and extracellular regulated kinases (ERKs) were detected in LPS-, LTA-, and PGN-treated RAW264.7 cells, and iNOS/NO production was blocked by adding the JNK inhibitor, SP600125, but not the ERK inhibitor, PD98059. However, ZnPP addition potentiated ERK and JNK protein phosphorylation stimulated by LPS, LTA, and PGN. Increases in total protein ubiquitination and ubiquitinated iNOS proteins were detected in ZnPP-treated macrophages elicited by LPS according to Western and immunoprecipitation/Western blotting assays, respectively. The decrease in LPS-induced iNOS protein by ZnPP was reversed by adding the proteasome inhibitors MG132 and lactacystin. The reduction in HO-1 protein induced by ZnPP via transfection of HO-1 small interfering RNA did not affect the inhibitory effect of ZnPP against LPS-induced iNOS/NO production and protein ubiquitination induced by ZnPP in macrophages. Data of the present study provide the first evidence to support ZnPP effectively inhibiting inflammatory iNOS/NO production through activation of protein ubiquitination in a HO-1-independent manner in macrophages.

  8. Zinc protoporphyrin inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-, lipoteichoic acid-, and peptidoglycan-induced nitric oxide production through stimulating iNOS protein ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Chow, Jyh-Ming; Lin, Hui-Yi; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Wu, Ming-Shun; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Lin, Chien-Huang; Chen, Yen-Chou

    2009-06-15

    In the present study, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), but not ferric protoporphyrin (FePP), tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), or zinc chloride (ZnCl(2)), at the doses of 0.5, 1, and 2 microM, dose-dependently inhibited lipopolysaccharide- (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and peptidoglycan (PGN)-induced inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) production with an increase in heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) protein in RAW264.7 macrophages in a serum-free condition. NO inhibition and HO-1 induction by ZnPP were blocked by the separate addition of fetal bovine serum (FBS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). A decrease in the iNOS/NO ratio and an increase in HO-1 protein by ZnPP were identified in three different conditions including ZnPP pretreatment, ZnPP co-treatment, and ZnPP post-treatment with LPS and LTA. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) and extracellular regulated kinases (ERKs) were detected in LPS-, LTA-, and PGN-treated RAW264.7 cells, and iNOS/NO production was blocked by adding the JNK inhibitor, SP600125, but not the ERK inhibitor, PD98059. However, ZnPP addition potentiated ERK and JNK protein phosphorylation stimulated by LPS, LTA, and PGN. Increases in total protein ubiquitination and ubiquitinated iNOS proteins were detected in ZnPP-treated macrophages elicited by LPS according to Western and immunoprecipitation/Western blotting assays, respectively. The decrease in LPS-induced iNOS protein by ZnPP was reversed by adding the proteasome inhibitors MG132 and lactacystin. The reduction in HO-1 protein induced by ZnPP via transfection of HO-1 small interfering RNA did not affect the inhibitory effect of ZnPP against LPS-induced iNOS/NO production and protein ubiquitination induced by ZnPP in macrophages. Data of the present study provide the first evidence to support ZnPP effectively inhibiting inflammatory iNOS/NO production through activation of protein ubiquitination in a HO-1-independent manner in macrophages.

  9. HSP32 (HO-1) inhibitor, copoly(styrene-maleic acid)-zinc protoporphyrin IX, a water-soluble micelle as anticancer agent: In vitro and in vivo anticancer effect.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jun; Greish, Khaled; Qin, Haibo; Liao, Long; Nakamura, Hideaki; Takeya, Motohiro; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    We reported previously the antitumor effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibition by zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP). ZnPP per se is poorly water soluble and thus cannot be used as anticancer chemotherapeutic. Subsequently, we developed water-soluble micelles of ZnPP using styrene-maleic acid copolymer (SMA), which encapsulated ZnPP (SMA-ZnPP). In this report, the in vitro and in vivo therapeutic effects of SMA-ZnPP are described. In vitro experiments using 11 cultured tumor cell lines and six normal cell lines revealed a remarkable cytotoxicity of SMA-ZnPP against various tumor cells; average IC(50) is about 11.1 μM, whereas the IC(50) to various normal cells is significantly higher, that is, more than 50 μM. In the pharmacokinetic study, we found that SMA-ZnPP predominantly accumulated in the liver tissue after i.v. injection, suggesting its applicability for liver cancer. As expected, a remarkable antitumor effect was achieved in the VX-2 tumor model in the liver of rabbit that is known as one the most difficult tumor models to cure. Antitumor effect was also observed in murine tumor xenograft, that is, B16 melanoma and Meth A fibrosarcoma. Meanwhile, no apparent side effects were found even at the dose of ∼7 times higher concentration of therapeutics dose. These findings suggest a potential of SMA-ZnPP as a tool for anticancer therapy toward clinical development, whereas further investigations are warranted.

  10. Cyclopentenone prostaglandin, 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-PGJ2, is metabolized by HepG2 cells via conjugation with glutathione.

    PubMed

    Brunoldi, Enrico M; Zanoni, Giuseppe; Vidari, Giovanni; Sasi, Soumya; Freeman, Michael L; Milne, Ginger L; Morrow, Jason D

    2007-10-01

    15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15-d-PGJ2) is a dehydration product of PGD2. This compound possesses a highly reactive polyunsaturated carbonyl moiety that is a substrate for Michael addition with thiol-containing biomolecules such as glutathione and cysteine residues on proteins. By reacting with glutathione and proteins, 15-d-PGJ2 is believed to exert potent biological activity. Despite the large number of publications that have ascribed bioactivity to this molecule, it is not known to what extent 15-d-PGJ2 is formed in vivo. Levels of free 15-d-PGJ2 measured in human biological fluids such as urine are low, and the biological importance of this compound has thus been questioned. Because of its reactivity, we hypothesized that 15-d-PGJ2 is present in vivo primarily as a Michael conjugate. Therefore, we undertook a detailed study of the metabolism of this compound in HepG2 cells that are known to metabolize other cyclopentenone eicosanoids. We report that HepG2 cells primarily convert 15-d-PGJ2 to a glutathione conjugate in which the carbonyl at C-11 is reduced to a hydroxyl. Subsequently, the glutathione portion of the molecule is hydrolyzed with loss of glutamic acid and glycine resulting in a cysteine conjugate. These findings confirm a general route for the metabolism of cyclopentenone eicosanoids in HepG2 cells and may pave the way for new insights regarding the formation of 15-d-PGJ2 in vivo.

  11. Identification of a prostaglandin D2 metabolite as a neuritogenesis enhancer targeting the TRPV1 ion channel

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Takahiro; Takahashi, Katsuhiro; Matsubara, Yui; Inuzuka, Emi; Nakashima, Fumie; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Kozai, Daisuke; Mori, Yasuo; Uchida, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells play important roles in allergic inflammation by secreting various mediators. In the present study, based on the finding that the medium conditioned by activated RBL-2H3 mast cells enhanced the nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neuritogenesis of PC12 cells, we attempted to isolate an active compound from the mast cell conditioned culture medium. Our experiment identified 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2), one of the PGD2 metabolites, as a potential enhancer of neuritogenesis. 15d-PGJ2 strongly enhanced the neuritogenesis elicited by a low-concentration of NGF that alone was insufficient to induce the neuronal differentiation. This 15d-PGJ2 effect was exerted in a Ca2+-dependent manner, but independently of the NGF receptor TrkA. Importantly, 15d-PGJ2 activated the transient receptor potential vanilloid-type 1 (TRPV1), a non-selective cation channel, leading to the Ca2+ influx. In addition, we observed that (i) NGF promoted the insertion of TRPV1 into the cell surface membrane and (ii) 15d-PGJ2 covalently bound to TRPV1. These findings suggest that the NGF/15d-PGJ2-induced neuritogenesis may be regulated by two sets of mechanisms, one for the translocation of TRPV1 into the cell surface by NGF and one for the activation of TRPV1 by 15d-PGJ2. Thus, there is most likely a link between allergic inflammation and activation of the neuronal differentiation. PMID:26879669

  12. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  13. Sesamin inhibits IL-1β-stimulated inflammatory response in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes by activating Nrf2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kong, Pengyu; Chen, Guanghua; Jiang, Anlong; Wang, Yufu; Song, Chengchao; Zhuang, Jinpeng; Xi, Chunyang; Wang, Guangxi; Ji, Ye; Yan, Jinglong

    2016-12-13

    Sesamin, a bioactive component extracted from sesame, has been reported to exert anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of sesamin on IL-1β-stimulated human osteoarthritis chondrocytes and investigated the possible mechanism. Results demonstrated that sesamin treatment significantly inhibited PGE2 and NO production induced by IL-1β. Sesamin inhibited MMP1, MMP3, and MMP13 production in IL-1β-stimulated chondrocytes. Sesamin also inhibited IL-1β-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and IκBα. Meanwhile, sesamin was found to up-regulate the expression of Nrf2 and HO-1. However, Nrf2 siRNA reversed the anti-inflammatory effects of sesamin. In conclusion, our results suggested that sesamin showed anti-inflammatory effects in IL-1β-stimulated chondrocytes by activating Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  14. Cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory effects of onion peel extract on lipopolysaccharide stimulated human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungmi; Kim, Ji-Sang; Park, Eunju

    2013-12-01

    The present study investigated the cytotoxic activity of ethanol extract of onion peel (OPE) in HT-29 human colon carcinoma cells. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis was performed to determine the amounts of phenolic acids and flavonoids in OPE. In addition, the influence of OPE on antioxidant- and inflammation-associated gene expression was also determined in a model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated HT-29 cells. HPLC analysis showed that OPE contained well-known antioxidant compounds, including p-coumaric acid, vanillic acid, epicatechin, and morin. After incubation with OPE, HT-29 cells showed either a loss of normal nuclear architecture or detachability from each other. The cytotoxic effects of OPE on HT-29 cells were confirmed by MTT and LDH release assays. LPS-induced oxidative conditions effectively downregulated TNF-α mRNA expression in OPE pretreated HT-29 cells compared with cells only stimulated with LPS. In addition, the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and glutathione S-transferase (GSTs) detoxification genes (i.e., GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1) was upregulated after treatment with LPS at sublethal concentrations. However, the LPS-induced mRNA expression of HO-1 and GSTs was significantly attenuated by treatment with OPE. Therefore, onion peel extract is a promising component of future nutraceuticals and value-added products.

  15. Hepatic injury associated with Trypanosoma cruzi infection is attenuated by treatment with 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14) prostaglandin J2.

    PubMed

    Penas, Federico Nicolás; Cevey, Ágata Carolina; Siffo, Sofía; Mirkin, Gerardo Ariel; Goren, Nora Beatriz

    2016-11-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, causes an intense inflammatory response in several tissues, including the liver. Since this organ is central to metabolism, its infection may be reflected in the outcome of the disease. 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14) prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2), a natural agonist of peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) γ, has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects in the heart upon T. cruzi infection. However, its role in the restoration of liver function and reduction of liver inflammation has not been studied yet. BALB/c mice were infected with T. cruzi. The effects of in vivo treatment with 15dPGJ2 on liver inflammation and fibrosis, as well as on the GOT/GPT ratio were studied and the role of NF-κB pathway on 15dPGJ2-mediated effects was analysed. 15dPGJ2 reduced liver inflammatory infiltrates, proinflammatory enzymes and cytokines expression, restored the De Ritis ratio values to normal, reduced the deposits of interstitial and perisinusoidal collagen, reduced the expression of the pro-fibrotic cytokines and inhibited the translocation of the p65 NF-κB subunit to the nucleus. Thus, we showed that 15dPGJ2 is able to significantly reduce the inflammatory response and fibrosis and reduced enzyme markers of liver damage in mice infected with T. cruzi.

  16. 15-Deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin-J(2) reveals a new pVHL-independent, lysosomal-dependent mechanism of HIF-1alpha degradation.

    PubMed

    Olmos, Gemma; Arenas, María I; Bienes, Raquel; Calzada, María Jose; Aragonés, Julián; Garcia-Bermejo, Maria Laura; Landazuri, Manuel O; Lucio-Cazaña, Javier

    2009-07-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) protein is degraded under normoxia by its association to von Hippel-Lindau protein (pVHL) and further proteasomal digestion. However, human renal cells HK-2 treated with 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin-J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) accumulate HIF-1alpha in normoxic conditions. Thus, we aimed to investigate the mechanism involved in this accumulation. We found that 15d-PGJ(2) induced an over-accumulation of HIF-1alpha in RCC4 cells, which lack pVHL and in HK-2 cells treated with inhibitors of the pVHL-proteasome pathway. These results indicated that pVHL-proteasome-independent mechanisms are involved, and therefore we aimed to ascertain them. We have identified a new lysosomal-dependent mechanism of HIF-1alpha degradation as a target for 15d-PGJ(2) based on: (1) HIF-1alpha colocalized with the specific lysosomal marker Lamp-2a, (2) 15d-PGJ(2) inhibited the activity of cathepsin B, a lysosomal protease, and (3) inhibition of lysosomal activity did not result in over-accumulation of HIF-1alpha in 15d-PGJ(2)-treated cells. Therefore, expression of HIF-1alpha is also modulated by lysosomal degradation.

  17. 15-Deoxy-Δ12,14-Prostaglandin J2 Modifies Components of the Proteasome and Inhibits Inflammatory Responses in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marcone, Simone; Evans, Paul; Fitzgerald, Desmond J.

    2016-01-01

    15-Deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) is an electrophilic lipid mediator derived from PGD2 with potent anti-inflammatory effects. These are likely to be due to the covalent modification of cellular proteins, via a reactive α,β-unsaturated carbonyl group in its cyclopentenone ring. This study was carried out to identify novel cellular target(s) for covalent modification by 15d-PGJ2 and to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of the prostaglandin on endothelial cells (EC). The data presented here show that 15d-PGJ2 modifies and inhibits components of the proteasome and consequently inhibits the activation of the NF-κB pathway in response to TNF-α. This, in turn, inhibits the adhesion and migration of monocytes toward activated EC, by reducing the expression of adhesion molecules and chemokines in the EC. The effects are consistent with the covalent modification of 13 proteins in the 19S particle of the proteasome identified by mass spectrometry and the suppression of proteasome function, and were similar to the effects seen with a known proteasome inhibitor (MG132). The ubiquitin–proteasome system has been implicated in the regulation of several inflammatory processes and the observation that 15d-PGJ2 profoundly affects the proteasome functions in human EC suggests that 15d-PGJ2 may regulate the progression of inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis. PMID:27833612

  18. L-F001, a Multifunction ROCK Inhibitor Prevents 6-OHDA Induced Cell Death Through Activating Akt/GSK-3beta and Nrf2/HO-1 Signaling Pathway in PC12 Cells and Attenuates MPTP-Induced Dopamine Neuron Toxicity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liting; Chen, Jingkao; Su, Dan; Chen, Meihui; Luo, Bingling; Pi, Rongbiao; Wang, Lan; Shen, Wei; Wang, Rikang

    2017-02-01

    Amounting evidences demonstrated that Rho/Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) might be a novel target for the therapy of Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently, we synthesized L-F001 and revealed it was a potent ROCK inhibitor with multifunctional effects. Here we investigated the effects of L-F001 in PD models. We found that L-F001 potently attenuated 6-OHDA-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells and significantly decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), prevented the 6-OHDA-induced decline of mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular GSH levels. In addition, L-F001 increased Akt and GSK-3beta phosphorylation and induced the nuclear Nrf2 and HO-1 expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, L-F001 restored the levels of p-Akt and p-GSK-3beta (Ser9) as well as HO-1 expression reduced by 6-OHDA. Those effects were blocked by the specific PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, indicating the involvement of Akt/GSK-3beta pathway in the neuroprotective effect of L-F001. In addition, L-F001 significantly attenuated the tyrosinehydroxylase immunoreactive cell loss in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6 tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced mice PD model. Together, our findings suggest that L-F001 prevents 6-OHDA-induced cell death through activating Akt/GSK-3beta and Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway and attenuates MPTP-induced dopaminergic neuron toxicity in mice. L-F001 might be a promising drug candidate for PD.

  19. Enteric glia modulate epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation through 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2

    PubMed Central

    Bach-Ngohou, Kalyane; Mahé, Maxime M; Aubert, Philippe; Abdo, Hind; Boni, Sébastien; Bourreille, Arnaud; Denis, Marc G; Lardeux, Bernard; Neunlist, Michel; Masson, Damien

    2010-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) and its major component, enteric glial cells (EGCs), have recently been identified as a major regulator of intestinal epithelial barrier functions. Indeed, EGCs inhibit intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation and increase barrier resistance and IEC adhesion via the release of EGC-derived soluble factors. Interestingly, EGC regulation of intestinal epithelial barrier functions is reminiscent of previously reported peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ)-dependent functional effects. In this context, the present study aimed at identifying whether EGC could synthesize and release the main PPARγ ligand, 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2), and regulate IEC functions such as proliferation and differentiation via a PPARγ dependent pathway. First, we demonstrated that the lipocalin but not the haematopoetic form for prostaglandin D synthase (PGDS), the enzyme responsible of 15dPGJ2 synthesis, was expressed in EGCs of the human submucosal plexus and of the subepithelium, as well as in rat primary culture of ENS and EGC lines. Next, 15dPGJ2 was identified in EGC supernatants of various EGC lines. 15dPGJ2 reproduced EGC inhibitory effects upon IEC proliferation, and inhibition of lipocalin PGDS expression by shRNA abrogated these effects. Furthermore, EGCs induced nuclear translocation of PPARγ in IEC, and both EGC and 15dPGJ2 effects upon IEC proliferation were prevented by the PPARγ antagonist GW9662. Finally, EGC induced differentiation-related gene expression in IEC through a PPARγ-dependent pathway. Our results identified 15dPGJ2 as a novel glial-derived mediator involved in the control of IEC proliferation/differentiation through activation of PPARγ. They also suggest that alterations of glial PGDS expression may modify intestinal epithelial barrier functions and be involved in the development of pathologies such as cancer or inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:20478974

  20. Targeting arachidonic acid pathway to prevent programmed hypertension in maternal fructose-fed male adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Tain, You-Lin; Lee, Wei-Chia; Wu, Kay L H; Leu, Steve; Chan, Julie Y H

    2016-12-01

    Hypertension can be programmed in response to nutritional insults in early life. Maternal high-fructose (HF) intake induced programmed hypertension in adult male offspring, which is associated with renal programming and arachidonic acid metabolism pathway. We examined whether early treatment with a soluble epoxide hydrolase (SEH) inhibitor, 12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid (AUDA) or 15-Deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostagandin J2 (15dPGJ2) can prevent HF-induced programmed hypertension. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats received regular chow or chow supplemented with fructose (60% diet by weight) during the whole period of pregnancy and lactation. Four groups of male offspring were studied: control, HF, HF+AUDA and HF+15dPGJ2. In HF+AUDA group, mother rats received AUDA 25 mg/L in drinking water during lactation. In the HF+15dPGJ2 group, male offspring received 15dPGJ2 1.5 mg/kg body weight by subcutaneous injection once daily for 1 week after birth. Rats were sacrificed at 12 weeks of age. Maternal HF-induced programmed hypertension is associated with increased renal protein level of SEH and oxidative stress, which early AUDA therapy prevents. Comparison of AUDA and 15dPGJ2 treatments demonstrated that AUDA was more effective in preventing HF-induced programmed hypertension. AUDA therapy increases angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) protein levels and PGE2 levels in adult offspring kidney exposed to maternal HF. 15dPGJ2 therapy increases plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) levels and decreases L-arginine-to-ADMA ratio. Better understanding of the impact of arachidonic acid pathway, especially inhibition of SEH, on renal programming may aid in developing reprogramming strategy to prevent programmed hypertension in children exposed to antenatal HF intake.

  1. Early postnatal treatment with soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor or 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostagandin J2 prevents prenatal dexamethasone and postnatal high saturated fat diet induced programmed hypertension in adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Lu, Pei-Chen; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Yu, Hong-Ren; Lin, Yu-Ju; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Tsai, Ching-Chou; Huang, Li-Tung; Tain, You-Lin

    2016-07-01

    Prenatal dexamethasone (DEX) exposure, postnatal high-fat (HF) intake, and arachidonic acid pathway are closely related to hypertension. We tested whether a soluble epoxide hydrolase (SEH) inhibitor, 12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid (AUDA) or 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostagandin J2 (15dPGJ2) therapy can rescue programmed hypertension in the DEX+HF two-hit model. Four groups of Sprague Dawley rats were studied: control, DEX+HF, AUDA, and 15dPGJ2. Dexamethasone (0.1mg/kg body weight) was intraperitoneally administered to pregnant rats from gestational day 16-22. Male offspring received high-fat diet (D12331, Research Diets) from weaning to 4 months of age. In AUDA group, mother rats received 25mg/L in drinking water during lactation. In the 15dPGJ2 group, male offspring received 15dPGJ2 1.5mg/kg BW by subcutaneous injection once daily for 1 week after birth. We found postnatal HF diet aggravated prenatal DEX-induced programmed hypertension, which was similarly prevented by early treatment with AUDA or 15dPGJ2. The beneficial effects of AUDA and 15d-PGJ2 therapy include inhibition of SEH, increases of renal angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) and angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) protein levels, and restoration of nitric oxide bioavailability. Better understanding of the impact of arachidonic acid pathway in the two-hit model will help prevent programmed hypertension in children exposed to corticosteroids and postnatal HF intake.

  2. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    Vagus nerve stimulation Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vagus nerve stimulation is a procedure that involves implantation of a device that stimulates the vagus nerve with electrical impulses. There's one vagus nerve on ...

  3. 15-Deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 induces expression of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase through Elk-1 activation in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Rim; Lee, Ha-Na; Lim, Kyu; Surh, Young-Joon; Na, Hye-Kyung

    2014-10-01

    Overproduction of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been reported to be implicated in carcinogenesis. The intracellular level of PGE2 is maintained not only by its biosynthesis, but also by inactivation/degradation. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) is the key enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of oncogenic PGE2 to a biologically inactive keto metabolite. In the present study, we demonstrate that 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 (15 d-PGJ2), one of the terminal products of cyclooxygenase-2, updregulates the expression and the activity of 15-PGDH in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. By using deletion constructs of the 15-PGDH promoter, we have found that E-twenty six (Ets) is the most essential determinant for 15-PGDH induction. 15 d-PGJ2 induced phosphorylation of Elk-1, one of Ets transcription factor family members, in the nucleus. Knockdown of Elk-1 abolished the ability of 15 d-PGJ2 to upregulate 15-PGDH expression. Furthermore, 15 d-PGJ2-mediated activation of Elk-1 was found to be dependent on activation of extracellular-signal related kinase (ERK) 1/2. Treatment of U0126, a pharmacological inhibitor of MEK1/2-ERK, abolished phosphorylation and DNA binding of Elk-1 as well as 15-PGDH induction in 15 d-PGJ2-treated MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, 15 d-PGJ2 generated reactive oxygen species (ROS), which contribute to the expression of 15-PGDH as well as phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Elk-1. 15 d-PGJ2 inhibited the migration of MDA-MB-231 cells, which was attenuated by transient transfection with 15-PGDH siRNA. Taken together, these findings suggest that 15 d-PGJ2 induces the expression of 15-PGDH through ROS-mediated activation of ERK1/2 and subsequently Elk-1 in the MDA-MB-231 cells, which may contribute to tumor suppressive activity of this cyclopentenone prostaglandin.

  4. Inhibitory Effects of Benzaldehyde Derivatives from the Marine Fungus Eurotium sp. SF-5989 on Inflammatory Mediators via the Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW264.7 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Su; Cui, Xiang; Lee, Dong-Sung; Ko, Wonmin; Sohn, Jae Hak; Yim, Joung Han; An, Ren-Bo; Kim, Youn-Chul; Oh, Hyuncheol

    2014-01-01

    Two benzaldehyde derivatives, flavoglaucin (1) and isotetrahydro-auroglaucin (2), were isolated from the marine fungus Eurotium sp. SF-5989 through bioassay- and 1H NMR-guided investigation. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of these compounds in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. We demonstrated that compounds 1 and 2 markedly inhibited LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production by suppressing inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression without affecting cell viability. We also demonstrated that the compounds reduced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Furthermore, compounds 1 and 2 inhibited LPS-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation by suppressing phosphorylation of IkappaB (IκB). These results indicated that the anti-inflammatory effects of these benzaldehyde derivatives in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages were due to the inactivation of the NF-κB pathway. In addition, compounds 1 and 2 induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression through the nuclear transcription factor-E2–related factor 2 (Nrf2) translocation. The inhibitory effects of compounds 1 and 2 on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and on NF-κB binding activity were reversed by HO-1 inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP). Thus, the anti-inflammatory effects of compounds 1 and 2 also correlated with their ability of inducing HO-1 expression. PMID:25535073

  5. ACTH (cosyntropin) stimulation test

    MedlinePlus

    ... The ACTH stimulation test measures how well the adrenal glands respond to adrenocorticotropic hormone ( ACTH ). ACTH is a ... produced in the pituitary gland that stimulates the adrenal glands to release a hormone called cortisol. How the ...

  6. Haem arginate infusion stimulates haem oxygenase-1 expression in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Doberer, D; Haschemi, A; Andreas, M; Zapf, T-C; Clive, B; Jeitler, M; Heinzl, H; Wagner, O; Wolzt, M; Bilban, M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Haem oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is an inducible protein that plays a major protective role in conditions such as ischaemia-reperfusion injury and inflammation. In this study, we have investigated the role of haem arginate (HA) in human male subjects in the modulation of HO-1 expression and its correlation with the GT length polymorphism (GTn) in the promoter of the HO-1 gene. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH In a dose-escalation, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, seven healthy male subjects with a homozygous short (S/S) and eight with a long (L/L) GTn genotype received intravenous HA. HO-1 protein expression and mRNA levels in peripheral blood monocytes, bilirubin, haptoglobin, haemopexin and haem levels were analysed over a 48 h observation period. KEY RESULTS We found that the baseline mRNA levels of HO-1 were higher in L/L subjects, while protein levels were higher in S/S subjects. HA induced a dose-dependent increase in the baseline corrected area under the curve values of HO-1 mRNA and protein over 48 h. The response of HO-1 mRNA was more pronounced in L/L subjects but the protein level was similar across the groups. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATION HA is an effective inducer of HO-1 in humans irrespective of the GTn genotype. The potential therapeutic application of HA needs to be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:20718734

  7. Brain Stimulation in Addiction.

    PubMed

    Salling, Michael C; Martinez, Diana

    2016-11-01

    Localized stimulation of the human brain to treat neuropsychiatric disorders has been in place for over 20 years. Although these methods have been used to a greater extent for mood and movement disorders, recent work has explored brain stimulation methods as potential treatments for addiction. The rationale behind stimulation therapy in addiction involves reestablishing normal brain function in target regions in an effort to dampen addictive behaviors. In this review, we present the rationale and studies investigating brain stimulation in addiction, including transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and deep brain stimulation. Overall, these studies indicate that brain stimulation has an acute effect on craving for drugs and alcohol, but few studies have investigated the effect of brain stimulation on actual drug and alcohol use or relapse. Stimulation therapies may achieve their effect through direct or indirect modulation of brain regions involved in addiction, either acutely or through plastic changes in neuronal transmission. Although these mechanisms are not well understood, further identification of the underlying neurobiology of addiction and rigorous evaluation of brain stimulation methods has the potential for unlocking an effective, long-term treatment of addiction.

  8. Factors stimulating bone formation.

    PubMed

    Lind, M; Bünger, C

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this review is to describe major approaches for stimulating bone healing and to review other factors affecting bone healing. Spinal bone fusion after surgery is a demanding process requiring optimal conditions for clinical success. Bone formation and healing can be enhanced through various methods. Experimental studies have revealed an array of stimulative measures. These include biochemical stimulation by use of hormones and growth factors, physical stimulation through mechanical and electromagnetic measures, and bone grafting by use of bone tissue or bone substitutes. Newer biological techniques such as stem cell transplantation and gene therapy can also be used to stimulate bone healing. Apart from bone transplantation, clinical experience with the many stimulation modalities is limited. Possible areas for clinical use of these novel methods are discussed.

  9. Direct evidence for the covalent modification of glutathione-S-transferase P1-1 by electrophilic prostaglandins: implications for enzyme inactivation and cell survival.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J; Gayarre, Javier; Avellano, M Isabel; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2007-01-15

    Glutathione-S-transferases (GST) catalyze the conjugation of electrophilic compounds to glutathione, thus playing a key role in cell survival and tumor chemoresistance. Cyclopentenone prostaglandins (cyPG) are electrophilic eicosanoids that display potent antiproliferative properties, through multiple mechanisms not completely elucidated. Here we show that the cyPG 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2) binds to GSTP1-1 covalently, as demonstrated by mass spectrometry and by the use of biotinylated 15d-PGJ2. Moreover, cyPG inactivate GSTP1-1 irreversibly. The presence of the cyclopentenone moiety is important for these effects. Covalent interactions also occur in cells, in which 15d-PGJ2 binds to endogenous GSTP1-1, irreversibly reduces GST free-thiol content and inhibits GST activity. Protein delivery of GSTP1-1 improves cell survival upon serum deprivation whereas 15d-PGJ2-treated GSTP1-1 displays a reduced protective effect. These results show the first evidence for the formation of stable adducts between cyPG and GSTP1-1 and may offer new perspectives for the development of irreversible GST inhibitors as anticancer agents.

  10. 15-Deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2-Glycerol Ester, a Putative Metabolite of 2-Arachidonyl Glycerol, Activates Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor γ

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Priyadarshini; Kaplan, Barbara L. F.; Thompson, Jerry T.; Vanden Heuvel, John P.

    2011-01-01

    2-Arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG) is an endogenous arachidonic acid derivative capable of suppressing interleukin (IL)-2 production by activated T cells. 2-AG-mediated IL-2 suppression is dependent on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) metabolism and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) activation. The objective of the present studies was to examine whether 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-PGJ2-glycerol ester (15d-PGJ2-G), a putative metabolite of 2-AG, can mimic the actions of 2-AG on IL-2 regulation through PPARγ activation. 15d-PGJ2-G bound PPARγ-ligand binding domain in a PPARγ competitive binding assay. 15d-PGJ2-G treatment activated PPARγ in a reporter assay, and PPARγ activation was attenuated when a PPARγ antagonist, 2-chloro-5-nitro-N-4-pyridinylbenzamide (T0070907), was present. 15d-PGJ2-G treatment suppressed IL-2 production by activated Jurkat cells, which was partially attenuated when pretreated with T0070907. Moreover, IL-2 suppression was pronounced when 15d-PGJ2-G was present 30 min before or after T-cell activation. Concordant with IL-2 suppression, 15d-PGJ2-G treatment decreased nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcriptional activity in transiently transfected Jurkat cells. It is noteworthy that T0070907 alone markedly increased NFAT reporter activity, suggesting the existence of endogenous PPARγ activation and modulation of NFAT. Because COX-2 metabolism of 2-AG is important for IL-2 suppression, the effect of 2-AG on COX-2 and PPARγ mRNA expression was investigated. 2-AG treatment decreased the up-regulation of COX-2 mRNA after T-cell activation, which suggests negative feedback limiting COX-2-mediated metabolism of 2-AG. PPARγ mRNA expression was increased upon activation, and 2-AG treatment produced a modest decrease in PPARγ mRNA expression. Collectively, our findings suggest that 15d-PGJ2-G activates PPARγ to decrease NFAT transcriptional activity and IL-2 expression in activated T cells. PMID:21511917

  11. Cleome rutidosperma and Euphorbia thymifolia Suppress Inflammatory Response via Upregulation of Phase II Enzymes and Modulation of NF-κB and JNK Activation in LPS-Stimulated BV2 Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hsiou-Yu; Wu, Pei-Shan; Wu, Ming-Jiuan

    2016-01-01

    Cleome rutidosperma DC. and Euphorbia thymifolia L. are herbal medicines used in traditional Indian and Chinese medicine to treat various illnesses. Reports document that they have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities; nonetheless, the molecular mechanisms involved in their anti-inflammatory actions have not yet been elucidated. The anti-neuroinflammatory activities and underlying mechanisms of ethanol extracts of Cleome rutidosperma (CR) and Euphorbia thymifolia (ET) were studied using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated microglial cell line BV2. The morphology changes and production of pro-inflammatory mediators were assayed. Gene expression of inflammatory genes such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, interleukin (IL)-1β, and CC chemokine ligand (CCL)-2, as well as phase II enzymes such as heme oxygenase (HO)-1, the modifier subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLM) and NAD(P)H quinone dehydrogenase 1 (NQO1), were further investigated using reverse transcription quantitative-PCR (RT-Q-PCR) and Western blotting. The effects of CR and ET on mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathways were examined using Western blotting and specific inhibitors. CR and ET suppressed BV2 activation, down-regulated iNOS and COX-2 expression and inhibited nitric oxide (NO) overproduction without affecting cell viability. They reduced LPS-mediated tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-6 production, attenuated IL-1β and CCL2 expression, but upregulated HO-1, GCLM and NQO1 expression. They also inhibited p65 NF-κB phosphorylation and modulated Jun-N terminal kinase (JNK) activation in BV2 cells. SP600125, the JNK inhibitor, significantly augmented the anti-IL-6 activity of ET. NF-κB inhibitor, Bay 11-7082, enhanced the anti-IL-6 effects of both CR and ET. Znpp, a competitive inhibitor of HO-1, attenuated the anti-NO effects of CR and ET. Our results show that CR and ET exhibit anti

  12. AN ELISA ASSAY FOR HEME OXYGENASE (HO-1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ELISA assay for heme oxygenase (HO-l )

    Abstract

    A double antibody capture ELISA for the HO-l protein has been developed to separately quantitate HO-I protein. The use of 2.5% NP40 detergent greatly assists in freeing HO-l protein from membranes and/or other cel...

  13. The point mutation UCH-L1 C152A protects primary neurons against cyclopentenone prostaglandin-induced cytotoxicity: implications for post-ischemic neuronal injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Li, W; Rose, M E; Hickey, R W; Chen, J; Uechi, G T; Balasubramani, M; Day, B W; Patel, K V; Graham, S H

    2015-11-05

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins (CyPGs), such as 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2), are reactive prostaglandin metabolites exerting a variety of biological effects. CyPGs are produced in ischemic brain and disrupt the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Ubiquitin-C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is a brain-specific deubiquitinating enzyme that has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases. Using tandem mass spectrometry (MS) analyses, we found that the C152 site of UCH-L1 is adducted by CyPGs. Mutation of C152 to alanine (C152A) inhibited CyPG modification and conserved recombinant UCH-L1 protein hydrolase activity after 15dPGJ2 treatment. A knock-in (KI) mouse expressing the UCH-L1 C152A mutation was constructed with the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technique. Brain expression and distribution of UCH-L1 in the KI mouse was similar to that of wild type (WT) as determined by western blotting. Primary cortical neurons derived from KI mice were resistant to 15dPGJ2 cytotoxicity compared with neurons from WT mice as detected by the WST-1 cell viability assay and caspase-3 and poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage. This protective effect was accompanied with significantly less ubiquitinated protein accumulation and aggregation as well as less UCH-L1 aggregation in C152A KI primary neurons after 15dPGJ2 treatment. Additionally, 15dPGJ2-induced axonal injury was also significantly attenuated in KI neurons as compared with WT. Taken together, these studies indicate that UCH-L1 function is important in hypoxic neuronal death, and the C152 site of UCH-L1 has a significant role in neuronal survival after hypoxic/ischemic injury.

  14. The point mutation UCH-L1 C152A protects primary neurons against cyclopentenone prostaglandin-induced cytotoxicity: implications for post-ischemic neuronal injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, H; Li, W; Rose, M E; Hickey, R W; Chen, J; Uechi, G T; Balasubramani, M; Day, B W; Patel, K V; Graham, S H

    2015-01-01

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins (CyPGs), such as 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2), are reactive prostaglandin metabolites exerting a variety of biological effects. CyPGs are produced in ischemic brain and disrupt the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Ubiquitin-C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is a brain-specific deubiquitinating enzyme that has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases. Using tandem mass spectrometry (MS) analyses, we found that the C152 site of UCH-L1 is adducted by CyPGs. Mutation of C152 to alanine (C152A) inhibited CyPG modification and conserved recombinant UCH-L1 protein hydrolase activity after 15dPGJ2 treatment. A knock-in (KI) mouse expressing the UCH-L1 C152A mutation was constructed with the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technique. Brain expression and distribution of UCH-L1 in the KI mouse was similar to that of wild type (WT) as determined by western blotting. Primary cortical neurons derived from KI mice were resistant to 15dPGJ2 cytotoxicity compared with neurons from WT mice as detected by the WST-1 cell viability assay and caspase-3 and poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage. This protective effect was accompanied with significantly less ubiquitinated protein accumulation and aggregation as well as less UCH-L1 aggregation in C152A KI primary neurons after 15dPGJ2 treatment. Additionally, 15dPGJ2-induced axonal injury was also significantly attenuated in KI neurons as compared with WT. Taken together, these studies indicate that UCH-L1 function is important in hypoxic neuronal death, and the C152 site of UCH-L1 has a significant role in neuronal survival after hypoxic/ischemic injury. PMID:26539913

  15. Inhibition of mitochondrial division through covalent modification of Drp1 protein by 15 deoxy-{Delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J2

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Nandita; Kar, Rekha; Singha, Prajjal K.; Venkatachalam, Manjeri A.; McEwen, Donald G.; Saikumar, Pothana

    2010-04-23

    Arachidonic acid derived endogenous electrophile 15d-PGJ2 has gained much attention in recent years due to its potent anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory actions mediated through thiol modification of cysteine residues in its target proteins. Here, we show that 15d-PGJ2 at 1 {mu}M concentration converts normal mitochondria into large elongated and interconnected mitochondria through direct binding to mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 and partial inhibition of its GTPase activity. Mitochondrial elongation induced by 15d-PGJ2 is accompanied by increased assembly of Drp1 into large oligomeric complexes through plausible intermolecular interactions. The role of decreased GTPase activity of Drp1 in the formation of large oligomeric complexes is evident when Drp1 is incubated with a non-cleavable GTP analog, GTP{gamma}S or by a mutation that inactivated GTPase activity of Drp1 (K38A). The mutation of cysteine residue (Cys644) in the GTPase effector domain, a reported target for modification by reactive electrophiles, to alanine mimicked K38A mutation induced Drp1 oligomerization and mitochondrial elongation, suggesting the importance of cysteine in GED to regulate the GTPase activity and mitochondrial morphology. Interestingly, treatment of K38A and C644A mutants with 15d-PGJ2 resulted in super oligomerization of both mutant Drp1s indicating that 15d-PGJ2 may further stabilize Drp1 oligomers formed by loss of GTPase activity through covalent modification of middle domain cysteine residues. The present study documents for the first time the regulation of a mitochondrial fission activity by a prostaglandin, which will provide clues for understanding the pathological and physiological consequences of accumulation of reactive electrophiles during oxidative stress, inflammation and degeneration.

  16. Music acupuncture stimulation method.

    PubMed

    Brătilă, F; Moldovan, C

    2007-01-01

    Harmonic Medicine is the model using the theory that the body rhythms synchronize to an outer rhythm applied for therapeutic purpose, can restores the energy balance in acupuncture channels and organs and the condition of well-being. The purpose of this scientific work was to demonstrate the role played by harmonic sounds in the stimulation of the Lung (LU) Meridian (Shoutaiyin Feijing) and of the Kidney (KI) Meridian (Zushaoyin Shenjing). It was used an original method that included: measurement and electronic sound stimulation of the Meridian Entry Point, measurement of Meridian Exit Point, computer data processing, bio feed-back adjustment of the music stimulation parameters. After data processing, it was found that the sound stimulation of the Lung Meridian Frequency is optimal between 122 Hz and 128 Hz, with an average of 124 Hz (87% of the subjects) and for Kidney Meridian from 118 Hz to 121 Hz, with an average of 120 Hz (67% of the subjects). The acupuncture stimulation was more intense for female subjects (> 7%) than for the male ones. We preliminarily consider that an informational resonance phenomenon can be developed between the acupuncture music stimulation frequency and the cellular dipole frequency, being a really "resonant frequency signature" of an acupoint. The harmonic generation and the electronic excitation or low-excitation status of an acupuncture point may be considered as a resonance mechanism. By this kind of acupunctural stimulation, a symphony may act and play a healer role.

  17. Vagus Nerve Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2014-06-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality.

  18. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality. PMID:24834378

  19. Muscle Stimulation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Goddard Space Flight Center contract, Electrologic of America was able to refine the process of densely packing circuitry on personal computer boards, providing significant contributions to the closed-loop systems for the Remote Manipulator System Simulator. The microcircuitry work was then applied to the StimMaster FES Ergometer, an exercise device used to stimulate muscles suffering from paralysis. The electrical stimulation equipment was developed exclusively for V-Care Health Systems, Inc. Product still commercially available as of March 2002.

  20. New York Canyon Stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Raemy, Bernard

    2012-06-21

    The New York Canyon Stimulation Project was to demonstrate the commercial application of Enhanced Geothermal System techniques in Buena Vista Valley area of Pershing County, Nevada. From October 2009 to early 2012, TGP Development Company aggressively implemented Phase I of Pre-Stimulation and Site/Wellbore readiness. This included: geological studies; water studies and analyses and procurement of initial permits for drilling. Oversubscription of water rights and lack of water needed for implementation of EGS were identified and remained primary obstacles. Despite extended efforts to find alternative solutions, the water supply circumstances could not be overcome and led TGP to determine a "No Go" decision and initiate project termination in April 2012.

  1. Cox-dependent fatty acid metabolites cause pain through activation of the irritant receptor TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Materazzi, Serena; Nassini, Romina; Andrè, Eunice; Campi, Barbara; Amadesi, Silvia; Trevisani, Marcello; Bunnett, Nigel W; Patacchini, Riccardo; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2008-08-19

    Prostaglandins (PG) are known to induce pain perception indirectly by sensitizing nociceptors. Accordingly, the analgesic action of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) results from inhibition of cyclooxygenases and blockade of PG biosynthesis. Cyclopentenone PGs, 15-d-PGJ(2), PGA(2), and PGA(1), formed by dehydration of their respective parent PGs, PGD(2), PGE(2), and PGE(1), possess a highly reactive alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl group that has been proposed to gate the irritant transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) channel. Here, by using TRPA1 wild-type (TRPA1(+/+)) or deficient (TRPA1(-/-)) mice, we show that cyclopentenone PGs produce pain by direct stimulation of nociceptors via TRPA1 activation. Cyclopentenone PGs caused a robust calcium response in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of TRPA1(+/+), but not of TRPA1(-/-) mice, and a calcium-dependent release of sensory neuropeptides from the rat dorsal spinal cord. Intraplantar injection of cyclopentenone PGs stimulated c-fos expression in spinal neurons of the dorsal horn and evoked an instantaneous, robust, and transient nociceptive response in TRPA1(+/+) but not in TRPA1(-/-) mice. The classical proalgesic PG, PGE(2), caused a slight calcium response in DRG neurons, increased c-fos expression in spinal neurons, and induced a delayed and sustained nociceptive response in both TRPA1(+/+) and TRPA1(-/-) mice. These results expand the mechanism of NSAID analgesia from blockade of indirect nociceptor sensitization by classical PGs to inhibition of direct TRPA1-dependent nociceptor activation by cyclopentenone PGs. Thus, TRPA1 antagonism may contribute to suppress pain evoked by PG metabolites without the adverse effects of inhibiting cyclooxygenases.

  2. Transcranial brain stimulation: closing the loop between brain and stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Karabanov, Anke; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To discuss recent strategies for boosting the efficacy of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation to improve human brain function. Recent findings Recent research exposed substantial intra- and inter-individual variability in response to plasticity-inducing transcranial brain stimulation. Trait-related and state-related determinants contribute to this variability, challenging the standard approach to apply stimulation in a rigid, one-size-fits-all fashion. Several strategies have been identified to reduce variability and maximize the plasticity-inducing effects of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation. Priming interventions or paired associative stimulation can be used to ‘standardize’ the brain-state and hereby, homogenize the group response to stimulation. Neuroanatomical and neurochemical profiling based on magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy can capture trait-related and state-related variability. Fluctuations in brain-states can be traced online with functional brain imaging and inform the timing or other settings of transcranial brain stimulation. State-informed open-loop stimulation is aligned to the expression of a predefined brain state, according to prespecified rules. In contrast, adaptive closed-loop stimulation dynamically adjusts stimulation settings based on the occurrence of stimulation-induced state changes. Summary Approaches that take into account trait-related and state-related determinants of stimulation-induced plasticity bear considerable potential to establish noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation as interventional therapeutic tool. PMID:27224087

  3. Regulation of hemeoxygenase-1 gene expression by Nrf2 and c-Jun in tertiary butylhydroquinone-stimulated rat primary astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin-Sun; Kim, Hee-Sun

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • tBHQ increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels in rat primary astrocytes. • tBHQ enhanced HO-1 gene transcription in an ARE-dependent manner. • tBHQ increased the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of Nrf2 and c-Jun to ARE. • Nrf2 and c-Jun are involved in the differential modulation of HO-1 expression. • Nrf2 and c-Jun regulate HO-1 expression via their coordinated interaction. - Abstract: Hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a phase II antioxidant enzyme that is primarily involved in detoxification and cytoprotection in a variety of tissues. However, the mechanism underlying HO-1 gene expression remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the regulation of HO-1 expression in primary cultured astrocytes by using the natural antioxidant compound tertiary butylhydroquinone (tBHQ). We found that tBHQ increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels. Promoter analysis revealed that tBHQ enhanced HO-1 gene transcription in an antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent manner. In addition, tBHQ increased the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of Nrf2 and c-Jun to ARE. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) experiments demonstrated that Nrf2 and c-Jun are involved in the differential modulation of HO-1 expression. Thus, Nrf2 knockdown reduced the basal level of HO-1 expression but did not affect the fold induction by tBHQ. On the other hand, knockdown of c-Jun diminished tBHQ-mediated induction of HO-1 without affecting basal expression. The data suggest that Nrf2 generally modulates the basal expression of HO-1, while c-Jun mediates HO-1 induction in response to tBHQ. The results of co-immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated a physical interaction between Nrf2 and c-Jun in tBHQ-treated astrocytes. The results suggest that Nrf2 and c-Jun regulate HO-1 expression via their coordinated interaction in tBHQ-treated rat primary astrocytes.

  4. New compound, 5-O-isoferuloyl-2-deoxy-D-ribono-γ-lacton from Clematis mandshurica: Anti-inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Dilshara, Matharage Gayani; Lee, Kyoung-Tae; Lee, Chang-Min; Choi, Yung Hyun; Lee, Hak-Ju; Choi, Il-Whan; Kim, Gi-Young

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are main immune cells to exacerbate neural disorders in persistent overactivating. Therefore, it is a good strategy to regulate microglia for the treatment of neural disorders. In the present study, we isolated and characterized a novel compound, 5-O-isoferuloyl-2-deoxy-D-ribono-γ-lacton (5-DRL) from Clematis mandshurica, and evaluated its anti-inflammatory effect in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated BV2 microglial cells. 5-DRL inhibited the expression of LPS-stimulated proinflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), as well as their regulatory genes inducible NO syntheses (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). 5-DRL also downregulated the LPS-induced DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) through suppression of the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunits, p65 and p50. Consistent with the inhibition of iNOS and COX-2 via NF-κB activity with 5-DRL, an inhibitor of NF-κB, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), also led to the suppression of LPS-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression. Additionally, 5-DRL corresponding with antioxidants, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and glutathione (GSH), remarkably inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Both NAC and GSH, thus attenuated the expression of iNOS and COX-2 by suppressing NF-κB activation, indicating that 5-DRL suppresses LPS-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression through downregulation of the ROS-dependent NF-κB signaling pathway. The present study also indicated that 5-DRL suppresses NO and PGE2 production by inducing heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) via nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Taken together, the present data indicate that 5-DRL attenuates the production of proinflammatory mediators such as NO and PGE2 as well as their regulatory genes in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells by inhibiting ROS-dependent NF-κB activation and stimulating the Nrf2/HO-1 signal pathway. These data may be implicated in the application of 5-DRL in LPS-stimulated

  5. Stimulated Raman photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Zhang, Hao F.; Noojin, Gary D.; Denton, Michael L.; Thomas, Robert J.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2010-01-01

    Achieving label-free, molecular-specific imaging with high spatial resolution in deep tissue is often considered the grand challenge of optical imaging. To accomplish this goal, significant optical scattering in tissues has to be overcome while achieving molecular specificity without resorting to extrinsic labeling. We demonstrate the feasibility of developing such an optical imaging modality by combining the molecularly specific stimulated Raman excitation with the photoacoustic detection. By employing two ultrashort excitation laser pulses, separated in frequency by the vibrational frequency of a targeted molecule, only the specific vibrational level of the target molecules in the illuminated tissue volume is excited. This targeted optical absorption generates ultrasonic waves (referred to as stimulated Raman photoacoustic waves) which are detected using a traditional ultrasonic transducer to form an image following the design of the established photoacoustic microscopy. PMID:21059930

  6. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  7. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, Murat

    2016-01-05

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) plays a pivotal role in thyroid hormone metabolism. It is a major controller of thyroid cell function and growth. Mutations in TSHR may lead to several thyroid diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism. Although its genetic and epigenetic alterations do not directly lead to carcinogenesis, it has a crucial role in tumor growth, which is initiated by several oncogenes. This article will provide a brief review of TSHR and related diseases.

  8. Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X.L.; Xiong, Y.Y.; Xu, G.L.; Liu, X.F.

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has provided remarkable therapeutic benefits for people with a variety of neurological disorders. Despite the uncertainty of the precise mechanisms underlying its efficacy, DBS is clinically effective in improving motor function of essential tremor, Parkinson's disease and primary dystonia and in relieving obsessive-compulsive disorder. Recently, this surgical technique has continued to expand to other numerous neurological diseases with encouraging results. This review highlighted the current and potential future clinical applications of DBS. PMID:25187779

  9. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tuncel, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) plays a pivotal role in thyroid hormone metabolism. It is a major controller of thyroid cell function and growth. Mutations in TSHR may lead to several thyroid diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism. Although its genetic and epigenetic alterations do not directly lead to carcinogenesis, it has a crucial role in tumor growth, which is initiated by several oncogenes. This article will provide a brief review of TSHR and related diseases. PMID:28117293

  10. Raft River well stimulation experiments: geothermal reservoir well stimulation program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) performed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA in 1979. Wells RRGP-4 and RRGP-5 were selected for the hydraulic fracture stimulation treatments. The well selection process, fracture treatment design, field execution, stimulation results, and pre- and post-job evaluations are presented.

  11. Human Tissue Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Neurodyne Corporation Human Tissue Stimulator (HTS) is a totally implantable system used for treatment of chronic pain and involuntary motion disorders by electrical stimulation. It was developed by Pacesetter Systems, Inc. in cooperation with the Applied Physics Laboratory. HTS incorporates a nickel cadmium battery, telemetry and command systems technologies of the same type as those used in NASA's Small Astronomy Satellite-3 in microminiature proportions so that the implantable element is the size of a deck of cards. The stimulator includes a rechargeable battery, an antenna and electronics to receive and process commands and to report on its own condition via telemetry, a wireless process wherein instrument data is converted to electrical signals and sent to a receiver where signals are presented as usable information. The HTS is targeted to nerve centers or to particular areas of the brain to provide relief from intractable pain or arrest involuntary motion. The nickel cadmium battery can be recharged through the skin. The first two HTS units were implanted last year and have been successful. Extensive testing is required before HTS can be made available for general use.

  12. Identification of heme oxygenase-1 stimulators by a convenient ELISA-based bilirubin quantification assay.

    PubMed

    Rücker, Hannelore; Amslinger, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has proven to be a useful tool for fighting inflammation. In order to identify new HO-1 inducers, an efficient screening method was developed which can provide new lead structures for drug research. We designed a simple ELISA-based HO-1 enzyme activity assay, which allows for the screening of 12 compounds in parallel in the setting of a 96-well plate. The well-established murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 is used and only about 26µg of protein from whole cell lysates is needed for the analysis of HO-1 activity. The quantification of HO-1 activity is based on an indirect ELISA using the specific anti-bilirubin antibody 24G7 to quantify directly bilirubin in the whole cell lysate, applying a horseradish peroxidase-tagged antibody together with ortho-phenylenediamine and H2O2 for detection. The bilirubin is produced on the action of HO enzymes by converting their substrate heme to biliverdin and additional recombinant biliverdin reductase together with NADPH at pH 7.4 in buffer. This sensitive assay allows for the detection of 0.57-82pmol bilirubin per sample in whole cell lysates. Twenty-three small molecules, mainly natural products with an α,β-unsaturated carbonyl unit such as polyphenols, including flavonoids and chalcones, terpenes, an isothiocyanate, and the drug oltipraz were tested at typically 6 or 24h incubation with RAW264.7 cells. The activity of known HO-1 inducers was confirmed, while the chalcones cardamonin, flavokawain A, calythropsin, 2',3,4'-trihydroxy-4-methoxychalcone (THMC), and 2',4'-dihydroxy-3,4-dimethoxychalcone (DHDMC) were identified as new potent HO-1 inducers. The highest inductive power after 6h incubation was found at 10µM for DHDMC (6.1-fold), carnosol (3.9-fold), butein (3.1-fold), THMC (2.9-fold), and zerumbone (2.5-fold). Moreover, the time dependence of HO-1 protein production for DHDMC was compared to its enzyme activity, which was further evaluated in the presence of

  13. Sprouty2 and Spred1-2 Proteins Inhibit the Activation of the ERK Pathway Elicited by Cyclopentenone Prostanoids

    PubMed Central

    Gragera, Teresa; Pérez-Rodríguez, Andrea; Retana, Diana; León, Gonzalo; Sánchez, Agustín; Oliva, José Luis; Pérez-Sala, Dolores; Rojas, José M.

    2011-01-01

    Sprouty and Spred proteins have been widely implicated in the negative regulation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor-extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. In considering the functional role of these proteins, we explored their effects on ERK activation induced by cyclopentenone prostanoids, which bind to and activate Ras proteins. We therefore found that ectopic overexpression in HeLa cells of human Sprouty2, or human Spred1 or 2, inhibits ERK1/2 and Elk-1 activation triggered by the cyclopentenone prostanoids PGA1 and 15d-PGJ2. Furthermore, we found that in HT cells that do not express Sprouty2 due to hypermethylation of its gene-promoter, PGA1-provoked ERK activation was more intense and sustained compared to other hematopoietic cell lines with unaltered Sprouty2 expression. Cyclopentenone prostanoids did not induce Sprouty2 tyrosine phosphorylation, in agreement with its incapability to activate tyrosine-kinase receptors. However, Sprouty2 Y55F, which acts as a defective mutant upon tyrosine-kinase receptor stimulation, did not inhibit cyclopentenone prostanoids-elicited ERK pathway activation. In addition, Sprouty2 did not affect the Ras-GTP levels promoted by cyclopentenone prostanoids. These results unveil both common and differential features in the activation of Ras-dependent pathways by cyclopentenone prostanoids and growth factors. Moreover, they provide the first evidence that Sprouty and Spred proteins are negative regulators of the ERK/Elk-1 pathway activation induced not only by growth-factors, but also by reactive lipidic mediators. PMID:21364986

  14. Effect of 15-Deoxy-∆12,14-prostaglandin J2 Nanocapsules on Inflammation and Bone Regeneration in a Rat Bone Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qi; Chen, Li-Li; Wei, Fen; Sun, Wei-Lian; Lei, Li-Hong; Ding, Pei-Hui; Tan, Jing-Yi; Chen, Xiao-Tao; Wu, Yan-Min

    2017-01-01

    Background: 15-Deoxy-∆12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2), one of the major metabolites from prostaglandin D2 in arachidonic acid metabolic pathway, has potential anti-inflammatory properties. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of 15d-PGJ2-loaded poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanocapsules (15d-PGJ2-NC) on inflammatory responses and bone regeneration in local bone defect. Methods: The study was conducted on 96 Wistar rats from June 2014 to March 2016. Saline, unloaded nanoparticles, free 15d-PGJ2 or 15d-PGJ2-NC, were delivered through a collagen vehicle inside surgically created transcortical defects in rat femurs. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels in the surrounding soft tissue were analyzed by Western blot and in the defect by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction over 14 days. Simultaneously, bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6) and platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B) messenger RNA (mRNA) in the defect were examined. New bone formation and EphrinB2 and osteoprotegerin (OPG) protein expression in the cortical defect were observed by Masson's Trichrome staining and immunohistochemistry over 28 days. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance. Least-significant difference and Dunnett's T3 methods were used with a bilateral P < 0.05. Results: Application of l5d-PGJ2-NC (100 μg/ml) in the local bone defect significantly decreased IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α mRNA and protein, compared with saline-treated controls (P < 0.05). l5d-PGJ2-NC upregulated BMP-6 and PDGF-B mRNA (P < 0.05). New bone formation was observed in the cortical defect in l5d-PGJ2-NC-treated animals from 7th day onward (P < 0.001). Expression of EphrinB2 and OPG presented early on day 3 and persisted through day 28 in 15d-PGJ2-NC group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Stable l5d-PGJ2-NC complexes were prepared that could attenuate IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α expression, while increasing new bone formation

  15. Dorsal column stimulator applications

    PubMed Central

    Yampolsky, Claudio; Hem, Santiago; Bendersky, Damián

    2012-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used to treat neuropathic pain since 1967. Following that, technological progress, among other advances, helped SCS become an effective tool to reduce pain. Methods: This article is a non-systematic review of the mechanism of action, indications, results, programming parameters, complications, and cost-effectiveness of SCS. Results: In spite of the existence of several studies that try to prove the mechanism of action of SCS, it still remains unknown. The mechanism of action of SCS would be based on the antidromic activation of the dorsal column fibers, which activate the inhibitory interneurons within the dorsal horn. At present, the indications of SCS are being revised constantly, while new applications are being proposed and researched worldwide. Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is the most common indication for SCS, whereas, the complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is the second one. Also, this technique is useful in patients with refractory angina and critical limb ischemia, in whom surgical or endovascular treatment cannot be performed. Further indications may be phantom limb pain, chronic intractable pain located in the head, face, neck, or upper extremities, spinal lumbar stenosis in patients who are not surgical candidates, and others. Conclusion: Spinal cord stimulation is a useful tool for neuromodulation, if an accurate patient selection is carried out prior, which should include a trial period. Undoubtedly, this proper selection and a better knowledge of its underlying mechanisms of action, will allow this cutting edge technique to be more acceptable among pain physicians. PMID:23230533

  16. Anti-inflammatory potential of peat moss extracts in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo-Suk; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Sung Ok; Kim, Gi-Young; Kim, Byung-Woo; Kim, Cheol Min; Seo, Yong-Bae; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Lee, Sang-Yeol; Jo, Kwon-Ho; Choi, Young Ju; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Gun-Do

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects of peat moss aqueous extract (PME) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. To demonstrate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of PME, the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and cytokines were measured using Griess reagent and cytokine ELISA kits, respectively. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis were conducted to evaluate the expression of genes and proteins. Immunofluorescence was used to measure the expression and translocation of transcription factors. Pre-treatment with PME inhibited the production of prostaglandin E(2) and NO by suppressing the gene expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible NO synthase, respectively. The LPS-stimulated gene expression and the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β were significantly reduced by PME. In the LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, nuclear factor‑κB (NF-κB) translocated from the cytosol to the nucleus, while pre-treatment with PME induced the sequestration of NF-κB in the cytosol through the inhibition of IκBα degradation. In the same manner, PME contributed to the inhibition of the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases. In addition, the PME-treated RAW 264.7 cells facilitated the activation of nuclear factor-like 2 (Nrf2) , and in turn, enhanced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. These results indicate that PME exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, and suggest that PME may neutralize inflammation and prevent cellular damage by oxidative stress.

  17. Intranasal Delivery of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Its Neuroprotective Effects Against Ischemic Brain Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao-liang; He, Mei-qing; Han, Xiang-yu; Sun, Jing-yi; Yang, Ming-feng; Yuan, Hui; Fan, Cun-dong; Zhang, Shuai; Mao, Lei-lei; Li, Da-wei; Zhang, Zong-yong; Zheng, Cheng-bi; Yang, Xiao-yi; Li, Yang V; Stetler, R Anne; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor with strong neuroprotective properties. However, it has limited capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier and thus potentially limiting its protective capacity. Recent studies demonstrated that intranasal drug administration is a promising way in delivering neuroprotective agents to the central nervous system. The current study therefore aimed at determining whether intranasal administration of G-CSF increases its delivery to the brain and its neuroprotective effect against ischemic brain injury. Transient focal cerebral ischemia in rat was induced with middle cerebral artery occlusion. Our resulted showed that intranasal administration is 8-12 times more effective than subcutaneous injection in delivering G-CSF to cerebrospinal fluid and brain parenchyma. Intranasal delivery enhanced the protective effects of G-CSF against ischemic injury in rats, indicated by decreased infarct volume and increased recovery of neurological function. The neuroprotective mechanisms of G-CSF involved enhanced upregulation of HO-1 and reduced calcium overload following ischemia. Intranasal G-CSF application also promoted angiogenesis and neurogenesis following brain ischemia. Taken together, G-CSF is a legitimate neuroprotective agent and intranasal administration of G-CSF is more effective in delivery and neuroprotection and could be a practical approach in clinic.

  18. Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dietze, Daniel R; Mathies, Richard A

    2016-05-04

    Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is an ultrafast nonlinear optical technique that provides vibrational structural information with high temporal (sub-50 fs) precision and high spectral (10 cm(-1) ) resolution. Since the first full demonstration of its capabilities ≈15 years ago, FSRS has evolved into a mature technique, giving deep insights into chemical and biochemical reaction dynamics that would be inaccessible with any other technique. It is now being routinely applied to virtually all possible photochemical reactions and systems spanning from single molecules in solution to thin films, bulk crystals and macromolecular proteins. This review starts with an historic overview and discusses the theoretical and experimental concepts behind this technology. Emphasis is put on the current state-of-the-art experimental realization and several variations of FSRS that have been developed. The unique capabilities of FSRS are illustrated through a comprehensive presentation of experiments to date followed by prospects.

  19. Stimulated coherent transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hung-chi Lihn

    1996-03-01

    Coherent radiation emitted from a relativistic electron bunch consists of wavelengths longer than or comparable to the bunch length. The intensity of this radiation out-numbers that of its incoherent counterpart, which extends to wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, by a factor equal to the number of electrons in the bunch. In typical accelerators, this factor is about 8 to 11 orders of magnitude. The spectrum of the coherent radiation is determined by the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and, therefore, contains information of the bunch distribution. Coherent transition radiation emitted from subpicosecond electron bunches at the Stanford SUNSHINE facility is observed in the far-infrared regime through a room-temperature pyroelectric bolometer and characterized through the electron bunch-length study. To measure the bunch length, a new frequency-resolved subpicosecond bunch-length measuring system is developed. This system uses a far-infrared Michelson interferometer to measure the spectrum of coherent transition radiation through optical autocorrelation with resolution far better than existing time-resolved methods. Hence, the radiation spectrum and the bunch length are deduced from the autocorrelation measurement. To study the stimulation of coherent transition radiation, a special cavity named BRAICER is invented. Far-infrared light pulses of coherent transition radiation emitted from electron bunches are delayed and circulated in the cavity to coincide with subsequent incoming electron bunches. This coincidence of light pulses with electron bunches enables the light to do work on electrons, and thus stimulates more radiated energy. The possibilities of extending the bunch-length measuring system to measure the three-dimensional bunch distribution and making the BRAICER cavity a broadband, high-intensity, coherent, far-infrared light source are also discussed.

  20. Induction of Nrf2-mediated genes by Antrodia salmonea inhibits ROS generation and inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsin-Ling; Lin, Shu-Wei; Lee, Chuan-Chen; Lin, Kai-Yuan; Liao, Chun-Huei; Yang, Ting-Yu; Wang, Hui-Min; Huang, Hui-Chi; Wu, Chi-Rei; Hseu, You-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Antrodia salmonea (AS), a well-known medicinal mushroom in Taiwan, has been reported to exhibit anti-oxidant, anti-angiogenic, anti-atherogenic, and anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, we investigated the activation of Nrf2-mediated antioxidant genes in RAW264.7 macrophages by the fermented culture broth of AS, studied the resulting protection against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated inflammation, and revealed the molecular mechanisms underlying these protective effects. We found that non-cytotoxic concentrations of AS (25-100 μg mL⁻¹) protected macrophages from LPS-induced cell death and ROS generation in a dose-dependent manner. The antioxidant potential of AS was directly correlated with the increased expression of the antioxidant genes HO-1, NQO-1, and γ-GCLC, as well as the level of intracellular GSH followed by an increase in the nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway. Furthermore, Nrf2 knockdown diminished the protective effects of AS, as evidenced by the increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including PGE₂, NO, TNF-α, and IL-1β, in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Notably, AS treatment significantly inhibited LPS-induced ICAM-1 expression in macrophages. Our data suggest that the anti-inflammatory potential of Antrodia salmonea is mediated by the activation of Nrf2-dependent antioxidant defense mechanisms. Results support the traditional usage of this beneficial mushroom for the treatment of free radical-related diseases and inflammation.

  1. Brain stimulation in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Christian Johannes; Groiss, Stefan Jun; Vesper, Jan; Schnitzler, Alfons; Wojtecki, Lars

    2016-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder which is associated with severe disturbances of motor function, especially choreatic movements, cognitive decline and psychiatric symptoms. Various brain stimulation methods have been used to study brain function in patients with HD. Moreover, brain stimulation has evolved as an alternative or additive treatment option, besides current symptomatic medical treatment. This article summarizes the results of brain stimulation to better understand the characteristics of cortical excitability and plasticity in HD and gives a perspective on the therapeutic role for noninvasive and invasive neuromodulatory brain stimulation methods.

  2. Optically stimulated differential impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Maxey, Lonnie C; Parks, II, James E; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A; Partridge, Jr., William P

    2014-02-18

    Methods and apparatuses for evaluating a material are described. Embodiments typically involve use of an impedance measurement sensor to measure the impedance of a sample of the material under at least two different states of illumination. The states of illumination may include (a) substantially no optical stimulation, (b) substantial optical stimulation, (c) optical stimulation at a first wavelength of light, (d) optical stimulation at a second wavelength of light, (e) a first level of light intensity, and (f) a second level of light intensity. Typically a difference in impedance between the impedance of the sample at the two states of illumination is measured to determine a characteristic of the material.

  3. EOR by stimulated microflora

    SciTech Connect

    Svarovskaya, L.I.; Altunina, L.K.; Rozhenkova, Z.A.; Bulavin, V.D.

    1995-12-31

    A combined microbiological and physico-chemical method for EOR has been developed for flooded West Siberia oil fields with formation temperature of 45{degrees}-95{degrees}C (318-365K). Formation water includes rich and various biocenoses numbering up to 2 x 10{sup 7} cells per ml. Representatives of genera, i.e, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Actinomyces, Micrococcus, Mycobacterium, Sarcina, etc. were found to be the most widely distributed microorganisms. The method is based on injection of systems exhibiting high oil displacing capacity and at the same time being an additional nitrous nutrient for endemic populations of microorganisms. Their injection into formation water favors biomass growth by 4-6 orders and promotes syntheses of biosurfactants, biopolymers, acids, etc., and gaseous products. The features of residual oil displacement have been studied on laboratory models using a combined microbiological and physico-chemical method. A curve for the yield of residual oil is presented by two peaks. The first peak is stipulated by the washing action of oil displacement system, and the second one by the effect of metabolites produced at stimulation of biogenic processes. Oil displacement index increases by 15%-30%.

  4. Atomic oxygen stimulated outgassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, Roger C.; Reynolds, John M.

    1991-01-01

    The passive Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Experiment A0034, Atomic Oxygen Simulated Outgassing, consisted of two identical one-sixth tray modules, exposing selected thermal control coatings to atomic oxygen and the combined space environment on the leading edge and, for reference, to the relative wake environment on the trailing edge. Optical mirrors were included adjacent to the thermal coatings for deposition of outgassing products. Ultraviolet grade windows and metal covers were provided for additional assessment of the effects of the various environmental factors. Preliminary results indicate that orbital atomic oxygen is both a degrading and a optically restorative factor in the thermo-optical properties of selected thermal coatings. There is evidence of more severe optical degradation on collector mirrors adjacent to coatings that were exposed to the RAM-impinging atomic oxygen. This evidence of atomic oxygen stimulated outgassing is discussed in relation to alternative factors that could affect degradation. The general effects of the space environment on the experiment hardware as well as the specimens are discussed.

  5. Dichotic Stimulation and Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosley, James L.; Virbancic, Mirna I.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews literature on the use of dichotic stimulation in individuals with mental retardation, and examines how noninvasive dichotic stimulation relates to hemisphere lateralization. Common findings are discussed concerning direction and magnitude of ear asymmetries, patterns of intrusion errors, and speech lateralization of Down…

  6. Stimulating Language: Insights from TMS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Joseph T.; Watkins, Kate E.

    2007-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, Pascual-Leone and colleagues used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate speech production in pre-surgical epilepsy patients and in doing so, introduced a novel tool into language research. TMS can be used to non-invasively stimulate a specific cortical region and transiently disrupt information processing. These…

  7. Rosiglitazone and 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2, ligands of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ), reduce ischaemia/reperfusion injury of the gut

    PubMed Central

    Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Pisano, Barbara; Dugo, Laura; Ianaro, Angela; Patel, Nimesh S A; Paola, Rosanna Di; Genovese, Tiziana; Chatterjee, Prabal K; Rosa, Massimo Di; Caputi, Achille P; Thiemermann, Christoph

    2003-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-dependent transcription factors related to retinoid, steroid and thyroid hormone receptors. The thiazolidinedione rosiglitazone and the endogenous cyclopentenone prostaglandin (PG)D2 metabolite, 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2), are two PPAR-γ ligands, which modulate the transcription of target genes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of rosiglitazone and 15d-PGJ2 on the tissue injury caused by ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) of the gut. I/R injury of the intestine was caused by clamping both the superior mesenteric artery and the coeliac trunk for 45 min, followed by release of the clamp allowing reperfusion for 2 or 4 h. This procedure results in splanchnic artery occlusion (SAO) shock. Rats subjected to SAO developed a significant fall in mean arterial blood pressure, and only 10% of the animals survived for the entire 4 h reperfusion period. Surviving animals were killed for histological examination and biochemical studies. Rats subjected to SAO displayed a significant increase in tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, significant increases in plasma tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β levels and marked injury to the distal ileum. Increased immunoreactivity to nitrotyrosine was observed in the ileum of rats subjected to SAO. Staining of sections of the ileum obtained from SAO rats with anti-intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) antibody resulted in diffuse staining. Administration at 30 min prior to the onset of gut ischaemia of the two PPAR-γ agonists (rosiglitazone (0.3 mg kg−1 i.v.) and 15d-PGJ2 (0.3 mg kg−1 i.v.)) significantly reduced the (i) fall in mean arterial blood pressure, (ii) mortality rate, (iii) infiltration of the reperfused intestine with polymorphonuclear neutrophils (MPO activity), (iv) lipid peroxidation (MDA levels), (v) production of

  8. Differential selectivity of protein modification by the cyclopentenone prostaglandins PGA1 and 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-PGJ2: role of glutathione.

    PubMed

    Gayarre, Javier; Stamatakis, Konstantinos; Renedo, Marta; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2005-10-24

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins (cyPG) with antiinflammatory and antiproliferative properties have been envisaged as leads for the development of therapeutic agents. Because cyPG effects are mediated in part by the formation of covalent adducts with critical signaling proteins, it is important to assess the specificity of this interaction. By using biotinylated derivatives of 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-PGJ(2) (15d-PGJ(2)-B) and PGA(1) (PGA(1)-B) we herein provide novel evidence for the differential selectivity of protein modification by distinct cyPG. The marked quantitative and qualitative differences in the binding of 15d-PGJ(2)-B and PGA(1)-B to cellular proteins were related to a differential reactivity in the presence of glutathione (GSH), both in vitro and in intact cells. Therefore GSH levels may influence not only the intensity but also the specificity of cyPG action.

  9. Inhibition of adhesive interaction between multiple myeloma and bone marrow stromal cells by PPARgamma cross talk with NF-kappaB and C/EBP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li Hua; Yang, Xiao Yi; Zhang, Xiaohu; Farrar, William L

    2007-12-15

    Binding of multiple myeloma (MM) cells to bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) triggers expression of adhesive molecules and secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), promoting MM cell growth, survival, drug resistance, and migration, which highlights the possibility of developing and validating novel anti-MM therapeutic strategies targeting MM cells-host BMSC interactions and their sequelae. Recently, we have found that expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) and its ligands can potently inhibit IL-6-regulated MM cell growth. Here we demonstrate that PPARgamma agonists 15-d-PGJ2 and troglitazone significantly suppress cell-cell adhesive events, including expression of adhesion molecules and IL-6 secretion from BMSCs triggered by adhesion of MM cells, as well as overcome drug resistance by a PPARgamma-dependent mechanism. The synthetic and natural PPARgamma agonists have diverging and overlapping mechanisms blocking transactivation of transcription factors NF-kappaB and 5'-CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPbeta). Both 15-d-PGJ2 and troglitazone blocked C/EBPbeta transcriptional activity by forming PPARgamma complexes with C/EBPbeta. 15-d-PGJ2 and troglitazone also blocked NF-kappaB activation by recruiting the coactivator PGC-1 from p65/p50 complexes. In addition, 15-d-PGJ2 had a non-PPARgamma-dependent effect by inactivation of phosphorylation of IKK and IkappaB. These studies provide the framework for PPARgamma-based pharmacological strategies targeting adhesive interactions of MM cells with the bone marrow microenvironment.

  10. Inhibition of Transglutaminase 2, a Novel Target for Pulmonary Fibrosis, by Two Small Electrophilic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Keith C.; Epa, Amali P.; Kulkarni, Ajit A.; Kottmann, R. Matthew; McCarthy, Claire E.; Johnson, Gail V.; Thatcher, Thomas H.; Phipps, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by progressive fibrotic destruction of normal lung architecture. Due to a lack of effective treatment options, new treatment approaches are needed. We previously identified transglutaminase (TG)2, a multifunctional protein expressed by human lung fibroblasts (HLFs), as a positive driver of fibrosis. TG2 catalyzes crosslinking of extracellular matrix proteins, enhances cell binding to fibronectin and integrin, and promotes fibronectin expression. We investigated whether the small electrophilic molecules 2-cyano-3,12-dioxoolean-1,9-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO) and 15-deoxy-delta-12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) inhibit the expression and profibrotic functions of TG2. CDDO and 15d-PGJ2 reduced expression of TG2 mRNA and protein in primary HLFs from control donors and donors with IPF. CDDO and 15d-PGJ2 also decreased the in vitro profibrotic effector functions of HLFs including collagen gel contraction and cell migration. The decrease in TG2 expression did not occur through activation of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ or generation of reactive oxidative species. CDDO and 15d-PGJ2 inhibited the extracellular signal–regulated kinase pathway, resulting in the suppression of TG2 expression. This is the first study to show that small electrophilic compounds inhibit the expression and profibrotic effector functions of TG2, a key promoter of fibrosis. These studies identify new and important antifibrotic activities of these two small molecules, which could lead to new treatments for fibrotic lung disease. PMID:24175906

  11. Inhibition of transglutaminase 2, a novel target for pulmonary fibrosis, by two small electrophilic molecules.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Keith C; Epa, Amali P; Kulkarni, Ajit A; Kottmann, R Matthew; McCarthy, Claire E; Johnson, Gail V; Thatcher, Thomas H; Phipps, Richard P; Sime, Patricia J

    2014-04-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by progressive fibrotic destruction of normal lung architecture. Due to a lack of effective treatment options, new treatment approaches are needed. We previously identified transglutaminase (TG)2, a multifunctional protein expressed by human lung fibroblasts (HLFs), as a positive driver of fibrosis. TG2 catalyzes crosslinking of extracellular matrix proteins, enhances cell binding to fibronectin and integrin, and promotes fibronectin expression. We investigated whether the small electrophilic molecules 2-cyano-3,12-dioxoolean-1,9-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO) and 15-deoxy-delta-12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) inhibit the expression and profibrotic functions of TG2. CDDO and 15d-PGJ2 reduced expression of TG2 mRNA and protein in primary HLFs from control donors and donors with IPF. CDDO and 15d-PGJ2 also decreased the in vitro profibrotic effector functions of HLFs including collagen gel contraction and cell migration. The decrease in TG2 expression did not occur through activation of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ or generation of reactive oxidative species. CDDO and 15d-PGJ2 inhibited the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway, resulting in the suppression of TG2 expression. This is the first study to show that small electrophilic compounds inhibit the expression and profibrotic effector functions of TG2, a key promoter of fibrosis. These studies identify new and important antifibrotic activities of these two small molecules, which could lead to new treatments for fibrotic lung disease.

  12. Nrf2 activation protects the liver from ischemia/ reperfusion injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kudoh, Kazuhiro; Uchinami, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Masato; Seki, Ekihiro; Yamamoto, Yuzo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of Nrf2 in the pathogenesis of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Summary Background Data Hepatic I/R injury is a serious complication that leads to liver failure after liver surgery. NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that plays a critical role in protecting cells against oxidative stress. Therefore, it is suggested that Nrf2 activation protects the liver from I/R injury. Methods Wild-type (WT) and Nrf2-deficient mice were treated with 15-deoxy-Δ12, 14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2), or a vehicle. Subsequently, these mice were subjected to 60 min hepatic 70% ischemia followed by reperfusion. Liver and blood samples were collected to evaluate liver injury and mRNA expressions. Results After hepatic I/R, Nrf2-deficient livers exhibited enhanced tissue damage, impaired GSTm1, NQO1, and GCLc inductions, disturbed redox state, and aggravated TNF-α mRNA expression in comparison to WT livers. 15d-PGJ2 treatment protected the livers of WT mice from I/R injury via increased expressions of GSTm1, NQO1 and GCLc, maintained redox status, and decreased TNF-α induction. These effects induced by 15d-PGJ2 were not seen in the livers of Nrf2−/− mice and were not annulled by PPARγ antagonist in Nrf2+/+ mice, suggesting that the protective effect of 15d-PGJ2 is mediated by Nrf2-dependent antioxidant response. Conclusions Nrf2 plays a critical role in the mechanism of hepatic I/R injury and would be a new therapeutic target for preventing hepatic I/R injury during liver surgery. PMID:24368646

  13. Nanomaterial-Enabled Neural Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongchen; Guo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed. PMID:27013938

  14. Digital electronic bone growth stimulator

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-05-09

    A device is described for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient`s skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures. 5 figs.

  15. Electrical stimulation in exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, Walter

    1994-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has a long history of use in medicine dating back to 46 A.D. when the Roman physician Largus found the electrical discharge of torpedo fishes useful in the treatment of pain produced by headache and gout. A rival Greek physician, Dioscorides, discounted the value of the torpedo fish for headache relief but did recommend its use in the treatment of hemorrhoids. In 1745, the Leyden jar and various sized electrostatic generators were used to treat angina pectoris, epilepsy, hemiplegia, kidney stones, and sciatica. Benjamin Franklin used an electrical device to treat successfully a young woman suffering from convulsive fits. In the late 1800's battery powered hydroelectric baths were used to treat chronic inflammation of the uterus while electrified athletic supporters were advertised for the treatment of male problems. Fortunately, such an amusing early history of the simple beginnings of electrical stimulation did not prevent eventual development of a variety of useful therapeutic and rehabilitative applications of electrical stimulation. Over the centuries electrical stimulation has survived as a modality in the treatment of various medical disorders with its primary application being in the rehabilitation area. Recently, a surge of new interest in electrical stimulation has been kindled by the work of a Russian sport scientist who reported remarkable muscle strength and endurance improvements in elite athletes. Yakov Kots reported his research on electric stimulation and strength improvements in 1977 at a Canadian-Soviet Exchange Symposium held at Concordia University in Montreal. Since then an explosion of new studies has been seen in both sport science and in medicine. Based upon the reported works of Kots and the present surge of new investigations, one could be misled as to the origin of electrical stimulation as a technique to increase muscle strength. As a matter of fact, electric stimulation has been used as a technique to improve

  16. Digital electronic bone growth stimulator

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1995-01-01

    A device for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient's skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures.

  17. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma and its ligands attenuate biologic functions of human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Rodriguez-Galán, Maria Cecilia; Subleski, Jeff J; Ortaldo, John R; Hodge, Deborah L; Wang, Ji-Ming; Shimozato, Osamu; Reynolds, Della A; Young, Howard A

    2004-11-15

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production and cytolytic activity are 2 major biologic functions of natural killer (NK) cells that are important for innate immunity. We demonstrate here that these functions are compromised in human NK cells treated with peroxisome proliferator-activated-gamma (PPAR-gamma) ligands via both PPAR-gamma-dependent and -independent pathways due to variation in PPAR-gamma expression. In PPAR-gamma-null NK cells, 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14) prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)), a natural PPAR-gamma ligand, reduces IFN-gamma production that can be reversed by MG132 and/or chloroquine, and it inhibits cytolytic activity of NK cells through reduction of both conjugate formation and CD69 expression. In PPARgamma-positive NK cells, PPAR-gamma activation by 15d-PGJ(2) and ciglitazone (a synthetic ligand) leads to reduction in both mRNA and protein levels of IFN-gamma. Overexpression of PPAR-gamma in PPAR-gamma-null NK cells reduces IFN-gamma gene expression. However, PPAR-gamma expression and activation has no effect on NK cell cytolytic activity. In addition, 15d-PGJ(2) but not ciglitazone reduces expression of CD69 in human NK cells, whereas CD44 expression is not affected. These results reveal novel pathways regulating NK cell biologic functions and provide a basis for the design of therapeutic agents that can regulate the function of NK cells within the innate immune response.

  18. Addition of electrophilic lipids to actin alters filament structure.

    PubMed

    Gayarre, Javier; Sánchez, David; Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J; Terrón, María C; Llorca, Oscar; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2006-11-03

    Pathophysiological processes associated with oxidative stress lead to the generation of reactive lipid species. Among them, lipids bearing unsaturated aldehyde or ketone moieties can form covalent adducts with cysteine residues and modulate protein function. Through proteomic techniques we have identified actin as a target for the addition of biotinylated analogs of the cyclopentenone prostaglandins 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-PGJ(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) and PGA(1) in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. This modification could take place in vitro and mapped to the protein C-terminal end. Other electrophilic lipids, like the isoprostane 8-iso-PGA(1) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, also bound to actin. The C-terminal region of actin is important for monomer-monomer interactions and polymerization. Electron microscopy showed that actin treated with 15d-PGJ(2) or 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal formed filaments which were less abundant and displayed shorter length and altered structure. Streptavidin-gold staining allowed mapping of biotinylated 15d-PGJ(2) at sites of filament disruption. These results shed light on the structural implications of actin modification by lipid electrophiles.

  19. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    ScienceCinema

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2016-07-12

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  20. Neural stimulation and recording electrodes.

    PubMed

    Cogan, Stuart F

    2008-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of nerve tissue and recording of neural electrical activity are the basis of emerging prostheses and treatments for spinal cord injury, stroke, sensory deficits, and neurological disorders. An understanding of the electrochemical mechanisms underlying the behavior of neural stimulation and recording electrodes is important for the development of chronically implanted devices, particularly those employing large numbers of microelectrodes. For stimulation, materials that support charge injection by capacitive and faradaic mechanisms are available. These include titanium nitride, platinum, and iridium oxide, each with certain advantages and limitations. The use of charge-balanced waveforms and maximum electrochemical potential excursions as criteria for reversible charge injection with these electrode materials are described and critiqued. Techniques for characterizing electrochemical properties relevant to stimulation and recording are described with examples of differences in the in vitro and in vivo response of electrodes.

  1. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-03-06

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  2. A precision mechanical nerve stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    An electromechanical device, used to apply and monitor stimulating pulses to a mammalian motor nerve, has been successfully developed at NASA Langley Research Center. Two existing force transducers, a flight skin friction balance and a miniature skin friction balance which were designed for making aerodynamic drag measurements, were modified and incorporated to form this precision instrument. The nerve stimulator is a type one servomechanism capable of applying and monitoring stimulating pulses of 0 to 10 grams with a precision of better than +/- 0.05 grams. Additionally, the device can be independently used to apply stimulating pulses by displacing the nerve from 0 to 0.25 mm with a precision of better than +/- 0.001 mm while measuring the level of the load applied.

  3. Demultiplexer circuit for neural stimulation

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O; Okandan, Murat; Pearson, Sean

    2012-10-09

    A demultiplexer circuit is disclosed which can be used with a conventional neural stimulator to extend the number of electrodes which can be activated. The demultiplexer circuit, which is formed on a semiconductor substrate containing a power supply that provides all the dc electrical power for operation of the circuit, includes digital latches that receive and store addressing information from the neural stimulator one bit at a time. This addressing information is used to program one or more 1:2.sup.N demultiplexers in the demultiplexer circuit which then route neural stimulation signals from the neural stimulator to an electrode array which is connected to the outputs of the 1:2.sup.N demultiplexer. The demultiplexer circuit allows the number of individual electrodes in the electrode array to be increased by a factor of 2.sup.N with N generally being in a range of 2-4.

  4. Electrical stimulation to restore respiration.

    PubMed

    Creasey, G; Elefteriades, J; DiMarco, A; Talonen, P; Bijak, M; Girsch, W; Kantor, C

    1996-04-01

    Electrical stimulation has been used for over 25 years to restore breathing to patients with high quadriplegia causing respiratory paralysis and patients with central alveolar hypoventilation. Three groups have developed electrical pacing systems for long-term support of respiration in humans. These systems consist of electrodes implanted on the phrenic nerves, connected by leads to a stimulator implanted under the skin, and powered and controlled from a battery-powered transmitter outside the body. The systems differ principally in the electrode design and stimulation waveform. Approximately 1,000 people worldwide have received one of the three phrenic pacing devices, most with strongly positive results: reduced risk of tracheal problems and chronic infection, the ability to speak and smell more normally, reduced risk of accidental interruption of respiration, greater independence, and reduced costs and time for ventilatory care. For patients with partial lesions of the phrenic nerves, intercostal muscle stimulation may supplement respiration.

  5. Breast Cancer Stimulation of Osteolysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    staining for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (Sigma) and observation of multinucleated cells. Preparation of RNA Since tumor burden in each bone...and TNF-a each stimulated secretion of cathepsin B and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase . We are currently investigating the influence of...secretion whereas IGF II, TNF-a, and PTHrP stimulate osteoclast secretion of cathepsin B and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase . REPORTABLE OUTCOMES

  6. Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The following are included: review of available data from previous fracturing stimulation operations, stimulation process variables, fracturing fluid design, hydraulic fracture design, stimulation case histories, and selected bibliography. (MHR)

  7. Emerging Neural Stimulation Technologies for Bladder Dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Woong; Kim, Daejeong; Yoo, Sangjin; Lee, Hyungsup; Lee, Gu-Haeng; Nam, Yoonkey

    2015-01-01

    In the neural engineering field, physiological dysfunctions are approached by identifying the target nerves and providing artificial stimulation to restore the function. Neural stimulation and recording technologies play a central role in this approach, and various engineering devices and stimulation techniques have become available to the medical community. For bladder control problems, electrical stimulation has been used as one of the treatments, while only a few emerging neurotechnologies have been used to tackle these problems. In this review, we introduce some recent developments in neural stimulation technologies including microelectrode array, closed-loop neural stimulation, optical stimulation, and ultrasound stimulation. PMID:25833475

  8. Neuroprotection trek--the next generation: neuromodulation I. Techniques--deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Russell J.

    2003-01-01

    Neuromodulation denotes controlled electrical stimulation of the central or peripheral nervous system. The three forms of neuromodulation described in this paper-deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation-were chosen primarily for their demonstrated or potential clinical usefulness. Deep brain stimulation is a completely implanted technique for improving movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, by very focal electrical stimulation of the brain-a technique that employs well-established hardware (electrode and pulse generator/battery). Vagus nerve stimulation is similar to deep brain stimulation in being well-established (for the treatment of refractory epilepsy), completely implanted, and having hardware that can be considered standard at the present time. Vagus nerve stimulation differs from deep brain stimulation, however, in that afferent stimulation of the vagus nerve results in diffuse effects on many regions throughout the brain. Although use of deep brain stimulation for applications beyond movement disorders will no doubt involve placing the stimulating electrode(s) in regions other than the thalamus, subthalamus, or globus pallidus, the use of vagus nerve stimulation for applications beyond epilepsy-for example, depression and eating disorders-is unlikely to require altering the hardware significantly (although stimulation protocols may differ). Transcranial magnetic stimulation is an example of an external or non-implanted, intermittent (at least given the current state of the hardware) stimulation technique, the clinical value of which for neuromodulation and neuroprotection remains to be determined.

  9. Electrical stimulation and motor recovery.

    PubMed

    Young, Wise

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several investigators have successfully regenerated axons in animal spinal cords without locomotor recovery. One explanation is that the animals were not trained to use the regenerated connections. Intensive locomotor training improves walking recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) in people, and >90% of people with incomplete SCI recover walking with training. Although the optimal timing, duration, intensity, and type of locomotor training are still controversial, many investigators have reported beneficial effects of training on locomotor function. The mechanisms by which training improves recovery are not clear, but an attractive theory is available. In 1949, Donald Hebb proposed a famous rule that has been paraphrased as "neurons that fire together, wire together." This rule provided a theoretical basis for a widely accepted theory that homosynaptic and heterosynaptic activity facilitate synaptic formation and consolidation. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord has a locomotor center, called the central pattern generator (CPG), which can be activated nonspecifically with electrical stimulation or neurotransmitters to produce walking. The CPG is an obvious target to reconnect after SCI. Stimulating motor cortex, spinal cord, or peripheral nerves can modulate lumbar spinal cord excitability. Motor cortex stimulation causes long-term changes in spinal reflexes and synapses, increases sprouting of the corticospinal tract, and restores skilled forelimb function in rats. Long used to treat chronic pain, motor cortex stimuli modify lumbar spinal network excitability and improve lower extremity motor scores in humans. Similarly, epidural spinal cord stimulation has long been used to treat pain and spasticity. Subthreshold epidural stimulation reduces the threshold for locomotor activity. In 2011, Harkema et al. reported lumbosacral epidural stimulation restores motor control in chronic motor complete patients. Peripheral nerve or functional electrical

  10. Evoked Electromyographically Controlled Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Time-variant muscle responses under electrical stimulation (ES) are often problematic for all the applications of neuroprosthetic muscle control. This situation limits the range of ES usage in relevant areas, mainly due to muscle fatigue and also to changes in stimulation electrode contact conditions, especially in transcutaneous ES. Surface electrodes are still the most widely used in noninvasive applications. Electrical field variations caused by changes in the stimulation contact condition markedly affect the resulting total muscle activation levels. Fatigue phenomena under functional electrical stimulation (FES) are also well known source of time-varying characteristics coming from muscle response under ES. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the actual muscle state and assess the expected muscle response by ES so as to improve the current ES system in favor of adaptive muscle-response-aware FES control. To deal with this issue, we have been studying a novel control technique using evoked electromyography (eEMG) signals to compensate for these muscle time-variances under ES for stable neuroprosthetic muscle control. In this perspective article, I overview the background of this topic and highlight important points to be aware of when using ES to induce the desired muscle activation regardless of the time-variance. I also demonstrate how to deal with the common critical problem of ES to move toward robust neuroprosthetic muscle control with the Evoked Electromyographically Controlled Electrical Stimulation paradigm. PMID:27471448

  11. Laser stimulation for pain research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Stuart; Dickinson, Mark R.; King, Terence A.; Jones, Anthony; Chen, Andrew; Derbyshire, Stuart; Townsend, D. W.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Mintun, M. A.; Nichols, T.

    1996-01-01

    Pain is a serious medical problem; it inflicts huge economic loss and personal suffering. Pain signals are conducted via small, non- and partially myelinated A-delta and C nerve fibers and lasers are particularly well suited to stimulating these fibers. Large myelinated fibers convey touch and vibration information and these fibers are also discharged when contact thermodes and other touch pain stimuli are used and this would give a more muddled signal for functional imaging experiments. The advantages of lasers over conventional methods of pain stimulation are good temporal resolution, no variable parameters are involved such as contact area and they give very reproducible results. Accurate inter-stimulus changes can be achieved by computer control of the laser pulse duration, pulse height and repetition rate and this flexibility enables complex stimulation paradigms to be realized. We present a flexible carbon dioxide laser system designed to generate these stimuli for the study of human cerebral pain responses. We discuss the advantages within research of this system over other methods of pain stimulation such as thermal, electrical and magnetic. The stimulator is used in conjunction with functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and electrophysiological methods of imaging the brain's activity. This combination is a powerful tool for the study of pain-induced activity in different areas of the brain. An accurate understanding of the brain's response to pain will help in research into the areas of rheumatoid arthritis and chronic back pain.

  12. Electrical brain stimulation for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Robert S; Velasco, Ana Luisa

    2014-05-01

    Neurostimulation enables adjustable and reversible modulation of disease symptoms, including those of epilepsy. Two types of brain neuromodulation, comprising anterior thalamic deep brain stimulation and responsive neurostimulation at seizure foci, are supported by Class I evidence of effectiveness, and many other sites in the brain have been targeted in small trials of neurostimulation therapy for seizures. Animal studies have mainly assisted in the identification of potential neurostimulation sites and parameters, but much of the clinical work is only loosely based on fundamental principles derived from the laboratory, and the mechanisms by which brain neurostimulation reduces seizures remain poorly understood. The benefits of stimulation tend to increase over time, with maximal effect seen typically 1-2 years after implantation. Typical reductions of seizure frequency are approximately 40% acutely, and 50-69% after several years. Seizure intensity might also be reduced. Complications from brain neurostimulation are mainly associated with the implantation procedure and hardware, including stimulation-related paraesthesias, stimulation-site infections, electrode mistargeting and, in some patients, triggered seizures or even status epilepticus. Further preclinical and clinical experience with brain stimulation surgery should lead to improved outcomes by increasing our understanding of the optimal surgical candidates, sites and parameters.

  13. Mechanisms of deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jennifer J.; Eskandar, Emad N.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is widely used for the treatment of movement disorders including Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia and, to a lesser extent, certain treatment-resistant neuropsychiatric disorders including obsessive-compulsive disorder. Rather than a single unifying mechanism, DBS likely acts via several, nonexclusive mechanisms including local and network-wide electrical and neurochemical effects of stimulation, modulation of oscillatory activity, synaptic plasticity, and, potentially, neuroprotection and neurogenesis. These different mechanisms vary in importance depending on the condition being treated and the target being stimulated. Here we review each of these in turn and illustrate how an understanding of these mechanisms is inspiring next-generation approaches to DBS. PMID:26510756

  14. Perspectives on stimulated Brillouin scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Elsa

    2017-01-01

    This collection of papers describes research that goes into detail on some of the more important issues in the physics of stimulated Brillouin scattering. This perspective describes the earliest years of the physics of stimulated Brillouin scattering, along with key developments that have led to this technically and physically rich field of today’s nonlinear optics. Stimulated Brillouin has a profound effect in optical fiber communications, initially discovered by its limit on the transmitted power. By controlling SBS in fibers and making use of its phase conjugation properties in both fibers and bulk media, a wide range of applications have been enabled. Today ring Brillouin lasers in fibers, whispering gallery modes and in photonic integrated circuits provide optical delay lines and switches, pulse shapers and components for increasingly complex and important optical systems.

  15. Deep brain stimulation: postoperative issues.

    PubMed

    Deuschl, Günther; Herzog, Jan; Kleiner-Fisman, Galit; Kubu, Cynthia; Lozano, Andres M; Lyons, Kelly E; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria C; Tamma, Filippo; Tröster, Alexander I; Vitek, Jerrold L; Volkmann, Jens; Voon, Valerie

    2006-06-01

    Numerous factors need to be taken into account when managing a patient with Parkinson's disease (PD) after deep brain stimulation (DBS). Questions such as when to begin programming, how to conduct a programming screen, how to assess the effects of programming, and how to titrate stimulation and medication for each of the targeted sites need to be addressed. Follow-up care should be determined, including patient adjustments of stimulation, timing of follow-up visits and telephone contact with the patient, and stimulation and medication conditions during the follow-up assessments. A management plan for problems that can arise after DBS such as weight gain, dyskinesia, axial symptoms, speech dysfunction, muscle contractions, paresthesia, eyelid, ocular and visual disturbances, and behavioral and cognitive problems should be developed. Long-term complications such as infection or erosion, loss of effect, intermittent stimulation, tolerance, and pain or discomfort can develop and need to be managed. Other factors that need consideration are social and job-related factors, development of dementia, general medical issues, and lifestyle changes. This report from the Consensus on Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease, a project commissioned by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons and the Movement Disorder Society, outlines answers to a series of questions developed to address all aspects of DBS postoperative management and decision-making with a systematic overview of the literature (until mid-2004) and by the expert opinion of the authors. The report has been endorsed by the Scientific Issues Committee of the Movement Disorder Society and the American Society of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery.

  16. The Electrical Stimulation Modifies the Cerebral Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Luisa Lilia; López-Meraz, María Leonor; Cuéllar-Herrera, Manola; Neri-Bazán., Leticia

    2002-08-01

    Electrical stimulation has been used for therapeuthic purposes. In this review, we present the clinical and scientific bases for using electrical stimulation as a treatment for pharmacological refractory epilepsy. We also describe results in receptors of inhibitory neurotransmitters obtained in rat brain with or without epilepsy, undergoing brain stimulation. Brain electrical stimulation may improve our understanding of brain function and neuroplasticity.

  17. Stimulating the lip motor cortex with transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Möttönen, Riikka; Rogers, Jack; Watkins, Kate E

    2014-06-14

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has proven to be a useful tool in investigating the role of the articulatory motor cortex in speech perception. Researchers have used single-pulse and repetitive TMS to stimulate the lip representation in the motor cortex. The excitability of the lip motor representation can be investigated by applying single TMS pulses over this cortical area and recording TMS-induced motor evoked potentials (MEPs) via electrodes attached to the lip muscles (electromyography; EMG). Larger MEPs reflect increased cortical excitability. Studies have shown that excitability increases during listening to speech as well as during viewing speech-related movements. TMS can be used also to disrupt the lip motor representation. A 15-min train of low-frequency sub-threshold repetitive stimulation has been shown to suppress motor excitability for a further 15-20 min. This TMS-induced disruption of the motor lip representation impairs subsequent performance in demanding speech perception tasks and modulates auditory-cortex responses to speech sounds. These findings are consistent with the suggestion that the motor cortex contributes to speech perception. This article describes how to localize the lip representation in the motor cortex and how to define the appropriate stimulation intensity for carrying out both single-pulse and repetitive TMS experiments.

  18. Chemosensory stimulation during sleep - Arousal responses to gustatory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Stuck, B A; Moutsis, T T; Bingel, U; Sommer, J U

    2016-05-13

    The processing of nociceptive, visual, vibrotactile, thermal and acoustic stimuli during sleep has been extensively investigated in the past. Recently, interest has focused on the impact of olfactory stimulation on sleep. In contrast to all other sensory systems, olfactory stimulation does not lead to an increased arousal frequency, regardless of hedonicity and concentration. The impact of the second chemosensory system, gustation, on sleep however has not been investigated to date. Twenty-one normosmic and normogeusic volunteers of both genders, aged 19-33 years, participated in the trial. Stimulation was performed with a gustometer using the following aqueous solutions: saccharose 20% (sweet), sodium chloride (NaCl) 7.5% (salty), citrate 5% (sour), and quinine 0.02% (bitter). A tasteless solution was used as negative control. Capsaicin, a strong trigeminal stimulus, served as positive control. Primary outcome was arousal frequency per stimulus in each sleep stage, as assessed with polysomnography. The frequency of arousals decreased in deeper sleep stages (N1: 211 arousals of 333 stimuli=63%, N2: 676/2728=25%, N3: 43/1378=3%, REM: 57/1010=6%). Statistically significant differences in terms of arousal frequency were found in N2 between the negative control and NaCl 100 μl (p<0.001), saccharose 100 μl, citrate 50 μl & 100 μl, and quinine 100 μl (p<0.05). Capsaicin led to complete awakenings in 94% of stimuli (30/32). These results demonstrate that gustatory stimulation during sleep induces arousals depending on stimulus intensity and sleep stage, which is different to olfactory stimulation and may be related to differences in central processing of the two chemosensory systems.

  19. Orientation selective deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehto, Lauri J.; Slopsema, Julia P.; Johnson, Matthew D.; Shatillo, Artem; Teplitzky, Benjamin A.; Utecht, Lynn; Adriany, Gregor; Mangia, Silvia; Sierra, Alejandra; Low, Walter C.; Gröhn, Olli; Michaeli, Shalom

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Target selectivity of deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy is critical, as the precise locus and pattern of the stimulation dictates the degree to which desired treatment responses are achieved and adverse side effects are avoided. There is a clear clinical need to improve DBS technology beyond currently available stimulation steering and shaping approaches. We introduce orientation selective neural stimulation as a concept to increase the specificity of target selection in DBS. Approach. This concept, which involves orienting the electric field along an axonal pathway, was tested in the corpus callosum of the rat brain by freely controlling the direction of the electric field on a plane using a three-electrode bundle, and monitoring the response of the neurons using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Computational models were developed to further analyze axonal excitability for varied electric field orientation. Main results. Our results demonstrated that the strongest fMRI response was observed when the electric field was oriented parallel to the axons, while almost no response was detected with the perpendicular orientation of the electric field relative to the primary fiber tract. These results were confirmed by computational models of the experimental paradigm quantifying the activation of radially distributed axons while varying the primary direction of the electric field. Significance. The described strategies identify a new course for selective neuromodulation paradigms in DBS based on axonal fiber orientation.

  20. Infant Stimulation Curriculum. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Herschel W. Nisonger Center.

    Presented is the Infant Stimulation Curriculum (developed by the Developmentally Delayed Infant Outreach Project) for parents and teachers to use with children who are developmentally between birth and 36 months of age. Published in a card format at a sixth grade readability level, the curriculum includes introductory cards providing information…

  1. Activities to Stimulate Critical Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Thomas B.; Schroeder, Connie

    1989-01-01

    Describes sample vocational activities that stimulate critical thinking: (1) setting up an accounting system (business education); (2) developing a marketing plan (marketing education); (3) developing a fertilizer application plan (agricultural education); (4) making the best purchase (home economics); (5) planning a repair/remodeling project…

  2. Aversive Stimulation -- Criteria for Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Patrick A.; Ohlson, Glenn A.

    Criteria for applying aversive stimulation with severely handicapped children are examined, and practical and ethical issues are considered. Factors seen to influence punishment outcomes include timing, intensity, and schedule of reinforcement. Suggested is the need for further research on the comparative effectiveness of positive and negative…

  3. Stimulation of phagocytosis by sulforaphane

    SciTech Connect

    Suganuma, Hiroyuki; Fahey, Jed W.; Bryan, Kelley E.; Healy, Zachary R.; Talalay, Paul

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Sulforaphane stimulates the phagocytosis of RAW 264.7 macrophages under conditions of serum deprivation. {yields} This effect does not require Nrf2-dependent induction of phase 2 genes. {yields} Inactivation of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) by sulforaphane may be involved in stimulation of phagocytosis by sulforaphane. -- Abstract: Sulforaphane, a major isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, protects living systems against electrophile toxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and radiation. A major protective mechanism is the induction of a network of endogenous cytoprotective (phase 2) genes that are regulated by transcription factor Nrf2. To obtain a more detailed understanding of the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of sulforaphane, we evaluated its effect on the phagocytosis activity of RAW 264.7 murine macrophage-like cells by measuring the uptake of 2-{mu}m diameter polystyrene beads. Sulforaphane raised the phagocytosis activity of RAW 264.7 cells but only in the absence or presence of low concentrations (1%) of fetal bovine serum. Higher serum concentrations depressed phagocytosis and abolished its stimulation by sulforaphane. This stimulation did not depend on the induction of Nrf2-regulated genes since it occurred in peritoneal macrophages of nrf2{sup -/-} mice. Moreover, a potent triterpenoid inducer of Nrf2-dependent genes did not stimulate phagocytosis, whereas sulforaphane and another isothiocyanate (benzyl isothiocyanate) had comparable inducer potencies. It has been shown recently that sulforaphane is a potent and direct inactivator of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), an inflammatory cytokine. Moreover, the addition of recombinant MIF to RAW 264.7 cells attenuated phagocytosis, but sulforaphane-inactivated MIF did not affect phagocytosis. The inactivation of MIF may therefore be involved in the phagocytosis-enhancing activity of sulforaphane.

  4. Electrical Stimulation Enhances Reinnervation After Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Electrical muscle stimulation following peripheral nerve injury has been a controversial method of treatment due primarily to the inconsistent literature surrounding it. In this presentation transcript I outline ongoing experiments investigating a clinically translatable daily muscle stimulation paradigm in rats following nerve injury. Results show that reinnervation of muscle and functional behavioural metrics are enhanced with daily stimulation with upregulation of intramuscular neurotrophic factors as a potential mechanism. In addition, the impact of stimulation on terminal sprouting, a mentioned negative aspect of electrical muscle stimulation, was a minor contributor to long term functional reinnervation of stimulated muscles in our studies. PMID:26913163

  5. Multisensory Stimulation in Stroke Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Barbro Birgitta

    2012-01-01

    The brain has a large capacity for automatic simultaneous processing and integration of sensory information. Combining information from different sensory modalities facilitates our ability to detect, discriminate, and recognize sensory stimuli, and learning is often optimal in a multisensory environment. Currently used multisensory stimulation methods in stroke rehabilitation include motor imagery, action observation, training with a mirror or in a virtual environment, and various kinds of music therapy. Non-invasive brain stimulation has showed promising preliminary results in aphasia and neglect. Patient heterogeneity and the interaction of age, gender, genes, and environment are discussed. Randomized controlled longitudinal trials starting earlier post-stroke are needed. The advance in brain network science and neuroimaging enabling longitudinal studies of structural and functional networks are likely to have an important impact on patient selection for specific interventions in future stroke rehabilitation. It is proposed that we should pay more attention to age, gender, and laterality in clinical studies. PMID:22509159

  6. Somato stimulation and acupuncture therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Jun; Rong, Pei-Jing; Shi, Li; Ben, Hui; Zhu, Bing

    2016-05-01

    Acupuncture is an oldest somato stimulus medical technique. As the most representative peripheral nerve stimulation therapy, it has a complete system of theory and application and is applicable to a large population. This paper expounds the bionic origins of acupuncture and analyzes the physiological mechanism by which acupuncture works. For living creatures, functionally sound viscera and effective endurance of pain are essential for survival. This paper discusses the way in which acupuncture increases the pain threshold of living creatures and the underlying mechanism from the perspective of bionics. Acupuncture can also help to adjust visceral functions and works most effectively in facilitating the process of digestion and restraining visceral pain. This paper makes an in-depth overview of peripheral nerve stimulation therapy represented by acupuncture. We look forward to the revival of acupuncture, a long-standing somato stimulus medicine, in the modern medical systems.

  7. Multisensory stimulation in stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Barbro Birgitta

    2012-01-01

    The brain has a large capacity for automatic simultaneous processing and integration of sensory information. Combining information from different sensory modalities facilitates our ability to detect, discriminate, and recognize sensory stimuli, and learning is often optimal in a multisensory environment. Currently used multisensory stimulation methods in stroke rehabilitation include motor imagery, action observation, training with a mirror or in a virtual environment, and various kinds of music therapy. Non-invasive brain stimulation has showed promising preliminary results in aphasia and neglect. Patient heterogeneity and the interaction of age, gender, genes, and environment are discussed. Randomized controlled longitudinal trials starting earlier post-stroke are needed. The advance in brain network science and neuroimaging enabling longitudinal studies of structural and functional networks are likely to have an important impact on patient selection for specific interventions in future stroke rehabilitation. It is proposed that we should pay more attention to age, gender, and laterality in clinical studies.

  8. Stimulated Superconductivity at Strong Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Ning; Dong, Xi; Silverstein, Eva; Torroba, Gonzalo; /Stanford U., ITP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    Stimulating a system with time dependent sources can enhance instabilities, thus increasing the critical temperature at which the system transitions to interesting low-temperature phases such as superconductivity or superfluidity. After reviewing this phenomenon in non-equilibrium BCS theory (and its marginal fermi liquid generalization) we analyze the effect in holographic superconductors. We exhibit a simple regime in which the transition temperature increases parametrically as we increase the frequency of the time-dependent source.

  9. Single well electric oil stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Th. K.

    1985-06-11

    A single well method and apparatus for electrically applying heat and stimulating is comprised of a relatively lower surface area formation electrode and relatively high surface area overburden electrode extending downward into the borehole past low resistivity water zones. This long overburden electrode may be formed of nonmagnetic metal to reduce hysteresis losses in the electrode. This improved single well system causes most of power to be dissipated in the oil pay zone and thereby renders single well production economical.

  10. Magnetic-motor-root stimulation: review.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Terao, Yasuo; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2013-06-01

    Magnetic stimulation can activate the human central and peripheral nervous systems non-invasively and virtually painlessly. Magnetic stimulation over the spinal enlargements can activate spinal nerves at the neuroforamina (magnetic-neuroforamina stimulation). This stimulation method provides us with information related to the latency of compound-muscle action potential (CMAP), which is usually interpreted as peripheral motor-conduction time (PMCT). However, this stimulation method has faced several problems in clinical applications. One is that supramaximal CMAPs were unobtainable. Another is that magnetic stimulation did not usually activate the spinal nerves in the spinal canal, i.e., the cauda equina, which prevented an evaluation of its conduction. For these reasons, magnetic-neuroforamina stimulation was rarely used to evaluate the conduction of peripheral nerves. It was mainly used to evaluate the conduction of the corticospinal tract using the parameter of central motor-conduction time (CMCT), which was calculated by subtracting PMCT from the latency of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the primary motor cortex. Recently, supramaximal stimulation has been achieved in magnetic-neuroforamina stimulation, and this has contributed to the measurement of both CMAP size and latency. The achievement of supramaximal stimulation is ascribed to the increase in magnetic-stimulator output and a novel coil, the magnetic augmented translumbosacral stimulation (MATS) coil. The most proximal part of the cauda equina can be reliably activated using the MATS coil (magnetic-conus stimulation), thus contributing to the measurement of cauda equina conduction time (CECT) and cortico-conus motor-conduction time (CCCT). These recent developments in magnetic-motor-root stimulation enable us to more precisely evaluate the conduction of the proximal part of peripheral nerves and that of the corticospinal tract for lower-limb muscles

  11. Movement disorders induced by deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Baizabal-Carvallo, José Fidel; Jankovic, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation represents a major advance in the treatment of several types of movement disorders. However, during stimulation new movement disorders may emerge, thus limiting the positive effects of this therapy. These movement disorders may be induced by: 1) stimulation of the targeted nucleus, 2) stimulation of surrounding tracts and nuclei, and 3) as a result of dose adjustment of accompanying medications, such as reduction of dopaminergic drugs in patients with Parkinson's disease. Various dyskinesias, blepharospasm, and apraxia of eyelid opening have been described mainly with subthalamic nucleus stimulation, whereas hypokinesia and freezing of gait have been observed with stimulation of the globus pallidus internus. Other deep brain stimulation-related movement disorders include dyskinesias associated with stimulation of the globus pallidus externus and ataxic gait as a side effect of chronic bilateral stimulation of the ventral intermediate nucleus of thalamus. These movement disorders are generally reversible and usually resolved once the stimulation is reduced or turned off. This, however, typically leads to loss of benefit of the underlying movement disorder which can be re-gained by using different contacts, changing targets or stimulation parameters, and adjusting pharmacological therapy. New and innovative emerging technologies and stimulation techniques may help to prevent or overcome the various deep brain stimulation-induced movement disorders. In this review we aim to describe the clinical features, frequency, pathophysiology, and strategies for treatment of these iatrogenic movement disorders.

  12. Stimulating parameters and de-synchronization in vagus nerve stimulation therapy for epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.-L.; Chen, Z.-Y.; Ma, J.; Feng, W.-J.

    2008-02-01

    The influence of the stimulation parameters on the de-synchronization of small world Hindmarsh-Rose (H-R) neural network is numerically investigated in the vagus nerve stimulation therapy for epilepsy. The simulation shows that synchronization evolves into de-synchronization when a part of neurons (about 10 percent) is stimulated with a pulse current signal. The network de-synchronization appears to be sensitive to the stimulation parameters. For the case of the same stimulation intensity, those weakly coupled networks reach de-synchronization more easily than strongly coupled networks. There exist an optimal stimulation interval and period of continuous stimulation time when other stimulation parameters remain invariable.

  13. Deep brain stimulation for dystonia.

    PubMed

    Vidailhet, Marie; Jutras, Marie-France; Grabli, David; Roze, Emmanuel

    2013-09-01

    The few controlled studies that have been carried out have shown that bilateral internal globus pallidum stimulation is a safe and long-term effective treatment for hyperkinetic disorders. However, most recent published data on deep brain stimulation (DBS) for dystonia, applied to different targets and patients, are still mainly from uncontrolled case reports (especially for secondary dystonia). This precludes clear determination of the efficacy of this procedure and the choice of the 'good' target for the 'good' patient. We performed a literature analysis on DBS for dystonia according to the expected outcome. We separated those with good evidence of favourable outcome from those with less predictable outcome. In the former group, we review the main results for primary dystonia (generalised/focal) and highlight recent data on myoclonus-dystonia and tardive dystonia (as they share, with primary dystonia, a marked beneficial effect from pallidal stimulation with good risk/benefit ratio). In the latter group, poor or variable results have been obtained for secondary dystonia (with a focus on heredodegenerative and metabolic disorders). From this overview, the main results and limits for each subgroup of patients that may help in the selection of dystonic patients who will benefit from DBS are discussed.

  14. Interleukin-6 Stimulates Defective Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gopinathan, Ganga; Milagre, Carla; Pearce, Oliver M T; Reynolds, Louise E; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan; Leinster, David A; Zhong, Haihong; Hollingsworth, Robert E; Thompson, Richard; Whiteford, James R; Balkwill, Frances

    2015-08-01

    The cytokine IL6 has a number of tumor-promoting activities in human and experimental cancers, but its potential as an angiogenic agent has not been fully investigated. Here, we show that IL6 can directly induce vessel sprouting in the ex vivo aortic ring model, as well as endothelial cell proliferation and migration, with similar potency to VEGF. However, IL6-stimulated aortic ring vessel sprouts had defective pericyte coverage compared with VEGF-stimulated vessels. The mechanism of IL6 action on pericytes involved stimulation of the Notch ligand Jagged1 as well as angiopoietin2 (Ang2). When peritoneal xenografts of ovarian cancer were treated with an anti-IL6 antibody, pericyte coverage of vessels was restored. In addition, in human ovarian cancer biopsies, there was an association between levels of IL6 mRNA, Jagged1, and Ang2. Our findings have implications for the use of cancer therapies that target VEGF or IL6 and for understanding abnormal angiogenesis in cancers, chronic inflammatory disease, and stroke.

  15. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Evidence-based Guideline for PATIENTS and their FAMILIES VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION FOR TREATING EPILEPSY This information sheet is provided to help you understand how vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) may help treat epilepsy. The American ...

  16. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Skeletal Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Doucet, Barbara M.; Lam, Amy; Griffin, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Lack of neural innervation due to neurological damage renders muscle unable to produce force. Use of electrical stimulation is a medium in which investigators have tried to find a way to restore movement and the ability to perform activities of daily living. Different methods of applying electrical current to modify neuromuscular activity are electrical stimulation (ES), neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and functional electrical stimulation (FES). This review covers the aspects of electrical stimulation used for rehabilitation and functional purposes. Discussed are the various parameters of electrical stimulation, including frequency, pulse width/duration, duty cycle, intensity/amplitude, ramp time, pulse pattern, program duration, program frequency, and muscle group activated, and how they affect fatigue in the stimulated muscle. PMID:22737049

  17. Vomiting Center reanalyzed: An electrical stimulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. D.; Wilson, V. J.

    1982-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the brainstem of 15 decerebrate cats produced stimulus-bound vomiting in only 4 animals. Vomiting was reproducible in only one cat. Effective stimulating sites were located in the solitary tract and reticular formation. Restricted localization of a vomiting center, stimulation of which evoked readily reproducible results, could not be obtained.

  18. Stimulated Parametric Emission Microscope Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Kazuyoshi; Isobe, Keisuke

    2006-10-01

    We present a novel microscopy technique based on the fourwave mixing (FWM) process that is enhanced by two-photon electronic resonance induced by a pump pulse along with stimulated emission induced by a dump pulse. A Ti:sapphire laser and an optical parametric oscillator are used as light sources for the pump and dump pulses, respectively. We demonstrate that our FWM technique can be used to obtain two-dimensional microscopic images of an unstained leaf of Camellia sinensis and an unlabeled tobacco BY2 Cell.

  19. Stimulated Brillouin Scattering Microscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ballmann, Charles W.; Thompson, Jonathan V.; Traverso, Andrew J.; Meng, Zhaokai; Scully, Marlan O.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional stimulated Brillouin scattering microscopy is demonstrated for the first time using low power continuous-wave lasers tunable around 780 nm. Spontaneous Brillouin spectroscopy has much potential for probing viscoelastic properties remotely and non-invasively on a microscopic scale. Nonlinear Brillouin scattering spectroscopy and microscopy may provide a way to tremendously accelerate the data aquisition and improve spatial resolution. This general imaging setup can be easily adapted for specific applications in biology and material science. The low power and optical wavelengths in the water transparency window used in this setup provide a powerful bioimaging technique for probing the mechanical properties of hard and soft tissue. PMID:26691398

  20. Side effects of stimulant use.

    PubMed

    Levy, F

    1993-08-01

    The current literature on side effects of central nervous system (CNS) stimulant medications used in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is reviewed, with particular emphasis on dose-response effects on differing behavioural systems. The reasons for variation in findings may lie in individual differences in children, or in differing responses of target behavioural systems. These may be understood in terms of underlying pharmacological mechanisms. Social, educational and philosophical issues relating to medication use are discussed, and the need for ongoing critical clinical and research approaches, rather than polarization of professional attitudes, is emphasized.

  1. Deep Brain Stimulation for Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Eric S; Zhang, Michael; Pendharkar, Arjun V; Azagury, Dan E; Bohon, Cara; Halpern, Casey H

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is now the third leading cause of preventable death in the US, accounting for 216,000 deaths annually and nearly 100 billion dollars in health care costs. Despite advancements in bariatric surgery, substantial weight regain and recurrence of the associated metabolic syndrome still occurs in almost 20-35% of patients over the long-term, necessitating the development of novel therapies. Our continually expanding knowledge of the neuroanatomic and neuropsychiatric underpinnings of obesity has led to increased interest in neuromodulation as a new treatment for obesity refractory to current medical, behavioral, and surgical therapies. Recent clinical trials of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in chronic cluster headache, Alzheimer’s disease, and depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of targeting the hypothalamus and reward circuitry of the brain with electrical stimulation, and thus provide the basis for a neuromodulatory approach to treatment-refractory obesity. In this study, we review the literature implicating these targets for DBS in the neural circuitry of obesity. We will also briefly review ethical considerations for such an intervention, and discuss genetic secondary-obesity syndromes that may also benefit from DBS. In short, we hope to provide the scientific foundation to justify trials of DBS for the treatment of obesity targeting these specific regions of the brain. PMID:26180683

  2. Braille line using electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puertas, A.; Purés, P.; Echenique, A. M.; Ensinck, J. P. Graffigna y. G.

    2007-11-01

    Conceived within the field of Rehabilitation Technologies for visually impaired persons, the present work aims at enabling the blind user to read written material by means of a tactile display. Once he is familiarized to operate this system, the user will be able to achieve greater performance in study, academic and job activities, thus achieving a rapid and easier social inclusion. The devise accepts any kind of text that is computer-loadable (documents, books, Internet information, and the like) which, through digital means, can be read as Braille text on the pad. This tactile display is composed of an electrodes platform that simulate, through stimulation the writing/reading Braille characters. In order to perceive said characters in similar way to the tactile feeling from paper material, the skin receptor of fingers are stimulated electrically so as to simulate the same pressure and depressions as those of the paper-based counterpart information. Once designed and developed, the display was tested with blind subjects, with relatively satisfactory results. As a continuing project, this prototype is currently being improved as regards.

  3. Optogenetic stimulation of the auditory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Victor H.; Gehrt, Anna; Reuter, Kirsten; Jing, Zhizi; Jeschke, Marcus; Mendoza Schulz, Alejandro; Hoch, Gerhard; Bartels, Matthias; Vogt, Gerhard; Garnham, Carolyn W.; Yawo, Hiromu; Fukazawa, Yugo; Augustine, George J.; Bamberg, Ernst; Kügler, Sebastian; Salditt, Tim; de Hoz, Livia; Strenzke, Nicola; Moser, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Auditory prostheses can partially restore speech comprehension when hearing fails. Sound coding with current prostheses is based on electrical stimulation of auditory neurons and has limited frequency resolution due to broad current spread within the cochlea. In contrast, optical stimulation can be spatially confined, which may improve frequency resolution. Here, we used animal models to characterize optogenetic stimulation, which is the optical stimulation of neurons genetically engineered to express the light-gated ion channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2). Optogenetic stimulation of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) activated the auditory pathway, as demonstrated by recordings of single neuron and neuronal population responses. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of SGNs restored auditory activity in deaf mice. Approximation of the spatial spread of cochlear excitation by recording local field potentials (LFPs) in the inferior colliculus in response to suprathreshold optical, acoustic, and electrical stimuli indicated that optogenetic stimulation achieves better frequency resolution than monopolar electrical stimulation. Virus-mediated expression of a ChR2 variant with greater light sensitivity in SGNs reduced the amount of light required for responses and allowed neuronal spiking following stimulation up to 60 Hz. Our study demonstrates a strategy for optogenetic stimulation of the auditory pathway in rodents and lays the groundwork for future applications of cochlear optogenetics in auditory research and prosthetics. PMID:24509078

  4. Vagus nerve stimulation regulates hemostasis in swine.

    PubMed

    Czura, Christopher J; Schultz, Arthur; Kaipel, Martin; Khadem, Anna; Huston, Jared M; Pavlov, Valentin A; Redl, Heinz; Tracey, Kevin J

    2010-06-01

    The central nervous system regulates peripheral immune responses via the vagus nerve, the primary neural component of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve suppresses proinflammatory cytokine release in response to endotoxin, I/R injury, and hypovolemic shock and protects against lethal hypotension. To determine the effect of vagus nerve stimulation on coagulation pathways, anesthetized pigs were subjected to partial ear resection before and after electrical vagus nerve stimulation. We observed that electrical vagus nerve stimulation significantly decreased bleeding time (pre-electrical vagus nerve stimulation = 1033 +/- 210 s versus post-electrical vagus nerve stimulation = 585 +/- 111 s; P < 0.05) and total blood loss (pre-electrical vagus nerve stimulation = 48.4 +/- 6.8 mL versus post-electrical vagus nerve stimulation = 26.3 +/- 6.7 mL; P < 0.05). Reduced bleeding time after vagus nerve stimulation was independent of changes in heart rate or blood pressure and correlated with increased thrombin/antithrombin III complex generation in shed blood. These data indicate that electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve attenuates peripheral hemorrhage in a porcine model of soft tissue injury and that this protective effect is associated with increased coagulation factor activity.

  5. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  6. Deep Brain Stimulation: Expanding Applications

    PubMed Central

    TEKRIWAL, Anand; BALTUCH, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    For over two decades, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has shown significant efficacy in treatment for refractory cases of dyskinesia, specifically in cases of Parkinson's disease and dystonia. DBS offers potential alleviation from symptoms through a well-tolerated procedure that allows personalized modulation of targeted neuroanatomical regions and related circuitries. For clinicians contending with how to provide patients with meaningful alleviation from often debilitating intractable disorders, DBSs titratability and reversibility make it an attractive treatment option for indications ranging from traumatic brain injury to progressive epileptic supra-synchrony. The expansion of our collective knowledge of pathologic brain circuitries, as well as advances in imaging capabilities, electrophysiology techniques, and material sciences have contributed to the expanding application of DBS. This review will examine the potential efficacy of DBS for neurologic and psychiatric disorders currently under clinical investigation and will summarize findings from recent animal models. PMID:26466888

  7. Electrode array for neural stimulation

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Okandan, Murat; Stein, David J.; Yang, Pin; Cesarano, III, Joseph; Dellinger, Jennifer

    2011-08-16

    An electrode array for neural stimulation is disclosed which has particular applications for use in a retinal prosthesis. The electrode array can be formed as a hermetically-sealed two-part ceramic package which includes an electronic circuit such as a demultiplexer circuit encapsulated therein. A relatively large number (up to 1000 or more) of individually-addressable electrodes are provided on a curved surface of a ceramic base portion the electrode array, while a much smaller number of electrical connections are provided on a ceramic lid of the electrode array. The base and lid can be attached using a metal-to-metal seal formed by laser brazing. Electrical connections to the electrode array can be provided by a flexible ribbon cable which can also be used to secure the electrode array in place.

  8. NONINVASIVE BRAIN STIMULATION IN TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Demirtas-Tatlidede, Asli; Vahabzadeh-Hagh, Andrew M.; Bernabeu, Montserrat; Tormos, Jose M.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    Brain stimulation techniques have evolved in the last few decades with more novel methods capable of painless, noninvasive brain stimulation. While the number of clinical trials employing noninvasive brain stimulation continues to increase in a variety of medication-resistant neurological and psychiatric diseases, studies evaluating their diagnostic and therapeutic potential in traumatic brain injury (TBI) are largely lacking. This review introduces different techniques of noninvasive brain stimulation, which may find potential use in TBI. We cover transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and transcranial doppler sonography (TCD) techniques. We provide a brief overview of studies to date, discuss possible mechanisms of action, and raise a number of considerations when thinking about translating these methods to clinical use. PMID:21691215

  9. ``Bloch wave'' modification of stimulated Raman by stimulated Brillouin scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, E. S.; Vu, H. X.; DuBois, D. F.; Bezzerides, B.

    2013-03-01

    Using the reduced-description particle-in-cell (RPIC) method, we study the coupling of backward stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS) and backward stimulated Brillouin scattering (BSBS) in regimes where the reflectivity involves the nonlinear behavior of particles trapped in the daughter plasma waves. The temporal envelope of a Langmuir wave (LW) obeys a Schrödinger equation where the potential is the periodic electron density fluctuation resulting from an ion-acoustic wave (IAW). The BSRS-driven LWs in this case have a Bloch wave structure and a modified dispersion due to the BSBS-driven spatially periodic IAW, which includes frequency band gaps at kLW˜kIAW/2˜k0 (kLW, kIAW, and k0 are the wave number of the LW, IAW, and incident pump electromagnetic wave, respectively). This band structure and the associated Bloch wave harmonic components are distinctly observed in RPIC calculations of the electron density fluctuation spectra and this structure may be observable in Thomson scatter. Bloch wave components grow up in the LW spectrum, and are not the result of isolated BSRS. Self-Thomson scattered light from these Bloch wave components can have forward scattering components. The distortion of the LW dispersion curve implies that the usual relationship connecting the frequency shift of the BSRS-scattered light and the density of origin of this light may become inaccurate. The modified LW frequency results in a time-dependent frequency shift that increases as the IAW grows, detunes the BSRS frequency matching condition, and reduces BSRS growth. A dependence of the BSRS reflectivity on the IAW Landau damping results because this damping determines the levels of IAWs. The time-dependent reflectivity in our simulations is characterized by bursts of sub-picosecond pulses of BSRS alternating with multi-ps pulses of BSBS, and BSRS is observed to decline precipitously as soon as SBS begins to grow from low levels. In strong BSBS regimes, the Bloch wave effects in BSRS are

  10. Light-controlled retinal stimulation on rabbit using CMOS-based flexible multi-chip stimulator.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, T; Takeuchi, Y; Noda, T; Sasagawa, K; Nishida, K; Kitaguchi, Y; Fujikado, T; Tano, Y; Ohta, J

    2009-01-01

    We implemented a light-sensing function on CMOS-based multi-chip stimulator for retinal prosthesis. Using the light-sensing circuitry attached to each stimulation electrode, the flexible multi-chip stimulator is capable of image-based patterned stimulation. We verified the function of the light-controlled decision based on the light intensity measured just beside the stimulation site. We also experimentally demonstrated in vivo retinal stimulation on rabbit's retina with light-controlled decision. The result of the present work is a simplified demonstration for the concept of retinal prosthesis with on-site imaging.

  11. Mirth and laughter elicited during brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Baca Vaca, Guadalupe; Lüders, Hans O; Basha, Maysaa Merhi; Miller, Jonathan P

    2011-12-01

    There are few reports of laughter and/or mirth evoked by electrical stimulation of the brain. In this study, we present a patient with intractable epilepsy in whom mirth and laughter was consistently produced during stimulation of the left inferior frontal gyrus (opercular part) using stereotactically placed depth electrodes. A review of the literature shows that cortical sites that produce mirth when stimulated are located in the dominant hemisphere close to language areas or cortical negative motor areas.

  12. Optical stimulation of peripheral nerves in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Jonathon D.

    This dissertation documents the emergence and validation of a new clinical tool that bridges the fields of biomedical optics and neuroscience. The research herein describes an innovative method for direct neurostimulation with pulsed infrared laser light. Safety and effectiveness of this technique are first demonstrated through functional stimulation of the rat sciatic nerve in vivo. The Holmium:YAG laser (lambda = 2.12 mum) is shown to operate at an optimal wavelength for peripheral nerve stimulation with advantages over standard electrical neural stimulation; including contact-free stimulation, high spatial selectivity, and lack of a stimulation artifact. The underlying biophysical mechanism responsible for transient optical nerve stimulation appears to be a small, absorption driven thermal gradient sustained at the axonal layer of nerve. Results explicitly prove that low frequency optical stimulation can reliably stimulate without resulting in tissue thermal damage. Based on the positive results from animal studies, these optimal laser parameters were utilized to move this research into the clinic with a combined safety and efficacy study in human subjects undergoing selective dorsal rhizotomy. The clinical Holmium:YAG laser was used to effectively stimulate human dorsal spinal roots and elicit functional muscle responses recorded during surgery without evidence of nerve damage. Overall these results predict that this technology can be a valuable clinical tool in various neurosurgical applications.

  13. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Ay, Ilknur; de Morais, Andreia Lopes; Qin, Tao; Zheng, Yi; Sadeghian, Homa; Oka, Fumiaki; Simon, Bruce; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-04-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation has recently been reported to improve symptoms of migraine. Cortical spreading depression is the electrophysiological event underlying migraine aura and is a trigger for headache. We tested whether vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression to explain its antimigraine effect. Unilateral vagus nerve stimulation was delivered either noninvasively through the skin or directly by electrodes placed around the nerve. Systemic physiology was monitored throughout the study. Both noninvasive transcutaneous and invasive direct vagus nerve stimulations significantly suppressed spreading depression susceptibility in the occipital cortex in rats. The electrical stimulation threshold to evoke a spreading depression was elevated by more than 2-fold, the frequency of spreading depressions during continuous topical 1 M KCl was reduced by ∼40%, and propagation speed of spreading depression was reduced by ∼15%. This effect developed within 30 minutes after vagus nerve stimulation and persisted for more than 3 hours. Noninvasive transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation was as efficacious as direct invasive vagus nerve stimulation, and the efficacy did not differ between the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres. Our findings provide a potential mechanism by which vagus nerve stimulation may be efficacious in migraine and suggest that susceptibility to spreading depression is a suitable platform to optimize its efficacy.

  14. Brain imaging correlates of peripheral nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Bari, Ausaf A.; Pouratian, Nader

    2012-01-01

    Direct peripheral nerve stimulation is an effective treatment for a number of disorders including epilepsy, depression, neuropathic pain, cluster headache, and urological dysfunction. The efficacy of this stimulation is ultimately due to modulation of activity in the central nervous system. However, the exact brain regions involved in each disorder and how they are modulated by peripheral nerve stimulation is not fully understood. The use of functional neuroimaging such as SPECT, PET and fMRI in patients undergoing peripheral nerve stimulation can help us to understand these mechanisms. We review the literature for functional neuroimaging performed in patients implanted with peripheral nerve stimulators for the above-mentioned disorders. These studies suggest that brain activity in response to peripheral nerve stimulation is a complex interaction between the stimulation parameters, disease type and severity, chronicity of stimulation, as well as nonspecific effects. From this information we may be able to understand which brain structures are involved in the mechanism of peripheral nerve stimulation as well as define the neural substrates underlying these disorders. PMID:23230531

  15. Vestibular Stimulation for Stress Management in Students

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sai Sailesh; Rajagopalan, Archana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although several methods are developed to alleviate stress among college students, logistic limitations in adopting them have limited their utility. Aim Hence, we aimed to test a very practical approach to alleviate stress among college students by achieving vestibular stimulation using swings. Materials and Methods In this study 60 male and female participants were randomly assigned into vestibular stimulation or control groups. Depression, anxiety, stress scores, sleep quality, heart rate, blood pressure, Autonomic functions, respiratory, haematological, cognitive function, Quality of life were recorded before and after 1st, 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th days of vestibular stimulation. Results STAI S and STAI T scores were significantly improved on day 28th following vestibular stimulation. Diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure were significantly decreased and remained within normal limits in vestibular group on day 28th following vestibular stimulation. Postural fall in blood pressure was significantly improved on day 14 onwards, following vestibular stimulation. Respiratory rate was significantly improved on day 7 onwards, following vestibular stimulation. PSQI sleep disturbance, PSQI sleep latency, PSQI total score and bleeding time was significantly improved following vestibular stimulation. Conclusion Our study supports the adoption of vestibular stimulation for stress management. Hence, placement of swings in college campuses must be considered, which may be a simple approach to alleviate stress among college students. PMID:27042457

  16. Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    A literature search on reservoir and/or well stimulation techniques suitable for application in geothermal fields is presented. The literature on stimulation techniques in oil and gas field applications was also searched and evaluated as to its relevancy to geothermal operations. The equivalent low-temperature work documented in the open literature is cited, and an attempt is made to evaluate the relevance of this information as far as high-temperature stimulation work is concerned. Clays play an important role in any stimulation work. Therefore, special emphasis has been placed on clay behavior anticipated in geothermal operations. (MHR)

  17. Alkaloids from Piper nigrum Exhibit Antiinflammatory Activity via Activating the Nrf2/HO-1 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Quynh Mai Thi; Tran, Phuong Thao; Tran, Manh Hung; Kim, Jeong Ah; Rho, Seong Soo; Lim, Chi-Hwan; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Woo, Mi Hee; Choi, Jae Sui; Lee, Jeong-Hyung; Min, Byung Sun

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, ten alkaloids, namely chabamide (1), pellitorine (2), retrofractamide A (3), pyrroperine (4), isopiperolein B (5), piperamide C9:1 (8E) (6), 6,7-dehydrobrachyamide B (7), 4,5-dihydropiperine (8), dehydropipernonaline (9), and piperine (10), were isolated from the fruits of Piper nigrum. Among these, chabamide (1), pellitorine (2), retrofractamide A (3), isopiperolein B (5), and 6,7-dehydrobrachyamide B (7) exhibited significant inhibitory activity on lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW264.7 cells, with IC50 values of 6.8, 14.5, 30.2, 23.7, and 38.5 μM, respectively. Furthermore, compound 1 inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production in bone marrow-derived macrophages with IC50 value of 9.5 μM. Consistent with NO inhibition, treatment of RAW264.7 cells with chabamide (1), pellitorine (2), and 6,7-dehydrobrachyamide B (7) suppressed expression of inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2. Chabamide (1), pellitorine (2), and 6,7-dehydrobrachyamide B (7) induced heme-oxygenase-1 expression at the transcriptional level. In addition, compound 1 induced the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and upregulated the expression of Nrf2 target genes, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 and γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase catalytic subunit, in a concentration-dependent manner in RAW264.7 cells. These findings suggest that chabamide (1) from P. nigrum exert antiinflammatory effects via the activation of the Nrf2/heme-oxygenase-1 pathway; hence, it might be a promising candidate for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. CO-opting the host HO-1 pathway in tuberculosis and malaria.

    PubMed

    Sinnis, Photini; Ernst, Joel D

    2008-05-15

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Plasmodium species results in upregulation of the host heme oxygenase-1 pathway. In tuberculosis infection, this leads to upregulation of the bacterial "dormancy regulon," whereas in malaria, it enhances the efficiency with which sporozoites develop into exoerythrocytic stages. Here we discuss these findings as well as some of the interesting questions they raise.

  19. Noninvasive cortical stimulation with transcranial direct current stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fregni, Felipe; Boggio, Paulo S; Santos, Marcelo C; Lima, Moises; Vieira, Adriana L; Rigonatti, Sergio P; Silva, M Teresa A; Barbosa, Egberto R; Nitsche, Michael A; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2006-10-01

    Electrical stimulation of deep brain structures, such as globus pallidus and subthalamic nucleus, is widely accepted as a therapeutic tool for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Cortical stimulation either with epidural implanted electrodes or repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation can be associated with motor function enhancement in PD. We aimed to study the effects of another noninvasive technique of cortical brain stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), on motor function and motor-evoked potential (MEP) characteristics of PD patients. We tested tDCS using different electrode montages [anodal stimulation of primary motor cortex (M1), cathodal stimulation of M1, anodal stimulation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and sham-stimulation] and evaluated the effects on motor function--as indexed by Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), simple reaction time (sRT) and Purdue Pegboard test--and on corticospinal motor excitability (MEP characteristics). All experiments were performed in a double-blinded manner. Anodal stimulation of M1 was associated with a significant improvement of motor function compared to sham-stimulation in the UPDRS (P < 0.001) and sRT (P = 0.019). This effect was not observed for cathodal stimulation of M1 or anodal stimulation of DLPFC. Furthermore, whereas anodal stimulation of M1 significantly increased MEP amplitude and area, cathodal stimulation of M1 significantly decreased them. There was a trend toward a significant correlation between motor function improvement after M1 anodal-tDCS and MEP area increase. These results confirm and extend the notion that cortical brain stimulation might improve motor function in patients with PD.

  20. Hyperthermia Stimulates HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Meziane, Oussama; Kula, Anna; Nisole, Sébastien; Porrot, Françoise; Anderson, Ian; Mammano, Fabrizio; Fassati, Ariberto; Marcello, Alessandro; Benkirane, Monsef; Schwartz, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42–45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38–40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C) increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity. PMID:22807676

  1. [Deep brain stimulation and neuroethics].

    PubMed

    Katayama, Yoichi; Fukaya, Chikashi

    2009-01-01

    The use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for mental disorders has been discussed in Japan from the viewpoint of ethical problems. Trials of experimental therapies require a basis of sound scientific rationale. New standard therapy emerges from such trials through detailed analysis of the outcome and side effects. Long-suffering patients with intractable symptoms may desperately seek an experimental therapy even though it has not yet been accepted as standard therapy. The ethical committee of each institution evaluates the level of scientific rationale and the expected level of benefits on the bias of the reported data, and decides whether the patients can receive the experimental therapy. However, the use of DBS for mental disorders is not based on sound scientific rational, since the disease mechanisms involved are far from understood. The data reported from the previous trials are insufficient for assuring the satisfactory results for mental disoder patients. Most institutions in Japan do not accept such levels of scientific rationale and expected benefits. Furthermore, from the cultural perspective, strong skepticism exists in Japan with regard to surgical interventions for mental disorders. Such an attitude is unexpectedly in harmony with many of the subjects currently discussed in the field of neuroethics. For example, who has the right to control DBS? How does someone decide the level of control of mental function by DBS? These questions are related to the discussion on how human society is formed and how the ethics are decided by considering both scientific rationale and human society.

  2. Digital electronic bone growth stimulator

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention relates to the electrical treatment of biological tissue. In particular, the present invention discloses a device that produces discrete electrical pulse trains for treating osteoporosis and accelerating bone growth. According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention consists of an electrical circuit configuration capable of generating Bassett-type waveforms shown with alternative signals provide for the treatment of either fractured bones or osteoporosis. The signal generator comprises a quartz clock, an oscillator circuit, a binary divider chain, and a plurality of simple, digital logic gates. Signals are delivered efficiently, with little or no distortion, and uniformly distributed throughout the area of injury. Perferably, power is furnished by widely available and inexpensive radio batteries, needing replacement only once in several days. The present invention can be affixed to a medical cast without a great increase in either weight or bulk. Also, the disclosed stimulator can be used to treat osteoporosis or to strengthen a healing bone after the cast has been removed by attaching the device to the patient`s skin or clothing.

  3. Factors Associated with Speech-Sound Stimulability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lof, Gregory L.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined stimulability in 30 children (ages 3 to 5) with articulation impairments. Factors found to relate to stimulability were articulation visibility, the child's age, the family's socioeconomic status, and the child's overall imitative ability. Perception, severity, otitis media history, language abilities, consistency of…

  4. Vagus nerve stimulation in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Adam D; Albu-Soda, Ahmed; Aziz, Qasim

    2016-11-02

    The diverse array of end organ innervations of the vagus nerve, coupled with increased basic science evidence, has led to vagus nerve stimulation becoming a management option in a number of clinical disorders. This review discusses methods of electrically stimulating the vagus nerve and its current and potential clinical uses.

  5. Electrocutaneous stimulation system for Braille reading.

    PubMed

    Echenique, Ana Maria; Graffigna, Juan Pablo; Mut, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    This work is an assistive technology for people with visual disabilities and aims to facilitate access to written information in order to achieve better social inclusion and integration into work and educational activities. Two methods of electrical stimulation (by current and voltage) of the mechanoreceptors was tested to obtain tactile sensations on the fingertip. Current and voltage stimulation were tested in a Braille cell and line prototype, respectively. These prototypes are evaluated in 33 blind and visually impaired subjects. The result of experimentation with both methods showed that electrical stimulation causes sensations of touch defined in the fingertip. Better results in the Braille characters reading were obtained with current stimulation (85% accuracy). However this form of stimulation causes uncomfortable sensations. The latter feeling was minimized with the method of voltage stimulation, but with low efficiency (50% accuracy) in terms of identification of the characters. We concluded that electrical stimulation is a promising method for the development of a simple and unexpensive Braille reading system for blind people. We observed that voltage stimulation is preferred by the users. However, more experimental tests must be carry out in order to find the optimum values of the stimulus parameters and increase the accuracy the Braille characters reading.

  6. Stimulation Activities: Age Birth to Five Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomgarden, Dave

    This handbook provides a collection of stimulation activities that encourage a child's physical and mental growth from birth to five years of age. Emphasis is placed on making stimulation aids that are inexpensive or can be made from scrap materials. Advice is given about ways to carry out designated activities. All activities have been tried and…

  7. Ultraviolet Light: Some Considerations for Vision Stimulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlton, Marie

    1986-01-01

    The article examines evidence of visual impairment caused by excessive amounts of ultraviolet (UV) light. Among considerations when using a source of UV light for vision stimulation are the position of the child and teacher, use of window glass filters or protective glasses, and careful recordkeeping of all UV stimulation. (Author/JW)[

  8. Wirelessly powering miniature implants for optogenetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Alexander J.; Ho, John S.; Tanabe, Yuji; Neofytou, Evgenios; Beygui, Ramin E.; Poon, Ada S. Y.

    2013-10-01

    Conventional methods for in vivo optogenetic stimulation require optical fibers or mounted prosthesis. We present an approach for wirelessly powering implantable stimulators using electromagnetic midfield. By exploiting the properties of the midfield, we demonstrate the ability to generate high intensity light pulses in a freely moving animal.

  9. Deep Stimulation at Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, K.; Cladouhos, T. T.; Petty, S.; Garrison, G. H.; Nordin, Y.; Uddenberg, M.; Swyer, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration is a 5 year field project designed to demonstrate recent technological advances for engineered geothermal systems (EGS) development. Advances in reservoir stimulation, diverter, and monitoring are being tested in a hot (>300 C), dry well (NWG 55-29) drilled in 2008. These technologies could reduce the cost of electrical power generation. The project began in 2010 with two years of permitting, technical planning, and development of a project-specific Induced Seismicity Mitigation Plan (ISMP), and is funded in part by the Department of Energy. In 2012, the well was hydraulically stimulated with water at pressures below the principle stress for 7 weeks, resulting in hydroshearing. The depth of stimulation was successfully shifted by injection of two pills of Thermally-degradable Zonal Isolation Materials (TZIMs). Injectivity changes, thermal profiles and seismicity indicate that fracture permeability in well NWG 55-29 was enhanced during stimulation. This work successfully demonstrated the viability of large-volume (40,000 m3), low-pressure stimulation coupled with non-mechanical diverter technology, and microseismic monitoring for reservoir mapping. Further analysis and field testing in 2013 indicates further stimulation will be required in order to develop an economically viable reservoir, and is scheduled in 2014. The 2014 stimulation will use improved stimulation and monitoring equipment, better knowledge based on 2012 outcomes, and create a deep EGS reservoir in the hottest part of the wellbore.

  10. A Guide to Stimulating Student Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Linda, Ed.; And Others

    Noting that teachers stimulate student writing in three ways--by arousing, directing, and rewarding--this guide offers suggestions for activities in each of these areas for the elementary, intermediate, and secondary levels. Following an introduction, four activities are presented: (1) stimulating student writing through arousal, (2) stimulating…

  11. Facial expression recognition and subthalamic nucleus stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, U; Kuehler, A; Hennenlotter, A; Haslinger, B; Tronnier, V; Krause, M; Pfister, R; Sprengelmeyer, R; Lange, K; Ceballos-Baumann, A

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the impact of STN stimulation in Parkinson's disease on perception of facial expressions. Results: There was a selective reduction in recognition of angry faces, but not other expressions, during STN stimulation. Conclusions: The findings may have important implications for social adjustment in these patients. PMID:15026519

  12. Microscopic magnetic stimulation of neural tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bonmassar, Giorgio; Lee, Seung Woo; Freeman, Daniel K.; Polasek, Miloslav; Fried, Shelley I.; Gale, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is currently used to treat a wide range of cardiovascular, sensory and neurological diseases. Despite its success, there are significant limitations to its application, including incompatibility with magnetic resonance imaging, limited control of electric fields and decreased performance associated with tissue inflammation. Magnetic stimulation overcomes these limitations but existing devices (that is, transcranial magnetic stimulation) are large, reducing their translation to chronic applications. In addition, existing devices are not effective for deeper, sub-cortical targets. Here we demonstrate that sub-millimeter coils can activate neuronal tissue. Interestingly, the results of both modelling and physiological experiments suggest that different spatial orientations of the coils relative to the neuronal tissue can be used to generate specific neural responses. These results raise the possibility that micro-magnetic stimulation coils, small enough to be implanted within the brain parenchyma, may prove to be an effective alternative to existing stimulation devices. PMID:22735449

  13. Optical nerve stimulation for a vestibular prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David M.; Bierer, Steven M.; Wells, Jonathon D.; Phillips, James O.

    2009-02-01

    Infrared Nerve Stimulation (INS) offers several advantages over electrical stimulation, including more precise spatial selectivity and improved surgical access. In this study, INS and electrical stimulation were compared in their ability to activate the vestibular branch of the VIIIth nerve, as a potential way to treat balance disorders. The superior and lateral canals of the vestibular system of Guinea pigs were identified and approached with the aid of precise 3-D reconstructions. A monopolar platinum stimulating electrode was positioned near the ampullae of the canals, and biphasic current pulses were used to stimulate vestibular evoked potentials and eye movements. Thresholds and input/output functions were measured for various stimulus conditions. A short pulsed diode laser (Capella, Lockheed Martin-Aculight, Inc., Bothell WA) was placed in the same anatomical position and various stimulus conditions were evaluated in their ability to evoke similar potentials and eye movements.

  14. Brain stimulation in posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, Vladan; Sher, Leo; Lapidus, Kyle A B; Mindes, Janet; A Golier, Julia; Yehuda, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a complex, heterogeneous disorder that develops following trauma and often includes perceptual, cognitive, affective, physiological, and psychological features. PTSD is characterized by hyperarousal, intrusive thoughts, exaggerated startle response, flashbacks, nightmares, sleep disturbances, emotional numbness, and persistent avoidance of trauma-associated stimuli. The efficacy of available treatments for PTSD may result in part from relief of associated depressive and anxiety-related symptoms in addition to treatment of core symptoms that derive from reexperiencing, numbing, and hyperarousal. Diverse, heterogeneous mechanisms of action and the ability to act broadly or very locally may enable brain stimulation devices to address PTSD core symptoms in more targeted ways. To achieve this goal, specific theoretical bases derived from novel, well-designed research protocols will be necessary. Brain stimulation devices include both long-used and new electrical and magnetic devices. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and Cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) have both been in use for decades; transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), magnetic seizure therapy (MST), deep brain stimulation (DBS), transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) have been developed recently, over approximately the past twenty years. The efficacy of brain stimulation has been demonstrated as a treatment for psychiatric and neurological disorders such as anxiety (CES), depression (ECT, CES, rTMS, VNS, DBS), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) (DBS), essential tremor, dystonia (DBS), epilepsy (DBS, VNS), Parkinson Disease (DBS), pain (CES), and insomnia (CES). To date, limited data on brain stimulation for PTSD offer only modest guidance. ECT has shown some efficacy in reducing comorbid depression in PTSD patients but has not been demonstrated to improve most core PTSD symptoms. CES and VNS have shown some efficacy in

  15. Bacteroides fragilis Enterotoxin Upregulates Heme Oxygenase-1 in Intestinal Epithelial Cells via a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase- and NF-κB-Dependent Pathway, Leading to Modulation of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Su Hyuk; Rho, Da Jeong; Jeon, Jong Ik; Kim, Young-Jeon; Woo, Hyun Ae; Lee, Yun Kyung

    2016-01-01

    The Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxin (BFT), a virulence factor of enterotoxigenic B. fragilis (ETBF), interacts with intestinal epithelial cells and can provoke signals that induce mucosal inflammation. Although expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is associated with regulation of inflammatory responses, little is known about HO-1 induction in ETBF infection. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of BFT on HO-1 expression in intestinal epithelial cells. Stimulation of intestinal epithelial cells with BFT resulted in upregulated expression of HO-1. BFT activated transcription factors such as NF-κB, AP-1, and Nrf2 in intestinal epithelial cells. Upregulation of HO-1 in intestinal epithelial cells was dependent on activated IκB kinase (IKK)–NF-κB signals. However, suppression of Nrf2 or AP-1 signals in intestinal epithelial cells did not result in significant attenuation of BFT-induced HO-1 expression. HO-1 induction via IKK–NF-κB in intestinal epithelial cells was regulated by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Furthermore, suppression of HO-1 activity led to increased apoptosis in BFT-stimulated epithelial cells. These results suggest that a signaling pathway involving p38 MAPK–IKK–NF-κB in intestinal epithelial cells is required for HO-1 induction during exposure to BFT. Following this induction, increased HO-1 expression may regulate the apoptotic process in responses to BFT stimulation. PMID:27324483

  16. Nanotechnology for Stimulating Osteoprogenitor Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, A.; Bulstrode, N.W.; Whitaker, I.S.; Eastwood, D.M.; Dunaway, D.; Ferretti, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bone is the second most transplanted tissue and due to its complex structure, metabolic demands and various functions, current reconstructive options such as foreign body implants and autologous tissue transfer are limited in their ability to restore defects. Most tissue engineering approaches target osteoinduction of osteoprogenitor cells by modifying the extracellular environment, using scaffolds or targeting intracellular signaling mechanisms or commonly a combination of all of these. Whilst there is no consensus as to what is the optimal cell type or approach, nanotechnology has been proposed as a powerful tool to manipulate the biomolecular and physical environment to direct osteoprogenitor cells to induce bone formation. Methods: Review of the published literature was undertaken to provide an overview of the use of nanotechnology to control osteoprogenitor differentiation and discuss the most recent developments, limitations and future directions. Results: Nanotechnology can be used to stimulate osteoprogenitor differentiation in a variety of way. We have principally classified research into nanotechnology for bone tissue engineering as generating biomimetic scaffolds, a vector to deliver genes or growth factors to cells or to alter the biophysical environment. A number of studies have shown promising results with regards to directing ostroprogenitor cell differentiation although limitations include a lack of in vivo data and incomplete characterization of engineered bone. Conclusion: There is increasing evidence that nanotechnology can be used to direct the fate of osteoprogenitor and promote bone formation. Further analysis of the functional properties and long term survival in animal models is required to assess the maturity and clinical potential of this. PMID:28217210

  17. Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of Pyeongwisan on LPS-Stimulated Murine Macrophages and Mouse Models of Acetic Acid-Induced Writhing Response and Xylene-Induced Ear Edema

    PubMed Central

    Oh, You-Chang; Jeong, Yun Hee; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ha, Jeong-Ho; Gu, Min Jung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-01-01

    Pyeongwisan (PW) is an herbal medication used in traditional East Asian medicine to treat anorexia, abdominal distension, borborygmus and diarrhea caused by gastric catarrh, atony and dilatation. However, its effects on inflammation-related diseases are unknown. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of PW on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation in macrophages and on local inflammation in vivo. We investigated the biological effects of PW on the production of inflammatory mediators, pro-inflammatory cytokines and related products as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Additionally, we evaluated the analgesic effect on the acetic acid-induced writhing response and the inhibitory activity on xylene-induced ear edema in mice. PW showed anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). In addition, PW strongly suppressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a NO synthesis enzyme, induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and inhibited NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation. Also, PW suppressed TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β cytokine production in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophage cells. Furthermore, PW showed an analgesic effect on the writhing response and an inhibitory effect on mice ear edema. We demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects and inhibitory mechanism in macrophages as well as inhibitory activity of PW in vivo for the first time. Our results suggest the potential value of PW as an inflammatory therapeutic agent developed from a natural substance. PMID:25569097

  18. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of pyeongwisan on LPS-stimulated murine macrophages and mouse models of acetic acid-induced writhing response and xylene-induced ear edema.

    PubMed

    Oh, You-Chang; Jeong, Yun Hee; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ha, Jeong-Ho; Gu, Min Jung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-01-06

    Pyeongwisan (PW) is an herbal medication used in traditional East Asian medicine to treat anorexia, abdominal distension, borborygmus and diarrhea caused by gastric catarrh, atony and dilatation. However, its effects on inflammation-related diseases are unknown. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of PW on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation in macrophages and on local inflammation in vivo. We investigated the biological effects of PW on the production of inflammatory mediators, pro-inflammatory cytokines and related products as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Additionally, we evaluated the analgesic effect on the acetic acid-induced writhing response and the inhibitory activity on xylene-induced ear edema in mice. PW showed anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). In addition, PW strongly suppressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a NO synthesis enzyme, induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and inhibited NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation. Also, PW suppressed TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β cytokine production in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophage cells. Furthermore, PW showed an analgesic effect on the writhing response and an inhibitory effect on mice ear edema. We demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects and inhibitory mechanism in macrophages as well as inhibitory activity of PW in vivo for the first time. Our results suggest the potential value of PW as an inflammatory therapeutic agent developed from a natural substance.

  19. Stimulating the Comfort of Textile Electrodes in Wearable Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hui; Lu, Yi; Chen, Wanzhen; Wu, Zhen; Zou, Haiqing; Krundel, Ludovic; Li, Guanglin

    2015-01-01

    Textile electrodes are becoming an attractive means in the facilitation of surface electrical stimulation. However, the stimulation comfort of textile electrodes and the mechanism behind stimulation discomfort is still unknown. In this study, a textile stimulation electrode was developed using conductive fabrics and then its impedance spectroscopy, stimulation thresholds, and stimulation comfort were quantitatively assessed and compared with those of a wet textile electrode and a hydrogel electrode on healthy subjects. The equivalent circuit models and the finite element models of different types of electrode were built based on the measured impedance data of the electrodes to reveal the possible mechanism of electrical stimulation pain. Our results showed that the wet textile electrode could achieve similar stimulation performance as the hydrogel electrode in motor threshold and stimulation comfort. However, the dry textile electrode was found to have very low pain threshold and induced obvious cutaneous painful sensations during stimulation, in comparison to the wet and hydrogel electrodes. Indeed, the finite element modeling results showed that the activation function along the z direction at the depth of dermis epidermis junction of the dry textile electrode was significantly larger than that of the wet and hydrogel electrodes, thus resulting in stronger activation of pain sensing fibers. Future work will be done to make textile electrodes have similar stimulation performance and comfort as hydrogel electrodes. PMID:26193273

  20. Stimulating the Comfort of Textile Electrodes in Wearable Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Lu, Yi; Chen, Wanzhen; Wu, Zhen; Zou, Haiqing; Krundel, Ludovic; Li, Guanglin

    2015-07-16

    Textile electrodes are becoming an attractive means in the facilitation of surface electrical stimulation. However, the stimulation comfort of textile electrodes and the mechanism behind stimulation discomfort is still unknown. In this study, a textile stimulation electrode was developed using conductive fabrics and then its impedance spectroscopy, stimulation thresholds, and stimulation comfort were quantitatively assessed and compared with those of a wet textile electrode and a hydrogel electrode on healthy subjects. The equivalent circuit models and the finite element models of different types of electrode were built based on the measured impedance data of the electrodes to reveal the possible mechanism of electrical stimulation pain. Our results showed that the wet textile electrode could achieve similar stimulation performance as the hydrogel electrode in motor threshold and stimulation comfort. However, the dry textile electrode was found to have very low pain threshold and induced obvious cutaneous painful sensations during stimulation, in comparison to the wet and hydrogel electrodes. Indeed, the finite element modeling results showed that the activation function along the z direction at the depth of dermis epidermis junction of the dry textile electrode was significantly larger than that of the wet and hydrogel electrodes, thus resulting in stronger activation of pain sensing fibers. Future work will be done to make textile electrodes have similar stimulation performance and comfort as hydrogel electrodes.

  1. Motor cortex inhibition induced by acoustic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Andrea A; Sharott, Andrew; Trottenberg, Thomas; Kupsch, Andreas; Brown, Peter

    2004-09-01

    The influence of the brainstem motor system on cerebral motor areas may play an important role in motor control in health and disease. A new approach to investigate this interaction in man is combining acoustic stimulation activating the startle system with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the motor cortex. However, it is unclear whether the inhibition of TMS responses following acoustic stimulation occurs at the level of the motor cortex through reticulo-cortical projections or subcortically, perhaps through reticulo-spinal projections. We compared the influence of acoustic stimulation on motor effects elicited by TMS over motor cortical areas to those evoked with subcortical electrical stimulation (SES) through depth electrodes in five patients treated with deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease. SES bypasses the motor cortex, demonstrating any interaction with acoustic stimuli at the subcortical level. EMG was recorded from the contralateral biceps brachii muscle. Acoustic stimulation was delivered binaurally through headphones and used as a conditioning stimulus at an interstimulus interval of 50 ms. When TMS was used as the test stimulus, the area and amplitude of the conditioned motor response was significantly inhibited (area: 57.5+/-12.9%, amplitude: 47.9+/-7.4%, as percentage of unconditioned response) whereas facilitation occurred with SES (area: 110.1+/-4.3%, amplitude: 116.9+/-6.9%). We conclude that a startle-evoked activation of reticulo-cortical projections transiently inhibits the motor cortex.

  2. Noninvasive stimulation of the human corticospinal tract.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J L; Gandevia, S C

    2004-04-01

    Spinal tracts can be stimulated noninvasively in human subjects by passing a high-voltage stimulus between the mastoids or by magnetic stimulation over the back of the head. The stimulus probably activates the corticospinal tract at the cervicomedullary junction (pyramidal decussation) and evokes large, short-latency motor responses in the arm muscles. These responses have a large monosynaptic component. Responses in leg muscles can be elicited by cervicomedullary junction stimulation or by stimulation over the cervical or thoracic spine. Because nerve roots are more easily activated than spinal tracts, stimulus spread to motor axons can occur. Facilitation of responses by voluntary activity confirms that the responses are evoked synaptically. Stimulation of the corticospinal tract is useful in studies of central conduction and studies of the behavior of motoneurons during different tasks. It also provides an important comparison to allow interpretation of changes in responses to stimulation of the motor cortex. The major drawback to the use of electrical stimulation of the corticospinal tract is that each stimulus is transiently painful.

  3. Electrical stimulation to accelerate wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Thakral, Gaurav; LaFontaine, Javier; Najafi, Bijan; Talal, Talal K.; Kim, Paul; Lavery, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several applications of electrical stimulation described in medical literature to accelerate wound healing and improve cutaneous perfusion. This is a simple technique that could be incorporated as an adjunctive therapy in plastic surgery. The objective of this review was to evaluate the results of randomized clinical trials that use electrical stimulation for wound healing. Method We identified 21 randomized clinical trials that used electrical stimulation for wound healing. We did not include five studies with treatment groups with less than eight subjects. Results Electrical stimulation was associated with faster wound area reduction or a higher proportion of wounds that healed in 14 out of 16 wound randomized clinical trials. The type of electrical stimulation, waveform, and duration of therapy vary in the literature. Conclusion Electrical stimulation has been shown to accelerate wound healing and increase cutaneous perfusion in human studies. Electrical stimulation is an adjunctive therapy that is underutilized in plastic surgery and could improve flap and graft survival, accelerate postoperative recovery, and decrease necrosis following foot reconstruction. PMID:24049559

  4. A fully implantable rodent neural stimulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, D. W. J.; Grayden, D. B.; Shepherd, R. K.; Fallon, J. B.

    2012-02-01

    The ability to electrically stimulate neural and other excitable tissues in behaving experimental animals is invaluable for both the development of neural prostheses and basic neurological research. We developed a fully implantable neural stimulator that is able to deliver two channels of intra-cochlear electrical stimulation in the rat. It is powered via a novel omni-directional inductive link and includes an on-board microcontroller with integrated radio link, programmable current sources and switching circuitry to generate charge-balanced biphasic stimulation. We tested the implant in vivo and were able to elicit both neural and behavioural responses. The implants continued to function for up to five months in vivo. While targeted to cochlear stimulation, with appropriate electrode arrays the stimulator is well suited to stimulating other neurons within the peripheral or central nervous systems. Moreover, it includes significant on-board data acquisition and processing capabilities, which could potentially make it a useful platform for telemetry applications, where there is a need to chronically monitor physiological variables in unrestrained animals.

  5. Optogenetic Stimulation of the Auditory Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Victor H.; Gehrt, Anna; Jing, Zhizi; Hoch, Gerhard; Jeschke, Marcus; Strenzke, Nicola; Moser, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Direct electrical stimulation of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) by cochlear implants (CIs) enables open speech comprehension in the majority of implanted deaf subjects1-6. Nonetheless, sound coding with current CIs has poor frequency and intensity resolution due to broad current spread from each electrode contact activating a large number of SGNs along the tonotopic axis of the cochlea7-9. Optical stimulation is proposed as an alternative to electrical stimulation that promises spatially more confined activation of SGNs and, hence, higher frequency resolution of coding. In recent years, direct infrared illumination of the cochlea has been used to evoke responses in the auditory nerve10. Nevertheless it requires higher energies than electrical stimulation10,11 and uncertainty remains as to the underlying mechanism12. Here we describe a method based on optogenetics to stimulate SGNs with low intensity blue light, using transgenic mice with neuronal expression of channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2)13 or virus-mediated expression of the ChR2-variant CatCh14. We used micro-light emitting diodes (µLEDs) and fiber-coupled lasers to stimulate ChR2-expressing SGNs through a small artificial opening (cochleostomy) or the round window. We assayed the responses by scalp recordings of light-evoked potentials (optogenetic auditory brainstem response: oABR) or by microelectrode recordings from the auditory pathway and compared them with acoustic and electrical stimulation. PMID:25350571

  6. Upper threshold of extracellular neural stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pangratz-Fuehrer, Susanne; Suh, Bongsoo; Mathieson, Keith; Naik, Natasha; Palanker, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that spiking neurons can produce action potentials in response to extracellular stimulation above certain threshold. It is widely assumed that there is no upper limit to somatic stimulation, except for cellular or electrode damage. Here we demonstrate that there is an upper stimulation threshold, above which no action potential can be elicited, and it is below the threshold of cellular damage. Existence of this upper stimulation threshold was confirmed in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) at pulse durations ranging from 5 to 500 μs. The ratio of the upper to lower stimulation thresholds varied typically from 1.7 to 7.6, depending on pulse duration. Computational modeling of extracellular RGC stimulation explained the upper limit by sodium current reversal on the depolarized side of the cell membrane. This was further confirmed by experiments in the medium with a low concentration of sodium. The limited width of the stimulation window may have important implications in design of the electro-neural interfaces, including neural prosthetics. PMID:22993266

  7. Upper threshold of extracellular neural stimulation.

    PubMed

    Boinagrov, David; Pangratz-Fuehrer, Susanne; Suh, Bongsoo; Mathieson, Keith; Naik, Natasha; Palanker, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    It is well known that spiking neurons can produce action potentials in response to extracellular stimulation above certain threshold. It is widely assumed that there is no upper limit to somatic stimulation, except for cellular or electrode damage. Here we demonstrate that there is an upper stimulation threshold, above which no action potential can be elicited, and it is below the threshold of cellular damage. Existence of this upper stimulation threshold was confirmed in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) at pulse durations ranging from 5 to 500 μs. The ratio of the upper to lower stimulation thresholds varied typically from 1.7 to 7.6, depending on pulse duration. Computational modeling of extracellular RGC stimulation explained the upper limit by sodium current reversal on the depolarized side of the cell membrane. This was further confirmed by experiments in the medium with a low concentration of sodium. The limited width of the stimulation window may have important implications in design of the electro-neural interfaces, including neural prosthetics.

  8. Injectable electronic identification, monitoring, and stimulation systems.

    PubMed

    Troyk, P R

    1999-01-01

    Historically, electronic devices such as pacemakers and neuromuscular stimulators have been surgically implanted into animals and humans. A new class of implants made possible by advances in monolithic electronic design and implant packaging is small enough to be implanted by percutaneous injection through large-gauge hypodermic needles and does not require surgical implantation. Among these, commercially available implants, known as radio frequency identification (RFID) tags, are used for livestock, pet, laboratory animal, and endangered-species identification. The RFID tag is a subminiature glass capsule containing a solenoidal coil and an integrated circuit. Acting as the implanted half of a transcutaneous magnetic link, the RFID tag is powered by and communicates with an extracorporeal magnetic reader. The tag transmits a unique identification code that serves the function of identifying the animal. Millions of RFID tags have been sold since the early 1980s. Based on the success of the RFID tags, research laboratories have developed injectable medical implants, known as micromodules. One type of micromodule, the microstimulator, is designed for use in functional-neuromuscular stimulation. Each microstimulator is uniquely addressable and could comprise one channel of a multichannel functional-neuromuscular stimulation system. Using bidirectional telemetry and commands, from a single extracorporeal transmitter, as many as 256 microstimulators could form the hardware basis for a complex functional-neuromuscular stimulation feedback-control system. Uses include stimulation of paralyzed muscle, therapeutic functional-neuromuscular stimulation, and neuromodulatory functions such as laryngeal stimulation and sleep apnea.

  9. Numerical dosimetry of transcranial magnetic stimulation coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive neuromodulation technique capable of stimulating neurons by means of electromagnetic induction. TMS can be used to map brain function and shows promise for the diagnosis and treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Calculation of fields induced in the brain are necessary to accurately identify stimulated neural tissue during TMS. This allows the development of novel TMS coil designs capable of stimulating deeper brain regions and increasing the localization of stimulation that can be achieved. We have performed numerical calculations of magnetic and electric field with high-resolution anatomically realistic human head models to find these stimulated brain regions for a variety of proposed TMS coil designs. The realistic head models contain heterogeneous tissue structures and electrical conductivities, yielding superior results to those obtained from the simplified homogeneous head models that are commonly employed. The attenuation of electric field as a function of depth in the brain and the localization of stimulating field have been methodically investigated. In addition to providing a quantitative comparison of different TMS coil designs the variation of induced field between subjects has been investigated. We also show the differences in induced fields between adult, adolescent and child head models to preemptively identify potential safety issues in the application of pediatric TMS.

  10. Computational modeling of epidural cortical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; Grill, Warren M.

    2008-12-01

    Epidural cortical stimulation (ECS) is a developing therapy to treat neurological disorders. However, it is not clear how the cortical anatomy or the polarity and position of the electrode affects current flow and neural activation in the cortex. We developed a 3D computational model simulating ECS over the precentral gyrus. With the electrode placed directly above the gyrus, about half of the stimulus current flowed through the crown of the gyrus while current density was low along the banks deep in the sulci. Beneath the electrode, neurons oriented perpendicular to the cortical surface were depolarized by anodic stimulation, and neurons oriented parallel to the boundary were depolarized by cathodic stimulation. Activation was localized to the crown of the gyrus, and neurons on the banks deep in the sulci were not polarized. During regulated voltage stimulation, the magnitude of the activating function was inversely proportional to the thickness of the CSF and dura. During regulated current stimulation, the activating function was not sensitive to the thickness of the dura but was slightly more sensitive than during regulated voltage stimulation to the thickness of the CSF. Varying the width of the gyrus and the position of the electrode altered the distribution of the activating function due to changes in the orientation of the neurons beneath the electrode. Bipolar stimulation, although often used in clinical practice, reduced spatial selectivity as well as selectivity for neuron orientation.

  11. Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation Attenuates Neuronal Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Kar, Kohitij; Duijnhouwer, Jacob; Krekelberg, Bart

    2017-03-01

    We previously showed that brief application of 2 mA (peak-to-peak) transcranial currents alternating at 10 Hz significantly reduces motion adaptation in humans. This is but one of many behavioral studies showing that weak currents applied to the scalp modulate neural processing. Transcranial stimulation has been shown to improve perception, learning, and a range of clinical symptoms. Few studies, however, have measured the neural consequences of transcranial current stimulation. We capitalized on the strong link between motion perception and neural activity in the middle temporal (MT) area of the macaque monkey to study the neural mechanisms that underlie the behavioral consequences of transcranial alternating current stimulation. First, we observed that 2 mA currents generated substantial intracranial fields, which were much stronger in the stimulated hemisphere (0.12 V/m) than on the opposite side of the brain (0.03 V/m). Second, we found that brief application of transcranial alternating current stimulation at 10 Hz reduced spike-frequency adaptation of MT neurons and led to a broadband increase in the power spectrum of local field potentials. Together, these findings provide a direct demonstration that weak electric fields applied to the scalp significantly affect neural processing in the primate brain and that this includes a hitherto unknown mechanism that attenuates sensory adaptation.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Transcranial stimulation has been claimed to improve perception, learning, and a range of clinical symptoms. Little is known, however, how transcranial current stimulation generates such effects, and the search for better stimulation protocols proceeds largely by trial and error. We investigated, for the first time, the neural consequences of stimulation in the monkey brain. We found that even brief application of alternating current stimulation reduced the effects of adaptation on single-neuron firing rates and local field potentials; this mechanistic

  12. Pallidotomy after chronic deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bulluss, Kristian J; Pereira, Erlick A; Joint, Carole; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2013-11-01

    Recent publications have demonstrated that deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease still exerts beneficial effects on tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia for up to 10 years after implantation of the stimulator. However with the progression of Parkinson's disease, features such as cognitive decline or "freezing" become prominent, and the presence of an implanted and functioning deep brain stimulator can impose a profound burden of care on the clinical team and family. The authors describe their experience in treating 4 patients who underwent removal of the implanted device due to either progressive dementia requiring full-time nursing or due to infection, and who subsequently underwent a unilateral pallidotomy.

  13. Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Wolhart

    2005-06-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

  14. Head-to-Head Comparison of Transcranial Random Noise Stimulation, Transcranial AC Stimulation, and Transcranial DC Stimulation for Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Vanneste, Sven; Fregni, Felipe; De Ridder, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Tinnitus is the perception of a sound in the absence of an external sound stimulus. This phantom sound has been related to plastic changes and hyperactivity in the auditory cortex. Different neuromodulation techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have been used in an attempt to modify local and distant neuroplasticity as to reduce tinnitus symptoms. Recently, two techniques of pulsed electrical stimulation using weak electrical currents – transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) – have also shown significant neuromodulatory effects. In the present study we conducted the first head-to-head comparison of three different transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) techniques, namely tDCS, tACS, and tRNS in 111 tinnitus patients by placing the electrodes overlying the auditory cortex bilaterally. The results demonstrated that tRNS induced the larger transient suppressive effect on the tinnitus loudness and the tinnitus related distress as compared to tDCS and tACS. Both tDCS and tACS induced small and non-significant effects on tinnitus symptoms, supporting the superior effects of tRNS as a method for tinnitus suppression. PMID:24391599

  15. Towards a Switched-Capacitor Based Stimulator for Efficient Deep-Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Jose; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a novel 4-channel prototype stimulation circuit for implantable neurological stimulators (INS). This Switched-Capacitor based Stimulator (SCS) aims to utilize charge storage and charge injection techniques to take advantage of both the efficiency of conventional voltage-controlled stimulators (VCS) and the safety and controllability of current-controlled stimulators (CCS). The discrete SCS prototype offers fine control over stimulation parameters such as voltage, current, pulse width, frequency, and active electrode channel via a LabVIEW graphical user interface (GUI) when connected to a PC through USB. Furthermore, the prototype utilizes a floating current sensor to provide charge-balanced biphasic stimulation and ensure safety. The stimulator was analyzed using an electrode-electrolyte interface (EEI) model as well as with a pair of pacing electrodes in saline. The primary motivation of this research is to test the feasibility and functionality of a safe, effective, and power-efficient switched-capacitor based stimulator for use in Deep Brain Stimulation. PMID:21095987

  16. Transient effects on stimulated Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Faris, G.W.; Dyer, M.J.; Hickman, A.P. )

    1992-08-01

    We present a detailed comparison of theory and experiment for transient stimulated Brillouin scattering for a pump pulse with Gaussian temporal profile. A new approach for measuring Brillouin linewidths is demonstrated, and an unexplained asymmetry is observed.

  17. Electrical stimulation of upper airway musculature.

    PubMed

    Smith, P L; Eisele, D W; Podszus, T; Penzel, T; Grote, L; Peter, J H; Schwartz, A R

    1996-12-01

    Investigators have postulated that pharyngeal collapse during sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may be alleviated by stimulating the genioglossus. The effect of electrical stimulation (ES) of the genioglossus on pharyngeal patency was examined in an isolated feline upper airway preparation and in apneic humans during sleep. We found that stimulation of the genioglossus (n = 8) and of the hypoglossal nerve (n = 1) increased maximum airflow through the isolated feline upper airway in humans during sleep. Additional findings in the isolated feline upper airway suggest that such increases in airflow were due to decreases in pharyngeal collapsibility. The evidence suggests that improvements in airflow dynamics with electrical stimulation are due to selective recruitment of the genioglossus, rather than due to nonspecific activation of the pharyngeal musculature or arousal from sleep. The implications of these results for future therapy with ES are discussed.

  18. Glass Probe Stimulation of Hair Cell Stereocilia.

    PubMed

    Peng, Anthony W; Ricci, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells are designed to sense mechanical stimuli of sound using their apical stereocilia hair bundles. Mechanical deflection of this hair bundle is converted into an electrical signal through gating of mechano-electric transduction channels. Stiff probe stimulation of hair bundles is an invaluable tool for studying the transduction channel and its associated processes because of the speed and ability to precisely control hair bundle position. Proper construction of these devices is critical to their ultimate performance as is appropriate placement of the probe onto the hair bundle. Here we describe the construction and use of a glass probe coupled to a piezo-electric actuator for stimulating hair bundles, including the basic technique for positioning of the stimulating probe onto the hair bundle. These piezo-electric stimulators can be adapted to other mechanically sensitive systems.

  19. Imbibition well stimulation via neural network design

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, William

    2007-08-14

    A method for stimulation of hydrocarbon production via imbibition by utilization of surfactants. The method includes use of fuzzy logic and neural network architecture constructs to determine surfactant use.

  20. Stimulated Raman scattering: old physics, new applications

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Petrov, Georgi I.; Zhang, Hao F.; Noojin, Gary D.; Denton, Michael L.; Thomas, Robert J.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2009-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering as a promising way of expanding the tunability of ultrafast lasers and as an exciting new biomedical imaging modality capable of selective excitation and chemically-specific diagnostics of molecular species. PMID:20354585

  1. Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions

    SciTech Connect

    2003-09-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. An assessment of historical deep gas well drilling activity and forecast of future trends was completed during the first six months of the project; this segment of the project was covered in Technical Project Report No. 1. The second progress report covers the next six months of the project during which efforts were primarily split between summarizing rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep reservoirs and contacting operators about case studies of deep gas well stimulation.

  2. Cerebral glucose consumption following verbal auditory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kushner, M J; Schwartz, R; Alavi, A; Dann, R; Rosen, M; Silver, F; Reivich, M

    1987-04-14

    We studied the effect of auditory stimulation upon cerebral glucose metabolism in young normals. The stimulus consisted of a non-English discourse which was presented monaurally to 10 normal blindfolded subjects (5 left ear, 5 right); the opposite ear was plugged. Six subjects studied blindfolded and with ears plugged served as controls. Sixteen discrete homologous cortical and subcortical regions of interest were examined. Regional glucose consumption and side-to-side differences in glucose metabolism were analyzed. Monaural stimulation produced significant increases in temporal metabolism contralateral to the side of stimulation. Significant asymmetries in metabolism were found at the temporoparietal junction, inferior parietal region, insula and corpus collosum. The left frontal speech areas remained unaffected. These findings demonstrate that in man the primary auditory pathways retain a contralateral organization. Further, cerebral activation induced by non-meaningful verbal stimulation is widespread within the left temporal and parietal regions but does not impact upon the frontal speech cortices.

  3. The role of LH in ovarian stimulation.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Elkin; Bosch, Ernesto; Fernandez, Iria; Portela, Susana; Ortiz, Ginna; Remohi, Jose; Pellicer, Antonio

    2012-03-01

    LH is a glycoprotein that plays a crucial role in folliculogenesis during the natural ovarian cycles. It has the same activity and shares receptors with hCG. However the use of LH in combination with FSH in controlled ovarian stimulation remains controversial. A practical approach concerning the usefulness of LH according to the endogenous level of LH is described herein. Specific groups of patients can benefit from ovarian stimulation with LH. New applications of LH/hCG activity are also discussed.

  4. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallett, Mark

    2000-07-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is rapidly developing as a powerful, non-invasive tool for studying the human brain. A pulsed magnetic field creates current flow in the brain and can temporarily excite or inhibit specific areas. TMS of motor cortex can produce a muscle twitch or block movement; TMS of occipital cortex can produce visual phosphenes or scotomas. TMS can also alter the functioning of the brain beyond the time of stimulation, offering potential for therapy.

  5. Neuro-muscular junction block stimulator simulator.

    PubMed

    Sprick, Cyle

    2006-03-01

    Improved technology and higher fidelity are making medical simulations increasingly popular. A simulated peripheral nerve stimulator and thumb actuator has been developed for use with the SimMan Universal Patient Simulator. This device incorporates a handheld control box, a McKibben pneumatic muscle and articulated thumb, and a remote software interface for the simulation facilitator. The system simulates the action of a peripheral nerve stimulator on the ulnar nerve, and the effects of neuromuscular junction blocking agents on the thumb motion.

  6. Enhanced Cultivation Of Stimulated Murine B Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Method of in vitro cultivation of large numbers of stimulated murine B lymphocytes. Cells electrofused with other cells to produce hybridomas and monoclonal antibodies. Offers several advantages: polyclonally stimulated B-cell blasts cultivated for as long as 14 days, hybridomas created throughout culture period, yield of hybridomas increases during cultivation, and possible to expand polyclonally in vitro number of B cells specific for antigenic determinants first recognized in vivo.

  7. Closing the loop of deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Carron, Romain; Chaillet, Antoine; Filipchuk, Anton; Pasillas-Lépine, William; Hammond, Constance

    2013-01-01

    High-frequency deep brain stimulation is used to treat a wide range of brain disorders, like Parkinson's disease. The stimulated networks usually share common electrophysiological signatures, including hyperactivity and/or dysrhythmia. From a clinical perspective, HFS is expected to alleviate clinical signs without generating adverse effects. Here, we consider whether the classical open-loop HFS fulfills these criteria and outline current experimental or theoretical research on the different types of closed-loop DBS that could provide better clinical outcomes. In the first part of the review, the two routes followed by HFS-evoked axonal spikes are explored. In one direction, orthodromic spikes functionally de-afferent the stimulated nucleus from its downstream target networks. In the opposite direction, antidromic spikes prevent this nucleus from being influenced by its afferent networks. As a result, the pathological synchronized activity no longer propagates from the cortical networks to the stimulated nucleus. The overall result can be described as a reversible functional de-afferentation of the stimulated nucleus from its upstream and downstream nuclei. In the second part of the review, the latest advances in closed-loop DBS are considered. Some of the proposed approaches are based on mathematical models, which emphasize different aspects of the parkinsonian basal ganglia: excessive synchronization, abnormal firing-rate rhythms, and a deficient thalamo-cortical relay. The stimulation strategies are classified depending on the control-theory techniques on which they are based: adaptive and on-demand stimulation schemes, delayed and multi-site approaches, stimulations based on proportional and/or derivative control actions, optimal control strategies. Some of these strategies have been validated experimentally, but there is still a large reservoir of theoretical work that may point to ways of improving practical treatment. PMID:24391555

  8. Considering optogenetic stimulation for cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Jeschke, Marcus; Moser, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    Electrical cochlear implants are by far the most successful neuroprostheses and have been implanted in over 300,000 people worldwide. Cochlear implants enable open speech comprehension in most patients but are limited in providing music appreciation and speech understanding in noisy environments. This is generally considered to be due to low frequency resolution as a consequence of wide current spread from stimulation contacts. Accordingly, the number of independently usable stimulation channels is limited to less than a dozen. As light can be conveniently focused, optical stimulation might provide an alternative approach to cochlear implants with increased number of independent stimulation channels. Here, we focus on summarizing recent work on optogenetic stimulation as one way to develop optical cochlear implants. We conclude that proof of principle has been presented for optogenetic stimulation of the cochlea and central auditory neurons in rodents as well as for the technical realization of flexible μLED-based multichannel cochlear implants. Still, much remains to be done in order to advance the technique for auditory research and even more for eventual clinical translation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled .

  9. Managing chronic pain with spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Lawrence J; Palmieri, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Since its introduction as a procedure of last resort in a terminally ill patient with intractable cancer-related pain, spinal cord stimulation has been used to effectively treat chronic pain of varied origins. Spinal cord stimulation is commonly used for control of pain secondary to failed back surgery syndrome and complex regional pain syndrome, as well as pain from angina pectoris, peripheral vascular disease, and other causes. By stimulating one or more electrodes implanted in the posterior epidural space, the patient feels paresthesias in their areas of pain, which reduces the level of pain. Pain is reduced without the side effects associated with analgesic medications. Patients have improved quality of life and improved function, with many returning to work. Spinal cord stimulation has been shown to be cost effective as compared with conservative management alone. There is strong evidence for efficacy and cost effectiveness of spinal cord stimulation in the treatment of pain associated with intractable angina, failed back surgery syndrome, and complex regional pain syndrome. In this article, we review the history and pathophysiology of spinal cord stimulation, and the evidence (or lack thereof) for efficacy in common clinical practice.

  10. A microprocessor-based multichannel subsensory stochastic resonance electrical stimulator.

    PubMed

    Chang, Gwo-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Stochastic resonance electrical stimulation is a novel intervention which provides potential benefits for improving postural control ability in the elderly, those with diabetic neuropathy, and stroke patients. In this paper, a microprocessor-based subsensory white noise electrical stimulator for the applications of stochastic resonance stimulation is developed. The proposed stimulator provides four independent programmable stimulation channels with constant-current output, possesses linear voltage-to-current relationship, and has two types of stimulation modes, pulse amplitude and width modulation.

  11. Selenoprotein Expression in Macrophages Is Critical for Optimal Clearance of Parasitic Helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis*

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Shakira M.; Shay, Ashley E.; James, Jamaal L.; Carlson, Bradley A.; Urban, Joseph F.; Prabhu, K. Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The plasticity of macrophages is evident in helminthic parasite infections, providing protection from inflammation. Previously we demonstrated that the micronutrient selenium induces a phenotypic switch in macrophage activation from a classically activated (pro-inflammatory; M1/CAM) toward an alternatively activated (anti-inflammatory; M2/AAM) phenotype, where cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent cyclopentenone prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) plays a key role. Here, we hypothesize that dietary selenium modulates macrophage polarization toward an AAM phenotype to assist in the increasing clearance of adult Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, a gastrointestinal nematode parasite. Mice on a selenium-adequate (0.08 ppm) diet significantly augmented intestinal AAM presence while decreasing adult worms and fecal egg production when compared with infection of mice on selenium-deficient (<0.01 ppm) diet. Further increase in dietary selenium to supraphysiological levels (0.4 ppm) had very little or no impact on worm expulsion. Normal adult worm clearance and enhanced AAM marker expression were observed in the selenium-supplemented Trspfl/flCreWT mice that express selenoproteins driven by tRNASec (Trsp), whereas N. brasiliensis-infected Trspfl/flCreLysM selenium-supplemented mice showed a decreased clearance, with lowered intestinal expression of several AAM markers. Inhibition of the COX pathway with indomethacin resulted in delayed worm expulsion in selenium-adequate mice. This was rescued with 15d-PGJ2, which partially recapitulated the effect of selenium supplementation on fecal egg output in addition to increasing markers of AAMs in the small intestine. Antagonism of PPARγ blocked the effect of selenium. These results suggest that optimal expression of selenoproteins and selenium-dependent production of COX-derived endogenous prostanoids, such as Δ12-PGJ2 and 15d-PGJ2, may regulate AAM activation to enhance anti-helminthic parasite responses. PMID:26644468

  12. 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-Prostaglandin J{sub 2} regulates leukemia inhibitory factor signaling through JAK-STAT pathway in mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasingh, Johnson; Bright, John J. . E-mail: jbright1@clarian.org

    2006-08-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are genetically normal, pluripotent cells, capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all cell lineages. While leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) maintains pluripotency in mouse ES cells, retinoic acid and other nuclear hormones induce neuro-glial differentiation in mouse and human ES cells in culture. Peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-dependent nuclear receptor transcription factors that regulate cell growth and differentiation in many cell types. However, the role of PPARs in the regulation of ES cell growth and differentiation is not known. In this study, we show that LIF induces proliferation and self-renewal of mouse D3-ES cells in culture. However, treatment with 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-Prostaglandin J{sub 2} (15d-PGJ2), a natural ligand for PPAR{gamma}, or all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) results in a dose-dependent decrease in proliferation and self-renewal in D3-ES cells. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analyses showed that LIF induces tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK1, TYK2 and STAT3 in 30 min and treatment with 15d-PGJ2 or ATRA results in a dose-dependent decrease in LIF-induced phosphorylation of JAK1 and STAT3 in D3-ES cells. However, treatment of D3-ES cells with Ciglitazone or 15d-PGJ2 for 48 h in culture resulted in a dose-dependent increase in PPAR{gamma} protein expression. These results suggest that PPAR{gamma} agonists regulate LIF signaling through JAK-STAT pathway leading to growth and self-renewal of ES cells.

  13. Activation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ in brain inhibits inflammatory pain, dorsal horn expression of Fos, and local edema

    PubMed Central

    Morgenweck, J.; Abdel-aleem, O.S.; McNamara, K.C.; Donahue, R.R.; Badr, M.Z.; Taylor, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    Systemic administration of thiazolidinediones reduces peripheral inflammation in vivo, presumably by acting at peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in peripheral tissues. Based on a rapidly growing body of literature indicating the CNS as a functional target of PPARγ actions, we postulated that brain PPARγ modulates peripheral edema and the processing of inflammatory pain signals in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. To test this in the plantar carrageenan model of inflammatory pain, we measured paw edema, heat hyperalgesia, and dorsal horn expression of the immediate-early gene c-fos after intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of PPARγ ligands or vehicle. We found that ICV rosiglitazone (0.5–50 µg) or 15d-PGJ2 (50–200 µg), but not vehicle, dose-dependently reduced paw thickness, paw volume and behavioral withdrawal responses to noxious heat. These anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperalgesia effects result from direct actions in the brain and not diffusion to other sites, because intraperitoneal and intrathecal administration of rosiglitazone (50 µg) and 15d-PGJ2 (200 µg) had no effect. PPARγ agonists changed neither overt behavior nor motor coordination, indicating that non-specific behavioral effects do not contribute to PPAR ligand-induced anti-hyperalgesia. ICV administration of structurally dissimilar PPARγ antagonists (either GW9662 or BADGE) reversed the anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperalgesic actions of both rosiglitazone and 15d-PGJ2. To evaluate the effects of PPARγ agonists on a classic marker of noxious stimulus-evoked gene expression, we quantified Fos protein expression in the dorsal horn. The number of carrageenan-induced Fos-like immunoreactive profiles was less in rosiglitazone-treated rats as compared to vehicle controls. We conclude that pharmacological activation of PPARγ in the brain rapidly inhibits local edema and the spinal transmission of noxious inflammatory signals. PMID:19891980

  14. Immunopathogenesis of HIV infection in cocaine users: role of arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Rao, Kurapati V K; Ding, Hong; Agudelo, Marisela; Raymond, Andrea D; Yoo, Changwon; Nair, Madhavan P N

    2014-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is known to be increased in HIV infected patients and illicit drug users are linked with severity of viral replication, disease progression, and impaired immune functions. Studies have shown that cocaine accelerates HIV infection and disease progression mediated by immune cells. Dendritic cells (DC) are the first line of antigen presentation and defense against immune dysfunction. However, the role of cocaine use in HIV associated acceleration of AA secretion and its metabolites on immature dendritic cells (IDC) has not been elucidated yet. The aim of this study is to elucidate the mechanism of AA metabolites cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostaglandin E2 synthetase (PGE2), thromboxane A2 receptor (TBXA2R), cyclopentenone prostaglandins (CyPG), such as 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2), 14-3-3 ζ/δ and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) mediated induction of IDC immune dysfunctions in cocaine using HIV positive patients. The plasma levels of AA, PGE2, 15d-PGJ2, 14-3-3 ζ/δ and IDC intracellular COX-2 and 5-LOX expression were assessed in cocaine users, HIV positive patients, HIV positive cocaine users and normal subjects. Results showed that plasma concentration levels of AA, PGE2 and COX-2, TBXA2R and 5-LOX in IDCs of HIV positive cocaine users were significantly higher whereas 15d-PGJ2 and 14-3-3 ζ/δ were significantly reduced compared to either HIV positive subjects or cocaine users alone. This report demonstrates that AA metabolites are capable of mediating the accelerative effects of cocaine on HIV infection and disease progression.

  15. Differential stimulation of the retina with subretinally injected exogenous neurotransmitter: A biomimetic alternative to electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rountree, Corey M.; Inayat, Samsoon; Troy, John B.; Saggere, Laxman

    2016-12-01

    Subretinal stimulation of the retina with neurotransmitters, the normal means of conveying visual information, is a potentially better alternative to electrical stimulation widely used in current retinal prostheses for treating blindness from photoreceptor degenerative diseases. Yet, no subretinal electrical or chemical stimulation study has stimulated the OFF and ON pathways differentially through inner retinal activation. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of differentially stimulating retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) through the inner nuclear layer of the retina with glutamate, a primary neurotransmitter chemical, in a biomimetic way. We show that controlled pulsatile delivery of glutamate into the subsurface of explanted wild-type rat retinas elicits highly localized simultaneous inhibitory and excitatory spike rate responses in OFF and ON RGCs. We also present the spatiotemporal characteristics of RGC responses to subretinally injected glutamate and the therapeutic stimulation parameters. Our findings could pave the way for future development of a neurotransmitter-based subretinal prosthesis offering more naturalistic vision and better visual acuity than electrical prostheses.

  16. [Comparison of differental intracochlear pressures between round window stimulation and ear canal stimulation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuelin

    2012-12-01

    Stimulation of the round window (RW) for coupling an implantable hearing system to the cochlea has gained increasing clinical importance. To compare the vibration transfer to the cochlear fluids and partition in response to normal acoustic stimulation and to mechanical stimulation of the RW, we carried out an acoustic-structure coupled finite element analysis using a recently developed finite element (FE) model in our laboratory, which consisted of external ear canal, middle ear and cochlea. Intracochlear pressures were derived during normal forward sound stimulation as well as reverse RW stimulation. A model was utilized to calculate the force required of an actuator at the RW to produce a differential intracochlear pressure that is equivalent to a stimulus produced in normal ear by a given external ear-canal pressure. The current results provided further information to support the optimization of the actuators and adapt existing prostheses for RW stimulation in order to insure sufficient acoustic output.

  17. The Codacs™ direct acoustic cochlear implant actuator: exploring alternative stimulation sites and their stimulation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Grossöhmichen, Martin; Salcher, Rolf; Kreipe, Hans-Heinrich; Lenarz, Thomas; Maier, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    This work assesses the efficiency of the Codacs system actuator (Cochlear Ltd., Sydney Australia) in different inner ear stimulation modalities. Originally the actuator was intended for direct perilymph stimulation after stapedotomy using a piston prosthesis. A possible alternative application is the stimulation of middle ear structures or the round window (RW). Here the perilymph stimulation with a K-piston through a stapes footplate (SFP) fenestration (N = 10) as well as stimulation of the stapes head (SH) with a Bell prosthesis (N = 9), SFP stimulation with an Omega/Aerial prosthesis (N = 8) and reverse RW stimulation (N = 10) were performed in cadaveric human temporal bones (TBs). Codacs actuator output is expressed as equivalent sound pressure level (eq. SPL) using RW and SFP displacement responses, measured by Laser Doppler velocimetry as reference. The axial actuator coupling force in stimulation of stapes and RW was adjusted to ~5 mN. The Bell prosthesis and Omega/Aerial prosthesis stimulation generated similar mean eq. SPLs (Bell: 127.5-141.8 eq. dB SPL; Omega/Aerial: 123.6-143.9 eq. dB SPL), being significantly more efficient than K-piston perilymph stimulation (108.6-131.6 eq. dB SPL) and RW stimulation (108.3-128.2 eq. dB SPL). Our results demonstrate that SH, SFP and RW are adequate alternative stimulation sites for the Codacs actuator using coupling prostheses and an axial coupling force of ~5 mN. Based on the eq. SPLs, all investigated methods were adequate for in vivo hearing aid applications, provided that experimental conditions including constant coupling force will be implemented.

  18. Neuroethics of deep brain stimulation for mental disorders: brain stimulation reward in humans.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Hideki; Katayama, Yoichi

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical basis of some deep brain stimulation (DBS) trials undertaken in the early years was the phenomenon of "brain stimulation reward (BSR)," which was first identified in rats. The animals appeared to be rewarded by pleasure caused by the stimulation of certain brain regions (reward system), such as the septal area. "Self-stimulation" experiments, in which rats were allowed to stimulate their own brain by pressing a freely accessible lever, they quickly learned lever pressing and sometimes continued to stimulate until they exhausted themselves. BSR was also observed with DBS of the septal area in humans. DBS trials in later years were undertaken on other theoretical bases, but unexpected BSR was sometimes induced by stimulation of some areas, such as the locus coeruleus complex. When BSR was induced, the subjects experienced feelings that were described as "cheerful," "alert," "good," "well-being," "comfort," "relaxation," "joy," or "satisfaction." Since the DBS procedure is equivalent to a "self-stimulation" experiment, they could become "addicted to the stimulation itself" or "compulsive about the stimulation," and stimulate themselves "for the entire day," "at maximum amplitude" and, in some instances, "into convulsions." DBS of the reward system has recently been applied to alleviate anhedonia in patients with refractory major depression. Although this approach appears promising, there remains a difficult problem: who can adjust their feelings and reward-oriented behavior within the normal range? With a self-stimulation procedure, the BSR may become uncontrollable. To develop DBS to the level of a standard therapy for mental disorders, we need to discuss "Who has the right to control the mental condition?" and "Who makes decisions" on "How much control is appropriate?" in daily life.

  19. Stimulating at the right time: phase-specific deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cagnan, Hayriye; Pedrosa, David; Little, Simon; Pogosyan, Alek; Cheeran, Binith; Aziz, Tipu; Green, Alexander; Fitzgerald, James; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Friston, Karl J; Denison, Timothy; Brown, Peter

    2017-01-01

    SEE MOLL AND ENGEL DOI101093/AWW308 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Brain regions dynamically engage and disengage with one another to execute everyday actions from movement to decision making. Pathologies such as Parkinson's disease and tremor emerge when brain regions controlling movement cannot readily decouple, compromising motor function. Here, we propose a novel stimulation strategy that selectively regulates neural synchrony through phase-specific stimulation. We demonstrate for the first time the therapeutic potential of such a stimulation strategy for the treatment of patients with pathological tremor. Symptom suppression is achieved by delivering stimulation to the ventrolateral thalamus, timed according to the patient's tremor rhythm. Sustained locking of deep brain stimulation to a particular phase of tremor afforded clinically significant tremor relief (up to 87% tremor suppression) in selected patients with essential tremor despite delivering less than half the energy of conventional high frequency stimulation. Phase-specific stimulation efficacy depended on the resonant characteristics of the underlying tremor network. Selective regulation of neural synchrony through phase-locked stimulation has the potential to both increase the efficiency of therapy and to minimize stimulation-induced side effects.

  20. Hydraulic Fracture Stimulation and Acid Treatment of Well Baca 20; Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program

    SciTech Connect

    1983-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program was initiated in February 1979 to pursue industry interest in geothermal well stimulation work and to develop technical expertise in areas directly related to geothermal well stimulation activities. This report provides an overview of the two experiments conducted in the high-temperature reservoir in Baca, New Mexico. The report discusses resource and reservoir properties, and provides a description of the stimulation experiment, a description of the treatment evaluation, and a summary of the experiment costs. (DJE-2005)

  1. Parameter exploration of staircase-shape extracellular stimulation for targeted stimulation of myelinated axon.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Ayako; Karashima, Akihiro; Nakao, Mitsuyuki; Katayama, Norihiro

    2011-01-01

    Spatio-temporal dynamics of a mathematical model of myelinated axon in response to staircase-shape extracellular electrical stimulation, which was developed for selective nerve stimulation, is investigated by the computer simulation. It is shown that the response is classified into four types: subthreshold response, cathodic excitation, anodal block and anodal break excitation. Based on the simulation results, simple diagrams representing the response characteristics of the axon are constructed as functions of stimulation parameters and distance between the axon and electrode. The diagram would be useful for determining simulation parameters for dynamic targeted stimulation of myelinated axon.

  2. Stimulating at the right time: phase-specific deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pedrosa, David; Little, Simon; Pogosyan, Alek; Cheeran, Binith; Aziz, Tipu; Green, Alexander; Fitzgerald, James; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Friston, Karl J.; Denison, Timothy; Brown, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Abstract See Moll and Engel (doi:10.1093/aww308) for a scientific commentary on this article. Brain regions dynamically engage and disengage with one another to execute everyday actions from movement to decision making. Pathologies such as Parkinson’s disease and tremor emerge when brain regions controlling movement cannot readily decouple, compromising motor function. Here, we propose a novel stimulation strategy that selectively regulates neural synchrony through phase-specific stimulation. We demonstrate for the first time the therapeutic potential of such a stimulation strategy for the treatment of patients with pathological tremor. Symptom suppression is achieved by delivering stimulation to the ventrolateral thalamus, timed according to the patient’s tremor rhythm. Sustained locking of deep brain stimulation to a particular phase of tremor afforded clinically significant tremor relief (up to 87% tremor suppression) in selected patients with essential tremor despite delivering less than half the energy of conventional high frequency stimulation. Phase-specific stimulation efficacy depended on the resonant characteristics of the underlying tremor network. Selective regulation of neural synchrony through phase-locked stimulation has the potential to both increase the efficiency of therapy and to minimize stimulation-induced side effects. PMID:28007997

  3. Simultaneous stimulation and recording of cardiac depolarization enabled by high-frequency stimulation.

    PubMed

    Giovangrandi, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency stimulation techniques have been recently proposed for the pacing and control of excitability of cardiac tissues. This paper introduces a system designed specifically for such stimulation, and demonstrates the unique ability to record depolarization events on the same electrode used for stimulation, during the stimulus. Experimental results with HL-1 cardiomyocytes are presented, highlighting key concepts enabled by this system, such as direct strength-duration relationship measurement and beat-to-beat stimulation threshold monitoring following pacing onset or pharmacological modulation.

  4. Cross-talk between TLR4 and PPARγ pathways in the arachidonic acid-induced inflammatory response in pancreatic acini.

    PubMed

    Mateu, A; Ramudo, L; Manso, M A; De Dios, I

    2015-12-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is generally associated with inflammation in different settings. We assess the molecular mechanisms involved in the inflammatory response exerted by AA on pancreatic acini as an approach to acute pancreatitis (AP). Celecoxib (COX-2 inhibitor), TAK-242 (TLR4 inhibitor) and 15d-PGJ2 (PPARγ agonist) were used to ascertain the signaling pathways. In addition, we examine the effects of TAK-242 and 15d-PGJ2 on AP induced in rats by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction (BPDO). To carry out in vitro studies, acini were isolated from pancreas of control rats. Generation of PGE2 and TXB2, activation of pro-inflammatory pathways (MAPKs, NF-κB, and JAK/STAT3) and overexpression of CCL2 and P-selectin was found in AA-treated acini. In addition, AA up-regulated TLR4 and down-regulated PPARγ expression. Celecoxib prevented the up-regulation of CCL2 and P-selectin but did not show any effect on the AA-mediated changes in TLR4 and PPARγ expression. TAK-242, reduced the generation of AA metabolites and repressed both the cascade of pro-inflammatory events which led to CCL2 and P-selectin overexpression as well as the AA-induced PPARγ down-regulation. Thus, TLR4 acts as upstream activating pro-inflammatory and inhibiting anti-inflammatory pathways. 15d-PGJ2 down-regulated TLR4 expression and hence prevented the synthesis of AA metabolites and the inflammatory response mediated by them. Reciprocal negative cross-talk between TLR4 and PPARγ pathways is evidenced. In vivo experiments showed that TAK-242 and 15d-PGJ2 treatments reduced the inflammatory response in BPDO-induced AP. We conclude that through TLR4-dependent mechanisms, AA up-regulated CCL2 and P-selectin in pancreatic acini, partly mediated by the generation of PGE2 and TXB2, which activated pro-inflammatory pathways, but also directly by down-regulating PPARγ expression with anti-inflammatory activity. In vitro and in vivo studies support the role of TLR4 in AP and the use of TLR4 inhibitors and

  5. The CRTH2 agonist Pyl A prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced fetal death but induces preterm labour

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Lynne; Herbert, Bronwen R; MacIntyre, David A; Hunte, Emma; Ponnampalam, Sathana; Johnson, Mark R; Teoh, Tiong G; Bennett, Phillip R

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory prostaglandin 15-deoxy-Δ 12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2) delays inflammation-induced preterm labour in the mouse and improves pup survival through the inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by a mechanism yet to be elucidated. 15dPGJ2 is an agonist of the second prostaglandin D2 receptor, chemoattractant receptor homologous to the T helper 2 cell (CRTH2). In human T helper cells CRTH2 agonists induce the production of the anti-inflammatory interleukins IL-10 and IL-4. We hypothesized that CRTH2 is involved in the protective effect of 15dPGJ2 in inflammation-induced preterm labour in the murine model. We therefore studied the effects of a specific small molecule CRTH2 agonist on preterm labour and pup survival. An intrauterine injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered to CD1 mice at embryonic day 16, ± CRTH2 agonist/vehicle controls. Mice were killed at 4.5 hr to assess fetal wellbeing and to harvest myometrium and pup brain for analysis of NF-κB, and T helper type 1/2 interleukins. To examine the effects of the CRTH2 agonist on LPS-induced preterm labour, mice were allowed to labour spontaneously. Direct effects of the CRTH2 agonist on uterine contractility were examined ex vivo on contracting myometrial strips. The CRTH2 agonist increased fetal survival from 20 to 100% in LPS-treated mice, and inhibited circular muscle contractility ex vivo. However, it augmented LPS-induced labour and significantly increased myometrial NF-κB, IL-1β, KC-GRO, interferon-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α. This suggests that the action of 15dPGJ2 is not via CRTH2 and therefore small molecule CRTH2 agonists are not likely to be beneficial for the prevention of inflammation-induced preterm labour. PMID:23374103

  6. In vitro Magnetic Stimulation: A Simple Stimulation Device to Deliver Defined Low Intensity Electromagnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Grehl, Stephanie; Martina, David; Goyenvalle, Catherine; Deng, Zhi-De; Rodger, Jennifer; Sherrard, Rachel M.

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) by electromagnetic fields appears to benefit human neurological and psychiatric conditions, although the optimal stimulation parameters and underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Although, in vitro studies have begun to elucidate cellular mechanisms, stimulation is delivered by a range of coils (from commercially available human stimulation coils to laboratory-built circuits) so that the electromagnetic fields induced within the tissue to produce the reported effects are ill-defined. Here, we develop a simple in vitro stimulation device with plug-and-play features that allow delivery of a range of stimulation parameters. We chose to test low intensity repetitive magnetic stimulation (LI-rMS) delivered at three frequencies to hindbrain explant cultures containing the olivocerebellar pathway. We used computational modeling to define the parameters of a stimulation circuit and coil that deliver a unidirectional homogeneous magnetic field of known intensity and direction, and therefore a predictable electric field, to the target. We built the coil to be compatible with culture requirements: stimulation within an incubator; a flat surface allowing consistent position and magnetic field direction; location outside the culture plate to maintain sterility and no heating or vibration. Measurements at the explant confirmed the induced magnetic field was homogenous and matched the simulation results. To validate our system we investigated biological effects following LI-rMS at 1 Hz, 10 Hz and biomimetic high frequency, which we have previously shown induces neural circuit reorganization. We found that gene expression was modified by LI-rMS in a frequency-related manner. Four hours after a single 10-min stimulation session, the number of c-fos positive cells increased, indicating that our stimulation activated the tissue. Also, after 14 days of LI-rMS, the expression of genes normally present in the tissue was differentially modified

  7. [Influence of radiotherapy on lymphocyte stimulation].

    PubMed

    Renner, H; Renner, K H; Hassenstein, E

    1976-08-01

    More than 300 lymphocyte cultures of 12 patients with seminomas were examined during the prophylactic radiotherapy and, in several cases, during an extended period until 20.5 months after the end of the treatment. The object of this study was to find out by measuring the capacity of the lymphocytes to be stimulated in vitro wheather they could be damaged by the radiotherapy. Among other reasons, the above mentioned patients were chosen because they had been submitted to irradiations of vast volumes of lymphatic tissues at a uniform focal dose of 4000 rad. The different opinions expressed in the literature (stimulation decreassed resp. increased resp. unchanged) are reflected by our results in such a way that we did not find a qualitative loss of the capacity to be stimulated cultures. The problem of the different opinions about the capacity of lymphocytes to be stimulated after a radiotherapy appears; among other things, to be based on different examination methods. According to these methods- morphological determination of the relative number of lymphoblasts, synthesis of DNA by fluid scintillation counting, or determination of the number of surviving cells in vitro -different results are obtained. It seems not possible to use the lymphocyte stimulation in vitro as a method of testing clinical sideefects occuring during the characteristics of immunity and radiation biology are not differentiated in a more precise manner.

  8. Matrix stimulation method for horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Economides, M.J.; Naceur, K.B.; Klem, R.C. )

    1991-07-01

    Well-performance forecasts suggests that many horizontal wells could be good candidates for matrix stimulation, even in certain reservoirs where vertical wells should be stimulated only by hydraulic fracturing. This paper presents a technique for the matrix treatment of horizontal wells to allow uniform distribution of the stimulation fluids. It involves pumping a reactive fluid through coiled tubing and an inert fluid through the coiled-tubing/well annulus. The well is completed with either a slotted liner or a cemented and perforated casing. The coiled tubing, placed at the farthest end of the well is retrieved gradually at a rate dependent on the injection rate. Both rates are calculated and are contingent upon reservoir and well properties and upon desired stimulation-fluid coverage. The complex phenomenon of acid stimulation involves different rheological properties between acid and the inert fluid, simultaneous mass transfer and reaction kinetics, and for carbonate reservoirs, such instabilities as wormhole growth. Acid-volume distributions along the well are presented for cases with and without coiled tubing. This paper details the procedures for this treatment, discusses hardware configurations, and outlines recommended fluids, additives, and rates.

  9. Radiant energy required for infrared neural stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaodong; Rajguru, Suhrud; Young, Hunter; Xia, Nan; Stock, Stuart R.; Xiao, Xianghui; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has been proposed as an alternative method to electrical stimulation because of its spatial selective stimulation. Independent of the mechanism for INS, to translate the method into a device it is important to determine the energy for stimulation required at the target structure. Custom-designed, flat and angle polished fibers, were used to deliver the photons. By rotating the angle polished fibers, the orientation of the radiation beam in the cochlea could be changed. INS-evoked compound action potentials and single unit responses in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) were recorded. X-ray computed tomography was used to determine the orientation of the optical fiber. Maximum responses were observed when the radiation beam was directed towards the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), whereas little responses were seen when the beam was directed towards the basilar membrane. The radiant exposure required at the SGNs to evoke compound action potentials (CAPs) or ICC responses was on average 18.9 ± 12.2 or 10.3 ± 4.9 mJ/cm2, respectively. For cochlear INS it has been debated whether the radiation directly stimulates the SGNs or evokes a photoacoustic effect. The results support the view that a direct interaction between neurons and radiation dominates the response to INS. PMID:26305106

  10. Stimulation of neutrophils by tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klebanoff, S.J.; Vadas, M.A.; Harlan, J.M.; Sparks, L.H.; Gamble, J.R.; Agosti, J.M.; Waltersdorph, A.M.

    1986-06-01

    Human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was shown to be a weak direct stimulus of the neutrophil respiratory burst and degranulation. The stimulation, as measured by iodination, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production, and lysozyme release, was considerably increased by the presence of unopsonized zymosan in the reaction mixture, an effect which was associated with the increased ingestion of the zymosan. TNF does not act as an opsonin but, rather, reacts with the neutrophil to increase its phagocytic activity. TNF-dependent phagocytosis, as measured indirectly by iodination, is inhibited by monoclonal antibodies (Mab) 60.1 and 60.3, which recognize different epitopes on the C3bi receptor/adherence-promoting surface glycoprotein of neutrophils. Other neutrophil stimulants, namely N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, and phorbol myristic acetate, also increase iodination in the presence of zymosan; as with TNF, the effect of these stimulants is inhibited by Mab 60.1 and 60.3, whereas, in contrast to that of TNF, their stimulation of iodination is unaffected by an Mab directed against TNF. TNF may be a natural stimulant of neutrophils which promotes adherence to endothelial cells and to particles, leading to increased phagocytosis, respiratory burst activity, and degranulation.

  11. Vestibular stimulation for management of premenstrual syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Johny, Minu; Kumar, Sai Sailesh; Rajagopalan, Archana; Mukkadan, Joseph Kurien

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The present study was undertaken to observe the effectiveness of vestibular stimulation in the management of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Materials and Methods: The present study was an experimental study; twenty female participants of age group 18–30 years were recruited in the present study. Conventional swing was used to administer vestibular stimulation. Variables were recorded before and after vestibular stimulation and compared. Results: Depression and stress scores are significantly decreased after 2 months of intervention. Anxiety scores decreased followed by vestibular stimulation. However, it is no statistically significant. Serum cortisol levels significantly decreased after 2 months of intervention. WHOQOL-BREF-transformed scores were not significantly changed followed by the intervention. However, psychological domain score (T2) and social relationships domain score (T3) were increased followed by intervention. Systolic blood pressure was significantly decreased after 2 months of intervention. No significant change was observed in diastolic pressure and pulse rate. Pain score was significantly decreased after 2 months of intervention. Mini mental status examination scores and spatial and verbal memory score were significantly improved followed by intervention. Conclusion: The present study provides preliminary evidence for implementing vestibular stimulation for management of PMS as a nonpharmacological therapy. Hence, we recommend further well-controlled, detailed studies in this area with higher sample size. PMID:28250680

  12. Stimulants for the Control of Hedonic Appetite

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, Alison S.; Hibbert, Emily J.; Champion, Bernard L.; Nanan, Ralph K. H.

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this paper is treatment of obesity in relation to the management of hedonic appetite. Obesity is a complex condition which may be potentiated by excessive reward seeking in combination with executive functioning deficits that impair cognitive control of behavior. Stimulant medications address both reward deficiency and enhance motivation, as well as suppressing appetite. They have long been recognized to be effective for treating obesity. However, stimulants can be abused for their euphoric effect. They induce euphoria via the same neural pathway that underlies their therapeutic effect in obesity. For this reason they have generally not been endorsed for use in obesity. Among the stimulants, only phentermine (either alone or in combination with topiramate) and bupropion (which has stimulant-like properties and is used in combination with naltrexone), are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for obesity, although dexamphetamine and methylpenidate are approved and widely used for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults and children. Experience gained over many years in the treatment of ADHD demonstrates that with careful dose titration, stimulants can be used safely. In obesity, improvement in mood and executive functioning could assist with the lifestyle changes necessary for weight control, acting synergistically with appetite suppression. The obesity crisis has reached the stage that strong consideration should be given to adequate utilization of this effective and inexpensive class of drug. PMID:27199749

  13. Radiant energy required for infrared neural stimulation

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Xiaodong; Rajguru, Suhrud; Young, Hunter; ...

    2015-08-25

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has been proposed as an alternative method to electrical stimulation because of its spatial selective stimulation. Independent of the mechanism for INS, to translate the method into a device it is important to determine the energy for stimulation required at the target structure. Custom-designed, flat and angle polished fibers, were used to deliver the photons. By rotating the angle polished fibers, the orientation of the radiation beam in the cochlea could be changed. INS-evoked compound action potentials and single unit responses in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) were recorded. X-ray computed tomography wasmore » used to determine the orientation of the optical fiber. Maximum responses were observed when the radiation beam was directed towards the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), whereas little responses were seen when the beam was directed towards the basilar membrane. The radiant exposure required at the SGNs to evoke compound action potentials (CAPs) or ICC responses was on average 18.9 ± 12.2 or 10.3 ± 4.9 mJ/cm2, respectively. For cochlear INS it has been debated whether the radiation directly stimulates the SGNs or evokes a photoacoustic effect. The results support the view that a direct interaction between neurons and radiation dominates the response to INS.« less

  14. Radiant energy required for infrared neural stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaodong; Rajguru, Suhrud; Young, Hunter; Xia, Nan; Stock, Stuart R; Xiao, Xianghui; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-08-25

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has been proposed as an alternative method to electrical stimulation because of its spatial selective stimulation. Independent of the mechanism for INS, to translate the method into a device it is important to determine the energy for stimulation required at the target structure. Custom-designed, flat and angle polished fibers, were used to deliver the photons. By rotating the angle polished fibers, the orientation of the radiation beam in the cochlea could be changed. INS-evoked compound action potentials and single unit responses in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) were recorded. X-ray computed tomography was used to determine the orientation of the optical fiber. Maximum responses were observed when the radiation beam was directed towards the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), whereas little responses were seen when the beam was directed towards the basilar membrane. The radiant exposure required at the SGNs to evoke compound action potentials (CAPs) or ICC responses was on average 18.9 ± 12.2 or 10.3 ± 4.9 mJ/cm(2), respectively. For cochlear INS it has been debated whether the radiation directly stimulates the SGNs or evokes a photoacoustic effect. The results support the view that a direct interaction between neurons and radiation dominates the response to INS.

  15. Mechanisms of electrical stimulation with neural prostheses.

    PubMed

    Rattay, F; Resatz, S; Lutter, P; Minassian, K; Jilge, B; Dimitrijevic, M R

    2003-01-01

    Individual electric and geometric characteristics of neural substructures can have surprising effects on artificially controlled neural signaling. A rule of thumb approved for the stimulation of long peripheral axons may not hold when the central nervous system is involved. This is demonstrated here with a comparison of results from the electrically stimulated cochlea, retina, and spinal cord. A generalized form of the activating function together with accurate modeling of the neural membrane dynamics are the tools to analyze the excitation mechanisms initiated by neural prostheses. Analysis is sometimes possible with a linear theory, in other cases, simulation of internal calcium concentration or ion channel current fluctuations is needed to see irregularities in spike trains. Spike initiation site can easily change within a single target neuron under constant stimulation conditions of a cochlear implant. Poor myelinization in the soma region of the human cochlear neurons causes firing characteristics different from any animal data. Retinal ganglion cells also generate propagating spikes within the dendritic tree. Bipolar cells in the retina are expected to respond with neurotransmitter release before a spike is generated in the ganglion cell, even when they are far away from the electrode. Epidural stimulation of the lumbar spinal cord predominantly stimulates large sensory axons in the dorsal roots which induce muscle reflex responses. Analysis with the generalized activating function, computer simulations of the nonlinear neural membrane behavior together with experimental and clinical data analysis enlighten our understanding of artificial firing patterns influenced by neural prostheses.

  16. Radiant energy required for infrared neural stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Xiaodong; Rajguru, Suhrud; Young, Hunter; Xia, Nan; Stock, Stuart R.; Xiao, Xianghui; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-08-25

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has been proposed as an alternative method to electrical stimulation because of its spatial selective stimulation. Independent of the mechanism for INS, to translate the method into a device it is important to determine the energy for stimulation required at the target structure. Custom-designed, flat and angle polished fibers, were used to deliver the photons. By rotating the angle polished fibers, the orientation of the radiation beam in the cochlea could be changed. INS-evoked compound action potentials and single unit responses in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) were recorded. X-ray computed tomography was used to determine the orientation of the optical fiber. Maximum responses were observed when the radiation beam was directed towards the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), whereas little responses were seen when the beam was directed towards the basilar membrane. The radiant exposure required at the SGNs to evoke compound action potentials (CAPs) or ICC responses was on average 18.9 ± 12.2 or 10.3 ± 4.9 mJ/cm2, respectively. For cochlear INS it has been debated whether the radiation directly stimulates the SGNs or evokes a photoacoustic effect. The results support the view that a direct interaction between neurons and radiation dominates the response to INS.

  17. Phrenic nerve stimulation: the Australian experience.

    PubMed

    Khong, Peter; Lazzaro, Amanda; Mobbs, Ralph

    2010-02-01

    Phrenic nerve stimulation is a technique whereby a nerve stimulator provides electrical stimulation of the phrenic nerve to cause diaphragmatic contraction. The most common indications for this procedure are central alveolar hypoventilation and high quadriplegia. This paper reviews the available data on the 19 patients treated with phrenic nerve stimulation in Australia to date. Of the 19 patients, 14 required pacing due to quadriplegia, one had congenital central hypoventilation syndrome and one had brainstem encephalitis. Information was unavailable for the remaining three patients. Currently, 11 of the pacers are known to be actively implanted, with the total pacing duration ranging from 1 to 21 years (mean 13 years). Eight of the 19 patients had revision surgeries. Four of these were to replace the original I-107 system (which had a 3-5-year life expectancy) with the current I-110 system, which is expected to perform electrically for the patient's lifetime. Three patients had revisions due to mechanical failure. The remaining patients' notes were incomplete. These data suggest that phrenic nerve stimulation can be used instead of mechanical ventilators for long-term ongoing respiratory support.

  18. Stimulants for the Control of Hedonic Appetite.

    PubMed

    Poulton, Alison S; Hibbert, Emily J; Champion, Bernard L; Nanan, Ralph K H

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this paper is treatment of obesity in relation to the management of hedonic appetite. Obesity is a complex condition which may be potentiated by excessive reward seeking in combination with executive functioning deficits that impair cognitive control of behavior. Stimulant medications address both reward deficiency and enhance motivation, as well as suppressing appetite. They have long been recognized to be effective for treating obesity. However, stimulants can be abused for their euphoric effect. They induce euphoria via the same neural pathway that underlies their therapeutic effect in obesity. For this reason they have generally not been endorsed for use in obesity. Among the stimulants, only phentermine (either alone or in combination with topiramate) and bupropion (which has stimulant-like properties and is used in combination with naltrexone), are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for obesity, although dexamphetamine and methylpenidate are approved and widely used for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults and children. Experience gained over many years in the treatment of ADHD demonstrates that with careful dose titration, stimulants can be used safely. In obesity, improvement in mood and executive functioning could assist with the lifestyle changes necessary for weight control, acting synergistically with appetite suppression. The obesity crisis has reached the stage that strong consideration should be given to adequate utilization of this effective and inexpensive class of drug.

  19. Infrared neural stimulation: a new stimulation tool for central nervous system applications

    PubMed Central

    Chernov, Mykyta; Roe, Anna Wang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The traditional approach to modulating brain function (in both clinical and basic science applications) is to tap into the neural circuitry using electrical currents applied via implanted electrodes. However, it suffers from a number of problems, including the risk of tissue trauma, poor spatial specificity, and the inability to selectively stimulate neuronal subtypes. About a decade ago, optical alternatives to electrical stimulation started to emerge in order to address the shortcomings of electrical stimulation. We describe the use of one optical stimulation technique, infrared neural stimulation (INS), during which short (of the order of a millisecond) pulses of infrared light are delivered to the neural tissue. Very focal stimulation is achieved via a thermal mechanism and stimulation location can be quickly adjusted by redirecting the light. After describing some of the work done in the peripheral nervous system, we focus on the use of INS in the central nervous system to investigate functional connectivity in the visual and somatosensory areas, target specific functional domains, and influence behavior of an awake nonhuman primate. We conclude with a positive outlook for INS as a tool for safe and precise targeted brain stimulation. PMID:26157967

  20. Evaluation of Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofman, I. S.; Warren, E.; DeSoto, R.; Moroney, G.; Chastain, J.; De Dios, Y. E.; Gadd, N.; Taylor, L.; Peters, B. T.; Allen, E.; Reschke, M. F.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    Microgravity exposure results in an adaptive central reinterpretation of information from multiple sensory sources to produce a sensorimotor state appropriate for motor actions in this unique environment, but this new adaptive state is no longer appropriate for the 1-g gravitational environment on Earth. During these gravitational transitions, astronauts experience deficits in both perceptual and motor functions including impaired postural control, disruption in spatial orientation, impaired control of locomotion that include alterations in muscle activation variability, modified lower limb kinematics, alterations in head-trunk coordination as well as reduced dynamic visual acuity. Post-flight changes in postural and locomotor control might have adverse consequences if a rapid egress was required following a long-duration mission, where support personnel may not be available to aid crewmembers. The act of emergency egress includes, but is not limited to standing, walking, climbing a ladder, jumping down, monitoring displays, actuating discrete controls, operating auxiliary equipment, and communicating with Mission Control and recovery teams while maintaining spatial orientation, mobility and postural stability in order to escape safely. The average time to recover impaired postural control and functional mobility to preflight levels of performance has been shown to be approximately two weeks after long-duration spaceflight. The postflight alterations are due in part to central reinterpretation of vestibular information caused by exposure to microgravity. In this study we will use a commonly used technique of transcutaneous electrical stimulation applied across the vestibular end organs (galvanic vestibular stimulation, GVS) to disrupt vestibular function as a simulation of post-flight disturbances. The goal of this project is an engineering human-in-the-loop evaluation of a device that can degrade performance of functional tasks (e.g. to maintain upright balance

  1. Stimulated Electronic X-Ray Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weninger, Clemens; Purvis, Michael; Ryan, Duncan; London, Richard A.; Bozek, John D.; Bostedt, Christoph; Graf, Alexander; Brown, Gregory; Rocca, Jorge J.; Rohringer, Nina

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate strong stimulated inelastic x-ray scattering by resonantly exciting a dense gas target of neon with femtosecond, high-intensity x-ray pulses from an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL). A small number of lower energy XFEL seed photons drive an avalanche of stimulated resonant inelastic x-ray scattering processes that amplify the Raman scattering signal by several orders of magnitude until it reaches saturation. Despite the large overall spectral width, the internal spiky structure of the XFEL spectrum determines the energy resolution of the scattering process in a statistical sense. This is demonstrated by observing a stochastic line shift of the inelastically scattered x-ray radiation. In conjunction with statistical methods, XFELs can be used for stimulated resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, with spectral resolution smaller than the natural width of the core-excited, intermediate state.

  2. Magnetic fields in noninvasive brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Dourado, Marcos; Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Caboclo, Luis Otávio Sales Ferreira; Scaff, Milberto; Guilhoto, Laura Maria de Figueiredo Ferreira; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2014-04-01

    The idea that magnetic fields could be used therapeutically arose 2000 years ago. These therapeutic possibilities were expanded after the discovery of electromagnetic induction by the Englishman Michael Faraday and the American Joseph Henry. In 1896, Arsène d'Arsonval reported his experience with noninvasive brain magnetic stimulation to the scientific French community. In the second half of the 20th century, changing magnetic fields emerged as a noninvasive tool to study the nervous system and to modulate neural function. In 1985, Barker, Jalinous, and Freeston presented transcranial magnetic stimulation, a relatively focal and painless technique. Transcranial magnetic stimulation has been proposed as a clinical neurophysiology tool and as a potential adjuvant treatment for psychiatric and neurologic conditions. This article aims to contextualize the progress of use of magnetic fields in the history of neuroscience and medical sciences, until 1985.

  3. Auditory stimulation and cardiac autonomic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Valenti, Vitor E.; Guida, Heraldo L.; Frizzo, Ana C. F.; Cardoso, Ana C. V.; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M.; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have already demonstrated that auditory stimulation with music influences the cardiovascular system. In this study, we described the relationship between musical auditory stimulation and heart rate variability. Searches were performed with the Medline, SciELO, Lilacs and Cochrane databases using the following keywords: “auditory stimulation”, “autonomic nervous system”, “music” and “heart rate variability”. The selected studies indicated that there is a strong correlation between noise intensity and vagal-sympathetic balance. Additionally, it was reported that music therapy improved heart rate variability in anthracycline-treated breast cancer patients. It was hypothesized that dopamine release in the striatal system induced by pleasurable songs is involved in cardiac autonomic regulation. Musical auditory stimulation influences heart rate variability through a neural mechanism that is not well understood. Further studies are necessary to develop new therapies to treat cardiovascular disorders. PMID:22948465

  4. [Transcranial direct current stimulation for depressive disorders].

    PubMed

    Aust, S; Palm, U; Padberg, F; Bajbouj, M

    2015-12-01

    Major depressive disorders are one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders worldwide but approximately 20-30 % of patients do not respond to standard guideline conform treatment. Recent neuroimaging studies in depressive patients revealed altered activation patterns in prefrontal brain areas and that successful cognitive behavioral therapy and psychopharmacological interventions are associated with a reversal of these neural alterations. Therefore, a direct modulation of prefrontal brain activation by non-invasive brain stimulation techniques, such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) seems to be a promising and innovative approach for the treatment of depressive disorders. In addition, recent neuropsychological findings indicated an augmentation of positive tDCS effects by simultaneous external activation of the stimulated brain area, for example by cognitive training tasks. Based on these findings, the possibility to augment cognitive-emotional learning processes during cognitive behavioral therapy by simultaneous tDCS to increase antidepressive therapeutic effects is discussed in this article.

  5. Stimulated plasma waves in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    The reported discussion is concerned with longitudinal waves associated with electron motions. These waves are easily stimulated in the ionosphere by rocket- and satellite-borne RF sounders. Most of the observations of stimulated plasma waves in the ionosphere are based on ionograms obtained from the sounders carried on board five satellites, including Explorer 20, Alouette 1 and 2, and ISIS 1 and 2. The majority of the observations can be explained by considering the propagation of the sounder-stimulated plasma waves. Attention is given to aspects of plasma wave dispersion, linear phenomena, plasma wave instabilities and nonlinear phenomena, unexplained phenomena, diagnostic applications, geophysical and astrophysical applications, and a number of experiments planned for the future.

  6. Early experiences with tachycardia-triggered vagus nerve stimulation using the AspireSR stimulator.

    PubMed

    El Tahry, Riëm; Hirsch, Martin; Van Rijckevorsel, Kenou; Santos, Susana Ferrao; de Tourtchaninoff, Marianne; Rooijakkers, Herbert; Coenen, Volker; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Many epilepsy patients treated with vagus nerve stimulation additionally use an "on-demand" function, triggering an extra stimulation to terminate a seizure or diminish its severity. Nevertheless, a substantial number of patients are not able to actively trigger stimulations by use of a magnet, due to the absence of an aura or inability for voluntary actions in the early phase of a seizure. To address this need, a novel implantable pulse generator, the AspireSR VNS system, was developed to provide automated ictal stimulation triggered by a seizure-detecting algorithm. We report our experience with three patients in assessing the functionality of ictal stimulation, illustrating the detection system in practice. Detection of ictal tachycardia and variable additional detections of physiological tachycardia depended on the individual seizure-detecting algorithm settings.

  7. Ovarian stimulation in ART - Unwinding pressing issues.

    PubMed

    Zech, N H; Zech, M; Baldauf, S; Comploj, G; Murtinger, M; Spitzer, D; Hradecký, L; Ajayi, R; Schuff, M; Zech, H

    2015-04-01

    Conventional controlled ovarian stimulation (cCOS) can cause significant discomfort, including ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). Clearly, management of OHSS and poor responder patients requires new strategies to overcome these problems and facilitate the birth of a healthy child with the fewest stimulation cycles. Several alternative methods have been developed. Non-conventional controlled ovarian stimulation (non-cCOS) is based on low-dose stimulation regimens and is often termed "light", "soft", "mini", "minimal", "mild", "low cost", or "low dose IVF". Non-controlled ovarian stimulation therapies (non-COS) include natural cycle IVF or a mixture between non-controlled and non-cCOS, termed "modified natural IVF" or "antiestrogen/aromatase inhibitor/low dose FSH-cycles", in which cycles are monitored but not controlled. These approaches promise to reduce the physical, emotional, and financial burden of IVF therapy while maintaining acceptable pregnancy rates. Such approaches might reduce the risk of OHSS. However, the overall cost per baby increases due to the higher number of stimulation cycles required, and the inconvenience of ovum pick-up still remains. The primary focus should be to obtain several good quality blastocysts after a single cCOS cycle. Thus, adequate numbers of mature oocytes are mandatory. What is more difficult and expensive for patients: several non-COS/non-cCOS cycles to obtain a baby or a single cCOS cycle with a high probability to obtain more than one child? Classic cCOS using the GnRH agonist long protocol followed by single embryo transfer (SET) at the blastocyst stage and aseptic vitrification of surplus embryos optimizes the IVF outcome. This strategy, combined with outpatient management in the case of OHSS, minimizes inconvenience and risks of OHSS. Accumulation cycles (AC) by repeated COS with subsequent freezing of blastocysts, combined with preimplantation genetic screening (PGS), is a promising new approach for low

  8. 21 CFR 882.5860 - Implanted neuromuscular stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... neuromuscular stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted neuromuscular stimulator is a device that provides electrical stimulation to a patient's peroneal or femoral nerve to cause muscles in the leg to contract, thus... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implanted neuromuscular stimulator....

  9. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  10. The "Paradoxical Effect" of Stimulants' Upon Hyperactive Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodemus, John; Swanson, Jon C.

    1977-01-01

    Amphetamines and other stimulant drugs are not causing so-called "paradoxical effects" in hyperactive children but are actually effective because they provide needed stimulation. According to the Swanson-Brodemus Model, amphetamines, et al., provide internal sources of stimulation, thus reducing the need for external stimulation. (Author)

  11. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  15. Pudendal Nerve Stimulation and Block by a Wireless Controlled Implantable Stimulator in Cats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guangning; Wang, Jicheng; Shen, Bing; Roppolo, James R.; de Groat, William C.; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the functionality of a wireless controlled implantable stimulator designed for stimulation and block of the pudendal nerve. Materials and Methods In 5 cats under α-chloralose anesthesia, the stimulator was implanted underneath the skin on the left side in the lower back along the sacral spine. Two tripolar cuff electrodes were implanted bilaterally on the pudendal nerves in addition to one bipolar cuff electrode that was implanted on the left side central to the tripolar cuff electrode. The stimulator provided high frequency (5-20 kHz) biphasic stimulation waveforms to the two tripolar electrodes and low frequency (1-100 Hz) rectangular pulses to the bipolar electrode. Bladder and urethral pressures were measured to determine the effects of pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) or block. Results The maximal (70-100 cmH2O) urethral pressure generated by 20 Hz PNS applied via the bipolar electrode was completely eliminated by the pudendal nerve block induced by the high frequency stimulation (6-15 kHz, 6-10 V) applied via the two tripolar electrodes. In a partially filled bladder 20-30 Hz PNS (2-8 V, 0.2 ms) but not 5 Hz stimulation applied via the bipolar electrode elicited a large sustained bladder contraction (45.9±13.4 to 52.0±22 cmH2O). During cystometry, the 5 Hz PNS significantly (P<0.05) increased bladder capacity to 176.5±27.1% of control capacity. Conclusions The wireless controlled implantable stimulator successfully generated the required waveforms for stimulation and block of pudendal nerve, which will be useful for restoring bladder functions after spinal cord injury (SCI). PMID:24320615

  16. Stimulated thermal Rayleigh scattering in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang

    2013-02-11

    Recently, mode instability was observed in optical fiber lasers at high powers, severely limiting power scaling for single-mode outputs. Some progress has been made towards understanding the underlying physics. A thorough understanding of the effect is critical for continued progress of this very important technology area. Mode instability in optical fibers is, in fact, a manifestation of stimulated thermal Rayleigh scattering. In this work, a quasi-closed-form solution for the nonlinear coupling coefficient is found for stimulated thermal Rayleigh scattering in optical fibers. The results help to significantly improve understanding of mode instability.

  17. Assays of thyroid-stimulating antibody

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, J.M.; Zakarija, M.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison is presented of the two major assay methods of thyroid-stimulating antibody (TSAb) of Graves' disease. The basic procedures involve: (1) some index of thyroid stimulation, usually in vitro, using TSAb to indicate its activity; and (2) indirect recognition by assessment of the inhibition of binding of radioiodinated thyrotropin (TSH) to a preparation of its receptor, i.e., TSH-binding inhibition or TBI. There is potential for misinterpretation of data acquired by testing patients' sera by one or the other basic procedure.

  18. Optical stimulation of neural tissue in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Jonathon; Kao, Chris; Mariappan, Karthik; Albea, Jeffrey; Jansen, E. Duco; Konrad, Peter; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2005-03-01

    For more than a century, the traditional method of stimulating neural activity has been based on electrical methods, and it remains the gold standard to date. We report a technological breakthrough in neural activation in which low-level, pulsed infrared laser light is used to elicit compound nerve and muscle potentials in mammalian peripheral nerve in vivo. Optically induced neural action potentials are spatially precise, artifact free, and damage free and are generated by use of energies well below tissue ablation threshold. Thus optical stimulation presents a simple yet novel approach to contact-free in vivo neural activation that has major implications for clinical neurosurgery, basic neurophysiology, and neuroscience.

  19. Neural dynamics during repetitive visual stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoneva, Tsvetomira; Garcia-Molina, Gary; Desain, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs), the brain responses to repetitive visual stimulation (RVS), are widely utilized in neuroscience. Their high signal-to-noise ratio and ability to entrain oscillatory brain activity are beneficial for their applications in brain-computer interfaces, investigation of neural processes underlying brain rhythmic activity (steady-state topography) and probing the causal role of brain rhythms in cognition and emotion. This paper aims at analyzing the space and time EEG dynamics in response to RVS at the frequency of stimulation and ongoing rhythms in the delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma bands. Approach.We used electroencephalography (EEG) to study the oscillatory brain dynamics during RVS at 10 frequencies in the gamma band (40-60 Hz). We collected an extensive EEG data set from 32 participants and analyzed the RVS evoked and induced responses in the time-frequency domain. Main results. Stable SSVEP over parieto-occipital sites was observed at each of the fundamental frequencies and their harmonics and sub-harmonics. Both the strength and the spatial propagation of the SSVEP response seem sensitive to stimulus frequency. The SSVEP was more localized around the parieto-occipital sites for higher frequencies (>54 Hz) and spread to fronto-central locations for lower frequencies. We observed a strong negative correlation between stimulation frequency and relative power change at that frequency, the first harmonic and the sub-harmonic components over occipital sites. Interestingly, over parietal sites for sub-harmonics a positive correlation of relative power change and stimulation frequency was found. A number of distinct patterns in delta (1-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (15-30 Hz) bands were also observed. The transient response, from 0 to about 300 ms after stimulation onset, was accompanied by increase in delta and theta power over fronto-central and occipital sites, which returned to baseline

  20. Transcranial laser stimulation improves human cerebral oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fenghua; Hase, Snehal N.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Transcranial laser stimulation of the brain with near‐infrared light is a novel form of non‐invasive photobiomodulation or low‐level laser therapy (LLLT) that has shown therapeutic potential in a variety of neurological and psychological conditions. Understanding of its neurophysiological effects is essential for mechanistic study and treatment evaluation. This study investigated how transcranial laser stimulation influences cerebral hemodynamics and oxygenation in the human brain in vivo using functional near‐infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Materials and Methods Two separate experiments were conducted in which 1,064‐nm laser stimulation was administered at (1) the center and (2) the right side of the forehead, respectively. The laser emitted at a power of 3.4 W and in an area of 13.6 cm2, corresponding to 0.25 W/cm2 irradiance. Stimulation duration was 10 minutes. Nine healthy male and female human participants of any ethnic background, in an age range of 18–40 years old were included in each experiment. Results In both experiments, transcranial laser stimulation induced an increase of oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbO2]) and a decrease of deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration (Δ[Hb]) in both cerebral hemispheres. Improvements in cerebral oxygenation were indicated by a significant increase of differential hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbD] = Δ[HbO2] − Δ[Hb]). These effects increased in a dose‐dependent manner over time during laser stimulation (10 minutes) and persisted after laser stimulation (6 minutes). The total hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbT] = Δ[HbO2] + Δ[Hb]) remained nearly unchanged in most cases. Conclusion Near‐infrared laser stimulation applied to the forehead can transcranially improve cerebral oxygenation in healthy humans. Lasers Surg. Med. 48:343–349, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26817446

  1. Deep brain stimulation for movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Thevathasan, Wesley; Gregory, Ralph

    2010-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation is now considered a routine treatment option for selected patients with advanced Parkinson's disease, primary segmental and generalised dystonia, and essential tremor. The neurosurgeon is responsible for the accurate and safe placement of the electrodes and the neurologist for the careful selection of patients and titration of medication against the effects of stimulation. A multidisciplinary team approach involving specialist nurses, neuropsychologists and neurophysiologists is required for a successful outcome. In this article we will summarise the key points in patient selection, provide an overview of the surgical technique, and discuss the beneficial and adverse outcomes that can occur.

  2. Tinnitus treatment with sound stimulation during sleep.

    PubMed

    M, Pedemonte; D, Drexler; S, Rodio; D, Geisinger; A, Bianco; D, Pol-Fernandes; V, Bernhardt

    2010-01-01

    A new strategy for idiopathic subjective tinnitus treatment - sound stimulation during sleep - has been applied. It was based on the acknowledgement that the auditory system also works during sleep, processing the incoming information. Eleven patients were stimulated every night during 6 months. The stimulus was a sound that mimetized the tinnitus and was fixed at the same tinnitus intensity, applied through an iPod. All patients decreased their tinnitus intensity in the first month of treatment (statistically significant), most of them in the first week. Tinnitus intensity continued decreasing in the following weeks; three patients presented periods of total silence.

  3. BQ123 Stimulates Skeletal Muscle Antioxidant Defense via Nrf2 Activation in LPS-Treated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jeleń, Agnieszka; Żebrowska, Marta; Balcerczak, Ewa; Gorąca, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Little is understood of skeletal muscle tissue in terms of oxidative stress and inflammation. Endothelin-1 is an endogenous, vasoconstrictive peptide which can induce overproduction of reactive oxygen species and proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether BQ123, an endothelin-A receptor antagonist, influences the level of TNF-α, IL-6, SOD-1, HO-1, Nrf2 mRNA, and NF-κB subunit RelA/p65 mRNA in the femoral muscle obtained from endotoxemic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 6) and received iv (1) saline (control), (2) LPS (15 mg/kg), (3) BQ123 (1 mg/kg), (4) BQ123 (1 mg/kg), and LPS (15 mg/kg, resp.) 30 min later. Injection of LPS led to significant increase in levels of RelA/p65 mRNA, TNF-α, and IL-6, while content of SOD-1, HO-1, and Nrf2 mRNA was unchanged. Administration of BQ123 prior to LPS challenge resulted in a significant reduction in RelA/p65 mRNA, TNF-α, and IL-6 levels, as well as markedly elevated concentrations of SOD-1, HO-1, and Nrf2 mRNA. BQ123 appears to enhance antioxidant defense and prevent production of TNF-α and IL-6 in skeletal muscle of LPS-treated rat. In conclusion, endothelin-A receptor antagonism exerts significant impact on the skeletal muscle favouring anti-inflammatory effects and protection against oxidative stress. PMID:26823945

  4. Clinical application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in stroke rehabilitation☆

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Joonho; Yang, EunJoo; Cho, KyeHee; Barcenas, Carmelo L; Kim, Woo Jin; Min, Yusun; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2012-01-01

    Proper stimulation to affected cerebral hemisphere would promote the functional recovery of patients with stroke. Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on cortical excitability can be can be altered by the stimulation frequency, intensity and duration. There has been no consistent recognition regarding the best stimulation frequency and intensity. This study reviews the intervention effects of repetitive transcranial stimulation on motor impairment, dysphagia, visuospatial neglect and aphasia, and summarizes the stimulation frequency, intensity and area for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to yield the best therapeutic effects. PMID:25745455

  5. IRG1 induced by heme oxygenase-1/carbon monoxide inhibits LPS-mediated sepsis and pro-inflammatory cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Jamal Uddin, Md; Joe, Yeonsoo; Kim, Seul-Ki; Oh Jeong, Sun; Ryter, Stefan W; Pae, Hyun-Ock; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2016-01-01

    The immunoresponsive gene 1 (IRG1) protein has crucial functions in embryonic implantation and neurodegeneration. IRG1 promotes endotoxin tolerance by increasing A20 expression in macrophages through reactive oxygen species (ROS). The cytoprotective protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which generates endogenous carbon monoxide (CO), is expressed in the lung during Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) tolerance and cross tolerance. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms and functional links between IRG1 and HO-1 in the innate immune system remain unknown. In the present study, we found that the CO releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2) and chemical inducers of HO-1 increased IRG1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent fashion in RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, inhibition of HO-1 activity by zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) and HO-1 siRNA significantly reduced expression of IRG1 under these conditions. In addition, treatment with CO and HO-1 induction significantly increased A20 expression, which was reversed by ZnPP and HO-1 siRNA. LPS-stimulated TNF-α was significantly decreased, whereas IRG1 and A20 were increased by CORM-2 application and HO-1 induction, which in turn were abrogated by ZnPP. Interestingly, siRNA against IRG1 and A20 reversed the effects of CO and HO-1 on LPS-stimulated TNF-α production. Additionally, CO and HO-1 inducers significantly increased IRG1 and A20 expression and downregulated TNF-α production in a LPS-stimulated sepsis mice model. Furthermore, the effects of CO and HO-1 on TNF-α production were significantly reversed when ZnPP was administered. In conclusion, CO and HO-1 induction regulates IRG1 and A20 expression, leading to inhibition of inflammation in vitro and in an in vivo mice model. PMID:25640654

  6. IRG1 induced by heme oxygenase-1/carbon monoxide inhibits LPS-mediated sepsis and pro-inflammatory cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Jamal Uddin, Md; Joe, Yeonsoo; Kim, Seul-Ki; Oh Jeong, Sun; Ryter, Stefan W; Pae, Hyun-Ock; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2016-03-01

    The immunoresponsive gene 1 (IRG1) protein has crucial functions in embryonic implantation and neurodegeneration. IRG1 promotes endotoxin tolerance by increasing A20 expression in macrophages through reactive oxygen species (ROS). The cytoprotective protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which generates endogenous carbon monoxide (CO), is expressed in the lung during Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) tolerance and cross tolerance. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms and functional links between IRG1 and HO-1 in the innate immune system remain unknown. In the present study, we found that the CO releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2) and chemical inducers of HO-1 increased IRG1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent fashion in RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, inhibition of HO-1 activity by zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) and HO-1 siRNA significantly reduced expression of IRG1 under these conditions. In addition, treatment with CO and HO-1 induction significantly increased A20 expression, which was reversed by ZnPP and HO-1 siRNA. LPS-stimulated TNF-α was significantly decreased, whereas IRG1 and A20 were increased by CORM-2 application and HO-1 induction, which in turn were abrogated by ZnPP. Interestingly, siRNA against IRG1 and A20 reversed the effects of CO and HO-1 on LPS-stimulated TNF-α production. Additionally, CO and HO-1 inducers significantly increased IRG1 and A20 expression and downregulated TNF-α production in a LPS-stimulated sepsis mice model. Furthermore, the effects of CO and HO-1 on TNF-α production were significantly reversed when ZnPP was administered. In conclusion, CO and HO-1 induction regulates IRG1 and A20 expression, leading to inhibition of inflammation in vitro and in an in vivo mice model.

  7. In vivo stimulation on rabbit retina using CMOS LSI-based multi-chip flexible stimulator for retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, T; Asano, R; Sugitani, S; Terasawa, Y; Nunoshita, M; Nakauchi, K; Fujikado, T; Tano, Y; Ohta, J

    2007-01-01

    We have performed in vivo electric stimulation experiments on rabbit retina to demonstrate feasibility of CMOS LSI-based multi-chip flexible neural stimulator for retinal prosthesis. We have developed new packaging structure with an improved flexibility and device control system which totally controls the LSI-based multi-chip stimulator, counter electrode, and stimulation generator. We have implanted the fabricated multi-chip stimulator into sclera pocket for STS (Suprachoroidal Transretinal Stimulation) configuration. We successfully obtained EEP (Electrically Evoked Potential) on visual cortex evoked by the multi-chip stimulator.

  8. Spatially distributed sequential stimulation reduces muscle fatigue during neuromuscular electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sayenko, Dimitry G; Popovic, Milos R; Masani, Kei

    2013-01-01

    A critical limitation with neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) approach is the rapid onset of muscle fatigue during repeated contractions, which results in the muscle force decay and slowing of muscle contractile properties. In our previous study, we demonstrated that spatially distributed sequential stimulation (SDSS) show a drastically greater fatigue-reducing ability compared to a conventional, single active electrode stimulation (SES) with an individual with spinal cord injury when applied for plantar flexors. The purpose of the present study is to explore the fatigue-reducing ability of SDSS for major lower limb muscle groups in the able-bodied population as well as individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). SDSS was delivered through four active electrodes applied to the muscle of interest, sending a stimulation pulse to each electrode one after another with 90° phase shift between successive electrodes. For comparison, SES was delivered through one active electrode. For both modes of stimulation, the resultant frequency to the muscle as a whole was 40 Hz. Using corresponding protocols for the fatiguing stimulation, we demonstrated the fatigue-reducing ability of SDSS by higher fatigue indices as compared with single active electrode setup for major leg muscles in both subject groups. The present work verifies and extends reported findings on the effectiveness of using spatially distributed sequential stimulation in the leg muscles to reduce muscle fatigue. Application of this technique can improve the usefulness of NMES during functional movements in the clinical setup.

  9. Neuromagnetic effects of pico-Tesla stimulation.

    PubMed

    Troebinger, Luzia; Anninos, Photios; Barnes, Gareth

    2015-09-01

    We used a double-blind experimental design to look for an effect of pico-Tesla magnetic stimulation in healthy subjects. Pico-Tesla stimulation is thought to increase the dominant frequency of 2-7 Hz oscillations in the human brain. We used magnetoencephalography to measure resting state brain activity. Each subject had two separate recording sessions consisting of three runs in between which they were given real or sham pT stimulation. We then tried to predict the real and sham stimulation sessions based on changes in the mean peak frequency in the 2-7 Hz band. Our predictions for these individual runs were 8 out of 14 at chance level (p = 0.39). After unblinding, we found no significant effect (p = 0.11) of an increase in the frequency range (2-7 Hz) across the subject group. Finally, we performed a Bayesian model comparison between the effect size predicted from previous clinical studies and a null model. Even though this study had a sensitivity advantage of at least one order of magnitude over previous work, we found the null model to be significantly (2000 times) more likely.

  10. STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEEP WELL COMPLETIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Wolhart

    2003-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a project to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. Phase 1 was recently completed and consisted of assessing deep gas well drilling activity (1995-2007) and an industry survey on deep gas well stimulation practices by region. Of the 29,000 oil, gas and dry holes drilled in 2002, about 300 were drilled in the deep well; 25% were dry, 50% were high temperature/high pressure completions and 25% were simply deep completions. South Texas has about 30% of these wells, Oklahoma 20%, Gulf of Mexico Shelf 15% and the Gulf Coast about 15%. The Rockies represent only 2% of deep drilling. Of the 60 operators who drill deep and HTHP wells, the top 20 drill almost 80% of the wells. Six operators drill half the U.S. deep wells. Deep drilling peaked at 425 wells in 1998 and fell to 250 in 1999. Drilling is expected to rise through 2004 after which drilling should cycle down as overall drilling declines.

  11. Infant and Infirm Language Stimulation Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeser, Gregory J.; And Others

    Presented is a language stimulation curriculum guide designed for severely mentally retarded institutionalized persons. Pre- and post-assessments and behavioral objectives with teaching suggestions are provided for the following curriculum areas: early motor development (such as sitting, crawling, and walking skills); adaptive skills (including…

  12. Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions

    SciTech Connect

    2004-03-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. An assessment of historical deep gas well drilling activity and forecast of future trends was completed during the first six months of the project; this segment of the project was covered in Technical Progress Report No. 1. During the next six months, efforts were primarily split between summarizing rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep reservoirs and contacting operators about case studies of deep gas well stimulation as documented in Technical Progress Report No. 2. This report details work done with Anadarko and ChevronTexaco in the Table Rock Field in Wyoming.

  13. Extracellular proton release by stimulated neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    van Zwieten, R.; Wever, R.; Hamers, M.N.; Weening, R.S.; Roos, D.

    1981-07-01

    We have tried to elucidate the mechanism of phagosome acidification in human neutrophils. Assuming that phenomena occurring at the plasma membrane reflect reactions in the phagocytic vacuoles, we have stimulated human neutrophils with agents that induce a ''respiratory burst,'' and we have measured the release of protons into the extracellular medium. Phorbol myristate acetate, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine and serum-opsonized zymosan particles each caused a rapid release of protons, concomitant with the increase in oxygen consumption. The stimulated release of protons was strictly coupled to the increase respiration of the cells, because inhibition of the respiration of either anaerobiosis, chlorpromazine, or glycolytic inhibitors also inhibited the release of protons. Also, in the presence of the above-mentioned stimulating agents, neutrophils from three patients with chronic granulomatous disease enhanced neither respiration not proton release. In normal cells, the ratio of deltaH+/-deltaO2 was 1.04 +/- 0.19 (mean +/ SD, n . 13). The mechanism of this proton release is not clear. The amount of lactic and carbonic acid produced by stimulated neutrophils was inadequate to explain the amount of protons released. Perhydroxyl radicals were also ruled out as the source of the protons. Because the cells did not release measurable amounts of phosphate ions, a phosphate-hydroxyl-ion antiport was also excluded. Finally, the lack of any effect of uncouplers renders it unlikely that a respiration-driven proton gradient is built up across the plasma membrane.

  14. Galvanic vestibular stimulation speeds visual memory recall.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, David; Nicholls, Sophie; Pattenden, Charlotte; Kilduff, Patrick; Milberg, William

    2008-08-01

    The experiments of Alessandro Volta were amongst the first to indicate that visuo-spatial function can be altered by stimulating the vestibular nerves with galvanic current. Until recently, the beneficial effects of the procedure were masked by the high levels of electrical current applied, which induced nystagmus-related gaze deviation and spatial disorientation. However, several neuropsychological studies have shown that much weaker, imperceptible currents that do not elicit unpleasant side-effects can help overcome visual loss after stroke. Here, we show that visual processing in neurologically healthy individuals can also benefit from galvanic vestibular stimulation. Participants first learnt the names of eight unfamiliar faces and then after a short delay, answered questions from memory about how pairs of these faces differed. Mean correct reaction times were significantly shorter when sub-sensory, noise-enhanced anodal stimulation was administered to the left mastoid, compared to when no stimulation was administered at all. This advantage occurred with no loss in response accuracy, and raises the possibility that the procedure may constitute a more general form of cognitive enhancement.

  15. [Transcranial magnetic stimulation used in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Bouché, Christophe; Marigaux, Sandrine; Pattedoie, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation is a non-invasive treatment technique, using electromagnetism properties. It has been used for around twenty years in neurology (treatment of neuropathic pain, certain abnormal movements, Parkinson's disease), and in psychiatry (obsessive compulsive disorder, hallucinations, mood disorders, etc.). The presence and support of a nurse during the sessions is essential.

  16. Feedback Dialogues That Stimulate Students' Reflective Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Schaaf, Marieke; Baartman, Liesbeth; Prins, Frans; Oosterbaan, Anne; Schaap, Harmen

    2013-01-01

    How can feedback dialogues stimulate students' reflective thinking? This study aims to investigate: (1) the effects of feedback dialogues between teachers and students on students' perceptions of teacher feedback and (2) the relation between features of feedback dialogues and students' thinking activities as part of reflective thinking. A…

  17. Motor cortex stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    De Rose, Marisa; Guzzi, Giusy; Bosco, Domenico; Romano, Mary; Lavano, Serena Marianna; Plastino, Massimiliano; Volpentesta, Giorgio; Marotta, Rosa; Lavano, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Motor Cortex Stimulation (MCS) is less efficacious than Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease. However, it might be proposed to patients excluded from DBS or unresponsive to DBS. Ten patients with advanced PD underwent unilateral MCS contralaterally to the worst clinical side. A plate electrode was positioned over the motor cortex in the epidural space through single burr hole after identification of the area with neuronavigation and neurophysiological tests. Clinical assessment was performed by total UPDRS, UPDRS III total, UPDRS III-items 27-31, UPDRS IV, and UPDRS II before implantation in off-medication and on-medication states and after surgery at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months in on-medication/on-stimulation and off-medication/on-stimulation states. We assessed changes of quality of life, throughout the Parkinson's disease quality of life scale (PDQoL-39), and the dose of anti-Parkinson's disease medications, throughout the Ldopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD). During off-medication state, we observed moderate and transitory reduction of total UPDRS and UPDRS total scores and significant and long-lasting improvement in UPDRS III items 27-31 score for axial symptoms. There was marked reduction of UPDRS IV score and LEDD. PDQL-39 improvement was also significant. No important complications and adverse events occurred.

  18. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation: Research Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Florene Carnicelli

    Currently, research is being performed in the area of nonsurgical and nonchemical means for influencing the body's threshold for pain. Today, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is being widely used for this purpose. Application of this treatment can be confusing, however, because determining such things as selection of the proper…

  19. Extra Stimulation in Intermediate Grade Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, George E.

    Three types of extra stimulation in reading are discussed: extra teacher time devoted to teaching reading, extra student time devoted to practice in reading, and extra motivation and reinforcement leading to greater amounts of student reading outside the school. Problems are created (1) when teaching time spent on reading is increased in the…

  20. Stimulating Cultural Appetites: An Experiential Gourmet Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez, Carolyn I.; Hu Poirier, Vickie

    2007-01-01

    This article is an extension of a presentation that won "Best Exercise" at the Eastern Academy of Management, 1998. The authors introduce an experiential gourmet approach using "food stories" to stimulate an aura of acceptance and appreciation for human commonalities before delving into human differences. The authors use a semester long…

  1. [Biogenic stimulants of metabolism in articular cartilage].

    PubMed

    Novikov, V E; Novikova, A V

    2011-01-01

    The review considers issues of pharmacodynamics and clinical applications of drugs with the metabolic type of action, which stimulate regeneration and provide the protective action on articular cartilage in cases of osteoarthritis. Published data of the experimental and clinical trials of the main chondroprotective agents are analyzed.

  2. Computer Games Functioning as Motivation Stimulants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Grace Hui Chin; Tsai, Tony Kung Wan; Chien, Paul Shih Chieh

    2011-01-01

    Numerous scholars have recommended computer games can function as influential motivation stimulants of English learning, showing benefits as learning tools (Clarke and Dede, 2007; Dede, 2009; Klopfer and Squire, 2009; Liu and Chu, 2010; Mitchell, Dede & Dunleavy, 2009). This study aimed to further test and verify the above suggestion,…

  3. Quantum theory of laser-stimulated desorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slutsky, M. S.; George, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    A quantum theory of laser-stimulated desorption (LSDE) is presented and critically analyzed. It is shown how LSDE depends on laser-pulse characteristics and surface-lattice dynamics. Predictions of the theory for a Debye model of the lattice dynamics are compared to recent experimental results.

  4. Social Early Stimulation of Trisomy-21 Babies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aparicio, Maria Teresa Sanz; Balana, Javier Menendez

    2003-01-01

    This study was initiated with twenty Down's syndrome babies to verify whether subjects undergoing social early stimulation would benefit from this type of treatment. An experimental study was designed with two training groups: visual or written instructions. The analyses of the results established statistically significant differences in the…

  5. Instrument for two-speed optokinetic stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandaurov, I. F.; Shestak, L. A.; Kuvshinov, Y. A.

    1980-01-01

    A device for providing optokinetic stimulation is described which has the advantages of being small, simple in design, and permits automatic operation in four directions at two drum speeds. The device has a screened chamber allowing polygraphic recording of optokinetic reactions by EEG.

  6. Motor-Cognitive Stimulation of the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Ana Rey; Lacruz, Inmaculada Canales; Pais, Maria Ines Taboas

    2011-01-01

    This article shows the cognitive and motor-perceptive effects of the application of a cognitive stimulating program through motor function on 234 elderly people. The assessment was carried out prior to and after the program. Significant improvements in the experimental group were observed (p [less than or equal to] 0.05) in six of the eight…

  7. Motor Cortex Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    De Rose, Marisa; Guzzi, Giusy; Bosco, Domenico; Romano, Mary; Lavano, Serena Marianna; Plastino, Massimiliano; Volpentesta, Giorgio; Marotta, Rosa; Lavano, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Motor Cortex Stimulation (MCS) is less efficacious than Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease. However, it might be proposed to patients excluded from DBS or unresponsive to DBS. Ten patients with advanced PD underwent unilateral MCS contralaterally to the worst clinical side. A plate electrode was positioned over the motor cortex in the epidural space through single burr hole after identification of the area with neuronavigation and neurophysiological tests. Clinical assessment was performed by total UPDRS, UPDRS III total, UPDRS III-items 27–31, UPDRS IV, and UPDRS II before implantation in off-medication and on-medication states and after surgery at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months in on-medication/on-stimulation and off-medication/on-stimulation states. We assessed changes of quality of life, throughout the Parkinson's disease quality of life scale (PDQoL-39), and the dose of anti-Parkinson's disease medications, throughout the Ldopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD). During off-medication state, we observed moderate and transitory reduction of total UPDRS and UPDRS total scores and significant and long-lasting improvement in UPDRS III items 27–31 score for axial symptoms. There was marked reduction of UPDRS IV score and LEDD. PDQL-39 improvement was also significant. No important complications and adverse events occurred. PMID:23213520

  8. Stimulate Students' Interest by Genetics Exordium Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yan

    2009-01-01

    Genetics is the important specialized course of bioscience and whether exordium is taught wonderfully or not plays the important and pivotal role. Well teaching exordium class may stimulate students, deep interest and intense desire for knowledge in this class. This text, according to teaching experience and taste, puts forward several teaching…

  9. Causal Measurement Models: Can Criticism Stimulate Clarification?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markus, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    In their 2016 work, Aguirre-Urreta et al. provided a contribution to the literature on causal measurement models that enhances clarity and stimulates further thinking. Aguirre-Urreta et al. presented a form of statistical identity involving mapping onto the portion of the parameter space involving the nomological net, relationships between the…

  10. Amino acid odorants stimulate microvillar sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Lipschitz, David L; Michel, William C

    2002-03-01

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) of zebrafish is populated with ciliated and microvillar olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Whether distinct classes of odorants specifically activate either of these unique populations of OSNs is unknown. Previously we demonstrated that zebrafish OSNs could be labeled in an activity-dependent fashion by amino acid but not bile acid odorants. To determine which sensory neuron type was stimulated by amino acid odorants, we labeled OSNs using the ion channel permeant probe agmatine (AGB) and analyzed its distribution with conventional light- and electron-microscope immunocytochemical techniques. Approximately 7% of the sensory epithelium was labeled by AGB exposure alone. Following stimulation with one of the eight amino acids tested, the proportion of labeled epithelium increased from 9% for histidine to 19% for alanine; amino acid stimulated increases in labeling of 2-12% over control labeling. Only histidine failed to stimulate a significant increase in the proportion of labeled OSNs compared to control preparations. Most amino acid sensitive OSNs were located superficially in the epithelium and immuno-electron microscopy demonstrated that the labeled OSNs were predominantly microvillar. Large numbers of nanogold particles (20-60 per 1.5 microm(2)) were associated with microvillar olfactory sensory neurons (MSNs), while few such particles (<15 per 1.5 microm(2)) were observed over ciliated olfactory sensory neurons (CSNs), supporting cells (SCs) and areas without tissue, such as the lumen above the OE. Collectively, these findings indicate that microvillar sensory neurons are capable of detecting amino acid odorants.

  11. How Learning Environments Can Stimulate Student Imagination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Chaoyun; Hsu, Yuling; Huang, Yinghsiu; Chen, Sheng-Chih

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate an array of environmental factors that can stimulate imagination and explore how these factors manifest in different design phases. The participants of this study were students in the field of educational technology from four universities across Taiwan. The instructional design process was divided into…

  12. Computational analysis of deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Cameron C; Miocinovic, Svjetlana; Butson, Christopher R

    2007-09-01

    Chronic, high-frequency electrical stimulation of subcortical brain structures (deep brain stimulation [DBS]) is an effective clinical treatment for several medically refractory neurological disorders. However, the clinical successes of DBS are tempered by the limited understanding of the response of neurons to applied electric fields and scientific definition of the therapeutic mechanisms of DBS remains elusive. In addition, it is presently unclear which electrode designs and stimulation parameters are optimal for maximum therapeutic benefit and minimal side effects. Detailed computer modeling of DBS has recently emerged as a powerful technique to enhance our understanding of the effects of DBS and to create a virtual testing ground for new stimulation paradigms. This review summarizes the fundamentals of neurostimulation modeling and provides an overview of some of the scientific contributions of computer models to the field of DBS. We then provide a prospective view on the application of DBS-modeling tools to augment the clinical utility of DBS and to design the next generation of DBS technology.

  13. Aromatase inhibitors in stimulated IVF cycles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors have been introduced as a new treatment modality that could challenge clomiphene citrate as an ovulation induction regiment in patients with PCOS. Although several randomized trials have been conducted regarding their use as ovulation induction agents, only few trials are available regarding their efficacy in IVF stimulated cycles. Current available evidence support that letrozole may have a promising role in stimulated IVF cycles, either when administered during the follicular phase for ovarian stimulation. Especially for women with poor ovarian response, letrozole appears to have the potential to increase clinical pregnancy rates when combined with gonadotropins, whereas at the same time reduces the total gonadotropin dose required for ovarian stimulation. However, given that in all of the trials letrozole has been administered in GnRH antagonist cycles, it is intriguing to test in the future how it may perform when used in GnRH agonist cycles. Finally administration of letrozole during luteal phase in IVF cycles offers another treatment modality for patients at high risk for OHSS taking into account that it drastically reduces estradiol levels PMID:21693033

  14. Electrical Stimulation as an Aid to Speechreading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Richard S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This paper, discussing use of electrical stimulation by postlingually deafened adults to supplement speechreading, focuses on: information conveyed by vision, acoustic information needed to resolve visual confusions, basic psychophysical abilities of cochlear implant patients, auditory-alone and audiovisual perception by cochlear-implant patients,…

  15. Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Pride, S.R.; Flekkoy, E.G.; Aursjo, O.

    2008-07-22

    The pore-scale effects of seismic stimulation on two-phase flow are modeled numerically in random 2D grain0pack geometries. Seismic stimulation aims to enhance oil production by sending seismic waves across a reservoir to liberate immobile patches of oil. For seismic amplitudes above a well-defined (analytically expressed) dimensionless criterion, the force perturbation associated with the waves indeed can liberate oil trapped on capillary barriers and get it flowing again under the background pressure gradient. Subsequent coalescence of the freed oil droplets acts to enhance oil movement further because longer bubbles overcome capillary barriers more efficiently than shorter bubbles do. Poroelasticity theory defines the effective force that a seismic wave adds to the background fluid-pressure gradient. The lattice-Boltzmann model in two dimensions is used to perform pore-scale numerical simulations. Dimensionless numbers (groups of material and force parameters) involved in seismic stimulation are defined carefully so that numerical simulations can be applied to field-scale conditions. Using the analytical criteria defined in the paper, there is a significant range of reservoir conditions over which seismic stimulation can be expected to enhance oil production.

  16. Mechanism of orientation of stimulating currents in magnetic brain stimulation (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, S.; Matsuda, T.

    1991-04-01

    We made a functional map of the human motor cortex related to the hand and foot areas by stimulating the human brain with a focused magnetic pulse. We observed that each functional area in the cortex has an optimum direction for which stimulating currents can produce neural excitation. The present report focuses on the mechanism which is responsible for producing this anisotropic response to brain stimulation. We first obtained a functional map of the brain related to the left ADM (abductor digiti minimi muscles). When the stimulating currents were aligned in the direction from the left to the right hemisphere, clear EMG (electromyographic) responses were obtained only from the left ADM to magnetic stimulation of both hemisphere. When the stimulating currents were aligned in the direction from the right to the left hemisphere, clear EMG signals were obtained only from the right ADM to magnetic stimulation of both hemisphere. The functional maps of the brain were sensitive to changes in the direction of the stimulating currents. To explain the phenomena obtained in the experiments, we developed a model of neural excitation elicited by magnetic stimulation. When eddy currents which are induced by pulsed magnetic fields flow in the direction from soma to the distal part of neural fiber, depolarized area in the distal part are excited, and the membrane excitation propagates along the nerve fiber. In contrast, when the induced currents flow in the direction from the distal part to soma, hyperpolarized parts block or inhibit neural excitation even if the depolarized parts near the soma can be excited. The model explains our observation that the orientation of the induced current vectors reflect both the functional and anatomical organization of the neural fibers in the brain.

  17. Evaluation of Intradural Stimulation Efficiency and Selectivity in a Computational Model of Spinal Cord Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Bryan; Lad, Shivanand P.; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is an alternative or adjunct therapy to treat chronic pain, a prevalent and clinically challenging condition. Although SCS has substantial clinical success, the therapy is still prone to failures, including lead breakage, lead migration, and poor pain relief. The goal of this study was to develop a computational model of SCS and use the model to compare activation of neural elements during intradural and extradural electrode placement. We constructed five patient-specific models of SCS. Stimulation thresholds predicted by the model were compared to stimulation thresholds measured intraoperatively, and we used these models to quantify the efficiency and selectivity of intradural and extradural SCS. Intradural placement dramatically increased stimulation efficiency and reduced the power required to stimulate the dorsal columns by more than 90%. Intradural placement also increased selectivity, allowing activation of a greater proportion of dorsal column fibers before spread of activation to dorsal root fibers, as well as more selective activation of individual dermatomes at different lateral deviations from the midline. Further, the results suggest that current electrode designs used for extradural SCS are not optimal for intradural SCS, and a novel azimuthal tripolar design increased stimulation selectivity, even beyond that achieved with an intradural paddle array. Increased stimulation efficiency is expected to increase the battery life of implantable pulse generators, increase the recharge interval of rechargeable implantable pulse generators, and potentially reduce stimulator volume. The greater selectivity of intradural stimulation may improve the success rate of SCS by mitigating the sensitivity of pain relief to malpositioning of the electrode. The outcome of this effort is a better quantitative understanding of how intradural electrode placement can potentially increase the selectivity and efficiency of SCS, which, in turn

  18. External trial deep brain stimulation device for the application of desynchronizing stimulation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, C.; Roulet, J.-C.; Niederhauser, J. J.; Döll, W.; Kirlangic, M. E.; Lysyansky, B.; Krachkovskyi, V.; Bhatti, M. A.; Barnikol, U. B.; Sasse, L.; Bührle, C. P.; Speckmann, E.-J.; Götz, M.; Sturm, V.; Freund, H.-J.; Schnell, U.; Tass, P. A.

    2009-12-01

    In the past decade deep brain stimulation (DBS)—the application of electrical stimulation to specific target structures via implanted depth electrodes—has become the standard treatment for medically refractory Parkinson's disease and essential tremor. These diseases are characterized by pathological synchronized neuronal activity in particular brain areas. We present an external trial DBS device capable of administering effectively desynchronizing stimulation techniques developed with methods from nonlinear dynamics and statistical physics according to a model-based approach. These techniques exploit either stochastic phase resetting principles or complex delayed-feedback mechanisms. We explain how these methods are implemented into a safe and user-friendly device.

  19. Tissue damage thresholds during therapeutic electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Ludwig, Kip A.; Welle, Cristin G.; Takmakov, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Recent initiatives in bioelectronic modulation of the nervous system by the NIH (SPARC), DARPA (ElectRx, SUBNETS) and the GlaxoSmithKline Bioelectronic Medicines effort are ushering in a new era of therapeutic electrical stimulation. These novel therapies are prompting a re-evaluation of established electrical thresholds for stimulation-induced tissue damage. Approach. In this review, we explore what is known and unknown in published literature regarding tissue damage from electrical stimulation. Main results. For macroelectrodes, the potential for tissue damage is often assessed by comparing the intensity of stimulation, characterized by the charge density and charge per phase of a stimulus pulse, with a damage threshold identified through histological evidence from in vivo experiments as described by the Shannon equation. While the Shannon equation has proved useful in assessing the likely occurrence of tissue damage, the analysis is limited by the experimental parameters of the original studies. Tissue damage is influenced by factors not explicitly incorporated into the Shannon equation, including pulse frequency, duty cycle, current density, and electrode size. Microelectrodes in particular do not follow the charge per phase and charge density co-dependence reflected in the Shannon equation. The relevance of these factors to tissue damage is framed in the context of available reports from modeling and in vivo studies. Significance. It is apparent that emerging applications, especially with microelectrodes, will require clinical charge densities that exceed traditional damage thresholds. Experimental data show that stimulation at higher charge densities can be achieved without causing tissue damage, suggesting that safety parameters for microelectrodes might be distinct from those defined for macroelectrodes. However, these increased charge densities may need to be justified by bench, non-clinical or clinical testing to provide evidence of device

  20. Temporal Prediction in lieu of Periodic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Charles E.; Wyart, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    Predicting not only what will happen, but also when it will happen is extremely helpful for optimizing perception and action. Temporal predictions driven by periodic stimulation increase perceptual sensitivity and reduce response latencies. At the neurophysiological level, a single mechanism has been proposed to mediate this twofold behavioral improvement: the rhythmic entrainment of slow cortical oscillations to the stimulation rate. However, temporal regularities can occur in aperiodic contexts, suggesting that temporal predictions per se may be dissociable from entrainment to periodic sensory streams. We investigated this possibility in two behavioral experiments, asking human participants to detect near-threshold auditory tones embedded in streams whose temporal and spectral properties were manipulated. While our findings confirm that periodic stimulation reduces response latencies, in agreement with the hypothesis of a stimulus-driven entrainment of neural excitability, they further reveal that this motor facilitation can be dissociated from the enhancement of auditory sensitivity. Perceptual sensitivity improvement is unaffected by the nature of temporal regularities (periodic vs aperiodic), but contingent on the co-occurrence of a fulfilled spectral prediction. Altogether, the dissociation between predictability and periodicity demonstrates that distinct mechanisms flexibly and synergistically operate to facilitate perception and action. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Temporal predictions are increasingly recognized as fundamental instruments for optimizing performance, enabling mammals to exploit regularities in the world. However, the notion of temporal predictions is often confounded with the idea of entrainment to periodic sensory inputs. At the behavioral level, it is also unclear whether perceptual sensitivity and reaction time improvements benefit the same way from temporal predictions and periodic stimulation. In two behavioral experiments on human

  1. Tissue damage thresholds during therapeutic electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cogan, Stuart F; Ludwig, Kip A; Welle, Cristin G; Takmakov, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Objective Recent initiatives in bioelectronic modulation of the nervous system by the NIH (SPARC), DARPA (ElectRx, SUBNETS) and the GlaxoSmithKline Bioelectronic Medicines effort are ushering in a new era of therapeutic electrical stimulation. These novel therapies are prompting a re-evaluation of established electrical thresholds for stimulation-induced tissue damage. Approach In this review, we explore what is known and unknown in published literature regarding tissue damage from electrical stimulation. Main results For macroelectrodes, the potential for tissue damage is often assessed by comparing the intensity of stimulation, characterized by the charge density and charge per phase of a stimulus pulse, with a damage threshold identified through histological evidence from in vivo experiments as described by the Shannon equation. While the Shannon equation has proved useful in assessing the likely occurrence of tissue damage, the analysis is limited by the experimental parameters of the original studies. Tissue damage is influenced by factors not explicitly incorporated into the Shannon equation, including pulse frequency, duty cycle, current density, and electrode size. Microelectrodes in particular do not follow the charge per phase and charge density co-dependence reflected in the Shannon equation. The relevance of these factors to tissue damage is framed in the context of available reports from modeling and in vivo studies. Significance It is apparent that emerging applications, especially with microelectrodes, will require clinical charge densities that exceed traditional damage thresholds. Experimental data show that stimulation at higher charge densities can be achieved without causing tissue damage, suggesting that safety parameters for microelectrodes might be distinct from those defined for macroelectrodes. However, these increased charge densities may need to be justified by bench, non-clinical or clinical testing to provide evidence of device safety

  2. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation of fungal secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Zeinab G.; Kalansuriya, Pabasara; Capon, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a preliminary investigation of the use the Gram-negative bacterial cell wall constituent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a natural chemical cue to stimulate and alter the expression of fungal secondary metabolism. Integrated high-throughput micro-cultivation and micro-analysis methods determined that 6 of 40 (15%) of fungi tested responded to an optimal exposure to LPS (0.6 ng/mL) by activating, enhancing or accelerating secondary metabolite production. To explore the possible mechanisms behind this effect, we employed light and fluorescent microscopy in conjunction with a nitric oxide (NO)-sensitive fluorescent dye and an NO scavenger to provide evidence that LPS stimulation of fungal secondary metabolism coincided with LPS activation of NO. Several case studies demonstrated that LPS stimulation can be scaled from single microplate well (1.5 mL) to preparative (>400 mL) scale cultures. For example, LPS treatment of Penicillium sp. (ACM-4616) enhanced pseurotin A and activated pseurotin A1 and pseurotin A2 biosynthesis, whereas LPS treatment of Aspergillus sp. (CMB-M81F) substantially accelerated and enhanced the biosynthesis of shornephine A and a series of biosynthetically related ardeemins and activated production of neoasterriquinone. As an indication of broader potential, we provide evidence that cultures of Penicillium sp. (CMB-TF0411), Aspergillus niger (ACM-4993F), Rhizopus oryzae (ACM-165F) and Thanatephorus cucumeris (ACM-194F) were responsive to LPS stimulation, the latter two examples being particular noteworthy as neither are known to produce secondary metabolites. Our results encourage the view that LPS stimulation can be used as a valuable tool to expand the molecular discovery potential of fungal strains that either have been exhaustively studied by or are unresponsive to traditional culture methodology. PMID:25379339

  3. Deep brain light stimulation effects on glutamate and dopamine concentration.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jinn-Rung; Lin, Shih-Shian; Liu, Janelle; Chen, Shih-How; Chio, Chung-Chin; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Liu, Jia-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Compared to deep brain electrical stimulation, which has been applied to treating pathological brain diseases, little work has been done on the effect of deep brain light stimulation. A fiber-coupled laser stimulator at 840 nm wavelength and 130 Hz pulse repetition rate is developed in this work for deep brain light stimulation in a rat model. Concentration changes in glutamate and dopamine in the striatum are observed using a microdialysis probe when the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is stimulated at various optical power levels. Experimental results show that light stimulation causes the concentration of glutamate to decrease while that of dopamine is increased. This suggests that deep brain light stimulation of the STN is a promising therapeutic strategy for dopamine-related diseases such as Parkinson's disease. The stimulator developed for this work is useful for deep brain light stimulation in biomedical research.

  4. Colon emptying induced by sequential electrical stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Sevcencu, Cristian; Rijkhoff, Nico J M; Sinkjaer, Thomas

    2005-12-01

    Electrical stimulation could be used to induce colon emptying. The present experiments were performed to establish a stimulation pattern to optimize the stimulation parameters and to test neural involvement in propulsion induced by electrical stimulation. Colon segments were sequentially stimulated using rectangular pulses. The resulting propulsive activity displaced intraluminal content in consecutive propulsion steps. The propulsion steps differed in displacement latency, distance, and velocity along the stimulated colon. Increasing the pulse duration or amplitude resulted in a decrease of the latency. Increasing the stimulation amplitude doubled the displacement distance. The frequencies tested in the present study did not affect propulsion. Inhibition of cholinergic and nitrergic pathways inhibited propulsion. Electrical stimulation can induce colonic propulsion. Motor differences are present along the descending colon. The most suitable combination of pulse parameters regarding colon stimulation is 0.3 ms, 5 mA, 10 Hz. Neural circuits are involved in propulsion when using these values.

  5. Activation of SC during electrical stimulation of LGN: retinal antidromic stimulation or corticocollicular activation?

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yusuke; Augath, Mark; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2011-12-01

    We have recently used combined electrostimulation, neurophysiology, microinjection and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the cortical activity patterns elicited during stimulation of cortical afferents in monkeys. We found that stimulation of a site in lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) increases the fMRI signal in the regions of primary visual cortex receiving input from that site, but suppresses it in the retinotopically matched regions of extrastriate cortex. Intracortical injection experiments showed that such suppression is due to synaptic inhibition. During these experiments, we have consistently observed activation of superior colliculus (SC) following LGN stimulation. Since LGN does not directly project to SC, the current study investigated the origin of SC activation. By examining experimental manipulations inactivating the primary visual cortex, we present here evidence that the robust SC activation, which follows the stimulation of LGN, is due to the activation of corticocollicular pathway.

  6. Anti-inflammatory effect of transduced PEP-1-heme oxygenase-1 in Raw 264.7 cells and a mouse edema model

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Soon Won; Sohn, Eun Jeong; Kim, Dae Won; Jeong, Hoon Jae; Kim, Mi Jin; Ahn, Eun Hee; Kim, Young Nam; Dutta, Suman; Kim, Duk-Soo; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Hwang, Hyun Sook; Choi, Soo Young

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Recombinant PEP-1 heme oxygenase-1 expression vector was constructed and overexpressed. {yields} We investigated transduction efficiency of PEP-1-HO-1 protein in Raw 264.7 cells. {yields} PEP-1-HO-1 was efficiently transduced into Raw 264.7 cells in a dose and time dependent manner. {yields} PEP-1-HO-1 exerted anti-inflammatory activity in Raw 264.7 cells and in a mice edema model. {yields} PEP-1-HO-1 could be used as a therapeutic drug against inflammatory diseases. -- Abstract: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which catalyzes the degradation of free heme to biliverdin, carbon monoxide (CO), and free iron (Fe{sup 2+}), is up-regulated by several cellular stress and cell injuries, including inflammation, ischemia and hypoxia. In this study, we examined whether fusion of HO-1 with PEP-1, a protein transduction domain that is able to deliver exogenous molecules to living cells or tissues, would facilitate HO-1 delivery to target cells and tissues, and thereby effectively exert a therapeutically useful response against inflammation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that PEP-1-HO-1 fusion proteins were transduced into Raw 264.7 cells in time- and dose-dependent manners, and were stably maintained in the cells for about 60 h. In addition, fluorescence analysis revealed that only PEP-1-HO-1 fusion proteins were significantly transduced into the cytoplasm of cells, while HO-1 proteins failed to be transduced. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated Raw 264.7 cells and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced mouse edema model, transduced PEP-1-HO-1 fusion proteins effectively inhibited the overexpression of pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines. Also, histological analysis demonstrated that PEP-1-HO-1 remarkably suppressed ear edema. The results suggest that the PEP-1-HO-1 fusion protein can be used as a therapeutic molecule against reactive oxygen species-related inflammatory diseases.

  7. Tissue heme oxygenase-1 exerts anti-inflammatory effects on LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Konrad, F M; Knausberg, U; Höne, R; Ngamsri, K-C; Reutershan, J

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been shown to display anti-inflammatory properties in models of acute pulmonary inflammation. For the first time, we investigated the role of leukocytic HO-1 using a model of HO-1(flox/flox) mice lacking leukocytic HO-1 that were subjected to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute pulmonary inflammation. Immunohistology and flow cytometry demonstrated that activation of HO-1 using hemin decreased migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) to the lung interstitium and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in the wild-type and, surprisingly, also in HO-1(flox/flox) mice, emphasizing the anti-inflammatory potential of nonmyeloid HO-1. Nevertheless, hemin reduced the CXCL1, CXCL2/3, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), and interleukin 6 (IL6) levels in both animal strains. Microvascular permeability was attenuated by hemin in wild-type and HO-1(flox/flox) mice, indicating a crucial role of non-myeloid HO-1 in endothelial integrity. The determination of the activity of HO-1 in mouse lungs revealed no compensatory increase in the HO-1(flox/flox) mice. Topical administration of hemin via inhalation reduced the dose required to attenuate PMN migration and microvascular permeability by a factor of 40, emphasizing its clinical potential. In addition, HO-1 stimulation was protective against pulmonary inflammation when initiated after the inflammatory stimulus. In conclusion, nonmyeloid HO-1 is crucial for the anti-inflammatory effect of this enzyme on PMN migration to different compartments of the lung and on microvascular permeability.

  8. Monitoring changes in hemodynamics following optogenetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frye, Seth

    The brain is composed of billions of neurons, all of which connected through a vast network. After years of study and applications of different technologies and techniques, there are still more questions than answers when it comes to the fundamental functions of the brain. This project aims to provide a new tool which can be used to gain a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that govern neurological processes inside the brain. In order for neural networks to operate, blood has to be supplied through neighboring blood vessels. As such, the increase or decrease in the blood supply has been used as an indicator of neural activity. The neural activity and blood supply relationship is known as neural vasculature coupling. Monitoring the hemodynamics is used as an indicator of neurological activity, but the causal relationship is an area of current research. Gaining a better understanding of the coupling of neural activity and the surrounding vasculature provides a more accurate methodology to evaluate regional neural activity. The new optical technology applied in this project provides a set of tools to both stimulate and monitor this coupling relationship. Optogenetics provides the capability of stimulating neural activity using specific wavelengths of light. Essentially this tool allows for the direct stimulation of networks of neurons by simply shining one color of light onto the brain. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), another new optical technology applied in this project, can record volumetric images of blood vessels and flow using only infrared light. The combination of the two optical technologies is then capable of stimulating neural activity and monitoring the hemodynamic response inside the brain using only light. As a result of this project we have successfully demonstrated the capability of both stimulating and imaging the brain using new optical technologies. The optical stimulation of neural activity has evoked a direct hemodynamic effect

  9. Computational electromagnetic methods for transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Luis J.

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive technique used both as a research tool for cognitive neuroscience and as a FDA approved treatment for depression. During TMS, coils positioned near the scalp generate electric fields and activate targeted brain regions. In this thesis, several computational electromagnetics methods that improve the analysis, design, and uncertainty quantification of TMS systems were developed. Analysis: A new fast direct technique for solving the large and sparse linear system of equations (LSEs) arising from the finite difference (FD) discretization of Maxwell's quasi-static equations was developed. Following a factorization step, the solver permits computation of TMS fields inside realistic brain models in seconds, allowing for patient-specific real-time usage during TMS. The solver is an alternative to iterative methods for solving FD LSEs, often requiring run-times of minutes. A new integral equation (IE) method for analyzing TMS fields was developed. The human head is highly-heterogeneous and characterized by high-relative permittivities (107). IE techniques for analyzing electromagnetic interactions with such media suffer from high-contrast and low-frequency breakdowns. The novel high-permittivity and low-frequency stable internally combined volume-surface IE method developed. The method not only applies to the analysis of high-permittivity objects, but it is also the first IE tool that is stable when analyzing highly-inhomogeneous negative permittivity plasmas. Design: TMS applications call for electric fields to be sharply focused on regions that lie deep inside the brain. Unfortunately, fields generated by present-day Figure-8 coils stimulate relatively large regions near the brain surface. An optimization method for designing single feed TMS coil-arrays capable of producing more localized and deeper stimulation was developed. Results show that the coil-arrays stimulate 2.4 cm into the head while stimulating 3

  10. Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation (tACS) Enhances Mental Rotation Performance during and after Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kasten, Florian H.; Herrmann, Christoph S.

    2017-01-01

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) has been repeatedly demonstrated to modulate endogenous brain oscillations in a frequency specific manner. Thus, it is a promising tool to uncover causal relationships between brain oscillations and behavior or perception. While tACS has been shown to elicit a physiological aftereffect for up to 70 min, it remains unclear whether the effect can still be elicited if subjects perform a complex task interacting with the stimulated frequency band. In addition, it has not yet been investigated whether the aftereffect is behaviorally relevant. In the current experiment, participants performed a Shepard-like mental rotation task for 80 min. After 10 min of baseline measurement, participants received either 20 min of tACS at their individual alpha frequency (IAF) or sham stimulation (30 s tACS in the beginning of the stimulation period). Afterwards another 50 min of post-stimulation EEG were recorded. Task performance and EEG were acquired during the whole experiment. While there were no effects of tACS on reaction times or event-related-potentials (ERPs), results revealed an increase in mental rotation performance in the stimulation group as compared to sham both during and after stimulation. This was accompanied by increased ongoing alpha power and coherence as well as event-related-desynchronization (ERD) in the alpha band in the stimulation group. The current study demonstrates a behavioral and physiological aftereffect of tACS in parallel. This indicates that it is possible to elicit aftereffects of tACS during tasks interacting with the alpha band. Therefore, the tACS aftereffect is suitable to achieve an experimental manipulation. PMID:28197084

  11. [Magneto-electrical stimulation (MES)--compared with percutaneous electrical stimulation (PES)].

    PubMed

    Ugawa, Y; Kohara, N; Shimpo, T; Mannen, T

    1989-01-01

    The central motor conduction was studied in 30 normal volunteers using a recently developed magneto-electrical stimulation technique (MES). The results were compared with those obtained by percutaneous electrical stimulation technique (PES) described previously. We made a magnetic stimulator similar to that of Barker et al. To stimulate the motor cortex, the magnetic coil was placed over the head. It was placed over the seventh cervical spinous process (C7) for cervical stimulation, and the first lumbar spinous process (L1) for lumbar stimulation. Cortical stimulation was performed when the subjects were at rest, and also at during weak voluntary contraction in some of them. Recordings were made from the deltoid (Del), biceps brachii (Bi), extensor carpi radialis (ECR), thenar, quadriceps femoris (Quad), tibialis anterior (TA) and flexor hallucis brevis (FHB) muscles with a pair of surface electrodes. The cortical and spinal latent periods (Lcor and Lsp, respectively) were measured. The central conduction time (CCT) was obtained by subtracting Lsp from Lcor for each muscle. In all subjects, responses were readily obtained by cortical, cervical and lumbar stimulations without discomfort in all the muscles examined. The cortical responses with amplitudes of more than 1mV could be recorded even in the lower limb muscles. There were no significant differences in Lsp and CCT between MES and PES, in all the upper limb muscles examined. The Lcors of the lower limb muscles obtained by MES were not different from those obtained by PES. However, the Lsps obtained by MES were significantly shorter than those by PES in the Quad and TA muscles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Hydraulic fracture stimulation treatment of Well Baca 23. Geothermal Reservoir Well-Stimulation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    Well Stimulation Experiment No. 5 of the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) was performed on March 22, 1981 in Baca 23, located in Union's Redondo Creek Project Area in Sandoval County, New Mexico. The treatment selected was a large hydraulic fracture job designed specifically for, and utilizing frac materials chosen for, the high temperature geothermal environment. The well selection, fracture treatment, experiment evaluation, and summary of the job costs are presented herein.

  13. Non-invasive brain stimulation in early rehabilitation after stroke.

    PubMed

    Blesneag, A V; Popa, L; Stan, A D

    2015-01-01

    The new tendency in rehabilitation involves non-invasive tools that, if applied early after stroke, promote neurorecovery. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation may correct the disruption of cortical excitability and effectively contribute to the restoration of movement and speech. The present paper analyses the results of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) trials, highlighting different aspects related to the repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation frequency, transcranial direct current stimulation polarity, the period and stimulation places in acute and subacute ischemic strokes. The risk of adverse events, the association with motor or language recovery specific training, and the cumulative positive effect evaluation are also discussed.

  14. Differential stimulation of the retina with subretinally injected exogenous neurotransmitter: A biomimetic alternative to electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Rountree, Corey M.; Inayat, Samsoon; Troy, John B.; Saggere, Laxman

    2016-01-01

    Subretinal stimulation of the retina with neurotransmitters, the normal means of conveying visual information, is a potentially better alternative to electrical stimulation widely used in current retinal prostheses for treating blindness from photoreceptor degenerative diseases. Yet, no subretinal electrical or chemical stimulation study has stimulated the OFF and ON pathways differentially through inner retinal activation. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of differentially stimulating retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) through the inner nuclear layer of the retina with glutamate, a primary neurotransmitter chemical, in a biomimetic way. We show that controlled pulsatile delivery of glutamate into the subsurface of explanted wild-type rat retinas elicits highly localized simultaneous inhibitory and excitatory spike rate responses in OFF and ON RGCs. We also present the spatiotemporal characteristics of RGC responses to subretinally injected glutamate and the therapeutic stimulation parameters. Our findings could pave the way for future development of a neurotransmitter-based subretinal prosthesis offering more naturalistic vision and better visual acuity than electrical prostheses. PMID:27929043

  15. Can the human lumbar posterior columns be stimulated by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation? A modeling study.

    PubMed

    Danner, Simon M; Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Ladenbauer, Josef; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2011-03-01

    Stimulation of different spinal cord segments in humans is a widely developed clinical practice for modification of pain, altered sensation, and movement. The human lumbar cord has become a target for modification of motor control by epidural and, more recently, by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation. Posterior columns of the lumbar spinal cord represent a vertical system of axons and when activated can add other inputs to the motor control of the spinal cord than stimulated posterior roots. We used a detailed three-dimensional volume conductor model of the torso and the McIntyre-Richard-Grill axon model to calculate the thresholds of axons within the posterior columns in response to transcutaneous lumbar spinal cord stimulation. Superficially located large-diameter posterior column fibers with multiple collaterals have a threshold of 45.4 V, three times higher than posterior root fibers (14.1 V). With the stimulation strength needed to activate posterior column axons, posterior root fibers of large and small diameters as well as anterior root fibers are coactivated. The reported results inform on these threshold differences, when stimulation is applied to the posterior structures of the lumbar cord at intensities above the threshold of large-diameter posterior root fibers.

  16. Post-stimulation block of frog sciatic nerve by high-frequency (kHz) biphasic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guangning; Xiao, Zhiying; Wang, Jicheng; Shen, Bing; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2017-04-01

    This study determined if high-frequency biphasic stimulation can induce nerve conduction block that persists after the stimulation is terminated, i.e., post-stimulation block. The frog sciatic nerve-muscle preparation was used in the study. Muscle contraction force induced by low-frequency (0.5 Hz) nerve stimulation was recorded to indicate the occurrence and recovery of nerve block induced by the high-frequency (5 or 10 kHz) biphasic stimulation. Nerve block was observed during high-frequency stimulation and after termination of the stimulation. The recovery from post-stimulation block occurred in two distinct phases. During the first phase, the complete block induced during high-frequency stimulation was maintained. The average maximal duration for the first phase was 107 ± 50 s. During the second phase, the block gradually or abruptly reversed. The duration of both first and second phases was dependent on stimulation intensity and duration but not frequency. Stimulation of higher inte